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Sample records for family practice system

  1. Teaching Family Systems Theory to Family Practice Residents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elliott, Steve; Herndon, Anne

    1981-01-01

    The family practice resident is taught that the patient's family is the most medically relevant context for viewing the patient's present symptoms and illnesses. With the removal of the necessity for family interviews, an effective training program in family dynamics was designed for family medicine residents. (Author/MLW)

  2. Understanding Families: Applying Family Systems Theory to Early Childhood Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christian, Linda Garris

    2006-01-01

    Working with families is one of the most important aspects of being an early childhood professional, yet it is an area in which many educators have received little preparation (Nieto 2004). Teachers spend hours learning about child development, developmentally appropriate practices, health and safety, playgrounds, and play. At times it seems that…

  3. Computerization of family practice.

    PubMed Central

    Elmslie, T; Rosser, W W

    1986-01-01

    The primary focus of computer systems for family practice is on patient billing. Primary care physicians should be aware of the many other benefits that can and should be considered when planning a system for their practice. This article describes the type and extent of information that can be stored in a family practice data base and explores some of the applications in areas of practice and patient management, prevention and research. PMID:3942928

  4. Influences of Family-Systems Intervention Practices on Parent-Child Interactions and Child Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trivette, Carol M.; Dunst, Carl J.; Hamby, Deborah W.

    2010-01-01

    The extent to which the influences of family-systems intervention practices could be traced to variations in parent-child interactions and child development was investigated by meta-analytic structural equation modeling (MASEM). MASEM is a procedure for producing a weighted pooled correlation matrix and fitting a structural equation model to the…

  5. Profession differences in family focused practice in the adult mental health system.

    PubMed

    Maybery, Darryl; Goodyear, Melinda; O'Hanlon, Brendan; Cuff, Rose; Reupert, Andrea

    2014-12-01

    There is a large gulf between what psychiatric services should (or could) provide and what they do in practice. This article sought to determine practice differences between the differing professions working in adult mental health services in terms of their family focused work. Three hundred and seven adult mental health professionals completed a cross-sectional survey of family focused practices in adult mental health services. Findings highlight that social workers engaged in more family focused practice compared to psychiatric nurses, who performed consistently the lowest on direct family care, compared to both social workers and psychologists. Clear skill, knowledge, and confidence differences are indicated between the professions. The article concludes by offering direction for future profession education and training in family focused practices. PMID:24945363

  6. [Systemic family therapy in the context of Alzheimer's disease: a theoretical and practical approach].

    PubMed

    Cantegreil-Kallen, Inge; Rigaud, Anne-Sophie

    2009-12-01

    Alzheimer's disease has a negative impact on family relationships and may trigger conflicts between the main caregiver and other family members. The systemic approach evidences the impact of dementia on structural and functional characteristics of the family system. Systemic family therapy is especially indicated in crisis situations such as emergency hospitalization or institutionalization of the patient, and when the family members do not agree on when and how to introduce care and support services at the patient's home. In this case, the aim of the intervention is to restore the communication between all the family members in order to find an agreement for the best management of the patients. Since September 2006, systemic family therapy has been offered in the memory clinic of the Broca Hospital to families having a member suffering from Alzheimer's disease. The involvement of the families was accomplished by the direct participation of the patient, main caregiver (spouse), grown-up children and grandchildren. The aim was to obtain an agreement for the access of support and care services at home from all the family members. The intervention was based on a step-by-step procedure and comprehended five sessions. The primary results of a pilot study are presented. PMID:20031507

  7. Strengthening Family Practices for Latino Families

    PubMed Central

    Chartier, Karen G.; Negroni, Lirio K.; Hesselbrock, Michie N.

    2010-01-01

    The study examined the effectiveness of a culturally-adapted Strengthening Families Program (SFP) for Latinos to reduce risks for alcohol and drug use in children. Latino families, predominantly Puerto Rican, with a 9–12 year old child and a parent(s) with a substance abuse problem participated in the study. Pre- and post-tests were conducted with each family. Parental stress, parent-child dysfunctional relations, and child behavior problems were reduced in the families receiving the intervention; family hardiness and family attachment were improved. Findings contribute to the validation of the SFP with Latinos, and can be used to inform social work practice with Puerto Rican families. PMID:20871785

  8. Advance directives in family practice.

    PubMed Central

    Kohut, N.; Singer, P. A.

    1993-01-01

    Family physicians can play an important role in helping patients and their families to discuss life-sustaining treatments and to complete advance directives. This article reviews the legal status of, and empirical studies on, advance directives and addresses some important clinical questions about their use relevant to family practice. PMID:8499789

  9. The Joy of Family Practice

    PubMed Central

    Ventres, William

    2012-01-01

    Many family physicians have written about how they influence, nurture, and empower people in their communities of practice. In this essay, the author writes of the personal joys that family medicine has brought him. An expression of his appreciation for his work as a family doctor, it touches on 6 themes that continue to rejuvenate his practice: love, faith, mystery, place, dance, and medicine. By examining the emotional and psychological dimensions of these themes, he offers a path by which other family physicians may be able to find sustenance and joy in their daily work. PMID:22585892

  10. State of family medicine practice in Lebanon

    PubMed Central

    Helou, Mariana; Rizk, Grace Abi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Many difficulties are encountered in family medicine practice and were subject to multinational studies. To date, no study was conducted in Lebanon to assess the challenges that family physicians face. This study aims to evaluate the family medicine practice in Lebanon stressing on the difficulties encountered by Lebanese family physicians. Materials and Methods: A questionnaire was sent to all 96 family medicine physicians practicing in Lebanon. Participants answered questions about characteristics of family medicine practice, evaluation of the quality of work, identification of obstacles, and their effect on the medical practice. Results: The response rate was 59%, and the average number of years of practice was 10.7 years. Physicians complain mainly of heavy load at work, too many bureaucratic tasks, demanding patients, and being undervalued by the specialists. Most physicians are able to adapt between their professional and private life. Conclusion: Despite all the obstacles encountered, Lebanese family physicians have a moderate satisfaction toward their practice. They remain positive and enthusiastic about their profession. Until the ministry of public health revises its current health system, the primary care profession in Lebanon will remain fragile as a profession. PMID:27453843

  11. Family medicine residents’ practice intentions

    PubMed Central

    Grierson, Lawrence E.M.; Fowler, Nancy; Kwan, Matthew Y.W.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To assess residents’ practice intentions since the introduction of the College of Family Physicians of Canada’s Triple C curriculum, which focuses on graduating family physicians who will provide comprehensive care within traditional and newer models of family practice. Design A survey based on Ajzen’s theory of planned behaviour was administered on 2 occasions. Setting McMaster University in Hamilton, Ont. Participants Residents (n = 135) who were enrolled in the Department of Family Medicine Postgraduate Residency Program at McMaster University in July 2012 and July 2013; 54 of the 60 first-year residents who completed the survey in 2012 completed it again in 2013. Main outcome measures The survey was modeled so as to measure the respondents’ intentions to practise with a comprehensive scope; determine the degree to which their attitudes, subjective norms, and perceptions of control about comprehensive practice influence those intentions; and investigate how these relationships change as residents progress through the curriculum. The survey also queried the respondents about their intentions with respect to particular medical services that underpin comprehensive practice. Results The responses indicate that the factors modeled by the theory of planned behaviour survey account for 60% of the variance in the residents’ intentions to adopt a comprehensive scope of practice upon graduation, that there is room for curricular improvement with respect to encouraging residents to practise comprehensive care, and that targeting subjective norms about comprehensive practice might have the greatest influence on improving resident intentions. Conclusion The theory of planned behaviour presents an effective approach to assessing curricular effects on resident practice intentions while also providing meaningful information for guiding further program evaluation efforts in the Department of Family Medicine at McMaster University. PMID:26889508

  12. The Dual-Earner Family's Impact on the Child and the Family System: Review and Implications for Counseling Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Bert; Reardon, Robert

    In recent years there has been a rapid increase in the number of American families in which both spouses work. The literature regarding preschoolers suggests that one cannot say that being from a dual-earner family will necessarily harm a child. Key issues center not on whether both parents work, but on the quality of substitute care and how well…

  13. Medical records in family practice. A review.

    PubMed

    Warren, M D

    1976-01-01

    The organisation of general practice in England is outlined and the independent contractor basis of the family practioner emphasised. Data from family practice, like data from hospital practice, may be used for clinical management, practice management, or research. Examples of applications in each of these fields are given. The basic records used in family practice--the medical record envelope, the prescription form and the claim for sickness benefit--are described. Some practices record morbidity (E Book or Diagnostic Index), some record systematically details of their activities (L Book or Activities Ledger) and some maintain age and sex registers and other registers of their patients; all these developments are outlined. Attention is drawn to the introduction of problem orientated records and to the use of computers in family practice, but these innovations are not discussed. Outstanding issues are the same as those in hospital record systems--accuracy, definitions, coverage, confidentiality, clerical support and costs, and the use made of the information. PMID:1085489

  14. Strengthening Family Practices for Latino Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chartier, Karen G.; Negroni, Lirio K.; Hesselbrock, Michie N.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of a culturally adapted Strengthening Families Program (SFP) for Latinos to reduce risks for alcohol and drug use in children. Latino families, predominantly Puerto Rican, with a 9- to 12-year-old child and a parent(s) with a substance abuse problem participated in the study. Pre- and post-tests were conducted…

  15. A computerized e book and data base for family practice.

    PubMed

    Tudiver, F

    1984-01-01

    A new computerized E Book and data base management system is under development at the discipline of family practice of Memorial University of Newfoundland. This system is capable of rapid analyses and produces detailed reports on morbidity indices and age-sex distributions of patients. Examples show how this system is being used to analyze the content of family practice, monitor and improve family practice resident learning experiences, improve patient care, and stimulate and facilitate family practice research. Future directions of this project are discussed. PMID:21283504

  16. Stress in Family Practice Residents

    PubMed Central

    Rudner, Howard L.

    1986-01-01

    Sources and levels of stress, as well as coping mechanisms, perceived by residents in both years of a two-year family practice residency program in Toronto are described. In addition, differences between first- and second-year residents, and between women and men residents, regardless of year, are examined. Results of the survey indicate that the levels of stress are relatively high throughout the two years of residency training. The three most stressful aspects of being a resident are time pressures, fatigue, and lack of self-confidence. Female residents appear to report a higher level of stress than males, especially in trying to combine a personal and a professional life. Specific coping mechanisms include talking to others, adjusting attitudes and feelings, or strategic use of time. Recommendations aimed at helping family medicine residency programs deal with the problem of stress in residents are suggested. A current major province-wide research study including all interns and residents in Ontario is described. PMID:21267263

  17. The Psychiatric Family Nurse Practitioner: A Collaborator in Family Practice

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Patricia D.

    1999-01-01

    The potential of the psychiatric family nurse practitioner (Psych.F.N.P.) to contribute to family practice through physical care and mental health care exists in the here and now. This role is a synthesis of 2 advanced practice roles, the psychiatric clinical nurse specialist (Psych.C.N.S.) and family nurse practitioner (F.N.P.), both of which continue to have great utility independently. This synthesis is a practical application of concepts that have evolved to meet the changing patterns of health care delivery. At this time, dual certification as a Psych.C.N.S. and F.N.P. best reflects the broad practice expertise of the psychiatric family nurse practitioner. The experienced psychiatric family nurse practitioner provides direct care for both physical and psychological needs of patients in a family practice setting. PMID:15014701

  18. Rural Idaho Family Physicians' Scope of Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Ed; Schmitz, David; Epperly, Ted; Nukui, Ayaka; Miller, Carissa Moffat

    2010-01-01

    Context: Scope of practice is an important factor in both training and recruiting rural family physicians. Purpose: To assess rural Idaho family physicians' scope of practice and to examine variations in scope of practice across variables such as gender, age and employment status. Methods: A survey instrument was developed based on a literature…

  19. Healthy Family 2009: Practicing Healthy Adult Living

    MedlinePlus

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Healthy Family 2009 Practicing Healthy Adult Living Past Issues / Winter ... diabetes, or if heart disease runs in your family, begin checking cholesterol at age 20. Colorectal Cancer : ...

  20. [Family constellations in theory and practice: on symmetry and complementarity].

    PubMed

    Schmidt, H R

    1992-11-01

    The concepts of "symmetry" and "complementary" of social systems in Bateson and Toman are compared. Bateson describes self-reinforcing cycles of formation of equality and inequality of social systems, whereas Toman means compatibility and incompatibility of social systems according to sibling positions of individuals involved. His concept is important to an empirical family psychology, family diagnosis and family therapy. A family diagnostic case-study shows the practical application. PMID:1470602

  1. A Research Framework for Understanding the Practical Impact of Family Involvement in the Juvenile Justice System: The Juvenile Justice Family Involvement Model.

    PubMed

    Walker, Sarah Cusworth; Bishop, Asia S; Pullmann, Michael D; Bauer, Grace

    2015-12-01

    Family involvement is recognized as a critical element of service planning for children's mental health, welfare and education. For the juvenile justice system, however, parents' roles in this system are complex due to youths' legal rights, public safety, a process which can legally position parents as plaintiffs, and a historical legacy of blaming parents for youth indiscretions. Three recent national surveys of juvenile justice-involved parents reveal that the current paradigm elicits feelings of stress, shame and distrust among parents and is likely leading to worse outcomes for youth, families and communities. While research on the impact of family involvement in the justice system is starting to emerge, the field currently has no organizing framework to guide a research agenda, interpret outcomes or translate findings for practitioners. We propose a research framework for family involvement that is informed by a comprehensive review and content analysis of current, published arguments for family involvement in juvenile justice along with a synthesis of family involvement efforts in other child-serving systems. In this model, family involvement is presented as an ascending, ordinal concept beginning with (1) exclusion, and moving toward climates characterized by (2) information-giving, (3) information-eliciting and (4) full, decision-making partnerships. Specific examples of how courts and facilities might align with these levels are described. Further, the model makes predictions for how involvement will impact outcomes at multiple levels with applications for other child-serving systems. PMID:26407854

  2. Family Therapy, Family Practice, and Child and Family Poverty: Historical Perspectives and Recent Developments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frankel, Harvy; Frankel, Sid

    2006-01-01

    This paper assesses the engagement of family therapy and family practice with families with children, who are living in poverty. It analyzes four promising models from two perspectives. The first perspective relates to critiques, which have been made of the practice of family therapy with families living in poverty; and the second relates to the…

  3. Teaching Psychiatry to Family Practice Residents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huzij, Teodor J.; Warner, Christopher H.; Lacy, Timothy; Rachal, James

    2005-01-01

    Objective: This article outlines a psychiatry curriculum developed for family practice residents by family practice-psychiatry residents. Methods: A literature review, needs assessment, planning, implementation, and initial assessment were conducted. Conclusion: Early results demonstrated improved general psychiatric knowledge and a high level of…

  4. Managing chronic pain in family practice.

    PubMed Central

    Librach, S. L.

    1993-01-01

    Pain is common in family practice. In dealing with chronic pain, both the family physician and the patient often have problems in defining and in understanding the origin of chronic pain and in providing effective pain relief. This article explores a practical, holistic approach to understanding and managing chronic pain. PMID:8471902

  5. Brief Psychotherapy in Family Practice

    PubMed Central

    MacDonald, Peter J.; Brown, Alan

    1986-01-01

    A large number of patients with psychosocial or psychiatric disorders present to family physicians, and the family physician needs a model of psychotherapy with which to cope with their problems. A model of brief psychotherapy is presented which is time limited, goal directed and easy to learn. It consists of four facets drawn from established areas of psychotherapy: characteristics of the therapist; characteristics of the patient; Eriksonian developmental stages; and the process of therapy as described by Carkhuff. These facets fit together in a way which is useful to the family physician in managing those patient problems for which brief psychotherapy is indicated. PMID:21267176

  6. Scaling up evidence-based practices for children and families in New York State: toward evidence-based policies on implementation for state mental health systems.

    PubMed

    Hoagwood, Kimberly Eaton; Olin, S Serene; Horwitz, Sarah; McKay, Mary; Cleek, Andrew; Gleacher, Alissa; Lewandowski, Eric; Nadeem, Erum; Acri, Mary; Chor, Ka Ho Brian; Kuppinger, Anne; Burton, Geraldine; Weiss, Dara; Frank, Samantha; Finnerty, Molly; Bradbury, Donna M; Woodlock, Kristin M; Hogan, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Dissemination of innovations is widely considered the sine qua non for system improvement. At least two dozen states are rolling out evidence-based mental health practices targeted at children and families using trainings, consultations, webinars, and learning collaboratives to improve quality and outcomes. In New York State (NYS) a group of researchers, policymakers, providers, and family support specialists have worked in partnership since 2002 to redesign and evaluate the children's mental health system. Five system strategies driven by empirically based practices and organized within a state-supported infrastructure have been used in the child and family service system with more than 2,000 providers: (a) business practices, (b) use of health information technologies in quality improvement, (c) specific clinical interventions targeted at common childhood disorders, (d) parent activation, and (e) quality indicator development. The NYS system has provided a laboratory for naturalistic experiments. We describe these initiatives, key findings and challenges, lessons learned for scaling, and implications for creating evidence-based implementation policies in state systems. PMID:24460518

  7. Scaling up Evidence-based Practices for Children and Families in New York State: Towards Evidence-based Policies on Implementation for State Mental Health Systems

    PubMed Central

    Hoagwood, Kimberly Eaton; Olin, S. Serene; Horwitz, Sarah; McKay, Mary; Cleek, Andrew; Gleacher, Alissa; Lewandowski, Eric; Nadeem, Erum; Acri, Mary; Chor, Ka Ho Brian; Kuppinger, Anne; Burton, Geraldine; Weiss, Dara; Frank, Samantha; Finnerty, Molly; Bradbury, Donna M.; Woodlock, Kristin M.; Hogan, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Dissemination of innovations is widely considered the sine qua non for system improvement. At least two dozen states are rolling-out evidence-based mental health practices targeted at children and families using trainings, consultations, webinars, and learning collaboratives to improve quality and outcomes. In New York State (NYS) a group of researchers, policy-makers, providers and family support specialists have worked in partnership since 2002 to redesign and evaluate the children’s mental health system. Five system strategies driven by empirically-based practices and organized within a state-supported infrastructure have been used in the child and family service system with over 2,000 providers: (a) business practices; (b) use of health information technologies in quality improvement; (c) specific clinical interventions targeted at common childhood disorders; (d) parent activation; and (e) quality indicator development. The NYS system has provided a laboratory for naturalistic experiments. We describe these initiatives, key findings and challenges, lessons learned for scaling, and implications for creating evidence-based implementation policies in state systems. PMID:24460518

  8. Therapy for Family Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosmann, Michael R.

    A family therapy model, based on a conceptualization of the family as a behavioral system whose members interact adaptively so that an optimal level of functioning is maintained within the system, is described. The divergent roots of this conceptualization are discussed briefly, as are the treatment approaches based on it. The author's model,…

  9. Paraprofessionals in Infant/Family Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fenichel, Emily, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    "Zero to Three is a single focus bulletin of the National Center for Infants, Toddlers, and Families providing insight from multiple disciplines on the development of infants, toddlers, and their families. Noting that sometimes practice needs to be "translated" into research, as with understanding the phenomenon of paraprofessional workers in…

  10. Family Literacy: From Theory to Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeBruin-Parecki, Andrea, Ed.; Krol-Sinclair, Barbara, Ed.

    This book addresses family literacy as a theoretically sound field of research and practice that can be used to improve literacy worldwide. The book's 14 chapters are divided into four sections. Following the "Introduction" (Andrea DeBruin-Parecki and Barbara Krol-Sinclair), under Section I--Theoretical Perspectives Related to Family Literacy--are…

  11. Internship Practices in Family Studies Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ballard, Sharon M.; Carroll, Elizabeth B.

    2005-01-01

    This study explored internship practices in family studies programs in the United States. Specifically, procedures, supervision, purpose, benefits, integration with coursework, and evaluation were examined. Data were collected via a questionnaire e-mailed to universities and colleges with undergraduate family studies programs (N = 68). Although…

  12. Clinical practice guidelines. New-to-practice family physicians' attitudes.

    PubMed Central

    Ferrier, B. M.; Woodward, C. A.; Cohen, M.; Williams, A. P.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the attitudes toward clinical practice guidelines of a group of family physicians who had recently entered practice in Ontario, and to compare them with the attitudes of a group of internists from the United States. DESIGN: Mailed questionnaire survey of all members of a defined cohort. SETTING: Ontario family practices. PARTICIPANTS: Certificants of the College of Family Physicians of Canada who received certification in 1989, 1990, and 1991 and who were practising in Ontario. Of 564-cohort members, 395 (70%) responded. Men (184) and women (211) responded at the same rate. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Levels of agreement with 10 descriptive statements about practice guidelines and analyses of variance of these responses for several physician characteristics. RESULTS: Of respondents in independent practice, 80% were in group practice. Women were more likely to have chosen group practice, in which they were more likely to use practice guidelines than men. Generally favourable attitudes toward guidelines were observed. Physician characteristics occasionally influenced agreement with the descriptors. The pattern of agreement was similar to that noted in the study of American internists, but, in general, Ontario physicians were more supportive. CONCLUSIONS: This group of relatively new-to-practice Ontario family physicians shows little resistance to guidelines and appears to read less threat of external control in them than does the US group. PMID:8616286

  13. Development of the Family Nursing Practice Scale.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Peggy; Tarrant, Marie

    2006-11-01

    This article describes the development and testing of the Family Nursing Practice Scale (FNPS). This self-report questionnaire is designed to measure perceived changes in family nursing practice including attitudes toward working with families, critical appraisal of their family nursing practice and reciprocity in the nurse-family relationship. Categories were derived from a needs assessment, competence as effective application of knowledge and skill and theoretical foundations for family assessment and intervention. Psychometric testing (content, construct validity, internal consistency, and test-retest reliability) was undertaken with 140 psychiatric nurses in Hong Kong. Practice appraisal and nurse-family relationships accounted for 56.4% of the variance. Cronbach's alpha reliability coefficients were .88 and .73 for the two subscales, respectively, and .86 for the scale overall. Test-retest reliability ranged from .62 to .93 on the individual items. The results provide preliminary evidence of the reliability and validity of the FNPS. The instrument provides quantitative and qualitative evaluation components. PMID:17099118

  14. Managing uncertainty in family practice.

    PubMed Central

    Biehn, J.

