Sample records for family medicine university

  1. Boston University Family Medicine

    E-print Network

    Spence, Harlan Ernest

    Boston University Family Medicine Global Health CollaborativeFamily Medicine As part of the Department of Family Medicine at Boston University, the Collaborative is committed to introducing and improving Family Medicine programs around the world. Family Medicine is a holistic specialty that attends

  2. [Family and community medicine and the university. SESPAS report 2010].

    PubMed

    Casado Vicente, Verónica; Bonal Pitz, Pablo; Cucalón Arenal, José Manuel; Serrano Ferrández, Elena; Suárez Gonzalez, Félix

    2012-03-01

    Family and community medicine is an academic subject, a medical specialty and a health profession with distinct dimensions: healthcare, teaching, research and management. In this discipline, the object of knowledge is the person, understood as a whole. Family medicine, as an academic subject, and primary care, as a health education setting, should be incorporated into the core graduate and postgraduate curricula. The absence of these elements leads to training bias and has major repercussions on quality, coordination and patient safety. The development of the Health Professions Act and the construction of the European Higher Education Area (EHEA) have created a favorable climate for the presence of this discipline in the university. Since the 1960s, family medicine has been consolidated as an academic subject with its own departments in almost all European universities, and a significant number of family physicians are teachers. A balance has been achieved between the hospital-based system (based on theory, disease, and the biological model) and the patient-centred model (based on problem solving, community-oriented and the bio-psycho-social model). The introduction of family and community medicine as a specific subject, and as a transverse subject and as an option in practicals, represents the adaptation of the educational system to social needs. This adaptation also represents a convergence with other European countries and the various legal requirements protecting this convergence. However, this new situation requires a new structure (departments) and faculty (professors and associate and assistant professors). PMID:22055214

  3. Teaching Humanities in Medicine: The University of Massachusetts Family Medicine Residency Program Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silk, Hugh; Shields, Sara

    2012-01-01

    Humanities in medicine (HIM) is an important aspect of medical education intended to help preserve humanism and a focus on patients. At the University of Massachusetts Family Medicine Residency Program, we have been expanding our HIM curriculum for our residents including orientation, home visit reflective writing, didactics and a department-wide…

  4. College of Medicine, Departments of Family Medicine and Psychiatry

    E-print Network

    Cui, Yan

    College of Medicine, Departments of Family Medicine and Psychiatry Present 46th Annual Family Medicine Review Course and the 7th Family Medicine/Psychiatry CME Conference SPEAKING THE SAME LANGUAGE reservations if overnight accommodations are needed and ask for group "University of TN Family Medicine

  5. FAMILY MEDICINE* Definition Of

    E-print Network

    Finley Jr., Russell L.

    FAMILY MEDICINE* Definition Of Family medicine is the medical specialty which provides continuing the biological, clinical and behavioral sciences. The scope of family medicine encompasses all ages, both sexes, each organ system and every disease entity. (1986) (2003) Quality Healthcare In Family Medicine Quality

  6. A combined course of primary health care practice and family medicine at the University of Gezira.

    PubMed

    Mirghani, O A; el Amin, E O; Ali, M E; Osman, H S; Hamad, B

    1988-07-01

    The community-based course presented is a longitudinal course running through four semesters in the Faculty of Medicine, University of Gezira, Sudan. Students combine their regular work in primary health care centres with attachments to a number of families in Wad Medani town. They continue to visit these families regularly throughout their entire medical course with the aim of studying them and helping them with some of their medical and psychosocial problems. PMID:3173159

  7. Family medicine curriculum

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Douglas; Schipper, Shirley

    2008-01-01

    PROBLEM ADDRESSED The Family Medicine Residency Program at the University of Alberta has used academic sessions and clinical-based teaching to prepare residents for private practice. Before the new curriculum, academic sessions were large group lectures given by specialists. These sessions lacked consistent quality, structured topics, and organization. OBJECTIVE OF PROGRAM The program was designed to improve the quality and consistency of academic sessions by creating a new curriculum. The goals for the new curriculum included improved organizational structure, improved satisfaction from the participants, improved resident knowledge and confidence in key areas of family medicine, and improved performance on licensing examinations. PROGRAM DESCRIPTION The new curriculum is faculty guided but resident organized. Twenty-three core topics in family medicine are covered during a 2-year rotating curriculum. Several small group activities, including problem-based learning modules, journal club, and examination preparation sessions, complement larger didactic sessions. A multiple-source evaluation process is an essential component of this new program. CONCLUSION The new academic curriculum for family medicine residents is based on a variety of learning styles and is consistent with the principles of adult learning theory. This structured curriculum provides a good basis for further development. Other programs across the country might want to incorporate these ideas into their current programming. PMID:18272637

  8. Role of Family Medicine Education in India's Step Toward Universal Health Coverage.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Sajitha M F; Angeline, Ruby P; David, Kirubah V; Christopher, Prince

    2014-07-01

    India's commitment to universal health coverage has grown stronger with the submission of High Level Expert Group report by the Planning Commission in 2012. With this report comes the commitment to increase the primary health-care workforce to meet the population needs. However, the focus should not be just to increase the number of health workers, but to produce better health workers. Doctors, nurses and community health workers trained in primary and secondary health-care facilities can make a significant contribution in responding to the needs of the local community. The role of family medicine education is worth exploring in this context to equip the primary care health workers with the competencies of providing person-centered, comprehensive and continuous care. PMID:25374848

  9. Role of Family Medicine Education in India's Step Toward Universal Health Coverage

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Sajitha M.F.; Angeline, Ruby P.; David, Kirubah V.; Christopher, Prince

    2014-01-01

    India's commitment to universal health coverage has grown stronger with the submission of High Level Expert Group report by the Planning Commission in 2012. With this report comes the commitment to increase the primary health-care workforce to meet the population needs. However, the focus should not be just to increase the number of health workers, but to produce better health workers. Doctors, nurses and community health workers trained in primary and secondary health-care facilities can make a significant contribution in responding to the needs of the local community. The role of family medicine education is worth exploring in this context to equip the primary care health workers with the competencies of providing person-centered, comprehensive and continuous care. PMID:25374848

  10. Two Programs for Primary Care Practitioners: Family Medicine Training in an Affiliated University Hospital Program and Primary Care Graduate Training in an Urban Private Medical Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farley, Eugene S.; Piemme, Thomas E.

    1975-01-01

    Eugene Farley describes the University of Rochester and Highland Hospital Family Medicine Program for teaching of primary care internists, primary care pediatricians, and family doctors. Thomas Piemme presents the George Washington University School of Medicine alternative, a 2-year program in an ambulatory setting leading to broad eligibility in…

  11. Queen's University alternative funding plan. Effect on patients, staff, and faculty in the Department of Family Medicine.

    PubMed Central

    Godwin, M.; Seguin, R.; Wilson, R.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the effect of the Queen's University alternative funding plan (AFP) on the Department of Family Medicine in terms of patient, staff, and faculty satisfaction; patient encounter logistics; clinical volume; and academic activity. DESIGN: Before-after study. SETTING: Department of Family Medicine at Queen's University of Kingston, Ont. PARTICIPANTS: Patients, faculty, and staff of the Department of Family Medicine's Family Medicine Centre. INTERVENTIONS: The AFP of Queen's University. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Patient satisfaction, staff and faculty job satisfaction, patient waiting time, time spent with patients, patient volume, number of publications, and amount of research funding obtained by faculty members. These outcomes were measured before the AFP began (time 0), 1 year post-AFP (time 1), and 2.5 years post-AFP (time 2). RESULTS: In some categories patients' satisfaction decreased at time 1, but in all cases it was either unchanged or improved at time 2. Staff and faculty job satisfaction did not change over time. Patients spent less time in the waiting room at time 2 than at time 0. Patient volume dropped about 10% between time 0 and time 2. Publication rate did not change, but external research funding increased significantly during the study period. CONCLUSION: The AFP has improved academic productivity, decreased patient volume by 10%, and improved patient flow during clinics. No negative effects on patient satisfaction or on job satisfaction of staff or faculty are apparent. PMID:10925758

  12. Department of Family Medicine and Public Health Sciences

    E-print Network

    Finley Jr., Russell L.

    Page 1 Department of Family Medicine and Public Health Sciences Wayne State University School of Medicine Applying for the George Mogill Family Medicine Award The Mogill Award Background and Purpose Academic Award for senior students choosing Family Medicine as a career. Dr. George Mogill was one

  13. Family Medicine's Waltz with Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downing, Raymond

    2012-01-01

    Family Medicine first formally confronted systems thinking with the adoption of the biopsychosocial model for understanding disease in a holistic manner; this is a description of a natural system. More recently, Family Medicine has been consciously engaged in developing itself as a system for delivering health care, an artificial system. We make…

  14. Decision making in family medicine

    PubMed Central

    Labrecque, Michel; Ratté, Stéphane; Frémont, Pierre; Cauchon, Michel; Ouellet, Jérôme; Hogg, William; McGowan, Jessie; Gagnon, Marie-Pierre; Njoya, Merlin; Légaré, France

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective To compare the ability of users of 2 medical search engines, InfoClinique and the Trip database, to provide correct answers to clinical questions and to explore the perceived effects of the tools on the clinical decision-making process. Design Randomized trial. Setting Three family medicine units of the family medicine program of the Faculty of Medicine at Laval University in Quebec city, Que. Participants Fifteen second-year family medicine residents. Intervention Residents generated 30 structured questions about therapy or preventive treatment (2 questions per resident) based on clinical encounters. Using an Internet platform designed for the trial, each resident answered 20 of these questions (their own 2, plus 18 of the questions formulated by other residents, selected randomly) before and after searching for information with 1 of the 2 search engines. For each question, 5 residents were randomly assigned to begin their search with InfoClinique and 5 with the Trip database. Main outcome measures The ability of residents to provide correct answers to clinical questions using the search engines, as determined by third-party evaluation. After answering each question, participants completed a questionnaire to assess their perception of the engine’s effect on the decision-making process in clinical practice. Results Of 300 possible pairs of answers (1 answer before and 1 after the initial search), 254 (85%) were produced by 14 residents. Of these, 132 (52%) and 122 (48%) pairs of answers concerned questions that had been assigned an initial search with InfoClinique and the Trip database, respectively. Both engines produced an important and similar absolute increase in the proportion of correct answers after searching (26% to 62% for InfoClinique, for an increase of 36%; 24% to 63% for the Trip database, for an increase of 39%; P = .68). For all 30 clinical questions, at least 1 resident produced the correct answer after searching with either search engine. The mean (SD) time of the initial search for each question was 23.5 (7.6) minutes with InfoClinique and 22.3 (7.8) minutes with the Trip database (P = .30). Participants’ perceptions of each engine’s effect on the decision-making process were very positive and similar for both search engines. Conclusion Family medicine residents’ ability to provide correct answers to clinical questions increased dramatically and similarly with the use of both InfoClinique and the Trip database. These tools have strong potential to increase the quality of medical care. PMID:24130286

  15. Master's and doctoral theses in family medicine and their publication output, Suez Canal University, Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Nour-Eldein, Hebatallah; Mansour, Nadia M.; Abdulmajeed, Abdulmajeed A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The completion of a thesis is a significant requirement for both a Master's and a doctorate degree in general practice/family medicine (GP/FM). A postgraduate thesis is a well-planned, time-intensive activity carried out over several years. The quality of the theses can be judged by the proportion of published papers. Objective: This study aimed to describe Master's and doctoral theses in family medicine and their publications between 1982 and 2014. Materials and Methods: GP/FM degree theses were reviewed at the Faculty of Medicine and central Suez Canal libraries. Several characteristics were extracted from each thesis relating to the main researcher, supervisors, themes, and study methods according to predefined criteria. Publications from the theses were described. Results: Over 33 years, 208 theses were completed by 173 GP/FM researchers. The majority of the theses were for Master's degrees (84.1%). Regarding the study design, most of the degree theses were cross-sectional studies (76.9%). The adult population was targeted in 33.7% of research theses. Nonprobability sampling was used in 51%. Rural communities were the setting of research in 43.8%, and primary health center (PHC)-based studies in 59.1%. The “Patient” category exceeded the other categories (28.4%). Publication from theses started in the second decade of research production. Of the degree theses, 21.6% original articles were published. Only 13.3% of articles from theses were published in PubMed-indexed journals. The researcher was first author in 62.2% of published articles. Conclusion: The production of GP/FM theses and their publications are going to increase. Continuous assessment and planning for GP/FM studies are recommended. PMID:25949959

  16. University of Mississippi School of Medicine

    E-print Network

    Raucher, Drazen

    University of Mississippi School of Medicine 2011 Match 1 Noah Abbas Surgery-Preliminary University of Mississippi Medical Center Jackson, Mississippi Karen Abernathy Internal Medicine Medical University of South, Mississippi Andrew Adams Family Medicine University of Mississippi Medical Center Jackson, Mississippi Keith

  17. College of Medicine FM Family and Community Medicine

    E-print Network

    MacAdam, Keith

    College of Medicine FM Family and Community Medicine KEY: # = new course * = course changed, FAMILY MEDICINE. (1-3) With the advice and approval of his or her faculty adviser, the first-year student may choose approved electives offered by the Department of Family and Community Medicine. The intent

  18. Family Medicine Digital Resource Library

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This resource was created by the Society of Teachers of Family Medicine (STFM) and was designed to support the sharing and collaborative development of educational resources among family medicine educators. The initial grant for this endeavor came from the National Library of Medicine and the project has been expanded a number of times. The STFM Resource Library contains lectures, learning modules, case studies, recommended websites, and conference handouts. The materials are all made available at no cost, and visitors can get started by looking at the Recently Uploaded area. Here they will find "Teaching Today With Tomorrow's Tools," "Teaching Inpatient Billing and Coding," and dozens of other newer items. Moving on, visitors can also use the Search area to focus on certain items of interest or browse the FAQ area to find answers to common questions. Finally, visitors can create their own personalized accounts or upload their own materials for possible inclusion in the archive. [KMG

  19. Starting a family during medical studies? Results of a pilot study on family friendliness in the study of medicine at the University of Ulm

    PubMed Central

    Liebhardt, Hubert; Stolz, Katrin; Mörtl, Kathrin; Prospero, Katrin; Niehues, Johanna; Fegert, Jörg

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The Ulm pilot study aimed to explore factors for a successful combination of medical education and starting a family. The empirical data derived from this study constitutes the foundation for an evidence-based reform of the medical curriculum in Ulm. Methods: In 2009, qualitative interviews with 37 of the 79 medical students with children at University of Ulm were conducted and analyzed using content analysis. The detected problem areas were used to develop a quantitative questionnaire for studying parents and academic teaching members in medical education in Ulm. Results: The parents were older, more often married and more likely to already have obtained a first training. One third of the students thought there was no ideal time to start a family during the years of medical education or specialist training. However, the majority of the students (61%) were convinced that parenthood is more compatible with medical studies than with specialist training. The interview data suggests that the end of medical school (4th to 6th year of studies), preferably during semester break, is especially suitable for child birth since it allows students to continue their studies without ‘losing time’. Conclusion: The biography and career of studying parents in medicine have specific characteristics. Universities and teaching hospitals are required to no longer leave the compatibility of family and study responsibilities to the students themselves. Rather, flexible structures need to be implemented that enable students to start a family while continuing their education. This means providing more childcare and greater support regarding academic counselling and career development. PMID:21818229

  20. Locum practice by recent family medicine graduates

    PubMed Central

    Myhre, Douglas L.; Konkin, Jill; Woloschuk, Wayne; Szafran, Olga; Hansen, Chantal; Crutcher, Rodney

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To explore the demographic characteristics of recent Alberta family medicine residency graduates choosing locum practice, as well as their reasons for choosing and leaving locum practice and the frustrations and rewards of locum placements. DESIGN Web-based and mailed cross-sectional survey and interviews. SETTING The family medicine residency training programs at the University of Calgary and the University of Alberta. PARTICIPANTS A total of 152 graduates who had completed family medicine training between 2001 and 2005, inclusive, and who had either done locums in the past or were doing locums at the time of the survey. Interviews were conducted with a subsample of this group (n = 10). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Duration of locum practice, reasons for choosing and leaving locum practice, and frustrations and rewards of locum practice. RESULTS Of the 377 graduates surveyed, 242 (64.2%) responded. Among the respondents, 155 (64.0%) had in the past practised or were at the time practising as locum physicians (complete data were available for 152 respondents). Most (71.7%) had arranged locum placements independently. The average duration of a locum placement was 9.1 months. Female and younger family physicians were more likely to practise as locum tenentes. The most common reason for doing a locum placement was as a practice exploration to increase experience or competence (46.7%). The primary reason for leaving locum practice was to settle into permanent practice (52.1%); interview data revealed that this reflected a desire for stability, a desire for continuity with patients, personal life changes, financial considerations, and the end of a perceived need for exploration. Locum tenentes were frustrated with negotiating locum contracts, low patient volumes, lack of patient continuity, and working with difficult staff. Rewards of locum practice included flexibility and freedom in practice, gaining experience, and the rewards that come from seeing patients. In total, 44.6% of family medicine graduates joined practices in which they had done locum placements. CONCLUSION Locum practice is a common early career choice for Alberta family medicine graduates. The most common reason for doing a locum placement was to gain experience, not to delay commitment. Locum practice tends to appeal more to female and younger family physicians. Rewards of locum practice were also cited as reasons for participation. Locum tenentes tend to be frustrated with the business aspects of arranging placements and with the generally low patient volumes. Long-term recruitment efforts by community physicians should be initiated within the first week of locum engagement. PMID:20463259

  1. Stanford University School of Medicine

    E-print Network

    Bogyo, Matthew

    Stanford University School of Medicine SUMMA Conference 2010 REaching FORwaRd in MEdicinE #12 of Excellence in Diversity in Medical Education (COEDME), the Stanford University School of Medicine Office-xxvi Considering a Career in Medicine (for deletion/Dr. G) The Application Process The MCaT about the MCaT Practice

  2. Boston University School of Medicine

    E-print Network

    Spence, Harlan Ernest

    2013­2015 Boston University School of Medicine Compassion Excellence Innovation Inclusion #12;Boston University School of Medicine2 www.bumc.bu.edu 1 Our MissiOn Boston University School of Medicine of medicine, to biomedical research, and to the health of the public. We, as a community, place great value

  3. Highland Family Medicine Pregnancy And Pediatric Care

    E-print Network

    Goldman, Steven A.

    At Highland Family Medicine Pregnancy And Pediatric Care Highland Family Medicine, we have a team, high quality pregnancy care. We care for you during your pregnancy and can continue to care for you plan a healthy pregnancy. If you think you may be pregnant now, call us and we will see you as soon

  4. Faculty advisor program for family medicine residents.

    PubMed Central

    Nasmith, L.; Boillat, M.; Rubenstein, H.; Daigle, N.; Goldstein, H.; Franco, E. D.

    1997-01-01

    PROBLEM BEING ADDRESSED: In response to the accreditation guidelines of the College of Family Physicians of Canada's (CFPC) Task Force on Intraining Evaluation, the Department of Family Medicine at McGill University implemented a faculty advisor program on July 1, 1993. OBJECTIVE OF PROGRAM: In addition to meeting the requirements of the CFPC, the faculty advisor program was developed to foster communication between residents and faculty, increase opportunities for feedback, promote self-directed learning, and personalize the educational experience of trainees. MAIN COMPONENTS OF PROGRAM: Residents were assigned an advisor. They were expected to meet their advisors monthly to discuss educational objectives, performance, career planning, and any problems. Educational plans were to be completed at each meeting. CONCLUSIONS: Feedback from advisors and residents has been positive, with both groups expressing overall satisfaction with the program. The faculty advisor program will continue but will be modified to address problems identified and better meet the needs of faculty and residents. PMID:9241464

  5. Yale University School of Medicine

    E-print Network

    Yale University School of Medicine http://info.med.yale.edu/education/finaid Yale University School of Medicine 367 Cedar Street New Haven, CT 06510 Phone: (203)785-2645 FAX: (203) 785-2924 2010-2011 Student

  6. Yale University School of Medicine

    E-print Network

    Yale University School of Medicine http://info.med.yale.edu/education/finaid Yale University School of Medicine 367 Cedar Street New Haven, CT 06510 Phone: (203)785-2645 FAX: (203) 785-2924 2010-2011 Parents

  7. Yale University School of Medicine

    E-print Network

    Yale University School of Medicine http://info.med.yale.edu/education/finaid Yale University School of Medicine 367 Cedar Street New Haven, CT 06510 Phone: (203)785-2645 FAX: (203) 785-2924 2010-2011 Income

  8. Yale University School of Medicine

    E-print Network

    Yale University School of Medicine http://info.med.yale.edu/education/finaid Yale University School of Medicine Financial Aid Office 367 Cedar Street New Haven, CT 06510 Phone: (203)785-2645 FAX: (203) 785

  9. Family Systems Consultation: Opportunities for Teaching in Family Medicine

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Susan H. McDaniel; Thomas Campbell; Lyman C. Wynne; Timothy Weber

    1988-01-01

    Family-systems consultation offers opportunities to teach residents basic concepts and relevant skills for working with families in family medicine. The application of systems theory to the consultation process helps clarify the role of the consultant-teacher in relation to the patient or family and the consultee-practitioner. Residents are able to gain experience interviewing and assessing families from their own practices with

  10. Public Health and Family Medicine: An Opportunity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Doug Campos-Outcalt

    The current national concern about bioterrorism and the inadequacy of the public health infrastruc- ture offers an opportunity for American family physicians to assume a key role in the front line of the US public health system. To meet this chal- lenge, family medicine educators need to insure that all family physicians are well trained to collab- orate effectively with

  11. The Family Medicine Specialty, Learning from Experience

    PubMed Central

    Soltanipour, Soheil; Heidarzadeh, Abtin; Hasandokht, Tolou

    2014-01-01

    Family medicine has been accepted as a model for Iranian health-care reform, but many debates have been raised since its establishment. Despite many successes achieved, this area of medicine is very challengeable. Family practice as a specialty is an innovation that has been introduced by the ministry of health and medical education in Iran. Although this approach seems sophisticated, learning from experience is the first step to avoid difficulties that may occur from this selection. Our goal is to declare strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats of family medicine specialty. PMID:25657959

  12. Yale University School of Medicine

    E-print Network

    Yale University School of Medicine http://info.med.yale.edu/education/finaid Yale University School of Medicine Financial Aid Office 367 Cedar Street New Haven, CT 06510 Phone: (203)785-2645 FAX: (203) 785 University School of Medicine Financial Aid Office. YALE MEDICAL SCHOOL STUDENT

  13. Ten most notable family medicine research studies in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Levitt, Cheryl; Katz, Alan; Mang, Eric; Safarov, Artem

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To identify 10 noteworthy Canadian family medicine research studies that have affected practice in order to demonstrate the unique value that Canadian family medicine research offers. Composition of the committee Representatives from the Section of Researchers (SOR) and the Health Policy and Government Relations department of the College of Family Physicians of Canada developed a framework for inclusion and identified an initial list of articles. Members of the SOR Council and research directors from the 17 Canadian departments of family medicine reviewed the preliminary list and suggested additional studies. Methods The authors developed an initial list of studies carried out by Canadian family medicine researchers from those researchers who had received awards from the College of Family Physicians of Canada since 2002. Additional studies were proposed by members of the SOR Council and the university research directors. A total of 36 published articles were reviewed by the SOR authors, and an annotated short list of 16 articles was prepared. From that list, the other authors identified 7 noteworthy studies that were used to form the basis of advocacy materials. The SOR authors, along with 3 additional members of the SOR Executive, used an informal consensus process to select the final 3 articles to arrive at the top 10. Report The top 10 most noteworthy family medicine research studies are presented in this article and represent the unique contribution that Canadian family medicine research brings to health care in Canada. They have helped advance health care quality and improve care delivery, beneficially influencing health care practices, health care policy, and patient experiences. Conclusion This project has identified 10 classic Canadian family medicine research studies that continue to influence practice today. In addition to their usefulness as tools for teaching, advocating, and championing the contribution of research to modern family practice, these studies are important examples of the value of research to patient health in Canada and around the world.

  14. Preventive Medicine and the Family

    PubMed Central

    Christie-Seely, Janet

    1981-01-01

    Studies have demonstrated the links between the family system and illness, emphasizing the importance of prevention on a family level for physical as well as psychological illness. Brief preventive counselling on routine visits is possible if the physician knows the family well and understands the principles of the family as a system. Periods of high risk when illness and family dysfunction increase in incidence are the normal “crises” of the family life cycle, medical crises of illness, hospitalization and death, and non-medical crises. High-risk families should be identified; secondary prevention is an important role for the family physician who sees family problems at a much earlier stage than the psychiatrist or marital or family therapist. PMID:21289689

  15. Yale University School of Medicine

    E-print Network

    Yale University School of Medicine http://info.med.yale.edu/education/finaid Yale University School of Medicine Financial Aid Office 367 Cedar Street New Haven, CT 06510 Phone: (203)785-2645 FAX: (203) 785 THE YALE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE We are required to obtain permission from the student when releasing

  16. Yale University School of Medicine

    E-print Network

    Yale University School of Medicine http://info.med.yale.edu/education/finaid Yale University School of Medicine Financial Aid Office 367 Cedar Street New Haven, CT 06510 Phone: (203)785-2645 FAX: (203) 785-2011(Medical School Students) I have read the terms and conditions of the loan at http://medicine.yale

  17. Yale University School of Medicine

    E-print Network

    Yale University School of Medicine http://info.med.yale.edu/education/finaid Yale University School of Medicine 367 Cedar Street New Haven, CT 06510 Phone: (203)785-2645 FAX: (203) 785-2924 REQUEST TO DISCLOSE of Medicine to provide information relating to my financial aid, or lack thereof, to my parent(s) or guardian

  18. Family Medicine: The Challenge of Maturity

    PubMed Central

    Hogg, William

    1989-01-01

    In this paper, adapted from the Keynote address to the 30th Annual Scientific Assembly of the College of Family Physicians of Canada, May 1988, in Montréal, Quebec, it is pointed out that family medicine has been successfully establishing itself as a distinct academic discipline since the early 1950s. Yet family doctors have not fully accepted and integrated its status. We continue to behave as if we don't believe in ourselves. Several reasons are suggested to explain why we have been slow to accept the remarkable progress of our discipline. A greater research effort is needed for family medicine to reach its potential. Family physicians in private practice and in community health centres must play a major role if this research effort is to succeed. Some practical examples of how private practitioners can be involved in research are presented. PMID:21249028

  19. The case for family medicine in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Sabzwari, Saniya Raghib

    2015-06-01

    The specialty of Family Medicine enjoys a special position in the medical practice of the West, serving as one of the key primary care specialties. Family physicians act as providers of first contact catering to the medical needs of the entire family in all aspects of preventive, curative and rehabilitative stages of illness and to health maintenance. The growth of this specialty, however, has lagged behind in Pakistan for various reasons. Having both a high burden of communicable and non-communicable diseases in Pakistan; family physicians should form the frontline force in dealing with these health issues. Several success stories of Family Medicine forming the base of medical services have been noted, validating its presence and propagation. The World Health Organisation also supported this in its 2008 report that discusses primary care for all. Growth of family practice needs to be encouraged at both undergraduate and postgraduate levels to ensure adequate training and provision of quality of medical care to our society. The need of the hour is that both medical institutions and the government develop policies to strengthen Family Medicine and incentivise family practice in rural and urban settings to cater to the needs of society at large. PMID:26060167

  20. Determinants of choosing a career in family medicine

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Ian; Gowans, Margot; Wright, Bruce; Brenneis, Fraser; Banner, Sandra; Boone, Jim

    2011-01-01

    Background Student choice is an important determinant of the distribution of specialties of practising physicians in many countries. Understanding characteristics at entry into medical school that are associated with the choice of residency in family medicine can assist medical schools in admitting an appropriate mix of students to serve the health care needs of their regions. Methods From 2002 to 2004, we collected data from students in 15 classes at 8 of 16 Canadian medical schools at entry. Surveys included questions on career choice, attitudes to practice and socio-demographic characteristics. We followed students prospectively with these data linked to their residency choice. We used multiple logistic regression analysis to identify entry characteristics that predicted a student’s ultimate career choice in family medicine. Results Of 1941 eligible students in the participating classes, 1542 (79.4%) contributed data to the final analyses. The following 11 entry variables predicted whether a student named family medicine as his or her top residency choice: being older, being engaged or in a long-term relationship, not having parents with postgraduate university education nor having family or close friends practicing medicine, having undertaken voluntary work in a developing nation, not volunteering with elderly people, desire for varied scope of practice, a societal orientation, a lower interest in research, desire for short postgraduate training, and lower preference for medical versus social problems. Interpretation Demographic and attitudinal characteristics at entry into medical school predicted whether students chose a career in family medicine. PMID:20974721

  1. Pediatric Emergency Medicine Fellowship University of Rochester

    E-print Network

    Goldman, Steven A.

    Pediatric Emergency Medicine Fellowship University of Rochester School of Medicine & Dentistry.......................................................................................................12 Pediatric Emergency Medicine Core Faculty and Fellows.............................................................................................15 #12;3 Pediatric Emergency Medicine Fellowship Golisano Children's Hospital at Strong University

  2. Learning by contract in family medicine training.

    PubMed

    Ogborne, W L; Killer, D V

    1984-06-01

    The Family Medicine Programme (FMP) of the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners is a national programme of vocational training for general/family practice. In 1981 the decision was made to adopt 'learning by contract' as an educational method leading to the certification of training. This paper describes the educational philosophy of the FMP and its importance in this decision. The experience of the authors in the implementation of learning by contract is also described. PMID:6530068

  3. Generation to Generation: The Heart of Family Medicine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winter, Robin O.

    2012-01-01

    According to the American Board of Family Medicine, "The scope of family medicine encompasses all ages, both sexes, each organ system and every disease entity." What makes the seemingly daunting task of practicing family medicine possible is that family physicians learn to utilize similar clinical reasoning for all of their patients regardless of…

  4. Family medicine research capacity building

    PubMed Central

    Rosser, Walter; Godwin, Marshall; Seguin, Rachelle

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT PROBLEM BEING ADDRESSED Research is not perceived as an integral part of family practice by most family physicians working in community practices. OBJECTIVE OF THE PROGRAM To assist community-based practitioners in answering research questions that emerge from their practices in order for them to gain a better understanding of research and its value. PROGRAM DESCRIPTION The Ontario College of Family Physicians developed a program consisting of 5 sets of weekend workshops, each 2 months apart. Two pilots of the 5-weekend program occurred between 2000 and 2003. After the pilots, thirteen 5-weekend programs were held in 2 waves by 20 facilitators, who were trained in one of two 1-day seminars. CONCLUSION This 5-weekend program, developed and tested in Ontario, stimulates community practitioners to learn how to answer research questions emerging from their practices. A 1-day seminar is adequate to train facilitators to successfully run these programs. Evaluations by both facilitators and program participants were very positive, with many participants stating that their clinical practices were improved as a result of the program. The program has been adapted for residency training, and it has already been used internationally. PMID:20228296

  5. Educational contracts in family medicine residency training.

    PubMed Central

    Mahood, S.; Rojas, R.; Andres, D.; Zagozeski, C.; White, G.; Bradel, T.

    1994-01-01

    An educational contract for family medicine residency training and evaluation addresses many of the difficulties and challenges of current postgraduate medical education. This article identifies important principles for developing a contractual approach; describes the contract used in one program and its implementation; and discusses its theory, advantages, and limitations. Images p550-a PMID:8199512

  6. Family Medicine Curriculum Guide to Substance Abuse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liepman, Michael R., Ed.; And Others

    This curriculum guide on substance abuse is intended for teachers of family medicine. Comments, learning objectives, teaching hints, and evaluations of knowledge are provided for each area in all chapters. Chapter 1 focuses on the pharmacology of commonly abused drugs including depressants, opioids, stimulants, hallucinogens, inhalants, and…

  7. Page 1 of 1 FACULTY: Faculty of Medicine, Department of Family Medicine

    E-print Network

    Sankoff, David

    Page 1 of 1 FACULTY: Faculty of Medicine, Department of Family Medicine REPORTS TO: Chair: The Department of Family Medicine is seeking a dedicated FTA Physician who is committed to providing, advancing and collaborates in the clinical teaching and supervision of Family Medicine residents and medical students

  8. Weaving Public Health Education Into the Fabric of a Family Medicine Residency

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stacy E. Potts; Konstantinos E. Deligiannidis; Suzanne B. Cashman; Marie E. Caggiano; Lisa H. Carter; Heather-Lyn Haley; Warren J. Ferguson

    2011-01-01

    Policymakers and accrediting bodies have recognized the importance of integrating public health, population health, and prevention into graduate medical education programs. The high prevalence of chronic illness, coupled with the impact of behavioral and societal determinants of health, necessitate an urgent call for family medicine residencies to prepare future leaders to meet these challenges.The University of Massachusetts Worcester Family Medicine

  9. Home visits in family medicine residency

    PubMed Central

    Jakubovicz, Difat; Srivastava, Anita

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Problem addressed There has been a decline in family physicians providing home visits to housebound patients. Objective of program To increase family medicine residents’ exposure to home visits; their comfort and skills in providing home visits; and their willingness to provide home visits after graduation. Program description Between 2000 and 2010, each family practice resident at St Joseph’s Health Centre Family Medicine Teaching Unit in Toronto, Ont, was assigned at least 1 housebound patient to care for longitudinally over 2 years; the rationale for this was to increase the sense of “ownership” and responsibility among residents for their assigned homebound patients. Starting in 2003, until the program’s conclusion in 2010, residents were asked to fill out surveys before and after the program to assess their comfort with and confidence in providing home visits, as well as their satisfaction with the program. Survey responses were analyzed for changes over the course of residency training. A total of 85 residents completed the home visit teaching program between 2003 and 2010 inclusive. Conclusion While residents’ willingness to provide home visits did not increase over the course of residency, their confidence in making housecalls did increase. There was also a trend toward increased confidence among residents in working with community agencies. Thus, having home visit patients be a part of resident practices might play an important role in increasing the likelihood that future family physicians will continue to care for their patients when those patients are no longer ambulatory. PMID:26052599

  10. Faculty development in family medicine. A reassessment.

    PubMed Central

    Steinert, Y.

    1993-01-01

    The 16 Canadian departments of family medicine were surveyed to ascertain the availability and content of faculty development activities. The results suggest numerous changes since 1985 and a strong commitment to faculty development. With the consolidation of many faculty development activities to date, departments should now consider other methods of faculty development, broaden their activities beyond the current emphasis on "teaching skills," examine the possibility of integrating faculty development with faculty evaluation, and conduct more systematic program evaluations. PMID:8219840

  11. Health literacy: implications for family medicine.

    PubMed

    Davis, Terry C; Wolf, Michael S

    2004-09-01

    As many as 90 million Americans have difficulty understanding and acting on health information. This health literacy epidemic is increasingly recognized as a problem that influences health care quality and cost. Yet many physicians do not recognize the problem or lack the skills and confidence to approach the subject with patients. In this issue of Family Medicine, several articles address health literacy in family medicine. Wallace and Lennon examined the readability of American Academy of Family Physicians patient education materials available via the Internet. They found that three of four handouts were written above the average reading level of American adults. Rosenthal and colleagues surveyed residents and found they lacked the confidence to screen and counsel adults about literacy. They used a Reach Out and Read program with accompanying resident education sessions to provide a practical and effective means for incorporating literacy assessment and counseling into primary care. Chew and colleagues presented an alternative to existing health literacy screening tests by asking three questions to detect inadequate health literacy. Likewise, Shea and colleagues reviewed the prospect of shortening the Rapid Estimate of Adult Literacy in Medicine (REALM), a commonly used health literacy screening tool. Both the Chew and Shea articles highlight the need for improved methods for recognizing literacy problems in the clinical setting. Further research is required to identify effective interventions that will strengthen the skills and coping strategies of both patients and providers and also prevent and limit poor reading and numeracy ability in the next generation. PMID:15343422

  12. Length of Training Debate in Family Medicine: Idealism Versus Realism?

    PubMed Central

    Orientale, Eugene

    2013-01-01

    How long a resident must train to achieve competency is an ongoing debate in medicine. For family medicine, there is an Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME)–approved proposal to examine the benefits of lengthening family medicine training from 3 to 4 years. The rationale for adding another year of residency in family medicine has included the following: (1) overcoming the effect of the duty hour limits in further reducing educational opportunities, (2) reversing the growing number of first-time takers of the American Board of Family Medicine primary board who fail to pass the exam, (3) enhancing the family medicine training experience by “decompressing” the ever-growing number of Residency Review Committee requirements to maintain accreditation, and (4) improving the overall quality of family medicine graduates. PMID:24404258

  13. University of Mississippi School of Medicine

    E-print Network

    Raucher, Drazen

    Page | 1 University of Mississippi School of Medicine 2010 Match Timothy Abston General Surgery York University SOM New York, NY John Allen Internal Medicine University of Virginia Charlottesville Medicine University Hospitals Jackson, MS Lauren Bethea Obstetrics-Gynecology University Hospitals Jackson

  14. Knowledge of CanMEDS–Family Medicine roles

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Victor K.; Burke, Clarissa A.; Narula, Archna

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective This study evaluates the self-perceived awareness of the new CanMEDS–Family Medicine (CanMEDS-FM) roles by family medicine residents. Design A 22-question online survey. Setting Canadian family medicine residency programs. Participants All residents enrolled in a Canadian family medicine residency as of September 2010 received the survey between May and June 2011. A total of 568 residents participated. Main outcome measures Survey respondents indicated their awareness of, their exposure to, and the perceived importance of the CanMEDS-FM roles. Results The survey response rate was 25.1%. In total, 88.9% (463 of 521) of family medicine residents were aware of the CanMEDS-FM roles; there was no statistically significant difference in awareness between first- and second-year residents. Family medicine expert and communicator were most frequently chosen as the most important CanMEDS-FM roles, while manager and scholar were selected the least often. Overall, 76.4% of family medicine residents thought that their core family medicine teaching was guided by CanMEDS-FM, while 41.8% thought the same about off-service rotations. Conclusion It appears that most family medicine residents are aware of the CanMEDS-FM roles. While core family medicine training and evaluation seem to be grounded in CanMEDS-FM, residency program directors should endeavour to ensure that the same principles apply during off-service rotations. PMID:24029530

  15. First trimester procedural abortion in family medicine.

    PubMed

    Lyus, Richard John; Gianutsos, Paul; Gold, Marji

    2009-01-01

    Unintended pregnancy is common, and in the United States almost one-third [corrected] of all women will have at least one abortion during their lifetime. The majority of abortions are performed in the first trimester. Although advances have been made in the provision of medical abortion in the family medicine setting, procedural methods remain the cornerstone of abortion care. We present a step-wise review of first trimester procedural abortion using the manual vacuum aspirator to demonstrate the feasibility of incorporating this service into a primary care setting. PMID:19264940

  16. PRIMARY CARE RESEARCH: 2012DIVISION OF FAMILY MEDICINE AND PRIMARY CARE,

    E-print Network

    Geldenhuys, Jaco

    1 PRIMARY CARE RESEARCH: 2012DIVISION OF FAMILY MEDICINE AND PRIMARY CARE, FACULTY OF MEDICINE AND HEALTH SCIENCES, STELLENBOSCH UNIVERSITY #12;2 3 PRIMARY CARE RESEARCH 2012 PRIMARY CARE RESEARCH 2012 2 0 1 2 #12;4 5 PRIMARY CARE RESEARCH 2012 PRIMARY CARE RESEARCH 2012 INTRODUCTION CLINICAL RESEARCH

  17. University of Central Florida College of Medicine

    E-print Network

    Foroosh, Hassan

    1 University of Central Florida College of Medicine 2011-2012 STUDENT FINANCIAL SERVICES GUIDEBOOK M.D. PROGRAM College of Medicine- Office of Student Financial Services Tel: 407.266.1381 or 407.........................................................................................................................10 Alternative/Private Loans

  18. Hospital grand rounds in family medicine. Content and educational structure.

    PubMed Central

    Lewkonia, R.; Sosnowski, M.; Murray, F.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate hospital grand rounds in family medicine, to examine their content and organization, and to recommend improved educational structures for these ubiquitous continuing medical education events. DATA SELECTION: Retrospective analysis of titles and content of 358 family medicine grand rounds offered in the department of family medicine of a large urban hospital from mid-1983 to the end of 1994. FINDINGS: Only 10% of family medicine grand rounds were presented by family physicians. Most grand rounds were in the form of specialists exhibiting their own interests in a lecture format. Analysis of grand rounds titles showed no consistent pattern of topics but an emphasis on practical aspects of medical care. Patient-based presentations were uncommon, as were grand rounds with more than one speaker. CONCLUSIONS: The content and mix of topics appeared appropriate, but in the absence of a curricular structure, or evaluation of learning gain, it is difficult to assess the value of grand rounds. PMID:9222579

  19. [Effects of family medicine education on medical students' attitudes].

