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1

Family Medicine.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The role, functions, and potential of family medicine are examined in a discussion drawing on observations of the University of Rochester Family Medicine Program at Highland Hospital, Rochester, New York. The discussion opens with a review of the factors ...

P. S. Warren

1970-01-01

2

[Family and community medicine and the university. SESPAS report 2010].  

PubMed

Family and community medicine is an academic subject, a medical specialty and a health profession with distinct dimensions: healthcare, teaching, research and management. In this discipline, the object of knowledge is the person, understood as a whole. Family medicine, as an academic subject, and primary care, as a health education setting, should be incorporated into the core graduate and postgraduate curricula. The absence of these elements leads to training bias and has major repercussions on quality, coordination and patient safety. The development of the Health Professions Act and the construction of the European Higher Education Area (EHEA) have created a favorable climate for the presence of this discipline in the university. Since the 1960s, family medicine has been consolidated as an academic subject with its own departments in almost all European universities, and a significant number of family physicians are teachers. A balance has been achieved between the hospital-based system (based on theory, disease, and the biological model) and the patient-centred model (based on problem solving, community-oriented and the bio-psycho-social model). The introduction of family and community medicine as a specific subject, and as a transverse subject and as an option in practicals, represents the adaptation of the educational system to social needs. This adaptation also represents a convergence with other European countries and the various legal requirements protecting this convergence. However, this new situation requires a new structure (departments) and faculty (professors and associate and assistant professors). PMID:22055214

Casado Vicente, Verónica; Bonal Pitz, Pablo; Cucalón Arenal, José Manuel; Serrano Ferrández, Elena; Suárez Gonzalez, Félix

2012-03-01

3

Teaching Humanities in Medicine: The University of Massachusetts Family Medicine Residency Program Experience  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Humanities in medicine (HIM) is an important aspect of medical education intended to help preserve humanism and a focus on patients. At the University of Massachusetts Family Medicine Residency Program, we have been expanding our HIM curriculum for our residents including orientation, home visit reflective writing, didactics and a department-wide…

Silk, Hugh; Shields, Sara

2012-01-01

4

Career choice of new medical students at three Canadian universities: family medicine versus specialty medicine  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Over the last 10 years the number of medical students choosing family medicine as a career has steadily declined. Stud- ies have demonstrated that career preference at the time that stu- dents begin medical school may be significantly associated with their ultimate career choice. We sought to identify the career preferences students have at entry to medical school and

Bruce Wright; Ian Scott; Wayne Woloschuk; Fraser Brenneis

5

Two Programs for Primary Care Practitioners: Family Medicine Training in an Affiliated University Hospital Program and Primary Care Graduate Training in an Urban Private Medical Center  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Eugene Farley describes the University of Rochester and Highland Hospital Family Medicine Program for teaching of primary care internists, primary care pediatricians, and family doctors. Thomas Piemme presents the George Washington University School of Medicine alternative, a 2-year program in an ambulatory setting leading to broad eligibility in…

Farley, Eugene S.; Piemme, Thomas E.

1975-01-01

6

Rural Family Medicine Training in Canada.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper examines the status of postgraduate family medicine training in rural settings in Canada and identifies problems and how they are addressed. Specifically, a survey of 18 university programs examined the portion of family medicine block training that is done in a rural practice setting within the 2-year postgraduate family medicine

Rourke, James T. B.; Rourke, Leslie L.

7

Choosing family medicine. What influences medical students?  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE: To explore factors that influence senior medical students to pursue careers in family medicine. DESIGN: Qualitative study using semistructured interviews. SETTING: University of Western Ontario (UWO) in London. PARTICIPANTS: Eleven of 29 graduating UWO medical students matched to Canadian family medicine residency programs beginning in July 2001. METHOD: Eleven semistructured interviews were conducted with a maximum variation sample of medical students. Interviews were transcribed and reviewed independently, and a constant comparative approach was used by the team to analyze the data. MAIN FINDINGS: Family physician mentors were an important influence on participants' decisions to pursue careers in family medicine. Participants followed one of three pathways to selecting family medicine: from an early decision to pursue family medicine, from initial uncertainty about career choice, or from an early decision to specialize and a change of mind. CONCLUSION: The perception of a wide scope of practice attracts candidates to family medicine. Having more family medicine role models early in medical school might encourage more medical students to select careers in family medicine.

Jordan, John; Brown, Judith Belle; Russell, Grant

2003-01-01

8

Starting a family during medical studies? Results of a pilot study on family friendliness in the study of medicine at the University of Ulm  

PubMed Central

Objective: The Ulm pilot study aimed to explore factors for a successful combination of medical education and starting a family. The empirical data derived from this study constitutes the foundation for an evidence-based reform of the medical curriculum in Ulm. Methods: In 2009, qualitative interviews with 37 of the 79 medical students with children at University of Ulm were conducted and analyzed using content analysis. The detected problem areas were used to develop a quantitative questionnaire for studying parents and academic teaching members in medical education in Ulm. Results: The parents were older, more often married and more likely to already have obtained a first training. One third of the students thought there was no ideal time to start a family during the years of medical education or specialist training. However, the majority of the students (61%) were convinced that parenthood is more compatible with medical studies than with specialist training. The interview data suggests that the end of medical school (4th to 6th year of studies), preferably during semester break, is especially suitable for child birth since it allows students to continue their studies without ‘losing time’. Conclusion: The biography and career of studying parents in medicine have specific characteristics. Universities and teaching hospitals are required to no longer leave the compatibility of family and study responsibilities to the students themselves. Rather, flexible structures need to be implemented that enable students to start a family while continuing their education. This means providing more childcare and greater support regarding academic counselling and career development.

Liebhardt, Hubert; Stolz, Katrin; Mortl, Kathrin; Prospero, Katrin; Niehues, Johanna; Fegert, Jorg

2011-01-01

9

Starting a family during medical studies? Results of a pilot study on family friendliness in the study of medicine at the University of Ulm.  

PubMed

Objective: The Ulm pilot study aimed to explore factors for a successful combination of medical education and starting a family. The empirical data derived from this study constitutes the foundation for an evidence-based reform of the medical curriculum in Ulm.Methods: In 2009, qualitative interviews with 37 of the 79 medical students with children at University of Ulm were conducted and analyzed using content analysis. The detected problem areas were used to develop a quantitative questionnaire for studying parents and academic teaching members in medical education in Ulm. Results: The parents were older, more often married and more likely to already have obtained a first training. One third of the students thought there was no ideal time to start a family during the years of medical education or specialist training. However, the majority of the students (61%) were convinced that parenthood is more compatible with medical studies than with specialist training. The interview data suggests that the end of medical school (4(th) to 6(th) year of studies), preferably during semester break, is especially suitable for child birth since it allows students to continue their studies without 'losing time'.Conclusion: The biography and career of studying parents in medicine have specific characteristics. Universities and teaching hospitals are required to no longer leave the compatibility of family and study responsibilities to the students themselves. Rather, flexible structures need to be implemented that enable students to start a family while continuing their education. This means providing more childcare and greater support regarding academic counselling and career development. PMID:21818229

Liebhardt, Hubert; Stolz, Katrin; Mörtl, Kathrin; Prospero, Katrin; Niehues, Johanna; Fegert, Jörg

2011-01-01

10

Decision making in family medicine  

PubMed Central

Abstract Objective To compare the ability of users of 2 medical search engines, InfoClinique and the Trip database, to provide correct answers to clinical questions and to explore the perceived effects of the tools on the clinical decision-making process. Design Randomized trial. Setting Three family medicine units of the family medicine program of the Faculty of Medicine at Laval University in Quebec city, Que. Participants Fifteen second-year family medicine residents. Intervention Residents generated 30 structured questions about therapy or preventive treatment (2 questions per resident) based on clinical encounters. Using an Internet platform designed for the trial, each resident answered 20 of these questions (their own 2, plus 18 of the questions formulated by other residents, selected randomly) before and after searching for information with 1 of the 2 search engines. For each question, 5 residents were randomly assigned to begin their search with InfoClinique and 5 with the Trip database. Main outcome measures The ability of residents to provide correct answers to clinical questions using the search engines, as determined by third-party evaluation. After answering each question, participants completed a questionnaire to assess their perception of the engine’s effect on the decision-making process in clinical practice. Results Of 300 possible pairs of answers (1 answer before and 1 after the initial search), 254 (85%) were produced by 14 residents. Of these, 132 (52%) and 122 (48%) pairs of answers concerned questions that had been assigned an initial search with InfoClinique and the Trip database, respectively. Both engines produced an important and similar absolute increase in the proportion of correct answers after searching (26% to 62% for InfoClinique, for an increase of 36%; 24% to 63% for the Trip database, for an increase of 39%; P = .68). For all 30 clinical questions, at least 1 resident produced the correct answer after searching with either search engine. The mean (SD) time of the initial search for each question was 23.5 (7.6) minutes with InfoClinique and 22.3 (7.8) minutes with the Trip database (P = .30). Participants’ perceptions of each engine’s effect on the decision-making process were very positive and similar for both search engines. Conclusion Family medicine residents’ ability to provide correct answers to clinical questions increased dramatically and similarly with the use of both InfoClinique and the Trip database. These tools have strong potential to increase the quality of medical care.

Labrecque, Michel; Ratte, Stephane; Fremont, Pierre; Cauchon, Michel; Ouellet, Jerome; Hogg, William; McGowan, Jessie; Gagnon, Marie-Pierre; Njoya, Merlin; Legare, France

2013-01-01

11

Family Medicine's Waltz with Systems  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Family Medicine first formally confronted systems thinking with the adoption of the biopsychosocial model for understanding disease in a holistic manner; this is a description of a natural system. More recently, Family Medicine has been consciously engaged in developing itself as a system for delivering health care, an artificial system. We make…

Downing, Raymond

2012-01-01

12

Family Medicine Specialty in Singapore  

PubMed Central

Family Medicine in Singapore has its roots in a generalist ethos and found its origin as a counter culture movement to the increasing sub-specialisation of medicine which resulted in a complex healthcare system where that patients are often cared for by multiple specialists potentially resulting in fragmentation of care. The aim of the discipline of Family Medicine was to train and develop more generalist physicians so as to promote holistic care. Family physicians are the largest pool of generalists who are trained to provide general medical care to patients in the context of the person, the family and the community that they live in.

Thomas, Santosh Lional

2013-01-01

13

Family medicine specialty in singapore.  

PubMed

Family Medicine in Singapore has its roots in a generalist ethos and found its origin as a counter culture movement to the increasing sub-specialisation of medicine which resulted in a complex healthcare system where that patients are often cared for by multiple specialists potentially resulting in fragmentation of care. The aim of the discipline of Family Medicine was to train and develop more generalist physicians so as to promote holistic care. Family physicians are the largest pool of generalists who are trained to provide general medical care to patients in the context of the person, the family and the community that they live in. PMID:24479066

Thomas, Santosh Lional

2013-04-01

14

Family medicine as a career option  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE To track and describe career choice decisions of medical students as they progressed through their undergraduate training. DESIGN Quantitative survey of each class at 5 points during their undergraduate experience. Each survey collected qualitative descriptors of students’ current career choices. SETTING Faculty of Medicine at Memorial University of Newfoundland in St John’s. PARTICIPANTS Undergraduate medical students in each year from 1999 to 2006. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Number of students considering family medicine as a career option at 5 different data-collection points throughout the medical school curriculum. RESULTS Many students considered family medicine as a career choice early in their undergraduate experience. The number of students considering family medicine dropped significantly during the second year of the curriculum. This trend was consistent across all students surveyed. Although interest in family medicine as a career rebounded later in the curriculum, it never fully recovered. CONCLUSION A large percentage of medical students considered family medicine as a career choice when they entered medical school. The percentage dropped significantly by the end of the second year of training. Attention should be directed toward understanding how the undergraduate medical curriculum in the first 2 years can protect and cultivate interest in family medicine as a career choice.

Bethune, Cheri; Hansen, Penelope A.; Deacon, Diana; Hurley, Katrina; Kirby, Allison; Godwin, Marshall

2007-01-01

15

Development and Modification of a Required Family Medicine Clerkship.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A new required clinical clerkship in family medicine at Duke University School of Medicine is described in terms of planning, implementation, and modification in response to students' evaluations. The data demonstrate that family medicine can be taught effectively as a core clinical rotation. (Author/MLW)

Michener, J. Lloyd; And Others

1985-01-01

16

Students' Perceptions Towards a Family Medicine Attachment Experience  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To explore the students' perceptions about their experience in a family medicine (FM) preceptorship in order to provide a sound basis for offering guidance to family medicine undergraduate education. Methods: During one full academic year at King Saud University, College of Medicine, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, a self administered questionnaire was distributed to all students (n = 177) at the

KHALID A. KALANTAN; NIALL PYRNE; E IAD AL-FARIS; AHMED AL-TAWEEL; NORAH AL-ROWAIS; HAMZA ABDUL; Eiad Al-Faris

2003-01-01

17

Holistic Medicine in Family Practice  

PubMed Central

During the twentieth century there have been great advances in medicine in the area of science and technology. At the same time, there has been a trend back to a more natural, humanistic approach to counteract patients' feelings of alienation. Holistic medicine approaches the physical, emotional, spiritual, and social aspects of a person as they relate to health and disease. It emphasizes prevention; concern for the environment and the food we eat; patient responsibility; using illness as a creative force to teach people to change; the `physician, heal thyself' philosophy; and appropriate alternatives to orthodox medicine. Family medicine faces the challenge of integrating these humanistic concepts with science.

Borins, Mel

1984-01-01

18

Family Medicine in Japan  

Microsoft Academic Search

Editor's Note: The fact that Japan has the longest life expectancy in the world does not suggest that they need to revamp their whole sys¬ tem and develop a new system of educating family physicians. How¬ ever, maybe the family physicians can make the statistics even better. I find the volume ofvisits fascinating. When I visited Korea in 1993, there

Blake W. H. Smith; Ray Demers; Linda Garcia-Shelton

2010-01-01

19

Family Medicine Digital Resource Library  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This resource was created by the Society of Teachers of Family Medicine (STFM) and was designed to support the sharing and collaborative development of educational resources among family medicine educators. The initial grant for this endeavor came from the National Library of Medicine and the project has been expanded a number of times. The STFM Resource Library contains lectures, learning modules, case studies, recommended websites, and conference handouts. The materials are all made available at no cost, and visitors can get started by looking at the Recently Uploaded area. Here they will find "Teaching Today With Tomorrow's Tools," "Teaching Inpatient Billing and Coding," and dozens of other newer items. Moving on, visitors can also use the Search area to focus on certain items of interest or browse the FAQ area to find answers to common questions. Finally, visitors can create their own personalized accounts or upload their own materials for possible inclusion in the archive. [KMG

20

Personal and professional development of teachers in family medicine.  

PubMed Central

While medical educators have devoted considerable effort to examining the optimal learning environment for teaching family medicine, less attention has been paid to "blocks" that prevent teachers of family medicine from being effective. This paper considers three major aspects of this problem: the personal and professional development of the teacher; blocks that impede this development; and the value of intervening in the teaching-learning process. These concerns are discussed in relation to an intervention program developed at the Byron Family Medical Centre, a family practice teaching unit affiliated with Victoria Hospital Corporation and the Department of Family Medicine, University of Western Ontario, London.

Brown, J B

1984-01-01

21

Handheld Computer Use in a Family Medicine Clerkship  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose. The objectives of this study were to track students' use of medical and nonmedical personal digital assistant (PDA) software and to obtain students' ratings of the usefulness of PDAs in a family medicine clerkship. Method. During the academic year 2001- 02, third-year clerkship students at the Northeastern Ohio Universities College of Medicine were loaned PDAs equipped with company-installed software,

John Sutton; LuAnne Stockton; Gary McCord; Valerie J. Gilchrist; Dinah Fedyna

2004-01-01

22

[The German University Medicine Map].  

PubMed

The University Medicine Map is a major step towards the realization of more transparency regarding the overall services of the medical schools in research, teaching, and patient care within the German university system. It includes comparative information about all 36 medical schools in Germany for the following areas: legal framework, finance, personnel, medical research, teaching and medical education, as well as patient care. The complete set of data for this map is accessible online under www.landkarte-hochschulmedizin.de and a selection of data is also available in print. Advantages and possible political implications for the higher education sector as well as the public domain are illustrated. Finally, the perspectives for future developments are indicated. PMID:19593538

Lohölter, R; Sass, H; von Jagow, G

2009-08-01

23

Gender and Power in Family Medicine Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses several articles in this issue that demonstrate the influence of gender and power on family medicine education. These articles show that both clinical and learning environments are influenced by gender and power. Recommends the study of gender and power as an overt component in the family medicine curriculum. (SLD)

Burge, S. K.

2000-01-01

24

Family Medicine Curriculum Resource Project: The Future  

Microsoft Academic Search

Under contract to the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), the Society of Teach- ers of Family Medicine (STFM) created an undergraduate medical education curricular resource designed to train physicians to practice in the 21st century. An interdisciplinary group of more than 35 educators worked for 4 years to create the Family Medicine Curriculum Resource (FMCR). By consensus, the Accreditation

Jeffrey A. Stearns; Marjorie A. Stearns; Paul M. Paulman; Alexander W. Chessman; Ardis K. Davis; Roger A. Sherwood; Kent J. Sheets; David J. Steele; Christine C. Matson

25

Integrating Prevention Education into the Medical School Curriculum: The Role of Departments of Family Medicine.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses the role of departments of family medicine in teaching preventive medicine through required clinical experiences, required nonclinical courses, electives, collaborative interdisciplinary clerkships, and interdisciplinary nonclinical courses. Offers examples of innovative programs at the Universities of Michigan, Wisconsin, Vermont,…

Stine, Curtis; Kohrs, Francis P.; Little, David N.; Kaprielian, Victoria; Gatipon, Betty B.; Haq, Cynthia

2000-01-01

26

Family Systems Consultation: Opportunities for Teaching in Family Medicine  

Microsoft Academic Search

Family-systems consultation offers opportunities to teach residents basic concepts and relevant skills for working with families in family medicine. The application of systems theory to the consultation process helps clarify the role of the consultant-teacher in relation to the patient or family and the consultee-practitioner. Residents are able to gain experience interviewing and assessing families from their own practices with

Susan H. McDaniel; Thomas Campbell; Lyman C. Wynne; Timothy Weber

1988-01-01

27

New "horizontal" curriculum in family medicine residency.  

PubMed Central

PROBLEM ADDRESSED: Opportunities for residents in a family medicine program to experience continuity of care with a group of patients and to be immersed in the role of a family physician were thought by faculty to be insufficient. OBJECTIVES OF THE PROGRAM: To enhance residents' experience of continuity of care with a group of patients; to create a model for training that better simulates clinical practice; and to position core family medicine experiences as the central and continuing focus of the residency program. MAIN COMPONENTS OF THE PROGRAM: The new curriculum replaces block rotations in family medicine with "horizontal" experiences comprising 3 half-days of patient care and 1 half-day seminar each week for all residents through both years of the program. The remaining time in first year is spent on the major disciplines--medicine, pediatrics, emergency, and obstetrics--for which a horizontal family medicine-centred experience has also been introduced. The second-year curriculum is flexible and largely self-directed. Initial evaluations indicate improved continuity of care of family practice patients and broadened clinical exposure for residents. The program has been fully accredited by the College. CONCLUSIONS: A horizontal curriculum in family medicine, designed to address perceived deficiencies in the traditional block rotational model of training, can be developed and implemented in an urban teaching hospital.

Tannenbaum, D. W.

1998-01-01

28

Preventive Medicine and the Family  

PubMed Central

Studies have demonstrated the links between the family system and illness, emphasizing the importance of prevention on a family level for physical as well as psychological illness. Brief preventive counselling on routine visits is possible if the physician knows the family well and understands the principles of the family as a system. Periods of high risk when illness and family dysfunction increase in incidence are the normal “crises” of the family life cycle, medical crises of illness, hospitalization and death, and non-medical crises. High-risk families should be identified; secondary prevention is an important role for the family physician who sees family problems at a much earlier stage than the psychiatrist or marital or family therapist.

Christie-Seely, Janet

1981-01-01

29

Web-based Education in Family Medicine Predoctoral Programs.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Surveyed directors of predoctoral family medicine programs (n=78; response rate of 61%) about the inclusion of Web-based educational methods in their programs, the level of interest in such programs, and barriers to program development. Results show nearly universal use of e-mail and Web pages. Identified faculty time and funding as common…

Leong, Shou Ling; Baldwin, Constance D.; Usatine, Richard P.; Adelman, Alan M.; Gjerde, Craig L.

2000-01-01

30

Patients' perceptions and experiences of family medicine residents in the office  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVE To examine patients' perceptions and experiences of having family medicine residents in the office. DESIGN Descriptive survey; questionnaire completed by patients. SETTING Outpatient office of 4 family physicians in the greater Vancouver area, affiliated with the Department of Family Medicine at the University of British Columbia. PARTICIPANTS A total of 265 English-speaking adult patients attending the office. MAIN OUTCOME

Christine E. Malcolm; Kevin K. Wong; Ruth Elwood-Martin

31

The attractiveness of family medicine among Polish medical students.  

PubMed

Abstract Background: In many developed countries tuning supply and demand of medical doctors is a continuous challenge to meet the ever changing needs of community and individual patients. The long study period for medical doctors creates the opportunity to observe the current career preferences of medical students and evolution in time. Objectives: To investigate the career choices of Polish students in different stages of their medical education. Methods: Medical students at five Polish medical universities were questioned about their career aspirations in the first, third and sixth year. Results: A total of 2020 students were recruited for the survey. Among first year students 17% preferred family medicine as final career option, compared to 20% in the third year, and 30% in the sixth year (significant trend, P < 0.0001). In particular, female students prefer family medicine: 71% women versus 62% women in the group with a preference for a non-family medicine orientation (P = 0.008). Medical students rejecting a career as a family doctor stated that the impossibility to work in a hospital environment was the determining factor. Conclusion: The opportunity for professional development seems to be an important determining factor in the choice of a medical specialty in Poland. The proportion of Polish students choosing family medicine increases during their progress in medical education, with one third of students interested in a career in family medicine by year six. PMID:24069901

Gowin, Ewelina; Horst-Sikorska, Wanda; Michalak, Micha?; Avonts, Dirk; Buczkowski, Krzysztof; Lukas, Witold; Korman, Tomasz; Litwiejko, Alicja; Chlabicz, S?awomir

2014-06-01

32

Five Weekend National Family Medicine Fellowship  

PubMed Central

PROBLEM ADDRESSED Many faculty development programs are thought time-consuming and inaccessible to academic family physicians or physicians wanting to move into academic positions. This is largely due to difficulty in leaving their practices for extended periods. Canadian family medicine needs trained leaders who can work in teams and are well grounded in the principles of their discipline as they relate to education, management, research, and policy making. OBJECTIVE OF PROGRAM To develop a team of leaders in family medicine. MAIN COMPONENTS OF PROGRAM The Five Weekend National Family Medicine Fellowship Program focuses on the essentials of education, management, communication, critical appraisal skills, and the principles of family medicine to develop leadership and team-building skills for faculty and community-based family physicians entering academic careers. This unique 1-year program combines intensive weekend seminars with small-group projects between weekends. It emphasizes a broader set of skills than just teaching, has regional representation, and focuses on leadership and teamwork using a time-efficient format. CONCLUSION The program has graduated 34 Fellows over the last 3 years. More than 90% of the 35 projects developed through course work have been presented in national or provincial peer-reviewed settings. Quantitative ratings of program structure, course content, and course outcomes have been positive.

Talbot, Yves; Batty, Helen; Rosser, Walter W.

1997-01-01

33

Do Family Medicine Residents and Their Teachers Have Common Goals?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Opinions were obtained from residents, family medicine faculty, and attending physicians familiar with an established family medicine residency program regarding the tasks that family doctors should and should not perform. (LBH)

London, Richard L.; Green, Larry A.

1977-01-01

34

Family Medicine Curriculum Resource Project: Overview  

Microsoft Academic Search

In 2000, the Health Resources and Services Administration, in the interest of fostering curriculum reform in medical schools, awarded a 4-year contract to the Society of Teachers of Family Medicine to develop a curricular resource. The contract directed development of a multi-part resource aimed at (1) preclerkship prerequisites for third-year clerkships in collaboration with internal medicine and pediatrics, (2) the

Ardis K. Davis; Jeffrey A. Stearns; Alexander W. Chessman; Paul M. Paulman; David J. Steele; Roger A. Sherwood

35

Family medicine research capacity building  

PubMed Central

ABSTRACT PROBLEM BEING ADDRESSED Research is not perceived as an integral part of family practice by most family physicians working in community practices. OBJECTIVE OF THE PROGRAM To assist community-based practitioners in answering research questions that emerge from their practices in order for them to gain a better understanding of research and its value. PROGRAM DESCRIPTION The Ontario College of Family Physicians developed a program consisting of 5 sets of weekend workshops, each 2 months apart. Two pilots of the 5-weekend program occurred between 2000 and 2003. After the pilots, thirteen 5-weekend programs were held in 2 waves by 20 facilitators, who were trained in one of two 1-day seminars. CONCLUSION This 5-weekend program, developed and tested in Ontario, stimulates community practitioners to learn how to answer research questions emerging from their practices. A 1-day seminar is adequate to train facilitators to successfully run these programs. Evaluations by both facilitators and program participants were very positive, with many participants stating that their clinical practices were improved as a result of the program. The program has been adapted for residency training, and it has already been used internationally.

Rosser, Walter; Godwin, Marshall; Seguin, Rachelle

2010-01-01

36

Family Medicine Curriculum Guide to Substance Abuse.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This curriculum guide on substance abuse is intended for teachers of family medicine. Comments, learning objectives, teaching hints, and evaluations of knowledge are provided for each area in all chapters. Chapter 1 focuses on the pharmacology of commonly abused drugs including depressants, opioids, stimulants, hallucinogens, inhalants, and…

Liepman, Michael R., Ed.; And Others

37

Generation to Generation: The Heart of Family Medicine  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

According to the American Board of Family Medicine, "The scope of family medicine encompasses all ages, both sexes, each organ system and every disease entity." What makes the seemingly daunting task of practicing family medicine possible is that family physicians learn to utilize similar clinical reasoning for all of their patients regardless of…

Winter, Robin O.

2012-01-01

38

Family medicine curriculum resource project: overview.  

PubMed

In 2000, the Health Resources and Services Administration, in the interest of fostering curriculum reform in medical schools, awarded a 4-year contract to the Society of Teachers of Family Medicine to develop a curricular resource. The contract directed development of a multi-part resource aimed at (1) preclerkship prerequisites for third-year clerkships in collaboration with internal medicine and pediatrics, (2) the family medicine clerkship, (3) post-clerkship preparation for residency training, and (4) specific special topic areas of importance to the government. The Family Medicine Curriculum Resource (FMCR) was produced by primary care educators, with day-to-day direction from an executive committee and overall oversight by an advisory committee. The FMCR was built around a theoretical framework to link medical student competencies with the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) competencies for residency training. Considerable energy throughout development of the FMCR was devoted to obtaining input from potential end-user audiences through an active dissemination effort. PMID:17186443

Davis, Ardis K; Stearns, Jeffrey A; Chessman, Alexander W; Paulman, Paul M; Steele, David J; Sherwood, Roger A

2007-01-01

39

Department of Tropical Medicine: Tulane University  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Tulane Tropical Medicine Web Page at Tulane University School of Public Health, New Orleans, Louisiana includes current scientific global research projects, US and international academic degree programs, malaria research activities in epidemiology, chloroquine drug resistance, and severe disease. Also available: faculty info and contact points and links to health-related sites.

1997-01-01

40

The University of Vermont College of Medicine.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study of the origin and history of the University of Vermont College of Medicine begins with the appointment of John Pomeroy to the faculty in 1804, and traces the years that followed. Chiefly concerned with the individuals who were involved, it is a case study of the responses of one small medical school to reform movements, and its ability…

Kaufman, Martin

41

[Research in family medicine--where now?].  

PubMed

The Departments of Family Medicine in Israel were established in the late 1970's. Currently, there are 12 departments of Family Medicine (FM) dispersed throughout Israel each academically affiliated with one of the four Medical Schools. The number of Family Medicine specialist physicians has increased in the past decades from 140 specialists in 1975 to 1,187 in 2004. The number of academic specialist physicians is approximately 213 for the years 2000-2004. An evaluation of the publication rate of family physicians analyzed a total of 1,165 publications (1975-2004). Over half of the articles were published in the last 10 years. Seventy-two percent were cited in MEDLINE. Publications in English encompassed 64.7% of the publications, Hebrew 34.6%, and 0.7% other. About 6% of the articles were published in journals with impact factor = 3 with research articles accounting for 46.9%. The publication output of FM in Israel is high, averaging 85.4 publications/1000 FM physicians/year. Almost 70% of the articles were published in non-FM journals. Academically affiliated FM board certified physicians published at higher rates averaging 334.3/1000 academic FM physicians/year (data available for 2000-2004 only). In this editorial the reasons for physicians to engage in research are reviewed as well as the incentives and barriers in place. In addition, the network model and research center models are discussed as possible solutions. Outlooks for the future are outlined. PMID:19260599

Shvartzman, Pesach

2008-12-01

42

A Putative Ancestry of Family Practice and Family Medicine: Genogram of a Discipline  

Microsoft Academic Search

The medical specialty of family practice and its academic discipline, family medicine, have both struggled to define their identities with respect to each other and with respect to medicine in general. Family practice and family medicine now appear to be in the young-adult stage of development. In early adulthood, it is difficult to gain an objective perspective on how multigenerational

Michael A. Crouch

1989-01-01

43

Length of Training Debate in Family Medicine: Idealism Versus Realism?  

PubMed Central

How long a resident must train to achieve competency is an ongoing debate in medicine. For family medicine, there is an Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME)–approved proposal to examine the benefits of lengthening family medicine training from 3 to 4 years. The rationale for adding another year of residency in family medicine has included the following: (1) overcoming the effect of the duty hour limits in further reducing educational opportunities, (2) reversing the growing number of first-time takers of the American Board of Family Medicine primary board who fail to pass the exam, (3) enhancing the family medicine training experience by “decompressing” the ever-growing number of Residency Review Committee requirements to maintain accreditation, and (4) improving the overall quality of family medicine graduates.

Orientale, Eugene

2013-01-01

44

Family Medicine Curriculum Resource Project: the future.  

PubMed

Under contract to the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), the Society of Teachers of Family Medicine (STFM) created an undergraduate medical education curricular resource designed to train physicians to practice in the 21st century. An interdisciplinary group of more than 35 educators worked for 4 years to create the Family Medicine Curriculum Resource (FMCR). By consensus, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) competencies were adopted as the theoretical framework for this project. The FMCR provides materials for the preclerkship years, the third-year family medicine clerkship, the postclerkship year, and faculty development, as well as guidance for integrating topics of special interest to the federal government (such as, geriatrics, Healthy People 2010, genetics, informatics) into a 4-year continuum of medical education. There are challenges inherent in implementing each component of the FMCR. For example, can the ACGME competency-based approach be adapted to undergraduate medical education? Can the densely packed preclerkship years be adapted to include more focused effort on developing these competencies, and whose job is it anyway? What is "core" to being a competent clinician, and what information can be obtained when needed from medical informatics sources? Will family medicine educators embrace the FMCR recommendations for their third-year clerkships? Will exit assessment of the competency levels of graduating medical students be achieved, and can it make them more capable residents? Can faculty in different clinical and educational settings integrate the teaching of "how to learn" into their repertoire? How will faculty development innovation progress in a time of increasing emphasis on clinical productivity? Developing a common language and adoption of core competencies for all levels of medical education is imperative in a society that is focusing on improving health care quality and outcomes. The FMCR Project has developed a curricular resource to assist medical educators in this task. The challenge for the future is to measure how the FMCR is used and to ascertain if it has an influence on better patient and system outcomes. PMID:17186449

Stearns, Jeffrey A; Stearns, Marjorie A; Paulman, Paul M; Chessman, Alexander W; Davis, Ardis K; Sherwood, Roger A; Sheets, Kent J; Steele, David J; Matson, Christine C

2007-01-01

45

Dinosaurs, hospital ecosystems, and the future of family medicine.  

PubMed

The continued presence of the family physician within hospital systems is key to family medicine remaining an attractive, viable specialty in the ever-evolving world of medicine. One physician muses about her place in this complex ecosystem and believes that family physicians lose their voice and thus risk their own extinction when they opt out of hospital practice. PMID:18626038

Glazner, Cherie

2008-01-01

46

Family medicine in the research revolution.  

PubMed

National Institutes of Health (NIH) funding has contributed to improvements in the health of the nation, but the pace of progress, particularly in the war on cancer, has been frustratingly slow. Departments of family medicine receive less NIH funding than all other specialties. Although numerous factors contribute to low family medicine funding levels, persistent undervaluing of primary care plays a paramount role. Fueled by the harsh reality that our nation's health is unconscionably poor, we are entering a new era in our nation's research enterprise, a virtual research revolution. The 3 components of this revolution are the NIH roadmap, personalized medicine, and the Clinical and Translational Science Awards. Each of these elements will contribute to a growing emphasis on translational research. Translational research demands formation of innovative structures in academic health centers (AHCs) to enable them to address questions of vital relevance to improving public health. Service research, funded by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and foundations, defines a new approach to research with high potential to improve the health of communities. To be a part of the research revolution, departments must rely on senior researchers to secure funding and provide mentorship for junior investigators. Junior investigators must relentlessly pursue answers to questions of direct relevance to improving health. Finally, department chairs have the obligation to identify research mentors, find ways to fund research gaps, and create a culture of scholarship and investigation. Advocating for AHCs to commit to improving the health of the regions they serve can have a substantial impact on the types of questions that centers choose to study and, ultimately, on the health of the communities they serve. PMID:20616284

Wender, Richard C

2010-01-01

47

Residents' views about family medicine specialty education in Turkey  

PubMed Central

Background Residents are one of the key stakeholders of specialty training. The Turkish Board of Family Medicine wanted to pursue a realistic and structured approach in the design of the specialty training programme. This approach required the development of a needs-based core curriculum built on evidence obtained from residents about their needs for specialty training and their needs in the current infrastructure. The aim of this study was to obtain evidence on residents' opinions and views about Family Medicine specialty training. Methods This is a descriptive, cross-sectional study. The board prepared a questionnaire to investigate residents' views about some aspects of the education programme such as duration and content, to assess the residents' learning needs as well as their need for a training infrastructure. The questionnaire was distributed to the Family Medicine Departments (n = 27) and to the coordinators of Family Medicine residency programmes in state hospitals (n = 11) by e-mail and by personal contact. Results A total of 191 questionnaires were returned. The female/male ratio was 58.6%/41.4%. Nine state hospitals and 10 university departments participated in the study. The response rate was 29%. Forty-five percent of the participants proposed over three years for the residency duration with either extensions of the standard rotation periods in pediatrics and internal medicine or reductions in general surgery. Residents expressed the need for extra rotations (dermatology 61.8%; otolaryngology 58.6%; radiology 52.4%). Fifty-nine percent of the residents deemed a rotation in a private primary care centre necessary, 62.8% in a state primary care centre with a proposed median duration of three months. Forty-seven percent of the participants advocated subspecialties for Family Medicine, especially geriatrics. The residents were open to new educational methods such as debates, training with models, workshops and e-learning. Participation in courses and congresses was considered necessary. The presence of a department office and the clinical competency of the educators were more favored by state residents. Conclusions This study gave the Board the chance to determine the needs of the residents that had not been taken into consideration sufficiently before. The length and the content of the programme will be revised according to the needs of the residents.

2010-01-01

48

What challenges hamper Kenyan family physicians in pursuing their family medicine mandate? A qualitative study among family physicians and their colleagues  

PubMed Central

Background Since 2005, Kenyan medical universities have been training general practitioners, providing them with clinical, management, teaching and research skills, in order to enhance access to and quality of health care services for the Kenyan population. This study assesses what expectations family physicians, colleagues of family physicians and policy makers have of family medicine, what expectations family physicians live up to and which challenges they face. Methods Family physicians were observed and interviewed about their expectations and challenges concerning family medicine. Expectations among their colleagues were assessed through focus group discussions. Policy makers’ expectations were assessed by analysing the governmental policy on family medicine and a university’s curriculum. Results Roles perceived for and performed by family physicians included providing comprehensive care, health care management, teaching, and to a lesser extent community outreach and performing research. Challenges faced by family physicians were being posted in situations where they are regarded as just another type of specialist, lack of awareness of the roles of family physicians among colleagues, lack of time, lack of funds and inadequate training. Conclusions The ministry’s posting policy has to be improved to ensure that family physicians have a chance to perform their intended roles. Creating an environment in which family physicians can function best requires more effort to enlighten other players in the health care system, like colleagues and policy makers, about the roles of family physicians.

2012-01-01

49

Approach to hoarding in family medicine  

PubMed Central

Abstract Objective To review the presentation of hoarding and provide basic management approaches and resources for family physicians. Sources of information PubMed was searched from 2001 to May 2011. The MeSH term hoarding was used to identify research and review articles related to the neuropsychological aspects of hoarding and its diagnosis and treatment. Main message Hoarding is often a hidden issue in family medicine. Patients with hoarding problems often present with a sentinel event such as a fall or residential fire. Although hoarding is traditionally associated with obsessive-compulsive disorder, patients more commonly have secondary organic disease associated with hoarding behaviour or have hoarding in absence of substantial compulsive traits. Hoarding disorder is expected to be included in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th edition. Management is best provided by a multidisciplinary approach when possible, and an increasing number of centres provide programs to improve symptoms or to reduce harm. Pharmacologic management has been shown to be of some help for treating secondary causes. In the elderly, conditions such as dementia, depression, and substance abuse are commonly associated with hoarding behaviour. Attempts should be made to keep patients in their homes whenever possible, but an assessment of capacity should guide the approach taken. Conclusion Hoarding is more common than family physicians realize. If hoarding is identified, local resources should be sought to assist in management. Assessment and treatment of underlying causes should be initiated when secondary causes are found. It is expected that primary hoarding will be a new diagnosis in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th edition.

Frank, Christopher; Misiaszek, Brian

2012-01-01

50

Results of the 2005 National Resident Matching Program: Family Medicine  

Microsoft Academic Search

The results of the 2005 National Resident Matching Program (NRMP) reflect a currently stable level of student interest in family medicine residency training in the United States. Compared with the 2004 Match, 19 more positions (66 fewer US seniors) were filled in family medicine residency programs through the NRMP in 2005, at the same time as four fewer (18 fewer

Perry A. Pugno; Gordon T. Schmittling; Gerald T. Fetter; Norman B. Kahn

51

Clinical Skills Acquired during a Clerkship in Family Medicine.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study of the preceived acquisition of clinical skills by second-year medical students in six required clerkships is reported. The students completed self-assessments of their clinical skills when taking the family medicine clerkship. The principal contributions of the family medicine clerkship were in the management of common problems.…

Michener, J. Lloyd; And Others

1986-01-01

52

A Pediatrician on the Family Medicine Faculty: A Workable Compromise.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The advantages of having a pediatrician, under the supervision of the program director, as member of a family medicine faculty are discussed. That academic role is outlined, and because it is a stopgap position, cautions regarding the future of a pediatric-family-medicine faculty member are offered. (JMD)

Passero, Mary Ann

1979-01-01

53

National Curricular Guidelines for Third-Year Family Medicine Clerkships.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The process used by the Society of Teachers of Family Medicine to develop core curriculum guidelines for third-year family medicine clerkships is described, the guidelines are presented, and dissemination, implementation, and further development activities are outlined. The work was supported by a Department of Health and Human Services grant.…

Academic Medicine, 1991

1991-01-01

54

Family medicine training in sub-Saharan Africa: South-South cooperation in the Primafamed project as strategy for development  

PubMed Central

Background. Health-care systems based on primary health care (PHC) are more equitable and cost effective. Family medicine trains medical doctors in comprehensive PHC with knowledge and skills that are needed to increase quality of care. Family medicine is a relatively new specialty in sub-Saharan Africa. Objective. To explore the extent to which the Primafamed South–South cooperative project contributed to the development of family medicine in sub-Saharan Africa. Methods. The Primafamed (Primary Health Care and Family Medicine Education) project worked together with 10 partner universities in sub-Saharan Africa to develop family medicine training programmes over a period of 2.5 years. A SWOT (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats) analysis was done and the training development from 2008 to 2010 in the different partner universities was analysed. Results. During the 2.5 years of the Primafamed project, all partner universities made progress in the development of their family medicine training programmes. The SWOT analysis showed that at both national and international levels, the time is ripe to train medical doctors in family medicine and to integrate the specialty into health-care systems, although many barriers, including little awareness, lack of funding, low support from other specialists and reserved support from policymakers, are still present. Conclusions. Family medicine can play an important role in health-care systems in sub-Saharan Africa; however, developing a new discipline is challenging. Advocacy, local ownership, action research and support from governments are necessary to develop family medicine and increase its impact. The Primafamed project showed that development of sustainable family medicine training programmes is a feasible but slow process. The South–South cooperation between the ten partners and the South African departments of family medicine strengthened confidence at both national and international levels.

Flinkenflogel, Maaike; Essuman, Akye; Chege, Patrick; Ayankogbe, Olayinka; De Maeseneer, Jan

2014-01-01

55

Geriatric Core Competencies for Family Medicine Curriculum and Enhanced Skills: Care of Elderly  

PubMed Central

Background There is a growing mandate for Family Medicine residency programs to directly assess residents’ clinical competence in Care of the Elderly (COE). The objectives of this paper are to describe the development and implementation of incremental core competencies for Postgraduate Year (PGY)-I Integrated Geriatrics Family Medicine, PGY-II Geriatrics Rotation Family Medicine, and PGY-III Enhanced Skills COE for COE Diploma residents at a Canadian University. Methods Iterative expert panel process for the development of the core competencies, with a pre-defined process for implementation of the core competencies. Results Eighty-five core competencies were selected overall by the Working Group, with 57 core competencies selected for the PGY-I/II Family Medicine residents and an additional 28 selected for the PGY-III COE residents. The core competencies follow the CanMEDS Family Medicine roles. Both sets of core competencies are based on consensus. Conclusions Due to demographic changes, it is essential that Family Physicians have the required skills and knowledge to care for the frail elderly. The core competencies described were developed for PGY-I/II Family Medicine residents and PGY-III Enhanced Skills COE, with a focus on the development of geriatric expertise for those patients that would most benefit.

Charles, Lesley; Triscott, Jean A.C.; Dobbs, Bonnie M.; McKay, Rhianne

2014-01-01

56

Complementary and Alternative Medicine: Core Competencies for Family Nurse Practitioners.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Directors of family nurse practitioner education programs (n=141) reported inclusion of some complementary/alternative medicine content (CAM), most commonly interviewing patients about CAM, critical thinking, evidence-based medicine, laws, ethics, and spiritual/cultural beliefs. Definition of CAM was medically, not holistically based. More faculty…

Burman, Mary E.

2003-01-01

57

Clinical Evaluation in a Family Medicine Residency.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study assessed (1) the validity of the Bowman Gray School of Medicine evaluation instrument regarding the occurrence of halo effects and (2) possible relationships between the faculty's evaluations of the residents and the residents' cognitive knowledge and productivity. (MLW)

Herman, James M.; And Others

1985-01-01

58

Workshops for Faculty Development in Family Medicine. Evaluation Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An evaluation was conducted of four faculty development workshops sponsored by the Society of Teachers of Family Medicine for faculty in family practice residency programs. Objectives of the evaluation were to determine the extent to which the workshops achieved the specified educational objectives and to assess the operational aspects of the…

Reineke, Robert A.; Welch, Wayne W.

59

Effect of location on family medicine residents' training.  

PubMed Central

A survey of family medicine residents trained at community-based or hospital-based centres suggested differences in experience and in career plans. Community-based residents saw more patients in the same family, believed they knew the community better, made more housecalls, expected to use allied health professionals more frequently, and were more likely to choose a small community practice.

Lebel, D.; Hogg, W.

1993-01-01

60

Evaluation of Teaching Veterinary Medicine at the University of Nairobi.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A survey of graduates from the University of Nairobi, Kenya in the field of veterinary medicine is reported. Areas covered include curriculum; teaching techniques; quality of faculty; and examinations. (JMF)

Lindstrom, U. B.

1976-01-01

61

The family as patient in family medicine : Rhetoric or reality?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Considerable attention has been paid to the role of the family as a system in its own right, rather than the individual patient, as the fundamental unit of health care delivery. Despite the apparent validity of this concept, many important questions remain unanswered. Among these are: (1) Is there sufficient understanding of family pathophysiology, of the sensitivity and specificity of

Thomas L. Schwenk; Charles C. Hughes

1983-01-01

62

Medicine in the 21st Century: Recommended Essential Geriatrics Competencies for Internal Medicine and Family Medicine Residents  

PubMed Central

Background Physician workforce projections by the Institute of Medicine require enhanced training in geriatrics for all primary care and subspecialty physicians. Defining essential geriatrics competencies for internal medicine and family medicine residents would improve training for primary care and subspecialty physicians. The objectives of this study were to (1) define essential geriatrics competencies common to internal medicine and family medicine residents that build on established national geriatrics competencies for medical students, are feasible within current residency programs, are assessable, and address the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education competencies; and (2) involve key stakeholder organizations in their development and implementation. Methods Initial candidate competencies were defined through small group meetings and a survey of more than 100 experts, followed by detailed item review by 26 program directors and residency clinical educators from key professional organizations. Throughout, an 8-member working group made revisions to maintain consistency and compatibility among the competencies. Support and participation by key stakeholder organizations were secured throughout the project. Results The process identified 26 competencies in 7 domains: Medication Management; Cognitive, Affective, and Behavioral Health; Complex or Chronic Illness(es) in Older Adults; Palliative and End-of-Life Care; Hospital Patient Safety; Transitions of Care; and Ambulatory Care. The competencies map directly onto the medical student geriatric competencies and the 6 Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education Competencies. Conclusions Through a consensus-building process that included leadership and members of key stakeholder organizations, a concise set of essential geriatrics competencies for internal medicine and family medicine residencies has been developed. These competencies are well aligned with concerns for residency training raised in a recent Medicare Payment Advisory Commission report to Congress. Work is underway through stakeholder organizations to disseminate and assess the competencies among internal medicine and family medicine residency programs.