    1982-01-01

    Because patients present in the early stages of undifferentiated problems, the family physician often faces uncertainty, especially in diagnosis and management. The physician's uncertainty may be unacceptable to the patient and may lead to inappropriate use of diagnostic procedures. The problem is intensified by the physician's hospital training, which emphasizes mastery of available knowledge and decision-making based on certainty. Strategies by which a physician may manage uncertainty include (a) a more open doctor-patient relationship, (b) understanding the patient's reason for attending the office, (c) a thorough assessment of the problem, (d) a commitment to reassessment and (e) appropriate consultation. PMID:7074488

  15. Holistic Medicine in Family Practice

    PubMed Central

    Borins, Mel

    1984-01-01

    During the twentieth century there have been great advances in medicine in the area of science and technology. At the same time, there has been a trend back to a more natural, humanistic approach to counteract patients' feelings of alienation. Holistic medicine approaches the physical, emotional, spiritual, and social aspects of a person as they relate to health and disease. It emphasizes prevention; concern for the environment and the food we eat; patient responsibility; using illness as a creative force to teach people to change; the `physician, heal thyself' philosophy; and appropriate alternatives to orthodox medicine. Family medicine faces the challenge of integrating these humanistic concepts with science. PMID:21283496

  16. A Family Resilience Framework: Innovative Practice Applications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, Froma

    2002-01-01

    Presents an overview of a research-informed family resilience framework, developed as a conceptual map to guide clinical intervention and prevention efforts with vulnerable families. Outlines key processes that foster resilience and innovative family systems training and service applications. (JDM)

  17. Ethics and Family Practice: Some Modern Dilemmas

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Earl V.

    1990-01-01

    Ethical dilemmas in family practice have increased in frequency and complexity as both the potential benefit and the potential harm of medical treatments have increased. All physicians must be aware of moral issues relating to medicine. Family physicians commonly face ethical problems concerning the patient with diminished autonomy; the right to refuse treatment; allocation of resources; informed consent; surrogate consent (for children, for the incompetent, and for those with diminished autonomy); and the appropriate level of aggressiveness in treatment. PMID:11651132

  18. Parenting Practices, Child Adjustment, and Family Diversity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amato, Paul R.; Fowler, Frieda

    2002-01-01

    Uses data from the National Survey of Families and Households to test the generality of the links between parenting practices and child outcomes. Parents' reports of support, monitoring, and harsh punishment were associated in the expected direction with parents' reports of children's adjustment, school grades, and behavior problems, and with…

  19. Teaching-Family Model: Insuring Quality Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McElgunn, Peggy

    2012-01-01

    The Teaching-Family Model was one of the earliest approaches to be supported by an extensive research base. As it has evolved over four decades, it retains the focus on teaching and learning but incorporates a strength- and relationship-based orientation. The model is also unique in gathering ongoing practice-based evidence to insure quality.

  20. Otolaryngology Training for Family Practice Residents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    And Others; Rood, Stewart R.

    1980-01-01

    The faculty of the Department of Otolaryngology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, has designed a rotation in the otolaryngology service, that is a basic clinical orientation to ear, nose and throat medicine, to fit the one-month block committed by the local family practice residency training program. The program is described and its…

  1. Sibling Family Practices: Guidelines for Healthy Boundaries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Toni Cavanagh; Huang, Bevan Emma; Simpson, Pippa M.

    2009-01-01

    A questionnaire was given to 500 mental health and child welfare professionals asking for maximum acceptable ages for siblings to engage jointly in certain family practices related to hygiene, affection, and privacy. A large proportion of respondents felt it was never acceptable for siblings to take showers together (40%), kiss on the mouth (37%),…

  2. Spontaneous Bruising in a Family Practice Population

    PubMed Central

    Modi, Amita V.

    1992-01-01

    Purpura simplex, or the syndrome of “easy bruisability,” is a benign, non-progressive clinical entity that can at times mimic more serious bleeding disorders. This study investigated the incidence of spontaneous bruising in a family practice population. Results suggest that spontaneous bruising is very common, particularly in women. Postulated mechanisms for purpura simplex are briefly reviewed. PMID:21221312

  3. Allocation of Allowances and Associated Family Practices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerr, M. Kaye; Cheadle, Tannis

    This study gathered information on general family practices concerning allowances given to children, parental reasons for the provision of allowances, the bases for their administration, and the frequency of conflicts generated around them. The subjects were 81 parents of elementary school children in a midwest Canadian city. Subjects completed…

  4. Functional Somatic Symptoms: Family Practice Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Fraser, Frederick Donald

    1990-01-01

    Functional symptoms are a common and at times irritating part of family practice. The expedient way of dealing with these patients is to investigate, prescribe, and reassure that nothing serious is wrong. This reassurance may not be convincing to the patient whose symptom persists. The author reviews the main issues in this field and describes a subset of patients who seem to have identification as the basis for their functional symptom. When cases are of short term, this subset can be handled by the family physician who is aware of the logic behind the functional symptoms in certain cases. An understanding of functional symptoms and a belief in their logic are important dimensions of comprehensive care in family practice. PMID:21233989

  5. Being a family systems thinker: a psychiatrist's personal odyssey.

    PubMed

    Combrinck-Graham, Lee

    2014-09-01

    This account traces the development of family systems thinking from early pioneering thinking and practices, through the development of institutions and professional definitions, and through challenges to family systems thinking and practice from the biomedical points of view. Throughout there is a strong conviction that "thinking family" is an essential core of effective mental health treatment, because families can heal. PMID:25074645

  6. Using Family Paradigms to Improve Evidence-Based Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hidecker, Mary Jo Cooley; Jones, Rebecca S.; Imig, David R.; Villarruel, Francisco A.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Evidence-based practice (EBP) describes clinical decision making using research, clinical experience, and client values. For family-centered practices, the client's family is integral to this process. This article proposes that using family paradigms, a family science framework, may help elicit and understand client/family values within…

  7. Value of a regional family practice residency training program site

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, Sarah; Mullett, Jennifer; Beerman, Steve

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To examine the perceptions of residents, nurses, and physicians about the effect of a regional family practice residency site on the delivery of health services in the community, as well as on the community health care providers. Design Interviews and focus groups were conducted. Setting Nanaimo, BC. Participants A total of 16 residents, 15 nurses, and 20 physicians involved with the family practice residency training program at the Nanaimo site. Methods A series of semistructured interviews and focus groups was conducted. Transcripts of interviews and focus groups were analyzed thematically by the research team. Main findings Overall, participants agreed that having a family practice residency training site in the community contributed to community life and to the delivery of health services in the following ways: increased community capacity and social capital; motivated positive relationships and attitudes in the hospital and community settings; improved communication and teamwork, as well as accessibility and understanding of the health care system; increased the standard of care; and facilitated the recruitment and retention of family physicians. Conclusion This family practice residency training site was beneficial for the community it served. Future planning for distributed medical education sites should take into account the effects of these sites on the health care community and ensure that they continue to be positive influences. Further research in this area could focus on patients’ perceptions of how residency programs affect their care, as well as on the effect of residency programs on wait times and workload for physicians and nurses. PMID:25217693

  8. Changing Policy and Practice in the Child Welfare System through Collaborative Efforts to Identify and Respond Effectively to Family Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banks, Duren; Landsverk, John; Wang, Kathleen

    2008-01-01

    The "Greenbook" provides a roadmap for child welfare agencies to collaborate and provide effective responses to families who are experiencing co-occurring child maltreatment and domestic violence. A multisite developmental evaluation was conducted of six demonstration sites that received federal funding to implement "Greenbook" recommendations for…

  9. Preparing the personal physician for practice: changing family medicine residency training to enable new model practice.

    PubMed

    Green, Larry A; Jones, Samuel M; Fetter, Gerald; Pugno, Perry A

    2007-12-01

    After two years of intensive study, in 2004 the Future of Family Medicine report concluded that the current U.S. health care system is inadequate and unsustainable, and called for changes within the specialty of family medicine to ensure the future health of the American public. With guidance and encouragement from many disciplines and health experts, a set of 10 recommendations was established to accomplish a transformative change in how family physicians serve their patients and how the essential function of primary care is achieved. From these recommendations came a period of innovation and experimentation in the training of family physicians, entitled Preparing the Personal Physician for Practice (P4). The P4 project is a carefully designed and evaluated initiative led by the American Board of Family Medicine and the Association of Family Medicine Residency Directors and administered by TransforMED, a practice redesign initiative of the American Academy of Family Physicians. Fourteen family medicine programs were chosen to participate and will put their innovations into practice from 2007 to 2012, during which time regular evaluation will be conducted. The purpose of P4 is to learn how to improve the graduate medical education of family physicians such that they are prepared to be outstanding personal physicians and to work in the new models of practice now emerging. The innovations tested by P4 residencies are expected to inspire substantial changes in the content, structure, and locations of training of family physicians and to guide future revisions in accreditation and certification requirements. PMID:18046133

  10. The mentoring needs of trainees in family practice.

    PubMed

    Brown, Judith Belle; Thorpe, Cathy; Paquette-Warren, Jann; Stewart, Moira; Kasperski, Jan

    2012-05-01

    This qualitative study examined medical students' and family practice residents' ideas, perceptions, and experiences of being mentored and their expectations of the mentoring experience. Eight focus groups and 16 individual interviews were used to collect data from 49 medical students and 29 family practice residents. Interviews and focus groups were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim. The analysis was iterative and interpretive, using both individual and team analyses. The analysis of the data revealed two central but related themes. The first theme reflected participants' overall experiences with mentors composed of three distinct elements: mentor roles (e.g. coach, advisor) and attributes (e.g. openness and approachability), interactions with mentors, and early exposure to family practice mentors (e.g. observing patient encounters). The second theme explicated the trainees' specific learning needs to be addressed by mentors that were categorised into three distinct yet overlapping levels: 1 practice level (i.e. guidance regarding the logistics of practice management) 2 system level (i.e. knowledge about the medical community as well as community resources) 3 personal level (i.e. guidance in balancing personal and professional responsibilities). Having the option of selecting multiple mentors to address unique aspects of the mentees' personal and professional development is critical in respecting the evolutionary nature and fluidity of the mentoring experience. PMID:22762878

  11. Family Medicine's Waltz with Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downing, Raymond

    2012-01-01

    Family Medicine first formally confronted systems thinking with the adoption of the biopsychosocial model for understanding disease in a holistic manner; this is a description of a natural system. More recently, Family Medicine has been consciously engaged in developing itself as a system for delivering health care, an artificial system. We make…

  12. Contracting for Trust in Family Practice Obstetrics

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Michael

    1983-01-01

    A case is presented, illustrating a problem faced by family physicians who practice obstetrics; women who present with lists of inflexible requirements for labor and delivery may be attempting to control a situation in which they feel a great deal of fear, and little trust for the physician. The physician who tries to deal with every item on the list, rather than to explore the meaning of the total presentation, risks establishing a contract that cannot be met—and attracting more demanding patients. It is better to offer to discuss the patient's fear and distrust; this is described as `contracting for trust', and is a way to promote patient and doctor flexibility. PMID:21283484

  13. Innovative educational practices in a required family medicine clerkship.

    PubMed

    Quinby, P M

    1993-01-01

    This paper traces the 7-year evolution of a required clerkship in Family Practice from the time of initial grant application to the current academic year. Results of experience in areas of student placement, preceptor recruitment, curriculum development, test construction, grading schema and course evaluation are described. Emphasis on streamlining administrative systems to decrease paperwork of course director is a major focus. Changing needs of department, medical school and student are reflected in the adaptations of the clerkship to these needs. PMID:8326845

  14. Participatory Design Research as a Practice for Systemic Repair: Doing Hand-in-Hand Math Research with Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Booker, Angela; Goldman, Shelley

    2016-01-01

    Success and failure in formal mathematics education has been used to legitimize stratification. We describe participatory design research as a methodology for systemic repair. The analysis describes epistemic authority--exercising the right or the power to know--as a form of agency in processes of mathematical problem solving and learning. We…

  15. Characteristics of Combined Family Practice-Psychiatry Residency Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rachal, James; Lacy, Timothy J.; Warner, Christopher H.; Whelchel, Jennifer

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate how family practice-psychiatry residency programs meet the challenges of rigorous accreditation demands, clinical supervision, and boundaries of practice. Method: A 54-question survey of program directors of family practice-psychiatry residency programs outlining program demographic data, curricula, coordination, resident…

  16. Indian family systems, collectivistic society and psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Chadda, Rakesh K; Deb, Koushik Sinha

    2013-01-01

    Indian society is collectivistic and promotes social cohesion and interdependence. The traditional Indian joint family, which follows the same principles of collectivism, has proved itself to be an excellent resource for the care of the mentally ill. However, the society is changing with one of the most significant alterations being the disintegration of the joint family and the rise of nuclear and extended family system. Although even in today's changed scenario, the family forms a resource for mental health that the country cannot neglect, yet utilization of family in management of mental disorders is minimal. Family focused psychotherapeutic interventions might be the right tool for greater involvement of families in management of their mentally ill and it may pave the path for a deeper community focused treatment in mental disorders. This paper elaborates the features of Indian family systems in the light of the Asian collectivistic culture that are pertinent in psychotherapy. Authors evaluate the scope and effectiveness of family focused psychotherapy for mental disorders in India, and debate the issues and concerns faced in the practice of family therapy in India. PMID:23858272

  17. Indian family systems, collectivistic society and psychotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Chadda, Rakesh K.; Deb, Koushik Sinha

    2013-01-01

    Indian society is collectivistic and promotes social cohesion and interdependence. The traditional Indian joint family, which follows the same principles of collectivism, has proved itself to be an excellent resource for the care of the mentally ill. However, the society is changing with one of the most significant alterations being the disintegration of the joint family and the rise of nuclear and extended family system. Although even in today's changed scenario, the family forms a resource for mental health that the country cannot neglect, yet utilization of family in management of mental disorders is minimal. Family focused psychotherapeutic interventions might be the right tool for greater involvement of families in management of their mentally ill and it may pave the path for a deeper community focused treatment in mental disorders. This paper elaborates the features of Indian family systems in the light of the Asian collectivistic culture that are pertinent in psychotherapy. Authors evaluate the scope and effectiveness of family focused psychotherapy for mental disorders in India, and debate the issues and concerns faced in the practice of family therapy in India. PMID:23858272

  18. A Survey of Adverse Drug Reactions in Family Practice

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, J. L.

    1984-01-01

    In this study, 232 Canadian family physicians recorded suspected adverse drug reactions (SADRs) in their practices for five months. Patients' age and sex, the drug(s) implicated, type of reaction and any disability were recorded on a card and sent to a central coordinating office each week. The number of SADRs in clinical practice seems to be small. An estimated 300,000 patients were involved in the study, and a total of 314 suspected adverse drug reactions in 314 patients were reported. A proposal is made for a surveillance system for new drugs. Family physicians would monitor all patients taking a drug or group of drugs and matched controls. The status of patients and controls would be recorded regularly and any SADRs reported to a central coordinating centre. PMID:21283495

  19. Promising Practices: Training Strategies for Serving Children with Serious Emotional Disturbance and Their Families in a System of Care. Systems of Care: Promising Practices in Children's Mental Health 1998 Series. Volume V.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyers, Judith; Kaufman, Martha; Goldman, Sybil

    This is the fifth volume in a series of monographs from the Comprehensive Community Mental Health Service for Children and Their Families Program, which currently supports 41 comprehensive system of care sites to meet the needs of children with serious emotional disturbances (SED). This volume examines theories of adult learning, core values, and…

  20. Integrating School and Family Counseling: Practical Solutions. The Family Psychology and Counseling Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Lynn D., Ed.

    This book offers practical suggestions for school counselors to begin integrating family counseling methods into their practice, while providing a rationale and the research support for working with families from a school base. It also provides specific techniques for using solution-focused tools, conducting family therapy with children, working…

  1. Teaching Family Systems Theory through Service Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Christine E.; Lampinen, Autumn; Kelley-Soderholm, Erin L.

    2006-01-01

    The authors present a rationale for incorporating service-learning projects into courses that teach family systems theory. A model program is presented to provide an example of the objectives, practical considerations, and student responses to such a project. Recommendations for counselor educators are made based on experience with the model…

  2. Strengthening Adoption Practice, Listening to Adoptive Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkinson, Anne; Gonet, Patricia

    2007-01-01

    In-depth interviews with 500 adoptive families who received postadoption services through Virginia's Adoptive Family Preservation (AFP) program paint a richly detailed picture of the challenges adoptive families face and what they need to sustain adoption for many years after finalization. Findings document the need for support in a variety of…

  3. Experience with a Family-Practice-Resident-Directed Obstetrical Clinic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, Jerry L.; Snyder, Frank

    1980-01-01

    At Toledo Hospital, family practice residents have assumed responsibility for the normal obstetrics clinic. Specialty consultations are provided by the hospital's obstetrics residency program. A medical audit of the clinic indicates that the family practice residents obtained consultations and made referrals at the appropriate times. (JMD)

  4. Family Counseling in Malaysia: Current Issues and Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noor, Norhayati Mohd.

    2014-01-01

    The study is carried out to explore the issues and practices in family counselling among the family counsellors at few counseling centres in Malaysia. Qualitative approach of single case embedded units was used for the study. Data collection was done using in-depth interview, observation and document analysis with 12 family counsellors. The data…

  5. Social workers as "experts" in the family court system: is evidence-based practice a missing link or host-created knowledge?

    PubMed

    Prescott, Dana E

    2013-10-01

    The graduate school curriculum for social workers requires that students learn to critically distinguish between opinion-based knowledge and evidence-based practices, or empirically-supported interventions. Once graduated, licensed social workers are often called upon to offer diagnostic and predictive opinions as experts in a variety of macro-environments. When the family courts are that "host" environment, social workers proffer expert opinions that may categorize and label parents or children for purposes of a judge's allocation of physical or legal custody. In this article, it is suggested that the social work profession, within all three domains of education, practice, and research, should more precisely link the design and fidelity of an evidence-based practice (EBP) with its potential misapplication or warping when proffered as science in "host" environments like family courts. As Foucault and other scholars warn, the failure to verify that an intervention is applied correctly may actually enhance the risk of social injustice by interpreting and translating EBP knowledge in the non-empirical form of authority-by-license. This article, therefore, proposes that the social work profession, from the classroom to the field, has an obligation to thoroughly understand and engage interdisciplinary practices that assure respect for the strengths and limits of social work knowledge. PMID:24066636

  6. Comprehensive Family Practice Clerkship in a Minority Institution

    PubMed Central

    Bang, Ki Moon; Greene, E. Josephine; Williams, Henry W.; Leath, Brenda A.; Matthews, Ruth

    1988-01-01

    A comprehensive family practice clerkship program at Howard University College of Medicine has been conducted since 1970. This institution is one of three predominantly black institutions offering a family practice program. The senior clerkship is mandatory and at least 20 to 25 percent of each class elect to participate in a four-to six- week family practice preceptorship. As a result of the clerkship's success, over 50 percent of the program's graduates actively practice in primary medical manpower shortage or medically underserved areas. PMID:3246700

  7. The role of family institutes in promoting the practice of family therapy.

    PubMed

    Rampage, Cheryl

    2014-09-01

    Much of the development of family therapy as a discipline was an outcome of the clinical, training, and theory-building activities conducted at family institutes around the United States. Beginning in the 1960s, these institutes were the crucibles in which the concepts and practices of family therapy flourished. The author, a leader at one of the largest family institutes in the United States, discusses the role of family institutes in promoting the practice of family therapy, as well as the challenges of doing so. PMID:24785549

  8. [Family medicine and practice in the Mexican Social Security Institute].

