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Sample records for family medicine university

  1. BOARD CERTIFIED FAMILY PHYSICIANS The Department of Family Medicine at the University of Vermont College of Medicine and The

    E-print Network

    Hayden, Nancy J.

    BOARD CERTIFIED FAMILY PHYSICIANS The Department of Family Medicine at the University of Vermont College of Medicine and The University of Vermont Medical Center is seeking board certified to applicants who have experience providing family medicine clinical services in an academic setting. Our

  2. Teaching Humanities in Medicine: The University of Massachusetts Family Medicine Residency Program Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silk, Hugh; Shields, Sara

    2012-01-01

    Humanities in medicine (HIM) is an important aspect of medical education intended to help preserve humanism and a focus on patients. At the University of Massachusetts Family Medicine Residency Program, we have been expanding our HIM curriculum for our residents including orientation, home visit reflective writing, didactics and a department-wide…

  3. A university of department of family medicine after ten years.

    PubMed

    Geyman, J P; Phillips, T J

    1982-02-01

    The Department of Family Medicine at the University of Washington was started ten years ago after a major curriculum change in the medical school placed new emphasis on education and training of family physicians for the surrounding region in Washington, Alaska, Montana and Idaho (WAMI). This department has organized active programs in patient care, teaching and research at the university base and in a number of affiliated community sites throughout the region. The department is well accepted within the mission of the medical school. Almost a third of graduating medical students choose postgraduate training in family practice. Almost 90 percent of the graduates of the ten programs within the department's network of family practice residencies are established in active family practices, with more than two thirds settling in the WAMI region. Follow-up studies show that these graduates feel well prepared for their practices; are providing a broad range of services in rural, suburban and urban settings; are typically involved in partnership or group practice; and are generally well satisfied with their personal and professional lives. PMID:7064482

  4. A University Department of Family Medicine After Ten Years

    PubMed Central

    Geyman, John P.; Phillips, Theodore J.

    1982-01-01

    The Department of Family Medicine at the University of Washington was started ten years ago after a major curriculum change in the medical school placed new emphasis on education and training of family physicians for the surrounding region in Washington, Alaska, Montana and Idaho (WAMI). This department has organized active programs in patient care, teaching and research at the university base and in a number of affiliated community sites throughout the region. The department is well accepted within the mission of the medical school. Almost a third of graduating medical students choose postgraduate training in family practice. Almost 90 percent of the graduates of the ten programs within the department's network of family practice residencies are established in active family practices, with more than two thirds settling in the WAMI region. Follow-up studies show that these graduates feel well prepared for their practices; are providing a broad range of services in rural, suburban and urban settings; are typically involved in partnership or group practice; and are generally well satisfied with their personal and professional lives. PMID:7064482

  5. Teaching Humanities in Medicine: The University of Massachusetts Family Medicine Residency Program Experience

    E-print Network

    Silk, Hugh; Shields, Sara

    2012-01-01

    Lancet “Ethics” “Medicine and Art” “Literature andFamily Medicine” essays, creative prose, or poetry, “Ethicsethics, and profiles of prominent persons; poetry, photography, personal essays - http://www.alphaomegaalpha.org/the_pharos.html Pulse--voices from the heart of medicine:

  6. Two Programs for Primary Care Practitioners: Family Medicine Training in an Affiliated University Hospital Program and Primary Care Graduate Training in an Urban Private Medical Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farley, Eugene S.; Piemme, Thomas E.

    1975-01-01

    Eugene Farley describes the University of Rochester and Highland Hospital Family Medicine Program for teaching of primary care internists, primary care pediatricians, and family doctors. Thomas Piemme presents the George Washington University School of Medicine alternative, a 2-year program in an ambulatory setting leading to broad eligibility in…

  7. Rural family medicine training site

    PubMed Central

    Liskowich, Sarah; Walker, Kathryn; Beatty, Nicolas; Kapusta, Peter; McKay, Shari; Ramsden, Vivian R.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To develop a framework for a successful rural family medicine training program and to assess the potential for a rural family medicine residency training program using the Weyburn and Estevan areas of Saskatchewan as test sites. Design A mixed-method design was used; however, the focus of this article was on the qualitative data collected. Questions formulated for the semistructured interviews evolved from the literature. Setting Rural Saskatchewan. Participants Community physicians and representatives from the Sun Country Regional Health Authority, the Saskatchewan Ministry of Health, and the University of Saskatchewan. Methods The data were documented during the interviews using a laptop computer, and the responses were reviewed with participants at the end of their interviews to ensure accuracy. The qualitative data collected were analyzed using inductive thematic analysis. Main findings Through the analysis of the data several themes emerged related to implementing a rural family medicine residency training program. Key predictors of success were physical resources, physician champions, physician teachers, educational support, administrative support, and other specialist support. Barriers to the development of a rural family medicine training site were differing priorities, lack of human resources, and lack of physical resources. Conclusion A project of this magnitude requires many people at different levels collaborating to be successful. PMID:26380856

  8. Family medicine residents’ practice intentions

    PubMed Central

    Grierson, Lawrence E.M.; Fowler, Nancy; Kwan, Matthew Y.W.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To assess residents’ practice intentions since the introduction of the College of Family Physicians of Canada’s Triple C curriculum, which focuses on graduating family physicians who will provide comprehensive care within traditional and newer models of family practice. Design A survey based on Ajzen’s theory of planned behaviour was administered on 2 occasions. Setting McMaster University in Hamilton, Ont. Participants Residents (n = 135) who were enrolled in the Department of Family Medicine Postgraduate Residency Program at McMaster University in July 2012 and July 2013; 54 of the 60 first-year residents who completed the survey in 2012 completed it again in 2013. Main outcome measures The survey was modeled so as to measure the respondents’ intentions to practise with a comprehensive scope; determine the degree to which their attitudes, subjective norms, and perceptions of control about comprehensive practice influence those intentions; and investigate how these relationships change as residents progress through the curriculum. The survey also queried the respondents about their intentions with respect to particular medical services that underpin comprehensive practice. Results The responses indicate that the factors modeled by the theory of planned behaviour survey account for 60% of the variance in the residents’ intentions to adopt a comprehensive scope of practice upon graduation, that there is room for curricular improvement with respect to encouraging residents to practise comprehensive care, and that targeting subjective norms about comprehensive practice might have the greatest influence on improving resident intentions. Conclusion The theory of planned behaviour presents an effective approach to assessing curricular effects on resident practice intentions while also providing meaningful information for guiding further program evaluation efforts in the Department of Family Medicine at McMaster University.

  9. Global Health in Family Medicine Summer Primer

    PubMed Central

    Rouleau, Katherine; Janakiram, Praseedha; Nicolle, Eileen; Godoy-Ruiz, Paula; Pakes, Barry N.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Problem addressed Despite the rapid emergence of global health training across North American universities, there remains a gap in educational programs focusing on the unique role of family medicine and primary care in global health. Objective of program The objective of the Global Health in Family Medicine Summer Primer, developed in 2013 by the Department of Family and Community Medicine at the University of Toronto in Ontario, is to strengthen global health competencies among family medicine residents and faculty. Program description The course covers the meaning of global health; global health ethics; the place of family medicine, primary care, and primary health care in the global health context; epidemiology; infectious diseases; the social determinants of health; and care of vulnerable populations locally and globally. The course is delivered in an intensive 5-day format with didactic lectures, group discussions, interactive workshops, and lived-experience panels. Conclusion The Global Health in Family Medicine Summer Primer has proven to be a successful educational initiative and provides valuable lessons learned for other academic science centres in developing global health training programs for family medicine residents and faculty. PMID:26380854

  10. Family Medicine's Waltz with Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downing, Raymond

    2012-01-01

    Family Medicine first formally confronted systems thinking with the adoption of the biopsychosocial model for understanding disease in a holistic manner; this is a description of a natural system. More recently, Family Medicine has been consciously engaged in developing itself as a system for delivering health care, an artificial system. We make…

  11. Master's and doctoral theses in family medicine and their publication output, Suez Canal University, Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Nour-Eldein, Hebatallah; Mansour, Nadia M.; Abdulmajeed, Abdulmajeed A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The completion of a thesis is a significant requirement for both a Master's and a doctorate degree in general practice/family medicine (GP/FM). A postgraduate thesis is a well-planned, time-intensive activity carried out over several years. The quality of the theses can be judged by the proportion of published papers. Objective: This study aimed to describe Master's and doctoral theses in family medicine and their publications between 1982 and 2014. Materials and Methods: GP/FM degree theses were reviewed at the Faculty of Medicine and central Suez Canal libraries. Several characteristics were extracted from each thesis relating to the main researcher, supervisors, themes, and study methods according to predefined criteria. Publications from the theses were described. Results: Over 33 years, 208 theses were completed by 173 GP/FM researchers. The majority of the theses were for Master's degrees (84.1%). Regarding the study design, most of the degree theses were cross-sectional studies (76.9%). The adult population was targeted in 33.7% of research theses. Nonprobability sampling was used in 51%. Rural communities were the setting of research in 43.8%, and primary health center (PHC)-based studies in 59.1%. The “Patient” category exceeded the other categories (28.4%). Publication from theses started in the second decade of research production. Of the degree theses, 21.6% original articles were published. Only 13.3% of articles from theses were published in PubMed-indexed journals. The researcher was first author in 62.2% of published articles. Conclusion: The production of GP/FM theses and their publications are going to increase. Continuous assessment and planning for GP/FM studies are recommended. PMID:25949959

  12. Family Medicine Specialty in Singapore

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Santosh Lional

    2013-01-01

    Family Medicine in Singapore has its roots in a generalist ethos and found its origin as a counter culture movement to the increasing sub-specialisation of medicine which resulted in a complex healthcare system where that patients are often cared for by multiple specialists potentially resulting in fragmentation of care. The aim of the discipline of Family Medicine was to train and develop more generalist physicians so as to promote holistic care. Family physicians are the largest pool of generalists who are trained to provide general medical care to patients in the context of the person, the family and the community that they live in. PMID:24479066

  13. Decision making in family medicine

    PubMed Central

    Labrecque, Michel; Ratté, Stéphane; Frémont, Pierre; Cauchon, Michel; Ouellet, Jérôme; Hogg, William; McGowan, Jessie; Gagnon, Marie-Pierre; Njoya, Merlin; Légaré, France

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective To compare the ability of users of 2 medical search engines, InfoClinique and the Trip database, to provide correct answers to clinical questions and to explore the perceived effects of the tools on the clinical decision-making process. Design Randomized trial. Setting Three family medicine units of the family medicine program of the Faculty of Medicine at Laval University in Quebec city, Que. Participants Fifteen second-year family medicine residents. Intervention Residents generated 30 structured questions about therapy or preventive treatment (2 questions per resident) based on clinical encounters. Using an Internet platform designed for the trial, each resident answered 20 of these questions (their own 2, plus 18 of the questions formulated by other residents, selected randomly) before and after searching for information with 1 of the 2 search engines. For each question, 5 residents were randomly assigned to begin their search with InfoClinique and 5 with the Trip database. Main outcome measures The ability of residents to provide correct answers to clinical questions using the search engines, as determined by third-party evaluation. After answering each question, participants completed a questionnaire to assess their perception of the engine’s effect on the decision-making process in clinical practice. Results Of 300 possible pairs of answers (1 answer before and 1 after the initial search), 254 (85%) were produced by 14 residents. Of these, 132 (52%) and 122 (48%) pairs of answers concerned questions that had been assigned an initial search with InfoClinique and the Trip database, respectively. Both engines produced an important and similar absolute increase in the proportion of correct answers after searching (26% to 62% for InfoClinique, for an increase of 36%; 24% to 63% for the Trip database, for an increase of 39%; P = .68). For all 30 clinical questions, at least 1 resident produced the correct answer after searching with either search engine. The mean (SD) time of the initial search for each question was 23.5 (7.6) minutes with InfoClinique and 22.3 (7.8) minutes with the Trip database (P = .30). Participants’ perceptions of each engine’s effect on the decision-making process were very positive and similar for both search engines. Conclusion Family medicine residents’ ability to provide correct answers to clinical questions increased dramatically and similarly with the use of both InfoClinique and the Trip database. These tools have strong potential to increase the quality of medical care. PMID:24130286

  14. Occupational medicine: new interface for family medicine?

    PubMed

    Markham, J

    1989-11-01

    Family physicians are naturally concerned with the work effects or causes of their patients' health problems. As occupational risk factors have become better understood, however, a new specialty of occupational medicine has been recognized by the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons in 1984, two years after the Canadian Board of Occupational Medicine started its own certification. Occupational physicians are available to act as an extension of the family doctor's care and can provide trustworthy medical resources in the workplace. The family physician should be aware of some of the games poorly trained or ill-informed personnel managers may play in the workplace if they have no medical consultant to rely on. New human rights legislation has given more opportunities to rehabilitate workers back to their jobs, and occupational physicians and family physicians can achieve a great deal in co-operation as a result. PMID:21248920

  15. Family medicine residents’ barriers to conducting scholarly work

    PubMed Central

    Bammeke, Femi; Liddy, Clare; Hogel, Matthew; Archibald, Douglas; Chaar, Ziad; MacLaren, Robin

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To identify family medicine residents’ barriers to conducting high-quality research for the mandatory family medicine resident scholarly project, as well as to determine possible strategies to encourage research activity among family medicine residents. Design Descriptive study using an online survey. Setting Department of Family Medicine at the University of Ottawa in Ontario. Participants A total of 54 first- and second-year residents. Main outcome measures Family medicine residents’ involvement in research activities, perceived quality of their mandatory scholarly project, intentions for publication and presentation, and attitudes toward potential barriers to and facilitators of conducting high-quality research. Results Of the 54 residents, 20 (37%) reported that their project was of high quality, 6 (11%) intended to publish their findings, and 2 (4%) intended to present their findings. Respondents indicated that the main barriers to conducting high-quality research were lack of time, interest, and scholarly skills. The proposed solutions to increase participation in scholarly work were to allow full research days to be used in half-day increments and to offer a journal club where residents could learn scholarly activities. Conclusion Family medicine residents found several factors to be considerable barriers to completing the required family medicine resident scholarly project. This indicates that there is a need to change the current approach to developing scholarly skills in family medicine. Greater allotment of and flexibility in protected research time and more sessions focused on developing scholarly skills might facilitate scholarly activity among family medicine residents. PMID:26623463

  16. Family medicine 360°: Global exchanges in family medicine

    PubMed Central

    Barata, Ana N.; Rigon, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The global world of the 21st century has created communities and cultures that are interconnected, thanks to the development both in the field of transportation and technology. In this global intercultural community, future physicians, and even more so future general practitioners (GPs)/family physicians (FPs), need to be clinically competent and culturally sensitive and flexible in order to adapt to different social settings while delivering holistic care in multiethnic teams and environments with professionalism. As such, exchange programs are exceptional opportunities for international collaboration and the development of personal and professional competencies of these health care professionals. Materials and Methods: This article presents a review of the literature on the value of exchanges as well as the results of exchange programs with educational content that are aimed at junior GPs/FPs. Results: Exchange programs have been growing in popularity, especially among junior GPs/FPs. Since its launch in 2013, The “Family Medicine 360° (FM360°) program has been receiving up to 163 inquires till date, promoting global cooperation among the World Organization of family Doctors (WONCA)'s Young Doctors’ Movementd (YDMs). Conclusions: By participating in an exchange program, future GPs/FPs are given the chance to experience intercultural communication and peer collaboration. They also develop personal and professional skills and thus, actively contribute to the growth and development of primary care all over the world. PMID:26288763

  17. Family Medicine Research: Implications for Wonca

    PubMed Central

    Bentzen, Niels

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of the article is to illustrate where in the lifelong curriculum of family medicine ought students, trainees, and family physicians learn about research in family medicine. The role of Wonca to promote this endeavor is discussed. I describe the recruitment and training programs for family physicians and state the implication for Wonca to promote family medicine research in the undergraduate curriculum, during residency, and in the graduate study programs for experienced medical doctors. I describe the possible research fields in family medicine and the special methods that can be used to get reliable and valid answers to relevant questions in family medicine. It is time for Wonca to develop a policy for family medicine research by developing a strategy to promote it. This can be done through a Wonca policy statement about family medicine research in the medical curriculum. Wonca can, in collaboration with national colleges, arrange workshops and master classes in research; create scholarships and fellowships for international family medicine researchers; influence journals and international bodies, such as the World Health Organization, governments, and colleges about the necessity of good family medical research; describe ethical guidelines for international primary care research; and create a number of databases for researchers to use. PMID:15655088

  18. Remediation plans in family medicine residency

    PubMed Central

    Audétat, Marie-Claude; Voirol, Christian; Béland, Normand; Fernandez, Nicolas; Sanche, Gilbert

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To assess use of the remediation instrument that has been implemented in training sites at the University of Montreal in Quebec to support faculty in diagnosing and remediating resident academic difficulties, to examine whether and how this particular remediation instrument improves the remediation process, and to determine its effects on the residents’ subsequent rotation assessments. Design A multimethods approach in which data were collected from different sources: remediation plans developed by faculty, program statistics for the corresponding academic years, and students’ academic records and rotation assessment results. Setting Family medicine residency program at the University of Montreal. Participants Family medicine residents in academic difficulty. Main outcome measures Assessment of the content, process, and quality of remediation plans, and students’ academic and rotation assessment results (successful, below expectations, or failure) both before and after the remediation period. Results The framework that was developed for assessing remediation plans was used to analyze 23 plans produced by 10 teaching sites for 21 residents. All plans documented cognitive problems and implemented numerous remediation measures. Although only 48% of the plans were of good quality, implementation of a remediation plan was positively associated with the resident’s success in rotations following the remediation period. Conclusion The use of remediation plans is well embedded in training sites at the University of Montreal. The residents’ difficulties were mainly cognitive in nature, but this generally related to deficits in clinical reasoning rather than knowledge gaps. The reflection and analysis required to produce a remediation plan helps to correct many academic difficulties and normalize the academic career of most residents in difficulty. Further effort is still needed to improve the quality of plans and to support teachers.

  19. Ten most notable family medicine research studies in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Levitt, Cheryl; Katz, Alan; Mang, Eric; Safarov, Artem

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To identify 10 noteworthy Canadian family medicine research studies that have affected practice in order to demonstrate the unique value that Canadian family medicine research offers. Composition of the committee Representatives from the Section of Researchers (SOR) and the Health Policy and Government Relations department of the College of Family Physicians of Canada developed a framework for inclusion and identified an initial list of articles. Members of the SOR Council and research directors from the 17 Canadian departments of family medicine reviewed the preliminary list and suggested additional studies. Methods The authors developed an initial list of studies carried out by Canadian family medicine researchers from those researchers who had received awards from the College of Family Physicians of Canada since 2002. Additional studies were proposed by members of the SOR Council and the university research directors. A total of 36 published articles were reviewed by the SOR authors, and an annotated short list of 16 articles was prepared. From that list, the other authors identified 7 noteworthy studies that were used to form the basis of advocacy materials. The SOR authors, along with 3 additional members of the SOR Executive, used an informal consensus process to select the final 3 articles to arrive at the top 10. Report The top 10 most noteworthy family medicine research studies are presented in this article and represent the unique contribution that Canadian family medicine research brings to health care in Canada. They have helped advance health care quality and improve care delivery, beneficially influencing health care practices, health care policy, and patient experiences. Conclusion This project has identified 10 classic Canadian family medicine research studies that continue to influence practice today. In addition to their usefulness as tools for teaching, advocating, and championing the contribution of research to modern family practice, these studies are important examples of the value of research to patient health in Canada and around the world.

  20. Teaching home care to family medicine residents.

    PubMed Central

    Boillat, M.; Boulet, S.; Poulin de Courval, L.

    1996-01-01

    A growing elderly population suffering from chronic and debilitating diseases, the rising cost of institutional care, and increasing demand from patients for home visits indicate that home care will become a more important part of family physicians' practice in the future. We describe a model for teaching family medicine residents how to provide home services. Images p282-a PMID:9222577

  1. Family medicine residency training and burnout: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Rutherford, Kimberly; Oda, Joanna

    2014-01-01

    Background Almost three-quarters of family practice residents in British Columbia (BC) meet criteria for burnout. We sought to understand how burnout is perceived and experienced by family medicine residents, and to identify both contributory and protective factors for resident burnout. Method Two semi-structured focus groups were conducted with ten family practice residents from five distinct University of British Columbia training sites. Participants completed the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI). The data were analyzed using a thematic analysis approach. Results Seventy percent of the focus group participants met criteria for burnout using the MBI. The experience of burnout was described as physical and emotional exhaustion, loss of motivation, isolation from loved ones, and disillusionment with the medical profession. Contributory factors included high workload, burned-out colleagues, perceived undervaluing of family medicine, lack of autonomy, and inability to achieve work-life balance. Protective factors included strong role models in medicine, feeling that one’s work is valued and rotations in family medicine. Conclusions The high level of burnout in family medicine residents in BC is a multifactorial and complex phenomenon. Training programs and faculty should be aware of burnout risk factors and strive to implement changes to reduce burnout, including allowing residents increased control over scheduling, access to counseling services and training for resident mentors. PMID:26451218

  2. Entrustable Professional Activities in Family Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Shaughnessy, Allen F.; Sparks, Jennifer; Cohen-Osher, Molly; Goodell, Kristen H.; Sawin, Gregory L.; Gravel, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Background The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education Outcome Project intended to move residency education toward assessing and documenting resident competence in 6 dimensions of performance important to the practice of medicine. Although the project defined a set of general attributes of a good physician, it did not define the actual activities that a competent physician performs in practice in the given specialty. These descriptions have been called entrustable professional activities (EPAs). Objective We sought to develop a list of EPAs for ambulatory practice in family medicine to guide curriculum development and resident assessment. Methods We developed an initial list of EPAs over the course of 3 years, and we refined it further by obtaining the opinion of experts using a Delphi Process. The experts participating in this study were recruited from 2 groups of family medicine leaders: organizers and participants in the Preparing the Personal Physician for Practice initiative, and members of the Society of Teachers of Family Medicine Task Force on Competency Assessment. The experts participated in 2 rounds of anonymous, Internet-based surveys. Results A total of 22 experts participated, and 21 experts participated in both rounds of the Delphi Process. The Delphi Process reduced the number of competency areas from 91 to 76 areas, with 3 additional competency areas added in round 1. Conclusions This list of EPAs developed through our Delphi process can be used as a starting point for family medicine residency programs interested in moving toward a competency-based approach to resident education and assessment. PMID:24404237

  3. Generation to Generation: The Heart of Family Medicine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winter, Robin O.

    2012-01-01

    According to the American Board of Family Medicine, "The scope of family medicine encompasses all ages, both sexes, each organ system and every disease entity." What makes the seemingly daunting task of practicing family medicine possible is that family physicians learn to utilize similar clinical reasoning for all of their patients regardless of…

  4. Family Medicine Curriculum Guide to Substance Abuse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liepman, Michael R., Ed.; And Others

    This curriculum guide on substance abuse is intended for teachers of family medicine. Comments, learning objectives, teaching hints, and evaluations of knowledge are provided for each area in all chapters. Chapter 1 focuses on the pharmacology of commonly abused drugs including depressants, opioids, stimulants, hallucinogens, inhalants, and…

  5. Foot Disorders in Family Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Cathcart, L. M.

    1979-01-01

    The foot has been largely ignored in modern practice and teaching. Paramedical disciplines are therefore taking up where physicians leave off. This paper seeks to outline the common conditions which are quickly and easily prevented, diagnosed and treated by family physicians. The major component of all three is an awareness of feet. A removal of the shoes and socks, and a rapid examination will tell us all, for the foot is not a hidden organ. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 4Fig. 7Fig. 9

  6. Family Medicine in Small Communities

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, K.A.

    1987-01-01

    This article is an off-the-cuff commentary on one practice in a city of 40,000 people. This city is in a largely agricultural area. The article stresses the pluses: the continuity of care and the more interesting and variegated nature of family practice here. There are negatives, as well: the more limited social life and the problems relating to employment for one's spouse. Patient confidentiality is more difficult to maintain, as is one's own privacy. Generally it is a busier and more challenging life, which I heartily recommend. PMID:21263786

  7. Organizing Family Medicine Geriatric Care

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, Vonda M.

    1989-01-01

    This article, written from the perceptive of a practising community physician, examines the servies available in the field of geriatric care at the present time. It suggests integration and co-ordination of existing facilities to maximize the current potential. It also considers the economic, geographical, and ethical concerns relating to geriatric care. It is a call for family physicians to co-ordinate their efforts in a multidisciplinary mode to ensure that our elderly are maintained in a comfortable caring atmosphere that encourages their maximum independence. PMID:21248994

  8. Canadian rural family medicine training programs

    PubMed Central

    Krupa, Lisa K.; Chan, Benjamin T.B.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To document the proliferation of rural family medicine residency programs and to note differences in design as they affect rural recruitment. DESIGN Descriptive study using semistructured telephone interviews. SETTING All family medicine residency programs in Canada in 2002. PARTICIPANTS Directors of Canadian family medicine residency programs. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Number of rural training programs and positions; months of rural exposure, degree of remoteness, and specialist support of rural communities within rural training programs. RESULTS The number of rural training programs rose from one in 1973 to 12 in 2002. Most medical schools now offer dedicated rural training streams. From 1989 to 2002, the number of rural residency positions quadrupled from 36 to 144; large jumps in capacity occurred from 1989 to 1991 and then from 1999 to 2001. Rural positions now represent 20% of all family medicine residency positions. Among rural programs, minimum rural exposure ranged from 4 to 12 months, and the median distance between rural training communities and referral sites ranged from 50 to 440 km (median 187 km). Rotations in communities with no hospital were mandatory in five of 12 rural programs, optional in five, and unavailable in two. The proportion of training communities used by rural programs that had family physicians only (ie, no immediate specialty backup) ranged from 0 to 78% (mean 44%). Most training communities (78%) used by rural programs had fewer than 10 000 residents. Four of 12 rural programs offered various specialty medicine rotations in small communities. CONCLUSION Rural residency programs have proliferated in Canada. The percentage of residency positions that are rural now equals the proportion of the general population in Canada living in rural areas. National guidelines for rural programs recommend at least 6 months of rural rotations and at least some training in communities without hospitals. Major variations among programs exist, and most program designs differ from designs recommended in national guidelines in at least one aspect. PMID:16926955

  9. Family Medicine at Corporate Clinics in India: Current Scenario

    PubMed Central

    Bijayraj, R.

    2013-01-01

    Family medicine is undergoing a sudden revival in India. There is significant lack of clarity regarding the opportunities, advantages, and challenges available in family medicine, especially in the private sector. This article is addressed to young doctors aspiring to specialize in family medicine. It is an attempt to shed light on the present scenario of family medicine in the corporate sector in India and make young doctors aware of the prospects in this area.

  10. Teaching the family system concept in family medicine.

    PubMed

    Christie-Seely, J

    1981-09-01

    Teaching the family system concept to physicians is difficult, as it entails a new way of thinking, at odds with the familiar linear medical model that focuses on the individual patient. This conceptual difference and the confusion between working with families in family medicine and family therapy explain the slow or superficial acceptance of family as the unit of care. Five principles have been found to be useful in teaching: (1) specific teaching techniques should take into account previous training and current time constraints; (2) evidence for the relevance of system theory to diagnosis, treatment, and prevention should be evaluated early in the teaching program; (3) clarity of expectations is crucial; (4) emphasis should be on the natural role of the family physician as first-line family advisor and the use of interviewing and observational skills already well developed; and (5) synthesis of the psychosocial and physical aspects of illness will occur naturally if the family physician is the teacher of family system concepts and the role model for their application in practice. PMID:7276849

  11. Home visits in family medicine residency

    PubMed Central

    Jakubovicz, Difat; Srivastava, Anita

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Problem addressed There has been a decline in family physicians providing home visits to housebound patients. Objective of program To increase family medicine residents’ exposure to home visits; their comfort and skills in providing home visits; and their willingness to provide home visits after graduation. Program description Between 2000 and 2010, each family practice resident at St Joseph’s Health Centre Family Medicine Teaching Unit in Toronto, Ont, was assigned at least 1 housebound patient to care for longitudinally over 2 years; the rationale for this was to increase the sense of “ownership” and responsibility among residents for their assigned homebound patients. Starting in 2003, until the program’s conclusion in 2010, residents were asked to fill out surveys before and after the program to assess their comfort with and confidence in providing home visits, as well as their satisfaction with the program. Survey responses were analyzed for changes over the course of residency training. A total of 85 residents completed the home visit teaching program between 2003 and 2010 inclusive. Conclusion While residents’ willingness to provide home visits did not increase over the course of residency, their confidence in making housecalls did increase. There was also a trend toward increased confidence among residents in working with community agencies. Thus, having home visit patients be a part of resident practices might play an important role in increasing the likelihood that future family physicians will continue to care for their patients when those patients are no longer ambulatory. PMID:26052599

  12. Screening for Depression Patients in Family Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Alic, Alma; Pranjic, Nurka; Selmanovic, Senada; Alibasic, Esad; Alic, Fahrudin; Ramic, Enisa; Spahic-Sarajlic, Selvedina

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Goal: The aims are to establish the prevalence of newfound, unidentified cases of depressive disorder by screening with the Becks Depression scale; To establish a comparative relationship with self-identified cases of depression in the patients in the family medicine; To assess the significance of the BDI in screening practice of family medicine. Patients and methods: A prospective study was conducted anonymously by Beck's Depression scale (Beck Depression Questionnaire org.-BDI) and specially created short questionnaire. The study included 250 randomly selected patients (20-60 years), users of services in family medicine in “Dom Zdravlja” Zenica, and the final number of respondents with included in the study was 126 (51 male, 75 female; response or response rate 50.4%). Exclusion factor was previously diagnosed and treated mental disorder. Participation was voluntary and respondents acknowledge the validity of completing the questionnaire. BDI consists of 21 items. Answers to questions about symptoms were ranked according to the Likert type scale responses from 0-4 (from irrelevant to very much). Respondents expressed themselves on personal perception of depression, whether are or not depressed. Results: Depression was observed in 48% of patients compared to 31% in self estimate depression analyzed the questionnaires. The negative trend in the misrecognition of depression is -17% (48:31). Depression was significantly more frequent in unemployed compared to employed respondents (p=0.001). The leading symptom in both sexes is the perception of lost hope (59% of cases). Conclusion: All respondents in family medicine care in Zenica showed a high percentage of newly detected (17%) patients with previously unrecognized depression. BDI is a really simple and effective screening tool for the detection and identification of persons with symptoms of depression. PMID:24783910

  13. Family Medicine Residency Program Directors Attitudes and Knowledge of Family Medicine CAM Competencies

    PubMed Central

    Gardiner, Paula; Filippelli, Amanda C.; Lebensohn, Patricia; Bonakdar, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Context Little is known about the incorporation of integrative medicine (IM) and complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) into family medicine residency programs. Objective The Society for Teachers of Family Medicine (STFM) approved a set of CAM/IM competencies for family medicine residencies. We hope to evaluate with an online survey tool, whether residency programs are implementing such competencies into their curriculum. We also hope to assess the knowledge and attitudes of Residency Directors (RDs) on the CAM/IM competencies. Design A survey was distributed by the CAFM (Council of Academic Family Medicine) Educational Research Alliance to RDs via email. The survey was distributed to 431 RDs. Of those who received it, 212 responded for a response rate of 49.1%. Questions assessed the knowledge and attitudes of CAM/IM competencies and incorporation of CAM/IM into residency curriculum. Results Forty-five percent of RDs were aware of the competencies. In term of RD attitudes, 58% reported that CAM/IM is an important component of residents' curriculum yet, 60% report not having specific learning objectives for CAM/IM in their residency curriculum. Among all programs, barriers to CAM/IM implementation included: time in residents' schedules (77%); faculty training (75%); access to CAM experts (43%); lack of reimbursement (43%), and financial resources (29%). Conclusions While many RDs are aware of the STFM CAM/IM competencies and acknowledge their role in residence education, there are many barriers preventing residencies to implementing the STFM CAM/IM competencies. PMID:24021471

  14. Introduction Engaging Family Medicine Residency Practices in Research

    E-print Network

    Nicholson, Bruce J.

    T Research Topics: · Complementary and Alternative Medicine Use · Patient's Firearm Safety · Diabetes Quality® Introduction Engaging Family Medicine Residency Practices in Research: The Residency ResearchT) is a collaboration of family medicine residency programs that began in 1998, with support from the Health Research

  15. Voices from family medicine: Lynn Carmichael. Interview by William B. Ventres and John J. Frey.

    PubMed

    Carmichael, L

    1992-01-01

    Now that the 25th anniversary of the Society of Teachers of Family Medicine is upon us, educators are likely to look back at the history, which set the stage for family medicine. This is a history replete with reports, politics, and ultimately, the development of family practice training programs. It is a history, as well, made through the labors of individuals. The vantage points we have chosen to examine in this series are those of some of the people who lent their efforts to the founding of family medicine. Common personal needs prompted us to explore these vantage points. Although we are at different points in our professional trajectories--one of us is a recent graduate from residency and fellowship training, the other has many years of experience as a teacher and journal editor--the same themes emerged in our self-explorations. Where do we fit into the family medicine movement? What satisfaction do we get out of our day-to-day routines of practice, teaching, and research? What meaning sustains our activities in the discipline? To help answer these questions, we looked to some of the leaders of family medicine. In this transcript, an abridged and edited version of interviews conducted in April and May of 1991, Lynn Carmichael, MD, discusses his involvement with the founding of family medicine, his perspectives on the importance of family practice, and his thoughts and concerns about the future. Dr. Carmichael is professor and founding chair of the Department of Family Medicine at the University of Miami School of Medicine. He was the first president of the Society of Teachers of Family Medicine, the founding editor of Family Medicine (then Family Medicine Teacher), and the initial recipient of the STFM Certificate of Excellence in 1978. PMID:1544534

  16. University of Alberta Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry

    E-print Network

    MacMillan, Andrew

    University of Alberta Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry Medical Sciences Graduate Program - Shantou ............................................................................................................ 5 Ethics training and approval

  17. Residents' views about family medicine specialty education in Turkey

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Residents are one of the key stakeholders of specialty training. The Turkish Board of Family Medicine wanted to pursue a realistic and structured approach in the design of the specialty training programme. This approach required the development of a needs-based core curriculum built on evidence obtained from residents about their needs for specialty training and their needs in the current infrastructure. The aim of this study was to obtain evidence on residents' opinions and views about Family Medicine specialty training. Methods This is a descriptive, cross-sectional study. The board prepared a questionnaire to investigate residents' views about some aspects of the education programme such as duration and content, to assess the residents' learning needs as well as their need for a training infrastructure. The questionnaire was distributed to the Family Medicine Departments (n = 27) and to the coordinators of Family Medicine residency programmes in state hospitals (n = 11) by e-mail and by personal contact. Results A total of 191 questionnaires were returned. The female/male ratio was 58.6%/41.4%. Nine state hospitals and 10 university departments participated in the study. The response rate was 29%. Forty-five percent of the participants proposed over three years for the residency duration with either extensions of the standard rotation periods in pediatrics and internal medicine or reductions in general surgery. Residents expressed the need for extra rotations (dermatology 61.8%; otolaryngology 58.6%; radiology 52.4%). Fifty-nine percent of the residents deemed a rotation in a private primary care centre necessary, 62.8% in a state primary care centre with a proposed median duration of three months. Forty-seven percent of the participants advocated subspecialties for Family Medicine, especially geriatrics. The residents were open to new educational methods such as debates, training with models, workshops and e-learning. Participation in courses and congresses was considered necessary. The presence of a department office and the clinical competency of the educators were more favored by state residents. Conclusions This study gave the Board the chance to determine the needs of the residents that had not been taken into consideration sufficiently before. The length and the content of the programme will be revised according to the needs of the residents. PMID:20398292

  18. West Virginia University 1 School of Medicine

    E-print Network

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    West Virginia University 1 School of Medicine Degrees Offered · M.D., Doctor of Medicine · M.D. /Ph.D., Joint Doctor of Medicine and Doctor of Philosophy · Ph.D. in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology · Ph.D., Pharmaceutical and Pharmacological Sciences · M.D. /M.P.H., Doctor of Medicine and Master of Public Health · Ph

  19. West Virginia University 1 School of Medicine

    E-print Network

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    West Virginia University 1 School of Medicine Degrees Offered · M.D., Doctor of Medicine · M.D. /Ph.D., Joint Doctor of Medicine and Doctor of Philosophy · Ph.D. in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology · Ph of Physical Therapy · Ph.D., Pharmaceutical and Pharmacological Sciences · M.D. /M.P.H., Doctor of Medicine

  20. The Ohio State University College of Medicine

    E-print Network

    Clark, Bunny

    The Ohio State University College of Medicine Approved by Arts and Sciences Integrative Approaches, and possibilities of integrating Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM), into traditional western approaches of Medicine U 5 (a GEC under Culture and Ideas) and ALLIED MED 607: The Role of Integrative Medicine

  1. West Virginia University 1 School of Medicine

    E-print Network

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    West Virginia University 1 School of Medicine Degrees Offered · M.D., Doctor of Medicine · M.D./Ph.D., Joint Doctor of Medicine and Doctor of Philosophy · Ph.D., in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology · Ph.D., Pharmaceutical and Pharmacological Sciences · M.D./M.P.H., Doctor of Medicine and Master of Public Health · M

  2. West Virginia University 1 School of Medicine

    E-print Network

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    West Virginia University 1 School of Medicine Other Content Degrees Offered · M.D., Doctor of Medicine · M.D. /Ph.D., Joint Doctor of Medicine and Doctor of Philosophy · Ph.D., in Biochemistry of Physical Therapy · Ph.D., Pharmaceutical and Pharmacological Sciences · M.D./M.P.H., Doctor of Medicine

  3. Health Is Primary: Family Medicine for America’s Health

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Robert L.; Pugno, Perry A.; Saultz, John W.; Tuggy, Michael L.; Borkan, Jeffrey M.; Hoekzema, Grant S.; DeVoe, Jennifer E.; Weida, Jane A.; Peterson, Lars E.; Hughes, Lauren S.; Kruse, Jerry E.; Puffer, James C.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE More than a decade ago the American Academy of Family Physicians, American Academy of Family Physicians Foundation, American Board of Family Medicine, Association of Departments of Family Medicine, Association of Family Practice Residency Directors, North American Primary Care Research Group, and Society of Teachers of Family Medicine came together in the Future of Family Medicine (FFM) to launch a series of strategic efforts to “renew the specialty to meet the needs of people and society,” some of which bore important fruit. Family Medicine for America’s Health was launched in 2013 to revisit the role of family medicine in view of these changes and to position family medicine with new strategic and communication plans to create better health, better health care, and lower cost for patients and communities (the Triple Aim). METHODS Family Medicine for America’s Health was preceded and guided by the development of a family physician role definition. A consulting group facilitated systematic strategic plan development over 9 months that included key informant interviews, formal stakeholder surveys, future scenario testing, a retreat for family medicine organizations and stakeholder representatives to review strategy options, further strategy refinement, and finally a formal strategic plan with draft tactics and design for an implementation plan. A second communications consulting group surveyed diverse stakeholders in coordination with strategic planning to develop a communication plan. The American College of Osteopathic Family Physicians joined the effort, and students, residents, and young physicians were included. RESULTS The core strategies identified include working to ensure broad access to sustained, primary care relationships; accountability for increasing primary care value in terms of cost and quality; a commitment to helping reduce health care disparities; moving to comprehensive payment and away from fee-for-service; transformation of training; technology to support effective care; improving research underpinning primary care; and actively engaging patients, policy makers, and payers to develop an understanding of the value of primary care. The communications plan, called Health is Primary, will complement these strategies. Eight family medicine organizations have pledged nearly $20 million and committed representatives to a multiyear implementation team that will coordinate these plans in a much more systematic way than occurred with FFM. CONCLUSIONS Family Medicine for America’s Health is a new commitment by 8 family medicine organizations to strategically align work to improve practice models, payment, technology, workforce and education, and research to support the Triple Aim. It is also a humble invitation to patients and to clinical and policy partners to collaborate in making family medicine even more effective. PMID:25352575

  4. UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH SCHOOL OF MEDICINE

    E-print Network

    Sibille, Etienne

    , Clinical and Translational Science Institute, Institute for Personalized Medicine, and the Heart, LungUNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 2014 ANNUAL REPORT FOUR QUESTIONS EVERY MED SCHOOL SHOULD ANSWER. START NOW. #12;UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 2014 ANNUAL REPORT Four

  5. Exploring and understanding academic leadership in family medicine

    PubMed Central

    Oandasan, Ivy; White, David; Hammond Mobilio, Melanie; Gotlib Conn, Lesley; Feldman, Kymm; Kim, Florence; Rouleau, Katherine; Sorensen, Leslie

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective To explore how family physicians understand the concept of academic leadership. Design Case study. Setting Department of Family and Community Medicine at the University of Toronto in Ontario. Participants Thirty family physician academic leaders. Methods Focus groups and interviews were conducted with family physicians from a large multisite urban university who were identified by peers as academic leaders at various career stages. Transcripts from the focus groups and interviews were anonymized and themes were analyzed and negotiated among 3 researchers. Main findings Participants identified qualities of leadership among academic leaders that align with those identified in the current literature. Despite being identified by others as academic leaders, participants were reluctant to self-identify as such. Participants believed they had taken on early leadership roles by default rather than through planned career development. Conclusion This study affirms the need to define academic leadership explicitly, advance a culture that supports it, and nurture leaders at all levels with a variety of strategies. PMID:23486818

  6. Family Handbook Georgia State University

    E-print Network

    Frantz, Kyle J.

    Family Handbook Georgia State University Child Development Program Lanette L. Suttles Child Development Center Capitol Hill Child Enrichment Center Bright from the Start, Georgia Department of Early Children #12;Revised 5/18/2015 2 Georgia State University Child Development Program This family handbook

  7. The Ohio State University College of Medicine

    E-print Network

    Clark, Bunny

    The Ohio State University College of Medicine Bioethics Minor Center for Bioethics and Medical.bolt@osumc.edu) www.medicine.osu.edu/orgs/bioethics The Bioethics Minor is designed to support and further undergraduate students' learning about the ethical issues surrounding advances in biology and medicine

  8. The Ohio State University College of Medicine

    E-print Network

    Clark, Bunny

    The Ohio State University College of Medicine Integrative Approaches to Health and Wellness Minor 43210 (614) 292-1706 http://medicine.osu.edu/hrsFaculty contact: Crystal Dunlevy, EdD, Crystal, and possibilities of integrating Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) into traditional western approaches

  9. UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA COLLEGE OF MEDICINE

    E-print Network

    Meyers, Steven D.

    UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA COLLEGE OF MEDICINE STRATEGIC PLAN 2010/11 ­ 2014/15 #12;OUR STRATEGIC of Medicine (COM) has accepted that challenge. The College has embarked on an aggressive strategic plan in a collaborative model across all three missions for medicine, nursing, public health, physical therapy, athletic

  10. STANFORD UNIVERSITY MEDICAL CENTER Stanford University School of Medicine

    E-print Network

    Kay, Mark A.

    1 STANFORD UNIVERSITY MEDICAL CENTER Stanford University School of Medicine Stanford Hospital the Stanford University Medical Center ­ the Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford Hospital for appointment to accredited residency programs: A. Graduates of medical schools in the United States and Canada

  11. Family medicine training in sub-Saharan Africa: South–South cooperation in the Primafamed project as strategy for development

    PubMed Central

    Flinkenflögel, Maaike; Essuman, Akye; Chege, Patrick; Ayankogbe, Olayinka; De Maeseneer, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Background. Health-care systems based on primary health care (PHC) are more equitable and cost effective. Family medicine trains medical doctors in comprehensive PHC with knowledge and skills that are needed to increase quality of care. Family medicine is a relatively new specialty in sub-Saharan Africa. Objective. To explore the extent to which the Primafamed South–South cooperative project contributed to the development of family medicine in sub-Saharan Africa. Methods. The Primafamed (Primary Health Care and Family Medicine Education) project worked together with 10 partner universities in sub-Saharan Africa to develop family medicine training programmes over a period of 2.5 years. A SWOT (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats) analysis was done and the training development from 2008 to 2010 in the different partner universities was analysed. Results. During the 2.5 years of the Primafamed project, all partner universities made progress in the development of their family medicine training programmes. The SWOT analysis showed that at both national and international levels, the time is ripe to train medical doctors in family medicine and to integrate the specialty into health-care systems, although many barriers, including little awareness, lack of funding, low support from other specialists and reserved support from policymakers, are still present. Conclusions. Family medicine can play an important role in health-care systems in sub-Saharan Africa; however, developing a new discipline is challenging. Advocacy, local ownership, action research and support from governments are necessary to develop family medicine and increase its impact. The Primafamed project showed that development of sustainable family medicine training programmes is a feasible but slow process. The South–South cooperation between the ten partners and the South African departments of family medicine strengthened confidence at both national and international levels. PMID:24857843

  12. Test ordering for preventive health care among family medicine residents

    PubMed Central

    Fung, Daisy; Schabort, Inge; MacLean, Catherine A.; Asrar, Farhan M.; Khory, Ayesha; Vandermeer, Ben; Allan, G. Michael

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To determine which screening tests family medicine residents order as part of preventive health care. Design A cross-sectional survey. Setting Alberta and Ontario. Participants First- and second-year family medicine residents at the University of Alberta in Edmonton, the University of Calgary in Alberta, and McMaster University in Hamilton, Ont, during the 2011 to 2012 academic year. Main outcome measures Demographic information, Likert scale ratings assessing ordering attitudes, and selections from a list of 38 possible tests that could be ordered for preventive health care for sample 38-year-old and 55-year-old female and male patients. Descriptive and comparative statistics were calculated. Results A total of 318 of 482 residents (66%) completed the survey. Recommended or appropriate tests were ordered by 82% (for cervical cytology) to 95% (for fasting glucose measurement) of residents. Across the different sample patients, residents ordered an average of 3.3 to 5.7 inappropriate tests per patient, with 58% to 92% ordering at least 1 inappropriate test per patient. The estimated average excess costs varied from $38.39 for the 38-year-old man to $106.46 for the 55-year-old woman. More regular use of a periodic health examination screening template did not improve ordering (P = .88). Conclusion In general, residents ordered appropriate preventive health tests reasonably well but also ordered an average of 3.3 to 5.7 inappropriate tests for each patient. Training programs need to provide better education for trainees around inappropriate screening and work hard to establish good ordering behaviour in preparation for entering practice. PMID:25767171

  13. Complementary and Alternative Medicine: Core Competencies for Family Nurse Practitioners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burman, Mary E.

    2003-01-01

    Directors of family nurse practitioner education programs (n=141) reported inclusion of some complementary/alternative medicine content (CAM), most commonly interviewing patients about CAM, critical thinking, evidence-based medicine, laws, ethics, and spiritual/cultural beliefs. Definition of CAM was medically, not holistically based. More faculty…

  14. Pharmacology Posi.ons at Tulane University School of Medicine

    E-print Network

    Pillow, Jonathan

    Pharmacology Posi.ons at Tulane University School of Medicine The Department of Pharmacology at Tulane University School of Medicine is currently recrui;ng faculty of Pharmacology, Tulane University School of Medicine, 1430 Tulane Avenue SL 83, New

  15. Department of Anatomy & Neurobiology Boston University School of Medicine

    E-print Network

    Spence, Harlan Ernest

    Department of Anatomy & Neurobiology Boston University School of Medicine Ph.D. Program Boston University School of Medicine Doctor of Philosophy in Anatomy & Neurobiology #12; Department of Anatomy & Neurobiology Boston University School of Medicine Ph.D. Program Guidelines Revised

  16. Geriatric training in family medicine: the natural history of a developing program.

    PubMed

    Moore, J T; Kane, W J

    1979-01-01

    During the past three years, the Duke-Watts Family Medicine Program and the Duke University Center for the Study of Aging and Human Development have developed training in geriatric medicine as an integral part of the family medicine residency program. This paper traces the following steps in the development of this program: a survey of resident and faculty interest, institution of a conference series, identification of potential training sites, development of elective rotations, and use of consultants. Principles found helpful in establishing training in geriatrics for family medicine residents include the following: involve residents in planning, start with modest goals, make the program relevant and practical, build on local strengths, include other health care professional trainees, and use ambulatory, acute hospital, and long-term care sites in the training rpogram. PMID:759552

  17. A Family Practice Residency Selective in Community-University Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seller, Robert H.; Bissonette, Raymond

    1979-01-01

    Residents in family practice sponsored by the State University of New York at Buffalo School of Medicine and Deaconess Hospital select a rotation to fulfill a community-university service requirement. The program was designed to involve residents in giving health care in Buffalo and western New York, where there is a physician shortage. (JMD)

  18. Where I Practice: On the Spaces of Family Medicine.

    PubMed

    Ventres, William B

    2015-01-01

    In this essay, the author explores 3 distinct "spaces" that have helped him metaphorically map the nature of his work as a family physician. These "spaces" represent cultural, personal, and relational environments in which he has practiced over the course of >30 years since beginning medical school. They concern, respectively, the dominant culture of medicine, one core philosophy of family medicine (the biopsychosocialexistential model), and the development of strong therapeutic bonds with patients. The author presents this textual and graphic exploration of "space" in hopes that others might reflect on their work, examine how they approach it, and bring richness and renewed meaning to their work as family physicians. PMID:26546663

  19. COLLEGE OF MEDICINE University of Central Florida

    E-print Network

    Wu, Shin-Tson

    COLLEGE OF MEDICINE University of Central Florida POLICY ON STUDENT SURVEYS The purpose will not be used for publication outside the College of Medicine. Procedures: 1. Research Surveys: a. May be initiated by students or faculty of the college (outside entities must first seek written approval from

  20. Parents Studying Medicine – the dichotomy of studying with a family

    PubMed Central

    Iden, Kirstin; Nürnberger, Frank; Sader, Robert; Dittrich, Winand

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: In this article the personal study and life situation of parents who are also medical students at the Medical School of the Goethe University Frankfurt am Main is discussed. There is a special focus on the topics “studying with children” and “family-friendly university”, which have been present in discussions about university development and in the daily life of academics, especially during the last decade. The workgroup “Individual Student Services” at the medical faculty at the Goethe University tries to meet the necessities of the individual study courses and to support the study success with a new counselling and student service concept. Methods: The experience of parents studying medicine was recorded in semi-structured interviews (Date: April 2010), which were held as part of the sponsored pilot project on part-time medical studies (“Pilot Project Part-time Medical Studies”). Additionally, study results from the Medical School of the Goethe University Frankfurt am Main were integrated as well as a literature analysis. Results: It was found that the teaching demands and support services, which have been suggested and needed for years now, have been partially implemented and are without sufficient support at the faculty level to date. Thus the current situation of medical students with children is still difficult and seems a big challenge for everyone involved. Solution: As part of the “Individual Student Services” a new pilot project on part-time medical studies was established in November 2009. Only the use of new, unconventional and innovative ideas allows universities to adequately support the changing and heterogeneous student population and support them to successfully completing their medical studies. PMID:22558026

  1. Department of Anatomy & Neurobiology Boston University School of Medicine

    E-print Network

    Spence, Harlan Ernest

    Department of Anatomy & Neurobiology Boston University School of Medicine Masters Program of Medicine Vesalius Program Master of Science in Anatomy & Neurobiology #12;Department of Anatomy & Neurobiology Boston University School of Medicine Masters Program Guidelines Revised Summer 2015 2

  2. Medicines in the correspondence of the Mozart family.

    PubMed

    Nieznanowska, J

    2001-12-01

    The most famous members of the Mozart family were musicians - not physicians. In spite of that, the family correspondence of the Mozarts contains much noteworthy information on 18th century medicine. It comes mainly from Leopold, the famous composer's father, which is why the vast majority of the medical data presented in the letters cannot be found in the popular editions of the correspondence. One of the medicine-related subjects usually omitted or presented briefly in such editions concerns the medicaments used in the Mozart family. Out of more than 100 remedies mentioned in the correspondence the article's author chose and described a few that seem to have played a particularly significant role in the life of the Mozart family. PMID:11958225

  3. Family medicine in Croatia: past, present, and forthcoming challenges.

    PubMed

    Kati?, Milica; Juresa, Vesna; Oreskovi?, Stjepan

    2004-10-01

    The aim of this paper is to present the effects of the reform of primary care by privatization and direct contracting between general practitioners/family physicians and the Croatian Institute for Health Insurance, as well as to propose possible improvements. Using the data of the Croatian Institute of Public Health, we analyzed the coverage of population and accessibility of service, management of chronic illnesses, home visits, and preventive check-ups in the family medicine service. In 2001, 2,408 (30.8% vocationally trained) doctors worked in the family medicine service, taking care of 3.759,248 (84.7%) registered inhabitants of Croatia. There was an average of 6 office encounters, 0.1 home visits, 0.05 preventive check-ups and 1.4 referrals per patient per year. Within the Project of Health System Reform a working group of primary care experts proposed the following improvements: 1) the family medicine service should be organized in accordance with the fundamental principles of accessibility, continuity, and integrated care; and 2) a multilayered financing model should be used, containing a capitation fee payment, fee for service payment, and specific program payment. Taking into account the European Union recommendation, a project aimed at ensuring the specialization of family medicine for all doctors working in the family medicine service was started in 2003. This study indicates that there is a gap between proclaimed health system improvements and effects of the reform of primary care. In order to achieve evidence-based health policy, concerted action of all participants in the decision-making process is needed. PMID:15495277

  4. Finding, keeping, and revitalizing the meaning in family medicine.

    PubMed

    Van Dyke, Anne; Seger, Amy M

    2013-01-01

    The culture of medicine is undergoing revolutionary change. Physicians are pulled in many directions involving the practice of medicine, the business of medicine, and the technology of medicine. Financial incentives and career promotions may be dependent upon such things as patient satisfaction scores, as well as adherence to guidelines for admissions and diagnostic testing. Of course, these metrics are monitored closely by hospitals, insurance companies, and the federal government. The resultant seemingly endless paperwork, deadlines, and multiple demands may result in a sense of time famine for physicians. Unfortunately, these expectations and demands can subsequently diminish the passion for medicine. Moreover, physicians are at high risk for significant physical and emotional exhaustion, often leading to a sense of demoralization. Physicians can ultimately lose sight of their reasons for choosing the field of medicine. Indeed, they can lose the inspiration and "meaning" derived from work in medicine all together. How, then, does one buffer oneself against such perils, and maintain the original passion and meaning in a chosen career of service to others? This article will describe one program's approach to promoting resilience and maintaining meaning during the residency training years through the establishment of a Meaning in Family Medicine Group. The conceptual background, approach to curriculum development, goals and objectives, resident feedback, and suggestions about how to carry this curriculum beyond the residency training years will be discussed. PMID:24261266

  5. Extended Educational Sessions at Three Family Medicine Residency Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zweifler, John; And Others

    1996-01-01

    The experiences of three family medicine residency programs in developing and implementing half- to full-day teaching sessions are described. Each program has multiple training locations, including rural sites, and releases residents from clinical duties for sessions on behavior issues, procedures, training, and other topics. Program success…

  6. Meeting the challenge of evidence-based medicine in the family medicine clerkship: closing the loop from academics to office.

