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1

Behavioral Medicine and University Departments of Family Practice  

PubMed Central

Behavioral medicine brings knowledge and skills from the social sciences to the practice of medicine. Modifying behavior which causes a health problem, disease prevention and health promotion, improving the relationship between patients and health professionals, understanding cultural and ethical issues, and the effect of illness on behavior are all aspects of behavioral medicine. Such `whole person' medicine fits well into family practice. However, careful consideration of the risks, challenges, opportunities and responsibilities of behavioral medicine is necessary. Academic family physicians must conduct research and help develop educational programs that will prepare graduates to deal with frustrating health problems which are affected by behavior. A division of behavioral medicine eventually may be established in the University of British Columbia's Department of Family Practice.

Grantham, Peter

1983-01-01

2

[Family and community medicine and the university. SESPAS report 2010].  

PubMed

Family and community medicine is an academic subject, a medical specialty and a health profession with distinct dimensions: healthcare, teaching, research and management. In this discipline, the object of knowledge is the person, understood as a whole. Family medicine, as an academic subject, and primary care, as a health education setting, should be incorporated into the core graduate and postgraduate curricula. The absence of these elements leads to training bias and has major repercussions on quality, coordination and patient safety. The development of the Health Professions Act and the construction of the European Higher Education Area (EHEA) have created a favorable climate for the presence of this discipline in the university. Since the 1960s, family medicine has been consolidated as an academic subject with its own departments in almost all European universities, and a significant number of family physicians are teachers. A balance has been achieved between the hospital-based system (based on theory, disease, and the biological model) and the patient-centred model (based on problem solving, community-oriented and the bio-psycho-social model). The introduction of family and community medicine as a specific subject, and as a transverse subject and as an option in practicals, represents the adaptation of the educational system to social needs. This adaptation also represents a convergence with other European countries and the various legal requirements protecting this convergence. However, this new situation requires a new structure (departments) and faculty (professors and associate and assistant professors). PMID:22055214

Casado Vicente, Verónica; Bonal Pitz, Pablo; Cucalón Arenal, José Manuel; Serrano Ferrández, Elena; Suárez Gonzalez, Félix

2011-11-04

3

The Evolution of Family Medicine Resident Projects at Dalhousie University  

PubMed Central

The Dalhousie Family Medicine Residency Program has always attempted to meet the research objectives of the College of Family Physicians of Canada. From a “Monitored Reading and Research” program, where projects were encouraged, the department developed a program which involved a mandatory project, preferably involving research, that is formally and objectively evaluated and supervised by faculty. The background, rationale, and problems encountered, as well as attempted solutions, are outlined.

O'Connor, John F.

1989-01-01

4

Developing an Integrated Evidence-Based Medicine Curriculum for Family Medicine Residency at the University of Alberta  

Microsoft Academic Search

There is general consensus in the academic community that evidence- based medicine (EBM) teaching is essential. Unfortunately, many postgraduate programs have significant weakness in their EBM programs. The Family Medicine Residency committee at the University of Alberta felt their EBM curriculum would benefit from critical review and revision. An EBM Curriculum Committee was created to evaluate previous components and develop

G. Michael Allan; Christina Korownyk; Amy Tan; Hugh Hindle; Lina Kung; Donna Manca

2008-01-01

5

Two Programs for Primary Care Practitioners: Family Medicine Training in an Affiliated University Hospital Program and Primary Care Graduate Training in an Urban Private Medical Center  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Eugene Farley describes the University of Rochester and Highland Hospital Family Medicine Program for teaching of primary care internists, primary care pediatricians, and family doctors. Thomas Piemme presents the George Washington University School of Medicine alternative, a 2-year program in an ambulatory setting leading to broad eligibility in…

Farley, Eugene S.; Piemme, Thomas E.

1975-01-01

6

Quo Vadis Family Medicine?  

PubMed Central

Originally presented as the first George McQuitty Memorial Lecture in Calgary, this article reviews the progress of family medicine since the inception of the first residency training programs in 1966, and speculates on its future.

Rice, Donald I.

1981-01-01

7

Starting a family during medical studies? Results of a pilot study on family friendliness in the study of medicine at the University of Ulm  

PubMed Central

Objective: The Ulm pilot study aimed to explore factors for a successful combination of medical education and starting a family. The empirical data derived from this study constitutes the foundation for an evidence-based reform of the medical curriculum in Ulm. Methods: In 2009, qualitative interviews with 37 of the 79 medical students with children at University of Ulm were conducted and analyzed using content analysis. The detected problem areas were used to develop a quantitative questionnaire for studying parents and academic teaching members in medical education in Ulm. Results: The parents were older, more often married and more likely to already have obtained a first training. One third of the students thought there was no ideal time to start a family during the years of medical education or specialist training. However, the majority of the students (61%) were convinced that parenthood is more compatible with medical studies than with specialist training. The interview data suggests that the end of medical school (4th to 6th year of studies), preferably during semester break, is especially suitable for child birth since it allows students to continue their studies without ‘losing time’. Conclusion: The biography and career of studying parents in medicine have specific characteristics. Universities and teaching hospitals are required to no longer leave the compatibility of family and study responsibilities to the students themselves. Rather, flexible structures need to be implemented that enable students to start a family while continuing their education. This means providing more childcare and greater support regarding academic counselling and career development.

Liebhardt, Hubert; Stolz, Katrin; Mortl, Kathrin; Prospero, Katrin; Niehues, Johanna; Fegert, Jorg

2011-01-01

8

[Why an Academic Department of Family Medicine?].  

PubMed

Over the last fifty years, Family Medicine has became not only an important part of many health systems around the world but also an established academic discipline. However, in the Iberoamerican context its development has been slow and with a number of difficulties. After a decade of work at the Family and Community Medicine Programme of the Catholic University of Chile, the role of Family medicine as an academic discipline requires a reflection. A definition of Family Medicine is advanced in line with a recent proposal of WONCA Europe including some fundamental aspects in the practice of any family doctor. A set of criteria for considering a medical subject as a discipline is analyzed and discussed with reference to Family Medicine. A unique field of action, an established body of knowledge, a set of analytical techniques, an specific area of research, its own philosophy, and a training which is intellectually rigorous, are all criteria that Family Medicine fulfills. Family Medicine is a medical discipline with a clear definition and it can be considered an academic discipline. Therefore, it is possible to establish an academic department within a Faculty of Medicine in Chile, which will contribute to a more balanced and complete medical education in the country. PMID:12790085

Pantoja, Tomás

2003-03-01

9

An innovative family medicine clerkship.  

PubMed

A clinical clerkship in family medicine at Brown University has been developed utilizing many innovative educational modalities. These include games, simulations, group problem solving, research projects, videotaping, case presentations, field trips, sensitivity sessions, computer assisted instruction, patient management problems, slide-tape shows, and direct clinical experiences. These modalities are described together with a new approach to evaluation. Students' evaluations of the clerkship have been excellent, providing evidence that this clerkship offers a model of learning that is both effective and enjoyable. PMID:7276876

Smith, S R; MacLeod, N M

1981-10-01

10

Practice Opportunities for Family Medicine Graduates  

PubMed Central

This paper documents the career choices of a graduating class of family medicine residents at Queen's University. In the first post-graduation year, residents were evenly divided between those who undertook a third year of training and those who began practice. For those who began practice, a profile of their first year of experience demonstrates the excellent variety of opportunities awaiting family medicine graduates.

Walters, David J.

1980-01-01

11

Behavioral medicine in Russian family medicine  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Russian Federation's recently adopted family medicine as a specialty, but with little or no training in psychosocial and behavioral issues, unlike many training programs in other countries. The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore the perceptions and experiences of Russian primary care physicians regarding the practice of behavioral medicine and psychosocial methods. Semi-structured in-depth interviews were conducted

David Buyck; Michael Floyd; Fred Tudiver; Lana McGrady; Andrea Journagin; Svetlana Kishenko

2005-01-01

12

Decision making in family medicine  

PubMed Central

Abstract Objective To compare the ability of users of 2 medical search engines, InfoClinique and the Trip database, to provide correct answers to clinical questions and to explore the perceived effects of the tools on the clinical decision-making process. Design Randomized trial. Setting Three family medicine units of the family medicine program of the Faculty of Medicine at Laval University in Quebec city, Que. Participants Fifteen second-year family medicine residents. Intervention Residents generated 30 structured questions about therapy or preventive treatment (2 questions per resident) based on clinical encounters. Using an Internet platform designed for the trial, each resident answered 20 of these questions (their own 2, plus 18 of the questions formulated by other residents, selected randomly) before and after searching for information with 1 of the 2 search engines. For each question, 5 residents were randomly assigned to begin their search with InfoClinique and 5 with the Trip database. Main outcome measures The ability of residents to provide correct answers to clinical questions using the search engines, as determined by third-party evaluation. After answering each question, participants completed a questionnaire to assess their perception of the engine’s effect on the decision-making process in clinical practice. Results Of 300 possible pairs of answers (1 answer before and 1 after the initial search), 254 (85%) were produced by 14 residents. Of these, 132 (52%) and 122 (48%) pairs of answers concerned questions that had been assigned an initial search with InfoClinique and the Trip database, respectively. Both engines produced an important and similar absolute increase in the proportion of correct answers after searching (26% to 62% for InfoClinique, for an increase of 36%; 24% to 63% for the Trip database, for an increase of 39%; P = .68). For all 30 clinical questions, at least 1 resident produced the correct answer after searching with either search engine. The mean (SD) time of the initial search for each question was 23.5 (7.6) minutes with InfoClinique and 22.3 (7.8) minutes with the Trip database (P = .30). Participants’ perceptions of each engine’s effect on the decision-making process were very positive and similar for both search engines. Conclusion Family medicine residents’ ability to provide correct answers to clinical questions increased dramatically and similarly with the use of both InfoClinique and the Trip database. These tools have strong potential to increase the quality of medical care.

Labrecque, Michel; Ratte, Stephane; Fremont, Pierre; Cauchon, Michel; Ouellet, Jerome; Hogg, William; McGowan, Jessie; Gagnon, Marie-Pierre; Njoya, Merlin; Legare, France

2013-01-01

13

Family Bonding with Universities  

Microsoft Academic Search

One justification offered for legacy admissions policies at universities is that that they bind entire families to the university.\\u000a Proponents maintain that these policies have a number of benefits, including increased donations from members of these families.\\u000a We use a rich set of data from an anonymous selective research institution to investigate which types of family members have\\u000a the most

Jonathan MeerHarvey; Harvey S. Rosen

2010-01-01

14

Family Medicine's Waltz with Systems  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Family Medicine first formally confronted systems thinking with the adoption of the biopsychosocial model for understanding disease in a holistic manner; this is a description of a natural system. More recently, Family Medicine has been consciously engaged in developing itself as a system for delivering health care, an artificial system. We make…

Downing, Raymond

2012-01-01

15

Family medicine as a career option  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE To track and describe career choice decisions of medical students as they progressed through their undergraduate training. DESIGN Quantitative survey of each class at 5 points during their undergraduate experience. Each survey collected qualitative descriptors of students’ current career choices. SETTING Faculty of Medicine at Memorial University of Newfoundland in St John’s. PARTICIPANTS Undergraduate medical students in each year from 1999 to 2006. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Number of students considering family medicine as a career option at 5 different data-collection points throughout the medical school curriculum. RESULTS Many students considered family medicine as a career choice early in their undergraduate experience. The number of students considering family medicine dropped significantly during the second year of the curriculum. This trend was consistent across all students surveyed. Although interest in family medicine as a career rebounded later in the curriculum, it never fully recovered. CONCLUSION A large percentage of medical students considered family medicine as a career choice when they entered medical school. The percentage dropped significantly by the end of the second year of training. Attention should be directed toward understanding how the undergraduate medical curriculum in the first 2 years can protect and cultivate interest in family medicine as a career choice.

Bethune, Cheri; Hansen, Penelope A.; Deacon, Diana; Hurley, Katrina; Kirby, Allison; Godwin, Marshall

2007-01-01

16

North Carolina Family Medicine Research Network (NC-FP-RN).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Department of Family Medicine at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and the North Carolina Family Medicine Research Network (NC-FM-RN; formerly called the North Carolina Family Practice-Based Practice Based Research Network) received AHRQ...

C. M. Mitchell K. Donahue P. Sloane T. Daaleman

2005-01-01

17

Holistic Medicine in Family Practice  

PubMed Central

During the twentieth century there have been great advances in medicine in the area of science and technology. At the same time, there has been a trend back to a more natural, humanistic approach to counteract patients' feelings of alienation. Holistic medicine approaches the physical, emotional, spiritual, and social aspects of a person as they relate to health and disease. It emphasizes prevention; concern for the environment and the food we eat; patient responsibility; using illness as a creative force to teach people to change; the `physician, heal thyself' philosophy; and appropriate alternatives to orthodox medicine. Family medicine faces the challenge of integrating these humanistic concepts with science.

Borins, Mel

1984-01-01

18

Teaching Family Medicine  

PubMed Central

Students should study the family system just as they would an organ system, making use of family studies and home visits. A comparison of private and academic faculty revealed the need to instruct private practitioners on patient selection and teaching methodology. Experience has shown that patients from the lower socioeconomic classes tend to allow the student to participate more in their family life and health care and that, in return, the student is often able to assist these patients in some way. Faculty must guide, monitor, and assist students with problems. Audit of students' and patients' reports on and evaluations of the family study will provide valuable information for planning future programs or revamping continuing ones.

Baumslag, Naomi

1976-01-01

19

Family Medicine: The Discipline, 1979  

PubMed Central

In order for any discipline to remain current, and therefore to grow, it must constantly be aware of its own definition. From this definition will come the need for constant revision, exclusion of outdated or inappropriate material and inclusion of new knowledge. This article examines the principles by which family medicine can perform these functions.

Hennen, Brian K. E.

1979-01-01

20

Personal and professional development of teachers in family medicine.  

PubMed Central

While medical educators have devoted considerable effort to examining the optimal learning environment for teaching family medicine, less attention has been paid to "blocks" that prevent teachers of family medicine from being effective. This paper considers three major aspects of this problem: the personal and professional development of the teacher; blocks that impede this development; and the value of intervening in the teaching-learning process. These concerns are discussed in relation to an intervention program developed at the Byron Family Medical Centre, a family practice teaching unit affiliated with Victoria Hospital Corporation and the Department of Family Medicine, University of Western Ontario, London.

Brown, J B

1984-01-01

21

Obstetrical practice after a family medicine residency.  

PubMed Central

To determine factors influencing physicians to provide obstetrical care, a questionnaire was sent to all 149 graduates of the University of Western Ontario family medicine program from 1987 to 1991, inclusive. Few (37.1%) of the 105 respondents still performed low-risk deliveries. Most frequently cited negative factors included interference with lifestyle, interruption of regular office routine, and insufficient training in obstetrics. Rural postal code, neonatal advanced life support training, and older age positively correlated with obstetrical practice. Ways in which residency training programs could address the alarming decrease in family practice obstetrics are discussed.

Buckle, D.

1994-01-01

22

Obstetrical practice after a family medicine residency.  

PubMed

To determine factors influencing physicians to provide obstetrical care, a questionnaire was sent to all 149 graduates of the University of Western Ontario family medicine program from 1987 to 1991, inclusive. Few (37.1%) of the 105 respondents still performed low-risk deliveries. Most frequently cited negative factors included interference with lifestyle, interruption of regular office routine, and insufficient training in obstetrics. Rural postal code, neonatal advanced life support training, and older age positively correlated with obstetrical practice. Ways in which residency training programs could address the alarming decrease in family practice obstetrics are discussed. PMID:8130674

Buckle, D

1994-02-01

23

Why would I choose a career in family medicine?  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE To describe the factors that medical students report influencethem to pursue careers in family medicine. DESIGN Qualitative study using focus groups and interviews and the results of surveys conducted at 3 different points in medical education. SETTING Three medical schools in western Canada: the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, the University of Calgary in Alberta, and the University of Alberta in Edmonton. PARTICIPANTS A total of 33 medical students. METHOD Students were surveyed during the first 2 weeks of their programs, at the end of their preclinical training, and again at the end of their clinical training on their interest in family medicine or other specialty areas. Focus groups and interviews were conducted to explore the reasons students gave for an emerging or final interest in family medicine as a career choice. A small cohort of students who stayed with another specialty choice or switched to another specialty from family medicine were also interviewed. Thematic content analysis was carried out. MAIN FINDINGS Students identified several important influences that were subdivided into pre–medical school, medical school, postgraduate training, and life-in-medicine influences. Many positive and negative aspects of family medicine were reported during the preclinical period. Clinical exposure was critical for demonstrating the positive aspects of family medicine. Postgraduate training, future practice, and nonpractice life considerations also influenced students’ career choices. CONCLUSION This study provides a qualitative understanding of why students choose careers in family medicine. Medical schools should offer high-quality family medicine clinical experiences, consider the potentially positive influence of rural settings, and provide early and accurate information on family medicine training and career opportunities. These interventions might help students make more informed career decisions and increase the likelihood that they will consider careers in family medicine.

Scott, Ian; Wright, Bruce; Brenneis, Fraser; Brett-MacLean, Pamela; McCaffrey, Laurie

2007-01-01

24

The Future of Psychology in Family Medicine  

Microsoft Academic Search

Psychology has been integral to the field of family medicine since its inception as a medical specialty in the 1960s. Psychologists and other behavioral scientists contribute to family medicine in teaching clinical skills, in defining research questions, in developing research methodology, and in creating integrated physical\\/mental health care delivery systems. Future developments in the field of psychology in family medicine

Edward J. Callahan

1997-01-01

25

Ten Years as a Family Medicine Teacher  

PubMed Central

This article summarizes impressions after ten years of fulltime teaching in a department of family medicine. Both positive and negative experiences are assessed, including views on teaching, medical school admissions, and the acceptance of training in family medicine. Concern is expressed for the longterm future of family medicine residency programs.

Biehn, John

1981-01-01

26

Locum practice by recent family medicine graduates  

PubMed Central

ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To explore the demographic characteristics of recent Alberta family medicine residency graduates choosing locum practice, as well as their reasons for choosing and leaving locum practice and the frustrations and rewards of locum placements. DESIGN Web-based and mailed cross-sectional survey and interviews. SETTING The family medicine residency training programs at the University of Calgary and the University of Alberta. PARTICIPANTS A total of 152 graduates who had completed family medicine training between 2001 and 2005, inclusive, and who had either done locums in the past or were doing locums at the time of the survey. Interviews were conducted with a subsample of this group (n = 10). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Duration of locum practice, reasons for choosing and leaving locum practice, and frustrations and rewards of locum practice. RESULTS Of the 377 graduates surveyed, 242 (64.2%) responded. Among the respondents, 155 (64.0%) had in the past practised or were at the time practising as locum physicians (complete data were available for 152 respondents). Most (71.7%) had arranged locum placements independently. The average duration of a locum placement was 9.1 months. Female and younger family physicians were more likely to practise as locum tenentes. The most common reason for doing a locum placement was as a practice exploration to increase experience or competence (46.7%). The primary reason for leaving locum practice was to settle into permanent practice (52.1%); interview data revealed that this reflected a desire for stability, a desire for continuity with patients, personal life changes, financial considerations, and the end of a perceived need for exploration. Locum tenentes were frustrated with negotiating locum contracts, low patient volumes, lack of patient continuity, and working with difficult staff. Rewards of locum practice included flexibility and freedom in practice, gaining experience, and the rewards that come from seeing patients. In total, 44.6% of family medicine graduates joined practices in which they had done locum placements. CONCLUSION Locum practice is a common early career choice for Alberta family medicine graduates. The most common reason for doing a locum placement was to gain experience, not to delay commitment. Locum practice tends to appeal more to female and younger family physicians. Rewards of locum practice were also cited as reasons for participation. Locum tenentes tend to be frustrated with the business aspects of arranging placements and with the generally low patient volumes. Long-term recruitment efforts by community physicians should be initiated within the first week of locum engagement.

Myhre, Douglas L.; Konkin, Jill; Woloschuk, Wayne; Szafran, Olga; Hansen, Chantal; Crutcher, Rodney

2010-01-01

27

Missions and medicine at Amherst: family ties to Edward Hitchcock jr, the missionary movement, and the American University of Beirut.  

PubMed

The Haystack Movement began at Williams College in 1805, occasioning the spread of American missions throughout the world. A half century later, two graduates of nearby Amherst College, Edward Hitchcock Jr and Daniel Bliss, laid the foundations for college health services in this country and for mission work and education in the Middle East. The influences of these two 19th century Amherst alumni are still felt today in our college health services and at the American University of Beirut. PMID:21660803

Dorman, John M

2011-01-01

28

Family and Occupational Medicine Linkage Model.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This linkage model refers to an educational model established in a clinical setting which can assist in providing opportunities for residents in family medicine to link up with their counterparts in occupational medicine so as to provide integrated traini...

J. Hake

1984-01-01

29

A Course for Teaching Patient-Centered Medicine to Family Medicine Residents.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Describes a three-year course at Ben Gurion University (Israel) to develop attitudes and skills necessary for patient-centered medicine. The course uses directed reading, open discussion, case presentations, role-playing, and Balint groups to develop skills at four levels: doctor-patient communication; family systems theory; family systems…

Yeheskel, Ayala; Biderman, Aya; Borkan, Jeffrey M.; Herman, Joseph

2000-01-01

30

Are Catholic universities giving up reproductive medicine?  

PubMed

The Catholic Church has established a large number of universities worldwide. A dozen have schools of medicine and the impact of church doctrine on reproductive medicine appears widely disparate between some medical schools at Catholic universities in Europe and the rest of the world. The pressure of the Vatican on the Catholic universities in Belgium to abandon IVF is mounting. Comparison of the scientific performances by the Catholic universities with and without IVF shows that the absence of IVF is disastrous for research in reproductive medicine. PMID:18088520

Brosens, Ivo

2007-12-01

31

Family Medicine/Northern Medical Services Involvement in Northern Saskatchewan  

PubMed Central

To address the problems of recruitment and retention of family physicians in various remote locations in northern Saskatchewan, the University of Saskatchewan became involved through Northern Medical Services, a division of the Department of Family Medicine. The University's involvement consists of the provision of resident family-physician services, visiting consultant services, family-practise resident training, research, and a consulting role of the Medical Health Officer. This paper reviews the context in which this program was created, its role in health care in the area, and its involvement with the communities in health promotion and research.

Irvine, James

1988-01-01

32

Public Health and Family Medicine: An Opportunity  

Microsoft Academic Search

The current national concern about bioterrorism and the inadequacy of the public health infrastruc- ture offers an opportunity for American family physicians to assume a key role in the front line of the US public health system. To meet this chal- lenge, family medicine educators need to insure that all family physicians are well trained to collab- orate effectively with

Doug Campos-Outcalt

33

EMORY UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF MEDICINE  

Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research (CBER)

Text Version... and decreases complications compared to the traditional landmark technique in patients in a pediatric intensive care unit. Critical Care Medicine ... More results from www.fda.gov/downloads/advisorycommittees/committeesmeetingmaterials

34

BOSTON UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF MEDICINE ...  

Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research (CBER)

Text Version... Performance Committee of the Ethics Interest Group, Society for General Internal Medicine 2003 – current Member, Health Literacy Interest Group ... More results from www.fda.gov/downloads/advisorycommittees/committeesmeetingmaterials

35

Evidence-based medicine among Jordanian family physicians Awareness, attitude, and knowledge  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVE To assess family practitioners' attitudes toward and awareness of evidence-based medicine (EBM). DESIGN A cross-sectional study from a questionnaire distributed between January and March 2007. SETTING Rural and urban family medicine centres throughout Jordan that are affiliated with the Ministry of Health, military centres, university medical centres, and the private sector. PARTICIPANTS Two hundred family physicians. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES

Lana Halaseh; Abdel Halim Mous; Adel Dabdoub

36

Competency-based evaluation tools for integrative medicine training in family medicine residency: a pilot study  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: As more integrative medicine educational content is integrated into conventional family medicine teaching, the need for effective evaluation strategies grows. Through the Integrative Family Medicine program, a six site pilot program of a four year residency training model combining integrative medicine and family medicine training, we have developed and tested a set of competency-based evaluation tools to assess residents'

Benjamin Kligler; Mary Koithan; Victoria Maizes; Meg Hayes; Craig Schneider; Patricia Lebensohn; Susan Hadley

2007-01-01

37

Sports Medicine and the Family Physician  

PubMed Central

As family practitioners we are encouraged to move with the times in every aspect of medicine. We pride ourselves on having received good training to apply our knowledge in all fields of medicine. The preventative aspects have been adequately emphasized in medical schools in all departments. We must give the greatest thought to the preventative aspects of sports medicine and to seek knowledge in this science that many of us were unable to or did not receive in our earlier training. Imagesp45-a

Bullard, J. A.

1970-01-01

38

The University of Vermont College of Medicine.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This study of the origin and history of the University of Vermont College of Medicine begins with the appointment of John Pomeroy to the faculty in 1804, and traces the years that followed. Chiefly concerned with the individuals who were involved, it is a case study of the responses of one small medical school to reform movements, and its ability…

Kaufman, Martin

39

Hypnosis and Hypnotism in Family Medicine  

PubMed Central

This article attempts to define and demystify hypnosis and to present the range of its applications in family medicine. The author reviews definitions and describes hypnotic phenomena, suggestibility, and the use of suggestion, as well as traditional, semitraditional, and Ericksonian induction methods, precautions, and dangers. Clinical uses are then presented for the family physician to apply to surgery, obstetrics, pain treatment, psychosomatic disorders, and psychotherapy. Imagesp2076-a

Nadeau, Gaetan

1992-01-01

40

Exploring and understanding academic leadership in family medicine  

PubMed Central

Abstract Objective To explore how family physicians understand the concept of academic leadership. Design Case study. Setting Department of Family and Community Medicine at the University of Toronto in Ontario. Participants Thirty family physician academic leaders. Methods Focus groups and interviews were conducted with family physicians from a large multisite urban university who were identified by peers as academic leaders at various career stages. Transcripts from the focus groups and interviews were anonymized and themes were analyzed and negotiated among 3 researchers. Main findings Participants identified qualities of leadership among academic leaders that align with those identified in the current literature. Despite being identified by others as academic leaders, participants were reluctant to self-identify as such. Participants believed they had taken on early leadership roles by default rather than through planned career development. Conclusion This study affirms the need to define academic leadership explicitly, advance a culture that supports it, and nurture leaders at all levels with a variety of strategies.

Oandasan, Ivy; White, David; Hammond Mobilio, Melanie; Gotlib Conn, Lesley; Feldman, Kymm; Kim, Florence; Rouleau, Katherine; Sorensen, Leslie

2013-01-01

41

Increasing student interest in family medicine and urban health care: the family care tract.  

PubMed

Throughout the last decade, general interest in primary care has drastically decreased. While medical students collectively show a high awareness for the significance of primary care during their first two years of medical school, this enthusiasm wanes for many as they complete their clinical years. As a result, fewer students enter into this concentration each year. In an attempt to mediate this changing interest, the University of Maryland School of Medicine Department of Family and Community Medicine has implemented the Family Care Track. This longitudinal experience spans the first two years of medical school and allows for mentorship by family medicine faculty, while also providing students with the opportunity to learn via the formation of long-term relationships with patients. PMID:19388405

Colgan, Richard; Iafolla, Caitlin E; Rooks, Yvette; Stewart, David L

2009-01-01

42

Barriers to Training Family Medicine Residents in Community Health Centers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background and Objectives: Training partnerships between family medicine residencies (FMRs) and community health centers (CHCs) are a potential solution to the chronic problem of health work- force shortages in CHCs. We conducted a national survey to identify the barriers to training family medicine residents in CHCs. Methods: We asked US family medicine residency directors to identify barriers to training residents

Jacob E. Sunshine; Carl G. Morris; Misbah Keen; C. Holly; A. Andrilla; Frederick M. Chen

2010-01-01

43

Effects of Wellness Programs in Family Medicine  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective of this research was to determine the effects of wellness programs on quality of life and utilization in an\\u000a academic family medicine practice in two small controlled studies. One offered stress management and problem solving; the\\u000a second offered a broader wellness intervention. Outcome measures consisted of scores on the Beck Anxiety Inventory, Hamilton\\u000a Depression Inventory, CES-D (depression), Health

Angele McGrady; Julie Brennan; Denis Lynch

2009-01-01

44

Early Abortion in Family Medicine: Clinical Outcomes  

PubMed Central

PURPOSE Clinical innovations have made it more feasible to incorporate early abortion into family medicine, yet the outcomes of early abortion procedures in this setting have not been well studied. We wished to assess the outcomes of first-trimester medication and aspiration abortion procedures by family physicians. METHODS Prospective observational cohort study conducted from August 2001 to February 2005 of 2,550 women who sought pregnancy termination in 4 clinical practices of family medicine departments and 1 private office/training site. RESULTS The rate of successful uncomplicated procedures for medication was 96.5% (95% confidence interval [CI], 95.5%–97.0%) and for aspiration was 99.9% (CI, 99.3%–1). Adverse events and complications of medication abortions were failed procedure (ongoing pregnancy; n = 19, 1.45%); incomplete abortion (n = 16, 1.22%); hemorrhage (n = 9, 0.69%); and patient request for aspiration (n = 1, 0.08%). One (0.08%) missed ectopic pregnancy was seen among patients receiving medication. Four types of adverse outcomes were encountered with aspiration: incomplete abortion requiring re-aspiration (n = 21, 1.83%); hemorrhage during the procedure (n = 4, 0.35%); missed ectopic pregnancy (n = 3, 0.26%); and minor endometritis (n = 1, 0.09%). Missed ectopic pregnancies were successfully treated in the inpatient setting without mortality (overall hospitalization rate of 0.16 of 100). All other complications were managed within outpatient family medicine sites. Rates of complication did not vary by experience of physician or by site of care (residency vs private practice). CONCLUSIONS Complications of medication and aspiration procedures occurred at a low rate, and most were minor and managed without incident.

Bennett, Ian M.; Baylson, Margaret; Kalkstein, Karin; Gillespie, Ginger; Bellamy, Scarlett L.; Fleischman, Joan

2009-01-01

45

A Putative Ancestry of Family Practice and Family Medicine: Genogram of a Discipline  

Microsoft Academic Search

The medical specialty of family practice and its academic discipline, family medicine, have both struggled to define their identities with respect to each other and with respect to medicine in general. Family practice and family medicine now appear to be in the young-adult stage of development. In early adulthood, it is difficult to gain an objective perspective on how multigenerational

Michael A. Crouch

1989-01-01

46

The Future of Family Medicine: A Collaborative Project of the Family Medicine Community  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND Recognizing fundamental flaws in the fragmented US health care systems and the potential of an integrative, generalist approach, the leadership of 7 national family medicine organizations initiated the Future of Family Medicine (FFM) project in 2002. The goal of the project was to develop a strategy to transform and renew the discipline of family medicine to meet the needs of patients in a changing health care environment. METHODS A national research study was conducted by independent research firms. Interviews and focus groups identified key issues for diverse constituencies, including patients, payers, residents, students, family physicians, and other clinicians. Subsequently, interviews were conducted with nationally representative samples of 9 key constituencies. Based in part on these data, 5 task forces addressed key issues to meet the project goal. A Project Leadership Committee synthesized the task force reports into the report presented here. RESULTS The project identified core values, a New Model of practice, and a process for development, research, education, partnership, and change with great potential to transform the ability of family medicine to improve the health and health care of the nation. The proposed New Model of practice has the following characteristics: a patient-centered team approach; elimination of barriers to access; advanced information systems, including an electronic health record; redesigned, more functional offices; a focus on quality and outcomes; and enhanced practice finance. A unified communications strategy will be developed to promote the New Model of family medicine to multiple audiences. The study concluded that the discipline needs to oversee the training of family physicians who are committed to excellence, steeped in the core values of the discipline, competent to provide family medicine’s basket of services within the New Model, and capable of adapting to varying patient needs and changing care technologies. Family medicine education must continue to include training in maternity care, the care of hospitalized patients, community and population health, and culturally effective and proficient care. A comprehensive lifelong learning program for each family physician will support continuous personal, professional, and clinical practice assessment and improvement. Ultimately, systemwide changes will be needed to ensure high-quality health care for all Americans. Such changes include taking steps to ensure that every American has a personal medical home, promoting the use and reporting of quality measures to improve performance and service, advocating that every American have health care coverage for basic services and protection against extraordinary health care costs, advancing research that supports the clinical decision making of family physicians and other primary care clinicians, and developing reimbursement models to sustain family medicine and primary care practices. CONCLUSIONS The leadership of US family medicine organizations is committed to a transformative process. In partnership with others, this process has the potential to integrate health care to improve the health of all Americans.

2004-01-01

47

Revolutionary leadership and family medicine education.  

PubMed

Reform of the payment and delivery systems in American health care is now being discussed at the highest levels of business and government. Family medicine educators, researchers, and program leaders have an opportunity to provide substantial leadership to this process in their own communities and nationally. To do so, they must reconsider the assumptions made in creating our current systems of practice and education, and this will require new leadership skills that focus on innovation and adaptability. It will also require a more aggressive willingness to test new ideas and a new scientific method to prove or disprove their value. This essay outlines essential elements of such leadership for those responsible for the education of future generations of family physicians. PMID:18382841

Saultz, John W

2008-04-01

48

An International Physician Education Program to Support the Recent Introduction of Family Medicine in Egypt  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background and Objectives: There are few reports of systematic international physician development programs to create family medicine as a new specialty in a developing nation. This paper describes the process and outcomes of a large-scale effort to initiate new family medicine training through the Egyptian Ministry of Health and Population (MOHP) using a 12-week US-based program at the University of

Désirée A. Lie; John R. Boker; Patricia M. Lenahan; Emily Dow; Joseph E. Scherger

49

Family medicine in the research revolution.  

PubMed

National Institutes of Health (NIH) funding has contributed to improvements in the health of the nation, but the pace of progress, particularly in the war on cancer, has been frustratingly slow. Departments of family medicine receive less NIH funding than all other specialties. Although numerous factors contribute to low family medicine funding levels, persistent undervaluing of primary care plays a paramount role. Fueled by the harsh reality that our nation's health is unconscionably poor, we are entering a new era in our nation's research enterprise, a virtual research revolution. The 3 components of this revolution are the NIH roadmap, personalized medicine, and the Clinical and Translational Science Awards. Each of these elements will contribute to a growing emphasis on translational research. Translational research demands formation of innovative structures in academic health centers (AHCs) to enable them to address questions of vital relevance to improving public health. Service research, funded by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and foundations, defines a new approach to research with high potential to improve the health of communities. To be a part of the research revolution, departments must rely on senior researchers to secure funding and provide mentorship for junior investigators. Junior investigators must relentlessly pursue answers to questions of direct relevance to improving health. Finally, department chairs have the obligation to identify research mentors, find ways to fund research gaps, and create a culture of scholarship and investigation. Advocating for AHCs to commit to improving the health of the regions they serve can have a substantial impact on the types of questions that centers choose to study and, ultimately, on the health of the communities they serve. PMID:20616284

Wender, Richard C

50

[What do medical students think of family medicine?].  

PubMed

Background: In the context of physician shortages, critical factors influencing career choice need to be better understood. The aim of this study was to explore experiences students have had with family medicine in order to develop additional strategies for recruiting family medicine trainees.Methods: Students from the five medical faculties in the federal state of Baden-Wuerttemberg were invited to participate in an online-survey via email. A purpose-built questionnaire was used. In addition to descriptive statistics, analysis included linear partial correlations controlled for age, gender, and semester, which were calculated between the variable "I believe family medicine is an attractive job" and the 31 variables of the survey. Linear regression was used to analyze the influence of experiences with family medicine and statements about family medicine to the perception of family medicine as an attractive specialty.Results: 1299 students participated in the survey. About half of the participants (49.7 %) considered working as a primary care physician to be attractive or partly attractive. 49.6 % of students reported positive experiences with family medicine as a patient and 33.1 % as a family member. 24.3 % reported positive experiences during the compulsory 1-2 weeks general practice internship and 18.1 % during a four weeks elective placement. For 302 participants (23.3 %), family medicine is presented positively in the media. 178 (13.7 %) consider family medicine to have high importance in both undergraduate and postgraduate education. Positive influences on judging attractiveness of family medicine were: own experience with family medicine as a clinical elective (rpart= + 0.450), own experience with family medicine as a patient (rpart= + 0.218), perception that family medicine offers a diversified working day (rpart= + 0.259), and perception that family medicine offers a good salary (rpart= + 0.242).Conclusion: To enable students during undergraduate studies to have practical experience with family medicine seems to be an important influence on judging family medicine attractive. PMID:23918593

Steinhäuser, J; Miksch, A; Hermann, K; Joos, S; Loh, A; Götz, K

2013-08-05

51

TEACHING UNIVERSITY STUDENTS FAMILY CAREGIVING ONLINE  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article describes an online course developed and currently offered at Middle Tennessee State University. Considering the statistics of family caregivers, their needs, and students’ and human service professionals’ education, the author demonstrates the necessity of such courses and their benefits. The author also considers the standards for online Social Work education. Because there are more than 54 million family

James E. Taylor

2004-01-01

52

[Patient's medicine cabinet composition study of 207 families in France].  

PubMed

France is the first country in Europe for medicines' consumption. It is not possible to imagine a house without a medicine cabinet. There are very few data on this subject. The aim of our work was to study the composition of families' cabinets. On the first six month 2010, an investigation questionnaire was distributed in pharmacy community located Pyrénées-Atlantiques area. Questionnaires were given to all the patients coming to the chemist's. On 207 questionnaires available, a medicines' cabinet hold 12.1 ± 12.1 specialities name in average, 19.8 ± 17.9 packing (most frequent: Classes V: miscelleanous and A medicines: digestive system and metabolism) and an average of 5.6 ± 7.5 expired packing (28.4% of the medicines stock). The present study highlights the important quantity of medicines found in the families' medicines cabinets. It underlines the important role of the pharmacist and family doctor for the patient's therapeutic education. PMID:22850100

Bordenave, Hélène; Despas, Fabien; Sommet, Agnès; Montastruc, Jean-Louis

2012-08-02

53

Report of Survey of Howard University College of Medicine.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Howard University's School of Medicine is evaluated in this report, in fulfillment of the United States Congress's requirement that the Office of Education annually evaluate one aspect of the Howard University educational program. Evaluation teams, comprised mostly of Office of Education professionals, spent several days at the University meeting…

Office of Education (DHEW), Washington, DC.

54

Impact of Proposed Institute of Medicine Duty Hours: Family Medicine Residency Directors' Perspective  

PubMed Central

Purpose To examine the opinions of family medicine residency program directors concerning the potential impact of the Institute of Medicine (IOM) resident duty hour recommendations on patient care and resident education. Methods A survey was mailed to 455 family medicine residency program directors. Data were summarized and analyzed using Epi Info statistical software. Significance was set at the P?family medicine residency program directors disagreed or strongly disagreed that the recent IOM duty hour recommendations will, in general, result in improved patient safety and resident education. Further, a majority of respondents disagreed or strongly disagreed that the proposed IOM rules would result in residents becoming more compassionate, more effective family physicians. Conclusion A majority of family medicine residency program directors believe that the proposed IOM duty hour recommendations would have a primarily detrimental effect on both patient care and resident education.

Carek, Peter J.; Gravel, Joseph W.; Kozakowski, Stanley; Pugno, Perry A.; Fetter, Gerald; Palmer, Elissa J.

2009-01-01

55

75 FR 61126 - Virginia Commonwealth University, School of Medicine; Notice of Decision on Applications for Duty...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration Virginia Commonwealth University, School of Medicine; Notice of Decision on Applications...Commonwealth University, School of Medicine, Richmond, VA 23298-0551....

2010-10-04

56

Satisfaction and Difficulties of Korean Family Medicine Resident Training Faculty  

PubMed Central

Background Practitioners of family medicine are essential to primary care practices in Korea. Resident training staffs in Korean family medicine departments have a crucial role in producing well-trained family physicians. This study assesses the aspects of satisfaction and difficulties of Korean family medicine resident training staffs. Methods We surveyed the resident training staffs of various Korean family medicine departments using an online survey tool. The survey used in this study was modified from previously used questionnaires. Respondents rated items using a five-point Likert scale and a 0-10 visual analogue scale. Results The response rate was 43.9% (122/278). The mean satisfaction score with regard to current family medicine residency programs was 7.59 out of 10. Resident training staffs found the administrative aspects of their role to be the most difficult. There were considerable differences in the reported difficulties of resident training according to the differing characteristics of each staff member, including age, sex, type of hospital, number of staff members, role as chief, and duration of staff. Most respondents (91.9%) cited a need for faculty development programs. Conclusion Korean family medicine resident training staffs need faculty development programs for the improvement of resident training. For the strengthening of core competencies among resident training staffs, faculty development programs or courses should be designed and implemented in Korea.

Kim, Jung-Ha; Kim, Ju Young; Kwon, Kil Young; Lee, Chul-Min; Hyun, Seung Soo

2013-01-01

57

Smoking behaviour, knowledge and attitudes among Family Medicine physicians and nurses in Bosnia and Herzegovina  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Smoking rates among the general population in Bosnia and Herzegovina are extremely high, and national campaigns to lower smoking rates have not yet begun. As part of future activities of the Queen's University Family Medicine Development Program in the Balkans Region, technical assistance may be provided to Bosnia and Herzegovina to develop of national tobacco control strategies. This assistance

Geoffrey Hodgetts; Teresa Broers; Marshall Godwin

2004-01-01

58

Complementary and Alternative Medicine: Core Competencies for Family Nurse Practitioners.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Directors of family nurse practitioner education programs (n=141) reported inclusion of some complementary/alternative medicine content (CAM), most commonly interviewing patients about CAM, critical thinking, evidence-based medicine, laws, ethics, and spiritual/cultural beliefs. Definition of CAM was medically, not holistically based. More…

Burman, Mary E.

2003-01-01

59

The Future of Family Systems Medicine: Challenges and Opportunities  

Microsoft Academic Search

Despite its early promise, family systems medicine (FSM) has struggled to realize its full potential as an exciting conceptual model for the practice of medicine in primary care settings. Instead, since the mid-1990s, it has been relegated to the sidelines despite compelling research and clinical evidence of its effectiveness. In this article, I will argue that in addition to challenges

Peter Steinglass

2006-01-01

60

Results of the 2007 National Resident Matching Program: family medicine.  

PubMed

The results of the 2007 National Resident Matching Program (NRMP) reflect a currently stable level of student interest in family medicine residency training in the United States. Compared with the 2006 Match, five fewer positions (with 25 fewer US seniors) were filled in family medicine residency programs through the NRMP in 2007, at the same time as 20 fewer (two more US seniors) in primary care internal medicine, the same number of pediatrics-primary care (four fewer US seniors), and one more (19 fewer US seniors) in internal medicine-pediatrics programs. Multiple forces, including student perspectives of the demands, rewards, and prestige of the specialty; the turbulence and uncertainty of the health care environment; lifestyle issues; and the impact of faculty role models continue to influence medical student career choices. Eighty-four more positions (12 more US seniors) were filled in categorical internal medicine. Fifty-four more positions (22 more US seniors) were filled in categorical pediatrics programs. The 2007 NRMP results suggest that interest in family medicine and primary care careers continues to decline. With the needs of the nation calling for the roles and services of family physicians, family medicine matched too few graduates through the 2007 NRMP to meet the nation's needs for primary care physicians. PMID:17764041

Pugno, Perry A; McGaha, Amy L; Schmittling, Gordon T; DeVilbiss, Ashley; Kahn, Norman B

2007-09-01

61

Results of the 2008 National Resident Matching Program: family medicine.  

PubMed

The results of the 2008 National Resident Matching Program (NRMP) reflect a currently stable level of student interest in family medicine residency training in the United States. Compared with the 2007 Match, 91 more positions (with 65 more US seniors) were filled in family medicine residency programs through the NRMP in 2008, at the same time as 10 fewer (one fewer US senior) in primary care internal medicine, eight fewer positions were filled in pediatrics-primary care (10 fewer US seniors), and 19 fewer (27 fewer US seniors) in internal medicine-pediatrics programs. Multiple forces, including student perspectives of the demands, rewards, and prestige of the specialty, the turbulence and uncertainty of the health care environment, lifestyle issues, and the impact of faculty role models, continue to influence medical student career choices. Thirty-one more positions (20 fewer US seniors) were filled in categorical internal medicine. Thirty more positions (84 fewer US seniors) were filled in categorical pediatrics programs. The 2008 NRMP results suggest that while interest in family medicine experienced a slight increase in the number of students choosing the specialty, interest in other primary care careers continues to decline. With the needs of the nation calling for the roles and services of family physicians, family medicine still matched too few graduates through the 2008 NRMP to meet the nation's needs for primary care physicians. PMID:18988043

Pugno, Perry A; McGaha, Amy L; Schmittling, Gordon T; DeVilbiss, Ashley D; Ostergaard, Daniel J

2008-09-01

62

Results of the 2009 National Resident Matching Program: family medicine.  