Williams, Brent C.; Warshaw, Gregg; Fabiny, Anne Rebecca; Lundebjerg, MPA, Nancy; Medina-Walpole, Annette; Sauvigne, Karen; Schwartzberg, Joanne G.; Leipzig, Rosanne M.

2010-01-01

63

[Thirty years of family medicine in B&H].  

PubMed

The experience in our surrounding throughout many years, based on Europeans and Worlds standards of health care service, gives the advantage to the Primary Health Care Service, with well educated family doctors and nurses who work in a community and give cheaper and quality health service. The paper presents a view of Family Medicine development in B&H during the last thirty years, and the most important projects realized in that period. PMID:17582984

Masi?, Izet; Jati?, Zaim; Zildzi?, Muharem

2007-01-01

64

The role of family therapists in veterinary medicine: opportunities for clinical services, education, and research.  

PubMed

Marriage and family therapists (MFTs) are applying their specific skill set in a variety of arenas. A new area for collaboration is veterinary medicine. The veterinary medical profession is emphasizing the importance of non-biomedical skills such as communication skills, acknowledging that human clientele are likely to view their pets as family members, and discussing veterinarian personal well-being. Each of these trends has clear application for intervention by MFTs. A discussion of how MFTs may be uniquely positioned to assist veterinary medicine is presented. An example of collaboration between MFT and veterinary medicine at Kansas State University is highlighted. Recommendations are made for development of effective educational relationships and possible private sector collaborations. PMID:17437457

Hafen, McArthur; Rush, Bonnie R; Reisbig, Allison M J; McDaniel, Kara Z; White, Mark B

2007-04-01

65

Morning Report in Family Medicine Residency Programs: A Descriptive Study.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Morning Report (MR) is a frequently held case conference in most Family Medicine (FM) residency programs among medical learners who discuss recent inpatient admissions before the day's care of patients. This study conducted a national survey of FM residency program directors to describe the roles of faculty and residents in facilitating MR.…

Kuncharapu, Indumathi; Cass, Alvah R.; Carlson, Carol A.; Scott, Jack R.

66

ENT Experience in a Family Medicine Clerkship: Is There Enough?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Used patient encounter records completed by 445 medical students to determine whether a family medicine clerkship offered enough experience in ear, nose, and throat (ENT) conditions. Results, which were used for curriculum development, suggest that these students were receiving sufficient opportunities for some areas of ENT practice, but not for…

O'Hara, Brenda S.; Saywell, Robert M., Jr.; Zollinger, Terrell W.; Smith, Christopher P.; Burba, Jennifer L.; Stopperich, David M.

2000-01-01

67

Family Medicine Educators' Perceptions of the Future of Faculty Development.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Family medicine faculty participated in focus groups to gather their perceptions about faculty development. They emphasized that faculty development methods must be proven effective, woven into the fabric of clinical practice, and deal with increasing time and financial pressures. Much discussion was related to the need for national and regional…

Quirk, Mark; Lasser, Daniel; Domino, Frank; Chuman, Alan; Devaney-O'Neil, Sarah

2002-01-01

68

Understanding the Careers of Physician Educators in Family Medicine.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Interviewed physician educators in family medicine to discover variables that draw them into education and sustain their vitality, and challenges that can support or derail their careers. Found that career decisions emanate from values associated with "making the world better"; that they seek challenging positions consistent with these values; and…

Simpson, Deborah E.; Rediske, Virginia A.; Beecher, Ann; Bower, Douglas; Meurer, Linda; Lawrence, Steven; Wolkomir, Michael

2001-01-01

69

Publications on diagnostic test evaluation in family medicine journals  

Microsoft Academic Search

Search strategies for articles reporting on diagnostic test evaluations have been subjected to less research than those in the domain of clinical trials. We set out to develop an optimal search strategy for publications on diagnostic test evaluations in general, that could be added to keywords describing the specific diagnostic test at issue. Nine Family Medicine journals were searched from

W. L. J. M. Devillé; P. D. Bezemer; L. M. Bouter

2000-01-01

70

Family systems medicine: The field and the journal  

Microsoft Academic Search

Those who lack all idea that it is possible to be wrong can learn nothing but know-how. — Gregory Bateson (2) This article will map the territory labeled family systems medicine. By delineating the boundaries and the contents of the field we will, as well, indicate our intentions as to the contents of this Journal. In attempting to map this

Donald A. Bloch

1983-01-01

71

Audience Response System: Effect on Learning in Family Medicine Residents  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background and Objectives: The use of an electronic audience response system (ARS) that promotes active participation during lectures has been shown to improve retention rates of factual information in nonmedical settings. This study (1) tested the hypothesis that the use of an ARS during didactic lectures can improve learning outcomes by family medicine residents and (2) identified factors influ-encing ARS-assisted

T. Eric Schackow; Milton Chavez

72

Extended Educational Sessions at Three Family Medicine Residency Programs.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The experiences of three family medicine residency programs in developing and implementing half- to full-day teaching sessions are described. Each program has multiple training locations, including rural sites, and releases residents from clinical duties for sessions on behavior issues, procedures, training, and other topics. Program success…

Zweifler, John; And Others

1996-01-01

73

Depression and burnout symptoms among Air Force family medicine providers.  

PubMed

This study investigated the prevalence of depression and burnout symptoms among family medicine providers on active duty in the US Air Force. Results demonstrated that 84% of those surveyed scored positive for degrees of depression symptoms; only sex differences were significant. PMID:24758978

Varner, Derrick F; Foutch, Brian K

2014-05-01

74

Library Cooperation at the NOVA University--the Nordic University in Agriculture, Forestry and Veterinary Medicine.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Nordic University in Agriculture, Forestry and Veterinary Medicine--the NOVA University-was established in 1995 to increase the cooperation between the Nordic agricultural universities. The NOVA libraries of the seven institutions and facilities involved wanted to show that they are a very useful partner in launching new ideas. They have the…

Myllys, Heli

75

Faculty Development at the Dept. of Family Medicine Univ. of Western Ontario  

PubMed Central

The Department of Family Medicine at the University of Western Ontario has been in existence for ten years. During this time there has developed a wealth of experience in helping members of the Department, both fulltime and part-time, to improve their skills as family practice teachers. The current faculty development program has dealt with the transition period from practitioner to teacher, the interaction of teacher and student and current concepts of learning theory. It is now working on the development of scholarship within the department. An outline of the master of clinical science program is given. We hope this program will facilitate the successful development of the next generation of family medicine teachers.

Morrissy, J.R.; Biehn, J.T.; McWhinney, I.R.; Bass, M.J.

1977-01-01

76

Female and Underrepresented Minority Faculty in Academic Departments of Family Medicine: Are Women and Minorities Better Off in Family Medicine?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Surveyed departments of family medicine to determine workforce composition and rank of women and minority faculty. Found that while faculty were more likely to be female or minority than in other medical disciplines, women and minorities were less likely to be associate or full professors. Found no institutional or departmental characteristics…

Lewis-Stevenson, Sherri; Hueston, William J.; Mainous, Arch G., III; Bazell, Carol; Ye, Xiaobu

2001-01-01

77

The Senior Mentor Program at Duke University School of Medicine  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Duke University School of Medicine has a unique curriculum in which students complete basic sciences in year 1 and clinical clerkships in year 2, making way for an entire year of independent study in year 3. Into this compact curriculum, education in geriatrics has been successfully introduced through focused exercises and activities strategically integrated in all four years. The

Mitchell T. Heflin

2006-01-01

78

Alternative Medicine and Herbal Use among University Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this study, the authors investigated the predictors of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) and herbal supplement use among university students. They investigated demographic factors, trait affectivity, symptom reports, and individuals' worries about modernity as potential contributors to use of CAM and herbals. The authors surveyed 506…

Johnson, Susan K.; Blanchard, Anita

2006-01-01

79

Family Medicine Training in the Care of Older Adults--Has the Retreat Been Sounded?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses the trend away from geriatrics training in family medicine residency despite the growing need in society. Asserts that family medicine is failing to seize an opportunity to advance the care of older adults and discusses what would constitute acceptable training in geriatrics and how it should fit into the family medicine curriculum. (EV)

Mouton, Charles P.; Parker, Robert W.

2003-01-01

80

A panoply of information for the practice of family medicine.  

PubMed

The majority of articles in this issue report on clinical conditions, adding to our knowledge base with which we practice family medicine. Topics range from childhood obesity to tobacco abuse treatment for patients with psychiatric disorders. We also have clinical papers on testing for group A streptococcus pharyngitis, incidentalomas identified in chest computed tomography exams, and a case of migraines associated with an ovarian teratoma. Others include long-term use of opioids (with information that could be surprising), and hand washing and face touching in the office. Enjoy the panoply of clinical information! We also have useful information on implementing medication reconciliation, 3 articles that relate to the integration of behavioral health into family medicine, and another 2 articles about recertification. PMID:24808105

Bowman, Marjorie A; Neale, Anne Victoria

2014-01-01

81

Occupational Stress and Physical Symptoms among Family Medicine Residents  

PubMed Central

Background The purpose of this study was to examine the levels of occupational stress and physical symptoms among family medicine residents and investigate the effect of subscales of occupational stress on physical symptoms. Methods A self-administered questionnaire survey of 1,152 family medicine residents was carried out via e-mail from April 2010 to July 2010. The response rate was 13.1% and the R (ver. 2.9.1) was used for the analysis of completed data obtained from 150 subjects. The questionnaire included demographic factors, resident training related factors, 24-items of the Korean Occupational Stress Scales and Korean Versions of the Wahler Physical Symptom Inventory. Results The total score of occupational stress of family medicine residents was relatively low compared to that of average workers. The scores of 'high job demand', 'inadequate social support', 'organizational injustice', and 'discomfort in occupational climate' were within the top 50%. Parameters associated with higher occupational stress included level of training, on-duty time, daily patient load, critical patient assigned, total working days, night duty day, sleep duration, and sleep quality. The six subscales of occupational stress, except for 'Job insecurity', had a significant positive correlation with physical symptom scores after adjustment had been made for potential confounders (total score, r = 0.325 and P < 0.001; high job demand, r = 0.439 and P < 0.001). Conclusion After the adjustment had been made for potential confounders, the total score of occupational stress and six subscales in family medicine residents showed a significant positive correlation with physical symptom scores.

Choi, So-Myung; Park, Yong Soon; Kim, Go-Young

2013-01-01

82

Residents' exposure to aboriginal health issues. Survey of family medicine programs in Canada.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE: To determine whether Canadian family medicine residency programs currently have objectives, staff, and clinical experiences for adequately exposing residents to aboriginal health issues. DESIGN: A one-page questionnaire was developed to survey the details of teaching about and exposure to aboriginal health issues. SETTING: Family medicine programs in Canada. PARTICIPANTS: All Canadian family medicine program directors in the 18 programs (16 at universities and two satellite programs) were surveyed between October 1997 and March 1998. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Whether programs had teaching objectives for exposing residents to aboriginal health issues, whether they had resource people available, what elective and core experiences in aboriginal health were offered, and what types of experiences were available. RESULTS: Response rate was 100%. No programs had formal, written curriculum objectives for residency training in aboriginal health issues, although some were considering them. Some programs, however, had objectives for specific weekend or day sessions. No programs had a strategy for encouraging enrollment of residents of aboriginal origin. Eleven programs had at least one resource person with experience in aboriginal health issues, and 12 had access to community-based aboriginal groups. Core experiences were all weekend seminars or retreats. Elective experiences in aboriginal health were available in 16 programs, and 11 programs were active on reserves. CONCLUSIONS: Many Canadian family medicine programs give residents some exposure to aboriginal health issues, but most need more expertise and direction on these issues. Some programs have unique approaches to teaching aboriginal health care that could be shared. Formalized objectives derived in collaboration with other family medicine programs and aboriginal groups could substantially improve the quality of education in aboriginal health care in Canada.

Redwood-Campbell, L.; MacDonald, W. A.; Moore, K.

1999-01-01

83

Teaching forensic medicine in the University of Porto.  

PubMed

The University of Porto (UP) provides education in Forensic Medicine (FM) through the 1st, 2nd and 3rd cycle of studies, post-graduation and continuing education courses. This education is related to forensic pathology, clinical forensic medicine (including forensic psychology and psychiatry), forensic chemistry and toxicology, forensic genetics and biology, and criminalistics. With this work we intent to reflect on how we are currently teaching FM in the UP, at all levels of university graduation. We will present our models, regarding the educational objectives, curricular program and teaching/learning methodologies of each cycle of studies as well as in post-graduate and continuing education courses. Historically, and besides related administratively to the Ministry of Justice, the Portuguese Medico-Legal Institutes (since 1918) and more recently the National Institute of Legal Medicine and Forensic Sciences (INMLCF) also have educational and research responsibilities. Thus, it lends space and cooperates with academic institutions and this contribution, namely regarding teaching forensic sciences in Portugal has been judged as an example for other Countries. This contribution is so important that in UP, the Department of Legal Medicine and Forensic Sciences of the Faculty of Medicine (FMUP) shares, until now, the same physical space with North Branch of the INMLCF, which represents a notorious advantage, since it makes possible the "learning by doing". PMID:24931860

Magalhães, Teresa; Dinis-Oliveira, Ricardo Jorge; Santos, Agostinho

2014-07-01

84

Does Family Medicine training in Thailand affect patient satisfaction with primary care doctors?  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Recent national healthcare reforms in Thailand aim to transfer primary care to family physicians, away from more expensive specialists. As Family Medicine has yet to be established as a separate discipline in Thailand, newly trained family physicians work alongside untrained general doctors in primary care. While it has been shown that Family Medicine training programs in Thailand can increase

Darin Jaturapatporn; Alan Dellow

2007-01-01

85

UVAL-MED a universal visual associative language for medicine.  

PubMed Central

We describe UVAL-MED, a Universal visual associative language for medicine, and propose its use in combination with diagnostic reasoning and decision support systems. When fully developed, our system will automatically translate SNOMED terms to UVAL-MED terms. Grammar and syntax for UVAL-MED are defined and its features as a language-independent tool are discussed. The perceived advantages of our graphical language for rapid integration of knowledge and the assessment of developing situations could thus facilitate decision making.

Preiss, B.; Echave, V.; Preiss, S. F.; Kaltenbach, M.

1994-01-01

86

A Third-Year Family Medicine Clerkship Based in an Academic Family Practice Center.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A 5-week family medicine clerkship is described that uses several innovative techniques: problem-based learning focusing on patient management tutorials; consultation with specialists; supervised patient care and a nursing home inpatient teaching service; and workshops on topics such as office-surgical techniques, practice management, and…

Taylor, Robert B; And Others

1984-01-01

87

Context and Trade-offs in Family Medicine.  

PubMed

This issue contains several articles that highlight the effect of context and tradeoffs encountered in the practice of family medicine. Some articles demonstrate how context affects the implementation of the patient-centered medical home model, the community risk of a measles outbreak, the rate of complementary and alternative medicine among different generations, and the number of family physicians primarily providing urgent and emergent care in a region. Tradeoffs are explored in articles that look at how electronic medical record use has changed the composition of workload in primary care and how the burgeoning number of clinical guidelines affects the choices made by family physicians. A look at diabetic patients' perceptions of their risk of negative outcomes reveals an interesting pattern of underestimation of the risk of death. Patients with chronic mental disorders are at risk of having significant difficulties in the workplace, which may place a heavy cost on the individual and society. An interesting retrospective study found that it takes a surprising amount of replacement therapy to correct vitamin D deficiency. PMID:25001992

Seehusen, Dean A; Bowman, Marjorie A; Neale, Anne Victoria

2014-01-01

88

Incorporating patient and family preferences into evidence-based medicine  

PubMed Central

Background Clinicians are encouraged to practice evidence-based medicine (EBM) as well as patient-centered medicine. At times, these paradigms seem to be mutually exclusive and difficult to reconcile. It can become even more challenging when trying to include the preferences of the patient’s family members. This paper discusses the basis for this quandary, providing examples of the real-world impact it has on diagnosis-seeking and treatment decision-making behaviors and how it might inform implementation of EBM practices. Analysis To further explore the role of friends and family in health-care decision making and to understand how patients and families introduce other considerations that may or may not be congruent with a strictly EBM approach, data from two research studies that examined healthcare–seeking behaviors are presented. Both studies explore how family and friends not only can influence health-care decisions but also may be a source of conflict for the patient and/or clinician. Conclusions Illness is a biological and social process. Clinicians who engage in EBM need to acknowledge the social and cultural factors that affect the health-care encounter, understand the important role of those factors in health-care decision making, and expand the paradigm of EBM to incorporate sociocultural influences more explicitly. Moreover, recognition of the influences family members and other caregivers have within the clinical encounter—by offering opinions and participating in treatment-related decision making—is needed and could lead to more efficient and effective health care.

2013-01-01

89

A Comparison of Students' Clinical Experience in Family Medicine and Traditional Clerkships.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Experience on the traditional internal medicine, surgery, pediatrics, obstetrics-gynecology, and psychiatry clerkships was compared with the experience on a family medicine clerkship. The family medicine clerkship offered the most experience with circulatory, respiratory, digestive, neurological, musculoskeletal, and skin problems and with…

Parkerson, George R., Jr.; And Others

1984-01-01

90

Transforming a family medicine center and residency program into a federally qualified health center.  

PubMed

The authors describe a family medicine center before and after a merger between the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California, the California Hospital Medical Center, and the Eisner Pediatric and Family Medical Center in 2012. The merger provided new opportunities to stabilize the financial base of a clinical practice struggling financially and to enhance the training of residents and other health professionals in primary care, which motivated the partners to consider this new model. After 18 months of negotiations, they were able to convert the family medicine center and residency program into a new federally qualified health center. The benefits to this new model include an increase in both patient volume and the quality of education, supporting residency accreditation; a greater number of residents from U.S. medical schools; enhanced education and preparation of primary care physicians for practice in medically underserved communities; enhanced reimbursements and new opportunities for state, local, and federal grants; and quality improvement and new information technology. The partners overcame academic, administrative, legal, and regulatory obstacles, communication barriers, and differences in culture and expectations to achieve this merger. Keys to their success include the commitment of the leaders at the three institutions to the goals of the merger, a dedicated project manager and consultants, opportunities for new revenue sources and reimbursements, and support from a pioneering charitable foundation. The authors conclude by discussing the implications of using community health centers as the focal point for training primary care clinicians and addressing workforce shortages. PMID:23524918

Cousineau, Michael R; Flores, Hector; Cheng, Scott; Gates, Jerry D; Douglas, James H; Clute, Gerald B; Coan, Carl E

2013-05-01

91

Interprofessional primary care in academic family medicine clinics  

PubMed Central

Abstract Objective To explore the status and processes of interprofessional work environments and the implications for interprofessional education in a sample of family medicine teaching clinics. Design Focus group interviews using a purposive sampling procedure. Setting Four academic family medicine clinics in Alberta. Participants Seven family physicians, 9 registered nurses, 5 licensed practical nurses, 2 residents, 1 psychologist, 1 informatics specialist, 1 pharmacist, 1 dietitian, 1 nurse practitioner, 1 receptionist, and 1 respiratory therapist. Methods Assessment of clinic status and performance in relation to established principles of interprofessional work and education was explored using semistructured focus group interviews. Main findings Our data supported the D’Amour and Oandasan model of successful interprofessional collaborative practice in terms of the model’s main “factors” (ie, shared goals and vision, sense of belonging, governance, and the structuring of clinical care) and their constituent “elements.” It is reasonable to conclude that the extent to which these factors and elements are both present and positively oriented in academic clinic settings is an important contributory factor to the establishment of interprofessional collaborative practice in primary care. Using this model, 2 of the 4 clinics were rated as expressing substantial progress in relation to interprofessional work, while the other 2 clinics were rated as less successful on that dimension. None of the clinics was identified as having a clear and explicit focus on providing interprofessional education. Conclusion The key factor in relation to the implementation of interprofessional work in primary care appears to be the existence of clear and explicit leadership in that direction. Substantial scope exists for improvement in the organization, conduct, and promotion of interprofessional education for Canadian primary care.

Drummond, Neil; Abbott, Karen; Williamson, Tyler; Somji, Behnaz

2012-01-01

92

40 years of biannual family medicine research meetings - The European General Practice Research Network (EGPRN)  

PubMed Central

Abstract Objective To document family medicine research in the 25 EGPRN member countries in 2010. Design Semi-structured survey with open-ended questions. Setting Academic family medicine in 23 European countries, Israel, and Turkey. Subjects 25 EGPRN national representatives. Main outcome measures Demographics of the general population and family medicine. Assessments, opinions, and suggestions. Results EGPRN has represented family medicine for almost half a billion people and > 300 000 general practitioners (GPs). Turkey had the largest number of family medicine departments and highest density of GPs, 2.1/1000 people, Belgium had 1.7, Austria 1.6, and France 1.5. Lowest GP density was reported from Israel 0.17, Greece 0.18, and Slovenia 0.4 GPs per 1000 people. Family medicine research networks were reported by 22 of 25 and undergraduate family medicine research education in 20 of the 25 member countries, and in 10 countries students were required to do research projects. Postgraduate family medicine research was reported by 18 of the member countries. Open-ended responses showed that EGPRN meetings promoted stimulating and interesting research questions such as comparative studies of chronic pain management, sleep disorders, elderly care, healthy lifestyle promotion, mental health, clinical competence, and appropriateness of specialist referrals. Many respondents reported a lack of interest in family medicine research related to poor incentives and low family medicine status in general and among medical students in particular. It was suggested that EGPRN exert political lobbying for family medicine research. Conclusion Since 1974, EGPRN organizes biannual conferences that unite and promote primary care practice, clinical research and academic family medicine in 25 member countries.

2013-01-01

93

Students letters to patients as a part of education in family medicine.  

PubMed

Family medicine fosters holistic approach to patient-centered practice. Current medical curriculum in Croatia does not have well-structured courses or tools to prepare medicals students for successful communication with the patient and for building lasting and beneficial doctor- patient relationship. We explored the value of students practice in writing letters to patients about their illness as a way of building personal and compassionate relationship with patients. Sixth year students at the School of Medicine in Split wrote letters to the patients from consultations under the supervision of the supervisor in a family medicine practice. Structured teaching of communication with the patient brings family medicine back to what has actually always been its main part- communication and doctor-patient relationship. Our future aim is to develop students letters to patients as a new tool in the family medicine course examination. Moreover, we will investigate how they can be used in everyday practice of family medicine. PMID:23311485

Mrduljaš-?jujic, Nataša; Pavli?evi?, Ivan?ica; Marušic, Ana; Marušic, Matko

2012-01-01

94

Chronic kidney disease care delivered by US family medicine and internal medicine trainees: results from an online survey  

PubMed Central

Background Complications of chronic kidney disease (CKD) contribute to morbidity and mortality. Consequently, treatment guidelines have been developed to facilitate early detection and treatment. However, given the high prevalence of CKD, many patients with early CKD are seen by non-nephrologists, who need to be aware of CKD complications, screening methods and treatment goals in order to initiate timely therapy and referral. Methods We performed a web-based survey to assess perceptions and practice patterns in CKD care among 376 family medicine and internal medicine trainees in the United States. Questions were focused on the identification of CKD risk factors, screening for CKD and associated co-morbidities, as well as management of anemia and secondary hyperparathyroidism in patients with CKD. Results Our data show that CKD risk factors are not universally recognized, screening for CKD complications is not generally taken into consideration, and that the management of anemia and secondary hyperparathyroidism poses major diagnostic and therapeutic difficulties for trainees. Conclusion Educational efforts are needed to raise awareness of clinical practice guidelines and recommendations for patients with CKD among future practitioners.

Lenz, Oliver; Fornoni, Alessia

2006-01-01

95

Knowledge about hepatitis B and C among patients attending family medicine clinics in Karachi.  

PubMed

Knowledge about hepatitis B and C was assessed in a cross-sectional study of 300 adults aged 18 or older attending family medicine clinics at The Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi. Most knew that hepatitis B and C are viral diseases that primarily affect the liver, but knowledge about risk factors for disease transmission was poor. Approximately 70% knew that hepatitis B is vaccine preventable; 60% had the misconception that hepatitis C is also vaccine preventable. The majority incorrectly believed that people with hepatitis B or C should follow the diet 'parhaiz'. Generally women knew more than men about the diseases. This study suggests that health education about these infections should be provided to the public. Family physicians can play an important role in educating people about the prevention of these diseases. PMID:15568456

Khuwaja, A K; Qureshi, R; Fatmi, Z

2002-11-01

96

Need to teach family medicine concepts even before establishing such practice in a country  

PubMed Central

Background The practice of family medicine is not well established in many developing countries including Sri Lanka. The Sri Lankan Government funds and runs the health facilities which cater to the health needs of a majority of the population. Services of a first contact doctor delivered by full time, vocationally trained, Family Physicians is generally overshadowed by outpatient departments of the government hospitals and after hours private practice by the government sector doctors and specialists. This process has changed the concept of the provision of comprehensive primary and continuing care for entire families, which in an ideal situation, should addresses psychosocial problems as well and deliver coordinated health care services in a society. Therefore there is a compelling need to teach Family Medicine concepts to undergraduates in all medical faculties. Discussion A similar situation prevails in many countries in the region. Faculty of Medicine Peradeniya embarked on teaching family medicine concepts even before a department of Family Medicine was established. The faculty has recognized CanMed Family Medicine concepts as the guiding principles where being an expert, communicator, collaborator, advocate, manager and professional is considered as core competencies of a doctor. These concepts created the basis to evaluate the existing family medicine curriculum , and the adequacy of teaching knowledge and skills, related to family medicine has been confirmed. However inadequacies of teaching related to communication, collaboration, management, advocacy and professionalism were recognized. Importance of inculcating patient centred attitudes and empathy in patient care was highlighted. Adopting evaluation tools like Patient Practitioner Orientation Scale and Jefferson’s Scale of Empathy was established. Consensus has been developed among all the departments to improve their teaching programmes in order to establish a system of teaching family medicine concepts among students which would lead them to be good Family Physicians in the future. Summary Teaching Family Medicine concepts could be initiated even before establishing departments of family medicine in medical faculties and establishing the practice of family medicine in society. Family medicine competencies could be inculcated among graduates while promoting the establishment of the proper practice of Family Medicine in the society.

2014-01-01

97

Clinical Intuition in Family Medicine: More Than First Impressions  

PubMed Central

PURPOSE The clinical literature advises physicians not to trust their intuition. Studies of clinical intuition, however, equate it to early impressions, the first thing that comes to the physician’s mind. This study aimed to investigate the validity of this perspective by examining real cases of intuition in family medicine. METHODS Eighteen family physicians were interviewed about patient cases in which they believed that they had experienced an intuition. Cases were included if (1) participants were unaware of the basis of their judgment, or (2) participants talked about the basis of their judgment but believed that it was irrational or unsubstantiated. During the interview, case descriptions were systematically probed following the Critical Decision Method. Transcripts were coded for judgments, informational cues, expectancies, goals, and actions and were reordered into chronological accounts of the decision process. The 2 authors independently categorized cases into 3 emerging decision process types. RESULTS Participants reported 31 cases, 24 of which met inclusion criteria. Three types of decision process emerged: gut feelings, recognitions, and insights (? = 0.78). In all cases, participants thought that their intuitive judgment was in conflict with a more rational explanation or what other colleagues would do. CONCLUSIONS Automatic, nonanalytical processes in clinical judgment extend beyond first impressions. Rather than admonishing clinicians not to trust their intuition, it should be acknowledged that little is currently known about the different types of intuitive processes and what determines their success or failure. Research on the conditions for accurate clinical intuitions is needed.

Woolley, Amanda; Kostopoulou, Olga

2013-01-01

98

Family medicine in a tertiary care hospital. Obstetrical outcomes and interventions.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE: To examine the rates of obstetrical complications and interventions among patients managed or comanaged by family physicians. DESIGN: Case series. Retrospective review of hospital records. SETTING: Victoria Hospital, a tertiary care centre affiliated with the University of Western Ontario in London, Ont. PARTICIPANTS: Five hundred forty-two women in labour admitted consecutively by family physicians from October 1, 1990, to September 31, 1991. There were no exclusions based on antenatal risk. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Degree of risk on admission, and rates of cesarean sections, inductions, epidurals, forceps deliveries, episiotomies, perineal tears, postpartum hemorrhages, and postpartum fever for mothers. For newborns, Apgar scores and rate of need for a pediatric critical care unit or special observation nursery. RESULTS: Except for rates of inductions and episiotomies, which were lower than those reported elsewhere, results were all comparable to those in previous North American studies of low-risk family medicine obstetric patients. CONCLUSION: Family physicians care for women with a range of antenatal risks. Even when practising in tertiary care environments, family physicians can minimize many obstetrical interventions while maintaining good maternal and neonatal outcomes.

Gaspar, D.; Jordan, J.

1995-01-01

99

Faculty Development in Family Medicine: A Survey of Needs and Resources.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Faculty development programs were introduced to help physician-teachers improve their competence in academic skills. The current status of faculty development programs in departments of family medicine were assessed via a questionnaire survey mailed to directors of family medicine residency programs. (MLW)

Frisch, S. R.; Talbot, Yves

1984-01-01

100

A Characterization of the Imminent Leadership Transition in Academic Family Medicine.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A survey of 97 chairmen of academic departments of family medicine found that over half intended to leave their position within 5 years, with job dissatisfaction given as the reason by 52. Findings suggest that future demand for academic chairmen of family medicine departments will be large and that chairmen will be young with limited academic…

Green, Larry A.; And Others

1991-01-01

101

The Effect of Offering International Health Training Opportunities on Family Medicine Residency Recruiting  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background and Objectives: While medical students' interest in family medicine declines, and resi- dency programs face recruiting challenges, interest in international health is increasing. We studied the influence of offering an international health track (IHT) on residency recruitment. Methods: We surveyed all graduates between the years 1994-2003 of a family medicine residency program of- fering an optional IHT (n=90). Descriptive

Andrew W. Bazemore; Maurice Henein; Linda M. Goldenhar; Magdalena Szaflarski; Christopher J. Lindsell; Philip Diller

102

Effect of Early Exposure to Family Medicine on Students' Attitudes Toward the Specialty.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study of the influence of clinical experiences on one medical school's students' choice of specialty found that neither early exposure to role models in family medicine nor the order in which specialty clerkships were taken significantly affected students' choice of family medicine. (MSE)

Allen, Sharon S.; And Others

1987-01-01

103

Audit as an Educational Package for Family Medicine Residents in Primary Health Care (PHC) Rotation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: The Saudi Board of Family and Community Medicine requires residents of family medicine to perform an audit during PHC rotation. The aim of the project is to introduce the residents to their future responsibilities towards improving health services in PHC setting. The Package: A series of small group discussion sessions introduces the concept of audit to residents. Each of

Abdul-Ilah I. Kutbi

2002-01-01

104

The Glass Is Half Full: Geriatric Precepting Encounters in Family Medicine  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Approximately 19% to 20% of all family medicine office visits involve care to patients older than age 65, yet limited research addresses family medicine geriatric education in the outpatient setting. This study explored how geriatric content is incorporated into resident/attending precepting encounters, using direct observation. An observer…

Rollins, Lisa K.; Martirosian, Tovia; Gazewood, John D.

2009-01-01

105

Education and training in family medicine: progress and a proposed national vision for 2030.  

PubMed

This review provides an update of education and training in family medicine in Singapore and worldwide. Family medicine has progressed much since 1969 when it was recognised as the 20th medical discipline in the United States. Three salient changes in the local healthcare landscape have been noted over time, which are of defining relevance to family medicine in Singapore, namely the rise of noncommunicable chronic diseases, the care needs of an expanding elderly population, and the care of a larger projected population in 2030. The change in the vision of family medicine into the future refers to a new paradigm of one discipline in many settings, and not limited to the community. Family medicine needs to provide a patient-centred medical home, and the discipline's education and training need to be realigned. The near-term training objectives are to address the service, training and research needs of a changing and challenging healthcare landscape. PMID:24664375

Goh, Lee Gan; Ong, Chooi Peng

2014-03-01

106

The art and science of prognostication in early university medicine.  

PubMed

Prognosis occupied a more prominent place in the medieval curriculum than it does at the modern university. Scholastic discussions were rooted in the Hippocratic Aphorisms and shaped by Galen's treatises On Crisis and On Critical Days. Medical prediction, as an art dependent on personal skills such as memory and conjecture, was taught with the aid of the liberal arts of rhetoric and logic. Scientific predictability was sought in branches of mathematics, moving from periodicity and numerology to astronomy. The search for certitude contributed to the cultivation of astrology; even at its peak, however, astrological medicine did not dominate the teaching on prognostication. The ultimate concern, which awaits further discussion, was not even with forecasting as such, but with the physician and, indeed, the patient. PMID:14657583

Demaitre, Luke

2003-01-01

107

Report on Financing the New Model of Family Medicine  

PubMed Central

PURPOSE To foster redesigning the work and workplaces of family physicians, this Future of Family Medicine task force was created to formulate and recommend a financial model that sustains and promotes a thriving New Model of care by focusing on practice reimbursement and health care finances. The goals of the task force were to develop a financial model that assesses the impact of the New Model on practice finances, and to recommend health care financial policies that, if implemented, would be expected to promote the New Model and the primary medical care function in the United States for the next few decades. METHODS The members of the task force reflected a wide range of professional backgrounds and expertise. The group met in person on 2 occasions and communicated by e-mail and conference calls to achieve consensus. A marketing study was carried out using focus groups to test the concept of the New Model with consumers. External consultants with expertise in health economics, health care finance, health policy, and practice management were engaged to assist the task force with developing the microeconomic (practice level) and macroeconomic (societal level) financial models necessary to achieve its goals. Model assumptions were derived from the published medical literature, existing practice management databases, and discussions with experienced physicians and other content experts. The results of the financial modeling exercise are included in this report. The initial draft report of the findings and recommendations was shared with a reactor panel representing a broad spectrum of constituencies. Feedback from these individuals was reviewed and incorporated, as appropriate, into the final report. RESULTS The practice-level financial model suggests that full implementation of the New Model of care within the current fee-for-service system of reimbursement would result in a 26% increase in compensation (from $167,457 to $210,288 total annual compensation) for prototypical family physicians who maintain their current number of work hours. Alternatively, physicians could choose to decrease their work hours by 12% and maintain their current compensation. This result is sensitive to physician practice group size. The societal level financial model shows that modifications in the current reimbursement system could lead to further improvements in compensation for family physicians practicing the New Model of care. Reimbursement for e-visits and chronic disease management could further increase total annual compensation to $229,849 for prototypical family physicians maintaining their current number of work hours. The widespread introduction of quality-based physician incentive bonus payments similar to some current programs that have been implemented on a limited basis could further increase total annual compensation up to $254,500. The adoption of a mixed reimbursement model, which would add an annual per-patient fee, a chronic care bonus, and an overall performance bonus to the current reimbursement system, could increase total annual compensation for the prototypical family physician continuing the current number of hours worked to as much as $277,800, a 66% increase above current compensation levels. The cost of transition to the New Model is estimated to range from $23,442 to $90,650 per physician, depending on the assumed magnitude of productivity loss associated with implementing an electronic health record. The financial impact of enhanced use of primary care on the costs of health care in the United States was estimated. If every American used a primary care physician as their usual source of care, health care costs would likely decrease by 5.6%, resulting in national savings of $67 billion dollars per year, with an improvement in the quality of the health care provided. CONCLUSIONS Family physicians could use New Model efficiency to increase compensation or to reduce work time. There are alternative reimbursement methodologies compatible with the New Model that would allow family physicians to share in the health car

Spann, Stephen J.

2004-01-01

108

A Graduate Program in Veterinary Preventive Medicine--University of Guelph--1976  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A three-semester (12-month) diploma program for veterinarians was begun at the University of Guelph in 1971 that is applicable to veterinarians employed in public health, regulatory veterinary medicine, and animal production medicine, where there is emphasis on preventive medicine. Each student completes a project suitable for seminar presentation…

Mitchell, W. R.; Barnum, D. A.

1977-01-01

109

Changing University Work, Freedom, Flexibility and Family  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article investigates what Finnish academics on short fixed-term contracts consider to be the effects of having children on work and careers. The study is framed by the context of the current state of the university sector, its neoliberal and entrepreneurial tendencies and its claims to meritocracy. Informants express relative happiness with…

Nikunen, Minna

2012-01-01

110

Changing university work, freedom, flexibility and family  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article investigates what Finnish academics on short fixed-term contracts consider to be the effects of having children on work and careers. The study is framed by the context of the current state of the university sector, its neoliberal and entrepreneurial tendencies and its claims to meritocracy. Informants express relative happiness with what they see as freedom and flexibility in

Minna Nikunen

2011-01-01

111

Reuniting public health and medicine: the University of New Mexico School of Medicine Public Health Certificate.  

PubMed

The University of New Mexico School of Medicine (UNMSOM) sought to train medical students in public health concepts, knowledge, and skills as a means of improving the health of communities statewide. Faculty members from every UNMSOM department collaborated to create and integrate a public health focus into all years of the medical school curriculum. They identified key competencies and developed new courses that would synchronize students' learning public health subjects with the mainstream medical school content. New courses include: Health Equity: Principles of Public Health; Epidemiology and Biostatistics; Evidence-Based Practice; Community-Based Service Learning; and Ethics in Public Health. Students experiencing the new courses, first in pilot and then final forms, gave high quantitative ratings to all courses. Some students' qualitative comments suggest that the Public Health Certificate has had a profound transformative effect. Instituting the integrated Public Health Certificate at UNMSOM places it among the first medical schools to require all its medical students to complete medical school with public health training. The new UNMSOM Public Health Certificate courses reunite medicine and public health in a unified curriculum. PMID:21961667

Geppert, Cynthia M A; Arndell, Cynthia L; Clithero, Amy; Dow-Velarde, Lily A; Eldredge, Jonathan D; Eldredge, Jonathan P; Kalishman, Summers; Kaufman, Arthur; McGrew, Martha C; Snyder, Tiffany M; Solan, Brian G; Timm, Craig T; Tollestrup, Kristine; Wagner, Lana K; Wiese, William H; Wiggins, Charles L; Cosgrove, Ellen M

2011-10-01

112

First-year family medicine residents' use of computers: knowledge, skills and attitudes.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE: To identify the computer knowledge, skills and attitudes of first-year family medicine residents. DESIGN: Cross-sectional survey of family medicine residents during the academic year 1993-94; sampling began in July 1993 and ended in October 1993. SETTING: Canada. PARTICIPANTS: All 727 first-year family medicine residents, of whom 433 (60%) responded. OUTCOME MEASURES: Previous computer experience or training, current use, barriers to use, and comfort with and attitudes regarding computers. RESULTS: There was no difference in age or sex between the respondents and all first-year family medicine residents in Canada. French-speaking respondents from Quebec were underrepresented (p < 0.001). Only 56 respondents (13%) felt extremely or very comfortable with computer use. The most commonly cited barriers to obtaining computer training were lack of time (243 respondents [56%]) and the high cost of computers (214 [49%]) but not lack of interest (69 [16%]). Most residents wanted more computer training (367 [85%]) and felt that computer training should be a mandatory component of family medicine training programs (308 [71%]). CONCLUSIONS: Computer knowledge and skills and comfort with computer use appear low among first-year family medicine residents in Canada, and barriers to acquisition of computer knowledge are impressive. Computer training should become an integral part of family medicine training in Canada, and user-friendly applicable computer systems are needed.

Rowe, B H; Ryan, D T; Therrien, S; Mulloy, J V

1995-01-01

113

Historical Evolution and Present Status of Family Medicine in Sri Lanka  

PubMed Central

Sri Lankan health system consists of Allopathic, Ayurvedic, Unani, and several other systems of medicine and allopathic medicine is catering to the majority of the health needs of the people. As in many other countries, Sri Lankan health system consists of both the state and the private sector General practitioners, MOs in OPDs of hospitals and MOs of central dispensaries, provide primary medical care in Sri Lanka. Most of the general practices are solo practices. One does not need postgraduate qualification or training in general practice to start a general practice. There is no registered population for any particular health care institution in the state sector or in the private sector and there is no strict referral procedure from primary care to secondary or tertiary care. Family doctors have been practicing in Sri Lanka for well over 150 years. The first national organization of general practitioners was Independent Medical Practitioner (IMPA)'s organization which was founded in 1929 and the College of General Practitioners of Sri Lanka was founded in 1974. College conducts its own Membership Course and Examination (MCGP) since 1999. Family Medicine was introduced to undergraduate curriculum in Sri Lanka in early 1980s and now almost all the medical faculties in the country have included Family Medicine in their curricula. In 1979, General Practice/Family Medicine was recognized as a specialty in Sri Lanka by the postgraduate institute of Medicine. Diploma in Family Medicine (DFM) and MD Family Medicine are the pathways for postgraduate training in Sri Lanka. At present 50 to 60 doctors enroll for DFM every year and the country has about 20 specialists (with MD) in Family Medicine. The author's vision for the future is that all the primary care doctors to have a postgraduate qualification in Family Medicine either DFM, MD, or MCGP which is a far cry from the present status.

Ramanayake, R. P. J. C.

2013-01-01

114

Historical evolution and present status of family medicine in sri lanka.  

PubMed

Sri Lankan health system consists of Allopathic, Ayurvedic, Unani, and several other systems of medicine and allopathic medicine is catering to the majority of the health needs of the people. As in many other countries, Sri Lankan health system consists of both the state and the private sector General practitioners, MOs in OPDs of hospitals and MOs of central dispensaries, provide primary medical care in Sri Lanka. Most of the general practices are solo practices. One does not need postgraduate qualification or training in general practice to start a general practice. There is no registered population for any particular health care institution in the state sector or in the private sector and there is no strict referral procedure from primary care to secondary or tertiary care. Family doctors have been practicing in Sri Lanka for well over 150 years. The first national organization of general practitioners was Independent Medical Practitioner (IMPA)'s organization which was founded in 1929 and the College of General Practitioners of Sri Lanka was founded in 1974. College conducts its own Membership Course and Examination (MCGP) since 1999. Family Medicine was introduced to undergraduate curriculum in Sri Lanka in early 1980s and now almost all the medical faculties in the country have included Family Medicine in their curricula. In 1979, General Practice/Family Medicine was recognized as a specialty in Sri Lanka by the postgraduate institute of Medicine. Diploma in Family Medicine (DFM) and MD Family Medicine are the pathways for postgraduate training in Sri Lanka. At present 50 to 60 doctors enroll for DFM every year and the country has about 20 specialists (with MD) in Family Medicine. The author's vision for the future is that all the primary care doctors to have a postgraduate qualification in Family Medicine either DFM, MD, or MCGP which is a far cry from the present status. PMID:24479065

Ramanayake, R P J C

2013-04-01

115

Veterinary Preventive Medicine Curriculum Development at Louisiana State University  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The program aims at training veterinarians, with interdepartmental faculty participation the rule rather than the exception. Included in the curriculum are: avian medicine, herd health management, veterinary public health, veterinary food hygiene, and regulatory veterinary medicine. (LBH)

Hubbert, William T.

1976-01-01

116

Labiatae Family in folk Medicine in Iran: from Ethnobotany to Pharmacology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Labiatae family is well represented in Iran by 46 genera and 410 species and subspecies. Many members of this family are used in traditional and folk medicine. Also they are used as culinary and ornamental plants. There are no distinct references on the ethnobotany and ethnopharmacology of the family in Iran and most of the publications and documents related to

Farzaneh Naghibi; Mahmoud Mosaddegh; Saeed Mohammadi Motamed; Abdolbaset Ghorbani

2005-01-01

117

Family Therapy and Alternative Medicine: Acupuncture as a Case in Point  

Microsoft Academic Search

Collaboration between family therapists and alternative medicine practitioners is recently cultivated ground that may prove to be fertile territory for the application of family therapy skills. Acupuncture and family therapy are two healing practices that differ in cultural tradition, language, and technique, yet they appear to share some underlying assumptions suggestive of a natural alliance in helping people with a

Israela Meyerstein

2000-01-01

118

Cancer Research Center Indiana University School of Medicine  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to authorize the Indiana School of Medicine to proceed with the detailed design, construction and equipping of the proposed Cancer Research Center (CRC). A grant was executed with the University on April 21, 1992. A four-story building with basement would be constructed on the proposed site over a 24-month period. The proposed project would bring together, in one building, three existing hematology/oncology basic research programs, with improved cost-effectiveness through the sharing of common resources. The proposed site is currently covered with asphaltic pavement and is used as a campus parking lot. The surrounding area is developed campus, characterized by buildings, walkways, with minimal lawns and plantings. The proposed site has no history of prior structures and no evidence of potential sources of prior contamination of the soil. Environmental impacts of construction would be limited to minor increases in traffic, and the typical noises associated with standard building construction. The proposed CRC project operation would involve the use radionuclides and various hazardous materials in conducting clinical studies. Storage, removal and disposal of hazardous wastes would be managed under existing University programs that comply with federal and state requirements. Radiological safety programs would be governed by Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) license and applicable Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations. There are no other NEPA reviews currently active which are in relationship to this proposed site. The proposed project is part of a Medical Campus master plan and is consistent with applicable local zoning and land use requirements.

Not Available

1994-08-01

119

Assessment of the Development and Support of the Family Medicine Departments Program. Executive Summary.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The study determined the extent to which institutions funded through the Departments grant program have met the objectives of assisting to establish, maintain and/or improve family medicine academic units which are comparable in status, faculty and curric...

J. A. Davis F. Lawler

1989-01-01

120

Assessment of the Development and Support of the Family Medicine Departments Program. Final Report.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The study determined the extent to which institutions funded through the Departments grant program have met the objectives of assisting to establish, maintain and/or improve family medicine academic units which are comparable in status, faculty and curric...

