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Sample records for family syndrome kindreds

  1. Inheritance of nevus number and size in melanoma and dysplastic nevus syndrome kindreds.

    PubMed

    Goldgar, D E; Cannon-Albright, L A; Meyer, L J; Piepkorn, M W; Zone, J J; Skolnick, M H

    1991-12-01

    Previous studies of the genetics of melanoma have focused on the dysplastic nevus syndrome (DNS). The variability in clinical and histopathological expression of affected individuals, however, has made definition and diagnosis of the syndrome difficult and subjective. Independent of the DNS, case-control studies have demonstrated the total number of nevi to be a significant risk factor for melanoma. In this article, we report results of genetic analyses of two quantitative nevus phenotypes that can be measured objectively in all subjects: the total number of nevi on an individual (TNN) and total nevus density (TND), a derived phenotype which incorporates both number and size of nevi. Ten kindreds ascertained for multiple cases of DNS-melanoma (multiplex ascertainment) and 16 kindreds and 19 solitary cases ascertained from a sequential list of melanoma cases without regard for family history (simplex ascertainment) were studied. Both phenotypes exhibited increased levels in relatives of probands compared with those in spouse controls. While neither TNN nor TND exhibited evidence for a major factor in the simplex pedigrees, a major factor was strongly indicated in the multiplex kindreds for TND. When both phenotypes were examined in more detail in the multiplex kindreds, the phenotype incorporating nevus size, TND, fit a mendelian pattern of inheritance better than the TNN. Significant residual familial correlations were found for both phenotypes. Parameter estimates from the best fitting genetic model indicated that a major gene may be responsible for 55% of the phenotypic variability of TND in the multiplex kindreds. PMID:1770551

  2. Second locus for Hirschsprung disease/Waardenburg syndrome in a large Mennonite kindred

    SciTech Connect

    Dow, E.; Cross, S.; Williamson, R.; Mulligan, L.M.; Lyonnet, S.; Wolgemuth, D.J.; Mascari, M.; Ladda, R.

    1994-10-15

    We have studied a large Mennonite kindred in which 20 members were affected with Hirschburg disease (HSCR), 5 of whom had one or more manifestations of Waardenburg syndrome (WS) type II (WS2). Eleven additional relatives had signs of WS2 without HSCR. Since HSCR and WS2 each represent perturbations of neural crest migration/differentiation, this large pedigree with apparent cosegregation of HSCR and WS2 offered an opportunity to search for linkage between these loci, candidate genes, and random DNA markers, particularly in view of recent discoveries of genes for Waardenburg syndrome type I (WS1) and Hirschsprung disease (c-ret). We have examined the following possible linked markers in 69 relatives in this family: the c-ret gene (HSCR); the human PAX3 gene (HuP2) on chromosome 2q (WS1) and placental alkaline phosphatase (ALPP) on chromosome 2q (linked to WS1); argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS) on chromosome 9q, close to ABO blood groups which have shown weak linkage to WS; and the {beta}1 GABA receptor gene (GABARB1) on chromosome 4q13-11, close to c-kit, deletions of which cause piebaldism. Linkage between any of these loci and HSCR/WS in this kindred was excluded, demonstrating that there is at least one further locus for HSCR other than c-ret. 45 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  3. Clinical analysis of a large kindred with the pallister ulnar-mammary syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Bamshad, M.; Root, S.; Carey, J.C.

    1996-11-11

    The ulnar-mammary syndrome (UMS) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by posterior limb deficiencies or duplications, apocrine/mammary gland hypoplasia and/or dysfunction, abnormal dentition, delayed puberty in males, and genital anomalies. We present the clinical descriptions of 33 members of a six generation kindred with UMS. The number of affected individuals in this family is more than the sum of all previously reported cases of UMS. The clinical expression of UMS is highly variable. While most patients have limb deficiencies, the range of abnormalities extends from hypoplasia of the terminal phalanx of the 5th digit to complete absence of the ulna and 3rd, 4th, and 5th digits. Moreover, affected individuals may have posterior digital duplications with or without contralateral limb deficiencies. Apocrine gland abnormalities range from diminished axillary perspiration with normal breast development and lactation, to complete absence of the breasts and no axillary perspiration. Dental abnormalities include misplaced or absent teeth. Affected males consistently undergo delayed puberty, and both sexes have diminished to absent axillary hair. Imperforate hymen were seen in some affected women. A gene for UMS was mapped to chromosome area 12q23-q24.1. A mutation in the gene causing UMS can interfere with limb patterning in the proximal/distal, anterior/posterior, and dorsal/ventral axes. This mutation disturbs development of the posterior elements of forearm, wrist, and hand while growth and development of the anterior elements remain normal. 24 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Linkage and mutational analysis of familial Alzheimer disease kindreds for the APP gene region

    SciTech Connect

    Kamino, K.; Anderson, L.; O'dahl, S.; Nemens, E.; Bird, T.D.; Schellenberg, G.D.; Wijsman, E.M.; Kukall, W.; Larson, E. ); Heston, L.L.

    1992-11-01

    A large number of familial Alzheimer disease (FAD) kindreds were examined to determine whether mutations in the amyloid precursor protein (APP) gene could be responsible for the disease. Previous studies have identified three mutations at APP codon 717 which are pathogenic for Alzheimer disease (AD). Samples from affected subjects were examined for mutations in exons 16 and 17 of the APP gene. A combination of direct sequencing and single-strand conformational polymorphism analysis was used. Sporadic AD and normal controls were also examined by the same methods. Five sequence variants were identified. One variant at APP codon 693 resulted in a Glu[yields]Gly change. This is the same codon as the hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis-Dutch type Glu[yields]Gln mutation. Another single-base change at APP codon 708 did not alter the amino acid encoded at this site. Two point mutations and a 6-bp deletion were identified in the intronic sequences surrounding exon 17. None of the variants could be unambigously determined to be responsible for FAD. The larger families were also analyzed by testing for linkage of FAD to a highly polymorphic short tandem repeat marker (D21S210) that is tightly linked to APP. Highly negative LOD scores were obtained for the family groups tested, and linkage was formally excluded beyond [theta] = .10 for the Volga German kindreds, [theta] = .20 for early-onset non-Volga Germans, and [theta] = .10 for late-onset families. LOD scores for linkage of FAD to markers centromeric to APP (D21S1/S11, D21S13, and D21S215) were also negative in the three family groups. These studies show that APP mutations account for AD in only a small fraction of FAD kindreds. 49 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  5. Cystic fibrosis in a large kindred family in Qatar.

    PubMed

    Abdul Wahab, A; Dawod, S T; al Thani, G

    2000-09-01

    We describe 45 patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), diagnosed between June 1987 and May 1999, seen at the Hamad Medical Corporation, Qatar in the Arabian Gulf. Twenty-six of 32 families in the study were related and belonged to the same Bedouin tribe. The parents of 98% of these cases were consanguineous. Metabolic alkalosis and/or hypo-electrolytaemia were found in a large proportion of infants with CF. Cystic fibrosis in Qatari children is phenotypically variable with mild to moderate respiratory symptoms, and none of them died during this study. Among the non-Arabic-Asian patients, pulmonary symptoms were more severe, Pseudomonas colonization was earlier, pancreatic insufficiency occurred in infancy and four died in early life. PMID:11064773

  6. Combined Genetic and Genealogic Studies Uncover a Large BAP1 Cancer Syndrome Kindred Tracing Back Nine Generations to a Common Ancestor from the 1700s

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Todd A.; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Behner, Dusty; Hoffman, Harriet; Hesdorffer, Mary; Nasu, Masaki; Napolitano, Andrea; Powers, Amy; Minaai, Michael; Baumann, Francine; Bryant-Greenwood, Peter; Lauk, Olivia; Kirschner, Michaela B.; Weder, Walter; Opitz, Isabelle; Pass, Harvey I.; Gaudino, Giovanni; Pastorino, Sandra; Yang, Haining

    2015-01-01

    We recently discovered an inherited cancer syndrome caused by BRCA1-Associated Protein 1 (BAP1) germline mutations, with high incidence of mesothelioma, uveal melanoma and other cancers and very high penetrance by age 55. To identify families with the BAP1 cancer syndrome, we screened patients with family histories of multiple mesotheliomas and melanomas and/or multiple cancers. We identified four families that shared an identical BAP1 mutation: they lived across the US and did not appear to be related. By combining family histories, molecular genetics, and genealogical approaches, we uncovered a BAP1 cancer syndrome kindred of ~80,000 descendants with a core of 106 individuals, whose members descend from a couple born in Germany in the early 1700s who immigrated to North America. Their descendants spread throughout the country with mutation carriers affected by multiple malignancies. Our data show that, once a proband is identified, extended analyses of these kindreds, using genomic and genealogical studies to identify the most recent common ancestor, allow investigators to uncover additional branches of the family that may carry BAP1 mutations. Using this knowledge, we have identified new branches of this family carrying BAP1 mutations. We have also implemented early-detection strategies that help identify cancers at early-stage, when they can be cured (melanomas) or are more susceptible to therapy (MM and other malignancies). PMID:26683624

  7. Combined Genetic and Genealogic Studies Uncover a Large BAP1 Cancer Syndrome Kindred Tracing Back Nine Generations to a Common Ancestor from the 1700s.

    PubMed

    Carbone, Michele; Flores, Erin G; Emi, Mitsuru; Johnson, Todd A; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Behner, Dusty; Hoffman, Harriet; Hesdorffer, Mary; Nasu, Masaki; Napolitano, Andrea; Powers, Amy; Minaai, Michael; Baumann, Francine; Bryant-Greenwood, Peter; Lauk, Olivia; Kirschner, Michaela B; Weder, Walter; Opitz, Isabelle; Pass, Harvey I; Gaudino, Giovanni; Pastorino, Sandra; Yang, Haining

    2015-12-01

    We recently discovered an inherited cancer syndrome caused by BRCA1-Associated Protein 1 (BAP1) germline mutations, with high incidence of mesothelioma, uveal melanoma and other cancers and very high penetrance by age 55. To identify families with the BAP1 cancer syndrome, we screened patients with family histories of multiple mesotheliomas and melanomas and/or multiple cancers. We identified four families that shared an identical BAP1 mutation: they lived across the US and did not appear to be related. By combining family histories, molecular genetics, and genealogical approaches, we uncovered a BAP1 cancer syndrome kindred of ~80,000 descendants with a core of 106 individuals, whose members descend from a couple born in Germany in the early 1700s who immigrated to North America. Their descendants spread throughout the country with mutation carriers affected by multiple malignancies. Our data show that, once a proband is identified, extended analyses of these kindreds, using genomic and genealogical studies to identify the most recent common ancestor, allow investigators to uncover additional branches of the family that may carry BAP1 mutations. Using this knowledge, we have identified new branches of this family carrying BAP1 mutations. We have also implemented early-detection strategies that help identify cancers at early-stage, when they can be cured (melanomas) or are more susceptible to therapy (MM and other malignancies). PMID:26683624

  8. Neuropathology of two members of a German-American kindred (Family C) with late onset parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Wszolek, Z K; Gwinn-Hardy, K; Wszolek, E K; Muenter, M D; Pfeiffer, R F; Rodnitzky, R L; Uitti, R J; McComb, R D; Gasser, T; Dickson, D W

    2002-04-01

    We present genealogical and longitudinal clinical observations and autopsy findings of a previously reported kindred, Family C (German-American), with late-onset autosomal dominant parkinsonism with evidence for linkage on chromosome 2p13. The clinical phenotype includes the cardinal features of idiopathic Parkinson's disease. In addition, postural tremor and dementia are detected in some individuals. Two members of the kindred, one affected and one unaffected have recently come to autopsy. The unaffected family member was an 82-year-old woman whose brain showed only mild age-related pathology and no evidence of subclinical Lewy body disease. In contrast, the affected family member was an 83-year-old man whose brain had neuronal loss, gliosis and Lewy bodies in the substantia nigra and other monoaminergic brain stem nuclei, as well as the basal forebrain and amygdala. Lewy bodies and Lewy neurites had a distribution typical of cases of idiopathic Parkinson's disease. Thus, the clinical and pathological findings in this family with autosomal dominant parkinsonism are similar to those of sporadic Parkinson's disease. PMID:11904753

  9. Familial idiopathic gonadotropin deficiency not linked to gene for gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) in Brazilian kindred

    SciTech Connect

    Faraco, J.; Francke, U.; Toledo, S.

    1994-09-01

    Familial idiopathic gonadotropin deficiency (FIGD) is an autosomal recessive disorder which results in failure to develop secondary sexual characteristics. The origin is a hypothalamic defect resulting in insufficient secretion of gonadotropin-releasing hormone GnRH (also called LHRH, luteinizing hormone releasing hormone) and follicle-stimuating hormone (FSH). FIGD has been determined to be a separate entity from Kallmann syndrome which presents with hypogonadism as well as anosmia. The FIGD phenotype appears to be analogous to the phenotype of the hpg (hypogonadal) mouse. Because the hpg phenotype is the result of a structurally abnormal GnRH gene, we have studied the GnRH gene in individuals from a previously reported Brazilian FIGD family. An informative dimorphic marker in the signal peptide sequence of the GnRH gene allowed assessment of linkage between the disease gene and the GnRH locus in this pedigree. We have concluded that the GnRH locus is not linked to the disease-causing mutation in these hypogonadal individuals. Recent evidence suggests that neuropeptide Y (NPY) may play a role in the initiation of puberty. We hypothesize that mutations in NPY may result in failure to secrete GnRH. We have characterized three diallelic frequent-cutter restriction fragment length polymorphisms within the human NPY locus, and are currently using these markers to determine if the NPY gene is linked to, and possibly the site of the disease mutation in this kindred.

