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1

Boston University Family Medicine  

E-print Network

Boston University Family Medicine Global Health CollaborativeFamily Medicine As part of the Department of Family Medicine at Boston University, the Collaborative is committed to introducing and improving Family Medicine programs around the world. Family Medicine is a holistic specialty that attends

Spence, Harlan Ernest

2

BOARD CERTIFIED FAMILY PHYSICIANS The Department of Family Medicine at the University of Vermont College of Medicine and The  

E-print Network

BOARD CERTIFIED FAMILY PHYSICIANS The Department of Family Medicine at the University of Vermont College of Medicine and The University of Vermont Medical Center is seeking board certified to applicants who have experience providing family medicine clinical services in an academic setting. Our

Hayden, Nancy J.

3

Teaching Humanities in Medicine: The University of Massachusetts Family Medicine Residency Program Experience  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Humanities in medicine (HIM) is an important aspect of medical education intended to help preserve humanism and a focus on patients. At the University of Massachusetts Family Medicine Residency Program, we have been expanding our HIM curriculum for our residents including orientation, home visit reflective writing, didactics and a department-wide…

Silk, Hugh; Shields, Sara

2012-01-01

4

Education in family medicine at the University of Mostar School of Medicine.  

PubMed

Department of Family medicine has been formed in academic year 2002/2003, few years later after the foundation of the School of Medicine University of Mostar. The formal members of department are professor and assistants who lecture and lead seminars. In addition, physicians in rural practices contribute to teaching of family medicine. Clinical teaching of family medicine at Mostar School of Medicine is organized in the summer semester of sixth year of the study. It lasts six weeks and contains lectures, seminars and practices. Every student has right and obligation to evaluate educational process at the end of the course in a form of questionnaire and essay. Family medicine continuously receives high marks by students, especially practices. Evaluation of teaching by students is good way of giving feedback about teaching. We believe that student opinion can revise and improve teaching practice. Our good experience and good marks may prompt the changing our educational curriculum to include family medicine at each study year of medical program. PMID:23311487

?erni Obrdalj, Edita; Curi?, Snježana; Zalihi?, Amra; Rumboldt, Mirjana

2012-01-01

5

FAMILY MEDICINE* Definition Of  

E-print Network

healthcare in family medicine is the achievement of optimal physical and mental health through accessible the patient's total health needs, and provides personal care within one or more fields of medicine. The family in the context of the family and the community. This care emphasizes disease prevention and health promotion

Finley Jr., Russell L.

6

Family Medicine Education in Canada, 1983  

PubMed Central

We now have good information about family medicine in terms of content, principles, and practice load. Undergraduate, residency and continuing education are improving, but some family medicine programs still have limited support from their university's faculty and governments. Residency in-training assessment and the certification process are better developed than is evaluation of new family doctors' practice performance. Research in the family medicine base is expanding, and residents are increasingly involved in projects. Family medicine teachers are now on a par with other clinical faculty, because they must meet tougher criteria for appointment and promotion. The political leadership of family medicine education, shared by the College of Family Physicians of Canada and academic departments, requires strong consensus and persistent activity. PMID:20469408

Hennen, Brian K. E.

1983-01-01

7

University of Mississippi School of Medicine  

E-print Network

University of Mississippi School of Medicine 2011 Match 1 Noah Abbas Surgery-Preliminary University of Mississippi Medical Center Jackson, Mississippi Karen Abernathy Internal Medicine Medical University of South, Mississippi Andrew Adams Family Medicine University of Mississippi Medical Center Jackson, Mississippi Keith

Raucher, Drazen

8

Practice Opportunities for Family Medicine Graduates  

PubMed Central

This paper documents the career choices of a graduating class of family medicine residents at Queen's University. In the first post-graduation year, residents were evenly divided between those who undertook a third year of training and those who began practice. For those who began practice, a profile of their first year of experience demonstrates the excellent variety of opportunities awaiting family medicine graduates. PMID:21293605

Walters, David J.

1980-01-01

9

Family Medicine's Waltz with Systems  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Family Medicine first formally confronted systems thinking with the adoption of the biopsychosocial model for understanding disease in a holistic manner; this is a description of a natural system. More recently, Family Medicine has been consciously engaged in developing itself as a system for delivering health care, an artificial system. We make…

Downing, Raymond

2012-01-01

10

EducationatURMCProgramFeatures Program: Family Medicine  

E-print Network

and patient care is the hallmark of our program. Facilities Residents have their continuity practice for all of university-based and community-based models. Highland Family Medicine sees over 18,000 primary care patients representatives, is functionally divided into six suites. Each has faculty and resident physicians, family nurse

Goldman, Steven A.

11

Developing family medicine in Mongolia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background : Mongolia previously had no tradition of Family Medicine. As part of overall health sec- tor reform, a general practice model has now been established with a primary care system of family doctors in group practices covering all population centers in the country. Methods : The present article describes the family doctor implementation process, including capita- tion payment arrangements,

Michael MIRA; Jacques JEUGMANS; Bunijav ORGIL

2003-01-01

12

College of Medicine, Departments of Family Medicine and Psychiatry  

E-print Network

College of Medicine, Departments of Family Medicine and Psychiatry Present 46th Annual Family Medicine Review Course and the 7th Family Medicine/Psychiatry CME Conference SPEAKING THE SAME LANGUAGE: Physicians in Family Practice and Psychiatry; Nurses and Nurse Practitioners serving patients in the same

Cui, Yan

13

College of Medicine FM Family and Community Medicine  

E-print Network

College of Medicine FM Family and Community Medicine KEY: # = new course * = course changed, FAMILY MEDICINE. (1-3) With the advice and approval of his or her faculty adviser, the first-year student may choose approved electives offered by the Department of Family and Community Medicine. The intent

MacAdam, Keith

14

Partnerships creating postgraduate family medicine in Kenya.  

PubMed

Culminating a decade-long process, the first family medicine residency program in Kenya, among the first in Africa outside Nigeria and South Africa, was launched in 2005. Three diverse stakeholders are collaborating in their individual and joint missions: Moi University Faculty of Health Sciences (MUFHS), educating medical students to serve rural Kenyans; the Institute of Family Medicine (Infa-Med), a church hospital-based non-governmental organization aiming to introduce family medicine in Kenya; and the Ministry of Health (MoH), working to create an efficient government health care workforce for 32 million Kenyans. MUFHS brings central facilities, enthusiastic academic leadership, and long-term vision. Infa-Med contributes start-up resources, expatriate family medicine faculty, and well-established hospitals for training. MoH is giving political support to the new specialty as well as scholarships to MoH medical officers entering the 3-year residency program leading to the degree of Master of Medicine in Family Health. Among the lessons learned through this process are the importance of melding the missions of all partners, of integrating clinical with community care of the underserved, and of deriving curriculum from African and international evidence on how to marshal available resources to meet Kenya's national needs. Opportunities continue for internal and international collaboration. PMID:17009191

Pust, Ronald; Dahlman, Bruce; Khwa-Otsyula, Barasa; Armstrong, Janice; Downing, Raymond

2006-10-01

15

2009-2011 Report from the Department of Family and Community Medicine ADVANCING FAMILY MEDICINE  

E-print Network

2009-2011 Report from the Department of Family and Community Medicine ADVANCING FAMILY MEDICINE Collaboration. Leadership. Excellence. #12;1 2 MESSAGE FROM THE CHAIR 3 ADVANCING FAMILY MEDICINE 4 Leadership educational scholarship in Family Medicine 10 Fostering academic leadership 12 Demonstrating social

Sokolowski, Marla

16

Boston University School of Medicine  

E-print Network

2013­2015 Boston University School of Medicine Compassion Excellence Innovation Inclusion #12;Boston University School of Medicine2 www.bumc.bu.edu 1 Our MissiOn Boston University School of Medicine of medicine, to biomedical research, and to the health of the public. We, as a community, place great value

Spence, Harlan Ernest

17

Practice choices of graduating family medicine residents.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE: To examine the types of practices family medicine residents chose during the first 2 years after residency, and how these choices have changed over a 15-year period. DESIGN: Mailed survey. SETTING: Areas served by graduates of the Queen's University family medicine residency program. PARTICIPANTS: Two hundred thirty (76%) of the 303 graduates from 1977 to 1991 of the Queen's University family medicine residency program responded to the questionnaire. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Type of practices residents entered immediately out of residency: whether they began full-time, part-time, locum tenens, or other type of practice; length of time spent in the first practice situation; and proportion of residents who had settled into a full-time practice within 2 years of completing residency. RESULTS: Residents who graduated before 1985 were significantly more likely to go into full-time practice immediately out of residency (P = .0001). The earlier residents had graduated from the program, the more likely they were to go immediately into full-time practice. This finding was not affected by residents' age, sex, size of community of origin, exposure to rural teaching sites, marital status, or how well prepared for practice they felt. Residents graduating before 1985 were also more likely to be in full-time practice within 2 years of completing their residency program (P = .003). CONCLUSIONS: Recent family medicine residents did not enter full-time practice immediately out of residency as often as those who had graduated earlier, nor did they commit to full-time practice within 2 years of graduating as often as residents graduating before 1985 did. PMID:9559193

Godwin, M.; Hodgetts, G.; Wilson, R.; Pong, R.; Najgebauer, E.

1998-01-01

18

Highland Family Medicine Pregnancy And Pediatric Care  

E-print Network

At Highland Family Medicine Pregnancy And Pediatric Care Highland Family Medicine, we have a team, high quality pregnancy care. We care for you during your pregnancy and can continue to care for you plan a healthy pregnancy. If you think you may be pregnant now, call us and we will see you as soon

Goldman, Steven A.

19

Occupational Medicine: Opportunities for Family Physicians  

PubMed Central

Occupational medicine has grown recently in sophistication and strength. Occupational physicians with specialty certification focus their attention on toxicology and health hazards in the workplace, compliance with regulatory requirements, and preventive services. These physicians are often employed by organizations. Most occupational health care will continue to be provided by family physicians, who may also be the physicians closest to the workers and their families. There are many opportunities for family physicians to develop their skills in occupational health care and to incorporate occupational medicine into their practices. PMID:21248919

Guidotti, Tee L.

1989-01-01

20

Family Bonding with Universities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

One justification offered for legacy admissions policies at universities is that that they bind entire families to the university. Proponents maintain that these policies have a number of benefits, including increased donations from members of these families. We use a rich set of data from an anonymous selective research institution to investigate…

Meer, Jonathan; Rosen, Harvey S.

2010-01-01

21

Community Health Clinics Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine  

E-print Network

Community Health Clinics Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine Students at the Feinberg School of Medicine have a wealth of opportunities to volunteer and provide community service patients, some of whom are immigrants. In addition, the Feinberg School of Medicine's Department of Family

Chisholm, Rex L.

22

Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine  

E-print Network

Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine Student Handbook Updated August 27, 2013 #12. Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine Augusta Webster, MD, Office of Medical Education 303 E

Chisholm, Rex L.

23

Veterinary Medicine 2 | Veterinary Medicine University of Saskatchewan  

E-print Network

Veterinary Medicine #12;2 | Veterinary Medicine University of Saskatchewan The Western College of Veterinary Medicine The Western College of Veterinary Medicine (WCVM) is the premier centre of veterinary laboratory for veterinary medicine and large-scale research facilities. IMPORTANT DATES FOR ADMISSION

Saskatchewan, University of

24

Generation to Generation: The Heart of Family Medicine  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

According to the American Board of Family Medicine, "The scope of family medicine encompasses all ages, both sexes, each organ system and every disease entity." What makes the seemingly daunting task of practicing family medicine possible is that family physicians learn to utilize similar clinical reasoning for all of their patients regardless of…

Winter, Robin O.

2012-01-01

25

Family Medicine Curriculum Guide to Substance Abuse.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This curriculum guide on substance abuse is intended for teachers of family medicine. Comments, learning objectives, teaching hints, and evaluations of knowledge are provided for each area in all chapters. Chapter 1 focuses on the pharmacology of commonly abused drugs including depressants, opioids, stimulants, hallucinogens, inhalants, and…

Liepman, Michael R., Ed.; And Others

26

Comparison of Research Trends in Korean and International Family Medicine in Journals of Family Medicine  

PubMed Central

Background Research is important for the development of family medicine as a professional field in primary care. The aim of this study was to suggest directions for the development of family medicine research by analyzing research trends in original papers published in the Korean Journal of Family Medicine (KJFM) and international journals. Methods We investigated original research papers published in KJFM and 4 international journals from August 2009 to July 2010. Analysis was conducted according to research topics, authors, methods, participants, and data sources. Results 'Clinical research' was the most common research topic in both the KJFM (88.3%) and international journals (57.3%); however, international journals had more studies in other domains ('education and research,' 'health service,' and 'family medicine'). More authors other than family physicians participated in international journals than in the KJFM (58% and 3.3%, respectively). Most studies were 'cross-sectional' in KJFM (77.0%) and international journals (51.5%): however, the latter had more 'qualitative' studies, 'cohort' studies, and 'systematic reviews' than the former. The largest study population was 'visitors of health promotion center' in the KJFM and 'outpatients' in international journals. Most of the study sources were 'survey' and 'medical records' in both. Conclusion There were limitations of diversity in the papers of the KJFM. Future investigation on papers of other than family medicine journals should be planned to assess research trends of family physicians. PMID:25426274

Jeon, Jin-Kyung; Lee, Jungun

2014-01-01

27

Program Registration Family Medicine/Psychiatry CME Conference  

E-print Network

Family Medicine) Credit Card: Charge $_______________ to my: MasterCard · VISA Credit CardProgram Registration Family Medicine/Psychiatry CME Conference MARCH 27, 28, 29, 2015 CME Hours TBA Family Medicine 711 Jefferson, Suite 137 Memphis, TN 38105 901-448-8006 (fax) #12;

Cui, Yan

28

University of Mississippi School of Medicine  

E-print Network

Page | 1 University of Mississippi School of Medicine 2010 Match Timothy Abston General Surgery York University SOM New York, NY John Allen Internal Medicine University of Virginia Charlottesville Medicine University Hospitals Jackson, MS Lauren Bethea Obstetrics-Gynecology University Hospitals Jackson

Raucher, Drazen

29

[Wound care at family medicine office].  

PubMed

Chronic wound is a big load for the patient, family and health care system. A team of family medicine doctors can provide care for chronic wound patient that will eventually lead to complete healing. With good education and proper work organization with defined mandatory changes in prescribing orthopedic tools (sets for compression), chronic wound patients can be completely managed at the primary care level. Such an approach would be possible through better and more efficient communication with secondary health care (wound centers), as well as telemedicine consultations. PMID:25326992

Podobnik, Drina

2014-10-01

30

Home visits in family medicine residency  

PubMed Central

Abstract Problem addressed There has been a decline in family physicians providing home visits to housebound patients. Objective of program To increase family medicine residents’ exposure to home visits; their comfort and skills in providing home visits; and their willingness to provide home visits after graduation. Program description Between 2000 and 2010, each family practice resident at St Joseph’s Health Centre Family Medicine Teaching Unit in Toronto, Ont, was assigned at least 1 housebound patient to care for longitudinally over 2 years; the rationale for this was to increase the sense of “ownership” and responsibility among residents for their assigned homebound patients. Starting in 2003, until the program’s conclusion in 2010, residents were asked to fill out surveys before and after the program to assess their comfort with and confidence in providing home visits, as well as their satisfaction with the program. Survey responses were analyzed for changes over the course of residency training. A total of 85 residents completed the home visit teaching program between 2003 and 2010 inclusive. Conclusion While residents’ willingness to provide home visits did not increase over the course of residency, their confidence in making housecalls did increase. There was also a trend toward increased confidence among residents in working with community agencies. Thus, having home visit patients be a part of resident practices might play an important role in increasing the likelihood that future family physicians will continue to care for their patients when those patients are no longer ambulatory.

Jakubovicz, Difat; Srivastava, Anita

2015-01-01

31

Education in long-term care for family medicine residents  

PubMed Central

Abstract Problem addressed Family medicine residents require more exposure to all aspects of care of the elderly in the community, including care in long-term care (LTC) homes. Objective of program To provide a framework for the development of integrated LTC rotations in family medicine programs. Program description Clear objectives for residents and clinical preceptors provided the foundation for the program. Rotations of 4 half days per year in LTC homes were integrated into core family medicine blocks. Residents worked with family physician preceptors providing LTC in the community. Teaching was case based and aligned with the core competencies set out in the CanMEDS (Canadian Medical Directives for Specialists) framework for medical education. The program was strongly supported by the university’s administration, clinical preceptors in the community, and LTC homes. Conclusion All the residents rated their LTC rotations as useful or extremely useful in preparing them to provide LTC in their future practices. Long-term care homes realized that investing in training medical residents in LTC could help improve care of the elderly in the community. PMID:21841091

Oliver, Doug; Emili, Anna; Chan, David; Taniguchi, Alan

2011-01-01

32

High altitude medicine for family physicians.  

PubMed Central

High altitude medicine deals with a continuum of diseases ranging from a mild discomfort to serious ailments affecting all organ systems, including the lungs, brain, and eyes. Decreased oxygen tension is the primary cause. The main principles of prevention are staging and graded ascent to allow acclimatization. Adventure travel to high altitude destinations is becoming increasingly popular; family physicians should be informed of the medical problems associated with such travel. Images p712-a p715-a p716-a PMID:8199523

McMurray, S. J.

1994-01-01

33

Screening for Depression Patients in Family Medicine  

PubMed Central

ABSTRACT Goal: The aims are to establish the prevalence of newfound, unidentified cases of depressive disorder by screening with the Becks Depression scale; To establish a comparative relationship with self-identified cases of depression in the patients in the family medicine; To assess the significance of the BDI in screening practice of family medicine. Patients and methods: A prospective study was conducted anonymously by Beck's Depression scale (Beck Depression Questionnaire org.-BDI) and specially created short questionnaire. The study included 250 randomly selected patients (20-60 years), users of services in family medicine in “Dom Zdravlja” Zenica, and the final number of respondents with included in the study was 126 (51 male, 75 female; response or response rate 50.4%). Exclusion factor was previously diagnosed and treated mental disorder. Participation was voluntary and respondents acknowledge the validity of completing the questionnaire. BDI consists of 21 items. Answers to questions about symptoms were ranked according to the Likert type scale responses from 0-4 (from irrelevant to very much). Respondents expressed themselves on personal perception of depression, whether are or not depressed. Results: Depression was observed in 48% of patients compared to 31% in self estimate depression analyzed the questionnaires. The negative trend in the misrecognition of depression is -17% (48:31). Depression was significantly more frequent in unemployed compared to employed respondents (p=0.001). The leading symptom in both sexes is the perception of lost hope (59% of cases). Conclusion: All respondents in family medicine care in Zenica showed a high percentage of newly detected (17%) patients with previously unrecognized depression. BDI is a really simple and effective screening tool for the detection and identification of persons with symptoms of depression. PMID:24783910

Alic, Alma; Pranjic, Nurka; Selmanovic, Senada; Alibasic, Esad; Alic, Fahrudin; Ramic, Enisa; Spahic-Sarajlic, Selvedina

2014-01-01

34

University of Oxford Department of Cardiovascular Medicine  

E-print Network

1 University of Oxford Department of Cardiovascular Medicine in collaboration with the Oxford the Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, which study molecular mechanisms in the early development The Medical Sciences Division, within which the Department of Cardiovascular Medicine is located, includes

Oxford, University of

35

SCHOOL OF DENTAL MEDICINE University of Pittsburgh  

E-print Network

SCHOOL OF DENTAL MEDICINE University of Pittsburgh Pitt Dental Medicine Alumni Update March 2012 Conservatory: Terry L. Buckenheimer (DMD `80) - Distinguished Alumnus Dental Medicine - Dr. Buckenheimer has leadership positions with the American Dental Association. Additionally, Dr. Buckenheimer has been actively

Jiang, Huiqiang

36

The University of South Carolina School of Medicine RESIDENCY APPOINTMENTS  

E-print Network

The University of South Carolina School of Medicine RESIDENCY APPOINTMENTS Class of 2013 Student, Rhode Island Micah Froese Family Medicine Anderson Area Medical Health Center Anderson, South Carolina Fran Bailey Obstetrics-Gynecology Palmetto Health/Univ. of South Carolina SOM Columbia, South Carolina

Almor, Amit

37

University of Glasgow Forensic Medicine and Science  

E-print Network

University of Glasgow Forensic Medicine and Science COURSE IN FORENSIC MEDICAL SCIENCES Session and Course Fee to: Dr Marjorie Turner Forensic Medicine and Science University of Glasgow Glasgow G12 8QQ Tel

Glasgow, University of

38

The Future of Family Medicine: A Collaborative Project of the Family Medicine Community  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND Recognizing fundamental flaws in the fragmented US health care systems and the potential of an integrative, generalist approach, the leadership of 7 national family medicine organizations initiated the Future of Family Medicine (FFM) project in 2002. The goal of the project was to develop a strategy to transform and renew the discipline of family medicine to meet the needs of patients in a changing health care environment. METHODS A national research study was conducted by independent research firms. Interviews and focus groups identified key issues for diverse constituencies, including patients, payers, residents, students, family physicians, and other clinicians. Subsequently, interviews were conducted with nationally representative samples of 9 key constituencies. Based in part on these data, 5 task forces addressed key issues to meet the project goal. A Project Leadership Committee synthesized the task force reports into the report presented here. RESULTS The project identified core values, a New Model of practice, and a process for development, research, education, partnership, and change with great potential to transform the ability of family medicine to improve the health and health care of the nation. The proposed New Model of practice has the following characteristics: a patient-centered team approach; elimination of barriers to access; advanced information systems, including an electronic health record; redesigned, more functional offices; a focus on quality and outcomes; and enhanced practice finance. A unified communications strategy will be developed to promote the New Model of family medicine to multiple audiences. The study concluded that the discipline needs to oversee the training of family physicians who are committed to excellence, steeped in the core values of the discipline, competent to provide family medicine’s basket of services within the New Model, and capable of adapting to varying patient needs and changing care technologies. Family medicine education must continue to include training in maternity care, the care of hospitalized patients, community and population health, and culturally effective and proficient care. A comprehensive lifelong learning program for each family physician will support continuous personal, professional, and clinical practice assessment and improvement. Ultimately, systemwide changes will be needed to ensure high-quality health care for all Americans. Such changes include taking steps to ensure that every American has a personal medical home, promoting the use and reporting of quality measures to improve performance and service, advocating that every American have health care coverage for basic services and protection against extraordinary health care costs, advancing research that supports the clinical decision making of family physicians and other primary care clinicians, and developing reimbursement models to sustain family medicine and primary care practices. CONCLUSIONS The leadership of US family medicine organizations is committed to a transformative process. In partnership with others, this process has the potential to integrate health care to improve the health of all Americans. PMID:15080220

2004-01-01

39

Development of family medicine in the middle East.  

PubMed

This paper outlines the development of family medicine in seven Middle Eastern countries. Some of the first family medicine activity occurred in Turkey in 1961, in Bahrain in 1978, in Lebanon in 1979, in Jordan in 1981, and in Kuwait in 1983. Family medicine programs have also been established in Qatar, the United Arab Emirates, Libya, and Iraq. In most programs, family medicine training occurs largely in hospitals, even though few Middle Eastern family physicians practice in hospitals after completion of residency training. Thus, there is a need for better outpatient training, but resistance from those responsible for traditional medical education makes it difficult to change the current model of family medicine education. There is also need for better opportunities for professional development after graduation and for establishing research activity in family medicine. PMID:17987417

Abyad, Abdulrazak; Al-Baho, Abeer Khaled; Unluoglu, Ilhami; Tarawneh, Mohammed; Al Hilfy, Thamer Kadum Yousif

2007-01-01

40

FAMILY MEDICINE Course name and number: Acting Internship in Family Medicine  

E-print Network

. Appreciate the need for displaying professional behavior in dealing with others. Demonstrate ability of the principles of Family Medicine and the development of sound clinical judgment and skills by accepting a systematic approach to clinical reasoning by developing a comprehensive approach to problem solving

41

PRIMARY CARE RESEARCH: 2012DIVISION OF FAMILY MEDICINE AND PRIMARY CARE,  

E-print Network

1 PRIMARY CARE RESEARCH: 2012DIVISION OF FAMILY MEDICINE AND PRIMARY CARE, FACULTY OF MEDICINE AND HEALTH SCIENCES, STELLENBOSCH UNIVERSITY #12;2 3 PRIMARY CARE RESEARCH 2012 PRIMARY CARE RESEARCH 2012 2 0 1 2 #12;4 5 PRIMARY CARE RESEARCH 2012 PRIMARY CARE RESEARCH 2012 INTRODUCTION CLINICAL RESEARCH

Geldenhuys, Jaco

42

San Jose State University Sports Medicine  

E-print Network

San Jose State University Sports Medicine Policies and Procedures 2010-2011 #12;Mission Statement The San Jose State University Sports Medicine staff is charged with the responsibility of providing-athlete on a daily basis and measuring their readiness for athletic competition. The sports medicine staff utilizes

Su, Xiao

43

What challenges hamper Kenyan family physicians in pursuing their family medicine mandate? A qualitative study among family physicians and their colleagues  

PubMed Central

Background Since 2005, Kenyan medical universities have been training general practitioners, providing them with clinical, management, teaching and research skills, in order to enhance access to and quality of health care services for the Kenyan population. This study assesses what expectations family physicians, colleagues of family physicians and policy makers have of family medicine, what expectations family physicians live up to and which challenges they face. Methods Family physicians were observed and interviewed about their expectations and challenges concerning family medicine. Expectations among their colleagues were assessed through focus group discussions. Policy makers’ expectations were assessed by analysing the governmental policy on family medicine and a university’s curriculum. Results Roles perceived for and performed by family physicians included providing comprehensive care, health care management, teaching, and to a lesser extent community outreach and performing research. Challenges faced by family physicians were being posted in situations where they are regarded as just another type of specialist, lack of awareness of the roles of family physicians among colleagues, lack of time, lack of funds and inadequate training. Conclusions The ministry’s posting policy has to be improved to ensure that family physicians have a chance to perform their intended roles. Creating an environment in which family physicians can function best requires more effort to enlighten other players in the health care system, like colleagues and policy makers, about the roles of family physicians. PMID:22536801

2012-01-01

44

Health Is Primary: Family Medicine for America’s Health  

PubMed Central

PURPOSE More than a decade ago the American Academy of Family Physicians, American Academy of Family Physicians Foundation, American Board of Family Medicine, Association of Departments of Family Medicine, Association of Family Practice Residency Directors, North American Primary Care Research Group, and Society of Teachers of Family Medicine came together in the Future of Family Medicine (FFM) to launch a series of strategic efforts to “renew the specialty to meet the needs of people and society,” some of which bore important fruit. Family Medicine for America’s Health was launched in 2013 to revisit the role of family medicine in view of these changes and to position family medicine with new strategic and communication plans to create better health, better health care, and lower cost for patients and communities (the Triple Aim). METHODS Family Medicine for America’s Health was preceded and guided by the development of a family physician role definition. A consulting group facilitated systematic strategic plan development over 9 months that included key informant interviews, formal stakeholder surveys, future scenario testing, a retreat for family medicine organizations and stakeholder representatives to review strategy options, further strategy refinement, and finally a formal strategic plan with draft tactics and design for an implementation plan. A second communications consulting group surveyed diverse stakeholders in coordination with strategic planning to develop a communication plan. The American College of Osteopathic Family Physicians joined the effort, and students, residents, and young physicians were included. RESULTS The core strategies identified include working to ensure broad access to sustained, primary care relationships; accountability for increasing primary care value in terms of cost and quality; a commitment to helping reduce health care disparities; moving to comprehensive payment and away from fee-for-service; transformation of training; technology to support effective care; improving research underpinning primary care; and actively engaging patients, policy makers, and payers to develop an understanding of the value of primary care. The communications plan, called Health is Primary, will complement these strategies. Eight family medicine organizations have pledged nearly $20 million and committed representatives to a multiyear implementation team that will coordinate these plans in a much more systematic way than occurred with FFM. CONCLUSIONS Family Medicine for America’s Health is a new commitment by 8 family medicine organizations to strategically align work to improve practice models, payment, technology, workforce and education, and research to support the Triple Aim. It is also a humble invitation to patients and to clinical and policy partners to collaborate in making family medicine even more effective. PMID:25352575

Phillips, Robert L.; Pugno, Perry A.; Saultz, John W.; Tuggy, Michael L.; Borkan, Jeffrey M.; Hoekzema, Grant S.; DeVoe, Jennifer E.; Weida, Jane A.; Peterson, Lars E.; Hughes, Lauren S.; Kruse, Jerry E.; Puffer, James C.

2014-01-01

45

UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE COLLEGE OF MEDICINE  

E-print Network

UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE COLLEGE OF MEDICINE Student Records Policy Approved by: Committee, investigations, and disciplinary actions are kept in the University of Tennessee Health Science to others except by student request. The University of Tennessee Health Science Center

Cui, Yan

46

Obstetrics anyone? How family medicine residents' interests changed.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE: To determine family medicine residents' attitudes and plans about practising obstetrics when they enter and when they graduate from their residency programs. DESIGN: Residents in each of 4 consecutive years, starting July 1991, were surveyed by questionnaire when they entered the program and again when they graduated (ending in June 1996). Only paired questionnaires were used for analysis. SETTING: Family medicine residency programs at the University of Toronto in Ontario. PARTICIPANTS: Of 358 family medicine residents who completed the University of Toronto program, 215 (60%) completed questionnaires at entry and exit. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Changes in attitudes and plans during the residency program as ascertained from responses to entry and exit questionnaires. RESULTS: Analysis was based on 215 paired questionnaires. Women residents had more interest in obstetric practice at entry: 58% of women, but only 31% of men were interested. At graduation, fewer women (49%) and men (22%) were interested in practising obstetrics. The intent to undertake rural practice was strongly associated with the intent to practise obstetrics. By graduation, residents perceived lifestyle factors and compensation as very important negative factors in relation to obstetric practice. Initial interest and the eventual decision to practise obstetrics were strongly associated. CONCLUSIONS: Intent to practise obstetrics after graduation was most closely linked to being a woman, intending to practise in a rural area, and having an interest in obstetrics prior to residency. Building on the interest in obstetrics that residents already have could be a better strategy for producing more physicians willing to practise obstetrics than trying to change the minds of those uninterested in such practice. PMID:10099803

Ruderman, J.; Holzapfel, S. G.; Carroll, J. C.; Cummings, S.

1999-01-01

47

Exploring and understanding academic leadership in family medicine  

PubMed Central

Abstract Objective To explore how family physicians understand the concept of academic leadership. Design Case study. Setting Department of Family and Community Medicine at the University of Toronto in Ontario. Participants Thirty family physician academic leaders. Methods Focus groups and interviews were conducted with family physicians from a large multisite urban university who were identified by peers as academic leaders at various career stages. Transcripts from the focus groups and interviews were anonymized and themes were analyzed and negotiated among 3 researchers. Main findings Participants identified qualities of leadership among academic leaders that align with those identified in the current literature. Despite being identified by others as academic leaders, participants were reluctant to self-identify as such. Participants believed they had taken on early leadership roles by default rather than through planned career development. Conclusion This study affirms the need to define academic leadership explicitly, advance a culture that supports it, and nurture leaders at all levels with a variety of strategies. PMID:23486818

Oandasan, Ivy; White, David; Hammond Mobilio, Melanie; Gotlib Conn, Lesley; Feldman, Kymm; Kim, Florence; Rouleau, Katherine; Sorensen, Leslie

2013-01-01

48

PERELMAN SCHOOL OF MEDICINE UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA  

E-print Network

PERELMAN SCHOOL OF MEDICINE AT THE UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA CLASS OF 2012 GRADUATION DVD We at the University of Pennsylvania Class of 2012 graduation ceremony. The event will be covered with two cameras@gmail.com PERELMAN SCHOOL OF MEDICINE AT THE UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA #12;

Bushman, Frederic

49

PERELMAN SCHOOL OF MEDICINE UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA  

E-print Network

PERELMAN SCHOOL OF MEDICINE AT THE UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA CLASS OF 2013 GRADUATION DVD We at the University of Pennsylvania Class of 2013 graduation ceremony. The event will be covered with two cameras@gmail.com PERELMAN SCHOOL OF MEDICINE AT THE UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA #12;

Bushman, Frederic

50

University of Calgary Faculty of Medicine  

E-print Network

University of Calgary Faculty of Medicine ASSOCIATE DEAN (EQUITY AND TEACHER-LEARNER RELATIONS) A, Faculty of Medicine for developing and maintaining a healthy and respectful working, teaching, and learning environment in the Faculty of Medicine by: 1. Facilitating the prevention and resolution

Habib, Ayman

51

University of New Mexico School of Medicine  

E-print Network

University of New Mexico School of Medicine Paul B. Roth, MD Chancellor for Health Sciences, Dean Biology Hugh Martin, MD Chair Anesthesiology Pope Moseley, MD Chair Internal Medicine William Rayburn, MD & Community Medicine Gary Rosenberg, MD Chair Neurology Robert Schenk, MD Chair Orthopedics Loretta Cordova

New Mexico, University of

52

Characteristics of Universal Embezzling Families  

E-print Network

We derive properties of general universal embezzling families for bipartite embezzlement protocols, where any pure state can be converted to any other without communication, but in the presence of the embezzling family. Using this framework, we exhibit various families inequivalent to that proposed by van Dam and Hayden. We suggest a possible improvement and present detail numerical analysis.

Debbie Leung; Bingjie Wang

2014-07-13

53

Hospital grand rounds in family medicine. Content and educational structure.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE: To investigate hospital grand rounds in family medicine, to examine their content and organization, and to recommend improved educational structures for these ubiquitous continuing medical education events. DATA SELECTION: Retrospective analysis of titles and content of 358 family medicine grand rounds offered in the department of family medicine of a large urban hospital from mid-1983 to the end of 1994. FINDINGS: Only 10% of family medicine grand rounds were presented by family physicians. Most grand rounds were in the form of specialists exhibiting their own interests in a lecture format. Analysis of grand rounds titles showed no consistent pattern of topics but an emphasis on practical aspects of medical care. Patient-based presentations were uncommon, as were grand rounds with more than one speaker. CONCLUSIONS: The content and mix of topics appeared appropriate, but in the absence of a curricular structure, or evaluation of learning gain, it is difficult to assess the value of grand rounds. PMID:9222579

Lewkonia, R.; Sosnowski, M.; Murray, F.

1996-01-01

54

Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine  

E-print Network

Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine Student Handbook Updated April 22, 2014 #12;ALL AT THE BEGINNING OF THE ACADEMIC YEAR. ON OCCASION PERIODIC UPDATES ARE NECESSARY. Northwestern University Feinberg

Engman, David M.

55

NorthwesternUniversity Feinberg School of Medicine  

E-print Network

NorthwesternUniversity Feinberg School of Medicine Director of Clinical Education and Human Movement Sciences (PTHMS), Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine invites applicants in the United States. To learn more about PTHMS, please visit: http://www.feinberg.northwestern.edu/ nupthms

Contractor, Anis

56

Family medicine training in sub-Saharan Africa: South–South cooperation in the Primafamed project as strategy for development  

PubMed Central

Background. Health-care systems based on primary health care (PHC) are more equitable and cost effective. Family medicine trains medical doctors in comprehensive PHC with knowledge and skills that are needed to increase quality of care. Family medicine is a relatively new specialty in sub-Saharan Africa. Objective. To explore the extent to which the Primafamed South–South cooperative project contributed to the development of family medicine in sub-Saharan Africa. Methods. The Primafamed (Primary Health Care and Family Medicine Education) project worked together with 10 partner universities in sub-Saharan Africa to develop family medicine training programmes over a period of 2.5 years. A SWOT (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats) analysis was done and the training development from 2008 to 2010 in the different partner universities was analysed. Results. During the 2.5 years of the Primafamed project, all partner universities made progress in the development of their family medicine training programmes. The SWOT analysis showed that at both national and international levels, the time is ripe to train medical doctors in family medicine and to integrate the specialty into health-care systems, although many barriers, including little awareness, lack of funding, low support from other specialists and reserved support from policymakers, are still present. Conclusions. Family medicine can play an important role in health-care systems in sub-Saharan Africa; however, developing a new discipline is challenging. Advocacy, local ownership, action research and support from governments are necessary to develop family medicine and increase its impact. The Primafamed project showed that development of sustainable family medicine training programmes is a feasible but slow process. The South–South cooperation between the ten partners and the South African departments of family medicine strengthened confidence at both national and international levels. PMID:24857843

Flinkenflögel, Maaike; Essuman, Akye; Chege, Patrick; Ayankogbe, Olayinka; De Maeseneer, Jan

2014-01-01

57

Test ordering for preventive health care among family medicine residents  

PubMed Central

Abstract Objective To determine which screening tests family medicine residents order as part of preventive health care. Design A cross-sectional survey. Setting Alberta and Ontario. Participants First- and second-year family medicine residents at the University of Alberta in Edmonton, the University of Calgary in Alberta, and McMaster University in Hamilton, Ont, during the 2011 to 2012 academic year. Main outcome measures Demographic information, Likert scale ratings assessing ordering attitudes, and selections from a list of 38 possible tests that could be ordered for preventive health care for sample 38-year-old and 55-year-old female and male patients. Descriptive and comparative statistics were calculated. Results A total of 318 of 482 residents (66%) completed the survey. Recommended or appropriate tests were ordered by 82% (for cervical cytology) to 95% (for fasting glucose measurement) of residents. Across the different sample patients, residents ordered an average of 3.3 to 5.7 inappropriate tests per patient, with 58% to 92% ordering at least 1 inappropriate test per patient. The estimated average excess costs varied from $38.39 for the 38-year-old man to $106.46 for the 55-year-old woman. More regular use of a periodic health examination screening template did not improve ordering (P = .88). Conclusion In general, residents ordered appropriate preventive health tests reasonably well but also ordered an average of 3.3 to 5.7 inappropriate tests for each patient. Training programs need to provide better education for trainees around inappropriate screening and work hard to establish good ordering behaviour in preparation for entering practice. PMID:25767171

Fung, Daisy; Schabort, Inge; MacLean, Catherine A.; Asrar, Farhan M.; Khory, Ayesha; Vandermeer, Ben; Allan, G. Michael

2015-01-01

58

Medical Student Research Programs Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine  

E-print Network

Medical Student Research Programs Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine Research Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine to improve patient care and safety. Feinberg provides 60 percent of all research across Northwestern

Apkarian, A. Vania

59

Departments | Centers | Institutes Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine  

E-print Network

Departments | Centers | Institutes Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine The Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine has many excellent departments, centers, institutes | Programs Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine #12;Departments Anesthesiology Cell

Chisholm, Rex L.

60

Department of Family Medicine Dpartement de Mdecine Familiale  

E-print Network

promotion and prevention. Global health is no longer the health issues of others. They are shared issues, control and reforms. Medicine and our health care system have become increasingly complex;2.4.12 2 health care system capable of meeting the needs of the population. The Family Medicine Group (FMG

Shoubridge, Eric

61

Results of the 2009 National Resident Matching Program: family medicine.  

PubMed

The results of the 2009 National Resident Matching Program (NRMP) reflect a persistently low level of student interest in family medicine residency training in the United States. Compared with the 2008 Match, 70 fewer positions (with 89 fewer US seniors) were filled in family medicine residency programs through the NRMP in 2009, at the same time that 18 fewer positions were filled in primary care internal medicine (11 fewer US seniors), one more position was filled in pediatrics-primary care (three more US seniors), and 13 more positions were filled in internal medicine-pediatrics programs (but with seven fewer US seniors). Multiple forces, including student perspectives of the demands, rewards and prestige of the specialty, the turbulence and uncertainty of the health care and economic environments, lifestyle issues, the advice of deans, and the impact of faculty role models, continue to influence medical student career choices. A total of 152 more positions (28 fewer US seniors) were filled in categorical internal medicine. Thirty-one more positions (72 more US seniors) were filled in categorical pediatrics programs. The 2009 NRMP results suggest that while interest in family medicine experienced a slight increase in the number of students choosing the specialty last year, overall interest in primary care careers continues to decline. With the nation continuing to call for the roles and services of family physicians, family medicine still matched too few graduates through the 2009 NRMP to effectively address the nation's needs for primary care physicians. PMID:19724942

Pugno, Perry A; McGaha, Amy L; Schmittling, Gordon T; DeVilbiss, Ashley D; Ostergaard, Daniel J

2009-09-01

62

Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine INSURANCE PAYMENT FORM  

E-print Network

Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine INSURANCE PAYMENT FORM VISITING STUDENT:____________________________________________________ Visiting Student Programs Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine Augusta Webster Office

Chisholm, Rex L.