    PubMed

    Casas Patiño, Donovan; Jarillo Soto, Edgar; Rodríguez Torres, Alejandra

    2014-01-01

    The central ideas of this research paper are related to the practice of family medicine as a specialty. It focuses in its origins, problems, unique characteristics, limitations, scope, management, and processes within the context of primary care of the Mexican Social Security System. This approach was based on a qualitative, hermeneutical study closely related to the Structural Functionalism Theory. Within this framework, medical practice is seen as an equation: Meaning = action + function/structure. This offers an approach to the understanding of reality through surveys and observations in five categories: identity, activity, purpose, values/norms, and power/relationship. The practice of family medicine is defined as a medical act in the Mexican Social Security Institute. This act is limited to a brief encounter and a prescription, which makes it a short, fleeting, medicalized interaction. The result is a negative social imaginary of the physician, the patient and the whole of society. Thus, individuals and society host a negative social imaginary bestowed on doctors and users of the health system. PMID:25375148

  9. Family physicians' approach to psychotherapy and counseling. Perceptions and practices.

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, J. G.

    1994-01-01

    To determine how family physicians perceive the support they get for psychotherapy and counseling, we surveyed a random sample of Ontario College of Family Physicians members. Of 100 physicians who had family medicine residency training with psychotherapy experience, 43% indicated that such training was inadequate for their current needs. Because family physicians often provide psychotherapy and counseling, their training should reflect the needs found in practice. PMID:8080505

  10. Treating obesity in the family practice setting.

    PubMed

    Fernstrom, M H

    2001-06-01

    The health risks of obesity include the development of comorbid conditions and increased overall mortality. Obesity increases health-related costs for both patients and the healthcare system and significantly affects workforce productivity through increased absenteeism and higher health and insurance payments for employers. Discrimination against obese individuals exists in the workplace and in various social contexts. Obesity is a chronic condition with complex, multiple causes involving physiologic, genetic, and behavioral components, all of which must be addressed for successful treatment. Traditional treatment options include diet, exercise, and behavior modification, but recently, pharmacotherapy has been incorporated as an effective and safe adjunct for long-term treatment of obesity. Additionally, bariatric surgery is an option for selected morbidly obese individuals. Weight losses of only 5% to 10% of initial body weight confer proven clinical benefits. Such modest weight losses can be achieved and maintained within a supportive environment provided in a primary care practice. PMID:19667563

  11. Understanding Latino Families: Scholarship, Policy, and Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zambrana, Ruth E., Ed.

    This anthology examines the contemporary status of Latino families, especially their great racial and ethnic diversity. The book focuses on the strengths of Latino/Hispanic groups, structural processes that impede their progress, and cultural and familial processes that enhance their intergenerational adaptation and resiliency. Chapter 1, "The…

  12. Strengthening Fragile Families through Research and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bembry, James X.

    2011-01-01

    Almost one third of all children in the United States are born to unmarried parents. This figure is even higher among poor and minority populations. Because of their heightened risk for economic and social problems and family dissolution, disadvantaged, unmarried parents have been called "fragile families." In 2002 the Bush administration…

  13. Factors influencing palliative care. Qualitative study of family physicians' practices.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, J. B.; Sangster, M.; Swift, J.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine factors that influence family physicians' decisions to practise palliative care. DESIGN: Qualitative method of in-depth interviews. SETTING: Southwestern Ontario. PARTICIPANTS: Family physicians who practise palliative care on a full-time basis, who practise on a part-time basis, or who have retired from active involvement in palliative care. METHOD: Eleven in-depth interviews were conducted to explore factors that influence family physicians' decisions to practise palliative care and factors that sustain their interest in palliative care. All interviews were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim. The analysis strategy used a phenomenological approach and occurred concurrently rather than sequentially. All interview transcriptions were read independently by the researchers, who then compared and combined their analyses. Final analysis involved examining all interviews collectively, thus permitting relationships between and among central themes to emerge. MAIN OUTCOME FINDINGS: The overriding theme was a common philosophy of palliative care focusing on acceptance of death, whole person care, compassion, communication, and teamwork. Participants' philosophies were shaped by their education and by professional and personal experiences. In addition, participants articulated personal and systemic factors currently affecting their practice of palliative care. CONCLUSIONS: Participants observed that primary care physicians should be responsible for their patients' palliative care within the context of interdisciplinary teams. For medical students to be knowledgeable and sensitive to the needs of dying patients, palliative care should be given higher priority in the curriculum. Finally, participants argued compellingly for transferring the philosophy of palliative care to the overall practice of medicine. PMID:9612588

  14. Family practice in Turkey: Observations from a pilot implementation

    PubMed Central

    Yaman, Hakan; Güneş, Evrim Didem

    2016-01-01

    Objective Turkey has implemented family practice on a pilot basis as part of the reform in health care, since 2005. This paper aims to understand and describe the prevalent practice patterns and clinic characteristics during the transition period. Design A cross-sectional descriptive study design was used. Subjects An online survey was conducted among Turkish GPs working as primary care doctors (without vocational training) during the reform period. Clinic and GP characteristics are analysed with descriptive statistics. Results List size is an important factor; larger lists lead to shorter consultation time and a longer wait for patients. GPs are generally satisfied with the reform. Conclusion During the transition to family practice access of patients to health care has improved and GPs are satisfied with their job. key pointsPatients in Turkey have adequate access to primary health care services.The waiting time for consultation is relatively short.Basic prevention activities occupy the majority of the GPs’ time.Reducing the panel size and introducing appointment systems may be useful. PMID:26893201

  15. Relationship between quality of care and choice of clinical computing system: retrospective analysis of family practice performance under the UK's quality and outcomes framework

    PubMed Central

    Kontopantelis, Evangelos; Buchan, Iain; Reeves, David; Checkland, Kath; Doran, Tim

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the relationship between performance on the UK Quality and Outcomes Framework pay-for-performance scheme and choice of clinical computer system. Design Retrospective longitudinal study. Setting Data for 2007–2008 to 2010–2011, extracted from the clinical computer systems of general practices in England. Participants All English practices participating in the pay-for-performance scheme: average 8257 each year, covering over 99% of the English population registered with a general practice. Main outcome measures Levels of achievement on 62 quality-of-care indicators, measured as: reported achievement (levels of care after excluding inappropriate patients); population achievement (levels of care for all patients with the relevant condition) and percentage of available quality points attained. Multilevel mixed effects multiple linear regression models were used to identify population, practice and clinical computing system predictors of achievement. Results Seven clinical computer systems were consistently active in the study period, collectively holding approximately 99% of the market share. Of all population and practice characteristics assessed, choice of clinical computing system was the strongest predictor of performance across all three outcome measures. Differences between systems were greatest for intermediate outcomes indicators (eg, control of cholesterol levels). Conclusions Under the UK's pay-for-performance scheme, differences in practice performance were associated with the choice of clinical computing system. This raises the question of whether particular system characteristics facilitate higher quality of care, better data recording or both. Inconsistencies across systems need to be understood and addressed, and researchers need to be cautious when generalising findings from samples of providers using a single computing system. PMID:23913774

  16. Pod people. Response of family physicians and family practice nurses to Kosovar refugees in Greenwood, NS.

    PubMed Central

    Twohig, P. L.; Burge, F.; MacLachlan, R.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To explore roles of family physicians and family practice nurses who provided care to Kosovar refugees at Greenwood, NS. DESIGN: Qualitative study based on individual interviews with family physicians and family practice nurses. SETTING: Family practices in Halifax, NS. PARTICIPANTS: Six family practice nurses, four physician faculty members, four community-based family physicians, and two family medicine residents were interviewed. Participants were purposefully chosen from the roster of service providers. METHOD: All interviews were conducted by one of the researchers and were semistructured. Interviews lasted approximately 30 minutes and were immediately transcribed. Key words and phrases were identified and compared with subsequent interviews until saturation was achieved. MAIN FINDINGS: Data yielded four analytical categories: the clinical encounter, expectation and experience, role and team functioning, and response. Participants reported how providing care in the context of a refugee camp was both similar to and different from their daily activities in family practice, as were their working relationships with other health care professionals. CONCLUSION: Primary care for refugees during complex health emergencies is often underreported in the literature. Yet family practice physicians and nurses recounted that they had the requisite skills to provide care in such a context. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:11143581

  17. Constructing the "Ideal" Family for Family-Centred Practice: Challenges for Delivery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dodd, Jenny; Saggers, Sherry; Wildy, Helen

    2009-01-01

    Family-centred practice positions families as the key decision-makers, central to and experts in the wants and needs of their child. This paper discusses how families interviewed for a Western Australian study describe their relationships with a range of allied health professionals in the paediatric disability sector. The allied health…

  18. Preparing School Counseling Students to Aid Families: Integrating a Family Systems Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paylo, Matthew John

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the value of integrating family systems theory into a school counseling curriculum is explored. Some programs have historically placed school counselors in a difficult position by not adequately preparing them for the demands of incorporating family systems and community collaboration into clinical practice. The rationale for…

  19. The Challenge of Teaching Obstetrics to Family Practice Residents

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, June C.

    1986-01-01

    Physicians who incorporate maternity care into family practice experience an increase in job satisfaction and enjoy a more favourable practice profile. Yet many family physicians are opting out of the obstetrical care of their patients. This development presents a major challenge to the teachers of family medicine. In many teaching programs the response of staff has been to move significant portions of residency training in obstetrics to smaller community hospitals. At Mount Sinai Hospital in Toronto, we believe that an integrated program in the tertiary care centre offers definite advantages. Our obstetrical training program integrates four elements: the community, the hospital, the Department of Family and Community Medicine, and the training program offered by that Department. We expect that family practice residents, by participating in this multifaceted, integrated program, will make a better-informed choice about practising obstetrics. PMID:21267328

  20. Bridging Research and Practice in the Family and Human Sciences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Small, Stephen A.

    2005-01-01

    Over the past decade there has been a growing concern over the gap between research and practice in family and other human sciences. Family scientists have been troubled that the scientific knowledge base is not frequently used by practitioners, whereas practitioners have complained that the research base is often not very useful for issues faced…

  1. Trajectories of Family Management Practices and Early Adolescent Behavioral Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Ming-Te; Dishion, Thomas J.; Stormshak, Elizabeth A.; Willett, John B.

    2011-01-01

    Stage-environment fit theory was used to examine the reciprocal lagged relations between family management practices and early adolescent problem behavior during the middle school years. In addition, the potential moderating roles of family structure and of gender were explored. Hierarchical linear modeling was used to describe patterns of growth…

  2. Normal versus Pathological Aging: Knowledge of Family Practice Residents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beall, S. Colleen; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Family physicians may lack discriminatory ability to differentiate normal aging form disease states. To assess such ability, 53 aging-related indicators or symptoms were presented to 65 physicians in 3 family practice residency programs. Respondents classified each symptom as normal aging or disease. On average, residents classified 73.4% of…

  3. House Call Training in the Family Practice Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warburton, Samuel W.; Sadler, Georgia R.

    1977-01-01

    Since practicing New Jersey family physicians still consider house calls important in the delivery of quality primary care, the Department of Family Medicine of the College of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey-Rutgers Medical School is assisting in revising program curricula to provide house call training. (Author/LBH)

  4. Family Religious Involvement, Parenting Practices and Academic Performance in Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Hae Seong; Bonner, Patricia

    2008-01-01

    This project investigated the impacts of family religious involvement and family religious affiliations on parenting practices and academic performance. This study utilized data from the base-year and first follow-up of the Education Longitudinal Study: 2002/2004 (ELS). A series of statistical techniques were incorporated to examine the nature of…

  5. Building on Strengths: Intergenerational Practice with African American Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waites, Cheryl

    2009-01-01

    Intergenerational kinship and multigenerational families (three or more generations) have been a source of strength for African Americans. This article presents a culturally responsive intergenerational practice model for working with African American families that draws on this legacy. The model looks at intergenerational kinship and…

  6. Understanding elder abuse in family practice

    PubMed Central

    Yaffe, Mark J.; Tazkarji, Bachir

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objective To discuss what constitutes elder abuse, why family physicians should be aware of it, what signs and symptoms might suggest mistreatment of older adults, how the Elder Abuse Suspicion Index might help in identification of abuse, and what options exist for responding to suspicions of abuse. Sources of information MEDLINE, PsycINFO, and Social Work Abstracts were searched for publications in English or French, from 1970 to 2011, using the terms elder abuse, elder neglect, elder mistreatment, seniors, older adults, violence, identification, detection tools, and signs and symptoms. Relevant publications were reviewed. Main message Elder abuse is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in older adults. While family physicians are well placed to identify mistreatment of seniors, their actual rates of reporting abuse are lower than those in other professions. This might be improved by an understanding of the range of acts that constitute elder abuse and what signs and symptoms seen in the office might suggest abuse. Detection might be enhanced by use of a short validated tool, such as the Elder Abuse Suspicion Index. Conclusion Family physicians can play a larger role in identifying possible elder abuse. Once suspicion of abuse is raised, most communities have social service or law enforcement providers available to do additional assessments and interventions. PMID:23242889

  7. Clinical Practice Patterns of Canadian Couple/Marital/Family Therapists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaton, John; Dienhart, Anna; Schmidt, Jonathan; Turner, Jean

    2009-01-01

    This clinical practice pattern survey had two unique aspects. It was a national survey of American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy (AAMFT) members in Canada that included all AAMFT membership categories, including student, affiliate, associate, clinical, and supervisor. It compared practice pattern data for clinical members from Canada…

  8. Characteristics and Clinical Practices of Rural Marriage and Family Therapists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, James

    2007-01-01

    This report presents a subset of data collected from the American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy (AAMFT) Practice Research Network project conducted in 2002. A sample of 47 clinical members of AAMFT who indicated they practiced in a rural community provided descriptive information on demographic characteristics, training, clinical…

  9. [Environmental Hazards Assessment Program annual report, June 1992--June 1993]. Results of the environmental health activities and needs assessment of the South Carolina statewide family practice system for the Environmental Hazards Assessment Program: EHAP Volume 1, No. 1

    SciTech Connect

    Musham, C.; Hainer, B.

    1993-05-01

    An activities and needs assessment was conducted to determine what each of the seven family practice residency programs in South Carolina is providing in environmental health education. In addition, this study was designed to determine: what are the barriers to greater emphasis on environmental health in family practice residency programs and, what the basic environmental health educational goals for family practice residency programs should be.

  10. Practising family history: 'identity' as a category of social practice.

    PubMed

    Bottero, Wendy

    2015-09-01

    Research on family history argues it performs the task of anchoring a sense of 'self' through tracing ancestral connection and cultural belonging, seeing it as a form of storied 'identity-work'. This paper draws on a small-scale qualitative study to think further on the identity-work of family history. Using practice theory, and a disaggregated notion of 'identity', it explores how the storying of family histories relates to genealogy as a leisure hobby, a form of historical research, and an information-processing activity; and examines the social organization of that narrativity, where various practical engagements render certain kinds of genealogical information more, or less, 'storyable'. Key features of 'identity-work' in family history, such as the construction of genealogy as a personal journey of discovery and identification with particular ancestors, emerge as a consequence of the procedures of family history, organized as a set of practical tasks. The paper explores 'identity-work' as a consequence of people's engagement in specific social practices which provide an internal logic to their actions, with various components of 'identity' emerging as categories of practice shaped within, and for, use. Focusing on 'identity' as something produced when we are engaged in doing other things, the paper examines how the practical organization of 'doing other things' helps produce 'identity' in particular ways. PMID:26173995

  11. Family Counseling Interventions: Understanding Family Systems and the Referral Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McWhirter, Ellen Hawley; And Others

    1993-01-01

    This article describes concepts underlying the idea of the "family as a system"; compares and contrasts four approaches to family therapy (those of Virginia Satir, Jay Haley, Murray Bowen, and Salvador Minuchin); and offers suggestions to teachers referring parents for family counseling. (DB)

  12. Transition to Family Practice in Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunes, Evrim Didem; Yaman, Hakan

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: Turkey's primary health care (PHC) system was established in the beginning of the 1960s and provides preventive and curative basic medical services to the population. This article describes the experience of the Turkish health system, as it tries to adapt to the European health system. It describes the current organization of primary…

  13. Examining the Relationships Between Family Meal Practices, Family Stressors, and the Weight of Youth in the Family

    PubMed Central

    Hearst, Mary O.; Fulkerson, Jayne; Murray, David M.; Martinson, Brian; Klein, Elizabeth; Pasch, Keryn; Samuelson, Anne

    2013-01-01

    Background Research is limited on how the social environment of the home is related to childhood obesity. Purpose The purpose of this research was to examine the relationships between positive family meal practices, family stressors, and the weight of youth and to examine parental weight status as a moderator of these relationships. Methods The study enrolled 368 parent/child dyads from a Minnesota sample. We used mediation analysis to examine the associations Results Families represented by an overweight parent reported fewer positive family meal practices (p<0.001), higher levels of depression (p=0.01), and fewer family rules (p=0.02) as compared to families represented by a healthy weight parent. For overweight parents, positive family meal practices mediated the relationship between some family stressors and child weight. Conclusions This research suggests that the home environment may affect the weight of children in the family, and the effect is more pronounced in families with at least one overweight parent. PMID:21136225

  14. Can naloxone prescription and overdose training for opioid users work in family practice?

    PubMed Central

    Leece, Pamela; Orkin, Aaron; Shahin, Rita; Steele, Leah S.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To explore family physicians’ attitudes toward prescribing naloxone to at-risk opioid users, as well as to determine the opportunities and challenges for expanding naloxone access to patients in family practice settings. Design One-hour focus group session and SWOT (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats) analysis. Setting Workshop held at the 2012 Family Medicine Forum in Toronto, Ont. Participants Seventeen conference attendees from 3 Canadian cities who practised in various family practice settings and who agreed to participate in the workshop. Methods The workshop included an overview of information about naloxone distribution and overdose education programs, followed by group discussion in smaller focus groups. Participants were instructed to focus their discussion on the question, “Could this [overdose education and naloxone prescription] work in your practice?” and to record notes using a standardized discussion guide based on a SWOT analysis. Two investigators reviewed the forms, extracting themes using an open coding process. Main findings Some participants believed that naloxone could be used safely among family practice patients, that the intervention fit well with their clinical practice settings, and that its use in family practice could enhance engagement with at-risk individuals and create an opportunity to educate patients, providers, and the public about overdose. Participants also indicated that the current guidelines and support systems for prescribing or administering naloxone were inadequate, that medicolegal uncertainties existed for those who prescribed or administered naloxone, and that high-quality evidence about the intervention’s effectiveness in family practice was lacking. Conclusion Family physicians believe that overdose education and naloxone prescription might provide patients at risk of opioid overdose in their practices with broad access to a potentially lifesaving intervention. However, they

  15. Student Development and Family Systems: Critical Review and Implications for Theory and Practice. Student-Environment Study Group. Student Development Monograph Series, Volume 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benjamin, Michael

    In response to a gap in the literature on student development with respect to the role of the family, and anecdotal evidence that the family's influence on the college student's development is profound, a review of the relevant literature on higher education, social psychology, psychiatry, sociology of the family, and family therapy was…

  16. Kidney organ donation: developing family practice initiatives to reverse inertia

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Kidney transplantation is associated with greater long term survival rates and improved quality of life compared with dialysis. Continuous growth in the number of patients with kidney failure has not been matched by an increase in the availability of kidneys for transplantation. This leads to long waiting lists, higher treatment costs and negative health outcomes. Discussion Misunderstandings, public uncertainty and issues of trust in the medical system, that limit willingness to be registered as a potential donor, could be addressed by community dissemination of information and new family practice initiatives that respond to individuals' personal beliefs and concerns regarding organ donation and transplantation. Summary Tackling both personal and public inertia on organ donation is important for any community oriented kidney donation campaign. PMID:20478042

  17. Trajectories of family management practices and early adolescent behavioral outcomes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ming-Te; Dishion, Thomas J; Stormshak, Elizabeth A; Willett, John B

    2011-09-01

    Stage-environment fit theory was used to examine the reciprocal lagged relations between family management practices and early adolescent problem behavior during the middle school years. In addition, the potential moderating roles of family structure and of gender were explored. Hierarchical linear modeling was used to describe patterns of growth in family management practices and adolescents' behavioral outcomes and to detect predictors of interindividual differences in initial status and rate of change. The sample comprised approximately 1,000 adolescents between ages 11 years and 15 years. The results indicated that adolescents' antisocial behaviors and substance use increased and their positive behavioral engagement decreased over time. As adolescent age increased, parental knowledge of their adolescent's activities decreased, as did parental rule making and support. The level and rate of change in family management and adolescent behavioral outcomes varied by family structure and by gender. Reciprocal longitudinal associations between parenting practices and adolescent problem behavior were found. Specifically, parenting practices predicted subsequent adolescent behavior, and adolescent behavior predicted subsequent parenting practices. In addition, parental warmth moderated the effects of parental knowledge and rule making on adolescent antisocial behavior and substance use over time. PMID:21688899

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging. Application to family practice.