  10. Exome Sequencing and Gene Prioritization Correct Misdiagnosis in a Chinese Kindred with Familial Amyloid Polyneuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hui; Zhou, Xueya; Wang, Jing; Wang, Xi; Liu, Liyang; Wu, Shinan; Li, Tengyan; Chen, Si; Yang, Jingwen; Sham, Pak Chung; Zhu, Guangming; Zhang, Xuegong; Wang, Binbin

    2016-01-01

    Inherited neuropathies show considerable heterogeneity in clinical manifestations and genetic etiologies, and are therefore often difficult to diagnose. Whole-exome sequencing (WES) has been widely adopted to make definite diagnosis of unclear conditions, with proven efficacy in optimizing patients’ management. In this study, a large Chinese kindred segregating autosomal dominant polyneuropathy with incomplete penetrance was ascertained through a patient who was initially diagnosed as Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. To investigate the genetic cause, forty-six living family members were genotyped by SNP microarrays, and one confirmed patient was subject to WES. Through systematic computational prioritization, we identified a missense mutation c.G148T in TTR gene which results in a p.V50L substitution known to cause transthyretin-related familial amyloid polyneuropathy. Co-segregation analysis and clinical follow-up confirmed the new diagnosis, which suggested new therapeutic options to the patients and informed high risk family members. This study confirms WES as a powerful tool in translational medicine, and further demostrates the practical utility of gene prioritization in narrowing the scope of causative mutation. PMID:27212199

  11. Exome Sequencing and Gene Prioritization Correct Misdiagnosis in a Chinese Kindred with Familial Amyloid Polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hui; Zhou, Xueya; Wang, Jing; Wang, Xi; Liu, Liyang; Wu, Shinan; Li, Tengyan; Chen, Si; Yang, Jingwen; Sham, Pak Chung; Zhu, Guangming; Zhang, Xuegong; Wang, Binbin

    2016-01-01

    Inherited neuropathies show considerable heterogeneity in clinical manifestations and genetic etiologies, and are therefore often difficult to diagnose. Whole-exome sequencing (WES) has been widely adopted to make definite diagnosis of unclear conditions, with proven efficacy in optimizing patients' management. In this study, a large Chinese kindred segregating autosomal dominant polyneuropathy with incomplete penetrance was ascertained through a patient who was initially diagnosed as Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. To investigate the genetic cause, forty-six living family members were genotyped by SNP microarrays, and one confirmed patient was subject to WES. Through systematic computational prioritization, we identified a missense mutation c.G148T in TTR gene which results in a p.V50L substitution known to cause transthyretin-related familial amyloid polyneuropathy. Co-segregation analysis and clinical follow-up confirmed the new diagnosis, which suggested new therapeutic options to the patients and informed high risk family members. This study confirms WES as a powerful tool in translational medicine, and further demostrates the practical utility of gene prioritization in narrowing the scope of causative mutation. PMID:27212199

  12. Nephritogenic antigen determinants in epidermal and renal basement membranes of kindreds with Alport-type familial nephritis.

    PubMed Central

    Kashtan, C; Fish, A J; Kleppel, M; Yoshioka, K; Michael, A F

    1986-01-01

    We probed epidermal basement membranes (EBM) of acid-urea denatured skin from members of kindreds with Alport-type familial nephritis (FN) for the presence of antigens reactive with Goodpasture sera (GPS) and serum (FNS) from an Alport patient who developed anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM) nephritis in a renal allograft. By immunoblotting, GPS reacted primarily with the 28,000 molecular weight (mol wt) monomer but also the 24,000 mol wt and 26,000 mol wt monomers of the noncollagenous globular domain (NC1) of type IV collagen from normal human GBM, while FNS identified only the 26,000-mol wt monomer. FNS reacted with EBM of 12 controls and nine unaffected male kindred members but not EBM of eight affected males. Five affected females exhibited interrupted reactivity of FNS with EBM. GPS showed variable reactivity with EBM and was not discriminating with respect to Alport-type FN. FNS did not stain renal basement members of five affected males. However, the EBM, tubular basement membrane, and Bowman's capsules of affected males contained antigens reactive with GPS. These immunochemical studies suggest that the FNS antigen is distinct from Goodpasture antigen(s). The expression of FNS antigen located on the NC1 domain of type IV collagen is altered in basement membranes of patients with Alport-type FN, and the distribution of this antigenic anomaly within kindreds suggests X-linked dominant transmission of a defective gene. Images PMID:2428839

  13. Manifestations of juvenile polyposis syndrome in SMAD4 mutation carriers of a kindred.

    PubMed

    Schwetz, Verena; Uhrig, Sabine; Spuller, Ekkehard; Deutschmann, Andrea; Högenauer, Christoph

    2012-08-01

    The autosomal dominantly inherited juvenile polyposis syndrome (JPS) leads to the development of multiple hamartomatous polyps in the gastrointestinal tract and is a precancerous condition. In a large family with a newly identified SMAD4 mutation (c.543delC), we describe the clinical manifestations of JPS. Nine affected SMAD4 mutation-positive family members were screened and treated for manifestations of JPS. Two family members were symptomatic at the time of diagnosis; seven were asymptomatic - independent of the severity of the manifestation. Each mutation carrier presented with colonic juvenile polyps, seven out of nine with additional gastric manifestations. One asymptomatic patient had early gastric cancer; another patient had a villous adenoma with high-grade intraepithelial neoplasia in the colon. Three patients had biliary lesions including a bile duct hamartoma in one and gallbladder polyps in two. Three patients had gastrointestinal vascular malformations. All mutation carriers were affected by JPS. Interestingly, the manifestations and their severity differed considerably between the patients, suggesting secondary factors influencing JPS manifestations such as Helicobacter pylori infection. PMID:22617360

  14. Identification of 13 new mutations in the vasopressin-neurophysin II gene in 17 kindreds with familial autosomal dominant neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus

    SciTech Connect

    Rittig, S.; Siggaard, C.; Pedersen, E.B.

    1996-01-01

    Familial neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus (FNDI) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by progressive postnatal deficiency of arginine vasopressin as a result of mutation in the gene that encodes the hormone. To determine the extent of mutations in the coding region that produce the phenotype, we studied members of 17 unrelated kindreds with the disorder. We sequenced all 3 exons of the gene by using a rapid, direct dye-terminator method and found the causative mutation in each kindred. In four kindreds, the mutations were each identical to mutations described in other affected families. In the other 13 kindreds each mutation was unique. There were two missense mutations that altered the cleavage region of the signal peptide, seven missense mutations in exon 2, which codes for the conserved portion of the protein, one nonsense mutation in exon 2, and three nonsense mutations in exon 3. These findings, together with the clinical features of FNDI, suggest that each of the mutations exerts an effect by directing the production of a pre-prohormone that cannot be folded, processed, or degraded properly and eventually destroys vasopressinergic neurons. 63 refs., 5 figs., 6 tabs.

  15. Identification of 13 new mutations in the vasopressin-neurophysin II gene in 17 kindreds with familial autosomal dominant neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus.

    PubMed Central

    Rittig, S.; Robertson, G. L.; Siggaard, C.; Kovács, L.; Gregersen, N.; Nyborg, J.; Pedersen, E. B.

    1996-01-01

    Familial neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus (FNDI) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by progressive postnatal deficiency of arginine vasopressin as a result of mutation in the gene that encodes the hormone. To determine the extent of mutations in the coding region that produce the phenotype, we studied members of 17 unrelated kindreds with the disorder. We sequenced all 3 exons of the gene by using a rapid, direct dye-terminator method and found the causative mutation in each kindred. In four kindreds, the mutations were each identical to mutations described in other affected families. In the other 13 kindreds each mutation was unique. There were two missense mutations that altered the cleavage region of the signal peptide, seven missense mutations in exon 2, which codes for the conserved portion of the protein, one nonsense mutation in exon 2, and three nonsense mutations in exon 3. These findings, together with the clinical features of FNDI, suggest that each of the mutations exerts an effect by directing the production of a pre-prohormone that cannot be folded, processed, or degraded properly and eventually destroys vasopressinergic neurons. Images Figure 3 PMID:8554046

  16. Apolipoprotein C-II and C-III metabolism in a kindred of familial hypobetalipoproteinemia

    SciTech Connect

    Malmendier, C.L.; Delcroix, C.; Lontie, J.F.; Dubois, D.Y. )

    1991-01-01

    Three affected members of a kindred with asymptomatic hypobetalipoproteinemia (HBL) showed low levels of triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol, and apolipoproteins (apo) B, C-II, and C-III. Turnover of iodine-labeled apo C-II and apo C-III associated in vitro to plasma lipoproteins was studied after intravenous injection. Radioactivity in plasma and lipoproteins (95% recovered in high-density lipoprotein (HDL) density range) and in 24-hour urine samples was observed for 16 days. A parallelism of the slowest slopes of plasma decay curves was observed between apo C-II and apo C-III, indicating a partial common catabolic route. Urine/plasma radioactivity ratio (U/P) varied with time, suggesting heterogeneity of metabolic pathways. A new compartmental model using the SAAM program was built, not only fitting simultaneously plasma and urine data, but also taking into account the partial common metabolism of lipoprotein particles (LP) containing apo C-II and apo C-III. The low apo C-II and C-III plasma concentrations observed in HBL compared with normal resulted from both an increased catabolism and a reduced synthesis, these changes being more marked for apo C-III. The modifications in the rate constants of the different pathways calculated from the new model are in favor of an increased direct removal of particles following the fast pathway, likely in the very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) density range.

  17. POLE and POLD1 mutations in 529 kindred with familial colorectal cancer and/or polyposis: review of reported cases and recommendations for genetic testing and surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Bellido, Fernando; Pineda, Marta; Aiza, Gemma; Valdés-Mas, Rafael; Navarro, Matilde; Puente, Diana A.; Pons, Tirso; González, Sara; Iglesias, Silvia; Darder, Esther; Piñol, Virginia; Soto, José Luís; Valencia, Alfonso; Blanco, Ignacio; Urioste, Miguel; Brunet, Joan; Lázaro, Conxi; Capellá, Gabriel; Puente, Xose S.; Valle, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Germ-line mutations in the exonuclease domains of POLE and POLD1 have been recently associated with polyposis and colorectal cancer (CRC) predisposition. Here, we aimed to gain a better understanding of the phenotypic characteristics of this syndrome to establish specific criteria for POLE and POLD1 mutation screening and to help define the clinical management of mutation carriers. Genet Med 18 4, 325–332. Methods: The exonuclease domains of POLE and POLD1 were studied in 529 kindred, 441 with familial nonpolyposis CRC and 88 with polyposis, by using pooled DNA amplification and massively parallel sequencing. Genet Med 18 4, 325–332. Results: Seven novel or rare genetic variants were identified. In addition to the POLE p.L424V recurrent mutation in a patient with polyposis, CRC and oligodendroglioma, six novel or rare POLD1 variants (four of them, p.D316H, p.D316G, p.R409W, and p.L474P, with strong evidence for pathogenicity) were identified in nonpolyposis CRC families. Phenotypic data from these and previously reported POLE/POLD1 carriers point to an associated phenotype characterized by attenuated or oligo-adenomatous colorectal polyposis, CRC, and probably brain tumors. In addition, POLD1 mutations predispose to endometrial and breast tumors. Genet Med 18 4, 325–332. Conclusion: Our results widen the phenotypic spectrum of the POLE/POLD1-associated syndrome and identify novel pathogenic variants. We propose guidelines for genetic testing and surveillance recommendations. Genet Med 18 4, 325–332. PMID:26133394

  18. A deleterious RNF43 germline mutation in a severely affected serrated polyposis kindred

    PubMed Central

    Taupin, Douglas; Lam, Wesley; Rangiah, David; McCallum, Larissa; Whittle, Belinda; Zhang, Yafei; Andrews, Daniel; Field, Matthew; Goodnow, Christopher C; Cook, Matthew C

    2015-01-01

    We report a germline nonsense mutation within the extracellular domain of the RING finger ubiquitin ligase RNF43, segregating with a severe form of serrated polyposis within a kindred. The finding provides evidence that inherited RNF43 mutations define a familial cancer syndrome. PMID:27081527

  19. Familial unilateral Brown syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kenawy, Nihal; Pilz, Daniela T

    2008-01-01

    We present a two-generation family with Brown syndrome. The proband was a six and a half-year-old female who presented with a history of failure of dextro-elevation of her left eye. A full ophthalmic evaluation was consistent with a left Brown syndrome. Family history revealed that her mother was operated on as a child for left Brown syndrome and examination of her four and a half-year-old sibling showed similar affection in the left eye. Autosomal dominant inheritance has been postulated in this condition. To our knowledge this is the first report of three members of a two-generation family with left-sided Brown syndrome. Genetic counseling of Brown syndrome cases is advised; nevertheless, identification of the responsible gene should shed more light on its genetics. PMID:18711279

  20. Genetic mapping of the gene for Usher syndrome: Linkage analysis in a large Samaritan kindred

    SciTech Connect

    Bonne-Tamir, B.; Korostishevsky, M.; Kalinsky, H.; Seroussi, E.; Beker, R.; Weiss, S. ); Godel, V. )

    1994-03-01

    Usher syndrome is a group of autosomal recessive disorders associated with congenital sensorineural deafness and progressive visual loss due to retinitis pigmentosa. Sixteen members of the small inbred Samaritan isolate with autosomal recessive deafness from 59 individuals including parents and affected and nonaffected sibs were typed for markers on chromosomes 1q and 11q for which linkage has recently been established for Usher syndrome types II and I. Statistically significant linkage was observed with four markers on 11q (D11S533, D11S527, OMP, and INT2) with a maximum six-point location score of 11.61 at the D11S533 locus. Analysis of haplotypes supports the notion that the mutation arose only once in an ancestral chromosome carrying a specific haplotype. The availability of markers closely linked to the disease locus allows indirect genotype analysis and identifies all carriers of the gene within the community. Furthermore, the detection of complete linkage disequilibrium between the D11S533 marker and the Usher gene suggests that these loci are either identical or adjacent and narrows the critical region to which physical mapping efforts are currently directed. 35 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs.

  1. A{sup -2} {yields} G transition at the 3{prime} acceptor splice site of IVS17 characterizes the COL2A1 gene mutation in the original Stickler syndrome kindred

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, C.J.; Ganguly, A.; Considine, E.