    PubMed

    Chou, M C; Lee, M C

    1991-07-01

    Undergraduate education is considered to be one of the main contributory factors for the development of family medicine through increasing the number of medical graduates opting for a career in family practice. To evaluate the effects of family medicine education on student's attitudes, 140 fifth year medical students were asked in 1989 to fill in a questionnaire both before and after their curricula. The average age of the 123 students who completed the questionnaire on both occasions was 24.9 years; 106 were males; 17 were tuition free and 26 took additional family medicine clerkships. On aggregate, the students' disposition toward family medicine before their curricula appeared to be uncertain. Mean scores on the attitude scale did not significantly differ between socioeconomic subgroups before the curricula. After the curricula, students' attitudes were significantly altered, especially toward the future development of family medicine in Taiwan. However, their disposition toward family practice as a career changed the least. The degree of alteration in students' attitude toward family medicine before and after the curricula was related to the intensity of the course and to their socioeconomic backgrounds. PMID:1875456

  20. Satisfaction and Difficulties of Korean Family Medicine Resident Training Faculty

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung-Ha; Kim, Ju Young; Kwon, Kil Young; Lee, Chul-Min; Hyun, Seung Soo

    2013-01-01

    Background Practitioners of family medicine are essential to primary care practices in Korea. Resident training staffs in Korean family medicine departments have a crucial role in producing well-trained family physicians. This study assesses the aspects of satisfaction and difficulties of Korean family medicine resident training staffs. Methods We surveyed the resident training staffs of various Korean family medicine departments using an online survey tool. The survey used in this study was modified from previously used questionnaires. Respondents rated items using a five-point Likert scale and a 0-10 visual analogue scale. Results The response rate was 43.9% (122/278). The mean satisfaction score with regard to current family medicine residency programs was 7.59 out of 10. Resident training staffs found the administrative aspects of their role to be the most difficult. There were considerable differences in the reported difficulties of resident training according to the differing characteristics of each staff member, including age, sex, type of hospital, number of staff members, role as chief, and duration of staff. Most respondents (91.9%) cited a need for faculty development programs. Conclusion Korean family medicine resident training staffs need faculty development programs for the improvement of resident training. For the strengthening of core competencies among resident training staffs, faculty development programs or courses should be designed and implemented in Korea. PMID:24106588

  1. Test ordering for preventive health care among family medicine residents

    PubMed Central

    Fung, Daisy; Schabort, Inge; MacLean, Catherine A.; Asrar, Farhan M.; Khory, Ayesha; Vandermeer, Ben; Allan, G. Michael

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To determine which screening tests family medicine residents order as part of preventive health care. Design A cross-sectional survey. Setting Alberta and Ontario. Participants First- and second-year family medicine residents at the University of Alberta in Edmonton, the University of Calgary in Alberta, and McMaster University in Hamilton, Ont, during the 2011 to 2012 academic year. Main outcome measures Demographic information, Likert scale ratings assessing ordering attitudes, and selections from a list of 38 possible tests that could be ordered for preventive health care for sample 38-year-old and 55-year-old female and male patients. Descriptive and comparative statistics were calculated. Results A total of 318 of 482 residents (66%) completed the survey. Recommended or appropriate tests were ordered by 82% (for cervical cytology) to 95% (for fasting glucose measurement) of residents. Across the different sample patients, residents ordered an average of 3.3 to 5.7 inappropriate tests per patient, with 58% to 92% ordering at least 1 inappropriate test per patient. The estimated average excess costs varied from $38.39 for the 38-year-old man to $106.46 for the 55-year-old woman. More regular use of a periodic health examination screening template did not improve ordering (P = .88). Conclusion In general, residents ordered appropriate preventive health tests reasonably well but also ordered an average of 3.3 to 5.7 inappropriate tests for each patient. Training programs need to provide better education for trainees around inappropriate screening and work hard to establish good ordering behaviour in preparation for entering practice. PMID:25767171

  2. Complementary and Alternative Medicine: Core Competencies for Family Nurse Practitioners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burman, Mary E.

    2003-01-01

    Directors of family nurse practitioner education programs (n=141) reported inclusion of some complementary/alternative medicine content (CAM), most commonly interviewing patients about CAM, critical thinking, evidence-based medicine, laws, ethics, and spiritual/cultural beliefs. Definition of CAM was medically, not holistically based. More faculty…

  3. The Ohio State University College of Medicine

    E-print Network

    The Ohio State University College of Medicine #12;Wiley W. "Chip" Souba, MD, ScD Dean, The Ohio are transforming the practice of medicine, with physicians at the center. Medical students at Ohio State have Ohio State's College of Medicine well prepared to discover, achieve and lead in the collaborative

  4. UNIVERSITY OF UTAH SCHOOL OF MEDICINE

    E-print Network

    Feschotte, Cedric

    UNIVERSITY OF UTAH SCHOOL OF MEDICINE MS in Clinical Investigation (MSCI) Program Fall Semester and Biostatistics Center (www.ccts.utah.edu/biostats ) Adjunct Assistant Professor, U of Utah School of Medicine, Department of Orthopaedics Div of Clinical Epidemiology, Dept of Internal Medicine 295 Chipeta Way Rm 1N433

  5. Why Research in Family Medicine? A Superfluous Question

    PubMed Central

    De Maeseneer, Jan M.; De Sutter, An

    2004-01-01

    The ultimate answer to the question, “Why research in family medicine?” is to provide better care for our patients. Through research we want to improve quality of primary care by improving our understanding and practice of it. This research will inevitably be specific for family medicine as family medicine is a specific discipline. In this article we first explore what makes family medicine a specific discipline. In a second part we present a framework to grasp the various research questions that must be answered to achieve the complex and multifaceted goal of improving quality of care. Family medicine is a specific discipline for 3 reasons: it has a unique epidemiology, the context of care is important, and it has a strong link and responsibility to the community. Quality of care is a complex and multidimensional concept that raises diverse research questions. We propose to map these questions within a framework defined by the 3 dimensions of the Donabedian triangle—structure, process, and outcome—and within each of these dimensions by 5 foci—basic knowledge, diagnostic and therapeutic problem solving, practice implementation, policy context, and education. This framework may help to make the various research questions operational and to point out the gaps in our research. The questions and answers should be relevant to daily practice and comprise all domains of family medicine so that eventually most of our daily actions in practice will be underpinned with medical, contextual, and policy evidence and contribute to the improvement of the quality of care. PMID:15655082

  6. UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA SCHOOL OF MEDICINE

    E-print Network

    Bushman, Frederic

    UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA SCHOOL OF MEDICINE Non-University Building Off-Campus Space Request Form Date: ___________________ 1. Space Request for: ________________________________________________________ (program / department / center / institute requesting space) 2. Requestor

  7. Faculty Physician Residency FAMILY MEDICINE RESIDENCY

    E-print Network

    on residency committees including recruitment, faculty, clinical competency, etc. Clinical Requirements (40 Medicine Residents in common office procedures Actively pursue and participate in research and scholarly activities Assist Residents in their research/scholarly activities Complete Evaluations for Resident

  8. COLLEGE OF VETERINARY MEDICINE UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE

    E-print Network

    Tennessee, University of

    COLLEGE OF VETERINARY MEDICINE UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE The University of Tennessee, founded in 1794, is one of the oldest educational institutions in the country. The College of Veterinary Medicine the cultural and recreational opportunities of Nashville and Atlanta. The modern Clyde M. York Veterinary

  9. Identifying Public Health Competencies Relevant to Family Medicine

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bart J. Harvey; Brent W. Moloughney; Karl T. Iglar

    2011-01-01

    Public health situations faced by family physicians and other primary care practitioners, such as severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and more recently H1N1, have resulted in an increased interest to identify the public health competencies relevant to family medicine. At present there is no agreed-on set of public health competencies delineating the knowledge and skills that family physicians should possess

  10. Defining competency-based evaluation objectives in family medicine

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Tim; Brailovsky, Carlos; Rainsberry, Paul; Lawrence, Katherine; Crichton, Tom; Carpentier, Marie-Pierre; Visser, Shaun

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Objective To develop a definition of competence in family medicine sufficient to guide a review of Certification examinations by the Board of Examiners of the College of Family Physicians of Canada. Design Delphi analysis of responses to a 4-question postal survey. Setting Canadian family practice. Participants A total of 302 family physicians who have served as examiners for the College of Family Physicians of Canada’s Certification examination. Methods A survey comprising 4 short-answer questions was mailed to the 302 participating family physicians asking them to list elements that define competence in family medicine among newly certified family physicians beginning independent practice. Two expert groups used a modified Delphi consensus process to analyze responses and generate 2 basic components of this definition of competence: first, the problems that a newly practising family physician should be competent to handle; second, the qualities, behaviour, and skills that characterize competence at the start of independent practice. Main findings Response rate was 54%; total number of elements among all responses was 5077, for an average 31 per respondent. Of the elements, 2676 were topics or clinical situations to be dealt with; the other 2401 were skills, behaviour patterns, or qualities, without reference to a specific clinical problem. The expert groups identified 6 essential skills, the phases of the clinical encounter, and 99 priority topics as the descriptors used by the respondents. More than 20% of respondents cited 30 of the topics. Conclusion Family physicians define the domain of competence in family medicine in terms of 6 essential skills, the phases of the clinical encounter, and priority topics. This survey represents the first level of definition of evaluation objectives in family medicine. Definition of the interactions among these elements will permit these objectives to become detailed enough to effectively guide assessment. PMID:21918130

  11. EVOLUTION AND MEDICINE Evolution, Medicine, and the Darwin Family

    E-print Network

    Antolin, Michael F.

    of evolution in the 1700s and 1800s is typified by how the medical family of Charles Darwin, including his grandfather Dr. Erasmus Darwin and father Dr. Robert Waring Darwin, directly and indirectly guided Charles' scientific development and eventual discovery of natural selection. In particular, in the 1700s, Erasmus

  12. 1 Kevin Abel 12 Chip Brooks Family Medicine Emergency Medicine

    E-print Network

    Raucher, Drazen

    Carolina Jackson, Mississippi 6 Marc Biggers 17 Jennifer Chamberlain Orthopaedic Surgery Surgery of Georgia-Augusta University Hospitals Augusta, Georgia Jackson, Mississippi 31 Nick Hendricks 42 Dustin LeBlanc

  13. [#1WordforFamilyMedicine: ideas beyond words].

    PubMed

    Hoedebecke, Kyle; Celotto, Stefano; Demurtas, Jacopo

    2015-06-01

    Social media has proven to be a powerful method in which ideas can be formed and shared publicly. Within the global family medicine community, the #1WordforFamilyMedicine project has gained widespread popularity with participation in over 30 countries on 5 continents. With over 3000 responses - and counting - this idea has crossed the globe to engage both the general public and medical community at an exponential rate. Further exploration into the use of social media for the benefit of our profession should continue as patients and physicians become increasing connected to the internet. PMID:26076418

  14. Pediatric Emergency Medicine Fellowship University of Rochester

    E-print Network

    Goldman, Steven A.

    Golisano Children's Hospital at Strong Strong Memorial Hospital #12;2 Table of Contents Introduction.............................................................................................17 Personnel Information..........................................................................................20 #12;3 Pediatric Emergency Medicine Fellowship Golisano Children's Hospital at Strong University

  15. University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine

    E-print Network

    Sibille, Etienne

    to cervical spinal cord injury (tetraplegia), brainstem stroke, muscular dystrophy, or amyotrophic lateral in participating, please contact: Wei Wang, MD, PhD Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, University

  16. Departments | Centers | Institutes Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine

    E-print Network

    Chisholm, Rex L.

    Departments | Centers | Institutes Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine The Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine has many excellent departments, centers, institutes offerings with the creation of the Institute for Public Health & Medicine, which combined interdisciplinary

  17. Medicinal uses, phytochemistry and pharmacology of family Sterculiaceae: a review.

    PubMed

    Al Muqarrabun, L M R; Ahmat, N

    2015-03-01

    The family Sterculiaceae is one of the most important families among flowering plants. Many of its members demonstrate medicinal properties and have been used for the treatment of various ailments and wounds. A wide range of compounds including alkaloids, phenyl propanoids, flavonoids, terpenoids and other types of compounds including hydrocarbons, sugars, quinones, phenolic acids, lactones, lignans, amine and amides have been isolated from several species in this family. Few studies have reported that some extracts and single compounds isolated from this family exhibited several biological activities, such as antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and cytotoxic activities. The present review is an effort to provide information about the traditional uses, phytochemistry and pharmacology of species from family Sterculiaceae, and to uncover the gaps and potentials requiring further research opportunities regarding the chemistry and pharmacy of this family. PMID:25599949

  18. Meeting the challenge of evidence-based medicine in the family medicine clerkship: closing the loop from academics to office.

    PubMed

    Cavanaugh, Susan K; Calabretta, Nancy

    2013-01-01

    An EBM Seminar and POEM® project was developed to teach evidence-based medicine in a family medicine clerkship. The seminar focused on the application of preclinical coursework in biostatistics and epidemiology to the clinical third year. POEM projects involved answering clinical questions, derived from patient cases in the family medicine offices, with best available evidence. These questions and answers were archived in a wiki which was made available to the institution's family medicine physicians. Selected POEMs were also published in the in-house family medicine newsletter. The POEM projects evolved from an educational exercise for medical students to a valuable repository of evidence for clinicians. PMID:23607466

  19. Morning Report in Family Medicine Residency Programs: A Descriptive Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuncharapu, Indumathi; Cass, Alvah R.; Carlson, Carol A.; Scott, Jack R.

    Morning Report (MR) is a frequently held case conference in most Family Medicine (FM) residency programs among medical learners who discuss recent inpatient admissions before the day's care of patients. This study conducted a national survey of FM residency program directors to describe the roles of faculty and residents in facilitating MR.…

  20. Wayne State University School of Medicine 2014 Award Nomination Form

    E-print Network

    Finley Jr., Russell L.

    Wayne State University School of Medicine 2014 Award Nomination Form 2014 WAYNE STATE UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF MEDICINE CALL FOR NOMINATIONS The Wayne State University School of Medicine Ambassador a committee appointed by the Dean of the School of Medicine. The selection committee is a representative body

  1. To each patient and employee at the OHSU Family Medicine Centers . . .

    E-print Network

    Chapman, Michael S.

    To each patient and employee at the OHSU Family Medicine Centers . . . We are committed, OHSU Family Medicine APPLAUSE Date Dear Dr. Saultz: The following individual(s) deserves special recognition for extending an extra measure of care: Family Medicine Staff Member(s): Comments/details: Please

  2. Family Medicine Training in the Care of Older Adults--Has the Retreat Been Sounded?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mouton, Charles P.; Parker, Robert W.

    2003-01-01

    Discusses the trend away from geriatrics training in family medicine residency despite the growing need in society. Asserts that family medicine is failing to seize an opportunity to advance the care of older adults and discusses what would constitute acceptable training in geriatrics and how it should fit into the family medicine curriculum. (EV)

  3. E-Learning Readiness in Medicine: Turkish Family Medicine (FM) Physicians Case

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parlakkiliç, Alaattin

    2015-01-01

    This research investigates e-learning readiness level of family medicine physicians (FM) in Turkey. The study measures the level of e-learning readiness of Turkish FM physicians by an online e-learning readiness survey. According to results five areas are ready at Turkish FM physicians but need a few improvements:…

  4. Department of Tropical Medicine: Tulane University

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    1997-01-01

    The Tulane Tropical Medicine Web Page at Tulane University School of Public Health, New Orleans, Louisiana includes current scientific global research projects, US and international academic degree programs, malaria research activities in epidemiology, chloroquine drug resistance, and severe disease. Also available: faculty info and contact points and links to health-related sites.

  5. University of Alberta Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry

    E-print Network

    MacMillan, Andrew

    .) Overview The experience visitors have when they come to the Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry (FoMD) website. For that reason, it's critical that we consider their experience when we're developing our web materials brand increases the university's effectiveness in attracting and retaining students, faculty

  6. Title: Brock Family Chair, GRA Eminent Scholar in Nanomedicine University Affiliations

    E-print Network

    Garmestani, Hamid

    Younan Xia Title: Brock Family Chair, GRA Eminent Scholar in Nanomedicine University Affiliations Nanomedicine Regenerative medicine Nanostructured materials Nanocatalysis Education Ph.D., Harvard) Eminent Scholar in Nanomedicine in the Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering at Georgia

  7. Why Family Medicine is a Good Career Choice for Indian Medical Graduates?

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Raman

    2014-01-01

    Internationally family medicine has evolved as an independent academic discipline of medical science and speciality vocational training for community based primary care physicians. India has a long tradition of family practice however due to various regulatory barriers family medicine did not optimally develop in mainstream medical education system for many decades. Recently, there is growing interest in this concept in India and family medicine is emerging as a viable career option for medical graduates in India. PMID:24791226

  8. UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA PERELMAN SCHOOL OF MEDICINE Curriculum Vitae

    E-print Network

    Pennsylvania, University of

    -2005 Executive Board, Center for Sleep and Circadian Neurobiology, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine of Medicine. 1995- Associate Director, Center for Sleep and Circadian Neurobiology, University of Pennsylvania for Sleep and Respiratory Neurobiology 1995- Member,

  9. UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA PERELMAN SCHOOL OF MEDICINE Curriculum Vitae

    E-print Network

    Pennsylvania, University of

    -2005 Executive Board, Center for Sleep and Circadian Neurobiology, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine of Medicine. 1995- Associate Director, Center for Sleep and Circadian Neurobiology, University of Pennsylvania for Sleep and Respiratory Neurobiology 1995- Member, Graduate G

  10. A Comparison of Students' Clinical Experience in Family Medicine and Traditional Clerkships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parkerson, George R., Jr.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Experience on the traditional internal medicine, surgery, pediatrics, obstetrics-gynecology, and psychiatry clerkships was compared with the experience on a family medicine clerkship. The family medicine clerkship offered the most experience with circulatory, respiratory, digestive, neurological, musculoskeletal, and skin problems and with…

  11. WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF MEDICINE DEPARTMENT OF PHYSIOLOGY & PHARMACOLOGY

    E-print Network

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF MEDICINE DEPARTMENT OF PHYSIOLOGY & PHARMACOLOGY 2013 SPRING West Virginia University School of Medicine Nurkiewicz February 7 Fan Wu, Ph.D. CFD Research University, School of Medicine Nurkiewicz 28 No seminar (E.J. Van Liere Memorial Convocation and HSC Research

  12. SUBJECT EXAM TESTING DATES BY CLERKSHIP -2012-2013 FAMILY MEDICINE NEUROLOGY PEDIATRICS PSYCHIATRY SURGERY INTERNAL MED. OB/GYN

    E-print Network

    Berdichevsky, Victor

    SUBJECT EXAM TESTING DATES BY CLERKSHIP -2012-2013 FAMILY MEDICINE NEUROLOGY PEDIATRICS PSYCHIATRY SUBJECT EXAM SCHEDULE 8:00 AM ­ Pediatrics, Family Medicine, Psychiatry and Surgery 11:00 AM ­ Medicine

  13. Management of Test Results in Family Medicine Offices

    PubMed Central

    Elder, Nancy C.; McEwen, Timothy R.; Flach, John M.; Gallimore, Jennie J.

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE We wanted to explore test results management systems in family medicine offices and to delineate the components of quality in results management. METHODS Using a multimethod protocol, we intensively studied 4 purposefully chosen family medicine offices using observations, interviews, and surveys. Data analysis consisted of iterative qualitative analysis, descriptive frequencies, and individual case studies, followed by a comparative case analysis. We assessed the quality of results management at each practice by both the presence of and adherence to systemwide practices for each results management step, as well as outcomes from chart reviews, patient surveys, and interview and observation notes. RESULTS We found variability between offices in how they performed the tasks for each of the specific steps of results management. No office consistently had or adhered to office-wide results management practices, and only 2 offices had written protocols or procedures for any results management steps. Whereas most patients surveyed acknowledged receiving their test results (87% to 100%), a far smaller proportion of patient charts documented patient notification (58% to 85%), clinician response to the result (47% to 84%), and follow-up for abnormal results (28% to 55%). We found 2 themes that emerged as factors of importance in assessing test results management quality: safety awareness—a leadership focus and communication that occurs around quality and safety, teamwork in the office, and the presence of appropriate policies and procedures; and technological adoption—the presence of an electronic health record, digital connections between the office and testing facilities, use of technology to facilitate patient communication, and the presence of forcing functions (built-in safeguards and requirements). CONCLUSION Understanding the components of safety awareness and technological adoption can assist family medicine offices in evaluating their own results management processes and help them design systems that can lead to higher quality care. PMID:19597172

  14. 2015 Admissions Guide: Doctoral Program of Medicine Graduate School of Medicine, the University of Tokyo

    E-print Network

    Miyashita, Yasushi

    1 2015 Admissions Guide: Doctoral Program of Medicine Graduate School of Medicine, the University of Medicine are to promote advanced research that will contribute to breakthroughs in our understanding of creative research ability. Prospective students The Graduate School of Medicine is looking

  15. 2012 Admissions Guide: Doctoral Program of Medicine Graduate School of Medicine, the University of Tokyo

    E-print Network

    Miyashita, Yasushi

    1 2012 Admissions Guide: Doctoral Program of Medicine Graduate School of Medicine, the University of Medicine are to promote advanced research that will contribute to breakthroughs in our understanding of creative research ability. Prospective students The Graduate School of Medicine is looking

  16. 2014 Admissions Guide: Doctoral Program of Medicine Graduate School of Medicine, the University of Tokyo

    E-print Network

    Miyashita, Yasushi

    1 2014 Admissions Guide: Doctoral Program of Medicine Graduate School of Medicine, the University of Medicine are to promote advanced research that will contribute to breakthroughs in our understanding of creative research ability. Prospective students The Graduate School of Medicine is looking

  17. 2013 Admissions Guide: Doctoral Program of Medicine Graduate School of Medicine, the University of Tokyo

    E-print Network

    Miyashita, Yasushi

    1 2013 Admissions Guide: Doctoral Program of Medicine Graduate School of Medicine, the University of Medicine are to promote advanced research that will contribute to breakthroughs in our understanding of creative research ability. Prospective students The Graduate School of Medicine is looking

  18. 2011 Admissions Guide: Doctoral Program of Medicine Graduate School of Medicine, the University of Tokyo

    E-print Network

    Miyashita, Yasushi

    1 2011 Admissions Guide: Doctoral Program of Medicine Graduate School of Medicine, the University of Medicine are to promote advanced research that will contribute to breakthroughs in our understanding of creative research ability. Prospective students The Graduate School of Medicine is looking

  19. The University of South Carolina School of Medicine RESIDENCY APPOINTMENTS

    E-print Network

    Almor, Amit

    Birmingham, Alabama Amanda Davis Anesthesiology University of Alabama Medical Center Birmingham, Alabama-Diagnostic University Medical Center Nashville, Tennessee Todd Gandy Internal Medicine Carolinas Medical Center

  20. The Transplant Patient and Transplant Medicine in Family Practice

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Lloyd D.

    2014-01-01

    Over the last two decades in particular there has been a remarkable increase in the number of solid organ transplants being performed worldwide alongside improvements in long-term survival rates. However, the infrastructure at transplant centres has been unable to keep pace with the current volume of the transplant patient work load. These pressures on transplant specialist centres has led to calls for an increased role of the general practitioner (GP) managing particular aspects of transplant patients’ medical care. Indeed, many aspects of follow-up care such as screening for malignancies, preventing infection through immunisation programmes, and managing cardiovascular risk factors are already important aspects of family practice medicine. This paper aims to review some of the aspects of transplant patient care that is important for healthcare workers in family practice to manage. PMID:25657941

  1. A small-group approach to teaching family medicine.

    PubMed

    Lennox, L; Devieux, J; Huff, F; Barker, P; Arradondo, J E; Devieux, R

    1985-01-01

    The authors describe a method for teaching preclinical medical students some important family medicine concepts utilizing a seminar format which allows for improved student-teacher interaction and individualization of material. These seminars, on family health behavior, compliance, behavioral interventions for life-style change, and managing stress, were designed to encourage freshman medical students to understand and apply concepts concerning health behavior and attitudes, both personally and professionally. The format of these sessions included the use of self-assessment instruments, discussion, role play, and case studies. Results of student evaluations indicate they perceived the seminars positively. Specific areas of positive value included the content and small-group related processes. The seminars also provided data useful for developing programs for students. PMID:3870792

  2. Enhancing the Family Medicine Curriculum in Deliveries and Emergency Medicine as a Way of Developing a Rural Teaching Site

    Microsoft Academic Search

    MacMillan Rodney; Loren A. Crown; Ricardo Hahn; John Martin

    Background: The urban family practice residencies of Memphis were not providing sufficient training or encouragement to young physicians for practice in rural communities. Methods: In 1990, the Department of Family Medicine, in partnership with the State of Tennessee Health Access Act and the Baptist Health Care System, developed a teaching practice in a rural county of western Tennessee. The family

  3. Tufts University School of Dental Medicine (TUSDM) Clinical Business Operations Internal Policy and Procedure Manual

    E-print Network

    Dennett, Daniel

    for an occlusal guard is $10.00 Dental Students' Family Members Discount (pre-doctoral only) Only the grandparentsTufts University School of Dental Medicine (TUSDM) Clinical Business Operations Internal Policy being offered within the Dental School to Tufts University students as well as guidelines for each

  4. [Family medicine and practice in the Mexican Social Security Institute].

    PubMed

    Casas Patiño, Donovan; Jarillo Soto, Edgar; Rodríguez Torres, Alejandra

    2014-01-01

    The central ideas of this research paper are related to the practice of family medicine as a specialty. It focuses in its origins, problems, unique characteristics, limitations, scope, management, and processes within the context of primary care of the Mexican Social Security System. This approach was based on a qualitative, hermeneutical study closely related to the Structural Functionalism Theory. Within this framework, medical practice is seen as an equation: Meaning = action + function/structure. This offers an approach to the understanding of reality through surveys and observations in five categories: identity, activity, purpose, values/norms, and power/relationship. The practice of family medicine is defined as a medical act in the Mexican Social Security Institute. This act is limited to a brief encounter and a prescription, which makes it a short, fleeting, medicalized interaction. The result is a negative social imaginary of the physician, the patient and the whole of society. Thus, individuals and society host a negative social imaginary bestowed on doctors and users of the health system. PMID:25375148

  5. Transforming a family medicine center and residency program into a federally qualified health center.

    PubMed

    Cousineau, Michael R; Flores, Hector; Cheng, Scott; Gates, Jerry D; Douglas, James H; Clute, Gerald B; Coan, Carl E

    2013-05-01

    The authors describe a family medicine center before and after a merger between the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California, the California Hospital Medical Center, and the Eisner Pediatric and Family Medical Center in 2012. The merger provided new opportunities to stabilize the financial base of a clinical practice struggling financially and to enhance the training of residents and other health professionals in primary care, which motivated the partners to consider this new model. After 18 months of negotiations, they were able to convert the family medicine center and residency program into a new federally qualified health center. The benefits to this new model include an increase in both patient volume and the quality of education, supporting residency accreditation; a greater number of residents from U.S. medical schools; enhanced education and preparation of primary care physicians for practice in medically underserved communities; enhanced reimbursements and new opportunities for state, local, and federal grants; and quality improvement and new information technology. The partners overcame academic, administrative, legal, and regulatory obstacles, communication barriers, and differences in culture and expectations to achieve this merger. Keys to their success include the commitment of the leaders at the three institutions to the goals of the merger, a dedicated project manager and consultants, opportunities for new revenue sources and reimbursements, and support from a pioneering charitable foundation. The authors conclude by discussing the implications of using community health centers as the focal point for training primary care clinicians and addressing workforce shortages. PMID:23524918

  6. Interprofessional primary care in academic family medicine clinics

    PubMed Central

    Drummond, Neil; Abbott, Karen; Williamson, Tyler; Somji, Behnaz

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objective To explore the status and processes of interprofessional work environments and the implications for interprofessional education in a sample of family medicine teaching clinics. Design Focus group interviews using a purposive sampling procedure. Setting Four academic family medicine clinics in Alberta. Participants Seven family physicians, 9 registered nurses, 5 licensed practical nurses, 2 residents, 1 psychologist, 1 informatics specialist, 1 pharmacist, 1 dietitian, 1 nurse practitioner, 1 receptionist, and 1 respiratory therapist. Methods Assessment of clinic status and performance in relation to established principles of interprofessional work and education was explored using semistructured focus group interviews. Main findings Our data supported the D’Amour and Oandasan model of successful interprofessional collaborative practice in terms of the model’s main “factors” (ie, shared goals and vision, sense of belonging, governance, and the structuring of clinical care) and their constituent “elements.” It is reasonable to conclude that the extent to which these factors and elements are both present and positively oriented in academic clinic settings is an important contributory factor to the establishment of interprofessional collaborative practice in primary care. Using this model, 2 of the 4 clinics were rated as expressing substantial progress in relation to interprofessional work, while the other 2 clinics were rated as less successful on that dimension. None of the clinics was identified as having a clear and explicit focus on providing interprofessional education. Conclusion The key factor in relation to the implementation of interprofessional work in primary care appears to be the existence of clear and explicit leadership in that direction. Substantial scope exists for improvement in the organization, conduct, and promotion of interprofessional education for Canadian primary care. PMID:22893347

  7. University of Oxford WELLCOME UNIT FOR THE HISTORY OF MEDICINE

    E-print Network

    Oxford, University of

    University of Oxford WELLCOME UNIT FOR THE HISTORY OF MEDICINE 45-47 BANBURY ROAD, OXFORD, OX2 6PE of Medicine, University of Oxford Details of other research seminars in history can be found at: http://www.history will be available from 2.00pm `Disease, Health, and Medicine since 1800' Week 1 13 October Mark Honigsbaum, Queen

  8. Washington University School of Medicine Telephone Numbers (Area Code 314)

    E-print Network

    Kornfeld, S. Kerry

    of Medicine has a rich, 122-year history of success in research, education and patient care. It pioneeredWashington University School of Medicine FACTS 2013 Telephone Numbers (Area Code 314) Washington University School of Medicine . . . . . . . . . . 362-5000 660 S. Euclid Ave., St. Louis, MO 63110

  9. Need to teach family medicine concepts even before establishing such practice in a country

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The practice of family medicine is not well established in many developing countries including Sri Lanka. The Sri Lankan Government funds and runs the health facilities which cater to the health needs of a majority of the population. Services of a first contact doctor delivered by full time, vocationally trained, Family Physicians is generally overshadowed by outpatient departments of the government hospitals and after hours private practice by the government sector doctors and specialists. This process has changed the concept of the provision of comprehensive primary and continuing care for entire families, which in an ideal situation, should addresses psychosocial problems as well and deliver coordinated health care services in a society. Therefore there is a compelling need to teach Family Medicine concepts to undergraduates in all medical faculties. Discussion A similar situation prevails in many countries in the region. Faculty of Medicine Peradeniya embarked on teaching family medicine concepts even before a department of Family Medicine was established. The faculty has recognized CanMed Family Medicine concepts as the guiding principles where being an expert, communicator, collaborator, advocate, manager and professional is considered as core competencies of a doctor. These concepts created the basis to evaluate the existing family medicine curriculum , and the adequacy of teaching knowledge and skills, related to family medicine has been confirmed. However inadequacies of teaching related to communication, collaboration, management, advocacy and professionalism were recognized. Importance of inculcating patient centred attitudes and empathy in patient care was highlighted. Adopting evaluation tools like Patient Practitioner Orientation Scale and Jefferson’s Scale of Empathy was established. Consensus has been developed among all the departments to improve their teaching programmes in order to establish a system of teaching family medicine concepts among students which would lead them to be good Family Physicians in the future. Summary Teaching Family Medicine concepts could be initiated even before establishing departments of family medicine in medical faculties and establishing the practice of family medicine in society. Family medicine competencies could be inculcated among graduates while promoting the establishment of the proper practice of Family Medicine in the society. PMID:24397851

  10. Development and validation of a questionnaire for evaluation of students' attitudes towards family medicine.

    PubMed

    Šter, Marija Petek; Švab, Igor; Klemenc-Ketiš, Zalika; Kersnik, Janko

    2015-03-01

    The development of the EURACT (European Academy of Teachers in General Practice) Educational Agenda helped many family medicine departments in development of clerkship and the aims and objectives of family medicine teaching. Our aims were to develop and validate a tool for assessment of students' attitudes towards family medicine and to evaluate the impact of the clerkship on students' attitudes regarding the competences of family doctor. In the pilot study, experienced family doctors were asked to describe their attitudes towards family medicine by using the Educational Agenda as a template for brainstorming. The statements were paraphrased and developed into a 164-items questionnaire, which was administered to 176 final-year students in academic year 2007/08. The third phase consisted of development of a final tool using statistical analysis, which resulted in the 60-items questionnaire in six domains which was used for the evaluation of students' attitudes. At the beginning of the clerkship, person-centred care and holistic approach scored lower than the other competences. Students' attitudes regarding the competences at the end of 7 weeks clerkship in family medicine were more positive, with exception of the competence regarding primary care management. The students who named family medicine as his or her future career choice, found holistic approach as more important than the students who did not name it as their future career. With the decision tree, which included students' attitudes to the competences of family medicine, we can successfully predict the future career choice in family medicine in 93.5% of the students. This study reports on the first attempt to develop a valid and reliable tool for measuring attitudes towards family medicine based on EURACT Educational Agenda. The questionnaire could be used for evaluating changes of students' attitudes in undergraduate curricula and for prediction of students' preferences regarding their future professional career in family medicine. PMID:26040061

  11. Characteristics of medical schools related to the choice of family medicine as a specialty.

    PubMed

    Campos-Outcalt, D; Senf, J H

    1989-10-01

    Previous research has identified five characteristics of medical schools that are related to the choice of family medicine as a specialty: (1) the amount of time devoted to required training in family medicine, (2) the timing of the required family medicine training, (3) the type of ownership of the school (public or private), (4) the geographic location of the school, and (5) the administrative structure of family medicine within the school. These five characteristics of U.S. medical schools during the mid-1980s, together with the school tuition levels, were examined with both univariate and multivariate analysis to observe their relationships to the percentage of U.S. medical graduates entering family medicine between July 1986 and December 1987. With univariate analysis, each characteristic was significantly related to the percentage of graduates entering family medicine. Using multivariate analysis, only the number of weeks required and the type of ownership of the school were significantly related to the percentage of graduates entering family medicine, with the higher percentages related to greater numbers of required weeks of family medicine training and to public ownership of the school. PMID:2789605

  12. Building family medicine postgraduate training in Jamaica: overcoming challenges in a resource-limited setting.

    PubMed

    Standard-Goldson, A; Williams-Green, P; Smith, K; Segree, W; James, K; Eldemire-Shearer, D

    2015-01-01

    This paper recounts the development of family medicine postgraduate training in Jamaica, the challenges faced and lessons learned. A self-administered questionnaire was completed by past trainees exploring the perceived usefulness, strengths and weaknesses of the programme. The results of this study helped guide the strengthening of family medicine training in a resource-limited setting. PMID:25654799

  13. The Glass Is Half Full: Geriatric Precepting Encounters in Family Medicine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rollins, Lisa K.; Martirosian, Tovia; Gazewood, John D.

    2009-01-01

    Approximately 19% to 20% of all family medicine office visits involve care to patients older than age 65, yet limited research addresses family medicine geriatric education in the outpatient setting. This study explored how geriatric content is incorporated into resident/attending precepting encounters, using direct observation. An observer…

  14. Evaluation of a Dementia Education Program for Family Medicine Residents

    PubMed Central

    Prorok, Jeanette C.; Stolee, Paul; Cooke, Martin; McAiney, Carrie A.; Lee, Linda

    2015-01-01

    Background Dementia diagnosis and management is increasing in importance in the training of future family physicians. This study evaluated the impact of a dementia education program for family medicine residents (FMR) on residents’ knowledge, attitudes, and confidence with respect to dementia assessment and management. A three-part questionnaire was developed and validated for these purposes. Methods A mixed methods study design was employed. The questionnaire’s internal consistency and test–retest reliability was determined and content validity was assessed. Twelve FMR participated in questionnaire validation. Program participants completed the validated questionnaire at baseline, at interim, and following program completion. Twenty-seven FMR completed the questionnaire as part of the program evaluation. Willing residents also participated in program feedback interviews. Differences in questionnaire scores between program participants and the comparison group were examined. Results Each questionnaire component demonstrated high internal consistency (Cronbach’s ?: 0.83–0.91) and test–retest reliability (intraclass correlation coefficients: 0.74–0.91). Program participants (n = 15) scored significantly higher than the comparison group (n = 12) on the knowledge component and also reported greater confidence in several areas. Qualitative data indicated that residents felt the program focused on important topic areas and appreciated the opportunity to work in an interprofessional team. Conclusion Evaluation results indicate that the program improved FMRs’ knowledge on dementia assessment and management, as well as increased the residents’ confidence levels. PMID:26180561

  15. Stanford University School of Medicine Financial Aid Office

    E-print Network

    Bogyo, Matthew

    ­ including Stanford University Grants and Loans, Federal Direct Unsubsidized and Grad PLUS Loans, and Perkins Stafford DL Grad PLUS Stanford University School of Medicine will process all Federal Direct Loans throughStanford University School of Medicine Financial Aid Office 2013-14 Financial Aid Instructions Your

  16. Understanding of family medicine in Africa: a qualitative study of leaders’ views

    PubMed Central

    Moosa, Shabir; Downing, Raymond; Mash, Bob; Reid, Steve; Pentz, Stephen; Essuman, Akye

    2013-01-01

    Background The World Health Organization encourages comprehensive primary care within an ongoing personalised relationship, including family physicians in the primary healthcare team, but family medicine is new in Africa, with doctors mostly being hospital based. African family physicians are trying to define family medicine in Africa, however, there is little clarity on the views of African country leadership and their understanding of family medicine and its place in Africa. Aim To understand leaders’ views on family medicine in Africa. Design and setting Qualitative study with in-depth interviews in nine sub-Saharan African countries. Method Key academic and government leaders were purposively selected. In-depth interviews were conducted using an interview guide, and thematically analysed. Results Twenty-seven interviews were conducted with government and academic leaders. Responders saw considerable benefits but also had concerns regarding family medicine in Africa. The benefits mentioned were: having a clinically skilled all-rounder at the district hospital; mentoring team-based care in the community; a strong role in leadership and even management in the district healthcare system; and developing a holistic practice of medicine. The concerns were that family medicine is: unknown or poorly understood by broader leadership; poorly recognised by officials; and struggling with policy ambivalence, requiring policy advocacy championed by family medicine itself. Conclusion The strong district-level clinical and leadership expectations of family physicians are consistent with African research and consensus. However, leaders’ understanding of family medicine is couched in terms of specialties and hospital care. African family physicians should be concerned by high expectations without adequate human resource and implementation policies. PMID:23561788

  17. Education and training in family medicine: progress and a proposed national vision for 2030.

    PubMed

    Goh, Lee Gan; Ong, Chooi Peng

    2014-03-01

    This review provides an update of education and training in family medicine in Singapore and worldwide. Family medicine has progressed much since 1969 when it was recognised as the 20th medical discipline in the United States. Three salient changes in the local healthcare landscape have been noted over time, which are of defining relevance to family medicine in Singapore, namely the rise of noncommunicable chronic diseases, the care needs of an expanding elderly population, and the care of a larger projected population in 2030. The change in the vision of family medicine into the future refers to a new paradigm of one discipline in many settings, and not limited to the community. Family medicine needs to provide a patient-centred medical home, and the discipline's education and training need to be realigned. The near-term training objectives are to address the service, training and research needs of a changing and challenging healthcare landscape. PMID:24664375

  18. Education and training in family medicine: progress and a proposed national vision for 2030

    PubMed Central

    Goh, Lee Gan; Ong, Chooi Peng

    2014-01-01

    This review provides an update of education and training in family medicine in Singapore and worldwide. Family medicine has progressed much since 1969 when it was recognised as the 20th medical discipline in the United States. Three salient changes in the local healthcare landscape have been noted over time, which are of defining relevance to family medicine in Singapore, namely the rise of noncommunicable chronic diseases, the care needs of an expanding elderly population, and the care of a larger projected population in 2030. The change in the vision of family medicine into the future refers to a new paradigm of one discipline in many settings, and not limited to the community. Family medicine needs to provide a patient-centred medical home, and the discipline’s education and training need to be realigned. The near-term training objectives are to address the service, training and research needs of a changing and challenging healthcare landscape. PMID:24664375

  19. Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine 2009 Award Winners

    E-print Network

    Chisholm, Rex L.

    Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine 2009 Award Winners Fifth Annual Lewis Landsberg precision performance measurement embedded within an electronic health record Third Place, Clinical Science

  20. Space Planning & Operations University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

    E-print Network

    Bushman, Frederic

    Space Planning & Operations University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine Policy & Procedure: Move Description: Move services within the School of Medicine are scheduled by Space Planning & Operations services. Scope: This policy applies to all School of Medicine faculty, staff and students occupying space

  1. Space Planning & Operations University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

    E-print Network

    Bushman, Frederic

    Space Planning & Operations University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine Policy & Procedure: Event in School of Medicine (SOM) spaces. Events include classes, seminars, conferences, symposia, lectures and use of Public Spaces or the School of Medicine Faculty Lounge. Please refer to SPO's Policies

  2. Family medicine in a tertiary care hospital. Obstetrical outcomes and interventions.

    PubMed Central

    Gaspar, D.; Jordan, J.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the rates of obstetrical complications and interventions among patients managed or comanaged by family physicians. DESIGN: Case series. Retrospective review of hospital records. SETTING: Victoria Hospital, a tertiary care centre affiliated with the University of Western Ontario in London, Ont. PARTICIPANTS: Five hundred forty-two women in labour admitted consecutively by family physicians from October 1, 1990, to September 31, 1991. There were no exclusions based on antenatal risk. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Degree of risk on admission, and rates of cesarean sections, inductions, epidurals, forceps deliveries, episiotomies, perineal tears, postpartum hemorrhages, and postpartum fever for mothers. For newborns, Apgar scores and rate of need for a pediatric critical care unit or special observation nursery. RESULTS: Except for rates of inductions and episiotomies, which were lower than those reported elsewhere, results were all comparable to those in previous North American studies of low-risk family medicine obstetric patients. CONCLUSION: Family physicians care for women with a range of antenatal risks. Even when practising in tertiary care environments, family physicians can minimize many obstetrical interventions while maintaining good maternal and neonatal outcomes. PMID:7787490

  3. Center for Biomedical Ethics and Humanities University of Virginia School of Medicine

    E-print Network

    Acton, Scott

    VA 5 October 2011 John F. Anderson Memorial Lecture The Shape of the Eye: Stories about Down Syndrome George Estreich MFA Author, The Shape of the Eye: Down Syndrome, Family, and the Stories We InheritCenter for Biomedical Ethics and Humanities University of Virginia School of Medicine PO Box 800761

  4. UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN SCHOOL OF MEDICINE AND PUBLIC HEALTH PHS 915--INTERNATIONAL HEALTH SYSTEMS AND POLICY

    E-print Network

    Scharer, John E.

    UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN SCHOOL OF MEDICINE AND PUBLIC HEALTH PHS 915--INTERNATIONAL HEALTH SYSTEMS Systems in the Context of Global Health Needs Module 3--Health Systems and Policies in High Income at Public Perceptions of Health Problems, Priorities, and Donors. Washington, D.C.: Kaiser Family Foundation

  5. Learning behaviour and preferences of family medicine residents under a flexible academic curriculum

    PubMed Central

    Sy, Alice; Wong, Eric; Boisvert, Leslie

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To determine family medicine residents’ learning behaviour and preferences outside of clinical settings in order to help guide the development of an effective academic program that can maximize their learning. Design Retrospective descriptive analysis of academic learning logs submitted by residents as part of their academic training requirements between 2008 and 2011. Setting London, Ont. Participants All family medicine residents at Western University who had completed their academic program requirements (N = 72) by submitting 300 or more credits (1 credit = 1 hour). Main outcome measures Amount of time spent on various learning modalities, location where the learning took place, resources used for self-study, and the objective of the learning activity. Results A total of 72 residents completed their academic requirements during the study period and logged a total of 25 068 hours of academic learning. Residents chose to spend most of their academic time engaging in self-study (44%), attending staff physicians’ teaching sessions (20%), and participating in conferences, courses, or workshops (12%) and in postgraduate medical education sessions (12%). Textbooks (26%), medical journals (20%), and point-of-care resources (12%) were the 3 most common resources used for self-study. The hospital (32%), residents’ homes (32%), and family medicine clinics (14%) were the most frequently cited locations where academic learning occurred. While all physicians used a variety of educational activities, most residents (67%) chose self-study as their primary method of learning. The topic for academic learning appeared to have some influence on the learning modalities used by residents. Conclusion Residents used a variety of learning modalities and chose self-study over other more traditional modalities (eg, lectures) for most of their academic learning. A successful academic program must take into account residents’ various learning preferences and habits while providing guidance and training in the use of more effective learning methods and resources to maximize educational outcomes. PMID:25551133

  6. Boston University School of Medicine Student Policy & Reference

    E-print Network

    Finzi, Adrien

    ________________________ 12 Boston University Sexual Harassment Policy _________________________________________ 13 Exam-Mail Communications at Boston University School of Medicine________ 38 Medical Student Electronic Mailing List Information __________________________________ 39 To send e-mail to other medical campus electronic mailing

  7. May 19, 2008 University of Connecticut School of Medicine

    E-print Network

    Kim, Duck O.

    May 19, 2008 University of Connecticut School of Medicine Space Policy Introduction Space, whether Center and its School of Medicine (SOM). The University of Connecticut Health Center Space Management Policy is used to allocate space to the SOM to meet its academic missions. This space policy provides

  8. Development of a portfolio of learning for postgraduate family medicine training in South Africa: a Delphi study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Within the 52 health districts in South Africa, the family physician is seen as the clinical leader within a multi-professional district health team. Family physicians must be competent to meet 90% of the health needs of the communities in their districts. The eight university departments of Family Medicine have identified five unit standards, broken down into 85 training outcomes, for postgraduate training. The family medicine registrar must prove at the end of training that all the required training outcomes have been attained. District health managers must be assured that the family physician is competent to deliver the expected service. The Colleges of Medicine of South Africa (CMSA) require a portfolio to be submitted as part of the uniform assessment of all registrars applying to write the national fellowship examinations. This study aimed to achieve a consensus on the contents and principles of the first national portfolio for use in family medicine training in South Africa. Methods A workshop held at the WONCA Africa Regional Conference in 2009 explored the purpose and broad contents of the portfolio. The 85 training outcomes, ideas from the WONCA workshop, the literature, and existing portfolios in the various universities were used to develop a questionnaire that was tested for content validity by a panel of 31 experts in family medicine in South Africa, via the Delphi technique in four rounds. Eighty five content items (national learning outcomes) and 27 principles were tested. Consensus was defined as 70% agreement. For those items that the panel thought should be included, they were also asked how to provide evidence for the specific item in the portfolio, and how to assess that evidence. Results Consensus was reached on 61 of the 85 national learning outcomes. The panel recommended that 50 be assessed by the portfolio and 11 should not be. No consensus could be reached on the remaining 24 outcomes and these were also omitted from the portfolio. The panel recommended that various types of evidence be included in the portfolio. The panel supported 26 of the 27 principles, but could not reach consensus on whether the portfolio should reflect on the relationship between the supervisor and registrar. Conclusion A portfolio was developed and distributed to the eight departments of Family Medicine in South Africa, and the CMSA, to be further tested in implementation. PMID:22385468

  9. Exploring professional identification and reputation of family medicine among medical students: a Canadian case study.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Charo; Tellier, Pierre-Paul; Bélanger, Emmanuelle

    2012-05-01

    We aim to shed light on medical students' professional identification with family medicine by means of a qualitative case study examining the reputation of, and professional identification processes with, family medicine among students enrolled in a Canadian medical school, where a consistently low number of students choose family medicine as first choice for postgraduate training. Six focus groups, three for second year students and three for fourth year students, were conducted in 2007 and 2008. Transcripts from group discussions were submitted to a thematic analysis, while documentary sources supported contextualisation. All the students participating in the investigation had a clear idea about the traditional role of general practitioners (GPs). Those students who seemed to better identify with a family medicine career path were characterised by feeling comfortable with the broad scope of general medical knowledge, and with requesting a second opinion, by valuing the possibility of a diversified profile of practice, and holding strong humanistic values, as well as by being more concerned about lifestyle issues. This was observed despite an academic context that strongly encouraged medical specialisation, as students unanimously pointed out. In such circumstances, identification with family medicine by undecided medical students was hampered. In order to embed family medicine in the academic discourse of excellence, and therefore encourage students' identification with this profession, more attention should be paid to family physicians' identity formation in academic centres. PMID:22762874

  10. Personalised medicine in Canada: a survey of adoption and practice in oncology, cardiology and family medicine

    PubMed Central

    Bonter, Katherine; Currier, Nathan; Pun, Jason; Ashbury, Fredrick D

    2011-01-01

    Introduction In order to provide baseline data on genetic testing as a key element of personalised medicine (PM), Canadian physicians were surveyed to determine roles, perceptions and experiences in this area. The survey measured attitudes, practice, observed benefits and impacts, and barriers to adoption. Methods A self-administered survey was provided to Canadian oncologists, cardiologists and family physicians and responses were obtained online, by mail or by fax. The survey was designed to be exploratory. Data were compared across specialties and geography. Results The overall response rate was 8.3%. Of the respondents, 43%, 30% and 27% were family physicians, cardiologists and oncologists, respectively. A strong majority of respondents agreed that genetic testing and PM can have a positive impact on their practice; however, only 51% agreed that there is sufficient evidence to order such tests. A low percentage of respondents felt that they were sufficiently informed and confident practicing in this area, although many reported that genetic tests they have ordered have benefited their patients. Half of the respondents agreed that genetic tests that would be useful in their practice are not readily available. A lack of practice guidelines, limited provider knowledge and lack of evidence-based clinical information were cited as the main barriers to practice. Differences across provinces were observed for measures relating to access to testing and the state of practice. Differences across specialties were observed for the state of practice, reported benefits and access to testing. Conclusions Canadian physicians recognise the benefits of genetic testing and PM; however, they lack the education, information and support needed to practice effectively in this area. Variability in practice and access to testing across specialties and across Canada was observed. These results support a need for national strategies and resources to facilitate physician knowledge, training and practice in PM. PMID:22021765

  11. Evaluation of Teaching and Learning in Family Medicine by Students: A Sri Lankan Experience

    PubMed Central

    Ramanayake, R. P. J. C.; De Silva, A. H. W.; Perera, D. P.; Sumanasekara, R. D. N.; Gunasekara, R.; Chandrasiri, P.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Family Medicine occupies a prominent place in the undergraduate curriculum of the Faculty of Medicine, University of Kelaniya, Sri Lanka. The one month clinical attachment during the fourth year utilizes a variety of teaching methods. This study evaluates teaching learning methods and learning environment of this attachment. Methodology: A descriptive cross sectional study was carried out among consenting students over a period of six months on completion of the clinical attachment using a pretested self administered questionnaire. Results: Completed questionnaires were returned by 114(99%) students. 90.2% were satisfied with the teaching methods in general while direct observation and feed back from teachers was the most popular(95.1%) followed by learning from patients(91.2%), debate(87.6%), seminar(87.5%) and small group discussions(71.9%). They were highly satisfied with the opportunity they had to develop communication skills (95.5%) and presentation skills (92.9%). Lesser learning opportunity was experienced for history taking (89.9%), problem solving (78.8%) and clinical examination (59.8%) skills. Student satisfaction regarding space within consultation rooms was 80% while space for history taking and examination (62%) and availability of clinical equipment (53%) were less. 90% thought the programme was well organized and adequate understanding on family medicine concepts and practice organization gained by 94% and 95% of the students respectively. Conclusions: Overall student satisfaction was high. Students prefer learning methods which actively involve them. It is important to provide adequate infra structure facilities for student activities to make it a positive learning experience for them. PMID:25810980

  12. Section of Geriatrics, Yale University School of Medicine The Section of Geriatrics, Department of Internal Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine,

    E-print Network

    Lee, Daeyeol

    Section of Geriatrics, Yale University School of Medicine The Section of Geriatrics, Department investigation as well as evidence of excellent potential for an outstanding career in Geriatric clinical investigation. Geriatric clinical fellowship training is preferred but not required. Yale University

  13. zentrum Innere medizin ABTEIlUNG AllGEMEINMEDIZIN centre for Internal medicine DEPARTMENT OF GENERAl PRACTICE/FAMIly MEDICINE

    E-print Network

    Gollisch, Tim

    OF GENERAl PRACTICE/FAMIly MEDICINE Abteilungsdirektor/in | Head of Department Prof. Dr. med. Michael M in General Practice Innovative Teaching and Assessment Formats Low Back Pain Frequent Reasons for Consultation in General Practice Generic Drugs Study Humboldtallee 38 D-37073 Göttingen Tel: +49

  14. UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA -SCHOOL OF MEDICINE Curriculum Vitae

    E-print Network

    Pennsylvania, University of

    of Medicine. 1991- Executive Board, Center for Sleep and Circadian Neurobiology, University of Pennsylvania of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. 1995- Associate Director, Center for Sleep and Circadian Neurobiology of Sleep and Chronobiology : Director, Unit for Experimental Psychiatry Vice Chair for Faculty Affairs

  15. UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA -SCHOOL OF MEDICINE Curriculum Vitae

    E-print Network

    Pennsylvania, University of

    of Medicine. 1991- Executive Board, Center for Sleep and Circadian Neurobiology, University of Pennsylvania of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. 1995- Associate Director, Center for Sleep and Circadian Neurobiology for Experimental Psychiatry Chief, Division of Sleep and Chronobiology Vice Chair for Faculty Affairs

  16. UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA PERELMAN SCHOOL OF MEDICINE Curriculum Vitae

    E-print Network

    Pennsylvania, University of

    of Medicine. 1991- Executive Board, Center for Sleep and Circadian Neurobiology, University of Pennsylvania of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. 1995- Associate Director, Center for Sleep and Circadian Neurobiology, Division of Sleep and Chronobiology : Director, Unit for Experimental Psychiatry Vice Chair for Faculty

  17. Dean's Faculty Advisory Committee University of Tennessee, College of Medicine

    E-print Network

    Cui, Yan

    Dean's Faculty Advisory Committee University of Tennessee, College of Medicine May 3, 2004 I. Call;The following guests were present: Henry Herrod, MD, Dean, College of Medicine III. Approval, funds for catering, and alternative dates. One suggestion was to schedule the Symposium to coincide

  18. Dean's Faculty Advisory Committee University of Tennessee, College of Medicine

    E-print Network

    Cui, Yan

    Dean's Faculty Advisory Committee University of Tennessee, College of Medicine September 10, 2007. The final number of posters will depend on space available. Pres. Rosenthal indicated that the Dean of Medicine. Drs. Bob Waters, Len Lothstein, Maggie DeBon, and Martin Croce volunteered to form the planning

  19. Dean's Faculty Advisory Committee University of Tennessee, College of Medicine

    E-print Network

    Cui, Yan

    Dean's Faculty Advisory Committee University of Tennessee, College of Medicine February 8, 2005 of Medicine. It is no longer the case that someone must have at least 30% of his funding from the state of what will be needed, not just at the present but into the future. One example is the need for space

  20. University of Southern California Mork Family

    E-print Network

    Southern California, University of

    fuels (with Yang L. Wang, Fokion N. Egolfopoulos, and Theodore T. Tsotsis) Basabdatta Roychudhuri WaterUniversity of Southern California Mork Family Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials embryonic stem cells via an engineered baculoviral vector carrying zinc finger nucleases (with Pin Wang) 12

  1. Primary Care, Ambulatory Care, and Family Medicine: Overlapping But Not Synonymous

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds, Robert E.

    1975-01-01

    Defines and depicts graphically the relationships between primary, secondary, and tertiary care functions (from least to most intensified phases of medical care); ambulatory care (care of sick or well people not confined to bed); and family medicine (an emerging medical discipline focusing on complete and longterm care of the family). (JT)

  2. The Effects of Family Systems Medicine Training on the Practice Orientations of General Practitioners

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jorma Kiuttu; Pekka Larivaara; Erkki Väisänen; Sirkka Keinänen-Kiukaanniemi; Hannu Oja

    1996-01-01

    This article compares the effect of a 2-year family systems medicine training program on the practice orientations of a group of general practitioners from various parts of Finland. During the first year, their orientations were classified as: symptom, patient, family, and systems. Toward the end of the second year, the orientations of the trainees were evaluated again and compared with

  3. Urban female patients' perceptions of the family medicine clinic as a site for abortion care

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Susan E. Rubin; Emily M. Godfrey; Miriam Shapiro; Marji Gold

    2009-01-01

    BackgroundInduced abortion is common in the US, yet there is a lack of providers. We surveyed female patients asking why they would or would not (a) accept early abortion offered by their family physician (FP) in their family medicine clinic (FMC) and (b) prefer to access abortion services in the FMC.

  4. Perceptions and Practices of Graduates of Combined Family Medicine-Psychiatry Residency Programs: A Nationwide Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warner, Christopher H.; Morganstein, Joshua; Rachal, James; Lacy, Timothy

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The authors evaluate the current practices and perceptions of graduates of combined family medicine-psychiatry residency programs in the following areas: preparation for practice, boundary formation, and integration of skills sets. Method: The authors conducted an electronic cross-sectional survey of all nationwide combined family

  5. The Australian National University College of Medicine, Biology & Environment

    E-print Network

    The Australian National University College of Medicine, Biology & Environment College of Physical://timetable.anu.edu.au/ · ANU Library: http://anulib.anu.edu.au/ · ANU student system guide ­ this will introduce you

  6. UNIVERSITY OF DELAWARE OFFICE OF LABORATORY ANIMAL MEDICINE

    E-print Network

    Firestone, Jeremy

    Rev 5/2010 UNIVERSITY OF DELAWARE OFFICE OF LABORATORY ANIMAL MEDICINE Buprenorphine ­ Rats SOP #A/20 Dilution of Buprenorphine (per Dose and Body Weight) Body Weight (grams) Dose = 0.01 mg/kg Injection Volume

  7. UNIVERSITY OF DELAWARE OFFICE OF LABORATORY ANIMAL MEDICINE

    E-print Network

    Firestone, Jeremy

    Rev 5/2010 UNIVERSITY OF DELAWARE OFFICE OF LABORATORY ANIMAL MEDICINE Buprenorphine ­ Mice SOP #A/20 Dilution of Buprenorphine (per Dose and Body Weight) Body Weight (grams) 0.05 mg/kg Dose Injection Volume

  8. Sexual medicine in family practice. Part 1: How to help.

    PubMed Central

    Holzapfel, S.

    1993-01-01

    Family physicians are in a unique position to help patients with sexual problems. They know their patients over a long time and often have both partners as patients. Most problems require minimal intervention, usually by providing information. Family physicians are sometimes the only professionals who are trusted enough to be told of abusive or incestuous situations. PMID:8471906

  9. Guiding the development of family medicine training in Africa through collaboration with the Medical Education Partnership Initiative.

    PubMed

    Mash, Robert J; de Villiers, Marietjie R; Moodley, Kalay; Nachega, Jean B

    2014-08-01

    Africa's health care challenges include a high burden of disease, low life expectancy, health workforce shortages, and varying degrees of commitment to primary health care on the part of policy makers and government officials. One overarching goal of the Medical Education Partnership Initiative (MEPI) is to develop models of medical education in Sub-Saharan Africa. To do this, MEPI has created a network of universities and other institutions that, among other things, recognizes the importance of supporting training programs in family medicine. This article provides a framework for assessing the stage of the development of family medicine training in Africa, including the challenges that were encountered and how educational organizations can help to address them. A modified "stages of change" model (precontemplation, contemplation, action, maintenance, and relapse) was used as a conceptual framework to understand the various phases that countries go through in developing family medicine in the public sector and to determine the type of assistance that is useful at each phase. PMID:25072584

  10. University of Maryland Medical System and School of Medicine

    E-print Network

    Weber, David J.

    University of Maryland Medical System and School of Medicine The Power of Partnership HEALTH the Scope of the University of Maryland Marlene and Stewart Greenebaum Cancer Center · Shock Trauma Expansion Dedicated to Maryland's Most Critically Ill and Injured · Research Partnership Across Disciplines

  11. Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University ECU PHYSICIANS

    E-print Network

    Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University ECU PHYSICIANS Title: Prescription Medication of prescription medication samples in the clinics of ECU Physicians in accordance with regulatory, accreditation at East Carolina University ECU PHYSICIANS Title: Prescription Medication Sample Policy Section No. 2 C12

  12. University of Maryland School of Medicine License Plate Information Thank you for requesting a set of University of Maryland School of Medicine license plates. By

    E-print Network

    Weber, David J.

    University of Maryland School of Medicine License Plate Information Thank you for requesting a set of University of Maryland School of Medicine license plates. By displaying these special bicentennial license plates, you will demonstrate your pride in the University of Maryland School of Medicine. Each set

  13. UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS COLLEGE OF MEDICINE AT URBANA-CHAMPAIGN MATCH LIST MARCH 2011

    E-print Network

    Frank, Thomas D.

    UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS COLLEGE OF MEDICINE AT URBANA-CHAMPAIGN MATCH LIST ­ MARCH 2011, Santa Clara, CA Bonnie Wang University of Illinois College of Medicine, Urbana, IL INTERNAL MEDICINE Children's Hospital of Michigan, Detroit, MI Jonathan Rhine Southern Illinois University School of Medicine

  14. A Problem-Solving Oral Examination for Family Medicine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Wart, Arthur D.

    1974-01-01

    The College of Family Physicians of Canada has used in its certification examination a new type of structured problem-solving examination called the Formal Oral. A series of preselected problem areas such as the complaint, relevant data base, investigation, and treatment are scored by two examiners. (Editor/PG)

  15. Assisting people with dementia with their medicines: experiences of family carers

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Felicity; Grijseels, Madelon S; Ryan, Patricia; Tobiansky, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Many family carers provide assistance with medicines that is vital for optimal clinical outcomes. Medicines-related tasks are known to contribute to carer burden and stress. This study examined the experiences of family carers when providing medicines-related assistance for a person with dementia, to indicate how services could become more responsive to the specific needs of this group of carers. Methods Semi-structured interviews were undertaken with family carers and care-recipients identified though a memory clinic in north London and a local Alzheimer's Society. The interview guide, comprising open questions, was informed by previous studies and consultation with stakeholders. Qualitative procedures involving a framework approach were employed in the analysis. Key findings Fourteen interviews with carers and five with care-recipients were conducted. These highlighted the burden and challenges, surrounding medicines-management activities. As well as practical aspects that could be complex, carers were commonly making judgements about the need for and appropriateness of medicines. Although experiences were varied, carers reported difficulties in maintaining supplies, ensuring adherence to regimens and accessing health professionals; and they made some recommendations for service improvements. Carers’ difficulty in obtaining information and advice about medicines was compounded by their desire to allow the care-recipient to retain autonomy over their medicines as long as possible. Conclusion This study highlights the distinct needs and problems with regard to medicines-management when caring for a person with dementia. As the prevalence of dementia rises, interventions designed to address these specific aspects of reduce carer-burden should be a priority for health professionals. PMID:25351043

  16. Argentine folk medicine: genotoxic effects of Chenopodiaceae family.

    PubMed

    Gadano, A B; Gurni, A A; Carballo, M A

    2006-01-16

    Chenopodium ambrosioides L. and Chenopodium multifidum L. (Chenopodiaceae), common name: Paico, are medicinal plants. They are aromatic shrubs growing in South America. For centuries, they have been used due to its medicinal properties. However, there are few reports in literature about the genotoxic effects of these plants. There for, the aim of these work is the evaluation of genetic damage induced by decoction and infusion of this plants which were assayed in different concentrations (1, 10, 100, 1,000 microL extract/mL culture), by addition of the extract to human lymphocyte cell cultures, negative controls were included. The endpoints evaluated were chromosomal aberrations (CA), sister chromatid exchanges (SCE), cell proliferation kinetics (CPK) and mitotic index (MI). The repeated measure analysis of variance was used for statistic evaluation of the results. The results showed: (a) statistical increase in the percentage of cells with CA and in the frequency of SCE when cultures were exposed to both aromatic plants, (b) a decrease in MI of both Paicos assayed, although no modification in the CPK values was observed, (c) no effect was noticed in the analysis of Chenopodium album L., which was used as negative control of the essential oil. These results suggest a cyto and genotoxic effect of Chenopodium ambrosioides and Chenopodium multifidum aqueous extracts related to the essential oil of the plant (as Chenopodium album did not perform). PMID:16219440

  17. UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN SCHOOL OF MEDICINE AND PUBLIC HEALTH PHS 810-915--INTERNATIONAL HEALTH SYSTEMS AND POLICY

    E-print Network

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN SCHOOL OF MEDICINE AND PUBLIC HEALTH PHS 810-915--INTERNATIONAL HEALTH Systems in the Context of Global Health Needs Module 3--Health Systems and Policies in High Income at Public Perceptions of Health Problems, Priorities, and Donors. Washington, D.C.: Kaiser Family Foundation

  18. Proposed roadmap to stepwise integration of genetics in family medicine and clinical research

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    We propose A step-by-step roadmap to integrate genetics in the Electronic Patient Record in Family Medicine and clinical research. This could make urgent operationalization of readily available genetic knowledge feasible in clinical research and consequently improved medical care. Improving genomic literacy by training and education is needed first. The second step is the improvement of the possibilities to register the family history in such a way that queries can identify patients at risk. Adding codes to the ICPC chapters “A21 Personal/family history of malignancy” and “A99 Disease carrier not described further” is proposed. Multidisciplinary guidelines for referral must be unambiguous. Electronical patient records need possibilities to add (new) family history information, including links between individuals who are family members. Automatic alerts should help general practitioners to recognize patients at risk who satisfy referral criteria. We present a familial breast cancer case with a BRCA1 mutation as an example. PMID:23415259

  19. Washington University/BJH/SLCH Consortium Adult Critical Care Medicine Institutional Resources Policy

    E-print Network

    Kornfeld, S. Kerry

    Washington University/BJH/SLCH Consortium Adult Critical Care Medicine Institutional Resources Policy Effective September 16, 2013 Introduction Critical Care Medicine (CCM) is a multidisciplinary programs: · Anesthesia Critical Care Medicine (0452821056) ­ Thomas J. Graetz, MD Program Director

  20. University of Maryland, School of Public Health Department of Family Science, Couple and Family Therapy Program

    E-print Network

    Hill, Wendell T.

    University of Maryland, School of Public Health Department of Family Science, Couple and Family) The Department of Family Science, School of Public Health, University of Maryland, College Park seeks a full in Maryland. Additionally, candidates should be an Approved Supervisor or an Approved Supervisor Candidate

  1. Providing competency-based family medicine residency training in substance abuse in the new millennium: a model curriculum

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J Paul Seale; Sylvia Shellenberger; Denice Crowe Clark

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This article, developed for the Betty Ford Institute Consensus Conference on Graduate Medical Education (December, 2008), presents a model curriculum for Family Medicine residency training in substance abuse. METHODS: The authors reviewed reports of past Family Medicine curriculum development efforts, previously-identified barriers to education in high risk substance use, approaches to overcoming these barriers, and current training guidelines of

  2. Implementation of a Symptom-Triggered Benzodiazepine Protocol for Alcohol Withdrawal in Family Medicine Inpatients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sharon See; Sarah Nosal; Wendy Brooks Barr; Robert Schiller

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this pilot study was to review the implementation of symptom-triggered benzodiazepine therapy and evaluate the feasibility and outcomes as compared with a previous hospital standard of fixed-dose phe- nobarbital protocol for alcohol withdrawal on a family medicine service. Methods: This retrospective chart review of 46 patients' medical records was performed on admissions to the fam- ily

  3. A New Faculty Training Model for Countries Developing Academic Family Medicine Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Douglas H.; Zammit-Montebello, Alfred

    1990-01-01

    This model was an intensive 8-month course for a group of 10 experienced Maltese general practitioners to train with a visiting professor of family medicine. Maltese teaching resources were used, and training occurred in the context of the society and health care system in which course members would teach. (Author/MLW)

  4. It is Time to Make a General Systems Paradigm Reality in Family and Community Medicine

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John P. Zubialde; Cheryl B. Aspy

    2001-01-01

    Responding effectively to the rapid change and complexity in the healthcare environment requires fundamental shifts in thinking to find effective solutions to new challenges. This paper proposes that now is the time for making general systems thinking a reality in family medicine so that lessons from newer scientific approaches to complexity can help us see where those solutions may lie.

  5. Multi-Source Evaluation of Interpersonal and Communication Skills of Family Medicine Residents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leung, Kai-Kuen; Wang, Wei-Dan; Chen, Yen-Yuan

    2012-01-01

    There is a lack of information on the use of multi-source evaluation to assess trainees' interpersonal and communication skills in Oriental settings. This study is conducted to assess the reliability and applicability of assessing the interpersonal and communication skills of family medicine residents by patients, peer residents, nurses, and…

  6. Development of a Competency Framework for Quality Improvement in Family Medicine: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Czabanowska, Katarzyna; Klemenc-Ketis, Zalika; Potter, Amanda; Rochfort, Andree; Tomasik, Tomasz; Csiszar, Judit; Van den Bussche, Piet

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to develop a comprehensive framework of quality improvement competencies for use in continuing professional development (CPD) and continuing medical education (CME) for European general practice/family medicine physicians (GPs/FDs). Methods: The study was carried out in three phases: literature review,…

  7. UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE COLLEGE OF MEDICINE

    E-print Network

    Cui, Yan

    Center Office of Student Affairs. Medical records are maintained by the University Health Service and to authorized members of the administration and faculty. Academic and health records are not available records of parents, or the personal memory notes of a University official or faculty member. Students do

  8. Sponsored by: The University of Maryland School of Medicine Accreditation: The University of Maryland School of Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education

    E-print Network

    Weber, David J.

    Sponsored by: The University of Maryland School of Medicine Accreditation: The University of Maryland School of Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education of Medicine designates this educational activity for a maximum of 1 AMA PRA Category 1 CreditTM. Physicians

  9. at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

    E-print Network

    Sharp, Kim

    .D., Ph.D. Professor of Neurosurgery at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania Dr. Baltuch is a nationally and internationally recognized leader in functional neurosurgery, and deep brain stimulation for Functional and Restorative Neurosurgery in the Department of Neurosurgery at Penn Medicine. He has

  10. Director, Physician Assistant Program Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine

    E-print Network

    Contractor, Anis

    Director, Physician Assistant Program Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine of Director, Physician Assistant Program. We seek a dynamic and experienced educator and administrator capable of leading the maturation of this newly-accredited program to a position of preeminence in physician

  11. THE ALBERT EINSTEIN COLLEGE OF MEDICINE OF YESHIVA UNIVERSITY

    E-print Network

    Brown, Lucy L.

    ................................................................................ 9 4.0 - MANAGEMENT OF EQUIPMENT INVENTORY 4.1 General and procedures for the management of equipment owned by or in the possession of the Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University (College). Management of equipment for purposes of this manual encompasses

  12. ALBERT EINSTEIN COLLEGE OF MEDICINE OF YESHIVA UNIVERSITY

    E-print Network

    Yates, Andrew

    ................................................................................ 9 4.0 - MANAGEMENT OF EQUIPMENT INVENTORY 4.1 General policies and procedures for the management of equipment owned by or in the possession of the Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University (College). Management of equipment for purposes

  13. UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA PERELMAN SCHOOL OF MEDICINE Curriculum Vitae

    E-print Network

    Pennsylvania, University of

    for Sleep and Circadian Neurobiology, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. 1996-97 Acting Chairman- Associate Director and Member, Center for Sleep and Respiratory Neurobiology 1995- Member, Graduate Group, of Sleep and Chronobiology Vice Chair for Faculty Affairs and Professional Development Department

  14. UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA PERELMAN SCHOOL OF MEDICINE Curriculum Vitae

    E-print Network

    Pennsylvania, University of

    for Sleep and Circadian Neurobiology, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. 1996-97 Acting Chairman- Associate Director and Member, Center for Sleep and Respiratory Neurobiology 1995- Member, Graduate Group, D of Sleep and Chronobiology Vice Chair for Faculty Affairs and Professional Development Department

  15. UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA PERELMAN SCHOOL OF MEDICINE Curriculum Vitae

    E-print Network

    Pennsylvania, University of

    for Sleep and Circadian Neurobiology, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. 1996-97 Acting Chairman- Associate Director and Member, Center for Sleep and Respiratory Neurobiology 1995- Member, Gradua David F. Dinges, Ph.D. Office Address Chief, Division of Sleep and Chronobiology : Director, Unit

  16. The University of Western Ontario Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry

    E-print Network

    Lennard, William N.

    The University of Western Ontario Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry CONDITIONS OF APPOINTMENT) (updated 2002) Approved by Senate March 19, 1999 Approved by the Board of Governors March 25, 1999 Updates approved by Senate April 19, 2002 Updates approved by the Board of Governors May 9, 2002 #12;TABLE

  17. University of Connecticut School of Dental Medicine Space Policy

    E-print Network

    Kim, Duck O.

    and its School of Dental Medicine (SDM). The University of Connecticut Health Center Space Management-react to funding transients nor, it is hoped, heighten stress but, rather, shall enhance the SDM's ability Health Center Space Management Policy by the Executive Vice President. The Dean may choose to confer

  18. Pre-Veterinary Medicine University of New Orleans

    E-print Network

    Li, X. Rong

    Pre-Veterinary Medicine University of New Orleans Advisor: Dr. Dorothy Scholl Tel: 280-6624 CRC 202A email: dscholl@uno.edu Minimum Prerequisite Course for Admission to the LSU School of Veterinary (BIOS 3453) will provide additional preparation for veterinary school. These courses serve as biology

  19. UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN SCHOOL OF MEDICINE AND PUBLIC HEALTH

    E-print Network

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    of public policy development and its impact on the prospects for health system improvement. CourseUNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN SCHOOL OF MEDICINE AND PUBLIC HEALTH DEPARTMENT OF POPULATION HEALTH SCIENCES PHS 785 HEALTH SYSTEMS, MANAGEMENT, AND POLICY SPRING 2012 #12;PHS 785--HEALTH SYSTEMS, MANAGEMENT

  20. UNIVERSITY OF DELAWARE OFFICE OF LABORATORY ANIMAL MEDICINE

    E-print Network

    Firestone, Jeremy

    Rev 5/2010 UNIVERSITY OF DELAWARE OFFICE OF LABORATORY ANIMAL MEDICINE Rat Restraint SOP #A-107 of your lab coat to relax or calm the animal, while maintaining hold of the animal. 3. For restraint by an assistant. 7. Constantly observe the rat during restraint. If the animal shows signs of respiratory distress

  1. UNIVERSITY OF DELAWARE OFFICE OF LABORATORY ANIMAL MEDICINE

    E-print Network

    Firestone, Jeremy

    Rev 5/2010 UNIVERSITY OF DELAWARE OFFICE OF LABORATORY ANIMAL MEDICINE Tail Snipping SOP #PRO-009 analysis of transgenic strains of mice. Anesthesia: · not required (but is recommended) for animals prior to weaning (21-28 days) · required for animals older than 28 days or for any animal that undergoes a repeat

  2. YALE UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF MEDICINE Pathology ITS and Digital Imaging

    E-print Network

    Repository Pathology Digital Slide Collection requires additional description form includes: ResidentYALE UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF MEDICINE Pathology ITS and Digital Imaging 310 Cedar Street, BML 161 New Whole Slide Scanning Request Form Scan Slides For : Return slides to: I would like a copy of the digital

  3. Teaching forensic medicine in the University of Porto.

    PubMed

    Magalhães, Teresa; Dinis-Oliveira, Ricardo Jorge; Santos, Agostinho

    2014-07-01

    The University of Porto (UP) provides education in Forensic Medicine (FM) through the 1st, 2nd and 3rd cycle of studies, post-graduation and continuing education courses. This education is related to forensic pathology, clinical forensic medicine (including forensic psychology and psychiatry), forensic chemistry and toxicology, forensic genetics and biology, and criminalistics. With this work we intent to reflect on how we are currently teaching FM in the UP, at all levels of university graduation. We will present our models, regarding the educational objectives, curricular program and teaching/learning methodologies of each cycle of studies as well as in post-graduate and continuing education courses. Historically, and besides related administratively to the Ministry of Justice, the Portuguese Medico-Legal Institutes (since 1918) and more recently the National Institute of Legal Medicine and Forensic Sciences (INMLCF) also have educational and research responsibilities. Thus, it lends space and cooperates with academic institutions and this contribution, namely regarding teaching forensic sciences in Portugal has been judged as an example for other Countries. This contribution is so important that in UP, the Department of Legal Medicine and Forensic Sciences of the Faculty of Medicine (FMUP) shares, until now, the same physical space with North Branch of the INMLCF, which represents a notorious advantage, since it makes possible the "learning by doing". PMID:24931860

  4. Institute for Genetic Medicine, Hokkaido University Research Center for Infection-associated Cancer (RCIAC)

    E-print Network

    Tachizawa, Kazuya

    in inflammation and carcinogenesis Eran Elinav (The Yale University School of Medicine) The NLRP6 inflammasome in inflammation and carcinogenesis Eran Elinav (The Yale University School of Medicine) The NLRP6 inflammasome

  5. University of South Carolina School of Medicine Greenville Biomedical Sciences Faculty

    E-print Network

    Almor, Amit

    University of South Carolina School of Medicine Greenville Biomedical Sciences Faculty The University of South Carolina School of Medicine Greenville (USCSOM Greenville) is seeking applications is located at the heart of the Greenville Hospital System, South Carolina's most comprehensive hospital

  6. Nature of the clinical difficulties of first-year family medicine residents under direct observation.

    PubMed Central

    Beaumier, A; Bordage, G; Saucier, D; Turgeon, J

    1992-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine and classify the difficulties of first-year family medicine residents observed during clinical interviews. DESIGN: Retrospective, descriptive study. SETTING: Family practice unit at a teaching hospital. PARTICIPANTS: Forty-seven of the 56 first-year family medicine residents during their 2-month compulsory rotation in ambulatory family medicine, between July 1983 and December 1988, and 4 physicians who supervised the residents. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: The residents' difficulties noted on the observation forms. MAIN RESULTS: A total of 1500 difficulties were observed during 194 interviews, an average of 7.7 (standard deviation 5.2) per interview. There were 167 different difficulties, which were classified into seven categories (introduction, initial contract, body of the interview, techniques and organization, interpersonal aspects, final contract and miscellaneous) and 20 subcategories. The 17 most frequently noted difficulties accounted for 40% of the total. CONCLUSIONS: The results constitute a useful starting point for developing a classification of residents' difficulties during clinical interviews. We believe that the list of difficulties is applicable to residents at all levels and in other specialties, especially in ambulatory settings. The list can be used to develop learning materials for supervisors and residents. PMID:1737313

  7. University of Connecticut School of Medicine

    E-print Network

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    CT University of Connecticut Health Center, HomeCare Program (in federally qualified health clinics-based, culturally competent, and developmentally sensitive standards ­of-care, facilitate greater knowledge through clinical, applied, and translational research, and attract and educate new pediatric mental health

  8. University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry Summer Scholars Program 2011

    E-print Network

    Goldman, Steven A.

    University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry Summer Scholars Program 2011 Travis Briggs Allegheny College #12;University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry Summer Scholars of Connecticut #12;University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry Summer Scholars Program 2011 Sarah

  9. Sponsored by: The University of Maryland School of Medicine Accreditation: The University of Maryland School of Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education

    E-print Network

    Weber, David J.

    Sponsored by: The University of Maryland School of Medicine Accreditation: The University of Maryland School of Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians. Credit Designation: The University of Maryland School

  10. Family medicine training in Saudi Arabia: Are there any variations among different regions?

    PubMed Central

    Abu Zuhairah, Ammar R.; Al-Dawood, Kasim M.; Khamis, Amar H.

    2015-01-01

    Aims: The aim was to compare Eastern, Makkah, and Asir regions in term of residents’ perception of the achievement of training objectives, and to assess various rotations based on residents’ perception. Settings and Design: This cross-sectional study was done among family medicine residents in the Eastern, Makkah, and Asir regions. Methodology: A questionnaire was developed by the investigator and validated by two experts. All residents, except R1 residents, were included. All data were collected by the investigator by direct contact with the residents. Statistical Analysis Used: Cronbach's alpha, analysis of variance, t-test, and univariate regression model as appropriate, were used. Results: Reliability of the questionnaire was found to be 75.4%. One hundred and seven (response rate: 83.6%) residents completed the questionnaire. There were 51 (47.7%), 27 (25.2%), and 29 (27.1%) residents in the program in the Eastern region, Makkah, and Asir, respectively. The mean age was 29.1 ± 2.5 years; half of the residents were male, most of (83.2%) were married, and more than half (54.2%) of had worked in primary health care before joining the program. Overall, 45% of the residents perceived that they had achieved the training objectives. The highest rotations as perceived by the residents were psychiatry and otolaryngology while the lowest were orthopedics and ophthalmology. There were significant differences among the study regions with regard to the rotations in family medicine, internal medicine, orthopedics, general surgery, and emergency medicine. Conclusions: Overall, a good percentage of the residents perceived that they had achieved the training objectives. The rotations differed in the studied regions. Psychiatry and otolaryngology had the highest percentage of family medicine residents who perceived that they had achieved the training objectives while lowest was in internal medicine and obstetrics and gynecology. The highest rotations as perceived by the family medicine residents were psychiatry and otolaryngology while lowest were orthopedics and ophthalmology. Sharing of experience and further studies are needed to improve the program rotations. PMID:25983607

  11. 'One Medicine - One Health' at the School of Veterinary Medicine of the University of Pennsylvania - the first 125 years.