    PubMed Central

    Goh, R. H.; Somers, S.; Jurriaans, E.; Yu, J.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review indications, contraindications, and risks of using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in order to help primary care physicians refer patients appropriately for MRI, screen for contraindications to using MRI, and educate patients about MRI. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: Recommendations are based on classic textbooks, the policies of our MRI group, and a literature search using MEDLINE with the MeSH headings magnetic resonance imaging, brain, musculoskeletal, and spine. The search was limited to human, English-language, and review articles. Evidence in favour of using MRI for imaging the head, spine, and joints is well established. For cardiac, abdominal, and pelvic conditions, MRI has been shown useful for certain indications, usually to complement other modalities. MAIN MESSAGE: For demonstrating soft tissue conditions, MRI is better than computed tomography (CT), but CT shows bone and acute bleeding better. Therefore, patients with trauma or suspected intracranial bleeding should have CT. Tumours, congenital abnormalities, vascular structures, and the cervical or thoracic spine show better on MRI. Either modality can be used for lower back pain. Cardiac, abdominal, and pelvic abnormalities should be imaged with ultrasound or CT before MRI. Contraindications for MRI are mainly metallic implants or shrapnel, severe claustrophobia, or obesity. CONCLUSIONS: With the increasing availability of MRI scanners in Canada, better understanding of the indications, contraindications, and risks will be helpful for family physicians and their patients. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 PMID:10509224

  19. Perceived Family Functioning and Family Resources of Hong Kong Families: Implications for Social Work Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ma, Joyce L. C.; Wong, Timothy K. Y.; Lau, Luk King; Pun, Shuk Han

    2009-01-01

    This article reports the results of a telephone survey (n = 1,015 respondents) that aims to identify the perceived general family functioning and family resources of Hong Kong Chinese families and their linkage to each other in a rapidly transforming society. The perceived general family functioning of the respondents was average, and the five…

  20. The future of family practice training in California.

    PubMed Central

    Midtling, J. E.; Barnett, P. G.; Blossom, H. J.; Burnett, W. H.

    1990-01-01

    Although the number of physicians in California has doubled since 1963, the number of family and general practice physicians has declined. The ratio of office-based primary care physicians to population has also decreased. Graduate medical education is funded largely from patient care revenues, but the low rate of reimbursement for ambulatory care makes training in primary care specialties especially dependent on public support. Medicare, the Veterans Administration, and the University of California provide more than $325 million a year in support of graduate medical education in California. Federal and state grant programs provide $5 million a year for family physician training in the state, but appropriations to these programs have been reduced in real terms. California family practice residencies are disproportionately located at county hospitals, where funding shortfalls make them especially vulnerable to cuts in grant programs. Additional resources will be needed if more family physicians are to be trained. Images PMID:2333709

  1. A Practical Approach to the Family That Expects a Miracle

    PubMed Central

    DeLisser, Horace M.

    2009-01-01

    When a patient is extremely ill and/or dying, and the family expects a miraculous recovery, this situation can be very challenging to physicians, particularly when there is certainty that the miracle will occur through divine intervention. A practical approach is therefore provided to clinicians for engaging families that anticipate the miraculous healing of a sick patient. This strategy involves exploring the meaning and significance of a miracle, providing a balanced, nonargumentative response and negotiation of patient-centered compromises, while conveying respect for patient spirituality and practicing good medicine. Such an approach, tailored to the specifics of each family, can be effective in helping a family come to a place of acceptance about the impending death of their loved one. PMID:19497899

  2. Behavioral Medicine and University Departments of Family Practice

    PubMed Central

    Grantham, Peter

    1983-01-01

    Behavioral medicine brings knowledge and skills from the social sciences to the practice of medicine. Modifying behavior which causes a health problem, disease prevention and health promotion, improving the relationship between patients and health professionals, understanding cultural and ethical issues, and the effect of illness on behavior are all aspects of behavioral medicine. Such `whole person' medicine fits well into family practice. However, careful consideration of the risks, challenges, opportunities and responsibilities of behavioral medicine is necessary. Academic family physicians must conduct research and help develop educational programs that will prepare graduates to deal with frustrating health problems which are affected by behavior. A division of behavioral medicine eventually may be established in the University of British Columbia's Department of Family Practice. PMID:20469407

  3. Using Movies to Teach Family Systems Concepts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudock, Anthony M., Jr.; Warden, Sherry A. Gallagher

    2001-01-01

    This article reflects a review of research relevant to family systems training and the use of films in the teaching of family systems theory. Advantages and disadvantages of using movies in an introductory-level graduate family therapy course are discussed. An outline of family therapy training objectives, as well as examples of a movie-based…

  4. Sexual medicine in family practice. Part 2: Treating sexual dysfunction.

    PubMed Central

    Holzapfel, S.

    1993-01-01

    Sexual problems can be caused by organic or psychological factors, or a combination of the two. Deciding which leads to an appropriate management plan. This paper describes the current status of treatments for common sexual dysfunctions seen in family practice. PMID:8471907

  5. Stress in Family Practice Residents: An Exploratory Study Using Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Julliard, Kell; Intilli, Nancy; Ryan, Jennifer; Vollmann, Sarah; Seshadri, Mahalakshmi

    2002-01-01

    Investigates the themes of 16 family practice residents' art work and their characteristics (age, gender, resident year, undergraduate training location) in relationship to stress. Residents' drawing were linked by common themes of psychological pressure, anxiety, a sense of being overwhelmed, and depression. Evidence of stress was more frequently…

  6. Best Practices in Working with Linguistically Diverse Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Araujo, Blanca E.

    2009-01-01

    Many schools face the challenge of forging partnerships with families from linguistically diverse backgrounds. Effective communication, funds of knowledge, culturally relevant teaching, and extending and accepting assistance are best practices that have been used successfully by school personnel when working with students who are identified as…

  7. Social Work Practice with Native American Families: A Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wintemute, Ginger, Ed.; Messer, Bonnie, Ed.

    A handbook on social work practice with Native American families, developed for use by students in undergraduate social work programs and by social service practitioners who work with Native American people, is divided into four sections. The first section contains four articles, written by Joseph A. Dudley (Methodist minister and Yankton Sioux)…

  8. Anxiety disorders in family practice. Diagnosis and management.

    PubMed Central

    Rosser, W. W.; Borins, M.; Audet, D.

    1994-01-01

    Anxiety disorders are common in family practice. Although not ideal, the DSM 3-R definitions of anxiety disorders provide a framework for diagnostic precision that assists physicians in choosing the best treatment. Assessing functional status helps determine the need for psychotherapeutic or pharmacologic intervention. We evaluate specific interventions and suggest the risks and benefits for each disorder. PMID:8312758

  9. Guiding the Family: Practical Counseling Techniques. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grunwald, Bernice Bronia; McAbee, Harold V.

    This text on principles of Adlerian Psychology is designed for use in family counseling. It begins with an overview of Alfred Adler and his basic philosophy on human relationships. Throughout the book, as the Adlerian theory is discussed, practical application of theory is explained for counselors. Counselors must have a firm theoretical basis for…

  10. Observed Parenting Practices of First-Generation Latino Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Domenech Rodriguez, Melanie; Davis, Melissa R.; Rodriguez, Jesus; Bates, Scott C.

    2006-01-01

    This study used an established behavioral observation methodology to examine the parenting practices of first-generation Latino parents of children 4 to 9 years of age. The study had three central aims, to examine: (1) the feasibility of using a behavioral observation methodology with Spanish-speaking immigrant families, (2) the utility of the…

  11. Family Empowerment Intervention: Conceptual Foundations and Clinical Practices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dembo, Richard; Dudell, Gary; Livingston, Stephen; Schmeidler, James

    2001-01-01

    Presents a detailed overview of the Family Empowerment Intervention (FEI), a system-oriented intervention delivered in-home by well-trained nontherapists. A clinical trial of FEI targeted arrested youths and their families. Topics covered included: theoretical foundations and goals of FEI, structural intervention strategies, and phases of the…

  12. Informed consent and its implications in family practice.

    PubMed

    Mangold, W J

    1975-04-01

    The doctrine of informed consent has had its practical introduction to medical malpractice litigation in the past five years. Its definition has not changed since the days when its definitive application was only a fond dream of the malpractice plaintiffs attorneys. However, with neh new methods of presenting this theory to the courts, and with the newly emerging practice fo having rulings on matters of law substituted by judges for prevailing standards of medical practice, the implications for family physicians have become tremendous. Hopefullum by understanding the principles involved in its application in the pertinent landmark cases, family physicians will be better able to abid the pitfalls engendered by the doctrine of informed consent. PMID:1127387

  13. Practice Locations of Texas Family Practice Residency Graduates, 1979-1987.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denton, David R.

    1989-01-01

    A study of family physicians graduating from Texas residency programs between 1979 and 1987 analyzed patterns of practice location and their relationship to residency location, focusing on size of practice community and distance from the residency program. It is concluded that state policy has effectively distributed physicians in the state. (MSE)

  14. Understanding partnership practice in child and family nursing through the concept of practice architectures.

    PubMed

    Hopwood, Nick; Fowler, Cathrine; Lee, Alison; Rossiter, Chris; Bigsby, Marg

    2013-09-01

    A significant international development agenda in the practice of nurses supporting families with young children focuses on establishing partnerships between professionals and service users. Qualitative data were generated through interviews and focus groups with 22 nurses from three child and family health service organisations, two in Australia and one in New Zealand. The aim was to explore what is needed in order to sustain partnership in practice, and to investigate how the concept of practice architectures can help understand attempts to enhance partnerships between nurses and families. Implementation of the Family Partnership Model (FPM) is taken as a specific point of reference. Analysis highlights a number of tensions between the goals of FPM and practice architectures relating to opportunities for ongoing learning; the role of individual nurses in shaping the practice; relationships with peers and managers; organisational features; and extra-organisational factors. The concept of practice architectures shows how changing practice requires more than developing individual knowledge and skills, and avoids treating individuals and context separately. The value of this framework for understanding change with reference to context rather than just individual's knowledge and skills is demonstrated, particularly with respect to approaches to practice development focused on providing additional training to nurses. PMID:23336287

  15. [Knowledge, attitudes and practices among religious students concerning family planning].

    PubMed

    Karout, N; Altuwaijri, S

    2012-07-01

    To determine the knowledge, attitude and practices concerning family planning of students attending religious schools in Lebanon, we conducted a cross-sectional study of 450 male and female students. A validated structured questionnaire was completed by the students. The majority of the students (65%) had a moderate level of knowledge, males more than females, but females had more positive beliefs and attitudes. More females agreed with family planning programmes and methods than males, but 35% had a negative attitude to family planning; a significant percentage had negative attitudes to contraceptive methods based on their view that they are not allowed (haram) in Islam. Among the married students, less than 40% used a family planning method; of those, the majority used a female method. Religion plays an important role in the health behaviour of religious students. Religious leaders can therefore inhibit or promote family planning, which will affect the success of family planning programmes. Thus, they should be included in the development and promotion of family planning programmes. PMID:22891526

  16. The family meetings in oncology: some practical guidelines.

    PubMed

    Gritti, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Somatic illness is not only an individual experience of physical and psychological suffering, but also a psychosocial status that modulates the patient's interpersonal relationships. Receiving a diagnosis of cancer causes severe distress. The patient's family, too, feels the emotional ups and downs of the patient. Like the patient, they feel distressed during the onset, course and outcome of the disease. Minimizing the interpersonal impact of the illness contributes to an improved quality of life for both patients and caregivers. Thus, it is widely assumed that cancer treatments should include some kind of psychological support for the patient and family members. All of these treatments are aimed at improving collaboration and illness perception among family, patients and healthcare professionals, and support the family during the course of the disease and cancer therapies. The family system theory is a valuable framework to explain how the disease of the patient and the family's daily life are interconnected. The therapeutic alliance with the family is a powerful tool to improve the quality of life for the patient, as well as to relieve the psychological distress of the family members who are involved. The following pages describe the objectives and conversational techniques that can be a tool for psychosocial work with the family of a cancer patient. The goal of this intervention is to help the patient's family to understand their problems and acknowledge the anxiety and fear of mourning that can impede their capacity to face the everyday problems they must cope with. To achieve this goal, it is recommended that a meeting (or a series of meetings) be scheduled, and conducted both in hospital and in the home. The steps to set up and conduct a family meeting are described in the paper, with special emphasis on communication skills required to meet family expectations and discuss the crucial issues of their everyday life. PMID:25653629

  17. Family-centered care for children with cerebral palsy: conceptual and practical considerations to advance care and practice.

    PubMed

    King, Gillian; Chiarello, Lisa

    2014-08-01

    This article focuses on conceptual and practical considerations in family-centered care for children with cerebral palsy and their families. In the last 5 years, there have been important advances in our understanding of the components of family-centered care, and initial attempts to understand the client change processes at play. Recent research elaborates on family-centered care by delving into aspects of family-provider partnership, and applying family-centered principles to organizational service delivery to bring about organizational cultures of family-centered care. Recent research has also begun to consider mediators of client change, and new practice models have been proposed that embrace family-centered principles and illustrate the "art" of practice. Future research directions are discussed, including explorations of causal relationships between family-centered care principles, elements of caregiving practice, client change processes, and child and family outcomes. The meaning of the recent literature for pediatric neurology practice is considered. PMID:24810084

  18. Personality types of family practice residents in the 1980s.

    PubMed

    Taylor, A D; Clark, C; Sinclair, A E

    1990-03-01

    This study was based on a nationwide sample of 778 family practice residents in the mid-1980s and was conducted to determine the personality types that were most common among those residents. The results showed that the single most common personality type was that in which the individual prefers to see the world in terms of challenges and future possibilities and to make decisions based upon his or her subjective values. These results showed that the sample differed significantly in Myers-Briggs personality type from both the general practitioners of the 1950s and the early family practice residents of the 1970s, who preferred to see the world in terms of the immediate facts of experience and to make decisions objectively. There were also significant differences between the civilian and military family practice residents, but not between the community-based and university-based residents. Implications regarding future practice styles, physicians' personal values, and manpower needs are discussed. PMID:2306322

  19. Defensive And Supportive Communications In Family Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, James F.

    1973-01-01

    An evaluation of the application of Systems Theory concepts to family functioning involving 21 families provides data which demonstrates that normal families behave as adaptive systems, both in generating and reciprocating high rates of supportiveness. Information is also obtained concerning a possible cause of aggressive behavior. (RP)

  20. Need to teach family medicine concepts even before establishing such practice in a country

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The practice of family medicine is not well established in many developing countries including Sri Lanka. The Sri Lankan Government funds and runs the health facilities which cater to the health needs of a majority of the population. Services of a first contact doctor delivered by full time, vocationally trained, Family Physicians is generally overshadowed by outpatient departments of the government hospitals and after hours private practice by the government sector doctors and specialists. This process has changed the concept of the provision of comprehensive primary and continuing care for entire families, which in an ideal situation, should addresses psychosocial problems as well and deliver coordinated health care services in a society. Therefore there is a compelling need to teach Family Medicine concepts to undergraduates in all medical faculties. Discussion A similar situation prevails in many countries in the region. Faculty of Medicine Peradeniya embarked on teaching family medicine concepts even before a department of Family Medicine was established. The faculty has recognized CanMed Family Medicine concepts as the guiding principles where being an expert, communicator, collaborator, advocate, manager and professional is considered as core competencies of a doctor. These concepts created the basis to evaluate the existing family medicine curriculum , and the adequacy of teaching knowledge and skills, related to family medicine has been confirmed. However inadequacies of teaching related to communication, collaboration, management, advocacy and professionalism were recognized. Importance of inculcating patient centred attitudes and empathy in patient care was highlighted. Adopting evaluation tools like Patient Practitioner Orientation Scale and Jefferson’s Scale of Empathy was established. Consensus has been developed among all the departments to improve their teaching programmes in order to establish a system of teaching family medicine

  1. Human-animal bonds II: the role of pets in family systems and family therapy.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Froma

    2009-12-01

    The vast majority of pet owners regard their companion animals as family members, yet the role of pets in family systems and family therapy has received little attention in research, training, and practice. This article first notes the benefits of family pets and their importance for resilience. It then examines their role in couple and family processes and their involvement in relational dynamics and tensions. Next, it addresses bereavement in the loss of a cherished pet, influences complicating grief, and facilitation of mourning and adaptation. Finally, it explores the ways that clients' pets and the use of therapists' companion animals in animal-assisted therapy can inform and enrich couple and family therapy as valuable resources in healing. PMID:19930434

  2. A Third-Year Family Medicine Clerkship Based in an Academic Family Practice Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Robert B; And Others

    1984-01-01

    A 5-week family medicine clerkship is described that uses several innovative techniques: problem-based learning focusing on patient management tutorials; consultation with specialists; supervised patient care and a nursing home inpatient teaching service; and workshops on topics such as office-surgical techniques, practice management, and…

  3. Educational role of nurse practitioners in a family practice centre

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Allyn; Moore, Ainsley; Barber, Anne; Opsteen, Joanne

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To examine the role of nurse practitioners (NPs) as educators of family medicine residents in order to better understand the interprofessional educational dynamics in a clinical teaching setting. Design A qualitative descriptive approach, using purposive sampling. Setting A family practice centre that is associated with an academic department of family medicine and is based in an urban area in southern Ontario. Participants First-year (8 of 9) and second-year (9 of 10) family medicine residents whose training program was based at the family practice centre, and all NPs (4 of 4) who worked at the centre. Methods Semistructured interviews were conducted, which were audiotaped and transcribed. An iterative approach was used for coding and analysis. Data management software guided organization and analysis of the data. Main findings Four interconnected themes were identified: role clarification, professional identity formation, factors that enhance the educational role of NPs, and factors that limit the educational role of NPs. Although residents recognized NPs’ value in team functioning and areas of specialized knowledge, they were unclear about NPs’ scope of practice. Depending on residents’ level of training, residents tended to respond differently to teaching by NPs. More of the senior residents believed they needed to think like physicians and preferred clinical teaching from physician teachers. Junior residents valued the step-by-step instructional approach used by NPs, and they had a decreased sense of vulnerability when being taught by NPs. Training in teaching skills was helpful for NPs. Barriers to providing optimal education included opportunity, time, and physician attitudes. Conclusion The lack of an intentional orientation of family medicine residents to NPs’ scope of practice and educational role can lead to difficulties in interprofessional education. More explicit recognition of the evolving professional identity of family

  4. The Transplant Patient and Transplant Medicine in Family Practice

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Lloyd D.

    2014-01-01

    Over the last two decades in particular there has been a remarkable increase in the number of solid organ transplants being performed worldwide alongside improvements in long-term survival rates. However, the infrastructure at transplant centres has been unable to keep pace with the current volume of the transplant patient work load. These pressures on transplant specialist centres has led to calls for an increased role of the general practitioner (GP) managing particular aspects of transplant patients’ medical care. Indeed, many aspects of follow-up care such as screening for malignancies, preventing infection through immunisation programmes, and managing cardiovascular risk factors are already important aspects of family practice medicine. This paper aims to review some of the aspects of transplant patient care that is important for healthcare workers in family practice to manage. PMID:25657941

  5. Recognizing borderline personality disorder in the family practice setting.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, J R; Saathoff, G B; Bernardo, M J; Barnett, B L

    1995-09-01

    The first step in the management of borderline personality disorder is making the correct diagnosis. A clinical example illustrates symptoms of a patient with borderline personality disorder in a family practice setting. Major characteristics of borderline personality disorder include severe mood instability, fear of abandonment, chronic boredom, self-injury, unstable interpersonal relationships, "splitting," identity instability and borderline rage. Early diagnosis may help prevent potential management problems and possible doctor-patient conflicts. PMID:7653428

  6. Integrating family medicine residents into a rural practice.

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, L.