PubMed

The results of the 2009 National Resident Matching Program (NRMP) reflect a persistently low level of student interest in family medicine residency training in the United States. Compared with the 2008 Match, 70 fewer positions (with 89 fewer US seniors) were filled in family medicine residency programs through the NRMP in 2009, at the same time that 18 fewer positions were filled in primary care internal medicine (11 fewer US seniors), one more position was filled in pediatrics-primary care (three more US seniors), and 13 more positions were filled in internal medicine-pediatrics programs (but with seven fewer US seniors). Multiple forces, including student perspectives of the demands, rewards and prestige of the specialty, the turbulence and uncertainty of the health care and economic environments, lifestyle issues, the advice of deans, and the impact of faculty role models, continue to influence medical student career choices. A total of 152 more positions (28 fewer US seniors) were filled in categorical internal medicine. Thirty-one more positions (72 more US seniors) were filled in categorical pediatrics programs. The 2009 NRMP results suggest that while interest in family medicine experienced a slight increase in the number of students choosing the specialty last year, overall interest in primary care careers continues to decline. With the nation continuing to call for the roles and services of family physicians, family medicine still matched too few graduates through the 2009 NRMP to effectively address the nation's needs for primary care physicians. PMID:19724942

Pugno, Perry A; McGaha, Amy L; Schmittling, Gordon T; DeVilbiss, Ashley D; Ostergaard, Daniel J

2009-09-01

63

An Adolescent Medicine Service: A Role for a Family Physician in a Pediatric Teaching Hospital  

PubMed Central

A family physician was appointed director of the Adolescent and Youth Medicine Service at the Montreal Children's Hospital. He was assigned a leadership role in the adolescent outpatient clinics and the adolescent inpatient ward. As team leader, he coordinates the work of allied health professionals and provides personal ongoing care to patients, fostering a comprehensive care approach in service, teaching and in links with the community. There are of course certain conceptual and practical problems in the situation of a primary care physician in a tertiary care setting; university departments of family medicine must face the challenge of altering consultants' thinking about their role.

Pavilanis, Alan V.

1984-01-01

64

Attitudes of Students Entering Internships and Residencies in Family Medicine  

PubMed Central

Does self-selection explain why residency-trained family physicians show a stronger patient, social, and multidisciplinary orientation than other physicians? Responses to a questionnaire mailed to 235 senior medical students entering internships or family medicine residencies showed significant differences only in multidisciplinary orientation. The study indirectly suggests that residency training does affect physicians' attitudes.

Beaudoin, Claude; Maheux, Brigitte; Beland, Francois

1991-01-01

65

Training family medicine residents to care for children  

PubMed Central

Abstract Problem addressed There is a lack of consensus around the optimal way to train family medicine residents to care for children. Objective of program Evaluation of an ambulatory versus an inpatient pediatrics rotation for family medicine residents. Program description A 4-week pediatrics rotation for second-year family medicine residents was introduced involving half-day ambulatory pediatric clinics. A nonequivalent control group evaluation study design was followed. Patient logbook entries, as well as residents’ satisfaction, knowledge, and self-reported confidence outcomes were compared between family medicine residents completing the new ambulatory rotation and those completing a traditional inpatient-ambulatory pediatrics rotation. Conclusion An ambulatory rotation in pediatrics is a feasible option for facilitating family medicine resident learning in child health care. Residents report exposure to more patient cases that reflect a family practice office setting and the same level of knowledge and confidence as residents completing an inpatient-ambulatory rotation. Intraprofessional collaboration, flexibility in scheduling, and the support of pediatric preceptors are key factors in the organization and implementation of an ambulatory rotation.

Duke, Pauline; Curran, Vernon; Hollett, Ann

2011-01-01

66

Family Medicine and Geriatric Medicine: Economic and Ideological Conflict.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Focuses on the supports and impediments inherent in the provision of geriatric medical care by family physicians. Addresses providing a good educational program for medical students and residents who will be caring for the elderly and developing uniform access to quality care for the elderly, the community, and community institutions.…

Zweig, Steven; Ingman, Stanley

1986-01-01

67

A new era for the Journal of Family and Community Medicine.  

PubMed

The Journal of Family and Community Medicine (JFCM) is the official scientific publication of the Saudi Society of Family and Community Medicine (SSFCM). The JFCM was first published in 1994 to meet "...a pressing need for a medical journal that would develop into a forum to address certain issues of family and community medicine.”[1] Thanks to the efforts of the earlier editorial team, the journal continued to serve as a major source for research in the field of family and community medicine and helped many researchers to communicate their work with the scientific communities. These results were achieved in spite of many obstacles that faced the JFCM at its early years. Now, thanks to the efforts of the new editorial team and the continued support of the University of Dammam and the sponsors of the SSFCM, the JFCM is an international peer-reviewed journal. The journal is committed to relevance and excellence and has a clear vision "...of becoming a leader in medical journalism in the field of family and community medicine..."[2] PMID:22870407

Al-Almaie, Sameeh M

2012-05-01

68

Results of the 2010 national resident matching program: family medicine.  

PubMed

The results of the 2010 National Resident Matching Program (NRMP) reflect a small but promising increased level of student interest in family medicine residency training in the United States. Compared with the 2009 Match, 75 more positions (with 101 more US seniors) were filled in family medicine residency programs through the NRMP in 2010, at the same time that seven more positions were filled in primary care internal medicine (one more US senior), 14 fewer positions were filled in pediatrics-primary care (16 fewer US seniors), and 16 more positions were filled in internal medicine-pediatrics programs (58 more US seniors). Multiple forces including student perspectives of the demands, rewards, and prestige of the specialty; national dialogue about health care reform; turbulence in the economic environment; lifestyle issues; the advice of deans; and the impact of faculty role models continue to influence medical student career choices. Ninety-four more positions (90 more US seniors) were filled in categorical internal medicine. Fifty-seven more positions (29 more US seniors) were filled in categorical pediatrics programs. The 2010 NRMP results suggest that there is a small increase in primary care careers; however, students continue to show an overall preference for subspecialty careers. Despite matching the highest number of US seniors into family medicine residencies since 2004, in 2010 the production of family physicians remains insufficient to meet the current and anticipated need to support the nation's primary care infrastructure. PMID:20830620

Pugno, Perry A; McGaha, Amy L; Schmittling, Gordon T; DeVilbiss Bieck, Ashley D; Crosley, Philip W; Ostergaard, Daniel J

2010-09-01

69

[Education in family medicine--a new approach].  

PubMed

The subject of the family medicine on the medical faculties in Bosnia and Herzegovina existed from recently as a separate curiculum of the medical study. Until recently the contents of this discipline interpreted within the subject of the social medicine or the object of the primary healthcare protection, and programs of teaching were based mainly on Anglosaxon experiences. The fact is that some teachers of the medical faculty in Sarajevo had their own visions and programs of the family medicine which by years were tested in the units of the family healthcare protection in Sarajevo, Mostar, and Banja Luka, about what was published in our and foreign literature. New approach from the family medicine should be based on as follows: greater use of the standardized procedures for the improvement of the communication skills; revised educational procedure of all the participants 6 interdisciplinaryilly in the education of the family medicine; improvement of knowledge about methodlogy and the principles of the research; improvement of the techniques and knowledge about the maipulatin of the medical informations; development of the skills of the continued studying through the total working aga; to the development of the capability of the critical estimation of the own work important; by the defining of the important educational goals in the curriculum of the urgent medicine; to the development and use of the methods feed-back informations from the students; to the modernizing of the methods of the evaluation of the educational process-adopted knowledge and the attitudes and the carrying out of the practice of the patients, and the ethic values in that process. In this work the authors consider the stated experiences in the education from the subject family medicine at our faculties realting to the foreign, and suggest that new concept of the education on the basis of these experiences in the practice. PMID:11769435

Zildzi?, M; Masi?, I; Hasanovi?, M; Beganli?, A; Tulumovi?, A; Herenda, S; Salihefendi?, N

2001-01-01

70

Library Cooperation at the NOVA University--the Nordic University in Agriculture, Forestry and Veterinary Medicine.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The Nordic University in Agriculture, Forestry and Veterinary Medicine--the NOVA University-was established in 1995 to increase the cooperation between the Nordic agricultural universities. The NOVA libraries of the seven institutions and facilities involved wanted to show that they are a very useful partner in launching new ideas. They have the…

Myllys, Heli

71

Sexual Health Care in Family Medicine  

PubMed Central

Although patients frequently present with sexual concerns, family doctors generally do not handle them well. Sexual issues may present in many ways: as specific concerns; as a component of non-sexual complaints or as a factor in relationship or marital problems. The family doctor must include sexual enquiry and counselling as part of overall health care, and in the management of illnesses. In order to be effective counsellors, physicians must examine their own attitudes, and become knowledgeable about sexuality and myths influencing sexual behavior, and skillful at interviewing and sexual history-taking. The family doctor can become adept at giving patients permission to discuss their sexuality, and at providing information and strategies to enhance sensual enjoyment and communication with partners. Small group training sessions incorporating discussion and role-playing effectively teach physicians skills and strategies in sexual counselling.

Cohen, Gerald; Cohen, May

1985-01-01

72

Family practice: professional identity in transition. A case study of family medicine in Canada.  

PubMed

With increasingly fewer family physicians in many countries and students less interested in primary care careers, generalists are becoming an endangered species. This situation is a major health care resource management challenge. In a rapidly changing health care environment, family medicine is struggling for a clear identity -- a matter which is crucial to health system restructuring because it affects the roles and functioning of other professions in the system. The objective of our study was to explore representations of roles and responsibilities of family physicians held by future family and specialist physicians and their clinical teachers in four Canadian medical school faculties of medicine, using both focus groups and individual interviews. In addition to family medicine, we targeted residency programs in general psychiatry, radiology and internal medicine -- three areas that interface significantly between primary care and specialized medicine. In each faculty, respondents included the vice-dean of postgraduate studies; the director of each relevant program; educators in the program; residents in each specialty in their last year of training. Findings are centred around three major themes: (1) the definition of family medicine; (2) family medicine as an endangered species, and (3) the generation gap between young family physicians and their educators. The sustained physician-patient relationship is considered a core characteristic of family medicine that is much valued by patients and physicians -- both generalists and specialists -- as something to be preserved in any model of collaboration to be developed. Overall, two divergent directions emerge: preserving all the professions' traditional functions while adapting to changing contexts, or concentrating on areas of expertise and moving towards creating "specialist" general practitioners, in response to a rapidly expanding scope of practice, and to the high value attributed to specialization by society and the professional system. PMID:18644668

Beaulieu, Marie-Dominique; Rioux, Marc; Rocher, Guy; Samson, Louise; Boucher, Laurier

2008-07-20

73

Identifying the content of family medicine for educational purposes: an empirical approach.  

PubMed

In this article, the authors present a method to assist in curriculum planning and report an application of the method at one institution. Through interviews of 40 selected subjects, the authors identified 27 content elements appropriate for inclusion in a family medicine curriculum for medical students. These elements were organized into four areas portraying family medicine as "a synthesis of content and process," "a field of inquiry," "a career and peer group," and "a value system." A questionnaire employing the method of pair-comparisons was subsequently completed by 38 of the interview subjects, and on the basis of these responses priorities were assigned to content elements within each area. For three of the four areas, there was statistically significant consensus about the priority orderings. Over three years, the content elements themselves and their priority orderings have proved beneficial to curricular planning at the University of North Carolina School of Medicine. PMID:6848757

Friedman, C P; Slatt, L M; Baker, R M; Cummings, S B

1983-01-01

74

[Thirty years of family medicine in B&H].  

PubMed

The experience in our surrounding throughout many years, based on Europeans and Worlds standards of health care service, gives the advantage to the Primary Health Care Service, with well educated family doctors and nurses who work in a community and give cheaper and quality health service. The paper presents a view of Family Medicine development in B&H during the last thirty years, and the most important projects realized in that period. PMID:17582984

Masi?, Izet; Jati?, Zaim; Zildzi?, Muharem

2007-01-01

75

The Senior Mentor Program at Duke University School of Medicine  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The Duke University School of Medicine has a unique curriculum in which students complete basic sciences in year 1 and clinical clerkships in year 2, making way for an entire year of independent study in year 3. Into this compact curriculum, education in geriatrics has been successfully introduced through focused exercises and activities…

Heflin, Mitchell T.

2006-01-01

76

Cancer Research Center Indiana University School of Medicine.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to authorize the Indiana School of Medicine to proceed with the detailed design, construction and equipping of the proposed Cancer Research Center (CRC). A grant was executed with the University on April 21, 1992. A...

1994-01-01

77

Alternative Medicine and Herbal Use among University Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|In this study, the authors investigated the predictors of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) and herbal supplement use among university students. They investigated demographic factors, trait affectivity, symptom reports, and individuals' worries about modernity as potential contributors to use of CAM and herbals. The authors surveyed…

Johnson, Susan K.; Blanchard, Anita

2006-01-01

78

Defining competency-based evaluation objectives in family medicine  

PubMed Central

Abstract Objective To provide a pragmatic approach to the evaluation of communication skills using observable behaviours, as part of a multiyear project to develop competency-based evaluation objectives for Certification in family medicine. Design A nominal group technique was used to develop themes and subthemes and to identify positive and negative observable behaviours that demonstrate competence in communication in family medicine. Setting The College of Family Physicians of Canada in Mississauga, Ont. Participants An expert group of 7 family physicians and 1 educational consultant, all of whom had experience in assessing competence in family medicine. Group members represented the Canadian context with respect to region, sex, language, community type, and experience. Methods The group used the nominal group technique to derive a list of observable behaviours that would constitute a detailed operational definition of competence in communication skills; multiple iterations were used until saturation was achieved. The group met several times a year, and membership remained unchanged during the 4 years in which the work was conducted. The iterative process was undertaken twice—once for communication with patients and once for communication with colleagues. Main findings Five themes, 5 subthemes, and 106 positive and negative observable behaviours were generated. The subtheme of charting skills was defined using a key-features analysis. Conclusion Communication skills were defined in terms of themes and observable behaviours. These definitions were intended to help assess family physicians’ competence at the start of independent practice.

Laughlin, Tom; Wetmore, Stephen; Allen, Tim; Brailovsky, Carlos; Crichton, Tom; Bethune, Cheri; Donoff, Michel; Lawrence, Kathrine

2012-01-01

79

Medicinal plants in an urban environment: the medicinal flora of Banares Hindu University, Varanasi, Uttar Pradesh  

PubMed Central

Varanasi is one of the oldest continuously inhabited cities of the world, and one of the most important Hindu pilgrimage sites. Despite this importance, very little information exits on the cities flora in general, and medicinal species found within its limit in particular. Traditional medicine plays a large role in Indian society. The presented study attempted to investigate if traditional plant use and availability of important common medicinal plants are maintained in urban environments. The paper presents information on the traditional uses of seventy-two plant species collected form the campus of Banares Hindu University, Varanasi, Uttar Pradesh, and highlights the uses of these plants by the local inhabitants.

Verma, Archana K; Kumar, Munesh; Bussmann, Rainer W

2007-01-01

80

Meeting the challenge of evidence-based medicine in the family medicine clerkship: closing the loop from academics to office.  

PubMed

An EBM Seminar and POEM® project was developed to teach evidence-based medicine in a family medicine clerkship. The seminar focused on the application of preclinical coursework in biostatistics and epidemiology to the clinical third year. POEM projects involved answering clinical questions, derived from patient cases in the family medicine offices, with best available evidence. These questions and answers were archived in a wiki which was made available to the institution's family medicine physicians. Selected POEMs were also published in the in-house family medicine newsletter. The POEM projects evolved from an educational exercise for medical students to a valuable repository of evidence for clinicians. PMID:23607466

Cavanaugh, Susan K; Calabretta, Nancy

2013-01-01

81

Morning Report in Family Medicine Residency Programs: A Descriptive Study.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Morning Report (MR) is a frequently held case conference in most Family Medicine (FM) residency programs among medical learners who discuss recent inpatient admissions before the day's care of patients. This study conducted a national survey of FM residency program directors to describe the roles of faculty and residents in facilitating MR.…

Kuncharapu, Indumathi; Cass, Alvah R.; Carlson, Carol A.; Scott, Jack R.

82

Teenage Alcoholism Modules for the Education of Family Medical Students, Family Medicine Residents, and Practicing Family Physicians.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This is a report on the development and promotion of six educational modules on recognizing, intervening, and treating adolescent alcoholism. The modules, faculty guide, and video and audio tapes are available from the Department of Family Medicine, Ohio ...

L. L. Gabel

1987-01-01

83

Teaching Physical Diagnosis in an Ambulatory Family Medicine Setting  

PubMed Central

A method of teaching physical diagnosis to second year medical students in an ambulatory family practice setting is described. During tutorial sessions, the tutor demonstrated each step in the physical examination and the students practiced on him or on other students who acted the part of patients. In addition, some newly registered patients in the family practice unit volunteered to allow the students to practice history taking and physical examinations on them. The students then watched the staff physician examine the same patients immediately afterwards. Some of the advantages of teaching physical diagnosis in this way rather than in the traditional ward setting include an emphasis on the practical aspects of family practice; the opportunity for student `examiners' to learn from the advice of student `patients', and the likelihood that early exposure to family medicine units influences students to pick family medicine as a career. A possible disadvantage is that students are unlikely to see many patients with abnormal physical findings in the family practice unit.

Marshall, Kenneth G.

1983-01-01

84

UVAL-MED a universal visual associative language for medicine.  

PubMed Central

We describe UVAL-MED, a Universal visual associative language for medicine, and propose its use in combination with diagnostic reasoning and decision support systems. When fully developed, our system will automatically translate SNOMED terms to UVAL-MED terms. Grammar and syntax for UVAL-MED are defined and its features as a language-independent tool are discussed. The perceived advantages of our graphical language for rapid integration of knowledge and the assessment of developing situations could thus facilitate decision making.

Preiss, B.; Echave, V.; Preiss, S. F.; Kaltenbach, M.

1994-01-01

85

Residents' exposure to aboriginal health issues. Survey of family medicine programs in Canada.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE: To determine whether Canadian family medicine residency programs currently have objectives, staff, and clinical experiences for adequately exposing residents to aboriginal health issues. DESIGN: A one-page questionnaire was developed to survey the details of teaching about and exposure to aboriginal health issues. SETTING: Family medicine programs in Canada. PARTICIPANTS: All Canadian family medicine program directors in the 18 programs (16 at universities and two satellite programs) were surveyed between October 1997 and March 1998. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Whether programs had teaching objectives for exposing residents to aboriginal health issues, whether they had resource people available, what elective and core experiences in aboriginal health were offered, and what types of experiences were available. RESULTS: Response rate was 100%. No programs had formal, written curriculum objectives for residency training in aboriginal health issues, although some were considering them. Some programs, however, had objectives for specific weekend or day sessions. No programs had a strategy for encouraging enrollment of residents of aboriginal origin. Eleven programs had at least one resource person with experience in aboriginal health issues, and 12 had access to community-based aboriginal groups. Core experiences were all weekend seminars or retreats. Elective experiences in aboriginal health were available in 16 programs, and 11 programs were active on reserves. CONCLUSIONS: Many Canadian family medicine programs give residents some exposure to aboriginal health issues, but most need more expertise and direction on these issues. Some programs have unique approaches to teaching aboriginal health care that could be shared. Formalized objectives derived in collaboration with other family medicine programs and aboriginal groups could substantially improve the quality of education in aboriginal health care in Canada.

Redwood-Campbell, L.; MacDonald, W. A.; Moore, K.

1999-01-01

86

Family Medicine Training Grants as a Method of Faculty Development: Are We Doing It Right?  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), through Title VII of the federal Public Health Service legislation, supports family medicine educational efforts through several funding programs. These include grant programs for predoctoral education, residency training, faculty development, and the establishment of departments of family medicine. These HRSA grants served as catalysts in estab- lishing the discipline of family medicine, and

Robert A. Baldor; Barry D. Weiss

87

Family Medicine Training in the Care of Older Adults--Has the Retreat Been Sounded?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Discusses the trend away from geriatrics training in family medicine residency despite the growing need in society. Asserts that family medicine is failing to seize an opportunity to advance the care of older adults and discusses what would constitute acceptable training in geriatrics and how it should fit into the family medicine curriculum.…

Mouton, Charles P.; Parker, Robert W.

2003-01-01

88

Implementing the information prescription protocol in a family medicine practice: a case study*†‡  

PubMed Central

Question: Can an information prescription protocol be successfully integrated into a family medicine practice seeking to enhance patient education and self-management? Setting: Milton Family Practice, an outpatient clinic and resident teaching site of the University of Vermont and Fletcher Allen Health Care, is located in a semirural area fifteen miles from main campus. Objectives: The objectives were to increase physicians' knowledge and use of information prescriptions, sustain integration of information prescription use, and increase physicians' ability to provide patient education information. Methods: Methods used were promotion of the National Library of Medicine's Information Rx, physician instruction, installation of patient and provider workstations, and a collaborative approach to practice integration. Main Results: A post-intervention survey showed increased physician knowledge and use of the Information Rx protocol. Support procedures were integrated at the practice. Conclusions: Sustainable integration of Information Rx in a primary care clinic requires not only promotion and education, but also attention to clinic organization and procedures.

Carey, Peggy; Haines, Laura; Lampson, Alan P; Pond, Fred

2010-01-01

89

Family medicine graduates' perceptions of intimidation, harassment, and discrimination during residency training  

PubMed Central

Background Despite there being considerable literature documenting learner distress and perceptions of mistreatment in medical education settings, these concerns have not been explored in-depth in Canadian family medicine residency programs. The purpose of the study was to examine intimidation, harassment and/or discrimination (IHD) as reported by Alberta family medicine graduates during their two-year residency program. Methods A retrospective questionnaire survey was conducted of all (n = 377) family medicine graduates from the University of Alberta and University of Calgary who completed residency training during 2001-2005. The frequency, type, source, and perceived basis of IHD were examined by gender, age, and Canadian vs international medical graduate. Descriptive data analysis (frequency, crosstabs), Chi-square, Fisher's Exact test, analysis of variance, and logistic regression were used as appropriate. Results Of 377 graduates, 242 (64.2%) responded to the survey, with 44.7% reporting they had experienced IHD while a resident. The most frequent type of IHD experienced was in the form of inappropriate verbal comments (94.3%), followed by work as punishment (27.6%). The main sources of IHD were specialist physicians (77.1%), hospital nurses (54.3%), specialty residents (45.7%), and patients (35.2%). The primary basis for IHD was perceived to be gender (26.7%), followed by ethnicity (16.2%), and culture (9.5%). A significantly greater proportion of males (38.6%) than females (20.0%) experienced IHD in the form of work as punishment. While a similar proportion of Canadian (46.1%) and international medical graduates (IMGs) (41.0%) experienced IHD, a significantly greater proportion of IMGs perceived ethnicity, culture, or language to be the basis of IHD. Conclusions Perceptions of IHD are prevalent among family medicine graduates. Residency programs should explicitly recognize and robustly address all IHD concerns.

2011-01-01

90

A teaching unit in primary care sports medicine for family medicine residents.  

PubMed

The authors describe their experience in setting up a sports medicine teaching unit within a family practice center of a teaching hospital. The unit's patient population more closely resembles that of a typical family practice than that of a traditional musculoskeletal teaching clinic (e.g., orthopedics, emergency room). The teaching program includes direct observation of residents performing history taking and physical examinations through one-way mirrors, close supervision for each case, and a sports therapist who educates patients and residents about home exercise programs when physiotherapy within private clinics is not necessary or affordable. At the end of each session 20-30 minutes are devoted to teaching specific physical examination skills. The authors describe how their clinic interacts with other services within the hospital and how certain obstacles they encountered when setting up the clinic might be avoided by others. They feel that this type of unit complements other existing programs in the family medicine department and provides an excellent learning experience for family medicine residents, who are likely to see a high proportion of patients with muskuloskeletal injuries in their practices. PMID:11242586

Vernec, A; Shrier, I

2001-03-01

91

Family Medicine Residents' and Community Physicians' Concerns about Patient Truthfulness.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Forty-four University of Kansas medical residents and nine associated community family physicians recorded their impressions of each patient's truthfulness and related issues after half-day patient care sessions. Analysis indicated residents doubted patients in 19.5% of encounters, senior physicians in 8.7%. Both groups had more negative than…

Woolley, Douglas; Clements, Thad

1997-01-01

92

Improving patient provider communication for Latinos at Temple University Hospital and Temple University School of Medicine.  

PubMed

This Report from the Field documents a series of interventions developed by Temple University Health System and School of Medicine through participation in the RWJF initiative entitled Hablamos Juntos. The report delineates outcomes to date demonstrating that these interventions have met the challenge of improving patient provider communication for Latinos. PMID:22080699

Viera, Elys; Colón, Dayan; Alonso, Yadira; Armas, Joey; Rico, Mario C; Diaz, Raquel; Pagan, Angel; Del Carpio-Cano, Fabiola; DeLa Cadena, Raul A

2011-11-01

93

Transforming a family medicine center and residency program into a federally qualified health center.  

PubMed

The authors describe a family medicine center before and after a merger between the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California, the California Hospital Medical Center, and the Eisner Pediatric and Family Medical Center in 2012. The merger provided new opportunities to stabilize the financial base of a clinical practice struggling financially and to enhance the training of residents and other health professionals in primary care, which motivated the partners to consider this new model. After 18 months of negotiations, they were able to convert the family medicine center and residency program into a new federally qualified health center. The benefits to this new model include an increase in both patient volume and the quality of education, supporting residency accreditation; a greater number of residents from U.S. medical schools; enhanced education and preparation of primary care physicians for practice in medically underserved communities; enhanced reimbursements and new opportunities for state, local, and federal grants; and quality improvement and new information technology. The partners overcame academic, administrative, legal, and regulatory obstacles, communication barriers, and differences in culture and expectations to achieve this merger. Keys to their success include the commitment of the leaders at the three institutions to the goals of the merger, a dedicated project manager and consultants, opportunities for new revenue sources and reimbursements, and support from a pioneering charitable foundation. The authors conclude by discussing the implications of using community health centers as the focal point for training primary care clinicians and addressing workforce shortages. PMID:23524918

Cousineau, Michael R; Flores, Hector; Cheng, Scott; Gates, Jerry D; Douglas, James H; Clute, Gerald B; Coan, Carl E

2013-05-01

94

A Comparison of Students' Clinical Experience in Family Medicine and Traditional Clerkships.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Experience on the traditional internal medicine, surgery, pediatrics, obstetrics-gynecology, and psychiatry clerkships was compared with the experience on a family medicine clerkship. The family medicine clerkship offered the most experience with circulatory, respiratory, digestive, neurological, musculoskeletal, and skin problems and with…

Parkerson, George R., Jr.; And Others

1984-01-01

95

Career advising in family medicine: a theoretical framework for structuring the medical student/faculty advisor interview  

PubMed Central

Background There are unique challenges to recruiting students into the specialty of family medicine within academic medical centers. Methods At Virginia Commonwealth University, we developed an advising framework to help students address institutional and personal obstacles to choosing family medicine as a career. Results The role of a faculty advisor is not to direct the student to a career choice but rather to foster a mentor relationship and help the student come to his or her own realizations regarding career choice. The faculty advisor/medical student interview is conceptualized as five discussion topics: self-knowledge, perception, organizational voice, cognitive dissonance, and anticipatory counseling. Conclusion This framework is intended to assist faculty in their efforts to encourage students to consider a career in family medicine.

Bradner, Melissa; Crossman, Steven H.; Vanderbilt, Allison A.; Gary, Judy; Munson, Paul

2013-01-01

96

Use of reminders for preventive procedures in family medicine.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE: To compare the effectiveness of three computerized reminder systems in the delivery of five preventive procedures in family practice. DESIGN: Prospective, randomized, controlled study. SETTING: Ottawa Civic Hospital Family Medicine Centre. PARTICIPANTS: Of 8502 patients 15 years of age or more who were not in a hospital or institution 5883 were randomly assigned, by family, to a control group, a physician reminder group (passive) or a telephone or letter reminder group (active). The remaining 2619 patients were not included in the randomized portion of the study but were monitored. INTERVENTION: During 1 year the patients in the active reminder groups received a telephone call or letter reminding them of any overdue preventive procedures; for those in the passive reminder group the physician was reminded at an office visit to provide any overdue service. OUTCOME MEASURE: Rates of completion of the preventive procedures required. MAIN RESULTS: All three reminder systems significantly improved the delivery of preventive services (p less than 0.001). The procedure completion rates were 42.0% in the letter reminder group, 42.0% in the telephone reminder group, 33.7% in the physician reminder group and 14.1% in the randomized control group. The use of a letter was more cost-effective than the telephone system, but the physician reminder system was the most cost-effective. CONCLUSION: Computerized reminder systems do improve the delivery of preventive services in family practice.

Rosser, W W; McDowell, I; Newell, C

1991-01-01

97

The Family Medicine Consultant—Reframing the Contribution of Medical Social Work  

Microsoft Academic Search

Integrating family therapy and the medical system is notoriously difficult. This paper describes an effective approach to the problem. The essence of the approach is to instate a medical professional, usually the medical social worker; into the role of family medicine consultant. The family medicine consultant is a professional who must be skilled in understanding the organization of both the

Elana K. Mandelbaum

1984-01-01

98

Family medicine in post-communist Europe needs a boost. Exploring the position of family medicine in healthcare systems of Central and Eastern Europe and Russia  

PubMed Central

Background The countries of Central and Eastern Europe have experienced a lot of changes at the end of the 20th century, including changes in the health care systems and especially in primary care. The aim of this paper is to systematically assess the position of family medicine in these countries, using the same methodology within all the countries. Methods A key informants survey in 11 Central and Eastern European countries and Russia using a questionnaire developed on the basis of systematic literature review. Results Formally, family medicine is accepted as a specialty in all the countries, although the levels of its implementation vary across the countries and the differences are important. In most countries, solo practice is the most predominant organisational form of family medicine. Family medicine is just one of many medical specialties (e.g. paediatrics and gynaecology) in primary health care. Full introduction of family medicine was successful only in Estonia. Conclusions Some of the unification of the systems may have been the result of the EU request for adequate training that has pushed the policies towards higher standards of training for family medicine. The initial enthusiasm of implementing family medicine has decreased because there was no initiative that would support this movement. Internal and external stimuli might be needed to continue transition process.

2012-01-01

99

Smoking behaviour, knowledge and attitudes among Family Medicine physicians and nurses in Bosnia and Herzegovina  

PubMed Central

Background Smoking rates among the general population in Bosnia and Herzegovina are extremely high, and national campaigns to lower smoking rates have not yet begun. As part of future activities of the Queen's University Family Medicine Development Program in the Balkans Region, technical assistance may be provided to Bosnia and Herzegovina to develop of national tobacco control strategies. This assistance may focus on training doctors and nurses on smoking cessation strategies with a view to helping their patients to stop smoking. Given this important role that health professionals have, data is needed on smoking rates as well as on smoking behaviour among doctors and nurses in Bosnia and Herzegovina. This study therefore seeks to determine the smoking rates and behaviour of family medicine physicians and nurses in Bosnia and Herzegovina and to determine how well prepared they feel with respect to counselling their patients on smoking cessation strategies. Methods The WHO Global Health Professional Survey, a self-administered questionnaire, was distributed to physicians and nurses in 19 Family Medicine Teaching Centres in Bosnia and Herzegovina in June 2002. Smoking rates and behaviour, as well as information on knowledge and attitudes regarding smoking were determined for both physicians and nurses. Results Of the 273 physicians and nurses currently working in Family Medicine Teaching Centres, 209 (77%) completed the questionnaire. Approximately 45% of those surveyed currently smoke, where 51% of nurses smoked, compared to 40% of physicians. With respect to knowledge and attitudes, all respondents agreed that smoking is harmful to one's health. However, "ever" smokers, compared to "never" smokers, were less likely to agree that health professionals who smoke were less likely to advise patients to quit smoking than non-smoking health professionals. Less than half of physicians and nurses had received formal training in smoking cessations strategies, but about two thirds of health professionals felt very or somewhat prepared to counsel their patients on how to quit smoking. Conclusions Our study indicates that almost half of Family Medicine health professionals in Bosnia and Herzegovina are smokers. This indicates a severe public health problem throughout the country. Steps need to be taken at a national level to address the fight against tobacco.

Hodgetts, Geoffrey; Broers, Teresa; Godwin, Marshall

2004-01-01

100

Design and Development of Family-University Cooperative Education System  

Microsoft Academic Search

Aiming at the lack of interactivity that parents participate in university education, FUCES (Family-University Cooperative Education System) is designed and implemented to help universities cultivate undergraduates together with parents. The system is developed based on browse\\/server structure and designed with MVC (Model-View-Controller) pattern by using ASP.NET under. Net Framework. Website plates such as ideological and political education, safety education, scholarship

Zisheng Li; Xiaoping Xiao

2012-01-01

101

Changing University Work, Freedom, Flexibility and Family  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This article investigates what Finnish academics on short fixed-term contracts consider to be the effects of having children on work and careers. The study is framed by the context of the current state of the university sector, its neoliberal and entrepreneurial tendencies and its claims to meritocracy. Informants express relative happiness with…

Nikunen, Minna

2012-01-01

102

Radionuclide production and yields at Washington University School of Medicine.  

PubMed

Washington University School of Medicine has carried out the production of ''non-standard'' nuclides for the positron emission tomography (PET) community since 1999 under the Radionuclide Resource for Cancer Applications grant R24 CA 86307 funded by the National Cancer Institute. With the support from the grant, we have successfully developed procedures for the high yield production of a wide range of radionuclides and made them available to the research community. The following non-standard PET nuclides, (60)Cu, (61)Cu, (64)Cu, (76)Br, (77)Br, (124)I, (94m)Tc, and (86)Y are routinely produced on Washington University on-site Cyclotron Corporation CS-15 or Japan Steel Works 16/8 cyclotrons. Additionally, a technique to produce (45)Ti has been developed and lately, (89)Zr is being investigated. This paper describes the production techniques and presents the performance results in terms of yields and radionuclidic purity. Sufficient yields for distribution are achieved and high radionuclide purity is also achieved yielding high quality product for medical research. PMID:18043542

Tang, L

2007-11-28

103

Evaluation of a task-based community oriented teaching model in family medicine for undergraduate medical students in Iraq  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: The inclusion of family medicine in medical school curricula is essential for producing competent general practitioners. The aim of this study is to evaluate a task-based, community oriented teaching model of family medicine for undergraduate students in Iraqi medical schools. METHODS: An innovative training model in family medicine was developed based upon tasks regularly performed by family physicians providing

Samim A Al-Dabbagh; Waleed G Al-Taee

2005-01-01

104

Didactic Content and Teaching Methodologies on Required Allopathic US Family Medicine Clerkships  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background and Objectives: Despite the increased prominence of family medicine clerkships in required third- and fourth-year clinical rotations in US allopathic medical schools, the content of these clerkships varies markedly among institutions, and there is little in the literature concerning the current or desired content of family medicine clerkships. This study explores the didactic content of a national sample of

L. Peter Schwiebert; Cheryl B. Aspy

105

Going Through Medical School and Considering the Choice of Family Medicine: Prescription or Antidote?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|A study of the choice of specialty by medical students suggests that Family Medicine depends on students whose choice predates medical school; the number of those interested diminishes significantly over the four years. Interviews suggest several characteristics of the medical school that mitigate against the choice of family medicine and steer…

Mauksch, Hans O.; And Others

106

[A tribute to the professors of forensic medicine at the University of Chile].  

PubMed

The outstanding work of professors of the chair of Forensic Medicine at the School of Medicine of the University of Chile is highlighted. This chair is divided in three periods, that are paralell to the history of Chilean medicine. During these periods, the chair initiated, developed and fortified its teaching activities. The practice of forensic medicine was institutionalized and spread throughout the country. Its field of action and knowledge areas also increased. PMID:18769817

Ciocca G, Luis; Bórquez V, Pamela; Burgos S, Raúl

2008-07-30

107

Learning from history: the legacy of Title VII in academic family medicine.  

PubMed

The current renaissance of interest in primary care could benefit from reviewing the history of federal investment in academic family medicine. The authors review 30 years of experience with the Title VII, Section 747 Training in Primary Care Medicine and Dentistry (Title VII) grant program, addressing three questions: (1) What Title VII grant programs were available to family medicine, and what were their goals? (2) How did Title VII change the discipline? and (3) What impact did Title VII family medicine programs have outside the discipline?Title VII grant programs evolved from broad support for the new discipline of family medicine to a sharper focus on specific national workforce objectives such as improving care for underserved and vulnerable populations and increasing diversity in the health professions. Grant programs were instrumental in establishing family medicine in nearly all medical schools and in supporting the educational underpinnings of the field. Title VII grants helped enhance the social capital of the discipline. Outside family medicine, Title VII fostered the development of innovative ambulatory education, institutional initiatives focusing on underserved and vulnerable populations, and primary care research capacity. Adverse effects include relative inattention to clinical and research missions in family medicine academic units and, institutionally, the development of medical education initiatives without core institutional support, which has put innovation and extension of education to communities at risk as grant funding has decreased. Reinvestment in academic family medicine can yield substantial benefits for family medicine and help reorient academic health centers. This article is part of a theme issue of Academic Medicine on the Title VII health professions training programs. PMID:18971653

Newton, Warren; Arndt, Jane E

2008-11-01

108

Cancer Research Center Indiana University School of Medicine  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to authorize the Indiana School of Medicine to proceed with the detailed design, construction and equipping of the proposed Cancer Research Center (CRC). A grant was executed with the University on April 21, 1992. A four-story building with basement would be constructed on the proposed site over a 24-month period. The proposed project would bring together, in one building, three existing hematology/oncology basic research programs, with improved cost-effectiveness through the sharing of common resources. The proposed site is currently covered with asphaltic pavement and is used as a campus parking lot. The surrounding area is developed campus, characterized by buildings, walkways, with minimal lawns and plantings. The proposed site has no history of prior structures and no evidence of potential sources of prior contamination of the soil. Environmental impacts of construction would be limited to minor increases in traffic, and the typical noises associated with standard building construction. The proposed CRC project operation would involve the use radionuclides and various hazardous materials in conducting clinical studies. Storage, removal and disposal of hazardous wastes would be managed under existing University programs that comply with federal and state requirements. Radiological safety programs would be governed by Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) license and applicable Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations. There are no other NEPA reviews currently active which are in relationship to this proposed site. The proposed project is part of a Medical Campus master plan and is consistent with applicable local zoning and land use requirements.

Not Available

1994-08-01

109

Family Medicine Resident Research: How About an N of 1 Trial?  

PubMed Central

Encouraging family-practice residents to undertake a research project should be a mandate of every Department of Family Medicine. In order to have an effective resident research program, time, expertise, funding and ideas are needed. An N of 1 randomized trial is one study design that may be attractive to family-medicine residents as a methodology from which to learn basic concepts of research. This paper provides a background description of single-patient trials and their use in resident research.

Birtwhistle, Richard V.

1989-01-01

110

Baylor College of Medicine's support of Tulane University School of Medicine following Hurricane Katrina.  

PubMed

The authors describe how Baylor College of Medicine (BCM), with three other Texas medical schools, "adopted" virtually all the 620 medical students and 526 house officers of Tulane University School of Medicine and continued their education for eight months after most of New Orleans, including Tulane, was flooded on August 29, 2005, after Hurricane Katrina. Soon after, BCM's president asked all senior staff to take whatever actions were necessary to sustain Tulane, and on September 7, leaders from BCM and three other Texas medical schools met to plan the relocation of Tulane's students and programs. The authors explain how problems were overcome (e.g., locating the scattered Tulane students and staff, finding them lodging, obtaining their records, and providing financial aid and counseling), and how high-quality educational experiences were maintained for both Tulane's and BCM's students and residents while assisting Tulane's faculty in numerous ways, helping Tulane plan the enrollment of its following year's students, and undergoing Liaison Committee for Medical Education and Accreditation Council on Graduate Medical Education site visits to BCM. After the BCM-Tulane experience, BCM developed a disaster-management plan (available online) that could help other schools as they plan for disasters. The authors also offer lessons learned in the areas of communication, cooperation, curriculum, collaboration, contact with accrediting bodies, and compassion. They close by stating that when BCM faculty are asked "how could you take Tulane's medical school in?" their response is, "how could we not?" They continue: "In medical education, a frequent discussion is how to teach humanism and professionalism; we teach it best by modeling it." PMID:17762246

Searle, Nancy S

2007-08-01

111

Universities and access to medicines: What is the optimal ‘humanitarian license’?  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper seeks to add an economic contribution to the current debate on using university licensing contracts to improve access to medicines in developing countries. We build a simple model in which we have a university licensing out an academic invention to a profit-maximizing pharmaceutical company. We compare three different types of licensing contracts that the university might use to

Annamaria Conti; Patrick Gaulé

2008-01-01

112

Model Joint Family Medicine-Preventive/Community Medicine Clerkship Curriculum Project. Executive Summary.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The purpose of the project was to develop a Manual of Clinical Preventive Medicine which would provide medical students, preceptors, and clerkship faculty with a reference tool to teach and learn practical preventive medicine skills and knowledge during a...

1986-01-01

113

Personalised medicine in Canada: a survey of adoption and practice in oncology, cardiology and family medicine  

PubMed Central

Introduction In order to provide baseline data on genetic testing as a key element of personalised medicine (PM), Canadian physicians were surveyed to determine roles, perceptions and experiences in this area. The survey measured attitudes, practice, observed benefits and impacts, and barriers to adoption. Methods A self-administered survey was provided to Canadian oncologists, cardiologists and family physicians and responses were obtained online, by mail or by fax. The survey was designed to be exploratory. Data were compared across specialties and geography. Results The overall response rate was 8.3%. Of the respondents, 43%, 30% and 27% were family physicians, cardiologists and oncologists, respectively. A strong majority of respondents agreed that genetic testing and PM can have a positive impact on their practice; however, only 51% agreed that there is sufficient evidence to order such tests. A low percentage of respondents felt that they were sufficiently informed and confident practicing in this area, although many reported that genetic tests they have ordered have benefited their patients. Half of the respondents agreed that genetic tests that would be useful in their practice are not readily available. A lack of practice guidelines, limited provider knowledge and lack of evidence-based clinical information were cited as the main barriers to practice. Differences across provinces were observed for measures relating to access to testing and the state of practice. Differences across specialties were observed for the state of practice, reported benefits and access to testing. Conclusions Canadian physicians recognise the benefits of genetic testing and PM; however, they lack the education, information and support needed to practice effectively in this area. Variability in practice and access to testing across specialties and across Canada was observed. These results support a need for national strategies and resources to facilitate physician knowledge, training and practice in PM.

Bonter, Katherine; Currier, Nathan; Pun, Jason; Ashbury, Fredrick D

2011-01-01

114

Occupational Medicine Graduate Training Program. University of Pittsburgh, Graduate School of Public Health.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

NIOSH support for the Occupational Medicine Residency at the University of Pittsburgh, Graduate School of Public Health remains instrmental in maintaining the strength of the program. These Training Grant funds have been used exclusively for trainee expen...

J. J. Schwerha

2006-01-01

115

The Use of Peer Group Review In a Community and Family Medicine Clerkship  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The importance of incorporating Professional Standards Review Organizations (PSRO) and related material in the medical curriculum during a phase of the one-month clerkship in community and family medicine is discussed. (Author/PG)|

Skipper, James K., Jr.; And Others

1974-01-01

116

Ethical and Practical Implications of the Human Genome Initiative for Family Medicine  

Microsoft Academic Search

advances in predictive genetic testing resulting from the Human Genome Ini- tiative could change significantly the routine practice of family medicine. Family physicians should be aware that increased genetic information may affect patients' abilities to acquire and maintain insurance and employment and that interested parties will have incentives to seek this information. The social consequences of genetic information, as well

S. Van McCrary; Bill Allen; Ray Moseley; Lee A. Crandall; Harry Ostrer; R. Whit Curry; Marvin A. Dewar; David Nye

2010-01-01

117

Drexel University and Drexel University College of Medicine: an overview of their commitment to women through education.  

PubMed

The Woman's Medical College of Pennsylvania was a groundbreaking institution and an ancestor to the Drexel University College of Medicine. The tradition of the Woman's Medical College lives on in the form of education and leadership programs dedicated to medical training for women. PMID:22340644

Price, Erica; Follen, Michele

2012-02-01

118

Tulane University School of Medicine Summer Histology Course  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This website provides information regarding a summer cell biology and medical histology course at Tulane University. The course is a comprehensive 5-week, 110-hour individualized remediation course for medical and dental students enrolled in medical or dental school.

Tulane University (Tulane University School of Medicine)

2012-07-24

119

Usefulness of cardiovascular family history data for population-based preventive medicine and medical research (the Health Family Tree Study and the NHLBI Family Heart Study).  