    1996-06-14

    Hereditary progressive arthro-ophthalmopathy, or {open_quotes}Stickler syndrome,{close_quotes} is an autosomal dominant osteochondrodysplasia characterized by a variety of ocular and skeletal anomalies which frequently lead to retinal detachment and precocious osteoarthritis. A variety of mutations in the COL2A1 gene have been identified in {open_quotes}Stickler{close_quotes} families; in most cases studied thus far, the consequence of mutation is the premature generation of a stop codon. We report here the characterization of a COL2A1 gene mutation in the original kindred described by Stickler et al. Conformational sensitive gel electrophoresis (CSGE) was used to screen for mutations in the entire COL2A1 gene in an affected member from the kindred. A prominent heteroduplex species was noted in the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) product from a region of the gene including exons 17 to 20. Direct sequencing of PCR-amplified genomic DNA resulted in the identification of a base substitution at the A{sup -2} position of the 3{prime} splice acceptor site of IVS17. Sequencing of DNA from affected and unaffected family members confirmed that the mutation segregated with the disease phenotype. Reverse transcriptase-PCR analysis of poly A+ RNA demonstrated that the mutant allele utilized a cryptic splice site in exon 18 of the gene, eliminating 16 bp at the start of exon 18. This frameshift eventually results in a premature termination codon. These findings are the first report of a splice site mutation in classical Stickler syndrome and they provide a satisfying historical context in which to view COL2A1 mutations in this dysplasia. 25 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Jackson-Weiss syndrome: Clinical and radiological findings in a large kindred and exclusion of the gene from 7p21 and 5qter

    SciTech Connect

    Ades, L.C.; Haan, E.A.; Mulley, J.C.; Senga, I.P.; Morris, L.L.; David, D.J.

    1994-06-01

    We describe the clinical and radiological manifestations of the Jackson-Weiss syndrome (JWS) in a large South Australian kindred. Radiological abnormalities not previously described in the hands include coned epiphyses, distal and middle phalangeal hypoplasia, and carpal bone malsegmentation. New radiological findings in the feet include coned epiphyses, hallux valgus, phalangeal, tarso-navicular and calcaneo-navicular fusions, and uniform absence of metatarsal fusions. Absence of linkage to eight markers along the short arm of chromosome 7 excluded allelian between JWS and Saethre-Chotzen syndrome at 7p21. No linkage was detected to D5S211, excluding allelism to another recently described cephalosyndactyly syndrome mapping to 5qter. 35 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  3. Retrospective molecular detection of Transthyretin Met 111 mutation in a Danish kindred with familial amyloid cardiomyopathy, using DNA from formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tissues.

    PubMed

    Nordvåg, B Y; Ranløv, I; Riise, H M; Husby, G; el-Gewely, M R

    1993-10-01

    Severe familial amyloid cardiomyopathy (FAC) in a Danish kindred is associated with a specific mutation (Met for Leu 111) in the transthyretin (TTR) gene. The mutation causes the loss of a DdeI restriction site in the gene, allowing molecular diagnostic studies. We studied formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues, up to 39 years old, from 29 family members of this kindred. DNA was partially purified from deparaffinized tissue sections and a DNA sequence of the TTR gene flanking the mutation site was amplified by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR), followed by restriction enzyme analysis. Amplified DNA was obtained from tissues representing 23 of the 29 persons. Ten out of the 23 family members were found to carry the TTR Met 111 mutation, whereas 13 were not affected. The results were consistent with known clinical data and with corresponding serum TTR examinations. This retrospective study shows that archival tissues can be used to confirm the diagnosis and disease pattern in members of families affected by hereditary diseases. PMID:8406434

  4. Familial atypical multiple mole melanoma (FAMMM) syndrome: history, genetics, and heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Henry T; Shaw, Trudy G

    2016-07-01

    Approximately 5-10 % of cutaneous melanoma occurs in kindreds with a hereditary predisposition. Mutations in the CDKN2A gene are found to occur in approximately 20-40 % of these kindreds. The first historical mention of what is now called the familial atypical multiple mole melanoma syndrome appears to be from 1820, with more reports throughout the 1950s, 1960s, and later years. In 1991, Lynch and Fusaro described an association between familial multiple mole melanoma and pancreatic cancer and work continues to elucidate the syndrome's genotypic and phenotypic heterogeneity. Individuals at risk for familial melanoma need periodic screenings. Unfortunately, adequate screening for pancreatic cancer does not currently exist, but pancreatic cancer's prominence in the hereditary setting will hopefully act as a stimulus for development of novel screening measures. PMID:26892865

  5. Prion protein gene analysis in three kindreds with fatal familial insomnia (FFI): codon 178 mutation and codon 129 polymorphism.

    PubMed Central

    Medori, R; Tritschler, H J

    1993-01-01

    Fatal familial insomnia (FFI) is a disease linked to a GAC(Asp)-->AAC(Asn) mutation in codon 178 of the prion protein (PrP) gene. FFI is characterized clinically by untreatable progressive insomnia, dysautonomia, and motor dysfunctions and is characterized pathologically by selective thalamic atrophy. We confirmed the 178Asn mutation in the PrP gene of a third FFI family of French ancestry. Three family members who are under 40 years of age and who inherited the mutation showed only reduced perfusion in the basal ganglia on single photon emission computerized tomography. Some FFI features differ from the clinical and neuropathologic findings associated with 178Asn reported elsewhere. However, additional intragenic mutations accounting for the phenotypic differences were not observed in two affected individuals. In other sporadic and familial forms of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and Gerstmann-Sträussler syndrome, Met or Val homozygosity at polymorphic codon 129 is associated with a more severe phenotype, younger age at onset, and faster progression. In FFI, young and old individuals at disease onset had 129Met/Val. Moreover, of five 178Asn individuals who are above age-at-onset range and who are well, two have 129Met and three have 129Met/Val, suggesting that polymorphic site 129 does not modulate FFI phenotypic expression. Genetic heterogeneity and environment may play an important role in inter- and intrafamilial variability of the 178Asn mutation. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8105681

  6. Prion protein gene analysis in three kindreds with fatal familial insomnia (FFI): Codon 178 mutation and codon 129 polymorphism

    SciTech Connect

    Medori, R.; Tritschler, H.J. )

    1993-10-01

    Fatal familial insomnia (FFI) is a disease linked to a GAC(Asp) [yields] AAC(Asn) mutation in codon 178 of the prion protein (PrP) gene. FFI is characterized clinically by untreatable progressive insomnia, dysautonomia, and motor dysfunctions and is characterized pathologically by selective thalamic atrophy. The authors confirmed the 178[sup Asn] mutation in the PrP gene of a third FFI family of French ancestry. Three family members who are under 40 years of age and who inherited the mutation showed only reduced perfusion in the basal ganglia on single photon emission computerized tomography. Some FFI features differ from the clinical and neuropathologic findings associated with 178[sup Asn] reported elsewhere. However, additional intragenic mutations accounting for the phenotypic differences were not observed in two affected individuals. In other sporadic and familial forms of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and Gerstmann-Straeussler syndrome, Met or Val homozygosity at polymorphic codon 129 is associated with a more severe phenotype, younger age at onset, and faster progression. In FFI, young and old individuals at disease onset had 129[sup Met/Val]. Moreover, of five 178[sup Asn] individuals who are above age-at-onset range and who are well, two have 129[sup Met] and three have 129[sup Met/Val], suggesting that polymorphic site 129 does not modulate FFI phenotypic expression. Genetic heterogeneity and environment may play an important role in inter- and intrafamilial variability of the 178[sup Asn] mutation. 32 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  7. A systematic search for linkage with nonsyndromic recessive deafness in two large Middle Eastern inbred kindreds excludes more than 30% of the genome

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, S.; Korostishevsky, M.; Frydman, M.

    1994-09-01

    It has been estimated that as many as 35 loci may individually cause autosomal recessive non-syndromic deafness. The extreme genetic heterogeneity, limited clinical differentiation and phenotypic assortative mating in many western countries make many families unsuitable for genetic linkage studies. Recently the first of those loci was mapped (to 13q) in two consanguineous families from northern Tunisia. We are studying two large highly consanguineous Middle Eastern kindreds (a total of 26 deaf in 98 sampled individuals). Examination in each family showed no evidence of clinical heterogeneity and indicated an uncomplicated profound bilateral sensorineural deafness. We have been able to exclude the 13q locus as the cause of deafness in each kindred and have also excluded such `candidate` loci as regions as those causing Usher`s syndrome type 1 (11q13)(11p), Usher`s syndrome type II (1q32-q41), Waardenburg syndrome type I (2q37), branchio-oto-renal syndrome (8q12-q13), Monge`s deafness (5q31), and Treacher Collins syndrome (5q31.3-q33.3). To date, no lod scores greater than 1 have been obtained in either kindred using 150 RFLT`s, VNTR`s and highly polymorphic microsatellite markers (CA repeats and tetranucleotides). By Morton`s criterion a minimum of 30% of the autosomal genome can be excluded for each kindred separately.

  8. Clinical spectrum of Kufor-Rakeb syndrome in the Chilean kindred with ATP13A2 mutations.

    PubMed

    Behrens, Maria I; Brüggemann, Norbert; Chana, Pedro; Venegas, Pablo; Kägi, Marianne; Parrao, Teresa; Orellana, Patricia; Garrido, Cristian; Rojas, Cecilia V; Hauke, Jan; Hahnen, Eric; González, Rafael; Seleme, Nicolas; Fernández, Verónica; Schmidt, Alexander; Binkofski, Ferdinand; Kömpf, Detlef; Kubisch, Christian; Hagenah, Johann; Klein, Christine; Ramirez, Alfredo

    2010-09-15

    We report the clinical features of the original Chilean family with Kufor-Rakeb syndrome (KRS) that led to the discovery of the ATP13A2 gene at the PARK9 locus. KRS is a rare juvenile-onset autosomal recessive disease characterized by progressive Parkinsonism, pyramidal signs, and cognitive decline in addition to vertical gaze palsy and facial-faucial-finger minimyoclonus. Neurological and neuropsychological examination during a 10-year period, videotaping, neuroimaging, and measurement of DNA methylation of the ATP13A2 promoter region were performed. The youngest 5 of 17 children of nonconsanguineous parents, carrying compound-heterozygous ATP13A2 mutations, had normal development until ages ∼10 to 12 years, when school performance deteriorated and slowness, rigidity, and frequent falls developed. Examination revealed bradykinesia, subtle postural/action tremor, cogwheel rigidity, spasticity, upward gaze palsy, smooth pursuit with saccadic intrusions, and dementia. Additional signs included facial-faucial-finger minimyoclonus, absent postural reflexes, visual/auditory hallucinations, and insomnia. Levodopa response could not be fully judged in this family. T2* magnetic resonance imaging sequences revealed marked diffuse hypointensity of the caudate (head and body) and lenticular nucleus bilaterally. Disease progression was slow including epilepsy, cachexia, and anarthria. Four affected members died after 28.5 ± 5.5 (mean ± SD) years of disease. Two heterozygous carriers, the mother and eldest sibling, showed jerky perioral muscle contractions and clumsiness of hand movements. There was no significant correlation between DNA methylation of the ATP13A2 promoter region and disease progression. The marked caudate and lenticular nucleus T2*-hypointensity suggests that KRS might belong to the family of neurodegenerative diseases associated with brain iron accumulation. PMID:20683840

  9. LDLR gene synonymous mutation c.1813C>T results in mRNA splicing variation in a kindred with familial hypercholesterolaemia.

    PubMed

    Ho, Clement K M; Musa, Fathel Rahman; Bell, Christine; Walker, Simon W

    2015-11-01

    Familial hypercholesterolaemia, one of the most common inherited diseases in the general population, is associated with mutations in at least three different genes including the low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR), apolipoprotein B (APOB) and protein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) genes. In this report, we describe an unclassified DNA variant (c.1813C>T; p.Leu605Leu) within exon 12 of the LDLR gene in a kindred in which familial hypercholesterolaemia is associated with c.1813C>T heterozygosity. In silico analysis suggested that c.1813C>T might affect splicing of the LDLR gene by creating a cryptic donor splice site, which was confirmed by RT-PCR coupled with cDNA sequencing, to result in the loss of 34 base pairs in the coding sequence. The latter truncated mRNA is predicted to generate a frameshift leading to a premature stop at codon 652 and early termination of the low density lipoprotein receptor polypeptide chain, and thus provides a molecular basis for the hypercholesterolaemic phenotype. This case report highlights the emerging utility of RNA studies for the molecular diagnosis of familial hypercholesterolaemia in patients with potential mRNA splicing variants. PMID:25624525

  10. Senior-Loken syndrome secondary to NPHP5/IQCB1 mutation in an Iranian family

    PubMed Central

    Haghighi, Alireza; Al-Hamed, Mohamed; Al-Hissi, Safa; Hynes, Ann-Marie; Sharifian, Maryam; Roozbeh, Jamshid; Saleh-Gohari, Nasrollah

    2011-01-01

    Senior-Loken syndrome (SLS) is a rare autosomal recessive disease characterized by nephronophthisis and early-onset retinal degeneration. We used a large Iranian family with SLS to establish a molecular genetic diagnosis. Following clinical evaluation, we undertook homozygosity mapping in two affected family members and mutational analysis in known SLS genes coinciding with regions of homozygosity. In a region of homozygosity coinciding with a known SLS locus on chromosome 3q21.1, we found a homozygous non-sense mutation R332X in NPHP5/IQCB1. This is the first report of a molecular genetic diagnosis in an Iranian kindred with SLS. PMID:25984213

