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1

Boston University Family Medicine  

E-print Network

Boston University Family Medicine Global Health CollaborativeFamily Medicine As part of the Department of Family Medicine at Boston University, the Collaborative is committed to introducing and improving Family Medicine programs around the world. Family Medicine is a holistic specialty that attends

Spence, Harlan Ernest

2

The new curriculum for family medicine at the University of Split, School of Medicine.  

PubMed

According to the new curriculum at the University of Split School of Medicine for the 2010/2011 academic year, the Department of Family Medicine based its teaching on its own expert and research work. The adequacy of the communication with the patient, his or her family and the social environment, as well as the concept of evidence-based medicine (EBM) have been defined as the foundation of expert and research work in family medicine. In accordance with this strategy, the members of the Department are involved in conducting journal clubs, Cochrane systematic reviews, research into the health of families where the father is absent working abroad (there are many such families with emigrant fathers in the region), and some are working on developing student letters to patients as an instrument for encouraging communication and empathy. The proportion of theoretical classes was reduced to provide more time for practice-based classes for students. The Work Diary was also introduced, as well as the student letter to the patient, practice of clinical skills and objective, structured, clinical examination (OSCE). The assessment of students is performed in four parts: the grade given by the students practice supervisor, the grade for student letters to patients, the OSCE exam grade and the written exam grade. Students achieved, on average, very high grades. The Department is also involved in the course on clinical and social skills to first and second year students, taking on the task of introducing students to patients and their surroundings. PMID:23311482

Pavli?evi?, Ivan?ica

2012-01-01

3

Developing an Integrated Evidence-Based Medicine Curriculum for Family Medicine Residency at the University of Alberta  

Microsoft Academic Search

There is general consensus in the academic community that evidence- based medicine (EBM) teaching is essential. Unfortunately, many postgraduate programs have significant weakness in their EBM programs. The Family Medicine Residency committee at the University of Alberta felt their EBM curriculum would benefit from critical review and revision. An EBM Curriculum Committee was created to evaluate previous components and develop

G. Michael Allan; Christina Korownyk; Amy Tan; Hugh Hindle; Lina Kung; Donna Manca

2008-01-01

4

Career choice of new medical students at three Canadian universities: family medicine versus specialty medicine  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Over the last 10 years the number of medical students choosing family medicine as a career has steadily declined. Stud- ies have demonstrated that career preference at the time that stu- dents begin medical school may be significantly associated with their ultimate career choice. We sought to identify the career preferences students have at entry to medical school and

Bruce Wright; Ian Scott; Wayne Woloschuk; Fraser Brenneis

5

College of Medicine, Departments of Family Medicine and Psychiatry  

E-print Network

College of Medicine, Departments of Family Medicine and Psychiatry Present 46th Annual Family Medicine Review Course and the 7th Family Medicine/Psychiatry CME Conference SPEAKING THE SAME LANGUAGE reservations if overnight accommodations are needed and ask for group "University of TN Family Medicine

Cui, Yan

6

FAMILY MEDICINE* Definition Of  

E-print Network

FAMILY MEDICINE* Definition Of Family medicine is the medical specialty which provides continuing the biological, clinical and behavioral sciences. The scope of family medicine encompasses all ages, both sexes, each organ system and every disease entity. (1986) (2003) Quality Healthcare In Family Medicine Quality

Finley Jr., Russell L.

7

Family Medicine Clerkship MID-ROTATION EVALUATION  

E-print Network

Family Medicine Clerkship MID-ROTATION EVALUATION The University of Chicago Division Please evaluate the student's level of skill in the following competencies in Family Medicine in Family Medicine 1. Involves and considers families in the care of patients in family medicine. 2

Issa, Naoum

8

1 Kevin Abel 12 Chip Brooks Family Medicine Emergency Medicine  

E-print Network

1 Kevin Abel 12 Chip Brooks Family Medicine Emergency Medicine North Mississippi Medical Ctr Earl K Otolaryngology Family Medicine Medical University of South Carolina North Mississippi Medical Center - Tupelo University of South Alabama New Orleans, Louisiana Mobile, Alabama 24 Cindy Garrett 35 Russ Johnson Family

Raucher, Drazen

9

Role of Family Medicine Education in India's Step Toward Universal Health Coverage  

PubMed Central

India's commitment to universal health coverage has grown stronger with the submission of High Level Expert Group report by the Planning Commission in 2012. With this report comes the commitment to increase the primary health-care workforce to meet the population needs. However, the focus should not be just to increase the number of health workers, but to produce better health workers. Doctors, nurses and community health workers trained in primary and secondary health-care facilities can make a significant contribution in responding to the needs of the local community. The role of family medicine education is worth exploring in this context to equip the primary care health workers with the competencies of providing person-centered, comprehensive and continuous care. PMID:25374848

Rahman, Sajitha M.F.; Angeline, Ruby P.; David, Kirubah V.; Christopher, Prince

2014-01-01

10

University of Mississippi School of Medicine  

E-print Network

University Hospitals Jackson, MS Tim Chen Family Medicine Carolinas Medical Center Charlotte, North Carolina Emergency Medicine University of Tennessee COM Chattanooga, TN Karah Coker Family Medicine McLennan County Melanie Hall Family Medicine North Mississippi Medical Center Tupelo, MS Jason Jarin Obstetrics

Raucher, Drazen

11

Description of Clerkships FAMILY MEDICINE  

E-print Network

Description of Clerkships FAMILY MEDICINE Department of Family Medicine #12;2 Family Medicine the dimensions of the role of the family physician and the problem-solving approach of family medicine, community Normally six students rotate monthly in the Department of family medicine. Students receive didactic

Shihadeh, Alan

12

Rural Family Medicine Training in Canada.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper examines the status of postgraduate family medicine training in rural settings in Canada and identifies problems and how they are addressed. Specifically, a survey of 18 university programs examined the portion of family medicine block training that is done in a rural practice setting within the 2-year postgraduate family medicine

Rourke, James T. B.; Rourke, Leslie L.

13

University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine  

E-print Network

_______________________________28 Module 4: Core Clerkships ____________________________29 Medicine and Family Medicine _________________________29 Inpatient Medicine________________________________29 Family Medicine

Bushman, Frederic

14

Department of Family Medicine and Public Health Sciences  

E-print Network

Page 1 Department of Family Medicine and Public Health Sciences Wayne State University School of Medicine Applying for the George Mogill Family Medicine Award The Mogill Award Background and Purpose Academic Award for senior students choosing Family Medicine as a career. Dr. George Mogill was one

Finley Jr., Russell L.

15

Behavioral medicine in Russian family medicine  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Russian Federation's recently adopted family medicine as a specialty, but with little or no training in psychosocial and behavioral issues, unlike many training programs in other countries. The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore the perceptions and experiences of Russian primary care physicians regarding the practice of behavioral medicine and psychosocial methods. Semi-structured in-depth interviews were conducted

David Buyck; Michael Floyd; Fred Tudiver; Lana McGrady; Andrea Journagin; Svetlana Kishenko

2005-01-01

16

SUMMA AKRON CITY HOSPITAL FAMILY MEDICINE RESIDENCY Application for Three Week Family Medicine Summer Externship  

E-print Network

SUMMA AKRON CITY HOSPITAL FAMILY MEDICINE RESIDENCY Application for Three Week Family Medicine) discussing your career goals, activities, ideas and interest in the Family Medicine Externship. 3. Please

Finley Jr., Russell L.

17

The Family in Family Medicine Research.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

If the family physician is to focus on the family as a unit of diagnosis and treatment, new knowledge with practical applications for the health care provided is required. Producing this knowledge is the responsibility of the family medicine researcher who will need to use new tools, strategies, and innovative research design. (JMD)

Froom, Jack; Rosen, Melville G.

1980-01-01

18

Today'sDate: / / University of Tennessee -College of Medicine  

E-print Network

Today'sDate: / / University of Tennessee - College of Medicine Department Of Family Medicine M3 Course Structure: Family Medicine Clerkship rotation consists of two required core educational blocks (4 weeks each). For the most part students will be assigned to one of the UT Family Medicine residency

Cui, Yan

19

Faculty Physician Residency FAMILY MEDICINE RESIDENCY  

E-print Network

Faculty Physician Residency FAMILY MEDICINE RESIDENCY 2900 N. Saginaw Street ­ Flint, MI Description: Educational/ Teaching Requirements (60%) Educate/Supervise Family Medicine Residents in Ambulatory setting Educate/Supervise Family Medicine Residents in the Hospital setting as required

20

Stanford Hospital and Clinics Stanford Family Medicine  

E-print Network

Stanford Hospital and Clinics Stanford Family Medicine (addressograph stamp) ADULT HISTORY (Page 1 and Clinics Stanford Family Medicine (addressograph stamp) ADULT HISTORY (Page 2) Date Completed Hospital and Clinics Stanford Family Medicine (addressograph stamp) ADULT HISTORY (Page 3) Date Completed

Ford, James

21

Boston University School of Medicine  

E-print Network

2013­2015 Boston University School of Medicine Compassion Excellence Innovation Inclusion #12;Boston University School of Medicine2 www.bumc.bu.edu 1 Our MissiOn Boston University School of Medicine of medicine, to biomedical research, and to the health of the public. We, as a community, place great value

Spence, Harlan Ernest

22

Starting a family during medical studies? Results of a pilot study on family friendliness in the study of medicine at the University of Ulm  

PubMed Central

Objective: The Ulm pilot study aimed to explore factors for a successful combination of medical education and starting a family. The empirical data derived from this study constitutes the foundation for an evidence-based reform of the medical curriculum in Ulm. Methods: In 2009, qualitative interviews with 37 of the 79 medical students with children at University of Ulm were conducted and analyzed using content analysis. The detected problem areas were used to develop a quantitative questionnaire for studying parents and academic teaching members in medical education in Ulm. Results: The parents were older, more often married and more likely to already have obtained a first training. One third of the students thought there was no ideal time to start a family during the years of medical education or specialist training. However, the majority of the students (61%) were convinced that parenthood is more compatible with medical studies than with specialist training. The interview data suggests that the end of medical school (4th to 6th year of studies), preferably during semester break, is especially suitable for child birth since it allows students to continue their studies without ‘losing time’. Conclusion: The biography and career of studying parents in medicine have specific characteristics. Universities and teaching hospitals are required to no longer leave the compatibility of family and study responsibilities to the students themselves. Rather, flexible structures need to be implemented that enable students to start a family while continuing their education. This means providing more childcare and greater support regarding academic counselling and career development. PMID:21818229

Liebhardt, Hubert; Stolz, Katrin; Mörtl, Kathrin; Prospero, Katrin; Niehues, Johanna; Fegert, Jörg

2011-01-01

23

Highland Family Medicine Pregnancy And Pediatric Care  

E-print Network

At Highland Family Medicine Pregnancy And Pediatric Care Highland Family Medicine, we have a team and your family throughout your lifetime. Highland Family Medicine 777 Clinton Avenue South Rochester, NY as possible for confirmation of your pregnancy. You and Your Doctor A special benefit of family medicine

Goldman, Steven A.

24

Gender, Family Status, and Career Patterns of Graduates of the University of Calgary Faculty of Medicine.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Among 745 physicians graduated from the University of Calgary (Canada) women were more likely to take parental leave, but gender differences in breaks taken for other reasons were less. Women worked fewer hours in direct patient care. Female parents under 35 spent fewer hours on patient care than all male parents. (Author/MSE)

Bryant, Heather E.; And Others

1991-01-01

25

Development and Modification of a Required Family Medicine Clerkship.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A new required clinical clerkship in family medicine at Duke University School of Medicine is described in terms of planning, implementation, and modification in response to students' evaluations. The data demonstrate that family medicine can be taught effectively as a core clinical rotation. (Author/MLW)

Michener, J. Lloyd; And Others

1985-01-01

26

College of Medicine FM Family and Community Medicine  

E-print Network

College of Medicine FM Family and Community Medicine KEY: # = new course * = course changed, FAMILY MEDICINE. (1-3) With the advice and approval of his or her faculty adviser, the first-year student may choose approved electives offered by the Department of Family and Community Medicine. The intent

MacAdam, Keith

27

Appointment of Dr. Howard Bergman as Chair of the Department of Family Medicine  

E-print Network

Appointment of Dr. Howard Bergman as Chair of the Department of Family Medicine of the Department of Family Medicine, at the Faculty of Medicine, McGill University. In this role, Dr. Bergman, sincerely, for her excellent guidance and accomplishments. Professor of Family Medicine, of Medicine

Shoubridge, Eric

28

Family Medicine Digital Resource Library  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This resource was created by the Society of Teachers of Family Medicine (STFM) and was designed to support the sharing and collaborative development of educational resources among family medicine educators. The initial grant for this endeavor came from the National Library of Medicine and the project has been expanded a number of times. The STFM Resource Library contains lectures, learning modules, case studies, recommended websites, and conference handouts. The materials are all made available at no cost, and visitors can get started by looking at the Recently Uploaded area. Here they will find "Teaching Today With Tomorrow's Tools," "Teaching Inpatient Billing and Coding," and dozens of other newer items. Moving on, visitors can also use the Search area to focus on certain items of interest or browse the FAQ area to find answers to common questions. Finally, visitors can create their own personalized accounts or upload their own materials for possible inclusion in the archive. [KMG

29

Washington University School of Medicine  

E-print Network

Executive Management Fellowship Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis #12;Thank you for your interest in the Executive Management Fellowship at Washington University School of Medicine. We and energy of people who accept the challenge to lead in advancing human health. Washington University School

Grant, Gregory

30

EducationatURMCProgramFeatures Program: Family Medicine  

E-print Network

EducationatURMC­ProgramFeatures Program: Family Medicine Program Chair: Stephen Schultz, MD Program-800-245-5139 Contact Email: fmres@urmc.rochester.edu About the Program The family medicine providers at our program are deeply committed to providing world class family medicine training. We are one of 14 p4 residency

Goldman, Steven A.

31

Obstetrical practice after a family medicine residency.  

PubMed Central

To determine factors influencing physicians to provide obstetrical care, a questionnaire was sent to all 149 graduates of the University of Western Ontario family medicine program from 1987 to 1991, inclusive. Few (37.1%) of the 105 respondents still performed low-risk deliveries. Most frequently cited negative factors included interference with lifestyle, interruption of regular office routine, and insufficient training in obstetrics. Rural postal code, neonatal advanced life support training, and older age positively correlated with obstetrical practice. Ways in which residency training programs could address the alarming decrease in family practice obstetrics are discussed. PMID:8130674

Buckle, D.

1994-01-01

32

FAMILY MEDICINE Course name and number: Acting Internship in Family Medicine  

E-print Network

FAMILY MEDICINE Course name and number: Acting Internship in Family Medicine LSU Residencies, skills and attitudes commensurate with those of a first year house officer in Family Medicine. The students will develop an understanding of Family Medicine through the consistent application

33

2009-2011 Report from the Department of Family and Community Medicine ADVANCING FAMILY MEDICINE  

E-print Network

2009-2011 Report from the Department of Family and Community Medicine ADVANCING FAMILY MEDICINE Collaboration. Leadership. Excellence. #12;1 2 MESSAGE FROM THE CHAIR 3 ADVANCING FAMILY MEDICINE 4 Leadership educational scholarship in Family Medicine 10 Fostering academic leadership 12 Demonstrating social

Sokolowski, Marla

34

Family Bonding with Universities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

One justification offered for legacy admissions policies at universities is that that they bind entire families to the university. Proponents maintain that these policies have a number of benefits, including increased donations from members of these families. We use a rich set of data from an anonymous selective research institution to investigate…

Meer, Jonathan; Rosen, Harvey S.

2010-01-01

35

THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO Department of Medicine  

E-print Network

THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO Department of Medicine THE 2ND FRANCIS L. LEDERER FOUNDATION SYMPOSIUM Chair, Department of Medicine Physician-in-Chief, University of Chicago Medicine Register online at: cme, Department of Medicine Physician-in-Chief, University of Chicago Medicine THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO FACULTY

Butler, Laurie J.

36

Pediatric Emergency Medicine Fellowship University of Rochester  

E-print Network

Pediatric Emergency Medicine Fellowship University of Rochester School of Medicine & Dentistry...............................................................................8 B. Other Clinical Experience of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry INTRODUCTION: The Pediatric Emergency Medicine (PEM) Fellowship

Goldman, Steven A.

37

Pediatric Emergency Medicine Fellowship University of Rochester  

E-print Network

Pediatric Emergency Medicine Fellowship University of Rochester School of Medicine & Dentistry...............................................................................9 B. Other Clinical Experience of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry INTRODUCTION: The Pediatric Emergency Medicine (PEM) Fellowship

Goldman, Steven A.

38

Responses to Medical Students' Frequently Asked Questions About Family Medicine  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article provides answers to many questions medical students ask about the specialty of family medicine. It was developed through the collaborative efforts of several family medicine organizations, including the American Academy of Family Physicians, the Society of Teachers of Family Medicine, the Association of Family Medicine Residency Directors, and the Associa- tion of Departments of Family Medicine. The article

AMY L. McGAHA; ELIZABETH GARRETT; C. JOBE; PETER NALIN; WARREN P. NEWTON; PERRY A. PUGNO; Kansas NORMAN B. KAHN

39

University of Alberta Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry  

E-print Network

University of Alberta Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry Medical Sciences Graduate Program - Shantou A ................................................................................................................ 14 APPENDIX B

MacMillan, Andrew

40

Community Faculty RetreatCommunity Faculty Retreat Department of Family MedicineDepartment of Family Medicine  

E-print Network

Community Faculty RetreatCommunity Faculty Retreat Department of Family MedicineDepartment of Family Medicine Friday, March 21- All day Saturday, March 22 - A.M. | Optional afternoon iPad workshop Welcome The Department of Family Medicine is pleased to invite you to our 4th annual Community Faculty

Petriu, Emil M.

41

Gender and Power in Family Medicine Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses several articles in this issue that demonstrate the influence of gender and power on family medicine education. These articles show that both clinical and learning environments are influenced by gender and power. Recommends the study of gender and power as an overt component in the family medicine curriculum. (SLD)

Burge, S. K.

2000-01-01

42

Gender Issues in Family Medicine Research  

PubMed Central

Gender is a significant determinant of health, yet the choice of topic for research, as well as the methodology, analysis, and interpretation, are often insensitive to the biologic, psychologic, social, economic, and cultural differences between men and women. Family medicine researchers could study a broad range of gender-related topics; such research could lead to improved family medicine. PMID:21229035

Cohen, May

1991-01-01

43

The Research Domain of Family Medicine  

PubMed Central

This article characterizes the large research domain of family medicine. It is a domain that can be productively explored from different perspectives, including: (1) the ecology of medical care and its focus on the environments of health care and interactions among them; (2) the realm of causation and important opportunities to discover how people lose and regain their health; (3) knowing medicine in different ways, focusing on what things mean in the inner and outer realities of individuals and groups of individuals; (4) the nature of the work of family physicians, such as first-contact care for any type of problem, sticking with patients regardless of their diagnoses, incorporating context into decision making, development of relevant technologies, articulating useful theory, and measuring what happens in family medicine; (5) the standard research categories of basic, clinical, health services, health policy, and educational research; and (6) thinking of family medicine research as both a linear process of translation and a wheel of knowledge with iterative loops of discovery that come from within family medicine. The domain of family medicine research is important and ripe for fuller discovery, and it invites the thinking and imagination of the best investigators. It seems unlikely that medical research can ever be complete without a robust family medicine research enterprise. As the domain of family medicine research is explored, not a few, but billions of people will benefit. PMID:15655084

Green, Larry A.

2004-01-01

44

Family Medicine/Northern Medical Services Involvement in Northern Saskatchewan  

PubMed Central

To address the problems of recruitment and retention of family physicians in various remote locations in northern Saskatchewan, the University of Saskatchewan became involved through Northern Medical Services, a division of the Department of Family Medicine. The University's involvement consists of the provision of resident family-physician services, visiting consultant services, family-practise resident training, research, and a consulting role of the Medical Health Officer. This paper reviews the context in which this program was created, its role in health care in the area, and its involvement with the communities in health promotion and research. PMID:21253032

Irvine, James

1988-01-01

45

University of Oxford Department of Cardiovascular Medicine  

E-print Network

1 University of Oxford Department of Cardiovascular Medicine in collaboration with the Oxford the Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, which study molecular mechanisms in the early development The Medical Sciences Division, within which the Department of Cardiovascular Medicine is located, includes

Oxford, University of

46

SCHOOL OF DENTAL MEDICINE University of Pittsburgh  

E-print Network

SCHOOL OF DENTAL MEDICINE University of Pittsburgh Pitt Dental Medicine Alumni Update March 2012 Conservatory: Terry L. Buckenheimer (DMD `80) - Distinguished Alumnus Dental Medicine - Dr. Buckenheimer has leadership positions with the American Dental Association. Additionally, Dr. Buckenheimer has been actively

Jiang, Huiqiang

47

Integrating Prevention Education into the Medical School Curriculum: The Role of Departments of Family Medicine.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses the role of departments of family medicine in teaching preventive medicine through required clinical experiences, required nonclinical courses, electives, collaborative interdisciplinary clerkships, and interdisciplinary nonclinical courses. Offers examples of innovative programs at the Universities of Michigan, Wisconsin, Vermont,…

Stine, Curtis; Kohrs, Francis P.; Little, David N.; Kaprielian, Victoria; Gatipon, Betty B.; Haq, Cynthia

2000-01-01

48

Preventive Medicine and the Family  

PubMed Central

Studies have demonstrated the links between the family system and illness, emphasizing the importance of prevention on a family level for physical as well as psychological illness. Brief preventive counselling on routine visits is possible if the physician knows the family well and understands the principles of the family as a system. Periods of high risk when illness and family dysfunction increase in incidence are the normal “crises” of the family life cycle, medical crises of illness, hospitalization and death, and non-medical crises. High-risk families should be identified; secondary prevention is an important role for the family physician who sees family problems at a much earlier stage than the psychiatrist or marital or family therapist. PMID:21289689

Christie-Seely, Janet

1981-01-01

49

Web-based Education in Family Medicine Predoctoral Programs.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Surveyed directors of predoctoral family medicine programs (n=78; response rate of 61%) about the inclusion of Web-based educational methods in their programs, the level of interest in such programs, and barriers to program development. Results show nearly universal use of e-mail and Web pages. Identified faculty time and funding as common…

Leong, Shou Ling; Baldwin, Constance D.; Usatine, Richard P.; Adelman, Alan M.; Gjerde, Craig L.

2000-01-01

50

A Program of Faculty Development in Family Medicine  

PubMed Central

This article describes one teacher's experience in a program of faculty development offered by the University of Western Ontario, Department of Family Medicine. Faculty development is summarized according to faculty's four roles: clinician, teacher, administrator and researcher. Emphasis is put on self-growth and development. The difficulties encountered after a sabbatical leave are briefly discussed. PMID:21289719

Grand'Maison, Paul

1981-01-01

51

Teaching home care to family medicine residents.  

PubMed Central

A growing elderly population suffering from chronic and debilitating diseases, the rising cost of institutional care, and increasing demand from patients for home visits indicate that home care will become a more important part of family physicians' practice in the future. We describe a model for teaching family medicine residents how to provide home services. Images p282-a PMID:9222577

Boillat, M.; Boulet, S.; Poulin de Courval, L.

1996-01-01

52

Occupational Medicine: Opportunities for Family Physicians  

PubMed Central

Occupational medicine has grown recently in sophistication and strength. Occupational physicians with specialty certification focus their attention on toxicology and health hazards in the workplace, compliance with regulatory requirements, and preventive services. These physicians are often employed by organizations. Most occupational health care will continue to be provided by family physicians, who may also be the physicians closest to the workers and their families. There are many opportunities for family physicians to develop their skills in occupational health care and to incorporate occupational medicine into their practices. PMID:21248919

Guidotti, Tee L.

1989-01-01

53

San Jose State University Sports Medicine  

E-print Network

San Jose State University Sports Medicine Policies and Procedures 2010-2011 #12;Mission Statement The San Jose State University Sports Medicine staff is charged with the responsibility of providing-athlete on a daily basis and measuring their readiness for athletic competition. The sports medicine staff utilizes

Su, Xiao

54

University of Alberta Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry  

E-print Network

University of Alberta Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry Internet Website Standards Policy.) Overview The experience visitors have when they come to the Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry (FoMD) website's and the University's brand and its integrity. Policy 1. The Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry website is an internet

MacMillan, Andrew

55

Do Family Medicine Residents and Their Teachers Have Common Goals?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Opinions were obtained from residents, family medicine faculty, and attending physicians familiar with an established family medicine residency program regarding the tasks that family doctors should and should not perform. (LBH)

London, Richard L.; Green, Larry A.

1977-01-01

56

University of Mississippi School of Medicine  

E-print Network

Urology University of Illinois Chicago, Illinois Lance Atchley Internal Medicine University of Mississippi Cassie Burns Anesthesiology University of Mississippi Medical Center Jackson, Mississippi John Burns Surg-Prelim/Urology

Raucher, Drazen

57

PREVENTIVE MEDICINE AT THE YALE UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF MEDICINE*  

E-print Network

division of the Department of Internal Medicine at the Yale University School of Medicine, has been established on the principle that preventive medicine is part of clinical medicine. This calls for a broad use of the term clinical medicine. It implies that clinical medicine means more than the practice of the technics of diagnosis and therapeutics, for, although it deals primarily with the care of the sick individual, it is also concerned with the whole subject of disease in living people. In other words, clinical medicine is not a specialty; it is the mother of the clinical specialties, such as internal medicine and surgery, and their subdivisions. As the aims of preventive medicine are (according to our definition) also concerned with the whole subject of disease in living people and particularly with the potentially sick individual, we find in this fact the justification for placing the new division in the midst of the clinical activities of the school. This assignment is by no

John R

58

Sports Medicine and the Family Physician  

PubMed Central

As family practitioners we are encouraged to move with the times in every aspect of medicine. We pride ourselves on having received good training to apply our knowledge in all fields of medicine. The preventative aspects have been adequately emphasized in medical schools in all departments. We must give the greatest thought to the preventative aspects of sports medicine and to seek knowledge in this science that many of us were unable to or did not receive in our earlier training. Imagesp45-a PMID:20468545

Bullard, J. A.

1970-01-01

59

Welcome to “Homeopathic Family Medicine  

E-print Network

Once a “normal ” book is printed, it is hard (and expensive) to change the information in it. Even more problematic is the fact that many books become out-of-date shortly after they are published. However, an eBook can be changed and updated easily, quickly, and with little expense. And because our mission in creating this eBook is to keep you informed of the latest and best research in the field of homeopathic medicine, the eBook format is ideal for this dynamic and ever-growing body of information. What you are going to get from this eBook is: ? An up-to-date reference to and description of clinical research that has evaluated the efficacy of homeopathic medicines, not just studies that showed that homeopathy “worked ” but also studies that show when it didn’t. ? A modern even futuristic overview of what homeopathic medicine is and what potential it has for treating you and people close to you. ? A user-friendly guide to what homeopathy has to offer in the treatment of 100+ common ailments. ? An overview statement at the beginning of every clinical chapter summarizes if this condition is appropriate for treatment by you (as a non-professional homeopath) and when and if referral to a professional homeopath is indicated. This overview statement will also summarize if there is or isn’t clinical research on the homeopathic treatment of people with this ailment. ? Reference to additional books, articles, or websites will provide further information on the homeopathic treatment of various conditions. As important as research is to knowing if something works or not, please know that just because there may not be formal studies published on the homeopathic treatment of a specific disease does NOT mean that homeopathy isn’t helpful in treating people who suffer from this ailment. In fact, because almost no governmental or drug company funds have been devoted to research on homeopathy, there are numerous conditions for which research has not yet been conducted. That said, you will be surprised and probably impressed at the body of research that has been conducted using homeopathic medicines. If, by chance, you know about clinical research in homeopathy that has not been referenced and described in this eBook, please consider contacted us. Email us at:

unknown authors

60

Psychiatric Emergencies In Family Medicine  

PubMed Central

The family physician is often called upon to deal with psychiatric emergencies. In order to deal with these situations expertly, he/she must be familiar with the techniques of psychiatric assessment and management. A knowledge of community resources is invaluable in treating such patients. PMID:20469247

Smith, V. A.; Goluboff, S.

1975-01-01

61

Family medicine: a specialty for all ages.  

PubMed

After a diminishing of its ranks following the post-World War II explosion of growth in medical discoveries, advanced medical technology, and the concomitant specialization of the physician workforce, family medicine is re-establishing itself as a leading medical specialty that has garnered growing interest among recent medical-school graduates. Family physicians provide care for patients of all ages, from newborns to the elderly. In addition to its wide scope of practice, family medicine is characterized by its emphasis on understanding of the whole person, its partnership approach with patients over many years, and its command of medical complexity. Family physicians are trained both to use community resources to assist individual patients in meeting medical or social needs and to identify and address community-wide needs. The specialty of family medicine is uniquely positioned to provide a leadership role in health-reform efforts that are accelerating across the country. Health care models that are gaining traction, such as the patient-centered medical home model, health homes, and accountable care organizations, share the characteristics of providing comprehensive, coordinated patient care with an emphasis on disease prevention and health promotion. This model of care, provided in the context of family and community, has been the hallmark of family medicine since its creation as a distinct medical specialty more than 40 years ago. In addition, family physicians' ability to care for patients of all ages make them particularly cost-effective as the new models of care move to improve access to care through expanded hours and locations. PMID:22976366

Calman, Neil S; Hauser, Diane; Leanza, Francesco; Schiller, Robert

2012-01-01

62

Educational contracts in family medicine residency training.  

PubMed Central

An educational contract for family medicine residency training and evaluation addresses many of the difficulties and challenges of current postgraduate medical education. This article identifies important principles for developing a contractual approach; describes the contract used in one program and its implementation; and discusses its theory, advantages, and limitations. Images p550-a PMID:8199512

Mahood, S.; Rojas, R.; Andres, D.; Zagozeski, C.; White, G.; Bradel, T.

1994-01-01

63

Family Medicine: Reassessment of Two Educational Objectives.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Emphasis on family medicine has resulted in three problems: definition, discrepancies between objectives and practice, and the lack of a specialized body of knowledge. Training should concentrate on simple but more effective goals, enhanced compassion and empathy, and improved communication skills, understanding of emotional needs, and counseling…

Christensen, Danis J.

1983-01-01

64

Intercultural Sensitivity of Rural Family Medicine Residents  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent literature emphasizes the importance of cultural competency and intercultural sensitivity for those in medical training. This study uses the Intercultural Development Inventory (IDI) to examine the intercultural sensitivity of Family Medicine residents specializing in rural healthcare. Results indicate that, as a whole, residents tend to significantly overestimate their intercultural sensitivity and adhere to a viewpoint that emphasizes cultural commonality

Allison K. Bradshaw; Joseph R. Biggs

65

Complementary Alternative Medicine: Implications for Family Therapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article considers the fit between family therapy and complementary alternative medicine (CAM). Descriptions of and research results on a variety of CAM practices are provided, as are implications for practice, education, research, and policy. It is concluded that the two fields mesh easily and that clients might be better served if their therapists had knowledge of CAM. At the

Dorothy S. Becvar; Cynthia A. Loveland Cook; Sharon L. Pontious

1998-01-01

66

Generation to Generation: The Heart of Family Medicine  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

According to the American Board of Family Medicine, "The scope of family medicine encompasses all ages, both sexes, each organ system and every disease entity." What makes the seemingly daunting task of practicing family medicine possible is that family physicians learn to utilize similar clinical reasoning for all of their patients regardless of…

Winter, Robin O.

2012-01-01

67

Methodology and outcomes of a family medicine research fellowship.  

PubMed

There has not been a strong tradition of training researchers to provide the great amount of new evidence needed for the practice of family medicine. Few models for creating successful family medicine researchers have been presented in the literature. The authors report on the methodology and outcomes of a faculty development research fellowship in the University of Pennsylvania's Department of Family Medicine and Community Health. The fellowship focuses on the two domains-intensive research training and academic career development-and frames them with coursework in a content-appropriate master's degree program and clinical practice in an underserved community. Fifteen fellows have completed the program, which began in 1997. Most fellows' research work has been related to primary care and health disparities. Program completers have been the principal investigators on 39 funded studies and coinvestigators on 24 funded studies. They have, at the time this article was written, described their work in 236 publications, 114 of them peer reviewed. All but one program completer hold academic faculty positions, and 12 practice in underserved areas. In a research-intense institution, the fellowship program successfully trained family physicians to be independent clinical researchers and leaders who have substantially contributed to the national effort to mitigate health disparities through practice and research. The authors suggest that the outcomes strongly support the development of similar training opportunities in family medicine departments in other resource- and research-rich institutions. PMID:19638782

Cronholm, Peter F; Straton, Joseph B; Bowman, Marjorie A

2009-08-01

68

Page 1 of 1 FACULTY: Faculty of Medicine, Department of Family Medicine  

E-print Network

Page 1 of 1 FACULTY: Faculty of Medicine, Department of Family Medicine REPORTS TO: Chair: The Department of Family Medicine is seeking a dedicated FTA Physician who is committed to providing, advancing and collaborates in the clinical teaching and supervision of Family Medicine residents and medical students

Sankoff, David

69

University of Calgary Faculty of Medicine  

E-print Network

University of Calgary Faculty of Medicine ASSOCIATE DEAN (EQUITY AND TEACHER-LEARNER RELATIONS) A, Faculty of Medicine for developing and maintaining a healthy and respectful working, teaching, and learning environment in the Faculty of Medicine by: 1. Facilitating the prevention and resolution

Habib, Ayman

70

UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA COLLEGE OF MEDICINE  

E-print Network

UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA COLLEGE OF MEDICINE STRATEGIC PLAN 2010/11 ­ 2014/15 #12;OUR STRATEGIC of Medicine (COM) has accepted that challenge. The College has embarked on an aggressive strategic plan in a collaborative model across all three missions for medicine, nursing, public health, physical therapy, athletic

Meyers, Steven D.

71

University of New Mexico School of Medicine  

E-print Network

University of New Mexico School of Medicine Paul B. Roth, MD Chancellor for Health Sciences, Dean Biology Hugh Martin, MD Chair Anesthesiology Pope Moseley, MD Chair Internal Medicine William Rayburn, MD & Community Medicine Gary Rosenberg, MD Chair Neurology Robert Schenk, MD Chair Orthopedics Loretta Cordova

New Mexico, University of

72

UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH SCHOOL OF MEDICINE  

E-print Network

(particularly at the cellular and molecular levels) that is giving us the ability to personalize medicine. We--heads our new Institute for Personalized Medicine, which you will read more about in the pages#12;2 UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 2013 ANNUAL REPORT 1 Message from the Dean 3 News

Jiang, Huiqiang

73

Oregon Health & Science University School of Medicine  

E-print Network

. With this in mind, interprofessional education is another important aspect of medical education. We striveOregon Health & Science University School of Medicine Medical Student Handbook 2012-2013 #12;Oregon Health & Science University School of Medicine Medical Student Handbook Welcome This is an exciting time

Chapman, Michael S.

74

Oregon Health & Science University School of Medicine  

E-print Network

. With this in mind, interprofessional education is another important aspect of medical education. We striveOregon Health & Science University School of Medicine Medical Student Handbook 2011-2012 #12;Oregon Health & Science University School of Medicine Medical Student Handbook Welcome This is an exciting time

Chapman, Michael S.

75

COLLEGE OF VETERINARY MEDICINE UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE  

E-print Network

and third years emphasize the study of diseases, their causes, diagnosis, treatment and preventionCOLLEGE OF VETERINARY MEDICINE UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE The University of Tennessee, founded in 1794, is one of the oldest educational institutions in the country. The College of Veterinary Medicine

Tennessee, University of

76

Comparison of Research Trends in Korean and International Family Medicine in Journals of Family Medicine  

PubMed Central

Background Research is important for the development of family medicine as a professional field in primary care. The aim of this study was to suggest directions for the development of family medicine research by analyzing research trends in original papers published in the Korean Journal of Family Medicine (KJFM) and international journals. Methods We investigated original research papers published in KJFM and 4 international journals from August 2009 to July 2010. Analysis was conducted according to research topics, authors, methods, participants, and data sources. Results 'Clinical research' was the most common research topic in both the KJFM (88.3%) and international journals (57.3%); however, international journals had more studies in other domains ('education and research,' 'health service,' and 'family medicine'). More authors other than family physicians participated in international journals than in the KJFM (58% and 3.3%, respectively). Most studies were 'cross-sectional' in KJFM (77.0%) and international journals (51.5%): however, the latter had more 'qualitative' studies, 'cohort' studies, and 'systematic reviews' than the former. The largest study population was 'visitors of health promotion center' in the KJFM and 'outpatients' in international journals. Most of the study sources were 'survey' and 'medical records' in both. Conclusion There were limitations of diversity in the papers of the KJFM. Future investigation on papers of other than family medicine journals should be planned to assess research trends of family physicians.

Jeon, Jin-Kyung; Lee, Jungun

2014-01-01

77

Department of Family Medicine Dpartement de Mdecine Familiale  

E-print Network

2.4.12 1 Department of Family Medicine Département de Médecine Familiale It's a perfect time to be in Family Medicine! Dear Colleagues, I am delighted and enthusiastic about taking on the daunting but exciting challenge of working with you in leading the McGill Department of Family Medicine

Shoubridge, Eric

78

DEPARTMENT OF FAMILY MEDICINE BYLAWS Page 2 TABLE OF CONTENTS  

E-print Network

#12;DEPARTMENT OF FAMILY MEDICINE ­ BYLAWS Page 2 TABLE OF CONTENTS Article I The Faculty...........................................................................................12 #12;DEPARTMENT OF FAMILY MEDICINE ­ BYLAWS Page 3 ARTICLE I. THE FACULTY 1.1. Composition of the Faculty 1.1.1. The regular tenure system faculty of the Department of Family Medicine shall be composed

79

Department of Family Medicine Dpartement de Mdecine Familiale  

E-print Network

Department of Family Medicine Département de Médecine Familiale MANY THANKS! I can hardly of Family Medicine in August of 2010. As we embark on an exciting new phase in the life of our department reflection of the dedication and passion of our clinical teachers, both in the family medicine units

Shoubridge, Eric

80

Family Medicine Faculty Medical Center Line (MCL) open rank  

E-print Network

Family Medicine Faculty Medical Center Line (MCL) open rank Division of General Medical Disciplines and rigorous scholarship to our dynamic and growing Family Medicine group. The successful candidate will be expected to have an MD degree and must be trained in Family Medicine. He or she must have substantive

Quake, Stephen R.