PubMed

Detailed medical family history data have been proposed to be effective in identifying high-risk families for targeted intervention. With use of a validated and standardized quantitative family risk score (FRS), the degree of familial aggregation of coronary heart disease (CHD), stroke, hypertension, and diabetes was obtained from 122,155 Utah families and 6,578 Texas families in the large, population-based Health Family Tree Study, and 1,442 families in the NHLBI Family Heart Study in Massachusetts, Minnesota, North Carolina, and Utah. Utah families with a positive family history of CHD (FRS > or =0.5) represented only 14% of the general population but accounted for 72% of persons with early CHD (men before age 55 years, women before age 65 years) and 48% of CHD at all ages. For strokes, 11% of families with FRS > or =0.5 accounted for 86% of early strokes (<75 years) and 68% of all strokes. Analyses of >5,000 families sampled each year in Utah for 14 years demonstrated a gradual decrease in the frequency of a strong positive family history of CHD (-26%/decade) and stroke (-15%/decade) that paralleled a decrease in incidence rates (r = 0.86, p <0.001 for CHD; r = 0.66, p <0.01 for stroke). Because of the collaboration of schools, health departments, and medical schools, the Health Family Tree Study proved to be a highly cost-efficient method for identifying 17,064 CHD-prone families and 13,106 stroke-prone families (at a cost of about $27 per high-risk family) in whom well-established preventive measures can be encouraged. We conclude that most early cardiovascular events in a population occur in families with a positive family history of cardiovascular disease. Family history collection is a validated and relatively inexpensive tool for family-based preventive medicine and medical research. PMID:11152826

Williams, R R; Hunt, S C; Heiss, G; Province, M A; Bensen, J T; Higgins, M; Chamberlain, R M; Ware, J; Hopkins, P N

2001-01-15

120

Value and Types of Medicines Returned by Patients to Sultan Qaboos University Hospital Pharmacy, Oman  

PubMed Central

Objectives: Frequent physician visits, improper therapeutic adherence and treatment modification after hospitalisation could result in unused medicine accumulating at home. This study aims to examine the value and types of medicines returned by patients at a tertiary care unit in Oman. Method: All medicines voluntarily returned to Sultan Qaboos University Hospital main pharmacy between February and June 2003 were reviewed. The cost of these medicines and potential cost saving, if some were returned to the hospital distribution cycle, were computed. A method of determining by physical observation whether they can be recycled was developed based on institutional-based guidelines and criteria. Results: Three hundred and eighty one patients returned their medicines (69% female). The patients returned a total of 1071 drugs (mean per patient 3.1 per month) corresponding to a total cost of Omani Rials (OR) 20,140 (mean per patient OR 10.6) (1 OR = 2.58 US dollar). Potential cost saving was OR 5,550 (mean per patient OR 2.9). Medicines of the cardiovascular group were returned in greatest number (24%) while anti-infective drugs had the highest share of the total cost (61%). Conclusion: The study identified values and types of medicines returned by patients at tertiary care unit in Oman. Medications used for cardiovascular and infectious diseases appeared as the most frequent and the most expensive returned medicines. It suggests that health care providers in Oman should devise health education programmes to improve proper utilization of medicine.

Al-Siyabi, Khalid; Al-Riyami, Kassim

2007-01-01

121

Institutional profile: the Wolfson Centre for Personalised Medicine, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK.  

PubMed

The Wolfson Centre for Personalised Medicine is part of the Institute of Translational Medicine at the University of Liverpool (Liverpool, UK). It houses a multidisciplinary team of personalized medicine researchers engaged in collaborative research with partners across the globe. The primary focus of the centre is the identification of predictive biomarkers of drug safety and efficacy with the aim of translation from 'bench-to-bedside'. Studies utilizing the latest genotyping and phenotyping, and point-of-care technologies, are undertaken with the ultimate aim of developing easy access for patients to truly personalized medicine. In addition to translation into clinical practice, the Centre puts significant emphasis into education of clinicians and scientists alike, as well as public engagement activities to promote personalized medicine. PMID:23746181

Alfirevic, Ana; Carr, Daniel F; Miyajima, Fabio; Pushpakom, Sudeep; Sutton, Laura; Jorgensen, Andrea L; Pirmohamed, Munir

2013-06-01

122

Stanford University's AI in medicine: still cutting the edge  

Microsoft Academic Search

Since the early 1970s, Stanford University Medical School has been not only one of the leading medical schools, but also home to some of the best researchers in artificial intelligence. The author discusses automated knowledge acquisition and representation, protocol directed therapy, time dependent data mining and medical decision support systems

S. R. Hedberg

1998-01-01

123

Family universal anomalous U(1) in realistic superstring derived models  

SciTech Connect

An important issue in supersymmetry phenomenology is the suppression of squarks contributions to Flavor Changing Neutral Currents (FCNC). Recently it was noted that in some free fermionic three generation models the anomalous U(1) is family universal. It was further shown that if the D-term of the U(1){sub A} is the dominant source of supersymmetry breaking, the squark masses are indeed approximately degenerate. In this paper the author discusses the properties of the superstring models that give rise to the flavor universal anomalous U(1). The root cause for the universal U(1){sub A} is the cyclic permutation symmetry, the characteristic property of the Z{sub 2} X Z{sub 2} orbifold compactification, realized in the free fermionic models by the NAHE set of boundary condition basis vectors. The properties of the three generation models that preserve this cyclic permutation symmetry in the flavor charges are discussed. The cyclic permutation symmetry of the Z{sub 2} x Z{sub 2} orbifold compactification is proposed to be the characteristic property, of phenomenological interest, that distinguishes it from other classes of superstring compactifications.

Faraggi, A.E.

1998-01-01

124

A Problem-Solving Oral Examination for Family Medicine  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The College of Family Physicians of Canada has used in its certification examination a new type of structured problem-solving examination called the Formal Oral. A series of preselected problem areas such as the complaint, relevant data base, investigation, and treatment are scored by two examiners. (Editor/PG)

Van Wart, Arthur D.

1974-01-01

125

Family medicine and international health-related travel  

Microsoft Academic Search

elays for medical interventions such as hip and knee replacements, spinal surgery, and ophthal- mologic procedures are a serious problem in Canada. Federal and provincial governments are strug- gling to shorten waiting lists and provide timely care. Patients often wait months to obtain appointments with specialists, undergo diagnostic tests, and receive treat- ment. Lack of access to family physicians can

Leigh Turner

2007-01-01

126

Hypnosis and Hypnotism in Family Medicine: How are they used in a clinical setting?  

PubMed

This article attempts to define and demystify hypnosis and to present the range of its applications in family medicine. The author reviews definitions and describes hypnotic phenomena, suggestibility, and the use of suggestion, as well as traditional, semitraditional, and Ericksonian induction methods, precautions, and dangers. Clinical uses are then presented for the family physician to apply to surgery, obstetrics, pain treatment, psychosomatic disorders, and psychotherapy. PMID:21221278

Nadeau, G

1992-09-01

127

A Family's Request for Complementary Medicine After Patient Brain Death  

PubMed Central

A 19-year-old woman living with relatives in the United States who was admitted for elective cranial surgery for complications related to a congenital disorder developed an acute intracranial hemorrhage 10 days after surgery. The patient was declared dead following repeat negative apnea tests. The patient’s father requested that the treating team administer an unverified traditional medicinal substance to the patient. Because of the unusual nature of this request, the treating team called an ethics consultation. The present article reviews this case and discusses other cases that share key features to determine whether and when it is appropriate to accommodate requests for interventions on patients who have been declared dead.

Applbaum, Arthur Isak; Tilburt, Jon C.; Collins, Michael T.; Wendler, David

2009-01-01

128

The Physiology Undergraduate Major in the University of Arizona College of Medicine: Past, Present, and Future  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

An article on the historical development and implementation of an undergraduate program offered through the Department of Physiology, a basic science department in the College of Medicine at the University of Arizona, culminating in a Bachelor of Science in Health Sciences degree with a major in Physiology.

PhD William H. Dantzler (University of Arizona College of Medicine Department of Physiology)

2011-06-01

129

Veterinary Medicine Program Review. State University System of Florida. Consultant's Report and Recommendations.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This report reviews the University of Florida's College of Veterinary Medicine and provides an analysis of the institution's strengths and weaknesses, along with recommendations to improve the college's programs. It examines the college's degree programs, students, faculty, facilities, and resources, as well as actions taken to meet…

Anderson, David P.

130

Student Senior Partnership Program: University of California Irvine School of Medicine  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Student Senior Partner Program (SSPP) forms the core of the required medical student geriatrics curriculum at the University of California-Irvine School of Medicine (UCISOM). The program utilizes a longitudinal modular format that extends over the first three years of medical school. Instruction is presented in didactic, patient interactive,…

Fitzpatrick, Camille; Musser, Anne; Mosqueda, Laura; Boker, John; Prislin, Michael

2006-01-01

131

Improvement of Oncology Education at the University of Washington School of Medicine, 1984-1988.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|After development and implementation of a revised oncology curriculum at the University of Washington School of Medicine student performance on oncology related questions on the National Board of Medical Examiners examination indicated substantial improvement relative to student performance in non-oncology areas and to the national average. (DB)|

Bleyer, W. Archie; And Others

1990-01-01

132

Improvement of Oncology Education at the University of Washington School of Medicine, 1984-1988.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

After development and implementation of a revised oncology curriculum at the University of Washington School of Medicine student performance on oncology related questions on the National Board of Medical Examiners examination indicated substantial improvement relative to student performance in non-oncology areas and to the national average. (DB)

Bleyer, W. Archie; And Others

1990-01-01

133

The Use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine Practices Among Australian University Students  

Microsoft Academic Search

A survey of 518 university students in Australia was conducted to gain a better understanding of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use. Results indicated that 81.1% of the students used at least 1 of 24 CAM practices. Top practices were relaxation, massage, herbs, art therapy, and prayer. The most common health reasons for using CAM were stress or psychosomatic issues

Robert H. Feldman; Ronald Laura

2004-01-01

134

Family background, subject specialization and occupational recruitment of Scottish university students: Some patterns and trends  

Microsoft Academic Search

University entrants from different social backgrounds tend to specialize in different subjects at university. Self-recruitment operates to a large extent in the ancient professions of medicine, dentistry and law, and few working class students enter these faculties. Self-recruitment of male students to engineering, business, farming and to a lesser extent teaching, is also evident. Working class university entrants frequently specialize

Alison Kelly

1976-01-01

135

[Curriculum reform in dental medicine at the University of Ghent].  

PubMed

The need for dental and oral treatment in the society is constantly changing. Epidemiological studies show that in the rapidly aging population in Western Europe, caries (except for root caries) is declining but more complex periodontal treatment is needed. The number of completely edentulous patients is decreasing. Patients have a longer life expectancy but are medically and psychologically more compromised. Many more patients are at high risk for medical complications. Therefore, a more medical orientation of the dental education is needed. The basic cellular and molecular knowledge in medicine is rapidly expanding. The practical application of this expanded knowledge has been introduced in dentistry such as use of DNA probes, genetic testing, vaccines etc. The graduating dentist should be aware of the scientific progress and be able to apply this technology in his future practice. Therefore, the urgent need was felt to reform the dental education fundamentally and to give it a more medical orientation. Teaching is organised in coherent blocks of lectures covering specific parts of' a discipline and discussing the content from different angles by different lecturers. Basic information (eg. physiology, microscopy, microbiology) is provided in the same block as the clinical and therapeutic information. Preclinical laboratories prepare the student for the clinical phase of a discipline and are not any longer devoted to dental technical laboratory work. More time is given to prosthetic planning, communication with the dental technician and to analyse the biological effects of prosthetic appliances. In the final year a large number of teaching hours is devoted to general medical pathology including physiopathology, dermatology, general head and neck pathology and surgery (ENT, oncology, orthognathic surgery) as well as gerodontology including general medical, psychological and nutritional themes. Finally, clinically the student has a multidisciplinary approach in his diagnosis and treatment of patients. The final aim is train and educated oral physicians. PMID:16004074

De Boever, J A

2004-01-01

136

Stanford University School of Medicine: Center for Narcolepsy  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Scientific studies of sleep patterns and behaviors have been around for decades, and the Stanford University Sleep Clinic was the first medical clinic established to examine sleep disorders. Since its founding, it has given rise to the Stanford Center for Narcolepsy. For visitors looking for information about their research and this illness, their website provides ample material. First-time visitors might do well to begin by reading the review essay, "A Hundred Years of Research", which provides some background on the ways in which researchers have explored the causes and etiology of this condition. Moving on, visitors can also learn about which medications are used to treat the condition, and also read about their innovative brain donation program.

137

The Doctoring Curriculum at the University of California, Davis School of Medicine: Leadership and Participant Roles for Psychiatry Faculty  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Objective: The authors describe in detail the 3-year model of the Doctoring curriculum plus an elective fourth-year Doctoring course at University of California, Davis School of Medicine (UCDSOM) and University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) School of Medicine and the critical role for psychiatry faculty leadership and participation. Methods:…

Bourgeois, James A.; Ton, Hendry; Onate, John; McCarthy, Tracy; Stevenson, Frazier T.; Servis, Mark E.; Wilkes, Michael S.

2008-01-01

138

Insights From Practice-based Researchers to Develop Family Medicine Faculty as Scholars  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background and Objectives: National mandates call for accelerating scholarly development of family medicine faculty. One strategy to address these mandates is training more faculty to participate in practice-based research (PBR). We need to determine competencies that enable faculty to conduct PBR, methods for training faculty in PBR, and strategies to streamline PBR operations in clinics. Methods: Through a qualitative literature

Linda M. Roth; Anne Victoria Neale; Kambria Kennedy; Mark J. DeHaven

2007-01-01

139

Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction and Family Systems Medicine: A Natural Fit  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) is a patient-centered treatment modality that is congruent with the core values of family systems medicine. It has numerous applications in clinical and nonclinical settings, including the education of physicians. The article by A. M. Tacón, Y. M. Caldera, and C. Ronaghan (2004) adds to the growing literature base on MBSR by studying its impact on

Joanne Cohen-Katz

2004-01-01

140

Multi-Source Evaluation of Interpersonal and Communication Skills of Family Medicine Residents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|There is a lack of information on the use of multi-source evaluation to assess trainees' interpersonal and communication skills in Oriental settings. This study is conducted to assess the reliability and applicability of assessing the interpersonal and communication skills of family medicine residents by patients, peer residents, nurses, and…

Leung, Kai-Kuen; Wang, Wei-Dan; Chen, Yen-Yuan

2012-01-01

141

Development of a Competency Framework for Quality Improvement in Family Medicine: A Qualitative Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: The aim of this study was to develop a comprehensive framework of quality improvement competencies for use in continuing professional development (CPD) and continuing medical education (CME) for European general practice/family medicine physicians (GPs/FDs). Methods: The study was carried out in three phases: literature review,…

Czabanowska, Katarzyna; Klemenc-Ketis, Zalika; Potter, Amanda; Rochfort, Andree; Tomasik, Tomasz; Csiszar, Judit; Van den Bussche, Piet

2012-01-01

142

Development of a Competency Framework for Quality Improvement in Family Medicine: A Qualitative Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Objective: The aim of this study was to develop a comprehensive framework of quality improvement competencies for use in continuing professional development (CPD) and continuing medical education (CME) for European general practice/family medicine physicians (GPs/FDs). Methods: The study was carried out in three phases: literature review,…

Czabanowska, Katarzyna; Klemenc-Ketis, Zalika; Potter, Amanda; Rochfort, Andree; Tomasik, Tomasz; Csiszar, Judit; Van den Bussche, Piet

2012-01-01

143

Monetary Value of a Prescription Assistance Program Service in a Rural Family Medicine Clinic  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Purpose: To quantify the monetary value of medications provided to rural Alabamians through provision of pharmaceutical manufacturer-sponsored prescription assistance programs (PAPs) provided by a clinical pharmacist in a private Black Belt family medicine clinic during 2007 and 2008. Methods: Patients struggling to afford prescription…

Whitley, Heather P.

2011-01-01

144

A growing family: the expanding universe of the bacterial cytoskeleton.  

PubMed

Cytoskeletal proteins are important mediators of cellular organization in both eukaryotes and bacteria. In the past, cytoskeletal studies have largely focused on three major cytoskeletal families, namely the eukaryotic actin, tubulin, and intermediate filament (IF) proteins and their bacterial homologs MreB, FtsZ, and crescentin. However, mounting evidence suggests that these proteins represent only the tip of the iceberg, as the cellular cytoskeletal network is far more complex. In bacteria, each of MreB, FtsZ, and crescentin represents only one member of large families of diverse homologs. There are also newly identified bacterial cytoskeletal proteins with no eukaryotic homologs, such as WACA proteins and bactofilins. Furthermore, there are universally conserved proteins, such as the metabolic enzyme CtpS, that assemble into filamentous structures that can be repurposed for structural cytoskeletal functions. Recent studies have also identified an increasing number of eukaryotic cytoskeletal proteins that are unrelated to actin, tubulin, and IFs, such that expanding our understanding of cytoskeletal proteins is advancing the understanding of the cell biology of all organisms. Here, we summarize the recent explosion in the identification of new members of the bacterial cytoskeleton and describe a hypothesis for the evolution of the cytoskeleton from self-assembling enzymes. PMID:22092065

Ingerson-Mahar, Michael; Gitai, Zemer

2011-11-28

145

Providing competency-based family medicine residency training in substance abuse in the new millennium: a model curriculum  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: This article, developed for the Betty Ford Institute Consensus Conference on Graduate Medical Education (December, 2008), presents a model curriculum for Family Medicine residency training in substance abuse. METHODS: The authors reviewed reports of past Family Medicine curriculum development efforts, previously-identified barriers to education in high risk substance use, approaches to overcoming these barriers, and current training guidelines of

J Paul Seale; Sylvia Shellenberger; Denice Crowe Clark

2010-01-01

146

First Universities Allied for Essential Medicines (UAEM) Neglected Diseases and Innovation Symposium.  

PubMed

Universities Allied for Essential Medicines organized its first Neglected Diseases and Innovation Symposium to address expanding roles of public sector research institutions in innovation in research and development of biomedical technologies for treatment of diseases, particularly neglected tropical diseases. Universities and other public research institutions are increasingly integrated into the pharmaceutical innovation system. Academic entities now routinely undertake robust high-throughput screening and medicinal chemistry research programs to identify lead compounds for small molecule drugs and novel drug targets. Furthermore, product development partnerships are emerging between academic institutions, non-profit entities, and biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies to create diagnostics, therapies, and vaccines for diseases of the poor. With not for profit mission statements, open access publishing standards, open source platforms for data sharing and collaboration, and a shift in focus to more translational research, universities and other public research institutions are well-placed to accelerate development of medical technologies, particularly for neglected tropical diseases. PMID:22232453

Musselwhite, Laura W; Maciag, Karolina; Lankowski, Alex; Gretes, Michael C; Wellems, Thomas E; Tavera, Gloria; Goulding, Rebecca E; Guillen, Ethan

2012-01-01

147

Surviving Hurricane Katrina: reconstructing the educational enterprise of Tulane University School of Medicine.  

PubMed

Hurricane Katrina was one of the greatest natural disasters to ever strike the United States. Tulane University School of Medicine, located in downtown New Orleans, and its three major teaching hospitals were flooded in the aftermath of the storm and forced to close. Faculty, students, residents, and staff evacuated to locations throughout the country. All critical infrastructure that normally maintained the school, including information technology, network communication servers, registration systems, and e-mail, became nonoperational. However, on the basis of experiences learned when Tropical Storm Allison flooded the Texas Medical Center in 2001, Baylor College of Medicine, University of Texas-Houston, University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston, and Texas A&M School of Medicine created the South Texas Alliance of Academic Health Centers, which allowed Tulane to move its education programs to Houston. Using Baylor's facilities, Tulane faculty rebuilt and delivered the preclinical curriculum, and clinical rotations were made available at the Alliance schools. Remarkably, the Tulane School of Medicine was able to resume all educational activities within a month after the storm. Educational reconstruction approaches, procedures employed, and lessons in institutional recovery learned are discussed so that other schools can prepare effectively for either natural or man-made disasters. Key disaster-response measures include designating an evacuation/command site in advance; backing up technology, communication, financial, registration, and credentialing systems; and establishing partnership with other institutions and leaders. PMID:17762249

Krane, N Kevin; Kahn, Marc J; Markert, Ronald J; Whelton, Paul K; Traber, Peter G; Taylor, Ian L

2007-08-01

148

Universal health care, genomic medicine and Thailand: investing in today and tomorrow.  

PubMed

One potential outcome of investing in genomic medicine is the provision of tools for creating a more cost-effective health-care system. Partly with this aim in mind, Thailand has launched two genotyping initiatives: the Thai SNP Discovery Project and the Thai Centre for Excellence in Life Sciences Pharmacogenomics Project. Together, these projects will help Thailand understand the genomic diversity of its population and explore the role that this diversity has in drug response and disease susceptibility in its population. A major future challenge will be for Thailand to integrate genomic medicine in its relatively young universal health-care system. PMID:18802416

Séguin, Béatrice; Hardy, Billie-Jo; Singer, Peter A; Daar, Abdallah S

2008-10-01

149

Assessment of patients' health status in family medicine.  

PubMed

General Practitioners feel increasing pressure from Public Health authorities to evaluate their work but generally accept outcome indices such as morbidity and mortality are too far away from GP practices to allow direct evaluation conclusions. A simple instrument is needed to assess the evolution in the health status of the populations the GP serves. To design such an instrument we developed a short, inexpensive questionnaire, to be filled in by the GP, that covers as many fields of health care as possible and reflects as closely as possible the specific approach in family practice. To construct this instrument five Guttman scales were first developed that refer to the five frameworks of though that a general practitioner uses, and submitted them to a process of validation. A composite index (SAMI) was mathematically derived from these five scales; it proved to be a valid instrument for measuring health status. To field test the SAMI index, a prospective cohort study was carried out in two subpopulations, Belgians and migrants, consulting seven GP practices. The evolution of four reasons for encounter (low back pain, pregnancy, diabetes and epigastralgia) were monitored by means of the five scales and the SAMI index. The evaluative conclusion that, despite special efforts of the GPs, their approach to migrants has to be reconsidered, is drawn. Above all the field test has shown that the five measurement scales and the global SAMI index are valid instruments, of easy use in general practice, that allow to assess the global health status of patient populations and give opportunities for evaluation of PHC services. PMID:2151753

Schillemans, L; De Muynck, A; Van der Stuyft, P; Saenen, R; Baeten, R

1990-01-01

150

Family practice clinics. Survey of family practice residents' attitudes.  

PubMed Central

All residents of McGill University's Department of Family Medicine were surveyed by mail about their family practice clinic experience. Residents were generally satisfied with their training site and their supervision, but noted problems with volume and diversity of patients, learning certain procedures, and knowledge of community resources. They did not want more family medicine clinic time.

Rubenstein, H.; Levitt, C.

1993-01-01

151

Making the 2007-2010 Action Plan work for women in family medicine in the Asia Pacific  

PubMed Central

The Wonca Working Party for Women and Family Medicine (WWPWFM) was organized in 2001 with the following objectives: to identify the key issues for women doctors; to review Wonca policies and procedures for equity and transparency; to provide opportunities to network at meetings and through the group's listserve and website; and to promote women doctors' participation in Wonca initiatives. In October 2008, at the Asia Pacific Regional conference, the Wonca Working Party on Women in Family Medicine (WWPWFM) held a preconference day and conference workshops, building on the success and commitment to initiatives which enhance women's participation in Wonca developed in Ontario, Canada (2006) and at the Singapore World Congress (2007). At this meeting fifty women workshopped issues for women in Family Medicine in the Asia Pacific. Using the Action Plan formulated in Singapore (2007) the participants identified key regional issues and worked towards a solution. Key issues identified were professional issues, training in family medicine and women's health. Solutions were to extend the understanding of women's contributions to family medicine, improved career pathways for women in family medicine and improving women's participation in practices, family medicine organizations and academic meetings.

2010-01-01

152

Introduction to Evidence-Based Medicine: a student-selected component at the Faculty of Medicine, King Abdulaziz University  

PubMed Central

Background Evidence-based medicine (EBM) involves approaching a clinical problem using a four-step method: (1) formulate a clear clinical question from a patient’s problem, (2) search the literature for relevant clinical articles, (3) evaluate (critically appraise) the evidence for its validity and usefulness, (4) implement useful findings into clinical practice. EBM has now been incorporated as an integral part of the medical curriculum in many faculties of medicine around the world. The Faculty of Medicine, King Abdulaziz University, started its process of curriculum reform and introduction of the new curriculum 4 years ago. One of the most characteristic aspects of this curriculum is the introduction of special study modules and electives as a student-selected component in the fourth year of study; the Introduction to Evidence-Based Medicine course was included as one of these special study modules. The purpose of this article is to evaluate the EBM skills of medical students after completing the course and their perceptions of the faculty member delivering the course and organization of the course. Materials and methods The EBM course was held for the first time as a special study module for fourth-year medical students in the first semester of the academic year 2009–2010. Fifteen students were enrolled in this course. At the end of the course, students anonymously evaluated aspects of the course regarding their EBM skills and course organization using a five- point Likert scale in response to an online course evaluation questionnaire. In addition, students’ achievement was evaluated with regard to the skills and competencies taught in the course. Results Medical students generally gave high scores to all aspects of the EBM course, including course organization, course delivery, methods of assessment, and overall. Scores were also high for students’ self-evaluation of skill level and EBM experience. The results of a faculty member’s evaluation of the students’ achievement showed an average total percentage (92.2%) for all EBM steps. Conclusion The EBM course at the Faculty of Medicine, King Abdulaziz University, is useful for familiarizing medical students with the basic principles of EBM and to help them in answering routine questions of clinical interest in a systematic way. In light of the results obtained from implementing this course with a small number of students, and as a student-selected component, the author believes integrating EBM longitudinally throughout the curriculum would be beneficial for King Abdulaziz University medical students. It would provide a foundation of knowledge, offer easy access to resources, promote point-of-care and team learning, help students to develop applicable skills for lifelong learning, and help the faculty to achieve its goals of becoming more student-centered and encouraging students to employ more self-directed learning strategies.

Hassanien, Mohammed Ahmed

2011-01-01

153

Implementing and Maintaining a Researchable Database from Electronic Medical Records: A Perspective from an Academic Family Medicine Department  

PubMed Central

Electronic medical records (EMRs) are posited as a tool for improving practice, policy and research in primary healthcare. This paper describes the Deliver Primary Healthcare Information (DELPHI) Project at the Department of Family Medicine at the University of Western Ontario, focusing on its development, current status and research potential in order to share experiences with researchers in similar contexts. The project progressed through four stages: (a) participant recruitment, (b) EMR software modification and implementation, (c) database creation and (d) data quality assessment. Currently, the DELPHI database holds more than two years of high-quality, de-identified data from 10 practices, with 30,000 patients and nearly a quarter of a million encounters.

Stewart, Moira; Thind, Amardeep; Terry, Amanda L.; Chevendra, Vijaya; Marshall, J. Neil

2009-01-01

154

Attitudes and perceptions of medical students about family medicine in Spain: protocol for a cross-sectional survey.  

PubMed

Background Despite the fact that family medicine (FM) has become established as a specialty in the past 25 years, this has not been reflected in the inclusion of the specialty in the majority of medical schools in Spain. Almost 40% of the students will work in primary care but, in spite of this, most universities do not have an assessed placement as such. There are only specific practice periods in health centres or some student-selected components with little weight in the overall curricula. Objectives To evaluate the attitudes and perceptions of medical students about FM in the health system and their perception about the need for specific training in FM at the undergraduate level. To explore change over time of these attitudes and perceptions and to examine potential predictive factors for change. Finally, we will review what teaching activity in FM is offered across the Spanish schools of medicine. Methods Descriptive cross-sectional survey. Each one of the different analyses will consist of two surveys: one for all the students in the first, third and fifth year of medical school in all the Spanish schools of medicine asking about their knowledge, perceptions and attitudes in relation to primary care and FM. There will be an additional survey for the coordinating faculty of the study in each university about the educational activities related to FM that are carried out in their centres. The repetition of the study every 2 years will allow for an analysis of the evolution of the cohort of students until they receive their degree and the potential predictive factors. Discussion This study will provide useful information for strategic planning decisions, content and educational methodology in medical schools in Spain and elsewhere. It will also help to evaluate the influence of the ongoing changes in FM, locally and at the European level, on the attitudes and perceptions of the students towards FM in Spain. PMID:22189348

Alonso-Coello, Pablo; Villa, Josep Jiménez; Hijar, Antonio Monreal; Tuduri, Xavier Mundet; Puime, Angel Otero; Zurro, Amando Martín

2011-12-21

155

Attitudes and perceptions of medical students about family medicine in Spain: protocol for a cross-sectional survey  

PubMed Central

Background Despite the fact that family medicine (FM) has become established as a specialty in the past 25?years, this has not been reflected in the inclusion of the specialty in the majority of medical schools in Spain. Almost 40% of the students will work in primary care but, in spite of this, most universities do not have an assessed placement as such. There are only specific practice periods in health centres or some student-selected components with little weight in the overall curricula. Objectives To evaluate the attitudes and perceptions of medical students about FM in the health system and their perception about the need for specific training in FM at the undergraduate level. To explore change over time of these attitudes and perceptions and to examine potential predictive factors for change. Finally, we will review what teaching activity in FM is offered across the Spanish schools of medicine. Methods Descriptive cross-sectional survey. Each one of the different analyses will consist of two surveys: one for all the students in the first, third and fifth year of medical school in all the Spanish schools of medicine asking about their knowledge, perceptions and attitudes in relation to primary care and FM. There will be an additional survey for the coordinating faculty of the study in each university about the educational activities related to FM that are carried out in their centres. The repetition of the study every 2?years will allow for an analysis of the evolution of the cohort of students until they receive their degree and the potential predictive factors. Discussion This study will provide useful information for strategic planning decisions, content and educational methodology in medical schools in Spain and elsewhere. It will also help to evaluate the influence of the ongoing changes in FM, locally and at the European level, on the attitudes and perceptions of the students towards FM in Spain.

Alonso-Coello, Pablo; Villa, Josep Jimenez; Hijar, Antonio Monreal; Tuduri, Xavier Mundet; Puime, Angel Otero

2011-01-01

156

Associated Factors of Suicide Among University Students: Importance of Family Environment  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim in this study was to underline the importance of family environment as a significant associate of suicide probability among university students. For this aim 226 Turkish university students completed Suicide Probability Scale, Family Environment Questionnaire, Beck Depression Inventory, and Positive and Negative Affect Scale. As a result of the formulated regression analysis, after controlling for the 51% of

Tülin Gençöz; P?nar

2006-01-01

157

Promoting Interdisciplinary Research in Departments of Medicine: Results from Two Models at Boston University School of Medicine  

PubMed Central

We have sought to broaden our department's research capacity using two different interdisciplinary approaches. First, we created the Evans Center for Interdisciplinary Biomedical Research (ECIBR) — a virtual center that promotes and funds Affinity Research Collaboratives (ARCs) initiated by faculty from within and outside Boston University (BU). Of the 11 funded ARCs, the 4 ARCs in existence for a minimum of 3 years have a total of 37 participants, 93 co-authored publications, and 33 new grants. Second, the Department of Medicine (DOM) created a Section of Computational Biomedicine in 2009 to enhance analytical and computational expertise in the DOM. After 3 years, the section is comprised of 10 faculty members and 21 trainees. The faculty members have collaborated with 20 faculty members in other sections or departments and secured 12 extramural grants (totaling ?$20 million in direct costs). The ECIBR and the Section of Computational Biomedicine represent new organizational approaches to stimulating innovation in research in a DOM.

Coleman, David L.; Spira, Avrum; Ravid, Katya

2013-01-01

158

Service-Learning in Healthy Aging for Medical Students and Family Medicine Residents  

Microsoft Academic Search

Introduction: Community-based educational opportunities can diversify and strengthen traditional clinical education. With growing diversity of patient populations and increasing life expectancy, it is imperative that medical students and residents prepare for practice within this context. The Center for Healthy Communities in the Department of Family and Community Medicine at the Medical College of Wisconsin, USA developed a community-based, service-learning program

Staci Young; Tovah Bates; Marie Wolff; Cheryl A. Maurana

2002-01-01

159

[Brazilian family spending on medicines: an analysis of data from the Family Budget Surveys, 2002-2003 and 2008-2009].  

PubMed

This study aimed to investigate spending on medicines by Brazilian families and related income inequalities, according to types of medicines. A cross-sectional study used data from the Family Budget Surveys conducted in 2002-2003 and 2008-2009. Expenditures were corrected according to the Extended National Consumer Price Index (IPCA). The Concentration Index (CI) was calculated as a measure of inequality. Average monthly spending on medicines was BRL 53.54 in the 2002-2003 survey and BRL 59.02 in 2008-2009. CI showed spending concentration in higher-income families. Spending composition varied according to family income. Lower-income families spent predominantly on analgesics, cold medicines, and anti-inflammatory drugs. Higher-income families concentrated their spending on medicines for diabetes and hypertension (and other cardiovascular diseases). From one survey to the next, even though lower-income households reduced the percentage of their budget spent on medicines, the latter still consume a large proportion of their health spending. PMID:24005926

Garcia, Leila Posenato; Sant'anna, Ana Cláudia; Magalhães, Luís Carlos Garcia de; Freitas, Lúcia Rolim Santana de; Aurea, Adriana Pacheco

2013-08-01

160

Health Hazard Evaluation Report HETA 89-055-2043, George Washington University School of Medicine, Washington, DC.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In response to a request from the Occupational Medicine Program of the George Washington University School of Medicine (SIC-8062) an evaluation was made of possible clustering of optic neuritis among employees in the pathology department over a 2 year per...

A. Suruda C. E. Moss

1990-01-01

161

The early years of coeducation at the Yale University School of Medicine.  

PubMed Central

The Yale School of Medicine began accepting women as candidates for the degree of medicine in the fall of 1916. This decision was consistent with the trend in medical education at the time. While Yale was not the first prestigious Eastern medical school to admit women, joining Johns Hopkins (1893) and the University of Pennsylvania (1914), it was not one of the last. Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons admitted women a year later, but Harvard Medical School held out until 1945. The years 1916--1920 saw the number of women enrolled in medical school almost double. Yale's decision to admit women seems to have been made with little resistance from the faculty. The final decision was made through the encouragement and financial help of Henry Farnam, a professor of economics at Yale, who agreed to pay for the women's bathrooms. His daughter, Louise, was in the first class of women. At graduation she was awarded the highest scholastic honors, the Campbell Gold Prize. From Yale she travelled to the Yale-sponsored medical school in Changsha, China, where she became the first female faculty member, a position she held for twelve years. The impressions of Ella Clay Wakeman Calhoun, the only woman to graduate in the second class of women, are presented here. Since 1916 the Yale School of Medicine has undergone extensive physical and philosophical changes, developments in which women have participated.

Baserga, S. J.

1980-01-01

162

Health Hazard Evaluation Report HETA 95-0031-2601, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, University Hospital, Newark, New Jersey.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In response to a request from management at the University Hospital, University of medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey (SIC-4119), Newark, New Jersey, an evaluation was made of a high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filtration system in an ambulance an...

T. A. Seitz J. Decker P. Jensen

1996-01-01

163

Destabilase from the medicinal leech is a representative of a novel family of lysozymes.  

PubMed

Intrinsic lysozyme-like activity was demonstrated for destabilase from the medicinal leech supported by (1) high specific lysozyme activity of the highly purified destabilase, (2) specific inhibition of the lysozyme-like activity by anti-destabilase antibodies, and (3) appreciable lysozyme-like activity in insect cells infected with recombinant baculoviruses carrying cDNAs encoding different isoforms of destabilase. Several isoforms of destabilase constitute a protein family at least two members of which are characterized by lysozyme activity. The corresponding gene family implies an ancient evolutionary history of the genes although the function(s) of various lysozymes in the leech remains unclear. Differences in primary structures of the destabilase family members and members of known lysozyme families allow one to assign the former to a new family of lysozymes. New proteins homologous to destabilase were recently described for Caenorhabditis elegans and bivalve mollusks suggesting that the new lysozyme family can be widely distributed among invertebrates. It remains to be investigated whether the two enzymatic activities (isopeptidase and lysozyme-like) are attributes of one and the same protein. PMID:10719176

Zavalova, L L; Baskova, I P; Lukyanov, S A; Sass, A V; Snezhkov, E V; Akopov, S B; Artamonova, I I; Archipova, V S; Nesmeyanov, V A; Kozlov, D G; Benevolensky, S V; Kiseleva, V I; Poverenny, A M; Sverdlov, E D

2000-03-16

164

Women's impressions of their inpatient birth care as provided by family physicians in the Shizuoka Family Medicine Training Program in Japan  

PubMed Central

Background Even though Japan faces serious challenges in women’s health care such as a rapidly aging population, attrition of obstetrical providers, and a harsh legal climate, few family medicine residency training programs in Japan include training in obstetrics, and the literature lacks research on women’s views of intra-partum pregnancy care by family physicians. Findings In this exploratory study, we conducted semi-structured qualitative interviews with five women who received their admission, intrapartum, delivery and discharge care from family medicine residents in the obstetrics ward of a community training hospital. Four women had vaginal births, and one had a Cesarean section. Three were primiparous, and two multiparous. Their ages ranged from 22–33. They found value in family physician medical knowledge and easy communication style, though despite explanation, some had trouble understanding the family physician’s scope of work. These women identified negative aspects of the hospital environment, and wanted more anticipatory guidance about what to expect physically after birth, but were enthusiastic about seeing a family doctor after discharge. Conclusions These results demonstrate the feasibility of family medicine residents providing inpatient birth care in a community hospital, and that patients are receptive to family physicians providing that care as well after discharge. Women’s primary concerns relate mostly to hospital environment issues, and better understanding the care family physicians provide. This illustrates-areas for family physicians to work for improvements.

2013-01-01

165

[The University of Chile School of medicine : 170 years serving the country].  

PubMed

The first course on Medical Sciences in Chile was inaugurated in 1833, being its director William C Blest, MD, an Irish physician graduated in Edinburgh University. Therefore, Dr. Blest can be considered the founder of Chilean formal medical education. When the University of Chile was established (in 1842), among its five initial Faculties was included Medicine, on the basis of the Medical Sciences course created ten years before. By then, the medical profession was not yet socially reputed and the initial years of the Faculty were difficult. During the 19th Century and until the second decade of the 20th century, this was the only medical school in the country. Its development was slow but sustained, reaching its apogee in the middle of the 20th Century, when it had outstanding clinical and basic sciences teachers and investigators. Clinical research, postgraduate teaching and medical specialization had a great development during that period. Nowadays, it is a complex Faculty that teaches eight health sciences courses leading to different professional titles, gives higher academic degrees in biomedicine and public health and certifies different medical specialties. It has a modern, well equipped library and a unique Museum of Medicine. Besides the traditional Departments in Medical Faculties, it has Departments of Medical Teaching, Bioethics and Medical Humanities. It provides continuing medical education programs and distance teaching has recently experienced a great development. The community is also favored with specific teaching programs. The academic promotion of its faculty members is based in a strict evaluation. During its existence, the Faculty has graduated a large number of physicians and other health care professionals. Our country should be grateful to the University of Chile Faculty of Medicine, in its 170th birthday, for its outstanding contribution to the development, welfare and happiness of Chilean society. PMID:12870228

Goic, Alejandro

2003-04-01

166

Measuring Patients' Perceptions of Patient-Centered Care: A Systematic Review of Tools for Family Medicine  

PubMed Central

PURPOSE Patient-centered care is widely acknowledged as a core value in family medicine. In this systematic review, we aimed to identify and compare instruments, subscales, or items assessing patients’ perceptions of patient-centered care in family medicine. METHODS We conducted a systematic literature review using the MEDLINE, Embase, and Cochrane databases covering 1980 through April 2009, with a specific search strategy for each database. The search strategy was supplemented with searching by hand and expert suggestions. We looked for articles meeting all of the following criteria: (1) describing self-administered instruments measuring patient perceptions of patient-centered care; (2) reporting quantitative or psychometric results of development or validation; (3) being relevant to an ambulatory family medicine context. The quality of each article retained was assessed using a modified version of the Standards for Reporting of Diagnostic Accuracy. Instrument’ items were mapped to dimensions of a patient-centered care conceptual framework. RESULTS Of the 3,045 articles identified, 90 were examined in detail, and 26, covering 13 instruments, met our inclusion criteria. Two instruments (5 articles) were dedicated to patient-centered care: the Patient Perception of Patient-Centeredness and the Consultation Care Measure, and 11 instruments (21 articles) included relevant subscales or items. CONCLUSIONS The 2 instruments dedicated to patient-centered care address key dimensions but are visit-based, limiting their applicability for the study of care processes over time, such as chronic illness management. Relevant items from the 11 other instruments provide partial coverage of the concept, but these instruments were not designed to provide a specific assessment of patient-centered care.

Hudon, Catherine; Fortin, Martin; Haggerty, Jeannie L.; Lambert, Mireille; Poitras, Marie-Eve

2011-01-01

167

Hepatitis B learning needs assessment of family medicine trainees in Canada: Results of a nationwide survey  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND: An estimated 350 million people worldwide have chronic hepatitis B (CHB), which is a major cause of cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. OBJECTIVE: To assess the level of knowledge among family medicine trainees regarding the identification and management of CHB. METHODS: A questionnaire to assess knowledge regarding screening and management of patients with CHB and cirrhosis was developed. The questionnaire was pilot tested among primary care physicians, subsequently revised and distributed to family medicine trainees across Canada through an online survey program (QuestionPro). RESULTS: A total of 158 trainees completed the questionnaire. Of these, 54% to 56% routinely offered vaccination against hepatitis A or hepatitis B virus (HBV), and 42% regularly screened patients for HBV risk factors. The percentage who recognized the need to screen high-risk populations for CHB, ie, individuals from an HBV-endemic country, men who have sex with men, or intravenous drug users was 73%, 66% and 74%, respectively. While less than 50% of respondents used the appropriate HBV screening tests, 86% to 91% correctly interpreted various HBV serological patterns. Only 3% recognized cirrhosis in our case scenario. Almost 80% of respondents inappropriately preferred prescribing a narcotic or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug over acetaminophen (4%) for pain control in a patient with cirrhosis. While less than 60% recognized HBeAg negative CHB as an indication for referral and treatment, 90% would have referred a patient in the immune-tolerant phase, even though treatment is not indicated. CONCLUSIONS: Knowledge gaps regarding CHB among family medicine trainees in the areas of primary prevention, disease recognition and management of cirrhosis were identified. Results suggest that opportunities to prevent potentially life-threatening complications are being missed.

Sam, Justina J; Heathcote, E Jenny; Wong, David KH; Wooster, Douglas L; Shah, Hemant

2011-01-01

168

Sports Medicine: Does the Family Physician Need to Acquire New Knowledge and Skills?  

PubMed Central

The knowledge and skills required to be competent in practising sports medicine can be defined and are discussed. Musculoskeletal injuries are the most common type of sports-related trauma, and their management requires diagnosis, acute treatment, and rehabilitation. Many other areas of management are involved, particularly exercise, with all its ramifications in children, adults, and the chronically sick. Use and abuse of drugs must be discussed with the athlete so that errors of legitimate use will not be made, and harmful effects can be explained. Family physicians in Canada receive variable training at both undergraduate and residency levels, but it probably forms a good foundation for amplification.

Haigh, Geoffrey

1988-01-01

169

Evaluation of a task-based community oriented teaching model in family medicine for undergraduate medical students in Iraq  

PubMed Central

Background The inclusion of family medicine in medical school curricula is essential for producing competent general practitioners. The aim of this study is to evaluate a task-based, community oriented teaching model of family medicine for undergraduate students in Iraqi medical schools. Methods An innovative training model in family medicine was developed based upon tasks regularly performed by family physicians providing health care services at the Primary Health Care Centre (PHCC) in Mosul, Iraq. Participants were medical students enrolled in their final clinical year. Students were assigned to one of two groups. The implementation group (28 students) was exposed to the experimental model and the control group (56 students) received the standard teaching curriculum. The study took place at the Mosul College of Medicine and at the Al-Hadba PHCC in Mosul, Iraq, during the academic year 1999–2000. Pre- and post-exposure evaluations comparing the intervention group with the control group were conducted using a variety of assessment tools. Results The primary endpoints were improvement in knowledge of family medicine and development of essential performance skills. Results showed that the implementation group experienced a significant increase in knowledge and performance skills after exposure to the model and in comparison with the control group. Assessment of the model by participating students revealed a high degree of satisfaction with the planning, organization, and implementation of the intervention activities. Students also highly rated the relevancy of the intervention for future work. Conclusion A model on PHCC training in family medicine is essential for all Iraqi medical schools. The model is to be implemented by various relevant departments until Departments of Family medicine are established.

Al-Dabbagh, Samim A; Al-Taee, Waleed G

2005-01-01

170

[Laboratory medicine in the post-genome era: experiences in Chiba University Hospital].  