J. A. Davis F. Lawler

1989-01-01

121

The Use of Family Therapy within a University Counseling Center  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As a counterpoint to the oftentimes adversarial way that parents are viewed when they appear to be overinvolved in the lives of their college-aged students, this article advocates for the use of a family therapy perspective in university counseling centers. Benefits of this perspective include a broadening of the lens through which individual…

Jackson, Kathryn

2009-01-01

122

Primary Care, Ambulatory Care, and Family Medicine: Overlapping But Not Synonymous  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Defines and depicts graphically the relationships between primary, secondary, and tertiary care functions (from least to most intensified phases of medical care); ambulatory care (care of sick or well people not confined to bed); and family medicine (an emerging medical discipline focusing on complete and longterm care of the family). (JT)

Reynolds, Robert E.

1975-01-01

123

Perceptions and Practices of Graduates of Combined Family Medicine-Psychiatry Residency Programs: A Nationwide Survey  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: The authors evaluate the current practices and perceptions of graduates of combined family medicine-psychiatry residency programs in the following areas: preparation for practice, boundary formation, and integration of skills sets. Method: The authors conducted an electronic cross-sectional survey of all nationwide combined family

Warner, Christopher H.; Morganstein, Joshua; Rachal, James; Lacy, Timothy

2007-01-01

124

Medicinal plant diversity in the flora of Saudi Arabia 1: a report on seven plant families  

Microsoft Academic Search

A preliminary survey on the medicinal plant diversity in the flora of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia has been made with seven families: Amaranthaceae, Apocynaceae, Capparidaceae, Euphorbiaceae, Labiatae, Polygonaceae and Solanaceae, as an initial study. These families are represented in the flora with 254 species (i.e. 12% of the total species), and individually with 21, 7, 29, 66, 76, 22

M. Atiqur Rahman; Jaber S. Mossa; Mansour S. Al-Said; Mohammed A. Al-Yahya

2004-01-01

125

Epidemiology and Herd Health Training in the School of Veterinary Medicine, Louisiana State University.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

At Louisiana State University School of Veterinary Medicine, training in preventive medicine is incorporated into all four years of the curriculum. The curriculum is described with focus on the fourth year practical course that involves problem solving, using various herds in the area. (JMD)

Archbald, L. F.; Hagstad, H. V.

1978-01-01

126

Guiding the development of family medicine training in Africa through collaboration with the medical education partnership initiative.  

PubMed

Africa's health care challenges include a high burden of disease, low life expectancy, health workforce shortages, and varying degrees of commitment to primary health care on the part of policy makers and government officials. One overarching goal of the Medical Education Partnership Initiative (MEPI) is to develop models of medical education in Sub-Saharan Africa. To do this, MEPI has created a network of universities and other institutions that, among other things, recognizes the importance of supporting training programs in family medicine. This article provides a framework for assessing the stage of the development of family medicine training in Africa, including the challenges that were encountered and how educational organizations can help to address them. A modified "stages of change" model (precontemplation, contemplation, action, maintenance, and relapse) was used as a conceptual framework to understand the various phases that countries go through in developing family medicine in the public sector and to determine the type of assistance that is useful at each phase. PMID:25072584

Mash, Robert J; de Villiers, Marietjie R; Moodley, Kalay; Nachega, Jean B

2014-08-01

127

What is the value and role of academic medicine in the life of its university?  

PubMed

National and global events are rapidly and irrevocably driving transformation in both academia and health care. One result is an increase in the pace of institutional restructuring, consolidations, and mergers, including the melding of academic medical centers (AMCs; i.e., medical schools and their clinical enterprises) with nonmedical universities. Georgia Regents University (GRU) resulted from one such recent consolidation, and the experience at the institution has highlighted the need to answer the question "What is the value and role of academic medicine and an AMC in the life and transformation of its university?" In attempting to answer this question, the author first contrasts the cultural features of academic medicine and nonmedical faculty and leaders, as observed from the GRU experience, which might be useful for leaders of other institutions of higher education. His analysis suggests that academic medicine is currently significantly insulated from the larger university, and that this segregation or siloing represents a lost opportunity for both the AMC and the university at large. The author's experience suggests that fostering greater synergy between the university and its AMC adds significant value, and that such synergy better ensures the ability of those universities with an AMC to undertake and meet future transformative challenges. Strategies should be proactively developed both to enhance academic medicine leaders' engagement with, exposure to, and education regarding the operations and challenges of higher education and the broader university, and, likewise, to increase nonmedical faculty's understanding of and experience with the value and unique challenges of academic medicine. PMID:24362397

Azziz, Ricardo

2014-02-01

128

Medicine utilization review at a university teaching hospital in New Delhi  

PubMed Central

Objective: A prospective medicine usage evaluation based on prescription monitoring was conducted in the medicine OPD of our university teaching hospital to know prescribing trends of different categories of medicines. Materials and Methods: A total of 600 patients were included in the study comprising of 339 (56.5%) males and 261 (43.5%) females. The data were recorded within the OPD by a registered pharmacist on a medicine usage evaluation form, approved by The University Institutional Review Board (IRB). Results: A total of 2365 medicines were prescribed to 600 patients during the 3 months study period. The mean number of medicines per prescription were found to be 3.94. Medicines were most frequently prescribed as solid dosage forms (85.62%), especially tablets (70.82%), and liquid formulations (14.12%). Oral route (96.17%) was the most preferred mode of administration, followed by topical (2.11%) and parenteral (1.60%) routes. Combination therapy (94.33%) was more prevalent than monotherapy (5.66%). An overwhelming tendency for prescribing medicines by brand names (99%) was observed by the physicians. The most frequently prescribed class of medicines were antimicrobials > analgesics > cardiovascular > gastrointestinal agents. The most prescribed individual medicines among various therapeutic classes included isoniazid (antimicrobial), amlodipine (cardiovascular), metformin (hypoglycemic), cetirizine (antiallergic), rabeprazole (GI medicine), atorvastatin (hypolipidemic), dextromethorphan (respiratory medicine), alprazolam (sedative-hypnotic), paracetamol (analgesic). Conclusions: There is a considerable scope of improvement in the existing prescribing practice, especially prescribing by generic names, needs to be encouraged and a hospital formulary has to be developed for the purpose. The number of medicines to be included per prescription should be judged rationally and polypharmacy ought to be curbed. Use of antimicrobial also needs to be rationalized as over usage of antibiotics may lead to the problems such as medicine resistance and noncompliance.

Aqil, M.; Bhadana, V.; Alam, M.S.; Pillai, K. K.; Kapur, P.

2012-01-01

129

[Research funding of university medicine by the BMBF, DFG, and EU].  

PubMed

Public research funding is of growing importance for university medicine as a finance resource particularly in view of decreasing institutional budgets provided by the Federal States, as a serious stimulus for change in university medicine, and as an intra- and interuniversity research quality indicator, which is also used in the process of (re-)distributing institutional budgets. These three factors are largely determining the research in university medicine. The large funding institutions BMBF, DFG, EU have different programs and, thus, specific influence on the development of university medicine. The health research program of the BMBF focuses on clinical and patient oriented research, and gives incentives for the development of research structures of university medicine. The funding mechanism of the DFG is primarily demand oriented (bottom-up) and is focused on basic research. Nevertheless, the coordinated funding measures of the DFG are increasingly influencing the development of university medicine. The actual 7th framework program of the EU has a demand-orientated basic research program (ERC) as well as a broad structured program which also funds clinical research. With the recently invented instrument of joint programming the EU intends to influence the funding priorities of the member states. PMID:19693474

Adler, G; von dem Knesebeck, J

2009-09-01

130

Comparing the Performance of Allopathically and Osteopathically Trained Physicians on the American Board of Family Medicine's Certification Examination  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: Two medical specialty boards offer certification in family medicine: the American Board of Family Medicine (ABFM) and the American Osteopathic Board of Family Physicians (AOBFP). The AOBFP certification is offered only to graduates of osteopathic colleges; however, graduates of both osteopathic and allopathic medical schools who have…

O'Neill, Thomas R.; Royal, Kenneth D.; Schulte, Bradley M.; Leigh, Terrence

2009-01-01

131

[University tutorship in medicine: a new experimental program in Mexico].  

PubMed

The document presents information on the program of medical tutorships initiated this year in Mexico. Its main purpose is to offer the new graduate physician instruction in internal medicine, pediatrics, gynecology and obstetrics, and general surgery through "open instruction" and training in the clinical aspects of private practice. During the one-year program, the physician will receive tutorial training in these branches of medicine (each to last three months), under the supervision and evaluation of a unversity and the respective medical association. Theoretical knowledge will be obtained through the use of self-instructional material (study units) and practical knowledge through collaboration with a physician in private practice. The system has been established with a view to using private medicine as a source of learning experiences for recent graduates; theoretically, this tutorship arrangement is expected to double the teaching capability of the national health system. PMID:7398571

López Portillo, M

1980-01-01

132

Family Medicine, the specialty of the future: the Portuguese situation within the European context  

PubMed Central

General Practice/Family Medicine is a specialty focused on the provision of comprehensive, continuing, and community oriented, person-centred care. The lack of prestige and the difficulty in attracting trainees to the specialty have been longstanding problems in most countries around the world. In Europe, General Practice/Family Medicine is also hampered for not being recognized as a specialty throughout Europe. As for Portugal, General Practice/Family Medicine is undergoing a massive organizational reform, as well as unprecedented levels of popularity among trainees. General Practice/Family holds tremendous latent potential, and is thus a specialty with a bright future ahead. It could well establish itself as the specialty of the future if it is able to overcome the barriers that currently make of General Practice/Family Medicine an unpopular career choice. It is important to train confident, competent and polyvalent family physicians, but it is also necessary to overhaul payment schemes, to invest in primary care infra-structure and organization, and to continue to attract more and more bright and motivated trainees.

2009-01-01

133

Effects of the Islamic Revolution in Iran on Medical Education: The Shiraz University School of Medicine.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Of 173 full-time faculty employed in 1978 at Shiraz University School of Medicine, 108 had left the university by December 1982, and 81 of these had left the country, aggravating the chronic shortage of medical personnel in Iran. Iranian authorities have not been able to counteract these trends. (GC)

Ronaghy, Hossain A.; And Others

1983-01-01

134

Impact of Pharmacy Student Interventions in an Urban Family Medicine Clinic  

PubMed Central

Objectives. To determine the number of interventions made by pharmacy students at an urban family medicine clinic and the acceptance rate of these recommendations by the healthcare providers. The secondary objective was to investigate the cost avoidance value of the interventions. Methods. A prospective, unblinded study was conducted to determine the number and cost avoidance value of clinical interventions made by pharmacy students completing advanced pharmacy practice experiences (APPEs) in an urban family medicine clinic. Results. Eighteen students completed this experience in the 8 months studied. Of the 718 interventions performed, 77% were accepted by physicians, including 58% of the 200 interventions that required immediate action. Projected avoidance was estimated at $61,855. Conclusion. The clinical interventions by pharmacy students were generally well received by healthcare providers and resulted in significant cost savings. Pharmacy students can play an important role in a family medicine clinic.

2014-01-01

135

Shaping the Future of Academic Health Centers: The Potential Contributions of Departments of Family Medicine  

PubMed Central

Academic health centers (AHCs) must change dramatically to meet the changing needs of patients and society, but how to do this remains unclear. The purpose of this supplement is to describe ways in which departments of family medicine can play leadership roles in helping AHCs evolve. This overview provides background for case studies and commentaries about the contribution of departments of family medicine in 5 areas: (1) ambulatory and primary care, (2) indigent care, (3) education in community and international settings, (4) workforce policy and practice, and (5) translational research. The common theme is a revitalization of the relationship between AHCs and the communities they serve across all missions. Family medicine leadership can provide dramatic organizational improvement in primary and ambulatory care networks and foster opportunities for leadership by AHCs in improving the health of the population. Departments of family medicine can also play a leading role in developing new partnerships with community-based organizations, managing the care of the indigent, and developing new curricula in community and international settings. Finally, family medicine departments and their faculty have a central role in helping AHCs respond to workforce needs and in developing translational research that emphasizes the health of the population and effectiveness of care. AHCs are a public good that must now evolve substantially to meet the needs of patients and society. By pushing for substantial change, by helping to reinvigorate the relationship between AHCs and the communities they serve, and by emphasizing fundamental innovation in clinical care, teaching, and research, family medicine can help lead the renewal of the AHC.

Newton, Warren P.; DuBard, C. Annette

2006-01-01

136

Cancer Risk Assessment by Rural and Appalachian Family Medicine Physicians  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Context: Challenges to the identification of hereditary cancer in primary care may be more pronounced in rural Appalachia, a medically underserved region. Purpose: To examine primary care physicians' identification of hereditary cancers. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was mailed to family physicians in the midwestern and southeastern United…

Kelly, Kimberly M.; Love, Margaret M.; Pearce, Kevin A.; Porter, Kyle; Barron, Mary A.; Andrykowski, Michael

2009-01-01

137

Who Is Driving Continuing Medical Education for Family Medicine?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Introduction: Considerable time and money are invested in continuing medical education (CME) for family physicians (FPs) but the effectiveness is uncertain. The participation of FPs as coordinators and teachers is not well known. The goal of this project was to describe the role of FPs in organizing and teaching CME events that are accredited for…

Klein, Douglas; Allan, G. Michael; Manca, Donna; Sargeant, Joan; Barnett, Carly

2009-01-01

138

Family medicine and international health-related travel  

Microsoft Academic Search

elays for medical interventions such as hip and knee replacements, spinal surgery, and ophthal- mologic procedures are a serious problem in Canada. Federal and provincial governments are strug- gling to shorten waiting lists and provide timely care. Patients often wait months to obtain appointments with specialists, undergo diagnostic tests, and receive treat- ment. Lack of access to family physicians can

Leigh Turner

2007-01-01

139

Current Bibliographies in Medicine: Alcoholism and the Family.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

There has been a growing popular interest in the impact of alcoholism on family members, especially on the children and adult children of alcoholics. Self-help groups such as Al-Anon and groups modeled on Al-Anon have proliferated. Magazine cover stories,...

C. B. Love

1989-01-01

140

[Efforts of gender equality at Kinki University School of Medicine].  

PubMed

In recent years, medical doctors are in short supply in many university hospitals. Retirement of female doctor after delivery is one of the reasons. Although they want to return to work after giving birth, they quit unavoidable because the working conditions do not match. Then, Kinki university hospital established the "provisions for special work arrangements". This work arrangement is the wage less, but the working hours is less than the regular. This work arrangement increased returner to the university hospital after delivery. PMID:24291988

Miyamoto, Katsuichi

2013-01-01

141

GIS Residency Footprinting: Analyzing the Impact of Family Medicine Graduate Medical Education in Hawai'i  

PubMed Central

Background Access to care for patients in Hawai‘i is compromised by a significant primary care workforce shortage. Not only are there not enough primary care providers, they are often not practicing in locations of high need such as rural areas on the neighbor islands or in the Pacific. Methods This study used geographic information systems (GIS) spatial analysis to look at practice locations for 86 University of Hawai‘i Family Medicine and Community Health graduates from 1993 to the 2010. Careful alumni records were verified and entered into the data set using the street address of major employment. Questions to be answered were (1) what percentage of program graduates remain in the state of Hawai‘i and (2) what percentage of graduates practice in health professional shortage areas (HPSAs) throughout the United States. Results This study found that 73 percent of graduates remain and practice in Hawai‘i with over 36 percent working in Health Professional Shortage Areas. Discussion Spatial analysis using GIS residency footprinting may be an important analytic tool to ensure that graduate medical education programs are meeting Hawai‘i's health workforce needs.

Buenconsejo-Lum, Lee E; Racsa, C Philip

2012-01-01

142

Tulane University School of Medicine Summer Histology Course  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This website provides information regarding a summer cell biology and medical histology course at Tulane University. The course is a comprehensive 5-week, 110-hour individualized remediation course for medical and dental students enrolled in medical or dental school.

Tulane University (Tulane University School of Medicine)

2012-07-24

143

Practising family medicine for adults with intellectual disabilities  

PubMed Central

Abstract Objective To explore the perspectives of adults with intellectual disabilities (IDs) on helpful interactions with their family physicians. Design Exploratory, qualitative study. Setting Vancouver, BC. Participants Purposive sample of 11 community-dwelling adults with IDs. Methods In-depth, semistructured interviews were conducted face to face with participants. Interviews were audiorecorded and transcribed verbatim. Research team members read the transcripts, which were then coded into categories and subcategories and discussed at collective analysis meetings. The main study themes were generated through this iterative, collective process. Main findings Two themes about helpful interactions were identified: helping patients understand and helping patients navigate the health care system. The first theme reflected helpful ways of communicating with patients with IDs. These approaches focused on plain-language communication and other strategies developed jointly by the patients and their physicians. The second theme reflected ways in which the family physicians helped adults with IDs manage their health needs despite the complex constraints of their socioeconomic situations. Conclusion Adults with IDs want to play an active role in managing their health as they age, and helpful interactions with family physicians make this possible.

Baumbusch, Jennifer; Phinney, Alison; Baumbusch, Sarah

2014-01-01

144

Survey of Pharmaceutical Promotion in a Family Medicine Training Program  

PubMed Central

Some researchers have shown that advertising by the pharmaceutical industry has a significant impact on the prescribing habits of physicians. Promotional material invades the practice of physicians in many guises, including journal advertisements, drug samples, clinical symposia sponsored by drug manufacturers, and the ever-diligent detail person. The author analyzed the prevalence of drug advertising, and found that promotional material was present in all the offices and examining rooms of clinicians in a Canadian family practice teaching centre. On average, 10.5 promotional items were present in each individual patient care area and almost 750 items were found in each physician's office.

Fogel, Martin L.

1989-01-01

145

Proposed roadmap to stepwise integration of genetics in family medicine and clinical research  

PubMed Central

We propose A step-by-step roadmap to integrate genetics in the Electronic Patient Record in Family Medicine and clinical research. This could make urgent operationalization of readily available genetic knowledge feasible in clinical research and consequently improved medical care. Improving genomic literacy by training and education is needed first. The second step is the improvement of the possibilities to register the family history in such a way that queries can identify patients at risk. Adding codes to the ICPC chapters “A21 Personal/family history of malignancy” and “A99 Disease carrier not described further” is proposed. Multidisciplinary guidelines for referral must be unambiguous. Electronical patient records need possibilities to add (new) family history information, including links between individuals who are family members. Automatic alerts should help general practitioners to recognize patients at risk who satisfy referral criteria. We present a familial breast cancer case with a BRCA1 mutation as an example.

2013-01-01

146

Faculty Development for Family Medicine Educators: An Agenda for Future Activities.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Literature on general, fellowship, and short-term faculty development activities for family medicine educators is reviewed. Suggestions for future activities include initiation of training during residency, fourth year clinical fellow positions and two-year research fellowships supported by clinic revenue and grants, and more rigorous fellowship…

Sheets, Kent J.; Schwenk, Thomas L.

1990-01-01

147

Social Work Clinical Practice in Family Medicine Centers: The Need for a Practice Model  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper reports the findings of a recently conducted study of the clinical practice of social work in family medicine residency training centers in eight southeastern states. Findings indicate that the practice of social work is firmly entrenched and expanding in this primary health care setting. Analysis of the clinical practice of these workers shows that workers tend to select

Howard Hess

1985-01-01

148

Development of a Competency Framework for Quality Improvement in Family Medicine: A Qualitative Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: The aim of this study was to develop a comprehensive framework of quality improvement competencies for use in continuing professional development (CPD) and continuing medical education (CME) for European general practice/family medicine physicians (GPs/FDs). Methods: The study was carried out in three phases: literature review,…

Czabanowska, Katarzyna; Klemenc-Ketis, Zalika; Potter, Amanda; Rochfort, Andree; Tomasik, Tomasz; Csiszar, Judit; Van den Bussche, Piet

2012-01-01

149

How information retrieval technology may impact on physician practice: an organizational case study in family medicine  

Microsoft Academic Search

Rationale Information retrieval technology tends to become nothing less than crucial in physician daily practice, notably in family medicine. Never- theless, few studies examine impacts of this technology and their results appear controversial. Aims and objectives Our article aims to explore these impacts using the medical literature, an organizational case study and the literature on organizations. Methods The case study

P. Pluye; R. M. Grad

2004-01-01

150

What Do Family Medicine Patients Think about Medical Students' Participation in Their Health Care?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A survey of 575 family-medicine patients in academic and community settings found most willing to have a medical student involved in their health care. One-third reported that students did at least part of the physical examination. Many patients said they would appreciate a medical student's attention. Almost half perceived that student…

Devera-Sales, Amelia; Paden, Carrie; Vinson, Daniel C.

1999-01-01

151

Family Medicine Patients' Use of the Internet for Health Information: A MetroNet Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

We explored a diverse sample of family medicine patients' use of the internet for health information. Primary objectives were to determine the extent of access to the Internet, and among those with access, the types of health information sought; how they search for that information; and how they assess the accuracy of the information. We also surveyed the physicians' perceptions

Kendra L. Schwartz; Thomas Roe; Justin Northrup; James Meza; Raouf Seifeldin; Anne Victoria Neale

152

Multi-Source Evaluation of Interpersonal and Communication Skills of Family Medicine Residents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

There is a lack of information on the use of multi-source evaluation to assess trainees' interpersonal and communication skills in Oriental settings. This study is conducted to assess the reliability and applicability of assessing the interpersonal and communication skills of family medicine residents by patients, peer residents, nurses, and…

Leung, Kai-Kuen; Wang, Wei-Dan; Chen, Yen-Yuan

2012-01-01

153

Psychosocial Training in U.S. Internal Medicine and Family Practice Residency Programs.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Surveyed directors of internal medicine (IM) and family practice (FP) residency programs regarding the format, content, and quantity of psychosocial training in their programs, their opinions on topics related to such training, and program demographics. Found considerable variation in content and time devoted to psychosocial training within and…

Gaufberg, Elizabeth H.; Joseph, Robert C.; Pels, Richard J.; Wyshak, Grace; Wieman, Dow; Nadelson, Carol C.

2001-01-01

154

A Classification of Developmental Activities of Academic Family Medicine Supported by Federal Grants.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Analysis of 61 successful grant applications for the federal Establishment of Departments of Family Medicine grants program identified three dimensions for classifying supported developmental activities: (1) the functional area of the activity; (2) the objectives of the activity; and (3) the strategies to be used to attain the objectives.…

Davis, Junius A.; And Others

1991-01-01

155

Proceedings of the 2008 Annual Predoctoral Education Conference of the Society of Teachers of Family Medicine (STFM)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Society of Teachers of Family Medicine (STFM; http:\\/\\/www.stfm.org) is a community of professionals devoted to teaching family medicine through undergraduate, graduate, and continuing medical education. This multidisciplinary group of physicians, educators, behavioral scientists, and researchers works to further STFM's mission of improving the health of all people through education, research, patient care, and advocacy. STFM holds an annual conference

David N. Little; Robert L. Hatch

2008-01-01

156

Developing a curriculum framework for global health in family medicine: emerging principles, competencies, and educational approaches  

PubMed Central

Background Recognizing the growing demand from medical students and residents for more comprehensive global health training, and the paucity of explicit curricula on such issues, global health and curriculum experts from the six Ontario Family Medicine Residency Programs worked together to design a framework for global health curricula in family medicine training programs. Methods A working group comprised of global health educators from Ontario's six medical schools conducted a scoping review of global health curricula, competencies, and pedagogical approaches. The working group then hosted a full day meeting, inviting experts in education, clinical care, family medicine and public health, and developed a consensus process and draft framework to design global health curricula. Through a series of weekly teleconferences over the next six months, the framework was revised and used to guide the identification of enabling global health competencies (behaviours, skills and attitudes) for Canadian Family Medicine training. Results The main outcome was an evidence-informed interactive framework http://globalhealth.ennovativesolution.com/ to provide a shared foundation to guide the design, delivery and evaluation of global health education programs for Ontario's family medicine residency programs. The curriculum framework blended a definition and mission for global health training, core values and principles, global health competencies aligning with the Canadian Medical Education Directives for Specialists (CanMEDS) competencies, and key learning approaches. The framework guided the development of subsequent enabling competencies. Conclusions The shared curriculum framework can support the design, delivery and evaluation of global health curriculum in Canada and around the world, lay the foundation for research and development, provide consistency across programmes, and support the creation of learning and evaluation tools to align with the framework. The process used to develop this framework can be applied to other aspects of residency curriculum development.

2011-01-01

157

The aquaporin family of water channel proteins in clinical medicine.  

PubMed

The aquaporins are a family of membrane channel proteins that serve as selective pores through which water crosses the plasma membranes of many human tissues and cell types. The sites where aquaporins are expressed implicate these proteins in renal water reabsorption, cerebrospinal fluid secretion and reabsorption, generation of pulmonary secretions, aqueous humor secretion and reabsorption, lacrimation, and multiple other physiologic processes. Determination of the aquaporin gene sequences and their chromosomal locations has provided insight into the structure and pathophysiologic roles of these proteins, and primary and secondary involvement of aquaporins is becoming apparent in diverse clinical disorders. Aquaporin-1 (AQP1) is expressed in multiple tissues including red blood cells, and the Colton blood group antigens represent a polymorphism on the AQP1 protein. AQP2 is restricted to renal collecting ducts and has been linked to congenital nephrogenic diabetes insipidus in humans and to lithium-induced nephrogenic diabetes insipidus and fluid retention from congestive heart failure in rat models. Congenital cataracts result from mutations in the mouse gene encoding the lens homolog Aqp0 (Mip). The present understanding of aquaporin physiology is still incomplete; identification of additional members of the aquaporin family will affect future studies of multiple disorders of water distribution throughout the body. In some tissues, the aquaporins may participate in the transepithelial movement of fluid without being rate limiting, so aquaporins may be involved in clinical disorders without being causative. As outlined in this review, our challenge is to identify disease states in which aquaporins are involved, to define the aquaporins' roles mechanistically, and to search for ways to exploit this information therapeutically. PMID:9193450

Lee, M D; King, L S; Agre, P

1997-05-01

158

Engagement of Groups in Family Medicine Board Maintenance of Certification  

PubMed Central

Purpose The American Board of Medical Specialties’ performance in practice, ‘Part IV’, portion of Maintenance of Certification (MOC) requirement provides an opportunity for practicing physicians to demonstrate quality improvement (QI) competence. However, specialty boards’ certification of one physician at a time does not tap into the potential of collective effort. This paper shares learning from a project to help family physicians work in groups to meet their Part IV MOC requirement. Methods A year-long implementation and evaluation project was conducted. Initially, 348 members of a regional family physician organization were invited to participate. A second path for enrollment was established through three healthcare systems and a county-wide learning collaborative. The participants were offered: a) a basic and straightforward introduction to quality improvement (QI) methods, b) the option of an alternative Part IV MOC module using a patient experience survey to guide QI efforts, c) practice-level improvement coaching, d) support for intra- and inter-practice collaboration and co-learning, and e) provision of QI resources. Results More physicians participated through group (66) than individual (12) recruitment, for a total of 78 physicians in 20 practices. Participation occurred at three levels: individual, intra-practice, and inter-practice. Within the one-year time frame, intra-practice collaboration occurred most frequently. Inter-practice and system-level collaboration has begun and continues to evolve. Physicians felt that they benefited from access to a practice coach, group process, and a subset of participants also reported that their QI competency had improved with participation. Conclusions Practice-level collaboration, access to a practice coach, flexibility in choosing and focusing improvement projects, tailored support, and involvement with professional affiliations, can enhance the Part IV MOC process. Specialty boards are likely to discover productive opportunities from working with practices, professional organizations, and healthcare systems to support intra- and inter-practice collaborative QI work that uses Part IV MOC requirements to motivate practice improvement.

Brenner, Christopher J.; Cheren, Mark; Stange, Kurt C.

2013-01-01

159

Dilepton signatures of family non-universal U1  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The supersymmetric models extending the minimal supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) by an additional Abelian gauge factor U(1 in order to solve the ? problem do generically suffer from anomalies disrupting the gauge coupling unification found in the MSSM. The anomalies are absent if the minimal matter content necessitated by the ? problem is augmented with exotic matter species having appropriate quantum numbers. Recently, it has been shown that anomaly cancellation can also be accomplished by introducing family non-universal U(1 charges and non-holomorphic soft-breaking terms [D.A. Demir, G.L. Kane, T.T. Wang, Phys. Rev. D 72 (2005) 015012, hep-ph/0503290]. We discuss collider signatures of anomaly-free family non-universal U(1 model by analyzing dilepton production in future colliders. We find that, both at LHC and NLC, one can establish existence/absence of such a Z boson by simply comparing the number of dilepton production events for electron, muon and tau lepton. The signal is free of the SM background.

Hayreter, Alper

2007-05-01

160

The Future of Family Medicine version 2.0: reflections from Pisacano scholars.  

PubMed

The Future of Family Medicine (FFM) project has helped shape and direct the evolution of primary care medicine over the past decade. Pisacano Scholars, a group of leaders in family medicine supported by the American Board of Family Medicine, gathered for a 2-day symposium in April 2013 to explore the history of the FFM project and outline a vision for the next phase of this work-FFM version 2.0 (v2.0). After learning about the original FFM project (FFM v1.0), the group held interactive discussions using the World Café approach to conversational leadership. This commentary summarizes the discussions and highlights major themes relevant to FFM v2.0 identified by the group. The group endorsed the FFM v1.0 recommendations as still relevant and marvelled at the progress made toward achieving many of those goals. Most elements of FFM v1.0 have moved forward, and some have been incorporated into policy blueprints for reform. Now is the time to refocus attention on facets of FFM v1.0 not yet realized and to identify key aspects missing from FFM v1.0. The Pisacano Scholars are committed to moving the FFM goals forward and hope that this expression of the group's vision will help to do so. PMID:24390896

Doohan, Noemi C; Duane, Marguerite; Harrison, Bridget; Lesko, Sarah; DeVoe, Jennifer E

2014-01-01

161

Consultation clinics for complementary and alternative medicine at Japanese university hospitals: An analysis at Tokushima University Hospital  

PubMed Central

Here, we report on a Consultation Clinic for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) which we established at Tokushima University Hospital in July of 2007 with the aim of providing person-to-person information on CAM, though not CAM therapy itself. In December of 2008, we received 55 applications for consultation, 37% concerning health foods, 37% Japanese herbal medicine (Kampo), and 26% various other topics. The consultants (nutritionists and pharmacists) communicated individually with 38 applicants; malignancies (26%) and cardiovascular disease (24%) were the main underlying concerns. To promote the quality of consultation, data was collected by means of focus group interviews concerning the perspective of the consultants. Safe and effective use of CAM requires a network of communication linking individuals, consultation teams, physicians, primary care institutions and university hospitals. To advance this goal, we plan to broaden the efforts described herein. Our findings indicate that the specific role of the consultation clinic in promoting the scientific use of CAM merits further study.

YANAGAWA, HIROAKI; TERAO, JUNJI; TAKEDA, EIJI; TAKAISHI, YOSHIHISA; KASHIWADA, YOSHIKI; KAWAZOE, KAZUYOSHI; FUSHITANI, SHUJI; TSUCHIYA, KOICHIRO; YAMAUCHI, AIKO; SATO, CHIHO; IRAHARA, MINORU

2010-01-01

162

Entry of US Medical School Graduates Into Family Medicine Residencies: 2004-2005 and 3-year Summary  

Microsoft Academic Search

This is the 24th report prepared by the American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP) on the percentage of each US medical school's graduates entering family medicine residency programs. Approximately 9.2% of the 15,895 graduates of US medical schools between July 2003 and June 2004 were first-year family medicine residents in 2004, compared with 9.3% in 2003 and 10.3% in 2002.

Perry A. Pugno; Gordon T. Schmittling; Norman B. Kahn

163

University of Florida and Shands Hospital Personalized Medicine Program: clinical implementation of pharmacogenetics  

PubMed Central

The University of Florida and Shands Hospital recently launched a genomic medicine program focused on the clinical implementation of pharmacogenetics called the Personalized Medicine Program. We focus on a preemptive, chip-based genotyping approach that is cost effective, while providing experience that will be useful as genomic medicine moves towards genome sequence data for patients becoming available. The Personalized Medicine Program includes a regulatory body that is responsible for ensuring that evidence-based examples are moved to clinical implementation, and relies on clinical decision support tools to provide healthcare providers with guidance on use of the genetic information. The pilot implementation was with CYP2C19-clopidogrel and future plans include expansion to additional pharmacogenetic examples, along with aiding in implementation in other health systems across Florida.

Johnson, Julie A; Elsey, Amanda R; Clare-Salzler, Michael J; Nessl, David; Conlon, Michael; Nelson, David R

2013-01-01

164

[Christian Ehrenfried Eschenbach (1712-1788)--a pioneer of legal medicine in German universities].  

PubMed

Christian Ehrenfried Eschenbach (1712-1788) belongs to the forerunners of the embossed natural science scholars of legal medicine in Germany. As a principal re-elected 11 times and dean of the medical faculty at Rostock University he defended academic positions in difficult times. His bibliography comprises numerous text books, e.g. on surgery, anatomy, pathology and obstetrics as well as various fields of mathematics. His Medicina legalis (1746 and 1775) belongs to the first systematic editions of forensic medicine in the German-speaking community. Thanks to his extensive practical experience as a physician and public health officer he took a very progressive position on questions of forensic medicine, issues of professional ethics in medicine and the assessment of injuries. He has wrongly been forgotten. PMID:15328926

Wegener, Rudolf

2004-01-01

165

The Physiology Undergraduate Major in the University of Arizona College of Medicine: Past, Present, and Future  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

An article on the historical development and implementation of an undergraduate program offered through the Department of Physiology, a basic science department in the College of Medicine at the University of Arizona, culminating in a Bachelor of Science in Health Sciences degree with a major in Physiology.

PhD William H. Dantzler (University of Arizona College of Medicine Department of Physiology)

2011-06-01

166

University of Kentucky College of Medicine Graduating Seniors' Satisfaction with Their Medical Education--May 1994.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study surveyed 1994 graduates (N=91) of the University of Kentucky College of Medicine (UKCM) regarding their satisfaction with the medical education they received at the school. The Class of 1994 was the last to finish before the implementation of a curriculum reform initiative designed to increase active student learning, integrate…

Witzke, Donald B.; And Others

167

Improvement of Oncology Education at the University of Washington School of Medicine, 1984-1988.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

After development and implementation of a revised oncology curriculum at the University of Washington School of Medicine student performance on oncology related questions on the National Board of Medical Examiners examination indicated substantial improvement relative to student performance in non-oncology areas and to the national average. (DB)

Bleyer, W. Archie; And Others

1990-01-01

168

Veterinary Medicine Program Review. State University System of Florida. Consultant's Report and Recommendations.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report reviews the University of Florida's College of Veterinary Medicine and provides an analysis of the institution's strengths and weaknesses, along with recommendations to improve the college's programs. It examines the college's degree programs, students, faculty, facilities, and resources, as well as actions taken to meet…

Anderson, David P.

169

Student Senior Partnership Program: University of California Irvine School of Medicine  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Student Senior Partner Program (SSPP) forms the core of the required medical student geriatrics curriculum at the University of California-Irvine School of Medicine (UCISOM). The program utilizes a longitudinal modular format that extends over the first three years of medical school. Instruction is presented in didactic, patient interactive,…

Fitzpatrick, Camille; Musser, Anne; Mosqueda, Laura; Boker, John; Prislin, Michael

2006-01-01

170

Nature of the clinical difficulties of first-year family medicine residents under direct observation.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE: To determine and classify the difficulties of first-year family medicine residents observed during clinical interviews. DESIGN: Retrospective, descriptive study. SETTING: Family practice unit at a teaching hospital. PARTICIPANTS: Forty-seven of the 56 first-year family medicine residents during their 2-month compulsory rotation in ambulatory family medicine, between July 1983 and December 1988, and 4 physicians who supervised the residents. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: The residents' difficulties noted on the observation forms. MAIN RESULTS: A total of 1500 difficulties were observed during 194 interviews, an average of 7.7 (standard deviation 5.2) per interview. There were 167 different difficulties, which were classified into seven categories (introduction, initial contract, body of the interview, techniques and organization, interpersonal aspects, final contract and miscellaneous) and 20 subcategories. The 17 most frequently noted difficulties accounted for 40% of the total. CONCLUSIONS: The results constitute a useful starting point for developing a classification of residents' difficulties during clinical interviews. We believe that the list of difficulties is applicable to residents at all levels and in other specialties, especially in ambulatory settings. The list can be used to develop learning materials for supervisors and residents.

Beaumier, A; Bordage, G; Saucier, D; Turgeon, J

1992-01-01

171

An Analysis of the Impact of Professional, Educational Organizational and Administrative Characteristics of Medical Schools Upon the Institutionalization of Family Medicine Education Programs.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The objectives of the mail survey of family medicine units throughout the country were: (1) Operationally to define 'institutionalization' of family medicine units by empirically deriving measures through experts in the field; (2) To develop a national ba...

T. F. Seif

1980-01-01

172

Stanford University School of Medicine: Center for Narcolepsy  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Scientific studies of sleep patterns and behaviors have been around for decades, and the Stanford University Sleep Clinic was the first medical clinic established to examine sleep disorders. Since its founding, it has given rise to the Stanford Center for Narcolepsy. For visitors looking for information about their research and this illness, their website provides ample material. First-time visitors might do well to begin by reading the review essay, "A Hundred Years of Research", which provides some background on the ways in which researchers have explored the causes and etiology of this condition. Moving on, visitors can also learn about which medications are used to treat the condition, and also read about their innovative brain donation program.

173

When Academics Become Parents: An Overview of Family Leave Policies at Canadian Universities.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reviews family leave policies in Canadian universities through March 2002. Analysis of pregnancy, adoption, and partner (paternity) leave policies reveal that most Canadian university policies produce income loss and disruption and are characterized by gender regulation and familialism. The paper proposes that improving faculty family leave…

Prentice, Susan; Pankratz, Curtis J.

2003-01-01

174

First Universities Allied for Essential Medicines (UAEM) Neglected Diseases and Innovation Symposium  

PubMed Central

Universities Allied for Essential Medicines organized its first Neglected Diseases and Innovation Symposium to address expanding roles of public sector research institutions in innovation in research and development of biomedical technologies for treatment of diseases, particularly neglected tropical diseases. Universities and other public research institutions are increasingly integrated into the pharmaceutical innovation system. Academic entities now routinely undertake robust high-throughput screening and medicinal chemistry research programs to identify lead compounds for small molecule drugs and novel drug targets. Furthermore, product development partnerships are emerging between academic institutions, non-profit entities, and biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies to create diagnostics, therapies, and vaccines for diseases of the poor. With not for profit mission statements, open access publishing standards, open source platforms for data sharing and collaboration, and a shift in focus to more translational research, universities and other public research institutions are well-placed to accelerate development of medical technologies, particularly for neglected tropical diseases.

Musselwhite, Laura W.; Maciag, Karolina; Lankowski, Alex; Gretes, Michael C.; Wellems, Thomas E.; Tavera, Gloria; Goulding, Rebecca E.; Guillen, Ethan

2012-01-01

175

Proceedings of the 2008 Annual Predoctoral Education Conference of the Society of Teachers of Family Medicine (STFM).  

PubMed

The Society of Teachers of Family Medicine (STFM; http://www.stfm.org) is a community of professionals devoted to teaching family medicine through undergraduate, graduate, and continuing medical education. This multidisciplinary group of physicians, educators, behavioral scientists, and researchers works to further STFM's mission of improving the health of all people through education, research, patient care, and advocacy. STFM holds an annual conference each spring and a predoctoral education conference each winter. STFM held its 34th Predoctoral Education Conference in Portland, Oregon, from January 24 to 27, 2008. The theme was "Igniting Students' Passion for Serving the Underserved." Christine Stabler, MD, Lancaster General Hospital, Lancaster, Pennsylvania, opened the conference with a plenary presentation on the passion for patient care, medical education, and advocacy that have defined her own career and continue to inspire medical trainees. Kenneth Ginsburg, MD, The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and the University of Pennsylvania, continued the theme of igniting students' passion by exploring the ways in which socialization in medical education can teach students to suppress their feelings and humorously illustrated how accessing a full range of emotions can lead to satisfying lives and practices. Tanya Page, MD, a recent residency graduate practicing in a homeless clinic in Portland, Oregon, described her own passion for caring for the underserved. Participants shared ideas and learned new skills in more than 65 workshops, seminars, and discussions as well as 65 educational research and curriculum evaluation papers. The unifying theme was incorporating care of the underserved in medical education. From the educational research or curriculum evaluation papers presented at the conference, the STFM Education Committee selected 8 papers felt to be of interest to readers of Teaching and Learning in Medicine. PMID:18855240

Little, David N; Hatch, Robert L

2008-01-01

176

A growing family: the expanding universe of the bacterial cytoskeleton  

PubMed Central

Cytoskeletal proteins are important mediators of cellular organization in both eukaryotes and bacteria. In the past, cytoskeletal studies have largely focused on three major cytoskeletal families, namely the eukaryotic actin, tubulin, and intermediate filament (IF) proteins and their bacterial homologs MreB, FtsZ, and crescentin. However, mounting evidence suggests that these proteins represent only the tip of the iceberg, as the cellular cytoskeletal network is far more complex. In bacteria, each of MreB, FtsZ, and crescentin represents only one member of large families of diverse homologs. There are also newly identified bacterial cytoskeletal proteins with no eukaryotic homologs, such as WACA proteins and bactofilins. Furthermore, there are universally conserved proteins, such as the metabolic enzyme CtpS, that assemble into filamentous structures that can be repurposed for structural cytoskeletal functions. Recent studies have also identified an increasing number of eukaryotic cytoskeletal proteins that are unrelated to actin, tubulin, and IFs, such that expanding our understanding of cytoskeletal proteins is advancing the understanding of the cell biology of all organisms. Here, we summarize the recent explosion in the identification of new members of the bacterial cytoskeleton and describe a hypothesis for the evolution of the cytoskeleton from self-assembling enzymes.

Ingerson-Mahar, Michael; Gitai, Zemer

2014-01-01

177

[Brazilian family spending on medicines: an analysis of data from the Family Budget Surveys, 2002-2003 and 2008-2009].  

PubMed

This study aimed to investigate spending on medicines by Brazilian families and related income inequalities, according to types of medicines. A cross-sectional study used data from the Family Budget Surveys conducted in 2002-2003 and 2008-2009. Expenditures were corrected according to the Extended National Consumer Price Index (IPCA). The Concentration Index (CI) was calculated as a measure of inequality. Average monthly spending on medicines was BRL 53.54 in the 2002-2003 survey and BRL 59.02 in 2008-2009. CI showed spending concentration in higher-income families. Spending composition varied according to family income. Lower-income families spent predominantly on analgesics, cold medicines, and anti-inflammatory drugs. Higher-income families concentrated their spending on medicines for diabetes and hypertension (and other cardiovascular diseases). From one survey to the next, even though lower-income households reduced the percentage of their budget spent on medicines, the latter still consume a large proportion of their health spending. PMID:24005926

Garcia, Leila Posenato; Sant'Anna, Ana Cláudia; Magalhães, Luís Carlos Garcia de; Freitas, Lúcia Rolim Santana de; Aurea, Adriana Pacheco

2013-08-01

178

Scaling up family medicine training in Gezira, Sudan - a 2-year in-service master programme using modern information and communication technology: a survey study  

PubMed Central

Background In 2010 the Gezira Family Medicine Project (GFMP) was initiated in Gezira state, Sudan, designed as an in-service training model. The project is a collaboration project between the University of Gezira, which aims to provide a 2-year master’s programme in family medicine for practicing doctors, and the Ministry of Health, which facilitates service provision and funds the training programme. This paper presents the programme, the teaching environment, and the first batch of candidates enrolled. Methods In this study a self-administered questionnaire was used to collect baseline data at the start of the project from doctors who joined the programme. A checklist was also used to assess the health centres where they work. A total of 188 out of 207 doctors responded (91%), while data were gathered from all 158 health centres (100%) staffed by the programme candidates. Results The Gezira model of in-service family medicine training has succeeded in recruiting 207 candidates in its first batch, providing health services in 158 centres, of which 84 had never been served by a doctor before. The curriculum is community oriented. The mean age of doctors was 32.5 years, 57% were males, and 32% were graduates from the University of Gezira. Respondents stated high confidence in practicing some skills such as asthma management and post-abortion uterine evacuation. They were least confident in other skills such as managing depression or inserting an intrauterine device. The majority of health centres was poorly equipped for management of noncommunicable diseases, as only 10% had an electrocardiography machine (ECG), 5% had spirometer, and 1% had a defibrillator. Conclusions The Gezira model has responded to local health system needs. Use of modern information and communication technology is used to facilitate both health service provision and training. The GFMP represents an example of a large-volume scaling-up programme of family medicine in Africa.

2014-01-01

179

[Advances in studies on chemical components and pharmacology of epiphytic type medicinal plants in the Orohid family].  

PubMed

Many of the epiphytic Orchids are used as traditional Chinese medicine. The chemical components and pharmacology have been studied in recent 15 years. This article reviewed the studies which will be beneficial to reveal the relatives among these medicinal plants in the Orchid Family and be helpful to develop new drugs. PMID:16335815

Li, Shu; Wang, Chun-Lan; Guo, Shun-Xing; Xiao, Pei-Gen

2005-10-01

180

Support for and aspects of use of educational games in family medicine and internal medicine residency programs in the US: a survey  

PubMed Central

Background The evidence supporting the effectiveness of educational games in graduate medical education is limited. Anecdotal reports suggest their popularity in that setting. The objective of this study was to explore the support for and the different aspects of use of educational games in family medicine and internal medicine residency programs in the United States. Methods We conducted a survey of family medicine and internal medicine residency program directors in the United States. The questionnaire asked the program directors whether they supported the use of educational games, their actual use of games, and the type of games being used and the purpose of that use. Results Of 434 responding program directors (52% response rate), 92% were in support of the use of games as an educational strategy, and 80% reported already using them in their programs. Jeopardy like games were the most frequently used games (78%). The use of games was equally popular in family medicine and internal medicine residency programs and popularity was inversely associated with more than 75% of residents in the program being International Medical Graduates. The percentage of program directors who reported using educational games as teaching tools, review tools, and evaluation tools were 62%, 47%, and 4% respectively. Conclusions Given a widespread use of educational games in the training of medical residents, in spite of limited evidence for efficacy, further evaluation of the best approaches to education games should be explored.