    1997-01-01

    PROBLEM: Integrating residents into community family practices can be challenging for busy doctors, especially when new preceptors have no formal preparation or teaching experience. OBJECTIVE OF PROGRAM: To develop an organized and practical approach to teaching residents in our busy rural group practice. Our seven northern Ontario family doctors have been training elective residents and clerks for 15 years. Recently, we have gone from hosting elective residents and students to teaching core family medicine residents. Our precepting plan allows us to dedicate a reasonable time to teaching while fulfilling our primary care duties. MAIN COMPONENTS: The program involves contracting, teaching, monitoring, feedback, and evaluation. CONCLUSION: We think we have developed a sustainable, workable set of teaching parameters that is applicable by various preceptors in different settings. It has simplified our teaching role and lessened our anxieties. Residents have benefited from the consistent protocol, which can be flexible enough to adapt to individual residents and preceptors, and have valued this teaching approach. Images p278-a p280-a PMID:9040915

  7. Sacred practices in highly religious families: Christian, Jewish, Mormon, and Muslim perspectives.

    PubMed

    Marks, Loren

    2004-06-01

    Quantitative research examining linkages between family relationships and religious experience has increased substantially in recent years. However, related qualitative research, including research that examines the processes and meanings behind recurring religion-family correlations, remains scant. To address this paucity, a racially diverse sample (N = 24) of married, highly religious Christian, Jewish, Mormon, and Muslim parents of school-aged children were interviewed regarding the importance of religious family interactions, rituals, and practices in their families. Mothers and fathers discussed several religious practices that were meaningful to them and explained why these practices were meaningful. Parents also identified costs and challenges associated with these practices. Interview data are presented in connection with three themes: (1) "practicing [and parenting] what you preach," (2) religious practices, family connection, and family communion, and (3) costs of family religious practices. The importance of family clinicians and researchers attending to the influence of religious practice in the lives of highly religious individuals and families is discussed. PMID:15603505

  8. Family Systems Theory in the Workplace.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Vivian

    This paper presents a summary of Murray Brown's family systems theory as it applies to the workplace, lists some indicators of when a system is working well, and cites some other guidelines for gauging and improving one's own functioning in the work system. Major concepts of Bowen's theory include: (1) the family and the workplace are systems; (2)…

  9. Families, Infants and the Justice System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fenichel, Emily, Ed.

    1993-01-01

    This periodical issue focuses on infants and toddlers and the justice system. The main article is entitled: "Families, Infants and the Justice System," written by Robert Horowitz. It looks at the role of the justice system in family dissolution and creation, the use of courts to resolve disputes, the role of the justice system in family…

  10. Value Systems and Psychopathology in Family Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zuk, Gerald H.

    1979-01-01

    Family therapy is a method for resolving conflict in value systems. The family therapist has three role functions: the go-between, the side-taker, and the celebrant. The therapist selectively expresses values that disrupt and then repair destructive family interaction. Short-term therapy works best because it least violates value expectations…

  11. Implementing Family Health Nursing in Tajikistan: from policy to practice in primary health care reform.

    PubMed

    Parfitt, Barbara Ann; Cornish, Flora

    2007-10-01

    The health systems of former Soviet Union countries are undergoing reform away from the highly centralised, resource-intensive, specialised and hierarchical Soviet system, towards a more generalist, efficient health service with greater focus on primary health care. Family Health Nursing is a new model designed by WHO Europe in which skilled generalist community nurses deliver primary health care to local communities. This paper presents a qualitative evaluation of the implementation of Family Health Nursing in Tajikistan. Using Stufflebeam's 'Context, Input, Process, and Product' model, the paper aims to evaluate the progress of this reform, and to understand the factors that help or hinder its implementation. A four-phase research design investigates the development of the Family Health Nurse role over time. In 5 rural areas, 6 focus groups and 18 interviews with Family Health Nurses, 4 observations of their practice, 7 interviews with families and 9 interviews with physicians were carried out. Data were analysed according to the components of Stufflebeam's model. Although the legacy of the Soviet health system did not set a precedent for a nurse who is capable of decision-making and who works in partnership with the physician, Family Health Nurses were successfully implementing new practices. Crucial to their ability to do so were the co-operation of physicians and families. Physicians were impressed by the nurses' development of knowledge, and families were impressed that the nurses could offer real solutions to their problems. However, failure to pay the nurses regular salaries had led to serious attrition of the workforce. We conclude that the success of the Family Health Nurse role in other countries will depend upon its position in relation to the historical health care system. PMID:17651876

  12. [The patient with an alcohol abuse problem family doctor practice].

    PubMed

    Szponar, Jarosław; Kuźniar-Placek, Justyna; Panasiuk, Lech

    2012-01-01

    Doctors of many specialties, including the family doctors, encounter the problems of alcohol abuse in their patients. Due to the fact that many symptoms of dangerous diseases can be masked by the fact of alcoholism, a brief doctor's visit has to be conducted with watchfulness, caution and care. Family doctors have some brief testes (such as CAGE test, AUDIT test), besides of precise anamnesis and blood chemistry, which make it easier to identify a patient with an alcohol problem. People with disabilities are more exposed to alcohol abuse since they often experience additional factors such as unemployment, social isolation and homelessness. All of the above factors foster the more frequent alcohol usage. In Poland the main treatment method of alcohol addiction is psychotherapy practiced in the rehab centers. The detoxification treatment is voluntary and free of charge even though the patients checking into those facilities are doing it against their will. They are forced to do so by entourage, family, spouse or risk of unemployment. Acamprozate is considered as a drug, run to extend abstaining from alcohol. In the past, therapy with disulfiram substance was common, but now, it is considered as unethical behaviour. In practice of medicine, a patient with alcohol addiction creates not onlya medical but also legal problems. Therefore keeping of detailed medical documentation is very important as it may become significant evidence in the future. PMID:23243928

  13. Learning Participation as Systems Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ison, Ray; Blackmore, Chris; Armson, Rosalind

    2007-01-01

    Learning participation only makes sense if it is purposeful. From our perspective its primary purpose is to achieve more effective managing in situations of complexity and change. We describe our evolving understandings and practices (a praxeology) for Systems Practice for managing complexity, built on 30 years of developing supported open…

  14. Family, school, and community partnerships: practical strategies for afterschool programs.

    PubMed

    Finn-Stevenson, Matia

    2014-12-01

    Much attention is given today to the importance of forging family, school, and community partnerships. Growing numbers of schools, many of them with afterschool programs, are dedicating resources to support and sustain relationships with families and community-based organizations. And, among government agencies and the philanthropic sector, there is widespread recognition that schools cannot be successful if they function alone in their quest to educate our nation's children, but must work with families and in the context of the community. Although the field is enjoying unprecedented popularity and many more schools and afterschool programs are partnering with community agencies and organizations, the notion of engaging parents and the community has not yet become an integral part of school reform, and in the afterschool field, practitioners who work at the program level directly with students often struggle with how they can make partnerships a reality. This chapter draws upon lessons learned from the School of the 21st Century (21C) to provide practical strategies for reaching out to and working with families and the community. The School of the 21st Century includes an afterschool component and is one of several national initiatives that use a community school strategy. PMID:25537352

  15. Linkage between Graduate Medical Education Training Practice Profiles in Psychiatry, Obstetrics/Gynecology, and Family Practice. Appendices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    SysteMetrics, Inc., Santa Barbara, CA.

    Provided are appendices for a study which examined the relationship between graduate medical education (GME) and practice profiles in three specialties: family practice, psychiatry, and obstetrics/gynecology. Appendix A includes materials related to methodology of the study. Appendices B-D include supplementary materials for family practice,…

  16. Partnerships at Work: Lessons Learned from Programs and Practices of Families, Professionals and Communities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bishop, Kathleen Kirk, Ed.; Taylor, Mary Skidmore, Ed.; Arango, Polly, Ed.

    Designed to celebrate family/interprofessional collaborative partnerships, this publication describes high-quality examples of how families and professionals at the family, community, state, and national levels have worked together to create programs and practices that are family-friendly and responsive to what families have said they want and…

  17. Guidelines for Establishing a Family Day Care System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newsome, Barbara; And Others

    Written as a basic guide, this report of the Community Coordinated Child Care Committee of Dane County, Wisconsin, aims to assist people interested in establishing family day care systems in their own communities. Practical information is provided on the prime factors that should be taken into account in selecting the ideal physical location and…

  18. Family override of valid donor consent to postmortem donation: issues in law and practice.

    PubMed

    Downie, J; Shea, A; Rajotte, C

    2008-06-01

    In 2005, 3974 Canadians were on waiting lists for organ transplants and 275 patients died while waiting. Canada's organ shortage has led to calls for changes to Canada's organ donation system and its legal framework. Herein we examine an issue in which law reform could both increase the number of available organs and better align practice with respect for autonomy, a core value underpinning the Canadian legal system: the issue of family overrides of a valid donor consent to postmortem donation. That is, we examine what should happen when an individual consented to postmortem donation but the family would like to override that consent. First, we examine the requirements for valid donor consent. Second, we consider the legal status of family overrides of valid donor consent in relation to postmortem donation. Third, we describe the available data with regard to the practice of permitting families to override valid donor consent and discuss the possible reasons for this practice. Finally, we describe and defend the desired results with respect to law reform and describe the actions needed to realize these results. PMID:18589083

  19. School Phobia: A Family Systems Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cerio, Jay

    1997-01-01

    Provides strategic and structural therapy concepts to use when addressing a child's school phobia. Describes how a family systems approach, which is solution-focused, employs family resources and fosters parental competencies. Offers a case study with a careful analysis of each session. Discusses implications for school counselors. (RJM)

  20. Literacy and Illiteracy in the Family System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryant, Lizbeth A.

    Scholars from various disciplines who examine the role an individual plays in the family as a major influence on his/her literacy are currently considering a factor often overlooked by researchers. Mikhail Bakhtin, Basil Bernstein, David Bleich and others find a cause-and-effect relationship between literacy and family systems. This suggests the…

  1. Practical aspects of systems hardening

    SciTech Connect

    Shepherd, W.J.

    1989-01-01

    Applications of hardening technology in a practical system require a balance between the factors governing affordability, producibility, and survivability of the finished design. Without careful consideration of the top-level system operating constraints, a design engineer may find himself with a survivable but overweight, unproductive, expensive design. This paper explores some lessons learned in applying hardening techniques to several laser communications programs and is intended as an introductory guide to novice designers faced with the task of hardening a space system.

  2. School Access and Participation: Family Engagement Practices in the New Latino Diaspora

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowenhaupt, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    This article describes how schools shape family engagement practices in the context of the New Latino Diaspora. Building on critical scholarship that has called for more culturally appropriate definitions of family engagement, this study seeks to develop a theoretical understanding of how school practices influence immigrant families' access…

  3. Patient and Family Engagement Summit: Needed Changes in Clinical Practice.

    PubMed

    Swartwout, Ellen; Drenkard, Karen; McGuinn, Kathy; Grant, Susan; El-Zein, Ashley

    2016-03-01

    Patient and family engagement is a strategy to enhance healthcare outcomes through strong clinician-patient partnerships. A new care delivery process, in which the patient is the driver of the healthcare team, is required to achieve optimal health. A summit partially funded by a seed grant from the Robert Wood Johnson Executive Nurse Fellow Alumni Foundation was held with interprofessional colleagues and patient representatives to identify needed clinical competencies and future practice changes. Recommended shifts in the care delivery process included a focus on patient strengths, including the patient as a valued team member, doing care "with me" and not "to me," and considering all entities or providers including the patient, as equal partners. PMID:26906687

  4. Manufactured housing plant injuries in a rural family practice.

    PubMed

    Kellerman, R

    1990-09-01

    The manufacture of mobile homes and prefabricated houses results in the second highest occupational injury and illness rate of any industry. The types of worker injuries sustained have never previously been characterized. This series of 138 injuries from a rural family practice categorizes the injuries sustained by workers in a manufactured housing plant. Most injuries were not judged to be serious, but did result in lost work time and morbidity. Forty-nine percent of all injuries involved lacerations or puncture wounds. Seventy-six percent of puncture wounds involved staple gun use. Two thirds of lacerations were from pieces of metal, siding, and other sharp objects; one third were from knives. Fingers, hands, and wrists were the most commonly injured anatomic sites. Nine cases of overuse injury were seen; two required carpal tunnel surgical release. Twelve injuries were serious enough to require hospitalization or consultation. There were no fatalities. Several suggestions for improved worker safety are presented. PMID:2391457

  5. Reducing alcohol consumption. Comparing three brief methods in family practice.

    PubMed Central

    McIntosh, M. C.; Leigh, G.; Baldwin, N. J.; Marmulak, J.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the effects of three brief methods of reducing alcohol consumption among family practice patients. DESIGN: Patients randomly assigned to one of three interventions were assessed initially and at 3-, 6-, and 12-month follow-up appointments. SETTING: Family practice clinic composed of 12 primary care physicians seeing approximately 6000 adults monthly in a small urban community, population 40,000. PARTICIPANTS: Through a screening questionnaire, 134 men and 131 women were identified as hazardous drinkers (five or more drinks at least once monthly) during an 11-month screening of 1420 patients. Of 265 patients approached, 180 agreed to participate and 159 (83 men and 76 women) actually participated in the study. INTERVENTIONS: Three interventions were studied: brief physician advice (5 minutes), two 30-minute sessions with a physician using cognitive behavioural strategies or two 30-minute sessions with a nurse practitioner using identical strategies. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Quantity and frequency (QF) of drinking were used to assess reduction in hazardous drinking and problems related to drinking over 12 months of follow up. RESULTS: No statistical difference between groups was found. The QF of monthly drinking was reduced overall by 66% (among men) and 74% (among women) for those reporting at least one hazardous drinking day weekly at assessment (N = 96). Men reported drinking significantly more than women. CONCLUSIONS: These results indicated that offering brief, specific advice can motivate patients to reduce their alcohol intake. There was no difference in effect between brief advice from their own physician or brief intervention by a physician or a nurse. PMID:9386883

  6. Policies and Practices. Shortening Children's Stays in Temporary Care, Part One. Family to Family: Tools for Rebuilding Foster Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Annie E. Casey Foundation, Baltimore, MD.

    The Family to Family initiative has encouraged states to reconceptualize, redesign, and reconstruct their foster care systems. By 1996, the initiative was being implemented in five states and six counties in two additional states. Drawing on the experiences of Family to Family participants, a framework for child welfare leaders working to reduce…

  7. Evaluating family partnership training in health visitor practice.

    PubMed

    Bidmead, Christine; Cowley, Sarah

    2005-07-01

    The second paper in this series of two on partnership examines the effects of family partnership (parent adviser) training which builds on health visitors' skills to facilitate partnership working with parents. This study was utilised as a pilot to identify a suitable method, to explore the interaction processes of health visitors who had undergone the training. The study draws together both quantitative and qualitative methods to seek to understand processes in depth. Three health visitors, who were part of a training group of 12, took part in the qualitative research using stimulated recall methodology. The quantitative data was collected from the whole training group using the Constructions of Helping questionnaire and the course evaluation form. The findings suggest that the family partnership training may be effective in enhancing partnership working in health visiting and that the stimulated recall methodology is an effective method of identifying the processes of interaction. The triangulation of methods led to an understanding that change in practice is dependent on the insight of the practitioner and that this may be able to be measured to some extent by the use of different methods. PMID:16095252

  8. Mentoring for medical students interested in family practice.

    PubMed

    Ricer, R E; Fox, B C; Miller, K E

    1995-06-01

    Formal mentoring programs have been suggested as one strategy to increase student interest in primary care. Mentoring has long been a part of the business world but has only recently become a formal part of family medicine training. This paper reviews the literature on mentoring and provides applications to family practice. Mentoring has been found to develop a deeper relationship than role modeling or preceptoring and should benefit the student and mentor. The mentor's roles and functions are varied and numerous; the mentor guides, assists, and counsels students longitudinally through their development as professionals. Mentoring is based in the present but is directed toward the future. Mentors need to have charisma, leadership and motivational skills, inspiration, competence, compassion, empathy, and willingness to share with the student. Strategies used when developing a mentoring program need to incorporate the positive qualities of mentoring while minimizing the negative components, as described in this paper. The tasks of mentoring are of less importance than the personal characteristics of the mentor. Mentors should not be involved in formally evaluating the student. Faculty development and monitoring of the relationships on a regular basis are important aspects of a successful program. PMID:7665021

  9. Practical Applications of Space Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council, Washington, DC. Assembly of Engineering.

    This report gives an overview of a study conducted by the Space Applications Board (SAB) on the practical applications of space systems. In this study, the SAB considered how the nation's space capability might be used to solve problems such as the shortage of food and energy; the improvement of the physical environment; inventorying and…

  10. Chronic unhappiness. Investigating the phenomenon in family practice.

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, C. G.

    1996-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate the experience of chronic unhappiness as it presents in family practice. DESIGN: A descriptive, qualitative study of both patients and physicians using an existential phenomenologic approach. SETTING: Two village general practices in South Africa. PARTICIPANTS: Four patients who were difficult, "heartsink" patients, who gave their doctors an overwhelming feeling of exasperation and defeat. METHOD: We investigated the clinical records thoroughly and explored patients' relationships with others. Through interpretation and reflection, we tried to discover what role the doctor could play with these patients. FINDINGS: Chronic unhappiness was found to be not only a condition of life for the patients but also for the doctor. It was an important factor in the relationship they shared. Unhappiness was revealed in part by frequent visits by the patients, a constellation of negative feelings in the doctor, and difficult patient-doctor relationships. CONCLUSION: Chronic unhappiness is not "treatable" in the normal curative or therapeutic sense. This does not prevent our quest to diagnose and cure, but enlarges our horizons to recognizing and accepting our own human reactions to patients and understanding how we can meet their needs. PMID:8653032

  11. Where are the schools? Children, families and food practices.

    PubMed

    Fairbrother, Hannah; Curtis, Penny; Goyder, Elizabeth

    2016-07-01

    Reducing childhood obesity is an international priority and children's diets, food knowledge and practices have come under intense scrutiny in both policy and popular discourse. Notwithstanding evidence that health interventions which resonate with children's own views are the most effective, there is still relatively little research which mobilises children's everyday perspectives on food to inform public health policy. We report key findings from a qualitative study with 53 children aged 9-10, attending two socio-economically contrasting schools in the UK. The study explored children's understandings of food in everyday life and their ideas about the relationship between food and health. Throughout the study, despite recent attempts to position schools as key sites for public health interventions, children consistently emphasised families as the locus for enduring food practices. The research highlights the value of listening to children and applying our understanding of their perspectives to ensure that public health initiatives work with the important influences on their diet and health that they themselves identify. PMID:27179138

  12. Hearing loss in elderly patients in a family practice.

    PubMed Central

    Sangster, J F; Gerace, T M; Seewald, R C

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate hearing loss in elderly patients. DESIGN: Cohort study. SETTING: Family practice. PATIENTS: All ambulatory patients 65 years of age or older who attended the practice from June to August 1989. OUTCOME MEASURES: The Hearing Handicap Inventory for the Elderly--Screening Version (HHIE-S) and the Welch-Allyn Audioscope. Patients who failed one or both of the screening tests were referred to a speech and hearing clinic for audiologic assessment and treatment recommendations. Those with hearing aids were excluded from the main study but were given the opportunity to have them assessed at the clinic. MAIN RESULTS: Of 157 eligible patients 42 were excluded: 16 refused to participate, 13 already had hearing aids, and 13 could not be contacted. Of the remaining 115, 34 failed one or both of the tests (14 failed the HHIE-S, 9 failed the audioscope test, and 11 failed both). Of the 34, 25 completed the audiologic assessment at the clinic. Fifteen were found to have severe hearing impairment; the recommendation was hearing aids for 12, further assessment for 2 and no treatment for 1. Of the remaining 10 patients it was thought that 6 would benefit from hearing aids. Ten of the 11 patients with hearing aids who agreed to undergo testing at the clinic were found to need an adjustment or replacement of their devices. CONCLUSIONS: Hearing loss is a significant problem in elderly patients in primary practice. Further study is required to determine which of the two screening tools is most effective. Most elderly patients with hearing aids may require modification or replacement of their devices. PMID:2009476

  13. [Mental stress of immigrant patients and the family practice].

    PubMed

    Koch, E; Müller, M J

    2007-10-18

    People of non-German background still have difficulties obtaining adequate access to the German health care system. Reasons include communication barriers, differences in the concept of disease and low level of education in addition to a frequently difficult social situation and immigration-related stress factors. The majority of the patients consult the family physician first. Taking into consideration the different cultural concepts of disease and immigration-specific stress factors opens new therapeutic options and expands the intercultural competence of the treating physician. PMID:17987716

  14. Cultural transition of international medical graduate residents into family practice in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Triscott, Jean A.C.; Waugh, Earle H.; Torti, Jacqueline M.I.; Barton, Martina

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To identify the perceived strengths that international medical graduate (IMG) family medicine residents possess and the challenges they are perceived to encounter in integrating into Canadian family practice. Methods This was a qualitative, exploratory study employing focus groups and interviews with 27 participants - 10 family physicians, 13 health care professionals, and 4 family medicine residents. Focus group/interview questions addressed the strengths that IMGs possess and the challenges they face in becoming culturally competent within the Canadian medico-cultural context. Qualitative data were audiotaped, transcribed, and analyzed thematically. Results Participants identified that IMG residents brought multiple strengths to Canadian practice including strong clinical knowledge and experience, high education level, the richness of varied cultural perspectives, and positive personal strengths.  At the same time, IMG residents appeared to experience challenges in the areas of:  (1) communication skills (language nuances, unfamiliar accents, speech volume/tone, eye contact, directness of communication); (2) clinical practice (uncommon diagnoses, lack of familiarity with care of the opposite sex and mental health conditions); (3) learning challenges (limited knowledge of Canada’s health care system, patient-centered care and ethical principles, unfamiliarity with self-directed learning,  unease with receiving feedback); (4) cultural differences (gender roles, gender equality, personal space, boundary issues; and (5) personal struggles.   Conclusions Residency programs must recognize the challenges that can occur during the cultural transition to Canadian family practice and incorporate medico-cultural education into the curriculum.  IMG residents also need to be aware of cultural differences and be open to different perspectives and new learning. PMID:27149322

  15. Becoming Family Literate: A New Construct and Platform for Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGregor, Sue L. T.

