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Sample records for family structure economic

  1. Impact of Family Structure on Parental Attitudes Toward the Economic Support of Adult Children Over the Transition to Adulthood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aquilino, William S.

    2005-01-01

    This research explored the influence of family structure on midlife parents' attitudes toward the economic support of adult children and measured change in those attitudes as their oldest child moved from adolescence to young adulthood. Results suggest that family structure has long-term effects on parents' attitudes toward financial obligations…

  2. ECONOMIC CONSIDERATIONS FOR REGULATING MARITAL DISSOLUTIONS IN RESPONSE TO NEW FAMILY STRUCTURES

    E-print Network

    Artigot Golobardes, Mireia

    2009-01-01

    of gender roles and specialization weakened marriage becausemarriages – or form multiple families – during their lifetime, gendergender roles, fertility rates and the already mentioned decrease in marriage

  3. Economic Conditions of Military Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hosek, James; MacDermid Wadsworth, Shelley

    2013-01-01

    In this article, the authors found that the economic circumstances of military families are good, certainly much improved compared with even a decade ago. The military context is nonetheless challenging, with long hours, dangerous work, frequent transfers, and stressful absences during deployment. Service members receive relatively high pay and…

  4. The Changing Family Structure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernard van Leer Foundation Newsletter, 1993

    1993-01-01

    This newsletter issue contains feature articles and short reports on how and why family structures are undergoing substantial change in many parts of the world. These articles include: (1) "The Changing Family Structure," a review of how families are changing and why; (2) "Peru: Families in the Andes"; (3) "Thailand: Families of the Garbage Dump";…

  5. Telecommunication, Economics, and Black Families in America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Redd, Lawrence N.

    1988-01-01

    The complex set of economic problems facing Black families can best be understood from a communication perspective. Corporate America historically has taken advantage of its access to information and use of communication media to control the economic conditions of Black families. Through research and communication technology Black families can…

  6. Economic conditions of military families.

    PubMed

    Hosek, James; Wadsworth, Shelley MacDermid

    2013-01-01

    For military children and their families, the economic news is mostly good. After a period of steady pay increases, James Hosek and Shelley MacDermid Wadsworth write, service members typically earn more than civilians with a comparable level of education. Moreover, they receive many other benefits that civilians often do not, including housing allowances, subsidized child care, tuition assistance, and top-of-the-line comprehensive health care. Of course, service members tend to work longer hours than civilians do, and they are exposed to hazards that civilians rarely, if ever, face. The extra pay they receive when they are deployed to combat zones helps their families cope financially but cannot alleviate the stress. Though service members are relatively well paid, the military lifestyle takes a toll on the earnings of their spouses. Chiefly because the military requires service members to move frequently, spouses' careers are regularly interrupted, and employers are hesitant to offer them jobs that require a large investment in training or a long learning curve. More military spouses than comparable civilian spouses are either unemployed or work fewer hours than they would like, and military spouses overall tend to earn less than their civilian counterparts. Despite the military's relatively high pay, some service members and their families--particularly among the junior enlisted ranks--report financial distress, and a handful even qualify for food stamps. Moreover, precisely because military pay tends to be higher than civilian pay, families may see a drop in income when a service member leaves the armed forces. Finally, the pay increases of recent years have slowed, and force cutbacks are coming; both of these factors will alter the financial picture for service members, possibly for the worse. PMID:25518691

  7. How Do Families Manage Their Economic Hardship?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baek, Eunyoung; DeVaney, Sharon A.

    2010-01-01

    Using data from the 2007 Survey of Consumer Finances, this study examined how families manage their economic hardship. A conceptual model was developed based on risk management theory and the permanent income hypothesis. About half of families used credit and about a third used their own savings to make up the difference between income and…

  8. The family structure in contemporary Japan.

    PubMed

    Miyajima, H

    1993-01-01

    The applicability of models of the family developed in the disciplines of sociology and cultural anthropology to the modern Japanese family is considered. "Our aim is to understand the contemporary Japanese family from two perspectives: the family as an economic unit and the family as a social security provider based on the arrangement and analysis of materials and statistics concerning current structure, form, type, and size of the contemporary Japanese family." Data are primarily from the annual survey undertaken by the Ministry of Health and Welfare on living conditions. PMID:12288893

  9. Children's Mental Health in Times of Economic Recession: Replication and Extension of the Family Economic Stress Model in Finland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solantaus, Tytti; Leinonen, Jenni; Punam Ki, Raija-Leena

    2004-01-01

    This study evaluated the applicability of the family economic stress model (FESM) in understanding the influences of economic hardship on child mental health during a nationwide economic recession in Finland. The information was gathered from 527 triads of 12-year-olds and their mothers and fathers from a population sample. The structural equation…

  10. Economic Disadvantage in Complex Family Systems: Expansion of Family Stress Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnett, Melissa A.

    2008-01-01

    Economic disadvantage is associated with multiple risks to early socioemotional development. This article reviews research regarding family stress frameworks to model the pathways from economic disadvantage to negative child outcomes via family processes. Future research in this area should expand definitions of family and household to incorporate…

  11. Mothers' Economic Conditions and Sources of Support in Fragile Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalil, Ariel; Ryan, Rebecca M.

    2010-01-01

    Rising rates of nonmarital childbirth in the United States have resulted in a new family type, the fragile family. Such families, which include cohabiting couples as well as single mothers, experience significantly higher rates of poverty and material hardship than their married counterparts. Ariel Kalil and Rebecca Ryan summarize the economic

  12. CULTURE, ECONOMIC STRUCTURE, AND THE DYNAMICS OF ECOLOGICAL ECONOMIC SYSTEMS

    E-print Network

    Fournier, John J.F.

    CULTURE, ECONOMIC STRUCTURE, AND THE DYNAMICS OF ECOLOGICAL ECONOMIC SYSTEMS By John M. Anderies B are developed and analyzed in an attempt to better un- derstand the interaction of culture, economic structure, and the dynamics of human ecological economic systems. Speci cally, how does the ability of humans to change

  13. Mothers' economic conditions and sources of support in fragile families.

    PubMed

    Kalil, Ariel; Ryan, Rebecca M

    2010-01-01

    Rising rates of nonmarital childbirth in the United States have resulted in a new family type, the fragile family. Such families, which include cohabiting couples as well as single mothers, experience significantly higher rates of poverty and material hardship than their married counterparts. Ariel Kalil and Rebecca Ryan summarize the economic challenges facing mothers in fragile families and describe the resources, both public and private, that help them meet these challenges. The authors explain that the economic fragility of these families stems from both mothers' and fathers' low earnings, which result from low education levels, as well as from physical, emotional, and mental health problems. Mothers in fragile families make ends meet in many ways. The authors show that various public programs, particularly those that provide in-kind assistance, do successfully lessen economic hardship in fragile families. Single mothers also turn to private sources of support--friends, family, boyfriends--for cash and in-kind assistance. But though these private safety nets are essential to many mothers' economic survival, according to the authors, private safety nets are not always consistent and dependable. Thus, assistance from private sources may not fundamentally improve mothers' economic circumstances. Policy makers, say Kalil and Ryan, must recognize that with rates of nonmarital childbirth at their current level, and potentially rising still, the fragile family is likely an enduring fixture in this country. It is thus essential to strengthen policies that both support these families' economic self-sufficiency and alleviate their hardship during inevitable times of economic distress. The most important first step, they say, is to strengthen the public safety net, especially such in-kind benefits as food stamps, Medicaid, housing, and child care. A next step would be to bolster community-based programs that can provide private financial support, such as emergency cash assistance, child care, and food aid, when mothers cannot receive it from their own private networks. PMID:20964131

  14. Family Structure, Family Processes, and Adolescent Smoking and Drinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Susan L.; Rinelli, Lauren N.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined whether family structure was associated with adolescent risk behaviors, including smoking and drinking. Family living arrangements have become increasingly diverse, yet research on adolescent risk behaviors has typically relied on measures of family structure that do not adequately capture this diversity. Data from the…

  15. Family Economic Pressure and Adolescent Suicidal Ideation: Application of the Family Stress Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoder, Kevin A.; Hoyt, Dan R.

    2005-01-01

    This study used a sample of 501 families from the Mississippi Delta region to examine the feasibility of the Family Stress Model for understanding adolescent suicidal ideation. The results indicated that family economic pressure was related to parental depressive symptoms, which, in turn, was related to parental hostile behavior and physical…

  16. Essays in population and family economics

    E-print Network

    León, Alexis, 1977-

    2004-01-01

    (cont.) observed in several Western countries. Finally, the third chapter evaluates the labor market effects of public subsidies to families with children. Using variation in the level of benefits provided by a policy ...

  17. Five Thousand American Families--Patterns of Economic Progress. Volume III: Analyses of the First Six Years of the Panel Study of Income Dynamics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, Greg J., Ed.; Morgan, James N., Ed.

    This volume focuses on the main issues to which the Panel Study of Income Dynamics was directed--the determinants of the changing economic fortunes of black and white families. The economic status of the families studied, patterns of transition, and changes in the structure of the families and their relationship to changes in economic activity are…

  18. Economic analysis of a passive solar multiple-family dwelling for upstate New York

    SciTech Connect

    Laquatra, J. Jr.

    1982-02-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the economic feasibility of passive solar energy as applied to a multiple-family dwelling in three upstate New York cities: Buffalo, Rochester, and Syracuse. Specifically, two passive solar applications - a Trombe wall and a direct-gain system - for a nine-unit structure designed by Total Environmental Action, Inc. were analyzed through the use of a solar economic performance code. City-specific data, including climatological information, building construction costs, utility rates, and property taxes were used, as were various economic parameters to reflect economic conditions in general and specifically those of the solar systems' owners.

  19. Chronic Family Economic Hardship, Family Processes and Progression of Mental and Physical Health Symptoms in Adolescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Tae Kyoung; Wickrama, K. A. S.; Simons, Leslie Gordon

    2013-01-01

    Research has documented the relationship between family stressors such as family economic hardship and marital conflict and adolescents' mental health symptoms, especially depressive symptoms. Few studies, however, have examined the processes whereby supportive parenting lessens this effect and the progression of mental health and physical health…

  20. Family migration and the economic status of women in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, A

    1997-01-01

    "The impact of family migration on women's economic position in a developing country setting is an area that has received relatively little research attention. Incorporating a lifetime perspective, this study makes use of the retrospective migration histories of husbands and wives from the second round of the Malaysian Family Life Survey to estimate how joint migration with the husband affects women's socioeconomic achievement. The findings show that family migration depresses the chances of working, but it does not significantly reduce socioeconomic attainment of those who do work. However, when a woman migrates with her husband she does forgo the substantial advantage she could have derived had she moved alone." PMID:12292875

  1. Family and Consumer Science (Home Economics) Education References.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scholl, Jan

    This document lists a total of 141 family and consumer science (home economics) references that were gleaned from popular press periodicals dating from December 1, 1994, to December 15, 1995. The references are organized by the following categories: child development, consumerism, grooming and clothing care, home environment, personal…

  2. A Framework for Including Family Health Spillovers in Economic Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Al-Janabi, Hareth; van Exel, Job; Brouwer, Werner; Coast, Joanna

    2016-02-01

    Health care interventions may affect the health of patients' family networks. It has been suggested that these "health spillovers" should be included in economic evaluation, but there is not a systematic method for doing this. In this article, we develop a framework for including health spillovers in economic evaluation. We focus on extra-welfarist economic evaluations where the objective is to maximize health benefits from a health care budget (the "health care perspective"). Our framework involves adapting the conventional cost-effectiveness decision rule to include 2 multiplier effects to internalize the spillover effects. These multiplier effects express the ratio of total health effects (for patients and their family networks) to patient health effects. One multiplier effect is specified for health benefit generated from providing a new intervention, one for health benefit displaced by funding this intervention. We show that using multiplier effects to internalize health spillovers could change the optimal funding decisions and generate additional health benefits to society. PMID:26377370

  3. Family Economic Stress and Academic Well-Being Among Chinese-American Youth: The Influence of Adolescents’ Perceptions of Economic Strain

    PubMed Central

    Mistry, Rashmita S.; Benner, Aprile D.; Tan, Connie S.; Kim, Su Yeong

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the pathways by which family economic stress influenced youth's educational outcomes in a sample of 444 Chinese American adolescents (Mages = 13.0, 17.1 years at waves 1 and 2, respectively). Using latent variable structural equation modeling, results across two waves of data, spanning early to late adolescence, demonstrated that the influence of parent report of economic stress on youth academic achievement (i.e., GPA), school engagement, and positive attitudes about education was mediated through youth's perceptions of family economic strain and self-reports of depressive symptoms. These relationships were observed to remain significant after accounting for selection bias using individual fixed-effects models. Finally, youth's perceptions of family economic strain were found to more strongly predict depressive symptoms during later, as compared to earlier, adolescence; all other modeled relationships were equivalent across the two time periods. Implications for expanding theoretical tenets of the Family Economic Stress Model are discussed. PMID:19586191

  4. Family economic stress and academic well-being among Chinese-American youth: the influence of adolescents' perceptions of economic strain.

    PubMed

    Mistry, Rashmita S; Benner, Aprile D; Tan, Connie S; Kim, Su Yeong

    2009-06-01

    This study examined the pathways by which family economic stress influenced youth's educational outcomes in a sample of 444 Chinese American adolescents (M ages = 13.0, 17.1 years at waves 1 and 2, respectively). Using latent variable structural equation modeling, results across two waves of data, spanning early to late adolescence, demonstrated that the influence of parent report of economic stress on youth academic achievement (i.e., GPA), school engagement, and positive attitudes about education was mediated through youth's perceptions of family economic strain and self-reports of depressive symptoms. These relationships were observed to remain significant after accounting for selection bias using individual fixed-effects models. Finally, youth's perceptions of family economic strain were found to more strongly predict depressive symptoms during later, as compared to earlier, adolescence; all other modeled relationships were equivalent across the two time periods. Implications for expanding theoretical tenets of the Family Economic Stress Model are discussed. PMID:19586191

  5. Economic stress, parenting, and child adjustment in Mexican American and European American families.

    PubMed

    Parke, Ross D; Coltrane, Scott; Duffy, Sharon; Buriel, Raymond; Dennis, Jessica; Powers, Justina; French, Sabine; Widaman, Keith F

    2004-01-01

    To assess the impact of economic hardship on 111 European American and 167 Mexican American families and their 5th-grade (M age=11.4 years) children, a family stress model was evaluated. Structural equation analyses revealed that economic hardship was linked to indexes of economic pressure that were related to depressive symptoms for mothers and fathers of both ethnicities. Depressive symptoms were linked to marital problems and hostile parenting. Paternal hostile parenting was related to child adjustment problems for European Americans, whereas marital problems were linked to child adjustment problems for Mexican Americans. Maternal acculturation was associated with both higher marital problems and lower hostile parenting. The utility of the model for describing the effects of economic hardship in Mexican Americans is noted. PMID:15566370

  6. Marital Structure and Economic Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Gary R.

    1979-01-01

    Results of this study indicate that the relationship between economic productivity of females and the occurrence of polygyny is different in different types of economic systems. Extant theories are too simplistic to explain these differences. Suggestions are made for further theoretical development which involves integration of several previous…

  7. Family Structure and Youths' Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Painter, Gary; Levine, David I.

    2000-01-01

    National Education Longitudinal Study data were used to examine whether parents' divorce/remarriage or existing family disadvantages caused such outcomes as teens' lower educational attainment or higher rates of parenthood. Neither divorce nor remarriage during a youth's high school years was strongly correlated with preexisting characteristics of…

  8. On Solid Ground Workbook: Family Support and Sustainable Community Economic Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez, Virginia

    Based on the view that strong families create healthy local economies and that family support is key to helping families become self-sufficient, active participants in the marketplace, this workbook is part of a wider effort at Family Support America to apply the principles of family support and the strategies of community economic development to…

  9. The Network Structure of Economic Output

    E-print Network

    Hidalgo, Cesar A.

    Much of the analysis of economic growth has focused on the study of aggregate output. Here, we deviate from this tradition and look instead at the structure of output embodied in the network connecting countries to the ...

  10. Familial Identification: Population Structure and Relationship Distinguishability

    PubMed Central

    Rohlfs, Rori V.; Fullerton, Stephanie Malia; Weir, Bruce S.

    2012-01-01

    With the expansion of offender/arrestee DNA profile databases, genetic forensic identification has become commonplace in the United States criminal justice system. Implementation of familial searching has been proposed to extend forensic identification to family members of individuals with profiles in offender/arrestee DNA databases. In familial searching, a partial genetic profile match between a database entrant and a crime scene sample is used to implicate genetic relatives of the database entrant as potential sources of the crime scene sample. In addition to concerns regarding civil liberties, familial searching poses unanswered statistical questions. In this study, we define confidence intervals on estimated likelihood ratios for familial identification. Using these confidence intervals, we consider familial searching in a structured population. We show that relatives and unrelated individuals from population samples with lower gene diversity over the loci considered are less distinguishable. We also consider cases where the most appropriate population sample for individuals considered is unknown. We find that as a less appropriate population sample, and thus allele frequency distribution, is assumed, relatives and unrelated individuals become more difficult to distinguish. In addition, we show that relationship distinguishability increases with the number of markers considered, but decreases for more distant genetic familial relationships. All of these results indicate that caution is warranted in the application of familial searching in structured populations, such as in the United States. PMID:22346758

  11. The Economic Plight of America's Young Families. An Update of CDF's Vanishing Dreams Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Children's Defense Fund, Washington, DC.

    This report describes improvements in the status of families headed by persons under age 30 from 1986 to 1987 based on figures from "Vanishing Dreams" and the most recent available data drawn from the Current Population Survey. The following sets of economic data are updated: (1) earnings of family heads; (2) young family incomes; and (3) poverty…

  12. A Family Structure Approach to the Analysis of Poverty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuby, Richard G.

    A typological approach to the analysis of poverty, based on selected characteristics of family structure, is suggested since the family unit is a concrete or actual structure in society, and much of the research and many of the action programs of the war on poverty have implicitly invoked some concept of the family. The typology of family

  13. Effects of Economic Structure on Regional Economic Performance 

    E-print Network

    Hong, Sa Heum

    2014-06-04

    Since the most recent recession, many local governments, which excessively paid attention to economic growth, have undergone tremendous difficulties caused by severe fluctuations. It shows that economic stability also has ...

  14. How does renewable energy drive community economic development, improve air quality & contribute to healthy families & communities?

    E-print Network

    de Leon, Alex R.

    · How does renewable energy drive community economic development, improve air quality & contribute to healthy families & communities? · How does renewable energy revitalize agricultural communities, provide energy self-sufficiency & protect the environment? · How do renewable energy & sustainable food create

  15. Child and Family Policies in a Time of Economic Crisis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, Dominic

    2010-01-01

    At the beginning of 2008, a number of the world's major economies began to experience the effects of the biggest economic financial crisis in history. By the end of that year, the financial crisis was a global recession, and governments responded with changes to a suite of social and economic policies. Two broad stages of government response are…

  16. Impact of economic labour migration: a qualitative exploration of left-behind family member perspectives in Sri Lanka.

    PubMed

    Siriwardhana, Chesmal; Wickramage, Kolitha; Jayaweera, Kaushalya; Adikari, Anushka; Weerawarna, Sulochana; Van Bortel, Tine; Siribaddana, Sisira; Sumathipala, Athula

    2015-06-01

    Sri Lanka is a major labour sending country in Asia, with a high proportion of female labour migrants employed as domestic housemaids in the Middle East with increasing remittances. Despite such financial gains for families and national economy, health and social effects on the left-behind families have had limited exploration. This qualitative study was carried out across five districts with high labour migration rates in Sri Lanka. Twenty in-depth interviews were conducted with participants recruited through purposive sampling. Data was analysed using content and thematic analysis and emerging themes were mapped. Pre-migration socio-economic situation, economic difficulties and higher earning possibilities abroad were considered to be the major push and pull factors for labour migration. Post-migration periods were shown to be of mixed benefit to left-behind families and children suffer the negative effects of parental absence. The absence of support mechanisms for dealing with adverse events such as serious injury, death, abuse or imprisonment were cited as major concerns. Post-migration periods affect the health, well-being and family structures of left-behind families. Promoting economic prosperity while ensuring health and social protection is a formidable policy challenge for 'labour sending' countries such as Sri Lanka. PMID:24242226

  17. Inter-relationships between the economic and emotional consequences of colorectal cancer for patients and their families: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background While the evidence-base concerning the economic impact of cancer for patients and their families/carers has grown in recent years, there is little known about how emotional responses to cancer influence this economic impact. We investigated the economic costs of cancer in the context of patients’ emotions and how these both shaped the patient and family burden. Methods Health professionals from six hospitals invited patients diagnosed with colorectal cancer (ICD10 C18-C20) within the previous year to take part in the study. Semi-structured face-to-face interviews were conducted with patients and, where available, a family member. Interviews covered medical and non-medical costs incurred as a result of cancer and the impact of these on the lives of the patient and their family. Interviews were audio-recorded. Recordings were transcribed verbatim and these data were analysed qualitatively using thematic content analysis. Results Twenty-two patients with colorectal cancer (17 colon and 5 rectal; 14 women and 8 men) were interviewed; 6 were accompanied by a family member. Important cancer-related financial outlays included: travel and parking associated with hospital appointments; costs of procedures; increased household bills; and new clothing. Cancer impacted on employed individuals’ ability to work and depressed their income. The opportunity cost of informal care for carers/family members, especially immediately post-diagnosis, was a strong theme. All patients spoke of the emotional burden of colorectal cancer and described how this burden could lead to further costs for themselves and their families by limiting work and hindering their ability to efficiently manage their expenses. Some patients also spoke of how economic and emotional burdens could interact with each other. Support from employers, family/carers and the state/health services and patients’ own attitudes influenced this inter-relationship. Conclusions The economic impact of colorectal cancer on patients and their families is complex. This study suggests that the economic costs and the emotional impact of cancer are often related and can exacerbate each other, but that various factors can meditate this inter-relationship. PMID:22676509

  18. The effect of economic stability on family stability among welfare recipients.

    PubMed

    Lewin, Alisa C

    2005-06-01

    The main rationale for defining two-parent families eligible for welfare was to keep families intact by eliminating an incentive for union dissolution. But there are other reasons for family instability, most notably women's reduced economic gain from marriage associated with having a chronically unemployed husband. This article explores the hypothesis that husband's unemployment increases union dissolution among welfare recipients. The analysis uses data from California's Link-Up demonstration project. A discrete-time event-history methodology was employed to examine family instability. The findings show that husband's unemployment and the family's long-term welfare dependency lead to breakup, net of race, age, and number of children. PMID:15860764

  19. FAMILY STRUCTURE, DYNAMICS AND PSYCHIATRIC DISORDER IN INDIA1

    PubMed Central

    Chopra, H.D.

    1984-01-01

    SUMMARY This paper briefly reviews the literature on family structure, dynamics and relationships between family-jointness and different psychiatric disorders in India. Many recent studies indicate that the nuclear families are more vulnerable and plea is made for maintaining the traditional joint family system, even in some modified forms, because of its “built-in-immunity” and supportive networks. PMID:21966010

  20. A Longitudinal Study of Perceived Family Functioning and Adolescent Adjustment in Chinese Adolescents With Economic Disadvantage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shek, Daniel T. L.

    2005-01-01

    This longitudinal study examines the relationships between perceived family functioning and adolescent psychological well-being and problem behavior in Chinese adolescents with economic disadvantage (N = 199). Results showed that perceived family functioning was concurrently related to measures of adolescent psychological well-being (existential…

  1. Economically Disadvantaged Children's Transitions into Elementary School: Linking Family Processes, School Contexts, and Educational Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crosnoe, Robert; Cooper, Carey E.

    2010-01-01

    Working from a core perspective on the developmental implications of economic disadvantage, this study attempted to identify "family-based" mechanisms of economic effects on early learning and their potential "school-based" remedies. Multilevel analysis of the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Kindergarten Cohort revealed that the accumulation of…

  2. Influence of Family Structure on Health among Youths with Diabetes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Sanna J.; Auslander, Wendy F.; White, Neil H.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the extent to which family structure is significantly associated with health in youth with Type 1 diabetes. Multiple regression analyses demonstrated that family structure remains a significant predictor of youth's health when statistically controlling for race, child's age, family socioeconomic status, and adherence. (BF)

  3. Family and Personal Adjustment of Economically Disadvantaged Chinese Adolescents in Hong Kong

    PubMed Central

    Shek, Daniel T. L.; Tsui, Pik Fong

    2012-01-01

    This study attempted to examine the relationship between poverty and adolescent developmental outcomes in the family and personal domains in 3,328 Chinese secondary school students in Hong Kong. Developmental outcomes included positive youth development constructs, problem behaviors, perceived family interaction, and parental parenting. Results showed that adolescents experiencing poverty did not differ from nonpoor adolescents in terms of risk behavior and in most indicators of positive youth development. On the other hand, adolescents with economic disadvantage displayed lower levels of positive identity, family interaction, and perceived paternal parenting than did those without economic disadvantage. PMID:22919290

  4. Families and Australia's Economic Future. Submission to the Economic Planning Advisory Council.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Institute of Family Studies, Melbourne (Australia).

    This report discusses trends in the way Australian families are forming and re-forming, factors determining families' access to income, and proposals regarding reform of the income transfer system. The current shape of families in Australia is described in terms of a shift to marriage at a later age; leaving-home behavior of young people; the…

  5. Economic Evaluation of Computerized Structural Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fortin, P. E.

    1985-01-01

    This completed effort involved a technical and economic study of the capabilities of computer programs in the area of structural analysis. The applicability of the programs to NASA projects and to other users was studied. The applications in other industries was explored including both research and development and applied areas. The costs of several alternative analysis programs were compared. A literature search covered applicable technical literature including journals, trade publications and books. In addition to the literature search, several commercial companies that have developed computerized structural analysis programs were contacted and their technical brochures reviewed. These programs include SDRC I-DEAS, MSC/NASTRAN, SCADA, SUPERSAP, NISA/DISPLAY, STAAD-III, MICAS, GTSTRUDL, and STARS. These programs were briefly reviewed as applicable to NASA projects.

  6. Molybdenum Site Structure of MOSC Family Proteins

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Mo K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy has been used to probe as-isolated structures of the MOSC family proteins pmARC-1 and HMCS-CT. The Mo K-edge near-edge spectrum of HMCS-CT is shifted ?2.5 eV to lower energy compared to the pmARC-1 spectrum, which indicates that as-isolated HMCS-CT is in a more reduced state than pmARC-1. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure analysis indicates significant structural differences between pmARC-1 and HMCS-CT, with the former being a dioxo site and the latter possessing only a single terminal oxo ligand. The number of terminal oxo donors is consistent with pmARC-1 being in the MoVI oxidation state and HMCS-CT in the MoIV state. These structures are in accord with oxygen-atom-transfer reactivity for pmARC-1 and persulfide bond cleavage chemistry for HMCS-CT. PMID:25166909

  7. Family Structure versus Family Relationships for Predicting to Substance Use/Abuse and Illegal Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedman, Alfred S.; Terras, Arlene; Glassman, Kimberly

    2000-01-01

    Study looked at sample of African-American adolescent males to determine the degree to which family structure (e.g., single parent vs. two-parent families) vs. the nature of the family relationships predict sons' involvement in substance use/abuse and illegal behavior. Of 33 relationships measures analyzed, 3 predicted the degree of recent…

  8. Family Structure and Mediators of Adolescent Drug Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broman, Clifford L.; Li, Xin; Reckase, Mark

    2008-01-01

    This study investigates how family structure is associated with adolescent drug use and how parenting, peer use, religiosity, and neighborhood problems may mediate the relationship. The authors use structural equation modeling to examine the relationship between family structure and drug use across race, and examine potential mediators. Using data…

  9. EARLY HEAD START Effects of Fathers, Neighborhoods and Family Structure

    E-print Network

    EARLY HEAD START Effects of Fathers, Neighborhoods and Family Structure on Child and Program Start Currently · 664 programs · 55,000 low income families National evaluation · 3,001 families disorder and aggression ­ Depression ­ Alcoholism and other drug abuse · Parental history of relationship

  10. Measuring Social Capital and Its Differentials by Family Structures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ravanera, Zenaida R.; Rajulton, Fernando

    2010-01-01

    Social capital has often been invoked to explain differences in children's well-being by family structure. That is, developmental outcome for children in lone or step parent family is not at par with that of children from intact family because parental investments on children may be lower not only in financial and human capital but also in social…

  11. Mate Availability, Family Formation, and Family Structure among Black Americans in Nonmetropolitan Louisiana 1970-1980.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fossett, Mark A.; Kiecolt, K. Jill

    1990-01-01

    Assesses effects of community sex ratio (of men to women) on rural Black family formation and structure. Ratio directly linked to Black women's marriage prevalence, and inversely linked to women's nonmarital fertility. Concludes ratio a family-structure factor. Suggests social policy implications. Suggests urban ghetto studies be broadened. (TES)

  12. Family Economic Hardship and Progression of Poor Mental Health in Middle-aged Husbands and Wives

    PubMed Central

    Wickrama, K. A. S.; Surjadi, Florensia F.; Lorenz, Frederick O.; Conger, Rand D.; Walker, Catie

    2011-01-01

    Using prospective data from 370 middle-aged husbands and wives during a 12-year period, we investigated the intra-individual and dyadic influence of family economic hardship on the levels of depressive symptoms of husbands and wives over their middle years. The results suggest that family economic hardship during the early middle years contributes to subsequent increase in depressive symptoms of husbands and wives after controlling for family economic hardship in late middle years. Consistent with stress-process theory, economic hardship influences depressive symptoms directly and indirectly through its influence on self-esteem. The results also provided evidence for the scar hypothesis which suggests that depression predicts subsequent level of self-esteem and form a reciprocal process between depressive symptoms and self-esteem over time. In sum, for both husbands and wives, our findings showed that depressive symptoms progress over the middle years through a self-perpetuating reciprocal process between self-esteem and depression initiated by early family economic hardship and through cross-spouse influences involving self-esteem and depressive symptoms. PMID:22577243

  13. Irregular breakfast consumption in adolescence and the family environment: underlying causes by family structure.

    PubMed

    Levin, Kate A; Kirby, Joanna

    2012-08-01

    Data from the 2002, 2006 and 2010 Scottish Health Behaviour in School-aged Children (HBSC) surveys were analysed using logistic multilevel regression for outcome variable irregular breakfast consumption (IBC). IBC prevalence in Scotland was higher among young people from reconstituted and single parent families, and particularly single father families. Family characteristics, found previously to be associated with breakfast consumption, such as number of siblings, perceived parenting, parental involvement and family affluence, differed by family structure. Family structure inequalities in IBC existed, also after adjustment for year and child's sex, age, grade and ethnicity. Across all family structures, IBC was more prevalent at the older age groups, among those who had difficult communication with their parents, and where household routines were infrequent. Greater number of siblings and lower family affluence were associated with higher odds of IBC in single mother and both parent families, while having a second home was associated with higher odds in reconstituted households. Fair parenting and being close to at least one parent was associated with reduced odds of IBC in single mother households, while being close to all parents was in single father households. In single mother homes, having a working mother was also positively associated with IBC. Family structure differences should be considered when addressing irregular breakfast consumption in adolescence. PMID:22446725

  14. Structural studies of Bcl-2-family regulators of apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, P.W. |; Cai, X.; Schiffer, M.

    1996-06-01

    The Bcl-2 family of proteins includes about a dozen different proteins which share two small regions of amino acid homology but otherwise exhibit rather modest sequence similarities. The members of this family function as molecular regulators of apoptosis, some as accelerators of cell death and others as inhibitors of apoptosis. The authors analyzed the predicted secondary structures of Bcl-2-family proteins and found that a series of four amphipathic helices, three short {beta}-strands, and a carboxyl-terminal transmembrane helix were conserved throughout the family. Since the Bcl-2-family proteins do not have homology with any proteins of known three-dimensional structure, it seems likely that the tertiary structure assumed by these conserved Bcl-2-family structural elements will represent a completely new protein fold. The authors have prepared recombinant versions of particular proteins of the Bcl-2-family so that the can analyze their molecular structures experimentally. In addition, since some of the Bcl-2-family members homodimerize, they are using small-zone size-exclusion chromatography to analyze the homodimerization of individual, purified Bcl-2-family proteins in order to determine the association and rate constants for these dimerization reactions using computer-simulation methods previously developed in the group. Since certain of these proteins also interest with each other to form heterodimers, the authors also hope to extend the analyses to similarly analyze the heterodimerization of pairs of purified Bcl-2-family proteins.

  15. Work and Family in the United States: A Policy Initiative. A Report of the Family Policy Panel of the Economic Policy Council of UNA-USA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Association of the United States of America, New York, NY.

    As part of its world employment project, the Economic Policy Council of the United Nations Association of the United States formed the family policy panel to further examine the extent of ongoing changes affecting the family, the workplace, and the economy. In its work, the family policy panel concentrated on five issues considered central to the…

  16. RICE UNIVERSITY Mapping the Structural Landscape of Protein Families

    E-print Network

    Kavraki, Lydia E.

    RICE UNIVERSITY Mapping the Structural Landscape of Protein Families with Geometric Feature Vectors and Cell Biology Houston, Texas December, 2009 #12;ABSTRACT Mapping the Structural Landscape of Protein be used separately or in combination for protein function analysis. The Family-wise Analysis of Sub

  17. [MATCHE: Management Approach to Teaching Consumer and Homemaking Education.] Economically Depressed Areas Strand: Human Development. Module III-E-1: Characteristics of Economically Depressed Areas Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Univ., Fresno. Dept. of Home Economics.

    This competency-based preservice home economics teacher education module on characteristics of economically depressed area families is the first in a set of three modules on human development in economically depressed areas (EDA). (This set is part of a larger set of sixty-seven modules on the Management Approach to Teaching Consumer and…

  18. [MATCHE: Management Approach to Teaching Consumer and Homemaking Education.] Economically Depressed Areas Strand: Human Development. Module III-E-2: The Child and the Economically Depressed Area Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boogaert, John

    This competency-based preservice home economics teacher education module on the child and the economically depressed area family is the second in a set of three modules on human development in economically depressed areas (EDA). (This set is part of a larger set of sixty-seven modules on the Management Approach to Teaching Consumer and Homemaking…

  19. Illusions of Prosperity: America's Working Families in an Age of Economic Insecurity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blau, Joel

    This book examines the political and economic consequences of the United States' growing reliance on the market and the effects that this growing reliance is having on U.S. workers and their families. The following are among the topics discussed in the book's 10 chapters: (1) consequences of the turn to the market (disinvestment, imbalance between…

  20. Family History Screening to Detect Increased Risk for Colorectal Cancer: Conceptual and Economic Considerations

    Cancer.gov

    Family History Screening to Detect Increased Risk for Colorectal Cancer: Conceptual and Economic Considerations Scott D. Ramsey, M.D., Ph.D. (Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center and University of Washington, Seattle, WA) Wylie Burke, M.D.., Ph.D.

  1. Food Stamp Participation of Hired Farmworker Families. Agriculture Economic Report No. 403.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Leslie Whitener; Rowe, Gene

    The Food Stamp Program allows low-income households to purchase a nutritionally adequate diet through normal channels of trade. Because of the generally low income of hired farmworkers, food stamp assistance is an important addition to the economic and nutritional status of these workers and their families. This report presents a socioeconomic…

  2. Toward a More Perfect Union: Basic Skills, Poor Families, and Our Economic Future. Occasional Paper 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berlin, Gordon; Sum, Andrew

    In the 1980s and 1990s important demographic, economic, and social changes will affect the nation's schools, families, and workplaces. In anticipation of these developments, there is renewed interest in formal educational attainment and basic academic skills. A concerted national effort to address the current crisis in basic skills development…

  3. Transitions in family structure and adolescent well-being.

    PubMed

    Spruijt, E; de Goede, M

    1997-01-01

    This article examines the effects of transitions in family structure on physical health, thoughts of suicide, mental health, relational well-being, and employment situation of adolescents from four family structures: stable intact families, conflict intact families, single-parent families, and stepfamilies. Data were used from the Utrecht Study of Adolescent Development (USAD), a study of developments in the life course of young people during the 1990s. Results are presented from over 2,500 respondents between 15 and 24 years of age. Their parents were also interviewed on a number of topics. Transition in family structure after marital problems, divorce, and remarriage does appear to have significant long-term effects on a number of adolescent well-being variables. Young people from single-parent families have the lowest scores on the different indicators; they are more likely to have relational problems and experience unemployment as compared with youngsters from stable intact families. Adolescents from conflict intact families and stepfamilies have moderate scores. These effects remain after controlling for family income, gender, age, and educational level. PMID:9426812

  4. The Family and Family Structure Classification Redefined for the Current Times

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Rahul

    2013-01-01

    The family is a basic unit of study in many medical and social science disciplines. Definitions of family have varied from country to country, and also within country. Because of this and the changing realities of the current times, there is a felt need for redefining the family and the common family structure types, for the purpose of study of the family as a factor in health and other variables of interest. A redefinition of a “family” has been proposed and various nuances of the definition are also discussed in detail. A classification scheme for the various types of family has also been put forward. A few exceptional case scenarios have been envisaged and their classification as per the new scheme is discussed, in a bid to clarify the classification scheme further. The proposed scheme should prove to be of use across various countries and cultures, for broadly classifying the family structure. The unique scenarios of particular cultures can be taken into account by defining region or culture-specific subtypes of the overall types of family structure. PMID:26664832

  5. Family Structure Effects on Maternal and Paternal Parenting in Low-Income Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson-Davis, Christina M.

    2008-01-01

    Using longitudinal data from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Survey, a birth cohort study, this study analyzes the effect of family structure on parenting for 3,402 mothers and 2,615 fathers. To address the problem of omitted variable bias, fixed effects methods are used to control for the presence of time-invariant unobserved…

  6. Economic well-being and children's social adjustment: the role of family process in an ethnically diverse low-income sample.

    PubMed

    Mistry, Rashmita S; Vandewater, Elizabeth A; Huston, Aletha C; McLoyd, Vonnie C

    2002-01-01

    Using latent variable structural equation modeling, a family economic stress model that links economic well-being to child well-being in an ethnically diverse, low-income sample of 419 elementary school-age children was evaluated. The sample was 57% African American and 28% Hispanic, and most families were headed by single mothers. The results provided support for the position that family process is a critical mediator of the effects of economic hardship on children's social adjustment. Lower levels of economic well-being, and the corollary elevated perceptions of economic pressure indirectly affected parenting behavior through an adverse impact on parental psychological well-being. Distressed parents reported feeling less effective and capable in disciplinary interactions with their child and were observed to be less affectionate in parent-child interactions. In turn, less than optimal parenting predicted lower teacher ratings of children's positive social behavior and higher ratings of behavior problems. Multiple-group analyses revealed that the pathways by which economic hardship influences children's behavior appear to operate similarly for boys and girls, and for African American and Hispanic families. PMID:12038561

  7. Financial Structure and Economic Welfare: Applied General Equilibrium Development Economics

    PubMed Central

    Townsend, Robert

    2010-01-01

    This review provides a common framework for researchers thinking about the next generation of micro-founded macro models of growth, inequality, and financial deepening, as well as direction for policy makers targeting microfinance programs to alleviate poverty. Topics include treatment of financial structure general equilibrium models: testing for as-if-complete markets or other financial underpinnings; examining dual-sector models with both a perfectly intermediated sector and a sector in financial autarky, as well as a second generation of these models that embeds information problems and other obstacles to trade; designing surveys to capture measures of income, investment/savings, and flow of funds; and aggregating individuals and households to the level of network, village, or national economy. The review concludes with new directions that overcome conceptual and computational limitations. PMID:21037939

  8. Family-Based Association Tests for Different Family Structures Using Pooled DNA

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Guohua; Zhao, Hongyu

    2015-01-01

    Summary DNA pooling is a cost-effective strategy for genomewise association studies to identify disease genes. In the context of family-based association studies, Risch & Teng (1998) mainly considered families of identical structures to detect associations between genetic markers and disease, and suggested possible approaches to incorporating different family types without a thorough study of their properties. However, families collected in real genetic studies often have different structures and, more importantly, the informativeness of each family structure depends on the disease model which is generally unknown. So there is a need to develop and investigate statistical methods to combine information from diverse family types. In this article, we propose a general strategy to incorporate different family types by assigning each family an “optimal” weight in association tests. In addition, we consider measurement errors in our analysis. When we evaluate our approach under different disease models and measurement errors, we find that our weighting scheme may lead to a substantial reduction in sample size required over the approach suggested by Risch & Teng (1998), and measurement errors may have significant impact on the required sample size when the error rates are not negligible. PMID:15996171

  9. Family Structure and the Intergenerational Transmission of Gender Ideology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Daniel L.; Knoester, Chris

    2011-01-01

    Using data from the National Survey of Families and Households, this study explores how single-parent, stepparent, and two-parent biological family structures may affect the transmission of gender ideology from parents to their adult children. Results indicate that biological parents' ideologies are strong predictors of their children's…

  10. Life Satisfaction and Family Structure among Adolescents in Hong Kong

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kwan, Ying-Keung

    2008-01-01

    Relationships between family structure and perceived life satisfaction in overall life and five domains of the Brief Multidimensional Students' Life Satisfaction Scale, family life, friendships, school experience, myself, and where I live were examined among 4,502 Chinese adolescent secondary school students in Hong Kong. Bivariate analyses showed…

  11. Family Socialization, Economic Self-Efficacy, and the Attainment of Financial Independence in Early Adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jennifer C.; Mortimer, Jeylan T.

    2009-01-01

    The attainment of financial independence is a key marker of the contemporary transition to adulthood. In this study we ask, how do young adults gain the capacity to support themselves? We contend that communication about work in the family during adolescence is an important precursor of economic self-efficacy during adolescence, which is positively associated with financial independence in early adulthood. Drawing upon rich longitudinal data that span adolescence and young adulthood, we first ask whether family communication and socialization practices surrounding work and finances influence the development of ways of thinking about oneself that imply self-reliance and confidence in the economic domain (economic self-efficacy). Second, we assess whether economic self-efficacy, measured during adolescence, has a long-term influence on the transition to adulthood, status attainment, and financial independence. Our findings indicate that direct communications about work with parents foster the development of economic self-efficacy. This positive dimension of the self-concept fosters achievement during the transition to adulthood (e.g., educational achievement, employment status, and income attainment), which, in turn, heighten financial independence in early adulthood. PMID:22025928

  12. Adolescent Risk Behaviours and Mealtime Routines: Does Family Meal Frequency Alter the Association between Family Structure and Risk Behaviour?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levin, Kate A.; Kirby, Joanna; Currie, Candace

    2012-01-01

    Family structure is associated with a range of adolescent risk behaviours, with those living in both parent families generally faring best. This study describes the association between family structure and adolescent risk behaviours and assesses the role of the family meal. Data from the 2006 Health Behaviour in School-Aged Children survey were…

  13. Structure of CD84 Provides Insight into SLAM Family Function

    SciTech Connect

    Yan,Q.; Malashkevich, V.; Fedorov, A.; Fedorov, E.; Cao, E.; Lary, J.; Cole, J.; Nathenson, S.; Almo, S.

    2007-01-01

    The signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM) family includes homophilic and heterophilic receptors that modulate both adaptive and innate immune responses. These receptors share a common ectodomain organization: a membrane-proximal immunoglobulin constant domain and a membrane-distal immunoglobulin variable domain that is responsible for ligand recognition. CD84 is a homophilic family member that enhances IFN-{gamma} secretion in activated T cells. Our solution studies revealed that CD84 strongly self-associates with a K{sub d} in the submicromolar range. These data, in combination with previous reports, demonstrate that the SLAM family homophilic affinities span at least three orders of magnitude and suggest that differences in the affinities may contribute to the distinct signaling behavior exhibited by the individual family members. The 2.0 {angstrom} crystal structure of the human CD84 immunoglobulin variable domain revealed an orthogonal homophilic dimer with high similarity to the recently reported homophilic dimer of the SLAM family member NTB-A. Structural and chemical differences in the homophilic interfaces provide a mechanism to prevent the formation of undesired heterodimers among the SLAM family homophilic receptors. These structural data also suggest that, like NTB-A, all SLAM family homophilic dimers adopt a highly kinked organization spanning an end-to-end distance of {approx}140 {angstrom}. This common molecular dimension provides an opportunity for all two-domain SLAM family receptors to colocalize within the immunological synapse and bridge the T cell and antigen-presenting cell.

  14. Familial and Economic Influences on the Gender-Related Educational and Occupational Aspirations of Rural Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Meece, Judith L.; Askew, Karyl J. S.; Agger, Charlotte A.; Hutchins, Bryan C.; Byun, Soo-yong

    2015-01-01

    Economic, occupational, and social shifts in rural economies have influenced nuanced changes in the educational and occupational aspirations of rural adolescent women and men. However, there is limited contemporary research that examines the aspirations of rural adolescents at the beginning of the 21st century. Drawing on a sample of 8,756 rural adolescents in the United States, we examine how familial, geographic, and economic variables influence gender-related differences in educational and occupational aspirations. Findings revealed significant gender differences, favoring girls, in youth's educational aspirations, occupational aspirations, and aspirations for nontraditional careers. Results highlight the importance of contextual variables such as parental expectations, family income, and motivation variables in predicting gender-related aspirations of rural youth.

  15. Research on spatial economic structure for different economic sectors from a perspective of a complex network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Sen; Yang, Hualei; Cai, Boliang; Yang, Chunxia

    2013-09-01

    The economy system is a complex system, and the complex network is a powerful tool to study its complexity. Here we calculate the economic distance matrices based on annual GDP of nine economic sectors from 1995-2010 in 31 Chinese provinces and autonomous regions,1 then build several spatial economic networks through the threshold method and the Minimal Spanning Tree method. After the analysis on the structure of the networks and the influence of geographic distance, some conclusions are drawn. First, connectivity distribution of a spatial economic network does not follow the power law. Second, according to the network structure, nine economic sectors could be divided into two groups, and there is significant discrepancy of network structure between these two groups. Moreover, the influence of the geographic distance plays an important role on the structure of a spatial economic network, network parameters are changed with the influence of the geographic distance. At last, 2000 km is the critical value for geographic distance: for real estate and finance, the spearman’s rho with l<2000 is bigger than that with l>2000, and the case is opposite for other economic sectors.

  16. The Structure of Galaxies. III. Two Structural Families of Ellipticals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schombert, James M.

    2015-11-01

    Using isophotal radius correlations for a sample of Two Micron All Sky Survey ellipticals, we have constructed a series of template surface brightness profiles to describe the profile shapes of ellipticals as a function of luminosity. The templates are a smooth function of luminosity, yet are not adequately matched to any fitting function supporting the view that ellipticals are weakly nonhomologous with respect to structure. Through comparison to the templates, it is discovered that ellipticals are divided into two families: those well matched to the templates, and a second class of ellipticals with distinctly shallower profile slopes. We refer to this second type of ellipticals as D class, an old morphological designation acknowledging diffuse appearance on photographic material. D ellipticals cover the same range of luminosity, size, and kinematics as normal ellipticals, but maintain a signature of recent equal-mass dry mergers. We propose that normal ellipticals grow after an initial dissipation formation era by accretion of low-mass companions as outlined in hierarchical formation scenarios, while D ellipticals are the result of later equal-mass mergers producing shallow luminosity profiles.

  17. Supersymmetric Structure of two Families of Solitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koller, Andrew; Olshanii, Maxim

    2012-02-01

    Solitons have generated considerable interest in the cold atoms and condensed matter communities. We demonstrate that two families of n-soliton solutions (with n an integer) -- one for the attractive nonlinear Schr"odinger (NLS) equation, and one for the sine-Gordon (sG) equation -- originate from a quantum-mechanical supersymmetric (QM-SUSY) chain connecting a set of reflectionless operators Hn. The families consist of breather-type solitons for NLSootnotetextD. Schrader, IEEE J. Quantum Electron. 31, 2221 (1995). and multi-(anti)kink solitons with specific velocities for sG. The operators Hn, which we refer to as Akulin`s HamiltoniansootnotetextV. M. Akulin, Coherent Dynamics of Complex Quantum Systems (Springer, Heidelberg, 2006)., form reflectionless direct-scattering initial conditions for the inverse scattering method. Such a QM-SUSY chain is analogous to the known connection between QM-SUSY chains of P"oschl-Teller potentials and solitons of the Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equationootnotetextSukumar, J. Phys. A 19, 2297 (1986). The existence of QM-SUSY chains connecting soliton solutions, now for three different integrable nonlinear equations, sheds light on the underlying mechanisms responsible for soliton generation.

  18. Family Structure and Long-Term Care Insurance Purchase

    PubMed Central

    Van Houtven, Courtney Harold; Coe, Norma B.; Konetzka, R. Tamara

    2015-01-01

    While it has long been assumed that family structure and potential sources of informal care play a large role in the purchase decisions for long-term care insurance (LTCI), current empirical evidence is inconclusive. Our study examines the relationship between family structure and LTCI purchase and addresses several major limitations of the prior literature by using a long panel of data and considering modern family relationships, such as presence of stepchildren. We find that family structure characteristics from one’s own generation, particularly about one’s spouse, are associated with purchase, but that few family structure attributes from the younger generation have an influence. Family factors that may indicate future caregiver supply are negatively associated with purchase: having a coresidential child, signaling close proximity, and having a currently working spouse, signaling a healthy and able spouse, that LTC planning has not occurred yet, or that there is less need for asset protection afforded by LTCI. Dynamic factors, such as increasing wealth or turning 65, are associated with higher likelihood of LTCI purchase. PMID:25760583

  19. Environmental Disaster and Economic Change: Do tropical cyclones have permanent effects on economic growth and structure?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jina, A.; von der Goltz, J.; Hsiang, S. M.

    2011-12-01

    Natural disasters have important, often devastating, effects upon economic growth and well-being. Due to this, disasters have become an active area of recent research and policy attention. However, much of this research has been narrowly focused, relying on anecdotal evidence and aggregated data to support conclusions about disaster impacts in the short-term. Employing a new global data set of tropical cyclone exposure from 1960 to 2008, we investigate in greater detail whether permanent changes in economic performance and structure can result from these extreme events in some cases. Our macro-economic analyses use the World Development Indicator dataset and have shown promising results: there are dramatic long-term economic transformations associated with tropical cyclones across a number of countries and industries. This effect is most clearly seen in Small Island Developing States (SIDS) and some countries in Latin America, where negative changes in long-term growth trends are observed in the years following a large tropical cyclone. In many economies with a high exposure to tropical cyclone damage, there are noticeable structural changes within the economy. The impacts of disasters might be expressed through various economic and social channels, through direct loss of lives and infrastructure damage; for instance, the destruction of infrastructure such as ports may damage export opportunities where replacement capital is not readily available. These structural changes may have far-reaching implications for economic growth and welfare. Larger nations subjected to the impacts of tropical cyclones are thought to be able to relocate economically important activities that are damaged by cyclones, and so long-term trend changes are not observed, even for events that cause a large immediate decrease in national productivity. By investigating in a more rigorous fashion the hypothesis that the environment triggers these permanent economic changes, our work has implications for the conceptual foundations of both economic theory and sustainable development.

  20. Polygynous Contexts, Family Structure, and Infant Mortality in sub-Saharan Africa

    PubMed Central

    Smith-Greenaway, Emily; Trinitapoli, Jenny

    2014-01-01

    Contextual characteristics influence infant mortality above and beyond family-level factors. The widespread practice of polygyny is one feature of many sub-Saharan African contexts that may be relevant to understanding patterns of infant mortality. Building on evidence that the prevalence of polygyny reflects broader economic, social, and cultural features, and has implications for how families engage in the practice, we investigate whether and how the prevalence of polygyny (1) spills over to elevate infant mortality for all families, and (2) conditions the survival disadvantage for children living in polygynous families (i.e., compared to monogamous families). We use data from Demographic and Health Surveys to estimate multilevel hazard models that identify associations between infant mortality and region-level prevalence of polygyny among 236,336 children in 260 subnational regions across 29 sub-Saharan African countries. We find little evidence that the prevalence of polygyny influences mortality for infants in non-polygynous households net of region-level socioeconomic factors and gender inequality. However, the prevalence of polygyny significantly amplifies the survival disadvantage for infants in polygynous families. Our findings demonstrate that considering the broader marital context reveals important insights into the relationship between family structure and child wellbeing. PMID:24402794

  1. The inter-alpha-inhibitor family: from structure to regulation.

    PubMed Central

    Salier, J P; Rouet, P; Raguenez, G; Daveau, M

    1996-01-01

    Inter-alpha-inhibitor (IalphaI) and related molecules, collectively referred to as the IalphaI family, are a group of plasma protease inhibitors. They display attractive features such as precursor polypeptides that give rise to mature chains with quite distinct fates and functions, and inter-chain glycosaminoglycan bonds within the various molecules. The discovery of an ever growing number of such molecules has raised pertinent questions about their pathophysiological functions. The knowledge of this family has long been structure-oriented, whereas the structure/function and structure/regulation relationships of the family members and their genes have been largely ignored. These relationships are now being elucidated in events such as gene transcription, precursor processing, changes in plasma protein levels in health and disease and binding capacities that involve hyaluronan as well as other plasma proteins as ligands. This review presents some recent progress made in these fields that paves the way for an understanding of the functions of IalphaI family members in vivo. Finally, given the wealth of heterogeneous, complicated and sometimes contradictory nomenclatures and acronyms currently in use for this family, a new, uniform, nomenclature is proposed for IalphaI family genes, precursor polypeptides and assembled proteins. PMID:8670091

  2. Economics of Condensing Gas Furnaces and Water Heaters Potential in Residential Single Family Homes

    SciTech Connect

    Lekov, Alex; Franco, Victor; Meyers, Steve

    2010-05-14

    Residential space and water heating accounts for over 90percent of total residential primary gas consumption in the United States. Condensing space and water heating equipment are 10-30percent more energy-efficient than conventional space and water heating. Currently, condensing gas furnaces represent 40 percent of shipments and are common in the Northern U.S. market. Meanwhile, manufacturers are planning to develop condensing gas storage water heaters to qualify for Energy Star? certification. Consumers, installers, and builders who make decisions about installing space and water heating equipment generally do not perform an analysis to assess the economic impacts of different combinations and efficiencies of space and water heating equipment. Thus, equipment is often installed without taking into consideration the potential life-cycle economic and energy savings of installing space and water heating equipment combinations. Drawing on previous and current analysis conducted for the United States Department of Energy rulemaking on amended standards for furnaces and water heaters, this paper evaluates the extent to which condensing equipment can provide life-cycle cost-effectiveness in a representative sample of single family American homes. The economic analyses indicate that significant energy savings and consumer benefits may result from large-scale introduction of condensing water heaters combined with condensing furnaces in U.S. residential single-family housing, particularly in the Northern region. The analyses also shows that important benefits may be overlooked when policy analysts evaluate the impact of space and water heating equipment separately.

  3. Family Structure and Unintended Teen Pregnancy. Healthy Moms, Healthy Kids: A Series on Maternal and Child Health in Colorado

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado Children's Campaign, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Family structure and maternal age at birth can have a significant influence on the physical, mental and economic well-being of mothers and their children. Children born to single mothers in poverty are more likely to face unemployment as adults, drop out of high school and encounter barriers to accessing quality health care. Children of teen…

  4. Family environment and the interrelation of family structure, child behavior, and metabolic control for children with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Overstreet, S; Goins, J; Chen, R S; Holmes, C S; Greer, T; Dunlap, W P; Frentz, J

    1995-08-01

    Examined perceptions of the family environment in a cross-regional sample of 90 families who had children with diabetes and 89 controls. Families were classified as either traditional (intact) or nontraditional (single-parent or blended families). Parents of children with diabetes reported less family expressiveness, which was a predictor of clinically higher levels of child behavior problems than controls. Parents in nontraditional families reported lower levels of organization, less emphasis on active-recreational pursuits, and more child behavior problems than traditional families. An additive effect of diabetes and nontraditional family structure was found for children with diabetes from nontraditional families, who reported substantially less cohesion than all other groups. Nontraditional family structure was more disruptive for children with diabetes than for controls; it was the best predictor of behavior problems and was related to poorer metabolic control. PMID:7666287

  5. Adolescent risk behaviours and mealtime routines: does family meal frequency alter the association between family structure and risk behaviour?

    PubMed

    Levin, Kate A; Kirby, Joanna; Currie, Candace

    2012-02-01

    Family structure is associated with a range of adolescent risk behaviours, with those living in both parent families generally faring best. This study describes the association between family structure and adolescent risk behaviours and assesses the role of the family meal. Data from the 2006 Health Behaviour in School-Aged Children survey were modelled using Multilevel Binomial modelling for six risk behaviour outcomes. Significantly more children from 'both parent' families ate a family meal every day and fewer 'hardly ever or never' did. Family structure was associated with boys' and girls' smoking, drinking, cannabis use and having sex and with girls' fighting. Frequency of eating a family meal was associated with a reduced likelihood of all risk behaviours among girls and all but fighting and having sex among boys. Eating a family meal regularly nullified the association between family structure and drinking alcohol for boys and girls and cannabis use for boys and reduced the effect size of alternative family structures on boys having sex and smoking. The family meal, associated with a reduced likelihood of many adolescent risk behaviours, reduces or eliminates the association with family structure and may therefore help to overcome inequalities in adolescent risk behaviours. PMID:21900407

  6. Contextual Risk, Maternal Negative Emotionality, and the Negative Emotion Dysregulation of Preschool Children from Economically Disadvantaged Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Eleanor D.; Ackerman, Brian P.

    2011-01-01

    Research Findings: This study examined relations between contextual risk, maternal negative emotionality, and preschool teacher reports of the negative emotion dysregulation of children from economically disadvantaged families. Contextual risk was represented by cumulative indexes of family and neighborhood adversity. The results showed a direct…

  7. Divorce, Family Structure, and the Academic Success of Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeynes, William

    The goal of this book is to examine the relationship between parental family structure, especially parental divorce and/or remarriage, and the academic achievement of children. Much has been written about the need to raise the academic achievement of students from minority backgrounds. However, minority is often defined in terms of skin color and…

  8. Structuring Formal Requirements Specifications for Reuse and Product Families

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heimdahl, Mats P. E.

    2001-01-01

    In this project we have investigated how formal specifications should be structured to allow for requirements reuse, product family engineering, and ease of requirements change, The contributions of this work include (1) a requirements specification methodology specifically targeted for critical avionics applications, (2) guidelines for how to structure state-based specifications to facilitate ease of change and reuse, and (3) examples from the avionics domain demonstrating the proposed approach.