81

University of Alberta Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry  

E-print Network

University of Alberta Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry Resident Wellbeing Committee Wellbeing, professionalism, sleep disorders, etc. o The Alberta Medical Association's Physician and Family Support Program (1 of interest to your group of residents (eg. the effects of sleep deprivation on your work and life

MacMillan, Andrew

82

Benefits of Comprehensive Reproductive Health Education in Family Medicine Residency  

Microsoft Academic Search

Given the high prevalence of unintended pregnancy and early pregnancy failure, family physicians frequently encounter these clinical problems. Early abortion care and miscarriage management are within the scope of family medicine, yet few family medicine residency programs' curricula routinely include training in these skills. Comprehensive reproductive health education for family physicians could benefit patients by improving access to safe care

Melissa Nothnagle; Linda Prine; Suzan Goodman

2008-01-01

83

The Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University  

E-print Network

The Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University EMERGENCY PROCEDURES MANUAL Prepared Resources Security Revised ­ May, 2013 #12;ALBERT EINSTEIN COLLEGE of MEDICINE of YESHIVA UNIVERSITY

Emmons, Scott

84

The Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University  

E-print Network

The Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University EMERGENCY PROCEDURES MANUAL Prepared Supporting Services Revised ­ January, 2012 #12;ALBERT EINSTEIN COLLEGE of MEDICINE of YESHIVA UNIVERSITY

Yates, Andrew

85

The Ohio State University College of Medicine  

E-print Network

, Department of Plastic Surgery The Ohio State University College of Medicine Quinn Capers IV, MD Associate the rare opportunity to study at one of America's most comprehensive medical campuses and to follow one

86

Stanford University School of Medicine Neuroscience Forum  

E-print Network

Stanford University School of Medicine Neuroscience Forum Salil Soman Midlife hypo metabolism, and Multiple Health Complaints Joyce Chung Gender and the Effects of TBI/Polytrauma: Comparative Analysis damage in cervical spinal cord injury Vidya Saravanapandian Stereotypical Alterations in Cortical

Kay, Mark A.

87

NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY FEINBERG SCHOOL OF MEDICINE  

E-print Network

care. We will discuss low health literacy in neurology and the importance to adherence. Finally, we will step back to examine access to neurological care and education NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY FEINBERG SCHOOL OF MEDICINE DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY

Contractor, Anis

88

Wayne State University School of Medicine  

E-print Network

Insurance Consultant and Broker 20 year relationship with WSU Medical School Disability and HealthWayne State University School of Medicine HEALTH INSURANCE #12;Michael Vincent Independent Insurance Administrative Services Insurance Education for Medical Students #12;Larson Financial Group

Finley Jr., Russell L.

89

The Future of Family Medicine: A Collaborative Project of the Family Medicine Community  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND Recognizing fundamental flaws in the fragmented US health care systems and the potential of an integrative, generalist approach, the leadership of 7 national family medicine organizations initiated the Future of Family Medicine (FFM) project in 2002. The goal of the project was to develop a strategy to transform and renew the discipline of family medicine to meet the needs of patients in a changing health care environment. METHODS A national research study was conducted by independent research firms. Interviews and focus groups identified key issues for diverse constituencies, including patients, payers, residents, students, family physicians, and other clinicians. Subsequently, interviews were conducted with nationally representative samples of 9 key constituencies. Based in part on these data, 5 task forces addressed key issues to meet the project goal. A Project Leadership Committee synthesized the task force reports into the report presented here. RESULTS The project identified core values, a New Model of practice, and a process for development, research, education, partnership, and change with great potential to transform the ability of family medicine to improve the health and health care of the nation. The proposed New Model of practice has the following characteristics: a patient-centered team approach; elimination of barriers to access; advanced information systems, including an electronic health record; redesigned, more functional offices; a focus on quality and outcomes; and enhanced practice finance. A unified communications strategy will be developed to promote the New Model of family medicine to multiple audiences. The study concluded that the discipline needs to oversee the training of family physicians who are committed to excellence, steeped in the core values of the discipline, competent to provide family medicine’s basket of services within the New Model, and capable of adapting to varying patient needs and changing care technologies. Family medicine education must continue to include training in maternity care, the care of hospitalized patients, community and population health, and culturally effective and proficient care. A comprehensive lifelong learning program for each family physician will support continuous personal, professional, and clinical practice assessment and improvement. Ultimately, systemwide changes will be needed to ensure high-quality health care for all Americans. Such changes include taking steps to ensure that every American has a personal medical home, promoting the use and reporting of quality measures to improve performance and service, advocating that every American have health care coverage for basic services and protection against extraordinary health care costs, advancing research that supports the clinical decision making of family physicians and other primary care clinicians, and developing reimbursement models to sustain family medicine and primary care practices. CONCLUSIONS The leadership of US family medicine organizations is committed to a transformative process. In partnership with others, this process has the potential to integrate health care to improve the health of all Americans. PMID:15080220

2004-01-01

90

Second Annual Family and Preventive Medicine Faculty Recognition  

E-print Network

Second Annual Family and Preventive Medicine Faculty Recognition UC San Diego Faculty Club October, MPH Associate Professor Division of Preventive Medicine Cheryl Anderson, PhD, MS Associate Professor Division of Preventive Medicine Timothy Barounis, MD HS Assistant Clinical Professor Division of Family

Blanco, Philip R.

91

Departments | Centers | Institutes Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine  

E-print Network

Departments | Centers | Institutes Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine The Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine has many excellent departments, centers, institutes offerings with the creation of the Institute for Public Health & Medicine, which combined interdisciplinary

Chisholm, Rex L.

92

DIVISION OF CARDIOVASCULAR MEDICINE STANFORD UNIVERSITY in the SCHOOL OF MEDICINE  

E-print Network

DIVISION OF CARDIOVASCULAR MEDICINE STANFORD UNIVERSITY in the SCHOOL OF MEDICINE FELLOWSHIP application.) Check one: Black___ American Indian or Alaskan Native____ White**___ Asian or Pacific Islander and qualifications. Mail applications to: June Teo Stanford University, Cardiovascular Medicine 300 Pasteur Drive

Ford, James

93

Sponsored By Washington University School of Medicine  

E-print Network

Sponsored By Washington University School of Medicine Continuing Medical Education 12th Annual University Medical Center, St. Louis Co-Chairs Abby S. Hollander, M.D. & Teresa L. Deshields, Ph.D. Presented: · Identify depression in patients with medical illness and analyze treatment issues with respect to clinical

Grant, Gregory

94

What challenges hamper Kenyan family physicians in pursuing their family medicine mandate? A qualitative study among family physicians and their colleagues  

PubMed Central

Background Since 2005, Kenyan medical universities have been training general practitioners, providing them with clinical, management, teaching and research skills, in order to enhance access to and quality of health care services for the Kenyan population. This study assesses what expectations family physicians, colleagues of family physicians and policy makers have of family medicine, what expectations family physicians live up to and which challenges they face. Methods Family physicians were observed and interviewed about their expectations and challenges concerning family medicine. Expectations among their colleagues were assessed through focus group discussions. Policy makers’ expectations were assessed by analysing the governmental policy on family medicine and a university’s curriculum. Results Roles perceived for and performed by family physicians included providing comprehensive care, health care management, teaching, and to a lesser extent community outreach and performing research. Challenges faced by family physicians were being posted in situations where they are regarded as just another type of specialist, lack of awareness of the roles of family physicians among colleagues, lack of time, lack of funds and inadequate training. Conclusions The ministry’s posting policy has to be improved to ensure that family physicians have a chance to perform their intended roles. Creating an environment in which family physicians can function best requires more effort to enlighten other players in the health care system, like colleagues and policy makers, about the roles of family physicians. PMID:22536801

2012-01-01

95

Characteristics of universal embezzling families  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Quantum state embezzlement is the transformation |? >?|? >|? > using only local operations, where |? > and |? > are multipartite quantum states. Exact embezzlement is an impossible task since it implies the increase of entanglement without communication. Surprisingly, van Dam and Hayden [Phys. Rev. A 67, 060302 (2003), 10.1103/PhysRevA.67.060302] find a universal embezzling family of states |? > that enables embezzlement in the bipartite setting with arbitrary precision as the dimension of |? > increases. Furthermore, the family is independent of the state |? > to be embezzled. We study embezzlement in the bipartite setting. We present various requirements and consequences, and infinitely many universal embezzling families inequivalent to that proposed by van Dam and Hayden. We include numerical studies of up to 33-qubit large local systems.

Leung, Debbie; Wang, Bingjie

2014-10-01

96

Exploring and understanding academic leadership in family medicine  

PubMed Central

Abstract Objective To explore how family physicians understand the concept of academic leadership. Design Case study. Setting Department of Family and Community Medicine at the University of Toronto in Ontario. Participants Thirty family physician academic leaders. Methods Focus groups and interviews were conducted with family physicians from a large multisite urban university who were identified by peers as academic leaders at various career stages. Transcripts from the focus groups and interviews were anonymized and themes were analyzed and negotiated among 3 researchers. Main findings Participants identified qualities of leadership among academic leaders that align with those identified in the current literature. Despite being identified by others as academic leaders, participants were reluctant to self-identify as such. Participants believed they had taken on early leadership roles by default rather than through planned career development. Conclusion This study affirms the need to define academic leadership explicitly, advance a culture that supports it, and nurture leaders at all levels with a variety of strategies. PMID:23486818

Oandasan, Ivy; White, David; Hammond Mobilio, Melanie; Gotlib Conn, Lesley; Feldman, Kymm; Kim, Florence; Rouleau, Katherine; Sorensen, Leslie

2013-01-01

97

Faculty of Medicine Programs, Courses and University Regulations  

E-print Network

Faculty of Medicine Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2013-2014 #12;#12;This PDF excerpt of Medicine, page 7 1.1 Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Occupational Health, page 7 5McGill University, Faculty of Medicine, 2013-2014 Faculty of Medicine 2013-2014 #12;2013-2014, McGill University6

Kambhampati, Patanjali

98

Wayne State University School of Medicine 2014 Award Nomination Form  

E-print Network

of Medicine. · Alumni who have made outstanding contributions to the health field, in the broader senseWayne State University School of Medicine 2014 Award Nomination Form 2014 WAYNE STATE UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF MEDICINE CALL FOR NOMINATIONS The Wayne State University School of Medicine Ambassador

Finley Jr., Russell L.

99

FIRST ANNUAL FAMILY AND PREVENTIVE MEDICINE FACULTY RECOGNITION  

E-print Network

Reception FIRST ANNUAL FAMILY AND PREVENTIVE MEDICINE FACULTY RECOGNITION UC SAN DIEGO FACULTY CLUB of Preventive Medicine Accelerated career review to step VI Loki Natarajan, Ph.D. Promotion to Professor Advancement to Professor Step VI Division of Preventive Medicine Career Reviews: Non Salaried Faculty

Russell, Lynn

100

Clinical Skills Acquired during a Clerkship in Family Medicine.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study of the preceived acquisition of clinical skills by second-year medical students in six required clerkships is reported. The students completed self-assessments of their clinical skills when taking the family medicine clerkship. The principal contributions of the family medicine clerkship were in the management of common problems.…

Michener, J. Lloyd; And Others

1986-01-01

101

A Pediatrician on the Family Medicine Faculty: A Workable Compromise.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The advantages of having a pediatrician, under the supervision of the program director, as member of a family medicine faculty are discussed. That academic role is outlined, and because it is a stopgap position, cautions regarding the future of a pediatric-family-medicine faculty member are offered. (JMD)

Passero, Mary Ann

1979-01-01

102

National Curricular Guidelines for Third-Year Family Medicine Clerkships.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The process used by the Society of Teachers of Family Medicine to develop core curriculum guidelines for third-year family medicine clerkships is described, the guidelines are presented, and dissemination, implementation, and further development activities are outlined. The work was supported by a Department of Health and Human Services grant.…

Academic Medicine, 1991

1991-01-01

103

The Role of Family Medicine in the Health Science Centre  

PubMed Central

The evolution of training in family medicine has passed through several controversial phases to its current position within academic medicine. Many controversies still exist; this article defines them in the areas of education, service and research, gives some reasons why they exist, and offers conclusions on the benefits of having a family practice unit in a health science centre. PMID:21289740

Bean, I. W.

1981-01-01

104

Results of the 2005 National Resident Matching Program: Family Medicine  

Microsoft Academic Search

The results of the 2005 National Resident Matching Program (NRMP) reflect a currently stable level of student interest in family medicine residency training in the United States. Compared with the 2004 Match, 19 more positions (66 fewer US seniors) were filled in family medicine residency programs through the NRMP in 2005, at the same time as four fewer (18 fewer

Perry A. Pugno; Gordon T. Schmittling; Gerald T. Fetter; Norman B. Kahn

105

Yale University School of Medicine  

E-print Network

/or interview me for publicity, educational, marketing, advertising and fundraising purposes through internal/or Yale University, as applicable, in writing, and the revocation will be effective on the date notified will be retained by Public Affairs, Marketing or Communications staff or other appropriate, authorized person

106

University of Vermont College of Medicine Residency Appointment List  

E-print Network

20010 Robert Areson Exempla St. Joseph Hosp. Family Medicine Suite 490 1960 N Ogden St. Denver, CO 80218 Washington St. Boston, MA 02111 Leslie Bradbury Central Maine Med. Ctr. Family Medicine 76 High St. Lewiston Florida COM Family Medicine 12901 N Bruce B Downs Blvd. Tampa, FL 33612 Mark Dammann Oregon Health

Hayden, Nancy J.

107

NorthwesternUniversity Feinberg School of Medicine  

E-print Network

Professor Department of Physical Therapy and Human Movement Sciences The Department of Physical Therapy". The department has one of the leading physical therapy education programs in the United States, training entryNorthwesternUniversity Feinberg School of Medicine Director of Clinical Education/Assistant

Contractor, Anis

108

A University/Government Collaboration  

E-print Network

A University/Government Collaboration Family medicine Expansion Report 2013 School of Medicine #12 ........................................................................................................................... i Family Medicine Expansion Report A University / Government Collaboration ............................................1 Attracting More Medical Students into Choosing a Career in Family Medicine

Sankoff, David

109

The University of South Carolina School of Medicine RESIDENCY APPOINTMENTS  

E-print Network

Affiliated Hospitals Tucson, Arizona Xian Qiao Internal Medicine Christiana Care Health Services Newark University School of Medicine New Orleans, Louisiana Adam Wells Internal Medicine LSU Health Sciences Center Health Science Center Brooklyn, New York Kerianne Springer Internal Medicine Wright State University

Almor, Amit

110

University of Southern California Mork Family  

E-print Network

Science 2009 Alumni Reunion Thursday, March 12, 2009 6:00 pm University Club Mork Family DepartmentUniversity of Southern California Mork Family Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Salovey David Wittry University of Southern California Mork Family Department of Chemical Engineering

Southern California, University of

111

Geriatric Core Competencies for Family Medicine Curriculum and Enhanced Skills: Care of Elderly  

PubMed Central

Background There is a growing mandate for Family Medicine residency programs to directly assess residents’ clinical competence in Care of the Elderly (COE). The objectives of this paper are to describe the development and implementation of incremental core competencies for Postgraduate Year (PGY)-I Integrated Geriatrics Family Medicine, PGY-II Geriatrics Rotation Family Medicine, and PGY-III Enhanced Skills COE for COE Diploma residents at a Canadian University. Methods Iterative expert panel process for the development of the core competencies, with a pre-defined process for implementation of the core competencies. Results Eighty-five core competencies were selected overall by the Working Group, with 57 core competencies selected for the PGY-I/II Family Medicine residents and an additional 28 selected for the PGY-III COE residents. The core competencies follow the CanMEDS Family Medicine roles. Both sets of core competencies are based on consensus. Conclusions Due to demographic changes, it is essential that Family Physicians have the required skills and knowledge to care for the frail elderly. The core competencies described were developed for PGY-I/II Family Medicine residents and PGY-III Enhanced Skills COE, with a focus on the development of geriatric expertise for those patients that would most benefit. PMID:24883163

Charles, Lesley; Triscott, Jean A.C.; Dobbs, Bonnie M.; McKay, Rhianne

2014-01-01

112

Hospital grand rounds in family medicine. Content and educational structure.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE: To investigate hospital grand rounds in family medicine, to examine their content and organization, and to recommend improved educational structures for these ubiquitous continuing medical education events. DATA SELECTION: Retrospective analysis of titles and content of 358 family medicine grand rounds offered in the department of family medicine of a large urban hospital from mid-1983 to the end of 1994. FINDINGS: Only 10% of family medicine grand rounds were presented by family physicians. Most grand rounds were in the form of specialists exhibiting their own interests in a lecture format. Analysis of grand rounds titles showed no consistent pattern of topics but an emphasis on practical aspects of medical care. Patient-based presentations were uncommon, as were grand rounds with more than one speaker. CONCLUSIONS: The content and mix of topics appeared appropriate, but in the absence of a curricular structure, or evaluation of learning gain, it is difficult to assess the value of grand rounds. PMID:9222579

Lewkonia, R.; Sosnowski, M.; Murray, F.

1996-01-01

113

Administration in family medicine education: an academic quandary.  

PubMed

Family medicine leadership is faced with the challenge of maintaining the progressive development of a new academic discipline. Academic administration has presented a dilemma to all fields, and there has been very limited training to assist administrators in academe. A survey of department chairmen and residency directors in family medicine determined that a high percentage of leaders have moved into their positions directly from practice or from faculty responsibilities. Predominant needs were in the areas of finance, external relationships, time management, and conflict intervention. There are several implications from this study which should be considered in the selection, training, and evaluation of academic family medicine administrators. PMID:7462935

Aluise, J J; Kirkman-Liff, B; Neely, G M

1981-02-01

114

CLINICAL FACULTY CRITERIA Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry, University of Alberta  

E-print Network

CLINICAL FACULTY CRITERIA Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry, University of Alberta 1 VERSION 04 April 2012 Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry, University of Alberta CRITERIA FOR ACADEMIC RANKS, PROMOTIONS AND APPOINTMENTS FOR CLINICAL ACADEMIC COLLEAGUES I.INTRODUCTION The Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry, University

MacMillan, Andrew

115

Evaluating Family Medicine Residency COPC Programs: Meeting the Challenge  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background and Objectives: We conducted a review of the evaluation literature and outcomes from community-oriented primary care (COPC) programs in US family medicine residencies since 1969. Methods: We used a Medline and ERIC search for \\

Alison Dobbie; Patricia Kelly; Eldonna Sylvia; Joshua Freeman

116

Resident research in family medicine: where are we now?  

PubMed

Increasing the amount and quality of family medicine research has long been a goal of the specialty. The Future of Family Medicine project endorses the generation of new knowledge and promotes scholarship during residency training. Formal training in the principles of research needs to be initiated early to create the cadre of highly trained researchers that will be required to accomplish this goal. Every family medicine residency graduate should have a working understanding of study design, study conduct, presentation of results, and critical analysis of the medical literature. Teaching these research skills in residency is challenging due to time constraints, funding limitations, varying resident interest, and a relative lack of experienced faculty mentors. This paper reviews the existing literature on teaching research to family medicine residents. Program features consistently associated with successfully promoting resident research include faculty mentors, a formal research curriculum, a forum to present projects, technical assistance, dedicated research time, and funding support. PMID:19816832

Seehusen, Dean A; Weaver, Sally P

2009-10-01

117

zentrum Innere medizin ABTEIlUNG AllGEMEINMEDIZIN centre for Internal medicine DEPARTMENT OF GENERAl PRACTICE/FAMIly MEDICINE  

E-print Network

OF GENERAl PRACTICE/FAMIly MEDICINE Abteilungsdirektor/in | Head of Department Prof. Dr. med. Michael M in family medicine and over 120 family medicine teaching practices are affiliated with the department Structured Clinical Examinati- on / OSCE-Prüfungen). Preface The Department of General Practice/ Family

Gollisch, Tim

118

Results of the 2009 National Resident Matching Program: family medicine.  

PubMed

The results of the 2009 National Resident Matching Program (NRMP) reflect a persistently low level of student interest in family medicine residency training in the United States. Compared with the 2008 Match, 70 fewer positions (with 89 fewer US seniors) were filled in family medicine residency programs through the NRMP in 2009, at the same time that 18 fewer positions were filled in primary care internal medicine (11 fewer US seniors), one more position was filled in pediatrics-primary care (three more US seniors), and 13 more positions were filled in internal medicine-pediatrics programs (but with seven fewer US seniors). Multiple forces, including student perspectives of the demands, rewards and prestige of the specialty, the turbulence and uncertainty of the health care and economic environments, lifestyle issues, the advice of deans, and the impact of faculty role models, continue to influence medical student career choices. A total of 152 more positions (28 fewer US seniors) were filled in categorical internal medicine. Thirty-one more positions (72 more US seniors) were filled in categorical pediatrics programs. The 2009 NRMP results suggest that while interest in family medicine experienced a slight increase in the number of students choosing the specialty last year, overall interest in primary care careers continues to decline. With the nation continuing to call for the roles and services of family physicians, family medicine still matched too few graduates through the 2009 NRMP to effectively address the nation's needs for primary care physicians. PMID:19724942

Pugno, Perry A; McGaha, Amy L; Schmittling, Gordon T; DeVilbiss, Ashley D; Ostergaard, Daniel J

2009-09-01

119

Results of the 2008 National Resident Matching Program: family medicine.  

PubMed

The results of the 2008 National Resident Matching Program (NRMP) reflect a currently stable level of student interest in family medicine residency training in the United States. Compared with the 2007 Match, 91 more positions (with 65 more US seniors) were filled in family medicine residency programs through the NRMP in 2008, at the same time as 10 fewer (one fewer US senior) in primary care internal medicine, eight fewer positions were filled in pediatrics-primary care (10 fewer US seniors), and 19 fewer (27 fewer US seniors) in internal medicine-pediatrics programs. Multiple forces, including student perspectives of the demands, rewards, and prestige of the specialty, the turbulence and uncertainty of the health care environment, lifestyle issues, and the impact of faculty role models, continue to influence medical student career choices. Thirty-one more positions (20 fewer US seniors) were filled in categorical internal medicine. Thirty more positions (84 fewer US seniors) were filled in categorical pediatrics programs. The 2008 NRMP results suggest that while interest in family medicine experienced a slight increase in the number of students choosing the specialty, interest in other primary care careers continues to decline. With the needs of the nation calling for the roles and services of family physicians, family medicine still matched too few graduates through the 2008 NRMP to meet the nation's needs for primary care physicians. PMID:18988043

Pugno, Perry A; McGaha, Amy L; Schmittling, Gordon T; DeVilbiss, Ashley D; Ostergaard, Daniel J

2008-09-01

120

Results of the 2007 National Resident Matching Program: family medicine.  

PubMed

The results of the 2007 National Resident Matching Program (NRMP) reflect a currently stable level of student interest in family medicine residency training in the United States. Compared with the 2006 Match, five fewer positions (with 25 fewer US seniors) were filled in family medicine residency programs through the NRMP in 2007, at the same time as 20 fewer (two more US seniors) in primary care internal medicine, the same number of pediatrics-primary care (four fewer US seniors), and one more (19 fewer US seniors) in internal medicine-pediatrics programs. Multiple forces, including student perspectives of the demands, rewards, and prestige of the specialty; the turbulence and uncertainty of the health care environment; lifestyle issues; and the impact of faculty role models continue to influence medical student career choices. Eighty-four more positions (12 more US seniors) were filled in categorical internal medicine. Fifty-four more positions (22 more US seniors) were filled in categorical pediatrics programs. The 2007 NRMP results suggest that interest in family medicine and primary care careers continues to decline. With the needs of the nation calling for the roles and services of family physicians, family medicine matched too few graduates through the 2007 NRMP to meet the nation's needs for primary care physicians. PMID:17764041

Pugno, Perry A; McGaha, Amy L; Schmittling, Gordon T; DeVilbiss, Ashley; Kahn, Norman B

2007-09-01

121

Why Research in Family Medicine? A Superfluous Question  

PubMed Central

The ultimate answer to the question, “Why research in family medicine?” is to provide better care for our patients. Through research we want to improve quality of primary care by improving our understanding and practice of it. This research will inevitably be specific for family medicine as family medicine is a specific discipline. In this article we first explore what makes family medicine a specific discipline. In a second part we present a framework to grasp the various research questions that must be answered to achieve the complex and multifaceted goal of improving quality of care. Family medicine is a specific discipline for 3 reasons: it has a unique epidemiology, the context of care is important, and it has a strong link and responsibility to the community. Quality of care is a complex and multidimensional concept that raises diverse research questions. We propose to map these questions within a framework defined by the 3 dimensions of the Donabedian triangle—structure, process, and outcome—and within each of these dimensions by 5 foci—basic knowledge, diagnostic and therapeutic problem solving, practice implementation, policy context, and education. This framework may help to make the various research questions operational and to point out the gaps in our research. The questions and answers should be relevant to daily practice and comprise all domains of family medicine so that eventually most of our daily actions in practice will be underpinned with medical, contextual, and policy evidence and contribute to the improvement of the quality of care. PMID:15655082

De Maeseneer, Jan M.; De Sutter, An

2004-01-01

122

Parents Studying Medicine - the dichotomy of studying with a family  

PubMed Central

Introduction: In this article the personal study and life situation of parents who are also medical students at the Medical School of the Goethe University Frankfurt am Main is discussed. There is a special focus on the topics “studying with children” and “family-friendly university”, which have been present in discussions about university development and in the daily life of academics, especially during the last decade. The workgroup “Individual Student Services” at the medical faculty at the Goethe University tries to meet the necessities of the individual study courses and to support the study success with a new counselling and student service concept. Methods: The experience of parents studying medicine was recorded in semi-structured interviews (Date: April 2010), which were held as part of the sponsored pilot project on part-time medical studies (“Pilot Project Part-time Medical Studies”). Additionally, study results from the Medical School of the Goethe University Frankfurt am Main were integrated as well as a literature analysis. Results: It was found that the teaching demands and support services, which have been suggested and needed for years now, have been partially implemented and are without sufficient support at the faculty level to date. Thus the current situation of medical students with children is still difficult and seems a big challenge for everyone involved. Solution: As part of the “Individual Student Services” a new pilot project on part-time medical studies was established in November 2009. Only the use of new, unconventional and innovative ideas allows universities to adequately support the changing and heterogeneous student population and support them to successfully completing their medical studies. PMID:22558026

Iden, Kirstin; Nurnberger, Frank; Sader, Robert; Dittrich, Winand

2012-01-01

123

UNIVERSITY OF MIAMI LEONARD M. MILLER SCHOOL OF MEDICINE  

E-print Network

UNIVERSITY OF MIAMI LEONARD M. MILLER SCHOOL OF MEDICINE CODE OF HONORABLE AND PROFESSIONAL CONDUCT AFFIRMATION The students of the University of Miami Leonard M. Miller School of Medicine, in recognition of the fact that the practice of medicine requires not only scientific knowledge and a mastery of technology

Miami, University of

124

commencement N university of Illinois COLLEGE OF MEDICINE Establish contact  

E-print Network

33 127th commencement N university of Illinois COLLEGE OF MEDICINE Establish contact with the spirit within the patient... G u i d a n c e a a d v i c e a c o u n c i l Doctor of Medicine Candidates | University of Illinois College of Medicine at rockford Jason P. Alvarado Todd V. Bierman Michelle L. Apple

Illinois at Chicago, University of

125

National Cheng Kung University College of Medicine Summer Program  

E-print Network

. There will be half day trips to herbal medicine factory and Tainan historical sites. You will also haveNational Cheng Kung University College of Medicine Summer Program A twoweek summer course in "Introduction to Chinese Medicine & Cross Culture Ethics" at the National Cheng Kung University College

Cengarle, María Victoria

126

University of Maryland School of Medicine Department of Epidemiolgy and Preventive Medicine  

E-print Network

University of Maryland School of Medicine Department of Epidemiolgy and Preventive Medicine, Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine. The Division Director will also serve as the Associate of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, the Greenebaum Cancer Center, the Institute of Human Virology

Weber, David J.

127

Updated 8/27/14 UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS COLLEGE OF MEDICINE @ URBANA-CHAMPAIGN  

E-print Network

................................................................................................... 27-44 CLER 656-Family Medicine CLER 655-Medicine I. M4RE612-Medicine II CLER 651-OB/GYN CLER 653-Pediatrics CLER 652-Psychiatry CLER 654-Surgery ELECTIVES Family Medicine Electives: Family Medicine - Scholarly Activity Elective ELEC 605: Family Medicine � Sub-I ELEC 847: Relational

Gilbert, Matthew

128

Message from the Chair of the McGill Department of Family Exciting Times in McGill Family Medicine  

E-print Network

1 Message from the Chair of the McGill Department of Family Medicine Exciting Times in McGill Family Medicine It was a little over a year ago when I first became Chair and sent out my first message of a family physician. This program, known as the McGill Longitudinal Family Medicine Experience, has been

Kambhampati, Patanjali

129

Clerkships Blocks Weeks State -Location Family Medicine 8 AK-Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta Regional Hospital, Bethel, AK  

E-print Network

Clerkships Blocks Weeks State - Location IPCC BLOCK Family Medicine 8 AK- Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta Regional Hospital, Bethel, AK AZ- Indian Health Service Hospital, Tuba City, AZ FL- University of Miami- Brown U/Memorial Hospital of RI, Pawtucket, RI Regional Sites (various practice sites in NH/VT) Medicine

Myers, Lawrence C.

130

Yale University School of Medicine Heart Book  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In 1992, this book, edited by three Yale University professors of Medicine, and designed "in clear, simple language, [to] cover the entire spectrum of cardiovascular disease," was published by Hearst Books. Now the Yale University Medical Library has made it available via the web (in Adobe Acrobat [.pdf] format only). Its 29 chapters are arranged in six major sections: The Heart and How it Works; How to Lower Your Risk of Heart Disease; Steps in Making Diagnosis; Major Cardiovascular Disorders; Special Situations; and Methods of Treatment. Also included is a concise "encyclopedia" of 39 heart disorders, symptoms, diagnoses, and treatments, from Angina Pectoris to Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome. This book provides a wealth of information on heart disease to its intended general audience. The chapters are split into separate .pdf files for greater ease of downloading.

1997-01-01

131

The development of academic family medicine in central and eastern Europe since 1990  

PubMed Central

Background Since the early 1990s former communist countries have been reforming their health care systems, emphasizing the key role of primary care and recognizing family medicine as a specialty and an academic discipline. This study assesses the level of academic development of the discipline characterised by education and research in central and eastern European (CEE) countries. Methods A key informants study, using a questionnaire developed on the basis of a systematic literature review and panel discussions, conducted in 11 central and eastern European countries and Russia. Results Family medicine in CEE countries is now formally recognized as a medical specialty and successfully introduced into medical training at undergraduate and postgraduate levels. Almost all universities have FM/GP departments, but only a few of them are led by general practitioners. The specialist training programmes in all countries except Russia fulfil the recommendations of the European Parliament. Structured support for research in FM/GP is not always available. However specific scientific organisations function in almost all countries except Russia. Scientific conferences are regularly organised in all the countries, but peer-reviewed journals are published in only half of them. Conclusions Family medicine has a relatively strong position in medical education in central and eastern Europe, but research in family practice is less developed. Although the position of the discipline at the universities is not very strong, most of the CEE countries can serve as an example of successful academic development for countries southern Europe, where family medicine is still not fully recognised. PMID:23510461

2013-01-01

132

Department of Family Medicine and Office of Health Promotion Research BOARD CERTIFIED FAMILY PHYSICIANS  

E-print Network

with Fletcher Allen Health Care is seeking board certified/eligible family physicians to join the full diverse racial, ethnic and cultural backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Applications will be acceptedDepartment of Family Medicine and Office of Health Promotion Research BOARD CERTIFIED FAMILY

Hayden, Nancy J.

133

WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF MEDICINE DEPARTMENT OF PHYSIOLOGY & PHARMACOLOGY  

E-print Network

Physics Resident Faculty, Robert M. Berne Cardiovascular Research Center University of Virginia School West Virginia University School of Medicine Nurkiewicz February 7 Fan Wu, Ph.D. CFD Research University, School of Medicine Nurkiewicz 28 No seminar (E.J. Van Liere Memorial Convocation and HSC Research

Mohaghegh, Shahab

134

The Ohio State University College of Medicine THE BEST ENVIRONMENT  

E-print Network

.........................................84 3 TheOhioStateUniversityCollegeofMedicine 2 #12;"Efforts to increase diversity in health care, Assistant Dean Office for Diversity and Cultural Affairs The Ohio State University Medical CenterThe Ohio State University College of Medicine THE BEST ENVIRONMENT FOR LEARNING IS A DIVERSE

Jones, Michelle

135

Results of the 2004 national resident matching program: family medicine.  

PubMed

The results of the 2004 National Resident Matching Program (NRMP) reflect a leveling in the recent trend of declining student interest in family medicine residency training in the United States. Compared with the 2003 Match, 34 more positions (36 fewer US seniors) were filled in family medicine residency programs through the NRMP in 2004, at the same time as 14 fewer (four fewer US seniors) in primary care internal medicine, 10 more in pediatrics-primary care (one more US senior), and 35 more (38 more US seniors) in internal medicine-pediatric programs. In comparison, one less position (one more US senior) was filled in anesthesiology and seven fewer (five more US seniors) in diagnostic radiology, two "marker" disciplines that have shown increases over the past several years. Many different forces, including student perspectives of the demands, rewards, and prestige of the specialty; the turbulence and uncertainty of the health care environment; liability protection issues; and the impact of faculty and resident role models, continue to influence medical student career choices. A total of 165 more positions (12 more US seniors) were filled in categorical internal medicine while 164 more positions (15 more US seniors) were filled in categorical pediatrics programs, where trainees perceive options for either practicing as generalists or entering subspecialty fellowships, depending on the market. With the needs of the nation, especially for rural and underserved populations, continuing to offer opportunities for family physicians, family medicine experienced a slight increase through the 2004 NRMP. The 2004 NRMP suggests that the trend away from family medicine and primary care careers may be leveling off. PMID:15343417

Pugno, Perry A; McPherson, Deborah S; Schmittling, Gordon T; Fetter, Gerald T; Kahn, Norman B

2004-09-01

136

Family Medicine’s Identity: Being Generalists in a Specialist Culture?  

PubMed Central

Family medicine has been in conflict about whether it is a specialty or a generalist discipline. Although for a time the family was offered as a solution to family medicine being marginalized in biomedicine, a more biomedical focus prevailed. As a result, the practice of family medicine came more to resemble the world of biomedicine despite an insistence on the discipline’s distinctiveness. Ways to avoid identity pitfalls in the future might be to seek solutions that do not promise to solve our identity problem once and for all, to refrain from adopting generalized slogans that do not encourage critical thinking, to practice what we preach, to accept that specialization is part of the American cultural ethos, and to embrace reflective practice. PMID:17003148

Stein, Howard F.

2006-01-01

137

ALBERT EINSTEIN COLLEGE OF MEDICINE of YESHIVA UNIVERSITY  

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ALBERT EINSTEIN COLLEGE OF MEDICINE of YESHIVA UNIVERSITY JACK and PEARL RESNICK CAMPUS DEPARTMENT of ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH & SAFETY Safety is Everyone's Responsibility INDOOR AIR QUALITY QUESTIONNAIRE 1. Name

Emmons, Scott

138

Medical Faculty of Ulm University Prospectus for Human Medicine  

E-print Network

Medical Faculty of Ulm University Prospectus for Human Medicine #12;1 Content Preface 3 Cources of Study in the Medical Faculty 5 Admission to the studies of human medicine 6 Description of the Course of Study in Human Medicine 7 Studying Abroad 10 Studying with a Child 12 Training and Promotion of the New

Ulm, Universität

139

ALBERT EINSTEIN COLLEGE OF MEDICINE OF YESHIVA UNIVERSITY  

E-print Network

ALBERT EINSTEIN COLLEGE OF MEDICINE OF YESHIVA UNIVERSITY JACK AND PEARL RESNICK CAMPUS · 1300: Mr/Ms , social security # , who is presently associated with the Albert Einstein College of Medicine radiation exposure records be released to the Albert Einstein College of Medicine's Radiation Safety Office

Emmons, Scott

140

COLLEGE OF MEDICINE University of Illinois at Chicago  

E-print Network

COLLEGE OF MEDICINE University of Illinois at Chicago 127th Commencement Class of 2009 UIC of Hippocrates Now being admitted to the profession of medicine, I solemnly pledge to consecrate my life will practice medicine with conscience and dignity. The health and life of my patient will be my first

Illinois at Chicago, University of

141

Family Medicine Educators' Perceptions of the Future of Faculty Development.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Family medicine faculty participated in focus groups to gather their perceptions about faculty development. They emphasized that faculty development methods must be proven effective, woven into the fabric of clinical practice, and deal with increasing time and financial pressures. Much discussion was related to the need for national and regional…

Quirk, Mark; Lasser, Daniel; Domino, Frank; Chuman, Alan; Devaney-O'Neil, Sarah

2002-01-01

142

Morning Report in Family Medicine Residency Programs: A Descriptive Study.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Morning Report (MR) is a frequently held case conference in most Family Medicine (FM) residency programs among medical learners who discuss recent inpatient admissions before the day's care of patients. This study conducted a national survey of FM residency program directors to describe the roles of faculty and residents in facilitating MR.…

Kuncharapu, Indumathi; Cass, Alvah R.; Carlson, Carol A.; Scott, Jack R.

143

Understanding the Careers of Physician Educators in Family Medicine.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Interviewed physician educators in family medicine to discover variables that draw them into education and sustain their vitality, and challenges that can support or derail their careers. Found that career decisions emanate from values associated with "making the world better"; that they seek challenging positions consistent with these values; and…

Simpson, Deborah E.; Rediske, Virginia A.; Beecher, Ann; Bower, Douglas; Meurer, Linda; Lawrence, Steven; Wolkomir, Michael

2001-01-01

144

ENT Experience in a Family Medicine Clerkship: Is There Enough?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Used patient encounter records completed by 445 medical students to determine whether a family medicine clerkship offered enough experience in ear, nose, and throat (ENT) conditions. Results, which were used for curriculum development, suggest that these students were receiving sufficient opportunities for some areas of ENT practice, but not for…

O'Hara, Brenda S.; Saywell, Robert M., Jr.; Zollinger, Terrell W.; Smith, Christopher P.; Burba, Jennifer L.; Stopperich, David M.