  11. Familial cancer syndromes and clusters.

    PubMed

    Birch, J M

    1994-07-01

    The study of rare families in which a variety of cancers occur, usually at an early age and with patterns consistent with a common hereditary mechanism, has contributed much to our understanding of the process of carcinogenesis. So far, genes identified as having a role in cancer predisposition in these families have also been important in the histogenesis of sporadic cancers. In the two most clearly defined cancer family syndromes, the Li-Fraumeni syndrome and Lynch syndrome II, the genes involved predispose to diverse but specific constellations of cancers. Genes associated with site-specific familial cancer clusters may also give rise to increased susceptibility to other cancers, and site-specific clusters may represent one end of a spectrum. A consistent feature of familial cancer syndromes is the variable expression within and between families. A challenge for the future will be to determine other factors which may interact with the principal genes involved, giving rise to this variability. PMID:7987644

  12. Familial Adrenocortical Carcinoma in Association With Lynch Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Challis, Benjamin G.; Kandasamy, Narayanan; Powlson, Andrew S.; Koulouri, Olympia; Annamalai, Anand Kumar; Happerfield, Lisa; Marker, Alison J.; Arends, Mark J.; Nik-Zainal, Serena

    2016-01-01

    Context: Adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) is a rare endocrine malignancy with a poor prognosis. Although the majority of childhood ACC arises in the context of inherited cancer susceptibility syndromes, it remains less clear whether a hereditary tumor predisposition exists for the development of ACC in adults. Here, we report the first occurrence of familial ACC in a kindred with Lynch syndrome resulting from a pathogenic germline MSH2 mutation. Case: A 54-year-old female with a history of ovarian and colorectal malignancy was found to have an ACC. A detailed family history revealed her mother had died of ACC and her sister had previously been diagnosed with endometrial and colorectal cancers. A unifying diagnosis of Lynch syndrome was considered, and immunohistochemical analyses demonstrated loss of MSH2 and MSH6 expression in both AACs (proband and her mother) and in the endometrial carcinoma of her sister. Subsequent genetic screening confirmed the presence of a germline MSH2 mutation (resulting in deletions of exons 1–3) in the proband and her sister. Conclusion: Our findings provide strong support for the recent proposal that ACC should be considered a Lynch syndrome-associated tumor and included in the Amsterdam II clinical diagnostic criteria. We also suggest that screening for ACC should be considered in cancer surveillance strategies directed at individuals with germline mutations in DNA mismatch repair genes. PMID:27144940

  13. Heterogeneity of the cystic fibrosis phenotype in a large kindred family in Qatar with cystic fibrosis mutation (I1234V).

    PubMed

    Abdul Wahab, A; Al Thani, G; Dawod, S T; Kambouris, M; Al Hamed, M

    2001-04-01

    Twenty-nine subjects (17 families) with cystic fibrosis belonging to the same Bedouin tribe were screened for cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator gene mutations (CFTR). Homozygous I1234V mutation in exon 19 was identified in all families with a relatively high rate of consanguinity (96.6 per cent). The homozygous I1234V mutation tended to present with a variable degree of pulmonary disease, pancreatic insufficiency and electrolyte imbalance. Homozygous I1234V was found to be a common mutation in the studied Bedouin tribe in Qatar. PMID:11336127

  14. Mitochondrial encephalomyopathy: variable clinical expression within a single kindred.

    PubMed Central

    Crimmins, D; Morris, J G; Walker, G L; Sue, C M; Byrne, E; Stevens, S; Jean-Francis, B; Yiannikas, C; Pamphlett, R

    1993-01-01

    The clinical manifestations of mitochondrial encephalomyopathy are described in four generations of a single kindred. The age of onset of major neurological disturbance varied from 3-70 years. In some patients, deafness was the only manifestation; in others, recurrent bouts of status epilepticus associated with focal neurological deficits and headache, caused severe disability or death. Examples of all three adult forms of mitochondrial encephalomyopathy: MELAS, MERFF and Kearns Sayre syndrome, were represented within the kindred. Associated features included deafness, short stature, non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, migraine, peptic ulceration and severe constipation. The nt 3243 A-G MELAS mutation was detected in two members of the kindred. This study highlights the diversity of clinical expression of a mitochondrial mutation within a single kindred. Images PMID:8350109

  15. Current status of familial gastrointestinal polyposis syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Ioan; Gurzu, Simona; Turdean, Gligore Sabin

    2015-01-01

    Because of the rarity of familial gastrointestinal cancer-predisposing syndromes, their exploration in literature is not extensive. In this review, an update of the clinicopathological and molecular criteria of gastrointestinal familial polyposis syndromes with potential malignant transformation is performed. In addition, a guide for screening and surveillance was synthesized and a distribution of gene mutations according to the specific syndromes and geographic distribution was included. The following inherited polyposes syndromes were analyzed: familial adenomatous polyposis, the hamartomatous familial polyposes (Juvenile polyposis, Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, Cowden syndrome, Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba syndrome, hereditary mixed polyposis syndrome, Gorlin syndrome, Birt-Hogg-Dube syndrome, neurofibromatosis type I and multiple endocrine neoplasia syndrome 2B), Li-Fraumeni syndrome, and MUTYH-associated adenomatous polyposis. For proper medical care, subspecialization of gastroenterologists, pathologists, and genticists in the field of familial diseases should be introduced in the medical curriculum. PMID:26600934

  16. Neuropsychological profile of a large kindred with familial Alzheimer's disease caused by the E280A single presenilin-1 mutation.

    PubMed

    Ardila, A; Lopera, F; Rosselli, M; Moreno, S; Madrigal, L; Arango-Lasprilla, J C; Arcos, M; Murcia, C; Arango-Viana, J C; Ossa, J; Goate, A; Kosik, K S

    2000-08-01

    It was hypothesized that subjective memory complaints represent the earliest sign of dementia in carriers of the presenilin-1 (PS1) mutation. A total of 122 subjects (44 males, 78 females) were included in this study. Forty of them were positive for the mutation in the PS1 gene (mutation positive, MP) whereas 82 showed negative results (mutation negative, MN). Subjects were active, functionally normal, even though some of them complained of memory difficulties. Two groups of neuropsychological instruments were administered: (a) The Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer's Disease (CERAD) neuropsychological test battery (Morris et al., 1989), and (b) some additional neuropsychological tests (Raven Test, Wechsler Memory Scale, Rey-Osterrieth Complex Figure, Boston Naming Test, Naming of Categories, Boston Diagnostic Aphasia Examination, Memory of Three Phrases, Knopman Test, Digit Symbol, and Visual "A" Cancellation Test). Performance in both groups was quite similar. In a secondary analysis, the MP group was subdivided into two subgroups: without and with memory complaints. When comparing both subgroups, a better performance in the first subgroup was found throughout the different subtests. Statistically significant differences were observed in the following test scores: Mini-Mental State Examination, Naming Test (Low Frequency), Memory of Words Test, Recall of Drawings, Wechsler Memory Scale (Logical Memory, Associative Learning, and Total Score), Rey-Osterrieth Complex Figure (Immediate Recall Condition), Boston Diagnostic Aphasia Examination (Complex Ideational Material Subtest), Memory of Three Phrases Test, Serial Verbal Learning (maximum score and Delayed Recall), Knopman Test (First Trial, Second Trial, and Recall after 5 Minutes), Digit Symbol, and Visual "A" Cancellation Test (Additions). Results supported the hypothesis that memory complaints represent the earliest symptom of familial Alzheimer's disease. In addition to the memory difficulties

  17. Can a familial gastrointestinal tumour syndrome be allelic with Waardenburg syndrome?

    PubMed

    Vilain, R E; Dudding, T; Braye, S G; Groombridge, C; Meldrum, C; Spigelman, A D; Ackland, S; Ashman, L; Scott, R J

    2011-06-01

    Familial gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) are rare but otherwise well-characterized tumour syndromes, most commonly occurring on a background of germline-activating mutations in the tyrosine kinase receptor c-KIT. The associated clinical spectrum reflects the constitutive activation of this gene product across a number of cell lines, generating gain-of-function phenotypes in interstitial cells of Cajal (GIST and dysphagia), mast cells (mastocytosis) and melanocytes (hyperpigmentation). We report a three-generation kindred harbouring a c-KIT germline-activating mutation resulting in multifocal GISTs, dysphagia and a complex melanocyte hyperpigmentation and hypopigmentation disorder, the latter with features typical of those observed in Waardenburg type 2 syndrome (WS2F). Sequencing of genes known to be causative for WS [microphthalmia transcription factor (MITF), Pax3, Sox10, SNAI2 ] failed to show any candidate mutations to explain this complex cutaneous depigmentation phenotype. Our case report conclusively expands the clinical spectrum of familial GISTs and shows a hitherto unrecognized link to WS. Possible mechanisms responsible for this novel cause of WS2F will be discussed. PMID:20636395

  18. Craniosynostosis suggestive of Saethre-Chotzen syndrome: Clinical description of a large kindred and exclusion of candidate regions on 7p

    SciTech Connect

    von Gernet, S.; Muehlbauer, W.; Fairley, J.

    1996-05-03

    We describe the clinical manifestations of an autosomal dominant form of craniosynostosis in a large family with eight affected relatives. Unilateral or bilateral coronal synostosis, low frontal hair line, strabismus, ptosis, and partial cutaneous syndactyly of fingers and toes are findings suggestive of the diagnosis of Saethre-Chotzen syndrome. The disease locus was excluded from the two adjacent Saethre-Chotzen candidate regions on 7p by linkage analysis with markers D7S664 and D7S507. This indicates heterogeneity of Saethre-Chotzen syndrome with a locus outside the candidate regions on 7p. 30 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Legius syndrome in fourteen families.

    PubMed

    Denayer, Ellen; Chmara, Magdalena; Brems, Hilde; Kievit, Anneke Maat; van Bever, Yolande; Van den Ouweland, Ans M W; Van Minkelen, Rick; de Goede-Bolder, Arja; Oostenbrink, Rianne; Lakeman, Phillis; Beert, Eline; Ishizaki, Takuma; Mori, Tomoaki; Keymolen, Kathelijn; Van den Ende, Jenneke; Mangold, Elisabeth; Peltonen, Sirkku; Brice, Glen; Rankin, Julia; Van Spaendonck-Zwarts, Karin Y; Yoshimura, Akihiko; Legius, Eric

    2011-01-01

    Legius syndrome presents as an autosomal dominant condition characterized by café-au-lait macules with or without freckling and sometimes a Noonan-like appearance and/or learning difficulties. It is caused by germline loss-of-function SPRED1 mutations and is a member of the RAS-MAPK pathway syndromes. Most mutations result in a truncated protein and only a few inactivating missense mutations have been reported. Since only a limited number of patients has been reported up until now, the full clinical and mutational spectrum is still unknown. We report mutation data and clinical details in fourteen new families with Legius syndrome. Six novel germline mutations are described. The Trp31Cys mutation is a new pathogenic SPRED1 missense mutation. Clinical details in the 14 families confirmed the absence of neurofibromas, and Lisch nodules, and the absence of a high prevalence of central nervous system tumors. We report white matter T2 hyperintensities on brain MRI scans in 2 patients and a potential association between postaxial polydactyly and Legius syndrome. PMID:21089071

  20. Legius Syndrome in Fourteen Families

    PubMed Central

    Denayer, Ellen; Chmara, Magdalena; Brems, Hilde; Kievit, Anneke Maat; van Bever, Yolande; Van den Ouweland, Ans MW; Van Minkelen, Rick; de Goede-Bolder, Arja; Oostenbrink, Rianne; Lakeman, Phillis; Beert, Eline; Ishizaki, Takuma; Mori, Tomoaki; Keymolen, Kathelijn; Van den Ende, Jenneke; Mangold, Elisabeth; Peltonen, Sirkku; Brice, Glen; Rankin, Julia; Van Spaendonck-Zwarts, Karin Y; Yoshimura, Akihiko; Legius, Eric

    2011-01-01

    Legius syndrome presents as an autosomal dominant condition characterized by café-au-lait macules with or without freckling and sometimes a Noonan-like appearance and/or learning difficulties. It is caused by germline loss-of-function SPRED1 mutations and is a member of the RAS-MAPK pathway syndromes. Most mutations result in a truncated protein and only a few inactivating missense mutations have been reported. Since only a limited number of patients has been reported up until now, the full clinical and mutational spectrum is still unknown. We report mutation data and clinical details in fourteen new families with Legius syndrome. Six novel germline mutations are described. The Trp31Cys mutation is a new pathogenic SPRED1 missense mutation. Clinical details in the 14 families confirmed the absence of neurofibromas, and Lisch nodules, and the absence of a high prevalence of central nervous system tumors. We report white matter T2 hyperintensities on brain MRI scans in 2 patients and a potential association between postaxial polydactyly and Legius syndrome. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:21089071

  1. Family perspectives about Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Skotko, Brian G; Levine, Susan P; Macklin, Eric A; Goldstein, Richard D

    2016-04-01

    National medical organizations recommend that during prenatal counseling sessions, healthcare providers discuss how having a child with Down syndrome (DS) might impact the family unit. Few studies, to date, have surveyed families about their life experiences. For this investigation, we examined 41 family attitudes, which were obtained from mailed questionnaires completed by 1,961 parents/guardians, 761 brothers/sisters, and 283 people with DS who were members of six DS non-profit organizations, chosen for their size, ethnic/racial diversities, and geographic distribution throughout the United States. About 83% of families reported to all being proud of the family member with DS, and 87% reported to all feeling love for the member with DS. Younger siblings (ages 9-11) were more likely to feel embarrassed by their sibling with DS if their parents/guardians also did. If one or more parents/guardians felt that their children without DS did have a good relationship with their child with DS, siblings were more likely to report that they loved and liked their brother/sister with DS. Overall, our data demonstrate that positive themes tend to dominate within modern-day families who have members with DS, although challenges were not insignificant for some. PMID:26692378

  2. Autosomal dominant Kufs` disease: Clinical heterogeneity in nine families, and exclusion of linkage to CLN1 and CLN3 markers in a large American kindred

    SciTech Connect

    Andermann, F.; Andermann, E.; Carpenter, S.