    PubMed

    Cavanaugh, Susan K; Calabretta, Nancy

    2013-01-01

    An EBM Seminar and POEM® project was developed to teach evidence-based medicine in a family medicine clerkship. The seminar focused on the application of preclinical coursework in biostatistics and epidemiology to the clinical third year. POEM projects involved answering clinical questions, derived from patient cases in the family medicine offices, with best available evidence. These questions and answers were archived in a wiki which was made available to the institution's family medicine physicians. Selected POEMs were also published in the in-house family medicine newsletter. The POEM projects evolved from an educational exercise for medical students to a valuable repository of evidence for clinicians. PMID:23607466

  7. south carolina medicineUniversity of South Carolina School of Medicine

    E-print Network

    Griggs, Jerrold R.

    south carolina medicineUniversity of South Carolina School of Medicine SUMMER 2015 Dr. John Eberth to identify a dean to lead the University of South Carolina School of Medicine. The committee tapped South challenging early years. In this issue of South Carolina Medicine magazine, we pay tribute to Dean Macdonald

  8. CHEM 4170, Medicinal Chemistry University of Missouri

    E-print Network

    Gates, Kent. S.

    CHEM 4170, Medicinal Chemistry University of Missouri Computer Graphics Visualization of Proteins and Protein-Ligand Complexes Derrick Seiner and Kent S. Gates 1. Introduction. Drugs typically bind to concave forces between functional groups on the surface of the drug and functional groups on the surface

  9. UNIVERSITY OF OTTAWA Faculty of Medicine

    E-print Network

    Xia, Xuhua

    451 Smyth Road Ottawa, ON K1H 8M5 Pharmacy/Pharmacology The Faculty of Medicine at the University of pharmacy/pharmacology research, and in particular: · Pharmacokinetics; · Pharmacodynamics; · Pharmaceutics-562-5452 Skills requirements: - Education: PhD or MD/PhD in pharmacy, pharmacology or a relevant field. - Work

  10. E-Learning Readiness in Medicine: Turkish Family Medicine (FM) Physicians Case

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parlakkiliç, Alaattin

    2015-01-01

    This research investigates e-learning readiness level of family medicine physicians (FM) in Turkey. The study measures the level of e-learning readiness of Turkish FM physicians by an online e-learning readiness survey. According to results five areas are ready at Turkish FM physicians but need a few improvements:…

  11. University of Utah School of Medicine Continuing Medical Education

    E-print Network

    Tipple, Brett

    University of Utah School of Medicine Continuing Medical Education 50 North Medical Drive Salt Lake of Utah School of Medicine Sponsored by University of Utah School of Medicine Office of Continuing Medical of Geriatrics & Gerontology University of Wisconsin-Madison Medical School Barbara Bates-Jensen, PhD, RN, CWOCN

  12. The Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University

    E-print Network

    Emmons, Scott

    The Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University EMERGENCY PROCEDURES MANUAL Prepared Resources Security Revised ­ October, 2014 #12;ALBERT EINSTEIN COLLEGE of MEDICINE of YESHIVA UNIVERSITY............................................................................................................................. 44 #12;ALBERT EINSTEIN COLLEGE of MEDICINE of YESHIVA UNIVERSITY EMERGENCY PROCEDURES MANUAL CIVIL

  13. November 2014 WAYNE STATE UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF MEDICINE

    E-print Network

    Berdichevsky, Victor

    UNIFIED STRATEGIC PLAN November 2014 #12;2 WAYNE STATE UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF MEDICINE In 2012,Valerie M. Parisi, M.D., M.P.H., M.B.A., dean of the Wayne State University School of Medicine, asked. (The specific objectives by which the Wayne State University School of Medicine will enact

  14. Clinical content of the WAMI community clerkship in family medicine.

    PubMed

    Phillips, W R; Rosenblatt, R A; Gordon, M J; Fletcher, R M

    1982-08-01

    Student experience with diagnostic encounters and clinical procedures was documented in the WAMI Program's Community Clerkship in Family Medicine from 1974 to 1978. This six-week senior clerkship was completed by 234 students and taught in six family practicees across the four-state WAMI (Washington, Alaska, Montana, Idaho) region. Students encountered a mean of 83 diagnostic problems and 22 procedures weekly. The average student saw 56 percent of the diagnoses common in family practic and performed 26 percent of the common procedures. The mean level of student responsibility (self-rated with 3 = independent management, 2 = assisted, and 1 = observed) was 2.7 for diagnostic encounters and 2.4 for procedures and increased over the four years. Despite the wide geographic separation and diversity of teaching sites, few differences were observed among the sites; this suggests that a community-based family medicine clerkship can be taught in a widely scattered network of rural teaching practices with uniformity of clinical content and educational quality. PMID:7097735

  15. Interdisciplinary, interinstitutional and international collaboration of family medicine researchers in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yi-Hsuan; Tseng, Yen-Han; Chang, Hsiao-Ting; Lin, Ming-Hwai; Tseng, Yen-Chiang; Hwang, Shinn-Jang

    2015-01-01

    The family medicine researches flourished worldwide in the past decade. However, the collaborative patterns of family medicine publications had not been reported. Our study analyzed the collaborative activity of family medicine researchers in Taiwan. We focused on the types of collaboration among disciplines, institutions and countries. We searched “family medicine” AND “Taiwan” in address field from Web of Science and documented the disciplines, institutions and countries of all authors. We analyzed the collaborative patterns of family medicine researchers in Taiwan from 2010 to 2014. The journal’s impact factor of each article in the same publication year was also retrieved. Among 1,217 articles from 2010 to 2014, interdisciplinary collaboration existed in 1,185 (97.3%) articles, interinstitutional in 1,012 (83.2%) and international in 142 (11.7%). Public health was the most common collaborative discipline. All international researches were also interdisciplinary and interinstitutional. The United States (75 articles), the United Kingdom (21) and the People’s Republic of China (20) were the top three countries with which family medicine researchers in Taiwan had collaborated. We found a high degree of interdisciplinary and interinstitutional collaboration of family medicine researches in Taiwan. However, the collaboration of family medicine researchers in Taiwan with family medicine colleagues of other domestic or foreign institutions was insufficient. The future direction of family medicine studies could focus on the promotion of communication among family medicine researchers. PMID:26500827

  16. Designing and implementing a resiliency program for family medicine residents.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Julie; McGrady, Angele

    2015-01-01

    Family medicine residents are at risk for burnout due to extended work hours, lack of control over their work schedule, and challenging work situations and environments. Building resiliency can prevent burnout and may improve a resident's quality of life and health behavior. This report describes a program designed to build resiliency, the ability to bounce back from stress, in family medicine residents in a medium sized U.S. residency training program. Interactive sessions emphasized building self-awareness, coping skills, strengths and meaning in work, time management, self-care, and connections in and outside of medicine to support resident well-being. System changes which fostered wellness were also implemented. These changes included increasing the availability of fresh fruits in the conference and call room, purchasing an elliptical exercise machine for the on call room, and offering a few minutes of mindfulness meditation daily to the inpatient residents. Results to date show excellent acceptance of the program by trainees, increased consumption of nutritious foods, more personal exercise, and self-reported decreased overreactions to stress. Resiliency programs can effectively serve to meet accreditation requirements while fostering residents' abilities to balance personal and professional demands. PMID:26130769

  17. Keeping family physicians in rural practice. Solutions favoured by rural physicians and family medicine residents.

    PubMed Central

    Rourke, James T. B.; Incitti, Filomena; Rourke, Leslie L.; Kennard, MaryAnn

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine how family medicine residents and practising rural physicians rate possible solutions for recruiting and sustaining physicians in rural practice. DESIGN: Cross-sectional mailed survey. SETTING: Rural family practices and family medicine residency programs in Ontario. PARTICIPANTS: Two hundred seventy-six physicians and 210 residents. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Ratings of proposed solutions on a 4-point scale from "very unimportant" to "very important". RESULTS: Rural family physicians rated funding for learner-driven continuing medical education (CME) and limiting on-call duty to 1 night in 5 as the most important education and practice solutions, respectively. Residents rated an alternate payment plan to include time off for attending and teaching CME and comprehensive payment plans with a guaranteed income for locums as the most important education and practice solutions, respectively. CONCLUSION: Residents and physicians rated solutions very similarly. A comprehensive package of the highest-rated solutions could help recruit and sustain physicians in rural practice because the solutions were developed by experts on rural practice and rated by family medicine residents and practising rural physicians. PMID:14526866

  18. Why Family Medicine is a Good Career Choice for Indian Medical Graduates?

    PubMed

    Kumar, Raman

    2014-01-01

    Internationally family medicine has evolved as an independent academic discipline of medical science and speciality vocational training for community based primary care physicians. India has a long tradition of family practice however due to various regulatory barriers family medicine did not optimally develop in mainstream medical education system for many decades. Recently, there is growing interest in this concept in India and family medicine is emerging as a viable career option for medical graduates in India. PMID:24791226

  19. Does the presence of learners affect family medicine obstetric outcomes?

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, Jo-Anne

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To compare patient outcomes and complications before and after involvement of family medicine residents in intrapartum care. Design Secondary data analysis. Setting London, Ont. Participants Obstetric patients of a family physician with a special interest in obstetrics. Main outcome measures Total number of births attended and births missed, as well as rates of inductions, augmentations for dystocia, augmentations for prelabour ruptured membranes, types of births (ie, normal vaginal, vacuum-assisted, low and outlet forceps deliveries; cesarean sections; and obstetrician-assisted vaginal births), and perineal outcomes (ie, intact; first-, second-, third-, or fourth-degree tears; episiotomies; and episiotomies with third-or fourth-degree extensions). Results During the period of time when family medicine residents were involved in intrapartum care, women sustained slightly more second-degree tears, and more cesarean sections were performed. Fewer women had vacuum-assisted births or unmedicated births. There were no significant differences in rates of normal vaginal births, low and outlet forceps deliveries, and perineal trauma (other than second-degree tears) including episiotomies. Conclusion Women experienced slightly more second-degree tears when residents were involved in their deliveries. The increased number of second-degree tears might be because of residents’ limited experience in providing intrapartum care. More important, there was no increase in other serious perineal trauma or episiotomy when residents provided supervised intrapartum care. This should reassure women and family practice obstetricians who choose to receive and provide obstetric care in a family practice teaching unit. The increase in rates of epidural use and cesarean sections and the decrease in rates of vacuum-assisted births reflect obstetric trends in Canada over the past decade.

  20. Incorporating patient and family preferences into evidence-based medicine

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Clinicians are encouraged to practice evidence-based medicine (EBM) as well as patient-centered medicine. At times, these paradigms seem to be mutually exclusive and difficult to reconcile. It can become even more challenging when trying to include the preferences of the patient’s family members. This paper discusses the basis for this quandary, providing examples of the real-world impact it has on diagnosis-seeking and treatment decision-making behaviors and how it might inform implementation of EBM practices. Analysis To further explore the role of friends and family in health-care decision making and to understand how patients and families introduce other considerations that may or may not be congruent with a strictly EBM approach, data from two research studies that examined healthcare–seeking behaviors are presented. Both studies explore how family and friends not only can influence health-care decisions but also may be a source of conflict for the patient and/or clinician. Conclusions Illness is a biological and social process. Clinicians who engage in EBM need to acknowledge the social and cultural factors that affect the health-care encounter, understand the important role of those factors in health-care decision making, and expand the paradigm of EBM to incorporate sociocultural influences more explicitly. Moreover, recognition of the influences family members and other caregivers have within the clinical encounter—by offering opinions and participating in treatment-related decision making—is needed and could lead to more efficient and effective health care. PMID:24565268

  1. Profile of Diseases Prevalent in a Tribal Locality in Jharkhand, India: A Family Medicine Practitioner's Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sumit

    2015-01-01

    Background: Majority of Indian population is dependent on general practitioners (GPs) for medical services at primary care level in India. They are most preferred and considered to be first contact person for medical services at primary care level. But advances in medical science has put more emphasis on specialist culture and average Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery (MBBS) graduates who are working as general physician are gradually feeling themselves less competent because they are less exposed to latest advances in treatment of diseases. Amidst such scenario, Christian Medical College (CMC) has come up with an idea: “The refer less and resolve more initiative”. It has started a decentralized 2-year family medicine distance diploma course (Postgraduate Diploma in Family Medicine (PGDFM)) now accredited by Dr. MGR Medical University, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, that trains the GPs to become family medicine specialist. Materials and Methods: As component of PGDFM course, this study was conducted to provide better understanding of prevalent ailments and common treatment provided by the GPs in the community at present giving key insight of current practice in rural area by a registered family medicine practitioner. Results: As part of study, among 500 patients evaluated, three most common diagnosis were upper respiratory infections (URIs; 18%), acute gastroenteritis including water-borne diseases (15.8%), and anemia (10.4%). Treatment given to these patients comprised of mostly of antipyretic, analgesic, and antimicrobial agents. Most common drug prescribed was paracetamol for fever. Other common drugs prescribed were amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, chloroquine, artemisin derivative, doxycycline, co-trimoxazole, miltefosine, cephalexin, ceftriaxone sodium, cefixime, oral rehydration salts, ranitidine, omeprazole, pantoprazole, metronidazole, albendazole, ondansetron, diclofenac sodium, piroxicam, ibuprofen, diphenhydramine, codeine-sulfate, amlodipine, ramipril, hydrochlorothiazide, atenolol, salbutamol, etophyline, metformin, glimepiride, fluoxetine, flavoxate, tamsulosin, iron-folic acid, etc. The fact that three or more drugs are given in most of the prescriptions, can be justified due to multiple morbidity and the severity of disease than to irresponsible prescribing. PMID:25811000

  2. Teaching Medical Students About Disability in Family Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Catherine Leigh; Brown, Rachel S.; Zhen, Huiling; McDermott, Suzanne

    2015-01-01

    We investigated whether a unique didactic focusing on delivering health care to patients with disabilities (PWDs) impacts medical students’ knowledge of specific disabilities and related concerns, attitudes about barriers to this populations’ health care, and behavior during typical primary care visits with PWDs. A 90-minute session for students during their third-year family medicine clerkship addressed clinical considerations for patients with mobility and cognitive impairments. Questionnaires were administered to students at the beginning and completion of the clerkship. Analyses of 71 matched questionnaires reveal that knowledge and attitudes were positively impacted. PMID:19724936

  3. University of Maryland Medical System and School of Medicine

    E-print Network

    Weber, David J.

    University of Maryland Medical System and School of Medicine The Power of Partnership HEALTH Medical System Highlights 50 School of Medicine Financial Report 51 Medical System Financial Report 52 Marylanders. University of Maryland Medical System and School of Medicine The Power of Partnership 2014ANNUAL

  4. University of Connecticut School of Dental Medicine Space Policy

    E-print Network

    Kim, Duck O.

    University of Connecticut School of Dental Medicine Space Policy Introduction Space, whether and its School of Dental Medicine (SDM). The University of Connecticut Health Center Space Management of Connecticut School of Dental Medicine Space Policy is: 1) to develop simple measures of the need for space

  5. UNIVERSITY OF MIAMI LEONARD M. MILLER SCHOOL OF MEDICINE

    E-print Network

    Shyu, Mei-Ling

    UNIVERSITY OF MIAMI LEONARD M. MILLER SCHOOL OF MEDICINE CODE OF HONORABLE AND PROFESSIONAL CONDUCT AFFIRMATION The students of the University of Miami Leonard M. Miller School of Medicine, in recognition of the fact that the practice of medicine requires not only scientific knowledge and a mastery of technology

  6. The Transplant Patient and Transplant Medicine in Family Practice

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Lloyd D.

    2014-01-01

    Over the last two decades in particular there has been a remarkable increase in the number of solid organ transplants being performed worldwide alongside improvements in long-term survival rates. However, the infrastructure at transplant centres has been unable to keep pace with the current volume of the transplant patient work load. These pressures on transplant specialist centres has led to calls for an increased role of the general practitioner (GP) managing particular aspects of transplant patients’ medical care. Indeed, many aspects of follow-up care such as screening for malignancies, preventing infection through immunisation programmes, and managing cardiovascular risk factors are already important aspects of family practice medicine. This paper aims to review some of the aspects of transplant patient care that is important for healthcare workers in family practice to manage. PMID:25657941

  7. Interprofessional primary care in academic family medicine clinics

    PubMed Central

    Drummond, Neil; Abbott, Karen; Williamson, Tyler; Somji, Behnaz

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objective To explore the status and processes of interprofessional work environments and the implications for interprofessional education in a sample of family medicine teaching clinics. Design Focus group interviews using a purposive sampling procedure. Setting Four academic family medicine clinics in Alberta. Participants Seven family physicians, 9 registered nurses, 5 licensed practical nurses, 2 residents, 1 psychologist, 1 informatics specialist, 1 pharmacist, 1 dietitian, 1 nurse practitioner, 1 receptionist, and 1 respiratory therapist. Methods Assessment of clinic status and performance in relation to established principles of interprofessional work and education was explored using semistructured focus group interviews. Main findings Our data supported the D’Amour and Oandasan model of successful interprofessional collaborative practice in terms of the model’s main “factors” (ie, shared goals and vision, sense of belonging, governance, and the structuring of clinical care) and their constituent “elements.” It is reasonable to conclude that the extent to which these factors and elements are both present and positively oriented in academic clinic settings is an important contributory factor to the establishment of interprofessional collaborative practice in primary care. Using this model, 2 of the 4 clinics were rated as expressing substantial progress in relation to interprofessional work, while the other 2 clinics were rated as less successful on that dimension. None of the clinics was identified as having a clear and explicit focus on providing interprofessional education. Conclusion The key factor in relation to the implementation of interprofessional work in primary care appears to be the existence of clear and explicit leadership in that direction. Substantial scope exists for improvement in the organization, conduct, and promotion of interprofessional education for Canadian primary care. PMID:22893347

  8. Are family medicine residents adequately trained to deliver palliative care?

    PubMed Central

    Mahtani, Ramona; Kurahashi, Allison M.; Buchman, Sandy; Webster, Fiona; Husain, Amna; Goldman, Russell

    2015-01-01

    Objective To explore educational factors that influence family medicine residents’ (FMRs’) intentions to offer palliative care and palliative care home visits to patients. Design Qualitative descriptive study. Setting A Canadian, urban, specialized palliative care centre. Participants First-year (n = 9) and second-year (n = 6) FMRs. Methods Semistructured interviews were conducted with FMRs following a 4-week palliative care rotation. Questions focused on participant experiences during the rotation and perceptions about their roles as family physicians in the delivery of palliative care and home visits. Participant responses were analyzed to summarize and interpret patterns related to their educational experience during their rotation. Main findings Four interrelated themes were identified that described this experience: foundational skill development owing to training in a specialized setting; additional need for education and support; unaddressed gaps in pragmatic skills; and uncertainty about family physicians’ role in palliative care. Conclusion Residents described experiences that both supported and inadvertently discouraged them from considering future engagement in palliative care. Reassuringly, residents were also able to underscore opportunities for improvement in palliative care education.

  9. Career advising in family medicine: a theoretical framework for structuring the medical student/faculty advisor interview

    PubMed Central

    Bradner, Melissa; Crossman, Steven H.; Vanderbilt, Allison A.; Gary, Judy; Munson, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Background There are unique challenges to recruiting students into the specialty of family medicine within academic medical centers. Methods At Virginia Commonwealth University, we developed an advising framework to help students address institutional and personal obstacles to choosing family medicine as a career. Results The role of a faculty advisor is not to direct the student to a career choice but rather to foster a mentor relationship and help the student come to his or her own realizations regarding career choice. The faculty advisor/medical student interview is conceptualized as five discussion topics: self-knowledge, perception, organizational voice, cognitive dissonance, and anticipatory counseling. Conclusion This framework is intended to assist faculty in their efforts to encourage students to consider a career in family medicine. PMID:23948497

  10. Space Planning & Operations University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

    E-print Network

    Bushman, Frederic

    Space Planning & Operations University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine Policy & Procedure: Event in School of Medicine (SOM) spaces. Events include classes, seminars, conferences, symposia, lectures and use of Public Spaces or the School of Medicine Faculty Lounge. Please refer to SPO's Policies

  11. Space Planning & Operations University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

    E-print Network

    Bushman, Frederic

    Space Planning & Operations University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine Policy & Procedure: Move Description: Move services within the School of Medicine are scheduled by Space Planning & Operations services. Scope: This policy applies to all School of Medicine faculty, staff and students occupying space

  12. University of Minnesota Academic Health Center Complementary and Alternative Medicine

    E-print Network

    Thomas, David D.

    University of Minnesota Academic Health Center Complementary and Alternative Medicine Survey and alternative medicine (CAM) or integrative health care. As stated in a recent NIH document, "CAM practices and Alternative Medicine. Our Academic Health Center (AHC) is the recipient of a NIH CAM education grant. We need

  13. University of Oxford WELLCOME UNIT FOR THE HISTORY OF MEDICINE

    E-print Network

    Wallace, Mark

    University of Oxford WELLCOME UNIT FOR THE HISTORY OF MEDICINE 45-47 BANBURY ROAD, OXFORD, OX2 6PE Banbury Road on Mondays at 2.15pm Coffee will be available from 2.00pm `Medicine, Leisure and the Arts' 1 Smith elise.smith@wuhmo.ox.ac.uk Wellcome Unit for the History of Medicine Details of all Wellcome Unit

  14. Research Cores Handbook University of Virginia School of Medicine

    E-print Network

    Lawrence, Deborah

    Research Cores Handbook University of Virginia School of Medicine Office of Research Core Administration May 2013 #12;#12;Dear Colleague: Thank you for your interest in the UVA School of Medicine Shared Research Resources. Each School of Medicine Core, administered by the Office of Research Core

  15. Montana State University 1 Food, Family and

    E-print Network

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    , distribution, nutrition, and community food security in order for students to better understand how foodMontana State University 1 Food, Family and Community Health Sciences Option The Department of Health and Human Development offers a Master of Science degree with an option in food, family

  16. CHILD & FAMILY STUDIES AT SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY

    E-print Network

    McConnell, Terry

    CHILD & FAMILY STUDIES AT SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY 1928 - Present #12;CHILD AND FAMILY STUDIES MISSION and educationally challenging environment in which students acquire comprehensive knowledge and skills about child involvement Child Development Self-regulation Play Development & heath care #12;FACULTY SCHOLARSHIP BOOKS #12

  17. Effect of family medicine residents on use of diagnostic investigations

    PubMed Central

    Seong, Augene; Osmun, W.E.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To determine the effect of the presence of family medicine residents on the use of laboratory and imaging investigations in a rural emergency department (ED). Design A retrospective cross-sectional electronic chart audit was completed. Background characteristics, as well as type and number of ordered investigations, were compared between study groups. Setting Strathroy Middlesex General Hospital in Strathroy, Ont, a rural community hospital that sees approximately 20 000 ED visits per year. Participants A total of 2000 sequential ED visits, including adult and pediatric patients. The test group consisted of patients seen while a resident was present in the ED. The control group consisted of patients seen while no residents were present in the ED. Main outcome measures Twenty-two distinct categories of common ED investigations were studied. Results There was no statistically significant difference between study groups for 19 of the 22 categories of investigations. There were significant differences in 3 categories: an increased number of D-dimer assays for patients seen while there were no residents in the ED (1.7% of patients vs 0.5% of patients, P = .03) and increased computed tomography and ultrasound imaging for patients seen while a resident was in the ED (4.8% vs 1.8%, P = .0012, and 5.3% and 1.7%, P < .001, respectively). These differences are likely not owing to resident involvement but are explained by a difference in test availability between groups. Conclusion The study was underpowered for most categories of studied investigations. However, the trends demonstrated in this study suggest that the presence of family medicine residents in a rural community ED does not substantially affect the overall use of diagnostic investigations. PMID:25217692

  18. Models for integrating behavioral medicine on a family medicine in-patient teaching service.

    PubMed

    Kertesz, Joseph W; Delbridge, Emilee J; Felix, Daniel S

    2014-01-01

    Training physicians to effectively assess, diagnose, and treat patients' behavioral health concerns begin in residency. While this training is increasingly more common in outpatient educational settings, there is also a great need to teach physicians to practice behavioral medicine with patients who are hospitalized. However, teaching family medicine resident physicians to understand, value, and practice essential behavioral health knowledge and skills during inpatient rotations can be a challenge for both residents and educators. In this article, we describe three models of inpatient behavioral medicine teaching, each with examples of practical content and teaching methods. We discuss strategies for success and potential barriers to overcome while teaching in the inpatient setting. Helping patients choose to change their health behaviors, which likely contribute in part to the reasons for their hospitalizations in the first place, should begin while patients are still in the hospital. Models of teaching, such as those presented here, can help improve the way we train physicians to address behavioral health needs with hospitalized patients. PMID:25084858

  19. Evaluation of a Dementia Education Program for Family Medicine Residents

    PubMed Central

    Prorok, Jeanette C.; Stolee, Paul; Cooke, Martin; McAiney, Carrie A.; Lee, Linda

    2015-01-01

    Background Dementia diagnosis and management is increasing in importance in the training of future family physicians. This study evaluated the impact of a dementia education program for family medicine residents (FMR) on residents’ knowledge, attitudes, and confidence with respect to dementia assessment and management. A three-part questionnaire was developed and validated for these purposes. Methods A mixed methods study design was employed. The questionnaire’s internal consistency and test–retest reliability was determined and content validity was assessed. Twelve FMR participated in questionnaire validation. Program participants completed the validated questionnaire at baseline, at interim, and following program completion. Twenty-seven FMR completed the questionnaire as part of the program evaluation. Willing residents also participated in program feedback interviews. Differences in questionnaire scores between program participants and the comparison group were examined. Results Each questionnaire component demonstrated high internal consistency (Cronbach’s ?: 0.83–0.91) and test–retest reliability (intraclass correlation coefficients: 0.74–0.91). Program participants (n = 15) scored significantly higher than the comparison group (n = 12) on the knowledge component and also reported greater confidence in several areas. Qualitative data indicated that residents felt the program focused on important topic areas and appreciated the opportunity to work in an interprofessional team. Conclusion Evaluation results indicate that the program improved FMRs’ knowledge on dementia assessment and management, as well as increased the residents’ confidence levels. PMID:26180561

  20. University of Connecticut Health Center School of Dental Medicine

    E-print Network

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    1 University of Connecticut Health Center School of Dental Medicine Application for Admission. 17. In the space provided below and on the next page, please discuss your reasons for wishing to pursue Periodontology training at the University of Connecticut School of Dental Medicine and how you

  1. May 19, 2008 University of Connecticut School of Medicine

    E-print Network

    Kim, Duck O.

    May 19, 2008 University of Connecticut School of Medicine Space Policy Introduction Space, whether Center and its School of Medicine (SOM). The University of Connecticut Health Center Space Management Policy is used to allocate space to the SOM to meet its academic missions. This space policy provides

  2. STANFORD UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF MEDICINE The Guardian Blanket

    E-print Network

    Puglisi, Joseph

    a certificate of coverage under the policy. Policyholder means STANFORD UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF MEDICINE . We, UsSTANFORD UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF MEDICINE CLASS 0001 LTD The Guardian Blanket Insurance Plan #12 CERTIFICATE OF COVERAGE The Guardian 7 Hanover Square New York, New York 10004 We, The Guardian, certify

  3. A University/Community Hospital Family Practice Residency Program

    PubMed Central

    Werblun, Merrill N.; Martin, L. Robert

    1977-01-01

    A residency program associated with a major university has many obvious advantages. On the other hand, a residency program located in an area of health manpower shortage is a major advantage to that community. This paper describes the development of a university affiliated family practice residency in the Mojave Desert of Southern California. It reports that it is possible to form a successful alliance between a medical center and a rural community, bringing increased primary care to the community, upgrading the quality of medicine practiced in the community and augmenting the staff of the local hospital without sacrificing training for the family practice residents. Furthermore, the residency program can become financially self-sufficient. PMID:919548

  4. Learning behaviour and preferences of family medicine residents under a flexible academic curriculum

    PubMed Central

    Sy, Alice; Wong, Eric; Boisvert, Leslie

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To determine family medicine residents’ learning behaviour and preferences outside of clinical settings in order to help guide the development of an effective academic program that can maximize their learning. Design Retrospective descriptive analysis of academic learning logs submitted by residents as part of their academic training requirements between 2008 and 2011. Setting London, Ont. Participants All family medicine residents at Western University who had completed their academic program requirements (N = 72) by submitting 300 or more credits (1 credit = 1 hour). Main outcome measures Amount of time spent on various learning modalities, location where the learning took place, resources used for self-study, and the objective of the learning activity. Results A total of 72 residents completed their academic requirements during the study period and logged a total of 25 068 hours of academic learning. Residents chose to spend most of their academic time engaging in self-study (44%), attending staff physicians’ teaching sessions (20%), and participating in conferences, courses, or workshops (12%) and in postgraduate medical education sessions (12%). Textbooks (26%), medical journals (20%), and point-of-care resources (12%) were the 3 most common resources used for self-study. The hospital (32%), residents’ homes (32%), and family medicine clinics (14%) were the most frequently cited locations where academic learning occurred. While all physicians used a variety of educational activities, most residents (67%) chose self-study as their primary method of learning. The topic for academic learning appeared to have some influence on the learning modalities used by residents. Conclusion Residents used a variety of learning modalities and chose self-study over other more traditional modalities (eg, lectures) for most of their academic learning. A successful academic program must take into account residents’ various learning preferences and habits while providing guidance and training in the use of more effective learning methods and resources to maximize educational outcomes. PMID:25551133

  5. University of Connecticut School of Dental Medicine

    E-print Network

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    ................................................................... 35 36 40 43 X. Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery.......................................................................................................... a. Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Clinical Competency Assessment................................ 46 47 XI. Oral Medicine

  6. Learning to See Beneath the Surface: A Qualitative Analysis of Family Medicine Residents' Reflections About Communication.

    PubMed

    Duggan, Ashley P; Vicini, Andrea; Allen, Lucas; Shaughnessy, Allen F

    2015-12-01

    Patients share straightforward statements with physicians such as describing their fears about their diagnosis. Physicians need to also understanding implicit, indirect, subtle communication cues that give broader context to patients' illness experiences. This project examines physicians' written reflections that offer insight into their interpretation of both the stated and the tacit aspects of their observations about communication, their resulting responses, and their intended actions. Tufts University Family Medicine residents (N = 33) of the Tufts Family Medicine Cambridge Health Alliance completed three reflective exercises each week over the course of 1 year (756 reflective entries). An interdisciplinary research team identified communication-related concepts within the reflections. Identified themes include (a) physicians recognizing and discovering mutual interplay of their communication with and patient disclosure, (b) physicians paying attention to subtleties of patient behavior as indicative of a fuller picture of patients' lives and their coping with illness, and (c) physician images of growth and awareness about communication indicative of their potential for growth and improvement. The project extends the literature in communication and medical education by examining explicit and tacit points of reflection about communication. The project (a) allows for unpacking the multifaceted aspects of reflection and (b) bridges reflective theory and medical education with communication foundations. PMID:26147857

  7. PROFESSIONAL SKILLS PROGRAM Case Western Reserve University, School of Medicine

    E-print Network

    Yang, Sichun

    PROFESSIONAL SKILLS PROGRAM Case Western Reserve University, School of Medicine Office of Graduate Writing Your Individual Development Plan (IDP) Denise Douglas, Rachel Begley November 13 Speed Mentoring School of Medicine Faculty December 11 Career in Scientific Writing Laura McCormack, ProED Communications

  8. THE UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT SCHOOL OF DENTAL MEDICINE

    E-print Network

    Kim, Duck O.

    GOALS THE UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT SCHOOL OF DENTAL MEDICINE In order to fulfill its mission, the School of Dental Medicine will continuously strive to achieve excellence by pursuing the following goals analysis as a means to life-long learning and continued competency. 2. Allow dental students to acquire

  9. Medicine on the Net From Isolation to Universal Connectivity

    E-print Network

    Filman, Robert E.

    Medicine on the Net From Isolation to Universal Connectivity M edical skill has always been scarce separation in time and space. The Internet, personal computers, wireless devices, high-resolution graphic displays, and similar technologies are just the current step in a process of distributed medicine

  10. Stanford University Department of Comparative Medicine Veterinary Service Center

    E-print Network

    Ford, James

    Stanford University Department of Comparative Medicine ­ Veterinary Service Center This VSC have the equipment, space, staff, and facilities to conduct the research, including essential resources Service Center (VSC) in the Department of Comparative Medicine (DCM). The VSC is part of a centralized

  11. SPACE PLANNING & OPERATIONS University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

    E-print Network

    Bushman, Frederic

    SPACE PLANNING & OPERATIONS University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine Policy & Procedure: Public Space Use and Scheduling 12 May 2003 PLEASE NOTE THAT THIS POLICY IS CURRENTLY UNDER REVISION Description: School of Medicine Public Space (list defined below) is being centrally scheduled by Space

  12. OREGON HEALTH & SCIENCE UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF MEDICINE GRADUATE STUDIES

    E-print Network

    Chapman, Michael S.

    OREGON HEALTH & SCIENCE UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF MEDICINE ­ GRADUATE STUDIES Guidelines of the Oral Examination Committee Pages 23 ­ 26 SECTION 6 Checklists for Completing Degree Requirements Pages requirements for the master's degree or PhD degree in the School of Medicine at the Oregon Health & Sciences

  13. SUPPLEMENTAL STATEMENT University of Connecticut School of Medicine

    E-print Network

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    SUPPLEMENTAL STATEMENT University of Connecticut School of Medicine Office of Medical Student@uchc.edu and the School of Medicine application fee ($85) electronically through the UCHC website at https Neuroscience Skeletal, Craniofacial & Oral Biology For information regarding submission of letters

  14. ALBERT EINSTEIN COLLEGE OF MEDICINE OF YESHIVA UNIVERSITY

    E-print Network

    Emmons, Scott

    ALBERT EINSTEIN COLLEGE OF MEDICINE OF YESHIVA UNIVERSITY JACK AND PEARL RESNICK CAMPUS · 1300's Responsibility E-MAIL: peter.babin@einstein.yu.edu PHONE: (718) 430-2243 Date: To* Dear Radiation Safety Officer: Mr/Ms , social security # , who is presently associated with the Albert Einstein College of Medicine

  15. Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University

    E-print Network

    Bukauskas, Feliksas

    4 1 Strategic Research Plan Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University Jack and Pearl Resnick Campus 1300 Morris Park Avenue Bronx, New York 10461 Albert Einstein College of Medicine.A. Cissell Consulting Design: GRAPHIC ARTS CENTER Creative Director: Peter Dama Albert Einstein College

  16. THE ALBERT EINSTEIN COLLEGE OF MEDICINE OF YESHIVA UNIVERSITY

    E-print Network

    Bukauskas, Feliksas

    THE ALBERT EINSTEIN COLLEGE OF MEDICINE OF YESHIVA UNIVERSITY Procedures Regarding Complaints of Unlawful Harassment The Albert Einstein College of Medicine is committed to maintaining an environment to a hostile working and learning environment and is unacceptable at Einstein. In addition to behaviors

  17. UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA -PERELMAN SCHOOL OF MEDICINE Curriculum Vitae

    E-print Network

    Chatterjee, Anjan

    UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA - PERELMAN SCHOOL OF MEDICINE Curriculum Vitae Date: 07/14/2014 Anjan Chatterjee, M.D. Address: Department of Neurology University of Pennsylvania 3 West Gates 3400 Spruce Street) 1985 M.D. University of Pennsylvania Postgraduate Training and Fellowship Appointments: 1985

  18. YALE UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF MEDICINE DEPARTMENT of PUBLIC HEALTH

    E-print Network

    YALE UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF MEDICINE DEPARTMENT of PUBLIC HEALTH SUBMISSION OF THESIS M.S. PUBLIC the final draft. Upon completion of the thesis, the student will make an oral presentation of their work

  19. Tufts University School of Dental Medicine Oral Health Screening Consent

    E-print Network

    Dennett, Daniel

    Tufts University School of Dental Medicine Oral Health Screening Consent that by signing this form I am consenting to receive a basic oral health assessment to establish and maintain oral health. I also understand that receiving this dental

  20. Evaluation of Teaching Veterinary Medicine at the University of Nairobi.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindstrom, U. B.

    1976-01-01

    A survey of graduates from the University of Nairobi, Kenya in the field of veterinary medicine is reported. Areas covered include curriculum; teaching techniques; quality of faculty; and examinations. (JMF)

  1. Evaluation of Teaching and Learning in Family Medicine by Students: A Sri Lankan Experience

    PubMed Central

    Ramanayake, R. P. J. C.; De Silva, A. H. W.; Perera, D. P.; Sumanasekara, R. D. N.; Gunasekara, R.; Chandrasiri, P.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Family Medicine occupies a prominent place in the undergraduate curriculum of the Faculty of Medicine, University of Kelaniya, Sri Lanka. The one month clinical attachment during the fourth year utilizes a variety of teaching methods. This study evaluates teaching learning methods and learning environment of this attachment. Methodology: A descriptive cross sectional study was carried out among consenting students over a period of six months on completion of the clinical attachment using a pretested self administered questionnaire. Results: Completed questionnaires were returned by 114(99%) students. 90.2% were satisfied with the teaching methods in general while direct observation and feed back from teachers was the most popular(95.1%) followed by learning from patients(91.2%), debate(87.6%), seminar(87.5%) and small group discussions(71.9%). They were highly satisfied with the opportunity they had to develop communication skills (95.5%) and presentation skills (92.9%). Lesser learning opportunity was experienced for history taking (89.9%), problem solving (78.8%) and clinical examination (59.8%) skills. Student satisfaction regarding space within consultation rooms was 80% while space for history taking and examination (62%) and availability of clinical equipment (53%) were less. 90% thought the programme was well organized and adequate understanding on family medicine concepts and practice organization gained by 94% and 95% of the students respectively. Conclusions: Overall student satisfaction was high. Students prefer learning methods which actively involve them. It is important to provide adequate infra structure facilities for student activities to make it a positive learning experience for them. PMID:25810980

  2. Developing the evidentiary basis for family medicine in the global context

    PubMed Central

    Ponka, David; Rouleau, Katherine; Arya, Neil; Redwood-Campbell, Lynda; Woollard, Robert; Siedlecki, Basia; Dunikowski, Lynn

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To provide an overview of the main methodologic challenges to finding definitive evidence of the positive effects of family medicine and family medicine training on a global scale. Composition of the committee In 2012, 2013, and 2014, the College of Family Physicians of Canada hosted the Besrour Conferences to reflect on its role in advancing the discipline of family medicine globally. The Besrour Papers Working Group, which was struck at the 2013 conference, was tasked with developing a series of papers to highlight the key issues, lessons learned, and outcomes emerging from the various activities of the Besrour collaboration. The working group comprised members of various academic departments of family medicine in Canada and abroad who attended the conferences. Methods We performed a scoping review to determine the methodologic obstacles to understanding the positive effects of family medicine globally. Report The main obstacle to evaluating family medicine globally is that one of its core dimensions and assets is its local adaptability. Family medicine takes on very different roles in different health systems, making aggregation of data difficult. In many countries family medicine competes with other disciplines rather than performing a gatekeeping role. Further, most research that has been conducted thus far comes from industrialized contexts, and patient continuity and its benefits might not be achievable in the short term in developing countries when clinical demands are great. We must find frameworks to permit strengthening the evidentiary basis of the discipline across different contexts without sacrificing its beneficial adaptability. Conclusion We believe that developing family medicine and its attributes is one of the keys to achieving global health. These attributes—including its comprehensiveness, adaptability, and attention to both local and patient needs—are key to advancing global health priorities, but make common evaluative frameworks for the discipline a challenge. The spread of family medicine over the past decades is indirect evidence of its utility, but we need to generate more evidence. We present some of the initial challenges to a broader and more rigorous evaluative framework. PMID:26380849

  3. Rev. July 1, 2012 Indiana University Paid Family Leave Application

    E-print Network

    Martins, Emília

    Rev. July 1, 2012 Indiana University Paid Family Leave Application To read the policy on Paid Family Leaves: https-doctoral, and intermittent appointees are not eligible for family leave). A paid leave

  4. Effect of a Substance Abuse Curriculum on the Recognition of Alcoholism by Family Medicine Residents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Susman, Jeff; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Prospectively evaluated identification of alcohol abusers by family practice residents in 278 family medicine inpatients. Overall, residents correctly identified 38.8 percent of current or past alcohol abusers and 94.8 percent of nonalcoholics. Correct diagnosis was unrelated to demographic factors, alcohol-related admission diagnosis, or years of…

  5. Assessing the Viability of External Searchable Resources on the American Board of Family Medicine's Certification Examination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neill, Thomas R.; Peabody, Michael R.; Stelter, Keith L.; Hagen, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    (Purpose) The purpose of our study was to assess the need for an external searchable resource to be used in conjunction with the American Board of Family Medicine's (ABFM) Maintenance of Certification for Family Physicians (MC-FP) Examination, discuss the philosophical question of whether an ESR should be allowed on the examination, and outline…

  6. The accelerated internal medicine program at the University of Kentucky.

    PubMed

    Thompson, J S; Haist, S A; DeSimone, P A; Engelberg, J; Rich, E C

    1992-06-15

    Concern is growing about the ability of categorical medicine residency programs, structured within academic health centers, to provide balanced, progressive, postgraduate internal medicine education. Detrimental factors, including over-representation of critically ill patients, shortened length of hospitalization, stress, discontinuity between undergraduate and graduate training, rotational assignments driven by hospital service imperatives, and total costs, may all negatively affect internal medicine residency education. Therefore, an experimental accelerated internal medicine (AIM) curriculum combining 3 years of undergraduate with 3 years of graduate internal medicine education has been initiated by the Department of Medicine and the College of Medicine at the University of Kentucky. After completion of the third year and during the first 13 months of the AIM curriculum, selected students are rotated through an integrated series of educational experiences that incorporate all of the requirements for graduation from medical school and progressively advance the students' skills, knowledge, and responsibilities to that of a second-year resident. Thereafter, the curriculum is similar to that of the categorical residents, except that more ambulatory care and off-site rotations are interspersed to better provide the educational experiences representative of the practice of internal medicine. Evaluations of the first groups of AIM residents indicate that their performance has equaled that of the control residents who graduated after 4 years from the College of Medicine. Furthermore, the AIM residents report general acceptance by their fellow residents and attending physicians and report no undue stress in making the transition. PMID:1586122

  7. Family Medicine, the specialty of the future: the Portuguese situation within the European context

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    General Practice/Family Medicine is a specialty focused on the provision of comprehensive, continuing, and community oriented, person-centred care. The lack of prestige and the difficulty in attracting trainees to the specialty have been longstanding problems in most countries around the world. In Europe, General Practice/Family Medicine is also hampered for not being recognized as a specialty throughout Europe. As for Portugal, General Practice/Family Medicine is undergoing a massive organizational reform, as well as unprecedented levels of popularity among trainees. General Practice/Family holds tremendous latent potential, and is thus a specialty with a bright future ahead. It could well establish itself as the specialty of the future if it is able to overcome the barriers that currently make of General Practice/Family Medicine an unpopular career choice. It is important to train confident, competent and polyvalent family physicians, but it is also necessary to overhaul payment schemes, to invest in primary care infra-structure and organization, and to continue to attract more and more bright and motivated trainees. PMID:19906299

  8. [USE OF COMPLEMENTARY AND ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE AMONG FAMILY MEDICINE PATIENTS--EXAMPLE OF THE TOWN OF ?AKOVEC].

    PubMed

    Vitale, Ksenija; Mun?ar, Roko; Sovi?, Slavica; Bergman-Markovi?, Biserka; Janev Holcer, Nataša

    2014-12-01

    The use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is widespread around the world including Croatia. The number of studies that investigate both quantitative and qualitative use of CAM in Croatia is limited. The aim of this study was to investigate the use of CAM among family medicine patients in the town of ?akovec and the rate they report it to their family doctor. This was a cross-sectional study in a sample of 300 patients that visited primary health center for any reason. We used anonymous questionnaire already employed in a previous investigation (?ižmešija et al. 2008), which describes socioeconomic characteristics, modalities of CAM use, and reasons for use. We also added questions on the type of herbs used and use of over-the-counter vitamin and mineral supplements. On data analysis we used descriptive statistics, ?2-test and Fisher's exact test, while the level of statistical significance was set at p ? 0.05. The response rate was 76%. Out of the total number of patients, 82% used some modality of CAM. Women, patients with secondary school education, employed and retired persons used CAM more often. Students and pupils reported least use of CAM. The most commonly used were herbs (87%), bioenergy (29%), diet therapy (28%), chiropractics (22%), and homeopathy and acupuncture (11% each). Vitamin and mineral supplements were used by 77% of study subjects. CAM was most frequently used for respiratory, urinary and musculoskeletal problems, as well as to improve overall health condition. Of the respondents that reported CAM use, 55% believed it would help them, 43% used it because they wanted to try something new, while only 2% indicated dissatisfaction with their physician as the reason for using CAM. Statistically, there were more subjects that used CAM and did not notify their family doctor about it, which could indicate poor communication between family doctors and health care users. Our results are consistent with a previous quantitative study conducted in Croatia and with literature data on the countries with a predominant use of western medicine. Qualitative data from previous studies in Croatia could explain the cultural and socioeconomic context of CAM use. Dissatisfaction with their physician as the reason for using CAM was rarely indicated, suggesting that CAM most probably fills the gap between successful and unsuccessful treatment, and perception that evidence based medicine has its own limitations. The arguments to turn to CAM therapy could involve poor doctor to patient ratio, i.e. 1750 patients per family medicine doctor on average, and the 20% increase in the number of diseases and conditions diagnosed by family medicine units. In conclusion, these results suggest that the use of CAM is common among patients in family medicine. When taking patient history, doctors should ask about CAM use and be aware of the patient beliefs and lifestyle. When patients strongly believe in CAM methods, there is the need of making compromise in therapy, with explanation of the possible side effects and at the same time continuous follow up. There is the need of additional education of family doctors and population about good and bad effects of CAM. In Croatia, accent should be on herbalism because this modality is most widespread. PMID:26285467

  9. SAPIENZA UNIVERSITY OF ROME DEPARTMENT OF ANATOMICAL, HISTOLOGICAL, FORENSIC MEDICINE AND ORTHOPEDIC

    E-print Network

    Di Pillo, Gianni

    1 SAPIENZA ­ UNIVERSITY OF ROME DEPARTMENT OF ANATOMICAL, HISTOLOGICAL, FORENSIC MEDICINE of the Department Council of the Department of Anatomical, Histological, Forensic Medicine and Orthopedic position ("assegno di ricerca") at the Department of Anatomical, Histological, Forensic Medicine

  10. Fibonacci family of dynamical universality classes.

    PubMed

    Popkov, Vladislav; Schadschneider, Andreas; Schmidt, Johannes; Schütz, Gunter M

    2015-10-13

    Universality is a well-established central concept of equilibrium physics. However, in systems far away from equilibrium, a deeper understanding of its underlying principles is still lacking. Up to now, a few classes have been identified. Besides the diffusive universality class with dynamical exponent [Formula: see text], another prominent example is the superdiffusive Kardar-Parisi-Zhang (KPZ) class with [Formula: see text]. It appears, e.g., in low-dimensional dynamical phenomena far from thermal equilibrium that exhibit some conservation law. Here we show that both classes are only part of an infinite discrete family of nonequilibrium universality classes. Remarkably, their dynamical exponents [Formula: see text] are given by ratios of neighboring Fibonacci numbers, starting with either [Formula: see text] (if a KPZ mode exist) or [Formula: see text] (if a diffusive mode is present). If neither a diffusive nor a KPZ mode is present, all dynamical modes have the Golden Mean [Formula: see text] as dynamical exponent. The universal scaling functions of these Fibonacci modes are asymmetric Lévy distributions that are completely fixed by the macroscopic current density relation and compressibility matrix of the system and hence accessible to experimental measurement. PMID:26424449

  11. Cancer Risk Assessment by Rural and Appalachian Family Medicine Physicians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Kimberly M.; Love, Margaret M.; Pearce, Kevin A.; Porter, Kyle; Barron, Mary A.; Andrykowski, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Context: Challenges to the identification of hereditary cancer in primary care may be more pronounced in rural Appalachia, a medically underserved region. Purpose: To examine primary care physicians' identification of hereditary cancers. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was mailed to family physicians in the midwestern and southeastern United…

  12. A Problem-Solving Oral Examination for Family Medicine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Wart, Arthur D.

