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1

BOARD CERTIFIED FAMILY PHYSICIANS The Department of Family Medicine at the University of Vermont College of Medicine and The  

E-print Network

BOARD CERTIFIED FAMILY PHYSICIANS The Department of Family Medicine at the University of Vermont College of Medicine and The University of Vermont Medical Center is seeking board certified/eligible family physicians to join the full-time faculty. This appointment at the University of Vermont

Hayden, Nancy J.

2

Teaching Humanities in Medicine: The University of Massachusetts Family Medicine Residency Program Experience  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Humanities in medicine (HIM) is an important aspect of medical education intended to help preserve humanism and a focus on patients. At the University of Massachusetts Family Medicine Residency Program, we have been expanding our HIM curriculum for our residents including orientation, home visit reflective writing, didactics and a department-wide…

Silk, Hugh; Shields, Sara

2012-01-01

3

A University Department of Family Medicine After Ten Years  

PubMed Central

The Department of Family Medicine at the University of Washington was started ten years ago after a major curriculum change in the medical school placed new emphasis on education and training of family physicians for the surrounding region in Washington, Alaska, Montana and Idaho (WAMI). This department has organized active programs in patient care, teaching and research at the university base and in a number of affiliated community sites throughout the region. The department is well accepted within the mission of the medical school. Almost a third of graduating medical students choose postgraduate training in family practice. Almost 90 percent of the graduates of the ten programs within the department's network of family practice residencies are established in active family practices, with more than two thirds settling in the WAMI region. Follow-up studies show that these graduates feel well prepared for their practices; are providing a broad range of services in rural, suburban and urban settings; are typically involved in partnership or group practice; and are generally well satisfied with their personal and professional lives. PMID:7064482

Geyman, John P.; Phillips, Theodore J.

1982-01-01

4

Research Publications in Medical Journals (1992-2013) by Family Medicine Authors - Suez Canal University-Egypt  

PubMed Central

Background: Research in family medicine (FM) provides an important contribution to its discipline. Family medicine research can contribute to many areas of primary care, ranging from the early diagnosis to equitable health care. Publication productivity is important in academic settings as a marker for career advancement. Objective: To describe the publications by family medicine researcher authors between 1992 and 2013. Materials and Methods: All full text, original articles published by family medicine researcher; author with affiliation to the Suez Canal University were collected using the internet and hand search. The journals that published for family medicine researcher authors were identified. Author characteristics were described. The trend of publications was described. All articles were analyzed for their characteristics, including the themes and study designs according to predefined criteria. Results: Along 22 years, 149 research articles were published by 48 family medicine authors in 39 medical journals. The largest category in publications was related to Family physician/Health service (FP-HS, n = 52 articles), followed by ‘Patient’ category (n = 42). All the studies were quantitative; the largest group was represented by cross-sectional studies (76.5%). Conclusions: The publication productivity by family medicine researchers are going to be increased. FP-HS and patient topics were mostly addressed in publications. Cross-sectional studies exceeded any other designs. There is need to put more emphasis on intervention studies. Continuous assessment and improvement of FM research production and publication is recommended.

Abdulmajeed, Abdulmajeed A.; Ismail, Mosleh A.; Nour-Eldein, Hebatallah

2014-01-01

5

The role of the European Academy of Teachers in General Practice and Family Medicine in family medicine education in Europe--the experience of the University of Maribor.  

PubMed

Primary health care is important item of political agendas since Alma Ata conference in 1978. West Balkans share common history in development of primary care since 1920s when Andrija Stampar introduced social and community based primary care concepts. The first known specialist training in general practice in the world started in former Yugoslavia in the early 1960s. Since then, much has been done in the field of general practice and family medicine and this is reflected in The European Academy of Teachers in General Practice and Family Medicine (EURACT), which is a network organisation within World Organization of National Colleges, Academies and Academic Associations of General Practitioners/Family Physicians Region Europe (WONCA Europe). Its aim is to foster and maintain high standards of care in European general practice by promoting general practice as a discipline by learning and teaching. EURACT developed several documents and teachers courses which can serve the development of family medicine curricula in new established departments of medical schools. This is also the case at Maribor Medical School, where learning outcomes and teaching methods are in concordance with EURACT teaching agenda, but also some innovative approaches are used, such as art and e-learning environment as teaching methods. PMID:23311490

Klemenc-Ketiš, Zalika; Kersnik, Janko

2012-01-01

6

College of Medicine, Departments of Family Medicine and Psychiatry  

E-print Network

College of Medicine, Departments of Family Medicine and Psychiatry Present 46th Annual Family Medicine Review Course and the 7th Family Medicine/Psychiatry CME Conference SPEAKING THE SAME LANGUAGE: Physicians in Family Practice and Psychiatry; Nurses and Nurse Practitioners serving patients in the same

Cui, Yan

7

Teaching Family Medicine  

PubMed Central

Students should study the family system just as they would an organ system, making use of family studies and home visits. A comparison of private and academic faculty revealed the need to instruct private practitioners on patient selection and teaching methodology. Experience has shown that patients from the lower socioeconomic classes tend to allow the student to participate more in their family life and health care and that, in return, the student is often able to assist these patients in some way. Faculty must guide, monitor, and assist students with problems. Audit of students' and patients' reports on and evaluations of the family study will provide valuable information for planning future programs or revamping continuing ones. PMID:21308094

Baumslag, Naomi

1976-01-01

8

Family Medicine Digital Resource Library  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This resource was created by the Society of Teachers of Family Medicine (STFM) and was designed to support the sharing and collaborative development of educational resources among family medicine educators. The initial grant for this endeavor came from the National Library of Medicine and the project has been expanded a number of times. The STFM Resource Library contains lectures, learning modules, case studies, recommended websites, and conference handouts. The materials are all made available at no cost, and visitors can get started by looking at the Recently Uploaded area. Here they will find "Teaching Today With Tomorrow's Tools," "Teaching Inpatient Billing and Coding," and dozens of other newer items. Moving on, visitors can also use the Search area to focus on certain items of interest or browse the FAQ area to find answers to common questions. Finally, visitors can create their own personalized accounts or upload their own materials for possible inclusion in the archive. [KMG

9

The William Carlos Williams Poetry Competition, sponsored by the Department of Family and Community Medicine at Northeast Ohio Medical University  

E-print Network

The William Carlos Williams Poetry Competition, sponsored by the Department of Family schools of medicine or osteopathy in the United States and Canada. Each year hundreds of entries Poems The top three poets will be awarded $300, $200, and $100 respectively and will be invited

Emmons, Scott

10

Obstetrical practice after a family medicine residency.  

PubMed Central

To determine factors influencing physicians to provide obstetrical care, a questionnaire was sent to all 149 graduates of the University of Western Ontario family medicine program from 1987 to 1991, inclusive. Few (37.1%) of the 105 respondents still performed low-risk deliveries. Most frequently cited negative factors included interference with lifestyle, interruption of regular office routine, and insufficient training in obstetrics. Rural postal code, neonatal advanced life support training, and older age positively correlated with obstetrical practice. Ways in which residency training programs could address the alarming decrease in family practice obstetrics are discussed. PMID:8130674

Buckle, D.

1994-01-01

11

Family Medicine in Rural Communities  

PubMed Central

Recruitment of physicians for rural communities is a continuing problem in Canada. Medical schools can be involved through preferential admission policies. Departments of family medicine across the country are including on-site training in rural communities and are seeking to improve their rural program curriculum. The McGill rural program is described from its origins to its present state. A rural coordinator oversees 12 sites at which both residents and students are trained. One site at Shawville, Que, is described from a rural physician's point of view. Imagesp2011-ap2012-ap2014-a PMID:21233945

Hirsh, Michael; Wootton, J.S.C.

1990-01-01

12

EVOLUTION AND MEDICINE Evolution, Medicine, and the Darwin Family  

E-print Network

of evolution in the 1700s and 1800s is typified by how the medical family of Charles Darwin, including hisEVOLUTION AND MEDICINE Evolution, Medicine, and the Darwin Family Michael F. Antolin Published grandfather Dr. Erasmus Darwin and father Dr. Robert Waring Darwin, directly and indirectly guided Charles

Antolin, Michael F.

13

Occupational Medicine: Opportunities for Family Physicians  

PubMed Central

Occupational medicine has grown recently in sophistication and strength. Occupational physicians with specialty certification focus their attention on toxicology and health hazards in the workplace, compliance with regulatory requirements, and preventive services. These physicians are often employed by organizations. Most occupational health care will continue to be provided by family physicians, who may also be the physicians closest to the workers and their families. There are many opportunities for family physicians to develop their skills in occupational health care and to incorporate occupational medicine into their practices. PMID:21248919

Guidotti, Tee L.

1989-01-01

14

A Program of Faculty Development in Family Medicine  

PubMed Central

This article describes one teacher's experience in a program of faculty development offered by the University of Western Ontario, Department of Family Medicine. Faculty development is summarized according to faculty's four roles: clinician, teacher, administrator and researcher. Emphasis is put on self-growth and development. The difficulties encountered after a sabbatical leave are briefly discussed. PMID:21289719

Grand'Maison, Paul

1981-01-01

15

Veterinary Medicine 2 | Veterinary Medicine University of Saskatchewan  

E-print Network

Veterinary Medicine #12;2 | Veterinary Medicine University of Saskatchewan The Western College notices Mid-June #12;University of Saskatchewan Veterinary Medicine | 3 WHY VETERINARY MEDICINE of Saskatchewan -- the only Canadian university with a full complement of health sciences colleges and schools

Saskatchewan, University of

16

Psychiatric Emergencies In Family Medicine  

PubMed Central

The family physician is often called upon to deal with psychiatric emergencies. In order to deal with these situations expertly, he/she must be familiar with the techniques of psychiatric assessment and management. A knowledge of community resources is invaluable in treating such patients. PMID:20469247

Smith, V. A.; Goluboff, S.

1975-01-01

17

Alternative medicine and the family physician.  

PubMed

The seven categories of alternative medicine, as established by the National Institutes of Health Office of Alternative Medicine, are mind-body interventions, bioelectromagnetic therapies, alternative systems of medical practice, manual healing methods, pharmacologic and biologic treatments, herbal medicine, and diet and nutrition. Mind-body approaches have been shown to be effective in a variety of conditions. Acupuncture and homeopathy are alternative systems of medical practice that may be beneficial. Chiropractic manipulation for low back pain and infant message for enhancing growth are two methods of manual healing. While the literature on herbal medicine is vast, most of it focuses on a single approach for a specific condition. Traditional herbalists use a combination of herbs individualized for the specific person. As more and more people turn to alternative therapies, it is important for family physicians to be open to their patients' interest in alternative approaches. PMID:8940955

Gordon, J S

1996-11-15

18

Geriatric fellowships in family medicine: status and directions.  

PubMed

The American Board of Medical Specialties recently approved the concept of certificates of added qualifications in geriatrics within both internal medicine and family practice. Certification requirements have been worked out for each training model, and questions have quite naturally arisen addressing whether the developing family practice model is substantially different from the longer established internal medicine model. A survey was made of 12 family practice based geriatric fellowship programs. Program directors were asked how they felt family practice geriatrics differed from internal medicine geriatrics in approaches to patient care and training and in areas of research interests. Information was also gathered about program size, length of training, and operational status. Eight fellowship programs were found to be active at the time of the survey, but only two for more than six months. Of the eight functioning programs, four were currently without fellows--a forewarning, perhaps, of potential recruitment problems for additional programs under development. Survey responses indicated a universal feeling among directors of family practice geriatric programs that their model does serve a unique function. Within the "distinguishing characteristics" most frequently noted, an emphasis on psychosocial and family issues can be identified. This emphasis can also be seen in the suggestions for distinctive research, with an indication of special interest in the delivery of health care. PMID:3342958

Koenig, H G; Kvale, J N; Hector, M

1988-01-01

19

[Wound care at family medicine office].  

PubMed

Chronic wound is a big load for the patient, family and health care system. A team of family medicine doctors can provide care for chronic wound patient that will eventually lead to complete healing. With good education and proper work organization with defined mandatory changes in prescribing orthopedic tools (sets for compression), chronic wound patients can be completely managed at the primary care level. Such an approach would be possible through better and more efficient communication with secondary health care (wound centers), as well as telemedicine consultations. PMID:25326992

Podobnik, Drina

2014-10-01

20

High altitude medicine for family physicians.  

PubMed Central

High altitude medicine deals with a continuum of diseases ranging from a mild discomfort to serious ailments affecting all organ systems, including the lungs, brain, and eyes. Decreased oxygen tension is the primary cause. The main principles of prevention are staging and graded ascent to allow acclimatization. Adventure travel to high altitude destinations is becoming increasingly popular; family physicians should be informed of the medical problems associated with such travel. Images p712-a p715-a p716-a PMID:8199523

McMurray, S. J.

1994-01-01

21

Family Medicine Curriculum Resource Project: the future.  

PubMed

Under contract to the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), the Society of Teachers of Family Medicine (STFM) created an undergraduate medical education curricular resource designed to train physicians to practice in the 21st century. An interdisciplinary group of more than 35 educators worked for 4 years to create the Family Medicine Curriculum Resource (FMCR). By consensus, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) competencies were adopted as the theoretical framework for this project. The FMCR provides materials for the preclerkship years, the third-year family medicine clerkship, the postclerkship year, and faculty development, as well as guidance for integrating topics of special interest to the federal government (such as, geriatrics, Healthy People 2010, genetics, informatics) into a 4-year continuum of medical education. There are challenges inherent in implementing each component of the FMCR. For example, can the ACGME competency-based approach be adapted to undergraduate medical education? Can the densely packed preclerkship years be adapted to include more focused effort on developing these competencies, and whose job is it anyway? What is "core" to being a competent clinician, and what information can be obtained when needed from medical informatics sources? Will family medicine educators embrace the FMCR recommendations for their third-year clerkships? Will exit assessment of the competency levels of graduating medical students be achieved, and can it make them more capable residents? Can faculty in different clinical and educational settings integrate the teaching of "how to learn" into their repertoire? How will faculty development innovation progress in a time of increasing emphasis on clinical productivity? Developing a common language and adoption of core competencies for all levels of medical education is imperative in a society that is focusing on improving health care quality and outcomes. The FMCR Project has developed a curricular resource to assist medical educators in this task. The challenge for the future is to measure how the FMCR is used and to ascertain if it has an influence on better patient and system outcomes. PMID:17186449

Stearns, Jeffrey A; Stearns, Marjorie A; Paulman, Paul M; Chessman, Alexander W; Davis, Ardis K; Sherwood, Roger A; Sheets, Kent J; Steele, David J; Matson, Christine C

2007-01-01

22

University of Glasgow Forensic Medicine and Science  

E-print Network

University of Glasgow Forensic Medicine and Science COURSE IN FORENSIC MEDICAL SCIENCES Session and Course Fee to: Dr Marjorie Turner Forensic Medicine and Science University of Glasgow Glasgow G12 8QQ Tel

Glasgow, University of

23

THE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, IRVINE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE  

E-print Network

is located at UC Irvine Medical Center in Orange. 101 The City Drive South Orange, CA 92868 877.UCI.DOCS (824 with these cancers. She is enthusiastic about bringing new clinical trials to UC Irvine's Chao Family Comprehensive University of California, Irvine School of Medicine Chao Family Comprehensive Cancer Center UC Irvine

George, Steven C.

24

University of Mississippi School of Medicine  

E-print Network

-Prelim/Ophthalmology University Hospitals Jackson, MS Michael Foster Medicine-Pediatrics University Hospitals Jackson, MS #12;Page, VA Robert Besinger Ophthalmology Research University Hospitals Jackson, MS Summer Allen Internal Medicine University Hospitals Jackson, MS Lauren Bethea Obstetrics-Gynecology University Hospitals Jackson

Raucher, Drazen

25

PREVENTIVE MEDICINE AT THE YALE UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF MEDICINE*  

E-print Network

division of the Department of Internal Medicine at the Yale University School of Medicine, has been established on the principle that preventive medicine is part of clinical medicine. This calls for a broad use of the term clinical medicine. It implies that clinical medicine means more than the practice of the technics of diagnosis and therapeutics, for, although it deals primarily with the care of the sick individual, it is also concerned with the whole subject of disease in living people. In other words, clinical medicine is not a specialty; it is the mother of the clinical specialties, such as internal medicine and surgery, and their subdivisions. As the aims of preventive medicine are (according to our definition) also concerned with the whole subject of disease in living people and particularly with the potentially sick individual, we find in this fact the justification for placing the new division in the midst of the clinical activities of the school. This assignment is by no

John R

26

PRIMARY CARE RESEARCH: 2012DIVISION OF FAMILY MEDICINE AND PRIMARY CARE,  

E-print Network

1 PRIMARY CARE RESEARCH: 2012DIVISION OF FAMILY MEDICINE AND PRIMARY CARE, FACULTY OF MEDICINE AND HEALTH SCIENCES, STELLENBOSCH UNIVERSITY #12;2 3 PRIMARY CARE RESEARCH 2012 PRIMARY CARE RESEARCH 2012 2 0 1 2 #12;4 5 PRIMARY CARE RESEARCH 2012 PRIMARY CARE RESEARCH 2012 INTRODUCTION CLINICAL RESEARCH

Geldenhuys, Jaco

27

Approach to hoarding in family medicine  

PubMed Central

Abstract Objective To review the presentation of hoarding and provide basic management approaches and resources for family physicians. Sources of information PubMed was searched from 2001 to May 2011. The MeSH term hoarding was used to identify research and review articles related to the neuropsychological aspects of hoarding and its diagnosis and treatment. Main message Hoarding is often a hidden issue in family medicine. Patients with hoarding problems often present with a sentinel event such as a fall or residential fire. Although hoarding is traditionally associated with obsessive-compulsive disorder, patients more commonly have secondary organic disease associated with hoarding behaviour or have hoarding in absence of substantial compulsive traits. Hoarding disorder is expected to be included in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th edition. Management is best provided by a multidisciplinary approach when possible, and an increasing number of centres provide programs to improve symptoms or to reduce harm. Pharmacologic management has been shown to be of some help for treating secondary causes. In the elderly, conditions such as dementia, depression, and substance abuse are commonly associated with hoarding behaviour. Attempts should be made to keep patients in their homes whenever possible, but an assessment of capacity should guide the approach taken. Conclusion Hoarding is more common than family physicians realize. If hoarding is identified, local resources should be sought to assist in management. Assessment and treatment of underlying causes should be initiated when secondary causes are found. It is expected that primary hoarding will be a new diagnosis in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th edition. PMID:23064916

Frank, Christopher; Misiaszek, Brian

2012-01-01

28

UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE COLLEGE OF MEDICINE  

E-print Network

UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE COLLEGE OF MEDICINE Student Records Policy Approved by: Committee, investigations, and disciplinary actions are kept in the University of Tennessee Health Science to others except by student request. The University of Tennessee Health Science Center

Cui, Yan

29

[The German University Medicine Map].  

PubMed

The University Medicine Map is a major step towards the realization of more transparency regarding the overall services of the medical schools in research, teaching, and patient care within the German university system. It includes comparative information about all 36 medical schools in Germany for the following areas: legal framework, finance, personnel, medical research, teaching and medical education, as well as patient care. The complete set of data for this map is accessible online under www.landkarte-hochschulmedizin.de and a selection of data is also available in print. Advantages and possible political implications for the higher education sector as well as the public domain are illustrated. Finally, the perspectives for future developments are indicated. PMID:19593538

Lohölter, R; Sass, H; von Jagow, G

2009-08-01

30

Family medicine training in sub-Saharan Africa: South–South cooperation in the Primafamed project as strategy for development  

PubMed Central

Background. Health-care systems based on primary health care (PHC) are more equitable and cost effective. Family medicine trains medical doctors in comprehensive PHC with knowledge and skills that are needed to increase quality of care. Family medicine is a relatively new specialty in sub-Saharan Africa. Objective. To explore the extent to which the Primafamed South–South cooperative project contributed to the development of family medicine in sub-Saharan Africa. Methods. The Primafamed (Primary Health Care and Family Medicine Education) project worked together with 10 partner universities in sub-Saharan Africa to develop family medicine training programmes over a period of 2.5 years. A SWOT (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats) analysis was done and the training development from 2008 to 2010 in the different partner universities was analysed. Results. During the 2.5 years of the Primafamed project, all partner universities made progress in the development of their family medicine training programmes. The SWOT analysis showed that at both national and international levels, the time is ripe to train medical doctors in family medicine and to integrate the specialty into health-care systems, although many barriers, including little awareness, lack of funding, low support from other specialists and reserved support from policymakers, are still present. Conclusions. Family medicine can play an important role in health-care systems in sub-Saharan Africa; however, developing a new discipline is challenging. Advocacy, local ownership, action research and support from governments are necessary to develop family medicine and increase its impact. The Primafamed project showed that development of sustainable family medicine training programmes is a feasible but slow process. The South–South cooperation between the ten partners and the South African departments of family medicine strengthened confidence at both national and international levels. PMID:24857843

Flinkenflögel, Maaike; Essuman, Akye; Chege, Patrick; Ayankogbe, Olayinka; De Maeseneer, Jan

2014-01-01

31

Are Catholic universities giving up reproductive medicine?  

PubMed

The Catholic Church has established a large number of universities worldwide. A dozen have schools of medicine and the impact of church doctrine on reproductive medicine appears widely disparate between some medical schools at Catholic universities in Europe and the rest of the world. The pressure of the Vatican on the Catholic universities in Belgium to abandon IVF is mounting. Comparison of the scientific performances by the Catholic universities with and without IVF shows that the absence of IVF is disastrous for research in reproductive medicine. PMID:18088520

Brosens, Ivo

2007-12-01

32

University of Mississippi School of Medicine  

E-print Network

University of Mississippi School of Medicine 2012 Match Kris Adams Pathology University of Mississippi Medical Center Jackson, MS Ben Anderson Oral-Maxillofacial Surgery University of Mississippi of Mississippi Medical Center Jackson, MS Hayes Baker Internal Med University of Virginia Charlottesville, VA

Raucher, Drazen

33

Clinical Evaluation in a Family Medicine Residency.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study assessed (1) the validity of the Bowman Gray School of Medicine evaluation instrument regarding the occurrence of halo effects and (2) possible relationships between the faculty's evaluations of the residents and the residents' cognitive knowledge and productivity. (MLW)

Herman, James M.; And Others

1985-01-01

34

The Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University  

E-print Network

The Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University EMERGENCY PROCEDURES MANUAL Prepared Supporting Services Revised ­ January, 2012 #12;ALBERT EINSTEIN COLLEGE of MEDICINE of YESHIVA UNIVERSITY

Yates, Andrew

35

The Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University  

E-print Network

The Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University EMERGENCY PROCEDURES MANUAL Prepared Resources Security Revised ­ May, 2013 #12;ALBERT EINSTEIN COLLEGE of MEDICINE of YESHIVA UNIVERSITY

Emmons, Scott

36

The current status of family medicine geriatric fellowships.  

PubMed

A questionnaire was sent to directors of all family medicine-affiliated geriatric fellowship programs to characterize trends and changes since institution of ACGME accreditation of fellowships. The number of fellowships has more than doubled since 1986, but few fellows graduate from these programs. There is currently a surplus of fellowship positions; over half of all programs did not recruit a first-year fellow for the 1989 academic year. In 1986, most family medicine-affiliated programs had independent administration. Almost half of the programs are now jointly sponsored with an internal medicine department. These programs are over six times more likely to train internists than family physicians. Although there has been a growth in geriatric training programs over the past three years, the number of family physicians seeking such training remains negligible. PMID:2099748

Reed, R L; Weiss, B D; Senf, J H

1990-01-01

37

COLLEGE OF VETERINARY MEDICINE UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE  

E-print Network

COLLEGE OF VETERINARY MEDICINE UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE The University of Tennessee, founded in 1794, established in 1974, is located in Knoxville on the University's Agricultural Campus along the Tennessee River. The city, the cultural center of East Tennessee, is situated in the Appalachian foothills of east central

Tennessee, University of

38

Characteristics of universal embezzling families  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Quantum state embezzlement is the transformation |? >?|? >|? > using only local operations, where |? > and |? > are multipartite quantum states. Exact embezzlement is an impossible task since it implies the increase of entanglement without communication. Surprisingly, van Dam and Hayden [Phys. Rev. A 67, 060302 (2003), 10.1103/PhysRevA.67.060302] find a universal embezzling family of states |? > that enables embezzlement in the bipartite setting with arbitrary precision as the dimension of |? > increases. Furthermore, the family is independent of the state |? > to be embezzled. We study embezzlement in the bipartite setting. We present various requirements and consequences, and infinitely many universal embezzling families inequivalent to that proposed by van Dam and Hayden. We include numerical studies of up to 33-qubit large local systems.

Leung, Debbie; Wang, Bingjie

2014-10-01

39

The development of academic family medicine in central and eastern Europe since 1990  

PubMed Central

Background Since the early 1990s former communist countries have been reforming their health care systems, emphasizing the key role of primary care and recognizing family medicine as a specialty and an academic discipline. This study assesses the level of academic development of the discipline characterised by education and research in central and eastern European (CEE) countries. Methods A key informants study, using a questionnaire developed on the basis of a systematic literature review and panel discussions, conducted in 11 central and eastern European countries and Russia. Results Family medicine in CEE countries is now formally recognized as a medical specialty and successfully introduced into medical training at undergraduate and postgraduate levels. Almost all universities have FM/GP departments, but only a few of them are led by general practitioners. The specialist training programmes in all countries except Russia fulfil the recommendations of the European Parliament. Structured support for research in FM/GP is not always available. However specific scientific organisations function in almost all countries except Russia. Scientific conferences are regularly organised in all the countries, but peer-reviewed journals are published in only half of them. Conclusions Family medicine has a relatively strong position in medical education in central and eastern Europe, but research in family practice is less developed. Although the position of the discipline at the universities is not very strong, most of the CEE countries can serve as an example of successful academic development for countries southern Europe, where family medicine is still not fully recognised. PMID:23510461

2013-01-01

40

University of Tennessee College of Medicine Scorecard College of Medicine Mission Statement and Scorecard Overview  

E-print Network

1 University of Tennessee College of Medicine Scorecard College of Medicine Mission Statement and Scorecard Overview The mission of the University of Tennessee College of Medicine is to improve the health the College of Medicine. Of note however, although they reflect the priorities of the University of Tennessee

Cui, Yan

41

Finding, keeping, and revitalizing the meaning in family medicine.  

PubMed

The culture of medicine is undergoing revolutionary change. Physicians are pulled in many directions involving the practice of medicine, the business of medicine, and the technology of medicine. Financial incentives and career promotions may be dependent upon such things as patient satisfaction scores, as well as adherence to guidelines for admissions and diagnostic testing. Of course, these metrics are monitored closely by hospitals, insurance companies, and the federal government. The resultant seemingly endless paperwork, deadlines, and multiple demands may result in a sense of time famine for physicians. Unfortunately, these expectations and demands can subsequently diminish the passion for medicine. Moreover, physicians are at high risk for significant physical and emotional exhaustion, often leading to a sense of demoralization. Physicians can ultimately lose sight of their reasons for choosing the field of medicine. Indeed, they can lose the inspiration and "meaning" derived from work in medicine all together. How, then, does one buffer oneself against such perils, and maintain the original passion and meaning in a chosen career of service to others? This article will describe one program's approach to promoting resilience and maintaining meaning during the residency training years through the establishment of a Meaning in Family Medicine Group. The conceptual background, approach to curriculum development, goals and objectives, resident feedback, and suggestions about how to carry this curriculum beyond the residency training years will be discussed. PMID:24261266

Van Dyke, Anne; Seger, Amy M

2013-01-01

42

Family Medicine in Undergraduate Medical Education in India  

PubMed Central

The Medical Council of India has set appropriate and relevant objectives to train each medical student into a basic doctor for the country. Even though they envisage that these basic doctors would work as physicians of first contact, providing for the health needs of India at primary and secondary care level, the site of training and the context of clinical teaching do not seem to empower the students to become a basic doctor. ‘Vision 2015’, the document written by the board of governors of medical council of India suggests reforms in medical education such as early clinical exposure, integration of principles of family medicine, and clinical training in the secondary care level. Family medicine training with trained family medicine faculty might add this missing ingredient to our basic doctor training. This article discusses the role of family medicine in undergraduate medical training. We also propose the objectives of such training, the structure of the training process, and the road blocks with possible solutions to its implementation.

Sankarapandian, Venkatesan; Christopher, Prince R.H.

2014-01-01

43

Family Medicine Faculty Medical Center Line (MCL) open rank  

E-print Network

of and applications from women and members of minority groups, as well as others who would bring additional dimensions experience in Family Medicine and clinical teaching, and either an established track record of funded for appointment in the Medical Center Line is excellence in the overall mix of clinical care, clinical teaching

Quake, Stephen R.

44

Pharmacist educators in family medicine residency programs: A qualitative analysis  

PubMed Central

Background 25-29% of North American family medicine residency programs utilize a pharmacist to teach residents. Little is known about the impact that these pharmacist educators have on residency training. The purpose of this study was to examine the experiences of residents, residency directors and pharmacists within Canadian family medicine residency programs that employ a pharmacist educator to better understand the impact of the role. Methods Recruitment from three cohorts (residents, residency directors, pharmacists) within family medicine residency programs across Canada for one-on-one semi-structured interviews followed by thematic analysis of anonymized transcript data. Results 11 residents, 6 residency directors and 17 pharmacist educators participated in interviews. Data themes were: (1) strong value of the teaching with respect to improved resident knowledge, confidence and patient care delivery; (2) lack of a formal pharmacotherapy curriculum; (3) desire for expansion of pharmacist teaching; (4) impact of teaching on collaboration; (5) impact of teaching on residency program faculty; and (6) lack of criticism of the role. Conclusions The pharmacist educator role is valued within residency programs across Canada and the role has a positive impact on several important aspects of family medicine resident training. Suggestions for improvement focused on expanding the teaching role and on implementing a formal curriculum for pharmacist educators to follow. PMID:22883928

2012-01-01

45

Internal medicine and family practice. Controversies, conflict and compromise.  

PubMed

Internal medicine and family practice have come into conflict because both specialties consider primary care to be part of their "turf". Moreover, in academic medical centers there is competition for scarce resources, including patients and support for residents. Analysis of the number of physicians in practice as well as in training shows clearly that both internists and family physicians, as well as pediatricians and obstetricians, must participate in rendering primary care if the needs for this type of physician are to be met. Internal medicine also has to achieve a better balance between generalists and subspecialists, and family practice must define its limitations, monitor its rapid growth and assure the quality of its training programs. Most of these problems are internal to each speciality rather than between two specialties, and, where there is conflict, compromise is clearly possible. PMID:1152923

Petersdorf, R G

1975-08-14

46

Female and Underrepresented Minority Faculty in Academic Departments of Family Medicine: Are Women and Minorities Better Off in Family Medicine?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Surveyed departments of family medicine to determine workforce composition and rank of women and minority faculty. Found that while faculty were more likely to be female or minority than in other medical disciplines, women and minorities were less likely to be associate or full professors. Found no institutional or departmental characteristics…

Lewis-Stevenson, Sherri; Hueston, William J.; Mainous, Arch G., III; Bazell, Carol; Ye, Xiaobu

2001-01-01

47

NorthwesternUniversity Feinberg School of Medicine  

E-print Network

research agenda. Applicants must be licensed or eligible for physical therapist licensure in Illinois- level physical therapists to become the future leaders of the profession, and scholars to conductNorthwesternUniversity Feinberg School of Medicine Director of Clinical Education/Assistant

Contractor, Anis

48

Department of Tropical Medicine: Tulane University  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Tulane Tropical Medicine Web Page at Tulane University School of Public Health, New Orleans, Louisiana includes current scientific global research projects, US and international academic degree programs, malaria research activities in epidemiology, chloroquine drug resistance, and severe disease. Also available: faculty info and contact points and links to health-related sites.

1997-01-01

49

Family Medicine Training in the Care of Older Adults--Has the Retreat Been Sounded?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses the trend away from geriatrics training in family medicine residency despite the growing need in society. Asserts that family medicine is failing to seize an opportunity to advance the care of older adults and discusses what would constitute acceptable training in geriatrics and how it should fit into the family medicine curriculum. (EV)

Mouton, Charles P.; Parker, Robert W.

2003-01-01

50

Yale University School of Medicine  

E-print Network

and Yale-New Haven Hospital) or Yale University, and/or their representatives or affiliates, [I have/or interview me for publicity, educational, marketing, advertising and fundraising purposes through internal will be retained by Public Affairs, Marketing or Communications staff or other appropriate, authorized person

51

Boston University School of Medicine Student Policy & Reference  

E-print Network

and Alcohol ______________________________ 29 Policy on Smoking at Boston University School of MedicineBoston University School of Medicine Student Policy & Reference MANUAL While every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of the information in this manual, Boston University School of Medicine

Finzi, Adrien

52

CLINICAL FACULTY CRITERIA Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry, University of Alberta  

E-print Network

CLINICAL FACULTY CRITERIA Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry, University of Alberta 1 VERSION 04 April 2012 Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry, University of Alberta CRITERIA FOR ACADEMIC RANKS, PROMOTIONS AND APPOINTMENTS FOR CLINICAL ACADEMIC COLLEAGUES I.INTRODUCTION The Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry, University

MacMillan, Andrew

53

The Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University  

E-print Network

The Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University EMERGENCY PROCEDURES MANUAL Prepared Resources Security Revised ­ October, 2014 #12;ALBERT EINSTEIN COLLEGE of MEDICINE of YESHIVA UNIVERSITY............................................................................................................................. 44 #12;ALBERT EINSTEIN COLLEGE of MEDICINE of YESHIVA UNIVERSITY EMERGENCY PROCEDURES MANUAL CIVIL

Jenny, Andreas

54

Pre-professional Medicine & Dentistry Portland State University offers the coursework and support services  

E-print Network

Pre-professional Medicine & Dentistry Portland State University offers the coursework and support of dentistry, allopathic medicine, osteopathic medicine, and podiatric medicine. Medical and dental schools

55

Why Family Medicine is a Good Career Choice for Indian Medical Graduates?  

PubMed Central

Internationally family medicine has evolved as an independent academic discipline of medical science and speciality vocational training for community based primary care physicians. India has a long tradition of family practice however due to various regulatory barriers family medicine did not optimally develop in mainstream medical education system for many decades. Recently, there is growing interest in this concept in India and family medicine is emerging as a viable career option for medical graduates in India. PMID:24791226

Kumar, Raman

2014-01-01

56

Family Medicine residents' knowledge and attitudes about end-of-life care.  

PubMed

The medical management of end-of-life symptoms, and the psychosocial care of the dying and their families have not been a specific part of the curriculum for undergraduate medical students or residency training programs. The purpose of our research was to assess family medicine residents' knowledge of and attitudes toward care of the dying. All entering (PGY1) and exiting (PGY2) residents of the Dalhousie University Family Medicine Residency Program were given a 50-item survey on end-of-life care. They survey contains two 25-item subscales concerning attitudes/opinions toward end-of-life care, and knowledge about care. Thirty-one of the 33 entering PGY1s 94%) and 26 of the 30 exiting PGY2s (86%) completed the surveys. Overall attitude scores were felt to be high among both groups, with little difference between them. Areas of concern regarding the adequacy of knowledge were found in relation to managing opioid drugs and the symptom of dyspnea. Interventions are now in development to address these issues in the residency program. In an era of subspecialties, the challenge of integrating these areas into the curriculum without creating rotations in specialist palliative care is an issue faced by most family medicine residency programs. PMID:11019501

Burge, F; McIntyre, P; Kaufman, D; Cummings, I; Frager, G; Pollett, A

2000-01-01

57

Context and trade-offs in family medicine.  

PubMed

This issue contains several articles that highlight the effect of context and tradeoffs encountered in the practice of family medicine. Some articles demonstrate how context affects the implementation of the patient-centered medical home model, the community risk of a measles outbreak, the rate of complementary and alternative medicine among different generations, and the number of family physicians primarily providing urgent and emergent care in a region. Tradeoffs are explored in articles that look at how electronic medical record use has changed the composition of workload in primary care and how the burgeoning number of clinical guidelines affects the choices made by family physicians. A look at diabetic patients' perceptions of their risk of negative outcomes reveals an interesting pattern of underestimation of the risk of death. Patients with chronic mental disorders are at risk of having significant difficulties in the workplace, which may place a heavy cost on the individual and society. An interesting retrospective study found that it takes a surprising amount of replacement therapy to correct vitamin D deficiency. PMID:25001992

Seehusen, Dean A; Bowman, Marjorie A; Neale, Anne Victoria

2014-01-01

58

Incorporating patient and family preferences into evidence-based medicine  

PubMed Central

Background Clinicians are encouraged to practice evidence-based medicine (EBM) as well as patient-centered medicine. At times, these paradigms seem to be mutually exclusive and difficult to reconcile. It can become even more challenging when trying to include the preferences of the patient’s family members. This paper discusses the basis for this quandary, providing examples of the real-world impact it has on diagnosis-seeking and treatment decision-making behaviors and how it might inform implementation of EBM practices. Analysis To further explore the role of friends and family in health-care decision making and to understand how patients and families introduce other considerations that may or may not be congruent with a strictly EBM approach, data from two research studies that examined healthcare–seeking behaviors are presented. Both studies explore how family and friends not only can influence health-care decisions but also may be a source of conflict for the patient and/or clinician. Conclusions Illness is a biological and social process. Clinicians who engage in EBM need to acknowledge the social and cultural factors that affect the health-care encounter, understand the important role of those factors in health-care decision making, and expand the paradigm of EBM to incorporate sociocultural influences more explicitly. Moreover, recognition of the influences family members and other caregivers have within the clinical encounter—by offering opinions and participating in treatment-related decision making—is needed and could lead to more efficient and effective health care. PMID:24565268

2013-01-01

59

University of Washington School of Medicine Department of Bioethics & Humanities  

E-print Network

of Graduate Studies Chief, UWMC Ethics Consult Service Adjunct, Family Medicine and School of Law Kelly Professor Adjunct, Health Services and Family Medicine James Whorton, PhD Professor Emeritus Education. The program offers training in research and clinical aspects of bioethics as well as empirical and normative

Anderson, Richard

60

SUBJECT EXAM TESTING DATES BY CLERKSHIP -2012-2013 FAMILY MEDICINE NEUROLOGY PEDIATRICS PSYCHIATRY SURGERY INTERNAL MED. OB/GYN  

E-print Network

SUBJECT EXAM TESTING DATES BY CLERKSHIP -2012-2013 FAMILY MEDICINE NEUROLOGY PEDIATRICS PSYCHIATRY SUBJECT EXAM SCHEDULE 8:00 AM ­ Pediatrics, Family Medicine, Psychiatry and Surgery 11:00 AM ­ Medicine

Berdichevsky, Victor

61

The Transplant Patient and Transplant Medicine in Family Practice  

PubMed Central

Over the last two decades in particular there has been a remarkable increase in the number of solid organ transplants being performed worldwide alongside improvements in long-term survival rates. However, the infrastructure at transplant centres has been unable to keep pace with the current volume of the transplant patient work load. These pressures on transplant specialist centres has led to calls for an increased role of the general practitioner (GP) managing particular aspects of transplant patients’ medical care. Indeed, many aspects of follow-up care such as screening for malignancies, preventing infection through immunisation programmes, and managing cardiovascular risk factors are already important aspects of family practice medicine. This paper aims to review some of the aspects of transplant patient care that is important for healthcare workers in family practice to manage.

Hughes, Lloyd D.

2014-01-01

62

UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN SCHOOL OF MEDICINE AND PUBLIC HEALTH  

E-print Network

UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN SCHOOL OF MEDICINE AND PUBLIC HEALTH DEPARTMENT OF POPULATION HEALTH@wisc.edu Gordon Ridley, Consultant to the Dean, School of Medicine and Public Health, gtridley@wisc.edu Teaching

Sheridan, Jennifer

63

40 years of biannual family medicine research meetings – The European General Practice Research Network (EGPRN)  

PubMed Central

Abstract Objective To document family medicine research in the 25 EGPRN member countries in 2010. Design Semi-structured survey with open-ended questions. Setting Academic family medicine in 23 European countries, Israel, and Turkey. Subjects 25 EGPRN national representatives. Main outcome measures Demographics of the general population and family medicine. Assessments, opinions, and suggestions. Results EGPRN has represented family medicine for almost half a billion people and > 300 000 general practitioners (GPs). Turkey had the largest number of family medicine departments and highest density of GPs, 2.1/1000 people, Belgium had 1.7, Austria 1.6, and France 1.5. Lowest GP density was reported from Israel 0.17, Greece 0.18, and Slovenia 0.4 GPs per 1000 people. Family medicine research networks were reported by 22 of 25 and undergraduate family medicine research education in 20 of the 25 member countries, and in 10 countries students were required to do research projects. Postgraduate family medicine research was reported by 18 of the member countries. Open-ended responses showed that EGPRN meetings promoted stimulating and interesting research questions such as comparative studies of chronic pain management, sleep disorders, elderly care, healthy lifestyle promotion, mental health, clinical competence, and appropriateness of specialist referrals. Many respondents reported a lack of interest in family medicine research related to poor incentives and low family medicine status in general and among medical students in particular. It was suggested that EGPRN exert political lobbying for family medicine research. Conclusion Since 1974, EGPRN organizes biannual conferences that unite and promote primary care practice, clinical research and academic family medicine in 25 member countries. PMID:24191874

2013-01-01

64

Yale University School of Medicine Heart Book  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In 1992, this book, edited by three Yale University professors of Medicine, and designed "in clear, simple language, [to] cover the entire spectrum of cardiovascular disease," was published by Hearst Books. Now the Yale University Medical Library has made it available via the web (in Adobe Acrobat [.pdf] format only). Its 29 chapters are arranged in six major sections: The Heart and How it Works; How to Lower Your Risk of Heart Disease; Steps in Making Diagnosis; Major Cardiovascular Disorders; Special Situations; and Methods of Treatment. Also included is a concise "encyclopedia" of 39 heart disorders, symptoms, diagnoses, and treatments, from Angina Pectoris to Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome. This book provides a wealth of information on heart disease to its intended general audience. The chapters are split into separate .pdf files for greater ease of downloading.

1997-01-01

65

Dean's Faculty Advisory Committee University of Tennessee, College of Medicine  

E-print Network

Dean's Faculty Advisory Committee University of Tennessee, College of Medicine November 7, 2003 that the chief contenders included: Autozone Club), Pink Palace, Library, Botanical Gardens, Fogelman Center

Cui, Yan

66

The Department of Family & Preventive Medicine KEEP THIS MANUAL AT THIS OFFICE OR  

E-print Network

1 The Department of Family & Preventive Medicine SAFETY & EMERGENCY MANUAL KEEP THIS MANUAL Emergency Management Agency, the American Red Cross, the Mayo Clinic Family Health Book, & Potential Violence on Campus.. 5 Weapon's on Campus......................................... 6 Harassment

Tipple, Brett

67

ALBERT EINSTEIN COLLEGE OF MEDICINE OF YESHIVA UNIVERSITY  

E-print Network

ALBERT EINSTEIN COLLEGE OF MEDICINE OF YESHIVA UNIVERSITY JACK AND PEARL RESNICK CAMPUS · 1300: Mr/Ms , social security # , who is presently associated with the Albert Einstein College of Medicine radiation exposure records be released to the Albert Einstein College of Medicine's Radiation Safety Office

Emmons, Scott

68

Medical advertising: the Family Encyclopaedia of Medicine scandal of 1914.  