2010-01-01

181

Performance of cancer screening in a university general internal medicine practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

The authors evaluated use of seven cancer screening tests by 52 providers in a university general internal medicine practice,\\u000a using 1980 American Cancer Society (ACS) recommendations as standards for comparison. Performance rates were determined by\\u000a retrospective medical record reviews of a stratified random sample of 525 patients. In addition, the 48 physicians and four\\u000a nurse-practitioners in the practice were interviewed

Stephen J. McPhee; Robert J. Richard; Sharon N. Solkowitz

1986-01-01

182

Women's impressions of their inpatient birth care as provided by family physicians in the Shizuoka Family Medicine Training Program in Japan  

PubMed Central

Background Even though Japan faces serious challenges in women’s health care such as a rapidly aging population, attrition of obstetrical providers, and a harsh legal climate, few family medicine residency training programs in Japan include training in obstetrics, and the literature lacks research on women’s views of intra-partum pregnancy care by family physicians. Findings In this exploratory study, we conducted semi-structured qualitative interviews with five women who received their admission, intrapartum, delivery and discharge care from family medicine residents in the obstetrics ward of a community training hospital. Four women had vaginal births, and one had a Cesarean section. Three were primiparous, and two multiparous. Their ages ranged from 22–33. They found value in family physician medical knowledge and easy communication style, though despite explanation, some had trouble understanding the family physician’s scope of work. These women identified negative aspects of the hospital environment, and wanted more anticipatory guidance about what to expect physically after birth, but were enthusiastic about seeing a family doctor after discharge. Conclusions These results demonstrate the feasibility of family medicine residents providing inpatient birth care in a community hospital, and that patients are receptive to family physicians providing that care as well after discharge. Women’s primary concerns relate mostly to hospital environment issues, and better understanding the care family physicians provide. This illustrates-areas for family physicians to work for improvements.

2013-01-01

183

Structural and functional insight into the universal stress protein family.  

PubMed

We present the crystal structures of two universal stress proteins (USP) from Archaeoglobus fulgidus and Nitrosomonas europaea in both apo- and ligand-bound forms. This work is the first complete synthesis of the structural properties of 26 USP available in the Protein Data Bank, over 75% of which were determined by structure genomics centers with no additional information provided. The results of bioinformatic analyses of all available USP structures and their sequence homologs revealed that these two new USP structures share overall structural similarity with structures of USPs previously determined. Clustering and cladogram analyses, however, show how they diverge from other members of the USP superfamily and show greater similarity to USPs from organisms inhabiting extreme environments. We compared them with other archaeal and bacterial USPs and discuss their similarities and differences in context of structure, sequential motifs, and potential function. We also attempted to group all analyzed USPs into families, so that assignment of the potential function to those with no experimental data available would be possible by extrapolation. PMID:23745136

Tkaczuk, Karolina L; A Shumilin, Igor; Chruszcz, Maksymilian; Evdokimova, Elena; Savchenko, Alexei; Minor, Wladek

2013-04-01

184

Patient satisfaction with access and continuity of care in a multidisciplinary academic family medicine clinic  

PubMed Central

Abstract Objective To determine patient satisfaction with care provided at a family medicine teaching clinic. Design Mailed survey. Setting Victoria Family Medical Centre in London, Ont. Participants Stratified random sample of 600 regular patients of the clinic aged 18 years or older; 301 responses were received. Main outcome measures Patient satisfaction with overall care, wait times for appointments, contact with physicians, and associated demographic factors. Logistic regression analysis and analysis were used to determine the significance of factors associated with satisfaction. Results The response rate was 50%. Overall, 88% of respondents were fairly, very, or completely satisfied with care. Older patients tended to be more satisfied. Patients who were less satisfied had longer wait times for appointments (P < .001) and reduced continuity with specific doctors (P = .004). More satisfied patients also felt connected through other members of the health care team. Conclusion Patients were generally satisfied with the care provided at the family medicine teaching clinic. Older patients tended to be more satisfied than younger patients. Points of dissatisfaction were related to wait times for appointments and continuity with patients’ usual doctors. These findings support the adoption of practices that reduce wait times and facilitate continuity with patients’ usual doctors and other regular members of the health care team.

Wetmore, Stephen; Boisvert, Leslie; Graham, Esther; Hall, Susan; Hartley, Tim; Wright, Lynda; Hammond, Jo-Anne; Ings, Holly; Lent, Barbara; Pawelec-Brzychczy, Anna; Valiquet, Stacey; Wickett, Jamie; Willing, Joanne

2014-01-01

185

Management controls in family-owned businesses (FOBs): A case study of an Indonesian family-owned University  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper reports on the results of a case study of management controls in an Indonesian family-owned University. The paper attempts to understand the nature and dynamics of management controls in the operations of the University. Data for the analyses are gathered from multiple sources including document analysis, observations and semi-structured interviews. The findings of the case study showed that

Mathew Tsamenyi; Irvan Noormansyah; Shahzad Uddin

2008-01-01

186

The views of key leaders in South Africa on implementation of family medicine: critical role in the district health system  

PubMed Central

Background Integrated team-based primary care is an international imperative. This is required more so in Africa, where fragmented verticalised care dominates. South Africa is trying to address this with health reforms, including Primary Health Care Re-engineering. Family physicians are already contributing to primary care despite family medicine being only fully registered as a full specialty in South Africa in 2008. However the views of leaders on family medicine and the role of family physicians is not clear, especially with recent health reforms. The aim of this study was to understand the views of key government and academic leaders in South Africa on family medicine, roles of family physicians and human resource issues. Methods This was a qualitative study with academic and government leaders across South Africa. In-depth interviews were conducted with sixteen purposively selected leaders using an interview guide. Thematic content analysis was based on the framework method. Results Whilst family physicians were seen as critical to the district health system there was ambivalence on their leadership role and ‘specialist’ status. National health reforms were creating both threats and opportunities for family medicine. Three key roles for family physicians emerged: supporting referrals; clinical governance/quality improvement; and providing support to community-oriented care. Respondents’ urged family physicians to consolidate the development and training of family physicians, and shape human resource policy to include family physicians. Conclusions Family physicians were seen as critical to the district health system in South Africa despite difficulties around their precise role. Whilst their role was dominated by filling gaps at district hospitals to reduce referrals it extended to clinical governance and developing community-oriented primary care - a tall order, requiring strong teamwork. Innovative team-based service delivery is possible despite human resource challenges, but requires family physicians to proactively develop team-based models of care, reform education and advocate for clearer policy, based on the views of these respondents.

2014-01-01

187

Associated Factors of Suicide Among University Students: Importance of Family Environment  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim in this study was to underline the importance of family environment as a significant associate of suicide probability among university students. For this aim 226 Turkish university students completed Suicide Probability Scale, Family Environment Questionnaire, Beck Depression Inventory, and Positive and Negative Affect Scale. As a result of the formulated regression analysis, after controlling for the 51% of

Tülin Gençöz; P?nar

2006-01-01

188

A Novel Nutrition Medicine Education Model: the Boston University Experience123  

PubMed Central

Most deaths in the United States are preventable and related to nutrition. Although physicians are expected to counsel their patients about nutrition-related health conditions, a recent survey reported minimal improvements in nutrition medicine education in US medical schools in the past decade. Starting in 2006, we have developed an educational plan using a novel student-centered model of nutrition medicine education at Boston University School of Medicine that focuses on medical student–mentored extracurricular activities to develop, evaluate, and sustain nutrition medicine education. The medical school uses a team-based approach focusing on case-based learning in the classroom, practice-based learning in the clinical setting, extracurricular activities, and a virtual curriculum to improve medical students’ knowledge, attitudes, and practice skills across their 4-y period of training. We have been using objectives from the NIH National Academy Awards guide and tools from the Association of American Medical Colleges to detect new areas of nutrition medicine taught at the medical school. Although we were only able to identify 20.5 h of teaching in the preclerkship years, we observed that most preclerkship nutrition medicine objectives were covered during the course of the 4-y teaching period, and extracurricular activities provided new opportunities for student leadership and partnership with other health professionals. These observations are very encouraging as new assessment tools are being developed. Future plans include further evaluation and dissemination of lessons learned using this model to improve public health wellness with support from academia, government, industry, and foundations.

Lenders, Carine; Gorman, Kathy; Milch, Hannah; Decker, Ashley; Harvey, Nanette; Stanfield, Lorraine; Lim-Miller, Aimee; Salge-Blake, Joan; Judd, Laura; Levine, Sharon

2013-01-01

189

Task Force Report 3. Report of the Task Force on Continuous Personal, Professional, and Practice Development in Family Medicine  

PubMed Central

PURPOSE This Future of Family Medicine task force report proposes a plan for lifelong learning that is designed to ensure family physicians are prepared to deliver the core attributes and system services of family medicine throughout their careers, especially within the New Model of family medicine that has been proposed. METHODS This report is based on consideration of the proposed New Model for family medicine, along with a careful review of the data generated through research conducted for the Future of Family Medicine project. The personal and professional development of family physicians and the continuous improvement of their practices were considered with an orientation toward providing systems to support the family patient-physician covenant. As a foundation for developing its plan for lifelong learning, the task force explored domains of management mastery, including the management of knowledge and information, the management of relationships, the management of care processes, and cultural proficiency. MAJOR FINDINGS This report presents a number of proposed innovations that have the potential to assure that family physicians deliver the core attributes of family medicine throughout their careers, including linking the family physician’s personal and professional development in a developmental context, based on ongoing self-assessment through the career stages of a family physician, and the creation of continuous personal and professional development modules as a new foundation for continuing medical education and professional development. The process for the continual improvement of clinical practice in family medicine must begin with a close working relationship between the academic community and the practice community. This relationship should be iterative over time, with research creating new practice innovations, which in turn create new questions for the research enterprise. CONCLUSION While traditional continuing medical education (CME) has served to meet many of the original tasks for which it was designed, the current model does not meet many of the emerging needs of patients, physicians, or health delivery systems. For this reason, traditional CME should be replaced with a process that incorporates personal, professional, and practice development. In order to build a more dynamic and effective way to support lifelong learning and performance change, this new process must address the needs that accompany the personal and professional developmental challenges encountered throughout the course of a family physician’s professional lifetime.

Jones, Warren A.; Avant, Robert F.; Davis, Nancy; Saultz, John; Lyons, Paul

2004-01-01

190

Primary Care Reform: Can Quebec's Family Medicine Group Model Benefit from the Experience of Ontario's Family Health Teams?  

PubMed Central

Canadian politicians, decision-makers, clinicians and researchers have come to agree that reforming primary care services is a key strategy for improving healthcare system performance. However, it is only more recently that real transformative initiatives have been undertaken in different Canadian provinces. One model that offers promise for improving primary care service delivery is the family medicine group (FMG) model developed in Quebec. A FMG is a group of physicians working closely with nurses in the provision of services to enrolled patients on a non-geographic basis. The objectives of this paper are to analyze the FMG's potential as a lever for improving healthcare system performance and to discuss how it could be improved. First, we briefly review the history of primary care in Quebec. Then we present the FMG model in relation to the four key healthcare system functions identified by the World Health Organization: (a) funding, (b) generating human and technological resources, (c) providing services to individuals and communities and (d) governance. Next, we discuss possible ways of advancing primary care reform, looking particularly at the family health team (FHT) model implemented in the province of Ontario. We conclude with recommendations to inspire other initiatives aimed at transforming primary care.

Breton, Mylaine; Levesque, Jean-Frederic; Pineault, Raynald; Hogg, William

2011-01-01

191

The Relationship Between the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine and the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center—A Profile in Synergy  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the synergistic evolution of their research, educational, and clinical programs, the University of Pittsburgh (Pitt) School of Medicine (SOM) and the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC) have followed one core principle: What is good for one is good for both. The collaboration is underpinned by UPMC's commitment to its community mission, including support for the academic and research

Arthur S. Levine; Thomas P. Detre; Margaret C. McDonald; Loren H. Roth; George A. Huber; Mary Germann Brignano; Sandra N. Danoff; David M. Farner; Jeffrey L. Masnick; Jeffrey A. Romoff

2008-01-01

192

Early COPD Diagnosis in Family Medicine Practice: How to Implement Spirometry?  

PubMed Central

Introduction. COPD is often diagnosed at an advanced stage because symptoms go unrecognized. Furthermore, spirometry is often not done. Methods. Study was conducted in diverse family medicine practice settings. Patients were targeted if respiratory symptoms were present. Patients had a spirometry to confirm the presence of airflow obstruction and COPD diagnosis. An evaluation of the process was done to better understand facilitating/limiting factors to the implementation of a primary care based spirometry program. Results. 12 of 19 primary care offices participated. 196 of 246 (80%) patients targeted based on the presence of smoking and respiratory symptoms did not have COPD; 18 (7%) and 32 (13%) had COPD, respectively, GOLD I and ?II. There was no difference in the type and number of respiratory symptoms between non-COPD and COPD patients. Most of the clinics did not have access to a trained healthcare professional to accomplish spirometry. They agreed that giving access to a trained healthcare professional was the easiest and most reliable way of doing spirometry. Conclusion. Spirometry, a simple test, is recommended in guidelines to make the diagnosis of COPD. The lack of allocated time and training of healthcare professionals makes its implementation challenging in family medicine practices.

Saad, Nathalie; Sedeno, Maria; Metz, Katrina; Bourbeau, Jean

2014-01-01

193

Geriatric Medicine Training for Family Practice Residents in the 21st Century: A Report from the Residency Assistance Program/Hartford Geriatrics Initiative.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Summarizes the initial results of the regional geriatric medicine curriculum retreats for family practice residency directors provided as part of the American Academy of Family Physicians multi-part project to improve the amount and quality of geriatric medicine education received by family practice residents. (EV)

Warshaw, Gregg; Murphy, John; Buehler, James; Singleton, Stacy

2003-01-01

194

Knowledge, Attitude and Practice of Family Physicians Regarding Smoking Cessation Counseling in Family Practice Centers, Suez Canal University, Egypt  

PubMed Central

Introduction: Family physicians are the first point of medical contact for most patients, and they come into contact with a large number of smokers. Also, they are well suited to offer effective counseling to people, because family physicians already have some knowledge of patients and their social environments. Aims: The present study was conducted to assess family physicians’ knowledge, attitude and practice of smoking cessation counseling aiming to improve quality of smoking cessation counseling among family physicians. Materials and Methods: The study was descriptive analytic cross sectional study. It was conducted within family medicine centers. Sample was comprehensive. it included 75 family physicians. They were asked to fill previously validated anonymous questionnaire to collect data about their personal characteristics, knowledge, attitude and practice of smoking cessation counseling, barriers and recommendations of physicians. Equal or above the mean scores were used as cut off point of the best scores for knowledge, attitude and practice. Statistical Analysis: SPSS version 18 was used for data entry and statistical analysis. Results: The best knowledge, attitude and practice scores among family physicians in the study sample were (45.3 %, 93.3% and 44% respectively). Age (P = 0.039) and qualification of family physicians (P = 0.04) were significant variables regarding knowledge scores while no statistically significance between personal characteristics of family physicians and their attitude or practice scores regarding smoking cessation counseling. More than half of the family physicians recommended training to improve their smoking cessation counseling. Conclusions: Favorable attitude scores of family physicians exceed passing knowledge scores or practice scores. Need for knowledge and training are stimulus to design an educational intervention to improve quality of smoking cessation counseling.

Eldein, Hebatallah Nour; Mansour, Nadia M.; Mohamed, Samar F.

2013-01-01

195

Emergency medicine expeditions to the developing world: the Loma Linda University experience in Papua New Guinea.  

PubMed

Emergency physicians (EPs) are increasingly participating in international medicine in regions that are chronically medically underserved. In August 1994, a ten-member emergency medicine team from the Loma Linda University School of Medicine staffed a 70-bed bush hospital in the primitive highlands of Papua New Guinea, providing both outpatient and inpatient medical care. Typhoid fever, malaria, polio, and numerous other infectious diseases were encountered. Rampant local tribal warfare resulted in regular penetrating injuries from arrows, spears, and machetes. The expedition was judged highly successful, in that 1) substantial medical service was provided to tribespeople accustomed to minimal care, 2) education was provided to local health care providers, and 3) team participants became adept at managing medical conditions uncommon in industrialized societies, and gained valuable ethical and utilitarian perspectives regarding health care delivery in underserved areas. In this article the objectives, organization, and experiences of the team members are described. This information may encourage other EPs to participate in medical expeditions to the developing world, and to provide general principles to assist in their organization and implementation. PMID:8727634

Clem, K J; Green, S M

1996-06-01

196

[Laboratory medicine in the post-genome era: experiences in Chiba University Hospital].  

PubMed

Since the completion of the human genome project, there is growing interest in the clinical application of genome sciences. For this purpose, particular attention toward identifying at-risk individuals and understanding the complexities of the testing process are essential. In this article, I describe the importance of clinical genetics and genetic counseling, and explain how and why the division of laboratory medicine is involved in these tasks in Chiba University Hospital. Our genetic counseling team consists of a clinical laboratory physician qualified as a clinical geneticist, medical technologist qualified as a genetic counselor, clinical psychologists, and a medical social worker. We treat more than 100 cases including late-onset, incurable neurological diseases, hereditary tumors, prenatal diagnosis, and chromosomal abnormalities. The sequencing of the human genome has paved the way for comprehensive transcriptome and proteome analyses. Since the detailed understanding of biological processes, both in healthy and pathological states, requires the direct study of relevant proteins, proteomics bridges the gap between the information coded in the genome sequence and cellular behavior. Therefore, proteomics is among the most promising technologies for the development of novel diagnostic tools. Recent advances in sophisticated technologies in proteomics should identify promising ways to discover novel markers in various fields of clinical medicine. In this presentation, I will give a definition of the proteome, and outline the basic methodologies for proteome analyses. I will also present our experiences in identifying novel biomarker candidates in hepatobiliary diseases, and discuss future perspectives of clinical proteomics in laboratory medicine. PMID:19175078

Nomura, Fumio

2008-12-01

197

The Emphasis Program: a scholarly concentrations program at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine.  

PubMed

In 1999, a faculty committee at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine reviewed the mission and goals of the school and determined that graduates should receive initial preparation to develop scholarly careers in medicine. The authors describe the design of a scholarly projects course, the Emphasis Program, which is required of all students in the first two years of medical school. Each student undertakes a mentored project in one of nine areas of scholarship related to medicine. Curricular time is devoted to the program during the first two academic years, and students also spend eight weeks working on their projects in the intervening summer. The program includes a core didactic curriculum on topics common to all areas of scholarly work, such as biostatistics and study design. Implemented with the entering class of 2004, 467 students had completed the program as of May 2010, and only two students have been unable to complete projects in the allotted time. The majority of graduating seniors reported that they felt this was a valuable aspect of their medical education. Whereas the program offers a broad spectrum of scholarship opportunities, most students have selected projects in more traditional areas, such as laboratory-based research and patient-oriented research. The authors describe early successes in meeting program goals as well as some of the ongoing challenges of administering a required but individualized program of this nature. PMID:20671539

Gotterer, Gerald S; O'Day, Denis; Miller, Bonnie M

2010-11-01

198

Using the Complexity Model to Enhance Diabetes Management in Three Family Medicine Practice: A Qualitative Comparative Case Study. Abstract, Executive Summary and Dissertation.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This study tested an invervention to change family practices' diabetes management, based on 'Complexity theory,' a conceptual model for understanding and directing changes in family medicine practices. Complexity theory proposes that practices be understo...

L. D. Helseth

1999-01-01

199

Study designs and statistical methods in the Journal of Family and Community Medicine: 1994-2010  

PubMed Central

Introduction: The Journal of Family and Community Medicine (JFCM) is the official peer reviewed scientific publication of the Saudi Society of Family and Community Medicine. Unlike many peer medical journals, the contents of JFCM, have never been analyzed. The objective of this study was to perform an analysis of the contents of the JFCM over a 16-year period to discern the study designs and statistical methods used with a view to improving future contents of the journal. Materials and Methods: All volumes of the JFCM, from 1 January 1994 to 31 December 2010 were hand searched for research articles. All papers identified as original articles were selected. For every article, the study designs and the statistical methods used were recorded. Articles were then classified according to their statistical methods and study designs. The frequency of study designs was calculated as a simple percentage of the total number of articles, while the frequency of statistical methods was calculated as a percentage of articles that used those statistical methods. Results: A total of 229 articles were analyzed. Of these, 66 (28.8%) either reported no statistics or reported simple summaries. The cross-sectional design was used in 175 (76.4%) of all analyzed articles. Statistical methods were used in 163 (71.2%) articles. Chi-squared test was used in 111 (68.1%) articles, and t-test used in 48 (29.4%) articles. Other common statistical tests were: Regression, which was used in 35 (21.5%) articles, ANOVA used in 23 (14.1%) articles, and odds ratio and relative risk tests which were used in 22 (13.5%) articles. Conclusions: The JFCM has a wide range of study designs and statistical methods. However, no article on experimental studies has been published in the JFCM since its inception.

Aljoudi, Abdullah S.

2013-01-01

200

"Sin Olvidar a los Padres": Families Collaborating within School and University Partnerships  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article describes the significance of 3 entities--the family, the school, and the university--working together to assist young Latino children succeed in school. In an effort to increase parental and teacher communication regarding school expectations, the Family Institute for Early Literacy Development was created. It uses principles of…

Riojas-Cortez, Mari; Flores, Belinda Bustos

2009-01-01

201

Rooted in Mission: Family and Consumer Sciences in Catholic Universities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this paper is to establish the unity between the missions of the Family and Consumer Sciences (FCS) discipline and Catholic higher education by demonstrating relationships among (a) Catholic Social Teaching (CST) and the role of the service principle to FCS; (b) Catholic Intellectual Tradition (CIT) and the centrality of intellect…

Duncan, Janine

2011-01-01

202

University Research: U.S. Reimbursement of Tuition Costs for University Employee Family Members. Report to Congressional Requesters.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The report examines tuition assistance costs being charged to the federal government for family members of employees at educational institutions performing government-funded research. The study involved visits to 5 of the 10 universities receiving the most federal government-funded contracts and grants. The report addresses: (1) comparison of…

General Accounting Office, Washington, DC. Div. of National Security and International Affairs.

203

Family, Learning Environments, Learning Approaches, and Student Outcomes in a Malaysian Private University  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article presents the quantitative findings from a mixed methods study of students and faculty at a private medical university in Malaysia. In particular, the relationships among students' individual characteristics, general self-efficacy, family context, university and classroom learning environments, curriculum, approaches to learning, and…

Kek, Megan A. Yih Chyn; Darmawan, I. Gusti Ngurah; Chen, Yu Sui

2007-01-01

204

[Adolescent medicine: conduct in the context of familial, social and/or scholastic breakdown(s)].  

PubMed

Adolescent medicine is not a specialty but constitutes a specific clinical practice. The majority of teenagers go through adolescence without necessarily requiring systematic medical monitoring For others, it is a period that reveals past and/or present events that can combine with one another and be a source of morbidity: post-traumatic symptoms, familial dysfunction, behavioral problems unmasking a psychiatric disorder, onset of chronic disease... Medical follow-up of adolescents brings to light unique clinical profiles reflecting the existence of familial, social and/or scholastic rupture(s). Herein, through the introduction of the concept of rupture, we describe the principals of pragmatic medical management. This approach emphasizes that, first and foremost, the teenager must be reassured as to the proper functioning of his/her body, so that, in parallel or secondarily, psychotherapy can be envisaged. This strategy, while providing a guide for an individual physician, demonstrates that, in certain cases, he/she can work in tandem with a multidisciplinary hospital unit, in which all care functions can be mobilized around the youth. PMID:24701889

Kaci, Florya; Allais, Claire; Girard, Thomas

2014-02-01

205

[Highlights 2008 in a university hospital-based internal medicine: the point of view from the chief residents].  

PubMed

Doctors must regularly adjust their patients' care according to recent relevant publications. The chief residents from the Department of Internal Medicine of a university hospital present some major themes of internal medicine treated during the year 2008, such as heart failure, diabetes, COPD, and thromboembolic disease. Emphasis will be placed primarily on changes in the daily hospital practice induced by these recent studies. This variety of topics illustrates both the broad spectrum of the current internal medicine, and the many uncertainties associated with modem medical practice based on evidence. PMID:19267051

Wilson, P; Bullani, R; Cosma, M; Deriaz, S; Donzé, J; Monney, C; Neuffer, N; Pantet, O; Roduit, J; Schwab, M; Méan, M

2009-01-28

206

Views of Family Medicine Trainees of a Teaching Hospital in Riyadh regarding their Hospital Rotations: A Qualitative Study  

PubMed Central

Objective: To explore Family Medicine Trainees views regarding the hospital component of their Family Medicine (FM) training program. Methodology: This is a qualitative focus group discussion based study. Thirteen trainees, eight from final year of FM training program and five from third year of the same program participated in the study. The structure for discussion included a previously distributed and completed questionnaire that included three sections. The first section was evaluation of the satisfaction of trainees with the different hospital specialties rotations. The second section related to reasons for rating the different rotations as excellent and very good. The third section related to deficiencies in training for those rotations which received a score of 3-5. The items in the questionnaire were utilized in the focus group discussion. Two facilitators who were investigators facilitated the discussion. The data was qualitatively analyzed to identify emergent themes and subthemes that described the trainees’ views. Results: The trainees highlighted the following views: Teaching in the hospital component is not relevant to the needs of Family Medicine trainees. Duration of the hospital posts should be reviewed. Emphasis should be on out-patient clinics rather than in-patient. More emphasis must be given to procedural skills, minor surgery and teaching in clinical contexts. Conclusion: Hospital training component of the Family Medicine training program should be reviewed, as the structure and its implementation doesn’t reflect the views of trainees regarding its relevance to their day to day practice.

Alquaiz, Aljohara M; Abdulghani, Hamza M; Karim, Syed Irfan; Qureshi, Riaz

2013-01-01

207

Does the site of postgraduate family medicine training predict performance on summative examinations? A comparison of urban and remote programs  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: The location of postgraduate medical training is shifting from teach- ing hospitals in urban centres to community practice in rural and remote set- tings. We were interested in knowing whether learning, as measured by summa- tive examinations, was comparable between graduates who trained in urban centres and those who trained in remote and rural settings. Methods: Family medicine training

Robert J. McKendry; Nick Busing; Dale W. Dauphinee; Carlos A. Brailovsky; André-Philippe Boulais

208

Views of Family Medicine Trainees of a Teaching Hospital in Riyadh regarding their Hospital Rotations: A Qualitative Study.  

PubMed

Objective: To explore Family Medicine Trainees views regarding the hospital component of their Family Medicine (FM) training program. Methodology: This is a qualitative focus group discussion based study. Thirteen trainees, eight from final year of FM training program and five from third year of the same program participated in the study. The structure for discussion included a previously distributed and completed questionnaire that included three sections. The first section was evaluation of the satisfaction of trainees with the different hospital specialties rotations. The second section related to reasons for rating the different rotations as excellent and very good. The third section related to deficiencies in training for those rotations which received a score of 3-5. The items in the questionnaire were utilized in the focus group discussion. Two facilitators who were investigators facilitated the discussion. The data was qualitatively analyzed to identify emergent themes and subthemes that described the trainees' views. Results: The trainees highlighted the following views: Teaching in the hospital component is not relevant to the needs of Family Medicine trainees. Duration of the hospital posts should be reviewed. Emphasis should be on out-patient clinics rather than in-patient. More emphasis must be given to procedural skills, minor surgery and teaching in clinical contexts. Conclusion: Hospital training component of the Family Medicine training program should be reviewed, as the structure and its implementation doesn't reflect the views of trainees regarding its relevance to their day to day practice. PMID:24353498

Alquaiz, Aljohara M; Abdulghani, Hamza M; Karim, Syed Irfan; Qureshi, Riaz

2013-01-01

209

New Knowledge for and About Primary Care: A View Through the Looking Glass of the Annals of Family Medicine  

Microsoft Academic Search

PURPOSE At this second anniversary of the Annals of Family Medicine, we sought to characterize primary care research and to identify opportunities for new directions by analyzing the content of the first and second volumes of the Annals. METHODS Using an a priori classification scheme, 2 editors independently categorized each research article and essay published in 2003 and 2004, excluding

William L. Miller; William R. Phillips; Louise S. Acheson; Benjamin F. Crabtree; Stephen J. Zyzanski; Paul S. Nutting; Robin S. Gotler; Laura A. McLellan; Kurt C. Stange

210

All in the Family: Genetics and Family Health History Video  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This nine-minute video from the Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU) Center for Life Science Education, in conjunction with the School of Medicine, emphasizes the need for a complete family history as a way to predict and treat health problems.

Ward Television of Washington, D.C (Ward Television of Washington, D.C.;)

2010-05-17

211

The University of Oklahoma College of Medicine summer medical program for high school students.  

PubMed

To enhance diversity of applicants to University of Oklahoma College of Medicine, a Summer Medical Program for High School Students was started in 2009. This comprehensive pipeline program included sessions on applying to medical school, interaction with a panel of minority physicians and health care professionals role models, clinically oriented didactics taught by physician faculty, shadowing experiences in clinics and hospitals, and presentation of student research reports. Students' assessments in 2009 showed increased understanding of the medical school application process, the medical curriculum and the medical field, and an increase in students'likeliness to choose a medical career. Importance of long-term mentoring and follow-up with students to sustain their medical interests is discussed. PMID:21888040

Larson, Jerome; Atkins, R Matthew; Tucker, Phebe; Monson, Angela; Corpening, Brian; Baker, Sherri

2011-06-01

212

Task Force 1. Report of the Task Force on Patient Expectations, Core Values, Reintegration, and the New Model of Family Medicine  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND To lay the groundwork for the development of a comprehensive strategy to transform and renew the specialty of family medicine, this Future of Family Medicine task force was charged with identifying the core values of family medicine, developing proposals to reform family medicine to meet consumer expectations, and determining systems of care to be delivered by family medicine in the future. METHODS A diverse, multidisciplinary task force representing a broad spectrum of perspectives and expertise analyzed and discussed published literature; findings from surveys, interviews, and focus groups compiled by research firms contracted to the Future of Family Medicine project; and analyses from The Robert Graham Center, professional societies in the United States and abroad, and others. Through meetings, conference calls, and writing, and revision of a series of subcommittee reports, the entire task force reached consensus on its conclusions and recommendations. These were reviewed by an external panel of experts and revisions were made accordingly. MAJOR FINDINGS After delivering on its promise to reverse the decline of general practice in the United States, family medicine and the nation face additional challenges to assure all people receive care that is safe, effective, patient-centered, timely, efficient, and equitable. Challenges the discipline needs to address to improve family physicians’ ability to make important further contributions include developing a broader, more accurate understanding of the specialty among the public and other health professionals, addressing the wide scope and variance in practice types within family medicine, winning respect for the specialty in academic circles, making family medicine a more attractive career option, and dealing with the perception that family medicine is not solidly grounded in science and technology. The task force set forth a proposed identity statement for family medicine, a basket of services that should be reliably provided in family medicine practices, and an itemization of key attributes and core values that define the specialty. It also proposed and described a New Model of family medicine for people of all ages and both genders that emphasizes patient-centered, evidence-based, whole-person care provided through a multidisciplinary team approach in settings that reduce barriers to access and use advanced information systems and other new technologies. The task force recommended a time of active experimentation to redesign the work and workplace of family physicians; the development of revised financial models for family medicine, and a national resource to provide assistance to individual practices moving to New Model practice; and cooperation with others pursuing the transformation of frontline medicine to better serve the public. CONCLUSIONS Unless there are changes in the broader health care system and within the specialty, the position of family medicine in the United States will be untenable in a 10- to 20-year time frame. Even within the constraints of today’s flawed health care system, there are major opportunities for family physicians to realize improved results for patients and economic success. A period of aggressive experimentation and redevelopment of family medicine is needed now. The future success of the discipline and its impact on public well-being depends in large measure on family medicine’s ability to rearticulate its vision and competencies in a fashion that has greater resonance with the public while substantially revising the organization and processes by which care is delivered. When accomplished, family physicians will achieve more fully the aspirations articulated by the specialty’s core values and contribute to the solution of the nation’s serious health care problems.

Green, Larry A.; Graham, Robert; Bagley, Bruce; Kilo, Charles M.; Spann, Stephen J.; Bogdewic, Stephen P.; Swanson, John

2004-01-01

213

A new paradigm for teaching behavior change: Implications for residency training in family medicine and psychiatry  

PubMed Central

Background Primary care physicians (PCPs) provide ~50?% of all mental health services in the U.S. Given the widening gap between patient mental health needs and resources available to meet those needs, there is an increasing demand for family medicine and psychiatry trainees to master competencies in both behavioral medicine and primary care counseling during residency-if for no other reason than to accommodate the realities of medical practice given the oft present gap between the need for psychiatric services and the availability, quality, and/or affordability of specialized psychiatric care. To begin to address this gap, a skills-based, interactive curriculum based on motivational interviewing (MI) as a teaching method is presented. Methods The curriculum described in this paper is a four-week block rotation taught in the second year of residency. Motivational interviewing (MI) is used as a teaching approach toward the goal of clinical behavior change. Residents’ strengths, personal choice and autonomy are emphasized. Each week of the rotation, there is a clinical topic and a set of specific skills for mastery. Residents are offered a “menu” of skills, role modeling, role/real play, practice with standardized patients (SP), and direct supervision in clinic. Results Thirty-nine residents have completed the curriculum. Based on residents’ subjective reporting using pre-post scales (i.e., importance and confidence), all participants to date have reported substantial increases in confidence/self-efficacy using primary care counseling skills in their continuity clinic. Conclusions This paper presents an innovative, empirically based model for teaching the essential skills necessary for physicians providing care for patients with mental/emotional health needs as well as health-behavior change concerns. Implications for training in the broader context, particularly as it relates to multi-disciplinary and collaborative models of teaching/training are discussed.

2012-01-01

214

The national portfolio for postgraduate family medicine training in South Africa: a descriptive study of acceptability, educational impact, and usefulness for assessment  

PubMed Central

Background Since 2007 a portfolio of learning has become a requirement for assessment of postgraduate family medicine training by the Colleges of Medicine of South Africa. A uniform portfolio of learning has been developed and content validity established among the eight postgraduate programmes. The aim of this study was to investigate the portfolio’s acceptability, educational impact, and perceived usefulness for assessment of competence. Methods Two structured questionnaires of 35 closed and open-ended questions were delivered to 53 family physician supervisors and 48 registrars who had used the portfolio. Categorical and nominal/ordinal data were analysed using simple descriptive statistics. The open-ended questions were analysed with ATLAS.ti software. Results Half of registrars did not find the portfolio clear, practical or feasible. Workshops on portfolio use, learning, and supervision were supported, and brief dedicated time daily for reflection and writing. Most supervisors felt the portfolio reflected an accurate picture of learning, but just over half of registrars agreed. While the portfolio helped with reflection on learning, participants were less convinced about how it helped them plan further learning. Supervisors graded most rotations, suggesting understanding the summative aspect, while only 61% of registrars reflected on rotations, suggesting the formative aspects are not yet optimally utilised. Poor feedback, the need for protected academic time, and pressure of service delivery impacting negatively on learning. Conclusion This first introduction of a national portfolio for postgraduate training in family medicine in South Africa faces challenges similar to those in other countries. Acceptability of the portfolio relates to a clear purpose and guide, flexible format with tools available in the workplace, and appreciating the changing educational environment from university-based to national assessments. The role of the supervisor in direct observations of the registrar and dedicated educational meetings, giving feedback and support, cannot be overemphasized.

2013-01-01

215

Access to medicines and out of pocket payments for primary care: Evidence from family medicine users in rural Tajikistan  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: In Tajikistan it is estimated that out of pocket payments constitute two-thirds of all health spending with high proportions of these contributions through informal payments. As a consequence, access to basic care is a major concern particularly among the most needy and vulnerable groups. This article evaluates accessibility of prescription medicines and patient expenditures for primary care services in

Fabrizio Tediosi; Raffael Aye; Shukufa Ibodova; Robin Thompson; Kaspar Wyss

2008-01-01

216

History of the Department of Pediatrics Yale University School of Medicine.  

PubMed Central

The history of pediatrics at the Yale University School of Medicine can be divided into eight historical eras. The "Paleohistorical Era" included colonial figures such as Governor John Winthrop and Hezekiah Beardsley who wrote about children's disease in colonial times. Eli Ives, Professor of the Diseases of Children at Yale Medical School gave the first systematic pediatric course in America in the first half of the nineteenth century. During the second era, from 1830-1920, the New Haven Hospital was opened. An affiliation between Yale University and the New Haven Hospital led to the formal establishment of clinical departments including pediatrics in the early 20th century. Six eras coinciding with successive pediatric chairman have led the department to its present respected position in American pediatrics. The department's 75th anniversary in 1996 is an occasion to recognize many of the department's accomplishments and leaders over the years. It is also a time to reaffirm the mission of the department: to the health needs of the children of Connecticut and beyond, to the advancement of scientific knowledge of infants and children and their diseases, and to the training and educational of the pediatric clinicians, educators and investigators of the future. Images Figure 1 Figure 2

Pearson, H. A.

1997-01-01

217

An Innovative Method for Teaching Epidemiology, Public Health, and Preventive Medicine.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Department of Community Health and Family Medicine at the University of Florida College of Medicine developed a curriculum component integrating epidemiologic concepts into a third year family medicine clerkship through a small-group project on a specific condition likely to be encountered by primary care physicians in community practice. (MSE)

Duerson, Margaret C.; And Others

1990-01-01

218

The University of Arizona College of Medicine Optimal Aging Program: Stepping in the Shadows of Successful Aging  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Optimal Aging Program (OAP) at the University of Arizona, College of Medicine is a longitudinal mentoring program that pairs students with older adults who are considered to be aging "successfully." This credit-bearing elective was initially established in 2001 through a grant from the John A. Hartford Foundation, and aims to expand the…

Sikora, Stephanie

2006-01-01

219

Integrating eLearning to Support Medical Education at the New University of Botswana School of Medicine  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Since the enrolment of its first cohort of students in 2009, the University of Botswana School of Medicine (UB SoM) has employed elearning as a key element to support and strengthen its model of decentralised medical education. Significant investments have been made in setting up the physical infrastructure, and in acquiring relevant expertise to…

Kebaetse, Masego B.; Nkomazana, Oathokwa; Haverkamp, Cecil

2014-01-01

220

Predictive Value of the Korean Academy of Family Medicine In-Training Examination for Certifying Examination  

PubMed Central

Background In-training examination (ITE) is a cognitive examination similar to the written test, but it is different from the Clinical Practice Examination of the Korean Academy of Family Medicine (KAFM) Certification Examination (CE). The objective of this is to estimate the positive predictive value of the KAFM-ITE for identifying residents at risk for poor performance on the three types of KAFM-CE. Methods 372 residents who completed the KAFM-CE in 2011 were included. We compared the mean KAFM-CE scores with ITE experience. We evaluated the correlation and the positive predictive value (PPV) of ITE for the multiple choice question (MCQ) scores of 1st written test & 2nd slide examination, the total clinical practice examination scores, and the total sum of 2nd test. Results 275 out of 372 residents completed ITE. Those who completed ITE had significantly higher MCQ scores of 1st written test than those who did not. The correlation of ITE scores with 1st written MCQ (0.627) was found to be the highest among the other kinds of CE. The PPV of the ITE score for 1st written MCQ scores was 0.672. The PPV of the ITE score ranged from 0.376 to 0.502. Conclusion The score of the KAFM ITE has acceptable positive predictive value that could be used as a part of comprehensive evaluation system for residents in cognitive field.

Kim, Ji-Yong

2011-01-01

221

Provider satisfaction with virtual specialist consultations in a family medicine department.  

PubMed

Virtual consultations (VCs) are being ordered by primary care physicians in 1 large multispecialty clinic, replacing face-to-face visits with specialists. Virtual consultations involve electronic communication between physicians, including exchanging medical information. The purpose of this study was to assess provider satisfaction with VCs via e-mail survey. Although approximately 30% of the 56 family medicine providers had not tried the VC system after it had been in place for over a year or said that they often forgot that VCs were an option, most of the providers surveyed (73%) felt that VCs provided good medical care. A majority felt that VCs are a cost-effective and efficient tool for our department (65%). Most specialists (81%) reported that VCs were an efficient use of their time, and 67% said that VCs were less disruptive than contacts by telephone or pager. Only 5% felt that VCs do not provide good medical care. Although several of our primary care providers have been enthusiastic about VCs, others have been reluctant to adopt this innovation. Specialists providing VCs tended to be supportive. This illustrates both the difficulty of incorporating e-health innovations in primary care practice and the potential for increased efficiency. PMID:19225331

Angstman, Kurt B; Adamson, Steven C; Furst, Joseph W; Houston, Margaret S; Rohrer, James E

2009-01-01

222

Win/win: creating collaborative training opportunities for behavioral health providers within family medicine residency programs.  

PubMed

Integrating behavioral health into primary healthcare offers multiple advantages for patients and health professionals. This model requires a new skill set for all healthcare professionals that is not emphasized in current educational models. The new skills include interprofessional team-based care competencies and expanded patient care competencies. Health professionals must learn new ways to efficiently and effectively address health behavior change, and manage behavioral health issues such as depression and anxiety. Learning environments that co-train mental health and primary care professionals facilitate acquisition of both teamwork and patient care competencies for mental health and primary care professional trainees. Family Medicine Residency programs provide an excellent opportunity for co-training. This article serves as a "how to" guide for residency programs interested in developing a co-training program. Necessary steps to establish and maintain a program are reviewed, as well as goals and objectives for a co-training curriculum and strategies to overcome barriers and challenges in co-training models. PMID:24261270

Ruddy, Nancy Breen; Borresen, Dorothy; Myerholtz, Linda

2013-01-01

223

Patient perception and knowledge of acetaminophen in a large family medicine service.  

PubMed

ABSTRACT The use of acetaminophen is currently under increased scrutiny by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) due to the risk of intentional and more concerning, unintentional overdose-related hepatotoxicity. Acetaminophen is responsible for an estimated 48% of all acute liver failure diagnoses. The purpose of this study is to evaluate patient perception and knowledge of the safe use and potential toxicity of acetaminophen-containing products. The authors conducted a descriptive, 2-week study using a convenience sample from a large family medicine clinic waiting room. Survey questions assessed ability to identify acetaminophen, knowledge of the current recommended maximum daily dose, respondent acetaminophen use patterns, common adverse effects associated with acetaminophen, and respondent self-reported alcohol consumption. Acetaminophen safety information was provided to all persons regardless of participation in the study. Of the 102 patients who chose to participate, 79% recognized acetaminophen as a synonym of Tylenol, whereas only 9% identified APAP as a frequently used abbreviation. One third of respondents thought acetaminophen was synonymous with ibuprofen and naproxen. Approximately one fourth of patients correctly identified the then maximum recommended daily acetaminophen dose of 4 g. Seventy-eight percent of patients correctly identified hepatotoxicity as the most common serious adverse effect. We conclude that patient deficiencies in knowledge of acetaminophen recognition, dosing, and toxicity warrant public education by health professionals at all levels of interaction. Current initiatives are promising; however, further efforts are required. PMID:24813653

Herndon, Christopher M; Dankenbring, Dawn M

2014-06-01

224

Recent Family Medicine Residency Graduates' Perceptions of Resident Duty Hour Restrictions  

PubMed Central

Background Resident duty hour limits, new requirements for supervision, and an enhanced focus on patient safety have shown mixed effects on resident quality of life, patient safety, and resident competency. Few studies have assessed how recent graduates feel these changes have affected their education. Objective We assessed recent graduates' perceptions about the effects of duty hour and supervision requirements on their education. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional survey of graduates from South Carolina Area Health Education Consortium-affiliated family medicine residency programs from 2005 to 2009 by using logistic regression to determine associations between participant characteristics and survey responses. Results Graduates (N ?=? 136) completed the survey with a 51.3% response rate. Nearly all (96%) reported that residency prepared them for their current work hours; 97% reported they felt adequately supervised; 81% worked fewer hours in practice than in residency; 20% believed the limits had restricted their clinical experience; and 3% felt duty hour limits were more important than supervision. Graduates who practiced in a mid-sized communities were more likely to report duty hour limits restricted their clinical experience than individuals practicing in communities of <10?000 (OR ?=? 6.30; 95% CI, 1.38–28.72). Conclusions Most graduates who responded to the survey felt supervision was equally or more important than limits on resident duty hours. However, 20% of respondents felt that the duty hour standards limited their education. The duty hour and supervision requirements challenge educators to ensure quality education.

Peterson, Lars E.; Diaz, Vanessa; Dickerson, Lori M.; Player, Marty S.; Carek, Peter J.

2013-01-01

225

Universality of aging: family caregivers for elderly cancer patients  

PubMed Central

The world population is aging, with the proportion of older people (65+ years) expected to reach 21% in 2050 and to exceed the number of younger people (aged 15 or less) for the first time in history. Because cancer is particularly a chronic disease of older people, a large increase in the number of elderly patients with cancer is anticipated. The estimated number of new cancer cases worldwide among people over 65 is expected to grow from about 6 million in 2008 to more than 11 million during the coming decade. By 2030, individuals over 65 are expected to account for 70% of all cancer patients in the Western world. Along with the increase in oncology patients, the number of older people caring for their ill spouses or other relatives is also growing, with the ensuing toll on these caregivers causing major concern, especially in western countries. In different societies the characteristics of family caregiver stressors, cultural norms concerning caregiving, and the availability of support have a huge impact on those providing care. Any study of older caregivers of older cancer patients requires an integrative evaluation of aging that takes into account cultural, social, psychological, and behavioral variables. This review proposes a critical discussion of the multidimensionality of the caregiving and of the impact that age, culture, and gender have on it.

Baider, Lea; Surbone, Antonella

2014-01-01

226

Tradition meets innovation: transforming academic medical culture at the University of Pennsylvania's Perelman School of Medicine.  