2000-01-01

145

Continuity of Care in the Family Medicine Residency  

PubMed Central

Based on the results of a survey of family medicine residency program directors across the country, there is a need for a national consensus on the definition of continuity of care, and on structures for teaching it and methods of evaluating it. PMID:8471901

Moore, Lisa; Busing, Nick

1993-01-01

146

Agreement between University of Medicine & Dentistry of New Jersey  

E-print Network

1 #12;2 Agreement between University of Medicine & Dentistry of New Jersey and Council of Chapters......................................41 APPENDIX B Salary Ranges for Public Health Faculty Unit Members is effective July 1, 2004, by and between the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey (hereinafter

Liu, Alice Y.C.

147

Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine University of London  

E-print Network

1 Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine University of London Department of Computing of the University of London, and for the Diploma of Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine. October method guidance and of coordinating ViewPoint interaction. In the spirit of multi-perspective development

Nuseibeh, Bashar

148

Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine Brand Platform  

E-print Network

customer benefit. Perhaps most importantly, a brand is an organizing principle that informs decisionmaking University College of Veterinary Medicine, a powerful brand supports efforts to do the following: renew1 Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine Brand Platform INTRODUCTION A brand

Pawlowski, Wojtek

149

STANFORD UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF MEDICINE DEPARTMENT OF PEDIATRICS  

E-print Network

STANFORD UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF MEDICINE DEPARTMENT OF PEDIATRICS DIVISION OF INFECTIOUS DISEASES, Stanford University School of Medicine 300 Pasteur Drive, Room G312 Stanford, California 94305-5208 List your application. Black American Indian or Alaskan Native White (having origins in any of the original

Kay, Mark A.

150

Feinberg Fact Sheet Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine  

E-print Network

medical school and affiliated hospitals uniformly rank highly in national surveys, based on qualityFeinberg Fact Sheet Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine The defining mission of Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine is to mentor and educate students to become exceptional

Chisholm, Rex L.

151

Feinberg Fact Sheet Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine  

E-print Network

school and affiliated hospitals uniformly rank highly in national surveys, based on quality of studentsFeinberg Fact Sheet Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine The mission of Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine is to mentor and educate students to become exceptional, compassionate

Chisholm, Rex L.

152

STUDENT NATIONAL MEDICAL ASSOCIATION TUFTS UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF MEDICINE  

E-print Network

STUDENT NATIONAL MEDICAL ASSOCIATION TUFTS UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF MEDICINE COLLEEN ROMAIN SCHOLARSHIP 2013 APPLICATION Tufts University School of Medicine Office of Multicultural Affairs 136 Harrison medical professionals. In an effort to help educate our communities, the Tufts chapter of the SNMA has

Tufts University

153

Creating a substance abuse network in family medicine: lessons learned.  

PubMed

Family practice was one of several primary care specialties awarded federal contracts in 1985 to survey substance abuse training needs. Family medicine has since excelled in creating a viable substance abuse network. Key events were the sponsorship of a fellowship program, the formation of the Society of Teachers of Family Medicine (STFM) Substance Abuse Working Group, and the working group's pursuit of externally funded projects. Tangible measures of the network's success include collective funding exceeding $7.3 million, an increase in the number of substance abuse activities at annual STFM conferences, and a nearly four-fold growth in the group's membership and collaborative publications. Key factors underlying the vitality of the network that may be generalizable include: 1) initial emphasis on training family physician faculty; 2) making optimal use of the existing administrative channels within STFM; 3) acquisition of external funding; 4) some continuity of core persons working together; 5) active networking within and outside family medicine; and 6) promotion of individual success. PMID:1601241

Davis, A K; Graham, A V; Coggan, P G; Finch, J N; Fleming, M F; Brown, R L; Sherwood, R A; Henry, R; Schulz, J

1992-01-01

154

Family practice: Professional identity in transition. A case study of family medicine in Canada  

Microsoft Academic Search

With increasingly fewer family physicians in many countries and students less interested in primary care careers, generalists are becoming an endangered species. This situation is a major health care resource management challenge. In a rapidly changing health care environment, family medicine is struggling for a clear identity—a matter which is crucial to health system restructuring because it affects the roles

Marie-Dominique Beaulieu; Marc Rioux; Guy Rocher; Louise Samson; Laurier Boucher

2008-01-01

155

Female and Underrepresented Minority Faculty in Academic Departments of Family Medicine: Are Women and Minorities Better Off in Family Medicine?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Surveyed departments of family medicine to determine workforce composition and rank of women and minority faculty. Found that while faculty were more likely to be female or minority than in other medical disciplines, women and minorities were less likely to be associate or full professors. Found no institutional or departmental characteristics…

Lewis-Stevenson, Sherri; Hueston, William J.; Mainous, Arch G., III; Bazell, Carol; Ye, Xiaobu

2001-01-01

156

The Rockefeller University Child and Family Center  

E-print Network

\\Grade__________ Previous Child Care or School Experience ____________________________________________ I understandThe Rockefeller University Child and Family Center Application for Admission Name of Child_____________________________________________________________________ Telephone Number_____________________ Other Address _______________________________ Child's Primary Language

157

Veterinary Medicine 2 | Veterinary Medicine University of Saskatchewan  

E-print Network

of species including food-producing animals, horses, companion animals, exotic pets and wildlife. Veterinary? Veterinary medicine focuses on animal health and the study of diseases that affect all animal species their interests in animals, science and health. Besides providing primary and specialized health care to a wide

Saskatchewan, University of

158

Alumni & Family Weekend Seattle University  

E-print Network

development and networking opportunity. They are designed to introduce students and parents to industry trends will be there to lead the discussion. 1:00 pm Women's Basketball Exhibition Game vs. Eastern Washington University

Carter, John

159

Family Medicine Training in the Care of Older Adults--Has the Retreat Been Sounded?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses the trend away from geriatrics training in family medicine residency despite the growing need in society. Asserts that family medicine is failing to seize an opportunity to advance the care of older adults and discusses what would constitute acceptable training in geriatrics and how it should fit into the family medicine curriculum. (EV)

Mouton, Charles P.; Parker, Robert W.

2003-01-01

160

To each patient and employee at the OHSU Family Medicine Centers . . .  

E-print Network

To each patient and employee at the OHSU Family Medicine Centers . . . We are committed, OHSU Family Medicine APPLAUSE Date Dear Dr. Saultz: The following individual(s) deserves special recognition for extending an extra measure of care: Family Medicine Staff Member(s): Comments/details: Please

Chapman, Michael S.

161

Residents' exposure to aboriginal health issues. Survey of family medicine programs in Canada.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE: To determine whether Canadian family medicine residency programs currently have objectives, staff, and clinical experiences for adequately exposing residents to aboriginal health issues. DESIGN: A one-page questionnaire was developed to survey the details of teaching about and exposure to aboriginal health issues. SETTING: Family medicine programs in Canada. PARTICIPANTS: All Canadian family medicine program directors in the 18 programs (16 at universities and two satellite programs) were surveyed between October 1997 and March 1998. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Whether programs had teaching objectives for exposing residents to aboriginal health issues, whether they had resource people available, what elective and core experiences in aboriginal health were offered, and what types of experiences were available. RESULTS: Response rate was 100%. No programs had formal, written curriculum objectives for residency training in aboriginal health issues, although some were considering them. Some programs, however, had objectives for specific weekend or day sessions. No programs had a strategy for encouraging enrollment of residents of aboriginal origin. Eleven programs had at least one resource person with experience in aboriginal health issues, and 12 had access to community-based aboriginal groups. Core experiences were all weekend seminars or retreats. Elective experiences in aboriginal health were available in 16 programs, and 11 programs were active on reserves. CONCLUSIONS: Many Canadian family medicine programs give residents some exposure to aboriginal health issues, but most need more expertise and direction on these issues. Some programs have unique approaches to teaching aboriginal health care that could be shared. Formalized objectives derived in collaboration with other family medicine programs and aboriginal groups could substantially improve the quality of education in aboriginal health care in Canada. PMID:10065306

Redwood-Campbell, L.; MacDonald, W. A.; Moore, K.

1999-01-01

162

RUTGERS, THE STATE UNIVERSITY OF NEW JERSEY UNIVERSITY OF MEDICINE AND DENTISTRY OF NEW JERSEY  

E-print Network

RUTGERS, THE STATE UNIVERSITY OF NEW JERSEY UNIVERSITY OF MEDICINE AND DENTISTRY OF NEW JERSEY and Dentistry of New Jersey BIOTECHNOLOGY TRAINING PROGRAM The PhD Training Program in Biotechnology of the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey (UMDNJ) was established in 1989. It is one

Muzzio, Fernando J.

163

University of Rochester Sports Medicine Visiting Team Guide  

E-print Network

University of Rochester Sports Medicine Visiting Team Guide Athletic.275.7379 #12; Athletic Training Services for your Event Our Sports Medicine Staff of Operation Treatment Hours are Monday-Friday from 10:30a-2:30p and there is a Sports

Mahon, Bradford Z.

164

Stanford University School of Medicine Policy on Commercial Support of  

E-print Network

is to insure Stanford CME is free from commercial influence, based upon the best scientific evidence available by the Stanford School of Medicine. GUIDELINES FOR ACCEPTING COMMERCIAL SUPPORT: What Constitutes CommercialStanford University School of Medicine Policy on Commercial Support of Continuing Medical Education

Kay, Mark A.

165

Stanford University School of Medicine Policy on Commercial Support of  

E-print Network

is to insure Stanford CME is free from commercial influence, based upon the best scientific evidence available by the Stanford School of Medicine. GUIDELINES FOR ACCEPTING COMMERCIAL SUPPORT: What Constitutes Commercial1 Stanford University School of Medicine Policy on Commercial Support of Continuing Medical

Ford, James

166

Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University  

E-print Network

4 1 Strategic Research Plan Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University Jack and Pearl Resnick Campus 1300 Morris Park Avenue Bronx, New York 10461 Albert Einstein College of Medicine.A. Cissell Consulting Design: GRAPHIC ARTS CENTER Creative Director: Peter Dama Albert Einstein College

Emmons, Scott

167

UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN SCHOOL OF MEDICINE AND PUBLIC HEALTH  

E-print Network

UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN SCHOOL OF MEDICINE AND PUBLIC HEALTH DEPARTMENT OF POPULATION HEALTH of public policy development and its impact on the prospects for health system improvement. Course@wisc.edu Gordon Ridley, Consultant to the Dean, School of Medicine and Public Health, gtridley@wisc.edu Teaching

Sheridan, Jennifer

168

Dean's Faculty Advisory Committee University of Tennessee, College of Medicine  

E-print Network

Dean's Faculty Advisory Committee University of Tennessee, College of Medicine April 8, 2014 Call of the DFAC subcommittee, versus the version now provided by the College of Medicine for test on Admissions presently states that the Executive Dean has final say on which candidates are admitted to medical

Cui, Yan

169

SPACE PLANNING & OPERATIONS University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine  

E-print Network

SPACE PLANNING & OPERATIONS University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine Policy & Procedure: Public Space Use and Scheduling 12 May 2003 PLEASE NOTE THAT THIS POLICY IS CURRENTLY UNDER REVISION Description: School of Medicine Public Space (list defined below) is being centrally scheduled by Space

Bushman, Frederic

170

Student Mistreatment Policy Wayne State University School of Medicine  

E-print Network

Student Mistreatment Policy Wayne State University School of Medicine The school adheres of inappropriate behavior or mistreatment. Examples of mistreatment include sexual harassment; discrimination or harassment based on race, religion, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, physical handicap or age

Berdichevsky, Victor

171

Dean's Faculty Advisory Committee University of Tennessee, College of Medicine  

E-print Network

Dean's Faculty Advisory Committee University of Tennessee, College of Medicine February 3,2009 Call on February 1, 2009 and, upon ensuring that everyone received this latest draft, the floor was opened

Cui, Yan

172

Dean's Faculty Advisory Committee University of Tennessee, College of Medicine  

E-print Network

Dean's Faculty Advisory Committee University of Tennessee, College of Medicine November 5, 2013 will be compiled #12;into a spreadsheet, so that the data will be available to everyone. All the data are being

Cui, Yan

173

Off the Roadmap? Family Medicine's Grant Funding and Committee Representation at NIH  

PubMed Central

PURPOSE Family medicine is challenged to develop its own research infrastructure and to inform and contribute to a national translational-research agenda. Toward these ends, understanding family medicine’s engagement with the National Institutes of Health (NIH) is important. METHODS We descriptively analyzed NIH grants to family medicine from 2002 through 2006 and the current NIH advisory committee memberships. RESULTS Grants (and dollars) awarded to departments of family medicine increased from 89 ($25.6 million) in 2002, to 154 ($44.6 million) in 2006. These values represented only 0.20% (0.15% for dollars) and 0.33% (0.22% for dollars), respectively, of total NIH awards. Nearly 75% of family medicine grants came from just 6 of NIH’s grant-funding 24 institutes and centers. Although having disproportionately fewer grant continuations (62% vs 72%) and R awards (68% vs 74%)—particularly R01 awards (53% vs 84%)—relative to NIH grantees overall, family medicine earned proportionately more new (28% vs 21%) and K awards (25% vs 9%) and had more physician principal investigators (52% vs 15%). Ten of the nation’s 132 departments of family medicine (7.6%) earned almost 50% of all family medicine awards. Representatives from family medicine were on 6.4% of NIH advisory committees (0.38% of all members); family physicians were on 2.7% (0.16% of members). CONCLUSIONS Departments of family medicine, and family physicians in particular, receive a miniscule proportion of NIH grant funding and have correspondingly minimal representation on standing NIH advisory committees. Family medicine’s engagement at the NIH remains near well-documented historic lows, undermining family medicine’s potential for translating medical knowledge into community practice, and advancing knowledge to improve health care and health for the US population as a whole. PMID:19001306

Lucan, Sean C.; Phillips, Robert L.; Bazemore, Andrew W.

2008-01-01

174

Family medicine graduates' perceptions of intimidation, harassment, and discrimination during residency training  

PubMed Central

Background Despite there being considerable literature documenting learner distress and perceptions of mistreatment in medical education settings, these concerns have not been explored in-depth in Canadian family medicine residency programs. The purpose of the study was to examine intimidation, harassment and/or discrimination (IHD) as reported by Alberta family medicine graduates during their two-year residency program. Methods A retrospective questionnaire survey was conducted of all (n = 377) family medicine graduates from the University of Alberta and University of Calgary who completed residency training during 2001-2005. The frequency, type, source, and perceived basis of IHD were examined by gender, age, and Canadian vs international medical graduate. Descriptive data analysis (frequency, crosstabs), Chi-square, Fisher's Exact test, analysis of variance, and logistic regression were used as appropriate. Results Of 377 graduates, 242 (64.2%) responded to the survey, with 44.7% reporting they had experienced IHD while a resident. The most frequent type of IHD experienced was in the form of inappropriate verbal comments (94.3%), followed by work as punishment (27.6%). The main sources of IHD were specialist physicians (77.1%), hospital nurses (54.3%), specialty residents (45.7%), and patients (35.2%). The primary basis for IHD was perceived to be gender (26.7%), followed by ethnicity (16.2%), and culture (9.5%). A significantly greater proportion of males (38.6%) than females (20.0%) experienced IHD in the form of work as punishment. While a similar proportion of Canadian (46.1%) and international medical graduates (IMGs) (41.0%) experienced IHD, a significantly greater proportion of IMGs perceived ethnicity, culture, or language to be the basis of IHD. Conclusions Perceptions of IHD are prevalent among family medicine graduates. Residency programs should explicitly recognize and robustly address all IHD concerns. PMID:22018090

2011-01-01

175

Teaching University Students Family Caregiving Online  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article describes an online course developed and currently offered at Middle Tennessee State University. Considering the statistics of family caregivers, their needs, and students and human service professionals education, the author demonstrates the necessity of such courses and their benefits. The author also considers the standards for…

Taylor, James

2004-01-01

176

Teaching University Students Family Caregiving Online  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article describes an online course developed and currently offered at Middle Tennessee State University. Considering the statistics of family caregivers, their needs, and students' and human service professionals' education, the author demonstrates the necessity of such courses and their benefits. The author also considers the standards for…

Taylor, James E.

2004-01-01

177

University of Southern California Mork Family  

E-print Network

of chemical warfare agents (with Nitin Nair, Fokion Egolfopoulos, and Theodore T. Tsotsis) Zachary LingleyUniversity of Southern California Mork Family Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials embryonic stem cells via an engineered baculoviral vector carrying zinc finger nucleases (with Pin Wang) 12

Southern California, University of

178

The MPH Faculty -Department of Family Medicine & Public Health Sciences Joel Ager, PhD Division of Population Health Sciences  

E-print Network

The MPH Faculty - Department of Family Medicine & Public Health Sciences Joel Ager, PhD Division, PhD Family Medicine Residency Program Linda Roth, PhD Division of Medical Education Maryjean Schenk School of Medicine, Wonsuk Yoo, PhD WSU School of Medicine DFMPHS/SOM Dept. of Family Medicine & Public

Cinabro, David

179

A Comparison of Students' Clinical Experience in Family Medicine and Traditional Clerkships.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Experience on the traditional internal medicine, surgery, pediatrics, obstetrics-gynecology, and psychiatry clerkships was compared with the experience on a family medicine clerkship. The family medicine clerkship offered the most experience with circulatory, respiratory, digestive, neurological, musculoskeletal, and skin problems and with…

Parkerson, George R., Jr.; And Others

1984-01-01

180

University of Mississippi School of Medicine  

E-print Network

Plastic Surgery University of Massachusetts Medical Center Worcester, MA Patrick Boler Med Preliminary of Mississippi Medical Center Jackson, MS Ben Anderson Oral-Maxillofacial Surgery University of Mississippi of Mississippi Medical Center Jackson, MS Rasheeda Crowell Prelim Surgery University of Florida Medical Center

Raucher, Drazen

181

University of Tennessee College of Veterinary Medicine  

E-print Network

Opens 8:00 am Dual Sessions Begin Law Enforcement Track 8:00 � 9:15am Large Scale Seizures in TN Medicine 2:30 � 3:00pm Break. Last chance to visit exhibits 3:00 � 4:30pm Search Warrants; How To Obtain

Wang, Xiaorui "Ray"

182

School of Medicine BULLETIN OF YALE UNIVERSITY  

E-print Network

of International Students and Scholars 87 Resource Oce on Disabilities 88 Resources on Sexual Misconduct 88 Commencement Awards 61 Thesis Prizes 63 Student Research Day Oral Presentations 64 Awards to Faculty and House at Yale School of Medicine 70 Leaves of Absence 70 Residence and Dining Facilities 73 Disability Insurance

183

SUBJECT EXAM TESTING DATES BY CLERKSHIP -2012-2013 FAMILY MEDICINE NEUROLOGY PEDIATRICS PSYCHIATRY SURGERY INTERNAL MED. OB/GYN  

E-print Network

SUBJECT EXAM TESTING DATES BY CLERKSHIP -2012-2013 FAMILY MEDICINE NEUROLOGY PEDIATRICS PSYCHIATRY SUBJECT EXAM SCHEDULE 8:00 AM ­ Pediatrics, Family Medicine, Psychiatry and Surgery 11:00 AM ­ Medicine

Berdichevsky, Victor

184

Integrating family medicine and complementary medicine in cancer care: A cross-cultural perspective.  

PubMed

In this paper, we describe the case study of a 27 year-old Arab female patient receiving palliative care for advanced breast cancer who was referred to complementary medicine (CM) consultation provided within a conventional oncology department. We explore the impact of the integrative CM practitioners' team of three family physicians and one Chinese medicine practitioner on the patient's well-being and specifically on the alleviation of her debilitating hot flashes and insomnia. This quality of life improvement is also affirmed by comparing the Edmonton Symptom Assessment Scale (ESAS) and Measure Yourself Concerns and Well-being (MYCAW) questionnaires administered at the initial and follow-up assessment sessions. In conclusion, we suggest that family physicians trained in evidence-based complementary medicine are optimal integrators of holistic patient-centered supportive care. The inclusion of trained CM practitioners in a multi-disciplinary integrative team may enhance the bio-psycho-social-spiritual perspective, and provide additional practical therapies that improve the quality of life of patients confronting cancer. PMID:24996588

Ben-Arye, Eran; Israely, Pesi; Baruch, Erez; Dagash, Jamal

2014-10-01

185

Transforming a family medicine center and residency program into a federally qualified health center.  

PubMed

The authors describe a family medicine center before and after a merger between the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California, the California Hospital Medical Center, and the Eisner Pediatric and Family Medical Center in 2012. The merger provided new opportunities to stabilize the financial base of a clinical practice struggling financially and to enhance the training of residents and other health professionals in primary care, which motivated the partners to consider this new model. After 18 months of negotiations, they were able to convert the family medicine center and residency program into a new federally qualified health center. The benefits to this new model include an increase in both patient volume and the quality of education, supporting residency accreditation; a greater number of residents from U.S. medical schools; enhanced education and preparation of primary care physicians for practice in medically underserved communities; enhanced reimbursements and new opportunities for state, local, and federal grants; and quality improvement and new information technology. The partners overcame academic, administrative, legal, and regulatory obstacles, communication barriers, and differences in culture and expectations to achieve this merger. Keys to their success include the commitment of the leaders at the three institutions to the goals of the merger, a dedicated project manager and consultants, opportunities for new revenue sources and reimbursements, and support from a pioneering charitable foundation. The authors conclude by discussing the implications of using community health centers as the focal point for training primary care clinicians and addressing workforce shortages. PMID:23524918

Cousineau, Michael R; Flores, Hector; Cheng, Scott; Gates, Jerry D; Douglas, James H; Clute, Gerald B; Coan, Carl E

2013-05-01

186

Curriculum to enhance pharmacotherapeutic knowledge in family medicine  

PubMed Central

Abstract Problem addressed Prescribing is an essential skill for physicians. Despite the fact that prescribing habits are still developing in residency, formal pharmacotherapy curricula are not commonplace in postgraduate programs. Objective of program To teach first-year and second-year family medicine residents a systematic prescribing process using a medication prescribing framework, which could be replicated and distributed. Program description A hybrid model of Web-based (www.rationalprescribing.com) and in-class seminar learning was used. Web-based modules, consisting of foundational pharmacotherapeutic content, were each followed by an in-class session, which involved applying content to case studies. A physician and a pharmacist were coteachers and they used simulated cases to enhance application of pharmacotherapeutic content and modeled interprofessional collaboration. Conclusion This systematic approach to prescribing was well received by family medicine residents. It might be important to introduce the process in the undergraduate curriculum—when learners are building their therapeutic foundational knowledge. Incorporating formal pharmacotherapeutic curriculum into residency teaching is challenging and requires further study to identify potential effects on prescribing habits. PMID:24235207

Bordman, Risa; Bajcar, Jana; Kennie, Natalie; Fernandes, Lisa; Iglar, Karl

2013-01-01

187

Evaluating the relative clinical efficiency of family medicine satellite clinics.  

PubMed

A study was conducted to evaluate the impact of decentralization in family medicine clinic services by comparing utilization of services in 3 satellite clinics to utilization patterns of patients served at the hub clinic. It was expected that a hub clinic would be more efficient than satellite clinics because of tighter administrative control and economies of scale. Stable chronically ill patients were used as a homogeneous tracer condition in a secondary analysis of 12 months of archival data. Three types of service use were analyzed: laboratory visits, x-ray visits, and visits to specialists. Among 1,410 stable chronically ill family medicine patients, 303 (21.5%) had 10 more laboratory visits, 222 (15.7%) had 2 or more x-ray visits, and 617 (43.8 %) had 2 or more visits to a specialist. Patients at one of the satellite clinics had greater odds of receiving 2 or more x-rays but lower odds of receiving 10 or more laboratory visits, in comparison with the hub clinic. Patients at the other 2 satellite clinics did not differ from hub patients for any type of service use. Overall, stable chronically ill patients were treated with approximately equal clinical efficiency in our satellite clinics. Some differences in efficiency may occur in some clinics, but these appear to be idiosyncratic rather than due to clinic size or distance from central control. PMID:17992106

Rohrer, James E; Bernard, Matthew; Adamson, Steve; Naessens, James; Furst, Joseph; Angstman, Kurt

2007-01-01

188

Family medicine in post-communist Europe needs a boost. Exploring the position of family medicine in healthcare systems of Central and Eastern Europe and Russia  

PubMed Central

Background The countries of Central and Eastern Europe have experienced a lot of changes at the end of the 20th century, including changes in the health care systems and especially in primary care. The aim of this paper is to systematically assess the position of family medicine in these countries, using the same methodology within all the countries. Methods A key informants survey in 11 Central and Eastern European countries and Russia using a questionnaire developed on the basis of systematic literature review. Results Formally, family medicine is accepted as a specialty in all the countries, although the levels of its implementation vary across the countries and the differences are important. In most countries, solo practice is the most predominant organisational form of family medicine. Family medicine is just one of many medical specialties (e.g. paediatrics and gynaecology) in primary health care. Full introduction of family medicine was successful only in Estonia. Conclusions Some of the unification of the systems may have been the result of the EU request for adequate training that has pushed the policies towards higher standards of training for family medicine. The initial enthusiasm of implementing family medicine has decreased because there was no initiative that would support this movement. Internal and external stimuli might be needed to continue transition process. PMID:22409775

2012-01-01

189

Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine Boston University School of Medicine, 72 East Concord Street, Boston, MA -2118-2526  

E-print Network

& Disease Co-Director, Stanford Center for Genomics and Personalized Medicine Professor of PathologyDepartment of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine Boston University School of Medicine, 72 East of Brain Reserve Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine in Early Alzheimer's Disease Patients

Finzi, Adrien

190

Thank you for choosing Highland Family Medicine (HFM) for your health care.We are proud to offer  

E-print Network

Welcome Thank you for choosing Highland Family Medicine (HFM) for your health care.We are proud. Family Medicine You and your family will be seen by a family doctor as your primary care physician (PCP) at Highland Family Medicine, in one of six office suites. Each suite has doctors, nurse practitioners

Goldman, Steven A.

191

Medicinal plants in an urban environment: the medicinal flora of Banares Hindu University, Varanasi, Uttar Pradesh  

PubMed Central

Varanasi is one of the oldest continuously inhabited cities of the world, and one of the most important Hindu pilgrimage sites. Despite this importance, very little information exits on the cities flora in general, and medicinal species found within its limit in particular. Traditional medicine plays a large role in Indian society. The presented study attempted to investigate if traditional plant use and availability of important common medicinal plants are maintained in urban environments. The paper presents information on the traditional uses of seventy-two plant species collected form the campus of Banares Hindu University, Varanasi, Uttar Pradesh, and highlights the uses of these plants by the local inhabitants. PMID:17996050

Verma, Archana K; Kumar, Munesh; Bussmann, Rainer W

2007-01-01

192

Use of Genograms in Family Medicine: A Family Physician\\/Family Therapist Collaboration  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this qualitative pilot study, Marriage and Family Therapy (MFT) master’s degree students trained in genogram construction gathered patient history for family practitioners in a family practice residency in Indiana, according to an interview designed for the study. Students benefitted from the extra practice in genogram construction; physicians and patients benefitted from the thorough histories collected. Physicians found the MFT

Elizabeth Schilson; Karen Braun; Amy Hudson

1993-01-01

193

Medical advertising: the Family Encyclopaedia of Medicine scandal of 1914.  

PubMed

The past 100 years have seen a transition from a total ban in Britain on all advertising by doctors to the laity to almost total freedom of medical information, with probable benefit to public health but also a risk of loss of privacy. The Family Encyclopaedia of Medicine, written by Dr Hugh Howard Riddle and published by Lord Northcliffe's Daily Mail in 1914, started a flood of medical journalism in the press and the newer media. The lavishly advertised misattribution of its authorship to 'thirty eminent specialists', including Clifford Allbutt and William Osler, caused a major rumpus in the London Royal College of Physicians, but the fortnightly publication continued and became a four-volume book, popular with a public avid for more and more medical information. PMID:19227968

Jellinek, E H

2008-12-01

194

In 2012, the faculty in the Department of Family Medicine endorsed using the College of Medicine's Appointments, Promotion, and Tenure Document (http://oaa.osu.edu/assets/files/documents/MED  

E-print Network

In 2012, the faculty in the Department of Family Medicine endorsed using the College of Medicine AND PROMOTION CRITERIA DEPARTMENT OF FAMILY MEDICINE Outlined below are the Department of Family Medicine that the College of Medicine expects that when the Department of Family Medicine forwards the dossier

195

Extending the boundaries of family medicine to perform manual procedures.  

PubMed

A recent survey by Menahem and colleagues revealed that 65% of the surveyed primary care physicians reported that they performed any minor surgical procedures, and 46% reported performance of any musculoskeletal injections. Lack of allocated time and lack of training were the main reported barriers confronting higher performance rates. Healthcare systems are shifting large chunks of traditional hospital-centered activities to competent and comprehensive community-based structures. These changes are very well aligned with key trends in modern consumerism that prefer a close to home availability of medical services. Minor surgical procedures and musculoskeletal injections are good examples of medical activities that had been performed mainly by hospital and community based specialists. The syllabus of specialty training in Family Medicine in Israel includes these skills and trainees should acquire them during the residency program. We estimate that hundreds of family physicians obtain different levels of such training. Yet, only few family physicians have allocated protected time for performance of the procedures. For the skilled physician, performance of such relatively simple procedures extends his professional boundaries and the comprehensiveness of his service. For the healthcare system the "extra effort" and investment needed for performance of minor surgical procedures in primary care clinics is small. The results of the present study reflect on wider issues of care delivery. This study highlights the need for formalized and documented training of family physicians together with allocation of managerial and technical requirements needed to encourage these and similar medically and economically justified endeavors that seem to be perfectly aligned with the wishes of healthcare consumers. PMID:25383180

Bitterman, Haim; Vinker, Shlomo

2014-01-01

196

Effect of family medicine residents on use of diagnostic investigations  

PubMed Central

Abstract Objective To determine the effect of the presence of family medicine residents on the use of laboratory and imaging investigations in a rural emergency department (ED). Design A retrospective cross-sectional electronic chart audit was completed. Background characteristics, as well as type and number of ordered investigations, were compared between study groups. Setting Strathroy Middlesex General Hospital in Strathroy, Ont, a rural community hospital that sees approximately 20 000 ED visits per year. Participants A total of 2000 sequential ED visits, including adult and pediatric patients. The test group consisted of patients seen while a resident was present in the ED. The control group consisted of patients seen while no residents were present in the ED. Main outcome measures Twenty-two distinct categories of common ED investigations were studied. Results There was no statistically significant difference between study groups for 19 of the 22 categories of investigations. There were significant differences in 3 categories: an increased number of D-dimer assays for patients seen while there were no residents in the ED (1.7% of patients vs 0.5% of patients, P = .03) and increased computed tomography and ultrasound imaging for patients seen while a resident was in the ED (4.8% vs 1.8%, P = .0012, and 5.3% and 1.7%, P < .001, respectively). These differences are likely not owing to resident involvement but are explained by a difference in test availability between groups. Conclusion The study was underpowered for most categories of studied investigations. However, the trends demonstrated in this study suggest that the presence of family medicine residents in a rural community ED does not substantially affect the overall use of diagnostic investigations. PMID:25217692

Seong, Augene; Osmun, W.E.

2014-01-01

197

630 W. 168th St., PH15E-1512 New York, New York 10032 212-305-9587 bgcu-md@columbia.edu Ben-Gurion University of the Negev Faculty of Health Sciences  

E-print Network

Medicine 2011 Brown University Providence, RI Family Medicine 2011 Case Western /University Hospital Case Pathology 2011 Duke University Hospital Durham, NC Psychiatry 2011 Ellis Hospital Family Medicine Schenectady, NY Family Medicine 2011 Fort Wayne Family Medicine Residency Fort Wayne, IN Family Medicine 2011

Grishok, Alla

198

UNIVERSITY OF DELAWARE OFFICE OF LABORATORY ANIMAL MEDICINE  

E-print Network

slight tension on the tail. 6. Locate the vein on one side of the tail and begin injections at mid Tail Vein injection Volumes: · Mouse: 0.125 ml (bolus) 0.03 ml (very slow infusion) · Rat: 0.5 ml #12;Rev 5/2010 UNIVERSITY OF DELAWARE OFFICE OF LABORATORY ANIMAL MEDICINE Intravenous (IV) Tail Vein

Firestone, Jeremy

199

Medicine and money: an approach to compensating university physicians.  

PubMed

Academic medical centers have been restructuring faculty compensation plans because decreasing clinical revenues have created budgetary problems. We propose an overall compensation strategy designed to reward high performance of university physicians. The approach incorporates Management by Objectives to improve communication of expectations within the organization and provide college of medicine leadership with much needed mechanisms to align faculty compensation with productivity. PMID:9401348

Maria, B L; Tosi, H H

1997-11-01

200

UNIVERSITY OF DELAWARE OFFICE OF LABORATORY ANIMAL MEDICINE  

E-print Network

Rev 5/2010 UNIVERSITY OF DELAWARE OFFICE OF LABORATORY ANIMAL MEDICINE Oral Gavage ­ Mouse & Rat SOP #A-106 Oral gavage is used to dose an animal with a specified volume of material directly into its stomach. Equipment required: · Gavage tube with rounded tip (available through OLAM) Mouse: usually 20

Firestone, Jeremy

201

ALBERT EINSTEIN COLLEGE OF MEDICINE OF YESHIVA UNIVERSITY  

E-print Network

ALBERT EINSTEIN COLLEGE OF MEDICINE OF YESHIVA UNIVERSITY JACK AND PEARL RESNICK CAMPUS · 1300's Responsibility E-MAIL ­ peter.babin@einstein.yu.edu PHONE: (718) 430-2243 Dosimeter/Film Badge Request: Female: 1. Did the Employee/Student have a previous badge at Einstein? 2. Has the Employee

Emmons, Scott

202

University of Tennessee College Of medicine Dean's Faculty Advisory Committee  

E-print Network

University of Tennessee College Of medicine Dean's Faculty Advisory Committee December 4, 2006 I CIO Committee has been established, and President Geller will request information about it. H. The status of physicians "practicing" at the Church Health Center and whether this violates UT or UTHSC

Cui, Yan

203

University of Verona Department of Medicine and Public Health  

E-print Network

University of Verona Department of Medicine and Public Health Section of Psychiatry and Clinical Psychology WHO Collaborating Centre for Research and Training in Mental Health and Service Evaluation Head in Mental Health on 23 February 1987. According to WHO regulations the designation lasts for four years

Romeo, Alessandro

204

Department of Public Health and Community Medicine University of Verona  

E-print Network

Department of Public Health and Community Medicine University of Verona Section of Psychiatry (Head Collaborating Centre for Research and Training in Mental Health and Service Evaluation (Director: Professor of mental health, costs evaluation, evaluation of mental health services, effectiveness of psychosocial

Romeo, Alessandro

205

DIVISION OF GRADUATE MEDICAL SCIENCES BOSTON UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF MEDICINE  

E-print Network

DIVISION OF GRADUATE MEDICAL SCIENCES BOSTON UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF MEDICINE SCHEDULE OF CLASSES-353-4256 PLEASE NOTE COURSE IS HELD AT SCHOOL OF LAW GMS FS 803S-A1 ADVANCED FORENSIC CHEMISTRY 2 Th 5:00-8:50 PM EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT GMS BC 640S-B1 EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN AND STATISTICS FOR EMERGENCY MANAGERS 2 M, W 4

Finzi, Adrien

206

Alternative Medicine and Herbal Use among University Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this study, the authors investigated the predictors of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) and herbal supplement use among university students. They investigated demographic factors, trait affectivity, symptom reports, and individuals' worries about modernity as potential contributors to use of CAM and herbals. The authors surveyed 506…

Johnson, Susan K.; Blanchard, Anita

2006-01-01

207

Space Planning & Operations University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine  

E-print Network

Space Planning & Operations University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine Policy & Procedure Building II/III fourteenth floor Faculty Lounge, and the criteria for reserving the Lounge Space use of the Faculty Lounge as well as scheduled use of the Lounge Space and Conference Rooms. Scope

Bushman, Frederic

208

SPACE PLANNING & OPERATIONS UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA SCHOOL OF MEDICINE  

E-print Network

SPACE PLANNING & OPERATIONS UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA SCHOOL OF MEDICINE Policy & Procedure a centralized scheduling system managed by Space Planning & Operations (SPO) with the intention of maximizing use of available space to meet educational space demands. Purpose: The purpose of this policy

Bushman, Frederic

209

The University of Maryland experience in integrating preventive medicine into the clinical medicine curriculum.  

PubMed Central

Lifestyle risk factors play a major role in the etiology of premature mortality, morbidity, and disability in the United States. Numerous professional groups as well as the Surgeon General of the Public Health Service have recommended that increased attention be devoted to training medical students and physicians to improve their knowledge and skills in health promotion and disease prevention. Such training is critical for attaining many of the "Healthy People 2000" objectives. For a variety of reasons, however, most medical schools have had difficulty in successfully integrating preventive medicine into their clinical curriculums. This article describes the critical elements that allowed the faculty at the University of Maryland School of Medicine to accomplish this goal through its fourth year clinical preventive medicine course. The strategies employed in this course may serve as a model for other institutions to achieve the integration of preventive medicine into their clinical curriculums. PMID:8497571

Havas, S; Rixey, S; Sherwin, R; Zimmerman, S I; Anderson, S

1993-01-01

210

Copyright 2011, The Ohio State University Family and Consumer Sciences  

E-print Network

Copyright © 2011, The Ohio State University Family and Consumer Sciences HYG-5564-11 Staphylococcus. #12;Copyright © 2011, The Ohio State University Staphylococcus aureus--page 2 Ohio State University

211

A Characterization of the Imminent Leadership Transition in Academic Family Medicine.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A survey of 97 chairmen of academic departments of family medicine found that over half intended to leave their position within 5 years, with job dissatisfaction given as the reason by 52. Findings suggest that future demand for academic chairmen of family medicine departments will be large and that chairmen will be young with limited academic…

Green, Larry A.; And Others

1991-01-01

212

Effect of Early Exposure to Family Medicine on Students' Attitudes Toward the Specialty.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study of the influence of clinical experiences on one medical school's students' choice of specialty found that neither early exposure to role models in family medicine nor the order in which specialty clerkships were taken significantly affected students' choice of family medicine. (MSE)

Allen, Sharon S.; And Others

1987-01-01

213

The Glass Is Half Full: Geriatric Precepting Encounters in Family Medicine  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Approximately 19% to 20% of all family medicine office visits involve care to patients older than age 65, yet limited research addresses family medicine geriatric education in the outpatient setting. This study explored how geriatric content is incorporated into resident/attending precepting encounters, using direct observation. An observer…

Rollins, Lisa K.; Martirosian, Tovia; Gazewood, John D.