    1974-01-01

    The College of Family Physicians of Canada has used in its certification examination a new type of structured problem-solving examination called the Formal Oral. A series of preselected problem areas such as the complaint, relevant data base, investigation, and treatment are scored by two examiners. (Editor/PG)

  13. Sexual medicine in family practice. Part 2: Treating sexual dysfunction.

    PubMed Central

    Holzapfel, S.

    1993-01-01

    Sexual problems can be caused by organic or psychological factors, or a combination of the two. Deciding which leads to an appropriate management plan. This paper describes the current status of treatments for common sexual dysfunctions seen in family practice. PMID:8471907

  14. Improving Feedback for Medical Students in a Family Medicine Clerkship

    PubMed Central

    White, D.G.; Tiberius, R.; Talbot, Y.; Schiralli, V.; Rickett, M.

    1991-01-01

    To evaluate whether feedback to medical students could be improved by asking teachers to complete a student performance rating form during a family practice clerkship, the authors had students and teachers fill out a questionnaire. Teachers in the intervention group reported observing students more frequently. Students' perceptions of feedback frequency correlated strongly with their ratings of feedback quality. PMID:21234079

  15. GUIDELINES1 for the University of Connecticut School of Medicine

    E-print Network

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    mechanism (e.g. managerial/confidential). The Executive Committee The administrative body for the plan1 GUIDELINES1 for the University of Connecticut School of Medicine Academic Merit Plan Review Revised and Approved by the Merit Plan Executive Committee November 2013 Applicability: All faculty must

  16. SPACE PLANNING & OPERATIONS UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA SCHOOL OF MEDICINE

    E-print Network

    Bushman, Frederic

    SPACE PLANNING & OPERATIONS UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA SCHOOL OF MEDICINE Policy & Procedure a centralized scheduling system managed by Space Planning & Operations (SPO) with the intention of maximizing use of available space to meet educational space demands. Purpose: The purpose of this policy

  17. Space Planning & Operations University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

    E-print Network

    Bushman, Frederic

    Space Planning & Operations University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine Policy & Procedure Building II/III fourteenth floor Faculty Lounge, and the criteria for reserving the Lounge Space use of the Faculty Lounge as well as scheduled use of the Lounge Space and Conference Rooms. Scope

  18. UNIVERSITY OF DELAWARE OFFICE OF LABORATORY ANIMAL MEDICINE

    E-print Network

    Firestone, Jeremy

    Rev 5/2010 UNIVERSITY OF DELAWARE OFFICE OF LABORATORY ANIMAL MEDICINE Intraperitoneal (IP the animal securely with ventral abdomen exposed and head pointed slightly downward. (This allows internal by drawing an imaginary line just above knees. In a female animal this is just cranial to and slightly medial

  19. ALBERT EINSTEIN COLLEGE OF MEDICINE OF YESHIVA UNIVERSITY

    E-print Network

    Emmons, Scott

    ALBERT EINSTEIN COLLEGE OF MEDICINE OF YESHIVA UNIVERSITY JACK AND PEARL RESNICK CAMPUS · 1300's Responsibility E-MAIL ­ peter.babin@einstein.yu.edu PHONE: (718) 430-2243 Dosimeter/Film Badge Request: Female: 1. Did the Employee/Student have a previous badge at Einstein? 2. Has the Employee

  20. Alternative Medicine and Herbal Use among University Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Susan K.; Blanchard, Anita

    2006-01-01

    In this study, the authors investigated the predictors of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) and herbal supplement use among university students. They investigated demographic factors, trait affectivity, symptom reports, and individuals' worries about modernity as potential contributors to use of CAM and herbals. The authors surveyed 506…

  1. Assisting people with dementia with their medicines: experiences of family carers

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Felicity; Grijseels, Madelon S; Ryan, Patricia; Tobiansky, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Many family carers provide assistance with medicines that is vital for optimal clinical outcomes. Medicines-related tasks are known to contribute to carer burden and stress. This study examined the experiences of family carers when providing medicines-related assistance for a person with dementia, to indicate how services could become more responsive to the specific needs of this group of carers. Methods Semi-structured interviews were undertaken with family carers and care-recipients identified though a memory clinic in north London and a local Alzheimer's Society. The interview guide, comprising open questions, was informed by previous studies and consultation with stakeholders. Qualitative procedures involving a framework approach were employed in the analysis. Key findings Fourteen interviews with carers and five with care-recipients were conducted. These highlighted the burden and challenges, surrounding medicines-management activities. As well as practical aspects that could be complex, carers were commonly making judgements about the need for and appropriateness of medicines. Although experiences were varied, carers reported difficulties in maintaining supplies, ensuring adherence to regimens and accessing health professionals; and they made some recommendations for service improvements. Carers’ difficulty in obtaining information and advice about medicines was compounded by their desire to allow the care-recipient to retain autonomy over their medicines as long as possible. Conclusion This study highlights the distinct needs and problems with regard to medicines-management when caring for a person with dementia. As the prevalence of dementia rises, interventions designed to address these specific aspects of reduce carer-burden should be a priority for health professionals. PMID:25351043

  2. Patterns of Relating Between Physicians and Medical Assistants in Small Family Medicine Offices

    PubMed Central

    Elder, Nancy C.; Jacobson, C. Jeffrey; Bolon, Shannon K.; Fixler, Joseph; Pallerla, Harini; Busick, Christina; Gerrety, Erica; Kinney, Dee; Regan, Saundra; Pugnale, Michael

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE The clinician-colleague relationship is a cornerstone of relationship-centered care (RCC); in small family medicine offices, the clinician–medical assistant (MA) relationship is especially important. We sought to better understand the relationship between MA roles and the clinician-MA relationship within the RCC framework. METHODS We conducted an ethnographic study of 5 small family medicine offices (having <5 clinicians) in the Cincinnati Area Research and Improvement Group (CARInG) Network using interviews, surveys, and observations. We interviewed 19 MAs and supervisors and 11 clinicians (9 family physicians and 2 nurse practitioners) and observed 15 MAs in practice. Qualitative analysis used the editing style. RESULTS MAs’ roles in small family medicine offices were determined by MA career motivations and clinician-MA relationships. MA career motivations comprised interest in health care, easy training/workload, and customer service orientation. Clinician-MA relationships were influenced by how MAs and clinicians respond to their perceptions of MA clinical competence (illustrated predominantly by comparing MAs with nurses) and organizational structure. We propose a model, trust and verify, to describe the structure of the clinician-MA relationship. This model is informed by clinicians’ roles in hiring and managing MAs and the social familiarity of MAs and clinicians. Within the RCC framework, these findings can be seen as previously undefined constraints and freedoms in what is known as the Complex Responsive Process of Relating between clinicians and MAs. CONCLUSIONS Improved understanding of clinician-MA relationships will allow a better appreciation of how clinicians and MAs function in family medicine teams. Our findings may assist small offices undergoing practice transformation and guide future research to improve the education, training, and use of MAs in the family medicine setting. PMID:24615311

  3. Practising family medicine for adults with intellectual disabilities

    PubMed Central

    Baumbusch, Jennifer; Phinney, Alison; Baumbusch, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To explore the perspectives of adults with intellectual disabilities (IDs) on helpful interactions with their family physicians. Design Exploratory, qualitative study. Setting Vancouver, BC. Participants Purposive sample of 11 community-dwelling adults with IDs. Methods In-depth, semistructured interviews were conducted face to face with participants. Interviews were audiorecorded and transcribed verbatim. Research team members read the transcripts, which were then coded into categories and subcategories and discussed at collective analysis meetings. The main study themes were generated through this iterative, collective process. Main findings Two themes about helpful interactions were identified: helping patients understand and helping patients navigate the health care system. The first theme reflected helpful ways of communicating with patients with IDs. These approaches focused on plain-language communication and other strategies developed jointly by the patients and their physicians. The second theme reflected ways in which the family physicians helped adults with IDs manage their health needs despite the complex constraints of their socioeconomic situations. Conclusion Adults with IDs want to play an active role in managing their health as they age, and helpful interactions with family physicians make this possible. PMID:25022654

  4. Development of a Competency Framework for Quality Improvement in Family Medicine: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Czabanowska, Katarzyna; Klemenc-Ketis, Zalika; Potter, Amanda; Rochfort, Andree; Tomasik, Tomasz; Csiszar, Judit; Van den Bussche, Piet

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to develop a comprehensive framework of quality improvement competencies for use in continuing professional development (CPD) and continuing medical education (CME) for European general practice/family medicine physicians (GPs/FDs). Methods: The study was carried out in three phases: literature review,…

  5. Back to the future: reflections on the history of the future of family medicine.

    PubMed

    Doohan, Noemi C; Endres, Jill; Koehn, Nerissa; Miller, John; Scherger, Joseph E; Martin, James; Devoe, Jennifer E

    2014-01-01

    These are historic times for family medicine. The profession is moving beyond the visionary blueprint of the Future of Family Medicine (FFM) report while working to harness the momentum created by the FFM movement. Preparing for, and leading through, the next transformative wave of change (FFM version 2.0) will require the engagement of multigenerational and multidisciplinary visionaries who bring wisdom from diverse experiences. Active group reflection on the past will potentiate the collective work being done to best chart the future. Historical competency is critically important for family medicine's future. This article describes the historical context of the development and launch of the FFM report, emphasizing the professional activism that preceded and followed it. This article is intended to spark intergenerational dialog by providing a multigenerational reflection on the history of FFM and the evolution that has occurred in family medicine over the past decade. Such intergenerational conversations enable our elders to share wisdom with our youth, while allowing our discipline to visualize history through the eyes of future generations. PMID:25381082

  6. Multi-Source Evaluation of Interpersonal and Communication Skills of Family Medicine Residents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leung, Kai-Kuen; Wang, Wei-Dan; Chen, Yen-Yuan

    2012-01-01

    There is a lack of information on the use of multi-source evaluation to assess trainees' interpersonal and communication skills in Oriental settings. This study is conducted to assess the reliability and applicability of assessing the interpersonal and communication skills of family medicine residents by patients, peer residents, nurses, and…

  7. Acting as Standardized Patients Enhances Family Medicine Residents' Self-Reported Skills in Palliative Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sittikariyakul, Pat; Jaturapatporn, Darin; Kirshen, A. J.

    2015-01-01

    Recent publications have confirmed the use of standardized patients (SPs) in improving clinical skills and enhancing competency. Little research has studied the benefits residents may themselves gain in palliative care playing the role of SPs. Nineteen Family Medicine residents were recruited as standardized patients (FMR-SPs) for a mandatory…

  8. Monetary Value of a Prescription Assistance Program Service in a Rural Family Medicine Clinic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitley, Heather P.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify the monetary value of medications provided to rural Alabamians through provision of pharmaceutical manufacturer-sponsored prescription assistance programs (PAPs) provided by a clinical pharmacist in a private Black Belt family medicine clinic during 2007 and 2008. Methods: Patients struggling to afford prescription medications…

  9. University of ConnecticutUniversity of Connecticut School of Medicine

    E-print Network

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    where "collaboration where "students work together toward success. Emphasis on the dynamics of patient-doctor relationships transforms students into physicians capable of delivering " of delivering " superior care of Medicine, you will play a role in patients' health from the very start of your medical education. In your

  10. Library Cooperation at the NOVA University--the Nordic University in Agriculture, Forestry and Veterinary Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myllys, Heli

    The Nordic University in Agriculture, Forestry and Veterinary Medicine--the NOVA University-was established in 1995 to increase the cooperation between the Nordic agricultural universities. The NOVA libraries of the seven institutions and facilities involved wanted to show that they are a very useful partner in launching new ideas. They have the…

  11. How the philosophies, styles, and methods of family medicine affect the research agenda.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, Allen; Becker, Lorne A

    2004-05-26

    Family physicians provide person-centered, continuous, comprehensive care that is accessible and available at the time of need. Although this core philosophy is shared around the world, its translation into actual practice can vary greatly with time and from place to place as family physicians adapt to local constraints and conditions. Factors driving these local variations include entrenched habits and patterns of care, funding systems, patient expectations, public policy, and the availability and quality of other critical health system components. This diversity provides both an opportunity and a challenge for family medicine research. The potential for fruitful comparisons and contrasts arising from natural experiments may require investigators to use multiple research methods capable of evaluating complex interventions and comparisons. Family medicine has the capacity to be an excellent laboratory in which research in representative populations can offer the pragmatic answers needed by practicing physicians. The nature of the research questions and interventions require the involvement of clinicians in the formulation of research questions and evaluation of the applicability of research results. The variations in implementation of the family medicine philosophy can be a potential asset because of the research opportunities they provide. PMID:15655087

  12. GIS Residency Footprinting: Analyzing the Impact of Family Medicine Graduate Medical Education in Hawai‘i

    PubMed Central

    Buenconsejo-Lum, Lee E; Racsa, C Philip

    2012-01-01

    Background Access to care for patients in Hawai‘i is compromised by a significant primary care workforce shortage. Not only are there not enough primary care providers, they are often not practicing in locations of high need such as rural areas on the neighbor islands or in the Pacific. Methods This study used geographic information systems (GIS) spatial analysis to look at practice locations for 86 University of Hawai‘i Family Medicine and Community Health graduates from 1993 to the 2010. Careful alumni records were verified and entered into the data set using the street address of major employment. Questions to be answered were (1) what percentage of program graduates remain in the state of Hawai‘i and (2) what percentage of graduates practice in health professional shortage areas (HPSAs) throughout the United States. Results This study found that 73 percent of graduates remain and practice in Hawai‘i with over 36 percent working in Health Professional Shortage Areas. Discussion Spatial analysis using GIS residency footprinting may be an important analytic tool to ensure that graduate medical education programs are meeting Hawai‘i's health workforce needs. PMID:22737640

  13. A computerized faculty time-management system in an academic family medicine department.

    PubMed

    Daugird, Allen J; Arndt, Jane E; Olson, P Richard

    2003-02-01

    The authors describe the development, implementation, and evaluation of a computerized faculty time-management system (FTMS) in the Department of Family Medicine at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill. The FTMS is presented as an integrated set of computerized spreadsheets used annually to allocate faculty time across all mission activities of the department. It was first implemented in 1996 and has been continuously developed since then. An iterative approach has been used to gain consensus among faculty about time resources needed for various tasks of all missions of the department. These time-resource assumptions are used in the computerized system. Faculty time is allocated annually by the department vice chair in negotiation with individual faculty, making sure that the activities planned do not exceed the work time each faculty member has available for the year. During this process, faculty preferences are balanced against department aggregate needs to meet mission commitments and obligations. The authors describe how the computerized FTMS is used for faculty time management and career development, department planning, budget planning, clinical scheduling, and mission cost accounting. They also describe barriers and potential abuses and the challenge of building an organizational culture willing to discuss faculty time openly and committed to developing a system perceived as fair and accurate. The spreadsheet file is available free from the authors for use in other departments. PMID:12584090

  14. The Practical Application of Exercise Training Principles in Family Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Clement, D. B.

    1982-01-01

    As millions of Canadians take the message of Participaction to heart, family physicians are asked a multitude of questions about exercise. It can be viewed as a pharmacological agent: dosage, frequency, host response, side effects and sensitivities should be considered in the design of an exercise program. Complications of exercise result in overuse injury to muscle, tendon and bone. Important etiological areas involve training, biomechanical features and footwear. Adequate recovery from a training stimulus is necessary for physiological adaptation. Warm up, flexibility, and dosage of exercise need special consideration. Compensatory activity caused by genu varum and pes planus may be reduced by the use of orthotic devices. Study of the wear pattern of the running shoe may reveal clues about biomechanical alignment. The physician's direct practical guidance will minimize complications, as will proper design of the exercise program and selection of appropriate equipment. PMID:21286100

  15. Family Physicians with a Certificate of Added Qualifications (CAQs) in Sports Medicine Spend the Majority of Their Time Practicing Sports Medicine.

    PubMed

    Rankin, Wade M; Cochrane, Anneli; Puffer, James C

    2015-01-01

    While family physicians holding certificates of added qualifications in sports medicine practice in multiple settings, little is currently known about the proportion of their time devoted exclusively to the practice of sports medicine. We found that most spend a majority of their time doing so, and this number has been increasing over the past decade. PMID:26546643

  16. The Future of Family Medicine version 2.0: reflections from Pisacano scholars.

    PubMed

    Doohan, Noemi C; Duane, Marguerite; Harrison, Bridget; Lesko, Sarah; DeVoe, Jennifer E

    2014-01-01

    The Future of Family Medicine (FFM) project has helped shape and direct the evolution of primary care medicine over the past decade. Pisacano Scholars, a group of leaders in family medicine supported by the American Board of Family Medicine, gathered for a 2-day symposium in April 2013 to explore the history of the FFM project and outline a vision for the next phase of this work-FFM version 2.0 (v2.0). After learning about the original FFM project (FFM v1.0), the group held interactive discussions using the World Café approach to conversational leadership. This commentary summarizes the discussions and highlights major themes relevant to FFM v2.0 identified by the group. The group endorsed the FFM v1.0 recommendations as still relevant and marvelled at the progress made toward achieving many of those goals. Most elements of FFM v1.0 have moved forward, and some have been incorporated into policy blueprints for reform. Now is the time to refocus attention on facets of FFM v1.0 not yet realized and to identify key aspects missing from FFM v1.0. The Pisacano Scholars are committed to moving the FFM goals forward and hope that this expression of the group's vision will help to do so. PMID:24390896

  17. Family medicine and medical ethics--a natural and necessary union.

    PubMed

    Dickman, R L

    1980-04-01

    Since many ethical dilemmas in the practice of medicine involve cases associated with tertiary care, primary care providers may feel removed from these kinds of problems. Family medicine, committed to an intellectual synergism with a variety of non-biomedical disciplines as well as being a "specialty in breadth" should develop a strong bond with medical ethics. Because of their ongoing relationships with patients and subsequent knowledge of their value systems, family physicians can provide leadership in guiding ethical decision making in intensive care settings. In addition, since a significant number of ethical dilemmas in medicine involve common problems, family physicians may be more sensitive to and feel more comfortable with this aspect of medical practice. Some family practice residency programs have begun to provide educational experiences in medical ethics for their trainees. Although the evaluation methodology for this aspect of training is not fully developed, it seems clear that residency programs should give additional attention to these areas in planning their curricula. PMID:7365436

  18. Nature of the clinical difficulties of first-year family medicine residents under direct observation.

    PubMed Central

    Beaumier, A; Bordage, G; Saucier, D; Turgeon, J

    1992-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine and classify the difficulties of first-year family medicine residents observed during clinical interviews. DESIGN: Retrospective, descriptive study. SETTING: Family practice unit at a teaching hospital. PARTICIPANTS: Forty-seven of the 56 first-year family medicine residents during their 2-month compulsory rotation in ambulatory family medicine, between July 1983 and December 1988, and 4 physicians who supervised the residents. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: The residents' difficulties noted on the observation forms. MAIN RESULTS: A total of 1500 difficulties were observed during 194 interviews, an average of 7.7 (standard deviation 5.2) per interview. There were 167 different difficulties, which were classified into seven categories (introduction, initial contract, body of the interview, techniques and organization, interpersonal aspects, final contract and miscellaneous) and 20 subcategories. The 17 most frequently noted difficulties accounted for 40% of the total. CONCLUSIONS: The results constitute a useful starting point for developing a classification of residents' difficulties during clinical interviews. We believe that the list of difficulties is applicable to residents at all levels and in other specialties, especially in ambulatory settings. The list can be used to develop learning materials for supervisors and residents. PMID:1737313

  19. Variation in Refill Protocols and Procedures in a Family Medicine Residency Network

    PubMed Central

    Guirguis-Blake, Janelle; Keppel, Gina A.; Force, Rex W.; Cauffield, Jacintha; Monger, Rob M.; Baldwin, Laura Mae

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES Efficient and accurate medication refill authorization is an integral service provided by family physicians and an essential skill to teach family medicine residents. The goal of this study was to examine the variation in medication refill protocols, procedures, and resources in family medicine residency practices across a five-state region as a background for development of best practices. METHODS Structured telephone interviews with a key informant at each of 11 clinical practices in a five-state (Washington, Wyoming, Alaska, Montana, and Idaho) family medicine residency network focused on refill protocols and procedures, which personnel have authorization authority, and other factors related to refill protocols and medication prescribing curriculum. Key themes were abstracted from interview notes. RESULTS There was marked variation in refill protocols and procedures across the clinical sites. While all practices were able to identify their refill procedure, no two practices’ procedures were the same, and only 36.4% had a formal written protocol that could be identified by the key informant. All of the practices with formal protocols routinely reviewed medical records before authorizing refills (100%, four/four) compared to less than half of those without formal protocols (42.9%, three/seven). Practices with formal protocols (75.0%) also transferred refill requests between staff prior to authorization more than those without formal protocols (57.1%). CONCLUSIONS Refill protocols and procedures were highly variable across these family medicine residency program practices. Surprisingly, formal written refill protocols were uncommon. Further research to identify best practices in medication refill procedures associated with safety outcomes is warranted. PMID:22930121

  20. The market is a strange creature: family medicine meeting the challenges of the changing political and socioeconomic structure.

    PubMed

    Westin, S

    1995-12-01

    This paper examines the extent to which family medicine is prepared to face today's political and socioeconomic trends. A modest assumption is that most countries will avoid the threats of food and energy crisis, environmental disasters, social collapse and even wars. Given that privilege, family medicine is faced with recent trends of market liberalism throughout the world, giving rise to new perspectives of economic prosperity, as well as widening gaps between the rich and affluent, and a growing number of unemployed, poor, and 'marginalized'. The recent UN World Summit for Social Development in Copenhagen highlighted the fact that poverty and long-term unemployment is becoming a permanent problem even in the rich world. The distinction between rich and poor countries might be better understood as widening gaps between rich and poor people in both kinds of countries. The challenge to family medicine will be twofold: 1) To develop a broader understanding of the associations between social risk factors on a population level, and its clinical expressions in individual patients in terms of illness, sick role behaviour and manifest disease, as well as potentials for constructive coping; 2) To contribute to a universally available primary health care, meeting the needs also of those who are not in the best position to pay. We are reminded of the classic 1971 Lancet paper by Julian Tudor Hart on "The inverse care law", implying that "the availability of good medical care tends to vary inversely with the need for it in the population served". In a world plagued with unforeseen discontinuities, general practice will need to maintain its core of 'personal doctoring'. Meeting people at the primary care level provides unique opportunities of being sensitive and responsive also to unexpected changes in society, and in some areas even making contributions to the directions of change. PMID:8826054

  1. Science and Medicine Dispatch reader survey 1. What is your status at Oxford University?

    E-print Network

    Wallace, Mark

    1 of 6 Science and Medicine Dispatch reader survey 1. What is your status at Oxford University question 1 #12;2 of 6 3. Do you read the Science and Medicine Libraries newsletter, Science and Medicine. How do you receive Science and Medicine Dispatch? Select all that apply. Response Percent Response

  2. Task Force Report 5. Report of the Task Force on Family Medicine’s Role in Shaping the Future Health Care Delivery System

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Richard G.; Snape, Pam S.; Burke, Kevin

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND Recognizing that the implementation of needed changes within family medicine will be enhanced through a concurrent effort to transform the broader health care system, this Future of Family Medicine task force was charged with determining family medicine’s leadership role in shaping the future health care delivery system. METHODS After reviewing the changes taking place within family medicine and the broader health care system, this task force identified 6 priorities for fostering necessary modifications in the health care system. In addressing the leadership challenge facing the discipline, the task force presents a 3-dimensional matrix that provides a useful framework for describing the audiences that should be targeted, the strategic priorities that should be pursued, and the specific recommendations that should be addressed. Noting that leadership is part of the heritage of family medicine, the task force reviewed past successes by the discipline as important lessons that can be instructive as family physicians begin advocating for needed changes. MAJOR FINDINGS Effective leadership is an essential ingredient that will determine, to a large extent, the success of family medicine in advocating for needed change in the health care system overall and in the specialty. It is vitally important to groom leaders within family medicine and to create venues where policy makers and influence leaders can look beyond their usual constituencies and horizons to a comprehensive view of health care. A central concept being proposed is that of a relationship-centered personal medical home. This medical home serves as the focal point through which all individuals—regardless of age, gender, race, ethnicity, or socioeconomic status—receive a basket of acute, chronic, and preventive medical care services that are accessible, accountable, comprehensive, integrated, patient-centered, safe, scientifically valid, and satisfying to both patients and their physicians. CONCLUSION Family medicine has and will continue to have an important leadership role in health system change. It has been most successful when it has been able to identify a high-priority goal through consensus within the discipline, to focus and coordinate local and national resources, and to use a multipronged approach in addressing the priority. Although the Future of Family Medicine project has provided an important impetus for the identification of key priorities across the discipline, for the FFM project ultimately to be a success, implementation steps will need to be identified and prioritized. The leadership matrix presented in this report can provide a useful structuring tool to identify, understand, and coordinate change efforts more effectively. Strategic alliances with primary care groups and others also will be critical to the success of change initiatives.

  3. Family Medicine Education with Virtual Patients: a Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Sobocan, Monika; Klemenc-Ketis, Zalika

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Virtual patients (VP) have been present within the medical education process for some time. Although they are assumed to be of great benefit for student learning, very little is know about student perception and outcomes of learning, especially during the pre-clerkship years. Therefore we have decided to investigate the use of VPs during lectures, which has never been analyzed before, but could present an opportunity for more effective and holistic learning. Methods: This was a qualitative study among the 4th year undergraduate medical students at the Medical Faculty, University of Maribor, Slovenia. Students, after completing 4 virtual patient cases during the semester, were asked to participate in focus groups. Using these focus groups we asked students to provide information about their perceptions of VP cases, their learning, and suggestions for educational improvements. Data was transcribed and analyzed using the grounded theory-based coding method (open coding). Results: Medical students reported having a positive attitude towards virtual patient learning. They perceived them as helpful for filling in knowledge gaps, learning appropriate patient care and clinical reasoning. However, especially within the setting of early clinical learning, students felt the need to discuss their questions with their tutors in order to achieve better learning outcomes. Conclusion: Students on teaching courses feel the need for structured instructor sessions and the integration of VPs in the course planning in order to maximize their learning outcomes. PMID:26483591

  4. Video Style Guide Washington University School of Medicine and Washington University Physicians

    E-print Network

    Grant, Gregory

    12/2010 Video Style Guide Washington University School of Medicine and Washington University Physicians Videos can be powerful tools to help communicate key messages to audiences. View recent statistics on web-based video consumption and sharing. Campus Contacts The Office of Communications and Marketing

  5. Stanford University, School of Medicine SoM Code of Conduct for Shared Spaces

    E-print Network

    Kay, Mark A.

    Stanford University, School of Medicine SoM Code of Conduct for Shared Spaces This code of conduct of Medicine space policies: #12;o Lane Library's Study Space Policy (http://med.stanford.edu/irt/edtech/policies/policy_study_spaces be respectful 2. Treatment of this facility and all School of Medicine/University property must always

  6. CERTIFICATION OF OPTIONAL FORBEARANCE OR DEFERMENT STATUS UNIVERSITY OF VIRGINIA SCHOOL OF MEDICINE

    E-print Network

    Huang, Wei

    CERTIFICATION OF OPTIONAL FORBEARANCE OR DEFERMENT STATUS UNIVERSITY OF VIRGINIA SCHOOL OF MEDICINE forbearance approved by the UVA School of Medicine Director of Financial Aid (Special forbearance monthly School of Medicine. _____ I am pursuing an M.D. Degree at a medical school other than the University

  7. MEDRESEARCHVOLUME 3, No. 1 FALL 2012 WAYNE STATE UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF MEDICINE

    E-print Network

    Berdichevsky, Victor

    MEDRESEARCHVOLUME 3, No. 1 FALL 2012 WAYNE STATE UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF MEDICINE #12;#12;1Table School of Medicine. To obtain additional copies, contact Philip Van Hulle at pvanhulle@med.wayne.edu. MEDResearch is published annually by the Wayne State University School of Medicine Office of Public Affairs

  8. The Mississippi State University College of Veterinary Medicine Shelter Program

    PubMed Central

    Bushby, Philip; Woodruff, Kimberly; Shivley, Jake

    2015-01-01

    Simple Summary First initiated in 1995 to provide veterinary students with spay/neuter experience, the shelter program at the Mississippi State University College of Veterinary Medicine has grown to be comprehensive in nature incorporating spay/neuter, basic wellness care, diagnostics, medical management, disease control, shelter management and biosecurity. Junior veterinary students spend five days in shelters; senior veterinary students spend 2-weeks visiting shelters in mobile veterinary units. The program has three primary components: spay/neuter, shelter medical days and Animals in Focus. Student gain significant hands-on experience and evaluations of the program by students are overwhelmingly positive. Abstract The shelter program at the Mississippi State University College of Veterinary Medicine provides veterinary students with extensive experience in shelter animal care including spay/neuter, basic wellness care, diagnostics, medical management, disease control, shelter management and biosecurity. Students spend five days at shelters in the junior year of the curriculum and two weeks working on mobile veterinary units in their senior year. The program helps meet accreditation standards of the American Veterinary Medical Association’s Council on Education that require students to have hands-on experience and is in keeping with recommendations from the North American Veterinary Medical Education Consortium. The program responds, in part, to the challenge from the Pew Study on Future Directions for Veterinary Medicine that argued that veterinary students do not graduate with the level of knowledge and skills that is commensurate with the number of years of professional education. PMID:26479234

  9. Proceedings of the 2008 Annual Predoctoral Education Conference of the Society of Teachers of Family Medicine (STFM).

    PubMed

    Little, David N; Hatch, Robert L

    2008-01-01

    The Society of Teachers of Family Medicine (STFM; http://www.stfm.org) is a community of professionals devoted to teaching family medicine through undergraduate, graduate, and continuing medical education. This multidisciplinary group of physicians, educators, behavioral scientists, and researchers works to further STFM's mission of improving the health of all people through education, research, patient care, and advocacy. STFM holds an annual conference each spring and a predoctoral education conference each winter. STFM held its 34th Predoctoral Education Conference in Portland, Oregon, from January 24 to 27, 2008. The theme was "Igniting Students' Passion for Serving the Underserved." Christine Stabler, MD, Lancaster General Hospital, Lancaster, Pennsylvania, opened the conference with a plenary presentation on the passion for patient care, medical education, and advocacy that have defined her own career and continue to inspire medical trainees. Kenneth Ginsburg, MD, The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and the University of Pennsylvania, continued the theme of igniting students' passion by exploring the ways in which socialization in medical education can teach students to suppress their feelings and humorously illustrated how accessing a full range of emotions can lead to satisfying lives and practices. Tanya Page, MD, a recent residency graduate practicing in a homeless clinic in Portland, Oregon, described her own passion for caring for the underserved. Participants shared ideas and learned new skills in more than 65 workshops, seminars, and discussions as well as 65 educational research and curriculum evaluation papers. The unifying theme was incorporating care of the underserved in medical education. From the educational research or curriculum evaluation papers presented at the conference, the STFM Education Committee selected 8 papers felt to be of interest to readers of Teaching and Learning in Medicine. PMID:18855240

  10. Women’s impressions of their inpatient birth care as provided by family physicians in the Shizuoka Family Medicine Training Program in Japan

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Even though Japan faces serious challenges in women’s health care such as a rapidly aging population, attrition of obstetrical providers, and a harsh legal climate, few family medicine residency training programs in Japan include training in obstetrics, and the literature lacks research on women’s views of intra-partum pregnancy care by family physicians. Findings In this exploratory study, we conducted semi-structured qualitative interviews with five women who received their admission, intrapartum, delivery and discharge care from family medicine residents in the obstetrics ward of a community training hospital. Four women had vaginal births, and one had a Cesarean section. Three were primiparous, and two multiparous. Their ages ranged from 22–33. They found value in family physician medical knowledge and easy communication style, though despite explanation, some had trouble understanding the family physician’s scope of work. These women identified negative aspects of the hospital environment, and wanted more anticipatory guidance about what to expect physically after birth, but were enthusiastic about seeing a family doctor after discharge. Conclusions These results demonstrate the feasibility of family medicine residents providing inpatient birth care in a community hospital, and that patients are receptive to family physicians providing that care as well after discharge. Women’s primary concerns relate mostly to hospital environment issues, and better understanding the care family physicians provide. This illustrates-areas for family physicians to work for improvements. PMID:23698036

  11. A Family’s Request for Complementary Medicine After Patient Brain Death

    PubMed Central

    Applbaum, Arthur Isak; Tilburt, Jon C.; Collins, Michael T.; Wendler, David

    2009-01-01

    A 19-year-old woman living with relatives in the United States who was admitted for elective cranial surgery for complications related to a congenital disorder developed an acute intracranial hemorrhage 10 days after surgery. The patient was declared dead following repeat negative apnea tests. The patient’s father requested that the treating team administer an unverified traditional medicinal substance to the patient. Because of the unusual nature of this request, the treating team called an ethics consultation. The present article reviews this case and discusses other cases that share key features to determine whether and when it is appropriate to accommodate requests for interventions on patients who have been declared dead. PMID:18477786

  12. Public Health Aspects of the Family Medicine Concepts in South Eastern Europe

    PubMed Central

    Masic, Izet; Hadziahmetovic, Miran; Donev, Doncho; Pollhozani, Azis; Ramadani, Naser; Skopljak, Amira; Pasagic, Almir; Roshi, Enver; Zunic, Lejla; Zildzic, Muharem

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Family medicine as a part of the primary health care is devoted to provide continuous and comprehensive health care to the individuals and families regardless of age, gender, types of diseases and affected system or part of the body. Special emphasis in such holistic approach is given to the prevention of diseases and health promotion. Family Medicine is the first step/link between doctors and patients within patients care as well as regular inspections/examinations and follow-up of the health status of healthy people. Most countries aspire to join the European Union and therefore adopting new regulations that are applied in the European Union. Aim: The aim of this study is to present the role and importance of family medicine, or where family medicine is today in 21 Century from the beginning of development in these countries. The study is designed as a descriptive epidemiological study with data from 10 countries of the former Communist bloc, Slovenia, Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Serbia, Montenegro, Macedonia, Kosovo, Albania, Bulgaria, Romania, Czech Republic, Slovakia and Hungary, just about half of them are members of the EU. We examined the following variables: socio-organizational indicators, health and educational indicators and health indicators. The data used refer to 2002 and as a source of data are used official data from reference WebPages of family medicine doctors associations, WONCA website (EURACT, EQuiP, EGPRN), WebPages of Bureau of Statistics of the countries where the research was conducted as well as the Ministries of Health. Results: Results indicates that the failures and shortcomings of health care organizations in Southeast Europe. Lack of money hinders the implementation of health care reform in all mentioned countries, the most of them that is more oriented to Bismarck financing system. Problems in the political, legal and economic levels are obstacles for efficient a problem reconstructing health care system toward family medicine and primary prevention interventions. The population is not enough educated for complicated enforcement for and prevention of diseases that have a heavy burden on the budget. Health insurance and payment of health services is often a problem, because the patients must be treated regardless of their insurance coverage and financial situation. The decrease in production and economic growth, as well as low gross national income in the countries with economic crisis, lead to the inability of treatment for a large number of the population. Such situation a system leads to additional debts and loans to healthcare system. Measures implemented for provision of acute curative care largely did not lead to improvements in the health status of the population. Educational and preventive measures, as well as higher standards for quality and accessibility of health care services for entire population in each country, especially those struggling are bound to joining the European Union and their implementation must start. The most A large number of medical institutions are is inefficient in health education and health promotion and must work to educate patients and families and increase the quality of preventive health services. Modernization of health care delivery and joining the European Union by increasing overall economic stability of countries is one of the primary goals of all countries in Southeast Europe. PMID:25395894

  13. Stem Cell & Regenerative Medicine Consortium (SCRMC), The University of Hong Kong School of Engineering, University of California, Irvine

    E-print Network

    Leung, Ka-Cheong

    Sponsors: Stem Cell & Regenerative Medicine Consortium (SCRMC), The University of Hong Kong School of Engineering, University of California, Irvine Strategic Research Theme, Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine & Technology Parks Corporation Co-organizers: School of Engineering, University of California, Irvine Stem Cell

  14. RICE UNIVERSITY Mapping the Structural Landscape of Protein Families

    E-print Network

    Kavraki, Lydia E.

    RICE UNIVERSITY Mapping the Structural Landscape of Protein Families with Geometric Feature Vectors and Cell Biology Houston, Texas December, 2009 #12;ABSTRACT Mapping the Structural Landscape of Protein be used separately or in combination for protein function analysis. The Family-wise Analysis of Sub

  15. The views of key leaders in South Africa on implementation of family medicine: critical role in the district health system

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Integrated team-based primary care is an international imperative. This is required more so in Africa, where fragmented verticalised care dominates. South Africa is trying to address this with health reforms, including Primary Health Care Re-engineering. Family physicians are already contributing to primary care despite family medicine being only fully registered as a full specialty in South Africa in 2008. However the views of leaders on family medicine and the role of family physicians is not clear, especially with recent health reforms. The aim of this study was to understand the views of key government and academic leaders in South Africa on family medicine, roles of family physicians and human resource issues. Methods This was a qualitative study with academic and government leaders across South Africa. In-depth interviews were conducted with sixteen purposively selected leaders using an interview guide. Thematic content analysis was based on the framework method. Results Whilst family physicians were seen as critical to the district health system there was ambivalence on their leadership role and ‘specialist’ status. National health reforms were creating both threats and opportunities for family medicine. Three key roles for family physicians emerged: supporting referrals; clinical governance/quality improvement; and providing support to community-oriented care. Respondents’ urged family physicians to consolidate the development and training of family physicians, and shape human resource policy to include family physicians. Conclusions Family physicians were seen as critical to the district health system in South Africa despite difficulties around their precise role. Whilst their role was dominated by filling gaps at district hospitals to reduce referrals it extended to clinical governance and developing community-oriented primary care - a tall order, requiring strong teamwork. Innovative team-based service delivery is possible despite human resource challenges, but requires family physicians to proactively develop team-based models of care, reform education and advocate for clearer policy, based on the views of these respondents. PMID:24961449

  16. Stanford University School of Medicine Department of Otolaryngology/Head & Neck

    E-print Network

    Bogyo, Matthew

    Stanford University School of Medicine Department of Otolaryngology/Head & Neck Surgery Resident............................................................................................................................................ 9 STANFORD HEAD AND NECK TEAM...................................................................................................................................14 Goals and Objectives PGY 2: SUH Head & Neck

  17. Stanford University School of Medicine Department of Otolaryngology/Head & Neck

    E-print Network

    Kay, Mark A.

    Stanford University School of Medicine Department of Otolaryngology/Head & Neck Surgery Resident ........................................................................................................................................... 10 STANFORD HEAD AND NECK TEAM .................................................................................................................................... 15 Goals and Objectives PGY 2: SUH Head & Neck

  18. ALBERT EINSTEIN COLLEGE of MEDICINE of YESHIVA UNIVERSITY DEPARTMENT of ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH and SAFETY

    E-print Network

    Emmons, Scott

    ALBERT EINSTEIN COLLEGE of MEDICINE of YESHIVA UNIVERSITY DEPARTMENT of ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH workplace. Thank you. Anthony Chibbaro Department of Environmental Health and Safety Albert Einstein College

  19. Scaling up family medicine training in Gezira, Sudan – a 2-year in-service master programme using modern information and communication technology: a survey study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In 2010 the Gezira Family Medicine Project (GFMP) was initiated in Gezira state, Sudan, designed as an in-service training model. The project is a collaboration project between the University of Gezira, which aims to provide a 2-year master’s programme in family medicine for practicing doctors, and the Ministry of Health, which facilitates service provision and funds the training programme. This paper presents the programme, the teaching environment, and the first batch of candidates enrolled. Methods In this study a self-administered questionnaire was used to collect baseline data at the start of the project from doctors who joined the programme. A checklist was also used to assess the health centres where they work. A total of 188 out of 207 doctors responded (91%), while data were gathered from all 158 health centres (100%) staffed by the programme candidates. Results The Gezira model of in-service family medicine training has succeeded in recruiting 207 candidates in its first batch, providing health services in 158 centres, of which 84 had never been served by a doctor before. The curriculum is community oriented. The mean age of doctors was 32.5 years, 57% were males, and 32% were graduates from the University of Gezira. Respondents stated high confidence in practicing some skills such as asthma management and post-abortion uterine evacuation. They were least confident in other skills such as managing depression or inserting an intrauterine device. The majority of health centres was poorly equipped for management of noncommunicable diseases, as only 10% had an electrocardiography machine (ECG), 5% had spirometer, and 1% had a defibrillator. Conclusions The Gezira model has responded to local health system needs. Use of modern information and communication technology is used to facilitate both health service provision and training. The GFMP represents an example of a large-volume scaling-up programme of family medicine in Africa. PMID:24443978

  20. Interactions with the pharmaceutical industry: a survey of family medicine residents in Ontario.

    PubMed Central

    Sergeant, M D; Hodgetts, P G; Godwin, M; Walker, D M; McHenry, P

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the attitudes, knowledge and practices of family medicine residents relating to the pharmaceutical industry and to assess the effectiveness of existing guidelines on appropriate interactions with the pharmaceutical industry. DESIGN: Survey by mailed questionnaire. SETTING: Ontario. PARTICIPANTS: All 262 second-year family medicine residents in Ontario (seven centres); 226 (86.3%) responded. RESULTS: Fifty-two (23.0%) of the residents who responded stated that they had read the CMA policy statement on appropriate interactions between physicians and the pharmaceutical industry. A total of 124 (54.9%) stated that they would attend a private dinner paid for by a pharmaceutical representative; the proportion was not significantly reduced among those who had read the CMA guidelines, which prohibit the acceptance of personal gifts. In all, 186 (82.3%) reported that they would like the opportunity to interact with pharmaceutical representatives in an educational setting, even though several programs now discourage these interactions. Approximately three quarters (172/226 [76.1%]) of the residents indicated that they plan to see pharmaceutical representatives in their future practice. Residents at Centre 2 were significantly more critical of the pharmaceutical industry than those from the other centres. Overall, being aware of, and familiar with, departmental policy or CMA policy on interactions with the pharmaceutical industry did not affect the residents' attitudes or intended future practices. CONCLUSION: The presence of guidelines concerning physicians' interactions with the pharmaceutical industry does not appear to have a significant impact on family medicine residents in Ontario. PMID:8911290

  1. The Family Medicine Residency Training Initiative in Miscarriage Management: Impact on Practice in Washington State

    PubMed Central

    Darney, Blair G.; Weaver, Marcia R.; Stevens, Nancy; Kimball, Jeana; Prager, Sarah W.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES Non-complicated spontaneous abortion cases should be counseled about the full range of management approaches, including uterine evacuation using manual vacuum aspiration (MVA). The Residency Training Initiative in Miscarriage Management (RTI-MM) is an intensive, multidimensional intervention designed to facilitate implementation of office-based management of spontaneous abortion using MVA in family medicine residency settings. The purpose of this study was to test the impact of the RTI-MM on self-reported use of MVA for management of spontaneous abortion. METHODS We used a pretest/posttest one group study design and a web-based, anonymous survey to collect data on knowledge, attitudes, perceived barriers, and practice of office-based management of spontaneous abortion. We used multivariable models to estimate incident relative risks and accounted for data clustering at the residency site level. RESULTS Our sample included 441 residents and faculty from 10 family medicine residency sites. Our findings show a positive association between the RTI-MM and self-reported use of MVA for management of spontaneous abortion (adjusted RR=9.11 [CI=4.20-19.78]) and were robust to model specification. Male gender, doing any type of management of spontaneous abortion (eg, expectant, medication), other on-site reproductive health training interventions, and support staff knowledge scores were also significant correlates of physician practice of MVA. CONCLUSIONS Our findings suggest that the RTI-MM was successful in influencing the practice of management of spontaneous abortion using MVA in this population and that support staff knowledge may impact physician practice. Integrating MVA into family medicine settings would potentially improve access to evidence-based, comprehensive care for women. PMID:23378077

  2. University of Minnesota Academic Health Center Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM)

    E-print Network

    Thomas, David D.

    University of Minnesota Academic Health Center Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) Survey complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) or integrative health care. As stated in a recent NIH document a National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine. Our Academic Health Center (AHC

  3. Center for Biomedical Ethics and Humanities University of Virginia School of Medicine

    E-print Network

    Huang, Wei

    Center for Biomedical Ethics and Humanities University of Virginia School of Medicine PO Box 800761 Charlottesville VA 22908-0761 434.924.5974/434.982.3971 (fax) http://www.medicine.virginia.edu/community- service, Charlottesville VA 1 February 2012 Alpha Omega Alpha Lecture of the School of Medicine Enhancing Male Performance

  4. MEDICINETHE MAGAZINE OF THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA FACULTY OF MEDICINE

    E-print Network

    Michelson, David G.

    MEDICINETHE MAGAZINE OF THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA FACULTY OF MEDICINE 10 Repairing THE MEDICINE MAN HOW UBC PUT JAMES CARD ON THE ROAD NORTH, TO A TOWN THAT DESPERATELY NEEDED HIM #12;"IF YOU The Medicine Man: A distributed education success story 06 "You Can't Do That": How UBC's innovation

  5. A Graduate Program in Veterinary Preventive Medicine--University of Guelph--1976

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, W. R.; Barnum, D. A.

    1977-01-01

    A three-semester (12-month) diploma program for veterinarians was begun at the University of Guelph in 1971 that is applicable to veterinarians employed in public health, regulatory veterinary medicine, and animal production medicine, where there is emphasis on preventive medicine. Each student completes a project suitable for seminar presentation…

  6. Task Force Report 3. Report of the Task Force on Continuous Personal, Professional, and Practice Development in Family Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Warren A.; Avant, Robert F.; Davis, Nancy; Saultz, John; Lyons, Paul

    2004-01-01

    PURPOSE This Future of Family Medicine task force report proposes a plan for lifelong learning that is designed to ensure family physicians are prepared to deliver the core attributes and system services of family medicine throughout their careers, especially within the New Model of family medicine that has been proposed. METHODS This report is based on consideration of the proposed New Model for family medicine, along with a careful review of the data generated through research conducted for the Future of Family Medicine project. The personal and professional development of family physicians and the continuous improvement of their practices were considered with an orientation toward providing systems to support the family patient-physician covenant. As a foundation for developing its plan for lifelong learning, the task force explored domains of management mastery, including the management of knowledge and information, the management of relationships, the management of care processes, and cultural proficiency. MAJOR FINDINGS This report presents a number of proposed innovations that have the potential to assure that family physicians deliver the core attributes of family medicine throughout their careers, including linking the family physician’s personal and professional development in a developmental context, based on ongoing self-assessment through the career stages of a family physician, and the creation of continuous personal and professional development modules as a new foundation for continuing medical education and professional development. The process for the continual improvement of clinical practice in family medicine must begin with a close working relationship between the academic community and the practice community. This relationship should be iterative over time, with research creating new practice innovations, which in turn create new questions for the research enterprise. CONCLUSION While traditional continuing medical education (CME) has served to meet many of the original tasks for which it was designed, the current model does not meet many of the emerging needs of patients, physicians, or health delivery systems. For this reason, traditional CME should be replaced with a process that incorporates personal, professional, and practice development. In order to build a more dynamic and effective way to support lifelong learning and performance change, this new process must address the needs that accompany the personal and professional developmental challenges encountered throughout the course of a family physician’s professional lifetime.

  7. Universal families and quantum control in infinite dimensions

    E-print Network

    R. Vilela Mendes

    2009-02-03

    In a topological space, a family of continuous mappings is called universal if its action, in at least one element of the space, is dense. If the mappings are unitary or trace-preserving completely positive, the notion of universality is closely related to the notion of controllability in either closed or open quantum systems. Quantum controllability in infinite dimensions is discussed in this setting and minimal generators are found for full control universal families. Some of the requirements of the operators needed for control in infinite dimensions follow from the properties of the infinite unitary group. Hence, a brief discussed of this group and their appropriate mathematical spaces is also included.

  8. [An introduction to the Institute of History of Medicine in Medical School of Johns Hopkins University].

    PubMed

    Li, Sha

    2015-05-01

    The Institute of History of Medicine in Medical School of Johns Hopkins University is a well-known institute in the world. It includes the department of history of medicine, a historic collection, a library of history of medicine and an Editorial Board of the Bulletin of History of Medicine, embodying the tasks of teaching, researching and publication. The faculty members are active and outstanding in lots of fields of history of medicine. It leads the latest research on history of medicine with extensive research scope and active academic activities. PMID:26420532

  9. Behavioral interventions for office-based care: interventions in the family medicine setting.

    PubMed

    Larzelere, Michele McCarthy

    2014-03-01

    The practice of family medicine includes the care of many patients with mental health or behavior change needs. Patients in mild to moderate distress may benefit from brief interventions performed in the family physician's office. Patients in more extreme distress may be helped by referral to behavioral health clinicians for short-term or open-ended therapies. Electronic therapy programs and bibliotherapy are also useful resources. The transition to the patient-centered medical home model may allow for more widespread integration of behavioral health care clinicians into primary care, in person and through telemental health care. Integrated care holds the promise of improved access, greater effectiveness of behavioral health service provision, and enhanced efficiency of primary care for patients with behavioral health care needs. PMID:24628010

  10. Primary Care Reform: Can Quebec's Family Medicine Group Model Benefit from the Experience of Ontario's Family Health Teams?

    PubMed

    Breton, Mylaine; Lévesque, Jean-Frédéric; Pineault, Raynald; Hogg, William

    2011-11-01

    Canadian politicians, decision-makers, clinicians and researchers have come to agree that reforming primary care services is a key strategy for improving healthcare system performance. However, it is only more recently that real transformative initiatives have been undertaken in different Canadian provinces. One model that offers promise for improving primary care service delivery is the family medicine group (FMG) model developed in Quebec. A FMG is a group of physicians working closely with nurses in the provision of services to enrolled patients on a non-geographic basis. The objectives of this paper are to analyze the FMG's potential as a lever for improving healthcare system performance and to discuss how it could be improved. First, we briefly review the history of primary care in Quebec. Then we present the FMG model in relation to the four key healthcare system functions identified by the World Health Organization: (a) funding, (b) generating human and technological resources, (c) providing services to individuals and communities and (d) governance. Next, we discuss possible ways of advancing primary care reform, looking particularly at the family health team (FHT) model implemented in the province of Ontario. We conclude with recommendations to inspire other initiatives aimed at transforming primary care. PMID:23115575

  11. Founding a new College of Medicine at Florida State University.

    PubMed

    Hurt, Myra M; Harris, J Ocie

    2005-11-01

    In 2000, the Florida State University (FSU) College of Medicine was founded, becoming the first new allopathic medical school in the United States in over 20 years. The new medical school was to use community-based clinical training for the education of its students, create a technology-rich environment, and address primary care health needs of Florida's citizens, especially the elderly, rural, minorities, and underserved. The challenges faced during the creation of the new school, including accreditation and a leadership change, as well as accomplishments are described here. The new school admits a diverse student body made possible through its extensive outreach programs, fosters a humane learning environment through creation of student learning communities, has a distributed clinical training model-with clinical campuses in Orlando, Pensacola, Sarasota and Tallahassee, and with 70% of training occurring in ambulatory settings-and utilizes 21st-century information technology. The curriculum focuses on patient-centered clinical training, using the biopsychosocial model of patient care throughout the entire medical curriculum, promotes primary care and geriatrics medicine through longitudinal community experiences, relies on a hybrid curriculum for delivery of the first two years of medical education with half of class sessions occurring in small groups and on a continuum of clinical skills development throughout the first three years, and uses an interdisciplinary departmental model for faculty, which greatly facilitates delivery of an integrated curriculum. The first class was admitted in 2001 and graduated in May 2005. In February 2005, the FSU College of Medicine received full accreditation from the Liaison Committee on Medical Education. PMID:16249293

  12. Evaluating a designated family planning clinic within a genitourinary medicine clinic.

    PubMed Central

    Carlin, E M; Russell, J M; Sibley, K; Boag, F C

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To evaluate an integrated family planning clinic (FPC) established by genitourinary medicine (GUM) staff held within a GUM women-only clinic (WOC). DESIGN--A retrospective case note review of women attending the FPC during the first year January-December 1992. RESULTS--One hundred and thirteen women, aged 13-41 years, attended the FPC; 45 were new attenders, six had previously tested antibody positive for the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), seven were intravenous drug users; 54% had a history of sexually transmitted disease (STD); 17.7% were using no contraception; 32.7% had previous termination of pregnancy (TOP) with 70 TOPs in total. Within three months of FPC attendance 89 (78.8%) women had genital STD screening performed; syphilis, HIV and hepatitis B serology, together with cervical cytology were performed in 77, 18, 13 and 62 women respectively. Infections identified were similar to those identified in the GUM clinic but the prevalence of Chlamydia trachomatis in diagnosed infections was commoner in FPC attenders and epidemiological treatment commoner in GUM attenders. No high grade cytology abnormalities were detected. No positive syphilis or new HIV positive results were identified; five women were found to be hepatitis B surface antibody positive. Contraception was changed in 60.8%. Most frequently supplied was the combined oral contraceptive pill (COCP). At the first FPC attendance six women required post coital contraception (PCC) and five were already pregnant, three suspected it, two were unaware. During the year three women conceived; two used COCP, but were non compliant; one used a diaphragm with unclear compliance. Seven of the eight pregnancies were terminated. Over the following year, 1992-93, contraception was supplied to 42 women; four required PCC; two intentional pregnancies occurred. Only one of the TOP women returned. CONCLUSION--An integrated FPC provides co-ordinated sexual health care. Pregnancy, TOP and FPC re-attendance rates together with improvement strategies are discussed. Avoiding unwanted pregnancy remains a universal challenge. PMID:7744399

  13. Z:\\Common\\Vice Dean Faculty Affairs\\University Documents Governance of the Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry, University of Alberta.