63

Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine APPLICATION PAYMENT FORM  

E-print Network

Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine APPLICATION PAYMENT FORM VISITING STUDENT: _________________________________________________ Visiting Student Programs Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine Augusta Webster Office

Chisholm, Rex L.

64

The Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University  

E-print Network

The Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University EMERGENCY PROCEDURES MANUAL Prepared Resources Security Revised ­ May, 2013 #12;ALBERT EINSTEIN COLLEGE of MEDICINE of YESHIVA UNIVERSITY

Emmons, Scott

65

The Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University  

E-print Network

The Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University EMERGENCY PROCEDURES MANUAL Prepared Supporting Services Revised ­ January, 2012 #12;ALBERT EINSTEIN COLLEGE of MEDICINE of YESHIVA UNIVERSITY

Yates, Andrew

66

Clinical Evaluation in a Family Medicine Residency.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study assessed (1) the validity of the Bowman Gray School of Medicine evaluation instrument regarding the occurrence of halo effects and (2) possible relationships between the faculty's evaluations of the residents and the residents' cognitive knowledge and productivity. (MLW)

Herman, James M.; And Others

1985-01-01

67

A Family Practice Residency Selective in Community-University Service.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Residents in family practice sponsored by the State University of New York at Buffalo School of Medicine and Deaconess Hospital select a rotation to fulfill a community-university service requirement. The program was designed to involve residents in giving health care in Buffalo and western New York, where there is a physician shortage. (JMD)

Seller, Robert H.; Bissonette, Raymond

1979-01-01

68

School of Medicine BULLETIN OF YALE UNIVERSITY  

E-print Network

of Yale University 7 Administration and Faculty 8 History, Mission, and Facilities 10 Harvey Cushing Emergency Medicine 116 Genetics 119 Global Health 122 History of Medicine 123 Immunobiology 127 Internal 171 Pediatrics 174 Pharmacology 179 Psychiatry 182 Public Health 189 Surgery 191 Therapeutic Radiology

69

Message from the Chair of the McGill Department of Family Exciting Times in McGill Family Medicine  

E-print Network

1 Message from the Chair of the McGill Department of Family Medicine Exciting Times in McGill Family Medicine It was a little over a year ago when I first became Chair and sent out my first message of a family physician. This program, known as the McGill Longitudinal Family Medicine Experience, has been

Kambhampati, Patanjali

70

COLLEGE OF VETERINARY MEDICINE UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE  

E-print Network

COLLEGE OF VETERINARY MEDICINE UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE The University of Tennessee, founded in 1794, established in 1974, is located in Knoxville on the University's Agricultural Campus along the Tennessee River. The city, the cultural center of East Tennessee, is situated in the Appalachian foothills of east central

Tennessee, University of

71

EVOLUTION AND MEDICINE Evolution, Medicine, and the Darwin Family  

E-print Network

of evolution in the 1700s and 1800s is typified by how the medical family of Charles Darwin, including his grandfather Dr. Erasmus Darwin and father Dr. Robert Waring Darwin, directly and indirectly guided Charles in medical school at Edinburgh and is recorded in Charles Darwin's own letters and notebooks. Despite

Antolin, Michael F.

72

Departments | Centers | Institutes Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine  

E-print Network

Departments | Centers | Institutes Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine The Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine has many excellent departments, centers, institutes offerings with the creation of the Institute for Public Health & Medicine, which combined interdisciplinary

Chisholm, Rex L.

73

Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine VISITING STUDENT ELECTIVE PROGRAM  

E-print Network

Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine VISITING STUDENT ELECTIVE PROGRAM 2013 University Feinberg School of Medicine. I have read my acceptance letter and approved application Feinberg School of Medicine from ______________(mm/dd/yy) to __________________ (mm

Chisholm, Rex L.

74

Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine VISITING STUDENT ELECTIVE PROGRAM  

E-print Network

Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine VISITING STUDENT ELECTIVE PROGRAM 2014 University Feinberg School of Medicine. I have read my acceptance letter and approved application Feinberg School of Medicine from ______________(mm/dd/yy) to __________________ (mm

Chisholm, Rex L.

75

Results of the 2010 national resident matching program: family medicine.  

PubMed

The results of the 2010 National Resident Matching Program (NRMP) reflect a small but promising increased level of student interest in family medicine residency training in the United States. Compared with the 2009 Match, 75 more positions (with 101 more US seniors) were filled in family medicine residency programs through the NRMP in 2010, at the same time that seven more positions were filled in primary care internal medicine (one more US senior), 14 fewer positions were filled in pediatrics-primary care (16 fewer US seniors), and 16 more positions were filled in internal medicine-pediatrics programs (58 more US seniors). Multiple forces including student perspectives of the demands, rewards, and prestige of the specialty; national dialogue about health care reform; turbulence in the economic environment; lifestyle issues; the advice of deans; and the impact of faculty role models continue to influence medical student career choices. Ninety-four more positions (90 more US seniors) were filled in categorical internal medicine. Fifty-seven more positions (29 more US seniors) were filled in categorical pediatrics programs. The 2010 NRMP results suggest that there is a small increase in primary care careers; however, students continue to show an overall preference for subspecialty careers. Despite matching the highest number of US seniors into family medicine residencies since 2004, in 2010 the production of family physicians remains insufficient to meet the current and anticipated need to support the nation's primary care infrastructure. PMID:20830620

Pugno, Perry A; McGaha, Amy L; Schmittling, Gordon T; DeVilbiss Bieck, Ashley D; Crosley, Philip W; Ostergaard, Daniel J

2010-09-01

76

Wayne State University School of Medicine 2014 Award Nomination Form  

E-print Network

School of Medicine website and in university and community media. IV. The recipients will be recognizedWayne State University School of Medicine 2014 Award Nomination Form 2014 WAYNE STATE UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF MEDICINE CALL FOR NOMINATIONS The Wayne State University School of Medicine Ambassador

Finley Jr., Russell L.

77

Results of the 2011 National Resident Matching Program: family medicine.  

PubMed

The results of the 2011 National Resident Matching Program (NRMP) reflect another small but promising increased level of student interest in family medicine residency training in the United States. Compared with the 2010 Match, family medicine residency programs filled 172 more positions (with 133 more US seniors) through the NRMP in 2011. In other primary care fields, 26 more primary care internal medicine positions filled (10 more US seniors), one more position in pediatrics-primary care (two fewer US seniors), and seven more positions in internal medicine-pediatrics programs (10 more US seniors). The 2011 NRMP results suggest a small increase in choosing primary care careers for the second year in a row; however, students continue to show an overall preference for subspecialty careers. Multiple forces continue to influence medical student career choices. Despite matching the highest number of US seniors into family medicine residencies since 2002, the production of family physicians remains insufficient to meet the current and anticipated need to support the nation's primary care infrastructure. PMID:22002772

Biggs, Wendy S; Bieck, Ashley D; Pugno, Perry A; Crosley, Philip W

2011-10-01

78

The development of academic family medicine in central and eastern Europe since 1990  

PubMed Central

Background Since the early 1990s former communist countries have been reforming their health care systems, emphasizing the key role of primary care and recognizing family medicine as a specialty and an academic discipline. This study assesses the level of academic development of the discipline characterised by education and research in central and eastern European (CEE) countries. Methods A key informants study, using a questionnaire developed on the basis of a systematic literature review and panel discussions, conducted in 11 central and eastern European countries and Russia. Results Family medicine in CEE countries is now formally recognized as a medical specialty and successfully introduced into medical training at undergraduate and postgraduate levels. Almost all universities have FM/GP departments, but only a few of them are led by general practitioners. The specialist training programmes in all countries except Russia fulfil the recommendations of the European Parliament. Structured support for research in FM/GP is not always available. However specific scientific organisations function in almost all countries except Russia. Scientific conferences are regularly organised in all the countries, but peer-reviewed journals are published in only half of them. Conclusions Family medicine has a relatively strong position in medical education in central and eastern Europe, but research in family practice is less developed. Although the position of the discipline at the universities is not very strong, most of the CEE countries can serve as an example of successful academic development for countries southern Europe, where family medicine is still not fully recognised. PMID:23510461

2013-01-01

79

University of Tennessee College of Medicine Scorecard College of Medicine Mission Statement and Scorecard Overview  

E-print Network

1 University of Tennessee College of Medicine Scorecard College of Medicine Mission Statement and Scorecard Overview The mission of the University of Tennessee College of Medicine is to improve the health the College of Medicine. Of note however, although they reflect the priorities of the University of Tennessee

Cui, Yan

80

Finding, keeping, and revitalizing the meaning in family medicine.  

PubMed

The culture of medicine is undergoing revolutionary change. Physicians are pulled in many directions involving the practice of medicine, the business of medicine, and the technology of medicine. Financial incentives and career promotions may be dependent upon such things as patient satisfaction scores, as well as adherence to guidelines for admissions and diagnostic testing. Of course, these metrics are monitored closely by hospitals, insurance companies, and the federal government. The resultant seemingly endless paperwork, deadlines, and multiple demands may result in a sense of time famine for physicians. Unfortunately, these expectations and demands can subsequently diminish the passion for medicine. Moreover, physicians are at high risk for significant physical and emotional exhaustion, often leading to a sense of demoralization. Physicians can ultimately lose sight of their reasons for choosing the field of medicine. Indeed, they can lose the inspiration and "meaning" derived from work in medicine all together. How, then, does one buffer oneself against such perils, and maintain the original passion and meaning in a chosen career of service to others? This article will describe one program's approach to promoting resilience and maintaining meaning during the residency training years through the establishment of a Meaning in Family Medicine Group. The conceptual background, approach to curriculum development, goals and objectives, resident feedback, and suggestions about how to carry this curriculum beyond the residency training years will be discussed. PMID:24261266

Van Dyke, Anne; Seger, Amy M

2013-01-01

81

Faculty of Medicine Programs, Courses and University Regulations  

E-print Network

Faculty of Medicine Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2013-2014 #12;#12;This PDF excerpt of Medicine, page 7 1.1 Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Occupational Health, page 7 5McGill University, Faculty of Medicine, 2013-2014 Faculty of Medicine 2013-2014 #12;2013-2014, McGill University6

Kambhampati, Patanjali

82

Medicinal uses, phytochemistry and pharmacology of family Sterculiaceae: a review.  

PubMed

The family Sterculiaceae is one of the most important families among flowering plants. Many of its members demonstrate medicinal properties and have been used for the treatment of various ailments and wounds. A wide range of compounds including alkaloids, phenyl propanoids, flavonoids, terpenoids and other types of compounds including hydrocarbons, sugars, quinones, phenolic acids, lactones, lignans, amine and amides have been isolated from several species in this family. Few studies have reported that some extracts and single compounds isolated from this family exhibited several biological activities, such as antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and cytotoxic activities. The present review is an effort to provide information about the traditional uses, phytochemistry and pharmacology of species from family Sterculiaceae, and to uncover the gaps and potentials requiring further research opportunities regarding the chemistry and pharmacy of this family. PMID:25599949

Al Muqarrabun, L M R; Ahmat, N

2015-03-01

83

Family Medicine in Undergraduate Medical Education in India  

PubMed Central

The Medical Council of India has set appropriate and relevant objectives to train each medical student into a basic doctor for the country. Even though they envisage that these basic doctors would work as physicians of first contact, providing for the health needs of India at primary and secondary care level, the site of training and the context of clinical teaching do not seem to empower the students to become a basic doctor. ‘Vision 2015’, the document written by the board of governors of medical council of India suggests reforms in medical education such as early clinical exposure, integration of principles of family medicine, and clinical training in the secondary care level. Family medicine training with trained family medicine faculty might add this missing ingredient to our basic doctor training. This article discusses the role of family medicine in undergraduate medical training. We also propose the objectives of such training, the structure of the training process, and the road blocks with possible solutions to its implementation. PMID:25657932

Sankarapandian, Venkatesan; Christopher, Prince R.H.

2014-01-01

84

Family medicine in undergraduate medical education in India.  

PubMed

The Medical Council of India has set appropriate and relevant objectives to train each medical student into a basic doctor for the country. Even though they envisage that these basic doctors would work as physicians of first contact, providing for the health needs of India at primary and secondary care level, the site of training and the context of clinical teaching do not seem to empower the students to become a basic doctor. 'Vision 2015', the document written by the board of governors of medical council of India suggests reforms in medical education such as early clinical exposure, integration of principles of family medicine, and clinical training in the secondary care level. Family medicine training with trained family medicine faculty might add this missing ingredient to our basic doctor training. This article discusses the role of family medicine in undergraduate medical training. We also propose the objectives of such training, the structure of the training process, and the road blocks with possible solutions to its implementation. PMID:25657932

Sankarapandian, Venkatesan; Christopher, Prince R H

2014-01-01

85

Teaching prenatal ultrasound to family medicine residents.  

PubMed

Prenatal ultrasound is a powerful diagnostic tool, but there has been little research on how to teach ultrasound to family physicians. The available evidence supports teaching through didactics followed by supervised scanning. Didactic topics include physics and machine usage, indications, fetal biometry, anatomic survey, practice management, ethical issues, and resources. Supervised scanning reinforces the didactic components of training. A "hand-on-hand" supervised scanning technique is recommended for the transmission of psychomotor skills in these sessions. Curricula for teaching ultrasound should include information on which residents will be taught prenatal ultrasound, who will teach them, how to create time for learning ultrasound skills, and how to test for competency. The literature suggests that competency can be achieved within 25-50 supervised scans. Measures of competency include examination and qualitative analysis of scanning. Competency-based testing needs further development because no uniform standards have been established. PMID:14872356

Dresang, Lee T; Rodney, William MacMillan; Dees, Jason

2004-02-01

86

Identifying HSDD in the family medicine setting.  

PubMed

Hypoactive sexual dysfunction disorder (HSDD) occurs among women of all ages but continues to be underdiagnosed and undertreated. A lack of patient-physician communication is a major reason underlying the failure to identify HSDD. Research has revealed that this problem represents a 2-way street: patients are reluctant to discuss sexual difficulties with their physicians, and physicians are reluctant to inquire about such issues. Moreover, some physicians are concerned that conversations about sexual function might consume too much time during the office visit. An additional consideration is the fact that many physicians do not believe they have the requisite knowledge and experience to diagnose and manage HSDD. By recognizing the nature of these barriers and implementing strategies to overcome them, family physicians can play an important role in promoting more widespread screening for female sexual dysfunction (FSD), leading to greater use of diagnostic modalities designed to ascertain the exact nature of the dysfunction. PMID:19825315

Kingsberg, Sheryl A

2009-07-01

87

Brand Guidelines Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine  

E-print Network

Brand Guidelines Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine Published February 9, 2010 djfhakjd ExitForwardBack #12;1 Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine Brand Guidelines Story University Medical School was renamed Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine (Feinberg

Engman, David M.

88

Department of Tropical Medicine: Tulane University  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Tulane Tropical Medicine Web Page at Tulane University School of Public Health, New Orleans, Louisiana includes current scientific global research projects, US and international academic degree programs, malaria research activities in epidemiology, chloroquine drug resistance, and severe disease. Also available: faculty info and contact points and links to health-related sites.

1997-01-01

89

Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine  

E-print Network

1 Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine Web Content Style Guide June 2013 #12.....................................................................................................................................................10 #12;3 Guide Purpose The purpose of this guide is to provide contributors of feinberg Feinberg site, and focus their information for greatest impact to web readers. The document also includes

Engman, David M.

90

Wayne State University School of Medicine  

E-print Network

Wayne State University School of Medicine HEALTH INSURANCE #12;Michael Vincent Independent Insurance Consultant and Broker 20 year relationship with WSU Medical School Disability and Health, Health Risk of Loss or Damage Transfer Risk to Insurance Company #12;Health Insurance All Medical

Finley Jr., Russell L.

91

Teaching Physical Diagnosis in an Ambulatory Family Medicine Setting  

PubMed Central

A method of teaching physical diagnosis to second year medical students in an ambulatory family practice setting is described. During tutorial sessions, the tutor demonstrated each step in the physical examination and the students practiced on him or on other students who acted the part of patients. In addition, some newly registered patients in the family practice unit volunteered to allow the students to practice history taking and physical examinations on them. The students then watched the staff physician examine the same patients immediately afterwards. Some of the advantages of teaching physical diagnosis in this way rather than in the traditional ward setting include an emphasis on the practical aspects of family practice; the opportunity for student `examiners' to learn from the advice of student `patients', and the likelihood that early exposure to family medicine units influences students to pick family medicine as a career. A possible disadvantage is that students are unlikely to see many patients with abnormal physical findings in the family practice unit. PMID:21283435

Marshall, Kenneth G.

1983-01-01

92

University of Maryland School of Medicine Department of Epidemiolgy and Preventive Medicine  

E-print Network

University of Maryland School of Medicine Department of Epidemiolgy and Preventive Medicine The University of Maryland School of Medicine is seeking a Director for the new Division of Cancer Epidemiology Director for Population Science of the nationally recognized University of Maryland Marlene and Stewart

Weber, David J.

93

Director, Physician Assistant Program Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine  

E-print Network

Director, Physician Assistant Program Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine The Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine invites applications and nominations for the position assistant education. The new Director will actively collaborate with faculty and staff of the Feinberg

Contractor, Anis

94

Balance of trade: export-import in family medicine.  

PubMed

North American family physicians leaving for less-developed countries (LDCs) may not be aware of internationally validated diagnostic and treatment technologies originating in LDCs. Thus they may bring with them inappropriate models and methods of medical care. More useful "exports" are based in sharing our collaborative vocational perspective with dedicated indigenous generalist clinicians who serve their communities. More specifically, Western doctors abroad can promote local reanalyses of international evidence-based medicine (EBM) studies, efficient deployment of scarce clinical resources, and a family medicine/generalist career ladder, ultimately reversing the "brain drain" from LDCs. Balancing these exports, we should import the growing number of EBM best practices originated in World Health Organization and other LDCs research that are applicable in developed nations. Many generalist colleagues, expatriate and indigenous, with long-term LDC experience stand ready to help us import these practices and perspectives. PMID:17987419

Pust, Ronald E

2007-01-01

95

CLINICAL FACULTY CRITERIA Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry, University of Alberta  

E-print Network

CLINICAL FACULTY CRITERIA Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry, University of Alberta 1 VERSION 04 April 2012 Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry, University of Alberta CRITERIA FOR ACADEMIC RANKS, PROMOTIONS AND APPOINTMENTS FOR CLINICAL ACADEMIC COLLEAGUES I.INTRODUCTION The Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry, University

MacMillan, Andrew

96

The Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University  

E-print Network

The Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University EMERGENCY PROCEDURES MANUAL Prepared Resources Security Revised ­ October, 2014 #12;ALBERT EINSTEIN COLLEGE of MEDICINE of YESHIVA UNIVERSITY............................................................................................................................. 44 #12;ALBERT EINSTEIN COLLEGE of MEDICINE of YESHIVA UNIVERSITY EMERGENCY PROCEDURES MANUAL CIVIL

Jenny, Andreas

97

Residents' exposure to aboriginal health issues. Survey of family medicine programs in Canada.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE: To determine whether Canadian family medicine residency programs currently have objectives, staff, and clinical experiences for adequately exposing residents to aboriginal health issues. DESIGN: A one-page questionnaire was developed to survey the details of teaching about and exposure to aboriginal health issues. SETTING: Family medicine programs in Canada. PARTICIPANTS: All Canadian family medicine program directors in the 18 programs (16 at universities and two satellite programs) were surveyed between October 1997 and March 1998. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Whether programs had teaching objectives for exposing residents to aboriginal health issues, whether they had resource people available, what elective and core experiences in aboriginal health were offered, and what types of experiences were available. RESULTS: Response rate was 100%. No programs had formal, written curriculum objectives for residency training in aboriginal health issues, although some were considering them. Some programs, however, had objectives for specific weekend or day sessions. No programs had a strategy for encouraging enrollment of residents of aboriginal origin. Eleven programs had at least one resource person with experience in aboriginal health issues, and 12 had access to community-based aboriginal groups. Core experiences were all weekend seminars or retreats. Elective experiences in aboriginal health were available in 16 programs, and 11 programs were active on reserves. CONCLUSIONS: Many Canadian family medicine programs give residents some exposure to aboriginal health issues, but most need more expertise and direction on these issues. Some programs have unique approaches to teaching aboriginal health care that could be shared. Formalized objectives derived in collaboration with other family medicine programs and aboriginal groups could substantially improve the quality of education in aboriginal health care in Canada. PMID:10065306

Redwood-Campbell, L.; MacDonald, W. A.; Moore, K.

1999-01-01

98

Pre-professional Medicine & Dentistry Portland State University offers the coursework and support services  

E-print Network

Pre-professional Medicine & Dentistry Portland State University offers the coursework and support of dentistry, allopathic medicine, osteopathic medicine, and podiatric medicine. Medical and dental schools

99

A Third-Year Family Medicine Clerkship Based in an Academic Family Practice Center.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A 5-week family medicine clerkship is described that uses several innovative techniques: problem-based learning focusing on patient management tutorials; consultation with specialists; supervised patient care and a nursing home inpatient teaching service; and workshops on topics such as office-surgical techniques, practice management, and…

Taylor, Robert B; And Others

1984-01-01

100

Why Family Medicine is a Good Career Choice for Indian Medical Graduates?  

PubMed

Internationally family medicine has evolved as an independent academic discipline of medical science and speciality vocational training for community based primary care physicians. India has a long tradition of family practice however due to various regulatory barriers family medicine did not optimally develop in mainstream medical education system for many decades. Recently, there is growing interest in this concept in India and family medicine is emerging as a viable career option for medical graduates in India. PMID:24791226

Kumar, Raman

2014-01-01

101

UNIVERSITY OF MIAMI LEONARD M. MILLER SCHOOL OF MEDICINE  

E-print Network

UNIVERSITY OF MIAMI LEONARD M. MILLER SCHOOL OF MEDICINE CODE OF HONORABLE AND PROFESSIONAL CONDUCT AFFIRMATION The students of the University of Miami Leonard M. Miller School of Medicine, in recognition of the fact that the practice of medicine requires not only scientific knowledge and a mastery of technology

Miami, University of

102

Context and trade-offs in family medicine.  

PubMed

This issue contains several articles that highlight the effect of context and tradeoffs encountered in the practice of family medicine. Some articles demonstrate how context affects the implementation of the patient-centered medical home model, the community risk of a measles outbreak, the rate of complementary and alternative medicine among different generations, and the number of family physicians primarily providing urgent and emergent care in a region. Tradeoffs are explored in articles that look at how electronic medical record use has changed the composition of workload in primary care and how the burgeoning number of clinical guidelines affects the choices made by family physicians. A look at diabetic patients' perceptions of their risk of negative outcomes reveals an interesting pattern of underestimation of the risk of death. Patients with chronic mental disorders are at risk of having significant difficulties in the workplace, which may place a heavy cost on the individual and society. An interesting retrospective study found that it takes a surprising amount of replacement therapy to correct vitamin D deficiency. PMID:25001992

Seehusen, Dean A; Bowman, Marjorie A; Neale, Anne Victoria

2014-01-01

103

Profile of Diseases Prevalent in a Tribal Locality in Jharkhand, India: A Family Medicine Practitioner's Perspective  

PubMed Central

Background: Majority of Indian population is dependent on general practitioners (GPs) for medical services at primary care level in India. They are most preferred and considered to be first contact person for medical services at primary care level. But advances in medical science has put more emphasis on specialist culture and average Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery (MBBS) graduates who are working as general physician are gradually feeling themselves less competent because they are less exposed to latest advances in treatment of diseases. Amidst such scenario, Christian Medical College (CMC) has come up with an idea: “The refer less and resolve more initiative”. It has started a decentralized 2-year family medicine distance diploma course (Postgraduate Diploma in Family Medicine (PGDFM)) now accredited by Dr. MGR Medical University, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, that trains the GPs to become family medicine specialist. Materials and Methods: As component of PGDFM course, this study was conducted to provide better understanding of prevalent ailments and common treatment provided by the GPs in the community at present giving key insight of current practice in rural area by a registered family medicine practitioner. Results: As part of study, among 500 patients evaluated, three most common diagnosis were upper respiratory infections (URIs; 18%), acute gastroenteritis including water-borne diseases (15.8%), and anemia (10.4%). Treatment given to these patients comprised of mostly of antipyretic, analgesic, and antimicrobial agents. Most common drug prescribed was paracetamol for fever. Other common drugs prescribed were amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, chloroquine, artemisin derivative, doxycycline, co-trimoxazole, miltefosine, cephalexin, ceftriaxone sodium, cefixime, oral rehydration salts, ranitidine, omeprazole, pantoprazole, metronidazole, albendazole, ondansetron, diclofenac sodium, piroxicam, ibuprofen, diphenhydramine, codeine-sulfate, amlodipine, ramipril, hydrochlorothiazide, atenolol, salbutamol, etophyline, metformin, glimepiride, fluoxetine, flavoxate, tamsulosin, iron-folic acid, etc. The fact that three or more drugs are given in most of the prescriptions, can be justified due to multiple morbidity and the severity of disease than to irresponsible prescribing.

Kumar, Sumit

2015-01-01

104

UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA -SCHOOL OF MEDICINE Curriculum Vitae  

E-print Network

UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA - SCHOOL OF MEDICINE Curriculum Vitae Date: 12 May 2011 David F. Dinges and Professional Development Department of Psychiatry University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine 1013 Blockley Louis University (Physiological Psychology) 1993 M.A. University of Pennsylvania (Honorary) Postgraduate

Pennsylvania, University of

105

UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA -SCHOOL OF MEDICINE Curriculum Vitae  

E-print Network

UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA - SCHOOL OF MEDICINE Curriculum Vitae Date: 4 February 2012 David F and Professional Development Department of Psychiatry University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine 1013 Blockley Louis University (Physiological Psychology) 1993 M.A. University of Pennsylvania (Honorary) Postgraduate

Pennsylvania, University of

106

UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA -SCHOOL OF MEDICINE Curriculum Vitae  

E-print Network

UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA - SCHOOL OF MEDICINE Curriculum Vitae Date: 18 November 2011 David F and Professional Development Department of Psychiatry University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine 1013 Blockley Louis University (Physiological Psychology) 1993 M.A. University of Pennsylvania (Honorary) Postgraduate

Pennsylvania, University of

107

SUBJECT EXAM TESTING DATES BY CLERKSHIP -2012-2013 FAMILY MEDICINE NEUROLOGY PEDIATRICS PSYCHIATRY SURGERY INTERNAL MED. OB/GYN  

E-print Network

SUBJECT EXAM TESTING DATES BY CLERKSHIP -2012-2013 FAMILY MEDICINE NEUROLOGY PEDIATRICS PSYCHIATRY SUBJECT EXAM SCHEDULE 8:00 AM ­ Pediatrics, Family Medicine, Psychiatry and Surgery 11:00 AM ­ Medicine

Berdichevsky, Victor

108

Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine 2012 Award Winners  

E-print Network

Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine 2012 Award Winners Eighth Annual Lewis Coordinator P.I. Stephen Persell, MD, MPH Electronic health record-based patient identification Professor, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Preventive Medicine, and Medical Social Sciences, Feinberg Eighth

Chisholm, Rex L.

109

The Transplant Patient and Transplant Medicine in Family Practice  

PubMed Central

Over the last two decades in particular there has been a remarkable increase in the number of solid organ transplants being performed worldwide alongside improvements in long-term survival rates. However, the infrastructure at transplant centres has been unable to keep pace with the current volume of the transplant patient work load. These pressures on transplant specialist centres has led to calls for an increased role of the general practitioner (GP) managing particular aspects of transplant patients’ medical care. Indeed, many aspects of follow-up care such as screening for malignancies, preventing infection through immunisation programmes, and managing cardiovascular risk factors are already important aspects of family practice medicine. This paper aims to review some of the aspects of transplant patient care that is important for healthcare workers in family practice to manage. PMID:25657941

Hughes, Lloyd D.

2014-01-01

110

Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine VISITING STUDENT ELECTIVE PROGRAM  

E-print Network

Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine VISITING STUDENT ELECTIVE PROGRAM 2012) in the Department of _____________________________________________ at Northwestern University Feinberg School) elective in the Department of __________________________________at Northwestern University Feinberg School

Chisholm, Rex L.

111

[Interface between university medicine and patient care].  

PubMed

The working profile of university hospitals includes medical education, research and implementation of medical innovations as well as large volume patient care. University hospitals offer inpatient, day care and outpatient care which are of essential value for many patients. Besides their primary role in treating rare and orphan diseases and complex cases, they increasingly support general patient care. There are different kinds of outpatient access and treatment options available. The funding of university hospitals and clinics is based on general university funding, income from third party funds for research, income from patient care and funding from the federal states for investments. In recent years these institutions have suffered more and more from economic deficits, a lack of investment and inadequate funding whereby high performance medicine cannot be sufficiently supported. Professors are developing into scientific managers and are frequently assessed by economic outcome and competitiveness. At the same time they are embedded in the structures of the university and are not in the position to make decisions on their own, in contrast to doctors in private practices. Therefore, processes, necessary investments and restructuring are significantly delayed. There is a need to develop strategies for long-term funding and providing university hospitals and clinics with the means to deliver the necessary services. PMID:25037478

Jacobsen, C; Burmester, G R; Detert, J

2014-08-01

112

[Family medicine and practice in the Mexican Social Security Institute].  

PubMed

The central ideas of this research paper are related to the practice of family medicine as a specialty. It focuses in its origins, problems, unique characteristics, limitations, scope, management, and processes within the context of primary care of the Mexican Social Security System. This approach was based on a qualitative, hermeneutical study closely related to the Structural Functionalism Theory. Within this framework, medical practice is seen as an equation: Meaning = action + function/structure. This offers an approach to the understanding of reality through surveys and observations in five categories: identity, activity, purpose, values/norms, and power/relationship. The practice of family medicine is defined as a medical act in the Mexican Social Security Institute. This act is limited to a brief encounter and a prescription, which makes it a short, fleeting, medicalized interaction. The result is a negative social imaginary of the physician, the patient and the whole of society. Thus, individuals and society host a negative social imaginary bestowed on doctors and users of the health system. PMID:25375148

Casas Patiño, Donovan; Jarillo Soto, Edgar; Rodríguez Torres, Alejandra

2014-01-01

113

Transforming a family medicine center and residency program into a federally qualified health center.  

PubMed

The authors describe a family medicine center before and after a merger between the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California, the California Hospital Medical Center, and the Eisner Pediatric and Family Medical Center in 2012. The merger provided new opportunities to stabilize the financial base of a clinical practice struggling financially and to enhance the training of residents and other health professionals in primary care, which motivated the partners to consider this new model. After 18 months of negotiations, they were able to convert the family medicine center and residency program into a new federally qualified health center. The benefits to this new model include an increase in both patient volume and the quality of education, supporting residency accreditation; a greater number of residents from U.S. medical schools; enhanced education and preparation of primary care physicians for practice in medically underserved communities; enhanced reimbursements and new opportunities for state, local, and federal grants; and quality improvement and new information technology. The partners overcame academic, administrative, legal, and regulatory obstacles, communication barriers, and differences in culture and expectations to achieve this merger. Keys to their success include the commitment of the leaders at the three institutions to the goals of the merger, a dedicated project manager and consultants, opportunities for new revenue sources and reimbursements, and support from a pioneering charitable foundation. The authors conclude by discussing the implications of using community health centers as the focal point for training primary care clinicians and addressing workforce shortages. PMID:23524918

Cousineau, Michael R; Flores, Hector; Cheng, Scott; Gates, Jerry D; Douglas, James H; Clute, Gerald B; Coan, Carl E

2013-05-01

114

Family medicine in post-communist Europe needs a boost. Exploring the position of family medicine in healthcare systems of Central and Eastern Europe and Russia  

PubMed Central

Background The countries of Central and Eastern Europe have experienced a lot of changes at the end of the 20th century, including changes in the health care systems and especially in primary care. The aim of this paper is to systematically assess the position of family medicine in these countries, using the same methodology within all the countries. Methods A key informants survey in 11 Central and Eastern European countries and Russia using a questionnaire developed on the basis of systematic literature review. Results Formally, family medicine is accepted as a specialty in all the countries, although the levels of its implementation vary across the countries and the differences are important. In most countries, solo practice is the most predominant organisational form of family medicine. Family medicine is just one of many medical specialties (e.g. paediatrics and gynaecology) in primary health care. Full introduction of family medicine was successful only in Estonia. Conclusions Some of the unification of the systems may have been the result of the EU request for adequate training that has pushed the policies towards higher standards of training for family medicine. The initial enthusiasm of implementing family medicine has decreased because there was no initiative that would support this movement. Internal and external stimuli might be needed to continue transition process. PMID:22409775

2012-01-01

115

40 years of biannual family medicine research meetings – The European General Practice Research Network (EGPRN)  

PubMed Central

Abstract Objective To document family medicine research in the 25 EGPRN member countries in 2010. Design Semi-structured survey with open-ended questions. Setting Academic family medicine in 23 European countries, Israel, and Turkey. Subjects 25 EGPRN national representatives. Main outcome measures Demographics of the general population and family medicine. Assessments, opinions, and suggestions. Results EGPRN has represented family medicine for almost half a billion people and > 300 000 general practitioners (GPs). Turkey had the largest number of family medicine departments and highest density of GPs, 2.1/1000 people, Belgium had 1.7, Austria 1.6, and France 1.5. Lowest GP density was reported from Israel 0.17, Greece 0.18, and Slovenia 0.4 GPs per 1000 people. Family medicine research networks were reported by 22 of 25 and undergraduate family medicine research education in 20 of the 25 member countries, and in 10 countries students were required to do research projects. Postgraduate family medicine research was reported by 18 of the member countries. Open-ended responses showed that EGPRN meetings promoted stimulating and interesting research questions such as comparative studies of chronic pain management, sleep disorders, elderly care, healthy lifestyle promotion, mental health, clinical competence, and appropriateness of specialist referrals. Many respondents reported a lack of interest in family medicine research related to poor incentives and low family medicine status in general and among medical students in particular. It was suggested that EGPRN exert political lobbying for family medicine research. Conclusion Since 1974, EGPRN organizes biannual conferences that unite and promote primary care practice, clinical research and academic family medicine in 25 member countries. PMID:24191874

2013-01-01

116

Feinberg Fact Sheet Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine  

E-print Network

Feinberg Fact Sheet Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine The mission of Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine is to mentor and educate students to become exceptional, compassionate. And we play an integral role in the communities we serve. Feinberg Facts Northwestern University Feinberg

Chisholm, Rex L.

117

UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA PERELMAN SCHOOL OF MEDICINE Curriculum Vitae  

E-print Network

UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA ­ PERELMAN SCHOOL OF MEDICINE Curriculum Vitae Date: 24 February 2013 of Psychiatry University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine 1013 Blockley Hall 423 Guardian Drive Philadelphia.A. University of Pennsylvania (Honorary) Postgraduate Training and Fellowship Appointments: 1975-77 Research

Pennsylvania, University of

118

UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA PERELMAN SCHOOL OF MEDICINE Curriculum Vitae  

E-print Network

UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA ­ PERELMAN SCHOOL OF MEDICINE Curriculum Vitae Date: 31 December 2013 of Psychiatry University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine 1013 Blockley Hall 423 Guardian Drive Philadelphia Psychology) 1993 M.A. University of Pennsylvania (Honorary) Postgraduate Training and Fellowship Appointments

Pennsylvania, University of

119

UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA PERELMAN SCHOOL OF MEDICINE Curriculum Vitae  

E-print Network

UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA ­ PERELMAN SCHOOL OF MEDICINE Curriculum Vitae Date: 20 August 2013 of Psychiatry University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine 1013 Blockley Hall 423 Guardian Drive Philadelphia.A. University of Pennsylvania (Honorary) Postgraduate Training and Fellowship Appointments: 1975-77 Research

Pennsylvania, University of

120

UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA PERELMAN SCHOOL OF MEDICINE Curriculum Vitae  

E-print Network

UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA ­ PERELMAN SCHOOL OF MEDICINE Curriculum Vitae Date: 4 November 2013 of Psychiatry University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine 1013 Blockley Hall 423 Guardian Drive Philadelphia.A. University of Pennsylvania (Honorary) Postgraduate Training and Fellowship Appointments: 1975-77 Research

Pennsylvania, University of

121

Yale University School of Medicine Heart Book  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In 1992, this book, edited by three Yale University professors of Medicine, and designed "in clear, simple language, [to] cover the entire spectrum of cardiovascular disease," was published by Hearst Books. Now the Yale University Medical Library has made it available via the web (in Adobe Acrobat [.pdf] format only). Its 29 chapters are arranged in six major sections: The Heart and How it Works; How to Lower Your Risk of Heart Disease; Steps in Making Diagnosis; Major Cardiovascular Disorders; Special Situations; and Methods of Treatment. Also included is a concise "encyclopedia" of 39 heart disorders, symptoms, diagnoses, and treatments, from Angina Pectoris to Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome. This book provides a wealth of information on heart disease to its intended general audience. The chapters are split into separate .pdf files for greater ease of downloading.

1997-01-01

122

Washington University School of Medicine Telephone Numbers (Area Code 314)  

E-print Network

Washington University School of Medicine FACTS 2012 Telephone Numbers (Area Code 314) Washington . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .TOP-DOCS (867-3627) Pediatrics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 454-KIDS (454

Baloh, Bob

123

Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine 2009 Award Winners  

E-print Network

Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine 2009 Award Winners Fifth Annual Lewis Landsberg Science Research Stephen D. Persell A multimodality outpatient quality improvement intervention using

Chisholm, Rex L.

124

Medical Faculty of Ulm University Prospectus for Human Medicine  

E-print Network

Medical Faculty of Ulm University Prospectus for Human Medicine #12;1 Content Preface 3 Cources of Study in the Medical Faculty 5 Admission to the studies of human medicine 6 Description of the Course of Study in Human Medicine 7 Studying Abroad 10 Studying with a Child 12 Training and Promotion of the New

Ulm, Universität

125

Page 1 of 4 Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine  

E-print Network

Page 1 of 4 Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine Procurement Card Policies. This document was created as a supplement for the Feinberg School of Medicine (FSM) users and should be used Agreement for Feinberg School of Medicine. By signing this form, the Cardholder acknowledges that he/she has

126

Department of Pathology STANFORD UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF MEDICINE  

E-print Network

in blood banking and transfusion medicine. The individual will provide medical cross coverage and transfusion medicine. The Stanford Blood Center collects approximately 50,000 red cell and 14, Stanford Medical School Blood Center The Department of Pathology at Stanford University School of Medicine

Bogyo, Matthew

127

ALBERT EINSTEIN COLLEGE OF MEDICINE OF YESHIVA UNIVERSITY  

E-print Network

ALBERT EINSTEIN COLLEGE OF MEDICINE OF YESHIVA UNIVERSITY JACK AND PEARL RESNICK CAMPUS · 1300: Mr/Ms , social security # , who is presently associated with the Albert Einstein College of Medicine radiation exposure records be released to the Albert Einstein College of Medicine's Radiation Safety Office

Emmons, Scott

128

Extending the boundaries of family medicine to perform manual procedures.  