PubMed

The past 100 years have seen a transition from a total ban in Britain on all advertising by doctors to the laity to almost total freedom of medical information, with probable benefit to public health but also a risk of loss of privacy. The Family Encyclopaedia of Medicine, written by Dr Hugh Howard Riddle and published by Lord Northcliffe's Daily Mail in 1914, started a flood of medical journalism in the press and the newer media. The lavishly advertised misattribution of its authorship to 'thirty eminent specialists', including Clifford Allbutt and William Osler, caused a major rumpus in the London Royal College of Physicians, but the fortnightly publication continued and became a four-volume book, popular with a public avid for more and more medical information. PMID:19227968

Jellinek, E H

2008-12-01

69

Need to teach family medicine concepts even before establishing such practice in a country  

PubMed Central

Background The practice of family medicine is not well established in many developing countries including Sri Lanka. The Sri Lankan Government funds and runs the health facilities which cater to the health needs of a majority of the population. Services of a first contact doctor delivered by full time, vocationally trained, Family Physicians is generally overshadowed by outpatient departments of the government hospitals and after hours private practice by the government sector doctors and specialists. This process has changed the concept of the provision of comprehensive primary and continuing care for entire families, which in an ideal situation, should addresses psychosocial problems as well and deliver coordinated health care services in a society. Therefore there is a compelling need to teach Family Medicine concepts to undergraduates in all medical faculties. Discussion A similar situation prevails in many countries in the region. Faculty of Medicine Peradeniya embarked on teaching family medicine concepts even before a department of Family Medicine was established. The faculty has recognized CanMed Family Medicine concepts as the guiding principles where being an expert, communicator, collaborator, advocate, manager and professional is considered as core competencies of a doctor. These concepts created the basis to evaluate the existing family medicine curriculum , and the adequacy of teaching knowledge and skills, related to family medicine has been confirmed. However inadequacies of teaching related to communication, collaboration, management, advocacy and professionalism were recognized. Importance of inculcating patient centred attitudes and empathy in patient care was highlighted. Adopting evaluation tools like Patient Practitioner Orientation Scale and Jefferson’s Scale of Empathy was established. Consensus has been developed among all the departments to improve their teaching programmes in order to establish a system of teaching family medicine concepts among students which would lead them to be good Family Physicians in the future. Summary Teaching Family Medicine concepts could be initiated even before establishing departments of family medicine in medical faculties and establishing the practice of family medicine in society. Family medicine competencies could be inculcated among graduates while promoting the establishment of the proper practice of Family Medicine in the society. PMID:24397851

2014-01-01

70

Illegitimacy and Other Purported Family Universals  

Microsoft Academic Search

Various features of the family have been argued to be universal among the world's societies. These include marriage and the family itself, male dominance and the division of labor by sex, incest taboos and exogamy, and the distinction between legitimate and illegiti mate birth. Each of these features except illegitimacy has a long history of theoretical and comparative investigation. The

Lewellyn Hendrix

1993-01-01

71

The Glass Is Half Full: Geriatric Precepting Encounters in Family Medicine  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Approximately 19% to 20% of all family medicine office visits involve care to patients older than age 65, yet limited research addresses family medicine geriatric education in the outpatient setting. This study explored how geriatric content is incorporated into resident/attending precepting encounters, using direct observation. An observer…

Rollins, Lisa K.; Martirosian, Tovia; Gazewood, John D.

2009-01-01

72

Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine Brand Platform  

E-print Network

1 Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine Brand Platform INTRODUCTION A brand customer benefit. Perhaps most importantly, a brand is an organizing principle that informs decisionmaking University College of Veterinary Medicine, a powerful brand supports efforts to do the following: renew

Pawlowski, Wojtek

73

Brand Guidelines Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine  

E-print Network

Brand Guidelines Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine Published February 9, 2010 djfhakjd ExitForwardBack #12;1 Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine Brand Guidelines Story and excellence. Introduction Introduction ExitForwardBack Logo Spacing Typography Color Palette Key Brand

Engman, David M.

74

Understanding of family medicine in Africa: a qualitative study of leaders’ views  

PubMed Central

Background The World Health Organization encourages comprehensive primary care within an ongoing personalised relationship, including family physicians in the primary healthcare team, but family medicine is new in Africa, with doctors mostly being hospital based. African family physicians are trying to define family medicine in Africa, however, there is little clarity on the views of African country leadership and their understanding of family medicine and its place in Africa. Aim To understand leaders’ views on family medicine in Africa. Design and setting Qualitative study with in-depth interviews in nine sub-Saharan African countries. Method Key academic and government leaders were purposively selected. In-depth interviews were conducted using an interview guide, and thematically analysed. Results Twenty-seven interviews were conducted with government and academic leaders. Responders saw considerable benefits but also had concerns regarding family medicine in Africa. The benefits mentioned were: having a clinically skilled all-rounder at the district hospital; mentoring team-based care in the community; a strong role in leadership and even management in the district healthcare system; and developing a holistic practice of medicine. The concerns were that family medicine is: unknown or poorly understood by broader leadership; poorly recognised by officials; and struggling with policy ambivalence, requiring policy advocacy championed by family medicine itself. Conclusion The strong district-level clinical and leadership expectations of family physicians are consistent with African research and consensus. However, leaders’ understanding of family medicine is couched in terms of specialties and hospital care. African family physicians should be concerned by high expectations without adequate human resource and implementation policies. PMID:23561788

Moosa, Shabir; Downing, Raymond; Mash, Bob; Reid, Steve; Pentz, Stephen; Essuman, Akye

2013-01-01

75

Report on Financing the New Model of Family Medicine  

PubMed Central

PURPOSE To foster redesigning the work and workplaces of family physicians, this Future of Family Medicine task force was created to formulate and recommend a financial model that sustains and promotes a thriving New Model of care by focusing on practice reimbursement and health care finances. The goals of the task force were to develop a financial model that assesses the impact of the New Model on practice finances, and to recommend health care financial policies that, if implemented, would be expected to promote the New Model and the primary medical care function in the United States for the next few decades. METHODS The members of the task force reflected a wide range of professional backgrounds and expertise. The group met in person on 2 occasions and communicated by e-mail and conference calls to achieve consensus. A marketing study was carried out using focus groups to test the concept of the New Model with consumers. External consultants with expertise in health economics, health care finance, health policy, and practice management were engaged to assist the task force with developing the microeconomic (practice level) and macroeconomic (societal level) financial models necessary to achieve its goals. Model assumptions were derived from the published medical literature, existing practice management databases, and discussions with experienced physicians and other content experts. The results of the financial modeling exercise are included in this report. The initial draft report of the findings and recommendations was shared with a reactor panel representing a broad spectrum of constituencies. Feedback from these individuals was reviewed and incorporated, as appropriate, into the final report. RESULTS The practice-level financial model suggests that full implementation of the New Model of care within the current fee-for-service system of reimbursement would result in a 26% increase in compensation (from $167,457 to $210,288 total annual compensation) for prototypical family physicians who maintain their current number of work hours. Alternatively, physicians could choose to decrease their work hours by 12% and maintain their current compensation. This result is sensitive to physician practice group size. The societal level financial model shows that modifications in the current reimbursement system could lead to further improvements in compensation for family physicians practicing the New Model of care. Reimbursement for e-visits and chronic disease management could further increase total annual compensation to $229,849 for prototypical family physicians maintaining their current number of work hours. The widespread introduction of quality-based physician incentive bonus payments similar to some current programs that have been implemented on a limited basis could further increase total annual compensation up to $254,500. The adoption of a mixed reimbursement model, which would add an annual per-patient fee, a chronic care bonus, and an overall performance bonus to the current reimbursement system, could increase total annual compensation for the prototypical family physician continuing the current number of hours worked to as much as $277,800, a 66% increase above current compensation levels. The cost of transition to the New Model is estimated to range from $23,442 to $90,650 per physician, depending on the assumed magnitude of productivity loss associated with implementing an electronic health record. The financial impact of enhanced use of primary care on the costs of health care in the United States was estimated. If every American used a primary care physician as their usual source of care, health care costs would likely decrease by 5.6%, resulting in national savings of $67 billion dollars per year, with an improvement in the quality of the health care provided. CONCLUSIONS Family physicians could use New Model efficiency to increase compensation or to reduce work time. There are alternative reimbursement methodologies compatible with the New Model that would allow family physicians to share in the health car

Spann, Stephen J.

2004-01-01

76

Montana State University 1 Family Financial Planning  

E-print Network

Montana State University 1 Family Financial Planning Dr. Deborah Haynes Department of Health and Human Development 217 Herrick Hall, Bozeman, MT 59717-3540 406-994-5013 Email: dhaynes@montana in this consortium, Montana State University offers two of the twelve required courses, in addition to the three

Lawrence, Rick L.

77

Learning behaviour and preferences of family medicine residents under a flexible academic curriculum  

PubMed Central

Abstract Objective To determine family medicine residents’ learning behaviour and preferences outside of clinical settings in order to help guide the development of an effective academic program that can maximize their learning. Design Retrospective descriptive analysis of academic learning logs submitted by residents as part of their academic training requirements between 2008 and 2011. Setting London, Ont. Participants All family medicine residents at Western University who had completed their academic program requirements (N = 72) by submitting 300 or more credits (1 credit = 1 hour). Main outcome measures Amount of time spent on various learning modalities, location where the learning took place, resources used for self-study, and the objective of the learning activity. Results A total of 72 residents completed their academic requirements during the study period and logged a total of 25 068 hours of academic learning. Residents chose to spend most of their academic time engaging in self-study (44%), attending staff physicians’ teaching sessions (20%), and participating in conferences, courses, or workshops (12%) and in postgraduate medical education sessions (12%). Textbooks (26%), medical journals (20%), and point-of-care resources (12%) were the 3 most common resources used for self-study. The hospital (32%), residents’ homes (32%), and family medicine clinics (14%) were the most frequently cited locations where academic learning occurred. While all physicians used a variety of educational activities, most residents (67%) chose self-study as their primary method of learning. The topic for academic learning appeared to have some influence on the learning modalities used by residents. Conclusion Residents used a variety of learning modalities and chose self-study over other more traditional modalities (eg, lectures) for most of their academic learning. A successful academic program must take into account residents’ various learning preferences and habits while providing guidance and training in the use of more effective learning methods and resources to maximize educational outcomes. PMID:25551133

Sy, Alice; Wong, Eric; Boisvert, Leslie

2014-01-01

78

Teaching adaptive leadership to family medicine residents: what? why? how?  

PubMed

Health care reform calls for patient-centered medical homes built around whole person care and healing relationships. Efforts to transform primary care practices and deliver these qualities have been challenging. This study describes one Family Medicine residency's efforts to develop an adaptive leadership curriculum and use coaching as a teaching method to address this challenge. We review literature that describes a parallel between the skills underlying such care and those required for adaptive leadership. We address two questions: What is leadership? Why focus on adaptive leadership? We then present a synthesis of leadership theories as a set of process skills that lead to organization learning through effective work relationships and adaptive leadership. Four models of the learning process needed to acquire such skills are explored. Coaching is proposed as a teaching method useful for going beyond information transfer to create the experiential learning necessary to acquire the process skills. Evaluations of our efforts to date are summarized. We discuss key challenges to implementing such a curriculum and propose that teaching adaptive leadership is feasible but difficult in the current medical education and practice contexts. PMID:22906156

Eubank, Daniel; Geffken, Dominic; Orzano, John; Ricci, Rocco

2012-09-01

79

Section of Geriatrics, Yale University School of Medicine The Section of Geriatrics, Department of Internal Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine,  

E-print Network

Section of Geriatrics, Yale University School of Medicine The Section of Geriatrics, Department investigation as well as evidence of excellent potential for an outstanding career in Geriatric clinical investigation. Geriatric clinical fellowship training is preferred but not required. Yale University

Lee, Daeyeol

80

Development of a portfolio of learning for postgraduate family medicine training in South Africa: a Delphi study  

PubMed Central

Background Within the 52 health districts in South Africa, the family physician is seen as the clinical leader within a multi-professional district health team. Family physicians must be competent to meet 90% of the health needs of the communities in their districts. The eight university departments of Family Medicine have identified five unit standards, broken down into 85 training outcomes, for postgraduate training. The family medicine registrar must prove at the end of training that all the required training outcomes have been attained. District health managers must be assured that the family physician is competent to deliver the expected service. The Colleges of Medicine of South Africa (CMSA) require a portfolio to be submitted as part of the uniform assessment of all registrars applying to write the national fellowship examinations. This study aimed to achieve a consensus on the contents and principles of the first national portfolio for use in family medicine training in South Africa. Methods A workshop held at the WONCA Africa Regional Conference in 2009 explored the purpose and broad contents of the portfolio. The 85 training outcomes, ideas from the WONCA workshop, the literature, and existing portfolios in the various universities were used to develop a questionnaire that was tested for content validity by a panel of 31 experts in family medicine in South Africa, via the Delphi technique in four rounds. Eighty five content items (national learning outcomes) and 27 principles were tested. Consensus was defined as 70% agreement. For those items that the panel thought should be included, they were also asked how to provide evidence for the specific item in the portfolio, and how to assess that evidence. Results Consensus was reached on 61 of the 85 national learning outcomes. The panel recommended that 50 be assessed by the portfolio and 11 should not be. No consensus could be reached on the remaining 24 outcomes and these were also omitted from the portfolio. The panel recommended that various types of evidence be included in the portfolio. The panel supported 26 of the 27 principles, but could not reach consensus on whether the portfolio should reflect on the relationship between the supervisor and registrar. Conclusion A portfolio was developed and distributed to the eight departments of Family Medicine in South Africa, and the CMSA, to be further tested in implementation. PMID:22385468

2012-01-01

81

SPACE PLANNING & OPERATIONS University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine  

E-print Network

SPACE PLANNING & OPERATIONS University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine Policy & Procedure: Public Space Use and Scheduling 12 May 2003 PLEASE NOTE THAT THIS POLICY IS CURRENTLY UNDER REVISION Description: School of Medicine Public Space (list defined below) is being centrally scheduled by Space

Bushman, Frederic

82

Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University  

E-print Network

4 1 Strategic Research Plan Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University Jack and Pearl Resnick Campus 1300 Morris Park Avenue Bronx, New York 10461 Albert Einstein College of Medicine.A. Cissell Consulting Design: GRAPHIC ARTS CENTER Creative Director: Peter Dama Albert Einstein College

Emmons, Scott

83

Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University ECU PHYSICIANS  

E-print Network

providers and administrative staff of the Brody School of Medicine to comply with the Comprehensive ErrorBrody School of Medicine at East Carolina University ECU PHYSICIANS Title: Comprehensive Error Rate. Policy Statement It is the policy of ECU Physicians to comply with all requests for medical record

84

UNIVERSITY OF DELAWARE OFFICE OF LABORATORY ANIMAL MEDICINE  

E-print Network

Rev 5/2010 UNIVERSITY OF DELAWARE OFFICE OF LABORATORY ANIMAL MEDICINE Buprenorphine ­ Mice SOP #A that mixture is not expired and has not changed appearance 2. Clean port of vial with alcohol prior to each

Firestone, Jeremy

85

UNIVERSITY OF DELAWARE OFFICE OF LABORATORY ANIMAL MEDICINE  

E-print Network

Rev 5/2010 UNIVERSITY OF DELAWARE OFFICE OF LABORATORY ANIMAL MEDICINE Baytril (Enrofloxacin with alcohol prior to each withdrawal 3. Withdraw drug using a new sterile needle and syringe for each animal 4

Firestone, Jeremy

86

UNIVERSITY OF DELAWARE OFFICE OF LABORATORY ANIMAL MEDICINE  

E-print Network

Rev 5/2010 UNIVERSITY OF DELAWARE OFFICE OF LABORATORY ANIMAL MEDICINE Buprenorphine ­ Rats SOP #A that mixture is not expired and has not changed appearance 2. Clean port of vial with alcohol prior to each

Firestone, Jeremy

87

Personalised medicine in Canada: a survey of adoption and practice in oncology, cardiology and family medicine  

PubMed Central

Introduction In order to provide baseline data on genetic testing as a key element of personalised medicine (PM), Canadian physicians were surveyed to determine roles, perceptions and experiences in this area. The survey measured attitudes, practice, observed benefits and impacts, and barriers to adoption. Methods A self-administered survey was provided to Canadian oncologists, cardiologists and family physicians and responses were obtained online, by mail or by fax. The survey was designed to be exploratory. Data were compared across specialties and geography. Results The overall response rate was 8.3%. Of the respondents, 43%, 30% and 27% were family physicians, cardiologists and oncologists, respectively. A strong majority of respondents agreed that genetic testing and PM can have a positive impact on their practice; however, only 51% agreed that there is sufficient evidence to order such tests. A low percentage of respondents felt that they were sufficiently informed and confident practicing in this area, although many reported that genetic tests they have ordered have benefited their patients. Half of the respondents agreed that genetic tests that would be useful in their practice are not readily available. A lack of practice guidelines, limited provider knowledge and lack of evidence-based clinical information were cited as the main barriers to practice. Differences across provinces were observed for measures relating to access to testing and the state of practice. Differences across specialties were observed for the state of practice, reported benefits and access to testing. Conclusions Canadian physicians recognise the benefits of genetic testing and PM; however, they lack the education, information and support needed to practice effectively in this area. Variability in practice and access to testing across specialties and across Canada was observed. These results support a need for national strategies and resources to facilitate physician knowledge, training and practice in PM. PMID:22021765

Bonter, Katherine; Currier, Nathan; Pun, Jason; Ashbury, Fredrick D

2011-01-01

88

The Art of Observation: Impact of a Family Medicine and Art Museum Partnership on Student Education  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background and Objectives: Compared to verbal communication, teaching the skill of observation is often shortchanged in medical education. Through a family medicine-art museum collaboration, we developed an elective course for second-year medical students titled the \\

Nancy C. Elder; Barbara Tobias; Amber Lucero-Criswell; Linda Goldenhar

89

Use of Non-Physician Professionals in Teaching Geriatrics to Internal Medicine and Family Practice Residents  

Microsoft Academic Search

Clinical training in geriatrics emphasizes the use of an interdisciplinary team in caring for the elderly patient. To examine how residency programs use non-physician professionals to teach geriatrics, a random sample consisting of one-third of all 420 internal medicine and 378 family practice training programs in the United States was surveyed. Thirty four percent of internal medicine programs and 68%

David B. Reuben; Arlene Fink; Susan Vivell; Susan H. Hirsch; John C. Beck

1992-01-01

90

DISCOVERIES/INVENTIONS School of Medicine in primary care, family  

E-print Network

pollution Innovative ways to eradicate disease -- from developing cancer vaccines to stem cell research medicine and #6 in research, internal medicine and geriatrics ­ U.S. News & World Report School of NursingASL, which offers sign language by cell phone for deaf and hard-of-hearing people WebAnywhere, a web

Yetisgen-Yildiz, Meliha

91

University of California, Irvine School of Medicine  

E-print Network

administrative functions pertaining to medical /9/20132 TABLE OF CONTENTS INTRODUCTION TO THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 3 ADMINISTRATIVE STRUCTURE 4 THE COMMITTEE ON CURRICULUM AND EDUCATIONAL POLICY (CEP) Error! Bookmark not defined. THE COMMITTEE ON PROMOTIONS AND HONORS

Rose, Michael R.

92

Effect of a Substance Abuse Curriculum on the Recognition of Alcoholism by Family Medicine Residents.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Prospectively evaluated identification of alcohol abusers by family practice residents in 278 family medicine inpatients. Overall, residents correctly identified 38.8 percent of current or past alcohol abusers and 94.8 percent of nonalcoholics. Correct diagnosis was unrelated to demographic factors, alcohol-related admission diagnosis, or years of…

Susman, Jeff; And Others

1992-01-01

93

Medicinal plants in an urban environment: the medicinal flora of Banares Hindu University, Varanasi, Uttar Pradesh  

PubMed Central

Varanasi is one of the oldest continuously inhabited cities of the world, and one of the most important Hindu pilgrimage sites. Despite this importance, very little information exits on the cities flora in general, and medicinal species found within its limit in particular. Traditional medicine plays a large role in Indian society. The presented study attempted to investigate if traditional plant use and availability of important common medicinal plants are maintained in urban environments. The paper presents information on the traditional uses of seventy-two plant species collected form the campus of Banares Hindu University, Varanasi, Uttar Pradesh, and highlights the uses of these plants by the local inhabitants. PMID:17996050

Verma, Archana K; Kumar, Munesh; Bussmann, Rainer W

2007-01-01

94

University of Maryland Medical System and School of Medicine  

E-print Network

University of Maryland Medical System and School of Medicine The Power of Partnership HEALTH the Scope of the University of Maryland Marlene and Stewart Greenebaum Cancer Center · Shock Trauma Expansion Dedicated to Maryland's Most Critically Ill and Injured · Research Partnership Across Disciplines

Weber, David J.

95

May 19, 2008 University of Connecticut School of Medicine  

E-print Network

Center and its School of Medicine (SOM). The University of Connecticut Health Center Space Management to the University of Connecticut Health Center Space Management Policy. The Dean may choose to delegate some or all quantitatively and qualitatively every year by the Dean. In addition, effective use of existing space, and future

Kim, Duck O.

96

WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF MEDICINE DEPARTMENT OF PHYSIOLOGY & PHARMACOLOGY  

E-print Network

WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF MEDICINE DEPARTMENT OF PHYSIOLOGY & PHARMACOLOGY 2013 SPRING Virginia University Frisbee 31 William Stauber, Ph.D. Professor Department of Physiology & Pharmacology Hardy, Ph.D. Mark Paternostro, Ph.D. Associate Professors of Physiology & Pharmacology West Virginia

Mohaghegh, Shahab

97

[Specialization in family medicine--has all the planned been achieved?].  

PubMed

The planned, comprehensive inclusion of general practitioners/family physicians in specialist education has begun with the project entitled Harmonization of Family Medicine Service with European Standards by the Implementation of Compulsory Residency. According to the Project, all physicians working in family medicine practice should have an opportunity to complete the respective residency by 2015. Analysis of the planned and completed family medicine residency in Croatia during the 2002-2006 period is presented. Of the total family medicine residency positions planned during the four-year period, 543 (90.5%) have been completed, with the greatest discrepancy recorded in program A applying to physicians younger than 35 having concluded a contract with the Croatian Institute of Health Insurance. In addition, this relationship varied among different countries. There are a number of obstacles hindering the Project implementation. However, it should be noted that the Project has made a breakthrough in upgrading the quality of family medicine practice, as a pledge of future development and rational performance of the entire health care system in Croatia, in order to promote the health care of the population at large. PMID:17593648

Vrci?-Keglevi?, Mladenka; Kati?, Milica; Tiljak, Hrvoje; Lazi?, Durdica; Neki?, Venija Cerovecki; Petricek, Goranka; Ozvaci?, Zlata; Soldo, Dragan

2007-02-01

98

THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO Department of Medicine  

E-print Network

for Clinical Medical Ethics Victoria Villaflor, MD Associate Professor of Medicine Irving Waxman, MD Professor Surgery Chief, Surgical Oncology Medical Director, Clinical Cancer Programs Ravi Salgia, MD, PhD Professor served as secretary general in the Japanese Government's Office of Medical Innovation and professor

Butler, Laurie J.

99

University of Maryland School of Medicine License Plate Information Thank you for requesting a set of University of Maryland School of Medicine license plates. By  

E-print Network

University of Maryland School of Medicine License Plate Information Thank you for requesting a set of University of Maryland School of Medicine license plates. By displaying these special bicentennial license plates, you will demonstrate your pride in the University of Maryland School of Medicine. Each set

Weber, David J.

100

Family Friends: Heart Medicine Money Can't Buy.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In 1986, the National Council on Aging developed the Family Friends program, which brings older people into the homes of children with disabilities and chronic illnesses. Charter programs were implemented in eight cities. These programs are still operating, and programs in other cities are in various stages of development. Since 1989, Family

National Council on the Aging, Inc., Washington, DC.

101

Ambulatory Education in the Internal Medicine Clerkship at Southern Illinois University School of Medicine.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The ambulatory care segment of the Southern Illinois University internal medicine clerkship provides extensive clinical exposure in a variety of settings and includes formal educational activities in seminars and workshops. Despite problems, educational quality has improved. Planned expansion includes a longitudinal experience for students.…

Kovach, Regina

1993-01-01

102

RUTGERS, THE STATE UNIVERSITY OF NEW JERSEY UNIVERSITY OF MEDICINE AND DENTISTRY OF NEW JERSEY  

E-print Network

RUTGERS, THE STATE UNIVERSITY OF NEW JERSEY UNIVERSITY OF MEDICINE AND DENTISTRY OF NEW JERSEY ................................................................................. 167 2 #12;Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey University of Medical and Dentistry of New Jersey BIOTECHNOLOGY TRAINING PROGRAM The PhD Training Program in Biotechnology

Muzzio, Fernando J.

103

University of Maryland School of Medicine PostDoctoral Fellowship in Cancer Epidemiology  

E-print Network

University of Maryland School of Medicine PostDoctoral Fellowship in Cancer Epidemiology Health, School of Medicine, University of Maryland at Baltimore (UMB). Our group has several ongoing University of Maryland School of Medicine jdorgan@som.umaryland.edu The University of Maryland, Baltimore

Weber, David J.

104

University of Maryland, School of Public Health Department of Family Science, Couple and Family Therapy Program  

E-print Network

University of Maryland, School of Public Health Department of Family Science, Couple and Family) The Department of Family Science, School of Public Health, University of Maryland, College Park seeks a full in Maryland. Additionally, candidates should be an Approved Supervisor or an Approved Supervisor Candidate

Hill, Wendell T.

105

Undergraduate medical education in general practice/family medicine throughout Europe – a descriptive study  

PubMed Central

Background It is increasingly becoming evident that a strong primary health care system is more likely to provide better population health, more equity in health throughout the population, and better use of economic resources, compared to systems that are oriented towards specialty care. Developing and maintaining a strong and sustainable primary health care requires that a substantial part of graduating doctors go into primary care. This in turn requires that general practice/family medicine (GP/FM) strongly influences the curricula in medical schools. In the present paper we aim at describing the extent of GP/FM teaching in medical schools throughout Europe, checking for the presence of GP/FM curricula and clinical teaching in GP offices. Methods A brief questionnaire was e-mailed to GP/FM or other professors at European medical universities. Results 259 out of 400 existing universities in 39 European countries responded to our questionnaire. Out of these, 35 (13.5%) reported to have no GP/FM curriculum. These 35 medical faculties were located in 12 different European countries. In addition, 15 of the medical schools where a GP/FM curriculum did exist, reported that this curriculum did not include any clinical component (n?=?5), or that the clinical part of the course was very brief - less than one week, mostly only a few hours (n?=?10). In total, 50 universities (19%) thus had no or a very brief GP/FM curriculum. These were mainly located in the Eastern or Southern European regions. Conclusion It is still possible to graduate from European medical universities without having been exposed to a GP/FM curriculum. The European Academy of Teachers in General Practice (EURACT) will launch efforts to change this situation. PMID:24289459

2013-01-01

106

Who Is Driving Continuing Medical Education for Family Medicine?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Introduction: Considerable time and money are invested in continuing medical education (CME) for family physicians (FPs) but the effectiveness is uncertain. The participation of FPs as coordinators and teachers is not well known. The goal of this project was to describe the role of FPs in organizing and teaching CME events that are accredited for…

Klein, Douglas; Allan, G. Michael; Manca, Donna; Sargeant, Joan; Barnett, Carly

2009-01-01

107

A Problem-Solving Oral Examination for Family Medicine  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The College of Family Physicians of Canada has used in its certification examination a new type of structured problem-solving examination called the Formal Oral. A series of preselected problem areas such as the complaint, relevant data base, investigation, and treatment are scored by two examiners. (Editor/PG)

Van Wart, Arthur D.

1974-01-01

108

Cancer Risk Assessment by Rural and Appalachian Family Medicine Physicians  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Context: Challenges to the identification of hereditary cancer in primary care may be more pronounced in rural Appalachia, a medically underserved region. Purpose: To examine primary care physicians' identification of hereditary cancers. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was mailed to family physicians in the midwestern and southeastern United…

Kelly, Kimberly M.; Love, Margaret M.; Pearce, Kevin A.; Porter, Kyle; Barron, Mary A.; Andrykowski, Michael

2009-01-01

109

Feinberg Fact Sheet Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine  

E-print Network

Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine #12;Feinberg Fact Sheet Location On the lakefront Information Class of 2015 Medical Students Class of 2015: 54% men, 46% women; *45% minority, 9% non. Global Health Opportunities Medical students can engage in global clinical experiences at one of 18

Chisholm, Rex L.

110

Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University ECU PHYSICIANS  

E-print Network

, at all times, by prison guard(s) with minimal disruption to the general ECU Physicians population. IIIBrody School of Medicine at East Carolina University ECU PHYSICIANS Title: Prisoner Transportation is to provide the minimum standards for the management of prisoner transportation and security within ECU

111

Alternative Medicine and Herbal Use among University Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this study, the authors investigated the predictors of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) and herbal supplement use among university students. They investigated demographic factors, trait affectivity, symptom reports, and individuals' worries about modernity as potential contributors to use of CAM and herbals. The authors surveyed 506…

Johnson, Susan K.; Blanchard, Anita

2006-01-01

112

Department of Public Health and Community Medicine University of Verona  

E-print Network

Department of Public Health and Community Medicine University of Verona Section of Psychiatry (Head Collaborating Centre for Research and Training in Mental Health and Service Evaluation (Director: Professor of mental health, costs evaluation, evaluation of mental health services, effectiveness of psychosocial

Romeo, Alessandro

113

University of Verona Department of Medicine and Public Health  

E-print Network

University of Verona Department of Medicine and Public Health Section of Psychiatry and Clinical Psychology WHO Collaborating Centre for Research and Training in Mental Health and Service Evaluation Head in Mental Health on 23 February 1987. According to WHO regulations the designation lasts for four years

Romeo, Alessandro

114

University of Virginia School of Medicine PO Box 800761  

E-print Network

.924.5974 http:/medicine.virginia.edu/community- service/centers/ biomedical-ethics-and- humanities/medical and Human Behavior and Medical Humanities and Bioethics Scholarly Concentration, Warren Alpert Medical Theology, Duke University Medical Center and Duke Divinity School, Durham NC Co-presented with the History

Acton, Scott

115

Stanford University School of Medicine Responsible Conduct of Research  

E-print Network

Stanford University School of Medicine Responsible Conduct of Research Session 5: Human Subjects a survey about alcohol use in the Inupiat community of Barrow, Alaska. A total of 88 Inupiats were interviewed about their attitudes and values about the use of alcohol, and their psychological histories

116

UNIVERSITY OF DELAWARE OFFICE OF LABORATORY ANIMAL MEDICINE  

E-print Network

Rev 5/2010 UNIVERSITY OF DELAWARE OFFICE OF LABORATORY ANIMAL MEDICINE Rat Restraint SOP #A-107 of your lab coat to relax or calm the animal, while maintaining hold of the animal. 3. For restraint by an assistant. 7. Constantly observe the rat during restraint. If the animal shows signs of respiratory distress

Firestone, Jeremy

117

SPACE PLANNING & OPERATIONS UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA SCHOOL OF MEDICINE  

E-print Network

SPACE PLANNING & OPERATIONS UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA SCHOOL OF MEDICINE Policy & Procedure a centralized scheduling system managed by Space Planning & Operations (SPO) with the intention of maximizing use of available space to meet educational space demands. Purpose: The purpose of this policy

Bushman, Frederic

118

Space Planning & Operations University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine  

E-print Network

Space Planning & Operations University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine Policy & Procedure Building II/III fourteenth floor Faculty Lounge, and the criteria for reserving the Lounge Space use of the Faculty Lounge as well as scheduled use of the Lounge Space and Conference Rooms. Scope

Bushman, Frederic

119

Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine Genomic Literacy  

E-print Network

Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine Genomic Literacy How Much is Enough? (and how, and Genomic Literacy: Contributions from Health Science Libraries #12;Veterinarians & their Clients "White;Hatscaps.name Librarians' genomic literacy · Special education not always required · Learn what types

Napp, Nils

120

ALBERT EINSTEIN COLLEGE OF MEDICINE OF YESHIVA UNIVERSITY  

E-print Network

ALBERT EINSTEIN COLLEGE OF MEDICINE OF YESHIVA UNIVERSITY JACK AND PEARL RESNICK CAMPUS · 1300's Responsibility E-MAIL ­ peter.babin@einstein.yu.edu PHONE: (718) 430-2243 Dosimeter/Film Badge Request: Female: 1. Did the Employee/Student have a previous badge at Einstein? 2. Has the Employee

Emmons, Scott

121

University of Connecticut School of Dental Medicine Space Policy  

E-print Network

and its School of Dental Medicine (SDM). The University of Connecticut Health Center Space Management Health Center Space Management Policy by the Executive Vice President. The Dean may choose to confer and Centers will be reviewed, quantitatively and qualitatively, every year by the Dean. In addition, effective

Kim, Duck O.

122

Stanford University Department of Medicine Quality Improvement Plan 2009 -2010  

E-print Network

Stanford University Department of Medicine Quality Improvement Plan 2009 - 2010 Department lead to process improvements. The DOM Quality Council, co-chaired by the Vice Chair for Clinical Affairs and Associate Chair for Organizational Improvement, oversees the quality and patient safety

Quake, Stephen R.

123

Evidence-based medicine in primary care: qualitative study of family physicians  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: The objectives of this study were: a) to examine physician attitudes to and experience of the practice of evidence-based medicine (EBM) in primary care; b) to investigate the influence of patient preferences on clinical decision-making; and c) to explore the role of intuition in family practice. Method: Qualitative analysis of semi-structured interviews of 15 family physicians purposively selected from

C Shawn Tracy; Guilherme Coelho Dantas; Ross EG Upshur

2003-01-01

124

Patterns of Relating Between Physicians and Medical Assistants in Small Family Medicine Offices  

PubMed Central

PURPOSE The clinician-colleague relationship is a cornerstone of relationship-centered care (RCC); in small family medicine offices, the clinician–medical assistant (MA) relationship is especially important. We sought to better understand the relationship between MA roles and the clinician-MA relationship within the RCC framework. METHODS We conducted an ethnographic study of 5 small family medicine offices (having <5 clinicians) in the Cincinnati Area Research and Improvement Group (CARInG) Network using interviews, surveys, and observations. We interviewed 19 MAs and supervisors and 11 clinicians (9 family physicians and 2 nurse practitioners) and observed 15 MAs in practice. Qualitative analysis used the editing style. RESULTS MAs’ roles in small family medicine offices were determined by MA career motivations and clinician-MA relationships. MA career motivations comprised interest in health care, easy training/workload, and customer service orientation. Clinician-MA relationships were influenced by how MAs and clinicians respond to their perceptions of MA clinical competence (illustrated predominantly by comparing MAs with nurses) and organizational structure. We propose a model, trust and verify, to describe the structure of the clinician-MA relationship. This model is informed by clinicians’ roles in hiring and managing MAs and the social familiarity of MAs and clinicians. Within the RCC framework, these findings can be seen as previously undefined constraints and freedoms in what is known as the Complex Responsive Process of Relating between clinicians and MAs. CONCLUSIONS Improved understanding of clinician-MA relationships will allow a better appreciation of how clinicians and MAs function in family medicine teams. Our findings may assist small offices undergoing practice transformation and guide future research to improve the education, training, and use of MAs in the family medicine setting. PMID:24615311

Elder, Nancy C.; Jacobson, C. Jeffrey; Bolon, Shannon K.; Fixler, Joseph; Pallerla, Harini; Busick, Christina; Gerrety, Erica; Kinney, Dee; Regan, Saundra; Pugnale, Michael

2014-01-01

125

University Housing and Dining Services Student Family Housing Rental Agreement  

E-print Network

University Housing and Dining Services Student Family Housing Rental Agreement Effective August 1 is for a space in University Housing and Dining Services (UHDS) Student Family Housing apartment complex at http://oregonstate.edu/admin/stucon/), Student Handbooks, and the University Housing and Dining

Escher, Christine

126

Proposed roadmap to stepwise integration of genetics in family medicine and clinical research  

PubMed Central

We propose A step-by-step roadmap to integrate genetics in the Electronic Patient Record in Family Medicine and clinical research. This could make urgent operationalization of readily available genetic knowledge feasible in clinical research and consequently improved medical care. Improving genomic literacy by training and education is needed first. The second step is the improvement of the possibilities to register the family history in such a way that queries can identify patients at risk. Adding codes to the ICPC chapters “A21 Personal/family history of malignancy” and “A99 Disease carrier not described further” is proposed. Multidisciplinary guidelines for referral must be unambiguous. Electronical patient records need possibilities to add (new) family history information, including links between individuals who are family members. Automatic alerts should help general practitioners to recognize patients at risk who satisfy referral criteria. We present a familial breast cancer case with a BRCA1 mutation as an example. PMID:23415259

2013-01-01

127

Institute for Genetic Medicine, Hokkaido University Research Center for Infection-associated Cancer (RCIAC)  

E-print Network

in inflammation and carcinogenesis Eran Elinav (The Yale University School of Medicine) The NLRP6 inflammasome in inflammation and carcinogenesis Eran Elinav (The Yale University School of Medicine) The NLRP6 inflammasome

Tachizawa, Kazuya

128

[The use of medicines storaged in the household in a population assisted by Family Health Program].  

PubMed

To approach the epidemiological use of medicines is necessary to recognize that such practice is not strictly limited to pharmacotherapy. The appropriate storage and the preservation of medicines are fundamental factors for effectiveness. This study was aimed at verifying the storage form/use of medicines in a community assisted by the Family Health Program in the district of Cristino Castro (PI, Brazil), as well as the level of the people's knowledge regarding drugs storage at home. The data were obtained visiting 52 families, starting with observations and applying a questionnaire. It was observed a low income and education levels, a fact that contributes in the effective therapeutic orientation. High percentage of the stored medicines is acquired without prescription. It is worth of mention the presence of a big amount of antimicrobial, reinforcing the danger of the self medication. 62% of those who take care of drugs have no information about their rational use, and 66% are not conscious of the toxicity. 54.10% of the medicines were at children's and domestic animals reach and 15.92% didn't possess label or any identification. Some families maintain in stock, basic medications, another accumulate a "therapeutic arsenal". PMID:21120339

Lima, Geandra Batista; Nunes, Lívio César Cunha; de Barros, José Augusto Cabral

2010-11-01

129

Implementation of a Symptom-Triggered Benzodiazepine Protocol for Alcohol Withdrawal in Family Medicine Inpatients  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose: The purpose of this pilot study was to review the implementation of symptom-triggered benzodiazepine therapy and evaluate the feasibility and outcomes as compared with a previous hospital standard of fixed-dose phe- nobarbital protocol for alcohol withdrawal on a family medicine service. Methods: This retrospective chart review of 46 patients' medical records was performed on admissions to the fam- ily

Sharon See; Sarah Nosal; Wendy Brooks Barr; Robert Schiller

2009-01-01

130

Multi-Source Evaluation of Interpersonal and Communication Skills of Family Medicine Residents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

There is a lack of information on the use of multi-source evaluation to assess trainees' interpersonal and communication skills in Oriental settings. This study is conducted to assess the reliability and applicability of assessing the interpersonal and communication skills of family medicine residents by patients, peer residents, nurses, and…

Leung, Kai-Kuen; Wang, Wei-Dan; Chen, Yen-Yuan

2012-01-01

131

Monetary Value of a Prescription Assistance Program Service in a Rural Family Medicine Clinic  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: To quantify the monetary value of medications provided to rural Alabamians through provision of pharmaceutical manufacturer-sponsored prescription assistance programs (PAPs) provided by a clinical pharmacist in a private Black Belt family medicine clinic during 2007 and 2008. Methods: Patients struggling to afford prescription medications…

Whitley, Heather P.

2011-01-01

132

Development of a Competency Framework for Quality Improvement in Family Medicine: A Qualitative Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: The aim of this study was to develop a comprehensive framework of quality improvement competencies for use in continuing professional development (CPD) and continuing medical education (CME) for European general practice/family medicine physicians (GPs/FDs). Methods: The study was carried out in three phases: literature review,…

Czabanowska, Katarzyna; Klemenc-Ketis, Zalika; Potter, Amanda; Rochfort, Andree; Tomasik, Tomasz; Csiszar, Judit; Van den Bussche, Piet

2012-01-01

133

Back to the future: reflections on the history of the future of family medicine.  

PubMed

These are historic times for family medicine. The profession is moving beyond the visionary blueprint of the Future of Family Medicine (FFM) report while working to harness the momentum created by the FFM movement. Preparing for, and leading through, the next transformative wave of change (FFM version 2.0) will require the engagement of multigenerational and multidisciplinary visionaries who bring wisdom from diverse experiences. Active group reflection on the past will potentiate the collective work being done to best chart the future. Historical competency is critically important for family medicine's future. This article describes the historical context of the development and launch of the FFM report, emphasizing the professional activism that preceded and followed it. This article is intended to spark intergenerational dialog by providing a multigenerational reflection on the history of FFM and the evolution that has occurred in family medicine over the past decade. Such intergenerational conversations enable our elders to share wisdom with our youth, while allowing our discipline to visualize history through the eyes of future generations. PMID:25381082

Doohan, Noemi C; Endres, Jill; Koehn, Nerissa; Miller, John; Scherger, Joseph E; Martin, James; Devoe, Jennifer E

2014-01-01

134

Providing competency-based family medicine residency training in substance abuse in the new millennium: a model curriculum  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: This article, developed for the Betty Ford Institute Consensus Conference on Graduate Medical Education (December, 2008), presents a model curriculum for Family Medicine residency training in substance abuse. METHODS: The authors reviewed reports of past Family Medicine curriculum development efforts, previously-identified barriers to education in high risk substance use, approaches to overcoming these barriers, and current training guidelines of

J Paul Seale; Sylvia Shellenberger; Denice Crowe Clark

2010-01-01

135

Library Cooperation at the NOVA University--the Nordic University in Agriculture, Forestry and Veterinary Medicine.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Nordic University in Agriculture, Forestry and Veterinary Medicine--the NOVA University-was established in 1995 to increase the cooperation between the Nordic agricultural universities. The NOVA libraries of the seven institutions and facilities involved wanted to show that they are a very useful partner in launching new ideas. They have the…

Myllys, Heli

136

University of Maryland School of Medicine Department of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Science  

E-print Network

6/2/2004 University of Maryland School of Medicine Department of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Science is one of two Allied Health departments of the University of Maryland School of Medicine. The chair of the Department is appointed by the dean of the University of Maryland School of Medicine

Weber, David J.

137

Stanford University School of Medicine Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences Psychiatry Grand Rounds  

E-print Network

and mental illness (e.g., Bipolar Disorder) Accreditation The Stanford University School of MedicineStanford University School of Medicine Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences Stanford University School of Medicine Thursday, March 14, 2013 Noon ­ 1:00 pm Alway

Kay, Mark A.

138

ILLUMINATIONS The Magazine of The School of Medicine Alumni AssociationUniversity of Utah  

E-print Network

ILLUMINATIONS The Magazine of The School of Medicine Alumni Association­University of Utah Director ILLUMINATIONS The Magazine for the University of Utah School of Medicine Alumni and Friends Editor Samuelson, MD,`80 Illuminations is published by the University of Utah School of Medicine Alumni Relations

Feschotte, Cedric

139

Sponsored by: The University of Maryland School of Medicine Accreditation: The University of Maryland School of Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education  

E-print Network

Sponsored by: The University of Maryland School of Medicine Accreditation: The University of Maryland School of Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians. Credit Designation: The University of Maryland School

Weber, David J.

140

The Future of Family Medicine version 2.0: reflections from Pisacano scholars.  