PubMed

Traditional performance expectations and career advancement paths for academic physicians persist despite dramatic transformations in the academic workflow, workload, and workforce over the past 20 years. Although the academic physician's triple role as clinician, researcher, and educator has been lauded as the ideal by academic health centers, current standards of excellence for promotion and tenure are based on outdated models. These models fail to reward collaboration and center around rigid career advancement plans that do little to accommodate the changing needs of individuals and organizations. The authors describe an innovative, comprehensive, multipronged initiative at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania to initiate change in the culture of academic medicine and improve academic productivity, job satisfaction, and overall quality of life for junior faculty. As a key part of this intervention, task forces from each of the 13 participating departments/divisions met five times between September 2010 and January 2011 to produce recommendations for institutional change. The authors discuss how this initiative, using principles adopted from business transformation, generated themes and techniques that can potentially guide workforce environment innovation in academic health centers across the United States. Recommendations include embracing a promotion/tenure/evaluation system that supports and rewards tailored individual academic career plans; ensuring leadership, decision-making roles, and recognition for junior faculty; deepening administrative and team supports for junior faculty; and solidifying and rewarding mentorship for junior faculty. By doing so, academic health centers can ensure the retention and commitment of faculty throughout all stages of their careers. PMID:23425986

Pati, Susmita; Reum, Josef; Conant, Emily; Tuton, Lucy Wolf; Scott, Patricia; Abbuhl, Stephanie; Grisso, Jeane Ann

2013-04-01

227

Tradition Meets Innovation: Transforming Academic Medical Culture at the University of Pennsylvania's Perelman School of Medicine  

PubMed Central

Traditional performance expectations and career advancement paths for academic physicians persist despite dramatic transformations in the academic workflow, workload, and workforce over the past twenty years. While the academic physician’s triple role as clinician, researcher, and educator has been lauded as the ideal by academic medical centers, current standards of excellence for promotion and tenure are based on outdated models. These models fail to reward collaboration and center around rigid career advancement plans that do little to accommodate the changing needs of individuals and organizations. Here, the authors describe an innovative, comprehensive, multi-pronged initiative at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania to initiate change in the culture of academic medicine and improve academic productivity, job satisfaction, and overall quality of life for junior faculty. As a key part of this intervention, task forces from each of the 13 participating departments/divisions met 5 times between September 2010 and January 2011 to produce recommendations for institutional change. The authors discuss how this initiative, using principles adopted from business transformation, generated themes and techniques that can potentially guide workforce environment innovation in academic health centers across the United States. Recommendations include embracing a promotion/tenure/evaluation system that supports and rewards tailored individual academic career plans; ensuring leadership, decision-making roles and recognition for junior faculty; deepening administrative and team supports for junior faculty; and solidifying and rewarding mentorship for junior faculty. By doing so, academic health centers can ensure the retention and commitment of faculty throughout all stages of their careers.

Pati, Susmita; Reum, Josef; Conant, Emily; Tuton, Lucy Wolf; Scott, Patricia; Abbuhl, Stephanie; Grisso, Jeane Ann

2013-01-01

228

Woman abuse in university and college dating relationships: The contribution of the ideology of familial patriarchy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Several theorists contend that male university\\/college students who physically, sexually, and psychologically abuse their\\u000a female dating partners are more likely than men who are not abusive to adhere to the ideology of familial patriarchy. These\\u000a scholars also argue that men who hold familial patriarchal attitudes and beliefs, and who are supported by their male peers,\\u000a are most likely to victimize

Walter S. DeKeseredy; Katharine Kelly

1993-01-01

229

Project Family Prevention Trials Based in Community–University Partnerships: Toward Scaled-Up Preventive Interventions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Findings from Project Family are presented to illustrate how a partnership-based program of research on universal family- and youth-focused interventions is addressing a public health challenge. One aspect of this public health challenge is the high prevalence of youth problem behaviors and a second aspect concerns barriers to scaling-up empirically-supported preventive interventions designed to ameliorate those problem behaviors. Illustrative findings

Richard L. Spoth; Cleve Redmond

2002-01-01

230

Lepton polarization effects in ?b???+?- decay in family non-universal Z? model  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Possible manifestation of the family non-universal Z? boson effects in lepton polarization in rare, exclusive baryonic ?b???+?- decay is examined. It is observed that the double lepton polarizations P, P and P are sensitive to the Z? contribution. Moreover, it is found that the values of the polarized forward-backward asymmetry AFBLL are different in Standard Model (SM) and family non-universal Z? model in different regions of q2, and therefore can serve as an efficient tool for establishing new physics beyond the SM.

Aliev, T. M.; Savc?, M.

2012-12-01

231

Semileptonic transition of ?b ? ??+?- in the family non-universal Z? model  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Using newly available form factors obtained from light-cone QCD sum rules in full theory, we study the flavor-changing neutral current transition of ?b ? ??+?- decay in the family non-universal Z? model. In particular, we evaluate the differential branching ratio and forward-backward asymmetry, as well as some related asymmetry parameters and polarizations. We compare the obtained results with predictions of the standard model and discuss the sensitivity of the observables under consideration to the family non-universal Z? gauge boson. The order of the differential branching ratio shows that this decay mode can be checked at the LHC in the near future.

Kat?rc?, N.; Azizi, K.

2013-08-01

232

Usefulness of cardiovascular family history data for population-based preventive medicine and medical research (The Health Family Tree Study and the NHLBI Family Heart Study)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Detailed medical family history data have been proposed to be effective in identifying high-risk families for targeted intervention. With use of a validated and standardized quantitative family risk score (FRS), the degree of familial aggregation of coronary heart disease (CHD), stroke, hypertension, and diabetes was obtained from 122,155 Utah families and 6,578 Texas families in the large, population-based Health Family

Roger R Williams; Steven C Hunt; Gerardo Heiss; Michael A Province; Jeannette T Bensen; Millicent Higgins; Robert M Chamberlain; Joan Ware; Paul N Hopkins

2001-01-01

233

The integration of the "spirituality in medicine" curriculum into the osteopathic communication curriculum at Kansas City University of Medicine and Biosciences.  

PubMed

With grant funding from the John Templeton Spirituality and Medicine Curricular Award to the George Washington Institute for Spirituality and Health, faculty at Kansas City University of Medicine and Biosciences (KCUMB) developed the "Spirituality in Medicine" curriculum. In developing the curriculum, faculty took into consideration competencies required by the Association of American Medical Colleges and qualitative results from surveys of medical school applicants and enrolled students. Strategies for curriculum delivery included lectures, panel discussions, role-playing, and training in the use of a spirituality assessment tool. A majority of the 250 students who received the training in 2010-2011 were able to demonstrate the following competencies: (1) being sensitive to patients' spiritual and cultural needs, (2) assessing patients' and their own spiritual needs, (3) appropriately using chaplain services for patient care, and (4) understanding the effects of health disparities and ethical issues on patient care. Challenges to implementation included a reduction in chaplain availability due to the economic downturn, a lack of student exposure to direct patient care during shadowing, too little religious diversity among chaplains, and changes in assignment schedules. New competencies required by the National Board of Osteopathic Medical Examiners overlap with and help ensure sustainability of the Spirituality in Medicine curriculum. KCUMB leaders have incorporated the use of the spirituality assessment tool into other parts of the curriculum and into service experiences, and they have introduced a new elective in palliative care. Synergistic efforts by faculty leaders for this initiative were critical to the implementation of this curriculum. PMID:24280841

Talley, Jan A; Magie, Richard

2014-01-01

234

Medical humanities at New York University School of Medicine: an array of rich programs in diverse settings.  

PubMed

The New York University School of Medicine has a rich tradition of cultivating programs in medical humanities and professionalism. They are drawn from the departments, centers, students, and faculty in the School of Medicine, have linkages throughout the university, and are interwoven into the fabric and culture of the institution. Some are centrally based in the School of Medicine's deans' office, and others are located in individual departments and receive support from the dean's office. This article describes representative programs for medical students and faculty. Curricular initiatives, the fundamental components of medical students' learning, include a course entitled "The Physician, Patient, and Society," a clerkship essay in the Medicine Clerkship, an opportunity for reflection during the medicine clerkship, and a medical humanities elective. In 2002, the Professionalism Initiative was launched to enhance and reflect the values of the medical profession. Its curriculum consists of a series of events that coordinate, particularly, with existing elements of the first-year curriculum (e.g., orientation week, a session during anatomy, a self-assessment workshop, and a peer-assessment workshop). The Master Scholars Program is a group of five, theme-based master societies consisting of faculty and students who share common interests around the society's themes. Programs developed for the societies include colloquia, faculty-led seminars, a mandatory student-mentoring program, and visiting scholars. Finally, the authors describe three high-quality literary publications created at New York University School of Medicine. Each of the initiatives undergoes regular critical examination and reflection that drive future planning. PMID:14534091

Krackov, Sharon K; Levin, Richard I; Catanesé, Veronica; Rey, Mariano; Aull, Felice; Blagev, Denitza; Dreyer, Benard; Grieco, Anthony J; Hebert, Cristy; Kalet, Adina; Lipkin, Mack; Lowenstein, Jerome; Ofri, Danielle; Stevens, David

2003-10-01

235

Inorganic analysis of herbal drugs. Part I. Metal determination in herbal drugs originating from medicinal plants of the family Lamiacae  

Microsoft Academic Search

Elemental profiles of the total analyte content of major, minor and trace el- ements (Cu, Zn, Mn, Fe, K, Ca, Mg, Al, Ba and B) in 8 herbal drugs, originating from medicinal plants of the family Lamiacae, were determined. Flame atomic ab- sorption\\/emission spectroscopy (FAAS\\/FAES), inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) and energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) were applied,

LATINKA SLAVKOVI; ALEKSANDAR POPOVI

236

Academic Medicine Meets Traditional African Healing  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Cyril Naidoo, who directs the department of family medicine at the University of KwaZulu-Natal's Nelson R. Mandela School of Medicine, conducts workshops to traditional healers on how to help patients with AIDS and HIV. In Dr. Naidoo's workshop, the group discusses how to counsel patients about HIV and AIDS, how to refer them for testing, and then…

Lindow, Megan

2008-01-01

237

The College of Human Medicine at Michigan State University: expansion and reinvention.  

PubMed

The College of Human Medicine (CHM) at Michigan State University, which graduated its first class in 1972, was one of the first community-based medical schools in the country. It was established as a state-funded medical school with specific legislative directives to educate primary care physicians who would serve the needs of the state, particularly those of underserved areas. However, the model has proved challenging to sustain with the many changes to the health care system and the economic climate of Michigan. In 2006, a two-phase expansion plan was implemented, and in 2010, CHM permanently expanded the matriculating class from 106 to 200 students with the establishment of a second four-year site for medical education in Grand Rapids. This article describes what school leaders and faculty have learned as they look back at the opportunity provided by expansion as well as the growing pains and lessons learned. The community-based model met many of the mission-related goals for CHM's graduates, who represent a diverse group of practitioners whose values resonate with the school's mission. Expansion has offered an opportunity to explore new research and clinical opportunities as well as to more fully realize the potential of community partners to meet local health care needs and reinvent a robust future for community-integrated medical education. PMID:23095925

Mavis, Brian; Sousa, Aron; Osuch, Janet; Arvidson, Cindy; Lipscomb, Wanda; Brady, Judy; Green, Wrenetta; Rappley, Marsha D

2012-12-01

238

Does medicine still show an unresolved discrimination against women? Experience in two European university hospitals.  

PubMed

Have invisible barriers for women been broken in 2007, or do we still have to break through medicine's glass ceiling? Data from two of the most prestigious university hospitals in Barcelona with 700-800 beds, Hospital Clínic (HC) and Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau (HSCSP) address this issue. In the HSCSP, 87% of the department chairs are men and 85% of the department unit chiefs are also men. With respect to women, only 5 (13%) are in the top position (department chair) and 4 (15%) are department unit chiefs. Similar statistics are also found at the HC: 87% of the department chairs and 89% of the department unit chiefs are men. Currently, only 6 women (13%) are in the top position and 6 (11%) are department unit chiefs. Analysis of the 2002 data of internal promotions in HC showed that for the first level (senior specialist) sex distribution was similar. Nevertheless, for the second level (consultant) only 25% were women, and for the top level (senior consultant) only 8% were women. These proportions have not changed in 2007 in spite of a 10% increase in leadership positions during this period. Similar proportions were found in HSCSP where 68% of the top promotions were held by men. The data obtained from these two different medical institutions in Barcelona are probably representative of other hospitals in Spain. It would be ethically desirable to have males and females in leadership positions in the medical profession. PMID:19181883

Santamaría, A; Merino, A; Viñas, O; Arrizabalaga, P

2009-02-01

239

Prostate-Specific Antigen Testing among the Elderly in Community-Based Family Medicine Practices  

PubMed Central

PURPOSE Controversy surrounds prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing for prostate cancer screening especially among elderly men aged 75+. This study examines whether patient age results in differential use of PSA testing and if organizational attributes such as communication, stress, decision making and practice history of change predict PSA testing among men 75+. METHODS Data come from chart audits of 1,149 men aged 50+ who were patients of 46 family medicine practices participating in 2 northeastern practice based research networks. Surveys administered to clinicians and staff in each practice provide practice level data. A stratified Cochran-Mantel-Haenszel (CHM) test was applied to examine whether PSA testing decreased with age. Hierarchical logistic regression analyses determined characteristics associated with PSA testing for men 75+. RESULTS Comparable rates for annual PSA testing of 77.2% for men aged 50-74 years and 74.6% for men 75+ were reported. The CMH test indicated no significant change in trend. Hierarchical models suggest that practice communication is the only organizational attribute that influences PSA testing for men 75+ (OR=5.04, p=0.022). Practices with higher communication scores (e.g., promoted constructive work relationships and a team atmosphere between staff and clinicians) screened men 75+ at lower rates than others. CONCLUSIONS Elderly men in community settings receive PSA testing at rates comparable to their younger counterparts even though major clinical practice guidelines discourage the practice for this population. Intra-office practice interventions that target PSA testing to the most appropriate populations and focus on communication (both within office and with patients) are needed.

Hudson, Shawna V.; Ohman-Strickland, Pamela; Ferrante, Jeanne M.; Lu-Yao, Grace; Orzano, A. John; Crabtree, Benjamin F.

2009-01-01

240

Comparison of a Private Family Practice and a University Teaching Practice  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

When a private family practice in Hamilton, Canada, became a teaching practice of McMaster University, a before-and-after study was conducted to compare characteristics of the patients and the impact of the change on the practice. Conclusion: Such a transplanted private practice is a realistic teaching resource in primary care. (Editor/JT)

Rudnick, K. Vincent; And Others

1976-01-01

241

Universal Child Care, Maternal Labor Supply, and Family Well-Being  

Microsoft Academic Search

We analyze the introduction of highly subsidized, universally accessible child care in Quebec, addressing the impact on child care utilization, maternal labor supply, and family well-being. We find strong evidence of a shift into new child care use, although some crowding out of existing arrangements is evident. Maternal labor supply increases significantly. Finally, the evidence suggests that children are worse

Michael Baker; Jonathan Gruber; Kevin Milligan

2008-01-01

242

Clinical practice guidelines for support of the family in the patient-centered intensive care unit: American College of Critical Care Medicine Task Force 2004???2005  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To develop clinical practice guidelines for the sup- port of the patient and family in the adult, pediatric, or neonatal patient-centered ICU. Participants: A multidisciplinary task force of experts in crit- ical care practice was convened from the membership of the American College of Critical Care Medicine (ACCM) and the Soci- ety of Critical Care Medicine (SCCM) to include

Judy E. Davidson; Karen Powers; Kamyar M. Hedayat; Mark Tieszen; Alexander A. Kon; Eric Shepard; Vicki Spuhler; I. David Todres; Mitchell Levy; Juliana Barr; Raj Ghandi; Gregory Hirsch; Deborah Armstrong

2007-01-01

243

Universality of bereavement life review for spirituality and depression in bereaved families.  

PubMed

The present study aimed to investigate the effects of the Bereavement Life Review on depression and spiritual well-being of bereaved families in a setting that does not specialize in palliative care. The participants were 20 bereaved family members who underwent the Bereavement Life Review over 2 sessions in 2 weeks. Beck Depression Inventory Second Edition scores significantly decreased from 14.4 ± 9.2 to 11.6 ± 7.4 (t = 2.15, P = .045) and Functional Assessment Chronic Illness Therapy-Spiritual scores increased from 24.3 ± 10.1 to 25.9 ± 11 (t = -1.0, P = .341) from pre- to postintervention. These results show that the Bereavement Life Review can decrease depression and improve spiritual well-being of bereaved families after the death of a family member in a setting without specialized palliative care. The results also suggest the universality of this therapy. PMID:23677768

Ando, Michiyo; Sakaguchi, Yukihiro; Shiihara, Yasufumi; Izuhara, Kumi

2014-05-01

244

Family variables as moderators between beliefs towards medicines and adherence to self-care behaviors and medication in type 2 diabetes.  

PubMed

This study analyzed whether family variables such as marital adjustment, partner support, family coping, and family stress moderated the relationship between negative beliefs about medicines and adherence to self-care behaviors (diet, glucose monitoring, exercise, foot care, and medication), in Type 2 diabetes patients. The sample was composed of 387 individuals with Type 2 diabetes, diagnosed in the past 12 months. Patients were assessed on self-care behaviors in diabetes, medication adherence, beliefs about medicines, family coping, family stress, marital adjustment, and partner support. The results showed marital adjustment, family coping, partner support, and family stress as moderators in the relationship between negative beliefs and adherence. Patients with negative beliefs regarding medicines, but who reported good marital adjustment and family coping were more likely to test their blood glucose; and if they reported low support from their partners were less likely to adhere to their prescribed diet. Finally, patients with negative beliefs about medicines, but who reported high family stress, were less likely to take their medication. The results emphasize the importance of family variables on adherence to self-care behaviors and medication. This study revealed the importance of including partners on interventions regarding Type 2 diabetes because they seem to play an important role in patient's adherence. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:24707825

Pereira, M Graça; Pedras, Susana; Machado, José Cunha

2014-06-01

245

Positions Toward Science Studies in Medicine Among University Graduates of Medicine and the Teenaged Participants of the "Medical Systems" Study Program  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The "Medical Systems" program was designed to introduce high school students to the world of advanced medicine. Its premise was to use an applied scientific discipline like medicine to encourage high-school students' interest in basic science. This study compares the teen-aged graduates of "Medical Systems" with fourth and fifth-year medical students. It aims to identify the attitudes of these two groups towards medical science and basic sciences in medicine. The population included 94 graduates of "Medical Systems" from schools throughout Israel, who had also completed an advanced-level course in a basic science (biology, chemistry or physics), and 96 medical students from different Israeli universities. The students' attitudes were measured using West et al.'s questionnaire (Med Educ 16(4):188-191, 1982), which assesses both the attitude of the participants towards basic science knowledge, and their attitude towards their learning experience in medical school. Nine participants from each group were also interviewed using a semi-structured interview protocol. The results showed essential differences in the attitudes of the two groups. The high school students consider scientific knowledge far more essential for a physician than do the medical students, who also showed a far lower estimation of the effectiveness of their science studies.

Ben-Zvi-Assaraf, Orit; Even-Israel, Chava

2011-08-01

246

Cancer Institute of New Jersey: University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey. Environmental Assessment  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to authorize the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey to proceed with the design, construction, and equipping of the proposed Clinical Treatment and Research Facility of the University of New Jersey on the New Brunswick campus. The facility will provide for the integration of new and existing clinical outpatient cancer treatment with basic and clinical research to expedite the application of new discoveries in cancer treatment. Based on the analysis in the environmental assessment, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA).

Not Available

1994-06-01

247

Familiarity of medical residents at Kerman Medical University with evidence based medicine databases  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND: Using Evidence Based Medicine (EBM) in clinical practice is an important strategy for improving and updating medical services. Therefore, EBM has recently attracted a lot of attention in many medical schools around the world. In this study we tried to evaluate the familiarity of clinical residents who are one of the main clinical decision makers in public hospitals and also the next generation of specialists with EBM and EBM databases. METHODS: This was a cross–sectional study in 2010 in which clinical residents of Kerman Medical University (KMU) participated. Residents were asked about the four main EBM databases. The data was collected by a self-administered questionnaire. RESULTS: The data showed that from the respondents only 26.6% knew about EBM and only 28.7% of the respondents were familiar with “Up to Date”, 22.3% were familiar with “Ovid EBM Reviews”, 6.4% were familiar with “Cochrane” and 5.3% were familiar with “BMJ Clinical Evidence”. The frequencies of those that actually used the databases for clinical decision making and could answer the search questions were even less. CONCLUSIONS: The results showed most of the residents lack sufficient knowledge about EBM and its databases. The reason is probably the inexistence of a systematic and comprehensive curriculum for EBM education during their residency program or undergraduate program. Thus, due to the importance of learning EBM in this group, there is a necessity to plan a comprehensive and proper education schedule for EBM and EBM database use at the beginning or further stages of residency.

Sadeghi, Masoumeh; Khanjani, Narges; Motamedi, Fatemeh; Saber, Maryam; Rad, Gholamreza Sharifi

2011-01-01

248

Scientific Production of Research Fellows at the Zagreb University School of Medicine, Croatia  

PubMed Central

Aim To evaluate scientific production among research fellows employed at the Zagreb University School of Medicine and identify factors associated with their scientific output. Method We conducted a survey among research fellows and their mentors during June 2005. The main outcome measure was publication success, defined for each fellow as publishing at least 0.5 articles per employment year in journals indexed in the Current Contents bibliographic database. Bivariate methods and binary logistic regression were used in data analysis. Results A total of 117 fellows (response rate 95%) and 83 mentors (100%) were surveyed. The highest scientific production was recorded among research fellows employed in public health departments (median 3.0 articles, interquartile range 4.0), compared with those from pre-clinical (median 0.0, interquartile range 2.0) and clinical departments (median 1.0, interquartile range 2.0) (Kruskal-Wallis, P?=?0.003). A total of 36 (29%) research fellows published at least 0.5 articles per employment year and were considered successful. Three variables were associated with fellows’ publication success: mentor’s scientific production (odds ratio [OR], 3.14; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.31-7.53), positive mentor’s assessment (OR, 3.15; 95% CI, 1.10-9.05), and fellows’ undergraduate publication in journals indexed in the Current Contents bibliographic database (OR, 4.05; 95% CI, 1.07-15.34). Conclusion Undergraduate publication could be used as one of the main criteria in selecting research fellows. One of the crucial factors in a fellow’s scientific production and career advancement is mentor’s input, which is why research fellows would benefit most from working with scientifically productive mentors.

Polasek, Ozren; Kolcic, Ivana; Buneta, Zoran; Cikes, Nada; Pecina, Marko

2006-01-01

249

Family physicians' attitude and practice of infertility management at primary care - Suez Canal University, Egypt  

PubMed Central

Introduction The very particular natures of infertility problem and infertility care make them different from other medical problems and services in developing countries. Even after the referral to specialists, the family physicians are expected to provide continuous support for these couples. This place the primary care service at the heart of all issues related to infertility. The aim of the work: to improve family physicians' attitude and practice about the approach to infertility management within primary care setting. Methods This study was conducted in the between June and December 2010. The study sample comprised 100 family physician trainees in the family medicine department and working in family practice centers or primary care units. They were asked to fill a questionnaire about their personal characteristics, attitude, and practice towards support, investigations, and treatment of infertile couples. Results Hundred family physicians were included in the study. They were previously received training in infertility management. Favorable attitude scores were detected among (68%) of physicians and primary care was considered a suitable place for infertility management among (77%) of participants. There was statistically significant difference regarding each of age groups, gender and years of experience with the physicians? attitude. There was statistically significant difference regarding gender, perceiving PHC as an appropriate place to manage infertility and attitude towards processes of infertility management with the physicians? practice. Conclusion Favorable attitude and practice were determined among the study sample. Supporting the structure of primary care and evidence-based training regarding infertility management are required to improve family physicians' attitude and practice towards infertility management.

Eldein, Hebatallah Nour

2013-01-01

250

Undergraduate Training in Companion Animal Preventive Medicine at Louisiana State University.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The veterinary curriculum at the LSU School of Veterinary Medicine has developed an undergraduate professional training program in companion animal preventive medicine--a new area of specialization--as a field of clinical practice. Curricula for years three and four are described. (Author/MLW)

Bech-Nielsen, Steen

1979-01-01

251

Child, Physician, and Parent Communication in a Family Medicine Setting - Final Report.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This project explored the process of communication between children, parents, and family physicians in routine pediatric visits in a family practice center. The long term objectives were to specify age-appropriate models for active involvement of children...

A. W. Ross J. K. Dias P. A. Wells R. H. Pantell T. J. Stewart

1982-01-01

252

Vaccination coverage of children aged 12-23 months in Gaziantep, Turkey: comparative results of two studies carried out by lot quality technique: what changed after family medicine?  

PubMed Central

Background Health care systems in many countries are changing for a variety of reasons. Monitoring of community-based services, especially vaccination coverage, is important during transition periods to ensure program effectiveness. In 2005, Turkey began a transformation from a “socialization of health services” system to a “family medicine” system. The family medicine system was implemented in the city of Gaziantep, in December, 2010. Methods Two descriptive, cross-sectional studies were conducted in Gaziantep city center; the first study was before the transition to the family medicine system and the second study was one year after the transition. The Lot Quality Technique methodology was used to determine the quality of vaccination services. The population studied was children aged 12–23 months. Data from the two studies were compared in terms of vaccination coverage and lot service quality to determine whether there were any changes in these parameters after the transition to a family service system. Results A total of 93.7% of children in Gaziantep were fully vaccinated before the transition. Vaccination rates decreased significantly to 84.0% (p <0.005) after the family medicine system was implemented. The number of unacceptable vaccine lots increased from 5 lots before the transition to 21 lots after the establishment of the family medicine system. Conclusions The number of first doses of vaccine given was higher after family medicine was implemented; however, the numbers of second, third, and booster doses, and the number of children fully vaccinated were lower than before transition. Acceptable and unacceptable lots were not the same before and after the transition. Different health care personnel were employed at the lots after family medicine was implemented. This result suggests that individual characteristics of the health care personnel working in a geographic area are as important as the socioeconomic and cultural characteristics of the community.

2014-01-01

253

Task Force Report 5. Report of the Task Force on Family Medicine's Role in Shaping the Future Health Care Delivery System  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND Recognizing that the implementation of needed changes within family medicine will be enhanced through a concurrent effort to transform the broader health care system, this Future of Family Medicine task force was charged with determining family medicine’s leadership role in shaping the future health care delivery system. METHODS After reviewing the changes taking place within family medicine and the broader health care system, this task force identified 6 priorities for fostering necessary modifications in the health care system. In addressing the leadership challenge facing the discipline, the task force presents a 3-dimensional matrix that provides a useful framework for describing the audiences that should be targeted, the strategic priorities that should be pursued, and the specific recommendations that should be addressed. Noting that leadership is part of the heritage of family medicine, the task force reviewed past successes by the discipline as important lessons that can be instructive as family physicians begin advocating for needed changes. MAJOR FINDINGS Effective leadership is an essential ingredient that will determine, to a large extent, the success of family medicine in advocating for needed change in the health care system overall and in the specialty. It is vitally important to groom leaders within family medicine and to create venues where policy makers and influence leaders can look beyond their usual constituencies and horizons to a comprehensive view of health care. A central concept being proposed is that of a relationship-centered personal medical home. This medical home serves as the focal point through which all individuals—regardless of age, gender, race, ethnicity, or socioeconomic status—receive a basket of acute, chronic, and preventive medical care services that are accessible, accountable, comprehensive, integrated, patient-centered, safe, scientifically valid, and satisfying to both patients and their physicians. CONCLUSION Family medicine has and will continue to have an important leadership role in health system change. It has been most successful when it has been able to identify a high-priority goal through consensus within the discipline, to focus and coordinate local and national resources, and to use a multipronged approach in addressing the priority. Although the Future of Family Medicine project has provided an important impetus for the identification of key priorities across the discipline, for the FFM project ultimately to be a success, implementation steps will need to be identified and prioritized. The leadership matrix presented in this report can provide a useful structuring tool to identify, understand, and coordinate change efforts more effectively. Strategic alliances with primary care groups and others also will be critical to the success of change initiatives.

Roberts, Richard G.; Snape, Pam S.; Burke, Kevin

2004-01-01

254

Investigation of current university research concerning energy conversion and conservation in small single-family dwellings  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An investigation was made of university research concerning energy conversion and conservation techniques which may be applied in small single-family residences. Information was accumulated through published papers, progress reports, telephone conversations, and personal interviews. A synopsis of each pertinent investigation is given. Finally, a discussion of the synopses is presented and recommendations are made concerning the applicability of concepts for the design and construction of NASA-Langley Research Center's proposed Technology Utilization House in Hampton, Virginia.

Grossman, G. R.; Roberts, A. S., Jr.

1975-01-01

255

Student Reactions to Health Services Rendered by the Sports Medicine Program to Intramural Participants at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper describes the activities of the Division of Sports Medicine at the University of North Carolina. The program works in the areas of (a) prevention, (b) treatment, (c) first aid, and (d) rehabilitation of athletic injuries sustained during intramural activities. The sports medicine staff consists of three full-time physicians, four…

Violette, Ronald W.

256

Validation of the Malay version of the Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support (MSPSS-M) among a group of medical students in Faculty of Medicine, University Malaya  

Microsoft Academic Search

ObjectiveThe aim of this study was to validate the Malay version of the Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support (MSPSS-M) among a group of medical students in Faculty of Medicine, University Malaya.

C. G. Ng; A. N. Amer Siddiq; S. A. Aida; N. Z. Zainal; O. H. Koh

2010-01-01

257

Health Hazard Evaluation Report Number HETA-81-226-1048, University of Georgia, College of Veterinary Medicine, Histopathology Laboratory, Athens, Georgia.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

An industrial hygiene survey was conducted by NIOSH on April 27, 1981, at the Histopathology Laboratory, University of Georgia College of Veterinary Medicine, because laboratory technicians had complained of headaches, nausea, and sinus problems which wer...

S. Salisbury

1982-01-01

258

Washington University School of Medicine researchers find that in lung cancer, smokers have 10 times more genetic damage than never-smokers  

Cancer.gov

Lung cancer patients with a history of smoking have 10 times more genetic mutations in their tumors than those with the disease who have never smoked, according to a new study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.

259

Admission Factors Predicting Family Medicine Specialty Choice: A Literature Review and Exploratory Study among Students in the Rural Medical Scholars Program  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: The Rural Medical Scholars Program (RMSP) was created to increase production of rural family physicians in Alabama. Literature review reveals reasons medical students choose careers in family medicine, and these reasons can be categorized into domains that medical schools can address through admission, curriculum, and structural…

Avery, Daniel M., Jr.; Wheat, John R.; Leeper, James D.; McKnight, Jerry T.; Ballard, Brent G.; Chen, Jia

2012-01-01

260

Improving Knowledge, Awareness, and Use of Flexible Career Policies through an Accelerator Intervention at the University of California, Davis, School of Medicine  

PubMed Central

The challenges of balancing a career and family life disproportionately affect women in academic health sciences and medicine, contributing to their slower career advancement and/or their attrition from academia. In this article, the authors first describe their experiences at the University of California, Davis, School of Medicine developing and implementing an innovative accelerator intervention designed to promote faculty work-life balance by improving knowledge, awareness, and access to comprehensive flexible career policies. They then summarize the results of two faculty surveys--one conducted before the implementation of their intervention and the second conducted one year into their three-year intervention--designed to assess faculty’s use and intention to use the flexible career policies, their awareness of available options, barriers to their use of the policies, and their career satisfaction. The authors found that the intervention significantly increased awareness of the policies and attendance at related educational activities, improved attitudes toward the policies, and decreased perceived barriers to use. These results however were most pronounced for female faculty and faculty under the age of 50. The authors next discuss areas for future research on faculty use of flexible career policies and offer recommendations for other institutions of higher education, not just those in academic medicine, interested in implementing a similar intervention. They conclude that having flexible career policies alone is not enough to stem the attrition of female faculty. Such policies must be fully integrated into an institution’s culture such that faculty are both aware of them and willing to use them.

Villablanca, Amparo C.; Beckett, Laurel; Nettiksimmons, Jasmine; Howell, Lydia P.

2013-01-01

261

Improving knowledge, awareness, and use of flexible career policies through an accelerator intervention at the University of California, Davis, School of Medicine.  

PubMed

The challenges of balancing a career and family life disproportionately affect women in academic health sciences and medicine, contributing to their slower career advancement and/or their attrition from academia. In this article, the authors first describe their experiences at the University of California, Davis, School of Medicine developing and implementing an innovative accelerator intervention designed to promote faculty work-life balance by improving knowledge, awareness, and access to comprehensive flexible career policies. They then summarize the results of two faculty surveys--one conducted before the implementation of their intervention and the second conducted one year into their three-year intervention--designed to assess faculty's use and intention to use the flexible career policies, their awareness of available options, barriers to their use of the policies, and their career satisfaction. The authors found that the intervention significantly increased awareness of the policies and attendance at related educational activities, improved attitudes toward the policies, and decreased perceived barriers to use. These results, however, were most pronounced for female faculty and faculty under the age of 50. The authors next discuss areas for future research on faculty use of flexible career policies and offer recommendations for other institutions of higher education--not just those in academic medicine--interested in implementing a similar intervention. They conclude that having flexible career policies alone is not enough to stem the attrition of female faculty. Such policies must be fully integrated into an institution's culture such that faculty are both aware of them and willing to use them. PMID:23619063

Villablanca, Amparo C; Beckett, Laurel; Nettiksimmons, Jasmine; Howell, Lydia P

2013-06-01

262

Effect of Surgical Training Course on Performance of Minor Surgical Procedures in Family Medicine Physicians' Offices: an Observational Study  

PubMed Central

Aim To examine the influence of a practical surgical course on the number of minor surgical procedures performed by family physicians. Methods We compared the number of minor surgical procedures performed by family physicians in 59 offices in the city of Osijek and surrounding rural area, Croatia, during 12 months before and after the 40-hour practical surgical course held in September 2006 by surgeons and family medicine specialists. Minor surgical procedures taught in the course included management of ingrown toenails, abscesses/comedones, and minor wounds, anesthesia application, disinfection, use and sterilization of surgical instruments, and antibiotic treatment. Results The number of minor surgical procedures performed in family medicine offices almost doubled (503 vs 906 after the course, P<0.001, Wilcoxon test). The median number of abscesses/comedones treatments per physician increased from 1 to 6 (P<0.001, Wilcoxon test), the number of managed wounds increased from 111 to 217 (P<0.001, Wilcoxon test), while the number of ingrown toenail resections increased from 120 to 186 (P?=?0.004, Wilcoxon test). Fifty percent of physicians did not treat patients surgically, irrespective of the training. We found no association between the number of performed procedures and age, length of employment, or location of the physician’s office (urban vs rural). However, we found that male physicians performed more surgical treatments both before and after the course (abscesses/comedones: P<0.001 and P?=?0.108 respectively; ingrown toenail resections: P?=?0.008 and P?=?0.008 respectively; minor wounds: P?=?0.030 and P<0.001; respectively). Conclusion Practical courses can encourage practitioners to treat the patients surgically in their offices and, thus, increase the number of services offered in primary care. Female physicians should be more encouraged to perform minor surgical procedures in their offices.

Gmajnic, Rudika; Pribic, Sanda; Lukic, Anita; Ebling, Barbara; Cupic, Nikola; Markovic, Ivana

2008-01-01

263

Rural initiatives at the James Cook University School of Medicine: a vertically integrated regional/rural/remote medical education provider.  

PubMed

Building on the success of the former North Queensland Clinical School/Royal Australian College of General Practitioners collaboration in North Queensland, the James Cook University School of Medicine continues to develop a model of close collaboration with stakeholder groups that provides medical education services to dispersed communities in northern Australia. The flagship themes of the programme (rural & remote, Indigenous and tropical health) are essential to the regional mission to improve the health care of people in northern Australia. Selection processes target regional and rural background students and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students. An innovative curriculum design reinforces interest in and relevance to regional health needs. The present paper provides an overview of the roles and early progress of the new School of Medicine, with the aim of keeping rural doctors informed about the continuing development of a successful 'national standards/local collaboration and control' model of education service delivery. PMID:11998272

Hays, R

2001-12-01

264

FAMILY MEDICINE RESIDENCY PROGRAM IN KINGDOM OF SAUDI ARABIA: RESIDENTS OPINION  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background & Objectives: Medical Education continues to improve the outpatient settings; the future of both family physician and specialty of family practice will depend entirely on the quality of care which the patients receive. The initial stage of this process is its effective residency and periodical evaluation of the program. Therefore, this study attempts to explore the resident's views about

Khalid A. Bin Abdulrahman; Ahmed Al-Dakheel

265

The new genetics and its consequences for family, kinship, medicine and medical genetics  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the past several decades there has been an explosion in our understanding of genetics. The new genetics is an integral part of contemporary biomedicine and promises great advances in alleviating disease, prolonging human life and leading us unto the medicine of the future. The aim of this paper is to explore the ways in which people make sense of

Kaja Finkler; Cécile Skrzynia; James P. Evans

2003-01-01

266

Career preferences and the work–family balance in medicine: gender differences among medical specialists  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this article career preferences of medical specialists in the Netherlands are analysed, based on a survey among the members of medical associations of five specialties. Four different career preferences were offered, each of which implied a possible variation in working hours. A questionnaire was sent to a random selected group of working specialists in general practice, internal medicine, anaesthesiology,

Phil J. M. Heiligers; Lammert Hingstman

2000-01-01

267

Establishing a minority-based community clinical oncology program: the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, New Jersey Medical School-university Hospital Cancer Center experience.  

PubMed

The Minority-Based Community Clinical Oncology Program (MB-CCOP) at University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, New Jersey Medical School-University Hospital Cancer Center was established to serve an unmet need in a medically, educationally, and socioeconomically underserved community of primarily African American and Latino patients in Newark and Essex County, New Jersey. The MB-CCOP was built on an existing infrastructure of multidisciplinary teams of cancer specialists who collaborated in patient care and an existing clinical research program, which included multilingual staff and a breast cancer navigator. This article highlights some of the unique opportunities and challenges involved in the startup of an MB-CCOP specifically relevant to an academic setting. We present a guide to the necessary infrastructure and institutional support that must be in place before considering such a program and some of the steps an institution can take to overcome barriers preventing successful enrollment of patients onto clinical trials. PMID:23814524

Wieder, Robert; Teal, Randall; Saunders, Tracie; Weiner, Bryan J

2013-03-01

268

Establishing a Minority-Based Community Clinical Oncology Program: The University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, New Jersey Medical School-University Hospital Cancer Center Experience  

PubMed Central

The Minority-Based Community Clinical Oncology Program (MB-CCOP) at University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, New Jersey Medical School–University Hospital Cancer Center was established to serve an unmet need in a medically, educationally, and socioeconomically underserved community of primarily African American and Latino patients in Newark and Essex County, New Jersey. The MB-CCOP was built on an existing infrastructure of multidisciplinary teams of cancer specialists who collaborated in patient care and an existing clinical research program, which included multilingual staff and a breast cancer navigator. This article highlights some of the unique opportunities and challenges involved in the startup of an MB-CCOP specifically relevant to an academic setting. We present a guide to the necessary infrastructure and institutional support that must be in place before considering such a program and some of the steps an institution can take to overcome barriers preventing successful enrollment of patients onto clinical trials.

Wieder, Robert; Teal, Randall; Saunders, Tracie; Weiner, Bryan J.

2013-01-01

269

Evolution of interprofessional learning: Dalhousie University's "From Family Violence to Health" module.  

PubMed

At Dalhousie University, interprofessional (IP) learning modules are used to help future health care professionals learn to work together in resolving complex problems. One module, "From Family Violence to Health," features the role of dental professionals. This paper describes the evolution of this module from the year 2000. By February 2003, 1,182 students from 15 health care professions had completed the module. Qualitative evaluation in years 1 and 2 of the program (2000 and 2001) revealed that, before participating in the IP module, many students were able to identify a role for themselves in the recognition of family violence and knew their responsibility to report incidents. However, after participating in the module, they had a greater understanding of the reporting of family violence, a more comprehensive and supportive perspective, increased recognition of how health care professionals could work together and improved awareness of the roles of other professions. In a quantitative evaluation in year 3 (2002), mean student ratings on a scale of 1 to 5 indicated that the IP module was relevant (4.2), increased their understanding of family violence (4.0), and had some impact in promoting IP learning (3.8). As health care delivery becomes more focused on care teams and system thinking, the provision of IP training is expected to increase. The Dalhousie University IP modules (available at http://www.dal.ca/~fhp/ipl/index.html) address health and social problems for which it is critical that health care and other professionals work together. Feedback from practitioners on the development of IP education is welcomed, particularly with regard to the IP module addressing family violence. PMID:14611714

Johnston, Grace M; Ryding, Helen A; Campbell, Lindsay M

2003-11-01

270

The content of family practice: a family medicine resident's 2 1/2-year experience with the E-book.  

PubMed

The purpose of this paper is to present the content of office family practice problems seen over a 2 1/2-year residency period and to afford comparison with the well-known Virginia Study. It illustrates the usefulness of the diagnostic E-Book, with which all the data were collected and preserved. Over a 2 1/2-year period, the author cared for 592 patients in the family practice office. The ratio of one physician to 592 patients compares to the Virginia Study's one physician to approximately 745 patients. A total of 1,640 problems were coded in the E-Book. In this study 55 problems/physician/month were seen, whereas in the Virginia Study approximately 177 problems/physician/month were noted. Respiratory illnesses were the most common diagnostic category in both studies. Among specific problems, obesity ranked first at Hershey, with afebrile colds second, hypertension and Beta streptococcal pharyngitis third, and smoking fourth. Obesity and smoking were ranked considerably lower in the Virginia Study, whereas "health maintenance examinations" were ranked number one. Finally, for age-sex practice profiles, the present data revealed two peak age groups for both sexes, whereas the Virginia work noted only one peak age range. PMID:903750

Shank, J C

1977-09-01

271

Occupational History-Taking in a Family Practice Academic Setting.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A university-affiliated family medicine residency program, with its emphasis on psychosocial factors of health, was used to observe the behavior of health care providers. Information obtained through chart reviews was used to develop a family practice residency curriculum in occupational medicine. (MLW)

Demers, Raymond Y.; Wall, Steve J.

1983-01-01

272

Agreement between the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey and the School of Health Related Professions Faculty, July 1, 1986-June 30, 1989.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The collective bargaining agreement between the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey and the School of Health Related Professions Faculty, an affiliate of the American Association of University Professors (AAUP), covering the period July 1, 1986 through June 30, 1989, is presented. Topics covered include the following: preamble;…

University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Newark.

273

International research-educational center of optical technologies for industry and medicine "photonics" at Saratov State University: education, research, and commercialization  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper International Research-Educational Center of Optical Technologies for Industry and Medicine "Photonics" at Saratov State University founded in 2007 in the framework of National Russian Federation Program "Innovative Universities" is presented. Some facilities in the field of optical and biomedical optics education, research, and commercialization are discussed.

Tuchin, Valery V.

2008-06-01

274

Prevalence of potential drug-drug interactions among internal medicine ward in University of Gondar Teaching Hospital, Ethiopia  

PubMed Central

Objective To determine the prevalence, clinical significance and the associated risk factors of potential drug-drug interactions (DDIs) at internal medicine ward of University of Gondar (UOG) hospital. Method A prospective cross-sectional study was conducted on patients treated in internal medicine ward of UOG hospital from April 29, 2013 to June 2, 2013. Data was collected from medical records and by interviewing the patients face to face. Descriptive analysis was conducted for back ground characteristics and logistic regression was used to determine the associated risk factors. Result In our study, we have identified a total number of 413 potential DDIs and 184 types of interacting combinations with 4.13 potential DDIs per patient. Among 413 potential DDIs most were of moderate interactions 61.2% (n=253) followed by 26% (n=107) of minor interactions and 12.8% (n=53) of major interactions. There was significant association of occurrence of potential DDIs only with taking three or more medications. Conclusion We have recorded a high rate of prevalence of potential DDI in the internal medicine ward of UOG hospital and a high number of clinically significant DDIs which the most prevalent DDI were of moderate severity. Careful selection of drugs and active pharmaceutical care is encouraged in order to avoid negative consequences of these interactions.

Bhagavathula, Akshaya Srikanth; Berhanie, Alemayehu; Tigistu, Habtamu; Abraham, Yishak; Getachew, Yosheph; Khan, Tahir Mehmood; Unakal, Chandrashekhar

2014-01-01

275

[The teaching of microbiology in the Faculty of Medicine of the University of Rome. Memories of the Institute].  

PubMed

The Author describes the various phases of the teaching of microbiology in the Faculty of Medicine of the University, of Rome, from the unity of Italy to the end of the twentieth century. A regular course of Bacteriology was started only in the academic year 1905/1906 as separate teaching from that of Hygiene and the Institute of Bacteriology was created in 1924. It was centered in Piazza del Viminale in Rome, in the same building as the Institute of Hygiene. Prof Vittorio Puntoni was the first Director of the Institute, also in its new site of the Città Universitaria which was inaugurated in 1935. In the meantime the old name of Bacteriology was changed to Microbiology and prof Puntoni remained as Director until 1943. The bombing during the war produced heavy damage to the new Institute and with the appointment of prof Aldo Cimmino as a new Director in 1946 the Institute of Microbiology began a long period of reconstruction and development. An astonishing improvement was achieved in the availability of human and technical resources, many groups of research workers were created and several pupils became professor of Microbiology in different Italian Universities. In 1981 prof Cimmino definitely retired, leaving, the teaching of Microbiology in the Faculty of Medicine of the University of Rome "La Sapienza" to five of his pupils. One of them, prof Garaci, a few years later passed to the new University of Rome "Tor Vergata", becoming also Rector. The other four professor (Orsi, Filadoro, Pezzi, del Piano) continued their teaching in the successive years, with the collaboration of several associate professors, whose status was created by the law 382 in 1980. A later law on the short degree course required also the official participation of many researchers to the new teaching. Finally in 2001 the official activity of the Institute of Microbiology ceased and was incorporated in the Department of Public Health Sciences. PMID:18478679

Orsi, N

2008-01-01

276

Education research at the Faculty of Medicine, University of Maastricht: fostering the interrelationship between professional and education practice.  