    E-print Network

    MacMillan, Andrew

    Z:\\Common\\Vice Dean Faculty Affairs\\University Documents Governance of the Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry, University of Alberta. The Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry (FOMD) mirrors Governance & Dean 1.12. Faculty Affairs Committee 1.13. Space Planning Committee for FoMD 1.14. Nominating Committee

  14. The art and science of prognostication in early university medicine.

    PubMed

    Demaitre, Luke

    2003-01-01

    Prognosis occupied a more prominent place in the medieval curriculum than it does at the modern university. Scholastic discussions were rooted in the Hippocratic Aphorisms and shaped by Galen's treatises On Crisis and On Critical Days. Medical prediction, as an art dependent on personal skills such as memory and conjecture, was taught with the aid of the liberal arts of rhetoric and logic. Scientific predictability was sought in branches of mathematics, moving from periodicity and numerology to astronomy. The search for certitude contributed to the cultivation of astrology; even at its peak, however, astrological medicine did not dominate the teaching on prognostication. The ultimate concern, which awaits further discussion, was not even with forecasting as such, but with the physician and, indeed, the patient. PMID:14657583

  15. A retrospective review of student pharmacist medication reconciliation activities in an outpatient family medicine center

    PubMed Central

    Andrus, Miranda R.; Anderson, Anthony D.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Medication reconciliation in the outpatient setting is an important part of preventing medication errors, and is mandated by the Joint Commission. Objective: To describe and quantify medication reconciliation efforts by student pharmacists in an outpatient family medicine center. Methods: A retrospective review was conducted of medication reconciliation documentation forms completed by student pharmacists during an outpatient clinical rotation between May 2012 and April 2013. Discrepancies were defined as any lack of agreement between the medication list in the electronic medical record and the patient reported regimen. Descriptive statistics were used to report results. Results: A total of 557 medication reconciliation documentation forms from 12 student pharmacists were reviewed. The average number of medications per patient interviewed was 9 (range 0-25). A total of 1,783 medication discrepancies were found with an average of 3.2 discrepancies per patient. An additional 272 medication allergy discrepancies were identified. The most common discrepancy was medications the patient was no longer taking (37.3%, n=766). The second most common discrepancy was over-the-counter and herbal medications that had not been added to the medication list (16.2%, n=335). Patient counseling was documented 159 times during the medication reconciliation process. Conclusions: Medication reconciliation by student pharmacists in an outpatient family medicine center resulted in the identification of many discrepancies in medication lists in an electronic health record. Student pharmacists also documented and clarified medication allergies and performed patient counseling. PMID:25883689

  16. Assessing medical student empathy in a family medicine clinical test: validity of the CARE measure

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Julie Y.; Chin, Weng Y.; Fung, Colman S. C.; Wong, Carlos K. H.; Tsang, Joyce P. Y.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The Consultation and Relational Empathy (CARE) measure developed and validated in primary care settings and used for general practitioner appraisal is a 10-item instrument used by patients to assess doctors’ empathy. The aim of this study is to investigate the validity of the CARE measure in assessing medical students’ empathy during a formative family medicine clinical test. Method All 158 final-year medical students were assessed by trained simulated patients (SPs) – who completed the CARE measure, the Jefferson Scale of Patient Perceptions of Physician Empathy (JSPPPE), and a global rating score to assess students’ empathy and history-taking ability. Results Exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis identified a unidimensional structure. The CARE measure strongly correlated with both convergent measures: global rating (?=0.79 and <0.001) and JSPPPE (?=0.77 and <0.001) and weakly correlated with the divergent measure: history-taking score (?=0.28 and <0.001). Internal consistency was excellent (Cronbach’s ?=0.94). Conclusion The CARE measure had strong construct and internal reliability in a formative, undergraduate family medicine examination. Its role in higher stakes examinations and other educational settings should be explored. PMID:26154863

  17. Department of Community Health Sciences Faculty of Medicine -University of Calgary

    E-print Network

    Calgary, University of

    Department of Community Health Sciences Faculty of Medicine - University of Calgary Page 1 of 5 ................................................................................................................. 4 3.3 Ethics Approval to Conduct Your Study Departmental Council 2014/01/31 #12;Department of Community Health Sciences Faculty of Medicine - University

  18. WELCOME TO GRADUATE MEDICAL EDUCATION AT THE UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT SCHOOL OF MEDICINE

    E-print Network

    Page 21 WELCOME TO GRADUATE MEDICAL EDUCATION AT THE UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT SCHOOL OF MEDICINE school and ending after the educational requirements for one of the medical specialties certifying boards. The University Of Connecticut School Of Medicine is committed to excellence in education, medical care

  19. University of Miami Miller School of Medicine Medical Student Rights and Responsibilities Handbook 2012-2013

    E-print Network

    Shyu, Mei-Ling

    University of Miami Miller School of Medicine Medical Student Rights and Responsibilities Handbook of the medical education programs at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine (UMMSM). Medical schools of professional behavior can be clearly defined and monitored during the medical school experience. Forms

  20. INTERACTION BETWEEN UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT SCHOOL OF MEDICINE GRADUATE MEDICAL RESIDENTS/FELLOWS AND THE

    E-print Network

    Page 141 ` INTERACTION BETWEEN UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT SCHOOL OF MEDICINE GRADUATE MEDICAL) industry representatives for residents/fellows of the University of Connecticut School of Medicine (UConn, clinical and research missions of UConn SOM. However, these interactions must be ethical and cannot create

  1. University of Illinois College of Medicine Social Media Standards and Guidelines

    E-print Network

    Alford, Simon

    University of Illinois College of Medicine Social Media Standards and Guidelines The University of Illinois College of Medicine reminds students of their professional obligations in regard to social media capacities or students/other employees authorized by the medical school administration may use social media

  2. Evaluation of Four Commonly Used DNA Barcoding Loci for Chinese Medicinal Plants of the Family Schisandraceae

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ruozhu; Fan, Jianhua; Chen, Zhiduan

    2015-01-01

    Many species of Schisandraceae are used in traditional Chinese medicine and are faced with contamination and substitution risks due to inaccurate identification. Here, we investigated the discriminatory power of four commonly used DNA barcoding loci (ITS, trnH-psbA, matK, and rbcL) and corresponding multi-locus combinations for 135 individuals from 33 species of Schisandraceae, using distance-, tree-, similarity-, and character-based methods, at both the family level and the genus level. Our results showed that the two spacer regions (ITS and trnH-psbA) possess higher species-resolving power than the two coding regions (matK and rbcL). The degree of species resolution increased with most of the multi-locus combinations. Furthermore, our results implied that the best DNA barcode for the species discrimination at the family level might not always be the most suitable one at the genus level. Here we propose the combination of ITS+trnH-psbA+matK+rbcL as the most ideal DNA barcode for discriminating the medicinal plants of Schisandra and Kadsura, and the combination of ITS+trnH-psbA as the most suitable barcode for Illicium species. In addition, the closely related species Schisandra rubriflora Rehder & E. H. Wilson and Schisandra grandiflora Hook.f. & Thomson, were paraphyletic with each other on phylogenetic trees, suggesting that they should not be distinct species. Furthermore, the samples of these two species from the southern Hengduan Mountains region formed a distinct cluster that was separated from the samples of other regions, implying the presence of cryptic diversity. The feasibility of DNA barcodes for identification of geographical authenticity was also verified here. The database and paradigm that we provide in this study could be used as reference for the authentication of traditional Chinese medicinal plants utilizing DNA barcoding. PMID:25938480

  3. Baylor College of Medicine's support of Tulane University School of Medicine following Hurricane Katrina.

    PubMed

    Searle, Nancy S

    2007-08-01

    The authors describe how Baylor College of Medicine (BCM), with three other Texas medical schools, "adopted" virtually all the 620 medical students and 526 house officers of Tulane University School of Medicine and continued their education for eight months after most of New Orleans, including Tulane, was flooded on August 29, 2005, after Hurricane Katrina. Soon after, BCM's president asked all senior staff to take whatever actions were necessary to sustain Tulane, and on September 7, leaders from BCM and three other Texas medical schools met to plan the relocation of Tulane's students and programs. The authors explain how problems were overcome (e.g., locating the scattered Tulane students and staff, finding them lodging, obtaining their records, and providing financial aid and counseling), and how high-quality educational experiences were maintained for both Tulane's and BCM's students and residents while assisting Tulane's faculty in numerous ways, helping Tulane plan the enrollment of its following year's students, and undergoing Liaison Committee for Medical Education and Accreditation Council on Graduate Medical Education site visits to BCM. After the BCM-Tulane experience, BCM developed a disaster-management plan (available online) that could help other schools as they plan for disasters. The authors also offer lessons learned in the areas of communication, cooperation, curriculum, collaboration, contact with accrediting bodies, and compassion. They close by stating that when BCM faculty are asked "how could you take Tulane's medical school in?" their response is, "how could we not?" They continue: "In medical education, a frequent discussion is how to teach humanism and professionalism; we teach it best by modeling it." PMID:17762246

  4. Changing University Work, Freedom, Flexibility and Family

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nikunen, Minna

    2012-01-01

    This article investigates what Finnish academics on short fixed-term contracts consider to be the effects of having children on work and careers. The study is framed by the context of the current state of the university sector, its neoliberal and entrepreneurial tendencies and its claims to meritocracy. Informants express relative happiness with…

  5. Montana State University 1 Family Financial Planning

    E-print Network

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    Education Alliance (http://www.gpidea.org) (GP-IDEA). The program is registered with the Certified Financial a consortium of eight mid-western and western land-grant universities through Great Plains Interactive Distance Planner® Board of Standards and meets the education criteria for individuals who wish to fulfill

  6. Veterinary Preventive Medicine Curriculum Development at Louisiana State University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hubbert, William T.

    1976-01-01

    The program aims at training veterinarians, with interdepartmental faculty participation the rule rather than the exception. Included in the curriculum are: avian medicine, herd health management, veterinary public health, veterinary food hygiene, and regulatory veterinary medicine. (LBH)

  7. Relevance of Hypersexual Disorder to Family Medicine and Primary Care as a Complex Multidimensional Chronic Disease Construct

    PubMed Central

    Vrijhoef, Bert; De Maeseneer, Jan; Vansintejan, Johan; Devroey, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    Hypersexual disorder (HD) is not defined in a uniform way in the psychiatric literature. In the absence of solid evidence on prevalence, causes, empirically validated diagnostic criteria, instruments for diagnosis, consistent guidelines on treatment options, medical and psychosocial consequences, and type of caregivers that need to be involved, HD remains a controversial and relatively poorly understood chronic disease construct. The role of family medicine in the detection, treatment, and followup of HD is not well studied. The purpose of this paper is to describe the complexity of HD as a multidimensional chronic disease construct and its relevance to family medicine and primary care. PMID:24066230

  8. Head Start Parent & Family Program University of Windsor

    E-print Network

    Head Start Parent & Family Program University of Windsor Welcome #12;Highlights of the Day (CAW Student Centre) 11:30 ­ 2:00 Registration & Timetabling Help #12;Highlights of the Day (Handbook Smoking Area ­ beyond front doors close to Fanchette Rd. · Bathrooms ­ to the right and up the ramp · Meet

  9. Montana State University Child Development Center Family Handbook

    E-print Network

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    Montana State University Child Development Center Family Handbook September 2013 August 2014.994.2013 Bozeman, MT 59717 www.montana.edu/hhd/cdc.htm #12;The MSU Child Development Center is a community, Welcome to the MSU Child Development Center, the laboratory preschool of the Early Childhood Education

  10. Knowledge and Perceptions of Family Leave Policies Among Female Faculty in Academic Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Freund, Karen M.; Kaplan, Samantha A.; Raj, Anita; Carr, Phyllis L.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this research was to examine the knowledge and perceptions of family leave policies and practices among senior leaders including American Association of Medical College members of the Group on Women in Medicine and Science (GWIMS) to identify perceived barriers to career success and satisfaction among female faculty. Methods In 2011–2012 GWIMS representatives and senior leaders at 24 medical schools were invited to participate in an interview about faculty perceptions of gender equity and overall institutional climate. An inductive thematic analysis of the qualitative data was conducted to identify themes represented in participant responses. The research team read and reviewed institutional family leave policies for concordance with key informant descriptions. Findings 22 GWIMS representatives and senior leaders comprised the final sample. Participants were female, 18 (82%) were full professors with the remainder being associate professors. Compared with publicly available policies at each institution, the knowledge of nine participants was consistent with policies, was discrepant for six, with the remaining seven acknowledging a lack of knowledge of policies. Four major themes were identified from the interview data: 1) Framing family leave as a personal issue undermines its effect on female faculty success; 2) Poor communication of policies impairs access and affects organizational climate; 3) Discrepancies in leave implementation disadvantage certain faculty in terms of time and pay; 4) Leave policies are valued and directly related to academic productivity. Conclusions Family leave policies are an important aspect of faculty satisfaction and academic success, yet policy awareness by senior leaders is lacking. Further organizational support is needed to promote equitable policy creation and implementation to support women in medical academia. PMID:24533979

  11. Colorado State University (CSU) Job Families CSU has 20 broadly defined job families.

    E-print Network

    in this job family provide general business operations of the organization or a combination of operational and security, risk management, environmental health professionals etc. Health Care (HC): Positions in this job of the University. May include positions in food service, catering, conference services, and event planning. #12

  12. Family medicine model in Turkey: a qualitative assessment from the perspectives of primary care workers

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background A person-list-based family medicine model was introduced in Turkey during health care reforms. This study aimed to explore from primary care workers’ perspectives whether this model could achieve the cardinal functions of primary care and have an integrative position in the health care system. Methods Four groups of primary care workers were included in this exploratory-descriptive study. The first two groups were family physicians (FP) (n?=?51) and their ancillary personnel (n?=?22). The other two groups were physicians (n?=?44) and midwives/nurses (n?=?11) working in community health centres. Participants were selected for maximum variation and 102 in-depth interviews and six focus groups were conducted using a semi-structured form. Results Data analysis yielded five themes: accessibility, first-contact care, longitudinality, comprehensiveness, and coordination. Most participants stated that many people are not registered with any FP and that the majority of these belong to the most disadvantaged groups in society. FPs reported that 40-60% of patients on their lists have never received a service from them and the majority of those who use their services do not use FPs as the first point of contact. According to most participants, the list-based system improved the longitudinality of the relationship between FPs and patients. However, based on other statements, this improvement only applies to one quarter of the population. Whereas there was an improvement limited to a quantitative increase in services (immunisation, monitoring of pregnant women and infants) included in the performance-based contracting system, participants stated that services not among the performance targets, such as family planning, postpartum follow-ups, and chronic disease management, could be neglected. FPs admitted not being able to keep informed of services their patients had received at other health institutions. Half of the participants stated that the list-based system removed the possibility of evaluating the community as a whole. Conclusions According to our findings, FPs have a limited role as the first point of contact and in giving longitudinal, comprehensive, and coordinated care. The family medicine model in Turkey is unable to provide a suitable structure to integrate health care services. PMID:24571275

  13. Qualitative Evaluation of Cardiovascular Diseases Management in Family Medicine Team in One Year Level

    PubMed Central

    Beganlic, Azijada; Pavljasevic, Suzana; Kreitmayer, Sanda; Zildzic, Muharem; Softic, Albina; Selmanovic, Senada; Becarevic, Munevera

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) are the leading death cause in modern world and are the most public health problem. WHO program for CVD contains: prevention, command and follow up of CVD in global level. Aim: Investigate CVD frequency in family medicine team in 2012.year (one year period of time) and qualitative management prevention and clinical services management quality of CVD together with recommended standards. Patients and methods: clinical revision of clinical standard practice patients with CVD was provided in Family medicine team in Public Health Centre Tuzla for the period of time from January 01 2012 - December 31 2012. For quality of realized services, AKAZ standards were based for: chapter 2. Health promotion and diseases prevention 2.5. preventive clinical services; chapter 3. Clinical services, standard 3.1. Coronary diseases and standard 3.2. TIA and Stroke. From CVD register next parameters had been used: age, gender, disease diagnose, therapy, blood pressure values, total cholesterol values, ß blockers therapy, anticoagulant therapy prescription, smoker status, stop smoking recommendation and influenza vaccination recommendation. Statistical approach: All results were taken in Excel program and statistically analyzed. Descriptive standard tests were taken with measurement of central tendency and dispersion. For significant differentials achieved with ?² chances relation was taken (Odds Ratio-OR) with 95% relevant security. All tests were leveled in statistical significant from 95% (p<0,05). Results: Considering total registered habitants number 1448 (males 624 females 824) total diseases of usually CVD in Team 1 family medicine 531 (36,67%). The most frequent disease was hypertension which was presented in 30,31% of registered patients but in total CVD illness was present in 82,67%. In relation with total patients number (531), female prevalence from CVD 345:186 males vs. 65%:35%; P=0,001 and was statistically significantly higher. Almost patients were in age from ?65 years. Nearly all the standards for chapter 2. Health promotion and diseases prevention and chapter 3. Clinical services, standard 3.1. Coronary diseases and standard 3.2. TIA and Stroke are met in larger percentages than the minimum, however, bad quality signs we have found in total cholesterol control were values of total cholesterol were ? 5mmol/l achieved only in 27.58% patients with CVD. Stop smoking recommendation in smokers with TIA and Stroke (total 10 smokers) was registered in 20,00% patients. Indicator was not achieved,(min level 25%). Conclusion: Role of family medicine team is extremely important in patient care who suffer from chronically noncontagious diseases such as CVD, as one of them. Considering that in our country preventive programs for CVD are at small level, results of this study are acceptable. Our plans for personal continuous educations and patient educations about healthy life style are pointed for higher or average of achieved standards and of course everything what have to be done should be written in personal dates of patients. PMID:26261378

  14. Family medicine residents’ perceived level of comfort in treating common sports injuries across residency programs in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Amoako, Adae O; Amoako, Agyenim B; Pujalte, George GA

    2015-01-01

    Background and objective Family physicians are expected to be comfortable in treating common sports injuries. Evidence shows a limited level of comfort in treating these injuries in pediatric and internal medicine residents. Studies are lacking, however, in family medicine residents. The purpose of this study is to assess the comfort level of family medicine residents in treating common sports injuries in adults and children based on their perceived level of knowledge and attitudes. Methods This is a cross-sectional study of family medicine residents in the United Sates. A written survey of 25 questions related to sports injury knowledge and factors affecting comfort level were collected. A chi-square test was implemented in calculating P-values. Results Five hundred and fifty-seven residents responded to the survey. A higher percentage of doctors of osteopathy (86.6%, 82.5%, 69.6%, and 68.7%) compared to doctors of medicine (78.5%, 71.6%, 53.4%, and 52.8%) respectively identified ankle sprain, concussion, plantar fasciitis, and lateral epicondylitis as common injuries, and felt comfortable in treating them (P-values =0.015, 0.004, 0.0001, and 0.0002, respectively). Residents with high interest in sports medicine correctly identified the injuries as common and felt comfortable treating them as well (knowledge, P=0.027, 0.0029, <0.0001, and 0.0001, respectively; comfort level, P=0.0016, <0.0001, 0.0897, and 0.0010, respectively). Conclusion Medical education background, factors that affect training, and an interest in sports medicine contribute to residents’ knowledge and comfort level in treatment of common sports injuries. PMID:25848326

  15. VARIABLE SELECTION FOR QUALITATIVE INTERACTIONS IN PERSONALIZED MEDICINE WHILE CONTROLLING THE FAMILY-

    E-print Network

    Murphy, Susan A.

    VARIABLE SELECTION FOR QUALITATIVE INTERACTIONS IN PERSONALIZED MEDICINE WHILE CONTROLLING of treatment, often referred to as stratified or personalized medicine. Though highly sought after, methods interactions; variable selection; personalized medicine; lasso 1 INTRODUCTION The topics of treatment covariate

  16. 2016 Admissions Guide: Doctoral Program of Medicine Graduate School of Medicine, the University of Tokyo

    E-print Network

    Miyashita, Yasushi

    or are expected to complete 18 years of overseas curricular education (ending with a course in medicine, dentistry to complete 18 years of overseas curricular education (ending with a course in medicine, dentistry, pharmacy.) (Note 1) (8) Persons who have completed 16 years of overseas curricular education (including at least

  17. Cancer Research Center Indiana University School of Medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to authorize the Indiana School of Medicine to proceed with the detailed design, construction and equipping of the proposed Cancer Research Center (CRC). A grant was executed with the University on April 21, 1992. A four-story building with basement would be constructed on the proposed site over a 24-month period. The proposed project would bring together, in one building, three existing hematology/oncology basic research programs, with improved cost-effectiveness through the sharing of common resources. The proposed site is currently covered with asphaltic pavement and is used as a campus parking lot. The surrounding area is developed campus, characterized by buildings, walkways, with minimal lawns and plantings. The proposed site has no history of prior structures and no evidence of potential sources of prior contamination of the soil. Environmental impacts of construction would be limited to minor increases in traffic, and the typical noises associated with standard building construction. The proposed CRC project operation would involve the use radionuclides and various hazardous materials in conducting clinical studies. Storage, removal and disposal of hazardous wastes would be managed under existing University programs that comply with federal and state requirements. Radiological safety programs would be governed by Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) license and applicable Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations. There are no other NEPA reviews currently active which are in relationship to this proposed site. The proposed project is part of a Medical Campus master plan and is consistent with applicable local zoning and land use requirements.

  18. University of Pennsylvania Geriatric Medicine Fellowship The School of Medicine ranks in the top five research institutions in the United States. Fellows

    E-print Network

    Bushman, Frederic

    University of Pennsylvania Geriatric Medicine Fellowship The School of Medicine ranks in the top Investigator Pathway (Years 1, 2 and/or 3) Master of Clinical Epidemiology Master of Translational Medicine, ethics, palliative care, sleep Cross cutting research areas or methods: ethics, health equity, community

  19. The Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, Laboratory Medicine McMaster University, invites applications for a one year Forensic Pathology Residency Program (PGY-6) for the academic

    E-print Network

    Thompson, Michael

    The Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, Laboratory Medicine McMaster University, invites applications for a one year Forensic Pathology Residency Program (PGY-6) for the academic year July 2013-June 2014. The Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine and the Hamilton Regional

  20. Ulm University | International Graduate School in Molecular Medicine Ulm | Albert-Einstein-Allee 11, O 25 | 89081 Ulm International Graduate School in Molecular Medicine Ulm,

    E-print Network

    Pfeifer, Holger

    Ulm University | International Graduate School in Molecular Medicine Ulm | Albert-Einstein-Allee 11, O 25 | 89081 Ulm International Graduate School in Molecular Medicine Ulm, Albert-Einstein-Allee 11 to the exam. Study Programme: International PhD Programme in Molecular Medicine Last Name

  1. Ulm University | International Graduate School in Molecular Medicine Ulm Meyerhofstrae, N 27/2.011 | 89081 Ulm | International Graduate School in Molecular Medicine Ulm,

    E-print Network

    Pfeifer, Holger

    Ulm University | International Graduate School in Molecular Medicine Ulm Meyerhofstraße, N 27/2.011 | 89081 Ulm | International Graduate School in Molecular Medicine Ulm, Meyerhofstraße, N 27/2.011, 89081 to the exam. Study Programme: PhD Programme in Molecular Medicine Last Name: ___________________________ First

  2. Evaluation of the educational environment of the Saudi family medicine residency training program

    PubMed Central

    Khoja, Abdullah T.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The study was conducted to evaluate the educational environment (EE) in Family Medicine Training Programs. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional survey, The Postgraduate Hospital Educational Environment Measure (PHEEM), was distributed to all residents at the four training centers in the central region. Cronbach's alpha was used to test the reliability. The mean and standard deviation (SD) for each item, the overall score and the three domains were calculated. A multiple linear regression model was developed with PHEEM scores as an outcome. The Mann–Whitney–Wilcoxon test was used to compare each item based on the selected factors. Results: The overall score was 67.1/160 (SD: 20.1). The PHEEM's domains scores: 24.2/56 (SD: 7.13) for perception of role autonomy; 25.3/60 (SD: 8.88), for perception of teaching; and 17/44 (SD: 5.6), for perception of social support. Training center and Level of training were the significant outcome predictors. Centre 1 (Joint Program) significantly had better scores than Centre 2. The instrument showed great reliability with a Cronbach's alpha of 0.92. Conclusions: There are many problems in the training program. Urgent actions are needed to improve the residents' learning experience particularly during rotations. Also, the curriculum should be restructured, and effective training methods introduced using the Best Evidence in Medical Education to meet the expectations and learning needs of family physicians. PMID:25657612

  3. Medicines

    MedlinePLUS

    ... better. In the United States, the Food and Drug Administration is in charge of assuring the safety ... prescription and over-the-counter medicines. Even safe drugs can cause unwanted side effects or interactions with ...

  4. University of Virginia School of Medicine PO Box 800761

    E-print Network

    Huang, Wei

    , and Professor of Medical Education, UVA Co-presented with the Institute for Practical Ethics and Public Life.924.5974 http:/medicine.virginia.edu/community- service/centers/ biomedical-ethics-and- humanities Sciences, UVA School of Medicine, in observance at UVA of Primary Care Week 18 September 2013 History

  5. Since its inception in 1968, the University of Connecticut School of Dental Medicine has

    E-print Network

    Since its inception in 1968, the University of Connecticut School of Dental Medicine has been a leader in dental education, research, patient care and community outreach. The school is an integral member of the UConn Health Center, a vibrant organization composed of the Schools of Medicine and Dental

  6. Rhoda Morrow, PhD Professor Laboratory Medicine, University of Washington

    E-print Network

    Brent, Roger

    Rhoda Morrow, PhD Professor Laboratory Medicine, University of Washington Head Faculty Affairs of Washington's School of Medicine and Head of Faculty Affairs for the Vaccine and Infectious Disease Division conducted 4 interactive workshops in Kampala on career development, mentoring, and research ethics. She

  7. Forensic Pathologist Hamilton Regional Laboratory Medicine Program and McMaster University

    E-print Network

    Thompson, Michael

    Forensic Pathologist Hamilton Regional Laboratory Medicine Program and McMaster University Hamilton, ON Applications are invited for a full-time Forensic Pathologist position with the Hamilton Regional Laboratory Medicine Program (HRLMP). The Forensic Pathology Unit is a sub-specialty of the Anatomic Pathology section

  8. May 1, 2014 1 Stanford University School of Medicine Faculty Handbook

    E-print Network

    Puglisi, Joseph

    ethics and may subject the individual to discipline. The Vice Dean of the School of MedicineMay 1, 2014 1 Stanford University School of Medicine Faculty Handbook 7.3 Evaluation Processes for compliance with School guidelines regarding Instructor appointments and reappointments. He or she

  9. February 10, 2014 1 Stanford University School of Medicine Faculty Handbook

    E-print Network

    Puglisi, Joseph

    February 10, 2014 1 Stanford University School of Medicine Faculty Handbook 8.3 Evaluation by a participant in an appointment, reappointment or promotion case is a serious breach of professional ethics and may subject the individual to discipline. The Vice Dean of the School of Medicine or the Chair

  10. Epidemiology and Herd Health Training in the School of Veterinary Medicine, Louisiana State University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Archbald, L. F.; Hagstad, H. V.

    1978-01-01

    At Louisiana State University School of Veterinary Medicine, training in preventive medicine is incorporated into all four years of the curriculum. The curriculum is described with focus on the fourth year practical course that involves problem solving, using various herds in the area. (JMD)

  11. UNIVERSITY OF ST ANDREWS POLICY AND PROCEDURES ON FITNESS TO PRACTISE MEDICINE

    E-print Network

    Brierley, Andrew

    1 UNIVERSITY OF ST ANDREWS POLICY AND PROCEDURES ON FITNESS TO PRACTISE MEDICINE Contents Section 1 The Fitness to Practise Policy Section 2 The Responsibilities of the School of Medicine Section 3 Referrals and Initial Assessment Section 4 Investigation Section 5 The Fitness to Practise Panel Section 6 The Panel

  12. Faculty of Medicine Graduate School of Medicine

    E-print Network

    Miyashita, Yasushi

    2007--2008 Faculty of Medicine Graduate School of Medicine PROSPECTUS The University of Tokyo #12;#12;Welcome to Faculty of Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine The University of Tokyo Takao Shimizu Dean, Faculty of Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine The University of Tokyo The Faculty of Medicine

  13. Task Force 1. Report of the Task Force on Patient Expectations, Core Values, Reintegration, and the New Model of Family Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Green, Larry A.; Graham, Robert; Bagley, Bruce; Kilo, Charles M.; Spann, Stephen J.; Bogdewic, Stephen P.; Swanson, John

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND To lay the groundwork for the development of a comprehensive strategy to transform and renew the specialty of family medicine, this Future of Family Medicine task force was charged with identifying the core values of family medicine, developing proposals to reform family medicine to meet consumer expectations, and determining systems of care to be delivered by family medicine in the future. METHODS A diverse, multidisciplinary task force representing a broad spectrum of perspectives and expertise analyzed and discussed published literature; findings from surveys, interviews, and focus groups compiled by research firms contracted to the Future of Family Medicine project; and analyses from The Robert Graham Center, professional societies in the United States and abroad, and others. Through meetings, conference calls, and writing, and revision of a series of subcommittee reports, the entire task force reached consensus on its conclusions and recommendations. These were reviewed by an external panel of experts and revisions were made accordingly. MAJOR FINDINGS After delivering on its promise to reverse the decline of general practice in the United States, family medicine and the nation face additional challenges to assure all people receive care that is safe, effective, patient-centered, timely, efficient, and equitable. Challenges the discipline needs to address to improve family physicians’ ability to make important further contributions include developing a broader, more accurate understanding of the specialty among the public and other health professionals, addressing the wide scope and variance in practice types within family medicine, winning respect for the specialty in academic circles, making family medicine a more attractive career option, and dealing with the perception that family medicine is not solidly grounded in science and technology. The task force set forth a proposed identity statement for family medicine, a basket of services that should be reliably provided in family medicine practices, and an itemization of key attributes and core values that define the specialty. It also proposed and described a New Model of family medicine for people of all ages and both genders that emphasizes patient-centered, evidence-based, whole-person care provided through a multidisciplinary team approach in settings that reduce barriers to access and use advanced information systems and other new technologies. The task force recommended a time of active experimentation to redesign the work and workplace of family physicians; the development of revised financial models for family medicine, and a national resource to provide assistance to individual practices moving to New Model practice; and cooperation with others pursuing the transformation of frontline medicine to better serve the public. CONCLUSIONS Unless there are changes in the broader health care system and within the specialty, the position of family medicine in the United States will be untenable in a 10- to 20-year time frame. Even within the constraints of today’s flawed health care system, there are major opportunities for family physicians to realize improved results for patients and economic success. A period of aggressive experimentation and redevelopment of family medicine is needed now. The future success of the discipline and its impact on public well-being depends in large measure on family medicine’s ability to rearticulate its vision and competencies in a fashion that has greater resonance with the public while substantially revising the organization and processes by which care is delivered. When accomplished, family physicians will achieve more fully the aspirations articulated by the specialty’s core values and contribute to the solution of the nation’s serious health care problems.

  14. M E D I C I N E The Stanford University Master of Science in Medicine Degree

    E-print Network

    Kay, Mark A.

    and Regenerative Medicine, Cardiovascular Medicine, Neuro- Innovation and Translational Neuroscience, ImmunityM E D I C I N E The Stanford University Master of Science in Medicine Degree Program for PhD Students A Program to Teach Translational Medicine to Basic Scientists to Bridge the Gap between Basic

  15. University of Connecticut School of Medicine Child & Adolescent Psychiatry Residency/Fellowship

    E-print Network

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    12/09 University of Connecticut School of Medicine Child & Adolescent Psychiatry Residency: __________________ To: Child and Adolescent Psychiatry training program From of neurology (2 months minimum; one month may be child neurology) ____ FTE months of adult inpatient psychiatry

  16. University of Illinois College of Medicine at Rockford Signs Memo of Understanding with PNU in Thailand

    E-print Network

    Alford, Simon

    in Thailand University of Illinois College of Medicine at Rockford Dean Alex Stagnaro-Green, Associate Dean) in Thailand earlier this month, on the King's birthday, to sign a memo of understanding between PNU

  17. Faculty of Medicine Graduate School of Medicine

    E-print Network

    Miyashita, Yasushi

    2005--2006 Faculty of Medicine Graduate School of Medicine PROSPECTUS The University of Tokyo #12;#12;Welcome to Faculty of Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine The University of Tokyo Nobutaka Hirokawa Dean, Faculty of Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine The University of Tokyo The University of Tokyo Graduate

  18. University of Connecticut Health Center School of Dental Medicine

    E-print Network

    Kim, Duck O.

    Medicine ! Certificate/MDS ! Certificate/Ph.D. Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery ! Certificate/MDS ! Certificate/Ph.D. Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology ! Certificate ! Certificate/MDS ! Certificate/Ph.D. Oral

  19. Can Credit Systems Help in Family Medicine Training in Developing Countries? An Innovative Concept

    PubMed Central

    Raji, J. Beulah; Velavan, Jachin; Anbarasi, Sahaya; Grant, Liz

    2014-01-01

    There is irrefutable evidence that health systems perform best when supported by a Family Physician network. Training a critical mass of highly skilled Family Physicians can help developing countries to reach their Millennium Development Goals and deliver comprehensive patient-centered health care to their population. The challenge in developing countries is the need to rapidly train these Family Physicians in large numbers, while also ensuring the quality of the learning, and assuring the quality of training. The experience of Christian Medical College (CMC), Vellore, India and other global examples confirm the fact that training large numbers is possible through well-designed blended learning programs. The question then arises as to how these programs can be standardized. Globally, the concept of the “credit system” has become the watch-word for many training programs seeking standardization. This article explores the possibility of introducing incremental academic certifications using credit systems as a method to standardize these blended learning programs, gives a glimpse at the innovation that CMC, Vellore is piloting in this regard partnering with the University of Edinburgh and analyses the possible benefits and pitfalls of such an approach. PMID:25374849

  20. Integration of Complementary and Alternative Medicine into Family Practices in Germany: Results of a National Survey

    PubMed Central

    Joos, Stefanie; Musselmann, Berthold; Szecsenyi, Joachim

    2011-01-01

    More than two-thirds of patients in Germany use complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) provided either by physicians or non-medical practitioners (“Heilpraktiker”). There is little information about the number of family physicians (FPs) providing CAM. Given the widespread public interest in the use of CAM, this study aimed to ascertain the use of and attitude toward CAM among FPs in Germany. A postal questionnaire developed based on qualitatively derived data was sent to 3000 randomly selected FPs in Germany. A reminder letter including a postcard (containing a single question about CAM use in practice and reasons for non-particpation in the survey) was sent to all FPs who had not returned the questionnaire. Of the 3000 FPs, 1027 (34%) returned the questionnaire and 444 (15%) returned the postcard. Altogether, 886 of the 1471 responding FPs (60%) reported using CAM in their practice. A positive attitude toward CAM was indicated by 503 FPs (55%), a rather negative attitude by 127 FPs (14%). Chirotherapy, relaxation and neural therapy were rated as most beneficial CAM therapies by FPs, whereas neural therapy, phytotherapy and acupuncture were the most commonly used therapies in German family practices. This survey clearly demonstrates that CAM is highly valued by many FPs and is already making a substantial contribution to first-contact primary care in Germany. Therefore, education and research about CAM should be increased. Furthermore, with the provision of CAM by FPs, the role of non-medical CAM practitioners within the German healthcare system is to be questioned. PMID:19293252

  1. Impact of family medicine clerkships in undergraduate medical education: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Turkeshi, Eralda; Michels, Nele R; Hendrickx, Kristin; Remmen, Roy

    2015-01-01

    Objective Synthesise evidence about the impact of family medicine/general practice (FM) clerkships on undergraduate medical students, teaching general/family practitioners (FPs) and/or their patients. Data sources Medline, ERIC, PsycINFO, EMBASE and Web of Knowledge searched from 21 November to 17 December 2013. Primary, empirical, quantitative or qualitative studies, since 1990, with abstracts included. No country restrictions. Full text languages: English, French, Spanish, German, Dutch or Italian. Review methods Independent selection and data extraction by two authors using predefined data extraction fields, including Kirkpatrick’s levels for educational intervention outcomes, study quality indicators and Best Evidence Medical Education (BEME) strength of findings’ grades. Descriptive narrative synthesis applied. Results Sixty-four included articles: impact on students (48), teaching FPs (12) and patients (8). Sample sizes: 16-1095 students, 3-146 FPs and 94-2550 patients. Twenty-six studies evaluated at Kirkpatrick level 1, 26 at level 2 and 6 at level 3. Only one study achieved BEME’s grade 5. The majority was assessed as grade 4 (27) and 3 (33). Students reported satisfaction with content and process of teaching as well as learning in FM clerkships. They enhanced previous learning, and provided unique learning on dealing with common acute and chronic conditions, health maintenance, disease prevention, communication and problem-solving skills. Students’ attitudes towards FM were improved, but new or enhanced interest in FM careers did not persist without change after graduation. Teaching FPs reported increased job satisfaction and stimulation for professional development, but also increased workload and less productivity, depending on the setting. Overall, student’s presence and participation did not have a negative impact on patients. Conclusions Research quality on the impact of FM clerkships is still limited, yet across different settings and countries, positive impact is reported on students, FPs and patients. Future studies should involve different stakeholders, medical schools and countries, and use standardised and validated evaluation tools. PMID:26243553

  2. Characteristics of ambulatory care visits to family medicine specialists in Taiwan: a nationwide analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lynn, An-Min; Shih, Tzu-Chien; Hung, Cheng-Hao; Hwang, Shinn-Jang; Chen, Tzeng-Ji

    2015-01-01

    Although family medicine (FM) is the most commonly practiced specialty among all the medical specialties, its practice patterns have seldom been analyzed. Looking at data from Taiwan’s National Health Insurance Research Database, the current study analyzed ambulatory visits to FM specialists nationwide. From a sample dataset that randomly sampled one out of every 500 cases among a total of 309,880,000 visits in 2012, it was found that 18.8% (n = 116, 551) of the 619,760 visits in the dataset were made to FM specialists. Most of the FM services were performed by male FM physicians. Elderly patients above 80 years of age accounted for only 7.1% of FM visits. The most frequent diagnoses (22.8%) were associated acute upper respiratory infections (including ICD 460, 465 and 466). Anti-histamine agents were prescribed in 25.6% of FM visits. Hypertension, diabetes and dyslipidemia were the causes of 20.7% of the ambulatory visits made to FM specialists of all types, while those conditions accounted for only 10.6% of visits to FM clinics. The study demonstrated the relatively low proportion of chronic diseases that was managed in FM clinics in Taiwan, and our detailed results could contribute to evidence-based discussions on healthcare policymaking and residency training. PMID:26290798

  3. Smoking cessation program in outpatient clinics of Family Medicine Department in Taiwan: a longitudinal evaluation.

    PubMed

    Hsueh, Kuang-Chieh; Chen, Chih-Yin; Yang, Yi-Hsin; Huang, Chih-Ling

    2010-03-01

    The Government of Taiwan has imposed a tobacco health tax of NT$5 (US$0.14) per pack of cigarettes since January 2002. The Department of Health has now begun to fund a smoking cessation program that provides nicotine-replacement therapy (NRT) and brief counseling by physicians in outpatient clinics. The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the smoking cessation program with a 3-year follow-up review implemented at outpatient clinics, which were run by the Family Medicine Department in a medical center, with a total of 772 adult participants. The abstinence rates were 99.7%, 49.2%, 37.7%, 30.2%, and 22.7%, at the 1-, 3-, 6-, 12-, and 36-month points, respectively. The frequency of clinic visits is a major factor predicting long-term cessation. The results indicate the need to pursue implementation and evaluation of multidisciplinary interventions in smoking cessation clinics with a longer follow-up, including the promotion of compliance to increase clinic visits and prevent relapse. PMID:20164104

  4. Win/win: creating collaborative training opportunities for behavioral health providers within family medicine residency programs.

    PubMed

    Ruddy, Nancy Breen; Borresen, Dorothy; Myerholtz, Linda

    2013-01-01

    Integrating behavioral health into primary healthcare offers multiple advantages for patients and health professionals. This model requires a new skill set for all healthcare professionals that is not emphasized in current educational models. The new skills include interprofessional team-based care competencies and expanded patient care competencies. Health professionals must learn new ways to efficiently and effectively address health behavior change, and manage behavioral health issues such as depression and anxiety. Learning environments that co-train mental health and primary care professionals facilitate acquisition of both teamwork and patient care competencies for mental health and primary care professional trainees. Family Medicine Residency programs provide an excellent opportunity for co-training. This article serves as a "how to" guide for residency programs interested in developing a co-training program. Necessary steps to establish and maintain a program are reviewed, as well as goals and objectives for a co-training curriculum and strategies to overcome barriers and challenges in co-training models. PMID:24261270

  5. Sounding Narrative Medicine: Studying Students’ Professional Identity Development at Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Eliza; Balmer, Dorene; Hermann, Nellie; Graham, Gillian; Charon, Rita

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To learn what medical students derive from training in humanities, social sciences, and the arts in a narrative medicine curriculum and to explore narrative medicine’s framework as it relates to students’ professional development. Method On completion of required intensive, half-semester narrative medicine seminars in 2010, 130 second-year medical students at Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons participated in focus group discussions of their experiences. Focus group transcriptions were submitted to close iterative reading by a team who performed a grounded-theory-guided content analysis, generating a list of codes into which statements were sorted to develop overarching themes. Provisional interpretations emerged from the close and repeated readings, suggesting a fresh conceptual understanding of how and through what avenues such education achieves its goals in clinical training. Results Students’ comments articulated the known features of narrative medicine—attention, representation, and affiliation—and endorsed all three as being valuable to professional identity development. They spoke of the salience of their work in narrative medicine to medicine and medical education and its dividends of critical thinking, reflection, and pleasure. Critiques constituted a small percentage of the statements in each category. Conclusions Students report that narrative medicine seminars support complex interior, interpersonal, perceptual, and expressive capacities. Students’ lived experiences confirm some expectations of narrative medicine curricular planners while exposing fresh effects of such work to view. PMID:24362390

  6. Relevance of Chronic Lyme Disease to Family Medicine as a Complex Multidimensional Chronic Disease Construct: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Goderis, Geert

    2014-01-01

    Lyme disease has become a global public health problem and a prototype of an emerging infection. Both treatment-refractory infection and symptoms that are related to Borrelia burgdorferi infection remain subject to controversy. Because of the absence of solid evidence on prevalence, causes, diagnostic criteria, tools and treatment options, the role of autoimmunity to residual or persisting antigens, and the role of a toxin or other bacterial-associated products that are responsible for the symptoms and signs, chronic Lyme disease (CLD) remains a relatively poorly understood chronic disease construct. The role and performance of family medicine in the detection, integrative treatment, and follow-up of CLD are not well studied either. The purpose of this paper is to describe insights into the complexity of CLD as a multidimensional chronic disease construct and its relevance to family medicine by means of a systematic literature review. PMID:25506429

  7. History of the renal section, New York University School of Medicine 1926-1986, New York University Medical Center.

    PubMed Central

    Chasis, H.

    1989-01-01

    This history of the Renal Section at New York University School of Medicine ascribes its birth to a policy introduced by John Henry Wyckoff in 1924 that divided the Department of Medicine into sections devoted to the various subspecialties. Physicians selected to head each section sought further training. William Goldring, asked to organize the kidney section, spent a sabbatical year working with Homer William Smith, chairman and professor of the department of physiology at New York University School of Medicine. The second event was the development of a postdoctoral fellowship program in which medical school graduates, following completion of their intern and residency program, returned to basic science departments for exposure to and training in research in preparation for their return to clinical medicine. The aim of this fellowship program was to introduce the experimental method, which had been productive in the physical sciences, to the study and treatment of disease in man. The third event was the continuous collaboration between members of the Department of Medicine and the Department of Physiology under the chairmanship of Homer Smith. Experimental protocols in cardiovascular and renal physiology developed in the laboratory were carried over to Bellevue Hospital for studies and treatment of patients with hypertensive and renal diseases under the direction of members of the Renal Section. The final step conceived by Saul J. Farber, Chairman and Professor of the Department of Medicine was unification into a single group of all faculty members working in the field of hypertensive and renal diseases in Bellevue, University, and Manhattan Veterans Administration Hospitals. The Renal Section then can attribute its origin and development to the establishment of divisions within the Department of Medicine, the postdoctoral fellowship program, and the collaboration between the Departments of Medicine and Physiology. The establishment of the Renal Section served as a prototype for organizing medical school faculties into teams responsible for teaching, investigation, and treating hypertensive and renal diseases and spawned nephrology as a subspecialty of Internal Medicine. PMID:2686789

  8. DEPARTMENT OF EPIDEMIOLOGY & PUBLIC HEALTH UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND SCHOOL OF MEDICINE

    E-print Network

    Weber, David J.

    DEPARTMENT OF EPIDEMIOLOGY & PUBLIC HEALTH UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND SCHOOL OF MEDICINE The Division of Gerontology in the Department of Epidemiology and Public Health of the University of Maryland School member will have expertise in one or more areas within the epidemiology of aging and/or gerontology

  9. Centre for the History of Medicine in Ireland University College Dublin &

    E-print Network

    Centre for the History of Medicine in Ireland University College Dublin & University of Ulster Mental Health Act in Ireland. His work is complementary to the Centre's expertise in the history on the History of Public Health in Northern Ireland Project which looks at the provision of public health under

  10. University of Virginia School of Medicine PO Box 800761

    E-print Network

    Huang, Wei

    noted) 10 September 2014 A John F. Anderson Memorial Lecture Healing in Medicine: Lessons from and the Institute for Practical Ethics and Public Life 17 September 2014 A John F. Anderson Memorial Lecture The Ash. Anderson Memorial Lecture Overdiagnosed: Making People Sick in the Pursuit of Health H. Gilbert Welch MD

  11. University of Virginia School of Medicine PO Box 800761

    E-print Network

    Huang, Wei

    .924.5974 http:/medicine.virginia.edu/community- service/centers/ biomedical-ethics-and- humanities/medical: Andreas Vesalius Turns 500, 1514-2015 Luke Demaitre PhD, Visiting Professor of Medical Education (History: Demonstrating Not So "Gross" Anatomy Danny Quirk BFA, Medical/Anatomical Illustrator, Springfield MA Co

  12. Comparative Review of Education Programs of Family Medicine (FM) in Bosnia and Herzegovina and Several Transition Countries

    PubMed Central

    Masic, Izet; Skopljak, Amira; Jatic, Zaim

    2014-01-01

    Family Medicine as an independent medical discipline is relatively young in the countries of Southeast Europe. Still are used the old models of all forms of education in this module, although most countries accepted Bologna undergraduate teaching concept and already implement it with greater or lesser success. Measuring the effects of the qualities of these concepts and models is not done systematically nor in uniform manner, so it could not be compared by the unique variables measuring the quality of education curricula, and especially the quality of education level of the graduates at the first, second and third degree courses and other forms of education. This paper provides a comparative overview of the state of education in the area of family medicine in the region. It creates comparison according to the study duration for undergraduate and postgraduate studies, doctoral studies and specialized studies in specified areas. What stand out are the proposals to improve education in the field of family medicine in the region. PMID:25685090

  13. Medical student attitudes towards family medicine in Spain: a statewide analysis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Family and community medicine (FM) became a recognized specialty in Spain in 1978; however, most medical schools in Spain still lack mandatory core courses in FM. In order to explore the perceptions, expectations and level of information amongst medical students in Spain in relation to FM and PC, and the training in these areas in the curriculum of the Medical Schools, a survey was developed to be administered in medical schools every two years. This article presents data from the first questionnaire administration. Methods The study population was all first-, third-, and fifth-year students (2009–2010) in 22 participating medical schools in Spain (of 27 total). The 83-item survey had three sections: personal data, FM training, professional practice expectations, and preferences). Chi-squared test or analyses of variance were used, as appropriate. Results We had a 41.8% response rate (n?=?5299/12924); 89.8% considered the social role of FM to be essential, while only 20% believed the specialty was well respected within the medical profession. The appeal of FM increased with years of study, independent of student characteristics or medical school attended. Among third and fifth-year students, 54.6% said their specialty preferences had changed during medical school; 73.6% felt that FM specialists should teach FM courses, and 83.3% thought that FM rotations in primary care centres were useful. Conclusions Students valued the social role of FM more highly than its scientific standing. The vast majority believe that FM training should be mandatory. Only 25% of first-year students have clear preferences for a specialization. Interest in FM increases moderately over their years of study. Working conditions in FM have decisive influence in choosing a specialty. PMID:22642617

  14. Developing and Successfully Implementing a Competency-Based Portfolio Assessment System in a Postgraduate Family Medicine Residency Program.