  9. Family structure as a predictor of screen time among youth

    PubMed Central

    McMillan, Rachel; McIsaac, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The family plays a central role in the development of health-related behaviors among youth. The objective of this study was to determine whether non-traditional parental structure and shared custody arrangements predict how much time youth spend watching television, using a computer recreationally, and playing video games. Participants were a nationally representative sample of Canadian youth (N = 26,068) in grades 6–10 who participated in the 2009/10 Health Behaviour in School-aged Children Survey. Screen time in youth from single parent and reconstituted families, with or without regular visitation with their non-residential parent, was compared to that of youth from traditional dual-parent families. Multiple imputation was used to account for missing data. After multiple imputation, the relative odds of being in the highest television, computer use, video game, and total screen time quartiles were not different in boys and girls from non-traditional families by comparison to boys and girls from traditional dual-parent families. In conclusion, parental structure and child custody arrangements did not have a meaningful impact on screen time among youth. PMID:26137429

  10. Retention of Economics Principles by Undergraduates on Alternative Curricular Structures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Daniel K. N.; Lybecker, Kristina M.; Taylor, Corrine H.

    2011-01-01

    The authors investigated whether the curricular structure of an economics course (semester, trimester, or compressed block schedule) has an effect on an undergraduate's subsequent retention of course material, while controlling for other relevant differences. They tested separately for theoretical or process comprehension and for graphical…

  11. Collisional family structure within the Nysa-Polana complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dykhuis, Melissa J.; Greenberg, Richard

    2015-05-01

    The Nysa-Polana complex is a group of low-inclination asteroid families in the inner main belt, bounded in semimajor axis by the Mars-crossing region and the Jupiter 3:1 mean-motion resonance. This group is important as the most likely source region for the target of the OSIRIS-REx mission, (101955) Bennu; however, family membership in the region is complicated by the presence of several dynamically overlapping families with a range of surface reflectance properties. The large S-type structure in the region appears to be associated with the parent body (135) Hertha, and displays an (eP,aP) correlation consistent with a collision event near true anomaly of ?180° with ejecta velocity vej ? 285m /s . The ejecta distribution from a collision with these orbital properties is predicted to have a maximum semimajor axis dispersion of ?aej = 0.005 ± 0.008AU , which constitutes only a small fraction (7%) of the observed semimajor axis dispersion, the rest of which is attributed to the Yarkovsky effect. The age of the family is inferred from the Yarkovsky dispersion to be 300-50+60 My. Objects in a smaller cluster that overlaps the large Hertha family in proper orbital element space have reflectance properties more consistent with the X-type (135) Hertha than the surrounding S-type family. These objects form a distinct Yarkovsky "V" signature in (aP, H) space, consistent with a more recent collision, which appears to also be dynamically connected to (135) Hertha. Production of two families with different reflectance properties from a single parent could result from the partial differentiation of the parent, shock darkening effects, or other causes. The Nysa-Polana complex also contains a low-albedo family associated with (142) Polana (called "New Polana" by Walsh et al. (Walsh, K.J. et al. [2013]. Icarus 225, 283-297)), and two other low-albedo families associated with (495) Eulalia. The second Eulalia family may be a high-aP , low-eP , low-iP component of the first Eulalia family-forming collision, possibly explained by an anisotropic ejection field.

  12. A zeolite family with expanding structural complexity and embedded isoreticular structures.

    PubMed

    Guo, Peng; Shin, Jiho; Greenaway, Alex G; Min, Jung Gi; Su, Jie; Choi, Hyun June; Liu, Leifeng; Cox, Paul A; Hong, Suk Bong; Wright, Paul A; Zou, Xiaodong

    2015-08-01

    The prediction and synthesis of new crystal structures enable the targeted preparation of materials with desired properties. Among porous solids, this has been achieved for metal-organic frameworks, but not for the more widely applicable zeolites, where new materials are usually discovered using exploratory synthesis. Although millions of hypothetical zeolite structures have been proposed, not enough is known about their synthesis mechanism to allow any given structure to be prepared. Here we present an approach that combines structure solution with structure prediction, and inspires the targeted synthesis of new super-complex zeolites. We used electron diffraction to identify a family of related structures and to discover the structural 'coding' within them. This allowed us to determine the complex, and previously unknown, structure of zeolite ZSM-25 (ref. 8), which has the largest unit-cell volume of all known zeolites (91,554 cubic ångströms) and demonstrates selective CO2 adsorption. By extending our method, we were able to predict other members of a family of increasingly complex, but structurally related, zeolites and to synthesize two more-complex zeolites in the family, PST-20 and PST-25, with much larger cell volumes (166,988 and 275,178 cubic ångströms, respectively) and similar selective adsorption properties. Members of this family have the same symmetry, but an expanding unit cell, and are related by hitherto unrecognized structural principles; we call these family members embedded isoreticular zeolite structures. PMID:26176918

  13. A zeolite family with expanding structural complexity and embedded isoreticular structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Peng; Shin, Jiho; Greenaway, Alex G.; Min, Jung Gi; Su, Jie; Choi, Hyun June; Liu, Leifeng; Cox, Paul A.; Hong, Suk Bong; Wright, Paul A.; Zou, Xiaodong

    2015-08-01

    The prediction and synthesis of new crystal structures enable the targeted preparation of materials with desired properties. Among porous solids, this has been achieved for metal-organic frameworks, but not for the more widely applicable zeolites, where new materials are usually discovered using exploratory synthesis. Although millions of hypothetical zeolite structures have been proposed, not enough is known about their synthesis mechanism to allow any given structure to be prepared. Here we present an approach that combines structure solution with structure prediction, and inspires the targeted synthesis of new super-complex zeolites. We used electron diffraction to identify a family of related structures and to discover the structural `coding' within them. This allowed us to determine the complex, and previously unknown, structure of zeolite ZSM-25 (ref. 8), which has the largest unit-cell volume of all known zeolites (91,554 cubic ångströms) and demonstrates selective CO2 adsorption. By extending our method, we were able to predict other members of a family of increasingly complex, but structurally related, zeolites and to synthesize two more-complex zeolites in the family, PST-20 and PST-25, with much larger cell volumes (166,988 and 275,178 cubic ångströms, respectively) and similar selective adsorption properties. Members of this family have the same symmetry, but an expanding unit cell, and are related by hitherto unrecognized structural principles; we call these family members embedded isoreticular zeolite structures.

  14. Economically Disadvantaged Children’s Transitions Into Elementary School: Linking Family Processes, School Contexts, and Educational Policy

    PubMed Central

    Crosnoe, Robert; Cooper, Carey E.

    2010-01-01

    Working from a core perspective on the developmental implications of economic disadvantage, this study attempted to identify family-based mechanisms of economic effects on early learning and their potential school-based remedies. Multilevel analysis of the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study–Kindergarten Cohort revealed that the accumulation of markers of economic disadvantage reduced math and reading testing gains across the primary grades. Such disparities were partially mediated by corresponding differences in children’s socioemotional problems, parenting stress, and parents’ human capital investments. These patterns appeared to be robust to observed and unobserved confounds. Various teacher qualifications and classroom practices were assessed as moderators of these family mediators, revealing teacher experience in grade level as a fairly consistent buffer against family-based risks for reading. PMID:20711417

  15. Structural and Energetic Characterization of the Ankyrin Repeat Protein Family

    PubMed Central

    Parra, R. Gonzalo; Espada, Rocío; Verstraete, Nina; Ferreiro, Diego U.

    2015-01-01

    Ankyrin repeat containing proteins are one of the most abundant solenoid folds. Usually implicated in specific protein-protein interactions, these proteins are readily amenable for design, with promising biotechnological and biomedical applications. Studying repeat protein families presents technical challenges due to the high sequence divergence among the repeating units. We developed and applied a systematic method to consistently identify and annotate the structural repetitions over the members of the complete Ankyrin Repeat Protein Family, with increased sensitivity over previous studies. We statistically characterized the number of repeats, the folding of the repeat-arrays, their structural variations, insertions and deletions. An energetic analysis of the local frustration patterns reveal the basic features underlying fold stability and its relation to the functional binding regions. We found a strong linear correlation between the conservation of the energetic features in the repeat arrays and their sequence variations, and discuss new insights into the organization and function of these ubiquitous proteins. PMID:26691182

  16. Female genital structures in several families of Centropagoidea (Copepoda: Calanoida)

    PubMed Central

    Barthélémy, R.-M.

    1998-01-01

    The female genital structures of 21 calanoid species belonging to the families Candaciidae, Centropagidae, Pontellidae, Sulcanidae, Temoridae and Tortanidae were studied using light and electron microscopy (scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy). Except the monotypic Sulcanidae, their organization conforms to a common pattern characterized by egg-laying ducts opening through paired adjacent gonopores into a small cavity, the genital atrium, covered by a genital operculum and opening to the outside through a distal atrial slit. No seminal receptacle is present and the seminal products must be stored for a brief period in the genital atrium.The genital structures occupy a well delimited genital area, the main changes in which concern their position on the ventral face of the genital double-somite, and operculum morphology. Their organization and possible mode of operation are compared with those of other calanoid families. A possible correlation between absence of seminal receptacles and mating behaviour is discussed.

  17. Strong sustainability in Nepal: A structural economics approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devkota, Surendra R.

    This dissertation analyzes the sustainability of the economy of Nepal. The main empirical question addressed is whether the Tenth Plan of Nepal (2002--2007) will meet its projected economic output goal and achieve its primary goal of reducing poverty. To this end, economic growth scenarios are examined in terms of availability of energy demand and supply, and income disparity among different households. The structure of the Nepali economy is examined using a Leontief input-output table, a Ghosian supply-side input-output table, and a social accounting matrix for the year 1999. Based on the input-output analysis of energy demand and supply for the 10th Plan, it is unlikely that energy requirements of the projected output will be met, unless some extra sources of energy are developed. Households need to switch their energy use from fuel wood/biomass to other alternatives. In order to meet the target of the Plan vis-a-vis energy demand or supply, a few policy measures are urgently needed, though some of these options require many years to develop. Household income inequality and distribution is examined through the SAM multipliers; namely aggregate, transfer, open-loop, and closed-loop multipliers. The investment-income multiplier scenarios for the 10th Plan indicate that the nominal income of households may increase due to the increased investment, which will not necessarily improve the bottom deciles households, particularly socio-economically deprived households. Economic growth in Nepal during the past fifty years demonstrates that the modernization model is unsuccessful. Economic growth occurred at some centers at the cost of periphery. A huge regional disparity has developed between hills and plains, east and west, city and rural areas. Nepal's persistent poverty indicates a failure of modernization theory. The Tenth Plan would be another continuation of a failed legacy, unless social and natural endowments are considered for sustainability. Nepal could be an example of a poor country moving along a path toward strong sustainability. To this end, a sincere intervention at the social and natural capital along with economic growth is necessary. Poverty alleviation efforts should target the socio-economically deprived households by enriching their human capital. Since community based social structures, such as the forest user groups, are already setting an example of strong sustainability, such community based social capital initiatives should be encouraged by granting rights and other resources to augment further economic activities like harnessing hydropower that may eventually transform the socio-ecological-economic system.

  18. Reducing Risk for Substance Use by Economically Disadvantaged Young Men: Positive Family Environments and Pathways to Educational Attainment.

    PubMed

    Martin, Monica J; Conger, Rand D; Sitnick, Stephanie L; Masarik, April S; Forbes, Erika E; Shaw, Daniel S

    2015-11-01

    Using prospective, longitudinal data spanning 10 years (age = 10-20) from a study of 295 economically disadvantaged males, the current investigation evaluated a developmental model that links early family environment and later educational aspirations, extracurricular activities, and educational attainment to substance use in early adulthood. The results indicate that a positive family environment during adolescence (low family conflict, high family warmth, and effective child management) predicted educational involvements during adolescence that promoted educational attainment during early adulthood. Finally, higher levels of educational attainment were associated with less substance use in early adulthood, even after controlling for adolescent substance use. These findings suggest that positive parenting promotes educational achievements that increase resilience to substance use for economically disadvantaged males. PMID:26307026

  19. New families of human regulatory RNA structures identified by comparative analysis of vertebrate genomes

    E-print Network

    Kellis, Manolis

    Regulatory RNA structures are often members of families with multiple paralogous instances across the genome. Family members share functional and structural properties, which allow them to be studied as a whole, facilitating ...

  20. The genetic and environmental foundations of political, psychological, social, and economic behaviors: a panel study of twins and families.

    PubMed

    Hatemi, Peter K; Smith, Kevin; Alford, John R; Martin, Nicholas G; Hibbing, John R

    2015-06-01

    Here we introduce the Genetic and Environmental Foundations of Political and Economic Behaviors: A Panel Study of Twins and Families (PIs Alford, Hatemi, Hibbing, Martin, and Smith). This study was designed to explore the genetic and environmental influences on social, economic, and political behaviors and attitudes. It involves identifying the psychological mechanisms that operate on these traits, the heritability of complex economic and political traits under varying conditions, and specific genetic correlates of attitudes and behaviors. In addition to describing the study, we conduct novel analyses on the data, estimating the heritability of two traits so far unexplored in the extant literature: Machiavellianism and Baron-Cohen's Empathizing Quotient. PMID:25994545

  1. Relationship Between Family Economic Resources, Psychosocial Well-being, and Educational Preferences of AIDS-Orphaned Children in Southern Uganda: Baseline Findings

    PubMed Central

    Ssewamala, Fred M.; Nabunya, Proscovia; Ilic, Vilma; Mukasa, Miriam N.; Ddamulira, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the relationship between economic resources, psychosocial well-being, and educational preferences of AIDS-orphaned children in southern Uganda. We use baseline data from a sample of 1410 AIDS-orphaned children (defined as children who have lost one or both biological parents to AIDS) enrolled in the Bridges to the Future study, a National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) funded study. Analyses from both bivariate and multiple regression analyses indicate the following: 1) despite the well-documented economic and psychosocial challenges AIDS-orphaned children face, many of these children have high educational plans and aspirations; 2) educational aspirations differ by orphanhood status (double orphan vs. single orphan); 3) regardless of orphanhood status, children report similar levels of psychosocial well-being; 4) high levels of family cohesion, positive perceptions of the future, school satisfaction, and lower levels of hopelessness (hopefulness) are associated with high educational aspirations; and 5) reported family economic resources at baseline, all seem to play a role in predicting children's educational preferences and psychosocial well-being. These findings suggest that the focus for care and support of orphaned children should not be limited to addressing their psychosocial needs. Addressing the economic needs of the households in which orphaned children live is equally important. Indeed, in the context of extreme poverty—in which most of the children represented in this study live—addressing structural factors, including poverty, may be a key driver in addressing their psychosocial functioning. PMID:26146601

  2. Family planning and contraceptive decision-making by economically disadvantaged, African-American women

    PubMed Central

    Hodgson, Eric J.; Collier, Charlene; Hayes, Laura; Curry, Leslie; Fraenkel, Liana

    2013-01-01

    Background Significant racial disparities exist in the US unplanned pregnancy rate. We conducted a qualitative study using the theory of planned behavior as a framework to describe how low-income, African-American women approach family planning. Study Design Structured focus groups were held with adult, low-income, non-pregnant, African-American women in Connecticut. Data were collected using a standardized discussion guide, and audio-taped and transcribed. Four, independent researchers coded the transcripts using the constant comparative method. Codes were organized into over-arching themes. Results Contraceptive knowledge was limited with formal education often occurring after sexual debut. Attitudes about contraception were overtly negative with method effectiveness being judged by the experience of side effects. Family and friends strongly influence contraceptive decisions while male partners are primarily seen as a barrier. Contraceptive pills are perceived as readily accessible although compliance is considered a barrier. Conclusions Contraception education should occur before sexual debut, should involve trusted family and community members, and should positively frame issues in terms of achieving life goals. PMID:23177266

  3. Psychological Stress and Parenting Behavior among Chinese Families: Findings from a Study on Parent Education for Economically Disadvantaged Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lam, Ching Man

    2011-01-01

    With the recognition of the crucial role of family and with the belief that parents have the greatest influence on a child's life, family and parent education has been widely practiced in Hong Kong and many other countries as measure for poverty alleviation. A study, employed quantitative method of a cross-sectional parent survey (N = 10,386) was…

  4. Economic Disadvantage, Perceived Family Life Quality, and Emotional Well-Being in Chinese Adolescents: A Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shek, Daniel T. L.

    2008-01-01

    Over three consecutive years, Chinese secondary school students experiencing and not experiencing economic disadvantage (n = 280 and 2,187, respectively) responded to measures of perceived family life quality (parenting attributes and parent-child relational quality) and emotional well-being (hopelessness, mastery, life satisfaction and…

  5. Reducing Risk for Substance Use by Economically Disadvantaged Young Men: Positive Family Environments and Pathways to Educational Attainment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Monica J.; Conger, Rand D.; Sitnick, Stephanie L.; Masarik, April S.; Forbes, Erika E.; Shaw, Daniel S.

    2015-01-01

    Using prospective, longitudinal data spanning 10 years (age = 10-20) from a study of 295 economically disadvantaged males, the current investigation evaluated a developmental model that links early family environment and later educational aspirations, extracurricular activities, and educational attainment to substance use in early adulthood. The…

  6. Growing up as "Man of the House": Adultification and Transition into Adulthood for Young Men in Economically Disadvantaged Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roy, Kevin; Messina, Lauren; Smith, Jocelyn; Waters, Damian

    2014-01-01

    Many children in economically disadvantaged communities assume adult roles in their families. Negotiating the responsibilities and expectations associated with becoming what some young men describe as "man of the house" has important implications for how adolescent boys move into adulthood. In this study, we share insights from field…

  7. The venus kinase receptor (VKR) family: structure and evolution

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTK) form a family of transmembrane proteins widely conserved in Metazoa, with key functions in cell-to-cell communication and control of multiple cellular processes. A new family of RTK named Venus Kinase Receptor (VKR) has been described in invertebrates. The VKR receptor possesses a Venus Fly Trap (VFT) extracellular module, a bilobate structure that binds small ligands to induce receptor kinase activity. VKR was shown to be highly expressed in the larval stages and gonads of several invertebrates, suggesting that it could have functions in development and/or reproduction. Results Analysis of recent genomic data has allowed us to extend the presence of VKR to five bilaterian phyla (Platyhelminthes, Arthropoda, Annelida, Mollusca, Echinodermata) as well as to the Cnidaria phylum. The presence of NveVKR in the early-branching metazoan Nematostella vectensis suggested that VKR arose before the bilaterian radiation. Phylogenetic and gene structure analyses showed that the 40 receptors identified in 36 animal species grouped monophyletically, and likely evolved from a common ancestor. Multiple alignments of tyrosine kinase (TK) and VFT domains indicated their important level of conservation in all VKRs identified up to date. We showed that VKRs had inducible activity upon binding of extracellular amino-acids and molecular modeling of the VFT domain confirmed the structure of the conserved amino-acid binding site. Conclusions This study highlights the presence of VKR in a large number of invertebrates, including primitive metazoans like cnidarians, but also its absence from nematodes and chordates. This little-known RTK family deserves to be further explored in order to determine its evolutionary origin, its possible interest for the emergence and specialization of Metazoa, and to understand its function in invertebrate development and/or reproductive biology. PMID:23721482

  8. Economic consequences of population size, structure and growth.

    PubMed

    Lee, R

    1983-01-01

    There seems to be 4 major approaches to conceptualizing and modeling demographic influences on economic and social welfare. These approaches are combined in various ways to construct richer and more comprehensive models. The basic approaches are: demographic influences on household or family behavior; population growth and reproducible capital; population size and fixed factors; and population and advantages of scale. These 4 models emphasize the supply side effects of population. A few of the ways in which these theories have been combined are sketched. Neoclassical growth models often have been combined with age distributed populations of individuals (or households), assumed to pursue optimal life cycle consumption and saving. In some well known development models, neoclassical growth models for the modern sector are linked by labor markets and migration to fixed factor (land) models of the traditional (agricultural) sector. A whole series of macro simulation models for developed and developing countries was based on single sector neoclassical growth models with age distributed populations. Yet, typically the household level foundations of assumed age distribution effects were not worked out. Simon's (1977) simulation models are in a class by themselves, for they are the only models that attempt to incorporate all the kinds of effects discussed. The economic demography of the individual and family cycle, as it is affected by regimes of fertility, mortality, and nuptiality, taken as given, are considered. The examination touches on many of the purported consequences of aggregate population growth and age composition, since so many of these are based implicitly or explicitly on assertions about micro level behavior. Demographic influences on saving and consumption, on general labor supply and female labor supply, and on problems of youth and old age dependency frequently fall in this category. Finally, attention is focused specifically on macro economic issues in the consequences of population in both developed and developing countries. In general cross national studies have failed to provide rough and stylized depiction of the consequences of rapid population growth, unless the absence of significant results is itself the result. PMID:12179534

  9. Structural Mechanisms of Allostery and Autoinhibition in JNK Family Kinases

    SciTech Connect

    Laughlin, J.D.; Nwachukwu, J.C.; Figuera-Losada, M.; Cherry, L.; Nettles, K.W.; LoGrasso, P.V.

    2012-12-05

    c-Jun N-terminal (JNK) family kinases have a common peptide-docking site used by upstream activating kinases, substrates, scaffold proteins, and phosphatases, where the ensemble of bound proteins determines signaling output. Although there are many JNK structures, little is known about mechanisms of allosteric regulation between the catalytic and peptide-binding sites, and the activation loop, whose phosphorylation is required for catalytic activity. Here, we compare three structures of unliganded JNK3 bound to different peptides. These were compared as a class to structures that differ in binding of peptide, small molecule ligand, or conformation of the kinase activation loop. Peptide binding induced an inhibitory interlobe conformer that was reversed by alterations in the activation loop. Structure class analysis revealed the subtle structural mechanisms for allosteric signaling between the peptide-binding site and activation loop. Biochemical data from isothermal calorimetry, fluorescence energy transfer, and enzyme inhibition demonstrated affinity differences among the three peptides that were consistent with structural observations.

  10. The Effects of Economic and Social Stressors on Parenting and Adolescent Adjustment of African-American Families. CEIC Research Brief, No. 109.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Ronald

    This study examines economic and social stressors and their effects on the parenting styles and adolescent adjustment of African American families. It systematically characterizes and explains the nature of some of the chronic economic and social stressors experienced by poor African American families as they affect parenting and adolescent…

  11. Family Structure and Adolescent Alcohol Use Problems: Extending Popular Explanations to American Indians.

    PubMed

    Eitle, Tamela McNulty; Johnson-Jennings, Michelle; Eitle, David J

    2013-11-01

    Competing explanations of the relationship between family structure and alcohol use problems are examined using a sample of American Indian adolescents from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health. Living in a single-parent family is found to be a marker for the unequal distribution of stress exposure and parental alcohol use, but the effects of other family structures like non-parent families and the presence of under 21-year-old extended family or non-family members emerge or remain as risk or protective factors for alcohol use problems after a consideration of SES, family processes, peer socialization, and social stress. In particular, a non-parent family structure that has not been considered in prior research emerged as a protective family structure for American Indian adolescent alcohol use problems. PMID:24014896

  12. Modeling the hydrologic and economic efficacy of stormwater utility credit programs for US single family residences.

    PubMed

    Kertesz, Ruben; Green, Olivia Odom; Shuster, William D

    2014-01-01

    As regulatory pressure to reduce the environmental impact of urban stormwater intensifies, US municipalities increasingly seek a dedicated source of funding for stormwater programs, such as a stormwater utility. In rare instances, single family residences are eligible for utility discounts for installing green infrastructure. This study examined the hydrologic and economic efficacy of four such programs at the parcel scale: Cleveland (OH), Portland (OR), Fort Myers (FL), and Lynchburg (VA). Simulations were performed to model the reduction in stormwater runoff by implementing bioretention on a typical residential property according to extant administrative rules. The EPA National Stormwater Calculator was used to perform pre- vs post-retrofit comparisons and to demonstrate its ease of use for possible use by other cities in utility planning. Although surface slope, soil type and infiltration rate, impervious area, and bioretention parameters were different across cities, our results suggest that modeled runoff volume was most sensitive to percent of total impervious area that drained to the bioretention cell, with soil type the next most important factor. Findings also indicate a persistent gap between the percentage of annual runoff reduced and the percentage of fee reduced. PMID:25500463

  13. The adipokinetic hormone family in Chrysomeloidea: structural and functional considerations *

    PubMed Central

    Gäde, Gerd; Marco, Heather G.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The presented work is a hybrid of an overview and an original research paper on peptides belonging to the adipokinetic hormone (AKH) family that are present in the corpora cardiaca of Chrysomeloidea. First, we introduce the AKH/red pigment-concentrating hormone (RPCH) peptide family. Second, we collate the available primary sequence data on AKH peptides in Cerambycidae and Chrysomelidae, and we present new sequencing data (from previously unstudied species) obtained by liquid-chromatography coupled with ion trap electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry. Our expanded data set encompasses the primary structure of AKHs from seven species of Cerambycidae and three species of Chrysomelidae. All of these species synthesise the octapeptide code-named Peram-CAH-I (pGlu-Val-Asn-Phe-Ser-Pro-Asn-Trp amide). Whereas this is the sole AKH peptide in Cerambycidae, Chrysomelidae demonstrate a probable event of AKH gene duplication, thereby giving rise to an additional AKH. This second AKH peptide may be either Emppe-AKH (pGlu-Val-Asn-Phe-Thr-Pro-Asn-Trp amide) or Peram-CAH-II (pGlu-Leu-Thr-Phe-Thr-Pro-Asn-Trp amide). The peptide distribution and structural data suggest that both families are closely related and that Peram-CAH-I is the ancestral peptide. We hypothesise on the molecular evolution of Emppe-AKH and Peram-CAH-II from the ancestral peptide due to nonsynonymous missense single nucleotide polymorphism in the nucleotide coding sequence of prepro-AKH. Finally, we review the biological significance of the AKH peptides as hyperprolinaemic hormones in Chrysomeloidea, i.e. they cause an increase in the circulating concentration of proline. The mobilisation of proline has been demonstrated during flight in both cerambycid and chrysomelid beetles. PMID:22303105

  14. Relations between Minuchin's Structural Family Model and Kohut's Self-Psychology Constructs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perosa, Linda

    1996-01-01

    Examines relationship between structural family model and self-psychology constructs. College women (n=164) completed the Structural Family Interaction Scale-Revised (SFIS-R), the Parental Relations Inventory, and the Goal Instability and Superiority scales from the Self-Expression Inventory. Indicated that women raised in families with strong…

  15. The Energy Economics of Financial Structuring for Renewable Energy Projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rana, Vishwajeet

    2011-12-01

    This dissertation focuses on the various financial structuring options for the renewable energy sector. The projects in this sector are capital-intensive to build but have relatively low operating costs in the long run when compared to traditional energy resources. The large initial capital requirements tend to discourage investors. To encourage renewable investments the government needs to provide financial incentives. Since these projects ultimately generate returns, the government's monetary incentives go to the sponsors and tax equity investors who build and operate such projects and invest capital in them. These incentives are usually in the form of ITCs, PTCs and accelerated depreciation benefits. Also, in some parts of the world, carbon credits are another form of incentive for the sponsors and equity investors to invest in such turnkey projects. The relative importance of these various considerations, however, differs from sponsor to sponsor, investor to investor and from project to project. This study focuses mainly on the US market, the federal tax benefits and incentives provided by the government. This study focuses on the energy economics that are used for project decision-making and parties involved in the transaction as: Project Developer/Sponsor, Tax equity investor, Debt investor, Energy buyer and Tax regulator. The study fulfils the knowledge gap in the decision making process that takes advantage of tax monetization in traditional after-tax analysis for renewable energy projects if the sponsors do not have the tax capacity to realize the total benefits of the project. A case-study for a wind farm, using newly emerging financial structures, validates the hypothesis that these renewable energy sources can meet energy industry economic criteria. The case study also helps to validate the following hypotheses: a) The greater a sponsor's tax appetite, the tower the sponsor's equity dilution. b) The use of leverage increases the cost of equity financing and the financing fee. c) Capital contributions by the sponsor are not relevant to the rate of return (IRR) over the life of the project. Overall conclusion is that financial structures can have a major impact on renewable energy, meeting energy demand in an economic manner. At the end, the dissertation lays down the foundation for future research that can be conducted in this field. Key Words: Renewable energy investments, structured finance, financial structuring

  16. Path Toward Economic Resilience for Family Caregivers: Mitigating Household Deprivation and the Health Care Talent Shortage at the Same Time

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Melissa A.

    2013-01-01

    Rising costs and a workforce talent shortage are two of the health care industry’s most pressing challenges. In particular, serious illnesses often impose significant costs on individuals and their families, which can place families at an increased risk for multigenerational economic deprivation or even an illness–poverty trap. At the same time, family caregivers often acquire a wide variety of health care skills that neither these caregivers nor the health care industry typically use. As these skills are marketable and could be paired with many existing medical certifications, this article describes a possible “path toward economic resilience” (PER) through a program whereby family caregivers could find meaningful employment using their new skills. The proposed program would identify ideal program candidates, assess and supplement their competencies, and connect them to the health care industry. We provide a set of practical steps and recommended tools for implementation, discuss pilot data on the program’s appeal and feasibility, and raise several considerations for program development and future research. Our analysis suggests that this PER program could appeal to family caregivers and the health care industry alike, possibly helping to address two of our health care system’s most pressing challenges with one solution. PMID:23633216

  17. Family Policy in Hungary: How to Improve the Reconciliation between Work and Family? OECD Economics Department Working Papers, No. 566

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hemmings, Philip

    2007-01-01

    Hungarian family policy focuses on providing generous options to take time off work to look after children. This system not only contributes to Hungary's low employment rate but encourages long separation from the labour market, has largely failed to significantly influence fertility rates and is relatively expensive to run. This paper looks at…

  18. Between Hope and Hard Times: New York's Working Families in Economic Distress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischer, David J.; Colton, Tara; Kleiman, Neil S.; Schimke, Karen

    2004-01-01

    Today, many jobs that once could support a family barely suffice to keep that family out of poverty. The implied bargain America offers its citizens is supposed to be that anyone who works hard and plays by the rules can support his or her family and move onward and upward. But for millions of New Yorkers, that bargain is out of reach; the uphill…

  19. All in the Family? The Structure and Meaning of Family Life among Young People

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turtiainen, Pirjo; Karvonen, Sakari; Rahkonen, Ossi

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this article is to explore young people's everyday family life with special reference to the use of time. First, we ask what kinds of activities young people engage in with their families, what kinds of families spend most time together, and whether this has changed over time. These analyses were based on two surveys conducted in the…

  20. Economic Evaluation of Single-Family-Residence Solar-Energy Installation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Long-term economic performance of a commercial solar-energy system was analyzed and used to predict economic performance at four additional sites. Analysis described in report was done to demonstrate viability of design over a broad range of environmental/economic conditions. Report contains graphs and tables that present evaluation procedure and results. Also contains appendixes that aid in understanding methods used.

  1. Structural conditionality of the piezoelectric properties of langasite family crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Dudka, A. P. Simonov, V. I.

    2011-11-15

    The atomic displacements upon isomorphic substitutions in crystals of the langasite family have been analyzed. The thermal parameters are determined and the probability density function of atoms is analyzed. Local potential energy minima are found which can be occupied by atoms under external effects. The contributions of cations in all four independent crystallographic positions and anions in all three such positions to the piezoelectric properties are established. One specific structural feature is the constant (at isomorphic substitutions) or possible (under external effects) but always opposite displacements of two cations along symmetry axis 2. Large cations in eight-vertex polyhedra make the main contribution to the piezoelectric properties. The cations in the tetrahedra on symmetry axis 2 weaken these properties. The cations in the octahedra in the origin of coordinates and in the tetrahedra on symmetry axes 3 only slightly affect the piezoelectricity.

  2. The Extended Granin Family: Structure, Function, and Biomedical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Bartolomucci, Alessandro; Possenti, Roberta; Mahata, Sushil K.; Fischer-Colbrie, Reiner; Loh, Y. Peng

    2011-01-01

    The chromogranins (chromogranin A and chromogranin B), secretogranins (secretogranin II and secretogranin III), and additional related proteins (7B2, NESP55, proSAAS, and VGF) that together comprise the granin family subserve essential roles in the regulated secretory pathway that is responsible for controlled delivery of peptides, hormones, neurotransmitters, and growth factors. Here we review the structure and function of granins and granin-derived peptides and expansive new genetic evidence, including recent single-nucleotide polymorphism mapping, genomic sequence comparisons, and analysis of transgenic and knockout mice, which together support an important and evolutionarily conserved role for these proteins in large dense-core vesicle biogenesis and regulated secretion. Recent data further indicate that their processed peptides function prominently in metabolic and glucose homeostasis, emotional behavior, pain pathways, and blood pressure modulation, suggesting future utility of granins and granin-derived peptides as novel disease biomarkers. PMID:21862681

  3. Different effects of economic and structural performance indexes on model construction of structural topology optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, G. L.; Sui, Y. K.

    2015-10-01

    The objective and constraint functions related to structural optimization designs are classified into economic and performance indexes in this paper. The influences of their different roles in model construction of structural topology optimization are also discussed. Furthermore, two structural topology optimization models, optimizing a performance index under the limitation of an economic index, represented by the minimum compliance with a volume constraint (MCVC) model, and optimizing an economic index under the limitation of a performance index, represented by the minimum weight with a displacement constraint (MWDC) model, are presented. Based on a comparison of numerical example results, the conclusions can be summarized as follows: (1) under the same external loading and displacement performance conditions, the results of the MWDC model are almost equal to those of the MCVC model; (2) the MWDC model overcomes the difficulties and shortcomings of the MCVC model; this makes the MWDC model more feasible in model construction; (3) constructing a model of minimizing an economic index under the limitations of performance indexes is better at meeting the needs of practical engineering problems and completely satisfies safety and economic requirements in mechanical engineering, which have remained unchanged since the early days of mechanical engineering.

  4. Technology Development Benefits and the Economics Breakdown Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, Eric J.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes the construction and application of the EBS (Economics Breakdown Structure) in evaluating technology investments across multiple systems and organizations, illustrated with examples in space transportation technology. The United States Government (USG) has a long history of investing in technology to enable its missions. Agencies such as the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the Department of Defense (DoD) have evaluated their technology development programs primarily on their effects on mission performance and cost. More and more, though, USG agencies are being evaluated on their technology transfer to the commercial sector. In addition, an increasing number of USG missions are being accomplished by industry-led or joint efforts, where the USG provides technology and funding but tasks industry with development and operation of the mission systems.

  5. STRUCTURAL ECONOMIC CHANGE AND INTERNATIONAL MIGRATION FROM MEXICO AND POLAND

    PubMed Central

    Massey, Douglas S.; Kalter, Frank; Pren, Karen A.

    2010-01-01

    In this article we use uniquely comparable data sets from two very different settings to examine how exogenous economic transformations affect the likelihood and selectivity of international out-migration. Specifically, we use data from the Mexican Migration Project to construct event history files predicting first U.S. trips from seven communities in the state of Veracruz, which until recently sent very few migrants abroad. Similarly, using data from the Polish Migration Project, we derive comparable event history files predicting first trips to Germany from four Polish communities, which also sent few migrants abroad before the 1980s. Our analyses suggest that the onset of structural adjustment in both places had a significant effect in raising the probability of international migration, even when controlling for a set of standard variables specified by other theories to influence migration propensity, such as the size of the binational income gap and various indicators of human and social capital. PMID:21765550

  6. Structuring economic incentives to reduce emissions from deforestation within Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Busch, Jonah; Lubowski, Ruben N; Godoy, Fabiano; Steininger, Marc; Yusuf, Arief A; Austin, Kemen; Hewson, Jenny; Juhn, Daniel; Farid, Muhammad; Boltz, Frederick

    2012-01-24

    We estimate and map the impacts that alternative national and subnational economic incentive structures for reducing emissions from deforestation (REDD+) in Indonesia would have had on greenhouse gas emissions and national and local revenue if they had been in place from 2000 to 2005. The impact of carbon payments on deforestation is calibrated econometrically from the pattern of observed deforestation and spatial variation in the benefits and costs of converting land to agriculture over that time period. We estimate that at an international carbon price of $10/tCO(2)e, a "mandatory incentive structure," such as a cap-and-trade or symmetric tax-and-subsidy program, would have reduced emissions by 163-247 MtCO(2)e/y (20-31% below the without-REDD+ reference scenario), while generating a programmatic budget surplus. In contrast, a "basic voluntary incentive structure" modeled after a standard payment-for-environmental-services program would have reduced emissions nationally by only 45-76 MtCO(2)e/y (6-9%), while generating a programmatic budget shortfall. By making four policy improvements--paying for net emission reductions at the scale of an entire district rather than site-by-site; paying for reductions relative to reference levels that match business-as-usual levels; sharing a portion of district-level revenues with the national government; and sharing a portion of the national government's responsibility for costs with districts--an "improved voluntary incentive structure" would have been nearly as effective as a mandatory incentive structure, reducing emissions by 136-207 MtCO(2)e/y (17-26%) and generating a programmatic budget surplus. PMID:22232665

  7. Structuring economic incentives to reduce emissions from deforestation within Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Busch, Jonah; Lubowski, Ruben N.; Godoy, Fabiano; Steininger, Marc; Yusuf, Arief A.; Austin, Kemen; Hewson, Jenny; Juhn, Daniel; Farid, Muhammad; Boltz, Frederick

    2012-01-01

    We estimate and map the impacts that alternative national and subnational economic incentive structures for reducing emissions from deforestation (REDD+) in Indonesia would have had on greenhouse gas emissions and national and local revenue if they had been in place from 2000 to 2005. The impact of carbon payments on deforestation is calibrated econometrically from the pattern of observed deforestation and spatial variation in the benefits and costs of converting land to agriculture over that time period. We estimate that at an international carbon price of $10/tCO2e, a “mandatory incentive structure,” such as a cap-and-trade or symmetric tax-and-subsidy program, would have reduced emissions by 163–247 MtCO2e/y (20–31% below the without-REDD+ reference scenario), while generating a programmatic budget surplus. In contrast, a “basic voluntary incentive structure” modeled after a standard payment-for-environmental-services program would have reduced emissions nationally by only 45–76 MtCO2e/y (6–9%), while generating a programmatic budget shortfall. By making four policy improvements—paying for net emission reductions at the scale of an entire district rather than site-by-site; paying for reductions relative to reference levels that match business-as-usual levels; sharing a portion of district-level revenues with the national government; and sharing a portion of the national government's responsibility for costs with districts—an “improved voluntary incentive structure” would have been nearly as effective as a mandatory incentive structure, reducing emissions by 136–207 MtCO2e/y (17–26%) and generating a programmatic budget surplus. PMID:22232665

  8. Three Studies in Industrial Economics: Competition and Industry Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keil, Jan

    Chapter 1 reviews alternative theories of competition - the standard Neoclassical view, the contribution of the Chicago School as well as the two dynamic lines of thought which are part of Austrian economics and Classical Political Economy. The latter is presented as a consistent alternative to the other existing theories. Of special interest is the question if and how industry structure matters in these approaches, how profitability differentials are explained and what role market share concentration and mobility barriers play. Their predictions and implications for empirical research are compared. Ways to test and evaluate these different approaches are described. Chapter 2 investigates econometrically how industry and micro level variables determine persistent differentials in the rate of return on assets in the U.S. The analysis is the first to use business segment data to explain long term profitability differentials. It presents new market concentration indicators that are superior to concentration ratios and allow to analyze an unpreceded amount of concentration and other data back to 1977. Critical concentration levels, non-linearities, interaction effects and previously ignored important control variables like industrial unionization are being considered. Concentration is found to have significant negative effects on profitability differentials. Barrier indicators are insignificant while market shares are positively correlated with long-run profitability. Concentration thus increases, not diminishes the degree of industrial competition. This is interpreted as evidence in support of Classical Political Economic competition theory. Chapter 3 presents a costs of production based industry analytical study that aims at consistency with Classical Political Economic thought. It investigates how growth of renewable electricity in Germany forces conventional power plants to shift towards more flexible operating regimes. The simulation of individual power plant load uses different current and future as well as alternative price and energy policy scenarios, four years of 15-minute interval data on system and renewable load as well as an unpreceded degree of detail on plant cost structures and technical characteristics. I find that the costs of electricity generation of cleaner, flexible thermal plants are positively effected by the transition. The competitiveness of inflexible baseload plants falls as they become more expensive than renewables. Lignite and nuclear power turns out to be unsuited to supplement renewable energy: a future exit reduces the average costs of electricity generation from conventional plants.

  9. Structure and Function of SLC4 Family HCO3- Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ying; Yang, Jichun; Chen, Li-Ming

    2015-01-01

    The solute carrier SLC4 family consists of 10 members, nine of which are HCO3- transporters, including three Na+-independent Cl?/HCO3- exchangers AE1, AE2, and AE3, five Na+-coupled HCO3- transporters NBCe1, NBCe2, NBCn1, NBCn2, and NDCBE, as well as “AE4” whose Na+-dependence remains controversial. The SLC4 HCO3- transporters play critical roles in pH regulation and transepithelial movement of electrolytes with a broad range of demonstrated physiological relevances. Dysfunctions of these transporters are associated with a series of human diseases. During the past decades, tremendous amount of effort has been undertaken to investigate the topological organization of the SLC4 transporters in the plasma membrane. Based upon the proposed topology models, mutational and functional studies have identified important structural elements likely involved in the ion translocation by the SLC4 transporters. In the present article, we review the advances during the past decades in understanding the structure and function of the SLC4 transporters. PMID:26648873

  10. The war at home: affective economics and transnationally adoptive families in the United States.

    PubMed

    Stryker, Rachael

    2011-01-01

    The question of how to best conduct post-placement interventions for transnationally adoptive families at risk of dissolution (legal annulment) is an emerging issue in the United States. The current popular trend for adoptive families to pursue biomedical post-placement interventions, despite a lack of proof that such interventions actually work to keep the adoptive family intact, suggests the need for a more phenomenological approach to understanding both adoptive parents’ and transnational adoptees’ post-placement experiences. This study examines the empirical experiences of adoptive families at risk of dissolution in the United States who attempt to define and navigate the path toward family stability after adopting. From the coding of this data set emerge some routes through and by which emotions circulate between adoptive parents and transnational adoptees through the family body and the family social. Particularly, it investigates one post-placement “affective economy” at work in which adoptive parents attempt, through the expression of particular forms of parental love, to align adoptees as subjects of the private, nuclear American family, while adoptees more often attempt to create space for more heterogeneous forms of family, ones that include birth parents and other kin-like relations in their countries of origin. Ultimately, it illuminates some vastly different and sometimes contradictory ways that adoptive parents and adoptees can interpret family through emotional lenses, ones that can prevent a smooth post-placement transition for adoption actors. An understanding of these differences and how they shape, and are shaped by, the post-placement affective economy within families at risk of dissolution may aid in locating indicators for adoption dissolution, and possibly, designing more effective post-placement interventions for families struggling in the aftermath of adoption. It may also help scholars begin to think about the construction and impact of affective economies in the realm of adoption more generally. PMID:22180883

  11. Does Family Structure Affect Children's Educational Outcomes? NBER Working Paper Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollak, Robert A.; Ginther, Donna K.

    This paper examines correlations between children's educational outcomes and family structure. Although popular discussions focus on distinctions between two-parent and single-parent families, earlier research shows that outcomes for stepchildren are similar to outcomes for children in single-parent families, and earlier researchers suggested that…

  12. Family Structure and Functions Identified by Persons Living with HIV/AIDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong-Wylie, Gina; Doherty-Poirier, Maryanne; Kieren, Dianne

    1999-01-01

    A study looked at the structural and functional aspects of family from the perspective of six people living with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) or human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Results showing how HIV/AIDS affects all members of the sufferer's family have implications for family practitioners. (Author/JOW)

  13. A computably stable structure with no Scott family of nitary formulas

    E-print Network

    Shore, Richard A.

    A computably stable structure with no Scott family of #12;nitary formulas Peter Cholak Department is relatively computably categorical if and only if it has a computably enumerable Scott family of #12;nitary that there is a computably stable rigid graph which does not have a Scott family of #12;nitary formulas. Therefore, any

  14. A Guide for Planning Performance-Based Family Education in Home Economics Education Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina State Dept. of Education, Columbia. Office of Vocational Education.

    This guide has been developed in order to help secondary teachers to plan a two-level, performance-based semester course on family life. Each of the levels is organized into units based on competencies. Level 1 covers self-understanding, the family in perspective, interpersonal relations, solutions to crises, community resources, and establishing…

  15. Identification of Tasks in Home Economics Related Occupations: Family and Community Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iowa State Univ. of Science and Technology, Ames. Dept. of Home Economics Education.

    The study of task identification in family and community services presents statistical correlations of task frequencies obtained by questionnaire for the occupations of visiting homemaker or homemaker home/health aide, family planning health aide, counselor on alcoholism, management aide in low-income housing projects, deputy juvenile probation…

  16. The measurement and prevalence of an ideational model of family and economic development in Nepal

    PubMed Central

    Thornton, Arland; Ghimire, Dirgha J.; Mitchell, Colter

    2012-01-01

    This paper is motivated by the expectation that developmental idealism has been disseminated to ordinary people and affects family behavior. Developmental idealism is a belief and value system that endorses societal and family development, views societal and family development as occurring together, and suggests that modern families are causes and consequences of societal development. We use data collected in Nepal in 2003 to examine the understandings of ordinary people and show that Nepalis can discuss ideas about development and its relationship to family life and that developmental idealism has been widely disseminated in Nepal. Developmental idealism is related in predictable ways to education, work experience, rural-urban residence, and mass media exposure. Although research ascertaining the influence of developmental idealism on demographic decision-making and behavior would be valuable, we cannot evaluate this with our one-time crossectional data, but our data and theory suggest that this influence may be substantial. PMID:22963536

  17. [Structural, developmental and functional evaluation of the family of individuals with arterial hypertension].

    PubMed

    Radovanovic, Cremilde Aparecida Trindade; Cecilio, Hellen Pollyanna Mantelo; Marcon, Sonia Silva

    2013-03-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the structure, development and functionality of the family that suffers from arterial hypertension. This is a qualitative study, developed with two families using the Calgary Model of Family Evaluation. It proposes the use of three categories of analysis: structural developmental and functional, and the use of a genogram and an ecomap. The two families are nuclear, however one is formed by the couple and their three sons who are married and reside in different homes. The other is a single-parent family established by the mother and children. The married son resides at another house in the same backyard with wife and daughter The application of the model of family evaluation allowed knowing the aspects related to the structure, operation and development of the two families that interfere impair or favor the development of the care in their quotidian. PMID:23781723

  18. The National Forum on Family Security: Social Economic Factors and Human Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keating, D.; Mustard, J. Fraser

    Social and economic influences significantly affect the development of competence, health, and well-being in modern society. During periods of profound social and economic change, such as the present, some sectors of society are often at very high risk of encountering a decline of social support and hence inadequate nurturance of developmental…

  19. Structure Analysis Uncovers a Highly Diverse but Structurally Conserved Effector Family in Phytopathogenic Fungi.

    PubMed

    de Guillen, Karine; Ortiz-Vallejo, Diana; Gracy, Jérome; Fournier, Elisabeth; Kroj, Thomas; Padilla, André

    2015-10-01

    Phytopathogenic ascomycete fungi possess huge effector repertoires that are dominated by hundreds of sequence-unrelated small secreted proteins. The molecular function of these effectors and the evolutionary mechanisms that generate this tremendous number of singleton genes are largely unknown. To get a deeper understanding of fungal effectors, we determined by NMR spectroscopy the 3-dimensional structures of the Magnaporthe oryzae effectors AVR1-CO39 and AVR-Pia. Despite a lack of sequence similarity, both proteins have very similar 6 ?-sandwich structures that are stabilized in both cases by a disulfide bridge between 2 conserved cysteins located in similar positions of the proteins. Structural similarity searches revealed that AvrPiz-t, another effector from M. oryzae, and ToxB, an effector of the wheat tan spot pathogen Pyrenophora tritici-repentis have the same structures suggesting the existence of a family of sequence-unrelated but structurally conserved fungal effectors that we named MAX-effectors (Magnaporthe Avrs and ToxB like). Structure-informed pattern searches strengthened this hypothesis by identifying MAX-effector candidates in a broad range of ascomycete phytopathogens. Strong expansion of the MAX-effector family was detected in M. oryzae and M. grisea where they seem to be particularly important since they account for 5-10% of the effector repertoire and 50% of the cloned avirulence effectors. Expression analysis indicated that the majority of M. oryzae MAX-effectors are expressed specifically during early infection suggesting important functions during biotrophic host colonization. We hypothesize that the scenario observed for MAX-effectors can serve as a paradigm for ascomycete effector diversity and that the enormous number of sequence-unrelated ascomycete effectors may in fact belong to a restricted set of structurally conserved effector families. PMID:26506000

  20. Structure Analysis Uncovers a Highly Diverse but Structurally Conserved Effector Family in Phytopathogenic Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Gracy, Jérome; Fournier, Elisabeth; Kroj, Thomas; Padilla, André

    2015-01-01

    Phytopathogenic ascomycete fungi possess huge effector repertoires that are dominated by hundreds of sequence-unrelated small secreted proteins. The molecular function of these effectors and the evolutionary mechanisms that generate this tremendous number of singleton genes are largely unknown. To get a deeper understanding of fungal effectors, we determined by NMR spectroscopy the 3-dimensional structures of the Magnaporthe oryzae effectors AVR1-CO39 and AVR-Pia. Despite a lack of sequence similarity, both proteins have very similar 6 ?-sandwich structures that are stabilized in both cases by a disulfide bridge between 2 conserved cysteins located in similar positions of the proteins. Structural similarity searches revealed that AvrPiz-t, another effector from M. oryzae, and ToxB, an effector of the wheat tan spot pathogen Pyrenophora tritici-repentis have the same structures suggesting the existence of a family of sequence-unrelated but structurally conserved fungal effectors that we named MAX-effectors (Magnaporthe Avrs and ToxB like). Structure-informed pattern searches strengthened this hypothesis by identifying MAX-effector candidates in a broad range of ascomycete phytopathogens. Strong expansion of the MAX-effector family was detected in M. oryzae and M. grisea where they seem to be particularly important since they account for 5–10% of the effector repertoire and 50% of the cloned avirulence effectors. Expression analysis indicated that the majority of M. oryzae MAX-effectors are expressed specifically during early infection suggesting important functions during biotrophic host colonization. We hypothesize that the scenario observed for MAX-effectors can serve as a paradigm for ascomycete effector diversity and that the enormous number of sequence-unrelated ascomycete effectors may in fact belong to a restricted set of structurally conserved effector families. PMID:26506000

  1. Economic penalties and rewards of family formation, gender and education in the low-income sector in Germany.

    PubMed

    Aisenbrey, Silke

    2009-03-01

    This article examines the differential effects of changes in family formations on men's and women's economic vulnerability. The motivating question is whether investments in education provide sufficient resources to escape the risk of poverty in the low-income sector or if changes in household characteristics are more important determinants of one's living standard. Changes in household characteristics are defined in terms of partners' entry into and exit from households and partners' different labour market profiles. The analysis focuses on households in the low-income sector in Germany, a population that is at high risk of poverty in a social welfare state that is expected to mitigate the effects of changes in family formation independent of gender. Findings from panel regression analysis demonstrate that women, in contrast to men, benefit economically as much as or more from investing in traditional family formations than in their own labour market position. This is especially the case for women with lower levels of education. PMID:19317679

  2. The Effects of Family Structure on African American Adolescents' Marijuana Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mandara, Jelani; Rogers, Sheba Y.; Zinbarg, Richard E.

    2011-01-01

    The relationship between family structure and marijuana use throughout adolescence was assessed among 1,069 African Americans from the NLSY. A model was also tested suggesting that the effects of family structure on marijuana use would be mediated by poverty, neighborhood quality, and adolescents' self-control. As most prior studies have found,…

  3. Family Structure and Income during the Stages of Childhood and Subsequent Prosocial Behavior in Young Adulthood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bandy, Robert; Ottoni-Wilhelm, Mark

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated whether family structure transition and low income are risk factors in the development of prosocial behavior. Models of young adults' prosocial behavior--charitable giving and volunteering--were estimated as functions of their family structure and income during the stages of childhood. Participants were a representative…

  4. Associations between Children's Physical Activities, Sedentary Behaviours and Family Structure: A Sequential Mixed Methods Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quarmby, T.; Dagkas, S.; Bridge, M.

    2011-01-01

    This mixed method paper explored the effect of family structure on children's physical activities and sedentary pursuits. It furthers the limited understanding of how family structure impacts on children's time in, and reasons behind engaging in, certain physical activities. Children from three inner city comprehensive schools in the Midlands,…

  5. Parental Discord vs. Family Structure: Effects of Divorce on the Self-Esteem of Daughters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Barbara H.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of family structure and parental discord on the self-esteem of 199 female undergraduates were investigated. Family structure and happiness ratings were substantially related, with those separated rated as less happy. Parental discord appeared to lower the self-esteem of daughters, whereas separation of parents did not. (Author/LMO)

  6. Does Family Structure Matter? A Domain-Specific Examination of Identity Exploration and Commitment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartoszuk, Karin; Pittman, Joe F.

    2010-01-01

    This exploratory study examines identity exploration and commitment in different domains and how family structure (original/alternative), gender, and age affect these processes in a convenience sample of 388 college students. Results reveal that participants from alternative family structures explore more in the political and gender role domains…

  7. The measurement and prevalence of an ideational model of family and economic development in Nepal.

    PubMed

    Thornton, Arland; Ghimire, Dirgha J; Mitchell, Colter

    2012-11-01

    Developmental idealism (DI) is a system of beliefs and values that endorses modern societies and families and sees them as occurring together, with modern families as causes and consequences of societal development. This study was motivated by the belief that the population of Nepal has absorbed these ideas and that the ideas affect their family behaviour. We use data collected in Nepal in 2003 to show that Nepalis discuss ideas about development and its relationship to family life and that DI has been widely accepted. It is related in predictable ways to education, paid employment, rural-urban residence, and mass media exposure. Although it would be useful to know its influence on demographic decision-making and behaviour, we cannot evaluate this with our one-time cross-sectional survey. Our data and theory suggest that this influence may be substantial. PMID:22963536

  8. Energy and the Structure of Social System: Significance for Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keefe, Dennis R.

    The purpose of the paper is to present a model and suggest hypotheses relating the family as a social system to the concepts of human and natural energy. Human energy is interpreted as the capacity of humans, in this case, family members, for doing work and natural energy as resources such as natural gas, carbon dioxide, and heat. A behavioral…

  9. The Effects of a School-Family-Community Partnership on the Academic Achievement, High School Graduation, and College Enrollment Rate of Economically Disadvantaged Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Yvette

    2012-01-01

    A school-family-community partnership to improve student achievement was examined at a comprehensive high school located in a low income urban community in Long Island City, New York. In this causal comparative analyses study, the researcher examines the effect of a school-family-community partnership on the educational outcomes of economically

  10. Entry Number: 1 GB DAILY DIARY LINKS AMONG FAMILY STRUCTURE, FAMILY CONTEXTUAL

    E-print Network

    within a family. Paradoxically, this role-reversal, referred to as parentification, has also been linked. Covariates will include age, gender, duration of parentification experience, birth order, age of onset

  11. Comprehensive Family-Centered Training Programs: Five Comparative Case Studies. Evaluation of the Mountain-Plains Education & Economic Development Program, Inc.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bale, Richard L.; Sprague, C. Fremont

    The Mountain-Plains Education & Economic Development Program, which exemplifies the comprehensive, residential family-centered approach to serving the economically disadvantaged, was compared to four similar programs in the United States: Arizona Job Colleges (AJC) in Arizona; Madera Employment Training Center (METC) in California; Manpower,…

  12. Economic disadvantage and transitional outcomes: a study of young people from low-income families in Hong Kong

    PubMed Central

    Ngai, Steven Sek Yum; Cheung, Jacky Chau-Kiu; To, Siu-ming; Luan, Hui; Zhao, Ruiling

    2014-01-01

    This study draws on data from focus groups involving 50 young people from low-income families in Hong Kong to investigate their school-to-work experiences. In line with the ecological–developmental perspective, our results show that contextual influences, including lower levels of parental involvement and lack of opportunities for further education or skill development, constrain both the formulation and pursuit of educational and career goals. In contrast, service use and supportive interactions with parents and non-family adults were found to help young people find a career direction and foster more adaptive transition. Furthermore, our results indicate a striking difference in intrapersonal agency and coping styles between youths who were attending further education or engaged in jobs with career advancement opportunities and those who were not. We discuss the implications of our findings, both for future research and for policy development to enhance the school-to-work transition of economically disadvantaged young people. PMID:25364087

  13. Letter knowledge in parent–child conversations: differences between families differing in socio-economic status

    PubMed Central

    Robins, Sarah; Ghosh, Dina; Rosales, Nicole; Treiman, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    When formal literacy instruction begins, around the age of 5 or 6, children from families low in socioeconomic status (SES) tend to be less prepared than children from families of higher SES. The goal of our study is to explore one route through which SES may influence children's early literacy skills: informal conversations about letters. The study builds on previous studies (Robins and Treiman, 2009; Robins et al., 2012, 2014) of parent–child conversations that show how U. S. parents and their young children talk about writing and provide preliminary evidence about similarities and differences in parent–child conversations as a function of SES. Focusing on parents and children aged three to five, we conducted five separate analyses of these conversations, asking whether and how family SES influences the previously established patterns. Although we found talk about letters in both upper and lower SES families, there were differences in the nature of these conversations. The proportion of letter talk utterances that were questions was lower in lower SES families and, of all the letter names that lower SES families talked about, more of them were uttered in isolation rather than in sequences. Lower SES families were especially likely to associate letters with the child's name, and they placed more emphasis on sequences in alphabetic order. We found no SES differences in the factors that influenced use of particular letter names (monograms), but there were SES differences in two-letter sequences (digrams). Focusing on the alphabet and on associations between the child's name and the letters within it may help to interest the child in literacy activities, but they many not be very informative about the relationship between letters and words in general. Understanding the patterns in parent–child conversations about letters is an important first step for exploring their contribution to children's early literacy skills and school readiness. PMID:25009516

  14. Letter knowledge in parent-child conversations: differences between families differing in socio-economic status.

    PubMed

    Robins, Sarah; Ghosh, Dina; Rosales, Nicole; Treiman, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    When formal literacy instruction begins, around the age of 5 or 6, children from families low in socioeconomic status (SES) tend to be less prepared than children from families of higher SES. The goal of our study is to explore one route through which SES may influence children's early literacy skills: informal conversations about letters. The study builds on previous studies (Robins and Treiman, 2009; Robins et al., 2012, 2014) of parent-child conversations that show how U. S. parents and their young children talk about writing and provide preliminary evidence about similarities and differences in parent-child conversations as a function of SES. Focusing on parents and children aged three to five, we conducted five separate analyses of these conversations, asking whether and how family SES influences the previously established patterns. Although we found talk about letters in both upper and lower SES families, there were differences in the nature of these conversations. The proportion of letter talk utterances that were questions was lower in lower SES families and, of all the letter names that lower SES families talked about, more of them were uttered in isolation rather than in sequences. Lower SES families were especially likely to associate letters with the child's name, and they placed more emphasis on sequences in alphabetic order. We found no SES differences in the factors that influenced use of particular letter names (monograms), but there were SES differences in two-letter sequences (digrams). Focusing on the alphabet and on associations between the child's name and the letters within it may help to interest the child in literacy activities, but they many not be very informative about the relationship between letters and words in general. Understanding the patterns in parent-child conversations about letters is an important first step for exploring their contribution to children's early literacy skills and school readiness. PMID:25009516

  15. Economics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, L. D.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of the economic aspects of water pollution control covering publications of 1976-77. This review also includes the policy issues of water management. A list of 77 references is presented. (HM)

  16. Can One-Parent Families or Divorced Families Produce Two-Language Children? An Investigation into How Portuguese-English Bilingual Children Acquire Biliteracy within Diverse Family Structures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Obied, Vicky Macleroy

    2010-01-01

    This article examines the emergence of biliteracy in school-aged Portuguese-English bilingual children growing up within diverse family structures in Portugal. The ethnographic research investigated the premise that some children have the opportunity to acquire biliteracy, like their bilingualism, in naturalistic contexts. There are gaps in…

  17. An estimated 5% of new protein structures solved today represent a new Pfam family

    SciTech Connect

    Mistry, Jaina; Kloppmann, Edda; Rost, Burkhard; Punta, Marco

    2013-11-01

    This study uses the Pfam database to show that the sequence redundancy of protein structures deposited in the PDB is increasing. The possible reasons behind this trend are discussed. High-resolution structural knowledge is key to understanding how proteins function at the molecular level. The number of entries in the Protein Data Bank (PDB), the repository of all publicly available protein structures, continues to increase, with more than 8000 structures released in 2012 alone. The authors of this article have studied how structural coverage of the protein-sequence space has changed over time by monitoring the number of Pfam families that acquired their first representative structure each year from 1976 to 2012. Twenty years ago, for every 100 new PDB entries released, an estimated 20 Pfam families acquired their first structure. By 2012, this decreased to only about five families per 100 structures. The reasons behind the slower pace at which previously uncharacterized families are being structurally covered were investigated. It was found that although more than 50% of current Pfam families are still without a structural representative, this set is enriched in families that are small, functionally uncharacterized or rich in problem features such as intrinsically disordered and transmembrane regions. While these are important constraints, the reasons why it may not yet be time to give up the pursuit of a targeted but more comprehensive structural coverage of the protein-sequence space are discussed.