PubMed

A recent survey by Menahem and colleagues revealed that 65% of the surveyed primary care physicians reported that they performed any minor surgical procedures, and 46% reported performance of any musculoskeletal injections. Lack of allocated time and lack of training were the main reported barriers confronting higher performance rates. Healthcare systems are shifting large chunks of traditional hospital-centered activities to competent and comprehensive community-based structures. These changes are very well aligned with key trends in modern consumerism that prefer a close to home availability of medical services. Minor surgical procedures and musculoskeletal injections are good examples of medical activities that had been performed mainly by hospital and community based specialists. The syllabus of specialty training in Family Medicine in Israel includes these skills and trainees should acquire them during the residency program. We estimate that hundreds of family physicians obtain different levels of such training. Yet, only few family physicians have allocated protected time for performance of the procedures. For the skilled physician, performance of such relatively simple procedures extends his professional boundaries and the comprehensiveness of his service. For the healthcare system the "extra effort" and investment needed for performance of minor surgical procedures in primary care clinics is small. The results of the present study reflect on wider issues of care delivery. This study highlights the need for formalized and documented training of family physicians together with allocation of managerial and technical requirements needed to encourage these and similar medically and economically justified endeavors that seem to be perfectly aligned with the wishes of healthcare consumers. PMID:25383180

Bitterman, Haim; Vinker, Shlomo

2014-01-01

129

Feinberg Fact Sheet Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine  

E-print Network

Feinberg Fact Sheet Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine The defining mission of Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine is to mentor and educate students to become exceptional and the upper Midwest. And we play an integral part in the communities we serve. Feinberg Fact Sheet

Chisholm, Rex L.

130

Family medicine in a tertiary care hospital. Obstetrical outcomes and interventions.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE: To examine the rates of obstetrical complications and interventions among patients managed or comanaged by family physicians. DESIGN: Case series. Retrospective review of hospital records. SETTING: Victoria Hospital, a tertiary care centre affiliated with the University of Western Ontario in London, Ont. PARTICIPANTS: Five hundred forty-two women in labour admitted consecutively by family physicians from October 1, 1990, to September 31, 1991. There were no exclusions based on antenatal risk. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Degree of risk on admission, and rates of cesarean sections, inductions, epidurals, forceps deliveries, episiotomies, perineal tears, postpartum hemorrhages, and postpartum fever for mothers. For newborns, Apgar scores and rate of need for a pediatric critical care unit or special observation nursery. RESULTS: Except for rates of inductions and episiotomies, which were lower than those reported elsewhere, results were all comparable to those in previous North American studies of low-risk family medicine obstetric patients. CONCLUSION: Family physicians care for women with a range of antenatal risks. Even when practising in tertiary care environments, family physicians can minimize many obstetrical interventions while maintaining good maternal and neonatal outcomes. PMID:7787490

Gaspar, D.; Jordan, J.

1995-01-01

131

Young L. Kim Northwestern University, Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL  

E-print Network

Short CV Young L. Kim Education Northwestern University, Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL: September 2005 ­ July 2007 (Cancer

Kim, Young L.

132

Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine TUITION and INSURANCE PAYMENT FORM  

E-print Network

Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine TUITION and INSURANCE PAYMENT FORM VISITING Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine Augusta Webster Office of Medical Education 303 East

Chisholm, Rex L.

133

Learning behaviour and preferences of family medicine residents under a flexible academic curriculum  

PubMed Central

Abstract Objective To determine family medicine residents’ learning behaviour and preferences outside of clinical settings in order to help guide the development of an effective academic program that can maximize their learning. Design Retrospective descriptive analysis of academic learning logs submitted by residents as part of their academic training requirements between 2008 and 2011. Setting London, Ont. Participants All family medicine residents at Western University who had completed their academic program requirements (N = 72) by submitting 300 or more credits (1 credit = 1 hour). Main outcome measures Amount of time spent on various learning modalities, location where the learning took place, resources used for self-study, and the objective of the learning activity. Results A total of 72 residents completed their academic requirements during the study period and logged a total of 25 068 hours of academic learning. Residents chose to spend most of their academic time engaging in self-study (44%), attending staff physicians’ teaching sessions (20%), and participating in conferences, courses, or workshops (12%) and in postgraduate medical education sessions (12%). Textbooks (26%), medical journals (20%), and point-of-care resources (12%) were the 3 most common resources used for self-study. The hospital (32%), residents’ homes (32%), and family medicine clinics (14%) were the most frequently cited locations where academic learning occurred. While all physicians used a variety of educational activities, most residents (67%) chose self-study as their primary method of learning. The topic for academic learning appeared to have some influence on the learning modalities used by residents. Conclusion Residents used a variety of learning modalities and chose self-study over other more traditional modalities (eg, lectures) for most of their academic learning. A successful academic program must take into account residents’ various learning preferences and habits while providing guidance and training in the use of more effective learning methods and resources to maximize educational outcomes. PMID:25551133

Sy, Alice; Wong, Eric; Boisvert, Leslie

2014-01-01

134

First-year family medicine residents' use of computers: knowledge, skills and attitudes.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE: To identify the computer knowledge, skills and attitudes of first-year family medicine residents. DESIGN: Cross-sectional survey of family medicine residents during the academic year 1993-94; sampling began in July 1993 and ended in October 1993. SETTING: Canada. PARTICIPANTS: All 727 first-year family medicine residents, of whom 433 (60%) responded. OUTCOME MEASURES: Previous computer experience or training, current use, barriers to use, and comfort with and attitudes regarding computers. RESULTS: There was no difference in age or sex between the respondents and all first-year family medicine residents in Canada. French-speaking respondents from Quebec were underrepresented (p < 0.001). Only 56 respondents (13%) felt extremely or very comfortable with computer use. The most commonly cited barriers to obtaining computer training were lack of time (243 respondents [56%]) and the high cost of computers (214 [49%]) but not lack of interest (69 [16%]). Most residents wanted more computer training (367 [85%]) and felt that computer training should be a mandatory component of family medicine training programs (308 [71%]). CONCLUSIONS: Computer knowledge and skills and comfort with computer use appear low among first-year family medicine residents in Canada, and barriers to acquisition of computer knowledge are impressive. Computer training should become an integral part of family medicine training in Canada, and user-friendly applicable computer systems are needed. PMID:7614442

Rowe, B H; Ryan, D T; Therrien, S; Mulloy, J V

1995-01-01

135

Family Therapy and Alternative Medicine: Acupuncture as a Case in Point  

Microsoft Academic Search

Collaboration between family therapists and alternative medicine practitioners is recently cultivated ground that may prove to be fertile territory for the application of family therapy skills. Acupuncture and family therapy are two healing practices that differ in cultural tradition, language, and technique, yet they appear to share some underlying assumptions suggestive of a natural alliance in helping people with a

Israela Meyerstein

2000-01-01

136

University of Connecticut School of Dental Medicine Space Policy  

E-print Network

University of Connecticut School of Dental Medicine Space Policy Introduction Space, whether Policy allocates space to the SDM to meet its academic missions, whereas this Space Policy guides of Connecticut School of Dental Medicine Space Policy is: 1) to develop simple measures of the need for space

Kim, Duck O.

137

Colorado State University College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences  

E-print Network

and validation of new diagnostic tests. Teaching commitments include the Veterinary Virology class, graduate and professional veterinary medicine programs and currently serve as major advisors for 54 PhD, 5Colorado State University College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences Department

138

University of Rochester Sports Medicine Visiting Team Guide  

E-print Network

University of Rochester Sports Medicine Visiting Team Guide Athletic.275.7379 #12; Athletic Training Services for your Event Our Sports Medicine Staff of Operation Treatment Hours are Monday-Friday from 10:30a-2:30p and there is a Sports

Mahon, Bradford Z.

139

UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN SCHOOL OF MEDICINE AND PUBLIC HEALTH  

E-print Network

UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN SCHOOL OF MEDICINE AND PUBLIC HEALTH DEPARTMENT OF POPULATION HEALTH, and delivery of services in the U.S. health care system; the role of prevention and other non- medical factors@wisc.edu Gordon Ridley, Consultant to the Dean, School of Medicine and Public Health, gtridley@wisc.edu Teaching

Sheridan, Jennifer

140

Department of Pathology STANFORD UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF MEDICINE  

E-print Network

and fellow training activities in blood banking and transfusion medicine. The individual will provide medical research projects in blood banking and transfusion medicine. The Stanford Blood Center collects of Clinical Services Stanford Medical School Blood Center The Department of Pathology at Stanford University

Bogyo, Matthew

141

UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA PERELMAN SCHOOL OF MEDICINE Curriculum Vitae  

E-print Network

UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA ­ PERELMAN SCHOOL OF MEDICINE Curriculum Vitae Date: 25 March 2014 David of Pennsylvania School of Medicine 1013 Blockley Hall 423 Guardian Drive Philadelphia, PA 19104-6021 e of Pennsylvania (Honorary) Postgraduate Training and Fellowship Appointments: 1975-77 Research Psychologist

Pennsylvania, University of

142

SPACE PLANNING & OPERATIONS University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine  

E-print Network

SPACE PLANNING & OPERATIONS University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine Policy & Procedure: Public Space Use and Scheduling 12 May 2003 PLEASE NOTE THAT THIS POLICY IS CURRENTLY UNDER REVISION Description: School of Medicine Public Space (list defined below) is being centrally scheduled by Space

Bushman, Frederic

143

Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University  

E-print Network

4 1 Strategic Research Plan Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University Jack and Pearl Resnick Campus 1300 Morris Park Avenue Bronx, New York 10461 Albert Einstein College of Medicine.A. Cissell Consulting Design: GRAPHIC ARTS CENTER Creative Director: Peter Dama Albert Einstein College

Emmons, Scott

144

University of Washington School of Medicine Department of Bioethics & Humanities  

E-print Network

of medicine. Medical Students: Faculty offer medical student training in clinical ethics and professionalism) served by the University of Washington School of Medicine. Medical Residents: Faculty teach an ethics curriculum to medical residents and fellows that provides foundational case-based training in clinical ethics

Anderson, Richard

145

Development of a portfolio of learning for postgraduate family medicine training in South Africa: a Delphi study  

PubMed Central

Background Within the 52 health districts in South Africa, the family physician is seen as the clinical leader within a multi-professional district health team. Family physicians must be competent to meet 90% of the health needs of the communities in their districts. The eight university departments of Family Medicine have identified five unit standards, broken down into 85 training outcomes, for postgraduate training. The family medicine registrar must prove at the end of training that all the required training outcomes have been attained. District health managers must be assured that the family physician is competent to deliver the expected service. The Colleges of Medicine of South Africa (CMSA) require a portfolio to be submitted as part of the uniform assessment of all registrars applying to write the national fellowship examinations. This study aimed to achieve a consensus on the contents and principles of the first national portfolio for use in family medicine training in South Africa. Methods A workshop held at the WONCA Africa Regional Conference in 2009 explored the purpose and broad contents of the portfolio. The 85 training outcomes, ideas from the WONCA workshop, the literature, and existing portfolios in the various universities were used to develop a questionnaire that was tested for content validity by a panel of 31 experts in family medicine in South Africa, via the Delphi technique in four rounds. Eighty five content items (national learning outcomes) and 27 principles were tested. Consensus was defined as 70% agreement. For those items that the panel thought should be included, they were also asked how to provide evidence for the specific item in the portfolio, and how to assess that evidence. Results Consensus was reached on 61 of the 85 national learning outcomes. The panel recommended that 50 be assessed by the portfolio and 11 should not be. No consensus could be reached on the remaining 24 outcomes and these were also omitted from the portfolio. The panel recommended that various types of evidence be included in the portfolio. The panel supported 26 of the 27 principles, but could not reach consensus on whether the portfolio should reflect on the relationship between the supervisor and registrar. Conclusion A portfolio was developed and distributed to the eight departments of Family Medicine in South Africa, and the CMSA, to be further tested in implementation. PMID:22385468

2012-01-01

146

STUDENT NATIONAL MEDICAL ASSOCIATION TUFTS UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF MEDICINE  

E-print Network

be graduating, Massachusetts high school students belonging to one of the following ethnic groups: Black: _____/_____/_____ Age: _____ __________________________________________________________ Race/Ethnicity _______________________________ STUDENT NATIONAL MEDICAL ASSOCIATION TUFTS UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF MEDICINE COLLEEN ROMAIN SCHOLARSHIP

Tufts University

147

Evaluation of Teaching and Learning in Family Medicine by Students: A Sri Lankan Experience  

PubMed Central

Background: Family Medicine occupies a prominent place in the undergraduate curriculum of the Faculty of Medicine, University of Kelaniya, Sri Lanka. The one month clinical attachment during the fourth year utilizes a variety of teaching methods. This study evaluates teaching learning methods and learning environment of this attachment. Methodology: A descriptive cross sectional study was carried out among consenting students over a period of six months on completion of the clinical attachment using a pretested self administered questionnaire. Results: Completed questionnaires were returned by 114(99%) students. 90.2% were satisfied with the teaching methods in general while direct observation and feed back from teachers was the most popular(95.1%) followed by learning from patients(91.2%), debate(87.6%), seminar(87.5%) and small group discussions(71.9%). They were highly satisfied with the opportunity they had to develop communication skills (95.5%) and presentation skills (92.9%). Lesser learning opportunity was experienced for history taking (89.9%), problem solving (78.8%) and clinical examination (59.8%) skills. Student satisfaction regarding space within consultation rooms was 80% while space for history taking and examination (62%) and availability of clinical equipment (53%) were less. 90% thought the programme was well organized and adequate understanding on family medicine concepts and practice organization gained by 94% and 95% of the students respectively. Conclusions: Overall student satisfaction was high. Students prefer learning methods which actively involve them. It is important to provide adequate infra structure facilities for student activities to make it a positive learning experience for them.

Ramanayake, R. P. J. C.; De Silva, A. H. W.; Perera, D. P.; Sumanasekara, R. D. N.; Gunasekara, R.; Chandrasiri, P.

2015-01-01

148

RUTGERS, THE STATE UNIVERSITY OF NEW JERSEY UNIVERSITY OF MEDICINE AND DENTISTRY OF NEW JERSEY  

E-print Network

RUTGERS, THE STATE UNIVERSITY OF NEW JERSEY UNIVERSITY OF MEDICINE AND DENTISTRY OF NEW JERSEY and Dentistry of New Jersey BIOTECHNOLOGY TRAINING PROGRAM The PhD Training Program in Biotechnology of the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey (UMDNJ) was established in 1989. It is one

Muzzio, Fernando J.

149

Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine ACCEPTED STUDENT REGISTRATION PAYMENT FORM  

E-print Network

Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine ACCEPTED STUDENT REGISTRATION PAYMENT FORM: _____________________________________________________ Signature of Card Holder: ____________________________________________ Northwestern University Feinberg

Chisholm, Rex L.

150

Suggested Guidelines for Pharmacotherapy Curricula in Family Medicine Residency Training: Recommendations From the Society of Teachers of Family Medicine Group on Pharmacotherapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Rational drug use has increasingly received public policy attention in efforts to maintain quality health care at lower costs. Prescribing habits are developed during residency training, and education regarding rational drug use should be an integral part of the residency curricula. Considering that many medical errors in family medicine are related to incorrect medication management, there is need for a

Oralia Bazaldua; Adrienne Z. Ables; Lori M. Dickerson; Laura Hansen; Ila Harris; James Hoehns; Eric Jackson; Connie Kraus; Heidi Mayville; Joseph J. Saseen

151

Medicinal plants in an urban environment: the medicinal flora of Banares Hindu University, Varanasi, Uttar Pradesh.  

PubMed

Varanasi is one of the oldest continuously inhabited cities of the world, and one of the most important Hindu pilgrimage sites. Despite this importance, very little information exits on the cities flora in general, and medicinal species found within its limit in particular. Traditional medicine plays a large role in Indian society. The presented study attempted to investigate if traditional plant use and availability of important common medicinal plants are maintained in urban environments. The paper presents information on the traditional uses of seventy-two plant species collected form the campus of Banares Hindu University, Varanasi, Uttar Pradesh, and highlights the uses of these plants by the local inhabitants. PMID:17996050

Verma, Archana K; Kumar, Munesh; Bussmann, Rainer W

2007-01-01

152

WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF MEDICINE DEPARTMENT OF PHYSIOLOGY & PHARMACOLOGY  

E-print Network

WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF MEDICINE DEPARTMENT OF PHYSIOLOGY & PHARMACOLOGY 2013 SPRING Virginia University Frisbee 31 William Stauber, Ph.D. Professor Department of Physiology & Pharmacology Hardy, Ph.D. Mark Paternostro, Ph.D. Associate Professors of Physiology & Pharmacology West Virginia

Mohaghegh, Shahab

153

University of Maryland Medical System and School of Medicine  

E-print Network

University of Maryland Medical System and School of Medicine The Power of Partnership HEALTH the Scope of the University of Maryland Marlene and Stewart Greenebaum Cancer Center · Shock Trauma Expansion Dedicated to Maryland's Most Critically Ill and Injured · Research Partnership Across Disciplines

Weber, David J.

154

Articulation Agreement Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis  

E-print Network

in Occupational Therapy & Truman State University Fall 2014 Students must: 1. Hold an overall 3.75 GPA on a 4 University School of Medicine Program in Occupational Therapy (the "Program"). Applicants should have 5 year of admission. 6. The GRE code for the Program in Occupational Therapy Program for Washington

Gering, Jon C.

155

University of California, San Diego INSTITUTE FOR GENOMIC MEDICINE  

E-print Network

University of California, San Diego INSTITUTE FOR GENOMIC MEDICINE 2011 SYMPOSIUM October 24th EXOME SEQUENCING" 9:00 NICO KATSANIS (DUKE UNIVERSITY MEDICAL CENTER) "Modeling the Morbid Human Genome" 9:30 ELIZABETH WINZELER (TSRI) "USING CHEMICAL GENETICS AND GENOMICS TO FIND NOVEL PATHOGEN TARGETS

Krstic, Miroslav

156

University of Maryland School of Medicine License Plate Information Thank you for requesting a set of University of Maryland School of Medicine license plates. By  

E-print Network

University of Maryland School of Medicine License Plate Information Thank you for requesting a set of University of Maryland School of Medicine license plates. By displaying these special bicentennial license plates, you will demonstrate your pride in the University of Maryland School of Medicine. Each set

Weber, David J.

157

THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO Department of Medicine  

E-print Network

for Clinical Medical Ethics Victoria Villaflor, MD Associate Professor of Medicine Irving Waxman, MD Professor Surgery Chief, Surgical Oncology Medical Director, Clinical Cancer Programs Ravi Salgia, MD, PhD Professor served as secretary general in the Japanese Government's Office of Medical Innovation and professor

Butler, Laurie J.

158

UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS COLLEGE OF MEDICINE AT URBANA-CHAMPAIGN MATCH LIST MARCH 2011  

E-print Network

UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS COLLEGE OF MEDICINE AT URBANA-CHAMPAIGN MATCH LIST ­ MARCH 2011, Santa Clara, CA Bonnie Wang University of Illinois College of Medicine, Urbana, IL INTERNAL MEDICINE Children's Hospital of Michigan, Detroit, MI Jonathan Rhine Southern Illinois University School of Medicine

Frank, Thomas D.

159

Preparing the personal physician for practice: changing family medicine residency training to enable new model practice.  

PubMed

After two years of intensive study, in 2004 the Future of Family Medicine report concluded that the current U.S. health care system is inadequate and unsustainable, and called for changes within the specialty of family medicine to ensure the future health of the American public. With guidance and encouragement from many disciplines and health experts, a set of 10 recommendations was established to accomplish a transformative change in how family physicians serve their patients and how the essential function of primary care is achieved. From these recommendations came a period of innovation and experimentation in the training of family physicians, entitled Preparing the Personal Physician for Practice (P4). The P4 project is a carefully designed and evaluated initiative led by the American Board of Family Medicine and the Association of Family Medicine Residency Directors and administered by TransforMED, a practice redesign initiative of the American Academy of Family Physicians. Fourteen family medicine programs were chosen to participate and will put their innovations into practice from 2007 to 2012, during which time regular evaluation will be conducted. The purpose of P4 is to learn how to improve the graduate medical education of family physicians such that they are prepared to be outstanding personal physicians and to work in the new models of practice now emerging. The innovations tested by P4 residencies are expected to inspire substantial changes in the content, structure, and locations of training of family physicians and to guide future revisions in accreditation and certification requirements. PMID:18046133

Green, Larry A; Jones, Samuel M; Fetter, Gerald; Pugno, Perry A

2007-12-01

160

BOSTON UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF MEDICINE CURRICULUM VITAE  

E-print Network

-1753 BUSINESS ADDRESS: BU Medical Center, Dept of Otolaryngology 820 Harrison Ave., FGH Bldg, 4th floor Boston) Title Institution (City & State) Inclusive Dates Professor, Otolaryngology Boston University School University 2007-present Clinical Professor, Otolaryngology University of California, San Francisco CA 2007

Guenther, Frank

161

Sexual medicine in family practice. Part 1: How to help.  

PubMed Central

Family physicians are in a unique position to help patients with sexual problems. They know their patients over a long time and often have both partners as patients. Most problems require minimal intervention, usually by providing information. Family physicians are sometimes the only professionals who are trusted enough to be told of abusive or incestuous situations. PMID:8471906

Holzapfel, S.

1993-01-01

162

Guiding the development of family medicine training in Africa through collaboration with the Medical Education Partnership Initiative.  

PubMed

Africa's health care challenges include a high burden of disease, low life expectancy, health workforce shortages, and varying degrees of commitment to primary health care on the part of policy makers and government officials. One overarching goal of the Medical Education Partnership Initiative (MEPI) is to develop models of medical education in Sub-Saharan Africa. To do this, MEPI has created a network of universities and other institutions that, among other things, recognizes the importance of supporting training programs in family medicine. This article provides a framework for assessing the stage of the development of family medicine training in Africa, including the challenges that were encountered and how educational organizations can help to address them. A modified "stages of change" model (precontemplation, contemplation, action, maintenance, and relapse) was used as a conceptual framework to understand the various phases that countries go through in developing family medicine in the public sector and to determine the type of assistance that is useful at each phase. PMID:25072584

Mash, Robert J; de Villiers, Marietjie R; Moodley, Kalay; Nachega, Jean B

2014-08-01

163

Family Medicine, the specialty of the future: the Portuguese situation within the European context  

PubMed Central

General Practice/Family Medicine is a specialty focused on the provision of comprehensive, continuing, and community oriented, person-centred care. The lack of prestige and the difficulty in attracting trainees to the specialty have been longstanding problems in most countries around the world. In Europe, General Practice/Family Medicine is also hampered for not being recognized as a specialty throughout Europe. As for Portugal, General Practice/Family Medicine is undergoing a massive organizational reform, as well as unprecedented levels of popularity among trainees. General Practice/Family holds tremendous latent potential, and is thus a specialty with a bright future ahead. It could well establish itself as the specialty of the future if it is able to overcome the barriers that currently make of General Practice/Family Medicine an unpopular career choice. It is important to train confident, competent and polyvalent family physicians, but it is also necessary to overhaul payment schemes, to invest in primary care infra-structure and organization, and to continue to attract more and more bright and motivated trainees. PMID:19906299

2009-01-01

164

University of Maryland School of Medicine PostDoctoral Fellowship in Cancer Epidemiology  

E-print Network

University of Maryland School of Medicine PostDoctoral Fellowship in Cancer Epidemiology Health, School of Medicine, University of Maryland at Baltimore (UMB). Our group has several ongoing University of Maryland School of Medicine jdorgan@som.umaryland.edu The University of Maryland, Baltimore

Weber, David J.

165

Shaping the Future of Academic Health Centers: The Potential Contributions of Departments of Family Medicine  

PubMed Central

Academic health centers (AHCs) must change dramatically to meet the changing needs of patients and society, but how to do this remains unclear. The purpose of this supplement is to describe ways in which departments of family medicine can play leadership roles in helping AHCs evolve. This overview provides background for case studies and commentaries about the contribution of departments of family medicine in 5 areas: (1) ambulatory and primary care, (2) indigent care, (3) education in community and international settings, (4) workforce policy and practice, and (5) translational research. The common theme is a revitalization of the relationship between AHCs and the communities they serve across all missions. Family medicine leadership can provide dramatic organizational improvement in primary and ambulatory care networks and foster opportunities for leadership by AHCs in improving the health of the population. Departments of family medicine can also play a leading role in developing new partnerships with community-based organizations, managing the care of the indigent, and developing new curricula in community and international settings. Finally, family medicine departments and their faculty have a central role in helping AHCs respond to workforce needs and in developing translational research that emphasizes the health of the population and effectiveness of care. AHCs are a public good that must now evolve substantially to meet the needs of patients and society. By pushing for substantial change, by helping to reinvigorate the relationship between AHCs and the communities they serve, and by emphasizing fundamental innovation in clinical care, teaching, and research, family medicine can help lead the renewal of the AHC. PMID:17003157

Newton, Warren P.; DuBard, C. Annette

2006-01-01

166

NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY FEINBERG SCHOOL OF MEDICINE  

E-print Network

University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA "Understanding Adherence: Health Literacy care. We will discuss low health literacy in neurology and the importance will address the role of health literacy and medication beliefs as modifiable barriers

Contractor, Anis

167

May 19, 2008 University of Connecticut School of Medicine  

E-print Network

May 19, 2008 University of Connecticut School of Medicine Space Policy Introduction Space, whether Policy is used to allocate space to the SOM to meet its academic missions. This space policy provides of the SOM Space Policy is to: 1) develop a simple measure of need and corresponding assignment of space

Kim, Duck O.

168

University of Verona Department of Medicine and Public Health  

E-print Network

University of Verona Department of Medicine and Public Health Section of Psychiatry and Clinical Psychology WHO Collaborating Centre for Research and Training in Mental Health and Service Evaluation Head in Mental Health on 23 February 1987. According to WHO regulations the designation lasts for four years

Romeo, Alessandro

169

Department of Public Health and Community Medicine University of Verona  

E-print Network

Department of Public Health and Community Medicine University of Verona Section of Psychiatry (Head Collaborating Centre for Research and Training in Mental Health and Service Evaluation (Director: Professor of mental health, costs evaluation, evaluation of mental health services, effectiveness of psychosocial

Romeo, Alessandro

170

University of Virginia School of Medicine PO Box 800761  

E-print Network

Sciences, UVA School of Medicine, in observance at UVA of Primary Care Week 18 September 2013 History, Charlottesville VA Singers from University Singers Co-presented with the History of the Health Sciences Lecture; Professor of Psychiatry and Neurobehavioral Sciences and Director, Institute of Law, Psychiatry and Public

Acton, Scott

171

FOR TWO CENTURIES, UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND SCHOOL OF MEDICINE  

E-print Network

mental illness and education Research endowments and program support By providing basic and clinical disorders, severe mental illness, and other programs of excellence, the department's distin- guished faculty--and to recognize our long history of excelence --the School of Medicine has created The University of Maryland Fund

Weber, David J.

172

Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University ECU Physicians  

E-print Network

Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University ECU Physicians Topic: Code Blue and other Healthcare Emergencies (formerly Code Blue) Section No. 2 Section Name: Clinical Approval Date: 06/09/97; 08 resuscitation and activating either a Code Blue or local EMS (by calling 911) when a medical emergency occurs

173

Pre-Veterinary Medicine University of New Orleans  

E-print Network

Pre-Veterinary Medicine University of New Orleans Advisor: Dr. Dorothy Scholl Tel: 280-6624 CRC 202A email: dscholl@uno.edu Minimum Prerequisite Course for Admission to the LSU School of Veterinary towards graduation for both sets of math courses. If you anticipate earning the BS degree in Biology, you

Li, X. Rong

174

THE UNIVERSITY OF TOLEDO Department of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology  

E-print Network

for Sleep Disorders Lynn Godfrey, B.S.N., CDE Diabetes Education Nurse Coordinator Deepak K. Malhotra, MD Associate Professor of Pharmacy Wayne State University Detroit, MI David G. Marrero, Ph.D. J.O. Richey Chair of Medicine Russell W. Smith, R.Ph., MBA Adjunct Clinical Instructor Manager, Pharmacy Operations Gregory

Toledo, University of

175

Alternative Medicine and Herbal Use among University Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this study, the authors investigated the predictors of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) and herbal supplement use among university students. They investigated demographic factors, trait affectivity, symptom reports, and individuals' worries about modernity as potential contributors to use of CAM and herbals. The authors surveyed 506…

Johnson, Susan K.; Blanchard, Anita

2006-01-01

176

Animal Health Diagnostic Center College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University  

E-print Network

Animal Health Diagnostic Center College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University In Partnership the acceptability of the sample size, remove the sample buffer from the AHDC sample tubes and submit the sample in the "dry" tube. As will all tests for PI animals, this newly formatted test will occasionally detect

Keinan, Alon

177

UNIVERSITY OF DELAWARE OFFICE OF LABORATORY ANIMAL MEDICINE  

E-print Network

Rev 5/2010 UNIVERSITY OF DELAWARE OFFICE OF LABORATORY ANIMAL MEDICINE Intraperitoneal (IP (dependant on animal size) · Mouse: 0.5-1 ml · Rat: 2-5 ml Note: Dilution of the injected drug with saline the animal securely with ventral abdomen exposed and head pointed slightly downward. (This allows internal

Firestone, Jeremy

178

THE ALBERT EINSTEIN COLLEGE OF MEDICINE OF YESHIVA UNIVERSITY  

E-print Network

................................................................................ 9 4.0 - MANAGEMENT OF EQUIPMENT INVENTORY 4.1 General and procedures for the management of equipment owned by or in the possession of the Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University (College). Management of equipment for purposes of this manual encompasses

Brown, Lucy L.

179

ALBERT EINSTEIN COLLEGE OF MEDICINE OF YESHIVA UNIVERSITY  

E-print Network

................................................................................ 9 4.0 - MANAGEMENT OF EQUIPMENT INVENTORY 4.1 General policies and procedures for the management of equipment owned by or in the possession of the Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University (College). Management of equipment for purposes

Yates, Andrew

180

SPACE PLANNING & OPERATIONS UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA SCHOOL OF MEDICINE  

E-print Network

SPACE PLANNING & OPERATIONS UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA SCHOOL OF MEDICINE Policy & Procedure a centralized scheduling system managed by Space Planning & Operations (SPO) with the intention of maximizing use of available space to meet educational space demands. Purpose: The purpose of this policy

Bushman, Frederic

181

Space Planning & Operations University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine  

E-print Network

Space Planning & Operations University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine Policy & Procedure Building II/III fourteenth floor Faculty Lounge, and the criteria for reserving the Lounge Space use of the Faculty Lounge as well as scheduled use of the Lounge Space and Conference Rooms. Scope

Bushman, Frederic

182

Bylaws of the Stanford University School of Medicine Faculty Senate  

E-print Network

(1) Representatives of the electorate shall be elected in each department in the School of Medicine and to the authority of the Stanford University Board of Trustees. The Senate shall represent and serve as a voice of Philosophy and Master of Science graduate degree programs. (3) The Senate shall advise on the role

Ford, James

183

FLORIDA ATLANTIC UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF MEDICINE SELF-INSURANCE PROGRAM  

E-print Network

of financial statements that are free from material misstatement, whether due to fraud or error. Auditor the assessment of the risks of material misstatement of the financial statements, whether due to fraud or errorFLORIDA ATLANTIC UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF MEDICINE SELF-INSURANCE PROGRAM FINANCIAL STATEMENTS JUNE 30

Fernandez, Eduardo

184

University of Virginia School of Medicine PO Box 800761  

E-print Network

.924.5974 http:/medicine.virginia.edu/community- service/centers/ biomedical-ethics-and- humanities/medical and Human Behavior and Medical Humanities and Bioethics Scholarly Concentration, Warren Alpert Medical Theology, Duke University Medical Center and Duke Divinity School, Durham NC Co-presented with the History

Acton, Scott

185

Musings on genome medicine: the value of family history  

PubMed Central

Will the routine availability of genome sequence information on individuals render family history information obsolete? I argue that it will not, both because the taking of a family history has other uses for the health professional, and because genome sequence data on their own omit the effects of numerous factors important for modifying risks of disease. These include information derived from factors downstream of genetic variants and from upstream epigenetic effects. Further difficulties arise with uncertainties relating to gene-gene and gene-environment interactions, which may take decades to resolve if their resolution is even possible. PMID:19664195

2009-01-01

186

Musings on genome medicine: the value of family history.  

PubMed

Will the routine availability of genome sequence information on individuals render family history information obsolete? I argue that it will not, both because the taking of a family history has other uses for the health professional, and because genome sequence data on their own omit the effects of numerous factors important for modifying risks of disease. These include information derived from factors downstream of genetic variants and from upstream epigenetic effects. Further difficulties arise with uncertainties relating to gene-gene and gene-environment interactions, which may take decades to resolve if their resolution is even possible. PMID:19664195

Clarke, Angus John

2009-01-01

187

Cancer Risk Assessment by Rural and Appalachian Family Medicine Physicians  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Context: Challenges to the identification of hereditary cancer in primary care may be more pronounced in rural Appalachia, a medically underserved region. Purpose: To examine primary care physicians' identification of hereditary cancers. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was mailed to family physicians in the midwestern and southeastern United…

Kelly, Kimberly M.; Love, Margaret M.; Pearce, Kevin A.; Porter, Kyle; Barron, Mary A.; Andrykowski, Michael

2009-01-01

188

Sexual medicine in family practice. Part 2: Treating sexual dysfunction.  

PubMed Central

Sexual problems can be caused by organic or psychological factors, or a combination of the two. Deciding which leads to an appropriate management plan. This paper describes the current status of treatments for common sexual dysfunctions seen in family practice. PMID:8471907

Holzapfel, S.

1993-01-01

189

Family medicine and international health-related travel  

Microsoft Academic Search

elays for medical interventions such as hip and knee replacements, spinal surgery, and ophthal- mologic procedures are a serious problem in Canada. Federal and provincial governments are strug- gling to shorten waiting lists and provide timely care. Patients often wait months to obtain appointments with specialists, undergo diagnostic tests, and receive treat- ment. Lack of access to family physicians can

Leigh Turner

2007-01-01

190

Narratives in Family Medicine: Tales of Transformation, Points of Breakthrough for Family Physicians  

Microsoft Academic Search

Despite the advances in technology, information transmission and evidence-based medicine, the role of the patient’s story is still a key to effective medical care. This paper examines the roles of narrative in medicine with particular emphasis on the narrative world of the primary care provider. The focus of this article is on the transforming power of stories and their use

Jeffrey Borkan; Schmuel Reis; Jack Medalie

2001-01-01

191

Teaching forensic medicine in the University of Porto.  

PubMed

The University of Porto (UP) provides education in Forensic Medicine (FM) through the 1st, 2nd and 3rd cycle of studies, post-graduation and continuing education courses. This education is related to forensic pathology, clinical forensic medicine (including forensic psychology and psychiatry), forensic chemistry and toxicology, forensic genetics and biology, and criminalistics. With this work we intent to reflect on how we are currently teaching FM in the UP, at all levels of university graduation. We will present our models, regarding the educational objectives, curricular program and teaching/learning methodologies of each cycle of studies as well as in post-graduate and continuing education courses. Historically, and besides related administratively to the Ministry of Justice, the Portuguese Medico-Legal Institutes (since 1918) and more recently the National Institute of Legal Medicine and Forensic Sciences (INMLCF) also have educational and research responsibilities. Thus, it lends space and cooperates with academic institutions and this contribution, namely regarding teaching forensic sciences in Portugal has been judged as an example for other Countries. This contribution is so important that in UP, the Department of Legal Medicine and Forensic Sciences of the Faculty of Medicine (FMUP) shares, until now, the same physical space with North Branch of the INMLCF, which represents a notorious advantage, since it makes possible the "learning by doing". PMID:24931860

Magalhães, Teresa; Dinis-Oliveira, Ricardo Jorge; Santos, Agostinho

2014-07-01

192

Assisting people with dementia with their medicines: experiences of family carers  

PubMed Central

Objectives Many family carers provide assistance with medicines that is vital for optimal clinical outcomes. Medicines-related tasks are known to contribute to carer burden and stress. This study examined the experiences of family carers when providing medicines-related assistance for a person with dementia, to indicate how services could become more responsive to the specific needs of this group of carers. Methods Semi-structured interviews were undertaken with family carers and care-recipients identified though a memory clinic in north London and a local Alzheimer's Society. The interview guide, comprising open questions, was informed by previous studies and consultation with stakeholders. Qualitative procedures involving a framework approach were employed in the analysis. Key findings Fourteen interviews with carers and five with care-recipients were conducted. These highlighted the burden and challenges, surrounding medicines-management activities. As well as practical aspects that could be complex, carers were commonly making judgements about the need for and appropriateness of medicines. Although experiences were varied, carers reported difficulties in maintaining supplies, ensuring adherence to regimens and accessing health professionals; and they made some recommendations for service improvements. Carers’ difficulty in obtaining information and advice about medicines was compounded by their desire to allow the care-recipient to retain autonomy over their medicines as long as possible. Conclusion This study highlights the distinct needs and problems with regard to medicines-management when caring for a person with dementia. As the prevalence of dementia rises, interventions designed to address these specific aspects of reduce carer-burden should be a priority for health professionals. PMID:25351043

Smith, Felicity; Grijseels, Madelon S; Ryan, Patricia; Tobiansky, Robert

2015-01-01

193

Institute for Genetic Medicine, Hokkaido University Research Center for Infection-associated Cancer (RCIAC)  

E-print Network

in inflammation and carcinogenesis Eran Elinav (The Yale University School of Medicine) The NLRP6 inflammasome in inflammation and carcinogenesis Eran Elinav (The Yale University School of Medicine) The NLRP6 inflammasome

Tachizawa, Kazuya

194

University of South Carolina School of Medicine Greenville Biomedical Sciences Faculty  

E-print Network

University of South Carolina School of Medicine Greenville Biomedical Sciences Faculty The University of South Carolina School of Medicine Greenville (USCSOM Greenville) is seeking applications is located at the heart of the Greenville Hospital System, South Carolina's most comprehensive hospital

Almor, Amit

195

Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine (Doctoral Course) Application Guide 2012/2013  

E-print Network

and Ethics, Hygiene), Regulatory Science, Medical Statistics, Food and Drug Evaluation Science, Epidemiology of Pathology Divisions: Pathology, Diagnostic Pathology, Molecular Medicine & Medical Genetics, Cancer Science Divisions: Integrated Medical Education, Community Medicine and Medical Network, Family

Banbara, Mutsunori

196

Patterns of Relating Between Physicians and Medical Assistants in Small Family Medicine Offices  

PubMed Central

PURPOSE The clinician-colleague relationship is a cornerstone of relationship-centered care (RCC); in small family medicine offices, the clinician–medical assistant (MA) relationship is especially important. We sought to better understand the relationship between MA roles and the clinician-MA relationship within the RCC framework. METHODS We conducted an ethnographic study of 5 small family medicine offices (having <5 clinicians) in the Cincinnati Area Research and Improvement Group (CARInG) Network using interviews, surveys, and observations. We interviewed 19 MAs and supervisors and 11 clinicians (9 family physicians and 2 nurse practitioners) and observed 15 MAs in practice. Qualitative analysis used the editing style. RESULTS MAs’ roles in small family medicine offices were determined by MA career motivations and clinician-MA relationships. MA career motivations comprised interest in health care, easy training/workload, and customer service orientation. Clinician-MA relationships were influenced by how MAs and clinicians respond to their perceptions of MA clinical competence (illustrated predominantly by comparing MAs with nurses) and organizational structure. We propose a model, trust and verify, to describe the structure of the clinician-MA relationship. This model is informed by clinicians’ roles in hiring and managing MAs and the social familiarity of MAs and clinicians. Within the RCC framework, these findings can be seen as previously undefined constraints and freedoms in what is known as the Complex Responsive Process of Relating between clinicians and MAs. CONCLUSIONS Improved understanding of clinician-MA relationships will allow a better appreciation of how clinicians and MAs function in family medicine teams. Our findings may assist small offices undergoing practice transformation and guide future research to improve the education, training, and use of MAs in the family medicine setting. PMID:24615311

Elder, Nancy C.; Jacobson, C. Jeffrey; Bolon, Shannon K.; Fixler, Joseph; Pallerla, Harini; Busick, Christina; Gerrety, Erica; Kinney, Dee; Regan, Saundra; Pugnale, Michael

2014-01-01

197

University of Maryland, School of Public Health Department of Family Science, Couple and Family Therapy Program  

E-print Network

University of Maryland, School of Public Health Department of Family Science, Couple and Family) The Department of Family Science, School of Public Health, University of Maryland, College Park seeks a full in Maryland. Additionally, candidates should be an Approved Supervisor or an Approved Supervisor Candidate

Hill, Wendell T.