2009-01-01

214

Faculty Development in Family Medicine: A Survey of Needs and Resources.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Faculty development programs were introduced to help physician-teachers improve their competence in academic skills. The current status of faculty development programs in departments of family medicine were assessed via a questionnaire survey mailed to directors of family medicine residency programs. (MLW)

Frisch, S. R.; Talbot, Yves

1984-01-01

215

Family medicine in a tertiary care hospital. Obstetrical outcomes and interventions.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE: To examine the rates of obstetrical complications and interventions among patients managed or comanaged by family physicians. DESIGN: Case series. Retrospective review of hospital records. SETTING: Victoria Hospital, a tertiary care centre affiliated with the University of Western Ontario in London, Ont. PARTICIPANTS: Five hundred forty-two women in labour admitted consecutively by family physicians from October 1, 1990, to September 31, 1991. There were no exclusions based on antenatal risk. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Degree of risk on admission, and rates of cesarean sections, inductions, epidurals, forceps deliveries, episiotomies, perineal tears, postpartum hemorrhages, and postpartum fever for mothers. For newborns, Apgar scores and rate of need for a pediatric critical care unit or special observation nursery. RESULTS: Except for rates of inductions and episiotomies, which were lower than those reported elsewhere, results were all comparable to those in previous North American studies of low-risk family medicine obstetric patients. CONCLUSION: Family physicians care for women with a range of antenatal risks. Even when practising in tertiary care environments, family physicians can minimize many obstetrical interventions while maintaining good maternal and neonatal outcomes. PMID:7787490

Gaspar, D.; Jordan, J.

1995-01-01

216

Understanding of family medicine in Africa: a qualitative study of leaders' views  

PubMed Central

Background The World Health Organization encourages comprehensive primary care within an ongoing personalised relationship, including family physicians in the primary healthcare team, but family medicine is new in Africa, with doctors mostly being hospital based. African family physicians are trying to define family medicine in Africa, however, there is little clarity on the views of African country leadership and their understanding of family medicine and its place in Africa. Aim To understand leaders’ views on family medicine in Africa. Design and setting Qualitative study with in-depth interviews in nine sub-Saharan African countries. Method Key academic and government leaders were purposively selected. In-depth interviews were conducted using an interview guide, and thematically analysed. Results Twenty-seven interviews were conducted with government and academic leaders. Responders saw considerable benefits but also had concerns regarding family medicine in Africa. The benefits mentioned were: having a clinically skilled all-rounder at the district hospital; mentoring team-based care in the community; a strong role in leadership and even management in the district healthcare system; and developing a holistic practice of medicine. The concerns were that family medicine is: unknown or poorly understood by broader leadership; poorly recognised by officials; and struggling with policy ambivalence, requiring policy advocacy championed by family medicine itself. Conclusion The strong district-level clinical and leadership expectations of family physicians are consistent with African research and consensus. However, leaders’ understanding of family medicine is couched in terms of specialties and hospital care. African family physicians should be concerned by high expectations without adequate human resource and implementation policies. PMID:23561788

Moosa, Shabir; Downing, Raymond; Mash, Bob; Reid, Steve; Pentz, Stephen; Essuman, Akye

2013-01-01

217

Learning from history: the legacy of Title VII in academic family medicine.  

PubMed

The current renaissance of interest in primary care could benefit from reviewing the history of federal investment in academic family medicine. The authors review 30 years of experience with the Title VII, Section 747 Training in Primary Care Medicine and Dentistry (Title VII) grant program, addressing three questions: (1) What Title VII grant programs were available to family medicine, and what were their goals? (2) How did Title VII change the discipline? and (3) What impact did Title VII family medicine programs have outside the discipline?Title VII grant programs evolved from broad support for the new discipline of family medicine to a sharper focus on specific national workforce objectives such as improving care for underserved and vulnerable populations and increasing diversity in the health professions. Grant programs were instrumental in establishing family medicine in nearly all medical schools and in supporting the educational underpinnings of the field. Title VII grants helped enhance the social capital of the discipline. Outside family medicine, Title VII fostered the development of innovative ambulatory education, institutional initiatives focusing on underserved and vulnerable populations, and primary care research capacity. Adverse effects include relative inattention to clinical and research missions in family medicine academic units and, institutionally, the development of medical education initiatives without core institutional support, which has put innovation and extension of education to communities at risk as grant funding has decreased. Reinvestment in academic family medicine can yield substantial benefits for family medicine and help reorient academic health centers. This article is part of a theme issue of Academic Medicine on the Title VII health professions training programs. PMID:18971653

Newton, Warren; Arndt, Jane E

2008-11-01

218

Use and teaching of pneumatic otoscopy in a family medicine residency program  

PubMed Central

Abstract Objective To determine to what extent FPs teach and use pneumatic otoscopy and to identify the chief influences on this behaviour. Design Mixed-methods descriptive study conducted between March and May 2011. Setting The family medicine residency program at Laval University in Quebec city, Que. Participants Directors of the family medicine teaching units (FMTUs), teachers, and residents. Methods We used questionnaires to assess the availability of pneumatic otoscopy equipment in 12 FMTUs, current behaviour and behavioural intention among physicians (residents and teachers) to use or teach pneumatic otoscopy, and facilitators and barriers to these practices. We also conducted 2 focus groups to further explore the facilitators of and barriers to using pneumatic otoscopy. We used descriptive statistics for quantitative data, transcribed the qualitative material, and performed content analysis. Main findings Eight of the 12 FMTUs reported having pneumatic otoscopy equipment. Four had it in all of their consulting rooms, and 2 formally taught it. Nine (4%) of 211 physicians reported regular use of pneumatic otoscopy. Mean (SD) intention to teach or use pneumatic otoscopy during the next year was low (2.4 [1.0] out of 5). Teachers identified improved diagnostic accuracy as the main facilitator both for use and for teaching, while residents identified recommendation by practice guidelines as the main facilitator for use. All physicians reported lack of availability of equipment as the main barrier to use. The main barrier to teaching pneumatic otoscopy reported by teachers was that they did not use it themselves. In focus groups, themes of consequences, capabilities, and socioprofessional influences were most dominant. Residents clearly identified role modeling by teachers as facilitating the use of pneumatic otoscopy. Conclusion Pneumatic otoscopy is minimally used and taught in the family medicine residency program studied. Interventions to increase its use should target identified underlying beliefs and facilitators of and barriers to its use and teaching. PMID:24029515

Ouedraogo, Eva; Labrecque, Michel; Cote, Luc; Charbonneau, Katerine; Legare, France

2013-01-01

219

Bree Aldridge, PhD Tufts University School of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology and Microbiology  

E-print Network

Bree Aldridge, PhD Tufts University School of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology and Microbiology Tufts University, Department of Biomedical Engineering Understanding the richness of single cell

Goldwasser, Shafi

220

Institute for Genetic Medicine, Hokkaido University Research Center for Infection-associated Cancer (RCIAC)  

E-print Network

Institute for Genetic Medicine, Hokkaido University Research Center for Infection-associated Cancer://www.igm.hokudai.ac.jp/ Research Center for Infection-associated Cancer, Institute for Genetic Medicine, Hokkaido University Graham://www.igm.hokudai.ac.jp/ Research Center for Infection-associated Cancer, Institute for Genetic Medicine, Hokkaido University Graham

Tachizawa, Kazuya

221

Dancing Between the Purist and the Practical: Teaching Evidence Based Medicine in the 3rd Year Family Medicine Clerkship  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVE: \\u0009To teach 3rd year medical students in a Family Medicine rotation the concepts and methods required to practice Evidence-Based Medicine and how to search for that evidence. The course was developed with an emphasis on finding resources and included an extensive epidemiological and statistical component. Using student evaluations, the evolution over five years will be explored.\\u000aMETHODS: \\u0009The didactic

Len L Levin; James F. Comes

2006-01-01

222

Family Medicine in a Consumer Age -- Part 4: Preventive Medicine, Professional Satisfaction, and the Rise of Consumerism  

PubMed Central

In an attempt to find out if the physician perceives the same strengths and weaknesses in today's practice of family medicine as does the consumer, the Lay Advisory Committee of the College's B.C. Chapter initiated a survey of physicians' and consumers' attitudes. This article, the fourth and last in a series, presents some of the results of the survey as they relate to preventive-medicine, professional satisfaction and the rise of consumerism.

Warner, Morton M.

1977-01-01

223

Development of a portfolio of learning for postgraduate family medicine training in South Africa: a Delphi study  

PubMed Central

Background Within the 52 health districts in South Africa, the family physician is seen as the clinical leader within a multi-professional district health team. Family physicians must be competent to meet 90% of the health needs of the communities in their districts. The eight university departments of Family Medicine have identified five unit standards, broken down into 85 training outcomes, for postgraduate training. The family medicine registrar must prove at the end of training that all the required training outcomes have been attained. District health managers must be assured that the family physician is competent to deliver the expected service. The Colleges of Medicine of South Africa (CMSA) require a portfolio to be submitted as part of the uniform assessment of all registrars applying to write the national fellowship examinations. This study aimed to achieve a consensus on the contents and principles of the first national portfolio for use in family medicine training in South Africa. Methods A workshop held at the WONCA Africa Regional Conference in 2009 explored the purpose and broad contents of the portfolio. The 85 training outcomes, ideas from the WONCA workshop, the literature, and existing portfolios in the various universities were used to develop a questionnaire that was tested for content validity by a panel of 31 experts in family medicine in South Africa, via the Delphi technique in four rounds. Eighty five content items (national learning outcomes) and 27 principles were tested. Consensus was defined as 70% agreement. For those items that the panel thought should be included, they were also asked how to provide evidence for the specific item in the portfolio, and how to assess that evidence. Results Consensus was reached on 61 of the 85 national learning outcomes. The panel recommended that 50 be assessed by the portfolio and 11 should not be. No consensus could be reached on the remaining 24 outcomes and these were also omitted from the portfolio. The panel recommended that various types of evidence be included in the portfolio. The panel supported 26 of the 27 principles, but could not reach consensus on whether the portfolio should reflect on the relationship between the supervisor and registrar. Conclusion A portfolio was developed and distributed to the eight departments of Family Medicine in South Africa, and the CMSA, to be further tested in implementation. PMID:22385468

2012-01-01

224

New Jersey Institute of Technology University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey  

E-print Network

Internship consists of 55 weeks of clinical rotations. There are nine required rotations ­ internal medicine, surgery, family medicine, obstetrics and gynecology, pediatrics, intensive care medicine, emergency medicine, psychiatry, and medical sub-specialties, and one elective rotation. ARE THERE OPPORTUNITIES

Bieber, Michael

225

Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine (Doctoral Course) Application Guide 2012/2013  

E-print Network

and Ethics, Hygiene), Regulatory Science, Medical Statistics, Food and Drug Evaluation Science, Epidemiology of Pathology Divisions: Pathology, Diagnostic Pathology, Molecular Medicine & Medical Genetics, Cancer Science Divisions: Integrated Medical Education, Community Medicine and Medical Network, Family

Banbara, Mutsunori

226

University of Kentucky 2013-2014 Undergraduate Bulletin 274 College of Medicine  

E-print Network

University of Kentucky 2013-2014 Undergraduate Bulletin 274 College of Medicine Frederick C. de Beer, M.D., is Dean of the College of Medicine. The College of Medicine offers a four-year curriculum leading to a degree of Doctor of Medicine (M.D.) and training for postdoctoral and research fellows

MacAdam, Keith

227

Peter A. Ubel Dennis T. McLawhorn University Professor of Business, Public Policy and Medicine  

E-print Network

and Medicine Duke University Fuqua Business School 100 Fuqua Drive Box 90120 Durham, NC 27708 peter of Minnesota Postdoctoral Training 07/1988-06/1991 Internal Medicine Residency Training Program, Mayo Graduate School of Medicine, Rochester, MN 07/1991-06/1992 Fellowship in Medical Ethics, University of Chicago

Reif, John H.

228

OFFICE OF THE ASSOCIATE DEAN FOR RESEARCH Purdue University College of Veterinary Medicine  

E-print Network

OFFICE OF THE ASSOCIATE DEAN FOR RESEARCH Purdue University College of Veterinary Medicine Summer Research Program for Veterinary Students The Purdue University College of Veterinary Medicine (PVM and conduct a research project on a topic related to their research in veterinary and/or comparative medicine

Holland, Jeffrey

229

OFFICE OF THE ASSOCIATE DEAN FOR RESEARCH Purdue University College of Veterinary Medicine  

E-print Network

OFFICE OF THE ASSOCIATE DEAN FOR RESEARCH Purdue University College of Veterinary Medicine Summer Research Program for Undergraduate Students The Purdue University College of Veterinary Medicine interested in veterinary medicine and biomedical research. The objective of this program is to provide

Holland, Jeffrey

230

Urbana Version 8/9/2006 UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS COLLEGE OF MEDICINE  

E-print Network

Urbana Version � 8/9/2006 UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS COLLEGE OF MEDICINE � URBANA-PEORIA-ROCKFORD MEDICAL STUDENT PROFESSIONALISM INCIDENT FORM PROCEDURES Medicine is a profession that requires high and shared only with appropriate parties. #12;Excerpted from the University of Illinois College of Medicine

Gilbert, Matthew

231

Program Director Master in Public Health Northwestern University # P-107N-14 The Institute for Public Health and Medicine (IPHAM) and the Department of Preventive Medicine at  

E-print Network

for Public Health and Medicine (IPHAM) and the Department of Preventive Medicine at Northwestern University functions, and is expected to have a primary academic appointment in the Department of Preventive Medicine

Engman, David M.

232

Family Bonding with Universities. NBER Working Paper No. 15493  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

One justification offered for legacy admissions policies at universities is that they bind entire families to the university. Proponents maintain that these policies have a number of benefits, including increased donations from members of these families. We use a rich set of data from an anonymous selective research institution to investigate…

Meer, Jonathan; Rosen, Harvey S.

2009-01-01

233

Marriage and Family Therapy at Texas Tech University  

E-print Network

academic and clinical training to students who will function as marriage and family therapists and Family Therapist. They will demonstrate an ability to: a. Understand and critically apply MFT theoryMarriage and Family Therapy at Texas Tech University Mission Statement and Learning Outcomes 2010

Gelfond, Michael

234

OFFICE OF ACADEMIC AFFAIRS SCHOOL OF MEDICINE  

E-print Network

, Medicine (General Internal Medicine) and (Family & Community Medicine) Morisa Guy, Medicine (General Internal Medicine) and (Family & Community Medicine) Lisa Ha, Medicine (Infectious Diseases) Ieshia

Kay, Mark A.

235

Perceptions and Practices of Graduates of Combined Family Medicine-Psychiatry Residency Programs: A Nationwide Survey  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: The authors evaluate the current practices and perceptions of graduates of combined family medicine-psychiatry residency programs in the following areas: preparation for practice, boundary formation, and integration of skills sets. Method: The authors conducted an electronic cross-sectional survey of all nationwide combined family

Warner, Christopher H.; Morganstein, Joshua; Rachal, James; Lacy, Timothy

2007-01-01

236

Sexual medicine in family practice. Part 1: How to help.  

PubMed Central

Family physicians are in a unique position to help patients with sexual problems. They know their patients over a long time and often have both partners as patients. Most problems require minimal intervention, usually by providing information. Family physicians are sometimes the only professionals who are trusted enough to be told of abusive or incestuous situations. PMID:8471906

Holzapfel, S.

1993-01-01

237

University of Virginia Athletics & Sports Medicine New Athlete Pre-Participation Health History, 2012-2013  

E-print Network

University of Virginia Athletics & Sports Medicine New Athlete Pre-Participation Health History_________________ Name____________________________________________ Sex_______ Date of Birth______________ Sport(s or sports physical? YES NO ______________________________________________________________________ * Have you

Acton, Scott

238

Montana State University 1 Family and Consumer  

E-print Network

Sciences (FCS) profession is dedicated to enhancing the relationships among individuals, families classes: EDEC 160 EC through Adolescent Dvlpmnt 3 FCS 138 Srvy of Fam Fin and Cons Issue 3 FCS 239 Contemporary Consumer Issues 3 FCS 263 Relationships and Fam Systems 3 FCS 337 Personal and Family Finance I 3

Maxwell, Bruce D.

239

Comparing the Performance of Allopathically and Osteopathically Trained Physicians on the American Board of Family Medicine's Certification Examination  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: Two medical specialty boards offer certification in family medicine: the American Board of Family Medicine (ABFM) and the American Osteopathic Board of Family Physicians (AOBFP). The AOBFP certification is offered only to graduates of osteopathic colleges; however, graduates of both osteopathic and allopathic medical schools who have…

O'Neill, Thomas R.; Royal, Kenneth D.; Schulte, Bradley M.; Leigh, Terrence

2009-01-01

240

Undergraduate medical education in general practice/family medicine throughout Europe - a descriptive study  

PubMed Central

Background It is increasingly becoming evident that a strong primary health care system is more likely to provide better population health, more equity in health throughout the population, and better use of economic resources, compared to systems that are oriented towards specialty care. Developing and maintaining a strong and sustainable primary health care requires that a substantial part of graduating doctors go into primary care. This in turn requires that general practice/family medicine (GP/FM) strongly influences the curricula in medical schools. In the present paper we aim at describing the extent of GP/FM teaching in medical schools throughout Europe, checking for the presence of GP/FM curricula and clinical teaching in GP offices. Methods A brief questionnaire was e-mailed to GP/FM or other professors at European medical universities. Results 259 out of 400 existing universities in 39 European countries responded to our questionnaire. Out of these, 35 (13.5%) reported to have no GP/FM curriculum. These 35 medical faculties were located in 12 different European countries. In addition, 15 of the medical schools where a GP/FM curriculum did exist, reported that this curriculum did not include any clinical component (n?=?5), or that the clinical part of the course was very brief - less than one week, mostly only a few hours (n?=?10). In total, 50 universities (19%) thus had no or a very brief GP/FM curriculum. These were mainly located in the Eastern or Southern European regions. Conclusion It is still possible to graduate from European medical universities without having been exposed to a GP/FM curriculum. The European Academy of Teachers in General Practice (EURACT) will launch efforts to change this situation. PMID:24289459

2013-01-01

241

The art and science of prognostication in early university medicine.  

PubMed

Prognosis occupied a more prominent place in the medieval curriculum than it does at the modern university. Scholastic discussions were rooted in the Hippocratic Aphorisms and shaped by Galen's treatises On Crisis and On Critical Days. Medical prediction, as an art dependent on personal skills such as memory and conjecture, was taught with the aid of the liberal arts of rhetoric and logic. Scientific predictability was sought in branches of mathematics, moving from periodicity and numerology to astronomy. The search for certitude contributed to the cultivation of astrology; even at its peak, however, astrological medicine did not dominate the teaching on prognostication. The ultimate concern, which awaits further discussion, was not even with forecasting as such, but with the physician and, indeed, the patient. PMID:14657583

Demaitre, Luke

2003-01-01

242

Department of Pathology STANFORD UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF MEDICINE  

E-print Network

and fellow training activities in blood banking and transfusion medicine. The individual will provide medical research projects in blood banking and transfusion medicine. The Stanford Blood Center collects in Clinical Pathology, Internal Medicine or Pediatrics, board eligible in Transfusion Medicine or minimum 1

Bogyo, Matthew

243

Department of Pathology STANFORD UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF MEDICINE  

E-print Network

in blood banking and transfusion medicine. The individual will provide medical cross coverage and transfusion medicine. The Stanford Blood Center collects approximately 50,000 red cell and 14 or Pediatrics, board eligible in Transfusion Medicine or minimum 1 year experience in Transfusion Medicine. You

Bogyo, Matthew

244

COLLEGE OF MEDICINE UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 2013-2014 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG  

E-print Network

of Orthopedics and Sports Medicine Important Notice: Beginning Fall 2012, students will no longer be allowed of required criteria set forth by the Department of Orthopedics and Sports Medicine in addition to the regular schools, colleges and universities, professional sports programs, sports medicine clinics, and other

Meyers, Steven D.

245

COLLEGE OF MEDICINE UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA -2009/2010 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG  

E-print Network

of Orthopaedics & Sports Medicine For Athletic Training Major (BAT): The undergraduate Athletic Training Major by the Department of Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine in addition to the regular university application process, sports medicine clinics, and other athletic health care settings. Interested students should visit our

Lajeunesse, Marc J.

246

COLLEGE OF MEDICINE UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA -2007/2008 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG  

E-print Network

of Orthopaedics & Sports Medicine For Athletic Training Major (BAT): The undergraduate Athletic Training Major by the Department of Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine in addition to the regular university application process. Suc programs, sports medicine clinics, and other athletic health care settings. Interested students should

Lajeunesse, Marc J.

247

COLLEGE OF MEDICINE UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 2012-2013 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG  

E-print Network

of Orthopedics & Sports Medicine Important Notice: The last applications for the undergraduate Bachelor of required criteria set forth by the Department of Orthopedics and Sports Medicine in addition to the regular schools, colleges and universities, professional sports programs, sports medicine clinics, and other

Lajeunesse, Marc J.

248

A Graduate Program in Veterinary Preventive Medicine--University of Guelph--1976  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A three-semester (12-month) diploma program for veterinarians was begun at the University of Guelph in 1971 that is applicable to veterinarians employed in public health, regulatory veterinary medicine, and animal production medicine, where there is emphasis on preventive medicine. Each student completes a project suitable for seminar presentation…

Mitchell, W. R.; Barnum, D. A.

1977-01-01

249

Impact of Pharmacy Student Interventions in an Urban Family Medicine Clinic  

PubMed Central

Objectives. To determine the number of interventions made by pharmacy students at an urban family medicine clinic and the acceptance rate of these recommendations by the healthcare providers. The secondary objective was to investigate the cost avoidance value of the interventions. Methods. A prospective, unblinded study was conducted to determine the number and cost avoidance value of clinical interventions made by pharmacy students completing advanced pharmacy practice experiences (APPEs) in an urban family medicine clinic. Results. Eighteen students completed this experience in the 8 months studied. Of the 718 interventions performed, 77% were accepted by physicians, including 58% of the 200 interventions that required immediate action. Projected avoidance was estimated at $61,855. Conclusion. The clinical interventions by pharmacy students were generally well received by healthcare providers and resulted in significant cost savings. Pharmacy students can play an important role in a family medicine clinic. PMID:24954930

2014-01-01

250

Matching community need with physician training: the OSU Urban Family Medicine Program.  

PubMed Central

There continues to be a shortage of primary care physicians practicing within urban, Iower-socioeconomic and minority communities despite the fact that many of the 125 allopathic and 19 osteopathic medical schools are located within the affected urban cities. Recognizing a need to better train and recruit primary care physicians to serve in urban settings and provide care to those underserved. The Ohio State Department of Family Medicine established an Urban Family Medicine Residency Program headquartered in Near East Columbus, OH. Starting in 2003, the Urban Family Medicine Residency Program began training up to two residents each academic year. The mission, vision and (curriculum have attracted residency applicants and faculty who have displayed sincere interest and commitment to practicing in urban lower socioeconomic communities. PMID:16749642

McDougle, Leon

2006-01-01

251

Asian Liver Center at Stanford University School of Medicine Position Opening: Research Intern  

E-print Network

Asian Liver Center at Stanford University School of Medicine Position The Asian Liver Center at Stanford University is the first organization hepatitis B infection and liver cancer in Asians and Asian Americans. We

Straight, Aaron

252

Center on the Family University of Hawai`i  

E-print Network

CENTER ON THE FAMILY Center on the Family University of Hawai`i Alcohol and Drug Abuse Division per year, administered by the Alcohol and Drug Abuse Division (ADAD) of the DOH. This progress report users of alcohol. An assessment of the state's substance abuse prevention system was conducted

Dong, Yingfei

253

ECON 461: Economics of Gender and Family Seattle University  

E-print Network

and Outcomes This course will enhance students' understanding of the role of gender in the familyECON 461: Economics of Gender and Family Seattle University Fall 2013 Tuesdays and Thursdays 1 School of Business and Economics Office: Pigott 523 Phone: (206) 296-2803 Email: bgh@seattleu.edu Office

Carter, John

254

Who Is Driving Continuing Medical Education for Family Medicine?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Introduction: Considerable time and money are invested in continuing medical education (CME) for family physicians (FPs) but the effectiveness is uncertain. The participation of FPs as coordinators and teachers is not well known. The goal of this project was to describe the role of FPs in organizing and teaching CME events that are accredited for…

Klein, Douglas; Allan, G. Michael; Manca, Donna; Sargeant, Joan; Barnett, Carly

2009-01-01

255

Cancer Risk Assessment by Rural and Appalachian Family Medicine Physicians  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Context: Challenges to the identification of hereditary cancer in primary care may be more pronounced in rural Appalachia, a medically underserved region. Purpose: To examine primary care physicians' identification of hereditary cancers. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was mailed to family physicians in the midwestern and southeastern United…

Kelly, Kimberly M.; Love, Margaret M.; Pearce, Kevin A.; Porter, Kyle; Barron, Mary A.; Andrykowski, Michael

2009-01-01

256

[JSPS-NRCT Core university program on natural medicine in pharmaceutical sciences].  

PubMed

The Core University Program provides a framework for international cooperative research in specifically designated fields and topics, centering around a core university in Japan and its counterpart university in other countries. In this program, individual scientists in the affiliated countries carry out cooperative research projects with sharply focused topics and explicitly delineated goals under leadership of the core universities. The Core University Program which we introduce here has been renewed since 2001 under the support of both the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS) and the National Research Council of Thailand (NRCT). Our program aims to conduct cooperative researches particularly focusing on Natural Medicine in the field of Pharmaceutical Sciences. Institute of Natural Medicine at University of Toyama (Japan), Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences at Chulalongkorn University (Thailand), and Chulabhorn Research Institute (Thailand) have been taking part in this JSPS-NRCT Core University Program as core universities. The Program is also supported by the 20 institution members in both countries. This program is running the five research subject under a key word of natural medicine which are related to i) age-related diseases, ii) allergy and cancer, iii) hepatitis and infectious diseases, iv) structure, synthesis, and bioactivity of natural medicines, and v) molecular biology of Thai medicinal plant components and database assembling of Thai medicinal plants. The program also encourages university members to strengthen related research activities, to share advanced academic and scientific knowledge on natural medicines. PMID:19336991

Saiki, Ikuo; Yamazaki, Mikako; Matsumoto, Kinzo

2009-04-01

257

University of Illinois College of Medicine Social Media Standards and Guidelines  

E-print Network

University of Illinois College of Medicine Social Media Standards and Guidelines The University of Illinois College of Medicine reminds students of their professional obligations in regard to social media capacities or students/other employees authorized by the medical school administration may use social media

Alford, Simon

258

UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH SCHOOL OF MEDICINE NEW CHALLENGES. NEW RISKS. NEW PARTNERSHIPS.  

E-print Network

;1UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH SCHOOL OF MEDICIN E WHAT'S NEXT? Good question. The simple answer is that NEXT is the annual report of the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. At Pitt, "What's next?" is a question evaluate scientific papers, and offer patients up-to-date, evidence-based care. These are the physicians we

Sibille, Etienne

259

Student National Medical Association University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry  

E-print Network

1 Student National Medical Association University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry Medical Association, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry Chapter, Region IX. ARTICLE to these offices by the SNMA General Body. b) Any E-Board candidate shall submit the following credentials

Goldman, Steven A.

260

University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey Volume 2 Number 1 Spring 2004 School pulsepulse  

E-print Network

University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey Volume 2 Number 1 Spring 2004 New Jersey Medical NJMS Pulse VOLUME 2, NUMBER 1, SPRING 2004 UNIVERSITY OF MEDICINE AND DENTISTRY OF NEW JERSEY NEW, INC.; BACK COVER PHOTO: PETER BYRON FEATURES 12 The New Science of Blood by Maryann B. Brinley Recent

Garfunkel, Eric

261

DOCTOR OF PHYSICAL THERAPY PROGRAM University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health  

E-print Network

DOCTOR OF PHYSICAL THERAPY PROGRAM University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health Mail to: Director of Development-School of Medicine and Public Health University of Wisconsin Theta Student Resources Fund Phi Theta Global Health Fund Please make checks out to: Phi Theta Mail to

Sheridan, Jennifer

262

The Department of Radiation Oncology at The University of Maryland School of Medicine is hosting  

E-print Network

: The Radiation Oncology Symposium- Best of 2012 is designed for radiation oncologists, radiation therapistsThe Department of Radiation Oncology at The University of Maryland School of Medicine is hosting The Radiation Oncology Symposium- Best of 2012 Sponsored by the University of Maryland School of Medicine Date

Weber, David J.

263

Sponsored by the University of California, Irvine School of Medicine RADIOLOGY GRAND ROUNDS  

E-print Network

Sponsored by the University of California, Irvine School of Medicine RADIOLOGY GRAND ROUNDS Wednesday, May 15, 2013 ­ 4:00 ­ 5:00PM UC Irvine Medical Center ­ Radiology Conference Room (0117) "Bone Resnick, MD, FACR Professor of Radiology, University of California, San Diego School of Medicine Chief

Mease, Kenneth D.

264

Tufts University School of Dental Medicine 8 Year Early Assurance Program  

E-print Network

Tufts University School of Dental Medicine 8 Year Early Assurance Program Application Instructions to Trustees of Tufts College. 3. Applications should be sent to: Tufts University School of Dental Medicine Office of Admissions One Kneeland Street ­ 15th Floor Boston, MA 02111 c/o Tufts 8 Year Early Assurance

Dennett, Daniel

265

Copyright 2009, The Ohio State University Family and Consumer Sciences  

E-print Network

;Copyright © 2009, The Ohio State University Freezing Meat, Poultry, and Game--page 2 food items youCopyright © 2009, The Ohio State University Family and Consumer Sciences HYG-5334-09 Freezing Meat, Poultry, and Game Meat, poultry, and wild game provide a healthy and nourishing food source, but in order

266

Departments | Centers | Institutes Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine  

E-print Network

Prosthetics- Orthotics Center Northwestern University Parkinson's Disease and Movement Disorders Center University Interdepartmental Neuroscience Program Northwestern University Prosthetics Research Laboratory

Chisholm, Rex L.

267

Practising family medicine for adults with intellectual disabilities  

PubMed Central

Abstract Objective To explore the perspectives of adults with intellectual disabilities (IDs) on helpful interactions with their family physicians. Design Exploratory, qualitative study. Setting Vancouver, BC. Participants Purposive sample of 11 community-dwelling adults with IDs. Methods In-depth, semistructured interviews were conducted face to face with participants. Interviews were audiorecorded and transcribed verbatim. Research team members read the transcripts, which were then coded into categories and subcategories and discussed at collective analysis meetings. The main study themes were generated through this iterative, collective process. Main findings Two themes about helpful interactions were identified: helping patients understand and helping patients navigate the health care system. The first theme reflected helpful ways of communicating with patients with IDs. These approaches focused on plain-language communication and other strategies developed jointly by the patients and their physicians. The second theme reflected ways in which the family physicians helped adults with IDs manage their health needs despite the complex constraints of their socioeconomic situations. Conclusion Adults with IDs want to play an active role in managing their health as they age, and helpful interactions with family physicians make this possible. PMID:25022654

Baumbusch, Jennifer; Phinney, Alison; Baumbusch, Sarah

2014-01-01

268

Evidence-based medicine in primary care: qualitative study of family physicians  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: The objectives of this study were: a) to examine physician attitudes to and experience of the practice of evidence-based medicine (EBM) in primary care; b) to investigate the influence of patient preferences on clinical decision-making; and c) to explore the role of intuition in family practice. Method: Qualitative analysis of semi-structured interviews of 15 family physicians purposively selected from

C Shawn Tracy; Guilherme Coelho Dantas; Ross EG Upshur

2003-01-01

269

Head, Department of Medicine Queen's University and Affiliated Teaching Hospitals  

E-print Network

, patient care and research within the Department and the region. The qualified applicant must be eligible Disease, Nephrology, Neurology, Palliative Medicine, Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine/oncology, nephrology, neurology, respirology, rheumatology, palliative care, and critical care, the Department also

Ellis, Randy

270

Stanford University School of Medicine Department of Pathology House Staff  

E-print Network

Hematopathology Fellow Janet McNaughton, MD Transfusion Medicine Fellow Tony Ng, MD Surgical Pathology Fellow Hughes, MD Transfusion Medicine Fellow Bryan Gammon, MD Dermatopathology Fellow Lorraine Pan, MD Gyn

Bogyo, Matthew

271

Veterinary Preventive Medicine Curriculum Development at Louisiana State University  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The program aims at training veterinarians, with interdepartmental faculty participation the rule rather than the exception. Included in the curriculum are: avian medicine, herd health management, veterinary public health, veterinary food hygiene, and regulatory veterinary medicine. (LBH)

Hubbert, William T.

1976-01-01

272

Patterns of Relating Between Physicians and Medical Assistants in Small Family Medicine Offices  

PubMed Central

PURPOSE The clinician-colleague relationship is a cornerstone of relationship-centered care (RCC); in small family medicine offices, the clinician–medical assistant (MA) relationship is especially important. We sought to better understand the relationship between MA roles and the clinician-MA relationship within the RCC framework. METHODS We conducted an ethnographic study of 5 small family medicine offices (having <5 clinicians) in the Cincinnati Area Research and Improvement Group (CARInG) Network using interviews, surveys, and observations. We interviewed 19 MAs and supervisors and 11 clinicians (9 family physicians and 2 nurse practitioners) and observed 15 MAs in practice. Qualitative analysis used the editing style. RESULTS MAs’ roles in small family medicine offices were determined by MA career motivations and clinician-MA relationships. MA career motivations comprised interest in health care, easy training/workload, and customer service orientation. Clinician-MA relationships were influenced by how MAs and clinicians respond to their perceptions of MA clinical competence (illustrated predominantly by comparing MAs with nurses) and organizational structure. We propose a model, trust and verify, to describe the structure of the clinician-MA relationship. This model is informed by clinicians’ roles in hiring and managing MAs and the social familiarity of MAs and clinicians. Within the RCC framework, these findings can be seen as previously undefined constraints and freedoms in what is known as the Complex Responsive Process of Relating between clinicians and MAs. CONCLUSIONS Improved understanding of clinician-MA relationships will allow a better appreciation of how clinicians and MAs function in family medicine teams. Our findings may assist small offices undergoing practice transformation and guide future research to improve the education, training, and use of MAs in the family medicine setting. PMID:24615311

Elder, Nancy C.; Jacobson, C. Jeffrey; Bolon, Shannon K.; Fixler, Joseph; Pallerla, Harini; Busick, Christina; Gerrety, Erica; Kinney, Dee; Regan, Saundra; Pugnale, Michael

2014-01-01

273

Changing University Work, Freedom, Flexibility and Family  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article investigates what Finnish academics on short fixed-term contracts consider to be the effects of having children on work and careers. The study is framed by the context of the current state of the university sector, its neoliberal and entrepreneurial tendencies and its claims to meritocracy. Informants express relative happiness with…

Nikunen, Minna

2012-01-01

274

Proposed roadmap to stepwise integration of genetics in family medicine and clinical research  

PubMed Central

We propose A step-by-step roadmap to integrate genetics in the Electronic Patient Record in Family Medicine and clinical research. This could make urgent operationalization of readily available genetic knowledge feasible in clinical research and consequently improved medical care. Improving genomic literacy by training and education is needed first. The second step is the improvement of the possibilities to register the family history in such a way that queries can identify patients at risk. Adding codes to the ICPC chapters “A21 Personal/family history of malignancy” and “A99 Disease carrier not described further” is proposed. Multidisciplinary guidelines for referral must be unambiguous. Electronical patient records need possibilities to add (new) family history information, including links between individuals who are family members. Automatic alerts should help general practitioners to recognize patients at risk who satisfy referral criteria. We present a familial breast cancer case with a BRCA1 mutation as an example. PMID:23415259

2013-01-01

275

What Do Family Medicine Patients Think about Medical Students' Participation in Their Health Care?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A survey of 575 family-medicine patients in academic and community settings found most willing to have a medical student involved in their health care. One-third reported that students did at least part of the physical examination. Many patients said they would appreciate a medical student's attention. Almost half perceived that student…

Devera-Sales, Amelia; Paden, Carrie; Vinson, Daniel C.

1999-01-01

276

A computer program to fit a family and community medicine set-up  

Microsoft Academic Search

A local Personal Computer (PC) network program has been designed to improve training and patient care in Family and Community Medicine set-up. The software was designed to cope with the different clinical, preventive, promotive and statistical programs of the teaching set-up. This system serves multiple levels of patient priority, assigning each patient to an individual health team staff. The present

Abdallah M. Mangoud; Faleh A. Al-ruwashed

2002-01-01

277

Multi-Source Evaluation of Interpersonal and Communication Skills of Family Medicine Residents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

There is a lack of information on the use of multi-source evaluation to assess trainees' interpersonal and communication skills in Oriental settings. This study is conducted to assess the reliability and applicability of assessing the interpersonal and communication skills of family medicine residents by patients, peer residents, nurses, and…

Leung, Kai-Kuen; Wang, Wei-Dan; Chen, Yen-Yuan

2012-01-01

278

Back to the future: reflections on the history of the future of family medicine.  