    2009-01-01

    The family as a basic social unit needs strategic support and strength to carry its weight, relative to other social institutions. This article focuses on why it is important to help people learn to be in a family and presents the construct of becoming family literate (different from family literacy). This learning is a legitimate platform from…

  16. Exploring the Literacy Practices of Refugee Families Enrolled in a Book Distribution Program and an Intergenerational Family Literacy Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singh, Sunita; Sylvia, Monica R.; Ridzi, Frank

    2015-01-01

    This ethnographic study presents findings of the literacy practices of Burmese refugee families and their interaction with a book distribution program paired with an intergenerational family literacy program. The project was organized at the level of Bronfenbrenner's exosystem (in "Ecology of human development". Cambridge, Harvard…

  17. Computer multitasking with Desqview 386 in a family practice.

    PubMed Central

    Davis, A E

    1990-01-01

    Computers are now widely used in medical practice for accounting and secretarial tasks. However, it has been much more difficult to use computers in more physician-related activities of daily practice. I investigated the Desqview multitasking system on a 386 computer as a solution to this problem. Physician-directed tasks of management of patient charts, retrieval of reference information, word processing, appointment scheduling and office organization were each managed by separate programs. Desqview allowed instantaneous switching back and forth between the various programs. I compared the time and cost savings and the need for physician input between Desqview 386, a 386 computer alone and an older, XT computer. Desqview significantly simplified the use of computer programs for medical information management and minimized the necessity for physician intervention. The time saved was 15 minutes per day; the costs saved were estimated to be $5000 annually. PMID:2383848

  18. Assessment of the severity of asthma in a family practice.

    PubMed

    Morris, N V; Abramson, M J; Rosier, M J; Strasser, R P

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate clinical history and self-perception of severity as predictors of asthma severity. A short-term longitudinal study was conducted in a family practice in Melbourne, Australia, utilizing peak flow monitoring, medication diary, and self-administered asthma severity questionnaire. Seventy-two asthmatic subjects with a positive bronchodilator or exercise test, aged between 6 and 79 years, were studied. Symptom and treatment items were correlated with peak flow variability and minimal peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR). An asthma severity scale was generated using the partial credit version of Item Response Theory and the participants' severity scores were validated against lung function tests and medication usage. Quantitative modeling procedures were used to investigate the interrelationships of factors associated with peak flow variability. Severity scores demonstrated significant relationships with peak flow variability (partial r = 0.34) and treatment items. Self-perceived severity of asthma in the preceding 2 weeks showed significant association with peak flow variability (partial rho = 0.46) and minimal PEFR (rho = -0.41). The severity module of the Monash Respiratory Questionnaire is a valid and reliable instrument. The most important symptoms appear to be the frequency of use of bronchodilator and frequency of nocturnal attacks. A carefully structured clinical history in conjunction with the peak flow criteria of variability and minimal peak flow rate would be appropriate in the evaluation of asthma severity. Patients' self-perception of the severity of their asthma needs further evaluation. PMID:8968297

  19. Building Bridges: Supporting Families across Service Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goetz, Kathy, Ed.

    1994-01-01

    This double issue of the journal "Report" focuses on the collaboration among seven social service systems that support and serve children and families. Each of the sections discusses one of the seven systems, presents an overview essay, and profiles programs that execute the service. The first section, on education, emphasizes linkages between…

  20. Salvador Minuchin's structural family therapy and its application to multicultural family systems.

    PubMed

    Navarre, S E

    1998-01-01

    The structural approach to family therapy offers a useful perspective to the nurse therapist working with families with various cultural backgrounds. Asian and Hispanic families are examined to illustrate using Minuchin's approach to family counseling. The rationale for the structural approach is explored, and specific therapeutic techniques for practice are described. Nurses who work with culturally diverse families might profit by using this approach. PMID:9883131

  1. Family Life Education in Multicultural Classrooms. Practical Guidelines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abbey, Nancy; And Others

    This guide presents approaches and guidelines for developing culturally appropriate and relevant family life education. It begins with a definition of culture and a look at different types of acculturation. A section on cultural relevance in family life education briefly explains the challenge of a multicultural approach in family life education…

  2. Preparing Educators to Involve Families: From Theory to Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, Heather Bastow, Ed.; Kreider, Holly Marie, Ed.; Lopez, M. Elena, Ed.; Chatman, Celina M., Ed.

    2005-01-01

    Family involvement in children's education is widely considered critical to student achievement. Yet teachers and other education professionals often feel unprepared to engage families in children's learning. The goal of Preparing Educators to Involve Families is to help prepare teachers and other professionals to partner effectively with the…

  3. Practice-Informed Approaches to Addressing Substance Abuse and Trauma Exposure in Urban Native Families Involved with Child Welfare.

    PubMed

    Lucero, Nancy M; Bussey, Marian

    2015-01-01

    Similar to families from other groups, urban-based American Indian and Alaska Native ("Native") family members involved with the child welfare system due to substance abuse issues are also often challenged by untreated trauma exposure. The link between these conditions and the history of genocidal policies aimed at destroying Native family ties, as well as experiences of ongoing discrimination, bring added dimensions for consideration when pro- viding services to these families. Practice-based evidence indicates that the trauma-informed and culturally responsive model developed by the Denver Indian Family Resource Center (DIFRC) shows promise in reducing out-of-home placements and re-referrals in urban Native families with substance abuse and child welfare concerns, while also increasing caregiver capabilities, family safety, and child well-being. This article provides strategies from the DIFRC approach that non-Native caseworkers and supervisors can utilize to create an environment in their own agencies that supports culturally based practice with Native families while incorporating a trauma-informed understanding of service needs of these families. Casework consistent with this approach demonstrates actions that meet the Active Efforts requirement of the Indian Child Welfare Act (ICWA) as well as sound clinical practice. Intensive and proactive case management designed specifically for families with high levels of service needs is a key strategy when combined with utilizing a caseworker brief screening tool for trauma exposure; training caseworkers to recognize trauma symptoms, making timely referrals to trauma treatment by behavioral health specialists experienced in working with Native clients, and providing a consistent service environment that focuses on client safety and worker trustworthiness. Finally, suggestions are put forth for agencies seeking to enhance their cultural responsiveness and include increasing workers' understanding of cultural values

  4. Programs That Work, from the Promising Practices Network on Children, Families and Communities. RAND Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kilburn, M. Rebecca, Ed.

    2014-01-01

    The Promising Practices Network (PPN) on Children, Families and Communities (www.promisingpractices.net) began as a partnership between four state-level organizations that help public and private organizations improve the well-being of children and families. The PPN website, archived in June 2014, featured summaries of programs and practices that…

  5. Parents' and Professionals' Perceptions of the Implementation of Family-Centered Practices in Child Assessments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crais, Elizabeth R.; Roy, Vicky Poston; Free, Karen

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the degree to which early intervention professionals and families agreed on whether specific family-centered practices were implemented in specific child assessments and which practices were viewed as important to include in future child assessments. Method: A self-rating instrument was used to survey 134 early intervention…

  6. Shared Knowledge and Mutual Respect: Enhancing Culturally Competent Practice through Collaboration with Families and Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verdon, Sarah; Wong, Sandie; McLeod, Sharynne

    2016-01-01

    Collaboration with families and communities has been identified as one of six overarching principles to speech and language therapists' (SLTs') engagement in culturally competent practice (Verdon et al., 2015a). The aim of this study was to describe SLTs' collaboration with families and communities when engaging in practice to support the speech,…

  7. The Family Impact Lens: A Family-Focused, Evidence-Informed Approach to Policy and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bogenschneider, Karen; Little, Olivia M.; Ooms, Theodora; Benning, Sara; Cadigan, Karen; Corbett, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Families have long been recognized for the contributions they make to their members and to society. Yet families are seldom substantively incorporated into the normal course of policy and program development, implementation, and evaluation. We propose the family impact lens as one way to shift the rhetoric from appreciating families to…

  8. Relationship-Centered Practices in Early Childhood: Working with Families, Infants, and Young Children at Risk

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ensher, Gail L.; Clark, David A.

    2011-01-01

    Strong working relationships with diverse families and children are the foundation of successful early intervention. Discover fresh, practical ways to build these relationships in this essential guidebook, every professional's blueprint for working with children and families within the specific context of their culture, family structure, and risk…

  9. Child Abuse and Neglect in Cambodian Refugee Families: Characteristics and Implications for Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Janet; Rhee, Siyon; Berthold, S. Megan

    2008-01-01

    This study examines the characteristics and patterns of child maltreatment among Cambodian refugee families in Los Angeles and assesses the implications for child welfare practice with Cambodian refugee families. Data were extracted from 243 active Cambodian case files maintained by the Los Angeles County Department of Children and Family Services…

  10. Home Literacy Beliefs and Practices among Low-Income Latino Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Heather S.; Gonzalez, Jorge E.; Pollard-Durodola, Sharolyn; Saenz, Laura M.; Soares, Denise A.; Resendez, Nora; Zhu, Leina; Hagan-Burke, Shanna

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore within-group patterns of variability in the home literacy environments (HLEs) of low-income Latino families using latent profile analysis. Participants were (N = 193) families of Latino preschoolers enrolled in a larger study. In the fall of 2012, mothers filled out a family literacy practices inventory, a…

  11. Epilogue: Systems Approaches and Systems Practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, Martin; Holwell, Sue

    Each of the five systems approaches discussed in this volume: system dynamics (SD), the viable systems model (VSM), strategic options development and analysis (SODA), soft systems methodology (SSM) and critical systems heuristics (CSH) has a pedigree. Not in the sense of the sometimes absurd spectacle of animals paraded at dog shows. Rather, their pedigree derives from their systems foundations, their capacity to evolve and their flexibility in use. None of the five approaches has developed out of use in restricted and controlled contexts of either low or high levels of complicatedness. Neither has any one of them evolved as a consequence of being applied only to situations with either presumed stakeholder agreement on purpose, or courteous disagreement amongst stakeholders, or stakeholder coercion. The compilation is not a celebration of abstract ‘methodologies', but of theoretically robust approaches that have a genuine pedigree in practice.

  12. Cultural Competency Training in a New-Start Rural/Frontier Family Practice Residency Program: A Cultural Immersion Integrative Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doty, Barbara J.; Pastorino, Ray

    The Alaska Family Practice Residency (AFPR) is a graduate medical education training program for family physicians headed for rural and remote practice sites. Located in Anchorage and affiliated with the University of Washington family practice residency network, the program has an integrated curriculum aimed at preparing family physicians to…

  13. Familial neuroendocrine tumor syndromes: from genetics to clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Akihiro; Katai, Miyuki; Hashizume, Kiyoshi; Fukushima, Yoshimitsu

    2006-01-01

    Thanks to recent developments in molecular biology and cancer genetics, genetic testing has become widely available and useful in several kinds of familial tumor syndrome. However, the impact of genetic testing on medical management is not always straightforward. Clinicians have to consider the psychological impact and ethical complexities of communicating hereditary cancer risk information to families. This review notes some points on genetic counseling before and after genetic testing for familial neuroendocrine tumor syndromes. PMID:17001463

  14. Family physicians who have focused practices in oncology

    PubMed Central

    Sisler, Jeffrey J.; DeCarolis, Mary; Robinson, Deborah; Sivananthan, Gokulan

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective To characterize the demographic characteristics, practice profile, and current work life of general practitioners in oncology (GPOs) for the first time. Design National Web survey performed in March 2011. Setting Canada. Participants Members of the national GPO organization. Respondents were asked to forward the survey to non-member colleagues. Main outcome measures Profile of work as GPOs and in other medical roles, training received, demographic characteristics, and professional satisfaction. Results The response rate was 73.3% for members of the Canadian Association of General Practitioners in Oncology; overall, 120 surveys were completed. Respondents worked in similar proportions in small and larger communities. About 60% of them had participated in formal training programs. Most respondents worked part-time as GPOs and also worked in other medical roles, particularly palliative care, primary care practice, teaching, and hospital work. More GPOs from cities with populations of greater than 100 000 worked solely as GPOs than those from smaller communities (P = .0057). General practitioners in oncology played a variety of roles in the cancer care system, particularly in systemic therapy, palliative care, inpatient care, and teaching. As a group, more than half of respondents were involved in the care of each of the 11 common cancer types. Overall, 87.8% of respondents worked in outpatient care, 59.1% provided inpatient care, and 33.0% provided on-call services; 92.8% were satisfied with their work as GPOs. Conclusion General practitioners in oncology are involved in all cancer care settings and usually combine this work with other roles, particularly with palliative care in rural Canada. Training is inconsistent but initiatives are under way to address this. Job satisfaction is better than that of Canadian FPs in general. As generalists, FPs bring a valuable skill set to their work as GPOs in the cancer care system. PMID:23766068

  15. Social Constructionist Family Systems Research: Conceptual Considerations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puig, Ana; Koro-Ljungberg, Mirka; Echevarria-Doan, Silvia

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to illustrate how theory and particularly the theoretical perspective of social constructionism can influence the ways in which scholars conduct qualitative research studies in the area of family systems. The authors argue for the importance of theory in qualitative research projects and promote researchers' clear…

  16. Theorizing in Family Gerontology: New Opportunities for Research and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberto, Karen A.; Blieszner, Rosemary; Allen, Katherine R.

    2006-01-01

    We examine the extent to which theory has been used in empirical studies of families in later life, identify prevalent types of theoretical frameworks, and assess connections between theory and both focal topics and analytic methods in the family gerontology literature. The paper is based on content and methodological analysis of 838 empirical…

  17. Sexual medicine in family practice. Part 1: How to help.

    PubMed Central

    Holzapfel, S.

    1993-01-01

    Family physicians are in a unique position to help patients with sexual problems. They know their patients over a long time and often have both partners as patients. Most problems require minimal intervention, usually by providing information. Family physicians are sometimes the only professionals who are trusted enough to be told of abusive or incestuous situations. PMID:8471906

  18. Postgraduate Medical Education for Rural Family Practice in Canada.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rourke, James T. B.

    2000-01-01

    To produce more rural physicians, the College of Family Physicians of Canada recommends providing earlier and more extensive rural medicine experience for all undergraduate medical students, developing rural postgraduate training programs, providing third-year optional special and advanced rural family-medicine skills training, and making advanced…

  19. Family, School, and Community Partnerships: Practical Strategies for Afterschool Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finn-Stevenson, Matia

    2014-01-01

    Much attention is given today to the importance of forging family, school, and community partnerships. Growing numbers of schools, many of them with afterschool programs, are dedicating resources to support and sustain relationships with families and community-based organizations. And, among government agencies and the philanthropic sector, there…

  20. The Pedagogical Experiences and Practices of Family Child Care Providers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, Ramona Gail; Vakil, Shernavaz

    2007-01-01

    The work in family child care is becoming increasingly more professional, moving from an image of "mothering" toward one of educare. The growing demand for expertise and competence in family child care providers can be examined in light of their pedagogical experiences and the ways in which children engage in learning in providers' homes. This…

  1. Family Sense-Making Practices in Science Center Conversations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimmerman, Heather Toomey; Reeve, Suzanne; Bell, Philip

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we examine the interactional ways that families make meaning from biological exhibits during a visit to an interactive science center. To understand the museum visits from the perspectives of the families, we use ethnographic and discourse analytic methods, including pre- and postvisit interviews, videotaped observations of the…

  2. A Short Course in Family Therapy: Translating Research Into Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Robert

    2005-01-01

    This article outlines a graduate-level, one-time-only family therapy course that prepares counseling trainees to be competent at entry-level family therapy in the United States. The approach outlined addresses the training concerns of programs that significantly emphasize individual-focused paradigms and that have limited time to train counseling…

  3. Rapid changes in American family life: consequences for child health and pediatric practice.

    PubMed

    Fiese, Barbara H; Rhodes, Holly G; Beardslee, William R

    2013-09-01

    Pediatricians are in the unique position of being on the front line of care for children and having access to their families. This article presents both a rationale and the evidence base for identifying the family characteristics and processes that affect child health and suggests approaches that pediatricians can implement to improve the care of children, using data from 3 recent reports of the Institute of Medicine and National Research Council, as well as other recent family research. Evidence regarding the impact on child health of 3 family factors in particular (family composition and living arrangements, family routines, and parental depression) is highlighted, and implications for pediatric practice are described. PMID:23918891

  4. Fostering Family-Centered Practices through a Family-Created Portfolio

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gregg, Katy; Rugg, Mary; Souto-Manning, Mariana

    2011-01-01

    When a child has disabilities, families and professionals must communicate their concerns and goals for the child. Often these concerns are expressed as weaknesses within a deficits-based framework. The use of a strengths-based, family-created portfolio is a communication strategy for reconceptualizing a child from the family's perspective in…

  5. Exploring Cumulative Risk and Family Literacy Practices in Low-Income Latino Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marcella, Jennifer; Howes, Carollee; Fuligni, Allison Sidle

    2014-01-01

    Research Findings: The home literacy environment and other early learning settings such as preschool play a role in children's language and literacy outcomes, yet research suggests that Latino, Spanish-speaking families are less likely than other families to participate in family literacy activities. This study explored the relations among…

  6. Parental Psychopathology and Child-Rearing Practices in Young Alcoholic Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, W. Hobart; And Others

    The relationship of parent alcohol involvement, depression, and antisocial behavior to self-reported parenting practices in a sample of 79 intact alcoholic families with male children of 3-6 years of age was studied. Child rearing practices were measured with the Block Child Rearing Practices Report. Psychopathology was measured with the…

  7. Building a framework for theory-based ethnographies for studying intergenerational family food practices.

    PubMed

    Visser, Sanne Siete; Hutter, Inge; Haisma, Hinke

    2016-02-01

    The growing rates of (childhood) obesity worldwide are a source concern for health professionals, policy-makers, and researchers. The increasing prevalence of associated diseases-such as diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, and psychological problems-shows the impact of obesity on people's health, already from a young age. In turn, these problems have obvious consequences for the health care system, including higher costs. However, the treatment of obesity has proven to be difficult, which makes prevention an important goal. In this study, we focus on food practices, one of the determinants of obesity. In recent years, it has become increasingly clear that interventions designed to encourage healthy eating of children and their families are not having the desired impact, especially among groups with a lower socioeconomic background (SEB). To understand why interventions fail to have an impact, we need to study the embedded social and cultural constructions of families. We argue that we need more than just decision-making theories to understand this cultural embeddedness, and to determine what cultural and social factors influence the decision-making process. By allowing families to explain their cultural background, their capabilities, and their opportunities, we will gain new insights into how families choose what they eat from a complex set of food choices. We have thus chosen to build a framework based on Sen's capability approach and the theory of cultural schemas. This framework, together with a holistic ethnographic research approach, can help us better understand what drives the food choices made in families. The framework is built to serve as a starting point for ethnographic research on food choice in families, and could contribute to the development of interventions that are embedded in the cultural realities of the targeted groups. PMID:26593100

  8. Patient empowerment, an additional characteristic of the European definitions of general practice/family medicine.

    PubMed

    Mola, Ernesto

    2013-06-01

    Growing evidence supports the inclusion of patient empowerment as a key ingredient of care for patients with chronic conditions. In recent years, several studies based on patient empowerment, have been carried out in different European countries in the context of general practice and primary care to improve management of chronic diseases. These studies have shown good results of the care model, increasing patient and health professionals' satisfaction, adherence to guidelines and to treatment, and improving clinical outcomes. In 2011, the Wonca European Council included as the twelfth characteristic of the European definitions of general practice/family medicine: 'promote patient empowerment'. The aim of this paper is to clarify the meaning of 'patient empowerment' and to explain why family medicine should be considered the most suitable setting to promote it. The inclusion of patient empowerment as one of the essential characteristics of general practice fills a conceptual gap and clearly suggests to the European health care systems a tested model to face chronic diseases: involving and empowering patients in managing their own conditions to improve health and well-being. PMID:23336328

  9. Practical Approaches to Family-friendly Medical Studies

    PubMed Central

    Liebhardt, Hubert; Niehues, Johanna; Fegert, Jörg M.

    2012-01-01

    Based on the pilot study carried out by the Office of the Dean of the Medical University of Ulm on the family-friendliness of the organisation of medical education in Ulm, this paper describes concrete measures that were designed at the university or have been partly implemented already. More flexibility and customization are essential characteristics and prerequisites of a family-friendly medical school as part of university education structures. Flexibility and customization can be achieved by designing lesson plans and study regulations so that both childcare is assured and that in emergencies, help can be quickly offered with a minimum of bureaucracy. More flexibility includes, amongst other things, adequate means for the individual to compensate for missed compulsory attendances and examination dates. The necessary shift in thinking and the willingness to cooperate on behalf of the management and teaching staff can be supported through the audit for family-friendliness “berufundfamilie” (job and family) or “familiengerechte hochschule” (family-friendly university), as well as strategic management tools of family-friendly corporate policies. Supporting mechanisms such as effectively networked advice services, course progression monitoring based on data, providing a parents’ passport with a cross-semester training contract, creating more interaction between student-parents or other students through a parent community or by study pairings and finally, reliable information on and compliance with the maternity leave rules for pregnant and breastfeeding medical students can help safeguard successful studying with children. PMID:22558029

  10. Practical approaches to family-friendly medical studies.

    PubMed

    Liebhardt, Hubert; Niehues, Johanna; Fegert, Jörg M

    2012-01-01

    Based on the pilot study carried out by the Office of the Dean of the Medical University of Ulm on the family-friendliness of the organisation of medical education in Ulm, this paper describes concrete measures that were designed at the university or have been partly implemented already. More flexibility and customization are essential characteristics and prerequisites of a family-friendly medical school as part of university education structures. Flexibility and customization can be achieved by designing lesson plans and study regulations so that both childcare is assured and that in emergencies, help can be quickly offered with a minimum of bureaucracy. More flexibility includes, amongst other things, adequate means for the individual to compensate for missed compulsory attendances and examination dates. The necessary shift in thinking and the willingness to cooperate on behalf of the management and teaching staff can be supported through the audit for family-friendliness "berufundfamilie" (job and family) or "familiengerechte hochschule" (family-friendly university), as well as strategic management tools of family-friendly corporate policies. Supporting mechanisms such as effectively networked advice services, course progression monitoring based on data, providing a parents' passport with a cross-semester training contract, creating more interaction between student-parents or other students through a parent community or by study pairings and finally, reliable information on and compliance with the maternity leave rules for pregnant and breastfeeding medical students can help safeguard successful studying with children. PMID:22558029

  11. The uses of emotion maps in research and clinical practice with families and couples: methodological innovation and critical inquiry.