  18. Determinants of Role Structure in Family Financial Management

    E-print Network

    Rosen, Dennis L.; Granbois, Donald H.

    1983-01-01

    Variables determining the role of husband and wife in family financial management are explored based on in-home, personal interviews. Financial tasks reflecting implementation activities and two groupings of decision activities were related...

  19. The Economic Consequences of Absent Parents. JCPR Working Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Page, Marianne E.; Stevens, Ann Huff

    In recent years, the belief that marriage bestows large economic gains has generated enthusiasm for policy proposals that encourage the formation and continuation of two-parent families. This study examined the effects of family structure on economic resources, controlling for unobservable family background characteristics. Data were drawn from…

  20. Overview of the family structure in Egypt and its relation to psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Okasha, Tarek; Elkholy, Hussien; El-Ghamry, Reem

    2012-04-01

    The family is the basic unit of any society and culture. The concept, structure, and function of the family unit vary considerably across different cultures; however, its role continues to be imperative to the development of individuals and their psychological make-up. All societies have a concept of 'family', its relative importance, structure, and functions; however, this varies according to the particular culture. In the Arabic culture, as well as other collectivistic cultures, the extended family is often regarded as the basic unit. The family is the foundational and basic social unit that fosters the stability, well-being and sustainability of society. The quality of family relationships shapes and influences the social, psychological, and biological development and functioning of its members. This may be especially relevant to individuals with mental health problems. The people of ancient Egypt valued family life highly, and this is the case even now. They treasured children and regarded them as a great blessing. If a couple had no children, they would pray to the gods and goddesses for help. They would also place letters at the tombs of dead relatives asking them to use their influence with the gods. The importance of family has not changed dramatically even though the structures are beginning to. In this paper we highlight changes in family set-up and the state of family therapy in Egypt. PMID:22515467

  1. An International Look at the Single-Parent: Family Structure Matters More for U.S. Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woessmann, Ludger

    2015-01-01

    When Daniel Patrick Moynihan raised the issue of family structure half a century ago, his concern was the increase in black families headed by women. Since then, the share of children raised in single-parent families in the United States has grown across racial and ethnic groups and with it evidence regarding the impact of family structure on…

  2. Preschool Quality and the Development of Children from Economically Disadvantaged Families in India

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rao, Nirmala

    2010-01-01

    Research Findings: The influence of preschool quality on the development of 67 4-year-old children from poor and rural families in South India was examined. Children's developmental status was assessed using a modified version of the McCarthy Scales of Children's Abilities and through physician ratings. Preschool quality was assessed through…

  3. Modeling the hydrologic and economic efficacy of stormwater utility credit programs for US single family residences

    EPA Science Inventory

    As regulatory pressure to reduce the environmental impact of urban stormwater intensifies, U.S. municipalities increasingly seek a dedicated source of funding for stormwater programs, such as a stormwater utility. In rare instances, single family residences are eligible for utili...

  4. Family Life Quality and Emotional Quality of Life in Chinese Adolescents with and without Economic Disadvantage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shek, Daniel T. L.; Lee, T. Y.

    2007-01-01

    Chinese secondary school students (N = 2758) responded to measures of perceived family life quality (parenting quality and parent-child relational quality) and emotional quality of life (hopelessness, mastery, life satisfaction and self-esteem). Parenting quality included different aspects of parental behavioral control (parental knowledge,…

  5. Farm Family Adaptations to Severe Economic Distress: Ohio. Results of the 1989 Regional Farm Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lobao, Linda; Meyer, Katherine

    During the farm crisis of the 1980s, many midwestern farm families suffered financial distress, but by 1989 an uneven financial recovery was under way. This report summarizes data collected from 388 Ohio farm operators (a 38.8% response rate) and 353 spouses as part of a large survey conducted in 12 North Central states. The purpose of the survey…

  6. Farm Family Adaptations to Severe Economic Distress: Indiana. Results of the 1989 Regional Farm Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnard, Freddie L.

    During the farm crisis of the 1980s, many midwestern farm families suffered financial distress, but by 1989 an uneven financial recovery was under way. This report summarizes data collected from 337 Indiana farm operators (a 24% response rate) and 289 spouses (a 21% response rate) as part of a large survey conducted in 12 North Central states. The…

  7. Farm Family Adaptations to Severe Economic Distress: North Dakota. Results of the 1989 Regional Farm Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ekstrom, Brenda L.; And Others

    During the farm crisis of the 1980s, many midwestern farm families suffered financial distress, but by 1989 an uneven financial recovery was under way. This report summaries data collected from 273 North Dakota farm operators (a 39% response) and 232 spouses (a 33% response) as part of a large survey conducted in 12 North Central states. The…

  8. Farm Family Adaptations to Severe Economic Distress: Regional Summary. Results of the 1989 Regional Farm Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lasley, Paul; Fellows, Jacqueline

    This report summarizes data from a February 1989 survey of farm families in 12 North Central states and is a companion reference report for a series of state reports. The 12 states are subdivided into Corn Belt states (Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Missouri, Ohio); Plains states (North Dakota, South Dakota, Kansas, Nebraska); and Lakes states…

  9. Farm Family Adaptations to Severe Economic Distress: Kansas. Results of the 1989 Regional Farm Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biere, Arlo

    During the farm crisis of the 1980s, many midwestern farm families suffered financial distress, but by 1989 an uneven financial recovery was under way. This report summarizes data collected from 342 Kansas farm operators (a 34% response rate) and 313 spouses (a 31% response rate) as part of a large survey conducted in 12 North Central states. The…

  10. Farm Family Adaptations to Severe Economic Distress: South Dakota. Results of the 1989 Regional Farm Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stover, Ronald G.; Stover, Penny W.

    During the farm crisis of the 1980s, many midwestern farm families suffered financial distress, but by 1989 an uneven financial recovery was under way. This report summarizes data collected from 207 South Dakota farm operators (a 29.6% response) and 182 spouses (a 26% response) as part of large survey conducted in 12 North Central states. The…

  11. Farm Family Adaptations to Severe Economic Distress: Iowa. Results of the 1989 Regional Farm Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lasley, Paul; Fellows, Jacqueline

    During the farm crisis of the 1980s, many midwestern farm families suffered financial distress, but by 1989 an uneven financial recovery was under way. This report summarizes data collected from 311 Iowa farm operators (a 31% response rate) and 288 spouses (a 29% response rate) as part of a large survey conducted in 12 North Central states. The…

  12. Farm Family Adaptations to Severe Economic Distress: Nebraska. Results of the 1989 Regional Farm Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Bruce B.

    During the farm crisis of the 1980s, many midwestern farm families suffered financial distress, but by 1989 an uneven financial recovery was under way. This report summarizes data collected from 230 Nebraska farm operators (a 23% response rate) and 222 spouses (a 22% response rate) as part of a large survey conducted in 12 North Central states.…

  13. Early Maternal Employment and Childhood Obesity among Economically Disadvantaged Families in the USA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coley, Rebekah Levine; Lombardi, Caitlin McPherran

    2012-01-01

    Research indicates a link between maternal employment and children's risk of obesity, but little prior work has addressed maternal employment during children's infancy. This study examined the timing and intensity of early maternal employment and associations with children's later overweight and obesity in a sample of low-income families in…

  14. The Economic Impact of Welfare Reform on Arkansas Families. Special Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arkansas Advocates for Children and Families, Little Rock.

    In 1997, the Transitional Employment Assistance (TEA) program was established in Arkansas as the state's version of welfare reform. Although there has been a 44 percent decrease in TEA cash assistance since the program's inception, questions continue regarding the impact of welfare reform on families with children. This report highlights some of…

  15. The Associations Between Social Support, Economic Strain, and Parenting Stress Among At-Risk Families

    E-print Network

    Wilson, Mary Horn

    2009-04-28

    This study tested the hypothesis that social support mediates the relation between economic strain and parenting stress using a sample of parents and caregivers (N = 151) of adolescents (ages 11-14) attending a six-week summer camp for at-risk youth...

  16. Exploration of Home Economics Occupations; Home and Family Education: 6775.01.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benson, Pauline; Estrada, Rosa J.

    The course, for use at the junior high school level, explores employment possibilities in home economics and related areas. Lists of resource materials, a pretest and posttest, and an extensive, 70-page curriculum guide are appended. The guide explores eight block areas: (1) introduction; (2) homemaking; (3) personal development for careers; (4)…

  17. Three-Generation Family Households: Differences by Family Structure at Birth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pilkauskas, Natasha V.

    2012-01-01

    Using data from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study (N = 4,898), this study investigated how the share, correlates, transition patterns, and duration of 3-generation households vary by mother's relationship status at birth. Nine percent of married mothers, 17% of cohabiting mothers, and 45% of single mothers lived in a 3-generation…

  18. Sociodemographic Status, Parental Background, Childhood Family Structure, and Attitudes toward Family Formation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trent, Katherine; South, Scott J.

    1992-01-01

    Used data from National Survey of Families and Households to investigate effects of individual characteristics, parental background, and childhood living arrangements on adults' attitudes toward marriage, divorce, and nonmarital childbearing. Strongest predictors were age, sex, and marital status, with older persons, men, and married persons…

  19. Economic Reason: The Interplay of Individual Learning and External Structure 

    E-print Network

    Clark, Andy

    1996-01-01

    Much work in economics, the social sciences, and elsewhere takes as it starting oint a somewhat unrealistic conception of rationality- a conception that ignores or downplays both the temporal and the situated aspects of ...

  20. Family Economic Strengthening and Parenting Stress Among Caregivers of AIDS-Orphaned Children: Results from a Cluster Randomized Clinical Trial in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Nabunya, Proscovia; Ssewamala, Fred M; Ilic, Vilma

    2014-09-01

    This study examines the impact of a family economic strengthening intervention on parenting stress among caregivers of AIDS-orphaned children in Uganda. The study uses data from a 4-year (2008-2012) NIMH randomized clinical trial for AIDS-orphaned children known as Suubi-Maka (N=346 dyads). Child-caregiver dyads from 10 comparable primary schools were randomly assigned to either the control group (n=167 dyads) receiving usual care for school-going orphaned children (such as food aid and scholastic materials) or the treatment group (n=179 dyads) receiving a family economic strengthening intervention (focused on a matched savings account), financial planning and management workshops over and above the usual care. Interviews were conducted at baseline, 12 months and 24 months follow-up. This study uses data from baseline and 24 months post-intervention. We use multivariate regression methods, controlling for socioeconomic characteristics. At 24 months, caregivers in the treatment group reported significantly lower levels of parenting stress compared to caregivers in the control group. Findings from this study point to the potential of a family economic strengthening intervention to improve caregiver's psychosocial wellbeing and that of their families. We conclude that programs and policies aimed at improving the psychosocial wellbeing of families caring for AIDS-orphaned children may consider incorporating economic strengthening components in their programming to help support these kinds of families, caregivers of AIDS-orphaned children especially those residing in developing countries. PMID:25136142

  1. Crystal structure of DJ-1/RS and implication on familial Parkinson's disease1

    E-print Network

    Li, Lian

    Crystal structure of DJ-1/RS and implication on familial Parkinson's disease1 Qing Huaia , Yingjie, including cancer, Parkinson's disease, and male fer- tility. It is unknown how DJ-1 functions, the conformational changes may diminish the DJ-1 binding with its partner, leading to the familial Parkinson

  2. Effects of Structural Family Therapy on Child and Maternal Mental Health Symptomatology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weaver, Addie; Greeno, Catherine G.; Marcus, Steven C.; Fusco, Rachel A.; Zimmerman, Tina; Anderson, Carol

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This pilot study examined the effect of structural family therapy (SFT) on children's impairment and depressive symptomatology and mothers' depressive symptomatology and anxiety for 31 families served by a community mental health clinic. Method: A one group predesign/postdesign, with a baseline and two follow-up time points,…

  3. Associations of Childhood Religious Attendance, Family Structure, and Nonmarital Fertility across Cohorts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wildeman, Christopher; Percheski, Christine

    2009-01-01

    This article considers associations among childhood family structure, childhood religious service attendance, and the probability of having a nonmarital first birth before age 30 for non-Hispanic White women born 1944 to 1964 using data from the 1988 and 1995 waves of the National Survey of Family Growth (N = 5,995). We found that attending…

  4. The impact of family structure and disruption on intergenerational emotional exchange in Eastern Europe.

    PubMed

    Moor, Nienke; Komter, Aafke

    2012-06-01

    Demographic trends across Europe involve a decrease in fertility and mortality rates, and an increase in divorce and stepfamily formation. Life courses and living arrangements have become less standardized and the structure of families has changed. In this article, we examine to what extent contemporary family structure and composition resulting from demographic changes affect emotional exchange between children and their parents, both from adult child to parent and from parent to child. Because the general level of well-being has been shown to be lower in Eastern Europe, thereby potentially affecting emotional exchange within families, we focus our research on Eastern Europe. We use the "conservation of resources theory" to derive hypotheses on how family structure may affect intergenerational emotional exchange. Family ties are assumed to be important resources of affection that people want to obtain and retain throughout their lives. Data from the Generations and Gender Survey (GGS) are used to test our hypotheses. In general, our data offer more support for the idea that families are resilient than for the often heard assumption that families are in decline as a consequence of the changed family structure and composition. PMID:22707927

  5. Mate Availability and Family Structure among African Americans in U.S. Metropolitan Areas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fossett, Mark A.; Kiecolt, K. Jill

    1993-01-01

    Analyzed census and vital statistics for U.S. metropolitan areas in 1980 to investigate effects of mate availability, socioeconomic status and employment, public assistance, population size, and region on several aspects of family formation and family structure among African Americans. Mate availability had positive effect on marriage prevalence…

  6. Family Structure and Fathers' Well-Being: Trajectories of Mental Health and Self-Rated Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meadows, Sarah O.

    2009-01-01

    The association between marital status and health among men has been well documented, but few studies track health trajectories following family structure transitions among unmarried fathers. Using the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study this article examines trajectories of paternal mental health and self-rated health, focusing on…

  7. Family 

    E-print Network

    Unknown

    2011-09-05

    (ADJFAT) and actual(ACTFAT)), intramuscular fat (MARB), and Warner-Bratzler shear force tenderness (WBSF). Family types with a greater proportion of Bos indicus in the sire in relation to the amount in the dam (F1 x A and B x F1) averaged longer GL... between males and females. Further examination within each sex showed a difference between male reciprocals that was two times that of females. iv Calves with a higher percentage of Bos indicus in the sire compared to the proportion in the dam showed...

  8. Children's Home Environments: Understanding the Role of Family Structure Changes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kowaleski-Jones, Lori; Dunifon, Rachel

    2004-01-01

    Using data from the 1996 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY79) merged mother-child sample, we investigate the impact of two family events, parental divorce and the birth of a sibling, on the cognitive stimulation and emotional support provided to children in the home. We use fixed-effect regression techniques to control for unmeasured…

  9. Creativity: Its Relationship to Single Parent Family Structure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenkins, Jeanne E.

    The insecurities generated in children by stressful environmental changes can compromise their receptivity to learning and their attitude toward school. Studies examining divorce outcomes focus primarily on two cognitive indicators: achievement and intelligence. This study explored the relationship between creative thinking components and family

  10. Family Structure & Social Change: A Preparation for Further Study Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donovan, Cathy

    This instructional unit, which is intended for Australians working toward a Certificate in General Education for Adults, contains activities to help learners develop the skills and knowledge to read and write complex texts while examining human relationships and the family. Aimed at both native and nonnative English speakers, the unit contains…

  11. Household income pooling and the demand for food: does family financial structure matter? 

    E-print Network

    Perusquia Corres, Ernesto

    2009-06-02

    to those of the unitary models. These two models, conditional and unconditional, not only allow for the effect of earned and unearned incomes of fathers and mothers to be different, but also incorporate family financial structure into the analysis...

  12. The Plant Proteome Folding Project: Structure and Positive Selection in Plant Protein Families

    E-print Network

    DeSalle, Rob

    -based protein structure prediction to predict protein structure for Arabidopsis and rice proteins. Based for .8,000 (;33%) of protein-coding loci, and the numbers for rice are compa- rable (Yu et al. 2002, 2005The Plant Proteome Folding Project: Structure and Positive Selection in Plant Protein Families M. M

  13. Family Structure and Adolescent Drug Use: An Exploration of Single-Parent Families

    PubMed Central

    Hemovich, Vanessa; Crano, William D.

    2011-01-01

    Data from the 2004 Monitoring the Future survey examined a nationally representative cross-sectional sample of 8th to 12th grade adolescents in rural and urban schools from across the United States (N = 37,507). Results found that drug use among daughters living with single fathers significantly exceeded that of daughters living with single mothers, while gender of parent was not associated with sons’ usage. This distinction in adolescent drug use between mother-only versus father-only households is largely overlooked in contemporary studies. Factors responsible for variations in sons’ and daughters’ usage in single-parent families have important implications for future drug prevention efforts. PMID:20001697

  14. The Diverse Social and Economic Structure of Nonmetropolitan America. Rural Development Research Report No. 49.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bender, Lloyd D.; And Others

    Effective rural development planning depends on facts and analysis based, not on rural averages, but on the diverse social and economic structure of rural America. Programs tailored to particular types of rural economies may be more effective than generalized programs. Because of their unique characteristics, government policies and economic

  15. The structural influence of family and parenting on young people's sexual and reproductive health in rural northern Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Wamoyi, Joyce; Wight, Daniel; Remes, Pieter

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores the structural role of the family and parenting in young people's sexual and reproductive health. The study involved eight weeks of participant observation, 26 in-depth interviews, and 11 group discussions with young people aged 14–24 years, and 20 in-depth interviews and 6 group discussions with parents/carers of children in this age group. At an individual level, parenting and family structure were found to affect young people's sexual behaviour by influencing children's self-confidence and interactional competence, limiting discussion of sexual health and shaping economic provision for children, which in turn affected parental authority and daughters' engagement in risky sexual behaviour. Sexual norms are reproduced both through parents' explicit prohibitions and their own behaviours. Girls are socialised to accept men's superiority, which shapes their negotiation of sexual relationships. Interventions to improve young people's sexual and reproductive health should recognise the structural effects of parenting, both in terms of direct influences on children and the dynamics by which structural barriers such as gendered power relations and cultural norms around sexuality are transmitted across generations. PMID:25597368

  16. Family, Community, and Educational Outcomes in South Asia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chudgar, Amita; Shafiq, M. Najeeb

    2010-01-01

    In this article, we review research on the economics and sociology of education to assess the relationships between family and community variables and children's educational outcomes in South Asia. At the family level, we examine the variables of family socioeconomic status (SES), parental education, family structure, and religion and caste. At…

  17. Modification Effects of Family Economic Status and School Factors on Depression Risk of Single-Father Family Children in Mid-Taiwan Area

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Jin-Ding; Hsieh, Yu-Hsin; Lin, Fu-Gong

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of single-parent families has increased significantly in Taiwan in recent years. Children born in single-parent families are predisposed to suffering from emotional problems. We aimed to determine if the children of single-parent families are more depressive than children from both-parent families, and to examine the individual and…

  18. Family structure and fertility in Taiwan: an extension and modification of Caldwell's wealth flows theory.

    PubMed

    Hsuing, P C

    1988-06-01

    Based on the data from a nationwide survey of labor force participation conducted in 1985 by the Office of the Directorate-General of Budget, Accounting and Statistics, Executive Yuan, Republic of China, this project tries to modify Caldwell's Wealth Flows Theory in order to analyze fertility behavior of married women. Caldwell's Wealth Flows Theory indicates that a patriarchal family has a significant effect on fertility. Unless the patriarchal family structure is replaced by a nuclear family system, he claims, fertility levels will remain relatively high in developing countries. However, he does not discuss social factors which may influence the process of change in the family structure and which factors in the patriarchal family may influence fertility. To make up this shortcoming, this paper shows that female educational level, employment patterns, and occupational prestige brings about change in the family structure. This research also indicates that women with higher education and occupational prestige have lower fertility. In addition, it finds that female occupational status is a main factor to bring about change in the family structure. (author's) PMID:12222474

  19. Structure-based analysis of catalysis and substrate definition in the HIT protein family

    SciTech Connect

    Lima, C.D.; Klein, M.G.; Hendrickson, W.A.

    1997-10-10

    The histidine triad (HIT) protein family is among the most ubiquitous and highly conserved in nature, but a biological activity has not yet been identified for any member of the HIT family. Fragile histidine triad protein (FHIT) and protein kinase C interacting protein (PKCL) were used in a structure-based approach to elucidate characteristics of in vivo ligands and reactions. Crystallographic structures of apo, substrate analog, pentacovalent transition-state analog, and product states of both enzymes reveal a catalytic mechanism and define substrate characteristics required for catalysis, thus unifying the HIT family as nucleotidyl hydrolases, transferases, or both. The approach described here may be useful in identifying structure-function relations between protein families identified through genomics. 15 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Conformation-family Monte Carlo: A new method for crystal structure prediction

    PubMed Central

    Pillardy, Jaroslaw; Arnautova, Yelena A.; Czaplewski, Cezary; Gibson, Kenneth D.; Scheraga, Harold A.

    2001-01-01

    A new global optimization method, Conformation-family Monte Carlo, has been developed recently for searching the conformational space of macromolecules. In the present paper, we adapted this method for prediction of crystal structures of organic molecules without assuming any symmetry constraints except the number of molecules in the unit cell. This method maintains a database of low energy structures that are clustered into families. The structures in this database are improved iteratively by a Metropolis-type Monte Carlo procedure together with energy minimization, in which the search is biased toward the regions of the lowest energy families. The Conformation-family Monte Carlo method is applied to a set of nine rigid and flexible organic molecules by using two popular force fields, AMBER and W99. The method performed well for the rigid molecules and reasonably well for the molecules with torsional degrees of freedom. PMID:11606783

  1. Changes in Young Children’s Family Structures and Child Care Arrangements

    PubMed Central

    Crosnoe, Robert; Prickett, Kate Chambers; Smith, Chelsea; Cavanagh, Shannon

    2013-01-01

    Family structure change can disrupt the settings of children’s daily lives. Most scholarship focuses on disruption in the home environment. Moving beyond the home, this study explores the association between changes in family structure and changes in several dimensions of early child care. With longitudinal data from the NICHD Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development (n = 1,298), first-difference models reveal that family structure transitions are associated with changes in the type and quantity of early care as well as the number of care arrangements used, especially during the latter part of infancy. Given prior evidence linking these child care dimensions to behavioral and cognitive outcomes, these results suggest a policy-relevant mechanism by which family change may create inequalities among children. PMID:24243268

  2. China`s macro economic trends and power industry structure

    SciTech Connect

    Binsheng Li; Johnson, C.J.; Hagen, R.

    1994-09-01

    Since China adopted an open door policy in 1978, its economy has grown rapidly. Between 1980 and 1993, China`s real GNP growth averaged 9.4 percent per year. Economists at the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences forecast that GNP will increase by 11.5 percent in 1994. During the rest of the decade, the Chinese government plans to reduce its annual GNP growth rate to 8-9 percent. During the 2001-2010 period, the economic growth rate is projected to decline to 6.5 percent per year. Table 1 compares China`s economic growth to other Asia-Pacific Economies, and includes projections to 2010. During the 1980s, China`s GDP growth rate was only second to that of South Korea. In the 1990`s, China is projected to have the highest economic growth in the Asia-Pacific region. China`s rapid economic growth is due to dramatic increases in the effective labor supply and effective capital stock. For the remainder of the 1990s, the effective labor supply should continue to increase rapidly because: (1) Chinese state enterprises are over-staffed and labor system reforms will move millions of these workers into more productive activities; (2) reforms in the wage system will provide increased incentives to work harder; (3) relaxation of migration controls from rural to urban areas will cause nominal labor in the industrial sector to accelerate; (4) differentials in personal income will increase and develop peer pressure on workers to work harder and earn more money; and (5) at China`s low personal income level, Chinese people are willing to trade leisure for more income as wages increase.

  3. Alcohol Consumption Patterns among Adolescents are Related to Family Structure and Exposure to Drunkenness within the Family: Results from the SEYLE Project

    PubMed Central

    Rüütel, Erik; Sisask, Merike; Värnik, Airi; Värnik, Peeter; Carli, Vladimir; Wasserman, Camilla; Hoven, Christina W.; Sarchiapone, Marco; Apter, Alan; Balazs, Judit; Bobes, Julio; Brunner, Romuald; Corcoran, Paul; Cosman, Doina; Haring, Christian; Iosue, Miriam; Kaess, Michael; Kahn, Jean-Pierre; Poštuvan, Vita; Sáiz, Pilar A.; Wasserman, Danuta

    2014-01-01

    There is expedient evidence showing that differences in adolescent alcohol consumption and other risk-behaviour depend on both family structure and family member drunkenness exposure. Data were obtained among adolescents (N = 12,115, mean age 14.9 ± 0.89) in Austria, Estonia, France, Germany, Hungary, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Romania, Slovenia and Spain within the European Union’s 7th Framework Programme funded project, ‘Saving and Empowering Young Lives in Europe (SEYLE)’. The current study reveals how adolescents’ alcohol consumption patterns are related to their family structure and having seen their family member drunk. The results revealed statistically significant differences in adolescent alcohol consumption depending on whether the adolescent lives in a family with both birth parents, in a single-parent family or in a family with one birth parent and one step-parent. The study also revealed that the abstaining from alcohol percentage among adolescents was greater in families with both birth parents compared to other family types. The study also showed that the more often adolescents see their family member drunk the more they drink themselves. There is no difference in adolescent drinking patterns whether they see their family member drunk once a month or once a week. This study gives an insight on which subgroups of adolescents are at heightened risk of alcohol abuse and that decrease of family member drunkenness may have positive effects on the drinking habits of their children. PMID:25493392

  4. Alcohol consumption patterns among adolescents are related to family structure and exposure to drunkenness within the family: results from the SEYLE project.

    PubMed

    Rüütel, Erik; Sisask, Merike; Värnik, Airi; Värnik, Peeter; Carli, Vladimir; Wasserman, Camilla; Hoven, Christina W; Sarchiapone, Marco; Apter, Alan; Balazs, Judit; Bobes, Julio; Brunner, Romuald; Corcoran, Paul; Cosman, Doina; Haring, Christian; Iosue, Miriam; Kaess, Michael; Kahn, Jean-Pierre; Poštuvan, Vita; Sáiz, Pilar A; Wasserman, Danuta

    2014-12-01

    There is expedient evidence showing that differences in adolescent alcohol consumption and other risk-behaviour depend on both family structure and family member drunkenness exposure. Data were obtained among adolescents (N = 12,115, mean age 14.9 ± 0.89) in Austria, Estonia, France, Germany, Hungary, Ireland, Israel, Italy,Romania, Slovenia and Spain within the European Union'ss 7th Framework Programme funded project, 'Saving and Empowering Young Lives in Europe (SEYLE)’. The current study reveals how adolescents' alcohol consumption patterns are related to their family structure and having seen their family member drunk. The results revealed statistically significant differences in adolescent alcohol consumption depending on whether the adolescent lives in a family with both birth parents, in a single-parent family or in a family with one birth parent and one step-parent. The study also revealed that the abstaining from alcohol percentage among adolescents was greater in families with both birth parents compared to other family types. The study also showed that the more often adolescents see their family member drunk the more they drink themselves. There is no difference in adolescent drinking patterns whether they see their family member drunk once a month or once a week. This study gives an insight on which subgroups of adolescents are at heightened risk of alcohol abuse and that decrease of family member drunkenness may have positive effects on the drinking habits of their children. PMID:25493392

  5. Crystal Structure and Characterization of the Glycoside Hydrolase Family 62 ?-l-Arabinofuranosidase from Streptomyces coelicolor*

    PubMed Central

    Maehara, Tomoko; Fujimoto, Zui; Ichinose, Hitomi; Michikawa, Mari; Harazono, Koichi; Kaneko, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    ?-l-Arabinofuranosidase, which belongs to the glycoside hydrolase family 62 (GH62), hydrolyzes arabinoxylan but not arabinan or arabinogalactan. The crystal structures of several ?-l-arabinofuranosidases have been determined, although the structures, catalytic mechanisms, and substrate specificities of GH62 enzymes remain unclear. To evaluate the substrate specificity of a GH62 enzyme, we determined the crystal structure of ?-l-arabinofuranosidase, which comprises a carbohydrate-binding module family 13 domain at its N terminus and a catalytic domain at its C terminus, from Streptomyces coelicolor. The catalytic domain was a five-bladed ?-propeller consisting of five radially oriented anti-parallel ?-sheets. Sugar complex structures with l-arabinose, xylotriose, and xylohexaose revealed five subsites in the catalytic cleft and an l-arabinose-binding pocket at the bottom of the cleft. The entire structure of this GH62 family enzyme was very similar to that of glycoside hydrolase 43 family enzymes, and the catalytically important acidic residues found in family 43 enzymes were conserved in GH62. Mutagenesis studies revealed that Asp202 and Glu361 were catalytic residues, and Trp270, Tyr461, and Asn462 were involved in the substrate-binding site for discriminating the substrate structures. In particular, hydrogen bonding between Asn462 and xylose at the nonreducing end subsite +2 was important for the higher activity of substituted arabinofuranosyl residues than that for terminal arabinofuranoses. PMID:24482228

  6. Collation and analyses of DNA-binding protein domain families from sequence and structural databanks.

    PubMed

    Malhotra, Sony; Sowdhamini, Ramanathan

    2015-04-01

    DNA-protein interactions govern several high fidelity cellular processes like DNA-replication, transcription, DNA repair, etc. Proteins that have the ability to recognise and bind DNA sequences can be classified either according to their DNA-binding motif or based on the sequence of the target nucleotides. We have collated the DNA-binding families by integrating information from both protein sequence family and structural databases. This resulted in a dataset of 1057 DNA-binding protein domain families. Their family properties (the number of members, percent identity distribution and length of members) and domain architectures were examined. Further, sequence domain families were mapped to structures in the protein databank (PDB) and the protein domain structure classification database (SCOP). The DNA-binding families, with no structural information, were clustered together into potential superfamilies based on sequence associations. On the basis of functions attributed to DNA-binding protein folds, we observe that a majority of the DNA-binding proteins follow divergent evolution. This study can serve as a basis for annotation and distribution of DNA-binding proteins in genome(s) of interest. The entire collated set of DNA-binding protein domains is available for download as Hidden Markov Models. PMID:25656606

  7. Structural Basis of Conserved Cysteine in the Fibroblast Growth Factor Family: Evidence for a

    E-print Network

    Blaber, Michael

    Structural Basis of Conserved Cysteine in the Fibroblast Growth Factor Family: Evidence for a Vestigial Half-Cystine Jihun Lee and Michael Blaber Department of Biomedical Sciences, College of Medicine (numbering scheme of the 140-residue form of FGF-1). Sequence and structure information suggests

  8. Predictors of Global Quality in Family Child Care Homes: Structural and Belief Characteristics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes-Belding, Kere; Hegland, Susan; Stein, Amanda; Sideris, John; Bryant, Donna

    2012-01-01

    Research Findings: With a substantial number of young children receiving care in family child care settings, an examination of the characteristics, both structural and attitudinal, that predict program quality is warranted. The current study examines gaps in the research by examining both structural characteristics and provider beliefs that…

  9. Behavioral Economics and Social Policy: Designing Innovative Solutions for Programs Supported by the Administration for Children and Families. OPRE Report No. 2014-16a

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richburg-Hayes, Lashawn; Anzelone, Caitlin; Dechausay, Nadine; Datta, Saugato; Fiorillo, Alexandra; Potok, Louis; Darling, Matthew; Balz, John

    2014-01-01

    The Behavioral Interventions to Advance Self-Sufficiency (BIAS) project is the first major opportunity to use a behavioral economics lens to look at programs that serve poor and vulnerable people in the United States. Sponsored by the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation of the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) within the U.S.…

  10. The structure of a family GH25 lysozyme from Aspergillus fumigatus

    PubMed Central

    Korczynska, Justyna E.; Danielsen, Steffen; Schagerlöf, Ulrika; Turkenburg, Johan P.; Davies, Gideon J.; Wilson, Keith S.; Taylor, Edward J.

    2010-01-01

    Lysins are important biomolecules which cleave the bacterial cell-wall polymer peptidoglycan. They are finding increasing commercial and medical application. In order to gain an insight into the mechanism by which these enzymes operate, the X-ray structure of a CAZy family GH25 ‘lysozyme’ from Aspergillus fumigatus was determined. This is the first fungal structure from the family and reveals a modified ?/?-barrel-like fold in which an eight-stranded ?-barrel is flanked by three ?-helices. The active site lies toward the bottom of a negatively charged pocket and its layout has much in common with other solved members of the GH25 and related GH families. A conserved active-site DXE motif may be implicated in catalysis, lending further weight to the argument that this glycoside hydrolase family operates via a ‘substrate-assisted’ catalytic mechanism. PMID:20823508

  11. Attributions of Fathering Behaviors Among Adolescents: The Role of Gender, Ethnicity, Family Structure, and Depressive Symptoms.

    PubMed

    Finlay, Andrea K; Cookston, Jeffrey T; Saenz, Delia S; Baham, Melinda E; Parke, Ross D; Fabricius, William; Braver, Sanford

    2014-03-01

    Little attention has been paid to how early adolescents make attributions for their fathers' behavior. Guided by symbolic interaction theory, we examined how adolescent gender, ethnicity, family structure, and depressive symptoms explained attributions for residential father behavior. 382 adolescents, grouped by ethnicity (European American, Mexican American) and family structure (intact, stepfamilies), reported attributions for their fathers' positive and negative behaviors. Results indicated that for positive events girls made significantly more stable attributions, whereas boys made more unstable attributions. Mexican American adolescents tended to make more unstable attributions for positive events than European Americans, and adolescents from intact families made more stable attributions for positive events than adolescents from stepfamilies. Implications are discussed for the role of attributions in father-adolescent relationships as prime for intervention in families. PMID:24855327

  12. The shikimate dehydrogenase family: functional diversity within a conserved structural and mechanistic framework.

    PubMed

    Peek, James; Christendat, Dinesh

    2015-01-15

    Shikimate dehydrogenase (SDH) catalyzes the NADPH-dependent reduction of 3-deydroshikimate to shikimate, an essential reaction in the biosynthesis of the aromatic amino acids and a large number of other secondary metabolites in plants and microbes. The indispensible nature of this enzyme makes it a potential target for herbicides and antimicrobials. SDH is the archetypal member of a large protein family, which contains at least four additional functional classes with diverse metabolic roles. The different members of the SDH family share a highly similar three-dimensional structure and utilize a conserved catalytic mechanism, but exhibit distinct substrate preferences, making the family a particularly interesting system for studying modes of substrate recognition used by enzymes. Here, we review our current understanding of the biochemical and structural properties of each of the five previously identified SDH family functional classes. PMID:25524738

  13. Structural Insights into the Anti-HIV Activity of the Oscillatoria agardhii Agglutinin Homolog Lectin Family*

    PubMed Central

    Koharudin, Leonardus M. I.; Kollipara, Sireesha; Aiken, Christopher; Gronenborn, Angela M.

    2012-01-01

    Oscillatoria agardhii agglutinin homolog (OAAH) proteins belong to a recently discovered lectin family. All members contain a sequence repeat of ?66 amino acids, with the number of repeats varying among different family members. Apart from data for the founding member OAA, neither three-dimensional structures, information about carbohydrate binding specificities, nor antiviral activity data have been available up to now for any other members of the OAAH family. To elucidate the structural basis for the antiviral mechanism of OAAHs, we determined the crystal structures of Pseudomonas fluorescens and Myxococcus xanthus lectins. Both proteins exhibit the same fold, resembling the founding family member, OAA, with minor differences in loop conformations. Carbohydrate binding studies by NMR and x-ray structures of glycan-lectin complexes reveal that the number of sugar binding sites corresponds to the number of sequence repeats in each protein. As for OAA, tight and specific binding to ?3,?6-mannopentaose was observed. All the OAAH proteins described here exhibit potent anti-HIV activity at comparable levels. Altogether, our results provide structural details of the protein-carbohydrate interaction for this novel lectin family and insights into the molecular basis of their HIV inactivation properties. PMID:22865886

  14. The relations among child quality, family structure, and the value of the mother's time in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Leppel, K

    1982-10-01

    A model of the determinants of child quality and of the value of a woman's time is developed and tested using data from the Malaysian Family Life Survey of 1976-1977. Child quality is measured by educational attainment; factors influencing the value of the mother's time include size and age composition of household, family income, education, and hours worked. The results indicate that size and age composition of household affect a woman's asking wage. However, more data are needed before the effects of family structure on schooling can be measured with confidence. PMID:12266446

  15. Structural and economic analysis of capesize bulk carriers

    E-print Network

    Hadjiyiannis, Nicholas

    2010-01-01

    Structural failures of bulk carriers continue to account for the loss of many lives every year. Capes are particularly vulnerable to cracking because of their large length, their trade in high density cargos, and the high ...

  16. Structural Basis of Membrane Targeting by the Dock180 Family of Rho Family Guanine Exchange Factors (Rho-GEFs)*

    PubMed Central

    Premkumar, Lakshmanane; Bobkov, Andrey A.; Patel, Manishha; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Bankston, Laurie A.; Stec, Boguslaw; Vuori, Kristiina; Côté, Jean-Francois; Liddington, Robert C.

    2010-01-01

    The Dock180 family of atypical Rho family guanine nucleotide exchange factors (Rho-GEFs) regulate a variety of processes involving cellular or subcellular polarization, including cell migration and phagocytosis. Each contains a Dock homology region-1 (DHR-1) domain that is required to localize its GEF activity to a specific membrane compartment where levels of phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-trisphosphate (PtdIns(3,4,5)P3) are up-regulated by the local activity of PtdIns 3-kinase. Here we define the structural and energetic bases of phosphoinositide specificity by the DHR-1 domain of Dock1 (a GEF for Rac1), and show that DHR-1 utilizes a C2 domain scaffold and surface loops to create a basic pocket on its upper surface for recognition of the PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 head group. The pocket has many of the characteristics of those observed in pleckstrin homology domains. We show that point mutations in the pocket that abolish phospholipid binding in vitro ablate the ability of Dock1 to induce cell polarization, and propose a model that brings together recent mechanistic and structural studies to rationalize the central role of DHR-1 in dynamic membrane targeting of the Rho-GEF activity of Dock180. PMID:20167601

  17. A computational approach to structural properties of glycoside hydrolase family 4 from bacteria.

    PubMed

    Craciun, Dana; Vlad-Oros, Beatrice; Filimon, Nicoleta; Ostafe, Vasile; Isvoran, Adriana

    2013-01-01

    Structural bioinformatics approaches applied to the alpha- and beta-glycosidases from the GH4 enzyme family reveal that, despite low sequence identity, these enzymes possess quite similar global structural characteristics reflecting a common reaction mechanism. Locally, there are a few distinctive structural characteristics of GH4 alpha- and beta-glycosidases, namely, surface cavities with different geometric characteristics and two regions with highly dissimilar structural organizations and distinct physicochemical properties in the alpha- and beta-glucosidases from Thermotoga maritima. We suggest that these structurally dissimilar regions may be involved in specific protein-protein interactions and this hypothesis is sustained by the predicted distinct functional partners of the investigated proteins. Also, we predict that alpha- and beta-glycosidases from the GH4 enzyme family interact with difenoconazole, a fungicide, but there are different features of these interactions especially concerning the identified structurally distinct regions of the investigated proteins. PMID:24340303

  18. Non-invasive sampling of schistosomes from humans requires correcting for family structure.

    PubMed

    Steinauer, Michelle L; Christie, Mark R; Blouin, Michael S; Agola, Lelo E; Mwangi, Ibrahim N; Maina, Geoffrey M; Mutuku, Martin W; Kinuthia, Joseph M; Mkoji, Gerald M; Loker, Eric S

    2013-01-01

    For ethical and logistical reasons, population-genetic studies of parasites often rely on the non-invasive sampling of offspring shed from their definitive hosts. However, if the sampled offspring are naturally derived from a small number of parents, then the strong family structure can result in biased population-level estimates of genetic parameters, particularly if reproductive output is skewed. Here, we document and correct for the strong family structure present within schistosome offspring (miracidia) that were collected non-invasively from humans in western Kenya. By genotyping 2,424 miracidia from 12 patients at 12 microsatellite loci and using a sibship clustering program, we found that the samples contained large numbers of siblings. Furthermore, reproductive success of the breeding schistosomes was skewed, creating differential representation of each family in the offspring pool. After removing the family structure with an iterative jacknifing procedure, we demonstrated that the presence of relatives led to inflated estimates of genetic differentiation and linkage disequilibrium, and downwardly-biased estimates of inbreeding coefficients (FIS). For example, correcting for family structure yielded estimates of FST among patients that were 27 times lower than estimates from the uncorrected samples. These biased estimates would cause one to draw false conclusions regarding these parameters in the adult population. We also found from our analyses that estimates of the number of full sibling families and other genetic parameters of samples of miracidia were highly intercorrelated but are not correlated with estimates of worm burden obtained via egg counting (Kato-Katz). Whether genetic methods or the traditional Kato-Katz estimator provide a better estimate of actual number of adult worms remains to be seen. This study illustrates that family structure must be explicitly accounted for when using offspring samples to estimate the genetic parameters of adult parasite populations. PMID:24069499

  19. Manganese oxide minerals: Crystal structures and economic and environmental significance

    PubMed Central

    Post, Jeffrey E.

    1999-01-01

    Manganese oxide minerals have been used for thousands of years—by the ancients for pigments and to clarify glass, and today as ores of Mn metal, catalysts, and battery material. More than 30 Mn oxide minerals occur in a wide variety of geological settings. They are major components of Mn nodules that pave huge areas of the ocean floor and bottoms of many fresh-water lakes. Mn oxide minerals are ubiquitous in soils and sediments and participate in a variety of chemical reactions that affect groundwater and bulk soil composition. Their typical occurrence as fine-grained mixtures makes it difficult to study their atomic structures and crystal chemistries. In recent years, however, investigations using transmission electron microscopy and powder x-ray and neutron diffraction methods have provided important new insights into the structures and properties of these materials. The crystal structures for todorokite and birnessite, two of the more common Mn oxide minerals in terrestrial deposits and ocean nodules, were determined by using powder x-ray diffraction data and the Rietveld refinement method. Because of the large tunnels in todorokite and related structures there is considerable interest in the use of these materials and synthetic analogues as catalysts and cation exchange agents. Birnessite-group minerals have layer structures and readily undergo oxidation reduction and cation-exchange reactions and play a major role in controlling groundwater chemistry. PMID:10097056

  20. The Economics of Structured Continuing Education in Selected Professional Journals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sasmor, James C.

    A study determined what business administration considerations were elements in the managerial decision making process to include structured continuing education in a professional journal and what the positive or negative results have been in terms of operating benefits and profits. An initial literature review showed the need for exploratory…

  1. The impact of family structure on the health of children: Effects of divorce*

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Jane

    2014-01-01

    Nearly three decades of research evaluating the impact of family structure on the health and well-being of children demonstrates that children living with their married, biological parents consistently have better physical, emotional, and academic well-being. Pediatricians and society should promote the family structure that has the best chance of producing healthy children. The best scientific literature to date suggests that, with the exception of parents faced with unresolvable marital violence, children fare better when parents work at maintaining the marriage. Consequently, society should make every effort to support healthy marriages and to discourage married couples from divorcing. PMID:25473135

  2. The impact of family structure on the health of children: Effects of divorce.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Jane

    2014-11-01

    Nearly three decades of research evaluating the impact of family structure on the health and well-being of children demonstrates that children living with their married, biological parents consistently have better physical, emotional, and academic well-being. Pediatricians and society should promote the family structure that has the best chance of producing healthy children. The best scientific literature to date suggests that, with the exception of parents faced with unresolvable marital violence, children fare better when parents work at maintaining the marriage. Consequently, society should make every effort to support healthy marriages and to discourage married couples from divorcing. PMID:25473135

  3. Changes in the Formation and Structure of Black Families: The Impact on Black Women. Working Paper No. 182.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAdoo, Harriette Pipes

    This paper attempts to dispel stereotypes about black family structures through an examination of the impact of demographic trends on black women. Topics covered include the following: (1) the structure of black families from the arrival of black slaves in North America through the 1950's; (2) the impact that the historical structure and…

  4. The N-Acetylglutamate Synthase Family: Structures, Function and Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Dashuang; Allewell, Norma M.; Tuchman, Mendel

    2015-01-01

    N-acetylglutamate synthase (NAGS) catalyzes the production of N-acetylglutamate (NAG) from acetyl-CoA and l-glutamate. In microorganisms and plants, the enzyme functions in the arginine biosynthetic pathway, while in mammals, its major role is to produce the essential co-factor of carbamoyl phosphate synthetase 1 (CPS1) in the urea cycle. Recent work has shown that several different genes encode enzymes that can catalyze NAG formation. A bifunctional enzyme was identified in certain bacteria, which catalyzes both NAGS and N-acetylglutamate kinase (NAGK) activities, the first two steps of the arginine biosynthetic pathway. Interestingly, these bifunctional enzymes have higher sequence similarity to vertebrate NAGS than those of the classical (mono-functional) bacterial NAGS. Solving the structures for both classical bacterial NAGS and bifunctional vertebrate-like NAGS/K has advanced our insight into the regulation and catalytic mechanisms of NAGS, and the evolutionary relationship between the two NAGS groups. PMID:26068232

  5. Imagining the future: Community perceptions of a family-based economic empowerment intervention for AIDS-orphaned adolescents in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Ismayilova, Leyla; Ssewamala, Fred; Mooers, Elizabeth; Nabunya, Proscovia; Sheshadri, Srividya

    2012-01-01

    AIDS-orphaned children and adolescents in sub-Saharan Africa have inadequate access to basic services, including health and education. Using a qualitative approach, the study explores the meaning of education in rural Uganda, obstacles faced by AIDS-orphaned adolescents and their caregivers to access secondary education, and the potential of an economic empowerment intervention SEED in addressing the challenges of accessing educational opportunities for AIDS-orphaned adolescents. The findings come from 29 semi-structured interviews conducted with eleven adolescents study participants, four caregivers and fourteen community leaders involved in the pilot SEED intervention. Study participants and community members indicated that the savings accounts offer a unique opportunity for orphaned adolescents to stay in school and imagine the future with optimism. PMID:23543861

  6. Informal Mealtime Pedagogies: Exploring the Influence of Family Structure on Young People's Healthy Eating Dispositions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quarmby, Thomas; Dagkas, Symeon

    2015-01-01

    Families are increasingly recognised as informal sites of learning, especially with regard to healthy eating. Through the use of Bourdieu's conceptual tools, this paper explores the role of family meals within different family structures and the informal pedagogic encounters that take place. How they help to construct young people's…

  7. Do family structure and poverty affect sexual risk behaviors of undergraduate students in Nigeria?

    PubMed

    Odimegwu, Clifford; Adedini, Sunday A

    2013-12-01

    This study examined sexual practices in a Nigerian University community with a view to understanding the role of family structure and poverty on risky sexual behaviours. A representative sample of 1,301 undergraduate students was randomly selected from the various faculties that made up the University. Using a questionnaire instrument, information was obtained on sexual behaviours of interest such as sexual initiation, multi-partnered sexual activity and condom use. Findings showed a noticeable variation in the relationship between family structure and risky sexual behaviour. Contrary to expectations, students from single parent homes showed lower likelihood of having multiple sexual partners. Also poverty was found not to be a critical determinant of risky sexual behaviour. Given the unclear nature of the findings, future study should explore further understanding of the relationship between family characteristics, poverty rating and risky sexual behaviour among students. PMID:24558790

  8. Structures of a histidine triad family protein from Entamoeba histolytica bound to sulfate, AMP and GMP.

    PubMed

    Lorimer, Donald D; Choi, Ryan; Abramov, Ariel; Nakazawa Hewitt, Stephen; Gardberg, Anna S; Van Voorhis, Wesley C; Staker, Bart L; Myler, Peter J; Edwards, Thomas E

    2015-05-01

    Three structures of the histidine triad family protein from Entamoeba histolytica, the causative agent of amoebic dysentery, were solved at high resolution within the Seattle Structural Genomics Center for Infectious Disease (SSGCID). The structures have sulfate (PDB entry 3oj7), AMP (PDB entry 3omf) or GMP (PDB entry 3oxk) bound in the active site, with sulfate occupying the same space as the ?-phosphate of the two nucleotides. The C(?) backbones of the three structures are nearly superimposable, with pairwise r.m.s.d.s ranging from 0.06 to 0.13 Å. PMID:25945711

  9. Family Structure and Child Mortality in Sub-Saharan Africa: Cross-National Effects of Polygyny

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Omariba, D. Walter Rasugu; Boyle, Michael H.

    2007-01-01

    This study applies multilevel logistic regression to Demographic and Health Survey data from 22 sub-Saharan African countries to examine whether the relationship between child mortality and family structure, with a specific emphasis on polygyny, varies cross-nationally and over time. Hypotheses were developed on the basis of competing theories on…

  10. Alignment and Structure Prediction of Divergent Protein Families: Periplasmic and Outer Membrane

    E-print Network

    Church, George M.

    and Department of Genetics, Harvard Medical School, 200 Longwood Ave Boston, MA 02115, USA Broad-speci®city ef as detailed examples. Gibbs sampling, hidden Markov models, and other analysis techniques were used to locate prediction algorithms in order to identify conserved structural features in protein families. This process

  11. Life Satisfaction among Children in Different Family Structures: A Comparative Study of 36 Western Societies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bjarnason, Thoroddur; Bendtsen, Pernille; Arnarsson, Arsaell M.; Borup, Ina; Iannotti, Ronald J.; Lofstedt, Petra; Haapasalo, Ilona; Niclasen, Birgit

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines differences in life satisfaction among children in different family structures in 36 western, industrialised countries (n = 184 496). Children living with both biological parents reported higher levels of life satisfaction than children living with a single parent or parent-step-parent. Children in joint physical custody…

  12. The Influence of Family Structure on Sexual Activity in a Randomized Effectiveness Trial for Minority Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherr, Michael E.; Crow, Janet; Stamey, James; Jones, Johnny; Dyer, Preston

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the influence of family structure on the outcomes of a sex education program in Miami, Florida. Using an experimental design, data collection occurred at pretest, 3-month, and 6-month follow-up with a sample of teenagers from high schools with a large majority of minority youth, assigned into treatment (n = 549) and control (n…

  13. The Effects of Race/Ethnicity, Income, and Family Structure on Adolescent Risk Behaviors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blum, Robert W.; Beuhring, Trisha; Shew, Marcia L.; Bearinger, Linda H.; Sieving, Renee E.; Resnick, Michael D.

    2000-01-01

    Examined the unique and combined contributions of race/ethnicity, income, and family structure to adolescent smoking, alcohol use, violence, suicide, and sexual intercourse. Data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health indicated that though some behaviors appeared to relate to the factors, when taken together, these factors…

  14. From Genome to Structure and Back Again: A Family Portrait of the Transcarbamylases.

    PubMed

    Shi, Dashuang; Allewell, Norma M; Tuchman, Mendel

    2015-01-01

    Enzymes in the transcarbamylase family catalyze the transfer of a carbamyl group from carbamyl phosphate (CP) to an amino group of a second substrate. The two best-characterized members, aspartate transcarbamylase (ATCase) and ornithine transcarbamylase (OTCase), are present in most organisms from bacteria to humans. Recently, structures of four new transcarbamylase members, N-acetyl-L-ornithine transcarbamylase (AOTCase), N-succinyl-L-ornithine transcarbamylase (SOTCase), ygeW encoded transcarbamylase (YTCase) and putrescine transcarbamylase (PTCase) have also been determined. Crystal structures of these enzymes have shown that they have a common overall fold with a trimer as their basic biological unit. The monomer structures share a common CP binding site in their N-terminal domain, but have different second substrate binding sites in their C-terminal domain. The discovery of three new transcarbamylases, l-2,3-diaminopropionate transcarbamylase (DPTCase), l-2,4-diaminobutyrate transcarbamylase (DBTCase) and ureidoglycine transcarbamylase (UGTCase), demonstrates that our knowledge and understanding of the spectrum of the transcarbamylase family is still incomplete. In this review, we summarize studies on the structures and function of transcarbamylases demonstrating how structural information helps to define biological function and how small structural differences govern enzyme specificity. Such information is important for correctly annotating transcarbamylase sequences in the genome databases and for identifying new members of the transcarbamylase family. PMID:26274952

  15. From Genome to Structure and Back Again: A Family Portrait of the Transcarbamylases

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Dashuang; Allewell, Norma M.; Tuchman, Mendel

    2015-01-01

    Enzymes in the transcarbamylase family catalyze the transfer of a carbamyl group from carbamyl phosphate (CP) to an amino group of a second substrate. The two best-characterized members, aspartate transcarbamylase (ATCase) and ornithine transcarbamylase (OTCase), are present in most organisms from bacteria to humans. Recently, structures of four new transcarbamylase members, N-acetyl-l-ornithine transcarbamylase (AOTCase), N-succinyl-l-ornithine transcarbamylase (SOTCase), ygeW encoded transcarbamylase (YTCase) and putrescine transcarbamylase (PTCase) have also been determined. Crystal structures of these enzymes have shown that they have a common overall fold with a trimer as their basic biological unit. The monomer structures share a common CP binding site in their N-terminal domain, but have different second substrate binding sites in their C-terminal domain. The discovery of three new transcarbamylases, l-2,3-diaminopropionate transcarbamylase (DPTCase), l-2,4-diaminobutyrate transcarbamylase (DBTCase) and ureidoglycine transcarbamylase (UGTCase), demonstrates that our knowledge and understanding of the spectrum of the transcarbamylase family is still incomplete. In this review, we summarize studies on the structures and function of transcarbamylases demonstrating how structural information helps to define biological function and how small structural differences govern enzyme specificity. Such information is important for correctly annotating transcarbamylase sequences in the genome databases and for identifying new members of the transcarbamylase family. PMID:26274952

  16. Gender Liberation, Economic Squeeze, or Fear of Strangers: Why Fathers Provide Infant Care in Dual-Earner Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glass, Jennifer

    1998-01-01

    Examines the experiences of families in which fathers care for their newborn infants when mothers return to work after childbirth. Documents the hours of care provided by fathers while mothers are at work, the simultaneous use of other child-care arrangements, and the average savings per family. Explores three possible motivations for families to…

  17. Structure and Organization of the Engraulidae Family U2 snRNA: An Evolutionary Model Gene?

    PubMed

    Chairi, Hicham; Gonzalez, Laureana Rebordinos

    2015-04-01

    The U2 snRNA multigene family has been analyzed in four species of the Engraulidae family--Engraulis encrasicolus, Engraulis mordax, Engraulis ringens, and Engraulis japonicas--with the object of understanding more about the structure of this multigene family in these pelagic species and studying their phylogenetic relationships. The results showed that the cluster of this gene family in the Engraulis genus is formed by the U2-U5 snRNA with highly conserved sequences of mini- and micro-satellites, such as (CTGT)n, embedded downstream of the transcription unit; findings indicate that this gene family evolved following the concerted model. The phylogenetic analysis of the non-transcribed spacer of cluster U2-U5 snDNA in the 4 species showed that the sequences of the species E. encrasicolus and E. japonicus are closely related; these two are genetically close to E. mordax and slightly more distant from E. ringens. The data obtained by molecular analysis of U2-U5 snDNA and their secondary structure, with the presence of the micro-satellite (CTGT)n and mini-satellites, show clearly that the species E. encrasicolus and E. japonicus are closely related and would be older than E. mordax and E. ringens. PMID:25838107

  18. Gene structure, phylogeny and expression profile of the sucrose synthase gene family in cacao (Theobroma cacao L.).

    PubMed

    Li, Fupeng; Hao, Chaoyun; Yan, Lin; Wu, Baoduo; Qin, Xiaowei; Lai, Jianxiong; Song, Yinghui

    2015-09-01

    In higher plants, sucrose synthase (Sus, EC 2.4.1.13) is widely considered as a key enzyme involved in sucrose metabolism. Although, several paralogous genes encoding different isozymes of Sus have been identified and characterized in multiple plant genomes, to date detailed information about the Sus genes is lacking for cacao. This study reports the identification of six novel Sus genes from economically important cacao tree. Analyses of the gene structure and phylogeny of the Sus genes demonstrated evolutionary conservation in the Sus family across cacao and other plant species. The expression of cacao Sus genes was investigated via real-time PCR in various tissues, different developmental phases of leaf, flower bud and pod. The Sus genes exhibited distinct but partially redundant expression profiles in cacao, with TcSus1, TcSus5 and TcSus6, being the predominant genes in the bark with phloem, TcSus2 predominantly expressing in the seed during the stereotype stage. TcSus3 and TcSus4 were significantly detected more in the pod husk and seed coat along the pod development, and showed development dependent expression profiles in the cacao pod. These results provide new insights into the evolution, and basic information that will assist in elucidating the functions of cacao Sus gene family. PMID:26440085

  19. School climate, family structure, and academic achievement: a study of moderation effects.

    PubMed

    O'Malley, Meagan; Voight, Adam; Renshaw, Tyler L; Eklund, Katie

    2015-03-01

    School climate has been lauded for its relationship to a host of desirable academic, behavioral, and social-emotional outcomes for youth. The present study tested the hypothesis that school climate counteracts youths' home-school risk by examining the moderating effects of students' school climate perceptions on the relationship between family structure (i.e., two-parent, one-parent, foster-care, and homeless households), and academic performance (i.e., self-reported [grade point average] GPA). The present sample consisted of 902 California public high schools, including responses from over 490,000 students in Grades 9 and 11. Results indicated that, regardless of family structure, students with more positive school climate perceptions self-reported higher GPAs. Youths with two-parent, one-parent, and homeless family structures displayed stepwise, linear improvements in self-reported GPA as perceptions of climate improved. Foster-care students' positive school climate perceptions had a weaker effect on their self-reported GPA compared with students living in other family structures. A unique curvilinear trend was found for homeless students, as the relationship between their school climate perceptions and self-reported GPA was stronger at lower levels. Overall, the moderation effect of positive school climate perceptions on self-reported GPA was strongest for homeless youth and youth from one-parent homes, suggesting that school climate has a protective effect for students living in these family structures. A protective effect was not found for youth in foster-care. Implications for research and practice are discussed. PMID:25111464

  20. Socio-Economic and Cultural Aspects of Ageing in Nepal

    E-print Network

    Regmi, Rishikeshab Raj

    1993-01-01

    and family organization are all determined by the infrastructural conditions of the agra­ rian economy of preindustrial technology. Nap. Ii Structure of Family The family in Nepali Society is the fundamental multi ­ purpose organization for many... persons maintained the economic and social power of the family by preventing fragmentation and 35 by maintaining continuity. The family has become a mullicompl· ex institution, included in it the needed religious Institution or religious affiliations...