198

Practising family medicine for adults with intellectual disabilities  

PubMed Central

Abstract Objective To explore the perspectives of adults with intellectual disabilities (IDs) on helpful interactions with their family physicians. Design Exploratory, qualitative study. Setting Vancouver, BC. Participants Purposive sample of 11 community-dwelling adults with IDs. Methods In-depth, semistructured interviews were conducted face to face with participants. Interviews were audiorecorded and transcribed verbatim. Research team members read the transcripts, which were then coded into categories and subcategories and discussed at collective analysis meetings. The main study themes were generated through this iterative, collective process. Main findings Two themes about helpful interactions were identified: helping patients understand and helping patients navigate the health care system. The first theme reflected helpful ways of communicating with patients with IDs. These approaches focused on plain-language communication and other strategies developed jointly by the patients and their physicians. The second theme reflected ways in which the family physicians helped adults with IDs manage their health needs despite the complex constraints of their socioeconomic situations. Conclusion Adults with IDs want to play an active role in managing their health as they age, and helpful interactions with family physicians make this possible. PMID:25022654

Baumbusch, Jennifer; Phinney, Alison; Baumbusch, Sarah

2014-01-01

199

Providing competency-based family medicine residency training in substance abuse in the new millennium: a model curriculum  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: This article, developed for the Betty Ford Institute Consensus Conference on Graduate Medical Education (December, 2008), presents a model curriculum for Family Medicine residency training in substance abuse. METHODS: The authors reviewed reports of past Family Medicine curriculum development efforts, previously-identified barriers to education in high risk substance use, approaches to overcoming these barriers, and current training guidelines of

J Paul Seale; Sylvia Shellenberger; Denice Crowe Clark

2010-01-01

200

Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction and Family Systems Medicine: A Natural Fit  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) is a patient-centered treatment modality that is congruent with the core values of family systems medicine. It has numerous applications in clinical and nonclinical settings, including the education of physicians. The article by A. M. Tacón, Y. M. Caldera, and C. Ronaghan (2004) adds to the growing literature base on MBSR by studying its impact on

Joanne Cohen-Katz

2004-01-01

201

A Combined Longitudinal Nursing Home Experience for Family Practice and Internal Medicine Residents  

Microsoft Academic Search

With the limited availability of FP (Family Practice) and IM (Internal Medicine) faculty well-trained to teach in the nursing home setting, it would be efficient to combine faculty and training programs for FP and IM residents training in the same community. In this paper we describe a seven-year experience with the training of FP and IM residents on a common,

Gregg Warshaw; Sally Brooks; Arvind Modawal; Stephen Mueller

2003-01-01

202

A manageable approach to integrating personal digital assistants into a family medicine clerkship  

Microsoft Academic Search

Personal digital assistants (PDAs) were incorporated into the six-week Family Medicine Clerkship in 2002 to achieve two major goals: tracking students' outpatient encounters at preceptor sites and providing opportunities to use PDAs during medical visits. Each student collects information on each patient seen. Data are then retrieved and presented to students individually and as a group twice during the rotation.

Julie Scott Taylor; David Anthony; Laura K. Lavallee; Nathaniel L. Taylor

2006-01-01

203

Integration of Complementary and Alternative Medicine into Family Practices in Germany: Results of a National Survey  

Microsoft Academic Search

More than two-thirds of patients in Germany use complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) provided either by physicians or non-medical practitioners ('Heilpraktiker'). There is little information about the number of family physicians (FPs) providing CAM. Given the widespread public interest in the use of CAM, this study aimed to ascertain the use of and attitude toward CAM among FPs in Germany.

Stefanie Joos; Berthold Musselmann; Joachim Szecsenyi

204

Multi-Source Evaluation of Interpersonal and Communication Skills of Family Medicine Residents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

There is a lack of information on the use of multi-source evaluation to assess trainees' interpersonal and communication skills in Oriental settings. This study is conducted to assess the reliability and applicability of assessing the interpersonal and communication skills of family medicine residents by patients, peer residents, nurses, and…

Leung, Kai-Kuen; Wang, Wei-Dan; Chen, Yen-Yuan

2012-01-01

205

Monetary Value of a Prescription Assistance Program Service in a Rural Family Medicine Clinic  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: To quantify the monetary value of medications provided to rural Alabamians through provision of pharmaceutical manufacturer-sponsored prescription assistance programs (PAPs) provided by a clinical pharmacist in a private Black Belt family medicine clinic during 2007 and 2008. Methods: Patients struggling to afford prescription medications…

Whitley, Heather P.

2011-01-01

206

ILLUMINATIONS The Magazine of The School of Medicine Alumni AssociationUniversity of Utah  

E-print Network

ILLUMINATIONS The Magazine of The School of Medicine Alumni Association­University of Utah Director ILLUMINATIONS The Magazine for the University of Utah School of Medicine Alumni and Friends Editor Samuelson, MD,`80 Illuminations is published by the University of Utah School of Medicine Alumni Relations

Feschotte, Cedric

207

University of Maryland School of Medicine Department of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Science  

E-print Network

6/2/2004 University of Maryland School of Medicine Department of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Science is one of two Allied Health departments of the University of Maryland School of Medicine. The chair of the Department is appointed by the dean of the University of Maryland School of Medicine

Weber, David J.

208

Library Cooperation at the NOVA University--the Nordic University in Agriculture, Forestry and Veterinary Medicine.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Nordic University in Agriculture, Forestry and Veterinary Medicine--the NOVA University-was established in 1995 to increase the cooperation between the Nordic agricultural universities. The NOVA libraries of the seven institutions and facilities involved wanted to show that they are a very useful partner in launching new ideas. They have the…

Myllys, Heli

209

Sponsored by: The University of Maryland School of Medicine Accreditation: The University of Maryland School of Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education  

E-print Network

Sponsored by: The University of Maryland School of Medicine Accreditation: The University of Maryland School of Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians. Credit Designation: The University of Maryland School

Weber, David J.

210

Stanford University School of Medicine Department of Otolaryngology/Head & Neck  

E-print Network

Stanford University School of Medicine Department of Otolaryngology/Head & Neck Surgery Resident ............................................................................................................................................ 4 2. STANFORD UNIVERSITY OTOLARYNGOLOGY FACULTY ROSTER ................................................ 5 3. OTOLARYNGOLOGY RESIDENCY APPLICATION REQUIREMENTS

Bogyo, Matthew

211

GIS Residency Footprinting: Analyzing the Impact of Family Medicine Graduate Medical Education in Hawai‘i  

PubMed Central

Background Access to care for patients in Hawai‘i is compromised by a significant primary care workforce shortage. Not only are there not enough primary care providers, they are often not practicing in locations of high need such as rural areas on the neighbor islands or in the Pacific. Methods This study used geographic information systems (GIS) spatial analysis to look at practice locations for 86 University of Hawai‘i Family Medicine and Community Health graduates from 1993 to the 2010. Careful alumni records were verified and entered into the data set using the street address of major employment. Questions to be answered were (1) what percentage of program graduates remain in the state of Hawai‘i and (2) what percentage of graduates practice in health professional shortage areas (HPSAs) throughout the United States. Results This study found that 73 percent of graduates remain and practice in Hawai‘i with over 36 percent working in Health Professional Shortage Areas. Discussion Spatial analysis using GIS residency footprinting may be an important analytic tool to ensure that graduate medical education programs are meeting Hawai‘i's health workforce needs. PMID:22737640

Buenconsejo-Lum, Lee E; Racsa, C Philip

2012-01-01

212

African leaders’ views on critical human resource issues for the implementation of family medicine in Africa  

PubMed Central

Background The World Health Organisation has advocated for comprehensive primary care teams, which include family physicians. However, despite (or because of) severe doctor shortages in Africa, there is insufficient clarity on the role of the family physician in the primary health care team. Instead there is a trend towards task shifting without thought for teamwork, which runs the risk of dangerous oversimplification. It is not clear how African leaders understand the challenges of implementing family medicine, especially in human resource terms. This study, therefore, sought to explore the views of academic and government leaders on critical human resource issues for implementation of family medicine in Africa. Method In this qualitative study, key academic and government leaders were purposively selected from sixteen African countries. In-depth interviews were conducted using an interview guide. All interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed and thematically analysed. Results There were 27 interviews conducted with 16 government and 11 academic leaders in nine Sub-Saharan African countries: Botswana, Democratic Republic of Congo, Ghana, Kenya, Malawi, Nigeria, Rwanda, South Africa and Uganda. Respondents spoke about: educating doctors in family medicine suited to Africa, including procedural skills and holistic care, to address the difficulty of recruiting and retaining doctors in rural and underserved areas; planning for primary health care teams, including family physicians; new supervisory models in primary health care; and general human resource management issues. Conclusions Important milestones in African health care fail to specifically address the human resource issues of integrated primary health care teamwork that includes family physicians. Leaders interviewed in this study, however, proposed organising the district health system with a strong embrace of family medicine in Africa, especially with regard to providing clinical leadership in team-based primary health care. Whilst these leaders focussed positively on entry and workforce issues, in terms of the 2006 World Health Report on human resources for health, they did not substantially address retention of family physicians. Family physicians need to respond to the challenge by respondents to articulate human resource policies appropriate to Africa, including the organisational development of the primary health care team with more sophisticated skills and teamwork. PMID:24438344

2014-01-01

213

Treating bipolar disorder. Evidence-based guidelines for family medicine.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE: To provide an evidence-based summary of medications commonly used for bipolar disorders and a practical approach to managing bipolar disorders in the office. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: Articles from 1990 to 2003 were selected from MEDLINE using the key words "bipolar disorder," "antiepileptics," "antipsychotics," "antidepressants," and "mood stabilizers." Good-quality evidence for many of these treatments comes from randomized trials. Lithium, divalproex, carbamazepine, lamotrigine, oxcarbazepine, and some novel antipsychotics all have level I evidence for treating various aspects of the disorder. MAIN MESSAGE: Treatment of bipolar disorder involves three therapeutic domains: acute mania, acute depression, and maintenance. Lithium has been a mainstay of treatment for some time, but antiepileptic drugs like divalproex, carbamazepine, and lamotrigine, along with novel antipsychotic drugs like olanzapine, risperidone, and quetiapine, alone or in combination, are increasingly being used successfully to treat acute mania and to maintain mood stability. CONCLUSION: Bipolar disorder is more common in family practice than previously believed. Drug treatments for this complex disorder have evolved rapidly over the past decade, radically changing its management. Treatment now tends to be very successful. PMID:15318676

McIntyre, Roger S.; Mancini, Deborah A.; Lin, Peter; Jordan, John

2004-01-01

214

Medicinal Plant List for the St. Clare Garden Santa Clara University, Santa Clara, California  

E-print Network

1 Medicinal Plant List for the St. Clare Garden Santa Clara University, Santa Clara, California distinguish between ornamental and medicinal plants. In the pre-modern period, most ornamental plants were used medicinally, and many medicinal plants (such as lavender and box) were ornamental. TREES, SHRUBS

Schwarz, Thomas

215

University of Kentucky 2013-2014 Undergraduate Bulletin 274 College of Medicine  

E-print Network

University of Kentucky 2013-2014 Undergraduate Bulletin 274 College of Medicine Frederick C. de Beer, M.D., is Dean of the College of Medicine. The College of Medicine offers a four-year curriculum leading to a degree of Doctor of Medicine (M.D.) and training for postdoctoral and research fellows

MacAdam, Keith

216

Task Force Report 5. Report of the Task Force on Family Medicine’s Role in Shaping the Future Health Care Delivery System  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND Recognizing that the implementation of needed changes within family medicine will be enhanced through a concurrent effort to transform the broader health care system, this Future of Family Medicine task force was charged with determining family medicine’s leadership role in shaping the future health care delivery system. METHODS After reviewing the changes taking place within family medicine and the broader health care system, this task force identified 6 priorities for fostering necessary modifications in the health care system. In addressing the leadership challenge facing the discipline, the task force presents a 3-dimensional matrix that provides a useful framework for describing the audiences that should be targeted, the strategic priorities that should be pursued, and the specific recommendations that should be addressed. Noting that leadership is part of the heritage of family medicine, the task force reviewed past successes by the discipline as important lessons that can be instructive as family physicians begin advocating for needed changes. MAJOR FINDINGS Effective leadership is an essential ingredient that will determine, to a large extent, the success of family medicine in advocating for needed change in the health care system overall and in the specialty. It is vitally important to groom leaders within family medicine and to create venues where policy makers and influence leaders can look beyond their usual constituencies and horizons to a comprehensive view of health care. A central concept being proposed is that of a relationship-centered personal medical home. This medical home serves as the focal point through which all individuals—regardless of age, gender, race, ethnicity, or socioeconomic status—receive a basket of acute, chronic, and preventive medical care services that are accessible, accountable, comprehensive, integrated, patient-centered, safe, scientifically valid, and satisfying to both patients and their physicians. CONCLUSION Family medicine has and will continue to have an important leadership role in health system change. It has been most successful when it has been able to identify a high-priority goal through consensus within the discipline, to focus and coordinate local and national resources, and to use a multipronged approach in addressing the priority. Although the Future of Family Medicine project has provided an important impetus for the identification of key priorities across the discipline, for the FFM project ultimately to be a success, implementation steps will need to be identified and prioritized. The leadership matrix presented in this report can provide a useful structuring tool to identify, understand, and coordinate change efforts more effectively. Strategic alliances with primary care groups and others also will be critical to the success of change initiatives.

Roberts, Richard G.; Snape, Pam S.; Burke, Kevin

2004-01-01

217

Urbana Version 8/9/2006 UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS COLLEGE OF MEDICINE  

E-print Network

Urbana Version ­ 8/9/2006 UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS COLLEGE OF MEDICINE ­ URBANA-PEORIA-ROCKFORD MEDICAL STUDENT PROFESSIONALISM INCIDENT FORM PROCEDURES Medicine is a profession that requires high and shared only with appropriate parties. #12;Excerpted from the University of Illinois College of Medicine

Gilbert, Matthew

218

OFFICE OF THE ASSOCIATE DEAN FOR RESEARCH Purdue University College of Veterinary Medicine  

E-print Network

OFFICE OF THE ASSOCIATE DEAN FOR RESEARCH Purdue University College of Veterinary Medicine Summer Research Program for Undergraduate Students The Purdue University College of Veterinary Medicine interested in veterinary medicine and biomedical research. The objective of this program is to provide

Holland, Jeffrey

219

OFFICE OF THE ASSOCIATE DEAN FOR RESEARCH Purdue University College of Veterinary Medicine  

E-print Network

OFFICE OF THE ASSOCIATE DEAN FOR RESEARCH Purdue University College of Veterinary Medicine Summer Research Program for Veterinary Students The Purdue University College of Veterinary Medicine (PVM and conduct a research project on a topic related to their research in veterinary and/or comparative medicine

Holland, Jeffrey

220

Peter A. Ubel Dennis T. McLawhorn University Professor of Business, Public Policy and Medicine  

E-print Network

and Medicine Duke University Fuqua Business School 100 Fuqua Drive Box 90120 Durham, NC 27708 peter of Minnesota Postdoctoral Training 07/1988-06/1991 Internal Medicine Residency Training Program, Mayo Graduate School of Medicine, Rochester, MN 07/1991-06/1992 Fellowship in Medical Ethics, University of Chicago

Reif, John H.

221

Manager of the Nikon Imaging Center at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL, USA  

E-print Network

Manager of the Nikon Imaging Center at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL, USA The Feinberg School of Medicine at Northwestern University is seeking a Manager for its Nikon, TIRF and multiphoton microscopes. The center is supported by the Feinberg School of Medicine

Goldman, Robert D.

222

COLLEGE OF MEDICINE UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 2011-2012 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG  

E-print Network

of Orthopaedics & Sports Medicine Athletic Training Major (BAT) The undergraduate Athletic Training Degree by the Department of Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine in addition to the regular university application process schools, colleges and universities, professional sports programs, sports medicine clinics, and other

Lajeunesse, Marc J.

223

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND SCHOOL OF MEDICINE DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL THERAPY & REHABILITATION SCIENCE  

E-print Network

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND SCHOOL OF MEDICINE DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL THERAPY & REHABILITATION are investing in the Department of Physical Therapy & Rehabilitation Science at the University of Maryland the University of Maryland School of Medicine are administered by the University of Maryland Baltimore

Weber, David J.

224

Family Bonding with Universities. NBER Working Paper No. 15493  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

One justification offered for legacy admissions policies at universities is that they bind entire families to the university. Proponents maintain that these policies have a number of benefits, including increased donations from members of these families. We use a rich set of data from an anonymous selective research institution to investigate…

Meer, Jonathan; Rosen, Harvey S.

2009-01-01

225

Obesity and pre-hypertension in family medicine: Implications for quality improvement  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND.: Prevention of pre-hypertension is an important goal for primary care patients. Obesity is a risk factor for hypertension, but has not been addressed for pre-hypertension in primary care populations. The objective of this study was to assess the degree to which obesity independently is associated with risk for pre-hypertension in family medicine patients. METHODS.: This study was a retrospective

James E Rohrer; Gregory J Anderson; Joseph W Furst

2007-01-01

226

Palliative medicine fellows attend to compassion fatigue using John Stone's 'Talking to the Family'.  

PubMed

For graduate medical education trainees, as well as contemporary practitioners, developing skills in recognizing compassion fatigue and practising self-care is vital to professional sustainability. The field of palliative medicine is no exception. In our fellowship programme, we use John Stone's poem, 'Talking to the Family,' to engage trainees in a professional development workshop on personal experiences and strategies for self-care. PMID:25814328

Groninger, Hunter

2015-04-01

227

DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL THERAPY AND HUMAN MOVEMENT SCIENCES NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY FEINBERG SCHOOL OF MEDICINE  

E-print Network

DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL THERAPY AND HUMAN MOVEMENT SCIENCES NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY FEINBERG SCHOOL/ore electronic (Internet) version at the Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, as requested, Department of Physical Therapy & Human Movement Sciences, Northwestern University's Feinberg School

Contractor, Anis

228

Department of Family Medicine and Office of Health Promotion Research BOARD CERTIFIED FAMILY PHYSICIANS  

E-print Network

a busy and collegial program. The position requires clinical focus and experience in the areas-season family atmosphere. Children's Health Magazine recently ranked Burlington as the number one place; applicants are requested to include in their cover letter information about how they will further this goal

Hayden, Nancy J.

229

New library building: Mercer University School of Medicine, Macon, Georgia.  

PubMed Central

The Mercer University School of Medicine (MUSM) enrolled its charter class in 1982. The curriculum is problem-based and adaptable to the learning needs of each student. MUSM is housed in a new building designed to support this unique educational program. Its library is an example of a comparatively small, but fully functional, medical school library. The planning process, design, and layout of the new library facility are described. Among its unique features are an integrated print and non-print collection, current periodical display space, and extensive use of task lighting. PMID:6733330

Rankin, J A; Bernard, G R

1984-01-01

230

Proceedings of the 2008 Annual Predoctoral Education Conference of the Society of Teachers of Family Medicine (STFM).  

PubMed

The Society of Teachers of Family Medicine (STFM; http://www.stfm.org) is a community of professionals devoted to teaching family medicine through undergraduate, graduate, and continuing medical education. This multidisciplinary group of physicians, educators, behavioral scientists, and researchers works to further STFM's mission of improving the health of all people through education, research, patient care, and advocacy. STFM holds an annual conference each spring and a predoctoral education conference each winter. STFM held its 34th Predoctoral Education Conference in Portland, Oregon, from January 24 to 27, 2008. The theme was "Igniting Students' Passion for Serving the Underserved." Christine Stabler, MD, Lancaster General Hospital, Lancaster, Pennsylvania, opened the conference with a plenary presentation on the passion for patient care, medical education, and advocacy that have defined her own career and continue to inspire medical trainees. Kenneth Ginsburg, MD, The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and the University of Pennsylvania, continued the theme of igniting students' passion by exploring the ways in which socialization in medical education can teach students to suppress their feelings and humorously illustrated how accessing a full range of emotions can lead to satisfying lives and practices. Tanya Page, MD, a recent residency graduate practicing in a homeless clinic in Portland, Oregon, described her own passion for caring for the underserved. Participants shared ideas and learned new skills in more than 65 workshops, seminars, and discussions as well as 65 educational research and curriculum evaluation papers. The unifying theme was incorporating care of the underserved in medical education. From the educational research or curriculum evaluation papers presented at the conference, the STFM Education Committee selected 8 papers felt to be of interest to readers of Teaching and Learning in Medicine. PMID:18855240

Little, David N; Hatch, Robert L

2008-01-01

231

Louisiana State University Medical Center School of Medicine in New Orleans Neuroscience Center of Excellence  

E-print Network

Louisiana State University Medical Center · School of Medicine in New Orleans Neuroscience Center University School of Medicine, Alzheimer's Disease Research Center Medical Education Building, Seminar Room. Edward F. Dudek, Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, Colorado State University, Fort Collins Medical

232

University of Maryland School of Medicine 2013 Mini-Med School  

E-print Network

University of Maryland School of Medicine 2013 Mini-Med School Mini-Med School Registration Form · Fax: 410.706.8520 · Mail: Office of Public Affairs, c/o Veronica Anderson University of Maryland goes on inside the University of Maryland School of Medicine. For five weeks this fall you can learn

Weber, David J.

233

Public Health Aspects of the Family Medicine Concepts in South Eastern Europe  

PubMed Central

Introduction: Family medicine as a part of the primary health care is devoted to provide continuous and comprehensive health care to the individuals and families regardless of age, gender, types of diseases and affected system or part of the body. Special emphasis in such holistic approach is given to the prevention of diseases and health promotion. Family Medicine is the first step/link between doctors and patients within patients care as well as regular inspections/examinations and follow-up of the health status of healthy people. Most countries aspire to join the European Union and therefore adopting new regulations that are applied in the European Union. Aim: The aim of this study is to present the role and importance of family medicine, or where family medicine is today in 21 Century from the beginning of development in these countries. The study is designed as a descriptive epidemiological study with data from 10 countries of the former Communist bloc, Slovenia, Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Serbia, Montenegro, Macedonia, Kosovo, Albania, Bulgaria, Romania, Czech Republic, Slovakia and Hungary, just about half of them are members of the EU. We examined the following variables: socio-organizational indicators, health and educational indicators and health indicators. The data used refer to 2002 and as a source of data are used official data from reference WebPages of family medicine doctors associations, WONCA website (EURACT, EQuiP, EGPRN), WebPages of Bureau of Statistics of the countries where the research was conducted as well as the Ministries of Health. Results: Results indicates that the failures and shortcomings of health care organizations in Southeast Europe. Lack of money hinders the implementation of health care reform in all mentioned countries, the most of them that is more oriented to Bismarck financing system. Problems in the political, legal and economic levels are obstacles for efficient a problem reconstructing health care system toward family medicine and primary prevention interventions. The population is not enough educated for complicated enforcement for and prevention of diseases that have a heavy burden on the budget. Health insurance and payment of health services is often a problem, because the patients must be treated regardless of their insurance coverage and financial situation. The decrease in production and economic growth, as well as low gross national income in the countries with economic crisis, lead to the inability of treatment for a large number of the population. Such situation a system leads to additional debts and loans to healthcare system. Measures implemented for provision of acute curative care largely did not lead to improvements in the health status of the population. Educational and preventive measures, as well as higher standards for quality and accessibility of health care services for entire population in each country, especially those struggling are bound to joining the European Union and their implementation must start. The most A large number of medical institutions are is inefficient in health education and health promotion and must work to educate patients and families and increase the quality of preventive health services. Modernization of health care delivery and joining the European Union by increasing overall economic stability of countries is one of the primary goals of all countries in Southeast Europe. PMID:25395894

Masic, Izet; Hadziahmetovic, Miran; Donev, Doncho; Pollhozani, Azis; Ramadani, Naser; Skopljak, Amira; Pasagic, Almir; Roshi, Enver; Zunic, Lejla; Zildzic, Muharem

2014-01-01

234

Teaching team membership to family medicine residents: what does it take?  

PubMed

Primary care reform proponents advocate for patient-centered medical homes built on interdisciplinary teamwork. Recent efforts document the difficulty achieving reform, which requires personal transformation by doctors. Currently no widely accepted curriculum to teach team membership in Family Medicine residencies exists. Organizational Development (OD) has 40 years of experience assessing and teaching the skills underlying teamwork. We present a curriculum that adapts OD insights to articulate a framework describing effective teamwork; define and teach specific team membership skills; reframe residents' perception of medicine to make relationships relevant; and transform training experiences to provide practice in interdisciplinary teamwork. Curriculum details include a rotation to introduce the new framework, six workshops, experiential learning in the practice, and coaching as a teaching method. We review program evaluations. We discuss challenges, including institutional resources and support, incorporation of a new language and culture into residency training, recruitment "for fit," and faculty/staff development. We conclude that teaching the relationship skills of effective team membership is feasible, but hard. Succeeding has transformative implications for patient relationships, residency training and the practice of family medicine. PMID:21417522

Eubank, Daniel; Orzano, John; Geffken, Dominic; Ricci, Rocco

2011-03-01

235

The views of key leaders in South Africa on implementation of family medicine: critical role in the district health system  

PubMed Central

Background Integrated team-based primary care is an international imperative. This is required more so in Africa, where fragmented verticalised care dominates. South Africa is trying to address this with health reforms, including Primary Health Care Re-engineering. Family physicians are already contributing to primary care despite family medicine being only fully registered as a full specialty in South Africa in 2008. However the views of leaders on family medicine and the role of family physicians is not clear, especially with recent health reforms. The aim of this study was to understand the views of key government and academic leaders in South Africa on family medicine, roles of family physicians and human resource issues. Methods This was a qualitative study with academic and government leaders across South Africa. In-depth interviews were conducted with sixteen purposively selected leaders using an interview guide. Thematic content analysis was based on the framework method. Results Whilst family physicians were seen as critical to the district health system there was ambivalence on their leadership role and ‘specialist’ status. National health reforms were creating both threats and opportunities for family medicine. Three key roles for family physicians emerged: supporting referrals; clinical governance/quality improvement; and providing support to community-oriented care. Respondents’ urged family physicians to consolidate the development and training of family physicians, and shape human resource policy to include family physicians. Conclusions Family physicians were seen as critical to the district health system in South Africa despite difficulties around their precise role. Whilst their role was dominated by filling gaps at district hospitals to reduce referrals it extended to clinical governance and developing community-oriented primary care - a tall order, requiring strong teamwork. Innovative team-based service delivery is possible despite human resource challenges, but requires family physicians to proactively develop team-based models of care, reform education and advocate for clearer policy, based on the views of these respondents. PMID:24961449

2014-01-01

236

Center for Biomedical Ethics and Humanities University of Virginia School of Medicine  

E-print Network

Center for Biomedical Ethics and Humanities University of Virginia School of Medicine PO Box 800761 Charlottesville VA 22908-0761 434.924.5974/434.982.3971 (fax) http://www.medicine.virginia.edu/community- service, Charlottesville VA 1 February 2012 Alpha Omega Alpha Lecture of the School of Medicine Enhancing Male Performance

Acton, Scott

237

A Graduate Program in Veterinary Preventive Medicine--University of Guelph--1976  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A three-semester (12-month) diploma program for veterinarians was begun at the University of Guelph in 1971 that is applicable to veterinarians employed in public health, regulatory veterinary medicine, and animal production medicine, where there is emphasis on preventive medicine. Each student completes a project suitable for seminar presentation…

Mitchell, W. R.; Barnum, D. A.

1977-01-01

238

COLLEGE OF MEDICINE UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA -2007/2008 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG  

E-print Network

of Orthopaedics & Sports Medicine For Athletic Training Major (BAT): The undergraduate Athletic Training Major by the Department of Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine in addition to the regular university application process. Suc programs, sports medicine clinics, and other athletic health care settings. Interested students should

Lajeunesse, Marc J.

239

COLLEGE OF MEDICINE UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 2012-2013 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG  

E-print Network

of Orthopedics & Sports Medicine Important Notice: The last applications for the undergraduate Bachelor of required criteria set forth by the Department of Orthopedics and Sports Medicine in addition to the regular schools, colleges and universities, professional sports programs, sports medicine clinics, and other

Lajeunesse, Marc J.

240

COLLEGE OF MEDICINE UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA -2010/2011 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG  

E-print Network

of Orthopaedics & Sports Medicine For Athletic Training Major (BAT): The undergraduate Athletic Training Major by the Department of Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine in addition to the regular university application process programs, sports medicine clinics, and other athletic health care settings. Interested students should

Lajeunesse, Marc J.

241

COLLEGE OF MEDICINE UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA -2009/2010 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG  

E-print Network

of Orthopaedics & Sports Medicine For Athletic Training Major (BAT): The undergraduate Athletic Training Major by the Department of Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine in addition to the regular university application process, sports medicine clinics, and other athletic health care settings. Interested students should visit our

Lajeunesse, Marc J.

242

COLLEGE OF MEDICINE UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 2013-2014 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG  

E-print Network

of Orthopedics and Sports Medicine Important Notice: Beginning Fall 2012, students will no longer be allowed of required criteria set forth by the Department of Orthopedics and Sports Medicine in addition to the regular schools, colleges and universities, professional sports programs, sports medicine clinics, and other

Meyers, Steven D.

243

Improving patient provider communication for Latinos at Temple University Hospital and Temple University School of Medicine.  

PubMed

This Report from the Field documents a series of interventions developed by Temple University Health System and School of Medicine through participation in the RWJF initiative entitled Hablamos Juntos. The report delineates outcomes to date demonstrating that these interventions have met the challenge of improving patient provider communication for Latinos. PMID:22080699

Viera, Elys; Colón, Dayan; Alonso, Yadira; Armas, Joey; Rico, Mario C; Diaz, Raquel; Pagan, Angel; Del Carpio-Cano, Fabiola; DeLa Cadena, Raul A

2011-11-01

244

Practical training in family medicine in the Dalmatian hinterland: first-hand experience of four physicians.  

PubMed

Four physicians working in private family medicine offices in Dalmatian Hinterland described their first hand experience of teaching sixthyear medical students. They supervised students during the 2010/2011 academic year, in an area that is economically undeveloped, rural, and where a number of people live in extended families. Although hesitant at first, the patients came to like the interaction with students, and later even yearned to provide students with as much information as possible. They also liked the letters that students had to write to them about their illness, because they could take them home and look for information without needing to see the doctor. The students showed diverse attitudes to different types of work in family medicine offices, mostly depending on their plans for future career. In general, they either complained or hesitated to perform duties that they did not fully master during earlier education, especially working with children. They needed several days to adapt to direct contact with the patients, and were more relaxed and cooperative when working in pairs than alone. The physicians themselves felt that they profited both from the novelty in the everyday routine and from the exchange of their experiences with the students. They liked their young colleagues and admitted they could not objectively review their own work, knowledge and skills. PMID:23311492

Jer?i?, Minka; ?izmi?, Zorka; Vujevi?, Miona; Puljiz, Tina

2012-01-01

245

Family medicine residency directors' perceptions of the position of chief resident.  

PubMed

This report describes a survey that explored the selection, training, duties, skills, and evaluation of chief residents as perceived by the program directors of the 381 family medicine residencies in the United States in 1989. A response rate of 79% (300 programs) was achieved. In 70% of the programs the chief resident received no formal training, and in 41% no formal evaluation. The program directors believed the most important duties and skills of a chief resident were acting as a liaison and advocate for residents, scheduling, and leadership. The directors thought that the most exciting aspects of being a chief resident included the development of leadership skills and the ability to influence curriculum; the aspects that caused the most concern included time pressures and demands that detract from clinical learning. The authors suggest that more attention should be directed to the nurturing and development of chief residents, who are the future leaders in academic medicine. PMID:1540277

Susman, J; Gilbert, C

1992-03-01

246

[Racism of "Blood" and colonial medicine - Blood group anthropology studies at Keijo Imperial University Department of Forensic Medicine].  

PubMed

This paper attempts to explore implications of Colonial medicine's Blood Type Studies, concerning the characteristics and tasks of racism in the Japanese Colonial Empire. Especially, it focuses on the Blood Group Anthropology Studies at Keijo Imperial University Department of Forensic Medicine. In Colonial Korea, the main stream of Blood Type Studies were Blood Group Anthropology Studies, which place Korean people who was inferior to Japanese people in the geography of the race on the one hand, but on the other, put Koreans as a missing link between the Mongolian and the Japanese for fulfillment of the Japanese colonialism, that is, assimilationist ideology. Then, Compared to the Western medicine and Metropole medicine of Japan, How differentiated was this tendency of Colonial Medicine from them? In this paper, main issues of Blood Group Anthropology Studies and its colonial implications are examined. PMID:23388491

Jung, Joon Young

2012-12-01

247

Scaling up family medicine training in Gezira, Sudan – a 2-year in-service master programme using modern information and communication technology: a survey study  

PubMed Central

Background In 2010 the Gezira Family Medicine Project (GFMP) was initiated in Gezira state, Sudan, designed as an in-service training model. The project is a collaboration project between the University of Gezira, which aims to provide a 2-year master’s programme in family medicine for practicing doctors, and the Ministry of Health, which facilitates service provision and funds the training programme. This paper presents the programme, the teaching environment, and the first batch of candidates enrolled. Methods In this study a self-administered questionnaire was used to collect baseline data at the start of the project from doctors who joined the programme. A checklist was also used to assess the health centres where they work. A total of 188 out of 207 doctors responded (91%), while data were gathered from all 158 health centres (100%) staffed by the programme candidates. Results The Gezira model of in-service family medicine training has succeeded in recruiting 207 candidates in its first batch, providing health services in 158 centres, of which 84 had never been served by a doctor before. The curriculum is community oriented. The mean age of doctors was 32.5 years, 57% were males, and 32% were graduates from the University of Gezira. Respondents stated high confidence in practicing some skills such as asthma management and post-abortion uterine evacuation. They were least confident in other skills such as managing depression or inserting an intrauterine device. The majority of health centres was poorly equipped for management of noncommunicable diseases, as only 10% had an electrocardiography machine (ECG), 5% had spirometer, and 1% had a defibrillator. Conclusions The Gezira model has responded to local health system needs. Use of modern information and communication technology is used to facilitate both health service provision and training. The GFMP represents an example of a large-volume scaling-up programme of family medicine in Africa. PMID:24443978

2014-01-01

248

Program Director Master in Public Health Northwestern University # P-107N-14 The Institute for Public Health and Medicine (IPHAM) and the Department of Preventive Medicine at  

E-print Network

for Public Health and Medicine (IPHAM) and the Department of Preventive Medicine at Northwestern University functions, and is expected to have a primary academic appointment in the Department of Preventive MedicineProgram Director Master in Public Health ­ Northwestern University # P-107N-14 The Institute

Engman, David M.

249

Evaluation of a task-based community oriented teaching model in family medicine for undergraduate medical students in Iraq  

PubMed Central

Background The inclusion of family medicine in medical school curricula is essential for producing competent general practitioners. The aim of this study is to evaluate a task-based, community oriented teaching model of family medicine for undergraduate students in Iraqi medical schools. Methods An innovative training model in family medicine was developed based upon tasks regularly performed by family physicians providing health care services at the Primary Health Care Centre (PHCC) in Mosul, Iraq. Participants were medical students enrolled in their final clinical year. Students were assigned to one of two groups. The implementation group (28 students) was exposed to the experimental model and the control group (56 students) received the standard teaching curriculum. The study took place at the Mosul College of Medicine and at the Al-Hadba PHCC in Mosul, Iraq, during the academic year 1999–2000. Pre- and post-exposure evaluations comparing the intervention group with the control group were conducted using a variety of assessment tools. Results The primary endpoints were improvement in knowledge of family medicine and development of essential performance skills. Results showed that the implementation group experienced a significant increase in knowledge and performance skills after exposure to the model and in comparison with the control group. Assessment of the model by participating students revealed a high degree of satisfaction with the planning, organization, and implementation of the intervention activities. Students also highly rated the relevancy of the intervention for future work. Conclusion A model on PHCC training in family medicine is essential for all Iraqi medical schools. The model is to be implemented by various relevant departments until Departments of Family medicine are established. PMID:16115312

Al-Dabbagh, Samim A; Al-Taee, Waleed G

2005-01-01

250

Data supporting key components of family medicine-scope, continuity, interprofessional care, and more.  

PubMed

This issue contains multiple articles supporting key components of family medicine, either evidence that these components are important, or strategies to implement them in practice. For examples, see the articles on interprofessional care,(1-5) continuity,(6) cultural competence,(7) continuing competence,(8,9) and provision of essential care to the underserved.(10) We provide additional insight into how different physicians interpret similar data on older patients.(11) We have broad physician input into potential items to be considered in the national Choosing Wisely campaign, with many excellent interventions identified that should be performed less often.(12) However, choosing wisely for the United States population should also require adequate payment to encompass the breadth of what family physicians can and want to do to improve health for and with their patients.(13) All the articles relate to improving quality and cost of health care. PMID:25748754

Bowman, Marjorie A; Neale, Anne Victoria; Seehusen, Dean A

2015-01-01

251

Asian Liver Center at Stanford University School of Medicine Position Opening: Research Intern  

E-print Network

Asian Liver Center at Stanford University School of Medicine Position The Asian Liver Center at Stanford University is the first organization hepatitis B infection and liver cancer in Asians and Asian Americans. We

Straight, Aaron

252

Stanford University School of Medicine Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences Psychiatry Grand Rounds  

E-print Network

Stanford University School of Medicine Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences Psychiatry Grand Rounds "X&Y: A genetic basis for understanding sex differences in childhood psychiatric disorders" David Hong, MD Instructor Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences Stanford University School

Kay, Mark A.

253

Florida International University Magazine Fall 2004: The Future of Medicine in South Florida  

Microsoft Academic Search

Copy of Florida International University Magazine published Fall 2004 with a feature article on the Honor College's Medical Education Program at Florida International University and its impact on the development of a school of medicine in South Florida.

2004-01-01

254

UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE COLLEGE OF MEDICINE GRADUATE MEDICAL EDUCATION FACT SHEET  

E-print Network

UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE COLLEGE OF MEDICINE GRADUATE MEDICAL EDUCATION FACT SHEET Residents in the University of Tennessee Graduate Medical Education Program are considered student employees. As student of The University of Tennessee, you will be paid by the University. The University is on a monthly payroll system

Cui, Yan

255

The art and science of prognostication in early university medicine.  

PubMed

Prognosis occupied a more prominent place in the medieval curriculum than it does at the modern university. Scholastic discussions were rooted in the Hippocratic Aphorisms and shaped by Galen's treatises On Crisis and On Critical Days. Medical prediction, as an art dependent on personal skills such as memory and conjecture, was taught with the aid of the liberal arts of rhetoric and logic. Scientific predictability was sought in branches of mathematics, moving from periodicity and numerology to astronomy. The search for certitude contributed to the cultivation of astrology; even at its peak, however, astrological medicine did not dominate the teaching on prognostication. The ultimate concern, which awaits further discussion, was not even with forecasting as such, but with the physician and, indeed, the patient. PMID:14657583

Demaitre, Luke

2003-01-01

256

University of Miami Miller School of Medicine Medical Student Rights and Responsibilities Handbook 2012-2013  

E-print Network

University of Miami Miller School of Medicine Medical Student Rights and Responsibilities Handbook of the medical education programs at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine (UMMSM). Medical schools of professional behavior can be clearly defined and monitored during the medical school experience. Forms

Miami, University of

257

TWO UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND SCHOOL OF MEDICINE FACULTY MEMBERS AND A BOARD MEMBER NAMED TO THE  

E-print Network

TWO UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND SCHOOL OF MEDICINE FACULTY MEMBERS AND A BOARD MEMBER NAMED TO THE DAILY RECORD'S LIST OF INFLUENTIAL MARYLANDERS Wednesday, February 13, 2013 Drs. Fraser and Rodriguez, as well as Board Member Emeritus Peter Angelos, Recognized The University of Maryland School of Medicine's Claire

Weber, David J.