PubMed

The Future of Family Medicine (FFM) project has helped shape and direct the evolution of primary care medicine over the past decade. Pisacano Scholars, a group of leaders in family medicine supported by the American Board of Family Medicine, gathered for a 2-day symposium in April 2013 to explore the history of the FFM project and outline a vision for the next phase of this work-FFM version 2.0 (v2.0). After learning about the original FFM project (FFM v1.0), the group held interactive discussions using the World Café approach to conversational leadership. This commentary summarizes the discussions and highlights major themes relevant to FFM v2.0 identified by the group. The group endorsed the FFM v1.0 recommendations as still relevant and marvelled at the progress made toward achieving many of those goals. Most elements of FFM v1.0 have moved forward, and some have been incorporated into policy blueprints for reform. Now is the time to refocus attention on facets of FFM v1.0 not yet realized and to identify key aspects missing from FFM v1.0. The Pisacano Scholars are committed to moving the FFM goals forward and hope that this expression of the group's vision will help to do so. PMID:24390896

Doohan, Noemi C; Duane, Marguerite; Harrison, Bridget; Lesko, Sarah; DeVoe, Jennifer E

2014-01-01

141

Marriage and Family Therapy at Texas Tech University  

E-print Network

Marriage and Family Therapy at Texas Tech University Mission Statement and Learning Outcomes 2010 he Marriage and Family Therapy graduate programs at TTU provide systemic clinical training to prepare program has been accredited by the Commission on Accreditation for Marriage and Family Therapy Education

Gelfond, Michael

142

[Current network in Hokkaido University School of Medicine].  

PubMed

Recently campus LAN (Local Area Network) HINES (Hokkaido university Information NEtwork System) has been popularized rapidly in Hokkaido University. A lot of personal computers have been connected to HINES. Although many people in our school of medicine are coming to be familiar with the Internet, the network has not been utilized sufficiently yet. Establishment of efficient education and research with network, that is the essential purpose of HINES, is the problem to be solved in the near future. In this document, how to set up both modem and ISDN (Integrated Services Digital Network) is also referred for the help of access to HINES from outside of the campus. PMID:8641673

Satoh, S; Matsuura, T; Yamada, K

1996-03-01

143

Task Force Report 5. Report of the Task Force on Family Medicine’s Role in Shaping the Future Health Care Delivery System  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND Recognizing that the implementation of needed changes within family medicine will be enhanced through a concurrent effort to transform the broader health care system, this Future of Family Medicine task force was charged with determining family medicine’s leadership role in shaping the future health care delivery system. METHODS After reviewing the changes taking place within family medicine and the broader health care system, this task force identified 6 priorities for fostering necessary modifications in the health care system. In addressing the leadership challenge facing the discipline, the task force presents a 3-dimensional matrix that provides a useful framework for describing the audiences that should be targeted, the strategic priorities that should be pursued, and the specific recommendations that should be addressed. Noting that leadership is part of the heritage of family medicine, the task force reviewed past successes by the discipline as important lessons that can be instructive as family physicians begin advocating for needed changes. MAJOR FINDINGS Effective leadership is an essential ingredient that will determine, to a large extent, the success of family medicine in advocating for needed change in the health care system overall and in the specialty. It is vitally important to groom leaders within family medicine and to create venues where policy makers and influence leaders can look beyond their usual constituencies and horizons to a comprehensive view of health care. A central concept being proposed is that of a relationship-centered personal medical home. This medical home serves as the focal point through which all individuals—regardless of age, gender, race, ethnicity, or socioeconomic status—receive a basket of acute, chronic, and preventive medical care services that are accessible, accountable, comprehensive, integrated, patient-centered, safe, scientifically valid, and satisfying to both patients and their physicians. CONCLUSION Family medicine has and will continue to have an important leadership role in health system change. It has been most successful when it has been able to identify a high-priority goal through consensus within the discipline, to focus and coordinate local and national resources, and to use a multipronged approach in addressing the priority. Although the Future of Family Medicine project has provided an important impetus for the identification of key priorities across the discipline, for the FFM project ultimately to be a success, implementation steps will need to be identified and prioritized. The leadership matrix presented in this report can provide a useful structuring tool to identify, understand, and coordinate change efforts more effectively. Strategic alliances with primary care groups and others also will be critical to the success of change initiatives.

Roberts, Richard G.; Snape, Pam S.; Burke, Kevin

2004-01-01

144

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND SCHOOL OF MEDICINE DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL THERAPY & REHABILITATION SCIENCE  

E-print Network

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND SCHOOL OF MEDICINE DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL THERAPY & REHABILITATION are investing in the Department of Physical Therapy & Rehabilitation Science at the University of Maryland the University of Maryland School of Medicine are administered by the University of Maryland Baltimore

Weber, David J.

145

Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine Boston University School of Medicine, 72 East Concord Street, Boston, MA -2118-2526  

E-print Network

Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine Boston University School of Medicine, 72 East Concord Street, Boston, MA -2118-2526 PATHOLOGY SEMINARS, FALL TERM 2011 FRIDAYS, 1:45-2:45 PM* one of Pathology, Mast Cells at the Interface Chief, Pathology Service, Stanford Hospital & Clinics of Health

Finzi, Adrien

146

Postdoctoral Fellowships in Adult Clinical Psychology Stanford University School of Medicine  

E-print Network

athletes. One opening is projected in the INSOMNIA AND BEHAVIORAL SLEEP MEDICINE PROGRAM, which specializes on the Stanford University campus. The Stanford Sleep Medicine Outpatient Center and the Stanford Pain Clinic

Puglisi, Joseph

147

University of Virginia Athletics & Sports Medicine New Athlete Pre-Participation Health History, 2012-2013  

E-print Network

University of Virginia Athletics & Sports Medicine New Athlete Pre-Participation Health History at Student Health for your Pre-Participation Physical. Please print this form and fax to General Medicine_________________ Name____________________________________________ Sex_______ Date of Birth______________ Sport(s

Acton, Scott

148

Skills Inventory/Biography University of Rochester School of Medicine & Dentistry  

E-print Network

Boston University Geriatrics Medical or Scientific Specialty Geriatric Medicine, Internal Medicine society meetings (i.e. American Geriatrics Society Annual Meetings) What is the best way to contact you

Goldman, Steven A.

149

Palliative medicine teaching program at the University of Cape Town: integrating palliative care principles into practice.  

PubMed

The article describes the development of the postgraduate palliative medicine programs at the University of Cape Town (UCT) through collaboration with the Palliative Medicine Division from the University of Wales College of Medicine in Cardiff, United Kingdom. The course is presented as a distance-learning program supported by web-based learning with three face-to-face teaching sessions during the course. UCT recognized the urgent need to assist African doctors in developing the medical skills required to care for an ever-increasing population of patients and their families who are faced with terminal illness and the physical, emotional, psychosocial, and spiritual distress associated with end-of-life issues. Since 2001, 139 postgraduate students have registered for the course, 10% of whom are from African countries other than South Africa. Using the experience from UCT in distance-learning programs, the Hospice Palliative Care Association developed an interdisciplinary course, "Introduction to Palliative Care." This course recognizes that, although improvement in patient care and palliative care will come as undergraduate training in palliative care is established, it is essential that previously qualified health care professionals are able to enhance their palliative care knowledge, skills, and attitudes. Trainers provide support to participants over a six-month period and assist in the transference of knowledge and skills into the workplace. PMID:17482047

Gwyther, Liz; Rawlinson, Fiona

2007-05-01

150

Montana State University 1 Family and Consumer  

E-print Network

, thereby enhancing the human condition. Students in FCS take a common core of foundation courses in content FCS 371 Research Methods in HHD 3 FCS 437 Managing Work and Family 3 FCS 457 Family Life Education 3, students take restricted supporting courses in the program. Both teaching (http://catalog.montana.edu/undergraduate/education

Maxwell, Bruce D.

151

UVAL-MED a universal visual associative language for medicine.  

PubMed Central

We describe UVAL-MED, a Universal visual associative language for medicine, and propose its use in combination with diagnostic reasoning and decision support systems. When fully developed, our system will automatically translate SNOMED terms to UVAL-MED terms. Grammar and syntax for UVAL-MED are defined and its features as a language-independent tool are discussed. The perceived advantages of our graphical language for rapid integration of knowledge and the assessment of developing situations could thus facilitate decision making. PMID:7949931

Preiss, B.; Echavé, V.; Preiss, S. F.; Kaltenbach, M.

1994-01-01

152

Public Health Aspects of the Family Medicine Concepts in South Eastern Europe  

PubMed Central

Introduction: Family medicine as a part of the primary health care is devoted to provide continuous and comprehensive health care to the individuals and families regardless of age, gender, types of diseases and affected system or part of the body. Special emphasis in such holistic approach is given to the prevention of diseases and health promotion. Family Medicine is the first step/link between doctors and patients within patients care as well as regular inspections/examinations and follow-up of the health status of healthy people. Most countries aspire to join the European Union and therefore adopting new regulations that are applied in the European Union. Aim: The aim of this study is to present the role and importance of family medicine, or where family medicine is today in 21 Century from the beginning of development in these countries. The study is designed as a descriptive epidemiological study with data from 10 countries of the former Communist bloc, Slovenia, Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Serbia, Montenegro, Macedonia, Kosovo, Albania, Bulgaria, Romania, Czech Republic, Slovakia and Hungary, just about half of them are members of the EU. We examined the following variables: socio-organizational indicators, health and educational indicators and health indicators. The data used refer to 2002 and as a source of data are used official data from reference WebPages of family medicine doctors associations, WONCA website (EURACT, EQuiP, EGPRN), WebPages of Bureau of Statistics of the countries where the research was conducted as well as the Ministries of Health. Results: Results indicates that the failures and shortcomings of health care organizations in Southeast Europe. Lack of money hinders the implementation of health care reform in all mentioned countries, the most of them that is more oriented to Bismarck financing system. Problems in the political, legal and economic levels are obstacles for efficient a problem reconstructing health care system toward family medicine and primary prevention interventions. The population is not enough educated for complicated enforcement for and prevention of diseases that have a heavy burden on the budget. Health insurance and payment of health services is often a problem, because the patients must be treated regardless of their insurance coverage and financial situation. The decrease in production and economic growth, as well as low gross national income in the countries with economic crisis, lead to the inability of treatment for a large number of the population. Such situation a system leads to additional debts and loans to healthcare system. Measures implemented for provision of acute curative care largely did not lead to improvements in the health status of the population. Educational and preventive measures, as well as higher standards for quality and accessibility of health care services for entire population in each country, especially those struggling are bound to joining the European Union and their implementation must start. The most A large number of medical institutions are is inefficient in health education and health promotion and must work to educate patients and families and increase the quality of preventive health services. Modernization of health care delivery and joining the European Union by increasing overall economic stability of countries is one of the primary goals of all countries in Southeast Europe. PMID:25395894

Masic, Izet; Hadziahmetovic, Miran; Donev, Doncho; Pollhozani, Azis; Ramadani, Naser; Skopljak, Amira; Pasagic, Almir; Roshi, Enver; Zunic, Lejla; Zildzic, Muharem

2014-01-01

153

University of Maryland School of Medicine 2013 Mini-Med School  

E-print Network

University of Maryland School of Medicine 2013 Mini-Med School Mini-Med School Registration Form · Fax: 410.706.8520 · Mail: Office of Public Affairs, c/o Veronica Anderson University of Maryland goes on inside the University of Maryland School of Medicine. For five weeks this fall you can learn

Weber, David J.

154

UNIVERSITY OF MEDICINE AND DENTISTRY OF NEW JERSEY NEW JERSEY MEDICAL SCHOOL  

E-print Network

UNIVERSITY OF MEDICINE AND DENTISTRY OF NEW JERSEY NEW JERSEY MEDICAL SCHOOL BYLAWS PREAMBLE: New Jersey Medical School ("NJMS") is an educational unit of the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New of New Jersey, hereinafter referred to as the University-wide Bylaws. The mission of NJMS is to offer

Routh, Vanessa H.

155

Attitudes and perceptions of medical students about family medicine in Spain: protocol for a cross-sectional survey  

PubMed Central

Background Despite the fact that family medicine (FM) has become established as a specialty in the past 25?years, this has not been reflected in the inclusion of the specialty in the majority of medical schools in Spain. Almost 40% of the students will work in primary care but, in spite of this, most universities do not have an assessed placement as such. There are only specific practice periods in health centres or some student-selected components with little weight in the overall curricula. Objectives To evaluate the attitudes and perceptions of medical students about FM in the health system and their perception about the need for specific training in FM at the undergraduate level. To explore change over time of these attitudes and perceptions and to examine potential predictive factors for change. Finally, we will review what teaching activity in FM is offered across the Spanish schools of medicine. Methods Descriptive cross-sectional survey. Each one of the different analyses will consist of two surveys: one for all the students in the first, third and fifth year of medical school in all the Spanish schools of medicine asking about their knowledge, perceptions and attitudes in relation to primary care and FM. There will be an additional survey for the coordinating faculty of the study in each university about the educational activities related to FM that are carried out in their centres. The repetition of the study every 2?years will allow for an analysis of the evolution of the cohort of students until they receive their degree and the potential predictive factors. Discussion This study will provide useful information for strategic planning decisions, content and educational methodology in medical schools in Spain and elsewhere. It will also help to evaluate the influence of the ongoing changes in FM, locally and at the European level, on the attitudes and perceptions of the students towards FM in Spain. PMID:22189348

Alonso-Coello, Pablo; Villa, Josep Jiménez; Hijar, Antonio Monreal; Tuduri, Xavier Mundet; Puime, Ángel Otero

2011-01-01

156

Support for and aspects of use of educational games in family medicine and internal medicine residency programs in the US: a survey  

PubMed Central

Background The evidence supporting the effectiveness of educational games in graduate medical education is limited. Anecdotal reports suggest their popularity in that setting. The objective of this study was to explore the support for and the different aspects of use of educational games in family medicine and internal medicine residency programs in the United States. Methods We conducted a survey of family medicine and internal medicine residency program directors in the United States. The questionnaire asked the program directors whether they supported the use of educational games, their actual use of games, and the type of games being used and the purpose of that use. Results Of 434 responding program directors (52% response rate), 92% were in support of the use of games as an educational strategy, and 80% reported already using them in their programs. Jeopardy like games were the most frequently used games (78%). The use of games was equally popular in family medicine and internal medicine residency programs and popularity was inversely associated with more than 75% of residents in the program being International Medical Graduates. The percentage of program directors who reported using educational games as teaching tools, review tools, and evaluation tools were 62%, 47%, and 4% respectively. Conclusions Given a widespread use of educational games in the training of medical residents, in spite of limited evidence for efficacy, further evaluation of the best approaches to education games should be explored. PMID:20338034

2010-01-01

157

The views of key leaders in South Africa on implementation of family medicine: critical role in the district health system  

PubMed Central

Background Integrated team-based primary care is an international imperative. This is required more so in Africa, where fragmented verticalised care dominates. South Africa is trying to address this with health reforms, including Primary Health Care Re-engineering. Family physicians are already contributing to primary care despite family medicine being only fully registered as a full specialty in South Africa in 2008. However the views of leaders on family medicine and the role of family physicians is not clear, especially with recent health reforms. The aim of this study was to understand the views of key government and academic leaders in South Africa on family medicine, roles of family physicians and human resource issues. Methods This was a qualitative study with academic and government leaders across South Africa. In-depth interviews were conducted with sixteen purposively selected leaders using an interview guide. Thematic content analysis was based on the framework method. Results Whilst family physicians were seen as critical to the district health system there was ambivalence on their leadership role and ‘specialist’ status. National health reforms were creating both threats and opportunities for family medicine. Three key roles for family physicians emerged: supporting referrals; clinical governance/quality improvement; and providing support to community-oriented care. Respondents’ urged family physicians to consolidate the development and training of family physicians, and shape human resource policy to include family physicians. Conclusions Family physicians were seen as critical to the district health system in South Africa despite difficulties around their precise role. Whilst their role was dominated by filling gaps at district hospitals to reduce referrals it extended to clinical governance and developing community-oriented primary care - a tall order, requiring strong teamwork. Innovative team-based service delivery is possible despite human resource challenges, but requires family physicians to proactively develop team-based models of care, reform education and advocate for clearer policy, based on the views of these respondents. PMID:24961449

2014-01-01

158

Practical training in family medicine in the Dalmatian hinterland: first-hand experience of four physicians.  

PubMed

Four physicians working in private family medicine offices in Dalmatian Hinterland described their first hand experience of teaching sixthyear medical students. They supervised students during the 2010/2011 academic year, in an area that is economically undeveloped, rural, and where a number of people live in extended families. Although hesitant at first, the patients came to like the interaction with students, and later even yearned to provide students with as much information as possible. They also liked the letters that students had to write to them about their illness, because they could take them home and look for information without needing to see the doctor. The students showed diverse attitudes to different types of work in family medicine offices, mostly depending on their plans for future career. In general, they either complained or hesitated to perform duties that they did not fully master during earlier education, especially working with children. They needed several days to adapt to direct contact with the patients, and were more relaxed and cooperative when working in pairs than alone. The physicians themselves felt that they profited both from the novelty in the everyday routine and from the exchange of their experiences with the students. They liked their young colleagues and admitted they could not objectively review their own work, knowledge and skills. PMID:23311492

Jer?i?, Minka; ?izmi?, Zorka; Vujevi?, Miona; Puljiz, Tina

2012-01-01

159

Patient satisfaction with access and continuity of care in a multidisciplinary academic family medicine clinic  

PubMed Central

Abstract Objective To determine patient satisfaction with care provided at a family medicine teaching clinic. Design Mailed survey. Setting Victoria Family Medical Centre in London, Ont. Participants Stratified random sample of 600 regular patients of the clinic aged 18 years or older; 301 responses were received. Main outcome measures Patient satisfaction with overall care, wait times for appointments, contact with physicians, and associated demographic factors. Logistic regression analysis and analysis were used to determine the significance of factors associated with satisfaction. Results The response rate was 50%. Overall, 88% of respondents were fairly, very, or completely satisfied with care. Older patients tended to be more satisfied. Patients who were less satisfied had longer wait times for appointments (P < .001) and reduced continuity with specific doctors (P = .004). More satisfied patients also felt connected through other members of the health care team. Conclusion Patients were generally satisfied with the care provided at the family medicine teaching clinic. Older patients tended to be more satisfied than younger patients. Points of dissatisfaction were related to wait times for appointments and continuity with patients’ usual doctors. These findings support the adoption of practices that reduce wait times and facilitate continuity with patients’ usual doctors and other regular members of the health care team. PMID:24733343

Wetmore, Stephen; Boisvert, Leslie; Graham, Esther; Hall, Susan; Hartley, Tim; Wright, Lynda; Hammond, Jo-Anne; Ings, Holly; Lent, Barbara; Pawelec-Brzychczy, Anna; Valiquet, Stacey; Wickett, Jamie; Willing, Joanne

2014-01-01

160

A Graduate Program in Veterinary Preventive Medicine--University of Guelph--1976  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A three-semester (12-month) diploma program for veterinarians was begun at the University of Guelph in 1971 that is applicable to veterinarians employed in public health, regulatory veterinary medicine, and animal production medicine, where there is emphasis on preventive medicine. Each student completes a project suitable for seminar presentation…

Mitchell, W. R.; Barnum, D. A.

1977-01-01

161

Scaling up family medicine training in Gezira, Sudan – a 2-year in-service master programme using modern information and communication technology: a survey study  

PubMed Central

Background In 2010 the Gezira Family Medicine Project (GFMP) was initiated in Gezira state, Sudan, designed as an in-service training model. The project is a collaboration project between the University of Gezira, which aims to provide a 2-year master’s programme in family medicine for practicing doctors, and the Ministry of Health, which facilitates service provision and funds the training programme. This paper presents the programme, the teaching environment, and the first batch of candidates enrolled. Methods In this study a self-administered questionnaire was used to collect baseline data at the start of the project from doctors who joined the programme. A checklist was also used to assess the health centres where they work. A total of 188 out of 207 doctors responded (91%), while data were gathered from all 158 health centres (100%) staffed by the programme candidates. Results The Gezira model of in-service family medicine training has succeeded in recruiting 207 candidates in its first batch, providing health services in 158 centres, of which 84 had never been served by a doctor before. The curriculum is community oriented. The mean age of doctors was 32.5 years, 57% were males, and 32% were graduates from the University of Gezira. Respondents stated high confidence in practicing some skills such as asthma management and post-abortion uterine evacuation. They were least confident in other skills such as managing depression or inserting an intrauterine device. The majority of health centres was poorly equipped for management of noncommunicable diseases, as only 10% had an electrocardiography machine (ECG), 5% had spirometer, and 1% had a defibrillator. Conclusions The Gezira model has responded to local health system needs. Use of modern information and communication technology is used to facilitate both health service provision and training. The GFMP represents an example of a large-volume scaling-up programme of family medicine in Africa. PMID:24443978

2014-01-01

162

Effect of debt on U.S. medical school graduates' preferences for family medicine, general internal medicine, and general pediatrics.  

PubMed

The authors assess the importance of educational debt in graduates' primary care specialty choices, and the variety of mechanisms through which debt may influence career decisions. Logistic regression models were used to identify significant predictors of the primary care specialty choices made by the 1991 and 1992 graduates of U.S. medical schools. These predictors were debt itself; other financial indicators; certain medical school characteristics; certain practice location plans; certain demographic factors; aspects of academic performance; and students' predisposition to a primary care specialty. Data for this study were gathered from a variety of sources at the Association of American Medical Colleges and from the Health Education Assistance Loans program. Both direct and indirect effects of debt were identified under specific conditions. The study revealed complex relationships between debt and the other predictors identified. For example, debt operated in relation to the levels of the graduates' expected incomes; debt from subsidized loan sources was significant for women who chose general internal medicine; debt was important in choices of family practice; and debt by itself was significant for those planning to practice in the West and who chose general internal medicine. Also, seemingly opposing effects of debt occurred. For example, in the family practice model used in this study, the threshold effect of debt was positive, while the linear effect of debt above the threshold was negative. Such vriations help explain the conflicting findings of some past research. These and other findings prompt the authors to state that when investigating the effects of debt, it is not fruitful to ask what the effect of the debt is on all three primary care fields as a group. It is more appropriate to ask several questions, such as: under what conditions does debt influence specialty plans? Among which groups of students does debt have an impact on specialty plans? Are all of the primary care specialties similarly affected by the issues surrounding debt? Does the effect of debt change over time? The authors conclude by indicating possible policy implications of their findings. PMID:8645411

Colquitt, W L; Zeh, M C; Killian, C D; Cultice, J M

1996-04-01

163

Task Force Report 3. Report of the Task Force on Continuous Personal, Professional, and Practice Development in Family Medicine  

PubMed Central

PURPOSE This Future of Family Medicine task force report proposes a plan for lifelong learning that is designed to ensure family physicians are prepared to deliver the core attributes and system services of family medicine throughout their careers, especially within the New Model of family medicine that has been proposed. METHODS This report is based on consideration of the proposed New Model for family medicine, along with a careful review of the data generated through research conducted for the Future of Family Medicine project. The personal and professional development of family physicians and the continuous improvement of their practices were considered with an orientation toward providing systems to support the family patient-physician covenant. As a foundation for developing its plan for lifelong learning, the task force explored domains of management mastery, including the management of knowledge and information, the management of relationships, the management of care processes, and cultural proficiency. MAJOR FINDINGS This report presents a number of proposed innovations that have the potential to assure that family physicians deliver the core attributes of family medicine throughout their careers, including linking the family physician’s personal and professional development in a developmental context, based on ongoing self-assessment through the career stages of a family physician, and the creation of continuous personal and professional development modules as a new foundation for continuing medical education and professional development. The process for the continual improvement of clinical practice in family medicine must begin with a close working relationship between the academic community and the practice community. This relationship should be iterative over time, with research creating new practice innovations, which in turn create new questions for the research enterprise. CONCLUSION While traditional continuing medical education (CME) has served to meet many of the original tasks for which it was designed, the current model does not meet many of the emerging needs of patients, physicians, or health delivery systems. For this reason, traditional CME should be replaced with a process that incorporates personal, professional, and practice development. In order to build a more dynamic and effective way to support lifelong learning and performance change, this new process must address the needs that accompany the personal and professional developmental challenges encountered throughout the course of a family physician’s professional lifetime.

Jones, Warren A.; Avant, Robert F.; Davis, Nancy; Saultz, John; Lyons, Paul

2004-01-01

164

[Racism of "Blood" and colonial medicine - Blood group anthropology studies at Keijo Imperial University Department of Forensic Medicine].  

PubMed

This paper attempts to explore implications of Colonial medicine's Blood Type Studies, concerning the characteristics and tasks of racism in the Japanese Colonial Empire. Especially, it focuses on the Blood Group Anthropology Studies at Keijo Imperial University Department of Forensic Medicine. In Colonial Korea, the main stream of Blood Type Studies were Blood Group Anthropology Studies, which place Korean people who was inferior to Japanese people in the geography of the race on the one hand, but on the other, put Koreans as a missing link between the Mongolian and the Japanese for fulfillment of the Japanese colonialism, that is, assimilationist ideology. Then, Compared to the Western medicine and Metropole medicine of Japan, How differentiated was this tendency of Colonial Medicine from them? In this paper, main issues of Blood Group Anthropology Studies and its colonial implications are examined. PMID:23388491

Jung, Joon Young

2012-12-01

165

Department of Pathology STANFORD UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF MEDICINE  

E-print Network

and fellow training activities in blood banking and transfusion medicine. The individual will provide medical research projects in blood banking and transfusion medicine. The Stanford Blood Center collects in Clinical Pathology, Internal Medicine or Pediatrics, board eligible in Transfusion Medicine or minimum 1

Bogyo, Matthew

166

Department of Pathology STANFORD UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF MEDICINE  

E-print Network

in blood banking and transfusion medicine. The individual will provide medical cross coverage and transfusion medicine. The Stanford Blood Center collects approximately 50,000 red cell and 14 or Pediatrics, board eligible in Transfusion Medicine or minimum 1 year experience in Transfusion Medicine. You

Bogyo, Matthew

167

Primary Care Reform: Can Quebec's Family Medicine Group Model Benefit from the Experience of Ontario's Family Health Teams?  

PubMed

Canadian politicians, decision-makers, clinicians and researchers have come to agree that reforming primary care services is a key strategy for improving healthcare system performance. However, it is only more recently that real transformative initiatives have been undertaken in different Canadian provinces. One model that offers promise for improving primary care service delivery is the family medicine group (FMG) model developed in Quebec. A FMG is a group of physicians working closely with nurses in the provision of services to enrolled patients on a non-geographic basis. The objectives of this paper are to analyze the FMG's potential as a lever for improving healthcare system performance and to discuss how it could be improved. First, we briefly review the history of primary care in Quebec. Then we present the FMG model in relation to the four key healthcare system functions identified by the World Health Organization: (a) funding, (b) generating human and technological resources, (c) providing services to individuals and communities and (d) governance. Next, we discuss possible ways of advancing primary care reform, looking particularly at the family health team (FHT) model implemented in the province of Ontario. We conclude with recommendations to inspire other initiatives aimed at transforming primary care. PMID:23115575

Breton, Mylaine; Lévesque, Jean-Frédéric; Pineault, Raynald; Hogg, William

2011-11-01

168

Founding a new College of Medicine at Florida State University.  

PubMed

In 2000, the Florida State University (FSU) College of Medicine was founded, becoming the first new allopathic medical school in the United States in over 20 years. The new medical school was to use community-based clinical training for the education of its students, create a technology-rich environment, and address primary care health needs of Florida's citizens, especially the elderly, rural, minorities, and underserved. The challenges faced during the creation of the new school, including accreditation and a leadership change, as well as accomplishments are described here. The new school admits a diverse student body made possible through its extensive outreach programs, fosters a humane learning environment through creation of student learning communities, has a distributed clinical training model-with clinical campuses in Orlando, Pensacola, Sarasota and Tallahassee, and with 70% of training occurring in ambulatory settings-and utilizes 21st-century information technology. The curriculum focuses on patient-centered clinical training, using the biopsychosocial model of patient care throughout the entire medical curriculum, promotes primary care and geriatrics medicine through longitudinal community experiences, relies on a hybrid curriculum for delivery of the first two years of medical education with half of class sessions occurring in small groups and on a continuum of clinical skills development throughout the first three years, and uses an interdisciplinary departmental model for faculty, which greatly facilitates delivery of an integrated curriculum. The first class was admitted in 2001 and graduated in May 2005. In February 2005, the FSU College of Medicine received full accreditation from the Liaison Committee on Medical Education. PMID:16249293

Hurt, Myra M; Harris, J Ocie

2005-11-01

169

Art-making in a family medicine clerkship: how does it affect medical student empathy?  

PubMed

BackgroundTo provide patient-centred holistic care, doctors must possess good interpersonal and empathic skills. Medical schools traditionally adopt a skills-based approach to such training but creative engagement with the arts has also been effective. A novel arts-based approach may help medical students develop empathic understanding of patients and thus contribute to medical students¿ transformative process into compassionate doctors. This study aimed to evaluate the impact of an arts-making workshop on medical student empathy.MethodsThis was a mixed-method quantitative-qualitative study. In the 2011¿12 academic year, all 161 third year medical students at the University of Hong Kong were randomly allocated into either an arts-making workshop or a problem-solving workshop during the Family Medicine clerkship according to a centrally-set timetable. Students in the arts-making workshop wrote a poem, created artwork and completed a reflective essay while students in the conventional workshop problem-solved clinical cases and wrote a case commentary. All students who agreed to participate in the study completed a measure of empathy for medical students, the Jefferson Scale of Empathy (JSE) (student version), at the start and end of the clerkship. Quantitative data analysis: Paired t-test and repeated measures ANOVA was used to compare the change within and between groups respectively. Qualitative data analysis: Two researchers independently chose representational narratives based on criteria adapted from art therapy. The final 20 works were agreed upon by consensus and thematically analysed using a grounded theory approach.ResultsThe level of empathy declined in both groups over time, but with no statistically significant differences between groups. For JSE items relating to emotional influence on medical decision making, participants in the arts-making workshop changed more than those in the problem-solving workshop. From the qualitative data, students perceived benefits in arts-making, and gained understanding in relation to self, patients, pain and suffering, and the role of the doctor.ConclusionsThough quantitative findings showed little difference in empathy between groups, arts-making workshop participants gained empathic understanding in four different thematic areas. This workshop also seemed to promote greater self-awareness which may help medical students recognize the potential for emotions to sway judgment. Future art workshops should focus on emotional awareness and regulation. PMID:25431323

Potash, Jordan S; Chen, Julie Y; Lam, Cindy; Chau, Vivian

2014-11-28

170

Geriatric Medicine Training for Family Practice Residents in the 21st Century: A Report from the Residency Assistance Program/Hartford Geriatrics Initiative.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Summarizes the initial results of the regional geriatric medicine curriculum retreats for family practice residency directors provided as part of the American Academy of Family Physicians multi-part project to improve the amount and quality of geriatric medicine education received by family practice residents. (EV)

Warshaw, Gregg; Murphy, John; Buehler, James; Singleton, Stacy

2003-01-01

171

Asian Liver Center at Stanford University School of Medicine Position Opening: Research Intern  

E-print Network

Asian Liver Center at Stanford University School of Medicine Position The Asian Liver Center at Stanford University is the first organization hepatitis B infection and liver cancer in Asians and Asian Americans. We

Straight, Aaron

172

The art and science of prognostication in early university medicine.  

PubMed

Prognosis occupied a more prominent place in the medieval curriculum than it does at the modern university. Scholastic discussions were rooted in the Hippocratic Aphorisms and shaped by Galen's treatises On Crisis and On Critical Days. Medical prediction, as an art dependent on personal skills such as memory and conjecture, was taught with the aid of the liberal arts of rhetoric and logic. Scientific predictability was sought in branches of mathematics, moving from periodicity and numerology to astronomy. The search for certitude contributed to the cultivation of astrology; even at its peak, however, astrological medicine did not dominate the teaching on prognostication. The ultimate concern, which awaits further discussion, was not even with forecasting as such, but with the physician and, indeed, the patient. PMID:14657583

Demaitre, Luke

2003-01-01

173

UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE COLLEGE OF MEDICINE GRADUATE MEDICAL EDUCATION FACT SHEET  

E-print Network

UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE COLLEGE OF MEDICINE GRADUATE MEDICAL EDUCATION FACT SHEET Residents in the University of Tennessee Graduate Medical Education Program are considered student employees. As student of The University of Tennessee, you will be paid by the University. The University is on a monthly payroll system

Cui, Yan

174

Acting as standardized patients enhances family medicine residents' self-reported skills in palliative care.  

PubMed

Recent publications have confirmed the use of standardized patients (SPs) in improving clinical skills and enhancing competency. Little research has studied the benefits residents may themselves gain in palliative care playing the role of SPs. Nineteen Family Medicine residents were recruited as standardized patients (FMR-SPs) for a mandatory palliative care workshop in communication for incoming, first-year trainees. Four months later, FMR-SPs reflected upon their own experiences. Two independent researchers performed thematic analysis of these interviews. Most of the residents were satisfied with their roles. Twelve reported improved understanding of self, their patients, the doctor-patient relationship, and the underlying philosophy of palliative care. They also described improved verbal and non-verbal communication skills. Eleven of 14 residents reflected upon behavioral changes in problem coping styles. All residents indicated an intention to apply the learning in their future work. Encouraging Thai Family Medicine residents, in years one through three, to portray SPs in palliative care appears to be a valuable learning experience for the resident. Future studies to validate whether this learning has been applied in subsequent practice are planned. PMID:25256636

Sittikariyakul, Pat; Jaturapatporn, Darin; Kirshen, A J

2014-09-26

175

DOCTOR OF PHYSICAL THERAPY PROGRAM University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health  

E-print Network

DOCTOR OF PHYSICAL THERAPY PROGRAM University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health Mail to: Director of Development-School of Medicine and Public Health University of Wisconsin Theta Student Resources Fund Phi Theta Global Health Fund Please make checks out to: Phi Theta Mail to

Sheridan, Jennifer

176

TWO UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND SCHOOL OF MEDICINE FACULTY MEMBERS AND A BOARD MEMBER NAMED TO THE  

E-print Network

TWO UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND SCHOOL OF MEDICINE FACULTY MEMBERS AND A BOARD MEMBER NAMED TO THE DAILY RECORD'S LIST OF INFLUENTIAL MARYLANDERS Wednesday, February 13, 2013 Drs. Fraser and Rodriguez, as well as Board Member Emeritus Peter Angelos, Recognized The University of Maryland School of Medicine's Claire

Weber, David J.

177

Sponsored by the University of California, Irvine School of Medicine RADIOLOGY GRAND ROUNDS  

E-print Network

Sponsored by the University of California, Irvine School of Medicine RADIOLOGY GRAND ROUNDS Wednesday, May 15, 2013 ­ 4:00 ­ 5:00PM UC Irvine Medical Center ­ Radiology Conference Room (0117) "Bone Resnick, MD, FACR Professor of Radiology, University of California, San Diego School of Medicine Chief

Mease, Kenneth D.

178

Tracking family medicine graduates. Where do they go, what services do they provide and whom do they see?  

PubMed Central

Background There are continued concerns over an adequate supply of family physicians (FPs) practicing in Canada. While most resource planning has focused on intake into postgraduate education, less information is available on what postgraduate medical training yields. We therefore undertook a study of Family Medicine (FM) graduates from the University of Toronto (U of T) to determine the type of information for physician resource planning that may come from tracking FM graduates using health administrative data. This study compared three cohorts of FM graduates over a 10 year period of time and it also compared FM graduates to all Ontario practicing FPs in 2005/06. The objectives for tracking the three cohorts of FM graduates were to: 1) describe where FM graduates practice in the province 2) examine the impact of a policy introduced to influence the distribution of new FM graduates in the province 3) describe the services provided by FM graduates and 4) compare workload measures. The objectives for the comparison of FM graduates to all practicing FPs in 2005/06 were to: 1) describe the patient population served by FM graduates, 2) compare workload of FM graduates to all practicing FPs. Methods The study cohort consisted of all U of T FM postgraduate trainees who started and completed their training between 1993 and 2003. This study was a descriptive record linkage study whereby postgraduate information for FM graduates was linked to provincial health administrative data. Comprehensiveness of care indicators and workload measures based on administrative data where determined for the study cohort. Results From 1993 to 2003 there were 857 University of Toronto FM graduates. While the majority of U of T FM graduates practice in Toronto or the surrounding Greater Toronto Area, there are FM graduates from U of T practicing in every region in Ontario, Canada. The proportion of FM graduates undertaking further emergency training had doubled from 3.6% to 7.8%. From 1993 to 2003, a higher proportion of the most recent FM graduates did hospital visits, emergency room care and a lower proportion undertook home visits. Male FM graduates appear to have had higher workloads compared with female FM graduates, though the difference between them was decreasing over time. A 1997 policy initiative to discount fees paid to new FPs practicing in areas deemed over supplied did result in a decrease in the proportion of FM graduates practicing in metropolitan areas. Conclusions We were able to profile the practices of FM graduates using existing and routinely collected population-based health administrative data. Further work tracking FM graduates could be helpful for physician resource forecasting and in examining the impact of policies on family medicine practice. PMID:22453049

2012-01-01

179

Stanford University School of Medicine Department of Pathology House Staff  

E-print Network

Hematopathology Fellow Janet McNaughton, MD Transfusion Medicine Fellow Tony Ng, MD Surgical Pathology Fellow Hughes, MD Transfusion Medicine Fellow Bryan Gammon, MD Dermatopathology Fellow Lorraine Pan, MD Gyn

Bogyo, Matthew

180

Relevance of Hypersexual Disorder to Family Medicine and Primary Care as a Complex Multidimensional Chronic Disease Construct  

PubMed Central

Hypersexual disorder (HD) is not defined in a uniform way in the psychiatric literature. In the absence of solid evidence on prevalence, causes, empirically validated diagnostic criteria, instruments for diagnosis, consistent guidelines on treatment options, medical and psychosocial consequences, and type of caregivers that need to be involved, HD remains a controversial and relatively poorly understood chronic disease construct. The role of family medicine in the detection, treatment, and followup of HD is not well studied. The purpose of this paper is to describe the complexity of HD as a multidimensional chronic disease construct and its relevance to family medicine and primary care. PMID:24066230

Vrijhoef, Bert; De Maeseneer, Jan; Vansintejan, Johan; Devroey, Dirk

2013-01-01

181

MONTANA STATE UNIVERSITY -BOZEMAN Family & Graduate Housing is primarily intended to provide affordable, temporary housing for students with families, single  

E-print Network

MONTANA STATE UNIVERSITY - BOZEMAN Family & Graduate Housing is primarily intended to provide affordable, temporary housing for students with families, single graduates, upper classmen, students RENTAL RATES SINGLE GRADUATE/UPPER CLASSMEN STUDENT HOUSING (Please see reverse side for single rates

Lawrence, Rick L.

182

Establishing the Need for Family Medicine Training in Intimate Partner Violence Screening.  

PubMed

In 2012, the USPSTF updated its guidelines and now recommends that all women of childbearing age be screened for IPV and services provided for women who screen positive. Based on these recommendations, objectives of this study were to (1) evaluate IPV knowledge, attitudes, and practices of physicians from different specialties and (2) determine significant differences by medical specialty. We recruited (n = 183) Internal Medicine, Emergency Medicine, Family Medicine (FM) and Obstetrics/Gynecology (OB/GYN) residents and attending physicians to complete a 15-question online survey assessing knowledge, attitudes and current IPV screening practices. We evaluated associations between medical specialty and knowledge, attitudes and practice measures before and after controlling for covariates. Knowledge of how often IPV occurs in society, community resources, and screening tools were significantly different by specialty (all p's < 0.05). A majority of FM physicians (88 %) reported that it is a physician's responsibility to find and treat IPV and 97 % reported that IPV should be included in their training. Compared to OB/GYN physicians in multivariate analyses, FM physicians were less likely to report they were comfortable discussing IPV with their patients in crude (OR = 0.35; 95 % CI = 0.13, 0.94) and adjusted models (OR = 0.20; 95 % CI = 0.06, 0.60). FM physicians were also less likely to report screening female patients for IPV before (OR = 0.25; 95 % CI = 0.08, 0.86) and after adjusting for confounders (OR = 0.11; 95 % CI = 0.03, 0.47). Our results indicate that FM physicians have positive attitudes towards finding and treating IPV yet need enhanced training to improve their comfort level with screening for and discussing IPV with their patients. PMID:25352415

Pagels, Patti; Kindratt, Tiffany B; Reyna, Guadalupe; Lam, Kenrick; Silver, Mandy; Gimpel, Nora E

2014-10-29

183

Copyright 2011, The Ohio State University Family and Consumer Sciences  

E-print Network

recorded in Japan. A third type, Yersinia pestis, causes the plagueCopyright © 2011, The Ohio State University Family and Consumer Sciences HYG-5574-11 Yersinia but is not transferredtopeoplethroughfood.Animals(pigs,birds, beavers, cats, and dogs) carry Yersinia enterocolitica and can cause

184

Copyright 2011, The Ohio State University Family and Consumer Sciences  

E-print Network

types that cause foodborne illnesses. What are the symptoms? Infections with Salmonella spp. are called has been found in infected, but otherwise healthy hens and their uncracked eggs. Is food the onlyCopyright © 2011, The Ohio State University Family and Consumer Sciences HYG-5566-11 Salmonella

185

Medication reconciliation by clinical pharmacists in an outpatient family medicine clinic.  

PubMed

OBJECTIVES To evaluate the incidence of medication discrepancies in electronic health record (EHR) medication lists in an outpatient family medicine clinic where clinical pharmacists perform medication reconciliation, to classify and resolve the discrepancies, to identify the most common medication classes involved, and to assess the clinical importance of the discrepancies. METHODS This research was conducted at Bethesda Family Medicine Clinic in St. Paul, MN, with data collected from February 2009 to February 2010. To be included, patients had to be 18 years or older and have at least 10 medications listed in the EHR. The clinical pharmacist saw each patient before the physician, reviewed the medication list with the patient, and made corrections to the EHR medication list. When possible, comprehensive medication management (CMM) also was conducted. RESULTS During 1 year, 327 patients were seen for medication reconciliation. A total of 2,167 discrepancies were identified and resolved, with a mean (±SD) of 6.6 ± 4.5 total discrepancies and 3.4 ± 3.2 clinically important discrepancies per patient. The range of total discrepancies per patient was 0 to 26. The most common discrepancy category was "patient not taking medication on list" (54.1%). Overall, the source of the discrepancy usually was the patient, but it varied according to discrepancy category. The most common medication classes involved were pain medications, gastrointestinal medications, and topical medications. Of the 2,167 discrepancies, 51.1% were determined to be clinically important by the pharmacist. The pharmacist conducted CMM in 48% of patients. CONCLUSION Outpatient medication reconciliation by a pharmacist identified and resolved a large number of medication discrepancies and improved the accuracy of EHR medication lists. Because more than 50% of the discrepancies were thought to be clinically important, improving the accuracy of medication lists could affect patient care. PMID:24531920

Milone, Anna S; Philbrick, Ann M; Harris, Ila M; Fallert, Christopher J

2014-01-01

186

The Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, Laboratory Medicine McMaster University, invites applications for a one year Forensic Pathology Residency Program (PGY-6) for the academic  

E-print Network

The Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, Laboratory Medicine McMaster University, invites applications for a one year Forensic Pathology Residency Program (PGY-6) for the academic year July 2013-June 2014. The Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine and the Hamilton Regional

Haykin, Simon

187

Evaluation of the educational environment of the Saudi family medicine residency training program  

PubMed Central

Objectives: The study was conducted to evaluate the educational environment (EE) in Family Medicine Training Programs. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional survey, The Postgraduate Hospital Educational Environment Measure (PHEEM), was distributed to all residents at the four training centers in the central region. Cronbach's alpha was used to test the reliability. The mean and standard deviation (SD) for each item, the overall score and the three domains were calculated. A multiple linear regression model was developed with PHEEM scores as an outcome. The Mann–Whitney–Wilcoxon test was used to compare each item based on the selected factors. Results: The overall score was 67.1/160 (SD: 20.1). The PHEEM's domains scores: 24.2/56 (SD: 7.13) for perception of role autonomy; 25.3/60 (SD: 8.88), for perception of teaching; and 17/44 (SD: 5.6), for perception of social support. Training center and Level of training were the significant outcome predictors. Centre 1 (Joint Program) significantly had better scores than Centre 2. The instrument showed great reliability with a Cronbach's alpha of 0.92. Conclusions: There are many problems in the training program. Urgent actions are needed to improve the residents' learning experience particularly during rotations. Also, the curriculum should be restructured, and effective training methods introduced using the Best Evidence in Medical Education to meet the expectations and learning needs of family physicians.