    PubMed

    McEwen, Laura A; Griffiths, Jane; Schultz, Karen

    2015-11-01

    The use of portfolios in postgraduate medical residency education to support competency development is increasing; however, the processes by which these assessment systems are designed, implemented, and maintained are emergent. The authors describe the needs assessment, development, implementation, and continuing quality improvement processes that have shaped the Portfolio Assessment Support System (PASS) used by the postgraduate family medicine program at Queen's University since 2009. Their description includes the impetus for change and contextual realities that guided the effort, plus the processes used for selecting assessment components and developing strategic supports. The authors discuss the identification of impact measures at the individual, programmatic, and institutional levels and the ways the department uses these to monitor how PASS supports competency development, scaffolds residents' self-regulated learning skills, and promotes professional identity formation. They describe the "academic advisor" role and provide an appendix covering the portfolio elements. Reflection elements include learning plans, clinical question logs, confidence surveys, and reflections about continuity of care and significant incidents. Learning module elements cover the required, online bioethics, global health, and consult-request modules. Assessment elements cover each resident's research project, clinical audits, presentations, objective structured clinical exam and simulated office oral exam results, field notes, entrustable professional activities, multisource feedback, and in-training evaluation reports. Document elements are the resident's continuing medical education activities including procedures log, attendance log, and patient demographic summaries.The authors wish to support others who are engaged in the systematic portfolio-design process or who may adapt aspects of PASS for their local programs. PMID:25993277

  15. SYMPTOMATOLOGY AND COMORBIDITY OF SOMATIZATION DISORDER AMONGST GENERAL OUTPATIENTS ATTENDING A FAMILY MEDICINE CLINIC IN SOUTH WEST NIGERIA

    PubMed Central

    Obimakinde1, A.M.; Ladipo, M.M.; A.E. Irabor

    2014-01-01

    Background: Individuals with somatization may be the most difficult to manage because of the diverse and frequent complaints across many organ systems. They often use impressionistic language to describe circumstantial symptoms which though bizarre, may resemble genuine diseases. The disorder is best understood in the context "illness" behaviour, masking underlying mental disorder, manifesting solely as somatic symptoms or with comorbidity. Objective: To evaluate somatization symptoms and explore its comorbidity in order to improve the management of these patients. Methods: A cross-sectional survey of 60 somatizing patients who were part of a case-control study, selected by consecutive sampling of 2668 patients who presented at the Family Medicine Clinic of University College Hospital Ibadan, Nigeria between May-August 2009. Data was collected using the ICPC-2, WHO- Screener and Diagnostic Schedule and analysed with SPSS 16. Results: There were at least 5 symptoms of somatization in 93.3% of the patients who were mostly females. Majority had crawling sensation, "headache", unexplained limb ache, pounding heart, lump in the throat and insomnia. The mean age at onset was 35yrs with 90% having recurrence of at least 10yrs.Approximately 54% had comorbidity with cardiovascular disease being the most prevalent. Conclusions: The study revealed that somatization is not a specific disease but one with a spectrum of expression. This supports proposition that features for the diagnosis of somatization could be presence of three or more vague symptoms and a chronic course lasting over two years. It is important to be conversant with pattern of symptoms and possible comorbidity for effective management of these patients. PMID:26069465

  16. School of Dental Medicine Academic Plan As an integral member at the University of Connecticut, the School of Dental Medicine is committed to

    E-print Network

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    School of Dental Medicine Academic Plan 2011-2016 As an integral member at the University of Connecticut, the School of Dental Medicine is committed to fulfillment of both its unique aspirations it academic plan for 2009-2014 entitled "Our World, Our People, Our Future". Preamble 1 The School of Dental

  17. LOCH Case study – Implementation of HEFCE Open Access policy for the next REF within the College of Medicine and Veterinary Medicine, University of Edinburgh 

    E-print Network

    Krzak, Anna

    2015-03-23

    This case study gives an overview of the local preparations being made for Open Access in the post-2014 REF within the College of Medicine and Veterinary Medicine (CMVM) at the University of Edinburgh, and is published as part of the Jisc...

  18. Universal Entropy of Word Ordering Across Linguistic Families

    PubMed Central

    Montemurro, Marcelo A.; Zanette, Damián H.

    2011-01-01

    Background The language faculty is probably the most distinctive feature of our species, and endows us with a unique ability to exchange highly structured information. In written language, information is encoded by the concatenation of basic symbols under grammatical and semantic constraints. As is also the case in other natural information carriers, the resulting symbolic sequences show a delicate balance between order and disorder. That balance is determined by the interplay between the diversity of symbols and by their specific ordering in the sequences. Here we used entropy to quantify the contribution of different organizational levels to the overall statistical structure of language. Methodology/Principal Findings We computed a relative entropy measure to quantify the degree of ordering in word sequences from languages belonging to several linguistic families. While a direct estimation of the overall entropy of language yielded values that varied for the different families considered, the relative entropy quantifying word ordering presented an almost constant value for all those families. Conclusions/Significance Our results indicate that despite the differences in the structure and vocabulary of the languages analyzed, the impact of word ordering in the structure of language is a statistical linguistic universal. PMID:21603637

  19. Training in childhood obesity management in the United States: a survey of pediatric, internal medicine-pediatrics and family medicine residency program directors

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Information about the availability and effectiveness of childhood obesity training during residency is limited. Methods We surveyed residency program directors from pediatric, internal medicine-pediatrics (IM-Peds), and family medicine residency programs between September 2007 and January 2008 about childhood obesity training offered in their programs. Results The response rate was 42.2% (299/709) and ranged by specialty from 40.1% to 45.4%. Overall, 52.5% of respondents felt that childhood obesity training in residency was extremely important, and the majority of programs offered training in aspects of childhood obesity management including prevention (N = 240, 80.3%), diagnosis (N = 282, 94.3%), diagnosis of complications (N = 249, 83.3%), and treatment (N = 242, 80.9%). However, only 18.1% (N = 54) of programs had a formal childhood obesity curriculum with variability across specialties. Specifically, 35.5% of IM-Peds programs had a formal curriculum compared to only 22.6% of pediatric and 13.9% of family medicine programs (p < 0.01). Didactic instruction was the most commonly used training method but was rated as only somewhat effective by 67.9% of respondents using this method. The most frequently cited significant barrier to implementing childhood obesity training was competing curricular demands (58.5%). Conclusions While most residents receive training in aspects of childhood obesity management, deficits may exist in training quality with a minority of programs offering a formal childhood obesity curriculum. Given the high prevalence of childhood obesity, a greater emphasis should be placed on development and use of effective training strategies suitable for all specialties training physicians to care for children. PMID:20163732

  20. Bonnie Spring holds a PhD from Harvard University and is Professor of Preventive Medicine, Psychology, and Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Director of Behavioral Medicine, and Co-Program Leader in Cancer Prevention and Control at Northwestern Universit

    Cancer.gov

    Bonnie Spring earned the PhD in psychology from Harvard University and is Professor of Preventive Medicine, Psychology, and Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Director of Behavioral Medicine, and Co-Program Leader in Cancer Prevention at Northwestern University.

  1. Weill Cornell Medicine -Qatar (WCM-Q) was established in 2001 as a partnership between Cornell University and Qatar

    E-print Network

    Lim, Seonhee

    Weill Cornell Medicine - Qatar (WCM-Q) was established in 2001 as a partnership between Cornell University and Qatar Foundation. It is part of Weill Cornell Medicine in New York City. Pre-medical teaching of Weill Cornell Medicine: a dedication to excellence in education, top-quality clinical care and research

  2. http://www.admin.ox.ac.uk/personnel/during/family/ University of Oxford's Glossary of Family Leave Terms and Abbreviations

    E-print Network

    http://www.admin.ox.ac.uk/personnel/during/family/ University of Oxford's Glossary of Family Leave couple. SAP Statutory Adoption Pay - provided by the state, paid by the employer and administered through for more details. SMP Statutory Maternity Pay - provided by the state, paid by the employer

  3. UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA PERELMAN SCHOOL OF MEDICINE Curriculum Vitae

    E-print Network

    Pennsylvania, University of

    for Experimental Psychiatry Vice Chair for Faculty Affairs and Professional Development Department of Psychiatry Psychiatry, The Institute of Pennsylvania Hospital and University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA Military of Psychology, The George Washington University 1977-80 Instructor of Psychology, Department of Psychiatry

  4. University of Connecticut School of Medicine Public Issues Council Meeting

    E-print Network

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    of financial stress at the SOM, it remain committed to projects that promote health and wellbeing of all of health care healthcare are key issues to the citizens of the state of Connecticut. Various groups have with these groups. As the state University and health center, the University should have a voice on this issue

  5. [Efforts of gender equality at Kinki University School of Medicine].

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Katsuichi

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, medical doctors are in short supply in many university hospitals. Retirement of female doctor after delivery is one of the reasons. Although they want to return to work after giving birth, they quit unavoidable because the working conditions do not match. Then, Kinki university hospital established the "provisions for special work arrangements". This work arrangement is the wage less, but the working hours is less than the regular. This work arrangement increased returner to the university hospital after delivery. PMID:24291988

  6. Flinders University School of Medicine, Northern Territory, Australia: Achieving Educational Excellence along with a Sustainable Rural Medical Workforce.

    PubMed

    Worley, Paul

    2008-10-01

    Introduction Medical schools today are being challenged to educate doctors who are willing and able to practice in areas of poverty and workforce need. In many countries, there is a shortage of doctors practicing in rural and remote communities. There is evidence that locating undergraduate medical education in rural areas increases the likelihood that graduates will choose to practice in underserved areas. Through its Parallel Rural Community Curriculum (PRCC), Flinders University School of Medicine (FUSM) now enables over 25% of its students to undertake an entire clinical year based in small rural communities supervised principally by rural family physicians. Objective The PRCC was conceived to provide a high quality educational intervention that would result in an increased number of students choosing to practice in rural and remote Australia. It was also designed to test the hypothesis that small rural and remote practices were capable of facilitating a full year of medical training at a standard comparable to that provided at a major tertiary hospital. Intervention Starting with eight students in four towns in 1997, the PRCC now places 30 students across 18 towns in rural Australia. The students simultaneously learn the disciplines of medicine, surgery, pediatrics, obstetrics and gynecology, psychiatry, and family medicine. At the end of the year, all Flinders students, regardless of training location, take the same comprehensive exam. Outcomes PRCC students improved their academic performance in comparison to their tertiary trained peers. This improvement has been consistent over the ten years studied. Seventy percent of the PRCC students have chosen to practice in rural locations, compared to 18 percent of tertiary-trained students. Over twelve years, the program has proved to be sustainable in a private practice environment with a workforce shortage. Conclusions Evaluation of the PRCC indicates that a rural community-based clinical education can provide a high quality academic experience for students as well as a sustainable solution to rural medical workforce maldistribution. PMID:21483334

  7. The mission of Washington University School of Medicine

    E-print Network

    Baloh, Bob

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .454-6000 One Children's Place, St. Louis, MO 63110-1002 StLouisChildrens.org BJC HealthCare, financial aid and employment. The university does not discriminate in access to, or treatment or employment

  8. A growing family: the expanding universe of the bacterial cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Ingerson-Mahar, Michael; Gitai, Zemer

    2012-01-01

    Cytoskeletal proteins are important mediators of cellular organization in both eukaryotes and bacteria. In the past, cytoskeletal studies have largely focused on three major cytoskeletal families, namely the eukaryotic actin, tubulin, and intermediate filament (IF) proteins and their bacterial homologs MreB, FtsZ, and crescentin. However, mounting evidence suggests that these proteins represent only the tip of the iceberg, as the cellular cytoskeletal network is far more complex. In bacteria, each of MreB, FtsZ, and crescentin represents only one member of large families of diverse homologs. There are also newly identified bacterial cytoskeletal proteins with no eukaryotic homologs, such as WACA proteins and bactofilins. Furthermore, there are universally conserved proteins, such as the metabolic enzyme CtpS, that assemble into filamentous structures that can be repurposed for structural cytoskeletal functions. Recent studies have also identified an increasing number of eukaryotic cytoskeletal proteins that are unrelated to actin, tubulin, and IFs, such that expanding our understanding of cytoskeletal proteins is advancing the understanding of the cell biology of all organisms. Here, we summarize the recent explosion in the identification of new members of the bacterial cytoskeleton and describe a hypothesis for the evolution of the cytoskeleton from self-assembling enzymes. PMID:22092065

  9. The Doctoring Curriculum at the University of California, Davis School of Medicine: Leadership and Participant Roles for Psychiatry Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bourgeois, James A.; Ton, Hendry; Onate, John; McCarthy, Tracy; Stevenson, Frazier T.; Servis, Mark E.; Wilkes, Michael S.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The authors describe in detail the 3-year model of the Doctoring curriculum plus an elective fourth-year Doctoring course at University of California, Davis School of Medicine (UCDSOM) and University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) School of Medicine and the critical role for psychiatry faculty leadership and participation. Methods:…

  10. University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio Internal Medicine Residency Program, Doctors Hospital at Renaissance, Edinburg, Texas

    E-print Network

    Nicholson, Bruce J.

    University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio Internal Medicine Residency Program, Doctors Hospital at Renaissance, Edinburg, Texas The University of Texas Health Science Center at San in the Internal Medicine Residency Program of the Doctors Hospital at Renaissance, Edinburg, Texas. This residency

  11. Admission Factors Predicting Family Medicine Specialty Choice: A Literature Review and Exploratory Study among Students in the Rural Medical Scholars Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avery, Daniel M., Jr.; Wheat, John R.; Leeper, James D.; McKnight, Jerry T.; Ballard, Brent G.; Chen, Jia

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The Rural Medical Scholars Program (RMSP) was created to increase production of rural family physicians in Alabama. Literature review reveals reasons medical students choose careers in family medicine, and these reasons can be categorized into domains that medical schools can address through admission, curriculum, and structural…

  12. Physician actions following a positive PHQ-2: implications for the implementation of depression screening in family medicine practice.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Cara H; Haradhvala, Natasha; Hubley, Samuel; Nash, Justin M; Keller, Martin B; Ashley, David; Weisberg, Risa B; Uebelacker, Lisa A

    2015-03-01

    Systematic screening of depression in primary care settings that have adequate follow-up and treatment is recommended. The Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) was developed as a depression screening measure for use in primary care. The PHQ-2, which includes just 2 items from the PHQ-9, is designed to be used as a first line depression screening measure, to be followed by the full PHQ-9 when a patient screens positive. However, completion of the first step in the process (PHQ-2) does not necessarily lead to completion of the second step (administration of the PHQ-9 when the PHQ-2 is positive), even when treatment and follow-up are available. The objective of the current study was to describe family medicine physicians' actions following a positive PHQ-2 and factors that affect their use of depression screening measures and treatment decisions. A retrospective chart review of 200 family medicine patients who screened positive on the PHQ-2 during an office visit was conducted. Additionally, 26 family medicine physicians in the practice were surveyed. Only 5% of patients with positive PHQ-2 scores were administered a PHQ-9. Physicians relied on their clinical judgment and prior knowledge about the patient's depression status to inform treatment decisions and cited time constraints and competing demands as reasons for not administered the PHQ-9. Physicians tended to treat depression with adequate doses of antidepressants and counseling. PHQ-2 screening did not necessarily lead to further evaluation, systematic follow-up, or changes in treatment. Implications for the implementation of depression screening in primary care settings are discussed. PMID:25485822

  13. Faculty of Medicine Graduate School of Medicine

    E-print Network

    Miyashita, Yasushi

    2009--2010 Faculty of Medicine Graduate School of Medicine PROSPECTUS The University of Tokyo #12;#12;A Message From the Dean of Faculty and Graduate School of Medicine, the University of Tokyo Takao Shimizu Dean, Faculty and Graduate School of Medicine The University of Tokyo Faculty of Medicine

  14. Faculty of Medicine Graduate School of Medicine

    E-print Network

    Miyashita, Yasushi

    2011--2012 Faculty of Medicine Graduate School of Medicine PROSPECTUS The University of Tokyo #12;#12;A Message From the Dean of Faculty and Graduate School of Medicine, the University of Tokyo Kohei Miyazono Dean, Faculty and Graduate School of Medicine The University of Tokyo Faculty of Medicine

  15. Faculty of Medicine Graduate School of Medicine

    E-print Network

    Miyashita, Yasushi

    2015 2016 Faculty of Medicine Graduate School of Medicine PROSPECTUS The University of Tokyo #12;#12;A Message From the Dean of Faculty and Graduate School of Medicine, the University of Tokyo Kohei Miyazono Dean, Faculty and Graduate School of Medicine The University of Tokyo Faculty of Medicine

  16. Five-Year MD Enrichment Program Application/Plan University of Connecticut School of Medicine

    E-print Network

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    Five-Year MD Enrichment Program Application/Plan University of Connecticut School of Medicine Full_________________________________ Proposed graduation date_________________________ Outline of enrichment plan: (specify date)____________ Please detail on a month-to- month basis your enrichment program (Be specific): Academic Year

  17. DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL THERAPY AND HUMAN MOVEMENT SCIENCES NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY FEINBERG SCHOOL OF MEDICINE

    E-print Network

    Chisholm, Rex L.

    DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL THERAPY AND HUMAN MOVEMENT SCIENCES NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY FEINBERG SCHOOL OF MEDICINE Benefits for Physical Therapy Clinical Educators To recognize the contribution of clinical evidence. The Department of Physical Therapy and Human Movement Sciences (PTHMS) will reimburse the Center

  18. An Investigation of the Selection Techniques of Veterinary Science and Medicine Students at Purdue University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gohn, Lyle Alan

    Investigated were factors for predicting success of students of veterinary medicine and science at Purdue University. All males enrolled as beginning students in the fall classes of 1959 through 1965 were analyzed. Student records and questionnaires were employed to gather information on academic records and demographic and non-demographic…

  19. University of Maryland School of Medicine PostDoctoral Fellowship in Cancer Epidemiology

    E-print Network

    Weber, David J.

    University of Maryland School of Medicine PostDoctoral Fellowship in Cancer Epidemiology Department of Epidemiology and Public Health & Greenebaum Cancer Center A postdoctoral fellowship in the molecular epidemiology of cancer is available immediately in the Department of Epidemiology and Public

  20. CENTER FOR AUTISM RESEARCH AND TRANSLATION UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, IRVINE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE

    E-print Network

    Al Faruque, Mohammad Abdullah

    CENTER FOR AUTISM RESEARCH AND TRANSLATION UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, IRVINE · SCHOOL OF MEDICINE #12;Within the span of just two generations, Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), once considered for Autism Research and Translation (CART) is stepping up to the challenge ­ because research holds the key

  1. PATHOLOGYBEAT DEPARTMENT OF PATHOLOGY, UNIVERSITY OF IOWA CARVER COLLEGE OF MEDICINE

    E-print Network

    for AMA PRA Category 1 CreditTM Shining a Fluorescent Light: 10-color Flow Cytometry and Cluster Analysis, UNIVERSITY OF IOWA CARVER COLLEGE OF MEDICINE Shining a Fluorescent Light: 10-color Flow Cytometry a wide spectrum of clinical presentations and outcomes.Therefore, correct classification is essential

  2. UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT SCHOOL OF MEDICINE Annual Report of the Department of Pediatrics 2010-2011

    E-print Network

    Kim, Duck O.

    ), to Associate Professor of Pediatrics Appointments of new faculty members: Amy Wu, MD (Cardiology); Carla PrudenUNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT SCHOOL OF MEDICINE Annual Report of the Department of Pediatrics 2010 & Nutrition) to Professor of Pediatrics; Umit Emre, MD (Pulmonolgy), and Gyula Acsadi, MD, PhD (Neurology

  3. Stanford University Cardiothoracic Surgical Skills and Education Center School of Medicine Summer Internship Application

    E-print Network

    Kay, Mark A.

    transportation from their high school to Stanford and back. Parking on campus is available but costs $12.00 a dayStanford University Cardiothoracic Surgical Skills and Education Center School of Medicine Summer Internship Application Transportation & Safety Information Trainees/interns are responsible for their own

  4. Radiation Sciences Baccalaureate Degree Program The University of Iowa | Carver College of Medicine

    E-print Network

    Radiation Sciences Baccalaureate Degree Program The University of Iowa | Carver College of Medicine of Candidates Selected 12 7 14 8 Average College GPA 3.24 3.25 2.93 3.10 Average Job-Shadowing Hours 100% > 4-1350 80+ Notes for DMS Job shadowing and healthcare experience: Job shadow length: anything > 4 hours

  5. University of Illinois at Chicago College of Medicine and its Participating Hospitals

    E-print Network

    Alford, Simon

    University of Illinois at Chicago College of Medicine and its Participating Hospitals AUTHORIZATION security number and date of birth, if applicable, to the staff at the following UIC participating hospitals; Advocate Christ Hospital and Medical Center, Advocate Illinois Masonic Medical Center, Advocate Lutheran

  6. Medicine and the arts in the undergraduate medical curriculum at the University of Oslo Faculty of Medicine, Oslo, Norway.

    PubMed

    Frich, Jan C; Fugelli, Per

    2003-10-01

    The authors describe a course titled Medicine and the Arts, established in 1996, that is part of the first semester of the undergraduate medical curriculum at the University of Oslo Faculty of Medicine. The course comprises four two-hour seminars on literature, visual arts, architecture, and music. The core objectives of the course are to demonstrate how art can be a source of personal and professional development, and also how art represents a source of insight into patients' experiences and the social, cultural, and historical context of medical practice. The course emphasizes that art is ambiguous and many layered and that its interpretation requires sensitivity, engagement, imagination, and reflection. Fostering these skills is a major aim of the course because these skills are also essential for clinical competence and professional development. The course's seminars are integrated into the curriculum but are not compulsory. Although the topics covered by the course have not been explicitly addressed in the formal examination of students, there has been some discussion about doing so, which would be a signal that those topics are as important as others in the curriculum. PMID:14534105

  7. A primer of Darwinian medicine Evolution and Medicine by Robert L. Perlman, Oxford University Press, 2013. US$49.50/27.50/s31.35 pbk (xiii + 162 pp.),

    E-print Network

    Blumstein, Daniel T.

    A primer of Darwinian medicine Evolution and Medicine by Robert L. Perlman, Oxford University Press, since Williams and Nesse's landmark article that introduced us to evolutionary medicine [1], I have. Evolutionary medicine is one of those fields where discourse and advances are sorely need- ed. In addition

  8. Academic Medicine Meets Traditional African Healing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindow, Megan

    2008-01-01

    Cyril Naidoo, who directs the department of family medicine at the University of KwaZulu-Natal's Nelson R. Mandela School of Medicine, conducts workshops to traditional healers on how to help patients with AIDS and HIV. In Dr. Naidoo's workshop, the group discusses how to counsel patients about HIV and AIDS, how to refer them for testing, and then…

  9. Surviving Hurricane Katrina: reconstructing the educational enterprise of Tulane University School of Medicine.

    PubMed

    Krane, N Kevin; Kahn, Marc J; Markert, Ronald J; Whelton, Paul K; Traber, Peter G; Taylor, Ian L

    2007-08-01

    Hurricane Katrina was one of the greatest natural disasters to ever strike the United States. Tulane University School of Medicine, located in downtown New Orleans, and its three major teaching hospitals were flooded in the aftermath of the storm and forced to close. Faculty, students, residents, and staff evacuated to locations throughout the country. All critical infrastructure that normally maintained the school, including information technology, network communication servers, registration systems, and e-mail, became nonoperational. However, on the basis of experiences learned when Tropical Storm Allison flooded the Texas Medical Center in 2001, Baylor College of Medicine, University of Texas-Houston, University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston, and Texas A&M School of Medicine created the South Texas Alliance of Academic Health Centers, which allowed Tulane to move its education programs to Houston. Using Baylor's facilities, Tulane faculty rebuilt and delivered the preclinical curriculum, and clinical rotations were made available at the Alliance schools. Remarkably, the Tulane School of Medicine was able to resume all educational activities within a month after the storm. Educational reconstruction approaches, procedures employed, and lessons in institutional recovery learned are discussed so that other schools can prepare effectively for either natural or man-made disasters. Key disaster-response measures include designating an evacuation/command site in advance; backing up technology, communication, financial, registration, and credentialing systems; and establishing partnership with other institutions and leaders. PMID:17762249

  10. MFTK 507 Marriage and Family Therapy Ethics 1 Texas A&M University Central Texas

    E-print Network

    Diestel, Geoff

    MFTK 507 Marriage and Family Therapy Ethics 1 Texas A&M University ­ Central Texas MFTK 507- 115 Marriage and Family Therapy Ethics Fall 2014 Instructor: DeAnna Harris-McKoy, PhD Office: Warrior Hall Room of Marriage and Family Therapy Education (COAMFTE) are referenced. See Bb for the full list of COAMFTE CCs. 2

  11. First Universities Allied for Essential Medicines (UAEM) Neglected Diseases and Innovation Symposium

    PubMed Central

    Musselwhite, Laura W.; Maciag, Karolina; Lankowski, Alex; Gretes, Michael C.; Wellems, Thomas E.; Tavera, Gloria; Goulding, Rebecca E.; Guillen, Ethan

    2012-01-01

    Universities Allied for Essential Medicines organized its first Neglected Diseases and Innovation Symposium to address expanding roles of public sector research institutions in innovation in research and development of biomedical technologies for treatment of diseases, particularly neglected tropical diseases. Universities and other public research institutions are increasingly integrated into the pharmaceutical innovation system. Academic entities now routinely undertake robust high-throughput screening and medicinal chemistry research programs to identify lead compounds for small molecule drugs and novel drug targets. Furthermore, product development partnerships are emerging between academic institutions, non-profit entities, and biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies to create diagnostics, therapies, and vaccines for diseases of the poor. With not for profit mission statements, open access publishing standards, open source platforms for data sharing and collaboration, and a shift in focus to more translational research, universities and other public research institutions are well-placed to accelerate development of medical technologies, particularly for neglected tropical diseases. PMID:22232453

  12. The content of family practice: a family medicine resident's 2 1/2-year experience with the E-book.

    PubMed

    Shank, J C

    1977-09-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present the content of office family practice problems seen over a 2 1/2-year residency period and to afford comparison with the well-known Virginia Study. It illustrates the usefulness of the diagnostic E-Book, with which all the data were collected and preserved. Over a 2 1/2-year period, the author cared for 592 patients in the family practice office. The ratio of one physician to 592 patients compares to the Virginia Study's one physician to approximately 745 patients. A total of 1,640 problems were coded in the E-Book. In this study 55 problems/physician/month were seen, whereas in the Virginia Study approximately 177 problems/physician/month were noted. Respiratory illnesses were the most common diagnostic category in both studies. Among specific problems, obesity ranked first at Hershey, with afebrile colds second, hypertension and Beta streptococcal pharyngitis third, and smoking fourth. Obesity and smoking were ranked considerably lower in the Virginia Study, whereas "health maintenance examinations" were ranked number one. Finally, for age-sex practice profiles, the present data revealed two peak age groups for both sexes, whereas the Virginia work noted only one peak age range. PMID:903750

  13. Training Family Medicine Residents in Effective Communication Skills While Utilizing Promotoras as Standardized Patients in OSCEs: A Health Literacy Curriculum

    PubMed Central

    Pagels, Patti; Kindratt, Tiffany; Arnold, Danielle; Brandt, Jeffrey; Woodfin, Grant; Gimpel, Nora

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Future health care providers need to be trained in the knowledge and skills to effectively communicate with their patients with limited health literacy. The purpose of this study is to develop and evaluate a curriculum designed to increase residents' health literacy knowledge, improve communication skills, and work with an interpreter. Materials and Methods. Family Medicine residents (N = 25) participated in a health literacy training which included didactic lectures and an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE). Community promotoras acted as standardized patients and evaluated the residents' ability to measure their patients' health literacy, communicate effectively using the teach-back and Ask Me 3 methods, and appropriately use an interpreter. Pre- and postknowledge, attitudes, and postdidactic feedback were obtained. We compared OSCE scores from the group that received training (didactic group) and previous graduates. Residents reported the skills they used in practice three months later. Results. Family Medicine residents showed an increase in health literacy knowledge (p = 0.001) and scored in the adequately to expertly performed range in the OSCE. Residents reported using the teach-back method (77.8%) and a translator more effectively (77.8%) three months later. Conclusions. Our innovative health literacy OSCE can be replicated for medical learners at all levels of training. PMID:26491565

  14. Are familial factors underlying the association between socioeconomic position and prescription medicine? A register-based study on Danish twins

    PubMed Central

    Madsen, Mia; Andersen, Per Kragh; Gerster, Mette; Andersen, Anne-Marie Nybo; Osler, Merete; Christensen, Kaare

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Although well established, the association between socioeconomic position and health and health behaviour is not clearly understood, and it has been speculated that familial factors, for example, dispositional factors or exposures in the rearing environment, may be underlying the association. The objective was to compare prescription fillings within twin pairs who are partly or fully genetically identical and share childhood exposures. Design Twin cohort study. Setting Denmark. Participants Data from the Danish Twin Registry were linked to registers in Statistics Denmark and the Danish Registry of Medicinal Product statistics. A total of 8582 monozygotic (MZ) and 15?788 dizygotic same sex (DZSS) twins were included. Outcome measures Number of prescription fillings during follow-up (1995–2005) was analysed according to education and income. Results of unpaired and intrapair analyses were compared. Results An inverse social gradient in filling of prescriptions for all-purpose and system-specific drugs was observed in the unpaired analyses. In the intrapair analyses, associations were attenuated some in DZSS and more in MZ twins. Filling of drugs targeting the nervous system was still strongly associated with income in the intrapair analyses. Conclusions Familial factors seem to account for part of the observed social inequality in filling of prescription medicine. PMID:24227869

  15. The Interdisciplinary Generalist Curriculum Project at the University of Vermont College of Medicine: The Vermont Generalist Curriculum (VGC) Experience.

    PubMed

    Fogarty, J; First, L R; Levine, M; Reardon, M; Magrane, D

    2001-04-01

    The University of Vermont College of Medicine received its Vermont Generalist Curriculum (VGC) subcontract as one of the second-cycle Interdisciplinary Generalist Curriculum (IGC) Project schools from 1995 to 1998. The Vermont program was jointly codirected by the chairs of family practice and pediatrics and the program director for internal medicine on a rotating basis and was overseen by a multidisciplinary steering committee that included generalists, basic scientists, specialists, and students. This committee provided guidance and support in recruitment of preceptors, continuous assessment and improvement of the courses, development of a clinical correlation manual for students in clinical offices, and cooperation around a jointly sponsored annual primary care meeting that included a joint scientific program, a research forum, and a faculty development workshop. The VGC has provided a pilot for many innovative curricular changes that have served as models for the school-wide curriculum redesign process currently under way at VERMONT: While the funding for this project ended in 1998, the changes, innovations, and collaboration born out of the project are valuable enough for the dean's office to maintain the VGC's funding and its steering committee for the future. PMID:11299185

  16. The New England Journal of Medicine Downloaded from nejm.org at HARVARD UNIVERSITY on October 28, 2013. For personal use only. No other uses without permission.

    E-print Network

    Alper, Chester A.

    Journal of Medicine Downloaded from nejm.org at HARVARD UNIVERSITY on October 28, 2013. For personal use of Medicine Downloaded from nejm.org at HARVARD UNIVERSITY on October 28, 2013. For personal use onlyThe New England Journal of Medicine Downloaded from nejm.org at HARVARD UNIVERSITY on October 28

  17. medicine.usask.ca/family C O M M I T T E D P E O P L E A C R O S S S A S K AT C H E WA N

    E-print Network

    Peak, Derek

    medicine.usask.ca/family C O M M I T T E D P E O P L E A C R O S S S A S K AT C H E WA N ­ Department of Academic Family Medicine Report for July 1, 2012 to June 30, 2013 learning all roads lead in Saskatchewan, we decided to focus this year on the Department of Academic Family Medicine's expansion

  18. Ulm University | International Graduate School in Molecular Medicine Ulm | Meyerhofstrae, N 27/2.011 | 89081 Ulm Ulm University | International Graduate School in Molecular Medicine Ulm | Albert-Einstein-Allee 11 | 89081 Ulm

    E-print Network

    Pfeifer, Holger

    /2.011 | 89081 Ulm Ulm University | International Graduate School in Molecular Medicine Ulm | Albert-Einstein | Albert-Einstein-Allee 11 | 89081 Ulm 2 Date: Signature: 3. Estimated Budget Please do not indicate costs | International Graduate School in Molecular Medicine Ulm | Albert-Einstein-Allee 11 | 89081 Ulm 3 Grant

  19. From LCME probation to compliance: the Marshall University Joan C Edwards School of Medicine experience.

    PubMed

    Miller, Bobby; Dzwonek, Brian; McGuffin, Aaron; Shapiro, Joseph I

    2014-01-01

    The Joan C Edwards School of Medicine (Marshall University, Huntington, WV, USA) was placed on probation by the Liaison Committee on Medical Education (LCME) in June 2011. In the following 2 years, extensive changes were made to address the numerous citations that resulted in this probation. In October 2013, the LCME lifted probation. In this article, we detail the challenges and solutions identified relevant to our struggle with compliance. PMID:25337003

  20. From LCME probation to compliance: the Marshall University Joan C Edwards School of Medicine experience

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Bobby; Dzwonek, Brian; McGuffin, Aaron; Shapiro, Joseph I

    2014-01-01

    The Joan C Edwards School of Medicine (Marshall University, Huntington, WV, USA) was placed on probation by the Liaison Committee on Medical Education (LCME) in June 2011. In the following 2 years, extensive changes were made to address the numerous citations that resulted in this probation. In October 2013, the LCME lifted probation. In this article, we detail the challenges and solutions identified relevant to our struggle with compliance. PMID:25337003

  1. The Women in Medicine and Health Science Program: An Innovative Initiative to Support Female Faculty at the University of California Davis School of Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Bauman, Melissa D.; Howell, Lydia P.; Villablanca, Amparo C.

    2014-01-01

    Problem Although more female physicians and scientists are choosing careers in academic medicine, women continue to be underrepresented as medical school faculty, particularly at the level of full professor and in leadership positions. Effective interventions to support women in academic medicine exist, but the nature and content of such programs varies widely. Approach Women in medicine programs can play a critical role in supporting women’s careers and can improve recruitment and retention of women by providing opportunities for networking, sponsorship, mentorship, and career development. The University of California Davis School of Medicine established the Women in Medicine and Health Science (WIMHS) program in 2000 to ensure the full participation and success of women in all roles within academic medicine. The authors describe the components and evolution of the WIMHS program. Outcomes A steady increase in the number and percentage of female faculty and department chairs, as well as a relatively low departure rate for female faculty, strong and growing internal partnerships, and enthusiastic support from faculty and the school of medicine leadership, suggest that the WIMHS program has had a positive influence on recruitment and retention, career satisfaction, and institutional climate to provide a more inclusive and supportive culture for women. Next steps Going forward, the WIMHS program will continue to advocate for broader institutional change to support female faculty, like creating an onsite childcare program. Other institutions seeking to address the challenges facing female faculty may consider using the WIMHS program as a model to guide their efforts. PMID:25006704

  2. Jared Baeten, MD, PhD Professor, Department of Global Health, Medicine and Epidemiology, University of Washington

    E-print Network

    Brent, Roger

    Jared Baeten, MD, PhD Professor, Department of Global Health, Medicine and Epidemiology, University of Washington Dr. Baeten is a professor in the Departments of Global Health, Medicine, and Epidemiology diseases, including clinical trials of novel prevention interventions, epidemiologic studies of risk

  3. The University of Iowa History of Medicine Society and the Iowa Women's Archives invite you to hear

    E-print Network

    The University of Iowa History of Medicine Society and the Iowa Women's Archives invite you to hear: Nineteenth century Davenport as a Hotbed of Con- troversial Alternative Medical Schools Thursday, June 19-9154. The UI History of Medicine Society website is located at: http://hosted.lib.uiowa.edu/histmed/ Greta

  4. The Magazine for Alumni and Friends of Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University Winter/Spring 2010

    E-print Network

    Emmons, Scott

    The Magazine for Alumni and Friends of Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University the magazine for alumni, faculty, students, friends and supporters of Albert einstein College of Medicine EinstEin Winter/Spring 2010 Growing Up Healthy How Einstein Is Helping City Kids #12;fEaturEs 2

  5. SUMMER/FALL 2012 The Magazine for Alumni and Friends of Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University

    E-print Network

    Bukauskas, Feliksas

    EINSTEIN SUMMER/FALL 2012 The Magazine for Alumni and Friends of Albert Einstein College and supporters of Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University Published by The Philip and Rita-mail: letters@einstein.yu.edu Website: www.einstein.yu.edu Copyright © 2012 Albert Einstein College of Medicine

  6. [Learning concepts of diagnosis in family medicine: the "mark robinson sign" - the traces that should not be there].

    PubMed

    Turabián, José Luis; Samarín-Ocampos, Elena; Minier, Luis; Pérez-Franco, Benjamín

    2015-11-01

    We review the mechanisms of the mental operation to identify the disease in family medicine, using five cases where the diagnosis process began in "the trace that should not be there" or "Robinson sign" as happened to Robinson Crusoe when he saw a human footprint on the beach of the "desert island". How could it be there?; It was a mystery, and based on metaphors, we framed the mechanism of "the trace that should not be there" mainly in the first phase of clinical or intuitive reasoning, but this intuition of the doctor should be accompanied by the diagnostic process, like the "basso continuo" of Baroque music, allowing improvisation and personal style, and in this way, eventually observing the footprint "that should not have been there" that may arise in the analytical, as well as in the verification phase of the assumptions made. PMID:25959290

  7. The University's teaching and research is organised into six schools: Arts and Humanities, Biological Sciences, Clinical Medicine,

    E-print Network

    The University's teaching and research is organised into six schools: Arts and Humanities, Biological Sciences, Clinical Medicine, Humanities and Social Sciences, Physical Sciences, and Technology Funding The University There are currently Cambridge research in numbers In 2012-13 the University

  8. Medicines for life 0800 80 80 98 | otago.ac.nz | txt 866 | university@otago.ac.nz

    E-print Network

    studying professional practice and clinical pharmacy. Throughout the degree there are many opportunities programme, including clinical and social pharmacy programmes up to master's level.Pharmacy Medicines for life 0800 80 80 98 | otago.ac.nz | txt 866 | university

  9. Acetylcholinesterase inhibitory, antioxidant and phytochemical properties of selected medicinal plants of the Lamiaceae family.

    PubMed

    Vladimir-Kneževi?, Sanda; Blažekovi?, Biljana; Kindl, Marija; Vladi?, Jelena; Lower-Nedza, Agnieszka D; Brantner, Adelheid H

    2014-01-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitory and antioxidant activities of Lamiaceae medicinal plants growing wild in Croatia. Using Ellman's colorimetric assay all tested ethanolic extracts and their hydroxycinnamic acid constituents demonstrated in vitro AChE inhibitory properties in a dose dependent manner. The extracts of Mentha x piperita, M. longifolia, Salvia officinalis, Satureja montana, Teucrium arduini, T. chamaedrys, T. montanum, T. polium and Thymus vulgaris at 1 mg/mL showed strong inhibitory activity against AChE. The antioxidant potential of the investigated Lamiaceae species was assessed by DPPH• scavenging activity and total antioxidant capacity assays, in comparison with hydroxycinnamic acids and trolox. The extracts differed greatly in their total hydroxycinnamic derivatives content, determined spectrophotometrically. Rosmarinic acid was found to be the predominant constituent in most of the investigated medicinal plants (by RP-HPLC) and had a substantial influence on their AChE inhibitory and antioxidant properties, with the exception of Teucrium species. These findings indicate that Lamiaceae species are a rich source of various natural AChE inhibitors and antioxidants that could be useful in the prevention and treatment of Alzheimer's and other related diseases. PMID:24413832

  10. Development of a Student Mentored Research Program between a Complementary and Alternative Medicine University and a Traditional, Research Intensive University

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Barbara M.; Furner, Sylvia E.; Cramer, Gregory D.

    2014-01-01

    The global need to develop clinician-scientists capable of using research in clinical practice, translating research knowledge into practice, and carrying out research that affects the quality, efficacy, and efficiency of health care is well-documented. The complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) professions embrace the call to develop physician-researchers to carry out translational and applied research for CAM modalities. CAM universities face unique challenges when implementing research training compared to traditional, research intensive (TRI) universities and medical centers where the majority of medical research is carried out. The authors present the development and outcomes of a mentored research program (MRP) between a CAM and a TRI institution, the National University of Health Sciences and the University of Illinois at Chicago School of Public Health, between 2006 and 2012. CAM pre-doctoral students engaged in a full-immersion semester at the TRI, including didactic courses and active research with a TRI faculty research mentor. Half of the participating doctor of chiropractic (DC) students continued on to PhD programs and half established integrative medicine, primary care clinical careers. Establishing rigorous criteria for mentors and mentees, communicating expectations, developing solid relationships between the mentor, mentee, and home school advisor, responding quickly to impediments, and providing adequate support from CAM and TRI investigators were key to the MRP success. To sustain research opportunities, coordinated degree programs for the DC and master of public health (DC/MPH) and master of clinical and translational research (DC/MS CTS) were established. PMID:24988423

  11. Factors Contributing to the University of Kansas School of Medicine Graduates' Choice of Specialty and Practice Location

    E-print Network

    Nguyen, Emma Hang Thi

    2013-12-31

    FACTORS CONTRIBUTING TO THE UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS SCHOOL OF MEDICINE GRADUATES’ CHOICE OF SPECIALTY AND PRACTICE LOCATION By Copyright 2013 Emma H. Nguyen Submitted to the graduate degree program in Department of Educational Leadership and Policy... The Dissertation Committee for Emma H. Nguyen certifies that this is the approved version of the following dissertation: FACTORS CONTRIBUTING TO THE UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS SCHOOL OF MEDICINE GRADUATES’ CHOICE OF SPECIALTY AND PRACTICE LOCATION...

  12. EinstEinThe Magazine for Alumni and Friends of Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University Winter/spring 2014

    E-print Network

    Emmons, Scott

    EinstEinThe Magazine for Alumni and Friends of Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva, students, friends and supporters of Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University Published.yu.edu Website: www.einstein.yu.edu Copyright © 2014 Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University

  13. Access to Medicines by Seguro Popular Beneficiaries: Pending Tasks towards Universal Health Coverage

    PubMed Central

    Servan-Mori, Edson; Heredia-Pi, Ileana; Montañez-Hernandez, Julio; Avila-Burgos, Leticia; Wirtz, Veronika J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective In the context of aiming to achieve universal health coverage in Mexico, this study compares access to prescribed medicines (ATPM) between Seguro Popular (SP) and non-SP affiliated outpatient health service users. Materials and Methods ATPM by 6,123 users of outpatient services was analyzed using the National Health and Nutrition Survey 2012. Adjusted bi-probit models were performed incorporating instrumental variables. Results 17.3% of SP and 10.1% of the non-SP population lacked ATPM. Two-thirds of all outpatient SP and 18.5% of all outpatient non-SP received health services at Ministry of Health facilities, among whom, 64.6 and 53.6% of the SP and non-SP population respectively reported ATPM at these facilities. Lack of medicines in health units, chronic health problems (compared to acute conditions) and prescription ?3 medicines were risk factors for non-ATPM. Adjusted models suggest that when using Ministry of Health services, the SP population has a higher probability of ATMP compared to the non-SP population. Conclusion Given the aspirations of achieving universal health coverage in Mexico, it is important to increase ATPM in Ministry of Health facilities thereby ensuring basic rights to health care are met. PMID:26407158

  14. 1Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Wellcome Trust Genome Campus, Hinxton, Cambridge, UK. 2Department of Social and Environmental Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, Osaka, Japan. Correspondence should be addressed to A.B. (abradley@san

    E-print Network

    Cai, Long

    of Social and Environmental Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, Osaka, Japan for regenerative medicine, however, is the delivery of reprogramming factors. Whereas retroviral transduction out by cell fusion or nuclear trans- fer1. The molecular basis of reprogramming has been revealed

  15. UNIVERSITY OF ST ANDREWS -FAMILY FRIENDLY LEAVE (FLOWCHART) Maternity Leave Paternity Leave Adoption Leave Family Leave

    E-print Network

    Brierley, Andrew

    Adoption Leave Family Leave All female employees. To qualify, a member of staff must have completed 26 of each child. Time off to deal with unforeseen problems in connection with dependants. Carers Days -paid

  16. Progress of Recurrent Education for the Development of Engineering Enhanced Medicine “REDEEM” at Tohoku University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamano, Masahiro; Matsuki, Noriaki; Numayama, Keiko; Takeda, Motohiro; Hayasaka, Tomoaki; Ishikawa, Takuji; Yamaguchi, Takami

    Tohoku University promotes the “REDEEM” project, which is a national project of Recurrent Education for the Development of Engineering Enhanced Medicine. This education system provides a curriculum for engineers who belong to bio-medical R&D. In Japan, most of industrial engineers have been excluded from systemized bio-medical education, while medical and co-medical personnel lack engineering education. This difference of backgrounds causes a discrepancy between medicine and engineering bringing difficulty in collaboration for development of medical equipments or drugs. In this project, we focus on the engineering side, and we try to develop and provide a bio-medical engineering course for engineers. In this paper, we report and discuss on the outline and the progress of the “REDEEM” project.

  17. CHEMICAL COMPOSITION AND ANTIBACTERIAL ACTIVITY OF SOME MEDICINAL PLANTS FROM LAMIACEAE FAMILY.

    PubMed

    Koz?owska, Mariola; Laudy, Agnieszka E; Przyby?, Jaros?aw; Ziarno, Ma?gorzata; Majewska, Ewa

    2015-01-01

    Chemical composition and antibacterial activity of aqueous (ethanolic and methanolic) extracts from herbs often used in Polish cuisine and traditional herbal medicine including thyme (Thymus vulgaris L.), rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis L.), oregano (Origanum vulgare L.), peppermint (Mentha piperita L.) and sage (Salvia officinalis L.) were compared. The aqueous ethanolic extracts contained slightly higher levels of phenolics compared to the aqueous methanolic extracts. In turn, GC-MS analysis showed that the aqueous methanolic extracts of thyme, rosemary and sage contained several additional compounds such as eugenol or ledol. The present studies also indicated that the bacterial species applied in the experiment exhibited different sensitivities towards tested extracts. Staphylococcus aureus strains were found to be the most sensitive bacteria to aqueous (ethanolic and methanolic) rosemary and sage extracts and aqueous methanolic thyme extract. Klebsiella pneumoniae ATCC 13883 and Proteus vulgaris NCTC 4635 were more susceptible to the aqueous methanolic thyme extract. However, Listeria monocytogenes 1043S was the most sensitive to the aqueous ethanolic rosemary extract. Gram-positive bacteria were generally more sensitive to the tested extracts than Gram-negative ones. PMID:26647633

  18. Department of Family and Consumer Science News

    E-print Network

    Hong, Don

    - ties. Panels are divided into different catego- ries, such asArts-in-Education, Community Arts, Folk Division of the Physical Medicine and Re- habilitation Department, University of Michigan Health Systems, Ann Arbor. Future family doctors at the James H. Quillen College of Medicine have been recognized

  19. A limited universe of membrane protein families and folds.

    PubMed

    Oberai, Amit; Ihm, Yungok; Kim, Sanguk; Bowie, James U

    2006-07-01

    One of the goals of structural genomics is to obtain a structural representative of almost every fold in nature. A recent estimate suggests that 70%-80% of soluble protein domains identified in the first 1000 genome sequences should be covered by about 25,000 structures-a reasonably achievable goal. As no current estimates exist for the number of membrane protein families, however, it is not possible to know whether family coverage is a realistic goal for membrane proteins. Here we find that virtually all polytopic helical membrane protein families are present in the already known sequences so we can make an estimate of the total number of families. We find that only approximately 700 polytopic membrane protein families account for 80% of structured residues and approximately 1700 cover 90% of structured residues. While apparently a finite and reachable goal, we estimate that it will likely take more than three decades to obtain the structures needed for 90% residue coverage, if current trends continue. PMID:16815920

  20. Intercampus network of the Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Indiana University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witt, Robert M.; Gibbs, Thomas; Holden, Robert W.

    1994-05-01

    During the past year, the Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Indiana University designed, specified, and installed a campus wide network. The network supports three functions: a laser camera network to allow the transfer of hard copy images across the campus; a positron emission tomography (PET) network to allow the interconnection of the workstations comprising the PET system; and a future personal computer network to allow support of departmental administrative functions with an upgrade path to allow the display of soft copy images in physician offices and other locations in the department.

  1. Correlation between Family Environment and Suicidal Ideation in University Students in China

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Hui; Bai, Bing; Chen, Lu; Han, Dong; Wang, Lin; Qiao, Zhengxue; Qiu, Xiaohui; Yang, Xiuxian; Yang, Yanjie

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study investigated the association between suicidal ideation and family environment. The sample included 5183 Chinese university students. A number of studies on suicidal ideation have focused on individuals rather than families. This paper reviews the general principles of suicidal ideation and the consequences resulting from the family environment. Methods: This study used six different colleges as the dataset, which included 2645 males and 2538 females. Students were questioned with respect to social demographics and suicidal ideation factors. The data were analyzed with factor and logistic analyses to determine the association between suicidal ideation and poor family environment. Results: The prevalence of suicidal ideation was 9.2% (476/5183). Most participants with suicidal ideation had significant similarities: they had poor family structures and relationships, their parents had unstable work, and their parents used improper parenting styles. Female students were more likely to have suicidal thoughts than male students. Conclusions: This study shows that suicidal ideation is a public health issue among Chinese university students and demonstrates the importance of considering the family environment when examining university students’ suicidal ideation. Understanding family-related suicidal ideation risk factors can help to predict and prevent suicides among university students. PMID:25633031

  2. [Gustav Klimt and the field of medicine. Painting of the medical faculty--relationship with the Zuckerkandl family].

    PubMed

    Schultheiss, D

    2007-09-01

    The art nouveau painter Gustav Klimt (1862-1918), a cofounder of the Vienna Secession movement, was commissioned in 1894 to prepare three ceiling paintings for the Great Hall of the University of Vienna portraying the faculties of "Philosophy," "Medicine," and "Jurisprudence." After the first public presentations of these paintings starting in 1900 fierce protests erupted since the artist had not painted a historical allegory but rather had created a modern symbolic picture in the Secessionism style. The controversy over the so-called faculty paintings escalated to the point that in 1905 Klimt irrevocably distanced himself from the commission and bought back his pictures from the state. The paintings were later purchased by the Austrian Gallery and in 1943 placed in storage in Lower Austria at the Immendorf Castle where they were destroyed by a fire in May 1945 when the German troops withdrew. Besides Klimt's preliminary sketches, only black and white photographs of the three paintings now exist as well as a color reproduction of the section depicting Hygieia from the "Medicine" painting. Due to the public rejection of the faculty paintings, Gustav Klimt broke away from official government-commissioned art and focused on private clients from among Viennese society. One of these intensive associations was with the anatomist Emil Zuckerkandl and his wife Berta, who was very active in cultural affairs. During the dispute over the faculty paintings, Zuckerkandl was one of the few university professors who signed a petition in favor of retaining the paintings. His brother, the industrialist Victor Zuckerkandl, was one of the major collectors and patrons of Secessionist art. The third brother, the well-known urologist Otto Zuckerkandl (1861-1921), president of the Second and Third Congresses of the German Society of Urology in 1909 and 1911, was also in close contact with Klimt. A portrait of his wife Amalie was a work in progress between 1913 and 1917, but it remained unfinished. PMID:17710380

  3. Young Children and Their Families Who Are Homeless. A University Affiliated Program's Response.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Tawara D.; Brown, Marisa C.

    This monograph describes a University Affiliated Program's (UAP) initiative that targets the development needs of children from birth to 5 years of age who are homeless and the services and supports provided to their families. The Georgetown University Child Development Center, the UAP for the District of Columbia, has implemented a homelessness…

  4. Gender Norms and Institutional Culture: The Family-Friendly versus the Father-Friendly University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sallee, Margaret W.