    PubMed

    Gabb, Jacqui; Singh, Reenee

    2015-03-01

    We explore how "emotion maps" can be productively used in clinical assessment and clinical practice with families and couples. This graphic participatory method was developed in sociological studies to examine everyday family relationships. Emotion maps enable us to effectively "see" the dynamic experience and emotional repertoires of family life. Through the use of a case example, in this article we illustrate how emotion maps can add to the systemic clinicians' repertoire of visual methods. For clinicians working with families, couples, and young people, the importance of gaining insight into how lives are lived, at home, cannot be understated. Producing emotion maps can encourage critical personal reflection and expedite change in family practice. Hot spots in the household become visualized, facilitating dialogue on prevailing issues and how these events may be perceived differently by different family members. As emotion maps are not reliant on literacy or language skills they can be equally completed by parents and children alike, enabling children's perspective to be heard. Emotion maps can be used as assessment tools, to demonstrate the process of change within families. Furthermore, emotion maps can be extended to use through technology and hence are well suited particularly to working with young people. We end the article with a wider discussion of the place of emotions and emotion maps within systemic psychotherapy. PMID:25091031

  12. The Uses of Emotion Maps in Research and Clinical Practice with Families and Couples: Methodological Innovation and Critical Inquiry

    PubMed Central

    Gabb, Jacqui; Singh, Reenee

    2015-01-01

    We explore how “emotion maps” can be productively used in clinical assessment and clinical practice with families and couples. This graphic participatory method was developed in sociological studies to examine everyday family relationships. Emotion maps enable us to effectively “see” the dynamic experience and emotional repertoires of family life. Through the use of a case example, in this article we illustrate how emotion maps can add to the systemic clinicians’ repertoire of visual methods. For clinicians working with families, couples, and young people, the importance of gaining insight into how lives are lived, at home, cannot be understated. Producing emotion maps can encourage critical personal reflection and expedite change in family practice. Hot spots in the household become visualized, facilitating dialogue on prevailing issues and how these events may be perceived differently by different family members. As emotion maps are not reliant on literacy or language skills they can be equally completed by parents and children alike, enabling children's perspective to be heard. Emotion maps can be used as assessment tools, to demonstrate the process of change within families. Furthermore, emotion maps can be extended to use through technology and hence are well suited particularly to working with young people. We end the article with a wider discussion of the place of emotions and emotion maps within systemic psychotherapy. PMID:25091031

  13. Caregiving families within the long-term services and support system for older adults.

    PubMed

    Qualls, Sara Honn

    2016-01-01

    Long-term care services and supports are primarily a family industry that warrants psychologists' involvement through practice, research, and policy advocacy. Families are poorly integrated into service systems despite the dominance of family caregiving work within health care and long-term care. This article positions family caregiving work within the context of family life across the life span, noting overlaps and distinctions between normal family life and caregiving work for older adults whose physical or cognitive challenges require assistance. The prevalence, work, and consequences of family caregiving for older adults are described. Families are identified as key partners in long-term care, despite substantial policy and practice barriers to integrating them into care structures and systems. Policy options for reducing or eliminating barriers are suggested, as are professional practice opportunities for psychologists to support caregiving families. Approaches to assessment and interventions for caregivers across a variety of settings are described. Gaps in research are highlighted, with a focus on how to understand caregiving as embedded within context of family, long-term care services and supports, and health care. Caregiving work presents an imperative for expanding psychologists' engagement in integrating and supporting the families whose caregiving is so critical to a rapidly aging society. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27159435

  14. Quantitative assessment of the quality of medical care provided in five family practices before and after attachment of a family practice nurse.

    PubMed Central

    Chambers, L. W.; Burke, M.; Ross, J.; Cantwell, R.

    1978-01-01

    The standards of patient care were maintained in five urban medical practices after the introduction of family practice nurses. Evaluations were achieved before and after their appointment by the indicator condition method. Minimal explicit criteria for the management of patients with 12 indicator conditions and by the use of 14 drugs were approved by an ad hoc peer group of community physicians. These cirteria were applied to the five practices by the use of a single-blind design and the abstraction of unaltered medical records. A standardized score for each practic e permitted comparison of scores for the management of indicator conditions and for the clinical use of drugs before and after attachment of the family practice nurses. For each of the indicator conditions and the drugs assessed in the five practices similar levels of adequacy were observed in the two study periods. These explicit (objective) audit resutls agreed with the implicit (subjective) assessments of the family practice nurses by their physician colleagues. PMID:647590

  15. Family-Focused Autism Spectrum Disorder Research: A Review of the Utility of Family Systems Approaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cridland, Elizabeth K.; Jones, Sandra C.; Magee, Christopher A.; Caputi, Peter

    2014-01-01

    A family member with an autism spectrum disorder presents pervasive and bidirectional influences on the entire family system, suggesting a need for family-focused autism spectrum disorder research. While there has been increasing interest in this research area, family-focused autism spectrum disorder research can still be considered relatively…

  16. Treating Sibling Incest Using a Family Systems Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haskins, Cora

    2003-01-01

    Discusses family systems theory as a framework for understanding the common family dynamics observed in families where there is sibling abuse. Presents a case example using family systems theory as a framework for conceptualizing and developing treatment. (Contains 45 references.) (GCP)

  17. Family Literacy and Digital Literacies: A Redefined Approach to Examining Social Practices of an African-American Family

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Tisha Y.

    2009-01-01

    This dissertation examines the digital literacy practices of an urban African-American family. Using an ethnographic case study approach (Stake, 2000), this qualitative study explores the multiple ways a mother (Larnee) and son (Gerard) interacted with digital literacies in the home. Situated within the framework of sociocultural traditions from…

  18. Women, microcredit and family planning practices: a case study from rural Ghana.

    PubMed

    Norwood, Carolette

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines the influence of informal banking club participation on family planning practices in rural Ghana. Research from Asia suggests that family planning practices are improved by club participation. This study examines this thesis in an African context, using rural Ghana as a case study. A sample of 204 women (19 years and older) was drawn from Abokobi village, Ghana. Multivariate analyses of direct, mediating and moderating effects of women’s demographic background characteristics, membership status and length, and women’s empowerment status as predictors of family planning practices are assessed. Findings suggest that club membership and membership length is not associated with family planning practices; however, age, education level, number of children and empowerment status are. PMID:21901899

  19. Promising Practices for Family Involvement in Schools. Family, School, Community, Partnership Issues, Volume 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hiatt-Michael, Diana B., Ed.

    Parent involvement as one of the eight National Education Goals has brought heightened awareness to the importance of connecting educational institutions and their communities. This book addresses major frameworks for understanding family involvement and government support of family involvement projects. The work also presents a theoretical base…

  20. The Development of Professional Identity in the Family Practice Resident.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grose, Nellie P.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    The development of professional identity as a family physician is better understood by referring to Erikson's description of the development of personal identity. Erikson describes eight stages, each one defined by its alternative outcomes--the best versus the worst that can happen. (MLW)

  1. Parental Bookreading Practices among Families in the Netherlands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duursma, Elisabeth

    2014-01-01

    Bookreading has proven to be beneficial for children's language and literacy development (e.g. Bus, Van Ijzendoorn and Pellegrini, 1995; Fletcher and Reese, 2005; Mol and Bus, 2011a). Families in Western countries are often advised to read to their young children, and many parents appear to be aware of the positive effects of bookreading.…

  2. Family Practice Physicians: Training Needs in Regards to Substance Abuse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eliason, Michele J.; Skinstad, Anne Helene

    2002-01-01

    Family medicine physicians were surveyed about their knowledge of substance abuse and wishes for continuing education. Results showed 10% had no substance abuse training in medical school, 15% had none during residency, and 21% had no continuing education on substance abuse. Most preferred continuing education programs as part of an annual…

  3. Bridging Prevention and Practice: Public Health and Family Violence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenberg, Mark L.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Discusses the role of public health (PH) professionals in preventing family and intimate violence including findings from PH research, such as the cycle of violence and need to include abuse issues across the lifespan into medical education. Proposes that incorporating PH principles into medical education can help forge an effective partnership…

  4. Community-Based Family-Focused Practice and Social Network Intervention. Data Trends #129

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Research and Training Center on Family Support and Children's Mental Health, 2006

    2006-01-01

    "Data Trends" reports present summaries of research on mental health services for children and adolescents and their families. The article summarized in this "Data Trends" examines research on the "contribution of informal support linkages in the achievement of treatment outcomes" in three models of family-based practice: Intensive Family…

  5. Supportive Housing for Homeless Families: Foster Care Outcomes and Best Practices. Summary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lenz-Rashid, Sonja

    2013-01-01

    The "Supportive Housing for Homeless Families: Foster Care Outcomes and Best Practices" report describes the outcome evaluation of Cottage Housing Incorporated's Serna Village program in Sacramento, California. Serna Village is a supportive housing program serving homeless families. Outcomes from the program illustrate that it is possible to end…

  6. Guidelines and Recommended Practices for the Individualized Family Service Plan. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGonigel, Mary J., Ed.; And Others

    This monograph presents identified best practices in the development of Individualized Family Service Plans (IFSP) as required for families who have young children with disabilities, by Public Law 99-457, the Education of the Handicapped Act Amendments (1986). Chapter One presents an overview of the monograph's development and use. Chapter Two…

  7. Building Family Partnerships: The Journey from Preservice Preparation to Classroom Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zygmunt-Fillwalk, Eva

    2011-01-01

    This study reports the relationship of an undergraduate course in family and community relations to the teaching practices of 1st-, 2nd-, and 3rd-year elementary and early childhood education graduates of a mid-sized Midwestern university. Sixty students were surveyed using the Peabody Family Involvement Survey (Katz & Bauch, 1999), with a…

  8. Minority Ethnic Adolescents' Wellbeing: Child Rearing Practices and Positive Family Influences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ochieng, Bertha M. N.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This paper examines Black adolescents' experiences and views on the interrelationships between their families' parenting practices and their wellbeing. Method: The material is drawn from a community-based qualitative study on the health and wellbeing experiences of Black African families and adolescents. A total of 53…

  9. Bilingual "Educación" in the Home: Everyday Mexican Immigrant Family Educational Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valdez, Verónica

    2015-01-01

    As we embrace the increasing numbers of young Mexican immigrant children and their families present in our schools, it is important for educators to better understand the many family educational practices present in these households. This article examines the strategies and resources utilized by two Mexican-born and two U.S.-born Mexican immigrant…

  10. Do Private Religious Practices Moderate the Relation between Family Conflict and Preadolescents' Depression and Anxiety Symptoms?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Kelly A.; Epkins, Catherine C.

    2009-01-01

    We extended past research that focused on the relation between family conflict and preadolescents' depressive and anxiety symptoms. In a sample of 160 11- to 12-year-olds, we examined whether private religious practices moderated the relations between family conflict and preadolescents' depressive and anxiety symptoms. Although preadolescents'…

  11. AAMFT Master Series Tapes: An Analysis of the Inclusion of Feminist Principles into Family Therapy Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haddock, Shelley A.; MacPhee, David; Zimmerman, Toni Schindler

    2001-01-01

    Content analysis of 23 American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy Master Series tapes was used to determine how well feminist behaviors have been incorporated into ideal family therapy practice. Feminist behaviors were infrequent, being evident in fewer than 3% of time blocks in event sampling and 10 of 39 feminist behaviors of the…

  12. Marriage and Family Therapists and Psychotropic Medications: Practice Patterns from a National Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hernandez, Barbara Couden; Doherty, William J.

    2005-01-01

    A national sample of marriage and family therapists (MFTs) was used to describe practice patterns of MFTs whose clients use psychotropics and to compare medicated and nonmedicated clients. Marriage and Family Therapists (n = 283) reported on 195 medicated and 483 nonmedicated adult clients. Clients (n = 375) rated their improvement and…

  13. The Development of Core Competencies for the Practice of Marriage and Family Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Thorana S.; Chenail, Ronald J.; Alexander, James F.; Crane, D. Russell; Johnson, Susan M.; Schwallie, Linda

    2007-01-01

    In response to a series of national policy reports regarding what has been termed the "quality chasm" in health and mental health care in the United States, in January 2003, the American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy convened a task force to develop core competencies (CC) for the practice of marriage and family therapy (MFT). The…

  14. The Impact of Public Housing Policy on Family Social Work Theory and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarty, Dawn

    2008-01-01

    Social workers are the professionals most engaged with families living in low-income and subsidized housing and most familiar with the problems associated with inadequate housing. Yet the discussion of public housing policy has been left largely to economists and housing activists and the clear implications for family social work practice have not…

  15. The nurse practitioner in family planning services: law and practice.

    PubMed

    Roemer, R

    1977-06-01

    Before 1971, when Idaho became the 1st state to authorize expanded scope of functions for registered nurses, nearly all states made it illegal for any nurse to perform diagnosis or prescribe treatment, creating an ambiguity as more and more nurses were equipped by education and technology to perform new tasks. Today 30 states have liberalized the scope of nursing functions, making it possible for nurses and nurse-midwives to assume, among other tasks, family planning functions. A table gives the status of legislation and regulations governing nurse practitioners and nurse-midwives in each state. The area of greatest controversy is the prescription of oral contraceptives. In some states it is allowed under doctor's supervision or in rural areas or in areas where clear need exists for a nurse to dispense such medication. Usually this dispensing is limited to a single course of treatment. Nurse-midwives are rapidly being accepted as extensions of scarce medical facilities. Generally nurse-midwives are authorized to provide prenatal and postpartum care, to handle normal deliveries, and do family planning work including fitting diaphragms and inserting and removing IUDs. An innovation is the family planning nurse practitioner. Several courses for such practitioners have been set up across the U.S. Graduates may, with medical direction, perform bimanual pelvic examinations and breast examinations, take blood pressure, prescribe contraception, fit diaphragms, insert IUDs, examine vaginal secretions microscopically, and refer patients with problems to physicians. In a California program both registered and nonregistered nurses are being trained as women's health specialists who may make routine examinations in both pregnant and nonpregnant women and give family planning advice. Non-RN family planning specialists being trained include licensed vocational nurses, baccalaureate degree holders in nonnursing fields, and qualified persons with less formal education. The 24-week

  16. Structured approach to patients with memory difficulties in family practice

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Linda; Weston, W. Wayne; Heckman, George; Gagnon, Micheline; Lee, F. Joseph; Sloka, Scott

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective To provide family physicians with a structured approach to patients presenting with memory difficulties. Sources of information The approach is based on an accredited memory clinic training program developed by the Centre for Family Medicine Memory Clinic in partnership with the Ontario College of Family Physicians. Main message Use of a structured clinical reasoning approach can assist physicians in achieving an accurate diagnosis in patients presenting with memory difficulties. Delirium, depression, and reversible causes need to be excluded, followed by differentiation among normal cognitive aging, mild cognitive impairment, and dementia. Obtaining collateral history and accurate functional assessment are critical. Common forms of dementia can be clinically differentiated by the order in which symptoms appear and by how cognitive deficits evolve over time. Typically, early signs of Alzheimer dementia involve impairment in episodic memory, whereas dementia involving predominantly vascular causes might present with early loss of executive function and relatively preserved episodic memory. Frontotemporal dementia and Lewy body spectrum disorders might have early loss of executive function and visuospatial function, as well as characteristic clinical features. Conclusion A clinical reasoning approach can help physicians achieve early, accurate diagnoses that can guide appropriate management and improve care for patients with memory difficulties. PMID:23486793

  17. Elderly adult survivors of family violence. Implications for clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Anetzberger, G J

    1997-10-01

    This article on elderly adult survivors of domestic violence (usually women) reviews the literature that examines the impact on later life of domestic violence experienced earlier in life and that examines the effects of elder abuse perpetrated by adult family members. The discussion is illustrated with case studies and figures that list the physical, psychological, behavioral, and social effects of each type of violence as well as intervening variables. Next, the paper reviews the influence of culture and ethnicity on the meaning attached to elder abuse and on help-seeking or accepting behavior. The article then proposes a conceptual framework that uses contributing factors (cultural background, individual influences, and cohort influences), modifying factors (the nature of violence, personal circumstances, and relationship with perpetrator), the meaning of violence, and the effects on the survivor to explain the effects of early or late family violence on elderly adult survivors. The discussion notes that the framework focuses on negative effects but that survivors of domestic violence can experience positive effects, such as the development of personal coping skills. The article ends by noting that this proposed framework has clinical implications because it recognizes that the effects of domestic violence on elderly adults may be complicated, it helps practitioners link symptoms to domestic violence, it helps practitioners realize that the meaning of domestic violence may vary among elderly victims, and it shows that family violence occurs in a social context. PMID:12322016

  18. Involving family systems in critical care nursing: challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Leon, Ana M; Knapp, Sandra

    2008-01-01

    The literature indicates that involvement of families in critical care settings is effective in meeting the needs of families and patients during a medical crisis. This article presents basic concepts from family systems theory, including cultural considerations useful in developing nursing care plans that integrate family involvement in the care of critically ill patients. PMID:18953193

  19. Family Functioning and Early Learning Practices in Immigrant Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jung, Sunyoung; Fuller, Bruce; Galindo, Claudia

    2012-01-01

    Poverty-related developmental-risk theories dominate accounts of uneven levels of household functioning and effects on children. But immigrant parents may sustain norms and practices--stemming from heritage culture, selective migration, and social support--that buffer economic exigencies. "Comparable" levels of social-emotional functioning in…

  20. Perceptions of Practice Problems Encountered by Family Physicians, Pediatricians, and Orthopedic Surgeons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xu, Gang; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Information about practice problems was solicited through a structured questionnaire completed by 59 family physicians, 101 pediatricians, and 102 orthopedic surgeons. Across all three groups, a lack of personal time was the major concern. Practice concerns vary among the specialties, a finding of interest to physician education. (SLD)

  1. In-Forming Practice through Action Research. Family and Consumer Sciences Teacher Education. Yearbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterat, Linda, Ed.; Smith, M. Gale

    This book contains 16 papers about informing family and consumer sciences educational practice through action research. The following papers are included: "Informing Practice through Classroom Inquiry" (Linda Peterat, M. Gale Smith); "Focusing Praxis Research on Sexism in a Primary Classroom" (Emily Sutherland); "Understanding the Meaning of…

  2. Heritage-Language Literacy Practices: A Case Study of Three Japanese American Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hashimoto, Kumi; Lee, Jin Sook

    2011-01-01

    This article documents the heritage-language (HL) literacy practices of three Japanese American families residing in a predominantly Anglo and Latino community. Through interviews and observations, this study investigates Japanese children's HL-literacy practices, parental attitudes toward HL literacy, and challenges in HL-literacy development in…

  3. Lessons from Family-Strengthening Interventions: Learning from Evidence-Based Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caspe, Margaret; Lopez, Elena M.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of the brief is to help educators, service providers, and local evaluators in schools, intermediary and community-based organizations, and social service agencies become more effective by highlighting the best program and evaluation practices of family-strengthening intervention programs. At a time when evidence-based practice matters,…

  4. Parental feeding practices in Mexican American families: Initial test of an expanded measure

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although obesity rates are high among Latino children, relatively few studies of parental feeding practices have examined Latino families as a separate group. Culturally-based approaches to measurement development can begin to identify parental feeding practices in specific cultural groups. This stu...

  5. Perceptions and Practices of Graduates of Combined Family Medicine-Psychiatry Residency Programs: A Nationwide Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warner, Christopher H.; Morganstein, Joshua; Rachal, James; Lacy, Timothy

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The authors evaluate the current practices and perceptions of graduates of combined family medicine-psychiatry residency programs in the following areas: preparation for practice, boundary formation, and integration of skills sets. Method: The authors conducted an electronic cross-sectional survey of all nationwide combined family…

  6. The role of family communication and parents' feeding practices in children's food preferences.

    PubMed

    Alm, Siril; Olsen, Svein Ottar; Honkanen, Pirjo

    2015-06-01

    This study used Family Communication Patterns Theory (FCPT) to explore how family-dinner-related communication takes place and how parents' feeding practices may be associated with children's preferences for dinner meals. The sample consisted of 12 dyads with seven- and eight-year-old Norwegian children and their parents. In-depth photo interviews were used for collecting data. Interview transcripts and photographs were examined through content analysis. Results indicated that most families were conversation oriented, and communication tended to shift from consensual during weekdays to pluralistic at weekends. On weekdays, the dinner menu was often a compromise between children's preferences and parents' intentions to provide quick, healthy dinner options for the family. To a greater extent at weekends, children were allowed to choose dinner alternatives for the entire family. Restriction of unhealthy dinner alternatives was the practice most used to control children's diets and, in fact, might explain children's high preferences for unhealthy dinner alternatives. Results underline the importance of giving children control of what they eat and being responsive to children's preferences while guiding them towards healthy dinner alternatives rather than using force and restriction. From a more theoretical perspective, this study explored how FCPT could be combined with theories about parents' feeding practices to understand meal preferences and choices among young children and their families, and how time and situation (context) influence families' communication patterns and feeding practices in their homes. PMID:25666300

  7. Does Memory of Childhood Determine Parenting? Correlation in Family Practice

    PubMed Central

    Dickie, Gordon L.; Hoddinott, Susan N.