PubMed

These are historic times for family medicine. The profession is moving beyond the visionary blueprint of the Future of Family Medicine (FFM) report while working to harness the momentum created by the FFM movement. Preparing for, and leading through, the next transformative wave of change (FFM version 2.0) will require the engagement of multigenerational and multidisciplinary visionaries who bring wisdom from diverse experiences. Active group reflection on the past will potentiate the collective work being done to best chart the future. Historical competency is critically important for family medicine's future. This article describes the historical context of the development and launch of the FFM report, emphasizing the professional activism that preceded and followed it. This article is intended to spark intergenerational dialog by providing a multigenerational reflection on the history of FFM and the evolution that has occurred in family medicine over the past decade. Such intergenerational conversations enable our elders to share wisdom with our youth, while allowing our discipline to visualize history through the eyes of future generations. PMID:25381082

Doohan, Noemi C; Endres, Jill; Koehn, Nerissa; Miller, John; Scherger, Joseph E; Martin, James; Devoe, Jennifer E

2014-01-01

279

Providing competency-based family medicine residency training in substance abuse in the new millennium: a model curriculum  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: This article, developed for the Betty Ford Institute Consensus Conference on Graduate Medical Education (December, 2008), presents a model curriculum for Family Medicine residency training in substance abuse. METHODS: The authors reviewed reports of past Family Medicine curriculum development efforts, previously-identified barriers to education in high risk substance use, approaches to overcoming these barriers, and current training guidelines of

J Paul Seale; Sylvia Shellenberger; Denice Crowe Clark

2010-01-01

280

Developing a curriculum framework for global health in family medicine: emerging principles, competencies, and educational approaches  

PubMed Central

Background Recognizing the growing demand from medical students and residents for more comprehensive global health training, and the paucity of explicit curricula on such issues, global health and curriculum experts from the six Ontario Family Medicine Residency Programs worked together to design a framework for global health curricula in family medicine training programs. Methods A working group comprised of global health educators from Ontario's six medical schools conducted a scoping review of global health curricula, competencies, and pedagogical approaches. The working group then hosted a full day meeting, inviting experts in education, clinical care, family medicine and public health, and developed a consensus process and draft framework to design global health curricula. Through a series of weekly teleconferences over the next six months, the framework was revised and used to guide the identification of enabling global health competencies (behaviours, skills and attitudes) for Canadian Family Medicine training. Results The main outcome was an evidence-informed interactive framework http://globalhealth.ennovativesolution.com/ to provide a shared foundation to guide the design, delivery and evaluation of global health education programs for Ontario's family medicine residency programs. The curriculum framework blended a definition and mission for global health training, core values and principles, global health competencies aligning with the Canadian Medical Education Directives for Specialists (CanMEDS) competencies, and key learning approaches. The framework guided the development of subsequent enabling competencies. Conclusions The shared curriculum framework can support the design, delivery and evaluation of global health curriculum in Canada and around the world, lay the foundation for research and development, provide consistency across programmes, and support the creation of learning and evaluation tools to align with the framework. The process used to develop this framework can be applied to other aspects of residency curriculum development. PMID:21781319

2011-01-01

281

Pain Education at the University of Washington School of Medicine  

PubMed Central

Contemporary medical education is inadequate to prepare medical students to competently assess and design care plans for patients with acute and chronic pain. The time devoted to pain education in most medical school curricula is brief and not integrated into case-based clinical experiences, and it is frequently nonexistent during clinical clerkships. Medical student pain curricula have been proposed for over 30 years and are commonly agreed upon, though rarely implemented. As a consequence of poor undergraduate pain education, postgraduate trainees and practicing physicians struggle with both competency and practice satisfaction; their patients are similarly dissatisfied. At the University of Washington School of Medicine, a committee of multidisciplinary pain experts has, between 2009 and 2011, successfully introduced a 4-year integrated pain curriculum that increases required pain education teaching time from 6 to 25 hours, and clinical elective pain courses from 177 to 318 hours. It is expected that increased didactic and case-based multidisciplinary clinical training will increase knowledge and competency in biopsychosocial measurement-based pain narrative and risk assessment, improve understanding of persistent pain as a chronic complex condition, and expand the role of patient-centered interprofessional treatment for medical students, residents, and fellows, leading to better prepared practicing physicians. PMID:23523022

Tauben, David J.; Loeser, John D.

2013-01-01

282

School of Medicine Page 1 Policy and Guidelines for Interactions between the Stanford University School of Medicine,  

E-print Network

University School of Medicine, the Stanford Hospital and Clinics, and Lucile Packard Children's Hospital and Clinics and the Lucile Packard Children's Hospital. Interactions with Industry occur in a variety of contexts, including marketing of new pharmaceutical products, medical devices, and hospital and research

Ford, James

283

African leaders' views on critical human resource issues for the implementation of family medicine in Africa  

PubMed Central

Background The World Health Organisation has advocated for comprehensive primary care teams, which include family physicians. However, despite (or because of) severe doctor shortages in Africa, there is insufficient clarity on the role of the family physician in the primary health care team. Instead there is a trend towards task shifting without thought for teamwork, which runs the risk of dangerous oversimplification. It is not clear how African leaders understand the challenges of implementing family medicine, especially in human resource terms. This study, therefore, sought to explore the views of academic and government leaders on critical human resource issues for implementation of family medicine in Africa. Method In this qualitative study, key academic and government leaders were purposively selected from sixteen African countries. In-depth interviews were conducted using an interview guide. All interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed and thematically analysed. Results There were 27 interviews conducted with 16 government and 11 academic leaders in nine Sub-Saharan African countries: Botswana, Democratic Republic of Congo, Ghana, Kenya, Malawi, Nigeria, Rwanda, South Africa and Uganda. Respondents spoke about: educating doctors in family medicine suited to Africa, including procedural skills and holistic care, to address the difficulty of recruiting and retaining doctors in rural and underserved areas; planning for primary health care teams, including family physicians; new supervisory models in primary health care; and general human resource management issues. Conclusions Important milestones in African health care fail to specifically address the human resource issues of integrated primary health care teamwork that includes family physicians. Leaders interviewed in this study, however, proposed organising the district health system with a strong embrace of family medicine in Africa, especially with regard to providing clinical leadership in team-based primary health care. Whilst these leaders focussed positively on entry and workforce issues, in terms of the 2006 World Health Report on human resources for health, they did not substantially address retention of family physicians. Family physicians need to respond to the challenge by respondents to articulate human resource policies appropriate to Africa, including the organisational development of the primary health care team with more sophisticated skills and teamwork. PMID:24438344

2014-01-01

284

University of Virginia School of Medicine PO Box 800761  

E-print Network

.924.5974 http:/medicine.virginia.edu/community- service/centers/ biomedical-ethics-and- humanities/medical and the Fire: Writing about Medicine, the Body and the Mind Christine Montross MD MFA, Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior and Medical Humanities and Bioethics Scholarly Concentration, Warren Alpert Medical

Acton, Scott

285

Tufts University School of Dental Medicine (TUSDM) Clinical Business Operations Internal Policy and Procedure Manual  

E-print Network

Tufts University School of Dental Medicine (TUSDM) Clinical Business Operations Internal Policy and Procedure Manual Policy Title: Tufts University Discount Policy by School Purpose: To identify the discounts being offered within the Dental School to Tufts University students as well as guidelines for each

Dennett, Daniel

286

Center for Biomedical Ethics and Humanities University of Virginia School of Medicine  

E-print Network

-Health PC, Lebanon, Virginia American Academy of Family Physicians' 2011 Family Physician of the Year with the History of the Health Sciences Lecture Series 28 September 2011 John F. Anderson Memorial Lecture Out in the American Civil War Margaret Humphreys MD PhD Josiah Charles Trent Professor in the History of Medicine

Acton, Scott

287

Epidemiology and Herd Health Training in the School of Veterinary Medicine, Louisiana State University.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

At Louisiana State University School of Veterinary Medicine, training in preventive medicine is incorporated into all four years of the curriculum. The curriculum is described with focus on the fourth year practical course that involves problem solving, using various herds in the area. (JMD)

Archbald, L. F.; Hagstad, H. V.

1978-01-01

288

UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT PRIMARY CARE INTERNAL MEDICINE RESIDENCY PROGRAM POSITIONS OBTAINED BY GRADUATES  

E-print Network

UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT PRIMARY CARE INTERNAL MEDICINE RESIDENCY PROGRAM POSITIONS OBTAINED BY GRADUATES 2009-2013 PRIMARY CARE/INTERNAL MEDICINE NAME GRADUATED STATE HOSPITAL/PRACTICE SITE Mujahed Resident Maria Figueras 2009 New Hampshire Primary Care IM Practice Therese Franco 2009 Washington

Oliver, Douglas L.

289

University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey Volume 1 Number 1 Spring 2003 School pulsepulse  

E-print Network

University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey Volume 1 Number 1 Spring 2003 New Jersey Medical OF MEDICINE AND DENTISTRY OF NEW JERSEY NEW JERSEY MEDICAL SCHOOL Dean, UMDNJ-New Jersey Medical School of Stroke by Maryann B. Brinley The Brain Attack Team prevents death and disability from stroke. 18 Through

Garfunkel, Eric

290

University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry GUIDELINES TO PREVENT THE MISTREATMENT OF STUDENTS  

E-print Network

harassment; discrimination or harassment based on race, religion, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientationUniversity of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry GUIDELINES TO PREVENT THE MISTREATMENT to prevent the mistreatment of School of Medicine and Dentistry students. AAMC POLICY STATEMENT Reaffirming

Goldman, Steven A.

291

Medical Student Fellowship in Women's Health Research Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania  

E-print Network

Medical Student Fellowship in Women's Health Research Perelman School of Medicine at the University in academic medicine · To promote research and education in women's health Dual Mission To support in women's health: 1 award may be specific to CV research ­ Clinical, basic science or community · Open

Bushman, Frederic

292

The Use of Family Therapy Within a University Counseling Center  

Microsoft Academic Search

As a counterpoint to the oftentimes adversarial way that parents are viewed when they appear to be overinvolved in the lives of their college-aged students, this article advocates for the use of a family therapy perspective in university counseling centers. Benefits of this perspective include a broadening of the lens through which individual concerns are seen and a more nuanced

Kathryn Jackson

2009-01-01

293

Copyright 2009, The Ohio State University Family and Consumer Sciences  

E-print Network

. Freeze only 2 to 3 pounds of food per cubic foot of available storage space in 24 hours. Storing MaintainCopyright © 2009, The Ohio State University Family and Consumer Sciences HYG-5349-09 Freezing Fruits Freezing fruits is the simplest, easiest, and quick- est method of preservation. Freezing costs

294

Montana State University Child Development Center Family Handbook  

E-print Network

Montana State University Child Development Center Family Handbook September 2013 August 2014.994.2013 Bozeman, MT 59717 www.montana.edu/hhd/cdc.htm #12;The MSU Child Development Center is a community, Welcome to the MSU Child Development Center, the laboratory preschool of the Early Childhood Education

Maxwell, Bruce D.

295

Academic Pediatric Pathologist Hamilton Regional Laboratory Medicine Program and McMaster University  

E-print Network

Academic Pediatric Pathologist Hamilton Regional Laboratory Medicine Program and McMaster University Hamilton, ON A position in Pediatric/Perinatal Anatomical Pathology will become available an excellent opportunity for an experienced academic pediatric pathologist or a recent graduate currently

Haykin, Simon

296

University of Virginia Athletics & Sports Medicine New Student-Athlete Health History 2013-14  

E-print Network

University of Virginia Athletics & Sports Medicine New Student-Athlete Health History 2013____________________________________________ Sex_______ Date of Birth_______________ Sport(s)_________________________ UVA Student ID specified, all questions below refer to your lifetime health history. You must respond to all

Acton, Scott

297

Center for Infectious Diseases (CID) Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine  

E-print Network

Center for Infectious Diseases (CID) Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine Microbiology (Hotta) Pathogenesis analysis of viruses; Antiviral drugs; Vaccine development Infectious Disease and epidemiology of avian influenza Infectious Disease Control (Kawabata) Epidemiology of infectious diseases

Banbara, Mutsunori

298

Zebrafish Facility Assistant Manager The Duke University School of Medicine has an immediate opening for a  

E-print Network

Zebrafish Facility Assistant Manager The Duke University School of Medicine has an immediate equipment, plumbing, wiring, fish health, water chemistry, and troubleshooting is expected. Work. 2.) Supervise and train technicians and student helpers on required duties. 3.) Respond to emergency

Mazzotti, Frank

299

University of illinois College of MediCine at roCkford  

E-print Network

: MasterCard Visa Credit card number _________________________________________________ 3- or 4-digit CID payable to the University of Illinois College of Medicine at Rockford. I prefer to pay by credit card # _____________Expiration date _________________________ Credit card billing name

Illinois at Chicago, University of

300

Wayne State University School of Medicine Year IV Subinternship  

E-print Network

in a sensitive manner. iii. Discuss end-of-life issues with patients and family members iv. Provide concise daily role in communicating aspects of patient care to patients, families and healthcare providers, often communication with the patient and family members iii. Electronic transmission b. Recognition and management

Berdichevsky, Victor

301

University of Virginia School of Medicine PO Box 800761  

E-print Network

of Psychiatry and Human Behavior and Medical Humanities and Bioethics Scholarly Concentration, Warren Alpert, Brooklyn NY #12;15 October 2014 Ebola! Frederick G. Hayden MD, Department of Medicine (Infectious Diseases

Acton, Scott

302

University of Connecticut Health Center School of Dental Medicine  

E-print Network

/MDS ! Certificate/Ph.D. Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology ! Certificate ! Certificate/MDS ! Certificate/Ph.D. Oral Medicine ! Certificate/MDS ! Certificate/Ph.D. Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery ! Certificate

Kim, Duck O.

303

Dean's Faculty Advisory Committee University of Tennessee, College of Medicine  

E-print Network

and analytical thinking. For basic sciences, clinical basic conferences and team-based learning will be added, called "foundations of medicine," which is subdivided into scientific foundations and clinical

Cui, Yan

304

[Advances in studies on chemical components and pharmacology of epiphytic type medicinal plants in the Orohid family].  

PubMed

Many of the epiphytic Orchids are used as traditional Chinese medicine. The chemical components and pharmacology have been studied in recent 15 years. This article reviewed the studies which will be beneficial to reveal the relatives among these medicinal plants in the Orchid Family and be helpful to develop new drugs. PMID:16335815

Li, Shu; Wang, Chun-Lan; Guo, Shun-Xing; Xiao, Pei-Gen

2005-10-01

305

Public Health Aspects of the Family Medicine Concepts in South Eastern Europe  

PubMed Central

Introduction: Family medicine as a part of the primary health care is devoted to provide continuous and comprehensive health care to the individuals and families regardless of age, gender, types of diseases and affected system or part of the body. Special emphasis in such holistic approach is given to the prevention of diseases and health promotion. Family Medicine is the first step/link between doctors and patients within patients care as well as regular inspections/examinations and follow-up of the health status of healthy people. Most countries aspire to join the European Union and therefore adopting new regulations that are applied in the European Union. Aim: The aim of this study is to present the role and importance of family medicine, or where family medicine is today in 21 Century from the beginning of development in these countries. The study is designed as a descriptive epidemiological study with data from 10 countries of the former Communist bloc, Slovenia, Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Serbia, Montenegro, Macedonia, Kosovo, Albania, Bulgaria, Romania, Czech Republic, Slovakia and Hungary, just about half of them are members of the EU. We examined the following variables: socio-organizational indicators, health and educational indicators and health indicators. The data used refer to 2002 and as a source of data are used official data from reference WebPages of family medicine doctors associations, WONCA website (EURACT, EQuiP, EGPRN), WebPages of Bureau of Statistics of the countries where the research was conducted as well as the Ministries of Health. Results: Results indicates that the failures and shortcomings of health care organizations in Southeast Europe. Lack of money hinders the implementation of health care reform in all mentioned countries, the most of them that is more oriented to Bismarck financing system. Problems in the political, legal and economic levels are obstacles for efficient a problem reconstructing health care system toward family medicine and primary prevention interventions. The population is not enough educated for complicated enforcement for and prevention of diseases that have a heavy burden on the budget. Health insurance and payment of health services is often a problem, because the patients must be treated regardless of their insurance coverage and financial situation. The decrease in production and economic growth, as well as low gross national income in the countries with economic crisis, lead to the inability of treatment for a large number of the population. Such situation a system leads to additional debts and loans to healthcare system. Measures implemented for provision of acute curative care largely did not lead to improvements in the health status of the population. Educational and preventive measures, as well as higher standards for quality and accessibility of health care services for entire population in each country, especially those struggling are bound to joining the European Union and their implementation must start. The most A large number of medical institutions are is inefficient in health education and health promotion and must work to educate patients and families and increase the quality of preventive health services. Modernization of health care delivery and joining the European Union by increasing overall economic stability of countries is one of the primary goals of all countries in Southeast Europe.

Masic, Izet; Hadziahmetovic, Miran; Donev, Doncho; Pollhozani, Azis; Ramadani, Naser; Skopljak, Amira; Pasagic, Almir; Roshi, Enver; Zunic, Lejla; Zildzic, Muharem

2014-01-01

306

Training in childhood obesity management in the United States: a survey of pediatric, internal medicine-pediatrics and family medicine residency program directors  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Information about the availability and effectiveness of childhood obesity training during residency is limited. METHODS: We surveyed residency program directors from pediatric, internal medicine-pediatrics (IM-Peds), and family medicine residency programs between September 2007 and January 2008 about childhood obesity training offered in their programs. RESULTS: The response rate was 42.2% (299\\/709) and ranged by specialty from 40.1% to 45.4%.

Margaret S Wolff; Erinn T Rhodes; David S Ludwig

2010-01-01

307

Accessibility Statement The Program in Occupational Therapy at Washington University School of Medicine is committed to  

E-print Network

Accessibility Statement The Program in Occupational Therapy at Washington University School include the web address or URL and the specific problems you have encountered. Program in Occupational Therapy Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis Campus Box 8505, 4444 Forest Park Ave. St

Grant, Gregory

308

Effects of the Islamic Revolution in Iran on Medical Education: The Shiraz University School of Medicine.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Of 173 full-time faculty employed in 1978 at Shiraz University School of Medicine, 108 had left the university by December 1982, and 81 of these had left the country, aggravating the chronic shortage of medical personnel in Iran. Iranian authorities have not been able to counteract these trends. (GC)

Ronaghy, Hossain A.; And Others

1983-01-01

309

Centre for the History of Medicine in Ireland University College Dublin &  

E-print Network

Centre for the History of Medicine in Ireland University College Dublin & University of Ulster Feeney was awarded post-doctoral funding from the Irish Research Council for the Humanities and Social Mental Health Act in Ireland. His work is complementary to the Centre's expertise in the history

310

University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Medicine and Public Health  

E-print Network

University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Medicine and Public Health Doctor of Physical Therapy;Clinical Internship Evaluation Tool Instructions INTRODUCTION The University of Wisconsin-Madison's Doctor of a competent clinician who meets the above criteria. If students are rated against the standard of an entry

Sheridan, Jennifer

311

DepartmentOfRadiationOncology UniversityOfMarylandSchoolOfMedicine  

E-print Network

: The Radiation Oncology Symposium Best of 2012 is designed for radiation oncologists, radiation therapistsDepartmentOfRadiationOncology UniversityOfMarylandSchoolOfMedicine 22SouthGreeneStreet Baltimore://www.umm.edu/resources/hotels.htm Fordrivingdirectionstoourcampuspleasevisit: www.umm.edu/gethere/ RADIATION ONCOLOGY SYMPOSIUM BEST of 2012 January 10, 2013 University

Weber, David J.

312

The University of Maryland School of Medicine Department of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Science  

E-print Network

1 The University of Maryland School of Medicine Department of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Science SUPPORTING PHYSICAL THERAPY EDUCATION THROUGH SPONSORSHIP For more than fifty years the Department of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Science (PTRS) at the University of Maryland School

Weber, David J.

313

Veterans Administration Palo Alto Health Care System An Affiliation of Stanford University School of Medicine  

E-print Network

Veterans Administration Palo Alto Health Care System An Affiliation of Stanford University School of Medicine at the Veterans Administration Palo Alto Health Care System (VAPAHCS) and Stanford University for the administrative and clinical care and treatment of veterans within the VAPAHCS. Individuals with experience

Quake, Stephen R.

314

Dean's Faculty Advisory Committee University of Tennessee, College of Medicine  

E-print Network

' Brown, PhD, Louisa Balazs, MD, PhD, Maggie DeBon, PhD, Elizabeth Fitzpatrick, PhD, Bob Foehring, Ph number, campus-wide. On the UT website are the College of Medicine's ByLaws, which were updated about 5) #12;provides some informal guidelines, e.g. to suggest about how many publications are appropriate

Cui, Yan

315

Dean's Faculty Advisory Committee University of Tennessee, College of Medicine  

E-print Network

, in the Patio on the 7th floor of the Wm. F. Bowld Hospital. Attendance The following members were present: Art henceforth, due to budget cuts. General discussion within the DFAC indicated that his departure UT funds, rather than the College of Medicine. Dr. Herrod indicated that efforts to form

Cui, Yan

316

Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine 2014 Award Winners  

E-print Network

wound healing and cardiac repair after myocardial infarction Second Place, Basic Science Andrea Murmann.S. Kim, MD The impact of advancing age on postoperative outcomes in plastic surgery Third Place, Clinical of Pediatrics and Primary Care, Feinberg School of Medicine, and Blair Harvey-Gintoft, Assistant Director

Chisholm, Rex L.

317

Women’s impressions of their inpatient birth care as provided by family physicians in the Shizuoka Family Medicine Training Program in Japan  

PubMed Central

Background Even though Japan faces serious challenges in women’s health care such as a rapidly aging population, attrition of obstetrical providers, and a harsh legal climate, few family medicine residency training programs in Japan include training in obstetrics, and the literature lacks research on women’s views of intra-partum pregnancy care by family physicians. Findings In this exploratory study, we conducted semi-structured qualitative interviews with five women who received their admission, intrapartum, delivery and discharge care from family medicine residents in the obstetrics ward of a community training hospital. Four women had vaginal births, and one had a Cesarean section. Three were primiparous, and two multiparous. Their ages ranged from 22–33. They found value in family physician medical knowledge and easy communication style, though despite explanation, some had trouble understanding the family physician’s scope of work. These women identified negative aspects of the hospital environment, and wanted more anticipatory guidance about what to expect physically after birth, but were enthusiastic about seeing a family doctor after discharge. Conclusions These results demonstrate the feasibility of family medicine residents providing inpatient birth care in a community hospital, and that patients are receptive to family physicians providing that care as well after discharge. Women’s primary concerns relate mostly to hospital environment issues, and better understanding the care family physicians provide. This illustrates-areas for family physicians to work for improvements. PMID:23698036

2013-01-01

318

Sounding Narrative Medicine: Studying Students' Professional Identity Development at Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons  

PubMed Central

Purpose To learn what medical students derive from training in humanities, social sciences, and the arts in a narrative medicine curriculum and to explore narrative medicine’s framework as it relates to students’ professional development. Method On completion of required intensive, half-semester narrative medicine seminars in 2010, 130 second-year medical students at Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons participated in focus group discussions of their experiences. Focus group transcriptions were submitted to close iterative reading by a team who performed a grounded-theory-guided content analysis, generating a list of codes into which statements were sorted to develop overarching themes. Provisional interpretations emerged from the close and repeated readings, suggesting a fresh conceptual understanding of how and through what avenues such education achieves its goals in clinical training. Results Students’ comments articulated the known features of narrative medicine—attention, representation, and affiliation—and endorsed all three as being valuable to professional identity development. They spoke of the salience of their work in narrative medicine to medicine and medical education and its dividends of critical thinking, reflection, and pleasure. Critiques constituted a small percentage of the statements in each category. Conclusions Students report that narrative medicine seminars support complex interior, interpersonal, perceptual, and expressive capacities. Students’ lived experiences confirm some expectations of narrative medicine curricular planners while exposing fresh effects of such work to view. PMID:24362390

Miller, Eliza; Balmer, Dorene; Hermann, Nellie; Graham, Gillian; Charon, Rita

2014-01-01

319

Practical training in family medicine in the Dalmatian hinterland: first-hand experience of four physicians.  

PubMed

Four physicians working in private family medicine offices in Dalmatian Hinterland described their first hand experience of teaching sixthyear medical students. They supervised students during the 2010/2011 academic year, in an area that is economically undeveloped, rural, and where a number of people live in extended families. Although hesitant at first, the patients came to like the interaction with students, and later even yearned to provide students with as much information as possible. They also liked the letters that students had to write to them about their illness, because they could take them home and look for information without needing to see the doctor. The students showed diverse attitudes to different types of work in family medicine offices, mostly depending on their plans for future career. In general, they either complained or hesitated to perform duties that they did not fully master during earlier education, especially working with children. They needed several days to adapt to direct contact with the patients, and were more relaxed and cooperative when working in pairs than alone. The physicians themselves felt that they profited both from the novelty in the everyday routine and from the exchange of their experiences with the students. They liked their young colleagues and admitted they could not objectively review their own work, knowledge and skills. PMID:23311492

Jer?i?, Minka; ?izmi?, Zorka; Vujevi?, Miona; Puljiz, Tina

2012-01-01

320

The views of key leaders in South Africa on implementation of family medicine: critical role in the district health system  

PubMed Central

Background Integrated team-based primary care is an international imperative. This is required more so in Africa, where fragmented verticalised care dominates. South Africa is trying to address this with health reforms, including Primary Health Care Re-engineering. Family physicians are already contributing to primary care despite family medicine being only fully registered as a full specialty in South Africa in 2008. However the views of leaders on family medicine and the role of family physicians is not clear, especially with recent health reforms. The aim of this study was to understand the views of key government and academic leaders in South Africa on family medicine, roles of family physicians and human resource issues. Methods This was a qualitative study with academic and government leaders across South Africa. In-depth interviews were conducted with sixteen purposively selected leaders using an interview guide. Thematic content analysis was based on the framework method. Results Whilst family physicians were seen as critical to the district health system there was ambivalence on their leadership role and ‘specialist’ status. National health reforms were creating both threats and opportunities for family medicine. Three key roles for family physicians emerged: supporting referrals; clinical governance/quality improvement; and providing support to community-oriented care. Respondents’ urged family physicians to consolidate the development and training of family physicians, and shape human resource policy to include family physicians. Conclusions Family physicians were seen as critical to the district health system in South Africa despite difficulties around their precise role. Whilst their role was dominated by filling gaps at district hospitals to reduce referrals it extended to clinical governance and developing community-oriented primary care - a tall order, requiring strong teamwork. Innovative team-based service delivery is possible despite human resource challenges, but requires family physicians to proactively develop team-based models of care, reform education and advocate for clearer policy, based on the views of these respondents. PMID:24961449

2014-01-01

321

UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA PERELMAN SCHOOL OF MEDICINE Curriculum Vitae  

E-print Network

for Experimental Psychiatry Vice Chair for Faculty Affairs and Professional Development Department of Psychiatry Psychiatry, The Institute of Pennsylvania Hospital and University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA Military of Psychology, The George Washington University 1977-80 Instructor of Psychology, Department of Psychiatry

Pennsylvania, University of

322

Teaching wound care to family medicine residents on a wound care service  

PubMed Central

Primary care physicians often care for patients with chronic wounds, and they can best serve patients if they have knowledge and proficient skills in chronic wound care, including sharp debridement. The Oakwood Annapolis Family Medicine Residency in Michigan, USA developed a Wound Care Service, incorporating wound care training during the surgical rotation. Effectiveness of the wound care training was evaluated through pre- and posttesting of residents, to assess changes in knowledge and comfort in treating chronic wounds. The results demonstrate significant improvement in residents’ knowledge and comfort in wound care. This innovation demonstrates the feasibility of educating residents in chronic wound care through hands-on experience. PMID:23983497

Little, Sahoko H; Menawat, Sunil S; Worzniak, Michael; Fetters, Michael D

2013-01-01

323

[Efforts of gender equality at Kinki University School of Medicine].  

PubMed

In recent years, medical doctors are in short supply in many university hospitals. Retirement of female doctor after delivery is one of the reasons. Although they want to return to work after giving birth, they quit unavoidable because the working conditions do not match. Then, Kinki university hospital established the "provisions for special work arrangements". This work arrangement is the wage less, but the working hours is less than the regular. This work arrangement increased returner to the university hospital after delivery. PMID:24291988

Miyamoto, Katsuichi

2013-01-01

324

Z:\\Common\\Vice Dean Faculty Affairs\\University Documents Governance of the Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry, University of Alberta.  

E-print Network

& Dentistry, University of Alberta. The Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry (FOMD) mirrors Governance Affairs 1.4. Vice - Dean Research 1.5. Chief Operating Officer 1.6. Senior Associate Dean Dentistry 1.5. Dentistry Admissions Committee (CDAC) 2.6. Dentistry Curriculum Committee (CDAC) 2.7. Medical Laboratory

MacMillan, Andrew

325

Behavioral interventions for office-based care: interventions in the family medicine setting.  

PubMed

The practice of family medicine includes the care of many patients with mental health or behavior change needs. Patients in mild to moderate distress may benefit from brief interventions performed in the family physician's office. Patients in more extreme distress may be helped by referral to behavioral health clinicians for short-term or open-ended therapies. Electronic therapy programs and bibliotherapy are also useful resources. The transition to the patient-centered medical home model may allow for more widespread integration of behavioral health care clinicians into primary care, in person and through telemental health care. Integrated care holds the promise of improved access, greater effectiveness of behavioral health service provision, and enhanced efficiency of primary care for patients with behavioral health care needs. PMID:24628010

Larzelere, Michele McCarthy

2014-03-01

326

Research, Education and Outreach in the Division of Agriculture, Forestry and Veterinary Medicine Mississippi State University  

E-print Network

, Forestry, and Veterinary Medicine personnel are using social media to reach a wider than ever audience clinic. 14 Positive Parenting An MSU program is connecting families to resources that help children students combine learning and social responsibility through participation in Little Dresses for Africa

Ray, David

327

Community Health Clinics Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine  

E-print Network

in community health clinics. Students staff primary care and specialty clinics (cardiology, endocrinology through federally qualified health centers to coordinate and provide care and assistance to the uninsured Erie Family Health Center Amundsen School Based Health Center Clemente Wildcats Student Health Center

Chisholm, Rex L.

328

Faculty of Medicine Graduate School of Medicine  

E-print Network

2007--2008 Faculty of Medicine Graduate School of Medicine PROSPECTUS The University of Tokyo #12;#12;Welcome to Faculty of Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine The University of Tokyo Takao Shimizu Dean, Faculty of Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine The University of Tokyo The Faculty of Medicine

Miyashita, Yasushi

329

Patient greeting preferences for themselves and their providers in a military family medicine clinic.  

PubMed

Using the proper greeting may be important to help establish rapport between health care providers and their patients. It may be particularly useful for family medicine physicians working in a military medical facility, where military rank and traditions are important. A total of 259 anonymous surveys were collected from patients treated at a military family medicine clinic. Most of the patients who completed the survey preferred to shake hands with their provider, be greeted using only their first name, and preferred that the provider introduce themselves using their last name only. Active duty patients were more likely than civilians to prefer a handshake (odds ratio [OR] 3.05, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.46-6.39) and officers were more likely to prefer a handshake compared to enlisted service members (OR 3.29; 95% CI 1.18-9.20). Respondents who were older were more likely to prefer a formal introduction by their provider compared to respondents under 35 years old (OR 2.92, 95% CI 1.35-6.31). Although most patients in this facility expressed a preference for how they would like to be greeted, providers are still encouraged to ask their patients how they would prefer to be addressed. PMID:24083924

Laird, John E; Tolentino, Jerlyn C; Gray, Cynthia

2013-10-01

330

Early COPD Diagnosis in Family Medicine Practice: How to Implement Spirometry?  

PubMed Central

Introduction. COPD is often diagnosed at an advanced stage because symptoms go unrecognized. Furthermore, spirometry is often not done. Methods. Study was conducted in diverse family medicine practice settings. Patients were targeted if respiratory symptoms were present. Patients had a spirometry to confirm the presence of airflow obstruction and COPD diagnosis. An evaluation of the process was done to better understand facilitating/limiting factors to the implementation of a primary care based spirometry program. Results. 12 of 19 primary care offices participated. 196 of 246 (80%) patients targeted based on the presence of smoking and respiratory symptoms did not have COPD; 18 (7%) and 32 (13%) had COPD, respectively, GOLD I and ?II. There was no difference in the type and number of respiratory symptoms between non-COPD and COPD patients. Most of the clinics did not have access to a trained healthcare professional to accomplish spirometry. They agreed that giving access to a trained healthcare professional was the easiest and most reliable way of doing spirometry. Conclusion. Spirometry, a simple test, is recommended in guidelines to make the diagnosis of COPD. The lack of allocated time and training of healthcare professionals makes its implementation challenging in family medicine practices. PMID:24804099

Saad, Nathalie; Sedeno, Maria; Metz, Katrina; Bourbeau, Jean

2014-01-01

331

Dr. Lipsky to Resign as Regional Dean of the University of Illinois College of Medicine at Rockford  

E-print Network

Dr. Lipsky to Resign as Regional Dean of the University of Illinois College of Medicine at Rockford of Illinois College of Medicine at Rockford, has announced his resignation. Eager to join his wife, Darice successful community partnerships and collaborations, the profile of the College of Medicine at Rockford has

Illinois at Chicago, University of

332

School of Dental Medicine Academic Plan As an integral member at the University of Connecticut, the School of Dental Medicine is committed to  

E-print Network

School of Dental Medicine Academic Plan 2011-2016 As an integral member at the University of Connecticut, the School of Dental Medicine is committed to fulfillment of both its unique aspirations it academic plan for 2009-2014 entitled "Our World, Our People, Our Future". Preamble 1 The School of Dental

Oliver, Douglas L.

333

Faculty of Medicine Graduate School of Medicine  

E-print Network

2005--2006 Faculty of Medicine Graduate School of Medicine PROSPECTUS The University of Tokyo #12;#12;Welcome to Faculty of Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine The University of Tokyo Nobutaka Hirokawa Dean, Faculty of Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine The University of Tokyo The University of Tokyo Graduate

Miyashita, Yasushi

334

Bonnie Spring holds a PhD from Harvard University and is Professor of Preventive Medicine, Psychology, and Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Director of Behavioral Medicine, and Co-Program Leader in Cancer Prevention and Control at Northwestern Universit  

Cancer.gov

Bonnie Spring earned the PhD in psychology from Harvard University and is Professor of Preventive Medicine, Psychology, and Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Director of Behavioral Medicine, and Co-Program Leader in Cancer Prevention at Northwestern University.

335

at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine  

E-print Network

, Education and Clinical Center (PDRECC) at the Department of Veterans Affairs and Director of the Center American Heart Association study sections and a Veterans Administration study section. Gordon H. Baltuch, M.D., Ph.D. Professor of Neurosurgery at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania Dr. Baltuch

Sharp, Kim

336

Dean's Faculty Advisory Committee University of Tennessee, College of Medicine  

E-print Network

health care providers, community-wide. These include, for example, childhood obesity, infant mortality mortality rate versus standardized charges. To respond to these challenges the University Medical Center by the UMCC; must understand health care cost issues, the mortality rate problem, the quality improvement

Cui, Yan

337

Stanford University School of Medicine Responsible Conduct of Research  

E-print Network

carried out in Europe asked people whom they trust to tell the truth about genetically modified crops scientists contributed to public distrust about genetically modified crops, and if so, how? 4) In her, and found that 26% of respondents named environmental organizations and 6% named universities. Have

338

Evidence-based medicine in primary care: qualitative study of family physicians  

PubMed Central

Background The objectives of this study were: a) to examine physician attitudes to and experience of the practice of evidence-based medicine (EBM) in primary care; b) to investigate the influence of patient preferences on clinical decision-making; and c) to explore the role of intuition in family practice. Method Qualitative analysis of semi-structured interviews of 15 family physicians purposively selected from respondents to a national survey on EBM mailed to a random sample of Canadian family physicians. Results Participants mainly welcomed the promotion of EBM in the primary care setting. A significant number of barriers and limitations to the implementation of EBM were identified. EBM is perceived by some physicians as a devaluation of the 'art of medicine' and a threat to their professional/clinical autonomy. Issues regarding the trustworthiness and credibility of evidence were of great concern, especially with respect to the influence of the pharmaceutical industry. Attempts to become more evidence-based often result in the experience of conflicts. Patient factors exert a powerful influence on clinical decision-making and can serve as trumps to research evidence. A widespread belief that intuition plays a vital role in primary care reinforced views that research evidence must be considered alongside other factors such as patient preferences and the clinical judgement and experience of the physician. Discussion Primary care physicians are increasingly keen to consider research evidence in clinical decision-making, but there are significant concerns about the current model of EBM. Our findings support the proposed revisions to EBM wherein greater emphasis is placed on clinical expertise and patient preferences, both of which remain powerful influences on physician behaviour. PMID:12740025

Tracy, C Shawn; Dantas, Guilherme Coelho; Upshur, Ross EG

2003-01-01

339

[Christian Ehrenfried Eschenbach (1712-1788)--a pioneer of legal medicine in German universities].  

PubMed

Christian Ehrenfried Eschenbach (1712-1788) belongs to the forerunners of the embossed natural science scholars of legal medicine in Germany. As a principal re-elected 11 times and dean of the medical faculty at Rostock University he defended academic positions in difficult times. His bibliography comprises numerous text books, e.g. on surgery, anatomy, pathology and obstetrics as well as various fields of mathematics. His Medicina legalis (1746 and 1775) belongs to the first systematic editions of forensic medicine in the German-speaking community. Thanks to his extensive practical experience as a physician and public health officer he took a very progressive position on questions of forensic medicine, issues of professional ethics in medicine and the assessment of injuries. He has wrongly been forgotten. PMID:15328926

Wegener, Rudolf

2004-01-01

340

Effects of the Islamic Revolution in Iran on medical education: the Shiraz University School of Medicine.  

PubMed

Some consequences of the Islamic Revolution in Iran on medical education were studied utilizing the Shiraz University School of Medicine. Of the 173 full-time faculty employed in 1978, 108 (63 per cent) had left the university by the end of 1982, and 81 (47 per cent) had left the country, aggravating the chronic shortage of medical personnel in Iran. Steps taken by the Iranian authorities to counteract these trends have not proven effective. PMID:6638237

Ronaghy, H A; Simon, H J

1983-12-01

341

Medicines  

MedlinePLUS

... better. In the United States, the Food and Drug Administration is in charge of assuring the safety ... prescription and over-the-counter medicines. Even safe drugs can cause unwanted side effects or interactions with ...