    PubMed

    Hendricks, Joan; Newton, Charles D; Rubenstein, Arthur

    2009-01-01

    The University of Pennsylvania's School of Veterinary Medicine (Penn Vet), in partnership with other veterinary schools and health professions, is positioned well to advance an international 'One Medicine - One Health' initiative. Founded in 1884 by the University's Medical Faculty, the School has been a leader in moulding the education and practice of veterinary medicine in the nation and the world. Successfully integrating biomedical research into all aspects of veterinary medical education, the School has made significant contributions to basic and clinical research by exemplifying 'One Medicine'. In looking to the future, Penn Vet will embrace the broader 'One Health' mission as well. PMID:20391397

  12. New conceptual model of EMR implementation in interprofessional academic family medicine clinics

    PubMed Central

    Halas, Gayle; Singer, Alexander; Styles, Carol; Katz, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To capture users’ experiences with a newly implemented electronic medical record (EMR) in family medicine academic teaching clinics and to explore their perceptions of its use in clinical and teaching processes. Design Qualitative study using focus group discussions guided by semistructured questions. Setting Three family medicine academic teaching clinics in Winnipeg, Man. Participants Faculty, residents, and support staff. Methods Focus group discussions were audiorecorded and transcribed. Data were analyzed by open coding, followed by development of consensus on a final coding strategy. We used this to independently code the data and analyze them to identify salient events and emergent themes. Main findings We developed a conceptual model to reflect and summarize key themes that we identified from participant comments regarding EMR implementation and use in an academic setting. These included training and support, system design, information management, work flow, communication, and continuity. Conclusion This is the first specific analysis of user experience with a newly implemented EMR in urban family medicine teaching clinics in Canada. The experiences of our participants with EMR implementation were similar to those reported in earlier investigations, but highlight organizational influences and integration strategies. Learning how to use and transitioning to EMRs has implications for clinical learners. This points to the need for further research to gain a more in-depth understanding of the effects of EMRs on the learning environment.

  13. How to Rationally Use Information Diagnostic Technologies in Family and General Medicine Practice

    PubMed Central

    Sivi?, Suad; Masic, Izet; Petkovic, Darko; Huseinagic, Senad; Tandir, Salih; Zunic, Lejla

    2009-01-01

    CONFLICT OF INTEREST: NONE DECLARED New discoveries in technology indeed enabled significant improvement of health care in the last three decades. Only during the last few years a significant breakthrough is achieved in the field of antiviral drugs, biotechnology, digital diagnostic technology, molecular diagnosis, tissues and organs transplantation as well as surgical and information technologies, which all contributed to the improvement of health care. Rapid growth of medical technology has led to the increase in costs of health care, increased access to these technologies and improvement of health care that is permanently encouraging the further development of technology. Technology encompasses the skills, knowledge and ability to understand, use and create useful things. It is the practical application of knowledge. Evaluation of health technology is the systematic evaluation of characteristics, results or impact of health technologies. The primary purpose of evaluation is to provide information to responsible parties for the technology in the health care system, which will be used in decision-making and introduction of these technologies. Information technology in medicine and health care represents all medical and health technology in the process of work, monitoring and evaluation done using computer technology. Progress of medical science in recent years especially needs to thank to the development of information technologies. The health care system of Bosnia and Herzegovina is currently operating in the two sub-systems of primary health care. One is inherited from the past system, in which the primary health care is provided by general practitioners, specialists in general practice, as well as gynecologists, pediatricians and pulmologists, and the second subsystem occurs when in PHC is introduced the system of family medicine doctors and family medicine specialists. Family medicine, based on the concept of orientation towards the methods which are more effective, rational and cost-effective health care, use of defined procedures and evidence-based medicine, and more adequate education can empower and stimulate general practice doctors, especially family medicine specialists, who have passed various forms of training and courses in this area, to more rational and efficient use of diagnostic technology in their daily practice, without unnecessary duplication of tests. With this they make savings to the healthcare system, improve the financial position of overall health system, especially in the PHC segment, increase satisfaction of doctors providing that health care, but also the users of health services. PMID:24133380

  14. Montana State University 1 Family and Consumer

    E-print Network

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    Contemporary Consumer Issues 3 FCS 263 Relationships and Fam Systems 3 FCS 337 Personal and Family Finance I 3 NUTR 221CS Basic Human Nutrition 3 Take the following: FCS 338 & FCS 339 Personal and Family Finance

  15. Family practice clinics. Survey of family practice residents' attitudes.

    PubMed Central

    Rubenstein, H.; Levitt, C.

    1993-01-01

    All residents of McGill University's Department of Family Medicine were surveyed by mail about their family practice clinic experience. Residents were generally satisfied with their training site and their supervision, but noted problems with volume and diversity of patients, learning certain procedures, and knowledge of community resources. They did not want more family medicine clinic time. PMID:8219838

  16. Women’s impressions of their inpatient birth care as provided by family physicians in the Shizuoka Family Medicine Training Program in Japan

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Even though Japan faces serious challenges in women’s health care such as a rapidly aging population, attrition of obstetrical providers, and a harsh legal climate, few family medicine residency training programs in Japan include training in obstetrics, and the literature lacks research on women’s views of intra-partum pregnancy care by family physicians. Findings In this exploratory study, we conducted semi-structured qualitative interviews with five women who received their admission, intrapartum, delivery and discharge care from family medicine residents in the obstetrics ward of a community training hospital. Four women had vaginal births, and one had a Cesarean section. Three were primiparous, and two multiparous. Their ages ranged from 22–33. They found value in family physician medical knowledge and easy communication style, though despite explanation, some had trouble understanding the family physician’s scope of work. These women identified negative aspects of the hospital environment, and wanted more anticipatory guidance about what to expect physically after birth, but were enthusiastic about seeing a family doctor after discharge. Conclusions These results demonstrate the feasibility of family medicine residents providing inpatient birth care in a community hospital, and that patients are receptive to family physicians providing that care as well after discharge. Women’s primary concerns relate mostly to hospital environment issues, and better understanding the care family physicians provide. This illustrates-areas for family physicians to work for improvements. PMID:23698036

  17. Public Health Aspects of the Family Medicine Concepts in South Eastern Europe

    PubMed Central

    Masic, Izet; Hadziahmetovic, Miran; Donev, Doncho; Pollhozani, Azis; Ramadani, Naser; Skopljak, Amira; Pasagic, Almir; Roshi, Enver; Zunic, Lejla; Zildzic, Muharem

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Family medicine as a part of the primary health care is devoted to provide continuous and comprehensive health care to the individuals and families regardless of age, gender, types of diseases and affected system or part of the body. Special emphasis in such holistic approach is given to the prevention of diseases and health promotion. Family Medicine is the first step/link between doctors and patients within patients care as well as regular inspections/examinations and follow-up of the health status of healthy people. Most countries aspire to join the European Union and therefore adopting new regulations that are applied in the European Union. Aim: The aim of this study is to present the role and importance of family medicine, or where family medicine is today in 21 Century from the beginning of development in these countries. The study is designed as a descriptive epidemiological study with data from 10 countries of the former Communist bloc, Slovenia, Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Serbia, Montenegro, Macedonia, Kosovo, Albania, Bulgaria, Romania, Czech Republic, Slovakia and Hungary, just about half of them are members of the EU. We examined the following variables: socio-organizational indicators, health and educational indicators and health indicators. The data used refer to 2002 and as a source of data are used official data from reference WebPages of family medicine doctors associations, WONCA website (EURACT, EQuiP, EGPRN), WebPages of Bureau of Statistics of the countries where the research was conducted as well as the Ministries of Health. Results: Results indicates that the failures and shortcomings of health care organizations in Southeast Europe. Lack of money hinders the implementation of health care reform in all mentioned countries, the most of them that is more oriented to Bismarck financing system. Problems in the political, legal and economic levels are obstacles for efficient a problem reconstructing health care system toward family medicine and primary prevention interventions. The population is not enough educated for complicated enforcement for and prevention of diseases that have a heavy burden on the budget. Health insurance and payment of health services is often a problem, because the patients must be treated regardless of their insurance coverage and financial situation. The decrease in production and economic growth, as well as low gross national income in the countries with economic crisis, lead to the inability of treatment for a large number of the population. Such situation a system leads to additional debts and loans to healthcare system. Measures implemented for provision of acute curative care largely did not lead to improvements in the health status of the population. Educational and preventive measures, as well as higher standards for quality and accessibility of health care services for entire population in each country, especially those struggling are bound to joining the European Union and their implementation must start. The most A large number of medical institutions are is inefficient in health education and health promotion and must work to educate patients and families and increase the quality of preventive health services. Modernization of health care delivery and joining the European Union by increasing overall economic stability of countries is one of the primary goals of all countries in Southeast Europe. PMID:25395894

  18. OFFICE OF THE ASSOCIATE DEAN FOR RESEARCH Purdue University College of Veterinary Medicine

    E-print Network

    Pittendrigh, Barry

    OFFICE OF THE ASSOCIATE DEAN FOR RESEARCH Purdue University College of Veterinary Medicine Summer Research Program for Undergraduate Students The Purdue University College of Veterinary Medicine (PVM interested in veterinary medicine and biomedical research. The objective of this program is to provide

  19. Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine Boston University School of Medicine, 72 East Concord Street, Boston, MA -2118-2526

    E-print Network

    Finzi, Adrien

    Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine Boston University School of Medicine, 72 East Concord Street, Boston, MA -2118-2526 PATHOLOGY SEMINARS, FALL TERM 2011 FRIDAYS, 1:45-2:45 PM* one of Pathology, Mast Cells at the Interface Chief, Pathology Service, Stanford Hospital & Clinics of Health

  20. UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND SCHOOL OF MEDICINE DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL THERAPY & REHABILITATION SCIENCE

    E-print Network

    Weber, David J.

    UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND SCHOOL OF MEDICINE DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL THERAPY & REHABILITATION are investing in the Department of Physical Therapy & Rehabilitation Science at the University of Maryland the University of Maryland School of Medicine are administered by the University of Maryland Baltimore

  1. Postdoctoral Fellowships in Adult Clinical Psychology Stanford University School of Medicine

    E-print Network

    Puglisi, Joseph

    athletes. One opening is projected in the INSOMNIA AND BEHAVIORAL SLEEP MEDICINE PROGRAM, which specializes on the Stanford University campus. The Stanford Sleep Medicine Outpatient Center and the Stanford Pain Clinic

  2. Skills Inventory/Biography University of Rochester School of Medicine & Dentistry

    E-print Network

    Goldman, Steven A.

    Boston University Geriatrics Medical or Scientific Specialty Geriatric Medicine, Internal Medicine society meetings (i.e. American Geriatrics Society Annual Meetings) What is the best way to contact you

  3. Attitudes and perceptions of medical students about family medicine in Spain: protocol for a cross-sectional survey

    PubMed Central

    Alonso-Coello, Pablo; Villa, Josep Jiménez; Hijar, Antonio Monreal; Tuduri, Xavier Mundet; Puime, Ángel Otero

    2011-01-01

    Background Despite the fact that family medicine (FM) has become established as a specialty in the past 25?years, this has not been reflected in the inclusion of the specialty in the majority of medical schools in Spain. Almost 40% of the students will work in primary care but, in spite of this, most universities do not have an assessed placement as such. There are only specific practice periods in health centres or some student-selected components with little weight in the overall curricula. Objectives To evaluate the attitudes and perceptions of medical students about FM in the health system and their perception about the need for specific training in FM at the undergraduate level. To explore change over time of these attitudes and perceptions and to examine potential predictive factors for change. Finally, we will review what teaching activity in FM is offered across the Spanish schools of medicine. Methods Descriptive cross-sectional survey. Each one of the different analyses will consist of two surveys: one for all the students in the first, third and fifth year of medical school in all the Spanish schools of medicine asking about their knowledge, perceptions and attitudes in relation to primary care and FM. There will be an additional survey for the coordinating faculty of the study in each university about the educational activities related to FM that are carried out in their centres. The repetition of the study every 2?years will allow for an analysis of the evolution of the cohort of students until they receive their degree and the potential predictive factors. Discussion This study will provide useful information for strategic planning decisions, content and educational methodology in medical schools in Spain and elsewhere. It will also help to evaluate the influence of the ongoing changes in FM, locally and at the European level, on the attitudes and perceptions of the students towards FM in Spain. PMID:22189348

  4. Implications of Demographic Shifts for the Future of Family Medicine Education

    PubMed Central

    Hekelman, Francine; Werner, James J.; Zyzanski, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES Doctoral trained faculty educators increase faculty physicians’ skills and capacities by implementing training and mentoring programs in academic primary care departments. The purpose of this study was to describe the characteristics, roles, challenges, and satisfaction of faculty educators working in departments of family medicine and to report perceptions of their work environment. METHODS The data for this study derive from a 2009 national survey of all full-time doctoral-level faculty members, including educators, working in US academic departments of family medicine. Items included demographics, roles, research output, financial support, and perceptions of the work environment. Descriptive statistics including means and percentages were used to compare public and private institutions. RESULTS Twenty-five full-time faculty educators responded to the survey. Median age was 57 years; median years worked was 17, with 52% holding the rank of associate or full professor. Differences were observed between public and private institutions in terms of how time is spent, sources of funding, rates of tenure, and number of grants and publications. Job-related perceptions were mostly positive, indicating a good fit of training and job responsibilities. Areas of dissatisfaction included feelings of being over committed and increased job stress. CONCLUSIONS As senior faculty educators retire, it is important to assure that the torch is passed to new faculty educators who can meet the professional development needs of future generations of family physicians. PMID:22791535

  5. STUDENT HANDBOOK THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE

    E-print Network

    Raucher, Drazen

    2011-2012 STUDENT HANDBOOK THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE THE UNIVERSITY OF MISSISSIPPI MEDICAL CENTER #12 equal opportunity in education and employment, M/F/D/V. #12;1.LakelandFamilyMedicineTeachingCenter 2Dentistry 25.Laundry 26.RiskManagement 27.DavidS.PankratzBuilding­SchoolofMedicine 28.TheUniversityHospital 29

  6. Scaling up family medicine training in Gezira, Sudan – a 2-year in-service master programme using modern information and communication technology: a survey study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In 2010 the Gezira Family Medicine Project (GFMP) was initiated in Gezira state, Sudan, designed as an in-service training model. The project is a collaboration project between the University of Gezira, which aims to provide a 2-year master’s programme in family medicine for practicing doctors, and the Ministry of Health, which facilitates service provision and funds the training programme. This paper presents the programme, the teaching environment, and the first batch of candidates enrolled. Methods In this study a self-administered questionnaire was used to collect baseline data at the start of the project from doctors who joined the programme. A checklist was also used to assess the health centres where they work. A total of 188 out of 207 doctors responded (91%), while data were gathered from all 158 health centres (100%) staffed by the programme candidates. Results The Gezira model of in-service family medicine training has succeeded in recruiting 207 candidates in its first batch, providing health services in 158 centres, of which 84 had never been served by a doctor before. The curriculum is community oriented. The mean age of doctors was 32.5 years, 57% were males, and 32% were graduates from the University of Gezira. Respondents stated high confidence in practicing some skills such as asthma management and post-abortion uterine evacuation. They were least confident in other skills such as managing depression or inserting an intrauterine device. The majority of health centres was poorly equipped for management of noncommunicable diseases, as only 10% had an electrocardiography machine (ECG), 5% had spirometer, and 1% had a defibrillator. Conclusions The Gezira model has responded to local health system needs. Use of modern information and communication technology is used to facilitate both health service provision and training. The GFMP represents an example of a large-volume scaling-up programme of family medicine in Africa. PMID:24443978

  7. Lecture by Distinguished Oncologist at Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 2013 Date : November 8, 2013

    E-print Network

    Banbara, Mutsunori

    of Urology, National Taiwan University College of Medicine Tel 078-382-5820 Ex. 5820 in Oncology Phase I University Hospital, and Adjunct Assistant Professor, Department of Urology, National Taiwan University

  8. Interactions with the pharmaceutical industry: a survey of family medicine residents in Ontario.

    PubMed Central

    Sergeant, M D; Hodgetts, P G; Godwin, M; Walker, D M; McHenry, P

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the attitudes, knowledge and practices of family medicine residents relating to the pharmaceutical industry and to assess the effectiveness of existing guidelines on appropriate interactions with the pharmaceutical industry. DESIGN: Survey by mailed questionnaire. SETTING: Ontario. PARTICIPANTS: All 262 second-year family medicine residents in Ontario (seven centres); 226 (86.3%) responded. RESULTS: Fifty-two (23.0%) of the residents who responded stated that they had read the CMA policy statement on appropriate interactions between physicians and the pharmaceutical industry. A total of 124 (54.9%) stated that they would attend a private dinner paid for by a pharmaceutical representative; the proportion was not significantly reduced among those who had read the CMA guidelines, which prohibit the acceptance of personal gifts. In all, 186 (82.3%) reported that they would like the opportunity to interact with pharmaceutical representatives in an educational setting, even though several programs now discourage these interactions. Approximately three quarters (172/226 [76.1%]) of the residents indicated that they plan to see pharmaceutical representatives in their future practice. Residents at Centre 2 were significantly more critical of the pharmaceutical industry than those from the other centres. Overall, being aware of, and familiar with, departmental policy or CMA policy on interactions with the pharmaceutical industry did not affect the residents' attitudes or intended future practices. CONCLUSION: The presence of guidelines concerning physicians' interactions with the pharmaceutical industry does not appear to have a significant impact on family medicine residents in Ontario. PMID:8911290

  9. The Family Medicine Residency Training Initiative in Miscarriage Management: Impact on Practice in Washington State

    PubMed Central

    Darney, Blair G.; Weaver, Marcia R.; Stevens, Nancy; Kimball, Jeana; Prager, Sarah W.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES Non-complicated spontaneous abortion cases should be counseled about the full range of management approaches, including uterine evacuation using manual vacuum aspiration (MVA). The Residency Training Initiative in Miscarriage Management (RTI-MM) is an intensive, multidimensional intervention designed to facilitate implementation of office-based management of spontaneous abortion using MVA in family medicine residency settings. The purpose of this study was to test the impact of the RTI-MM on self-reported use of MVA for management of spontaneous abortion. METHODS We used a pretest/posttest one group study design and a web-based, anonymous survey to collect data on knowledge, attitudes, perceived barriers, and practice of office-based management of spontaneous abortion. We used multivariable models to estimate incident relative risks and accounted for data clustering at the residency site level. RESULTS Our sample included 441 residents and faculty from 10 family medicine residency sites. Our findings show a positive association between the RTI-MM and self-reported use of MVA for management of spontaneous abortion (adjusted RR=9.11 [CI=4.20-19.78]) and were robust to model specification. Male gender, doing any type of management of spontaneous abortion (eg, expectant, medication), other on-site reproductive health training interventions, and support staff knowledge scores were also significant correlates of physician practice of MVA. CONCLUSIONS Our findings suggest that the RTI-MM was successful in influencing the practice of management of spontaneous abortion using MVA in this population and that support staff knowledge may impact physician practice. Integrating MVA into family medicine settings would potentially improve access to evidence-based, comprehensive care for women. PMID:23378077

  10. Copyright 2009, The Ohio State University Family and Consumer Sciences

    E-print Network

    Making your own baby food is a healthy, cheaper choice than buying baby food. It is also very easy to doCopyright © 2009, The Ohio State University Family and Consumer Sciences MOB-5-09 Making Baby Food

  11. Geriatric Medicine Training for Family Practice Residents in the 21st Century: A Report from the Residency Assistance Program/Hartford Geriatrics Initiative.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warshaw, Gregg; Murphy, John; Buehler, James; Singleton, Stacy

    2003-01-01

    Summarizes the initial results of the regional geriatric medicine curriculum retreats for family practice residency directors provided as part of the American Academy of Family Physicians multi-part project to improve the amount and quality of geriatric medicine education received by family practice residents. (EV)

  12. University of Maryland School of Medicine 2013 Mini-Med School

    E-print Network

    Weber, David J.

    University of Maryland School of Medicine 2013 Mini-Med School Mini-Med School Registration Form · Fax: 410.706.8520 · Mail: Office of Public Affairs, c/o Veronica Anderson University of Maryland goes on inside the University of Maryland School of Medicine. For five weeks this fall you can learn

  13. The Examined Life: Writing and the Art of Medicine

    E-print Network

    , adventure? Prosperity, recognition? Family, friends, a home? Those of us in counseling and medicine Stories: "Small Jewels" for Personal Reflection and Teaching (WRI) Colleen Fogarty, MD, University

  14. Acting as standardized patients enhances family medicine residents' self-reported skills in palliative care.

    PubMed

    Sittikariyakul, Pat; Jaturapatporn, Darin; Kirshen, A J

    2015-08-01

    Recent publications have confirmed the use of standardized patients (SPs) in improving clinical skills and enhancing competency. Little research has studied the benefits residents may themselves gain in palliative care playing the role of SPs. Nineteen Family Medicine residents were recruited as standardized patients (FMR-SPs) for a mandatory palliative care workshop in communication for incoming, first-year trainees. Four months later, FMR-SPs reflected upon their own experiences. Two independent researchers performed thematic analysis of these interviews. Most of the residents were satisfied with their roles. Twelve reported improved understanding of self, their patients, the doctor-patient relationship, and the underlying philosophy of palliative care. They also described improved verbal and non-verbal communication skills. Eleven of 14 residents reflected upon behavioral changes in problem coping styles. All residents indicated an intention to apply the learning in their future work. Encouraging Thai Family Medicine residents, in years one through three, to portray SPs in palliative care appears to be a valuable learning experience for the resident. Future studies to validate whether this learning has been applied in subsequent practice are planned. PMID:25256636

  15. Patient greeting preferences for themselves and their providers in a military family medicine clinic.

    PubMed

    Laird, John E; Tolentino, Jerlyn C; Gray, Cynthia

    2013-10-01

    Using the proper greeting may be important to help establish rapport between health care providers and their patients. It may be particularly useful for family medicine physicians working in a military medical facility, where military rank and traditions are important. A total of 259 anonymous surveys were collected from patients treated at a military family medicine clinic. Most of the patients who completed the survey preferred to shake hands with their provider, be greeted using only their first name, and preferred that the provider introduce themselves using their last name only. Active duty patients were more likely than civilians to prefer a handshake (odds ratio [OR] 3.05, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.46-6.39) and officers were more likely to prefer a handshake compared to enlisted service members (OR 3.29; 95% CI 1.18-9.20). Respondents who were older were more likely to prefer a formal introduction by their provider compared to respondents under 35 years old (OR 2.92, 95% CI 1.35-6.31). Although most patients in this facility expressed a preference for how they would like to be greeted, providers are still encouraged to ask their patients how they would prefer to be addressed. PMID:24083924

  16. Evaluation of Four Commonly Used DNA Barcoding Loci for Chinese Medicinal Plants of the Family Schisandraceae

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ruozhu; Fan, Jianhua; Chen, Zhiduan

    2015-01-01

    Many species of Schisandraceae are used in traditional Chinese medicine and are faced with contamination and substitution risks due to inaccurate identification. Here, we investigated the discriminatory power of four commonly used DNA barcoding loci (ITS, trnH-psbA, matK, and rbcL) and corresponding multi-locus combinations for 135 individuals from 33 species of Schisandraceae, using distance-, tree-, similarity-, and character-based methods, at both the family level and the genus level. Our results showed that the two spacer regions (ITS and trnH-psbA) possess higher species-resolving power than the two coding regions (matK and rbcL). The degree of species resolution increased with most of the multi-locus combinations. Furthermore, our results implied that the best DNA barcode for the species discrimination at the family level might not always be the most suitable one at the genus level. Here we propose the combination of ITS+trnH-psbA+matK+rbcL as the most ideal DNA barcode for discriminating the medicinal plants of Schisandra and Kadsura, and the combination of ITS+trnH-psbA as the most suitable barcode for Illicium species. In addition, the closely related species Schisandra rubriflora Rehder & E. H. Wilson and Schisandra grandiflora Hook.f. & Thomson, were paraphyletic with each other on phylogenetic trees, suggesting that they should not be distinct species. Furthermore, the samples of these two species from the southern Hengduan Mountains region formed a distinct cluster that was separated from the samples of other regions, implying the presence of cryptic diversity. The feasibility of DNA barcodes for identification of geographical authenticity was also verified here. The database and paradigm that we provide in this study could be used as reference for the authentication of traditional Chinese medicinal plants utilizing DNA barcoding. PMID:25938480

  17. Gastrointestinal/Liver Pathologist Hamilton Regional Laboratory Medicine Program and McMaster University

    E-print Network

    Thompson, Michael

    Gastrointestinal/Liver Pathologist Hamilton Regional Laboratory Medicine Program and Mc Laboratory Medicine Program (HRLMP), the Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, McMaster University research in this area. The successful candidate will share general clinical responsibilities with a large

  18. UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA SCHOOL OF MEDICINE SCHEDULE OF UPCOMING EVENTS FOR 2008-09

    E-print Network

    Bushman, Frederic

    FOR SLEEP AND RESPIRATORY NEUROBIOLOGY SEMINAR SERIES Clifford B. Saper, MD, PhD James Jackson Putnam of Nursing "Sleep and behavioral disturbance in dementia" University of Pennsylvania School of MedicineD Assistant Professor of Medicine, Evanston Northwestern Healthcare Research Institute "Sleep and circadian

  19. College of Veterinary Medicine University of Illinois College Confers 134 Degrees, Certificates

    E-print Network

    Gilbert, Matthew

    College of Veterinary Medicine · University of Illinois d Graduation College Confers 134 Degrees the College of Veterinary Medicine on May 14. About half from this class joined practices in Illinois. Anne Barger, pathobiology, to give the address. Dr. Thomas Graves, veterinary clinical medicine, gave

  20. Reuniting public health and medicine: the University of New Mexico School of Medicine Public Health Certificate.

    PubMed

    Geppert, Cynthia M A; Arndell, Cynthia L; Clithero, Amy; Dow-Velarde, Lily A; Eldredge, Jonathan D; Eldredge, Jonathan P; Kalishman, Summers; Kaufman, Arthur; McGrew, Martha C; Snyder, Tiffany M; Solan, Brian G; Timm, Craig T; Tollestrup, Kristine; Wagner, Lana K; Wiese, William H; Wiggins, Charles L; Cosgrove, Ellen M

    2011-10-01

    The University of New Mexico School of Medicine (UNMSOM) sought to train medical students in public health concepts, knowledge, and skills as a means of improving the health of communities statewide. Faculty members from every UNMSOM department collaborated to create and integrate a public health focus into all years of the medical school curriculum. They identified key competencies and developed new courses that would synchronize students' learning public health subjects with the mainstream medical school content. New courses include: Health Equity: Principles of Public Health; Epidemiology and Biostatistics; Evidence-Based Practice; Community-Based Service Learning; and Ethics in Public Health. Students experiencing the new courses, first in pilot and then final forms, gave high quantitative ratings to all courses. Some students' qualitative comments suggest that the Public Health Certificate has had a profound transformative effect. Instituting the integrated Public Health Certificate at UNMSOM places it among the first medical schools to require all its medical students to complete medical school with public health training. The new UNMSOM Public Health Certificate courses reunite medicine and public health in a unified curriculum. PMID:21961667

  1. Principles of clinical medicine: Oregon Health Sciences University School of Medicine.

    PubMed

    Fields, S A; Toffler, W L; Elliott, D; Chappelle, K

    1998-01-01

    In 1992, the School of Medicine at Oregon Health Sciences University inaugurated a Principles of Clinical Medicine (PCM) course as part of an overall curricular revision. The PCM course, which covers the first and second years of medical school, integrates material from ten separate courses in the previous curriculum. Students learn longitudinally over the two years, rather than "cramming" discrete areas of knowledge and then moving on. Course sessions are related to concurrently taken basic science classes. Meeting two afternoons per week, the PCM course offers preceptorships, health care issues sessions, and patient examination sessions. The PCM course aims to encompass the body of knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary to become a competent physician. First- and second-year students have more opportunities than previously to interact with patients and practicing physicians in the community. Competition between learning areas, student perceptions of "soft" and "hard" courses, teacher recruitment, and administrative burnout are ongoing difficulties, while faculty recognition and development, administrative commitment and flexibility, and student and faculty feedback all contribute to the success of the course. The PCM course is now the backbone of the first two years of medical school and creates a solid foundation for the third and fourth years. PMID:9447198

  2. Affirmative Action Officers Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

    E-print Network

    Sharp, Kim

    ) · Otorhinolaryngology · Radiation Oncology · Dermatology · Emergency Medicine · Family Practice Judy Shea, Ph for review and approval before the ads may be published in professional journals. 2) Affirmative Action Forms . · Anesthesiology & Critical Care · Radiology · Surgery · OB/GYN INTERIM · Ophthalmology · Orthopaedic Surgery

  3. [Assessing research productivity in Department of Internal Medicine, University of Zagreb, School of Medicine and University Hospital Centre Zagreb].

    PubMed

    Petrak, Jelka; Sember, Marijan; Grani?, Davorka

    2012-01-01

    Bibliometric analysis may give an objective information about publishing activity, citation rate and collaboration patterns of individuals, groups and institutions. The publication productivity of the present medical staff (79 with specialist degree and 22 residents) in Department of Internal Medicine, University of Zagreb School of Medicine in University Hospital Centre Zagreb was measured by the number of papers indexed by Medline, their impact was measured by the number of times these papers had subsequently been cited in the medical literature, while the collaboration pattern was estimated by the authors' addresses listed in the papers. PubMed database was a source for verifying the bibliographic data, and the citation data were searched via Thomson Web of Scence (WoS) platform. There were a total of 1182 papers, published from 1974 to date. The number of papers per author ranged from 0 to 252. Sixty of papers were published in English, and 39% in Croatian language. The roughly equal share was published in local and foreign journals. The RCT studies and practice guidelines were among the most cited papers and were at the same time published by the highly ranked journals. The collaboration analysis confirmed the extensive involment in the international multicentric clinical trials as well as in the development of international/local practice guidelines. PMID:22768679

  4. Department of Pathology STANFORD UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF MEDICINE

    E-print Network

    Bogyo, Matthew

    and fellow training activities in blood banking and transfusion medicine. The individual will provide medical research projects in blood banking and transfusion medicine. The Stanford Blood Center collects in Clinical Pathology, Internal Medicine or Pediatrics, board eligible in Transfusion Medicine or minimum 1

  5. Department of Pathology STANFORD UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF MEDICINE

    E-print Network

    Bogyo, Matthew

    in blood banking and transfusion medicine. The individual will provide medical cross coverage and transfusion medicine. The Stanford Blood Center collects approximately 50,000 red cell and 14 or Pediatrics, board eligible in Transfusion Medicine or minimum 1 year experience in Transfusion Medicine. You

  6. Relevance of Hypersexual Disorder to Family Medicine and Primary Care as a Complex Multidimensional Chronic Disease Construct

    PubMed Central

    Vrijhoef, Bert; De Maeseneer, Jan; Vansintejan, Johan; Devroey, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    Hypersexual disorder (HD) is not defined in a uniform way in the psychiatric literature. In the absence of solid evidence on prevalence, causes, empirically validated diagnostic criteria, instruments for diagnosis, consistent guidelines on treatment options, medical and psychosocial consequences, and type of caregivers that need to be involved, HD remains a controversial and relatively poorly understood chronic disease construct. The role of family medicine in the detection, treatment, and followup of HD is not well studied. The purpose of this paper is to describe the complexity of HD as a multidimensional chronic disease construct and its relevance to family medicine and primary care. PMID:24066230

  7. TWO UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND SCHOOL OF MEDICINE FACULTY MEMBERS AND A BOARD MEMBER NAMED TO THE

    E-print Network

    Weber, David J.

    TWO UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND SCHOOL OF MEDICINE FACULTY MEMBERS AND A BOARD MEMBER NAMED TO THE DAILY RECORD'S LIST OF INFLUENTIAL MARYLANDERS Wednesday, February 13, 2013 Drs. Fraser and Rodriguez, as well as Board Member Emeritus Peter Angelos, Recognized The University of Maryland School of Medicine's Claire

  8. The University of Illinois at Chicago College of Medicine Head, Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences

    E-print Network

    Alford, Simon

    The University of Illinois at Chicago College of Medicine Head, Department of Ophthalmology of Illinois Eye Research Institute and the Illinois Eye and Ear Infirmary. The Department of Ophthalmology Tobacman, MD Chair, Ophthalmology Search Committee University of Illinois at Chicago, College of Medicine

  9. University of Illinois at Chicago College of Medicine and its Participating Hospitals

    E-print Network

    Alford, Simon

    University of Illinois at Chicago College of Medicine and its Participating Hospitals AUTHORIZATION, ____________________________, hereby authorize the College of Medicine at the University of Illinois at Chicago to disclose my social; Advocate Christ Hospital and Medical Center, Advocate Illinois Masonic Medical Center, Advocate Lutheran

  10. Department of Cellular and Molecular Pharmacology, Graduate School of Medicine, University of Tokyo

    E-print Network

    Miyashita, Yasushi

    Department of Cellular and Molecular Pharmacology, Graduate School of Medicine, University of Tokyo GLOBAL COE SEMINAR Ph.D. Assistant Professor, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Department cells achieve such sophisticated processing using a finite set of molecules within a confined space

  11. University of Miami Miller School of Medicine Medical Student Rights and Responsibilities Handbook 2012-2013

    E-print Network

    Miami, University of

    University of Miami Miller School of Medicine Medical Student Rights and Responsibilities Handbook of the medical education programs at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine (UMMSM). Medical schools have a responsibility for the initial professional education of their students and for assisting

  12. Sponsored by the University of California, Irvine School of Medicine RADIOLOGY GRAND ROUNDS

    E-print Network

    Mease, Kenneth D.

    Sponsored by the University of California, Irvine School of Medicine RADIOLOGY GRAND ROUNDS Wednesday, May 15, 2013 ­ 4:00 ­ 5:00PM UC Irvine Medical Center ­ Radiology Conference Room (0117) "Bone Resnick, MD, FACR Professor of Radiology, University of California, San Diego School of Medicine Chief

  13. OFFICE OF THE ASSOCIATE DEAN FOR RESEARCH Purdue University College of Veterinary Medicine

    E-print Network

    Pittendrigh, Barry

    OFFICE OF THE ASSOCIATE DEAN FOR RESEARCH Purdue University College of Veterinary Medicine Summer Research Program for Veterinary Students The Purdue University College of Veterinary Medicine (PVM), is pleased to announce the availability of summer research fellowships for veterinary students interested

  14. The Department of Radiation Oncology at The University of Maryland School of Medicine is hosting

    E-print Network

    Weber, David J.

    The Department of Radiation Oncology at The University of Maryland School of Medicine is hosting The Radiation Oncology Symposium- Best of 2012 Sponsored by the University of Maryland School of Medicine Date://cmetracker.net/UMD About the Course: The Radiation Oncology Symposium- Best of 2012 will provide the attendees with the new

  15. The Department of Radiation Oncology at The University of Maryland School of Medicine is hosting

    E-print Network

    Weber, David J.

    The Department of Radiation Oncology at The University of Maryland School of Medicine is hosting The Radiation Oncology Symposium- Best of 2014 Sponsored by the University of Maryland School of Medicine Date://cmetracker.net/UMD About the Course: The Radiation Oncology Symposium- Best of 2014 will provide the attendees with the new

  16. Family medicine model in Turkey: a qualitative assessment from the perspectives of primary care workers

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background A person-list-based family medicine model was introduced in Turkey during health care reforms. This study aimed to explore from primary care workers’ perspectives whether this model could achieve the cardinal functions of primary care and have an integrative position in the health care system. Methods Four groups of primary care workers were included in this exploratory-descriptive study. The first two groups were family physicians (FP) (n?=?51) and their ancillary personnel (n?=?22). The other two groups were physicians (n?=?44) and midwives/nurses (n?=?11) working in community health centres. Participants were selected for maximum variation and 102 in-depth interviews and six focus groups were conducted using a semi-structured form. Results Data analysis yielded five themes: accessibility, first-contact care, longitudinality, comprehensiveness, and coordination. Most participants stated that many people are not registered with any FP and that the majority of these belong to the most disadvantaged groups in society. FPs reported that 40-60% of patients on their lists have never received a service from them and the majority of those who use their services do not use FPs as the first point of contact. According to most participants, the list-based system improved the longitudinality of the relationship between FPs and patients. However, based on other statements, this improvement only applies to one quarter of the population. Whereas there was an improvement limited to a quantitative increase in services (immunisation, monitoring of pregnant women and infants) included in the performance-based contracting system, participants stated that services not among the performance targets, such as family planning, postpartum follow-ups, and chronic disease management, could be neglected. FPs admitted not being able to keep informed of services their patients had received at other health institutions. Half of the participants stated that the list-based system removed the possibility of evaluating the community as a whole. Conclusions According to our findings, FPs have a limited role as the first point of contact and in giving longitudinal, comprehensive, and coordinated care. The family medicine model in Turkey is unable to provide a suitable structure to integrate health care services. PMID:24571275

  17. From general practice to primary care: the industrialisation of family medicine in Britain.

    PubMed

    Iliffe, Steve

    2002-01-01

    Health services are multi-unit enterprises providing multi-component services, and organisationally are equivalent to very large, diversified companies. Although public health services like Britain's National Health service (NHS) are not for-profit enterprises, they may share characteristics of such enterprises, particularly where these characteristics offer methods of cost-containment. Since all health services, however organised, face the same problem of resources being insufficient to meet demand for health care, they exhibit an underlying tendency towards solving problems in health care using mechanisms borrowed from other industries. This paper attempts to answer the question: to what extent has general practice (family medicine) in Britain's NHS adopted industrial modes of organisation from productive (for-profit) industries? PMID:12013714

  18. Financing and budgeting of community-based family medicine residency programs.

    PubMed

    Carlisle, Robert

    2006-06-01

    Using an Internet-based survey for the fiscal year 2003 to 2004, 56 community-based family medicine residency programs participated in primary research of current financing and expenditures. A median of dollar 194,125 was invested in training each resident annually. The bulk of funding stemmed from sponsoring institution support and clinical care revenues. The majority of programs did not receive Title VII funds, state, local, or philanthropic support. Clinical care activity continued a historical trend of increases. There were 1,076 patient visits per resident full-time equivalent, producing 39.5% of program financing. The percentage of visits provided to those with Medicaid was 35.9%. Expenses included a calculated malpractice rate of dollar 17,097 per faculty full-time equivalent. This effort provides a database available for further expansion, a comparison to medical school-based residency programs, analyses for reflection on program characteristics, and future comparison of historical trends. PMID:16800412

  19. Stanford University School of Medicine Department of Pathology House Staff

    E-print Network

    Bogyo, Matthew

    Hematopathology Fellow Janet McNaughton, MD Transfusion Medicine Fellow Tony Ng, MD Surgical Pathology Fellow Hughes, MD Transfusion Medicine Fellow Bryan Gammon, MD Dermatopathology Fellow Lorraine Pan, MD Gyn

  20. Veterinary Preventive Medicine Curriculum Development at Louisiana State University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hubbert, William T.

    1976-01-01

    The program aims at training veterinarians, with interdepartmental faculty participation the rule rather than the exception. Included in the curriculum are: avian medicine, herd health management, veterinary public health, veterinary food hygiene, and regulatory veterinary medicine. (LBH)

  1. STUDENT HANDBOOK The Florida State University College of Medicine Student Handbook is published annually by the College of

    E-print Network

    Ronquist, Fredrik

    STUDENT HANDBOOK 2013-2014 The Florida State University College of Medicine Student Handbook in this handbook is subject to change. THE FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY COLLEGE of MEDICINE #12;Revised 8-16-13 Page 2

  2. Curricula for teaching the content of clinical practice guidelines to family medicine and internal medicine residents in the US: a survey study

    PubMed Central

    Akl, Elie A; Mustafa, Reem; Wilson, Mark C; Symons, Andrew; Moheet, Amir; Rosenthal, Thomas; Guyatt, Gordon H; Schünemann, Holger J

    2009-01-01

    Background Teaching the content of clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) is important to both clinical care and graduate medical education. The objective of this study was to determine the characteristics of curricula for teaching the content of CPGs in family medicine and internal medicine residency programs in the United States. Methods We surveyed the directors of family medicine and internal medicine residency programs in the United States. The questionnaire included questions about the characteristics of the teaching of CPGs: goals and objectives, educational activities, evaluation, aspects of CPGs that the program teaches, the methods of making texts of CPGs available to residents, and the major barriers to teaching CPGs. Results Of 434 programs responding (out of 839, 52%), 14% percent reported having written goals and objectives related to teaching CPGs. The most frequently taught aspect was the content of specific CPGs (76%). The top two educational strategies used were didactic sessions (76%) and journal clubs (64%). Auditing for adherence by residents was the primary evaluation strategy (44%), although 36% of program directors conducted no evaluation. Programs made texts of CPGs available to residents most commonly in the form of paper copies (54%) while the most important barrier was time constraints on faculty (56%). Conclusion Residency programs teach different aspects of CPGs to varying degrees, and the majority uses educational strategies not supported by research evidence. PMID:19772570

  3. Assessing family medicine trainees – what can we learn from the European neighbours?

    PubMed Central

    Flum, Elisabeth; Maagaard, Roar; Godycki-Cwirko, Maciek; Scarborough, Nigel; Scherpbier, Nynke; Ledig, Thomas; Roos, Marco; Steinhäuser, Jost

    2015-01-01

    Background: Although demands on family physicians (FP) are to a large extent similar in the European Union, uniform assessment standards for family medicine (FM) specialty training and assessment do not exist. Aim of this pilot study was to elicit and compare the different modalities and assessment methods of FM specialty training in five European countries. Methods: A semi structured survey was undertaken based on a convenient sample in five European countries (Denmark, Germany, Poland, the Netherlands and the United Kingdom). The respondents were asked to respond to ten items about aspects of FM specialty training and assessment methods in their respective countries. If available, this data was completed with information from official websites of the countries involved. Results: FM specialty training is performed heterogeneously in the surveyed countries. Training time periods range from three to five years, in some countries requiring a foundation program of up to two years. Most countries perform longitudinal assessment during FM specialty training using a combination of competence-based approach with additional formative and summative assessment. There is some evidence on the assessments methods used, however the assessment method used and costs of assessment differs remarkably between the participating countries. Conclusions: Longitudinal and competence-based assessment is the presently preferred approach for FM specialty training. Countries which use less multifaceted methods for assessment could learn from best practice. Potential changes have significant cost implications.