Khoja, Abdullah T.

2015-01-01

188

The MPH Faculty -Department of Family Medicine & Public Health Sciences Joel Ager, PhD Division of Population Health Sciences  

E-print Network

The MPH Faculty - Department of Family Medicine & Public Health Sciences Joel Ager, PhD Division of Population Health Sciences Bengt Arnetz, MD, PhD, MPH Director, Div. of Occupational & Environ. Health Judith Arnetz, PhD Division of Occupational & Environmental Health David Bassett, PhD Graduate Student Officer

Cinabro, David

189

JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF MEDICINE Department of Psychiatry Behavioral Biology Research Center  

E-print Network

's therapeutic potential in the treatment of drug and alcohol abuse. There is also opportunity to explore its useJOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF MEDICINE Department of Psychiatry Behavioral Biology Research to get in touch with Lisa Seischab at the Fund for Johns Hopkins Medicine. Her contact information

Connor, Ed

190

Epidemiology and Herd Health Training in the School of Veterinary Medicine, Louisiana State University.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

At Louisiana State University School of Veterinary Medicine, training in preventive medicine is incorporated into all four years of the curriculum. The curriculum is described with focus on the fourth year practical course that involves problem solving, using various herds in the area. (JMD)

Archbald, L. F.; Hagstad, H. V.

1978-01-01

191

Approved by Dental Senate, May 4, 2012 University of Connecticut School of Dental Medicine  

E-print Network

the Principles of Ethics and Code of Professional Conduct set forth by the American Dental Association (ADAPage 1 Approved by Dental Senate, May 4, 2012 University of Connecticut School of Dental Medicine and faculty2 ) of the School of Dental Medicine (SDM) community shall be expected to uphold and embody

Oliver, Douglas L.

192

Medical Student Fellowship in Women's Health Research Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania  

E-print Network

Medical Student Fellowship in Women's Health Research Perelman School of Medicine at the University in academic medicine · To promote research and education in women's health Dual Mission To support in women's health: 1 award may be specific to CV research ­ Clinical, basic science or community · Open

Bushman, Frederic

193

Forensic Pathologist Hamilton Regional Laboratory Medicine Program and McMaster University  

E-print Network

Forensic Pathologist Hamilton Regional Laboratory Medicine Program and McMaster University Hamilton, ON Applications are invited for a full-time Forensic Pathologist position with the Hamilton Regional Laboratory Medicine Program (HRLMP). The Forensic Pathology Unit is a sub-specialty of the Anatomic Pathology section

Haykin, Simon

194

Center for Biomedical Ethics and Humanities University of Virginia School of Medicine  

E-print Network

of Nursing 9 March 2011 Brodie Lecture in Medical Education Moral Distress in Health Professionals--A CallCenter for Biomedical Ethics and Humanities University of Virginia School of Medicine PO Box 800761 Charlottesville VA 22908-0761 434.924.5974/434.982.3971 (fax) http://www.medicine.virginia.edu/community- service/centers/biomedical-ethics

Acton, Scott

195

Center for Biomedical Ethics and Humanities University of Virginia School of Medicine  

E-print Network

, Philadelphia PA Copresented with the School of Nursing 2 November 2011 Hollingsworth Lecture in Ethics Title Lectures. For information, call 434.924.5974 or see http://www.medicine.virginia.edu/community-service/centers/biomedical-ethics-and-humanities/medicalCenter for Biomedical Ethics and Humanities University of Virginia School of Medicine PO Box 800761

Acton, Scott

196

Differences between family physicians and patients in their knowledge and attitudes regarding traditional chinese medicine  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: With patients turning more to alternative medicine, most physicians are still conservative in their views toward these practices. It is important to know whether there is a difference between physicians and patients regarding knowledge and attitudes about alternative medicine. This study focused on information regarding a specific type of alternative medicine, traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). Methods: Two questionnaires—one for

Bin Chen; Amy Bernard; Randall Cottrell

2000-01-01

197

[Teaching of medicine of the University of Bologna in the Reinaissance].  

PubMed

The foundation date of the University of Bologna was 1150, was the first European University and set the pattern. The combination of structured teaching and students association marked the origin of the studium generale. The presence of teaching legists encouraged teachers in others fields to come to Bologna. Ars dictaminis, grammar, logic, philosophy, mathematical arts and especially medicine were taught there by the middle of the thirteenth century. The university had to offer advanced instruction in law, medicine, and theology, had a minimum of six to eight professors teaching civil law, canon law, medicine, logic, natural philosophy and usually rhetoric. Many professors bearing local names were able scholars and commanding figures in medicine and surgery. Taddeo Alderotti (1210-95) began to teach medicine in Bologna about 1260. He soon raised medicine to a prestigious position in the university. The geographical distribution demonstrates the international character of the student body 73% were Italians and 26% non Italians. The decision of the commune of Bologna to wrest control of the university from the students by paying professors was probably the most important decision in the history of Italian universities. Examination of the distribution of professors offers a detailed picture of the faculty. In 1370 the university had 11 professors of civil law, seven professors of canon law, three professors of medical theory, two of medical practice (the specific of diagnosis and treatment), and one professor of surgery. After growing steadily the numbers of teachers stabilized at 85 to 110 until 1530. PMID:16827269

Romero y Huesca, Andrés; Moreno-Rojas, Juan Carlos; Soto-Miranda, Miguel Angel; Ponce-Landín, Francisco Javier; Hernández, Daniel Alejandro; Ramírez-Bollas, Julio

2006-01-01

198

The University of Maryland School of Medicine Department of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Science  

E-print Network

1 The University of Maryland School of Medicine Department of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation the Department of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Science (PTRS) at the University of Maryland School on the sprawling University of Maryland Baltimore campus as part of a Research I institution and large

Weber, David J.

199

Task Force 1. Report of the Task Force on Patient Expectations, Core Values, Reintegration, and the New Model of Family Medicine  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND To lay the groundwork for the development of a comprehensive strategy to transform and renew the specialty of family medicine, this Future of Family Medicine task force was charged with identifying the core values of family medicine, developing proposals to reform family medicine to meet consumer expectations, and determining systems of care to be delivered by family medicine in the future. METHODS A diverse, multidisciplinary task force representing a broad spectrum of perspectives and expertise analyzed and discussed published literature; findings from surveys, interviews, and focus groups compiled by research firms contracted to the Future of Family Medicine project; and analyses from The Robert Graham Center, professional societies in the United States and abroad, and others. Through meetings, conference calls, and writing, and revision of a series of subcommittee reports, the entire task force reached consensus on its conclusions and recommendations. These were reviewed by an external panel of experts and revisions were made accordingly. MAJOR FINDINGS After delivering on its promise to reverse the decline of general practice in the United States, family medicine and the nation face additional challenges to assure all people receive care that is safe, effective, patient-centered, timely, efficient, and equitable. Challenges the discipline needs to address to improve family physicians’ ability to make important further contributions include developing a broader, more accurate understanding of the specialty among the public and other health professionals, addressing the wide scope and variance in practice types within family medicine, winning respect for the specialty in academic circles, making family medicine a more attractive career option, and dealing with the perception that family medicine is not solidly grounded in science and technology. The task force set forth a proposed identity statement for family medicine, a basket of services that should be reliably provided in family medicine practices, and an itemization of key attributes and core values that define the specialty. It also proposed and described a New Model of family medicine for people of all ages and both genders that emphasizes patient-centered, evidence-based, whole-person care provided through a multidisciplinary team approach in settings that reduce barriers to access and use advanced information systems and other new technologies. The task force recommended a time of active experimentation to redesign the work and workplace of family physicians; the development of revised financial models for family medicine, and a national resource to provide assistance to individual practices moving to New Model practice; and cooperation with others pursuing the transformation of frontline medicine to better serve the public. CONCLUSIONS Unless there are changes in the broader health care system and within the specialty, the position of family medicine in the United States will be untenable in a 10- to 20-year time frame. Even within the constraints of today’s flawed health care system, there are major opportunities for family physicians to realize improved results for patients and economic success. A period of aggressive experimentation and redevelopment of family medicine is needed now. The future success of the discipline and its impact on public well-being depends in large measure on family medicine’s ability to rearticulate its vision and competencies in a fashion that has greater resonance with the public while substantially revising the organization and processes by which care is delivered. When accomplished, family physicians will achieve more fully the aspirations articulated by the specialty’s core values and contribute to the solution of the nation’s serious health care problems.

Green, Larry A.; Graham, Robert; Bagley, Bruce; Kilo, Charles M.; Spann, Stephen J.; Bogdewic, Stephen P.; Swanson, John

2004-01-01

200

75 FR 61126 - Virginia Commonwealth University, School of Medicine; Notice of Decision on Applications for Duty...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Commonwealth University, School of Medicine; Notice of Decision on Applications for Duty-Free Entry of Scientific Instruments This is a...biological macromolecules, which will be observed under cryogenic conditions. We know of no instruments of equivalent...

2010-10-04

201

Faculty Positions in Microbial Pathogenesis Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis  

E-print Network

Faculty Positions in Microbial Pathogenesis Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis aspects of microbial pathogenesis using innovative combinations of genomics, genetics, cell biology publications. To apply, please send a single PDF document containing a Curriculum Vitae, selected reprints

Doering, Tamara

202

University of Connecticut School of Medicine Child & Adolescent Psychiatry Residency/Fellowship  

E-print Network

12/09 University of Connecticut School of Medicine Child & Adolescent Psychiatry Residency: __________________ To: Child and Adolescent Psychiatry training program From of neurology (2 months minimum; one month may be child neurology) ____ FTE months of adult inpatient psychiatry

Oliver, Douglas L.

203

University of Virginia Athletics & Sports Medicine New Student-Athlete Health History 2013-14  

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University of Virginia Athletics & Sports Medicine New Student-Athlete Health History 2013____________________________________________ Sex_______ Date of Birth_______________ Sport(s)_________________________ UVA Student ID specified, all questions below refer to your lifetime health history. You must respond to all

Acton, Scott

204

Fellowship Training Program in Digestive Diseases Yale University School of Medicine  

E-print Network

Fellowship Training Program in Digestive Diseases Yale University School of Medicine Curriculum Knowledge in Digestive Diseases ................................. 5 General Goals and Objectives ..................... 52 VA Connecticut Health Care System General Information ...................... 59 VA GI Consult

Johnson, Marcia K.

205

Skills Inventory/Biography University of Rochester School of Medicine & Dentistry  

E-print Network

Program Director Boston University Geriatrics Medical or Scientific Specialty Geriatric Medicine, Internal and national medical society meetings (i.e. American Geriatrics Society Annual Meetings) What is the best way

Goldman, Steven A.

206

The potential medicinal value of plants from Asteraceae family with antioxidant defense enzymes as biological targets.  

PubMed

Abstract Context: Plants and most of the plant-derived compounds have long been known for their potential pharmaceutical effects. They are well known to play an important role in the treatment of several diseases from diabetes to various types of cancers. Today most of the clinically effective pharmaceuticals are developed from plant-derived ancestors in the history of medicine. Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the free radical scavenging activity and total phenolic and flavonoid contents of methanol, ethanol, and acetone extracts from flowers and leaves of Onopordum acanthium L., Carduus acanthoides L., Cirsium arvense (L.) Scop., and Centaurea solstitialis L., all from the Asteraceae family, for investigating their potential medicinal values of biological targets that are participating in the antioxidant defense system such as catalase (CAT), glutathione S-transferase (GST), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx). Materials and methods: In this study, free radical scavenging activity and total phenolic and flavonoid contents of the plant samples were assayed by DPPH, Folin-Ciocalteu, and aluminum chloride colorimetric methods. Also, the effects of extracts on CAT, GST, and GPx enzyme activities were investigated. Results and discussion: The highest phenolic and flavonoid contents were detected in the acetone extract of C. acanthoides flowers, with 90.305?mg GAE/L and 185.43?mg Q/L values, respectively. The highest DPPH radical scavenging was observed with the methanol leaf extracts of C. arvense with an IC50 value of 366?ng/mL. The maximum GPx and GST enzyme inhibition activities were observed with acetone extracts from the flower of C. solstitialis with IC50 values of 79 and 232?ng/mL, respectively. PMID:25339240

Koc, Suheda; Isgor, Belgin S; Isgor, Yasemin G; Shomali Moghaddam, Naznoosh; Yildirim, Ozlem

2014-10-23

207

National Cheng Kung University College of Medicine Summer Program  

E-print Network

at the Chinese Medicine Clinic, visit nursing homes in Taiwan and participate in PatientDoctor Interviews. Please feel free to email her for more information regarding NCKU, traveling in Taiwan, accommodation

Cengarle, María Victoria

208

COLLEGE OF MEDICINE University of Illinois at Chicago  

E-print Network

of Hippocrates Now being admitted to the profession of medicine, I solemnly pledge to consecrate my life of Doctor of Philosophy Degrees President B. Joseph White, PhD The Oath of Hippocrates Administered by Dean

Illinois at Chicago, University of

209

Can credit systems help in family medicine training in developing countries? An innovative concept.  

PubMed

There is irrefutable evidence that health systems perform best when supported by a Family Physician network. Training a critical mass of highly skilled Family Physicians can help developing countries to reach their Millennium Development Goals and deliver comprehensive patient-centered health care to their population. The challenge in developing countries is the need to rapidly train these Family Physicians in large numbers, while also ensuring the quality of the learning, and assuring the quality of training. The experience of Christian Medical College (CMC), Vellore, India and other global examples confirm the fact that training large numbers is possible through well-designed blended learning programs. The question then arises as to how these programs can be standardized. Globally, the concept of the "credit system" has become the watch-word for many training programs seeking standardization. This article explores the possibility of introducing incremental academic certifications using credit systems as a method to standardize these blended learning programs, gives a glimpse at the innovation that CMC, Vellore is piloting in this regard partnering with the University of Edinburgh and analyses the possible benefits and pitfalls of such an approach. PMID:25374849

Raji, J Beulah; Velavan, Jachin; Anbarasi, Sahaya; Grant, Liz

2014-07-01

210

Access to medicines and out of pocket payments for primary care: Evidence from family medicine users in rural Tajikistan  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: In Tajikistan it is estimated that out of pocket payments constitute two-thirds of all health spending with high proportions of these contributions through informal payments. As a consequence, access to basic care is a major concern particularly among the most needy and vulnerable groups. This article evaluates accessibility of prescription medicines and patient expenditures for primary care services in

Fabrizio Tediosi; Raffael Aye; Shukufa Ibodova; Robin Thompson; Kaspar Wyss

2008-01-01

211

Family Diversity: Perceptions of University Students Relative to Gender and College Major.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Findings from a survey of 280 university students indicated that they tended to support the nuclear family as a "family," and feel that families with children represented a "family." Several gender and college major differences were found in attitudes about families, as discussed. (SLD)

Ford, Donna Y.; And Others

1996-01-01

212

The national portfolio for postgraduate family medicine training in South Africa: a descriptive study of acceptability, educational impact, and usefulness for assessment  

PubMed Central

Background Since 2007 a portfolio of learning has become a requirement for assessment of postgraduate family medicine training by the Colleges of Medicine of South Africa. A uniform portfolio of learning has been developed and content validity established among the eight postgraduate programmes. The aim of this study was to investigate the portfolio’s acceptability, educational impact, and perceived usefulness for assessment of competence. Methods Two structured questionnaires of 35 closed and open-ended questions were delivered to 53 family physician supervisors and 48 registrars who had used the portfolio. Categorical and nominal/ordinal data were analysed using simple descriptive statistics. The open-ended questions were analysed with ATLAS.ti software. Results Half of registrars did not find the portfolio clear, practical or feasible. Workshops on portfolio use, learning, and supervision were supported, and brief dedicated time daily for reflection and writing. Most supervisors felt the portfolio reflected an accurate picture of learning, but just over half of registrars agreed. While the portfolio helped with reflection on learning, participants were less convinced about how it helped them plan further learning. Supervisors graded most rotations, suggesting understanding the summative aspect, while only 61% of registrars reflected on rotations, suggesting the formative aspects are not yet optimally utilised. Poor feedback, the need for protected academic time, and pressure of service delivery impacting negatively on learning. Conclusion This first introduction of a national portfolio for postgraduate training in family medicine in South Africa faces challenges similar to those in other countries. Acceptability of the portfolio relates to a clear purpose and guide, flexible format with tools available in the workplace, and appreciating the changing educational environment from university-based to national assessments. The role of the supervisor in direct observations of the registrar and dedicated educational meetings, giving feedback and support, cannot be overemphasized. PMID:23885806

2013-01-01

213

Sounding Narrative Medicine: Studying Students’ Professional Identity Development at Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons  

PubMed Central

Purpose To learn what medical students derive from training in humanities, social sciences, and the arts in a narrative medicine curriculum and to explore narrative medicine’s framework as it relates to students’ professional development. Method On completion of required intensive, half-semester narrative medicine seminars in 2010, 130 second-year medical students at Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons participated in focus group discussions of their experiences. Focus group transcriptions were submitted to close iterative reading by a team who performed a grounded-theory-guided content analysis, generating a list of codes into which statements were sorted to develop overarching themes. Provisional interpretations emerged from the close and repeated readings, suggesting a fresh conceptual understanding of how and through what avenues such education achieves its goals in clinical training. Results Students’ comments articulated the known features of narrative medicine—attention, representation, and affiliation—and endorsed all three as being valuable to professional identity development. They spoke of the salience of their work in narrative medicine to medicine and medical education and its dividends of critical thinking, reflection, and pleasure. Critiques constituted a small percentage of the statements in each category. Conclusions Students report that narrative medicine seminars support complex interior, interpersonal, perceptual, and expressive capacities. Students’ lived experiences confirm some expectations of narrative medicine curricular planners while exposing fresh effects of such work to view. PMID:24362390

Miller, Eliza; Balmer, Dorene; Hermann, Nellie; Graham, Gillian; Charon, Rita

2014-01-01

214

Research, Education and Outreach in the Division of Agriculture, Forestry and Veterinary Medicine Mississippi State University  

E-print Network

from the Vault exhibit. (Photo by Scott Corey) 4 Rebel Dog A family of Ole Miss alums turns to MSU's College of Veterinary Medicine when their beloved dog becomes severely injured. 6 Drainage Dilemma An MSU out if a refined version of byproducts from corn-to-ethanol manufacturing pro- vides nutrition

Ray, David

215

History of the renal section, New York University School of Medicine 1926-1986, New York University Medical Center.  

PubMed Central

This history of the Renal Section at New York University School of Medicine ascribes its birth to a policy introduced by John Henry Wyckoff in 1924 that divided the Department of Medicine into sections devoted to the various subspecialties. Physicians selected to head each section sought further training. William Goldring, asked to organize the kidney section, spent a sabbatical year working with Homer William Smith, chairman and professor of the department of physiology at New York University School of Medicine. The second event was the development of a postdoctoral fellowship program in which medical school graduates, following completion of their intern and residency program, returned to basic science departments for exposure to and training in research in preparation for their return to clinical medicine. The aim of this fellowship program was to introduce the experimental method, which had been productive in the physical sciences, to the study and treatment of disease in man. The third event was the continuous collaboration between members of the Department of Medicine and the Department of Physiology under the chairmanship of Homer Smith. Experimental protocols in cardiovascular and renal physiology developed in the laboratory were carried over to Bellevue Hospital for studies and treatment of patients with hypertensive and renal diseases under the direction of members of the Renal Section. The final step conceived by Saul J. Farber, Chairman and Professor of the Department of Medicine was unification into a single group of all faculty members working in the field of hypertensive and renal diseases in Bellevue, University, and Manhattan Veterans Administration Hospitals. The Renal Section then can attribute its origin and development to the establishment of divisions within the Department of Medicine, the postdoctoral fellowship program, and the collaboration between the Departments of Medicine and Physiology. The establishment of the Renal Section served as a prototype for organizing medical school faculties into teams responsible for teaching, investigation, and treating hypertensive and renal diseases and spawned nephrology as a subspecialty of Internal Medicine. PMID:2686789

Chasis, H.

1989-01-01

216

Relevance of Chronic Lyme Disease to Family Medicine as a Complex Multidimensional Chronic Disease Construct: A Systematic Review  

PubMed Central

Lyme disease has become a global public health problem and a prototype of an emerging infection. Both treatment-refractory infection and symptoms that are related to Borrelia burgdorferi infection remain subject to controversy. Because of the absence of solid evidence on prevalence, causes, diagnostic criteria, tools and treatment options, the role of autoimmunity to residual or persisting antigens, and the role of a toxin or other bacterial-associated products that are responsible for the symptoms and signs, chronic Lyme disease (CLD) remains a relatively poorly understood chronic disease construct. The role and performance of family medicine in the detection, integrative treatment, and follow-up of CLD are not well studied either. The purpose of this paper is to describe insights into the complexity of CLD as a multidimensional chronic disease construct and its relevance to family medicine by means of a systematic literature review. PMID:25506429

Goderis, Geert

2014-01-01

217

TheJournalofExperimentalMedicine JEM The Rockefeller University Press $15.00  

E-print Network

TheJournalofExperimentalMedicine ARTICLE JEM © The Rockefeller University Press $15.00 www, The Rockefeller University, New York, NY 10021 5Laboratory Animal Science Program, Science Applications Research Foundation, Oklahoma City, OK 73104 The B cell­speci c enzyme activation-induced cytidine

Papavasiliou, F. Nina

218

Our Achievements in Telemedicine within the Partnership Program with Boston University School of Medicine.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses advances in telecommunications and telemedicine in developing countries and describes a partnership between the Emergency Scientific Medical Center in Armenia, Boston University School of Medicine, and the University of Massachusetts to exchange personnel for educational and technical assistance and to provide better services and…

Tadevosyan, A.; Screnci, D.

2002-01-01

219

Research, Education and Outreach in the Division of Agriculture, Forestry and Veterinary Medicine Mississippi State University  

E-print Network

I I Mississippi State University Research, Education and Outreach in the Division of Agriculture, Forestry and Veterinary Medicine I I I Mississippi State University Volume 2, Number 2 SPRING 2006 #12;On are working to develop new varieties. 6 Arena Attraction Mississippi's agricenters provide a variety

Ray, David

220

An interface of Chlamydia testing by community family planning clinics and referral to hospital genitourinary medicine clinics  

Microsoft Academic Search

ObjectivesTo assess compliance with the protocol for the management of women with Chlamydia trachomatis diagnosed in community family planning (FP) clinics; to assess the rate of attendance at genitourinary medicine (GUM) clinics by these women; to assess the rate of adequate treatment and to assess the level of communication between GUM clinics and FP clinics.MethodRetrospective review of FP clinic records

Chris Wilkinson; Helen Massil; Jacqueline Evans

2000-01-01

221

Feinberg Fact Sheet Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine  

E-print Network

School of Medicine #12;Feinberg Facts Location On the lakefront in downtown Chicago's Streeterville Class of 2017: 59% men, 41% women; 39% White, 32% Asian,*17% Underrepresented Minorities, (URM), 10 Health Opportunities Medical students can engage in global clinical experiences at one of 20 affiliated

Chisholm, Rex L.

222

University of Virginia School of Medicine PO Box 800761  

E-print Network

.924.5974 http:/medicine.virginia.edu/community- service/centers/ biomedical-ethics-and- humanities/medical GETS ORGANS FOR TRANSPLANT? MEDICAL, LEGAL, AND ETHICAL VIEWS OCCASIONED BY THE SARAH MURNAGHAN CASE, and Professor of Medical Education, UVA Co-presented with the Institute for Practical Ethics and Public Life

Acton, Scott

223

Dean's Faculty Advisory Committee University of Tennessee, College of Medicine  

E-print Network

approved as written. Minutes had previously been distributed by electronic means. Old Business There was no old business. New Business Dr. Hank Herrod, Dean of the College of Medicine, discussed five main topics with the DFAC [new business: dean to talk about [1] what he envisions for this committee; [2

Cui, Yan

224

University of Virginia School of Medicine PO Box 800761  

E-print Network

.924.5974 http:/medicine.virginia.edu/community- service/centers/ biomedical-ethics-and- humanities/medical __________________________________________ The Medical Center Hour is produced weekly throughout the academic year by the Center for Biomedical Ethics Clinicians and Patients Larry R. Churchill PhD, Center for Biomedical Ethics and Society, Vanderbilt

Acton, Scott

225

University of Virginia School of Medicine PO Box 800761  

E-print Network

.924.5974 http:/medicine.virginia.edu/community- service/centers/ biomedical-ethics-and- humanities/medical September 2012 The Kenneth R. Crispell Memorial History Lecture "Ethically Impossible"? The U.S. Sexually Issues and Center for Biomedical Ethics and Humanities, UVA Co-presented with the History of the Health

Acton, Scott

226

Comparative Review of Education Programs of Family Medicine (FM) in Bosnia and Herzegovina and Several Transition Countries  

PubMed Central

Family Medicine as an independent medical discipline is relatively young in the countries of Southeast Europe. Still are used the old models of all forms of education in this module, although most countries accepted Bologna undergraduate teaching concept and already implement it with greater or lesser success. Measuring the effects of the qualities of these concepts and models is not done systematically nor in uniform manner, so it could not be compared by the unique variables measuring the quality of education curricula, and especially the quality of education level of the graduates at the first, second and third degree courses and other forms of education. This paper provides a comparative overview of the state of education in the area of family medicine in the region. It creates comparison according to the study duration for undergraduate and postgraduate studies, doctoral studies and specialized studies in specified areas. What stand out are the proposals to improve education in the field of family medicine in the region.

Masic, Izet; Skopljak, Amira; Jatic, Zaim

2014-01-01

227

University of Maryland School of Medicine For all inquiries, please contact us at admissions@som.umaryland.edu  

E-print Network

University of Maryland School of Medicine For all inquiries, please contact us at admissions, Maryland 21201 · 410.706.7478 · medschool.umaryland.edu/admissions The University of Maryland, Baltimore Association, accredits the School of Medicine. The University of Maryland, Baltimore is actively committed

Weber, David J.

228

Agreement between University of Medicine & Dentistry of New Jersey  

E-print Network

of the American Association of University Professors July 1, 2004 to June 30, 2009 Contents Page PREAMBLE Retirement Program.......71 SIDE LETTER OF AGREEMENT Code of Ethics.........................73 SIDE LETTER called the University) and the Council of Chapters of the American Association of University Professors

Liu, Alice Y.C.

229

Bonnie Spring holds a PhD from Harvard University and is Professor of Preventive Medicine, Psychology, and Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Director of Behavioral Medicine, and Co-Program Leader in Cancer Prevention and Control at Northwestern Universit  

Cancer.gov

Bonnie Spring earned the PhD in psychology from Harvard University and is Professor of Preventive Medicine, Psychology, and Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Director of Behavioral Medicine, and Co-Program Leader in Cancer Prevention at Northwestern University.

230

UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA PERELMAN SCHOOL OF MEDICINE The Division of Biostatistics in the Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology at the University of Pennsylvania  

E-print Network

UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA PERELMAN SCHOOL OF MEDICINE The Division of Biostatistics in the Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology at the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine) in Biostatistics. The University of Pennsylvania, founded by Benjamin Franklin, is a world-class research

Carriquiry, Alicia

231

Reconstruction and Analysis of Gene Family Evolution in Mammals University of Connecticut, 2010  

E-print Network

Reconstruction and Analysis of Gene Family Evolution in Mammals Jin Jun University of Connecticut family histories. #12;Reconstruction and Analysis of Gene Family Evolution in Mammals Jin Jun B.S., Korea Reconstruction and Analysis of Gene Family Evolution in Mammals Presented by Jin Jun Major Advisor: Craig E

Mandoiu, Ion

232

School of Psychology, Family & Community: Job Placement. May 2013 Page 1 Seattle Pacific University's School of Psychology, Family & Community  

E-print Network

School of Psychology, Family & Community: Job Placement. May 2013 Page 1 Seattle Pacific University with local companies where they would like to be employed, find an internship to supplement their coursework of Psychology, Family & Community: Job Placement. May 2013 Page 2 Some of the companies our students and alumni

Nelson, Tim

233

UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA PERELMAN SCHOOL OF MEDICINE Curriculum Vitae  

E-print Network

for Experimental Psychiatry Vice Chair for Faculty Affairs and Professional Development Department of Psychiatry Psychiatry, The Institute of Pennsylvania Hospital and University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA Military of Psychology, The George Washington University 1977-80 Instructor of Psychology, Department of Psychiatry

Pennsylvania, University of

234

Resident and program director perspectives on third-year family medicine programs  

PubMed Central

ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To determine the views of family medicine (FM) program directors, third-year program coordinators, and residents on the factors affecting demand and allocation of postgraduate year 3 (PGY3) positions and the effects of these programs on the professional activities of program graduates. DESIGN Cross-sectional surveys and key informant interviews. SETTING Ontario (FM residents) and across Canada (program directors) in 2006. PARTICIPANTS All FM residents in Ontario and all core program directors and PGY3 program coordinators nationally were eligible to participate in the surveys. Eighteen key informant interviews were conducted, all in Ontario. Interviewees included all FM program directors, selected PGY3 program coordinators, residents, and other community stakeholders. METHODS Resident surveys were Web-based; invitations to participate were delivered by FM programs via e-mail lists. The program director and coordinator surveys were postal surveys. Interviews were audiotaped and transcribed, and the authors coded the interviews for themes. MAIN FINDINGS Response rates for the surveys were 34% to 39% for residents and 78% for program directors and coordinators. Respondents agreed that programs should include flexible training options of varied duration. Demand for training is determined more by resident need than community or health system factors, and is either increasing or stable. Overall, respondents believed that approximately one-third of core program graduates should have the opportunity for PGY3 training. They thought re-entry from practice should be permitted, but mandatory return-of-service agreements were not desired. Program allocation and resident selection is a complex process with resident merit playing an important role. Respondents expected PGY3 graduates to practise differently than PGY2 graduates and to provide improved quality of care in their fields. They also thought that PGY3 graduates might play larger roles in leadership and teaching than core program graduates. CONCLUSION It is likely that PGY3 programs will continue to grow and form an increasingly important part of the FM training system in Canada. Flexible programs that can adapt to changing educational, health system, and community needs are essential. Training programs and national and provincial colleges of FM will also need to ensure that these physicians are provided with opportunities to maintain their links with the rest of the FM community. PMID:19752262

Green, Michael; Birtwhistle, Richard; MacDonald, Ken; Schmelzle, Jason

2009-01-01

235

University of Florida and Shands Hospital Personalized Medicine Program: clinical implementation of pharmacogenetics  

PubMed Central

The University of Florida and Shands Hospital recently launched a genomic medicine program focused on the clinical implementation of pharmacogenetics called the Personalized Medicine Program. We focus on a preemptive, chip-based genotyping approach that is cost effective, while providing experience that will be useful as genomic medicine moves towards genome sequence data for patients becoming available. The Personalized Medicine Program includes a regulatory body that is responsible for ensuring that evidence-based examples are moved to clinical implementation, and relies on clinical decision support tools to provide healthcare providers with guidance on use of the genetic information. The pilot implementation was with CYP2C19-clopidogrel and future plans include expansion to additional pharmacogenetic examples, along with aiding in implementation in other health systems across Florida. PMID:23651020

Johnson, Julie A; Elsey, Amanda R; Clare-Salzler, Michael J; Nessl, David; Conlon, Michael; Nelson, David R

2013-01-01

236

17TH ANNUAL ROBERT F.E. STIER MEMORIAL LECTURES IN MEDICINE  

E-print Network

17TH ANNUAL ROBERT F.E. STIER MEMORIAL LECTURES IN MEDICINE Keynote RICHARD A. DEYO, MD, MPH Kaiser Permanente Professor of Evidence-Based Family Medicine Department of Medicine, Dept. of Public Health & Preventive Medicine, Oregon Health and Science University Thursday, February 21, 2013 at 4:00 PM Free Public

Collins, Gary S.

237

Z:\\Common\\Vice Dean Faculty Affairs\\University Documents Governance of the Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry, University of Alberta.  

E-print Network

& Dentistry, University of Alberta. The Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry (FOMD) mirrors Governance Affairs 1.4. Vice - Dean Research 1.5. Chief Operating Officer 1.6. Senior Associate Dean Dentistry 1.5. Dentistry Admissions Committee (CDAC) 2.6. Dentistry Curriculum Committee (CDAC) 2.7. Medical Laboratory

MacMillan, Andrew

238

Factors Contributing to the University of Kansas School of Medicine Graduates' Choice of Specialty and Practice Location  

E-print Network

and predictors of primary care choice for U.S. medical school graduates (Jeffe, et al., 2010). For this particular study, primary care was defined as family medicine, internal medicine (both general and subspecialty), obstetrics-gynecology, pediatrics (both... general and subspecialty), and combined internal medicine/pediatrics. Individualized, linked data for all 1997-2006 U.S. medical school graduates who completed two American Academy of Medical School (AAMC) questionnaires, the Matriculating Student...

Nguyen, Emma Hang Thi

2013-12-31

239

Vaccination coverage of children aged 12-23 months in Gaziantep, Turkey: comparative results of two studies carried out by lot quality technique: what changed after family medicine?  

PubMed Central

Background Health care systems in many countries are changing for a variety of reasons. Monitoring of community-based services, especially vaccination coverage, is important during transition periods to ensure program effectiveness. In 2005, Turkey began a transformation from a “socialization of health services” system to a “family medicine” system. The family medicine system was implemented in the city of Gaziantep, in December, 2010. Methods Two descriptive, cross-sectional studies were conducted in Gaziantep city center; the first study was before the transition to the family medicine system and the second study was one year after the transition. The Lot Quality Technique methodology was used to determine the quality of vaccination services. The population studied was children aged 12–23 months. Data from the two studies were compared in terms of vaccination coverage and lot service quality to determine whether there were any changes in these parameters after the transition to a family service system. Results A total of 93.7% of children in Gaziantep were fully vaccinated before the transition. Vaccination rates decreased significantly to 84.0% (p <0.005) after the family medicine system was implemented. The number of unacceptable vaccine lots increased from 5 lots before the transition to 21 lots after the establishment of the family medicine system. Conclusions The number of first doses of vaccine given was higher after family medicine was implemented; however, the numbers of second, third, and booster doses, and the number of children fully vaccinated were lower than before transition. Acceptable and unacceptable lots were not the same before and after the transition. Different health care personnel were employed at the lots after family medicine was implemented. This result suggests that individual characteristics of the health care personnel working in a geographic area are as important as the socioeconomic and cultural characteristics of the community. PMID:24581049

2014-01-01

240

Evaluation of the Learning Environment for Diploma in Family Medicine with the Dundee Ready Education Environment (DREEM) Inventory.  

PubMed

The primary healthcare system is at a turning point in Saudi Arabia. However, the sustainability of family medicine as the core element of that system is increasingly being called into question because of lack of family physicians. In keeping view this problem; a postgraduate diploma program in family medicine has started in 2008. A validated measure of educational environment i.e., Dundee Ready Education Environment (DREEM) questionnaire consisting of 50 questions having five domains of perception was administered to all 13 trainees of the diploma course at the completion of the program to check their perception about learning evironment. The trainees comprised of 4 males (40%) and 6 females (60%). The overall score showed more positive than negative side (147/200). There is no significant difference (P > 0.05) in the mean scores of five different domains of perception. The subclasses of five domains showed that teaching perceived as positive by 50%, moving towards right direction by 80%, feeling more positive by 50%, positive attitude by 80% and the 70% scored the course as not too bad. The overall high score and positive attitude towards the course assures the better teaching environment. However, there are areas to improve and it requires continuous evaluation. PMID:21179228

Khan, A Sattar; Akturk, Zekeriya; Al-Megbil, Tarek

2010-01-01

241

Evaluation of the Learning Environment for Diploma in Family Medicine with the Dundee Ready Education Environment (DREEM) Inventory  

PubMed Central

The primary healthcare system is at a turning point in Saudi Arabia. However, the sustainability of family medicine as the core element of that system is increasingly being called into question because of lack of family physicians. In keeping view this problem; a postgraduate diploma program in family medicine has started in 2008. A validated measure of educational environment i.e., Dundee Ready Education Environment (DREEM) questionnaire consisting of 50 questions having five domains of perception was administered to all 13 trainees of the diploma course at the completion of the program to check their perception about learning evironment. The trainees comprised of 4 males (40%) and 6 females (60%). The overall score showed more positive than negative side (147/200). There is no significant difference (P > 0.05) in the mean scores of five different domains of perception. The subclasses of five domains showed that teaching perceived as positive by 50%, moving towards right direction by 80%, feeling more positive by 50%, positive attitude by 80% and the 70% scored the course as not too bad. The overall high score and positive attitude towards the course assures the better teaching environment. However, there are areas to improve and it requires continuous evaluation. PMID:21179228

Akturk, Zekeriya; Al-Megbil, Tarek

2010-01-01

242

Stanford University School of Medicine Responsible Conduct of Research  

E-print Network

at noon on the last day of class for the quarter. Case 1 By Sally Tobin In 1999, Richard Curtin opened Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU) that was being sent to twins who had been born in Virginia

243

University of Vermont College of Medicine Residency Appointment List  

E-print Network

Anderson UVM/Fletcher Allen Pediatrics Burlington, VT Irina Arkhipova-Jenkins Oregon Health & Science University Obstetrics & Gynecology Portland, OR Chelsea Harris Univ. of Maryland Med. Center General Surgery

Hayden, Nancy J.

244

Tulane University School of Medicine Summer Histology Course  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This website provides information regarding a summer cell biology and medical histology course at Tulane University. The course is a comprehensive 5-week, 110-hour individualized remediation course for medical and dental students enrolled in medical or dental school.

Tulane University (Tulane University School of Medicine)

2012-07-24

245

East Tennessee State University James H. Quillen College of Medicine  

E-print Network

and Responsibilities p. 4 Student's Bill of Rights p. 4 GENERAL INFORMATION .................................................................................................45 Student Evaluation System p. 46 Grading System p. 46 Class Ranking p. 47 United States Medical#12; East Tennessee State University James H. Quillen

Karsai, Istvan

246

East Tennessee State University James H. Quillen College of Medicine  

E-print Network

and Responsibilities p. 3 Student's Bill of Rights p. 4 GENERAL INFORMATION .................................................................................................45 Student Evaluation System p. 46 Grading System p. 46 Class Ranking p. 47 United States Medical#12; East Tennessee State University James H. Quillen

Karsai, Istvan

247

Connecticut State Orthodontic Society, the UConn Orthodontics Alumni Association and the University of Connecticut School of Dental Medicine,  

E-print Network

Accreditation The University of Connecticut School of Dental Medicine is accredited by the American AssociationConnecticut State Orthodontic Society, the UConn Orthodontics Alumni Association and the University of Connecticut School of Dental Medicine, Division of Orthodontics presents The Charles J. Burstone Seminar

Oliver, Douglas L.

248

Research, Education and Outreach in the Division of Agriculture, Forestry and VeterinaryMedicine Mississippi State University  

E-print Network

Medicine Mississippi State University Research, Education and Outreach in the Division of Agriculture, Forestry and Veterinary Medicine Mississippi State University Volume 1, Number 4 FALL 2005 #12;2005 2 Tableof the secrets of tree reproduction. 16 Focus Teaching, research and outreach in the Division of Agriculture

Ray, David

249

Admission Factors Predicting Family Medicine Specialty Choice: A Literature Review and Exploratory Study among Students in the Rural Medical Scholars Program  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: The Rural Medical Scholars Program (RMSP) was created to increase production of rural family physicians in Alabama. Literature review reveals reasons medical students choose careers in family medicine, and these reasons can be categorized into domains that medical schools can address through admission, curriculum, and structural…

Avery, Daniel M., Jr.; Wheat, John R.; Leeper, James D.; McKnight, Jerry T.; Ballard, Brent G.; Chen, Jia

2012-01-01

250

A growing family: the expanding universe of the bacterial cytoskeleton  

PubMed Central

Cytoskeletal proteins are important mediators of cellular organization in both eukaryotes and bacteria. In the past, cytoskeletal studies have largely focused on three major cytoskeletal families, namely the eukaryotic actin, tubulin, and intermediate filament (IF) proteins and their bacterial homologs MreB, FtsZ, and crescentin. However, mounting evidence suggests that these proteins represent only the tip of the iceberg, as the cellular cytoskeletal network is far more complex. In bacteria, each of MreB, FtsZ, and crescentin represents only one member of large families of diverse homologs. There are also newly identified bacterial cytoskeletal proteins with no eukaryotic homologs, such as WACA proteins and bactofilins. Furthermore, there are universally conserved proteins, such as the metabolic enzyme CtpS, that assemble into filamentous structures that can be repurposed for structural cytoskeletal functions. Recent studies have also identified an increasing number of eukaryotic cytoskeletal proteins that are unrelated to actin, tubulin, and IFs, such that expanding our understanding of cytoskeletal proteins is advancing the understanding of the cell biology of all organisms. Here, we summarize the recent explosion in the identification of new members of the bacterial cytoskeleton and describe a hypothesis for the evolution of the cytoskeleton from self-assembling enzymes. PMID:22092065

Ingerson-Mahar, Michael; Gitai, Zemer

2014-01-01

251

A growing family: the expanding universe of the bacterial cytoskeleton.  

PubMed

Cytoskeletal proteins are important mediators of cellular organization in both eukaryotes and bacteria. In the past, cytoskeletal studies have largely focused on three major cytoskeletal families, namely the eukaryotic actin, tubulin, and intermediate filament (IF) proteins and their bacterial homologs MreB, FtsZ, and crescentin. However, mounting evidence suggests that these proteins represent only the tip of the iceberg, as the cellular cytoskeletal network is far more complex. In bacteria, each of MreB, FtsZ, and crescentin represents only one member of large families of diverse homologs. There are also newly identified bacterial cytoskeletal proteins with no eukaryotic homologs, such as WACA proteins and bactofilins. Furthermore, there are universally conserved proteins, such as the metabolic enzyme CtpS, that assemble into filamentous structures that can be repurposed for structural cytoskeletal functions. Recent studies have also identified an increasing number of eukaryotic cytoskeletal proteins that are unrelated to actin, tubulin, and IFs, such that expanding our understanding of cytoskeletal proteins is advancing the understanding of the cell biology of all organisms. Here, we summarize the recent explosion in the identification of new members of the bacterial cytoskeleton and describe a hypothesis for the evolution of the cytoskeleton from self-assembling enzymes. PMID:22092065

Ingerson-Mahar, Michael; Gitai, Zemer

2012-01-01

252

Eight Years of Building Community Partnerships and Trust: The UCLA Family Medicine Community-Based Participatory Research Experience  

PubMed Central

Acknowledging the growing disparities in health and health care that exist among immigrant families and minority populations in large urban communities, the UCLA Department of Family Medicine (DFM) sought a leadership role in the development of family medicine training and community-based participatory research (CBPR). Performing CBPR requires that academic medicine departments build sustainable and long-term community partnerships. The authors describe the eight-year (2000–2008) process of building sustainable community partnerships and trust between the UCLA DFM and the Sun Valley community, located in Los Angeles County. The authors used case studies of three research areas of concentration (asthma, diabetes prevention, and establishing access to primary care) to describe how they established community trust and sustained long-term community research partnerships. In preparing each case study, they used an iterative process to review qualitative data. Many lessons were common across their research concentration areas. They included the importance of (1) having clear and concrete community benefits, (2) supporting an academic–community champion, (3) political advocacy, (4) partnering with diverse organizations, (5) long-term academic commitment, and (6) medical student involvement. The authors found that establishing a long-term relationship and trust was a prerequisite to successfully initiate CBPR activities that included an asthma school-based screening program, community walking groups, and one of the largest school-based primary care clinics in the United States. Their eight-year experience in the Sun Valley community underscores how academic–community research partnerships can result in benefits of high value to communities and academic departments. PMID:19881437

Moreno, Gerardo; Rodríguez, Michael A.; Lopez, Glenn A.; Bholat, Michelle A.; Dowling, Patrick T.