  1. Structural basis for protein–protein interactions in the 14-3-3 protein family

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiaowen; Lee, Wen Hwa; Sobott, Frank; Papagrigoriou, Evangelos; Robinson, Carol V.; Grossmann, J. Günter; Sundström, Michael; Doyle, Declan A.; Elkins, Jonathan M.

    2006-01-01

    The seven members of the human 14-3-3 protein family regulate a diverse range of cell signaling pathways by formation of protein–protein complexes with signaling proteins that contain phosphorylated Ser/Thr residues within specific sequence motifs. Previously, crystal structures of three 14-3-3 isoforms (zeta, sigma, and tau) have been reported, with structural data for two isoforms deposited in the Protein Data Bank (zeta and sigma). In this study, we provide structural detail for five 14-3-3 isoforms bound to ligands, providing structural coverage for all isoforms of a human protein family. A comparative structural analysis of the seven 14-3-3 proteins revealed specificity determinants for binding of phosphopeptides in a specific orientation, target domain interaction surfaces and flexible adaptation of 14-3-3 proteins through domain movements. Specifically, the structures of the beta isoform in its apo and peptide bound forms showed that its binding site can exhibit structural flexibility to facilitate binding of its protein and peptide partners. In addition, the complex of 14-3-3 beta with the exoenzyme S peptide displayed a secondary structural element in the 14-3-3 peptide binding groove. These results show that the 14-3-3 proteins are adaptable structures in which internal flexibility is likely to facilitate recognition and binding of their interaction partners. PMID:17085597

  2. A Self-Ethnographic Investigation of Continuing Education Program in Engineering Arising from Economic Structural Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaihlavirta, Auri; Isomöttönen, Ville; Kärkkäinen, Tommi

    2015-01-01

    This paper provides a self-ethnographic investigation of a continuing education program in engineering in Central Finland. The program was initiated as a response to local economic structural change, in order to offer re-education possibilities for a higher educated workforce currently under unemployment threat. We encountered considerable…

  3. Wood fuel for power generation at Wendel, California. Volume 2. Business structure and economics

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-05-01

    The business structure and operating approach recommended for economic procurement of wood fuel for the proposed Honey Lake hybrid power plant are covered including: (a) constraints, (b) availability of wood fuel, (c) business approach and organization, (d) cost of wood fuel, and (e) socioeconomic considerations.

  4. Structural Blockage: A Cross-national Study of Economic Dependency, State Efficacy, and Underdevelopment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delacroix, Jacques; Ragin, Charles C.

    1981-01-01

    Presents a statistical analysis of dependency of developing nations on more highly developed and industrialized nations and relates this dependency to various degrees of economic development. The analysis is based on the structural blockage argument (one of several dependency arguments contained in many versions of dependency theory). Emphasizes…

  5. Zimbabwe's success story in education and health: will it weather economic structural adjustment?

    PubMed

    Tumwine, J K

    1992-12-01

    The beginning of the 1980s saw the birth of Zimbabwe as a result of a protracted liberation war. It coincided with global interest in primary health care, the concept of universal primary school education and, unfortunately, moves towards economic stabilization and structural adjustment programmes. Economic structural adjustment was adopted by several sub Saharan African countries with dire consequences for the poor and vulnerable. Zimbabwe's commitment to social justice and to equitable distribution of resources demonstrated a practical move away from the culture of rhetoric so characteristic of many governments and non-governmental organisations and agencies. This commitment has been translated into impressive improvements in health and education. Current evidence shows that education has had a positive impact on health and related areas like contraceptive use, child mortality and the nutrition status of children. Conversely nutrition and health conditions among school children are important determinants of educational outcomes. Hitherto Zimbabwe's economy has been sufficiently strong to avoid excessive dependence on the International Monetary Fund, the World Bank and other foreign financial institutions. Unfortunately, however, the current economic recession together with economic structural adjustment programmes are beginning to have a negative impact on health and education. Will true synergism between health and education weather these structural problems? It seems that the people and government of Zimbabwe have the capacity and resolve to weather such a storm. PMID:1469676

  6. Cytochrome P450 Family 1 Inhibitors and Structure-Activity Relationships

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jiawang; Sridhar, Jayalakshmi; Foroozesh, Maryam

    2014-01-01

    With the widespread use of O-alkoxyresorufin dealkylation assays since the 1990’s, thousands of inhibitors of cytochrome P450 family 1 enzymes (P450s 1A1, 1A2, and 1B1) have been identified and studied. Generally, planar polycyclic molecules such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, stilbenoids, and flavonoids are considered to potentially be effective inhibitors of these enzymes. However, the details of structure-activity relationships and selectivity of these inhibitors are still ambiguous. In this review, we thoroughly discuss the selectivity of many representative P450 family 1 inhibitors reported in the past 20 years through a meta-analysis. PMID:24287985

  7. Structural Characterization of the Predominant Family of Histidine Kinase Sensor Domains

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z.; Hendrickson, W

    2010-01-01

    Histidine kinase (HK) receptors are used ubiquitously by bacteria to monitor environmental changes, and they are also prevalent in plants, fungi, and other protists. Typical HK receptors have an extracellular sensor portion that detects a signal, usually a chemical ligand, and an intracellular transmitter portion that includes both the kinase domain itself and the site for histidine phosphorylation. While kinase domains are highly conserved, sensor domains are diverse. HK receptors function as dimers, but the molecular mechanism for signal transduction across cell membranes remains obscure. In this study, eight crystal structures were determined from five sensor domains representative of the most populated family, family HK1, found in a bioinformatic analysis of predicted sensor domains from transmembrane HKs. Each structure contains an inserted repeat of PhoQ/DcuS/CitA (PDC) domains, and similarity between sequence and structure is correlated across these and other double-PDC sensor proteins. Three of the five sensors crystallize as dimers that appear to be physiologically relevant, and comparisons between ligated structures and apo-state structures provide insights into signal transmission. Some HK1 family proteins prove to be sensors for chemotaxis proteins or diguanylate cyclase receptors, implying a combinatorial molecular evolution.

  8. Common and Distant Structural Characteristics of Feruloyl Esterase Families from Aspergillus oryzae

    PubMed Central

    Udatha, D. B. R. K. Gupta; Mapelli, Valeria; Panagiotou, Gianni; Olsson, Lisbeth

    2012-01-01

    Background Feruloyl esterases (FAEs) are important biomass degrading accessory enzymes due to their capability of cleaving the ester links between hemicellulose and pectin to aromatic compounds of lignin, thus enhancing the accessibility of plant tissues to cellulolytic and hemicellulolytic enzymes. FAEs have gained increased attention in the area of biocatalytic transformations for the synthesis of value added compounds with medicinal and nutritional applications. Following the increasing attention on these enzymes, a novel descriptor based classification system has been proposed for FAEs resulting into 12 distinct families and pharmacophore models for three FAE sub-families have been developed. Methodology/Principal Findings The feruloylome of Aspergillus oryzae contains 13 predicted FAEs belonging to six sub-families based on our recently developed descriptor-based classification system. The three-dimensional structures of the 13 FAEs were modeled for structural analysis of the feruloylome. The three genes coding for three enzymes, viz., A.O.2, A.O.8 and A.O.10 from the feruloylome of A. oryzae, representing sub-families with unknown functional features, were heterologously expressed in Pichia pastoris, characterized for substrate specificity and structural characterization through CD spectroscopy. Common feature-based pharamacophore models were developed according to substrate specificity characteristics of the three enzymes. The active site residues were identified for the three expressed FAEs by determining the titration curves of amino acid residues as a function of the pH by applying molecular simulations. Conclusions/Significance Our findings on the structure-function relationships and substrate specificity of the FAEs of A. oryzae will be instrumental for further understanding of the FAE families in the novel classification system. The developed pharmacophore models could be applied for virtual screening of compound databases for short listing the putative substrates prior to docking studies or for post-processing docking results to remove false positives. Our study exemplifies how computational predictions can complement to the information obtained through experimental methods. PMID:22745763

  9. Multifactorial inheritance with cultural transmission and assortative mating. III. Family structure and the analysis of separation experiments.

    PubMed Central

    Cloninger, C R; Rice, J; Reich, T

    1979-01-01

    Demographic data about family composition or structure in the United States is reviewed. About 25% of white children and a majority of black children are reared in either broken or extended families, and this must be taken into consideration for valid studies of cultural inheritance. Atypical family structures are described including those in which parents include: biological parents, stepparents, grandparents, uncles, aunts, sibs, foster parents, and their spouses. General formulae for a wide variety of kinship correlations are derived using path analysis. The multifactorial model presented allows for cultural inheritance, polygenic inheritance, correlated sibling environments, and phenotypic assortative mating (as previously described for intact families) plus extensions necessary for the analysis of separation experiments. These extensions allow for variable family structure and differences in parental influence due to separation, age or stage of development of the child, birth order, or type of relationship. Family structure is observed to have a marked effect on familial resemblance. Computer simulation studies demonstrate marked heterogeneity among phenotypic correlations for kinships of the same degree of genetic relationship arising in different family structures. Analyses of multiple types of sibs and other relatives in variable family structures offer great promise for the study of cultural inheritance. PMID:572636

  10. Emerging Factors in Work/Family Interference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mehrotra, Jena; Gebeke, Debra

    In recent years the study of work and family issues has expanded from a focus on men's unemployment, women's employment, and two-career couples to more complex issues of economics, structural and psychological characteristics of work, enactment of multiple roles, the work/family cycle, combined effects of partners' work role characteristics, and…

  11. Adjusting to change: linking family structure transitions with parenting and boys' adjustment.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Charles R; Forgatch, Marion S

    2002-06-01

    This study examined links between family structure transitions and children's academic, behavioral, and emotional outcomes in a sample of 238 divorcing mothers and their sons in Grades 1-3. Multiple methods and agents were used in assessing family process variables and child outcomes. Findings suggest that greater accumulations of family transitions were associated with poorer academic functioning, greater acting-out behavior, and worse emotional adjustment for boys. However, in all three cases, these relationships were mediated by parenting practices: Parental academic skill encouragement mediated the relationship between transitions and academic functioning, and a factor of more general effective parenting practices mediated the relationships between transitions and acting out and emotional adjustment. PMID:12090250

  12. A Bio-economic Study of the Trophic Structure of the Omani Fish Catch

    PubMed Central

    Abd El-Rahman, Medhat Abd El-Barr

    2014-01-01

    The present study was conducted to obtain estimates of certain biological and economic indices of the trophic structure of the Omani landed fish catch, namely, the mean trophic level (MTL), the fishing-in-balance (FiB) index and the relative price index (RPI). The MTL generally decreased from 1995 to 2010, indicating a fishing-down of the marine trophic web. The FiB index increased, indicating an imbalance in the fisheries. An economic index, the RPI, decreased from 1994 to 2007, indicating that the values of lower trophic level (TL) species increased relative to those of higher TL species. PMID:25210586

  13. Family ties in tough times: how young adults and their parents view the U.S. economic crisis.

    PubMed

    Stein, Catherine H; Abraham, Kristen M; Bonar, Erin E; Leith, Jaclyn E; Kraus, Shane W; Hamill, Alexis C; Gumber, Shinakee; Hoffmann, Erica; Fogo, Wendy R

    2011-06-01

    The present intergenerational study examined the perceived impact of the recent U.S. economic crisis on a sample of 68 young adult-parent dyads. The relative contribution of perceived economic pressure, reports of adult child-parent relationship quality, and concerns about the economic future in accounting for variation in self-reports of psychological distress for adult children and their middle-aged parents were examined. Parents' concerns about their children's economic future accounted for variation in their reports of anxiety and depressed mood above and beyond that of perceived economic pressures and their views of the parent-child relationship. In contrast, for young adults, reports of personal economic pressure were generally related to self-reported anxiety and depressed mood. Implications of findings for research and practice are discussed. PMID:21534669

  14. Structural Features and Chaperone Activity of the NudC Protein Family

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Meiying; Cierpicki, Tomasz; Burdette, Alexander J.; Utepbergenov, Darkhan; Janczyk, Pawe; #322; #321; .; Derewenda, Urszula; Stukenberg, P. Todd; Caldwell, Kim A.; Derewenda, Zygmunt S.

    2012-05-25

    The NudC family consists of four conserved proteins with representatives in all eukaryotes. The archetypal nudC gene from Aspergillus nidulans is a member of the nud gene family that is involved in the maintenance of nuclear migration. This family also includes nudF, whose human orthologue, Lis1, codes for a protein essential for brain cortex development. Three paralogues of NudC are known in vertebrates: NudC, NudC-like (NudCL), and NudC-like 2 (NudCL2). The fourth distantly related member of the family, CML66, contains a NudC-like domain. The three principal NudC proteins have no catalytic activity but appear to play as yet poorly defined roles in proliferating and dividing cells. We present crystallographic and NMR studies of the human NudC protein and discuss the results in the context of structures recently deposited by structural genomics centers (i.e., NudCL and mouse NudCL2). All proteins share the same core CS domain characteristic of proteins acting either as cochaperones of Hsp90 or as independent small heat shock proteins. However, while NudC and NudCL dimerize via an N-terminally located coiled coil, the smaller NudCL2 lacks this motif and instead dimerizes as a result of unique domain swapping. We show that NudC and NudCL, but not NudCL2, inhibit the aggregation of several target proteins, consistent with an Hsp90-independent heat shock protein function. Importantly, and in contrast to several previous reports, none of the three proteins is able to form binary complexes with Lis1. The availability of structural information will be of help in further studies on the cellular functions of the NudC family.

  15. Nutritional assessment of pre-school children in rural villages of the family dynamics, lifestyles and nutrition study (1997-2001) I. Socio-economic status of households.

    PubMed

    Chee, Heng Leng; Khor, Geoklin; Arshad, Fatimah; Wanmuda, Wanabdulmanan; Shabdin, Ahmadaffendi; Abusamah, Asnarulkhadi; Abdullah, Rohani; Bidin, Sitijamilah; Emby, Zahid; Mohdmarjan, Zamaliah

    2002-03-01

    This paper presents the socio-economic profile of households in the Family Dynamics Study (FDS) (1997-2001) and makes comparisons with the earlier Functional Groups Study (FGS) (1992-1996). For the current study, FGS villages with a high prevalence of child malnutrition were purposively selected. In each village selected, all households were included, and interviews with a structured questionnaire were conducted in April-May 1998. Incomes were generally low and incidence of poverty was high; 49.6% of the households were under the poverty line income, of which 37.2% were poor and 12.4% were hard core poor. Overall, only 23.2% of heads of households were in agricultural occupations, others being primarily waged workers and petty traders. Livestock rearing was widespread (57.8%), and most households (90.4%) owned at least one motorised vehicle, the most common being the motorcycle. The majority of households had refrigerators (73.6%), washing machines (58.8%), and televisions (91.1%); but telephones (42.2%), mobile phones (6.1%) and computers (2.3%) were less common. Although 99.7% of households had electricity supply and 95.1% had either a flush or pour flush latrine, only 57.4% had piped water supply. In comparison to the FGS, poverty in the current study is lower (49.6% of FDS households are poor compared to 55.2% of FGS households), the proportion of household heads in agricultural occupations is also lower (26.9% compared to 55.3%), while all other socioeconomic indicators were better, except for piped water supply, which remains inadequate for households in the current study. PMID:22692437

  16. Ubiquitin family proteins and their relationship to the proteasome: a structural perspective.

    PubMed

    Walters, Kylie J; Goh, Amanda M; Wang, Qinghua; Wagner, Gerhard; Howley, Peter M

    2004-11-29

    Many biological processes rely on targeted protein degradation, the dysregulation of which contributes to the pathogenesis of various diseases. Ubiquitin plays a well-established role in this process, in which the covalent attachment of polyubiquitin chains to protein substrates culminates in their degradation via the proteasome. The three-dimensional structural topology of ubiquitin is highly conserved as a domain found in a variety of proteins of diverse biological function. Some of these so-called "ubiquitin family proteins" have recently been shown to bind components of the 26S proteasome via their ubiquitin-like domains, thus implicating proteasome activity in pathways other than protein degradation. In this chapter, we provide a structural perspective of how the ubiquitin family of proteins interacts with the proteasome. PMID:15571810

  17. Family income, parental education and brain structure in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Noble, Kimberly G; Houston, Suzanne M; Brito, Natalie H; Bartsch, Hauke; Kan, Eric; Kuperman, Joshua M; Akshoomoff, Natacha; Amaral, David G; Bloss, Cinnamon S; Libiger, Ondrej; Schork, Nicholas J; Murray, Sarah S; Casey, B J; Chang, Linda; Ernst, Thomas M; Frazier, Jean A; Gruen, Jeffrey R; Kennedy, David N; Van Zijl, Peter; Mostofsky, Stewart; Kaufmann, Walter E; Kenet, Tal; Dale, Anders M; Jernigan, Terry L; Sowell, Elizabeth R

    2015-05-01

    Socioeconomic disparities are associated with differences in cognitive development. The extent to which this translates to disparities in brain structure is unclear. We investigated relationships between socioeconomic factors and brain morphometry, independently of genetic ancestry, among a cohort of 1,099 typically developing individuals between 3 and 20 years of age. Income was logarithmically associated with brain surface area. Among children from lower income families, small differences in income were associated with relatively large differences in surface area, whereas, among children from higher income families, similar income increments were associated with smaller differences in surface area. These relationships were most prominent in regions supporting language, reading, executive functions and spatial skills; surface area mediated socioeconomic differences in certain neurocognitive abilities. These data imply that income relates most strongly to brain structure among the most disadvantaged children. PMID:25821911

  18. Family Income, Parental Education and Brain Structure in Children and Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Noble, Kimberly G.; Houston, Suzanne M.; Brito, Natalie H.; Bartsch, Hauke; Kan, Eric; Kuperman, Joshua M.; Akshoomoff, Natacha; Amaral, David G.; Bloss, Cinnamon S.; Libiger, Ondrej; Schork, Nicholas J.; Murray, Sarah S.; Casey, B. J.; Chang, Linda; Ernst, Thomas M.; Frazier, Jean A.; Gruen, Jeffrey R.; Kennedy, David N.; Zijl, Peter Van; Mostofsky, Stewart; Kaufmann, Walter E.; Kenet, Tal; Dale, Anders M.; Jernigan, Terry L.; Sowell, Elizabeth R.

    2015-01-01

    Socioeconomic disparities are associated with differences in cognitive development. The extent to which this translates to disparities in brain structure is unclear. Here, we investigated relationships between socioeconomic factors and brain morphometry, independently of genetic ancestry, among a cohort of 1099 typically developing individuals between 3 and 20 years. Income was logarithmically associated with brain surface area. Specifically, among children from lower income families, small differences in income were associated with relatively large differences in surface area, whereas, among children from higher income families, similar income increments were associated with smaller differences in surface area. These relationships were most prominent in regions supporting language, reading, executive functions and spatial skills; surface area mediated socioeconomic differences in certain neurocognitive abilities. These data indicate that income relates most strongly to brain structure among the most disadvantaged children. Potential implications are discussed. PMID:25821911

  19. A Structure-Based Classification and Analysis of Protein Domain Family Binding Sites and Their Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Ghoorah, Anisah W.; Devignes, Marie-Dominique; Alborzi, Seyed Ziaeddin; Smaïl-Tabbone, Malika; Ritchie, David W.

    2015-01-01

    While the number of solved 3D protein structures continues to grow rapidly, the structural rules that distinguish protein-protein interactions between different structural families are still not clear. Here, we classify and analyse the secondary structural features and promiscuity of a comprehensive non-redundant set of domain family binding sites (DFBSs) and hetero domain-domain interactions (DDIs) extracted from our updated KBDOCK resource. We have partitioned 4001 DFBSs into five classes using their propensities for three types of secondary structural elements (“?” for helices, “?” for strands, and “?” for irregular structure) and we have analysed how frequently these classes occur in DDIs. Our results show that ? elements are not highly represented in DFBSs compared to ? and ? elements. At the DDI level, all classes of binding sites tend to preferentially bind to the same class of binding sites and ?/? contacts are significantly disfavored. Very few DFBSs are promiscuous: 80% of them interact with just one Pfam domain. About 50% of our Pfam domains bear only one single-partner DFBS and are therefore monogamous in their interactions with other domains. Conversely, promiscuous Pfam domains bear several DFBSs among which one or two are promiscuous, thereby multiplying the promiscuity of the concerned protein. PMID:25860777

  20. Families' Social Backgrounds Matter: Socio-Economic Factors, Home Learning and Young Children's Language, Literacy and Social Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartas, Dimitra

    2011-01-01

    Parental support with children's learning is considered to be one pathway through which socio-economic factors influence child competencies. Utilising a national longitudinal sample from the Millennium Cohort Study, this study examined the relationship between home learning and parents' socio-economic status and their impact on young children's…

  1. The effects of race/ethnicity, income, and family structure on adolescent risk behaviors.

    PubMed Central

    Blum, R W; Beuhring, T; Shew, M L; Bearinger, L H; Sieving, R E; Resnick, M D

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The study examined the unique and combined contributions of race/ethnicity, income, and family structure to adolescent cigarette smoking, alcohol use, involvement with violence, suicidal thoughts or attempts, and sexual intercourse. METHODS: Analyses were based on the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health. A nationally representative sample of 7th to 12th graders participated in in-home interviews, as did a resident parent for 85.6% of the adolescent subjects. The final sample included 10,803 White, Black, and Hispanic 7th to 12th graders. RESULTS: White adolescents were more likely to smoke cigarettes, drink alcohol, and attempt suicide in the younger years than were Black and Hispanic youths. Black youths were more likely to have had sexual intercourse; both Black and Hispanic youths were more likely than White teens to engage in violence. Controlling for gender, race/ethnicity, income, and family structure together explained no more than 10% of the variance in each of the 5 risk behaviors among younger adolescents and no more than 7% among older youths. CONCLUSIONS: Findings suggest that when taken together, race/ethnicity, income, and family structure provide only limited understanding of adolescent risk behaviors. PMID:11111260

  2. Relation between parent psychiatric symptoms and youth problems: moderation through family structure and youth gender.

    PubMed

    Schleider, Jessica L; Chorpita, Bruce F; Weisz, John R

    2014-02-01

    Links between parents' psychiatric symptoms and their children's behavioral and emotional problems have been widely documented in previous research, and the search for moderators of this association has begun. However, family structure (single versus dual-parent households) has received little attention as a potential moderator, despite indirect evidence that risk may be elevated in single-parent homes. Two other candidate moderators-youth gender and age-have been tested directly, but with inconsistent findings across studies, perhaps in part because studies have differed in whether they used youth clinical samples and in which informants (parents vs. youths) reported on youth problems. In the present study, we examined these three candidate moderators using a sample of exclusively clinic-referred youths (N?=?333, 34 % girls, aged 7-14,) and assessing youth problems through both parent- and youth-reports. Both family structure and youth gender emerged as robust moderators across parent and youth informants. Parent symptoms were associated with youth internalizing and externalizing problems in single-parent but not dual-parent homes; and parent symptoms were associated with youth internalizing problems among boys, but not girls. The moderator findings suggest that the risks associated with parent psychopathology may not be uniform but may depend, in part, on family structure and youth gender. PMID:24014160

  3. Genetic characterization and structural analysis of VHL Spanish families to define genotype-phenotype correlations.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Llorente, Sergio; Bravo, Jerónimo; Cebrián, Arancha; Cascón, Alberto; Pollan, Marina; Tellería, Dolores; Letón, Rocío; Urioste, Miguel; Rodríguez-López, Raquel; de Campos, Jose M; Muñoz, María J; Lacambra, Carmen; Benítez, Javier; Robledo, Mercedes

    2004-02-01

    Von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) disease is a hereditary cancer syndrome caused by germline mutations in the VHL gene. This gene, located in the 3p25-26 chromosome, is a tumor suppressor gene associated with the inhibition of angiogenesis and apoptosis, cell cycle exit, fibronectin matrix assembly, and proteolysis. To define the molecular basis of VHL in a Spanish population, we studied 33 patients suspected of suffering familial or de novo VHL disease and two familial pheochromocytoma cases. Sequence analysis of the coding regions of the VHL gene revealed germline sequence variants in 68.7% (24 out of 35) of the patients, and four of them presented with undescribed germline alterations: g.5429-5430insG, p.Leu128Arg, p.Tyr175Cys, and p.Tyr175Asn. For the remaining 11 patients who showed negative for point mutations, we performed Southern blot analysis and detected gross rearrangements in eight cases (22.8% of the index cases). Our results support the relevance of VHL gene analysis in familial pheochromocytoma cases and also in those with no familial history. In order to investigate the relevance of different amino acid changes in the VHL phenotype, we also analyzed the genotype-phenotype correlations using structural analysis to assess protein stability and complexes. The association of clear cell renal carcinoma (CCRC) development with a relatively high loss of structural stability in pVHL missense-mutants was consistent. Structural stability data in the genotype-phenotype correlations therefore provides us with a better understanding of VHL clinical implications. It is also a suitable approach to the evaluation of unknown significance changes. PMID:14722919

  4. Structural and Biochemical Characterization of the Human Cyclophilin Family of Peptidyl-Prolyl Isomerases

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Tara L.; Walker, John R.; Campagna-Slater, Valérie; Finerty, Jr., Patrick J.; Paramanathan, Ragika; Bernstein, Galina; MacKenzie, Farrell; Tempel, Wolfram; Ouyang, Hui; Lee, Wen Hwa; Eisenmesser, Elan Z.; Dhe-Paganon, Sirano

    2011-12-14

    Peptidyl-prolyl isomerases catalyze the conversion between cis and trans isomers of proline. The cyclophilin family of peptidyl-prolyl isomerases is well known for being the target of the immunosuppressive drug cyclosporin, used to combat organ transplant rejection. There is great interest in both the substrate specificity of these enzymes and the design of isoform-selective ligands for them. However, the dearth of available data for individual family members inhibits attempts to design drug specificity; additionally, in order to define physiological functions for the cyclophilins, definitive isoform characterization is required. In the current study, enzymatic activity was assayed for 15 of the 17 human cyclophilin isomerase domains, and binding to the cyclosporin scaffold was tested. In order to rationalize the observed isoform diversity, the high-resolution crystallographic structures of seven cyclophilin domains were determined. These models, combined with seven previously solved cyclophilin isoforms, provide the basis for a family-wide structure:function analysis. Detailed structural analysis of the human cyclophilin isomerase explains why cyclophilin activity against short peptides is correlated with an ability to ligate cyclosporin and why certain isoforms are not competent for either activity. In addition, we find that regions of the isomerase domain outside the proline-binding surface impart isoform specificity for both in vivo substrates and drug design. We hypothesize that there is a well-defined molecular surface corresponding to the substrate-binding S2 position that is a site of diversity in the cyclophilin family. Computational simulations of substrate binding in this region support our observations. Our data indicate that unique isoform determinants exist that may be exploited for development of selective ligands and suggest that the currently available small-molecule and peptide-based ligands for this class of enzyme are insufficient for isoform specificity.

  5. Heterologous Quaternary Structure of CXCL12 and its Relationship to the CC Chemokine Family

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, J.; Yuan, H; Kong, Y; Xiong, Y; Lolis, E

    2010-01-01

    X-ray crystallographic studies reveal that CXCL12 is able to form multiple dimer types, a traditional CXC dimer and a 'CC-like' form. Phylogenetic analysis of all known human chemokines demonstrates CXCL12 is more closely related to the CC chemokine class than other CXC chemokines. These observations indicate that CXCL12 contains genomic and structural elements characteristic of both CXC and CC chemokines.Chemokines are members of a superfamily of proteins involved in the migration of cells to the proper anatomical position during embryonic development or in response to infection or stress during an immune response. There are two major (CC and CXC) and two minor (CX3C and XC) families based on the sequence around the first conserved cysteine. The topology of all structures is essentially identical with a flexible N-terminal region of 3-8 amino acids, a 10-20 residue N-terminal loop, a short 3{sub 10}-helix, three {beta}-strands, and a {alpha}-helix. The major consequence of the subtle difference between the families occurs at the oligomeric level. Monomers of the CC, CXC, and CX3C families form dimers in a family-specific manner. The XCL1 chemokine is a monomer that can interconvert between two folded states. All chemokines activate GPCRs according to family-specificity, however there are a few examples of chemokines crossing the family boundary to function as antagonists. A two-stage mechanism for chemokine activation of GPCRs has been proposed. The N-terminal region of the receptor interacts with the chemokine, followed by receptor activation by the chemokine N-terminal region. Monomeric chemokines have been demonstrated to be the active form for receptor function. There are numerous examples of both chemokines and their receptors forming dimers. While family-specific dimerization may be an attractive explanation for why specific chemokines only activate GPCRs within their own family, the role of dimers in the function of chemokines has not been resolved. Given that CXCL12 is in the CXC family, the CXC dimer is considered the physiologic dimer in all previous studies based on crystallographic evidence. NMR and mutational studies agree with the CXC dimer form in solution. The CXC form of the dimer is seen in recent structures of CXCL12 bound to a heparin disaccharide and several CXCR4 peptides. In one case, crystals of the CXC-type dimer were soaked in a heparin disaccharide solution to determine the interactions between this dimer and bound disaccharide. In another case, in order to overcome NMR chemical shift line broadening when CXCR4 peptides are added, a 'locked' dimer was constructed by introducing a cysteine mutant that linked subunits as a CXC dimer through an inter-subunit disulfide bond. The solution structures of the locked CXC dimer with CXCR4 peptides were determined. The locked CXC dimer retained Ca{sup 2+} mobilization yet lost chemotaxis activity, presumably because the monomer is the active form. In addition to existing as a monomer and CXC dimer, CXCL12 is now demonstrated to have the capacity to form CC type dimers in the presence of a CXCR4 peptide.

  6. A Comprehensive Phylogenetic and Structural Analysis of the Carcinoembryonic Antigen (CEA) Gene Family

    PubMed Central

    Pavlopoulou, Athanasia; Scorilas, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    The carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) gene family belongs to the immunoglobulin (Ig) superfamily and codes for a vast number of glycoproteins that differ greatly both in amino acid composition and function. The CEA family is divided into two groups, the carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecules (CEACAMs) and the pregnancy-specific glycoproteins. The CEA family members are implicated in pleiotropic (patho)physiological functions including cell–cell adhesion, pregnancy, immunity, neovascularization, regulation of insulin homeostasis, and carcinogenesis. In general, the CEA-encoded proteins are composed of an extracellular region with Ig variable and constant-like domains and a cytoplasmic region containing signaling motifs. Of particular interest, the well-studied human and mouse CEA genes are arranged in clusters in a single chromosome. Taking into account this characteristic, we made an effort to reconstruct the evolutionary history of the CEA gene family. Toward this end, the publicly available genomes were searched extensively for CEA homologs. The domain organization of the retrieved protein sequences was analyzed, and, subsequently, comprehensive phylogenetic analyses of the entire length CEA homologous proteins were performed. A series of evolutionarily conserved amino acid residues, functionally important, were identified. The relative positioning of these residues on the modeled tertiary structure of novel CEA protein domains revealed that they are, also, spatially conserved. Furthermore, the chromosomal arrangement of CEA genes was examined, and it was found that the CEA genes are preserved in terms of position, transcriptional orientation, and number in all species under investigation. PMID:24858421

  7. Crystal structure of the glycosidase family 73 peptidoglycan hydrolase FlgJ

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, Wataru; Ochiai, Akihito; Momma, Keiko; Itoh, Takafumi; Mikami, Bunzo; Maruyama, Yukie; Murata, Kousaku

    2009-03-27

    Glycoside hydrolase (GH) categorized into family 73 plays an important role in degrading bacterial cell wall peptidoglycan. The flagellar protein FlgJ contains N- and C-terminal domains responsible for flagellar rod assembly and peptidoglycan hydrolysis, respectively. A member of family GH-73, the C-terminal domain (SPH1045-C) of FlgJ from Sphingomonas sp. strain A1 was expressed in Escherichia coli, purified, and characterized. SPH1045-C exhibited bacterial cell lytic activity most efficiently at pH 6.0 and 37 deg. C. The X-ray crystallographic structure of SPH1045-C was determined at 1.74 A resolution by single-wavelength anomalous diffraction. The enzyme consists of two lobes, {alpha} and {beta}. A deep cleft located between the two lobes can accommodate polymer molecules, suggesting that the active site is located in the cleft. Although SPH1045-C shows a structural homology with family GH-22 and GH-23 lysozymes, the arrangement of the nucleophile/base residue in the active site is specific to each peptidoglycan hydrolase.

  8. Computer Program for Assessing the Economic Feasibility of Solar Energy for Single Family Residences and Light Commercial Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forney, J. A.; Walker, D.; Lanier, M.

    1979-01-01

    Computer program, SHCOST, was used to perform economic analyses of operational test sites. The program allows consideration of the economic parameters which are important to the solar system user. A life cycle cost and cash flow comparison is made between a solar heating system and a conventional system. The program assists in sizing the solar heating system. A sensitivity study and plot capability allow the user to select the most cost effective system configuration.

  9. The Relationship of Family Structure to Adolescent Drug Use, Peer Affiliation, and Perception of Peer Acceptance of Drug Use.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenkins, Jeanne E.; Zunguze, Sabina T.

    1998-01-01

    Uses a self-report instrument to examine the relationship of family structure to adolescent drug use and peer-related factors. Finds significant differences in drug use variables, with adolescents from intact families reporting less frequent drug use, fewer drug-using friends, and more perceptions of peer disapproval of drug use. (GCP)

  10. Factor Structure and Psychometric Properties of the Work-Family Balance Scale in an Urban Chinese Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Huiping; Yip, Paul S. F.; Chi, Peilian; Chan, Kinsun; Cheung, Yee Tak; Zhang, Xiulan

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the factor structure of the Work-Family Balance Scale (WFBS) and examine its reliability and validity in use in the urban Chinese population. The scale was validated using a sample of 605 urban Chinese residents from 7 cities. Exploratory factor analysis identified two factors: work-family conflict and…

  11. User's manual for SMACS: a family of codes for probabilistic structural analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bumpus, S; Shukla, S N; O'Connell, W J; Gerhard, M A

    1982-03-01

    SMACS is a code which links the seismic input, soil-structure interaction and structural response calculations to obtain response vectors, which in turn are used as input for risk analysis. Inherently, there are uncertainties involved in various links of the seismic methodology chain. SMACS incorporates the uncertainty in the seismic input by using a suite of possible earthquakes. Uncertainties in the soil-structure interaction (SSI) are incorporated by using a range of values of soil shear modulus and soil material damping at a given site. Similarly a range of probable values of modal frequency and damping of the structure are used to account for uncertainties in structural modelling. The following pre-processor codes are available, as a package, to create necessary input files for the SMACS program: SIMQ (for generating seimic input); GLAY and CLAF (for soil-structure interaction analysis); and SAP4 (for modal analysis of the structures). The post-processor codes available are: PRESTO (to plot probability distributions for the response vectors or basic events); and CHANGO (to plot comparisons of basic events from different analyses). The code, SMACS, and the nature of the problem it solves are discussed. The way that SMACS is executed is explained. Manuals are provided that explain how to create the necessary input files for different subprograms of the SMACS family. An example problem illustrating an SSI analysis for a containment structure is presented.

  12. Structure and dynamics of [gamma]-SNAP: Insight into flexibility of proteins from the SNAP family

    SciTech Connect

    Bitto, Eduard; Bingman, Craig A.; Kondrashov, Dmitry A.; McCoy, Jason G.; Bannen, Ryan M.; Wesenberg, Gary E.; Phillips, Jr., George N.

    2010-02-19

    Soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein gamma ({gamma}-SNAP) is a member of an eukaryotic protein family involved in intracellular membrane trafficking. The X-ray structure of Brachydanio rerio {gamma}-SNAP was determined to 2.6 {angstrom} and revealed an all-helical protein comprised of an extended twisted-sheet of helical hairpins with a helical-bundle domain on its carboxy-terminal end. Structural and conformational differences between multiple observed {gamma}-SNAP molecules and Sec17, a SNAP family protein from yeast, are analyzed. Conformational variation in {gamma}-SNAP molecules is matched with great precision by the two lowest frequency normal modes of the structure. Comparison of the lowest-frequency modes from {gamma}-SNAP and Sec17 indicated that the structures share preferred directions of flexibility, corresponding to bending and twisting of the twisted sheet motif. We discuss possible consequences related to the flexibility of the SNAP proteins for the mechanism of the 20S complex disassembly during the SNAP receptors recycling.

  13. The human connexin gene family of gap junction proteins: distinct chromosomal locations but similar structures.

    PubMed

    Fishman, G I; Eddy, R L; Shows, T B; Rosenthal, L; Leinwand, L A

    1991-05-01

    Connexins are protein subunits that constitute gap junction channels. Two members of this gene family, connexin43 (Cx43) and connexin32 (Cx32), are abundantly expressed in the heart and liver, respectively. Human genomic DNA analysis revealed the presence of two loci for Cx43: an expressed gene and a processed pseudogene. The expressed gene (GJA1) was mapped to human chromosome 6 and the pseudogene (GJA1P) to chromosome 5. To determine whether Cx32 was linked to Cx43, somatic cell hybrids were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction and hybridization, resulting in the assignment of the gene for Cx32 (GJB1) to the X chromosome at Xp11----q22. Comparison of the structures of connexin genes suggests that members of this multigene family arose from a single precursor, but evolved to distinct chromosomal locations. PMID:1646158

  14. Association of Family Structure to Later Criminality: A Population-Based Follow-Up Study of Adolescent Psychiatric Inpatients in Northern Finland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ikaheimo, Olli; Laukkanen, Matti; Hakko, Helina; Rasanen, Pirkko

    2013-01-01

    The influence of family structure on criminality in adolescents is well acknowledged in population based studies of delinquents, but not regarding adolescent psychiatric inpatients. The association of family structure to criminality was examined among 508 adolescents receiving psychiatric inpatient treatment between 2001 and 2006. Family structure

  15. Structural analysis of haemoglobin binding by HpuA from the Neisseriaceae family.

    PubMed

    Wong, Chi T; Xu, Yingqi; Gupta, Akshari; Garnett, James A; Matthews, Steve J; Hare, Stephen A

    2015-01-01

    The Neisseriaceae family of bacteria causes a range of diseases including meningitis, septicaemia, gonorrhoea and endocarditis, and extracts haem from haemoglobin as an important iron source within the iron-limited environment of its human host. Herein we report crystal structures of apo- and haemoglobin-bound HpuA, an essential component of this haem import system. The interface involves long loops on the bacterial receptor that present hydrophobic side chains for packing against the surface of haemoglobin. Interestingly, our structural and biochemical analyses of Kingella denitrificans and Neisseria gonorrhoeae HpuA mutants, although validating the interactions observed in the crystal structure, show how Neisseriaceae have the fascinating ability to diversify functional sequences and yet retain the haemoglobin binding function. Our results present the first description of HpuA's role in direct binding of haemoglobin. PMID:26671256

  16. Stress: Family, Economic, and Management Considerations. Papers of the Annual Conference of the Western Region Home Management Family Economics Educators (28th, Salt Lake City, Utah, November 3-5, 1988). Volume 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holyoak, Arlene, Ed.

    These proceedings consist of 16 papers, some of which are followed by discussants' comments. They include: "Growing Older in a Rural Retirement Community" (Brokaw, Peters, Tripple; discussants Olson, Tucker; "An Interactive Computer Model for Achieving Personal Financial Goals" (Dilbeck, Hinds, Ulivi; discussants Burton, Peterson); "The Economics

  17. Population genetic structure of economically important Tortricidae (Lepidoptera) in South Africa: a comparative analysis.

    PubMed

    Timm, A E; Geertsema, H; Warnich, L

    2010-08-01

    Comparative studies of the population genetic structures of agricultural pests can elucidate the factors by which their population levels are affected, which is useful for designing pest management programs. This approach was used to provide insight into the six Tortricidae of major economic importance in South Africa. The population genetic structure of the carnation worm E. acerbella and the false codling moth T. leucotreta, analyzed using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analysis, is presented here for the first time. These results were compared with those obtained previously for the codling moth Cydia pomonella, the oriental fruit moth Grapholita molesta, the litchi moth Cryptophlebia peltastica and the macadamia nut borer T. batrachopa. Locally adapted populations were detected over local geographic areas for all species. No significant differences were found among population genetic structures as result of population history (whether native or introduced) although host range (whether oligophagous or polyphagous) had a small but significant effect. It is concluded that factors such as dispersal ability and agricultural practices have the most important effects on genetically structuring populations of the economically important Tortricidae in South Africa. PMID:19941674

  18. Structural correlations in the family of small leucine-rich repeat proteins and proteoglycans.

    PubMed

    McEwan, Paul A; Scott, Paul G; Bishop, Paul N; Bella, Jordi

    2006-08-01

    The family of small leucine-rich repeat proteins and proteoglycans (SLRPs) contains several extracellular matrix molecules that are structurally related by a protein core composed of leucine-rich repeats (LRRs) flanked by two conserved cysteine-rich regions. The small proteoglycan decorin is the archetypal SLRP. Decorin is present in a variety of connective tissues, typically "decorating" collagen fibrils, and is involved in important biological functions, including the regulation of the assembly of fibrillar collagens and modulation of cell adhesion. Several SLRPs are known to regulate collagen fibrillogenesis and there is evidence that they may share other biological functions. We have recently determined the crystal structure of the protein core of decorin, the first such determination of a member of the SLRP family. This structure has highlighted several correlations: (1) SLRPs have similar internal repeat structures; (2) SLRP molecules are far less curved than an early model of decorin based on the three-dimensional structure of ribonuclease inhibitor; (3) the N-terminal and C-terminal cysteine-rich regions are conserved capping motifs. Furthermore, the structure shows that decorin dimerizes through the concave surface of its LRR domain, which has been implicated previously in its interaction with collagen. We have established that both decorin and opticin, another SLRP, form stable dimers in solution. Conservation of residues involved in decorin dimerization suggests that the mode of dimerization for other SLRPs will be similar. Taken together these results suggest the need for reevaluation of currently accepted models of SLRP interaction with their ligands. PMID:16884925

  19. Measured energy savings and economics of retrofitting existing single-family homes: An update of the BECA-B database

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, S.D.; Goldman, C.A.; Harris, J.P.

    1991-02-01

    The energy bill for US single-family households was over $77 billion in 1987 (excluding auto fuel purchases), accounting for approximately 20% of national energy expenditures. Large sums are spent on residential retrofits by individual homeowners, government agencies, and utilities. As of late 1987, over 21 million households indicated that they had added at least one energy-saving measure in the previous two years, while a recent Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) study estimated that nearly 15 million residential customers have participated in some kind of demand-side management (DSM) program. Given the level of continuing investments in residential energy efficiency, accurate estimates of savings from various conservation measures are increasingly necessary, especially as new technologies become more sophisticated and incremental efficiency gains more difficult to achieve. This report provides a comparative analysis of measured data on the performance and cost-effectiveness of energy-saving measures in existing single-family homes, based on information in the Buildings Energy-Use Compilation and Analysis (BECA) data base. The initial BECA report on measured data for single-family retrofits was completed seven years ago. In updating the single-family database, we have added 135 data points, representing over 33,000 houses, to the original database of 145 retrofit projects. The report is organized in two volumes. Volume 1 provides a summary of energy savings and costs of individual retrofit measures and strategies and results from federal/state low-income and utility weatherization programs. we also discuss measurement issues, predicted versus actual savings, trends in single-family retrofit programs, and implications for the next generation'' of cost-effective single-family retrofits. Volume 2 contains a written summary of each retrofit project and complete data tables. 87 refs., 20 figs., 16 tabs.

  20. Structural Characterization of Inhibitors with Selectivity against Members of a Homologous Enzyme Family

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlovsky, Alexander G.; Liu, Xuying; Faehnle, Christopher R.; Potente, Nina; Viola, Ronald E.

    2013-01-31

    The aspartate biosynthetic pathway provides essential metabolites for many important biological functions, including the production of four essential amino acids. As this critical pathway is only present in plants and microbes, any disruptions will be fatal to these organisms. An early pathway enzyme, L-aspartate-{beta}-semialdehyde dehydrogenase, produces a key intermediate at the first branch point of this pathway. Developing potent and selective inhibitors against several orthologs in the L-aspartate-{beta}-semialdehyde dehydrogenase family can serve as lead compounds for antibiotic development. Kinetic studies of two small molecule fragment libraries have identified inhibitors that show good selectivity against L-aspartate-{beta}-semialdehyde dehydrogenases from two different bacterial species, Streptococcus pneumoniae and Vibrio cholerae, despite the presence of an identical constellation of active site amino acids in this homologous enzyme family. Structural characterization of enzyme-inhibitor complexes have elucidated different modes of binding between these structurally related enzymes. This information provides the basis for a structure-guided approach to the development of more potent and more selective inhibitors.

  1. Structural basis for recognition of diverse transcriptional repressors by the TOPLESS family of corepressors

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Jiyuan; Ma, Honglei; Gu, Xin; Thelen, Adam; Brunzelle, Joseph S.; Li, Jiayang; Xu, H. Eric; Melcher, Karsten

    2015-01-01

    TOPLESS (TPL) and TOPLESS-related (TPR) proteins comprise a conserved family of plant transcriptional corepressors that are related to Tup1, Groucho, and TLE (transducin-like enhancer of split) corepressors in yeast, insects, and mammals. In plants, TPL/TPR corepressors regulate development, stress responses, and hormone signaling through interaction with small ethylene response factor–associated amphiphilic repression (EAR) motifs found in diverse transcriptional repressors. How EAR motifs can interact with TPL/TPR proteins is unknown. We confirm the amino-terminal domain of the TPL family of corepressors, which we term TOPLESS domain (TPD), as the EAR motif–binding domain. To understand the structural basis of this interaction, we determined the crystal structures of the TPD of rice (Os) TPR2 in apo (apo protein) state and in complexes with the EAR motifs from Arabidopsis NINJA (novel interactor of JAZ), IAA1 (auxin-responsive protein 1), and IAA10, key transcriptional repressors involved in jasmonate and auxin signaling. The OsTPR2 TPD adopts a new fold of nine helices, followed by a zinc finger, which are arranged into a disc-like tetramer. The EAR motifs in the three different complexes adopt a similar extended conformation with the hydrophobic residues fitting into the same surface groove of each OsTPR2 monomer. Sequence alignments and structure-based mutagenesis indicate that this mode of corepressor binding is highly conserved in a large set of transcriptional repressors, thus providing a general mechanism for gene repression mediated by the TPL family of corepressors. PMID:26601214

  2. Drug Development in Conformational Diseases: A Novel Family of Chemical Chaperones that Bind and Stabilise Several Polymorphic Amyloid Structures

    PubMed Central

    Bencomo, Alberto; Lara-Martínez, Reyna; Rivera-Marrero, Suchitil; Domínguez, Guadalupe; Pérez-Perera, Rafaela; Jiménez-García, Luis Felipe; Altamirano-Bustamante, Nelly F.; Diaz-Delgado, Massiel; Vedrenne, Fernand; Rivillas-Acevedo, Lina; Pasten-Hidalgo, Karina; Segura-Valdez, María de Lourdes; Islas-Andrade, Sergio; Garrido-Magaña, Eulalia; Perera-Pintado, Alejandro; Prats-Capote, Anaís; Rodríguez-Tanty, Chryslaine; Altamirano-Bustamante, Myriam M.

    2015-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of conformational diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Cancer, poses a global challenge at many different levels. It has devastating effects on the sufferers as well as a tremendous economic impact on families and the health system. In this work, we apply a cross-functional approach that combines ideas, concepts and technologies from several disciplines in order to study, in silico and in vitro, the role of a novel chemical chaperones family (NCHCHF) in processes of protein aggregation in conformational diseases. Given that Serum Albumin (SA) is the most abundant protein in the blood of mammals, and Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) is an off-the-shelf protein available in most labs around the world, we compared the ligandability of BSA:NCHCHF with the interaction sites in the Human Islet Amyloid Polypeptide (hIAPP):NCHCHF, and in the amyloid pharmacophore fragments (A?17–42 and A?16–21):NCHCHF. We posit that the merging of this interaction sites is a meta-structure of pharmacophore which allows the development of chaperones that can prevent protein aggregation at various states from: stabilizing the native state to destabilizing oligomeric state and protofilament. Furthermore to stabilize fibrillar structures, thus decreasing the amount of toxic oligomers in solution, as is the case with the NCHCHF. The paper demonstrates how a set of NCHCHF can be used for studying and potentially treating the various physiopathological stages of a conformational disease. For instance, when dealing with an acute phase of cytotoxicity, what is needed is the recruitment of cytotoxic oligomers, thus chaperone F, which accelerates fiber formation, would be very useful; whereas in a chronic stage it is better to have chaperones A, B, C, and D, which stabilize the native and fibril structures halting self-catalysis and the creation of cytotoxic oligomers as a consequence of fiber formation. Furthermore, all the chaperones are able to protect and recondition the cerebellar granule cells (CGC) from the cytotoxicity produced by the hIAPP20–29 fragment or by a low potassium medium, regardless of their capacity for accelerating or inhibiting in vitro formation of fibers. In vivo animal experiments are required to study the impact of chemical chaperones in cognitive and metabolic syndromes. PMID:26327208

  3. Early feeding practices and family structure: associations with overweight in children.

    PubMed

    Hunsberger, Monica

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this review is to examine two factors that may be associated with development of childhood overweight: early feeding, namely exclusive breastfeeding practices; family structure. Findings from the Identification and prevention of Dietary- and lifestyle-induced health EFfects In Children and infantS (IDEFICS) study are presented in the context of the literature. IDEFICS is a multi-centre European study exploring the risks for overweight and obesity in children, which recruited 16,224 children aged 2-9 years from September 2007 to June 2008 at survey centres in Italy, Estonia, Cyprus, Belgium, Sweden, Hungary, Germany and Spain. Among the IDEFICS sample, after controlling for confounders, exclusive breastfeeding for 4-6 months was protective of overweight (including obesity) when compared with children never exclusively breastfed (OR 0·73, 95% CI 0·63, 0·85). Family structure and number of siblings may also be associated with overweight. IDEFICS children without siblings were more likely (OR 1·52, 95% CI 1·34, 1·72) to be overweight than their peers with siblings when controlling for factors related to childhood overweight such as country, parental education, parental weight, maternal age, child's age, birth weight and gender. Both early feeding practices and family structure play a role in the future development of obesity. The impact of breastfeeding on future development of overweight is dependent upon the dose. Exclusive breastfeeding for the recommended 6 months appears to be protective of overweight. Family structure is also an important component and emerging research suggests only children are at increased risk for overweight in comparison with those with siblings. In European countries, approximately 22 million children are overweight. Early dietary exposures, genetic, environmental and social factors have all been proposed as potential causal factors. Two such factors include exclusive breastfeeding and the impact of being an only child. We have investigated these two factors for associations with overweight; our studies, in the context of previous findings, are the focus of this review. PMID:24507855

  4. Families of solutions to the generalized Ginzburg-Landau equation and structural transitions between them

    SciTech Connect

    Ovchinnikov, Yu. N.

    2013-09-15

    Solutions to the generalized Ginzburg-Landau equations for superconductors are obtained for a Ginzburg-Landau parameter {kappa} close to unity. The families of solutions with arbitrary number n of flux quanta in a unit cell are analyzed. It is shown that under certain conditions, a cascade of phase transitions between different structures in a magnetic field appears near T{sub c}. Algebraic equations are derived for determining the boundaries of coexistence of different phases on the (T, H{sub 0}) plane.

  5. Structural analysis of Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 glycoside hydrolase from CAZy family GH105

    SciTech Connect

    Germane, Katherine L.; Servinsky, Matthew D.; Gerlach, Elliot S.; Sund, Christian J.; Hurley, Margaret M.

    2015-07-29

    The crystal structure of the protein product of the C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824 gene CA-C0359 is structurally similar to YteR, an unsaturated rhamnogalacturonyl hydrolase from B. subtilis strain 168. Substrate modeling and electrostatic studies of the active site of the structure of CA-C0359 suggests that the protein can now be considered to be part of CAZy glycoside hydrolase family 105. Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 gene CA-C0359 encodes a putative unsaturated rhamnogalacturonyl hydrolase (URH) with distant amino-acid sequence homology to YteR of Bacillus subtilis strain 168. YteR, like other URHs, has core structural homology to unsaturated glucuronyl hydrolases, but hydrolyzes the unsaturated disaccharide derivative of rhamnogalacturonan I. The crystal structure of the recombinant CA-C0359 protein was solved to 1.6 Å resolution by molecular replacement using the phase information of the previously reported structure of YteR (PDB entry (http://scripts.iucr.org/cgi-bin/cr.cgi?rm)) from Bacillus subtilis strain 168. The YteR-like protein is a six-?-hairpin barrel with two ?-sheet strands and a small helix overlaying the end of the hairpins next to the active site. The protein has low primary protein sequence identity to YteR but is structurally similar. The two tertiary structures align with a root-mean-square deviation of 1.4 Å and contain a highly conserved active pocket. There is a conserved aspartic acid residue in both structures, which has been shown to be important for hydration of the C=C bond during the release of unsaturated galacturonic acid by YteR. A surface electrostatic potential comparison of CA-C0359 and proteins from CAZy families GH88 and GH105 reveals the make-up of the active site to be a combination of the unsaturated rhamnogalacturonyl hydrolase and the unsaturated glucuronyl hydrolase from Bacillus subtilis strain 168. Structural and electrostatic comparisons suggests that the protein may have a slightly different substrate specificity from that of YteR.

  6. Gram-Negative Marine Bacteria: Structural Features of Lipopolysaccharides and Their Relevance for Economically Important Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Anwar, Muhammad Ayaz; Choi, Sangdun

    2014-01-01

    Gram-negative marine bacteria can thrive in harsh oceanic conditions, partly because of the structural diversity of the cell wall and its components, particularly lipopolysaccharide (LPS). LPS is composed of three main parts, an O-antigen, lipid A, and a core region, all of which display immense structural variations among different bacterial species. These components not only provide cell integrity but also elicit an immune response in the host, which ranges from other marine organisms to humans. Toll-like receptor 4 and its homologs are the dedicated receptors that detect LPS and trigger the immune system to respond, often causing a wide variety of inflammatory diseases and even death. This review describes the structural organization of selected LPSes and their association with economically important diseases in marine organisms. In addition, the potential therapeutic use of LPS as an immune adjuvant in different diseases is highlighted. PMID:24796306

  7. The Family-Study Interface and Academic Outcomes: Testing a Structural Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meeuwisse, Marieke; Born, Marise Ph.; Severiens, Sabine E.