342

Stress reduction for nurses through Arts-in-Medicine at the University of New Mexico Hospitals.  

PubMed

Artists-in-medicine at the University of New Mexico help nurses remember and renew the values that originally attracted them to the field of nursing. Exploring their nascent creativity through massage, yoga, art, music, and writing, nurses are encouraged to reconnect emotionally and spiritually with themselves, their patients, and fellow healthcare workers. PMID:17627196

Repar, Patricia Ann; Patton, Douglas

2007-01-01

343

Cytology Submission Form College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University AHDC Accession No. / Date  

E-print Network

Cytology Submission Form College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University AHDC Accession No Monday through Friday. AHDC Acct. No.____________ Sampling Date Please check all that apply: p Cytology field). Page ____ of ____ VSS-FORM-002-V.06 Smears Submitted CYTOLOGY TESTS REQUESTED : Species Breed

Keinan, Alon

344

UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT SCHOOL OF MEDICINE Annual Report of the Department of Pediatrics 2010-2011  

E-print Network

UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT SCHOOL OF MEDICINE Annual Report of the Department of Pediatrics 2010 & Nutrition) to Professor of Pediatrics; Umit Emre, MD (Pulmonolgy), and Gyula Acsadi, MD, PhD (Neurology), to Associate Professor of Pediatrics Appointments of new faculty members: Amy Wu, MD (Cardiology); Carla Pruden

Kim, Duck O.

345

University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry Updated: February 5, 2013  

E-print Network

's life as a professional. The American Association of Medical Colleges' Medical Student Objectives. Under pressure of fatigue, professional stress, or personal problems, students should strive to maintaiUniversity of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry Updated: February 5, 2013 MEDICAL STUDENT

Goldman, Steven A.

346

Postdoctoral Fellowships in Adult Clinical Psychology Stanford University School of Medicine  

E-print Network

Postdoctoral Fellowships in Adult Clinical Psychology Stanford University School of Medicine-doctoral fellows in our APA-accredited adult clinical psychology fellowship for the 2014-2015 academic year. Clinic SHC and LPCH are private, non-profit hospitals. #12;2 Mission The mission of the Adult Clinical

Puglisi, Joseph

347

Department of Radiation Oncology University of Maryland School of Medicine/Medical Center  

E-print Network

Department of Radiation Oncology University of Maryland School of Medicine/Medical Center ASTRO internal radiation therapy to the liver using yttrium-90 coated resin microspheres. ACCEPTED, POSTER 2 prognostic factor in locally advanced esophageal cancer patients treated with trimodality therapy. ACCEPTED

Weber, David J.

348

University of Kentucky College of Medicine Graduating Seniors' Satisfaction with Their Medical Education--May 1994.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study surveyed 1994 graduates (N=91) of the University of Kentucky College of Medicine (UKCM) regarding their satisfaction with the medical education they received at the school. The Class of 1994 was the last to finish before the implementation of a curriculum reform initiative designed to increase active student learning, integrate…

Witzke, Donald B.; And Others

349

Stanford University School of Medicine Privacy Office medprivacy@stanford.edu | 650.725.1828  

E-print Network

(PHI) and "other sensitive data." As a reminder, PHI includes: · Name, address, date of birth, age categories in Stanford University's Data Classification Guidelines. Information must be protected whether it of Medicine IRT Service Desk at X5-8000 if you have questions. Use of personal email accounts. You should

Kay, Mark A.

350

Sponsored by the University of California, Irvine School of Medicine RADIOLOGY GRAND ROUNDS  

E-print Network

Sponsored by the University of California, Irvine School of Medicine RADIOLOGY GRAND ROUNDS Wednesday, March 6, 2013 ­ 3:30 ­ 4:30PM UCI Medical Center ­ Radiology Conference Room (0117) "Screening Mammography at the Threshold for Recall" Edward A. Sickles, M.D., F.A.C.R. Professor Emeritus of Radiology

Mease, Kenneth D.

351

Sponsored by the University of California, Irvine School of Medicine RADIOLOGY GRAND ROUNDS  

E-print Network

Sponsored by the University of California, Irvine School of Medicine RADIOLOGY GRAND ROUNDS Wednesday, February 27, 2013 ­ 4:00 ­ 5:00PM UCI Medical Center ­ Radiology Conference Room (0117) "Neuroimaging of Epilepsy" Noriko Salamon, MD, PhD Professor of Radiology, Director of Diagnostic Neuroradiology

Mease, Kenneth D.

352

Sponsored by the University of California, Irvine School of Medicine RADIOLOGY GRAND ROUNDS  

E-print Network

Sponsored by the University of California, Irvine School of Medicine RADIOLOGY GRAND ROUNDS Wednesday, November 14, 2012 ­ 4:00 ­ 5:00PM UCI Medical Center ­ Radiology Conference Room (0117) "Neuroimaging of Epilepsy" Noriko Salamon, MD, PhD Professor of Radiology, Director of Diagnostic Neuroradiology

Mease, Kenneth D.

353

Sponsored by the University of California, Irvine School of Medicine RADIOLOGY GRAND ROUNDS  

E-print Network

Sponsored by the University of California, Irvine School of Medicine RADIOLOGY GRAND ROUNDS Wednesday, July 10, 2013 ­ 4:00 ­ 5:00PM UC Irvine Medical Center ­ Radiology Conference Room 0117 "f updated information on radiological science topics and research. Target Audience Attending physicians

Mease, Kenneth D.

354

Sponsored by the University of California, Irvine School of Medicine RADIOLOGY GRAND ROUNDS  

E-print Network

Sponsored by the University of California, Irvine School of Medicine RADIOLOGY GRAND ROUNDS Monday, April 8, 2013 ­ 4:00 ­ 5:00PM UCI Medical Center ­ Radiology Conference Room (0117) "Imaging of Intracranial Infections: Pearls and Pitfalls" Mark E. Mullins, M.D., Ph.D. Associate Professor of Radiology

Mease, Kenneth D.

355

DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL THERAPY AND HUMAN MOVEMENT SCIENCES NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY FEINBERG SCHOOL OF MEDICINE  

E-print Network

DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL THERAPY AND HUMAN MOVEMENT SCIENCES NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY FEINBERG SCHOOL OF MEDICINE Benefits for Physical Therapy Clinical Educators To recognize the contribution of clinical evidence. The Department of Physical Therapy and Human Movement Sciences (PTHMS) will reimburse the Center

Contractor, Anis

356

University of Maryland School of Medicine Department of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Science  

E-print Network

6/2/2004 University of Maryland School of Medicine Department of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Science Stationery Graphic Standards and Style Guide #12;2 The Department of Physical Therapy. Therefore, the term `Department of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Science' can not be used without

Weber, David J.

357

Intercampus network of the Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Indiana University  

Microsoft Academic Search

During the past year, the Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Indiana University designed, specified, and installed a campus wide network. The network supports three functions: a laser camera network to allow the transfer of hard copy images across the campus; a positron emission tomography (PET) network to allow the interconnection of the workstations comprising the PET system; and a

Robert M. Witt; Thomas Gibbs; Robert W. Holden

1994-01-01

358

Stanford University School of Medicine Department of Otolaryngology/Head & Neck Surgery  

E-print Network

Goals & Objectives : Skills & Knowledge 10 General Surgery Rotation 10 Stanford Head and Neck Team PGY2 Appendix F: Palo Alto Veteran's Affairs Rotation Checklist Documentation Policies Scheduling Surgery CasesStanford University School of Medicine Department of Otolaryngology/Head & Neck Surgery Resident

Kay, Mark A.

359

Department of Community Medicine & Health Care University of Connecticut Health Center  

E-print Network

Department of Community Medicine & Health Care University of Connecticut Health Center Directions right at the first traffic light onto Route 4 East (Farmington Avenue). At third traffic light, turn and crosses the I-84 access road. At the fourth traffic light, turn left into The Exchange office complex

Oliver, Douglas L.

360

Comparison of pharmacist managed anticoagulation with usual medical care in a family medicine clinic  

PubMed Central

Background The beneficial outcomes of oral anticoagulation therapy are dependent upon achieving and maintaining an optimal INR therapeutic range. There is growing evidence that better outcomes are achieved when anticoagulation is managed by a pharmacist with expertise in anticoagulation management rather than usual care by family physicians. This study compared a pharmacist managed anticoagulation program (PC) to usual physician care (UC) in a family medicine clinic. Methods A retrospective cohort study was carried out in a family medicine clinic which included a clinical pharmacist. In 2006, the pharmacist assumed anticoagulation management. For a 17-month period, the PC group (n = 112) of patients on warfarin were compared to the UC patients (n = 81) for a similar period prior to 2006. The primary outcome was the percentage of time patients' INR was in the therapeutic range (TTR). Secondary outcomes were the percentage of time in therapeutic range within ± 0.3 units of the recommended range (expanded TTR) and percentage of time the INR was >5.0 or <1.5. Results The baseline characteristics were similar between the groups. Fifty-five percent of the PC group was male with a mean age of 67 years; 51% of the UC group was male with a mean age of 71 years. The most common indications for warfarin in both groups were atrial fibrillation, mechanical heart valves and deep vein thrombosis. The TTR was 73% for PC and 65% for UC (p < 0.0001). The expanded TTR for PC was 91% and 85% for UC (p < 0.0001). The percentage of time INR values were <1.5 was 0.7% for PC patients and 1.9% for UC patients (p < 0.0001), and >5 were 0.3% for PC patients and 0.1% for UC (p < 0.0001). Conclusion The pharmacist-managed anticoagulation program within a family practice clinic compared to usual care by the physicians achieved significantly better INR control as measured by the percentage of time patients' INR values were kept in both the therapeutic and expanded range. Based on the results of this study, a collaborative family practice clinic using pharmacists and physicians may be an effective model for anticoagulation management with these results verified in future prospective randomized studies. PMID:21849052

2011-01-01

361

When Academics Become Parents: An Overview of Family Leave Policies at Canadian Universities.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reviews family leave policies in Canadian universities through March 2002. Analysis of pregnancy, adoption, and partner (paternity) leave policies reveal that most Canadian university policies produce income loss and disruption and are characterized by gender regulation and familialism. The paper proposes that improving faculty family leave…

Prentice, Susan; Pankratz, Curtis J.

2003-01-01

362

VARIABLE SELECTION FOR QUALITATIVE INTERACTIONS IN PERSONALIZED MEDICINE WHILE CONTROLLING THE FAMILY-  

E-print Network

VARIABLE SELECTION FOR QUALITATIVE INTERACTIONS IN PERSONALIZED MEDICINE WHILE CONTROLLING of treatment, often referred to as stratified or personalized medicine. Though highly sought after, methods interactions; variable selection; personalized medicine; lasso 1 INTRODUCTION The topics of treatment covariate

Murphy, Susan A.

363

First Universities Allied for Essential Medicines (UAEM) Neglected Diseases and Innovation Symposium.  

PubMed

Universities Allied for Essential Medicines organized its first Neglected Diseases and Innovation Symposium to address expanding roles of public sector research institutions in innovation in research and development of biomedical technologies for treatment of diseases, particularly neglected tropical diseases. Universities and other public research institutions are increasingly integrated into the pharmaceutical innovation system. Academic entities now routinely undertake robust high-throughput screening and medicinal chemistry research programs to identify lead compounds for small molecule drugs and novel drug targets. Furthermore, product development partnerships are emerging between academic institutions, non-profit entities, and biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies to create diagnostics, therapies, and vaccines for diseases of the poor. With not for profit mission statements, open access publishing standards, open source platforms for data sharing and collaboration, and a shift in focus to more translational research, universities and other public research institutions are well-placed to accelerate development of medical technologies, particularly for neglected tropical diseases. PMID:22232453

Musselwhite, Laura W; Maciag, Karolina; Lankowski, Alex; Gretes, Michael C; Wellems, Thomas E; Tavera, Gloria; Goulding, Rebecca E; Guillen, Ethan

2012-01-01

364

Family medicine model in Turkey: a qualitative assessment from the perspectives of primary care workers  

PubMed Central

Background A person-list-based family medicine model was introduced in Turkey during health care reforms. This study aimed to explore from primary care workers’ perspectives whether this model could achieve the cardinal functions of primary care and have an integrative position in the health care system. Methods Four groups of primary care workers were included in this exploratory-descriptive study. The first two groups were family physicians (FP) (n?=?51) and their ancillary personnel (n?=?22). The other two groups were physicians (n?=?44) and midwives/nurses (n?=?11) working in community health centres. Participants were selected for maximum variation and 102 in-depth interviews and six focus groups were conducted using a semi-structured form. Results Data analysis yielded five themes: accessibility, first-contact care, longitudinality, comprehensiveness, and coordination. Most participants stated that many people are not registered with any FP and that the majority of these belong to the most disadvantaged groups in society. FPs reported that 40-60% of patients on their lists have never received a service from them and the majority of those who use their services do not use FPs as the first point of contact. According to most participants, the list-based system improved the longitudinality of the relationship between FPs and patients. However, based on other statements, this improvement only applies to one quarter of the population. Whereas there was an improvement limited to a quantitative increase in services (immunisation, monitoring of pregnant women and infants) included in the performance-based contracting system, participants stated that services not among the performance targets, such as family planning, postpartum follow-ups, and chronic disease management, could be neglected. FPs admitted not being able to keep informed of services their patients had received at other health institutions. Half of the participants stated that the list-based system removed the possibility of evaluating the community as a whole. Conclusions According to our findings, FPs have a limited role as the first point of contact and in giving longitudinal, comprehensive, and coordinated care. The family medicine model in Turkey is unable to provide a suitable structure to integrate health care services. PMID:24571275

2014-01-01

365

Medication reconciliation by clinical pharmacists in an outpatient family medicine clinic.  

PubMed

OBJECTIVES To evaluate the incidence of medication discrepancies in electronic health record (EHR) medication lists in an outpatient family medicine clinic where clinical pharmacists perform medication reconciliation, to classify and resolve the discrepancies, to identify the most common medication classes involved, and to assess the clinical importance of the discrepancies. METHODS This research was conducted at Bethesda Family Medicine Clinic in St. Paul, MN, with data collected from February 2009 to February 2010. To be included, patients had to be 18 years or older and have at least 10 medications listed in the EHR. The clinical pharmacist saw each patient before the physician, reviewed the medication list with the patient, and made corrections to the EHR medication list. When possible, comprehensive medication management (CMM) also was conducted. RESULTS During 1 year, 327 patients were seen for medication reconciliation. A total of 2,167 discrepancies were identified and resolved, with a mean (±SD) of 6.6 ± 4.5 total discrepancies and 3.4 ± 3.2 clinically important discrepancies per patient. The range of total discrepancies per patient was 0 to 26. The most common discrepancy category was "patient not taking medication on list" (54.1%). Overall, the source of the discrepancy usually was the patient, but it varied according to discrepancy category. The most common medication classes involved were pain medications, gastrointestinal medications, and topical medications. Of the 2,167 discrepancies, 51.1% were determined to be clinically important by the pharmacist. The pharmacist conducted CMM in 48% of patients. CONCLUSION Outpatient medication reconciliation by a pharmacist identified and resolved a large number of medication discrepancies and improved the accuracy of EHR medication lists. Because more than 50% of the discrepancies were thought to be clinically important, improving the accuracy of medication lists could affect patient care. PMID:24531920

Milone, Anna S; Philbrick, Ann M; Harris, Ila M; Fallert, Christopher J

2014-01-01

366

Seattle Pacific University --20052006 Graduate Catalog 101 Marriage and Family Therapy (M.S.)  

E-print Network

, administrator and medical family therapist. Marriage and Family Therapy program graduates work with individualsSeattle Pacific University -- 2005­2006 Graduate Catalog 101 Marriage and Family Therapy (M.S.) MISSION STATEMENT The mission of the Marriage and Family Therapy (MFT) program at Seattle Pacific

Nelson, Tim

367

M.D. Program Student Handbook The University of Central Florida College of Medicine educates and inspires individuals to be exemplary  

E-print Network

M.D. Program Student Handbook #12;#12;The University of Central Florida College of Medicine of Central Florida College of Medicine M.D. Program Student Handbook 2013 ­ 2014 The University of Central Florida College of Medicine M.D. Program Student Handbook is published annually by the College of Medicine

Wu, Shin-Tson

368

Curricula for teaching the content of clinical practice guidelines to family medicine and internal medicine residents in the US: a survey study  

PubMed Central

Background Teaching the content of clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) is important to both clinical care and graduate medical education. The objective of this study was to determine the characteristics of curricula for teaching the content of CPGs in family medicine and internal medicine residency programs in the United States. Methods We surveyed the directors of family medicine and internal medicine residency programs in the United States. The questionnaire included questions about the characteristics of the teaching of CPGs: goals and objectives, educational activities, evaluation, aspects of CPGs that the program teaches, the methods of making texts of CPGs available to residents, and the major barriers to teaching CPGs. Results Of 434 programs responding (out of 839, 52%), 14% percent reported having written goals and objectives related to teaching CPGs. The most frequently taught aspect was the content of specific CPGs (76%). The top two educational strategies used were didactic sessions (76%) and journal clubs (64%). Auditing for adherence by residents was the primary evaluation strategy (44%), although 36% of program directors conducted no evaluation. Programs made texts of CPGs available to residents most commonly in the form of paper copies (54%) while the most important barrier was time constraints on faculty (56%). Conclusion Residency programs teach different aspects of CPGs to varying degrees, and the majority uses educational strategies not supported by research evidence. PMID:19772570

Akl, Elie A; Mustafa, Reem; Wilson, Mark C; Symons, Andrew; Moheet, Amir; Rosenthal, Thomas; Guyatt, Gordon H; Schunemann, Holger J

2009-01-01

369

A growing family: the expanding universe of the bacterial cytoskeleton  

PubMed Central

Cytoskeletal proteins are important mediators of cellular organization in both eukaryotes and bacteria. In the past, cytoskeletal studies have largely focused on three major cytoskeletal families, namely the eukaryotic actin, tubulin, and intermediate filament (IF) proteins and their bacterial homologs MreB, FtsZ, and crescentin. However, mounting evidence suggests that these proteins represent only the tip of the iceberg, as the cellular cytoskeletal network is far more complex. In bacteria, each of MreB, FtsZ, and crescentin represents only one member of large families of diverse homologs. There are also newly identified bacterial cytoskeletal proteins with no eukaryotic homologs, such as WACA proteins and bactofilins. Furthermore, there are universally conserved proteins, such as the metabolic enzyme CtpS, that assemble into filamentous structures that can be repurposed for structural cytoskeletal functions. Recent studies have also identified an increasing number of eukaryotic cytoskeletal proteins that are unrelated to actin, tubulin, and IFs, such that expanding our understanding of cytoskeletal proteins is advancing the understanding of the cell biology of all organisms. Here, we summarize the recent explosion in the identification of new members of the bacterial cytoskeleton and describe a hypothesis for the evolution of the cytoskeleton from self-assembling enzymes. PMID:22092065

Ingerson-Mahar, Michael; Gitai, Zemer

2014-01-01

370

Medicine and the arts in the undergraduate medical curriculum at the University of Oslo Faculty of Medicine, Oslo, Norway.  

PubMed

The authors describe a course titled Medicine and the Arts, established in 1996, that is part of the first semester of the undergraduate medical curriculum at the University of Oslo Faculty of Medicine. The course comprises four two-hour seminars on literature, visual arts, architecture, and music. The core objectives of the course are to demonstrate how art can be a source of personal and professional development, and also how art represents a source of insight into patients' experiences and the social, cultural, and historical context of medical practice. The course emphasizes that art is ambiguous and many layered and that its interpretation requires sensitivity, engagement, imagination, and reflection. Fostering these skills is a major aim of the course because these skills are also essential for clinical competence and professional development. The course's seminars are integrated into the curriculum but are not compulsory. Although the topics covered by the course have not been explicitly addressed in the formal examination of students, there has been some discussion about doing so, which would be a signal that those topics are as important as others in the curriculum. PMID:14534105

Frich, Jan C; Fugelli, Per

2003-10-01

371

International medical graduates in family medicine in the United States of America: an exploration of professional characteristics and attitudes  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: The number of international medical graduates (IMGs) entering family medicine in the United States of America has steadily increased since 1997. Previous research has examined practice locations of these IMGs and their role in providing care to underserved populations. To our knowledge, research does not exist comparing professional profiles, credentials and attitudes among IMG and United States medical graduate

Amanda L Morris; Robert L Phillips; George E Fryer Jr; Larry A Green; Fitzhugh Mullan

2006-01-01

372

ASUM Child Care, Preschool and Family Resources University Center, Room 119 The University of Montana Missoula, MT 59812  

E-print Network

ASUM Child Care, Preschool and Family Resources University Center, Room 119 The University of Montana Missoula, MT 59812 www.umt.edu/childcare Office (406) 243-2542 Fax (406) 243-2531 ASUM Child Care in the Associated Students of the University of Montana (ASUM) Child Care Preschool center programs. The centers

Steele, Brian

373

A primer of Darwinian medicine Evolution and Medicine by Robert L. Perlman, Oxford University Press, 2013. US$49.50/27.50/s31.35 pbk (xiii + 162 pp.),  

E-print Network

A primer of Darwinian medicine Evolution and Medicine by Robert L. Perlman, Oxford University Press, since Williams and Nesse's landmark article that introduced us to evolutionary medicine [1], I have. Evolutionary medicine is one of those fields where discourse and advances are sorely need- ed. In addition

Blumstein, Daniel T.

374

Performance of cancer screening in a university general internal medicine practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

The authors evaluated use of seven cancer screening tests by 52 providers in a university general internal medicine practice,\\u000a using 1980 American Cancer Society (ACS) recommendations as standards for comparison. Performance rates were determined by\\u000a retrospective medical record reviews of a stratified random sample of 525 patients. In addition, the 48 physicians and four\\u000a nurse-practitioners in the practice were interviewed

Stephen J. McPhee; Robert J. Richard; Sharon N. Solkowitz

1986-01-01

375

From LCME probation to compliance: the Marshall University Joan C Edwards School of Medicine experience  

PubMed Central

The Joan C Edwards School of Medicine (Marshall University, Huntington, WV, USA) was placed on probation by the Liaison Committee on Medical Education (LCME) in June 2011. In the following 2 years, extensive changes were made to address the numerous citations that resulted in this probation. In October 2013, the LCME lifted probation. In this article, we detail the challenges and solutions identified relevant to our struggle with compliance. PMID:25337003

Miller, Bobby; Dzwonek, Brian; McGuffin, Aaron; Shapiro, Joseph I

2014-01-01

376

Task Force 1. Report of the Task Force on Patient Expectations, Core Values, Reintegration, and the New Model of Family Medicine  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND To lay the groundwork for the development of a comprehensive strategy to transform and renew the specialty of family medicine, this Future of Family Medicine task force was charged with identifying the core values of family medicine, developing proposals to reform family medicine to meet consumer expectations, and determining systems of care to be delivered by family medicine in the future. METHODS A diverse, multidisciplinary task force representing a broad spectrum of perspectives and expertise analyzed and discussed published literature; findings from surveys, interviews, and focus groups compiled by research firms contracted to the Future of Family Medicine project; and analyses from The Robert Graham Center, professional societies in the United States and abroad, and others. Through meetings, conference calls, and writing, and revision of a series of subcommittee reports, the entire task force reached consensus on its conclusions and recommendations. These were reviewed by an external panel of experts and revisions were made accordingly. MAJOR FINDINGS After delivering on its promise to reverse the decline of general practice in the United States, family medicine and the nation face additional challenges to assure all people receive care that is safe, effective, patient-centered, timely, efficient, and equitable. Challenges the discipline needs to address to improve family physicians’ ability to make important further contributions include developing a broader, more accurate understanding of the specialty among the public and other health professionals, addressing the wide scope and variance in practice types within family medicine, winning respect for the specialty in academic circles, making family medicine a more attractive career option, and dealing with the perception that family medicine is not solidly grounded in science and technology. The task force set forth a proposed identity statement for family medicine, a basket of services that should be reliably provided in family medicine practices, and an itemization of key attributes and core values that define the specialty. It also proposed and described a New Model of family medicine for people of all ages and both genders that emphasizes patient-centered, evidence-based, whole-person care provided through a multidisciplinary team approach in settings that reduce barriers to access and use advanced information systems and other new technologies. The task force recommended a time of active experimentation to redesign the work and workplace of family physicians; the development of revised financial models for family medicine, and a national resource to provide assistance to individual practices moving to New Model practice; and cooperation with others pursuing the transformation of frontline medicine to better serve the public. CONCLUSIONS Unless there are changes in the broader health care system and within the specialty, the position of family medicine in the United States will be untenable in a 10- to 20-year time frame. Even within the constraints of today’s flawed health care system, there are major opportunities for family physicians to realize improved results for patients and economic success. A period of aggressive experimentation and redevelopment of family medicine is needed now. The future success of the discipline and its impact on public well-being depends in large measure on family medicine’s ability to rearticulate its vision and competencies in a fashion that has greater resonance with the public while substantially revising the organization and processes by which care is delivered. When accomplished, family physicians will achieve more fully the aspirations articulated by the specialty’s core values and contribute to the solution of the nation’s serious health care problems.

Green, Larry A.; Graham, Robert; Bagley, Bruce; Kilo, Charles M.; Spann, Stephen J.; Bogdewic, Stephen P.; Swanson, John

2004-01-01

377

Can credit systems help in family medicine training in developing countries? An innovative concept.  

PubMed

There is irrefutable evidence that health systems perform best when supported by a Family Physician network. Training a critical mass of highly skilled Family Physicians can help developing countries to reach their Millennium Development Goals and deliver comprehensive patient-centered health care to their population. The challenge in developing countries is the need to rapidly train these Family Physicians in large numbers, while also ensuring the quality of the learning, and assuring the quality of training. The experience of Christian Medical College (CMC), Vellore, India and other global examples confirm the fact that training large numbers is possible through well-designed blended learning programs. The question then arises as to how these programs can be standardized. Globally, the concept of the "credit system" has become the watch-word for many training programs seeking standardization. This article explores the possibility of introducing incremental academic certifications using credit systems as a method to standardize these blended learning programs, gives a glimpse at the innovation that CMC, Vellore is piloting in this regard partnering with the University of Edinburgh and analyses the possible benefits and pitfalls of such an approach. PMID:25374849

Raji, J Beulah; Velavan, Jachin; Anbarasi, Sahaya; Grant, Liz

2014-07-01

378

Access to medicines and out of pocket payments for primary care: Evidence from family medicine users in rural Tajikistan  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: In Tajikistan it is estimated that out of pocket payments constitute two-thirds of all health spending with high proportions of these contributions through informal payments. As a consequence, access to basic care is a major concern particularly among the most needy and vulnerable groups. This article evaluates accessibility of prescription medicines and patient expenditures for primary care services in

Fabrizio Tediosi; Raffael Aye; Shukufa Ibodova; Robin Thompson; Kaspar Wyss

2008-01-01

379

Office of Graduate Medical Education University of Tennessee  

E-print Network

/12/2014 #12;Office of Graduate Medical Education University of Tennessee Family Medicine Coordinator Email catina.price@mlh.org Fax Family Medicine-Jackson Program Director Gregg Mitchell, MD 294 Size 24 Coordinator Sharron Cole Coordinator Email sjcole@uthsc.edu Fax (731) 927-8453 Family Medicine

Cui, Yan

380

Sleep Duration, Quality, or Stability and Obesity in an Urban Family Medicine Center  

PubMed Central

Purpose: Inadequate sleep has negative metabolic consequences that may contribute to obesity. A priori hypotheses posit relationships between sleep characteristics, carbohydrate and lipid metabolism, appetite, fatigue, and obesity in laboratory, clinical, and population settings. There are few reports from primary care; and none that address sleep duration, quality, and stability. This study examines the relationship between three sleep characteristics—duration, quality, or stability—and obesity in our urban hospital affiliated family medicine center in Akron, Ohio. Methods: A systematic sampling process yielded 225 representative patients who completed the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, the Berlin Apnea Questionnaire, and the Sleep Timing Questionnaire. Demographic, body mass, hypertension, and insurance data were obtained from the electronic medical record. Associations between self-reported sleep characteristics and obesity were examined via contingency tables and regression models. Results: Seventy-eight percent (78%) reported poor quality sleep, 59% had elevated Berlin apnea-risk scores, 12% reported restless legs symptoms, and 9% reported a prior diagnosis of sleep apnea; 62% were obese. We found significant (p < 0.05) associations between sleep quality, duration or bedtime stability, and obesity. The association between sleep quality and obesity was negative and linear (69%, 72%, 56%, 43%), while the association between sleep duration and obesity was U-shaped (74%, 53%, 53%, 62%; linear term p = 0.02 and quadratic term p = 0.03). Less stable bedtimes during the week (OR = 2.3, p = 0.008) or on the weekend (OR = 1.8, p = 0.04) were also associated with obesity. The association between sleep quality and obesity was not explained by patient demographics or snoring (ORadj = 2.2; p = 0.008) Conclusion: This study adds to the sparse literature on the relationship between three self-reported sleep characteristics and obesity in urban primary care settings which typically differ from both general population and specialty outpatient settings. Citation: Logue EE; Scott ED; Palmieri PA; Dudley P. Sleep duration, quality, or stability and obesity in an urban family medicine center. J Clin Sleep Med 2014;10(2):177-182. PMID:24533001

Logue, Everett E.; Scott, Edward D.; Palmieri, Patrick A.; Dudley, Patricia

2014-01-01

381

Associated Factors of Suicide Among University Students: Importance of Family Environment  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim in this study was to underline the importance of family environment as a significant associate of suicide probability among university students. For this aim 226 Turkish university students completed Suicide Probability Scale, Family Environment Questionnaire, Beck Depression Inventory, and Positive and Negative Affect Scale. As a result of the formulated regression analysis, after controlling for the 51% of

Tülin Gençöz; P?nar

2006-01-01

382

The Magazine for Alumni and Friends of Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University Winter/Spring 2010  

E-print Network

The Magazine for Alumni and Friends of Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University the magazine for alumni, faculty, students, friends and supporters of Albert einstein College of Medicine EinstEin Winter/Spring 2010 Growing Up Healthy How Einstein Is Helping City Kids #12;fEaturEs 2

Yates, Andrew

383

SUMMER/FALL 2012 The Magazine for Alumni and Friends of Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University  

E-print Network

EINSTEIN SUMMER/FALL 2012 The Magazine for Alumni and Friends of Albert Einstein College and supporters of Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University Published by The Philip and Rita-mail: letters@einstein.yu.edu Website: www.einstein.yu.edu Copyright © 2012 Albert Einstein College of Medicine

Kenny, Paraic

384

SSppoottlliigghhtt oonn RReesseeaarrcchh Volume IX, No. 3, May 2012 University of Missouri-Columbia, College of Veterinary Medicine  

E-print Network

the PSRS document. IT'S ABOUT THE RESEARCH Carolyn Henry, DVM, MS, was named the interim associate director in November. Henry is the MU faculty facilitator for the University's One Health/One Medicine Mizzou Advantage strength we have here in the field of comparative medicine," she said. Henry said her goal during

Taylor, Jerry

385

Name of Institution Boston University-Mental Health Counseling & Behavioral Medicine Website www.bumc.bu.edu/mhbm  

E-print Network

Name of Institution Boston University-Mental Health Counseling & Behavioral Medicine Program individuals in mental health counseling interventions with a complementary background in behavioral medicine Website www.bumc.bu.edu/mhbm Programs Offered The Master of Arts (M.A.) in Mental Health Counseling

New Hampshire, University of

386

A Novel Nutrition Medicine Education Model: the Boston University Experience123  

PubMed Central

Most deaths in the United States are preventable and related to nutrition. Although physicians are expected to counsel their patients about nutrition-related health conditions, a recent survey reported minimal improvements in nutrition medicine education in US medical schools in the past decade. Starting in 2006, we have developed an educational plan using a novel student-centered model of nutrition medicine education at Boston University School of Medicine that focuses on medical student–mentored extracurricular activities to develop, evaluate, and sustain nutrition medicine education. The medical school uses a team-based approach focusing on case-based learning in the classroom, practice-based learning in the clinical setting, extracurricular activities, and a virtual curriculum to improve medical students’ knowledge, attitudes, and practice skills across their 4-y period of training. We have been using objectives from the NIH National Academy Awards guide and tools from the Association of American Medical Colleges to detect new areas of nutrition medicine taught at the medical school. Although we were only able to identify 20.5 h of teaching in the preclerkship years, we observed that most preclerkship nutrition medicine objectives were covered during the course of the 4-y teaching period, and extracurricular activities provided new opportunities for student leadership and partnership with other health professionals. These observations are very encouraging as new assessment tools are being developed. Future plans include further evaluation and dissemination of lessons learned using this model to improve public health wellness with support from academia, government, industry, and foundations. PMID:23319117

Lenders, Carine; Gorman, Kathy; Milch, Hannah; Decker, Ashley; Harvey, Nanette; Stanfield, Lorraine; Lim-Miller, Aimee; Salge-Blake, Joan; Judd, Laura; Levine, Sharon

2013-01-01

387

To: Stanford University School of Medicine faculty, staff, or students interested in conducting research within the MD curriculum  

E-print Network

/experimental group and/or no dissemination included) - Surveys examining student attitudes towards course 1 To: Stanford University School of Medicine faculty, staff, or students interested similar methodologies to research (e.g., surveys, observations, interviews) but are not broadly

Puglisi, Joseph

388

Predictive Value of the Korean Academy of Family Medicine In-Training Examination for Certifying Examination  

PubMed Central

Background In-training examination (ITE) is a cognitive examination similar to the written test, but it is different from the Clinical Practice Examination of the Korean Academy of Family Medicine (KAFM) Certification Examination (CE). The objective of this is to estimate the positive predictive value of the KAFM-ITE for identifying residents at risk for poor performance on the three types of KAFM-CE. Methods 372 residents who completed the KAFM-CE in 2011 were included. We compared the mean KAFM-CE scores with ITE experience. We evaluated the correlation and the positive predictive value (PPV) of ITE for the multiple choice question (MCQ) scores of 1st written test & 2nd slide examination, the total clinical practice examination scores, and the total sum of 2nd test. Results 275 out of 372 residents completed ITE. Those who completed ITE had significantly higher MCQ scores of 1st written test than those who did not. The correlation of ITE scores with 1st written MCQ (0.627) was found to be the highest among the other kinds of CE. The PPV of the ITE score for 1st written MCQ scores was 0.672. The PPV of the ITE score ranged from 0.376 to 0.502. Conclusion The score of the KAFM ITE has acceptable positive predictive value that could be used as a part of comprehensive evaluation system for residents in cognitive field. PMID:22745873

Kim, Ji-Yong

2011-01-01

389

Win/win: creating collaborative training opportunities for behavioral health providers within family medicine residency programs.  

PubMed

Integrating behavioral health into primary healthcare offers multiple advantages for patients and health professionals. This model requires a new skill set for all healthcare professionals that is not emphasized in current educational models. The new skills include interprofessional team-based care competencies and expanded patient care competencies. Health professionals must learn new ways to efficiently and effectively address health behavior change, and manage behavioral health issues such as depression and anxiety. Learning environments that co-train mental health and primary care professionals facilitate acquisition of both teamwork and patient care competencies for mental health and primary care professional trainees. Family Medicine Residency programs provide an excellent opportunity for co-training. This article serves as a "how to" guide for residency programs interested in developing a co-training program. Necessary steps to establish and maintain a program are reviewed, as well as goals and objectives for a co-training curriculum and strategies to overcome barriers and challenges in co-training models. PMID:24261270

Ruddy, Nancy Breen; Borresen, Dorothy; Myerholtz, Linda

2013-01-01

390

Usefulness of cardiovascular family history data for population-based preventive medicine and medical research (The Health Family Tree Study and the NHLBI Family Heart Study)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Detailed medical family history data have been proposed to be effective in identifying high-risk families for targeted intervention. With use of a validated and standardized quantitative family risk score (FRS), the degree of familial aggregation of coronary heart disease (CHD), stroke, hypertension, and diabetes was obtained from 122,155 Utah families and 6,578 Texas families in the large, population-based Health Family

Roger R Williams; Steven C Hunt; Gerardo Heiss; Michael A Province; Jeannette T Bensen; Millicent Higgins; Robert M Chamberlain; Joan Ware; Paul N Hopkins

2001-01-01

391

The early years of coeducation at the Yale University School of Medicine.  

PubMed Central

The Yale School of Medicine began accepting women as candidates for the degree of medicine in the fall of 1916. This decision was consistent with the trend in medical education at the time. While Yale was not the first prestigious Eastern medical school to admit women, joining Johns Hopkins (1893) and the University of Pennsylvania (1914), it was not one of the last. Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons admitted women a year later, but Harvard Medical School held out until 1945. The years 1916--1920 saw the number of women enrolled in medical school almost double. Yale's decision to admit women seems to have been made with little resistance from the faculty. The final decision was made through the encouragement and financial help of Henry Farnam, a professor of economics at Yale, who agreed to pay for the women's bathrooms. His daughter, Louise, was in the first class of women. At graduation she was awarded the highest scholastic honors, the Campbell Gold Prize. From Yale she travelled to the Yale-sponsored medical school in Changsha, China, where she became the first female faculty member, a position she held for twelve years. The impressions of Ella Clay Wakeman Calhoun, the only woman to graduate in the second class of women, are presented here. Since 1916 the Yale School of Medicine has undergone extensive physical and philosophical changes, developments in which women have participated. PMID:6996342

Baserga, S. J.

1980-01-01

392

medicine.usask.ca/family C O M M I T T E D P E O P L E A C R O S S S A S K AT C H E WA N  

E-print Network

­ Department of Academic Family Medicine Report for July 1, 2012 to June 30, 2013 learning all roads lead in Saskatchewan, we decided to focus this year on the Department of Academic Family Medicine's expansion obligatory one month of (undergraduate) Family Medicine in Fifth Year appears to be successful and more

Peak, Derek

393

An Innovative Method for Teaching Epidemiology, Public Health, and Preventive Medicine.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Department of Community Health and Family Medicine at the University of Florida College of Medicine developed a curriculum component integrating epidemiologic concepts into a third year family medicine clerkship through a small-group project on a specific condition likely to be encountered by primary care physicians in community practice. (MSE)

Duerson, Margaret C.; And Others

1990-01-01

394

Proceedings from the 5th annual university of calgary leaders in medicine research symposium.  