2014-01-01

253

ECE Department, Boston University 4/17/2011 Title Automated medicine dispenser for the elderly  

E-print Network

ECE Department, Boston University 4/17/2011 Title Automated medicine dispenser for the elderly (ECE Description The goal of this project is to design and build a prototype of an automated system for dispensing-giver or physician. While pill dispensers of various complexities exist on the market (ePill), these devices

254

UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT SCHOOL OF MEDICINE Pediatric Surgical Subspecialities Annual Report 2010-2011  

E-print Network

UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT SCHOOL OF MEDICINE Pediatric Surgical Subspecialities Annual Report 2010 the Department of Pediatric Surgical Subspecialties of Connecticut Children's Medical Center. Over the last year the surgical services have continued to experience tremendous growth, performing procedures on over 10

Kim, Duck O.

255

Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University Title: Managed Care Contract Evaluation  

E-print Network

Section No. 3 CF10 Section Name: Clinical Finance Approval Date: 10/24/2013 Approval: Paul R.G. Cunningham Review criteria are as follows: 1. The execution of a Direct Employer Group Agreement (i.e., Golden School of Medicine at East Carolina University Title: Managed Care Contract Evaluation Section No. 3 CF10

256

Post-Doctoral Fellow in Neuroscience Optogenetics: Washington University School of Medicine  

E-print Network

Post-Doctoral Fellow in Neuroscience Optogenetics: Washington University School of Medicine Post state of the art optogenetics, development/refinement of novel micro-optic devices, patch clamp-on experience in electrophysiology, applied physics or optogenetics is a plus. · Creative thinking skills

Pillow, Jonathan

257

Does medicine still show an unresolved discrimination against women? Experience in two European university hospitals  

Microsoft Academic Search

Have invisible barriers for women been broken in 2007, or do we still have to break through medicine's glass ceiling? Data from two of the most prestigious university hospitals in Barcelona with 700-800 beds, Hospital Clínic (HC) and Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau (HSCSP) address this issue. In the HSCSP, 87% of the department chairs are men

A Santamaría; A Merino; O Viñas; P Arrizabalaga

2009-01-01

258

Faculty Position in Women's Infectious Disease Research Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis  

E-print Network

Faculty Position in Women's Infectious Disease Research Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis The Center for Women's Infectious Disease Research (cWIDR, http and biochemistry to purse fundamental problems in infectious disease to improve female health and quality of life

Doering, Tamara

259

TheJournalofExperimentalMedicine JEM The Rockefeller University Press $30.00  

E-print Network

supplemental material. Chromosomal reinsertion of broken RSS ends during T cell development John D. Curry,1TheJournalofExperimentalMedicine ARTICLE JEM © The Rockefeller University Press $30.00 www.jem.org/cgi/doi/ Cite by DOI: 10.1084/jem.20070583 1 of 11 10.1084/jem.20070583 Adaptive immunity depends on V(D

Schlissel, Mark S.

260

Improvement of Oncology Education at the University of Washington School of Medicine, 1984-1988.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

After development and implementation of a revised oncology curriculum at the University of Washington School of Medicine student performance on oncology related questions on the National Board of Medical Examiners examination indicated substantial improvement relative to student performance in non-oncology areas and to the national average. (DB)

Bleyer, W. Archie; And Others

1990-01-01

261

The Use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine Practices Among Australian University Students  

Microsoft Academic Search

A survey of 518 university students in Australia was conducted to gain a better understanding of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use. Results indicated that 81.1% of the students used at least 1 of 24 CAM practices. Top practices were relaxation, massage, herbs, art therapy, and prayer. The most common health reasons for using CAM were stress or psychosomatic issues

Robert H. Feldman; Ronald Laura

2004-01-01

262

Sponsored by the University of California, Irvine School of Medicine RADIOLOGY GRAND ROUNDS  

E-print Network

Sponsored by the University of California, Irvine School of Medicine RADIOLOGY GRAND ROUNDS Wednesday, March 6, 2013 ­ 3:30 ­ 4:30PM UCI Medical Center ­ Radiology Conference Room (0117) "Screening Mammography at the Threshold for Recall" Edward A. Sickles, M.D., F.A.C.R. Professor Emeritus of Radiology

Mease, Kenneth D.

263

Sponsored by the University of California, Irvine School of Medicine RADIOLOGY GRAND ROUNDS  

E-print Network

Sponsored by the University of California, Irvine School of Medicine RADIOLOGY GRAND ROUNDS Wednesday, July 10, 2013 ­ 4:00 ­ 5:00PM UC Irvine Medical Center ­ Radiology Conference Room 0117 "f updated information on radiological science topics and research. Target Audience Attending physicians

Mease, Kenneth D.

264

Sponsored by the University of California, Irvine School of Medicine RADIOLOGY GRAND ROUNDS  

E-print Network

Sponsored by the University of California, Irvine School of Medicine RADIOLOGY GRAND ROUNDS Monday, April 8, 2013 ­ 4:00 ­ 5:00PM UCI Medical Center ­ Radiology Conference Room (0117) "Imaging of Intracranial Infections: Pearls and Pitfalls" Mark E. Mullins, M.D., Ph.D. Associate Professor of Radiology

Mease, Kenneth D.

265

Sponsored by the University of California, Irvine School of Medicine RADIOLOGY GRAND ROUNDS  

E-print Network

Sponsored by the University of California, Irvine School of Medicine RADIOLOGY GRAND ROUNDS Wednesday, November 14, 2012 ­ 4:00 ­ 5:00PM UCI Medical Center ­ Radiology Conference Room (0117) "Neuroimaging of Epilepsy" Noriko Salamon, MD, PhD Professor of Radiology, Director of Diagnostic Neuroradiology

Mease, Kenneth D.

266

Sponsored by the University of California, Irvine School of Medicine RADIOLOGY GRAND ROUNDS  

E-print Network

Sponsored by the University of California, Irvine School of Medicine RADIOLOGY GRAND ROUNDS Wednesday, February 27, 2013 ­ 4:00 ­ 5:00PM UCI Medical Center ­ Radiology Conference Room (0117) "Neuroimaging of Epilepsy" Noriko Salamon, MD, PhD Professor of Radiology, Director of Diagnostic Neuroradiology

Mease, Kenneth D.

267

Student Senior Partnership Program: University of California Irvine School of Medicine  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Student Senior Partner Program (SSPP) forms the core of the required medical student geriatrics curriculum at the University of California-Irvine School of Medicine (UCISOM). The program utilizes a longitudinal modular format that extends over the first three years of medical school. Instruction is presented in didactic, patient interactive,…

Fitzpatrick, Camille; Musser, Anne; Mosqueda, Laura; Boker, John; Prislin, Michael

2006-01-01

268

Center for Biomedical Ethics and Humanities University of Virginia School of Medicine  

E-print Network

November 2011 Hollingsworth Lecture in Ethics Medical Confidentiality in the Age of Social Media Anita L _________________________________________ The Medical Center Hour is produced weekly throughout the academic year by the Center for Biomedical EthicsCenter for Biomedical Ethics and Humanities University of Virginia School of Medicine PO Box 800761

Acton, Scott

269

Center for Biomedical Ethics and Humanities University of Virginia School of Medicine  

E-print Network

Center for Biomedical Ethics and Humanities University of Virginia School of Medicine PO Box 800761, and audience responses Co-presented with the Institute for Practical Ethics and Public Life, Virginia of respondents, and audience responses Co-presented with the Institute for Practical Ethics and Public Life

Acton, Scott

270

Dreaming big dreams: the University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Medicine.  

PubMed

The University of Alabama School of Medicine has a rich legacy dating back almost 150 years to Antebellum Mobile and the original Medical College of Alabama. The school's success helped transform Birmingham from a city rooted in the steel industry to one of the U.S.'s major biomedical research centers. Today the school is an internationally acclaimed leader in research and education and serves as the anchor of the University of Alabama at Birmingham and the UAB Health System. PMID:14515915

Mansfield, Laura A

2003-08-01

271

THE ACADEMIES OF ADVISORS PROGRAM BOSTON UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF MEDICINE  

E-print Network

TO DE-STRESS AND REFRESH 10. Classical Music 9. Aromatherapy 8. Humor/Laughter 7. Regulate Diet testing and assessments for adults, adolescents, and children. Many insurance plans, including Boston University's Chickering Health Plan, can be used to cover a portion of applicable fees, and a sliding fee

Spence, Harlan Ernest

272

Stanford University School of Medicine Responsible Conduct of Research  

E-print Network

carried out in Europe asked people whom they trust to tell the truth about genetically modified crops scientists contributed to public distrust about genetically modified crops, and if so, how? 4) In her, and found that 26% of respondents named environmental organizations and 6% named universities. Have

273

Effect of Surgical Training Course on Performance of Minor Surgical Procedures in Family Medicine Physicians’ Offices: an Observational Study  

PubMed Central

Aim To examine the influence of a practical surgical course on the number of minor surgical procedures performed by family physicians. Methods We compared the number of minor surgical procedures performed by family physicians in 59 offices in the city of Osijek and surrounding rural area, Croatia, during 12 months before and after the 40-hour practical surgical course held in September 2006 by surgeons and family medicine specialists. Minor surgical procedures taught in the course included management of ingrown toenails, abscesses/comedones, and minor wounds, anesthesia application, disinfection, use and sterilization of surgical instruments, and antibiotic treatment. Results The number of minor surgical procedures performed in family medicine offices almost doubled (503 vs 906 after the course, P<0.001, Wilcoxon test). The median number of abscesses/comedones treatments per physician increased from 1 to 6 (P<0.001, Wilcoxon test), the number of managed wounds increased from 111 to 217 (P<0.001, Wilcoxon test), while the number of ingrown toenail resections increased from 120 to 186 (P?=?0.004, Wilcoxon test). Fifty percent of physicians did not treat patients surgically, irrespective of the training. We found no association between the number of performed procedures and age, length of employment, or location of the physician’s office (urban vs rural). However, we found that male physicians performed more surgical treatments both before and after the course (abscesses/comedones: P<0.001 and P?=?0.108 respectively; ingrown toenail resections: P?=?0.008 and P?=?0.008 respectively; minor wounds: P?=?0.030 and P<0.001; respectively). Conclusion Practical courses can encourage practitioners to treat the patients surgically in their offices and, thus, increase the number of services offered in primary care. Female physicians should be more encouraged to perform minor surgical procedures in their offices. PMID:18581614

Gmajni?, Rudika; Pribi?, Sanda; Luki?, Anita; Ebling, Barbara; ?upi?, Nikola; Markovi?, Ivana

2008-01-01

274

Academic Medicine Meets Traditional African Healing  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Cyril Naidoo, who directs the department of family medicine at the University of KwaZulu-Natal's Nelson R. Mandela School of Medicine, conducts workshops to traditional healers on how to help patients with AIDS and HIV. In Dr. Naidoo's workshop, the group discusses how to counsel patients about HIV and AIDS, how to refer them for testing, and then…

Lindow, Megan

2008-01-01

275

Surviving Hurricane Katrina: reconstructing the educational enterprise of Tulane University School of Medicine.  

PubMed

Hurricane Katrina was one of the greatest natural disasters to ever strike the United States. Tulane University School of Medicine, located in downtown New Orleans, and its three major teaching hospitals were flooded in the aftermath of the storm and forced to close. Faculty, students, residents, and staff evacuated to locations throughout the country. All critical infrastructure that normally maintained the school, including information technology, network communication servers, registration systems, and e-mail, became nonoperational. However, on the basis of experiences learned when Tropical Storm Allison flooded the Texas Medical Center in 2001, Baylor College of Medicine, University of Texas-Houston, University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston, and Texas A&M School of Medicine created the South Texas Alliance of Academic Health Centers, which allowed Tulane to move its education programs to Houston. Using Baylor's facilities, Tulane faculty rebuilt and delivered the preclinical curriculum, and clinical rotations were made available at the Alliance schools. Remarkably, the Tulane School of Medicine was able to resume all educational activities within a month after the storm. Educational reconstruction approaches, procedures employed, and lessons in institutional recovery learned are discussed so that other schools can prepare effectively for either natural or man-made disasters. Key disaster-response measures include designating an evacuation/command site in advance; backing up technology, communication, financial, registration, and credentialing systems; and establishing partnership with other institutions and leaders. PMID:17762249

Krane, N Kevin; Kahn, Marc J; Markert, Ronald J; Whelton, Paul K; Traber, Peter G; Taylor, Ian L

2007-08-01

276

First Universities Allied for Essential Medicines (UAEM) Neglected Diseases and Innovation Symposium  

PubMed Central

Universities Allied for Essential Medicines organized its first Neglected Diseases and Innovation Symposium to address expanding roles of public sector research institutions in innovation in research and development of biomedical technologies for treatment of diseases, particularly neglected tropical diseases. Universities and other public research institutions are increasingly integrated into the pharmaceutical innovation system. Academic entities now routinely undertake robust high-throughput screening and medicinal chemistry research programs to identify lead compounds for small molecule drugs and novel drug targets. Furthermore, product development partnerships are emerging between academic institutions, non-profit entities, and biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies to create diagnostics, therapies, and vaccines for diseases of the poor. With not for profit mission statements, open access publishing standards, open source platforms for data sharing and collaboration, and a shift in focus to more translational research, universities and other public research institutions are well-placed to accelerate development of medical technologies, particularly for neglected tropical diseases. PMID:22232453

Musselwhite, Laura W.; Maciag, Karolina; Lankowski, Alex; Gretes, Michael C.; Wellems, Thomas E.; Tavera, Gloria; Goulding, Rebecca E.; Guillen, Ethan

2012-01-01

277

Are familial factors underlying the association between socioeconomic position and prescription medicine? A register-based study on Danish twins  

PubMed Central

Objectives Although well established, the association between socioeconomic position and health and health behaviour is not clearly understood, and it has been speculated that familial factors, for example, dispositional factors or exposures in the rearing environment, may be underlying the association. The objective was to compare prescription fillings within twin pairs who are partly or fully genetically identical and share childhood exposures. Design Twin cohort study. Setting Denmark. Participants Data from the Danish Twin Registry were linked to registers in Statistics Denmark and the Danish Registry of Medicinal Product statistics. A total of 8582 monozygotic (MZ) and 15?788 dizygotic same sex (DZSS) twins were included. Outcome measures Number of prescription fillings during follow-up (1995–2005) was analysed according to education and income. Results of unpaired and intrapair analyses were compared. Results An inverse social gradient in filling of prescriptions for all-purpose and system-specific drugs was observed in the unpaired analyses. In the intrapair analyses, associations were attenuated some in DZSS and more in MZ twins. Filling of drugs targeting the nervous system was still strongly associated with income in the intrapair analyses. Conclusions Familial factors seem to account for part of the observed social inequality in filling of prescription medicine. PMID:24227869

Madsen, Mia; Andersen, Per Kragh; Gerster, Mette; Andersen, Anne-Marie Nybo; Osler, Merete; Christensen, Kaare

2013-01-01

278

PURDUE UNIVERSITY RESIDENCES NEWSLETTER FOR FAMILIES AND FRIENDS IN THIS ISSUE  

E-print Network

PURDUE UNIVERSITY RESIDENCES NEWSLETTER FOR FAMILIES AND FRIENDS IN THIS ISSUE www FOR FAMILIES AND FRIENDS EDITOR Danielle Fawbush Director of Marketing and Communications, University acts of violence. The most common crime on Purdue's campus is theft of personal property, specifically

Fernández-Juricic, Esteban

279

RICE UNIVERSITY Mapping the Structural Landscape of Protein Families  

E-print Network

members, segregation by ligation state, and orga- nization by ancestry among convergent protein lineages: Constructing Consensus Motifs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 3.6 Step 6: Formulating Hypothesis Tests-Family Ontologies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 4.3 Ancestry-based Intra-Family Ontologies

Kavraki, Lydia E.

280

Stanford University School of Medicine: Center for Narcolepsy  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Scientific studies of sleep patterns and behaviors have been around for decades, and the Stanford University Sleep Clinic was the first medical clinic established to examine sleep disorders. Since its founding, it has given rise to the Stanford Center for Narcolepsy. For visitors looking for information about their research and this illness, their website provides ample material. First-time visitors might do well to begin by reading the review essay, "A Hundred Years of Research", which provides some background on the ways in which researchers have explored the causes and etiology of this condition. Moving on, visitors can also learn about which medications are used to treat the condition, and also read about their innovative brain donation program.

281

From LCME probation to compliance: the Marshall University Joan C Edwards School of Medicine experience  

PubMed Central

The Joan C Edwards School of Medicine (Marshall University, Huntington, WV, USA) was placed on probation by the Liaison Committee on Medical Education (LCME) in June 2011. In the following 2 years, extensive changes were made to address the numerous citations that resulted in this probation. In October 2013, the LCME lifted probation. In this article, we detail the challenges and solutions identified relevant to our struggle with compliance. PMID:25337003

Miller, Bobby; Dzwonek, Brian; McGuffin, Aaron; Shapiro, Joseph I

2014-01-01

282

HUMAN RESOURCES AT UC BERKELEY | UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, BERKELEY | careers@berkeley.edu | December 2011 Job Fields and Families  

E-print Network

Research · Payroll · Purchasing · Academic Human Resources · Benefits · Compensation · Employee RelationsHUMAN RESOURCES AT UC BERKELEY | UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, BERKELEY | careers ARTS FIELD: FAMILIES: FIELD: FAMILIES: RESEARCH ADMINISTRATION FIELD: FAMILIES: EDUCATIONAL SERVICES

Militzer, Burkhard

283

Ebola -A Community Education Presentation The University of Illinois College of Medicine at Rockford will host a presentation: Ebola A  

E-print Network

Ebola - A Community Education Presentation The University of Illinois College of Medicine at Rockford will host a presentation: Ebola ­A Community Education Presentation. Dr. Gary Rifkin, Professor of Medicine and Interim Chair of the Department of Biomedical Sciences, will talk about the virus and its

Alford, Simon

284

SUMMER/FALL 2012 The Magazine for Alumni and Friends of Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University  

E-print Network

EINSTEIN SUMMER/FALL 2012 The Magazine for Alumni and Friends of Albert Einstein College and supporters of Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University Published by The Philip and Rita-mail: letters@einstein.yu.edu Website: www.einstein.yu.edu Copyright © 2012 Albert Einstein College of Medicine

Kenny, Paraic

285

Cytotoxicity and phytotoxicity of some selected medicinal plants of the family Polygonaceae  

Microsoft Academic Search

The cytotoxicity of the crude methanolic extracts of Rumex hastatus, Rumex dentatus, Rumex nepalensis, Rheum australe, Polygonum persicaria and Polygonum plebejum (Family Polygonaceae) was determined against Artemia salina at 1000, 100 and 10 ? ? ? ?g\\/ml. R. hastatus, R. dentatus and R. nepalensis showed significant activity at a concentration of 1000 ? ? ? ?g\\/ml against Artemia salina. R.

Farrukh Hussain; Ishfaq Hameed; Ghulam Dastagir; Ibrar Khan; Bashir Ahmad; Pharma Biotech

2010-01-01

286

A National Survey on the Current Status of Family Practice Residency Education in Geriatric Medicine.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A survey of family practice residency directors found that 92 percent have a required geriatrics curriculum; nursing homes, assisted living facilities, and home care are the predominant training sites; the mean number of geriatrics faculty is 2.6 per program; and conflicting time demands with other curricula was ranked as the most significant…

Li, Ina; Arenson, Christine; Warshaw, Gregg; Bragg, Elizabeth; Shaull, Ruth; Counsell, Steven R.

2003-01-01

287

Introduction to the Clinical Curriculum The clinical phase (M-3 and M-4 years) of the University of Illinois, College of Medicine  

E-print Network

/her to competently practice evidence-based medicine; 2.2 Determinants of poor health, disease-based risk factors and evidence-based medicine. Medical Knowledge The faculty of the University of Illinois, College of Medicine of evidence-based medicine; 2.7 Investigatory and analytical thinking approach to clinical situations

Gilbert, Matthew

288

Two Postitions Open: Veterinary Pathology Resident Oregon State University, College of Veterinary Medicine, Department of Biomedical Sciences invites applications  

E-print Network

Two Postitions Open: Veterinary Pathology Resident Oregon State University, College of Veterinary Medicine, Department of Biomedical Sciences invites applications for a Veterinary Anatomic Pathology Resident and a Veterinary Clinical Pathology Resident (one position each). Veterinary Pathology Residents

Escher, Christine

289

Genetic diversity study of some medicinal plant accessions belong to Apiaceae family based on seed storage proteins patterns.  

PubMed

Cumin (Cuminum cyminum L.), Fennel (Foeniculum vulgare L.) and Longleaf (Falcaria vulgaris Bernh) that all belong to Apiaceae family as medicinal plants are very important in many countries. Study of genetic diversity for medicinal plant is important for researches in future. One of the methods to evaluate plant genetic diversity and classification of them is the electrophoresis of seed storage proteins. This research was conducted in order to evaluate seed protein variability in different Iranian Cumin, Fennel and Longleaf accessions and grouping them based on these proteins as a biochemical marker. For this purpose, the samples were first powdered in liquid nitrogen and seed protein was extracted with extraction buffer. Then total soluble proteins were resolved on 12.5 % sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis gels. The electrophoretic protein pattern showed 38 bands that were low polymorphism among the accessions. The result of cluster analysis showed that the accessions were classified in three groups (all 29 Cumin accessions in the first group, three Fennel ecotypes in second group and three Longleaf accessions in the last one). PMID:23086265

Masoumi, Sayed Mohammad; Kahrizi, Danial; Rostami-Ahmadvandi, Hossein; Soorni, Jahad; Kiani, Sara; Mostafaie, Ali; Yari, Kheirollah

2012-12-01

290

Acetylcholinesterase inhibitory, antioxidant and phytochemical properties of selected medicinal plants of the Lamiaceae family.  

PubMed

The present study aimed to evaluate acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitory and antioxidant activities of Lamiaceae medicinal plants growing wild in Croatia. Using Ellman's colorimetric assay all tested ethanolic extracts and their hydroxycinnamic acid constituents demonstrated in vitro AChE inhibitory properties in a dose dependent manner. The extracts of Mentha x piperita, M. longifolia, Salvia officinalis, Satureja montana, Teucrium arduini, T. chamaedrys, T. montanum, T. polium and Thymus vulgaris at 1 mg/mL showed strong inhibitory activity against AChE. The antioxidant potential of the investigated Lamiaceae species was assessed by DPPH• scavenging activity and total antioxidant capacity assays, in comparison with hydroxycinnamic acids and trolox. The extracts differed greatly in their total hydroxycinnamic derivatives content, determined spectrophotometrically. Rosmarinic acid was found to be the predominant constituent in most of the investigated medicinal plants (by RP-HPLC) and had a substantial influence on their AChE inhibitory and antioxidant properties, with the exception of Teucrium species. These findings indicate that Lamiaceae species are a rich source of various natural AChE inhibitors and antioxidants that could be useful in the prevention and treatment of Alzheimer's and other related diseases. PMID:24413832

Vladimir-Kneževi?, Sanda; Blažekovi?, Biljana; Kindl, Marija; Vladi?, Jelena; Lower-Nedza, Agnieszka D; Brantner, Adelheid H

2014-01-01

291

Medical Liability Insurance as a Barrier to the Provision of Abortion Services in Family Medicine  

PubMed Central

Family physicians who wish to provide abortions have been subject to both denial of coverage by medical liability insurers and the imposition of large premium increases. These policy decisions by insurance companies raise questions about the role of family physicians in abortion care and about the autonomy of medical specialties in defining their scope of practice. We review the issues specific to abortion services in the primary care setting and examine the broader implications for the medical profession. Finally, we review how advocacy and improved regulation of the insurance industry could help to ensure that clinicians who are trained and willing to provide services to their patients are not limited by the decisions of medical liability insurers. PMID:18703433

Grumbach, Kevin

2008-01-01

292

Physicians' perceptions of and approaches to woman abuse. Does certification in family medicine make a difference?  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE: To discover whether family physicians who go through residency training and The College of Family Physicians of Canada's (CFPC) certification process are more responsive than other physicians to woman abuse, whether they perceive and approach such abuse more appropriately, and whether they seek out more education on the subject. DESIGN: A national survey using a pretested 43-item mailed questionnaire to examine perceptions of and approaches to detection and management of woman abuse. SETTING: Canadian family and general practice. PARTICIPANTS: A cross-sectional sample of 1574 family physicians and general practitioners, of whom 963 (61%) volunteers responded. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Demographic variables, perceptions of abuse, methods of diagnosing and managing woman abuse. RESULTS: Most respondents agreed they could not diagnose and treat woman abuse effectively, regardless of certification status. They indicated they were detecting only 33% of cases. Certificants of CFPC, in particular residency-trained certificants, were more likely to think that they should be diagnosing woman abuse than noncertificants; they were also more likely to help victims by referring them to specialists and other agencies. Certificants were also more likely to think they should be treating these patients themselves, and that they were not adequately trained to do so. Although most respondents thought they needed more education, certificants were more likely to know of relevant courses, to have attended such courses, and to have read books or articles on the topic. CONCLUSIONS: Being a certificant is not associated with perceived skills in diagnosing and treating woman abuse, but is associated with an increased awareness of the problem. Certificants know that education on woman abuse is available. PMID:8792017

Tudiver, F.; Permaul-Woods, J. A.

1996-01-01

293

EinstEinThe Magazine for Alumni and Friends of Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University Winter/spring 2014  

E-print Network

EinstEinThe Magazine for Alumni and Friends of Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva, students, friends and supporters of Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University Published.yu.edu Website: www.einstein.yu.edu Copyright © 2014 Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University

Bukauskas, Feliksas

294

VARIABLE SELECTION FOR QUALITATIVE INTERACTIONS IN PERSONALIZED MEDICINE WHILE CONTROLLING THE FAMILY-WISE ERROR RATE  

PubMed Central

For many years, subset analysis has been a popular topic for the biostatistics and clinical trials literature. In more recent years, the discussion has focused on finding subsets of genomes which play a role in the effect of treatment, often referred to as stratified or personalized medicine. Though highly sought after, methods for detecting subsets with altering treatment effects are limited and lacking in power. In this article we discuss variable selection for qualitative interactions with the aim to discover these critical patient subsets. We propose a new technique designed specifically to find these interaction variables among a large set of variables while still controlling for the number of false discoveries. We compare this new method against standard qualitative interaction tests using simulations and give an example of its use on data from a randomized controlled trial for the treatment of depression. PMID:22023676

Gunter, Lacey; Zhu, Ji; Murphy, Susan

2012-01-01

295

Use of a non-traditional university ambulatory practice to teach large animal medicine.  

PubMed

While many other veterinary schools have moved away from a traditional university-based ambulatory practice, the Ohio State University's Large Animal Practice has continued to provide a cost-effective and valuable method of preparing students for today's careers in veterinary medicine. The practice provides a full array of services to production, equine, and camelid clients, including herd health, individual animal medicine and surgery, and emergency services. Acquiring established practices from alumni has formed the client base. Four full-time veterinarians operate the clinic. While these same clinicians do some classroom teaching, their primary responsibility is devoted to the five to six fourth-year veterinary students who rotate through the clinic every two weeks. Teaching methods and objectives for these students include case discussions, homework, truck quiz books, and practice management issues. Financially, the clinic runs as a private practice, with minimal support from the college (201,000 US dollars per fiscal year) and a gross income of 676,000 US dollars per year. Thus, in a cost-effective manner, this required core ambulatory rotation provides students with a scientific learning experience that exposes them to all aspects of large animal production medicine in a real-world setting. PMID:15551233

Masterson, Margaret A; Welker, Bimbo; Midla, Lowell T; Meiring, Richard W; Hoblet, Kent H

2004-01-01

296

New graduate certificate offered in global health The Division of Public Health in the Department of Family and Preventive Medicine is pleased to announce a  

E-print Network

New graduate certificate offered in global health The Division of Public Health in the Department of Family and Preventive Medicine is pleased to announce a new graduate certificate in global health. The division is accepting students into this certificate program immediately. The Global Health Certificate

Feschotte, Cedric

297

Associate Professor or Professor -Health Promotion The Faculty of Health Sciences and the Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry at Western University are  

E-print Network

School of Medicine & Dentistry at Western University are seeking an outstanding scholar in the Health://www.schulich.uwo.ca/familymedicine/) in the Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry (http://www.schulich.uwo.ca/). The successful candidate will help

Sinnamon, Gordon J.

298

THE ART OF DENTISTRYA PUBLICATION OF THE SCHOOL OF DENTAL MEDICINE CASE WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY Summer 2008 volume 8 issue 2  

E-print Network

by the American Dental Association's Commission of Dental Accreditation, a mock site viTHE ART OF DENTISTRYA PUBLICATION OF THE SCHOOL OF DENTAL MEDICINE CASE WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY from the Dean . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 The School of Dental Medicine

Cavusoglu, Cenk

299

San Francisco State University Department of Psychology Fall 2013 Hartman Family Scholarship in Psychology  

E-print Network

San Francisco State University ­ Department of Psychology Fall 2013 Hartman Family Scholarship in Psychology $500 scholarships available for undergraduate students BACKGROUND The Hartman Family Scholarship in Psychology is available in honor of Dr. Susan Hartman Taylor. Dr. Susan Hartman Taylor was a faculty member

300

PURDUE UNIVERSITY RESIDENCES NEWSLETTER FOR FAMILIES AND FRIENDS In thIs Issue  

E-print Network

EXPRESS PURDUE UNIVERSITY RESIDENCES NEWSLETTER FOR FAMILIES AND FRIENDS In thIs Issue www and Other Drug Abuse and Violence Prevention Web site offers more information specific to spring break spring break week to visit family or work at a job. In addition, many students take non-beach destination

Fernández-Juricic, Esteban

301

"Sin Olvidar a los Padres": Families Collaborating within School and University Partnerships  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article describes the significance of 3 entities--the family, the school, and the university--working together to assist young Latino children succeed in school. In an effort to increase parental and teacher communication regarding school expectations, the Family Institute for Early Literacy Development was created. It uses principles of…

Riojas-Cortez, Mari; Flores, Belinda Bustos

2009-01-01

302

Atrial fibrillation anticoagulation care in a large urban family medicine practice  

PubMed Central

Abstract Objective To determine the proportion of patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) in primary care achieving guideline-concordant stroke prevention treatment based on both the previous (2010) and the updated (2012) Canadian guideline recommendations. Design Retrospective chart review. Participants Primary care patients (N = 204) with AF. The mean age was 71.3 years and 53.4% were women. Setting Large urban community family practice in Toronto, Ont. Main outcome measures Patient demographic characteristics such as sex and age; a list of current cardiac medications including anticoagulants and antiplatelets; the total number of medications; relevant current and past medical history including presence of diabetes, stroke or transient ischemic attack, hypertension, and vascular disease; number of visits to the family physician and cardiologist in the past year and past 5 years, and how many of these were for AF; the number of visits to the emergency department or hospitalizations for AF, congestive heart failure, or stroke; if patients were taking warfarin, how often their international normalized ratios were recorded, and how many times they were in the reference range; CHADS2 (congestive heart failure, hypertension, age ? 75, diabetes mellitus, and stroke or transient ischemic attack) score, if recorded; and reason for not taking oral anticoagulants when they should have been, if recorded. Results Among those who had CHADS2 scores of 0, 64 patients (97.0%) were receiving appropriate stroke prevention in AF (SPAF) treatment according to the 2010 guidelines. When the 2012 guidelines were applied, 39 patients (59.1%) were receiving appropriate SPAF treatment (P < .001). For those with CHADS2 scores of 1, 88.4% of patients had appropriate SPAF treatment according to the 2010 guidelines, but only 55.1% were adequately treated according to the 2012 guidelines (P < .001). Of the patients at the highest risk (CHADS2 score > 1), 68.1% were adequately treated with anticoagulation and an additional 8.7% (6 of 69) had documented reasons why they were not taking anticoagulants. Conclusion When assessed using the 2012 Canadian Cardiovascular Society AF guidelines, the proportion of patients receiving appropriate SPAF therapy in this primary care setting decreased substantially. All patients with CHADS2 scores of 0 or 1 should be reassessed to ensure that they are receiving optimal stroke prevention treatment. PMID:24627401

Valentinis, Alissia; Ivers, Noah; Bhatia, Sacha; Meshkat, Nazanin; Leblanc, Kori; Ha, Andrew; Morra, Dante

2014-01-01

303

Truman State University Residence Life Request for Family Housing  

E-print Network

___________________________ Reason for Request _____ Residing with spouse (Must provide notarized copy of marriage certificate) Marriage Date:____________ _____ Residing with dependent child Must provide notarized copy of birth-mail reslife@truman.edu to make alternative arrangements.) Requesting Family housing For (please circle): Fall

Gering, Jon C.

304

Copyright 2009, The Ohio State University Family and Consumer Sciences  

E-print Network

, Storing, and Serving Ohio Kohlrabi, Rutabagas, and Turnips Another name for kohlrabi is turnip cabbage and it is a member of the cabbage family. The flavor of its bulb-like stem is similar to a turnip. The rutabaga ofkohlrabi,rutabagas,andturnipsinOhio,contact your county Extension educator, Agriculture or Horticulture

305

Babies on Campus: Service to Infants and Families among Competing Priorities in University Child Care Programs  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

University early childhood programs attempt to balance a traditional tri-part mission: service to children and families; professional development of caregivers/teachers, clinicians, and researchers; and research on child development, learning, and/or education. Increasingly, infants receive care and education on university campuses, yet little is…

McMullen, Mary Benson; Lash, Martha

2012-01-01

306

Gender Norms and Institutional Culture: The Family-Friendly versus the Father-Friendly University  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article investigates the role that gender norms and expectations about parenting play in establishing the family-friendly versus the father-friendly university. Using interviews with 51 male faculty at three research universities, the article considers how faculty and administrators' actions perpetuate cultures that promote or hinder…

Sallee, Margaret W.

2013-01-01

307

Integrating an internet-mediated walking program into family medicine clinical practice: a pilot feasibility study  

PubMed Central

Background Regular participation in physical activity can prevent many chronic health conditions. Computerized self-management programs are effective clinical tools to support patient participation in physical activity. This pilot study sought to develop and evaluate an online interface for primary care providers to refer patients to an Internet-mediated walking program called Stepping Up to Health (SUH) and to monitor participant progress in the program. Methods In Phase I of the study, we recruited six pairs of physicians and medical assistants from two family practice clinics to assist with the design of a clinical interface. During Phase II, providers used the developed interface to refer patients to a six-week pilot intervention. Provider perspectives were assessed regarding the feasibility of integrating the program into routine care. Assessment tools included quantitative and qualitative data gathered from semi-structured interviews, surveys, and online usage logs. Results In Phase I, 13 providers used SUH and participated in two interviews. Providers emphasized the need for alerts flagging patients who were not doing well and the ability to review participant progress. Additionally, providers asked for summary views of data across all enrolled clinic patients as well as advertising materials for intervention recruitment. In response to this input, an interface was developed containing three pages: 1) a recruitment page, 2) a summary page, and 3) a detailed patient page. In Phase II, providers used the interface to refer 139 patients to SUH and 37 (27%) enrolled in the intervention. Providers rarely used the interface to monitor enrolled patients. Barriers to regular use of the intervention included lack of integration with the medical record system, competing priorities, patient disinterest, and physician unease with exercise referrals. Intention-to-treat analyses showed that patients increased walking by an average of 1493 steps/day from pre- to post-intervention (t = (36) = 4.13, p < 0.01). Conclusions Providers successfully referred patients using the SUH provider interface, but were less willing to monitor patient compliance in the program. Patients who completed the program significantly increased their step counts. Future research is needed to test the effectiveness of integrating SUH with clinical information systems over a longer evaluation period. PMID:21702957

2011-01-01

308

Care for post-stroke patients at Malaysian public health centres: self-reported practices of family medicine specialists  

PubMed Central

Background Provision of post stroke care in developing countries is hampered by discoordination of services and limited access to specialised care. Albeit shortcomings, primary care continues to provide post-stroke services in less than favourable circumstances. This paper aimed to review provision of post-stroke care and related problems among Family Medicine Specialists managing public primary health care services. Methods A semi-structured questionnaire was distributed to 121 Family Physicians servicing public funded health centres in a pilot survey focused on improving post stroke care provision at community level. The questionnaire assessed respondents background and practice details i.e. estimated stroke care burden, current service provision and opinion on service improvement. Means and frequencies described quantitative data. For qualitative data, constant comparison method was used until saturation of themes was reached. Results Response rate of 48.8% was obtained. For every 100 patients seen at public healthcentres each month, 2 patients have stroke. Median number of stroke patients seen per month is 5 (IQR 2-10). 57.6% of respondents estimated total stroke patients treated per year at each centre was less than 40 patients. 72.4% lacked a standard care plan although 96.6% agreed one was needed. Patients seen were: discharged from tertiary care (88.1%), shared care plan with specialists (67.8%) and patients who developed stroke during follow up at primary care (64.4%). Follow-ups were done at 8-12 weekly intervals (60.3%) with 3.4% on ‘as needed’ basis. Referrals ranked in order of frequency were to physiotherapy services, dietitian and speech and language pathologists in public facilities. The FMS’ perceived 4 important ‘needs’ in managing stroke patients at primary care level; access to rehabilitation services, coordinated care between tertiary centres and primary care using multidisciplinary care approach, a standardized guideline and family and caregiver support. Conclusions Post discharge stroke care guidelines and access to rehabilitation services at primary care is needed for post stroke patients residing at home in the community. PMID:24580779

2014-01-01

309

Thank you for your gift! YES. I would like to make a gift to the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry. Please  

E-print Network

of Medicine and Dentistry. Please fill out this page and return to: University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry Office of Academic Development and Alumni Relations 300 East River Road, P.O. Box 278996 Rochester:____________________________________________ Gift Designation School of Medicine & Dentistry Annual Fund (A06262) A specific department or fund

Goldman, Steven A.

310

Copyright 2009, The Ohio State University Family and Consumer Sciences  

E-print Network

For more information, visit the Ohio Department of Aging web site at: http://www.goldenbuckeye.com and Ohio State University Extension's "Aging in Ohio" web site at: http://seniorseries.osu.edu Putting My more dark-green veggies like broccoli, spinach, and other dark leafy greens. #12;SS-152-R08--page 2

311

Medical humanities: a new undergraduate teaching program at the University of Geneva School of Medicine, Switzerland.  

PubMed

In 2001, a new program of medical humanities was initiated at the University of Geneva School of Medicine in Switzerland. Four mandatory seminars and one optional 2-week internship are offered to second-through fifth-year medical students. The program has four interdependent goals: contextualizing, developing personal reflection and judgment, encouraging imagination, and offering specific ways to improve the quality of the therapeutic relationship. The program is based on an integrated vision of the humanities and stimulates the students' imagination and reflection in a way that medical students should find useful. Three steps help teachers to build an integrated vision: familiarization, confrontation, and adjustment to the medical culture. The mandatory seminars are taught by a team consisting of a physician and a humanities teacher. All the physicians, department heads, and clinicians involved in each seminar actively collaborated. The medical humanities program is in the Bioethics Unit, which is housed in the Department of Community Health and Medicine with medical history and legal medicine. This intellectual, institutional, and physical proximity encourages informal dialogue and ensures a more coherent and unified vision of the different disciplines. In their assessments of the program, students stated that the seminars gave them food for thought and met their expectations. However, it is premature to draw conclusions from these assessments because the program is still in its infancy. The program strives to provide students with tools specific to the humanities so that they can strengthen their own judgment, listening skills, open-mindedness, creativity, and curiosity, attributes that are needed to ensure that the therapeutic relationship will be satisfying for both physicians and patients. PMID:14534107

Louis-Courvoisier, Micheline

2003-10-01

312

Great hospitals of Asia: the Department of Neurosurgery at Seoul National University College of Medicine.  

PubMed

Established in 1957, the Department of Neurosurgery at Seoul National University College of Medicine is the one of the oldest neurosurgical departments in Korea. The seven past Chairmen (Bo Sung Sim, Kil Soo Choi, Dae Hee Han, Byung-Kyu Cho, Hyun Jib Kim, Hee-Won Jung, and Dong Gyu Kim) have devoted themselves to the development of the department. The current chair, Chun Kee Chung, assumed the position in July 2010. The current department comprises several clinical programs that encompass the entire spectrum of neurosurgical disorders, with 29 specialized faculty members and care teams in three hospitals: Seoul National University Hospital (SNUH), Boramae Medical Center (BMC), and Seoul National University Bundang Hospital (SNUBH). The remarkable growth of the department during the last half century made it possible to perform 5,666 operations (3,299 at SNUH, 411 at BMC and 1,860 at SNUBH) during 2009. A total of 1,201 articles authored by faculty members were published in scientific journals between 1958 and 2009, approximately 32% of which were published in international journals. The department is regarded as the "Mecca" of neurosurgery in Korea because of its outstanding achievement and the many distinguished alumni with leadership roles in the academic field. This article traces the clinical, academic, and scientific development of the department, its present activities, and its future direction. PMID:21600472

Kim, Dong Gyu; Park, Chul-Kee; Paek, Sun Ha; Kim, Jeong Eun; Kim, Chi Heon; Phi, Ji Hoon

2011-01-01

313

Samuel A. Mudd, MD, physician-farmer, University of Maryland School of Medicine class of 1856.  

PubMed

America is in the midst of experiencing the sesquicentennial of the Civil War. We do so with some ambivalence knowing that the war forged a great union and ended slavery but also caused the deaths of more than 600,000 fellow citizens. Samuel A. Mudd, MD, University of Maryland School of Medicine class of 1856, was a man of this time. As a physician-farmer in Southern Maryland, he was a highly respected physician, a slave owner, and a devout citizen. The Civil War (1861-1865) would alter his life in ways few could have imagined. This article looks at his background, his education, his work as a physician-farmer, and his dramatic rise to national attention and infamy. Convicted by a military tribunal and imprisoned for his "crimes," he was able to partially redeem himself using his medical skills and professionalism. Mudd was a man of his time. And what a time it was. PMID:23183366

Harding, Richard K

2012-12-01

314

The teaching of basic clinical skills at School of Medicine, University of São Paulo.  