    2011-01-01

    Expanding on family-work and work-study models, this article investigated a model for family-study conflict and family-study facilitation. The focus of the study was the relationship of family-study conflict and family-study facilitation with students' effortful behaviors and academic performance among a sample of university students (N = 1,656).…

  8. Development of a structure-validated Family Relationship Questionnaire (FRQ) with Chinese university students.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liuxi; Xu, Kai; Fu, Lingyun; Xu, Shaofang; Gao, Qianqian; Wang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Consistent results have shown a relationship between the psychological world of children and their perceived parental bonding or family attachment style, but to date there is no single measure covering both styles. The authors designed a statement matrix with 116 items for this purpose and compared it with the Parental Bonding Instrument (PBI) in a study with 718 university students. After exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses, five factors (scales)--namely, Paternal/Maternal Encouragement (5 items each), Paternal/Maternal Abuse (5 items each), Paternal/Maternal Freedom Release (5 items each), General Attachment (5 items), and Paternal/Maternal Dominance (4 items each)--were defined to form a Family Relationship Questionnaire (FRQ). The internal alphas of the factors ranged from .64 to .83, and their congruency coefficients were .93 to .98 in samples regarding father and mother. Women scored significantly higher on FRQ General Attachment and Maternal Encouragement and lower on Paternal Abuse than men did; only children scored significantly higher on Paternal and Maternal Encouragements than children with siblings did. Women also scored significantly higher on PBI Paternal Autonomy Denial; only children scored significantly higher on Paternal and Maternal Cares and Maternal Autonomy Denial. All intercorrelations between FRQ scales were low to medium, and some correlations between FRQ and PBI scales were medium to high. This study demonstrates that the FRQ has a structure of five factors with satisfactory discriminant and convergent validities, which might help to characterize family relationships in healthy and clinical populations. PMID:26366981

  9. Crystal structure analysis of a bacterial aryl acylamidase belonging to the amidase signature enzyme family.

    PubMed

    Lee, Saeyoung; Park, Eun-Hye; Ko, Hyeok-Jin; Bang, Won Gi; Kim, Hye-Yeon; Kim, Kyoung Heon; Choi, In-Geol

    2015-11-13

    The atomic structure of a bacterial aryl acylamidase (EC 3.5.1.13; AAA) is reported and structural features are investigated to better understand the catalytic profile of this enzyme. Structures of AAA were determined in its native form and in complex with the analgesic acetanilide, p-acetaminophenol, at 1.70 Å and 1.73 Å resolutions, respectively. The overall structural fold of AAA was identified as an ?/? fold class, exhibiting an open twisted ?-sheet core surrounded by ?-helices. The asymmetric unit contains one AAA molecule and the monomeric form is functionally active. The core structure enclosing the signature sequence region, including the canonical Ser-cisSer-Lys catalytic triad, is conserved in all members of the Amidase Signature enzyme family. The structure of AAA in a complex with its ligand reveals a unique organization in the substrate-binding pocket. The binding pocket consists of two loops (loop1 and loop2) in the amidase signature sequence and one helix (?10) in the non-amidase signature sequence. We identified two residues (Tyr(136) and Thr(330)) that interact with the ligand via water molecules, and a hydrogen-bonding network that explains the catalytic affinity over various aryl acyl compounds. The optimum activity of AAA at pH > 10 suggests that the reaction mechanism employs Lys(84) as the catalytic base to polarize the Ser(187) nucleophile in the catalytic triad. PMID:26454172

  10. Genetic influence on left ventricular structure and function: a Korean twin and family study.

    PubMed

    Noh, Hye-Mi; Lee, Sang Cheol; Park, Seung Woo; Sung, Joohon; Song, Yun-Mi

    2015-06-01

    Genetic factors have been suggested to be one of the determinants of the variation of left ventricular (LV) structure and function. However, the heritability range of LV structure varies across studies and the influence of genetics on LV function is not well established, especially in Asian populations. Study subjects were 1,642 healthy Korean adults from 426 families, consisting of 298 pairs of monozygotic twins, 62 pairs of dizygotic twins, one set of triplets, 567 siblings, and 354 parents. LV structure and function were measured by M-mode and 2D echocardiography, and conventional and tissue Doppler imaging (TDI). Pairwise intra-class correlations for various familial relationships and heritability were estimated for LV structure and function. The heritability of LV mass, LV ejection fraction (LVEF), left atrial volume index, the ratio between early and late diastolic velocity of mitral inflow (E/A ratio), and the ratio between early diastolic velocity of mitral inflow and early diastolic mitral annular velocities (E/Ea ratio) was 0.44, 0.27, 0.44, 0.25, and 0.33, respectively. Bivariate genetic analysis showed that LV structural and functional traits had significant genetic correlations with cardiovascular risk factors. Additive genetic correlation (?G) of LV mass with body mass index, systolic blood pressure, and high density lipoprotein cholesterol were 0.49, 0.42, and -0.15 respectively. LVEF (?G = 0.33) and left atrial volume index (?G = 0.24) also had a significant genetic correlation with systolic blood pressure. These findings support the theory that genetic factors have significant influence on these traits and necessitate further work to identify the specific genes involved. PMID:25871282

  11. Measured energy savings and economics of retrofitting existing single- family homes: An update of the BECA-B database

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, S.D.; Goldman, C.A.; Harris, J.P.

    1991-02-01

    These appendices are the companion volume to report number LBL--28147 Vol.1, with the same title. The summary data tables include physical characteristics, energy consumption, savings, and the retrofit measures installed and their costs for each retrofit project. Each existing single family residential building'' retrofit project in the BECA-B database is described. 99 refs. (BM)

  12. Differential Effects of Economic Factors on Specialist and Family Physician Distribution in Illinois: A County-Level Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mistretta, Martin J.

    2007-01-01

    Context: Uneven distribution of physicians across geographic areas of the United States remains a significant problem that may have implications for health. Purpose: To develop a statistical model of physician distribution in Illinois counties that predicts where specialists and family physicians practice, and to suggest policy strategies for…

  13. Child Care Subsidies and the Economic Well-Being of Recipient Families: A Survey and Implications for Kentucky

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    University of Kentucky Center for Poverty Research, 2008

    2008-01-01

    The secular increase over the past several decades in the number of families where both the husband and wife work in the paid labor force, coupled with the surge in labor force participation of single mothers in the 1990s, has heightened policy focus on child care options for working parents; federal and state governments are now major players…

  14. State of Australia's Young People: A Report on the Social, Economic, Health and Family Lives of Young People

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muir, Kristy; Mullan, Killian; Powell, Abigail; Flaxman, Saul; Thompson, Denise; Griffiths, Megan

    2009-01-01

    This report presents a comprehensive picture of how young Australians are faring by bringing together data from a variety of sources and drawing on the comments of young people themselves. Overall the report presents a positive picture, showing how important young people are to this country and why it makes good economic and social sense for…

  15. The Association between Adolescent Life Satisfaction, Family Structure, Family Affluence and Gender Differences in Parent-Child Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levin, Kate Ann; Dallago, Lorenza; Currie, Candace

    2012-01-01

    The study sought to examine young people's life satisfaction in the context of the family environment, using data from the 2006 HBSC: WHO-collaborative Study in Scotland (N = 5,126). Multilevel linear regression analyses were carried out for 11-, 13- and 15-year old boys and girls, with outcome measure ridit-transformed life satisfaction. The…

  16. Alterations in brain structures underlying language function in young adults at high familial risk for schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Alan N.; Seidman, Larry J.; Jabbar, Gul A.; Mesholam-Gately, Raquelle; Thermenos, Heidi W.; Juelich, Richard; Proal, Ashley C.; Shenton, Martha; Kubicki, Marek; Mathew, Ian; Keshavan, Matcheri; DeLisi, Lynn E.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Neuroanatomical and cognitive alterations typical of schizophrenia (SZ) patients are observed to a lesser extent in their adolescent and adult first-degree relatives, likely reflecting neurodevelopmental abnormalities associated with genetic risk for the illness. The anatomical pathways for language are hypothesized to be abnormal and to underlie the positive symptoms of schizophrenia. Examining non-psychotic relatives at high familial risk (FHR) for schizophrenia may clarify if these deficits represent trait markers associated with genetic vulnerability, rather than specific markers resulting from the pathological process underlying schizophrenia. Methods T1 MRI scans from a 3T Siemens scanner of young adult FHR subjects (N=46) and controls with no family history of illness (i.e. at low genetic risk LRC; N=31) were processed using FreeSurfer 5.0. We explored volumetric and lateralization alterations in regions associated with language processing. An extensive neuropsychological battery of language measures was administered. Results No significant differences were observed between groups on any language measures. Controlling Intracranial volume, significantly smaller center Pars Triangularis (PT) (p<0.01) and right Pars Orbitalis (PO) (p < 0.01) volumes and reversal of the L > R Pars Orbitalis (p < 0.001) lateralization were observed in FHR subjects. In addition, the L Pars Triangularis and R Pars Orbitalis correlated with performance on tests of linguistic function in the FHR group. Conclusions Reduced volume and reversed structural asymmetry in language-related regions hypothesized to be altered in SZ are also found in first degree relatives at FHR, despite normal language performance. To clarify if these findings are endophenotypes for Sz, future studied would need to be performed of ill and well family members no longer within the age range of risk for illness to show these deficits segregate with schizophrenia within families. Moreover, measures of complex language need to be studied to determine if FHR individuals manifest impairments in some aspects of language function. PMID:22892286

  17. A class 2 weight assessment for the implementation of commonality and preliminary structural designs for the family of commuter airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Creighton, Tom; Dragush, George; Hendrich, Louis; Hensley, Doug; Morgan, Louise; Oxendine, Charles; Remen, John; Robinson, Terry; Russell, Mark; Swift, Jerry

    1987-01-01

    The feasibility of commonality objectives are determined. Commonality is discussed in terms of weight penalties that increase the take-off weight of several members of the family of airplanes. Preliminary designs of fuselage structural members and a discussion of weight penalties due to implementation of common fuselage structure throughout the family is examined. Wing torque box designs are discussed along with structural weight penalties incurred. A landing gear design study is contained along with the weight penalties that a common gear system will impose. Implementation of common power plants throughout the family and the weight penalties that occur are discussed. The weight penalties imposed by commonality on all the airplanes in the family are summarized. Class 2 breakdowns are also presented. The feasibility of commonality based on a percentage of take-off weight increase over the Class 2 baseline weights is then assessed.

  18. Structural Insight of a Trimodular Halophilic Cellulase with a Family 46 Carbohydrate-Binding Module

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Chaoxiang; Junaid, Muhammad; Lu, Zhenghui; Zhang, Houjin; Ma, Yanhe

    2015-01-01

    Cellulases are the key enzymes used in the biofuel industry. A typical cellulase contains a catalytic domain connected to a carbohydrate-binding module (CBM) through a flexible linker. Here we report the structure of an atypical trimodular cellulase which harbors a catalytic domain, a CBM46 domain and a rigid CBM_X domain between them. The catalytic domain shows the features of GH5 family, while the CBM46 domain has a sandwich-like structure. The catalytic domain and the CBM46 domain form an extended substrate binding cleft, within which several tryptophan residues are well exposed. Mutagenesis assays indicate that these residues are essential for the enzymatic activities. Gel affinity electrophoresis shows that these tryptophan residues are involved in the polysaccharide substrate binding. Also, electrostatic potential analysis indicates that almost the entire solvent accessible surface of CelB is negatively charged, which is consistent with the halophilic nature of this enzyme. PMID:26562160

  19. Structural insight into the TRIAP1/PRELI-like domain family of mitochondrial phospholipid transfer complexes.

    PubMed

    Miliara, Xeni; Garnett, James A; Tatsuta, Takashi; Abid Ali, Ferdos; Baldie, Heather; Pérez-Dorado, Inmaculada; Simpson, Peter; Yague, Ernesto; Langer, Thomas; Matthews, Stephen

    2015-07-01

    The composition of the mitochondrial membrane is important for its architecture and proper function. Mitochondria depend on a tightly regulated supply of phospholipid via intra-mitochondrial synthesis and by direct import from the endoplasmic reticulum. The Ups1/PRELI-like family together with its mitochondrial chaperones (TRIAP1/Mdm35) represent a unique heterodimeric lipid transfer system that is evolutionary conserved from yeast to man. Work presented here provides new atomic resolution insight into the function of a human member of this system. Crystal structures of free TRIAP1 and the TRIAP1-SLMO1 complex reveal how the PRELI domain is chaperoned during import into the intermembrane mitochondrial space. The structural resemblance of PRELI-like domain of SLMO1 with that of mammalian phoshatidylinositol transfer proteins (PITPs) suggest that they share similar lipid transfer mechanisms, in which access to a buried phospholipid-binding cavity is regulated by conformationally adaptable loops. PMID:26071602

  20. Structural insight into the TRIAP1/PRELI-like domain family of mitochondrial phospholipid transfer complexes

    PubMed Central

    Miliara, Xeni; Garnett, James A; Tatsuta, Takashi; Abid Ali, Ferdos; Baldie, Heather; Pérez-Dorado, Inmaculada; Simpson, Peter; Yague, Ernesto; Langer, Thomas; Matthews, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    The composition of the mitochondrial membrane is important for its architecture and proper function. Mitochondria depend on a tightly regulated supply of phospholipid via intra-mitochondrial synthesis and by direct import from the endoplasmic reticulum. The Ups1/PRELI-like family together with its mitochondrial chaperones (TRIAP1/Mdm35) represent a unique heterodimeric lipid transfer system that is evolutionary conserved from yeast to man. Work presented here provides new atomic resolution insight into the function of a human member of this system. Crystal structures of free TRIAP1 and the TRIAP1–SLMO1 complex reveal how the PRELI domain is chaperoned during import into the intermembrane mitochondrial space. The structural resemblance of PRELI-like domain of SLMO1 with that of mammalian phoshatidylinositol transfer proteins (PITPs) suggest that they share similar lipid transfer mechanisms, in which access to a buried phospholipid-binding cavity is regulated by conformationally adaptable loops. PMID:26071602

  1. Crystal structure and snapshots along the reaction pathway of a family 51 ?-l-arabinofuranosidase

    PubMed Central

    Hövel, Klaus; Shallom, Dalia; Niefind, Karsten; Belakhov, Valery; Shoham, Gil; Baasov, Timor; Shoham, Yuval; Schomburg, Dietmar

    2003-01-01

    High-resolution crystal structures of ?-l-arabinofuranosidase from Geobacillus stearothermophilus T-6, a family 51 glycosidase, are described. The enzyme is a hexamer, and each monomer is organized into two domains: a (?/?)8-barrel and a 12-stranded ? sandwich with jelly-roll topology. The structures of the Michaelis complexes with natural and synthetic substrates, and of the transient covalent arabinofuranosyl– enzyme intermediate represent two stable states in the double displacement mechanism, and allow thorough examination of the catalytic mechanism. The arabinofuranose sugar is tightly bound and distorted by an extensive network of hydrogen bonds. The two catalytic residues are 4.7 ? apart, and together with other conserved residues contribute to the stabilization of the oxocarbenium ion-like transition state via charge delocalization and specific protein–substrate interactions. The enzyme is an anti-protonator, and a 1.7 ? electrophilic migration of the anomeric carbon takes place during the hydrolysis. PMID:14517232

  2. Structure-function characterization reveals new catalytic diversity in the galactose oxidase and glyoxal oxidase family.

    PubMed

    Yin, DeLu Tyler; Urresti, Saioa; Lafond, Mickael; Johnston, Esther M; Derikvand, Fatemeh; Ciano, Luisa; Berrin, Jean-Guy; Henrissat, Bernard; Walton, Paul H; Davies, Gideon J; Brumer, Harry

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol oxidases, including carbohydrate oxidases, have a long history of research that has generated fundamental biological understanding and biotechnological applications. Despite a long history of study, the galactose 6-oxidase/glyoxal oxidase family of mononuclear copper-radical oxidases, Auxiliary Activity Family 5 (AA5), is currently represented by only very few characterized members. Here we report the recombinant production and detailed structure-function analyses of two homologues from the phytopathogenic fungi Colletotrichum graminicola and C. gloeosporioides, CgrAlcOx and CglAlcOx, respectively, to explore the wider biocatalytic potential in AA5. EPR spectroscopy and crystallographic analysis confirm a common active-site structure vis-à-vis the archetypal galactose 6-oxidase from Fusarium graminearum. Strikingly, however, CgrAlcOx and CglAlcOx are essentially incapable of oxidizing galactose and galactosides, but instead efficiently catalyse the oxidation of diverse aliphatic alcohols. The results highlight the significant potential of prospecting the evolutionary diversity of AA5 to reveal novel enzyme specificities, thereby informing both biology and applications. PMID:26680532

  3. X-ray structure of fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase family member Homo sapiens FLJ36880.

    PubMed

    Manjasetty, Babu A; Niesen, Frank H; Delbrück, Heinrich; Götz, Frank; Sievert, Volker; Büssow, Konrad; Behlke, Joachim; Heinemann, Udo

    2004-10-01

    The human protein FLJ36880 belongs to the fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase family. The X-ray structure of FLJ36880 has been determined to 2.2 A resolution employing the semi-automated high-throughput structural genomics approach of the Protein Structure Factory. FLJ36880 adopts a mixed beta-sandwich roll fold and forms homodimers in crystals as well as in solution. One Mg2+ ion is bound to each subunit of the dimeric protein by coordination to three carboxylate oxygens and three water molecules. These metal binding sites are accessible from the same surface of the dimer, partly due to the disorder of the undecapeptide stretch D29 to L39. The overall structure and metal binding site of FLJ36880 bear clear similarities to the C-terminal domain of the bifunctional enzyme HpcE from Escherichia coli C, fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase from Mus musculus and to YcgM (Apc5008) from E. coli 1262. These similarities provide a framework for suggesting biochemical functions and evolutionary relationships of FLJ36880. It appears highly probable that the metal binding sites are involved in an enzymatic activity related to the catabolism of aromatic amino acids. Two point mutations in the active-site of FAH, responsible for the metabolic disease hereditary tyrosinemia type I (HTI) in humans, affect residues that are structurally conserved in FLJ36880 and located in the putative catalytic site. PMID:15551868

  4. Abstract Profiles of Structural Stability Point to Universal Tendencies, Family-Specific Factors, and Ancient Connections between Languages

    PubMed Central

    Dediu, Dan; Levinson, Stephen C.

    2012-01-01

    Language is the best example of a cultural evolutionary system, able to retain a phylogenetic signal over many thousands of years. The temporal stability (conservatism) of basic vocabulary is relatively well understood, but the stability of the structural properties of language (phonology, morphology, syntax) is still unclear. Here we report an extensive Bayesian phylogenetic investigation of the structural stability of numerous features across many language families and we introduce a novel method for analyzing the relationships between the “stability profiles” of language families. We found that there is a strong universal component across language families, suggesting the existence of universal linguistic, cognitive and genetic constraints. Against this background, however, each language family has a distinct stability profile, and these profiles cluster by geographic area and likely deep genealogical relationships. These stability profiles seem to show, for example, the ancient historical relationships between the Siberian and American language families, presumed to be separated by at least 12,000 years, and possible connections between the Eurasian families. We also found preliminary support for the punctuated evolution of structural features of language across families, types of features and geographic areas. Thus, such higher-level properties of language seen as an evolutionary system might allow the investigation of ancient connections between languages and shed light on the peopling of the world. PMID:23028843

  5. Comparative Study on Sequence-Structure-Function Relationship of the Human Short-chain Dehydrogenases/Reductases Protein Family.

    PubMed

    Tang, Nu Thi Ngoc; Le, Ly

    2014-01-01

    Human short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases (SDRs) protein family has been the subject of recent studies for its critical role in human metabolism. Studies also found that single nucleotide polymorphisms of the SDR protein family were responsible for a variety of genetic diseases, including type II diabetes. This study reports the effect of sequence variation on the structural and functional integrities of human SDR protein family using phylogenetics and correlated mutation analysis tools. Our results indicated that (i) tyrosine, serine, and lysine are signature protein residues that have direct contribution to the structural and functional stabilities of the SDR protein family, (ii) subgroups of SDR protein family have their own signature protein combination that represent their unique functionality, and (iii) mutations of the human SDR protein family showed high correlation in terms of evolutionary history. In combination, the results inferred that over evolutionary history, the SDR protein family was able to diverge itself in order to adapt with the changes in human nutritional demands. Our study reveals understanding of structural and functional scaffolds of specific SDR subgroups that may facilitate the design of specific inhibitor. PMID:25374450

  6. Familial Albright`s hereditary osteodystrophy with hypoparathyroidism: Normal structural G{sub s}{alpha} gene

    SciTech Connect

    Shapira, H.; Friedman, E.; Farfel, Z.

    1996-04-01

    Albright`s hereditary osteodystrophy (AHO) is a characteristic skeletal phenotype, including short stature, obesity, round face, and brachydactyly. AHO appears in patients with pseudohypoparathyroidism (PHP) who have resistance to PTH and in their eumetabolic family members who have pseudohypoparathyroidism (PPHP). The differential diagnosis of AHO in families without PHP includes brachydactyly E, whose existence as a distinct entity has been questioned. We studied a patient with familial AHO who presented with hypocalcemia. To our surprise, PTH levels were low, and the response to PTH administration was normal. This is the first case of familial AHO with hypoparathyroidism. The proband`s family included 22 affected subjects spanning 3 generations, who had variable degrees of AHO manifestations, with an autosomal dominant inheritance trait. The metacarpophalangeal pattern profile was typical of that of PHP-PPHP. As deficient activity and inactivating mutations of G{sub s}{alpha} were described in PHP as well as in PPHP, we measured the biological activity of G{sub s} in family members, which was normal. To exclude subtle abnormalities in the G{sub s}{alpha} gene, we sequenced the entire coding region of G{alpha} in the propositus, which was normal. We conclude that hypocalcemia should be adequately evaluated even in the presence of familial AHO, and that familial AHO can occur with a normal coding structural Ga gene. Identification of the molecular defect in familial AHO without PHP will shed light on the pathogenesis of AHO in general. 20 refs., 3 figs.

  7. Jamaican families.

    PubMed

    Miner, Dianne Cooney

    2003-01-01

    The study of the family in the Caribbean originated with European scholars who assumed the universality of the patriarchal nuclear family and the primacy of this structure to the healthy functioning of society. Matrifocal Caribbean families thus were seen as chaotic and disorganized and inadequate to perform the essential tasks of the social system. This article provides a more current discussion of the Jamaican family. It argues that its structure is the result of the agency and adaptation of its members and not the root cause of the increasing marginalization of peoples in the developing world. The article focuses on families living in poverty and how the family structure supports essential family functions, adaptations, and survival. PMID:12597672

  8. A Content Analysis of the Family Structure in Children's Literature for the Periods between 1955-1970 and 1980-1995.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallo, Erminia Mina

    A study examined how the family structure has changed over time in contemporary realistic children's literature for middle readers. There is an ongoing debate in this country about what defines a family and whether it is in transformation or becoming extinct. Since 1960 there is evidence that the family structure has changed. The books selected in…

  9. Structural analysis of Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 glycoside hydrolase from CAZy family GH105

    PubMed Central

    Germane, Katherine L.; Servinsky, Matthew D.; Gerlach, Elliot S.; Sund, Christian J.; Hurley, Margaret M.

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 gene CA_C0359 encodes a putative unsaturated rhamnogalacturonyl hydrolase (URH) with distant amino-acid sequence homology to YteR of Bacillus subtilis strain 168. YteR, like other URHs, has core structural homology to unsaturated glucuronyl hydrolases, but hydrolyzes the unsaturated disaccharide derivative of rhamnogalacturonan I. The crystal structure of the recombinant CA_C0359 protein was solved to 1.6?Å resolution by molecular replacement using the phase information of the previously reported structure of YteR (PDB entry 1nc5) from Bacillus subtilis strain 168. The YteR-like protein is a six-?-hairpin barrel with two ?-sheet strands and a small helix overlaying the end of the hairpins next to the active site. The protein has low primary protein sequence identity to YteR but is structurally similar. The two tertiary structures align with a root-mean-square deviation of 1.4?Å and contain a highly conserved active pocket. There is a conserved aspartic acid residue in both structures, which has been shown to be important for hydration of the C=C bond during the release of unsaturated galacturonic acid by YteR. A surface electrostatic potential comparison of CA_C0359 and proteins from CAZy families GH88 and GH105 reveals the make-up of the active site to be a combination of the unsaturated rhamnogalacturonyl hydrolase and the unsaturated glucuronyl hydrolase from Bacillus subtilis strain 168. Structural and electrostatic comparisons suggests that the protein may have a slightly different substrate specificity from that of YteR. PMID:26249707

  10. Structures of Bacillus subtilis PdaA, a family 4 carbohydrate esterase, and a complex with N-acetyl-glucosamine

    E-print Network

    van Aalten, Daan

    Structures of Bacillus subtilis PdaA, a family 4 carbohydrate esterase, and a complex with N carbohydrate esterases deacetylate poly- meric carbohydrate substrates such as chitin, acetyl xylan carbohydrate esterases in a structural context and represents a first step towards understanding the reaction

  11. Identification of family-specific residue packing motifs and their use for structure-based protein function prediction

    E-print Network

    Prins, Jan

    for several proteins characterized in structural genomics projects, including orphan structures, and we function prediction Á Family-specific motifs Á Frequent subgraph mining Á Orphan proteins Introduction of North Carolina, CB#7360 Beard Hall, Chapel Hill, NC, USA e-mail: alex_tropsha@unc.edu 123 J Comput Aided

  12. Family support and ease of access link socio-economic status and sports club membership in adolescent girls: a mediation study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Much research has been conducted into the determinants of physical activity (PA) participation among adolescent girls. However, the more specific question of what are the determinants of particular forms of PA participation, such as the link between participation through a sports club, has not been investigated. Accordingly, the aim of this study was to investigate the relationships between participation in a sports club and socio-economic status (SES), access to facilities, and family and peer support, for female adolescents. Methods A survey of 732 female adolescent school students (521 metropolitan, 211 non-metropolitan; 489 Year 7, 243 Year 11) was conducted. The survey included demographic information (living arrangements, ethnicity indicators, and indicators of SES such as parental education and employment status and locality); access to facilities; and family and peer support (travel, encouragement, watching, praise, joint participation). For each characteristic, sports club participants and non-participants were compared using chi-square tests. Multiple mediation analyses were used to investigate the role of access, family and peer support in the link between SES and sport participation. Results There were significant associations (p<0.05) between sports club participation and: all demographic characteristics; all measures of family and peer support; and access to sport-related facilities. Highest levels of participation were associated with monolingual Australian-born families, with two parents, at least one of whom was well-educated, with both parents employed, and high levels of parental assistance, engagement and support. Participation in club sport among both younger and older adolescent girls was significantly positively associated with the SES of both their neighbourhoods and their households, particularly in metropolitan areas. These associations were most strongly mediated by family support and by access to facilities. Conclusions To facilitate and promote greater participation in club sport among adolescent girls from low SES neighbourhoods and households, strategies should target modifiable determinants such as facility access and parental support. This will involve improving access to sports facilities and promoting, encouraging and assisting parents to provide support for their daughters’ participation in sport clubs. PMID:23618407

  13. The Structural Basis of Exopolygalacturonase Activity in a Family 28 Glycoside Hydrolase

    SciTech Connect

    Abbott,D.; Boraston, A.

    2007-01-01

    Family 28 glycoside hydrolases (polygalacturonases) are found in organisms across the plant, fungal and bacterial kingdoms, where they are central to diverse biological functions such as fruit ripening, biomass recycling and plant pathogenesis. The structures of several polygalacturonases have been reported; however, all of these enzymes utilize an endo-mode of digestion, which generates a spectrum of oligosaccharide products with varying degrees of polymerization. The structure of a complementary exo-acting polygalacturonase and an accompanying explanation of the molecular determinants for its specialized activity have been noticeably lacking. We present the structure of an exopolygalacturonase from Yersinia enterocolitica, YeGH28 in a native form (solved to 2.19 {angstrom} resolution) and a digalacturonic acid product complex (solved to 2.10 {angstrom} resolution). The activity of YeGH28 is due to inserted stretches of amino acid residues that transform the active site from the open-ended channel observed in the endopolygalacturonases to a closed pocket that restricts the enzyme to the exclusive attack of the non-reducing end of oligogalacturonide substrates. In addition, YeGH28 possesses a fused FN3 domain with unknown function, the first such structure described in pectin active enzymes.

  14. The Structure of the Cytomegalovirus-Encoded m04 Glycoprotein, a Prototypical Member of the m02 Family of Immunoevasins*

    PubMed Central

    Berry, Richard; Vivian, Julian P.; Deuss, Felix A.; Balaji, Gautham R.; Saunders, Philippa M.; Lin, Jie; Littler, Dene R.; Brooks, Andrew G.; Rossjohn, Jamie

    2014-01-01

    The ability of CMVs to evade the immune system of the host is dependent on the expression of a wide array of glycoproteins, many of which interfere with natural killer cell function. In murine CMV, two large protein families mediate this immune-evasive function. Although it is established that the m145 family members mimic the structure of MHC-I molecules, the structure of the m02 family remains unknown. The most extensively studied m02 family member is m04, a glycoprotein that escorts newly assembled MHC-I molecules to the cell surface, presumably to avoid “missing self” recognition. Here we report the crystal structure of the m04 ectodomain, thereby providing insight into this large immunoevasin family. m04 adopted a ?-sandwich immunoglobulin variable (Ig-V)-like fold, despite sharing very little sequence identity with the Ig-V superfamily. In addition to the Ig-V core, m04 possesses several unique structural features that included an unusual ?-strand topology, a number of extended loops and a prominent ?-helix. The m04 interior was packed by a myriad of hydrophobic residues that form distinct clusters around two conserved tryptophan residues. This hydrophobic core was well conserved throughout the m02 family, thereby indicating that murine CMV encodes a number of Ig-V-like molecules. We show that m04 binds a range of MHC-I molecules with low affinity in a peptide-independent manner. Accordingly, the structure of m04, which represents the first example of an murine CMV encoded Ig-V fold, provides a basis for understanding the structure and function of this enigmatic and large family of immunoevasins. PMID:24982419

  15. The Future of Family Life. Overview: ERIC Fact Sheet No. 13.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Catherine

    This fact sheet presents an overview of current and projected changes in American family life, along with implications of those changes for home economics educators. Topics which are covered include: (1) changing family structures; (2) working women and homemakers; (3) family problems such as divorce, adolescent sexuality and pregnancy, violence…

  16. Boxy/peanut "bulges": comparing the structure of galaxies with the underlying families of periodic orbits

    E-print Network

    P. A. Patsis; E. M. Xilouris

    2005-12-09

    The vertical profiles of disc galaxies are built by the material trapped around stable periodic orbits, which form their "skeletons". According to this, the knowledge of the stability of the main families of periodic orbits in appropriate 3D models, can predict possible morphologies for edge-on disc galaxies. In a pilot survey we compare the orbital structures which lead to the appearance of "peanuts" and "X"-like features with the edge-on profiles of three disc galaxies (IC 2531, NGC 4013 and UGC 2048). The subtraction from the images of a model representing the axisymmetric component of the galaxies reveals the contribution of the non-axisymmetric terms. We find a direct correspondence between the orbital profiles of 3D bars in models and the observed main morphological features of the residuals. We also apply a simple unsharp masking technique in order to study the sharpest features of the images. Our basic conclusion is that the morphology of the boxy "bulges" of these galaxies can be explained by considering disc material trapped around stable 3D periodic orbits. In most models these building-blocks periodic orbits are bifurcated from the planar central family of a non-axisymmetric component, usually a bar, at low order vertical resonances. In such a case the boxy "bulges" are parts of bars seen edge-on. For the three galaxies we study the families associated with the "peanut" or "X"-shape morphology are most probably bifurcations at the vertical 2/1 or 4/1 resonance.

  17. Brain structure-function associations in multi-generational families genetically enriched for bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Fears, Scott C; Schür, Remmelt; Sjouwerman, Rachel; Service, Susan K; Araya, Carmen; Araya, Xinia; Bejarano, Julio; Knowles, Emma; Gomez-Makhinson, Juliana; Lopez, Maria C; Aldana, Ileana; Teshiba, Terri M; Abaryan, Zvart; Al-Sharif, Noor B; Navarro, Linda; Tishler, Todd A; Altshuler, Lori; Bartzokis, George; Escobar, Javier I; Glahn, David C; Thompson, Paul M; Lopez-Jaramillo, Carlos; Macaya, Gabriel; Molina, Julio; Reus, Victor I; Sabatti, Chiara; Cantor, Rita M; Freimer, Nelson B; Bearden, Carrie E

    2015-07-01

    Recent theories regarding the pathophysiology of bipolar disorder suggest contributions of both neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative processes. While structural neuroimaging studies indicate disease-associated neuroanatomical alterations, the behavioural correlates of these alterations have not been well characterized. Here, we investigated multi-generational families genetically enriched for bipolar disorder to: (i) characterize neurobehavioural correlates of neuroanatomical measures implicated in the pathophysiology of bipolar disorder; (ii) identify brain-behaviour associations that differ between diagnostic groups; (iii) identify neurocognitive traits that show evidence of accelerated ageing specifically in subjects with bipolar disorder; and (iv) identify brain-behaviour correlations that differ across the age span. Structural neuroimages and multi-dimensional assessments of temperament and neurocognition were acquired from 527 (153 bipolar disorder and 374 non-bipolar disorder) adults aged 18-87 years in 26 families with heavy genetic loading for bipolar disorder. We used linear regression models to identify significant brain-behaviour associations and test whether brain-behaviour relationships differed: (i) between diagnostic groups; and (ii) as a function of age. We found that total cortical and ventricular volume had the greatest number of significant behavioural associations, and included correlations with measures from multiple cognitive domains, particularly declarative and working memory and executive function. Cortical thickness measures, in contrast, showed more specific associations with declarative memory, letter fluency and processing speed tasks. While the majority of brain-behaviour relationships were similar across diagnostic groups, increased cortical thickness in ventrolateral prefrontal and parietal cortical regions was associated with better declarative memory only in bipolar disorder subjects, and not in non-bipolar disorder family members. Additionally, while age had a relatively strong impact on all neurocognitive traits, the effects of age on cognition did not differ between diagnostic groups. Most brain-behaviour associations were also similar across the age range, with the exception of cortical and ventricular volume and lingual gyrus thickness, which showed weak correlations with verbal fluency and inhibitory control at younger ages that increased in magnitude in older subjects, regardless of diagnosis. Findings indicate that neuroanatomical traits potentially impacted by bipolar disorder are significantly associated with multiple neurobehavioural domains. Structure-function relationships are generally preserved across diagnostic groups, with the notable exception of ventrolateral prefrontal and parietal association cortex, volumetric increases in which may be associated with cognitive resilience specifically in individuals with bipolar disorder. Although age impacted all neurobehavioural traits, we did not find any evidence of accelerated cognitive decline specific to bipolar disorder subjects. Regardless of diagnosis, greater global brain volume may represent a protective factor for the effects of ageing on executive functioning. PMID:25943422

  18. The actin family protein ARP6 contributes to the structure and the function of the nucleolus.

    PubMed

    Kitamura, Hiroshi; Matsumori, Haruka; Kalendova, Alzbeta; Hozak, Pavel; Goldberg, Ilya G; Nakao, Mitsuyoshi; Saitoh, Noriko; Harata, Masahiko

    2015-08-21

    The actin family members, consisting of actin and actin-related proteins (ARPs), are essential components of chromatin remodeling complexes. ARP6, one of the nuclear ARPs, is part of the Snf-2-related CREB-binding protein activator protein (SRCAP) chromatin remodeling complex, which promotes the deposition of the histone variant H2A.Z into the chromatin. In this study, we showed that ARP6 influences the structure and the function of the nucleolus. ARP6 is localized in the central region of the nucleolus, and its knockdown induced a morphological change in the nucleolus. We also found that in the presence of high concentrations of glucose ARP6 contributed to the maintenance of active ribosomal DNA (rDNA) transcription by placing H2A.Z into the chromatin. In contrast, under starvation, ARP6 was required for cell survival through the repression of rDNA transcription independently of H2A.Z. These findings reveal novel pleiotropic roles for the actin family in nuclear organization and metabolic homeostasis. PMID:26164235

  19. Avidin related protein 2 shows unique structural and functional features among the avidin protein family

    PubMed Central

    Hytönen, Vesa P; Määttä, Juha AE; Kidron, Heidi; Halling, Katrin K; Hörhä, Jarno; Kulomaa, Tuomas; Nyholm, Thomas KM; Johnson, Mark S; Salminen, Tiina A; Kulomaa, Markku S; Airenne, Tomi T

    2005-01-01

    Background The chicken avidin gene family consists of avidin and several avidin related genes (AVRs). Of these gene products, avidin is the best characterized and is known for its extremely high affinity for D-biotin, a property that is utilized in numerous modern life science applications. Recently, the AVR genes have been expressed as recombinant proteins, which have shown different biotin-binding properties as compared to avidin. Results In the present study, we have employed multiple biochemical methods to better understand the structure-function relationship of AVR proteins focusing on AVR2. Firstly, we have solved the high-resolution crystal structure of AVR2 in complex with a bound ligand, D-biotin. The AVR2 structure reveals an overall fold similar to the previously determined structures of avidin and AVR4. Major differences are seen, especially at the 1–3 subunit interface, which is stabilized mainly by polar interactions in the case of AVR2 but by hydrophobic interactions in the case of AVR4 and avidin, and in the vicinity of the biotin binding pocket. Secondly, mutagenesis, competitive dissociation analysis and differential scanning calorimetry were used to compare and study the biotin-binding properties as well as the thermal stability of AVRs and avidin. These analyses pinpointed the importance of residue 109 for biotin binding and stability of AVRs. The I109K mutation increased the biotin-binding affinity of AVR2, whereas the K109I mutation decreased the biotin-binding affinity of AVR4. Furthermore, the thermal stability of AVR2(I109K) increased in comparison to the wild-type protein and the K109I mutation led to a decrease in the thermal stability of AVR4. Conclusion Altogether, this study broadens our understanding of the structural features determining the ligand-binding affinities and stability as well as the molecular evolution within the protein family. This novel information can be applied to further develop and improve the tools already widely used in avidin-biotin technology. PMID:16212654

  20. The economic burden of pediatric gastroenteritis to Bolivian families: a cross-sectional study of correlates of catastrophic cost and overall cost burden

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Worldwide, acute gastroenteritis causes substantial morbidity and mortality in children less than five years of age. In Bolivia, which has one of the lower GDPs in South America, 16% of child deaths can be attributed to diarrhea, and the costs associated with diarrhea can weigh heavily on patient families. To address this need, the study goal was to identify predictors of cost burden (diarrhea-related costs incurred as a percentage of annual income) and catastrophic cost (cost burden???1% of annual household income). Methods From 2007 to 2009, researchers interviewed caregivers (n?=?1,107) of pediatric patients (<5 years old) seeking treatment for diarrhea in six Bolivian hospitals. Caregivers were surveyed on demographics, clinical symptoms, direct (e.g. medication, consult fees), and indirect (e.g. lost wages) costs. Multivariate regression models (n?=?551) were used to assess relationships of covariates to the outcomes of cost burden (linear model) and catastrophic cost (logistic model). Results We determined that cost burden and catastrophic cost shared the same significant (p?economic impact of pediatric diarrhea from the familial perspective and provides insight into potential areas of intervention to reduce associated economic burden. PMID:24962128

  1. A family of molecular sieves containing framework-bound organic structure-directing agents.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jun Kyu; Shin, Jiho; Ahn, Nak Ho; Turrina, Alessandro; Park, Min Bum; Byun, Youngchul; Cho, Sung June; Wright, Paul A; Hong, Suk Bong

    2015-09-14

    Organic structure-directing agents (OSDAs), such as quaternary ammonium cations and amines, used in the synthesis of zeolites and related crystalline microporous oxides usually end up entrapped inside the void spaces of the crystallized inorganic host lattice. But none of them is known to form direct chemical bonds to the framework of these industrially important catalysts and adsorbents. We demonstrate that ECR-40, currently regarded as a typical silicoaluminophosphate molecular sieve, constitutes instead a new family of inorganic-organic hybrid networks in which the OSDAs are covalently bonded to the inorganic framework. ECR-40 crystallization begins with the formation of an Al-OSDA complex in the liquid phase in which the Al is octahedrally coordinated. This unit is incorporated in the crystallizing ECR-40. Subsequent removal of framework-bound OSDAs generates Al-O-Al linkages in a fully tetrahedrally coordinated framework. PMID:26245692

  2. Structural evolution of glycan recognition by a family of potent HIV antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Garces, Fernando; Sok, Devin; Kong, Leopold; McBride, Ryan; Kim, Helen J.; Saye-Francisco, Karen F.; Julien, Jean-Philippe; Hua, Yuanzi; Cupo, Albert; Moore, John P.; Paulson, James C.; Ward, Andrew B.; Burton, Dennis R.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The HIV envelope glycoprotein (Env) is densely covered with self-glycans that should help shield it from recognition by the human immune system. Here we examine how a particularly potent family of broadly neutralizing antibodies (Abs) has evolved common and distinct structural features to counter the glycan shield and interact with both glycan and protein components of HIV Env. The inferred germline antibody already harbors potential binding pockets for a glycan and a short protein segment. Affinity maturation then leads to divergent evolutionary branches that either focus on a single glycan and protein segment (e.g. Ab PGT124) or engage multiple glycans (e.g. Abs PGT121-123). Furthermore, other surrounding glycans are avoided by selecting an appropriate initial antibody shape that prevents steric hindrance. Such molecular recognition lessons are important for engineering proteins that can recognize or accommodate glycans. PMID:25259921

  3. 'Mommy, I miss daddy'. The effect of family structure on children's health in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Ayllón, Sara; Ferreira-Batista, Natalia N

    2015-12-01

    This paper studies the relationship between single motherhood and children's height-for-age z-scores in Brazil. In order to isolate the causal effect between family structure and children's condition, we estimate an econometric model that uses male preference for firstborn sons and local sex ratios to instrument the probability of a woman becoming a single mother. Our results have a local average treatment effect interpretation (LATE). We find that children being raised by a single mother (whose marital status is affected by a firstborn girl and a low sex ratio) have a height-for-age z-score that is lower than that of children of similar characteristics that cohabit with both progenitors. We claim that the increasing trend of single motherhood in Brazil should be of concern in health policy design. PMID:26344780

  4. A Study of the American Family and Money. The General Mills American Family Report 1974-75.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Mills, Inc., Minneapolis, Minn.

    The report provides statistical information on the immediate and long-term impact of money and economics on American life in 1975. Included are data concerning the impact of money on family structure, intra-family relationships, values, money management, health, and life-style. Statistics are based on 2,194 interviews, including interviews with…

  5. The first crystal structure of the peptidase domain of the U32 peptidase family.

    PubMed

    Schacherl, Magdalena; Montada, Angelika A M; Brunstein, Elena; Baumann, Ulrich

    2015-12-01

    The U32 family is a collection of over 2500 annotated peptidases in the MEROPS database with unknown catalytic mechanism. They mainly occur in bacteria and archaea, but a few representatives have also been identified in eukarya. Many of the U32 members have been linked to pathogenicity, such as proteins from Helicobacter and Salmonella. The first crystal structure analysis of a U32 catalytic domain from Methanopyrus kandleri (gene mk0906) reveals a modified (??)8 TIM-barrel fold with some unique features. The connecting segment between strands ?7 and ?8 is extended and helix ?7 is located on top of the C-terminal end of the barrel body. The protein exhibits a dimeric quaternary structure in which a zinc ion is symmetrically bound by histidine and cysteine side chains from both monomers. These residues reside in conserved sequence motifs. No typical proteolytic motifs are discernible in the three-dimensional structure, and biochemical assays failed to demonstrate proteolytic activity. A tunnel in which an acetate ion is bound is located in the C-terminal part of the ?-barrel. Two hydrophobic grooves lead to a tunnel at the C-terminal end of the barrel in which an acetate ion is bound. One of the grooves binds to a Strep-Tag II of another dimer in the crystal lattice. Thus, these grooves may be binding sites for hydrophobic peptides or other ligands. PMID:26627657

  6. The impact of retail rate structures on the economics of commercial photovoltaic systems in California

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, Andrew D.; Wiser, Ryan; Barbose, Galen; Golove, William

    2008-06-24

    This article examines the impact of retail electricity rate design on the economic value of grid-connected photovoltaic (PV) systems, focusing on commercial customers in California. Using 15-min interval building load and PV production data from a sample of 24 actual commercial PV installations, we compare the value of the bill savings across 20 commercial-customer retail electricity rates currently offered in the state. Across all combinations of customers and rates, we find that the annual bill savings from PV, per kWh generated, ranges from $0.05 to $0.24/kWh. This sizable range in rate-reduction value reflects differences in rate structures, revenue requirements, the size of the PV system relative to building load, and customer load shape. The most significant rate design issue for the value of commercial PV is found to be the percentage of total utility bills recovered through demand charges, though a variety of other factors are also found to be of importance. The value of net metering is found to be substantial, but only when energy from commercial PV systems represents a sizable portion of annual customer load. Though the analysis presented here is specific to California, our general results demonstrate the fundamental importance of retail rate design for the customer-economics of grid-connected, customer-sited PV.

  7. The Impact of Retail Rate Structures on the Economics of Commercial Photovoltaic Systems in California

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, Andrew; Wiser, Ryan; Barbose, Galen; Golove, William

    2008-05-11

    This article examines the impact of retail electricity rate design on the economic value of grid-connected photovoltaic (PV) systems, focusing on commercial customers in California. Using 15-minute interval building load and PV production data from a sample of 24 actual commercial PV installations, we compare the value of the bill savings across 20 commercial-customer retail electricity rates currently offered in the state. Across all combinations of customers and rates, we find that the annual bill savings from PV, per kWh generated, ranges from $0.05/kWh to $0.24/kWh. This sizable range in rate-reduction value reflects differences in rate structures, revenue requirements, the size of the PV system relative to building load, and customer load shape. The most significant rate design issue for the value of commercial PV is found to be the percentage of total utility bills recovered through demand charges, though a variety of other factors are also found to be of importance. The value of net metering is found to be substantial, but only when commercial PV systems represent a sizable portion of annual customer load. Though the analysis presented here is specific to California, our general results demonstrate the fundamental importance of retail rate design for the customer-economics of grid-connected, customer-sited PV.

  8. Economics of online structural health monitoring of wind turbines: Cost benefit analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Dam, Jeremy; Bond, Leonard J.

    2015-03-01

    Operations and maintenance (O&M) costs have an average share over the lifetime of the turbine of approximately 20%-25% of the total levelized cost per kWh of electricity produced. Online structural health monitoring (OSHM) and condition-based maintenance (CBM) of wind turbine blades has the potential to reduce O&M costs and hence reduce the overall cost of wind energy. OSHM and CBM offer the potential to improve turbine blade life cycle management, limit the number of physical inspections, and reduce the potential for missed significant defects. An OSHM system would reduce the need for physical inspections, and have inspections occur only after problem detection takes place. In the economics of wind energy, failures and unplanned outages can cause significant downtime, particularly while waiting for the manufacturing and shipping of major parts. This paper will report a review and assessment of SHM technologies and a cost benefit analysis, which will examine whether the added costs associated with an OSHM system will give an adequate return on the investment. One method in which OSHM reduces costs is, in part, by converting corrective maintenance to preventative maintenance. This paper shows that under both best and worse conditions implementing an OSHM system is cost effective in more than 50% of the trials, which have been performed. Opportunities appear to exist to improve the economic justification for implementing OSHM.

  9. Work-family conflict in context: the impact of structural and perceived neighborhood disadvantage on work-family conflict.

    PubMed

    Young, Marisa

    2015-03-01

    Despite increasing levels of work-family conflict (WFC) among North Americans, few scholars examine the broader contexts in which these conflicts occur. I address this gap by examining how the neighborhood of residence impacts WFC, with a focus on social inequality and disadvantage across neighborhoods. I hypothesize that neighborhood disadvantage may impact WFC directly-by introducing ambient stressors that inhibit individuals from successfully balancing competing domain demands, and indirectly-by undermining the psychological resources that would combat the harmful effects of disadvantaged contexts. Using individual and census-level data from Canada, I consider both objective and subjective measures of neighborhood disadvantage and find that, overall, individuals in more disadvantaged neighborhoods are worse off because these contexts increase WFC, while reducing the psychological resources that would otherwise buffer these deleterious effects. However, some of these associations vary by gender. I discuss the broader implications of these findings for neighborhood effects and WFC research. PMID:25592939

  10. Structure of the first representative of Pfam family PF09410 (DUF2006) reveals a structural signature of the calycin superfamily that suggests a role in lipid metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Bakolitsa, Constantina; Skerra, Arne; Lomize, Andrei; Carlton, Dennis; Miller, Mitchell D.; Krishna, S. Sri; Abdubek, Polat; Astakhova, Tamara; Axelrod, Herbert L.; Clayton, Thomas; Deller, Marc C.; Duan, Lian; Feuerhelm, Julie; Grant, Joanna C.; Grzechnik, Slawomir K.; Han, Gye Won; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Jin, Kevin K.; Klock, Heath E.; Knuth, Mark W.; Kozbial, Piotr; Kumar, Abhinav; Marciano, David; McMullan, Daniel; Morse, Andrew T.; Nigoghossian, Edward; Okach, Linda; Paulsen, Jessica; Reyes, Ron; Rife, Christopher L.; van den Bedem, Henry; Weekes, Dana; Xu, Qingping; Hodgson, Keith O.; Wooley, John; Elsliger, Marc-Andre; Deacon, Ashley M.; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2015-10-15

    The first structural representative of the domain of unknown function DUF2006 family, also known as Pfam family PF09410, comprises a lipocalin-like fold with domain duplication. The finding of the calycin signature in the N-terminal domain, combined with remote sequence similarity to two other protein families (PF07143 and PF08622) implicated in isoprenoid metabolism and the oxidative stress response, support an involvement in lipid metabolism. Clusters of conserved residues that interact with ligand mimetics suggest that the binding and regulation sites map to the N-terminal domain and to the interdomain interface, respectively.

  11. On an economic prediction of the finer resolution level wavelet coefficients in electron structure calculations

    E-print Network

    Szilvia Nagy; János Pipek

    2015-02-28

    In wavelet based electron structure calculations introducing a new, finer resolution level is usually an expensive task, this is why often a two-level approximation is used with very fine starting resolution level. This process results in large matrices to calculate with and a large number of coefficients to be stored. In our previous work we have developed an adaptively refining solution scheme that determines the indices, where refined basis functions are to be included, and later a method for predicting the next, finer resolution coefficients in a very economic way. In the present contribution we would like to determine, whether the method can be applied for predicting not only the first, but also the other, higher resolution level coefficients. Also the energy expectation values of the predicted wave functions are studied, as well as the scaling behaviour of the coefficients in the fine resolution limit.

  12. An economic prediction of the finer resolution level wavelet coefficients in electronic structure calculations.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Szilvia; Pipek, János

    2015-11-25

    In wavelet based electronic structure calculations, introducing a new, finer resolution level is usually an expensive task, this is why often a two-level approximation is used with very fine starting resolution level. This process results in large matrices to calculate with and a large number of coefficients to be stored. In our previous work we have developed an adaptively refined solution scheme that determines the indices, where the refined basis functions are to be included, and later a method for predicting the next, finer resolution coefficients in a very economic way. In the present contribution, we would like to determine whether the method can be applied for predicting not only the first, but also the other, higher resolution level coefficients. Also the energy expectation values of the predicted wave functions are studied, as well as the scaling behaviour of the coefficients in the fine resolution limit. PMID:26176200

  13. Structure and function of the human Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase enzyme family

    E-print Network

    Rood, Jennifer E. (Jennifer Evelyn)

    2013-01-01

    The poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) family of enzymes in humans is comprised of 17 proteins. PARP-1, the first member of the family, synthesizes a large, complex post-translational modification, poly(ADP-ribose). While ...

  14. Adaptations for economical bipedal running: the effect of limb structure on three-dimensional joint mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Rubenson, Jonas; Lloyd, David G.; Heliams, Denham B.; Besier, Thor F.; Fournier, Paul A.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the mechanical adaptations linked to economical locomotion in cursorial bipeds. We addressed this question by comparing mass-matched humans and avian bipeds (ostriches), which exhibit marked differences in limb structure and running economy. We hypothesized that the nearly 50 per cent lower energy cost of running in ostriches is a result of: (i) lower limb-swing mechanical power, (ii) greater stance-phase storage and release of elastic energy, and (iii) lower total muscle power output. To test these hypotheses, we used three-dimensional joint mechanical measurements and a simple model to estimate the elastic and muscle contributions to joint work and power. Contradictory to our first hypothesis, we found that ostriches and humans generate the same amounts of mechanical power to swing the limbs at a similar self-selected running speed, indicating that limb swing probably does not contribute to the difference in energy cost of running between these species. In contrast, we estimated that ostriches generate 120 per cent more stance-phase mechanical joint power via release of elastic energy compared with humans. This elastic mechanical power occurs nearly exclusively at the tarsometatarso-phalangeal joint, demonstrating a shift of mechanical power generation to distal joints compared with humans. We also estimated that positive muscle fibre power is 35 per cent lower in ostriches compared with humans, and is accounted for primarily by higher capacity for storage and release of elastic energy. Furthermore, our analysis revealed much larger frontal and internal/external rotation joint loads during ostrich running than in humans. Together, these findings support the hypothesis that a primary limb structure specialization linked to economical running in cursorial species is an elevated storage and release of elastic energy in tendon. In the ostrich, energy-saving specializations may also include passive frontal and internal/external rotation load-bearing mechanisms. PMID:21030429

  15. Mammalian molybdo-flavoenzymes, an expanding family of proteins: structure, genetics, regulation, function and pathophysiology.

    PubMed Central

    Garattini, Enrico; Mendel, Ralf; Romão, Maria João; Wright, Richard; Terao, Mineko

    2003-01-01

    The molybdo-flavoenzymes are structurally related proteins that require a molybdopterin cofactor and FAD for their catalytic activity. In mammals, four enzymes are known: xanthine oxidoreductase, aldehyde oxidase and two recently described mouse proteins known as aldehyde oxidase homologue 1 and aldehyde oxidase homologue 2. The present review article summarizes current knowledge on the structure, enzymology, genetics, regulation and pathophysiology of mammalian molybdo-flavoenzymes. Molybdo-flavoenzymes are structurally complex oxidoreductases with an equally complex mechanism of catalysis. Our knowledge has greatly increased due to the recent crystallization of two xanthine oxidoreductases and the determination of the amino acid sequences of many members of the family. The evolution of molybdo-flavoenzymes can now be traced, given the availability of the structures of the corresponding genes in many organisms. The genes coding for molybdo-flavoenzymes are expressed in a cell-specific fashion and are controlled by endogenous and exogenous stimuli. The recent cloning of the genes involved in the biosynthesis of the molybdenum cofactor has increased our knowledge on the assembly of the apo-forms of molybdo-flavoproteins into the corresponding holo-forms. Xanthine oxidoreductase is the key enzyme in the catabolism of purines, although recent data suggest that the physiological function of this enzyme is more complex than previously assumed. The enzyme has been implicated in such diverse pathological situations as organ ischaemia, inflammation and infection. At present, very little is known about the pathophysiological relevance of aldehyde oxidase, aldehyde oxidase homologue 1 and aldehyde oxidase homologue 2, which do not as yet have an accepted endogenous substrate. PMID:12578558

  16. Serotype-Specific Structural Differences in the Protease-Cofactor Complexes of the Dengue Virus Family

    SciTech Connect

    Chandramouli, Sumana; Joseph, Jeremiah S.; Daudenarde, Sophie; Gatchalian, Jovylyn; Cornillez-Ty, Cromwell; Kuhn, Peter

    2010-03-04

    With an estimated 40% of the world population at risk, dengue poses a significant threat to human health, especially in tropical and subtropical regions. Preventative and curative efforts, such as vaccine development and drug discovery, face additional challenges due to the occurrence of four antigenically distinct serotypes of the causative dengue virus (DEN1 to -4). Complex immune responses resulting from repeat assaults by the different serotypes necessitate simultaneous targeting of all forms of the virus. One of the promising targets for drug development is the highly conserved two-component viral protease NS2B-NS3, which plays an essential role in viral replication by processing the viral precursor polyprotein into functional proteins. In this paper, we report the 2.1-{angstrom} crystal structure of the DEN1 NS2B hydrophilic core (residues 49 to 95) in complex with the NS3 protease domain (residues 1 to 186) carrying an internal deletion in the N terminus (residues 11 to 20). While the overall folds within the protease core are similar to those of DEN2 and DEN4 proteases, the conformation of the cofactor NS2B is dramatically different from those of other flaviviral apoprotease structures. The differences are especially apparent within its C-terminal region, implicated in substrate binding. The structure reveals for the first time serotype-specific structural elements in the dengue virus family, with the reported alternate conformation resulting from a unique metal-binding site within the DEN1 sequence. We also report the identification of a 10-residue stretch within NS3pro that separates the substrate-binding function from the catalytic turnover rate of the enzyme. Implications for broad-spectrum drug discovery are discussed.

  17. Crystal Structures of a Glycoside Hydrolase Family 20 Lacto-N-biosidase from Bifidobacterium bifidum *

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Tasuku; Katayama, Takane; Hattie, Mitchell; Sakurama, Haruko; Wada, Jun; Suzuki, Ryuichiro; Ashida, Hisashi; Wakagi, Takayoshi; Yamamoto, Kenji; Stubbs, Keith A.; Fushinobu, Shinya

    2013-01-01

    Human milk oligosaccharides contain a large variety of oligosaccharides, of which lacto-N-biose I (Gal-?1,3-GlcNAc; LNB) predominates as a major core structure. A unique metabolic pathway specific for LNB has recently been identified in the human commensal bifidobacteria. Several strains of infant gut-associated bifidobacteria possess lacto-N-biosidase, a membrane-anchored extracellular enzyme, that liberates LNB from the nonreducing end of human milk oligosaccharides and plays a key role in the metabolic pathway of these compounds. Lacto-N-biosidase belongs to the glycoside hydrolase family 20, and its reaction proceeds via a substrate-assisted catalytic mechanism. Several crystal structures of GH20 ?-N-acetylhexosaminidases, which release monosaccharide GlcNAc from its substrate, have been determined, but to date, a structure of lacto-N-biosidase is unknown. Here, we have determined the first three-dimensional structures of lacto-N-biosidase from Bifidobacterium bifidum JCM1254 in complex with LNB and LNB-thiazoline (Gal-?1,3-GlcNAc-thiazoline) at 1.8-? resolution. Lacto-N-biosidase consists of three domains, and the C-terminal domain has a unique ?-trefoil-like fold. Compared with other ?-N-acetylhexosaminidases, lacto-N-biosidase has a wide substrate-binding pocket with a ?2 subsite specific for ?-1,3-linked Gal, and the residues responsible for Gal recognition were identified. The bound ligands are recognized by extensive hydrogen bonds at all of their hydroxyls consistent with the enzyme's strict substrate specificity for the LNB moiety. The GlcNAc sugar ring of LNB is in a distorted conformation near 4E, whereas that of LNB-thiazoline is in a 4C1 conformation. A possible conformational pathway for the lacto-N-biosidase reaction is discussed. PMID:23479733

  18. Structural Analysis of a Glycoside Hydrolase Family 11 Xylanase from Neocallimastix patriciarum

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Ya-Shan; Chen, Chun-Chi; Huang, Chun-Hsiang; Ko, Tzu-Ping; Luo, Wenhua; Huang, Jian-Wen; Liu, Je-Ruei; Guo, Rey-Ting

    2014-01-01

    The catalytic domain of XynCDBFV, a glycoside hydrolase family 11 (GH11) xylanase from ruminal fungus Neocallimastix patriciarum previously engineered to exhibit higher specific activity and broader pH adaptability, holds great potential in commercial applications. Here, the crystal structures of XynCDBFV and its complex with substrate were determined to 1.27–1.43 ? resolution. These structures revealed a typical GH11 ?-jelly-roll fold and detailed interaction networks between the enzyme and ligands. Notably, an extended N-terminal region (NTR) consisting of 11 amino acids was identified in the XynCDBFV structure, which is found unique among GH11 xylanases. The NTR is attached to the catalytic core by hydrogen bonds and stacking forces along with a disulfide bond between Cys-4 and Cys-172. Interestingly, the NTR deletion mutant retained 61.5% and 19.5% enzymatic activity at 55 °C and 75 °C, respectively, compared with the wild-type enzyme, whereas the C4A/C172A mutant showed 86.8% and 23.3% activity. These results suggest that NTR plays a role in XynCDBFV thermostability, and the Cys-4/Cys-172 disulfide bond is critical to the NTR-mediated interactions. Furthermore, we also demonstrated that Pichia pastoris produces XynCDBFV with higher catalytic activity at higher temperature than Escherichia coli, in which incorrect NTR folding and inefficient disulfide bond formation might have occurred. In conclusion, these structural and functional analyses of the industrially favored XynCDBFV provide a molecular basis of NTR contribution to its thermostability. PMID:24619408

  19. DNA secondary structures are associated with recombination in major Plasmodium falciparum variable surface antigen gene families

    PubMed Central

    Sander, Adam F.; Lavstsen, Thomas; Rask, Thomas S.; Lisby, Michael; Salanti, Ali; Fordyce, Sarah L.; Jespersen, Jakob S.; Carter, Richard; Deitsch, Kirk W.; Theander, Thor G.; Pedersen, Anders Gorm; Arnot, David E.