PubMed

An academic department of education serving the entire university and a strategic choice by the Faculty of Medicine to support educational innovation through education research are the historical cornerstones of the education research program of the University of Maastricht. Over the years, the department's initial exclusive research focus on the evaluation of problem-based learning has widened to include theory-based applied research covering the broad domain of education. The program focuses on themes: the learning of students and teachers, characteristics of powerful learning environments, and assessment and evaluation of learning and teaching. Although modest in terms of resources, the program is firmly anchored within the Faculty's organizational structure. Educational relevance and professional alignment are the most prominent determinants of the success of the program. These features sustain the institutional mission of educational excellence as well as the high ranking of the Faculty of Medicine's medical training program among the training programs of the Netherlands' medical schools. A break in this self-perpetuating mechanism--due either to internal politics or to staffing problems--forms the main risk factor for the continuation of the department. PMID:15383361

van der Vleuten, Cees P M; Dolmans, Diana H J M; de Grave, Willem S; van Luijk, Scheltus J; Muijtjens, Arno M M; Scherpbier, Albert J J A; Schuwirth, Lambert W T; Wolfhagen, Ineke H A P

2004-10-01

277

Monitoring of adverse drug reactions associated with antihypertensive medicines at a university teaching hospital in New Delhi  

PubMed Central

Aim To monitor the adverse drug reactions (ADRs) caused by antihypertensive medicines prescribed in a university teaching hospital. Methods The present work was an open, non-comparative, observational study conducted on hypertensive patients attending the Medicine OPD of Majeedia Hospital, Jamia Hamdard, New Delhi, India by conducting patient interviews and recording the data on ADR monitoring form as recommended by Central Drugs Standard Control Organization (CDSCO), Government of India. Results A total of 21 adverse drug reactions were observed in 192 hypertensive patients. Incidence of adverse drug reactions was found to be higher in patients more than 40?years in age, and females experienced more ADRs (n = 14, 7.29%) than males, 7 (3.64%). Combination therapy was associated with more number of adverse drug reactions (66.7%) as against monotherapy (33.3%). Calcium channel blockers were found to be the most frequently associated drugs with adverse drug reactions (n = 7), followed by diuretics (n = 5), and ?-blockers (n = 4). Among individual drugs, amlodipine was found to be the commonest drug associated with adverse drug reactions (n = 7), followed by torasemide (n = 3). Adverse drug reactions associated with central nervous system were found to be the most frequent (42.8%) followed by musculo-skeletal complaints (23.8%) and gastro-intestinal disorders (14.3%). Conclusions The present pharmacovigilance study represents the adverse drug reaction profile of the antihypertensive medicines prescribed in our university teaching hospital. The above findings would be useful for physicians in rational prescribing. Calcium channel blockers were found to be the most frequently associated drugs with adverse drug reactions.

2012-01-01

278

Reduction in the perinatal HIV transmission: the experience at the Maternal Infant Studies Center and Gamma Projects at the University of Puerto Rico School of Medicine.  

PubMed

The AIDS pandemic had a significant impact in Puerto Rico, especially among the heterosexual populations, in particular women. Women are one of the fastest growing risk groups with HIV/AIDS in the USA and constitute about half of the AIDS cases in the world. During the past 10 years Puerto Rico has ranked among the top 5 jurisdictions in the United States in AIDS cases rates, among men, women and children. In 1987 a universal prenatal HIV screening program was implemented in the University Hospital catchment area consisting of approximately 5,000 deliveries per year. Because of the early identification of pregnant women living with HIV, access to lifesaving clinical research and the implementation of multiple strategies and comprehensive care, the perinatal HIV transmission has been reduced to zero since 1997, with a blip of one case in 2002, and none since then. The availability and access to clinical and behavioral research has been one of the key elements for this success story. The programs involved and responsible for this spectacular outcome, namely the Maternal Infant Studies Center (CEMI-Spanish Acronym) and Gamma Projects at the University of Puerto Rico School of Medicine are described. The cost savings impact of stopping mother-infant perinatal HIV-1 transmission has been calculated to be approximately $34 to $58 million dollars in 10 years. The impact of the effectiveness of these programs in having healthy uninfected infants, prolonging and improving the quality of life of those living with HIV, and providing hope to families affected by this epidemic is incalculable. PMID:18246960

Zorrilla, Carmen D; Tamayo Agrait, Vivian; Febo, Irma; Santiago, Lydia E; Díaz, Clemente; Salabarría, Iraida; Pérez, Eileen; Hillyer, George V

2007-12-01

279

A National Survey on the Current Status of Family Practice Residency Education in Geriatric Medicine.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A survey of family practice residency directors found that 92 percent have a required geriatrics curriculum; nursing homes, assisted living facilities, and home care are the predominant training sites; the mean number of geriatrics faculty is 2.6 per program; and conflicting time demands with other curricula was ranked as the most significant…

Li, Ina; Arenson, Christine; Warshaw, Gregg; Bragg, Elizabeth; Shaull, Ruth; Counsell, Steven R.

2003-01-01

280

Acetylcholinesterase inhibitory, antioxidant and phytochemical properties of selected medicinal plants of the Lamiaceae family.  

PubMed

The present study aimed to evaluate acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitory and antioxidant activities of Lamiaceae medicinal plants growing wild in Croatia. Using Ellman's colorimetric assay all tested ethanolic extracts and their hydroxycinnamic acid constituents demonstrated in vitro AChE inhibitory properties in a dose dependent manner. The extracts of Mentha x piperita, M. longifolia, Salvia officinalis, Satureja montana, Teucrium arduini, T. chamaedrys, T. montanum, T. polium and Thymus vulgaris at 1 mg/mL showed strong inhibitory activity against AChE. The antioxidant potential of the investigated Lamiaceae species was assessed by DPPH• scavenging activity and total antioxidant capacity assays, in comparison with hydroxycinnamic acids and trolox. The extracts differed greatly in their total hydroxycinnamic derivatives content, determined spectrophotometrically. Rosmarinic acid was found to be the predominant constituent in most of the investigated medicinal plants (by RP-HPLC) and had a substantial influence on their AChE inhibitory and antioxidant properties, with the exception of Teucrium species. These findings indicate that Lamiaceae species are a rich source of various natural AChE inhibitors and antioxidants that could be useful in the prevention and treatment of Alzheimer's and other related diseases. PMID:24413832

Vladimir-Kneževi?, Sanda; Blažekovi?, Biljana; Kindl, Marija; Vladi?, Jelena; Lower-Nedza, Agnieszka D; Brantner, Adelheid H

2014-01-01

281

Otolaryngology Training for Family Practice Residents.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The faculty of the Department of Otolaryngology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, has designed a rotation in the otolaryngology service, that is a basic clinical orientation to ear, nose and throat medicine, to fit the one-month block committed by the local family practice residency training program. The program is described and its…

And Others; Rood, Stewart R.

1980-01-01

282

[Evolutionary medicine].  

PubMed

Evolutionary medicine allows new insights into long standing medical problems. Are we "really stoneagers on the fast lane"? This insight might have enormous consequences and will allow new answers that could never been provided by traditional anthropology. Only now this is made possible using data from molecular medicine and systems biology. Thereby evolutionary medicine takes a leap from a merely theoretical discipline to practical fields - reproductive, nutritional and preventive medicine, as well as microbiology, immunology and psychiatry. Evolutionary medicine is not another "just so story" but a serious candidate for the medical curriculum providing a universal understanding of health and disease based on our biological origin. PMID:24343183

Wjst, M

2013-12-01

283

Genetic diversity study of some medicinal plant accessions belong to Apiaceae family based on seed storage proteins patterns.  

PubMed

Cumin (Cuminum cyminum L.), Fennel (Foeniculum vulgare L.) and Longleaf (Falcaria vulgaris Bernh) that all belong to Apiaceae family as medicinal plants are very important in many countries. Study of genetic diversity for medicinal plant is important for researches in future. One of the methods to evaluate plant genetic diversity and classification of them is the electrophoresis of seed storage proteins. This research was conducted in order to evaluate seed protein variability in different Iranian Cumin, Fennel and Longleaf accessions and grouping them based on these proteins as a biochemical marker. For this purpose, the samples were first powdered in liquid nitrogen and seed protein was extracted with extraction buffer. Then total soluble proteins were resolved on 12.5 % sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis gels. The electrophoretic protein pattern showed 38 bands that were low polymorphism among the accessions. The result of cluster analysis showed that the accessions were classified in three groups (all 29 Cumin accessions in the first group, three Fennel ecotypes in second group and three Longleaf accessions in the last one). PMID:23086265

Masoumi, Sayed Mohammad; Kahrizi, Danial; Rostami-Ahmadvandi, Hossein; Soorni, Jahad; Kiani, Sara; Mostafaie, Ali; Yari, Kheirollah

2012-12-01

284

VARIABLE SELECTION FOR QUALITATIVE INTERACTIONS IN PERSONALIZED MEDICINE WHILE CONTROLLING THE FAMILY-WISE ERROR RATE  

PubMed Central

For many years, subset analysis has been a popular topic for the biostatistics and clinical trials literature. In more recent years, the discussion has focused on finding subsets of genomes which play a role in the effect of treatment, often referred to as stratified or personalized medicine. Though highly sought after, methods for detecting subsets with altering treatment effects are limited and lacking in power. In this article we discuss variable selection for qualitative interactions with the aim to discover these critical patient subsets. We propose a new technique designed specifically to find these interaction variables among a large set of variables while still controlling for the number of false discoveries. We compare this new method against standard qualitative interaction tests using simulations and give an example of its use on data from a randomized controlled trial for the treatment of depression.

Gunter, Lacey; Zhu, Ji; Murphy, Susan

2012-01-01

285

[Primary health care and family medicine--possibilities for treatment of opiate addicts].  

PubMed

The global trend of promoting management and treatment of drug addicts in family physician offices is the result of the success of opioid agonist therapy. Studies have shown favorable results by shifting treatment into the hands of family physician. This process contributes to general health care of drug addicts and their health by linking different areas of health care, thereby providing comprehensive protection. Shifting treatment of addiction to family physician offices contributes to the elimination of treatment isolation and stigmatization, while further benefits are lower barriers to employment, increase in patient privacy and opportunity to provide health care. The aim of this study was to provide a concise overview of the knowledge from new clinical research over the past ten years on heroin addiction treatment in primary care. New research dealing with the approach to treating addicts indicates a direct link between receiving primary health care with a reduced likelihood of using heroin; furthermore, the main concerns of drug addicts for treatment are availability of more therapeutic programs, better functioning of existing programs, and improved staff relations towards them; final results and outcomes achieved by office and hospital treatment of drug addicts are similar and confirm the positive linear relationship between treatment duration and outcome. Studies comparing therapies show a positive effect of the adaptive methadone treatment maintenance model on the psychosocial factors; equal efficiency of treatment regardless of initiation with buprenorphine or with methadone; and equal effectiveness of levo-alpha-acetylmethadol treatment compared with methadone and diacetylmorphine as a good alternative for addiction therapy with previously unsatisfactory results. New studies on buprenorphine show equal effectiveness and cost of detoxification whether guided by a family physician or at the hospital; non-supervised therapy does not significantly influence the outcome, but is significantly cheaper; long-term therapy with buprenorphine in the doctor's office shows mild retention. PMID:23814972

Tiljak, Hrvoje; Nerali?, Ivana; Cerovecki, Venija; Kastelic, Andrej; Adzi?, Zlata Ozvaci?; Tiljak, Anja

2012-10-01

286

Suicidal Ideation in a Population-Based Sample of Adolescents: Implications for Family Medicine Practice  

PubMed Central

Introduction. This study investigated the relationship between suicidal ideation and demographic characteristics, health conditions, depression, and health care utilization patterns among adolescents. Methods. Secondary analysis of the regionally representative Canadian Community Health Survey conducted in 2000/2001 (response rate 85%). Adolescents aged 15 to 19 who reported suicidal ideation in the previous year (n = 260) were compared with their peers who did not (n = 5528). The association between suicidal ideation and socio-demographic and health characteristics were investigated. Findings. Almost three-quarters (73%) of suicidal adolescents had not spoken with any health professional about mental health issues in the preceding year. Despite the fact that 80% of suicidal adolescents had regular contact with their family doctor, only 5% had consulted with them about mental health issues. In addition to the well-known risk factors of depression and stress, suicidal ideation was highly elevated in adolescents with two or more chronic health conditions, self-reported poor health, migraines, and back pain and those whose activities were prevented by pain (P < .05). Other characteristics significantly correlated with suicidal ideation included smoking, living in single parent families, and having lower levels of social support. Conclusions. Family physicians should regularly screen for suicidal thoughts in their adolescent patients with these characteristics.

Hamelin, Gail P.; Granger, Stephen J. R.

2013-01-01

287

A methodology to assess experiences in implementing e-Health solutions in Croatian family medicine.  

PubMed

The central information system of primary health care of the Republic of Croatia is in an early stage of implementation which for now covers integration of all family doctors' offices into a single comprehensive eHealth network connecting their software solutions with the national payer institute and public health authority. Measuring the quality and efficiency of information systems at an early stage of development is a very difficult task. The main goal of this work is establishing the foundation for a formal methodology to measure and quantify the experience of family doctors in the current use of this system. A questionnaire has been created to support the work which, on one side carefully follows our assumptions for quality criteria, and on the other collects valuable input from the users of the technology and solutions implemented. Our work is closely aligned with worldwide accepted standards and recommendations carefully analyzed and localized to reflect the current environment and health policy. This paper presents some preliminary results based on the survey conducted with family doctors on the field. PMID:21685598

Kralj, Damir; Kon?ar, Miroslav; Tonkovi?, Stanko

2011-01-01

288

Integrative Laser Medicine and High-Tech Acupuncture at the Medical University of Graz, Austria, Europe  

PubMed Central

At the moment, modernization of acupuncture has a high priority. On the traditional side, acupuncture has only recently been awarded the status of Intangible Cultural Heritage by the UNESCO. On the innovative side, high-tech acupuncture is a registered trademark in Austria. Acupuncture has been used for medical treatment for thousands of years. A large number of empirical data are available but the technical quantification of effects was not possible up to now. Using electroacupuncture, needle, or laser stimulation and modern biomedical techniques, it was possible for the first time to quantify changes in biological activities caused by acupuncture. This paper which serves as introduction for the special issue “High-Tech Acupuncture and Integrative Laser Medicine” of the present journal, focuses on the latest innovative aspects that underline the further enhancement and development of acupuncture. Special emphasis is given to new methodological and technical investigations, for example, results obtained from all kinds of acupuncture innovations (e.g., teleacupuncture) and integrative laser medicine.

Litscher, Gerhard

2012-01-01

289

"No struggle, no fight, no court battle": the 1948 desegregation of the University of Arkansas School of Medicine.  

PubMed

In 1948, over 30 percent of the approved medical schools in the United States excluded black students. However, on September 10, 1948, the University of Arkansas School of Medicine became the first Southern medical school to desegregate when Edith Mae Irby matriculated. Her admission occurred without incident. There were no jeering white mobs, no court action, and no federal troops. Irby's admission had its roots in a successful legal campaign launched by the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People to eradicate racial inequalities in professional and graduate education. A confluence of factors led the University of Arkansas to desegregate. These included the state's lack of the financial resources necessary to comply with U.S. Supreme Court decisions, a climate of racial moderation in Arkansas, shrewd political maneuvering by officials at the University of Arkansas, and Irby's academic accomplishments. Irby's historic admission is frequently overlooked as a historical milestone. Its invisibility is due in part to its sharp contrast to the dominant narratives of school desegregation in the South. Yet, the story of Irby's entrance into medical school is critical for a more complete understanding of the history of medical education and the civil rights movement. PMID:22416058

Gamble, Vanessa Northington

2013-07-01

290

The effect of polyphenolic-polysaccharide conjugates from selected medicinal plants of Asteraceae family on the peroxynitrite-induced changes in blood platelet proteins  

Microsoft Academic Search

Lots of plants belonging to Asteraceae family are very popular in folk medicine in Poland. These plants are also known as being rich in acidic polysaccharides, due to the presence of hexuronic acids or its derivatives. Our preliminary experiments have shown that the extract from Conyza canadensis L. possesses various biological activity, including antiplatelet, antiocoagulant and antioxidant properties. The aim

Joanna Saluk-Juszczak; Izabela Pawlaczyk; Beata Olas; Joanna Ko?odziejczyk; Michal Ponczek; Pawel Nowak; Marta Tsirigotis-Wo?oszczak; Barbara Wachowicz; Roman Gancarz

2010-01-01

291

Desafíos en la enseñanza de la medicina familiar en el pregrado: el caso de México Challenges in Teaching of Undergraduate Family Medicine: The Case of Mexico  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Academic Internship Program for medical students must be revised and modified regularly to be updated with the health problems of Mexico, and we should implement new teaching models that allow for fortification of medical education. There are important challenges inherent in the teaching of undergraduate Family Medicine, such as time devoted to teaching in a global world with an

Trejo-Mejía J; Estrada-Salgado D; Peña-Balderas J; Garnica-García J

292

Performance control of medical devices in the Cerrahpa?a Faculty of Medicine in Istanbul University  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this study, a project was developed for performance control of the medical devices in the Cerrahpasa Health Faculty in Istanbul University. The calibration measurements of these medical devices were performed and the measurement results were interpreted in according to the IPM “Inspection and Preventive Maintenance System” procedures which are developed by ECRI (Emergency Care Research Institute). By using these

M. Sezdi

2010-01-01

293

Role of Research Universities in Health and Medicine. Go8 Backgrounder 20  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Universities have much to contribute to the improvement of health delivery, research, and teaching/learning. In progressing health reform, the Government should be mindful of the need to: (1) strengthen high quality medical research; (2) promote translation of research to teaching, population health and health services; and (3) address Health…

Group of Eight (NJ1), 2010

2010-01-01

294

[Epidemiological investigation in five dental offices of the Clinic of Dentistry, Faculty of Medicine, Palacký University, Olomouc and of the Olomouc University Hospital].  

PubMed

The aim of this epidemiological investigation was to determine microbial contamination of surfaces, medical devices, and equipment in five outpatient dental offices of the Clinic of Dentistry, Faculty of Medicine, Palacký University, Olomouc and of the Olomouc University Hospital. The epidemiological investigation was carried out as a one-time detection of microbial contamination from selected at risk sites on the dental unit with chair and in its immediate surroundings that had been sampled before the staff and patients arrived in the morning. The rates of culture-negative results ranged from 6.0 % in the children's dental office to 17.3 % in the dental prosthetics office. No statistically significant difference in these rates was found between different types of dental offices. The most commonly identified microorganisms were coagulase-negative staphylococci and Bacillus sp. Pseudomonas aeruginosa often reported to be the cause of hospital infection was isolated from the spit-toon drain in most of the cases. No methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus was cultured from the swabs. We believe that the microorganisms isolated from the at risk sites are indoor airborne pathogens initially present in aerosols and then deposited on surfaces during the time after working hours. Keywords: dental office - bioaersol - contamination of surfaces - infectious agent. PMID:24730995

Sedlatá Jurásková, E; Matoušková, I

2014-02-01

295

Reflections on the impact of Title VII funding at the University of New England College of Osteopathic Medicine.  

PubMed

Title VII funding played an important role in the development of the University of New England College of Osteopathic Medicine (UNECOM). These funds enabled the 90% tuition-funded school to implement a primary-care-based curriculum in its formative years and played a crucial role in the 1995-2005 period of curriculum revision. UNECOM successfully competed for Title VII program funding in Physician Faculty Development in Primary Care, Academic Units in Primary Care, Predoctoral Training in Primary Care, and Residency Training in Primary Care. This funding helped the institution refine its vision and mission as a result of the federal imperatives surrounding primary health care. Securing these funds enabled the institution to jump-start programs with start-up federal funding, expand faculty, access educational innovation by networking with other grantees across the nation, and expand faculty grant-making knowledge and skills via federal technical assistance and grant review processes. Subsequent institutionalization of the resulting innovations may have played a role in UNECOM maintaining its production of primary care physicians, as evidenced by 71% of its 1996-2002 graduates practicing in primary care specialties. The impact of Title VII funding at UNECOM provides an example of how new and existing medical schools whose missions align with federal priorities can use these programs to develop curriculum and resources congruent with their missions.This article is part of a theme issue of Academic Medicine on the Title VII health professions training programs. PMID:18971658

Shannon, Stephen C

2008-11-01

296

Preventive medicine: self-assessment of knowledge, skills and attitudes of medical students at the Medical University of Vienna.  

PubMed

Prevention and health promotion are gaining importance in modern medical curricula. Aim of this study was to evaluate the self-assessment of knowledge, skills and attitudes of medical students towards health promotion and prevention. In 2012, at the Medical University of Vienna, 27% of the 633 fourth-year medical students (50.3% male and 49.7% female; mean age: 24 years) completed a questionnaire. Results show a high assessment of prevention in most respondents. Knowledge gaps were detected on occupational health and mother-child pass examinations. However, almost all students reported sufficient knowledge on screening and risk assessment of developing cardiovascular diseases. Almost all respondents estimated to be able to identify risky behaviours. Overall, estimation towards prevention of tomorrow's physicians is very positive. However, only 40% believed to have been adequately trained on preventive medicine so far. Relevant preventive aspects were added to the medical curriculum in 2012-2013 with the new block 'Public Health'. PMID:24468828

Borsoi, Livia; Rieder, Anita; Stein, Katharina Viktoria; Hofhansl, Angelika; Dorner, Thomas Ernst

2014-04-01

297

Suggestions for a Web based universal exchange and inference language for medicine.  

PubMed

Mining biomedical and pharmaceutical data generates huge numbers of interacting probabilistic statements for inference, which can be supported by mining Web text sources. This latter can also be probabilistic, in a sense described in this report. However, the diversity of tools for probabilistic inference is troublesome, suggesting a need for a unifying best practice. Physicists often claim that quantum mechanics is the universal best practice for probabilistic reasoning. We discuss how the Dirac notation and algebra suggest the form and algebraic and semantic meaning of XML-like Web tags for a clinical and biomedical universal exchange language formulated to make sense directly to the eye of the physician and biomedical researcher. PMID:24211018

Robson, Barry; Caruso, Thomas P; Balis, Ulysses G J

2013-12-01

298

Origin and evolution of the Department of Neurosurgery, Neurological Institute, Faculty of Medicine, Kyushu University.  

PubMed

The Department of Neurosurgery at Kyushu University had its origins within the First Department of Surgery and was established as a subspecialty at the Neurological Institute more than 30 years ago under the leadership of Katsutoshi Kitamura. Further development of the neurosurgical department has proceeded during the chairmanship of Masashi Fukui. These leaders and many other dedicated physicians and surgeons, nurses, investigators from other countries, and staff members have contributed to the creation of a research-oriented neurosurgical environment that interacts fruitfully with the other components of the Neurological Institute. This article describes the development of neurosurgery within Kyushu, which has been a highly cosmopolitan area throughout its long history. More specifically, this account outlines the origin and growth of the Department of Neurosurgery at Kyushu University. PMID:10690737

Ikezaki, K; Fukui, M

2000-02-01

299

Positions toward Science Studies in Medicine among University Graduates of Medicine and the Teenaged Participants of the "Medical Systems" Study Program  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The "Medical Systems" program was designed to introduce high school students to the world of advanced medicine. Its premise was to use an applied scientific discipline like medicine to encourage high-school students' interest in basic science. This study compares the teen-aged graduates of "Medical Systems" with fourth and fifth-year medical…

Ben-Zvi-Assaraf, Orit; Even-Israel, Chava

2011-01-01

300

A family-universal anomalous U(1) in string models as the origin of supersymmetry breaking and squark degeneracy  

SciTech Connect

Recently a promising mechanism for supersymmetry breaking that utilizes both an anomalous U(1) gauge symmetry and an effective mass term m {approx} 1TeV of certain relevant fields has been proposed. In this paper we examine whether such a mechanism can emerge in superstring derived free fermionic models. We observe that certain three generation string solutions, though not all, lead to an anomalous U(1) which couples universally to all three families. The advantages of this three-family universality of U(1){sub A}, compared to the two-family case, proposed in earlier works, in yielding squark degeneracy, while avoiding radiative breaking of color and charge, are noted. The root cause of the flavor universality of U(1){sub A} is the cyclic permutation symmetry that characterizes the Z{sub 2} x Z{sub 2} orbifold compactification with standard embedding, realized in the free fermionic models by the NAHE set. It is shown that nonrenormalizable terms which contain hidden-sector condensates, generate the required suppression of the relevant mass term m, compared to the Planck scale. While the D-term of the family universal U(1){sub A} leads to squark degeneracy, those of the family dependent U(1)`s, remarkably enough, are found to vanish for the solutions considered, owing to minimization of the potential.

Faraggi, A.E. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States). Dept. of Physics; Pati, J.C. [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States). Dept. of Physics

1997-12-01

301

Web based distance learning at Faculty of Medicine of Sarajevo University.  

PubMed

The time in which we live is defined by the significant influence of the information technologies on our lives, changes and development of society and the efficacy of all the organization systems. Increase and development of distance learning (DL) technologies over the past decade has exposed the potential and the efficiency of new technologies. Number of events has organized by teaching staff from Cathedrae for Medical Informatics in order to promote distance learning and web based education are very extensive: professional-scientific events, workshops and congresses, first tele-exam at the Medical Faculty, Introducing of Distance learning in curriculum at biomedical faculties, etc. At the University in Sarajevo in year 2003 was opened the e-learning center for the support to the faculties the distance studies by use of the information technology. At Medical Faculty of University of Sarajevo at Cathedrae for Medical Informatics since 2002 is in progress realization of the project named: "Possibilities of introducing distance learning in medical curriculum", approved by the Federal and the Cantonal ministry of science and education. Pilot project was realized during three past school years, theoretical and practical education of subject Medical informatics are adapted to the new concepts of education using world trends of education from the distance. One group of students was included in the project finalized by electronic exam registration and electronic exam on 20 June 2005, publicly, in the Physiology amphitheatre of the Medical Faculty in Sarajevo. PMID:16879119

Masi?, Izet; Novo, Ahmed; Kudumovi?, Mensura; Rama, Admir; Dzananovi?, Almir; Guso, Emir; Basi?, Mirza

2006-05-01

302

Evaluation of the quality of antenatal care using electronic health record information in family medicine clinics of Mexico City  

PubMed Central

Background Evaluation of the quality of antenatal care (ANC) using indicators should be part of the efforts to improve primary care services in developing countries. The growing use of the electronic health record (EHR) has the potential of making the evaluation more efficient. The objectives of this study were: (a) to develop quality indicators for ANC and (b) to evaluate the quality of ANC using EHR information in family medicine clinics (FMCs) of Mexico City. Methods We used a mixed methods approach including: (a) in-depth interviews with health professionals; (b) development of indicators following the RAND-UCLA method; (c) a retrospective cohort study of quality of care provided to 5342 women aged 12–49 years who had completed their pregnancy in 2009 and attended to at least one ANC visit with their family doctor. The study took place in four FMCs located in Mexico City. The source of information was the EHR. SAS statistical package served for programing and performing the descriptive statistical analysis. Results 14 ANC quality indicators were developed. The evaluation showed that 40.6% of women began ANC in the first trimester; 63.5% with low-risk pregnancy attended four or more ANC visits; 4.4% were referred for routine obstetric ultrasound, and 41.1% with vaginal infection were prescribed metronidazole. On average, the percentage of recommended care that women received was 32.7%. Conclusions It is feasible to develop quality indicators suitable for evaluating the quality of ANC using routine EHR data. The study identified the ANC areas that require improvement; which can guide future strategies aimed at improving ANC quality.

2014-01-01

303

Developing an academic medical library core journal collection in the (almost) post-print era: the Florida State University College of Medicine Medical Library experience  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Florida State University (FSU) College of Medicine Medical Library is the first academic medical library to be established since the Web's dramatic appearance during the 1990s. A large customer base for electronic medical information resources is both comfortable with and eager to migrate to the electronic format completely, and vendors are designing radical pricing models that make print journal

Barbara Shearer; Suzanne P. Nagy

2003-01-01

304

Integrating an internet-mediated walking program into family medicine clinical practice: a pilot feasibility study  

PubMed Central

Background Regular participation in physical activity can prevent many chronic health conditions. Computerized self-management programs are effective clinical tools to support patient participation in physical activity. This pilot study sought to develop and evaluate an online interface for primary care providers to refer patients to an Internet-mediated walking program called Stepping Up to Health (SUH) and to monitor participant progress in the program. Methods In Phase I of the study, we recruited six pairs of physicians and medical assistants from two family practice clinics to assist with the design of a clinical interface. During Phase II, providers used the developed interface to refer patients to a six-week pilot intervention. Provider perspectives were assessed regarding the feasibility of integrating the program into routine care. Assessment tools included quantitative and qualitative data gathered from semi-structured interviews, surveys, and online usage logs. Results In Phase I, 13 providers used SUH and participated in two interviews. Providers emphasized the need for alerts flagging patients who were not doing well and the ability to review participant progress. Additionally, providers asked for summary views of data across all enrolled clinic patients as well as advertising materials for intervention recruitment. In response to this input, an interface was developed containing three pages: 1) a recruitment page, 2) a summary page, and 3) a detailed patient page. In Phase II, providers used the interface to refer 139 patients to SUH and 37 (27%) enrolled in the intervention. Providers rarely used the interface to monitor enrolled patients. Barriers to regular use of the intervention included lack of integration with the medical record system, competing priorities, patient disinterest, and physician unease with exercise referrals. Intention-to-treat analyses showed that patients increased walking by an average of 1493 steps/day from pre- to post-intervention (t = (36) = 4.13, p < 0.01). Conclusions Providers successfully referred patients using the SUH provider interface, but were less willing to monitor patient compliance in the program. Patients who completed the program significantly increased their step counts. Future research is needed to test the effectiveness of integrating SUH with clinical information systems over a longer evaluation period.

2011-01-01

305

Department of surgery/college of medicine university of South alabama: historical and contemporaneous perspectives.  

PubMed

Many members of the medical profession in Mobile, Alabama, have exemplified a strong commitment to the education of their colleagues and successors, a tradition (L., traditio, "to hand over") that dates from the early 18th century. The Mobile General (city/county) Hospital (1830 to 1970) and its successor, the Medical Center, University of South Alabama (1971 to the present), were the institutional foci of those endeavors. Because it is individuals who create, design, and vitalize institutions, this monograph is an acknowledgment of the accomplishments of those who gave that endeavor purpose, direction, and meaning, particularly with reference to the evolution of surgical education. Numerous clinical and societal forces-cultural, economic, political, and social-influenced that evolution. This compilation gives attribution to a legacy of commitment to health and medical/surgical care, education, and research within southern Alabama. PMID:24887719

Richards, William O; Luterman, Arnold; Simmons, Jon D; Rodning, Charles B

2014-05-01

306

"PULS." - a Blog-based Online-Magazine for Students of Medicine of the Goethe University Frankfurt  

PubMed Central

In the context of nationwide protests 2009 also students of the faculty of medicine/dentistry at Goethe-University in Frankfurt demanded more transparency and communication. To satisfy these demands, a web 2.0-tool offered an innovative solution: A blog-based online-magazine for students and other faculty-members. The online-magazine „PULS.“ is realized with the share-ware blog-software (wordpress version 3.1.3) and is conceived and written by an online-journalist. „PULS.“ is available from https://newsmagazin.puls.med.uni-frankfurt.de/wp/. The articles are generated from own investigations and from ideas of different groups of the faculty– deanship, students and lecturers. A user-analysis is conducted with the open-source software Piwik and considers the data security. Additionally, every year an anonymous online-user-survey (Survey Monkey) is conducted. “PULS.” is continuously online since 14.02.2010 and has published 806 articles (state: 27.11.2012) and has about 2400 readers monthly. The content focuses on the needs of Frankfurt medical students. The close cooperation with different groups of the faculty - deanship, students and lecturers - furthermore guarantees themes relevant to the academic faculty. “PULS.” flanks complex projects and decisions with background-information and communicates them understandable. The user-evaluation shows a growing number of readers and a high acceptance for the online-magazine, its themes and its style. The web 2.0-tool “Blog” and the web-specific language comply with media habits of the main target group, the students of the faculty medicine/dentistry. Thus, “PULS.” has proven as a suitable and strategic instrument. It pushes towards a higher transparency, more communication and a stronger identification of the students with their faculty.

Wurche, Bettina; Klauer, Gertrud; Nurnberger, Frank

2013-01-01

307

Allocating limited resources in a time of fiscal constraints: a priority setting case study from Dalhousie University Faculty of Medicine.  

PubMed

Facing a projected $1.4M deficit on a $35M operating budget for fiscal year 2011/2012, members of the Dalhousie University Faculty of Medicine developed and implemented an explicit, transparent, criteria-based priority setting process for resource reallocation. A task group that included representatives from across the Faculty of Medicine used a program budgeting and marginal analysis (PBMA) framework, which provided an alternative to the typical public-sector approaches to addressing a budget deficit of across-the-board spending cuts and political negotiation. Key steps to the PBMA process included training staff members and department heads on priority setting and resource reallocation, establishing process guidelines to meet immediate and longer-term fiscal needs, developing a reporting structure and forming key working groups, creating assessment criteria to guide resource reallocation decisions, assessing disinvestment proposals from all departments, and providing proposal implementation recommendations to the dean. All departments were required to submit proposals for consideration. The task group approved 27 service reduction proposals and 28 efficiency gains proposals, totaling approximately $2.7M in savings across two years. During this process, the task group faced a number of challenges, including a tight timeline for development and implementation (January to April 2011), a culture that historically supported decentralized planning, at times competing interests (e.g., research versus teaching objectives), and reductions in overall health care and postsecondary education government funding. Overall, faculty and staff preferred the PBMA approach to previous practices. Other institutions should use this example to set priorities in times of fiscal constraints. PMID:23702521

Mitton, Craig; Levy, Adrian; Gorsky, Diane; MacNeil, Christina; Dionne, Francois; Marrie, Tom

2013-07-01

308

Career support in medicine - experiences with a mentoring program for junior physicians at a university hospital  

PubMed Central

Purpose: Until now, mentoring has hardly been used by the medical profession in German-speaking countries as a means of supporting junior physicians in their careers. The aim of the mentoring project described here was to obtain information for promoting and developing future mentoring programs at a university hospital. Method: A new integrated mentoring model was developed and implemented over a 12-month period. Peer groups were advised on the mentoring process by mentors and program managers. A total of eight mentoring groups (40 peers) from four departments of a university hospital took part in the project: four voluntarily, and four on a compulsory basis. The evaluation was carried out using qualitative methods for analysis of the group protocols and the focus group interviews with the participants. Results: Group discussions revealed that individual mentees, young female physicians in particular, developed concrete career plans and initiated further career-relevant steps. Some mentees - again more women than men - were promoted to senior physician posts. Further measurable career steps were increased research and publishing activity, and research fellowships abroad. The group process developed in five typical phases (forming, storming, norming, performing, and finalizing), which differed according to whether the groups had been formed on a voluntary or compulsory basis. In the evaluation interviews, mentees emphasized the following as effective mentoring factors: Concrete definition of own career goals; exchange of experiences within the peer groups; support and motivation from the mentors; and fostering of the group process by the program managers. Conclusion: Participation in mentoring programs has to be voluntary. Mentees are motivated, autonomous, goal-oriented and prepared to take action. Mentors serve as examples and advisers. They derive satisfaction from being held in high esteem, as well as from the advancement of their own careers. Program managers have experience in systems theory and group dynamics, structure the group processes, and evaluate the quality of the results. Hospital management should regard mentoring as a business strategy and a means of staff development and quality management, and provide the necessary resources. The mentoring program presented here is being extended to other departments of the hospital on the basis of the positive experiences it has offered.

Buddeberg-Fischer, Barbara; Vetsch, Esther; Mattanza, Guido

2004-01-01

309

[Quality of medical records in Naples (Italy) 2nd University School of Medicine].  

PubMed

To evaluate and improve the quality of medical-record keeping, in clinics and surgery departments. The evaluation involved 66 Operative Units (O.U.) of the "2nd University Hospital" in Naples (Italy). 10 medical records for each O.U. were randomly selected, for a total of 660. The quality was evaluated in all sections of medical records using the criteria of completeness, clarity and traceability of the data. The most critical issues are: unclear handwriting in almost all sections, in the whole scarse presence of a discharge letter (17.0%) in surgery (1.4%), almost total absence of the physicians signature in the clinical diary (2.3%). The completeness of medical records (presence of patient's history, physical examination, informed consent) is significantly higher in the surgery departments. The medical records are significantly righter in the clinic departments. In general, a poor quality of medical-record keeping was detected. This indicates the need to improve the quality by involving the staff in the importance of correct compilation. PMID:19014110

Agozzino, E; Esposito, S; Parmeggiani, C; Piro, A; Grippo, N; Di Palma, M A

2008-01-01

310

Results of a healthcare worker (HCW) survey on environmental awareness as an instrument for the preparation of an environmental report for the University Medicine Greifswald  

PubMed Central

Background: Environmental reporting is increasingly important for medical facilities. Currently, hospitals can determine the content of an environmental report as they see fit. Objective: To examine the utility and scope of an employee survey as an instrument for the preparation of an environmental report at the University Hospital Greifswald. Method: For this purpose a questionnaire was developed with a focus on environmental behaviour and the significance attached to the protection of the environment. Results: The employees of the University Medicine Greifswald attach an unexpectedly high significance to the protection of the environment. Based on this finding, this potential should be used to promote the optimal implementation of ecological-economic behaviour within the University Medicine. Conclusion: An employee survey is a useful instrument in the preparation of an environmental report.

Heiden, Jens-Uwe; Kramer, Axel; Bornewasser, Manfred; Lemanski, Sandra; Below, Harald

2011-01-01

311

Recommendations from recent graduates in medicine, nursing and pharmacy on improving interprofessional education in university programs: a qualitative study  

PubMed Central

Background Interprofessional education (IPE) has been recognized as an innovative approach for the development of a collaborative, practice-ready health workforce, but is not used consistently in undergraduate health professional programs. We sought to explore the reflections of graduates on the IPE experiences they had during their undergraduate education and training. It was anticipated that having completed their pre-vocational education and spent up to two years working in a clinical environment, recent graduates would be well-placed to provide insights into the value of the IPE opportunities they had, and to suggest approaches for improving these opportunities in undergraduate programs. Methods This study was part of a larger research project (Interprofessional Education for the Quality use of Medicines; IPE for QuM) which used focus groups as part of an interpretive research design to inform other aspects of the research. Here, we report on focus groups with recent graduates recruited from area health services across Australia. Results Sixty-eight recent graduates working in New South Wales, Western Australia, and Tasmania participated in 12 focus group sessions. In this paper, we report on new graduates’ reflections on their experiences of IPE as part of their university degree, as well as their recommendations to improve interprofessional education before graduation. The new graduates were unanimous in valuing IPE from their current perspective of being in the health workforce. Most IPE experiences recalled were regarded as positive, but those valued most highly were experiences that involved genuine engagement and opportunities to interact with students in other professions working on a relevant problem. Clinical placement was a missed opportunity with few structured meaningful interprofessional learning experiences. Surprisingly there was little social contact between professions in universities even when programs were co-located, thus reinforcing professional silos. Conclusions The graduates provided many insightful reflections about the value of university-based IPE and their preparedness for clinical practice. Although universally acclaimed as a "good idea" there is much room for improvement. We put forward a set of suggestions to improve IPE and guide the design of future IPE efforts.

2014-01-01

312

Rare Decay Bc ? Ds*?+?- in a Family Non-Universal Z' Model  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Using the form factors calculated in the three-point QCD sum rules, we calculate the new physics contributions to the physical observables of Bc ? D*s?+?- decay in a family non-universal Z' model. Under the consideration of three cases of the new physics parameters, we find that: (a) the Z' boson can provide large contributions to the differential decay rates; (b) the forward-backward asymmetry (FBA) can be increased by about 47%, 38%, and 110% at most in S1, S2, and extreme limit values (ELV), respectively. In addition, the zero crossing can be shifted in all the cases; (c) when ? > 0.08, the value of PL can be changed from -1 in the Standard Model (SM) to -0.5 in S1, -0.6 in S2, and 0 in extreme limit values, respectively; (d) the new physics corrections to PT will decrease the SM prediction about 25% for the cases of S1 and S2, 100% for the case of ELV.

Lü, Lin-Xia; Zhang, Guo-Fang; Wang, Shuai-Wei; Zhang, Zhi-Qing

2013-02-01

313

Knowledge and use of dietary supplements by students of College of Medicine, University of Lagos, Idi-Araba, Lagos, Nigeria  

PubMed Central

Rationale: Nutritional supplements are preparations intended to supplement the diet and provide nutrients. They include vitamins, minerals, fiber, fatty acids, or amino acids, that may be missing or may not be consumed in sufficient quantities in a person's diet. Many health professionals including dietitians, physicians and pharmacists are supplement users. Objectives: The objectives of the present study were to determine knowledge and use of dietary supplements among students of College of Medicine, University of Lagos who are potential health professionals. Methodology: A self-administered questionnaire with a mix of open and close ended questions was employed to collect data in this study. It was distributed to 300 students that were in their final year in various departments of the college. Findings: Response rate was 89%. About 86% of the students have used dietary supplement before while half of them (50%) have used it in the past 12 months. The common types of dietary supplements used in the past 12 months are the vitamins. The reasons for use by the students were good health, poor diet, to boost immunity, weight gain and doctor's prescription. Most of the students were occasional and once in a while users. Conclusions: Majority of the students were aware of dietary supplement use and most of them were occasional users.

Aina, Bolajoko A.; Ojedokun, Oluwayemisi A.

2014-01-01

314

A survey describing the use of complementary therapies and medicines by women attending a family planning clinic  

PubMed Central

Background Complementary medicines (CMs) are widely used by women. Although, women in Australia are frequent users of CM, few studies have examined their utilisation by women attending a family planning service. The aim of this study was to examine (i) the extent of and type of CM, (ii) women’s views about safety and efficacy, and (iii) the factors influencing women’s decision-making. Methods A cross-sectional survey using a convenience sample of 221women aged greater than 18 years attending a family planning (FP) service was undertaken over a two week period in Sydney, Australia. An anonymous self-administered questionnaire was designed to examine women’s current and previous use of CMs, their attitudes towards safety and effectiveness, the factors influencing their decision-making, and their disclosure of CM use to a FP health professional. Demographic questions were designed to describe the diversity of the participants. Logistic regression was used to examine the association between CM use and demographics. Results Sixty-seven percent of women surveyed were currently using CMs, and 83% reported use during the previous 12 months. Most respondents utilised CMs to maintain their general health or for prevention of ill health. Over 30% of women lacked information to make an informed response to questions examining their views about the safety of CMs. Forty-four percent of participants stated they discussed their use of CMs with their FP providers. The main reason why women did not mention CMs was they did not see the relevance to their consultation (43%). Lower rates of CM use were found for younger women (OR 0.24, 95% CI 0.09-0.61), and those not completing high school (OR 0.44, 95% 0.20-1.00). Conclusion The use of CM is very common among women attending an Australian FP clinic, however our findings may not be generalisable to all women. We identified a notable gap in women’s awareness of the potential for interactions between CM and prescribed medication. Our findings also emphasise the need for healthcare providers to initiate discussions with clients about their utilisation of CM.

2013-01-01

315

Work-Family Balance and Academic Advancement in Medical Schools  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: This study examines various options that a faculty member might exercise to achieve work-family balance in academic medicine and their consequences for academic advancement. Method: Three data sets were analyzed: an anonymous web-administered survey of part-time tenure track-eligible University of Illinois College of Medicine (UI-COM)…

Fox, Geri; Schwartz, Alan; Hart, Katherine M.

2006-01-01

316

Does the absence of a supportive family environment influence the outcome of a universal intervention for the prevention of depression?  

PubMed

To date, universal, school-based interventions have produced limited success in the long-term prevention of depression in young people. This paper examines whether family relationship support moderates the outcomes of a universal, school-based preventive intervention for depression in adolescents. It reports a secondary analysis of data from the beyondblue schools research initiative. Twenty-five matched pairs of secondary schools were randomly assigned to an intervention or control condition (N = 5633 Grade 8 students). The multi-component, school-based intervention was implemented over a 3-year period, with 2 years of follow-up in Grades 11 and 12. For those available at follow-up, small but significantly greater reductions in depressive and anxiety symptoms and improvements in emotional wellbeing were found over time for the intervention group compared to the control among those who experienced low family relationship support in Grade 8. For those who did not experience low family relationship support in Grade 8, no significant effects of the invention were found over the control condition. This pattern of results was also found for the intent-to-treat sample for measures of depression and anxiety. Previous research may have overlooked important moderating variables that influence the outcome of universal approaches to the prevention of depression. The findings raise issues of the relative costs and benefits of universal versus targeted approaches to the prevention of depression. PMID:24828082

Spence, Susan H; Sawyer, Michael G; Sheffield, Jeanie; Patton, George; Bond, Lyndal; Graetz, Brian; Kay, Debra

2014-01-01

317

Does the Absence of a Supportive Family Environment Influence the Outcome of a Universal Intervention for the Prevention of Depression?  

PubMed Central

To date, universal, school-based interventions have produced limited success in the long-term prevention of depression in young people. This paper examines whether family relationship support moderates the outcomes of a universal, school-based preventive intervention for depression in adolescents. It reports a secondary analysis of data from the beyondblue schools research initiative. Twenty-five matched pairs of secondary schools were randomly assigned to an intervention or control condition (N = 5633 Grade 8 students). The multi-component, school-based intervention was implemented over a 3-year period, with 2 years of follow-up in Grades 11 and 12. For those available at follow-up, small but significantly greater reductions in depressive and anxiety symptoms and improvements in emotional wellbeing were found over time for the intervention group compared to the control among those who experienced low family relationship support in Grade 8. For those who did not experience low family relationship support in Grade 8, no significant effects of the invention were found over the control condition. This pattern of results was also found for the intent-to-treat sample for measures of depression and anxiety. Previous research may have overlooked important moderating variables that influence the outcome of universal approaches to the prevention of depression. The findings raise issues of the relative costs and benefits of universal versus targeted approaches to the prevention of depression.