PubMed

This article describes how is the teaching of basic clinical skills given to the 3rd in the undergraduate program, at the School of Medicine, University of São Paulo. This course has been implementing some techniques of teaching-learning for last years in order to become it more dynamic and interesting. Small group teaching is the main feature of the course "Basic Clinical Skills" given at the University of São Paulo, School of Medicine. This technique is improved by keeping each group with a teacher for a long time to allow better integration between them and to facilitate a better acquisition of attitudes towards the patient and all the team involved in the care of patient. All the classes are practical with early contact with real cases. Medical students learn how to take down the medical history, how to perform an adequate physical examination and make diagnoses under supervision of their teachers. Discussion cases, recognition of medical patterns and hypothetic-deductive strategy are used to develop an efficient medical reasoning. The authors show the results obtained through questionnaires filled in by the students at the end of the course and the analysis of which demonstrates that the students are highly satisfied with these kind of strategies and profit better from them. In 1996 and 1997, respectively, the course's satisfaction was 93.13% and 88.08% (excellent + good). The students' capacity to perform their objectives is situated in their majority between 6 and 8, these values represent a good and sufficient to very good performance. PMID:10413951

Kira, C M; Atta, J A

1998-01-01

315

Universality of aging: family caregivers for elderly cancer patients  

PubMed Central

The world population is aging, with the proportion of older people (65+ years) expected to reach 21% in 2050 and to exceed the number of younger people (aged 15 or less) for the first time in history. Because cancer is particularly a chronic disease of older people, a large increase in the number of elderly patients with cancer is anticipated. The estimated number of new cancer cases worldwide among people over 65 is expected to grow from about 6 million in 2008 to more than 11 million during the coming decade. By 2030, individuals over 65 are expected to account for 70% of all cancer patients in the Western world. Along with the increase in oncology patients, the number of older people caring for their ill spouses or other relatives is also growing, with the ensuing toll on these caregivers causing major concern, especially in western countries. In different societies the characteristics of family caregiver stressors, cultural norms concerning caregiving, and the availability of support have a huge impact on those providing care. Any study of older caregivers of older cancer patients requires an integrative evaluation of aging that takes into account cultural, social, psychological, and behavioral variables. This review proposes a critical discussion of the multidimensionality of the caregiving and of the impact that age, culture, and gender have on it. PMID:25076927

Baider, Lea; Surbone, Antonella

2014-01-01

316

University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health Course Title: Extramural Elective Clerkship in International Health  

E-print Network

University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health Course Title: Extramural Elective may include public health, prevention, and health education activities. Placements will be approved diagnosis and management, epidemiological, public health and prevention aspects of acute and/or chronic

Sheridan, Jennifer

317

Evaluating the Effectiveness of a Senior Mentor Program: The University of Missouri-Columbia School of Medicine  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

At the University of Missouri-Columbia School of Medicine, we developed a voluntary senior-mentor program, the Senior Teacher Educator Partnership (STEP), for first- and second-year medical students. Using qualitative research methods, we examined the impact of STEP on medical students' attitudes and then assessed the congruence of what is learned…

Hoffman, Kimberly G.; Gray, Peggy; Hosokawa, Michael C.; Zweig, Steven C.

2006-01-01

318

An asessment of the educational preparation of the Texas A&M University College of Veterinary Medicine graduates  

E-print Network

The purpose of this study was to determine the initial and actual professional goals, the changes in initial and actual professional goals and the reasons for this change of the different Texas A&M University veterinary medicine graduates from 1990...

Carbajal, Virginia Isabel

2006-08-16

319

Subscriber access provided by University of Washington | Libraries Journal of Medicinal Chemistry is published by the American Chemical Society.  

E-print Network

Subscriber access provided by University of Washington | Libraries Journal of Medicinal Chemistry is published by the American Chemical Society. 1155 Sixteenth Street N.W., Washington, DC 20036 Article L. M. J. Verlinde, Mandana Karimi, Galina I. Lepesheva, Michael H. Gelb, and Frederick S. Buckner J

Gelb, Michael

320

Subscriber access provided by University of Washington | Libraries Journal of Medicinal Chemistry is published by the American Chemical Society.  

E-print Network

Subscriber access provided by University of Washington | Libraries Journal of Medicinal Chemistry is published by the American Chemical Society. 1155 Sixteenth Street N.W., Washington, DC 20036 Article Potent. Cummings, Kasey Rivas, William P. Katt, Carrie Horne#y, Frederick S. Buckner, Debopam Chakrabarti, Sai#d M

Gelb, Michael

321

Proceedings of Student-Faculty Research Day, CSIS, Pace University, May 3rd Tele-Medicine Risk Adjustment  

E-print Network

by altering payment for enrollees based on health status and demographics [2]. Medicare Risk Adjustment data-Medicine Risk Adjustment Maja Misheva, Matthew Racioppo, William Gasparrini, Aykut Donmez, Jean F. Coppola, and Ray Miranti Seidenberg School of CSIS, Pace University, White Plains, NY 10606 Abstract--Medicare Risk

Tappert, Charles

322

Integrating eLearning to Support Medical Education at the New University of Botswana School of Medicine  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Since the enrolment of its first cohort of students in 2009, the University of Botswana School of Medicine (UB SoM) has employed elearning as a key element to support and strengthen its model of decentralised medical education. Significant investments have been made in setting up the physical infrastructure, and in acquiring relevant expertise to…

Kebaetse, Masego B.; Nkomazana, Oathokwa; Haverkamp, Cecil

2014-01-01

323

Critical Thinking and Complementary and Alternative Medicine Education at a Small University: Program Evolution and Lessons Learned  

Microsoft Academic Search

Patient use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) has resulted in diverse educational initiatives in universities around the country. This article describes the creation of a CAM continuing-education pilot program delivered to a diverse group of practicing medical professionals in Alaska. Program strengths include emphasis on critical thinking strategies, identification of cultural barriers, a multidisciplinary medical team approach, and program

Lyn W. Freeman; Derek Welton

2005-01-01

324

Use of complementary and alternative medicine by cancer patients at the University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital, Enugu, Nigeria  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: The use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) by cancer patients is very common and varies between populations. The referenced English literature has no local study from Africa on this subject. This study was conducted to define the prevalence, pattern of use, and factors influencing the use of CAM by cancer patients at the University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital

Emmanuel R Ezeome; Agnes N Anarado

2007-01-01

325

The Magazine for Alumni and Friends of Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University Summer/Fall 2009  

E-print Network

The Magazine for Alumni and Friends of Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University ent/ 50 th Reunion Coverage #12;WorldWidE CommitmEnt Over the last decade, Albert Einstein College EinstEin Summer/Fall 2009 EINSTEIN & INDIA Working together for global health Inside: 2009 Com m encem

Yates, Andrew

326

Indiana Institute for Biomedical Imaging Sciences Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Indiana University School of Medicine  

E-print Network

Indiana Institute for Biomedical Imaging Sciences Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Indiana University School of Medicine The Indiana Institute of Biomedical Imaging Sciences (IIBIS) In-vivo Imaging Core provides Cancer Center investigators with access to state-of-the-art in-vivo imaging

Zhou, Yaoqi

327

THE INSTITUTES AT NORTHWESTERN MEDICINE AT NORTHWESTERN  

E-print Network

care, acupuncture, naturopathic medicine, nutrition counseling, health psychology, bodywork, energyTHE INSTITUTES AT NORTHWESTERN MEDICINE INNOVATION ENGINES AT NORTHWESTERN MEDICINE OSHER CENTER FOR INTEGRATIVE MEDICINE AT NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY #12;THE INSTITUTES AT NORTHWESTERN MEDICINE INNOVATION ENGINES

Engman, David M.

328

The University of Vermont Libraries' Center for Digital Initiatives: Fletcher Family  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The University of Vermont Libraries' Center for Digital Initiatives has continued to add to their online offerings in recent years. This latest collection is quite a pip, and it contains family correspondence from the Fletcher Family of Vermont. The family correspondence begins in 1826, and it is primarily focused around several family members who moved west to New York, Ohio, and other parts of the heartland. Throughout these letters, the various correspondents detail the process of creating and managing their new farms and the documents leave no fact (or price) unexplored as they discuss the land, grains, stock, and groceries. All told, there are 139 letters in the collection, and visitors can click on the "Browse the Collection" section to view the letters listed by author. Additionally, visitors can search the collection by keyword, title, or subject.

329

University of Hawaii-Botany Department: Vascular Plant Family Access Page  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Created by botanist Dr. Gerald D. Carr of the University of Hawaii, this website is filled with great annotated photos of vascular plants. The site is organized into sections for the non-flowering and flowering plant families. The plant families are organized according to several systems including traditional presentation, Arthur CronquistâÂÂs classification scheme (1981), and the phylogenetic outline of Judd et al. (2002). The site also offers a new integrated Alphabetical Index for Flowering Plant Families. Plant familiesâ are hyperlinked to an introductory paragraph accompanied by photos and information about selected species in that group. For example, the Moraceae section includes annotated photos for jack fruit (_Artocarpus heterophyllus_), climbing fig (_Ficus pumila_), and mulberry (_Morus alba_). The site also includes diagrams depicting non-flowering vascular plants as treated by Judd et al., and flowering plant relationships according to Cronquist.

Carr, Gerald D.

330

Positions Toward Science Studies in Medicine Among University Graduates of Medicine and the Teenaged Participants of the "Medical Systems" Study Program  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The "Medical Systems" program was designed to introduce high school students to the world of advanced medicine. Its premise was to use an applied scientific discipline like medicine to encourage high-school students' interest in basic science. This study compares the teen-aged graduates of "Medical Systems" with fourth and fifth-year medical students. It aims to identify the attitudes of these two groups towards medical science and basic sciences in medicine. The population included 94 graduates of "Medical Systems" from schools throughout Israel, who had also completed an advanced-level course in a basic science (biology, chemistry or physics), and 96 medical students from different Israeli universities. The students' attitudes were measured using West et al.'s questionnaire (Med Educ 16(4):188-191, 1982), which assesses both the attitude of the participants towards basic science knowledge, and their attitude towards their learning experience in medical school. Nine participants from each group were also interviewed using a semi-structured interview protocol. The results showed essential differences in the attitudes of the two groups. The high school students consider scientific knowledge far more essential for a physician than do the medical students, who also showed a far lower estimation of the effectiveness of their science studies.

Ben-Zvi-Assaraf, Orit; Even-Israel, Chava

2011-08-01

331

Work-Family Balance and Academic Advancement in Medical Schools  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: This study examines various options that a faculty member might exercise to achieve work-family balance in academic medicine and their consequences for academic advancement. Method: Three data sets were analyzed: an anonymous web-administered survey of part-time tenure track-eligible University of Illinois College of Medicine (UI-COM)…

Fox, Geri; Schwartz, Alan; Hart, Katherine M.

2006-01-01

332

Work-family conflict and well-being in university employees.  

PubMed

This is one of the first reported studies to have reviewed the role of work-family conflict in university employees, both academic and nonacademic. The goal of this research was to examine the role of work-family conflict as a mediator of relationships between features of the work environment and worker well-being and organizational outcomes. A sample of 3,326 Australian university workers responded to an online survey. Work-family conflict added substantially to the explained variance in physical symptoms and psychological strain after taking account of job demands and control, and to a lesser extent to the variance in job performance. However, it had no extra impact on organizational commitment, which was most strongly predicted by job autonomy. Despite differing in workloads and work-family conflict, academic ("faculty") and nonacademic staff demonstrated similar predictors of worker and organizational outcomes. Results suggest two pathways through which management policies may be effective in improving worker well-being and productivity: improving job autonomy has mainly direct effects, while reducing job demands is mediated by consequent reductions in work-family conflict. PMID:25175890

Winefield, Helen R; Boyd, Carolyn; Winefield, Anthony H

2014-01-01

333

Measuring university student satisfaction with a campus family planning clinic in Costa Rica.  

PubMed

Family planning clinics for university students play a valuable role in promoting health. This research project, a pilot study among women students who sought family planning services through a Costa Rican university clinic, introduced student evaluation of the family planning clinic, documented services provided in family planning visits, and identified issues for further study. Aged 18-33 years, the 53 respondents (a convenient sample) who completed a self-administered questionnaire were mostly (64%) single; all were sexually active; and 78% wished to have children (or more children) some day. Though all were sexually active at the time of their visit, only 62% were currently using contraception, and fewer than half of these were using effective methods. Nearly all students (96%) reported they learned new information during their appointment, and many received screening tests and examinations. Respondents rated their satisfaction with aspects of clinic service as high, citing the clinic's low visibility on campus as the most important area for improvement. All of the students said they would definitely return (85%) or would consider returning (15%). The results support the continuance of such a clinic on the campus, as well as of the practice of student evaluation. This collaborative study demonstrated areas for future research and stimulated interest in the university clinic as a research setting. PMID:8375977

Kalma, S

1993-08-01

334

STATISTICS IN MEDICINE Statist. Med. 19, 8398 (2000)  

E-print Network

practice, physicians mentally compare a laboratory result with previous values and use their clinical USDA; ARS; Grand Forks Human Nutrition Research Center; Grand Forks; ND 58202; U.S.A. 5 University of Hematology=Oncology; Department of Medicine and Chao Family Comprehensive Cancer Center; University

McLachlan, Geoff

335

UW Anesthesiology & Pain Medicine The Department of Anesthesiology & Pain Medicine at the University of Washington provides several  

E-print Network

at the University of Washington provides several courses in Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS) Training to UW staff and the general public. 2013/14 ACLS 2-DAY COURSE Classroom & Simulation-centered learning sessions on BLS, AED, ACLS & megacode. Goal: AHA ACLS credentialing For: Community anesthesiologists and UW

Anderson, Richard

336

Cancer Informatics 2006: 2 277287 277 Correspondence: Rainer K. Brachmann, Department of Medicine, School of Medicine, University of  

E-print Network

, computational docking results, functional assays, and protein structure data. As an example of the hybrid) (Baroni et al. 2004; Dearth et al. 2006); bioinformatics and computational docking (Donald Bren School and Bioinformatics, University of California, Irvine, California 92697, U.S.A. Abstract: Complex problems in life

Lathrop, Richard H.

337

Building learning communities: evolution of the colleges at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine.  

PubMed

Learning communities, which are an emerging trend in medical education, create a foundation for professional and academic development through the establishment of longitudinal relationships between students and faculty. In this article, the authors describe the robust learning community system at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, which encompasses wellness, career planning, professional development, and academics.The Vanderbilt Advisory Colleges Program introduced in 2006 initially focused on two goals: promoting wellness and providing career advising. In the 2011-2012 academic year, the focus of the colleges expanded to incorporate an enhanced level of personal career advising and an academic component. In the four-year College Colloquium course, faculty selected as college mentors teach the medical humanities and lead sessions dedicated to student professional development in the areas of leadership, research, and service-learning. This academic and professional development program builds on the existing strengths of the colleges and has transformed the colleges into learning communities.The authors reflect on lessons learned and discuss future plans. They report that internal data and data from the Association of American Medical Colleges Medical School Graduation Questionnaire support consistently high and increasing satisfaction among Vanderbilt medical students, across the metrics of personal counseling, faculty mentoring, and career planning. PMID:23887019

Fleming, Amy; Cutrer, William; Moutsios, Sandi; Heavrin, Benjamin; Pilla, Michael; Eichbaum, Quentin; Rodgers, Scott

2013-09-01

338

RappoRtSchulich School of Medicine & dentiStry WeStern univerSity / AluMni MAgAzine / 2013  

E-print Network

RappoRtSchulich School of Medicine & dentiStry WeStern univerSity / AluMni MAgAzine / 2013 setting of Medicine & dentistry ReseaRch 16 ReseaRch notaBles 18 eMpoweRing ReseaRch through leadership, mentorship, Schulich School of Medicine & dentistry, has spent the past 25 years learning about AlS, and he's confident

Denham, Graham

339

Parents and Families LEHIGH UNIVERSITY 1 Jacalyn F. `78 and Andrew Aaron `09P  

E-print Network

Parents and Families LEHIGH UNIVERSITY 1 Jacalyn F. `78 and Andrew Aaron `09P Deborah J. Goodman and David E. Abbey `07P `12P Herand Abcarian `03P John H. Abel `90P `F/S ++ Teri S. and Mark A. Aboud `13P Rebecca A. and Renaldo M. Abreu `13P Lynne J. Acierno and Douglas D. Bradley `11P Heidi B. and Cory S

Napier, Terrence

340

Remarks by Provost Lloyd B. Minor Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine  

E-print Network

on prevention and helping to shape public policy. 3 #12;In 2009 total health expenditures in the United States accounts for 85% of all health care expenditures. For the one-fourth of Americans with multiple chronic move academic medicine forward: from medicine to health. 1 #12;But first things first. I have

Connor, Ed

341

Undergraduate Training in Companion Animal Preventive Medicine at Louisiana State University.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The veterinary curriculum at the LSU School of Veterinary Medicine has developed an undergraduate professional training program in companion animal preventive medicine--a new area of specialization--as a field of clinical practice. Curricula for years three and four are described. (Author/MLW)

Bech-Nielsen, Steen

1979-01-01

342

Attitudes about Cancer Medicine among Primary Care Residents and Their Teachers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A cancer attitude survey is analyzed that was administered to residents and faculty physicians in the departments of Family Medicine, Internal Medicine, and Human Oncology at the University of Wisconsin. Categories surveyed include opinions about the benefits of prevention, risk management, early detection and screening, treatment and care, and…

Love, Richard R.; And Others

1980-01-01

343

Students’ perception of the learning environment at Xavier University School of Medicine, Aruba  

PubMed Central

Purpose: The learning environment at Xavier University School of Medicine (XUSOM), Aruba has not been previously studied. Hence, the present study was carried out using the Dundee Ready Education Environment Measure (DREEM) to obtain student perceptions about the learning environment and compare the same among different subgroups of respondents. Methods: The questionnaire was administered to undergraduate medical students in their first to fifth semester during the first two weeks of June 2013. The students’ perceptions were evaluated by noting their degree of agreement with a set of 50 statements using a Likert-type scale. The mean overall score and the scores of subcategory were calculated and compared among different respondents (P<0.05). Results: Seventy-three of the 86 students (84.9%) completed the questionnaire. The overall mean±SD score was 131.79±22.86 (maximum score 200). The mean±SD score for students’ perception of teaching/learning was 31.99±6.23 (maximum score, 48), while the score for students’ perceptions of teachers was 30.05±5.54 (maximum score, 44). The mean±SD scores for students’ academic self-perception, students’ perception of the atmosphere, and students’ social self-perception were 21.88±5.11 (maximum score, 32), 30.92±8.59 (maximum score, 48), and 16.96±4.71 (maximum score, 28), respectively. There were no differences in scores according to the respondents’ personal characteristics. Conclusion: The student responses about the learning environment at the institution were positive. We plan to obtain regular student feedback as the curriculum becomes progressively more student-centered and integrated. PMID:24223238

2013-01-01

344

2013-2014 Parent & Family Guide Texas Tech universiTy 1 especialmente para padres y familiares ........................................................................................ 2  

E-print Network

2013-2014 Parent & Family Guide Texas Tech universiTy 1 Contenido especialmente para padres y ........................................................ 8 recursos académicos en Texas Tech ..................................................................................................................... 22 Tradiciones de Texas Tech

Gelfond, Michael

345

Comparison of burnout pattern between hospital physicians and family physicians working in Suez Canal University Hospitals  

PubMed Central

Introduction The burnout syndrome is characterized by emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and low personal accomplishment. It is associated with impaired job performance. Methods This descriptive study examined 171 physicians for the presence of burnout and its related risk factors. The evaluation of burnout was through Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI). The participant was considered to meet the study criteria for burnout if he or she got a “high“ score on at least 2 of the three dimensions of MBI. Results In the current study, the prevalence of burnout in hospital physicians (53.9%) was significantly higher than family physicians (41.94%) with (p=0.001). Participants who work in the internal medicine department scored the highest prevalence (69.64%) followed by Surgeons (56.50%) and Emergency doctors (39.39%). On the other hand, Pediatricians got the lowest prevalence (18.75%). Working in the teaching hospital and being married are strong predictors for occurrence of burnout. Conclusion There is a significant difference of burnout between hospital physicians and family physicians among the study subjects. Working in the teaching hospital and being married are strong predictors for occurrence of burnout. PMID:25422682

Kotb, Amany Ali; Mohamed, Khalid Abd-Elmoez; Kamel, Mohammed Hbany; Ismail, Mosleh Abdul Rahman; Abdulmajeed, Abdulmajeed Ahmed

2014-01-01

346

Alternative and Integrative Medicine  

MedlinePLUS

... by a given culture (eg, Asian, Indian, African). Homeopathic Medicine: This alternative medicine system is based on ... organization does he/she represent? (A business? A college or university? A nonprofit organization?) What is his/ ...

347

1998 Oxford University Press 239241Nucleic Acids Research, 1998, Vol. 26, No. 1 The Nuclear Receptor Resource: a growing family  

E-print Network

RESOURCE: A GROWING FAMILY Nuclear receptors are involved in multiple cellular signalling pathways. To facilitate access to data on the super- family, we created and continue to develop the Nuclear Receptor© 1998 Oxford University Press 239­241Nucleic Acids Research, 1998, Vol. 26, No. 1 The Nuclear

Abraham, Nader G.

348

Certification of Health Care Provider for THE CITY UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK Family Member's Serious Health Condition  

E-print Network

Certification of Health Care Provider for THE CITY UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK Family Member's Serious with a serious health condition to submit a medical certification issued by the health care provider for FMLA leave to care for a covered family member with a serious health condition. If requested by your

Rosen, Jay

349

CILC Pinnacle Award Recipients Adventures In Medicine & Science (AIMS) Program of Saint Louis University  

E-print Network

CILC Pinnacle Award Recipients 2013-2014 Adventures In Medicine & Science (AIMS) Program of Saint Plains Historical Museum Pro Football Hall of Fame Reef HQ Aquarium (Australia) Royal Botanical Gardens

Robeson, Scott M.

350

Raymond and Ruth Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania  

E-print Network

and reviewed grants for the United Kingdom Childhood Cancer Study Group and the National Medical Research including Pediatrics, Annals of Surgery, Journal of Trauma and Annals of Advances of Automotive Medicine

Bushman, Frederic

351

Clinical Laboratory Scientist, Genetics Hamilton Regional Laboratory Medicine Program and McMaster University  

E-print Network

Clinical Laboratory Scientist, Genetics Hamilton Regional Laboratory Medicine Program and Mc that includes tertiary genetic, pediatric, hematology, pathology, oncology, and obstetrical services components of genetic services in the program if desired by the candidate. We particularly seek candidates

Hitchcock, Adam P.

352

Research, Education and Outreach in the Division of Agriculture, Forestry and Veterinary Medicine Mississippi State University  

E-print Network

Rain Barrels Many find that using rain barrels can help save money, as well as the environment. 26 and Veterinary Medicine. 30 Cattle Cooperation The association between cattleman Milton Sundbeck and the MSU

Ray, David

353

Capacity Building Toward Evidence-Based Medicine Among Healthcare Professionals at the University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Ho Chi Minh City, and Its Related Institutes.  

PubMed

Research capacity development enhances a country's ownership of activities aimed at strengthening its health system. In Vietnam, continuing medical education (CME) is attracting increasing attention with the establishment of legal and policy frameworks. During 2010-2013, the Japan International Cooperation Agency funded a research capacity building project targeting physicians in Ho Chi Minh City. The project had been developed in four previous courses that were conducted in collaboration with Fukushima Medical University and Ho Chi Minh City University of Medicine and Pharmacy (UMP). The project succeeded in obtaining accreditation as the city's CME course. A total of 262 physicians attended three courses that have a divided set of research competencies. Following the Kirkpatrick Model for evaluating the effectiveness of training programs, we confirmed the participants' positive reaction to the courses (Level 1 evaluation), their perceived increase in knowledge and confidence in research skills (Level 2 evaluation), and application of learned knowledge in their practice (Level 3 evaluation). Presented here is a step-by-step scaling-up model of health research capacity building. Strategies for the further expansion include: further capacity building of instructors; responding to clinicians' specific needs; building a recruiting system with authorization; and improving the Level 3 training evaluation. PMID:25237279

Nga, LE Thi Quynh; Goto, Aya; Trung, Tran The; Vinh, Nguyen Quang; Khue, Nguyen Thy

2014-02-01

354

Capacity Building Toward Evidence-Based Medicine Among Healthcare Professionals at the University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Ho Chi Minh City, and Its Related Institutes  

PubMed Central

Research capacity development enhances a country’s ownership of activities aimed at strengthening its health system. In Vietnam, continuing medical education (CME) is attracting increasing attention with the establishment of legal and policy frameworks. During 2010-2013, the Japan International Cooperation Agency funded a research capacity building project targeting physicians in Ho Chi Minh City. The project had been developed in four previous courses that were conducted in collaboration with Fukushima Medical University and Ho Chi Minh City University of Medicine and Pharmacy (UMP). The project succeeded in obtaining accreditation as the city’s CME course. A total of 262 physicians attended three courses that have a divided set of research competencies. Following the Kirkpatrick Model for evaluating the effectiveness of training programs, we confirmed the participants’ positive reaction to the courses (Level 1 evaluation), their perceived increase in knowledge and confidence in research skills (Level 2 evaluation), and application of learned knowledge in their practice (Level 3 evaluation). Presented here is a step-by-step scaling-up model of health research capacity building. Strategies for the further expansion include: further capacity building of instructors; responding to clinicians’ specific needs; building a recruiting system with authorization; and improving the Level 3 training evaluation. PMID:25237279

Nga, LE Thi Quynh; GOTO, Aya; Trung, TRAN The; Vinh, NGUYEN Quang; Khue, NGUYEN Thy

2014-01-01

355

Families overcoming under stress: implementing family-centered prevention for military families facing wartime deployments and combat operational stress.  

PubMed

The toll of multiple and prolonged deployments on families has become clearer in recent years as military families have seen an increase in childhood anxiety, parental psychological distress, and marital discord. Families overcoming under stress (FOCUS), a family-centered evidence-informed resiliency training program developed at University of California, Los Angeles and Harvard Medical School, is being implemented at military installations through an initiative from Navy Bureau of Medicine and Surgery. The research foundation for FOCUS includes evidence-based preventive interventions that were adapted to meet the specific needs of military families facing combat operational stress associated with wartime deployments. Using a family narrative approach, FOCUS includes a customized approach utilizing core intervention components, including psychoeducation, emotional regulation skills, goal setting and problem solving skills, traumatic stress reminder management techniques, and family communication skills. The purpose of this study is to describe the development and implementation of FOCUS for military families. A case example is also presented. PMID:21305955

Lester, Patricia; Mogil, Catherine; Saltzman, William; Woodward, Kirsten; Nash, William; Leskin, Gregory; Bursch, Brenda; Green, Sara; Pynoos, Robert; Beardslee, William

2011-01-01

356

Promoting Health and Mental Health in Children, Youth, and Families. Springer Series on Behavior Therapy and Behavioral Medicine, Volume 27.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In the last decade, there has been increased attention paid to the scope of mental and physical health problems that affect individuals at different points over the entire life span. This volume presents many problem areas and the range of their impact on individuals, families, and society at large. The impact of intervention programs is described…

Glenwick, David S., Ed.; Jason, Leonard A., Ed.

357

Family medicine, 'La Herencia' and breast cancer; understanding the (dis)continuities of predictive genetics in Cuba.  

PubMed

Building on social science research examining the relationship between genetic knowledge, identity and the family this paper takes the cultural context of Cuba as a site for critical ethnographic engagement. The paper makes use of research working with a range of Cuban public and genetic professionals as part of a collaborative research project exploring the social and cultural context of health beliefs about breast cancer. It illuminates the contrasting ways in which genomic knowledge linked to an increased risk of breast cancer is perceived, communicated, and acted upon. It is argued that the particular meaning and significance of genetic risk linked to breast cancer in this context must be examined in relation to long standing institutional practices relating to public health care provision. The focus on 'the family' in the provision of Cuban health provides a particularly viable foundation for the expansion of what is described as 'community genetics', including the collation of family history details for common complex diseases such as breast cancer. Nevertheless specific public perceptions of risk related to breast cancer and the difficulties of discussing a diagnosis of cancer openly in the family point to the very specific challenges for the translation and application of predictive interventions in Cuba. In summary the dynamic interrelationship between public health, perceptions of risk or health beliefs about the causes of the disease and attitudes towards cancer diagnosis within the family point to both continuities and discontinuities in the way that genomic interventions linked to breast cancer are unfolding as part of a dynamic yet still ostensibly socialist project of health care in Cuba. PMID:21239101

Gibbon, Sahra

2011-06-01

358

Development of a student-mentored research program between a complementary and alternative medicine university and a traditional, research-intensive university.  

PubMed

The global need to develop clinician-scientists capable of using research in clinical practice, translating research knowledge into practice, and carrying out research that affects the quality, efficacy, and efficiency of health care is well documented. The complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) professions embrace the call to develop physician-researchers to carry out translational and applied research for CAM modalities. CAM universities face unique challenges when implementing research training compared with traditional, research-intensive (TRI) universities and medical centers where the majority of medical research is carried out.The authors present the development and outcomes of a mentored research program (MRP) between a CAM and a TRI institution, the National University of Health Sciences and the University of Illinois at Chicago School of Public Health, between 2006 and 2012. CAM predoctoral students engaged in a full-immersion semester at the TRI, including didactic courses and active research with a TRI faculty research mentor. Half of the participating doctor of chiropractic (DC) students continued on to PhD programs, and half established integrative medicine, primary care clinical careers.Establishing rigorous criteria for mentors and mentees, communicating expectations, developing solid relationships between the mentor, mentee, and home school advisor, responding quickly to impediments, and providing adequate support from CAM and TRI investigators were key to the MRP's success. To sustain research opportunities, coordinated degree programs for the DC and master of public health and master of clinical and translational research were established. PMID:24988423

Sullivan, Barbara M; Furner, Sylvia E; Cramer, Gregory D

2014-09-01

359

The Lau Family UHCOP Growth Fund Endowment The University of Houston is an EEO/AA institution.  

E-print Network

The Lau Family UHCOP Growth Fund Endowment The University of Houston is an EEO/AA institution UHCOP Growth Fund Endowment. The Growth Fund is a way to facilitate starting an endowment at the College of Pharmacy. Currently, the University of Houston requires a minimum of $25,000 to fund an endowment

Garbey, Marc

360

SCHOOL OF MEDICINE CURRICULUM GUIDE  

E-print Network

University, School of Medicine Medical Student Competencies and Institutional Learning Objectives The Wayne State University School of Medicine has established a comprehensive set of competencies summarizes the general competencies and institutional learning objectives. The first row defines the general

Rajlich, Vaclav

361

Prevalence of potential drug-drug interactions among internal medicine ward in University of Gondar Teaching Hospital, Ethiopia  

PubMed Central

Objective To determine the prevalence, clinical significance and the associated risk factors of potential drug-drug interactions (DDIs) at internal medicine ward of University of Gondar (UOG) hospital. Method A prospective cross-sectional study was conducted on patients treated in internal medicine ward of UOG hospital from April 29, 2013 to June 2, 2013. Data was collected from medical records and by interviewing the patients face to face. Descriptive analysis was conducted for back ground characteristics and logistic regression was used to determine the associated risk factors. Result In our study, we have identified a total number of 413 potential DDIs and 184 types of interacting combinations with 4.13 potential DDIs per patient. Among 413 potential DDIs most were of moderate interactions 61.2% (n=253) followed by 26% (n=107) of minor interactions and 12.8% (n=53) of major interactions. There was significant association of occurrence of potential DDIs only with taking three or more medications. Conclusion We have recorded a high rate of prevalence of potential DDI in the internal medicine ward of UOG hospital and a high number of clinically significant DDIs which the most prevalent DDI were of moderate severity. Careful selection of drugs and active pharmaceutical care is encouraged in order to avoid negative consequences of these interactions. PMID:25183081

Bhagavathula, Akshaya Srikanth; Berhanie, Alemayehu; Tigistu, Habtamu; Abraham, Yishak; Getachew, Yosheph; Khan, Tahir Mehmood; Unakal, Chandrashekhar

2014-01-01

362

Tufts University School of Medicine's Master of Science in Pain Research,  

E-print Network

advanced learning. The New England School of Acupuncture is the oldest school of Acupuncture and Oriental a Master of Acupuncture or Master of Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine Degree. In addition to their comprehensive training in acupuncture, NESA students choosing the CAS-PM track gain expertise

Dennett, Daniel

363

VISION STATEMENT The University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV) School of Medicine will address  

E-print Network

with best practices; Educational space will be organized so that interdisciplinary teams study and work programs in the schools of Allied Health Sciences, Dental Medicine, Community Health Sciences, Nursing will be an innovative center for teaching a diverse group of future Nevada doctors how to work in healthcare teams

Walker, Lawrence R.

364

Connectwith the Boston University School of Medicine Community you are here  

E-print Network

Asement Lounge chequerscafe Lockers emAiL stAtions talBot green 08fOuntain 09 HippocrAtes bust 10 tALbot bui;WELCOME School of Medicine Lobby Sculptures Talbot Green School of Public Health Hippocrates Newton

Spence, Harlan Ernest

365

Research, Education and Outreach in the Division of Agriculture, Forestry and Veterinary Medicine Mississippi State University  

E-print Network

livestock reproduction rates. 23 Wild Things They are wild, but a new study finds ways to manage feral hogs and Veterinary Medicine Toyota recently selected Mississippi as the home for the company's newest North American County site was a big factor in Toyota's choice of Mississippi over Arkansas and Tennessee

Ray, David

366

1 | P a g e WAYNE STATE UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF MEDICINE  

E-print Network

;3 | P a g e Abel EL. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome. In: McGraw-Hill Encyclopedia of Science & Technology, 8th AND TRANSLATIONAL SCIENCE STEPHEN A. KRAWETZ, PH.D., ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR CHARLOTTE B. FAILING PROFESSOR OF FETAL DR. Transcervical retrieval of fetal cells in the practice of modern medicine: A review

Berdichevsky, Victor

367

Assistant or Associate Professors in the Department of Medicine, Stanford University  

E-print Network

of Immunology The Division of Immunology and Rheumatology in the Department of Medicine at Stanford in Rheumatology, and have demonstrated skills in patient oriented clinical research (clinical trials, health regular mail to: C. Garrison Fathman, M.D. Chief of the Division of Immunology and Rheumatology CCSR

Quake, Stephen R.

368

The Junior Research Group "Molecular Architecture of Synapses", Inner Ear Lab of the University Medicine  

E-print Network

Medicine Göttingen, is seeking a PhD student SSSSalary according to TValary according to TValary according to provide top-quality patient care, excellent research and modern teaching. Göttingen lies near the cen- ter applicants with equal qualifica- tions will be given preferential treatment. We look forward to receiving

Gollisch, Tim

369

Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University Title: Terminating the Patient-Provider Relationship  

E-print Network

Physicians that physicians, physician assistants, nurse practitioners and certified nurse midwifes (providers the opportunity to modify behaviors and improve compliance to the medical treatment plan. · The Office of Risk on Ethics and Judicial Affairs Opinion E 10.015 issued December 2001: The practice of medicine, and its

370

Barriers to T raining Family Physicians in the Caribbean: Distance Education as a Promising Prescription  

Microsoft Academic Search

Family medicine physicians have been an important part of the primary health care landscape in the Caribbean for many decades. Most of these practitioners have been trained up to the bachelor's level in medicine and surgery at the University of the West Indies (UWI). The UWI with this responsibility for the training of physicians has, over the years, developed a

Tomlin J. Paul; Pauline Williams-Green

371

A Qualitative Study on Factors that Influence Turkish Medical Students’ Decisions to Become Family Physicians After the Health Transformation Programme  

PubMed Central

Background: In Turkey, general practitioners were authorized to work as family physicians without specialization, within the scope of the Health Transformation Programme, due to inadequate number of family medicine specialists since 2004. With this new implementation Family Medicine specialty became a less preferable option for medical students. Aims: The study was to investigate the perspectives of medical students and understand the issues to choose Family Medicine specialty as a career option. Materials and Methods: This qualitative study was performed with 48 final year medical students using a convenience sample from two medical universities. Results: Three main categories emerged from the data viewing Family Medicine ‘as a specialty’, ‘as an employment’, and finally ‘as a system’. Very few students stated that Family Medicine would be their choice for specialty. Conclusions: Family Medicine does not seem to be an attractive option in career planning by medical students. Several factors that may constrain students from choosing Family Medicine include: not perceiving Family Medicine as a field of expertise, and the adverse conditions at work which may originate from duality in the system. PMID:25006564

Tanriover, Ozlem; Hidiroglu, Seyhan; Akan, Hulya; Ay, Pinar; Erdogan, Yalcin; Karavus, Melda; Vitrinel, Ayca; Hayran, Osman

2014-01-01

372

Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine 100th anniversary. Introduction. From hygiene and tropical medicine to global health.  

PubMed

The author reviews the history of the Tulane School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine. In 1912, Dr. Creighton Wellman published a groundbreaking paper entitled "The New Orleans School of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene," outlining a clear plan for a new independent school of public health. He became the founding dean of the Tulane School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. Dr. Wellman had spent 9 years practicing medicine in Angola and graduated from the London School of Tropical Medicine before launching a career in tropical medicine in the United States. Tulane already had a formal course of hygiene established as early as 1881. The founding of Tulane School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine was made possible by a gift from Samuel Zemurray, who would become the president of the United Fruit Company. In January of 1914, Dr. Wellman abruptly left New Orleans to live in Brazil. The school lost its independence in 1919 and again became part of the School of Medicine until 1967. The school initiated by Dr. Wellman is the foundation on which today's Tulane School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine is built. PMID:23035133

Buekens, Pierre

2012-10-01

373

Alexander Norbash, MD, MHCM, FACR Chairman and Professor of Radiology, Boston University School of Medicine  

E-print Network

Alexander Norbash, MD, MHCM, FACR Chairman and Professor of Radiology, Boston University School. Norbash joined Boston University Medical Center in March 2004 as Chairman and Professor of Radiology. Dr, graduated from the University of Pittsburgh Radiology Residency, and completed fellowships in both

Vajda, Sandor

374

Research, Education and Outreach in the Division of Agriculture, Forestry and Veterinary Medicine Mississippi State University  

E-print Network

· · · Mississippi State University Volume 8, Number 2 SPRING 2012 The land-grant university system celebrates 150 years. . . Page 16 #12;MISSISSIPPI LANDMARKS · · · 2 Table of Contents On the Cover The latest farm equipment, circa 1919, was displayed in front of the YMCA building. Mississippi State University and more

Ray, David

375

Establishing a minority-based community clinical oncology program: the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, New Jersey Medical School-university Hospital Cancer Center experience.  

PubMed

The Minority-Based Community Clinical Oncology Program (MB-CCOP) at University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, New Jersey Medical School-University Hospital Cancer Center was established to serve an unmet need in a medically, educationally, and socioeconomically underserved community of primarily African American and Latino patients in Newark and Essex County, New Jersey. The MB-CCOP was built on an existing infrastructure of multidisciplinary teams of cancer specialists who collaborated in patient care and an existing clinical research program, which included multilingual staff and a breast cancer navigator. This article highlights some of the unique opportunities and challenges involved in the startup of an MB-CCOP specifically relevant to an academic setting. We present a guide to the necessary infrastructure and institutional support that must be in place before considering such a program and some of the steps an institution can take to overcome barriers preventing successful enrollment of patients onto clinical trials. PMID:23814524

Wieder, Robert; Teal, Randall; Saunders, Tracie; Weiner, Bryan J

2013-03-01

376

Establishing a Minority-Based Community Clinical Oncology Program: The University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, New Jersey Medical School–University Hospital Cancer Center Experience  

PubMed Central

The Minority-Based Community Clinical Oncology Program (MB-CCOP) at University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, New Jersey Medical School–University Hospital Cancer Center was established to serve an unmet need in a medically, educationally, and socioeconomically underserved community of primarily African American and Latino patients in Newark and Essex County, New Jersey. The MB-CCOP was built on an existing infrastructure of multidisciplinary teams of cancer specialists who collaborated in patient care and an existing clinical research program, which included multilingual staff and a breast cancer navigator. This article highlights some of the unique opportunities and challenges involved in the startup of an MB-CCOP specifically relevant to an academic setting. We present a guide to the necessary infrastructure and institutional support that must be in place before considering such a program and some of the steps an institution can take to overcome barriers preventing successful enrollment of patients onto clinical trials. PMID:23814524

Wieder, Robert; Teal, Randall; Saunders, Tracie; Weiner, Bryan J.

2013-01-01

377

The Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, McMaster University, invites applications for a one year Anatomic Pathology Fellowship. This fellowship may be in any of the following areas: Breast,  

E-print Network

The Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, McMaster University, invites applications for a one year Anatomic Pathology Fellowship. This fellowship may be in any of the following areas: Breast Pathology. The Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine and the Hamilton Regional Laboratory Medicine

Thompson, Michael

378

The Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, McMaster University, invites applications for a one year Forensic Pathology Residency Program (PGY-6) for the academic year July 2012-June 2013.  

E-print Network

The Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, McMaster University, invites applications for a one year Forensic Pathology Residency Program (PGY-6) for the academic year July 2012-June 2013. The Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine and the Hamilton Regional Laboratory Medicine Program

Thompson, Michael

379

Death is not always a failure: outcomes from implementing an online virtual patient clinical case in palliative care for family medicine clerkship  

PubMed Central

Background The dying patient is a reality of medicine. Medical students, however, feel unprepared to effectively manage the complex end-of-life (EOL) management issues of the dying patient and want increased experiential learning in Palliative Care. Aims To address the need for more formal curriculum in EOL care, we developed and implemented an online virtual patient (VP) clinical case in Palliative Care into the 2010–2011 Year Three Family Medicine Clerkship rotation curriculum. Methods A mixed-method design was used to measure the change in knowledge and perceived preparedness level in EOL care before and after completing the online VP case. A survey collected qualitative descriptions of the students’ educational experience of using this case. Results Ninety five percent (130/137) of the students voluntarily consented to have their results analyzed. The group knowledge score (n=127) increased significantly from a pre-course average of 7.69/16±2.27, to a post-course average of 10.02/16±2.39 (p<0.001). The students’ self-assessed comfort level increased significantly with all aspects of EOL management from pre-course to post-course (p<0.001). Nearly, 91.1% of the students rated the VP realism as ‘Good to Excellent’, 86% rated the case as educationally beneficial. Nearly 59.3% of students felt emotionally engaged with the VP. Qualitative feedback found that the case content was very useful and realistic, but that the interface was sometimes awkward to navigate. Conclusions The online VP case in Palliative Care is a useful teaching tool that may help to address the need for increased formal Palliative Care experience in medical school training programs. PMID:24267774

Tan, Amy; Ross, Shelley Paige; Duerksen, Kimberley

2013-01-01

380

A family-universal anomalous U(1) in string models as the origin of supersymmetry breaking and squark degeneracy  

SciTech Connect

Recently a promising mechanism for supersymmetry breaking that utilizes both an anomalous U(1) gauge symmetry and an effective mass term m {approx} 1TeV of certain relevant fields has been proposed. In this paper we examine whether such a mechanism can emerge in superstring derived free fermionic models. We observe that certain three generation string solutions, though not all, lead to an anomalous U(1) which couples universally to all three families. The advantages of this three-family universality of U(1){sub A}, compared to the two-family case, proposed in earlier works, in yielding squark degeneracy, while avoiding radiative breaking of color and charge, are noted. The root cause of the flavor universality of U(1){sub A} is the cyclic permutation symmetry that characterizes the Z{sub 2} x Z{sub 2} orbifold compactification with standard embedding, realized in the free fermionic models by the NAHE set. It is shown that nonrenormalizable terms which contain hidden-sector condensates, generate the required suppression of the relevant mass term m, compared to the Planck scale. While the D-term of the family universal U(1){sub A} leads to squark degeneracy, those of the family dependent U(1)`s, remarkably enough, are found to vanish for the solutions considered, owing to minimization of the potential.