    2014-01-01

    Many bacterial, viral and parasitic pathogens undergo antigenic variation to counter host immune defense mechanisms. In Plasmodium falciparum, the most lethal of human malaria parasites, switching of var gene expression results in alternating expression of the adhesion proteins of the Plasmodium falciparum-erythrocyte membrane protein 1 class on the infected erythrocyte surface. Recombination clearly generates var diversity, but the nature and control of the genetic exchanges involved remain unclear. By experimental and bioinformatic identification of recombination events and genome-wide recombination hotspots in var genes, we show that during the parasite’s sexual stages, ectopic recombination between isogenous var paralogs occurs near low folding free energy DNA 50-mers and that these sequences are heavily concentrated at the boundaries of regions encoding individual Plasmodium falciparum-erythrocyte membrane protein 1 structural domains. The recombinogenic potential of these 50-mers is not parasite-specific because these sequences also induce recombination when transferred to the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Genetic cross data suggest that DNA secondary structures (DSS) act as inducers of recombination during DNA replication in P. falciparum sexual stages, and that these DSS-regulated genetic exchanges generate functional and diverse P. falciparum adhesion antigens. DSS-induced recombination may represent a common mechanism for optimizing the evolvability of virulence gene families in pathogens. PMID:24253306

  20. Structural insights into the DNA-binding specificity of E2F family transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Morgunova, Ekaterina; Yin, Yimeng; Jolma, Arttu; Dave, Kashyap; Schmierer, Bernhard; Popov, Alexander; Eremina, Nadejda; Nilsson, Lennart; Taipale, Jussi

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian cell cycle is controlled by the E2F family of transcription factors. Typical E2Fs bind to DNA as heterodimers with the related dimerization partner (DP) proteins, whereas the atypical E2Fs, E2F7 and E2F8 contain two DNA-binding domains (DBDs) and act as repressors. To understand the mechanism of repression, we have resolved the structure of E2F8 in complex with DNA at atomic resolution. We find that the first and second DBDs of E2F8 resemble the DBDs of typical E2F and DP proteins, respectively. Using molecular dynamics simulations, biochemical affinity measurements and chromatin immunoprecipitation, we further show that both atypical and typical E2Fs bind to similar DNA sequences in vitro and in vivo. Our results represent the first crystal structure of an E2F protein with two DBDs, and reveal the mechanism by which atypical E2Fs can repress canonical E2F target genes and exert their negative influence on cell cycle progression. PMID:26632596

  1. Structural insights into the DNA-binding specificity of E2F family transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Morgunova, Ekaterina; Yin, Yimeng; Jolma, Arttu; Dave, Kashyap; Schmierer, Bernhard; Popov, Alexander; Eremina, Nadejda; Nilsson, Lennart; Taipale, Jussi

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian cell cycle is controlled by the E2F family of transcription factors. Typical E2Fs bind to DNA as heterodimers with the related dimerization partner (DP) proteins, whereas the atypical E2Fs, E2F7 and E2F8 contain two DNA-binding domains (DBDs) and act as repressors. To understand the mechanism of repression, we have resolved the structure of E2F8 in complex with DNA at atomic resolution. We find that the first and second DBDs of E2F8 resemble the DBDs of typical E2F and DP proteins, respectively. Using molecular dynamics simulations, biochemical affinity measurements and chromatin immunoprecipitation, we further show that both atypical and typical E2Fs bind to similar DNA sequences in vitro and in vivo. Our results represent the first crystal structure of an E2F protein with two DBDs, and reveal the mechanism by which atypical E2Fs can repress canonical E2F target genes and exert their negative influence on cell cycle progression. PMID:26632596

  2. Structure of the Archaeal Pab87 Peptidase Reveals a Novel Self-Compartmentalizing Protease Family

    PubMed Central

    Delfosse, Vanessa; Girard, Eric; Birck, Catherine; Delmarcelle, Michaël; Delarue, Marc; Poch, Olivier; Schultz, Patrick; Mayer, Claudine

    2009-01-01

    Self-compartmentalizing proteases orchestrate protein turnover through an original architecture characterized by a central catalytic chamber. Here we report the first structure of an archaeal member of a new self-compartmentalizing protease family forming a cubic-shaped octamer with D4 symmetry and referred to as CubicO. We solved the structure of the Pyrococcus abyssi Pab87 protein at 2.2 Å resolution using the anomalous signal of the high-phasing-power lanthanide derivative Lu-HPDO3A. A 20 Å wide channel runs through this supramolecular assembly of 0.4 MDa, giving access to a 60 Å wide central chamber holding the eight active sites. Surprisingly, activity assays revealed that Pab87 degrades specifically d-amino acid containing peptides, which have never been observed in archaea. Genomic context of the Pab87 gene showed that it is surrounded by genes involved in the amino acid/peptide transport or metabolism. We propose that CubicO proteases are involved in the processing of d-peptides from environmental origins. PMID:19266066

  3. On some surface structures of potential taxonomic importance in families of the suborders Polydesmidea and Dalodesmidea (Polydesmida, Diplopoda)

    PubMed Central

    Akkari, Nesrine; Enghoff, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Surface structures have rarely been the subject of a comprehensive study in Polydesmida despite their tremendous variety within this order. A number of these peripheral structures are here studied in most families of the suborders Polydesmidea and Dalodesmidea (sensu Hoffman 1980), using scanning electron microscopy. An illustrated description of the surface sculpture of the prozonite, the limbus and the intercalary cuticular micro-scutes on the metazonite is given for the first time for the studied families, together with an account of some other poorly known surface structures. Taken together, these characters allow us to recognize two main groupings of families. The families Ammodesmidae, Cryptodesmidae, Cyrtodesmidae, Haplodesmidae, Oniscodesmidae and Pyrgodesmidae have knobs on the posterior part of the prozonites, a toothed to lobed limbus, and no micro-scutes on the metazonites, wheras the families Fuhrmannodesmidae, Polydesmidae, Dalodesmidae, Macrosternodesmidae, Nearctodesmidae, Opisotretidae and Trichopolydesmidae have no knobs on the posterior part of the prozonites, a spiky or reduced limbus, and intercalary micro-scutes on the metazonites. The results are complemented with literature records and compared with current taxonomic and phylogenetic interpretations of the group. PMID:22303092

  4. Structural and Functional Characterization of a Novel Family GH115 4-O-Methyl-?-Glucuronidase with Specificity for Decorated Arabinogalactans.

    PubMed

    Aalbers, Friso; Turkenburg, Johan P; Davies, Gideon J; Dijkhuizen, Lubbert; Lammerts van Bueren, Alicia

    2015-12-01

    Glycoside hydrolases are clustered into families based on amino acid sequence similarities, and belonging to a particular family can infer biological activity of an enzyme. Family GH115 contains ?-glucuronidases where several members have been shown to hydrolyze terminal ?-1,2-linked glucuronic acid and 4-O-methylated glucuronic acid from the plant cell wall polysaccharide glucuronoxylan. Other GH115 enzymes show no activity on glucuronoxylan, and therefore, it has been proposed that family GH115 may be a poly-specific family. In this study, we reveal that a putative periplasmic GH115 from the human gut symbiont Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, BtGH115A, hydrolyzes terminal 4-O-methyl-glucuronic acid residues from decorated arabinogalactan isolated from acacia tree. The three-dimensional structure of BtGH115A reveals that BtGH115A has the same domain architecture as the other structurally characterized member of this family, BoAgu115A; however the position of the C-terminal module is altered with respect to each individual enzyme. Phylogenetic analysis of GH115 amino sequences divides the family into distinct clades that may distinguish different substrate specificities. Finally, we show that BtGH115A ?-glucuronidase activity is necessary for the sequential digestion of branched galactans from acacia gum by a galactan-?-1,3-galactosidase from family GH43; however, while B. thetaiotaomicron grows on larch wood arabinogalactan, the bacterium is not able to metabolize acacia gum arabinogalactan, suggesting that BtGH115A is involved in degradation of arabinogalactan fragments liberated by other microbial species in the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:26186997

  5. Controlled synthesis of a structurally characterized family of sterically constrained heterocyclic alkoxy-modified titanium alkoxides.

    PubMed

    Boyle, Timothy J; Sewell, Robin M; Ottley, Leigh Anna M; Pratt, Harry D; Quintana, Christopher J; Bunge, Scott D

    2007-03-01

    The reaction of [Ti(mu-ONep)(ONep)3]2 (ONep = OCH2C(CH3)3) with a series of heterocyclic methanol derivatives [tetrahydrofurfuryl alcohol (H-OTHF), thiophene methanol (H-OTPM), or 2-pyridylcarbinol (H-OPy)-collectively termed H-OR*], led to the isolation of a novel family of OR*-substituted titanium alkoxide precursors. Independent of the initial stoichiometry for the H-OTHF reaction, a monosubstituted, dinuclear species was isolated as [(ONep)3Ti(muc-OTHF)]2 (1). For 1, each Ti was octahedrally (Oh) bound by three terminal ONep ligands, one bidentate bridging OTHF ligand (muc-OTHF), and an oxygen from the other muc-OTHF ligand. For the OTPM derivatives, the product was identified as [(ONep)3Ti(mu-OTPM)]2 (2). For this ligand, the soft S atom does not bind to the Ti but the O atom does act as a bridge between the two trigonal bipyramidal bound Ti metal centers. The OPy system yielded (OPy)2Ti(OR)2 independent of the OR and the stoichiometry used [OR = ONep (3), OCHMe2 (4), OCMe3 (5)]. For 3-5, the two OPy ligands chelate to the Oh-bound Ti metal center with two terminal OR ligands. Compounds 1-5 were fully characterized using a variety of analytical techniques. An initial investigation of the proposed chemical stability of the '(OPy)2Ti' moiety of 3-5 to alcoholysis exchange pathways involving (i) alkyl alcohols, (ii) aryl alcohols, (iii) substituted phenols, (iv) H-OR* derivatives, and (v) silanols proved successful through the isolation of a novel family of structurally characterized (OPy)2Ti(OR')2 (7-24) compounds. PMID:17319735

  6. Fungal Cytochrome P450 Monooxygenases: Their Distribution, Structure, Functions, Family Expansion, and Evolutionary Origin

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wanping; Lee, Mi-Kyung; Jefcoate, Colin; Kim, Sun-Chang; Chen, Fusheng; Yu, Jae-Hyuk

    2014-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 (CYP) monooxygenase superfamily contributes a broad array of biological functions in living organisms. In fungi, CYPs play diverse and pivotal roles in versatile metabolism and fungal adaptation to specific ecological niches. In this report, CYPomes in the 47 genomes of fungi belong to the phyla Ascomycota, Basidiomycota, Chytridiomycota, and Zygomycota have been studied. The comparison of fungal CYPomes suggests that generally fungi possess abundant CYPs belonging to a variety of families with the two global families CYP51 and CYP61, indicating individuation of CYPomes during the evolution of fungi. Fungal CYPs show highly conserved characteristic motifs, but very low overall sequence similarities. The characteristic motifs of fungal CYPs are distinguishable from those of CYPs in animals, plants, and especially archaea and bacteria. The four representative motifs contribute to the general function of CYPs. Fungal CYP51s and CYP61s can be used as the models for the substrate recognition sites analysis. The CYP proteins are clustered into 15 clades and the phylogenetic analyses suggest that the wide variety of fungal CYPs has mainly arisen from gene duplication. Two large duplication events might have been associated with the booming of Ascomycota and Basidiomycota. In addition, horizontal gene transfer also contributes to the diversification of fungal CYPs. Finally, a possible evolutionary scenario for fungal CYPs along with fungal divergences is proposed. Our results provide the fundamental information for a better understanding of CYP distribution, structure and function, and new insights into the evolutionary events of fungal CYPs along with the evolution of fungi. PMID:24966179

  7. Economic development and the structure of the demand for commerial energy

    E-print Network

    Judson, Ruth A.; Schmalensee, Richard.; Stoker, Thomas M.

    To deepen understanding of the relation between economic development and energy demand, this study estimates the Engel curves that relate per-capita energy consumption in major economic sectors to per-capita GDP. Panel ...

  8. Economic development and the structure of the demand for commerial energy

    E-print Network

    Judson, Ruth A.

    To deepen the understanding of the relation between economic development and energy demand, this study estimates the Engel curves that relate per-capita energy consumption in major economic sectors to per-capita GDP. Panel ...

  9. Multiple Mating and Family Structure of the Western Tent Caterpillar, Malacosoma californicum pluviale: Impact on Disease Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Franklin, Michelle T.; Ritland, Carol E.; Myers, Judith H.; Cory, Jenny S.

    2012-01-01

    Background Levels of genetic diversity can strongly influence the dynamics and evolutionary changes of natural populations. Survival and disease resistance have been linked to levels of genetic diversity in eusocial insects, yet these relationships remain untested in gregarious insects where disease transmission can be high and selection for resistance is likely to be strong. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we use 8 microsatellite loci to examine genetic variation in 12 families of western tent caterpillars, Malacosoma californicum pluviale from four different island populations to determine the relationship of genetic variability to survival and disease resistance. In addition these genetic markers were used to elucidate the population structure of western tent caterpillars. Multiple paternity was revealed by microsatellite markers, with the number of sires estimated to range from one to three per family (mean ± SE ?=?1.92±0.23). Observed heterozygosity (HO) of families was not associated to the resistance of families to a nucleopolyhedrovirus (NPV) (r?=?0.161, F1,12 ?=?0.271, P?=?0.614), a major cause of mortality in high-density populations, but was positively associated with larval survival (r?=?0.635, F1,10 ?=?5.412, P?=?0.048). Genetic differentiation among the families was high (FST?=?0.269, P<0.0001), and families from the same island were as differentiated as were families from other islands. Conclusion/Significance We have been able to describe and characterize 8 microsatellite loci, which demonstrate patterns of variation within and between families of western tent caterpillars. We have discovered an association between larval survival and family-level heterozygosity that may be relevant to the population dynamics of this cyclic forest lepidopteran, and this will be the topic of future work. PMID:22655050

  10. Investigating Shifts in Diverse Family Structures in Newbery Award and Honor Books Utilizing U.S. Census Data, 1930-2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Despain, Shannon M.; Tunnell, Michael O.; Wilcox, Brad; Morrison, Timothy G.

    2015-01-01

    Newbery Award and Honor books are a representation of children's literature, but family structures portrayed in them have not previously been studied. This prescriptive content analysis considered 87 contemporary realistic fiction Newbery winners and runners-up since the 1930s that portray families in English-speaking, Western settings. The family

  11. Structure of a Complex between Nedd8 and the Ulp/Senp Protease Family Member Den1

    SciTech Connect

    Reverter, David; Wu, Kenneth; Erdene, Tudeviin Gan; Pan, Zhen-Qiang; Wilkinson, Keith D.; Lima, Christopher D.

    2010-07-20

    The Nedd8 conjugation pathway is conserved from yeast to humans and is essential in many organisms. Nedd8 is conjugated to cullin proteins in a process that alters SCF E3 ubiquitin ligase activity, and it is presumed that Nedd8 deconjugation would reverse these effects. We now report the X-ray structures of the human Nedd8-specific protease, Den1, in a complex with the inhibitor Nedd8 aldehyde, thus revealing a model for the tetrahedral transition state intermediate generated during proteolysis. Although Den1 is closely related to the SUMO-specific protease family (Ulp/Senp family), structural analysis of the interface suggests determinants involved in Nedd8 selectivity by Den1 over other ubiquitin-like family members and suggests how the Ulp/Senp architecture has been modified to interact with different ubiquitin-like modifiers.

  12. Structural dynamics of the ?E22 (Osaka) familial Alzheimer's disease-linked amyloid ?-protein

    PubMed Central

    Inayathullah, Mohammed; Teplow, David B.

    2012-01-01

    A familial form of Alzheimer disease (AD) recently was described in a kindred in Osaka, Japan. This kindred possesses an amyloid ?-protein (A?) precursor mutation within the A? coding region that results in the deletion of Glu22 (?E22). We report here results of studies of [?E22]A?40 and ?E22A?42 that sought to elucidate the conformational dynamics, oligomerization behavior, fibril formation kinetics, fibril morphology, and fibril stability of these mutant peptides. Both [?E22]A? peptides had extraordinary ?-sheet formation propensities. The [?E22]A?40 mutant formed ?-sheet secondary structure elements ?400-fold faster. Studies of ?-sheet stability in the presence of fluorinated alcohol cosolvents or high pH revealed that the ?E22 mutation substantially increased stability, producing a rank order of [?E22]A?42 >> A?42 > [?E22]A?40 > A?40. The mutation facilitated formation of oligomers by [?E22]A?42 (dodecamers and octadecamers) that were not observed with A?42. Both A?40 and A?42 peptides formed nebulous globular and small string-like structures immediately upon solvation from lyophilizates, whereas short protofibrillar and fibrillar structures were evident immediately in the ?E22 samples. Determination of the critical concentration for fibril formation for the [?E22]A? peptides showed it to be ?1/2 that of the wild type homologues, demonstrating that the mutations causes a modest increase in fibril stability. The magnitude of this increase, when considered in the context of the extraordinary increase in ?-sheet propensity for the ?E22 peptides, suggests that the primary biophysical effect of the mutation is to accelerate conformational changes in the peptide monomer that facilitate oligomerization and higher-order assembly. PMID:21668291

  13. Declining Fortunes of Children in Middle-Class Families: Economic Inequality and Child Well-Being in the 21st Century. FCD Child and Youth Well-Being Index (CWI) Policy Brief 2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hernandez, Donald J.

    2011-01-01

    Americans are struggling through the greatest economic downturn since the Great Depression. In recent years, a significant body of research and analysis has documented the breakdown of the middle class and the impact of the current financial crisis on family income, housing, and jobs. But few reports have examined these impacts through the lens of…

  14. Auswirkungen von okonomischem Druck auf die psychosoziale Befindlichkeit von Jugendlichen: Zur Bedeutung von Familienbeziehungen und Schulniveau (The Effect of Economic Pressure on the Psycho-Social Well-Being of Adolescents: The Importance of Family Relations and School Track).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butz, Petra; Boehnke, Klaus

    1997-01-01

    Presents findings on the impact of economic pressure on the well-being of adolescents in Berlin. Shows that relative losses in purchasing power are related to decreased self-esteem in problematic family climates; school level, place of residence, and relative gain in purchasing power played a greater role in xenophobia and aggressive helplessness.…

  15. Investing in Human Capital. Papers of the Annual Conference of the Western Region Home Management Family Economics Educators (26th, San Francisco, California, November 13-15, 1986). Volume 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, Ruth E., Ed.

    These proceedings consist of 13 presentations, most of which are followed by responses or discussant comments. The papers include "Comparable Worth: Pay Equity or Road to Ruin?" (Ferber; discussants Braconi, Zick); "Measuring Financial Satisfaction" (Davis; discussant Lown); "Can Tools for Regional Economics Be Used to Assess the Export of Family

  16. Structural basis of the substrate specificity of the FPOD/FAOD family revealed by fructosyl peptide oxidase from Eupenicillium terrenum.

    PubMed

    Gan, Weiqiong; Gao, Feng; Xing, Keke; Jia, Minze; Liu, Haiping; Gong, Weimin

    2015-04-01

    The FAOD/FPOD family of proteins has the potential to be useful for the longterm detection of blood glucose levels in diabetes patients. A bottleneck for this application is to find or engineer a FAOD/FPOD family enzyme that is specifically active towards ?-fructosyl peptides but is inactive towards other types of glycated peptides. Here, the crystal structure of fructosyl peptide oxidase from Eupenicillium terrenum (EtFPOX) is reported at 1.9?Å resolution. In contrast to the previously reported structure of amadoriase II, EtFPOX has an open substrate entrance to accommodate the large peptide substrate. The functions of residues critical for substrate selection are discussed based on structure comparison and sequence alignment. This study reveals the first structural details of group I FPODs that prefer ?-fructosyl substrates and could provide significant useful information for uncovering the mechanism of substrate specificity of FAOD/FPODs and guidance towards future enzyme engineering for diagnostic purposes. PMID:25849495

  17. 'Trying to make it all come together': structuration and employed mothers' experience of family food provisioning in Canada.

    PubMed

    Slater, Joyce; Sevenhuysen, Gustaaf; Edginton, Barry; O'neil, John

    2012-09-01

    This research examined the aetiology of employed mothers' food choice and food provisioning decisions using a qualitative, grounded theory methodology. Semi-structured interviews using the Food Choice Map were conducted with eleven middle-income employed mothers of elementary school-age children. Results demonstrated that the women exhibited conflicting identities with respect to food choice and provisioning. As 'good mothers' they were the primary food and nutrition caregivers for the family, desiring to provide healthy, homemade foods their families preferred at shared family meals. They also sought to be independent selves, working outside the home, within the context of a busy modern family. Increased food autonomy of children, and lack of time due to working outside the home and children's involvement in extracurricular activities, were significant influences on their food choice and provisioning. This resulted in frequently being unable to live up to their expectations of consistently providing healthy homemade foods and having shared family meals. To cope, the women frequently relied on processed convenience and fast foods despite their acknowledged inferior nutritional status. Using Giddens' structuration theory, the dynamic relationships between the women's food choice and provisioning actions, their identities and larger structures including socio-cultural norms, conditions of work and the industrial food system were explored. The ensuing dietary pattern of the women and their families increases the risk of poor health outcomes, including obesity. These results have implications for public health responses to improve population health by shifting the focus from individual-level maternal influences to structural influences on diet. PMID:21693474

  18. Structures of human Bruton's tyrosine kinase in active and inactive conformations suggest a mechanism of activation for TEC family kinases

    SciTech Connect

    Marcotte, Douglas J.; Liu, Yu-Ting; Arduini, Robert M.; Hession, Catherine A.; Miatkowski, Konrad; Wildes, Craig P.; Cullen, Patrick F.; Hong, Victor; Hopkins, Brian T.; Mertsching, Elisabeth; Jenkins, Tracy J.; Romanowski, Michael J.; Baker, Darren P.; Silvian, Laura F.

    2010-11-15

    Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK), a member of the TEC family of kinases, plays a crucial role in B-cell maturation and mast cell activation. Although the structures of the unphosphorylated mouse BTK kinase domain and the unphosphorylated and phosphorylated kinase domains of human ITK are known, understanding the kinase selectivity profiles of BTK inhibitors has been hampered by the lack of availability of a high resolution, ligand-bound BTK structure. Here, we report the crystal structures of the human BTK kinase domain bound to either Dasatinib (BMS-354825) at 1.9 {angstrom} resolution or to 4-amino-5-(4-phenoxyphenyl)-7H-pyrrolospyrimidin- 7-yl-cyclopentane at 1.6 {angstrom} resolution. This data provides information relevant to the development of small molecule inhibitors targeting BTK and the TEC family of nonreceptor tyrosine kinases. Analysis of the structural differences between the TEC and Src families of kinases near the Trp-Glu-Ile motif in the N-terminal region of the kinase domain suggests a mechanism of regulation of the TEC family members.

  19. Family Structure Transitions and Early Childhood Development in Taiwan: Evidence from a Population-Based Birth Cohort Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Jennifer Chun-Li; Chiang, Tung-liang

    2015-01-01

    Taiwan has over the past three decades been experiencing demographic changes that may pose important concerns for children's quality of life. This study examines the relationships and potential pathways between family structure transitions and early childhood development. Our analysis is based on 19,499 children from the 2005 birth cohort who…

  20. Brief Report: Risky Sexual Behavior of Adolescents in Belgrade--Association with Socioeconomic Status and Family Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vukovic, Dejana S.; Bjegovic, Vesna M.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the association between socioeconomic status and family structure with risky sexual behaviors in adolescents. Methods: A total of 1782 15-year-old Belgrade schoolchildren (47.5% boys and 52.5% girls) completed a questionnaire from the WHO study, "Health behavior of schoolchildren." Results:…

  1. Parent-Child Relations and Peer Associations as Mediators of the Family Structure--Substance Use Relationship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crawford, Lizabeth A.; Novak, Katherine B.

    2008-01-01

    Using data from the National Education Longitudinal Survey of 1988, the authors assess the extent to which adolescents' levels of parental attachment and opportunities for participating in delinquent activities mediate the family structure--substance use relationship. A series of hierarchical regressions supported the hypotheses that high levels…

  2. Influence of Family Communication Structure and Vanity Trait on Consumption Behavior: A Case Study of Adolescent Students in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Wei-Lung; Liu, Hsiang-Te; Lin, Tai-An; Wen, Yung-Sung

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to study the relationship between family communication structure, vanity trait, and related consumption behavior. The study used an empirical method with adolescent students from the northern part of Taiwan as the subjects. Multiple statistical methods and the SEM model were used for testing the hypotheses. The…

  3. Structures of human Bruton's tyrosine kinase in active and inactive conformations suggest a mechanism of activation for TEC family kinases

    PubMed Central

    Marcotte, Douglas J; Liu, Yu-Ting; Arduini, Robert M; Hession, Catherine A; Miatkowski, Konrad; Wildes, Craig P; Cullen, Patrick F; Hong, Victor; Hopkins, Brian T; Mertsching, Elisabeth; Jenkins, Tracy J; Romanowski, Michael J; Baker, Darren P; Silvian, Laura F

    2010-01-01

    Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK), a member of the TEC family of kinases, plays a crucial role in B-cell maturation and mast cell activation. Although the structures of the unphosphorylated mouse BTK kinase domain and the unphosphorylated and phosphorylated kinase domains of human ITK are known, understanding the kinase selectivity profiles of BTK inhibitors has been hampered by the lack of availability of a high resolution, ligand-bound BTK structure. Here, we report the crystal structures of the human BTK kinase domain bound to either Dasatinib (BMS-354825) at 1.9 Å resolution or to 4-amino-5-(4-phenoxyphenyl)-7H-pyrrolospyrimidin- 7-yl-cyclopentane at 1.6 Å resolution. This data provides information relevant to the development of small molecule inhibitors targeting BTK and the TEC family of nonreceptor tyrosine kinases. Analysis of the structural differences between the TEC and Src families of kinases near the Trp-Glu-Ile motif in the N-terminal region of the kinase domain suggests a mechanism of regulation of the TEC family members. PMID:20052711

  4. Primary structure of a multimeric protein, homologous to the PEP-utilizing enzyme family and isolated from a hyperthermophilic archaebacterium.

    PubMed

    Cicicopol, C; Peters, J; Kellermann, J; Baumeister, W

    1994-12-19

    A large protein complex (approx. 2000 kDa) was found in the cytosol of the hyperthermophilic archaebacterium Staphylothermus marinus. The purified protein was shown to be a homomultimer of 93 kDa subunits, the primary structure of which was determined by nucleotide sequence analysis. The protein belongs to the family of phosphoenolpyruvate-utilizing enzymes and represents the first member characterized in archaebacteria. Its homomultimeric organisation differs from the typically dimeric structure of its eubacterial and eukaryotic counterparts. PMID:7805870

  5. Families: An Expanding Role for Professional Counselors. Proceedings of the Conference (San Antonio, Texas, February 1-3, 1986).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, George M.; And Others

    This document contains papers from a conference which targeted the needs and interests of counselors working with families. Individual papers in the book include: (1) "Economic, Social and Political Influences on Families" (Lynda Henley Walters); (2) "Family Structures and Stresses: A Counseling Perspective" (Edwin Herr); (3) "Cultural Diversity…

  6. A Structural Overview of RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerases from the Flaviviridae Family

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jiqin; Liu, Weichi; Gong, Peng

    2015-01-01

    RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RdRPs) from the Flaviviridae family are representatives of viral polymerases that carry out RNA synthesis through a de novo initiation mechanism. They share a ? 600-residue polymerase core that displays a canonical viral RdRP architecture resembling an encircled right hand with palm, fingers, and thumb domains surrounding the active site. Polymerase catalytic motifs A–E in the palm and motifs F/G in the fingers are shared by all viral RdRPs with sequence and/or structural conservations regardless of the mechanism of initiation. Different from RdRPs carrying out primer-dependent initiation, Flaviviridae and other de novo RdRPs utilize a priming element often integrated in the thumb domain to facilitate primer-independent initiation. Upon the transition to the elongation phase, this priming element needs to undergo currently unresolved conformational rearrangements to accommodate the growth of the template-product RNA duplex. In the genera of Flavivirus and Pestivirus, the polymerase module in the C-terminal part of the RdRP protein may be regulated in cis by the N-terminal region of the same polypeptide. Either being a methyltransferase in Flavivirus or a functionally unclarified module in Pestivirus, this region could play auxiliary roles for the canonical folding and/or the catalysis of the polymerase, through defined intra-molecular interactions. PMID:26062131

  7. The multigene families of actinoporins (part I): Isoforms and genetic structure.

    PubMed

    Valle, A; Alvarado-Mesén, J; Lanio, M E; Álvarez, C; Barbosa, J A R G; Pazos, I F

    2015-09-01

    Actinoporins are basic pore-forming proteins produced by sea anemones, with molecular weight around 20 kDa showing high affinity for sphingomyelin-containing membranes. Most sea anemones produce more than one actinoporin isoform differing in isoelectric point, molecular weigth and cytolytic activity. Examples of sea anemones with actinoporin isoforms are: Actinia equina with at least five isoform genes; Actinia tenebrosa, three isoforms; Actinia fragacea, five isoforms; Actineria villosa, Phyllodiscus semoni, Stichodactyla helianthus and Oulactis orientalis, with two isoforms each one, and Heteractis crispa with twenty-four isoforms. Additionally, thirty-four different amino acid sequences were deduced from fifty-two nucleotide sequences of Heteractis magnifica toxins suggesting the presence of a large number of isoforms or allelic variants. Many amino acidic changes in the isoforms are located in important regions for pore formation. The genetic structure of actinoporins comprises a pre-propeptide and a mature toxin region; therefore, actinoporins could be synthetized in the Golgi apparatus as precursor forms. The subsequent maturation of the toxins involves a proteolytic processing during secretion. Here we hypothesize that sea anemones could have suffered duplication, conversion and mutation of genes that produced multigene families as an efficient response to evolutionary pressure, leading to successful strategies of predatory and defensive function. PMID:26187849

  8. Genomic structure and expression of STM2, the chromosome 1 familial Alzheimer disease gene

    SciTech Connect

    Levy-Lahad, E.; Wang, Kai; Fu, Ying Hui

    1996-06-01

    Mutations in the gene STM2 result in autosomal dominant familial Alzheimer disease. To screen for mutations and to identify regulatory elements for this gene, the genomic DNA sequence and intron-exon structure were determined. Twelve exons including 10 coding exons were identified in a genomic region spanning 23, 737 bp. The first 2 exons encode the 5{prime}-untranslated region. Expression analysis of STM2 indicates that two transcripts of 2.4 and 2.8 kb are found in skeletal muscle, pancreas, and heart. In addition, a splice variant of the 2.4-kb transcript was identified that is the result of the use of an alternative splice acceptor site located in exon 10. The use of this site results in a transcript lacking a single glutamate. The promotor for this gene and the alternatively spliced exons leading to the 2.8-kb form of the gene remain to be identified. Expression of STM2 was high in skeletal muscle and pancreas, with comparatively low levels observed in brain. This expression pattern is intriguing since in Alzheimer disease, pathology and degeneration are observed only in the central nervous system. 19 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Boxy/peanut "bulges": comparing the structure of galaxies with the underlying families of periodic orbits

    E-print Network

    Patsis, P A

    2006-01-01

    The vertical profiles of disc galaxies are built by the material trapped around stable periodic orbits, which form their "skeletons". According to this, the knowledge of the stability of the main families of periodic orbits in appropriate 3D models, can predict possible morphologies for edge-on disc galaxies. In a pilot survey we compare the orbital structures which lead to the appearance of "peanuts" and "X"-like features with the edge-on profiles of three disc galaxies (IC 2531, NGC 4013 and UGC 2048). The subtraction from the images of a model representing the axisymmetric component of the galaxies reveals the contribution of the non-axisymmetric terms. We find a direct correspondence between the orbital profiles of 3D bars in models and the observed main morphological features of the residuals. We also apply a simple unsharp masking technique in order to study the sharpest features of the images. Our basic conclusion is that the morphology of the boxy "bulges" of these galaxies can be explained by conside...

  10. NTB-A Receptor Crystal Structure: Insights into Homophilic Interactions in the Signaling Lymphocytic Activation Molecule Receptor Family

    SciTech Connect

    Cao,E.; Ramagopal, U.; Fedorov, A.; Fedorov, E.; Yan, Q.; Lary, J.; Cole, J.; Nathenson, S.; Almo, S.

    2006-01-01

    The signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM) family includes homophilic and heterophilic receptors that regulate both innate and adaptive immunity. The ectodomains of most SLAM family members are composed of an N-terminal IgV domain and a C-terminal IgC2 domain. NK-T-B-antigen (NTB-A) is a homophilic receptor that stimulates cytotoxicity in natural killer (NK) cells, regulates bactericidal activities in neutrophils, and potentiates T helper 2 (Th2) responses. The 3.0 {angstrom} crystal structure of the complete NTB-A ectodomain revealed a rod-like monomer that self-associates to form a highly kinked dimer spanning an end-to-end distance of {approx}100 {angstrom}. The NTB-A homophilic and CD2-CD58 heterophilic dimers show overall structural similarities but differ in detailed organization and physicochemical properties of their respective interfaces. The NTB-A structure suggests a mechanism responsible for binding specificity within the SLAM family and imposes physical constraints relevant to the colocalization of SLAM-family proteins with other signaling molecules in the immunological synapse.

  11. Impact of family structure and common environment on heritability estimation for neuroimaging genetics studies using Sequential Oligogenic Linkage Analysis Routines

    PubMed Central

    Koran, Mary Ellen; Thornton-Wells, Tricia A.; Jahanshad, Neda; Glahn, David C.; Thompson, Paul M.; Blangero, John; Nichols, Thomas E.; Kochunov, Peter; Landman, Bennett A.

    2014-01-01

    Imaging genetics is an emerging methodological field that combines genetic information with medical imaging-derived metrics to understand how genetic factors impact observable phenotypes. In order for a trait to be a reasonable phenotype in an imaging genetics study, it must be heritable: at least some proportion of its variance must be due to genetic influences. The Sequential Oligogenic Linkage Analysis Routines (SOLAR) imaging genetics software can estimate the heritability of a trait in complex pedigrees. We investigate the ability of SOLAR to accurately estimate heritability and common environmental effects on simulated imaging phenotypes in various family structures. We found that heritability is reliably estimated with small family-based studies of 40 to 80 individuals, though subtle differences remain between the family structures. In an imaging application analysis, we found that with 80 subjects in any of the family structures, estimated heritability of white matter fractional anisotropy was biased by <10% for every region of interest. Results from these studies can be used when investigators are evaluating power in planning genetic analyzes. PMID:25558465

  12. A novel ?-xylosidase structure from Geobacillus thermoglucosidasius: the first crystal structure of a glycoside hydrolase family GH52 enzyme reveals unpredicted similarity to other glycoside hydrolase folds.

    PubMed

    Espina, Giannina; Eley, Kirstin; Pompidor, Guillaume; Schneider, Thomas R; Crennell, Susan J; Danson, Michael J

    2014-05-01

    Geobacillus thermoglucosidasius is a thermophilic bacterium that is able to ferment both C6 and C5 sugars to produce ethanol. During growth on hemicellulose biomass, an intracellular ?-xylosidase catalyses the hydrolysis of xylo-oligosaccharides to the monosaccharide xylose, which can then enter the pathways of central metabolism. The gene encoding a G. thermoglucosidasius ?-xylosidase belonging to CAZy glycoside hydrolase family GH52 has been cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant enzyme has been characterized and a high-resolution (1.7 Å) crystal structure has been determined, resulting in the first reported structure of a GH52 family member. A lower resolution (2.6 Å) structure of the enzyme-substrate complex shows the positioning of the xylobiose substrate to be consistent with the proposed retaining mechanism of the family; additionally, the deep cleft of the active-site pocket, plus the proximity of the neighbouring subunit, afford an explanation for the lack of catalytic activity towards the polymer xylan. Whilst the fold of the G. thermoglucosidasius ?-xylosidase is completely different from xylosidases in other CAZy families, the enzyme surprisingly shares structural similarities with other glycoside hydrolases, despite having no more than 13% sequence identity. PMID:24816105

  13. X-Ray Crystal Structure of Bone Marrow Kinase in the X Chromosome: A Tec Family Kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Muckelbauer, Jodi; Sack, John S.; Ahmed, Nazia; Burke, James; Chang, ChiehYing Y.; Gao, Mian; Tino, Joseph; Xie, Dianlin; Tebben, Andrew J.

    2012-06-27

    Bone marrow kinase in the X chromosome, a member of the Tec family of tyrosine kinases, plays a role in both monocyte/macrophage trafficking as well as cytokine secretion. Although the structures of Tec family kinases Bruton's tyrosine kinase and IL-2-inducible T-cell kinase are known, the crystal structures of other Tec family kinases have remained elusive. We report the X-ray crystal structures of bone marrow kinase in the X chromosome in complex with dasatinib at 2.4 {angstrom} resolution and PP2 at 1.9 {angstrom} resolution. The bone marrow kinase in the X chromosome structures reveal a typical kinase protein fold; with well-ordered protein conformation that includes an open/extended activation loop and a stabilized DFG-motif rendering the kinase in an inactive conformation. Dasatinib and PP2 bind to bone marrow kinase in the X chromosome in the ATP binding pocket and display similar binding modes to that observed in other Tec and Src protein kinases. The bone marrow kinase in the X chromosome structures identify conformational elements of the DFG-motif that could potentially be utilized to design potent and/or selective bone marrow kinase in the X chromosome inhibitors.

  14. Brief Report: Effect of Menarcheal Status and Family Structure on Depressive Symptoms and Emotional/Behavioural Problems in Young Adolescent Girls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Capron, Christiane; Therond, Carine; Duyme, Michel

    2007-01-01

    The study investigated the relationship between depressive symptoms and emotional/behavioural problems in adolescent girls (N = 553) aged 12-13 years, menarcheal status and family structure, and considered whether the effect of family structure was the same in the presence or absence of menses. The Children's Depression Inventory (CDI) and the…

  15. A Structural Equation Analysis of Family Accommodation in Pediatric Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caporino, Nicole E.; Morgan, Jessica; Beckstead, Jason; Phares, Vicky; Murphy, Tanya K.; Storch, Eric A.

    2012-01-01

    Family accommodation of symptoms is counter to the primary goals of cognitive-behavioral therapy for pediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and can pose an obstacle to positive treatment outcomes. Although increased attention has been given to family accommodation in pediatric OCD, relatively little is known about associated child and…

  16. Children's Literature Reflecting Diverse Family Structures: Social and Academic Benefits for Early Reading Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hampton, Frederick M.; Rak, Carl; Mumford, Dawn A.

    1997-01-01

    Addresses the importance of infusing relevant reading stories about nontraditional families into the standard K-3 curriculum to stimulate identification, appreciation, and motivation for young learners. Conscious use of literature reflecting diverse families creates a zone of relevant learning and telegraphs the importance of the children's…

  17. CHANGES IN THE STRUCTURE AND ROLES OF SPANISH-AMERICAN FAMILIES OF NORTHERN NEW MEXICO.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    KNOWLTON, CLARK S.

    DATA FOR THIS PAPER WERE OBTAINED FROM EXAMINATION OF AVAILABLE LITERATURE AND FROM FIELD WORK IN SAN MIGUEL AND MORA COUNTIES OF NORTHERN NEW MEXICO. THE EXTENDED PATRIARCHAL FAMILY WAS THE PRIMARY SOCIAL SYSTEM AMONG THE SPANISH AMERICANS, OFTEN CONSISTING OF MEMBERS OF THREE OR FOUR GENERATIONS HEADED BY THE GRANDFATHER. THIS FAMILY COOPERATED…

  18. Structural basis for the inhibition of M1 family aminopeptidases by the natural product actinonin: Crystal structure in complex with E. coli aminopeptidase N.

    PubMed

    Ganji, Roopa Jones; Reddi, Ravikumar; Gumpena, Rajesh; Marapaka, Anil Kumar; Arya, Tarun; Sankoju, Priyanka; Bhukya, Supriya; Addlagatta, Anthony

    2015-05-01

    Actinonin is a pseudotripeptide that displays a high affinity towards metalloproteases including peptide deformylases (PDFs) and M1 family aminopeptidases. PDF and M1 family aminopeptidases belong to thermolysin-metzincin superfamily. One of the major differences in terms of substrate binding pockets between these families is presence (in M1 aminopeptidases) or absence (in PDFs) of an S1 substrate pocket. The binding mode of actinonin to PDFs has been established previously; however, it is not clear how the actinonin, without a P1 residue, would bind to the M1 aminopeptidases. Here we describe the crystal structure of Escherichia coli aminopeptidase N (ePepN), a model protein of the M1 family aminopeptidases in complex with actinonin. For comparison we have also determined the structure of ePepN in complex with a well-known tetrapeptide inhibitor, amastatin. From the comparison of the actinonin and amastatin ePepN complexes, it is clear that the P1 residue is not critical as long as strong metal chelating head groups, like hydroxamic acid or ?-hydroxy ketone, are present. Results from this study will be useful for the design of selective and efficient hydroxamate inhibitors against M1 family aminopeptidases. PMID:25644575

  19. Structural basis for the mechanism and substrate specificity of glycocyamine kinase, a phosphagen kinase family member

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Kap; Pullalarevu, Sadhana; Surabian, Karen Talin; Howard, Andrew; Suzuki, Tomohiko; Moult, John; Herzberg, Osnat

    2010-03-12

    Glycocyamine kinase (GK), a member of the phosphagen kinase family, catalyzes the Mg{sup 2+}-dependent reversible phosphoryl group transfer of the N-phosphoryl group of phosphoglycocyamine to ADP to yield glycocyamine and ATP. This reaction helps to maintain the energy homeostasis of the cell in some multicelullar organisms that encounter high and variable energy turnover. GK from the marine worm Namalycastis sp. is heterodimeric, with two homologous polypeptide chains, {alpha} and {beta}, derived from a common pre-mRNA by mutually exclusive N-terminal alternative exons. The N-terminal exon of GK{beta} encodes a peptide that is different in sequence and is 16 amino acids longer than that encoded by the N-terminal exon of GK{alpha}. The crystal structures of recombinant GK{alpha}{beta} and GK{beta}{beta} from Namalycastis sp. were determined at 2.6 and 2.4 {angstrom} resolution, respectively. In addition, the structure of the GK{beta}{beta} was determined at 2.3 {angstrom} resolution in complex with a transition state analogue, Mg{sup 2+}-ADP-NO{sub 3}{sup -}-glycocyamine. Consistent with the sequence homology, the GK subunits adopt the same overall fold as that of other phosphagen kinases of known structure (the homodimeric creatine kinase (CK) and the monomeric arginine kinase (AK)). As with CK, the GK N-termini mediate the dimer interface. In both heterodimeric and homodimeric GK forms, the conformations of the two N-termini are asymmetric, and the asymmetry is different than that reported previously for the homodimeric CKs from several organisms. The entire polypeptide chains of GK{alpha}{beta} are structurally defined, and the longer N-terminus of the {beta} subunit is anchored at the dimer interface. In GK{beta}{beta} the 24 N-terminal residues of one subunit and 11 N-terminal residues of the second subunit are disordered. This observation is consistent with a proposal that the GK{alpha}{beta} amino acids involved in the interface formation were optimized once a heterodimer emerged as the physiological form of the enzyme. As a consequence, the homodimer interface (either solely {alpha} or solely {beta} chains) has been corrupted. In the unbound state, GK exhibits an open conformation analogous to that observed with ligand-free CK or AK. Upon binding the transition state analogue, both subunits of GK undergo the same closure motion that clasps the transition state analogue, in contrast to the transition state analogue complexes of CK, where the corresponding transition state analogue occupies only one subunit, which undergoes domain closure. The active site environments of the GK, CK, and AK at the bound states reveal the structural determinants of substrate specificity. Despite the equivalent binding in both active sites of the GK dimer, the conformational asymmetry of the N-termini is retained. Thus, the coupling between the structural asymmetry and negative cooperativity previously proposed for CK is not supported in the case of GK.

  20. Measuring the quality of structure and process in end-of-life care from the bereaved family perspective.

    PubMed

    Morita, Tatsuya; Hirai, Kei; Sakaguchi, Yukihiro; Maeyama, Etsuko; Tsuneto, Satoru; Shima, Yasuo

    2004-06-01

    Measurement of the structure/process of care is the first step in improving end-of-life care. The primary aim of this study was to psychometrically validate an instrument for directly measuring the bereaved family's perception of the necessity for improvement in structural/procedural aspects of palliative care. Different sets of questionnaires were sent to 800 and 425 families who lost family members at one of 70 certified palliative care units in Japan in the development and validation phases, respectively, and 281 families of the latter group in the follow-up phase. The participants were requested to fill out a newly-developed Care Evaluation Scale (CES), along with outcome measures (the perceived experience and satisfaction levels) and potential covariates (the degree of expectation, the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale, and the Social Desirability Scale). We obtained 485, 310, and 202 responses in the development, validation, and follow-up phases (response rates: 64%, 75%, and 72%, respectively). The 28-item CES had an overall Cronbach's coefficient alpha of 0.98; the intra-class correlation coefficient in the test-retest examination was 0.57. A confirmatory factor analysis revealed 10 subscales: physical care (by physicians, by nurses), psycho-existential care, help with decision-making (for patients, for family), environment, family burden, cost, availability, and coordination/consistency. The CES subscales were only moderately correlated with the perceived-experience and satisfaction levels of corresponding areas (r=0.36-0.52 and 0.39-0.60, respectively). The CES score was not significantly associated with the degree of expectation, the changes of depression, or the Social Desirability Scale. The CES is a useful tool to measure the bereaved family's perception of the necessity for improvement in structural/procedural aspects of palliative care. The advantages of the CES are: 1) it specifically evaluates the structure and process of care, 2) it directly identifies needed improvements, 3) it is not affected by the degree of expectation, depression, or social desirability, and 4) it has satisfactory psychometric properties. PMID:15165647

  1. Solution structure of the squash trypsin inhibitor MCoTI-II. A new family for cyclic knottins.

    PubMed

    Heitz, A; Hernandez, J F; Gagnon, J; Hong, T T; Pham, T T; Nguyen, T M; Le-Nguyen, D; Chiche, L

    2001-07-10

    The "knottin" fold is a stable cysteine-rich scaffold, in which one disulfide crosses the macrocycle made by two other disulfides and the connecting backbone segments. This scaffold is found in several protein families with no evolutionary relationships. In the past few years, several homologous peptides from the Rubiaceae and Violaceae families were shown to define a new structural family based on macrocyclic knottin fold. We recently isolated from Momordica cochinchinensis seeds the first known macrocyclic squash trypsin inhibitors. These compounds are the first members of a new family of cyclic knottins. In this paper, we present NMR structural studies of one of them, MCoTI-II, and of a beta-Asp rearranged form, MCoTI-IIb. Both compounds display similar and well-defined conformations. These cyclic squash inhibitors share a similar conformation with noncyclic squash inhibitors such as CPTI-II, and it is postulated that the main effect of the cyclization is a reduced sensitivity to exo-proteases. On the contrary, clear differences were detected with the three-dimensional structures of other known cyclic knottins, i.e., kalata B1 or circulin A. The two-disulfide cystine-stabilized beta-sheet motif [Heitz et al. (1999) Biochemistry 38, 10615-10625] is conserved in the two families, whereas in the C-to-N linker, one disulfide bridge and one loop are differently located. The molecular surface of MCoTI-II is almost entirely charged in contrast to circulin A that displays a well-marked amphiphilic character. These differences might explain why the isolated macrocyclic squash inhibitors from M. cochinchinensis display no significant antibacterial activity, whereas circulins and kalata B1 do. PMID:11434766

  2. Predictive Bcl-2 Family Binding Models Rooted in Experiment or Structure

    E-print Network

    Dutta, Sanjib

    Proteins of the Bcl-2 family either enhance or suppress programmed cell death and are centrally involved in cancer development and resistance to chemotherapy. BH3 (Bcl-2 homology 3)-only Bcl-2 proteins promote cell death ...

  3. Family structure as a risk factor for women's sexual victimization: a study using the Danish registry system.

    PubMed

    Elklit, Ask; Shevlin, Mark

    2010-12-01

    This study estimated the risk of sexual victimization associated with different family structures. Based on the Danish Civil Registration System, all female visitors to the Centre for Rape Victims (CRV) at the University Hospital in Aarhus, during a two-year period (January 2005 to December 2006) were identified (N = 214) along with a control group (N = 4,343) that was matched by age and residential location. The family structure in the preceding year was used as a predictor variable in a logistic regression model. Results indicted that, compared to those who were married with children at home, being single with children at home significantly increased the likelihood of having visited the CRV. This is consistent with the research literature that has shown that single women with children are at risk for disadvantage on a range of socioeconomic and psychological factors as well as at risk for interpersonal violence. PMID:19816763

  4. Family of middle repetitive DNA sequences in the mouse genome with structural features of solitary retroviral long terminal repeats.

    PubMed Central

    Wirth, T; Glöggler, K; Baumruker, T; Schmidt, M; Horak, I

    1983-01-01

    Screening of a 129/J mouse genomic library under nonstringent hybridization conditions with a xenotropic virus-like long terminal repeat (LTR) probe revealed a family of sequences resembling insertion elements (IS) with structural features of solitary retroviral LTRs; these are called LTR-IS. They are interspersed among variable flanking regions of mouse DNA and lack any viral structural genes. LTR-IS elements start and end with 11-base-pair inverted repeats and contain signals implicated in RNA polymerase II transcriptional regulation: C-C-A-A-T, T-A-T-A-A-A, and A-A-T-A-A-A. The members of the family are homologous, but not identical, approximately equal to 500-base-pair-long elements with 4-base-pair target-site duplications on both sites of the element. There are 500 LTR-IS per mouse haploid genome. Images PMID:6304707

  5. Crystal structure of a novel two domain GH78 family ?-rhamnosidase from Klebsiella oxytoca with rhamnose bound

    PubMed Central

    O’Neill, Ellis C; Stevenson, Clare E M; Paterson, Michael J; Rejzek, Martin; Chauvin, Anne-Laure; Lawson, David M; Field, Robert A

    2015-01-01

    The crystal structure of the GH78 family ?-rhamnosidase from Klebsiella oxytoca (KoRha) has been determined at 2.7 Å resolution with rhamnose bound in the active site of the catalytic domain. Curiously, the putative catalytic acid, Asp 222, is preceded by an unusual non-proline cis-peptide bond which helps to project the carboxyl group into the active centre. This KoRha homodimeric structure is significantly smaller than those of the other previously determined GH78 structures. Nevertheless, the enzyme displays ?-rhamnosidase activity when assayed in vitro, suggesting that the additional structural domains found in the related enzymes are dispensible for function. Proteins 2015; 83:1742–1749. © 2015 The Authors. Proteins: Structure, Function, and Bioinformatics Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25846411

  6. Phylogenetic analysis, structural evolution and functional divergence of the 12-oxo-phytodienoate acid reductase gene family in plants

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wenyan; Liu, Bing; Yu, Lujun; Feng, Dongru; Wang, Hongbin; Wang, Jinfa

    2009-01-01

    Background The 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid reductases (OPRs) are enzymes that catalyze the reduction of double-bonds in ?, ?-unsaturated aldehydes or ketones and are part of the octadecanoid pathway that converts linolenic acid to jasmonic acid. In plants, OPRs belong to the old yellow enzyme family and form multigene families. Although discoveries about this family in Arabidopsis and other species have been reported in some studies, the evolution and function of multiple OPRs in plants are not clearly understood. Results A comparative genomic analysis was performed to investigate the phylogenetic relationship, structural evolution and functional divergence among OPR paralogues in plants. In total, 74 OPR genes were identified from 11 species representing the 6 major green plant lineages: green algae, mosses, lycophytes, gymnosperms, monocots and dicots. Phylogenetic analysis showed that seven well-conserved subfamilies exist in plants. All OPR genes from green algae were clustered into a single subfamily, while those from land plants fell into six other subfamilies, suggesting that the events leading to the expansion of the OPR family occurred in land plants. Further analysis revealed that lineage-specific expansion, especially by tandem duplication, contributed to the current OPR subfamilies in land plants after divergence from aquatic plants. Interestingly, exon/intron structure analysis showed that the gene structures of OPR paralogues exhibits diversity in intron number and length, while the intron positions and phase were highly conserved across different lineage species. These observations together with the phylogenetic tree revealed that successive single intron loss, as well as indels within introns, occurred during the process of structural evolution of OPR paralogues. Functional divergence analysis revealed that altered functional constraints have occurred at specific amino acid positions after diversification of the paralogues. Most notably, significant functional divergence was also found in all pairs, except for the II/IV, II/V and V/VI pairs. Strikingly, analysis of the site-specific profiles established by posterior probability revealed that the positive-selection sites and/or critical amino acid residues for functional divergence are mainly distributed in ?-helices and substrate binding loop (SBL), indicating the functional importance of these regions for this protein family. Conclusion This study highlights the molecular evolution of the OPR gene family in all plant lineages and indicates critical amino acid residues likely relevant for the distinct functional properties of the paralogues. Further experimental verification of these findings may provide valuable information on the OPRs' biochemical and physiological functions. PMID:19416520

  7. Lending behavior and community structure in an online peer-to-peer economic network

    E-print Network

    Krumme, Katherine Ann

    Increasingly, economic transactions are taking place over social networks. We study the static and dynamic characteristics of a peer-to-peer lending network through 350,000 loan listings and accompanying member profiles ...

  8. Structure-Guided Functional Characterization of DUF1460 Reveals a New, Highly Specific NlpC/P60 Amidase Family

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qingping; Mengin-Lecreulx, Dominique; Patin, Delphine; Grant, Joanna C.; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Knuth, Mark W.; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Elsliger, Marc-André; Deacon, Ashley M.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY GlcNAc-1,6-anhydro-MurNAc-tetrapeptide is a major peptidoglycan degradation intermediate and a cytotoxin. It is generated by lytic transglycosylases and further degraded and recycled by various enzymes. We have identified and characterized a novel, highly specific N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase (AmiA) from Bacteroides uniformis, a member of the DUF1460 protein family, that hydrolyzes GlcNAc-1,6-anhydro-MurNAc-peptide into disaccharide and stem peptide. The high-resolution apo-structure at 1.15 Å resolution shows that AmiA is related to NlpC/P60 ?-D-Glu-meso-diaminopimelic acid amidases and shares a common catalytic core and cysteine peptidase-like active site. AmiA has evolved structural adaptations that reconfigure the substrate recognition site. The preferred substrates for AmiA were predicted in silico based on structural and bioinformatics data, and were subsequently characterized experimentally. Further crystal structures of AmiA in complexes with GlcNAc-1,6-anhydro-MurNAc and GlcNAc have enabled us to elucidate substrate recognition and specificity. DUF1460 is highly conserved in structure and defines a new amidase family. PMID:25465128

  9. Phylogeny and structure of the cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase gene family in Brachypodium distachyon

    PubMed Central

    Bukh, Christian; Nord-Larsen, Pia Haugaard; Rasmussen, Søren K.

    2012-01-01

    Cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD) catalyses the final step of the monolignol biosynthesis, the conversion of cinnamyl aldehydes to alcohols, using NADPH as a cofactor. Seven members of the CAD gene family were identified in the genome of Brachypodium distachyon and five of these were isolated and cloned from genomic DNA. Semi-quantitative reverse-transcription PCR revealed differential expression of the cloned genes, with BdCAD5 being expressed in all tissues and highest in root and stem while BdCAD3 was only expressed in stem and spikes. A phylogenetic analysis of CAD-like proteins placed BdCAD5 on the same branch as bona fide CAD proteins from maize (ZmCAD2), rice (OsCAD2), sorghum (SbCAD2) and Arabidopsis (AtCAD4, 5). The predicted three-dimensional structures of both BdCAD3 and BdCAD5 resemble that of AtCAD5. However, the amino-acid residues in the substrate-binding domains of BdCAD3 and BdCAD5 are distributed symmetrically and BdCAD3 is similar to that of poplar sinapyl alcohol dehydrogenase (PotSAD). BdCAD3 and BdCAD5 expressed and purified from Escherichia coli both showed a temperature optimum of about 50 °C and molar weight of 49kDa. The optimal pH for the reduction of coniferyl aldehyde were pH 5.2 and 6.2 and the pH for the oxidation of coniferyl alcohol were pH 8 and 9.5, for BdCAD3 and BdCAD5 respectively. Kinetic parameters for conversion of coniferyl aldehyde and coniferyl alcohol showed that BdCAD5 was clearly the most efficient enzyme of the two. These data suggest that BdCAD5 is the main CAD enzyme for lignin biosynthesis and that BdCAD3 has a different role in Brachypodium. All CAD enzymes are cytosolic except for BdCAD4, which has a putative chloroplast signal peptide adding to the diversity of CAD functions. PMID:23028019

  10. Global change and landscape structure in Ukraine: Ecological and socio-economic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shvidenko, Anatoly; Lakyda, Petro; Schepaschenko, Dmitry; Vasylyshyn, Roman; Marchuk, Yuiry

    2013-04-01

    The current land cover of Ukraine is very heterogeneous. While on average forest covers 15.9% of its land, substantial part of the country is basically forestless. The agricultural potential of Ukraine is high. However, in spite of the fact that 68% of the arable land in Ukraine consists of the famous Ukrainian black soils (chernozems), the quality of the country's arable land (69.5% of the total land) is not satisfactory. The country has the highest over the globe share of the tilled land (~80% of the agricultural land in the country) and processes of soil erosion impact about one third of arable land. Air pollution, soil and water contamination are widespread. Substantial problems are generated by the Chernobyl disaster. Overall, about half of the country is in the critical and pre-critical ecological situation. Climatic predictions suppose that the country will live in much warmer and drier climate by end of this century. Taking into account that major pat of Ukraine lies in the xeric belt, the expected climatic change generates divers risks for both environment and vegetation ecosystems of the country, particularly for forests and agriculture. The presentation considers the role of forests and trees outside of forests in transition to integrated ecosystem management and sustainable structure of landscapes within two scenarios of socio-economic development for the next 20 yeas. The "business-as-usual" scenario prolongs tendencies of dynamics of the land-use and forest sectors during the last 20 years. This scenario leads to further deterioration of quality of land and environment in Ukraine. The "progressive" scenario is considered as a crucial initial step of adaptation to climatic change and includes a system of pressing measures which are needed to decrease destructive processes that are observed at the landscape level. It is shown that it would require development of 1.62 M ha of protective forests including 0.62 M ha on unstable elements of landscapes (sands, steep slopes etc.), 0.51 M ha on heavily eroded lands and 0.49 M ha of liner stands (field protective and run off - protective shelterbelts). Such a development has a solid economic background within post Kyoto international policies. Suggested measures in the forest sector are considered as a first step in transition to sustainable forest management, implementation of urgent adaptation activities to climate change and would allow substantially intensified multi-service use of forests (including impacts on major biogeochemical cycles, increasing wood harvest at ~25% etc.). We present major indicators of the carbon budget of forest and agro-forest ecosystems for the last two decades and for the next 20 years in the framework of the two above scenarios. This research was supported by the European Community's Framework Programme (FP7) via GESAPU project (n°247645).