PubMed

Since the completion of the human genome project, there is growing interest in the clinical application of genome sciences. For this purpose, particular attention toward identifying at-risk individuals and understanding the complexities of the testing process are essential. In this article, I describe the importance of clinical genetics and genetic counseling, and explain how and why the division of laboratory medicine is involved in these tasks in Chiba University Hospital. Our genetic counseling team consists of a clinical laboratory physician qualified as a clinical geneticist, medical technologist qualified as a genetic counselor, clinical psychologists, and a medical social worker. We treat more than 100 cases including late-onset, incurable neurological diseases, hereditary tumors, prenatal diagnosis, and chromosomal abnormalities. The sequencing of the human genome has paved the way for comprehensive transcriptome and proteome analyses. Since the detailed understanding of biological processes, both in healthy and pathological states, requires the direct study of relevant proteins, proteomics bridges the gap between the information coded in the genome sequence and cellular behavior. Therefore, proteomics is among the most promising technologies for the development of novel diagnostic tools. Recent advances in sophisticated technologies in proteomics should identify promising ways to discover novel markers in various fields of clinical medicine. In this presentation, I will give a definition of the proteome, and outline the basic methodologies for proteome analyses. I will also present our experiences in identifying novel biomarker candidates in hepatobiliary diseases, and discuss future perspectives of clinical proteomics in laboratory medicine. PMID:19175078

Nomura, Fumio

2008-12-01

171

Quantitative analysis of Spanish university scientific output in the area of Legal and Forensic Medicine: International exposure  

Microsoft Academic Search

We set out to analyse and quantify the papers published (for an international readership) by Spanish universities in the field\\u000a of Legal and Forensic Medicine. For this, we used the MEDLINE data base, to analyse research articles in which a Spanish university\\u000a teacher (whose sole employment was with a university, as registered by the Ministry of Education in July 2005,

Javier Valles-Valenzuela; María D. Pérez-Cárceles; Eduardo Osuna; Aurelio Luna

2009-01-01

172

Family Relationships, Academic Environments, and Psychosocial Development during the University Experience: A Longitudinal Investigation.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This cohort-sequential study assessed family and university environment on identity formation and ego strength. Findings indicated few developmental changes over 2 years. Intellectual and supportive academic departments and democratic family life predicted ego strength. The effect of intellectual and supportive academic departments on psychosocial…

Adams, Gerald R.; Ryan, Bruce A.; Keating, Leo

2000-01-01

173

Acculturation and depressive symptoms in Muslim university students: Personal–family acculturation match  

Microsoft Academic Search

The relationships of personal acculturation and of personal–family acculturation match to depressive symptoms were investigated in a sample of 68 Muslim university students. Two dimensions of personal and family acculturation were assessed: heritage and mainstream culture identification. Participants completed the Vancouver Index of Acculturation (Ryder, Alden, & Paulhus, 2000) and the depressive disorder subscale of the Psychiatric Diagnostic Screening Questionnaire

Yasmin Asvat; Vanessa L. Malcarne

2008-01-01

174

Sin Olvidar a los Padres: Families Collaborating Within School and University Partnerships  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article describes the significance of 3 entities—the family, the school, and the university—working together to assist young Latino children succeed in school. In an effort to increase parental and teacher communication regarding school expectations, the Family Institute for Early Literacy Development was created. It uses principles of funds of knowledge as well as the ecological systems theory. Findings indicate

Mari Riojas-Cortez; Belinda Bustos Flores

2009-01-01

175

Understanding your stakeholders: Conducting a market analysis for university-based family business centers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Family business is a vital institution in the global economy. Universities and their family business centers must operate more effectively and efficiently to better serve their stakeholders by using marketing research to align their mission statements with the needs of their stakeholders. Primary needs, and perhaps those most neglected among stakeholders, that must be assessed are those of the students

Michelle DeMoss; Greg McCann

176

College and University Reference Guide to Work-Family Programs. Report on a Collaborative Study.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report summarizes findings of a study that assessed current levels of support for family friendly programs at colleges and universities in the United States. Analysis of the survey data text and tables is presented in four sections that define purpose and methodology, historical context, provide profiles of various work-family initiatives,…

Friedman, Dana E.; And Others

177

Primary Care Reform: Can Quebec's Family Medicine Group Model Benefit from the Experience of Ontario's Family Health Teams?  

PubMed Central

Canadian politicians, decision-makers, clinicians and researchers have come to agree that reforming primary care services is a key strategy for improving healthcare system performance. However, it is only more recently that real transformative initiatives have been undertaken in different Canadian provinces. One model that offers promise for improving primary care service delivery is the family medicine group (FMG) model developed in Quebec. A FMG is a group of physicians working closely with nurses in the provision of services to enrolled patients on a non-geographic basis. The objectives of this paper are to analyze the FMG's potential as a lever for improving healthcare system performance and to discuss how it could be improved. First, we briefly review the history of primary care in Quebec. Then we present the FMG model in relation to the four key healthcare system functions identified by the World Health Organization: (a) funding, (b) generating human and technological resources, (c) providing services to individuals and communities and (d) governance. Next, we discuss possible ways of advancing primary care reform, looking particularly at the family health team (FHT) model implemented in the province of Ontario. We conclude with recommendations to inspire other initiatives aimed at transforming primary care.

Breton, Mylaine; Levesque, Jean-Frederic; Pineault, Raynald; Hogg, William

2011-01-01

178

Family-Friendly Policies and the Research University  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Institutions of higher education nationwide have been adopting policies to help faculty members with primary caregiving roles to attain tenure, and much research has been devoted to their effectiveness. The range of policies and programs has expanded dramatically since the 1970s. Among the options now available are family leave, elder-care…

Quinn, Kate; Lange, Sheila Edwards; Olswang, Steven G.

2004-01-01

179

Reform in the United States: its impact on medicine and education for family practice.  

PubMed

The historical concept of reform is useful as an aid to understand the modern rise of family practice education. Beginning about 1890, historians have identified several themes of reform in the United States which have been expressed culturally, politically, and socially. Each of these themes, agrarianism, bureaucratization of the professions, and utopianism, has influenced medicine and medical education--first at the turn of the century in the activities of the AMA in promoting public health and in establishing the natural sciences as a basis for medical education and practice. Since the end of World War II, additional reform themes have become visible which are also influencing medicine. Among these are humanism, consumerism, and the women's movement. It is the author's thesis that the present vitality and future development of family practice as a discipline is more dependent on its capacity and willingness to be identified with these expressions of reform than on its negotiations and compromises within the medical education establishment. PMID:978147

Stephens, G G

1976-10-01

180

Patient greeting preferences for themselves and their providers in a military family medicine clinic.  

PubMed

Using the proper greeting may be important to help establish rapport between health care providers and their patients. It may be particularly useful for family medicine physicians working in a military medical facility, where military rank and traditions are important. A total of 259 anonymous surveys were collected from patients treated at a military family medicine clinic. Most of the patients who completed the survey preferred to shake hands with their provider, be greeted using only their first name, and preferred that the provider introduce themselves using their last name only. Active duty patients were more likely than civilians to prefer a handshake (odds ratio [OR] 3.05, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.46-6.39) and officers were more likely to prefer a handshake compared to enlisted service members (OR 3.29; 95% CI 1.18-9.20). Respondents who were older were more likely to prefer a formal introduction by their provider compared to respondents under 35 years old (OR 2.92, 95% CI 1.35-6.31). Although most patients in this facility expressed a preference for how they would like to be greeted, providers are still encouraged to ask their patients how they would prefer to be addressed. PMID:24083924

Laird, John E; Tolentino, Jerlyn C; Gray, Cynthia

2013-10-01

181

Patient empowerment, an additional characteristic of the European definitions of general practice/family medicine.  

PubMed

Growing evidence supports the inclusion of patient empowerment as a key ingredient of care for patients with chronic conditions. In recent years, several studies based on patient empowerment, have been carried out in different European countries in the context of general practice and primary care to improve management of chronic diseases. These studies have shown good results of the care model, increasing patient and health professionals' satisfaction, adherence to guidelines and to treatment, and improving clinical outcomes. In 2011, the Wonca European Council included as the twelfth characteristic of the European definitions of general practice/family medicine: 'promote patient empowerment'. The aim of this paper is to clarify the meaning of 'patient empowerment' and to explain why family medicine should be considered the most suitable setting to promote it. The inclusion of patient empowerment as one of the essential characteristics of general practice fills a conceptual gap and clearly suggests to the European health care systems a tested model to face chronic diseases: involving and empowering patients in managing their own conditions to improve health and well-being. PMID:23336328

Mola, Ernesto

2013-01-22

182

Geriatric Medicine Training for Family Practice Residents in the 21st Century: A Report from the Residency Assistance Program/Hartford Geriatrics Initiative.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Summarizes the initial results of the regional geriatric medicine curriculum retreats for family practice residency directors provided as part of the American Academy of Family Physicians multi-part project to improve the amount and quality of geriatric medicine education received by family practice residents. (EV)

Warshaw, Gregg; Murphy, John; Buehler, James; Singleton, Stacy

2003-01-01

183

Priorities for University Outreach in Children, Youth, Families and Communities.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Michigan residents (n=950) rated the following topics of most interest: school violence, child abuse, drug abuse, and affordable health care. Their preferences for information sources, in priority order, were as follows: public schools, Internet, television, Michigan State University extension, and print materials. (SK)|

Griffore, Robert J.; Phenice, Lillian A.; Walker, Rosemary; Carolan, Marsha

1999-01-01

184

A Classification of Genre Families in University Student Writing  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|As demand for English-medium higher education continues to grow internationally and participation in higher education increases, the need for a better understanding of academic writing is pressing. Prior university wide taxonomies of student writing have relied on intuition, the opinions of faculty, or data from course documentation and task…

Gardner, Sheena; Nesi, Hilary

2013-01-01

185

[Female presence in teaching of dentistry and medicine carrers at the National University of Cordoba].  

PubMed

Social stratification based on gender has undoubtedly a powerful bearing on the division of labor in the area of health. The presence of women has reached significant levels in the Teaching Departments at almost every Institution of Higher Education, although it has been observed that the higher the position, the fewer the women occupying such positions. The purpose of this work is to analyze the evolution of admission and leaving of men and women students as well as the distribution of teaching positions according to sex at the School of Dentistry and at Medical School of the National University of Cordoba. In addition, this study aims at visualizing both the feminine role and the existence of posts in the field of education which are traditionally staffed by women, and also the factors contributing to define these positions. An analysis of the female participation in university education shows that in those programs of study where there is a predominance of female students, the proportion of women teachers is lower. It has also been noticed that the proportion of women working as teaching assistants is higher than that of women occupying leading positions in the management of the Schools. By the year 2003, at the University of Cordoba, 43% of the teachers and 58% of the students enrolled were women. At the School of Dentistry there is a higher percentage (10%) of female teachers, while at the School of Medicine the male teaching staff is 19.3% higher. These data allows us to infer that most probably, the differences observed in our analysis are the result of a held belief that considers that Medicine belongs to men's domain and consequently, women medical doctors find it difficult to gain prestige and reach high-level, well paid positions. PMID:17645047

Sánchez Dagum, Mercedes L; Sánchez de Sica, Esther; Hernando, Luis M

2006-01-01

186

Providing competency-based family medicine residency training in substance abuse in the new millennium: a model curriculum  

PubMed Central

Background This article, developed for the Betty Ford Institute Consensus Conference on Graduate Medical Education (December, 2008), presents a model curriculum for Family Medicine residency training in substance abuse. Methods The authors reviewed reports of past Family Medicine curriculum development efforts, previously-identified barriers to education in high risk substance use, approaches to overcoming these barriers, and current training guidelines of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) and their Family Medicine Residency Review Committee. A proposed eight-module curriculum was developed, based on substance abuse competencies defined by Project MAINSTREAM and linked to core competencies defined by the ACGME. The curriculum provides basic training in high risk substance use to all residents, while also addressing current training challenges presented by U.S. work hour regulations, increasing international diversity of Family Medicine resident trainees, and emerging new primary care practice models. Results This paper offers a core curriculum, focused on screening, brief intervention and referral to treatment, which can be adapted by residency programs to meet their individual needs. The curriculum encourages direct observation of residents to ensure that core skills are learned and trains residents with several "new skills" that will expand the basket of substance abuse services they will be equipped to provide as they enter practice. Conclusions Broad-based implementation of a comprehensive Family Medicine residency curriculum should increase the ability of family physicians to provide basic substance abuse services in a primary care context. Such efforts should be coupled with faculty development initiatives which ensure that sufficient trained faculty are available to teach these concepts and with efforts by major Family Medicine organizations to implement and enforce residency requirements for substance abuse training.

2010-01-01

187

Medicines  

MedlinePLUS

... better. In the United States, the Food and Drug Administration is in charge of assuring the safety ... prescription and over-the-counter medicines. Even safe drugs can cause unwanted side effects or interactions with ...

188

Technology at Washington University School of Medicine Library: BACS, PHILSOM, and OCTANET.  

PubMed

A brief overview of the Bibliographic Access and Control System developed by the Washington University School of Medicine Library is presented. Because the system has been described in two previous reports, this paper focuses on its relationship to other automated programs (i.e., PHILSOM and OCTANET), education of users, evaluation of the system, and outreach to the medical center. In operation for more than two years, BACS represents the computerization of much of the managerial and operational functions of the library, and marks the completion of stage 1 of the three stages of library evolution described in the AAMC report Academic Information in the Academic Health Sciences Center: Roles for the Library in Information Management. PMID:6688750

Crawford, S; Johnson, M F; Kelly, E A

1983-07-01

189

[The nuclear physicist, Rudolf Fleischmann and medicine at the University of Strassburg].  

PubMed

Under German occupation in World War II,Alsace-Lorraine was subjected to politically enforced Germanization. One means was science policy. The newly founded research institute of the medical school of the University of Strasbourg for instance was modeled on the Heidelberg Kaiser Wilhelm Institute for Medical Research of Ludolf von Krehl, incorporating institutes for internal medicine, physics and chemistry, and housing very modern research facilities. The expansion created tremendous professional opportunities for young German scientists like Rudolf Fleischmann, who worked in Strasbourg until the liberation, when he was taken as prisoner by the allied intelligence mission "Alsos." Released in 1946, Fleischmann started a second career in Hamburg and Erlangen, where he died in 2002. In one of his last interviews, which he gave to the author of this paper, he called the Strasbourg period a prerequisite for establishing his own scientific reputation. PMID:17152580

Weiss, Burghard

2006-01-01

190

Samuel A. Mudd, MD, physician-farmer, University of Maryland School of Medicine class of 1856.  

PubMed

America is in the midst of experiencing the sesquicentennial of the Civil War. We do so with some ambivalence knowing that the war forged a great union and ended slavery but also caused the deaths of more than 600,000 fellow citizens. Samuel A. Mudd, MD, University of Maryland School of Medicine class of 1856, was a man of this time. As a physician-farmer in Southern Maryland, he was a highly respected physician, a slave owner, and a devout citizen. The Civil War (1861-1865) would alter his life in ways few could have imagined. This article looks at his background, his education, his work as a physician-farmer, and his dramatic rise to national attention and infamy. Convicted by a military tribunal and imprisoned for his "crimes," he was able to partially redeem himself using his medical skills and professionalism. Mudd was a man of his time. And what a time it was. PMID:23183366

Harding, Richard K

2012-12-01

191

Relevance of Hypersexual Disorder to Family Medicine and Primary Care as a Complex Multidimensional Chronic Disease Construct  

PubMed Central

Hypersexual disorder (HD) is not defined in a uniform way in the psychiatric literature. In the absence of solid evidence on prevalence, causes, empirically validated diagnostic criteria, instruments for diagnosis, consistent guidelines on treatment options, medical and psychosocial consequences, and type of caregivers that need to be involved, HD remains a controversial and relatively poorly understood chronic disease construct. The role of family medicine in the detection, treatment, and followup of HD is not well studied. The purpose of this paper is to describe the complexity of HD as a multidimensional chronic disease construct and its relevance to family medicine and primary care.

Vrijhoef, Bert; De Maeseneer, Jan; Vansintejan, Johan; Devroey, Dirk

2013-01-01

192

Support programs for minority students at Ohio University College of Osteopathic Medicine.  

PubMed

The Ohio University College of Osteopathic Medicine ranks high among the nation's 19 osteopathic medical schools with respect to the percentage of underrepresented minorities (URMs) in the entering class. The college has strong recruitment and retention programs for URM and disadvantaged students. URM enrollment rose steadily from 11% in 1982-83 to 22% in 1997-98, despite the school's location in a rural, residential public university with few minorities as students or town residents. The college has six programs to support minority students through both undergraduate and medical school: the Summer Scholars Program (1983 to present), an intensive six-week summer program to prepare rising under-graduate seniors and recent graduates to apply to medical school; Academic Enrichment (1987 to present), to support first- and second-year medical students; the Prematriculation Program (1988 to present), an intensive six-week summer program for students who will matriculate in the college; Program ExCEL (1993 to present), a four-year program for undergraduates at Ohio University; the Summer Enrichment Program (1993 to present), an optional six-week program for students who will enter the premedical course at Ohio University; and the Post-baccalaureate Program (1993 to present), a year-long, individually tailored program for URM students who have applied to the medical college but have been rejected. The medical college first focused on supporting students already in the medical school curriculum, then expanded logically back through the undergraduate premedical programs, always targeting learning strategies and survival strategies, peer and faculty support, and mastery of the basic science content. The college plans to create an on-site MCAT preparation program and perhaps expand into secondary education. PMID:10219219

Thompson, H C; Weiser, M A

1999-04-01

193

Family history: a guide for neurologists in the age of genomic medicine.  

PubMed

The field of neurogenetics has expanded dramatically over recent years. Neurogenetics has developed from a distinct subspecialty within neurology to something that transcends most of the common presenting conditions for neurologists. The importance of understanding the genetic contribution to conditions like epilepsy, neurodevelopmental disorders, and metabolic diseases has become very evident in neurology. In the era of personalized medicine and genomic testing, we have just begun to understand how genetic factors contribute to the development of disease, influence its natural history and severity, and determine its response to therapy. Genetic risk analysis and interpretation have become central components for the modern clinical assessment, and a comprehensive family history analysis is essential for neurologists. The benefits of collecting and updating a detailed pedigree are important for diagnostic guidance, risk counseling, and test interpretation. A review of genetic inheritance patterns, pedigree construction, and factors that influence disease presentation is outlined for the application in neurology practice. PMID:23245548

Vento, Jodie M

2012-12-01

194

[The symptoms in family medicine are not symptoms of disease, they are symptoms of life].  

PubMed

The symptoms in family medicine are not signs of disease, but "signs of life"; in the consultation "all patient life comes together with him". Every consultation is primarily a biopsicosocial problem: the person perceives a dysfunction or alteration in relation with himself and his context. To do a diagnosis only with physical symptoms, can be a mistake because these do not identify the real problem. The different types of symptoms are "entangled" or chained some in others: the symptoms can be fitted or inevitable; to be expressions of biochemical alterations, symbols for the patient, group context expressions, or kinds of facing the facts; and they depend on the previous psychological patient performance, the severity of the deficit of the psychological function associated with the disease, the residual skills, the adjustment and the confrontation of the functional limitations, the relation doctor-patient, as well as on the influence of the context. PMID:21782291

Turabián, José Luis; Pérez Franco, Benjamín; Turabián Fernández, José Luis; Pérez Franco, Benjamin

2011-07-22

195

Using the Complexity Model to Enhance Diabetes Management in Three Family Medicine Practice: A Qualitative Comparative Case Study. Abstract, Executive Summary and Dissertation.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This study tested an invervention to change family practices' diabetes management, based on 'Complexity theory,' a conceptual model for understanding and directing changes in family medicine practices. Complexity theory proposes that practices be understo...

L. D. Helseth

1999-01-01

196

Effect of a brief emergency medicine education course on emergency department work intensity of family physicians.  

PubMed

ABSTRACTBackground:Recently, many Canadian emergency departments (EDs) have struggled with physician staffing shortages. In 2006, the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care funded a brief "emergency medicine primer" (EMP) course for family physicians to upgrade or refresh skills, with the goal of increasing their ED work intensity. We sought to determine the effect of the EMP on the ED work intensity of family physicians.Methods:A retrospective longitudinal study was conducted of the ED work of 239 family physicians in the 2 years before and after a minimum of 6 months and up to 2 years from completing an EMP course in 2006 to 2008 compared to non-EMP physicians. ED work intensity was defined as the number of ED shifts per month and the number of ED patients seen per month. We conducted two analyses: a before and after comparison of all EMP physicians and a matched cohort analysis matching each EMP physician to four non-EMP physicians on sex, year of medical school graduation, rurality, and pre-EMP ED work intensity.Results:Postcourse, EMP physicians worked 0.5 more ED shifts per month (13% increase, p ?=? 0.027). Compared to their matched controls, EMP physicians worked 0.7 more shifts per month (13% increase, p ?=? 0.0032) and saw 15 more patients per month (17% increase, p ?=? 0.0008) compared to matched non-EMP physicians. The greatest increases were among EMP physicians who were younger, were urban, had previous ED experience, or worked in a high-volume ED. The effect of the EMP course was negligible for physicians with no previous ED experience or working in rural areas.Conclusion:The EMP course is associated with modest increases in ED work intensity among some family physicians, in particular younger physicians in urban areas. No increase was seen among physicians without previous ED experience or working in rural areas. PMID:23283121

Vaillancourt, Samuel; Schultz, Susan E; Leaver, Chad; Stukel, Thérèse A; Schull, Michael J

2013-01-01

197

All in the Family: Genetics and Family Health History Video  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This nine-minute video from the Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU) Center for Life Science Education, in conjunction with the School of Medicine, emphasizes the need for a complete family history as a way to predict and treat health problems.

Ward Television of Washington, D.C (Ward Television of Washington, D.C.;)

2010-05-17

198

Study designs and statistical methods in the Journal of Family and Community Medicine: 1994-2010  

PubMed Central

Introduction: The Journal of Family and Community Medicine (JFCM) is the official peer reviewed scientific publication of the Saudi Society of Family and Community Medicine. Unlike many peer medical journals, the contents of JFCM, have never been analyzed. The objective of this study was to perform an analysis of the contents of the JFCM over a 16-year period to discern the study designs and statistical methods used with a view to improving future contents of the journal. Materials and Methods: All volumes of the JFCM, from 1 January 1994 to 31 December 2010 were hand searched for research articles. All papers identified as original articles were selected. For every article, the study designs and the statistical methods used were recorded. Articles were then classified according to their statistical methods and study designs. The frequency of study designs was calculated as a simple percentage of the total number of articles, while the frequency of statistical methods was calculated as a percentage of articles that used those statistical methods. Results: A total of 229 articles were analyzed. Of these, 66 (28.8%) either reported no statistics or reported simple summaries. The cross-sectional design was used in 175 (76.4%) of all analyzed articles. Statistical methods were used in 163 (71.2%) articles. Chi-squared test was used in 111 (68.1%) articles, and t-test used in 48 (29.4%) articles. Other common statistical tests were: Regression, which was used in 35 (21.5%) articles, ANOVA used in 23 (14.1%) articles, and odds ratio and relative risk tests which were used in 22 (13.5%) articles. Conclusions: The JFCM has a wide range of study designs and statistical methods. However, no article on experimental studies has been published in the JFCM since its inception.

Aljoudi, Abdullah S.

2013-01-01

199

The Effect of Patients' Met Expectations on Consultation Outcomes. A Study with Family Medicine Residents  

PubMed Central

Objectives To know the patients’ expectations and the fulfillment of these at family medicine consultations by resident doctors and to assess their effect on some consultation outcomes. Design A prospective cohort study. Participants Patients attending family medicine consultations held by 38 resident doctors: 1,301 eligible patients, 702 filled in all questionnaires. Measurements Before each visit, the patients’ expectations about that particular consultation were registered. Right after the visit was over, their perception of several aspects of the communicative interaction with the doctor was measured. Later, patients were interviewed on the phone to know how their expectations had been fulfilled, how satisfied they were about the consultation, how they had followed the doctor’s suggestions, if they were going to seek further care for the same cause later, and the evolution of their clinical problem. Logistic regression was the main analysis used. Results The most common expectations were the doctor showing interest and listening (30.5%), getting some information about the diagnosis (16.3%), and sharing problems and doubts (11.1%). The rate of main expectations that were met was 76.5%. Satisfaction with the encounter was associated with the clinical evolution [odds ratio (OR) 2.23; confidence interval (CI): 1.32–3.75], and the fulfilling of the patients’ main or two main expectations was significantly related to all the measured outcomes (satisfaction OR 3.51, CI: 1.73–7.8; adherence OR 1.80, CI: 1.11–2.92; clinical evolution OR 1.54, CI: 1.01–2.35; and seeking further care later OR 0.54, CI:0.36–0.81) Conclusions Patients prioritize expectations of a more general sort when they attend primary care consultations and residents fulfill these acceptably. The fulfillment of expectations seems to affect the studied outcomes more than other factors.

Perula de Torres, Luis Angel; Jaramillo-Martin, Inmaculada

2007-01-01

200

[Essential aspects of the reorganization of medical education at the University of Chile School of Medicine].  

PubMed

The Medical School of the University of Chile is enforcing deep transformations in its curricular setting, to cope with the physician model of the next century. It is following the universal trends that look for new objectives, methodologies, scenarios and resources in medical teaching. These goals should be accomplished very soon, allowing the School to be in the lead of curricular transformations. These changes have overflowed the limits of curricular renovation and a process of institutional reorganisation is aiming to increase its efficacy and yield. The bases of this reorganisation are the search for excellency, the renovation of academic staff with the incorporation of better trained professionals, the integration of basic and clinical disciplines in coherent programmatic proposals and the configuration of structures to organise and articulate medical knowledge. Optimisation of education has also extra-institutional implications with the establishment of accreditation systems for professionals and educational institutions. These systems are mandatory world wide and guarantee the capability of educational institutions and their products. The School of Medicine is committed in this achievement along with the Association of Medical Schools and The Superior Education Council. PMID:9567381

Rosselot Jaramillo, E

1997-07-01

201

History of the Department of Pediatrics Yale University School of Medicine.  

PubMed Central

The history of pediatrics at the Yale University School of Medicine can be divided into eight historical eras. The "Paleohistorical Era" included colonial figures such as Governor John Winthrop and Hezekiah Beardsley who wrote about children's disease in colonial times. Eli Ives, Professor of the Diseases of Children at Yale Medical School gave the first systematic pediatric course in America in the first half of the nineteenth century. During the second era, from 1830-1920, the New Haven Hospital was opened. An affiliation between Yale University and the New Haven Hospital led to the formal establishment of clinical departments including pediatrics in the early 20th century. Six eras coinciding with successive pediatric chairman have led the department to its present respected position in American pediatrics. The department's 75th anniversary in 1996 is an occasion to recognize many of the department's accomplishments and leaders over the years. It is also a time to reaffirm the mission of the department: to the health needs of the children of Connecticut and beyond, to the advancement of scientific knowledge of infants and children and their diseases, and to the training and educational of the pediatric clinicians, educators and investigators of the future. Images Figure 1 Figure 2

Pearson, H. A.

1997-01-01

202

The Evaluation Of Physician-to-nutritionist Referrals For Medical Nutrition Therapy For Patients Seen In Family Medicine Centers  

Microsoft Academic Search

LEARNING OUTCOME: To examine the physician-to-nutritionist referral process for four disease states seen in a family medicine centers.To determine whether patients with four diet-related diseases were receiving the benefit of medical nutrition therapy in a family practice setting, a retrospective chart review was done. The tour disease states studied included the following: diabetes meilitus. hypertension, hypercholestcrolemia, and obesity. Together these

Paige J. Madden; Carol O Mitcheil; May Dundas; Linda Eck

1996-01-01

203

Teaching-skills training programs for family medicine residents Systematic review of formats, content, and effects of existing programs  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVE To review the literature on teaching-skills training programs for family medicine residents and to identify formats and content of these programs and their effects. DATA SOURCES Ovid MEDLINE (1950 to mid-July 2008) and the Education Resources Information Center database (pre-1966 to mid-July 2008) were searched using and combining the MeSH terms teaching, internship and residency, and family practice; and

Miriam Lacasse

204

Identification of Family Non-universal Gauge Bosons in High-energy Electron-positron Collisions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We examine effects on measurable observables in e+e- collisions resulting from the existence of additional neutral gauge bosons originating in extensions of the standard model. In particular, we consider family non-universal neutral gauge bosons occurring in the minimal supersymmetric standard model and in the Sp(6)L ? U(1)Y model, as well as other theoretically motivated popular neutral gauge bosons. We show how the proper employment of the generation-dependent couplings of the extra gauge boson, and the appropriate adjustment of the beam polarization, not only improved the identification of the models but also enhanced the discovery potential of the family non-universal extra gauge bosons.

Bagneid, Ali A.; Althubiti, Numa A.

2011-10-01

205

Project Family Prevention Trials Based in Community–University Partnerships: Toward Scaled-Up Preventive Interventions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Findings from Project Family are presented to illustrate how a partnership-based program of research on universal family- and youth-focused interventions is addressing a public health challenge. One aspect of this public health challenge is the high prevalence of youth problem behaviors and a second aspect concerns barriers to scaling-up empirically-supported preventive interventions designed to ameliorate those problem behaviors. Illustrative findings

Richard L. Spoth; Cleve Redmond

2002-01-01

206

Woman abuse in university and college dating relationships: The contribution of the ideology of familial patriarchy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Several theorists contend that male university\\/college students who physically, sexually, and psychologically abuse their\\u000a female dating partners are more likely than men who are not abusive to adhere to the ideology of familial patriarchy. These\\u000a scholars also argue that men who hold familial patriarchal attitudes and beliefs, and who are supported by their male peers,\\u000a are most likely to victimize

Walter S. DeKeseredy; Katharine Kelly

1993-01-01

207

Prevention of Child Behavior Problems Through Universal Implementation of a Group Behavioral Family Intervention  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this mental health promotion initiative was to evaluate the effectiveness of a universally delivered group behavioral\\u000a family intervention (BFI) in preventing behavior problems in children. This study investigates the transferability of an efficacious\\u000a clinical program to a universal prevention intervention delivered through child and community health services targeting parents\\u000a of preschoolers within a metropolitan health region. A

Stephen R. Zubrick; Kristine A. Ward; Sven R. Silburn; David Lawrence; Anwen A. Williams; Eve Blair; Deborah Robertson; Matthew R. Sanders

2005-01-01

208

The University of Arizona College of Medicine Optimal Aging Program: Stepping in the Shadows of Successful Aging  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Optimal Aging Program (OAP) at the University of Arizona, College of Medicine is a longitudinal mentoring program that pairs students with older adults who are considered to be aging "successfully." This credit-bearing elective was initially established in 2001 through a grant from the John A. Hartford Foundation, and aims to expand the…

Sikora, Stephanie

2006-01-01

209

Establishing a Clinically?Based Nursing Department in Partnership with a University Faculty of Medicine and an Acute Hospital  

Microsoft Academic Search

Following a review of hospital based, post basic nursing education at Royal Adelaide Hospital, a clinically focused department of clinical nursing was established in May 1995 as a collaborative venture between The University of Adelaide Faculty of Medicine and Royal Adelaide Hospital. Teaching commenced in February 1996, and 14 specialist graduate certificate and graduate diplomas; a course work master of

Alan Pearson; Mary Fitzgerald

1997-01-01

210

The revised 'Early Learning in Medicine' curriculum at the University of Otago—focusing on students, patients, and community  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article describes recent changes to years 2 and 3 of undergraduate medical education at the University of Otago, now termed 'Early Learning in Medicine'. These changes focus on learning that is contextually relevant, student centred, horizontally and vertically integrated, and community based. Three new programmes have been introduced to the course; Integrated Cases, Clinical Skills, and Healthcare in the

David Perez; Joy R Rudland; Hamish Wilson; Gayle Roberton; David Gerrard; Antony Wheatley

211

Use of complementary and alternative medicine by cancer patients at the University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital, Enugu, Nigeria  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: The use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) by cancer patients is very common and varies between populations. The referenced English literature has no local study from Africa on this subject. This study was conducted to define the prevalence, pattern of use, and factors influencing the use of CAM by cancer patients at the University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital

Emmanuel R Ezeome; Agnes N Anarado

2007-01-01

212

Evaluating the Effectiveness of a Senior Mentor Program: The University of Missouri-Columbia School of Medicine  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|At the University of Missouri-Columbia School of Medicine, we developed a voluntary senior-mentor program, the Senior Teacher Educator Partnership (STEP), for first- and second-year medical students. Using qualitative research methods, we examined the impact of STEP on medical students' attitudes and then assessed the congruence of what is…

Hoffman, Kimberly G.; Gray, Peggy; Hosokawa, Michael C.; Zweig, Steven C.

2006-01-01

213

Toward competency-based curricula in patient-centered spiritual care: recommended competencies for family medicine resident education.  

PubMed

Spiritual care is increasingly recognized as an important component of medical care. Although many primary care residency programs incorporate spiritual care into their curricula, there are currently no consensus guidelines regarding core competencies necessary for primary care training. In 2006, the Society of Teachers of Family Medicine's Interest Group on Spirituality undertook a three-year initiative to address this need. The project leader assembled a diverse panel of eight educators with dual expertise in (1) spirituality and health and (2) family medicine. The multidisciplinary panel members represented different geographic regions and diverse faith traditions and were nationally recognized senior faculty. They underwent three rounds of a modified Delphi technique to achieve initial consensus regarding spiritual care competencies (SCCs) tailored for family medicine residency training, followed by an iterative process of external validation, feedback, and consensus modifications of the SCCs. Panel members identified six knowledge, nine skills, and four attitude core SCCs for use in training and linked these to competencies of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. They identified three global competencies for use in promotion and graduation criteria. Defining core competencies in spiritual care clarifies training goals and provides the basis for robust curricula evaluation. Given the breadth of family medicine, these competencies may be adaptable to other primary care fields, to medical and surgical specialties, and to medical student education. Effective training in this area may enhance physicians' ability to attend to the physical, mental, and spiritual needs of patients and better maintain sustainable healing relationships. PMID:20978428

Anandarajah, Gowri; Craigie, Frederic; Hatch, Robert; Kliewer, Stephen; Marchand, Lucille; King, Dana; Hobbs, Richard; Daaleman, Timothy P

2010-12-01

214

Polyphenolic-polysaccharide compounds from selected medicinal plants of Asteraceae and Rosaceae families: Chemical characterization and blood anticoagulant activity  

Microsoft Academic Search

The preparations from selected traditional medicinal plants in Poland (Asteraceae and Rosaceae families), were prepared in the multi-step process of isolation and their anticoagulant activity was measured by APTT and PT tests. The most promising effect was observed for the substances extracted from Fragaria vesca (Rosaceae) and Echinacea purpurea (Asteraceae). They showed interesting activity with respect to the activity of

Izabela Pawlaczyk; Leszek Czerchawski; Witold Pilecki; Eliza Lamer-Zarawska; Roman Gancarz

2009-01-01

215

Comparison of volunteer and full?time faculty performance in a required third?year family medicine clerkship  

Microsoft Academic Search

The increased number of required family medicine clerkships has created the need for more qualified faculty to serve as preceptors. One solution to the faculty shortage is to use volunteer faculty practicing in the private setting. This article describes how volunteer faculty at one institution were selected and trained and compares the performance of volunteer and full?time faculty using several

L. Peter Schwiebert; Christian N. Ramsey Jr; Alan Davis

1992-01-01

216

Tradition meets innovation: transforming academic medical culture at the University of Pennsylvania's Perelman School of Medicine.  

PubMed

Traditional performance expectations and career advancement paths for academic physicians persist despite dramatic transformations in the academic workflow, workload, and workforce over the past 20 years. Although the academic physician's triple role as clinician, researcher, and educator has been lauded as the ideal by academic health centers, current standards of excellence for promotion and tenure are based on outdated models. These models fail to reward collaboration and center around rigid career advancement plans that do little to accommodate the changing needs of individuals and organizations. The authors describe an innovative, comprehensive, multipronged initiative at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania to initiate change in the culture of academic medicine and improve academic productivity, job satisfaction, and overall quality of life for junior faculty. As a key part of this intervention, task forces from each of the 13 participating departments/divisions met five times between September 2010 and January 2011 to produce recommendations for institutional change. The authors discuss how this initiative, using principles adopted from business transformation, generated themes and techniques that can potentially guide workforce environment innovation in academic health centers across the United States. Recommendations include embracing a promotion/tenure/evaluation system that supports and rewards tailored individual academic career plans; ensuring leadership, decision-making roles, and recognition for junior faculty; deepening administrative and team supports for junior faculty; and solidifying and rewarding mentorship for junior faculty. By doing so, academic health centers can ensure the retention and commitment of faculty throughout all stages of their careers. PMID:23425986

Pati, Susmita; Reum, Josef; Conant, Emily; Tuton, Lucy Wolf; Scott, Patricia; Abbuhl, Stephanie; Grisso, Jeane Ann

2013-04-01

217

The national portfolio for postgraduate family medicine training in South Africa: a descriptive study of acceptability, educational impact, and usefulness for assessment  

PubMed Central

Background Since 2007 a portfolio of learning has become a requirement for assessment of postgraduate family medicine training by the Colleges of Medicine of South Africa. A uniform portfolio of learning has been developed and content validity established among the eight postgraduate programmes. The aim of this study was to investigate the portfolio’s acceptability, educational impact, and perceived usefulness for assessment of competence. Methods Two structured questionnaires of 35 closed and open-ended questions were delivered to 53 family physician supervisors and 48 registrars who had used the portfolio. Categorical and nominal/ordinal data were analysed using simple descriptive statistics. The open-ended questions were analysed with ATLAS.ti software. Results Half of registrars did not find the portfolio clear, practical or feasible. Workshops on portfolio use, learning, and supervision were supported, and brief dedicated time daily for reflection and writing. Most supervisors felt the portfolio reflected an accurate picture of learning, but just over half of registrars agreed. While the portfolio helped with reflection on learning, participants were less convinced about how it helped them plan further learning. Supervisors graded most rotations, suggesting understanding the summative aspect, while only 61% of registrars reflected on rotations, suggesting the formative aspects are not yet optimally utilised. Poor feedback, the need for protected academic time, and pressure of service delivery impacting negatively on learning. Conclusion This first introduction of a national portfolio for postgraduate training in family medicine in South Africa faces challenges similar to those in other countries. Acceptability of the portfolio relates to a clear purpose and guide, flexible format with tools available in the workplace, and appreciating the changing educational environment from university-based to national assessments. The role of the supervisor in direct observations of the registrar and dedicated educational meetings, giving feedback and support, cannot be overemphasized.

2013-01-01

218

Task Force 1. Report of the Task Force on Patient Expectations, Core Values, Reintegration, and the New Model of Family Medicine  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND To lay the groundwork for the development of a comprehensive strategy to transform and renew the specialty of family medicine, this Future of Family Medicine task force was charged with identifying the core values of family medicine, developing proposals to reform family medicine to meet consumer expectations, and determining systems of care to be delivered by family medicine in the future. METHODS A diverse, multidisciplinary task force representing a broad spectrum of perspectives and expertise analyzed and discussed published literature; findings from surveys, interviews, and focus groups compiled by research firms contracted to the Future of Family Medicine project; and analyses from The Robert Graham Center, professional societies in the United States and abroad, and others. Through meetings, conference calls, and writing, and revision of a series of subcommittee reports, the entire task force reached consensus on its conclusions and recommendations. These were reviewed by an external panel of experts and revisions were made accordingly. MAJOR FINDINGS After delivering on its promise to reverse the decline of general practice in the United States, family medicine and the nation face additional challenges to assure all people receive care that is safe, effective, patient-centered, timely, efficient, and equitable. Challenges the discipline needs to address to improve family physicians’ ability to make important further contributions include developing a broader, more accurate understanding of the specialty among the public and other health professionals, addressing the wide scope and variance in practice types within family medicine, winning respect for the specialty in academic circles, making family medicine a more attractive career option, and dealing with the perception that family medicine is not solidly grounded in science and technology. The task force set forth a proposed identity statement for family medicine, a basket of services that should be reliably provided in family medicine practices, and an itemization of key attributes and core values that define the specialty. It also proposed and described a New Model of family medicine for people of all ages and both genders that emphasizes patient-centered, evidence-based, whole-person care provided through a multidisciplinary team approach in settings that reduce barriers to access and use advanced information systems and other new technologies. The task force recommended a time of active experimentation to redesign the work and workplace of family physicians; the development of revised financial models for family medicine, and a national resource to provide assistance to individual practices moving to New Model practice; and cooperation with others pursuing the transformation of frontline medicine to better serve the public. CONCLUSIONS Unless there are changes in the broader health care system and within the specialty, the position of family medicine in the United States will be untenable in a 10- to 20-year time frame. Even within the constraints of today’s flawed health care system, there are major opportunities for family physicians to realize improved results for patients and economic success. A period of aggressive experimentation and redevelopment of family medicine is needed now. The future success of the discipline and its impact on public well-being depends in large measure on family medicine’s ability to rearticulate its vision and competencies in a fashion that has greater resonance with the public while substantially revising the organization and processes by which care is delivered. When accomplished, family physicians will achieve more fully the aspirations articulated by the specialty’s core values and contribute to the solution of the nation’s serious health care problems.

Green, Larry A.; Graham, Robert; Bagley, Bruce; Kilo, Charles M.; Spann, Stephen J.; Bogdewic, Stephen P.; Swanson, John

2004-01-01

219

Parents in higher education: impacts of university learning on the self and the family  

Microsoft Academic Search

Intra? and inter?generational social mobility have been implicit to a wide range of UK Government policies aimed at promoting social inclusion through a focus on education and employability. Framed by these policy initiatives and a critical look at widening participation in higher education, this paper reflects on the impacts of university learning on the self and the family among students

Emma Wainwright; Elodie Marandet

2010-01-01

220

PaRaDe - PAssive RAdar DEmonstrator family development at Warsaw University of Technology  

Microsoft Academic Search

The paper presents a family of passive coherent location (PCL) radar demonstrators, called PaRaDe (passive radar demonstrator), which were developed at Warsaw University of Technology. The systems exploit commercial FM radio transmitters as illuminators of opportunity in order to detect and track airborne targets. In the paper, the details of demonstrator systems are described and the results obtained in tests

Mateusz Malanowski; Krzysztof Kulpa; Jacek Misiurewicz

2008-01-01

221

Predicting Role Conflict, Overload and Contagion in Adult Women University Students with Families and Jobs  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many adult women studying at universities face difficulties related to their multiple roles, yet little is known about vulnerable groups or supportive responses. This study of 443 women with jobs and families enrolled in adult education, social work, or nursing identified to what extent life situations, institutional supports, and perceived demands and support systems predict role conflict, overload, and contagion.

Alice M. Home

1998-01-01

222

Access to medicines and out of pocket payments for primary care: Evidence from family medicine users in rural Tajikistan  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: In Tajikistan it is estimated that out of pocket payments constitute two-thirds of all health spending with high proportions of these contributions through informal payments. As a consequence, access to basic care is a major concern particularly among the most needy and vulnerable groups. This article evaluates accessibility of prescription medicines and patient expenditures for primary care services in

Fabrizio Tediosi; Raffael Aye; Shukufa Ibodova; Robin Thompson; Kaspar Wyss

2008-01-01

223

Medical humanities at New York University School of Medicine: an array of rich programs in diverse settings.  

PubMed

The New York University School of Medicine has a rich tradition of cultivating programs in medical humanities and professionalism. They are drawn from the departments, centers, students, and faculty in the School of Medicine, have linkages throughout the university, and are interwoven into the fabric and culture of the institution. Some are centrally based in the School of Medicine's deans' office, and others are located in individual departments and receive support from the dean's office. This article describes representative programs for medical students and faculty. Curricular initiatives, the fundamental components of medical students' learning, include a course entitled "The Physician, Patient, and Society," a clerkship essay in the Medicine Clerkship, an opportunity for reflection during the medicine clerkship, and a medical humanities elective. In 2002, the Professionalism Initiative was launched to enhance and reflect the values of the medical profession. Its curriculum consists of a series of events that coordinate, particularly, with existing elements of the first-year curriculum (e.g., orientation week, a session during anatomy, a self-assessment workshop, and a peer-assessment workshop). The Master Scholars Program is a group of five, theme-based master societies consisting of faculty and students who share common interests around the society's themes. Programs developed for the societies include colloquia, faculty-led seminars, a mandatory student-mentoring program, and visiting scholars. Finally, the authors describe three high-quality literary publications created at New York University School of Medicine. Each of the initiatives undergoes regular critical examination and reflection that drive future planning. PMID:14534091

Krackov, Sharon K; Levin, Richard I; Catanesé, Veronica; Rey, Mariano; Aull, Felice; Blagev, Denitza; Dreyer, Benard; Grieco, Anthony J; Hebert, Cristy; Kalet, Adina; Lipkin, Mack; Lowenstein, Jerome; Ofri, Danielle; Stevens, David

2003-10-01

224

[Attitudes of health personnel in a university hospital toward evidence-based medicine].  

PubMed

Over the last few years the concepts and methods of the evidence-based medicine (EBM) have been increasingly recognized and applied in the Croatian medical community. Central Medical Library at Zagreb university Medical School has been developing a web-based service aimed to help practitioners find best evidence for solving specific clinical problems. Therefore, the health personnel affiliated to a teaching hospital were surveyed. The questionnaire included 18 questions evaluating attitudes towards EBM. It was displayed by the library's information desk. There were 204 respondents, 62% of them clinical specialists. Most respondents agreed that EBM is useful in clinical decision making (57.4%) as well as in improving patient care (55.4%). Lack of personal time (60.8%) and insufficient skills (60.3%) were percieved as the main barriers to practising EBM. The vast majority of respondents (96.6%) reported never having received EBM training. The study results show that medical librarians can play an expanded role in saving the practitioners' time by searching EBM resources and assessing the quality of the information. PMID:20857805

Markulin, Helena; Petrak, Jelka

225

Does medicine still show an unresolved discrimination against women? Experience in two European university hospitals.  

PubMed

Have invisible barriers for women been broken in 2007, or do we still have to break through medicine's glass ceiling? Data from two of the most prestigious university hospitals in Barcelona with 700-800 beds, Hospital Clínic (HC) and Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau (HSCSP) address this issue. In the HSCSP, 87% of the department chairs are men and 85% of the department unit chiefs are also men. With respect to women, only 5 (13%) are in the top position (department chair) and 4 (15%) are department unit chiefs. Similar statistics are also found at the HC: 87% of the department chairs and 89% of the department unit chiefs are men. Currently, only 6 women (13%) are in the top position and 6 (11%) are department unit chiefs. Analysis of the 2002 data of internal promotions in HC showed that for the first level (senior specialist) sex distribution was similar. Nevertheless, for the second level (consultant) only 25% were women, and for the top level (senior consultant) only 8% were women. These proportions have not changed in 2007 in spite of a 10% increase in leadership positions during this period. Similar proportions were found in HSCSP where 68% of the top promotions were held by men. The data obtained from these two different medical institutions in Barcelona are probably representative of other hospitals in Spain. It would be ethically desirable to have males and females in leadership positions in the medical profession. PMID:19181883

Santamaría, A; Merino, A; Viñas, O; Arrizabalaga, P

2009-02-01

226

Building learning communities: evolution of the colleges at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine.  