    1994-09-01

    Most forms of neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (NCL) are autosomal recessive, and three genes have already been mapped: the infantile form (CLN 1); the juvenile form (CLN 3); and the early juvenile variant (CLN 5) on chromosomes 1, 16 and 13, respectively. Kufs` disease or adolescent-adult onset NCL is usually inherited as an autosomal recessive trait, and presents as three distinct clinical syndromes: progressive myoclonus epilepsy (PME) with onset in the early teens or around age 30; and onset of dementia with motor disability in the 30s. We have studied three families originating from different parts of the USA manifesting dominantly inherited Kufs` disease. Granular osmophilic deposits (GROD) were found in brain, but storage in skin was not an obligatory feature. Six dominantly inherited PME families have been ascertained from three different regions of Spain. No storage was found in skin or muscle in any of these families. The mean age of onset in the American families is earlier, the clinical manifestations more severe, and the progression much more rapid that in the Spanish families. These findings would suggest the possibility of genetic heterogeneity involving two or more loci, or different mutations at the same gene locus. Genetic linkage studies have been carried out in a six-generation New Jersey family in an attempt to characterize the gene(s) responsible for this disorder. The infantile NCL locus on chromosome 1p (CLN1) and the juvenile NCL locus on chromosome 16p (CLN 3) have been excluded in this family. Further clinical, pathological and molecular genetic studies should lead to the clarification of the diagnostic approaches in this disorder.

  3. Familial Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome maps to a locus on chromosome 7q3.

    PubMed Central

    MacRae, C A; Ghaisas, N; Kass, S; Donnelly, S; Basson, C T; Watkins, H C; Anan, R; Thierfelder, L H; McGarry, K; Rowland, E

    1995-01-01

    We have mapped a disease locus for Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome (WPW) and familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (FHC) segregating in a large kindred to chromosome 7 band q3. Although WPW syndrome and FHC have been observed in members of the same family in prior studies, the relationship between these two diseases has remained enigmatic. A large family with 25 surviving individuals who are affected by one or both of these conditions was studied. The disease locus is closely linked to loci D7S688, D7S505, and D7S483 (maximum two point LOD score at D7S505 was 7.80 at theta = 0). While four different FHC loci have been described this is the first locus that can be mutated to cause both WPW and/or FHC. PMID:7657794

  4. Identification of compound heterozygous KCNJ1 mutations (encoding ROMK) in a kindred with Bartter's syndrome and a functional analysis of their pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Shalabh; Li, Dimin; Edwards, Noel; Hynes, Ann-M; Wood, Katrina; Al-Hamed, Mohamed; Wroe, Anna C; Reaich, David; Moochhala, Shabbir H; Welling, Paul A; Sayer, John A

    2013-11-01

    A multiplex family was identified with biochemical and clinical features suggestive of Bartter's syndrome (BS). The eldest sibling presented with developmental delay and rickets at 4 years of age with evidence of hypercalciuria and hypokalemia. The second sibling presented at 1 year of age with urinary tract infections, polyuria, and polydipsia. The third child was born after a premature delivery with a history of polyhydramnios and neonatal hypocalcemia. Following corrective treatment she also developed hypercalciuria and a hypokalemic metabolic alkalosis. There was evidence of secondary hyperreninemia and hyperaldosteronism in all three siblings consistent with BS. Known BS genes were screened and functional assays of ROMK (alias KCNJ1, Kir1.1) were carried out in Xenopus oocytes. We detected compound heterozygous missense changes in KCNJ1, encoding the potassium channel ROMK. The S219R/L220F mutation was segregated from father and mother, respectively. In silico modeling of the missense mutations suggested deleterious changes. Studies in Xenopus oocytes revealed that both S219R and L220F had a deleterious effect on ROMK-mediated potassium currents. Coinjection to mimic the compound heterozygosity produced a synergistic decrease in channel function and revealed a loss of PKA-dependent stabilization of PIP2 binding. In conclusion, in a multiplex family with BS, we identified compound heterozygous mutations in KCNJ1. Functional studies of ROMK confirmed the pathogenicity of these mutations and defined the mechanism of channel dysfunction. PMID:24400161

  5. Modeling Family Adaptation to Fragile X Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raspa, Melissa; Bailey, Donald, Jr.; Bann, Carla; Bishop, Ellen

    2014-01-01

    Using data from a survey of 1,099 families who have a child with Fragile X syndrome, we examined adaptation across 7 dimensions of family life: parenting knowledge, social support, social life, financial impact, well-being, quality of life, and overall impact. Results illustrate that although families report a high quality of life, they struggle…

  6. Familial 'sleep apnea plus' syndrome: report of a family.

    PubMed

    Manon-Espaillat, R; Gothe, B; Adams, N; Newman, C; Ruff, R

    1988-02-01

    We describe a familial disorder consisting of sleep apnea, anosmia, colorblindness, partial complex seizures, and cognitive dysfunction. The phenotypic expression of the syndrome suggests an autosomal dominant inheritance with incomplete penetrance. PMID:3257550

  7. Endocrine neoplasms in familial syndromes of hyperparathyroidism.

    PubMed

    Li, Yulong; Simonds, William F

    2015-06-01

    Familial syndromes of hyperparathyroidism, including multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1), multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2A (MEN2A), and the hyperparathyroidism-jaw tumor (HPT-JT), comprise 2-5% of primary hyperparathyroidism cases. Familial syndromes of hyperparathyroidism are also associated with a range of endocrine and nonendocrine tumors, including potential malignancies. Complications of the associated neoplasms are the major causes of morbidities and mortalities in these familial syndromes, e.g., parathyroid carcinoma in HPT-JT syndrome; thymic, bronchial, and enteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors in MEN1; and medullary thyroid cancer and pheochromocytoma in MEN2A. Because of the different underlying mechanisms of neoplasia, these familial tumors may have different characteristics compared with their sporadic counterparts. Large-scale clinical trials are frequently lacking due to the rarity of these diseases. With technological advances and the development of new medications, the natural history, diagnosis, and management of these syndromes are also evolving. In this article, we summarize the recent knowledge on endocrine neoplasms in three familial hyperparathyroidism syndromes, with an emphasis on disease characteristics, molecular pathogenesis, recent developments in biochemical and radiological evaluation, and expert opinions on surgical and medical therapies. Because these familial hyperparathyroidism syndromes are associated with a wide variety of tumors in different organs, this review is focused on those endocrine neoplasms with malignant potential. PMID:27207564

  8. Homozygous HAX1 mutations in severe congenital neutropenia patients with sporadic disease: a novel mutation in two unrelated British kindreds.

    PubMed

    Smith, Bradley N; Ancliff, Phil J; Pizzey, Arnold; Khwaja, Asim; Linch, David C; Gale, Rosemary E

    2009-03-01

    Patients with autosomal dominant (AD), sporadic and X-linked severe congenital neutropenia (SCN) may have mutations in the elastase 2 (ELA2) or Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS) genes. Homozygous mutations in the HAX1 gene have recently been reported in autosomal recessive (AR) cases of primarily Middle-Eastern descent and the original Kostmann family. We screened 109 predominantly Caucasian SCN kindreds for mutations in these genes; 33 (30%) had 24 different ELA2 mutations, five of them novel, two kindreds (2%) had WAS mutations and four kindreds (4%) had three different HAX1 mutations, two of them novel. One HAX1 mutation (p.Ser43LeufsX11) was found in an AR Ashkenazi Jewish kindred, the other (p.Glu31LysfsX54) in two unrelated British patients with sporadic disease. Microsatellite analysis of the HAX1 locus revealed a common haplotype (maximum distance 4.1 Megabases) for the p.Glu31LysfsX54 patients, suggesting a possible ancestral founder. In functional assays, the level of spontaneous and staurosporine-induced apoptosis was increased in neutrophils from both p.Ser43LeufsX11 patients but not a p.Glu31LysfsX54 patient, suggesting the possible presence of modifying factors. The low incidence of HAX1 mutations in our study suggests that the frequency may vary between racial groups but suggests that irrespective of inheritance or racial origin, SCN patients should be screened for HAX1 mutations. PMID:19036076

  9. Marfan syndrome affecting a whole Sudanese family

    PubMed Central

    Elmahdi, Laila M; Ali, Sulafa KM

    2013-01-01

    Marfan syndrome (MS, OMIM 154700) is an autosomal dominant disorder of fibrous connective tissue with striking pleiotropism and clinical variability. The cardinal features occur in skeletal, ocular, and cardiovascular systems. We describe a Sudanese family with the father and all his 4 children manifesting the syndrome. To our knowledge, there were no previously reported MS cases from Sudan.

  10. High-density genetic and physical mapping of DNA markers near the X-linked Alport syndrome locus: definition and use of flanking polymorphic markers.

    PubMed

    Barker, D F; Fain, P R; Goldgar, D E; Dietz-Band, J N; Turco, A E; Kashtan, C E; Gregory, M C; Tryggvason, K; Skolnick, M H; Atkin, C L

    1991-12-01

    To refine the genetic and physical mapping of the locus for Alport syndrome (ATS), 22 X-chromosome restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) markers that fall between Xq21.3 and Xq25 were tested for genetic linkage with the disease and also mapped with respect to a series of physical breakpoints in this region. The location of the COL4A5 gene, which has recently been shown to be mutated in at least some families with Alport syndrome, was determined with respect to the same physical breakpoints. Two large Utah kindreds were included in the genetic studies, kindreds P and C, with 125 and 63 potentially informative meioses, respectively. Both kindreds have essentially identical nephritis; however, kindred P has sensorineural hearing loss associated with the nephritis, while kindred C does not. A mutation in COL4A5 has been demonstrated for kindred P, but no change in this gene has yet been detected for kindred C. Twelve informative probes did not recombine with the disease locus in either kindred (theta = 0.0, with combined lod scores for the two kindreds ranging from 7.7 to 30.0). The closest markers that could be demonstrated to flank the disease locus were the same for each kindred and thus the locations of the mutations causing the two disease phenotypes are not distinguishable at the current level of genetic resolution. The flanking markers are also useful for the resolution of questionable diagnoses and allow accurate estimates for these families of the rate of sporadic hematuria in noncarrier females (7%) and the penetrance of hematuria for carrier females (93%). PMID:1684566

  11. Genetic linkage analysis in 26 families with Bardet-Biedl syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, A.F.; Bruford, E.A.; Mansfield, D.C.

    1994-09-01

    Bardet-Biedl syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by polydactyly, obesity, hypogonadism, retinitis pigmentosa, renal anomalies and mental retardation. Clinical heterogeneity is quite marked both within and between families. Linkage has been reported between Bardet-Biedl syndrome and the D16408 marker in chromosomal region 16q21 in an extended Bedouin kindred and, more recently, in a subset of 17 out of 31 families using the PYGM/D11S913 markers in chromosomal region 11q13. We have analyzed linkage to the 16q21 and 11q13 regions and used markers covering chromosomes 2, 3, 17 and 18 in a set of 26 Bardet-Biedl families, each containing at least two affected individuals, with a total of 57 affected members. Evidence of linkage to the D11S527 locus has been identified assuming linkage homogeneity with a lod score of 2.72 at a recombination fraction of 0.11 (95% limits 0.03-0.25).

  12. A Japanese family with popliteal pterygium syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Katsube, Motoki; Yoshiura, Koh-ichiro; Kusumoto, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    We investigated a family in which the mother and a daughter suffered from popliteal pterygium syndrome (PPS). Mutation in the interferon regulatory factor 6 (IRF6) gene was detected in the mother and daughter. This is the second report of a family case with mutation in the IRF6 gene in Japanese patients with PPS.

  13. A family with Wagner syndrome with uveitis and a new versican mutation

    PubMed Central

    Rothschild, Pierre-Raphaël; Brézin, Antoine P.; Nedelec, Brigitte; des Roziers, Cyril Burin; Ghiotti, Tiffany; Orhant, Lucie; Boimard, Mathieu

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To report the clinical and molecular findings of a kindred with Wagner syndrome (WS) revealed by intraocular inflammatory features. Methods Eight available family members underwent complete ophthalmologic examination, including laser flare cell meter measurements. Collagen, type II, alpha 1, versican (VCAN), frizzled family receptor 4, low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5, tetraspanin 12, and Norrie disease (pseudoglioma) genes were screened with direct sequencing. Results The index case was initially referred for unexplained severe and chronic postoperative bilateral uveitis following a standard cataract surgery procedure. Clinical examination of the proband revealed an optically empty vitreous with avascular vitreous strands and veils, features highly suggestive of WS. The systematic familial ophthalmologic examination identified three additional unsuspected affected family members who also presented with the WS phenotype, including uveitis for one of them. We identified a novel c.4004–6T>A nucleotide substitution at the acceptor splice site of intron 7 of the VCAN gene that segregated with the disease phenotype. Conclusions We present a family with WS with typical WS features and intraocular inflammatory manifestations associated with a novel splice site VCAN mutation. Beyond the structural role in the retinal-vitreous architecture, versican is also emerging as a pivotal mediator of the inflammatory response, supporting uveitis predisposition as a clinical manifestation of WS. PMID:24174867

  14. A common DLX3 gene mutation is responsible for tricho-dento-osseous syndrome in Virginia and North Carolina families.

    PubMed

    Price, J A; Wright, J T; Kula, K; Bowden, D W; Hart, T C

    1998-10-01

    Tricho-dento-osseous syndrome (TDO) is characterised by a variable clinical phenotype primarily affecting the hair, teeth, and bone. Different clinical features are observed between and within TDO families. It is not known whether the variable clinical features are the result of genetic heterogeneity or clinical variability. A gene for TDO was localised recently to chromosome 17q21 in four North Carolina families, and a 4 bp deletion in the human distal-less 3 gene (DLX3) was identified in all affected members. A previous genetic linkage study in a large Virginia kindred with TDO indicated possible linkage to the ABO, Gc, and Kell blood group loci. To examine whether TDO exhibits genetic heterogeneity, we have performed molecular genetic analysis to determine whether affected members of this Virginia kindred have the DLX3 gene deletion identified in North Carolina families. Results show that affected subjects (n=3) from the Virginia family have the same four nucleotide deletion previously identified in the North Carolina families. A common haplotype for three genetic markers surrounding the DLX3 gene was identified in all affected subjects in the North Carolina and Virginia families. These findings suggest that all people with TDO who have been evaluated have inherited the same DLX3 gene deletion mutation from a common ancestor. The variable clinical phenotype observed in these North Carolina and Virginia families, which share a common gene mutation, suggests that clinical variability is not the result of genetic heterogeneity at the major locus, but may reflect genetic heterogeneity at other epigenetic loci or contributing environmental factors or both. PMID:9783705

  15. Family Demands, Social Support and Family Functioning in Taiwanese Families Rearing Children with Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsiao, C-Y.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Down syndrome (DS) affects not only children but also their families. Much remains to be learned about factors that influence how families of children with DS function, especially families in non-Western populations. The purpose of this cross-sectional, correlational study was to examine how family demographics, family demands and…

  16. Concordance of phenotypic expression and gender identity in a large kindred with a mutation in the androgen receptor.