PubMed

On November 8, 2013, the Leaders in Medicine (LIM) program hosted the 5th Annual Research Symposium. Dr. Jerrold Ellner, Chief of the Infectious Diseases section at Boston Medical Centre and Professor of Medicine at Boston University School of Medicine, was the keynote speaker and presented his lecture entitled "Tuberculosis - Past, Present and Future". The LIM symposium gives a forum for LIM as well as non-LIM medical students to present their research work as either an oral or poster presentation. There were a total of 53 abstracts presented and five oral presentations. The symposium was attended by over 100 students and more than 30 staff members. The oral presentations included • Amrita Roy, Aboriginal identity, ethnic minority status, and prenatal depressive symptoms in a longitudinal pregnancy cohort study in Alberta. • David Nicholl, Obstructive sleep apnea treatment with continuous positive airway pressure decreases intraglomerular pressure and alters renal sensitivity to angiotensin. • James Cotton, An assemblage A Giardia cathepsin B protease degrades interleukin-8 and attenuates neutrophil chemotaxis. • Krystyna Ediger, Alexander Arnold and Emily Shelton, Rebuilding the Calgary Student Run Clinic: A Model for Sustainability. • Sarah MacEachern, Inhibiting inducible nitric oxide synthase restores electrogenic ion transport in experimental IBD: a novel role for enteric glia. See the article on the University of Calgary Leaders in Medicine Program, "A Prescription that Addresses the Decline of Basic Science Education in Medical School" in this same issue of CIM for more details on the program. In short, the LIM Research Symposium has the following objectives: (1) to showcase the impressive variety of projects undertaken by students in the LIM Program as well as U of C medical students; (2) to encourage medical student participation in research and special projects; and, (3) to inform students and faculty about the diversity of opportunities available for research and special projects during medical school and beyond. The following abstracts are those that were put forward for publication. PMID:25282136

Thornton, Christina S; Keough, Michael B; Roberts, Jodie I; Yipp, Bryan; Hollenberg, Morley; Bau, Jason T; Peplowski, Michael A; Beck, Paul L

2014-01-01

395

EinstEinThe Magazine for Alumni and Friends of Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University Winter/spring 2014  

E-print Network

EinstEinThe Magazine for Alumni and Friends of Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva, students, friends and supporters of Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University Published.yu.edu Website: www.einstein.yu.edu Copyright � 2014 Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University

Bukauskas, Feliksas

396

Multi-source evaluation of interpersonal and communication skills of family medicine residents.  

PubMed

There is a lack of information on the use of multi-source evaluation to assess trainees' interpersonal and communication skills in Oriental settings. This study is conducted to assess the reliability and applicability of assessing the interpersonal and communication skills of family medicine residents by patients, peer residents, nurses, and teaching staffs and to compare the ratings with the objective structured clinical examination (OSCE). Our results revealed instruments used by staffs, peers, nurses, and self-evaluation have good internal consistency reliability (? > 0.90), except for the behavioral checklist (? = 0.57). Staffs', peers', and nurses' evaluations were highly correlated with one another (r = 0.722 for staff- and peer-rating, r = 0.734 for staff- and nurse-rating, r = 0.634 for peer- and nurse-rating). However, residents' self-rating and patients-rating were not correlated to ratings by any other raters. OSCE evaluation was correlated to peer-rating (r = 0.533) and staff-rating (r = 0.642), but not correlated to self- or patient-rating. The generalizability study revealed the major sources of variance came from the types of rater and the interaction of residents and types of rater. This study found self-rating and patient-rating were not consistent with other sources of rating on residents' interpersonal and communication skills. Whether variations among different types of rater in a multi-source evaluation should be regarded as measurement errors or complementary information is worth further study. PMID:22240920

Leung, Kai-Kuen; Wang, Wei-Dan; Chen, Yen-Yuan

2012-12-01

397

Diversity of metabolic syndrome criteria in association with cardiovascular diseases – a family medicine-based investigation  

PubMed Central

Background This study compared the association between the 3 definitions of metabolic syndrome (MetS) suggested by the World Health Organization (WHO), National Cholesterol Education Programme (NCEP ATP III), and International Diabetes Federation (IDF), and the risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVD) and shows the prevalence and characteristics of persons with MetS in continental vs. coastal regions and rural vs. urban residence in Croatia. Material/Methods A prospective multicenter study was conducted on 3245 participants ?40 years, who visited general practices from May to July 2008 for any reason. This was a cross-sectional study of the Cardiovascular Risk and Intervention Study in Croatia-family medicine project (ISRCTN31857696). Results All analyzed MetS definitions showed an association with CVD, but the strongest was shown by NCEP ATP III; coronary disease OR 2.48 (95% CI 1.80–3.82), cerebrovascular disease OR 2.14 (1.19–3.86), and peripheral artery disease OR 1.55 (1.04–2.32), especially for age and male sex. According to the NCEP ATP III (IDF), the prevalence was 38.7% (45.9%) [15.9% (18.6%) in men, and 22.7% (27.3%) in women, and 28.4% (33.9%) in the continental region, 10.2% (10.9%) in the coastal region, 26.2% (31.5%) in urban areas, and 12.4% (14.4%) in rural areas. Older age, male sex, and residence in the continental area were positively associated with MetS diagnosis according to NCEP ATP III, and current smoking and Mediterranean diet adherence have protective effects. Conclusions The NCEP ATP III definition seems to provide the strongest association with CVD and should therefore be preferred for use in this population. PMID:23852333

Ivezi?-Lali?, Dragica; Markovi?, Biserka Bergman; Kranj?evi?, Ksenija; Kern, Josipa; Vrdoljak, Davorka; Vu?ak, Jasna

2013-01-01

398

Sponsored by the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Center for Continuing Education in the Health Sciences, the University of Pittsburgh School of Social Work,  

E-print Network

in discrimination or harassment on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, ancestry, sex, age, maritalSponsored by the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Center for Continuing Education in the Health Sciences, the University of Pittsburgh School of Social Work, Western Psychiatric Institute

Sibille, Etienne

399

PEP (Prevention of Injuries and Enhanced Performance) We are offering a group class at University Sports Medicine that is specifically designed to help reduce the number  

E-print Network

at University Sports Medicine that is specifically designed to help reduce the number and frequency of non classes. *for information see our PEP brochure or go to: www.http://urmc.rochester.edu/ortho/patient/specialties/sports-medicine

Goldman, Steven A.

400

Development and implementation of a geriatric care/case management program in a military community-based family medicine residency.  

PubMed

This article discusses how the development of a longitudinal geriatric assessment form facilitated a case management program in identifying high-risk frail elders within a military family practice clinic. A careful review of geriatric assessment tools was performed. From this review, a model geriatric assessment form was developed. A "SWOT" (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats) analysis of the family medicine department was completed to determine if the environment was ready for case management. Analysis of the SWOT data revealed that the environment was favorable for a population-based approach to case management. Results of this initial study are encouraging. The new longitudinal geriatric assessment form has assisted family practice residents in organizing problems and data while seeing elderly patients. As a direct result, higher-risk frail elders have been identified for closer evaluation and follow-up. Future goals are to measure outcomes-based data and to refine the geriatric assessment process. PMID:11143424

Williams, C M; Petrelli, J; Murphy, M

2000-11-01

401

Individual, family, social support and stress factors affecting university students' generalised self-efficacy beliefs.  

E-print Network

??Students' success at university is influenced by their generalised self-ecfficacy beliefs. Previous studies compared these beliefs to individual variables derived from self-concept, family, stress, and… (more)

Amm, Lesley E.

2007-01-01

402

Academic Medicine Meets Traditional African Healing  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Cyril Naidoo, who directs the department of family medicine at the University of KwaZulu-Natal's Nelson R. Mandela School of Medicine, conducts workshops to traditional healers on how to help patients with AIDS and HIV. In Dr. Naidoo's workshop, the group discusses how to counsel patients about HIV and AIDS, how to refer them for testing, and then…

Lindow, Megan

2008-01-01

403

Indiana University School of Medicine (Joseph E. Walther Hall R3 rm. 203) --November 6, 2009 1:00p 1:10p Welcome and Introduction  

E-print Network

Indiana University School of Medicine (Joseph E. Walther Hall ­ R3 rm. 203) -- November 6, 2009 1 Indiana University School of Medicine 1:10p ­ 1:30p "A microRNA Regulatory Feedback Loop Involved in the Development of ER­ breast Cancers" Kenneth Nephew, Indiana University Medical Sciences 1:30p ­1:50p "Estradiol

Zhou, Yaoqi

404

Experience with using second life for medical education in a family and community medicine education unit  

PubMed Central

Background The application of new technologies to the education of health professionals is both a challenge and a necessity. Virtual worlds are increasingly being explored as a support for education. Aim: The aim of this work is to study the suitability of Second Life (SL) as an educational tool for primary healthcare professionals. Methods Design: Qualitative study of accredited clinical sessions in SL included in a continuing professional development (CPD) programme for primary healthcare professionals. Location: Zaragoza I Zone Family and Community Medicine Education Unit (EU) and 9 health centres operated by the Aragonese Health Service, Aragon, Spain. Method: The EU held two training workshops in SL for 16 healthcare professionals from 9 health centres by means of two workshops, and requested them to facilitate clinical sessions in SL. Attendance was open to all personnel from the EU and the 9 health centres. After a trail period of clinical sessions held at 5 health centres between May and November 2010, the CPD-accredited clinical sessions were held at 9 health centres between February and April 2011. Participants: 76 healthcare professionals attended the CPD-accredited clinical sessions in SL. Main measurements: Questionnaire on completion of the clinical sessions. Results Response rate: 42-100%. Questionnaire completed by each health centre on completion of the CPD-accredited clinical sessions: Access to SL: 2 centres were unable to gain access. Sound problems: 0% (0/9). Image problems: 0% (0/9). Voice/text chat: used in 100% (10/9); 0 incidents. Questionnaire completed by participants in the CPD-accredited clinical sessions: Preference for SL as a tool: 100% (76/76). Strengths of this method: 74% (56/76) considered it eliminated the need to travel; 68% (52/76) believed it made more effective use of educational resources; and 47% (36/76) considered it improved accessibility. Weaknesses: 91% (69/76) experienced technical problems, while; 9% (7/76) thought it was impersonal and with little interaction. 65.79% (50/76) believed it was better than other distance learning methods and 38.16% (29/76) believed it was better than face-to-face learning. Conclusions SL is a tool that allows educational activities to be designed that involve a number of health centres in different geographical locations, consequently eliminating the need to travel and making more effective use of educational resources. PMID:22587562

2012-01-01

405

San Francisco State University Department of Psychology Fall 2013 Hartman Family Scholarship in Psychology  

E-print Network

San Francisco State University ­ Department of Psychology Fall 2013 Hartman Family Scholarship in Psychology $500 scholarships available for undergraduate students BACKGROUND The Hartman Family Scholarship in Psychology is available in honor of Dr. Susan Hartman Taylor. Dr. Susan Hartman Taylor was a faculty member

406

Acculturation and depressive symptoms in Muslim university students: Personal–family acculturation match  

Microsoft Academic Search

The relationships of personal acculturation and of personal–family acculturation match to depressive symptoms were investigated in a sample of 68 Muslim university students. Two dimensions of personal and family acculturation were assessed: heritage and mainstream culture identification. Participants completed the Vancouver Index of Acculturation (Ryder, Alden, & Paulhus, 2000) and the depressive disorder subscale of the Psychiatric Diagnostic Screening Questionnaire

Yasmin Asvat; Vanessa L. Malcarne

2008-01-01

407

The Role of Gender, Attachment Dimensions, and Family Environment on Loneliness among Turkish University Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of the present study was to investigate the predictive value of gender, attachment dimensions and family environment in explaining loneliness among students. The study included 473 students (281 females, 192 males) from Ankara University. The UCLA Loneliness Scale, Family Environment Assessment Scale and Experiences in Close…

Demirli, Aylin; Demir, Ayhan

2014-01-01

408

Vaccination coverage of children aged 12-23 months in Gaziantep, Turkey: comparative results of two studies carried out by lot quality technique: what changed after family medicine?  

PubMed Central

Background Health care systems in many countries are changing for a variety of reasons. Monitoring of community-based services, especially vaccination coverage, is important during transition periods to ensure program effectiveness. In 2005, Turkey began a transformation from a “socialization of health services” system to a “family medicine” system. The family medicine system was implemented in the city of Gaziantep, in December, 2010. Methods Two descriptive, cross-sectional studies were conducted in Gaziantep city center; the first study was before the transition to the family medicine system and the second study was one year after the transition. The Lot Quality Technique methodology was used to determine the quality of vaccination services. The population studied was children aged 12–23 months. Data from the two studies were compared in terms of vaccination coverage and lot service quality to determine whether there were any changes in these parameters after the transition to a family service system. Results A total of 93.7% of children in Gaziantep were fully vaccinated before the transition. Vaccination rates decreased significantly to 84.0% (p <0.005) after the family medicine system was implemented. The number of unacceptable vaccine lots increased from 5 lots before the transition to 21 lots after the establishment of the family medicine system. Conclusions The number of first doses of vaccine given was higher after family medicine was implemented; however, the numbers of second, third, and booster doses, and the number of children fully vaccinated were lower than before transition. Acceptable and unacceptable lots were not the same before and after the transition. Different health care personnel were employed at the lots after family medicine was implemented. This result suggests that individual characteristics of the health care personnel working in a geographic area are as important as the socioeconomic and cultural characteristics of the community. PMID:24581049

2014-01-01

409

Gender Norms and Institutional Culture: The Family-Friendly versus the Father-Friendly University  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article investigates the role that gender norms and expectations about parenting play in establishing the family-friendly versus the father-friendly university. Using interviews with 51 male faculty at three research universities, the article considers how faculty and administrators' actions perpetuate cultures that promote or hinder…

Sallee, Margaret W.

2013-01-01

410

Rooted in Mission: Family and Consumer Sciences in Catholic Universities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this paper is to establish the unity between the missions of the Family and Consumer Sciences (FCS) discipline and Catholic higher education by demonstrating relationships among (a) Catholic Social Teaching (CST) and the role of the service principle to FCS; (b) Catholic Intellectual Tradition (CIT) and the centrality of intellect…

Duncan, Janine

2011-01-01

411

Copyright 2009, The Ohio State University Family and Consumer Sciences  

E-print Network

and benefits of breast milk are impossible to reproduce. Consider making breastfeeding your first choice.Breastmilkismadebyyou,soitis thebestfoodforyournewbornbaby.Breastfeed- ing your baby is also good for mothers and the whole family. Breast milk to learn as much as they can about breastfeeding before giving birth. Breast milk is good for babies: ·It

412

Appointment of Dr. James G. Martin as Chair, Department of Medicine of McGill University and Physician-in-Chief of the McGill University Health Centre  

E-print Network

Appointment of Dr. James G. Martin as Chair, Department of Medicine of McGill University and Physician-in-Chief of the McGill University Health Centre It is our pleasure to announce the appointment of Dr. James G. Martin to the positions of Chair, Department of Medicine of McGill University

Barthelat, Francois

413

Thank you for your gift! YES. I would like to make a gift to the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry. Please  

E-print Network

of Medicine and Dentistry. Please fill out this page and return to: University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry Office of Academic Development and Alumni Relations 300 East River Road, P.O. Box 278996 Rochester:____________________________________________ Gift Designation School of Medicine & Dentistry Annual Fund (A06262) A specific department or fund

Goldman, Steven A.

414

A Classification of Genre Families in University Student Writing  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As demand for English-medium higher education continues to grow internationally and participation in higher education increases, the need for a better understanding of academic writing is pressing. Prior university wide taxonomies of student writing have relied on intuition, the opinions of faculty, or data from course documentation and task…

Gardner, Sheena; Nesi, Hilary

2013-01-01

415

University Fees & Financial Planning for Parents and Families  

E-print Network

Culture and Communication · Interactive Digital Media · Information Security Incidental Fees: Student Science (Specialist & Major) · Digital Enterprise Management · Communication, Culture & Info Tech · Visual-time Ontario university student OSAP maximum amounts (fall/winter) Single student with no dependents $360/week

Sokolowski, Marla

416

Copyright 2009, The Ohio State University Family and Consumer Sciences  

E-print Network

For more information, visit the Ohio Department of Aging web site at: http://www.goldenbuckeye.com and Ohio State University Extension's "Aging in Ohio" web site at: http://seniorseries.osu.edu Putting My more dark-green veggies like broccoli, spinach, and other dark leafy greens. #12;SS-152-R08--page 2

417

Dipion decay modes of the ? family from a universal ? coupling  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the framework of a universal-?-coupling scheme we obtain predictions for the decay rates of ?'-->???, ?''-->???, and ?''-->?'?? in agreement with CLEO and CUSB measurements. We also predict the shape of the dipion mass distribution for these transitions. The shape predicted for ?'-->??? is found to be in excellent agreement with experiment.

Coffou, E.; Martinis, M.; Mikuta-Martinis, V.

1986-01-01

418

Variable Selection for Qualitative Interactions in Personalized Medicine While Controlling the Family-Wise Error Rate  

Microsoft Academic Search

For many years, subset analysis has been a popular topic for the biostatistics and clinical trials literature. In more recent years, the discussion has focused on finding subsets of genomes which play a role in the effect of treatment, often referred to as stratified or personalized medicine. Though highly sought after, methods for detecting subsets with altering treatment effects are

Lacey Gunter; Ji Zhu; Susan Murphy

2011-01-01

419

Are familial factors underlying the association between socioeconomic position and prescription medicine? A register-based study on Danish twins  

PubMed Central

Objectives Although well established, the association between socioeconomic position and health and health behaviour is not clearly understood, and it has been speculated that familial factors, for example, dispositional factors or exposures in the rearing environment, may be underlying the association. The objective was to compare prescription fillings within twin pairs who are partly or fully genetically identical and share childhood exposures. Design Twin cohort study. Setting Denmark. Participants Data from the Danish Twin Registry were linked to registers in Statistics Denmark and the Danish Registry of Medicinal Product statistics. A total of 8582 monozygotic (MZ) and 15?788 dizygotic same sex (DZSS) twins were included. Outcome measures Number of prescription fillings during follow-up (1995–2005) was analysed according to education and income. Results of unpaired and intrapair analyses were compared. Results An inverse social gradient in filling of prescriptions for all-purpose and system-specific drugs was observed in the unpaired analyses. In the intrapair analyses, associations were attenuated some in DZSS and more in MZ twins. Filling of drugs targeting the nervous system was still strongly associated with income in the intrapair analyses. Conclusions Familial factors seem to account for part of the observed social inequality in filling of prescription medicine. PMID:24227869

Madsen, Mia; Andersen, Per Kragh; Gerster, Mette; Andersen, Anne-Marie Nybo; Osler, Merete; Christensen, Kaare

2013-01-01

420

The integration of the "spirituality in medicine" curriculum into the osteopathic communication curriculum at Kansas City University of Medicine and Biosciences.  

PubMed

With grant funding from the John Templeton Spirituality and Medicine Curricular Award to the George Washington Institute for Spirituality and Health, faculty at Kansas City University of Medicine and Biosciences (KCUMB) developed the "Spirituality in Medicine" curriculum. In developing the curriculum, faculty took into consideration competencies required by the Association of American Medical Colleges and qualitative results from surveys of medical school applicants and enrolled students. Strategies for curriculum delivery included lectures, panel discussions, role-playing, and training in the use of a spirituality assessment tool. A majority of the 250 students who received the training in 2010-2011 were able to demonstrate the following competencies: (1) being sensitive to patients' spiritual and cultural needs, (2) assessing patients' and their own spiritual needs, (3) appropriately using chaplain services for patient care, and (4) understanding the effects of health disparities and ethical issues on patient care. Challenges to implementation included a reduction in chaplain availability due to the economic downturn, a lack of student exposure to direct patient care during shadowing, too little religious diversity among chaplains, and changes in assignment schedules. New competencies required by the National Board of Osteopathic Medical Examiners overlap with and help ensure sustainability of the Spirituality in Medicine curriculum. KCUMB leaders have incorporated the use of the spirituality assessment tool into other parts of the curriculum and into service experiences, and they have introduced a new elective in palliative care. Synergistic efforts by faculty leaders for this initiative were critical to the implementation of this curriculum. PMID:24280841

Talley, Jan A; Magie, Richard

2014-01-01

421

The University of Arizona College of Medicine Optimal Aging Program: Stepping in the Shadows of Successful Aging  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Optimal Aging Program (OAP) at the University of Arizona, College of Medicine is a longitudinal mentoring program that pairs students with older adults who are considered to be aging "successfully." This credit-bearing elective was initially established in 2001 through a grant from the John A. Hartford Foundation, and aims to expand the…

Sikora, Stephanie

2006-01-01

422

An asessment of the educational preparation of the Texas A&M University College of Veterinary Medicine graduates  

E-print Network

The purpose of this study was to determine the initial and actual professional goals, the changes in initial and actual professional goals and the reasons for this change of the different Texas A&M University veterinary medicine graduates from 1990-2002...

Carbajal, Virginia Isabel

2006-08-16

423

Integrating eLearning to Support Medical Education at the New University of Botswana School of Medicine  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Since the enrolment of its first cohort of students in 2009, the University of Botswana School of Medicine (UB SoM) has employed elearning as a key element to support and strengthen its model of decentralised medical education. Significant investments have been made in setting up the physical infrastructure, and in acquiring relevant expertise to…

Kebaetse, Masego B.; Nkomazana, Oathokwa; Haverkamp, Cecil

2014-01-01

424

Connecticut State Orthodontic Society, the UConn Orthodontics Alumni Association and the University of Connecticut School of Dental Medicine,  

E-print Network

Connecticut State Orthodontic Society, the UConn Orthodontics Alumni Association and the University of Connecticut School of Dental Medicine, Division of Orthodontics presents The Charles J. Burstone Seminar) Dr. Peter Ngan is Professor and Chairman of the Department of Orthodontics and Head of the Division

Oliver, Douglas L.

425

Proceedings of Student-Faculty Research Day, CSIS, Pace University, May 3rd Tele-Medicine Risk Adjustment  

E-print Network

by altering payment for enrollees based on health status and demographics [2]. Medicare Risk Adjustment data-Medicine Risk Adjustment Maja Misheva, Matthew Racioppo, William Gasparrini, Aykut Donmez, Jean F. Coppola, and Ray Miranti Seidenberg School of CSIS, Pace University, White Plains, NY 10606 Abstract--Medicare Risk

Tappert, Charles

426

Evaluating the Effectiveness of a Senior Mentor Program: The University of Missouri-Columbia School of Medicine  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

At the University of Missouri-Columbia School of Medicine, we developed a voluntary senior-mentor program, the Senior Teacher Educator Partnership (STEP), for first- and second-year medical students. Using qualitative research methods, we examined the impact of STEP on medical students' attitudes and then assessed the congruence of what is learned…

Hoffman, Kimberly G.; Gray, Peggy; Hosokawa, Michael C.; Zweig, Steven C.

2006-01-01

427

University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health Course Title: Extramural Elective Clerkship in International Health  

E-print Network

University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health Course Title: Extramural Elective may include public health, prevention, and health education activities. Placements will be approved diagnosis and management, epidemiological, public health and prevention aspects of acute and/or chronic

Sheridan, Jennifer

428

UNIVERSITY of MARYLAND SCHOOL of MEDICINE DEPARTMENT of PHYSICAL THERAPY & REHABILITATION SCIENCE It is hard to imagine  

E-print Network

2008 UNIVERSITY of MARYLAND SCHOOL of MEDICINE · DEPARTMENT of PHYSICAL THERAPY & REHABILITATION was appointed chair of the Department of Physical Therapy by former dean Donald E. Wilson, MD, MACP. It gives me to educate the physical therapists of tomorrow. · Accreditation for the DPT program was awarded in 2006

Weber, David J.

429

Florida State University, College of Medicine, Dr. Cappendijk Lab. 1 Abstract--Birdsongs are a naturally learned behavior in  

E-print Network

Florida State University, College of Medicine, Dr. Cappendijk Lab. 1 Abstract-- Birdsongs are a naturally learned behavior in the male zebra finch. This behavior shows a remarkable parallel with vocal the early onset and development of neurodegenerative disorders, using the naturally occurring feature (song

van Engelen, Robert A.

430

Digital Media Specialist Internship The College of Medicine-Urbana at the University of Illinois seeks students to participate in  

E-print Network

Digital Media Specialist Internship The College of Medicine-Urbana at the University of Illinois the opportunity to work on a range of projects including print, Web, video, and new media. Each Digital Media proficiency in new media technologies. The emphasis will be on the effective use of digital images, text

Gilbert, Matthew

431

UNIVERSITY OF ST ANDREWS -FAMILY FRIENDLY LEAVE (FLOWCHART) Maternity Leave Paternity Leave Adoption Leave Family Leave  

E-print Network

Adoption Leave Family Leave All female employees. To qualify, a member of staff must have completed 26 of childbirth. Employees whose partner is pregnant or adopting. Provided service conditions met then employees or placed (adoption) up to 8 weeks from that date in either a block of 2 weeks or 2 separate blocks of 1

Brierley, Andrew

432

Tradition meets innovation: transforming academic medical culture at the University of Pennsylvania's Perelman School of Medicine.  

PubMed

Traditional performance expectations and career advancement paths for academic physicians persist despite dramatic transformations in the academic workflow, workload, and workforce over the past 20 years. Although the academic physician's triple role as clinician, researcher, and educator has been lauded as the ideal by academic health centers, current standards of excellence for promotion and tenure are based on outdated models. These models fail to reward collaboration and center around rigid career advancement plans that do little to accommodate the changing needs of individuals and organizations. The authors describe an innovative, comprehensive, multipronged initiative at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania to initiate change in the culture of academic medicine and improve academic productivity, job satisfaction, and overall quality of life for junior faculty. As a key part of this intervention, task forces from each of the 13 participating departments/divisions met five times between September 2010 and January 2011 to produce recommendations for institutional change. The authors discuss how this initiative, using principles adopted from business transformation, generated themes and techniques that can potentially guide workforce environment innovation in academic health centers across the United States. Recommendations include embracing a promotion/tenure/evaluation system that supports and rewards tailored individual academic career plans; ensuring leadership, decision-making roles, and recognition for junior faculty; deepening administrative and team supports for junior faculty; and solidifying and rewarding mentorship for junior faculty. By doing so, academic health centers can ensure the retention and commitment of faculty throughout all stages of their careers. PMID:23425986

Pati, Susmita; Reum, Josef; Conant, Emily; Tuton, Lucy Wolf; Scott, Patricia; Abbuhl, Stephanie; Grisso, Jeane Ann

2013-04-01

433

Psychological Medicine, 2000, 30, 345357. Printed in the United Kingdom # 2000 Cambridge University Press  

E-print Network

Psychological Medicine, 2000, 30, 345�357. Printed in the United Kingdom # 2000 Cambridge to understanding thought disorder in schizophrenia G. R. KUPERBERG," P. K. MCGUIRE AND A. S. DAVID From the Department of Psychological Medicine, Institute of Psychiatry and King's College School of Medicine

Kuperberg, Gina

434

Pre-professional Medicine & Dentistry Portland State University offers the coursework and support services  

E-print Network

in biology, general chemistry, organic chemistry, and physics. Requirements for individual medical and dental of dentistry, allopathic medicine, osteopathic medicine, and podiatric medicine. Medical and dental schools require or strongly recommend completion of a bachelor's degree prior to entry. Portland State's pre-medical

435

HEALTH PROFESSIONS RECRUITMENT & EXPOSURE PROGRAM Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine, Student National Medical Association  

E-print Network

in medicine (i.e. Black/African American, Latino, American Indian, and Asian/Pacific Islander) that have School of Medicine, Student National Medical Association (SNMA) student group each year coordinates of medicine, as well as have minority healthcare students interact with them on a regular basis. HRPEP

Chisholm, Rex L.

436

Master in Molecular Medicine Faculty of Medicine  

E-print Network

Master in Molecular Medicine Faculty of Medicine February 2010 #12;University of Ulm There are many of the Master program The English Master course of studies combines the disciplines Biology and Medicine of research, development and application in the field of molecular medicine especially in universities

Pfeifer, Holger

437

Prevention of Child Behavior Problems Through Universal Implementation of a Group Behavioral Family Intervention  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this mental health promotion initiative was to evaluate the effectiveness of a universally delivered group behavioral\\u000a family intervention (BFI) in preventing behavior problems in children. This study investigates the transferability of an efficacious\\u000a clinical program to a universal prevention intervention delivered through child and community health services targeting parents\\u000a of preschoolers within a metropolitan health region. A

Stephen R. Zubrick; Kristine A. Ward; Sven R. Silburn; David Lawrence; Anwen A. Williams; Eve Blair; Deborah Robertson; Matthew R. Sanders

2005-01-01

438

Occupational History-Taking in a Family Practice Academic Setting.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A university-affiliated family medicine residency program, with its emphasis on psychosocial factors of health, was used to observe the behavior of health care providers. Information obtained through chart reviews was used to develop a family practice residency curriculum in occupational medicine. (MLW)

Demers, Raymond Y.; Wall, Steve J.

1983-01-01

439

Prevention, family, and community  

PubMed Central

The “Prevention, Family, and Community” session was chaired by Dr. Joseph Jror-Serk Cheng, who is an expert in community psychiatry and mental health policy and is superintendent of the Bali Psychiatric Center in Taipei. Dr. Shu-Lung Yang, dean of Student Affairs and Professor/Director of the Crime Research Center, National Chung Cheng University in Taiwan, served as the discussant. The two presenters were Dr. Louise Ann Rohrbach, who presented on “Prevention of Alcohol and other Drug Abuse: Science, Practice, Critical Issues, and Future Direction,” and Dr. Dennis Daley, who spoke on “Family and Social Aspects of Drug Abuse: Implications for Treatment and Recovery.” Dr. Rohrbach is associate professor of Preventive Medicine and director of the Master of Public Health (MPH) program at the University of Southern California (USC) Keck School of Medicine. Dr. Daley is professor of psychiatry at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine in Pennsylvania.

Yang, Shu-Lung; Rohrbach, Louise Ann; Daley, Dennis

2014-01-01

440

[Pages from the history of the Department of Forensic Medicine, I.M. Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University].  

PubMed

The history of the Department of Forensic Medicine of I.M. Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University is highlighted based on the results of the studies of the relevant literature data and archival materials. The authors lay special emphasis on the organization of the teaching process and research at different stages of the development of the Department, scientific and forensic medical activities of its leading specialists, materials obtained in the course of research, and the contribution to the development of forensic medicine made by outstanding scientists. PMID:22567951

Leonova, E N; Romanenko, G Kh; Sidorovich, Iu V

2012-01-01

441

Scientist, Centre for Molecular Medicine and Therapeutics Child and Family Research Institute  

E-print Network

be influenced by the environment, which means our lifestyle can impact the expression of our genes. Epigenetics:00 PM OISE, University of Toronto, 252 Bloor St West 12th Floor Nexus Lounge RSVP: 416 978 8325

Sokolowski, Marla

442

The Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, McMaster University, invites applications for a one year Anatomic Pathology Fellowship. This fellowship may be in any of the following areas: Breast,  

E-print Network

The Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, McMaster University, invites applications Pathology. The Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine and the Hamilton Regional Laboratory Medicine Inquiries Dr Snezana Popovic McMaster University Pathology and Molecular Medicine 1280 Main St W, HSC-2N17B

Thompson, Michael

443

Brine Shrimp Lethality Activity of Thai Medicinal Plants in the Family Meliaceae  

Microsoft Academic Search

Brine shrimp larvae have been used as a bioassay for a variety of toxic substances. The method has also been applied to plant extracts in order to facilitate the isolation of biologically active compounds. In this study, the plants in the family Meliaceae have been selected to test for brine shrimp lethality activity based on taxonomic approach including Azedirachta indica,

Sirintorn Pisutthanana; Pinyupa Plianbangchang

444

Teaching Family Physicians About Mood Disorders: A Procedure Suite for Behavioral Medicine  

PubMed Central

Background and Objectives: One of the skills required of family physicians is the ability to recognize and treat individuals suffering from mood disorders. This study represents an interdisciplinary residency training approach that (1) is unique in family practice residencies; (2) trains faculty, residents, and students in mood disorder recognition and treatment; (3) has been evaluated by the Residency Review Committee and found compatible with psychiatry training guidelines; and (4) is adaptable to varied settings. Method: Existing psychiatric education at an urban family practice residency program was evaluated. A new curriculum was developed to emphasize clinical interactions that would allow residents to model the behavior of family physicians who demonstrate interest and expertise in psychiatry. The centerpiece of this curriculum is a family-physician–led, multidisciplinary, in-house consultation service known as a mood disorders clinic (MDC). Educational effectiveness was evaluated by comparing resident identification rates of mood disorders before and after training. Educational utility was evaluated by implementation in a variety of settings. Results: Fifty-one residents rotated through 1 or more of 3 practice sites during a 60-month period. Psychiatric diagnoses for the 187 patients who remained in treatment for complete clinical assessment included all major mood and anxiety disorders outlined in the DSM-IV. A wide variety of associated psychosocial problems were also identified. A significant difference (p < .05) was seen between the number of continuity patients diagnosed with psychiatric conditions by resident physicians before and after the training experience. Conclusion: Implementation of this intensive training experience resulted in subjective as well as objective enhancement of resident education by providing an intensive, focused educational experience in primary care psychiatry. This concept is adaptable to a variety of practice sites and educational levels. The MDC could become the hub of an integrated delivery system for mental health services in an ambulatory primary care setting. PMID:15014702

Manning, J. Sloan; Zylstra, Robert G.; Connor, Pamela D.

1999-01-01

445

Acetylcholinesterase inhibitory, antioxidant and phytochemical properties of selected medicinal plants of the Lamiaceae family.  

PubMed

The present study aimed to evaluate acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitory and antioxidant activities of Lamiaceae medicinal plants growing wild in Croatia. Using Ellman's colorimetric assay all tested ethanolic extracts and their hydroxycinnamic acid constituents demonstrated in vitro AChE inhibitory properties in a dose dependent manner. The extracts of Mentha x piperita, M. longifolia, Salvia officinalis, Satureja montana, Teucrium arduini, T. chamaedrys, T. montanum, T. polium and Thymus vulgaris at 1 mg/mL showed strong inhibitory activity against AChE. The antioxidant potential of the investigated Lamiaceae species was assessed by DPPH• scavenging activity and total antioxidant capacity assays, in comparison with hydroxycinnamic acids and trolox. The extracts differed greatly in their total hydroxycinnamic derivatives content, determined spectrophotometrically. Rosmarinic acid was found to be the predominant constituent in most of the investigated medicinal plants (by RP-HPLC) and had a substantial influence on their AChE inhibitory and antioxidant properties, with the exception of Teucrium species. These findings indicate that Lamiaceae species are a rich source of various natural AChE inhibitors and antioxidants that could be useful in the prevention and treatment of Alzheimer's and other related diseases. PMID:24413832

Vladimir-Kneževi?, Sanda; Blažekovi?, Biljana; Kindl, Marija; Vladi?, Jelena; Lower-Nedza, Agnieszka D; Brantner, Adelheid H

2014-01-01

446

Institutional leadership and faculty response: fostering professionalism at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine.  

PubMed

Fostering professionalism requires institutional leadership and faculty buy-in. At the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, policies and educational programs were developed to enhance professionalism in three areas: conduct of clinical trials, relations with pharmaceutical manufacturers, and the clinical and teaching environment. Responsible conduct of clinical trials has been addressed with mandatory online education and certification for clinical investigators, but some still fail to recognize conflicts of interest. Activity of pharmaceutical representatives has been strictly regulated, meals and gifts from pharmaceutical companies prohibited, and the role of the pharmaceutical industry in the formulary process and in continuing medical education curtailed. Some faculty members have resented such restrictions, particularly in regard to their opportunity to give paid lectures. Professionalism in the clinical and teaching environment has been addressed with interdisciplinary rounding, experiential learning for medical students and residents in small groups, increased recognition of role models of professionalism, and active management of disruptive physicians. Leadership has been exerted through policy development, open communications, and moral suasion and example. Faculty members have expressed both their support and their reservations. Development of communication strategies continues, including town hall meetings, small groups and critical incident narratives, and individual feedback. The understanding and endorsement of faculty, staff, and trainees are an essential element of the professionalism effort. PMID:17971690

Wasserstein, Alan G; Brennan, Patrick J; Rubenstein, Arthur H

2007-11-01

447

The College of Human Medicine at Michigan State University: expansion and reinvention.  

PubMed

The College of Human Medicine (CHM) at Michigan State University, which graduated its first class in 1972, was one of the first community-based medical schools in the country. It was established as a state-funded medical school with specific legislative directives to educate primary care physicians who would serve the needs of the state, particularly those of underserved areas. However, the model has proved challenging to sustain with the many changes to the health care system and the economic climate of Michigan. In 2006, a two-phase expansion plan was implemented, and in 2010, CHM permanently expanded the matriculating class from 106 to 200 students with the establishment of a second four-year site for medical education in Grand Rapids. This article describes what school leaders and faculty have learned as they look back at the opportunity provided by expansion as well as the growing pains and lessons learned. The community-based model met many of the mission-related goals for CHM's graduates, who represent a diverse group of practitioners whose values resonate with the school's mission. Expansion has offered an opportunity to explore new research and clinical opportunities as well as to more fully realize the potential of community partners to meet local health care needs and reinvent a robust future for community-integrated medical education. PMID:23095925

Mavis, Brian; Sousa, Aron; Osuch, Janet; Arvidson, Cindy; Lipscomb, Wanda; Brady, Judy; Green, Wrenetta; Rappley, Marsha D

2012-12-01

448

Does medicine still show an unresolved discrimination against women? Experience in two European university hospitals.  