258

Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University Title: Code Blue and other Healthcare Emergencies  

E-print Network

Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University Title: Code Blue and other Healthcare for initiating resuscitation and activating either a Code Blue or local EMS (by calling 911) when a medical;Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University Title: Code Blue and other Healthcare Emergencies

259

Version: 1/1/2013 Page 1 Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine  

E-print Network

Version: 1/1/2013 Page 1 Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine Northwestern Memorial University Feinberg School of Medicine ("Feinberg"), Northwestern Memorial HealthCare ("NMHC the individual policies of Feinberg, NMHC, or NMFF. These policies remain in effect and can be accessed at http://www.feinberg

Chisholm, Rex L.

260

UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA SCHOOL OF MEDICINE SCHEDULE OF UPCOMING EVENTS FOR 2008-09  

E-print Network

UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA SCHOOL OF MEDICINE SCHEDULE OF UPCOMING EVENTS FOR 2008-09: ~Lunch of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Biomedical Research Building, Room 253 Friday, October 3rd, 2008 at 12:00 PMOct. 3 Kathy Richards, PhD, RN, FAAN, FAASM Professor of Nursing, University of Pennsylvania School

Bushman, Frederic

261

Updated 8/25/14 Family Medicine Electives..................................................................................................... 3-16  

E-print Network

-13) ELEC 847: Relational Medicine (14-15) ELEC 859: Sports Medicine (16) Internal Medicine Electives Management (80) ELEC 679: Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery (81) ELEC 859: Sports Medicine (82) ELEC 676

Gilbert, Matthew

262

A retrospective review of student pharmacist medication reconciliation activities in an outpatient family medicine center  

PubMed Central

Background: Medication reconciliation in the outpatient setting is an important part of preventing medication errors, and is mandated by the Joint Commission. Objective: To describe and quantify medication reconciliation efforts by student pharmacists in an outpatient family medicine center. Methods: A retrospective review was conducted of medication reconciliation documentation forms completed by student pharmacists during an outpatient clinical rotation between May 2012 and April 2013. Discrepancies were defined as any lack of agreement between the medication list in the electronic medical record and the patient reported regimen. Descriptive statistics were used to report results. Results: A total of 557 medication reconciliation documentation forms from 12 student pharmacists were reviewed. The average number of medications per patient interviewed was 9 (range 0-25). A total of 1,783 medication discrepancies were found with an average of 3.2 discrepancies per patient. An additional 272 medication allergy discrepancies were identified. The most common discrepancy was medications the patient was no longer taking (37.3%, n=766). The second most common discrepancy was over-the-counter and herbal medications that had not been added to the medication list (16.2%, n=335). Patient counseling was documented 159 times during the medication reconciliation process. Conclusions: Medication reconciliation by student pharmacists in an outpatient family medicine center resulted in the identification of many discrepancies in medication lists in an electronic health record. Student pharmacists also documented and clarified medication allergies and performed patient counseling.

Andrus, Miranda R.; Anderson, Anthony D.

2014-01-01

263

Universal families and quantum control in infinite dimensions  

E-print Network

In a topological space, a family of continuous mappings is called universal if its action, in at least one element of the space, is dense. If the mappings are unitary or trace-preserving completely positive, the notion of universality is closely related to the notion of controllability in either closed or open quantum systems. Quantum controllability in infinite dimensions is discussed in this setting and minimal generators are found for full control universal families. Some of the requirements of the operators needed for control in infinite dimensions follow from the properties of the infinite unitary group. Hence, a brief discussed of this group and their appropriate mathematical spaces is also included.

R. Vilela Mendes

2009-02-03

264

Veterinary Preventive Medicine Curriculum Development at Louisiana State University  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The program aims at training veterinarians, with interdepartmental faculty participation the rule rather than the exception. Included in the curriculum are: avian medicine, herd health management, veterinary public health, veterinary food hygiene, and regulatory veterinary medicine. (LBH)

Hubbert, William T.

1976-01-01

265

School of Medicine Page 1 Policy and Guidelines for Interactions between the Stanford University School of Medicine,  

E-print Network

University School of Medicine, the Stanford Hospital and Clinics, and Lucile Packard Children's Hospital and Clinics and the Lucile Packard Children's Hospital. Interactions with Industry occur in a variety or the institution. Individuals must consciously and actively divorce clinical care decisions from any perceived

Ford, James

266

Relevance of Hypersexual Disorder to Family Medicine and Primary Care as a Complex Multidimensional Chronic Disease Construct  

PubMed Central

Hypersexual disorder (HD) is not defined in a uniform way in the psychiatric literature. In the absence of solid evidence on prevalence, causes, empirically validated diagnostic criteria, instruments for diagnosis, consistent guidelines on treatment options, medical and psychosocial consequences, and type of caregivers that need to be involved, HD remains a controversial and relatively poorly understood chronic disease construct. The role of family medicine in the detection, treatment, and followup of HD is not well studied. The purpose of this paper is to describe the complexity of HD as a multidimensional chronic disease construct and its relevance to family medicine and primary care. PMID:24066230

Vrijhoef, Bert; De Maeseneer, Jan; Vansintejan, Johan; Devroey, Dirk

2013-01-01

267

Changing University Work, Freedom, Flexibility and Family  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article investigates what Finnish academics on short fixed-term contracts consider to be the effects of having children on work and careers. The study is framed by the context of the current state of the university sector, its neoliberal and entrepreneurial tendencies and its claims to meritocracy. Informants express relative happiness with…

Nikunen, Minna

2012-01-01

268

Sample Course Curriculum:Chinese Medicine Clinical Rotation at Shanghai Jiao Tong University, School of Medicine Dates Time Room Activities Instructors Location/Hospitals  

E-print Network

.Outline of Traditional Chinese Drug (1) 1. Program Director 2. Jianzhong Xu Office of Chinese Medicine 2 of Chinese Medicine 2-4 pm #15 International Student Building, language lab Outline of Traditional ChineseSample Course Curriculum:Chinese Medicine Clinical Rotation at Shanghai Jiao Tong University

Bushman, Frederic

269

Inspiring Hope through Regenerative Medicine To benefit the University of Maryland School of Medicine  

E-print Network

, September 28, 2014 4pm to 7pm Join us for our annual fundraiser for regenerative medicine! Enjoy superb food Medicine. A perfect spot for cocktails and conversation. Program Advertiser $2,500 each Advertising in our Name Contact Name Address Home Business City, State, Zip Email Address Home Business Phone Home

Weber, David J.

270

Faculty of Medicine Graduate School of Medicine  

E-print Network

2007--2008 Faculty of Medicine Graduate School of Medicine PROSPECTUS The University of Tokyo #12;#12;Welcome to Faculty of Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine The University of Tokyo Takao Shimizu Dean, Faculty of Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine The University of Tokyo The Faculty of Medicine

Miyashita, Yasushi

271

[Crisis in family medicine: A bioethical perspective from the routine practice].  

PubMed

From the beginning, family medicine (FM) has brought health care nearer to the population. A crisis in FM is a good time to look at the social expectations and to reformulate and to strengthen the principles that guide the specialty. An ethical reflection is presented on what to do from the microcosm of daily practice. Bureaucracy and trivialities cause a moral decline which prevents FM from offering the specific service that it should. Its visualisation as doorman to the system, a mere filter of banalities, an administration area or as a handkerchief for the system to cry on, draws a socially unacceptable caricature. It is vital for FM to reach an effective compromise preferably directed at the most vulnerable groups or individuals. But it also urgently needs a sense of recovery as an area of human promotion, in which the professionals do not lose their moral capacity to have something to desire, want, achieve and enjoy. PMID:20304527

Montero, Santiago Alvarez

2010-10-01

272

Family medicine model in Turkey: a qualitative assessment from the perspectives of primary care workers  

PubMed Central

Background A person-list-based family medicine model was introduced in Turkey during health care reforms. This study aimed to explore from primary care workers’ perspectives whether this model could achieve the cardinal functions of primary care and have an integrative position in the health care system. Methods Four groups of primary care workers were included in this exploratory-descriptive study. The first two groups were family physicians (FP) (n?=?51) and their ancillary personnel (n?=?22). The other two groups were physicians (n?=?44) and midwives/nurses (n?=?11) working in community health centres. Participants were selected for maximum variation and 102 in-depth interviews and six focus groups were conducted using a semi-structured form. Results Data analysis yielded five themes: accessibility, first-contact care, longitudinality, comprehensiveness, and coordination. Most participants stated that many people are not registered with any FP and that the majority of these belong to the most disadvantaged groups in society. FPs reported that 40-60% of patients on their lists have never received a service from them and the majority of those who use their services do not use FPs as the first point of contact. According to most participants, the list-based system improved the longitudinality of the relationship between FPs and patients. However, based on other statements, this improvement only applies to one quarter of the population. Whereas there was an improvement limited to a quantitative increase in services (immunisation, monitoring of pregnant women and infants) included in the performance-based contracting system, participants stated that services not among the performance targets, such as family planning, postpartum follow-ups, and chronic disease management, could be neglected. FPs admitted not being able to keep informed of services their patients had received at other health institutions. Half of the participants stated that the list-based system removed the possibility of evaluating the community as a whole. Conclusions According to our findings, FPs have a limited role as the first point of contact and in giving longitudinal, comprehensive, and coordinated care. The family medicine model in Turkey is unable to provide a suitable structure to integrate health care services. PMID:24571275

2014-01-01

273

Family medicine residents’ perceived level of comfort in treating common sports injuries across residency programs in the United States  

PubMed Central

Background and objective Family physicians are expected to be comfortable in treating common sports injuries. Evidence shows a limited level of comfort in treating these injuries in pediatric and internal medicine residents. Studies are lacking, however, in family medicine residents. The purpose of this study is to assess the comfort level of family medicine residents in treating common sports injuries in adults and children based on their perceived level of knowledge and attitudes. Methods This is a cross-sectional study of family medicine residents in the United Sates. A written survey of 25 questions related to sports injury knowledge and factors affecting comfort level were collected. A chi-square test was implemented in calculating P-values. Results Five hundred and fifty-seven residents responded to the survey. A higher percentage of doctors of osteopathy (86.6%, 82.5%, 69.6%, and 68.7%) compared to doctors of medicine (78.5%, 71.6%, 53.4%, and 52.8%) respectively identified ankle sprain, concussion, plantar fasciitis, and lateral epicondylitis as common injuries, and felt comfortable in treating them (P-values =0.015, 0.004, 0.0001, and 0.0002, respectively). Residents with high interest in sports medicine correctly identified the injuries as common and felt comfortable treating them as well (knowledge, P=0.027, 0.0029, <0.0001, and 0.0001, respectively; comfort level, P=0.0016, <0.0001, 0.0897, and 0.0010, respectively). Conclusion Medical education background, factors that affect training, and an interest in sports medicine contribute to residents’ knowledge and comfort level in treatment of common sports injuries.

Amoako, Adae O; Amoako, Agyenim B; Pujalte, George GA

2015-01-01

274

Cancer Research Center Indiana University School of Medicine  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to authorize the Indiana School of Medicine to proceed with the detailed design, construction and equipping of the proposed Cancer Research Center (CRC). A grant was executed with the University on April 21, 1992. A four-story building with basement would be constructed on the proposed site over a 24-month period. The proposed project would bring together, in one building, three existing hematology/oncology basic research programs, with improved cost-effectiveness through the sharing of common resources. The proposed site is currently covered with asphaltic pavement and is used as a campus parking lot. The surrounding area is developed campus, characterized by buildings, walkways, with minimal lawns and plantings. The proposed site has no history of prior structures and no evidence of potential sources of prior contamination of the soil. Environmental impacts of construction would be limited to minor increases in traffic, and the typical noises associated with standard building construction. The proposed CRC project operation would involve the use radionuclides and various hazardous materials in conducting clinical studies. Storage, removal and disposal of hazardous wastes would be managed under existing University programs that comply with federal and state requirements. Radiological safety programs would be governed by Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) license and applicable Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations. There are no other NEPA reviews currently active which are in relationship to this proposed site. The proposed project is part of a Medical Campus master plan and is consistent with applicable local zoning and land use requirements.

Not Available

1994-08-01

275

Forensic Pathologist Hamilton Regional Laboratory Medicine Program and McMaster University  

E-print Network

Forensic Pathologist Hamilton Regional Laboratory Medicine Program and McMaster University Hamilton, ON Applications are invited for a full-time Forensic Pathologist position with the Hamilton Regional Laboratory Medicine Program (HRLMP). The Forensic Pathology Unit is a sub-specialty of the Anatomic Pathology section

Haykin, Simon

276

Medical Student Fellowship in Women's Health Research Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania  

E-print Network

Medical Student Fellowship in Women's Health Research Perelman School of Medicine at the University in academic medicine · To promote research and education in women's health Dual Mission To support in women's health: 1 award may be specific to CV research ­ Clinical, basic science or community · Open

Bushman, Frederic

277

UNIVERSITY OF ST ANDREWS POLICY AND PROCEDURES ON FITNESS TO PRACTISE MEDICINE  

E-print Network

1 UNIVERSITY OF ST ANDREWS POLICY AND PROCEDURES ON FITNESS TO PRACTISE MEDICINE Contents Section 1 The Fitness to Practise Policy Section 2 The Responsibilities of the School of Medicine Section 3 Referrals and Initial Assessment Section 4 Investigation Section 5 The Fitness to Practise Panel Section 6 The Panel

Brierley, Andrew

278

University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry GUIDELINES TO PREVENT THE MISTREATMENT OF STUDENTS  

E-print Network

University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry GUIDELINES TO PREVENT THE MISTREATMENT to prevent the mistreatment of School of Medicine and Dentistry students. AAMC POLICY STATEMENT Reaffirming, physical handicap or age; humiliation, psychological or physical punishment and the use of grading

Goldman, Steven A.

279

Faculty of Medicine Graduate School of Medicine  

E-print Network

2005--2006 Faculty of Medicine Graduate School of Medicine PROSPECTUS The University of Tokyo #12;#12;Welcome to Faculty of Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine The University of Tokyo Nobutaka Hirokawa Dean, Faculty of Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine The University of Tokyo The University of Tokyo Graduate

Miyashita, Yasushi

280

Evaluation of the educational environment of the Saudi family medicine residency training program  

PubMed Central

Objectives: The study was conducted to evaluate the educational environment (EE) in Family Medicine Training Programs. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional survey, The Postgraduate Hospital Educational Environment Measure (PHEEM), was distributed to all residents at the four training centers in the central region. Cronbach's alpha was used to test the reliability. The mean and standard deviation (SD) for each item, the overall score and the three domains were calculated. A multiple linear regression model was developed with PHEEM scores as an outcome. The Mann–Whitney–Wilcoxon test was used to compare each item based on the selected factors. Results: The overall score was 67.1/160 (SD: 20.1). The PHEEM's domains scores: 24.2/56 (SD: 7.13) for perception of role autonomy; 25.3/60 (SD: 8.88), for perception of teaching; and 17/44 (SD: 5.6), for perception of social support. Training center and Level of training were the significant outcome predictors. Centre 1 (Joint Program) significantly had better scores than Centre 2. The instrument showed great reliability with a Cronbach's alpha of 0.92. Conclusions: There are many problems in the training program. Urgent actions are needed to improve the residents' learning experience particularly during rotations. Also, the curriculum should be restructured, and effective training methods introduced using the Best Evidence in Medical Education to meet the expectations and learning needs of family physicians. PMID:25657612

Khoja, Abdullah T.

2015-01-01

281

International medical graduates in family medicine in the United States of America: an exploration of professional characteristics and attitudes  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: The number of international medical graduates (IMGs) entering family medicine in the United States of America has steadily increased since 1997. Previous research has examined practice locations of these IMGs and their role in providing care to underserved populations. To our knowledge, research does not exist comparing professional profiles, credentials and attitudes among IMG and United States medical graduate

Amanda L Morris; Robert L Phillips; George E Fryer Jr; Larry A Green; Fitzhugh Mullan

2006-01-01

282

[Teaching of medicine of the University of Bologna in the Reinaissance].  

PubMed

The foundation date of the University of Bologna was 1150, was the first European University and set the pattern. The combination of structured teaching and students association marked the origin of the studium generale. The presence of teaching legists encouraged teachers in others fields to come to Bologna. Ars dictaminis, grammar, logic, philosophy, mathematical arts and especially medicine were taught there by the middle of the thirteenth century. The university had to offer advanced instruction in law, medicine, and theology, had a minimum of six to eight professors teaching civil law, canon law, medicine, logic, natural philosophy and usually rhetoric. Many professors bearing local names were able scholars and commanding figures in medicine and surgery. Taddeo Alderotti (1210-95) began to teach medicine in Bologna about 1260. He soon raised medicine to a prestigious position in the university. The geographical distribution demonstrates the international character of the student body 73% were Italians and 26% non Italians. The decision of the commune of Bologna to wrest control of the university from the students by paying professors was probably the most important decision in the history of Italian universities. Examination of the distribution of professors offers a detailed picture of the faculty. In 1370 the university had 11 professors of civil law, seven professors of canon law, three professors of medical theory, two of medical practice (the specific of diagnosis and treatment), and one professor of surgery. After growing steadily the numbers of teachers stabilized at 85 to 110 until 1530. PMID:16827269

Romero y Huesca, Andrés; Moreno-Rojas, Juan Carlos; Soto-Miranda, Miguel Angel; Ponce-Landín, Francisco Javier; Hernández, Daniel Alejandro; Ramírez-Bollas, Julio

2006-01-01

283

RICE UNIVERSITY Mapping the Structural Landscape of Protein Families  

E-print Network

members, segregation by ligation state, and orga- nization by ancestry among convergent protein lineagesRICE UNIVERSITY Mapping the Structural Landscape of Protein Families with Geometric Feature Vectors and Cell Biology Houston, Texas December, 2009 #12;ABSTRACT Mapping the Structural Landscape of Protein

Kavraki, Lydia E.

284

The University of Maryland School of Medicine Department of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Science  

E-print Network

1 The University of Maryland School of Medicine Department of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation the Department of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Science (PTRS) at the University of Maryland School on the sprawling University of Maryland Baltimore campus as part of a Research I institution and large

Weber, David J.

285

Program Coordination: Dr. Konstanze Muschko University of Tbingen Faculty of Medicine  

E-print Network

, computational and soft skills are provided by the Competence Centre for University Teaching in Medicine of Tübin- gen provides a wealth of opportunities for interdisciplinary collaboration. And such close cooperation on research extends beyond the University and around the world. The University of Tübingen has

286

DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL THERAPY AND HUMAN MOVEMENT SCIENCES NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY, FEINBERG SCHOOL OF MEDICINE  

E-print Network

' professional development. 2. Manage student's clinical internship in a collegial manner that demonstrates SCHOOL OF MEDICINE Clinical Education Expectations and Evaluation The purpose of this document is to facilitate planning clinical experiences. During clinical experiences, the university expects students

Chisholm, Rex L.

287

Stanford University School of Medicine Guidelines for Preparation of Bibliography and Candidate's Statement Materials  

E-print Network

Stanford University School of Medicine Guidelines for Preparation of Bibliography and Candidate's Statement Materials for Faculty Candidates Whose Scholarly Contributions Are Primarily Collaborative. In order to inform review committees better as they attempt to assess a candidate's individual scholarly

Puglisi, Joseph

288

Fellowship Training Program in Digestive Diseases Yale University School of Medicine  

E-print Network

Fellowship Training Program in Digestive Diseases Yale University School of Medicine Curriculum Knowledge in Digestive Diseases ................................. 5 General Goals and Objectives ..................... 52 VA Connecticut Health Care System General Information ...................... 59 VA GI Consult

Johnson, Marcia K.

289

University of Connecticut School of Medicine Child & Adolescent Psychiatry Residency/Fellowship  

E-print Network

12/09 University of Connecticut School of Medicine Child & Adolescent Psychiatry Residency: __________________ To: Child and Adolescent Psychiatry training program From of neurology (2 months minimum; one month may be child neurology) ____ FTE months of adult inpatient psychiatry

Oliver, Douglas L.

290

Center for Infectious Diseases (CID) Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine  

E-print Network

Center for Infectious Diseases (CID) Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine Microbiology (Hotta) Pathogenesis analysis of viruses; Antiviral drugs; Vaccine development Infectious Disease and epidemiology of avian influenza Infectious Disease Control (Kawabata) Epidemiology of infectious diseases

Banbara, Mutsunori

291

Differences between family physicians and patients in their knowledge and attitudes regarding traditional chinese medicine  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: With patients turning more to alternative medicine, most physicians are still conservative in their views toward these practices. It is important to know whether there is a difference between physicians and patients regarding knowledge and attitudes about alternative medicine. This study focused on information regarding a specific type of alternative medicine, traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). Methods: Two questionnaires—one for

Bin Chen; Amy Bernard; Randall Cottrell

2000-01-01

292

UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA -PERELMAN SCHOOL OF MEDICINE Curriculum Vitae  

E-print Network

, University of Chicago, Chicago, Il. 1989-1990 Fellowship, Dementia, Case Western Reserve University Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham 1999-present Adjunct Scientist, Moss Rehabilitation Research

Chatterjee, Anjan

293

[End of the word and relegation of bodies in medicine: university formation of physicians].  

PubMed

Medicine is based on a growing demand for science. Yet, the patient's speech is ill adapted to the current desire of rationality. Inaccuracy and errancy have become the features of clinical examination. Self censorship of the speech gradually appears. Presenting the body becomes useless, if not suspicious. Medical technology replaces perceived subjectivity. What medicine says prevails over what the body knows. In a strange paradox, the "echo" precedes the speech. The risk of having an autistic medicine is looming. University teaching must be aware of this. The obvious gap between the speech and the body not only evades the ethical issue but also paradoxically deprives the medicine from its scientific acumen. PMID:19445110

Sicard, D

2008-01-01

294

Consumption of medicines, alcohol, tobacco and cannabis among university students: a 2-year follow-up  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective  To determine the prevalence of medicine consumption among Spanish university students and its association with alcohol, tobacco\\u000a and cannabis consumption.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Method  We carried out a cohort study among Spanish university students (n = 2,700). Consumption of medicines during the previous 15 days, risky alcohol use, and tobacco and cannabis consumption were\\u000a measured using questionnaire. Logistic regression models were generated using consumption of medicines as

Francisco Caamaño-Isorna; Nayara Mota; Alberto Crego; Montserrat Corral; Socorro Rodríguez Holguín; Fernando Cadaveira

2011-01-01

295

A new paradigm for teaching behavior change: Implications for residency training in family medicine and psychiatry  

PubMed Central

Background Primary care physicians (PCPs) provide ~50?% of all mental health services in the U.S. Given the widening gap between patient mental health needs and resources available to meet those needs, there is an increasing demand for family medicine and psychiatry trainees to master competencies in both behavioral medicine and primary care counseling during residency-if for no other reason than to accommodate the realities of medical practice given the oft present gap between the need for psychiatric services and the availability, quality, and/or affordability of specialized psychiatric care. To begin to address this gap, a skills-based, interactive curriculum based on motivational interviewing (MI) as a teaching method is presented. Methods The curriculum described in this paper is a four-week block rotation taught in the second year of residency. Motivational interviewing (MI) is used as a teaching approach toward the goal of clinical behavior change. Residents’ strengths, personal choice and autonomy are emphasized. Each week of the rotation, there is a clinical topic and a set of specific skills for mastery. Residents are offered a “menu” of skills, role modeling, role/real play, practice with standardized patients (SP), and direct supervision in clinic. Results Thirty-nine residents have completed the curriculum. Based on residents’ subjective reporting using pre-post scales (i.e., importance and confidence), all participants to date have reported substantial increases in confidence/self-efficacy using primary care counseling skills in their continuity clinic. Conclusions This paper presents an innovative, empirically based model for teaching the essential skills necessary for physicians providing care for patients with mental/emotional health needs as well as health-behavior change concerns. Implications for training in the broader context, particularly as it relates to multi-disciplinary and collaborative models of teaching/training are discussed. PMID:22863077

2012-01-01

296

COLLEGE OF MEDICINE University of Illinois at Chicago  

E-print Network

of Hippocrates Now being admitted to the profession of medicine, I solemnly pledge to consecrate my life of Doctor of Philosophy Degrees President B. Joseph White, PhD The Oath of Hippocrates Administered by Dean

Illinois at Chicago, University of

297

Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University ECU PHYSICIANS  

E-print Network

of a patient who the provider is treating for gonorrhea or Chlamydia. Partner management of patients with gonorrhea or Chlamydia should include the following items: (a) #12;Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina

298

Symposium Encourages Collaborative Efforts in Regenerative Medicine NC State University and The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill held its first joint  

E-print Network

and The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill held its first joint symposium on regenerative medicineSymposium Encourages Collaborative Efforts in Regenerative Medicine NC State University on October 15, 2013. Titled Opportunities, Challenges and Resources in Regenerative Medicine, NC State

Langerhans, Brian

299

Can credit systems help in family medicine training in developing countries? An innovative concept.  

PubMed

There is irrefutable evidence that health systems perform best when supported by a Family Physician network. Training a critical mass of highly skilled Family Physicians can help developing countries to reach their Millennium Development Goals and deliver comprehensive patient-centered health care to their population. The challenge in developing countries is the need to rapidly train these Family Physicians in large numbers, while also ensuring the quality of the learning, and assuring the quality of training. The experience of Christian Medical College (CMC), Vellore, India and other global examples confirm the fact that training large numbers is possible through well-designed blended learning programs. The question then arises as to how these programs can be standardized. Globally, the concept of the "credit system" has become the watch-word for many training programs seeking standardization. This article explores the possibility of introducing incremental academic certifications using credit systems as a method to standardize these blended learning programs, gives a glimpse at the innovation that CMC, Vellore is piloting in this regard partnering with the University of Edinburgh and analyses the possible benefits and pitfalls of such an approach. PMID:25374849

Raji, J Beulah; Velavan, Jachin; Anbarasi, Sahaya; Grant, Liz

2014-07-01

300

Usefulness of cardiovascular family history data for population-based preventive medicine and medical research (The Health Family Tree Study and the NHLBI Family Heart Study)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Detailed medical family history data have been proposed to be effective in identifying high-risk families for targeted intervention. With use of a validated and standardized quantitative family risk score (FRS), the degree of familial aggregation of coronary heart disease (CHD), stroke, hypertension, and diabetes was obtained from 122,155 Utah families and 6,578 Texas families in the large, population-based Health Family

Roger R Williams; Steven C Hunt; Gerardo Heiss; Michael A Province; Jeannette T Bensen; Millicent Higgins; Robert M Chamberlain; Joan Ware; Paul N Hopkins

2001-01-01

301

Examination outcomes for international medical graduates pursuing or completing family medicine residency training in Quebec  

PubMed Central

ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To review the success of international medical graduates (IMGs) who are pursuing or have completed a Quebec residency training program and examinations. DESIGN We retrospectively reviewed IMGs’ success rates on the pre-residency Collège des médecins du Québec medical clinical sciences written examination and objective structured clinical examination, as well as on the post-residency Certification Examination in Family Medicine. SETTING Quebec. PARTICIPANTS All IMGs taking their examinations between 2001 and 2008, inclusive, and Canadian and American graduates taking their examinations during this same period. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Success rates for IMGs on the pre-residency and post-residency examinations, compared with success rates for Canadian and American graduates. RESULTS Success rates on the pre-residency clinical examinations remained below 50% from 2001 to 2008 for IMGs. Similarly, during the same period, the average success rate on the Certification examination was 56.0% for IMGs, compared with 93.5% for Canadian and American medical graduates. CONCLUSION Despite pre-residency competency screening and in-program orientation and supports, a substantial number of IMGs in Quebec are not passing their Certification examinations. Another study is under way to analyze reasons for some IMGs’ lack of success and to find ways to help IMGs complete residency training successfully and pass the Certification examination. PMID:20841596

MacLellan, Anne-Marie; Brailovsky, Carlos; Rainsberry, Paul; Bowmer, Ian; Desrochers, Micheline

2010-01-01

302

Study of a novel curriculum on electronic communication in family medicine residencies.  

PubMed

Electronic communication between physicians and patients is common but can carry risks to users--both patients and physicians. Little is known about electronic communication between physicians and patients and even less about electronic communication during residency. We studied knowledge and practices before and after a controlled test of a novel curriculum teaching e-mail communication with patients using residents and faculty in 16 family medicine residencies in the United States. Both faculty and residents showed a lack of knowledge of confidentiality and encryption, little familiarity with published guidelines for physician-patient e-mail, and noncompliance with documentation requirements before the curriculum was presented. Posttests revealed a greater improvement in knowledge and appropriate behaviors related to patient-physician e-mail in the intervention group compared to control sites (mean intervention increase is 13 points[t=-4.065, P<.01], mean control increase is 5 points [t=-2.015, P<.05]). An increased uncertainty about comfort with patient e-mail among intervention residents is an interesting result that could be due to heightened awareness of issues but limited time devoted to absorbing the topic. Suggestions for delivering the curriculum are provided. PMID:20455106

Paladine, Heather L; Miller, Katrina; White, Brett; Feifer, Chris

2010-05-01

303

Trends in preventive activities for the adult population in family medicine in Croatia: 1995-2012.  

PubMed

A few preventive activities were recorded in Croatian family medicine (FM) from 1995 until 2003, and then in 2004, additional fee-for-service reimbursement for general check-ups for people aged 45 to 65 years was introduced. The aim of this study was to investigate the trends in preventive activities before and after the introduction of those measures by using the Croatian Health Service Yearbooks for 1995-2012 as the main database. Data on the number of preventive, general, and total number of check-ups were collected. The results showed that the total number of check-ups registered in FM was low, suggesting that the additional reimbursement did not bring any improvements. In fact, the trend in the number decreased after 2004. These results are not unexpected because of the ineffectiveness of general check-ups as indicated in the literature. General check-ups should be replaced by targeted preventive interventions with evidence-based effectiveness. PMID:25643529

Nelken-Bestvina, Darja; Kurc-Bionda, Alma; Vojvodi?, Zeljko; Babi?, Ivana; Pavlekovi?, Gordana; Soši?, Zvonko

2014-12-01

304

commencement N university of Illinois COLLEGE OF MEDICINE Establish contact  

E-print Network

Yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe Robstein Lovejoy Chidavaenzi Hometown: Harare, Zimbabwe Education: University of Zimbabwe, BSc., 1995 University of Zimbabwe, MPhil, 2007 Dissertation: Development, Protein

Illinois at Chicago, University of

305

Sounding Narrative Medicine: Studying Students’ Professional Identity Development at Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons  

PubMed Central

Purpose To learn what medical students derive from training in humanities, social sciences, and the arts in a narrative medicine curriculum and to explore narrative medicine’s framework as it relates to students’ professional development. Method On completion of required intensive, half-semester narrative medicine seminars in 2010, 130 second-year medical students at Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons participated in focus group discussions of their experiences. Focus group transcriptions were submitted to close iterative reading by a team who performed a grounded-theory-guided content analysis, generating a list of codes into which statements were sorted to develop overarching themes. Provisional interpretations emerged from the close and repeated readings, suggesting a fresh conceptual understanding of how and through what avenues such education achieves its goals in clinical training. Results Students’ comments articulated the known features of narrative medicine—attention, representation, and affiliation—and endorsed all three as being valuable to professional identity development. They spoke of the salience of their work in narrative medicine to medicine and medical education and its dividends of critical thinking, reflection, and pleasure. Critiques constituted a small percentage of the statements in each category. Conclusions Students report that narrative medicine seminars support complex interior, interpersonal, perceptual, and expressive capacities. Students’ lived experiences confirm some expectations of narrative medicine curricular planners while exposing fresh effects of such work to view. PMID:24362390

Miller, Eliza; Balmer, Dorene; Hermann, Nellie; Graham, Gillian; Charon, Rita

2014-01-01

306

Centre for the History of Medicine in Ireland University College Dublin &  

E-print Network

Centre for the History of Medicine in Ireland University College Dublin & University of Ulster Mental Health Act in Ireland. His work is complementary to the Centre's expertise in the history of psychiatry. Tom's book, Sean MacEntee: A Political Life (Dublin, 2008) was published by Irish Academic Press

307

TheJournalofExperimentalMedicine JEM The Rockefeller University Press $15.00  

E-print Network

TheJournalofExperimentalMedicine ARTICLE JEM © The Rockefeller University Press $15.00 www, The Rockefeller University, New York, NY 10021 5Laboratory Animal Science Program, Science Applications Research Foundation, Oklahoma City, OK 73104 The B cell­speci c enzyme activation-induced cytidine

Papavasiliou, F. Nina

308

Partnerships in Medical Education: An Exploration of Library Service Models for Postgraduate Medicine at Macquarie University  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Macquarie University's new medical school, The Australian School of Advanced Medicine (ASAM), is developing a postgraduate program that incorporates a partnership with Macquarie University Library. The curriculum encompasses contemporary models of competency-based assessment, teamwork and lifelong learning that are integrated with research and…

Simons, Mary

2008-01-01

309

Raymond and Ruth Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania  

E-print Network

and Promotions Closing Remarks J. Larry Jameson, M.D., Ph.D. Reception Continues #12;FACULTY 2011 NEWLY 4 5 Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania FACULTY 2011 Program Welcome Remarks J. Larry Jameson, M.D., Ph.D. Executive Vice President, University of Pennsylvania for the Health System Dean

Bushman, Frederic

310

Veterans Administration Palo Alto Health Care System An Affiliation of Stanford University School of Medicine  

E-print Network

Veterans Administration Palo Alto Health Care System An Affiliation of Stanford University School of Medicine at the Veterans Administration Palo Alto Health Care System (VAPAHCS) and Stanford University for the administrative and clinical care and treatment of veterans within the VAPAHCS. Individuals with experience

Quake, Stephen R.

311

Accessibility Statement The Program in Occupational Therapy at Washington University School of Medicine is committed to  

E-print Network

Accessibility Statement The Program in Occupational Therapy at Washington University School include the web address or URL and the specific problems you have encountered. Program in Occupational Therapy Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis Campus Box 8505, 4444 Forest Park Ave. St

Grant, Gregory

312

Our Achievements in Telemedicine within the Partnership Program with Boston University School of Medicine.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses advances in telecommunications and telemedicine in developing countries and describes a partnership between the Emergency Scientific Medical Center in Armenia, Boston University School of Medicine, and the University of Massachusetts to exchange personnel for educational and technical assistance and to provide better services and…

Tadevosyan, A.; Screnci, D.

2002-01-01

313

Tufts University School of Dental Medicine (TUSDM) Clinical Business Operations Internal Policy and Procedure Manual  

E-print Network

Tufts University School of Dental Medicine (TUSDM) Clinical Business Operations Internal Policy being offered within the Dental School to Tufts University students as well as guidelines for each and presented for signature to both the Practice Coordinator and Dental Practice Administrator. The DPA

Dennett, Daniel

314

Universal influenza immunization. Were Ontario family physicians prepared?  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE: To explore family physicians' experiences during the first year of Ontario's universal influenza immunization program. DESIGN: Qualitative study using in-depth interviews. SETTING: Thames Valley region of southwestern Ontario. PARTICIPANTS: A maximum variation sample of nine family physicians selected by snowball sampling after initial consultation with a local family physician advisory committee. METHOD: Interviews were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim. Analysis was sequential, using a combination of editing, immersion, and crystallization. Interview transcripts were read by individual members of the team who met to compare findings at several stages during data collection. MAIN FINDINGS: The program affected family physicians because immunization strategies designed for immunizing high-risk patients needed to be modified to deal with greater numbers of patients. While generally supportive of the program, physicians found it difficult to implement. Responses reflected ongoing conflict between individual and public health priorities, particularly regarding children and pregnant women. CONCLUSION: The program could have been more effective if the culture and climate of Ontario family practice had been considered during its development and implementation. PMID:14594100

Russell, Grant; Sutton, Judy; Reid, Graham J.; Beynon, Charlene; Cohen, Irene; Huffman, David

2003-01-01

315

History of the renal section, New York University School of Medicine 1926-1986, New York University Medical Center.  

PubMed Central

This history of the Renal Section at New York University School of Medicine ascribes its birth to a policy introduced by John Henry Wyckoff in 1924 that divided the Department of Medicine into sections devoted to the various subspecialties. Physicians selected to head each section sought further training. William Goldring, asked to organize the kidney section, spent a sabbatical year working with Homer William Smith, chairman and professor of the department of physiology at New York University School of Medicine. The second event was the development of a postdoctoral fellowship program in which medical school graduates, following completion of their intern and residency program, returned to basic science departments for exposure to and training in research in preparation for their return to clinical medicine. The aim of this fellowship program was to introduce the experimental method, which had been productive in the physical sciences, to the study and treatment of disease in man. The third event was the continuous collaboration between members of the Department of Medicine and the Department of Physiology under the chairmanship of Homer Smith. Experimental protocols in cardiovascular and renal physiology developed in the laboratory were carried over to Bellevue Hospital for studies and treatment of patients with hypertensive and renal diseases under the direction of members of the Renal Section. The final step conceived by Saul J. Farber, Chairman and Professor of the Department of Medicine was unification into a single group of all faculty members working in the field of hypertensive and renal diseases in Bellevue, University, and Manhattan Veterans Administration Hospitals. The Renal Section then can attribute its origin and development to the establishment of divisions within the Department of Medicine, the postdoctoral fellowship program, and the collaboration between the Departments of Medicine and Physiology. The establishment of the Renal Section served as a prototype for organizing medical school faculties into teams responsible for teaching, investigation, and treating hypertensive and renal diseases and spawned nephrology as a subspecialty of Internal Medicine. PMID:2686789

Chasis, H.

1989-01-01

316

Relevance of Chronic Lyme Disease to Family Medicine as a Complex Multidimensional Chronic Disease Construct: A Systematic Review  

PubMed Central

Lyme disease has become a global public health problem and a prototype of an emerging infection. Both treatment-refractory infection and symptoms that are related to Borrelia burgdorferi infection remain subject to controversy. Because of the absence of solid evidence on prevalence, causes, diagnostic criteria, tools and treatment options, the role of autoimmunity to residual or persisting antigens, and the role of a toxin or other bacterial-associated products that are responsible for the symptoms and signs, chronic Lyme disease (CLD) remains a relatively poorly understood chronic disease construct. The role and performance of family medicine in the detection, integrative treatment, and follow-up of CLD are not well studied either. The purpose of this paper is to describe insights into the complexity of CLD as a multidimensional chronic disease construct and its relevance to family medicine by means of a systematic literature review. PMID:25506429

Goderis, Geert

2014-01-01

317

Diversity Applicant ~ Diversity Applicant ~ Diversity Applicant ~ Diversity Applicant ~ 02/13 Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine  

E-print Network

/13 Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine McGaw Medical Center of Northwestern University Visiting Description: Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine and the McGaw Medical Center of Northwestern for the supplemental application. Please refer to the Visiting student website for further information: http://www.feinberg

Chisholm, Rex L.

318

Diversity Applicant ~ Diversity Applicant ~ Diversity Applicant ~ Diversity Applicant ~ 1/14 Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine  

E-print Network

/14 Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine McGaw Medical Center of Northwestern University Visiting Description: Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine and the McGaw Medical Center of Northwestern for the supplemental application. Please refer to the Visiting student website for further information: http://www.feinberg

Chisholm, Rex L.

319

University of Maryland School of Medicine For all inquiries, please contact us at admissions@som.umaryland.edu  

E-print Network

University of Maryland School of Medicine For all inquiries, please contact us at admissions, Maryland 21201 · 410.706.7478 · medschool.umaryland.edu/admissions The University of Maryland, Baltimore Association, accredits the School of Medicine. The University of Maryland, Baltimore is actively committed

Weber, David J.

320

University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry  

E-print Network

WITH DISABILITIES To be in compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, the School of Medicine and Dentistry to request accommodations under the Americans with Disabilities Act must follow the Medical School is committed to making reasonable accommodations to assist students with documented disabilities to fulfill

Goldman, Steven A.