  4. The Effect of a Required Third-Year Family Medicine Clerkship on Medical Students' Attitudes: Value Indoctrination and Value Clarification.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Senf, Janet H.; Campos-Outcalt, Douglas

    1995-01-01

    Data on 997 medical students' attitudes before and after a required 6-week clerkship in family medicine, compared with specialty match data, found that the clerkship had the effects of both value indoctrination and value clarification for students. This effect appeared to persist throughout the third and fourth years. (Author/MSE)

  5. International medical graduates in family medicine in the United States of America: an exploration of professional characteristics and attitudes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Amanda L Morris; Robert L Phillips; George E Fryer Jr; Larry A Green; Fitzhugh Mullan

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The number of international medical graduates (IMGs) entering family medicine in the United States of America has steadily increased since 1997. Previous research has examined practice locations of these IMGs and their role in providing care to underserved populations. To our knowledge, research does not exist comparing professional profiles, credentials and attitudes among IMG and United States medical graduate

  6. Supervised near-peer clinical teaching in the ambulatory clinic: an exploratory study of family medicine residents' perspectives.

    PubMed

    Ince-Cushman, Daniel; Rudkin, Teresa; Rosenberg, Ellen

    2015-02-01

    Near-peer teaching is used extensively in hospital-based rotations but its use in ambulatory care is less well studied. The objective of this study was to verify the benefits of near-peer teaching found in other contexts and to explore the benefits and challenges of near-peer clinical supervision unique to primary care. A qualitative descriptive design using semi-structured interviews was chosen to accomplish this. A faculty preceptor supervised senior family medicine residents as they supervised a junior resident. We then elicited residents' perceptions of the experience. The study took place at a family medicine teaching unit in Canada. Six first-year and three second-year family medicine residents participated. Both junior and senior residents agreed that near-peer clinical supervision should be an option during family medicine residency training. The senior resident was perceived to benefit the most. Near-peer teaching was found to promote self-reflection and confidence in the supervising resident. Residents felt that observation by a faculty preceptor was required. In conclusion, the benefits of near-peer teaching previously described in hospital settings can be extended to ambulatory care training programmes. However, the perceived need for direct observation in a primary care context may make it more challenging to implement. PMID:25601040

  7. Faculty of Medicine Graduate School of Medicine

    E-print Network

    Miyashita, Yasushi

    2007--2008 Faculty of Medicine Graduate School of Medicine PROSPECTUS The University of Tokyo #12;#12;Welcome to Faculty of Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine The University of Tokyo Takao Shimizu Dean, Faculty of Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine The University of Tokyo The Faculty of Medicine

  8. Medicines

    MedlinePLUS

    ... better. In the United States, the Food and Drug Administration is in charge of assuring the safety ... prescription and over-the-counter medicines. Even safe drugs can cause unwanted side effects or interactions with ...

  9. The Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, Laboratory Medicine McMaster University, invites applications for a one year Forensic Pathology Residency Program (PGY-6) for the academic

    E-print Network

    Haykin, Simon

    The Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, Laboratory Medicine McMaster University, invites applications for a one year Forensic Pathology Residency Program (PGY-6) for the academic year July 2013-June 2014. The Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine and the Hamilton Regional

  10. The Use of Family Therapy within a University Counseling Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Kathryn

    2009-01-01

    As a counterpoint to the oftentimes adversarial way that parents are viewed when they appear to be overinvolved in the lives of their college-aged students, this article advocates for the use of a family therapy perspective in university counseling centers. Benefits of this perspective include a broadening of the lens through which individual…

  11. Faculty of Medicine Graduate School of Medicine

    E-print Network

    Miyashita, Yasushi

    2005--2006 Faculty of Medicine Graduate School of Medicine PROSPECTUS The University of Tokyo #12;#12;Welcome to Faculty of Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine The University of Tokyo Nobutaka Hirokawa Dean, Faculty of Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine The University of Tokyo The University of Tokyo Graduate

  12. Cancer Research Center Indiana University School of Medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to authorize the Indiana School of Medicine to proceed with the detailed design, construction and equipping of the proposed Cancer Research Center (CRC). A grant was executed with the University on April 21, 1992. A four-story building with basement would be constructed on the proposed site over a 24-month period. The proposed project would bring together, in one building, three existing hematology/oncology basic research programs, with improved cost-effectiveness through the sharing of common resources. The proposed site is currently covered with asphaltic pavement and is used as a campus parking lot. The surrounding area is developed campus, characterized by buildings, walkways, with minimal lawns and plantings. The proposed site has no history of prior structures and no evidence of potential sources of prior contamination of the soil. Environmental impacts of construction would be limited to minor increases in traffic, and the typical noises associated with standard building construction. The proposed CRC project operation would involve the use radionuclides and various hazardous materials in conducting clinical studies. Storage, removal and disposal of hazardous wastes would be managed under existing University programs that comply with federal and state requirements. Radiological safety programs would be governed by Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) license and applicable Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations. There are no other NEPA reviews currently active which are in relationship to this proposed site. The proposed project is part of a Medical Campus master plan and is consistent with applicable local zoning and land use requirements.

  13. Complementary and Alternative Medicine Use and Adherence to Asthma Medications among Latino and Non-Latino White Families

    PubMed Central

    McQuaid, Elizabeth L.; Fedele, David A.; Adams, Sue K.; Koinis-Mitchell, Daphne; Mitchell, Jessica; Kopel, Sheryl J.; Seifer, Ronald; Jandasek, Barbara; Fritz, Gregory K.; Canino, Glorisa

    2013-01-01

    Objective The current study sought to evaluate patterns of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use in a sample of Latino and Non-Latino white (NLW) children with asthma, to determine whether parental beliefs about conventional medications and barriers to obtaining these medications were related to CAM use, and to assess whether CAM use was associated with decreased adherence to controller medications. Methods Participants included 574 families of children with asthma from Non-Latino White, Puerto Rican, and Dominican backgrounds from RI and from Island Puerto Rico. All parents completed a brief checklist of barriers to medication use and an assessment of CAM approaches. A subsample of 259 families had controller medication use monitored objectively for approximately one month by MDILog (fluticasone propionate), TrackCap (montelukast), or dosage counter (fluticasone/salmeterol combination). Results Prevalence of CAM use was high among Latino families. Perceived barriers to obtaining medication were related to increased CAM use in Puerto Rican families from RI. Elevated medication concerns were positively associated with CAM use among NLW and Island PR families. CAM use was positively related to objective adherence within NLW families, and unrelated in other groups. Conclusions CAM use is common among Latino families with asthma. Among some families, CAM use may be initiated as a way to cope with barriers to obtaining medication or when parents have concerns about conventional medications. Families who report CAM use do not appear to be substituting CAM for conventional asthma medication. PMID:24602583

  14. West Virginia University 1 School of Pharmacy

    E-print Network

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    was first offered at West Virginia University as a department in the School of Medicine in 1914. The College D. Ponte - Pharm.D. (University of Utah) Departments of Clinical Pharmacy and Family Medicine

  15. West Virginia University 1 School of Pharmacy

    E-print Network

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    was first offered at West Virginia University as a department in the School of Medicine in 1914. The College - Pharm.D. (University of Utah) Departments of Clinical Pharmacy and Family Medicine · Yongyut Rojanasakul

  16. Can Credit Systems Help in Family Medicine Training in Developing Countries? An Innovative Concept

    PubMed Central

    Raji, J. Beulah; Velavan, Jachin; Anbarasi, Sahaya; Grant, Liz

    2014-01-01

    There is irrefutable evidence that health systems perform best when supported by a Family Physician network. Training a critical mass of highly skilled Family Physicians can help developing countries to reach their Millennium Development Goals and deliver comprehensive patient-centered health care to their population. The challenge in developing countries is the need to rapidly train these Family Physicians in large numbers, while also ensuring the quality of the learning, and assuring the quality of training. The experience of Christian Medical College (CMC), Vellore, India and other global examples confirm the fact that training large numbers is possible through well-designed blended learning programs. The question then arises as to how these programs can be standardized. Globally, the concept of the “credit system” has become the watch-word for many training programs seeking standardization. This article explores the possibility of introducing incremental academic certifications using credit systems as a method to standardize these blended learning programs, gives a glimpse at the innovation that CMC, Vellore is piloting in this regard partnering with the University of Edinburgh and analyses the possible benefits and pitfalls of such an approach. PMID:25374849

  17. HEALTH PROFESSIONS RECRUITMENT & EXPOSURE PROGRAM Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine, Student National Medical Association

    E-print Network

    Chisholm, Rex L.

    HEALTH PROFESSIONS RECRUITMENT & EXPOSURE PROGRAM 2012 (HPREP) Northwestern University's Feinberg of medicine, as well as have minority healthcare students interact with them on a regular basis. HRPEP by healthcare students · Information on different health professions and fields of medicine This program

  18. HEALTH PROFESSIONS RECRUITMENT & EXPOSURE PROGRAM Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine, Student National Medical Association

    E-print Network

    Chisholm, Rex L.

    HEALTH PROFESSIONS RECRUITMENT & EXPOSURE PROGRAM 2013 (HPREP) Northwestern University's Feinberg of medicine, as well as have minority healthcare students interact with them on a regular basis. HRPEP by healthcare students Information on different health professions and fields of medicine This program

  19. HEALTH PROFESSIONS RECRUITMENT & EXPOSURE PROGRAM Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine, Student National Medical Association

    E-print Network

    Chisholm, Rex L.

    HEALTH PROFESSIONS RECRUITMENT & EXPOSURE PROGRAM 2014 (HPREP) Northwestern University's Feinberg of medicine, as well as have minority healthcare students interact with them on a regular basis. HRPEP by healthcare students Information on different health professions and fields of medicine This program

  20. ALBERT EINSTEIN COLLEGE of MEDICINE of YESHIVA UNIVERSITY DEPARTMENT of ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH and SAFETY

    E-print Network

    Yates, Andrew

    ALBERT EINSTEIN COLLEGE of MEDICINE of YESHIVA UNIVERSITY DEPARTMENT of ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH, grease, oil, fluid or food. 2. Poor drainage around pipes and drains. 3. Indoor walking surface. Anthony Chibbaro Department of Environmental Health and Safety Albert Einstein College of Medicine

  1. Assistant or Associate Professor in the Department of Medicine Stanford University

    E-print Network

    Bogyo, Matthew

    Assistant or Associate Professor in the Department of Medicine Stanford University Stanford Prevention Research Center The Stanford Prevention Research Center, in the Department of Medicine, is seeking and provision of adequate space that will be tailored to the needs of the successful applicants. Candidates

  2. UNIVERSITY OF ST ANDREWS POLICY AND PROCEDURES ON FITNESS TO PRACTISE MEDICINE

    E-print Network

    Brierley, Andrew

    1 UNIVERSITY OF ST ANDREWS POLICY AND PROCEDURES ON FITNESS TO PRACTISE MEDICINE Contents Section 1 The Fitness to Practise Policy Section 2 The Responsibilities of the School of Medicine Section 3 Referrals and Initial Assessment Section 4 Investigation Section 5 The Fitness to Practise Panel Section 6 The Panel

  3. ECE Department, Boston University 4/17/2011 Title Automated medicine dispenser for the elderly

    E-print Network

    ECE Department, Boston University 4/17/2011 Title Automated medicine dispenser for the elderly (ECE-ME) Technical areas Control systems, precision machine design, wireless, optical recognition Customer's Project medicine to an elderly person at the appropriate times as required by a remotely located care

  4. Medical Student Fellowship in Women's Health Research Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

    E-print Network

    Bushman, Frederic

    Medical Student Fellowship in Women's Health Research Perelman School of Medicine at the University in academic medicine · To promote research and education in women's health Dual Mission To support in women's health: 1 award may be specific to CV research ­ Clinical, basic science or community · Open

  5. College of Veterinary Medicine University of Illinois Faculty and Staff Awards

    E-print Network

    Gilbert, Matthew

    College of Veterinary Medicine · University of Illinois g Faculty and Staff Awards For the past 13 of publications, research awards, and outside recognition Dr. Tom Goetz Professor, Veterinary Clinical Medicine Dr, and continuing education Dr. Anne Barger Clinical Assistant Professor, Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory Dr

  6. ASSISTANT/ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR University of California, Davis, School of Medicine

    E-print Network

    Nguyen, Danh

    of Internal Medicine Division of Nephrology The University of California Davis, School of Medicine, Division of Nephrology is recruiting for a full-time position at the Assistant or Associate Professor level care/clinical nephrology activities will be required in this position. The final candidate will hold

  7. ASSISTANT/ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR University of California, Davis, School of Medicine

    E-print Network

    Nguyen, Danh

    of Internal Medicine Division of Nephrology The University of California, Davis, School of Medicine, Division of Nephrology is recruiting for a full-time position at the Assistant or Associate Professor level in the Health Sciences Clinical Professor series. This position will be split 50%/50% between general nephrology

  8. UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT PRIMARY CARE INTERNAL MEDICINE RESIDENCY PROGRAM POSITIONS OBTAINED BY GRADUATES

    E-print Network

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT PRIMARY CARE INTERNAL MEDICINE RESIDENCY PROGRAM POSITIONS OBTAINED BY GRADUATES 2009-2013 PRIMARY CARE/INTERNAL MEDICINE NAME GRADUATED STATE HOSPITAL/PRACTICE SITE Mujahed Resident Maria Figueras 2009 New Hampshire Primary Care IM Practice Therese Franco 2009 Washington

  9. POSITION X1226 Extension Assistant Family and Consumer Sciences LOCATION The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee

    E-print Network

    Grissino-Mayer, Henri D.

    POSITION X1226 Extension Assistant Family and Consumer Sciences LOCATION The University status. Assumes other duties as assigned. REQUIREMENT Master's degree in Family and Consumer Sciences, training, and resource development. Assist in the preparation for Family Impact Seminars as needed

  10. [Teaching of medicine of the University of Bologna in the Reinaissance].

    PubMed

    Romero y Huesca, Andrés; Moreno-Rojas, Juan Carlos; Soto-Miranda, Miguel Angel; Ponce-Landín, Francisco Javier; Hernández, Daniel Alejandro; Ramírez-Bollas, Julio

    2006-01-01

    The foundation date of the University of Bologna was 1150, was the first European University and set the pattern. The combination of structured teaching and students association marked the origin of the studium generale. The presence of teaching legists encouraged teachers in others fields to come to Bologna. Ars dictaminis, grammar, logic, philosophy, mathematical arts and especially medicine were taught there by the middle of the thirteenth century. The university had to offer advanced instruction in law, medicine, and theology, had a minimum of six to eight professors teaching civil law, canon law, medicine, logic, natural philosophy and usually rhetoric. Many professors bearing local names were able scholars and commanding figures in medicine and surgery. Taddeo Alderotti (1210-95) began to teach medicine in Bologna about 1260. He soon raised medicine to a prestigious position in the university. The geographical distribution demonstrates the international character of the student body 73% were Italians and 26% non Italians. The decision of the commune of Bologna to wrest control of the university from the students by paying professors was probably the most important decision in the history of Italian universities. Examination of the distribution of professors offers a detailed picture of the faculty. In 1370 the university had 11 professors of civil law, seven professors of canon law, three professors of medical theory, two of medical practice (the specific of diagnosis and treatment), and one professor of surgery. After growing steadily the numbers of teachers stabilized at 85 to 110 until 1530. PMID:16827269

  11. Patient perception and knowledge of acetaminophen in a large family medicine service.

    PubMed

    Herndon, Christopher M; Dankenbring, Dawn M

    2014-06-01

    The use of acetaminophen is currently under increased scrutiny by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) due to the risk of intentional and more concerning, unintentional overdose-related hepatotoxicity. Acetaminophen is responsible for an estimated 48% of all acute liver failure diagnoses. The purpose of this study is to evaluate patient perception and knowledge of the safe use and potential toxicity of acetaminophen-containing products. The authors conducted a descriptive, 2-week study using a convenience sample from a large family medicine clinic waiting room. Survey questions assessed ability to identify acetaminophen, knowledge of the current recommended maximum daily dose, respondent acetaminophen use patterns, common adverse effects associated with acetaminophen, and respondent self-reported alcohol consumption. Acetaminophen safety information was provided to all persons regardless of participation in the study. Of the 102 patients who chose to participate, 79% recognized acetaminophen as a synonym of Tylenol, whereas only 9% identified APAP as a frequently used abbreviation. One third of respondents thought acetaminophen was synonymous with ibuprofen and naproxen. Approximately one fourth of patients correctly identified the then maximum recommended daily acetaminophen dose of 4 g. Seventy-eight percent of patients correctly identified hepatotoxicity as the most common serious adverse effect. We conclude that patient deficiencies in knowledge of acetaminophen recognition, dosing, and toxicity warrant public education by health professionals at all levels of interaction. Current initiatives are promising; however, further efforts are required. PMID:24813653

  12. Smoking Cessation in Family Medicine: Effects of an Area Health Education Center Training Program

    PubMed Central

    Johns, Tracy L.; Lawrence, Elizabeth; Martini, Leila E.; Dunn, Grace E.; Thompson, Zachary J.; Zwygart, Kira

    2010-01-01

    Background and Objectives Many clinicians have not received adequate training in smoking cessation. We examined the effects of a tobacco training program on clinician behavior, attitudes, knowledge, and comfort related to smoking cessation. Methods In a prospective cohort study, family medicine residents and faculty completed a pretest, followed by an educational intervention that encompassed presentations on smoking cessation resources, motivational interviewing, and the neurobiology of addiction and pharmacotherapy. After 3 months, participants completed a postintervention survey. Results were analyzed using chi-square tests to examine the effects of training. Results Thirty-three residents and faculty completed the pretraining survey and 25 completed the posttraining survey. Following training, participants were more familiar and comfortable with Public Health Service Clinical Practice Guidelines (P < .0001). No significant differences were found in performance of the 5 As (Ask, Advise, Assess, Assist, and Arrange) or other behaviors, including providing assistance with counseling, cessation plans, resources, or pharmacotherapy. There were no improvements in knowledge of specific intervention plans or attitudes related to identifying and counseling smokers. Conclusion A multidisciplinary tobacco training program increases clinician familiarity and comfort with practice guidelines, and may contribute to improving care activities that promote a healthy lifestyle. Future research should explore other interventions that have the potential of changing practice patterns on a larger scale. Future studies should also assess the effect of training programs on patient-oriented outcomes. PMID:21975634

  13. How we use patient encounter data for reflective learning in family medicine training.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Simon; Henderson, Kim; Tapley, Amanda; Scott, John; van Driel, Mieke; Thomson, Allison; Spike, Neil; McArthur, Lawrie; Presser, Jenny; Magin, Parker

    2014-10-14

    Abstract Introduction: Consulting with patients is the core learning activity of Australian family medicine (general practice/GP) training, providing a rich source of reflective learning for trainees. We have developed a reflective learning program for postgraduate vocational trainees based on clinical encounters. Methods: The Registrar Clinical Encounters in Training (ReCEnT) program is an educational program documenting GP trainees' consultations in five Australian GP training providers. Trainees record patient demographics, consultation details, problems managed, management practices and educational factors from sixty consecutive consultations per six-month training term. Trainees receive a detailed feedback report comparing individual data to aggregated trainee data and national GP data. Results: The patient encounter system provides multiple opportunities for reflective learning across a number of domains of exposure and practice. Reflection can occur during completion of the encounter form; as self-reflection on the feedback report; as facilitated reflection with the GP trainer and medical educator; and as part of integration of data into teaching. We have identified areas for further development, including enhancing the reflective skills of trainees and trainers. Conclusion: The ReCEnT patient encounter program provides a rich platform for reflective learning for vocational trainees and supports development of skills in lifelong learning. PMID:25314377

  14. Academic Pediatric Pathologist Hamilton Regional Laboratory Medicine Program and McMaster University

    E-print Network

    Haykin, Simon

    Academic Pediatric Pathologist Hamilton Regional Laboratory Medicine Program and McMaster University Hamilton, ON A position in Pediatric/Perinatal Anatomical Pathology will become available an excellent opportunity for an experienced academic pediatric pathologist or a recent graduate currently

  15. Clinical Laboratory Scientist, Genetics Hamilton Regional Laboratory Medicine Program and McMaster University

    E-print Network

    Hitchcock, Adam P.

    Clinical Laboratory Scientist, Genetics Hamilton Regional Laboratory Medicine Program and McMaster University Hamilton, Ontario, Canada Applications are invited from laboratory scientists interested in providing professional expertise for a large academic laboratory program serving the Central South region

  16. ALBERT EINSTEIN COLLEGE of MEDICINE of YESHIVA UNIVERSITY DEPARTMENT of ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH and SAFETY

    E-print Network

    Emmons, Scott

    and SAFETY HEALTH and SAFETY CONSTRUCTION SAFETY AUDIT FORM Job Location: Field Supervisor: Safety Officer Qualified Person Present Proper Supports Scaffold Inspection #12;HEALTH and SAFETY CONSTRUCTION SAFETY AUDITALBERT EINSTEIN COLLEGE of MEDICINE of YESHIVA UNIVERSITY DEPARTMENT of ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH

  17. University of Connecticut School of Medicine Child & Adolescent Psychiatry Residency/Fellowship

    E-print Network

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    12/09 University of Connecticut School of Medicine Child & Adolescent Psychiatry Residency: __________________ To: Child and Adolescent Psychiatry training program From of neurology (2 months minimum; one month may be child neurology) ____ FTE months of adult inpatient psychiatry

  18. Skills Inventory/Biography University of Rochester School of Medicine & Dentistry

    E-print Network

    Goldman, Steven A.

    Program Director Boston University Geriatrics Medical or Scientific Specialty Geriatric Medicine, Internal and national medical society meetings (i.e. American Geriatrics Society Annual Meetings) What is the best way

  19. [End of the word and relegation of bodies in medicine: university formation of physicians].

    PubMed

    Sicard, D

    2008-01-01

    Medicine is based on a growing demand for science. Yet, the patient's speech is ill adapted to the current desire of rationality. Inaccuracy and errancy have become the features of clinical examination. Self censorship of the speech gradually appears. Presenting the body becomes useless, if not suspicious. Medical technology replaces perceived subjectivity. What medicine says prevails over what the body knows. In a strange paradox, the "echo" precedes the speech. The risk of having an autistic medicine is looming. University teaching must be aware of this. The obvious gap between the speech and the body not only evades the ethical issue but also paradoxically deprives the medicine from its scientific acumen. PMID:19445110

  20. Relevance of Chronic Lyme Disease to Family Medicine as a Complex Multidimensional Chronic Disease Construct: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Goderis, Geert

    2014-01-01

    Lyme disease has become a global public health problem and a prototype of an emerging infection. Both treatment-refractory infection and symptoms that are related to Borrelia burgdorferi infection remain subject to controversy. Because of the absence of solid evidence on prevalence, causes, diagnostic criteria, tools and treatment options, the role of autoimmunity to residual or persisting antigens, and the role of a toxin or other bacterial-associated products that are responsible for the symptoms and signs, chronic Lyme disease (CLD) remains a relatively poorly understood chronic disease construct. The role and performance of family medicine in the detection, integrative treatment, and follow-up of CLD are not well studied either. The purpose of this paper is to describe insights into the complexity of CLD as a multidimensional chronic disease construct and its relevance to family medicine by means of a systematic literature review. PMID:25506429

  1. Family and Consumer Sciences University Faculty Perceptions of Interdisciplinary Work

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Virginia B. Vincenti

    2005-01-01

    The overall purpose of this article is to describe research focusing on two questions: What is family and consumer sciences (FCS) higher education faculty members’ understanding of interdisciplinary work? What have faculty learned from their interdisciplinary experiences about facilitators and inhibitors? The researcher used Seidman's three-question, in-depth interview protocol with 9 participants in a large, midwestern, land-grant university. Qualitative analysis

  2. Consumption of medicines, alcohol, tobacco and cannabis among university students: a 2-year follow-up

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Francisco Caamaño-Isorna; Nayara Mota; Alberto Crego; Montserrat Corral; Socorro Rodríguez Holguín; Fernando Cadaveira

    2011-01-01

    Objective  To determine the prevalence of medicine consumption among Spanish university students and its association with alcohol, tobacco\\u000a and cannabis consumption.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Method  We carried out a cohort study among Spanish university students (n = 2,700). Consumption of medicines during the previous 15 days, risky alcohol use, and tobacco and cannabis consumption were\\u000a measured using questionnaire. Logistic regression models were generated using consumption of medicines as

  3. An interface of Chlamydia testing by community family planning clinics and referral to hospital genitourinary medicine clinics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chris Wilkinson; Helen Massil; Jacqueline Evans

    2000-01-01

    ObjectivesTo assess compliance with the protocol for the management of women with Chlamydia trachomatis diagnosed in community family planning (FP) clinics; to assess the rate of attendance at genitourinary medicine (GUM) clinics by these women; to assess the rate of adequate treatment and to assess the level of communication between GUM clinics and FP clinics.MethodRetrospective review of FP clinic records

  4. Comparative Review of Education Programs of Family Medicine (FM) in Bosnia and Herzegovina and Several Transition Countries

    PubMed Central

    Masic, Izet; Skopljak, Amira; Jatic, Zaim

    2014-01-01

    Family Medicine as an independent medical discipline is relatively young in the countries of Southeast Europe. Still are used the old models of all forms of education in this module, although most countries accepted Bologna undergraduate teaching concept and already implement it with greater or lesser success. Measuring the effects of the qualities of these concepts and models is not done systematically nor in uniform manner, so it could not be compared by the unique variables measuring the quality of education curricula, and especially the quality of education level of the graduates at the first, second and third degree courses and other forms of education. This paper provides a comparative overview of the state of education in the area of family medicine in the region. It creates comparison according to the study duration for undergraduate and postgraduate studies, doctoral studies and specialized studies in specified areas. What stand out are the proposals to improve education in the field of family medicine in the region. PMID:25685090

  5. Dean's Faculty Advisory Committee University of Tennessee, College of Medicine

    E-print Network

    Cui, Yan

    preparatory for the upcoming LCME visit (Liason Committee on Medical Education). Dr. Peppler has now appointed on this campus. One idea was to invite him to share his ideas and plans for the College of Medicine, and what he

  6. COLLEGE OF MEDICINE University of Illinois at Chicago

    E-print Network

    Illinois at Chicago, University of

    of Hippocrates Now being admitted to the profession of medicine, I solemnly pledge to consecrate my life of Doctor of Philosophy Degrees President B. Joseph White, PhD The Oath of Hippocrates Administered by Dean

  7. THE UNIVERSITY OF TOLEDO Department of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology

    E-print Network

    Toledo, University of

    for Sleep Disorders Lynn Godfrey, B.S.N., CDE Diabetes Education Nurse Coordinator Deepak K. Malhotra, M, BA Director, Molecular Basis of Disease Graduate Program Adjunct Professor of Medicinal Chemistry

  8. Policy on Student Travel to Countries with a State Department Travel Warning Boston University School of Medicine

    E-print Network

    Spence, Harlan Ernest

    School of Medicine International Health Program Boston University School of Medicine International Health, and location · What this experience has to offer over similar alternative rotations in non-Travel Warning

  9. Symposium Encourages Collaborative Efforts in Regenerative Medicine NC State University and The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill held its first joint

    E-print Network

    Langerhans, Brian

    Symposium Encourages Collaborative Efforts in Regenerative Medicine NC State University and The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill held its first joint symposium on regenerative medicine on October 15, 2013. Titled Opportunities, Challenges and Resources in Regenerative Medicine, NC State

  10. SYMPTOMATOLOGY AND COMORBIDITY OF SOMATIZATION DISORDER AMONGST GENERAL OUTPATIENTS ATTENDING A FAMILY MEDICINE CLINIC IN SOUTH WEST NIGERIA

    PubMed Central

    Obimakinde1, A.M.; Ladipo, M.M.; A.E. Irabor

    2014-01-01

    Background: Individuals with somatization may be the most difficult to manage because of the diverse and frequent complaints across many organ systems. They often use impressionistic language to describe circumstantial symptoms which though bizarre, may resemble genuine diseases. The disorder is best understood in the context "illness" behaviour, masking underlying mental disorder, manifesting solely as somatic symptoms or with comorbidity. Objective: To evaluate somatization symptoms and explore its comorbidity in order to improve the management of these patients. Methods: A cross-sectional survey of 60 somatizing patients who were part of a case-control study, selected by consecutive sampling of 2668 patients who presented at the Family Medicine Clinic of University College Hospital Ibadan, Nigeria between May-August 2009. Data was collected using the ICPC-2, WHO- Screener and Diagnostic Schedule and analysed with SPSS 16. Results: There were at least 5 symptoms of somatization in 93.3% of the patients who were mostly females. Majority had crawling sensation, "headache", unexplained limb ache, pounding heart, lump in the throat and insomnia. The mean age at onset was 35yrs with 90% having recurrence of at least 10yrs.Approximately 54% had comorbidity with cardiovascular disease being the most prevalent. Conclusions: The study revealed that somatization is not a specific disease but one with a spectrum of expression. This supports proposition that features for the diagnosis of somatization could be presence of three or more vague symptoms and a chronic course lasting over two years. It is important to be conversant with pattern of symptoms and possible comorbidity for effective management of these patients.

  11. Family variables as moderators between beliefs towards medicines and adherence to self-care behaviors and medication in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Pereira, M Graça; Pedras, Susana; Machado, José Cunha

    2014-06-01

    This study analyzed whether family variables such as marital adjustment, partner support, family coping, and family stress moderated the relationship between negative beliefs about medicines and adherence to self-care behaviors (diet, glucose monitoring, exercise, foot care, and medication), in Type 2 diabetes patients. The sample was composed of 387 individuals with Type 2 diabetes, diagnosed in the past 12 months. Patients were assessed on self-care behaviors in diabetes, medication adherence, beliefs about medicines, family coping, family stress, marital adjustment, and partner support. The results showed marital adjustment, family coping, partner support, and family stress as moderators in the relationship between negative beliefs and adherence. Patients with negative beliefs regarding medicines, but who reported good marital adjustment and family coping were more likely to test their blood glucose; and if they reported low support from their partners were less likely to adhere to their prescribed diet. Finally, patients with negative beliefs about medicines, but who reported high family stress, were less likely to take their medication. The results emphasize the importance of family variables on adherence to self-care behaviors and medication. This study revealed the importance of including partners on interventions regarding Type 2 diabetes because they seem to play an important role in patient's adherence. PMID:24707825

  12. Medical Education Curriculum At a Glance 2013-2014** University of California Irvine School of Medicine

    E-print Network

    Rose, Michael R.

    & Embryology Clinical Foundations I MS 2 ­ 8/12/13 ­ 3/13/14 Microbiology General Pathology Pharmacology Behavioral Science & Ethics Clinical Pathology Clinical Foundations II USMLE Step 1 Review ** For official Clinical Foundation 3 (CF3)­ 2 weeks Elective/vacation ­ 4 weeks Family Medicine - 4 weeks Inpatient

  13. Clinical practice guidelines for support of the family in the patient-centered intensive care unit: American College of Critical Care Medicine Task Force 2004???2005

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Judy E. Davidson; Karen Powers; Kamyar M. Hedayat; Mark Tieszen; Alexander A. Kon; Eric Shepard; Vicki Spuhler; I. David Todres; Mitchell Levy; Juliana Barr; Raj Ghandi; Gregory Hirsch; Deborah Armstrong

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To develop clinical practice guidelines for the sup- port of the patient and family in the adult, pediatric, or neonatal patient-centered ICU. Participants: A multidisciplinary task force of experts in crit- ical care practice was convened from the membership of the American College of Critical Care Medicine (ACCM) and the Soci- ety of Critical Care Medicine (SCCM) to include

  14. On behalf of the GMS students, welcome to the Boston University School of Medicine!

    E-print Network

    Hutyra, Lucy R.

    Terrier ID Office 710 Albany St. Boston, MA 02118 Mon-Fri 7am-9am, 12:30-3:00pm ATMs Bank of America to the Boston University School of Medicine! To help you achieve success here at BUSM, you have several............................................................................... 33 2 Table of Contents #12;3 Campus Life #12; Boston University has an interactive maps option

  15. TheJournalofExperimentalMedicine JEM The Rockefeller University Press $15.00

    E-print Network

    Papavasiliou, F. Nina

    TheJournalofExperimentalMedicine ARTICLE JEM © The Rockefeller University Press $15.00 www, The Rockefeller University, New York, NY 10021 5Laboratory Animal Science Program, Science Applications Research Foundation, Oklahoma City, OK 73104 The B cell­speci c enzyme activation-induced cytidine

  16. TheJournalofExperimentalMedicine JEM The Rockefeller University Press $30.00

    E-print Network

    Arnold, Jonathan

    York University School of Medicine, New York, NY 10016 4Biomedical Sciences Graduate Program, Division of Immunology, The Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 108-8639, Japan 7 the lungs to the local lymph node, airway administration of LPS did not accelerate transport of bacteria

  17. DOCTOR OF PHYSICAL THERAPY PROGRAM University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health

    E-print Network

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    DOCTOR OF PHYSICAL THERAPY PROGRAM University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health toward: University of Wisconsin Foundation Funds The Physical Therapy General Fund The Visiting The Barbara Ellen Gerlich-Hoefeyzer Scholarship Fund Physical Therapy Student Scholarship Fund Mary Mc

  18. Veterans Administration Palo Alto Health Care System An Affiliation of Stanford University School of Medicine

    E-print Network

    Quake, Stephen R.

    Veterans Administration Palo Alto Health Care System An Affiliation of Stanford University School of Medicine at the Veterans Administration Palo Alto Health Care System (VAPAHCS) and Stanford University for the administrative and clinical care and treatment of veterans within the VAPAHCS. Individuals with experience

  19. The University of Maryland School of Medicine Department of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Science

    E-print Network

    Weber, David J.

    1 The University of Maryland School of Medicine Department of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation the Department of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Science (PTRS) at the University of Maryland School therapy education program with a strong emphasis on clinical evidence through rehabilitation science

  20. History of the renal section, New York University School of Medicine 1926-1986, New York University Medical Center.

    PubMed Central

    Chasis, H.

    1989-01-01

    This history of the Renal Section at New York University School of Medicine ascribes its birth to a policy introduced by John Henry Wyckoff in 1924 that divided the Department of Medicine into sections devoted to the various subspecialties. Physicians selected to head each section sought further training. William Goldring, asked to organize the kidney section, spent a sabbatical year working with Homer William Smith, chairman and professor of the department of physiology at New York University School of Medicine. The second event was the development of a postdoctoral fellowship program in which medical school graduates, following completion of their intern and residency program, returned to basic science departments for exposure to and training in research in preparation for their return to clinical medicine. The aim of this fellowship program was to introduce the experimental method, which had been productive in the physical sciences, to the study and treatment of disease in man. The third event was the continuous collaboration between members of the Department of Medicine and the Department of Physiology under the chairmanship of Homer Smith. Experimental protocols in cardiovascular and renal physiology developed in the laboratory were carried over to Bellevue Hospital for studies and treatment of patients with hypertensive and renal diseases under the direction of members of the Renal Section. The final step conceived by Saul J. Farber, Chairman and Professor of the Department of Medicine was unification into a single group of all faculty members working in the field of hypertensive and renal diseases in Bellevue, University, and Manhattan Veterans Administration Hospitals. The Renal Section then can attribute its origin and development to the establishment of divisions within the Department of Medicine, the postdoctoral fellowship program, and the collaboration between the Departments of Medicine and Physiology. The establishment of the Renal Section served as a prototype for organizing medical school faculties into teams responsible for teaching, investigation, and treating hypertensive and renal diseases and spawned nephrology as a subspecialty of Internal Medicine. PMID:2686789

  1. University of Maryland School of Medicine For all inquiries, please contact us at admissions@som.umaryland.edu

    E-print Network

    Weber, David J.

    University of Maryland School of Medicine For all inquiries, please contact us at admissions, Maryland 21201 · 410.706.7478 · medschool.umaryland.edu/admissions The University of Maryland, Baltimore Association, accredits the School of Medicine. The University of Maryland, Baltimore is actively committed

  2. University of Virginia School of Medicine PO Box 800761

    E-print Network

    Acton, Scott

    Care of Transgender Teens Christine Burt Solorzano MD, Nancy McLaren MD, and Brock Libby MD, Department.medicine.virginia.edu/community-service/centers/biomedical-ethics-and- humanities/medical-center-hour Watch the Medical Center Hour on YouTube at http://

  3. University of Virginia School of Medicine PO Box 800761

    E-print Network

    Acton, Scott

    Care of Transgender Teens Christine Burt Solorzano MD, Nancy McLaren MD, and Brock Libby MD, Department.medicine.virginia.edu/community-service/centers/biomedical-ethics-and- humanities/medical-center-hour Watch the Medical Center Hour on YouTube at

  4. UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA PERELMAN SCHOOL OF MEDICINE Curriculum Vitae

    E-print Network

    Pennsylvania, University of

    of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. 1991-2005 Executive Board, Center for Sleep and Circadian Neurobiology for Neurobiology and Behavior Steering Committee, Department of Psychiatry. 1996- Chief, Division of Sleep Director and Member, Center for Sleep and Respiratory Neurobiology 1995- Member, Gra

  5. UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA PERELMAN SCHOOL OF MEDICINE Curriculum Vitae

    E-print Network

    Pennsylvania, University of

    of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. 1991-2005 Executive Board, Center for Sleep and Circadian Neurobiology for Neurobiology and Behavior Steering Committee, Department of Psychiatry. 1996- Chief, Division of Sleep Director and Member, Center for Sleep and Respiratory Neurobiology 1995- Member, Graduate Group, Depa

  6. Student Handbook University of Utah School of Medicine

    E-print Network

    Feschotte, Cedric

    Resources Policy 54 Drug-Free Environment 58 Drug Testing 60 Educational Records and Privacy Rights 63 / OSHA / Compliance Training 68 Student Group Fund-Raising Policy 69 School of Medicine Industry Relations Policy 70 Government 76 College Council 76 Executive Committee 76 Appointment, Retention

  7. LOCH Case study – Implementation of HEFCE Open Access policy for the next REF within the College of Medicine and Veterinary Medicine, University of Edinburgh 

    E-print Network

    Krzak, Anna

    2015-03-23

    This case study gives an overview of the local preparations being made for Open Access in the post-2014 REF within the College of Medicine and Veterinary Medicine (CMVM) at the University of Edinburgh, and is published as part of the Jisc...

  8. Experience with using second life for medical education in a family and community medicine education unit

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The application of new technologies to the education of health professionals is both a challenge and a necessity. Virtual worlds are increasingly being explored as a support for education. Aim: The aim of this work is to study the suitability of Second Life (SL) as an educational tool for primary healthcare professionals. Methods Design: Qualitative study of accredited clinical sessions in SL included in a continuing professional development (CPD) programme for primary healthcare professionals. Location: Zaragoza I Zone Family and Community Medicine Education Unit (EU) and 9 health centres operated by the Aragonese Health Service, Aragon, Spain. Method: The EU held two training workshops in SL for 16 healthcare professionals from 9 health centres by means of two workshops, and requested them to facilitate clinical sessions in SL. Attendance was open to all personnel from the EU and the 9 health centres. After a trail period of clinical sessions held at 5 health centres between May and November 2010, the CPD-accredited clinical sessions were held at 9 health centres between February and April 2011. Participants: 76 healthcare professionals attended the CPD-accredited clinical sessions in SL. Main measurements: Questionnaire on completion of the clinical sessions. Results Response rate: 42-100%. Questionnaire completed by each health centre on completion of the CPD-accredited clinical sessions: Access to SL: 2 centres were unable to gain access. Sound problems: 0% (0/9). Image problems: 0% (0/9). Voice/text chat: used in 100% (10/9); 0 incidents. Questionnaire completed by participants in the CPD-accredited clinical sessions: Preference for SL as a tool: 100% (76/76). Strengths of this method: 74% (56/76) considered it eliminated the need to travel; 68% (52/76) believed it made more effective use of educational resources; and 47% (36/76) considered it improved accessibility. Weaknesses: 91% (69/76) experienced technical problems, while; 9% (7/76) thought it was impersonal and with little interaction. 65.79% (50/76) believed it was better than other distance learning methods and 38.16% (29/76) believed it was better than face-to-face learning. Conclusions SL is a tool that allows educational activities to be designed that involve a number of health centres in different geographical locations, consequently eliminating the need to travel and making more effective use of educational resources. PMID:22587562

  9. Professional Success and Gender in Family Medicine: Design of Scales and Examination of Gender Differences in Subjective and Objective Success Among Family Physicians.