    PubMed

    Hooper, H T; Figueiredo, B C; Pavan-Senn, C C; De Lacerda, L; Sandrini, R; Mengarelli, J K; Japp, K; Karaviti, L P

    2004-03-01

    A 14-year-old female presented to the Pediatric Endocrine Clinic, Universidade Federal o Parana Curitiba, Brazil, for obesity. A few years later, despite normal breast development, the patient had failed to menstruate and lacked pubic and axillary hair. Laboratory analyses revealed high levels of testosterone. Karyotype analysis was XY. Direct sequencing of her genomic DNA showed a G to T transition at nucleotide 2089 at exon 2 in the androgen receptor gene, resulting in a substitution of Phe for Cys at position 576. This mutation disrupts the first Zn finger critical to DNA binding and transcriptional activity and results in complete androgen-insensitivity syndrome (CAIS). This individual was part of 700-member multigenerational kindred of German origin living in small villages in Southern Brazil. Family members who gave informed consent were screened using a polymerase chain reaction-based method. Nineteen CAIS-affected individuals and carriers were identified. All presented with infertility and lack of or sparse pubic hair. The prevalence of common AIS within the kindred greatly exceeds that of the general population and is due in part to their isolated familial and community structures. All individuals are genuinely feminine in their appearance, sex behavior, gender identity, and integration within their communities. We conclude that CAIS leads to complete feminization of XY individuals and results in individuals who are psychologically and socially established and integrated as women within the familial and cultural contexts of their communities. PMID:14756668

  17. Most Families Cherish a Child with Down Syndrome, Survey Finds

    MedlinePlus

    ... nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_157878.html Most Families Cherish a Child With Down Syndrome, Survey Finds ... 21, 2016 MONDAY, March 21, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Families of children with Down syndrome face challenges, but ...

  18. Munchausen Syndrome by Proxy: A Family Affair.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mehl, Albert L.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    The article reports on a case of Munchausen syndrome by proxy in which chronic illicit insulin was administered to a one-year-old child by her mother. Factitious illnesses continued despite psychiatric intervention. Retrospective review of medical records suggested 30 previous episodes of factitious illness within the family. (DB)

  19. A Family History Study of Asperger Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghaziuddin, Mohammad

    2005-01-01

    Asperger syndrome (AS) is a childhood-onset disorder often described as a mild variant of autism. Although classified as a distinct disorder in the DSM-IV, its overlap with autism continues to be a matter of ongoing debate. While the family genetic origins of autism are well established, few studies have investigated this topic in AS using current…

  20. Familial hypothalamic digoxin deficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kurup, Ravi Kumar; Kurup, Parameswara Achutha

    2004-01-01

    The case report of a family with coexistence of hypotension, recurrent respiratory infection, motor tics, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), major depressive disorder, early onset osteoporosis, low body mass index, bulimia nervosa, and healthy aging with longevity is described. The family members had hyposexual behavior and less tendency toward spirituality. They did not have insomnia, but they did display tendency toward increased somnolence. No addictive behavior was observed. The family demonstrated a high level of bonding and affectionate behavior, and they were less creative, with an average intelligence quotient (IQ). There was a total absence of vascular thrombosis, systemic neoplasms and neuronal degeneration in the indexed family. All members of the indexed family were left hemispheric dominant. The levels of serum digoxin, HMG-CoA reductase activity, and dolichol were found to be decreased in the members of the indexed family, with a corresponding increase in red blood cell (RBC) Na(+)-K+ ATPase activity, serum ubiquinone and magnesium levels. There was increase in tyrosine catabolites and a reduction in tryptophan catabolites in the serum. The total and individual glycosaminoglycan fractions, carbohydrate residues of glycoproteins, activity of glycosaminoglycans (GAG) degrading enzymes, and glycohydrolases were decreased in the serum. The concentration of RBC membrane total GAG and carbohydrate residues of glycoproteins increased, while the cholesterol: phospholipid ratio of the membrane decreased. The activity of free radical scavenging enzymes were increased, while the concentration of free radicals decreased significantly. The same biochemical patterns were observed in left hemispheric dominance as opposed to right hemispheric dominance. The significance of these findings in the pathogenesis of these disorders is discussed. PMID:14990764

  1. Familial CRC—Beyond the Lynch Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Stoffel, Elena M.; Kastrinos, Fay

    2013-01-01

    Although 30% of individuals diagnosed with CRC report a family history of the disease, only 5–6% carry germline mutations in genes associated with known hereditary cancer syndromes. The evaluation and management of families affected with CRC can be complicated by variability in disease phenotypes and limited sensitivity of genetic tests. In this review we examine what is currently known about familial CRC and what we have yet to learn, and explore how novel genomic approaches might be used to identify additional genetic and epigenetic factors implicated in heritable risk for cancer. PMID:23962553

  2. Two distinct origins of a common BRCA1 mutation in breast-ovarian cancer families: a genetic study of 15 185delAG-mutation kindreds.

    PubMed Central

    Berman, D. B.; Wagner-Costalas, J.; Schultz, D. C.; Lynch, H. T.; Daly, M.; Godwin, A. K.

    1996-01-01

    We screened 163 women from breast-ovarian cancer-prone families, as well as 178 individuals affected with breast and/or ovarian cancer but unselected for family history, for germ-line mutations in exon 2 of BRCA1, by SSCP analysis and direct sequencing. A total of 25 mutations were detected. Thirteen of 64 Jewish Ashkenazi women and 2 non-Jewish individuals were found to possess the 185delAG mutation. Haplotype data for all 15 individuals, with markers intragenic to BRCA1, suggest that the Jewish Ashkenazi individuals share a common ancestry that is distinct from the lineage shared by the other two women. These data provide the first evidence of two distinct lines of transmission for the 185delAG mutation, only one of which has its origins in the Jewish Ashkenazi population. Our screening also uncovered 10 affected individuals with an 11-bp deletion at nucleotide 188 of BRCA1 (188del11), 4 of whom are Ashkenazi Jews. This is only the third reported mutation detected within the Jewish Ashkenazi population and may represent the second most common alteration in BRCA1 found in Ashkenazi Jews in the United States. The observed overrepresentation of specific mutations within a subgroup of the general population may eventually contribute to the development of inexpensive and routine tests for BRCA1 mutations, as well as to the elucidation of other contributory factors (e.g., diet, environment, and chemical exposures) that may play a key role in cancer initiation and development. The implications of the mutational data, as well as the role that founder effect, demographic history, and penetrance play in the resulting observed phenomena, are discussed. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8651293

  3. Genetics of familial intrahepatic cholestasis syndromes

    PubMed Central

    van Mil, S W C; Houwen, R; Klomp, L

    2005-01-01

    Bile acids and bile salts have essential functions in the liver and in the small intestine. Their synthesis in the liver provides a metabolic pathway for the catabolism of cholesterol and their detergent properties promote the solubilisation of essential nutrients and vitamins in the small intestine. Inherited conditions that prevent the synthesis of bile acids or their excretion cause cholestasis, or impaired bile flow. These disorders generally lead to severe human liver disease, underscoring the essential role of bile acids in metabolism. Recent advances in the elucidation of gene defects underlying familial cholestasis syndromes has greatly increased knowledge about the process of bile flow. The expression of key proteins involved in bile flow is tightly regulated by transcription factors of the nuclear hormone receptor family, which function as sensors of bile acids and cholesterol. Here we review the genetics of familial cholestasis disorders, the functions of the affected genes in bile flow, and their regulation by bile acids and cholesterol. PMID:15937079

  4. Familial Turner syndrome: the importance of information.

    PubMed

    Periquito, Isabel; Carrusca, Catarina; Morgado, Joana; Robalo, Brígida; Pereira, Carla; de Lurdes Sampaio, Maria

    2016-05-01

    Turner syndrome is a common genetic disorder with an incidence of 1 in 2500 live births. Spontaneous fertility is rare in such patients and is most likely in women with mosaicism or very distal Xp deletions. The authors report an unusual case of familial Turner syndrome in a woman with mosaicism 45,X/46,Xdel(Xp) karyotype with three documented spontaneous pregnancies, which resulted in two daughters with 46,Xdel(X)(p11.4)mat karyotype and a healthy son. The mother was first diagnosed by the age of 11 and did not receive contraceptive medication, due to information that she would be infertile. Both daughters were referred to an endocrinology unit and are now under growth hormone treatment, and have been growing in the 3rd percentile. This family illustrates the complexity and difficulties in counseling, follow-up and treatment in Turner syndrome, namely referring to a tertiary center, fertility and treatment such as growth hormone and hormonal replacement, due to the heterogeneity of the clinical spectrum. PMID:26824976

  5. Familial syndromes associated with neuroendocrine tumours

    PubMed Central

    Komarowska, Hanna; Czarnywojtek, Agata; Waligórska-Stachura, Joanna; Bączyk, Maciej; Ziemnicka, Katarzyna; Fischbach, Jakub; Wrotkowska, Elżbieta; Ruchała, Marek

    2015-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumours may be associated with familial syndromes. At least eight inherited syndromes predisposing to endocrine neoplasia have been identified. Two of these are considered to be major factors predisposing to benign and malignant endocrine tumours, designated multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 and type 2 (MEN1 and MEN2). Five other autosomal dominant diseases show more heterogeneous clinical patterns, such as the Carney complex, hyperparathyroidism-jaw tumour syndrome, Von Hippel-Lindau syndrome (VHL), neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) and tuberous sclerosis. The molecular and cellular interactions underlying the development of most endocrine cells and related organs represent one of the more complex pathways not yet to be deciphered. Almost all endocrine cells are derived from the endoderm and neuroectoderm. It is suggested that within the first few weeks of human development there are complex interactions between, firstly, the major genes involved in the initiation of progenitor-cell differentiation, secondly, factors secreted by the surrounding mesenchyme, and thirdly, a series of genes controlling cell differentiation, proliferation and migration. Together these represent a formula for the harmonious development of endocrine glands and tissue. PMID:26557756

  6. A Korean Family with the Muenke Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jae Eun; Park, Dong Ha

    2010-01-01

    The Muenke syndrome (MS) is characterized by unicoronal or bicoronal craniosynostosis, midfacial hypoplasia, ocular hypertelorism, and a variety of minor abnormalities associated with a mutation in the fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) gene. The birth prevalence is approximately one in 10,000 live births, accounting for 8-10% of patients with coronal synostosis. Although MS is a relatively common diagnosis in patients with craniosynostosis syndromes, with autosomal dominant inheritance, there has been no report of MS, in an affected Korean family with typical cephalo-facial morphology that has been confirmed by molecular studies. Here, we report a familial case of MS in a female patient with a Pro250Arg mutation in exon 7 (IgII-IGIII linker domain) of the FGFR3 gene. This patient had mild midfacial hypoplasia, hypertelorism, downslanting palpebral fissures, a beak shaped nose, plagio-brachycephaly, and mild neurodevelopmental delay. The same mutation was confirmed in the patient's mother, two of the mother's sisters and the maternal grandfather. The severity of the cephalo-facial anomalies was variable among these family members. PMID:20592905

  7. A Korean family with the Muenke syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jae Eun; Park, Dong Ha; Yoon, Soo Han

    2010-07-01

    The Muenke syndrome (MS) is characterized by unicoronal or bicoronal craniosynostosis, midfacial hypoplasia, ocular hypertelorism, and a variety of minor abnormalities associated with a mutation in the fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) gene. The birth prevalence is approximately one in 10,000 live births, accounting for 8-10% of patients with coronal synostosis. Although MS is a relatively common diagnosis in patients with craniosynostosis syndromes, with autosomal dominant inheritance, there has been no report of MS, in an affected Korean family with typical cephalo-facial morphology that has been confirmed by molecular studies. Here, we report a familial case of MS in a female patient with a Pro250Arg mutation in exon 7 (IgII-IGIII linker domain) of the FGFR3 gene. This patient had mild midfacial hypoplasia, hypertelorism, downslanting palpebral fissures, a beak shaped nose, plagio-brachycephaly, and mild neurodevelopmental delay. The same mutation was confirmed in the patient's mother, two of the mother's sisters and the maternal grandfather. The severity of the cephalo-facial anomalies was variable among these family members. PMID:20592905

  8. A study of a family with leopard syndrome.

    PubMed

    Loyd, D W; Tsuang, M T; Benge, J W

    1982-03-01

    We report a family with multiple lentigines syndrome and a manic-like psychosis. The psychosis and multiple lentigines syndrome are genetically unrelated, since the psychosis occurred in a maternal half-sibling of the propositus, while multiple lentigines syndrome occurred in the father of the propositus. The propositus also had Gilbert's syndrome and mitral valve prolapse. No other family members personally examined had either of these last two disorders. PMID:7061405

  9. Black Kindreds: Parenthood and Personal Kinship Networks Among Blacks "On Aid."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stack, Carol B.

    This study suggests that jural parenthood, i.e. socially recognized parenthood, is the basis of the creation of personal kinship networks, commonly referred to as personal kindreds. From 1968 to 1970, field work was conducted among second generation welfare families in an urban black community in a midwestern city in the United States. The…

  10. [Families with recurrent cases of Waardenburg-Klein syndrome].