    2013-01-01

    This article investigates the role that gender norms and expectations about parenting play in establishing the family-friendly versus the father-friendly university. Using interviews with 51 male faculty at three research universities, the article considers how faculty and administrators' actions perpetuate cultures that promote or hinder…

  5. Babies on Campus: Service to Infants and Families among Competing Priorities in University Child Care Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMullen, Mary Benson; Lash, Martha

    2012-01-01

    University early childhood programs attempt to balance a traditional tri-part mission: service to children and families; professional development of caregivers/teachers, clinicians, and researchers; and research on child development, learning, and/or education. Increasingly, infants receive care and education on university campuses, yet little is…

  6. Use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine in Children with Cancer: A Study at a Swiss University Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Magi, Tatjana; Kuehni, Claudia E.; Torchetti, Loredana; Wengenroth, Laura; Lüer, Sonja; Frei-Erb, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Background Though complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) are frequently used by children and adolescents with cancer, there is little information on how and why they use it. This study examined prevalence and methods of CAM, the therapists who applied it, reasons for and against using CAM and its perceived effectiveness. Parent-perceived communication was also evaluated. Parents were asked if medical staff provided information on CAM to patients, if parents reported use of CAM to physicians, and what attitude they thought physicians had toward CAM. Study Design All childhood cancer patients treated at the University Children’s Hospital Bern between 2002–2011 were retrospectively surveyed about their use of CAM. Results Data was collected from 133 patients (response rate: 52%). Of those, 53% had used CAM (mostly classical homeopathy) and 25% of patients received information about CAM from medical staff. Those diagnosed more recently were more likely to be informed about CAM options. The most frequent reason for choosing CAM was that parents thought it would improve the patient’s general condition. The most frequent reason for not using CAM was lack of information. Of those who used CAM, 87% perceived positive effects. Conclusions Since many pediatric oncology patients use CAM, patients’ needs should be addressed by open communication between families, treating oncologists and CAM therapists, which will allow parents to make informed and safe choices about using CAM. PMID:26694320

  7. Elements related to attrition of women faculty at the University of Pittsburgh, School of Medicine: A case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gandhi, Pooja

    Recent studies have shown that the number of women faculty in academic medicine is much lesser than the number of women that are graduating from medical schools. Many academic institutes face the challenge of retaining talented faculty and this attrition from academic medicine prevents career advancement of women faculty. This case study attempts to identify some of the reasons for dissatisfaction that may be related to the attrition of women medical faculty at the University of Pittsburgh, School of Medicine. Data was collected using a job satisfaction survey, which consisted of various constructs that are part of a faculty's job and proxy measures to gather the faculty's intent to leave their current position at the University of Pittsburgh or academic medicine in general. The survey results showed that although women faculty were satisfied with their job at the University of Pittsburgh, there are some important factors that influenced their decision of potentially dropping out. The main reasons cited by the women faculty were related to funding pressures, work-life balance, mentoring of junior faculty and the amount of time spent on clinical responsibilities. The analysis of proxy measures showed that if women faculty decided to leave University of Pittsburgh, it would most probably be due to better opportunity elsewhere followed by pressure to get funding. The results of this study aim to provide the School of Medicine at the University of Pittsburgh with information related to attrition of its women faculty and provide suggestions for implications for policy to retain their women faculty.

  8. Quality evaluation and pattern recognition analyses of marker compounds from five medicinal drugs of Rutaceae family by HPLC/PDA.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Bing Tian; Kim, Eun Jung; Son, Kun Ho; Son, Jong Keun; Min, Byung Sun; Woo, Mi Hee

    2015-08-01

    To establish a standard of quality control and to identify different origins for the Rutaceae family [Citri Unshiu Peel (CU), Citri Unshiu Immature Peel (CI), Ponciri Immature Fructus (PI), Aurantii Immature Fructus (AI), and Aurantii Fructus (AU)], 13 standards including rutin (1), narirutin (2), naringin (3), hesperidin (4), neohesperidin (5), neoponcirin (6), poncirin (7), naringenin (8), isosinensetin (9), sinensetin (10), nobiletin (11), heptamethoxyflavone (12), and tangeretin (13) were determined by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)/photo-diode array (PDA) analysis. A YMC ODS C18 (250 × 4.6 mm, 5 µm) column was used and the ratio of mobile phases of water (A) and acetonitrile (B) delivered to the column for gradient elution was applied. This method was fully validated with respect to linearity, accuracy, precision, stability, and robustness. The HPLC/PDA method was applied successfully to quantify 13 major compounds in the extracts of CU, CI, PI, AI, and AU. The pattern recognition analysis combined with LC chromatographic data was performed by repeated analysis of 27 reference samples in the above five Rutaceae oriental medicinal drugs. The established HPLC method was rapid and reliable for quantitative analysis and quality control of multiple components in five Rutaceae species with different origins. PMID:25732613

  9. Public Health and Preventive Medicine Meet Integrative Health: Applications of Competency Mapping to Curriculum Education at the University of Michigan.

    PubMed

    Wells, Eden V; Benn, Rita K; Warber, Sara L

    2015-11-01

    The University of Michigan School of Public Health Preventive Medicine Residency (UMSPH PMR) Integrative Medicine Program (IMP) was developed to incorporate integrative medicine (IM), public health, and preventive medicine principles into a comprehensive curriculum for preventive medicine residents and faculty. The objectives of this project were to (1) increase the preventive medicine workforce skill sets based in complementary and alternative medicine and IM that would address individual and population health issues; (2) address the increasing demand for evidence-based IM by training physicians to implement cost-effective primary and secondary prevention services and programs; and (3) share lessons learned, curriculum evaluations, and best practices with the larger cohort of funded IM PMR programs. The UMSPH PMR collaborated with University of Michigan IM faculty to incorporate existing IM competencies with those already established for preventive medicine and public health residency training as the first critical step for IMP curriculum integration. Essential teaching strategies incorporated didactic and practicum methods, and made use of seasoned IM faculty, along with newly minted preventive medicine integrative teaching faculty, and PMR resident learners as IM teachers. The major components of the IMP curriculum included resident participation in IMP Orientation Sessions, resident leadership in epidemiology graduate IM seminars, resident rotations in IM month-long clinical practicums, resident participation in interprofessional health system-wide IM clinical case conferences, and PMR faculty enrollment in the renowned Faculty Scholars Program in Integrative Healthcare. This paper describes the novel interdisciplinary collaborations and key curriculum components that resulted in the IMP, as well as evaluation of strengths, weaknesses, and lessons learned. PMID:26477903

  10. Cancer Informatics 2006: 2 277287 277 Correspondence: Rainer K. Brachmann, Department of Medicine, School of Medicine, University of

    E-print Network

    Lathrop, Richard H.

    -held medical goal of cancer treatment. The Cancer Research DataBase (CRDB) was designed in support of a projectCancer Informatics 2006: 2 277­287 277 Correspondence: Rainer K. Brachmann, Department of Medicine Database Integration Using a Hybrid Strategy: A p53 Cancer Research Database Vadim Y. Bichutskiy1

  11. University of Massachusetts Family Medical Leave Act Request Form

    E-print Network

    Massachusetts at Lowell, University of

    Month Day Year Month Day Year Requested Leave Dates Birth or Adoption Continuous Care of Child to my same position, or an equivalent position, with equivalent pay, benefits and other employment terms. #12;Benefits Manager Date HR005__ FMLA Request Form University of Massachusetts Lowell forms can

  12. The integration of the "spirituality in medicine" curriculum into the osteopathic communication curriculum at Kansas City University of Medicine and Biosciences.

    PubMed

    Talley, Jan A; Magie, Richard

    2014-01-01

    With grant funding from the John Templeton Spirituality and Medicine Curricular Award to the George Washington Institute for Spirituality and Health, faculty at Kansas City University of Medicine and Biosciences (KCUMB) developed the "Spirituality in Medicine" curriculum. In developing the curriculum, faculty took into consideration competencies required by the Association of American Medical Colleges and qualitative results from surveys of medical school applicants and enrolled students. Strategies for curriculum delivery included lectures, panel discussions, role-playing, and training in the use of a spirituality assessment tool. A majority of the 250 students who received the training in 2010-2011 were able to demonstrate the following competencies: (1) being sensitive to patients' spiritual and cultural needs, (2) assessing patients' and their own spiritual needs, (3) appropriately using chaplain services for patient care, and (4) understanding the effects of health disparities and ethical issues on patient care. Challenges to implementation included a reduction in chaplain availability due to the economic downturn, a lack of student exposure to direct patient care during shadowing, too little religious diversity among chaplains, and changes in assignment schedules. New competencies required by the National Board of Osteopathic Medical Examiners overlap with and help ensure sustainability of the Spirituality in Medicine curriculum. KCUMB leaders have incorporated the use of the spirituality assessment tool into other parts of the curriculum and into service experiences, and they have introduced a new elective in palliative care. Synergistic efforts by faculty leaders for this initiative were critical to the implementation of this curriculum. PMID:24280841

  13. Proceedings from the 6th Annual University of Calgary Leaders in Medicine Research Symposium.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Jodie I; Beatty, Jennifer K; Peplowski, Michael A; Keough, Michael B; Yipp, Bryan G; Hollenberg, Morley D; Beck, Paul L

    2015-01-01

    On November 14, 2014, the Leaders in Medicine (LIM) program at the Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary hosted its 6th Annual Research Symposium. Dr. Danuta Skowronski, Epidemiology Lead for Influenza and Emerging Respiratory Pathogens at the British Columbia Centre for Disease Control (BCCDC), was the keynote speaker and presented a lecture entitled "Rapid response research during emerging public health crises: influenza and reflections from the five year anniversary of the 2009 pandemic". The LIM symposium provides a forum for both LIM and non-LIM medical students to present their research work, either as an oral or poster presentation. There were a total of six oral presentations and 77 posters presented. ?The oral presentations included: Swathi Damaraju, "The role of cell communication and 3D Cell-Matrix environment in a stem cell-based tissue engineering strategy for bone repair"; Menglin Yang, "The proteolytic activity of Nepenthes pitcher fluid as a therapeutic for the treatment of celiac disease"; Amelia Kellar, "Monitoring pediatric inflammatory bowel disease - a retrospective analysis of transabdominal ultrasound"; Monica M. Faria-Crowder, "The design and application of a molecular profiling strategy to identify polymicrobial acute sepsis infections"; Waleed Rahmani, "Hair follicle dermal stem cells regenerate the dermal sheath, repopulate the dermal papilla and modulate hair type"; and, Laura Palmer, "A novel role for amyloid beta protein during hypoxia/ischemia". ?The article on the University of Calgary Leaders in Medicine Program, "A Prescription that Addresses the Decline of Basic Science Education in Medical School," in a previous issue of CIM (2014 37(5):E292) provides more details on the program. Briefly, the LIM Research Symposium has the following objectives: (1) to showcase the impressive variety of projects undertaken by students in the LIM Program as well as University of Calgary medical students; (2) to encourage medical student participation in research and special projects; and, (3) to inform students and faculty about the diversity of opportunities available for research and special projects during medical school and beyond.??The following abstracts were submitted for publication. PMID:26654516

  14. The Primary Care-Population Medicine Program at The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University.

    PubMed

    George, Paul; Tunkel, Allan R; Dollase, Richard; Gruppuso, Philip; Dumenco, Luba; Rapoza, Brenda; Borkan, Jeffrey

    2015-09-01

    The United States healthcare system has been in a period of rapid evolution over the past decade, a trend that is anticipated to continue for the foreseeable future. Physicians are increasingly responsible for the quality of care they provide, and are being held accountable not just for the patient in front of them, but also for the outcomes of their patient panels, communities, and populations. In response to these changes, as well as the projected shortage of primary care physicians, the Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University (AMS) developed the Primary Care-Population Medicine (PC-PM) program, which builds upon the traditional curriculum with major integrated curricular innovations. The first is a Master of Science Degree in Population Medicine that requires students to take nine additional courses over four years, complete a thesis project focused on an area of Population Medicine, and take part in significant leadership training. Another significant innovative element is the development of a Longitudinal Integrated Clerkship (LIC) during the 3rd year of medical school in which the students complete a longitudinal outpatient experience with the same preceptors and patients. During the LIC students will follow a panel of patients wherever care is provided, while focusing on population health and healthcare delivery issues, in addition to medical topics throughout their clinical and didactic experiences. Though several of the innovative elements are being piloted, the inaugural PC-PM class of up to 24 students will only begin in August 2015. While the outcomes from this program will not be known for many years, the potential impact of the program is significant for AMS, medical education, and the future of healthcare delivery. PMID:26324970

  15. Lepton polarization effects in ?b ? ??+?- decay in family non-universal Z? model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliev, T. M.; Savc?, M.

    2012-12-01

    Possible manifestation of the family non-universal Z? boson effects in lepton polarization in rare, exclusive baryonic ?b ? ??+?- decay is examined. It is observed that the double lepton polarizations PNN, PTT and PTN are sensitive to the Z? contribution. Moreover, it is found that the values of the polarized forward-backward asymmetry AFBLL are different in Standard Model (SM) and family non-universal Z? model in different regions of q2, and therefore can serve as an efficient tool for establishing new physics beyond the SM.

  16. Educational research at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine: a grassroots development.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Patricia A; Wright, Scott M; Kern, David E

    2004-10-01

    The Divisions of General Internal Medicine at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine have been a rich source of educational research. To better understand the facilitators and barriers to educational research within the divisions, the authors reviewed published educational research from the divisions published between 1995-2004 and examined the history, leadership decisions, and sentinel events that have allowed educational scholarship within the divisions to grow. The authors' analysis suggests a grassroots model of programmatic growth that includes a growing cadre of clinician-educator scholars, effective mentorship, a faculty development program, access to learners, access to research expertise, protected time for scholarship, some funding, and an institutional culture that stimulates scholarship. A medical education fellowship was integral to the model; fellows were first authors for 47% of reviewed manuscripts. Extramural funding has helped build an infrastructure that supports educational scholarship; however, only 12% of the publications have had extramural funding. Protected time for faculty is the characteristic of this model most at risk. While there has been a move toward more institutional support of educational research, it is clear that further growth in the educational research program will require noninstitutional resources. PMID:15383358

  17. Samuel A. Mudd, MD, physician-farmer, University of Maryland School of Medicine class of 1856.

    PubMed

    Harding, Richard K

    2012-12-01

    America is in the midst of experiencing the sesquicentennial of the Civil War. We do so with some ambivalence knowing that the war forged a great union and ended slavery but also caused the deaths of more than 600,000 fellow citizens. Samuel A. Mudd, MD, University of Maryland School of Medicine class of 1856, was a man of this time. As a physician-farmer in Southern Maryland, he was a highly respected physician, a slave owner, and a devout citizen. The Civil War (1861-1865) would alter his life in ways few could have imagined. This article looks at his background, his education, his work as a physician-farmer, and his dramatic rise to national attention and infamy. Convicted by a military tribunal and imprisoned for his "crimes," he was able to partially redeem himself using his medical skills and professionalism. Mudd was a man of his time. And what a time it was. PMID:23183366

  18. Technology at Washington University School of Medicine Library: BACS, PHILSOM, and OCTANET.

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, S; Johnson, M F; Kelly, E A

    1983-01-01

    A brief overview of the Bibliographic Access and Control System developed by the Washington University School of Medicine Library is presented. Because the system has been described in two previous reports, this paper focuses on its relationship to other automated programs (i.e., PHILSOM and OCTANET), education of users, evaluation of the system, and outreach to the medical center. In operation for more than two years, BACS represents the computerization of much of the managerial and operational functions of the library, and marks the completion of stage 1 of the three stages of library evolution described in the AAMC report Academic Information in the Academic Health Sciences Center: Roles for the Library in Information Management. PMID:6688750

  19. Ways to address the challenges of a modern medical curriculum: living academic medicine at the University of Split, School of Medicine.

    PubMed

    Grkovi?, Ivica; Sapunar, Damir; Maruši?, Matko

    2012-01-01

    Structure of a modern medical curriculum should follow recommendations of professional bodies (like World Federation for Medical Education) in order to educate and train medical professionals equipped with problem solving/critical thinking skills entering a world of evidence-based medicine and demands of contemporary medical practices. Also, political and socio-economic realities in addition to traditional and cultural values should be taken into account in order to avoid creating an unsustainable program. Requests for curricular changes by the European Union Commission were used as a chance to shape our program into an original blend of traditional pre-clinical and clinical subjects with several vertically integrated subjects focusing on mastering clinical skills, professional attitudes, information management and critical as well as evidence-based reasoning and decision making. Reasons for introducing curricular changes in addition to detailed structure of current medical course at the University of Split School of Medicine is presented in this paper. PMID:23311480

  20. Genome Medicine 2009, 11

    E-print Network

    Dehene, Frank

    Genome Medicine 2009, 11::88 Correspondence BBrriiddggiinngg tthhee ggaapp bbeettwweeeenn Care Medicine and CRISMA laboratory, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Scaife 602, 3550 Biotechnology Center, University of Torino, Via Nizza 52, I, 10126 Torino, Italy; 10Institutionen för Medicin

  1. Development of the acquisition model of online information resources at Faculty of Medicine Library, Khon Kaen University.

    PubMed

    Thanapaisal, Soodjai; Thanapaisal, Chaiwit

    2013-09-01

    Faculty of Medicine Library, Khon Kaen University started to acquire online information resources since 2001 with the subscriptions to 2 databases. Nowadays it has 29 items of subscriptions and the expenses on online information resources reach to 17 million baht, more than 70 percent of the information resources budget, serving the academic purposes of the Faculty of Medicine. The problems of online information resources acquisition fall into 4 categories, and lead to 4 aspects conforming the model of the acquisition, comparing or benchmarking with the 4 selected medical school libraries in Bangkok, Chiang Mai, and Songkhla, and discussion with some other Thai and foreign libraries. The acquisition model of online information resources is developed from those problems and proposed for Faculty of Medicine Library, Khon Kaen University as well as for any medical libraries which prefer. PMID:24386752

  2. The mission of Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine is to mentor and educate students to become exceptional, compassionate and innovative

    E-print Network

    Chisholm, Rex L.

    are intertwined with the education mission. Our medical school and affiliated hospitals uniformly rank highlyThe mission of Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine is to mentor and educate. Feinberg Facts Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine #12;Feinberg Facts Location

  3. The Many Worlds of Hugh Everett III: Multiple Universes, Mutual Assured Destruction, and the Meltdown of a Nuclear Family

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kent, Adrian

    2011-07-01

    A review of Peter Byrne's biography of Hugh Everett III, "The Many Worlds of Hugh Everett III: Multiple Universes, Mutual Assured Destruction, and the Meltdown of a Nuclear Family", (Oxford University Press, 2010).

  4. WORK ENVIRONMENT The University of Connecticut School of Medicine will provide each resident/fellow with a work

    E-print Network

    Page 166 ` WORK ENVIRONMENT The University of Connecticut School of Medicine will provide each resident/fellow with a work environment that promotes the success of the resident/fellow in reaching be provided with materials to support patient care in the work environment at all times. These shall include

  5. The University of Arizona College of Medicine Optimal Aging Program: Stepping in the Shadows of Successful Aging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sikora, Stephanie

    2006-01-01

    The Optimal Aging Program (OAP) at the University of Arizona, College of Medicine is a longitudinal mentoring program that pairs students with older adults who are considered to be aging "successfully." This credit-bearing elective was initially established in 2001 through a grant from the John A. Hartford Foundation, and aims to expand the…

  6. Evaluating the Effectiveness of a Senior Mentor Program: The University of Missouri-Columbia School of Medicine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Kimberly G.; Gray, Peggy; Hosokawa, Michael C.; Zweig, Steven C.

    2006-01-01

    At the University of Missouri-Columbia School of Medicine, we developed a voluntary senior-mentor program, the Senior Teacher Educator Partnership (STEP), for first- and second-year medical students. Using qualitative research methods, we examined the impact of STEP on medical students' attitudes and then assessed the congruence of what is learned…

  7. Proceedings of Student-Faculty Research Day, CSIS, Pace University, May 3rd Tele-Medicine Risk Adjustment

    E-print Network

    Tappert, Charles

    by altering payment for enrollees based on health status and demographics [2]. Medicare Risk Adjustment data-Medicine Risk Adjustment Maja Misheva, Matthew Racioppo, William Gasparrini, Aykut Donmez, Jean F. Coppola, and Ray Miranti Seidenberg School of CSIS, Pace University, White Plains, NY 10606 Abstract--Medicare Risk

  8. Strategies To Create and Sustain a Diverse Faculty and Student Body at the Boston University School of Dental Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frankl, Spencer N.

    2003-01-01

    Discusses, in the context of the experience of the Boston University School of Dental Medicine, the challenges and opportunities inherent in creating and sustaining a diverse student body and a diverse faculty, staff, and administration. Highlights the role of the school's evolution as a learning organization as an essential contributing factor to…

  9. The Magazine for Alumni and Friends of Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University Summer/Fall 2009

    E-print Network

    Emmons, Scott

    The Magazine for Alumni and Friends of Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University ent/ 50 th Reunion Coverage #12;WorldWidE CommitmEnt Over the last decade, Albert Einstein College EinstEin Summer/Fall 2009 EINSTEIN & INDIA Working together for global health Inside: 2009 Com m encem

  10. University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey Volume 2 Number 2 Fall 2004 Winter 2005 School pulsepulse

    E-print Network

    Garfunkel, Eric

    University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey Volume 2 Number 2 Fall 2004 Winter 2005 New tradition of quality education, innovative research, compassionate patient care and community outreach. Many of our alumni have gone on to enjoy successful and meaningful careers in patient care, public health

  11. Integrating eLearning to Support Medical Education at the New University of Botswana School of Medicine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kebaetse, Masego B.; Nkomazana, Oathokwa; Haverkamp, Cecil

    2014-01-01

    Since the enrolment of its first cohort of students in 2009, the University of Botswana School of Medicine (UB SoM) has employed elearning as a key element to support and strengthen its model of decentralised medical education. Significant investments have been made in setting up the physical infrastructure, and in acquiring relevant expertise to…

  12. Pediatric Faculty The Department of Family & Community Health Systems at the University of Texas Health

    E-print Network

    Nicholson, Bruce J.

    . The successful candidate will: Have a minimum of a master's degree in nursing with a focus on pediatric nursingPediatric Faculty The Department of Family & Community Health Systems at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio (UTHSCSA) seeks one nurse educator and scholar with a strong

  13. Increasing Family Involvement and Cultural Understanding through a University-School Partnership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pohan, Cathy A.; Adams, Carol

    2007-01-01

    We believe that one powerful model for preparing culturally responsive teachers who are well equipped to increase family involvement is through established partnerships between universities and high-need schools. Participants in this program are involved in a variety of cross-cultural experiences in a school that serves culturally, linguistically,…

  14. Work-Family Conflict, Job Satisfaction and Labour Turnover Intentions among State University Lecturers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oredein, Afolakemi Olasumbo; Alao, Foluso Toyin

    2010-01-01

    Examining the extent at which work-family conflict and job satisfaction could predict the labour turnover intentions among lecturers, Olabisi Onabanjo University, Nigeria, as a case study, is the purpose of this study. 229 (95%) respondents out of 240 returned their copies of the questionnaire for data analysis. The results reveal that there was a…

  15. Networking the Home and University: How Families Can Be Integrated into Proximate/Distant Computer Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, J. Allen; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Describes study that was conducted to determine the feasibility of networking home microcomputers with a university mainframe system in order to investigate a new family process research paradigm, as well as the design and function of the microcomputer/mainframe system. Test instrumentation is described and systems' reliability and validity are…

  16. The Elizabeth Wisner Social Welfare Research Center for Families and Children at Tulane University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moon, Katie Lauve; Buttell, Frederick

    2015-01-01

    The Elizabeth Wisner Social Welfare Center for Families and Children is a community-based research center within the School of Social Work at the Tulane University. The Wisner Center primarily supports research projects that examine the causes and consequences of intimate partner violence, promote the development of new frameworks for…

  17. History of the Department of Pediatrics Yale University School of Medicine.

    PubMed

    Pearson, H A

    1997-01-01

    The history of pediatrics at the Yale University School of Medicine can be divided into eight historical eras. The "Paleohistorical Era" included colonial figures such as Governor John Winthrop and Hezekiah Beardsley who wrote about children's disease in colonial times. Eli Ives, Professor of the Diseases of Children at Yale Medical School gave the first systematic pediatric course in America in the first half of the nineteenth century. During the second era, from 1830-1920, the New Haven Hospital was opened. An affiliation between Yale University and the New Haven Hospital led to the formal establishment of clinical departments including pediatrics in the early 20th century. Six eras coinciding with successive pediatric chairman have led the department to its present respected position in American pediatrics. The department's 75th anniversary in 1996 is an occasion to recognize many of the department's accomplishments and leaders over the years. It is also a time to reaffirm the mission of the department: to the health needs of the children of Connecticut and beyond, to the advancement of scientific knowledge of infants and children and their diseases, and to the training and educational of the pediatric clinicians, educators and investigators of the future. PMID:9544489

  18. Positions Toward Science Studies in Medicine Among University Graduates of Medicine and the Teenaged Participants of the "Medical Systems" Study Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Zvi-Assaraf, Orit; Even-Israel, Chava

    2011-08-01

    The "Medical Systems" program was designed to introduce high school students to the world of advanced medicine. Its premise was to use an applied scientific discipline like medicine to encourage high-school students' interest in basic science. This study compares the teen-aged graduates of "Medical Systems" with fourth and fifth-year medical students. It aims to identify the attitudes of these two groups towards medical science and basic sciences in medicine. The population included 94 graduates of "Medical Systems" from schools throughout Israel, who had also completed an advanced-level course in a basic science (biology, chemistry or physics), and 96 medical students from different Israeli universities. The students' attitudes were measured using West et al.'s questionnaire (Med Educ 16(4):188-191, 1982), which assesses both the attitude of the participants towards basic science knowledge, and their attitude towards their learning experience in medical school. Nine participants from each group were also interviewed using a semi-structured interview protocol. The results showed essential differences in the attitudes of the two groups. The high school students consider scientific knowledge far more essential for a physician than do the medical students, who also showed a far lower estimation of the effectiveness of their science studies.

  19. Tradition meets innovation: transforming academic medical culture at the University of Pennsylvania's Perelman School of Medicine.

    PubMed

    Pati, Susmita; Reum, Josef; Conant, Emily; Tuton, Lucy Wolf; Scott, Patricia; Abbuhl, Stephanie; Grisso, Jeane Ann

    2013-04-01

    Traditional performance expectations and career advancement paths for academic physicians persist despite dramatic transformations in the academic workflow, workload, and workforce over the past 20 years. Although the academic physician's triple role as clinician, researcher, and educator has been lauded as the ideal by academic health centers, current standards of excellence for promotion and tenure are based on outdated models. These models fail to reward collaboration and center around rigid career advancement plans that do little to accommodate the changing needs of individuals and organizations. The authors describe an innovative, comprehensive, multipronged initiative at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania to initiate change in the culture of academic medicine and improve academic productivity, job satisfaction, and overall quality of life for junior faculty. As a key part of this intervention, task forces from each of the 13 participating departments/divisions met five times between September 2010 and January 2011 to produce recommendations for institutional change. The authors discuss how this initiative, using principles adopted from business transformation, generated themes and techniques that can potentially guide workforce environment innovation in academic health centers across the United States. Recommendations include embracing a promotion/tenure/evaluation system that supports and rewards tailored individual academic career plans; ensuring leadership, decision-making roles, and recognition for junior faculty; deepening administrative and team supports for junior faculty; and solidifying and rewarding mentorship for junior faculty. By doing so, academic health centers can ensure the retention and commitment of faculty throughout all stages of their careers. PMID:23425986

  20. Work-family conflict and well-being in university employees.

    PubMed

    Winefield, Helen R; Boyd, Carolyn; Winefield, Anthony H

    2014-01-01

    This is one of the first reported studies to have reviewed the role of work-family conflict in university employees, both academic and nonacademic. The goal of this research was to examine the role of work-family conflict as a mediator of relationships between features of the work environment and worker well-being and organizational outcomes. A sample of 3,326 Australian university workers responded to an online survey. Work-family conflict added substantially to the explained variance in physical symptoms and psychological strain after taking account of job demands and control, and to a lesser extent to the variance in job performance. However, it had no extra impact on organizational commitment, which was most strongly predicted by job autonomy. Despite differing in workloads and work-family conflict, academic ("faculty") and nonacademic staff demonstrated similar predictors of worker and organizational outcomes. Results suggest two pathways through which management policies may be effective in improving worker well-being and productivity: improving job autonomy has mainly direct effects, while reducing job demands is mediated by consequent reductions in work-family conflict. PMID:25175890

  1. Family 

    E-print Network

    Unknown

    2011-09-05

    (ADJFAT) and actual(ACTFAT)), intramuscular fat (MARB), and Warner-Bratzler shear force tenderness (WBSF). Family types with a greater proportion of Bos indicus in the sire in relation to the amount in the dam (F1 x A and B x F1) averaged longer GL... between males and females. Further examination within each sex showed a difference between male reciprocals that was two times that of females. iv Calves with a higher percentage of Bos indicus in the sire compared to the proportion in the dam showed...

  2. Relationships between obesity management and depression management in a university-based family medicine center

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Emily R.; Theeke, Laurie; Minchau, Elizabeth; Mallow, Jennifer; Lucke-Wold, Noelle; Wampler, Jason

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to describe and examine relationships among sociodemographics, obesity, and depression management in Appalachian adults. Data sources This study was conducted in a primary care center and used a cross-sectional, quantitative, nonexperimental descriptive, and predictive design. Data were obtained from a random sample of 240 adult records that were stratified by gender. Analysis included exploration of all variables for descriptive information followed by bivariate analyses to determine significant relationships between variables, and regression analysis using variables with significant relation to obesity and depression management. Conclusions Obesity was prevalent (48%) though less than 1% had documented diagnosis. Over 98% of the 65 participants diagnosed with depression did not have documentation of use of a depression screening tool. Diagnosis of depression correlated significantly with elevated body mass index (BMI) and diagnosis of obesity. Gender bias was evident with males having more documentation of weight-loss discussions and planning, and women receiving more referrals to behavioral health for counseling. Implications for practice Innovations to enhance the diagnosis of obesity could lead to consistent provider-led management. Implementation studies of valid depression screening tools in the electronic medical record could enhance the identification of depressive symptoms and could promote health equity. PMID:25219571

  3. The effect of polyphenolic-polysaccharide conjugates from selected medicinal plants of Asteraceae family on the peroxynitrite-induced changes in blood platelet proteins.

    PubMed

    Saluk-Juszczak, Joanna; Pawlaczyk, Izabela; Olas, Beata; Ko?odziejczyk, Joanna; Ponczek, Michal; Nowak, Pawel; Tsirigotis-Wo?oszczak, Marta; Wachowicz, Barbara; Gancarz, Roman

    2010-12-01

    Lots of plants belonging to Asteraceae family are very popular in folk medicine in Poland. These plants are also known as being rich in acidic polysaccharides, due to the presence of hexuronic acids or its derivatives. Our preliminary experiments have shown that the extract from Conyza canadensis L. possesses various biological activity, including antiplatelet, antiocoagulant and antioxidant properties. The aim of our study was to assess if macromolecular glycoconjugates from selected herbal plants of Asteraceae family: Achillea millefolium L., Arnica montana L., Echinacea purpurea L., Solidago virgaurea L., Chamomilla recutita (L.) Rauschert., and Conyza canadensis L. protect platelet proteins against nitrative and oxidative damage induced by peroxynitrite, which is responsible for oxidative/nitrative modifications of platelet proteins: the formation of 3-nitrotyrosine and carbonyl groups. These modifications may lead to changes of blood platelet functions and can have pathological consequences. The role of these different medicinal plants in the defence against oxidative/nitrative stress in human platelets is still unknown, therefore the oxidative damage to platelet proteins induced by peroxynitrite and protectory effects of tested conjugates by the estimation of carbonyl group level and nitrotyrosine formation (a marker of protein nitration) were studied in vitro. The antioxidative properties of the polyphenolic-polysaccharide conjugates from selected tested medicinal plants were also compared with the action of a well characterized antioxidative commercial polyphenol - resveratrol (3,4',5-trihydroxystilbene). The obtained results demonstrate that the compounds from herbal plants: A. millefolium, A. montana, E. purpurea, C. recutita, S. virgaurea, possess antioxidative properties and protect platelet proteins against peroxynitrite toxicity in vitro, similar to the glycoconjugates from C. canadensis. However, in the comparative studies, the polyphenolic-polysaccharide conjugates from selected tested medicinal plants were not found to be more effective antioxidant, than the solution of pure resveratrol. PMID:20869393

  4. Ethnic differences in medicinal plant use among University students: a cross-sectional survey of self-reported medicinal plant use at two Midwest Universities

    E-print Network

    Craft, Rachel; McClure, Katrina; Corbett, Steven; Ferreira, Maria Pontes; Stiffarm, Ashley M.; Kindscher, Kelly

    2015-01-01

    5 6 Cedar 4 0 Tea tree oil 2 1 Navajo tea 2 0 Peyote 2 0 One occurrence: 5 HTP 0 1 Cranberry 0 1 Kratom 0 1 Mullein 0 1 Red raspberry leaves 0 1 Yerba Mate 0 1 Angelica root 1 0 Bitterroot/Black Medicine 1 0 Choke Cherry leaf 1 0 Corn pollen 1 0...

  5. Does medicine still show an unresolved discrimination against women? Experience in two European university hospitals.

    PubMed

    Santamaría, A; Merino, A; Viñas, O; Arrizabalaga, P

    2009-02-01

    Have invisible barriers for women been broken in 2007, or do we still have to break through medicine's glass ceiling? Data from two of the most prestigious university hospitals in Barcelona with 700-800 beds, Hospital Clínic (HC) and Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau (HSCSP) address this issue. In the HSCSP, 87% of the department chairs are men and 85% of the department unit chiefs are also men. With respect to women, only 5 (13%) are in the top position (department chair) and 4 (15%) are department unit chiefs. Similar statistics are also found at the HC: 87% of the department chairs and 89% of the department unit chiefs are men. Currently, only 6 women (13%) are in the top position and 6 (11%) are department unit chiefs. Analysis of the 2002 data of internal promotions in HC showed that for the first level (senior specialist) sex distribution was similar. Nevertheless, for the second level (consultant) only 25% were women, and for the top level (senior consultant) only 8% were women. These proportions have not changed in 2007 in spite of a 10% increase in leadership positions during this period. Similar proportions were found in HSCSP where 68% of the top promotions were held by men. The data obtained from these two different medical institutions in Barcelona are probably representative of other hospitals in Spain. It would be ethically desirable to have males and females in leadership positions in the medical profession. PMID:19181883

  6. From concept to culture: the WWAMI program at the University of Washington School of Medicine.

    PubMed

    Ramsey, P G; Coombs, J B; Hunt, D D; Marshall, S G; Wenrich, M D

    2001-08-01

    Shortages of primary care physicians have historically affected rural areas more severely than urban and suburban areas. In 1970, the University of Washington School of Medicine (UWSOM) administrators and faculty initiated a four-state, community-based program to increase the number of generalist physicians throughout a predominantly rural and underserved region in the U.S. Northwest. The program developed regional medical education for three neighboring states that lacked their own medical schools, and encouraged physicians in training to practice in the region. Now serving five Northwest states (Washington, Wyoming, Alaska, Montana, and Idaho), the WWAMI program has solidified and expanded throughout its 30-year history. Factors important to success include widespread participation in and ownership of the program by the participating physicians, faculty, institutions, legislatures, and associations; partnership among constituents; educational equivalency among training sites; and development of an educational continuum with recruitment and/or training at multiple levels, including K--12, undergraduate, graduate training, residency, and practice. The program's positive influences on the UWSOM have included historically early attention to primary care and community-based clinical training and development of an ethic of closely monitored innovation. The use of new information technologies promises to further expand the ability to organize and offer medical education in the WWAMI region. PMID:11500276

  7. Building learning communities: evolution of the colleges at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Amy; Cutrer, William; Moutsios, Sandi; Heavrin, Benjamin; Pilla, Michael; Eichbaum, Quentin; Rodgers, Scott

    2013-09-01

    Learning communities, which are an emerging trend in medical education, create a foundation for professional and academic development through the establishment of longitudinal relationships between students and faculty. In this article, the authors describe the robust learning community system at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, which encompasses wellness, career planning, professional development, and academics.The Vanderbilt Advisory Colleges Program introduced in 2006 initially focused on two goals: promoting wellness and providing career advising. In the 2011-2012 academic year, the focus of the colleges expanded to incorporate an enhanced level of personal career advising and an academic component. In the four-year College Colloquium course, faculty selected as college mentors teach the medical humanities and lead sessions dedicated to student professional development in the areas of leadership, research, and service-learning. This academic and professional development program builds on the existing strengths of the colleges and has transformed the colleges into learning communities.The authors reflect on lessons learned and discuss future plans. They report that internal data and data from the Association of American Medical Colleges Medical School Graduation Questionnaire support consistently high and increasing satisfaction among Vanderbilt medical students, across the metrics of personal counseling, faculty mentoring, and career planning. PMID:23887019

  8. Improving Knowledge, Awareness, and Use of Flexible Career Policies through an Accelerator Intervention at the University of California, Davis, School of Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Villablanca, Amparo C.; Beckett, Laurel; Nettiksimmons, Jasmine; Howell, Lydia P.

    2013-01-01

    The challenges of balancing a career and family life disproportionately affect women in academic health sciences and medicine, contributing to their slower career advancement and/or their attrition from academia. In this article, the authors first describe their experiences at the University of California, Davis, School of Medicine developing and implementing an innovative accelerator intervention designed to promote faculty work-life balance by improving knowledge, awareness, and access to comprehensive flexible career policies. They then summarize the results of two faculty surveys--one conducted before the implementation of their intervention and the second conducted one year into their three-year intervention--designed to assess faculty’s use and intention to use the flexible career policies, their awareness of available options, barriers to their use of the policies, and their career satisfaction. The authors found that the intervention significantly increased awareness of the policies and attendance at related educational activities, improved attitudes toward the policies, and decreased perceived barriers to use. These results however were most pronounced for female faculty and faculty under the age of 50. The authors next discuss areas for future research on faculty use of flexible career policies and offer recommendations for other institutions of higher education, not just those in academic medicine, interested in implementing a similar intervention. They conclude that having flexible career policies alone is not enough to stem the attrition of female faculty. Such policies must be fully integrated into an institution’s culture such that faculty are both aware of them and willing to use them. PMID:23619063

  9. Improving knowledge, awareness, and use of flexible career policies through an accelerator intervention at the University of California, Davis, School of Medicine.

    PubMed

    Villablanca, Amparo C; Beckett, Laurel; Nettiksimmons, Jasmine; Howell, Lydia P

    2013-06-01

    The challenges of balancing a career and family life disproportionately affect women in academic health sciences and medicine, contributing to their slower career advancement and/or their attrition from academia. In this article, the authors first describe their experiences at the University of California, Davis, School of Medicine developing and implementing an innovative accelerator intervention designed to promote faculty work-life balance by improving knowledge, awareness, and access to comprehensive flexible career policies. They then summarize the results of two faculty surveys--one conducted before the implementation of their intervention and the second conducted one year into their three-year intervention--designed to assess faculty's use and intention to use the flexible career policies, their awareness of available options, barriers to their use of the policies, and their career satisfaction. The authors found that the intervention significantly increased awareness of the policies and attendance at related educational activities, improved attitudes toward the policies, and decreased perceived barriers to use. These results, however, were most pronounced for female faculty and faculty under the age of 50. The authors next discuss areas for future research on faculty use of flexible career policies and offer recommendations for other institutions of higher education--not just those in academic medicine--interested in implementing a similar intervention. They conclude that having flexible career policies alone is not enough to stem the attrition of female faculty. Such policies must be fully integrated into an institution's culture such that faculty are both aware of them and willing to use them. PMID:23619063

  10. Investigation of current university research concerning energy conversion and conservation in small single-family dwellings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grossman, G. R.; Roberts, A. S., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    An investigation was made of university research concerning energy conversion and conservation techniques which may be applied in small single-family residences. Information was accumulated through published papers, progress reports, telephone conversations, and personal interviews. A synopsis of each pertinent investigation is given. Finally, a discussion of the synopses is presented and recommendations are made concerning the applicability of concepts for the design and construction of NASA-Langley Research Center's proposed Technology Utilization House in Hampton, Virginia.

  11. Work and family conflict in academic science: patterns and predictors among women and men in research universities.

    PubMed

    Fox, Mary Frank; Fonseca, Carolyn; Bao, Jinghui

    2011-10-01

    This article addresses work-family conflict as reported among women and men academic scientists in data systematically collected across fields of study in nine US research universities. Arguing that academic science is a particularly revealing case for studying work-family conflict, the article addresses: (1) the bi-directional conflict of work with family, and family with work, reported among the scientists; (2) the ways that higher, compared with lower, conflict, is predicted by key features of family, academic rank, and departments/institutions; and (3) patterns and predictors of work-family conflict that vary, as well as converge, by gender. Results point to notable differences, and commonalties, by gender, in factors affecting interference in both directions of work-family conflict reported by scientists. These findings have implications for understandings of how marriage and children, senior compared with junior academic rank, and departmental climates shape work-family conflict among women and men in US academic science. PMID:22164721

  12. The Role of Family Environment in Depressive Symptoms among University Students: A Large Sample Survey in China

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yanjie; Chen, Lu; Qiu, Xiaohui; Qiao, Zhengxue; Zhou, Jiawei; Pan, Hui; Ban, Bo; Zhu, Xiongzhao; He, Jincai; Ding, Yongqing; Bai, Bing

    2015-01-01

    Objective To explore the relationship between family environment and depressive symptoms and to evaluate the influence of hard and soft family environmental factors on depression levels in a large sample of university students in China. Methods A multi-stage stratified sampling procedure was used to select 6,000 participants. The response rate was 88.8%, with 5,329 students completing the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and the Family Environment Scale Chinese Version (FES-CV), which was adapted for the Chinese population. Differences between the groups were tested for significance by the Student’s t-test; ANOVA was used to test continuous variables. The relationship between soft family environmental factors and BDI were tested by Pearson correlation analysis. Hierarchical linear regression analysis was conducted to model the effects of hard environmental factors and soft environmental factors on depression in university students. Results A total of 11.8% of students scored above the threshold of moderate depression(BDI?14). Hard family environmental factors such as parent relationship, family economic status, level of parental literacy and non-intact family structure were associated with depressive symptoms. The soft family environmental factors—conflict and control—were positively associated with depression, while cohesion was negatively related to depressive symptom after controlling for other important associates of depression. Hierarchical regression analysis indicated that the soft family environment correlates more strongly with depression than the hard family environment. Conclusions Soft family environmental factors—especially cohesion, conflict and control—appeared to play an important role in the occurrence of depressive symptoms. These findings underline the significance of the family environment as a source of risk factors for depression among university students in China and suggest that family-based interventions and improvement are very important to reduce depression among university students. PMID:26629694

  13. Cancer Institute of New Jersey: University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey. Environmental Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to authorize the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey to proceed with the design, construction, and equipping of the proposed Clinical Treatment and Research Facility of the University of New Jersey on the New Brunswick campus. The facility will provide for the integration of new and existing clinical outpatient cancer treatment with basic and clinical research to expedite the application of new discoveries in cancer treatment. Based on the analysis in the environmental assessment, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA).

  14. A nationwide survey on the expectation of public healthcare providers on family medicine specialists in Malaysia—a qualitative analysis of 623 written comments

    PubMed Central

    Chew, Boon-How; Cheong, Ai-Theng; Ismail, Mastura; Hamzah, Zuhra; A-Rashid, Mohd-Radzniwan; Md-Yasin, Mazapuspavina; Ali, Norsiah

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine the expectation of public healthcare providers/professionals (PHCPs) who are working closely with family medicine specialists (FMSs) at public health clinics. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting This study is part of a larger national study on the perception of the Malaysian public healthcare professionals on FMSs. Participants PHCPs from three categories of health facilities, namely hospitals, health clinics and health offices. Main outcome measures Qualitative analysis of written comments of respondents’ expectation of FMSs. Results The participants’ response rate was 58% (780/1345) with an almost equal proportion from each public healthcare facility. We identified 21 subthemes for the 623 expectation comments. The six emerging themes are (1) need for more FMSs, (2) clinical roles and functions of FMSs, (3) administrative roles of FMSs, (4) contribution to community and public health, (5) attributes improvement and (6) research and audits. FMSs were expected to give attention to clinical duty. Delivering this responsibility with competence included having the latest medical knowledge in their own and others’ medical disciplines, practising evidence-based medicine in prehospital and posthospital care, better supervision of staff and doctors under their care, fostering effective teamwork, communicating more often with hospital specialists and making appropriate referral. Expectations ranged from definite and strong for more FMSs at the health clinics to low expectation for FMSs’ involvement in research; to mal-expectation on FMSs’ involvement in community and public health programmes. Conclusions There were some remarkable differences in expectations on FMSs from the three different PHCPs. These ranged from being clinically competent and administratively available for patients and staff at the health clinics, to mal-expectations on FMSs to engage in public health affairs. Relevant parties, including FMSs themselves, could take appropriate self-improvement initiatives to enhance public practice of family medicine and patient care. Trial registration number NMRR ID: 08-12-1167. PMID:24919639

  15. Respiratory medicine at McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario: 1968 to 2013

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Norman L; O’Byrne, Paul M

    2014-01-01

    The medical school at McMaster University (Hamilton, Ontario) was conceived in 1965 and admitted the first class in 1969. John Evans became the founding Dean and he invited Moran Campbell to be the first Chairman of the Department of Medicine. Moran Campbell, already a world figure in respiratory medicine and physiology, arrived at McMaster in September 1968, and he invited Norman Jones to be Coordinator of the Respiratory Programme. At that time, Hamilton had a population of 300,000, with two full-time respirologists, Robert Cornett at the Hamilton General Hospital and Michael Newhouse at St Joseph’s Hospital. From the clinical perspective, the aim of the Respiratory Programme was to develop a network approach to clinical problems among the five hospitals in the Hamilton region, with St Joseph’s Hospital serving as a regional referral centre, and each hospital developing its own focus: intensive care and burns units at the Hamilton General Hospital; cancer at the Henderson (later Juravinski) Hospital; tuberculosis and rehabilitation at the Chedoke Hospital; pediatrics and neonatal intensive care at the McMaster University Medical Centre; and community care at the Joseph Brant Hospital in Burlington (Ontario). The network provided an ideal base for a specialty residency program. There was also the need to establish viable research. These objectives were achieved through collaboration, support of hospital administration, and recruitment of clinicians and faculty, mainly from our own trainees and research fellows. By the mid-1970s the respiratory group numbered more than 25; outpatient clinic visits and research had grown beyond our initial expectations. The international impact of the group became reflected in the clinical and basic research endeavours. ASTHMA: Freddy Hargreave and Jerry Dolovich established methods to measure airway responsiveness to histamine and methacholine. Allergen inhalation was shown to increase airway responsiveness for several weeks, and the late response was shown to be an immunoglobulin E-mediated phenomenon. Paul O’Byrne and Gail Gauvreau showed that the prolonged allergen-induced responses were due to eosinophilic and basophilic airway inflammation and, with Judah Denburg, revealed upregulation of eosinophil/basophil progenitor production in bone marrow and airways. The Firestone Institute became the centre of studies identifying the inflammatory pheno-type of patients with difficult-to-control asthma. Freddy Hargreave and others developed methods for sputum induction to identify persisting eosinophilic airway inflammation and documented its presence in the absence of asthma and in patients with persistent cough. Parameswaran Nair has applied these techniques to the management of asthma in routine clinical practice. The Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire and the Asthma Control Tests were developed by Drs Liz Juniper and Gordon Guyatt. The first Canadian evidence-based clinical guidelines for asthma management in 1989 were coordinated by Freddy Hargreave, Jerry Dolovich and Michael Newhouse. DISTRIBUTION OF INHALED PARTICLES: Michael Newhouse and Myrna Dolovich used inhaled radiolabelled aerosols to study the distribution of inhaled particles and their clearance in normal subjects, smokers and patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. They developed the aerochamber, and were the first to radiolabel therapeutic aerosols to distinguish the effects of peripheral versus central deposition. Particle deposition and clearance were shown to be impaired in ciliary dyskinesia and cystic fibrosis. DYSPNEA: Moran Campbell and Kieran Killian measured psychophysical estimates of the sense of effort in breathing in studies of loaded breathing and exercise to show that dyspnea increased as a power function of both duration and intensity of respiratory muscle contraction, and in relation to reductions in respiratory muscle strength. These principles also applied to dyspnea in cardiorespiratory disorders. EXERCISE CAPACITY: Norman Jones and Moran Campbell developed a system fo

  16. The University of Chicago Department of Statistics

    E-print Network

    of Health Research and Policy Stanford University School of Medicine "Genetic Association Tests for Family, 5734 S. University Avenue ABSTRACT Several investigators have proposed tests for genetic association based on data from nuclear families. The tests differ in how they handle missing parental genotypes. I

  17. The evolution of integrative medical education: the influence of the University of Arizona Center for Integrative Medicine.

    PubMed

    Maizes, Victoria; Horwitz, Randy; Lebensohn, Patricia; McClafferty, Hilary; Dalen, James; Weil, Andrew

    2015-11-01

    The University of Arizona Center for Integrative Medicine (AzCIM) was founded in 1994 with a primary focus of educating physicians in integrative medicine (IM). Twenty years later, IM has become an internationally recognized movement in medicine. With 40% of United States' medical schools having membership in the Academic Consortium for Integrative Medicine and Health it is foreseeable that all medical students and residents will soon receive training in the principles and practices of IM. The AzCIM has the broadest range and depth of IM educational programs and has had a major influence on integrative medical education in the United States. This review describes the fellowship, residency and medical student programs at AzCIM as well as other significant national drivers of IM education; it also points out the challenges faced in developing IM initiatives. The field of IM has matured with new national board certification in IM requiring fellowship training. Allied health professional IM educational courses, as well as integrative health coaching, assure that all members of the health care team can receive training. This review describes the evolution of IM education and will be helpful to academic centers, health care institutions, and countries seeking to introduce IM initiatives. PMID:26559360

  18. Generating Respect for All in a Climate of academic ExcellenceGenerating Respect for All in a Climate of academic Excellence Sponsored by the Dean of the University of Arizona College of Medicine

    E-print Network

    McCallum, William G.

    in a Climate of academic Excellence Sponsored by the Dean of the University of Arizona College of Medicine.................................................................. 35 GRACE Project Website www.medicine.arizona.edu/grace #12;2 An Overview of the GRACE Project at the University of Arizona College of Medicine (COM) with the ultimate goal of identifying and implementing

  19. Clinical Laboratory Scientist, Genetics Hamilton Regional Laboratory Medicine Program and McMaster University

    E-print Network

    Thompson, Michael

    Clinical Laboratory Scientist, Genetics Hamilton Regional Laboratory Medicine Program and Mc that includes tertiary genetic, pediatric, hematology, pathology, oncology, and obstetrical services components of genetic services in the program if desired by the candidate. We particularly seek candidates

  20. DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL THERAPY AND HUMAN MOVEMENT SCIENCES NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY, FEINBERG SCHOOL OF MEDICINE

    E-print Network

    Chisholm, Rex L.

    SCHOOL OF MEDICINE Clinical Education Expectations and Evaluation The purpose of this document to contribute to facility goals by providing high quality clinical, educational, research, and administrative. Manage student's clinical internship in a collegial manner that demonstrates unconditional positive

  1. Family non-universal U(1)' gauge symmetries and b {r_arrow} s transitions.

    SciTech Connect

    Barger, V.; Everett, L.; Jiang, J.; Langacker, P.; Liu, T.; Wagner, C .E. M.; High Energy Physics; Univ. of Chicago; Univ. of Wisconsin at Madison; Inst. for Advanced Study

    2009-01-01

    We present a correlated analysis for the {Delta}B = 1, 2 processes which occur via b {yields} s transitions within models with a family nonuniversal U(1){prime}. We take a model-independent approach and only require family universal charges for the first and second generations and small fermion mixing angles. The results of our analysis show that within this class of models, the anomalies in B{sub s}-B{sub s}{sup -} mixing and the time-dependent CP asymmetries of the penguin-dominated B{sub d} {yields} ({pi},{psi},{eta}{prime},{rho},{omega},f{sub 0})K{sub S} decays can be accommodated.