    PubMed

    Delgado, Ana; Saletti-Cuesta, Lorena; López-Fernández, Luis Andrés; Toro-Cárdenas, Silvia; de Dios Luna Del Castillo, Juan

    2014-07-21

    Two components of professional success have been defined: objective career success (OCS) and subjective career success (SCS). Despite the increasing number of women practicing medicine, gender inequalities persist. The objectives of this descriptive, cross-sectional, and multicenter study were (a) to construct and validate OCS and SCS scales, (b) to determine the relationships between OCS and SCS and between each scale and professional/family characteristics, and (c) to compare these associations between male and female family physicians (FPs). The study sample comprised 250 female and 250 male FPs from urban health centers in Andalusia (Spain). Data were gathered over 6 months on gender, age, care load, professional/family variables, and family-work balance, using a self-administered questionnaire. OSC and SCS scales were examined by using exploratory factorial analysis and Cronbach's ?, and scores were compared by gender-stratified bivariate and multiple regression analyses. Intraclass correlation coefficients were calculated using a multilevel analysis. The response rate was 73.6%. We identified three OCS factors and two SCS factors. Lower scores were obtained by female versus male FPs in the OCS dimensions, but there were no gender differences in either SCS dimension. PMID:25049366

  10. 1 BHATI FAMILY INDIA TRAVEL GRANT (42/2012) THE AUSTRALIAN NATIONAL UNIVERSITY

    E-print Network

    Botea, Adi

    1 ­ BHATI FAMILY INDIA TRAVEL GRANT (42/2012) THE AUSTRALIAN NATIONAL UNIVERSITY BHATI FAMILY INDIA TRAVEL GRANT CONDITIONS OF GRANT 1. Introduction 1.1 The Bhati Family has provided funds for a travel grant to be awarded each year in perpetuity to be known as the "Bhati Family India Travel Grant". 1

  11. Evaluation of the Learning Environment for Diploma in Family Medicine with the Dundee Ready Education Environment (DREEM) Inventory

    PubMed Central

    Akturk, Zekeriya; Al-Megbil, Tarek

    2010-01-01

    The primary healthcare system is at a turning point in Saudi Arabia. However, the sustainability of family medicine as the core element of that system is increasingly being called into question because of lack of family physicians. In keeping view this problem; a postgraduate diploma program in family medicine has started in 2008. A validated measure of educational environment i.e., Dundee Ready Education Environment (DREEM) questionnaire consisting of 50 questions having five domains of perception was administered to all 13 trainees of the diploma course at the completion of the program to check their perception about learning evironment. The trainees comprised of 4 males (40%) and 6 females (60%). The overall score showed more positive than negative side (147/200). There is no significant difference (P > 0.05) in the mean scores of five different domains of perception. The subclasses of five domains showed that teaching perceived as positive by 50%, moving towards right direction by 80%, feeling more positive by 50%, positive attitude by 80% and the 70% scored the course as not too bad. The overall high score and positive attitude towards the course assures the better teaching environment. However, there are areas to improve and it requires continuous evaluation. PMID:21179228

  12. Evaluation of the Learning Environment for Diploma in Family Medicine with the Dundee Ready Education Environment (DREEM) Inventory.

    PubMed

    Khan, A Sattar; Akturk, Zekeriya; Al-Megbil, Tarek

    2010-01-01

    The primary healthcare system is at a turning point in Saudi Arabia. However, the sustainability of family medicine as the core element of that system is increasingly being called into question because of lack of family physicians. In keeping view this problem; a postgraduate diploma program in family medicine has started in 2008. A validated measure of educational environment i.e., Dundee Ready Education Environment (DREEM) questionnaire consisting of 50 questions having five domains of perception was administered to all 13 trainees of the diploma course at the completion of the program to check their perception about learning evironment. The trainees comprised of 4 males (40%) and 6 females (60%). The overall score showed more positive than negative side (147/200). There is no significant difference (P > 0.05) in the mean scores of five different domains of perception. The subclasses of five domains showed that teaching perceived as positive by 50%, moving towards right direction by 80%, feeling more positive by 50%, positive attitude by 80% and the 70% scored the course as not too bad. The overall high score and positive attitude towards the course assures the better teaching environment. However, there are areas to improve and it requires continuous evaluation. PMID:21179228

  13. Admission Factors Predicting Family Medicine Specialty Choice: A Literature Review and Exploratory Study among Students in the Rural Medical Scholars Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avery, Daniel M., Jr.; Wheat, John R.; Leeper, James D.; McKnight, Jerry T.; Ballard, Brent G.; Chen, Jia

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The Rural Medical Scholars Program (RMSP) was created to increase production of rural family physicians in Alabama. Literature review reveals reasons medical students choose careers in family medicine, and these reasons can be categorized into domains that medical schools can address through admission, curriculum, and structural…

  14. The University of Georgia www.vet.uga.edu College of Veterinary Medicine Spring/Summer 2008

    E-print Network

    Hall, Daniel

    for the College of Veterinary Medicine, and we are entering an exciting phase of our College's history. OurThe University of Georgia www.vet.uga.edu College of Veterinary Medicine Spring/Summer 2008 of Veterinary Medicine, Office of Public Relations for alumni and friends. To send story ideas, class notes

  15. COLLEGE OF VETERINARY MEDICINE Office of the Dean Oregon State University, 200 Magruder Hall, Corvallis, Oregon 97331-4802

    E-print Network

    Escher, Christine

    COLLEGE OF VETERINARY MEDICINE Office of the Dean Oregon State University, 200 Magruder Hall in comparative Veterinary Medicine would be rolled into this MPH-DVM program, or if an alternate MS program requirements for colleges of veterinary medicine. Therefore, further budget cuts cannot be addressed

  16. Excellence in Veterinary Medicine at Colorado State University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tietz, William J.

    1977-01-01

    Colorado State University has developed a strong interdisciplinary faculty that provides the entire university with graduate and undergraduate instruction in the basic biomedical sciences--anatomy, physiology, and microbiology--in addition to instruction in the professional curriculum. (LBH)

  17. University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry

    E-print Network

    Goldman, Steven A.

    .........................................................................................................11 COMPUTING AND ELECTRONIC COMMUNICATIONS POLICY.....................................................11 ELECTRONIC MEDICAL RECORD DOCUMENTATION POLICY FOR MEDICAL STUDENTS .......17 UNIVERSITY.............................................................................................................25 SEXUAL HARASSMENT

  18. Eight Years of Building Community Partnerships and Trust: The UCLA Family Medicine Community-Based Participatory Research Experience

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Gerardo; Rodríguez, Michael A.; Lopez, Glenn A.; Bholat, Michelle A.; Dowling, Patrick T.

    2014-01-01

    Acknowledging the growing disparities in health and health care that exist among immigrant families and minority populations in large urban communities, the UCLA Department of Family Medicine (DFM) sought a leadership role in the development of family medicine training and community-based participatory research (CBPR). Performing CBPR requires that academic medicine departments build sustainable and long-term community partnerships. The authors describe the eight-year (2000–2008) process of building sustainable community partnerships and trust between the UCLA DFM and the Sun Valley community, located in Los Angeles County. The authors used case studies of three research areas of concentration (asthma, diabetes prevention, and establishing access to primary care) to describe how they established community trust and sustained long-term community research partnerships. In preparing each case study, they used an iterative process to review qualitative data. Many lessons were common across their research concentration areas. They included the importance of (1) having clear and concrete community benefits, (2) supporting an academic–community champion, (3) political advocacy, (4) partnering with diverse organizations, (5) long-term academic commitment, and (6) medical student involvement. The authors found that establishing a long-term relationship and trust was a prerequisite to successfully initiate CBPR activities that included an asthma school-based screening program, community walking groups, and one of the largest school-based primary care clinics in the United States. Their eight-year experience in the Sun Valley community underscores how academic–community research partnerships can result in benefits of high value to communities and academic departments. PMID:19881437

  19. Post-doctoral and Graduate Student Training Grants in the School of Biological Sciences and School of Medicine at the University of California at Irvine (Fall, 2011).

    E-print Network

    Rose, Michael R.

    of Medicine at the University of California at Irvine (Fall, 2011). Principle Investigator Program School Informatics Training Program Dr. TALLIE BARAM Anatomy and Neurobiology Medicine Epilepsy Research Training Program Dr. VINCENT CAIOZZO Orthopaedic Surgery Medicine UCI Multidisciplinary Exercise Sciences Training

  20. Academic Medicine Meets Traditional African Healing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindow, Megan

    2008-01-01

    Cyril Naidoo, who directs the department of family medicine at the University of KwaZulu-Natal's Nelson R. Mandela School of Medicine, conducts workshops to traditional healers on how to help patients with AIDS and HIV. In Dr. Naidoo's workshop, the group discusses how to counsel patients about HIV and AIDS, how to refer them for testing, and then…

  1. [Christian Ehrenfried Eschenbach (1712-1788)--a pioneer of legal medicine in German universities].

    PubMed

    Wegener, Rudolf

    2004-01-01

    Christian Ehrenfried Eschenbach (1712-1788) belongs to the forerunners of the embossed natural science scholars of legal medicine in Germany. As a principal re-elected 11 times and dean of the medical faculty at Rostock University he defended academic positions in difficult times. His bibliography comprises numerous text books, e.g. on surgery, anatomy, pathology and obstetrics as well as various fields of mathematics. His Medicina legalis (1746 and 1775) belongs to the first systematic editions of forensic medicine in the German-speaking community. Thanks to his extensive practical experience as a physician and public health officer he took a very progressive position on questions of forensic medicine, issues of professional ethics in medicine and the assessment of injuries. He has wrongly been forgotten. PMID:15328926

  2. The Czechoslovak legal regulation of family relations affected by development in medicine.

    PubMed

    Dragonec, J

    1990-01-01

    Medicine has developed rapidly during the last decades. Transplantation, sex-change surgery in transsexual or heterosexual persons, interference in the process of reproduction of human species and procedures like lobotomy have remarkably expanded the possibilities of contemporary medicine. This, at the same time gives rise to unprecedented legal problems. A number of them have not yet been solved in many countries, though legislative solutions are sought. The road to their solution, however, is full of blind curves: no sooner does the law offer an answer to one problem than medicine demands the answer to another, brand new one. This is why knowledge of these problems' regulation in different countries might be of use. That article gives an outline of their regulation in Czechoslovakia. PMID:2122164

  3. Are familial factors underlying the association between socioeconomic position and prescription medicine? A register-based study on Danish twins

    PubMed Central

    Madsen, Mia; Andersen, Per Kragh; Gerster, Mette; Andersen, Anne-Marie Nybo; Osler, Merete; Christensen, Kaare

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Although well established, the association between socioeconomic position and health and health behaviour is not clearly understood, and it has been speculated that familial factors, for example, dispositional factors or exposures in the rearing environment, may be underlying the association. The objective was to compare prescription fillings within twin pairs who are partly or fully genetically identical and share childhood exposures. Design Twin cohort study. Setting Denmark. Participants Data from the Danish Twin Registry were linked to registers in Statistics Denmark and the Danish Registry of Medicinal Product statistics. A total of 8582 monozygotic (MZ) and 15?788 dizygotic same sex (DZSS) twins were included. Outcome measures Number of prescription fillings during follow-up (1995–2005) was analysed according to education and income. Results of unpaired and intrapair analyses were compared. Results An inverse social gradient in filling of prescriptions for all-purpose and system-specific drugs was observed in the unpaired analyses. In the intrapair analyses, associations were attenuated some in DZSS and more in MZ twins. Filling of drugs targeting the nervous system was still strongly associated with income in the intrapair analyses. Conclusions Familial factors seem to account for part of the observed social inequality in filling of prescription medicine. PMID:24227869

  4. Tulane University School of Medicine Summer Histology Course

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Tulane University (Tulane University School of Medicine)

    2012-07-24

    This website provides information regarding a summer cell biology and medical histology course at Tulane University. The course is a comprehensive 5-week, 110-hour individualized remediation course for medical and dental students enrolled in medical or dental school.

  5. Academic Critical Care Physicians Critical Care Medicine Program, Queen's University

    E-print Network

    Abolmaesumi, Purang

    a unique mix of year-round recreational, cultural and academic opportunities. Remuneration is competitive individuals. Queen's University is committed to employment equity and diversity in the workplace and welcomes

  6. Med School Financial Aid Office "ToDo" List Stanford University School of Medicine

    E-print Network

    Bogyo, Matthew

    number. You will see a screen with these options: #12;Med School Financial Aid Office "ToDo" List Page 2: Financial Awareness Counseling is optional and NOT the same as regular Entrance Counseling, whichMed School Financial Aid Office "ToDo" List Page 1 Stanford University School of Medicine Financial

  7. DOCUMENT RELEASE FORM DEPARTMENT OF SPEECH-LANGUAGE PATHOLOGY FACULTY OF MEDICINE, UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO

    E-print Network

    Prodiæ, Aleksandar

    DOCUMENT RELEASE FORM DEPARTMENT OF SPEECH-LANGUAGE PATHOLOGY FACULTY OF MEDICINE, UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO I hereby request that the Department of Speech-Language Pathology send the record of: Clinical WITH THIS REQUEST FORM $ If payment is by cheque or money order, please make payable to: "Dept of Speech-Language

  8. DOCUMENT RELEASE FORM DEPARTMENT OF SPEECH-LANGUAGE PATHOLOGY FACULTY OF MEDICINE, UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO

    E-print Network

    Sokolowski, Marla

    DOCUMENT RELEASE FORM DEPARTMENT OF SPEECH-LANGUAGE PATHOLOGY FACULTY OF MEDICINE, UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO I hereby request that the Department of Speech-Language Pathology send the following record request name of association / regulatory body / individual fee to student for dept use only Speech-Language

  9. University of Central Florida College of Medicine Industry Relations Policy and Guidelines

    E-print Network

    Foroosh, Hassan

    , Fellowships, and Other Support for Trainees 7.3 Training of COM Personnel 7.4 Education of COM Industry1 University of Central Florida College of Medicine Industry Relations Policy and Guidelines Table Relationships with Industry 3.1 Gifts and Meals 3.2 Consulting Relationships 3.3 Industry-Funded Speaking

  10. UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA -SCHOOL OF MEDICINE TECHNICAL, NON-ACADEMIC, STANDARDS

    E-print Network

    Leistikow, Bruce N.

    , and members of the health care team. They must be able to obtain a medical history in a timely fashionUNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA - SCHOOL OF MEDICINE TECHNICAL, NON-ACADEMIC, STANDARDS Essential physical and cognitive abilities and sufficient mental and emotional stability to assure that candidates

  11. DOCTOR OF PHYSICAL THERAPY PROGRAM University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health

    E-print Network

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    for Special Olympics Pre-College Enrichment Opportunity Program Learning Excellence (PEOPLE) Program Reach Out and Read Reading at the Children's Hospital Relay for Life SAFE Exercise Buddies SalvationDOCTOR OF PHYSICAL THERAPY PROGRAM University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health

  12. University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry Updated: February 5, 2013

    E-print Network

    Goldman, Steven A.

    . Under pressure of fatigue, professional stress, or personal problems, students should strive to maintaiUniversity of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry Updated: February 5, 2013 MEDICAL STUDENT Student Promotions and Review Board (MSPRB) retains the right to review professionalism, behavioral

  13. DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL THERAPY AND HUMAN MOVEMENT SCIENCES NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY FEINBERG SCHOOL OF MEDICINE

    E-print Network

    Contractor, Anis

    DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL THERAPY AND HUMAN MOVEMENT SCIENCES NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY FEINBERG SCHOOL OF MEDICINE Benefits for Physical Therapy Clinical Educators To recognize the contribution of clinical evidence. The Department of Physical Therapy and Human Movement Sciences (PTHMS) will reimburse the Center

  14. James P. Wilmot Cancer Center | University of Rochester Medicine 2014 Volume I

    E-print Network

    Portman, Douglas

    cancer, for instance, discovered a potential partnership with a kidney cancer specialist; brainJames P. Wilmot Cancer Center | University of Rochester Medicine 2014 Volume I Special Edition: Cancer Research at Wilmot WILMOTCANCER CENTERMEDICINE #12;"Why me?" is a question that crosses the minds

  15. A Study of the Semiannual Admissions System at the University of Tennessee College of Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rittenhouse, Carl H.; Weiner, Samuel

    This report describes the program and examines the advantages and disadvantages of the semiannual admissions system used by the University of Tennessee College of Medicine (UTCM). It also considers effects of an accelerated program which together with the use of a semiannual admissions system permit more efficient use of facilities and the…

  16. Sponsored by the University of California, Irvine School of Medicine RADIOLOGY GRAND ROUNDS

    E-print Network

    Mease, Kenneth D.

    Sponsored by the University of California, Irvine School of Medicine RADIOLOGY GRAND ROUNDS Wednesday, November 14, 2012 ­ 4:00 ­ 5:00PM UCI Medical Center ­ Radiology Conference Room (0117) "Neuroimaging of Epilepsy" Noriko Salamon, MD, PhD Professor of Radiology, Director of Diagnostic Neuroradiology

  17. Sponsored by the University of California, Irvine School of Medicine RADIOLOGY GRAND ROUNDS

    E-print Network

    Mease, Kenneth D.

    Sponsored by the University of California, Irvine School of Medicine RADIOLOGY GRAND ROUNDS Wednesday, July 10, 2013 ­ 4:00 ­ 5:00PM UC Irvine Medical Center ­ Radiology Conference Room 0117 "f updated information on radiological science topics and research. Target Audience Attending physicians

  18. Sponsored by the University of California, Irvine School of Medicine RADIOLOGY GRAND ROUNDS

    E-print Network

    Mease, Kenneth D.

    Sponsored by the University of California, Irvine School of Medicine RADIOLOGY GRAND ROUNDS Wednesday, February 27, 2013 ­ 4:00 ­ 5:00PM UCI Medical Center ­ Radiology Conference Room (0117) "Neuroimaging of Epilepsy" Noriko Salamon, MD, PhD Professor of Radiology, Director of Diagnostic Neuroradiology

  19. Sponsored by the University of California, Irvine School of Medicine RADIOLOGY GRAND ROUNDS

    E-print Network

    Mease, Kenneth D.

    Sponsored by the University of California, Irvine School of Medicine RADIOLOGY GRAND ROUNDS Monday, April 8, 2013 ­ 4:00 ­ 5:00PM UCI Medical Center ­ Radiology Conference Room (0117) "Imaging of Intracranial Infections: Pearls and Pitfalls" Mark E. Mullins, M.D., Ph.D. Associate Professor of Radiology

  20. Sponsored by the University of California, Irvine School of Medicine RADIOLOGY GRAND ROUNDS

    E-print Network

    Mease, Kenneth D.

    Sponsored by the University of California, Irvine School of Medicine RADIOLOGY GRAND ROUNDS Wednesday, March 6, 2013 ­ 3:30 ­ 4:30PM UCI Medical Center ­ Radiology Conference Room (0117) "Screening Mammography at the Threshold for Recall" Edward A. Sickles, M.D., F.A.C.R. Professor Emeritus of Radiology

  1. CONFIDENTIAL REPORTING The University of Connecticut School of Medicine provides several ways through which

    E-print Network

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    Page 123 CONFIDENTIAL REPORTING The University of Connecticut School of Medicine provides several ways through which residents/fellows may raise and resolve issues in a confidential and protected will be treated in a confidential manner and the program will protect the resident/fellow from intimidation

  2. Change without Reform: The Case of Stanford University School of Medicine, 1908-1990.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuban, Larry

    1997-01-01

    The nine-decade history of the Stanford University of Medicine (California) and its history of teaching human anatomy illustrate the recurring processes of curricular and instructional reforms in medical education and the ways in which these reform efforts do not disturb the traditional preclinical/clinical model of medical education. (SLD)

  3. The Use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine Practices Among Australian University Students

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert H. Feldman; Ronald Laura

    2004-01-01

    A survey of 518 university students in Australia was conducted to gain a better understanding of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use. Results indicated that 81.1% of the students used at least 1 of 24 CAM practices. Top practices were relaxation, massage, herbs, art therapy, and prayer. The most common health reasons for using CAM were stress or psychosomatic issues

  4. Improvement of Oncology Education at the University of Washington School of Medicine, 1984-1988.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bleyer, W. Archie; And Others

    1990-01-01

    After development and implementation of a revised oncology curriculum at the University of Washington School of Medicine student performance on oncology related questions on the National Board of Medical Examiners examination indicated substantial improvement relative to student performance in non-oncology areas and to the national average. (DB)

  5. DOCUMENT RELEASE FORM DEPARTMENT OF SPEECH-LANGUAGE PATHOLOGY FACULTY OF MEDICINE, UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO

    E-print Network

    Sokolowski, Marla

    DOCUMENT RELEASE FORM DEPARTMENT OF SPEECH-LANGUAGE PATHOLOGY FACULTY OF MEDICINE, UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO I hereby request that the Department of Speech-Language Pathology send the following record name of association / regulatory body / individual fee to student for dept use only CASLPA

  6. Student Senior Partnership Program: University of California Irvine School of Medicine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzpatrick, Camille; Musser, Anne; Mosqueda, Laura; Boker, John; Prislin, Michael

    2006-01-01

    The Student Senior Partner Program (SSPP) forms the core of the required medical student geriatrics curriculum at the University of California-Irvine School of Medicine (UCISOM). The program utilizes a longitudinal modular format that extends over the first three years of medical school. Instruction is presented in didactic, patient interactive,…

  7. University of Maryland School of Medicine Department of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Science

    E-print Network

    Weber, David J.

    and Rehabilitation Science Stationery Graphic Standards and Style Guide #12;2 The Department of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Science is one of two Allied Health departments of the University of Maryland School of Medicine. Therefore, the term `Department of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Science' can not be used without

  8. THE INSTITUTES AT NORTHWESTERN MEDICINE AT NORTHWESTERN

    E-print Network

    Engman, David M.

    THE INSTITUTES AT NORTHWESTERN MEDICINE INNOVATION ENGINES AT NORTHWESTERN MEDICINE OSHER CENTER FOR INTEGRATIVE MEDICINE AT NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY #12;THE INSTITUTES AT NORTHWESTERN MEDICINE INNOVATION ENGINES AT NORTHWESTERN MEDICINE OSHER CENTER FOR INTEGRATIVE MEDICINE AT NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY "Atthe

  9. UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA PERELMAN SCHOOL OF MEDICINE The Division of Biostatistics in the Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology at the University of Pennsylvania

    E-print Network

    Carriquiry, Alicia

    UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA PERELMAN SCHOOL OF MEDICINE The Division of Biostatistics in the Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology at the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine will be commensurate with credentials and experience. A doctoral degree in biostatistics, statistics, or a related

  10. Ben-Gurion University of the Negev Faculty of Health Sciences Medical School for International Health

    E-print Network

    Grishok, Alla

    Year Placement City, State Specialty 2013 Albany Medical Center Albany, NY Family Medicine 2013 Albert Einstein College of Medicine/Montefiore Medical Center Bronx, NY Medicine 2013 AnMed Health Anderson, SC Family Medicine 2013 Case Western/University Hospital Case Medical Center Cleveland, OH Neurology 2013

  11. The integration of evidence based medicine and personal care in family practice

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. MacAuley

    1996-01-01

    Evidence based medicine is seductive in its simplicity and few would argue with the philosophical concept. The reality of\\u000a its application in primary care is rather different. It is difficult to find evidence supporting many clinical management\\u000a decisions, it may be difficult to interpret evidence when it is available, and it may be difficult to apply this evidence\\u000a in the

  12. 630 W. 168th St., PH15E-1512 New York, New York 10032 212-305-9587 bgcu-md@columbia.edu Ben-Gurion University of the Negev Faculty of Health Sciences

    E-print Network

    Grishok, Alla

    of Medicine/Montefiore Medical Center Bronx, NY General Surgery 2011 Baystate Medical Center/Tufts University Springfield, MA Medicine-Prelim. 2011 Baystate Medical Center/Tufts University Springfield, MA Internal Medicine 2011 Brown University Providence, RI Family Medicine 2011 Case Western /University Hospital Case

  13. Occupational History-Taking in a Family Practice Academic Setting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demers, Raymond Y.; Wall, Steve J.

    1983-01-01

    A university-affiliated family medicine residency program, with its emphasis on psychosocial factors of health, was used to observe the behavior of health care providers. Information obtained through chart reviews was used to develop a family practice residency curriculum in occupational medicine. (MLW)

  14. Feinberg School of Medicine

    E-print Network

    Chisholm, Rex L.

    1.25.2012 SENIOR ELECTIVE CATALOG 2012-2013 Feinberg School of Medicine #12;2 TABLE OF CONTENTS_____________________________________ 18 Dermatology ________________________________________________ 19 Family Medicine _____________________________________________ 24 Internal Medicine_____________________________________________ 29 Neurology

  15. Options for Families in the Face of Adversity. (Proceedings of the Family Study Conference, Oklahoma State University, March 16-18, 1977).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater. Div. of Home Economics.

    This report of a statewide conference on the possible options for families in the face of adversity was co-sponsored by the Family Study Center--Division of Home Economics, and the Office of University Extension, Oklahoma State University. General sessions on the effect of social change on the family, the co-relation between the energy crisis and…

  16. The Effect of a Literacy Training Program on Family Medicine Residents

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marjorie S. Rosenthal; Mark J. Werner; Norman H. Dubin

    Background and Objectives: Pediatric literacy promotion programs carried out in the primary care setting, such as Reach Out and Read (ROR), have been associated with improved language skills for preschool children. Primary care physicians have frequent contact with young families and may be well situated for a literacy promotion program for both children and adults. We examined whether introduc- ing

  17. Cytotoxicity and phytotoxicity of some selected medicinal plants of the family Polygonaceae

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Farrukh Hussain; Ishfaq Hameed; Ghulam Dastagir; Ibrar Khan; Bashir Ahmad; Pharma Biotech

    2010-01-01

    The cytotoxicity of the crude methanolic extracts of Rumex hastatus, Rumex dentatus, Rumex nepalensis, Rheum australe, Polygonum persicaria and Polygonum plebejum (Family Polygonaceae) was determined against Artemia salina at 1000, 100 and 10 ? ? ? ?g\\/ml. R. hastatus, R. dentatus and R. nepalensis showed significant activity at a concentration of 1000 ? ? ? ?g\\/ml against Artemia salina. R.

  18. A National Survey on the Current Status of Family Practice Residency Education in Geriatric Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Ina; Arenson, Christine; Warshaw, Gregg; Bragg, Elizabeth; Shaull, Ruth; Counsell, Steven R.

    2003-01-01

    A survey of family practice residency directors found that 92 percent have a required geriatrics curriculum; nursing homes, assisted living facilities, and home care are the predominant training sites; the mean number of geriatrics faculty is 2.6 per program; and conflicting time demands with other curricula was ranked as the most significant…

  19. Teaching Family Physicians About Mood Disorders: A Procedure Suite for Behavioral Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Manning, J. Sloan; Zylstra, Robert G.; Connor, Pamela D.

    1999-01-01

    Background and Objectives: One of the skills required of family physicians is the ability to recognize and treat individuals suffering from mood disorders. This study represents an interdisciplinary residency training approach that (1) is unique in family practice residencies; (2) trains faculty, residents, and students in mood disorder recognition and treatment; (3) has been evaluated by the Residency Review Committee and found compatible with psychiatry training guidelines; and (4) is adaptable to varied settings. Method: Existing psychiatric education at an urban family practice residency program was evaluated. A new curriculum was developed to emphasize clinical interactions that would allow residents to model the behavior of family physicians who demonstrate interest and expertise in psychiatry. The centerpiece of this curriculum is a family-physician–led, multidisciplinary, in-house consultation service known as a mood disorders clinic (MDC). Educational effectiveness was evaluated by comparing resident identification rates of mood disorders before and after training. Educational utility was evaluated by implementation in a variety of settings. Results: Fifty-one residents rotated through 1 or more of 3 practice sites during a 60-month period. Psychiatric diagnoses for the 187 patients who remained in treatment for complete clinical assessment included all major mood and anxiety disorders outlined in the DSM-IV. A wide variety of associated psychosocial problems were also identified. A significant difference (p < .05) was seen between the number of continuity patients diagnosed with psychiatric conditions by resident physicians before and after the training experience. Conclusion: Implementation of this intensive training experience resulted in subjective as well as objective enhancement of resident education by providing an intensive, focused educational experience in primary care psychiatry. This concept is adaptable to a variety of practice sites and educational levels. The MDC could become the hub of an integrated delivery system for mental health services in an ambulatory primary care setting. PMID:15014702

  20. Structural and functional insight into the universal stress protein family

    PubMed Central

    Tkaczuk, Karolina L; A Shumilin, Igor; Chruszcz, Maksymilian; Evdokimova, Elena; Savchenko, Alexei; Minor, Wladek

    2013-01-01

    We present the crystal structures of two universal stress proteins (USP) from Archaeoglobus fulgidus and Nitrosomonas europaea in both apo- and ligand-bound forms. This work is the first complete synthesis of the structural properties of 26 USP available in the Protein Data Bank, over 75% of which were determined by structure genomics centers with no additional information provided. The results of bioinformatic analyses of all available USP structures and their sequence homologs revealed that these two new USP structures share overall structural similarity with structures of USPs previously determined. Clustering and cladogram analyses, however, show how they diverge from other members of the USP superfamily and show greater similarity to USPs from organisms inhabiting extreme environments. We compared them with other archaeal and bacterial USPs and discuss their similarities and differences in context of structure, sequential motifs, and potential function. We also attempted to group all analyzed USPs into families, so that assignment of the potential function to those with no experimental data available would be possible by extrapolation. PMID:23745136

  1. ASUM Child Care, Preschool and Family Resources University Center, Room 119 The University of Montana Missoula, MT 59812

    E-print Network

    Steele, Brian

    ASUM Child Care, Preschool and Family Resources University Center, Room 119 The University Preschool UofM Faculty, Staff and Community Enrollment Application Summer Semester 2013 ­ Spring Semester in the Associated Students of the University of Montana (ASUM) Child Care Preschool center programs. The centers

  2. Bylaws of Family, Youth & Community Sciences, University of Florida Page 1 DEPARTMENT OF FAMILY, YOUTH AND COMMUNITY SCIENCES

    E-print Network

    Jawitz, James W.

    as chief executive and administrative officer of the Department. The Chair provides financial planning of the Department faculty for execution of academic policy. The Chair is expected to operate the DepartmentBylaws of Family, Youth & Community Sciences, University of Florida Page 1 BYLAWS OF DEPARTMENT

  3. Performance of cancer screening in a university general internal medicine practice

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stephen J. McPhee; Robert J. Richard; Sharon N. Solkowitz

    1986-01-01

    The authors evaluated use of seven cancer screening tests by 52 providers in a university general internal medicine practice,\\u000a using 1980 American Cancer Society (ACS) recommendations as standards for comparison. Performance rates were determined by\\u000a retrospective medical record reviews of a stratified random sample of 525 patients. In addition, the 48 physicians and four\\u000a nurse-practitioners in the practice were interviewed

  4. Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine (Doctoral Course) Application Guide 2012/2013

    E-print Network

    Banbara, Mutsunori

    and Molecular Medicine, Drug Discovery), Neurophysiology, Neuronal Signaling, Developmental Neurobiology (Respiratory Medicine, Sleep and Respiratory Care Medicine), Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology

  5. Two Postitions Open: Veterinary Pathology Resident Oregon State University, College of Veterinary Medicine, Department of Biomedical Sciences invites applications

    E-print Network

    Escher, Christine

    Two Postitions Open: Veterinary Pathology Resident Oregon State University, College of Veterinary Medicine, Department of Biomedical Sciences invites applications for a Veterinary Anatomic Pathology Resident and a Veterinary Clinical Pathology Resident (one position each). Veterinary Pathology Residents

  6. Otolaryngology Training for Family Practice Residents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    And Others; Rood, Stewart R.

    1980-01-01

    The faculty of the Department of Otolaryngology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, has designed a rotation in the otolaryngology service, that is a basic clinical orientation to ear, nose and throat medicine, to fit the one-month block committed by the local family practice residency training program. The program is described and its…

  7. The Department of Family & Preventive Medicine KEEP THIS MANUAL AT THIS OFFICE OR

    E-print Network

    Tipple, Brett

    emergencies. #12;2 IN CASE OF EMERGENCY YOU ARE IN ROOM # _______ IN BLDG# _______ AT PHONE#_______ EMERGENCY doors and windows. Evacuate to meeting point. CHEMICAL SPILL IS or MIGHT BE LIFE THREATENING Call 5-2677 24 hrs University Police Evacuate to meeting point. (Unless non-life threatening in which case secure

  8. A cultural diversity seen in Croatian family medicine: a lady from Janjevo.

    PubMed

    Pavlov, Renata

    2014-12-01

    The role of cultural diversities in doctor's everyday work is going more and more important in globalised world, therefore it draws lots of attention in literature. Cultural differences that exist between people, such as language, dress and traditions, are usually distinguished from the term cultural diversity which is mainly understood as having different cultures respect each other's differences. The great effort is made to educate culturally competent practitioners, nurses or doctors. The presented case of lady from Janjevo was a good role model for work with all patients with culturally different background coming to family practice. This lady example could also help to other colleagues to learn from experience on systematic way. PMID:25643554

  9. [Gustav Klimt and the field of medicine. Painting of the medical faculty--relationship with the Zuckerkandl family].

    PubMed

    Schultheiss, D

    2007-09-01

    The art nouveau painter Gustav Klimt (1862-1918), a cofounder of the Vienna Secession movement, was commissioned in 1894 to prepare three ceiling paintings for the Great Hall of the University of Vienna portraying the faculties of "Philosophy," "Medicine," and "Jurisprudence." After the first public presentations of these paintings starting in 1900 fierce protests erupted since the artist had not painted a historical allegory but rather had created a modern symbolic picture in the Secessionism style. The controversy over the so-called faculty paintings escalated to the point that in 1905 Klimt irrevocably distanced himself from the commission and bought back his pictures from the state. The paintings were later purchased by the Austrian Gallery and in 1943 placed in storage in Lower Austria at the Immendorf Castle where they were destroyed by a fire in May 1945 when the German troops withdrew. Besides Klimt's preliminary sketches, only black and white photographs of the three paintings now exist as well as a color reproduction of the section depicting Hygieia from the "Medicine" painting. Due to the public rejection of the faculty paintings, Gustav Klimt broke away from official government-commissioned art and focused on private clients from among Viennese society. One of these intensive associations was with the anatomist Emil Zuckerkandl and his wife Berta, who was very active in cultural affairs. During the dispute over the faculty paintings, Zuckerkandl was one of the few university professors who signed a petition in favor of retaining the paintings. His brother, the industrialist Victor Zuckerkandl, was one of the major collectors and patrons of Secessionist art. The third brother, the well-known urologist Otto Zuckerkandl (1861-1921), president of the Second and Third Congresses of the German Society of Urology in 1909 and 1911, was also in close contact with Klimt. A portrait of his wife Amalie was a work in progress between 1913 and 1917, but it remained unfinished. PMID:17710380

  10. "Sin Olvidar a los Padres": Families Collaborating within School and University Partnerships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riojas-Cortez, Mari; Flores, Belinda Bustos

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the significance of 3 entities--the family, the school, and the university--working together to assist young Latino children succeed in school. In an effort to increase parental and teacher communication regarding school expectations, the Family Institute for Early Literacy Development was created. It uses principles of…

  11. San Francisco State University Department of Psychology Fall 2013 Hartman Family Scholarship in Psychology

    E-print Network

    San Francisco State University ­ Department of Psychology Fall 2013 Hartman Family Scholarship in Psychology $500 scholarships available for undergraduate students BACKGROUND The Hartman Family Scholarship in Psychology is available in honor of Dr. Susan Hartman Taylor. Dr. Susan Hartman Taylor was a faculty member

  12. Master in Molecular Medicine Faculty of Medicine

    E-print Network

    Pfeifer, Holger

    Master in Molecular Medicine Faculty of Medicine February 2010 #12;University of Ulm There are many of the Master program The English Master course of studies combines the disciplines Biology and Medicine of research, development and application in the field of molecular medicine especially in universities

  13. Evaluation of the quality of antenatal care using electronic health record information in family medicine clinics of Mexico City

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Evaluation of the quality of antenatal care (ANC) using indicators should be part of the efforts to improve primary care services in developing countries. The growing use of the electronic health record (EHR) has the potential of making the evaluation more efficient. The objectives of this study were: (a) to develop quality indicators for ANC and (b) to evaluate the quality of ANC using EHR information in family medicine clinics (FMCs) of Mexico City. Methods We used a mixed methods approach including: (a) in-depth interviews with health professionals; (b) development of indicators following the RAND-UCLA method; (c) a retrospective cohort study of quality of care provided to 5342 women aged 12–49 years who had completed their pregnancy in 2009 and attended to at least one ANC visit with their family doctor. The study took place in four FMCs located in Mexico City. The source of information was the EHR. SAS statistical package served for programing and performing the descriptive statistical analysis. Results 14 ANC quality indicators were developed. The evaluation showed that 40.6% of women began ANC in the first trimester; 63.5% with low-risk pregnancy attended four or more ANC visits; 4.4% were referred for routine obstetric ultrasound, and 41.1% with vaginal infection were prescribed metronidazole. On average, the percentage of recommended care that women received was 32.7%. Conclusions It is feasible to develop quality indicators suitable for evaluating the quality of ANC using routine EHR data. The study identified the ANC areas that require improvement; which can guide future strategies aimed at improving ANC quality. PMID:24885103

  14. 1UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH SCHOOL OF MEDICI N E UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH SCHOOL OF MEDICINE

    E-print Network

    Sibille, Etienne

    one of the top NCAA basketball programs in the country plays to sell-out crowds. It's a fine view that was on a decidedly upward trend. The School of Medicine was in a particularly good position, with a long track record

  15. Stanford University School of Medicine Pre-Clerkship Curriculum 2013-14 Q1 Autumn Quarter (16 weeks) Q2 Winter Quarter (11 weeks) Q3 Spring Quarter (11 weeks)

    E-print Network

    Puglisi, Joseph

    Stanford University School of Medicine Pre-Clerkship Curriculum 2013-14 YEAR ONE Q1 Autumn Quarter Cardiovascular 10:00 11:00 Immunology Immunology 12:00 1:15 Gross Anatomy Practice of Medicine Anatomy Nervous System Practice of Medicine Practice of Medicine Practice of Medicine 2:15 3:15 Practice of Medicine 4

  16. Stanford University School of Medicine Pre-Clerkship Curriculum 2012-13 Q1 Autumn Quarter (16 weeks) Q2 Winter Quarter (11 weeks) Q3 Spring Quarter (11 weeks)

    E-print Network

    Puglisi, Joseph

    Stanford University School of Medicine Pre-Clerkship Curriculum 2012-13 YEAR ONE Q1 Autumn Quarter of Medicine Anatomy Nervous System Practice of Medicine Practice of Medicine Practice of Medicine 2:15 3:15 · Practice of Medicine 4:15 YEAR TWO Q4 Autumn Quarter (16 weeks) Q5 Winter Quarter (11 weeks) Q6 Spring

  17. [Internet communication between family physicians and the university hospital].

    PubMed

    Tschudi, P; Hunziker, St; Kündig, J; Lüscher, U; Freiermuth, O; Heller, G; Heberer, M

    2002-02-13

    The potential of electronic communication in medicine is assessed based on an analysis of a pilot project pertaining to internet based communication among referring and hospital physicians. Advantages of electronic data exchange in medicine pertain to speed and capacity for data transfer, availability of data and data integration, ultimately enabling consistent medical case management. Quality requirements of electronic communication of medical data are related to safety, availability, data integration, potential for case management and system qualities. Medical efficiency can be increased by use of electronic communication only if complex functions beyond the substitution of conventional mail by e-mail are implemented and an exhaustive use of the technology can be achieved. PMID:11883360

  18. Care for post-stroke patients at Malaysian public health centres: self-reported practices of family medicine specialists

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Provision of post stroke care in developing countries is hampered by discoordination of services and limited access to specialised care. Albeit shortcomings, primary care continues to provide post-stroke services in less than favourable circumstances. This paper aimed to review provision of post-stroke care and related problems among Family Medicine Specialists managing public primary health care services. Methods A semi-structured questionnaire was distributed to 121 Family Physicians servicing public funded health centres in a pilot survey focused on improving post stroke care provision at community level. The questionnaire assessed respondents background and practice details i.e. estimated stroke care burden, current service provision and opinion on service improvement. Means and frequencies described quantitative data. For qualitative data, constant comparison method was used until saturation of themes was reached. Results Response rate of 48.8% was obtained. For every 100 patients seen at public healthcentres each month, 2 patients have stroke. Median number of stroke patients seen per month is 5 (IQR 2-10). 57.6% of respondents estimated total stroke patients treated per year at each centre was less than 40 patients. 72.4% lacked a standard care plan although 96.6% agreed one was needed. Patients seen were: discharged from tertiary care (88.1%), shared care plan with specialists (67.8%) and patients who developed stroke during follow up at primary care (64.4%). Follow-ups were done at 8-12 weekly intervals (60.3%) with 3.4% on ‘as needed’ basis. Referrals ranked in order of frequency were to physiotherapy services, dietitian and speech and language pathologists in public facilities. The FMS’ perceived 4 important ‘needs’ in managing stroke patients at primary care level; access to rehabilitation services, coordinated care between tertiary centres and primary care using multidisciplinary care approach, a standardized guideline and family and caregiver support. Conclusions Post discharge stroke care guidelines and access to rehabilitation services at primary care is needed for post stroke patients residing at home in the community. PMID:24580779

  19. A limited universe of membrane protein families and folds.

    PubMed

    Oberai, Amit; Ihm, Yungok; Kim, Sanguk; Bowie, James U

    2006-07-01

    One of the goals of structural genomics is to obtain a structural representative of almost every fold in nature. A recent estimate suggests that 70%-80% of soluble protein domains identified in the first 1000 genome sequences should be covered by about 25,000 structures-a reasonably achievable goal. As no current estimates exist for the number of membrane protein families, however, it is not possible to know whether family coverage is a realistic goal for membrane proteins. Here we find that virtually all polytopic helical membrane protein families are present in the already known sequences so we can make an estimate of the total number of families. We find that only approximately 700 polytopic membrane protein families account for 80% of structured residues and approximately 1700 cover 90% of structured residues. While apparently a finite and reachable goal, we estimate that it will likely take more than three decades to obtain the structures needed for 90% residue coverage, if current trends continue. PMID:16815920

  20. Correlation between Family Environment and Suicidal Ideation in University Students in China

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Hui; Bai, Bing; Chen, Lu; Han, Dong; Wang, Lin; Qiao, Zhengxue; Qiu, Xiaohui; Yang, Xiuxian; Yang, Yanjie

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study investigated the association between suicidal ideation and family environment. The sample included 5183 Chinese university students. A number of studies on suicidal ideation have focused on individuals rather than families. This paper reviews the general principles of suicidal ideation and the consequences resulting from the family environment. Methods: This study used six different colleges as the dataset, which included 2645 males and 2538 females. Students were questioned with respect to social demographics and suicidal ideation factors. The data were analyzed with factor and logistic analyses to determine the association between suicidal ideation and poor family environment. Results: The prevalence of suicidal ideation was 9.2% (476/5183). Most participants with suicidal ideation had significant similarities: they had poor family structures and relationships, their parents had unstable work, and their parents used improper parenting styles. Female students were more likely to have suicidal thoughts than male students. Conclusions: This study shows that suicidal ideation is a public health issue among Chinese university students and demonstrates the importance of considering the family environment when examining university students’ suicidal ideation. Understanding family-related suicidal ideation risk factors can help to predict and prevent suicides among university students. PMID:25633031

  1. [Women's education according to the first women to receive doctorates in medicine from Spanish universities, 1882].