321

Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine Genomic Literacy  

E-print Network

://www.offa.org/dna_alltest.html · Veterinary hospital websites An informed consumer can alert the practitioner www.inugami.ca #12, Genetics and Genomics Education Cluster on a series of Genomic Medicine peer-to-peer seminars (Thanks for the ideas, Kristi Holmes!) · Pathway analysis peer-to-peer training "summits" #12;Librarians & Libraries #12

Napp, Nils

322

University of Virginia School of Medicine PO Box 800761  

E-print Network

noted) 10 September 2014 A John F. Anderson Memorial Lecture Healing in Medicine: Lessons from and the Institute for Practical Ethics and Public Life 17 September 2014 A John F. Anderson Memorial Lecture The Ash. Anderson Memorial Lecture Overdiagnosed: Making People Sick in the Pursuit of Health H. Gilbert Welch MD

Acton, Scott

323

ResearchUniversity of Florida College of Veterinary Medicine  

E-print Network

species is our primary goal, and our objectives for doing this unfold in multifaceted ways every day, and conservation medicine and biology to improve the health and well- being of wildlife and our environment are all everyday lives. Some of our individual researchers and their programs are better known than others. Many

Wu, Dapeng Oliver

324

UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT SCHOOL OF MEDICINE COMMUNITY SERVICE REQUIREMENT  

E-print Network

PROJECTS American School for the Deaf Health Education Program Health education to ASD students of varying settings · Augmenting professional education through experience with community activities · Contributing in the Community Based Education Office, Department of Community Medicine, located in AG073; Telephone: 679

Oliver, Douglas L.

325

Dean's Faculty Advisory Committee University of Tennessee, College of Medicine  

E-print Network

approved as written. Minutes had previously been distributed by electronic means. Old Business There was no old business. New Business Dr. Hank Herrod, Dean of the College of Medicine, discussed five main topics with the DFAC [new business: dean to talk about [1] what he envisions for this committee; [2

Cui, Yan

326

Dean's Faculty Advisory Committee University of Tennessee, College of Medicine  

E-print Network

throughout the College of Medicine/CoM, as a metric or standard by which to quantify educational activity. Experience showed the earlier tool not to be widely applicable. It did not fit the diversity of educational spent preparing for lectures, responding to student questions after class, updating curriculum

Cui, Yan

327

Health Sciences Library System University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine  

E-print Network

================================================================ Title: Comparative effectiveness research : evidence, medicine, and policy / Carol M. Ashton, Nelda P of Contents Evaluation Studies as Topic (p1-2) Outcome Assessment (Health Care) (p2-8) Program Evaluation (p8-10) Electronic Resources: Books, Video, Journals (p10-12) Sort: Under each category, yr/descending, ti

Benos, Takis

328

Case study – Implementation of HEFCE Open Access policy for the next REF within the College of Medicine and Veterinary Medicine, University of Edinburgh   

E-print Network

This case study gives an overview of the local preparations being made for Open Access in the post-2014 REF within the College of Medicine and Veterinary Medicine (CMVM) at the University of Edinburgh, and is published as part of the Jisc...

Krzak, Anna

2015-03-23

329

School of Dental Medicine Academic Plan As an integral member at the University of Connecticut, the School of Dental Medicine is committed to  

E-print Network

School of Dental Medicine Academic Plan 2011-2016 As an integral member at the University of Connecticut, the School of Dental Medicine is committed to fulfillment of both its unique aspirations it academic plan for 2009-2014 entitled "Our World, Our People, Our Future". Preamble 1 The School of Dental

Oliver, Douglas L.

330

Comparative Review of Education Programs of Family Medicine (FM) in Bosnia and Herzegovina and Several Transition Countries  

PubMed Central

Family Medicine as an independent medical discipline is relatively young in the countries of Southeast Europe. Still are used the old models of all forms of education in this module, although most countries accepted Bologna undergraduate teaching concept and already implement it with greater or lesser success. Measuring the effects of the qualities of these concepts and models is not done systematically nor in uniform manner, so it could not be compared by the unique variables measuring the quality of education curricula, and especially the quality of education level of the graduates at the first, second and third degree courses and other forms of education. This paper provides a comparative overview of the state of education in the area of family medicine in the region. It creates comparison according to the study duration for undergraduate and postgraduate studies, doctoral studies and specialized studies in specified areas. What stand out are the proposals to improve education in the field of family medicine in the region. PMID:25685090

Masic, Izet; Skopljak, Amira; Jatic, Zaim

2014-01-01

331

UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA -PERELMAN SCHOOL OF MEDICINE Curriculum Vitae  

E-print Network

, University of Chicago, Chicago, Il. 1989-1990 Fellowship, Dementia, Case Western Reserve University Scientist, Moss Rehabilitation Research Institute #12;Anjan Chatterjee, M.D. Page 2 1999 Associate Scientist

Chatterjee, Anjan

332

Bonnie Spring holds a PhD from Harvard University and is Professor of Preventive Medicine, Psychology, and Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Director of Behavioral Medicine, and Co-Program Leader in Cancer Prevention and Control at Northwestern Universit  

Cancer.gov

Bonnie Spring earned the PhD in psychology from Harvard University and is Professor of Preventive Medicine, Psychology, and Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Director of Behavioral Medicine, and Co-Program Leader in Cancer Prevention at Northwestern University.

333

University of London Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine  

E-print Network

logic in which ownership constraints are tracked through a proof and ownership is inferred from heap would like to thank God for everything, including logic. Thank you to my parents, my wife and my family

Gardner, Philippa

334

ChiCago MediCine University of  

E-print Network

morning. These tests would be more than a thorough checkup for the families in this farming community Donny's guilty glance. "OK, try to hold still. You want to get out of here, don't you?" Sickness, inside

Ober, Carole

335

Meeting the Challenge of Practice Quality Improvement: A Study of Seven Family Medicine Residency Training Practices  

PubMed Central

Purpose Incorporating quality improvement (QI) into resident education and clinical care is challenging. This report explores key characteristics shaping the relative success or failure of QI efforts in seven primary care practices serving as family medicine residency training sites. Method The authors used data from the 2002–2008 Using Learning Teams for Reflective Adaptation (ULTRA) study to conduct a comparative case analysis. This secondary data analysis focused on seven residency training practices' experiences with RAP (reflective adaptive process), a 12-week intensive QI process. Field notes, meeting notes, and audiotapes of RAP meetings were used to construct case summaries. A matrix comparing key themes across practices was used to rate practices' QI progress during RAP on a scale of 0 to 3. Results Three practices emerged as unsuccessful (scores of 0–1) and four as successful (scores of 2–3). Larger practices with previous QI experience, faculty with extensive exposure to QI literature, and an office manager, residency director, or medical director who advocated for the process made substantial progress during RAP, succeeding at QI. Smaller practices without these characteristics were unable to do so. Successful practices also engaged residents in the QI process and identified serious problems as potential crises; unsuccessful practices did not. Conclusions Larger residency training practices are more likely to have the resources and characteristics that permit them to create a QI-supportive culture leading to QI success. The authors suggest, however, that smaller practices may increase their chances of success by adopting a developmental approach to QI. PMID:22030767

Chase, Sabrina M.; Miller, William L.; Shaw, Eric; Looney, Anna; Crabtree, Benjamin F.

2011-01-01

336

Medical student attitudes towards family medicine in Spain: a statewide analysis  

PubMed Central

Background Family and community medicine (FM) became a recognized specialty in Spain in 1978; however, most medical schools in Spain still lack mandatory core courses in FM. In order to explore the perceptions, expectations and level of information amongst medical students in Spain in relation to FM and PC, and the training in these areas in the curriculum of the Medical Schools, a survey was developed to be administered in medical schools every two years. This article presents data from the first questionnaire administration. Methods The study population was all first-, third-, and fifth-year students (2009–2010) in 22 participating medical schools in Spain (of 27 total). The 83-item survey had three sections: personal data, FM training, professional practice expectations, and preferences). Chi-squared test or analyses of variance were used, as appropriate. Results We had a 41.8% response rate (n?=?5299/12924); 89.8% considered the social role of FM to be essential, while only 20% believed the specialty was well respected within the medical profession. The appeal of FM increased with years of study, independent of student characteristics or medical school attended. Among third and fifth-year students, 54.6% said their specialty preferences had changed during medical school; 73.6% felt that FM specialists should teach FM courses, and 83.3% thought that FM rotations in primary care centres were useful. Conclusions Students valued the social role of FM more highly than its scientific standing. The vast majority believe that FM training should be mandatory. Only 25% of first-year students have clear preferences for a specialization. Interest in FM increases moderately over their years of study. Working conditions in FM have decisive influence in choosing a specialty. PMID:22642617

2012-01-01

337

UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA PERELMAN SCHOOL OF MEDICINE The Division of Biostatistics in the Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology at the University of Pennsylvania  

E-print Network

UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA PERELMAN SCHOOL OF MEDICINE The Division of Biostatistics in the Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology at the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine) in Biostatistics. The University of Pennsylvania, founded by Benjamin Franklin, is a world-class research

Carriquiry, Alicia

338

An Innovative Method for Teaching Epidemiology, Public Health, and Preventive Medicine.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Department of Community Health and Family Medicine at the University of Florida College of Medicine developed a curriculum component integrating epidemiologic concepts into a third year family medicine clerkship through a small-group project on a specific condition likely to be encountered by primary care physicians in community practice. (MSE)

Duerson, Margaret C.; And Others

1990-01-01

339

Training in childhood obesity management in the United States: a survey of pediatric, internal medicine-pediatrics and family medicine residency program directors  

PubMed Central

Background Information about the availability and effectiveness of childhood obesity training during residency is limited. Methods We surveyed residency program directors from pediatric, internal medicine-pediatrics (IM-Peds), and family medicine residency programs between September 2007 and January 2008 about childhood obesity training offered in their programs. Results The response rate was 42.2% (299/709) and ranged by specialty from 40.1% to 45.4%. Overall, 52.5% of respondents felt that childhood obesity training in residency was extremely important, and the majority of programs offered training in aspects of childhood obesity management including prevention (N = 240, 80.3%), diagnosis (N = 282, 94.3%), diagnosis of complications (N = 249, 83.3%), and treatment (N = 242, 80.9%). However, only 18.1% (N = 54) of programs had a formal childhood obesity curriculum with variability across specialties. Specifically, 35.5% of IM-Peds programs had a formal curriculum compared to only 22.6% of pediatric and 13.9% of family medicine programs (p < 0.01). Didactic instruction was the most commonly used training method but was rated as only somewhat effective by 67.9% of respondents using this method. The most frequently cited significant barrier to implementing childhood obesity training was competing curricular demands (58.5%). Conclusions While most residents receive training in aspects of childhood obesity management, deficits may exist in training quality with a minority of programs offering a formal childhood obesity curriculum. Given the high prevalence of childhood obesity, a greater emphasis should be placed on development and use of effective training strategies suitable for all specialties training physicians to care for children. PMID:20163732

2010-01-01

340

Clinical practice guidelines for support of the family in the patient-centered intensive care unit: American College of Critical Care Medicine Task Force 2004???2005  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To develop clinical practice guidelines for the sup- port of the patient and family in the adult, pediatric, or neonatal patient-centered ICU. Participants: A multidisciplinary task force of experts in crit- ical care practice was convened from the membership of the American College of Critical Care Medicine (ACCM) and the Soci- ety of Critical Care Medicine (SCCM) to include

Judy E. Davidson; Karen Powers; Kamyar M. Hedayat; Mark Tieszen; Alexander A. Kon; Eric Shepard; Vicki Spuhler; I. David Todres; Mitchell Levy; Juliana Barr; Raj Ghandi; Gregory Hirsch; Deborah Armstrong

2007-01-01

341

17TH ANNUAL ROBERT F.E. STIER MEMORIAL LECTURES IN MEDICINE  

E-print Network

17TH ANNUAL ROBERT F.E. STIER MEMORIAL LECTURES IN MEDICINE Keynote RICHARD A. DEYO, MD, MPH Kaiser Permanente Professor of Evidence-Based Family Medicine Department of Medicine, Dept. of Public Health & Preventive Medicine, Oregon Health and Science University Thursday, February 21, 2013 at 4:00 PM Free Public

Collins, Gary S.

342

UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA PERELMAN SCHOOL OF MEDICINE Curriculum Vitae  

E-print Network

for Experimental Psychiatry Vice Chair for Faculty Affairs and Professional Development Department of Psychiatry Psychiatry, The Institute of Pennsylvania Hospital and University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA Military of Psychology, The George Washington University 1977-80 Instructor of Psychology, Department of Psychiatry

Pennsylvania, University of

343

University of Alberta Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry  

E-print Network

of interest to your group of residents (eg. the effects of sleep deprivation on your work and life, professionalism, sleep disorders, etc. o The Alberta Medical Association's Physician and Family Support Program (1) then discuss as a group ways you could improve your sleep habits. This could be done over a meal out

MacMillan, Andrew

344

Wayne State University School of Medicine Year IV Subinternship  

E-print Network

Interns should demonstrate the ability to: a. Communicate effectively with patients and family members i. Utilize and written summaries of patients to members of the health care team. i. Recognition and synthesis of relevant and professional behavior - Subinterns should: a. Demonstrate an understanding of the value of effective

Berdichevsky, Victor

345

University of Florida and Shands Hospital Personalized Medicine Program: clinical implementation of pharmacogenetics  

PubMed Central

The University of Florida and Shands Hospital recently launched a genomic medicine program focused on the clinical implementation of pharmacogenetics called the Personalized Medicine Program. We focus on a preemptive, chip-based genotyping approach that is cost effective, while providing experience that will be useful as genomic medicine moves towards genome sequence data for patients becoming available. The Personalized Medicine Program includes a regulatory body that is responsible for ensuring that evidence-based examples are moved to clinical implementation, and relies on clinical decision support tools to provide healthcare providers with guidance on use of the genetic information. The pilot implementation was with CYP2C19-clopidogrel and future plans include expansion to additional pharmacogenetic examples, along with aiding in implementation in other health systems across Florida. PMID:23651020

Johnson, Julie A; Elsey, Amanda R; Clare-Salzler, Michael J; Nessl, David; Conlon, Michael; Nelson, David R

2013-01-01

346

[Efforts of gender equality at Kinki University School of Medicine].  

PubMed

In recent years, medical doctors are in short supply in many university hospitals. Retirement of female doctor after delivery is one of the reasons. Although they want to return to work after giving birth, they quit unavoidable because the working conditions do not match. Then, Kinki university hospital established the "provisions for special work arrangements". This work arrangement is the wage less, but the working hours is less than the regular. This work arrangement increased returner to the university hospital after delivery. PMID:24291988

Miyamoto, Katsuichi

2013-01-01

347

Z:\\Common\\Vice Dean Faculty Affairs\\University Documents Governance of the Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry, University of Alberta.  

E-print Network

& Dentistry, University of Alberta. The Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry (FOMD) mirrors Governance Affairs 1.4. Vice - Dean Research 1.5. Chief Operating Officer 1.6. Senior Associate Dean Dentistry 1.5. Dentistry Admissions Committee (CDAC) 2.6. Dentistry Curriculum Committee (CDAC) 2.7. Medical Laboratory

MacMillan, Andrew

348

Universal Entropy of Word Ordering Across Linguistic Families  

PubMed Central

Background The language faculty is probably the most distinctive feature of our species, and endows us with a unique ability to exchange highly structured information. In written language, information is encoded by the concatenation of basic symbols under grammatical and semantic constraints. As is also the case in other natural information carriers, the resulting symbolic sequences show a delicate balance between order and disorder. That balance is determined by the interplay between the diversity of symbols and by their specific ordering in the sequences. Here we used entropy to quantify the contribution of different organizational levels to the overall statistical structure of language. Methodology/Principal Findings We computed a relative entropy measure to quantify the degree of ordering in word sequences from languages belonging to several linguistic families. While a direct estimation of the overall entropy of language yielded values that varied for the different families considered, the relative entropy quantifying word ordering presented an almost constant value for all those families. Conclusions/Significance Our results indicate that despite the differences in the structure and vocabulary of the languages analyzed, the impact of word ordering in the structure of language is a statistical linguistic universal. PMID:21603637

Montemurro, Marcelo A.; Zanette, Damián H.

2011-01-01

349

Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine Brand Platform  

E-print Network

on the University's brand and recommendations for photography, videography, and participating in social media the challenges of today's society by assuming leadership positions in the community and profession improve accordingly; manage effectively during economic downturns; attract valuable employees, business partners

Pawlowski, Wojtek

350

Tulane University School of Medicine Summer Histology Course  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This website provides information regarding a summer cell biology and medical histology course at Tulane University. The course is a comprehensive 5-week, 110-hour individualized remediation course for medical and dental students enrolled in medical or dental school.

Tulane University (Tulane University School of Medicine)

2012-07-24

351

Vaccination coverage of children aged 12-23 months in Gaziantep, Turkey: comparative results of two studies carried out by lot quality technique: what changed after family medicine?  

PubMed Central

Background Health care systems in many countries are changing for a variety of reasons. Monitoring of community-based services, especially vaccination coverage, is important during transition periods to ensure program effectiveness. In 2005, Turkey began a transformation from a “socialization of health services” system to a “family medicine” system. The family medicine system was implemented in the city of Gaziantep, in December, 2010. Methods Two descriptive, cross-sectional studies were conducted in Gaziantep city center; the first study was before the transition to the family medicine system and the second study was one year after the transition. The Lot Quality Technique methodology was used to determine the quality of vaccination services. The population studied was children aged 12–23 months. Data from the two studies were compared in terms of vaccination coverage and lot service quality to determine whether there were any changes in these parameters after the transition to a family service system. Results A total of 93.7% of children in Gaziantep were fully vaccinated before the transition. Vaccination rates decreased significantly to 84.0% (p <0.005) after the family medicine system was implemented. The number of unacceptable vaccine lots increased from 5 lots before the transition to 21 lots after the establishment of the family medicine system. Conclusions The number of first doses of vaccine given was higher after family medicine was implemented; however, the numbers of second, third, and booster doses, and the number of children fully vaccinated were lower than before transition. Acceptable and unacceptable lots were not the same before and after the transition. Different health care personnel were employed at the lots after family medicine was implemented. This result suggests that individual characteristics of the health care personnel working in a geographic area are as important as the socioeconomic and cultural characteristics of the community. PMID:24581049

2014-01-01

352

Evaluation of the Learning Environment for Diploma in Family Medicine with the Dundee Ready Education Environment (DREEM) Inventory.  

PubMed

The primary healthcare system is at a turning point in Saudi Arabia. However, the sustainability of family medicine as the core element of that system is increasingly being called into question because of lack of family physicians. In keeping view this problem; a postgraduate diploma program in family medicine has started in 2008. A validated measure of educational environment i.e., Dundee Ready Education Environment (DREEM) questionnaire consisting of 50 questions having five domains of perception was administered to all 13 trainees of the diploma course at the completion of the program to check their perception about learning evironment. The trainees comprised of 4 males (40%) and 6 females (60%). The overall score showed more positive than negative side (147/200). There is no significant difference (P > 0.05) in the mean scores of five different domains of perception. The subclasses of five domains showed that teaching perceived as positive by 50%, moving towards right direction by 80%, feeling more positive by 50%, positive attitude by 80% and the 70% scored the course as not too bad. The overall high score and positive attitude towards the course assures the better teaching environment. However, there are areas to improve and it requires continuous evaluation. PMID:21179228

Khan, A Sattar; Akturk, Zekeriya; Al-Megbil, Tarek

2010-01-01

353

Evaluation of the Learning Environment for Diploma in Family Medicine with the Dundee Ready Education Environment (DREEM) Inventory  

PubMed Central

The primary healthcare system is at a turning point in Saudi Arabia. However, the sustainability of family medicine as the core element of that system is increasingly being called into question because of lack of family physicians. In keeping view this problem; a postgraduate diploma program in family medicine has started in 2008. A validated measure of educational environment i.e., Dundee Ready Education Environment (DREEM) questionnaire consisting of 50 questions having five domains of perception was administered to all 13 trainees of the diploma course at the completion of the program to check their perception about learning evironment. The trainees comprised of 4 males (40%) and 6 females (60%). The overall score showed more positive than negative side (147/200). There is no significant difference (P > 0.05) in the mean scores of five different domains of perception. The subclasses of five domains showed that teaching perceived as positive by 50%, moving towards right direction by 80%, feeling more positive by 50%, positive attitude by 80% and the 70% scored the course as not too bad. The overall high score and positive attitude towards the course assures the better teaching environment. However, there are areas to improve and it requires continuous evaluation. PMID:21179228

Akturk, Zekeriya; Al-Megbil, Tarek

2010-01-01

354

M.D. Program Student Handbook The University of Central Florida College of Medicine educates and inspires individuals to be exemplary  

E-print Network

M.D. Program Student Handbook #12;#12;The University of Central Florida College of Medicine of Central Florida College of Medicine M.D. Program Student Handbook 2013 ­ 2014 The University of Central Florida College of Medicine M.D. Program Student Handbook is published annually by the College of Medicine

Wu, Shin-Tson

355

University of Connecticut School of Dental Medicine The Americans with Disabilities Act  

E-print Network

1 University of Connecticut School of Dental Medicine The Americans with Disabilities Act General their needs. However, if an accommodation in the admission process is requested for a disability, neither the applicant's medical history nor disability status will be considered in deciding on suitability

Oliver, Douglas L.

356

Chair, Department of Bioethics and Humanities University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA  

E-print Network

of the selected candidate. If clinically active the candidate must be eligible for a Washington State professional to bioethics scholarship and teaching 2. The demonstrated ability to promote and advance departmental, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences University of Washington School of Medicine 1959 NE Pacific Street, UW Box

Anderson, Richard

357

James P. Wilmot Cancer Center | University of Rochester Medicine 2014 Volume I  

E-print Network

of many people who cope with cancer. Science offers tremendous perspective, because the truth and breast cancer researchers began working together more closely, and laboratory scientists sawJames P. Wilmot Cancer Center | University of Rochester Medicine 2014 Volume I Special Edition

Portman, Douglas

358

Center for Biomedical Ethics and Humanities University of Virginia School of Medicine  

E-print Network

for Practical Ethics and Public Life and the History of the Health Sciences Lecture Series 17 February 2010 Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore MD Co-presented with Patient Safety, McLeod Hall (School of Nursing) Mindfulness in Medicine and Psychology: Its Transformative

Acton, Scott

359

Louisiana State University Medical Center School of Medicine in New Orleans NeuroscienceCenterofExcellence  

E-print Network

Louisiana State University Medical Center · School of Medicine in New Orleans Neuroscience for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AK Novel Therapeutic Strategies for Retinal Angiogenesis Neuroscience.JulieBlendy,AssistantProfessor,DepartmentofPharmacology,Universityof PennsylvaniaMedicalCenter,Philadelphia,PA Molecular Genetic Analysis of CREB Deficient Mice NeuroscienceCenter8

360

Skills Inventory/Biography University of Rochester School of Medicine & Dentistry  

E-print Network

2011 Timothy G. Benson '00M (MD) School of Medicine & Dentistry Alumni Council Early and Mid health treatment of elite athletes/high achievers Administrative Skills and Experience Medical Director.S. degree at Baldwin-Wallace College in Berea, Ohio, and an M.D. degree from the University of Rochester

Goldman, Steven A.

361

Calendar of Events 1996 Louisiana State University Medical Center School of Medicine in New Orleans  

E-print Network

Calendar of Events 1996 Louisiana State University Medical Center · School of Medicine in New, Louisiana Regulation of Voltage-gated Ca2+ Channels in Teleost Retina February 14 Brian Davis, Ph of Ophthalmology, Lions Eye Center, LSU Medical Center, New Orleans, Louisiana Novel Nerve Regeneration Guides May

362

BioMed Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowship Yale University School of Medicine  

E-print Network

BioMed Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowship Yale University School of Medicine June 8--August 8, 2015 BioMed SURF is a research-intensive summer training program in biomedical research.D. in the biomedical sciences. The aims of BioMed SURF are to identify URM applicants interested in biomedical research

363

Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine 1 Public Health Program  

E-print Network

organized community effort," utilizing education, research, and community service. Who should be interested;Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine 3 What is special about the CWrU mPH Program,innovative,highlyaccessible faculty and staff. #12;Master of public health prograM What is the CWrU mPH Program curriculum? The CWRU

Rollins, Andrew M.

364

Phone Numbers and Floors of Patient Services at Tufts University School of Dental Medicine  

E-print Network

Phone Numbers and Floors of Patient Services at Tufts University School of Dental Medicine Clinic) 636-6888 12 Craniofacial Pain Center (617) 636-6817 6 Emergency Clinic (Treatment of acute pain and urgent dental needs) (617) 636-6828 3 Endodontic Post-Doctoral Clinic (Treatment of root canals) (617

Dennett, Daniel

365

Post-Doctoral Fellow in Neuroscience Optogenetics: Washington University School of Medicine  

E-print Network

Post-Doctoral Fellow in Neuroscience Optogenetics: Washington University School of Medicine Post state of the art optogenetics, development/refinement of novel micro-optic devices, patch clamp-on experience in electrophysiology, applied physics or optogenetics is a plus. · Creative thinking skills

Pillow, Jonathan

366

Improvement of Oncology Education at the University of Washington School of Medicine, 1984-1988.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

After development and implementation of a revised oncology curriculum at the University of Washington School of Medicine student performance on oncology related questions on the National Board of Medical Examiners examination indicated substantial improvement relative to student performance in non-oncology areas and to the national average. (DB)

Bleyer, W. Archie; And Others

1990-01-01

367

The University of Illinois at Chicago College of Medicine Head, Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences  

E-print Network

The University of Illinois at Chicago College of Medicine Head, Department of Ophthalmology of the Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences. We seek a distinguished clinician. The Head will oversee the Ophthalmology clinical, research, and educational programs of both the Lions

Alford, Simon

368

CONFIDENTIAL REPORTING The University of Connecticut School of Medicine provides several ways through which  

E-print Network

Page 123 CONFIDENTIAL REPORTING The University of Connecticut School of Medicine provides several ways through which residents/fellows may raise and resolve issues in a confidential and protected will be treated in a confidential manner and the program will protect the resident/fellow from intimidation

Oliver, Douglas L.

369

Change without Reform: The Case of Stanford University School of Medicine, 1908-1990.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The nine-decade history of the Stanford University of Medicine (California) and its history of teaching human anatomy illustrate the recurring processes of curricular and instructional reforms in medical education and the ways in which these reform efforts do not disturb the traditional preclinical/clinical model of medical education. (SLD)

Cuban, Larry

1997-01-01

370

Stanford University School of Medicine Department of Otolaryngology/Head & Neck Surgery  

E-print Network

Stanford University School of Medicine Department of Otolaryngology/Head & Neck Surgery Resident Otolaryngology Faculty Roster 5 3. Otolaryngology Residency Application Requirements 6 4. Resident Rotation Schedule 7 4.1 Resident Rotation Block Schedule 9 5. Otolaryngology Post-Graduate Educational Program 10

Kay, Mark A.

371

Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University Title: Managed Care Contract Evaluation  

E-print Network

Section No. 3 CF10 Section Name: Clinical Finance Approval Date: 10/24/2013 Approval: Paul R.G. Cunningham Review criteria are as follows: 1. The execution of a Direct Employer Group Agreement (i.e., Golden School of Medicine at East Carolina University Title: Managed Care Contract Evaluation Section No. 3 CF10

372

Zebrafish Facility Assistant Manager The Duke University School of Medicine has an immediate opening for a  

E-print Network

Zebrafish Facility Assistant Manager The Duke University School of Medicine has an immediate opening for a Zebrafish Facility Assistant Manager. This large facility provides support for 50+ researchers from six different biomedical research labs that use zebrafish as a model organism. Candidates

Mazzotti, Frank

373

TheJournalofExperimentalMedicine JEM The Rockefeller University Press $8.00  

E-print Network

TheJournalofExperimentalMedicine JEM © The Rockefeller University Press $8.00 Vol. 201, No. 10, May Mowe,1 Yao-hui Sun,1 Nicholas P.West,1 Michael Williamson,3 Marina Botto,4 Harry Smith,5 and Christoph

Williamson, Mike P.

374

Childhood family living arrangements and blood pressure in black men: the Howard University Family Study.  

PubMed

Black men have higher blood pressure (BP) levels and consequently higher prevalence of hypertension compared with men from other ethnic groups in the United States. Socio-familial factors in childhood have been found to play an important role in hypertension, but few studies have examined this relationship among black men. We investigated whether childhood family living arrangements are independently associated with mean BP and hypertension in a cross-sectional sample of 515 unrelated black male participants aged ?20 years enrolled in the Howard University Family Study between 2001 and 2008. Black men who lived with both parents compared with the reference group of men who never lived with both parents during their lifetime had lower systolic BP (-4.4 mm Hg [95% confidence interval {CI}, -7.84 to -0.96]), pulse pressure (-3.9 mm Hg [95% CI, -6.28 to -1.51]), and mean arterial BP (-2.0 mm Hg [95% CI, -4.44 to 0.51]). This protective effect was more pronounced among men who lived with both parents for 1 to 12 years of their lives; they had decreased systolic BP (-6.5 mm Hg [95% CI, -10.99 to -1.95]), pulse pressure (-5.4 mm Hg [95% CI, -8.48 to -2.28]), mean arterial pressure (-3.3 mm Hg [95% CI, -6.56 to 0.00]), and a 46% decreased odds of developing hypertension (odds ratio=0.54; 95% CI, 0.30 to 0.99). No statistically significant associations were found for diastolic BP. These results provide preliminary evidence that childhood family structure exerts a long-term influence on BP among black men. PMID:24296284

Barrington, Debbie S; Adeyemo, Adebowale A; Rotimi, Charles N

2014-01-01

375

A primer of Darwinian medicine Evolution and Medicine by Robert L. Perlman, Oxford University Press, 2013. US$49.50/27.50/s31.35 pbk (xiii + 162 pp.),  

E-print Network

A primer of Darwinian medicine Evolution and Medicine by Robert L. Perlman, Oxford University Press, since Williams and Nesse's landmark article that introduced us to evolutionary medicine [1], I have. Evolutionary medicine is one of those fields where discourse and advances are sorely need- ed. In addition

Blumstein, Daniel T.

376

Admission Factors Predicting Family Medicine Specialty Choice: A Literature Review and Exploratory Study among Students in the Rural Medical Scholars Program  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: The Rural Medical Scholars Program (RMSP) was created to increase production of rural family physicians in Alabama. Literature review reveals reasons medical students choose careers in family medicine, and these reasons can be categorized into domains that medical schools can address through admission, curriculum, and structural…

Avery, Daniel M., Jr.; Wheat, John R.; Leeper, James D.; McKnight, Jerry T.; Ballard, Brent G.; Chen, Jia

2012-01-01

377

Introduction to Evidence-Based Medicine: a student-selected component at the Faculty of Medicine, King Abdulaziz University  

PubMed Central

Background Evidence-based medicine (EBM) involves approaching a clinical problem using a four-step method: (1) formulate a clear clinical question from a patient’s problem, (2) search the literature for relevant clinical articles, (3) evaluate (critically appraise) the evidence for its validity and usefulness, (4) implement useful findings into clinical practice. EBM has now been incorporated as an integral part of the medical curriculum in many faculties of medicine around the world. The Faculty of Medicine, King Abdulaziz University, started its process of curriculum reform and introduction of the new curriculum 4 years ago. One of the most characteristic aspects of this curriculum is the introduction of special study modules and electives as a student-selected component in the fourth year of study; the Introduction to Evidence-Based Medicine course was included as one of these special study modules. The purpose of this article is to evaluate the EBM skills of medical students after completing the course and their perceptions of the faculty member delivering the course and organization of the course. Materials and methods The EBM course was held for the first time as a special study module for fourth-year medical students in the first semester of the academic year 2009–2010. Fifteen students were enrolled in this course. At the end of the course, students anonymously evaluated aspects of the course regarding their EBM skills and course organization using a five- point Likert scale in response to an online course evaluation questionnaire. In addition, students’ achievement was evaluated with regard to the skills and competencies taught in the course. Results Medical students generally gave high scores to all aspects of the EBM course, including course organization, course delivery, methods of assessment, and overall. Scores were also high for students’ self-evaluation of skill level and EBM experience. The results of a faculty member’s evaluation of the students’ achievement showed an average total percentage (92.2%) for all EBM steps. Conclusion The EBM course at the Faculty of Medicine, King Abdulaziz University, is useful for familiarizing medical students with the basic principles of EBM and to help them in answering routine questions of clinical interest in a systematic way. In light of the results obtained from implementing this course with a small number of students, and as a student-selected component, the author believes integrating EBM longitudinally throughout the curriculum would be beneficial for King Abdulaziz University medical students. It would provide a foundation of knowledge, offer easy access to resources, promote point-of-care and team learning, help students to develop applicable skills for lifelong learning, and help the faculty to achieve its goals of becoming more student-centered and encouraging students to employ more self-directed learning strategies. PMID:23745093

Hassanien, Mohammed Ahmed

2011-01-01

378

Physician actions following a positive PHQ-2: Implications for the implementation of depression screening in family medicine practice.  

PubMed

Systematic screening of depression in primary care settings that have adequate follow-up and treatment is recommended. The Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) was developed as a depression screening measure for use in primary care. The PHQ-2, which includes just 2 items from the PHQ-9, is designed to be used as a first line depression screening measure, to be followed by the full PHQ-9 when a patient screens positive. However, completion of the first step in the process (PHQ-2) does not necessarily lead to completion of the second step (administration of the PHQ-9 when the PHQ-2 is positive), even when treatment and follow-up are available. The objective of the current study was to describe family medicine physicians' actions following a positive PHQ-2 and factors that affect their use of depression screening measures and treatment decisions. A retrospective chart review of 200 family medicine patients who screened positive on the PHQ-2 during an office visit was conducted. Additionally, 26 family medicine physicians in the practice were surveyed. Only 5% of patients with positive PHQ-2 scores were administered a PHQ-9. Physicians relied on their clinical judgment and prior knowledge about the patient's depression status to inform treatment decisions and cited time constraints and competing demands as reasons for not administered the PHQ-9. Physicians tended to treat depression with adequate doses of antidepressants and counseling. PHQ-2 screening did not necessarily lead to further evaluation, systematic follow-up, or changes in treatment. Implications for the implementation of depression screening in primary care settings are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:25485822

Fuchs, Cara H; Haradhvala, Natasha; Hubley, Samuel; Nash, Justin M; Keller, Martin B; Ashley, David; Weisberg, Risa B; Uebelacker, Lisa A

2015-03-01

379

University of Pennsylvania Geriatric Medicine Fellowship The School of Medicine ranks in the top five research institutions in the United States. Fellows  

E-print Network

Introduction to quality measures and quality assessment Nursing Home policies and procedures Principles with education-based manuscripts Teaching is supported through continuing grants from the Health Resources-professional Collaborators: School of Nursing, Department of Family Medicine and Community Health, Department of Psychiatry

Bushman, Frederic

380

Careers in medicine at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine: an innovative approach to specialty exploration and selection.  

PubMed

Research on resident attrition rates suggests that medical students would benefit from more comprehensive career advising programs during medical school. Responding to this need, students and administrators at the Vanderbilt University School of Medicine (Vanderbilt) introduced a broad Careers in Medicine (CiM) program in 2005 to complement the CiM resources offered by the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC). In this article, the authors detail the Vanderbilt CiM program's four core components: career-related events, an elective course, specialty interest groups, and career advising. The authors discuss the program's implementation and its student-led organizational structure, and they provide a critical assessment of important lessons learned. Using data from internal satisfaction surveys and the AAMC's Medical School Graduation Questionnaire (GQ), they demonstrate the success of Vanderbilt's career counseling efforts. According to recent GQ data, Vanderbilt ranks above the U.S. medical school average on graduating students' ratings of overall satisfaction with career services and of the usefulness of key programming. The authors present this description of the Vanderbilt CiM model as a framework for other medical schools to consider adopting or adapting as they explore options for expanding their own career counseling services. PMID:22622212

Sweeney, Kyle R; Fritz, Ryan A; Rodgers, Scott M

2012-07-01

381

Academic Medicine Meets Traditional African Healing  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Cyril Naidoo, who directs the department of family medicine at the University of KwaZulu-Natal's Nelson R. Mandela School of Medicine, conducts workshops to traditional healers on how to help patients with AIDS and HIV. In Dr. Naidoo's workshop, the group discusses how to counsel patients about HIV and AIDS, how to refer them for testing, and then…

Lindow, Megan

2008-01-01

382

University of London Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine  

E-print Network

for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy of the University of London and the Diploma of Membership of Imperial of this parallel that is the driving force behind the thesis. We proceed with examples: relational composition relational composition of closed relations of compact regular locales. A technical achievement of the thesis

Vickers, Steve

383

Bylaws of the Stanford University School of Medicine Faculty Senate  

E-print Network

Section 2. Departmental Senators and Alternates (1) Representatives of the electorate shall be elected and to the authority of the Stanford University Board of Trustees. The Senate shall represent and serve as a voice of Philosophy (PhD) and Master of Science graduate degree programs. (3) The Senate shall advise on the role

Straight, Aaron

384

Stanford University School of Medicine Responsible Conduct of Research  

E-print Network

Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU) that was being sent to twins who had been born in Virginia asked very personal questions about him, including whether or not his genitalia were asymmetrical. He felt that the personal nature of these questions was invasive and that the researchers should have

385

Promoting Interdisciplinary Research in Departments of Medicine: Results from Two Models at Boston University School of Medicine  

PubMed Central

We have sought to broaden our department's research capacity using two different interdisciplinary approaches. First, we created the Evans Center for Interdisciplinary Biomedical Research (ECIBR) — a virtual center that promotes and funds Affinity Research Collaboratives (ARCs) initiated by faculty from within and outside Boston University (BU). Of the 11 funded ARCs, the 4 ARCs in existence for a minimum of 3 years have a total of 37 participants, 93 co-authored publications, and 33 new grants. Second, the Department of Medicine (DOM) created a Section of Computational Biomedicine in 2009 to enhance analytical and computational expertise in the DOM. After 3 years, the section is comprised of 10 faculty members and 21 trainees. The faculty members have collaborated with 20 faculty members in other sections or departments and secured 12 extramural grants (totaling ?$20 million in direct costs). The ECIBR and the Section of Computational Biomedicine represent new organizational approaches to stimulating innovation in research in a DOM. PMID:23874035

Coleman, David L.; Spira, Avrum; Ravid, Katya

2013-01-01

386

Knowledge, Attitude and Practice of Family Physicians Regarding Smoking Cessation Counseling in Family Practice Centers, Suez Canal University, Egypt  

PubMed Central

Introduction: Family physicians are the first point of medical contact for most patients, and they come into contact with a large number of smokers. Also, they are well suited to offer effective counseling to people, because family physicians already have some knowledge of patients and their social environments. Aims: The present study was conducted to assess family physicians’ knowledge, attitude and practice of smoking cessation counseling aiming to improve quality of smoking cessation counseling among family physicians. Materials and Methods: The study was descriptive analytic cross sectional study. It was conducted within family medicine centers. Sample was comprehensive. it included 75 family physicians. They were asked to fill previously validated anonymous questionnaire to collect data about their personal characteristics, knowledge, attitude and practice of smoking cessation counseling, barriers and recommendations of physicians. Equal or above the mean scores were used as cut off point of the best scores for knowledge, attitude and practice. Statistical Analysis: SPSS version 18 was used for data entry and statistical analysis. Results: The best knowledge, attitude and practice scores among family physicians in the study sample were (45.3 %, 93.3% and 44% respectively). Age (P = 0.039) and qualification of family physicians (P = 0.04) were significant variables regarding knowledge scores while no statistically significance between personal characteristics of family physicians and their attitude or practice scores regarding smoking cessation counseling. More than half of the family physicians recommended training to improve their smoking cessation counseling. Conclusions: Favorable attitude scores of family physicians exceed passing knowledge scores or practice scores. Need for knowledge and training are stimulus to design an educational intervention to improve quality of smoking cessation counseling. PMID:24479071

Eldein, Hebatallah Nour; Mansour, Nadia M.; Mohamed, Samar F.