Faraggi, A.E. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States). Dept. of Physics; Pati, J.C. [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States). Dept. of Physics

1997-12-01

381

Abstract Profiles of Structural Stability Point to Universal Tendencies, Family-Specific Factors, and Ancient Connections between Languages  

PubMed Central

Language is the best example of a cultural evolutionary system, able to retain a phylogenetic signal over many thousands of years. The temporal stability (conservatism) of basic vocabulary is relatively well understood, but the stability of the structural properties of language (phonology, morphology, syntax) is still unclear. Here we report an extensive Bayesian phylogenetic investigation of the structural stability of numerous features across many language families and we introduce a novel method for analyzing the relationships between the “stability profiles” of language families. We found that there is a strong universal component across language families, suggesting the existence of universal linguistic, cognitive and genetic constraints. Against this background, however, each language family has a distinct stability profile, and these profiles cluster by geographic area and likely deep genealogical relationships. These stability profiles seem to show, for example, the ancient historical relationships between the Siberian and American language families, presumed to be separated by at least 12,000 years, and possible connections between the Eurasian families. We also found preliminary support for the punctuated evolution of structural features of language across families, types of features and geographic areas. Thus, such higher-level properties of language seen as an evolutionary system might allow the investigation of ancient connections between languages and shed light on the peopling of the world. PMID:23028843

Dediu, Dan; Levinson, Stephen C.

2012-01-01

382

Pathology and Molecular Medicine  

E-print Network

Pathology and Molecular Medicine ANATOMICAL PATHOLOGY GRAND ROUNDS 2012 / 2013 TIME: 12:30 - 1:30 p. Pollett Mount Sinai Hospital University of Toronto Personalized Medicine in GI Oncologic Pathology November 21st MDCL ­ 3020 2:00 ­ 3:00 pm Dr. J. Waye McMaster University CSI Pathology: Confirmation

Haykin, Simon

383

Familial Colonic Cancer Syndromes  

PubMed Central

These discussions are selected from the weekly staff conferences in the Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco. Taken from transcriptions, they are prepared by Drs Homer A. Boushey, Associate Professor of Medicine, and David G. Warnock, Associate Professor of Medicine, under the direction of Dr Lloyd H. Smith, Jr, Professor of Medicine and Chairman of the Department of Medicine. Requests for reprints should be sent to the Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, School of Medicine, San Francisco, CA 94143. Images PMID:6356610

1983-01-01

384

[Creation of the St Joseph University Faculty of Medicine in Beirut: 125 years of Franco-Lebanese healthcare cooperation].  

PubMed

The Mediterranean--mare nostrum--has always been a cradle of exchanges for the different inhabitants of its shores, as highlighted by myths and legends dating back to antiquity. Cooperation between France and Lebanon expanded markedly in the 17th century and has continually expanded since, in fields such as education, through initiatives launched by the French government and by religious institutions. The Faculty of Medicine is an excellent example. The instigator was the Society of Jesus, which had created St Joseph University in 1875, eventually being supported by the French government. Following an agreement signed on 7 May 1883 between the Society of Jesus and the French authorities, the medical school opened on November 30th of the same year. The school soon became a faculty, and was managed until 1976 by a chancellor who answered to a French academic institution and delivered French state medical degrees. In 1976, however, following changes to the statutes of St Joseph University and the Faculty, the latter became a fully fledged Lebanese Faculty of Medicine delivering its diplomas through St Joseph University. The faculty soon needed a hospital complex to meet its students' medical needs. After some trials with local hospitals, it was decided to build the facility from scratch, and to name it Hotel Dieu de France. Construction was financed by the French government, and by a subscription launched by the French Press Syndicate, at the initiative of the newspaper Le Temps and at the request of the French Asia Committee (Comité de l'Asie Française). The Hospital was inaugurated on May 27, 1923. It soon encompassed a French maternity unit and cancer center, thus constituting the French Hospital Association (Association Hospitalière Française). In 1984, following an agreement between the French government and St Joseph University, Hotel Dieu became the property of the university, and the vice-chancellor became chairman of the board. The transfer of the faculty and Hotel Dieu to Lebanese authority did not spell an end to French support. Indeed, France continues to take an active part in the development of these two institutions through visiting professors and training for young doctors. Symbolically, the hospital is still called Hotel Dieu de France. PMID:18225430

Farah, Pierre

2007-01-01

385

Reflections on the impact of Title VII funding at the University of New England College of Osteopathic Medicine.  

PubMed

Title VII funding played an important role in the development of the University of New England College of Osteopathic Medicine (UNECOM). These funds enabled the 90% tuition-funded school to implement a primary-care-based curriculum in its formative years and played a crucial role in the 1995-2005 period of curriculum revision. UNECOM successfully competed for Title VII program funding in Physician Faculty Development in Primary Care, Academic Units in Primary Care, Predoctoral Training in Primary Care, and Residency Training in Primary Care. This funding helped the institution refine its vision and mission as a result of the federal imperatives surrounding primary health care. Securing these funds enabled the institution to jump-start programs with start-up federal funding, expand faculty, access educational innovation by networking with other grantees across the nation, and expand faculty grant-making knowledge and skills via federal technical assistance and grant review processes. Subsequent institutionalization of the resulting innovations may have played a role in UNECOM maintaining its production of primary care physicians, as evidenced by 71% of its 1996-2002 graduates practicing in primary care specialties. The impact of Title VII funding at UNECOM provides an example of how new and existing medical schools whose missions align with federal priorities can use these programs to develop curriculum and resources congruent with their missions.This article is part of a theme issue of Academic Medicine on the Title VII health professions training programs. PMID:18971658

Shannon, Stephen C

2008-11-01

386

Curricular and extracurricular activities of medical students during war, Zagreb University School of Medicine, 1991-1995.  

PubMed

War, as a major human disaster, affects many aspects of life, including medical education. This report describes curricular and extracurricular activities of the students at the Zagreb University School of Medicine during the wars in Croatia and neighboring Bosnia and Herzegovina. Although condensed versions of the curricula were prepared in case of a major breakdown in civilian life, the school maintained the continuity and quality of its curriculum throughout the war. Students engaged in extracurricular activities related to medical aspects of the war, including organization of resuscitation and first aid courses, collecting medical documentation on war victims, humanitarian help to refugees, and peace-promoting activities. Some students joined mobile surgical teams on the battlefronts. After army service, most of them returned to the school and successfully continued with their studies. The school also accepted guest-students from other new states emerged from former Yugoslavia. The authors found that the students' engagement in extracurricular activities related to medicine was enormously beneficial both to the psychological well-being of the students and to the region's peace-building efforts. PMID:11221772

Glunci?, V; Pulani?, D; Prka, M; Marusíc, A; Marusíc, M

2001-01-01

387

Integrative Laser Medicine and High-Tech Acupuncture at the Medical University of Graz, Austria, Europe  

PubMed Central

At the moment, modernization of acupuncture has a high priority. On the traditional side, acupuncture has only recently been awarded the status of Intangible Cultural Heritage by the UNESCO. On the innovative side, high-tech acupuncture is a registered trademark in Austria. Acupuncture has been used for medical treatment for thousands of years. A large number of empirical data are available but the technical quantification of effects was not possible up to now. Using electroacupuncture, needle, or laser stimulation and modern biomedical techniques, it was possible for the first time to quantify changes in biological activities caused by acupuncture. This paper which serves as introduction for the special issue “High-Tech Acupuncture and Integrative Laser Medicine” of the present journal, focuses on the latest innovative aspects that underline the further enhancement and development of acupuncture. Special emphasis is given to new methodological and technical investigations, for example, results obtained from all kinds of acupuncture innovations (e.g., teleacupuncture) and integrative laser medicine. PMID:22570669

Litscher, Gerhard

2012-01-01

388

School of Veterinary Medicine Bulletin  

E-print Network

School of Veterinary Medicine Bulletin 2009-2010 #12;2 School of Veterinary Medicine About at the Louisiana State University School of Veterinary Medicine, March 28-April 26, 2009. #12;2009­2010 Bulletin of address, undeliverable copies, and other mail sent to­School of Veterinary Medicine, LSU, Baton Rouge

389

The European General Practice Research Network Presents the Translations of Its Comprehensive Definition of Multimorbidity in Family Medicine in Ten European Languages  

PubMed Central

Background Multimorbidity, according to the World Health Organization, exists when there are two or more chronic conditions in one patient. This definition seems inaccurate for the holistic approach to Family Medicine (FM) and long-term care. To avoid this pitfall the European General Practitioners Research Network (EGPRN) designed a comprehensive definition of multimorbidity using a systematic literature review. Objective To translate that English definition into European languages and to validate the semantic, conceptual and cultural homogeneity of the translations for further research. Method Forward translation of the EGPRN’s definition of multimorbidity followed by a Delphi consensus procedure assessment, a backward translation and a cultural check with all teams to ensure the homogeneity of the translations in their national context. Consensus was defined as 70% of the scores being higher than 6. Delphi rounds were repeated in each country until a consensus was reached Results 229 European medical expert FPs participated in the study. Ten consensual translations of the EGPRN comprehensive definition of multimorbidity were achieved. Conclusion A comprehensive definition of multimorbidity is now available in English and ten European languages for further collaborative research in FM and long-term care. PMID:25607642

Le Reste, Jean Yves; Nabbe, Patrice; Rivet, Charles; Lygidakis, Charilaos; Doerr, Christa; Czachowski, Slawomir; Lingner, Heidrun; Argyriadou, Stella; Lazic, Djurdjica; Assenova, Radost; Hasaganic, Melida; Munoz, Miquel Angel; Thulesius, Hans; Le Floch, Bernard; Derriennic, Jeremy; Sowinska, Agnieska; Van Marwijk, Harm; Lietard, Claire; Van Royen, Paul

2015-01-01

390

Identification of Chinese Herbal Medicines from Zingiberaceae Family Using Feature Extraction and Cascade Classifier Based on Response Signals from E-Nose  

PubMed Central

Identification of Chinese herbal medicines (CHMs) by human experience is often inaccurate because individual ability and external factors may influence the outcome. However, it might be promising to employ an electronic nose (E-nose) to identify them. This paper presents a rapid and reliable method for identification of ten different species of CHMs from Zingiberaceae family based on their response signals from E-nose. Ten Zingiberaceae CHMs were measured and their maximum response values were analyzed by principal component analysis (PCA). Result shows that E Zhu (Curcuma phaeocaulis Val.) and Yi Zhi (Alpinia oxyphylla Miq.) could not be distinguished completely by PCA. Two solutions were proposed: (i) using BestFirst+CfsSubsetEval (BC) method to extract more discriminative features to select sensors with higher contribution rate and remove the redundant signals; (ii) employing a novel cascade classifier with two stages to enhance the distinguishing-positive rate (DPR). Based on these strategies, six features were extracted and used in different stages of the cascade classifier with higher DPRs. PMID:25114708

Peng, Lian; Zou, Hui-Qin; Bauer, Rudolf; Liu, Yong; Tao, Ou; Yan, Su-Rong; Han, Yu; Li, Jia-Hui; Ren, Zhi-Yu; Yan, Yong-Hong

2014-01-01

391

PURDUE UNIVERSITY RESIDENCES NEWSLETTER FOR FAMILIES AND FRIENDS IN THIS ISSUE  

E-print Network

Residences Jennifer Wetli Parent Association Liaison, University Residences CONTRIBUTING WRITER / DESIGNER Amelia R. Hitchcock University Residences DESIGNER Dorian V. Scotti University Residences HALLWAYS from the August Boiler Block Party. #12;UNIVERSITY RESIDENCES3 UNIVERSITY RESIDENCES3 MAY 2013 Costumed

Fernández-Juricic, Esteban

392

Department and function: Director, Transfusion Medicine  

E-print Network

Department and function: Director, Transfusion Medicine Education: 1981-1987 Universities of Bochum and Essen, Medicine 1996 Specialist in Transfusion Medicine Positions: 1987-1988 University of Marburg and Oncology 1993-1998 Humboldt-University of Berlin, Transfusion Medicine 1998 Hannover Medical School

Manstein, Dietmar J.

393

"No struggle, no fight, no court battle": the 1948 desegregation of the University of Arkansas School of Medicine.  

PubMed

In 1948, over 30 percent of the approved medical schools in the United States excluded black students. However, on September 10, 1948, the University of Arkansas School of Medicine became the first Southern medical school to desegregate when Edith Mae Irby matriculated. Her admission occurred without incident. There were no jeering white mobs, no court action, and no federal troops. Irby's admission had its roots in a successful legal campaign launched by the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People to eradicate racial inequalities in professional and graduate education. A confluence of factors led the University of Arkansas to desegregate. These included the state's lack of the financial resources necessary to comply with U.S. Supreme Court decisions, a climate of racial moderation in Arkansas, shrewd political maneuvering by officials at the University of Arkansas, and Irby's academic accomplishments. Irby's historic admission is frequently overlooked as a historical milestone. Its invisibility is due in part to its sharp contrast to the dominant narratives of school desegregation in the South. Yet, the story of Irby's entrance into medical school is critical for a more complete understanding of the history of medical education and the civil rights movement. PMID:22416058

Gamble, Vanessa Northington

2013-07-01

394

Preventive medicine: self-assessment of knowledge, skills and attitudes of medical students at the Medical University of Vienna.  

PubMed

Prevention and health promotion are gaining importance in modern medical curricula. Aim of this study was to evaluate the self-assessment of knowledge, skills and attitudes of medical students towards health promotion and prevention. In 2012, at the Medical University of Vienna, 27% of the 633 fourth-year medical students (50.3% male and 49.7% female; mean age: 24 years) completed a questionnaire. Results show a high assessment of prevention in most respondents. Knowledge gaps were detected on occupational health and mother-child pass examinations. However, almost all students reported sufficient knowledge on screening and risk assessment of developing cardiovascular diseases. Almost all respondents estimated to be able to identify risky behaviours. Overall, estimation towards prevention of tomorrow's physicians is very positive. However, only 40% believed to have been adequately trained on preventive medicine so far. Relevant preventive aspects were added to the medical curriculum in 2012-2013 with the new block 'Public Health'. PMID:24468828

Borsoi, Livia; Rieder, Anita; Stein, Katharina Viktoria; Hofhansl, Angelika; Dorner, Thomas Ernst

2014-04-01

395

Jewish medicine and the University of Padua: contribution of the Padua graduate Toviah Cohen to nephrology.  

PubMed

During the period of the 11th to 17th century, the access of Jews to European universities was restricted and even those who were fortunate enough to be admitted to a university were not awarded a degree at the end of their studies. An exception to this situation was the University of Padua that allowed Jewish students to study and awarded them degrees; indeed 229 physicians graduated from this university between 1409 and 1721. Among these physicians there were many luminaries such as Joseph Del Medigo, Salmon Congeliano and Toviah Cohen. The latter made many contributions to the field of nephrology. In this treatise Maaseh Toviah he discussed uroscopy, kidney function, body fluid homeostasis and obstructive uropathy. PMID:10213821

Massry, S G; Smogorzewski, M; Hazani, E; Shasha, S M

1999-01-01

396

University of Washington This research was made possible by funding from the National Library of Medicine  

E-print Network

Working Group and and from UW ITHS lists of Informatics Tools Non-proprietary systems ­ OpenClinica 2://www.iwg-online.org/projects/redcap/index.php WebTrial (University of Washington) No online link DADOS (Duke University) No online link OpenClinica http://www.openclinica.org Velos http://www.velos.com/products_eres_overview.shtml Figure 1 Task 1

Washington at Seattle, University of

397

Bereavement: The Role of the Family Physician  

PubMed Central

Much has been written regarding attitudes of patients, families, and physicians in managing death and subsequent grief reactions. Here at Howard University College of Medicine, we are constantly aware of our educational responsibility to insure that our students and residents achieve certain levels of awareness, acquire certain basic and specific information, and be afforded an opportunity to ventilate and discuss issues of death, dying, and bereavement as they relate to their current or future encounters with patients and their families. We are specifically interested in the roles and responsibilities of the family physician. PMID:904017

Secundy, Marian G.

1977-01-01

398

Publication Productivity of Faculty of Medicine, Mansoura University Indexed in PubMed  

PubMed Central

Background: Analysis of PubMed publications as an indicator of the research productivity of individual countries, regions, or institutions has recently become a field of interest. Aim: The aim was to assess the past trends in PubMed-indexed medical publications from Mansoura Faculty of Medicine and to have an idea about the current situation in medical research. Materials and Methods: PubMed was searched for publications affiliated to Mansoura from the end of the calendar year 2012 and earlier. Results: Of 2798 papers related to Mansoura, 1756 publications were included in the analysis, and 1042 publications were excluded (false positives). The highest number of publications was in 2011 (10.6%, 187/1756) followed by 2012 (10.2%, 179/1756). There was an increase of the publication rate over 5-years period until it reaches 47.0% (826/1756) during the period from 2008 to 2012. The main high-producing department was Urology and Nephrology, which accounted for 35.9% (631/1756) of the total publications followed by Pediatrics and Parasitology. The median number of authors participated in the researches was four ranging from 1 to 23. Most of the publications were in the form of intervention/clinical trials (38.4%, 662/1756) followed by descriptive/cross-sectional study (38.3%, 659/1756). The median of the impact factor was 1.99 ranging from 0.27 to 53.3. Conclusion: The publication productivity of Mansoura Faculty of Medicine showed fluctuating pattern from the end of the calendar year 2012 and earlier. Future prospects for increasing research productivity should be considered to increase the number and quality of publications and academic staff participating in high-quality international researches. PMID:25364602

Helal, RM; Abou-ElWafa, HS; El-Gilany, AH

2014-01-01

399

nJit and the university of Medicine and dentistry of new Jersey (uMdnJ) have forged alliances in diverse  

E-print Network

nJit and the university of Medicine and dentistry of new Jersey (uMdnJ) have forged alliances and UMDNJ, two preeminent Newark institutions. Shortly after New Jersey Medical School (NJMS) opened of innovative prosthetic joints ­ including the extraordinarily successful New Jersey Low Contact Stress Knee

Gary, Dale E.

400

The Addictions Counselling program was developed by the University of Lethbridge and Medicine Hat College. The program provides students with the practical skills and the  

E-print Network

The Addictions Counselling program was developed by the University of Lethbridge and Medicine Hat for an effective and compassionate role in treatment, prevention and health promotion wherever addiction, or the potential for addiction, affects people's lives. The program considers a range of intervention strategies

Seldin, Jonathan P.

401

The Addictions Program was developed by Medicine Hat College and the University of Lethbridge to prepare graduates who will be skilled in counselling persons who are  

E-print Network

The Addictions Program was developed by Medicine Hat College and the University of Lethbridge to prepare graduates who will be skilled in counselling persons who are experiencing some form of addictive placement where students will work closely with professionals in the addictions field. Students may elect

Seldin, Jonathan P.

402

The Addictions Counselling Program was developed by the University of Lethbridge and Medicine Hat College.The program provides students with the practical skills and theoretical  

E-print Network

The Addictions Counselling Program was developed by the University of Lethbridge and Medicine Hat for an active and compassionate role in treatment, prevention and health promotion wherever addiction,or the potential for addiction,affects people's lives.The program focuses on a range of strategies and addictive

Seldin, Jonathan P.

403

Published by The University of Vermont College of Medicine Office of Primary Care Summer 2013 A Newsletter Dedicated to T hose Who Deliver & Teach P rimary Care  

E-print Network

Published by The University of Vermont College of Medicine Office of Primary Care Summer 2013 A Newsletter Dedicated to T hose Who Deliver & Teach P rimary Care From the Editor Vermont was named the #1 of "Primarily Vermont", Commissioner Harry Chen, md discusses some ways in which primary care practitioners can

Hayden, Nancy J.

404

Published by The University of Vermont College of Medicine Office of Primary Care Fall 2014 A Newsletter Dedicated to T hose Who Deliver & Teach P rimary Care  

E-print Network

Published by The University of Vermont College of Medicine Office of Primary Care Fall 2014 activities to observe October as Health Care Career Awareness Month, as designated in Vermont statute (Act; and presented health career lessons in several Vermont schools. While every month is `health care career

Hayden, Nancy J.

405

NEW YORK STATE EQUINE MEDICAL DIRECTOR The New York State Gaming Commission and the Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine are  

E-print Network

NEW YORK STATE EQUINE MEDICAL DIRECTOR The New York State Gaming Commission and the Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine are seeking applications for the New York State Equine Medical Director. The new position will be established cooperatively between Cornell and the State Gaming

Rodriguez, Carlos

406

Collaborative Care for Older Adults with low back pain by family medicine physicians and doctors of chiropractic (COCOA): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial  

PubMed Central

Background Low back pain is a prevalent and debilitating condition that affects the health and quality of life of older adults. Older people often consult primary care physicians about back pain, with many also receiving concurrent care from complementary and alternative medicine providers, most commonly doctors of chiropractic. However, a collaborative model of treatment coordination between these two provider groups has yet to be tested. The primary aim of the Collaborative Care for Older Adults Clinical Trial is to develop and evaluate the clinical effectiveness and feasibility of a patient-centered, collaborative care model with family medicine physicians and doctors of chiropractic for the treatment of low back pain in older adults. Methods/design This pragmatic, pilot randomized controlled trial will enroll 120 participants, age 65 years or older with subacute or chronic low back pain lasting at least one month, from a community-based sample in the Quad-Cities, Iowa/Illinois, USA. Eligible participants are allocated in a 1:1:1 ratio to receive 12 weeks of medical care, concurrent medical and chiropractic care, or collaborative medical and chiropractic care. Primary outcomes are self-rated back pain and disability. Secondary outcomes include general and functional health status, symptom bothersomeness, expectations for treatment effectiveness and improvement, fear avoidance behaviors, depression, anxiety, satisfaction, medication use and health care utilization. Treatment safety and adverse events also are monitored. Participant-rated outcome measures are collected via self-reported questionnaires and computer-assisted telephone interviews at baseline, and at 4, 8, 12, 24, 36 and 52 weeks post-randomization. Provider-rated expectations for treatment effectiveness and participant improvement also are evaluated. Process outcomes are assessed through qualitative interviews with study participants and research clinicians, chart audits of progress notes and content analysis of clinical trial notes. Discussion This pragmatic, pilot randomized controlled trial uses a mixed method approach to evaluate the clinical effectiveness, feasibility, and participant and provider perceptions of collaborative care between medical doctors and doctors of chiropractic in the treatment of older adults with low back pain. Trial registration This trial registered in ClinicalTrials.gov on 04 March 2011 with the ID number of NCT01312233. PMID:23324133

2013-01-01

407

Role of Research Universities in Health and Medicine. Go8 Backgrounder 20  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Universities have much to contribute to the improvement of health delivery, research, and teaching/learning. In progressing health reform, the Government should be mindful of the need to: (1) strengthen high quality medical research; (2) promote translation of research to teaching, population health and health services; and (3) address Health…

Group of Eight (NJ1), 2010

2010-01-01

408

Louisiana State University Medical Center School of Medicine in New Orleans Neuroscience Center of Excellence  

E-print Network

University, Sweden Medical Education Building, Seminar Room 10, 4:00 p.m. Neural Transplantation in Parkinson in Brain Development, Plasticity, and Disease November 24-25, 1997 Satellite Symposium for the Society and Other Diffusible Signals in Brain Development, Plasticity, and Disease," is being organized by Drs. R

409

Research, Education and Outreach in the Division of Agriculture, Forestry and Veterinary Medicine Mississippi State University  

E-print Network

· · · Mississippi State University Volume 8, Number 3 SUMMER 2012 Boreal toad numbers have dwindled to dangerous levels in recent years. . . Page 8 #12;MISSISSIPPI LANDMARKS · · · 2 Table of Contents On the Cover Boreal toad numbers have dwindled to dangerous levels in recent years, and Mississippi State Uni- versity

Ray, David

410

Research, Education and Outreach in the Division of Agriculture, Forestry and Veterinary Medicine Mississippi State University  

E-print Network

· · · Mississippi State University Volume 8, Number 4 FALL 2012 The woods were abuzz with the sound of equipment in October. . . Page 8 #12;MISSISSIPPI LANDMARKS · · · 2 Table of Contents On the Cover The 2012 edition the Gulf Coast during storms. 14 Magical Wood Mississippi State event teaches kids about the science behind

Ray, David

411

Research, Education and Outreach in the Division of Agriculture, Forestry and Veterinary Medicine Mississippi State University  

E-print Network

I I Mississippi State University Volume 2, Number 1 WINTER 2006 #12;On the Cover Out Spoke Improved food production is the mission of a Mississippi State partnership in Bolivia. 16 Focus Teaching personnel have been recognized for accomplishments. 29 Editorial Mississippi's natural areas are important

Ray, David

412

Research, Education and Outreach in the Division of Agriculture, Forestry and Veterinary Medicine Mississippi State University  

E-print Network

n n Mississippi State University Volume 1, Number 3 SUMMER 2005 #12;On the Cover Crosby Arboretum invasion MSU scientists seek ways to control Formosan termites. 8 Crosby Arboretum South Mississippi site into Mississippi. 24 Fish research Research provides tools for the fight against fish production problems. 26

Ray, David

413

Research, Education and Outreach in the Division of Agriculture, Forestry and Veterinary Medicine Mississippi State University  

E-print Network

n n Mississippi State University Volume 7, Number 2 SPRING 2011 Students in an MSU School of Human Sciences class use creativity to make clothing from everyday objects. . . Page 8 #12;MISSISSIPPI 2 Tableof clothing and accessories from everyday objects. 10 Grasshopper Find A Mississippi Agricultural and Forestry

Ray, David

414

Research, Education and Outreach in the Division of Agriculture, Forestry and Veterinary Medicine Mississippi State University  

E-print Network

Mississippi State University Volume 3, Number 3 SUMMER 2007 Fishing Mississippi's Ignored Streams...page 6 #12;MISSISSIPPI 2 TableofContents 2020 2222 LANDMARKS 88 1515 44 On the Cover Mississippi's shallow streams sister Alison prepare for the dressage class at the Mississippi 4-H State Horse Show in July. (Photo

Ray, David

415

Research, Education and Outreach in the Division of Agriculture, Forestry and Veterinary Medicine Mississippi State University  

E-print Network

n n Mississippi State University Volume 5, Number 1 WINTER 2009 Tess is a lucky Labrador...Page 8 #12;MISSISSIPPI 2 TableofContents LANDMARKS 8 On the Cover Tess, a black Labrador retriever, is doing for a near-fatal wound. The story is on page 8. (Photo by Marco Nicovich) Back Cover Mississippi's Master

Ray, David

416

Research, Education and Outreach in the Division of Agriculture, Forestry and Veterinary Medicine Mississippi State University  

E-print Network

n n Mississippi State University Volume 7, Number 4 FALL 2011 Mississippians show interest in community-supported agriculture programs . . . Page 4 #12;MISSISSIPPI 2 TableofContents LANDMARKS 12 14 4 24 researchers gather valuable information to help estimate black bear populations in Mississippi. 14 Medical

Ray, David

417

Research, Education, and Outreach in the Division of Agriculture, Forestry, and Veterinary Medicine Mississippi State University  

E-print Network

· · · Mississippi State University Volume 9, Number 3 FALL 2013 MSU Alumnus Enjoys His Dairy Career . . . Page 16 #12;MISSISSIPPI LANDMARKS Table of Contents On the Cover A charm of hummingbirds hovers around a feeder in a Mississippi garden. Unique to the Americas, these miniature marvels winter in Central

Ray, David

418

Research, Education, and Outreach in the Division of Agriculture, Forestry, and Veterinary Medicine Mississippi State University  

E-print Network

· · · Mississippi State University Volume 10, Number 1 MAY 2014 Mississippi Agriculture Sets Records in 2013...Page 10 #12;MISSISSIPPI LANDMARKS Table of Contents On the Cover The value of Mississippi's 2013 overall Sector Success 2013 was a banner year for Mississippi agriculture. 12 When to Spray New information

Ray, David

419

Research, Education and Outreach in the Division of Agriculture, Forestry and Veterinary Medicine Mississippi State University  

E-print Network

Mississippi State University Volume 4, Number 2 SPRING 2008 New South Mississippi Blueberries...Page 8 #12;MISSISSIPPI 2 TableofContents 2222 2424 LANDMARKS 88 1212 44 On the Cover A wind machine to protect against is taking root in south Mississippi. 12 Homeward Bound Adoption program helps send Mississippi pups to new

Ray, David

420

UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT PRIMARY CARE INTERNAL MEDICINE RESIDENCY PROGRAM POSITIONS OBTAINED BY GRADUATES  

E-print Network

Caballes 2010 Hepatology North Carolina Carolinas Medical Center Sharon Dowell 2010 Rheumatology Maryland Pulmonary/Critical Care Connecticut UConn Health Center Carlos Gadea 2010 Rheumatology Kentucky University of Kentucky Ria Lim 2010 Endocrinology Connecticut UConn Health Center Viktorija Overiene 2010 Rheumatology

Oliver, Douglas L.

421

Skills Inventory/Biography University of Rochester School of Medicine & Dentistry  

E-print Network

The skills of physical examination of the patient, curriculum design, and adult learning. Geriatrics women; was PI on NHLBI/NIH grant for cultural competence curriculum; was PI on Reynolds Foundation geriatrics, Massachusetts Email: serena_h_chao@hotmail.com Assistant Program Director Boston University Geriatrics Medical

Goldman, Steven A.

422

Research, Education, and Outreach in the Division of Agriculture, Forestry, and Veterinary Medicine Mississippi State University  

E-print Network

. . . Page 14 #12;MISSISSIPPI LANDMARKS Table of Contents On the Cover This colorful South American butterfly · · · Mississippi State University Volume 9, Number 1 WINTER 2013 Butterfly Donation Enhances MSU Collection. 11 South American Assets A beautiful collection of tropical butterflies now resides at MSU. 12

Ray, David

423

Development and Experimental Study of Education Through the Synergetic Training for the Engineering Enhanced Medicine “ESTEEM” in Tohoku University  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We developed new bio-medical engineering curriculum for industrial engineers, and we confirmed that the engineer's needs and the educative effects by holding a trail program. This study in Tohoku University was supported by the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI) . We named the curriculum as “ESTEEM” which is acronym of project title “Education through the Synergetic Training for the Engineering Enhanced Medicine” . In Tohoku University, the “REDEEM” curriculum which is an entry level course of bio-medical engineering for engineers has been already held. The positioning of “ESTEEM” program is an advanced course to enhance knowledge and experience in clinical point of view. The program is consisted of the problem based learning (PBL) style lectures, practical training, and observation learning in hospital. It is a unique opportunity to have instruction by doctors, from diagnosis to surgical operation, from traditional technique to front-line medical equipment. In this paper, we report and discuss on the progress of the new bio-medical engineering curriculum.

Yamano, Masahiro; Matsuki, Noriaki; Numayama, Keiko; Takeda, Motohiro; Hayasaka, Tomoaki; Ishikawa, Takuji; Yamaguchi, Takami

424

Wichita State University Fairmount College of Liberal Arts and Sciences 2014 -2015 Preparation for a Profession in Veterinary Medicine  

E-print Network

for a Profession in Veterinary Medicine A bachelor's degree is preferred for admissions into most veterinary, and a veterinarian. Core Courses for Veterinary Medicine Programs: a minimum requirement § Engl 101 English) is required for admission to Colleges of Veterinary Medicine. The minimum grade point average considered

425

Wichita State University Fairmount College of Liberal Arts and Sciences 2013 -2014 Preparation for a Profession in Veterinary Medicine  

E-print Network

for a Profession in Veterinary Medicine A bachelor's degree is preferred for admissions into most veterinary, and a veterinarian. Core Courses for Veterinary Medicine Programs: a minimum requirement § Engl 101 English) is required for admission to Colleges of Veterinary Medicine. The minimum grade point average considered

426

[Osteopathic medicine].  

PubMed

Osteopathy is originated in the 19th century in the United States. Andrew Taylor Still seek for an alternative medical system to the orthodox medicine largely empirical and advocating bloodletting, calomel, etc., all of which was resumed with terms like" heroic medicine". Osteopathy as other alternative medical practices (homeopathy, eclecticism, etc.) based on rational and metaphysical postulates as vitalism or the fact that man is a divinely ordained machine. Still's approach was essentially manual and based on manipulation of the joints. Today osteopaths challenge these dogmas and seek to agree their practice within scientific biomedical standards. Even if strong randomized clinical trials are lacking, several surveys report how osteopathy gained public notoriety. Several recent meta-analyses pinpoint the benefit of the spinal manipulative treatment and even if there is no evidence that such an approach is superior to other advocated therapies there is no evidence that these therapies are more effective than the first one. The major indications for such a treatment are cervical and low back pain, either chronic or acute. The quality of the relationship between the practitioner and patient together with the placebo effect are important components of a treatment effect. Osteopathic education is an important aspect and only higher education institutions, i.e. universities can achieve and maintain adequate standards. Materia medica and surgery represent the two major therapeutic mainstreams in medicine; osteopathy considered as manual medicine could be the third one. PMID:22034767

Klein, P; Lepers, Y; Salem, W

2011-09-01

427

[The 2010 curriculum of the faculty of medicine at the National University of Mexico].  

PubMed

The 2010 undergraduate medical degree curriculum at the faculty of medicine of the Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (UNAM) constitutes an important curricular reform of medical education in our country. It is the result of an institutional reflective process and academic dialog, which culminated in its approval by UNAM’s Academic Council for the Biology, Chemistry, and Health Sciences areas on February 2nd, 2010. Some distinguishing characteristics of the new academic curriculum are: organization by courses with a focus on outcome competencies; three curricular axes that link three knowledge areas; four educational phases with achievement profiles; new courses (biomedical informatics, basic-clinical and clinical-basic integration, among others); and core curriculum. The aforementioned curriculum was decided within a framework of effective teaching strategies, competency oriented learning assessment methods, restructuring of the training of teaching staff, and establishment of a curriculum committee follow-up and evaluation of the program. Curricular change in medical education is a complex process through which the institution can achieve its mission and vision. This change process faces challenges and opportunities, and requires strategic planning with long-term foresight to guarantee a successful dynamic transition for students, teachers, and for the institution itself. PMID:21527971

Sánchez-Mendiola, Melchor; Durante-Montiel, Irene; Morales-López, Sara; Lozano-Sánchez, Rogelio; Martínez-González, Adrián; Graue Wiechers, Enrique

2011-01-01

428

The national portfolio of learning for postgraduate family medicine training in South Africa: experiences of registrars and supervisors in clinical practice  

PubMed Central

Background In South Africa the submission of a portfolio of learning has become a national requirement for assessment of family medicine training. A national portfolio has been developed, validated and implemented. The aim of this study was to explore registrars’ and supervisors’ experience regarding the portfolio’s educational impact, acceptability, and perceived usefulness for assessment of competence. Methods Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 17 purposively selected registrars and supervisors from all eight South African training programmes. Results The portfolio primarily had an educational impact through making explicit the expectations of registrars and supervisors in the workplace. This impact was tempered by a lack of engagement in the process by registrars and supervisors who also lacked essential skills in reflection, feedback and assessment. The acceptability of the portfolio was limited by service delivery demands, incongruence between the clinical context and educational requirements, design of the logbook and easy availability of the associated tools. The use of the portfolio for formative assessment was strongly supported and appreciated, but was not always happening and in some cases registrars had even organised peer assessment. Respondents were unclear as to how the portfolio would be used for summative assessment. Conclusions The learning portfolio had a significant educational impact in shaping work-place based supervision and training and providing formative assessment. Its acceptability and usefulness as a learning tool should increase over time as supervisors and registrars become more competent in its use. There is a need to clarify how it will be used in summative assessment. PMID:24207009

2013-01-01

429

"PULS." - a blog-based online-magazine for students of medicine of the Goethe University Frankfurt.  

PubMed

In the context of nationwide protests 2009 also students of the faculty of medicine/dentistry at Goethe-University in Frankfurt demanded more transparency and communication. To satisfy these demands, a web 2.0-tool offered an innovative solution: A blog-based online-magazine for students and other faculty-members. The online-magazine "PULS." is realized with the share-ware blog-software (wordpress version 3.1.3) and is conceived and written by an online-journalist. "PULS." is available from https://newsmagazin.puls.med.uni-frankfurt.de/wp/. The articles are generated from own investigations and from ideas of different groups of the faculty- deanship, students and lecturers. A user-analysis is conducted with the open-source software Piwik and considers the data security. Additionally, every year an anonymous online-user-survey (Survey Monkey) is conducted. "PULS." is continuously online since 14.02.2010 and has published 806 articles (state: 27.11.2012) and has about 2400 readers monthly. The content focuses on the needs of Frankfurt medical students. The close cooperation with different groups of the faculty - deanship, students and lecturers - furthermore guarantees themes relevant to the academic faculty. "PULS." flanks complex projects and decisions with background-information and communicates them understandable. The user-evaluation shows a growing number of readers and a high acceptance for the online-magazine, its themes and its style. The web 2.0-tool "Blog" and the web-specific language comply with media habits of the main target group, the students of the faculty medicine/dentistry. Thus, "PULS." has proven as a suitable and strategic instrument. It pushes towards a higher transparency, more communication and a stronger identification of the students with their faculty. PMID:23467571

Wurche, Bettina; Klauer, Gertrud; Nürnberger, Frank

2013-01-01

430

"PULS." – a Blog-based Online-Magazine for Students of Medicine of the Goethe University Frankfurt  

PubMed Central

In the context of nationwide protests 2009 also students of the faculty of medicine/dentistry at Goethe-University in Frankfurt demanded more transparency and communication. To satisfy these demands, a web 2.0-tool offered an innovative solution: A blog-based online-magazine for students and other faculty-members. The online-magazine „PULS.“ is realized with the share-ware blog-software (wordpress version 3.1.3) and is conceived and written by an online-journalist. „PULS.“ is available from https://newsmagazin.puls.med.uni-frankfurt.de/wp/. The articles are generated from own investigations and from ideas of different groups of the faculty– deanship, students and lecturers. A user-analysis is conducted with the open-source software Piwik and considers the data security. Additionally, every year an anonymous online-user-survey (Survey Monkey) is conducted. “PULS.” is continuously online since 14.02.2010 and has published 806 articles (state: 27.11.2012) and has about 2400 readers monthly. The content focuses on the needs of Frankfurt medical students. The close cooperation with different groups of the faculty - deanship, students and lecturers - furthermore guarantees themes relevant to the academic faculty. “PULS.” flanks complex projects and decisions with background-information and communicates them understandable. The user-evaluation shows a growing number of readers and a high acceptance for the online-magazine, its themes and its style. The web 2.0-tool “Blog” and the web-specific language comply with media habits of the main target group, the students of the faculty medicine/dentistry. Thus, “PULS.” has proven as a suitable and strategic instrument. It pushes towards a higher transparency, more communication and a stronger identification of the students with their faculty. PMID:23467571

Wurche, Bettina; Klauer, Gertrud; Nürnberger, Frank

2013-01-01

431

Suggestions for a Web based universal exchange and inference language for medicine.  

PubMed

Mining biomedical and pharmaceutical data generates huge numbers of interacting probabilistic statements for inference, which can be supported by mining Web text sources. This latter can also be probabilistic, in a sense described in this report. However, the diversity of tools for probabilistic inference is troublesome, suggesting a need for a unifying best practice. Physicists often claim that quantum mechanics is the universal best practice for probabilistic reasoning. We discuss how the Dirac notation and algebra suggest the form and algebraic and semantic meaning of XML-like Web tags for a clinical and biomedical universal exchange language formulated to make sense directly to the eye of the physician and biomedical researcher. PMID:24211018

Robson, Barry; Caruso, Thomas P; Balis, Ulysses G J

2013-12-01

432

Results of a healthcare worker (HCW) survey on environmental awareness as an instrument for the preparation of an environmental report for the University Medicine Greifswald  

PubMed Central

Background: Environmental reporting is increasingly important for medical facilities. Currently, hospitals can determine the content of an environmental report as they see fit. Objective: To examine the utility and scope of an employee survey as an instrument for the preparation of an environmental report at the University Hospital Greifswald. Method: For this purpose a questionnaire was developed with a focus on environmental behaviour and the significance attached to the protection of the environment. Results: The employees of the University Medicine Greifswald attach an unexpectedly high significance to the protection of the environment. Based on this finding, this potential should be used to promote the optimal implementation of ecological-economic behaviour within the University Medicine. Conclusion: An employee survey is a useful instrument in the preparation of an environmental report. PMID:22242082

Heiden, Jens-Uwe; Kramer, Axel; Bornewasser, Manfred; Lemanski, Sandra; Below, Harald

2011-01-01

433

Does the absence of a supportive family environment influence the outcome of a universal intervention for the prevention of depression?  

PubMed

To date, universal, school-based interventions have produced limited success in the long-term prevention of depression in young people. This paper examines whether family relationship support moderates the outcomes of a universal, school-based preventive intervention for depression in adolescents. It reports a secondary analysis of data from the beyondblue schools research initiative. Twenty-five matched pairs of secondary schools were randomly assigned to an intervention or control condition (N = 5633 Grade 8 students). The multi-component, school-based intervention was implemented over a 3-year period, with 2 years of follow-up in Grades 11 and 12. For those available at follow-up, small but significantly greater reductions in depressive and anxiety symptoms and improvements in emotional wellbeing were found over time for the intervention group compared to the control among those who experienced low family relationship support in Grade 8. For those who did not experience low family relationship support in Grade 8, no significant effects of the invention were found over the control condition. This pattern of results was also found for the intent-to-treat sample for measures of depression and anxiety. Previous research may have overlooked important moderating variables that influence the outcome of universal approaches to the prevention of depression. The findings raise issues of the relative costs and benefits of universal versus targeted approaches to the prevention of depression. PMID:24828082

Spence, Susan H; Sawyer, Michael G; Sheffield, Jeanie; Patton, George; Bond, Lyndal; Graetz, Brian; Kay, Debra

2014-05-01

434

Does the Absence of a Supportive Family Environment Influence the Outcome of a Universal Intervention for the Prevention of Depression?  

PubMed Central

To date, universal, school-based interventions have produced limited success in the long-term prevention of depression in young people. This paper examines whether family relationship support moderates the outcomes of a universal, school-based preventive intervention for depression in adolescents. It reports a secondary analysis of data from the beyondblue schools research initiative. Twenty-five matched pairs of secondary schools were randomly assigned to an intervention or control condition (N = 5633 Grade 8 students). The multi-component, school-based intervention was implemented over a 3-year period, with 2 years of follow-up in Grades 11 and 12. For those available at follow-up, small but significantly greater reductions in depressive and anxiety symptoms and improvements in emotional wellbeing were found over time for the intervention group compared to the control among those who experienced low family relationship support in Grade 8. For those who did not experience low family relationship support in Grade 8, no significant effects of the invention were found over the control condition. This pattern of results was also found for the intent-to-treat sample for measures of depression and anxiety. Previous research may have overlooked important moderating variables that influence the outcome of universal approaches to the prevention of depression. The findings raise issues of the relative costs and benefits of universal versus targeted approaches to the prevention of depression. PMID:24828082

Spence, Susan H.; Sawyer, Michael G.; Sheffield, Jeanie; Patton, George; Bond, Lyndal; Graetz, Brian; Kay, Debra

2014-01-01

435

Family Farms Report 2010 Max Irsik DVM, MAB  

E-print Network

Family Farms Report 2010 Max Irsik DVM, MAB Beef Cattle Extension Veterinarian University of Florida College of Veterinary Medicine irsikm@ufl.edu 352-294-4349 The number of farms within the U.S. peaked at 6.8 million in 1935 and has fallen sharply until the 1970s. The falling farm numbers during

Watson, Craig A.