    PubMed

    Flecha Garcia, C

    1999-01-01

    This study looks at the topic of women's education as considered by the first two women to receive the degree of Doctor in Medicine from a Spanish university. Delores Aleu and Martina Castells decided to present as a doctoral thesis the development of an issue of particular relevance during the final decades of the 19th century. The importance given to public education and the difficulties young women encountered in participating under the same conditions as young men led these two women--who both held a bachelor's degree--to raise the issue and defend personal and social reasons that justified their full participation in different levels of education. PMID:11624263

  2. COlUMBIA UNIvERSITy COllEgE OF DENTAl MEDICINE REgISTER ONlINE

    E-print Network

    Grishok, Alla

    for Symposium attendance. note Both options include the two-day Columbia University/iCOi Dental implantCOlUMBIA UNIvERSITy COllEgE OF DENTAl MEDICINE REgISTER ONlINE: dental,500 with payment in full by Sept. 1, 2013 CE Credits: 94 (84, plus 10 for Dec. 13-14 CU/ICOI Implant Symposium

  3. Family, Learning Environments, Learning Approaches, and Student Outcomes in a Malaysian Private University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kek, Megan A. Yih Chyn; Darmawan, I. Gusti Ngurah; Chen, Yu Sui

    2007-01-01

    This article presents the quantitative findings from a mixed methods study of students and faculty at a private medical university in Malaysia. In particular, the relationships among students' individual characteristics, general self-efficacy, family context, university and classroom learning environments, curriculum, approaches to learning, and…

  4. Babies on Campus: Service to Infants and Families among Competing Priorities in University Child Care Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMullen, Mary Benson; Lash, Martha

    2012-01-01

    University early childhood programs attempt to balance a traditional tri-part mission: service to children and families; professional development of caregivers/teachers, clinicians, and researchers; and research on child development, learning, and/or education. Increasingly, infants receive care and education on university campuses, yet little is…

  5. Correlation between phq-9 score and physical activity level, risk factors and non-communicable diseases in patients in family medicine clinic

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zivana Gavric; Anna Culafic; Brankica Markovic

    2011-01-01

    The work of physicians in primary health care is essential in prevention and early detection of health risk factors. To determine\\u000a the incidence of depression among patients in family medicine clinics, as well as the correlation between depression, risk\\u000a factors and NCDs, and to determine correlation between depression (PHQ-9 score) and the level of physical activity. The pilot\\u000a study was

  6. Montana State University Child Development Center Family Handbook

    E-print Network

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    , with the primary goal of providing a quality early childhood education program for children ages 3 5 that honors and respects children, families, and educators for their diversity, curiosity, and humanity. We inspire and celebrate wellbeing in a dynamic, engaging, and playful learning environment. Dear Parents

  7. Rooted in Mission: Family and Consumer Sciences in Catholic Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, Janine

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to establish the unity between the missions of the Family and Consumer Sciences (FCS) discipline and Catholic higher education by demonstrating relationships among (a) Catholic Social Teaching (CST) and the role of the service principle to FCS; (b) Catholic Intellectual Tradition (CIT) and the centrality of intellect…

  8. Indiana University School of Medicine (Joseph E. Walther Hall R3 rm. 203) --November 6, 2009 1:00p 1:10p Welcome and Introduction

    E-print Network

    Zhou, Yaoqi

    Indiana University School of Medicine (Joseph E. Walther Hall ­ R3 rm. 203) -- November 6, 2009 1 Indiana University School of Medicine 1:10p ­ 1:30p "A microRNA Regulatory Feedback Loop Involved in the Development of ER­ breast Cancers" Kenneth Nephew, Indiana University Medical Sciences 1:30p ­1:50p "Estradiol

  9. Elements related to attrition of women faculty at the University of Pittsburgh, School of Medicine: A case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gandhi, Pooja

    Recent studies have shown that the number of women faculty in academic medicine is much lesser than the number of women that are graduating from medical schools. Many academic institutes face the challenge of retaining talented faculty and this attrition from academic medicine prevents career advancement of women faculty. This case study attempts to identify some of the reasons for dissatisfaction that may be related to the attrition of women medical faculty at the University of Pittsburgh, School of Medicine. Data was collected using a job satisfaction survey, which consisted of various constructs that are part of a faculty's job and proxy measures to gather the faculty's intent to leave their current position at the University of Pittsburgh or academic medicine in general. The survey results showed that although women faculty were satisfied with their job at the University of Pittsburgh, there are some important factors that influenced their decision of potentially dropping out. The main reasons cited by the women faculty were related to funding pressures, work-life balance, mentoring of junior faculty and the amount of time spent on clinical responsibilities. The analysis of proxy measures showed that if women faculty decided to leave University of Pittsburgh, it would most probably be due to better opportunity elsewhere followed by pressure to get funding. The results of this study aim to provide the School of Medicine at the University of Pittsburgh with information related to attrition of its women faculty and provide suggestions for implications for policy to retain their women faculty.

  10. A survey describing the use of complementary therapies and medicines by women attending a family planning clinic

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Complementary medicines (CMs) are widely used by women. Although, women in Australia are frequent users of CM, few studies have examined their utilisation by women attending a family planning service. The aim of this study was to examine (i) the extent of and type of CM, (ii) women’s views about safety and efficacy, and (iii) the factors influencing women’s decision-making. Methods A cross-sectional survey using a convenience sample of 221women aged greater than 18 years attending a family planning (FP) service was undertaken over a two week period in Sydney, Australia. An anonymous self-administered questionnaire was designed to examine women’s current and previous use of CMs, their attitudes towards safety and effectiveness, the factors influencing their decision-making, and their disclosure of CM use to a FP health professional. Demographic questions were designed to describe the diversity of the participants. Logistic regression was used to examine the association between CM use and demographics. Results Sixty-seven percent of women surveyed were currently using CMs, and 83% reported use during the previous 12 months. Most respondents utilised CMs to maintain their general health or for prevention of ill health. Over 30% of women lacked information to make an informed response to questions examining their views about the safety of CMs. Forty-four percent of participants stated they discussed their use of CMs with their FP providers. The main reason why women did not mention CMs was they did not see the relevance to their consultation (43%). Lower rates of CM use were found for younger women (OR 0.24, 95% CI 0.09-0.61), and those not completing high school (OR 0.44, 95% 0.20-1.00). Conclusion The use of CM is very common among women attending an Australian FP clinic, however our findings may not be generalisable to all women. We identified a notable gap in women’s awareness of the potential for interactions between CM and prescribed medication. Our findings also emphasise the need for healthcare providers to initiate discussions with clients about their utilisation of CM. PMID:24025479

  11. Genome Medicine 2009, 11

    E-print Network

    Genome Medicine 2009, 11::88 Correspondence BBrriiddggiinngg tthhee ggaapp bbeettwweeeenn Care Medicine and CRISMA laboratory, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Scaife 602, 3550 Biotechnology Center, University of Torino, Via Nizza 52, I, 10126 Torino, Italy; 10Institutionen för Medicin

  12. Emergency Medicine Grand Rounds Emergency Medicine Classroom

    E-print Network

    Emergency Medicine Grand Rounds Emergency Medicine Classroom Tuesday, September 3, 2013 8 am ­ 9 am Department Presented by: Azeem Tajani, MD PGY-3, ECU Emergency Medicine Objectives: 1. Discuss the State in the suicidal Patient. Accreditation: The Brody School of Medicine of East Carolina University is accredited

  13. College of Medicine ER Emergency Medicine

    E-print Network

    MacAdam, Keith

    College of Medicine ER Emergency Medicine KEY: # = new course * = course changed = course dropped University of Kentucky 2013-2014 Undergraduate Bulletin 1 ER 815 FIRST-YEAR ELECTIVE, EMERGENCY MEDICINE. (1 offered by the Department of Emergency Medicine. The intent is to provide the student an opportunity

  14. 2013-2014 Parent & Family Guide Texas Tech universiTy 1 especialmente para padres y familiares ........................................................................................ 2

    E-print Network

    Gelfond, Michael

    2013-2014 Parent & Family Guide Texas Tech universiTy 1 Contenido especialmente para padres y ........................................................ 8 recursos académicos en Texas Tech ..................................................................................................................... 22 Tradiciones de Texas Tech

  15. Copyright 2009, The Ohio State University Family and Consumer Sciences

    E-print Network

    For more information, visit the Ohio Department of Aging web site at: http://www.goldenbuckeye.com and Ohio State University Extension's "Aging in Ohio" web site at: http://seniorseries.osu.edu Putting My more dark-green veggies like broccoli, spinach, and other dark leafy greens. #12;SS-152-R08--page 2

  16. Acculturation and depressive symptoms in Muslim university students: personal-family acculturation match.

    PubMed

    Asvat, Yasmin; Malcarne, Vanessa L

    2008-04-01

    The relationships of personal acculturation and of personal-family acculturation match to depressive symptoms were investigated in a sample of 68 Muslim university students. Two dimensions of personal and family acculturation were assessed: heritage and mainstream culture identification. Participants completed the Vancouver Index of Acculturation (Ryder, Alden, & Paulhus, 2000 ) and the depressive disorder subscale of the Psychiatric Diagnostic Screening Questionnaire (Zimmerman & Mattia, 1999 ). For personal acculturation, individuals with high personal heritage culture identification reported fewer lifetime (but not past-year) depressive symptoms. In contrast, individuals with high personal mainstream culture identification reported more past-year (but not lifetime) depressive symptoms. The hypothesis that a match between personal and family acculturation orientation would be associated with fewer depressive symptoms was supported for heritage culture identification only. For past-year depression, the two match conditions (low or high personal and family heritage culture identification) were associated with significantly fewer depressive symptoms than a low personal/high family mismatch but did not differ from a high personal/low family mismatch. For lifetime depression, a high personal/high family match was associated with significantly fewer depressive symptoms than all other conditions. Findings suggests that, for Muslims, a match of high personal and high family heritage culture identification may act as a protective factor for the experience of depressive symptoms both in the short term (past year) and in the long term (lifetime). PMID:22023606

  17. Work-Family Balance and Academic Advancement in Medical Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Geri; Schwartz, Alan; Hart, Katherine M.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: This study examines various options that a faculty member might exercise to achieve work-family balance in academic medicine and their consequences for academic advancement. Method: Three data sets were analyzed: an anonymous web-administered survey of part-time tenure track-eligible University of Illinois College of Medicine (UI-COM)…

  18. Samuel A. Mudd, MD, physician-farmer, University of Maryland School of Medicine class of 1856.

    PubMed

    Harding, Richard K

    2012-12-01

    America is in the midst of experiencing the sesquicentennial of the Civil War. We do so with some ambivalence knowing that the war forged a great union and ended slavery but also caused the deaths of more than 600,000 fellow citizens. Samuel A. Mudd, MD, University of Maryland School of Medicine class of 1856, was a man of this time. As a physician-farmer in Southern Maryland, he was a highly respected physician, a slave owner, and a devout citizen. The Civil War (1861-1865) would alter his life in ways few could have imagined. This article looks at his background, his education, his work as a physician-farmer, and his dramatic rise to national attention and infamy. Convicted by a military tribunal and imprisoned for his "crimes," he was able to partially redeem himself using his medical skills and professionalism. Mudd was a man of his time. And what a time it was. PMID:23183366

  19. Universality of aging: family caregivers for elderly cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Baider, Lea; Surbone, Antonella

    2014-01-01

    The world population is aging, with the proportion of older people (65+ years) expected to reach 21% in 2050 and to exceed the number of younger people (aged 15 or less) for the first time in history. Because cancer is particularly a chronic disease of older people, a large increase in the number of elderly patients with cancer is anticipated. The estimated number of new cancer cases worldwide among people over 65 is expected to grow from about 6 million in 2008 to more than 11 million during the coming decade. By 2030, individuals over 65 are expected to account for 70% of all cancer patients in the Western world. Along with the increase in oncology patients, the number of older people caring for their ill spouses or other relatives is also growing, with the ensuing toll on these caregivers causing major concern, especially in western countries. In different societies the characteristics of family caregiver stressors, cultural norms concerning caregiving, and the availability of support have a huge impact on those providing care. Any study of older caregivers of older cancer patients requires an integrative evaluation of aging that takes into account cultural, social, psychological, and behavioral variables. This review proposes a critical discussion of the multidimensionality of the caregiving and of the impact that age, culture, and gender have on it. PMID:25076927

  20. The effect of polyphenolic-polysaccharide conjugates from selected medicinal plants of Asteraceae family on the peroxynitrite-induced changes in blood platelet proteins.

    PubMed

    Saluk-Juszczak, Joanna; Pawlaczyk, Izabela; Olas, Beata; Ko?odziejczyk, Joanna; Ponczek, Michal; Nowak, Pawel; Tsirigotis-Wo?oszczak, Marta; Wachowicz, Barbara; Gancarz, Roman

    2010-12-01

    Lots of plants belonging to Asteraceae family are very popular in folk medicine in Poland. These plants are also known as being rich in acidic polysaccharides, due to the presence of hexuronic acids or its derivatives. Our preliminary experiments have shown that the extract from Conyza canadensis L. possesses various biological activity, including antiplatelet, antiocoagulant and antioxidant properties. The aim of our study was to assess if macromolecular glycoconjugates from selected herbal plants of Asteraceae family: Achillea millefolium L., Arnica montana L., Echinacea purpurea L., Solidago virgaurea L., Chamomilla recutita (L.) Rauschert., and Conyza canadensis L. protect platelet proteins against nitrative and oxidative damage induced by peroxynitrite, which is responsible for oxidative/nitrative modifications of platelet proteins: the formation of 3-nitrotyrosine and carbonyl groups. These modifications may lead to changes of blood platelet functions and can have pathological consequences. The role of these different medicinal plants in the defence against oxidative/nitrative stress in human platelets is still unknown, therefore the oxidative damage to platelet proteins induced by peroxynitrite and protectory effects of tested conjugates by the estimation of carbonyl group level and nitrotyrosine formation (a marker of protein nitration) were studied in vitro. The antioxidative properties of the polyphenolic-polysaccharide conjugates from selected tested medicinal plants were also compared with the action of a well characterized antioxidative commercial polyphenol - resveratrol (3,4',5-trihydroxystilbene). The obtained results demonstrate that the compounds from herbal plants: A. millefolium, A. montana, E. purpurea, C. recutita, S. virgaurea, possess antioxidative properties and protect platelet proteins against peroxynitrite toxicity in vitro, similar to the glycoconjugates from C. canadensis. However, in the comparative studies, the polyphenolic-polysaccharide conjugates from selected tested medicinal plants were not found to be more effective antioxidant, than the solution of pure resveratrol. PMID:20869393

  1. ORIENTATION All new residents/fellows to the University of Connecticut School of Medicine are required to

    E-print Network

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    Page 43 ORIENTATION All new residents/fellows to the University of Connecticut School of Medicine are required to attend a Graduate Medical Education (GME) orientation. Components of the GME orientation be completed before a resident/fellow can begin. The GME orientation is typically scheduled at the end of June

  2. Indiana Institute for Biomedical Imaging Sciences Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Indiana University School of Medicine

    E-print Network

    Zhou, Yaoqi

    Indiana Institute for Biomedical Imaging Sciences Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Indiana University School of Medicine The Indiana Institute of Biomedical Imaging Sciences (IIBIS) In funds provided by an NCI P20 ICMIC planning grant, the Indiana 21st Century Technology Development Fund

  3. SSppoottlliigghhtt oonn RReesseeaarrcchh Volume IX, No. 3, May 2012 University of Missouri-Columbia, College of Veterinary Medicine

    E-print Network

    Taylor, Jerry

    months have found many College of Veterinary Medicine faculty and researchers in news venues. Just, 2012) You could say Ron Cott goes the extra mile for his students in the University of Missouri for student and alumni affairs in the college, led a dozen veterinary students on a 20-day trip to South

  4. Integrating eLearning to Support Medical Education at the New University of Botswana School of Medicine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kebaetse, Masego B.; Nkomazana, Oathokwa; Haverkamp, Cecil

    2014-01-01

    Since the enrolment of its first cohort of students in 2009, the University of Botswana School of Medicine (UB SoM) has employed elearning as a key element to support and strengthen its model of decentralised medical education. Significant investments have been made in setting up the physical infrastructure, and in acquiring relevant expertise to…

  5. UNIVERSITY of MARYLAND SCHOOL of MEDICINE DEPARTMENT of PHYSICAL THERAPY & REHABILITATION SCIENCE It is hard to imagine

    E-print Network

    Weber, David J.

    2008 UNIVERSITY of MARYLAND SCHOOL of MEDICINE · DEPARTMENT of PHYSICAL THERAPY & REHABILITATION was appointed chair of the Department of Physical Therapy by former dean Donald E. Wilson, MD, MACP. It gives me for 10 years. · We changed our Department name to Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Science to reflect

  6. Proceedings of Student-Faculty Research Day, CSIS, Pace University, May 3rd Tele-Medicine Risk Adjustment

    E-print Network

    Tappert, Charles

    by altering payment for enrollees based on health status and demographics [2]. Medicare Risk Adjustment data-Medicine Risk Adjustment Maja Misheva, Matthew Racioppo, William Gasparrini, Aykut Donmez, Jean F. Coppola, and Ray Miranti Seidenberg School of CSIS, Pace University, White Plains, NY 10606 Abstract--Medicare Risk

  7. A Problem Solving Curriculum for Active Learning at the Northwest Center for Medical Education, Indiana University School of Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iatridis, Panayotis G.

    An innovative curriculum called the "Regional Center Alternative Pathway," recently adopted by the Northwest Center for Medical Education (part of Indiana University's School of Medicine), is presented. The curriculum combines the traditional structure's didactic approach with a new problem-based tutorial curriculum. In this curriculum the…

  8. College of Veterinary Medicine University of Illinois On May 19, the board of the Illinois Veterinary Medical Alumni

    E-print Network

    Gilbert, Matthew

    College of Veterinary Medicine · University of Illinois l On May 19, the board of the Illinois Veterinary Medical Alumni Association became the very first group to hold a meeting in the new Alice Campbell of the Veterinary Teaching Hospital; Dr. Bill Augustine ('75); Dr. Roger Dupuis ('71); and Jim Pound, associate

  9. Florida State University, College of Medicine, Dr. Cappendijk Lab. 1 Abstract--Birdsongs are a naturally learned behavior in

    E-print Network

    van Engelen, Robert A.

    influences and individual learning styles. These characteristics of the zebra finch birdsong make the zebraFlorida State University, College of Medicine, Dr. Cappendijk Lab. 1 Abstract-- Birdsongs are a naturally learned behavior in the male zebra finch. This behavior shows a remarkable parallel with vocal

  10. Tamara Fuller, PhD Children and Family Research Center, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

    E-print Network

    Liberzon, Daniel

    different from the investigation pathway in terms of family engagement, caseworker practice, and servicesTamara Fuller, PhD Children and Family Research Center, University of Illinois at Urbana received a traditional investigation and those who received a family assessment. Gain understanding

  11. Center on School, Family, and Community Partnerships Johns Hopkins University 2701 N. Charles St., Suite 300 Baltimore MD 21218

    E-print Network

    Connor, Ed

    and development on family and community engagement. We look forward to seeing you in Philadelphia! Contact DrCenter on School, Family, and Community Partnerships Johns Hopkins University 2701 N. Charles St@jhu.edu 17th INTERNATIONAL ROUNDTABLE ON SCHOOL, FAMILY, AND COMMUNITY PARTNERSHIPS Advancing Partnerships

  12. Comparison of a Private Family Practice and a University Teaching Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudnick, K. Vincent; And Others

    1976-01-01

    When a private family practice in Hamilton, Canada, became a teaching practice of McMaster University, a before-and-after study was conducted to compare characteristics of the patients and the impact of the change on the practice. Conclusion: Such a transplanted private practice is a realistic teaching resource in primary care. (Editor/JT)

  13. Certification of Qualifying Exigency THE CITY UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK For Military Family Leave

    E-print Network

    Rosen, Jay

    Certification of Qualifying Exigency THE CITY UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK For Military Family Leave a response as to the frequency or duration of the qualifying exigency. Be as specific as you can; terms: _____________________________________________________________________________ First Middle Last Name of covered military member on active duty or call to active duty status

  14. SMALL UNIVERSAL FAMILIES OF GRAPHS ON +1 JAMES CUMMINGS, MIRNA DZAMONJA, AND CHARLES MORGAN

    E-print Network

    Dzamonja, Mirna

    SMALL UNIVERSAL FAMILIES OF GRAPHS ON +1 JAMES CUMMINGS, MIRNA DZAMONJA, AND CHARLES MORGAN when µ is a successor cardinal + and 2 > + . When is regular it is known that: James Cummings. Charles Morgan thanks EPSRC for their support through grant EP/I00498. Cum- mings, Dzamonja and Morgan

  15. Parents in higher education: impacts of university learning on the self and the family

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Emma Wainwright; Elodie Marandet

    2010-01-01

    Intra? and inter?generational social mobility have been implicit to a wide range of UK Government policies aimed at promoting social inclusion through a focus on education and employability. Framed by these policy initiatives and a critical look at widening participation in higher education, this paper reflects on the impacts of university learning on the self and the family among students

  16. The University of Vermont Libraries' Center for Digital Initiatives: Fletcher Family

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The University of Vermont Libraries' Center for Digital Initiatives has continued to add to their online offerings in recent years. This latest collection is quite a pip, and it contains family correspondence from the Fletcher Family of Vermont. The family correspondence begins in 1826, and it is primarily focused around several family members who moved west to New York, Ohio, and other parts of the heartland. Throughout these letters, the various correspondents detail the process of creating and managing their new farms and the documents leave no fact (or price) unexplored as they discuss the land, grains, stock, and groceries. All told, there are 139 letters in the collection, and visitors can click on the "Browse the Collection" section to view the letters listed by author. Additionally, visitors can search the collection by keyword, title, or subject.

  17. Residents’ and preceptors’ perceptions of the use of the iPad for clinical teaching in a family medicine residency program

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background As Family Medicine programs across Canada are transitioning into a competency-based curriculum, medical students and clinical teachers are increasingly incorporating tablet computers in their work and educational activities. The purpose of this pilot study was to identify how preceptors and residents use tablet computers to implement and adopt a new family medicine curriculum and to evaluate how they access applications (apps) through their tablet in an effort to support and enhance effective teaching and learning. Methods Residents and preceptors (n = 25) from the Family Medicine program working at the Pembroke Regional Hospital in Ontario, Canada, were given iPads and training on how to use the device in clinical teaching and learning activities and how to access the online curriculum. Data regarding the use and perceived contribution of the iPads were collected through surveys and focus groups. This mixed methods research used analysis of survey responses to support the selection of questions for focus groups. Results Reported results were categorized into: curriculum and assessment; ease of use; portability; apps and resources; and perceptions about the use of the iPad in teaching/learning setting. Most participants agreed on the importance of accessing curriculum resources through the iPad but recognized that these required enhancements to facilitate use. The iPad was considered to be more useful for activities involving output of information than for input. Participants’ responses regarding the ease of use of mobile technology were heterogeneous due to the diversity of computer proficiency across users. Residents had a slightly more favorable opinion regarding the iPad’s contribution to teaching/learning compared to preceptors. Conclusions iPad’s interface should be fully enhanced to allow easy access to online curriculum and its built-in resources. The differences in computer proficiency level among users should be reduced by sharing knowledge through workshops led by more skillful iPad users. To facilitate collection of information through the iPad, the design of electronic data-input forms should consider the participants’ reported negative perceptions towards typing data through mobile devices. Technology deployment projects should gather sufficient evidence from pilot studies in order to guide efforts to adapt resources and infrastructure to relevant needs of Family Medicine teachers and learners. PMID:25138307

  18. Family 

    E-print Network

    Unknown

    2011-09-05

    THE ROLES OF SELECTED EXTRACOMMUNITY ORGANIZATIONS IN THE DECISION-MAKING PROCESS: A COMPARISON OF THREE COMMUNITIES CONCERNING DAM CONSTRUCTION A Thesis SUE ELLEN RICHARDSON Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University... in Partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1975 Major Subject: Sociology THE ROLES OF SELECTED EXTRACOMMUNITY ORGANIZATIONS IN THE DECISION-t1AKING PROCESS A COMPARISON OF THREE COMMUNITIES CONCERNING DAM COI...

  19. Perceptions of the Concept of Mutation among Family Members of Patients Receiving Outpatient Genetic Services and University Students

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Noriko Ando; Yumi Iwamitsu; Kazuhisa Takemura; Yukiko Saito; Fumio Takada

    2009-01-01

    Our objectives were to investigate: (1) relationships between perceptions of various terms regarding mutation and the depth\\u000a of knowledge regarding mutation among family members of patients receiving genetic outpatient services, and (2) differences\\u000a in perceptions of the term “gene mutation” for family members versus university students. Fifty-eight family members and 178\\u000a university students responded to two questionnaires: Impressions regarding the

  20. Can a 3-hour educational workshop and the provision of practical tools encourage family physicians to prescribe physical activity as medicine? A pre–post study

    PubMed Central

    Windt, Johann; Windt, Adriaan; Davis, Jennifer; Petrella, Robert; Khan, Karim

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To increase, in our sample, the proportion of family physicians who provided their patients with written physical activity prescriptions after the delivery of a 3-hour educational workshop with the provision of practical tools to facilitate behaviour change. Design A pre–post study. Setting Abbotsford and Mission, British Columbia. Participants All 158 physicians registered with the Abbotsford (121) or Mission (37) Divisions of Family Practice were invited to participate. Intervention A 3-hour educational workshop combined with practical tools. Educational content of the workshop included (1) assessing patients’ physical activity levels, (2) using motivational interviewing techniques to encourage physical activity and (3) providing written physical activity prescriptions when appropriate. Practical tools to facilitate physician behaviour changes included a ‘physical activity vital sign’, and copies of the Exercise is Medicine Canada Prescription Pad. Participating physicians completed a bespoke questionnaire before and 4?weeks after their attendance at the workshop. Outcome measures The primary outcome was the change in the proportion of family physicians who reported providing written physical activity prescriptions. Exploratory outcomes included changes in other physical activity prescription behaviours, the perceived importance of various barriers to prescription, and knowledge and confidence in regards to physical activity prescription. McNemar's test evaluated changes in proportions before and after the workshop, while Wilcoxon signed-rank tests evaluated changes in Likert data. Results 25 family physicians completed the baseline questionnaire and attended the workshop, with 100% follow-up response rate. The proportion of family physicians who reported providing written physical activity prescriptions in their clinical practice increased significantly (p<0.05), from 10 (40%) at baseline to 17 (68%) 4?weeks after the intervention. Conclusions Educational workshops combined with practical tools appear to be a promising method to encourage the use of written physical activity prescriptions among family physicians in this setting, over the short term. PMID:26141304

  1. Attitudes about Cancer Medicine among Primary Care Residents and Their Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Love, Richard R.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    A cancer attitude survey is analyzed that was administered to residents and faculty physicians in the departments of Family Medicine, Internal Medicine, and Human Oncology at the University of Wisconsin. Categories surveyed include opinions about the benefits of prevention, risk management, early detection and screening, treatment and care, and…

  2. A nationwide survey on the expectation of public healthcare providers on family medicine specialists in Malaysia—a qualitative analysis of 623 written comments

    PubMed Central

    Chew, Boon-How; Cheong, Ai-Theng; Ismail, Mastura; Hamzah, Zuhra; A-Rashid, Mohd-Radzniwan; Md-Yasin, Mazapuspavina; Ali, Norsiah

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine the expectation of public healthcare providers/professionals (PHCPs) who are working closely with family medicine specialists (FMSs) at public health clinics. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting This study is part of a larger national study on the perception of the Malaysian public healthcare professionals on FMSs. Participants PHCPs from three categories of health facilities, namely hospitals, health clinics and health offices. Main outcome measures Qualitative analysis of written comments of respondents’ expectation of FMSs. Results The participants’ response rate was 58% (780/1345) with an almost equal proportion from each public healthcare facility. We identified 21 subthemes for the 623 expectation comments. The six emerging themes are (1) need for more FMSs, (2) clinical roles and functions of FMSs, (3) administrative roles of FMSs, (4) contribution to community and public health, (5) attributes improvement and (6) research and audits. FMSs were expected to give attention to clinical duty. Delivering this responsibility with competence included having the latest medical knowledge in their own and others’ medical disciplines, practising evidence-based medicine in prehospital and posthospital care, better supervision of staff and doctors under their care, fostering effective teamwork, communicating more often with hospital specialists and making appropriate referral. Expectations ranged from definite and strong for more FMSs at the health clinics to low expectation for FMSs’ involvement in research; to mal-expectation on FMSs’ involvement in community and public health programmes. Conclusions There were some remarkable differences in expectations on FMSs from the three different PHCPs. These ranged from being clinically competent and administratively available for patients and staff at the health clinics, to mal-expectations on FMSs to engage in public health affairs. Relevant parties, including FMSs themselves, could take appropriate self-improvement initiatives to enhance public practice of family medicine and patient care. Trial registration number NMRR ID: 08-12-1167. PMID:24919639

  3. University of Hawaii-Botany Department: Vascular Plant Family Access Page

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Carr, Gerald D.

    Created by botanist Dr. Gerald D. Carr of the University of Hawaii, this website is filled with great annotated photos of vascular plants. The site is organized into sections for the non-flowering and flowering plant families. The plant families are organized according to several systems including traditional presentation, Arthur Cronquistâ??s classification scheme (1981), and the phylogenetic outline of Judd et al. (2002). The site also offers a new integrated Alphabetical Index for Flowering Plant Families. Plant familiesâ?? are hyperlinked to an introductory paragraph accompanied by photos and information about selected species in that group. For example, the Moraceae section includes annotated photos for jack fruit (_Artocarpus heterophyllus_), climbing fig (_Ficus pumila_), and mulberry (_Morus alba_). The site also includes diagrams depicting non-flowering vascular plants as treated by Judd et al., and flowering plant relationships according to Cronquist.

  4. Advanced Biotechnology and Medicine

    E-print Network

    C A B M Center for Advanced Biotechnology and Medicine http://cabm.umdnj.edu 2002 Report By Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey and by The University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey for Advanced Biotechnology and Medicine 2 CONTENTS Director's Overview 3 Research Programs and Laboratories 5

  5. Advanced Biotechnology and Medicine

    E-print Network

    C A B M Center for Advanced Biotechnology and Medicine http://www.cabm.rutgers.edu 2009 Annual Administered By Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey and by the University of Medicine and Dentistry;__________________________________________________________________________________ Center for Advanced Biotechnology and Medicine 2 CONTENTS Director's Overview 3 Research Programs

  6. Advanced Biotechnology and Medicine

    E-print Network

    C A B M Center for Advanced Biotechnology and Medicine http://cabm.umdnj.edu 2005 Report By Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey and by The University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey for Advanced Biotechnology and Medicine 2 CONTENTS Director's Overview 3 Research Programs and Laboratories 5

  7. Advanced Biotechnology and Medicine

    E-print Network

    C A B M Center for Advanced Biotechnology and Medicine http://cabm.umdnj.edu 2004 Report By Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey and by The University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey for Advanced Biotechnology and Medicine 2 CONTENTS Director's Overview 3 Research Programs and Laboratories 5

  8. Advanced Biotechnology and Medicine

    E-print Network

    C A B M Center for Advanced Biotechnology and Medicine http://cabm.umdnj.edu 2008 Report By Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey and by the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey;__________________________________________________________________________________ Center for Advanced Biotechnology and Medicine 2 CONTENTS Director's Overview 3 Research Programs

  9. Advanced Biotechnology and Medicine

    E-print Network

    C A B M Center for Advanced Biotechnology and Medicine http://cabm.umdnj.edu 2003 Report By Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey and by The University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey for Advanced Biotechnology and Medicine 2 CONTENTS Director's Overview 3 Research Programs and Laboratories 5

  10. Winter 2007 Practicing Medicine

    E-print Network

    Cui, Yan

    Winter 2007 Practicing Medicine in the Line of Fire #12; UTHealthScienceCenter University of tennessee HealtH science center Medicine Magazine Winter 2007 CommunicationsTeam Writing,Editing Sh ................................................................................................ DirectorofDevelopment VaCanT DirectorofplannedgivingVaCanT University of Tennessee Medicine Magazine

  11. Advanced Biotechnology and Medicine

    E-print Network

    C A B M Center for Advanced Biotechnology and Medicine http://cabm.umdnj.edu 2007 Report By Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey and by the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey for Advanced Biotechnology and Medicine 2 CONTENTS Director's Overview 3 Research Programs and Laboratories 6

  12. Advanced Biotechnology and Medicine

    E-print Network

    C A B M Center for Advanced Biotechnology and Medicine http://cabm.umdnj.edu 2002 Report By Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey and by The University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey for Advanced Biotechnology and Medicine 2 CONTENTS Director's Overview 3 Research Programs and Laboratories

  13. Advanced Biotechnology and Medicine

    E-print Network

    C A B M Center for Advanced Biotechnology and Medicine http://cabm.umdnj.edu 2006 Report By Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey and by the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey for Advanced Biotechnology and Medicine 2 CONTENTS Director's Overview 3 Research Programs and Laboratories 5

  14. Does medicine still show an unresolved discrimination against women? Experience in two European university hospitals.

    PubMed

    Santamaría, A; Merino, A; Viñas, O; Arrizabalaga, P

    2009-02-01

    Have invisible barriers for women been broken in 2007, or do we still have to break through medicine's glass ceiling? Data from two of the most prestigious university hospitals in Barcelona with 700-800 beds, Hospital Clínic (HC) and Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau (HSCSP) address this issue. In the HSCSP, 87% of the department chairs are men and 85% of the department unit chiefs are also men. With respect to women, only 5 (13%) are in the top position (department chair) and 4 (15%) are department unit chiefs. Similar statistics are also found at the HC: 87% of the department chairs and 89% of the department unit chiefs are men. Currently, only 6 women (13%) are in the top position and 6 (11%) are department unit chiefs. Analysis of the 2002 data of internal promotions in HC showed that for the first level (senior specialist) sex distribution was similar. Nevertheless, for the second level (consultant) only 25% were women, and for the top level (senior consultant) only 8% were women. These proportions have not changed in 2007 in spite of a 10% increase in leadership positions during this period. Similar proportions were found in HSCSP where 68% of the top promotions were held by men. The data obtained from these two different medical institutions in Barcelona are probably representative of other hospitals in Spain. It would be ethically desirable to have males and females in leadership positions in the medical profession. PMID:19181883

  15. DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL THERAPY & HUMAN MOVEMENT SCIENCES FEINBERG SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY

    E-print Network

    Chisholm, Rex L.

    DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL THERAPY & HUMAN MOVEMENT SCIENCES FEINBERG SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, NORTHWESTERN, teaching, administration, research, quality improvement, program development, etc.) 2. Given your knowledge

  16. Investigation of current university research concerning energy conversion and conservation in small single-family dwellings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grossman, G. R.; Roberts, A. S., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    An investigation was made of university research concerning energy conversion and conservation techniques which may be applied in small single-family residences. Information was accumulated through published papers, progress reports, telephone conversations, and personal interviews. A synopsis of each pertinent investigation is given. Finally, a discussion of the synopses is presented and recommendations are made concerning the applicability of concepts for the design and construction of NASA-Langley Research Center's proposed Technology Utilization House in Hampton, Virginia.

  17. The New England Journal of Medicine Downloaded from nejm.org at HARVARD UNIVERSITY on October 28, 2013. For personal use only. No other uses without permission.

    E-print Network

    Alper, Chester A.

    The New England Journal of Medicine Downloaded from nejm.org at HARVARD UNIVERSITY on October 28 Massachusetts Medical Society. All rights reserved. #12;The New England Journal of Medicine Downloaded from nejm the NEJM Archive. Copyright © 2010 Massachusetts Medical Society. All rights reserved. #12;The New England

  18. To be in a position to apply to the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Alberta, students should include the following

    E-print Network

    Seldin, Jonathan P.

    To be in a position to apply to the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Alberta, students Biology 2000 - Principles of Genetics Chemistry 1000 - Atoms, Molecules and Chemical Reactions Chemistry students may apply to the Faculty of Medicine after completion of 20 courses, most students are admitted

  19. UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE HEALTH SCIENCE CENTER SCHEDULE OF MAINTENANCE, TUITION AND FEES EFFECTIVE FALL 2014(Fees shown are for One Semester Only) College of Medicine -Year 1

    E-print Network

    Cui, Yan

    , TUITION AND FEES EFFECTIVE FALL 2014(Fees shown are for One Semester Only) College of Medicine - Year 3UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE HEALTH SCIENCE CENTER SCHEDULE OF MAINTENANCE, TUITION AND FEES EFFECTIVE FALL 2014(Fees shown are for One Semester Only) College of Medicine - Year 1 Hours Maintenance Fee

  20. Published by The University of Vermont College of Medicine Office of Primary Care Spring 2014 A Newsletter Dedicated to T hose Who Deliver & Teach P rimary Care

    E-print Network

    Hayden, Nancy J.

    Published by The University of Vermont College of Medicine Office of Primary Care Spring 2014 available for vt's 2015 educational loan repayment program for primary care practitioners and dentists; hrsa programs. Elizabeth Cote, Director, uvm College of Medicine, Office of Primary Care and ahec Program

  1. Published by The University of Vermont College of Medicine Office of Primary Care Fall 2014 A Newsletter Dedicated to T hose Who Deliver & Teach P rimary Care

    E-print Network

    Hayden, Nancy J.

    Published by The University of Vermont College of Medicine Office of Primary Care Fall 2014 by the Office of Primary Care and statewide AHEC Network to attract and cultivate young people into health care, Director, uvm College of Medicine, Office of Primary Care and ahec Program Limiting Benzodiazepine Use

  2. Situational analysis of teaching and learning of medicine and nursing students at Makerere University College of Health Sciences

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sarah Kiguli; Rhona Baingana; Ligia Paina; David Mafigiri; Sara Groves; Godfrey Katende; Elsie Kiguli-Malwadde; Juliet Kiguli; Moses Galukande; Mayega Roy; Robert Bollinger; George Pariyo

    2011-01-01

    Background  Makerere University College of Health Sciences (MakCHS) in Uganda is undergoing a major reform to become a more influential\\u000a force in society. It is important that its medicine and nursing graduates are equipped to best address the priority health\\u000a needs of the Ugandan population, as outlined in the government’s Health Sector Strategic Plan (HSSP). The assessment identifies\\u000a critical gaps in

  3. Families overcoming under stress: implementing family-centered prevention for military families facing wartime deployments and combat operational stress.