    PubMed

    Bliumina, M G; Moskovkina, A G

    1985-06-01

    Deaf children with the type I Waardenburg--Klein syndrome were studied. Secondary cases were found in 14 unrelated and 1 incest families. In 10 families probands and all their affected relatives had the type I Waardenburg--Klein syndrome. In 4 families patients were discovered with both type I and type II syndromes. In an incest family the proband seemed to have the type III, while his mother and father (sibs) had type II and their grandmother the type I syndrome. These results contradict the hypothesis claiming the origin of different types of Waardenburg--Klein syndrome to be due to the action of different genes. It is proposed that types I and II, or all types of the syndrome are caused by a single dominant gene. Potential mechanisms for clinical polymorphism of Waardenburg--Klein syndrome are related to incomplete penetrance and varying expression of this gene. PMID:4029612

  11. Linkage analysis in familial Angelman syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Wagstaff, J. ); Shugart, Y.Y. ); Lalande, M. Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Boston, MA )

    1993-07-01

    Familial Angelman syndrome (AS) can result from mutations in chromosome 15q11q13 that, when transmitted from father to child, result in no phenotypic abnormality but, when transmitted from mother to child, cause AS. These mutations therefore behave neither as dominant nor as recessive mutations but, rather, show an imprinted mode of inheritance. The authors have analyzed two sibling pairs with AS and a larger family with four AS offspring of three sisters with several recently described microsatellite polymorphisms in the AS region. AS siblings inherited the same maternal alleles at the GABRB3 and GABRA5 loci, and the unaffected siblings of AS individuals inherited the other maternal alleles at these loci. In one of the AS sibling pairs, analysis of a recombination event indicates that the mutation responsible for AS is distal to locus D15S63. This result is consistent with a previously described imprinted submicroscopic deletion causing AS, a deletion that includes loci D15S10, D15S113, and GABRB3, all distal to D15S63. The analysis of the larger AS family provides the first clear demonstration of a new mutation in nondeletion AS. Analysis of linkage of AS to GABRB3 in these three families, on the assumption of imprinted inheritance (i.e., penetrance of an AS mutation is 1 if transmitted maternally and is 0 if transmitted paternally), indicates a maximum lod score of 3.52 at 6 = 0. 34 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Fragile X syndrome in incestuous families

    SciTech Connect

    Seemanova, E.

    1996-11-11

    Reed suggested the investigation of children 219 from incestuous unions as a method for calculation of the detrimental heterozygosity of man. Some studies of latent genetics load in man have been based on the comparison of health status of incestuous children with their half-sibs born to the same mothers in matings with nonconsanguineous partners. These studies were limited to the detection of autosomal-recessive genes leading to abnormal phenotypes or mental deficiency in homozygotes. The highest coefficient of inbreeding in human beings is 1/4 in offspring of incestuous matings: hence, the high proportion of affected homozygotes and low incidence of affected individuals among their maternal half-sibs. Mental deficiency in incestuous children represents not only cases of simple recessive inheritance. Recently, we observed three incestuous families in which fragile X syndrome was detected. The fra(X) children were born to carriers from incestuous unions as well as to unrelated partners. Therefore, we recommend use of incestuous children and their maternal half-sibs as a control group for studies estimating latent genetic load after investigation for fra(X). The incidence of fra(X) syndrome is high, and mental retardation in heterozygotes is uncommon. Both of these factors can play a role in the occurrence of incest, and in pregnancy at young age, as well as in multiple partnerships. Families of heterozygotes for fragile X should be excluded from the material for the calculation of human latent detrimental (autosomal-recessive) genetic load. 3 refs., 3 figs.

  13. Familial carpal tunnel syndrome: a report of a Finnish family.

    PubMed

    Mahjneh, I; Saarinen, A; Siivola, J

    2001-12-01

    The existence of familial carpal tunnel syndrome (FCTS) as a separate autonomic entity has been discussed during the last few years. In order to contribute with more data to the literature, we report here the results of clinical. electrophysiological, pathological and radiological studies performed in 5 patients belonging to the same Finnish pedigree. The disease appeared usually before the second decade with numbness and pain on the I--III digits. In most patients symptoms were unilateral but within 2 years they became bilateral. In all patients typical electrophysiological features of median nerve entrapment have been recorded. X-rays of the wrist showed narrow carpal tunnel in all patients. In all patients the possibility of having HNPP as well as familial amyloidosis has been excluded by molecular genetic and pathological studies. All patients underwent surgery and at postoperative stage symptoms were relieved or completely disappeared. Our study supports the theory that FCTS exists as a separate autonomic entity, therefore it is important in front of a sporadic case to investigate the family occurrence of CTS. PMID:11903093

  14. A novel CHST3 allele associated with spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia and hearing loss in Pakistani kindred.

    PubMed

    Waryah, A M; Shahzad, M; Shaikh, H; Sheikh, S A; Channa, N A; Hufnagel, R B; Makhdoom, A; Riazuddin, S; Ahmed, Z M

    2016-07-01

    Skeletal dysplasias (SDs) are highly heterogeneous disorders composed of 40 clinical sub-types that are part of 456 well-delineated syndromes in humans. Here, we enrolled consanguineous kindred from a remote area of Sindh province of Pakistan, with 14 affected individuals suffering with short stature, kyphoscoliosis, joint dislocations, clubfoot, heart valve anomalies and progressive bilateral mixed hearing loss. To identify pathogenic variants in this family, whole exome sequencing (WES) was performed in one affected and one normal individual, which revealed a novel transversion mutation (c.802G>T; p.Glu268*) in CHST3 associated with the phenotype. CHST3 encodes a chondroitin 6-O-sulfotransferase-1 (C6ST-1) enzyme that is essential for the sulfation of proteoglycans found in cartilages. Previously, mutations in CHST3 have largely been reported in sporadic cases of SD, primarily with severe spinal abnormalities, joint dislocations, joint contractures, and clubfoot. Clinical and radiological examination of the affected individuals in this family provides new insights into phenotypic spectrum of CHST3 alleles and disease progression with age. PMID:26572954

  15. Recognizing Family Dynamics in the Treatment of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sperry, Len

    2012-01-01

    Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is an increasingly common chronic medical condition that affects not only patients but also their families. Because family dynamics, particularly the family life cycle, can and does influence the disease process, those providing counseling to CFS patients and their families would do well to recognize these dynamics.…

  16. Familial neuroendocrine tumor syndromes: from genetics to clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Akihiro; Katai, Miyuki; Hashizume, Kiyoshi; Fukushima, Yoshimitsu

    2006-01-01

    Thanks to recent developments in molecular biology and cancer genetics, genetic testing has become widely available and useful in several kinds of familial tumor syndrome. However, the impact of genetic testing on medical management is not always straightforward. Clinicians have to consider the psychological impact and ethical complexities of communicating hereditary cancer risk information to families. This review notes some points on genetic counseling before and after genetic testing for familial neuroendocrine tumor syndromes. PMID:17001463

  17. SIDS Family Adjustment Scale: A Method of Assessing Family Adjustment to Sudden Infant Death Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    May, Harold J.; Breme, Frederick J.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) and the family's resultant grief process. Explores SIDS as a family crisis, and by identifying the psychological factors or tasks pertinent to family adjustment, proposes a SIDS Family Adjustment Scale which assists in recognizing adaptive and maladaptive grief responses. (Author)

  18. Divorce in families of children with Down Syndrome or Rett Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lederman, Vivian Renne Gerber; Alves, Bianca dos Santos; Negrão, Juliana; Maria, Juliana Negrão; Schwartzman, José Salomão; D'Antino, Maria Eloisa Famá; Brunoni, Decio

    2015-05-01

    This study evaluates the impact in the stability and management of the marriage of parents of a child with Down or Rett Syndrome. Morbidity of the syndromes and the marital status of the couples before and after the birth of the affected children were considered variables. The divorce rate in families with Down syndrome was 10%, similar to the Brazilian rate population. In Rett Syndrome, the divorce rate was significantly higher, 23.5%. The higher morbidity of Rett Syndrome, and the moment of diagnosis could be relevant factors for the increased divorce rate related to this syndrome. PMID:26017939

  19. Tumour spectrum in the FAMMM syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, H. T.; Fusaro, R. M.; Pester, J.; Oosterhuis, J. A.; Went, L. N.; Rumke, P.; Neering, H.; Lynch, J. F.

    1981-01-01

    The Familial Atypical Multiple Mole-Melanoma Syndrome (FAMMM) is characterized by an autosomal dominantly inherited susceptibility to multiple atypical naevi. Patients with this hereditary phenotype show a strong susceptibility to cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM). Our investigation of an extended Dutch kindred showing the FAMMM phenotype revealed a proband with bilateral intraocular malignant melanoma (IOM) and multiple CMM. The family revealed an array of tumours which included carcinoma of the lung, skin, larynx, and breast in addition to CMM and IOM, which were transmitted vertically through 3 generations. There was male-to-male transmission, and the number of affected males and females was about the same, which was consistent with an autosomal dominant inheritance. Thus the FAMMM syndrome not only indicates a potential for CMM, but a susceptibility to other systemic cancers as well. These observations, though limited to a single kindred, merit a painstaking evaluation of cancer of all anatomical sites in other kindreds showing the FAMMM syndrome. Such studies could yield clues to cancer aetiology, pathogenesis, and control. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7295511

  20. Genetic and morphological findings in progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis (Byler disease [PFIC-1] and Byler syndrome): evidence for heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Bull, L N; Carlton, V E; Stricker, N L; Baharloo, S; DeYoung, J A; Freimer, N B; Magid, M S; Kahn, E; Markowitz, J; DiCarlo, F J; McLoughlin, L; Boyle, J T; Dahms, B B; Faught, P R; Fitzgerald, J F; Piccoli, D A; Witzleben, C L; O'Connell, N C; Setchell, K D; Agostini, R M; Kocoshis, S A; Reyes, J; Knisely, A S

    1997-07-01

    Byler disease (ByD) is an autosomal recessive disorder in which cholestasis of onset in infancy leads to hepatic fibrosis and death. Children who have a clinically similar disorder, but are not members of the Amish kindred in which ByD was described, are said to have Byler syndrome (ByS). Controversy exists as to whether ByD and ByS (subtypes of progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis [PFIC]) represent one clinicopathological entity. The gene for ByD has been mapped to a 19-cM region of 18q21-q22. PFIC caused by a lesion in this region, including ByD, can be designated PFIC-1. Examination of haplotypes in siblings with ByS in two unrelated non-Amish families showed that the gene(s) responsible for their disorder(s) did not lie in the PFIC-1 candidate region. On light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), liver tissue differed between Amish children with PFIC-1, who had coarsely granular bile and at presentation had bland intracanalicular cholestasis, and the children with ByS in the two non-Amish families, who had amorphous or finely filamentous bile and at presentation had neonatal hepatitis. Bile acid composition of bile also differed: In the Amish children with PFIC-1 and in one ByS family, the proportional concentration of chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) in bile was low compared with normal bile; in the other ByS family, it was only slightly reduced. Genetic analysis and light microscopy and TEM of liver may help distinguish PFIC-1 from other forms of ByS. PMID:9214465

  1. [Asperger's syndrome in family context--review of studies].

    PubMed

    Zmijewska, Anna

    2010-01-01

    In recent years in the face of still growing number of diagnosis of pervasive developmental disorders there has been an increase in number of research in the functioning of family of children with autism or Asperger's Syndrome. Studies concerning families of children with autism have been predominantly occupied with the stress-coping strategies and also with the therapeutic effect of interaction between disabled children and the rest of the family. New studies with families of children with Asperger's Syndrome, apart from the coping styles of parents and the received support, are also examining the properties of the system of these families, like: cohesion, adaptability, organisation, control, expressiveness or conflict. Such a perspective enables researchers to describe the circularity of influences in these families, on the other hand, however, some methodological deficiencies of this research, as well as the lack of longitudinal studies prevent researchers from creating a comprehensive picture of functioning of these families. PMID:21452506

  2. Familial colorectal cancer syndromes: an overview of clinical management.

    PubMed

    Sammour, Tarik; Hayes, Ian P; Hill, Andrew G; Macrae, Finlay A; Winter, Des C

    2015-06-01

    Familial colorectal cancer syndromes pose a complex challenge to the treating clinician. Once a syndrome is recognized, genetic testing is often required to confirm the clinical suspicion. Management from that point is usually based on disease-specific guideline recommendations targeting risk reduction for the patient and their relatives through surgery, surveillance and chemoprophylaxis. The aim of this paper is to provide an up-to-date summary of the most common familial syndromes and their medical and surgical management, with specific emphasis on evidence-based interventions that improve patient outcome, and to present the information in a manner that is easily readable and clinically relevant to the treating clinician. PMID:25779305

  3. Family Therapy of Terroristic Trauma: Psychological Syndromes and Treatment Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Laurence

    2003-01-01

    Reviews pertinent literature on terroristic trauma and combines this information with the author's experience in treating adults, children, and family victims and survivors of recent terrorist attacks. Describes the psychological syndromes resulting from terrorism and discusses the relevant individual and family therapy modalities for treating…

  4. Nonorganic Failure-to-Thrive Syndrome and the Family System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alderette, Paula; deGraffenried, Donald F.

    1986-01-01

    Argues that nonorganic failure-to-thrive syndrome (NFTT) in infants is the result of family disengagement--the family system's maladaptive style of interaction. Proposes a systems-based approach to diagnosis and to treatment, focusing on the process of disengagement and other interaction factors. (Author/ABB)

  5. Families of 30-35-Year Olds with Down's Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, Janet

    2005-01-01

    Background: The families of a population sample of people with Down's syndrome (DS), and of their non-disabled controls, have been followed since early childhood, and the families have now been seen again as their sons and daughters reached age 30 and 35 years. Methods: A semi-structured interview schedule was used, including items from the…

  6. Genetics Home Reference: congenital central hypoventilation syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... central hypoventilation syndrome: PHOX2B genotype determines risk for sudden death. Pediatr Pulmonol. 2008 Jan;43(1):77-86. ... Rand CM. Congenital central hypoventilation syndrome (CCHS) and sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS): kindred disorders of autonomic regulation. Respir ...