PubMed

Learning communities, which are an emerging trend in medical education, create a foundation for professional and academic development through the establishment of longitudinal relationships between students and faculty. In this article, the authors describe the robust learning community system at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, which encompasses wellness, career planning, professional development, and academics.The Vanderbilt Advisory Colleges Program introduced in 2006 initially focused on two goals: promoting wellness and providing career advising. In the 2011-2012 academic year, the focus of the colleges expanded to incorporate an enhanced level of personal career advising and an academic component. In the four-year College Colloquium course, faculty selected as college mentors teach the medical humanities and lead sessions dedicated to student professional development in the areas of leadership, research, and service-learning. This academic and professional development program builds on the existing strengths of the colleges and has transformed the colleges into learning communities.The authors reflect on lessons learned and discuss future plans. They report that internal data and data from the Association of American Medical Colleges Medical School Graduation Questionnaire support consistently high and increasing satisfaction among Vanderbilt medical students, across the metrics of personal counseling, faculty mentoring, and career planning. PMID:23887019

Fleming, Amy; Cutrer, William; Moutsios, Sandi; Heavrin, Benjamin; Pilla, Michael; Eichbaum, Quentin; Rodgers, Scott

2013-09-01

227

The University of Vermont Libraries' Center for Digital Initiatives: Fletcher Family  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The University of Vermont Libraries' Center for Digital Initiatives has continued to add to their online offerings in recent years. This latest collection is quite a pip, and it contains family correspondence from the Fletcher Family of Vermont. The family correspondence begins in 1826, and it is primarily focused around several family members who moved west to New York, Ohio, and other parts of the heartland. Throughout these letters, the various correspondents detail the process of creating and managing their new farms and the documents leave no fact (or price) unexplored as they discuss the land, grains, stock, and groceries. All told, there are 139 letters in the collection, and visitors can click on the "Browse the Collection" section to view the letters listed by author. Additionally, visitors can search the collection by keyword, title, or subject.

228

Predictive Value of the Korean Academy of Family Medicine In-Training Examination for Certifying Examination  

PubMed Central

Background In-training examination (ITE) is a cognitive examination similar to the written test, but it is different from the Clinical Practice Examination of the Korean Academy of Family Medicine (KAFM) Certification Examination (CE). The objective of this is to estimate the positive predictive value of the KAFM-ITE for identifying residents at risk for poor performance on the three types of KAFM-CE. Methods 372 residents who completed the KAFM-CE in 2011 were included. We compared the mean KAFM-CE scores with ITE experience. We evaluated the correlation and the positive predictive value (PPV) of ITE for the multiple choice question (MCQ) scores of 1st written test & 2nd slide examination, the total clinical practice examination scores, and the total sum of 2nd test. Results 275 out of 372 residents completed ITE. Those who completed ITE had significantly higher MCQ scores of 1st written test than those who did not. The correlation of ITE scores with 1st written MCQ (0.627) was found to be the highest among the other kinds of CE. The PPV of the ITE score for 1st written MCQ scores was 0.672. The PPV of the ITE score ranged from 0.376 to 0.502. Conclusion The score of the KAFM ITE has acceptable positive predictive value that could be used as a part of comprehensive evaluation system for residents in cognitive field.

Kim, Ji-Yong

2011-01-01

229

Smoking Cessation in Family Medicine: Effects of an Area Health Education Center Training Program  

PubMed Central

Background and Objectives Many clinicians have not received adequate training in smoking cessation. We examined the effects of a tobacco training program on clinician behavior, attitudes, knowledge, and comfort related to smoking cessation. Methods In a prospective cohort study, family medicine residents and faculty completed a pretest, followed by an educational intervention that encompassed presentations on smoking cessation resources, motivational interviewing, and the neurobiology of addiction and pharmacotherapy. After 3 months, participants completed a postintervention survey. Results were analyzed using chi-square tests to examine the effects of training. Results Thirty-three residents and faculty completed the pretraining survey and 25 completed the posttraining survey. Following training, participants were more familiar and comfortable with Public Health Service Clinical Practice Guidelines (P < .0001). No significant differences were found in performance of the 5 As (Ask, Advise, Assess, Assist, and Arrange) or other behaviors, including providing assistance with counseling, cessation plans, resources, or pharmacotherapy. There were no improvements in knowledge of specific intervention plans or attitudes related to identifying and counseling smokers. Conclusion A multidisciplinary tobacco training program increases clinician familiarity and comfort with practice guidelines, and may contribute to improving care activities that promote a healthy lifestyle. Future research should explore other interventions that have the potential of changing practice patterns on a larger scale. Future studies should also assess the effect of training programs on patient-oriented outcomes.

Johns, Tracy L.; Lawrence, Elizabeth; Martini, Leila E.; Dunn, Grace E.; Thompson, Zachary J.; Zwygart, Kira

2010-01-01

230

Usefulness of cardiovascular family history data for population-based preventive medicine and medical research (The Health Family Tree Study and the NHLBI Family Heart Study)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Detailed medical family history data have been proposed to be effective in identifying high-risk families for targeted intervention. With use of a validated and standardized quantitative family risk score (FRS), the degree of familial aggregation of coronary heart disease (CHD), stroke, hypertension, and diabetes was obtained from 122,155 Utah families and 6,578 Texas families in the large, population-based Health Family

Roger R Williams; Steven C Hunt; Gerardo Heiss; Michael A Province; Jeannette T Bensen; Millicent Higgins; Robert M Chamberlain; Joan Ware; Paul N Hopkins

2001-01-01

231

Academic Medicine Meets Traditional African Healing  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Cyril Naidoo, who directs the department of family medicine at the University of KwaZulu-Natal's Nelson R. Mandela School of Medicine, conducts workshops to traditional healers on how to help patients with AIDS and HIV. In Dr. Naidoo's workshop, the group discusses how to counsel patients about HIV and AIDS, how to refer them for testing, and…

Lindow, Megan

2008-01-01

232

Situational analysis of teaching and learning of medicine and nursing students at Makerere University College of Health Sciences  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  Makerere University College of Health Sciences (MakCHS) in Uganda is undergoing a major reform to become a more influential\\u000a force in society. It is important that its medicine and nursing graduates are equipped to best address the priority health\\u000a needs of the Ugandan population, as outlined in the government’s Health Sector Strategic Plan (HSSP). The assessment identifies\\u000a critical gaps in

Sarah Kiguli; Rhona Baingana; Ligia Paina; David Mafigiri; Sara Groves; Godfrey Katende; Elsie Kiguli-Malwadde; Juliet Kiguli; Moses Galukande; Mayega Roy; Robert Bollinger; George Pariyo

2011-01-01

233

Problem-Based Learning in an e-Learning Environment: A Case Study at Griffith University School of Medicine  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Increasing numbers of medical schools in Australia and overseas have moved away from didactic teaching methodologies and embraced\\u000a problem-based learning (PBL) to improve clinical reasoning skills and communication skills as well as to encourage self-directed\\u000a lifelong learning. In January 2005, the first cohort of students entered the new MBBS program at the Griffith University School\\u000a of Medicine, Gold Coast, to

Raymond A. Tedman; Heather Alexander; Robert Loudon

234

Family Health Nurse Project—An Education Program of the World Health OrganizationThe University of Stirling Experience  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article outlines the delivery of the Family Health Nurse Education Programme of the World Health Organization (WHO) at the University of Stirling, Scotland, from 2001 to 2005. The program was part of the WHO European Family Health Nurse pilot project. The curriculum outlined by the WHO Curriculum Planning Group detailed the broad thrust of the Family Health Nurse Education

Ian Murray

2008-01-01

235

[Development of standards for education and training in family and community medicine - contributions by WONCA IberoAmerica (CIMF)].  

PubMed

The WONCA Education Working Party (WEP) is developing a set of standards for medical student education, postgraduate training in family medicine / general practice and continuing professional development for family doctors. At this point the contributions by WONCA world regions are very important, and for this reason the main objective of this report is to present the standards developed by the Iberoamerican WONCA Region (CIMF). To be comprehensive and effective, standards should reflect regional realities and so the contributions from CIMF may reinforce and strengthen the key initiative of WEP and the implementation of the standards throughout the world. PMID:21145135

Demarzo, Marcelo Marcos Piva; Marin, Anibal; Padula Anderson, Maria Inez; De Castro Filho, Eno Dias; Kidd, Michael

2010-12-08

236

Positions Toward Science Studies in Medicine Among University Graduates of Medicine and the Teenaged Participants of the "Medical Systems" Study Program  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The "Medical Systems" program was designed to introduce high school students to the world of advanced medicine. Its premise was to use an applied scientific discipline like medicine to encourage high-school students' interest in basic science. This study compares the teen-aged graduates of "Medical Systems" with fourth and fifth-year medical students. It aims to identify the attitudes of these two groups towards medical science and basic sciences in medicine. The population included 94 graduates of "Medical Systems" from schools throughout Israel, who had also completed an advanced-level course in a basic science (biology, chemistry or physics), and 96 medical students from different Israeli universities. The students' attitudes were measured using West et al.'s questionnaire (Med Educ 16(4):188-191, 1982), which assesses both the attitude of the participants towards basic science knowledge, and their attitude towards their learning experience in medical school. Nine participants from each group were also interviewed using a semi-structured interview protocol. The results showed essential differences in the attitudes of the two groups. The high school students consider scientific knowledge far more essential for a physician than do the medical students, who also showed a far lower estimation of the effectiveness of their science studies.

Ben-Zvi-Assaraf, Orit; Even-Israel, Chava

2011-08-01

237

Positions Toward Science Studies in Medicine Among University Graduates of Medicine and the Teenaged Participants of the ``Medical Systems'' Study Program  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The “Medical Systems” program was designed to introduce high school students to the world of advanced medicine. Its premise was to use an applied scientific discipline like medicine to encourage high-school students’ interest in basic science. This study compares the teen-aged graduates of “Medical Systems” with fourth and fifth-year medical students. It aims to identify the attitudes of these two groups towards medical science and basic sciences in medicine. The population included 94 graduates of “Medical Systems” from schools throughout Israel, who had also completed an advanced-level course in a basic science (biology, chemistry or physics), and 96 medical students from different Israeli universities. The students’ attitudes were measured using West et al.’s questionnaire (Med Educ 16(4):188-191, 1982), which assesses both the attitude of the participants towards basic science knowledge, and their attitude towards their learning experience in medical school. Nine participants from each group were also interviewed using a semi-structured interview protocol. The results showed essential differences in the attitudes of the two groups. The high school students consider scientific knowledge far more essential for a physician than do the medical students, who also showed a far lower estimation of the effectiveness of their science studies.

Ben-Zvi-Assaraf, Orit; Even-Israel, Chava

2010-10-01

238

Identification of Family Non-universal Gauge Bosons in High-energy Electron-positron Collisions  

SciTech Connect

We examine effects on measurable observables in e{sup +}e{sup -} collisions resulting from the existence of additional neutral gauge bosons originating in extensions of the standard model. In particular, we consider family non-universal neutral gauge bosons occurring in the minimal supersymmetric standard model and in the Sp(6){sub L} x U(1){sub Y} model, as well as other theoretically motivated popular neutral gauge bosons. We show how the proper employment of the generation-dependent couplings of the extra gauge boson, and the appropriate adjustment of the beam polarization, not only improved the identification of the models but also enhanced the discovery potential of the family non-universal extra gauge bosons.

Bagneid, Ali A.; Althubiti, Numa A. [Department of Physics, Umm Al-Qura University, Makkah (Saudi Arabia)

2011-10-27

239

Diversity of metabolic syndrome criteria in association with cardiovascular diseases - a family medicine-based investigation  

PubMed Central

Background This study compared the association between the 3 definitions of metabolic syndrome (MetS) suggested by the World Health Organization (WHO), National Cholesterol Education Programme (NCEP ATP III), and International Diabetes Federation (IDF), and the risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVD) and shows the prevalence and characteristics of persons with MetS in continental vs. coastal regions and rural vs. urban residence in Croatia. Material/Methods A prospective multicenter study was conducted on 3245 participants ?40 years, who visited general practices from May to July 2008 for any reason. This was a cross-sectional study of the Cardiovascular Risk and Intervention Study in Croatia-family medicine project (ISRCTN31857696). Results All analyzed MetS definitions showed an association with CVD, but the strongest was shown by NCEP ATP III; coronary disease OR 2.48 (95% CI 1.80–3.82), cerebrovascular disease OR 2.14 (1.19–3.86), and peripheral artery disease OR 1.55 (1.04–2.32), especially for age and male sex. According to the NCEP ATP III (IDF), the prevalence was 38.7% (45.9%) [15.9% (18.6%) in men, and 22.7% (27.3%) in women, and 28.4% (33.9%) in the continental region, 10.2% (10.9%) in the coastal region, 26.2% (31.5%) in urban areas, and 12.4% (14.4%) in rural areas. Older age, male sex, and residence in the continental area were positively associated with MetS diagnosis according to NCEP ATP III, and current smoking and Mediterranean diet adherence have protective effects. Conclusions The NCEP ATP III definition seems to provide the strongest association with CVD and should therefore be preferred for use in this population.

Ivezic-Lalic, Dragica; Markovic, Biserka Bergman; Kranjcevic, Ksenija; Kern, Josipa; Vrdoljak, Davorka; Vucak, Jasna

2013-01-01

240

Multi-source evaluation of interpersonal and communication skills of family medicine residents.  

PubMed

There is a lack of information on the use of multi-source evaluation to assess trainees' interpersonal and communication skills in Oriental settings. This study is conducted to assess the reliability and applicability of assessing the interpersonal and communication skills of family medicine residents by patients, peer residents, nurses, and teaching staffs and to compare the ratings with the objective structured clinical examination (OSCE). Our results revealed instruments used by staffs, peers, nurses, and self-evaluation have good internal consistency reliability (? > 0.90), except for the behavioral checklist (? = 0.57). Staffs', peers', and nurses' evaluations were highly correlated with one another (r = 0.722 for staff- and peer-rating, r = 0.734 for staff- and nurse-rating, r = 0.634 for peer- and nurse-rating). However, residents' self-rating and patients-rating were not correlated to ratings by any other raters. OSCE evaluation was correlated to peer-rating (r = 0.533) and staff-rating (r = 0.642), but not correlated to self- or patient-rating. The generalizability study revealed the major sources of variance came from the types of rater and the interaction of residents and types of rater. This study found self-rating and patient-rating were not consistent with other sources of rating on residents' interpersonal and communication skills. Whether variations among different types of rater in a multi-source evaluation should be regarded as measurement errors or complementary information is worth further study. PMID:22240920

Leung, Kai-Kuen; Wang, Wei-Dan; Chen, Yen-Yuan

2012-01-13

241

Mapping Postgraduate Research at the University of Zambia: a review of dissertations for the Master of Medicine Programme  

PubMed Central

Background The publication of a dissertation is an integral part of the four-year postgraduate degree of Master of Medicine (in clinical disciplines) within the School of Medicine at the University of Zambia. The governing research policy states that the subject matter of the dissertation is expected to cover a topic relevant to health care in the Zambian context, that it be conducted in a way that is consistent with international ethical guidelines for biomedical research involving human subjects, and that research outcomes should be maximally utilized. The aim of the study is to explore the characteristics of the Masters of Medicine research at the University of Zambia. Methodology This descriptive study explores the subject matter and research methodology by type of clinical specialty of all dissertations from 1986 to 2009. Results The 132 dissertations included 36 (27.3%) in Surgery, 35 (26.5%) in Paediatrics, 32 (24.2%) in Internal Medicine, 24 (18.2%) in Obstetrics and Gynaecology, and 5 (3.8%) in Orthopaedic Surgery. Only 7 (5.3%) were interventional/experimental studies (4 of which were randomized controlled trials). Cross-sectional studies were the predominant type of the 125 observational studies (n=112, 84.8%). Thirty-three dissertations (25.0%) predominantly addressed HIV (16 Internal Medicine, 10 Paediatrics, 6 Surgery and 1 Obstetrics and Gynaecology); and 18 (13.6%) predominantly addressed infections, excluding TB (11 in Paediatrics). Other subjects included malignancy (n=6), TB (n=5), and diabetes mellitus (n=4). Over half of the dissertations (76, 57.6%) addressed the determinants of the cause, risk and development of diseases; and a third dealt with management and evaluation of diseases (26 and 18, respectively). Conclusions Few dissertations were based on experimental designs and most addressed determinants of the cause of diseases through cross-sectional studies. HIV and infections predominate as diseases reflecting the prevailing disease patterns in Lusaka in particular, and Zambia in general.

Ahmed, Y; Kanyengo, CW; Akakandelwa, Akakandelwa

2012-01-01

242

A Comparison of Surgery and Family Medicine Residents' Perceptions of Cross-Cultural Care Training of Cross-Cultural Care Training  

PubMed Central

The need for physicians formally trained to deliver care to diverse patient populations has been widely advocated. Utilizing a validated tool, Weissman and Betancourt's Cross-Cultural Care Survey, the aim of this current study was to compare surgery and family medicine residents' perceptions of their preparedness and skillfulness to provide high quality cross-cultural care. Past research has documented differences between the two groups' reported impressions of importance and level of instruction received in cross-cultural care. Twenty surgery and 15 family medicine residents participated in the study. Significant differences were found between surgery and family medicine residents on most ratings of the amount of training they received in cross-cultural skills. Specifically, family medicine residents reported having received more training on: 1) determining how patients want to be addressed, 2) taking a social history, 3) assessing their understanding of the cause of illness, 4) negotiating their treatment plan, 5) assessing whether they are mistrustful of the health care system and/or doctor, 6) identifying cultural customs, 7) identifying how patients make decisions within the family, and 8) delivering services through a medical interpreter. One unexpected finding was that surgery residents, who reported not receiving much formal cultural training, reported higher mean scores on perceived skillfulness (i.e. ability) than family medicine residents. The disconnect may be linked to the family medicine residents' training in cultural humility — more knowledge and understanding of cross-cultural care can paradoxically lead to perceptions of being less prepared or skillful in this area.

Jackson, David S; Lin, Susan Y; Park, Elyse R

2010-01-01

243

Washington University School of Medicine researchers find that in lung cancer, smokers have 10 times more genetic damage than never-smokers  

Cancer.gov

Lung cancer patients with a history of smoking have 10 times more genetic mutations in their tumors than those with the disease who have never smoked, according to a new study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.

244

Student Reactions to Health Services Rendered by the Sports Medicine Program to Intramural Participants at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper describes the activities of the Division of Sports Medicine at the University of North Carolina. The program works in the areas of (a) prevention, (b) treatment, (c) first aid, and (d) rehabilitation of athletic injuries sustained during intramural activities. The sports medicine staff consists of three full-time physicians, four…

Violette, Ronald W.

245

Student Reactions to Health Services Rendered by the Sports Medicine Program to Intramural Participants at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This paper describes the activities of the Division of Sports Medicine at the University of North Carolina. The program works in the areas of (a) prevention, (b) treatment, (c) first aid, and (d) rehabilitation of athletic injuries sustained during intramural activities. The sports medicine staff consists of three full-time physicians, four…

Violette, Ronald W.

246

Experiment in an early admissions program at the University of Utah College of Medicine.  

PubMed

Thirty-one selected high school graduates were accepted into the College of Medicine prior to any college course work. The program was established to provide greater educational opportunity to the gifted student. PMID:606086

Cockayne, T W; Samuelson, C O

1977-01-01

247

University of California-Los Angeles: Online Archive of American Folk Medicine  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Archive of American Folk Medicine is the result of more than 50 years of work by UCLA-associated folklorists who "documented beliefs and practices relating to folk medicine and alternative healthcare. In order to make the data more readily available to the worldwide community of researchers and medical practitioners, the Online Archive of American Folk Medicine was established in 1996 under the direction of Dr. Michael Owen Jones, a professor of folklore and history at UCLA." The Archive draws from over 3,200 published works, and is intended to serve folklorists, sociologists, and historians. The website provides basic and advanced search options; and records include brief entries for Citation, Condition, Belief, Method of Treatment, and more. Users should be aware that the Archive website has not been updated in several years but it remains a valuable resource for researchers and others interested in folk medicine.

248

Establishing a minority-based community clinical oncology program: the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, New Jersey Medical School-university Hospital Cancer Center experience.  

PubMed

The Minority-Based Community Clinical Oncology Program (MB-CCOP) at University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, New Jersey Medical School-University Hospital Cancer Center was established to serve an unmet need in a medically, educationally, and socioeconomically underserved community of primarily African American and Latino patients in Newark and Essex County, New Jersey. The MB-CCOP was built on an existing infrastructure of multidisciplinary teams of cancer specialists who collaborated in patient care and an existing clinical research program, which included multilingual staff and a breast cancer navigator. This article highlights some of the unique opportunities and challenges involved in the startup of an MB-CCOP specifically relevant to an academic setting. We present a guide to the necessary infrastructure and institutional support that must be in place before considering such a program and some of the steps an institution can take to overcome barriers preventing successful enrollment of patients onto clinical trials. PMID:23814524

Wieder, Robert; Teal, Randall; Saunders, Tracie; Weiner, Bryan J

2013-03-01

249

Experience with using second life for medical education in a family and community medicine education unit  

PubMed Central

Background The application of new technologies to the education of health professionals is both a challenge and a necessity. Virtual worlds are increasingly being explored as a support for education. Aim: The aim of this work is to study the suitability of Second Life (SL) as an educational tool for primary healthcare professionals. Methods Design: Qualitative study of accredited clinical sessions in SL included in a continuing professional development (CPD) programme for primary healthcare professionals. Location: Zaragoza I Zone Family and Community Medicine Education Unit (EU) and 9 health centres operated by the Aragonese Health Service, Aragon, Spain. Method: The EU held two training workshops in SL for 16 healthcare professionals from 9 health centres by means of two workshops, and requested them to facilitate clinical sessions in SL. Attendance was open to all personnel from the EU and the 9 health centres. After a trail period of clinical sessions held at 5 health centres between May and November 2010, the CPD-accredited clinical sessions were held at 9 health centres between February and April 2011. Participants: 76 healthcare professionals attended the CPD-accredited clinical sessions in SL. Main measurements: Questionnaire on completion of the clinical sessions. Results Response rate: 42-100%. Questionnaire completed by each health centre on completion of the CPD-accredited clinical sessions: Access to SL: 2 centres were unable to gain access. Sound problems: 0% (0/9). Image problems: 0% (0/9). Voice/text chat: used in 100% (10/9); 0 incidents. Questionnaire completed by participants in the CPD-accredited clinical sessions: Preference for SL as a tool: 100% (76/76). Strengths of this method: 74% (56/76) considered it eliminated the need to travel; 68% (52/76) believed it made more effective use of educational resources; and 47% (36/76) considered it improved accessibility. Weaknesses: 91% (69/76) experienced technical problems, while; 9% (7/76) thought it was impersonal and with little interaction. 65.79% (50/76) believed it was better than other distance learning methods and 38.16% (29/76) believed it was better than face-to-face learning. Conclusions SL is a tool that allows educational activities to be designed that involve a number of health centres in different geographical locations, consequently eliminating the need to travel and making more effective use of educational resources.

2012-01-01

250

Child, Physician, and Parent Communication in a Family Medicine Setting - Final Report.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This project explored the process of communication between children, parents, and family physicians in routine pediatric visits in a family practice center. The long term objectives were to specify age-appropriate models for active involvement of children...

A. W. Ross J. K. Dias P. A. Wells R. H. Pantell T. J. Stewart

1982-01-01

251

On a new compactification of moduli of vector bundles on a surface. V: Existence of a universal family  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We investigate the existence of a universal family/pseudofamily of admissible stable pairs over the space of moduli \\widetilde M constructed in previous papers of the author. Bibliography: 16 titles.

Timofeeva, Nadezda V.

2013-03-01

252

Planning a new library in an age of transition: the Washington University School of Medicine Library and Biomedical Communications Center.  

PubMed Central

In an era of great technological and socioeconomic changes, the Washington University School of Medicine conceptualized and built its first Library and Biomedical Communications Center in seventy-eight years. The planning process, evolution of the electronic library, and translation of functions into operating spaces are discussed. Since 1983, when the project was approved, a whole range of information technologies and services have emerged. The authors consider the kind of library that would operate in a setting where people can do their own searches, order data and materials through an electronic network, analyze and manage information, and use software to create their own publications. Images

Crawford, S; Halbrook, B

1990-01-01

253

On-line intergrated library system: bibliographic access and control system of Washington University School of Medicine.  

PubMed

The on-line integrated library system is a relatively simple and logical concept. The perception that many library functions can be incorporated within one system, using a single data base, has led a number of practitioners to independently develop such systems. This paper describes the Bibliographic Access and Control System (BACS), developed by the Washington University School of Medicine Library, and identifies some of the underlying principles, components, and capabilities of this system from the vantage point of operational experience over one year. PMID:6896835

Kelly, E A; Yedlin, D K; Crawford, S Y; Igielnik, S

1982-07-01

254

Task Force Report 5. Report of the Task Force on Family Medicine's Role in Shaping the Future Health Care Delivery System  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND Recognizing that the implementation of needed changes within family medicine will be enhanced through a concurrent effort to transform the broader health care system, this Future of Family Medicine task force was charged with determining family medicine’s leadership role in shaping the future health care delivery system. METHODS After reviewing the changes taking place within family medicine and the broader health care system, this task force identified 6 priorities for fostering necessary modifications in the health care system. In addressing the leadership challenge facing the discipline, the task force presents a 3-dimensional matrix that provides a useful framework for describing the audiences that should be targeted, the strategic priorities that should be pursued, and the specific recommendations that should be addressed. Noting that leadership is part of the heritage of family medicine, the task force reviewed past successes by the discipline as important lessons that can be instructive as family physicians begin advocating for needed changes. MAJOR FINDINGS Effective leadership is an essential ingredient that will determine, to a large extent, the success of family medicine in advocating for needed change in the health care system overall and in the specialty. It is vitally important to groom leaders within family medicine and to create venues where policy makers and influence leaders can look beyond their usual constituencies and horizons to a comprehensive view of health care. A central concept being proposed is that of a relationship-centered personal medical home. This medical home serves as the focal point through which all individuals—regardless of age, gender, race, ethnicity, or socioeconomic status—receive a basket of acute, chronic, and preventive medical care services that are accessible, accountable, comprehensive, integrated, patient-centered, safe, scientifically valid, and satisfying to both patients and their physicians. CONCLUSION Family medicine has and will continue to have an important leadership role in health system change. It has been most successful when it has been able to identify a high-priority goal through consensus within the discipline, to focus and coordinate local and national resources, and to use a multipronged approach in addressing the priority. Although the Future of Family Medicine project has provided an important impetus for the identification of key priorities across the discipline, for the FFM project ultimately to be a success, implementation steps will need to be identified and prioritized. The leadership matrix presented in this report can provide a useful structuring tool to identify, understand, and coordinate change efforts more effectively. Strategic alliances with primary care groups and others also will be critical to the success of change initiatives.

Roberts, Richard G.; Snape, Pam S.; Burke, Kevin

2004-01-01

255

The study of B ? K(*)l+l- decays in family non-universal Z' models  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In a combined investigation of B ? K(*)l+l- decays, constraints on the related couplings in family non-universal Z' models are derived. We find that within the allowed parameter space, the recently observed forward-backward asymmetry in the B ? K*l+l- decay can be explained by flipping the signs of the Wilson coefficients C9eff and C10. With the obtained constraints, we also calculate the branching ratio of the Bs ? ?+?- decay. The upper bound of our prediction is nearly an order of magnitude smaller than the upper bound given by the CDF Collaboration recently.

Cheng-Wei, Chiang; Li, Run-Hui; Lü, Cai-Dian

2012-01-01

256

A Qualitative Study of Intimate Partner Violence Universal Screening by Family Therapy Interns: Implications for Practice, Research, Training, and Supervision  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Although a few family therapy researchers and clinicians have urged universal screening for intimate partner violence (IPV), how screening is implemented--and, in particular, client and therapist response to screening--is vaguely defined and largely untested. This qualitative study examined the dilemmas experienced by couples and family therapy…

Todahl, Jeffrey L.; Linville, Deanna; Chou, Liang-Ying; Maher-Cosenza, Patricia

2008-01-01

257

Interdisciplinary Training in Infant/Family Specializations through Existing Programs at the University of Nebraska. Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study explored current University of Nebraska graduate course offerings which address content relative to infants, families, and/or the professional teamwork associated with services to handicapped or at-risk infants, toddlers, and their families. Faculty from 12 departments were surveyed as to their interest in interdisciplinary,…

Marvin, Christine A.; And Others

258

A Qualitative Study of Intimate Partner Violence Universal Screening by Family Therapy Interns: Implications for Practice, Research, Training, and Supervision  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Although a few family therapy researchers and clinicians have urged universal screening for intimate partner violence (IPV), how screening is implemented--and, in particular, client and therapist response to screening--is vaguely defined and largely untested. This qualitative study examined the dilemmas experienced by couples and family therapy…

Todahl, Jeffrey L.; Linville, Deanna; Chou, Liang-Ying; Maher-Cosenza, Patricia

2008-01-01

259

International research-educational center of optical technologies for industry and medicine "photonics" at Saratov State University: education, research, and commercialization  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper International Research-Educational Center of Optical Technologies for Industry and Medicine "Photonics" at Saratov State University founded in 2007 in the framework of National Russian Federation Program "Innovative Universities" is presented. Some facilities in the field of optical and biomedical optics education, research, and commercialization are discussed.

Tuchin, Valery V.

2008-06-01

260

Admission Factors Predicting Family Medicine Specialty Choice: A Literature Review and Exploratory Study among Students in the Rural Medical Scholars Program  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Purpose: The Rural Medical Scholars Program (RMSP) was created to increase production of rural family physicians in Alabama. Literature review reveals reasons medical students choose careers in family medicine, and these reasons can be categorized into domains that medical schools can address through admission, curriculum, and structural…

Avery, Daniel M., Jr.; Wheat, John R.; Leeper, James D.; McKnight, Jerry T.; Ballard, Brent G.; Chen, Jia

2012-01-01

261

Feminism in Fiji: a Study of Family Structure, Perception, and the Transformation of Gender Roles by University Women  

Microsoft Academic Search

Past research has suggested that institutions, such as the family in rural agrarian societies, influence women's adjustment to roles in society.This project explores socialization processes involved in constructing traditional versus feminist values in Fijian female university students.Observation of and interviews with women who attend the University of the South Pacific will offer valuable insight into their choice of furthering their

Elizabeth Morgan

2000-01-01

262

Simulation analysis of an outpatient department of internal medicine in a university hospital  

Microsoft Academic Search

Soaring health care costs and greater emphasis on preventative medicine have compelled researchers to examine new ways to reduce costs and improve efficiency in outpatient services. Extended waiting times for treatment in the outpatient department followed by short consultations has long been a complaint of patients. This issue is becoming increasingly important in Japan with its progressively aging society. In

A. K. Athula Wijewickrama; Soemon Takakuwa

2006-01-01

263

Simulation Analysis of an Outpatient Department of Internal Medicine in a University Hospital  

Microsoft Academic Search

Soaring health care costs and greater emphasis on preventative medicine have compelled researchers to examine new ways to reduce costs and improve efficiency in outpatient services. Extended waiting times for treatment in the outpatient department followed by short consultations has long been a complaint of patients. This issue is becoming increasingly important in Japan with its progressively aging society. In

A. K. Athula Wijewickrama; S. Takakuwa

2006-01-01

264

The Czechoslovak legal regulation of family relations affected by development in medicine.  

PubMed

Medicine has developed rapidly during the last decades. Transplantation, sex-change surgery in transsexual or heterosexual persons, interference in the process of reproduction of human species and procedures like lobotomy have remarkably expanded the possibilities of contemporary medicine. This, at the same time gives rise to unprecedented legal problems. A number of them have not yet been solved in many countries, though legislative solutions are sought. The road to their solution, however, is full of blind curves: no sooner does the law offer an answer to one problem than medicine demands the answer to another, brand new one. This is why knowledge of these problems' regulation in different countries might be of use. That article gives an outline of their regulation in Czechoslovakia. PMID:2122164

Dragonec, J

1990-01-01

265

Philanthropy and scientific medicine: the history of the University of Minnesota's Cancer Institute.  

PubMed

The University of Minnesota's Cancer Institute was established in 1925 with a gift from the Citizens Aid Society. The Institute was the first cancer hospital in Minnesota, and its focus on patient care, research, and education laid the foundation for the eventual formation of the Masonic Cancer Center. This article describes the origins of interdisciplinary cancer care at the University of Minnesota. PMID:22039685

Slaughter, Aimee; Kersey, John H

2011-09-01

266

Agreement between the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey and the Council of Chapters of the American Association of University Professors, July 1, 1983 to June 30, 1986.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The collective bargaining agreement between the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey and the Council of Chapters (690 members) of the American Association of University Professors (AAUP) covering the period July 1, 1983-June 30, 1986 is presented. The agreement covers the New Jersey Medical School, New Jersey Dental School, Rutgers…

Rutgers, The State Univ., New Brunswick, NJ. School of Medicine.

267

The Health Policy and Legislative Awareness Initiative at the Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine: theory meets practice.  

PubMed

In a constantly evolving health care landscape shaped by many voices--including those of third party payers and government--physicians must learn to play a more proactive role to become better advocates for their patients and to uphold the basic tenets of their noble profession. As legislation and public health become increasingly intertwined with the practice of medicine, educators must provide future physicians with the tools to meet these new challenges. Accordingly, in 1996 Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine embarked on its Health Policy and Legislative Awareness Initiative, a medical school elective designed to provide theoretical knowledge as well as practical experience in legislative and policy issues for future physicians early in their careers. The Initiative has three key elements: a series of lectures taught by national and local experts covering a basic health policy curriculum, a mini-internship conducted at the office of a Pennsylvania State legislator, and a practical assignment leading to authorship of a resolution to a national medical organization or assisting in drafting a bill intended for introduction to the Pennsylvania State Legislature. Following several years of successful implementation and a moderate growth in enrollment, recent changes in the local and national scene have peaked the interest of most students to learn about the system in which they will practice medicine. Therefore, in addition to describing the Initiative in its current form, the authors discuss future plans for expanded elective opportunities and consider the issue of integrating health policy education into core medical school curricula. PMID:15851453

Quraishi, Sadeq A; Orkin, Fredrick K; Weitekamp, Michael R; Khalid, Ayesha N; Sassani, Joseph W

2005-05-01

268

New Paradigm in Training of Undergraduate Clinical Skills: the NEPTUNE-CS project at the Split University School of Medicine  

PubMed Central

Clinical skills’ training is arguably the weakest point in medical schools’ curriculum. This study briefly describes how we at the Split University School of Medicine cope with this problem. We consider that, over the last decades, a considerable advancement in teaching methodologies, tools, and assessment of students has been made. However, there are many unresolved issues, most notably: (i) the institutional value system, impeding the motivation of the teaching staff; (ii) lack of a strong mentoring system; (iii) organization, timing, and placement of training in the curriculum; (iv) lack of publications pertinent to training; and (v) unwillingness of patients to participate in student training. To improve the existing training models we suggest increased institutional awareness of obstacles, as well as willingness to develop mechanisms for increasing the motivation of faculty. It is necessary to introduce changes in the structure and timing of training and to complement it with a catalog, practicum, and portfolio of clinical skills. At Split University School of Medicine, we developed a new paradigm aimed to improve the teaching of clinical skills called “Neptune-CSS,” which stands for New Paradigm in Training of Undergraduate Clinical Skills in Split.

Simunovic, Vladimir J.; Hozo, Izet; Rakic, Mladen; Jukic, Marko; Tomic, Snjezana; Kokic, Slaven; Ljutic, Dragan; Druzijanic, Nikica; Grkovic, Ivica; Simunovic, Filip; Marasovic, Dujomir

2010-01-01

269

Monitoring of adverse drug reactions associated with antihypertensive medicines at a university teaching hospital in New Delhi  

PubMed Central

Aim To monitor the adverse drug reactions (ADRs) caused by antihypertensive medicines prescribed in a university teaching hospital. Methods The present work was an open, non-comparative, observational study conducted on hypertensive patients attending the Medicine OPD of Majeedia Hospital, Jamia Hamdard, New Delhi, India by conducting patient interviews and recording the data on ADR monitoring form as recommended by Central Drugs Standard Control Organization (CDSCO), Government of India. Results A total of 21 adverse drug reactions were observed in 192 hypertensive patients. Incidence of adverse drug reactions was found to be higher in patients more than 40?years in age, and females experienced more ADRs (n = 14, 7.29%) than males, 7 (3.64%). Combination therapy was associated with more number of adverse drug reactions (66.7%) as against monotherapy (33.3%). Calcium channel blockers were found to be the most frequently associated drugs with adverse drug reactions (n = 7), followed by diuretics (n = 5), and ?-blockers (n = 4). Among individual drugs, amlodipine was found to be the commonest drug associated with adverse drug reactions (n = 7), followed by torasemide (n = 3). Adverse drug reactions associated with central nervous system were found to be the most frequent (42.8%) followed by musculo-skeletal complaints (23.8%) and gastro-intestinal disorders (14.3%). Conclusions The present pharmacovigilance study represents the adverse drug reaction profile of the antihypertensive medicines prescribed in our university teaching hospital. The above findings would be useful for physicians in rational prescribing. Calcium channel blockers were found to be the most frequently associated drugs with adverse drug reactions.

2012-01-01

270

Relationship Between Cognitive Distortions and Psychological and Behavioral Factors in a Family Medicine Outpatient Sample  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between the frequency of cognitive distortions, as measured by the Inventory of Cognitive Distortions (ICD), and psychological and behavioral factors, as measured by the Millon Behavioral Medicine Diagnostic (MBMD), which includes negative health habits, psychiatric indications, coping styles, stress moderators, treatment prognostics, and management guide. The sample was selected from

Jeffrey K. Uhl

2007-01-01

271

Impact of a Required Family Medicine Clerkship on Medical Students' Attitudes about Primary Care.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|A survey of 314 medical students before and after a required third-year internal medicine clerkship found differences between students choosing primary care and subspecialties, while undecided students shifted between those groups on several items. Results suggest the clerkship may affect students' image of primary care. (Author/MSE)|

Duerson, Margaret C.; And Others

1989-01-01

272

The effects of family nursing and family medicine clinical rotations on nursing and medical students' self-efficacy for health promotion counseling.  

PubMed

The effects of community-based family nursing and medicine clinical rotations on students' confidence in their knowledge and ability to counsel clients in selected health promotion areas were examined from the perspective of Bandura's (1986) self-efficacy theory. Nursing students (n=66) enrolled in a community family nursing course and medical students (n=71) enrolled in a 6-week family practice clerkship rotation completed questionnaires at three points: prior to, at completion of, and 3 months following their clinical rotations. Nursing and medical students' self-efficacy levels at pretest were similar. At-posttest, nursing students' self-efficacy was significantly higher than that of the medical students. This difference was sustained at 3 months follow up. Students' conception of health (clinical vs. nonclinical) did not have an effect on posttest self-efficacy levels. Self-efficacy scores accounted for 63% of the variance in the nursing students' self-reported use of health promotion principles in their daily practice; but only 11% of the variance in medical students' daily practice. The results of this exploratory study provide information to guide theory-informed curricular decisions to design clinical learning activities that foster the development of health promotion counseling skills in both nursing and medical students. PMID:10606129

Laschinger, H K; McWilliam, C L; Weston, W

1999-11-01

273

Adherence to screening mammography recommendations in a university general medicine clinic  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVE: To determine factors predicting adherence to a health care provider’s screening mammography recommendation in a general internal\\u000a medicine practice.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a DESIGN: Prospective observational study.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a SETTING: An urban academic general internal medicine practice.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a PATIENTS: Three hundred forty-nine asymptomatic women, aged 50 years and older, without prior history of breast cancer, who received\\u000a a health care provider’s recommendation for screening mammography.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a MEASUREMENT:

Nancy C. Dolan; Douglas R. Reifler; Mary McGrae McDermott; William C. McGaghie

1995-01-01

274

[A paradigm change in German academic medicine. Merger and privatization as exemplified with the university hospitals in Marburg and Giessen].  

PubMed

1. The intended fusion of the university hospitals Marburg and Giessen in the state of Hessia is "a marriage under pressure with uncalculated risk" (Spiegel 2005). In the present political and financial situation it hardly appears to be avoidable. From the point of the view of the faculty of medicine in Marburg it is difficult to understand, that the profits of this well guided university hospital with a positive yearly budget should go to the neighboring university hospital which still had a fair amount of deficit spending in the last years.2. Both medical faculties suffer from a very low budget from the state of Hessia for research and teaching. Giessen much more than Marburg, have a substantial need for investments in buildings and infrastructure. Both institutions have a similar need for investments in costly medical apparatuses. This is a problem, which many university hospitals face nowadays.3. The intended privatisation of one or both university hospitals will need sound answers to several fundamental questions and problems:a) A privatisation potentially endangers the freedom of research and teaching garanteed by the German constitution. A private company will undoubtedly influence by active or missing additional support the direction of research in the respective academic institution. An example is the priorisation of clinical in contrast to basic research.b) With the privatisation practical absurdities in the separation of research and teaching on one side and hospital care on the other will become obvious with respect to the status of the academic employees, the obligatory taxation (16%) when a transfer of labor from one institution to the other is taken into account. The use of rooms for seminars, lectures and bedside with a double function for both teaching, research and hospital care has to be clarified with a convincing solution in everyday practice.c) The potential additional acquisition of patients, which has been advocated by the Hessian state government, may be unrealistic, when the 4th biggest university hospital in Germany will be created by the merger. University hospitals recrute the patients for high end medicine beyond their region because of the specialized academic competence and advanced technical possibilities. Additional recruitment of patients for routine hospital can hardly be expected.d) A private management will have to consider primarily the "shareholder value", even when investing in infrastructure and buildings, as it can be expected for one partner. On the longterm this will not be possible without a substantial reduction of employees in both institutions. There are, however, also substantial efforts of some private hospital chains in clinical research, e. g. by Helios in Berlin and Rhön Gmbh at the Leipzig Heart Center.e) There is a yet underestimated but very substantial risk because of the taxation for the private owner when academic staff is transferred from the university to hospital care in their dual function as academic teachers and doctors. This risk also applies for the university if the transfer should come from hospital to the university. These costs would add to the financial burden, which has to be carried in addition to the DRGs. PMID:15875106

Maisch, Bernhard

2005-03-01

275

Potentilla fulgens (Family Rosaceae), a medicinal plant of north-east India: a natural anthelmintic?  

Microsoft Academic Search

The cestode parasite, Raillietina echinobothrida and the trematode, Gastrothylax crumenifer were exposed to the ethanolic root peel extract of Potentilla fulgens, an antiparasitic local medicinal plant of Meghalaya, India, to evaluate the anthelmintic efficacy of the plant. The parasites\\u000a were incubated in 1, 5, 10, 20, 50 and 100 mg crude alcoholic extract per ml of phosphate buffered saline (PBS) at

Bishnupada Roy; Ananta Swargiary; D. Syiem; V. Tandon

2010-01-01

276

Integrative Laser Medicine and High-Tech Acupuncture at the Medical University of Graz, Austria, Europe  

PubMed Central

At the moment, modernization of acupuncture has a high priority. On the traditional side, acupuncture has only recently been awarded the status of Intangible Cultural Heritage by the UNESCO. On the innovative side, high-tech acupuncture is a registered trademark in Austria. Acupuncture has been used for medical treatment for thousands of years. A large number of empirical data are available but the technical quantification of effects was not possible up to now. Using electroacupuncture, needle, or laser stimulation and modern biomedical techniques, it was possible for the first time to quantify changes in biological activities caused by acupuncture. This paper which serves as introduction for the special issue “High-Tech Acupuncture and Integrative Laser Medicine” of the present journal, focuses on the latest innovative aspects that underline the further enhancement and development of acupuncture. Special emphasis is given to new methodological and technical investigations, for example, results obtained from all kinds of acupuncture innovations (e.g., teleacupuncture) and integrative laser medicine.

Litscher, Gerhard

2012-01-01

277

Kuwait University Faculty of Medicine Students' Attitudes toward English and an English Based Curriculum.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A survey of University of Kuwait medical students' perceptions of the English-language curriculum had three objectives: to compare their attitudes with those of Arabs from other Arab countries; elicit students' opinions of the English-based medical and science curriculum and the adequacy of their English language preparation; and assess the…

Vogt, Christina; Oliver, David

278

Role of Research Universities in Health and Medicine. Go8 Backgrounder 20  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Universities have much to contribute to the improvement of health delivery, research, and teaching/learning. In progressing health reform, the Government should be mindful of the need to: (1) strengthen high quality medical research; (2) promote translation of research to teaching, population health and health services; and (3) address Health…

Group of Eight (NJ1), 2010

2010-01-01

279

The revised 'Early Learning in Medicine' curriculum at the University of Otago--focusing on students, patients, and community.  

PubMed

This article describes recent changes to years 2 and 3 of undergraduate medical education at the University of Otago, now termed 'Early Learning in Medicine'. These changes focus on learning that is contextually relevant, student centred, horizontally and vertically integrated, and community based. Three new programmes have been introduced to the course; Integrated Cases, Clinical Skills, and Healthcare in the Community. Innovative teaching and learning activities have been implemented to prepare students for a greater level of interaction with patients, carers, health professionals, and community organisations. This curriculum also aims to increase the relevance of their theoretical learning within and across years, and foster an early appreciation of professional responsibilities. Challenges to facilitating this direction are described and framed by an evolutionary approach that builds upon the strong features of the previous course. PMID:19448775

Perez, David; Rudland, Joy R; Wilson, Hamish; Roberton, Gayle; Gerrard, David; Wheatley, Antony

2009-04-03

280

An assessment of patient sign-outs conducted by University at Buffalo internal medicine residents.  