  2. Situational analysis of teaching and learning of medicine and nursing students at Makerere University College of Health Sciences

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Makerere University College of Health Sciences (MakCHS) in Uganda is undergoing a major reform to become a more influential force in society. It is important that its medicine and nursing graduates are equipped to best address the priority health needs of the Ugandan population, as outlined in the government’s Health Sector Strategic Plan (HSSP). The assessment identifies critical gaps in the core competencies of the MakCHS medicine and nursing and ways to overcome them in order to achieve HSSP goals. Methods Documents from the Uganda Ministry of Health were reviewed, and medicine and nursing curricula were analyzed. Nineteen key informant interviews (KII) and seven focus group discussions (FGD) with stakeholders were conducted. The data were manually analyzed for emerging themes and sub-themes. The study team subsequently used the checklists to create matrices summarizing the findings from the KIIs, FGDs, and curricula analysis. Validation of findings was done by triangulating information from the different data collection methods. Results The core competencies that medicine and nursing students are expected to achieve by the end of their education were outlined for both programs. The curricula are in the process of reform towards competency-based education, and on the surface, are well aligned with the strategic needs of the country. But implementation is inadequate, and can be changed: • Learning objectives need to be more applicable to achieving competencies. • Learning experiences need to be more relevant for competencies and setting in which students will work after graduation (i.e. not just clinical care in a tertiary care facility). • Student evaluation needs to be better designed for assessing these competencies. Conclusion MakCHS has made a significant attempt to produce relevant, competent nursing and medicine graduates to meet the community needs. Ways to make them more effective though deliberate efforts to apply a competency-based education are possible. PMID:21411003

  3. Promoting Health and Mental Health in Children, Youth, and Families. Springer Series on Behavior Therapy and Behavioral Medicine, Volume 27.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glenwick, David S., Ed.; Jason, Leonard A., Ed.

    In the last decade, there has been increased attention paid to the scope of mental and physical health problems that affect individuals at different points over the entire life span. This volume presents many problem areas and the range of their impact on individuals, families, and society at large. The impact of intervention programs is described…

  4. Improving Feedback for Medical Students in a Family Medicine Clerkship: Evaluating medical student performance using frequent feedback.

    PubMed

    White, D G; Tiberius, R; Talbot, Y; Schiralli, V; Rickett, M

    1991-01-01

    To evaluate whether feedback to medical students could be improved by asking teachers to complete a student performance rating form during a family practice clerkship, the authors had students and teachers fill out a questionnaire. Teachers in the intervention group reported observing students more frequently. Students' perceptions of feedback frequency correlated strongly with their ratings of feedback quality. PMID:21234079

  5. Family medicine, ‘La Herencia’ and breast cancer; understanding the (dis)continuities of predictive genetics in Cuba

    PubMed Central

    Gibbon, Sahra

    2011-01-01

    Building on social science research examining the relationship between genetic knowledge, identity and the family this paper takes the cultural context of Cuba as a site for critical ethnographic engagement. The paper makes use of research working with a range of Cuban publics and genetic professionals as part of a collaborative research project exploring the social and cultural context of health beliefs about breast cancer. It illuminates the contrasting ways in which genomic knowledge linked to an increased risk of breast cancer is perceived, communicated, and acted upon. It is argued that the particular meaning and significance of genetic risk linked to breast cancer in this context must be examined in relation to long standing institutional practices relating to public health care provision. The focus on ‘the family’ in the provision of Cuban health provides a particularly viable foundation for the expansion of what is described as ‘community genetics’, including the collation of family history details for common complex diseases such as breast cancer. Nevertheless specific public perceptions of risk related to breast cancer and the difficulties of discussing a diagnosis of cancer openly in the family point to the very specific challenges for the translation and application of predictive interventions in Cuba. In summary the dynamic interrelationship between public health, perceptions of risk or health beliefs about the causes of the disease and attitudes towards cancer diagnosis within the family point to both continuities and discontinuities in the way that genomic interventions linked to breast cancer are unfolding as part of a dynamic yet still ostensibly socialist project of health care in Cuba. PMID:21239101

  6. Health care providers' perspectives of an intervention designed to improve colorectal cancer screening rates in family medicine residency clinics : a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Sara; Goldsmith, Geoffrey; Price, Robert; Brooks, Audrey; Harvey, Amanda

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to obtain feedback from family medicine residents and clinic nurses regarding a colorectal cancer screening (CRCS) intervention. Focus groups were used to ask participants three questions about their perceptions of the intervention and subsequent patient screening behaviors. Content analysis and constant comparison were used to yield two meaningful themes from the participant responses: patient-specific issues and study design issues. Patient-specific issues included: lack of education and fear, finances and insurance coverage, and compliance. Study design issues included: lack of time, a need for reminders to discuss CRCS with patients, quality of the nurse's role, and a need for better clinical staff education and awareness. Results show ways to significantly improve future implementation of the CRCS intervention. Ultimately, future use of clinic-based CRCS interventions could be vastly improved by utilizing strategies to promote teamwork and increase the sense of mutual ownership among clinic staff. PMID:22826203

  7. Development of a student-mentored research program between a complementary and alternative medicine university and a traditional, research-intensive university.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Barbara M; Furner, Sylvia E; Cramer, Gregory D

    2014-09-01

    The global need to develop clinician-scientists capable of using research in clinical practice, translating research knowledge into practice, and carrying out research that affects the quality, efficacy, and efficiency of health care is well documented. The complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) professions embrace the call to develop physician-researchers to carry out translational and applied research for CAM modalities. CAM universities face unique challenges when implementing research training compared with traditional, research-intensive (TRI) universities and medical centers where the majority of medical research is carried out.The authors present the development and outcomes of a mentored research program (MRP) between a CAM and a TRI institution, the National University of Health Sciences and the University of Illinois at Chicago School of Public Health, between 2006 and 2012. CAM predoctoral students engaged in a full-immersion semester at the TRI, including didactic courses and active research with a TRI faculty research mentor. Half of the participating doctor of chiropractic (DC) students continued on to PhD programs, and half established integrative medicine, primary care clinical careers.Establishing rigorous criteria for mentors and mentees, communicating expectations, developing solid relationships between the mentor, mentee, and home school advisor, responding quickly to impediments, and providing adequate support from CAM and TRI investigators were key to the MRP's success. To sustain research opportunities, coordinated degree programs for the DC and master of public health and master of clinical and translational research were established. PMID:24988423

  8. UC Davis School of Medicine Match Results -2013

    E-print Network

    Leistikow, Bruce N.

    Rosa-CA Family Medicine SANTA ROSA CA UC Irvine Med Ctr-CA Family Medicine ORANGE CA VCU-Shenandoah Valley-VA Family Medicine FRONT ROYAL VA White Mem Med Ctr-LA-CA Family Medicine LOS ANGELES CA Brigham

  9. Development of a structure-validated Family Relationship Questionnaire (FRQ) with Chinese university students.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liuxi; Xu, Kai; Fu, Lingyun; Xu, Shaofang; Gao, Qianqian; Wang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Consistent results have shown a relationship between the psychological world of children and their perceived parental bonding or family attachment style, but to date there is no single measure covering both styles. The authors designed a statement matrix with 116 items for this purpose and compared it with the Parental Bonding Instrument (PBI) in a study with 718 university students. After exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses, five factors (scales)--namely, Paternal/Maternal Encouragement (5 items each), Paternal/Maternal Abuse (5 items each), Paternal/Maternal Freedom Release (5 items each), General Attachment (5 items), and Paternal/Maternal Dominance (4 items each)--were defined to form a Family Relationship Questionnaire (FRQ). The internal alphas of the factors ranged from .64 to .83, and their congruency coefficients were .93 to .98 in samples regarding father and mother. Women scored significantly higher on FRQ General Attachment and Maternal Encouragement and lower on Paternal Abuse than men did; only children scored significantly higher on Paternal and Maternal Encouragements than children with siblings did. Women also scored significantly higher on PBI Paternal Autonomy Denial; only children scored significantly higher on Paternal and Maternal Cares and Maternal Autonomy Denial. All intercorrelations between FRQ scales were low to medium, and some correlations between FRQ and PBI scales were medium to high. This study demonstrates that the FRQ has a structure of five factors with satisfactory discriminant and convergent validities, which might help to characterize family relationships in healthy and clinical populations. PMID:26366981

  10. Radiation Treatment for Ewing Family of Tumors in Adults: University of Florida Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Shi Wenyin; Indelicato, Daniel J.; Keole, Sameer R.; Morris, Christopher G.; Scarborough, Mark T.; Gibbs, Parker C.; Zlotecki, Robert A.

    2008-11-15

    Purpose: To review the clinical characteristics and outcomes of adult patients with Ewing family of tumors treated with radiation at University of Florida. Methods and Materials: Clinical features, treatment, and outcomes of 47 patients older than 18 years with Ewing family of tumors treated with combined radiation therapy and chemotherapy from 1970 to 2005 were retrospectively reviewed. Analysis was stratified by age older or younger than 30 years. Patients with metastatic disease at the time of diagnosis were excluded from the study. Results: The 29 men and 18 women had a median age of 24 years. Thirty-three patients were 18-30 years old and 14 patients were older than 30 years. Median follow-up of living patients was 8.2 years. The 5-year overall survival rate for all patients was 43% (p = 0.8523). The 5-year local control rate for all patients was 75% (p = 0.9326). The 5-year rate of freedom from distant metastasis for all patients was 45% (p = 0.5471). There were no significant differences in 5-year overall survival, local control, and freedom from distant metastasis rates; patterns of distant failure; or toxicity profiles between older adult patients and younger adult patients. Conclusions: We found that the natural history and treatment outcomes of the Ewing family of tumors were consistently similar in adults (young and old) and children. Thus, aggressive combined modality approaches should be considered for adult patients.

  11. On-line intergrated library system: bibliographic access and control system of Washington University School of Medicine.

    PubMed

    Kelly, E A; Yedlin, D K; Crawford, S Y; Igielnik, S

    1982-07-01

    The on-line integrated library system is a relatively simple and logical concept. The perception that many library functions can be incorporated within one system, using a single data base, has led a number of practitioners to independently develop such systems. This paper describes the Bibliographic Access and Control System (BACS), developed by the Washington University School of Medicine Library, and identifies some of the underlying principles, components, and capabilities of this system from the vantage point of operational experience over one year. PMID:6896835

  12. Planning a new library in an age of transition: the Washington University School of Medicine Library and Biomedical Communications Center.

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, S; Halbrook, B

    1990-01-01

    In an era of great technological and socioeconomic changes, the Washington University School of Medicine conceptualized and built its first Library and Biomedical Communications Center in seventy-eight years. The planning process, evolution of the electronic library, and translation of functions into operating spaces are discussed. Since 1983, when the project was approved, a whole range of information technologies and services have emerged. The authors consider the kind of library that would operate in a setting where people can do their own searches, order data and materials through an electronic network, analyze and manage information, and use software to create their own publications. Images PMID:2393757

  13. On-line intergrated library system: bibliographic access and control system of Washington University School of Medicine.

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, E A; Yedlin, D K; Crawford, S Y; Igielnik, S

    1982-01-01

    The on-line integrated library system is a relatively simple and logical concept. The perception that many library functions can be incorporated within one system, using a single data base, has led a number of practitioners to independently develop such systems. This paper describes the Bibliographic Access and Control System (BACS), developed by the Washington University School of Medicine Library, and identifies some of the underlying principles, components, and capabilities of this system from the vantage point of operational experience over one year. PMID:6896835

  14. Prevalence of potential drug-drug interactions among internal medicine ward in University of Gondar Teaching Hospital, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Bhagavathula, Akshaya Srikanth; Berhanie, Alemayehu; Tigistu, Habtamu; Abraham, Yishak; Getachew, Yosheph; Khan, Tahir Mehmood; Unakal, Chandrashekhar

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the prevalence, clinical significance and the associated risk factors of potential drug-drug interactions (DDIs) at internal medicine ward of University of Gondar (UOG) hospital. Method A prospective cross-sectional study was conducted on patients treated in internal medicine ward of UOG hospital from April 29, 2013 to June 2, 2013. Data was collected from medical records and by interviewing the patients face to face. Descriptive analysis was conducted for back ground characteristics and logistic regression was used to determine the associated risk factors. Result In our study, we have identified a total number of 413 potential DDIs and 184 types of interacting combinations with 4.13 potential DDIs per patient. Among 413 potential DDIs most were of moderate interactions 61.2% (n=253) followed by 26% (n=107) of minor interactions and 12.8% (n=53) of major interactions. There was significant association of occurrence of potential DDIs only with taking three or more medications. Conclusion We have recorded a high rate of prevalence of potential DDI in the internal medicine ward of UOG hospital and a high number of clinically significant DDIs which the most prevalent DDI were of moderate severity. Careful selection of drugs and active pharmaceutical care is encouraged in order to avoid negative consequences of these interactions. PMID:25183081

  15. THE SCHOOL OF DENTAL MEDICINE NEW RESEARCH AND TEACHING BUILDING FOR THE UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennsylvania Univ., Philadelphia.

    IN PLANNING A NEW RESEARCH AND TEACHING BUILDING FOR THE SCHOOL OF DENTAL MEDICINE, A PROGRAM WAS DEVELOPED OUTLINING THE DESIGN NEEDS AND THE SPACE AND FACILITY REQUIREMENTS. MAJOR AREAS OF THE PROGRAM WERE--(1) GENERAL DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION COMPONENTS, (2) THE RESEARCH COMPONENT, AND (3) THE BASIC SCIENCE TEACHING COMPONENTS. SPACE…

  16. Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania Committee on Appointments and Promotions

    E-print Network

    Bushman, Frederic

    2008-2017 Chris Feudtner, M.D., Ph.D., M.P.H. (CE) Pediatrics 2015-2018 Susan L. Furth, M.D., Ph-2017 David Sarwer, Ph.D. (CE) Psychiatry 2013-2016 Judy A. Shea, Ph.D. (CE) Vice-Chair Medicine 2006 - Gail B

  17. UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA -SCHOOL OF MEDICINE TECHNICAL, NON-ACADEMIC, STANDARDS

    E-print Network

    Leistikow, Bruce N.

    . COMMUNICATION: Candidates must be able to communicate effectively and efficiently with patients, their families by alcohol or other substances are not suitable candidates for admission, promotion, or graduation. TECHNICAL

  18. Center for Biomedical Ethics and Humanities University of Virginia School of Medicine

    E-print Network

    Huang, Wei

    VA 5 October 2011 John F. Anderson Memorial Lecture The Shape of the Eye: Stories about Down Syndrome George Estreich MFA Author, The Shape of the Eye: Down Syndrome, Family, and the Stories We Inherit

  19. CILC Pinnacle Award Recipients Adventures In Medicine & Science (AIMS) Program of Saint Louis University

    E-print Network

    Indiana University

    Louis University Alaska SeaLife Center Aquarium of the Pacific Author Winner Twins Buffalo Zoo Center of One Hennepin Theatre Trust History Live Indiana University African Studies Program Inspired Classroom

  20. Positions toward Science Studies in Medicine among University Graduates of Medicine and the Teenaged Participants of the "Medical Systems" Study Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ben-Zvi-Assaraf, Orit; Even-Israel, Chava

    2011-01-01

    The "Medical Systems" program was designed to introduce high school students to the world of advanced medicine. Its premise was to use an applied scientific discipline like medicine to encourage high-school students' interest in basic science. This study compares the teen-aged graduates of "Medical Systems" with fourth and fifth-year medical…

  1. [Eduardo Garcia Solá (1845-1922): university reformer and historian of medicine].

    PubMed

    Olagüe de Ros, Guillermo

    2006-01-01

    A notorious teacher and search of the spanish Medical School of Granada was Eduardo Garcia Solá (1845-1922). He is well known as an early introductor of laboratory medicine in Spain and dedicated many publications to medical microbiology and morbid anatomy. An aspect of his scientific biography not well known is analyzed in this paper, his labor as a reformer of medical teaching and his historicomedical work. PMID:18543452

  2. Information Technology – a Tool for Development of the Teaching Process at the Faculty of Medicine, University of Sarajevo

    PubMed Central

    Masic, Izet; Begic, Edin

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Information Technologies, taking slow steps, have found its application in the teaching process of Faculty of Medicine, University of Sarajevo. Online availability of the teaching content is mainly intended for users of the Bologna process. Aim: The aim was to present the level of use of information technologies at the Faculty of Medicine, University of Sarajevo, comparing two systems, old system and the Bologna process, and to present new ways of improving the teaching process, using information technology. Material and methods: The study included the period from 2012 to 2014, and included 365 students from the old system and the Bologna Process. Study had prospective character. Results: Students of the old system are older than students of the Bologna process. In both systems higher number of female students is significantly present. All students have their own computers, usually using the Office software package and web browsers. Visits of social networks were the most common reason for which they used computers. On question if they know to work with databases, 14.6% of students of the old system responded positively and 26.2% of students of the Bologna process answered the same. Students feel that working with databases is necessary to work in primary health care. On the question of the degree of computerization at the university, there were significant differences between the two systems (p <0.05). When asked about the possibility of using computers at school, there were no significant differences between the two systems. There has been progress of that opportunity from year to year. Students of Bologna process were more interested in the introduction of information technology, than students of old system. 68.7% of students of the Bologna process of generation 2013-2014, and 71.3% of generation 2014-2015, believed that the subject of Medical Informatics, the same or similar name, should be included in the new reform teaching process of the Faculty of Medicine, University of Sarajevo. Conclusion: Information technologies can help the development of the teaching process, and represent attractive and accessible tool in the process of modernization and progress. PMID:26005278

  3. Abstract Profiles of Structural Stability Point to Universal Tendencies, Family-Specific Factors, and Ancient Connections between Languages

    PubMed Central

    Dediu, Dan; Levinson, Stephen C.

    2012-01-01

    Language is the best example of a cultural evolutionary system, able to retain a phylogenetic signal over many thousands of years. The temporal stability (conservatism) of basic vocabulary is relatively well understood, but the stability of the structural properties of language (phonology, morphology, syntax) is still unclear. Here we report an extensive Bayesian phylogenetic investigation of the structural stability of numerous features across many language families and we introduce a novel method for analyzing the relationships between the “stability profiles” of language families. We found that there is a strong universal component across language families, suggesting the existence of universal linguistic, cognitive and genetic constraints. Against this background, however, each language family has a distinct stability profile, and these profiles cluster by geographic area and likely deep genealogical relationships. These stability profiles seem to show, for example, the ancient historical relationships between the Siberian and American language families, presumed to be separated by at least 12,000 years, and possible connections between the Eurasian families. We also found preliminary support for the punctuated evolution of structural features of language across families, types of features and geographic areas. Thus, such higher-level properties of language seen as an evolutionary system might allow the investigation of ancient connections between languages and shed light on the peopling of the world. PMID:23028843

  4. Effects of traditional herbal medicine, Hwaotang, on atherosclerosis using the spontaneous familial hypercholesterolemia model, Kurosawa and Kusanagi-hypercholesterolemic rabbits and the venous thrombosis rats.

    PubMed

    Park, Won-Hwan; Hong, Mun-Yeob; Chung, Kang-Hyun; Kim, Hyung-Min; Lee, Young-Choon; Kim, Cheorl-Ho

    2005-10-01

    Hwaotang (HOT), a traditional Korean medicinal formulation, is a dried decoctum of a mixture of seven herbal medicines, consisting of Angelica gigantis Radix, Rehmanniae Radix, Paeoniae Radix, Ciniamomi Cortex, Cnidii Rhizoma, Persicae Semen and Carthami Flos. In the present study, the inhibitory effects and anti thrombic properties of HOT on the progression of atherosclerotic lesions were studied using the spontaneous familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) model, Kurosawa and Kusanagi-hypercholesterolemic (KHC) rabbits and rats. Changes in blood chemistry, pathology and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation were measured in a control and HOT group. In the control group, the area of atheromatous plaques of the aorta progressed between week 12 (36.65%) and week 14 (46.22%). This progression of atherosclerotic lesions did not occur in the HOT-treated group after 12 (24.24%) and 14 (23.34%) weeks. Antioxidative effects on LDL were seen in the HOT in weeks 12 and 14. HOT improved the hypercholesterolemia in the KHC rabbits. On the other hand, HOT and five of the seven herbs, except Cnidii Rhizoma and Carthami Flos, inhibited the endotoxin-induced hepatic venous thrombosis in high cholesterol diet-treated rats. However, Ciniamomi Cortex showed a very weak inhibitory effect on the endotoxin-induced hepatic venous thrombosis. The extract also inhibited the endotoxin-induced decrease in blood platelets and fibrinogen, and endotoxin-induced increase in fibrin degradation products (FDP) on disseminated intravascular coagulation in normal rats. In conclusion, these results suggest that HOT has inhibitory effects on the development of atheromatous plaque formation in spontaneous FH rabbits. It is also suggested that the antioxidative effects of HOT on LDL led to the beneficial effects observed in this study. The protection by HOT and its herbs on the artificially induced ischemic infarction might be related to their inhibitory effects on disseminated intravascular coagulation, platelet coagulation and thrombotic action. PMID:16261513

  5. Tufts University School of Dental Medicine (TUSDM) Clinical Business Operations Internal Policy and Procedure Manual

    E-print Network

    Dennett, Daniel

    not qualify for the family discount. Radiographs, gold, lab, teeth, or implant materials are charged out Oral examinations Prophylaxis Emergency (diagnostic only) After assignment of insurance benefits, all to receive these benefits. Medical, Sackler and Postdoctoral Student and Fellows Medical, Sackler

  6. Nuclear Medicine

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Parents/Teachers Resource Links for Students Glossary Nuclear Medicine What is nuclear medicine? What are radioactive tracers? ... funded researchers advancing nuclear medicine? What is nuclear medicine? Nuclear medicine is a medical specialty that uses ...

  7. Association of Common Mental Disorders and Quality of Life with the Frequency of Attendance in Slovenian Family Medicine Practices: Longitudinal Study

    PubMed Central

    Rifel, Janez; Švab, Igor; Seli?, Polona; Rotar Pavli?, Danica; Nazareth, Irwin; Car, Josip

    2013-01-01

    Background Most research on frequent attendance has been cross-sectional and restricted to one year attendance rates. A few longitudinal studies suggest that frequent attendance is self-limiting. Frequent attenders are more likely to have social and psychiatric problems, medically unexplained physical symptoms, chronic somatic diseases (especially diabetes) and are prescribed more psychotropic medication and analgesics. Research Question To describe the attendance rates in a longitudinal study and to test if depression, panic syndrome, other anxiety syndrome, alcohol misuse and general quality of life are associated with frequent attendance in next two consecutive years. Methods 1118 consecutive family practice attendees, aged 18 to 75 years from randomly selected family medicine practices were recruited at baseline and followed up at 12 and 24 months. We identified frequent attenders in the top 10 centile within one year. Using a multivariate model, we ascertained if presence of common mental disorders and quality of life assessed at baseline in 2003 predict frequent attendance in 2004 and 2005. Results 40% of frequent attenders continue to be frequent attenders in the following year and 20% of the frequent attenders were so for the 24 month period. Lower physical scores on the SF-12 questionnaire were strongly associated with future frequent attendance at 12 and 24 months. There was a trend for people with greater than elementary school education to be less likely to become frequent attenders at both 12 and 24 months. For other variables these effects were less consistent. Presence of major depression, panic syndrome, other anxiety syndrome and alcohol misuse were not predictive of frequent attendance in the following two years. Conclusion Low physical quality of life is strongly predictive of higher frequent attendance and similar finding was observed for people with lower educational level but further confirmatory research is required to establish this association. PMID:23342107

  8. Why do – or don’t – patients with urinary tract infection participate in a clinical trial? A qualitative study in German family medicine

    PubMed Central

    Bleidorn, Jutta; Bucak, Sermin; Gágyor, Ildikó; Hummers-Pradier, Eva; Dierks, Marie-Luise

    2015-01-01

    Background: Insufficient patient recruitment can impair the conduct of clinical trials substantially, not least because a significant number of eligible patients decline trial participation. Though barriers and motivational factors have been worked out for patients with cancer or chronic diseases, little is known about primary care patients’ perceptions towards trial participation when visiting their family practitioner (FP) with acute uncomplicated conditions. This study aims to assess primary care patients’ motivation and barriers to participate in trials, and to identify factors that optimize patient recruitment in future trials. Methods: This study was embedded in a drug trial comparing two treatment strategies for women with uncomplicated urinary tract infection in primary care. Semi-structured telephone interviews both with trial participants and decliners were conducted. The interview guideline focused on patients’ personal motivational or hampering factors. Further topics were study theme, FPs’ role, randomization, trial procedures, and potential motivational factors or barriers presumed to be relevant for other patients. Transcripts were analyzed by summarizing content analysis. Results: 20 interviews with trial participants and 5 interviews with trial decliners were conducted. Results show various reasons for trial participation from three categories: personal aspects, trial related aspects and patient-physician-relationship. A relevant trial topic and perceived personal benefit promotes participation as well as the wish to support research in general. Additionally, a maximum of safety concerning symptom relief reassures patients significantly. Trust in the FP plays also an important role in the decision process. Trial decliners show strong individual treatment preferences, which, together with individual reasons, lead to trial refusals. Conclusions: To optimize recruitment conditions for further clinical trials on acute and common conditions in family medicine, the following key issues should be considered: emphasizing patients’ personal benefit, featuring patient relevant trial topics, providing a maximum of safety, keeping effort by trial procedures comfortable. PMID:26512232

  9. Agreement between the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey and the Council of Chapters of the American Association of University Professors, July 1, 1983 to June 30, 1986.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rutgers, The State Univ., New Brunswick, NJ. School of Medicine.

    The collective bargaining agreement between the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey and the Council of Chapters (690 members) of the American Association of University Professors (AAUP) covering the period July 1, 1983-June 30, 1986 is presented. The agreement covers the New Jersey Medical School, New Jersey Dental School, Rutgers…

  10. Knowledge and Attitude about Stem Cells and Their Application in Medicine among Nursing Students in Universiti Sains Malaysia, Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    LYE, Jee Leng; SOON, Lean Keng; WAN AHMAD, Wan Amir Nizam; TAN, Suat Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Background: Stem cell research has been extensively explored worldwide to enhance human health in medical setting. Nevertheless, there is currently no full understanding of the stem cell knowledge and attitude levels among student nurses in Malaysia. This study aimed to assess the level of stem cell knowledge, attitude toward stem cell application in medicine, and its association with years of education, among Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM) undergraduate nursing students. Methods: A cross-sectional study (n = 88) was conducted using self-administered questionnaire consisted of demographic information, stem cells knowledge and attitude statements. Data was analysed using Statistical Package Social Software 20.0. Results: The majority of participants (92%) had moderate knowledge score about stem cells. Many students (33%) worried that stem cell application might cause a harm to humanity yet had a positive (76.1%) attitude towards its therapeutic potential (45.5%). Poor correlation between knowledge and attitude (r = 0.08) indicated that acceptance towards stem cell is not solely based on the knowledge level but also on other factors including religion and culture. Conclusion: Therefore, this study suggests that various educational programs on stem cell should be implemented considering the religion, cultural, social, and behavioural determinants in the population to improve stem cell knowledge and encourage a more positive attitude towards stem cells in medicine among these nursing students. PMID:26715905

  11. Development of global health education at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine: a student-driven initiative

    PubMed Central

    Moran, Dane; Edwardson, Jill; Cuneo, Charles Nicholas; Tackett, Sean; Aluri, James; Kironji, Antony; Cox, Jacob; Carroll, Bryn; Lie, Erina; Fofana, Mariam; Bollinger, Robert C.; Ziegelstein, Roy C.; Chen, Chi C. G.

    2015-01-01

    Global health is increasingly present in the formal educational curricula of medical schools across North America. In 2008, students at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine (JHUSOM) perceived a lack of structured global health education in the existing curriculum and began working with the administration to enhance global health learning opportunities, particularly in resource-poor settings. Key events in the development of global health education have included the introduction of a global health intersession mandatory for all first-year students; required pre-departure ethics training for students before all international electives; and the development of a clinical global health elective (Global Health Leadership Program, GHLP). The main challenges to improving global health education for medical students have included securing funding, obtaining institutional support, and developing an interprofessional program that benefits from the resources of the Schools of Medicine, Public Health, and Nursing. Strategies used included objectively demonstrating the need for and barriers to more structured global health experiences; obtaining guidance and modifying existing resources from other institutions and relevant educational websites; and harnessing institution-specific strengths including the large Johns Hopkins global research footprint and existing interprofessional collaborations across the three schools. The Johns Hopkins experience demonstrates that with a supportive administration, students can play an important and effective role in improving global health educational opportunities. The strategies we used may be informative for other students and educators looking to implement global health programs at their own institutions. PMID:26220909

  12. [A paradigm change in German academic medicine. Merger and privatization as exemplified with the university hospitals in Marburg and Giessen].

    PubMed

    Maisch, Bernhard

    2005-03-01

    1. The intended fusion of the university hospitals Marburg and Giessen in the state of Hessia is "a marriage under pressure with uncalculated risk" (Spiegel 2005). In the present political and financial situation it hardly appears to be avoidable. From the point of the view of the faculty of medicine in Marburg it is difficult to understand, that the profits of this well guided university hospital with a positive yearly budget should go to the neighboring university hospital which still had a fair amount of deficit spending in the last years.2. Both medical faculties suffer from a very low budget from the state of Hessia for research and teaching. Giessen much more than Marburg, have a substantial need for investments in buildings and infrastructure. Both institutions have a similar need for investments in costly medical apparatuses. This is a problem, which many university hospitals face nowadays.3. The intended privatisation of one or both university hospitals will need sound answers to several fundamental questions and problems:a) A privatisation potentially endangers the freedom of research and teaching garanteed by the German constitution. A private company will undoubtedly influence by active or missing additional support the direction of research in the respective academic institution. An example is the priorisation of clinical in contrast to basic research.b) With the privatisation practical absurdities in the separation of research and teaching on one side and hospital care on the other will become obvious with respect to the status of the academic employees, the obligatory taxation (16%) when a transfer of labor from one institution to the other is taken into account. The use of rooms for seminars, lectures and bedside with a double function for both teaching, research and hospital care has to be clarified with a convincing solution in everyday practice.c) The potential additional acquisition of patients, which has been advocated by the Hessian state government, may be unrealistic, when the 4th biggest university hospital in Germany will be created by the merger. University hospitals recrute the patients for high end medicine beyond their region because of the specialized academic competence and advanced technical possibilities. Additional recruitment of patients for routine hospital can hardly be expected.d) A private management will have to consider primarily the "shareholder value", even when investing in infrastructure and buildings, as it can be expected for one partner. On the longterm this will not be possible without a substantial reduction of employees in both institutions. There are, however, also substantial efforts of some private hospital chains in clinical research, e. g. by Helios in Berlin and Rhön Gmbh at the Leipzig Heart Center.e) There is a yet underestimated but very substantial risk because of the taxation for the private owner when academic staff is transferred from the university to hospital care in their dual function as academic teachers and doctors. This risk also applies for the university if the transfer should come from hospital to the university. These costs would add to the financial burden, which has to be carried in addition to the DRGs. PMID:15875106

  13. Training family medicine residents to build and remodel a patient centered medical home in Rhode Island: a team based approach to PCMH education.

    PubMed

    Chandran, Rabin; Furey, Christopher; Goldberg, Arnold; Ashley, David; Anandarajah, Gowri

    2015-04-01

    Primary Care practices in the United States are undergoing rapid transformation into Patient Centered Medical Homes (PCMHs), prompting a need to train resident physicians in this new model of primary care. However, few PCMH curricula are described or evaluated in the literature. We describe the development and implementation of an innovative, month-long, team-based, block rotation, integrated into the Brown Family Medicine Residency Program, within the context of statewide PCMH practice transformation in Rhode Island. The PCMH resident team (first-, second- and third-year residents) gain PCMH skills, with progressive levels of responsibility through residency. In addition to traditional supervised direct outpatient care, learning activities include: active participation in PCMH transformation projects, population health level patient management, quality improvement activities, interdisciplinary teamwork, chronic disease management (including leading group medical visits), and PCMH specific didactics paired with weekly projects. This new clinical block rotation and team holds promise as a model to train residents for future PCMH primary care practices. PMID:25830172

  14. "No struggle, no fight, no court battle": the 1948 desegregation of the University of Arkansas School of Medicine.

    PubMed

    Gamble, Vanessa Northington

    2013-07-01

    In 1948, over 30 percent of the approved medical schools in the United States excluded black students. However, on September 10, 1948, the University of Arkansas School of Medicine became the first Southern medical school to desegregate when Edith Mae Irby matriculated. Her admission occurred without incident. There were no jeering white mobs, no court action, and no federal troops. Irby's admission had its roots in a successful legal campaign launched by the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People to eradicate racial inequalities in professional and graduate education. A confluence of factors led the University of Arkansas to desegregate. These included the state's lack of the financial resources necessary to comply with U.S. Supreme Court decisions, a climate of racial moderation in Arkansas, shrewd political maneuvering by officials at the University of Arkansas, and Irby's academic accomplishments. Irby's historic admission is frequently overlooked as a historical milestone. Its invisibility is due in part to its sharp contrast to the dominant narratives of school desegregation in the South. Yet, the story of Irby's entrance into medical school is critical for a more complete understanding of the history of medical education and the civil rights movement. PMID:22416058

  15. UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT SCHOOL OF MEDICINE Pediatric Surgical Subspecialities Annual Report 2010-2011

    E-print Network

    Kim, Duck O.

    Surgery ....................................................7 Dentistry and Oral-Maxillofacial Surgery in pediatric general surgery and in July, 2012, our first pediatric urology fellow will begin. Additionally Chairman, Department of Surgery Associate Professor Surgery (Urology) and Pediatrics (Oncology) University

  16. ACCESS TO EDUCATION RECORDS Education records at Washington State University are protected and regulated by the Family Educational

    E-print Network

    ACCESS TO EDUCATION RECORDS Education records at Washington State University are protected and regulated by the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974. WSU's policy related to this law and its with a legitimate educational interest. Release of specific information from education records must be done

  17. Montana State University Privacy of Student Records The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act, a federal law that protects the

    E-print Network

    Lawrence, Rick L.

    , a federal law that protects the confidentiality of a student's education record, and Montana state statutes the express written consent of the student. Education records covered by federal and state privacy lawsMontana State University Privacy of Student Records The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act

  18. A Study of Problems and Stress of Southeast Asian Students with Accompanying Families at the University of Pittsburgh.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruetrakul, Pimon

    The perceptions of Southeast Asian graduate students at the University of Pittsburgh were explored. The students were asked to elucidate the problems which arose as they and their families adapted to the American experience. Findings are reported in seven categories. They are the following: (1) academic expenses did not cause financial problems…

  19. FAMILY & MEDICAL LEAVE ACT (FMLA) QUICK REFERENCE Refer to the following University resources simultaneously with this FMLA reference guide

    E-print Network

    New Mexico, University of

    FAMILY & MEDICAL LEAVE ACT (FMLA) QUICK REFERENCE Refer to the following University resources. Complete and submit the FMLA Employee Request and Medical Certification forms to Supervisor; 2. Employee. Employee must recertify the original FMLA event and/or update Medical Certification if the: Use

  20. THE FAMILY FLAVIVIRIDAE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The family Flaviviridae, commonly referred to as the flavivirus family, contains viruses important to both human and veterinary medicine. The term flavivirus can be confusing because it is used both to refer to the family and one of the three genera within that family. The proper name of the viral...

  1. Susan R. Ross, Ph.D. has been appointed Head of the Department of Microbiology and Immunology at the University of Illinois College of Medicine at Chicago, effective

    E-print Network

    Alford, Simon

    Susan R. Ross, Ph.D. has been appointed Head of the Department of Microbiology and Immunology, susceptibility and immune response to virus infection. Dr. Ross is Professor of Microbiology and Interim Chair of Microbiology at the Perelman School of Medicine of the University of Pennsylvania. She received her Ph

  2. [The research on medicine in Greco-Roman Egypt in the Centre de Documentation de Papyrologie Littéraire (CEDOPAL) of the University of Liège].

    PubMed

    Marganne, Marie-Hélène

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents the research on medicine in Greco-Roman Egypt conducted in the last forty years at the Centre de Documentation de Papyrologie Littéraire (CEDOPAL) at the University of Liège. It describes the main results obtained by deciphering, editing, translating and commenting Greek and Latin medical papyri, be they literary, documentary or magical. PMID:26492678

  3. An Outline of a Proposed Five- plus Three-Year Combined Undergraduate-Master's Degree for Clinical Medicine Majors at Nanjing Medical University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gao, Xing-Ya; Yu, Rong-Bin; Shen, Hong-Bing; Chen, Qi

    2014-01-01

    To build an effective model to train excellent doctors, Nanjing Medical University has proposed a five- plus three-year combined undergraduate-master's clinical medicine degree program. The program integrates undergraduate education, the education of research students, and standardized doctor residency training into a single system, allowing…

  4. Collaborative Care for Older Adults with low back pain by family medicine physicians and doctors of chiropractic (COCOA): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Low back pain is a prevalent and debilitating condition that affects the health and quality of life of older adults. Older people often consult primary care physicians about back pain, with many also receiving concurrent care from complementary and alternative medicine providers, most commonly doctors of chiropractic. However, a collaborative model of treatment coordination between these two provider groups has yet to be tested. The primary aim of the Collaborative Care for Older Adults Clinical Trial is to develop and evaluate the clinical effectiveness and feasibility of a patient-centered, collaborative care model with family medicine physicians and doctors of chiropractic for the treatment of low back pain in older adults. Methods/design This pragmatic, pilot randomized controlled trial will enroll 120 participants, age 65 years or older with subacute or chronic low back pain lasting at least one month, from a community-based sample in the Quad-Cities, Iowa/Illinois, USA. Eligible participants are allocated in a 1:1:1 ratio to receive 12 weeks of medical care, concurrent medical and chiropractic care, or collaborative medical and chiropractic care. Primary outcomes are self-rated back pain and disability. Secondary outcomes include general and functional health status, symptom bothersomeness, expectations for treatment effectiveness and improvement, fear avoidance behaviors, depression, anxiety, satisfaction, medication use and health care utilization. Treatment safety and adverse events also are monitored. Participant-rated outcome measures are collected via self-reported questionnaires and computer-assisted telephone interviews at baseline, and at 4, 8, 12, 24, 36 and 52 weeks post-randomization. Provider-rated expectations for treatment effectiveness and participant improvement also are evaluated. Process outcomes are assessed through qualitative interviews with study participants and research clinicians, chart audits of progress notes and content analysis of clinical trial notes. Discussion This pragmatic, pilot randomized controlled trial uses a mixed method approach to evaluate the clinical effectiveness, feasibility, and participant and provider perceptions of collaborative care between medical doctors and doctors of chiropractic in the treatment of older adults with low back pain. Trial registration This trial registered in ClinicalTrials.gov on 04 March 2011 with the ID number of NCT01312233. PMID:23324133

  5. Implementation of an Integrative Medicine Curriculum for Preventive Medicine Residents.

    PubMed

    Chiaramonte, Delia R; D'Adamo, Christopher; Amr, Sania

    2015-11-01

    The University of Maryland Department of Epidemiology and Public Health collaborated with the Center for Integrative Medicine at the same institution to develop and implement a unique integrative medicine curriculum within a preventive medicine residency program. Between October 2012 and July 2014, Center for Integrative Medicine faculty provided preventive medicine residents and faculty, and occasionally other Department of Epidemiology and Public Health faculty, with comprehensive exposure to the field of integrative medicine, including topics such as mind-body medicine, nutrition and nutritional supplements, Traditional Chinese Medicine, massage, biofield therapies, manual medicine, stress management, creative arts, and the use of integrative medicine in the inpatient setting. Preventive medicine residents, under the supervision of Department of Epidemiology and Public Health faculty, led integrative medicine-themed journal clubs. Resident assessments included a case-based knowledge evaluation, the Integrative Medicine Attitudes Questionnaire, and a qualitative evaluation of the program. Residents received more than 60 hours of integrative medicine instruction, including didactic sessions, experiential workshops, and wellness retreats in addition to clinical experiences and individual wellness mentoring. Residents rated the program positively and recommended that integrative medicine be included in preventive medicine residency curricula. The inclusion of a wellness-focused didactic, experiential, and skill-based integrative medicine program within a preventive medicine residency was feasible and well received by all six preventive medicine residents. PMID:26477900

  6. Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine has excellent departments, centers, institutes, and programs that showcase the combined expertise of talented

    E-print Network

    Chisholm, Rex L.

    Asher Center for the Study and Treatment of Depressive Disorders Center for Behavioral Intervention Pharmacology Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Physical Therapy and Human Movement Sciences Physiology Preventive Medicine Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences Radiation Oncology Radiology Surgery Urology Centers

  7. Role of Research Universities in Health and Medicine. Go8 Backgrounder 20

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Group of Eight (NJ1), 2010

    2010-01-01

    Universities have much to contribute to the improvement of health delivery, research, and teaching/learning. In progressing health reform, the Government should be mindful of the need to: (1) strengthen high quality medical research; (2) promote translation of research to teaching, population health and health services; and (3) address Health…

  8. Academic Ethics in Turkish Universities: Perceptions of Academicians from Engineering, Medicine and Education Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aydin, Inayet; Demirkasimoglu, Nihan; Alkin, Senar

    2012-01-01

    Problem Statement: Academicians such as scientists contribute to the research of knowledge, to the free disclosure of knowledge, to students' training, and to public service with their special knowledge and skills. Academicians' ethical responsibilities and values a very important place in the development of universities' functions, which, in…

  9. Posting to Secure Websites, rev. 01/28/10 Educational Technology Stanford University School of Medicine

    E-print Network

    Kay, Mark A.

    Posting to Secure Websites, rev. 01/28/10 Educational Technology · Stanford University School ("Stanford") permission to record, digitize, and distribute via a password-protected website and/or other a few copyrighted images from a book, article, or website ·Playing short portions of movies

  10. Posting to Public Websites, rev. 03/04/10 Educational Technology Stanford University School of Medicine

    E-print Network

    Kay, Mark A.

    Posting to Public Websites, rev. 03/04/10 Educational Technology · Stanford University School ("Stanford") permission to record, digitize, and distribute via an openly accessible website and/or other a few copyrighted images from a book, article, or website ·Playing short portions of movies

  11. Trials of large group teaching in Malaysian private universities: a cross sectional study of teaching medicine and other disciplines

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background This is a pilot cross sectional study using both quantitative and qualitative approach towards tutors teaching large classes in private universities in the Klang Valley (comprising Kuala Lumpur, its suburbs, adjoining towns in the State of Selangor) and the State of Negeri Sembilan, Malaysia. The general aim of this study is to determine the difficulties faced by tutors when teaching large group of students and to outline appropriate recommendations in overcoming them. Findings Thirty-two academics from six private universities from different faculties such as Medical Sciences, Business, Information Technology, and Engineering disciplines participated in this study. SPSS software was used to analyse the data. The results in general indicate that the conventional instructor-student approach has its shortcoming and requires changes. Interestingly, tutors from Medicine and IT less often faced difficulties and had positive experience in teaching large group of students. Conclusion However several suggestions were proposed to overcome these difficulties ranging from breaking into smaller classes, adopting innovative teaching, use of interactive learning methods incorporating interactive assessment and creative technology which enhanced students learning. Furthermore the study provides insights on the trials of large group teaching which are clearly identified to help tutors realise its impact on teaching. The suggestions to overcome these difficulties and to maximize student learning can serve as a guideline for tutors who face these challenges. PMID:21902839

  12. Development and Experimental Study of Education Through the Synergetic Training for the Engineering Enhanced Medicine “ESTEEM” in Tohoku University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamano, Masahiro; Matsuki, Noriaki; Numayama, Keiko; Takeda, Motohiro; Hayasaka, Tomoaki; Ishikawa, Takuji; Yamaguchi, Takami

    We developed new bio-medical engineering curriculum for industrial engineers, and we confirmed that the engineer's needs and the educative effects by holding a trail program. This study in Tohoku University was supported by the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI) . We named the curriculum as “ESTEEM” which is acronym of project title “Education through the Synergetic Training for the Engineering Enhanced Medicine” . In Tohoku University, the “REDEEM” curriculum which is an entry level course of bio-medical engineering for engineers has been already held. The positioning of “ESTEEM” program is an advanced course to enhance knowledge and experience in clinical point of view. The program is consisted of the problem based learning (PBL) style lectures, practical training, and observation learning in hospital. It is a unique opportunity to have instruction by doctors, from diagnosis to surgical operation, from traditional technique to front-line medical equipment. In this paper, we report and discuss on the progress of the new bio-medical engineering curriculum.

  13. Investigating the Effect of Family Non-universal $Z^\\prime$ Boson in $B \\to ??$ Decay

    E-print Network

    Ying Li

    2013-11-12

    Within the perturbative QCD approach, we re-calculate the branching ratio and polarization fractions of the pure annihilation decay $B \\to \\phi \\phi$ in both the standard model (SM) and the family non-universal $Z^\\prime$ model. We find that this decay is dominated by the longitudinal part, while the transverse parts are negligibly due to the absence of the $(S-P)(S+P)$-type operator. In SM, the branching ratio is predicted as $(4.4^{+0.8+0.3}_{-0.6-0.5}) \\times 10^{-8}$, which is larger than the previous predictions. With an additional $Z^\\prime$ boson, the branching ratio can be enhanced by a factor of 2, or reduced one half in the allowed parameters space. These results will be tested by the ongoing LHCb experiment and forthcoming Super-B experiments. Moreover, if the $Z^\\prime$ boson could be directly detected at hadron collider, this decay can be used to constrain its mass and the couplings in turn.

  14. JOURNAL OF THE HISTORY OF MEDICINE AND ALLIED SCIENCES The Author 2006. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved.

    E-print Network

    Richards, Robert J.

    [ 1 ] JOURNAL OF THE HISTORY OF MEDICINE AND ALLIED SCIENCES © The Author 2006. Published by Oxford, but the ideas that dominate are those of Schelling and even more so of Goethe. Historians of medicine will find was #12;2 of 2 Journal of the History of Medicine metaphorical and allusive all the way down, and that one

  15. A cross-sectional survey of complementary and alternative medicine use by children and adolescents attending the University Hospital of Wales

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, Nigel W; Cincotta, Domenic R; Lim, Alissa; Powell, Colin VE

    2006-01-01

    Background A high prevalence of CAM use has been documented worldwide in children and adolescents with chronic illnesses. Only a small number of studies, however, have been conducted in the United Kingdom. The primary aim of this study was to examine the use of CAM by children and adolescents with a wide spectrum of acute and chronic medical problems in a tertiary children's hospital in Wales. Methods Structured personal interviews of 100 inpatients and 400 outpatients were conducted over a 2-month period in 2004. The yearly and monthly prevalence of CAM use were assessed and divided into medicinal and non-medicinal therapies. This use was correlated with socio-demographic factors. Results There were 580 patients approached to attain 500 completed questionnaires. The use of at least one type of CAM in the past year was 41% (95% CI 37–46%) and past month 26% (95% CI 23–30%). The yearly prevalence of medicinal CAM was 38% and non-medicinal 12%. The users were more likely to have parents that were tertiary educated (mother: OR = 2.3, 95%CI 1.6–3.3) and a higher family income (Pearson chi-square for trend = 14.3, p < 0.001). The most common medicinal types of CAM were non-prescribed vitamins and minerals (23%) and herbal therapies (10%). Aromatherapy (5%) and reflexology (3%) were the most prevalent non-medicinal CAMs. None of the inpatient medical records documented CAM use in the past month. Fifty-two percent of medicinal and 38% of non-medicinal CAM users felt their doctor did not need to know about CAM use. Sixty-six percent of CAM users did not disclose the fact to their doctor. Three percent of all participants were using herbs and prescription medicines concurrently. Conclusion There is a high prevalence of CAM use in our study population. Paediatricians need to ensure that they ask parents and older children about their CAM usage and advise caution with regard to potential interactions. CAM is a rapidly expanding industry that requires further evidence-based research to provide more information on the effectiveness and safety of many CAM therapies. Statutory or self-regulation of the different segments of the industry is important. Integration of CAM with allopathic western medicine through education and better communication is slowly progressing. PMID:16670012

  16. Sample Course Curriculum:Chinese Medicine Clinical Rotation at Shanghai Jiao Tong University, School of Medicine Dates Time Room Activities Instructors Location/Hospitals

    E-print Network

    Bushman, Frederic

    , School of Medicine Dates Time Room Activities Instructors Location/Hospitals 6/18 13h45 arriving Shanghai, Dr. Shicong Fu Department of Injury, Ruijin Hospital 6/21 9-11 am #15 International Student Building and Moxibustion, Ruijin Hospital 2-4 pm #15 International Student Building, language lab Outline of Traditional

  17. "PULS." – a Blog-based Online-Magazine for Students of Medicine of the Goethe University Frankfurt

    PubMed Central

    Wurche, Bettina; Klauer, Gertrud; Nürnberger, Frank

    2013-01-01

    In the context of nationwide protests 2009 also students of the faculty of medicine/dentistry at Goethe-University in Frankfurt demanded more transparency and communication. To satisfy these demands, a web 2.0-tool offered an innovative solution: A blog-based online-magazine for students and other faculty-members. The online-magazine „PULS.“ is realized with the share-ware blog-software (wordpress version 3.1.3) and is conceived and written by an online-journalist. „PULS.“ is available from https://newsmagazin.puls.med.uni-frankfurt.de/wp/. The articles are generated from own investigations and from ideas of different groups of the faculty– deanship, students and lecturers. A user-analysis is conducted with the open-source software Piwik and considers the data security. Additionally, every year an anonymous online-user-survey (Survey Monkey) is conducted. “PULS.” is continuously online since 14.02.2010 and has published 806 articles (state: 27.11.2012) and has about 2400 readers monthly. The content focuses on the needs of Frankfurt medical students. The close cooperation with different groups of the faculty - deanship, students and lecturers - furthermore guarantees themes relevant to the academic faculty. “PULS.” flanks complex projects and decisions with background-information and communicates them understandable. The user-evaluation shows a growing number of readers and a high acceptance for the online-magazine, its themes and its style. The web 2.0-tool “Blog” and the web-specific language comply with media habits of the main target group, the students of the faculty medicine/dentistry. Thus, “PULS.” has proven as a suitable and strategic instrument. It pushes towards a higher transparency, more communication and a stronger identification of the students with their faculty. PMID:23467571

  18. Tradition Meets Innovation: Transforming Academic Medical Culture at the University of Pennsylvania’s Perelman School of Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Pati, Susmita; Reum, Josef; Conant, Emily; Tuton, Lucy Wolf; Scott, Patricia; Abbuhl, Stephanie; Grisso, Jeane Ann

    2013-01-01

    Traditional performance expectations and career advancement paths for academic physicians persist despite dramatic transformations in the academic workflow, workload, and workforce over the past twenty years. While the academic physician’s triple role as clinician, researcher, and educator has been lauded as the ideal by academic medical centers, current standards of excellence for promotion and tenure are based on outdated models. These models fail to reward collaboration and center around rigid career advancement plans that do little to accommodate the changing needs of individuals and organizations. Here, the authors describe an innovative, comprehensive, multi-pronged initiative at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania to initiate change in the culture of academic medicine and improve academic productivity, job satisfaction, and overall quality of life for junior faculty. As a key part of this intervention, task forces from each of the 13 participating departments/divisions met 5 times between September 2010 and January 2011 to produce recommendations for institutional change. The authors discuss how this initiative, using principles adopted from business transformation, generated themes and techniques that can potentially guide workforce environment innovation in academic health centers across the United States. Recommendations include embracing a promotion/tenure/evaluation system that supports and rewards tailored individual academic career plans; ensuring leadership, decision-making roles and recognition for junior faculty; deepening administrative and team supports for junior faculty; and solidifying and rewarding mentorship for junior faculty. By doing so, academic health centers can ensure the retention and commitment of faculty throughout all stages of their careers. PMID:23425986

  19. "PULS." - a blog-based online-magazine for students of medicine of the Goethe University Frankfurt.