  11. Molecular Phylogenetics and Systematics of the Bivalve Family Ostreidae Based on rRNA Sequence-Structure Models and Multilocus Species Tree

    PubMed Central

    Salvi, Daniele; Macali, Armando; Mariottini, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    The bivalve family Ostreidae has a worldwide distribution and includes species of high economic importance. Phylogenetics and systematic of oysters based on morphology have proved difficult because of their high phenotypic plasticity. In this study we explore the phylogenetic information of the DNA sequence and secondary structure of the nuclear, fast-evolving, ITS2 rRNA and the mitochondrial 16S rRNA genes from the Ostreidae and we implemented a multi-locus framework based on four loci for oyster phylogenetics and systematics. Sequence-structure rRNA models aid sequence alignment and improved accuracy and nodal support of phylogenetic trees. In agreement with previous molecular studies, our phylogenetic results indicate that none of the currently recognized subfamilies, Crassostreinae, Ostreinae, and Lophinae, is monophyletic. Single gene trees based on Maximum likelihood (ML) and Bayesian (BA) methods and on sequence-structure ML were congruent with multilocus trees based on a concatenated (ML and BA) and coalescent based (BA) approaches and consistently supported three main clades: (i) Crassostrea, (ii) Saccostrea, and (iii) an Ostreinae-Lophinae lineage. Therefore, the subfamily Crassotreinae (including Crassostrea), Saccostreinae subfam. nov. (including Saccostrea and tentatively Striostrea) and Ostreinae (including Ostreinae and Lophinae taxa) are recognized. Based on phylogenetic and biogeographical evidence the Asian species of Crassostrea from the Pacific Ocean are assigned to Magallana gen. nov., whereas an integrative taxonomic revision is required for the genera Ostrea and Dendostrea. This study pointed out the suitability of the ITS2 marker for DNA barcoding of oyster and the relevance of using sequence-structure rRNA models and features of the ITS2 folding in molecular phylogenetics and taxonomy. The multilocus approach allowed inferring a robust phylogeny of Ostreidae providing a broad molecular perspective on their systematics. PMID:25250663

  12. Structure of the mouse Saa4 gene and its linkage to the serum amyloid A gene family

    SciTech Connect

    De Beer, M.C.; Goodson, M.L.; Kindy, M.S.

    1996-05-15

    The serum amyloid A (SAA) proteins are a polymorphic family of apolipoproteins associated with high-density lipoproteins (HDL). Three distinct subfamilies have been identified: (i) a cytokine-induced acute phase subfamily that is hepatically produced and can become the major apolipoprotein on HDL (SAA1, SAA2); (ii) a peripherally produced acute phase SAA3 that is only a monor HDL apolipoprotein; and (iii) a constitutive subfamily (SAA4) that is a minor normal HDL apolipoprotein comprising more than 90% of the SAA during homeostasis. Here we define the structure of the Saa4 gene. Similar to other Saa family members, it has four exons and three introns. It is 4588 bp long from the transcription start site to the end of the 3{prime}-untranslated region and is approximately 20% larger than other Saa genes. We have located Saa4 11 kb upstream from Saa3 and 5 kb downstream from Saa1, with the pseudogene approximately 1 kb from the 5{prime} end of Saa4. Saa4 has the same orientation as most other Saa family members, with only Saa2 having an opposing orientation. These data promote our understanding of the evolution of the Saa family. They enhance our ability to develop the mouse as a transgenic and gene deletion model to advance the understanding of the function of these apolipoproteins. 20 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  13. DNA polymerase 3'?5' exonuclease activity: Different roles of the beta hairpin structure in family-B DNA polymerases.

    PubMed

    Darmawan, Hariyanto; Harrison, Melissa; Reha-Krantz, Linda J

    2015-05-01

    Proofreading by the bacteriophage T4 and RB69 DNA polymerases requires a ? hairpin structure that resides in the exonuclease domain. Genetic, biochemical and structural studies demonstrate that the phage ? hairpin acts as a wedge to separate the primer-end from the template strand in exonuclease complexes. Single amino acid substitutions in the tip of the hairpin or deletion of the hairpin prevent proofreading and create "mutator" DNA polymerases. There is little known, however, about the function of similar hairpin structures in other family B DNA polymerases. We present mutational analysis of the yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) DNA polymerase ? hairpin. Deletion of the DNA polymerase ? hairpin (hp?) did not significantly reduce DNA replication fidelity; thus, the ? hairpin structure in yeast DNA polymerase ? is not essential for proofreading. However, replication efficiency was reduced as indicated by a slow growth phenotype. In contrast, the G447D amino acid substitution in the tip of the hairpin increased frameshift mutations and sensitivity to hydroxyurea (HU). A chimeric yeast DNA polymerase ? was constructed in which the T4 DNA polymerase hairpin (T4hp) replaced the yeast DNA polymerase ? hairpin; a strong increase in frameshift mutations was observed and the mutant strain was sensitive to HU and to the pyrophosphate analog, phosphonoacetic acid (PAA). But all phenotypes - slow growth, HU-sensitivity, PAA-sensitivity, and reduced fidelity, were observed only in the absence of mismatch repair (MMR), which implicates a role for MMR in mediating DNA polymerase ? replication problems. In comparison, another family B DNA polymerase, DNA polymerase ?, has only an atrophied hairpin with no apparent function. Thus, while family B DNA polymerases share conserved motifs and general structural features, the ? hairpin has evolved to meet specific needs. PMID:25753811

  14. Structural and Functional Characterization of the JH2 Pseudokinase Domain of JAK Family Tyrosine Kinase 2 (TYK2).

    PubMed

    Min, Xiaoshan; Ungureanu, Daniela; Maxwell, Sarah; Hammarén, Henrik; Thibault, Steve; Hillert, Ellin-Kristina; Ayres, Merrill; Greenfield, Brad; Eksterowicz, John; Gabel, Chris; Walker, Nigel; Silvennoinen, Olli; Wang, Zhulun

    2015-11-01

    JAK (Janus family of cytoplasmic tyrosine kinases) family tyrosine kinase 2 (TYK2) participates in signaling through cytokine receptors involved in immune responses and inflammation. JAKs are characterized by dual kinase domain: a tyrosine kinase domain (JH1) that is preceded by a pseudokinase domain (JH2). The majority of disease-associated mutations in JAKs map to JH2, demonstrating its central regulatory function. JH2s were considered catalytically inactive, but JAK2 JH2 was found to have low autoregulatory catalytic activity. Whether the other JAK JH2s share ATP binding and enzymatic activity has been unclear. Here we report the crystal structure of TYK2 JH2 in complex with adenosine 5'-O-(thiotriphosphate) (ATP-?S) and characterize its nucleotide binding by biochemical and biophysical methods. TYK2 JH2 did not show phosphotransfer activity, but it binds ATP and the nucleotide binding stabilizes the protein without inducing major conformational changes. Mutation of the JH2 ATP-binding pocket increased basal TYK2 phosphorylation and downstream signaling. The overall structural characteristics of TYK2 JH2 resemble JAK2 JH2, but distinct stabilizing molecular interactions around helix ?AL in the activation loop provide a structural basis for differences in substrate access and catalytic activities among JAK family JH2s. The structural and biochemical data suggest that ATP binding is functionally important for both TYK2 and JAK2 JH2s, whereas the regulatory phosphorylation appears to be a unique property of JAK2. Finally, the co-crystal structure of TYK2 JH2 complexed with a small molecule inhibitor demonstrates that JH2 is accessible to ATP-competitive compounds, which offers novel approaches for targeting cytokine signaling as well as potential therapeutic applications. PMID:26359499

  15. Structural Insight on the Mechanism of Regulation of the MarR Family of Proteins: High-Resolution Crystal Structure of a Transcriptional Repressor from Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum

    SciTech Connect

    Saridakis, Vivian; Shahinas, Dea; Xu, Xiaohui; Christendat, Dinesh

    2008-03-31

    Transcriptional regulators belonging to the MarR family are characterized by a winged-helix DNA binding domain. These transcriptional regulators regulate the efflux and influx of phenolic agents in bacteria and archaea. In Escherichia coli, MarR regulates the multiple antibiotic resistance operon and its inactivation produces a multiple antibiotic resistance phenotype. In some organisms, active efflux of drug compounds will produce a drug resistance phenotype, whereas in other organisms, active influx of chlorinated hydrocarbons results in their rapid degradation. Although proteins in the MarR family are regulators of important biological processes, their mechanism of action is not well understood and structural information about how phenolic agents regulate the activity of these proteins is lacking. This article presents the three-dimensional structure of a protein of the MarR family, MTH313, in its apo form and in complex with salicylate, a known inactivator. A comparison of these two structures indicates that the mechanism of regulation involves a large conformational change in the DNA binding lobe. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay and biophysical analyses further suggest that salicylate inactivates MTH313 and prevents it from binding to its promoter region.

  16. Family Support & Health Care: Working Together for Healthy Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lalley, Jacqueline, Ed.; Ahsan, Nilofer, Ed.

    1998-01-01

    This report of the Family Resource Coalition of America examines partnerships between family support programs and health care providers, forged to ensure that the comprehensive needs of families are met. The report begins with two articles, "Family Support and the Emerging Health System" and "Social and Economic Issues Affecting Health--A…

  17. Structural Insight into and Mutational Analysis of Family 11 Xylanases: Implications for Mechanisms of Higher pH Catalytic Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Wenqin; Zhou, Cheng; Zhao, Yueju; Wang, Qinhong; Ma, Yanhe

    2015-01-01

    To understand the molecular basis of higher pH catalytic adaptation of family 11 xylanases, we compared the structures of alkaline, neutral, and acidic active xylanases and analyzed mutants of xylanase Xyn11A-LC from alkalophilic Bacillus sp. SN5. It was revealed that alkaline active xylanases have increased charged residue content, an increased ratio of negatively to positively charged residues, and decreased Ser, Thr, and Tyr residue content relative to non-alkaline active counterparts. Between strands ?6 and ?7, alkaline xylanases substitute an ?-helix for a coil or turn found in their non-alkaline counterparts. Compared with non-alkaline xylanases, alkaline active enzymes have an inserted stretch of seven amino acids rich in charged residues, which may be beneficial for xylanase function in alkaline conditions. Positively charged residues on the molecular surface and ionic bonds may play important roles in higher pH catalytic adaptation of family 11 xylanases. By structure comparison, sequence alignment and mutational analysis, six amino acids (Glu16, Trp18, Asn44, Leu46, Arg48, and Ser187, numbering based on Xyn11A-LC) adjacent to the acid/base catalyst were found to be responsible for xylanase function in higher pH conditions. Our results will contribute to understanding the molecular mechanisms of higher pH catalytic adaptation in family 11 xylanases and engineering xylanases to suit industrial applications. PMID:26161643

  18. Analysis of the peroxiredoxin family: using active site structure and sequence information for global classification and residue analysis

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Kimberly J.; Knutson, Stacy T.; Soito, Laura; Klomsiri, Chananat; Poole, Leslie B.; Fetrow, Jacquelyn S.

    2010-01-01

    Peroxiredoxins (Prxs) are a widespread and highly expressed family of cysteine-based peroxidases that react very rapidly with H2O2, organic peroxides, and peroxynitrite. Correct subfamily classification has been problematic since Prx subfamilies are frequently not correlated with phylogenetic distribution and diverge in their preferred reductant, oligomerization state, and tendency towards overoxidation. We have developed a method that uses the Deacon Active Site Profiler (DASP) tool to extract functional site profiles from structurally characterized proteins, to computationally define subfamilies, and to identify new Prx subfamily members from GenBank(nr). For the 58 literature-defined Prx test proteins, 57 were correctly assigned and none were assigned to the incorrect subfamily. The >3500 putative Prx sequences identified were then used to analyze residue conservation in the active site of each Prx subfamily. Our results indicate that the existence and location of the resolving cysteine varies in some subfamilies (e.g. Prx5) to a greater degree than previously appreciated and that interactions at the A interface (common to Prx5, Tpx and higher order AhpC/Prx1 structures) are important for stabilization of the correct active site geometry. Interestingly, this method also allows us to further divide the AhpC/Prx1 into four groups that are correlated with functional characteristics. The DASP method provides more accurate subfamily classification than PSI-BLAST for members of the Prx family and can now readily be applied to other large protein families. PMID:21287625

  19. Structure of CfaA Suggests a New Family of Chaperones Essential for Assembly of Class 5 Fimbriae

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Rui; Fordyce, April; Chen, Yu-Xing; McVeigh, Annette; Savarino, Stephen J.; Xia, Di

    2014-01-01

    Adhesive pili on the surface of pathogenic bacteria comprise polymerized pilin subunits and are essential for initiation of infections. Pili assembled by the chaperone-usher pathway (CUP) require periplasmic chaperones that assist subunit folding, maintain their stability, and escort them to the site of bioassembly. Until now, CUP chaperones have been classified into two families, FGS and FGL, based on the short and long length of the subunit-interacting loops between its F1 and G1 ?-strands, respectively. CfaA is the chaperone for assembly of colonization factor antigen I (CFA/I) pili of enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC), a cause of diarrhea in travelers and young children. Here, the crystal structure of CfaA along with sequence analyses reveals some unique structural and functional features, leading us to propose a separate family for CfaA and closely related chaperones. Phenotypic changes resulting from mutations in regions unique to this chaperone family provide insight into their function, consistent with involvement of these regions in interactions with cognate subunits and usher proteins during pilus assembly. PMID:25122114

  20. Economic Burden of Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    The economic burden of cancer is the economic cost to the nation associated with expenditures on cancer preventive, screening and treatment services, the economic cost associated with time and effort spent by patients and their families undergoing cancer treatment and the economic cost associated with lost productivity due to cancer-related disability and premature death. One approach to estimating this burden is the Cost-of-Illness study, that uses various national level data sources to obtain estimates of these various components.

  1. Influence of Family and Socio-Demographic Variables on Students with Low Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casanova, Pedro F.; Garcia-Linares, M. Cruz; de la Torre, Manuel J.; Carpio, M. de la Villa

    2005-01-01

    In this study we compare the distribution of parental educational styles and the scores reported both by parents and students for various family characteristics (acceptance, control, involvement, and expectations) and socio-demographic factors (socio-economic status, family structure, number of children, and order of birth of the children) in a…

  2. THE PLANT GENOME: AN EVOLUTIONARY VIEW ON STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION The family of terpene synthases in plants: a mid-size

    E-print Network

    Tholl, Dorothea

    THE PLANT GENOME: AN EVOLUTIONARY VIEW ON STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION The family of terpene synthases in plants: a mid-size family of genes for specialized metabolism that is highly diversified throughout the kingdom Feng Chen1,* , Dorothea Tholl2 , Jo¨rg Bohlmann3 and Eran Pichersky4 1 Department of Plant

  3. Topological properties of large-scale structural brain networks in children with familial risk for reading difficulties

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini, S.M. Hadi; Black, Jessica M.; Soriano, Teresa; Bugescu, Nicolle; Martinez, Rociel; Raman, Mira M.; Kesler, Shelli R.; Hoeft, Fumiko

    2013-01-01

    Developmental dyslexia is a neurobiological deficit characterized by persistent difficulty in learning to read in children and adults who otherwise possess normal intelligence. Functional and structural connectivity data suggest that developmental dyslexia could be a disconnection syndrome. However, whether abnormalities in connectivity exist in beginning readers at-risk for reading difficulties is unknown. Using graphtheoretical analysis, we investigated differences in global and regional topological properties of structural brain networks in 42 beginning readers with (FH+) and without (FH?) familial risk for reading difficulties. We constructed separate structural correlation networks based on measures of surface area and cortical thickness. Results revealed changes in topological properties in brain regions known to be abnormal in dyslexia (left supramarginal gyrus, left inferior frontal gyrus) in the FH+ group mainly in the network constructed from measures of cortical surface area. We also found alterations in topological properties in regions that are not often advertised as dyslexia but nonetheless play important role in reading (left posterior cingulate, hippocampus, and left precentral gyrus). To our knowledge, this is the first report of altered topological properties of structural correlation networks in children at risk for reading difficulty, and motivates future studies that examine the mechanisms underlying how these brain networks may mediate the influences of family history on reading outcome. PMID:23333415

  4. Crystal structure of a papain-fold protein without the catalytic residue: a novel member in the cysteine proteinase family.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Min; Wei, Zhiyi; Chang, Shaojie; Teng, Maikun; Gong, Weimin

    2006-04-21

    A 31kDa cysteine protease, SPE31, was isolated from the seeds of a legume plant, Pachyrizhus erosus. The protein was purified, crystallized and the 3D structure solved using molecular replacement. The cDNA was obtained by RT PCR followed by amplification using mRNA isolated from the seeds of the legume plant as a template. Analysis of the cDNA sequence and the 3D structure indicated the protein to belong to the papain family. Detailed analysis of the structure revealed an unusual replacement of the conserved catalytic Cys with Gly. Replacement of another conserved residue Ala/Gly by a Phe sterically blocks the access of the substrate to the active site. A polyethyleneglycol molecule and a natural peptide fragment were bound to the surface of the active site. Asn159 was found to be glycosylated. The SPE31 cDNA sequence shares several features with P34, a protein found in soybeans, that is implicated in plant defense mechanisms as an elicitor receptor binding to syringolide. P34 has also been shown to interact with vegetative storage proteins and NADH-dependent hydroxypyruvate reductase. These roles suggest that SPE31 and P34 form a unique subfamily within the papain family. The crystal structure of SPE31 complexed with a natural peptide ligand reveals a unique active site architecture. In addition, the clear evidence of glycosylated Asn159 provides useful information towards understanding the functional mechanism of SPE31/P34. PMID:16497323

  5. The Conservation of Structure and Mechanism of Catalytic Action in a Family of Thiamin Pyrophosphate (TPP)-dependent Enzymes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominiak, P.; Ciszak, Ewa

    2004-01-01

    Thiamin pyrophosphate (TPP)-dependent enzymes are a divergent family of TPP and metal ion binding proteins that perform a wide range of functions with the common decarboxylation steps of a -(O=)C-C(OH)- fragment of alpha-ketoacids and alpha- hydroxyaldehydes. To determine how structure and catalytic action are conserved in the context of large sequence differences existing within this family of enzymes, we have carried out an analysis of TPP-dependent enzymes of known structures. The common structure of TPP-dependent enzymes is formed at the interface of four alpha/beta domains from at least two subunits, which provide for two metal and TPP-binding sites. Residues around these catalytic sites are conserved for functional purpose, while those further away from TPP are conserved for structural reasons. Together they provide a network of contacts required for flip-flop catalytic action within TPP-dependent enzymes. Thus our analysis defines a TPP-action motif that is proposed for annotating TPP-dependent enzymes for advancing functional proteomics.

  6. Searching for Structure: Reconstructing Crow Family Life during the Reservation Era.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoxie, Frederick E.

    1991-01-01

    Outlines a method of using census information on residence and marriage among the Crow during the early reservation era (1880-1910) to investigate the persistence of traditional family patterns and the emergence of twentieth-century tribal culture. Contains 19 data tables and figures. (SV)

  7. Structural and Supportive Changes in Couples' Family and Friendship Networks across the Transition to Parenthood.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bost, Kelly K.; Cox, Martha J.; Burchinal, Margaret R.; Payne, Chris

    2002-01-01

    Examines patterns of change in family and friend network with parenthood in 137 couples surveyed before the birth of their first child. Husbands and wives who reported larger network sizes and support prior to their first child's birth were more likely to report larger networks after birth. Changes in parents' social systems were related to…

  8. Effects of Family Structure Type and Stability on Children's Academic Performance Trajectories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sun, Yongmin; Li, Yuanzhang

    2011-01-01

    Using five waves of panel data from 8,008 children in the ECLS-K, the current study compared children's academic performance growth curves from kindergarten through fifth grade among three types of nondisrupted and three types of disrupted families. The analyses found that children in nondisrupted two-biological-parent and nondisrupted stepparent…

  9. Mate-Selection Systems and Criteria: Variation according to Family Structure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Gary R.; Stone, Lorene Hemphill

    1980-01-01

    Autonomous mate selection based on romantic attraction is more likely to be institutionalized in societies with nuclear family systems. Neolocal residence customs increase the probability that mate selection is autonomous but decrease the probability that it is based on romantic attraction. (Author)

  10. School Climate, Family Structure, and Academic Achievement: A Study of Moderation Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Malley, Meagan; Voight, Adam; Renshaw, Tyler L.; Eklund, Katie

    2015-01-01

    School climate has been lauded for its relationship to a host of desirable academic, behavioral, and social-emotional outcomes for youth. The present study tested the hypothesis that school climate counteracts youths' home-school risk by examining the moderating effects of students' school climate perceptions on the relationship between family

  11. A structure-based protocol for learning the family-specific mechanisms of membrane-binding domains

    PubMed Central

    Källberg, Morten; Bhardwaj, Nitin; Langlois, Robert; Lu, Hui

    2012-01-01

    Motivation: Peripheral membrane-targeting domain (MTD) families, such as C1-, C2- and PH domains, play a key role in signal transduction and membrane trafficking by dynamically translocating their parent proteins to specific plasma membranes when changes in lipid composition occur. It is, however, difficult to determine the subset of domains within families displaying this property, as sequence motifs signifying the membrane binding properties are not well defined. For this reason, procedures based on sequence similarity alone are often insufficient in computational identification of MTDs within families (yielding less than 65% accuracy even with a sequence identity of 70%). Results: We present a machine learning protocol for determining membrane-targeting properties achieving 85–90% accuracy in separating binding and non-binding domains within families. Our model is based on features from both sequence and structure, thereby incorporation statistics obtained from the entire domain family and domain-specific physical quantities such as surface electrostatics. In addition, by using the enriched rules in alternating decision tree classifiers, we are able to determine the meaning of the assigned function labels in terms of biological mechanisms. Conclusions: The high accuracy of the learned models and good agreement between the rules discovered using the ADtree classifier and mechanisms reported in the literature reflect the value of machine learning protocols in both prediction and biological knowledge discovery. Our protocol can thus potentially be used as a general function annotation and knowledge mining tool for other protein domains. Availability: metador.bioengr.uic.edu Contact: huilu@uic.edu PMID:22962463

  12. Structural Determinants Allowing Transferase Activity in SENSITIVE TO FREEZING 2, Classified as a Family I Glycosyl Hydrolase*

    PubMed Central

    Roston, Rebecca L.; Wang, Kun; Kuhn, Leslie A.; Benning, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    SENSITIVE TO FREEZING 2 (SFR2) is classified as a family I glycosyl hydrolase but has recently been shown to have galactosyltransferase activity in Arabidopsis thaliana. Natural occurrences of apparent glycosyl hydrolases acting as transferases are interesting from a biocatalysis standpoint, and knowledge about the interconversion can assist in engineering SFR2 in crop plants to resist freezing. To understand how SFR2 evolved into a transferase, the relationship between its structure and function are investigated by activity assay, molecular modeling, and site-directed mutagenesis. SFR2 has no detectable hydrolase activity, although its catalytic site is highly conserved with that of family 1 glycosyl hydrolases. Three regions disparate from glycosyl hydrolases are identified as required for transferase activity as follows: a loop insertion, the C-terminal peptide, and a hydrophobic patch adjacent to the catalytic site. Rationales for the effects of these regions on the SFR2 mechanism are discussed. PMID:25100720

  13. Isolation, structural analysis, and expression characteristics of the maize TIFY gene family.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhongbao; Li, Xianglong; Yu, Rong; Han, Meng; Wu, Zhongyi

    2015-10-01

    TIFY, previously known as ZIM, comprises a plant-specific family annotated as transcription factors that might play important roles in stress response. Despite TIFY proteins have been reported in Arabidopsis and rice, a comprehensive and systematic survey of ZmTIFY genes has not yet been conducted. To investigate the functions of ZmTIFY genes in this family, we isolated and characterized 30 ZmTIFY (1 TIFY, 3 ZML, and 26 JAZ) genes in an analysis of the maize (Zea mays L.) genome in this study. The 30 ZmTIFY genes were distributed over eight chromosomes. Multiple alignment and motif display results indicated that all ZmTIFY proteins share two conserved TIFY and Jas domains. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the ZmTIFY family could be divided into two groups. Putative cis-elements, involved in abiotic stress response, phytohormones, pollen grain, and seed development, were detected in the promoters of maize TIFY genes. Microarray data showed that the ZmTIFY genes had tissue-specific expression patterns in various maize developmental stages and in response to biotic and abiotic stresses. The results indicated that ZmTIFY4, 5, 8, 26, and 28 were induced, while ZmTIFY16, 13, 24, 27, 18, and 30 were suppressed, by drought stress in the maize inbred lines Han21 and Ye478. ZmTIFY1, 19, and 28 were upregulated after infection by three pathogens, whereas ZmTIFY4, 13, 21, 23, 24, and 26 were suppressed. These results indicate that the ZmTIFY family may have vital roles in response to abiotic and biotic stresses. The data presented in this work provide vital clues for further investigating the functions of the genes in the ZmTIFY family. PMID:25862669

  14. The market is a strange creature: family medicine meeting the challenges of the changing political and socioeconomic structure.

    PubMed

    Westin, S

    1995-12-01

    This paper examines the extent to which family medicine is prepared to face today's political and socioeconomic trends. A modest assumption is that most countries will avoid the threats of food and energy crisis, environmental disasters, social collapse and even wars. Given that privilege, family medicine is faced with recent trends of market liberalism throughout the world, giving rise to new perspectives of economic prosperity, as well as widening gaps between the rich and affluent, and a growing number of unemployed, poor, and 'marginalized'. The recent UN World Summit for Social Development in Copenhagen highlighted the fact that poverty and long-term unemployment is becoming a permanent problem even in the rich world. The distinction between rich and poor countries might be better understood as widening gaps between rich and poor people in both kinds of countries. The challenge to family medicine will be twofold: 1) To develop a broader understanding of the associations between social risk factors on a population level, and its clinical expressions in individual patients in terms of illness, sick role behaviour and manifest disease, as well as potentials for constructive coping; 2) To contribute to a universally available primary health care, meeting the needs also of those who are not in the best position to pay. We are reminded of the classic 1971 Lancet paper by Julian Tudor Hart on "The inverse care law", implying that "the availability of good medical care tends to vary inversely with the need for it in the population served". In a world plagued with unforeseen discontinuities, general practice will need to maintain its core of 'personal doctoring'. Meeting people at the primary care level provides unique opportunities of being sensitive and responsive also to unexpected changes in society, and in some areas even making contributions to the directions of change. PMID:8826054

  15. Five Thousand American Families--Patterns of Economic Progress. Volume V: Components of Change in Family Well-Being and Other Analyses of the First Eight Years of the Panel Study of Income Dynamics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, Greg J., Ed.; Morgan, James N., Ed.

    This volume contains analyses of data from the first eight waves of the Panel Study of Income Dynamics. The first part of this volume attempts to evaluate the relative importance of family composition changes, labor force participation decisions, and changes in earnings for the black and white families studied. The second part deals with a variety…

  16. Economic Evaluation Research in the Context of Child Welfare Policy: A Structured Literature Review and Recommendations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldhaber-Fiebert, Jeremy D.; Snowden, Lonnie R.; Wulczyn, Fred; Landsverk, John; Horwitz, Sarah M.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: With over 1 million children served by the US Child Welfare system at a cost of $20 billion annually, this study examines the economic evaluation literature on interventions to improve outcomes for children at risk for and currently involved with the system, identifies areas where additional research is needed, and discusses the use of…

  17. Economics of Online Structural Health Monitoring of Wind Turbines: Cost Benefit Analysis

    E-print Network

    McCalley, James D.

    &M costs and hence reduce the overall cost of wind energy. OSHM and CBM offer the potential to improve turbine blade life cycle management, limit the number of physical inspections, and reduce the potential performed. Opportunities appear to exist to improve the economic justification for implementing OSHM

  18. Economic and Social Conditions Relating to Agriculture and Its Structure to Year 2000. CARD Miscellaneous Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heady, Earl O.

    Possible economic and social trends in world agriculture by year 2000 will include increased energy costs; larger, fewer and more specialized farms; decreasing agricultural population; closer ties between farmers and large agribusinesses; more emphasis on consumer and environmental protection; and an increased importance of agriculture in…

  19. Loop Motions Important to Product Expulsion in the Thermobifida fusca Glycoside Hydrolase Family 6 Cellobiohydrolase from Structural and Computational Studies*

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Miao; Bu, Lintao; Vuong, Thu V.; Wilson, David B.; Crowley, Michael F.; Sandgren, Mats; Ståhlberg, Jerry; Beckham, Gregg T.; Hansson, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Cellobiohydrolases (CBHs) are typically major components of natural enzyme cocktails for biomass degradation. Their active sites are enclosed in a tunnel, enabling processive hydrolysis of cellulose chains. Glycoside hydrolase Family 6 (GH6) CBHs act from nonreducing ends by an inverting mechanism and are present in many cellulolytic fungi and bacteria. The bacterial Thermobifida fusca Cel6B (TfuCel6B) exhibits a longer and more enclosed active site tunnel than its fungal counterparts. Here, we determine the structures of two TfuCel6B mutants co-crystallized with cellobiose, D274A (catalytic acid), and the double mutant D226A/S232A, which targets the putative catalytic base and a conserved serine that binds the nucleophilic water. The ligand binding and the structure of the active site are retained when compared with the wild type structure, supporting the hypothesis that these residues are directly involved in catalysis. One structure exhibits crystallographic waters that enable construction of a model of the ?-anomer product after hydrolysis. Interestingly, the product sites of TfuCel6B are completely enclosed by an “exit loop” not present in fungal GH6 CBHs and by an extended “bottom loop”. From the structures, we hypothesize that either of the loops enclosing the product subsites in the TfuCel6B active site tunnel must open substantially for product release. With simulation, we demonstrate that both loops can readily open to allow product release with equal probability in solution or when the enzyme is engaged on cellulose. Overall, this study reveals new structural details of GH6 CBHs likely important for functional differences among enzymes from this important family. PMID:24085303

  20. The Crystal Structure of Bacteriophage HK97 gp6: Defining a Large Family of Head?Tail Connector Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Cardarelli, Lia; Lam, Robert; Tuite, Ashleigh; Baker, Lindsay A.; Sadowski, Paul D.; Radford, Devon R.; Rubinstein, John L.; Battaile, Kevin P.; Chirgadze, Nickolay; Maxwell, Karen L.; Davidson, Alan R.

    2010-08-17

    The final step in the morphogenesis of long-tailed double-stranded DNA bacteriophages is the joining of the DNA-filled head to the tail. The connector is a specialized structure of the head that serves as the interface for tail attachment and the point of egress for DNA from the head during infection. Here, we report the determination of a 2.1 {angstrom} crystal structure of gp6 of bacteriophage HK97. Through structural comparisons, functional studies, and bioinformatic analysis, gp6 has been determined to be a component of the connector of phage HK97 that is evolutionarily related to gp15, a well-characterized connector component of bacteriophage SPP1. Whereas the structure of gp15 was solved in a monomeric form, gp6 crystallized as an oligomeric ring with the dimensions expected for a connector protein. Although this ring is composed of 13 subunits, which does not match the symmetry of the connector within the phage, sequence conservation and modeling of this structure into the cryo-electron microscopy density of the SPP1 connector indicate that this oligomeric structure represents the arrangement of gp6 subunits within the mature phage particle. Through sequence searches and genomic position analysis, we determined that gp6 is a member of a large family of connector proteins that are present in long-tailed phages. We have also identified gp7 of HK97 as a homologue of gp16 of phage SPP1, which is the second component of the connector of this phage. These proteins are members of another large protein family involved in connector assembly.

  1. Children’s Mental Health Task 11 FY 2006: Family-Directed Structural Therapy Training Project

    E-print Network

    McLendon, Tara; McLendon, Don; Petr, Chris

    2006-07-01

    , KU staff wanted to better understand if the FDST model could be taught to various service providers (including case managers, attendant care workers, parent support specialists, home-based family therapists, and out-patient therapists... able undertake the project during FY 2006. Six hour FDST trainings were offered at both CMHCs, with the Manhattan CBS team attending at PMHS and the Mission CBS team attending at JCMHC. Self-selected out-patient therapists attended at both sites...

  2. Structural and Functional Analyses of a Glycoside Hydrolase Family 5 Enzyme with an Unexpected [beta]-Fucosidase Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, Shosuke; Park, David S.; Bae, Brian; Mackie, Roderick; Cann, Isaac K.O.; Nair, Satish K.

    2012-02-15

    We present characterization of PbFucA, a family 5 glycoside hydrolase (GH5) from Prevotella bryantii B{sub 1}4. While GH5 members typically are xylanases, PbFucA shows no activity toward xylan polysaccharides. A screen against a panel of p-nitrophenol coupled sugars identifies PbFucA as a {beta}-D-fucosidase. We also present the 2.2 {angstrom} resolution structure of PbFucA and use structure-based mutational analysis to confirm the role of catalytically essential residues. A comparison of the active sites of PbFucA with those of family 5 and 51 glycosidases reveals that while the essential catalytic framework is identical between these enzymes, the steric contours of the respective active site clefts are distinct and likely account for substrate discrimination. Our results show that members of this cluster of orthologous group (COG) 5520 have {beta}-D-fucosidase activities, despite showing an overall sequence and structural similarity to GH-5 xylanases.

  3. Domain-Swapped Dimer of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Cytochrome c551: Structural Insights into Domain Swapping of Cytochrome c Family Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Nagao, Satoshi; Ueda, Mariko; Osuka, Hisao; Komori, Hirofumi; Kamikubo, Hironari; Kataoka, Mikio; Higuchi, Yoshiki; Hirota, Shun

    2015-01-01

    Cytochrome c (cyt c) family proteins, such as horse cyt c, Pseudomonas aeruginosa cytochrome c551 (PA cyt c551), and Hydrogenobacter thermophilus cytochrome c552 (HT cyt c552), have been used as model proteins to study the relationship between the protein structure and folding process. We have shown in the past that horse cyt c forms oligomers by domain swapping its C-terminal helix, perturbing the Met–heme coordination significantly compared to the monomer. HT cyt c552 forms dimers by domain swapping the region containing the N-terminal ?-helix and heme, where the heme axial His and Met ligands belong to different protomers. Herein, we show that PA cyt c551 also forms domain-swapped dimers by swapping the region containing the N-terminal ?-helix and heme. The secondary structures of the M61A mutant of PA cyt c551 were perturbed slightly and its oligomer formation ability decreased compared to that of the wild-type protein, showing that the stability of the protein secondary structures is important for domain swapping. The hinge loop of domain swapping for cyt c family proteins corresponded to the unstable region specified by hydrogen exchange NMR measurements for the monomer, although the swapping region differed among proteins. These results show that the unstable loop region has a tendency to become a hinge loop in domain-swapped proteins. PMID:25853415

  4. Three-dimensional structure of a putative non-cellulosomal cohesin module from a Clostridium perfringens family 84 glycoside hydrolase.

    PubMed

    Chitayat, Seth; Gregg, Katie; Adams, Jarrett J; Ficko-Blean, Elizabeth; Bayer, Edward A; Boraston, Alisdair B; Smith, Steven P

    2008-01-01

    The genomes of myonecrotic strains of Clostridium perfringens encode a large number of secreted glycoside hydrolases. The activities of these enzymes are consistent with degradation of the mucosal layer of the human gastrointestinal tract, glycosaminoglycans and other cellular glycans found throughout the body. In many cases this is thought to aid in the propagation of the major toxins produced by C. perfringens. One such example is the family 84 glycoside hydrolases, which contains five C. perfringens members (CpGH84A-E), each displaying a unique modular architecture. The smallest and most extensively studied member, CpGH84C, comprises an N-terminal catalytic domain with beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase activity, a family 32 carbohydrate-binding module, a family 82 X-module (X82) of unknown function, and a fibronectin type-III-like module. Here we present the structure of the X82 module from CpGH84C, determined by both NMR spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography. CpGH84C X82 adopts a jell-roll fold comprising two beta-sheets formed by nine beta-strands. CpGH84C X82 displays distant amino acid sequence identity yet close structural similarity to the cohesin modules of cellulolytic anaerobic bacteria. Cohesin modules are responsible for the assembly of numerous hydrolytic enzymes in a cellulose-degrading multi-enzyme complex, termed the cellulosome, through a high-affinity interaction with the calcium-binding dockerin module. A planar surface is located on the face of the CpGH84 X82 structure that corresponds to the dockerin-binding region of cellulolytic cohesin modules and has the approximate dimensions to accommodate a dockerin module. The presence of cohesin-like X82 modules in glycoside hydrolases of C. perfringens is an indication that the formation of novel X82-dockerin mediated multi-enzyme complexes, with potential roles in pathogenesis, is possible. PMID:17999932

  5. Structural organization, mapping, characterization and evolutionary relationships of CDKN2 gene family members in Xiphophorus fishes.

    PubMed

    Kazianis, Steven; Khanolkar, Vandeeta A; Nairn, Rodney S; Rains, J Douglas; Trono, David; Garcia, Rachel; Williams, Earlanda L; Walter, Ronald B

    2004-07-01

    Xiphophorus fishes and their hybrids are used as models for the study of melanoma and other diseases. The cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor gene family in humans is comprised of four members, including CDKN2A (P16), and dysregulation of this gene is implicated in numerous neoplasms including melanomas. We have investigated the status of the gene family in the southern platyfish X. maculatus. Xiphophorus harbors at least two such loci, which we now term CDKN2A/B and CDKN2D. Both loci map to Xiphophorus linkage group 5, a genomic area that has long been known to harbor the DIFF tumor suppressor locus. Within this report, we report on the complete cloning, genomic exon/intron boundary delineation, linkage mapping and expressional characteristics of Xiphophorus CDKN2D. We also compare and contrast this expression to that of the previously isolated CDKN2AB locus in normal and neoplastic tissues derived from non-hybrid and hybrid fishes. The hypothetical evolutionary relationships of gene family members and their involvement in melanoma is evaluated. In comparison to CDKN2A/B, the RNA expression of Xiphophorus CDKN2D differs in normal tissues and is not associated with melanotic/pathologic tissues, confirming functional divergence between obvious homologues. PMID:15533787

  6. Structured interviews examining the burden, coping, self-efficacy and quality of life among family caregivers of persons with dementia in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Tay, Kay Chai Peter; Seow, Chuen Chai Dennis; Xiao, Chunxiang; Lee, Hui Min Julian; Chiu, Helen Fk; Chan, Sally Wai-Chi

    2014-02-17

    Dementia is a global health issue and the effects on caregivers are substantial. The study aimed to examine the associations of burden, coping, self-efficacy with quality of life among family caregivers of persons with dementia in Singapore. Structured interviews were conducted in a convenience sample of 84 family caregivers caring and seeking clinical care for the persons with dementia in an outpatient clinic of a public hospital in Singapore. The outcome measures included the Family Burden Interview Schedule, Family Crisis Oriented Personal Evaluation Scale, General Perceived Self-Efficacy Scale, and World Health Organization Quality of Life Scale - Brief Version. In general, significant correlations were observed between the quality of life scores with coping strategy and family burden scores, but not between the coping strategy and family burden scores. Compared to demographic factors such as caregiver age and household income, psychosocial factors including family burden, coping strategies, and self-efficacy demonstrated greater association with quality of life in the participants. However, the dynamics of these associations will change with an increasing population of persons with dementia, decreasing nuclear family size, and predicted changes in family living arrangements for the persons with dementia in future. As such, it necessitates continuous study examining the needs and concerns of family caregivers and the relevance of ongoing interventions specific to caregivers of persons with dementia. PMID:24535819

  7. Children in Immigrant Families--The U.S. and 50 States: Economic Need beyond the Official Poverty Measure. Research Brief Series. Publication #2009-19

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hernandez, Donald J.; Denton, Nancy A.; Macartney, Suzanne

    2009-01-01

    This Research Brief, the second in Child Trends series on immigrant children, draws on new results from Census 2000 data to examine differences in the poverty rates between children in immigrant families and children in native-born families. The brief reports results for the official poverty measure, but also for two alternatives to the official…

  8. Impact of the Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program on Low-Income Families: An Indepth Analysis. Agricultural Economic Report Number 220.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feaster, J. Gerald

    This report evaluates the Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP) of the Extension Service of the Department of Agriculture. About 184,000 low-income families participated in the program prior to October 1969. A national sample of 10,500 showed that family incomes were very low--less than 2,700 dollars, of which more than a third was…

  9. Economic Hardship, Family Relationships, and Adolescent Distress: An Evaluation of a Stress-Distress Mediation Model in Mother-Daughter and Mother-Son Dyads.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark-Lempers, Dania S.; Lempers, Jacques D.

    1997-01-01

    Evaluates a stress-distress mediation model of relationships among economic hardship, maternal financial strain, maternal marital happiness, the parent-child relationship, and adolescent distress. Results, based on 398 sixth and eighth graders and their mothers, indicate that economic hardship increases maternal financial strain, which leads to…

  10. RNA pentaloop structures as effective targets of regulators belonging to the RsmA/CsrA protein family

    PubMed Central

    Lapouge, Karine; Perozzo, Remo; Iwaszkiewicz, Justyna; Bertelli, Claire; Zoete, Vincent; Michielin, Olivier; Scapozza, Leonardo; Haas, Dieter

    2013-01-01

    In the Gac/Rsm signal transduction pathway of Pseudomonas fluorescens CHA0, the dimeric RNA-binding proteins RsmA and RsmE, which belong to the vast bacterial RsmA/CsrA family, effectively repress translation of target mRNAs containing a typical recognition sequence near the translation start site. Three small RNAs (RsmX, RsmY, RsmZ) with clustered recognition sequences can sequester RsmA and RsmE and thereby relieve translational repression. According to a previously established structural model, the RsmE protein makes optimal contacts with an RNA sequence 5?-A/UCANGGANGU/A-3?, in which the central ribonucleotides form a hexaloop. Here, we questioned the relevance of the hexaloop structure in target RNAs. We found that two predicted pentaloop structures, AGGGA (in pltA mRNA encoding a pyoluteorin biosynthetic enzyme) and AAGGA (in mutated pltA mRNA), allowed effective interaction with the RsmE protein in vivo. By contrast, ACGGA and AUGGA were poor targets. Isothermal titration calorimetry measurements confirmed the strong binding of RsmE to the AGGGA pentaloop structure in an RNA oligomer. Modeling studies highlighted the crucial role of the second ribonucleotide in the loop structure. In conclusion, a refined structural model of RsmE-RNA interaction accommodates certain pentaloop RNAs among the preferred hexaloop RNAs. PMID:23635605

  11. Limited family structure and triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) subtype as predictors of BRCA mutations in a genetic counseling cohort of early-onset sporadic breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Zugazagoitia, Jon; Pérez-Segura, Pedro; Manzano, Arancha; Blanco, Ignacio; Vega, Ana; Custodio, Ana; Teulé, Alex; Fachal, Laura; Martínez, Beatriz; González-Sarmiento, Rogelio; Cruz-Hernández, Juan Jesús; Chirivella, Isabel; Garcés, Vicente; Garre, Pilar; Romero, Atocha; Caldés, Trinidad; Díaz-Rubio, Eduardo; de la Hoya, Miguel

    2014-11-01

    Early-onset diagnosis is an eligibility criterion for BRCA1 and BRCA2 (BRCA) testing in sporadic breast cancer patients. Limited family structure has been proposed as a predictor of BRCA mutation status in this group of patients. An overwhelming amount of data supports a strong association between BRCA1 mutations and triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC). Here, we analyze the feasibility of using limited family structure and TNBC as predictors of BRCA mutation status in early-onset breast cancer patients attending genetic counseling units. We have conducted the study in a cohort of sporadic early-onset (?35 years) breast cancer patients (N = 341) previously selected for BRCA genetic testing in Academic Hereditary Cancer Clinics from Spain. A retrospective review of medical records available at the time of risk assessment allowed us classifying patients according to family structure and TNBC. In addition, BRCAPRO score was calculated for all patients. Association between categorical variables was investigated using the Fisher's exact test. Binary Logistic Regression Analysis was used for multivariate analysis. Limited family structure (OR 3.61, p = 0.013) and TNBC (OR 3.14, p = 0.013) were independent predictors of BRCA mutation status. Mutation prevalence in the subgroup of patients with at least one positive predictor was 14%, whereas it dropped to 3% in non-TNBCs with adequate family history (OR 5.31, 95% CI 1.38-23.89, p = 0.006). BRCAPRO correctly discerned between limited and adequate family structures. Limited family structure and TNBC are feasible predictors of BRCA mutation status in sporadic early-onset (?35 years) breast cancer patients attending genetic counseling units. The low prevalence of mutations observed in non-TNBCs with adequate family structure suggests that this subgroup of patients might be excluded from genetic testing. PMID:25342642

  12. Kinetic and Structural Characterization of DmpI from Helicobacter pylori and Archaeoglobus fulgidus, Two 4-Oxalocrotonate Tautomerase Family Members

    PubMed Central

    Almrud, Jeffrey J.; Dasgupta, Rakhi; Czerwinski, Robert M.; Kern, Andrew D.; Hackert, Marvin L.; Whitman, Christian P.

    2010-01-01

    The tautomerase superfamily consists of structurally homologous proteins that are characterized by a ?–?–? fold and a catalytic amino-terminal proline. 4-Oxalocrotonate tautomerase (4-OT) family members have been identified and categorized into five subfamilies on the basis of multiple sequence alignments and the conservation of key catalytic and structural residues. Representative members from two subfamilies have been cloned, expressed, purified, and subjected to kinetic and structural characterization. The crystal structure of DmpI from Helicobacter pylori (HpDmpI), a 4-OT homologue in subfamily 3, has been determined to high resolution (1.8 Å and 2.1 Å) in two different space groups. HpDmpI is a homohexamer with an active site cavity that includes Pro-1, but lacks the equivalent of Arg-11 and Arg-39 found in 4-OT. Instead, the side chain of Lys-36 replaces that of Arg-11 in a manner similar to that observed in the trimeric macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), which is the title protein of another family in the superfamily. The electrostatic surface of the active site is also quite different and suggests that HpDmpI might prefer small, monoacid substrates. A kinetic analysis of the enzyme is consistent with the structural analysis, but a biological role for the enzyme remains elusive. The crystal structure of DmpI from Archaeoglobus fulgidus (AfDmpI), a 4-OT homologue in subfamily-4, has been determined to 2.4 Å resolution. AfDmpI is also a homohexamer, with a proposed active site cavity that includes Pro-1, but lacks any other residues that are readily identified as catalytic ones related to 4-OT activity. Indeed, the electrostatic potential of the active site differs significantly in that it is mostly neutral, in contrast to the usual electropositive features found in other 4-OT family members, suggesting that AfDmpI might accommodate hydrophobic substrates. A kinetic analysis has been carried out, but does not provide any clues about the type of reaction the enzyme might catalyze. PMID:20709352

  13. Structural genomics analysis of uncharacterized protein families overrepresented in human gut bacteria identifies a novel glycoside hydrolase

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Bacteroides spp. form a significant part of our gut microbiome and are well known for optimized metabolism of diverse polysaccharides. Initial analysis of the archetypal Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron genome identified 172 glycosyl hydrolases and a large number of uncharacterized proteins associated with polysaccharide metabolism. Results BT_1012 from Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron VPI-5482 is a protein of unknown function and a member of a large protein family consisting entirely of uncharacterized proteins. Initial sequence analysis predicted that this protein has two domains, one on the N- and one on the C-terminal. A PSI-BLAST search found over 150 full length and over 90 half size homologs consisting only of the N-terminal domain. The experimentally determined three-dimensional structure of the BT_1012 protein confirms its two-domain architecture and structural analysis of both domains suggests their specific functions. The N-terminal domain is a putative catalytic domain with significant similarity to known glycoside hydrolases, the C-terminal domain has a beta-sandwich fold typically found in C-terminal domains of other glycosyl hydrolases, however these domains are typically involved in substrate binding. We describe the structure of the BT_1012 protein and discuss its sequence-structure relationship and their possible functional implications. Conclusions Structural and sequence analyses of the BT_1012 protein identifies it as a glycosyl hydrolase, expanding an already impressive catalog of enzymes involved in polysaccharide metabolism in Bacteroides spp. Based on this we have renamed the Pfam families representing the two domains found in the BT_1012 protein, PF13204 and PF12904, as putative glycoside hydrolase and glycoside hydrolase-associated C-terminal domain respectively. PMID:24742328

  14. Essays on development economics

    E-print Network

    Ruthbah, Ummul Hasanath

    2007-01-01

    This dissertation is a collection of three independent papers in empirical development economics. The first chapter studies the effect of a family planning program in Bangladesh, which successfully reduced fertility, on ...

  15. Changing aspects of economic and family structures in Kal?rdasht, a district in Northern Iran, up to 1978

    E-print Network

    Mir-Hosseini, Ziba

    1980-12-02

    There are two major language groups, Persian and Turkish. Those who speak Persian or related dialects constitute three-fourths of the population and of these groups the largest is comprised of those who speak Persian itself. The Kurds, Gilakis, Mazandaranis...

  16. Crystal structure of murine coronavirus receptor sCEACAM1a[1,4],a member of the carcinoembtyonic antigen family

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, K.; Zelus, B. D.; Meijers, R.; Liu, J.-H.; Bergelson, J. M.; Zhang, R.; Duke, N.; Joachimiak, A.; Holmes, K. V.; Wang, J.-H.; Biosciences Division; Dana-Farber Cancer Inst.; Harvard Medical School; Univ. of Colorado Health Science Center; Univ. of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

    2002-05-01

    CEACAM1 is a member of the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) family. Isoforms of murine CEACAM1 serve as receptors for mouse hepatitis virus (MHV), a murine coronavirus. Here we report the crystal structure of soluble murine sCEACAM1a[1,4], which is composed of two Ig-like domains and has MHV neutralizing activity. Its N-terminal domain has a uniquely folded CC' loop that encompasses key virus-binding residues. This is the first atomic structure of any member of the CEA family, and provides a prototypic architecture for functional exploration of CEA family members. We discuss the structural basis of virus receptor activities of murine CEACAM1 proteins, binding of Neisseria to human CEACAM1, and other homophilic and heterophilic interactions of CEA family members.

  17. Theoretical prediction of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis missense mutation effects on Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase structural stability

    SciTech Connect

    Potier, M.; Tu, Y.

    1994-09-01

    Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD) deficiency is associated with the progressive paralytic disorder familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (FALS). Fifteen missense mutations in the SOD gene were identified in several patients. These mutations may prevent correct promoter folding or hamper homodimer formation necessary for SOD activity. To understand the effect of the missense mutations on SOD structure and function, we used a theoretical analysis of structural effects based on two predictive methods using the modeled tertiary structure of human SOD. The first method uses the TORSO program which optimizes amino acid side-chains repacking in both wild-type and mutant SODs and calculates protein internal packing energy. The second method uses a hydrophobicity scale of the amino acid residues and considers both solvent accessibility and hydrophobic nature of residue substitutions to compute a stabilization energy change ({delta}E). These predictive methods have been tested in 187 single and multiple missense mutants of 8 proteins (T4 lysozyme, human carbonic anhydrase II, chymotrypsin inhibitor 2, f1 gene V protein, barnase, {lambda}-repressor, chicken and human lysozymes) with experimentally determined thermostability. The overall prediction accuracy with these proteins was 88%. Analysis of FALS missense mutations {delta}E predicts that 14 of 15 mutations destabilize the SOD structure. The other missense mutation is located at the homodimer interface and may hinder dimer formation. This approach is applicable to any protein with known tertiary structure to predict missense mutation effects on protein stability.

  18. The Phenylalanine Ammonia-Lyase Gene Family in Raspberry. Structure, Expression, and Evolution1

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Amrita; Ellis, Brian E.

    2001-01-01

    In raspberry (Rubus idaeus), development of fruit color and flavor are critically dependent on products of the phenylpropanoid pathway. To determine how these metabolic functions are integrated with the fruit ripening program, we are examining the properties and expression of key genes in the pathway. Here, we report that l- phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) is encoded in raspberry by a family of two genes (RiPAL1 and RiPAL2). RiPAL1 shares 88% amino acid sequence similarity to RiPAL2, but phylogenetic analysis places RiPAL1 and RiPAL2 in different clusters within the plant PAL gene family. The spatial and temporal expression patterns of the two genes were investigated in various vegetative and floral tissues using the reverse transcriptase competitor polymerase chain reaction assay. Although expression of both genes was detected in all tissues examined, RiPAL1 was associated with early fruit ripening events, whereas expression of RiPAL2 correlated more with later stages of flower and fruit development. Determination of the absolute levels of the two transcripts in various tissues showed that RiPAL1 transcripts were 3- to 10-fold more abundant than those of RiPAL2 in leaves, shoots, roots, young fruits, and ripe fruits. The two RiPAL genes therefore appear to be controlled by different regulatory mechanisms. PMID:11553751

  19. Structures of peptide families by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and distance geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Pease, J.H.

    1989-12-01

    The three dimensional structures of several small peptides were determined using a combination of {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and distance geometry calculations. These techniques were found to be particularly helpful for analyzing structural differences between related peptides since all of the peptides' {sup 1}H NMR spectra are very similar. The structures of peptides from two separate classes are presented. Peptides in the first class are related to apamin, an 18 amino acid peptide toxin from honey bee venom. The {sup 1}H NMR assignments and secondary structure determination of apamin were done previously. Quantitative NMR measurements and distance geometry calculations were done to calculate apamin's three dimensional structure. Peptides in the second class are 48 amino acid toxins from the sea anemone Radianthus paumotensis. The {sup 1}H NMR assignments of toxin II were done previously. The {sup 1}H NMR assignments of toxin III and the distance geometry calculations for both peptides are presented.

  20. Medium-chain sugar amphiphiles: a new family of healthy vegetable oil structuring agents.

    PubMed

    Jadhav, Swapnil R; Hwang, Hyeondo; Huang, Qingrong; John, George

    2013-12-11

    Vegetable oils are frequently structured to enhance their organoleptic and mechanical properties. This is usually achieved by increasing the net amount of saturated and/or trans fatty acids in the oil. With the risk of coronary heart diseases associated with these fatty acids, the food industry is looking for better alternatives. In this context, the medium-chain dialkanoates of low-calorie sugars (sugar alcohol dioctanoates) are investigated as a healthy alternative structuring agent. Precursors of sugar amphiphiles, being FDA-approved GRAS materials, exhibited high cell viability at a concentration ~50 ?g/mL. They readily formed nanoscale multilayered structures in an oil matrix to form a coherent network at low concentrations (1-3 wt %/v), which immobilized a wide range of oils (canola, soybean, and grapeseed oils). The structuring efficiency of sugar amphiphiles was computed in terms of mechanical, thermal, and structural properties and found to be a function of its type and concentration. PMID:24236574

  1. Balancing Family and Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yahnke, Sally; And Others

    The purpose of this monograph is to present a series of activities designed to teach strategies needed for effectively managing the multiple responsibilities of family and work. The guide contains 11 lesson plans dealing with balancing family and work that can be used in any home economics class, from middle school through college. The lesson…

  2. FAMILY TYMOVIRIDAE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This article provides a brief review of the taxonomic structure, virion properties, genome organization and replication strategy, antigenic properties, and biological properties of viruses in the family Tymoviridae. Criteria for demarcation of genus and species are provided. A brief review of each...

  3. ECONOMIC STRAIN AND ADOLESCENT FUNCTIONING IN AT-RISK FAMILIES: THE MEDIATING ROLES OF STRESSFUL PARENT/CHILD RELATIONSHIPS AND STRESSFUL LIFE EVENTS

    E-print Network

    Wilson, Mary Horn

    2012-12-31

    Potential mediators of the relationship between parent perception of economic strain and adolescent self-perception of psychological functioning in adolescents were evaluated across two domains, internalizing problems and personal adjustment...

  4. Applying a Family-Level Economic Strengthening Intervention to Improve Education and Health-Related Outcomes of School-Going AIDS-Orphaned Children: Lessons from a Randomized Experiment in Southern Uganda.