PubMed

Internal medicine residents were surveyed regarding patient sign-outs at shift change. Data were used to design and implement interventions aimed at improving sign-out quality. This quasi-experimental project incorporated the Plan, Do, Study, Act methodology. Residents completed an anonymous electronic survey regarding experiences during sign-outs. Survey questions assessed structure, process, and outcome of sign-outs. Analysis of qualitative and quantitative data was performed; interventions were implemented based on survey findings. A total of 120 surveys (89% response) and 115 surveys (83% response) were completed by residents of 4 postgraduate years in response to the first (2008) and second (2009) survey requests, respectively. Approximately 79% of the respondents to the second survey indicated that postintervention sign-out systems were superior to preintervention systems. Results indicated improvement in specific areas of structure, process, and outcome. Survey-based modifications to existing sign-out systems effected measurable quality improvement in structure, process, and outcome. PMID:21926279

Wheat, Deirdre; Co, Christopher; Manochakian, Rami; Rich, Ellen

2011-09-16

281

Brine Shrimp Lethality Activity of Thai Medicinal Plants in the Family Meliaceae  

Microsoft Academic Search

Brine shrimp larvae have been used as a bioassay for a variety of toxic substances. The method has also been applied to plant extracts in order to facilitate the isolation of biologically active compounds. In this study, the plants in the family Meliaceae have been selected to test for brine shrimp lethality activity based on taxonomic approach including Azedirachta indica,

Sirintorn Pisutthanana; Pinyupa Plianbangchang

282

A National Survey on the Current Status of Family Practice Residency Education in Geriatric Medicine.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A survey of family practice residency directors found that 92 percent have a required geriatrics curriculum; nursing homes, assisted living facilities, and home care are the predominant training sites; the mean number of geriatrics faculty is 2.6 per program; and conflicting time demands with other curricula was ranked as the most significant…

Li, Ina; Arenson, Christine; Warshaw, Gregg; Bragg, Elizabeth; Shaull, Ruth; Counsell, Steven R.

2003-01-01

283

A National Survey on the Current Status of Family Practice Residency Education in Geriatric Medicine.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|A survey of family practice residency directors found that 92 percent have a required geriatrics curriculum; nursing homes, assisted living facilities, and home care are the predominant training sites; the mean number of geriatrics faculty is 2.6 per program; and conflicting time demands with other curricula was ranked as the most significant…

Li, Ina; Arenson, Christine; Warshaw, Gregg; Bragg, Elizabeth; Shaull, Ruth; Counsell, Steven R.

2003-01-01

284

Postgraduate Veterinary Training in Conservation Medicine: An Interdisciplinary Program at Murdoch University, Australia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although many veterinarians in Australia have been interested in wildlife conservation, the concept of active and worthwhile\\u000a involvement in biodiversity conservation has often seemed difficult to achieve. There are many boundaries which may hinder\\u000a the ability of veterinarians to contribute effectively to wildlife conservation initiatives. This article discusses postgraduate\\u000a veterinary educational initiatives at Murdoch University, Perth, Western Australia, which aim

Kristin Warren

2006-01-01

285

Domestic Violence and Family Dysfunction as Risk Factor for Violent Behavior among University Students in North Jordan  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between family dysfunction and domestic violence with violent behavior\\u000a of university students in North Jordan. A stratified random sample included 1560 undergraduate students from three universities.\\u000a The distribution of self- administrated questionnaire was done based on the schedule of registration made by the department\\u000a of the admission and registration at

Abdelhakeem M. Okour; Heba H. Hijazi

2009-01-01

286

Teaching Family Physicians About Mood Disorders: A Procedure Suite for Behavioral Medicine  

PubMed Central

Background and Objectives: One of the skills required of family physicians is the ability to recognize and treat individuals suffering from mood disorders. This study represents an interdisciplinary residency training approach that (1) is unique in family practice residencies; (2) trains faculty, residents, and students in mood disorder recognition and treatment; (3) has been evaluated by the Residency Review Committee and found compatible with psychiatry training guidelines; and (4) is adaptable to varied settings. Method: Existing psychiatric education at an urban family practice residency program was evaluated. A new curriculum was developed to emphasize clinical interactions that would allow residents to model the behavior of family physicians who demonstrate interest and expertise in psychiatry. The centerpiece of this curriculum is a family-physician–led, multidisciplinary, in-house consultation service known as a mood disorders clinic (MDC). Educational effectiveness was evaluated by comparing resident identification rates of mood disorders before and after training. Educational utility was evaluated by implementation in a variety of settings. Results: Fifty-one residents rotated through 1 or more of 3 practice sites during a 60-month period. Psychiatric diagnoses for the 187 patients who remained in treatment for complete clinical assessment included all major mood and anxiety disorders outlined in the DSM-IV. A wide variety of associated psychosocial problems were also identified. A significant difference (p < .05) was seen between the number of continuity patients diagnosed with psychiatric conditions by resident physicians before and after the training experience. Conclusion: Implementation of this intensive training experience resulted in subjective as well as objective enhancement of resident education by providing an intensive, focused educational experience in primary care psychiatry. This concept is adaptable to a variety of practice sites and educational levels. The MDC could become the hub of an integrated delivery system for mental health services in an ambulatory primary care setting.

Manning, J. Sloan; Zylstra, Robert G.; Connor, Pamela D.

1999-01-01

287

Genetic diversity study of some medicinal plant accessions belong to Apiaceae family based on seed storage proteins patterns.  

PubMed

Cumin (Cuminum cyminum L.), Fennel (Foeniculum vulgare L.) and Longleaf (Falcaria vulgaris Bernh) that all belong to Apiaceae family as medicinal plants are very important in many countries. Study of genetic diversity for medicinal plant is important for researches in future. One of the methods to evaluate plant genetic diversity and classification of them is the electrophoresis of seed storage proteins. This research was conducted in order to evaluate seed protein variability in different Iranian Cumin, Fennel and Longleaf accessions and grouping them based on these proteins as a biochemical marker. For this purpose, the samples were first powdered in liquid nitrogen and seed protein was extracted with extraction buffer. Then total soluble proteins were resolved on 12.5 % sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis gels. The electrophoretic protein pattern showed 38 bands that were low polymorphism among the accessions. The result of cluster analysis showed that the accessions were classified in three groups (all 29 Cumin accessions in the first group, three Fennel ecotypes in second group and three Longleaf accessions in the last one). PMID:23086265

Masoumi, Sayed Mohammad; Kahrizi, Danial; Rostami-Ahmadvandi, Hossein; Soorni, Jahad; Kiani, Sara; Mostafaie, Ali; Yari, Kheirollah

2012-10-20

288

[Gustav Klimt and the field of medicine. Painting of the medical faculty--relationship with the Zuckerkandl family].  

PubMed

The art nouveau painter Gustav Klimt (1862-1918), a cofounder of the Vienna Secession movement, was commissioned in 1894 to prepare three ceiling paintings for the Great Hall of the University of Vienna portraying the faculties of "Philosophy," "Medicine," and "Jurisprudence." After the first public presentations of these paintings starting in 1900 fierce protests erupted since the artist had not painted a historical allegory but rather had created a modern symbolic picture in the Secessionism style. The controversy over the so-called faculty paintings escalated to the point that in 1905 Klimt irrevocably distanced himself from the commission and bought back his pictures from the state. The paintings were later purchased by the Austrian Gallery and in 1943 placed in storage in Lower Austria at the Immendorf Castle where they were destroyed by a fire in May 1945 when the German troops withdrew. Besides Klimt's preliminary sketches, only black and white photographs of the three paintings now exist as well as a color reproduction of the section depicting Hygieia from the "Medicine" painting. Due to the public rejection of the faculty paintings, Gustav Klimt broke away from official government-commissioned art and focused on private clients from among Viennese society. One of these intensive associations was with the anatomist Emil Zuckerkandl and his wife Berta, who was very active in cultural affairs. During the dispute over the faculty paintings, Zuckerkandl was one of the few university professors who signed a petition in favor of retaining the paintings. His brother, the industrialist Victor Zuckerkandl, was one of the major collectors and patrons of Secessionist art. The third brother, the well-known urologist Otto Zuckerkandl (1861-1921), president of the Second and Third Congresses of the German Society of Urology in 1909 and 1911, was also in close contact with Klimt. A portrait of his wife Amalie was a work in progress between 1913 and 1917, but it remained unfinished. PMID:17710380

Schultheiss, D

2007-09-01

289

[Primary health care and family medicine--possibilities for treatment of opiate addicts].  

PubMed

The global trend of promoting management and treatment of drug addicts in family physician offices is the result of the success of opioid agonist therapy. Studies have shown favorable results by shifting treatment into the hands of family physician. This process contributes to general health care of drug addicts and their health by linking different areas of health care, thereby providing comprehensive protection. Shifting treatment of addiction to family physician offices contributes to the elimination of treatment isolation and stigmatization, while further benefits are lower barriers to employment, increase in patient privacy and opportunity to provide health care. The aim of this study was to provide a concise overview of the knowledge from new clinical research over the past ten years on heroin addiction treatment in primary care. New research dealing with the approach to treating addicts indicates a direct link between receiving primary health care with a reduced likelihood of using heroin; furthermore, the main concerns of drug addicts for treatment are availability of more therapeutic programs, better functioning of existing programs, and improved staff relations towards them; final results and outcomes achieved by office and hospital treatment of drug addicts are similar and confirm the positive linear relationship between treatment duration and outcome. Studies comparing therapies show a positive effect of the adaptive methadone treatment maintenance model on the psychosocial factors; equal efficiency of treatment regardless of initiation with buprenorphine or with methadone; and equal effectiveness of levo-alpha-acetylmethadol treatment compared with methadone and diacetylmorphine as a good alternative for addiction therapy with previously unsatisfactory results. New studies on buprenorphine show equal effectiveness and cost of detoxification whether guided by a family physician or at the hospital; non-supervised therapy does not significantly influence the outcome, but is significantly cheaper; long-term therapy with buprenorphine in the doctor's office shows mild retention. PMID:23814972

Tiljak, Hrvoje; Nerali?, Ivana; Cerovecki, Venija; Kastelic, Andrej; Adzi?, Zlata Ozvaci?; Tiljak, Anja

2012-10-01

290

VARIABLE SELECTION FOR QUALITATIVE INTERACTIONS IN PERSONALIZED MEDICINE WHILE CONTROLLING THE FAMILY-WISE ERROR RATE  

PubMed Central

For many years, subset analysis has been a popular topic for the biostatistics and clinical trials literature. In more recent years, the discussion has focused on finding subsets of genomes which play a role in the effect of treatment, often referred to as stratified or personalized medicine. Though highly sought after, methods for detecting subsets with altering treatment effects are limited and lacking in power. In this article we discuss variable selection for qualitative interactions with the aim to discover these critical patient subsets. We propose a new technique designed specifically to find these interaction variables among a large set of variables while still controlling for the number of false discoveries. We compare this new method against standard qualitative interaction tests using simulations and give an example of its use on data from a randomized controlled trial for the treatment of depression.

Gunter, Lacey; Zhu, Ji; Murphy, Susan

2012-01-01

291

Development and Experimental Study of Education Through the Synergetic Training for the Engineering Enhanced Medicine “ESTEEM” in Tohoku University  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We developed new bio-medical engineering curriculum for industrial engineers, and we confirmed that the engineer's needs and the educative effects by holding a trail program. This study in Tohoku University was supported by the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI) . We named the curriculum as “ESTEEM” which is acronym of project title “Education through the Synergetic Training for the Engineering Enhanced Medicine” . In Tohoku University, the “REDEEM” curriculum which is an entry level course of bio-medical engineering for engineers has been already held. The positioning of “ESTEEM” program is an advanced course to enhance knowledge and experience in clinical point of view. The program is consisted of the problem based learning (PBL) style lectures, practical training, and observation learning in hospital. It is a unique opportunity to have instruction by doctors, from diagnosis to surgical operation, from traditional technique to front-line medical equipment. In this paper, we report and discuss on the progress of the new bio-medical engineering curriculum.

Yamano, Masahiro; Matsuki, Noriaki; Numayama, Keiko; Takeda, Motohiro; Hayasaka, Tomoaki; Ishikawa, Takuji; Yamaguchi, Takami

292

Realisation of the guidelines for faculty-internal exams at the Department of General Medicine at the University of Munich  

PubMed Central

Graded exams are prerequisites for the admission to the medical state examination. Accordingly the exams must be of good quality in order to allow benchmarking with the faculty and between different universities. Criteria for good quality need to be considered - namely objectivity, validity and reliability. The guidelines for the processing of exams published by the GMA are supposed to help maintaining those criteria. In 2008 the Department of General Medicine at the University of Munich fulfils only 14 of 18 items. A review process, appropriate training of the staff and the introduction of the IMSm software were the main changes that helped to improve the ‘GMA-score’ to 30 fulfilled items. We see the introduction of the IMSm system as our biggest challenge ahead. IMSm helps to streamline the necessary workflow and improves their quality (e.g. by the detection of cueing, item analysis). Overall, we evaluate the steps to improve the exam process as very positive. We plan to engage co-workers outside the department to assist in the various review processes in the future. Furthermore we think it might be of value to get into contact with other departments and faculties to benefit from each other’s question pools.

Boeder, Niklas; Holzer, Matthias; Schelling, Jorg

2012-01-01

293

Abstract Profiles of Structural Stability Point to Universal Tendencies, Family-Specific Factors, and Ancient Connections between Languages  

PubMed Central

Language is the best example of a cultural evolutionary system, able to retain a phylogenetic signal over many thousands of years. The temporal stability (conservatism) of basic vocabulary is relatively well understood, but the stability of the structural properties of language (phonology, morphology, syntax) is still unclear. Here we report an extensive Bayesian phylogenetic investigation of the structural stability of numerous features across many language families and we introduce a novel method for analyzing the relationships between the “stability profiles” of language families. We found that there is a strong universal component across language families, suggesting the existence of universal linguistic, cognitive and genetic constraints. Against this background, however, each language family has a distinct stability profile, and these profiles cluster by geographic area and likely deep genealogical relationships. These stability profiles seem to show, for example, the ancient historical relationships between the Siberian and American language families, presumed to be separated by at least 12,000 years, and possible connections between the Eurasian families. We also found preliminary support for the punctuated evolution of structural features of language across families, types of features and geographic areas. Thus, such higher-level properties of language seen as an evolutionary system might allow the investigation of ancient connections between languages and shed light on the peopling of the world.

Dediu, Dan; Levinson, Stephen C.

2012-01-01

294

Family health nurse project--an education program of the World Health Organization: the University of Stirling experience.  

PubMed

This article outlines the delivery of the Family Health Nurse Education Programme of the World Health Organization (WHO) at the University of Stirling, Scotland, from 2001 to 2005. The program was part of the WHO European Family Health Nurse pilot project. The curriculum outlined by the WHO Curriculum Planning Group detailed the broad thrust of the Family Health Nurse Education Programme and was modified to be responsive to the context in which it was delivered, while staying faithful to general principles and precepts. The Family Health Nurse Education Programme is described in its evolving format over the two phases of the project; the remote and rural context occurred from 2001 to 2003, and the modification of the program for the urban phase of the project occurred during 2004 and 2005. The conceptual framework that was foundational to the development of the curriculum to prepare family health nurses will be described. PMID:19066336

Murray, Ian

2008-12-09

295

The montana state university conceptual model of complementary and alternative medicine health literacy.  

PubMed

This article aims to present and describe a model of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) health literacy. The model is the conceptual basis for CAM health literacy, which is operationally defined as the information about CAM needed to make informed self-management decisions regarding health. Improving health literacy is a national priority, and widespread use of CAM has added to the complexity of this task. There are no currently available models or measures of health literacy regarding CAM. The authors developed the model using an iterative process of deriving concepts, constructs, and empirical indicators from the literature and the author's prior work, review and critique by experts, and revision. The model of CAM health literacy can serve as the basis for future research on the use and efficacy of CAM and the constructs and concepts within it can be used to identify points of intervention for research or for clinical practice. It is anticipated that the model will have scientific and clinical application for assessing health literacy in other self care decision-making situations. PMID:23889542

Shreffler-Grant, Jean; Nichols, Elizabeth; Weinert, Clarann; Ide, Bette

2013-07-26

296

Web based distance learning at Faculty of Medicine of Sarajevo University.  

PubMed

The time in which we live is defined by the significant influence of the information technologies on our lives, changes and development of society and the efficacy of all the organization systems. Increase and development of distance learning (DL) technologies over the past decade has exposed the potential and the efficiency of new technologies. Number of events has organized by teaching staff from Cathedrae for Medical Informatics in order to promote distance learning and web based education are very extensive: professional-scientific events, workshops and congresses, first tele-exam at the Medical Faculty, Introducing of Distance learning in curriculum at biomedical faculties, etc. At the University in Sarajevo in year 2003 was opened the e-learning center for the support to the faculties the distance studies by use of the information technology. At Medical Faculty of University of Sarajevo at Cathedrae for Medical Informatics since 2002 is in progress realization of the project named: "Possibilities of introducing distance learning in medical curriculum", approved by the Federal and the Cantonal ministry of science and education. Pilot project was realized during three past school years, theoretical and practical education of subject Medical informatics are adapted to the new concepts of education using world trends of education from the distance. One group of students was included in the project finalized by electronic exam registration and electronic exam on 20 June 2005, publicly, in the Physiology amphitheatre of the Medical Faculty in Sarajevo. PMID:16879119

Masi?, Izet; Novo, Ahmed; Kudumovi?, Mensura; Rama, Admir; Dzananovi?, Almir; Guso, Emir; Basi?, Mirza

2006-05-01

297

The relationship between the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine and the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center--a profile in synergy.  

PubMed

In the synergistic evolution of their research, educational, and clinical programs, the University of Pittsburgh (Pitt) School of Medicine (SOM) and the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC) have followed one core principle: What is good for one is good for both. The collaboration is underpinned by UPMC's commitment to its community mission, including support for the academic and research objectives of the SOM. UPMC's conceptual origin was fostered by its experience with Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic in the 1970s. Over time, UPMC acquired other hospitals through merger and negotiation and, by 2008, had grown into a $7 billion global health enterprise. From the outset, the senior leaders of both UPMC and Pitt committed to collaborative decision making on all key issues. Under this coordinated decision-making model, UPMC oversees all clinical activity, including that from a consolidated physicians' practice plan. Pitt remains the guardian of all academic priorities, particularly faculty-based research. UPMC's steady financial success underpins the model. A series of interrelated agreements formally defines the relationship between Pitt and UPMC, including shared board seats and UPMC's committed ongoing financial support of the SOM. In addition, the two institutions have jointly made research growth a priority. The payoff from this dynamic has been a steadily growing Pitt research portfolio; enhanced growth, visibility, and stature for UPMC, the SOM, and Pitt as a whole; and the sustained success of UPMC's clinical enterprise, which now has an international scope. Given the current stagnation in the National Institutes of Health budget, the Pitt-UPMC experience may be instructive to other academic health centers. PMID:18728434

Levine, Arthur S; Detre, Thomas P; McDonald, Margaret C; Roth, Loren H; Huber, George A; Brignano, Mary Germann; Danoff, Sandra N; Farner, David M; Masnick, Jeffrey L; Romoff, Jeffrey A

2008-09-01

298

The resident-as-teacher educational challenge: a needs assessment survey at the National Autonomous University of Mexico Faculty of Medicine  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: The role of residents as educators is increasingly recognized, since it impacts residents, interns, medical students and other healthcare professionals. A widespread implementation of resident-as-teacher courses in developed countries' medical schools has occurred, with variable results. There is a dearth of information about this theme in developing countries. The National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM) Faculty of Medicine has

Melchor Sánchez-Mendiola; Enrique L Graue-Wiechers; Leobardo C Ruiz-Pérez; Rocío García-Durán; Irene Durante-Montiel

2010-01-01

299

A Study of Problems and Stress of Southeast Asian Students with Accompanying Families at the University of Pittsburgh.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The perceptions of Southeast Asian graduate students at the University of Pittsburgh were explored. The students were asked to elucidate the problems which arose as they and their families adapted to the American experience. Findings are reported in seven categories. They are the following: (1) academic expenses did not cause financial problems…

Ruetrakul, Pimon

300

Positions toward Science Studies in Medicine among University Graduates of Medicine and the Teenaged Participants of the "Medical Systems" Study Program  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The "Medical Systems" program was designed to introduce high school students to the world of advanced medicine. Its premise was to use an applied scientific discipline like medicine to encourage high-school students' interest in basic science. This study compares the teen-aged graduates of "Medical Systems" with fourth and fifth-year medical…

Ben-Zvi-Assaraf, Orit; Even-Israel, Chava

2011-01-01

301

Organizing Evidence Based Medicine (EBM) Journal Clubs in Department of Neurosurgery, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences  

PubMed Central

Introduction A journal club is a group of individuals who meet regularly to evaluate critically the clinical application of latest medical literature. Evidence-based medicine (EBM) is ‘the use of current best evidence, in making decisions about the care of individual patients’. For this purpose, we organized journal clubs using standard EBM method, to substitute for traditional ones, evaluating efficacy of evidence based meetings in improvement of medical education in department of Neurosurgery. Methods and Materials After six traditional journal clubs two validated questionnaires (evaluating organizing method and degree of satisfaction), were filled out by the residents. After an instructing workshop and six evidence based journal sessions, the same questionnaires were completed by the attendees. The collected data were analyzed using SPSS 17. Results The mean score of the first questionnaires (Evaluating the method of organizing sessions) 16.72±7.86 (median=14) for traditional journal clubs and 40.18±6.38 (median=40) for evidence based forms (P=0.003).The mean grade of the second questionnaires (degree of satisfaction) was 13.18±4.6 (median=14) and 21.90±4.27 (median=22), for traditional and evidence based ones, respectively. (P=0.006). Conclusion The aim of evidence based journal club is to help individuals to evaluate the current literature critically. The best way to decide if any adjustments are necessary is to ask the participants whether they are satisfied with the conference. As improvement of critical judgment is the goal of the journal clubs, the response of the resident according to the knowledge of methodology and biostatistics, is a principle. In present study, significant improvement in critical appraisal skills was seen after holding evidence based journal clubs.

Shokouhi, Ghaffar; Ghojazadeh, Morteza; Sattarnezhad, Neda

2012-01-01

302

[Introduction of a quality management system compliant with DIN EN 9001:2000 in a university department of nuclear medicine].  

PubMed

In 1995, the management of the University Clinic Hamburg-Eppendorf proposed to establish a total quality assurance (QA) system. A revised QA-system has been introduced stepwise in the department of nuclear medicine since 1997, and certification was achieved in accordance with DIN EN ISO 9001:2000 on February 14, 2001. The QA-handbook is divided into two parts. The first part contains operational (diagnostic and therapeutic) procedures in so-called standard operating procedures (SOP). They describe the indication of procedures as well as the competences and time necessary in a standardized manner. Up to now, more than 70 SOPs have been written as a collaborative approach between technicians and physicians during daily clinical routine after analysing and discussing the procedures. Thus, the results were more clearly defined processes and more satisfied employees. The second part consists of general rules and directions concerning the security of work and equipment as well as radiation protection tasks, hygiene etc. as it is required by the law. This part was written predominantly by the management of the department of nuclear-medicine and the QA-coordinator. Detailed information for the patients, documentation of the work-flows as well as the medical report was adopted to the QM-system. Although in the introduction phase of a QA-system a vast amount of time is necessary, some months later a surplus for the clinical workday will become available. The well defined relations of competences and procedures will result in a gain of time, a reduction of costs and a help to ensure the legal demands. Last but not least, the QA-system simply helps to build up confidence and acceptance both by the patients and the referring physicians. PMID:11797512

Jansen-Schmidt, V; Paschen, U; Kröger, S; Bohuslavizki, K H; Clausen, M

2001-12-01

303

B? K 1 ? + ? - decays in a family non-universal Z' model  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The implications of the family non-universal Z' model in the B? K 1(1270,1400) ? + ? -( ?= e , ? , ?) decays are explored, where the mass eigenstates K 1(1270, 1400) are the mixtures of 1 P 1 and 3 P 1 states with the mixing angle ?. In this work, considering the Z' boson and setting the mixing angle ?=(-34±13)?, we analyze the branching ratio, the dilepton invariant mass spectrum, the normalized forward-backward asymmetry and lepton polarization asymmetries of each decay mode. We find that all observables of B? K 1(1270) ? + ? - are sensitive to the Z' contribution. Moreover, the observables of B? K 1(1400) ? + ? - have a relatively strong ?-dependence; thus, the Z' contribution will be buried by the uncertainty of the mixing angle ?. Furthermore, the zero crossing position in the FBA spectrum of B? K 1(1270) ? + ? - at low dilepton mass will move to the positive direction with Z' contribution. For the tau modes, the effects of Z' are not remarkable due to the small phase space. These results could be tested in the running LHC-b experiment and Super-B factory.

Li, Ying; Hua, Juan; Yang, Kwei-Chou

2011-10-01

304

Rare Decay Bc ? Ds*?+?- in a Family Non-Universal Z' Model  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Using the form factors calculated in the three-point QCD sum rules, we calculate the new physics contributions to the physical observables of Bc ? D*s?+?- decay in a family non-universal Z' model. Under the consideration of three cases of the new physics parameters, we find that: (a) the Z' boson can provide large contributions to the differential decay rates; (b) the forward-backward asymmetry (FBA) can be increased by about 47%, 38%, and 110% at most in S1, S2, and extreme limit values (ELV), respectively. In addition, the zero crossing can be shifted in all the cases; (c) when ? > 0.08, the value of PL can be changed from -1 in the Standard Model (SM) to -0.5 in S1, -0.6 in S2, and 0 in extreme limit values, respectively; (d) the new physics corrections to PT will decrease the SM prediction about 25% for the cases of S1 and S2, 100% for the case of ELV.

Lü, Lin-Xia; Zhang, Guo-Fang; Wang, Shuai-Wei; Zhang, Zhi-Qing

2013-02-01

305

Results of a healthcare worker (HCW) survey on environmental awareness as an instrument for the preparation of an environmental report for the University Medicine Greifswald.  

PubMed

Background: Environmental reporting is increasingly important for medical facilities. Currently, hospitals can determine the content of an environmental report as they see fit. Objective: To examine the utility and scope of an employee survey as an instrument for the preparation of an environmental report at the University Hospital Greifswald. Method: For this purpose a questionnaire was developed with a focus on environmental behaviour and the significance attached to the protection of the environment.Results: The employees of the University Medicine Greifswald attach an unexpectedly high significance to the protection of the environment. Based on this finding, this potential should be used to promote the optimal implementation of ecological-economic behaviour within the University Medicine. Conclusion: An employee survey is a useful instrument in the preparation of an environmental report. PMID:22242082

Heiden, Jens-Uwe; Kramer, Axel; Bornewasser, Manfred; Lemanski, Sandra; Below, Harald

2011-12-15

306

Results of a healthcare worker (HCW) survey on environmental awareness as an instrument for the preparation of an environmental report for the University Medicine Greifswald  

PubMed Central

Background: Environmental reporting is increasingly important for medical facilities. Currently, hospitals can determine the content of an environmental report as they see fit. Objective: To examine the utility and scope of an employee survey as an instrument for the preparation of an environmental report at the University Hospital Greifswald. Method: For this purpose a questionnaire was developed with a focus on environmental behaviour and the significance attached to the protection of the environment. Results: The employees of the University Medicine Greifswald attach an unexpectedly high significance to the protection of the environment. Based on this finding, this potential should be used to promote the optimal implementation of ecological-economic behaviour within the University Medicine. Conclusion: An employee survey is a useful instrument in the preparation of an environmental report.

Heiden, Jens-Uwe; Kramer, Axel; Bornewasser, Manfred; Lemanski, Sandra; Below, Harald

2011-01-01

307

A descriptive analysis of personality and gender at the Louisiana State University School of Veterinary Medicine.  

PubMed

The goals of this study were to explore the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator profile and gender differences of Louisiana State University veterinary students. A 12-year composite sample (N = 935) revealed that the personality profile was different from the published US population norm, but similar to the bimodal ESTJ-ISTJ profile found in Louisiana medical students. Significant gender differences were found among six of the 16 types. A 12-year trend analysis revealed a significant shift away from the prototypical ESTJ-ISTJ profile, culminating in a discernable heterogeneous profile for both males and females in the last four years. Composite scores for the 2004-2007 cohort (N = 331) revealed that the predominant types for women were ENFP, ESFJ, ESTJ, ISFJ, and ISTJ. For men, the predominant types were ESTJ, ESTP, INTP, and ISTJ. Post hoc tests confirmed significant gender differences for ESTP, INTP, ISTP, and ESFJ types. The evidence of significant gender differences and confirmation that personality profiles have begun to vary widely across the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator spectrum in the last four years have implications at the practical and theoretical levels. This could have profound effects on pedagogical considerations for faculty involved in veterinary medical education. PMID:19861716

Johnson, Stephanie W; Gill, Marjorie S; Grenier, Charles; Taboada, Joseph

2009-01-01

308

[Quality of medical records in Naples (Italy) 2nd University School of Medicine].  

PubMed

To evaluate and improve the quality of medical-record keeping, in clinics and surgery departments. The evaluation involved 66 Operative Units (O.U.) of the "2nd University Hospital" in Naples (Italy). 10 medical records for each O.U. were randomly selected, for a total of 660. The quality was evaluated in all sections of medical records using the criteria of completeness, clarity and traceability of the data. The most critical issues are: unclear handwriting in almost all sections, in the whole scarse presence of a discharge letter (17.0%) in surgery (1.4%), almost total absence of the physicians signature in the clinical diary (2.3%). The completeness of medical records (presence of patient's history, physical examination, informed consent) is significantly higher in the surgery departments. The medical records are significantly righter in the clinic departments. In general, a poor quality of medical-record keeping was detected. This indicates the need to improve the quality by involving the staff in the importance of correct compilation. PMID:19014110

Agozzino, E; Esposito, S; Parmeggiani, C; Piro, A; Grippo, N; Di Palma, M A

309

Potentilla fulgens (Family Rosaceae), a medicinal plant of north-east India: a natural anthelmintic?  

PubMed

The cestode parasite, Raillietina echinobothrida and the trematode, Gastrothylax crumenifer were exposed to the ethanolic root peel extract of Potentilla fulgens, an antiparasitic local medicinal plant of Meghalaya, India, to evaluate the anthelmintic efficacy of the plant. The parasites were incubated in 1, 5, 10, 20, 50 and 100 mg crude alcoholic extract per ml of phosphate buffered saline (PBS) at a temperature of 37 ± 1°C. Paralysis and death were observed at 2.00 ± 0.05 and 2.80 ± 0.06 h for the cestode and 1.21 ± 0.06 and 2.18 ± 0.04 h for the trematode parasites at the highest test concentration of the plant extract. The commercial anthelmintic, Praziquantel (PZQ) showed higher activity at the tested concentration (0.02 mg/ml). To further investigate the efficacy of the plant extract, vital tegumental enzymes of the parasite viz. Acid phosphatase (AcPase), Alkaline phosphatase (AlkPase) and Adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) were studied. Quantitatively, the total enzyme activity of AcPase, AlkPase and ATPase was found to be reduced significantly by 69.20, 66.43 and 29.63% for R. echinobothrida and 47.96, 51.79 and 42.63% for G. crumenifer, respectively compared to the respective controls; histochemical study also showed reduction in the visible staining of the enzymes. The reference drug, PZQ also showed more or less similar effect like that of the plant extract. The result suggests that phytochemicals of P. fulgens have anthelmintic potential. PMID:21966126

Roy, Bishnupada; Swargiary, Ananta; Syiem, D; Tandon, V

2010-12-07

310

More women enter medicine: young doctors' family origin and career choice.  

PubMed

This study is part of the Finnish Junior Physicians 88 Study, the purpose of which was to shed light on the life situation, career choice and future plans of young doctors and their views on medical education. The survey population included all the medical doctors registered during the years 1977-1986 in Finland (n = 5208). A postal questionnaire was sent to a sample of 2632 doctors born on odd-numbered days. After a reminder letter, 1745 questionnaires (66%) were returned. Forty-nine per cent of the respondents were women. Typically both men and women doctors had a father who was an upper-level white-collar worker and a mother who was a housewife. More men than women had a father who was a doctor or other health professional. More women than men mentioned that a lifelong calling (42% vs 30%), success at school (58% vs 47%) and an interest in helping people (78% vs 71%) had considerable influence on their decision to become a doctor. Men more often than women emphasized the medical profession being regarded as a highly paid (56% vs 47%) and a high status profession (64% vs 56%) and also that a family member was a doctor (15% vs 11%). PMID:8208148

Neittaanmäki, L; Luhtala, R; Virjo, I; Kumpusalo, E; Mattila, K; Jääskeläinen, M; Kujala, S; Isokoski, M

1993-09-01

311

[The results of hacettepe university faculty of medicine parasitology laboratory in 2003-2012: evaluation of 10 years].  

PubMed

Objective: Parasitic diseases are common throughout the world. Evaluation of regional epidemiological data is needed to determine protective measures and treatment strategies. Methods: This study evaluates the parasites detected in Hacettepe University Faculty of Medicine Parasitology Laboratory. Results: Of the 87,100 clinical samples evaluated in the study, 85,707 (98.4%) were from stool samples. Parasites were shown in 3,681 (4.2%) of the samples from 2,906 patients. The most common parasites were Giardia intestinalis (40%), Blastocystis spp. (22%), Entamoeba coli (12%), Dientamoeba fragilis (9%), Enterobius vermicularis (5%), Echinococcus spp. (4%) and Taenia spp. (3%) respectively. When distribution among years was evaluated, G. intestinalis, the most common parasite, had a tendency to decrease after 2004 whereas cases with Blastocystis spp. showed a clear increase in 2011 and 2012. The downward trend in parasite-positive cases also stopped in the last two years, in parallel to the increase of Blastocystis spp. During the study, Leishmania spp. and Plasmodium spp. were detected in four patients each. Conclusion: This study evaluated the results of a laboratory that scans a large number of patients in our region. Data obtained from different regions will allow to direct strategies to diagnose, treat and implement preventive measures against parasitic diseases in our country. (Turkiye Parazitol Derg 2013; 37: 97-101). PMID:23955906

Gülmez, Dolunay; Sar?ba?, Zeynep; Akyön, Yakut; Ergüven, Sibel

2013-01-01

312

The Senior Mentor Program at the University of South Carolina School of Medicine: an innovative geriatric longitudinal curriculum.  

PubMed

This paper describes development, implementation, and evaluation strategies of a longitudinal geriatric curriculum, the Senior Mentor Program (SMP). The rationale for exposing undergraduate medical students to healthy, community-dwelling older adults is to use the relationship and activities as vehicles for improving knowledge of aging and providing students experience with aging as a stage and process. The University of South Carolina School of Medicine's major aim in geriatrics is to prepare students to become skilled physicians in care of older adults. The SMP is embedded into the curriculum. The program introduced medical students to healthy older adults, presented selected health care issues in this population, integrated material early in the curriculum, acquainted students with longitudinal patient care, and introduced students to older adults' living arrangements. The SMP is an effective means of infusing geriatric content into the medical school curriculum and positively affects mentors' and students' attitudes toward each other. This has implications for medical and professional schools, such as nursing, social work, and physical therapy. PMID:17023380

Roberts, Ellen; Richeson, Nancy; Thornhill, Joshua T; Corwin, Sara J; Eleazer, G Paul

2006-01-01

313

Integrating an internet-mediated walking program into family medicine clinical practice: a pilot feasibility study  

PubMed Central

Background Regular participation in physical activity can prevent many chronic health conditions. Computerized self-management programs are effective clinical tools to support patient participation in physical activity. This pilot study sought to develop and evaluate an online interface for primary care providers to refer patients to an Internet-mediated walking program called Stepping Up to Health (SUH) and to monitor participant progress in the program. Methods In Phase I of the study, we recruited six pairs of physicians and medical assistants from two family practice clinics to assist with the design of a clinical interface. During Phase II, providers used the developed interface to refer patients to a six-week pilot intervention. Provider perspectives were assessed regarding the feasibility of integrating the program into routine care. Assessment tools included quantitative and qualitative data gathered from semi-structured interviews, surveys, and online usage logs. Results In Phase I, 13 providers used SUH and participated in two interviews. Providers emphasized the need for alerts flagging patients who were not doing well and the ability to review participant progress. Additionally, providers asked for summary views of data across all enrolled clinic patients as well as advertising materials for intervention recruitment. In response to this input, an interface was developed containing three pages: 1) a recruitment page, 2) a summary page, and 3) a detailed patient page. In Phase II, providers used the interface to refer 139 patients to SUH and 37 (27%) enrolled in the intervention. Providers rarely used the interface to monitor enrolled patients. Barriers to regular use of the intervention included lack of integration with the medical record system, competing priorities, patient disinterest, and physician unease with exercise referrals. Intention-to-treat analyses showed that patients increased walking by an average of 1493 steps/day from pre- to post-intervention (t = (36) = 4.13, p < 0.01). Conclusions Providers successfully referred patients using the SUH provider interface, but were less willing to monitor patient compliance in the program. Patients who completed the program significantly increased their step counts. Future research is needed to test the effectiveness of integrating SUH with clinical information systems over a longer evaluation period.

2011-01-01

314

Coworking as a Career Strategy: Implications for the Work and Family Lives of University Employees  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study of 276 couples compares coworking couples, which means both partners work for the same university, with noncoworking couples, those couples in which only one partner is employed at a university. Among the employees at the two universities studied, one in seven dual-earner couples cowork. These couples are more educated and are less likely to prioritize one spouses' career

Stephen Sweet; Phyllis Moen

2004-01-01

315

The role of traditional healers in the provision of health care and family planning services: Malay traditional and indigenous medicine.  

PubMed

The practitioners of traditional and indigenous medicine rely mainly upon medicinal plants and herbs for the preparation of therapeutic substances. The therapeutic properties of several medicinal plants and popular traditional medicine remedies are being investigated and validated. Present health care systems place people from developing countries in a dilemma. Countries can either continue providing a type of health care which cannot be extended to all in need or rethink and offer more inclusive types of medical care and delivery systems. Traditional medicine has a clear role to play in society, and even the World Health Organization supports the practice of traditional medicine to complement modern medicine. Traditional Malay medicine is the distillation of vast historical experience dating back more than 1000 years. It is often based upon observation, clinical trials, and experiments. The promotion and development of Malay traditional medicine can both foster dignity and self-confidence in communities through self-reliance, while considerably reducing the country's drug costs. The integrity and dignity of a people stems from self-respect and self-reliance. The practice of traditional medicine practitioners can help promote such conditions in many ways. It serves as an important focus for international technical cooperation and offers the potential for major breakthroughs in therapeutics and health care delivery. Effort should be taken to keep the practice of traditional medicine alive in Malaysia. PMID:12319996

Raden Sanusi, H R; Werner, R

1985-01-01

316

A Longitudinal Study of the Sociosexual Dynamics in a Captive Family Group of Wolves: The University of Connecticut Wolf Project  

Microsoft Academic Search

An interest in the role of the social environment on the evolution of behavior led Professor Benson Ginsburg to studies of\\u000a wolf social behavior. He initiated the University of Connecticut wolf project with a family group of wolves housed in a protected\\u000a enclosure in an isolated area of campus. One aim of this project was to conduct a longitudinal study

Susan M. Jenks

317

Creating an Evidence-Based Admissions Formula for a New Dental School: University of Nevada, Las Vegas, School of Dental Medicine  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article reports development of an evidence-based admissions formula that effectively incorporates the admissions criteria most likely to influence dental school performance. This study utilized peer-reviewed literature and analysis of admissions and performance data from the first three classes of students at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, School of Dental Medicine (UNLV-SDM). We used Pearson's correlation, linear regression, and

Karl Kingsley; Jeremy Sewell; Marcia Ditmyer; Susan O'Malley; Gillian M. Galbraith

318

Perspectives on gender-specific medicine, course and learning style preferences in medical education: a study among students at the Medical University of Vienna.  

PubMed

In the study for the thesis Web Based Training with Moodle: Gender-differences in Action of Drugs, a survey among students of the Medical University of Vienna (MUV) concerning the implementation of gender-specific medicine in the curriculum and students' learning styles was performed. Data analysis (given as mean±sem) showed that students (n = 642) rated (Likert scale, 1-6) the importance of gender-specific medicine fairly high (4.02±0.06), and rated the importance of knowing about gender-specific medicine as a medical doctor even higher (4.49±0.05). Further implementation of gender-relevant topics into the curriculum appeared less important (3.64±0.06). Students rated their own knowledge on gender-specific medicine neutrally (3.40±0.05). For some items significant differences between males and females as well as the old and new curriculum were found. Students considered gender-specific medicine as important but sufficiently covered in their medical education at the MUV. PMID:21360294

Harreiter, Jürgen; Wiener, Hubert; Plass, Herbert; Kautzky-Willer, Alexandra

2011-03-07

319

A cross-sectional survey of complementary and alternative medicine use by children and adolescents attending the University Hospital of Wales  

PubMed Central

Background A high prevalence of CAM use has been documented worldwide in children and adolescents with chronic illnesses. Only a small number of studies, however, have been conducted in the United Kingdom. The primary aim of this study was to examine the use of CAM by children and adolescents with a wide spectrum of acute and chronic medical problems in a tertiary children's hospital in Wales. Methods Structured personal interviews of 100 inpatients and 400 outpatients were conducted over a 2-month period in 2004. The yearly and monthly prevalence of CAM use were assessed and divided into medicinal and non-medicinal therapies. This use was correlated with socio-demographic factors. Results There were 580 patients approached to attain 500 completed questionnaires. The use of at least one type of CAM in the past year was 41% (95% CI 37–46%) and past month 26% (95% CI 23–30%). The yearly prevalence of medicinal CAM was 38% and non-medicinal 12%. The users were more likely to have parents that were tertiary educated (mother: OR = 2.3, 95%CI 1.6–3.3) and a higher family income (Pearson chi-square for trend = 14.3, p < 0.001). The most common medicinal types of CAM were non-prescribed vitamins and minerals (23%) and herbal therapies (10%). Aromatherapy (5%) and reflexology (3%) were the most prevalent non-medicinal CAMs. None of the inpatient medical records documented CAM use in the past month. Fifty-two percent of medicinal and 38% of non-medicinal CAM users felt their doctor did not need to know about CAM use. Sixty-six percent of CAM users did not disclose the fact to their doctor. Three percent of all participants were using herbs and prescription medicines concurrently. Conclusion There is a high prevalence of CAM use in our study population. Paediatricians need to ensure that they ask parents and older children about their CAM usage and advise caution with regard to potential interactions. CAM is a rapidly expanding industry that requires further evidence-based research to provide more information on the effectiveness and safety of many CAM therapies. Statutory or self-regulation of the different segments of the industry is important. Integration of CAM with allopathic western medicine through education and better communication is slowly progressing.

Crawford, Nigel W; Cincotta, Domenic R; Lim, Alissa; Powell, Colin VE

2006-01-01

320

Family-Friendly Programs at Pacific University's College of Health Professions: Feedback, Analysis, and Recommendations  

Microsoft Academic Search

An increasing number of organizations have developed family-friendly policies and programs over the past 20 years in response to the demographic changes of the workforce to include more working mothers. In addition, organizations learned to use family friendly programs as a means of recruiting top talent and retaining experienced employees (Arthur & Cook, 2003). However, as Frone (2003) explained, while

Alison Greco

2008-01-01

321

Attitudes about Cancer Medicine among Primary Care Residents and Their Teachers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|A cancer attitude survey is analyzed that was administered to residents and faculty physicians in the departments of Family Medicine, Internal Medicine, and Human Oncology at the University of Wisconsin. Categories surveyed include opinions about the benefits of prevention, risk management, early detection and screening, treatment and care, and…

Love, Richard R.; And Others

1980-01-01

322

Attitudes about Cancer Medicine among Primary Care Residents and Their Teachers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A cancer attitude survey is analyzed that was administered to residents and faculty physicians in the departments of Family Medicine, Internal Medicine, and Human Oncology at the University of Wisconsin. Categories surveyed include opinions about the benefits of prevention, risk management, early detection and screening, treatment and care, and…

Love, Richard R.; And Others

1980-01-01

323

Universal Hash Families and the Leftover Hash Lemma, and Applications to Cryptography and Computing  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper is an expository treatment of the leftover hash lemma and some of its applicationsin cryptography and complexity.1 IntroductionThe technique of universal hashing, introduced in 1979 by Carter and Wegman [6], has becomean essential tool in many areas of computer science, including derandomization, pseudorandomnumber generation and privacy amplication, to mention three specic applications. It has beenobserved that universal hash

D. r. Stinson

2001-01-01

324

Medicinal Herb Garden  

MedlinePLUS

... June 22, 2008) You may access the Medicinal Herb Garden images via the following lists: Index by ... the University of Washington in Seattle, the Medicinal Herb Garden is a resource for herbalists, medics, and ...

325

Is family medicine meeting the HIV\\/AIDS challenge? A national survey of family physicians' beliefs, clinical competence, and experience regarding HIV disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

A national sample of family physicians was surveyed to (1) assess family physicians' beliefs about the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and individuals at risk for infection, their clinical competence regarding HIV-related issues, and their experiences with HIV disease; (2) present conclusions to the American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP) to effect the development of an early clinical care protocol and

John Gerard Ryan

1991-01-01

326

The provision of reliable medical information for all! : A revolutional approach for moving toward the revitalization of regional medicine : In the mind of Ms. Noriko Taira, Librarian of Health Sciences University of Hokkaido  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The provision of reliable medical information for all! : A revolutional approach for moving toward the revitalization of regional medicine : In the mind of Ms. Noriko Taira, Librarian of Health Sciences University of Hokkaido

Morita, Utako

327

The Sorcerer II Global Ocean Sampling Expedition: Expanding the Universe of Protein Families  

Microsoft Academic Search

Metagenomics projects based on shotgun sequencing of populations of micro-organisms yield insight into protein families. We used sequence similarity clustering to explore proteins with a comprehensive dataset consisting of sequences from available databases together with 6.12 million proteins predicted from an assembly of 7.7 million Global Ocean Sampling (GOS) sequences. The GOS dataset covers nearly all known prokaryotic protein families.