    PubMed

    Wurche, Bettina; Klauer, Gertrud; Nürnberger, Frank

    2013-01-01

    In the context of nationwide protests 2009 also students of the faculty of medicine/dentistry at Goethe-University in Frankfurt demanded more transparency and communication. To satisfy these demands, a web 2.0-tool offered an innovative solution: A blog-based online-magazine for students and other faculty-members. The online-magazine "PULS." is realized with the share-ware blog-software (wordpress version 3.1.3) and is conceived and written by an online-journalist. "PULS." is available from https://newsmagazin.puls.med.uni-frankfurt.de/wp/. The articles are generated from own investigations and from ideas of different groups of the faculty- deanship, students and lecturers. A user-analysis is conducted with the open-source software Piwik and considers the data security. Additionally, every year an anonymous online-user-survey (Survey Monkey) is conducted. "PULS." is continuously online since 14.02.2010 and has published 806 articles (state: 27.11.2012) and has about 2400 readers monthly. The content focuses on the needs of Frankfurt medical students. The close cooperation with different groups of the faculty - deanship, students and lecturers - furthermore guarantees themes relevant to the academic faculty. "PULS." flanks complex projects and decisions with background-information and communicates them understandable. The user-evaluation shows a growing number of readers and a high acceptance for the online-magazine, its themes and its style. The web 2.0-tool "Blog" and the web-specific language comply with media habits of the main target group, the students of the faculty medicine/dentistry. Thus, "PULS." has proven as a suitable and strategic instrument. It pushes towards a higher transparency, more communication and a stronger identification of the students with their faculty. PMID:23467571

  20. Allocating limited resources in a time of fiscal constraints: a priority setting case study from Dalhousie University Faculty of Medicine.

    PubMed

    Mitton, Craig; Levy, Adrian; Gorsky, Diane; MacNeil, Christina; Dionne, Francois; Marrie, Tom

    2013-07-01

    Facing a projected $1.4M deficit on a $35M operating budget for fiscal year 2011/2012, members of the Dalhousie University Faculty of Medicine developed and implemented an explicit, transparent, criteria-based priority setting process for resource reallocation. A task group that included representatives from across the Faculty of Medicine used a program budgeting and marginal analysis (PBMA) framework, which provided an alternative to the typical public-sector approaches to addressing a budget deficit of across-the-board spending cuts and political negotiation. Key steps to the PBMA process included training staff members and department heads on priority setting and resource reallocation, establishing process guidelines to meet immediate and longer-term fiscal needs, developing a reporting structure and forming key working groups, creating assessment criteria to guide resource reallocation decisions, assessing disinvestment proposals from all departments, and providing proposal implementation recommendations to the dean. All departments were required to submit proposals for consideration. The task group approved 27 service reduction proposals and 28 efficiency gains proposals, totaling approximately $2.7M in savings across two years. During this process, the task group faced a number of challenges, including a tight timeline for development and implementation (January to April 2011), a culture that historically supported decentralized planning, at times competing interests (e.g., research versus teaching objectives), and reductions in overall health care and postsecondary education government funding. Overall, faculty and staff preferred the PBMA approach to previous practices. Other institutions should use this example to set priorities in times of fiscal constraints. PMID:23702521

  1. The national portfolio of learning for postgraduate family medicine training in South Africa: experiences of registrars and supervisors in clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In South Africa the submission of a portfolio of learning has become a national requirement for assessment of family medicine training. A national portfolio has been developed, validated and implemented. The aim of this study was to explore registrars’ and supervisors’ experience regarding the portfolio’s educational impact, acceptability, and perceived usefulness for assessment of competence. Methods Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 17 purposively selected registrars and supervisors from all eight South African training programmes. Results The portfolio primarily had an educational impact through making explicit the expectations of registrars and supervisors in the workplace. This impact was tempered by a lack of engagement in the process by registrars and supervisors who also lacked essential skills in reflection, feedback and assessment. The acceptability of the portfolio was limited by service delivery demands, incongruence between the clinical context and educational requirements, design of the logbook and easy availability of the associated tools. The use of the portfolio for formative assessment was strongly supported and appreciated, but was not always happening and in some cases registrars had even organised peer assessment. Respondents were unclear as to how the portfolio would be used for summative assessment. Conclusions The learning portfolio had a significant educational impact in shaping work-place based supervision and training and providing formative assessment. Its acceptability and usefulness as a learning tool should increase over time as supervisors and registrars become more competent in its use. There is a need to clarify how it will be used in summative assessment. PMID:24207009

  2. Does the Absence of a Supportive Family Environment Influence the Outcome of a Universal Intervention for the Prevention of Depression?

    PubMed Central

    Spence, Susan H.; Sawyer, Michael G.; Sheffield, Jeanie; Patton, George; Bond, Lyndal; Graetz, Brian; Kay, Debra

    2014-01-01

    To date, universal, school-based interventions have produced limited success in the long-term prevention of depression in young people. This paper examines whether family relationship support moderates the outcomes of a universal, school-based preventive intervention for depression in adolescents. It reports a secondary analysis of data from the beyondblue schools research initiative. Twenty-five matched pairs of secondary schools were randomly assigned to an intervention or control condition (N = 5633 Grade 8 students). The multi-component, school-based intervention was implemented over a 3-year period, with 2 years of follow-up in Grades 11 and 12. For those available at follow-up, small but significantly greater reductions in depressive and anxiety symptoms and improvements in emotional wellbeing were found over time for the intervention group compared to the control among those who experienced low family relationship support in Grade 8. For those who did not experience low family relationship support in Grade 8, no significant effects of the invention were found over the control condition. This pattern of results was also found for the intent-to-treat sample for measures of depression and anxiety. Previous research may have overlooked important moderating variables that influence the outcome of universal approaches to the prevention of depression. The findings raise issues of the relative costs and benefits of universal versus targeted approaches to the prevention of depression. PMID:24828082

  3. [What is new in 2014 for the specialist in hospital internal medicine? The point of view of university hospital chief residents].

    PubMed

    Bonjour, T; Voruz, S; Aebischer, O; Benmachiche, M; Carrel, G; Castioni, J; Cosma-Rochat, M; Gachoud, D; Gagliano, M; Giger, A; Greiser, J; Fournier, J; Méan, M; Mieville, A; Rouiller Larpin, N; Tusgul, S; Wenger, N; Lamy, O

    2015-01-21

    The year 2014 was rich in significant advances in all areas of internal medicine. Many of them have an impact on our daily practice and on the way we manage one problem or another. From the use of the ultrasound for the diagnosis of pneumonia to the choice of the site of venous access and the type of line, and the increasing complexity of choosing an oral anticoagulant agent, this selection offers to the readers a brief overview of the major advances. The chief residents in the Service of internal medicine of the Lausanne University hospital are pleased to share their readings. PMID:25831610

  4. The pond is wider than you think! Problems encountered when searching family practice literature.

    PubMed Central

    Rosser, W. W.; Starkey, C.; Shaughnessy, R.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To explain differences in the results of literature searches in British general practice and North American family practice or family medicine. DESIGN: Comparative literature search. SETTING: The Department of Family and Community Medicine at the University of Toronto in Ontario. METHOD: Literature searches on MEDLINE demonstrated that certain search strategies ignored certain key words, depending on the search engine and the search terms chosen. Literature searches using the key words "general practice," "family practice," and "family medicine" combined with the topics "depression" and then "otitis media" were conducted in MEDLINE using four different Web-based search engines: Ovid, HealthGate, PubMed, and Internet Grateful Med. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The number of MEDLINE references retrieved for both topics when searched with each of the three key words, "general practice," "family practice," and "family medicine" using each of the four search engines. RESULTS: For each topic, each search yielded very different articles. Some search engines did a better job of matching the term "general practice" to the terms "family medicine" and "family practice," and thus improved retrieval. The problem of language use extends to the variable use of terminology and differences in spelling between British and American English. CONCLUSION: We need to heighten awareness of literature search problems and the potential for duplication of research effort when some of the literature is ignored, and to suggest ways to overcome the deficiencies of the various search engines. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:10660792

  5. Physical symptoms in outpatients with psychiatric disorders consulting the general internal medicine division at a Japanese university hospital

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Yukiko; Takeshima, Taro; Mise, Junichi; Ishikawa, Shizukiyo; Matsumura, Masami

    2015-01-01

    Purpose General practitioners have an important role in diagnosing a variety of patients, including psychiatric patients with complicated symptoms. We evaluated the relationship between physical symptoms and psychiatric disorders in general internal medicine (GIM) outpatients in a Japanese university hospital. Materials and methods We coded the symptoms and diagnoses of outpatients from medical documents using the International Classification of Primary Care, second edition (ICPC-2). The participants were new outpatients who consulted the GIM outpatient division at Jichi Medical University Hospital in Tochigi, Japan from January–June, 2012. We reviewed all medical documents and noted symptoms and diagnoses. These were coded using ICPC-2. Results A total of 1,194 participants were evaluated, 148 (12.4%) of whom were diagnosed as having psychiatric disorders. The prevalence of depression, anxiety disorder, and somatization was 19.6% (number [n] =29), 14.9% (n=22), and 14.2% (n=21), respectively, among the participants with psychiatric disorders. The presence of several particular symptoms was associated with having a psychiatric disorder as compared with the absence of these symptoms after adjusting for sex, age, and the presence of multiple symptoms (odds ratio [OR] =4.98 [95% confidence interval {CI}: 1.66–14.89] for palpitation; OR =4.36 [95% CI: 2.05–9.39] for dyspnea; OR =3.46 [95% CI: 1.43–8.36] for tiredness; and OR =2.99 [95% CI: 1.75–5.13] for headache). Conclusion Not only the psychiatric symptoms, but also some physical symptoms, were associated with psychiatric disorders in GIM outpatients at our university hospital. These results may be of help to general practitioners in appropriately approaching and managing patients with psychiatric disorders. PMID:26316801

  6. Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practice of Medical Students Regarding Occupational Risks of Hepatitis B Virus in College of Medicine, Aljouf University

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hazmi, AH

    2015-01-01

    Background: Medical students represent a population that is at high-risk group for acquiring and spreading hepatitis B infection (HBV). Aim: This study was designed to evaluate the knowledge and attitudes among male student regarding occupational risks of HBV infection. Subjects and Methods: During March 2013, a descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted on medical students of AlJouf University College of Medicine. Structured questionnaires of 16 different statements concerning knowledge base of HBV, attitudes as well as practices toward occupational risks of hepatitis B were distributed to 120 students. Results: Response rate of 76.7% (92/120) yielded 92 questionnaires for analysis. Majority of the students surveyed 62.0% (57/92) perceived that they are at high risk of contracting and spreading HBV. The rate of this perception among students who had a history of training on universal precautions was more than that found among those who did not have (70.8% vs. 58.8%; P < 0.01). Most of the students surveyed 63.0% (58/92) considered vaccine is safe and more than half 52.2% (48/92) were vaccinated against HBV. There were a very strong agreement about needlestick 92.4% (85/92) and blood 87.0% (80/92) as efficient modes of HBV transmission. Seventy-two percent of the participants did not have any knowledge about post-exposure prophylaxis for hepatitis B. A significant relationship was found between students who had a history of training on universal precautions and knowledge about post needlestick injury (P < 0.01). Conclusion: Infectious occupational risk of hepatitis B remains a challenge for medical students and the foundations of the medical institutes. Students must complete an infection control training before they start their clinical education. PMID:25745570

  7. Role of Calpain-10 Gene Variants in Familial Type 2 Diabetes in Caucasians

    E-print Network

    Cox, Nancy J.

    Role of Calpain-10 Gene Variants in Familial Type 2 Diabetes in Caucasians STEVEN C. ELBEIN; Departments of Medicine and Human Genetics (N.J.C.), The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637; Human Genetics Center (C.L.H.), The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, Texas 77225

  8. Montana State University 1 WWAMI Medical Education

    E-print Network

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    the basic and clinical sciences, and includes rural health care at an early time in medical education Medicine, Family Medicine, Internal Medicine, Neurology, OB/GYN, Pediatrics, Psychiatry and Surgery Bozeman/GYN, Pediatrics & Psychiatry Kalispell: Family Medicine, OB/GYN, Surgery Lewistown: Family Medicine Libby: Family

  9. Advancing the Integration of Population Medicine into Medical Curricula at The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University: A New Master's Degree Program.

    PubMed

    Mello, Michael J; Feller, Edward; George, Paul; Borkan, Jeffrey

    2015-09-01

    Additional knowledge, attitudes and skills are required for the next generation of medical students as they expand the traditional focus on individual patients to include population-based health and scholarly investigation. The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University (AMS) is initiating a master's degree program as a key component of the new Primary Care-Population Medicine program at AMS leading to both a Doctorate in Medicine (MD) and Master of Science in Population Medicine (ScM) degrees in four years. The ScM is composed of a series of nine courses, integrated into the four-year MD curriculum, as well as a thesis. Additional attention will be given to leadership and quality improvement training. The goal is to produce graduates competent in the care of individual patients, panels, communities, and populations. PMID:26324971

  10. Occupational and Environmental Clinical Medicine II

    E-print Network

    Finley Jr., Russell L.

    Occupational and Environmental Medicine Years I-IV 2014-2015 Year II Clinical Medicine II · Toxicology- 4 lecture unit · Clinical Correlations: Poisoned Patient- 2 lecture unit Year I Clinical MedicineDetroit · Earthworks · Greening of Detroit Street Medicine · Detroit Clean Up Clinical Education Year III Family

  11. A comprehensive analysis of hadronic b ? s transitions in a family non-universal Z? model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Qin; Li, Xin-Qiang; Yang, Ya-Dong

    2014-10-01

    Motivated by the latest improved measurements of B-meson decays, we make a comprehensive analysis of the impact of a family non-universal {{Z}^{\\prime }} boson on {{B}_{s}}-{{\\bar{B}}_{s}} mixing and two-body hadronic B-meson decays, all being characterized by the quark-level b\\to s transition. Explicitly 22 decay modes and the related 52 observables are considered, and some interesting correlations between them are also carefully examined. Firstly, the allowed oases of b-s-{{Z}^{\\prime }} coupling parameters |B_{sb}^{L,R}| and \\phi _{s}^{L,R} are extracted from {{B}_{s}}-{{\\bar{B}}_{s}} mixing. Then, in the ‘SM limit’ (i.e., no new types of {{Z}^{\\prime }}-induced four-quark operators arise compared to the SM case), we study the {{Z}^{\\prime }} effects on B\\to \\pi K, \\pi {{K}^{*}} and \\rho K decays. It is found that a new weak phase \\phi _{s}^{L}\\sim -{{90}^{{}^\\circ }} is crucial for resolving the observed ‘\\pi K CP puzzle’ and the allowed cases of the other {{Z}^{\\prime }} coupling parameters are also strongly restricted. Moreover, the {{Z}^{\\prime }} effects on {{\\bar{B}}_{s}}\\to KK, K{{K}^{*}} and {{\\pi }^{0}}\\phi decays, being induced by the same quark-level b\\to sq\\bar{q}\\;(q=u,d) transitions, are also investigated. In particular, it is found that the decay {{\\bar{B}}_{s}}\\to {{\\pi }^{0}}\\phi , once measured, would play a key role in revealing the observed ‘\\pi K CP puzzle’ and probing possible new physics hints. Finally, to check the non-universality of {{Z}^{\\prime }} couplings to light-quark pairs, we have studied the B\\to \\phi K decays in detail and found that the left-handed s-s-{{Z}^{\\prime }} coupling is different from the d-d-{{Z}^{\\prime }} one, which is due to the large A_{CP}^{dir}({{B}^{-}}\\to \\phi {{K}^{-}}) reported by the BaBar Collaboration.

  12. The Effect of U.S. University Students' Problematic Internet Use on Family Relationships: A Mixed-Methods Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Susan M.; Li, Wen; O’Brien, Jennifer E.; Howard, Matthew O.

    2015-01-01

    This is the first study to investigate how college students in the U.S. with problematic Internet use perceive the role the Internet plays within their families of origin. The sample included 27 U.S. university students who self-identified as excessive Internet users. Participants reported spending more than 25 hours a week on the Internet on non-school or non-work-related activities and reported Internet-associated health and/or psychosocial problems. This study provides descriptive statistics from participants' completion of two problematic Internet use measures (i.e., Young's Diagnostic Questionnaire and the Compulsive Internet Use Scale) and reports findings from four focus groups. Three themes emerged from the focus groups: (1) family connectedness, (2) family conflict/family disconnection, and (3) family Internet overuse. The findings of this study are a first step toward the design of effective interventions for problematic Internet use among U.S. college students and serve to inform clinical practice and health policy in this area. PMID:26658077

  13. The USF Health Morsani College of Medicine

    E-print Network

    Meyers, Steven D.

    The USF Health Morsani College of Medicine TOMORROW'S PHYSICIANS #12;#12;USF HEALTH MORSANI COLLEGE OF MEDICINE | UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA | USF HEALTH DOWNTOWN 3 TheMorsaniCollegeofMedicine Academics HEALTH MORSANI COLLEGE OF MEDICINE | UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA | USF HEALTH DOWNTOWN4 BAND-AIDS ONLY GO

  14. Ethnobotanical investigation of traditional medicinal plants commercialized in the markets of Mashhad, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Amiri, Mohammad Sadegh; Joharchi, Mohammad Reza

    2013-01-01

    Objective: An ethnobotanical survey on the medicinal plant species marketed in Mashhad city, northeastern Iran, was conducted in order to document traditional medicinal knowledge and application of medicinal plants. Materials and Methods: This study was undertaken between 2011 and 2012. The indigenous knowledge of traditional healers used for medicinal purposes were collected through questionnaire and personal interviews during field trips. Ethnobotanical data was arranged alphabetically by family name followed by botanical name, vernacular name, part used, folk use, and recipe. Correct identification was made with the help of the various Floras and different herbal literature at the Ferdowsi University of Mashhad Herbarium (FUMH). Results: The present investigation reported medicinal information for about 269 species, belonging to 87 vascular plant families and one fungus family. The most important family was Lamiaceae with 26 species, followed by Asteraceae with 23, Fabaceae with 20, and Apiaceae with 19. Herbal medicine uses reported by herbalists was classified into 132 different uses which show significant results to treat a wide spectrum of human ailments. Plants sold at the market were mostly used for digestive system disorders, respiratory problems, urological troubles, nervous system disorders, skin problems, and gynecological ailments. Conclusion: This survey showed that although people in study area have access to modern medical facilities, a lot of them still continue to depend on medicinal plants for the treatment of healthcare problems. The present paper represents significant ethnobotanical information on medical plants which provides baseline data for future pharmacological and phytochemical studies. PMID:25050282

  15. Family Background and Students' Achievement on a University Entrance Exam in Brazil

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guimaraes, Juliana; Sampaio, Breno

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines the determinants of students' performance on the entrance test at Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Brazil. Particular attention is paid to the importance of family background variables, such as parents' education and family income, on students' performance and how they relate to the probability of attending public schools…

  16. Perceptions of University Seniors toward Internationalizing Curriculum in Family and Consumer Sciences: Have We Made Progress?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paige, Rosalind C.; Williams, Sally K.

    2001-01-01

    Family and consumer sciences seniors (n=131) completed questionnaires and attended focus groups. Textiles/clothing and family and consumer sciences education students were most positive about international course content. A majority believed intercultural understanding was important to their careers. (Contains 33 references.) (SK)

  17. A Home/University Computer Network: Test of a System to Study Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, J. Allen; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Reports on a computer-based research model that was designed to test family process variables. Integration with an existing family decision-making process model is described, the microcomputer/mainframe system is explained, and system reliability and validity are discussed in relation to traditional process variable research methodologies. (29…

  18. Texas A&M University Central Texas Family Relationships and Development

    E-print Network

    Diestel, Geoff

    , family functions and structural changes. Divorced, post- divorce, remarried, single- parent and other and Grading Rubric will be posted on Bb Final Paper: Students are required to write a paper analyzing family - 492 points Final Paper 100 points C 383 ­ 437points D 233 - 382 points F

  19. Knowledge and use of dietary supplements by students of College of Medicine, University of Lagos, Idi-Araba, Lagos, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Aina, Bolajoko A.; Ojedokun, Oluwayemisi A.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: Nutritional supplements are preparations intended to supplement the diet and provide nutrients. They include vitamins, minerals, fiber, fatty acids, or amino acids, that may be missing or may not be consumed in sufficient quantities in a person's diet. Many health professionals including dietitians, physicians and pharmacists are supplement users. Objectives: The objectives of the present study were to determine knowledge and use of dietary supplements among students of College of Medicine, University of Lagos who are potential health professionals. Methodology: A self-administered questionnaire with a mix of open and close ended questions was employed to collect data in this study. It was distributed to 300 students that were in their final year in various departments of the college. Findings: Response rate was 89%. About 86% of the students have used dietary supplement before while half of them (50%) have used it in the past 12 months. The common types of dietary supplements used in the past 12 months are the vitamins. The reasons for use by the students were good health, poor diet, to boost immunity, weight gain and doctor's prescription. Most of the students were occasional and once in a while users. Conclusions: Majority of the students were aware of dietary supplement use and most of them were occasional users. PMID:25031497

  20. Analysis of the study skills of undergraduate pharmacy students of the University of Zambia School of Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Ezeala, Christian Chinyere; Siyanga, Nalucha

    2015-01-01

    It aimed to compare the study skills of two groups of undergraduate pharmacy students in the School of Medicine, University of Zambia using the Study Skills Assessment Questionnaire (SSAQ), with the goal of analysing students’ study skills and identifying factors that affect study skills. A questionnaire was distributed to 67 participants from both programs using stratified random sampling. Completed questionnaires were rated according to participants study skill. The total scores and scores within subscales were analysed and compared quantitatively. Questionnaires were distributed to 37 students in the regular program, and to 30 students in the parallel program. The response rate was 100%. Students had moderate to good study skills: 22 respondents (32.8%) showed good study skills, while 45 respondents (67.2%) were found to have moderate study skills. Students in the parallel program demonstrated significantly better study skills (mean SSAQ score, 185.4±14.5), particularly in time management and writing, than the students in the regular program (mean SSAQ score 175±25.4; P<0.05). No significant differences were found according to age, gender, residential or marital status, or level of study. The students in the parallel program had better time management and writing skills, probably due to their prior work experience. The more intensive training to students in regular program is needed in improving time management and writing skills. PMID:26442716

  1. Center for Nuclear Medicine Research in Alzheimer`s Disease Health Sciences Center, West Virginia University. Environmental Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-04-01

    The Environmental Assessment (EA) of the Center for Nuclear Medicine Research in Alzheimer`s Disease (CNMR) at the Health Sciences Center, at West Virginia University in Morgantown, West Virginia for the construction and operation was prepared by DOE. The EA documents analysis of the environmental and socioeconomic impacts that might occur as a result of these actions, and characterizes potential impacts on the environment. In the EA, DOE presents its evaluation of potential impacts of construction and operation of the CNMR on health and safety of both workers and the public, as well as on the external environment. Construction impacts include the effects of erosion, waste disposal, air emissions, noise, and construction traffic and parking. Operational impacts include the effects of waste generation (domestic, sanitary, hazardous, medical/biological, radioactive and mixed wastes), radiation exposures, air emissions (radioactive, criteria, and air toxics), noise, and new workers. No sensitive resources (wetlands, special sources of groundwater, protected species) exist in the area of project effect.

  2. CityLab, a biotechnology learning laboratory for high school teachers and students at the Boston University School of Medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Franblau, C.; Phillips, C.; Zook, D.

    1994-12-31

    CityLab is a fully equipped biotechnology learning laboratory for high school students and teachers funded by the National Institutes of Health and located at the Boston University School of Medicine. The aim of CityLab is to provide access to state-of-the-art laboratory facilities and curriculum in biotechnology otherwise unavailable to most school systems. Teachers bring their classes to CityLab where they are challenged to solve problems by applying the same techniques and concepts of genetics and molecular biology. Each topic is presented in a mystery format. Some popular investigations include The Mystery of the Crooked Cell (sickle cell anemia), The Case of the Crown Jewels (DNA restrictions analysis), and Entangled in the Web (transformation). In addition to regular class visits, CityLab offers two after school enrichment activities, the Biotechnology Club and BioCity. The club provides eighty young people with the opportunity to work more extensively in the laboratory investigating topics such as genetic engineering, gene cloning, and AIDS. BioCity is a mock biotechnology company run by and for students. Since 1992, more than 2,000 high school students and 300 teachers have used CityLab.

  3. LESS KNOWN USES OF WEEDS AS MEDICINAL PLANTS

    PubMed Central

    Sahu, T. R.

    1984-01-01

    In this paper the author presents medicinal or otherwise useful weed species with details of family, vernacular name and its medicinal utility. Information on other general economic importance of medicinal weeds is also described here. PMID:22557414

  4. Health, Medicine and Aging Concentration Concentrations in Sociology

    E-print Network

    Turc, Catalin

    Sociology Health, Medicine and Aging Concentration Concentrations in Sociology Students majoring. The 4 concentrations are: · Crime, Law and Justice · Health, Medicine and Aging · Gender, Work and Family · Social Inequality Health, Medicine and Aging Concentration Undergraduate students majoring

  5. Research Article in Medicine

    E-print Network

    Coolen, ACC "Ton"

    Research Article Statistics in Medicine Received XXXX (www.interscience.wiley.com) DOI: 10.1002/sim to survival data, with prostate cancer as the primary risk (the ULSAM cohort), leads to plausible alternative of Medicine, Guy's Hospital, London, U.K. c Department of Surgical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala

  6. Complementary and Alternative Medicine for Multiple Sclerosis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... and their FAMILIES COMPLEMENTARY AND ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE FOR MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS This fact sheet is provided to help you ... complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) for treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS). The American Academy of Neurology (AAN) is ...

  7. Research Article in Medicine

    E-print Network

    Small, Dylan

    Research Article Statistics in Medicine Received XXXX (www.interscience.wiley.com) DOI: 10.1002/sim of Statistics, The Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania b Division of Oral Epidemiology and Dental Public

  8. Communicating bioastronautics research to students, families and the nation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLeish, Marlene Y.; Moreno, Nancy P.; Thomson, William A.; Newman, Dava J.; Gannon, Patrick J.; Smith, Roland B.; Denton, Jon J.; James, Robert K.; Wilson, Craig; Sognier, Marguerite; Illman, Deborah L.

    2005-05-01

    The National Space Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI) is supporting the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) education mission through a comprehensive Education and Public Outreach Program (EPOP) that communicates the excitement and significance of space biology to schools, families, and lay audiences. The EPOP is comprised of eight academic institutions: Baylor College of Medicine, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Morehouse School of Medicine, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Texas A&M University, University of Texas Medical Branch Galveston, Rice University, and the University of Washington. This paper describes the programs and products created by the EPOP to promote space life science education in schools and among the general public. To date, these activities have reached thousands of teachers and students around the US and have been rated very highly.

  9. Revised: January 1. 2015 SCHOOL OF MEDICINE IN NEW ORLEANS

    E-print Network

    Lean, MD 1 1998 Medicine Margaret Bishop-Baier, MD 1 2000 Psychiatry John Ruby, PhD 1 2000 Physiology (ret Pathology Michael Walsh, MD 1 2013 Psychiatry Murtuza Ali, MD* 2 2013 Medicine Fenton Winfield, MD 1 2013 OB 2014 Family Medicine/Rural Scholars Emilio Russo, MD 3 2015 Family Medicine/Rural Scholars * Faculty

  10. Missions and Medicine at Amherst: Family Ties to Edward Hitchcock Jr., the Missionary Movement, and the American University of Beirut

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorman, John M.

    2011-01-01

    The Haystack Movement began at Williams College in 1805, occasioning the spread of American missions throughout the world. A half century later, two graduates of nearby Amherst College, Edward Hitchcock Jr. and Daniel Bliss, laid the foundations for college health services in this country and for mission work and education in the Middle East. The…

  11. The relationship between the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine and the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center--a profile in synergy.

    PubMed

    Levine, Arthur S; Detre, Thomas P; McDonald, Margaret C; Roth, Loren H; Huber, George A; Brignano, Mary Germann; Danoff, Sandra N; Farner, David M; Masnick, Jeffrey L; Romoff, Jeffrey A

    2008-09-01

    In the synergistic evolution of their research, educational, and clinical programs, the University of Pittsburgh (Pitt) School of Medicine (SOM) and the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC) have followed one core principle: What is good for one is good for both. The collaboration is underpinned by UPMC's commitment to its community mission, including support for the academic and research objectives of the SOM. UPMC's conceptual origin was fostered by its experience with Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic in the 1970s. Over time, UPMC acquired other hospitals through merger and negotiation and, by 2008, had grown into a $7 billion global health enterprise. From the outset, the senior leaders of both UPMC and Pitt committed to collaborative decision making on all key issues. Under this coordinated decision-making model, UPMC oversees all clinical activity, including that from a consolidated physicians' practice plan. Pitt remains the guardian of all academic priorities, particularly faculty-based research. UPMC's steady financial success underpins the model. A series of interrelated agreements formally defines the relationship between Pitt and UPMC, including shared board seats and UPMC's committed ongoing financial support of the SOM. In addition, the two institutions have jointly made research growth a priority. The payoff from this dynamic has been a steadily growing Pitt research portfolio; enhanced growth, visibility, and stature for UPMC, the SOM, and Pitt as a whole; and the sustained success of UPMC's clinical enterprise, which now has an international scope. Given the current stagnation in the National Institutes of Health budget, the Pitt-UPMC experience may be instructive to other academic health centers. PMID:18728434

  12. Wichita State University Fairmount College of Liberal Arts and Sciences 2014 -2015 Preparation for a Profession in Veterinary Medicine

    E-print Network

    for a Profession in Veterinary Medicine A bachelor's degree is preferred for admissions into most veterinary, and strong written and oral communication skills. Most schools base admissions decisions on a balanced, and a veterinarian. Core Courses for Veterinary Medicine Programs: a minimum requirement § Engl 101 English

  13. 1Division of Hematology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN 2Program for Evolutionary Dynamics, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA

    E-print Network

    Traulsen, Arne

    1Division of Hematology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN 2Program for Evolutionary: February 1, 2008 Address for correspondence: David Dingli, MD, PhD, Division of Hematology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, 200 First St SW, Rochester, MN 55905 Fax: 507-266-4972; e-mail: dingli.david@mayo

  14. SPRING/SUMMER 2013 The Magazine for Alumni and Friends of Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University

    E-print Network

    Bukauskas, Feliksas

    EINSTEIN SPRING/SUMMER 2013 The Magazine for Alumni and Friends of Albert Einstein College The magazine for alumni, faculty, students, friends and supporters of Albert Einstein College of Medicine-mail: letters@einstein.yu.edu Website: www.einstein.yu.edu Copyright © 2013 Albert Einstein College of Medicine

  15. * Correspondence to: Marshall M. Joffe, Division of Biostatistics, Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, 602 Blockley Hall, 423 Guardian Drive, Philadelphia, PA 19104-6021,

    E-print Network

    and Epidemiology, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, 602 Blockley Hall, 423 Guardian Drive of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, ºniversity of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, 602 Blockley Hall, 423 Guardian Drive, Philadelphia, PA 19104-6021, º.S.A. Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene

  16. STUDENT INTEREST GROUPS Current UCD School of Medicine Student Interest Groups

    E-print Network

    Ullrich, Paul

    , interactive discussions, and activities surrounding different areas of ethics in medicine. Christian Medical regarding career options and emergency medicine training programs. Family Medicine Interest Group FMIGSTUDENT INTEREST GROUPS #12;Current UCD School of Medicine Student Interest Groups Name

  17. Longitudinal Effects of a Universal Family-Focused Intervention on Growth Patterns of Adolescent Internalizing Symptoms and Polysubstance Use: Gender Comparisons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trudeau, Linda; Spoth, Richard; Randall, G. Kevin; Azevedo, Kari

    2007-01-01

    This study evaluated effects of the "Iowa Strengthening Families Program," a family-focused universal preventive intervention, on growth patterns of adolescent internalizing (anxiety and depressive symptoms) and monthly polysubstance use (alcohol, tobacco, marijuana, inhalants, and other illicit drugs), as well as the association between…

  18. Jamaican families.

    PubMed

    Miner, Dianne Cooney

    2003-01-01

    The study of the family in the Caribbean originated with European scholars who assumed the universality of the patriarchal nuclear family and the primacy of this structure to the healthy functioning of society. Matrifocal Caribbean families thus were seen as chaotic and disorganized and inadequate to perform the essential tasks of the social system. This article provides a more current discussion of the Jamaican family. It argues that its structure is the result of the agency and adaptation of its members and not the root cause of the increasing marginalization of peoples in the developing world. The article focuses on families living in poverty and how the family structure supports essential family functions, adaptations, and survival. PMID:12597672

  19. Coworking as a Career Strategy: Implications for the Work and Family Lives of University Employees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweet, Stephen; Moen, Phyllis

    2004-01-01

    This study of 276 couples compares coworking couples, which means both partners work for the same university, with noncoworking couples, those couples in which only one partner is employed at a university. Among the employees at the two universities studied, one in seven dual-earner couples cowork. These couples are more educated and are less…

  20. Internal Medicine Clerkship Inpatient Rotation

    E-print Network

    Sherman, S. Murray

    Oral and Written Communication Professional Behavior OME NEW Medicine IR Mid Eval Did Not ObserveInternal Medicine Clerkship Inpatient Rotation MID-ROTATION EVALUATION The University of Chicago Division of the Biological Sciences and the Pritzker School of Medicine Student: Date:Attending: Site

  1. Assistant, Associate or full Professor (MCL or UTL) Stanford Center for Biomedical Ethics, Department of Medicine

    E-print Network

    Quake, Stephen R.

    for Biomedical Ethics, Department of Medicine Stanford University, School of Medicine The Division of General Medical Disciplines in the Department of Medicine at Stanford University seeks a dynamic biomedical ethicist to join the Department of Medicine

  2. Nuclear Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Badawi, Ramsey D.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the use of nuclear medicine techniques in diagnosis and therapy. Describes instrumentation in diagnostic nuclear medicine and predicts future trends in nuclear medicine imaging technology. (Author/MM)

  3. Taking Medicines

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Taking Medicines Drugs in the Body Medicines can enter the body in many different ways, ... many steps happen along the way. Understanding how medicines work in your body can help you learn ...

  4. ADHD Medicines

    MedlinePLUS

    ... System How the Body Works Main Page ADHD Medicines KidsHealth > Kids > Health Problems > Learning & Emotional Problems > ADHD ... doctor can decide if ADHD medicine is needed. Medicine and the Mind There are a lot of ...

  5. Diabetes Medicines

    MedlinePLUS

    ... choices and physical activity, you may need diabetes medicines. The kind of medicine you take depends on your type of diabetes, ... pills. Combination pills contain two kinds of diabetes medicine in one tablet. Some people take pills and ...

  6. Development of residency program guidelines for interaction with the pharmaceutical industry. Education Council, Residency Training Programme in Internal Medicine, Department of Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ont.

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Medical residency programs are likely to face increasing pressure to address their relations with the pharmaceutical industry. Our internal medicine residency program has developed guidelines that were adopted after extensive debate by residents and faculty members. The guidelines are based on the principles that residents and faculty should set the educational agenda and that the residency program should not allow gifts of any sort from industry to residents. Specific policies include obtaining and screening educational materials from the industry before residents are exposed to them, proscribing "drug lunches" and accepting industry sponsorship only when the residency program maintains complete control of the educational event being sponsored. The industry response to the guidelines was split; about half reacted negatively, and half found the guidelines acceptable. Our experience suggests that productive debate about guidelines for the interaction of residency programs with the pharmaceutical industry is possible and desirable and that explicit policies can clarify areas of ambiguity. PMID:8348422

  7. The Sorcerer II Global Ocean Sampling expedition: expanding the universe of protein families.

    PubMed

    Yooseph, Shibu; Sutton, Granger; Rusch, Douglas B; Halpern, Aaron L; Williamson, Shannon J; Remington, Karin; Eisen, Jonathan A; Heidelberg, Karla B; Manning, Gerard; Li, Weizhong; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Cieplak, Piotr; Miller, Christopher S; Li, Huiying; Mashiyama, Susan T; Joachimiak, Marcin P; van Belle, Christopher; Chandonia, John-Marc; Soergel, David A; Zhai, Yufeng; Natarajan, Kannan; Lee, Shaun; Raphael, Benjamin J; Bafna, Vineet; Friedman, Robert; Brenner, Steven E; Godzik, Adam; Eisenberg, David; Dixon, Jack E; Taylor, Susan S; Strausberg, Robert L; Frazier, Marvin; Venter, J Craig

    2007-03-01

    Metagenomics projects based on shotgun sequencing of populations of micro-organisms yield insight into protein families. We used sequence similarity clustering to explore proteins with a comprehensive dataset consisting of sequences from available databases together with 6.12 million proteins predicted from an assembly of 7.7 million Global Ocean Sampling (GOS) sequences. The GOS dataset covers nearly all known prokaryotic protein families. A total of 3,995 medium- and large-sized clusters consisting of only GOS sequences are identified, out of which 1,700 have no detectable homology to known families. The GOS-only clusters contain a higher than expected proportion of sequences of viral origin, thus reflecting a poor sampling of viral diversity until now. Protein domain distributions in the GOS dataset and current protein databases show distinct biases. Several protein domains that were previously categorized as kingdom specific are shown to have GOS examples in other kingdoms. About 6,000 sequences (ORFans) from the literature that heretofore lacked similarity to known proteins have matches in the GOS data. The GOS dataset is also used to improve remote homology detection. Overall, besides nearly doubling the number of current proteins, the predicted GOS proteins also add a great deal of diversity to known protein families and shed light on their evolution. These observations are illustrated using several protein families, including phosphatases, proteases, ultraviolet-irradiation DNA damage repair enzymes, glutamine synthetase, and RuBisCO. The diversity added by GOS data has implications for choosing targets for experimental structure characterization as part of structural genomics efforts. Our analysis indicates that new families are being discovered at a rate that is linear or almost linear with the addition of new sequences, implying that we are still far from discovering all protein families in nature. PMID:17355171

  8. The Sorcerer II Global Ocean Sampling Expedition: Expanding theUniverse of Protein Families

    SciTech Connect

    Yooseph, Shibu; Sutton, Granger; Rusch, Douglas B.; Halpern,Aaron L.; Williamson, Shannon J.; Remington, Karin; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Heidelberg, Karla B.; Manning, Gerard; Li, Weizhong; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Cieplak, Piotr; Miller, Christopher S.; Li, Huiying; Mashiyama, Susan T.; Joachimiak, Marcin P.; van Belle, Christopher; Chandonia, John-Marc; Soergel, David A.; Zhai, Yufeng; Natarajan, Kannan; Lee, Shaun; Raphael,Benjamin J.; Bafna, Vineet; Friedman, Robert; Brenner, Steven E.; Godzik,Adam; Eisenberg, David; Dixon, Jack E.; Taylor, Susan S.; Strausberg,Robert L.; Frazier, Marvin; Venter, J.Craig

    2006-03-23

    Metagenomics projects based on shotgun sequencing of populations of micro-organisms yield insight into protein families. We used sequence similarity clustering to explore proteins with a comprehensive dataset consisting of sequences from available databases together with 6.12 million proteins predicted from an assembly of 7.7 million Global Ocean Sampling (GOS) sequences. The GOS dataset covers nearly all known prokaryotic protein families. A total of 3,995 medium- and large-sized clusters consisting of only GOS sequences are identified, out of which 1,700 have no detectable homology to known families. The GOS-only clusters contain a higher than expected proportion of sequences of viral origin, thus reflecting a poor sampling of viral diversity until now. Protein domain distributions in the GOS dataset and current protein databases show distinct biases. Several protein domains that were previously categorized as kingdom specific are shown to have GOS examples in other kingdoms. About 6,000 sequences (ORFans) from the literature that heretofore lacked similarity to known proteins have matches in the GOS data. The GOS dataset is also used to improve remote homology detection. Overall, besides nearly doubling the number of current proteins, the predicted GOS proteins also add a great deal of diversity to known protein families and shed light on their evolution. These observations are illustrated using several protein families, including phosphatases, proteases, ultraviolet-irradiation DNA damage repair enzymes, glutamine synthetase, and RuBisCO. The diversity added by GOS data has implications for choosing targets for experimental structure characterization as part of structural genomics efforts. Our analysis indicates that new families are being discovered at a rate that is linear or almost linear with the addition of new sequences, implying that we are still far from discovering all protein families in nature.

  9. The Sorcerer II Global Ocean Sampling Expedition: Expanding the Universe of Protein Families

    PubMed Central

    Yooseph, Shibu; Sutton, Granger; Rusch, Douglas B; Halpern, Aaron L; Williamson, Shannon J; Remington, Karin; Eisen, Jonathan A; Heidelberg, Karla B; Manning, Gerard; Li, Weizhong; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Cieplak, Piotr; Miller, Christopher S; Li, Huiying; Mashiyama, Susan T; Joachimiak, Marcin P; van Belle, Christopher; Chandonia, John-Marc; Soergel, David A; Zhai, Yufeng; Natarajan, Kannan; Lee, Shaun; Raphael, Benjamin J; Bafna, Vineet; Friedman, Robert; Brenner, Steven E; Godzik, Adam; Eisenberg, David; Dixon, Jack E; Taylor, Susan S; Strausberg, Robert L; Frazier, Marvin; Venter, J. Craig

    2007-01-01

    Metagenomics projects based on shotgun sequencing of populations of micro-organisms yield insight into protein families. We used sequence similarity clustering to explore proteins with a comprehensive dataset consisting of sequences from available databases together with 6.12 million proteins predicted from an assembly of 7.7 million Global Ocean Sampling (GOS) sequences. The GOS dataset covers nearly all known prokaryotic protein families. A total of 3,995 medium- and large-sized clusters consisting of only GOS sequences are identified, out of which 1,700 have no detectable homology to known families. The GOS-only clusters contain a higher than expected proportion of sequences of viral origin, thus reflecting a poor sampling of viral diversity until now. Protein domain distributions in the GOS dataset and current protein databases show distinct biases. Several protein domains that were previously categorized as kingdom specific are shown to have GOS examples in other kingdoms. About 6,000 sequences (ORFans) from the literature that heretofore lacked similarity to known proteins have matches in the GOS data. The GOS dataset is also used to improve remote homology detection. Overall, besides nearly doubling the number of current proteins, the predicted GOS proteins also add a great deal of diversity to known protein families and shed light on their evolution. These observations are illustrated using several protein families, including phosphatases, proteases, ultraviolet-irradiation DNA damage repair enzymes, glutamine synthetase, and RuBisCO. The diversity added by GOS data has implications for choosing targets for experimental structure characterization as part of structural genomics efforts. Our analysis indicates that new families are being discovered at a rate that is linear or almost linear with the addition of new sequences, implying that we are still far from discovering all protein families in nature. PMID:17355171

  10. Healthy Homes University: A Home-Based Environmental Intervention and Education Program for Families with Pediatric Asthma in Michigan

    PubMed Central

    Largo, Thomas W.; Borgialli, Michele; Wisinski, Courtney L.; Wahl, Robert L.; Priem, Wesley F.

    2011-01-01

    Environmental conditions within the home can exacerbate asthmatic children's symptoms. To improve health outcomes among this group, we implemented an in-home environmental public health program—Healthy Homes University—for low-income families in Lansing, Michigan, from 2005 to 2008. Families received four visits during a six-month intervention. Program staff assessed homes for asthma triggers and subsequently provided products and services to reduce exposures to cockroaches, dust mites, mold, tobacco smoke, and other triggers. We also provided asthma education that included identification of asthma triggers and instructions on specific behaviors to reduce exposures. Based on self-reported data collected from 243 caregivers at baseline and six months, the impact of asthma on these children was substantially reduced, and the proportion who sought acute unscheduled health care for their asthma decreased by more than 47%. PMID:21563708

  11. Factors determining the choice of contraceptive methods at the Family Planning Clinic, University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Konje, J C; Oladini, F; Otolorin, E O; Ladipo, O O

    1998-10-01

    In a study of 2000 women volunteers seeking contraceptive services at the Family Planning Clinic (FPC), University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria, 66.2 per cent chose the intrauterine device (IUD) making it the most common method of contraception. Factors influencing choice of contraceptive methods were advice from friends and family members, intended duration of use and information from the media. Ignorance, fear and unfounded cultural beliefs were factors responsible for the delay in seeking contraceptive advice. The mass media was an important source of information for most of the women. We conclude that the IUD is the contraceptive of choice in our clinic because of the highly selective nature of our clients. In order to provide a service with a broader clientele, we suggest the incorporation of other priority reproductive health services such as cervical and breast cancer screening, prevention and treatment of reproductive tract infections and sexually transmitted diseases including HIV/AIDS. PMID:9855717

  12. Family meal traditions. Comparing reported childhood food habits to current food habits among university students.

    PubMed

    De Backer, Charlotte J S

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate if reported childhood food habits predict the food habits of students at present. Questions addressed are: does the memory of childhood family meals promote commensality among students? Does the memory of (grand)parents' cooking influence students' cooking? And, is there still a gender difference in passing on everyday cooking skills? Using a cross-sectional survey, 104 students were asked about their current eating and cooking habits, and their eating habits and the cooking behavior of their (grand)parents during their childhood. Results show that frequencies in reported childhood family meals predict frequencies of students' commensality at present. The effects appear for breakfast and dinner, and stay within the same meal: recalled childhood family breakfasts predict current breakfast commensality, recalled childhood family dinners predict current dinner commensality. In terms of recalled cookery of (grand)parents and the use of family recipes a matrilineal dominance can be observed. Mothers are most influential, and maternal grandmothers outscore paternal grandmothers. Yet, fathers' childhood cooking did not pass unnoticed either. They seem to influence male students' cookery. Overall, in a life-stage of transgression students appear to maintain recalled childhood food rituals. Suggestions are discussed to further validate these results. PMID:23707416

  13. Universal Family-Focused Intervention with Young Adolescents: Effects on Health-Risking Sexual Behaviors and STDs Among Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Clair, Scott; Trudeau, Linda

    2013-01-01

    Considering the prevalence and consequences of health-risking sexual behaviors (HRSBs) and STDs among young adults, their prevention is a public health priority. Emerging etiological and prevention outcome literatures suggested study of the long-term effects of universal family-focused interventions on young adult HRSBs and STDs. Although earlier studies have demonstrated intervention impact on adolescent substance misuse, no study has examined universal family-focused intervention effects on young adult HRSBs and STDs via reductions in adolescent misuse. Sixth grade students and their families enrolled in 33 rural Midwestern schools were randomly assigned to experimental conditions. Self-report questionnaires provided data at pretest (Ns=238, 221, and 208 for the Iowa Strengthening Families Program [ISFP], Preparing for the Drug Free Years [PDFY], and control groups, respectively), with seven data points through young adulthood (age 21). In latent growth modeling, three young adult HRSB measures (number of sexual partners, condom use, substance use with sex) and lifetime STDs were specified as distal outcomes mediated by adolescent substance initiation growth factors (average level and rate of change). Results showed that the models fit the data and, except for condom use, there were significant indirect effects, with a higher frequency of significant findings for ISFP. The model additions of direct intervention effects on young adult outcomes generally were not supported, consistent with a model positing that long-term intervention effects on young adult HRSBs and STDs outcomes are indirect. As an indication of the practical significance of long-term effects, analyses revealed relative reduction rates ranging from 6 % to 46 % for significant outcomes. PMID:23408278

  14. Family practice in Turkey: views of family practice residents.

    PubMed

    Akdeniz, Melahat; Yaman, Hakan; Senol, Ye?im; Akbayin, Zelal; Cihan, Fatma Gök?in; Celik, Sercan Bulut

    2011-05-01

    Turkey's family practice training program is aimed at providing further training to clinically proficient family physicians who serve the community. A survey conducted in 2001 revealed that there was a need for providing additional training and more time in a specially dedicated family practice placement for family practitioners. Recent changes in the Turkish health care system have also impacted the training environment of family practice residents. Clearly, training needs to change with time. The aims of this study are to investigate the attitudes of resident family practice physicians regarding their training in the health care system in order to gather their views on the hospital learning environment, and to estimate their burnout levels. For this research, the design included a 1-phase cross-sectional study. This study was undertaken in 2008 in departments of family medicine at universities (n = 21) and training and research hospitals of the Ministry of Health (n = 11). Approximately 250 family practice residents in Turkey were approached. In total, 174 residents participated (70% response rate). The survey instruments included a questionnaire with 25 queries and 2 scales: The Postgraduate Hospital Educational Environment Measure and the Maslach Burnout Questionnaire-Human Services Survey. The average age of the participants was 32.2 years (standard deviation, 4.5 years; range, 24-57 years). The gender distribution was 57.6% women and 42.4% men. Marital status was 34.7% single, 62.9% married, and 2.4% divorced/widowed. In our results, residents affirmed that university hospitals were the best facilities for residency training. Their future plans confirmed that most would like to work in family health centers. This sample showed average levels of emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and lack of personal accomplishment. Perceptions of professional autonomy, quality of training, and social support were below average. It may be concluded that certain milestones in the development of family practice in Turkey have been fulfilled. The new regulation for postgraduate training has increased the share of family practice training to 50% (18 months). Establishment of educational family health centers has been planned. Introduction of the formative and summative assessment processes in family practice training is anticipated. It is expected that an assessment such as the Membership of the Royal College of General Practitioners (International) (mRCGP[INT]) examination would be helpful for Turkish residents in reaching these goals. PMID:21566424

  15. 4 | spring 2010 volume 14, number 1A publication of the University of Illinois College of Medicine and Medical Center

    E-print Network

    Alford, Simon

    Sciences is changing medical research IllInoIs MedIcIne also inside Teaching Robotic Surgery My Bone Marrow medical center, and how a new generation of surgeons is learning how to operate robotic instruments

  16. Content updated July 2015 Yeshiva University provides you and your family with comprehensive medical and dental

    E-print Network

    Emmons, Scott

    medical and dental coverage through a choice of Empire Blue Cross Blue Shield health plans and Cigna Dental Plans. If you are eligible to participate in the medical and dental plan, you and your family of enrolling in one of two dental plans administered by Cigna Dental. Please click on the links below to learn

  17. Content updated November 2015 Yeshiva University provides you and your family with comprehensive medical and dental

    E-print Network

    Emmons, Scott

    medical and dental coverage through a choice of Empire Blue Cross Blue Shield health plans and Cigna Dental Plans. If you are eligible to participate in the medical and dental plan, you and your family of enrolling in one of two dental plans administered by Cigna Dental. Please click on the links below to learn

  18. The "Entrepreneurial University", Family and Gender: Changes and Demands Faced by Fixed-Term Workers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nikunen, Minna

    2014-01-01

    Managerialism and neoliberal changes and demands influence the work and family lives of academics differently in different positions and contexts. In this article, I explore how Finnish academics on short fixed-term contracts have been treated, and how they interpret recent changes and their effects on their work and private lives. I ask how the…

  19. Rates and Psychological Effects of Exposure to Family Violence among Sri Lankan University Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haj-Yahia, Muhammad M.; de Zoysa, Piyanjli

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: The study had two objectives: to examine the rates of exposure to family violence among students in a non-Western society, with Sri Lanka as a case study and to examine the psychological effects of their exposure. Method: Four hundred seventy six medical students in Sri Lanka were surveyed. A self-administered questionnaire was…

  20. Military Youth and Family Program The University of New Hampshire Cooperative Extension (UNH

    E-print Network

    , participated in group games, and enjoyed outdoor activities! Military Teen Adventure Camps provide high energy, high adventure, and high experience ways for teens to connect - including camps for military teens, snowmobiling and more! Teens travel from all over the country to participate in this camp. Military Family Camp