    PubMed

    Lester, Patricia; Mogil, Catherine; Saltzman, William; Woodward, Kirsten; Nash, William; Leskin, Gregory; Bursch, Brenda; Green, Sara; Pynoos, Robert; Beardslee, William

    2011-01-01

    The toll of multiple and prolonged deployments on families has become clearer in recent years as military families have seen an increase in childhood anxiety, parental psychological distress, and marital discord. Families overcoming under stress (FOCUS), a family-centered evidence-informed resiliency training program developed at University of California, Los Angeles and Harvard Medical School, is being implemented at military installations through an initiative from Navy Bureau of Medicine and Surgery. The research foundation for FOCUS includes evidence-based preventive interventions that were adapted to meet the specific needs of military families facing combat operational stress associated with wartime deployments. Using a family narrative approach, FOCUS includes a customized approach utilizing core intervention components, including psychoeducation, emotional regulation skills, goal setting and problem solving skills, traumatic stress reminder management techniques, and family communication skills. The purpose of this study is to describe the development and implementation of FOCUS for military families. A case example is also presented. PMID:21305955

  4. The Ohio State University College of Medicine Med 3-4 Academic Program

    E-print Network

    of aids or devices, such as voice amplifiers; and #12;3. The physical capability to perform medical tasks for training certificate in the medicine or osteopathic medicine from the State Medical Board of Ohio. 1. Have documentation, such as police records, certified court records and any institutional correspondence and orders

  5. Research, Education and Outreach in the Division of Agriculture, Forestry and Veterinary Medicine Mississippi State University

    E-print Network

    Ray, David

    Research, Education and Outreach in the Division of Agriculture, Forestry and Veterinary Medicine n preserves state's native plants. 11 Towns turn green Urban forestry helps towns create more green space. 12 and Veterinary Medicine. 14 Deployment support 4-H mobilizes to help military kids cope. 16 Focus Teaching

  6. Attitudes of Registered and Licensed Practical Nurses About the Importance of Families in Surgical Hospital Units: Findings From the Landspitali University Hospital Family Nursing Implementation Project.

    PubMed

    Blöndal, Katrin; Zoëga, Sigridur; Hafsteinsdottir, Jorunn E; Olafsdottir, Olof Asdis; Thorvardardottir, Audur B; Hafsteinsdottir, Sigrun A; Sveinsdóttir, Herdis

    2014-07-15

    The purpose of this study was to examine attitudes of registered nurses and licensed practical nurses about the importance of the family in surgical hospital units before (T1) and after (T2) implementation of a Family Systems Nursing educational intervention based on the Calgary Family Assessment and Intervention Models. This study was part of the Landspitali University Hospital Family Nursing Implementation Project and used a nonrandomized, quasi-experimental design with nonequivalent group before and after and without a control group. There were 181 participants at T1 and 130 at T2. No difference was found in nurses' attitudes as measured by the Families Importance in Nursing Care-Nurses' Attitudes (FINC-NA) questionnaire, before and after the educational intervention. Attitudes toward families were favorable at both times. Analysis of demographic variables showed that age, work experience, and workplace (inpatient vs. outpatient units) had an effect on the nurses' attitudes toward families. The influence of work experience on attitudes toward family care warrants further exploration. PMID:25026965

  7. UW MEDICINE ANNUAL ADDRESS 2014 UW MEDICINE'S ROLE IN

    E-print Network

    Borenstein, Elhanan

    UW MEDICINE ANNUAL ADDRESS 2014 UW MEDICINE'S ROLE IN IMPROVING HEALTH: 2014 Paul G. Ramsey, M.D. CEO, UW Medicine Executive Vice President for Medical Affairs and Dean of the School of Medicine, University of Washington February 6, 2014 #12;UW MEDICINE ANNUAL ADDRESS 2014 Transformation · Common usage

  8. Cancer Institute of New Jersey: University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey. Environmental Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to authorize the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey to proceed with the design, construction, and equipping of the proposed Clinical Treatment and Research Facility of the University of New Jersey on the New Brunswick campus. The facility will provide for the integration of new and existing clinical outpatient cancer treatment with basic and clinical research to expedite the application of new discoveries in cancer treatment. Based on the analysis in the environmental assessment, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA).

  9. Ohio Physiological Society 2012 report The Ohio Physiological Society held its 27th annual meeting at Wright State University's Boonshoft School of Medicine

    E-print Network

    Alvarez, Francisco J.

    , Wright g p p p , g y; , g State University; Venkateshwar Mutyam, University of Dayton; Amy Engevik at Wright State University's Boonshoft School of Medicine on October 2627, 2012. With 127 registrants from began with research presentations from four new investigators in Ohio: Dr. Nadja Grobe, Wright State

  10. 1 -Bala Cynwyd Medical Associates 2 -Brookside Family Practice

    E-print Network

    Bushman, Frederic

    Practice 4 - Christiana Care Health System 5 - French Creek Family Medicine 6 - Hightstown Medical Associates 8 - King of Prussia Medicine 9 - Lancaster General Hospital 10 - Lehigh Valley Family Health Care-South Jersey Family Medicine 18 - PennCare-Chestnut Hill Family Medicine 22 - Penn Medicine

  11. Medication Cost Information in a Computer-Based Patient Record System Impact on Prescribing in a Family Medicine Clinical Practice

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Steven M. Ornstein; Lori L. MacFarlane; Ruth G. Jenkins; Qin Pan; Karen A. Wager

    1999-01-01

    Background: Medicationsaccountfor8%ofnationalhealth care expenditures, and prescription drugs are a focus of cost containment measures. Physicians have limited knowledge about drug costs, and no method of providing this informa- tion has demonstrated sustained cost reductions. Objective: To determine the impact of cost informa- tion in a computer-based patient record system on pre- scribing by family physicians. Methods: A yearlong, controlled clinical

  12. Interdisciplinary Training in Infant/Family Specializations through Existing Programs at the University of Nebraska. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marvin, Christine A.; And Others

    This study explored current University of Nebraska graduate course offerings which address content relative to infants, families, and/or the professional teamwork associated with services to handicapped or at-risk infants, toddlers, and their families. Faculty from 12 departments were surveyed as to their interest in interdisciplinary,…

  13. Comparison of burnout pattern between hospital physicians and family physicians working in Suez Canal University Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Kotb, Amany Ali; Mohamed, Khalid Abd-Elmoez; Kamel, Mohammed Hbany; Ismail, Mosleh Abdul Rahman; Abdulmajeed, Abdulmajeed Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The burnout syndrome is characterized by emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and low personal accomplishment. It is associated with impaired job performance. Methods This descriptive study examined 171 physicians for the presence of burnout and its related risk factors. The evaluation of burnout was through Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI). The participant was considered to meet the study criteria for burnout if he or she got a “high“ score on at least 2 of the three dimensions of MBI. Results In the current study, the prevalence of burnout in hospital physicians (53.9%) was significantly higher than family physicians (41.94%) with (p=0.001). Participants who work in the internal medicine department scored the highest prevalence (69.64%) followed by Surgeons (56.50%) and Emergency doctors (39.39%). On the other hand, Pediatricians got the lowest prevalence (18.75%). Working in the teaching hospital and being married are strong predictors for occurrence of burnout. Conclusion There is a significant difference of burnout between hospital physicians and family physicians among the study subjects. Working in the teaching hospital and being married are strong predictors for occurrence of burnout. PMID:25422682

  14. Students’ perception of the learning environment at Xavier University School of Medicine, Aruba

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The learning environment at Xavier University School of Medicine (XUSOM), Aruba has not been previously studied. Hence, the present study was carried out using the Dundee Ready Education Environment Measure (DREEM) to obtain student perceptions about the learning environment and compare the same among different subgroups of respondents. Methods: The questionnaire was administered to undergraduate medical students in their first to fifth semester during the first two weeks of June 2013. The students’ perceptions were evaluated by noting their degree of agreement with a set of 50 statements using a Likert-type scale. The mean overall score and the scores of subcategory were calculated and compared among different respondents (P<0.05). Results: Seventy-three of the 86 students (84.9%) completed the questionnaire. The overall mean±SD score was 131.79±22.86 (maximum score 200). The mean±SD score for students’ perception of teaching/learning was 31.99±6.23 (maximum score, 48), while the score for students’ perceptions of teachers was 30.05±5.54 (maximum score, 44). The mean±SD scores for students’ academic self-perception, students’ perception of the atmosphere, and students’ social self-perception were 21.88±5.11 (maximum score, 32), 30.92±8.59 (maximum score, 48), and 16.96±4.71 (maximum score, 28), respectively. There were no differences in scores according to the respondents’ personal characteristics. Conclusion: The student responses about the learning environment at the institution were positive. We plan to obtain regular student feedback as the curriculum becomes progressively more student-centered and integrated. PMID:24223238

  15. The telephone survey in family practice.

    PubMed

    Curtis, P; Talbot, A; Evens, S; Smart, A; Speros, L

    1981-03-01

    Patient surveys can be useful methods of obtaining information for the purposes of improving health services, practice management, or research in family medicine. The telephone interview is an effective and economical method of undertaking such a survey. The advantages and disadvantages of the telephone survey method are briefly illustrated by a study conducted in the Family Practice Center at the University of North Carolina concerning patient perspectives on their after-hours medical encounters with physicians. PMID:6780651

  16. ALBERT EINSTEIN COLLEGE of MEDICINE of YESHIVA UNIVERSITY DEPARTMENT of ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH and SAFETY

    E-print Network

    Emmons, Scott

    of the drug to control disease agents in humans, veterinary medicine or agriculture. IIIB ­ NIH/OBA and IBC nanograms per kilogram body weight (such as microbial toxins ­ botulinum toxin, tetanus toxin, diphtheria

  17. Predictors of complementary and alternative medicine use among Texas university undergraduates 

    E-print Network

    Versnik Nowak, Amy L.

    2006-10-30

    Research regarding use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) among all populations in America is needed to understand what seems to be an increasing trend. Education has been shown to be a significant determinant of CAM use, therefore...

  18. Feasibility and impact of an evidence-based electronic decision support system for diabetes care in family medicine: protocol for a cluster randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In Belgium, the construction of the national electronic point-of-care information service, EBMPracticeNet, was initiated in 2011 to optimize quality of care by promoting evidence-based decision-making. The collaboration of the government, healthcare providers, Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM) partners, and vendors of Electronic Health Records (EHR) is unique to this project. All Belgian healthcare professionals get free access to an up-to-date database of validated Belgian and nearly 1,000 international guidelines, incorporated in a portal that also provides EBM information from sources other than guidelines, including computerized clinical decision support that is integrated in the EHRs. The EBMeDS system is the electronic evidence-based decision support system of EBMPracticeNet. The EBMeDS system covers all clinical areas of diseases and could play a crucial role in response to the emerging challenge posed by chronic conditions. Diabetes was chosen as the analysis topic of interest. The objective of this study is to assess the effectiveness of EBMeDS use in improving diabetes care. This objective will be enhanced by a formal process evaluation to provide crucial information on the feasibility of using the system in daily Belgian family medicine. Methods The study is a cluster-randomized trial with before/after measurements conducted in Belgian family medicine. Physicians’ practices will be randomly assigned to the intervention or control group in a 1:1 ratio, to receive either the EBMeDS reminders or to follow the usual care process. Randomization will be performed by a statistical consultant with an electronic random list generator, anonymously for the researchers. The follow-up period of the study will be 12 months with interim analysis points at 3, 6 and 9 months. Primary outcome is the one-year pre- to post-implementation change in HbA1c. Patients will not be informed about the intervention. Data analysts will be kept blinded to the allocation. Discussion The knowledge obtained in this study will be useful for further integration in other Belgian software packages. Users’ perceptions and process evaluation will provide information for improving the feasibility of the system. Trial registration The trial is registered with the ClinicalTrials.gov registry: NCT01830569. PMID:23915250

  19. Morphogenesis & Regenerative Medicine

    E-print Network

    Brodie III, Edmund D.

    Morphogenesis Symposium & Regenerative Medicine May 27-29, 2009 Registration & Abstract submission will showcase some of the best research performed in morphogenesis and regenerative medicine. A wide range Francisco Haifan Lin Yale University Ruth Lehmann The Skirball Institute of Biomolecular Medicine #12;

  20. Research Article in Medicine

    E-print Network

    Small, Dylan

    Research Article Statistics in Medicine Received XXXX (www.interscience.wiley.com) DOI: 10.1002/sim of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, passed away on May 1, 2011 at the age of 53 from complications of multiple Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania

  1. Research Article in Medicine

    E-print Network

    Coolen, ACC "Ton"

    Research Article Statistics in Medicine Received XXXX (www.interscience.wiley.com) DOI: 10.1002/sim of Medicine, Guy's Hospital, London, U.K. c Department of Surgical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala;Statistics in Medicine J. van Baardewijk et al. primary risk only primary & secondary risk SKM 1 0.0 0.2 0

  2. Medicine and health studies

    E-print Network

    Sussex, University of

    Medicine and health studies Key facts · The excellent reputation of Sussex in research related to medicine has been enhanced by the opening of BSMS. Working with partners such as the Genome Damage. · Medicine at BSMS was ranked in the top 20 in the UK in The Guardian University Guide 2013. · At present

  3. Comparative Medicine Copyright 2000

    E-print Network

    Comparative Medicine Copyright 2000 by the American Association for Laboratory Animal Science Vol. Wallace, Jr.,2 and James E. Ferrell, Jr.3 From the Departments of 1 Comparative Medicine, and 3 Molecular at Stanford University's School of Medicine research animal facility. The affected frogs were purchased from

  4. Pathology and Molecular Medicine

    E-print Network

    Haykin, Simon

    Pathology and Molecular Medicine ANATOMICAL PATHOLOGY GRAND ROUNDS 2012 / 2013 TIME: 12:30 - 1:30 p. Pollett Mount Sinai Hospital University of Toronto Personalized Medicine in GI Oncologic Pathology ROUNDS ARE SPONSORED BY THE DEPARTMENT OF PATHOLOGY AND MOLECULAR MEDICINE Updated: October5, 2012 #12;

  5. INTRODUCTION TO GENOMIC MEDICINE

    E-print Network

    INTRODUCTION TO GENOMIC MEDICINE Genomics play a role in 21st century research and clinical practice and Washington University School of Medicine is at the forefront of this evolving field related to genomic medicine. Tentative Schedule: WHEN: WHERE: WHO CAN ATTEND? INTRODUCTION January 31

  6. Radiation Treatment for Ewing Family of Tumors in Adults: University of Florida Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Shi Wenyin; Indelicato, Daniel J.; Keole, Sameer R.; Morris, Christopher G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL (United States); Scarborough, Mark T.; Gibbs, Parker C. [Department of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL (United States); Zlotecki, Robert A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL (United States)], E-mail: zlotera@ufl.edu

    2008-11-15

    Purpose: To review the clinical characteristics and outcomes of adult patients with Ewing family of tumors treated with radiation at University of Florida. Methods and Materials: Clinical features, treatment, and outcomes of 47 patients older than 18 years with Ewing family of tumors treated with combined radiation therapy and chemotherapy from 1970 to 2005 were retrospectively reviewed. Analysis was stratified by age older or younger than 30 years. Patients with metastatic disease at the time of diagnosis were excluded from the study. Results: The 29 men and 18 women had a median age of 24 years. Thirty-three patients were 18-30 years old and 14 patients were older than 30 years. Median follow-up of living patients was 8.2 years. The 5-year overall survival rate for all patients was 43% (p = 0.8523). The 5-year local control rate for all patients was 75% (p = 0.9326). The 5-year rate of freedom from distant metastasis for all patients was 45% (p = 0.5471). There were no significant differences in 5-year overall survival, local control, and freedom from distant metastasis rates; patterns of distant failure; or toxicity profiles between older adult patients and younger adult patients. Conclusions: We found that the natural history and treatment outcomes of the Ewing family of tumors were consistently similar in adults (young and old) and children. Thus, aggressive combined modality approaches should be considered for adult patients.

  7. Research, Education, and Outreach in the Division of Agriculture, Forestry, and Veterinary Medicine Mississippi State University

    E-print Network

    Ray, David

    in the College ofVeterinary Medicine. With so many sharp young minds on cam- pus, we need to find new ways Timber Training Camp prepares students for forestry careers. 6 High-Tech Crops New cropping systems seek a stable future for amphibians. 12 The Beat Goes On An after school project helps create quality

  8. Tufts University School of Medicine's Master of Science in Pain Research,

    E-print Network

    Dennett, Daniel

    advanced learning. The New England School of Acupuncture is the oldest school of Acupuncture and Oriental a Master of Acupuncture or Master of Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine Degree. In addition to their comprehensive training in acupuncture, NESA students choosing the CAS-PM track gain expertise

  9. Connectwith the Boston University School of Medicine Community you are here

    E-print Network

    Spence, Harlan Ernest

    Asement Lounge chequerscafe Lockers emAiL stAtions talBot green 08fOuntain 09 HippocrAtes bust 10 tALbot bui;WELCOME School of Medicine Lobby Sculptures Talbot Green School of Public Health Hippocrates Newton

  10. Developing an Organizational Understanding of Faculty Mentoring Programs in Academic Medicine in Major American Research Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischer Zellers, Darlene

    2013-01-01

    This study examines the organizational and contextual factors associated with faculty mentoring programs in academic medicine within major research institutions in the United States, and explores the usefulness of organizational behavior theory in understanding these relationships. To date, many formal faculty mentoring programs are in operation…

  11. Research, Education and Outreach in the Division of Agriculture, Forestry and Veterinary Medicine Mississippi State University

    E-print Network

    Ray, David

    Research, Education and Outreach in the Division of Agriculture, Forestry and Veterinary Medicine into a successful business. 6 Robotic Spark Fun and learning go together in the 4-H robotics program. 7 Panda from the Internet often needs verification. That is the case with a recent Yahoo Education article

  12. Assistant or Associate Professors in the Department of Medicine, Stanford University

    E-print Network

    Quake, Stephen R.

    of Immunology The Division of Immunology and Rheumatology in the Department of Medicine at Stanford in Rheumatology, and have demonstrated skills in patient oriented clinical research (clinical trials, health regular mail to: C. Garrison Fathman, M.D. Chief of the Division of Immunology and Rheumatology CCSR

  13. 1 | P a g e WAYNE STATE UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF MEDICINE

    E-print Network

    Berdichevsky, Victor

    to trophinin-mediated adhesion during blastocyst implantation. Cell Cycle (News and Views Section). Delaney, Lewandowski L, Ondersma S, Partridge T, Sokol RJ. Prenatal cocaine exposure and age 7 behavior: The roles DR. Transcervical retrieval of fetal cells in the practice of modern medicine: A review

  14. THE SCHOOL OF DENTAL MEDICINE NEW RESEARCH AND TEACHING BUILDING FOR THE UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennsylvania Univ., Philadelphia.

    IN PLANNING A NEW RESEARCH AND TEACHING BUILDING FOR THE SCHOOL OF DENTAL MEDICINE, A PROGRAM WAS DEVELOPED OUTLINING THE DESIGN NEEDS AND THE SPACE AND FACILITY REQUIREMENTS. MAJOR AREAS OF THE PROGRAM WERE--(1) GENERAL DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION COMPONENTS, (2) THE RESEARCH COMPONENT, AND (3) THE BASIC SCIENCE TEACHING COMPONENTS. SPACE…

  15. Genome-wide identification, molecular cloning, expression profiling and posttranscriptional regulation analysis of the Argonaute gene family in Salvia miltiorrhiza, an emerging model medicinal plant

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Argonaute (AGO) is the core component of RNA-induced silencing complex. The AGO gene family has been analyzed in various plant species; however, there is no report about AGOs in the well-known Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) plant, Salvia miltiorrhiza. Results Through a genome-wide analysis, we identified ten SmAGO genes in S. miltiorrhiza. Full-length cDNAs of all SmAGOs were subsequently cloned and sequenced. These SmAGOs were characterized using a comprehensive approach. Sequence features, gene structures and conserved domains were analyzed by the comparison of SmAGOs and AtAGOs. Phylogenetic relationships among AGO proteins from S. miltiorrhiza, Arabidopsis and rice were revealed. The expression levels of SmAGO genes in various tissues of S. miltiorrhiza were investigated. The results implied that some SmAGOs, such as SmAGO1, SmAGO2, SmAGO3, SmAGO7 and SmAGO10, probably played similar roles as their counterparts in Arabidopsis; whereas the others could be more species-specialized. It suggests the conservation and diversity of AGOs in plants. Additionally, we identified a total of 24 hairpin structures, representing six miRNA gene families, to be miRNA precursors. Using the modified 5?-RACE method, we confirmed that SmAGO1 and SmAGO2 were targeted by S. miltiorrhiza miR168a/b and miR403, respectively. It suggests the conservation of AGO1-miR168 and AGO2-miR403 regulatory modules in S. miltiorrhiza and Arabidopsis. Conclusions This is the first attempt to explore SmAGOs and miRNAs in S. miltiorrhiza. The results provide useful information for further elucidation of gene silencing pathways in S. miltiorrhiza. PMID:23889895

  16. Association of Common Mental Disorders and Quality of Life with the Frequency of Attendance in Slovenian Family Medicine Practices: Longitudinal Study

    PubMed Central

    Rifel, Janez; Švab, Igor; Seli?, Polona; Rotar Pavli?, Danica; Nazareth, Irwin; Car, Josip

    2013-01-01

    Background Most research on frequent attendance has been cross-sectional and restricted to one year attendance rates. A few longitudinal studies suggest that frequent attendance is self-limiting. Frequent attenders are more likely to have social and psychiatric problems, medically unexplained physical symptoms, chronic somatic diseases (especially diabetes) and are prescribed more psychotropic medication and analgesics. Research Question To describe the attendance rates in a longitudinal study and to test if depression, panic syndrome, other anxiety syndrome, alcohol misuse and general quality of life are associated with frequent attendance in next two consecutive years. Methods 1118 consecutive family practice attendees, aged 18 to 75 years from randomly selected family medicine practices were recruited at baseline and followed up at 12 and 24 months. We identified frequent attenders in the top 10 centile within one year. Using a multivariate model, we ascertained if presence of common mental disorders and quality of life assessed at baseline in 2003 predict frequent attendance in 2004 and 2005. Results 40% of frequent attenders continue to be frequent attenders in the following year and 20% of the frequent attenders were so for the 24 month period. Lower physical scores on the SF-12 questionnaire were strongly associated with future frequent attendance at 12 and 24 months. There was a trend for people with greater than elementary school education to be less likely to become frequent attenders at both 12 and 24 months. For other variables these effects were less consistent. Presence of major depression, panic syndrome, other anxiety syndrome and alcohol misuse were not predictive of frequent attendance in the following two years. Conclusion Low physical quality of life is strongly predictive of higher frequent attendance and similar finding was observed for people with lower educational level but further confirmatory research is required to establish this association. PMID:23342107

  17. Positions toward Science Studies in Medicine among University Graduates of Medicine and the Teenaged Participants of the "Medical Systems" Study Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ben-Zvi-Assaraf, Orit; Even-Israel, Chava

    2011-01-01

    The "Medical Systems" program was designed to introduce high school students to the world of advanced medicine. Its premise was to use an applied scientific discipline like medicine to encourage high-school students' interest in basic science. This study compares the teen-aged graduates of "Medical Systems" with fourth and fifth-year medical…

  18. The Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, McMaster University, invites applications for a one year Anatomic Pathology Fellowship. This fellowship may be in any of the following areas: Breast,

    E-print Network

    Thompson, Michael

    The Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, McMaster University, invites applications for a one year Anatomic Pathology Fellowship. This fellowship may be in any of the following areas: Breast Pathology. The Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine and the Hamilton Regional Laboratory Medicine

  19. The Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, McMaster University, invites applications for a one year Forensic Pathology Residency Program (PGY-6) for the academic year July 2012-June 2013.

    E-print Network

    Thompson, Michael

    The Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, McMaster University, invites applications for a one year Forensic Pathology Residency Program (PGY-6) for the academic year July 2012-June 2013. The Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine and the Hamilton Regional Laboratory Medicine Program

  20. Training family medicine residents to build and remodel a patient centered medical home in Rhode Island: a team based approach to PCMH education.

    PubMed

    Chandran, Rabin; Furey, Christopher; Goldberg, Arnold; Ashley, David; Anandarajah, Gowri

    2015-04-01

    Primary Care practices in the United States are undergoing rapid transformation into Patient Centered Medical Homes (PCMHs), prompting a need to train resident physicians in this new model of primary care. However, few PCMH curricula are described or evaluated in the literature. We describe the development and implementation of an innovative, month-long, team-based, block rotation, integrated into the Brown Family Medicine Residency Program, within the context of statewide PCMH practice transformation in Rhode Island. The PCMH resident team (first-, second- and third-year residents) gain PCMH skills, with progressive levels of responsibility through residency. In addition to traditional supervised direct outpatient care, learning activities include: active participation in PCMH transformation projects, population health level patient management, quality improvement activities, interdisciplinary teamwork, chronic disease management (including leading group medical visits), and PCMH specific didactics paired with weekly projects. This new clinical block rotation and team holds promise as a model to train residents for future PCMH primary care practices. PMID:25830172

  1. The European General Practice Research Network Presents the Translations of Its Comprehensive Definition of Multimorbidity in Family Medicine in Ten European Languages

    PubMed Central

    Le Reste, Jean Yves; Nabbe, Patrice; Rivet, Charles; Lygidakis, Charilaos; Doerr, Christa; Czachowski, Slawomir; Lingner, Heidrun; Argyriadou, Stella; Lazic, Djurdjica; Assenova, Radost; Hasaganic, Melida; Munoz, Miquel Angel; Thulesius, Hans; Le Floch, Bernard; Derriennic, Jeremy; Sowinska, Agnieska; Van Marwijk, Harm; Lietard, Claire; Van Royen, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Background Multimorbidity, according to the World Health Organization, exists when there are two or more chronic conditions in one patient. This definition seems inaccurate for the holistic approach to Family Medicine (FM) and long-term care. To avoid this pitfall the European General Practitioners Research Network (EGPRN) designed a comprehensive definition of multimorbidity using a systematic literature review. Objective To translate that English definition into European languages and to validate the semantic, conceptual and cultural homogeneity of the translations for further research. Method Forward translation of the EGPRN’s definition of multimorbidity followed by a Delphi consensus procedure assessment, a backward translation and a cultural check with all teams to ensure the homogeneity of the translations in their national context. Consensus was defined as 70% of the scores being higher than 6. Delphi rounds were repeated in each country until a consensus was reached Results 229 European medical expert FPs participated in the study. Ten consensual translations of the EGPRN comprehensive definition of multimorbidity were achieved. Conclusion A comprehensive definition of multimorbidity is now available in English and ten European languages for further collaborative research in FM and long-term care. PMID:25607642

  2. Abstract Profiles of Structural Stability Point to Universal Tendencies, Family-Specific Factors, and Ancient Connections between Languages

    PubMed Central

    Dediu, Dan; Levinson, Stephen C.

    2012-01-01

    Language is the best example of a cultural evolutionary system, able to retain a phylogenetic signal over many thousands of years. The temporal stability (conservatism) of basic vocabulary is relatively well understood, but the stability of the structural properties of language (phonology, morphology, syntax) is still unclear. Here we report an extensive Bayesian phylogenetic investigation of the structural stability of numerous features across many language families and we introduce a novel method for analyzing the relationships between the “stability profiles” of language families. We found that there is a strong universal component across language families, suggesting the existence of universal linguistic, cognitive and genetic constraints. Against this background, however, each language family has a distinct stability profile, and these profiles cluster by geographic area and likely deep genealogical relationships. These stability profiles seem to show, for example, the ancient historical relationships between the Siberian and American language families, presumed to be separated by at least 12,000 years, and possible connections between the Eurasian families. We also found preliminary support for the punctuated evolution of structural features of language across families, types of features and geographic areas. Thus, such higher-level properties of language seen as an evolutionary system might allow the investigation of ancient connections between languages and shed light on the peopling of the world. PMID:23028843

  3. Alexander Norbash, MD, MHCM, FACR Chairman and Professor of Radiology, Boston University School of Medicine

    E-print Network

    Vajda, Sandor

    Alexander Norbash, MD, MHCM, FACR Chairman and Professor of Radiology, Boston University School. Norbash joined Boston University Medical Center in March 2004 as Chairman and Professor of Radiology. Dr, graduated from the University of Pittsburgh Radiology Residency, and completed fellowships in both

  4. Information Technology – a Tool for Development of the Teaching Process at the Faculty of Medicine, University of Sarajevo

    PubMed Central

    Masic, Izet; Begic, Edin

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Information Technologies, taking slow steps, have found its application in the teaching process of Faculty of Medicine, University of Sarajevo. Online availability of the teaching content is mainly intended for users of the Bologna process. Aim: The aim was to present the level of use of information technologies at the Faculty of Medicine, University of Sarajevo, comparing two systems, old system and the Bologna process, and to present new ways of improving the teaching process, using information technology. Material and methods: The study included the period from 2012 to 2014, and included 365 students from the old system and the Bologna Process. Study had prospective character. Results: Students of the old system are older than students of the Bologna process. In both systems higher number of female students is significantly present. All students have their own computers, usually using the Office software package and web browsers. Visits of social networks were the most common reason for which they used computers. On question if they know to work with databases, 14.6% of students of the old system responded positively and 26.2% of students of the Bologna process answered the same. Students feel that working with databases is necessary to work in primary health care. On the question of the degree of computerization at the university, there were significant differences between the two systems (p <0.05). When asked about the possibility of using computers at school, there were no significant differences between the two systems. There has been progress of that opportunity from year to year. Students of Bologna process were more interested in the introduction of information technology, than students of old system. 68.7% of students of the Bologna process of generation 2013-2014, and 71.3% of generation 2014-2015, believed that the subject of Medical Informatics, the same or similar name, should be included in the new reform teaching process of the Faculty of Medicine, University of Sarajevo. Conclusion: Information technologies can help the development of the teaching process, and represent attractive and accessible tool in the process of modernization and progress. PMID:26005278

  5. 20th Annual Feline Medicine

    E-print Network

    Schladow, S. Geoffrey

    20th Annual Feline Medicine Symposium Sunday, February 10, 2002 School of Veterinary Medicine University of California, Davis 170 Schalm Hall Sponsored by: The Feline Medicine Club and the Iams Company ============================================================ 8:00 am Registration and Breakfast 12:00 pmComplimentary Lunch 8:30 am Transfusion Medicine

  6. School of Veterinary Medicine Bulletin

    E-print Network

    School of Veterinary Medicine Bulletin 2009-2010 #12;2 School of Veterinary Medicine About at the Louisiana State University School of Veterinary Medicine, March 28-April 26, 2009. #12;2009­2010 Bulletin of address, undeliverable copies, and other mail sent to­School of Veterinary Medicine, LSU, Baton Rouge

  7. Probe a family non-universal Z? boson effects in B???+?- decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Qin; Gao, Yin-Hao

    2011-04-01

    Motivated by the recent measurement on B(B????) by CDF Collaboration, we study the effects of a family non-universal Z boson on rare semileptonic B???? decay. In our evaluations, we analyze the dependences of the dimuon invariant mass spectrum and normalized forward-backward asymmetry on Z couplings and show that these observables are highly sensitive to new Z contributions. Three limiting scenarios are presented in the detailed analyses. Numerically, within the allowed ranges of Z couplings under the constraints from B-B mixing, B??K, B?(X,K,K)?? decays and so on, B(B????) and AFB(L)(B????) could be enhanced by about 96% and 17% ( 133%) respectively at most by Z contributions. However, B(B????) is hardly to be reduced. Furthermore, the zero crossing in A(B????) spectrum at low dimuon mass always exists.

  8. Impact of an HMO on a university-based family practice program.

    PubMed

    Curtis, P; Sloat, S; Aluise, J; Von Clemm, T; Brannon, R; White, M F

    1988-01-01

    The impact over a 12-month period of a major increase in enrollment of prepaid insurance patients on the clinical, administrative, and educational activities of a university-based family practice residency program is described. Patient services increased by 40 percent, placing a heavy clinical load on faculty and third-year residents. There were significant increases in referral to psychology, psychotherapy, ophthalmology, and otolaryngology specialists. The high demand for services caused logistical difficulties for office and nursing staff. Adaptation to these changes and cost-containment efforts were hampered by institutional relationships. Strategies to manage the impact included hiring additional staff and part-time clinicians, introducing quality assurance and internal control procedures, and repeated orientation to the prepaid plan. Overall, the impact of the plan was of educational value to both residents and faculty. PMID:3339311

  9. Department and function: Director, Transfusion Medicine

    E-print Network

    Manstein, Dietmar J.

    Department and function: Director, Transfusion Medicine Education: 1981-1987 Universities of Bochum and Essen, Medicine 1996 Specialist in Transfusion Medicine Positions: 1987-1988 University of Marburg and Oncology 1993-1998 Humboldt-University of Berlin, Transfusion Medicine 1998 Hannover Medical School

  10. Establishing a minority-based community clinical oncology program: the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, New Jersey Medical School-university Hospital Cancer Center experience.

    PubMed

    Wieder, Robert; Teal, Randall; Saunders, Tracie; Weiner, Bryan J

    2013-03-01

    The Minority-Based Community Clinical Oncology Program (MB-CCOP) at University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, New Jersey Medical School-University Hospital Cancer Center was established to serve an unmet need in a medically, educationally, and socioeconomically underserved community of primarily African American and Latino patients in Newark and Essex County, New Jersey. The MB-CCOP was built on an existing infrastructure of multidisciplinary teams of cancer specialists who collaborated in patient care and an existing clinical research program, which included multilingual staff and a breast cancer navigator. This article highlights some of the unique opportunities and challenges involved in the startup of an MB-CCOP specifically relevant to an academic setting. We present a guide to the necessary infrastructure and institutional support that must be in place before considering such a program and some of the steps an institution can take to overcome barriers preventing successful enrollment of patients onto clinical trials. PMID:23814524

  11. Collaborative Care for Older Adults with low back pain by family medicine physicians and doctors of chiropractic (COCOA): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Low back pain is a prevalent and debilitating condition that affects the health and quality of life of older adults. Older people often consult primary care physicians about back pain, with many also receiving concurrent care from complementary and alternative medicine providers, most commonly doctors of chiropractic. However, a collaborative model of treatment coordination between these two provider groups has yet to be tested. The primary aim of the Collaborative Care for Older Adults Clinical Trial is to develop and evaluate the clinical effectiveness and feasibility of a patient-centered, collaborative care model with family medicine physicians and doctors of chiropractic for the treatment of low back pain in older adults. Methods/design This pragmatic, pilot randomized controlled trial will enroll 120 participants, age 65 years or older with subacute or chronic low back pain lasting at least one month, from a community-based sample in the Quad-Cities, Iowa/Illinois, USA. Eligible participants are allocated in a 1:1:1 ratio to receive 12 weeks of medical care, concurrent medical and chiropractic care, or collaborative medical and chiropractic care. Primary outcomes are self-rated back pain and disability. Secondary outcomes include general and functional health status, symptom bothersomeness, expectations for treatment effectiveness and improvement, fear avoidance behaviors, depression, anxiety, satisfaction, medication use and health care utilization. Treatment safety and adverse events also are monitored. Participant-rated outcome measures are collected via self-reported questionnaires and computer-assisted telephone interviews at baseline, and at 4, 8, 12, 24, 36 and 52 weeks post-randomization. Provider-rated expectations for treatment effectiveness and participant improvement also are evaluated. Process outcomes are assessed through qualitative interviews with study participants and research clinicians, chart audits of progress notes and content analysis of clinical trial notes. Discussion This pragmatic, pilot randomized controlled trial uses a mixed method approach to evaluate the clinical effectiveness, feasibility, and participant and provider perceptions of collaborative care between medical doctors and doctors of chiropractic in the treatment of older adults with low back pain. Trial registration This trial registered in ClinicalTrials.gov on 04 March 2011 with the ID number of NCT01312233. PMID:23324133

  12. Research, Education, and Outreach in the Division of Agriculture, Forestry, and Veterinary Medicine Mississippi State University

    E-print Network

    Ray, David

    a nutritious and safe food supply. · Sustainable renewable energy systems -- We are working to develop bet- ter-being of agricultural producers, forest landowners, and communi- ties in general. Those are assets that help make us strive to advance agricultural production, natural resource management, family and community resources

  13. Department of Cellular and Molecular Pharmacology, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo

    E-print Network

    Miyashita, Yasushi

    on the membrane potential, matrix and cytosolic pH, as well as on the nature of the fatty compounds activating UCPs increase conductance of the IMM remain elusive due to the lack of direct methods to measure from the brown adipose tissue to identify and characterize currents produced by the family's founding

  14. Reflections on the impact of Title VII funding at the University of New England College of Osteopathic Medicine.

    PubMed

    Shannon, Stephen C

    2008-11-01

    Title VII funding played an important role in the development of the University of New England College of Osteopathic Medicine (UNECOM). These funds enabled the 90% tuition-funded school to implement a primary-care-based curriculum in its formative years and played a crucial role in the 1995-2005 period of curriculum revision. UNECOM successfully competed for Title VII program funding in Physician Faculty Development in Primary Care, Academic Units in Primary Care, Predoctoral Training in Primary Care, and Residency Training in Primary Care. This funding helped the institution refine its vision and mission as a result of the federal imperatives surrounding primary health care. Securing these funds enabled the institution to jump-start programs with start-up federal funding, expand faculty, access educational innovation by networking with other grantees across the nation, and expand faculty grant-making knowledge and skills via federal technical assistance and grant review processes. Subsequent institutionalization of the resulting innovations may have played a role in UNECOM maintaining its production of primary care physicians, as evidenced by 71% of its 1996-2002 graduates practicing in primary care specialties. The impact of Title VII funding at UNECOM provides an example of how new and existing medical schools whose missions align with federal priorities can use these programs to develop curriculum and resources congruent with their missions.This article is part of a theme issue of Academic Medicine on the Title VII health professions training programs. PMID:18971658

  15. A curricular model for the training of physician scientists: the evolution of the Duke University School of Medicine curriculum.

    PubMed

    O'Connor Grochowski, Colleen; Halperin, Edward Charles; Buckley, Edward George

    2007-04-01

    Duke University School of Medicine offers an unusual doctor of medicine educational program. The core basic sciences are taught in year one, core clinical clerkships are completed in the second year, the entire third year is devoted to scholarly investigation, and elective rotations are fulfilled in the fourth year. The creation of this unique structure presented many challenges and is the product of a desire of key faculty 40 years ago to change radically the way medical education was taught. Over the years, improvements have been made, but the underlying principles of these visionary leaders have been retained: inquire not just acquire, flexibility of choice, and in-depth exploration. In the spirit of innovation that was established 40 years ago, leaders and faculty at Duke developed a new curricular model in 2004, called Foundation for Excellence, which is anchored in integrated, interdisciplinary innovation. The authors describe the process of curricular reform and provide a detailed overview of this unique approach to medical education. In keeping with Duke's mission to graduate clinician-researchers and clinician-educators, reducing the basic science curriculum to one year created a year saved, which students are now required to devote to scholarly pursuits. The authors argue that adopting a similar one-year basic science curriculum would make instructional time available for other schools to achieve their own institutional goals. PMID:17414195

  16. I/We would like to make a gift today to Consumer and Family Sciences at Purdue University. Total Gift Amount: $ _____________________ [ ] This gift will be matched.

    E-print Network

    like to make a gift today to Consumer and Family Sciences at Purdue University. Total Gift Amount (800) 535-7303 or e-mail cfsalums@purdue.edu Thank you! EA/EOU COLLEGE OF CONSUMER AND FAMILY SCIENCES and Family Sciences, Office of Development 812 W. State Street, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2060 Questions? Call

  17. The pond is wider than you think! Problems encountered when searching family practice literature.

    PubMed Central

    Rosser, W. W.; Starkey, C.; Shaughnessy, R.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To explain differences in the results of literature searches in British general practice and North American family practice or family medicine. DESIGN: Comparative literature search. SETTING: The Department of Family and Community Medicine at the University of Toronto in Ontario. METHOD: Literature searches on MEDLINE demonstrated that certain search strategies ignored certain key words, depending on the search engine and the search terms chosen. Literature searches using the key words "general practice," "family practice," and "family medicine" combined with the topics "depression" and then "otitis media" were conducted in MEDLINE using four different Web-based search engines: Ovid, HealthGate, PubMed, and Internet Grateful Med. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The number of MEDLINE references retrieved for both topics when searched with each of the three key words, "general practice," "family practice," and "family medicine" using each of the four search engines. RESULTS: For each topic, each search yielded very different articles. Some search engines did a better job of matching the term "general practice" to the terms "family medicine" and "family practice," and thus improved retrieval. The problem of language use extends to the variable use of terminology and differences in spelling between British and American English. CONCLUSION: We need to heighten awareness of literature search problems and the potential for duplication of research effort when some of the literature is ignored, and to suggest ways to overcome the deficiencies of the various search engines. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:10660792

  18. ACCESS TO EDUCATION RECORDS Education records at Washington State University are protected and regulated by the Family Educational

    E-print Network

    Collins, Gary S.

    ACCESS TO EDUCATION RECORDS Education records at Washington State University are protected and regulated by the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974. WSU's policy related to this law and its with a legitimate educational interest. Release of specific information from education records must be done

  19. A Study of Problems and Stress of Southeast Asian Students with Accompanying Families at the University of Pittsburgh.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruetrakul, Pimon

    The perceptions of Southeast Asian graduate students at the University of Pittsburgh were explored. The students were asked to elucidate the problems which arose as they and their families adapted to the American experience. Findings are reported in seven categories. They are the following: (1) academic expenses did not cause financial problems…

  20. University of Central Florida Certification of Health Care Provider Form for Employee's Serious Health Condition (Family and Medical Leave Act)

    E-print Network

    Wu, Shin-Tson

    must generally maintain records and documents relating to medical certifications, recertifications, or medical histories of employees created for FMLA purposes as confidential medical records in separate files/records Health Condition (Family and Medical Leave Act) Page 1 of 2 University of Central Florida, Human