    1989-01-01

    The authors studied 46 eldest or only children under school age and their parents to determine the relationship between parents' recollections of their own childhoods and the way they use their family physician for care of their children. The parents completed a questionnaire that measured the caring and overprotection dimensions of the parenting they themselves remember. Positive correlations were found between perceptions of maternal overprotection and the frequency of children's visits. Negative correlations were found between perceptions of parental affection and children's visits and non-routine diagnoses. Neuroticism was found to be a confounding variable that slightly weakened the relationship between maternal caring and children's visits. PMID:20469500

  8. Family meals and eating practices among mothers in Santos, Brazil: A population-based study.

    PubMed

    Sato, Priscila de Morais; Lourenço, Bárbara Hatzlhoffer; Trude, Angela Cristina Bizzotto; Unsain, Ramiro Fernandez; Pereira, Patrícia Rocha; Martins, Paula Andrea; Scagliusi, Fernanda Baeza

    2016-08-01

    This study investigates family meals among mothers and explores associations between eating with family and sociodemographic characteristics, body mass index, and eating practices. A population-based cross-sectional study, using complex cluster-sampling, was conducted in the city of Santos, Brazil with 439 mothers. Frequency of family meals was assessed by asking if mothers did or did not usually have a) breakfast, b) lunch, and c) dinner with family. Linear regression analyses were conducted for the number of meals eaten with family per day and each of the potential explanatory variables, adjusting for the mother's age. Poisson regression with robust variance was used to analyze each factor associated with eating with family as classified categorically: a) sharing meals with family, b) not eating any meals with family. Only 16.4% (n = 72) of participants did not eat any meals with family. From the 83.6% (n = 367) of mothers that had at least one family meal per day, 69.70% (n = 306) ate dinner with their families. Mothers aged ≥40 years reported significantly fewer meals eaten with family compared to mothers aged 30-39 years (β: -0.26, p = 0.04). Having family meals was 54% more prevalent among mothers with ≥12 years of education (PR for no meals eaten with family: 0.54, 95% CI: 0.30; 0.96, p = 0.03), when compared to mothers with less than nine years of education. Eating no meals with family was 85% more prevalent among mothers who reported that eating was one of the biggest pleasures in their lives (PR: 1.85, 95% CI: 1.21; 2.82, p = 0.004). We suggest the need for further research investigating the effects of family meals on mothers' health through nutritional and phenomenological approaches. PMID:26994738

  9. The network perspective: an integration of attachment and family systems theories.

    PubMed

    Kozlowska, Kasia; Hanney, Lesley

    2002-01-01

    In this article we discuss the network paradigm as a useful base from which to integrate attachment and family systems theories. The network perspective refers to the application of general systems theory to living systems, and provides a framework that conceptualizes the dyadic and family systems as simultaneously distinct and interconnected. Network thinking requires that the clinician holds multiple perspectives in mind, considers each system level as both a part and a whole, and shifts the focus of attention between levels as required. Key epistemological issues that have hindered the integration of the theories are discussed. These include inconsistencies within attachment theory itself and confusion surrounding the theoretical conceptualizations of the relationship between attachment and family systems theories. Detailed information about attachment categories is provided using the Dynamic Maturational model. Case vignettes illustrating work with young children and their families explore the clinical implications of integrating attachment data into family therapy practice. PMID:12395561

  10. Innovation-diffusion: a geographical study of the transition of family limitation practice in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Ting, T Y

    1984-09-01

    This paper uses map analysis to study the transition of family limitation practice in Taiwan between 1961-80. The innovation-diffusion perspective emphasizes that birth control, particularly contraception, is a recent innovation and is essentially new in human culture. The innovation-diffusion theory assumes that the decline of fertility began in a setting where there was no, or at most very limited, previous practice of birth control. The theory emphasizes the importance of the spread of information. It also assumes that innovation starts in metropolitan centers, diffuses to other urban places with some delay, and penetrates to rural areas still later. Innovation behavior also diffuses from 1 area to another which is culturally and linguistically similar. Although there was some urban to rural diffusion from the Taiwan family planning program, the government supported program provided services more evenly between urban and rural areas, thus somewhat limiting the diffusion effect from the program. For the diffusion of family practice in Taiwan, it is expected that the availability of of information about and means of family limitation practice may effect the rate of the increase of small m values -- an index of family limitation -- in an area. The case study of Pingtung county shows that the demand-side diffusion from urban to rural areas was important in the earlier decade of the transition of family plimitation practice, but distance from urban center was less important as practice became more uniform through diffusion. Ethnicity, whether or not the township was dominated by Hakka or Fukienese, also seems to have played an important role in determining the pace at which the local residents adopted family practice limitation. Hakka townships seem to have adopted family limitation practice more slowly than Fukienese townships about the same distance from the urban center. The map analysis of Pingtung county provides descriptive evidence to support the diffusion of

  11. Clinical Decision Support for Vascular Disease in Community Family Practice

    PubMed Central

    Keshavjee, K; Holbrook, AM; Lau, E; Esporlas-Jewer, I; Troyan, S

    2006-01-01

    The COMPETE III Vascular Disease Tracker (C3VT) is a personalized, Web-based, clinical decision support tool that provides patients and physicians access to a patient’s 16 individual vascular risk markers, specific advice for each marker and links to best practices in vascular disease management. It utilizes the chronic care model1 so that physicians can better manage patients with chronic diseases. Over 1100 patients have been enrolled into the COMPETE III study to date.

  12. Family Resource Systems: The Nebraska Model. Proceedings of the Family Resource Systems Conference (January 24-25, 1980).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stark, Jack A., Ed.

    Proceedings are presented from a 1980 conference on community based services for families of developmentaly disabled children. The following ten papers are included: "Leading Edge Services to Families of Persons with Developmental Disabilities" (R. Perske); "Family Resource Services and Support Systems for Families with Handicapped Children" (B.…

  13. Integration of Complementary and Alternative Medicine into Family Practices in Germany: Results of a National Survey

    PubMed Central

    Joos, Stefanie; Musselmann, Berthold; Szecsenyi, Joachim

    2011-01-01

    More than two-thirds of patients in Germany use complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) provided either by physicians or non-medical practitioners (“Heilpraktiker”). There is little information about the number of family physicians (FPs) providing CAM. Given the widespread public interest in the use of CAM, this study aimed to ascertain the use of and attitude toward CAM among FPs in Germany. A postal questionnaire developed based on qualitatively derived data was sent to 3000 randomly selected FPs in Germany. A reminder letter including a postcard (containing a single question about CAM use in practice and reasons for non-particpation in the survey) was sent to all FPs who had not returned the questionnaire. Of the 3000 FPs, 1027 (34%) returned the questionnaire and 444 (15%) returned the postcard. Altogether, 886 of the 1471 responding FPs (60%) reported using CAM in their practice. A positive attitude toward CAM was indicated by 503 FPs (55%), a rather negative attitude by 127 FPs (14%). Chirotherapy, relaxation and neural therapy were rated as most beneficial CAM therapies by FPs, whereas neural therapy, phytotherapy and acupuncture were the most commonly used therapies in German family practices. This survey clearly demonstrates that CAM is highly valued by many FPs and is already making a substantial contribution to first-contact primary care in Germany. Therefore, education and research about CAM should be increased. Furthermore, with the provision of CAM by FPs, the role of non-medical CAM practitioners within the German healthcare system is to be questioned. PMID:19293252

  14. Capturing the Family Context of Emotion Regulation: A Family Systems Model Comparison Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fosco, Gregory M.; Grych, John H.

    2013-01-01

    Several dimensions of family functioning are recognized as formative influences on children's emotion regulation. Historically, they have been studied separately, limiting our ability to understand how they function within the family system. The present investigation tested models including family emotional climate, interparental conflict,…

  15. The implications of the Human Genome Project for family practice.

    PubMed

    Whittaker, L A

    1992-09-01

    The Human Genome Project is an international effort to map and sequence the human genome. The information it will generate has been referred to by some as the "new anatomy," and may play an important role in the future of medicine. However, as with any new technological advancement, the outcome of the Human Genome Project and the subsequent availability of new technology will raise a myriad of ethical, legal, and social concerns. The fear is that this technology will be applied in the clinical setting before the appropriate infrastructure is in place to deal with the issues it will raise. The family physician, far from being merely an interested observer in this process, will be responsible for the delivery of much of this technology as it becomes available. As an intermediary between the technology and the individual patient, the physician has a unique obligation to join in the thoughtful consideration and debate of these issues. PMID:1517727

  16. Male osteoporosis: clinical approach and management in family practice

    PubMed Central

    Goh, Lay Hoon; How, Choon How; Lau, Tang Ching

    2014-01-01

    In Singapore, male osteoporosis is gaining greater importance due to our ageing population. Family physicians should screen for osteoporosis in elderly men and men with risk factors or secondary causes for the condition. A bone mineral density (BMD) test is used for diagnosis. FRAX® can be used to predict the absolute ten-year fracture risk. Management includes reduction of risk factors or secondary causes, fall prevention, appropriate physical activity and a diet adequate in calcium and vitamin D. Referrals to specialists for evaluation and therapy can be considered, particularly for younger men with more severe disease. Current first-line drug treatment includes bisphosphonates and teriparatide. Testosterone increases BMD of the spine, but data on fracture risk reduction is unavailable. Public and physician education with the involvement of health authorities can create greater awareness of this silent condition, which can lead to complications, morbidity and death, if left untreated. PMID:25091882

  17. Patient Care and Paternalism: Dilemmas of Family Practice

    PubMed Central

    Wilbush, Joel

    1990-01-01

    From the clinical records of a country doctor, this vignette concerns a teenaged girl who, having refused treatment, is persuaded, under near duress, to accept a regimen that her family physician considers best for her. Although apparently arrogant paternalism, the practitioner's approach proves, on reflection, to possess considerable merit. The author discusses the ethical principles that have led to rejection of paternalism in the West. Formulated as absolute maxims, they soon require, like all absolutes, a multitude of explanations and additions. Some logical, social, and other “exceptions” are briefly mentioned, because the old doctor's intuitive actions seem to have oddly coincided with a number of them. Yet the questions remain: Should this medical practitioner have become so deeply involved? Should he have interfered with his patient's autonomy to the extent he did? Was he justified? PMID:11659246

  18. Nutrition Education Practices and Opinions of Alberta Family Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, S. Ann; Joffres, Michel R.

    1990-01-01

    A questionnaire was mailed to a random sample of 532 members of the Alberta Chapter of the College of Family Physicians in order to assess the role of physicians in providing nutrition education to their patients. Of the 255 respondents (53% response rate), over 97% agreed that “educating patients about nutrition is an important role for physicians.” Physicians most often gave nutrition information on obesity, constipation, heart disease and hypertension, alcohol, coffee, infant feeding, osteoporosis, and prenatal nutrition. Female physicians gave nutrition information significantly more often than male physicians on four maternal and child health topics. Perceived barriers to nutrition education included lack of reimbursement for physicians (86%), lack of time (48%), and limited access to patient information (42%). Most physicians often informed patients on the seven most common nutrition topics despite these concerns. PMID:21249103

  19. Three Cs of Translating Evidence-Based Programs for Youth and Families to Practice Settings.

    PubMed

    Freire, Kimberley E; Perkinson, Leah; Morrel-Samuels, Susan; Zimmerman, Marc A

    2015-01-01

    Despite the growing number of evidence-based programs (EBPs) for youth and families, few are well-integrated in service systems or widely adopted by communities. One set of challenges to widespread adoption of EBPs relates to the transfer of programs from research and development to practice settings. This is often because program developers have limited guidance on how to prepare their programs for broad dissemination in practice settings. We describe Three Cs of Translation, which are key areas that are essential for developers to translate their EBPs from research to practice settings: (1) Communicate the underlying theory in terms easily understandable to end users, (2) Clarify fidelity and flexibility, and (3) Codify implementation lessons and examples. Program developers are in the best position to describe their interventions, to define intervention core components, to clarify fidelity and flexibility, and to codify implementation lessons from intervention studies. We note several advantages for developers to apply the Three Cs prior to intervention dissemination and provide specific recommendations for translation. PMID:26375189

  20. Family Values as Practiced by Feminist Parents: Bridging Third-Wave Feminism and Family Pluralism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mack-Canty, Colleen; Wright, Sue

    2004-01-01

    The shift from second-wave feminism, with its emphasis on gender equality, to third-wave feminism, whose concern is with oppression more generally, poses intriguing questions about theoretical and social change. We have chosen to explore these issues through the insight and perspectives of families who parent from feminist perspectives. To gain…

  1. A Systems Perspective of Individual Development and Family Functioning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawyers, Janet K.; Moran, James D., III

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to advance understanding of the individual and family from a systems perspective and to facilitate interdisciplinary communication between individual and family theorists. This article outlines the systems concepts in human development and family theories to show that the groundwork for unification is already…

  2. Adoption of open-access scheduling in an academic family practice

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, Stewart; Sadler, Laura; Lawson, Beverley

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT PROBLEM ADDRESSED Patients have to wait too long to see their family physicians. Open access, a new approach to office scheduling, has shown promise in reducing patient wait times to see primary care physicians. OBJECTIVE OF PROGRAM To offer same-day appointments to most patients who call the office, thus reducing wait times as measured by the third available appointment. Reductions in no-show rates have also been reported by those who have adopted the open-access system. PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Following extensive preparation, a 2-site academic practice in Halifax, NS, adopted open-access booking in October 2008. Data on third available appointment times, no-show appointments, and patient volumes were tracked before and during the yearlong implementation. CONCLUSION The clinics recorded a substantial, sustained reduction in third available appointment time, indicating improved patient access. There was also a decline in no-show appointments. Patient volumes were unaffected. PMID:20841595

  3. [Dutch-Romanian cooperation in the area of family practice].

    PubMed

    van Es, J C

    2001-10-27

    During the years 1992-2000, there was a cooperative programme between the Romanian general practitioners' association (Societatea Nationala de Medicina Generala) in Romania and the Dutch Foundation for the Advancement of Quality in Healthcare in Romania. A succession of programmes were developed and carried out, which were financed by the Dutch government. The purpose of the cooperative programme was to support the development of Romanian general practice in terms of quality and structure. In the first programme, financed by the Dutch Ministry of Health, Welfare and Sport, about 200 Romanian general practitioners received continuing education. This was followed by a social transformation programme (MATRA) that had two parts: (a) the general practitioners association was supported and advised with respect to improving its organisational efficiency and (b) about 50 carefully selected Romanian general practitioners were trained, in post-academic research, management or teaching. The Romanian authorities accredited these trainees as teachers. The co-operation is being continued in 2001 with the setting up of a sentinel station programme in which 100 Romanian general practitioners collect relevant, representative data on health, illness and practice. PMID:11715598

  4. Family self-tailoring: Applying a systems approach to improving family healthy living behaviors.

    PubMed

    Moore, Shirley M; Jones, Lenette; Alemi, Farrokh

    2016-01-01

    The adoption and maintenance of healthy living behaviors by individuals and families is a major challenge. We describe a new model of health behavior change, SystemCHANGE (SC), which focuses on the redesign of family daily routines using system improvement methods. In the SC intervention, families are taught a set of skills to engage in a series of small, family self-designed experiments to test ideas to change their daily routines. The family system-oriented changes brought about by these experiments build healthy living behaviors into family daily routines so that these new behaviors happen as a matter of course, despite wavering motivation, willpower, or personal effort on the part of individuals. Case stories of the use of SC to improve family healthy living behaviors are provided. Results of several pilot tests of SC indicate its potential effectiveness to change health living behaviors across numerous populations. PMID:27301950

  5. The Evaluation Phase of Systemic Family Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caille, Philippe

    1982-01-01

    Describes the initial evaluation phase of family therapy, which clarifies the circular interaction maintaining the symptom, the family structure, and its relationship to the therapist. Suggests using first sessions to collect data and organize it meaningfully. Presents phenomenological and mythical models of family functioning as guides for…

  6. Process and Practice: Three Domains in Foster Care. Fostering Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schatz, Mona Struhsaker; Glenn, David

    This module is part of a training program for foster parents and foster care workers offered at Colorado State University. The module's learning objectives address: (1) the organization of a social services foster care system; (2) the functioning of human systems and the rules governing their operation; and (3) the difficulties complex systems…

  7. The practice of travel medicine by family practitioners.

    PubMed

    Ross, M; Pinto, I; Sparks, B

    1995-06-01

    This study sought to determine the prevalence of family practitioners (FPs) in Johannesburg, South Africa, who are consulted by travelers. The study quantified the extent of medical activity of FPs and determined sources of physicians' updating information. Data were obtained from a random sample of 180 of the 576 nonspecialists listed as private medical practitioners in 1992-93 in the Johannesburg telephone directory. Interviews were obtained from 109 practitioners, of whom 105 were consulted by travelers. The average rate of consultations was an estimated 30/FP. Over 90% of FPs were asked about malaria prevention and/or immunization. 98% provided advice on malaria, and over 80% administered immunizations. The most common vaccine was Hepatitis B (63%), followed by gamma globulin for Hepatitis A (58%), and tetanus toxoid (50%). It was common for FPs to recommend antidiarrheal medications. Clients did not generally ask about diarrhea prevention. 47% gave preventive advice alone on diarrhea or recommendations for medication. FPs kept up to date on medical affairs by reading professional journals and following local experts or colleagues. In 1992, an estimated 100,000 travelers visited FPs in Johannesburg. PMID:12178510

  8. Inborn errors of metabolism: psychosocial challenges and proposed family systems model of intervention.

    PubMed

    Weber, Stacy L; Segal, Summer; Packman, Wendy

    2012-04-01

    Inborn errors of metabolism result in psychosocial crises that challenge individual and familial modes of functioning across the life cycle. Increased stress, mood disorders, interpersonal challenges, decreased quality of life, and grief reactions are all common for patients and their families. To effectively care for these patients, a holistic approach to their care, which incorporates their social context, is essential. Patients and their families need support as they focus on immediate practical demands, grieve over illness-related losses, and reorient future expectations. A family systems based model provides a flexible and individualized approach to care that allows for optimal psychosocial adjustment throughout the disease process. PMID:22532988

  9. Description of the clinical practice of advanced practice nurses in family-centered early intervention in two rural settings.

    PubMed

    Kang, R; Barnard, K; Oshio, S

    1994-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the scope of clinical practice of advanced practice nurses who were involved in a project designed to increase access of families with at-risk and disabled young children, newborn to 3 years of age, to early intervention services in rural Washington State. The findings from this study are based on the retrospective review of records of clients seen by the advanced practice nurses. Nursing diagnoses and nursing interventions were assigned to chart recordings. The most frequently occurring nursing diagnoses assigned to parents were Altered Parenting, Altered Family Processes, Fear, Noncompliance, and Knowledge Deficit. The most frequently occurring nursing diagnoses assigned to children were Impaired Physical Mobility, Impaired Verban Communication, Altered Nutrition: Less than Body Requirements, Sensory-Perceptual Alteration, and Altered Thought Processes. Categories of nursing intervention recorded most frequently were Monitoring, Planning and Information. Discussion of findings addresses the roles and reimbursement of advanced practice nurses who provide family-centered early intervention services in rural communities. PMID:7870654

  10. Medical students’ perceptions and attitudes about family practice: a qualitative research synthesis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background During the last decade medical students from most Western countries have shown little interest in family practice. Understanding the factors that influence medical students to choose family medicine is crucial. Objective To systematically review and synthesize published evidence about medical students’ attitudes and perceptions towards family practice. Methods A qualitative systematic review. The literature search was undertaken in July 2010 in PubMed, EMBASE, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), Social Science Citation Index (SSCI), and ProQuest Dissertations & Theses. Two authors independently selected the studies for their inclusion and assessed their quality. The selected studies were thoroughly read. Key themes and categories were identified. A matrix was created for allowing the comparison of each theme across studies. Results Ten studies were finally included. Seven broad themes were identified across them: 1) Scope and context of practice was a broad theme comprising linked sub-themes: perception of a varied specialty, broad practice, holistic perspective and flexibility that allows having a family; 2) Lower interest or intellectually less challenging: treating common disease, repetitive, quasi administrative job; 3) Influence of role models, either positive and negative, and society: negative comments from other professionals, peers and family; 4) Lower prestige; 5) Poor remuneration; 6) Medical school influences, being important both the length and quality of the exposure; 7) Post graduate training, where the shorter duration and the lower intensity were perceived as positive aspects. After identifying these seven key themes, were also looked into patterns in the distribution of these themes among studies. Conclusions Our qualitative review provides a comprehensive picture of medical students’ attitudes towards family practice in the available literature. In general, although some students find family medicine