Spence, Susan H.; Sawyer, Michael G.; Sheffield, Jeanie; Patton, George; Bond, Lyndal; Graetz, Brian; Kay, Debra

2014-01-01

318

[Travel medicine].  

PubMed

Travel Medicine was inherited from Tropical Medicine and was organised around the development of intercontinental travels. It concerns all types of travellers, especially tourists, migrants and expatriates. It must be universal, scientific, but first of all preventive. Its aims to the information of all professionals concerned by health and tourism. Its goal is also the training of physicians and the education of travellers regarding their own responsibilities. PMID:7819786

Armengaud, M

1993-01-01

319

Attitudes about Cancer Medicine among Primary Care Residents and Their Teachers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A cancer attitude survey is analyzed that was administered to residents and faculty physicians in the departments of Family Medicine, Internal Medicine, and Human Oncology at the University of Wisconsin. Categories surveyed include opinions about the benefits of prevention, risk management, early detection and screening, treatment and care, and…

Love, Richard R.; And Others

1980-01-01

320

Coworking as a Career Strategy: Implications for the Work and Family Lives of University Employees  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study of 276 couples compares coworking couples, which means both partners work for the same university, with noncoworking couples, those couples in which only one partner is employed at a university. Among the employees at the two universities studied, one in seven dual-earner couples cowork. These couples are more educated and are less…

Sweet, Stephen; Moen, Phyllis

2004-01-01

321

Students' perception of the learning environment at Xavier University School of Medicine, Aruba: a follow-up study  

PubMed Central

Xavier University School of Medicine admits students mainly from the United States and Canada to the undergraduate medical program. A previous study conducted in June 2013 used the Dundee Ready Educational Environment Measure to measure the educational environment and impact of different teaching and learning methods in the program. The present study aims to obtain information about students' perceptions of changes in the educational environment, which underwent modifications in teaching and learning, in January 2014. Information was collected about the participants' semester of study, gender, nationality, and age. Students' perceptions of the educational environment were documented by noting their degree of agreement with a set of 50 statements grouped into five categories. Average scores were compared among different groups. The mean total and category scores were compared to those of the 2013 study. Sixty of the sixty-nine students (86.9%) who enrolled in the undergraduate medical program participated in the survey. The majority were male, aged 20-25 years, and of American nationality. The mean±SD total score was 151.32±18.3. The mean scores for students' perception in the survey categories were perception of teaching/learning (38.45), perception of teachers (33.90), academic self-perceptions (22.95), perception of atmosphere (36.32), and social self-perception (19.70). There were no significant differences in these scores among the different groups. All scores except those for academic self-perception were significantly higher in the present study compared to the previous one (P<0.05). The above results will be of particular interest to schools that plan to transition to an integrated curriculum.

2014-01-01

322

Quality management of medical education at the Carl Gustav Carus Faculty of Medicine, University of Technology Dresden, Germany.  

PubMed

The Carl Gustav Carus Faculty of Medicine, University of Technology Dresden, Germany, was founded in 1993 after the reunification of Germany. In 1999, a reform process of medical education was started together with Harvard Medical International. The traditional teacher and discipline-centred curriculum was replaced by a student-centred, interdisciplinary and integrative curriculum which has been named DIPOL (Dresden Integrative Patient/Problem- Oriented Learning). The reform process was accompanied and supported by a parallel-ongoing Faculty Development Program. In 2004, a Quality Management Program in medical education was implemented, and in 2005 medical education received DIN EN ISO 9001:2000 certification. Quality Management Program and DIN EN ISO 9001:2000 certification were/are unique for the 34 medical schools in Germany. The students played a very important strategic role in all processes. They were/are members in all committees like the Faculty Board, the Board of Study Affairs (with equal representation) and the ongoing audits in the Quality Management Program. Students are the only ones who experience all years of the curriculum and are capable of detecting, for example gaps, overlaps, inconsistencies of the curriculum and assessments. Therefore, the in-depth knowledge of students about the medical school's curriculum is a very helpful and essential tool in curriculum reform processes and Quality Management Programs of medical education. The reform in medical education, the establishment of the Quality Management program and the certification resulted in an improvement of quality and output of medical education and medical research. PMID:19159039

Dieter, Peter Erich

2008-12-01

323

Students' perception of the learning environment at Xavier University School of Medicine, Aruba: a follow-up study.  

PubMed

Xavier University School of Medicine admits students mainly from the United States and Canada to the undergraduate medical program. A previous study conducted in June 2013 used the Dundee Ready Educational Environment Measure to measure the educational environment and impact of different teaching and learning methods in the program. The present study aims to obtain information about students' perceptions of changes in the educational environment, which underwent modifications in teaching and learning, in January 2014. Information was collected about the participants' semester of study, gender, nationality, and age. Students' perceptions of the educational environment were documented by noting their degree of agreement with a set of 50 statements grouped into five categories. Average scores were compared among different groups. The mean total and category scores were compared to those of the 2013 study. Sixty of the sixty-nine students (86.9%) who enrolled in the undergraduate medical program participated in the survey. The majority were male, aged 20-25 years, and of American nationality. The mean±SD total score was 151.32±18.3. The mean scores for students' perception in the survey categories were perception of teaching/learning (38.45), perception of teachers (33.90), academic self-perceptions (22.95), perception of atmosphere (36.32), and social self-perception (19.70). There were no significant differences in these scores among the different groups. All scores except those for academic self-perception were significantly higher in the present study compared to the previous one (P<0.05). The above results will be of particular interest to schools that plan to transition to an integrated curriculum. PMID:24798426

Shankar, P Ravi; Bharti, Rishi; Ramireddy, Ravi; Balasubramanium, Ramanan; Nuguri, Vivek

2014-01-01

324

Cheating on examinations and its predictors among undergraduate students at Hawassa University College of Medicine and Health Science, Hawassa, Ethiopia  

PubMed Central

Background Cheating on examinations in academic institutions is a worldwide issue. When cheating occurs in medical schools, it has serious consequences for human life, social values, and the economy. This study was conducted to determine the prevalence of cheating and identify factors that influence cheating among students of Hawassa University College of medicine and health science. Methods A cross sectional study was conducted from May through June 2013. A pre-tested self-administered, structured questionnaire was used to collect self-reported data regarding cheating. Data were entered and analyzed using SPSS version 20. Descriptive statistics were used for data summarization and presentation. Degree of association was measured by Chi Square test, with significance level set at p?=?0.05. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to assess associations. Results The prevalence of self-reported cheating was found to be 19.8% (95% CI?=?17.4-21.9). About 12.1% (95% CI?=?10.2-13.9) of students disclosed cheating on the entrance examination. The majority of students (80.1% (95% CI?=?77.9-82.3) disclosed that they would not report cheating to invigilators even if they had witnessed cheating. Analysis by multiple regression models showed that students who cheated in high school were more likely to cheat (adjusted OR?=?1. 80, 95% CI?=?1. 01–3.19) and that cheating was less likely among students who didn’t cheat on entrance examinations (adjusted OR?=?0. 25, 95% CI?=?0. 14–0.45). Dining outside the university cafeteria and receiving pocket money of Birr 300 or more were strongly associated with cheating (adjusted OR?=?3.08, 95% CI?=?1.54-6.16 and adjusted OR?=?1.69 (95% CI?=?1.05-2.72), respectively. The odds of cheating among students were significantly higher for those who went to private high school, were substance users, and didn’t attend lectures than for those who attended government schools, were not substance abusers, and attended lectures. Conclusion Our findings have important implications for development of an institution’s policies on academic integrity. By extension, they affect the policies of high schools. Increased levels of supervision during entrance examination, mandated attendance at lectures, and reduction of substance use are likely to reduce cheating. No significant association was found with background, level of parental education, grade point average, and interest in field of study.

2014-01-01

325

Family Background and Students' Achievement on a University Entrance Exam in Brazil  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper examines the determinants of students' performance on the entrance test at Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Brazil. Particular attention is paid to the importance of family background variables, such as parents' education and family income, on students' performance and how they relate to the probability of attending public schools…

Guimaraes, Juliana; Sampaio, Breno

2013-01-01

326

Perceptions of University Seniors toward Internationalizing Curriculum in Family and Consumer Sciences: Have We Made Progress?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Family and consumer sciences seniors (n=131) completed questionnaires and attended focus groups. Textiles/clothing and family and consumer sciences education students were most positive about international course content. A majority believed intercultural understanding was important to their careers. (Contains 33 references.) (SK)

Paige, Rosalind C.; Williams, Sally K.

2001-01-01

327

The effect of polyphenolic-polysaccharide conjugates from selected medicinal plants of Asteraceae family on the peroxynitrite-induced changes in blood platelet proteins.  

PubMed

Lots of plants belonging to Asteraceae family are very popular in folk medicine in Poland. These plants are also known as being rich in acidic polysaccharides, due to the presence of hexuronic acids or its derivatives. Our preliminary experiments have shown that the extract from Conyza canadensis L. possesses various biological activity, including antiplatelet, antiocoagulant and antioxidant properties. The aim of our study was to assess if macromolecular glycoconjugates from selected herbal plants of Asteraceae family: Achillea millefolium L., Arnica montana L., Echinacea purpurea L., Solidago virgaurea L., Chamomilla recutita (L.) Rauschert., and Conyza canadensis L. protect platelet proteins against nitrative and oxidative damage induced by peroxynitrite, which is responsible for oxidative/nitrative modifications of platelet proteins: the formation of 3-nitrotyrosine and carbonyl groups. These modifications may lead to changes of blood platelet functions and can have pathological consequences. The role of these different medicinal plants in the defence against oxidative/nitrative stress in human platelets is still unknown, therefore the oxidative damage to platelet proteins induced by peroxynitrite and protectory effects of tested conjugates by the estimation of carbonyl group level and nitrotyrosine formation (a marker of protein nitration) were studied in vitro. The antioxidative properties of the polyphenolic-polysaccharide conjugates from selected tested medicinal plants were also compared with the action of a well characterized antioxidative commercial polyphenol - resveratrol (3,4',5-trihydroxystilbene). The obtained results demonstrate that the compounds from herbal plants: A. millefolium, A. montana, E. purpurea, C. recutita, S. virgaurea, possess antioxidative properties and protect platelet proteins against peroxynitrite toxicity in vitro, similar to the glycoconjugates from C. canadensis. However, in the comparative studies, the polyphenolic-polysaccharide conjugates from selected tested medicinal plants were not found to be more effective antioxidant, than the solution of pure resveratrol. PMID:20869393

Saluk-Juszczak, Joanna; Pawlaczyk, Izabela; Olas, Beata; Ko?odziejczyk, Joanna; Ponczek, Michal; Nowak, Pawel; Tsirigotis-Wo?oszczak, Marta; Wachowicz, Barbara; Gancarz, Roman

2010-12-01

328

Talking to Teens About Family Problems An Opportunity for Prevention  

Microsoft Academic Search

Most pediatricians do not screen for family problems as part of routine adolescent health care.1 This study documents fears, worries, and concerns about family issues expressed by 147 teenagers on a confidential questionnaire during consecutive initial visits to an adolescent medicine clinic in a university hospital setting. Among the salient findings, 44% had thought about running away from home, 42%

Robert M. Cavanaugh; Paul K. Henneberger

1996-01-01

329

The Sorcerer II Global Ocean Sampling Expedition: Expanding the Universe of Protein Families  

Microsoft Academic Search

Metagenomics projects based on shotgun sequencing of populations of micro-organisms yield insight into protein families. We used sequence similarity clustering to explore proteins with a comprehensive dataset consisting of sequences from available databases together with 6.12 million proteins predicted from an assembly of 7.7 million Global Ocean Sampling (GOS) sequences. The GOS dataset covers nearly all known prokaryotic protein families.

Shibu Yooseph; Granger Sutton; Douglas B. Rusch; Aaron L. Halpern; Shannon J. Williamson; Karin Remington; Jonathan A. Eisen; Karla B. Heidelberg; Gerard Manning; Weizhong Li; Lukasz Jaroszewski; Piotr Cieplak; Christopher S. Miller; Huiying Li; Susan T. Mashiyama; Marcin P. Joachimiak; Christopher van Belle; John-Marc Chandonia; David A. Soergel; Yufeng Zhai; Kannan Natarajan; Shaun Lee; Benjamin J. Raphael; Vineet Bafna; Robert Friedman; Steven E. Brenner; Adam Godzik; David Eisenberg; Jack E. Dixon; Susan S. Taylor; Robert L. Strausberg; Marvin Frazier; J. Craig Venter

2007-01-01

330

The Sorcerer II Global Ocean Sampling Expedition: Expanding the Universe of Protein Families  

PubMed Central

Metagenomics projects based on shotgun sequencing of populations of micro-organisms yield insight into protein families. We used sequence similarity clustering to explore proteins with a comprehensive dataset consisting of sequences from available databases together with 6.12 million proteins predicted from an assembly of 7.7 million Global Ocean Sampling (GOS) sequences. The GOS dataset covers nearly all known prokaryotic protein families. A total of 3,995 medium- and large-sized clusters consisting of only GOS sequences are identified, out of which 1,700 have no detectable homology to known families. The GOS-only clusters contain a higher than expected proportion of sequences of viral origin, thus reflecting a poor sampling of viral diversity until now. Protein domain distributions in the GOS dataset and current protein databases show distinct biases. Several protein domains that were previously categorized as kingdom specific are shown to have GOS examples in other kingdoms. About 6,000 sequences (ORFans) from the literature that heretofore lacked similarity to known proteins have matches in the GOS data. The GOS dataset is also used to improve remote homology detection. Overall, besides nearly doubling the number of current proteins, the predicted GOS proteins also add a great deal of diversity to known protein families and shed light on their evolution. These observations are illustrated using several protein families, including phosphatases, proteases, ultraviolet-irradiation DNA damage repair enzymes, glutamine synthetase, and RuBisCO. The diversity added by GOS data has implications for choosing targets for experimental structure characterization as part of structural genomics efforts. Our analysis indicates that new families are being discovered at a rate that is linear or almost linear with the addition of new sequences, implying that we are still far from discovering all protein families in nature.

Yooseph, Shibu; Sutton, Granger; Rusch, Douglas B; Halpern, Aaron L; Williamson, Shannon J; Remington, Karin; Eisen, Jonathan A; Heidelberg, Karla B; Manning, Gerard; Li, Weizhong; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Cieplak, Piotr; Miller, Christopher S; Li, Huiying; Mashiyama, Susan T; Joachimiak, Marcin P; van Belle, Christopher; Chandonia, John-Marc; Soergel, David A; Zhai, Yufeng; Natarajan, Kannan; Lee, Shaun; Raphael, Benjamin J; Bafna, Vineet; Friedman, Robert; Brenner, Steven E; Godzik, Adam; Eisenberg, David; Dixon, Jack E; Taylor, Susan S; Strausberg, Robert L; Frazier, Marvin; Venter, J. Craig

2007-01-01

331

The Sorcerer II Global Ocean Sampling expedition: expanding the universe of protein families.  

PubMed

Metagenomics projects based on shotgun sequencing of populations of micro-organisms yield insight into protein families. We used sequence similarity clustering to explore proteins with a comprehensive dataset consisting of sequences from available databases together with 6.12 million proteins predicted from an assembly of 7.7 million Global Ocean Sampling (GOS) sequences. The GOS dataset covers nearly all known prokaryotic protein families. A total of 3,995 medium- and large-sized clusters consisting of only GOS sequences are identified, out of which 1,700 have no detectable homology to known families. The GOS-only clusters contain a higher than expected proportion of sequences of viral origin, thus reflecting a poor sampling of viral diversity until now. Protein domain distributions in the GOS dataset and current protein databases show distinct biases. Several protein domains that were previously categorized as kingdom specific are shown to have GOS examples in other kingdoms. About 6,000 sequences (ORFans) from the literature that heretofore lacked similarity to known proteins have matches in the GOS data. The GOS dataset is also used to improve remote homology detection. Overall, besides nearly doubling the number of current proteins, the predicted GOS proteins also add a great deal of diversity to known protein families and shed light on their evolution. These observations are illustrated using several protein families, including phosphatases, proteases, ultraviolet-irradiation DNA damage repair enzymes, glutamine synthetase, and RuBisCO. The diversity added by GOS data has implications for choosing targets for experimental structure characterization as part of structural genomics efforts. Our analysis indicates that new families are being discovered at a rate that is linear or almost linear with the addition of new sequences, implying that we are still far from discovering all protein families in nature. PMID:17355171

Yooseph, Shibu; Sutton, Granger; Rusch, Douglas B; Halpern, Aaron L; Williamson, Shannon J; Remington, Karin; Eisen, Jonathan A; Heidelberg, Karla B; Manning, Gerard; Li, Weizhong; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Cieplak, Piotr; Miller, Christopher S; Li, Huiying; Mashiyama, Susan T; Joachimiak, Marcin P; van Belle, Christopher; Chandonia, John-Marc; Soergel, David A; Zhai, Yufeng; Natarajan, Kannan; Lee, Shaun; Raphael, Benjamin J; Bafna, Vineet; Friedman, Robert; Brenner, Steven E; Godzik, Adam; Eisenberg, David; Dixon, Jack E; Taylor, Susan S; Strausberg, Robert L; Frazier, Marvin; Venter, J Craig

2007-03-01

332

Healthy Homes University: A Home-Based Environmental Intervention and Education Program for Families with Pediatric Asthma in Michigan  

PubMed Central

Environmental conditions within the home can exacerbate asthmatic children's symptoms. To improve health outcomes among this group, we implemented an in-home environmental public health program—Healthy Homes University—for low-income families in Lansing, Michigan, from 2005 to 2008. Families received four visits during a six-month intervention. Program staff assessed homes for asthma triggers and subsequently provided products and services to reduce exposures to cockroaches, dust mites, mold, tobacco smoke, and other triggers. We also provided asthma education that included identification of asthma triggers and instructions on specific behaviors to reduce exposures. Based on self-reported data collected from 243 caregivers at baseline and six months, the impact of asthma on these children was substantially reduced, and the proportion who sought acute unscheduled health care for their asthma decreased by more than 47%.

Largo, Thomas W.; Borgialli, Michele; Wisinski, Courtney L.; Wahl, Robert L.; Priem, Wesley F.

2011-01-01

333

Universe  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Universe SciPack explores the ways scientists learn about the universe and the current ideas about the origins and formation of the universe. The focus is on Standards and Benchmarks related to the universe including how the universe was formed, formation and destruction of stars and characteristics of the sun and stars in terms of size and composition.In addition to comprehensive inquiry-based learning materials tied to Science Education Standards and Benchmarks, the SciPack includes the following additional components:� Pedagogical Implications section addressing common misconceptions, teaching resources and strand maps linking grade band appropriate content to standards. � Access to one-on-one support via e-mail to content "Wizards".� Final Assessment which can be used to certify mastery of the concepts.Learning Outcomes:Universe: How We Know What We Know� Select the right instrument given something specific to learn about the universe.� Describe, in simple terms, how scientists analyze light to learn about objects in the universe.� Describe what the study of light can tell us about objects in the universe.� Understand the various parts of the electromagnetic spectrum and how the various wavelengths can provide astronomers with different information.� Recognize that astronomers study a wide range of electromagnetic waves, not restricted to visible light.Universe: The Sun as a Star� Reject common misconceptions, such as stars are bits of the Sun. � List characteristics of the Sun that match the definition of a star.� Accurately compare and contrast the characteristics of the Sun with other stars (e.g., mass, distance, size, color).� Recognize the rough ratio of the distance to the Sun and the distance to the next nearest stars on a human scale (i.e., if the sun is 10 feet away, roughly how far is the next nearest star?).� Select the rough estimate of the travel time (at speed of light) to next nearest star from a list.� Describe how astronomers determined that the stars were just like the Sun.Universe: Birth, Life, and Death of Stars� Recount key aspects of the stellar life cycle. � Recognize the variables and conditions that would be needed to make predictions about the life cycle of a star, including the prominent role of initial mass. � Determine whether a reasonable prediction can be made, given certain knowns and unknowns.� Explain how the elements that compose our planet and solar system (and the rest of the universe) were formed.� Explain where the energy released by our Sun and other stars comes from.Universe: The Universe Beyond our Solar System� Arrange various objects in order of size and distance, ranging from space probes and moons to galaxies and galactic clusters.� Catalogue, in simple terms, the objects within a galaxy.� Generally explain "what is within what" (planetary systems, star clusters, galaxies, etc.).� Describe the location of our solar system within the Milky Way galaxy.� Describe the limitations of using parallax, radar, and brightness to measure the distance of objects from Earth, and classify objects whose distance from Earth could be accurately measured using each type of measurement strategy.Universe: The Origin and Evolution of the Universe� Provide a basic description of the conditions at the beginning of the universe.� Give the approximate age of the universe.� Recognize the scientific account of the current state of the universe given different explanations.� Explain the evidence for an expanding universe.� Describe, in simple terms, how scientists use observations of position and motion to learn about objects in the universe.

National Science Teachers Association (NSTA)

2007-03-21

334

A nationwide survey on the expectation of public healthcare providers on family medicine specialists in Malaysia--a qualitative analysis of 623 written comments  

PubMed Central

Objective To examine the expectation of public healthcare providers/professionals (PHCPs) who are working closely with family medicine specialists (FMSs) at public health clinics. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting This study is part of a larger national study on the perception of the Malaysian public healthcare professionals on FMSs. Participants PHCPs from three categories of health facilities, namely hospitals, health clinics and health offices. Main outcome measures Qualitative analysis of written comments of respondents’ expectation of FMSs. Results The participants’ response rate was 58% (780/1345) with an almost equal proportion from each public healthcare facility. We identified 21 subthemes for the 623 expectation comments. The six emerging themes are (1) need for more FMSs, (2) clinical roles and functions of FMSs, (3) administrative roles of FMSs, (4) contribution to community and public health, (5) attributes improvement and (6) research and audits. FMSs were expected to give attention to clinical duty. Delivering this responsibility with competence included having the latest medical knowledge in their own and others’ medical disciplines, practising evidence-based medicine in prehospital and posthospital care, better supervision of staff and doctors under their care, fostering effective teamwork, communicating more often with hospital specialists and making appropriate referral. Expectations ranged from definite and strong for more FMSs at the health clinics to low expectation for FMSs’ involvement in research; to mal-expectation on FMSs’ involvement in community and public health programmes. Conclusions There were some remarkable differences in expectations on FMSs from the three different PHCPs. These ranged from being clinically competent and administratively available for patients and staff at the health clinics, to mal-expectations on FMSs to engage in public health affairs. Relevant parties, including FMSs themselves, could take appropriate self-improvement initiatives to enhance public practice of family medicine and patient care. Trial registration number NMRR ID: 08-12-1167.

Chew, Boon-How; Cheong, Ai-Theng; Ismail, Mastura; Hamzah, Zuhra; A-Rashid, Mohd-Radzniwan; Md-Yasin, Mazapuspavina; Ali, Norsiah

2014-01-01

335

Longitudinal Effects of a Universal Family-Focused Intervention on Growth Patterns of Adolescent Internalizing Symptoms and Polysubstance Use: Gender Comparisons  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study evaluated effects of the "Iowa Strengthening Families Program," a family-focused universal preventive intervention, on growth patterns of adolescent internalizing (anxiety and depressive symptoms) and monthly polysubstance use (alcohol, tobacco, marijuana, inhalants, and other illicit drugs), as well as the association between…

Trudeau, Linda; Spoth, Richard; Randall, G. Kevin; Azevedo, Kari

2007-01-01

336

Did past economic prosperity affect the health related quality of life predictors? A longitudinal study on a representative sample of Slovenian family medicine patients  

PubMed Central

Background Health related quality of life (HRQOL) as an important measure of medical outcomes has been shown to be associated with demographic factors and the most common mental and chronic somatic diseases. This study’s aim was to identify factors predicting changes in HRQOL over a follow-up period in a representative sample of Slovenian family medicine patients. Methods In a longitudinal multi-centred study between 2003 and 2005, data were collected from 1118 consecutive attendees from 60 family medicine practices in Slovenia on quality of life, socio-demographic factors and the presence of mental disorders, with follow-up after 6 and 24 months. Retrospective information on chronic diseases was obtained from patients` health records. In three time-sequential multiple linear regression models, data on 601 patients (53.8%) was analysed to determine factors associated with each component score of quality of life. Results At baseline the patients were 48.58 (SE?=?0.58) years of age, over half were women (386 (64.2%)) and most were Slovenian (548 (91.2%)). Quality of life was seen to improve over the two-year period. Factors significantly and consistently associated with a better mental component score of quality of life were social support, satisfactory circumstances in patients` household and absence of anxiety. Major life events in the past year and depression were shown to be risk factors for mental and physical components, while level of education, absence of long-term disability and chronic pain were identified as predictors of the physical component. Conclusions Detection and successful treatment of depression and anxiety has a potential to lead to improved quality of life in family medicine attendees; family physicians should be alert for the early onset of these conditions, knowing that symptoms of chronic pain, depression and anxiety often overlap in patients. Poorly educated patients and those lacking social support and/or satisfactory household circumstances should be recognised and empowered, and appropriate coping mechanisms should be introduced.

2013-01-01

337

Family and Career Characteristics of Women and Men College and University Administrators.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examined family and career characteristics of 112 married women and men administrators. Data indicated that although women and men administrators reported using similar role-management strategies, women considered their careers to be significantly more time demanding. Women married younger, had fewer children, and earned less salary than male…

Bird, Gloria W.

1984-01-01

338

Court Cases Involving Schools and Universities under the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Educational institutions are required either by law or by necessity to maintain records on students. Prior to the passage of the "Buckley Amendment," more commonly known as the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA), K-12 and postsecondary school officials maintained, used, and shared records according to their own discretion. Although…

Edmonds, Vincent H.

2009-01-01

339

Helping Academics Have Families and Tenure Too: Universities Discover Their Self-Interest  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"Did you have a kid and, if so, how?" is one of the hottest questions everywhere in higher education. Even as women overtake men among Americans receiving doctorates, a substantial body of new research shows that they are being discouraged from careers in academia because the timing and requirements of tenure make it so hard to raise families. In…

Marcus, Jon

2007-01-01

340

The "Entrepreneurial University", Family and Gender: Changes and Demands Faced by Fixed-Term Workers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Managerialism and neoliberal changes and demands influence the work and family lives of academics differently in different positions and contexts. In this article, I explore how Finnish academics on short fixed-term contracts have been treated, and how they interpret recent changes and their effects on their work and private lives. I ask how the…

Nikunen, Minna

2014-01-01

341

Rates and Psychological Effects of Exposure to Family Violence among Sri Lankan University Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objectives: The study had two objectives: to examine the rates of exposure to family violence among students in a non-Western society, with Sri Lanka as a case study and to examine the psychological effects of their exposure. Method: Four hundred seventy six medical students in Sri Lanka were surveyed. A self-administered questionnaire was…

Haj-Yahia, Muhammad M.; de Zoysa, Piyanjli

2008-01-01

342

The Parent's Toolshop: The Universal Blueprint for Building a Healthy Family.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Noting that building and maintaining healthy family relationships is analogous to building a house, this book guides parents through a self-paced parenting workshop to help build healthy relationships, prevent problems, and respond effectively to situations that occur. With the exception of Chapters 1 and 3, the chapters are designed to be…

Pawel, Jody Johnston

343

Improving health care globally : a critical review of the necessity of family medicine research and recommendations to build research capacity  

Microsoft Academic Search

An invitational conference led by the World Organization of Family Doctors (Wonca) involving selected delegates from 34 countries was held in Kingston, Ontario, Canada, March 8 to12, 2003. The conference theme was \\

C. van Weel; W. W. Rosser

2004-01-01

344

Coping Strategies and the Request for a Consultation on Complementary and Alternative Medicine – a Cross-Sectional Survey of Patients in a Psychosomatic and Three Medical Departments of a German University Hospital  

Microsoft Academic Search

SummaryObjective: To identify factors, predicting which patients of a large German university hospital request for a consultation on complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). Patients and Methods: 350 patients of 3 medical and a psychosomatic department of the University Hospital Freiburg were consecutively surveyed with respect to their coping strategies, health locus of control, anxiety, depression, and the request for a

R. Huber; R. Lüdtke; I. Beiser; D. Koch

2004-01-01

345

Learning to Lead in Higher Education: Insights into the Family Backgrounds of Women University Presidents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Qualitative methods were used to explore the backgrounds, experiences, and perceptions of ten women U.S. university presidents on becoming leaders. Using the phenomenological research methodology, the presidents were interviewed about their lived experiences of developing the knowledge, skills, abilities, and competencies required for successful…

Madsen, Susan R.

2006-01-01

346

University and College Counselors as Athletic Team Consultants: Using a Structural Family Therapy Model  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Increasingly, university and college counselors are sought out by their institution's sports coaches for assistance in achieving team goals. Traditional sport psychology models that have the individual athlete as their primary focus are insufficient frameworks for team-level consultations. The authors believe that systemic approaches may provide…

Parcover, Jason A.; Mettrick, Jennifer; Parcover, Cynthia A. D.; Griffin-Smith, Pamela

2009-01-01

347

The universal YrdC/Sua5 family is required for the formation of threonylcarbamoyladenosine in tRNA  

PubMed Central

Threonylcarbamoyladenosine (t6A) is a universal modification found at position 37 of ANN decoding tRNAs, which imparts a unique structure to the anticodon loop enhancing its binding to ribosomes in vitro. Using a combination of bioinformatic, genetic, structural and biochemical approaches, the universal protein family YrdC/Sua5 (COG0009) was shown to be involved in the biosynthesis of this hypermodified base. Contradictory reports on the essentiality of both the yrdC wild-type gene of Escherichia coli and the SUA5 wild-type gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae led us to reconstruct null alleles for both genes and prove that yrdC is essential in E. coli, whereas SUA5 is dispensable in yeast but results in severe growth phenotypes. Structural and biochemical analyses revealed that the E. coli YrdC protein binds ATP and preferentially binds RNAThr lacking only the t6A modification. This work lays the foundation for elucidating the function of a protein family found in every sequenced genome to date and understanding the role of t6A in vivo.

El Yacoubi, Basma; Lyons, Benjamin; Cruz, Yulien; Reddy, Robert; Nordin, Brian; Agnelli, Fabio; Williamson, James R.; Schimmel, Paul; Swairjo, Manal A.; de Crecy-Lagard, Valerie

2009-01-01

348

Longitudinal substance initiation outcomes for a universal preventive intervention combining family and school programs.  

PubMed

This study evaluated the substance initiation effects of an intervention combining family and school-based competency-training intervention components. Thirty-six rural schools were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 conditions: (a) the classroom-based Life Skills Training (LST) and the Strengthening Families Program: For Parents and Children 10-14, (b) LST only, or (c) a control condition. Outcomes were examined 1 year after the intervention posttest, using a substance initiation index (SII) measuring lifetime use of alcohol, cigarettes, and marijuana and by rates of each individual substance. Planned intervention-control contrasts showed significant effects for both the combined and LST-only interventions on the SII and on marijuana initiation. Relative reduction rates for alcohol initiation were 30.0% for the combined intervention and 4.1% for LST only. PMID:12079251

Spoth, Richard L; Redmond, Cleve; Trudeau, Linda; Shin, Chungyeol

2002-06-01

349

A universe of dwarfs and giants: genome size and chromosome evolution in the monocot family Melanthiaceae.  

PubMed

• Since the occurrence of giant genomes in angiosperms is restricted to just a few lineages, identifying where shifts towards genome obesity have occurred is essential for understanding the evolutionary mechanisms triggering this process. • Genome sizes were assessed using flow cytometry in 79 species and new chromosome numbers were obtained. Phylogenetically based statistical methods were applied to infer ancestral character reconstructions of chromosome numbers and nuclear DNA contents. • Melanthiaceae are the most diverse family in terms of genome size, with C-values ranging more than 230-fold. Our data confirmed that giant genomes are restricted to tribe Parideae, with most extant species in the family characterized by small genomes. Ancestral genome size reconstruction revealed that the most recent common ancestor (MRCA) for the family had a relatively small genome (1C = 5.37 pg). Chromosome losses and polyploidy are recovered as the main evolutionary mechanisms generating chromosome number change. • Genome evolution in Melanthiaceae has been characterized by a trend towards genome size reduction, with just one episode of dramatic DNA accumulation in Parideae. Such extreme contrasting profiles of genome size evolution illustrate the key role of transposable elements and chromosome rearrangements in driving the evolution of plant genomes. PMID:24299166

Pellicer, Jaume; Kelly, Laura J; Leitch, Ilia J; Zomlefer, Wendy B; Fay, Michael F

2014-03-01

350

Missions and Medicine at Amherst: Family Ties to Edward Hitchcock Jr., the Missionary Movement, and the American University of Beirut  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Haystack Movement began at Williams College in 1805, occasioning the spread of American missions throughout the world. A half century later, two graduates of nearby Amherst College, Edward Hitchcock Jr. and Daniel Bliss, laid the foundations for college health services in this country and for mission work and education in the Middle East. The…

Dorman, John M.

2011-01-01

351

High referral rates to secondary care by general practitioners in Norway are associated with GPs' gender and specialist qualifications in family medicine, a study of 4350 consultations  

PubMed Central

Background Referral rates of general practitioners (GPs) are an important determinant of secondary care utilization. The variation in these rates across GPs is considerable, and cannot be explained by patient morbidity alone. The main objective of this study was to assess the GPs’ referral rate to secondary care in Norway, any associations between the referral decision and patient, GP, health care characteristics and who initiated the referring issue in the consultation. Methods The probabilities of referral to secondary care and/or radiological examination were examined in 100 consecutive consultations of 44 randomly chosen Norwegian GPs. The GPs recorded whether the issue of referral was introduced, who introduced it and if the patient was referred. Multilevel and naive multivariable logistic regression analyses were performed to explore associations between the probability of referral and patient, GP and health care characteristics. Results Of the 4350 consultations included, 13.7% (GP range 4.0%-28.0%) of patients were referred to secondary somatic and psychiatric care. Female GPs referred significantly more frequently than male GPs (16.0% versus 12.6%, adjusted odds ratio, AOR, 1.25), specialists in family medicine less frequently than their counterparts (12.5% versus 14.9%, AOR 0.76) and salaried GPs more frequently than private practitioners (16.2% versus 12.1%, AOR 1.36). In 4.2% (GP range 0%-12.9%) of the consultations, patients were referred to radiological examination. Specialists in family medicine, salaried GPs and GPs with a Norwegian medical degree referred significantly more frequently to radiological examination than their counterparts (AOR 1.93, 2.00 and 1.73, respectively). The issue of referral was introduced in 23% of the consultations, and in 70.6% of these cases by the GP. The high referrers introduced the referral issue significantly more frequently and also referred a significantly larger proportion when the issue was introduced. Conclusions The main finding of the present study was a high overall referral rate, and a striking range among the GPs. Male GPs and specialists in family medicine referred significantly less frequently to secondary care, but the latter referred more frequently to radiological examination. Our findings indicate that intervention on high referrers is a potential area for quality improvement, and there is a need to explore the referral decision process itself.

2013-01-01

352

A Cost Analysis of an Introduction to Clinical Medicine Course in a Non-University Teaching Hospital.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Analysis of direct costs to teach a 10-week Introduction to Clinical Medicine course to 26 students in the spring of 1995 found that attending physicians worked a total of 736.5 hours, for a cost of $37,303; residents worked 314 hours, at a cost of $4,396; and miscellaneous costs totaled $2,019. The per-student cost was $1,681. (Author/MSE)

Tai, Lee W.; Tulley, John E.

1997-01-01

353

What Is a Pediatric Sports Medicine Specialist?  

MedlinePLUS

... Specialist? Family Life Listen What is a Pediatric Sports Medicine Specialist? Article Body If your child or teen ... and teens. What Kind of Training Do Pediatric Sports Medicine Specialists Have? Pediatric sports medicine specialists are medical ...

354

Changes and Challenges in Rural Graduate Medical Education: The Family Medicine Spokane Rural Training Track Experience in Colville, Wash.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Rural community-based graduate medical education programs in family practice generate highly trained physicians who typically settle and practice in rural communities. In response to federal funding cutbacks and revised accreditation requirements that threatened its program, the Colville, Washington, Mount Carmel Hospital agreed to fully fund its…

Maudlin, Robert K.; Newkirk, Gary R.; Snook, Michael D.; Cooper, Gloria

2000-01-01

355

Family medicine, 'La Herencia' and breast cancer; understanding the (dis)continuities of predictive genetics in Cuba  

PubMed Central

Building on social science research examining the relationship between genetic knowledge, identity and the family this paper takes the cultural context of Cuba as a site for critical ethnographic engagement. The paper makes use of research working with a range of Cuban publics and genetic professionals as part of a collaborative research project exploring the social and cultural context of health beliefs about breast cancer. It illuminates the contrasting ways in which genomic knowledge linked to an increased risk of breast cancer is perceived, communicated, and acted upon. It is argued that the particular meaning and significance of genetic risk linked to breast cancer in this context must be examined in relation to long standing institutional practices relating to public health care provision. The focus on ‘the family’ in the provision of Cuban health provides a particularly viable foundation for the expansion of what is described as ‘community genetics’, including the collation of family history details for common complex diseases such as breast cancer. Nevertheless specific public perceptions of risk related to breast cancer and the difficulties of discussing a diagnosis of cancer openly in the family point to the very specific challenges for the translation and application of predictive interventions in Cuba. In summary the dynamic interrelationship between public health, perceptions of risk or health beliefs about the causes of the disease and attitudes towards cancer diagnosis within the family point to both continuities and discontinuities in the way that genomic interventions linked to breast cancer are unfolding as part of a dynamic yet still ostensibly socialist project of health care in Cuba.

Gibbon, Sahra

2011-01-01

356

Cough and Cold Medicine Abuse (For Parents)  

MedlinePLUS

... drugstore with a few dollars or raiding the family medicine cabinet. And because it's found in over-the- ... it's not. Even when it comes from the family medicine cabinet or the corner drugstore, when taken in ...

357

A Qualitative Study on Factors that Influence Turkish Medical Students' Decisions to Become Family Physicians After the Health Transformation Programme  

PubMed Central

Background: In Turkey, general practitioners were authorized to work as family physicians without specialization, within the scope of the Health Transformation Programme, due to inadequate number of family medicine specialists since 2004. With this new implementation Family Medicine specialty became a less preferable option for medical students. Aims: The study was to investigate the perspectives of medical students and understand the issues to choose Family Medicine specialty as a career option. Materials and Methods: This qualitative study was performed with 48 final year medical students using a convenience sample from two medical universities. Results: Three main categories emerged from the data viewing Family Medicine ‘as a specialty’, ‘as an employment’, and finally ‘as a system’. Very few students stated that Family Medicine would be their choice for specialty. Conclusions: Family Medicine does not seem to be an attractive option in career planning by medical students. Several factors that may constrain students from choosing Family Medicine include: not perceiving Family Medicine as a field of expertise, and the adverse conditions at work which may originate from duality in the system.

Tanriover, Ozlem; Hidiroglu, Seyhan; Akan, Hulya; Ay, Pinar; Erdogan, Yalcin; Karavus, Melda; Vitrinel, Ayca; Hayran, Osman

2014-01-01

358

Nuclear Medicine  

MedlinePLUS

Nuclear Medicine What is nuclear medicine? What are radioactive tracers? What is Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT)? What ... funded researchers advancing nuclear medicine? What is nuclear medicine? Nuclear medicine is a medical specialty that uses ...

359

Oral conditions of 1,049 patients referred to a university-based oral medicine and orofacial pain center.  

PubMed

At the USC Orofacial Pain/Oral Medicine Center, 1,049 new patients seen from September 2003 to September 2005 were sorted according to their primary diagnosis. Two-thirds were female and 19.7% were over 64 years of age. The most prevalent diseases were categorized and compared with a similar study published 15 years ago. The seven categories included osseous disease (3.3%), mucogingival disease (17.8%), salivary/lymphatic disease (3.3%), TMD (46.3%); neuropathic pain/headache disorders (13.1%), motor/sleep disorders (9.1%), and miscellaneous (not included in above categories) (7.1%). The 35 most frequent diagnoses were sorted by the mean age of our patients and the male-female ratio was also determined. The oldest patients had burning mouth syndrome (68.1 +/- 14.7) and the youngest had internal derangements of the temporomandibular joints (27.9 +/- 14.0). These data could be used to provide information on the scope of oral medicine practice, to help practitioners create age-appropriate differential diagnoses, and to help dental school curriculum committees and graduate program directors assess their curricula to ensure they are including the full range of oral conditions in their programs. PMID:17990478

Suarez, Piedad; Clark, Glenn

2007-01-01

360

A longitudinal study of the sociosexual dynamics in a captive family group of wolves: the University of Connecticut wolf project.  

PubMed

An interest in the role of the social environment on the evolution of behavior led Professor Benson Ginsburg to studies of wolf social behavior. He initiated the University of Connecticut wolf project with a family group of wolves housed in a protected enclosure in an isolated area of campus. One aim of this project was to conduct a longitudinal study of a family group of wolves in order to understand the proximate behavioral mechanisms underlying mating dynamics with a degree of control and opportunistic observation that could not be achieved through field studies. The development of social relationships and the dynamics of mating were observed for 9 years. As in nature, agonistic relationships strongly influenced reproductive success, successful breeding was limited to a single pair each season, and the behavioral dynamics included status transitions with breeder rotations. Our work, when combined with the results of other captive wolf studies, has contributed valuable information to the general understanding of wolf social behavior, especially regarding the proximate behavior patterns underlying group social interactions and reproduction. This understanding has broadened perspectives on the dynamic interplay between social behavior and evolutionary processes. PMID:21409588

Jenks, Susan M

2011-11-01

361

A Rhodobacter capsulatus Member of a Universal Permease Family Imports Molybdate and Other Oxyanions?  

PubMed Central

Molybdenum (Mo) is an important trace element that is toxic at high concentrations. To resolve the mechanisms underlying Mo toxicity, Rhodobacter capsulatus mutants tolerant to high Mo concentrations were isolated by random transposon Tn5 mutagenesis. The insertion sites of six independent isolates mapped within the same gene predicted to code for a permease of unknown function located in the cytoplasmic membrane. During growth under Mo-replete conditions, the wild-type strain accumulated considerably more Mo than the permease mutant. For mutants defective for the permease, the high-affinity molybdate importer ModABC, or both transporters, in vivo Mo-dependent nitrogenase (Mo-nitrogenase) activities at different Mo concentrations suggested that ModABC and the permease import molybdate in nanomolar and micromolar ranges, respectively. Like the permease mutants, a mutant defective for ATP sulfurylase tolerated high Mo concentrations, suggesting that ATP sulfurylase is the main target of Mo inhibition in R. capsulatus. Sulfate-dependent growth of a double mutant defective for the permease and the high-affinity sulfate importer CysTWA was reduced compared to those of the single mutants, implying that the permease plays an important role in sulfate uptake. In addition, permease mutants tolerated higher tungstate and vanadate concentrations than the wild type, suggesting that the permease acts as a general oxyanion importer. We propose to call this permease PerO (for oxyanion permease). It is the first reported bacterial molybdate transporter outside the ABC transporter family.

Gisin, Jonathan; Muller, Alexandra; Pfander, Yvonne; Leimkuhler, Silke; Narberhaus, Franz; Masepohl, Bernd

2010-01-01

362

Key Beliefs Related to Decisions for Physical Activity Engagement Among First-in-Family Students Transitioning to University.  

PubMed

The current study investigated key beliefs related to decisions for physical activity (PA) engagement among first-in-family (FIF) students transitioning to university. FIF students (n = 157) completed an online questionnaire assessing standard theory of planned behaviour constructs and belief-based items. One week later, participants completed a follow-up questionnaire assessing self-reported PA during the previous week. Results identified a range of behavioural, normative, and control beliefs that were significantly correlated with both PA intention and behaviour. Various key beliefs were also identified in relation to FIF students' decisions to be regularly physically active, with behavioural beliefs such as "take up too much time", normative beliefs including "friends outside of university", and control beliefs such as "cost", identified. Finally, frequencies of those who strongly or fully accepted these beliefs were analysed, demonstrating that typically, a large number of FIF students did not hold the beliefs, and as such, these are relevant to target in resultant interventions. The current study effectively highlights a number of key beliefs that can be targeted in programs aimed at encouraging FIF students' PA. Further, the study addresses a gap in the literature of targeting FIF students, a cohort at risk for inactivity, and utilises a sound theoretical framework to identify the unique set of beliefs guiding decisions for PA for this at-risk community group. PMID:24381124

Cowie, Eloise; Hamilton, Kyra

2014-08-01

363

Review of Three Decades of Laboratory Exercises in the Preclinical Curriculum at the Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Review of the use of preclinical curricular time for laboratory exercises at the Case Western Reserve University (Ohio) medical school 1955-89 found a 92 percent decrease in hours devoted to animal and human physiology. Advantages of inclusion of such exercises are seen to outweigh disadvantages, and efforts to revitalize them are recommended.…

Genuth, Saul; And Others

1992-01-01

364

Core Goals and Objectives of the University of Connecticut School of Medicine: The Product and the Process.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The final report of the University of Connecticut Health Center curriculum project entitled "A Data-Based Approval to Developing a Curriculum" is presented. The aims of the project were these: (1) to develop procedures for judging and cross-judging the goals and objectives of undergraduate medical education; (2) to implement these procedures by…

Gjerde, Craig L.; Sheehan, T. Joseph

365

Service with Style: Micki McIntyre--Health Sciences Library, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

After a brief career in musical theater, Micki McIntyre entered the graduate library program at Columbia University, where she noticed a poster advertising free tuition to library employees. "There was a vacancy at the health sciences library, and that's how a theater major became a medical librarian." She's a medical librarian with flair. As…

Library Journal, 2005

2005-01-01

366

[Hangings in the material of Department of Forensic Medicine, Nicolaus Copernicus University Collegium Medicum in Bydgoszcz, in the years 2000-2010].  