436

Symposium Encourages Collaborative Efforts in Regenerative Medicine NC State University and The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill held its first joint  

E-print Network

Medicine, Intestinal and Cardiovascular Stem Cells in Tissue Repair and Regenerative Medicine bringing together faculty, graduate students and staff who share research interests in stem cells representing research on various aspects of regenerative medicine or stem cells. The final session was a round

Langerhans, Brian

437

PAIN MEDICINE Volume 6 Number 4 2005  

E-print Network

PAIN MEDICINE Volume 6 · Number 4 · 2005 © American Academy of Pain Medicine 1526-2375/05/$15.00/327 327­328 Blackwell Science, LtdOxford, UKPMEPain Medicine1526-2375American Academy of Pain Medicine H. Guarino, MD, Washington University School of Medicine, Department of Anesthesi- ology, Pain

Steinbach, Joe Henry

438

[Gunshot wounds in the material of Forensic Medicine Institute, Collegium Medicum, Nicolaus Copernicus University in Bydgoszcz].  

PubMed

The Medical Forensic Institute, Collegium Medicum, Nicolaus Copernicus University in Bydgoszcz annually conducts approximately 600 autopsies. Gunshot wounds constitute only a small percentage of that number. The authors of this work have conducted an analysis of autopsy protocols prepared at the Institute in the years 1995-2005. During this period, 48 people were found dead as a result of gunshot wounds. This number constitutes 0.66% of all autopsies conducted within that time-frame. The objective of this study was an attempt at assessing the character of this phenomenon with due consideration given to the following parameters: age, sex, sobriety, circumstances and locality of the event, as well as season of the year, at comparing the results with data found in the literature on the subject. PMID:17907626

Bloch-Bogus?awska, Elzbieta; Engelgardt, Piotr; Paradowska, Agnieszka

2007-01-01

439

The Arabian Gulf University College of Medicine and Medical Sciences: a successful model of a multinational medical school.  

PubMed

In the late 1970s, leaders of the Arabian [corrected] Gulf countries proposed a novel idea of a joint educational and cultural venture: establishing a new regional university based in the Kingdom of Bahrain that would be managed as a multinational consortium of Gulf countries including Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, and Bahrain. It was intended to promote higher education and research in the Gulf region; to serve the development needs of the region; to reflect the unique economic, social, and cultural attributes of the Gulf communities and their environments; and to respond to the health care needs of the member countries. Since its inception in 1982, the College of Medicine and Medical Sciences (CMMS) at Arabian Gulf University (AGU) has adopted the educational philosophy of problem-based learning (PBL) and self-directed, student-centered education. The curriculum is integrated, with early introduction of education to foster clinical skills and professional competencies. The strategic alliance with the health care systems in Bahrain and other Gulf regions has created a successful model of efficient and effective initialization of health care resources in the community. The experience that has accumulated at the AGU-CMMS from introducing innovative medical education has allowed it to take a leadership position in medical education in the Gulf region. The original goals of this unique experiment have been realized along with unanticipated outcomes of spearheading changes in medical education in the Gulf region. Old and new medical schools have adopted several characteristics of the AGU educational program. Several elements contributed to its success: a clear vision of providing quality medical education and realizing and sustaining this vision by a supportive leadership at the university and college levels; an alliance with the regional health care systems; a dedicated faculty who have been able to work as a team while continually developing themselves; proper student selection and the creation of a culture of student/faculty partnerships in education and in building an international reputation and credibility by cooperating with reputable international universities and organizations. PMID:17122475

Hamdy, Hossam; Anderson, M Brownell

2006-12-01

440

Recommendations from recent graduates in medicine, nursing and pharmacy on improving interprofessional education in university programs: a qualitative study  

PubMed Central

Background Interprofessional education (IPE) has been recognized as an innovative approach for the development of a collaborative, practice-ready health workforce, but is not used consistently in undergraduate health professional programs. We sought to explore the reflections of graduates on the IPE experiences they had during their undergraduate education and training. It was anticipated that having completed their pre-vocational education and spent up to two years working in a clinical environment, recent graduates would be well-placed to provide insights into the value of the IPE opportunities they had, and to suggest approaches for improving these opportunities in undergraduate programs. Methods This study was part of a larger research project (Interprofessional Education for the Quality use of Medicines; IPE for QuM) which used focus groups as part of an interpretive research design to inform other aspects of the research. Here, we report on focus groups with recent graduates recruited from area health services across Australia. Results Sixty-eight recent graduates working in New South Wales, Western Australia, and Tasmania participated in 12 focus group sessions. In this paper, we report on new graduates’ reflections on their experiences of IPE as part of their university degree, as well as their recommendations to improve interprofessional education before graduation. The new graduates were unanimous in valuing IPE from their current perspective of being in the health workforce. Most IPE experiences recalled were regarded as positive, but those valued most highly were experiences that involved genuine engagement and opportunities to interact with students in other professions working on a relevant problem. Clinical placement was a missed opportunity with few structured meaningful interprofessional learning experiences. Surprisingly there was little social contact between professions in universities even when programs were co-located, thus reinforcing professional silos. Conclusions The graduates provided many insightful reflections about the value of university-based IPE and their preparedness for clinical practice. Although universally acclaimed as a "good idea" there is much room for improvement. We put forward a set of suggestions to improve IPE and guide the design of future IPE efforts. PMID:24636554

2014-01-01

441

Medical training in community medicine: a comprehensive, academic, service-based curriculum.  

PubMed

The University of Pennsylvania's Family Practice Residency includes a significant community medicine component in order to accomplish the goals of addressing the health-related needs of the university's neighbors; exposing residents to the knowledge, skills and attitudes necessary to address the health needs of a community; and encouraging health careers with a community focus. It is my belief that these goals further the agenda of the National Institute of Medicine and Healthy People 2000 and 2010. Longitudinal and block community medicine experiences were established to accomplish these goals. This article describes and discusses three measurable outcomes of this curriculum: (1) individual resident projects, (2) resident class projects and (3) significant career foci in community medicine among resident graduates. I believe that our community medicine program exemplifies medical training in a community setting and furthers the national health agenda. PMID:14620964

Fisher, Judith A

2003-12-01

442

Muthi to medicine  

Microsoft Academic Search

The limited commercial opportunity for bioprospecting for isolated pure natural compounds or their derivatives from plants for novel pharmaceuticals is discussed. A broad overview of the key research inputs involved in the commercialisation of indigenous medicinal plants as botanical medicines is given to assist young researchers in contextualising research from an industry perspective, and to encourage university–industry collaboration. Compliance with

N. Gericke

443

WHO Collaborating Centre for Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome for the Eastern Mediterranean Regional Office, Faculty of Medicine, Kuwait University, Kuwait.  

PubMed

In the early 1980s, the World Health Organization (WHO) designated the Virology Unit of the Faculty of Medicine, Health Sciences Centre, Kuwait University, Kuwait, a collaborating centre for AIDS for the Eastern Mediterranean Regional Office (EMRO), recognizing it to be in compliance with WHO guidelines. In this centre, research integral to the efforts of WHO to combat AIDS is conducted. In addition to annual workshops and symposia, the centre is constantly updating and renewing its facilities and capabilities in keeping with current and latest advances in virology. As an example of the activities of the centre, the HIV-1 RNA viral load in plasma samples of HIV-1 patients is determined by real-time PCR using the AmpliPrep TaqMan HIV-1 test v2.0. HIV-1 drug resistance is determined by sequencing the reverse transcriptase and protease regions on the HIV-1 pol gene, using the TRUGENE HIV-1 Genotyping Assay on the OpenGene® DNA Sequencing System. HIV-1 subtypes are determined by sequencing the reverse transcriptase and protease regions on the HIV-1 pol gene using the genotyping assays described above. A fundamental program of Kuwait's WHO AIDS collaboration centre is the national project on the surveillance of drug resistance in human deficiency virus in Kuwait, which illustrates how the centre and its activities in Kuwait can serve the EMRO region of WHO. PMID:24434786

Altawalah, Haya; Al-Nakib, Widad

2014-01-01

444

Evaluating the effectiveness of a Senior Mentor Program: the University of Missouri-Columbia School of Medicine.  

PubMed

At the University of Missouri-Columbia School of Medicine, we developed a voluntary senior-mentor program, the Senior Teacher Educator Partnership (STEP), for first- and second-year medical students. Using qualitative research methods, we examined the impact of STEP on medical students' attitudes and then assessed the congruence of what is learned through STEP with the knowledge, skills, and attitudes needed to provide care to the elderly patient. STEP was found to be a successful strategy for teaching themes of recognizing the elderly within an ecological context, enhancing sympathy and empathy, emphasizing respect for elderly persons, and gaining an appreciation that aging is an individualized process. New areas identified for student learning experiences included understanding the complexity of the health care system and its impact on elderly patients, understanding the payment system, and developing skills in assessment and care coordination. A model is described for continuous enhancement of educational programs to be used to improve educational experience in geriatrics. PMID:17023382

Hoffman, Kimberly; Gray, Peggy; Hosokawa, Michael C; Zweig, Steven C

2006-01-01

445

Center for Nuclear Medicine Research in Alzheimer`s Disease Health Sciences Center, West Virginia University. Environmental Assessment  

SciTech Connect

The Environmental Assessment (EA) of the Center for Nuclear Medicine Research in Alzheimer`s Disease (CNMR) at the Health Sciences Center, at West Virginia University in Morgantown, West Virginia for the construction and operation was prepared by DOE. The EA documents analysis of the environmental and socioeconomic impacts that might occur as a result of these actions, and characterizes potential impacts on the environment. In the EA, DOE presents its evaluation of potential impacts of construction and operation of the CNMR on health and safety of both workers and the public, as well as on the external environment. Construction impacts include the effects of erosion, waste disposal, air emissions, noise, and construction traffic and parking. Operational impacts include the effects of waste generation (domestic, sanitary, hazardous, medical/biological, radioactive and mixed wastes), radiation exposures, air emissions (radioactive, criteria, and air toxics), noise, and new workers. No sensitive resources (wetlands, special sources of groundwater, protected species) exist in the area of project effect.

Not Available

1994-04-01

446

CityLab, a biotechnology learning laboratory for high school teachers and students at the Boston University School of Medicine  

SciTech Connect

CityLab is a fully equipped biotechnology learning laboratory for high school students and teachers funded by the National Institutes of Health and located at the Boston University School of Medicine. The aim of CityLab is to provide access to state-of-the-art laboratory facilities and curriculum in biotechnology otherwise unavailable to most school systems. Teachers bring their classes to CityLab where they are challenged to solve problems by applying the same techniques and concepts of genetics and molecular biology. Each topic is presented in a mystery format. Some popular investigations include The Mystery of the Crooked Cell (sickle cell anemia), The Case of the Crown Jewels (DNA restrictions analysis), and Entangled in the Web (transformation). In addition to regular class visits, CityLab offers two after school enrichment activities, the Biotechnology Club and BioCity. The club provides eighty young people with the opportunity to work more extensively in the laboratory investigating topics such as genetic engineering, gene cloning, and AIDS. BioCity is a mock biotechnology company run by and for students. Since 1992, more than 2,000 high school students and 300 teachers have used CityLab.

Franblau, C.; Phillips, C.; Zook, D. [and others

1994-12-31

447

LESS KNOWN USES OF WEEDS AS MEDICINAL PLANTS  

PubMed Central

In this paper the author presents medicinal or otherwise useful weed species with details of family, vernacular name and its medicinal utility. Information on other general economic importance of medicinal weeds is also described here. PMID:22557414

Sahu, T. R.

1984-01-01

448

Family Background and Students' Achievement on a University Entrance Exam in Brazil  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper examines the determinants of students' performance on the entrance test at Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Brazil. Particular attention is paid to the importance of family background variables, such as parents' education and family income, on students' performance and how they relate to the probability of attending public schools…

Guimaraes, Juliana; Sampaio, Breno

2013-01-01

449

A descriptive analysis of personality and gender at the Louisiana State University School of Veterinary Medicine.  

PubMed

The goals of this study were to explore the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator profile and gender differences of Louisiana State University veterinary students. A 12-year composite sample (N = 935) revealed that the personality profile was different from the published US population norm, but similar to the bimodal ESTJ-ISTJ profile found in Louisiana medical students. Significant gender differences were found among six of the 16 types. A 12-year trend analysis revealed a significant shift away from the prototypical ESTJ-ISTJ profile, culminating in a discernable heterogeneous profile for both males and females in the last four years. Composite scores for the 2004-2007 cohort (N = 331) revealed that the predominant types for women were ENFP, ESFJ, ESTJ, ISFJ, and ISTJ. For men, the predominant types were ESTJ, ESTP, INTP, and ISTJ. Post hoc tests confirmed significant gender differences for ESTP, INTP, ISTP, and ESFJ types. The evidence of significant gender differences and confirmation that personality profiles have begun to vary widely across the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator spectrum in the last four years have implications at the practical and theoretical levels. This could have profound effects on pedagogical considerations for faculty involved in veterinary medical education. PMID:19861716

Johnson, Stephanie W; Gill, Marjorie S; Grenier, Charles; Taboada, Joseph

2009-01-01

450

the Art of DentistryA publicAtion of the school of dentAl medicine cAse Western reserve university spring 2010 y volume 10 y issue 1  

E-print Network

School of Dental Medicine had an extraordinarily favorable site visit from the American Dental Association's Commission on Dental Accreditation. this visit can only lead to the most positive response fromthe Art of DentistryA publicAtion of the school of dentAl medicine cAse Western reserve university

Cavusoglu, Cenk

451

University of Michigan Medical School 2010 Residency Match Results  

E-print Network

University of Michigan Medical School 2010 Residency Match Results Name Institution Specialty Michael Ambrose U Michigan Hosps-Ann Arbor Pediatrics Kate Anderson Exempla St Joseph Hosp-CO Family Medicine Ketti Augusztiny U Michigan Hosps-Ann Arbor Family Med/Ypsilanti Kathryn Baker U Michigan Hosps

Shyy, Wei

452

Missions and Medicine at Amherst: Family Ties to Edward Hitchcock Jr., the Missionary Movement, and the American University of Beirut  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Haystack Movement began at Williams College in 1805, occasioning the spread of American missions throughout the world. A half century later, two graduates of nearby Amherst College, Edward Hitchcock Jr. and Daniel Bliss, laid the foundations for college health services in this country and for mission work and education in the Middle East. The…

Dorman, John M.

2011-01-01

453

SPRING/SUMMER 2013 The Magazine for Alumni and Friends of Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University  

E-print Network

EINSTEIN SPRING/SUMMER 2013 The Magazine for Alumni and Friends of Albert Einstein College The magazine for alumni, faculty, students, friends and supporters of Albert Einstein College of Medicine-mail: letters@einstein.yu.edu Website: www.einstein.yu.edu Copyright © 2013 Albert Einstein College of Medicine

Kenny, Paraic

454

77 FR 36550 - Advisory Committee on Training in Primary Care Medicine and Dentistry; Notice of Meeting  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Committee on Training in Primary Care Medicine and Dentistry; Notice of Meeting In...Committee on Training in Primary Care, Medicine and Dentistry (ACTPCMD). Dates and...Presentations will be given by experts in family medicine, internal medicine, and...

2012-06-19

455

Paradata for 'ADAM?Animated Dissection of Anatomy for Medicine software: a multimedia interface for the universal integration of medical knowledge as well as an interactive learning system in human anatomy'  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This record contains paradata for the resource 'ADAM?Animated Dissection of Anatomy for Medicine software: a multimedia interface for the universal integration of medical knowledge as well as an interactive learning system in human anatomy'

456

Vol. 26 No. 8 INFECTION CONTROL AND HOSPITAL EPIDEMIOLOGY 1 Drs. Crnich and Maki are from the Section of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, University of Wisconsin Hospital and Medical School,  

E-print Network

the Section of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, University of Wisconsin Hospital and Medical for Disease Control and Prevention has periodically published evi- dence-based guidelines for the prevention

Crone, Wendy C.

457

Career Influences, Educational Experiences, and Professional Attitudes of Women in Veterinary Medicine.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A college of veterinary medicine in a large state university compared its male and female students on the influences on their career choice, including attitudes of family and school personnel, and students' academic experiences, gender-role expectations and conflicts, attitudes regarding professional dedication and competence, and their need for…

Andberg, Wendy L.; And Others

458

Longitudinal Effects of a Universal Family-Focused Intervention on Growth Patterns of Adolescent Internalizing Symptoms and Polysubstance Use: Gender Comparisons  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study evaluated effects of the "Iowa Strengthening Families Program," a family-focused universal preventive intervention, on growth patterns of adolescent internalizing (anxiety and depressive symptoms) and monthly polysubstance use (alcohol, tobacco, marijuana, inhalants, and other illicit drugs), as well as the association between…

Trudeau, Linda; Spoth, Richard; Randall, G. Kevin; Azevedo, Kari

2007-01-01

459

Nuclear Medicine.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the use of nuclear medicine techniques in diagnosis and therapy. Describes instrumentation in diagnostic nuclear medicine and predicts future trends in nuclear medicine imaging technology. (Author/MM)

Badawi, Ramsey D.

2001-01-01

460

Supporting the academic mission in an era of constrained resources: approaches at the University of Arizona College of Medicine.  

PubMed

The authors describe initiatives at the University of Arizona College of Medicine to markedly expand faculty, build research along programmatic lines, and promote a new, highly integrated medical school curriculum. Accomplishing these goals in this era of declining resources is challenging. The authors describe their approaches and outcomes to date, derived from a solid theoretical framework in the management literature, to (1) support research faculty recruitment, emphasizing return on investment, by using net present value to guide formulation of recruitment packages, (2) stimulate efficiency and growth through incentive plans, by using utility theory to optimize incentive plan design, (3) distribute resources to support programmatic growth, by allocating research space and recruitment dollars to maximize joint hires between units with shared interests, and (4) distribute resources from central administration to encourage medical student teaching, by aligning state dollars to support a new integrated organ-system based-curriculum. Detailed measurement is followed by application of management principles, including mathematical modeling, to make projections based on the data collected. Although each of the initiatives was developed separately, they are linked functionally and financially, and they are predicated on explicitly identifying opportunity costs for all major decisions, to achieve efficiencies while supporting growth. The overall intent is to align institutional goals in education, research, and clinical care with incentives for unit heads and individual faculty to achieve those goals, and to create a clear line of sight between expectations and rewards. Implementation is occurring in a hypothesis-driven fashion, permitting testing and refinement of the strategies. PMID:18728439

Joiner, Keith A; Libecap, Ann; Cress, Anne E; Wormsley, Steve; St Germain, Patricia; Berg, Robert; Malan, Philip

2008-09-01

461

Students' perception of the learning environment at Xavier University School of Medicine, Aruba: a follow-up study.  

PubMed

Xavier University School of Medicine admits students mainly from the United States and Canada to the undergraduate medical program. A previous study conducted in June 2013 used the Dundee Ready Educational Environment Measure to measure the educational environment and impact of different teaching and learning methods in the program. The present study aims to obtain information about students' perceptions of changes in the educational environment, which underwent modifications in teaching and learning, in January 2014. Information was collected about the participants' semester of study, gender, nationality, and age. Students' perceptions of the educational environment were documented by noting their degree of agreement with a set of 50 statements grouped into five categories. Average scores were compared among different groups. The mean total and category scores were compared to those of the 2013 study. Sixty of the sixty-nine students (86.9%) who enrolled in the undergraduate medical program participated in the survey. The majority were male, aged 20-25 years, and of American nationality. The mean±SD total score was 151.32±18.3. The mean scores for students' perception in the survey categories were perception of teaching/learning (38.45), perception of teachers (33.90), academic self-perceptions (22.95), perception of atmosphere (36.32), and social self-perception (19.70). There were no significant differences in these scores among the different groups. All scores except those for academic self-perception were significantly higher in the present study compared to the previous one (P<0.05). The above results will be of particular interest to schools that plan to transition to an integrated curriculum. PMID:24798426

Shankar, P Ravi; Bharti, Rishi; Ramireddy, Ravi; Balasubramanium, Ramanan; Nuguri, Vivek

2014-01-01

462

Students' perception of the learning environment at Xavier University School of Medicine, Aruba: a follow-up study  

PubMed Central

Xavier University School of Medicine admits students mainly from the United States and Canada to the undergraduate medical program. A previous study conducted in June 2013 used the Dundee Ready Educational Environment Measure to measure the educational environment and impact of different teaching and learning methods in the program. The present study aims to obtain information about students' perceptions of changes in the educational environment, which underwent modifications in teaching and learning, in January 2014. Information was collected about the participants' semester of study, gender, nationality, and age. Students' perceptions of the educational environment were documented by noting their degree of agreement with a set of 50 statements grouped into five categories. Average scores were compared among different groups. The mean total and category scores were compared to those of the 2013 study. Sixty of the sixty-nine students (86.9%) who enrolled in the undergraduate medical program participated in the survey. The majority were male, aged 20-25 years, and of American nationality. The mean±SD total score was 151.32±18.3. The mean scores for students' perception in the survey categories were perception of teaching/learning (38.45), perception of teachers (33.90), academic self-perceptions (22.95), perception of atmosphere (36.32), and social self-perception (19.70). There were no significant differences in these scores among the different groups. All scores except those for academic self-perception were significantly higher in the present study compared to the previous one (P<0.05). The above results will be of particular interest to schools that plan to transition to an integrated curriculum. PMID:24798426

2014-01-01

463

Developing educational leaders: the teaching scholars program at the University of California, San Francisco, School of Medicine.  

PubMed

A Teaching Scholars Program (TSP) was established in 1998 in the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), School of Medicine with the mission of building knowledgeable and skilled educational leaders, teachers, and scholars. Conducted through the Office of Medical Education (OME), the TSP is a 10-month program that accepts 12 scholars per year. Financial support for the program, including salary support for co-directors and staff, is provided by the OME. Scholars' departments are required to provide release time for one afternoon per week for 10 months. The TSP provides participants with an intensive weekly seminar series, collaborative learning experiences, mentored projects, and a network of educational colleagues. The weekly seminars use an interactive format to address topics within seven targeted areas: (1) learning theory; (2) teaching methods; (3) curriculum development/evaluation; (4) assessment of learning; (5) leadership and organizational change; (6) career development; and (7) educational research. Since its inception, 76 scholars have graduated from or are currently enrolled in the TSP. The majority are clinicians at assistant professor rank, although four basic scientists, two medical students, and three OME staff members have also participated in the program. The TSP is highly valued by participants, and preliminary evaluation data suggest that the program has resulted in an increase in educational research, scholarly activities, and the number of skilled and knowledgeable faculty with major leadership roles in medical education at UCSF. Challenges facing the TSP include scholar release time, mentoring time, and follow-up contact to encourage TSP graduates' postgraduation productivity, continuing educational development, and support. PMID:17065856

Muller, Jessica H; Irby, David M

2006-11-01

464

Preventive and Community Medicine in Primary Care. Teaching of Preventive Medicine Vol. 5.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This monograph is the result of a conference on the role of preventive and community medicine in primary medical care and education. The following six papers were presented at the conference: (1) Roles of Departments of Preventive Medicine; (2) Competency-Based Objectives in Preventive Medicine for the Family Physician; (3) Preventive Medicine

Barker, William H., Ed.

465

The Sorcerer II Global Ocean Sampling Expedition: Expanding theUniverse of Protein Families  

SciTech Connect

Metagenomics projects based on shotgun sequencing of populations of micro-organisms yield insight into protein families. We used sequence similarity clustering to explore proteins with a comprehensive dataset consisting of sequences from available databases together with 6.12 million proteins predicted from an assembly of 7.7 million Global Ocean Sampling (GOS) sequences. The GOS dataset covers nearly all known prokaryotic protein families. A total of 3,995 medium- and large-sized clusters consisting of only GOS sequences are identified, out of which 1,700 have no detectable homology to known families. The GOS-only clusters contain a higher than expected proportion of sequences of viral origin, thus reflecting a poor sampling of viral diversity until now. Protein domain distributions in the GOS dataset and current protein databases show distinct biases. Several protein domains that were previously categorized as kingdom specific are shown to have GOS examples in other kingdoms. About 6,000 sequences (ORFans) from the literature that heretofore lacked similarity to known proteins have matches in the GOS data. The GOS dataset is also used to improve remote homology detection. Overall, besides nearly doubling the number of current proteins, the predicted GOS proteins also add a great deal of diversity to known protein families and shed light on their evolution. These observations are illustrated using several protein families, including phosphatases, proteases, ultraviolet-irradiation DNA damage repair enzymes, glutamine synthetase, and RuBisCO. The diversity added by GOS data has implications for choosing targets for experimental structure characterization as part of structural genomics efforts. Our analysis indicates that new families are being discovered at a rate that is linear or almost linear with the addition of new sequences, implying that we are still far from discovering all protein families in nature.

Yooseph, Shibu; Sutton, Granger; Rusch, Douglas B.; Halpern,Aaron L.; Williamson, Shannon J.; Remington, Karin; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Heidelberg, Karla B.; Manning, Gerard; Li, Weizhong; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Cieplak, Piotr; Miller, Christopher S.; Li, Huiying; Mashiyama, Susan T.; Joachimiak, Marcin P.; van Belle, Christopher; Chandonia, John-Marc; Soergel, David A.; Zhai, Yufeng; Natarajan, Kannan; Lee, Shaun; Raphael,Benjamin J.; Bafna, Vineet; Friedman, Robert; Brenner, Steven E.; Godzik,Adam; Eisenberg, David; Dixon, Jack E.; Taylor, Susan S.; Strausberg,Robert L.; Frazier, Marvin; Venter, J.Craig

2006-03-23

466

The Sorcerer II Global Ocean Sampling Expedition: Expanding the Universe of Protein Families  

PubMed Central

Metagenomics projects based on shotgun sequencing of populations of micro-organisms yield insight into protein families. We used sequence similarity clustering to explore proteins with a comprehensive dataset consisting of sequences from available databases together with 6.12 million proteins predicted from an assembly of 7.7 million Global Ocean Sampling (GOS) sequences. The GOS dataset covers nearly all known prokaryotic protein families. A total of 3,995 medium- and large-sized clusters consisting of only GOS sequences are identified, out of which 1,700 have no detectable homology to known families. The GOS-only clusters contain a higher than expected proportion of sequences of viral origin, thus reflecting a poor sampling of viral diversity until now. Protein domain distributions in the GOS dataset and current protein databases show distinct biases. Several protein domains that were previously categorized as kingdom specific are shown to have GOS examples in other kingdoms. About 6,000 sequences (ORFans) from the literature that heretofore lacked similarity to known proteins have matches in the GOS data. The GOS dataset is also used to improve remote homology detection. Overall, besides nearly doubling the number of current proteins, the predicted GOS proteins also add a great deal of diversity to known protein families and shed light on their evolution. These observations are illustrated using several protein families, including phosphatases, proteases, ultraviolet-irradiation DNA damage repair enzymes, glutamine synthetase, and RuBisCO. The diversity added by GOS data has implications for choosing targets for experimental structure characterization as part of structural genomics efforts. Our analysis indicates that new families are being discovered at a rate that is linear or almost linear with the addition of new sequences, implying that we are still far from discovering all protein families in nature. PMID:17355171

Yooseph, Shibu; Sutton, Granger; Rusch, Douglas B; Halpern, Aaron L; Williamson, Shannon J; Remington, Karin; Eisen, Jonathan A; Heidelberg, Karla B; Manning, Gerard; Li, Weizhong; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Cieplak, Piotr; Miller, Christopher S; Li, Huiying; Mashiyama, Susan T; Joachimiak, Marcin P; van Belle, Christopher; Chandonia, John-Marc; Soergel, David A; Zhai, Yufeng; Natarajan, Kannan; Lee, Shaun; Raphael, Benjamin J; Bafna, Vineet; Friedman, Robert; Brenner, Steven E; Godzik, Adam; Eisenberg, David; Dixon, Jack E; Taylor, Susan S; Strausberg, Robert L; Frazier, Marvin; Venter, J. Craig

2007-01-01

467

Cheating on examinations and its predictors among undergraduate students at Hawassa University College of Medicine and Health Science, Hawassa, Ethiopia  

PubMed Central

Background Cheating on examinations in academic institutions is a worldwide issue. When cheating occurs in medical schools, it has serious consequences for human life, social values, and the economy. This study was conducted to determine the prevalence of cheating and identify factors that influence cheating among students of Hawassa University College of medicine and health science. Methods A cross sectional study was conducted from May through June 2013. A pre-tested self-administered, structured questionnaire was used to collect self-reported data regarding cheating. Data were entered and analyzed using SPSS version 20. Descriptive statistics were used for data summarization and presentation. Degree of association was measured by Chi Square test, with significance level set at p?=?0.05. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to assess associations. Results The prevalence of self-reported cheating was found to be 19.8% (95% CI?=?17.4-21.9). About 12.1% (95% CI?=?10.2-13.9) of students disclosed cheating on the entrance examination. The majority of students (80.1% (95% CI?=?77.9-82.3) disclosed that they would not report cheating to invigilators even if they had witnessed cheating. Analysis by multiple regression models showed that students who cheated in high school were more likely to cheat (adjusted OR?=?1. 80, 95% CI?=?1. 01–3.19) and that cheating was less likely among students who didn’t cheat on entrance examinations (adjusted OR?=?0. 25, 95% CI?=?0. 14–0.45). Dining outside the university cafeteria and receiving pocket money of Birr 300 or more were strongly associated with cheating (adjusted OR?=?3.08, 95% CI?=?1.54-6.16 and adjusted OR?=?1.69 (95% CI?=?1.05-2.72), respectively. The odds of cheating among students were significantly higher for those who went to private high school, were substance users, and didn’t attend lectures than for those who attended government schools, were not substance abusers, and attended lectures. Conclusion Our findings have important implications for development of an institution’s policies on academic integrity. By extension, they affect the policies of high schools. Increased levels of supervision during entrance examination, mandated attendance at lectures, and reduction of substance use are likely to reduce cheating. No significant association was found with background, level of parental education, grade point average, and interest in field of study. PMID:24885973

2014-01-01

468

Factors determining the choice of contraceptive methods at the Family Planning Clinic, University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria.  

PubMed

In a study of 2000 women volunteers seeking contraceptive services at the Family Planning Clinic (FPC), University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria, 66.2 per cent chose the intrauterine device (IUD) making it the most common method of contraception. Factors influencing choice of contraceptive methods were advice from friends and family members, intended duration of use and information from the media. Ignorance, fear and unfounded cultural beliefs were factors responsible for the delay in seeking contraceptive advice. The mass media was an important source of information for most of the women. We conclude that the IUD is the contraceptive of choice in our clinic because of the highly selective nature of our clients. In order to provide a service with a broader clientele, we suggest the incorporation of other priority reproductive health services such as cervical and breast cancer screening, prevention and treatment of reproductive tract infections and sexually transmitted diseases including HIV/AIDS. PMID:9855717

Konje, J C; Oladini, F; Otolorin, E O; Ladipo, O O

1998-10-01

469

Healthy Homes University: A Home-Based Environmental Intervention and Education Program for Families with Pediatric Asthma in Michigan  

PubMed Central

Environmental conditions within the home can exacerbate asthmatic children's symptoms. To improve health outcomes among this group, we implemented an in-home environmental public health program—Healthy Homes University—for low-income families in Lansing, Michigan, from 2005 to 2008. Families received four visits during a six-month intervention. Program staff assessed homes for asthma triggers and subsequently provided products and services to reduce exposures to cockroaches, dust mites, mold, tobacco smoke, and other triggers. We also provided asthma education that included identification of asthma triggers and instructions on specific behaviors to reduce exposures. Based on self-reported data collected from 243 caregivers at baseline and six months, the impact of asthma on these children was substantially reduced, and the proportion who sought acute unscheduled health care for their asthma decreased by more than 47%. PMID:21563708

Largo, Thomas W.; Borgialli, Michele; Wisinski, Courtney L.; Wahl, Robert L.; Priem, Wesley F.

2011-01-01

470

To be in a position to apply to the Western College of Veterinary Medicine at the University of Saskatchewan at  

E-print Network

of Saskatchewan at the end of 30 courses, students should include the following: Biochemistry 3010 (Chemistry 3310 VeterinaryMedicine UniversityofSaskatchewan Calendar Year: 2001/2002 Faculty: Arts & Science (UofL) Program

Seldin, Jonathan P.

471

Court Cases Involving Schools and Universities under the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Educational institutions are required either by law or by necessity to maintain records on students. Prior to the passage of the "Buckley Amendment," more commonly known as the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA), K-12 and postsecondary school officials maintained, used, and shared records according to their own discretion. Although…

Edmonds, Vincent H.

2009-01-01

472

Seattle Pacific University --20052006 Graduate Catalog 90 SCHOOL OF PSYCHOLOGY, FAMILY, AND COMMUNITY  

E-print Network

to the scientific study of psychological and social processes. (3) Committed to Service. Grounding our learning the following: · Integrate the findings of scientific psychology with the interpersonal skills and sensitivity individuals and groups. · Embrace a vocation of service to individuals, families, and their communities

Nelson, Tim

473

The "Entrepreneurial University", Family and Gender: Changes and Demands Faced by Fixed-Term Workers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Managerialism and neoliberal changes and demands influence the work and family lives of academics differently in different positions and contexts. In this article, I explore how Finnish academics on short fixed-term contracts have been treated, and how they interpret recent changes and their effects on their work and private lives. I ask how the…

Nikunen, Minna

2014-01-01

474

Creating a Culture for Change: The University Researcher, Principal, and Teacher Family.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Consistent with educational reform efforts, this study examines traditional roles of teacher educators, university researchers, and public school personnel and addresses the following questions: (1) What role can the university play as change is initiated within public schools? (2) In order to create a culture for change, how must the traditional…

Dana, Nancy Fichtman; And Others

475

POSITION X1226 Extension Assistant Family and Consumer Sciences LOCATION The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee  

E-print Network

of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee EFFECTIVE DATE January 1, 2013. Screening of applicants' credentials Employees Retirement; Workers' Compensation; study, sick and annual leave; numerous University of Tennessee provides a gateway to the University of Tennessee as the outreach unit of the Institute of Agriculture

Grissino-Mayer, Henri D.

476

The Effect of Family Background, University Quality and Educational Mismatch on Wage: An Analysis Using a Young Cohort of Italian Graduates  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper analyzes the impact of university quality, family background and mismatch on the wages of young Italian graduates. An empirical analysis is undertaken using a representative sample of graduates merged with a dataset containing information on the characteristics of universities. By utilizing quantile regression techniques, some evidence…

Ordine, Patrizia; Rose, Giuseppe

2015-01-01

477

Collaboration between family physicians and nurse clinicians  

PubMed Central

Abstract Objective To determine whether graduating family physicians are exposed to collaboration between family physicians and nurse clinicians during their training, as well as their opinions about shared care between doctors and nurse clinicians in the delivery of patient care. Design Anonymous online survey. Setting Two French-Canadian university family medicine residency programs. Participants The 2010 and 2011 graduating family physicians (N = 343) from the University of Montreal and Laval University in Quebec. Main outcome measures The extent to which nurse clinicians in graduating family physicians’ training milieu were involved in preventive and curative patient care activities, and graduates’ opinions about nurse clinicians sharing care with physicians. Results Of 343 graduates, 186 (54.2%) participated in the survey. Although as residents in family medicine their exposure to shared care with nurse clinicians was somewhat limited, respondents indicated that they were generally quite open to the idea of sharing care with nurse clinicians. More than 70% of respondents agreed or strongly agreed that nurse clinicians could adjust, according to protocols of clinical guidelines, the treatment of patients with diabetes, hypertension, and asthma, as well as regulate medication for pain control in terminally ill patients. By contrast, respondents were less favourable to nurse clinicians adjusting the treatment of patients with depression. More than 80% of respondents agreed or strongly agreed that nurse clinicians could initiate treatment via a medical directive for routine hormonal contraception, acne, uncomplicated cystitis, and sexually transmitted infections. Respondents’ opinions on nurse clinicians initiating treatment for pharyngitis and otitis were more divided. Conclusion Graduating family physicians are quite open to collaborating with nurse clinicians. Although they have observed some collaboration between physicians and nurses, there are areas of shared clinical activities in which they would benefit from further exposure and training. PMID:25122832

Maheux, Brigitte; Côté, Luc; Sobanjo, Omobola; Authier, Louise; Lajeunesse, Julie; Leclerc, Mylène; Lefort, Louise

2014-01-01

478

PURDUE UNIVERSITY RESIDENCES NEWSLETTER FOR FAMILIES AND FRIENDS IN THIS ISSUE  

E-print Network

as Ursula, the villain in Disney's The Little Mermaid . Dressing up for Halloween has become a yearly quieter ­ at least for a little while! Another big change we are facing here in University Residences

Fernández-Juricic, Esteban

479

Use of complementary and alternative medicine by patients with hematological diseases experience at a university hospital in northeast Mexico  

PubMed Central

Background Complementary and alternative medicine includes a diverse group of medical and healthcare systems, practices and products not considered part of conventional medicine. Although there is information on unconventional practices in oncological diseases, specific data regarding the use of complementary and alternative medicine by hematology patients is scarce. Objective The aim of this study is to document the prevalence of this modality of unconventional therapy in patients with malignant and benign hematological diseases, particularly children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Methods An observational study of adult patients and guardians of children with malignant or benign hematological diseases was carried out by applying a structured questionnaire detailing the use and results of the most prevalent complementary and alternative medicine practices. Results One hundred and twenty patients were included; 104 had malignant and 16 had benign hematological diseases. The use of complementary and alternative medicine was greater in benign diseases but the difference was not statistically significant (64.7% versus 41.7%; p-value = 0.08). Patients and guardians with high school or college educations used these alternative practices more than patients with less schooling (60.7% versus 54.7%; p-value = 0.032). The use of folk remedies was most prevalent followed by herbal preparations and spiritual healing. Sixty-four percent of patients that used these unconventional practices reported improvement in their symptoms and increased capacity to perform daily activities. Conclusion No significant difference was documented between patients with malignant or benign hematological diseases using these alternative practices. The majority of complementary and alternative medicine users reported improvement of the disease or chemotherapy-related symptoms. PMID:23049401

Jaime-Pérez, José Carlos; Chapa-Rodríguez, Adrián; Rodríguez-Martínez, Marisol; Colunga-Pedraza, Perla Rocío; Marfil-Rivera, Luis Javier; Gómez-Almaguer, David

2012-01-01

480

} Surgery 7 weeks } Medicine 7 weeks  

E-print Network

#12;} Surgery 7 weeks } Medicine 7 weeks } Pediatrics 7 weeks } OB-GYN 7 weeks } Psychiatry 7 weeks;} Medicine, Surgery, Pediatrics 8 weeks } OB-GYN, Family Med, Psychiatry 6 weeks } Elective block 6 weeks;} Educational and LCME concerns } Student wish for longer Medicine and Surgery rotations } National norms

Myers, Lawrence C.

481

Implementing a national approach to universal child and family health services in Australia: professionals' views of the challenges and opportunities.  

PubMed

Australia has a well-accepted system of universal child and family health (CFH) services. However, government reports and research indicate that these services vary across states and territories, and many children and families do not receive these services. The aim of this paper was to explore professionals' perceptions of the challenges and opportunities in implementing a national approach to universal CFH services across Australia. Qualitative data were collected between July 2010 and April 2011 in the first phase of a three-phase study designed to investigate the feasibility of implementing a national approach to CFH services in Australia. In total, 161 professionals participated in phase 1 consultations conducted either as discussion groups, teleconferences or through email conversation. Participants came from all Australian states and territories and included 60 CFH nurses, 45 midwives, 15 general practitioners (GPs), 12 practice nurses, 14 allied health professionals, 7 early childhood education specialists, 6 staff from non-government organisations and 2 Australian government policy advisors. Data were analysed thematically. Participants supported the concept of a universal CFH service, but identified implementation barriers. Key challenges included the absence of a minimum data set and lack of aggregated national data to assist planning and determine outcomes; an inconsistent approach to transfer of information about mothers and newborns from maternity services to CFH nursing services or GPs; poor communication across disciplines and services; issues of access and equity of service delivery; workforce limitations and tensions around role boundaries. Directions for change were identified, including improved electronic data collection and communication systems, reporting of service delivery and outcomes between states and territories, professional collaboration, service co-location and interprofessional learning and development. PMID:25440982

Schmied, Virginia; Homer, Caroline; Fowler, Cathrine; Psaila, Kim; Barclay, Lesley; Wilson, Ian; Kemp, Lynn; Fasher, Michael; Kruske, Sue

2015-03-01

482

Full, Associate or Assistant Professor of Medicine Division of Immunology and Rheumatology  

E-print Network

Full, Associate or Assistant Professor of Medicine Division of Immunology and Rheumatology Stanford University The Division of Immunology and Rheumatology in the Department of Medicine at Stanford University

Quake, Stephen R.

483

The Electronic Newsletter of the Academic Women's Network at Washington University School of Medicine Volume 15, Number 3 Fall 2011  

E-print Network

institutions nationally, reveals a large and startling gender disparity at the higher academic ranks of prominent US schools of medicine. Gender gaps were found at the tenure level that differed between 33 particularly stands out in the context of medical school classes that are now on average 50/50 gender balanced

Larson-Prior, Linda

484

The Electronic Newsletter of the Academic Women's Network at Washington University School of Medicine Volume 16, Number 1 Spring 2012  

E-print Network

Ross, M.D., Co-Director of Social Media Kathy Berchelmann, M.D., Co-Director of Social Media Honorary of Medicine Volume 16, Number 1 Spring 2012 From the President's Desk by Joan Luby, M.D. The Changing Face administrative leaders. Based on all of these factors, I am very optimistic that real and significant change

Larson-Prior, Linda

485

Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University Title: Expanding or Creating New Clinical Programs/Services  

E-print Network

, and national practice standards within the clinical specialty; and do not create an unacceptable risk for its, and Nursing Services will receive and consider proposals to expand existing clinical programs, services of Brody School of Medicine and ECU Physicians' strategic plan; conform to regulations, standards

486

The Electronic Newsletter of the Academic Women's Network at Washington University School of Medicine Volume 15, Number 1 Spring 2011  

E-print Network

of Medicine Volume 15, Number 1 Spring 2011 From the President's Desk by Lisa Moscoso, M.D., Ph.D. My seven Spring 2011 From the President's Desk, cont... To make a long story short, this topic matters to us in the air. While the crowd watched the entertainer, I watched the children in the front row, wide eyed

Larson-Prior, Linda

487

An Interdisciplinary Educational Project in Comprehensive Family Health Care. Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

To develop skills and understanding of interdisciplinary teamwork, the University of Miami's Department of Family Medicine and the School of Nursing conducted a project involving 10 teams of medical, nursing, and social work students. The primary objectives of the project were: (1) to instill and maintain positive attitudes in student physicians,…

Tanner, Libby A.

488

Policy #6050 Family and Medical Leave Act Policy 1 OLD DOMINION UNIVERSITY  

E-print Network

or Veterans Affairs health care provider or by a Department of Defense TRICARE network or non, but not including former members or members on the permanent disability list. Also covered are veterans who have-network authorized private health care provider. Eligible University Employees - Those employed for a total

489

COPD Medicine  

MedlinePLUS

... 5654 ) You are here: Health Information > Medications > COPD COPD Medicine Your doctor may prescribe medicine to control ... Calendar Read the News View Daily Pollen Count COPD Program This program offers comprehensive, individualized care for ...

490

Diabetes Medicines  

MedlinePLUS

Diabetes means your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. If you can't control your diabetes with wise food choices and physical activity, you may need diabetes medicines. The kind of medicine you take depends ...