Shibu Yooseph; Granger Sutton; Douglas B. Rusch; Aaron L. Halpern; Shannon J. Williamson; Karin Remington; Jonathan A. Eisen; Karla B. Heidelberg; Gerard Manning; Weizhong Li; Lukasz Jaroszewski; Piotr Cieplak; Christopher S. Miller; Huiying Li; Susan T. Mashiyama; Marcin P. Joachimiak; Christopher van Belle; John-Marc Chandonia; David A. Soergel; Yufeng Zhai; Kannan Natarajan; Shaun Lee; Benjamin J. Raphael; Vineet Bafna; Robert Friedman; Steven E. Brenner; Adam Godzik; David Eisenberg; Jack E. Dixon; Susan S. Taylor; Robert L. Strausberg; Marvin Frazier; J. Craig Venter

2007-01-01

328

Developing an academic medical library core journal collection in the (almost) post-print era: the Florida State University College of Medicine Medical Library experience  

PubMed Central

The Florida State University (FSU) College of Medicine Medical Library is the first academic medical library to be established since the Web's dramatic appearance during the 1990s. A large customer base for electronic medical information resources is both comfortable with and eager to migrate to the electronic format completely, and vendors are designing radical pricing models that make print journal cancellations economically advantageous. In this (almost) post-print environment, the new FSU Medical Library is being created and will continue to evolve. By analyzing print journal subscription lists of eighteen academic medical libraries with similar missions to the community-based FSU College of Medicine and by entering these and selected quality indicators into a Microsoft Access database, a core list was created. This list serves as a selection guide, as a point for discussion with faculty and curriculum leaders when creating budgets, and for financial negotiations in a broader university environment. After journal titles specific to allied health sciences, veterinary medicine, dentistry, pharmacy, library science, and nursing were eliminated from the list, 4,225 unique journal titles emerged. Based on a ten-point scale including SERHOLD holdings and DOCLINE borrowing activity, a list of 449 core titles is identified. The core list has been saved in spreadsheet format for easy sorting by a number of parameters.

Shearer, Barbara S.; Nagy, Suzanne P.

2003-01-01

329

The Sorcerer II Global Ocean Sampling expedition: expanding the universe of protein families.  

PubMed

Metagenomics projects based on shotgun sequencing of populations of micro-organisms yield insight into protein families. We used sequence similarity clustering to explore proteins with a comprehensive dataset consisting of sequences from available databases together with 6.12 million proteins predicted from an assembly of 7.7 million Global Ocean Sampling (GOS) sequences. The GOS dataset covers nearly all known prokaryotic protein families. A total of 3,995 medium- and large-sized clusters consisting of only GOS sequences are identified, out of which 1,700 have no detectable homology to known families. The GOS-only clusters contain a higher than expected proportion of sequences of viral origin, thus reflecting a poor sampling of viral diversity until now. Protein domain distributions in the GOS dataset and current protein databases show distinct biases. Several protein domains that were previously categorized as kingdom specific are shown to have GOS examples in other kingdoms. About 6,000 sequences (ORFans) from the literature that heretofore lacked similarity to known proteins have matches in the GOS data. The GOS dataset is also used to improve remote homology detection. Overall, besides nearly doubling the number of current proteins, the predicted GOS proteins also add a great deal of diversity to known protein families and shed light on their evolution. These observations are illustrated using several protein families, including phosphatases, proteases, ultraviolet-irradiation DNA damage repair enzymes, glutamine synthetase, and RuBisCO. The diversity added by GOS data has implications for choosing targets for experimental structure characterization as part of structural genomics efforts. Our analysis indicates that new families are being discovered at a rate that is linear or almost linear with the addition of new sequences, implying that we are still far from discovering all protein families in nature. PMID:17355171

Yooseph, Shibu; Sutton, Granger; Rusch, Douglas B; Halpern, Aaron L; Williamson, Shannon J; Remington, Karin; Eisen, Jonathan A; Heidelberg, Karla B; Manning, Gerard; Li, Weizhong; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Cieplak, Piotr; Miller, Christopher S; Li, Huiying; Mashiyama, Susan T; Joachimiak, Marcin P; van Belle, Christopher; Chandonia, John-Marc; Soergel, David A; Zhai, Yufeng; Natarajan, Kannan; Lee, Shaun; Raphael, Benjamin J; Bafna, Vineet; Friedman, Robert; Brenner, Steven E; Godzik, Adam; Eisenberg, David; Dixon, Jack E; Taylor, Susan S; Strausberg, Robert L; Frazier, Marvin; Venter, J Craig

2007-03-01

330

Internal Medicine Trainee Self-Assessments of End-of-Life Communication Skills Do Not Predict Assessments of Patients, Families, or Clinician-Evaluators  

PubMed Central

Abstract Purpose To investigate the strength of association between trainees' self-assessments of the quality of their end-of-life communication skills and the assessments of their patients, patients' families, and clinician-evaluators. Methods As part of a randomized trial, pre-intervention survey data were collected at two sites from internal medicine trainees and their patients, patients' families, and clinician-evaluators. In this observational analysis, comparisons using regression analysis were made between (1) trainees' scores on a scale of perceived competence at communication about end-of-life care and (2) patients', families', and clinician-evaluators' scores on a questionnaire on the quality of end-of-life communication (QOC). Secondary analyses were performed using topic-focused subscales of these measures. Results Internal medicine trainees (143) were studied with both self-assessment and external assessments. No significant associations were found between trainee perceived competence scores and primary outcome measures (p>0.05). Of the 12 secondary subscale analyses, trainees' self-ratings were significantly associated with external assessments for only one comparison, but the association was in the opposite direction with increased trainee ratings being significantly associated with decreased family ratings on “treatment discussions.” We also examined the correlation between ratings by patients, family, and clinician-evaluators, which showed significant correlations (p<0.05) for 7 of 18 comparisons (38.9%). Conclusions Trainee self-evaluations do not predict assessments by their patients, patients' families, or their clinician-evaluators regarding the quality of end-of-life communication. Although these results should be confirmed using the same measures across all raters, in the meantime efforts to improve communication about end-of-life care should consider outcomes other than physician self-assessment to determine intervention success.

Dickson, Robert P.; Engelberg, Ruth A.; Back, Anthony L.; Ford, Dee W.

2012-01-01

331

Healthy Homes University: A Home-Based Environmental Intervention and Education Program for Families with Pediatric Asthma in Michigan  

PubMed Central

Environmental conditions within the home can exacerbate asthmatic children's symptoms. To improve health outcomes among this group, we implemented an in-home environmental public health program—Healthy Homes University—for low-income families in Lansing, Michigan, from 2005 to 2008. Families received four visits during a six-month intervention. Program staff assessed homes for asthma triggers and subsequently provided products and services to reduce exposures to cockroaches, dust mites, mold, tobacco smoke, and other triggers. We also provided asthma education that included identification of asthma triggers and instructions on specific behaviors to reduce exposures. Based on self-reported data collected from 243 caregivers at baseline and six months, the impact of asthma on these children was substantially reduced, and the proportion who sought acute unscheduled health care for their asthma decreased by more than 47%.

Largo, Thomas W.; Borgialli, Michele; Wisinski, Courtney L.; Wahl, Robert L.; Priem, Wesley F.

2011-01-01

332

Can the University Escape from the Labyrinth of Technology? Part 4: Extending the Strategy to Medicine, the Social Sciences, and the University  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This fourth part outlines a strategy for overcoming the limitations of the knowledge system for engineering by combining intellectual maps, preventive approaches, umbrella concepts, and round tables as described in the earlier parts. A discussion of the issues faced by modern medicine illustrates the paradigmatic nature of the diagnosis and…

Vanderburg, Willem H.

2006-01-01

333

The Impact of Family Support on the Success of Black Men at an Historically Black University: Affirming the Revision of Tinto’s Theory  

Microsoft Academic Search

: This qualitative study of 11 Black male students who entered a public historically Black college and university (HBCU) as academically underprepared and persisted to graduation, provides insight into the ways in which family promotes academic success for Black male students at a public HBCU. The study’s findings encourage practitioners at HBCUs to reassess the relationship between family involvement and

Dina C. Maramba; Robert T. Palmer; Ryan J. Davis

2011-01-01

334

The Impact of Family Support on the Success of Black Men at an Historically Black University: Affirming the Revision of Tinto’s Theory  

Microsoft Academic Search

This qualitative study of 11 Black male students who entered a public historically Black college and university (HBCU) as academically underprepared and persisted to graduation, provides insight into the ways in which family promotes academic success for Black male students at a public HBCU. The study’s findings encourage practitioners at HBCUs to reassess the relationship between family involvement and academic

Dina C. Maramba; Robert T. Palmer; Ryan J. Davis

2011-01-01

335

Court Cases Involving Schools and Universities under the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Educational institutions are required either by law or by necessity to maintain records on students. Prior to the passage of the "Buckley Amendment," more commonly known as the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA), K-12 and postsecondary school officials maintained, used, and shared records according to their own discretion. Although…

Edmonds, Vincent H.

2009-01-01

336

Rates and Psychological Effects of Exposure to Family Violence among Sri Lankan University Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Objectives: The study had two objectives: to examine the rates of exposure to family violence among students in a non-Western society, with Sri Lanka as a case study and to examine the psychological effects of their exposure. Method: Four hundred seventy six medical students in Sri Lanka were surveyed. A self-administered questionnaire was…

Haj-Yahia, Muhammad M.; de Zoysa, Piyanjli

2008-01-01

337

Predicting Role Conflict, Overload and Contagion in Adult Women University Students with Families and Jobs.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Data from 443 women combining work, family, and schooling showed that lower income increased their vulnerability to role conflict. Perceived intensity of student demands was the strongest predictor of role conflict, overload, and contagion (preoccupation with one role while performing another). Conflict and overload were eased somewhat by distance…

Home, Alice M.

1998-01-01

338

Research of urinary tract infections in family medicine physicians' offices--empiric antimicrobial therapy of urinary tract infections--Croatian experience.  

PubMed

In the period between October 1st and November 30th, 2006, we investigated a total of 3188 episodes of UTI (802 among males; 2386 among females) recorded in 108 family medicine offices in 20 cities in Croatia. The most common UTIs in women were acute uncomplicated cystitis (62%), complicated UTIs - cystitis and pyelonephritis (14%), urethritis (9%), acute uncomplicated pyelonephritis (6%), recurrent cystitis (5%), asymptomatic bacteriuria (3%) and recurrent pyelonephritis. The most common UTIs in men were complicated UTIs - cystitis and pyelonephritis (48%), urethritis (25%), prostatitis (24%) and asymptomatic bacteriuria (3%). Etiological diagnosis was made in 999 (31%) UTI episodes before antimicrobial therapy was given. The most frequently isolated causative pathogens were Escherichia coli (77%), Enterococcus faecalis (9%), Proteus mirabilis (5%), Klebsiella spp (3%), Streptococcus agalactiae (3%) and Enterobacter (1%). Antimicrobial drug was administered in 2939 (92.19%) UTI episodes, in 1940 (66.01%) as empirical therapy, and in 999 (34%) as targeted antimicrobial therapy. The most commonly administered drug in empirical therapy for acute uncomplicated cystitis, recurrent cystitis and urethritis in women was cephalexin, for acute uncomplicated pyelonephritis and complicated UTIs in women co-amoxiclav, and for UTIs in males ciprofloxacin. The results of this research of 3188 UTI episodes in family medicine physicians' offices provide a confirmatory answer to question whether empirical antimicrobial therapy of UTI prescribed by Croatian family practitioners is in accordance with the national guidelines. PMID:19662789

Skerk, Vedrana; Skerk, Visnja; Jaksi?, Jerko; Lakos, Adela Kolumbi?; Matrapazovski, Mirjana; Malekovi?, Gordan; Andrasevi?, Arjana Tambi?; Radoaevi?, Velena; Markoti?, Alemka; Begovac, Josip

2009-06-01

339

The Scale-Linkage Algorithm: Construction of a Universal Criterion Scale for Families of Institutions.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Preceeding through the development of a sequence of paired calibrations determined by a hierarchical clustering algorithm, the proposed method of constructing a universal criterion scale does not rely on covariate information. The procedure is illustrated with data from American law schools. (Author/BW)|

Braun, Henry I.; Szatrowski, Ted H.

1984-01-01

340

University and College Counselors as Athletic Team Consultants: Using a Structural Family Therapy Model  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Increasingly, university and college counselors are sought out by their institution's sports coaches for assistance in achieving team goals. Traditional sport psychology models that have the individual athlete as their primary focus are insufficient frameworks for team-level consultations. The authors believe that systemic approaches may provide…

Parcover, Jason A.; Mettrick, Jennifer; Parcover, Cynthia A. D.; Griffin-Smith, Pamela

2009-01-01

341

University and College Counselors as Athletic Team Consultants: Using a Structural Family Therapy Model  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Increasingly, university and college counselors are sought out by their institution's sports coaches for assistance in achieving team goals. Traditional sport psychology models that have the individual athlete as their primary focus are insufficient frameworks for team-level consultations. The authors believe that systemic approaches may provide…

Parcover, Jason A.; Mettrick, Jennifer; Parcover, Cynthia A. D.; Griffin-Smith, Pamela

2009-01-01

342

The effect of polyphenolic-polysaccharide conjugates from selected medicinal plants of Asteraceae family on the peroxynitrite-induced changes in blood platelet proteins.  

PubMed

Lots of plants belonging to Asteraceae family are very popular in folk medicine in Poland. These plants are also known as being rich in acidic polysaccharides, due to the presence of hexuronic acids or its derivatives. Our preliminary experiments have shown that the extract from Conyza canadensis L. possesses various biological activity, including antiplatelet, antiocoagulant and antioxidant properties. The aim of our study was to assess if macromolecular glycoconjugates from selected herbal plants of Asteraceae family: Achillea millefolium L., Arnica montana L., Echinacea purpurea L., Solidago virgaurea L., Chamomilla recutita (L.) Rauschert., and Conyza canadensis L. protect platelet proteins against nitrative and oxidative damage induced by peroxynitrite, which is responsible for oxidative/nitrative modifications of platelet proteins: the formation of 3-nitrotyrosine and carbonyl groups. These modifications may lead to changes of blood platelet functions and can have pathological consequences. The role of these different medicinal plants in the defence against oxidative/nitrative stress in human platelets is still unknown, therefore the oxidative damage to platelet proteins induced by peroxynitrite and protectory effects of tested conjugates by the estimation of carbonyl group level and nitrotyrosine formation (a marker of protein nitration) were studied in vitro. The antioxidative properties of the polyphenolic-polysaccharide conjugates from selected tested medicinal plants were also compared with the action of a well characterized antioxidative commercial polyphenol - resveratrol (3,4',5-trihydroxystilbene). The obtained results demonstrate that the compounds from herbal plants: A. millefolium, A. montana, E. purpurea, C. recutita, S. virgaurea, possess antioxidative properties and protect platelet proteins against peroxynitrite toxicity in vitro, similar to the glycoconjugates from C. canadensis. However, in the comparative studies, the polyphenolic-polysaccharide conjugates from selected tested medicinal plants were not found to be more effective antioxidant, than the solution of pure resveratrol. PMID:20869393

Saluk-Juszczak, Joanna; Pawlaczyk, Izabela; Olas, Beata; Ko?odziejczyk, Joanna; Ponczek, Michal; Nowak, Pawel; Tsirigotis-Wo?oszczak, Marta; Wachowicz, Barbara; Gancarz, Roman

2010-09-30

343

Use of complementary and alternative medicine by patients with hematological diseases experience at a university hospital in northeast Mexico  

PubMed Central

Background Complementary and alternative medicine includes a diverse group of medical and healthcare systems, practices and products not considered part of conventional medicine. Although there is information on unconventional practices in oncological diseases, specific data regarding the use of complementary and alternative medicine by hematology patients is scarce. Objective The aim of this study is to document the prevalence of this modality of unconventional therapy in patients with malignant and benign hematological diseases, particularly children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Methods An observational study of adult patients and guardians of children with malignant or benign hematological diseases was carried out by applying a structured questionnaire detailing the use and results of the most prevalent complementary and alternative medicine practices. Results One hundred and twenty patients were included; 104 had malignant and 16 had benign hematological diseases. The use of complementary and alternative medicine was greater in benign diseases but the difference was not statistically significant (64.7% versus 41.7%; p-value = 0.08). Patients and guardians with high school or college educations used these alternative practices more than patients with less schooling (60.7% versus 54.7%; p-value = 0.032). The use of folk remedies was most prevalent followed by herbal preparations and spiritual healing. Sixty-four percent of patients that used these unconventional practices reported improvement in their symptoms and increased capacity to perform daily activities. Conclusion No significant difference was documented between patients with malignant or benign hematological diseases using these alternative practices. The majority of complementary and alternative medicine users reported improvement of the disease or chemotherapy-related symptoms.

Jaime-Perez, Jose Carlos; Chapa-Rodriguez, Adrian; Rodriguez-Martinez, Marisol; Colunga-Pedraza, Perla Rocio; Marfil-Rivera, Luis Javier; Gomez-Almaguer, David

2012-01-01

344

The effect of a course in family medicine on future career choice: a long-range follow-up of a controlled experiment in medical education.  

PubMed

The career choices and professional behavior of three cohorts of students who participated in a family medicine program were studied by mail questionnaire. Cohort I (1957--1960), as part of an educational experiment, had been randomly assigned to the course; unselected classmates were used as controls. Cohort II (1961--1965) and Cohort III (1966--1970) were volunteers; alphabetically adjacent classmates were used as a comparison group. The results suggest that the impact of a given medical school course on future behavior must be evaluated in the context of general medical school orientation and societal trends extraneous to the school itself. PMID:759553

Rosenblatt, R A; Alpert, J J

1979-01-01

345

Veterinary Medicine Advisory Committee 5/13/97  

Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research (CBER)

Text Version... CENTER FOR VETERINARY MEDICINE VETERINARY MEDICINE ADVISORY COMMITTEE ... Veterinary Medicine, NC State University, and I am ... More results from www.fda.gov/downloads/advisorycommittees/committeesmeetingmaterials

346

Core Curriculum and Special Study Modules at the Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Universiti Malaysia Sarawak  

Microsoft Academic Search

Introduction: The Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences (FMHS), follows a problem-based learning, integrated and community-based curriculum which reflects the specific needs of doctors working in Sarawak. Using paediatrics as an example, this paper describes the process of development of core content (knowledge, procedural and communication skills, attitudes), additional knowledge and special study modules at the FMHS. Objectives: In 2003,

Alam Sher Malik; Rukhsana Hussain Malik

2004-01-01

347

Factors that influence the choice of psychiatry as a career by medical students at the School of Medicine, College of Health Sciences, University of Nairobi.  

PubMed

Abstract The aim of this paper is to assess the particular factors facilitating and those hampering the choice of psychiatry as a career by medical students at the University of Nairobi in a cross-sectional population study of medical students at the University of Nairobi, College of Health Sciences, School of Medicine using self-administered questionnaires. A total of 31 students (13%) said they would like to be psychiatrists while 44 (18%) were neutral and 170 (69%) did not want to become psychiatrists. The factors that made psychiatry interesting for the students included the view that the problems presented by psychiatric patients were often particularly interesting and challenging and the fact that mental illness presented the field of medicine with one of the greatest challenges. Discouraging factors articulated by the students included views that psychiatry was a vague and speculative speciality, psychiatry was not an important part of the curriculum in medical schools, and psychiatric patients tend to make more emotional demands on their doctors than other patients. There was a negative view of psychiatric patients who most of the students thought were strange, dangerous and incurable, although they were curious to know more about them. Most of the negative influence in psychiatry is due to the misconceptions that students have about its prestige and scope, the rewards it offers in terms of job satisfaction and opportunities and the negative views towards psychiatric patients. Integration of psychiatry into the curriculum may address these misunderstandings. PMID:24032494

Ndetei, David M; Ngumi, Zipporah W; Mutiso, Victoria N; Musyimi, Christine W; Kamau, Lucy W

2013-08-01

348

Missions and Medicine at Amherst: Family Ties to Edward Hitchcock Jr., the Missionary Movement, and the American University of Beirut  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Haystack Movement began at Williams College in 1805, occasioning the spread of American missions throughout the world. A half century later, two graduates of nearby Amherst College, Edward Hitchcock Jr. and Daniel Bliss, laid the foundations for college health services in this country and for mission work and education in the Middle East. The…

Dorman, John M.

2011-01-01

349

Missions and Medicine at Amherst: Family Ties to Edward Hitchcock Jr., the Missionary Movement, and the American University of Beirut  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The Haystack Movement began at Williams College in 1805, occasioning the spread of American missions throughout the world. A half century later, two graduates of nearby Amherst College, Edward Hitchcock Jr. and Daniel Bliss, laid the foundations for college health services in this country and for mission work and education in the Middle East. The…

Dorman, John M.

2011-01-01

350

A longitudinal study of the sociosexual dynamics in a captive family group of wolves: the University of Connecticut wolf project.  

PubMed

An interest in the role of the social environment on the evolution of behavior led Professor Benson Ginsburg to studies of wolf social behavior. He initiated the University of Connecticut wolf project with a family group of wolves housed in a protected enclosure in an isolated area of campus. One aim of this project was to conduct a longitudinal study of a family group of wolves in order to understand the proximate behavioral mechanisms underlying mating dynamics with a degree of control and opportunistic observation that could not be achieved through field studies. The development of social relationships and the dynamics of mating were observed for 9 years. As in nature, agonistic relationships strongly influenced reproductive success, successful breeding was limited to a single pair each season, and the behavioral dynamics included status transitions with breeder rotations. Our work, when combined with the results of other captive wolf studies, has contributed valuable information to the general understanding of wolf social behavior, especially regarding the proximate behavior patterns underlying group social interactions and reproduction. This understanding has broadened perspectives on the dynamic interplay between social behavior and evolutionary processes. PMID:21409588

Jenks, Susan M

2011-03-16

351

Families overcoming under stress: implementing family-centered prevention for military families facing wartime deployments and combat operational stress.  

PubMed

The toll of multiple and prolonged deployments on families has become clearer in recent years as military families have seen an increase in childhood anxiety, parental psychological distress, and marital discord. Families overcoming under stress (FOCUS), a family-centered evidence-informed resiliency training program developed at University of California, Los Angeles and Harvard Medical School, is being implemented at military installations through an initiative from Navy Bureau of Medicine and Surgery. The research foundation for FOCUS includes evidence-based preventive interventions that were adapted to meet the specific needs of military families facing combat operational stress associated with wartime deployments. Using a family narrative approach, FOCUS includes a customized approach utilizing core intervention components, including psychoeducation, emotional regulation skills, goal setting and problem solving skills, traumatic stress reminder management techniques, and family communication skills. The purpose of this study is to describe the development and implementation of FOCUS for military families. A case example is also presented. PMID:21305955

Lester, Patricia; Mogil, Catherine; Saltzman, William; Woodward, Kirsten; Nash, William; Leskin, Gregory; Bursch, Brenda; Green, Sara; Pynoos, Robert; Beardslee, William

2011-01-01

352

High referral rates to secondary care by general practitioners in Norway are associated with GPs' gender and specialist qualifications in family medicine, a study of 4350 consultations  

PubMed Central

Background Referral rates of general practitioners (GPs) are an important determinant of secondary care utilization. The variation in these rates across GPs is considerable, and cannot be explained by patient morbidity alone. The main objective of this study was to assess the GPs’ referral rate to secondary care in Norway, any associations between the referral decision and patient, GP, health care characteristics and who initiated the referring issue in the consultation. Methods The probabilities of referral to secondary care and/or radiological examination were examined in 100 consecutive consultations of 44 randomly chosen Norwegian GPs. The GPs recorded whether the issue of referral was introduced, who introduced it and if the patient was referred. Multilevel and naive multivariable logistic regression analyses were performed to explore associations between the probability of referral and patient, GP and health care characteristics. Results Of the 4350 consultations included, 13.7% (GP range 4.0%-28.0%) of patients were referred to secondary somatic and psychiatric care. Female GPs referred significantly more frequently than male GPs (16.0% versus 12.6%, adjusted odds ratio, AOR, 1.25), specialists in family medicine less frequently than their counterparts (12.5% versus 14.9%, AOR 0.76) and salaried GPs more frequently than private practitioners (16.2% versus 12.1%, AOR 1.36). In 4.2% (GP range 0%-12.9%) of the consultations, patients were referred to radiological examination. Specialists in family medicine, salaried GPs and GPs with a Norwegian medical degree referred significantly more frequently to radiological examination than their counterparts (AOR 1.93, 2.00 and 1.73, respectively). The issue of referral was introduced in 23% of the consultations, and in 70.6% of these cases by the GP. The high referrers introduced the referral issue significantly more frequently and also referred a significantly larger proportion when the issue was introduced. Conclusions The main finding of the present study was a high overall referral rate, and a striking range among the GPs. Male GPs and specialists in family medicine referred significantly less frequently to secondary care, but the latter referred more frequently to radiological examination. Our findings indicate that intervention on high referrers is a potential area for quality improvement, and there is a need to explore the referral decision process itself.

2013-01-01

353

Service with Style: Micki McIntyre--Health Sciences Library, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|After a brief career in musical theater, Micki McIntyre entered the graduate library program at Columbia University, where she noticed a poster advertising free tuition to library employees. "There was a vacancy at the health sciences library, and that's how a theater major became a medical librarian." She's a medical librarian with flair. As…

Library Journal, 2005

2005-01-01

354

Service with Style: Micki McIntyre--Health Sciences Library, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

After a brief career in musical theater, Micki McIntyre entered the graduate library program at Columbia University, where she noticed a poster advertising free tuition to library employees. "There was a vacancy at the health sciences library, and that's how a theater major became a medical librarian." She's a medical librarian with flair. As…

Library Journal, 2005

2005-01-01

355

Histopathology of protozoal infection in animals: a retrospective study at the University of Philippines College of Veterinary Medicine (1972-2010).  

PubMed

The authors describe the first parasitological survey of protozoal infections on tissue slide sections of field cases processed at the histopathology laboratory of the College of Veterinary Medicine (CVM) at the University of the Philippines Los Baños (UPLB). Over 80% of the field cases were from Region 4 (CALABARZON) and the rest were equally distributed from other areas of the Philippines, namely: Region 2 (Cagayan Valley), Metropolitan Manila (National Capital Region), Region III (Central Luzon) and Region VI (Western Visayas). Histopathological analyses of tissue sections from 51 archived cases (1972-2010) of parasitic aetiology were performed. Microscopic examination of a total of 286 histopathological slides revealed the presence of several protozoa, including sarcosporidiosis, hepatic coccidiosis, intestinal coccidiosis, balantidiosis and leucocyto-zoonosis. In addition, the finding of Balantidium and Sarcocystis may have zoonotic implications and can therefore be used as markers of public health importance. PMID:22485007

Baticados, Abigail M; Baticados, Waren N

356

[Research in the PhD Program led by János Fehér between 1993 and 2010 at the Biochemical Research Laboratory, 2nd Department of Medicine, Semmelweis University].  

PubMed

Author wish to express gratitude to late professor János Fehér for the invitation to participate in "Free Radical and Immunological References of Hepatology" PhD program in 1993 and for providing opportunity to establish a laboratory at the 2nd Department of Medicine, Semmelweis University. He established a joint medical and biological research that is continuing unbrokenly. In this research group, between 1993 and 2010, eleven Ph.D. students received their scientific degrees and two candidate dissertations were prepared. Three students are working in this very exciting field even today. Author would like to salute before János Fehér's remembrance by giving a list of results of topics under her leadership. PMID:21071304

Blázovics, Anna

2010-11-21

357

What Is a Pediatric Sports Medicine Specialist?  

MedlinePLUS

... Specialist? Family Life Listen What is a Pediatric Sports Medicine Specialist? Article Body If your child or ... and teens. What Kind of Training Do Pediatric Sports Medicine Specialists Have? Pediatric sports medicine specialists are ...

358

Promoting Health and Mental Health in Children, Youth, and Families. Springer Series on Behavior Therapy and Behavioral Medicine, Volume 27.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|In the last decade, there has been increased attention paid to the scope of mental and physical health problems that affect individuals at different points over the entire life span. This volume presents many problem areas and the range of their impact on individuals, families, and society at large. The impact of intervention programs is…

Glenwick, David S., Ed.; Jason, Leonard A., Ed.

359

Family medicine, 'La Herencia' and breast cancer; understanding the (dis)continuities of predictive genetics in Cuba  

PubMed Central

Building on social science research examining the relationship between genetic knowledge, identity and the family this paper takes the cultural context of Cuba as a site for critical ethnographic engagement. The paper makes use of research working with a range of Cuban publics and genetic professionals as part of a collaborative research project exploring the social and cultural context of health beliefs about breast cancer. It illuminates the contrasting ways in which genomic knowledge linked to an increased risk of breast cancer is perceived, communicated, and acted upon. It is argued that the particular meaning and significance of genetic risk linked to breast cancer in this context must be examined in relation to long standing institutional practices relating to public health care provision. The focus on ‘the family’ in the provision of Cuban health provides a particularly viable foundation for the expansion of what is described as ‘community genetics’, including the collation of family history details for common complex diseases such as breast cancer. Nevertheless specific public perceptions of risk related to breast cancer and the difficulties of discussing a diagnosis of cancer openly in the family point to the very specific challenges for the translation and application of predictive interventions in Cuba. In summary the dynamic interrelationship between public health, perceptions of risk or health beliefs about the causes of the disease and attitudes towards cancer diagnosis within the family point to both continuities and discontinuities in the way that genomic interventions linked to breast cancer are unfolding as part of a dynamic yet still ostensibly socialist project of health care in Cuba.

Gibbon, Sahra

2011-01-01

360

Family medicine, 'La Herencia' and breast cancer; understanding the (dis)continuities of predictive genetics in Cuba.  

PubMed

Building on social science research examining the relationship between genetic knowledge, identity and the family this paper takes the cultural context of Cuba as a site for critical ethnographic engagement. The paper makes use of research working with a range of Cuban public and genetic professionals as part of a collaborative research project exploring the social and cultural context of health beliefs about breast cancer. It illuminates the contrasting ways in which genomic knowledge linked to an increased risk of breast cancer is perceived, communicated, and acted upon. It is argued that the particular meaning and significance of genetic risk linked to breast cancer in this context must be examined in relation to long standing institutional practices relating to public health care provision. The focus on 'the family' in the provision of Cuban health provides a particularly viable foundation for the expansion of what is described as 'community genetics', including the collation of family history details for common complex diseases such as breast cancer. Nevertheless specific public perceptions of risk related to breast cancer and the difficulties of discussing a diagnosis of cancer openly in the family point to the very specific challenges for the translation and application of predictive interventions in Cuba. In summary the dynamic interrelationship between public health, perceptions of risk or health beliefs about the causes of the disease and attitudes towards cancer diagnosis within the family point to both continuities and discontinuities in the way that genomic interventions linked to breast cancer are unfolding as part of a dynamic yet still ostensibly socialist project of health care in Cuba. PMID:21239101

Gibbon, Sahra

2010-11-24

361

Health care providers' perspectives of an intervention designed to improve colorectal cancer screening rates in family medicine residency clinics : a qualitative study.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to obtain feedback from family medicine residents and clinic nurses regarding a colorectal cancer screening (CRCS) intervention. Focus groups were used to ask participants three questions about their perceptions of the intervention and subsequent patient screening behaviors. Content analysis and constant comparison were used to yield two meaningful themes from the participant responses: patient-specific issues and study design issues. Patient-specific issues included: lack of education and fear, finances and insurance coverage, and compliance. Study design issues included: lack of time, a need for reminders to discuss CRCS with patients, quality of the nurse's role, and a need for better clinical staff education and awareness. Results show ways to significantly improve future implementation of the CRCS intervention. Ultimately, future use of clinic-based CRCS interventions could be vastly improved by utilizing strategies to promote teamwork and increase the sense of mutual ownership among clinic staff. PMID:22826203

Rowe, Sara; Goldsmith, Geoffrey; Price, Robert; Brooks, Audrey; Harvey, Amanda

2012-12-01

362

Quality of care and health-related quality of life of climacteric stage women cared for in family medicine clinics in Mexico  

PubMed Central

Objectives 1) To design and validate indicators to measure the quality of the process of care that climacteric stage women receive in family medicine clinics (FMC). 2) To assess the quality of care that climacteric stage women receive in FMC. 3) To determine the association between quality of care and health-related quality of life (HR-QoL) among climacteric stage women. Methods The study had two phases: I. Design and validation of indicators to measure the quality of care process by using the RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method. II. Evaluation of the quality of care and its association with HR-QoL through a cross-sectional study conducted in two FMC located in Mexico City that included 410 climacteric stage women. The quality of care was measured by estimating the percentage of recommended care received (PRCR) by climacteric stage women in three process components: health promotion, screening, and treatment. The HR-QoL was measured using the Cervantes scale (0-155). The association between quality of care and HR-QoL was estimated through multiple linear regression analysis. Results The lowest mean of PRCR was for the health promotion component (24.1%) and the highest for the treatment component (86.6%). The mean of HR-QoL was 50.1 points. The regression analysis showed that in the treatment component, for every 10 additional points of the PRCR, the global HR-QoL improved 2.8 points on the Cervantes scale (coefficient -0.28, P < 0.0001). Conclusion The indicators to measure quality of care for climacteric stage women are applicable and feasible in family medicine settings. There is a positive association between the quality of the treatment component and HR-QoL; this would encourage interventions to improve quality of care for climacteric stage women.

2010-01-01

363

The Impact of Family Support on the Success of Black Men at an Historically Black University: Affirming the Revision of Tinto's Theory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This qualitative study of 11 Black male students who entered a public historically Black college and university (HBCU) as academically under-prepared and persisted to graduation, provides insight into the ways in which family promotes academic success for Black male students at a public HBCU. The study's findings encourage practitioners at HBCUs…

Palmer, Robert T.; Davis, Ryan J.; Maramba, Dina C.

2011-01-01

364

[State under the influence of drugs or psychotropic agents--a comparison of toxicological and medical examinations in materials of the Department of Forensic Medicine and Toxicology, Silesian University of Medicine, Katowice].  

PubMed

In the paper, the authors present the results of toxicological examinations of blood samples taken from drivers during road check procedures or from perpetrators of traffic road accidents, which--taking into consideration the kind of the determined agents and their concentrations--were compared with the results of medical examinations from blood sampling protocols studied in the Department of Forensic Medicine and Toxicology, Silesian University of Medicine. All the blood samples were first analyzed using an immunoenzymatic assay (ELISA). Then, the LC-MS method was used. The positive results of screening for the presence of cannabinols were verified by GC-MS. Out of 329 blood samples, 145 were positive. The presence of cannabinols, amphetamine or MDMA was the most predominant finding. Diazepam was determined in 4 cases and opiates in 1 case. Only in 31% cases did positive results of toxicological examinations correspond to deviations found during the medical examinations constituting the basis for the final diagnosis of state "under the influence". In practice, appraisal of drug influence during medical examination seems to be limited and dependent on variable reactions of the examined individuals to a psychoactive agent, time lapse between the traffic road event and the examination or concomitant symptoms associated with ethylene alcohol activity. The final diagnosis of state "under the influence of drugs" or "under the influence of psychotropic agents" given by the physician does not result from the effect of these substances observed during the medical examination, but is very often formulated based on the medical history or police findings. The analysis of the above mentioned cases where Delta9THC or/and amphetamine was detected showed no correlation between the concentration of the psychoactive agent determined in blood and symptoms triggered by its action as described by the physician. PMID:22117486

Korczy?ska, Ma?gorzata; Kulikowska, Joanna; Celi?ski, Rafa?; Nowicka, Joanna; Rojek, Sebastian; Uttecht-Pude?ko, Anna

365

Paradigms of family medicine: bridging traditions with new concepts; meeting the challenge of being the good doctor from 2011  

PubMed Central

This is the paper for the Wes Fabb Oration for the WONCA Asia Pacific Regional Conference 2011. This paper will review the case for the important role of the family physician/general practitioner in worldwide health care as determined by the WHO. The importance of continuing care is highlighted. The features of a good doctor will be defined and the process of meeting this challenge for excellence of care is presented.

2011-01-01

366

An examination of biracial college youths' family ethnic socialization, ethnic identity, and adjustment: do self-identification labels and university context matter?  

PubMed

This study examined family ethnic socialization, ethnic identity, and adjustment among Latino/White and Asian/White biracial college students (n = 507), with special attention to how ethnic self-identification and university ethnic composition informed the ethnic identity process. Findings indicated that family ethnic socialization was positively related to participants' ethnic identity exploration and resolution, but not ethnic identity affirmation. Furthermore, ethnic identity resolution and affirmation were associated with higher self-acceptance and self-esteem, and lower depressive symptoms. Importantly, university ethnic composition moderated the association between ethnic identity resolution and anxiety, such that resolution promoted adjustment in contexts that were relatively more ethnically diverse. University ethnic composition also moderated the association between ethnic identity affirmation and both self-esteem and self-acceptance, such that affirmation was associated with better adjustment but only in schools that were less ethnically diverse. PMID:22905967

Brittian, Aerika S; Umaña-Taylor, Adriana J; Derlan, Chelsea L

2012-08-20

367

Potential drug-drug and drug-disease interactions in prescriptions for ambulatory patients over 50 years of age in family medicine clinics in Mexico City  

PubMed Central

Background In Mexico, inappropriate prescription of drugs with potential interactions causing serious risks to patient health has been little studied. Work in this area has focused mainly on hospitalized patients, with only specific drug combinations analyzed; moreover, the studies have not produced conclusive results. In the present study, we determined the frequency of potential drug-drug and drug-disease interactions in prescriptions for ambulatory patients over 50 years of age, who used Mexican Institute of Social Security (IMSS) family medicine clinics. In addition, we aimed to identify the associated factors for these interactions. Methods We collected information on general patient characteristics, medical histories, and medication (complete data). The study included 624 ambulatory patients over 50 years of age, with non-malignant pain syndrome, who made ambulatory visits to two IMSS family medicine clinics in Mexico City. The patients received 7-day prescriptions for non-opioid analgesics. The potential interactions were identified by using the Thompson Micromedex program. Data were analyzed using descriptive, bivariate and multiple logistic regression analyses. Results The average number of prescribed drugs was 5.9 ± 2.5. About 80.0% of patients had prescriptions implying one or more potential drug-drug interactions and 3.8% of patients were prescribed drug combinations with interactions that should be avoided. Also, 64.0% of patients had prescriptions implying one or more potential drug disease interactions. The factors significantly associated with having one or more potential interactions included: taking 5 or more medicines (adjusted Odds Ratio (OR): 4.34, 95%CI: 2.76–6.83), patient age 60 years or older (adjusted OR: 1.66, 95% CI: 1.01–2.74) and suffering from cardiovascular diseases (adjusted OR: 7.26, 95% CI: 4.61–11.44). Conclusion The high frequency of prescription of drugs with potential drug interactions showed in this study suggests that it is common practice in primary care level. To lower the frequency of potential interactions it could be necessary to make a careful selection of therapeutic alternatives, and in cases without other options, patients should be continuously monitored to identify adverse events.

Doubova (Dubova), Svetlana Vladislavovna; Reyes-Morales, Hortensia; Torres-Arreola, Laura del Pilar; Suarez-Ortega, Magdalena

2007-01-01

368

Can poetry make better doctors? Teaching the humanities and arts to medical students and residents at the University of California, Irvine, College of Medicine.  

PubMed

The Program in Medical Humanities & Arts at the University of California, Irvine, College of Medicine has been in existence for five years. The program was implemented to enhance aspects of professionalism including empathy, altruism, compassion, and caring toward patients, as well as to hone clinical communication and observational skills. It contains elective or required curriculum across all four years of medical school and required curriculum in two residency programs, organized according to structural principles of horizontal coherence, vertical complexity, and patient care applications. The program emphasizes small-group, interdisciplinary teaching and faculty development, and is notable for learners' use of creative projects to reflect on patients and themselves. Evaluation of the program indicates a positive response among learners. More systematic studies point to increases in empathy and positive attitudes toward the humanities as tools for professional development as a result of exposure to the program curriculum. Future directions include closer collaboration with the University of California, Irvine, Schools of the Arts and Humanities, involvement of local artists and writers, and development of a graduation with distinction in humanities for medical students. PMID:14534086

Shapiro, Johanna; Rucker, Lloyd

2003-10-01

369

[Intrauterine myelomeningocele repair: experience of the fetal medicine and therapy program of the Virgen de Rocío University Hospital].  

PubMed

The most frequent form of spina bifida is myelomeningocele. There is no optimal postnatal treatment for this defect. In addition to the motor or sensory deficits, which depend on the location of the lesion, the defect is usually associated with Chiari ii malformation in affected children. Myelomeningocele has high mortality and, in up to 80% to 90% of patients, can be accompanied by hydrocephalus, which causes severe neurocognitive impairment and requires the patient to be shunted for survival. Intrauterine repair of fetal malformations employing open access through hysterotomy has become a therapeutic option due to improved anesthetic and surgical techniques and instrumentation, which have allowed this type of intervention to become relatively frequent. Anesthetic treatment should focus on both the mother and fetus and the hemodynamic factors regulating placental flow, uterine dynamics, blood loss and fetal well-being must remain well-controlled. Within our Program for Fetal Medicine and Therapy, 21 open fetal interventions have been performed: 17 EXIT procedures and 4 procedures for the intrauterine correction of fetal myelomeningocele. We describe our experience of the intrauterine repair of fetal myelomeningocele through open fetal surgery. PMID:23121708

Marenco, M L; Márquez, J; Ontanilla, A; García-Díaz, L; Rivero, M; Losada, A; Torrejón, R; Sainz, J A; Antiñolo, G

2012-10-31

370

Series: The research agenda for general practice/family medicine and primary health care in Europe. Part 5: Needs and implications for future research and policy.  

PubMed

The recently published 'Research Agenda for General Practice/Family Medicine and Primary Health Care in Europe' summarizes the evidence relating to the core competencies and characteristics of the Wonca Europe definition of GP/FM, and highlights related needs and implications for future research and policy. The European Journal of General Practice publishes a series of articles based on this document. In a first article, background, objectives, and methodology were discussed. In three subsequent, articles the results for the six core competencies of the European Definition of GP/FM were presented. This article formulates the common aims for further research and appropriate research methodologies, based on the missing evidence and research gaps identified form the comprehensive literature review. In addition, implications of this research agenda for general practitioners/family doctors, researchers, research organizations, patients and policy makers are presented. The concept of six core competencies should be abandoned in favour of a model with four dimensions, including clinical, person related, community oriented and management aspects. Future research and policy should consider more the involvement and rights of patients; more attention should be given to how new treatments or technologies are effectively translated into routine patient care, in particular primary care. There is a need for a European ethics board. The promotion of GP/FM research demands a good infrastructure in each country, including access to literature and databases, appropriate funding and training possibilities. PMID:21073268

van Royen, Paul; Beyer, Martin; Chevallier, Patrick; Eilat-Tsanani, Sophia; Lionis, Christos; Peremans, Lieve; Petek, Davorina; Rurik, Imre; Soler, Jean Karl; Stoffers, Henri E J H; Topsever, Pinar; Ungan, Mehmet; Hummers-Pradier, Eva

2010-12-01

371

[Longitudinality, prestige, good reputation (social and professional) and general/family medicine. Clinical and public health aspects. SESPAS Report 2012].  

PubMed

The reform of primary care in Spain in 1984 focussed mainly on skills and knowledge (physician training and working hours) and material resources (new buildings). The reform did not succeed in improving longitudinal care nor did it give primary care physicians greater power, that is, the reform did not increase coordination or strengthen the central role of the family physician in services provision. The lack of longitudinality has persisted over the years since the working methods that encourage it (and its resulting clinical and public health benefits) have not been stimulated. Longitudinality is the personal relationship established over the years between general practitioners and their patients and is defined as (a) care by the same family physician of most of the patient's problems throughout his or her life, and (b) the recognition by patients and the population of a stable source of care to be used for initial contact and for the follow-up of problems. The tendency in the medical profession and society at large is to respond to an increasing number of health problems more quickly and intensely, with increasingly powerful means and with a greater number of specialists. In turn, this tendency makes medical activities dangerous. To counteract this tendency, a motto of "less is better" should be adopted, implying greater longitudinality. Many initiatives could improve longitudinality, such as incentives for not moving, increasing the capitation component of remuneration to nearly 50%, broadening the range of general practitioners' skills, including family members in the same patient list, and transforming the role of specialists into that of consultants. PMID:22197320

Gérvas, Juan; Pérez Fernández, Mercedes; Sánchez Sánchez, Roberto José

2011-12-22

372

Risk factors for fatal outcome in patients with opioid dependence treated with methadone in a family medicine setting in Croatia  

PubMed Central

Aim To determine the risk factors for fatal outcome in patients with opioid dependence treated with methadone at the primary care level. Methods A group of 287 patients with opioid dependence was monitored prospectively from 1995 to 2007. At the beginning of the study, we collected the data on patient baseline characteristics, treatment characteristics, and living environment. At the annual check-up, we collected the data on daily methadone dose, method of methadone therapy administration, and family physician’s assessment of the patient’s drug use status. Results Out of 287 patients, 8% died. Logistic regression analysis showed that the predictors of fatal outcome were continuation of drug use during previous therapeutic attempts (odds ratio [OR], 19.402; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.659-226.873), maintenance therapy as the planned treatment modality (OR, 3.738; 95% CI, 1.045-13.370), living in an unstable relationship (OR, 9.275; 95% CI, 2.207-38.984), and loss of continuity of care (OR, 12.643; 95% CI, 3.001-53.253). Conclusion The patients presenting these risk factors require special attention. It is important for family physicians to insist on compliance with the treatment protocol and intervene when they lose contact with the patient to prevent the fatal outcome.