2013-01-01

387

First Universities Allied for Essential Medicines (UAEM) Neglected Diseases and Innovation Symposium  

PubMed Central

Universities Allied for Essential Medicines organized its first Neglected Diseases and Innovation Symposium to address expanding roles of public sector research institutions in innovation in research and development of biomedical technologies for treatment of diseases, particularly neglected tropical diseases. Universities and other public research institutions are increasingly integrated into the pharmaceutical innovation system. Academic entities now routinely undertake robust high-throughput screening and medicinal chemistry research programs to identify lead compounds for small molecule drugs and novel drug targets. Furthermore, product development partnerships are emerging between academic institutions, non-profit entities, and biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies to create diagnostics, therapies, and vaccines for diseases of the poor. With not for profit mission statements, open access publishing standards, open source platforms for data sharing and collaboration, and a shift in focus to more translational research, universities and other public research institutions are well-placed to accelerate development of medical technologies, particularly for neglected tropical diseases. PMID:22232453

Musselwhite, Laura W.; Maciag, Karolina; Lankowski, Alex; Gretes, Michael C.; Wellems, Thomas E.; Tavera, Gloria; Goulding, Rebecca E.; Guillen, Ethan

2012-01-01

388

Family nursing for undergraduate nursing students: the Brandon University Family Case Model approach.  

PubMed

For family nursing to become an essential component of nursing practice, the authors believe that undergraduate nursing programs need to present family nursing theory and practice in such a way that "thinking family" will become an integral part of students' nursing practice. This article articulates how one faculty group created the Family Case Model (FCM) as a vehicle for embedding family nursing across five courses in an undergraduate curriculum, allowing students to become immersed in the lives of families. Five skeleton case families representing different cultures, family forms, and family illness experiences were designed to reinforce both individual and family development and response to illness. These case families were linked to specific courses within the curriculum dealing with the traditional medical-surgical content of undergraduate nursing programs. The FCM invited a focus on the reciprocity between illness, family members, and the nurse across courses. The article describes the development, implementation, and evaluation of the FCM. PMID:20406999

Braun, Viola Fast; Hyndman, Kathryn; Foster, Cathy

2010-05-01

389

Effect of Surgical Training Course on Performance of Minor Surgical Procedures in Family Medicine Physicians’ Offices: an Observational Study  

PubMed Central

Aim To examine the influence of a practical surgical course on the number of minor surgical procedures performed by family physicians. Methods We compared the number of minor surgical procedures performed by family physicians in 59 offices in the city of Osijek and surrounding rural area, Croatia, during 12 months before and after the 40-hour practical surgical course held in September 2006 by surgeons and family medicine specialists. Minor surgical procedures taught in the course included management of ingrown toenails, abscesses/comedones, and minor wounds, anesthesia application, disinfection, use and sterilization of surgical instruments, and antibiotic treatment. Results The number of minor surgical procedures performed in family medicine offices almost doubled (503 vs 906 after the course, P<0.001, Wilcoxon test). The median number of abscesses/comedones treatments per physician increased from 1 to 6 (P<0.001, Wilcoxon test), the number of managed wounds increased from 111 to 217 (P<0.001, Wilcoxon test), while the number of ingrown toenail resections increased from 120 to 186 (P?=?0.004, Wilcoxon test). Fifty percent of physicians did not treat patients surgically, irrespective of the training. We found no association between the number of performed procedures and age, length of employment, or location of the physician’s office (urban vs rural). However, we found that male physicians performed more surgical treatments both before and after the course (abscesses/comedones: P<0.001 and P?=?0.108 respectively; ingrown toenail resections: P?=?0.008 and P?=?0.008 respectively; minor wounds: P?=?0.030 and P<0.001; respectively). Conclusion Practical courses can encourage practitioners to treat the patients surgically in their offices and, thus, increase the number of services offered in primary care. Female physicians should be more encouraged to perform minor surgical procedures in their offices. PMID:18581614

Gmajni?, Rudika; Pribi?, Sanda; Luki?, Anita; Ebling, Barbara; ?upi?, Nikola; Markovi?, Ivana

2008-01-01

390

Interview with Dr. John Rock, the Founding Dean of Florida International University Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine  

Microsoft Academic Search

A series of interviews with the founding deans of Florida Interanational University Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine conducted on April 6, 2011 by Bohyun Kim, the Digital Access Librarian at Florida International University Medical Library.\\u000aThis audio recording is the interview with Dr. John Rock, the Founding Dean of Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, Florida International University and the format

John Rock; Bohyun Kim

2011-01-01

391

Family-centered theory: origins, development, barriers, and supports to implementation in rehabilitation medicine.  

PubMed

The concept of family-centered care was introduced to the public more than 4 decades ago, stressing the importance of the family in children's well being. Since then, family-centered values and practices have been widely implemented in child health. The purpose of this article is to offer an overview of the development and evolution of family-centered theory as an underlying conceptual foundation for contemporary health services. The focus includes key concepts, accepted definitions, barriers, and supports that can influence successful implementation, and discussion of the valid quantitative measures of family-centeredness currently available to evaluate service delivery. The article also provides the foundation, and proposes questions, for future research. PMID:18586223

Bamm, Elena L; Rosenbaum, Peter

2008-08-01

392

Are familial factors underlying the association between socioeconomic position and prescription medicine? A register-based study on Danish twins  

PubMed Central

Objectives Although well established, the association between socioeconomic position and health and health behaviour is not clearly understood, and it has been speculated that familial factors, for example, dispositional factors or exposures in the rearing environment, may be underlying the association. The objective was to compare prescription fillings within twin pairs who are partly or fully genetically identical and share childhood exposures. Design Twin cohort study. Setting Denmark. Participants Data from the Danish Twin Registry were linked to registers in Statistics Denmark and the Danish Registry of Medicinal Product statistics. A total of 8582 monozygotic (MZ) and 15?788 dizygotic same sex (DZSS) twins were included. Outcome measures Number of prescription fillings during follow-up (1995–2005) was analysed according to education and income. Results of unpaired and intrapair analyses were compared. Results An inverse social gradient in filling of prescriptions for all-purpose and system-specific drugs was observed in the unpaired analyses. In the intrapair analyses, associations were attenuated some in DZSS and more in MZ twins. Filling of drugs targeting the nervous system was still strongly associated with income in the intrapair analyses. Conclusions Familial factors seem to account for part of the observed social inequality in filling of prescription medicine. PMID:24227869

Madsen, Mia; Andersen, Per Kragh; Gerster, Mette; Andersen, Anne-Marie Nybo; Osler, Merete; Christensen, Kaare

2013-01-01

393

The new genetics and its consequences for family, kinship, medicine and medical genetics  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the past several decades there has been an explosion in our understanding of genetics. The new genetics is an integral part of contemporary biomedicine and promises great advances in alleviating disease, prolonging human life and leading us unto the medicine of the future. The aim of this paper is to explore the ways in which people make sense of

Kaja Finkler; Cécile Skrzynia; James P. Evans

2003-01-01

394

A Comparison of Surgery and Family Medicine Residents' Perceptions of Cross-Cultural Care Training of Cross-Cultural Care Training  

PubMed Central

The need for physicians formally trained to deliver care to diverse patient populations has been widely advocated. Utilizing a validated tool, Weissman and Betancourt's Cross-Cultural Care Survey, the aim of this current study was to compare surgery and family medicine residents' perceptions of their preparedness and skillfulness to provide high quality cross-cultural care. Past research has documented differences between the two groups' reported impressions of importance and level of instruction received in cross-cultural care. Twenty surgery and 15 family medicine residents participated in the study. Significant differences were found between surgery and family medicine residents on most ratings of the amount of training they received in cross-cultural skills. Specifically, family medicine residents reported having received more training on: 1) determining how patients want to be addressed, 2) taking a social history, 3) assessing their understanding of the cause of illness, 4) negotiating their treatment plan, 5) assessing whether they are mistrustful of the health care system and/or doctor, 6) identifying cultural customs, 7) identifying how patients make decisions within the family, and 8) delivering services through a medical interpreter. One unexpected finding was that surgery residents, who reported not receiving much formal cultural training, reported higher mean scores on perceived skillfulness (i.e. ability) than family medicine residents. The disconnect may be linked to the family medicine residents' training in cultural humility — more knowledge and understanding of cross-cultural care can paradoxically lead to perceptions of being less prepared or skillful in this area. PMID:21225585

Jackson, David S; Lin, Susan Y; Park, Elyse R

2010-01-01

395

Universal Protein Families and the Functional Content of the Last Universal Common Ancestor  

Microsoft Academic Search

.   The phylogenetic distribution of Methanococcus jannaschii proteins can provide, for the first time, an estimate of the genome content of the last common ancestor of the three domains\\u000a of life. Relying on annotation and comparison with reference to the species distribution of sequence similarities results\\u000a in 324 proteins forming the universal family set. This set is very well characterized

Nikos Kyrpides; Ross Overbeek; Christos Ouzounis

1999-01-01

396

Stanford University School of Medicine: Center for Narcolepsy  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Scientific studies of sleep patterns and behaviors have been around for decades, and the Stanford University Sleep Clinic was the first medical clinic established to examine sleep disorders. Since its founding, it has given rise to the Stanford Center for Narcolepsy. For visitors looking for information about their research and this illness, their website provides ample material. First-time visitors might do well to begin by reading the review essay, "A Hundred Years of Research", which provides some background on the ways in which researchers have explored the causes and etiology of this condition. Moving on, visitors can also learn about which medications are used to treat the condition, and also read about their innovative brain donation program.

397

medicine.usask.ca/family C O M M I T T E D P E O P L E A C R O S S S A S K AT C H E WA N  

E-print Network

medicine.usask.ca/family C O M M I T T E D P E O P L E A C R O S S S A S K AT C H E WA N ­ Department of Academic Family Medicine Report for July 1, 2012 to June 30, 2013 learning all roads lead in Saskatchewan, we decided to focus this year on the Department of Academic Family Medicine's expansion

Peak, Derek

398

THE FAMILY GAP IN WAGES AND CAREERS Geir Hgsnes, University of Oslo  

E-print Network

MEMORANDUM No 1:2006 THE FAMILY GAP IN WAGES AND CAREERS By Geir Høgsnes, University of Oslo Andrew References 113 #12;Abstract: The Family Gap in Wages and Careers The report investigates how family. Secondly, concerning the wage gap between men and women, it is larger for those with children than those

Løw, Erik

399

[75th anniversary of the Pontifical Catholic University of Chile School of Medicine].  

PubMed

The Pontifical Catholic University of Chile founded its School of Medicine in 1930, preceded by the Schools of Medicine of the University of Chile (founded in 1833) and the University of Concepción (founded in 1924). The founders of the new School were prominent members of the Catholic Church, advised by distinguished Chilean physicians and scientists, most of them already full Professors at the University of Chile. During the first decades, only a small number of full-time faculties could be recruited and the academic team included mostly part-time teachers, generally shared with the already established Medical Schools, as well as practising physicians with little or no previous teaching experience. Along 75 years of fruitful existence, this Medical School has evolved to become one of the leading organizations in graduate and post-graduate medical education in Latin America, with high standards in teaching methodology and a superb productivity in clinical and biomedical research. The history of this Medical School stands as an example to the currently nascent Medical Schools founded by private universities in Chile. The standards of high quality medical education should be maintained for the well-being of our population so that these new Medical Schools can become respected and accepted as peers by the entire community of Chilean Universities. PMID:16341363

Reyes, Humberto

2005-10-01

400

A Primer on the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act Lee Tyner, University Attorney  

E-print Network

FERPA A Primer on the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act Lee Tyner, University Attorney Donna Gurley, Associate University Attorney Lyceum, Suite 209 915-7014 FERPA, the Family Educational was to prevent institutions from maintaining secret files on students. If a student requests to see his or her

Tchumper, Gregory S.

401

From LCME probation to compliance: the Marshall University Joan C Edwards School of Medicine experience  

PubMed Central

The Joan C Edwards School of Medicine (Marshall University, Huntington, WV, USA) was placed on probation by the Liaison Committee on Medical Education (LCME) in June 2011. In the following 2 years, extensive changes were made to address the numerous citations that resulted in this probation. In October 2013, the LCME lifted probation. In this article, we detail the challenges and solutions identified relevant to our struggle with compliance. PMID:25337003

Miller, Bobby; Dzwonek, Brian; McGuffin, Aaron; Shapiro, Joseph I

2014-01-01

402

From LCME probation to compliance: the Marshall University Joan C Edwards School of Medicine experience.  

PubMed

The Joan C Edwards School of Medicine (Marshall University, Huntington, WV, USA) was placed on probation by the Liaison Committee on Medical Education (LCME) in June 2011. In the following 2 years, extensive changes were made to address the numerous citations that resulted in this probation. In October 2013, the LCME lifted probation. In this article, we detail the challenges and solutions identified relevant to our struggle with compliance. PMID:25337003

Miller, Bobby; Dzwonek, Brian; McGuffin, Aaron; Shapiro, Joseph I

2014-01-01

403

Assessment of the educational environment at the College of Medicine of King Saud University  

Microsoft Academic Search

??? ABSTRACT We used an Arabic translation (revised in our college) of the Dundee Ready Education Environment Measure (DREEM) inventory to assess the educational environment at the College of Medicine in King Saud University, Riyadh. Over 500 questionnaires were distributed and 222 were analysed. Scores were: 45.0% overall; 40.7% for students' perception of learning, 48.2% for perception of teachers, 46.3%

S. A. Sheik

404

University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health Course Title: Extramural Elective Clerkship in International Health  

E-print Network

University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health Course Title: Extramural Elective Clerkship in International Health Department/ Course Number: Senior Medicine #882-937 Offered: Semesters I may include public health, prevention, and health education activities. Placements will be approved

Sheridan, Jennifer

405

The Magazine for Alumni and Friends of Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University Winter/Spring 2010  

E-print Network

The Magazine for Alumni and Friends of Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University the magazine for alumni, faculty, students, friends and supporters of Albert einstein College of Medicine EinstEin Winter/Spring 2010 Growing Up Healthy How Einstein Is Helping City Kids #12;fEaturEs 2

Yates, Andrew

406

SUMMER/FALL 2012 The Magazine for Alumni and Friends of Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University  

E-print Network

EINSTEIN SUMMER/FALL 2012 The Magazine for Alumni and Friends of Albert Einstein College and supporters of Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University Published by The Philip and Rita-mail: letters@einstein.yu.edu Website: www.einstein.yu.edu Copyright © 2012 Albert Einstein College of Medicine

Kenny, Paraic

407

Introduction to the Clinical Curriculum The clinical phase (M-3 and M-4 years) of the University of Illinois, College of Medicine  

E-print Network

/her to competently practice evidence-based medicine; 2.2 Determinants of poor health, disease-based risk factors and evidence-based medicine. Medical Knowledge The faculty of the University of Illinois, College of Medicine of evidence-based medicine; 2.7 Investigatory and analytical thinking approach to clinical situations

Gilbert, Matthew

408

Academic promotion and tenure in U.S. family medicine units.  

PubMed

The authors interviewed by telephone the heads (or their representatives) of 101 of the 120 family practice units in U.S. medical schools in 1987. Each respondent was asked for his or her personal perceptions of the relative importances of research, teaching, patient care, and administrative activities in the academic promotion process. Respondents were also asked for their views of their units' and institutions' perceptions of the importances of the same four activities in the promotion process, as well as other related questions about promotion and tenure. The findings indicate that there is still a significant incongruence between the value structure of most family practice units and that of their institutions but that many family practice units are beginning to achieve parity of promotion and tenure with other departments in their institutions. PMID:2713010

Holloway, R L; Hale, K L; Rakel, R E

1989-05-01

409

Boise State University Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA)  

E-print Network

to care for a covered family member with a serious health condition to submit a medical certification a request for FMLA leave to care for a covered family member with a serious health condition. Your response or daughter, date of birth: ___________________________ 4) Describe the care you will provide to your family

Barrash, Warren

410

Structural and functional insight into the universal stress protein family  

PubMed Central

We present the crystal structures of two universal stress proteins (USP) from Archaeoglobus fulgidus and Nitrosomonas europaea in both apo- and ligand-bound forms. This work is the first complete synthesis of the structural properties of 26 USP available in the Protein Data Bank, over 75% of which were determined by structure genomics centers with no additional information provided. The results of bioinformatic analyses of all available USP structures and their sequence homologs revealed that these two new USP structures share overall structural similarity with structures of USPs previously determined. Clustering and cladogram analyses, however, show how they diverge from other members of the USP superfamily and show greater similarity to USPs from organisms inhabiting extreme environments. We compared them with other archaeal and bacterial USPs and discuss their similarities and differences in context of structure, sequential motifs, and potential function. We also attempted to group all analyzed USPs into families, so that assignment of the potential function to those with no experimental data available would be possible by extrapolation. PMID:23745136

Tkaczuk, Karolina L; A Shumilin, Igor; Chruszcz, Maksymilian; Evdokimova, Elena; Savchenko, Alexei; Minor, Wladek

2013-01-01

411

Family Medicine Residency Directors' Perceptions of the Position of Chief Resident.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A survey of 300 family practice residency directors found most chief residents receive no formal training or evaluation. Primary duties are acting as liaison and advocate for residents, scheduling, and leadership. Opportunity to develop leadership skills and influence curriculum are chief advantages; time pressures and demands are main…

Susman, Jeff; Gilbert, Carol

1992-01-01

412

Cytotoxicity and phytotoxicity of some selected medicinal plants of the family Polygonaceae  

Microsoft Academic Search

The cytotoxicity of the crude methanolic extracts of Rumex hastatus, Rumex dentatus, Rumex nepalensis, Rheum australe, Polygonum persicaria and Polygonum plebejum (Family Polygonaceae) was determined against Artemia salina at 1000, 100 and 10 ? ? ? ?g\\/ml. R. hastatus, R. dentatus and R. nepalensis showed significant activity at a concentration of 1000 ? ? ? ?g\\/ml against Artemia salina. R.

Farrukh Hussain; Ishfaq Hameed; Ghulam Dastagir; Ibrar Khan; Bashir Ahmad; Pharma Biotech

2010-01-01

413

Brine Shrimp Lethality Activity of Thai Medicinal Plants in the Family Meliaceae  

Microsoft Academic Search

Brine shrimp larvae have been used as a bioassay for a variety of toxic substances. The method has also been applied to plant extracts in order to facilitate the isolation of biologically active compounds. In this study, the plants in the family Meliaceae have been selected to test for brine shrimp lethality activity based on taxonomic approach including Azedirachta indica,

Sirintorn Pisutthanana; Pinyupa Plianbangchang

414

[Development and implementation of the dementia guideline of the German Society of General Practice and Family Medicine].  

PubMed

The evidence-based guidelines of the German Society of General Practice and Family Medicine (DEGAM) are developed according to an established ten-stage plan. The twelfth guideline addresses the health care problem of dementia. The main focus is the sensitive handling of patients and their relatives, e.g., although the goal is an early diagnosis, patients should also be protected against overdiagnosis. The treatment of Alzheimer's disease consists of three components: optimal care and supervision, the use of nondrug therapy, and a critically weighed administration of medications. The successful implementation of the guideline should be achieved by a multimodal strategy. This includes not only the direct integration of general practitioners (GPs) in developing the guideline, but also a comprehensive publication offensive, a wide use in training sessions including new media, the testing of complex implementation approaches in trials, and the use of the guideline in the context of GP contracts. PMID:20127438

Vollmar, Horst Christian; Abholz, Heinz-Harald; Egidi, Günther; Mand, Peter; Butzlaff, Martin E; Wilm, Stefan

2010-01-01

415

The Southern Alberta Collaboration for Nursing Education Program (SACNE) is a joint venture among Lethbridge Community College, Medicine Hat College and the University of Lethbridge.  

E-print Network

Lethbridge Community College, Medicine Hat College and the University of Lethbridge. Courses taken at Lethbridge Community College, Medicine Hat College or the University of Lethbridge count as SACNE courses or Medicine Hat College.Those students who have selected the baccalaureate program will completeYear Three

Seldin, Jonathan P.

416

EinstEinThe Magazine for Alumni and Friends of Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University Winter/spring 2014  

E-print Network

EinstEinThe Magazine for Alumni and Friends of Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva, students, friends and supporters of Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University Published.yu.edu Website: www.einstein.yu.edu Copyright © 2014 Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University

Bukauskas, Feliksas

417

Genetic diversity study of some medicinal plant accessions belong to Apiaceae family based on seed storage proteins patterns.  

PubMed

Cumin (Cuminum cyminum L.), Fennel (Foeniculum vulgare L.) and Longleaf (Falcaria vulgaris Bernh) that all belong to Apiaceae family as medicinal plants are very important in many countries. Study of genetic diversity for medicinal plant is important for researches in future. One of the methods to evaluate plant genetic diversity and classification of them is the electrophoresis of seed storage proteins. This research was conducted in order to evaluate seed protein variability in different Iranian Cumin, Fennel and Longleaf accessions and grouping them based on these proteins as a biochemical marker. For this purpose, the samples were first powdered in liquid nitrogen and seed protein was extracted with extraction buffer. Then total soluble proteins were resolved on 12.5 % sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis gels. The electrophoretic protein pattern showed 38 bands that were low polymorphism among the accessions. The result of cluster analysis showed that the accessions were classified in three groups (all 29 Cumin accessions in the first group, three Fennel ecotypes in second group and three Longleaf accessions in the last one). PMID:23086265

Masoumi, Sayed Mohammad; Kahrizi, Danial; Rostami-Ahmadvandi, Hossein; Soorni, Jahad; Kiani, Sara; Mostafaie, Ali; Yari, Kheirollah

2012-12-01

418

Acetylcholinesterase inhibitory, antioxidant and phytochemical properties of selected medicinal plants of the Lamiaceae family.  

PubMed

The present study aimed to evaluate acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitory and antioxidant activities of Lamiaceae medicinal plants growing wild in Croatia. Using Ellman's colorimetric assay all tested ethanolic extracts and their hydroxycinnamic acid constituents demonstrated in vitro AChE inhibitory properties in a dose dependent manner. The extracts of Mentha x piperita, M. longifolia, Salvia officinalis, Satureja montana, Teucrium arduini, T. chamaedrys, T. montanum, T. polium and Thymus vulgaris at 1 mg/mL showed strong inhibitory activity against AChE. The antioxidant potential of the investigated Lamiaceae species was assessed by DPPH• scavenging activity and total antioxidant capacity assays, in comparison with hydroxycinnamic acids and trolox. The extracts differed greatly in their total hydroxycinnamic derivatives content, determined spectrophotometrically. Rosmarinic acid was found to be the predominant constituent in most of the investigated medicinal plants (by RP-HPLC) and had a substantial influence on their AChE inhibitory and antioxidant properties, with the exception of Teucrium species. These findings indicate that Lamiaceae species are a rich source of various natural AChE inhibitors and antioxidants that could be useful in the prevention and treatment of Alzheimer's and other related diseases. PMID:24413832

Vladimir-Kneževi?, Sanda; Blažekovi?, Biljana; Kindl, Marija; Vladi?, Jelena; Lower-Nedza, Agnieszka D; Brantner, Adelheid H

2014-01-01

419

The early years of coeducation at the Yale University School of Medicine.  

PubMed Central

The Yale School of Medicine began accepting women as candidates for the degree of medicine in the fall of 1916. This decision was consistent with the trend in medical education at the time. While Yale was not the first prestigious Eastern medical school to admit women, joining Johns Hopkins (1893) and the University of Pennsylvania (1914), it was not one of the last. Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons admitted women a year later, but Harvard Medical School held out until 1945. The years 1916--1920 saw the number of women enrolled in medical school almost double. Yale's decision to admit women seems to have been made with little resistance from the faculty. The final decision was made through the encouragement and financial help of Henry Farnam, a professor of economics at Yale, who agreed to pay for the women's bathrooms. His daughter, Louise, was in the first class of women. At graduation she was awarded the highest scholastic honors, the Campbell Gold Prize. From Yale she travelled to the Yale-sponsored medical school in Changsha, China, where she became the first female faculty member, a position she held for twelve years. The impressions of Ella Clay Wakeman Calhoun, the only woman to graduate in the second class of women, are presented here. Since 1916 the Yale School of Medicine has undergone extensive physical and philosophical changes, developments in which women have participated. PMID:6996342

Baserga, S. J.

1980-01-01

420

[Primary health care and family medicine--possibilities for treatment of opiate addicts].  

PubMed

The global trend of promoting management and treatment of drug addicts in family physician offices is the result of the success of opioid agonist therapy. Studies have shown favorable results by shifting treatment into the hands of family physician. This process contributes to general health care of drug addicts and their health by linking different areas of health care, thereby providing comprehensive protection. Shifting treatment of addiction to family physician offices contributes to the elimination of treatment isolation and stigmatization, while further benefits are lower barriers to employment, increase in patient privacy and opportunity to provide health care. The aim of this study was to provide a concise overview of the knowledge from new clinical research over the past ten years on heroin addiction treatment in primary care. New research dealing with the approach to treating addicts indicates a direct link between receiving primary health care with a reduced likelihood of using heroin; furthermore, the main concerns of drug addicts for treatment are availability of more therapeutic programs, better functioning of existing programs, and improved staff relations towards them; final results and outcomes achieved by office and hospital treatment of drug addicts are similar and confirm the positive linear relationship between treatment duration and outcome. Studies comparing therapies show a positive effect of the adaptive methadone treatment maintenance model on the psychosocial factors; equal efficiency of treatment regardless of initiation with buprenorphine or with methadone; and equal effectiveness of levo-alpha-acetylmethadol treatment compared with methadone and diacetylmorphine as a good alternative for addiction therapy with previously unsatisfactory results. New studies on buprenorphine show equal effectiveness and cost of detoxification whether guided by a family physician or at the hospital; non-supervised therapy does not significantly influence the outcome, but is significantly cheaper; long-term therapy with buprenorphine in the doctor's office shows mild retention. PMID:23814972

Tiljak, Hrvoje; Nerali?, Ivana; Cerovecki, Venija; Kastelic, Andrej; Adzi?, Zlata Ozvaci?; Tiljak, Anja

2012-10-01

421

Progress of Recurrent Education for the Development of Engineering Enhanced Medicine “REDEEM” at Tohoku University  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Tohoku University promotes the “REDEEM” project, which is a national project of Recurrent Education for the Development of Engineering Enhanced Medicine. This education system provides a curriculum for engineers who belong to bio-medical R&D. In Japan, most of industrial engineers have been excluded from systemized bio-medical education, while medical and co-medical personnel lack engineering education. This difference of backgrounds causes a discrepancy between medicine and engineering bringing difficulty in collaboration for development of medical equipments or drugs. In this project, we focus on the engineering side, and we try to develop and provide a bio-medical engineering course for engineers. In this paper, we report and discuss on the outline and the progress of the “REDEEM” project.

Yamano, Masahiro; Matsuki, Noriaki; Numayama, Keiko; Takeda, Motohiro; Hayasaka, Tomoaki; Ishikawa, Takuji; Yamaguchi, Takami

422

PEP (Prevention of Injuries and Enhanced Performance) We are offering a group class at University Sports Medicine that is specifically designed to help reduce the number  

E-print Network

at University Sports Medicine that is specifically designed to help reduce the number and frequency of non classes. *for information see our PEP brochure or go to: www.http://urmc.rochester.edu/ortho/patient/specialties/sports-medicine

Goldman, Steven A.

423

Associate Professor or Professor -Health Promotion The Faculty of Health Sciences and the Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry at Western University are  

E-print Network

School of Medicine & Dentistry at Western University are seeking an outstanding scholar in the Health://www.schulich.uwo.ca/familymedicine/) in the Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry (http://www.schulich.uwo.ca/). The successful candidate will help

Sinnamon, Gordon J.

424

New graduate certificate offered in global health The Division of Public Health in the Department of Family and Preventive Medicine is pleased to announce a  

E-print Network

New graduate certificate offered in global health The Division of Public Health in the Department of Family and Preventive Medicine is pleased to announce a new graduate certificate in global health. The division is accepting students into this certificate program immediately. The Global Health Certificate

Feschotte, Cedric

425

The UNIVERSITY of NORTH CAROLINA at CHAPEL HILL Mining Protein Family Specific  

E-print Network

The UNIVERSITY of NORTH CAROLINA at CHAPEL HILL Mining Protein Family Specific Residue Packing of North Carolina at Chapel Hill March 29, 2004 #12;12/29/20052 The UNIVERSITY of NORTH CAROLINA at CHAPEL;12/29/20053 The UNIVERSITY of NORTH CAROLINA at CHAPEL HILL Protein Contact Distance Maps (CD) Each node models a residue

Huan, Jun "Luke"

426

Family consent and the pursuit of better medicines through genetic research.  

PubMed

Rapid changes in the science and technology related to genetic research are challenging scientists, health care providers, ethicists, regulators, patient groups, and the pharmaceutical industry to keep pace with ethically grounded, workable guidelines for both the research and clinical applications of human genetics. We describe the genetic research being conducted by one pharmaceutical company (GlaxoSmithKline) and how the company is addressing the ethical, legal, and social issues surrounding this research; discuss an industry working group's attempt to advance pharmacogenetic research by openly addressing and disseminating information on related ethical, legal, and regulatory issues; identify scientific and ethical differences among various types of genetic research; discuss potential implications of family consent on subject privacy and autonomy, data collection, and study conduct; and suggest points to consider when study sponsors, investigators, and ethics committees evaluate research proposals. Public and expert opinion regarding informed consent in genetic research is evolving as a result of increased education, discussion, and understanding of the relevant issues. Five years ago, there was strong support for anonymity in genetic research as a privacy safeguard. Now, an increasingly popular school of thought advocates against anonymity to preserve an individual's ability to withdraw and, if desired, access research results. It is important to recognize this evolution and address consent issues in a reasoned, practical, and consistent way, including input from patients and their families, health care providers, ethicists, scientists, regulatory bodies, research sponsors, and the lay community. Responsibility for assessing issues related to family consent for research should remain with local investigators, ethics boards, and study sponsors. A "one-size-fits-all" perspective in the form of new regulations, for example, would likely be a disservice to all. PMID:11803771

Renegar, G; Rieser, P; Manasco, P

2001-01-01

427

Master in Molecular Medicine Faculty of Medicine  

E-print Network

Master in Molecular Medicine Faculty of Medicine February 2010 #12;University of Ulm There are many of the Master program The English Master course of studies combines the disciplines Biology and Medicine of research, development and application in the field of molecular medicine especially in universities

Pfeifer, Holger

428

The Department of Family & Preventive Medicine KEEP THIS MANUAL AT THIS OFFICE OR  

E-print Network

description of the situation. UTILITY FAILURE Call 1-7221 7a-5p Plant Operations 5-2677 24 hrs University. NATURAL GAS ODOR Call 1-7221 Plant Operations Identify source if possible. EARTHQUAKE DO NOT CALL Inside-Get beneath structure. (desk, doorway) Outdoors-Get into open area after tremor. GAS LEAK OR ELECTRICAL HAZARD

Tipple, Brett

429

Otolaryngology Training for Family Practice Residents.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The faculty of the Department of Otolaryngology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, has designed a rotation in the otolaryngology service, that is a basic clinical orientation to ear, nose and throat medicine, to fit the one-month block committed by the local family practice residency training program. The program is described and its…

And Others; Rood, Stewart R.

1980-01-01

430

[Women's education according to the first women to receive doctorates in medicine from Spanish universities, 1882].  

PubMed

This study looks at the topic of women's education as considered by the first two women to receive the degree of Doctor in Medicine from a Spanish university. Delores Aleu and Martina Castells decided to present as a doctoral thesis the development of an issue of particular relevance during the final decades of the 19th century. The importance given to public education and the difficulties young women encountered in participating under the same conditions as young men led these two women--who both held a bachelor's degree--to raise the issue and defend personal and social reasons that justified their full participation in different levels of education. PMID:11624263

Flecha Garcia, C

1999-01-01

431

Angel: post-implementation evaluation at the Indiana University School of Medicine.  

PubMed

With continued adoption of course management systems, librarians are assuming new roles and challenges with regard to providing information resources and library services in a digital environment. For approximately five years, the Indiana University School of Medicine has employed Angel as its online teaching environment, and the Ruth Lilly Medical Library has been actively involved in the adoption of Angel. As the implementation phase was completed, a post-implementation evaluation was due. The authors conducted an evaluation of the Angel system to evaluate utilization level, content types, and library resources/services integration. This article provides the findings of the post-implementation Angel Courses Evaluation. PMID:15364647

Hatfield, Amy J; Brahmi, Frances A

2004-01-01

432

COlUMBIA UNIvERSITy COllEgE OF DENTAl MEDICINE REgISTER ONlINE  

E-print Network

for Symposium attendance. note Both options include the two-day Columbia University/iCOi Dental implantCOlUMBIA UNIvERSITy COllEgE OF DENTAl MEDICINE REgISTER ONlINE: dental,500 with payment in full by Sept. 1, 2013 CE Credits: 94 (84, plus 10 for Dec. 13-14 CU/ICOI Implant Symposium

Grishok, Alla

433

A cultural diversity seen in Croatian family medicine: a lady from Janjevo.  

PubMed

The role of cultural diversities in doctor's everyday work is going more and more important in globalised world, therefore it draws lots of attention in literature. Cultural differences that exist between people, such as language, dress and traditions, are usually distinguished from the term cultural diversity which is mainly understood as having different cultures respect each other's differences. The great effort is made to educate culturally competent practitioners, nurses or doctors. The presented case of lady from Janjevo was a good role model for work with all patients with culturally different background coming to family practice. This lady example could also help to other colleagues to learn from experience on systematic way. PMID:25643554

Pavlov, Renata

2014-12-01

434

[Laboratory medicine in the post-genome era: experiences in Chiba University Hospital].  

PubMed

Since the completion of the human genome project, there is growing interest in the clinical application of genome sciences. For this purpose, particular attention toward identifying at-risk individuals and understanding the complexities of the testing process are essential. In this article, I describe the importance of clinical genetics and genetic counseling, and explain how and why the division of laboratory medicine is involved in these tasks in Chiba University Hospital. Our genetic counseling team consists of a clinical laboratory physician qualified as a clinical geneticist, medical technologist qualified as a genetic counselor, clinical psychologists, and a medical social worker. We treat more than 100 cases including late-onset, incurable neurological diseases, hereditary tumors, prenatal diagnosis, and chromosomal abnormalities. The sequencing of the human genome has paved the way for comprehensive transcriptome and proteome analyses. Since the detailed understanding of biological processes, both in healthy and pathological states, requires the direct study of relevant proteins, proteomics bridges the gap between the information coded in the genome sequence and cellular behavior. Therefore, proteomics is among the most promising technologies for the development of novel diagnostic tools. Recent advances in sophisticated technologies in proteomics should identify promising ways to discover novel markers in various fields of clinical medicine. In this presentation, I will give a definition of the proteome, and outline the basic methodologies for proteome analyses. I will also present our experiences in identifying novel biomarker candidates in hepatobiliary diseases, and discuss future perspectives of clinical proteomics in laboratory medicine. PMID:19175078

Nomura, Fumio

2008-12-01

435

FEDERAL FAMILY EDUCATION LOAN (FFEL) PROGRAM U.S. STUDENTS ATTENDING MCMASTER UNIVERSITY  

E-print Network

1 FEDERAL FAMILY EDUCATION LOAN (FFEL) PROGRAM FOR U.S. STUDENTS ATTENDING MCMASTER UNIVERSITY of Conduct Policy 20 ix. The Student Right-to-Know Act 20 x. Federal Student Aid Ombudsman 20 xi. Filing is a certified foreign institution (School Code 00 685300), eligible to participate in the Federal Family

Hitchcock, Adam P.

436

San Francisco State University Department of Psychology Fall 2013 Hartman Family Scholarship in Psychology  

E-print Network

San Francisco State University ­ Department of Psychology Fall 2013 Hartman Family Scholarship in Psychology $500 scholarships available for undergraduate students BACKGROUND The Hartman Family Scholarship in Psychology is available in honor of Dr. Susan Hartman Taylor. Dr. Susan Hartman Taylor was a faculty member

437

Acculturation and depressive symptoms in Muslim university students: Personal–family acculturation match  

Microsoft Academic Search

The relationships of personal acculturation and of personal–family acculturation match to depressive symptoms were investigated in a sample of 68 Muslim university students. Two dimensions of personal and family acculturation were assessed: heritage and mainstream culture identification. Participants completed the Vancouver Index of Acculturation (Ryder, Alden, & Paulhus, 2000) and the depressive disorder subscale of the Psychiatric Diagnostic Screening Questionnaire

Yasmin Asvat; Vanessa L. Malcarne

2008-01-01

438

david b. Falk college oF sport and human dynamics syracuse university falk family makes  

E-print Network

and Family Therapy >> Nutrition Science >> Social Work orange Central 2011 November 11-13 nursing Alumnidavid b. Falk college oF sport and human dynamics syracuse university defining moment falk family Session November 5, 10 a.m. Shaffer Art Building Learn about our graduate programs in: >> Addiction

Mather, Patrick T.

439

The Role of Gender, Attachment Dimensions, and Family Environment on Loneliness among Turkish University Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of the present study was to investigate the predictive value of gender, attachment dimensions and family environment in explaining loneliness among students. The study included 473 students (281 females, 192 males) from Ankara University. The UCLA Loneliness Scale, Family Environment Assessment Scale and Experiences in Close…

Demirli, Aylin; Demir, Ayhan

2014-01-01

440

Northwestern University Archives Evanston, Illinois Charles W. Pearson Family Papers, 1843-1968  

E-print Network

Northwestern University Archives · Evanston, Illinois Charles W. Pearson Family Papers, 1843-1968 Series 11/3/11/2 Boxes 1-15 Introductory Note The Charles Pearson Family Papers document the life and career of Charles W. Pearson, Northwestern alumnus and faculty member (professor and department chair

441

History of Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine 1 The first informal meeting for the school's establishment, held on March 12, 1859, included a number of  

E-print Network

History of Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine 1 The first informal meeting University Feinberg School of Medi- cine in 2002 in recognition of a $103 million donation from the Joseph and Bessie Feinberg Foundation. History of Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine #12;History

Chisholm, Rex L.