PubMed

This study presents an analysis of suicides based on autopsy protocols from the years 2000-2010. Out of all autopsies conducted at Department of Forensic Medicine, Nicolaus Copernicus University Collegium Medicum in Bydgoszcz, 477 cases resulted from hanging. During this period the majority of hangings were recorded in 2010 (61 cases). The parameters assessed in this study included age, sex, post-mortem blood ethanol concentration and place of death of the victims. The age range of the deceased was similar in the group of men and women. Males represented the majority of victims of hanging (89%); only 11% of all the victims were females. The authors observed differences in blood alcohol level of the victims in association with their sex. Not present ethanol was noted in approx. 42% of men and 71% of women. More than 65% cases of suicide hangings were encountered in urban areas, in living quarters and outbuildings. PMID:24847637

Sumi?ska-Ziemann, Barbara; Bloch-Bogus?awska, Elzbieta

2013-01-01

367

Growth in Clinical Research Productivity and Funding at the University of Hawaii's John A. Burns School of Medicine: The Past 10 Years  

PubMed Central

Over the last ten years, faculty at the John A. Burns School of Medicine (JABSOM) and the University of Hawaii (UH) have been actively engaged in ongoing efforts to increase the quantity and improve the quality of biomedical research in the State of Hawaii. JABSOM’s Clinical Research Center (CRC), funded in 1995 by the National Center for Research Resources (NCRR) and the Research Centers in Minority Institutions (RCMI) of the National Institutes of Health, has provided research infrastructure that has been essential to these efforts. The CRC and other JABSOM departments and affiliated programs have collaborated with public and private entities within the community, particularly in the area of health related to diverse racial and ethnic populations. This paper sets forth a number of the significant indicators of research progress, as illustrated primarily through CRC support for various research activities conducted at JABSOM.

Shomaker, T. Samuel; Harrigan, Rosanne C.; Easa, David

2005-01-01

368

Conflict resolution at the University of Ottawa Faculty of Medicine: The Pelican and the sign of the triangle.  

PubMed

In 1997 the University of Ottawa Medical School adopted a conflict-resolution policy for informally dealing with complaints of abuse, harassment and intimidation, sexual harassment, and scientific misconduct or misappropriation of intellectual property. In collaboration with the university's Faculty of Law, general conflict-resolution workshops were given for faculty and administration and mediation training was provided to medical faculty designated "complaint officers" under the policy. In this article, the authors describe the policy and training and then analyze the first major incident arising after the policy's implementation: the publication of disrespectful misogynist material in The Pelican, a medical student society newsletter. The Pelican incident is used as a "lessons learned" case study both in terms of its multiple outcomes and as an opportunity to pinpoint some important policy and practical considerations that emerged in implementing a conflict-resolution policy. The article also describes the results of a learning environment survey conducted after the Pelican incident. PMID:11299145

Zweibel, E B; Goldstein, R

2001-04-01

369

Death is not always a failure: outcomes from implementing an online virtual patient clinical case in palliative care for family medicine clerkship  

PubMed Central

Background The dying patient is a reality of medicine. Medical students, however, feel unprepared to effectively manage the complex end-of-life (EOL) management issues of the dying patient and want increased experiential learning in Palliative Care. Aims To address the need for more formal curriculum in EOL care, we developed and implemented an online virtual patient (VP) clinical case in Palliative Care into the 2010–2011 Year Three Family Medicine Clerkship rotation curriculum. Methods A mixed-method design was used to measure the change in knowledge and perceived preparedness level in EOL care before and after completing the online VP case. A survey collected qualitative descriptions of the students’ educational experience of using this case. Results Ninety five percent (130/137) of the students voluntarily consented to have their results analyzed. The group knowledge score (n=127) increased significantly from a pre-course average of 7.69/16±2.27, to a post-course average of 10.02/16±2.39 (p<0.001). The students’ self-assessed comfort level increased significantly with all aspects of EOL management from pre-course to post-course (p<0.001). Nearly, 91.1% of the students rated the VP realism as ‘Good to Excellent’, 86% rated the case as educationally beneficial. Nearly 59.3% of students felt emotionally engaged with the VP. Qualitative feedback found that the case content was very useful and realistic, but that the interface was sometimes awkward to navigate. Conclusions The online VP case in Palliative Care is a useful teaching tool that may help to address the need for increased formal Palliative Care experience in medical school training programs.

Tan, Amy; Ross, Shelley Paige; Duerksen, Kimberley

2013-01-01

370

Multivendor nuclear medicine PACS provide fully digital clinical operation at the University of Miami/Jackson Memorial Hospital  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In an effort to improve patient care while considering cost-effectiveness, we developed a Picture Archiving and Communication System (PACS), which combines imaging cameras, computers and other peripheral equipment from multiple nuclear medicine vectors. The PACS provides fully-digital clinical operation which includes acquisition and automatic organization of patient data, distribution of the data to all networked units inside the department and other remote locations, digital analysis and quantitation of images, digital diagnostic reading of image studies and permanent data archival with the ability for fast retrieval. The PACS enabled us to significantly reduce the amount of film used, and we are currently proceeding with implementing a film-less laboratory. Hard copies are produced on paper or transparent sheets for non-digitally connected parts of the hospital. The PACS provides full-digital operation which is faster, more reliable, better organized and managed, and overall more efficient than a conventional film-based operation. In this paper, the integration of the various PACS components from multiple vendors is reviewed, and the impact of PACS, with its advantages and limitations on our clinical operation is analyzed.

Georgiou, Mike F.; Sfakianakis, George N.; Johnson, Gary; Douligeris, Christos; Scandar, Silvia; Eisler, E.; Binkley, B.

1994-05-01

371

Nuclear Medicine: Career Information  

MedlinePLUS

... Patients For Healthcare Providers Career Center Career Information Nuclear physicians are usually based in a university or ... and have limited involvement in direct patient care. Nuclear Medicine physicians participate in the intellectual challenge presented ...

372

The Relationship between First-Year Medical School Grades and Academic, Personality, and Attitude Measures: Wright State University School of Medicine, Class of 1984. Program Evaluation Studies, Report Number 5.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigated (1) selected academic, personality, and attitude characteristics of the Wright State University School of Medicine (WSUSOM) class of 1984 and (2) the relationships between first-year grades and various personality, attitude, and premedical academic measures. In September 1980, first-year medical students (n-99), class of…

Markert, Ronald J.

373

Effectiveness of evidence-based medicine training for undergraduate students at a Chinese Military Medical University: a self-controlled trial  

PubMed Central

Background To evaluate the effect of the integration of evidence-based medicine (EBM) into medical curriculum by measuring undergraduate medical students’ EBM knowledge, attitudes, personal application, and anticipated future use. Methods A self-controlled trial was conducted with 251 undergraduate students at a Chinese Military Medical University, using a validated questionnaire regarding the students’ evidence-based practice (EBP) about knowledge (EBP-K), attitude (EBP-A), personal application (EBP-P), and future anticipated use (EBP-F). The educational intervention was a 20-hour EBM course formally included in the university’s medical curriculum, combining lectures with small group discussion and student-teacher exchange sessions. Data were analyzed using paired t-tests to test the significance of the difference between a before and after comparison. Results The difference between the pre- and post-training scores were statistically significant for EBP-K, EBP-A, EBP-P, and EBP-F. The scores for EBP-P showed the most pronounced percentage change after EBM training (48.97?±?8.6%), followed by EBP-A (20.83?±?2.1%), EBP-K (19.21?±?3.2%), and EBP-F (17.82?±?5.7%). Stratified analyses by gender, and program subtypes did not result in any significant changes to the results. Conclusions The integration of EBM into the medical curriculum improved undergraduate medical students’ EBM knowledge, attitudes, personal application, and anticipated future use. A well-designed EBM training course and objective outcome measurements are necessary to ensure the optimum learning opportunity for students.

2014-01-01

374

Series: The research agenda for general practice/family medicine and primary health care in Europe. Part 4. Results: specific problem solving skills.  

PubMed

The 'Research Agenda for General Practice/Family Medicine and Primary Health Care in Europe' summarizes the evidence relating to the core competencies and characteristics of the Wonca Europe definition of GP/FM, and its implications for general practitioners/family doctors, researchers and policy makers. The European Journal of General Practice publishes a series of articles based on this document. The previous articles presented background, objectives, and methodology, as well results on 'primary care management' and 'community orientation' and the person-related core competencies of GP/FM. This article reflects on the general practitioner's 'specific problem solving skills'. These include decision making on diagnosis and therapy of specific diseases, accounting for the properties of primary care, but also research questions related to quality management and resource use, shared decision making, or professional education and development. Clinical research covers most specific diseases, but often lacks pragmatism and primary care relevance. Quality management is a stronghold of GP/FM research. Educational interventions can be effective when well designed for a specific setting and situation. However, their message that 'usual care' by general practitioners is insufficient may be problematic. GP and their patients need more research into diagnostic reasoning with a step-wise approach to increase predictive values in a setting characterized by uncertainty and low prevalence of specific diseases. Pragmatic comparative effectiveness studies of new and established drugs or non-pharmaceutical therapy are needed. Multi-morbidity and complexity should be addressed. Studies on therapy, communication strategies and educational interventions should consider impact on health and sustainability of effects. PMID:20825274

Hummers-Pradier, Eva; Beyer, Martin; Chevallier, Patrick; Eilat-Tsanani, Sophia; Lionis, Christos; Peremans, Lieve; Petek, Davorina; Rurik, Imre; Soler, Jean Karl; Stoffers, Henri Ejh; Topsever, Pinar; Ungan, Mehmet; van Royen, Paul

2010-09-01

375

An Examination of Biracial College Youths' Family Ethnic Socialization, Ethnic Identity, and Adjustment: Do Self-Identification Labels and University Context Matter?  

PubMed Central

This study examined family ethnic socialization, ethnic identity, and adjustment among Latino/White and Asian/White biracial college students (n = 507), with special attention to how ethnic self-identification and university ethnic composition informed the ethnic identity process. Findings indicated that family ethnic socialization was positively related to participants’ ethnic identity exploration and resolution, but not ethnic identity affirmation. Furthermore, ethnic identity resolution and affirmation were associated with higher self-acceptance and self-esteem, and lower depressive symptoms. Importantly, university ethnic composition moderated the association between ethnic identity resolution and anxiety, such that resolution promoted adjustment in contexts that were relatively more ethnically diverse. University ethnic composition also moderated the association between ethnic identity affirmation and both self-esteem and self-acceptance, such that affirmation was associated with better adjustment but only in schools that were less ethnically diverse.

Brittian, Aerika S.; Umana-Taylor, Adriana J.; Derlan, Chelsea L.

2014-01-01

376

Proactive Medicine: The "UCI 30," an Ultrasound-Based Clinical Initiative From the University of California, Irvine.  

PubMed

This article discusses the benefits of integrating point-of-care diagnostic ultrasound into the four-year medical school curriculum. Handheld ultrasound devices have been used to teach medical students at the University of California (UC), Irvine, since August 2010, and the article explains how the use of this inexpensive, safe, and noninvasive tool enhances the ability of a physician conducting a standard physical exam to confirm suspected findings and uncover other suspected pathology at a reasonable cost. The authors describe the ultrasound curriculum at UC Irvine and the process of its implementation. In the appendix to the article, the authors describe the specific diagnostic benefits of using a handheld ultrasound device for each element of the Stanford 25 physical exam. Their ultrasound-enhanced approach to the physical exam is referred to as the "UCI 30." They make recommendations for how and when to integrate ultrasound into the physical exam. The article points out that early training of medical students in the use of ultrasound can avoid the diagnostic problems of ultrasound by maximizing students' comfort and ability to obtain accurate ultrasound images for diagnostic and procedural purposes. PMID:24826849

Fox, J Christian; Schlang, Joelle R; Maldonado, Graciela; Lotfipour, Shahram; Clayman, Ralph V

2014-07-01

377

Communicating bioastronautics research to students, families and the nation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The National Space Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI) is supporting the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) education mission through a comprehensive Education and Public Outreach Program (EPOP) that communicates the excitement and significance of space biology to schools, families, and lay audiences. The EPOP is comprised of eight academic institutions: Baylor College of Medicine, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Morehouse School of Medicine, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Texas A&M University, University of Texas Medical Branch Galveston, Rice University, and the University of Washington. This paper describes the programs and products created by the EPOP to promote space life science education in schools and among the general public. To date, these activities have reached thousands of teachers and students around the US and have been rated very highly.

MacLeish, Marlene Y.; Moreno, Nancy P.; Thomson, William A.; Newman, Dava J.; Gannon, Patrick J.; Smith, Roland B.; Denton, Jon J.; James, Robert K.; Wilson, Craig; Sognier, Marguerite; Illman, Deborah L.

2005-05-01

378

Communicating bioastronautics research to students, families and the nation.  

PubMed

The National Space Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI) is supporting the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) education mission through a comprehensive Education and Public Outreach Program (EPOP) that communicates the excitement and significance of space biology to schools, families, and lay audiences. The EPOP is comprised of eight academic institutions: Baylor College of Medicine, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Morehouse School of Medicine, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Texas A&M University, University of Texas Medical Branch Galveston, Rice University, and the University of Washington. This paper describes the programs and products created by the EPOP to promote space life science education in schools and among the general public. To date, these activities have reached thousands of teachers and students around the US and have been rated very highly. PMID:15834996

MacLeish, Marlene Y; Moreno, Nancy P; Thomson, William A; Newman, Dava J; Gannon, Patrick J; Smith, Roland B; Denton, Jon J; James, Robert K; Wilson, Craig; Sognier, Marguerite; Illman, Deborah L

2005-01-01

379

Collaborative Care for Older Adults with low back pain by family medicine physicians and doctors of chiropractic (COCOA): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial  

PubMed Central

Background Low back pain is a prevalent and debilitating condition that affects the health and quality of life of older adults. Older people often consult primary care physicians about back pain, with many also receiving concurrent care from complementary and alternative medicine providers, most commonly doctors of chiropractic. However, a collaborative model of treatment coordination between these two provider groups has yet to be tested. The primary aim of the Collaborative Care for Older Adults Clinical Trial is to develop and evaluate the clinical effectiveness and feasibility of a patient-centered, collaborative care model with family medicine physicians and doctors of chiropractic for the treatment of low back pain in older adults. Methods/design This pragmatic, pilot randomized controlled trial will enroll 120 participants, age 65 years or older with subacute or chronic low back pain lasting at least one month, from a community-based sample in the Quad-Cities, Iowa/Illinois, USA. Eligible participants are allocated in a 1:1:1 ratio to receive 12 weeks of medical care, concurrent medical and chiropractic care, or collaborative medical and chiropractic care. Primary outcomes are self-rated back pain and disability. Secondary outcomes include general and functional health status, symptom bothersomeness, expectations for treatment effectiveness and improvement, fear avoidance behaviors, depression, anxiety, satisfaction, medication use and health care utilization. Treatment safety and adverse events also are monitored. Participant-rated outcome measures are collected via self-reported questionnaires and computer-assisted telephone interviews at baseline, and at 4, 8, 12, 24, 36 and 52 weeks post-randomization. Provider-rated expectations for treatment effectiveness and participant improvement also are evaluated. Process outcomes are assessed through qualitative interviews with study participants and research clinicians, chart audits of progress notes and content analysis of clinical trial notes. Discussion This pragmatic, pilot randomized controlled trial uses a mixed method approach to evaluate the clinical effectiveness, feasibility, and participant and provider perceptions of collaborative care between medical doctors and doctors of chiropractic in the treatment of older adults with low back pain. Trial registration This trial registered in ClinicalTrials.gov on 04 March 2011 with the ID number of NCT01312233.

2013-01-01

380

Ethnobotanical investigation of traditional medicinal plants commercialized in the markets of Mashhad, Iran  

PubMed Central

Objective: An ethnobotanical survey on the medicinal plant species marketed in Mashhad city, northeastern Iran, was conducted in order to document traditional medicinal knowledge and application of medicinal plants. Materials and Methods: This study was undertaken between 2011 and 2012. The indigenous knowledge of traditional healers used for medicinal purposes were collected through questionnaire and personal interviews during field trips. Ethnobotanical data was arranged alphabetically by family name followed by botanical name, vernacular name, part used, folk use, and recipe. Correct identification was made with the help of the various Floras and different herbal literature at the Ferdowsi University of Mashhad Herbarium (FUMH). Results: The present investigation reported medicinal information for about 269 species, belonging to 87 vascular plant families and one fungus family. The most important family was Lamiaceae with 26 species, followed by Asteraceae with 23, Fabaceae with 20, and Apiaceae with 19. Herbal medicine uses reported by herbalists was classified into 132 different uses which show significant results to treat a wide spectrum of human ailments. Plants sold at the market were mostly used for digestive system disorders, respiratory problems, urological troubles, nervous system disorders, skin problems, and gynecological ailments. Conclusion: This survey showed that although people in study area have access to modern medical facilities, a lot of them still continue to depend on medicinal plants for the treatment of healthcare problems. The present paper represents significant ethnobotanical information on medical plants which provides baseline data for future pharmacological and phytochemical studies.

Amiri, Mohammad Sadegh; Joharchi, Mohammad Reza

2013-01-01

381

B_s^0 - overline B_s^0 mixing in a family non-universal Z' model revisited  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Motivated by the very recent measurements performed at the LHCb and the Tevatron of the B_s^0 - overline B_s^0 mixing, in this paper we revisit it in a family non-universal Z' model, to check if a simultaneous explanation for all the mixing observables, especially for the like-sign dimuon charge asymmetry observed by the D0 collaboration, could be made in such a specific model. In the first scenario where the Z' boson contributes only to the off-diagonal element M_{{{12}}}^s , it is found that, once the combined constraints from ? M s , ? s and ?? s are imposed, the model could not explain the measured flavour-specific CP asymmetry a_{{fs}}^s , at least within its 1 ? ranges. In the second scenario where the NP contributes also to the absorptive part ?_{{{12}}}^s via tree-level Z'-induced b ? coverline c s operators, we find that, with the constraints from ? M s , ? s and the indirect CP asymmetry in {{overline B }_d} ? J/?K S taken into account, the present measured 1 ? experimental ranges for a_{{fs}}^s could not be reproduced too. Thus, such a specific Z' model with our specific assumptions could not simultaneously reconcile all the present data on B_s^0 - overline B_s^0 mixing. Future improved measurements from the LHCb and the proposed superB experiments, especially of the flavour-specific CP asymmetries, are expected to shed light on the issue.

Li, Xin-Qiang; Li, Yan-Min; Lu, Gong-Ru; Su, Fang

2012-05-01

382

Phenotype-genotype updates from familial Mediterranean fever database registry of Mansoura University Children' Hospital, Mansoura, Egypt  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND: Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is autosomal recessive disease that affects people from Mediterranean region, Europe and Japan. Its gene (Mediterranean fever [MEFV]) has more than 100 mostly non-sense mutations. OBJECTIVES: The objective of the following study is to provide some phenotype-genotype correlates in FMF by categorizing the Egyptian FMF cases from Delta governorates after analysis of the four most common mutations of MEFV gene (M680I, M694I, M694V, V726A). SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Clinically, suspected FMF cases using Tel-Hashomer criteria were enrolled in the study. Cases were referred to Mansoura University Children's Hospital that serves most of the most middle Delta governorates, in the period from 2006 to 2011. Subjects included 282 males and 144 females, mean age of onset 9.3 ± 2.2 years. All cases were analyzed for these mutations using amplification refractory mutation system based on the polymerase chain reaction technique. Five FMF patients agreed to undergo renal biopsy to check for development of amyloidosis. Analysis of data was carried out using SPSS (SPSS, Inc., Chicago, IL, USA). RESULTS: Mutation was found in 521 out of 852 studies alleles, the most frequent is M694V (35.4%) followed by M694I, V726A and M680I. 11 cases were homozygous; 7 M694V, 3 M680I and only one M694I case. Severe abdominal pain occurred in 31 (7.28%) but severe arthritis in 103 cases (24.2%). Strong association was found between arthritis and homozygous mutant compared with single and double heterozygous (72.7% vs. 33.3% and 20.24%, P < 0.001). Four amyloid cases were M694V positive. CONCLUSION: M694V allele is the most common among Egyptian FMF especially those with amyloidosis. We recommend routine check for amyloidosis in FMF cases to statistically validate this link.

Al-Haggar, Mohammad S.; Yahia, Sohier; Abdel-Hady, Dina; Al-Saied, Afaf; Al-Kenawy, Rasha; Abo-El-Kasem, Rabab

2014-01-01

383

Patient characteristics, practice activities, and one-month outcomes for chronic, recurrent low-back pain treated by chiropractors and family medicine physicians: A practice-based feasibility study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Chronic low-back pain is a significant public health problem for which few therapies are supported by predictable outcomes. In this report, practice activities and 1-month outcomes data are presented for 93 chiropractic patients and 45 medical patients with chronic, recurrent low-back pain.Design: A prospective, observational, community-based feasibility study involving chiropractors and family medicine physicians.Setting: Forty private chiropractic clinics, the

Joanne Nyiendo; Mitchell Haas; Peter Goodwin

2000-01-01

384

[Health Promotion and care of immigrant population in the eighth Municipality of Rome: the experience of the Medicine Service of Solidarity and the University Hospital of Tor Vergata].  

PubMed

The VIII Municipality of Rome is characterized by a high poverty rate, by the presence of many immigrant communities and by the lack of health services available to vulnerable social groups. In 2005 , the " Servizio di Medicina Solidale" of the University Hospital of "Tor Vergata", for the first time intervened in this Municipality regarding Immigrant Health. The paper describes the activities and organization of this service from January 2005 to December 2007. It demonstrates a complex epidemiological picture of 2,374 immigrants, characterized by a young population, mostly women with reproductive health issues, followed by children with infectious and nutritional problems and, ultimately, adults who accessed the service, firstly for gastroenterological problems, secondly for cardiovascular problems and finally for dysmetabolic disorders. The paper describes the culture-centered actions of Health Promotion and Health Education in order to improve health awareness and promote integration of immigrants. The study indicates that the limited number of hospital admissions ( n.20) with respect to the number of outpatient visits (n.70.000) in the first seven years of the service " Medicina Solidale" has significantly reduced the number of unnecessary admissions to emergency wards. In conclusion it is notable that the cost of such intervention results eight times inferior to emergency admissions and further confirms that a Community medicine approach is sustainable. PMID:23532164

Palombi, Leonardo; Ercoli, Lucia; Buonomo, Ersilia; Mancinelli, Sandro; De Luca, Simona; Laurenti, Serena; Visconti, Giuseppe; Bollero, Patrizio

2013-01-01

385

Training at Washington University School of Medicine in Psychiatry in the late l950's, from the perspective of an affective disorder researcher.  

PubMed

In the late 1950s three men in the Department of Psychiatry at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, MO, Drs. Eli Robins, Sam Guze and George Winokur, developed sets of criteria, based on published data and their own research, for the diagnosis and treatment of mental disorders. They also presented data on how to validate these diagnoses. They termed their endeavor, "The medical model for psychiatric disorders." Residents were taught how to use criteria to diagnose and treat psychiatric patients. Besides clinical interviewing, the emphasis was on published data, critical literature reading and research, either basic or clinical, always using structured interviews. All residents were required to do psychiatric research, supervised by one of the full-time staff. Besides the three above, there were many other faculty members who were actively engaged in teaching and research, but they all adhered to the above model. Repetition was the most important aspect of learning. It was an exciting time to be there and that enthusiasm led to many of the trainees continuing to be committed to academic careers and the others, to a very high standard of psychiatric care. In addition, it led to the development of DSMIII and beyond, a host of validated structured interviews, a method for testing new drugs, a method for validating psychiatric diagnoses, an emphasis on the importance of genetics to psychiatry, and many important clinical findings. PMID:16527361

Clayton, Paula J

2006-05-01

386

The novel ethylene-regulated gene OsUsp1 from rice encodes a member of a plant protein family related to prokaryotic universal stress proteins  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using subtractive hybridization a submergence- induced gene was identified from deepwater rice, OsUsp1, that encodes a homologue of the bacterial universal stress protein family. Sequence analysis revealed that OsUSP1 is most closely related to the bacterial MJ0577-type of ATP-binding USP proteins which have been suggested to act as a molecular switch. USP protein homologues appear to be ubiqui- tous in

Margret Sauter; Guillaume Rzewuski; Tanja Marwedel

2002-01-01

387

Fertility desires and family planning demand among HIV-positive clients in follow-up care at antiretroviral treatment unit in Gondar university hospital, Ethiopia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Despite the growing importance of fertility issues for HIV-infected persons, little is known about their actual fertility desires and intentions. This study was, therefore, aimed at assessing fertility desires and demand for family planning in HIV-positive clients in follow-up care at antiretroviral treatment (ART) unit in Gondar University Hospital, Ethiopia. A cross sectional quantitative study on 389 study subjects (56%

Lidya Tesfaye; Mengesha Admassu; Assefa Getachew; Hardeep R. Sharma

2012-01-01

388

Diabetes Medicines  

MedlinePLUS

... choices and physical activity, you may need diabetes medicines. The kind of medicine you take depends on your type of diabetes, ... pills. Combination pills contain two kinds of diabetes medicine in one tablet. Some people take pills and ...

389

Nuclear Medicine.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the use of nuclear medicine techniques in diagnosis and therapy. Describes instrumentation in diagnostic nuclear medicine and predicts future trends in nuclear medicine imaging technology. (Author/MM)

Badawi, Ramsey D.

2001-01-01

390

COPD Medicine  

MedlinePLUS

... You are here: Health Information > Medications > COPD COPD Medicine Your doctor may prescribe medicine to control the ... Learn how to manage your medications . Signs the Medicine Is Helping How can you work with your ...

391

Complementary and Alternative Medicine for Multiple Sclerosis  

MedlinePLUS

... for PATIENTS and their FAMILIES COMPLEMENTARY AND ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE FOR MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS This fact sheet is provided ... understand the current evidence regarding complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) for treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS). The ...

392

Medicines for the Treatment of Hoarding  

MedlinePLUS

Medicines for the Treatment of Hoarding by Sanjaya Saxena, M.D. Professor, UCSD Department of Psychiatry Director, ... be caused by different genetic and family factors. Medicines for Hoarding There two kinds of treatment that ...

393

A Qualitative Analysis of Family Support and Interaction among African American College Students at an Ivy League University  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The support that the African American college students from predominantly White campuses get from the families and other kinship networks is analyzed. It is concluded that the family support helps in reducing stress level among college students and provides an emotional support to them.

Barnett, Marina

2004-01-01

394

Long-Term Follow-Up and Results of Thirty Pediatric Intracranial Hydatid Cysts: Half a Century of Experience in the Department of Neurosurgery of the School of Medicine at the University of Istanbul (1952–2001)  

Microsoft Academic Search

A series of 30 documented cases of intracranial hydatid cyst out of 33 pediatric and 45 total patients admitted to the Department of Neurosurgery of the School of Medicine at Istanbul University within the years 1952–1996 is presented. The pediatric population consisted of 73% of the series. Twenty patients (66%) are alive and well after a follow-up period of 8–45

Cagatay Onal; Faruk Unal; Orhan Barlas; Nail Izgi; Kemal Hepgul; M. Inan Turantan; Ali Canbolat; Kirac Turker; Cicek Bayindir; Husameddin K. Gokay; Umur Kaya

2001-01-01

395

Promoting Children’s Mental Health in Family Supportive Housing: A Community–University Partnership for Formerly Homeless Children and Families  

Microsoft Academic Search

Emerging research indicates that significant numbers of formerly homeless families residing in permanent supportive housing\\u000a have caregivers with substance use and mental health disorders, and children with histories of exposure to violence, abuse,\\u000a and out-of-home placement. These factors place children at risk for adverse psychosocial outcomes, including later homelessness,\\u000a providing a strong rationale for embedding child-focused prevention and intervention services

Abigail H. Gewirtz

2007-01-01

396

A Resident's Perspective Of Burnout In A Hospice Setting Or Home Hospice Palliative Care As Anti-burnout During Family Medicine Residency  

Cancer.gov

Principles Of Family Practice Principles Of Family Practice ¾ ¾ Access to care Access to care ¾ ¾ Continuity of care Continuity of care ¾ ¾ Comprehensive care Comprehensive care ¾ ¾ Coordination of care Coordination of care ¾ ¾ Contextual care Contextual care Jimbo M.

397

Posttraumatic stress disorder among Sri Lankan University students as a consequence of their exposure to family violence.  

PubMed

The article presents the results of a study on the association between exposure to family violence (i.e., witnessing interparental violence and experiencing parental violence) during childhood and adolescence and adult posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The study was conducted among a self-selected convenience sample of 476 students from Sri Lanka, using a self-administered questionnaire. The findings indicate that the more participants witnessed interparental violence and the more they experienced parental violence, the more they exhibited PTSD symptoms. Moreover, the findings reveal that participants' exposure to family violence explains a significant amount of the variance in their PTSD over and above the variance that can be attributed to their sociodemographic characteristics (age, gender, number of siblings, and family's socioeconomic status) and to their perceptions of the environment and functioning of their families. The limitations of the study and recommendations for future research are discussed. PMID:19106201

Haj-Yahia, Muhammad M; Tishby, Orya; de Zoysa, Piyanjali

2009-12-01

398

Preventive and Community Medicine in Primary Care. Teaching of Preventive Medicine Vol. 5.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This monograph is the result of a conference on the role of preventive and community medicine in primary medical care and education. The following six papers were presented at the conference: (1) Roles of Departments of Preventive Medicine; (2) Competency-Based Objectives in Preventive Medicine for the Family Physician; (3) Preventive Medicine

Barker, William H., Ed.

399

Do people really know what makes a family history of cancer?  

PubMed

BACKGROUND: Family history is often referred to as a family tree in casual everyday conservations, but it carries a different connotation in medicine. This study is the first to investigate people's understanding of 'family medical history' and the concept of 'family' in the context of inherited cancer. METHODS: Three hundred and nine staff at the Faculty of Medicine and Health, University of Leeds completed an online web survey. RESULTS: Not all respondents understood or knew what makes a family history of cancer. Only 54% knew exactly the type of information required to make a family history. Apart from blood relatives, adopted and step-siblings, step parents, in-laws, spouses, friends and colleagues were also named as 'family' for family history taking. Personal experience of living with cancer and academic qualification were not significant in influencing knowledge of family history. CONCLUSIONS: There is misunderstanding and poor knowledge of family history of cancer and the type of information required to make a family history even in a sample of people teaching and researching medicine and health issues. Public understanding of the value of family medical history in cancer prevention and management is important if informed clinical decisions and appropriate health care are to be delivered. PMID:22889133

Lim, Jennifer N W; Hewison, Jenny

2012-08-13

400

III Workshop Nazionale Divirologia Veterinaria. Facolta id Medicina Veterinaria, Held in degli Studie di Bari, Valenzano (Bari), on 11-12, Giugno 2009. Riassunti (III National Workshop on Veterinary Virology. Held in Veterinary Medicine, University of Bar, Valenzano (Bari). June 11-12, 2009. Abstact Book).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Workshop is organized in collaboration with the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine of the University of Bari and the Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale della Puglia e Basilicata. It is aimed to gather veterinarians, biologists and technicians from the ...

C. Buonavoglia E. Falcone F. M. Ruggeri S. Babsa

2009-01-01

401

The resident-as-teacher educational challenge: a needs assessment survey at the National Autonomous University of Mexico Faculty of Medicine  

PubMed Central

Background The role of residents as educators is increasingly recognized, since it impacts residents, interns, medical students and other healthcare professionals. A widespread implementation of resident-as-teacher courses in developed countries' medical schools has occurred, with variable results. There is a dearth of information about this theme in developing countries. The National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM) Faculty of Medicine has more than 50% of the residency programs' physician population in Mexico. This report describes a needs assessment survey for a resident as teacher program at our institution. Methods A cross-sectional descriptive survey was developed based on a review of the available literature and discussion by an expert multidisciplinary committee. The goal was to identify the residents' attitudes, academic needs and preferred educational strategies regarding resident-as-teacher activities throughout the residency. The survey was piloted and modified accordingly. The paper anonymous survey was sent to 7,685 residents, the total population of medical residents in UNAM programs in the country. Results There was a 65.7% return rate (5,186 questionnaires), a broad and representative sample of the student population. The residents felt they had knowledge and were competent in medical education, but the majority felt a need to improve their knowledge and skills in this discipline. Most residents (92.5%) felt that their role as educators of medical students, interns and other residents was important/very important. They estimated that 45.5% of their learning came from other residents. Ninety percent stated that it was necessary to be trained in teaching skills. The themes identified to include in the educational intervention were mostly clinically oriented. The educational strategies in order of preference were interactive lectures with a professor, small groups with a moderator, material available in a website for self-learning, printed material for self-study and homework, and small group web-based learning. Conclusions There is a large unmet need to implement educational interventions to improve residents' educational skills in postgraduate educational programs in developing countries. Most perceived needs of residents are practical and clinically oriented, and they prefer traditional educational strategies. Resident as teachers educational interventions need to be designed taking into account local needs and resources.

2010-01-01

402

Psychiatry as an Internal Medicine Subspecialty: An Educational Model.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

To lessen the traditional mind-body dichotomy in medicine, the West Virginia University School of Medicine has integrated psychiatry into the Department of Internal Medicine and the university hospital's psychiatric ward has been transformed into the Conjoint Medicine Service. Patients with a variety of emotional and medical problems are admitted.…

Shemo, John P. D.; And Others

1980-01-01

403

The need for specialized training programs in palliative medicine  

PubMed Central

Canada faces a significant and growing burden of terminal illness. There are major unresolved economic, ethical and social issues related to care at the end of life. Despite the international reputation for Canadian efforts in palliative care, the medical profession in Canada has largely failed to recognize the importance of the field, as evidenced by the lack of commitment on the part of most medical faculties at Canadian universities to developing academic strength in palliative medicine, the lack of content in the undergraduate curriculum and of postgraduate programs in palliative medicine, and the lack of support for research into end-of-life care. The authors propose a conjoint initiative by the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada and the College of Family Physicians of Canada to develop specialized training programs in palliative medicine as a critical step in addressing this crisis.

Seely, J F; Scott, J F; Mount, B M

1997-01-01

404

On the Analysis of Genome-Wide Association Studies in Family-Based Designs: A Universal, Robust Analysis Approach and an Application to Four Genome-Wide Association Studies  

Microsoft Academic Search

For genome-wide association studies in family-based designs, we propose a new, universally applicable approach. The new test statistic exploits all available information about the association, while, by virtue of its design, it maintains the same robustness against population admixture as traditional family-based approaches that are based exclusively on the within-family information. The approach is suitable for the analysis of almost

Sungho Won; Jemma B. Wilk; Rasika A. Mathias; Christopher J. ODonnell; Edwin K. Silverman; Kathleen Barnes; George T. OConnor; Scott T. Weiss; Christoph Lange

2009-01-01

405

Posttraumatic Stress Disorder among Sri Lankan University Students as a Consequence of Their Exposure to Family Violence  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The article presents the results of a study on the association between exposure to family violence (i.e., witnessing interparental violence and experiencing parental violence) during childhood and adolescence and adult posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The study was conducted among a self-selected convenience sample of 476 students from Sri…

Haj-Yahia, Muhammad M.; Tishby, Orya; de Zoysa, Piyanjali

2009-01-01

406

[Market oriented occupational medicine].  

PubMed

The history and the recent state of occupational medicine in Hungary, and its relation with governmental labor organizations are analyzed. In the past 20 years, large "socialist" factories were replaced by smaller companies employing fewer workers. They have been forced to establish contract with occupational health providers. Many of them offer primary care services, whereas family physicians having a board examination in occupational medicine are allowed to work in this field as well. The market of occupational medicine is less regulated, and ethical rules are not always considered. Undercutting prices is a common practice. The recent system could be improved by some regulations which should be respected. There is no reason to make rough changes establishing a new market for profit oriented insurance companies, and to allow employees and employers to work without specification neglecting international agreements. Occupational medicine should be supervised again by the health authorities instead of economists who have quite different, short-term priorities. PMID:22951411

Rurik, Imre; Cseh, Károly

2012-09-01

407

Validation of HPLC Determination of Phenolic Acids Present in Some Lamiaceae Family Plants  

Microsoft Academic Search

HPLC columns with different length, particle size, and chemical properties of sorbent were tested and compared for the application in the development of the universal HPLC assay for determination of phenolic compounds, which could be present in some medicinal plants from the Lamiaceae family (Melissa officinalis, Rosmarinus officinalis, Salvia officinalis, Thymus serpyllum, and Origanum vulgare). More RP?18 columns have been

Alica Ziaková; Eva Brandšteterová

2003-01-01

408

Alternative Medicine  

MedlinePLUS

Alternative Medicine en Español email Send this article to a friend by filling out the fields below: Your name: ... Send Thanks for emailing that article! Tweet Alternative medicine may be defined as non-standard, unconventional treatments ...

409

A Required Internal Medicine Preceptorship.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A preceptorship in an internal medicine clerkship at Southern Illinois University School of Medicine is discussed and evaluated. The results of a telephone survey indicate that the preceptorship had an important impact on the students, who learned time management, office management, and management of chronic clinical problems. (MLW)

Anderson, M. Brownell; And Others

1982-01-01

410

Medicine Women.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Described as a survival manual for Indian women in medicine, this collected work contains diverse pieces offering inspiration and practical advice for Indian women pursuing or considering careers in medicine. Introductory material includes two legends symbolizing the Medicine or Spirit Woman's role in Indian culture and an overview of Indians Into…

Beiswenger, James N., Ed.; Jeanotte, Holly, Ed.

411

A Collaborative Needs Assessment and Work Plan in Behavioral Medicine Curriculum Development in Vietnam  

Microsoft Academic Search

An important aspect of family medicine education in the United States and abroad is behavioral medicine. Interpersonal and communication skills, mental health assessment, and sensitivity to diverse patient populations are areas of curricular importance. This article describes the behavioral medicine portion of a family medicine consultation with Vietnam, in progress since 1999. The needs assessment for behavioral medicine reveals few

Julie M. Schirmer; Cynthia Cartwright; Alain J. Montegut; George K. Dreher; Jeffrey Stovall

2004-01-01

412

50 Years: Veterinary Medicine.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the history, research, teaching strategies, and specialties of the University of California at Davis School of Veterinary Medicine. Documents effects of changing societal attitudes toward wildlife, pets, working animals, and food animals on curriculum, the systems approach to disease, comparative genetics, biotechnology, the ecology of…

Narlesky, Lynn

1998-01-01

413

Osteopathic Medicine: About Osteopathic Medicine  

MedlinePLUS

... Advancing the distinctive philosophy and practice of osteopathic medicine Inside the AOA About the AOA AOA Membership ... DOs Licensed? How Are DOs Certified? About Osteopathic Medicine Page Content You are more than just the ...

414

Sasang constitutional medicine and traditional chinese medicine: a comparative overview.  

PubMed

Sasang constitutional medicine (SCM) is a holistic typological constitution medicine which balances psychological, social, and physical aspects of an individual to achieve wellness and increase longevity. SCM has the qualities of preventative medicine, as it emphasizes daily health management based on constitutionally differentiated regimens and self-cultivation of the mind and body. This review's goal is to establish a fundamental understanding of SCM and to provide a foundation for further study. It compares the similarities and differences of philosophical origins, perspectives on the mind (heart), typological systems, pathology, and therapeutics between SCM and traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). TCM is based on the Taoist view of the universe and humanity. The health and longevity of an individual depends on a harmonious relationship with the universe. On the other hand, SCM is based on the Confucian view of the universe and humanity. SCM focuses on the influence of human affairs on the psyche, physiology, and pathology. PMID:21941592

Yoo, Junghee; Lee, Euiju; Kim, Chungmi; Lee, Junhee; Lixing, Lao

2012-01-01

415

First-generation college students and U.S. citizens: is the university perceived like family or strangers?  

PubMed

We examined school sense of community (SSOC) between university students who are first-generation U.S. citizens (n = 936) or students who are non-first-generation U.S. citizens (n = 3,556), and between first-generation college students (n = 1,114) and students who are non-first-generation college students (n = 3,378), both attending an urban and diverse Roman Catholic university. Participants reported their SSOC and whether the school was innovative and inclusive, examining whether a higher sense of school community and positive notions of one's campus mission related to being a first-generation U.S. citizen or a first-generation college student. Results showed that a lack of belongingness may lead to lower academic achievement, school dropouts, and less school involvement. Future research should explore why there is a differing impact on school sense of community and campus mission perception for students who are first-generation U.S. citizens or first-generation college students. PMID:23256592

Williams, Shannon M; Karahalios, Vicky S; Ferrari, Joseph R

2013-01-01

416

The current status of knowledge of herbal medicine and medicinal plants in Fiche, Ethiopia  

PubMed Central

Background A majority of Ethiopians rely on traditional medicine as their primary form of health care, yet they are in danger of losing both their knowledge and the plants they have used as medicines for millennia. This study, conducted in the rural town of Fiche in Ethiopia, was undertaken with the support of Southern Cross University (SCU) Australia, Addis Ababa University (AAU) Ethiopia, and the Ethiopian Institute of Biodiversity (EIB), Ethiopia. The aim of this study, which included an ethnobotanical survey, was to explore the maintenance of tradition in the passing on of knowledge, the current level of knowledge about medicinal herbs and whether there is awareness and concern about the potential loss of both herbal knowledge and access to traditional medicinal plants. Methods This study was conducted using an oral history framework with focus groups, unstructured and semi-structured interviews, field-walk/discussion sessions, and a market survey. Fifteen people were selected via purposeful and snowball sampling. Analysis was undertaken using a grounded theory methodology. Results Fourteen lay community members and one professional herbalist provided information about 73 medicinal plants used locally. An ethnobotanical survey was performed and voucher specimens of 53 of the plants, representing 33 families, were collected and deposited at the EIB Herbarium. The community members are knowledgeable about recognition of medicinal plants and their usage to treat common ailments, and they continue to use herbs to treat sickness as they have in the past. A willingness to share knowledge was demonstrated by both the professional herbalist and lay informants. Participants are aware of the threat to the continued existence of the plants and the knowledge about their use, and showed willingness to take steps to address the situation. Conclusion There is urgent need to document the valuable knowledge of medicinal herbs in Ethiopia. Ethnobotanical studies are imperative, and concomitant sustainable programmes that support the sustainability of herbal medicine traditions may be considered as a way to collect and disseminate information thereby supporting communities in their efforts to maintain their heritage. This study contributes to the documentation of the status of current traditional herbal knowledge in Ethiopia.

2014-01-01

417

Rebuilding TRUST: A Community, Multi-Agency, State, and University Partnership to Improve Behavioral Health Care for American Indian Youth, their Families, and Communities  

PubMed Central

American Indian/Alaska Native youth represent the strength and survival of many Nations and Tribes. However, the aftermath of colonialism has resulted in numerous health disparities and challenges for Native youth, including the highest rate of suicide in the United States. With the aims of elucidating the causes of behavioral health disparities, eliminating them, and improving behavioral health care for Native youth, a partnership of providers, community members, and university faculty and staff completed a comprehensive literature review; conducted advisory meetings with 71 American Indian youth, parents, and elders; surveyed 25 service providers; and engaged in ongoing consultation with traditional practitioners. Results from the multiple sources were synthesized and are reported with 20 policy, provider, and research recommendations that recognize the importance of moving beyond exclusive reliance on western models of care and that seek to foster transformation of individuals, families, communities, behavioral health service systems of care, and social structures.

Goodkind, Jessica R.; Ross-Toledo, Kimberly; John, Susie; Lee Hall, Janie; Ross, Lucille; Freeland, Lance; Colleta, Ernest; Becenti-Fundark, Twila

2014-01-01

418

[Experience of the Center for Emergency Medicine of the University Medical Center in Sarajevo and principles of the emergency medical care system].  

PubMed

In siege and blocked Sarajevo, in 40 months, in primary care unit and than in Emergency Department 42,075 injured and ill persons have got the first aid. Out of that, 37% were injures 16% acute surgical conditions, 23% internal urgent conditions (since October 1994). There were 24% non-urgent cases from the surgical field. In this period of time 107,453 patients were treated hospitably, with an average of 2.108 hospital beds. In 1996, the primary care was given in 21,708 urgent cases, or 60% of 36,312 hospitably treated persons in total. There were 29% injuries, 24% of acute surgical cases, and 47% of internal medicine cases. Urgent centre received 53% individual paints who came by themselves without any medical aid; 25% from health centres where they have bog a primary care, and 22% came after received first aid of primary care in the Emergency department. By applying war surgical doctrine and general medical doctrine, with appropriate services for prompt diagnostics and treatment, with qualified specialists and consultancy services, a good quality of adequate treatment and care has been achieved, the mortality has been reduced, the hospitalisation has been rationalised, and treatment length has been reduced. Analysis demonstrates the reasons for existence of such medical centres in large hospitals. We have recognised the problems we are facing with, and which have to be solved progressively, as well as those concerning the functioning health services in Sarajevo Canton, and Federation of B&H. On the basis of all these knowledge's we believe that a well organised urgent medicine implemented in practice has great importance in the overall treatment. Basic objectives for establishing the urgent medicine as a system are: The first priority is to organise a modern system of urgent medicine, based on the principles of general medical doctrine and complementing with health care system. Urgent medicine programme should be incorporated in the process of medical education of the medical staff, giving a priority to the activities in practice. Provide modern equipment and adequate working space. Develop already developed co-operation with institutions and professionals from Europe and USA. Improve the low level of the first aid training of the population through the first aid courses. PMID:9601776

Drnda, K

1997-01-01

419

A universal product code scanner is a feasible method of measuring household food inventory and food use patterns in low-income families.  

PubMed

This study assesses the feasibility of using a Universal Product Code (UPC) scanner to record the home food inventory of limited-resource families. Feasibility was based on UPC scanner accuracy, time involved, and researcher/study participant feedback. Program staff members completed a traditional line-item inventory and UPC scan of 5,920 food items during 51 separate visits to the homes of 32 families. Foods reported from the UPC scanner were compared with the manual line-item food inventory. The UPC scanner report had an accuracy of 95.6% (5,661/5,920). Further, the UPC scanning technique offered a 31.8% time savings over the traditional line-item inventory approach. The UPC scanner was easy to use and participants reported that scanning food items was non-intrusive. A UPC scanner is a feasible method of recording the home food inventory, and the accuracy and simplicity of this approach can provide useful information on foods available for consumption within a home. PMID:16503237

Weinstein, James L; Phillips, Valery; MacLeod, Erin; Arsenault, Margaret; Ferris, Ann M

2006-03-01