Cerovecki, Venija; Tiljak, Hrvoje; Ozvacic Adzic, Zlata; Krizmaric, Miljenko; Pregelj, Peter; Kastelic, Andrej

2013-01-01

373

University-Community Collaborations for the Twenty-First Century: Outreach Scholarship for Youth and Families. Michigan State University Series on Children, Youth, and Families, Vol. 4; Garland Reference Library of Social Science, Vol. 1119.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The 22 essays and case studies in this book offer a theoretical and practical guide on outreach programs of colleges and universities. The chapters are: (1) "The New American Outreach University: Challenges and Options" (Richard M. Lerner, Lou Anna K. Simon); (2) "The Land-Grant Idea and the Evolving Outreach University" (James T. Bonnen); (3)…

Lerner, Richard M., Ed.; Simon, Lou Anna K., Ed.

374

New methods for medicinal chemistry--universal gene cloning and expression systems for production of marine bioactive metabolites.  

PubMed

Natural products from symbiotic or commensal associations between marine invertebrate and microbial organisms show exceptional promise as pharmaceuticals in many therapeutic areas. An economic and sustainable global market supply due to difficulty of synthesis is cited as the main obstacle for exploitation of these otherwise exciting marine bioactive compounds. Different strategies have been evoked to overcome this impediment as long-term harvesting of wild stocks from the environment is considered unsound, and other modes of production based on biosynthesis, such as aquaculture, have not yet been proven as reliable. One option is to clone the genes encoding the biosynthetic expression of a lead metabolite into a surrogate host suitable for industrial-scale fermentation. To facilitate this goal we are developing a universal system to clone and express genes responsible for biosynthesis of natural products from both eukaryotic and prokaryotic partners of marine symbioses. The ability to harness the complete meta-transcriptome of entire biosynthetic pathways is particularly valuable where the biogenesis of a target natural product occurring within a complex symbiotic association is unclear. PMID:16529560

Dunlap, Walter C; Jaspars, Marcel; Hranueli, Daslav; Battershill, Christopher N; Peri?-Concha, Natasa; Zucko, Jurica; Wright, Stephen H; Long, Paul F

2006-01-01

375

[Invitation to be basic medical research doctors; current status and efforts at Kurume University School of Medicine].  

PubMed

Many medical students are interested in basic medical researches. However, to make a decision to get into the research position throughout the life is not easy. In Kurume University, although shortage of clinicians, partly due to the atmosphere that senior doctors consider experiences of basic research is favorable as well as a re-evaluation of PhD degree, staffs and PhD students with MD or DDS are not very rare in the departments of basic medical sciences including the anatomy department. Some, not many though, MDs once lead clinical experience return to basic research in order to solve problems they encountered at clinical scenes or for enthusiasms for spirit of further inquiry for life sciences. Those might be lead by the push of senior doctors or through "admission course for medical sciences" and "laboratory experience training" in the initial curriculum of the medical course. Open spaces where students and researchers can enjoy free scientific talking are hopefully expected to facilitate establishing students' incentive to participate in basic studies. PMID:23600318

Nakamura, Kei-ichiro; Kimura, Iori; Fujita, Kazuaki; Takano, Yoko; Saga, Tsuyoshi; Ohta, Keisuke; Yamaki, Kouichi

2013-03-01

376

Applying principles from "Scientific Foundations for Future Physicians" to teaching chemistry in the department of medicine at Chang Gung University.  

PubMed

Similar to the current trends in America that were recognized by the Association of American Medical College and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute in their 2009 report titled "Scientific Foundations for Future Physicians," Taiwanese medical students are lacking in their ability to apply their knowledge of basic sciences to real-life situations. The report recommended developing a competency-based approach to learning and also called for an increase in integrated and interdisciplinary courses in the education of medical students. Such a class, which would encourage students to look at biological concepts through chemical and physical principles, has been developed at Chang Gung University, and it strives to develop the medical student's ability to work in groups, think critically, and clearly and convincingly present ideas. The course requires students to present biological topics in groups after working closely with a teacher, and it trains the students to identify useful and trustworthy sources, to constructively criticize each other, and work together to present a cohesive and informative presentation for their peers. From my teaching experience, classes such as this have led me to conclude that the teacher's role does not simply encompass that of the informant, but also the facilitator of the academic success of the students, and this has led me to create certain class policies for teachers that help students of any field success in class. PMID:22301012

Lou, Bih-Show

2012-01-09

377

B_s^0 - overline B_s^0 mixing in a family non-universal Z' model revisited  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Motivated by the very recent measurements performed at the LHCb and the Tevatron of the B_s^0 - overline B_s^0 mixing, in this paper we revisit it in a family non-universal Z' model, to check if a simultaneous explanation for all the mixing observables, especially for the like-sign dimuon charge asymmetry observed by the D0 collaboration, could be made in such a specific model. In the first scenario where the Z' boson contributes only to the off-diagonal element M_{{{12}}}^s , it is found that, once the combined constraints from ? M s , ? s and ?? s are imposed, the model could not explain the measured flavour-specific CP asymmetry a_{{fs}}^s , at least within its 1 ? ranges. In the second scenario where the NP contributes also to the absorptive part ?_{{{12}}}^s via tree-level Z'-induced b ? coverline c s operators, we find that, with the constraints from ? M s , ? s and the indirect CP asymmetry in {{overline B }_d} ? J/?K S taken into account, the present measured 1 ? experimental ranges for a_{{fs}}^s could not be reproduced too. Thus, such a specific Z' model with our specific assumptions could not simultaneously reconcile all the present data on B_s^0 - overline B_s^0 mixing. Future improved measurements from the LHCb and the proposed superB experiments, especially of the flavour-specific CP asymmetries, are expected to shed light on the issue.

Li, Xin-Qiang; Li, Yan-Min; Lu, Gong-Ru; Su, Fang

2012-05-01

378

Communicating bioastronautics research to students, families and the nation.  

PubMed

The National Space Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI) is supporting the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) education mission through a comprehensive Education and Public Outreach Program (EPOP) that communicates the excitement and significance of space biology to schools, families, and lay audiences. The EPOP is comprised of eight academic institutions: Baylor College of Medicine, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Morehouse School of Medicine, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Texas A&M University, University of Texas Medical Branch Galveston, Rice University, and the University of Washington. This paper describes the programs and products created by the EPOP to promote space life science education in schools and among the general public. To date, these activities have reached thousands of teachers and students around the US and have been rated very highly. PMID:15834996

MacLeish, Marlene Y; Moreno, Nancy P; Thomson, William A; Newman, Dava J; Gannon, Patrick J; Smith, Roland B; Denton, Jon J; James, Robert K; Wilson, Craig; Sognier, Marguerite; Illman, Deborah L

379

Communicating bioastronautics research to students, families and the nation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The National Space Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI) is supporting the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) education mission through a comprehensive Education and Public Outreach Program (EPOP) that communicates the excitement and significance of space biology to schools, families, and lay audiences. The EPOP is comprised of eight academic institutions: Baylor College of Medicine, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Morehouse School of Medicine, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Texas A&M University, University of Texas Medical Branch Galveston, Rice University, and the University of Washington. This paper describes the programs and products created by the EPOP to promote space life science education in schools and among the general public. To date, these activities have reached thousands of teachers and students around the US and have been rated very highly.

MacLeish, Marlene Y.; Moreno, Nancy P.; Thomson, William A.; Newman, Dava J.; Gannon, Patrick J.; Smith, Roland B.; Denton, Jon J.; James, Robert K.; Wilson, Craig; Sognier, Marguerite; Illman, Deborah L.

2005-05-01

380

What do physicians know and say about fetal alcohol syndrome: a survey of obstetricians, pediatricians, and family medicine physicians.  

PubMed

Pediatricians, obstetricians, and family practice physicians in Michigan were surveyed by mail for their knowledge and opinions about Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS) and Fetal Alcohol Effects (FAE). Physicians said that about 67% of their patients raised questions about drinking during pregnancy but only 2% specifically referred to FAS or FAE. Most physicians were uncertain about whether their colleagues were sufficiently aware of FAS, whether FAS could be diagnosed at birth, or if physicians were acquainted with the syndrome's major criteria. However, most believed FAS was not being overdiagnosed and believed that making a diagnosis of FAS at birth could lead to improved treatment of an affected child. Physicians also believed that physician counseling was a more effective way of reducing the incidence of FAS/FAE than warning labels. Forty-one percent of the physicians placed the threshold for FAS at one to three drinks per day and 38% placed the threshold at one or fewer drinks a day. Thirty-five percent placed the estimated incidence of FAS at 1 to 2 per 1000 in the United States. We conclude that physicians are in relative agreement about the effects of drinking during pregnancy and the value of physician counseling but are misguided as to what constitutes a true risk level of drinking as far as the etiology of FAS is concerned. PMID:9884137

Abel, E L; Kruger, M

1998-12-01

381

Experience of establishment of multiple mini structure interview as part of student admission policy at Faculty of Medicine, King Abdulaziz University, 2011-2012.  

PubMed

Faculty of Medicine (FOM), King Abdulaziz University (KAU), requested for international recognition by the Laison Committee of Canadian Medical Education (LCME) during the period 2008-2010. Selection of medical students was a must standard in LCME. After obtaining a written permission from higher administration at KAU, a committee for the establishment of multiple-mini-interview (MMI) was formed and they conducted workshops to train faculty members at FOM on such process. The interviews were set up in a manner similar to that of an objective-structured clinical evaluation (OSCE), with the applicant moving from one station to another. The applicant was either asked to discuss a scenario or respond to direct questions. The interviewers used a standardized scoring form to rate candidates. When the data were analyzed, it was found that the performance of men students was insignificantly higher than that of women students in stations concerned with personnel character and professionalism. The performance of women students was significantly higher in all other stations (those considered motivation, morals and bioethics, team work and communication skills and behaviors). The women's overall performance was significantly higher than men. PMID:23581900

El Says, Faten; Ayuob, Nasra; Fahmy, Abdel Rhman; El Fayez, Fayza; Hasanian, Mohamed; El Deek, Basem

2013-01-01

382

[Health Promotion and care of immigrant population in the eighth Municipality of Rome: the experience of the Medicine Service of Solidarity and the University Hospital of Tor Vergata].  

PubMed

The VIII Municipality of Rome is characterized by a high poverty rate, by the presence of many immigrant communities and by the lack of health services available to vulnerable social groups. In 2005 , the " Servizio di Medicina Solidale" of the University Hospital of "Tor Vergata", for the first time intervened in this Municipality regarding Immigrant Health. The paper describes the activities and organization of this service from January 2005 to December 2007. It demonstrates a complex epidemiological picture of 2,374 immigrants, characterized by a young population, mostly women with reproductive health issues, followed by children with infectious and nutritional problems and, ultimately, adults who accessed the service, firstly for gastroenterological problems, secondly for cardiovascular problems and finally for dysmetabolic disorders. The paper describes the culture-centered actions of Health Promotion and Health Education in order to improve health awareness and promote integration of immigrants. The study indicates that the limited number of hospital admissions ( n.20) with respect to the number of outpatient visits (n.70.000) in the first seven years of the service " Medicina Solidale" has significantly reduced the number of unnecessary admissions to emergency wards. In conclusion it is notable that the cost of such intervention results eight times inferior to emergency admissions and further confirms that a Community medicine approach is sustainable. PMID:23532164

Palombi, Leonardo; Ercoli, Lucia; Buonomo, Ersilia; Mancinelli, Sandro; De Luca, Simona; Laurenti, Serena; Visconti, Giuseppe; Bollero, Patrizio

383

Evolution: medicine's most basic science  

Microsoft Academic Search

The celebrations for the bicentennial of Darwin's birth will be grand for good reason. Darwin's discoveries are generating new insights faster than ever, especially in medicine and public health. Second editions of important books on evolution and medicine have just appeared, major conferences are taking place worldwide, and scores of universities now off er courses on evolutionary medicine. However, physicians

Randolph M Nesse

2008-01-01

384

Progress in Complementary and Alternative Medicine Research  

PubMed Central

Integrative Medicine at Yale and the Yale Center for Continuing Medical Education (CME) sponsored the Yale Research Symposium on Complementary and Integrative Medicine in March 2010 at the university’s School of Medicine. Delivering the keynote address, Dr. Josephine P. Briggs, Director of the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM) at the National Institutes of Health (NIH), highlighted recent progress made in the field of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM).

Millet, John D.

2010-01-01

385

A Comparison of Invalidating Family Environment Characteristics between University Students Engaging in Self-Injurious Thoughts & Actions and Non-Self-Injuring University Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Individuals experiencing non-suicidal self-injurious (NSSI) thoughts only are greatly overlooked by current research. This investigation aimed at determining how three groups of university students differed in their reported quality of childhood relationships with parents, and histories of physical and sexual abuses. These groups included students…

Martin, Jodi; Bureau, Jean-Francois; Cloutier, Paula; Lafontaine, Marie-France

2011-01-01

386

A Comparison of Invalidating Family Environment Characteristics between University Students Engaging in Self-Injurious Thoughts & Actions and Non-Self-Injuring University Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Individuals experiencing non-suicidal self-injurious (NSSI) thoughts only are greatly overlooked by current research. This investigation aimed at determining how three groups of university students differed in their reported quality of childhood relationships with parents, and histories of physical and sexual abuses. These groups included…

Martin, Jodi; Bureau, Jean-Francois; Cloutier, Paula; Lafontaine, Marie-France

2011-01-01

387

Affordability: Family Incomes and Net Prices at Highly Selective Private Colleges and Universities. Discussion Paper No. 66r  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|College tuition is frequently compared, in press and politics, to the US median family income. That is, however, a highly misleading benchmark since schools with need-based financial aid rarely charge students from median income families the reported sticker price. Working from the financial aid records of individual students at twenty-eight…

Hill, Catharine; Winston, Gordon; Boyd, Stephanie

2004-01-01

388

A Qualitative Analysis of Family Support and Interaction among African American College Students at an Ivy League University  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The support that the African American college students from predominantly White campuses get from the families and other kinship networks is analyzed. It is concluded that the family support helps in reducing stress level among college students and provides an emotional support to them.

Barnett, Marina

2004-01-01

389

Social work training in family practice.  

PubMed

Three undergraduate social-work students were placed in the University Department of Family Medicine for their field practice. This was the first time an element of social work had been introduced in this particular setting. A before and after analysis of opinions from all three parties revealed that the experience was a worthwhile one for all concerned. The services provided by the social workers were wide ranging and perceived to be important by residents and staff. PMID:20468991

Roy, R G; Adams, D W

1973-11-01

390

Social Work Training In Family Practice  

PubMed Central

Three undergraduate social-work students were placed in the University Department of Family Medicine for their field practice. This was the first time an element of social work had been introduced in this particular setting. A before and after analysis of opinions from all three parties revealed that the experience was a worthwhile one for all concerned. The services provided by the social workers were wide ranging and perceived to be important by residents and staff.

Roy, R. G.; Adams, D. W.

1973-01-01

391

Collaboration between family physicians and community pharmacists  

PubMed Central

Abstract Objective To ascertain the opinions of graduating family physicians about collaboration between family physicians and community pharmacists. Design Anonymous online survey. Setting Two French-Canadian university family medicine residency programs. Participants The 2010 and 2011 graduating family physicians (N = 343) from the University of Montreal and Laval University in Quebec. Main outcome measures Content of written prescriptions; frequency of and reasons for consultations with community pharmacists; and graduates’ perceptions of sharing professional responsibilities with community pharmacists. Results The response rate was 54.2%. Overall, graduates were open to collaborating actively with community pharmacists. For example, at least 60% of graduates reported that it was important to write on prescriptions about any changes to patients’ medication and creatinine clearance. Most graduates responded positively to sharing responsibility for the adjustment of treatment of patients with certain chronic conditions (88.3% for anticoagulation, 64.7% for hypercholesterolemia, 61.2% for hypertension, and 60.6% for diabetes) and for the initiation of treatment of minor conditions according to a collective prescription (80.6% for traveler’s diarrhea, 74.1% for juvenile acne, and 73.6% for allergic rhinitis). However, such interprofessional collaboration requires that each professional group continues to adapt to its roles and responsibilities. Conclusion Family medicine graduates are open to actively collaborating with community pharmacists, but they have some reservations regarding sharing certain responsibilities. As collaborative practices are changing, graduates’ opinions should be documented once they are actually practising.

Cote, Luc; Normandeau, Michelle; Maheux, Brigitte; Authier, Louise; Lefort, Louise

2013-01-01

392

Collaborative Care for Older Adults with low back pain by family medicine physicians and doctors of chiropractic (COCOA): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial  

PubMed Central

Background Low back pain is a prevalent and debilitating condition that affects the health and quality of life of older adults. Older people often consult primary care physicians about back pain, with many also receiving concurrent care from complementary and alternative medicine providers, most commonly doctors of chiropractic. However, a collaborative model of treatment coordination between these two provider groups has yet to be tested. The primary aim of the Collaborative Care for Older Adults Clinical Trial is to develop and evaluate the clinical effectiveness and feasibility of a patient-centered, collaborative care model with family medicine physicians and doctors of chiropractic for the treatment of low back pain in older adults. Methods/design This pragmatic, pilot randomized controlled trial will enroll 120 participants, age 65 years or older with subacute or chronic low back pain lasting at least one month, from a community-based sample in the Quad-Cities, Iowa/Illinois, USA. Eligible participants are allocated in a 1:1:1 ratio to receive 12 weeks of medical care, concurrent medical and chiropractic care, or collaborative medical and chiropractic care. Primary outcomes are self-rated back pain and disability. Secondary outcomes include general and functional health status, symptom bothersomeness, expectations for treatment effectiveness and improvement, fear avoidance behaviors, depression, anxiety, satisfaction, medication use and health care utilization. Treatment safety and adverse events also are monitored. Participant-rated outcome measures are collected via self-reported questionnaires and computer-assisted telephone interviews at baseline, and at 4, 8, 12, 24, 36 and 52 weeks post-randomization. Provider-rated expectations for treatment effectiveness and participant improvement also are evaluated. Process outcomes are assessed through qualitative interviews with study participants and research clinicians, chart audits of progress notes and content analysis of clinical trial notes. Discussion This pragmatic, pilot randomized controlled trial uses a mixed method approach to evaluate the clinical effectiveness, feasibility, and participant and provider perceptions of collaborative care between medical doctors and doctors of chiropractic in the treatment of older adults with low back pain. Trial registration This trial registered in ClinicalTrials.gov on 04 March 2011 with the ID number of NCT01312233.

2013-01-01

393

Long-Term Follow-Up and Results of Thirty Pediatric Intracranial Hydatid Cysts: Half a Century of Experience in the Department of Neurosurgery of the School of Medicine at the University of Istanbul (1952–2001)  

Microsoft Academic Search

A series of 30 documented cases of intracranial hydatid cyst out of 33 pediatric and 45 total patients admitted to the Department of Neurosurgery of the School of Medicine at Istanbul University within the years 1952–1996 is presented. The pediatric population consisted of 73% of the series. Twenty patients (66%) are alive and well after a follow-up period of 8–45

Cagatay Onal; Faruk Unal; Orhan Barlas; Nail Izgi; Kemal Hepgul; M. Inan Turantan; Ali Canbolat; Kirac Turker; Cicek Bayindir; Husameddin K. Gokay; Umur Kaya

2001-01-01

394

A Comparison of Invalidating Family Environment Characteristics Between University Students Engaging in Self-Injurious Thoughts & Actions and Non-Self-Injuring University Students  

Microsoft Academic Search

Individuals experiencing non-suicidal self-injurious (NSSI) thoughts only are greatly overlooked by current research. This\\u000a investigation aimed at determining how three groups of university students differed in their reported quality of childhood\\u000a relationships with parents, and histories of physical and sexual abuses. These groups included students experiencing only\\u000a NSSI thoughts (n = 126), students engaging in NSSI actions (n = 90), and students exhibiting neither

Jodi Martin; Jodi MartinJean-Francois Bureau; Paula Cloutier; Marie-France Lafontaine

395

Posttraumatic stress disorder among Sri Lankan University students as a consequence of their exposure to family violence.  

PubMed

The article presents the results of a study on the association between exposure to family violence (i.e., witnessing interparental violence and experiencing parental violence) during childhood and adolescence and adult posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The study was conducted among a self-selected convenience sample of 476 students from Sri Lanka, using a self-administered questionnaire. The findings indicate that the more participants witnessed interparental violence and the more they experienced parental violence, the more they exhibited PTSD symptoms. Moreover, the findings reveal that participants' exposure to family violence explains a significant amount of the variance in their PTSD over and above the variance that can be attributed to their sociodemographic characteristics (age, gender, number of siblings, and family's socioeconomic status) and to their perceptions of the environment and functioning of their families. The limitations of the study and recommendations for future research are discussed. PMID:19106201

Haj-Yahia, Muhammad M; Tishby, Orya; de Zoysa, Piyanjali

2008-12-23

396

Impact of system-level changes and training on alcohol screening and brief intervention in a family medicine residency clinic: a pilot study  

PubMed Central

Background Although screening and brief intervention (SBI) are effective in reducing unhealthy alcohol use, major challenges exist in implementing clinician-delivered SBI in primary care settings. This 2006–2007 pilot study describes the impact of systems changes and booster trainings designed to increase SBI rates in a family medicine residency clinic which annually screened adults with a self-administered AUDIT-C questionnaire and used paper prompts to encourage physician interventions for patients with positive screens. Methods Investigators added the Single Alcohol Screening Question (SASQ) to nursing vital signs forms, added a checkbox for documenting brief interventions to the clinicians’ outpatient encounter form, and conducted one-hour nurse and clinician booster trainings. Impact was measured using chart reviews conducted before implementing systems changes, then six weeks and six months post-implementation. Results At all three time points screening rates using AUDIT-C plus SASQ exceeded 90%, however AUDIT-C screening decreased to 85% after 6 months (p=.025). Identification of unhealthy alcohol users increased from 4% to 22.9% at six weeks and 18.8% at six months (p=.002) using both screens. Nursing vital signs screening using the SASQ reached 71.4% six weeks after implementation but decreased to 45.5% at six months. Changes in clinician brief intervention rates did not achieve statistical significance. Conclusions This is the second study reporting sustained primary care alcohol screening rates of more than 90%. Screening patients with SASQ and/or AUDIT-C identified a higher percentage of patients with unhealthy alcohol use. Dissemination of effective strategies for identifying unhealthy alcohol users should continue, while future research should focus on identifying more effective strategies for increasing intervention rates.

2013-01-01

397

Medicinal plants of the Bulgarian dendroflora  

Microsoft Academic Search

The paper offers characterisation of the medicinal plants of the Bulgarian dendroflora. Of the 406 species of arboreal plants found on the Bulgarian territory, 180 (44.3 %) belonging to 97 genera and 44 families are considered medicinal and are used in different areas of medicine. Pinophyta is represented by 11 species, while Magnoliophyta by 169 species. Most medicinal plants belong

Alexander N. Tashev; Evgeni I. Tsavkov

398

A comparison of invalidating family environment characteristics between university students engaging in self-injurious thoughts & actions and non-self-injuring university students.  

PubMed

Individuals experiencing non-suicidal self-injurious (NSSI) thoughts only are greatly overlooked by current research. This investigation aimed at determining how three groups of university students differed in their reported quality of childhood relationships with parents, and histories of physical and sexual abuses. These groups included students experiencing only NSSI thoughts (n = 126), students engaging in NSSI actions (n = 90), and students exhibiting neither (n = 1,080). Results showed that individuals experiencing NSSI thoughts only, and those engaging in NSSI actions reported poorer relationships with parents and more physical abuse than the No NSSI group; however, NSSI thoughts and NSSI action groups had similar outcomes to one another for most variables. These findings suggest that individuals experiencing only NSSI thoughts share similar negative childhood environments associated with engagement in NSSI action and that they should be included in future research, particularly investigations aimed at identifying protective factors that could prevent them from engaging in NSSI. PMID:21365260

Martin, Jodi; Bureau, Jean-François; Cloutier, Paula; Lafontaine, Marie-France

2011-03-02

399

III Workshop Nazionale Divirologia Veterinaria. Facolta id Medicina Veterinaria, Held in degli Studie di Bari, Valenzano (Bari), on 11-12, Giugno 2009. Riassunti (III National Workshop on Veterinary Virology. Held in Veterinary Medicine, University of Bar, Valenzano (Bari). June 11-12, 2009. Abstact Book).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Workshop is organized in collaboration with the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine of the University of Bari and the Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale della Puglia e Basilicata. It is aimed to gather veterinarians, biologists and technicians from the ...

C. Buonavoglia E. Falcone F. M. Ruggeri S. Babsa

2009-01-01

400

Classroom Lesson on Safe OTC Medicine Use - for Adult ...  

Center for Drug Evaluation (CDER)

Text Version... over-the-counter medicine this week? ... OTC medicine? So, have you or has anyone in your family used an over-the-counter medicine this week? ... More results from www.fda.gov/downloads/drugs/resourcesforyou

401

Nuclear Medicine.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Describes the use of nuclear medicine techniques in diagnosis and therapy. Describes instrumentation in diagnostic nuclear medicine and predicts future trends in nuclear medicine imaging technology. (Author/MM)|

Badawi, Ramsey D.

2001-01-01

402

The resident-as-teacher educational challenge: a needs assessment survey at the National Autonomous University of Mexico Faculty of Medicine  

PubMed Central

Background The role of residents as educators is increasingly recognized, since it impacts residents, interns, medical students and other healthcare professionals. A widespread implementation of resident-as-teacher courses in developed countries' medical schools has occurred, with variable results. There is a dearth of information about this theme in developing countries. The National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM) Faculty of Medicine has more than 50% of the residency programs' physician population in Mexico. This report describes a needs assessment survey for a resident as teacher program at our institution. Methods A cross-sectional descriptive survey was developed based on a review of the available literature and discussion by an expert multidisciplinary committee. The goal was to identify the residents' attitudes, academic needs and preferred educational strategies regarding resident-as-teacher activities throughout the residency. The survey was piloted and modified accordingly. The paper anonymous survey was sent to 7,685 residents, the total population of medical residents in UNAM programs in the country. Results There was a 65.7% return rate (5,186 questionnaires), a broad and representative sample of the student population. The residents felt they had knowledge and were competent in medical education, but the majority felt a need to improve their knowledge and skills in this discipline. Most residents (92.5%) felt that their role as educators of medical students, interns and other residents was important/very important. They estimated that 45.5% of their learning came from other residents. Ninety percent stated that it was necessary to be trained in teaching skills. The themes identified to include in the educational intervention were mostly clinically oriented. The educational strategies in order of preference were interactive lectures with a professor, small groups with a moderator, material available in a website for self-learning, printed material for self-study and homework, and small group web-based learning. Conclusions There is a large unmet need to implement educational interventions to improve residents' educational skills in postgraduate educational programs in developing countries. Most perceived needs of residents are practical and clinically oriented, and they prefer traditional educational strategies. Resident as teachers educational interventions need to be designed taking into account local needs and resources.

2010-01-01

403

Family-of-Origin Relationships and Self-Differentiation among University Students with Bulimic-Type Behaviors.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines the difference between undergraduate students who self-reported a high incidence of bulimic-type behaviors and those students who reported a low incidence of bulimic type behaviors. Results show that females exhibiting bulimic behaviors tend to fuse with their families and lack personal authority, whereas males indicated fusion and…

Levy, Patricia A.; Hadley, Barbara J.

1998-01-01

404

Posttraumatic Stress Disorder among Sri Lankan University Students as a Consequence of Their Exposure to Family Violence  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The article presents the results of a study on the association between exposure to family violence (i.e., witnessing interparental violence and experiencing parental violence) during childhood and adolescence and adult posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The study was conducted among a self-selected convenience sample of 476 students from Sri…

Haj-Yahia, Muhammad M.; Tishby, Orya; de Zoysa, Piyanjali

2009-01-01

405

WORKING WITH LOW-INCOME FAMILIES, PROCEEDINGS OF THE AHEA WORKSHOP (UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO, MARCH 15-19, 1965).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|WORK WITH LOW INCOME FAMILIES HAS BEEN PART OF THE BASIC PHILOSOPHY OF THE AMERICAN HOME ECONOMICS ASSOCIATION (AHEA) SINCE ITS INCEPTION. A NATIONAL WORKSHOP WAS ATTENDED BY STATE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION AND U.S. OFFICE OF EDUCATION PERSONNEL, TEACHER-EDUCATORS, EXTENSION WORKERS, SOCIAL WORKERS, AND PERSONS WITH RELATED INTERESTS. TEXTS OF THE…

American Home Economics Association, Washington, DC.

406

Posttraumatic Stress Disorder among Sri Lankan University Students as a Consequence of Their Exposure to Family Violence  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The article presents the results of a study on the association between exposure to family violence (i.e., witnessing interparental violence and experiencing parental violence) during childhood and adolescence and adult posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The study was conducted among a self-selected convenience sample of 476 students from Sri…

Haj-Yahia, Muhammad M.; Tishby, Orya; de Zoysa, Piyanjali

2009-01-01

407

Research and Development Program (for the Laboratory of Nuclear Medicine and Radiation Biology, University of California, Los Angeles). Fiscal Year 1966.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The biomedical program of the Laboratory of Nuclear Medicine and Radiation Biology for FY 1966 is conducted within the scope of the following categories: Somatic Effects of Radiation; Combating Detrimental Effects of Radiation; Molecular and Cellular Leve...

1964-01-01

408

A Resident's Perspective Of Burnout In A Hospice Setting Or Home Hospice Palliative Care As Anti-burnout During Family Medicine Residency  

Cancer.gov

Principles Of Family Practice Principles Of Family Practice ¾ ¾ Access to care Access to care ¾ ¾ Continuity of care Continuity of care ¾ ¾ Comprehensive care Comprehensive care ¾ ¾ Coordination of care Coordination of care ¾ ¾ Contextual care Contextual care Jimbo M.

409

Comprehensive Family Practice Clerkship in a Minority Institution  

PubMed Central

A comprehensive family practice clerkship program at Howard University College of Medicine has been conducted since 1970. This institution is one of three predominantly black institutions offering a family practice program. The senior clerkship is mandatory and at least 20 to 25 percent of each class elect to participate in a four-to six- week family practice preceptorship. As a result of the clerkship's success, over 50 percent of the program's graduates actively practice in primary medical manpower shortage or medically underserved areas.

Bang, Ki Moon; Greene, E. Josephine; Williams, Henry W.; Leath, Brenda A.; Matthews, Ruth

1988-01-01

410

Medicines and \\  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sixty-four urban children grades K-6 were interviewed in an exploratory study in 1980 to provide information about children's knowledge and orientations toward medicines and abusable substances. Responses indicated children believe themselves to have considerable autonomy in medicine use — 72% said they ask for medicines, 67% get medicines for themselves and others, and 19% (more often older and less economically

Patricia J. Bush; Frances R. Davidson

1982-01-01

411

Validation of HPLC Determination of Phenolic Acids Present in Some Lamiaceae Family Plants  

Microsoft Academic Search

HPLC columns with different length, particle size, and chemical properties of sorbent were tested and compared for the application in the development of the universal HPLC assay for determination of phenolic compounds, which could be present in some medicinal plants from the Lamiaceae family (Melissa officinalis, Rosmarinus officinalis, Salvia officinalis, Thymus serpyllum, and Origanum vulgare). More RP?18 columns have been

Alica Ziaková; Eva Brandšteterová

2003-01-01

412

First-generation college students and U.S. citizens: is the university perceived like family or strangers?  

PubMed

We examined school sense of community (SSOC) between university students who are first-generation U.S. citizens (n = 936) or students who are non-first-generation U.S. citizens (n = 3,556), and between first-generation college students (n = 1,114) and students who are non-first-generation college students (n = 3,378), both attending an urban and diverse Roman Catholic university. Participants reported their SSOC and whether the school was innovative and inclusive, examining whether a higher sense of school community and positive notions of one's campus mission related to being a first-generation U.S. citizen or a first-generation college student. Results showed that a lack of belongingness may lead to lower academic achievement, school dropouts, and less school involvement. Future research should explore why there is a differing impact on school sense of community and campus mission perception for students who are first-generation U.S. citizens or first-generation college students. PMID:23256592

Williams, Shannon M; Karahalios, Vicky S; Ferrari, Joseph R

2013-01-01

413

Medication Guide Antidepressant Medicines, Depression and ...  

Center for Drug Evaluation (CDER)

Text Version... Patients and their families or other caregivers should discuss all treatment choices ... effects of the medicine prescribed for you or your family member. ... More results from www.fda.gov/downloads/drugs/drugsafety

414

Evaluation of a university-community partnership to provide home-based, mental health services for children from families living in poverty.  

PubMed

A university-community partnership is described that resulted in the development of community-based mental health services for young children from families living in poverty. The purpose of this pilot project was to implement an evidence-based treatment program in the homes of an at-risk population of children with significant emotional and behavior problems that were further complicated by developmental delays. Outcomes for 237 children who participated in the clinic's treatment program over a 2 year period are presented. Comparisons are included between treatment completers and non-completers and the issues of subject attrition, potential subject selection bias, and the generalizability of the results are addressed. The need for more professionals who are trained to address mental health issues in very young children who live in very challenging conditions are discussed. PMID:23054148

Fox, Robert A; Mattek, Ryan J; Gresl, Brittany L

2012-09-30

415

Update in Palliative Medicine  

Microsoft Academic Search

he goal of palliative medicine is to prevent and relieve suffering and to support the best quality of life for patients and their families, regardless of the stage of the disease or need for other therapies (1). Palliative care ex- pands traditional disease model medical treatments to in- clude the goals of enhancing quality of life, optimizing function, and helping

Nathan E. Goldstein; Daniel Fischberg

416

[Market oriented occupational medicine].  

PubMed

The history and the recent state of occupational medicine in Hungary, and its relation with governmental labor organizations are analyzed. In the past 20 years, large "socialist" factories were replaced by smaller companies employing fewer workers. They have been forced to establish contract with occupational health providers. Many of them offer primary care services, whereas family physicians having a board examination in occupational medicine are allowed to work in this field as well. The market of occupational medicine is less regulated, and ethical rules are not always considered. Undercutting prices is a common practice. The recent system could be improved by some regulations which should be respected. There is no reason to make rough changes establishing a new market for profit oriented insurance companies, and to allow employees and employers to work without specification neglecting international agreements. Occupational medicine should be supervised again by the health authorities instead of economists who have quite different, short-term priorities. PMID:22951411

Rurik, Imre; Cseh, Károly

2012-09-01

417

Universal Similarity  

Microsoft Academic Search

We survey a new area of parameter-free similarity distance measures useful in\\u000adata-mining, pattern recognition, learning and automatic semantics extraction.\\u000aGiven a family of distances on a set of objects, a distance is universal up to\\u000aa certain precision for that family if it minorizes every distance in the\\u000afamily between every two objects in the set, up to the

Paul Vitanyi

2005-01-01

418

50 Years: Veterinary Medicine.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Describes the history, research, teaching strategies, and specialties of the University of California at Davis School of Veterinary Medicine. Documents effects of changing societal attitudes toward wildlife, pets, working animals, and food animals on curriculum, the systems approach to disease, comparative genetics, biotechnology, the ecology of…

Narlesky, Lynn

1998-01-01

419

Rewarding family medicine while penalizing comprehensiveness? Primary care payment incentives and health reform: the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA).  

PubMed

Family physicians' scope of work is exceptionally broad, particularly with increasing rurality. Provisions for Medicare bonus payment specified in the health care reform bill (the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act) used a narrow definition of primary care that inadvertently offers family physicians disincentives to delivering comprehensive primary care. PMID:22086805

Petterson, Stephen; Bazemore, Andrew W; Phillips, Robert L; Xierali, Imam M; Rinaldo, Jason; Green, Larry A; Puffer, James C

420

Diabetes Medicines  

MedlinePLUS

Diabetes means your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. If you can't control your diabetes with wise food choices and physical activity, you may need diabetes medicines. The kind of medicine you take depends ...

421

Mitochondrial Medicine  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mitochondrial medicine represents a complex of clinical, biochemical, pathological and genetic information crucial in diagnosis\\u000a and treatment. An outline of the development of mitochondrial medicine was for the first time published by Luft in 1994 [22].\\u000a Several organizations are focused on mitochondrial medicine, from experimental and clinical research (Mitochondrial Research\\u000a Society – MRS) to patients application (Mitochondrial Medicine Society –MMS),

Anna Gvozdjáková

422

The molecular basis for high affinity of a universal ligand for human bombesin receptor (BnR) family members  

PubMed Central

There is increased interest in the Bn-receptor family because they are frequently over/ectopically-expressed by tumors and thus useful as targets for imaging or receptor-targeted-cytotoxicity. The synthetic Bn-analog,[D-Tyr6,?-Ala11,Phe13,Nle14]Bn(6-14)[Univ.Lig] has the unique property of having high affinity for all three human BNRs(GRPR,NMBR,BRS-3), and thus could be especially useful for this approach. However, the molecular basis of this property is unclear and is the subject of this study. To accomplish this, site-directed mutagenesis was used after identifying potentially important amino acids using sequence homology analysis of all BnRs with high affinity for Univ.Lig compared to the Cholecystokinin-receptor(CCKAR), which has low affinity. Using various criteria 74 amino acids were identified and 101 mutations made in GRPR by changing each to those of CCKAR or to alanine. 22 GRPR mutations showed a significant decrease in affinity for Univ.Lig(>2-fold) with 2 in EC2[ D97N,G112V], 1 in UTM6[Y284A], 2 in EC4[R287N,H300S] showing >10-fold decrease in Univ.Lig affinity. Additional mutations were made to explore the molecular basis for these changes. Our results show that high affinity for Univ.Lig by human Bn-receptors requires positively charged amino acids in extracellular (EC)-domain 4 and to a lesser extent EC2 and EC3 suggesting charge-charge interactions may be particularly important for determining the general high affinity of this ligand. Furthermore, transmembrane amino acids particularly in UTM6 are important contributing both charge-charge interactions as well as interaction with a tyrosine residue in close proximity suggesting possible receptor-peptide cation-pi or H–bonding interactions are also important for determining its high affinity.

Uehara, Hirotsugu; Hocart, Simon J.; Gonzalez, Nieves; Mantey, Samuel A.; Nakagawa, Tomoo; Katsuno, Tatsuro; Coy, David H.; Jensen, Robert T.

2012-01-01

423

Dynamic Diagnosis of Familial Prion Diseases Supports the ?2-?2 Loop as a Universal Interference Target  

PubMed Central

Background Mutations in the cellular prion protein associated to familial prion disorders severely increase the likelihood of its misfolding into pathogenic conformers. Despite their postulation as incompatible elements with the native fold, these mutations rarely modify the native state structure. However they variably have impact on the thermodynamic stability and metabolism of PrPC and on the properties of PrPSc aggregates. To investigate whether the pathogenic mutations affect the dynamic properties of the HuPrP(125-229) ?-fold and find possible common patterns of effects that could help in prophylaxis we performed a dynamic diagnosis of ten point substitutions. Methodology/Principal Findings Using all-atom molecular dynamics simulations and novel analytical tools we have explored the effect of D178N, V180I, T183A, T188K, E196K, F198S, E200K, R208H, V210I and E211Q mutations on the dynamics of HuPrP(125-228) ?-fold. We have found that while preserving the native state, all mutations produce dynamic changes which perturb the coordination of the ?2-?3 hairpin to the rest of the molecule and cause the reorganization of the patches for intermolecular recognition, as the disappearance of those for conversion inhibitors and the emergence of an interaction site at the ?2-?2 loop region. Conclusions/Significance Our results suggest that pathogenic mutations share a common pattern of dynamical alterations that converge to the conversion of the ?2-?2 loop into an interacting region that can be used as target for interference treatments in genetic diseases.

Meli, Massimiliano; Gasset, Maria; Colombo, Giorgio

2011-01-01

424

Medicine Women.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Described as a survival manual for Indian women in medicine, this collected work contains diverse pieces offering inspiration and practical advice for Indian women pursuing or considering careers in medicine. Introductory material includes two legends symbolizing the Medicine or Spirit Woman's role in Indian culture and an overview of Indians…

Beiswenger, James N., Ed.; Jeanotte, Holly, Ed.

425

Expanding the Scope of Anatomical Sciences: The Case of "Human Evolution--The Fossil Evidence" Course at the Sackler School of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The Anatomy Department at Tel-Aviv University Medical School offers its students an elective course of 26 didactic hours on human evolution. The course is open to students from all faculties, who must fulfill all academic requirements, without a prerequisite of a background in anatomy. Approximately 120 students attend annually, a third of them…

Notzer, Netta; Abramovitz, Ruth

2012-01-01

426

Washington University School of Medicine: A Distinctive Program in Deaf Education Studies at the Program in Audiology and Communication Sciences (PACS)  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Developments in universal newborn hearing screening programs and assistive hearing technology have had considerable effects on the speech, language, and educational success of children who are deaf or hard of hearing. Several recent research studies of children who are deaf or hard of hearing and who use spoken language as their primary method of…

Hayes, Heather

2010-01-01

427

Differences and Similarities in the Practice of Medicine Between Australia and the United States of America: Challenges and Opportunities for The University of Queensland and the Ochsner Clinical School  

PubMed Central

Background In 2008, The University of Queensland (UQ) in Australia and the Ochsner Health System (OHS) in Louisiana entered into a partnership that will allow a cohort of United States (US) citizens to enroll in an Australian medical degree program in which students will study for their first 2 years of medical school in Brisbane, Australia, and then complete the final 2 years of clinical education at OHS in New Orleans. The program's goal is to create graduates eligible to practice in Australia, New Zealand, and/or the US. Methods We reviewed the UQ School of Medicine–established Ochsner Clinical School (OCS) and the translation of the UQ clinical curriculum to the US. Results The curriculum presented both challenges and opportunities, revealing the similarities and differences in the practice of medicine between Australia and the US. This paper highlights some of them, in terms of the healthcare systems, the health professional workforce, and medical education. For example, the healthcare system and medical school curriculum in Australia have a strong focus on primary care. Conclusions This new model in education may help train more primary care physicians for the US, providing physicians with a unique global perspective to face the future challenges of medical practice.

Jones, Peter D.; Seoane, Leonardo; Deichmann, Richard; Kantrow, Charles

2011-01-01

428

Prevention in Family Practice  

PubMed Central

Prevention has had an enormous impact on the health of western nations. Because people are now living longer, educating patients about prevention is becoming increasingly important. Priorities for preventive medicine are reviewed; in office practice, the most important preventive strategies are helping patients to quit smoking, giving advice on nutrition, recommending moderate regular exercise, detecting and treating patients at high risk for suicide, and detecting and treating hypertensive patients. Teachers of family medicine can improve the teaching of prevention by helping to establish liaisons between departments of family medicine and community and preventive health. The future impact of prevention on medical care is also discussed.

Reynolds, J. L.

1983-01-01

429

[Cases of acute fatal alcohol poisoning in the material of the Department of Forensic Medicine, Medical University in Bia?ystok, in the years 1984-2004].  

PubMed

The paper presents the analysis of acute fatal ethanol poisonings in the material of the Forensic Medicine Institute in Bia?ystok. Our study has shown that a predominant majority of the deceased died during the phase of alcohol elimination. Moreover, these people were often in good health and generally fit. In view of the immense material analyzed by the present authors and the 20-year time span under investigation, it may be concluded that middle-aged men constitute a group the highest risk of death resulting from acute alcohol poisoning. The assessment of alcohol concentration in blood and other body liquids, for example in urine, allows for defining the phase when death of an alcohol-imbibing individual occurred. In medico-legal and clinical practice, such a determination is very important in terms of initiating appropriate treatment or specifying the mechanism of death. PMID:20441077

Ok?ota, Magdalena; Niemcunowicz-Janica, Anna; Za?uski, Janusz; Wardaszka, Zofia; Ptaszy?ska-Sarosiek, Iwona

430

Educational and Career Outcomes of an Internal Medicine Preceptorship for First-Year Medical Students  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE Medical educators have attempted in recent years to provide quality clinical experiences for medical students early in their medical training. We questioned whether participating in a preceptorship in internal medicine (PIM) resulted in better performances on subsequent clinical rotations and increased interest in internal medicine. PARTICIPANTS Fifty-four students have participated in the PIM to date, with control groups consisting of students who applied for it but were not selected (n = 36), students participating in a preceptorship in family medicine (n = 168), and the remaining students (n = 330). DESIGN Prospective cohort study. SETTING University medical center and community practices. INTERVENTION A 2-month, clinical preceptorship following the first year of medical school. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS The following outcomes were assessed: scores in the introduction to clinical medicine course; grades in the medical ethics course; scores from the internal medicine clerkship; and choosing a career in internal medicine. In their second year, PIM students scored higher in both semesters of the introduction to clinical medicine course (87% and 86% vs 84% and 84%, p’s < .01) and were more likely to receive honors in ethics (50% vs 29%, p < .01) than non-PIM students. During the internal medicine clerkship, PIM students’ scores were significantly higher on an objective structured clinical examination (79% vs 76%, p = .05), ambulatory clinical evaluations (80% vs 76%, p < .01), and ov