442

Consultation clinics for complementary and alternative medicine at Japanese university hospitals: An analysis at Tokushima University Hospital  

PubMed Central

Here, we report on a Consultation Clinic for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) which we established at Tokushima University Hospital in July of 2007 with the aim of providing person-to-person information on CAM, though not CAM therapy itself. In December of 2008, we received 55 applications for consultation, 37% concerning health foods, 37% Japanese herbal medicine (Kampo), and 26% various other topics. The consultants (nutritionists and pharmacists) communicated individually with 38 applicants; malignancies (26%) and cardiovascular disease (24%) were the main underlying concerns. To promote the quality of consultation, data was collected by means of focus group interviews concerning the perspective of the consultants. Safe and effective use of CAM requires a network of communication linking individuals, consultation teams, physicians, primary care institutions and university hospitals. To advance this goal, we plan to broaden the efforts described herein. Our findings indicate that the specific role of the consultation clinic in promoting the scientific use of CAM merits further study. PMID:22993564

YANAGAWA, HIROAKI; TERAO, JUNJI; TAKEDA, EIJI; TAKAISHI, YOSHIHISA; KASHIWADA, YOSHIKI; KAWAZOE, KAZUYOSHI; FUSHITANI, SHUJI; TSUCHIYA, KOICHIRO; YAMAUCHI, AIKO; SATO, CHIHO; IRAHARA, MINORU

2010-01-01

443

PARENT&FAMILY THE UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT ARLINGTON  

E-print Network

Center in the E.H. Hereford University Center. We have an exciting weekend planned for you and your, please don't hesitate to stop by the Palo Duro Lounge, E.H. Hereford University Center. C HOURS FRIDAY going to events across campus. 9:30 am ­ 12 pm · Bluebonnet Ballroom Entrance E.H. Hereford University

Huang, Haiying

444

Evaluation of the quality of antenatal care using electronic health record information in family medicine clinics of Mexico City  

PubMed Central

Background Evaluation of the quality of antenatal care (ANC) using indicators should be part of the efforts to improve primary care services in developing countries. The growing use of the electronic health record (EHR) has the potential of making the evaluation more efficient. The objectives of this study were: (a) to develop quality indicators for ANC and (b) to evaluate the quality of ANC using EHR information in family medicine clinics (FMCs) of Mexico City. Methods We used a mixed methods approach including: (a) in-depth interviews with health professionals; (b) development of indicators following the RAND-UCLA method; (c) a retrospective cohort study of quality of care provided to 5342 women aged 12–49 years who had completed their pregnancy in 2009 and attended to at least one ANC visit with their family doctor. The study took place in four FMCs located in Mexico City. The source of information was the EHR. SAS statistical package served for programing and performing the descriptive statistical analysis. Results 14 ANC quality indicators were developed. The evaluation showed that 40.6% of women began ANC in the first trimester; 63.5% with low-risk pregnancy attended four or more ANC visits; 4.4% were referred for routine obstetric ultrasound, and 41.1% with vaginal infection were prescribed metronidazole. On average, the percentage of recommended care that women received was 32.7%. Conclusions It is feasible to develop quality indicators suitable for evaluating the quality of ANC using routine EHR data. The study identified the ANC areas that require improvement; which can guide future strategies aimed at improving ANC quality. PMID:24885103

2014-01-01

445

A comparison of patient visits to osteopathic and allopathic general and family medicine physicians: results from the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey, 2003–2004  

PubMed Central

Background Osteopathic philosophy is consistent with an emphasis on primary care and suggests that osteopathic physicians may have distinctive ways of interacting with their patients. Methods The National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS) was used to derive national estimates of utilization of osteopathic general and family medicine physicians during 2003 and 2004 and to examine the patient characteristics and physician-patient interactions of these osteopathic physicians. All analyses were performed using complex samples software to appropriately weigh outcomes according to the multistage probability sample design used in NAMCS and multivariate modeling was used to control for potential confounders. Results and discussion When weighted according to the multistage probability sample design used, the 6939 patient visits studied represented an estimated 341.4 million patient visits to general and family medicine specialists in the United States, including 64.9 million (19%) visits to osteopathic physicians and 276.5 million (81%) visits to allopathic physicians. Osteopathic physicians were a major source of care in the Northeast (odds ratio [OR], 2.94; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.42–6.08), providing more than one-third of general and family medicine patient visits in this geographic region. Pediatric and young adult patients (OR, 0.64; 95% CI, 0.45–0.91), Hispanics (OR, 0.63; 95% CI, 0.40–1.00), and non-Black racial minority groups (OR, 0.39; 95% CI, 0.18–0.82) were less likely to visit osteopathic physicians. There were no significant differences between osteopathic and allopathic physicians with regard to the time spent with patients, provision of five common preventive medicine counseling services, or a focus on preventive care during office visits. Conclusion Osteopathic physicians are a major source of general and family medicine care in the United States, particularly in the Northeast. However, pediatric and young adult patients, Hispanics, and non-Black racial minorities underutilize osteopathic physicians. There is little evidence to support a distinctive approach to physician-patient interactions among osteopathic physicians in general and family medicine, particularly with regard to time spent with patients and preventive medicine services. PMID:17371578

Licciardone, John C

2007-01-01

446

Constructing and Communicating Privacy Boundaries: How Family Medicine Physicians Manage Patient Requests for Religious Disclosure in the Clinical Interaction.  

PubMed

Religion/spirituality (R/S) is an important component of some patients' psychosocial framework when facing illness. While many patients report an increased desire for R/S dialogue in clinical interaction, especially when facing a frightening diagnosis, some physicians report discomfort talking about R/S and hold various beliefs regarding the appropriateness of such discussions. Not only do physicians manage conversations centering on patient disclosures in the clinical visit, they must also navigate requests to share their own personal information. Farber et al. (2000) found that over a 12-month period nearly 40% of physicians reported that patients asked questions that transgressed professional boundaries. This article uses Petronio's communication privacy management theory as a lens through which to situate our understanding of how family medicine physicians construct and communicate privacy boundaries in response to patient requests for religious disclosure. Results provide an in-depth theoretical understanding of issues surrounding religious disclosure in the medical visit and expand the discussion on health care providers' personal and professional privacy boundaries as documented by Petronio and Sargent (2011). Implications for health care training and practice are discussed. PMID:25257124

Canzona, Mollie Rose; Peterson, Emily Bylund; Villagran, Melinda M; Seehusen, Dean A

2014-09-25

447

Correlation between Family Environment and Suicidal Ideation in University Students in China  

PubMed Central

Background: This study investigated the association between suicidal ideation and family environment. The sample included 5183 Chinese university students. A number of studies on suicidal ideation have focused on individuals rather than families. This paper reviews the general principles of suicidal ideation and the consequences resulting from the family environment. Methods: This study used six different colleges as the dataset, which included 2645 males and 2538 females. Students were questioned with respect to social demographics and suicidal ideation factors. The data were analyzed with factor and logistic analyses to determine the association between suicidal ideation and poor family environment. Results: The prevalence of suicidal ideation was 9.2% (476/5183). Most participants with suicidal ideation had significant similarities: they had poor family structures and relationships, their parents had unstable work, and their parents used improper parenting styles. Female students were more likely to have suicidal thoughts than male students. Conclusions: This study shows that suicidal ideation is a public health issue among Chinese university students and demonstrates the importance of considering the family environment when examining university students’ suicidal ideation. Understanding family-related suicidal ideation risk factors can help to predict and prevent suicides among university students. PMID:25633031

Zhai, Hui; Bai, Bing; Chen, Lu; Han, Dong; Wang, Lin; Qiao, Zhengxue; Qiu, Xiaohui; Yang, Xiuxian; Yang, Yanjie

2015-01-01

448

Thank you for your gift! YES. I would like to make a gift to the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry. Please  

E-print Network

of Medicine and Dentistry. Please fill out this page and return to: University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry Office of Academic Development and Alumni Relations 300 East River Road, P.O. Box 278996 Rochester:____________________________________________ Gift Designation School of Medicine & Dentistry Annual Fund (A06262) A specific department or fund

Goldman, Steven A.

449

Care for post-stroke patients at Malaysian public health centres: self-reported practices of family medicine specialists  

PubMed Central

Background Provision of post stroke care in developing countries is hampered by discoordination of services and limited access to specialised care. Albeit shortcomings, primary care continues to provide post-stroke services in less than favourable circumstances. This paper aimed to review provision of post-stroke care and related problems among Family Medicine Specialists managing public primary health care services. Methods A semi-structured questionnaire was distributed to 121 Family Physicians servicing public funded health centres in a pilot survey focused on improving post stroke care provision at community level. The questionnaire assessed respondents background and practice details i.e. estimated stroke care burden, current service provision and opinion on service improvement. Means and frequencies described quantitative data. For qualitative data, constant comparison method was used until saturation of themes was reached. Results Response rate of 48.8% was obtained. For every 100 patients seen at public healthcentres each month, 2 patients have stroke. Median number of stroke patients seen per month is 5 (IQR 2-10). 57.6% of respondents estimated total stroke patients treated per year at each centre was less than 40 patients. 72.4% lacked a standard care plan although 96.6% agreed one was needed. Patients seen were: discharged from tertiary care (88.1%), shared care plan with specialists (67.8%) and patients who developed stroke during follow up at primary care (64.4%). Follow-ups were done at 8-12 weekly intervals (60.3%) with 3.4% on ‘as needed’ basis. Referrals ranked in order of frequency were to physiotherapy services, dietitian and speech and language pathologists in public facilities. The FMS’ perceived 4 important ‘needs’ in managing stroke patients at primary care level; access to rehabilitation services, coordinated care between tertiary centres and primary care using multidisciplinary care approach, a standardized guideline and family and caregiver support. Conclusions Post discharge stroke care guidelines and access to rehabilitation services at primary care is needed for post stroke patients residing at home in the community. PMID:24580779

2014-01-01

450

Gender Norms and Institutional Culture: The Family-Friendly versus the Father-Friendly University  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article investigates the role that gender norms and expectations about parenting play in establishing the family-friendly versus the father-friendly university. Using interviews with 51 male faculty at three research universities, the article considers how faculty and administrators' actions perpetuate cultures that promote or hinder…

Sallee, Margaret W.

2013-01-01

451

Family, Learning Environments, Learning Approaches, and Student Outcomes in a Malaysian Private University  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article presents the quantitative findings from a mixed methods study of students and faculty at a private medical university in Malaysia. In particular, the relationships among students' individual characteristics, general self-efficacy, family context, university and classroom learning environments, curriculum, approaches to learning, and…

Kek, Megan A. Yih Chyn; Darmawan, I. Gusti Ngurah; Chen, Yu Sui

2007-01-01

452

Babies on Campus: Service to Infants and Families among Competing Priorities in University Child Care Programs  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

University early childhood programs attempt to balance a traditional tri-part mission: service to children and families; professional development of caregivers/teachers, clinicians, and researchers; and research on child development, learning, and/or education. Increasingly, infants receive care and education on university campuses, yet little is…

McMullen, Mary Benson; Lash, Martha

2012-01-01

453

Young Children and Their Families Who Are Homeless. A University Affiliated Program's Response.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This monograph describes a University Affiliated Program's (UAP) initiative that targets the development needs of children from birth to 5 years of age who are homeless and the services and supports provided to their families. The Georgetown University Child Development Center, the UAP for the District of Columbia, has implemented a homelessness…

Taylor, Tawara D.; Brown, Marisa C.

454

Copyright 2009, The Ohio State University Family and Consumer Sciences  

E-print Network

: Steps for Success Breastfeeding is very good for infants, moth- ers, and the rest of the family Your Baby Talk to women who have breastfed well in the past. Experienced mothers can be a great the mother will not be making enough milk, her breasts contain a thin fluid that helps protect her baby from

455

Copyright 2009, The Ohio State University Family and Consumer Sciences  

E-print Network

, Storing, and Serving Ohio Kohlrabi, Rutabagas, and Turnips Another name for kohlrabi is turnip cabbage and it is a member of the cabbage family. The flavor of its bulb-like stem is similar to a turnip. The rutabaga is a root much like the turnip, but yellow in color and stronger in flavor. Turnips

456

Rooted in Mission: Family and Consumer Sciences in Catholic Universities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this paper is to establish the unity between the missions of the Family and Consumer Sciences (FCS) discipline and Catholic higher education by demonstrating relationships among (a) Catholic Social Teaching (CST) and the role of the service principle to FCS; (b) Catholic Intellectual Tradition (CIT) and the centrality of intellect…

Duncan, Janine

2011-01-01

457

The integration of the "spirituality in medicine" curriculum into the osteopathic communication curriculum at Kansas City University of Medicine and Biosciences.  

PubMed

With grant funding from the John Templeton Spirituality and Medicine Curricular Award to the George Washington Institute for Spirituality and Health, faculty at Kansas City University of Medicine and Biosciences (KCUMB) developed the "Spirituality in Medicine" curriculum. In developing the curriculum, faculty took into consideration competencies required by the Association of American Medical Colleges and qualitative results from surveys of medical school applicants and enrolled students. Strategies for curriculum delivery included lectures, panel discussions, role-playing, and training in the use of a spirituality assessment tool. A majority of the 250 students who received the training in 2010-2011 were able to demonstrate the following competencies: (1) being sensitive to patients' spiritual and cultural needs, (2) assessing patients' and their own spiritual needs, (3) appropriately using chaplain services for patient care, and (4) understanding the effects of health disparities and ethical issues on patient care. Challenges to implementation included a reduction in chaplain availability due to the economic downturn, a lack of student exposure to direct patient care during shadowing, too little religious diversity among chaplains, and changes in assignment schedules. New competencies required by the National Board of Osteopathic Medical Examiners overlap with and help ensure sustainability of the Spirituality in Medicine curriculum. KCUMB leaders have incorporated the use of the spirituality assessment tool into other parts of the curriculum and into service experiences, and they have introduced a new elective in palliative care. Synergistic efforts by faculty leaders for this initiative were critical to the implementation of this curriculum. PMID:24280841

Talley, Jan A; Magie, Richard

2014-01-01

458

Genome Medicine 2009, 11  

E-print Network

Genome Medicine 2009, 11::88 Correspondence BBrriiddggiinngg tthhee ggaapp bbeettwweeeenn Care Medicine and CRISMA laboratory, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Scaife 602, 3550 Biotechnology Center, University of Torino, Via Nizza 52, I, 10126 Torino, Italy; 10Institutionen för Medicin

459

Providing WIC Services to Homeless Families  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Families in Transition program (FIT), in collaboration with the University of Maryland School of Medicine, designed and implemented a Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC) homeless outreach project. Staff scheduled regular outreach visits to shelters and soup kitchens to ensure that eligible participants were certified for the WIC program and families were closely followed.Two hundred

Lisa Ann Hamm; E. Wayne Holden

1999-01-01

460

Correlation between phq-9 score and physical activity level, risk factors and non-communicable diseases in patients in family medicine clinic  

Microsoft Academic Search

The work of physicians in primary health care is essential in prevention and early detection of health risk factors. To determine\\u000a the incidence of depression among patients in family medicine clinics, as well as the correlation between depression, risk\\u000a factors and NCDs, and to determine correlation between depression (PHQ-9 score) and the level of physical activity. The pilot\\u000a study was

Zivana Gavric; Anna Culafic; Brankica Markovic

2011-01-01

461

College of Medicine ER Emergency Medicine  

E-print Network

College of Medicine ER Emergency Medicine KEY: # = new course * = course changed = course dropped University of Kentucky 2013-2014 Undergraduate Bulletin 1 ER 815 FIRST-YEAR ELECTIVE, EMERGENCY MEDICINE. (1 offered by the Department of Emergency Medicine. The intent is to provide the student an opportunity

MacAdam, Keith

462

Appointment of Dr. James G. Martin as Chair, Department of Medicine of McGill University and Physician-in-Chief of the McGill University Health Centre  

E-print Network

Appointment of Dr. James G. Martin as Chair, Department of Medicine of McGill University of Dr. James G. Martin to the positions of Chair, Department of Medicine of McGill University, and Physician-in-Chief of the McGill University Health Centre (MUHC), both effective January 1, 2014. Dr. Martin

Barthelat, Francois

463

Technology at Washington University School of Medicine Library: BACS, PHILSOM, and OCTANET.  

PubMed Central

A brief overview of the Bibliographic Access and Control System developed by the Washington University School of Medicine Library is presented. Because the system has been described in two previous reports, this paper focuses on its relationship to other automated programs (i.e., PHILSOM and OCTANET), education of users, evaluation of the system, and outreach to the medical center. In operation for more than two years, BACS represents the computerization of much of the managerial and operational functions of the library, and marks the completion of stage 1 of the three stages of library evolution described in the AAMC report Academic Information in the Academic Health Sciences Center: Roles for the Library in Information Management. PMID:6688750

Crawford, S; Johnson, M F; Kelly, E A

1983-01-01

464

Samuel A. Mudd, MD, physician-farmer, University of Maryland School of Medicine class of 1856.  

PubMed

America is in the midst of experiencing the sesquicentennial of the Civil War. We do so with some ambivalence knowing that the war forged a great union and ended slavery but also caused the deaths of more than 600,000 fellow citizens. Samuel A. Mudd, MD, University of Maryland School of Medicine class of 1856, was a man of this time. As a physician-farmer in Southern Maryland, he was a highly respected physician, a slave owner, and a devout citizen. The Civil War (1861-1865) would alter his life in ways few could have imagined. This article looks at his background, his education, his work as a physician-farmer, and his dramatic rise to national attention and infamy. Convicted by a military tribunal and imprisoned for his "crimes," he was able to partially redeem himself using his medical skills and professionalism. Mudd was a man of his time. And what a time it was. PMID:23183366

Harding, Richard K

2012-12-01

465

A survey describing the use of complementary therapies and medicines by women attending a family planning clinic  

PubMed Central

Background Complementary medicines (CMs) are widely used by women. Although, women in Australia are frequent users of CM, few studies have examined their utilisation by women attending a family planning service. The aim of this study was to examine (i) the extent of and type of CM, (ii) women’s views about safety and efficacy, and (iii) the factors influencing women’s decision-making. Methods A cross-sectional survey using a convenience sample of 221women aged greater than 18 years attending a family planning (FP) service was undertaken over a two week period in Sydney, Australia. An anonymous self-administered questionnaire was designed to examine women’s current and previous use of CMs, their attitudes towards safety and effectiveness, the factors influencing their decision-making, and their disclosure of CM use to a FP health professional. Demographic questions were designed to describe the diversity of the participants. Logistic regression was used to examine the association between CM use and demographics. Results Sixty-seven percent of women surveyed were currently using CMs, and 83% reported use during the previous 12 months. Most respondents utilised CMs to maintain their general health or for prevention of ill health. Over 30% of women lacked information to make an informed response to questions examining their views about the safety of CMs. Forty-four percent of participants stated they discussed their use of CMs with their FP providers. The main reason why women did not mention CMs was they did not see the relevance to their consultation (43%). Lower rates of CM use were found for younger women (OR 0.24, 95% CI 0.09-0.61), and those not completing high school (OR 0.44, 95% 0.20-1.00). Conclusion The use of CM is very common among women attending an Australian FP clinic, however our findings may not be generalisable to all women. We identified a notable gap in women’s awareness of the potential for interactions between CM and prescribed medication. Our findings also emphasise the need for healthcare providers to initiate discussions with clients about their utilisation of CM. PMID:24025479

2013-01-01

466

As part of the mission of Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine to mentor and educate students to become inquiry-driven physicians, educators, and  

E-print Network

As part of the mission of Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine to mentor and educate Feinberg curriculum, which will begin rollout in the 2012/13 academic year. Course Descriptions Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine Area of Scholarly Concentration Program Northwestern

Chisholm, Rex L.

467

As part of the mission of Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine to mentor and educate students to become inquiry-driven physicians, educators,  

E-print Network

As part of the mission of Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine to mentor and educateSC will be integrated into each phase of the new Feinberg curriculum, which began in the 2012/13 academic year. Course Descriptions Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine Area of Scholarly Concentration Program

Chisholm, Rex L.

468

University of St Andrews -School of Medicine Handbook Version 08/05/2014 / dcm10 1 students_disclosure_joining the PVG scheme  

E-print Network

University of St Andrews - School of Medicine Handbook Version 08/05/2014 / dcm10 1 students wish to take a view on. DC MASSON Executive Administrator Disclosure Officer dcm10@st-andrews.ac.uk #12;University of St Andrews - School of Medicine Handbook Version 08/05/2014 / dcm10 2 students

Brierley, Andrew

469

Is family medicine meeting the HIV\\/AIDS challenge? A national survey of family physicians' beliefs, clinical competence, and experience regarding HIV disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

A national sample of family physicians was surveyed to (1) assess family physicians' beliefs about the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and individuals at risk for infection, their clinical competence regarding HIV-related issues, and their experiences with HIV disease; (2) present conclusions to the American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP) to effect the development of an early clinical care protocol and

John Gerard Ryan

1991-01-01

470

Project Family Prevention Trials Based in Community–University Partnerships: Toward Scaled-Up Preventive Interventions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Findings from Project Family are presented to illustrate how a partnership-based program of research on universal family- and youth-focused interventions is addressing a public health challenge. One aspect of this public health challenge is the high prevalence of youth problem behaviors and a second aspect concerns barriers to scaling-up empirically-supported preventive interventions designed to ameliorate those problem behaviors. Illustrative findings

Richard L. Spoth; Cleve Redmond

2002-01-01

471

Digital Media Specialist Internship The College of Medicine-Urbana at the University of Illinois seeks students to participate in  

E-print Network

Digital Media Specialist Internship The College of Medicine-Urbana at the University of Illinois the opportunity to work on a range of projects including print, Web, video, and new media. Each Digital Media proficiency in new media technologies. The emphasis will be on the effective use of digital images, text

Gilbert, Matthew

472

Connecticut State Orthodontic Society, the UConn Orthodontics Alumni Association and the University of Connecticut School of Dental Medicine,  

E-print Network

Connecticut State Orthodontic Society, the UConn Orthodontics Alumni Association and the University of Connecticut School of Dental Medicine, Division of Orthodontics presents The Charles J. Burstone Seminar) Dr. Peter Ngan is Professor and Chairman of the Department of Orthodontics and Head of the Division

Oliver, Douglas L.

473

The University of Arizona College of Medicine Optimal Aging Program: Stepping in the Shadows of Successful Aging  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Optimal Aging Program (OAP) at the University of Arizona, College of Medicine is a longitudinal mentoring program that pairs students with older adults who are considered to be aging "successfully." This credit-bearing elective was initially established in 2001 through a grant from the John A. Hartford Foundation, and aims to expand the…

Sikora, Stephanie

2006-01-01

474

Yale University School of Medicine Autorizacin para el Uso o la Revelacin de Informacin de Salud Protegida (PHI)  

E-print Network

Yale University School of Medicine Autorización para el Uso o la Revelación de Información de Salud: ___________________________ Yo autorizo a la Universidad de Yale que use o revele la siguiente información de salud protegida Compensación Laboral Escuela Otra razón (especifique): ________________________________ 1. Yo entiendo que esta

475

WORK ENVIRONMENT The University of Connecticut School of Medicine will provide each resident/fellow with a work  

E-print Network

the potentially negative effects of fatigue. Programs will ensure that appropriate supervision is in place for all. Residents/fellows shall care for patients in an environment that maximizes effective communicationPage 169 ` WORK ENVIRONMENT The University of Connecticut School of Medicine will provide each

Oliver, Douglas L.

476

Integrating eLearning to Support Medical Education at the New University of Botswana School of Medicine  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Since the enrolment of its first cohort of students in 2009, the University of Botswana School of Medicine (UB SoM) has employed elearning as a key element to support and strengthen its model of decentralised medical education. Significant investments have been made in setting up the physical infrastructure, and in acquiring relevant expertise to…

Kebaetse, Masego B.; Nkomazana, Oathokwa; Haverkamp, Cecil

2014-01-01

477

Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University Title: Duty to Report Suspicion of Child Abuse/Neglect  

E-print Network

Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University Title: Duty to Report Suspicion of Child Abuse establishes the ECU Physicians guidelines for reporting suspicions of child abuse or neglect in accordance abuse and/or neglect. N.C.G.S 7B-309. stipulates that anyone making a report of suspicion of child abuse

478

Name of Institution Boston University-Mental Health Counseling & Behavioral Medicine Website www.bumc.bu.edu/mhbm  

E-print Network

Name of Institution Boston University-Mental Health Counseling & Behavioral Medicine Program Website www.bumc.bu.edu/mhbm Programs Offered The Master of Arts (M.A.) in Mental Health Counseling for an independent mental health-care license in Massachusetts and other states. The primary objective is to prepare

New Hampshire, University of

479

ORIENTATION All new residents/fellows to the University of Connecticut School of Medicine are required to  

E-print Network

Page 43 ORIENTATION All new residents/fellows to the University of Connecticut School of Medicine are required to attend a Graduate Medical Education (GME) orientation. Components of the GME orientation be completed before a resident/fellow can begin. The GME orientation is typically scheduled at the end of June

Oliver, Douglas L.

480

Faculty Position in Ophthalmology The Department of Clinical Sciences in the College of Veterinary Medicine at Cornell University invites  

E-print Network

Faculty Position in Ophthalmology The Department of Clinical Sciences in the College of Veterinary Medicine at Cornell University invites applications for a tenure track or clinical track Ophthalmology faculty position in the Section of Ophthalmology. This expansion of the Section will result in a total

Chen, Tsuhan

481

Ebola -A Community Education Presentation The University of Illinois College of Medicine at Rockford will host a presentation: Ebola A  

E-print Network

Ebola - A Community Education Presentation The University of Illinois College of Medicine at Rockford will host a presentation: Ebola ­A Community Education Presentation. Dr. Gary Rifkin, Professor. Dr. Martell started her career as a public health nurse and advanced through leadership with program

Alford, Simon

482

Proceedings of Student-Faculty Research Day, CSIS, Pace University, May 3rd Tele-Medicine Risk Adjustment  

E-print Network

by altering payment for enrollees based on health status and demographics [2]. Medicare Risk Adjustment data-Medicine Risk Adjustment Maja Misheva, Matthew Racioppo, William Gasparrini, Aykut Donmez, Jean F. Coppola, and Ray Miranti Seidenberg School of CSIS, Pace University, White Plains, NY 10606 Abstract--Medicare Risk

Tappert, Charles

483

The Magazine for Alumni and Friends of Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University Summer/Fall 2009  

E-print Network

The Magazine for Alumni and Friends of Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University ent/ 50 th Reunion Coverage #12;WorldWidE CommitmEnt Over the last decade, Albert Einstein College EinstEin Summer/Fall 2009 EINSTEIN & INDIA Working together for global health Inside: 2009 Com m encem

Yates, Andrew

484

A comprehensive approach to enhancing sexual health education in the Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine  

Microsoft Academic Search

We report on the Sexual Health Curriculum Enhancement project at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine. Using a $100 000 grant from Pfizer Pharmaceuticals, Inc., we have developed and are in the process of implementing a comprehensive, cross-disciplinary and innovative curriculum that is based on three primary objectives for teaching sexual health: attitude change, behavior change, and knowledge acquisition.

S A Kingsberg; C J Malemud; T Novak; K Cole-Kelly; M Z Wile; P Spanos; T M Nosek

2003-01-01

485

Copyright 2011, The Ohio State University Family and Consumer Sciences  

E-print Network

Foodborne Illness and Seafood Introduction Fish and seafood harvested from seawater can be contaminated to foodborne illness. Symptoms of illness Symptoms of Vibrio parahaemolyticus infection are diarrhea, abdominal Vibrio species: Foodborne Illness and Seafood--page 2 Ohio State University Extension embraces human

486

Copyright 2009, The Ohio State University Family and Consumer Sciences  

E-print Network

. Store in plastic bags and use within 3­5 days. Dry onions· --Store onions in a cool, dry, dark place-292-1868 Visit Ohio State University Extension's web site "Ohioline" at: http://ohioline.osu.edu Safe Handling

487

Copyright 2009, The Ohio State University Family and Consumer Sciences  

E-print Network

For more information, visit the Ohio Department of Aging web site at: http://www.goldenbuckeye.com and Ohio State University Extension's "Aging in Ohio" web site at: http://seniorseries.osu.edu Putting My more dark-green veggies like broccoli, spinach, and other dark leafy greens. #12;SS-152-R08--page 2

488

Positions Toward Science Studies in Medicine Among University Graduates of Medicine and the Teenaged Participants of the "Medical Systems" Study Program  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The "Medical Systems" program was designed to introduce high school students to the world of advanced medicine. Its premise was to use an applied scientific discipline like medicine to encourage high-school students' interest in basic science. This study compares the teen-aged graduates of "Medical Systems" with fourth and fifth-year medical students. It aims to identify the attitudes of these two groups towards medical science and basic sciences in medicine. The population included 94 graduates of "Medical Systems" from schools throughout Israel, who had also completed an advanced-level course in a basic science (biology, chemistry or physics), and 96 medical students from different Israeli universities. The students' attitudes were measured using West et al.'s questionnaire (Med Educ 16(4):188-191, 1982), which assesses both the attitude of the participants towards basic science knowledge, and their attitude towards their learning experience in medical school. Nine participants from each group were also interviewed using a semi-structured interview protocol. The results showed essential differences in the attitudes of the two groups. The high school students consider scientific knowledge far more essential for a physician than do the medical students, who also showed a far lower estimation of the effectiveness of their science studies.

Ben-Zvi-Assaraf, Orit; Even-Israel, Chava

2011-08-01

489

Internal Medicine Trainee Self-Assessments of End-of-Life Communication Skills Do Not Predict Assessments of Patients, Families, or Clinician-Evaluators  

PubMed Central

Abstract Purpose To investigate the strength of association between trainees' self-assessments of the quality of their end-of-life communication skills and the assessments of their patients, patients' families, and clinician-evaluators. Methods As part of a randomized trial, pre-intervention survey data were collected at two sites from internal medicine trainees and their patients, patients' families, and clinician-evaluators. In this observational analysis, comparisons using regression analysis were made between (1) trainees' scores on a scale of perceived competence at communication about end-of-life care and (2) patients', families', and clinician-evaluators' scores on a questionnaire on the quality of end-of-life communication (QOC). Secondary analyses were performed using topic-focused subscales of these measures. Results Internal medicine trainees (143) were studied with both self-assessment and external assessments. No significant associations were found between trainee perceived competence scores and primary outcome measures (p>0.05). Of the 12 secondary subscale analyses, trainees' self-ratings were significantly associated with external assessments for only one comparison, but the association was in the opposite direction with increased trainee ratings being significantly associated with decreased family ratings on “treatment discussions.” We also examined the correlation between ratings by patients, family, and clinician-evaluators, which showed significant correlations (p<0.05) for 7 of 18 comparisons (38.9%). Conclusions Trainee self-evaluations do not predict assessments by their patients, patients' families, or their clinician-evaluators regarding the quality of end-of-life communication. Although these results should be confirmed using the same measures across all raters, in the meantime efforts to improve communication about end-of-life care should consider outcomes other than physician self-assessment to determine intervention success. PMID:22475195

Dickson, Robert P.; Engelberg, Ruth A.; Back, Anthony L.; Ford, Dee W.

2012-01-01

490

Tradition meets innovation: transforming academic medical culture at the University of Pennsylvania's Perelman School of Medicine.  

PubMed

Traditional performance expectations and career advancement paths for academic physicians persist despite dramatic transformations in the academic workflow, workload, and workforce over the past 20 years. Although the academic physician's triple role as clinician, researcher, and educator has been lauded as the ideal by academic health centers, current standards of excellence for promotion and tenure are based on outdated models. These models fail to reward collaboration and center around rigid career advancement plans that do little to accommodate the changing needs of individuals and organizations. The authors describe an innovative, comprehensive, multipronged initiative at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania to initiate change in the culture of academic medicine and improve academic productivity, job satisfaction, and overall quality of life for junior faculty. As a key part of this intervention, task forces from each of the 13 participating departments/divisions met five times between September 2010 and January 2011 to produce recommendations for institutional change. The authors discuss how this initiative, using principles adopted from business transformation, generated themes and techniques that can potentially guide workforce environment innovation in academic health centers across the United States. Recommendations include embracing a promotion/tenure/evaluation system that supports and rewards tailored individual academic career plans; ensuring leadership, decision-making roles, and recognition for junior faculty; deepening administrative and team supports for junior faculty; and solidifying and rewarding mentorship for junior faculty. By doing so, academic health centers can ensure the retention and commitment of faculty throughout all stages of their careers. PMID:23425986

Pati, Susmita; Reum, Josef; Conant, Emily; Tuton, Lucy Wolf; Scott, Patricia; Abbuhl, Stephanie; Grisso, Jeane Ann

2013-04-01

491

Student Family Housing Adopts Non-Smoking Policy University of Toronto Student Family Housing is pleased to announce the adoption of a non-smoking  

E-print Network

Student Family Housing Adopts Non-Smoking Policy University of Toronto Student Family Housing is pleased to announce the adoption of a non-smoking policy. Effective May 1, 2012, smoking has been prohibited outdoors within 9 meters of all entrances. As of January 1, 2013, the indoor non-smoking policy

Toronto, University of

492

Universality of aging: family caregivers for elderly cancer patients  

PubMed Central

The world population is aging, with the proportion of older people (65+ years) expected to reach 21% in 2050 and to exceed the number of younger people (aged 15 or less) for the first time in history. Because cancer is particularly a chronic disease of older people, a large increase in the number of elderly patients with cancer is anticipated. The estimated number of new cancer cases worldwide among people over 65 is expected to grow from about 6 million in 2008 to more than 11 million during the coming decade. By 2030, individuals over 65 are expected to account for 70% of all cancer patients in the Western world. Along with the increase in oncology patients, the number of older people caring for their ill spouses or other relatives is also growing, with the ensuing toll on these caregivers causing major concern, especially in western countries. In different societies the characteristics of family caregiver stressors, cultural norms concerning caregiving, and the availability of support have a huge impact on those providing care. Any study of older caregivers of older cancer patients requires an integrative evaluation of aging that takes into account cultural, social, psychological, and behavioral variables. This review proposes a critical discussion of the multidimensionality of the caregiving and of the impact that age, culture, and gender have on it. PMID:25076927

Baider, Lea; Surbone, Antonella

2014-01-01

493

Truman State University Foundation Scholarship recipients for 2012-2013 Holman Family Graduate Student Scholarship  

E-print Network

Truman State University Foundation Scholarship recipients for 2012-2013 Holman Family Graduate Student Scholarship Erin Blankers Norah Friel Beatriz Parks Ryan Trimble This scholarship fund. Scholarships consist of the interest earnings on a $1 million gift to this fund made during the Bright Minds

Gering, Jon C.

494

Predicting Role Conflict, Overload and Contagion in Adult Women University Students with Families and Jobs  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many adult women studying at universities face difficulties related to their multiple roles, yet little is known about vulnerable groups or supportive responses. This study of 443 women with jobs and families enrolled in adult education, social work, or nursing identified to what extent life situations, institutional supports, and perceived demands and support systems predict role conflict, overload, and contagion.

Alice M. Home

1998-01-01

495

The University of Vermont Libraries' Center for Digital Initiatives: Fletcher Family  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The University of Vermont Libraries' Center for Digital Initiatives has continued to add to their online offerings in recent years. This latest collection is quite a pip, and it contains family correspondence from the Fletcher Family of Vermont. The family correspondence begins in 1826, and it is primarily focused around several family members who moved west to New York, Ohio, and other parts of the heartland. Throughout these letters, the various correspondents detail the process of creating and managing their new farms and the documents leave no fact (or price) unexplored as they discuss the land, grains, stock, and groceries. All told, there are 139 letters in the collection, and visitors can click on the "Browse the Collection" section to view the letters listed by author. Additionally, visitors can search the collection by keyword, title, or subject.

496

The effect of polyphenolic-polysaccharide conjugates from selected medicinal plants of Asteraceae family on the peroxynitrite-induced changes in blood platelet proteins.  

PubMed

Lots of plants belonging to Asteraceae family are very popular in folk medicine in Poland. These plants are also known as being rich in acidic polysaccharides, due to the presence of hexuronic acids or its derivatives. Our preliminary experiments have shown that the extract from Conyza canadensis L. possesses various biological activity, including antiplatelet, antiocoagulant and antioxidant properties. The aim of our study was to assess if macromolecular glycoconjugates from selected herbal plants of Asteraceae family: Achillea millefolium L., Arnica montana L., Echinacea purpurea L., Solidago virgaurea L., Chamomilla recutita (L.) Rauschert., and Conyza canadensis L. protect platelet proteins against nitrative and oxidative damage induced by peroxynitrite, which is responsible for oxidative/nitrative modifications of platelet proteins: the formation of 3-nitrotyrosine and carbonyl groups. These modifications may lead to changes of blood platelet functions and can have pathological consequences. The role of these different medicinal plants in the defence against oxidative/nitrative stress in human platelets is still unknown, therefore the oxidative damage to platelet proteins induced by peroxynitrite and protectory effects of tested conjugates by the estimation of carbonyl group level and nitrotyrosine formation (a marker of protein nitration) were studied in vitro. The antioxidative properties of the polyphenolic-polysaccharide conjugates from selected tested medicinal plants were also compared with the action of a well characterized antioxidative commercial polyphenol - resveratrol (3,4',5-trihydroxystilbene). The obtained results demonstrate that the compounds from herbal plants: A. millefolium, A. montana, E. purpurea, C. recutita, S. virgaurea, possess antioxidative properties and protect platelet proteins against peroxynitrite toxicity in vitro, similar to the glycoconjugates from C. canadensis. However, in the comparative studies, the polyphenolic-polysaccharide conjugates from selected tested medicinal plants were not found to be more effective antioxidant, than the solution of pure resveratrol. PMID:20869393

Saluk-Juszczak, Joanna; Pawlaczyk, Izabela; Olas, Beata; Ko?odziejczyk, Joanna; Ponczek, Michal; Nowak, Pawel; Tsirigotis-Wo?oszczak, Marta; Wachowicz, Barbara; Gancarz, Roman

2010-12-01

497

Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine Boston University School of Medicine, 72 East Concord Street, Boston, MA -2118-2526  

E-print Network

Concord Street, Boston, MA -2118-2526 PATHOLOGY SEMINARS, FALL TERM 2011 FRIDAYS, 1:45-2:45 PM* one Associate Professor of Pathology Modulating Neutrophil Function Harvard Medical School OCTOBER 7 Feng Zhang for Continuing Medical education to provide continuing medical education for physicians. Boston University School

Finzi, Adrien

498

Residents’ and preceptors’ perceptions of the use of the iPad for clinical teaching in a family medicine residency program  

PubMed Central

Background As Family Medicine programs across Canada are transitioning into a competency-based curriculum, medical students and clinical teachers are increasingly incorporating tablet computers in their work and educational activities. The purpose of this pilot study was to identify how preceptors and residents use tablet computers to implement and adopt a new family medicine curriculum and to evaluate how they access applications (apps) through their tablet in an effort to support and enhance effective teaching and learning. Methods Residents and preceptors (n = 25) from the Family Medicine program working at the Pembroke Regional Hospital in Ontario, Canada, were given iPads and training on how to use the device in clinical teaching and learning activities and how to access the online curriculum. Data regarding the use and perceived contribution of the iPads were collected through surveys and focus groups. This mixed methods research used analysis of survey responses to support the selection of questions for focus groups. Results Reported results were categorized into: curriculum and assessment; ease of use; portability; apps and resources; and perceptions about the use of the iPad in teaching/learning setting. Most participants agreed on the importance of accessing curriculum resources through the iPad but recognized that these required enhancements to facilitate use. The iPad was considered to be more useful for activities involving output of information than for input. Participants’ responses regarding the ease of use of mobile technology were heterogeneous due to the diversity of computer proficiency across users. Residents had a slightly more favorable opinion regarding the iPad’s contribution to teaching/learning compared to preceptors. Conclusions iPad’s interface should be fully enhanced to allow easy access to online curriculum and its built-in resources. The differences in computer proficiency level among users should be reduced by sharing knowledge through workshops led by more skillful iPad users. To facilitate collection of information through the iPad, the design of electronic data-input forms should consider the participants’ reported negative perceptions towards typing data through mobile devices. Technology deployment projects should gather sufficient evidence from pilot studies in order to guide efforts to adapt resources and infrastructure to relevant needs of Family Medicine teachers and learners. PMID:25138307

2014-01-01

499

Building learning communities: evolution of the colleges at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine.  

PubMed

Learning communities, which are an emerging trend in medical education, create a foundation for professional and academic development through the establishment of longitudinal relationships between students and faculty. In this article, the authors describe the robust learning community system at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, which encompasses wellness, career planning, professional development, and academics.The Vanderbilt Advisory Colleges Program introduced in 2006 initially focused on two goals: promoting wellness and providing career advising. In the 2011-2012 academic year, the focus of the colleges expanded to incorporate an enhanced level of personal career advising and an academic component. In the four-year College Colloquium course, faculty selected as college mentors teach the medical humanities and lead sessions dedicated to student professional development in the areas of leadership, research, and service-learning. This academic and professional development program builds on the existing strengths of the colleges and has transformed the colleges into learning communities.The authors reflect on lessons learned and discuss future plans. They report that internal data and data from the Association of American Medical Colleges Medical School Graduation Questionnaire support consistently high and increasing satisfaction among Vanderbilt medical students, across the metrics of personal counseling, faculty mentoring, and career planning. PMID:23887019

Fleming, Amy; Cutrer, William; Moutsios, Sandi; Heavrin, Benjamin; Pilla, Michael; Eichbaum, Quentin; Rodgers, Scott

2013-09-01

500

RappoRtSchulich School of Medicine & dentiStry WeStern univerSity / AluMni MAgAzine / 2013  

E-print Network

RappoRtSchulich School of Medicine & dentiStry WeStern univerSity / AluMni MAgAzine / 2013 setting of Medicine & dentistry ReseaRch 16 ReseaRch notaBles 18 eMpoweRing ReseaRch through leadership, mentorship, Schulich School of Medicine & dentistry, has spent the past 25 years learning about AlS, and he's confident

Denham, Graham