    PubMed

    Ssewamala, Fred M; Karimli, Leyla; Torsten, Neilands; Wang, Julia Shu-Huah; Han, Chang-Keun; Ilic, Vilma; Nabunya, Proscovia

    2016-01-01

    Children comprise the largest proportion of the population in sub-Saharan Africa. Of these, millions are orphaned. Orphanhood increases the likelihood of growing up in poverty, dropping out of school, and becoming infected with HIV. Therefore, programs aimed at securing a healthy developmental trajectory for these orphaned children are desperately needed. We conducted a two-arm cluster-randomized controlled trial to evaluate the effectiveness of a family-level economic strengthening intervention with regard to school attendance, school grades, and self-esteem in AIDS-orphaned adolescents aged 12-16 years from 10 public rural primary schools in southern Uganda. Children were randomly assigned to receive usual care (counseling, school uniforms, school lunch, notebooks, and textbooks), "bolstered" with mentorship from a near-peer (control condition, n?=?167), or to receive bolstered usual care plus a family-level economic strengthening intervention in the form of a matched Child Savings Account (Suubi-Maka treatment arm, n?=?179). The two groups did not differ at baseline, but 24 months later, children in the Suubi-Maka treatment arm reported significantly better educational outcomes, lower levels of hopelessness, and higher levels of self-concept compared to participants in the control condition. Our study contributes to the ongoing debate on how to address the developmental impacts of the increasing numbers of orphaned and vulnerable children and adolescents in sub-Saharan Africa, especially those affected by HIV/AIDS. Our findings indicate that innovative family-level economic strengthening programs, over and above bolstered usual care that includes psychosocial interventions for young people, may have positive developmental impacts related to education, health, and psychosocial functioning. PMID:26228480

  5. Structure of the hypothetical DUF1811-family protein GK0453 from Geobacillus kaustophilus HTA426

    PubMed Central

    Padmanabhan, Balasundaram; Nakamura, Yoshihiro; Antonyuk, Svetlana V.; Strange, Richard W.; Hasnain, S. Samar; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Bessho, Yoshitaka

    2013-01-01

    The crystal structure of a conserved hypothetical protein, GK0453, from Geobacillus kaustophilus has been determined to 2.2?Å resolution. The crystal belonged to space group P43212, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 75.69, c = 64.18?Å. The structure was determined by the molecular-replacement method and was refined to a final R factor of 22.6% (R free = 26.3%). Based on structural homology, the GK0453 protein possesses two independent binding sites and hence it may simultaneously interact with two proteins or with a protein and a nucleic acid. PMID:23545635

  6. Structural insights into the substrate specificity and transglycosylation activity of a fungal glycoside hydrolase family 5 ?-mannosidase.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Peng; Liu, Yang; Yan, Qiaojuan; Chen, Zhongzhou; Qin, Zhen; Jiang, Zhengqiang

    2014-11-01

    ?-Mannosidases are exo-acting glycoside hydrolases (GHs) that catalyse the removal of the nonreducing end ?-D-mannose from manno-oligosaccharides or mannoside-substituted molecules. They play important roles in fundamental biological processes and also have potential applications in various industries. In this study, the first fungal GH family 5 ?-mannosidase (RmMan5B) from Rhizomucor miehei was functionally and structurally characterized. RmMan5B exhibited a much higher activity against manno-oligosaccharides than against p-nitrophenyl ?-D-mannopyranoside (pNPM) and had a transglycosylation activity which transferred mannosyl residues to sugars such as fructose. To investigate its substrate specificity and transglycosylation activity, crystal structures of RmMan5B and of its inactive E202A mutant in complex with mannobiose, mannotriose and mannosyl-fructose were determined at resolutions of 1.3, 2.6, 2.0 and 2.4?Å, respectively. In addition, the crystal structure of R. miehei ?-mannanase (RmMan5A) was determined at a resolution of 2.3?Å. Both RmMan5A and RmMan5B adopt the (?/?)8-barrel architecture, which is globally similar to the other members of GH family 5. However, RmMan5B shows several differences in the loop around the active site. The extended loop between strand ?8 and helix ?8 (residues 354-392) forms a `double' steric barrier to `block' the substrate-binding cleft at the end of the -1 subsite. Trp119, Asn260 and Glu380 in the ?-mannosidase, which are involved in hydrogen-bond contacts with the -1 mannose, might be essential for exo catalytic activity. Moreover, the structure of RmMan5B in complex with mannosyl-fructose has provided evidence for the interactions between the ?-mannosidase and D-fructofuranose. Overall, the present study not only helps in understanding the catalytic mechanism of GH family 5 ?-mannosidases, but also provides a basis for further enzymatic engineering of ?-mannosidases and ?-mannanases. PMID:25372687

  7. The crystal structure of Escherichia coli TdcF, a member of the highly conserved YjgF/YER057c/UK114 family

    PubMed Central

    Burman, Julia D; Stevenson, Clare EM; Sawers, R Gary; Lawson, David M

    2007-01-01

    Background The YjgF/YER057c/UK114 family of proteins is widespread in nature, but has as yet no clearly defined biological role. Members of the family exist as homotrimers and are characterised by intersubunit clefts that are delineated by well-conserved residues; these sites are likely to be of functional significance, yet catalytic activity has never been detected for any member of this family. The gene encoding the TdcF protein of E. coli, a YjgF/YER057c/UK114 family member, resides in an operon that strongly suggests a role in the metabolism of 2-ketobutyrate for this protein. Results We have determined the crystal structure of E. coli TdcF by molecular replacement to a maximum resolution of 1.6 Å. Structures are also presented of TdcF complexed with a variety of ligands. Conclusion The TdcF structure closely resembles those of all YjgF/YER057c/UK114 family members determined thus far. It has the trimeric quaternary structure and intersubunit cavities characteristic of this family of proteins. We show that TdcF is capable of binding several low molecular weight metabolites bearing a carboxylate group, although the interaction with 2-ketobutyrate appears to be the most well defined. These observations may be indicative of a role for TdcF in sensing this potentially toxic metabolite. PMID:17506874

  8. The structural and functional effects of the familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy-linked cardiac troponin C mutation, L29Q.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Ian M; Sevrieva, Ivanka; Li, Monica X; Irving, Malcolm; Sun, Yin-Biao; Sykes, Brian D

    2015-10-01

    Familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (FHC) is characterized by severe abnormal cardiac muscle growth. The traditional view of disease progression in FHC is that an increase in the Ca(2+)-sensitivity of cardiac muscle contraction ultimately leads to pathogenic myocardial remodeling, though recent studies suggest this may be an oversimplification. For example, FHC may be developed through altered signaling that prevents downstream regulation of contraction. The mutation L29Q, found in the Ca(2+)-binding regulatory protein in heart muscle, cardiac troponin C (cTnC), has been linked to cardiac hypertrophy. However, reports on the functional effects of this mutation are conflicting, and our goal was to combine in vitro and in situ structural and functional data to elucidate its mechanism of action. We used nuclear magnetic resonance and circular dichroism to solve the structure and characterize the backbone dynamics and stability of the regulatory domain of cTnC with the L29Q mutation. The overall structure and dynamics of cTnC were unperturbed, although a slight rearrangement of site 1, an increase in backbone flexibility, and a small decrease in protein stability were observed. The structure and function of cTnC was also assessed in demembranated ventricular trabeculae using fluorescence for in situ structure. L29Q reduced the cooperativity of the Ca(2+)-dependent structural change in cTnC in trabeculae under basal conditions and abolished the effect of force-generating myosin cross-bridges on this structural change. These effects could contribute to the pathogenesis of this mutation. PMID:26341255

  9. The structural and functional effects of the familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy-linked cardiac troponin C mutation, L29Q

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Ian M.; Sevrieva, Ivanka; Li, Monica X.; Irving, Malcolm; Sun, Yin-Biao; Sykes, Brian D.

    2015-01-01

    Familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (FHC) is characterized by severe abnormal cardiac muscle growth. The traditional view of disease progression in FHC is that an increase in the Ca2 +-sensitivity of cardiac muscle contraction ultimately leads to pathogenic myocardial remodeling, though recent studies suggest this may be an oversimplification. For example, FHC may be developed through altered signaling that prevents downstream regulation of contraction. The mutation L29Q, found in the Ca2 +-binding regulatory protein in heart muscle, cardiac troponin C (cTnC), has been linked to cardiac hypertrophy. However, reports on the functional effects of this mutation are conflicting, and our goal was to combine in vitro and in situ structural and functional data to elucidate its mechanism of action. We used nuclear magnetic resonance and circular dichroism to solve the structure and characterize the backbone dynamics and stability of the regulatory domain of cTnC with the L29Q mutation. The overall structure and dynamics of cTnC were unperturbed, although a slight rearrangement of site 1, an increase in backbone flexibility, and a small decrease in protein stability were observed. The structure and function of cTnC was also assessed in demembranated ventricular trabeculae using fluorescence for in situ structure. L29Q reduced the cooperativity of the Ca2 +-dependent structural change in cTnC in trabeculae under basal conditions and abolished the effect of force-generating myosin cross-bridges on this structural change. These effects could contribute to the pathogenesis of this mutation. PMID:26341255

  10. Expansion of the aspartate [beta]-semialdehyde dehydrogenase family: the first structure of a fungal ortholog

    SciTech Connect

    Arachea, B.T.; Liu, X.; Pavlovsky, A.G.; Viola, R.E.

    2010-08-13

    The enzyme aspartate semialdehyde dehydrogenase (ASADH) catalyzes a critical transformation that produces the first branch-point intermediate in an essential microbial amino-acid biosynthetic pathway. The first structure of an ASADH isolated from a fungal species (Candida albicans) has been determined as a complex with its pyridine nucleotide cofactor. This enzyme is a functional dimer, with a similar overall fold and domain organization to the structurally characterized bacterial ASADHs. However, there are differences in the secondary-structural elements and in cofactor binding that are likely to cause the lower catalytic efficiency of this fungal enzyme. Alterations in the dimer interface, through deletion of a helical subdomain and replacement of amino acids that participate in a hydrogen-bonding network, interrupt the intersubunit-communication channels required to support an alternating-site catalytic mechanism. The detailed functional information derived from this new structure will allow an assessment of ASADH as a possible target for antifungal drug development.

  11. Structure of the N-terminal fragment of topoisomerase V reveals a new family of topoisomerases

    SciTech Connect

    Taneja, Bhupesh; Patel, Asmita; Slesarev, Alexei; Mondragon, Alfonso

    2010-09-02

    Topoisomerases are involved in controlling and maintaining the topology of DNA and are present in all kingdoms of life. Unlike all other types of topoisomerases, similar type IB enzymes have only been identified in bacteria and eukarya. The only putative type IB topoisomerase in archaea is represented by Methanopyrus kandleri topoisomerase V. Despite several common functional characteristics, topoisomerase V shows no sequence similarity to other members of the same type. The structure of the 61 kDa N-terminal fragment of topoisomerase V reveals no structural similarity to other topoisomerases. Furthermore, the structure of the active site region is different, suggesting no conservation in the cleavage and religation mechanism. Additionally, the active site is buried, indicating the need of a conformational change for activity. The presence of a topoisomerase in archaea with a unique structure suggests the evolution of a separate mechanism to alter DNA.

  12. Structure of armadillo ACBP: a new member of the acyl-CoA-binding protein family

    SciTech Connect

    Costabel, Marcelo D.; Ermácora, Mario R.; Santomé, José A.; Alzari, Pedro M.; Guérin, Diego M. A.

    2006-10-01

    The X-ray structure of the tetragonal form of apo acyl-CoA-binding protein (ACBP) from the Harderian gland of the South American armadillo Chaetophractus villosus has been solved. The X-ray structure of the tetragonal form of apo acyl-CoA-binding protein (ACBP) from the Harderian gland of the South American armadillo Chaetophractus villosus has been solved. ACBP is a carrier for activated long-chain fatty acids and has been associated with many aspects of lipid metabolism. Its secondary structure is highly similar to that of the corresponding form of bovine ACBP and exhibits the unique flattened ?-helical bundle (up–down–down–up) motif reported for animal, yeast and insect ACBPs. Conformational differences are located in loops and turns, although these structural differences do not suffice to account for features that could be related to the unusual biochemistry and lipid metabolism of the Harderian gland.

  13. Biochemical and Structural Insights into RNA Binding by Ssh10b, a Member of the Highly Conserved Sac10b Protein Family in Archaea*

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Li; Ding, Jingjin; Guo, Rong; Hou, Yanjie; Wang, Da-Cheng; Huang, Li

    2014-01-01

    Proteins of the Sac10b family are highly conserved in Archaea. Ssh10b, a member of the Sac10b family from the hyperthermophilic crenarchaeon Sulfolobus shibatae, binds to RNA in vivo. Here we show that binding by Ssh10b destabilizes RNA secondary structure. Structural analysis of Ssh10b in complex with a 25-bp RNA duplex containing local distortions reveals that Ssh10b binds the two RNA strands symmetrically as a tetramer with each dimer bound asymmetrically to a single RNA strand. Amino acid residues involved in double-stranded RNA binding are similar, but non-identical, to those in dsDNA binding. The dimer-dimer interaction mediated by the intermolecular ?-sheet appears to facilitate the destabilization of base pairing in the secondary structure of RNA. Our results suggest that proteins of the Sac10b family may play important roles in RNA transactions requiring destabilization of RNA secondary structure in Sulfolobus. PMID:24307170

  14. Biochemical and structural characterization of a novel ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme E2 from Agrocybe aegeria reveals Ube2w family-specific properties

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Chao; Li, De-Feng; Feng, Lei; Hou, Yanjie; Sun, Hui; Wang, Da-Cheng; Liu, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Ubiquitination is a post-translational modification that is involved in myriad cellar regulation and disease pathways. The ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme (E2) is an important player in the ubiquitin transfer pathway. Although many E2 structures are available, not all E2 families have known structures, and three-dimensional structures from fungal organisms other than yeast are lacking. We report here the crystal structure of UbcA1, which is a novel ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme identified from the edible and medicinal mushroom Agrocybe aegerita and displays potential antitumor properties. The protein belongs to the Ube2w family and shows similar biochemical characteristics to human Ube2w, including monomer-dimer equilibrium in solution, ?-NH2 ubiquitin-transfer activity and a mechanism to recognize backbone atoms of intrinsically disordered N-termini in substrates. Its structure displays a unique C-terminal conformation with an orientation of helix ?3 that is completely different from the reported E2 structures but similar to a recently reported NMR ensemble of Ube2w. A mutagenesis study on this novel enzyme revealed that an intact C-terminus is significant for protein dimerization and enzymatic activity. As the first crystallized full-length protein of this family, UbcA1 may supersede the truncated X-ray structure of Ube2w (PDB entry 2A7L) as the representative structure of the Ube2w family. PMID:26525192

  15. Class 2 design update for the family of commuter airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Creighton, Thomas R.; Hendrich, Louis J.

    1987-01-01

    This is the final report of seven on the design of a family of commuter airplanes. This design effort was performed in fulfillment of NASA/USRA grant NGT-8001. Its contents are as follows: (1) the class 1 baseline designs for the commuter airplane family; (2) a study of takeoff weight penalties imposed on the commuter family due to implementing commonality objectives; (3) component structural designs common to the commuter family; (4) details of the acquisition and operating economics of the commuter family, i.e., savings due to production commonality and handling qualities commonality are determined; (5) discussion of the selection of an advanced turboprop propulsion system for the family of commuter airplanes, and (6) a proposed design for an SSSA controller design to achieve similar handling for all airplanes. Final class 2 commuter airplane designs are also presented.

  16. Structural basis of substrate specificity and regiochemistry in the MycF/TylF family of sugar O-methyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Bernard, Steffen M; Akey, David L; Tripathi, Ashootosh; Park, Sung Ryeol; Konwerski, Jamie R; Anzai, Yojiro; Li, Shengying; Kato, Fumio; Sherman, David H; Smith, Janet L

    2015-05-15

    Sugar moieties in natural products are frequently modified by O-methylation. In the biosynthesis of the macrolide antibiotic mycinamicin, methylation of a 6'-deoxyallose substituent occurs in a stepwise manner first at the 2'- and then the 3'-hydroxyl groups to produce the mycinose moiety in the final product. The timing and placement of the O-methylations impact final stage C-H functionalization reactions mediated by the P450 monooxygenase MycG. The structural basis of pathway ordering and substrate specificity is unknown. A series of crystal structures of MycF, the 3'-O-methyltransferase, including the free enzyme and complexes with S-adenosyl homocysteine (SAH), substrate, product, and unnatural substrates, show that SAM binding induces substantial ordering that creates the binding site for the natural substrate, and a bound metal ion positions the substrate for catalysis. A single amino acid substitution relaxed the 2'-methoxy specificity but retained regiospecificity. The engineered variant produced a new mycinamicin analog, demonstrating the utility of structural information to facilitate bioengineering approaches for the chemoenzymatic synthesis of complex small molecules containing modified sugars. Using the MycF substrate complex and the modeled substrate complex of a 4'-specific homologue, active site residues were identified that correlate with the 3' or 4' specificity of MycF family members and define the protein and substrate features that direct the regiochemistry of methyltransfer. This classification scheme will be useful in the annotation of new secondary metabolite pathways that utilize this family of enzymes. PMID:25692963

  17. School/Family Relationships in the New Social Climate: The Case of the Czech Republic in the 1990's.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rabusicova, Milada; Pol, Milan

    Dramatic changes in the economic and political structure of the Czech Republic in recent years have challenged schools to transform themselves from closed institutions into open organizations that collaborate with families and communities. This study explored the questions: (1) Are changes in school/family relations really occurring? (2) What are…

  18. The Economics of Solar Heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forney, J. A.

    1982-01-01

    SHCOST program assesses economic feasibility of solar energy for single-family residences and light commercial applications. Program analyzes life-cycle costs as well as sensitivity studies to aid designer in selecting most economically attractive solar system for single-family residence or light commercial application. SHCOST includes fairly comprehensive list of cost elements from which user may select.

  19. Working to End Family Homelessness. Annual Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center on Family Homelessness (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    The National Center on Family Homelessness is determined to end family homelessness. Sheltering families provides a temporary safe haven. Connecting families to permanent housing, essential services, and critical supports can change their lives forever. Through research the Center learns what families need to rebound from the housing, economic,…

  20. Supersonic Cruise Research 1979, part 2. [airframe structures and materials, systems integration, economic analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Advances in airframe structure and materials technology for supersonic cruise aircraft are reported with emphasis on titanium and composite structures. The operation of the Concorde is examined as a baseline for projections into the future. A market survey of U.S. passenger attitudes and preferences, the impact of advanced air transport technology and the integration of systems for the advanced SST and for a smaller research/business jet vehicle are also discussed.

  1. Impacts of Commercial Electric Utility Rate Structure Elements on the Economics of Photovoltaic Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ong, S.; Denholm, P.; Doris, E.

    2010-06-01

    This analysis uses simulated building data, simulated solar photovoltaic (PV) data, and actual electric utility tariff data from 25 cities to understand better the impacts of different commercial rate structures on the value of solar PV systems. By analyzing and comparing 55 unique rate structures across the United States, this study seeks to identify the rate components that have the greatest effect on the value of PV systems. Understanding the beneficial components of utility tariffs can both assist decision makers in choosing appropriate rate structures and influence the development of rates that favor the deployment of PV systems. Results from this analysis show that a PV system's value decreases with increasing demand charges. Findings also indicate that time-of-use rate structures with peaks coincident with PV production and wide ranges between on- and off-peak prices most benefit the types of buildings and PV systems simulated. By analyzing a broad set of rate structures from across the United States, this analysis provides an insight into the range of impacts that current U.S. rate structures have on PV systems.

  2. [Differentiated structures of early prevention measures for families at risk using the example of the project "nobody slips through the net"].

    PubMed

    Eickhorst, Andreas; Borchardt, Silke; Cierpka, Manfred

    2012-01-01

    Against the background of practical experiences from the Early Prevention model project "Nobody slips through the net" (in three counties of Germany) the necessity of differentiated structures of preventive measures for different groups of families will be discussed. Therefore a distribution in three types of families the visiting qualified person could be confronted with during their work in the families' homes is proposed, especially with respect to the degree of risk and available resources. We conclude by illustrating the implications of this approach by means of a case vignette. PMID:23367809

  3. Solution structure of Arabidopsis thaliana protein At5g39720.1, a member of the AIG2-like protein family

    SciTech Connect

    Lytle, Betsy L.; Peterson, Francis C.; Tyler, Ejan M.; Newman, Carrie L.; Vinarov, Dmitriy A.; Markley, John L.; Volkman, Brian F.

    2006-06-01

    The solution structure of A. thaliana protein At5g39720.1 reported here is the first for a member of the AIG2-like family (PF06094). The three-dimensional structure shows similarity to those determined for members of the uncharacterized Pfam family UPF0131. The three-dimensional structure of Arabidopsis thaliana protein At5g39720.1 was determined by NMR spectroscopy. It is the first representative structure of Pfam family PF06094, which contains protein sequences similar to that of AIG2, an A. thaliana protein of unknown function induced upon infection by the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae. The At5g39720.1 structure consists of a five-stranded ?-barrel surrounded by two ?-helices and a small ?-sheet. A long flexible ?-helix protrudes from the structure at the C-terminal end. A structural homology search revealed similarity to three members of Pfam family UPF0131. Conservation of residues in a hydrophilic cavity able to bind small ligands in UPF0131 proteins suggests that this may also serve as an active site in AIG2-like proteins.

  4. Structure of the lamin A/C R482W mutant responsible for dominant familial partial lipodystrophy (FPLD)

    SciTech Connect

    Magracheva, Eugenia; Kozlov, Serguei; Stewart, Colin L.; Wlodawer, Alexander; Zdanov, Alexander

    2009-08-07

    Proteins of the A-type lamin family, which consists of two members, lamin A and lamin C, are the major components of a thin proteinaceous filamentous meshwork, the lamina, that underlies the inner nuclear membrane. A-type lamins have recently become the focus of extensive functional studies as a consequence of the linking of at least eight congenital diseases to mutations in the lamin A/C gene (LMNA). This spectrum of pathologies, which mostly manifest themselves as dominant traits, includes muscle dystrophies, dilated cardiomyopathies, the premature aging syndrome Hutchinson-Guilford progeria and familial partial lipodystrophy (FPLD). The crystal structure of the lamin A/C mutant R482W, a variant that causes FPLD, has been determined at 1.5 {angstrom} resolution. A completely novel aggregation state of the C-terminal globular domain and the position of the mutated amino-acid residue suggest means by which the mutation may affect lamin A/C-protein and protein-DNA interactions.

  5. Sequence variation and structural conservation allows development of novel function and immune evasion in parasite surface protein families

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, Matthew K; Carrington, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Trypanosoma and Plasmodium species are unicellular, eukaryotic pathogens that have evolved the capacity to survive and proliferate within a human host, causing sleeping sickness and malaria, respectively. They have very different survival strategies. African trypanosomes divide in blood and extracellular spaces, whereas Plasmodium species invade and proliferate within host cells. Interaction with host macromolecules is central to establishment and maintenance of an infection by both parasites. Proteins that mediate these interactions are under selection pressure to bind host ligands without compromising immune avoidance strategies. In both parasites, the expansion of genes encoding a small number of protein folds has established large protein families. This has permitted both diversification to form novel ligand binding sites and variation in sequence that contributes to avoidance of immune recognition. In this review we consider two such parasite surface protein families, one from each species. In each case, known structures demonstrate how extensive sequence variation around a conserved molecular architecture provides an adaptable protein scaffold that the parasites can mobilise to mediate interactions with their hosts. PMID:24442723

  6. Activity, specificity and structure of I-Bth0305I: a representative of a new homing endonuclease family

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Gregory K.; Heiter, Daniel F.; Pietrokovski, Shmuel; Stoddard, Barry L.

    2011-01-01

    Novel family of putative homing endonuclease genes was recently discovered during analyses of metagenomic and genomic sequence data. One such protein is encoded within a group I intron that resides in the recA gene of the Bacillus thuringiensis 0305?8–36 bacteriophage. Named I-Bth0305I, the endonuclease cleaves a DNA target in the uninterrupted recA gene at a position immediately adjacent to the intron insertion site. The enzyme displays a multidomain, homodimeric architecture and footprints a DNA region of ?60?bp. Its highest specificity corresponds to a 14-bp pseudopalindromic sequence that is directly centered across the DNA cleavage site. Unlike many homing endonucleases, the specificity profile of the enzyme is evenly distributed across much of its target site, such that few single base pair substitutions cause a significant decrease in cleavage activity. A crystal structure of its C-terminal domain confirms a nuclease fold that is homologous to very short patch repair (Vsr) endonucleases. The domain architecture and DNA recognition profile displayed by I-Bth0305I, which is the prototype of a homing lineage that we term the ‘EDxHD’ family, are distinct from previously characterized homing endonucleases. PMID:21890897

  7. Supramolecular Structure of a New Family of Circular Proteoglycans Mediating Cell Adhesion in Sponges

    E-print Network

    Bielefeld, Universität

    in Sponges Janina Jarchow,* Ju¨rgen Fritz, Dario Anselmetti, Anthony Calabro,§ Vincent C. Hascall,§ Daniela responsible for species-specific cell adhesion in sponges. Here, we present the structure of the aggregation factor from the marine sponge Microciona prolifera, which constitutes the first description of a circular

  8. Structural characterization of Helicobacter pylori dethiobiotin synthetase reveals differences between family members

    SciTech Connect

    Porebski, Przemyslaw J.; Klimecka, Maria; Chruszcz, Maksymilian; Nicholls, Robert A.; Murzyn, Krzysztof; Cuff, Marianne E.; Xu, Xiaohui; Cymborowski, Marcin; Murshudov, Garib N.; Savchenko, Alexei; Edwards, Aled; Minor, Wladek

    2012-07-11

    Dethiobiotin synthetase (DTBS) is involved in the biosynthesis of biotin in bacteria, fungi, and plants. As humans lack this pathway, DTBS is a promising antimicrobial drug target. We determined structures of DTBS from Helicobacter pylori (hpDTBS) bound with cofactors and a substrate analog, and described its unique characteristics relative to other DTBS proteins. Comparison with bacterial DTBS orthologs revealed considerable structural differences in nucleotide recognition. The C-terminal region of DTBS proteins, which contains two nucleotide-recognition motifs, differs greatly among DTBS proteins from different species. The structure of hpDTBS revealed that this protein is unique and does not contain a C-terminal region containing one of the motifs. The single nucleotide-binding motif in hpDTBS is similar to its counterpart in GTPases; however, isothermal titration calorimetry binding studies showed that hpDTBS has a strong preference for ATP. The structural determinants of ATP specificity were assessed with X-ray crystallographic studies of hpDTBS-ATP and hpDTBS-GTP complexes. The unique mode of nucleotide recognition in hpDTBS makes this protein a good target for H. pylori-specific inhibitors of the biotin synthesis pathway.

  9. SCOP database in 2004: renements integrate structure and sequence family data

    E-print Network

    either in isolation or in more than one context in multidomain proteins. The protein domains are classi for Protein Engineering and 3 MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Hills Road, Cambridge CB2 2QH, UK, 1 September 17, 2003; Accepted September 18, 2003 ABSTRACT The Structural Classi®cation of Proteins (SCOP

  10. Going to extremes: family structure, children's well-being, and social science.

    PubMed

    Cherlin, A J

    1999-11-01

    In this article I argue that public discussions of demographic issues are often conducted in a troubling pattern in which one extreme position is debated in relation to the opposite extreme. This pattern impedes our understanding of social problems and is a poor guide to sound public policies. To illustrate this thesis I use the case of social scientific research examining how children are affected by not living with two biological parents while they are growing up. Over the last decade, I maintain, most of the public, and even many social scientists, have been puzzled and poorly informed by this debate. In particular I consider Judith Wallerstein's clinically based claims of the pervasive, profound harm caused by divorce and, at the other extreme, Judith Rich Harris's reading of behavioral genetics and evolutionary psychology, which leads her to dismiss the direct effects of divorce. Neither extreme gives a clear picture of the consequences of growing up in a single-parent family or a stepfamily. PMID:10604072

  11. Family of $N$-dimensional superintegrable systems and quadratic algebra structures

    E-print Network

    Md Fazlul Hoque; Ian Marquette; Yao-Zhong Zhang

    2015-10-04

    Classical and quantum superintegrable systems have a long history and they possess more integrals of motion than degrees of freedom. They have many attractive properties, wide applications in modern physics and connection to many domains in pure and applied mathematics. We overview two new families of superintegrable Kepler-Coulomb systems with non-central terms and superintegrable Hamiltonians with double singular oscillators of type $(n,N-n)$ in $N$-dimensional Euclidean space. We present their quadratic and polynomial algebras involving Casimir operators of $so(N+1)$ Lie algebras that exhibit very interesting decompositions $Q(3)\\oplus so(N-1)$, $Q(3)\\oplus so(n)\\oplus so(N-n)$ and the cubic Casimir operators. The realization of these algebras in terms of deformed oscillator enables the determination of a finite dimensional unitary representation. We present algebraic derivations of the degenerate energy spectra of these systems and relate them with the physical spectra obtained from the separation of variables.

  12. FAMILY RESOURCE MANAGEMENT TRAININGS September 1, 2013 August 31, 2014

    E-print Network

    FAMILY RESOURCE MANAGEMENT TRAININGS September 1, 2013 ­ August 31, 2014 Updated 11.11.2013 THE FRM with limited academic background in family resource management, family economics, financial education and those through four, two-hour webinars. * Family Economics 101 October 24, 2013 Event ID: WHT691498 * Family

  13. Crystal structure of CsCrAs2O7, a new member of the diarsenate family

    PubMed Central

    Bouhassine, Mohamad Alem; Boughzala, Habib

    2015-01-01

    Caesium chromium(III) diarsenate(V), CsCrAs2O7, was prepared by solid-state reactions. The title structure consists of isolated CrO6 octa­hedra and As2O7 diarsenate groups, sharing corners to build up a three-dimensional [CrAs2O7]? anionic framework. In this framework, channels extending parallel to [001] are present in which the ten-coordinate Cs+ ions reside. CsCrAs2O7 is isotypic with the monoclinic A I M III X 2O7 (A I = alkali metal; M III = Al, Cr, Fe; X = As, P) type I family of compounds crystallizing in the space group P21/c. PMID:26090138

  14. Crystal structure of cce_0566 from Cyanothece 51142, a protein associated with nitrogen fixation in the DUF269 family

    SciTech Connect

    Buchko G. W.; Robinson H.

    2012-02-01

    The crystal structure for cce{_}0566 (171 aa, 19.4 kDa), a DUF269 annotated protein from the diazotrophic cyanobacterium Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142, was determined to 1.60 {angstrom} resolution. Cce{_}0566 is a homodimer with each molecule composed of eight {alpha}-helices folded on one side of a three strand anti-parallel {beta}-sheet. Hydrophobic interactions between the side chains of largely conserved residues on the surface of each {beta}-sheet hold the dimer together. The fold observed for cce{_}0566 may be unique to proteins in the DUF269 family, hence, the protein may also have a function unique to nitrogen fixation. A solvent accessible cleft containing conserved charged residues near the dimer interface could represent the active site or ligand-binding surface for the protein's biological function.

  15. Crystal structure of cce_0566 from Cyanothece 51142, a protein associated with nitrogen fixation in the DUF269 family

    SciTech Connect

    Buchko, Garry W.; Robinson, Howard

    2012-02-17

    The crystal structure for cce_0566 (171 aa, 19.4 kDa), a DUF269 annotated protein from the diazo- trophic cyanobacterium Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142, was determined to 1.60 A? resolution. Cce_0566 is a homodimer with each molecule composed of eight a-helices folded on one side of a three strand anti-parallel b-sheet. Hydrophobic interactions between the side chains of largely conserved residues on the surface of each b-sheet hold the dimer together. The fold observed for cce_0566 may be unique to proteins in the DUF269 family, hence, the protein may also have a function unique to nitrogen fixation. A solvent accessible cleft containing conserved charged residues near the dimer interface could represent the active site or ligand-binding surface for the protein’s biological function.

  16. The purification, crystallization and preliminary structural characterization of human MAWDBP, a member of the phenazine biosynthesis-like protein family

    SciTech Connect

    Herde, Petra; Blankenfeldt, Wulf

    2006-06-01

    The purification, crystallization and preliminary structural characterization of human MAWD-binding protein (MAWDBP) are described. MAWDBP is the only representative of the phenazine biosynthesis-like protein family in the human genome. Its expression is elevated in several disease processes, including insulin resistance, folate deficiency and hypotension, and it may also be involved in carcinogenesis. The exact molecular function of MAWDBP is unknown. Native and seleno-l-methionine-labelled MAWDBP were expressed in Escherichia coli and crystallized at room temperature from precipitants containing 10 mM KF, 14%(w/v) PEG 3350 and 0.1 M sodium citrate pH 5.4. Crystals belong to space group H32, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 187, c = 241 Å, indicative of three to five monomers per asymmetric unit. Crystals were cryoprotected with 15%(v/v) glycerol and data have been collected to 2.7 Å resolution.

  17. Structural basis for telomerase RNA recognition and RNP assembly by the holoenzyme La family protein p65

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Mahavir; Wang, Zhonghua; Koo, Bon-Kyung; Patel, Anooj; Cascio, Duilio; Collins, Kathleen; Feigon, Juli

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Telomerase is a ribonucleoprotein complex essential for maintenance of telomere DNA at linear chromosome ends. The catalytic core of Tetrahymena telomerase comprises a ternary complex of telomerase RNA (TER), telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT), and the essential La family protein p65. NMR and crystal structures of p65 C-terminal domain and its complex with stem IV of TER reveal that RNA recognition is achieved by a novel combination of single- and double-strand RNA binding, which induces a 105° bend in TER. The domain is a cryptic, atypical RNA recognition motif with a disordered C-terminal extension that forms an ?-helix in the complex necessary for hierarchical assembly of TERT with p65-TER. This work provides the first structural insight into biogenesis and assembly of TER with a telomerase-specific protein. Additionally, our studies define a structurally homologous domain (xRRM) in genuine La and LARP7 proteins and suggest a general mode of RNA binding for biogenesis of their diverse RNA targets. PMID:22705372

  18. Structural basis for telomerase RNA recognition and RNP assembly by the holoenzyme La family protein p65.

    PubMed

    Singh, Mahavir; Wang, Zhonghua; Koo, Bon-Kyung; Patel, Anooj; Cascio, Duilio; Collins, Kathleen; Feigon, Juli

    2012-07-13

    Telomerase is a ribonucleoprotein complex essential for maintenance of telomere DNA at linear chromosome ends. The catalytic core of Tetrahymena telomerase comprises a ternary complex of telomerase RNA (TER), telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT), and the essential La family protein p65. NMR and crystal structures of p65 C-terminal domain and its complex with stem IV of TER reveal that RNA recognition is achieved by a combination of single- and double-stranded RNA binding, which induces a 105° bend in TER. The domain is a cryptic, atypical RNA recognition motif with a disordered C-terminal extension that forms an ? helix in the complex necessary for hierarchical assembly of TERT with p65-TER. This work provides the first structural insight into biogenesis and assembly of TER with a telomerase-specific protein. Additionally, our studies define a structurally homologous domain (xRRM) in genuine La and LARP7 proteins and suggest a general mode of RNA binding for biogenesis of their diverse RNA targets. PMID:22705372

  19. Structural Diversity in the Dandelion (Taraxacum officinale) Polyphenol Oxidase Family Results in Different Responses to Model Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Dirks-Hofmeister, Mareike E.; Singh, Ratna; Leufken, Christine M.; Inlow, Jennifer K.; Moerschbacher, Bruno M.

    2014-01-01

    Polyphenol oxidases (PPOs) are ubiquitous type-3 copper enzymes that catalyze the oxygen-dependent conversion of o-diphenols to the corresponding quinones. In most plants, PPOs are present as multiple isoenzymes that probably serve distinct functions, although the precise relationship between sequence, structure and function has not been addressed in detail. We therefore compared the characteristics and activities of recombinant dandelion PPOs to gain insight into the structure–function relationships within the plant PPO family. Phylogenetic analysis resolved the 11 isoenzymes of dandelion into two evolutionary groups. More detailed in silico and in vitro analyses of four representative PPOs covering both phylogenetic groups were performed. Molecular modeling and docking predicted differences in enzyme-substrate interactions, providing a structure-based explanation for grouping. One amino acid side chain positioned at the entrance to the active site (position HB2+1) potentially acts as a “selector” for substrate binding. In vitro activity measurements with the recombinant, purified enzymes also revealed group-specific differences in kinetic parameters when the selected PPOs were presented with five model substrates. The combination of our enzyme kinetic measurements and the in silico docking studies therefore indicate that the physiological functions of individual PPOs might be defined by their specific interactions with different natural substrates. PMID:24918587

  20. Structural Basis for Telomerase RNA Recognition and RNP Assembly by the Holoenzyme La Family Protein p65

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Mahavir; Wang, Zhonghua; Koo, Bon-Kyung; Patel, Anooj; Cascio, Duilio; Collins, Kathleen; Feigon, Juli

    2012-07-01

    Telomerase is a ribonucleoprotein complex essential for maintenance of telomere DNA at linear chromosome ends. The catalytic core of Tetrahymena telomerase comprises a ternary complex of telomerase RNA (TER), telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT), and the essential La family protein p65. NMR and crystal structures of p65 C-terminal domain and its complex with stem IV of TER reveal that RNA recognition is achieved by a combination of single- and double-stranded RNA binding, which induces a 105{sup o} bend in TER. The domain is a cryptic, atypical RNA recognition motif with a disordered C-terminal extension that forms an {alpha} helix in the complex necessary for hierarchical assembly of TERT with p65-TER. This work provides the first structural insight into biogenesis and assembly of TER with a telomerase-specific protein. Additionally, our studies define a structurally homologous domain (xRRM) in genuine La and LARP7 proteins and suggest a general mode of RNA binding for biogenesis of their diverse RNA targets.

  1. Streptococcus pneumoniae Endohexosaminidase D, Structural and Mechanistic Insight into Substrate-Assisted Catalysis in Family 85 Glycoside Hydrolases

    SciTech Connect

    Abbott, D.; Macauley, M; Vocadlo, D; Boraston, A

    2009-01-01

    Endo-?-d-glucosaminidases from family 85 of glycoside hydrolases (GH85 endohexosaminidases) act to cleave the glycosidic linkage between the two N-acetylglucosamine units that make up the chitobiose core of N-glycans. Endohexosaminidase D (Endo-D), produced by Streptococcus pneumoniae, is believed to contribute to the virulence of this organism by playing a role in the deglycosylation of IgG antibodies. Endohexosaminidases have received significant attention for this reason and, moreover, because they are powerful tools for chemoenzymatic synthesis of proteins having defined glycoforms. Here we describe mechanistic and structural studies of the catalytic domain (SpGH85) of Endo-D that provide compelling support for GH85 enzymes using a catalytic mechanism involving substrate-assisted catalysis. Furthermore, the structure of SpGH85 in complex with the mechanism-based competitive inhibitor NAG-thiazoline (Kd = 28 ?m) provides a coherent rationale for previous mutagenesis studies of Endo-D and other related GH85 enzymes. We also find GH85, GH56, and GH18 enzymes have a similar configuration of catalytic residues. Notably, GH85 enzymes have an asparagine in place of the aspartate residue found in these other families of glycosidases. We propose that this residue, as the imidic acid tautomer, acts analogously to the key catalytic aspartate of GH56 and GH18 enzymes. This topographically conserved arrangement of the asparagine residue and a conserved glutamic acid, coupled with previous kinetic studies, suggests these enzymes may use an unusual proton shuttle to coordinate effective general acid and base catalysis to aid cleavage of the glycosidic bond. These results collectively provide a blueprint that may be used to facilitate protein engineering of these enzymes to improve their function as biocatalysts for synthesizing glycoproteins having defined glycoforms and also may serve as a guide for generating inhibitors of GH85 enzymes.

  2. Nine new phosphorene polymorphs with non-honeycomb structures: a much extended family.

    PubMed

    Wu, Menghao; Fu, Huahua; Zhou, Ling; Yao, Kailun; Zeng, Xiao Cheng

    2015-05-13

    We predict a new class of monolayer phosphorus allotropes, namely, ?-P, ?-P, ?-P, and ?-P. Distinctly different from the monolayer ?-P (black) and previously predicted ?-P (Phys. Rev. Lett. 2014, 112, 176802), ?-P, and ?-P (Phys. Rev. Lett. 2014, 113, 046804) with buckled honeycomb lattice, the new allotropes are composed of P4 square or P5 pentagon units that favor tricoordination for P atoms. The new four polymorphs, together with five additional hybrid polymorphs, greatly enrich the phosphorene structures, and their stabilities are confirmed by first-principles calculations. In particular, the ?-P is shown to be equally stable as the ?-P (black) and more stable than all previously reported phosphorene polymorphs. Prediction of nonvolatile ferroelastic switching and structural transformation among different polymorphs under strains points out their potential applications via strain engineering. PMID:25844524

  3. Families with Special Health Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock. Home Economics Curriculum Center.

    This document contains teacher's materials for a five-unit secondary education vocational home economics course on families with special health needs. The units cover: (1) family health needs (including the impact of special needs on financial well-being, the impact on the psychological health of the family, and the relationship of society to…

  4. Flavin Amine Oxidases from the Monoamine Oxidase Structural Family Utilize a Hydride Transfer Mechanism 

    E-print Network

    Henderson Pozzi, Michelle

    2011-08-08

    supported by Edmondson (44). The evidence for this mechanism comes from quantitative structure-activity relationship studies of MAO A with a series of para-substituted benzylamine analogues in which Miller and Edmondson report a positive correlation... are not consistent with previous observations with substituted benzylamines as substrates for MAO B, where correlation between the rate constant for flavin reduction and the Taft steric parameter indicates that sterics are more important for flavin reduction (46...

  5. Structural-Functional Analysis Reveals a Specific Domain Organization in Family GH20 Hexosaminidases

    PubMed Central

    Val-Cid, Cristina; Biarnés, Xevi; Faijes, Magda; Planas, Antoni

    2015-01-01

    Hexosaminidases are involved in important biological processes catalyzing the hydrolysis of N-acetyl-hexosaminyl residues in glycosaminoglycans and glycoconjugates. The GH20 enzymes present diverse domain organizations for which we propose two minimal model architectures: Model A containing at least a non-catalytic GH20b domain and the catalytic one (GH20) always accompanied with an extra ?-helix (GH20b-GH20-?), and Model B with only the catalytic GH20 domain. The large Bifidobacterium bifidum lacto-N-biosidase was used as a model protein to evaluate the minimal functional unit due to its interest and structural complexity. By expressing different truncated forms of this enzyme, we show that Model A architectures cannot be reduced to Model B. In particular, there are two structural requirements general to GH20 enzymes with Model A architecture. First, the non-catalytic domain GH20b at the N-terminus of the catalytic GH20 domain is required for expression and seems to stabilize it. Second, the substrate-binding cavity at the GH20 domain always involves a remote element provided by a long loop from the catalytic domain itself or, when this loop is short, by an element from another domain of the multidomain structure or from the dimeric partner. Particularly, the lacto-N-biosidase requires GH20b and the lectin-like domain at the N- and C-termini of the catalytic GH20 domain to be fully soluble and functional. The lectin domain provides this remote element to the active site. We demonstrate restoration of activity of the inactive GH20b-GH20-? construct (model A architecture) by a complementation assay with the lectin-like domain. The engineering of minimal functional units of multidomain GH20 enzymes must consider these structural requirements. PMID:26024355

  6. “We’ll Figure a Way”: Teenage Mothers’ Experiences in Shifting Social and Economic Contexts

    PubMed Central

    Mollborn, Stefanie; Jacobs, Janet

    2012-01-01

    The current economic and social context calls for a renewed assessment of the consequences of an early transition to parenthood. In interviews with 55 teenage mothers in Colorado, we find that they are experiencing severe economic and social strains. Financially, although most are receiving substantial help from family members and sometimes their children’s fathers, basic needs often remain unmet. Macroeconomic and family structure trends have resulted in deprived material circumstances, while welfare reform and other changes have reduced the availability of aid. Socially, families’ and communities’ disapproval of early childbearing negatively influences the support young mothers receive, their social interactions, and their experiences with social institutions. PMID:22368313

  7. Functional and structural brain correlates of risk for major depression in children with familial depression.

    PubMed

    Chai, Xiaoqian J; Hirshfeld-Becker, Dina; Biederman, Joseph; Uchida, Mai; Doehrmann, Oliver; Leonard, Julia A; Salvatore, John; Kenworthy, Tara; Brown, Ariel; Kagan, Elana; de Los Angeles, Carlo; Whitfield-Gabrieli, Susan; Gabrieli, John D E

    2015-01-01

    Despite growing evidence for atypical amygdala function and structure in major depression, it remains uncertain as to whether these brain differences reflect the clinical state of depression or neurobiological traits that predispose individuals to major depression. We examined function and structure of the amygdala and associated areas in a group of unaffected children of depressed parents (at-risk group) and a group of children of parents without a history of major depression (control group). Compared to the control group, the at-risk group showed increased activation to fearful relative to neutral facial expressions in the amygdala and multiple cortical regions, and decreased activation to happy relative to neutral facial expressions in the anterior cingulate cortex and supramarginal gyrus. At-risk children also exhibited reduced amygdala volume. The extensive hyperactivation to negative facial expressions and hypoactivation to positive facial expressions in at-risk children are consistent with behavioral evidence that risk for major depression involves a bias to attend to negative information. These functional and structural brain differences between at-risk children and controls suggest that there are trait neurobiological underpinnings of risk for major depression. PMID:26106565

  8. The loop structure of Actinomycete glycoside hydrolase family 5 mannanases governs substrate recognition.

    PubMed

    Kumagai, Yuya; Yamashita, Keitaro; Tagami, Takayoshi; Uraji, Misugi; Wan, Kun; Okuyama, Masayuki; Yao, Min; Kimura, Atsuo; Hatanaka, Tadashi

    2015-10-01

    Endo-?-1,4-mannanases from Streptomyces thermolilacinus (StMan) and Thermobifida fusca (TfMan) demonstrated different substrate specificities. StMan hydrolyzed galactosylmannooligosaccharide (GGM5; 6(III) ,6(IV) -?-d-galactosyl mannopentaose) to GGM3 and M2, whereas TfMan hydrolyzed GGM5 to GGM4 and M1. To determine the region involved in the substrate specificity, we constructed chimeric enzymes of StMan and TfMan and evaluated their substrate specificities. Moreover, the crystal structure of the catalytic domain of StMan (StMandC) and the complex structure of the inactive mutant StE273AdC with M6 were solved at resolutions of 1.60 and 1.50 Å, respectively. Structural comparisons of StMandC and the catalytic domain of TfMan lead to the identification of a subsite around -1 in StMandC that could accommodate a galactose branch. These findings demonstrate that the two loops (loop7 and loop8) are responsible for substrate recognition in GH5 actinomycete mannanases. In particular, Trp281 in loop7 of StMan, which is located in a narrow and deep cleft, plays an important role in its affinity toward linear substrates. Asp310 in loop8 of StMan specifically bound to the galactosyl unit in the -1 subsite. PMID:26257335

  9. Functional and structural brain correlates of risk for major depression in children with familial depression

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Xiaoqian J.; Hirshfeld-Becker, Dina; Biederman, Joseph; Uchida, Mai; Doehrmann, Oliver; Leonard, Julia A.; Salvatore, John; Kenworthy, Tara; Brown, Ariel; Kagan, Elana; de los Angeles, Carlo; Whitfield-Gabrieli, Susan; Gabrieli, John D.E.

    2015-01-01

    Despite growing evidence for atypical amygdala function and structure in major depression, it remains uncertain as to whether these brain differences reflect the clinical state of depression or neurobiological traits that predispose individuals to major depression. We examined function and structure of the amygdala and associated areas in a group of unaffected children of depressed parents (at-risk group) and a group of children of parents without a history of major depression (control group). Compared to the control group, the at-risk group showed increased activation to fearful relative to neutral facial expressions in the amygdala and multiple cortical regions, and decreased activation to happy relative to neutral facial expressions in the anterior cingulate cortex and supramarginal gyrus. At-risk children also exhibited reduced amygdala volume. The extensive hyperactivation to negative facial expressions and hypoactivation to positive facial expressions in at-risk children are consistent with behavioral evidence that risk for major depression involves a bias to attend to negative information. These functional and structural brain differences between at-risk children and controls suggest that there are trait neurobiological underpinnings of risk for major depression. PMID:26106565

  10. The Structure of YnaI Implies Structural and Mechanistic Conservation in the MscS Family of Mechanosensitive Channels

    PubMed Central

    Böttcher, Bettina; Prazak, Vojtech; Rasmussen, Akiko; Black, Susan S.; Rasmussen, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Summary Mechanosensitive channels protect bacteria against lysis caused by a sudden drop in osmolarity in their surroundings. Besides the channel of large conductance (MscL) and small conductance (MscS), Escherichia coli has five additional paralogs of MscS that are functional and widespread in the bacterial kingdom. Here, we present the structure of YnaI by cryo-electron microscopy to a resolution of 13 Å. While the cytosolic vestibule is structurally similar to that in MscS, additional density is seen in the transmembrane (TM) region consistent with the presence of two additional TM helices predicted for YnaI. The location of this density suggests that the extra TM helices are tilted, which could induce local membrane curvature extending the tension-sensing paddles seen in MscS. Off-center lipid-accessible cavities are seen that resemble gaps between the sensor paddles in MscS. The conservation of the tapered shape and the cavities in YnaI suggest a mechanism similar to that of MscS. PMID:26256535

  11. The Structure of YnaI Implies Structural and Mechanistic Conservation in the MscS Family of Mechanosensitive Channels.

    PubMed

    Böttcher, Bettina; Prazak, Vojtech; Rasmussen, Akiko; Black, Susan S; Rasmussen, Tim

    2015-09-01

    Mechanosensitive channels protect bacteria against lysis caused by a sudden drop in osmolarity in their surroundings. Besides the channel of large conductance (MscL) and small conductance (MscS), Escherichia coli has five additional paralogs of MscS that are functional and widespread in the bacterial kingdom. Here, we present the structure of YnaI by cryo-electron microscopy to a resolution of 13 Å. While the cytosolic vestibule is structurally similar to that in MscS, additional density is seen in the transmembrane (TM) region consistent with the presence of two additional TM helices predicted for YnaI. The location of this density suggests that the extra TM helices are tilted, which could induce local membrane curvature extending the tension-sensing paddles seen in MscS. Off-center lipid-accessible cavities are seen that resemble gaps between the sensor paddles in MscS. The conservation of the tapered shape and the cavities in YnaI suggest a mechanism similar to that of MscS. PMID:26256535

  12. Socio-Demographic Determinants of Economic Growth: Age-Structure, Preindustrial Heritage and Sociolinguistic Integration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crenshaw, Edward; Robison, Kristopher

    2010-01-01

    This study establishes a socio-demographic theory of international development derived from selected classical and contemporary sociological theories. Four hypotheses are tested: (1. population growth's effect on development depends on age-structure; (2. historic population density (used here as an indicator of preindustrial social complexity)…

  13. Structural and Financial Characteristics of U.S. Sugar Beet Farms. Agricultural Economic Report Number 584.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clauson, Annette L.; Hoff, Frederic L.

    This report analyzes production and financial characteristics of sugar beet producers in seven regions. Section 1 examines the structural characteristics of U.S. sugar beet producers. Sugar beet production; land use, tenure, irrigation, and livestock enterprises are considered. Section 2 discusses production costs, including cost estimates,…

  14. A not-so-grim tale: how childhood family structure influences reproductive and risk-taking outcomes in a historical U.S. Population.

    PubMed

    Sheppard, Paula; Garcia, Justin R; Sear, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    Childhood family structure has been shown to play an important role in shaping a child's life course development, especially in industrialised societies. One hypothesis which could explain such findings is that parental investment is likely to be diluted in families without both natural parents. Most empirical studies have examined the influence of only one type of family disruption or composition (e.g. father absence) making it difficult to simultaneously compare the effects of different kinds of family structure on children's future outcomes. Here we use a large, rich data source (n=16,207) collected by Alfred Kinsey and colleagues in the United States from 1938 to 1963, to examine the effects of particular childhood family compositions and compare between them. The dataset further allows us to look at the effects of family structure on an array of traits relating to sexual maturity, reproduction, and risk-taking. Our results show that, for both sexes, living with a single mother or mother and stepfather during childhood was often associated with faster progression to life history events and greater propensity for risk-taking behaviours. However, living with a single father or father and stepmother was typically not significantly different to having both natural parents for these outcomes. Our results withstand adjustment for socioeconomic status, age, ethnicity, age at puberty (where applicable), and sibling configuration. While these results support the hypothesis that early family environment influences subsequent reproductive strategy, the different responses to the presence or absence of different parental figures in the household rearing environment suggests that particular family constructions exert independent influences on childhood outcomes. Our results suggest that father-absent households (i.e. single mothers or mothers and stepfathers) are most highly associated with subsequent fast life history progressions, compared with mother-absent households, and those with two natural parents. PMID:24599234

  15. A Not-So-Grim Tale: How Childhood Family Structure Influences Reproductive and Risk-Taking Outcomes in a Historical U.S. Population

    PubMed Central

    Sheppard, Paula; Garcia, Justin R.; Sear, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    Childhood family structure has been shown to play an important role in shaping a child's life course development, especially in industrialised societies. One hypothesis which could explain such findings is that parental investment is likely to be diluted in families without both natural parents. Most empirical studies have examined the influence of only one type of family disruption or composition (e.g. father absence) making it difficult to simultaneously compare the effects of different kinds of family structure on children's future outcomes. Here we use a large, rich data source (n?=?16,207) collected by Alfred Kinsey and colleagues in the United States from 1938 to 1963, to examine the effects of particular childhood family compositions and compare between them. The dataset further allows us to look at the effects of family structure on an array of traits relating to sexual maturity, reproduction, and risk-taking. Our results show that, for both sexes, living with a single mother or mother and stepfather during childhood was often associated with faster progression to life history events and greater propensity for risk-taking behaviours. However, living with a single father or father and stepmother was typically not significantly different to having both natural parents for these outcomes. Our results withstand adjustment for socioeconomic status, age, ethnicity, age at puberty (where applicable), and sibling configuration. While these results support the hypothesis that early family environment influences subsequent reproductive strategy, the different responses to the presence or absence of different parental figures in the household rearing environment suggests that particular family constructions exert independent influences on childhood outcomes. Our results suggest that father-absent households (i.e. single mothers or mothers and stepfathers) are most highly associated with subsequent fast life history progressions, compared with mother-absent households, and those with two natural parents. PMID:24599234

  16. How Do Family Caregivers of Older People Give Up Caregiving?

    PubMed Central

    Mortazavi, Hamed; Peyrovi, Hamid; Joolaee, Soodabeh

    2015-01-01

    Background Population aging has social, economic and political consequences. Most family caregivers prefer to care for their family member older person with chronic disease at home. Despite traditional culture within Iranian families, in some cases, hospitalization of the elderly in nursing home is inevitable, and this affects the old person and his/her family. The aim of this study was to explain how Iranian family cargivers give up caring their older person with chronic condition at home. Methods A grounded theory approach was used to conduct the study. The study setting included four nursing homes under the auspices of Iran Welfare Organization. Fourteen participants were recruited through purposive sampling. Data were collected from December 2010 to March 2011 by Semi-structured interviews lasting about 17 to 95 minutes (average 52 minutes). Constant comparative analysis was used to analyze the data. Results Three main categories appeared at the end of the analysis: “going out of the road of usual life”, “challenge of meeting older person, family and caregivers care needs”, and “the appearance of inconstancy in the family”. They explained exclusively how family caregivers of old people give up caregiving. Conclusion Health care providers are recommended to become familiar with challenges of family caregivers in taking care of older person with chronic disease at home, and then organize their supportive and consulting actions according to family situations in order to improve the life quality of older person and family caregivers. PMID:26171407

  17. Transcriptome analyses reveal protein and domain families that delineate stage-related development in the economically important parasitic nematodes, Ostertagia ostertagi and Cooperia oncophora

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cooperia oncophora and Ostertagia ostertagi are among the most important gastrointestinal nematodes of cattle worldwide. The economic losses caused by these parasites are on the order of hundreds of millions of dollars per year. Conventional treatment of these parasites is through anthelmintic drug...

  18. Structures of the contryphan family of cyclic peptides. Role of electrostatic interactions in cis-trans isomerism.

    PubMed

    Pallaghy, P K; He, W; Jimenez, E C; Olivera, B M; Norton, R S

    2000-10-24

    The contryphan family of cyclic peptides, isolated recently from various species of cone shell, has the conserved sequence motif NH(3)(+)-X(1)COD-WX(5)PWC-NH(2), where X(1) is either Gly or absent, O is 4-trans-hydroxyproline, and X(5) is Glu, Asp, or Gln. The solution structures described herein of two new naturally occurring contryphan sequences, contryphan-Sm and des[Gly1]-contryphan-R, are similar to those of contryphan-R, the structure of which has been determined recently [Pallaghy et al. (1999) Biochemistry 38, 11553-11559]. The (1)H NMR chemical shifts of another naturally occurring peptide, contryphan-P, indicate that it also adopts a similar structure. All of these contryphans exist in solution as a mixture of two conformers due to cis-trans isomerization about the Cys2-Hyp3 peptide bond. The lower cis-trans ratio for contryphan-Sm enabled elucidation of the 3D structure of both its major and its minor forms, for which the patterns of (3)J(H)(alpha)(HN) coupling constants are very different. As with contryphan-R, the structure of the major form of contryphan-Sm (cis Cys2-Hyp3 peptide bond) contains an N-terminal chain reversal and a C-terminal type I beta-turn. The minor conformer (trans peptide bond) forms a hairpin structure with sheetlike hydrogen bonds and a type II beta-turn, with the D-Trp4 at the 'Gly position' of the turn. The ratio of conformers arising from cis-trans isomerism around the peptide bond preceding Hyp3 is sensitive to both the amino acid sequence and the solution conditions, varying from 2.7:1 to 17:1 across the five sequences. The sequence and structural determinants of the cis-trans isomerism have been elucidated by comparison of the cis-trans ratios for these peptides with those for contryphan-R and an N-acetylated derivative thereof. The cis-trans ratio is reduced for peptides in which either the charged N-terminal ammonium or the X(5) side-chain carboxylate is neutralized, implying that an electrostatic interaction between these groups stabilizes the cis conformer relative to the trans. These results on the structures and cis-trans equilibrium of different conformers suggest a paradigm of 'locally determined but globally selected' folding for cyclic peptides and constrained protein loops, where the series of stereochemical centers in the loop dictates the favorable conformations and the equilibrium is determined by a small number of side-chain interactions. PMID:11041849

  19. The type I interferon receptor: structure, function, and evolution of a family business.

    PubMed

    Mogensen, K E; Lewerenz, M; Reboul, J; Lutfalla, G; Uzé, G

    1999-10-01

    Recent results indicate that coherent models of how multiple interferons (IFN) are recognized and signal selectively through a common receptor are now feasible. A proposal is made that the IFN receptor, with its subunits IFNAR-1 and IFNAR-2, presents two separate ligand binding sites, and this double structure is both necessary and sufficient to ensure that the different IFN are recognized and can act selectively. The key feature is the duplication of the extracellular domain of the IFNAR-1 subunit and the configurational geometry that this imposes on the intracellular domains of the receptor subunits and their associated tyrosine kinases. PMID:10547147

  20. Structural and spectroscopic investigations on deuteron glasses belonging to the potassium dihydrogen phosphate family

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhury, Rajul Ranjan; Chitra, R.; Abraham, Geogy J.

    2015-06-01

    X-ray powder diffraction and Raman measurements were performed on the mixed crystals of deuterated potassium dihydrogen phosphate (DKDP) and deuterated ammonium dihydrogen phosphate (DADP) grown at our lab. These crystals are known to behave like deuteron glasses due to frustration between ferroelectric and antiferroelectric ordering. Both spectral as well as structural studies indicate that crystals belonging to the glassy regions of the crystal composition have stronger O-D-O hydrogen bonds as compared to those belong to the ferroelectric or antiferroelectric regions of the crystal composition.