PubMed

Have invisible barriers for women been broken in 2007, or do we still have to break through medicine's glass ceiling? Data from two of the most prestigious university hospitals in Barcelona with 700-800 beds, Hospital Clínic (HC) and Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau (HSCSP) address this issue. In the HSCSP, 87% of the department chairs are men and 85% of the department unit chiefs are also men. With respect to women, only 5 (13%) are in the top position (department chair) and 4 (15%) are department unit chiefs. Similar statistics are also found at the HC: 87% of the department chairs and 89% of the department unit chiefs are men. Currently, only 6 women (13%) are in the top position and 6 (11%) are department unit chiefs. Analysis of the 2002 data of internal promotions in HC showed that for the first level (senior specialist) sex distribution was similar. Nevertheless, for the second level (consultant) only 25% were women, and for the top level (senior consultant) only 8% were women. These proportions have not changed in 2007 in spite of a 10% increase in leadership positions during this period. Similar proportions were found in HSCSP where 68% of the top promotions were held by men. The data obtained from these two different medical institutions in Barcelona are probably representative of other hospitals in Spain. It would be ethically desirable to have males and females in leadership positions in the medical profession. PMID:19181883

Santamaría, A; Merino, A; Viñas, O; Arrizabalaga, P

2009-02-01

449

PURDUE UNIVERSITY RESIDENCES NEWSLETTER FOR FAMILIES AND FRIENDS In thIs Issue  

E-print Network

police officers walk foot patrols on campus talking to students about staying safe . #12;www.housingEXPRESS PURDUE UNIVERSITY RESIDENCES NEWSLETTER FOR FAMILIES AND FRIENDS In thIs Issue www.housing safety, and working in conjunction with Purdue Police Department to have increased officer patrol. "We

Fernández-Juricic, Esteban

450

Childrens School 2012-2013 Carnegie Mellon University FAMILY HANDBOOK www.psy.cmu.edu/cs  

E-print Network

and assessing childrens progress in all aspects of the social, cognitive, and physical foundations necessary in various disciplines to meet the changing needs of society. (10.A.01). We invite each Childrens SchoolChildrens School 2012-2013 Carnegie Mellon University FAMILY HANDBOOK www.psy.cmu.edu/cs 1 Dear

451

Children's School 2013-2014 Carnegie Mellon University FAMILY HANDBOOK www.psy.cmu.edu/cs  

E-print Network

and assessing children's progress in all aspects of the social, cognitive, and physical foundations necessary in various disciplines to meet the changing needs of society (10.A.01). We invite each Children's SchoolChildren's School 2013-2014 Carnegie Mellon University FAMILY HANDBOOK www.psy.cmu.edu/cs 1 Dear

452

PURDUE UNIVERSITY RESIDENCES NEWSLETTER FOR FAMILIES AND FRIENDS IN THIS ISSUE  

E-print Network

EXPRESS PURDUE UNIVERSITY RESIDENCES NEWSLETTER FOR FAMILIES AND FRIENDS IN THIS ISSUE www and are equipped with a blue light for easy access. For assistance, push the button, which will connect you to the Purdue police department. Also, students remaining on campus should plan to prepare their own meals

Fernández-Juricic, Esteban

453

Parents in higher education: impacts of university learning on the self and the family  

Microsoft Academic Search

Intra? and inter?generational social mobility have been implicit to a wide range of UK Government policies aimed at promoting social inclusion through a focus on education and employability. Framed by these policy initiatives and a critical look at widening participation in higher education, this paper reflects on the impacts of university learning on the self and the family among students

Emma Wainwright; Elodie Marandet

2010-01-01

454

Suicidal ideation in a population-based sample of adolescents: implications for family medicine practice.  

PubMed

Introduction. This study investigated the relationship between suicidal ideation and demographic characteristics, health conditions, depression, and health care utilization patterns among adolescents. Methods. Secondary analysis of the regionally representative Canadian Community Health Survey conducted in 2000/2001 (response rate 85%). Adolescents aged 15 to 19 who reported suicidal ideation in the previous year (n = 260) were compared with their peers who did not (n = 5528). The association between suicidal ideation and socio-demographic and health characteristics were investigated. Findings. Almost three-quarters (73%) of suicidal adolescents had not spoken with any health professional about mental health issues in the preceding year. Despite the fact that 80% of suicidal adolescents had regular contact with their family doctor, only 5% had consulted with them about mental health issues. In addition to the well-known risk factors of depression and stress, suicidal ideation was highly elevated in adolescents with two or more chronic health conditions, self-reported poor health, migraines, and back pain and those whose activities were prevented by pain (P < .05). Other characteristics significantly correlated with suicidal ideation included smoking, living in single parent families, and having lower levels of social support. Conclusions. Family physicians should regularly screen for suicidal thoughts in their adolescent patients with these characteristics. PMID:24967322

Fuller-Thomson, Esme; Hamelin, Gail P; Granger, Stephen J R

2013-01-01

455

Suicidal Ideation in a Population-Based Sample of Adolescents: Implications for Family Medicine Practice  

PubMed Central

Introduction. This study investigated the relationship between suicidal ideation and demographic characteristics, health conditions, depression, and health care utilization patterns among adolescents. Methods. Secondary analysis of the regionally representative Canadian Community Health Survey conducted in 2000/2001 (response rate 85%). Adolescents aged 15 to 19 who reported suicidal ideation in the previous year (n = 260) were compared with their peers who did not (n = 5528). The association between suicidal ideation and socio-demographic and health characteristics were investigated. Findings. Almost three-quarters (73%) of suicidal adolescents had not spoken with any health professional about mental health issues in the preceding year. Despite the fact that 80% of suicidal adolescents had regular contact with their family doctor, only 5% had consulted with them about mental health issues. In addition to the well-known risk factors of depression and stress, suicidal ideation was highly elevated in adolescents with two or more chronic health conditions, self-reported poor health, migraines, and back pain and those whose activities were prevented by pain (P < .05). Other characteristics significantly correlated with suicidal ideation included smoking, living in single parent families, and having lower levels of social support. Conclusions. Family physicians should regularly screen for suicidal thoughts in their adolescent patients with these characteristics. PMID:24967322

Hamelin, Gail P.; Granger, Stephen J. R.

2013-01-01

456

Universality of bereavement life review for spirituality and depression in bereaved families.  

PubMed

The present study aimed to investigate the effects of the Bereavement Life Review on depression and spiritual well-being of bereaved families in a setting that does not specialize in palliative care. The participants were 20 bereaved family members who underwent the Bereavement Life Review over 2 sessions in 2 weeks. Beck Depression Inventory Second Edition scores significantly decreased from 14.4 ± 9.2 to 11.6 ± 7.4 (t = 2.15, P = .045) and Functional Assessment Chronic Illness Therapy-Spiritual scores increased from 24.3 ± 10.1 to 25.9 ± 11 (t = -1.0, P = .341) from pre- to postintervention. These results show that the Bereavement Life Review can decrease depression and improve spiritual well-being of bereaved families after the death of a family member in a setting without specialized palliative care. The results also suggest the universality of this therapy. PMID:23677768

Ando, Michiyo; Sakaguchi, Yukihiro; Shiihara, Yasufumi; Izuhara, Kumi

2014-05-01

457

The University of Vermont Libraries' Center for Digital Initiatives: Fletcher Family  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The University of Vermont Libraries' Center for Digital Initiatives has continued to add to their online offerings in recent years. This latest collection is quite a pip, and it contains family correspondence from the Fletcher Family of Vermont. The family correspondence begins in 1826, and it is primarily focused around several family members who moved west to New York, Ohio, and other parts of the heartland. Throughout these letters, the various correspondents detail the process of creating and managing their new farms and the documents leave no fact (or price) unexplored as they discuss the land, grains, stock, and groceries. All told, there are 139 letters in the collection, and visitors can click on the "Browse the Collection" section to view the letters listed by author. Additionally, visitors can search the collection by keyword, title, or subject.

458

University of Hawaii-Botany Department: Vascular Plant Family Access Page  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Created by botanist Dr. Gerald D. Carr of the University of Hawaii, this website is filled with great annotated photos of vascular plants. The site is organized into sections for the non-flowering and flowering plant families. The plant families are organized according to several systems including traditional presentation, Arthur CronquistâÂÂs classification scheme (1981), and the phylogenetic outline of Judd et al. (2002). The site also offers a new integrated Alphabetical Index for Flowering Plant Families. Plant familiesâ are hyperlinked to an introductory paragraph accompanied by photos and information about selected species in that group. For example, the Moraceae section includes annotated photos for jack fruit (_Artocarpus heterophyllus_), climbing fig (_Ficus pumila_), and mulberry (_Morus alba_). The site also includes diagrams depicting non-flowering vascular plants as treated by Judd et al., and flowering plant relationships according to Cronquist.

Carr, Gerald D.

459

My university. What I learned from the Productive Cooperative Movement to Promotion of Humanistic Family Planning.  

PubMed

Based on experiences with the Productive Cooperative Movement and the Parasite Control Movement in Japan, the Japanese Family Planning Movement began in April 1954. The resultant private and nonprofit Japan Family Planning Association (JFPA) followed and it served to help Japan achieve its goal of reducing fertility by promoting family planning. It did so by publishing a monthly newsletter on family planning, hosting meetings and national conventions, spreading information via the mass media, and selling contraceptives and educational materials. JFPA earned funding from these sales with no support from the government thereby establishing self dependence and freedom to speak candidly to the government. The JFPA learned that families wanted to improve their standard of living and were willing to limit family size to 2 children. After the birth rate peaked in 1955, the birth rate and the number of illegal abortions decreased. In the 1950s, JFPA joined the International Planned Parenthood Federation and subsequently learned of the problems faced by developing countries. Based on the successful reduction of fertility in Japan and a strong economic base, JFPA and the government were in a position to organize an international cooperation program for family planning. Therefore, the leader of JFPA resigned to found the Japanese Organization for International Cooperation in Family Planning which promotes family planning in developing countries via its integrated family planning, nutrition, and parasite control program. A steering committee composed of leaders from government, universities, and private organizations sets the policies for the program in each country. It is to the Japanese government's advantage to work with private organizations instead of providing all social services because they are flexible and provide administrative stability and national expenses are minimized. PMID:12316428

Kunii, C

1990-07-01

460

Yale University School of Medicine Autorizacin para el Uso o la Revelacin de Informacin de Salud Protegida (PHI)  

E-print Network

Yale University School of Medicine Autorización para el Uso o la Revelación de Información de Salud: ___________________________ Yo autorizo a la Universidad de Yale que use o revele la siguiente información de salud protegida tome acción confiando en esta: Oficial de privacidad del adjunto de Medicina de Yale, 300 George Street

461

Problem-Based Learning in an e-Learning Environment: A Case Study at Griffith University School of Medicine  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Increasing numbers of medical schools in Australia and overseas have moved away from didactic teaching methodologies and embraced\\u000a problem-based learning (PBL) to improve clinical reasoning skills and communication skills as well as to encourage self-directed\\u000a lifelong learning. In January 2005, the first cohort of students entered the new MBBS program at the Griffith University School\\u000a of Medicine, Gold Coast, to

Raymond A. Tedman; Heather Alexander; Robert Loudon

462

Well Child Care in Family Medicine Part 2: Immunization and Nutrition  

PubMed Central

Part 1 of this article, published last month, outlined the work of a University of Western Ontario committee in establishing criteria for the well child examination. This final section describes the committee's schedule for immunization, emphasizing that the schedule itself is far less important than the need to ensure completion of an immunization program. It also outlines the committee's findings on infant nutrition, with strategies for promotion of breast-feeding. PMID:21286056

McCracken, E. C.; Christie, R. J.; McKinnie, M. B.; Fox, A. M.

1982-01-01

463

[Gustav Klimt and the field of medicine. Painting of the medical faculty--relationship with the Zuckerkandl family].  

PubMed

The art nouveau painter Gustav Klimt (1862-1918), a cofounder of the Vienna Secession movement, was commissioned in 1894 to prepare three ceiling paintings for the Great Hall of the University of Vienna portraying the faculties of "Philosophy," "Medicine," and "Jurisprudence." After the first public presentations of these paintings starting in 1900 fierce protests erupted since the artist had not painted a historical allegory but rather had created a modern symbolic picture in the Secessionism style. The controversy over the so-called faculty paintings escalated to the point that in 1905 Klimt irrevocably distanced himself from the commission and bought back his pictures from the state. The paintings were later purchased by the Austrian Gallery and in 1943 placed in storage in Lower Austria at the Immendorf Castle where they were destroyed by a fire in May 1945 when the German troops withdrew. Besides Klimt's preliminary sketches, only black and white photographs of the three paintings now exist as well as a color reproduction of the section depicting Hygieia from the "Medicine" painting. Due to the public rejection of the faculty paintings, Gustav Klimt broke away from official government-commissioned art and focused on private clients from among Viennese society. One of these intensive associations was with the anatomist Emil Zuckerkandl and his wife Berta, who was very active in cultural affairs. During the dispute over the faculty paintings, Zuckerkandl was one of the few university professors who signed a petition in favor of retaining the paintings. His brother, the industrialist Victor Zuckerkandl, was one of the major collectors and patrons of Secessionist art. The third brother, the well-known urologist Otto Zuckerkandl (1861-1921), president of the Second and Third Congresses of the German Society of Urology in 1909 and 1911, was also in close contact with Klimt. A portrait of his wife Amalie was a work in progress between 1913 and 1917, but it remained unfinished. PMID:17710380

Schultheiss, D

2007-09-01

464

Cancer Institute of New Jersey: University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey. Environmental Assessment  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to authorize the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey to proceed with the design, construction, and equipping of the proposed Clinical Treatment and Research Facility of the University of New Jersey on the New Brunswick campus. The facility will provide for the integration of new and existing clinical outpatient cancer treatment with basic and clinical research to expedite the application of new discoveries in cancer treatment. Based on the analysis in the environmental assessment, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA).

Not Available

1994-06-01

465

Student Family Housing Adopts Non-Smoking Policy University of Toronto Student Family Housing is pleased to announce the adoption of a non-smoking  

E-print Network

Student Family Housing Adopts Non-Smoking Policy University of Toronto Student Family Housing is pleased to announce the adoption of a non-smoking policy. Effective May 1, 2012, smoking has been prohibited outdoors within 9 meters of all entrances. As of January 1, 2013, the indoor non-smoking policy

Toronto, University of

466

Work-family conflict and well-being in university employees.  

PubMed

This is one of the first reported studies to have reviewed the role of work-family conflict in university employees, both academic and nonacademic. The goal of this research was to examine the role of work-family conflict as a mediator of relationships between features of the work environment and worker well-being and organizational outcomes. A sample of 3,326 Australian university workers responded to an online survey. Work-family conflict added substantially to the explained variance in physical symptoms and psychological strain after taking account of job demands and control, and to a lesser extent to the variance in job performance. However, it had no extra impact on organizational commitment, which was most strongly predicted by job autonomy. Despite differing in workloads and work-family conflict, academic ("faculty") and nonacademic staff demonstrated similar predictors of worker and organizational outcomes. Results suggest two pathways through which management policies may be effective in improving worker well-being and productivity: improving job autonomy has mainly direct effects, while reducing job demands is mediated by consequent reductions in work-family conflict. PMID:25175890

Winefield, Helen R; Boyd, Carolyn; Winefield, Anthony H

2014-01-01

467

Undergraduate Training in Companion Animal Preventive Medicine at Louisiana State University.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The veterinary curriculum at the LSU School of Veterinary Medicine has developed an undergraduate professional training program in companion animal preventive medicine--a new area of specialization--as a field of clinical practice. Curricula for years three and four are described. (Author/MLW)

Bech-Nielsen, Steen

1979-01-01

468

Research, Education, and Outreach in the Division of Agriculture, Forestry, and Veterinary Medicine Mississippi State University  

E-print Network

Research, Education, and Outreach in the Division of Agriculture, Forestry, and Veterinary Medicine of a generous private collector. (Photo by Kat Lawrence) 4 Partners in Collaboration MSU and an Indian of Agriculture, Forestry, and Veterinary Medicine. 30 Scholarship Success Endowment helps students build

Ray, David

469

Postbaccalaureate Medical/Dental Education Preparatory Program (MEDPREP) at Southern Illinois University School of Medicine.  

PubMed

Between 1972 and 1998, the state and federally funded Medical/Dental Education Preparatory Program (MEDPREP) at Southern Illinois University School of Medicine served approximately 900 qualified minority and disadvantaged students, in an effort to increase the number of underrepresented-minority (URM) students accepted into and retained in health professions schools. To help students improve their application credentials, this post-baccalaureate program establishes high expectations for student progress, designs individual curricula, offers extensive academic and personal counseling, has its own teaching faculty, and operates in a specially equipped, designated facility. This supportive educational environment has demonstrated success. By 1998 over 500 MEDPREP students had been accepted into medical or other health professions schools, and 86% of them had graduated or were scheduled to graduate. And while the number of new URM entrants to medical schools declined nationwide from 1995 to 1997, 70 URM students from MEDPREP matriculated to 28 different allopathic medical schools, eight entered three different osteopathic medical schools, and two entered dental schools. Recent data indicate that the score changes of Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) repeaters who were MEDPREP students were larger than those of all MCAT repeaters reported by the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC). In fact, the MEDPREP repeaters' score changes were two to nearly six times greater than the overall changes reported by the AAMC. These gains suggest that a carefully designed, long-term post-baccalaureate intervention such as MEDPREP can increase the pool of qualified URM and disadvantaged students accepted into and retained in health professions schools. PMID:10219216

McGlinn, S; Jackson, E W; Bardo, H R

1999-04-01

470

Scientific Production of Research Fellows at the Zagreb University School of Medicine, Croatia  

PubMed Central

Aim To evaluate scientific production among research fellows employed at the Zagreb University School of Medicine and identify factors associated with their scientific output. Method We conducted a survey among research fellows and their mentors during June 2005. The main outcome measure was publication success, defined for each fellow as publishing at least 0.5 articles per employment year in journals indexed in the Current Contents bibliographic database. Bivariate methods and binary logistic regression were used in data analysis. Results A total of 117 fellows (response rate 95%) and 83 mentors (100%) were surveyed. The highest scientific production was recorded among research fellows employed in public health departments (median 3.0 articles, interquartile range 4.0), compared with those from pre-clinical (median 0.0, interquartile range 2.0) and clinical departments (median 1.0, interquartile range 2.0) (Kruskal-Wallis, P?=?0.003). A total of 36 (29%) research fellows published at least 0.5 articles per employment year and were considered successful. Three variables were associated with fellows’ publication success: mentor’s scientific production (odds ratio [OR], 3.14; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.31-7.53), positive mentor’s assessment (OR, 3.15; 95% CI, 1.10-9.05), and fellows’ undergraduate publication in journals indexed in the Current Contents bibliographic database (OR, 4.05; 95% CI, 1.07-15.34). Conclusion Undergraduate publication could be used as one of the main criteria in selecting research fellows. One of the crucial factors in a fellow’s scientific production and career advancement is mentor’s input, which is why research fellows would benefit most from working with scientifically productive mentors. PMID:17042070

Polasek, Ozren; Kolcic, Ivana; Buneta, Zoran; Cikes, Nada; Pecina, Marko

2006-01-01

471

Familiarity of medical residents at Kerman Medical University with evidence based medicine databases  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND: Using Evidence Based Medicine (EBM) in clinical practice is an important strategy for improving and updating medical services. Therefore, EBM has recently attracted a lot of attention in many medical schools around the world. In this study we tried to evaluate the familiarity of clinical residents who are one of the main clinical decision makers in public hospitals and also the next generation of specialists with EBM and EBM databases. METHODS: This was a cross–sectional study in 2010 in which clinical residents of Kerman Medical University (KMU) participated. Residents were asked about the four main EBM databases. The data was collected by a self-administered questionnaire. RESULTS: The data showed that from the respondents only 26.6% knew about EBM and only 28.7% of the respondents were familiar with “Up to Date”, 22.3% were familiar with “Ovid EBM Reviews”, 6.4% were familiar with “Cochrane” and 5.3% were familiar with “BMJ Clinical Evidence”. The frequencies of those that actually used the databases for clinical decision making and could answer the search questions were even less. CONCLUSIONS: The results showed most of the residents lack sufficient knowledge about EBM and its databases. The reason is probably the inexistence of a systematic and comprehensive curriculum for EBM education during their residency program or undergraduate program. Thus, due to the importance of learning EBM in this group, there is a necessity to plan a comprehensive and proper education schedule for EBM and EBM database use at the beginning or further stages of residency. PMID:22973334

Sadeghi, Masoumeh; Khanjani, Narges; Motamedi, Fatemeh; Saber, Maryam; Rad, Gholamreza Sharifi

2011-01-01

472

Published by The University of Vermont College of Medicine Office of Primary Care Spring 2014 A Newsletter Dedicated to T hose Who Deliver & Teach P rimary Care  

E-print Network

Published by The University of Vermont College of Medicine Office of Primary Care Spring 2014 available for vt's 2015 educational loan repayment program for primary care practitioners and dentists; hrsa programs. Elizabeth Cote, Director, uvm College of Medicine, Office of Primary Care and ahec Program

Hayden, Nancy J.

473

The program does not discriminate with regard to sex, race, age, religion, color, disability or national origin UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT HEALTH CENTER SCHOOL OF MEDICINE  

E-print Network

The program does not discriminate with regard to sex, race, age, religion, color, disability or national origin UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT HEALTH CENTER SCHOOL OF MEDICINE RESIDENCY IN CHILD & ADOLESCENT School of Medicine a. Graduate of U.S. or Canadian medical school accredited by the Liaison Committee

Oliver, Douglas L.

474

The Addictions Program was developed by Medicine Hat College and the University of Lethbridge to prepare graduates who will be skilled in counselling persons who are  

E-print Network

The Addictions Program was developed by Medicine Hat College and the University of Lethbridge to prepare graduates who will be skilled in counselling persons who are experiencing some form of addictive behaviour. The first two years of this four-year program will be offered at Medicine Hat College

Seldin, Jonathan P.

475

Improving Knowledge, Awareness, and Use of Flexible Career Policies through an Accelerator Intervention at the University of California, Davis, School of Medicine  

PubMed Central

The challenges of balancing a career and family life disproportionately affect women in academic health sciences and medicine, contributing to their slower career advancement and/or their attrition from academia. In this article, the authors first describe their experiences at the University of California, Davis, School of Medicine developing and implementing an innovative accelerator intervention designed to promote faculty work-life balance by improving knowledge, awareness, and access to comprehensive flexible career policies. They then summarize the results of two faculty surveys--one conducted before the implementation of their intervention and the second conducted one year into their three-year intervention--designed to assess faculty’s use and intention to use the flexible career policies, their awareness of available options, barriers to their use of the policies, and their career satisfaction. The authors found that the intervention significantly increased awareness of the policies and attendance at related educational activities, improved attitudes toward the policies, and decreased perceived barriers to use. These results however were most pronounced for female faculty and faculty under the age of 50. The authors next discuss areas for future research on faculty use of flexible career policies and offer recommendations for other institutions of higher education, not just those in academic medicine, interested in implementing a similar intervention. They conclude that having flexible career policies alone is not enough to stem the attrition of female faculty. Such policies must be fully integrated into an institution’s culture such that faculty are both aware of them and willing to use them. PMID:23619063

Villablanca, Amparo C.; Beckett, Laurel; Nettiksimmons, Jasmine; Howell, Lydia P.

2013-01-01

476

nJit and the university of Medicine and dentistry of new Jersey (uMdnJ) have forged alliances in diverse  

E-print Network

of Restorative Dentistry. He coaches dental researchers in using their unique closed-loop servo-hydraulic multinJit and the university of Medicine and dentistry of new Jersey (uMdnJ) have forged alliances

Gary, Dale E.

477

Washington University School of Medicine researchers find that in lung cancer, smokers have 10 times more genetic damage than never-smokers  

Cancer.gov

Lung cancer patients with a history of smoking have 10 times more genetic mutations in their tumors than those with the disease who have never smoked, according to a new study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.

478

Atrial fibrillation anticoagulation care in a large urban family medicine practice  

PubMed Central

Abstract Objective To determine the proportion of patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) in primary care achieving guideline-concordant stroke prevention treatment based on both the previous (2010) and the updated (2012) Canadian guideline recommendations. Design Retrospective chart review. Participants Primary care patients (N = 204) with AF. The mean age was 71.3 years and 53.4% were women. Setting Large urban community family practice in Toronto, Ont. Main outcome measures Patient demographic characteristics such as sex and age; a list of current cardiac medications including anticoagulants and antiplatelets; the total number of medications; relevant current and past medical history including presence of diabetes, stroke or transient ischemic attack, hypertension, and vascular disease; number of visits to the family physician and cardiologist in the past year and past 5 years, and how many of these were for AF; the number of visits to the emergency department or hospitalizations for AF, congestive heart failure, or stroke; if patients were taking warfarin, how often their international normalized ratios were recorded, and how many times they were in the reference range; CHADS2 (congestive heart failure, hypertension, age ? 75, diabetes mellitus, and stroke or transient ischemic attack) score, if recorded; and reason for not taking oral anticoagulants when they should have been, if recorded. Results Among those who had CHADS2 scores of 0, 64 patients (97.0%) were receiving appropriate stroke prevention in AF (SPAF) treatment according to the 2010 guidelines. When the 2012 guidelines were applied, 39 patients (59.1%) were receiving appropriate SPAF treatment (P < .001). For those with CHADS2 scores of 1, 88.4% of patients had appropriate SPAF treatment according to the 2010 guidelines, but only 55.1% were adequately treated according to the 2012 guidelines (P < .001). Of the patients at the highest risk (CHADS2 score > 1), 68.1% were adequately treated with anticoagulation and an additional 8.7% (6 of 69) had documented reasons why they were not taking anticoagulants. Conclusion When assessed using the 2012 Canadian Cardiovascular Society AF guidelines, the proportion of patients receiving appropriate SPAF therapy in this primary care setting decreased substantially. All patients with CHADS2 scores of 0 or 1 should be reassessed to ensure that they are receiving optimal stroke prevention treatment. PMID:24627401

Valentinis, Alissia; Ivers, Noah; Bhatia, Sacha; Meshkat, Nazanin; Leblanc, Kori; Ha, Andrew; Morra, Dante

2014-01-01

479

Identification of Family Non-universal Gauge Bosons in High-energy Electron-positron Collisions  

SciTech Connect

We examine effects on measurable observables in e{sup +}e{sup -} collisions resulting from the existence of additional neutral gauge bosons originating in extensions of the standard model. In particular, we consider family non-universal neutral gauge bosons occurring in the minimal supersymmetric standard model and in the Sp(6){sub L} x U(1){sub Y} model, as well as other theoretically motivated popular neutral gauge bosons. We show how the proper employment of the generation-dependent couplings of the extra gauge boson, and the appropriate adjustment of the beam polarization, not only improved the identification of the models but also enhanced the discovery potential of the family non-universal extra gauge bosons.

Bagneid, Ali A.; Althubiti, Numa A. [Department of Physics, Umm Al-Qura University, Makkah (Saudi Arabia)

2011-10-27

480

SCHOOL OF MEDICINE CURRICULUM GUIDE  

E-print Network

SCHOOL OF MEDICINE YEAR 2 CURRICULUM GUIDE WAYNE STATE UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 20112012 PLEASE READ THE INTRODUCTORY PAGES VERY CAREFULLY University, School of Medicine Medical Student Competencies and Institutional Learning Objectives

Cinabro, David

481

SCHOOL OF MEDICINE CURRICULUM GUIDE  

E-print Network

SCHOOL OF MEDICINE YEAR 2 CURRICULUM GUIDE WAYNE STATE UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 20092010 PLEASE READ THE INTRODUCTORY PAGES VERY CAREFULLY University, School of Medicine Medical Student Competencies and Institutional Learning Objectives

Cinabro, David

482

Impact of universal health insurance coverage in Thailand on sales and market share of medicines for non-communicable diseases: an interrupted time series study  

PubMed Central

Objective In 2001, Thailand implemented the Universal Coverage Scheme (UCS), a public insurance system that aimed to achieve universal access to healthcare, including essential medicines, and to influence primary care centres and hospitals to use resources efficiently, via capitated payment for outpatient services and other payment policies for inpatient care. Our objective was to evaluate the impact of the UCS on utilisation of medicines in Thailand for three non-communicable diseases: cancer, cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Design Interrupted time-series design, with a non-equivalent comparison group. Setting Thailand, 1998–2006. Data Quarterly purchases of medicines from hospital and retail pharmacies collected by IMS Health between 1998 and 2006. Intervention UCS implementation, April–October 2001. Outcome measures Total pharmaceutical sales volume and percent market share by licensing status and National Essential Medicine List status. Results The UCS was associated with long-term increases in sales of medicines for conditions that are typically treated in outpatient primary care settings, such as diabetes, high cholesterol and high blood pressure, but not for medicines for diseases that are typically treated in secondary or tertiary care settings, such as heart failure, arrhythmias and cancer. Although the majority of increases in sales were for essential medicines, there were also postpolicy increases in sales of non-essential medicines. Immediately following the reform, there was a significant shift in hospital sector market share by licensing status for most classes of medicines. Government-produced products often replaced branded generic or generic competitors. Conclusions Our results suggest that expanding health insurance coverage with a medicine benefit to the entire Thai population increased access to medicines in primary care. However, our study also suggests that the UCS may have had potentially undesirable effects. Evaluations of the long-term impacts of universal health coverage on medicine utilisation are urgently needed. PMID:23192243

Garabedian, Laura Faden; Ross-Degnan, Dennis; Ratanawijitrasin, Sauwakon; Stephens, Peter; Wagner, Anita Katharina

2012-01-01

483

STANFORD UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF MEDICINE DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL CENTER  

E-print Network

coronary angiography, percutaneous coronary intervention, and electrophysiologic testing, and device procedures such as percutaneous coronary interventions and EP device implantation. Following the procedures a nurse practitioner and behavioral medicine specialist, in counseling patients who are post MI, post PCI

Ford, James

484

College of Veterinary Medicine University of Illinois Faculty and Staff Awards  

E-print Network

, and continuing education Dr. Anne Barger Clinical Assistant Professor, Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory Dr Medicine Chicago Veterinary Medical Association Outstanding Instructor Award for an instructor who provides creativity and initiative, and interpersonal skills Kim Knapp Veterinary Technician I, Veterinary Clinical

Gilbert, Matthew

485

Gastrointestinal/Liver Pathologist Hamilton Regional Laboratory Medicine Program and McMaster University  

E-print Network

programs with emphasis on the gastrointestinal tract. The appointee will have hospital staff appointmentsGastrointestinal/Liver Pathologist Hamilton Regional Laboratory Medicine Program and Mc opportunity for a pathologist who wishes to specialize in gastrointestinal and liver pathology and conduct

Thompson, Michael

486

Predictors of complementary and alternative medicine use among Texas university undergraduates  

E-print Network

Research regarding use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) among all populations in America is needed to understand what seems to be an increasing trend. Education has been shown to be a significant determinant of CAM use, therefore...

Versnik Nowak, Amy L.

2006-10-30

487

UC Davis School of Medicine Match Results 2011  

E-print Network

Ctr/NeoucomOH Family Medicine AKRON OH 15 Alaska Family Med/Providence Hosp Family Medicine ANCHORAGE AK 16 Ft Collins Fam MedCO Family Medicine FORT COLLINS CO 17 Long Beach Mem Med CtrCA Family Medicine LONG BEACH CA17 Long Beach Mem Med CtrCA Family Medicine LONG BEACH CA 18 Long Beach Mem Med Ctr

Leistikow, Bruce N.

488

Evaluation of the quality of antenatal care using electronic health record information in family medicine clinics of Mexico City  

PubMed Central

Background Evaluation of the quality of antenatal care (ANC) using indicators should be part of the efforts to improve primary care services in developing countries. The growing use of the electronic health record (EHR) has the potential of making the evaluation more efficient. The objectives of this study were: (a) to develop quality indicators for ANC and (b) to evaluate the quality of ANC using EHR information in family medicine clinics (FMCs) of Mexico City. Methods We used a mixed methods approach including: (a) in-depth interviews with health professionals; (b) development of indicators following the RAND-UCLA method; (c) a retrospective cohort study of quality of care provided to 5342 women aged 12–49 years who had completed their pregnancy in 2009 and attended to at least one ANC visit with their family doctor. The study took place in four FMCs located in Mexico City. The source of information was the EHR. SAS statistical package served for programing and performing the descriptive statistical analysis. Results 14 ANC quality indicators were developed. The evaluation showed that 40.6% of women began ANC in the first trimester; 63.5% with low-risk pregnancy attended four or more ANC visits; 4.4% were referred for routine obstetric ultrasound, and 41.1% with vaginal infection were prescribed metronidazole. On average, the percentage of recommended care that women received was 32.7%. Conclusions It is feasible to develop quality indicators suitable for evaluating the quality of ANC using routine EHR data. The study identified the ANC areas that require improvement; which can guide future strategies aimed at improving ANC quality. PMID:24885103

2014-01-01

489

College of Medicine ER Emergency Medicine  

E-print Network

College of Medicine ER Emergency Medicine KEY: # = new course * = course changed = course dropped University of Kentucky 2013-2014 Undergraduate Bulletin 1 ER 815 FIRST-YEAR ELECTIVE, EMERGENCY MEDICINE. (1-year curriculum. Pass-fail only. Prereq: Admission to first year, CollegeofMedicine. ER 825 SECOND-YEAR ELECTIVE

MacAdam, Keith

490

Care for post-stroke patients at Malaysian public health centres: self-reported practices of family medicine specialists  

PubMed Central

Background Provision of post stroke care in developing countries is hampered by discoordination of services and limited access to specialised care. Albeit shortcomings, primary care continues to provide post-stroke services in less than favourable circumstances. This paper aimed to review provision of post-stroke care and related problems among Family Medicine Specialists managing public primary health care services. Methods A semi-structured questionnaire was distributed to 121 Family Physicians servicing public funded health centres in a pilot survey focused on improving post stroke care provision at community level. The questionnaire assessed respondents background and practice details i.e. estimated stroke care burden, current service provision and opinion on service improvement. Means and frequencies described quantitative data. For qualitative data, constant comparison method was used until saturation of themes was reached. Results Response rate of 48.8% was obtained. For every 100 patients seen at public healthcentres each month, 2 patients have stroke. Median number of stroke patients seen per month is 5 (IQR 2-10). 57.6% of respondents estimated total stroke patients treated per year at each centre was less than 40 patients. 72.4% lacked a standard care plan although 96.6% agreed one was needed. Patients seen were: discharged from tertiary care (88.1%), shared care plan with specialists (67.8%) and patients who developed stroke during follow up at primary care (64.4%). Follow-ups were done at 8-12 weekly intervals (60.3%) with 3.4% on ‘as needed’ basis. Referrals ranked in order of frequency were to physiotherapy services, dietitian and speech and language pathologists in public facilities. The FMS’ perceived 4 important ‘needs’ in managing stroke patients at primary care level; access to rehabilitation services, coordinated care between tertiary centres and primary care using multidisciplinary care approach, a standardized guideline and family and caregiver support. Conclusions Post discharge stroke care guidelines and access to rehabilitation services at primary care is needed for post stroke patients residing at home in the community. PMID:24580779

2014-01-01

491

UC Davis School of Medicine Match Results -2014  

E-print Network

/Sacramento SACRAMENTO CA Sutter Health-CA Family Med/Sacramento SACRAMENTO CA Central WA Family Med Family Medicine YAKIMA WA Long Beach Mem Med Ctr-CA Family Medicine LONG BEACH CA Memorial Health-Univ Med Ctr-GA Family Medicine SAVANNAH GA O'Connor Hospital-CA Family Medicine SAN JOSE CA Shasta Community Health Ctr-CA Family

Leistikow, Bruce N.

492

Alexander Norbash, MD, MHCM, FACR Chairman and Professor of Radiology, Boston University School of Medicine  

E-print Network

Alexander Norbash, MD, MHCM, FACR Chairman and Professor of Radiology, Boston University School. Norbash joined Boston University Medical Center in March 2004 as Chairman and Professor of Radiology. Dr, graduated from the University of Pittsburgh Radiology Residency, and completed fellowships in both

Vajda, Sandor

493

Work and family conflict in academic science: patterns and predictors among women and men in research universities.  

PubMed

This article addresses work-family conflict as reported among women and men academic scientists in data systematically collected across fields of study in nine US research universities. Arguing that academic science is a particularly revealing case for studying work-family conflict, the article addresses: (1) the bi-directional conflict of work with family, and family with work, reported among the scientists; (2) the ways that higher, compared with lower, conflict, is predicted by key features of family, academic rank, and departments/institutions; and (3) patterns and predictors of work-family conflict that vary, as well as converge, by gender. Results point to notable differences, and commonalties, by gender, in factors affecting interference in both directions of work-family conflict reported by scientists. These findings have implications for understandings of how marriage and children, senior compared with junior academic rank, and departmental climates shape work-family conflict among women and men in US academic science. PMID:22164721

Fox, Mary Frank; Fonseca, Carolyn; Bao, Jinghui

2011-10-01

494

BS/DMD Seven Year Combined Degree Program Application: 2012 Tufts University School of Dental Medicine offers a seven year combined degree  

E-print Network

BS/DMD Seven Year Combined Degree Program Application: 2012 Tufts University School of Dental Medicine offers a seven year combined degree program for undergraduates of Tufts University. Interested should anticipate completing courses during summer sessions in order to meet such deadlines. The Tufts

Dennett, Daniel

495

Quality of care and health-related quality of life of climacteric stage women cared for in family medicine clinics in Mexico  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVES: 1) To design and validate indicators to measure the quality of the process of care that climacteric stage women receive in family medicine clinics (FMC). 2) To assess the quality of care that climacteric stage women receive in FMC. 3) To determine the association between quality of care and health-related quality of life (HR-QoL) among climacteric stage women. METHODS:

Svetlana Doubova Dubova; Sergio Flores-Hernández; Leticia Rodriguez-Aguilar; Ricardo Pérez-Cuevas

2010-01-01

496

1 | P a g e WAYNE STATE UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF MEDICINE  

E-print Network

AND TRANSLATIONAL SCIENCE and STEPHEN A. KRAWETZ, PH.D., ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR CHARLOTTE B. FAILING PROFESSOR OF FETAL; Reproductive Medicine Network. Metformin and/or clomiphene do not adversely affect liver or renal function obstruction subsequent to Essure microinsert sterilization: a case report. Fertility and Sterility 2011 July

VandeVord, Pamela

497

Assistant or Associate Professors in the Department of Medicine, Stanford University  

E-print Network

of Immunology The Division of Immunology and Rheumatology in the Department of Medicine at Stanford in Rheumatology, and have demonstrated skills in patient oriented clinical research (clinical trials, health regular mail to: C. Garrison Fathman, M.D. Chief of the Division of Immunology and Rheumatology CCSR

Quake, Stephen R.

498