  7. Functional classification and mutation analysis of a synpolydactyly kindred.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jianda; Chen, Yao; Cao, Ke; Zou, Yonghua; Zhou, Haiyan; Hu, Feng; Ni, Bin; Chen, Yong

    2014-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to analyze a congenital syndactyly/polydactyly kindred and propose a new functional classification method of clinical significance. The modes of inheritance and mutational mechanisms were also determined using genetic analyses. Hand and foot anatomy and functions were measured using photographic images, X-ray imaging and grip ability tests. Genetic analysis comprised the genotyping of polymorphic microsatellite markers at known polydactyly-associated loci and the sequencing of the candidate gene. A functional classification system was devised to divide the clinical features into three types, which included mild, moderate or severe deformity. The family was concluded to have syndactyly type II with autosomal dominant inheritance. The microsatellites, D2S2310 and D2S2314, at the 2q31-32 chromosome, which have previously been associated with synpolydactyly type I, were found to be associated with the disorder in the current family. A 27-bp insertion mutation was identified in the affected individuals in the HOXD13 gene at this locus. The insertion added a further nine alanine residues to the polyalanine stretch within the encoded protein. In conclusion, the functional classification method described in the present study may be used to guide surgical approaches to treatment. A family was identified in whom expansion of the polyalanine tract in the HOXD13 gene causes autosomal dominant hereditary synpolydactyly. PMID:25289061

  8. A second family with CATSHL syndrome: Confirmatory report of another unique FGFR3 syndrome.

    PubMed

    Escobar, Luis F; Tucker, Megan; Bamshad, Michael

    2016-07-01

    Here we describe the second reported family with the CATSHL syndrome, a condition resulting from a unique mutation in the fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) gene. Our family confirms the consistent and unique phenotype of this condition, and the specificity of the mutation in FGFR3. The CATSHL syndrome appears to be an autosomal dominant disorder with full penetrance. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27139183

  9. Familial cryptic translocation in Angelman syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Weyerts, L.K.; Wiley, J.E.; Loud, K.M.

    1994-09-01

    The majority of patients with Angelman syndrome have been shown to have a cytogenetic or molecular deletion on the maternally derived chromosome 15. We report on a case of Angelman syndrome in which this deletion occurs as an unbalanced cryptic translocation involving chromosomes 14 and 15. The proband was diagnosed clinically as having Angelman syndrome. Multiple cytogenetic studies were done without detecting any deletion. When DNA probes (Oncor) specific for the Prader Willi/Angelman locus became available, the patient was restudied and found to be deleted for {open_quotes}region A{close_quotes} (D15S11) but not for {open_quotes}region B{close_quotes} (GABRB3). No other abnormality was detected. The proband`s mother was then studied. The chromosome 15 marker probe and D15S11 were detected on different chromosomes. Using alpha-satellite probes, a cryptic 14;15 translocation was uncovered. This balanced translocation was also found to be carried by the sister of the proband. This case, along with a case presented at the 1993 ASHG meeting, illustrates the need for using acrocentric probes when studying Angelman syndrome patients. The proband was studied using additional probes specific for this region and found to be deleted for SNRPN but not for D15S10. The breakpoint of the translocation in this patient delineates the smallest deletion of the Angelman syndrome region reported to date and therefore may represent the specific gene involved.

  10. Exome sequencing identified new mutations in a Marfan syndrome family

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Marfan syndrome is a common autosomal dominant hereditary connective tissue disorder. There is no cure for Marfan syndrome currently. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology is efficient to identify genetic lesions at the exome level. Here we carried out exome sequencing of two Marfan syndrome patients. Further Sanger sequencing validation in other five members from the same family was also implemented to confirm new variants which may contribute to the pathogenesis of the disease. Two new variants, including one nonsense SNP in the Marfan syndrome gene FBN1 and one missense mutation in exon 15 of LRP1, which may be related to the phenotype of the patients were identified. The exome sequencing analysis provides us a new insight into the molecular events governing pathogenesis of Marfan syndrome. Virtual slide http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/1229110069114125. PMID:24484584

  11. Family Functioning in Families with a Child with Down Syndrome: A Mixed Methods Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Povee, K.; Roberts, L.; Bourke, J.; Leonard, H.

    2012-01-01

    Background: This study aimed to explore the factors that predict functioning in families with a child with Down syndrome using a mixed methods design. The quantitative component examined the effect of maladaptive and autism-spectrum behaviours on the functioning of the family while the qualitative component explored the impact of having a child…

  12. Rare nonconservative LRP6 mutations are associated with metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rajvir; Smith, Emily; Fathzadeh, Mohsen; Liu, Wenzhong; Go, Gwang-Woong; Subrahmanyan, Lakshman; Faramarzi, Saeed; McKenna, William; Mani, Arya

    2013-09-01

    A rare mutation in LRP6 has been shown to underlie autosomal dominant coronary artery disease (CAD) and metabolic syndrome in an Iranian kindred. The prevalence and spectrum of LRP6 mutations in the disease population of the United States is not known. Two hundred white Americans with early onset familial CAD and metabolic syndrome and 2,000 healthy Northern European controls were screened for nonconservative mutations in LRP6. Three novel mutations were identified, which cosegregated with the metabolic traits in the kindreds of the affected subjects and none in the controls. All three mutations reside in the second propeller domain, which plays a critical role in ligand binding. Two of the mutations substituted highly conserved arginines in the second YWTD domain and the third substituted a conserved glycosylation site. The functional characterization of one of the variants showed that it impairs Wnt signaling and acts as a loss of function mutation. PMID:23703864

  13. Rare nonconservative LRP6 mutations are associated with metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Rajvir; Smith, Emily; Fathzadeh, Mohsen; Liu, Wenzhong; Go, Gwang-Woong; Subrahmanyan, Lakshman; Faramarzi, Saeed; McKenna, William; Mani, Arya

    2013-01-01

    A rare mutation in LRP6 has been shown to underlie autosomal dominant coronary artery disease (CAD) and metabolic syndrome in an Iranian kindred. The prevalence and spectrum of LRP6 mutations in the disease population of the United States is not known. Two hundred white Americans with early onset familial CAD and metabolic syndrome and 2000 healthy Northern European controls were screened for nonconservative mutations in LRP6. Three novel mutations were identified, which co-segregated with the metabolic traits in the kindreds of the affected subjects and none in the controls. All three mutations reside in the second propeller domain, which plays a critical role in ligand binding. Two of the mutations substituted highly conserved arginines in the second YWTD domain and the third substituted a conserved glycosylation site. The functional characterization of one of the variants showed that it impairs Wnt signaling and acts as a loss of function mutation. PMID:23703864

  14. Familial hepatopulmonary syndrome in common variable immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Holmes, S N; Condliffe, A; Griffiths, W; Baxendale, H; Kumararatne, D S

    2015-04-01

    Common Variable Immunodeficiency (CVID) comprises a heterogeneous group of primary antibody deficiencies which lead to a range of complications, including infectious, neoplastic and inflammatory disorders. This report describes monozygotic twin brothers with CVID who developed cryptogenic liver disease and subsequently hepatopulmonary syndrome (HPS). This is the second report of the association of HPS and CVID. Its occurrence in two identical twins implicates a genetic basis. PMID:25708586

  15. Is there a familial link between Down's syndrome and neural tube defects? Population and familial survey

    PubMed Central

    Amorim, Márcia R; Castilla, Eduardo E; Orioli, Iêda M

    2004-01-01

    Objective To verify whether Down's syndrome and neural tube defects arise more often in the same family than expected by chance. Design Population and familial survey. Setting Network of maternity hospitals in the Latin American collaborative study of congenital malformations (ECLAMC) in Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Paraguay, Peru, Uruguay, and Venezuela between 1982 and 2000. Probands 2421 cases of neural tube defects, 952 of hydrocephalus, and 3095 of Down's syndrome registered from a total of 1 583 838 live births and stillbirths. Main outcome measures Observed number of cases of Down's syndrome among siblings of probands with a neural tube defect or hydrocephalus and number expected on the basis of maternal age; observed number of cases of neural tube defects or hydrocephalus among siblings of probands with Down's syndrome and number expected according to the prevalence in the same population. Results Five cases of Down's syndrome occurred among 5404 pregnancies previous to a case of neural tube defect or hydrocephalus, compared with 5.13 expected after adjustment by maternal age. Twelve cases of neural tube defect or hydrocephalus occurred among 8066 pregnancies previous to a case of Down's syndrome, compared with 17.18 expected on the basis of the birth prevalence for neural tube defects plus hydrocephalus in the same population. Conclusion No association occurred between families at risk of neural tube defects and those at risk of Down's syndrome. PMID:14662523

  16. Linkage Analysis in Familial Non-Lynch Syndrome Colorectal Cancer Families from Sweden

    PubMed Central

    Lindblom, Annika

    2013-01-01

    Family history is a major risk factor for colorectal cancer and many families segregate the disease as a seemingly monogenic trait. A minority of familial colorectal cancer could be explained by known monogenic genes and genetic loci. Familial polyposis and Lynch syndrome are two syndromes where the predisposing genes are known but numerous families have been tested without finding the predisposing gene. We performed a genome wide linkage analysis in 121 colorectal families with an increased risk of colorectal cancer. The families were ascertained from the department of clinical genetics at the Karolinska University Hospital in Stockholm, Sweden and were considered negative for Familial Polyposis and Lynch syndrome. In total 600 subjects were genotyped using single nucleotide polymorphism array chips. Parametric- and non-parametric linkage analyses were computed using MERLIN in all and subsets of families. No statistically significant result was seen, however, there were suggestive positive HLODs above two in parametric linkage analysis. This was observed in a recessive model for high-risk families, at locus 9q31.1 (HLOD=2.2, rs1338121) and for moderate-risk families, at locus Xp22.33 (LOD=2.2 and HLOD=2.5, rs2306737). Using families with early-onset, recessive analysis suggested one locus on 4p16.3 (LOD=2.2, rs920683) and one on 17p13.2 (LOD/HLOD=2.0, rs884250). No NPL score above two was seen for any of the families. Our linkage study provided additional support for the previously suggested region on chromosome 9 and suggested additional loci to be involved in colorectal cancer risk. Sequencing of genes in the regions will be done in future studies. PMID:24349560

  17. Linkage analysis in familial non-Lynch syndrome colorectal cancer families from Sweden.

    PubMed

    Kontham, Vinaykumar; von Holst, Susanna; Lindblom, Annika

    2013-01-01

    Family history is a major risk factor for colorectal cancer and many families segregate the disease as a seemingly monogenic trait. A minority of familial colorectal cancer could be explained by known monogenic genes and genetic loci. Familial polyposis and Lynch syndrome are two syndromes where the predisposing genes are known but numerous families have been tested without finding the predisposing gene. We performed a genome wide linkage analysis in 121 colorectal families with an increased risk of colorectal cancer. The families were ascertained from the department of clinical genetics at the Karolinska University Hospital in Stockholm, Sweden and were considered negative for Familial Polyposis and Lynch syndrome. In total 600 subjects were genotyped using single nucleotide polymorphism array chips. Parametric- and non-parametric linkage analyses were computed using MERLIN in all and subsets of families. No statistically significant result was seen, however, there were suggestive positive HLODs above two in parametric linkage analysis. This was observed in a recessive model for high-risk families, at locus 9q31.1 (HLOD=2.2, rs1338121) and for moderate-risk families, at locus Xp22.33 (LOD=2.2 and HLOD=2.5, rs2306737). Using families with early-onset, recessive analysis suggested one locus on 4p16.3 (LOD=2.2, rs920683) and one on 17p13.2 (LOD/HLOD=2.0, rs884250). No NPL score above two was seen for any of the families. Our linkage study provided additional support for the previously suggested region on chromosome 9 and suggested additional loci to be involved in colorectal cancer risk. Sequencing of genes in the regions will be done in future studies. PMID:24349560

  18. Targeted therapy for hereditary cancer syndromes: hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome, Lynch syndrome, familial adenomatous polyposis, and Li-Fraumeni syndrome.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Rishi; Liebe, Sarah; Turski, Michelle L; Vidwans, Smruti J; Janku, Filip; Garrido-Laguna, Ignacio; Munoz, Javier; Schwab, Richard; Rodon, Jordi; Kurzrock, Razelle; Subbiah, Vivek

    2014-12-01

    Cancer genetics has rapidly evolved in the last two decades. Understanding and exploring the several genetic pathways in the cancer cell is the foundation of targeted therapy. Several genomic aberrations have been identified and their role in carcinogenesis is being explored. In contrast to most cancers where these mutations are acquired, patients with hereditary cancer syndromes have inherited genomic aberrations. The understanding of the molecular pathobiology in hereditary cancer syndromes has advanced dramatically. In addition, many molecularly targeted therapies have been developed that could have potential roles in the treatment of patients with hereditary cancer syndromes. In this review, we outline the presentation, molecular biology, and possible targeted therapies for two of the most widely recognized hereditary cancer syndromes -- hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome and hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer syndrome (Lynch syndrome). We will also discuss other syndromes such as familial adenomatous polyposis and Li-Fraumeni syndrome (TP53). PMID:25549704

  19. Helping Families Cope with the Severe Stress of Dravet Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Camfield, Peter; Camfield, Carol; Nolan, Kathleen

    2016-06-01

    A child with Dravet syndrome shakes family life to the core. Dravet syndrome usually has three phases: (1) up to 1-1½ years: with episodes of febrile status epilepticus but normal development; (2) age 1½ to ~6-10 years: with frequent seizures of varying types, developmental stagnation, behavioural and sleep problems; (3) after ~10 years: improvement in seizures, deteriorating gait, intellectual disability but some developmental gains. Complete seizure control is rare-simply prescribing medication is inadequate to help families. Based on structured interviews with 24 families and confirmed by more informal discussions with other families, we suggest strategies for coping with this catastrophe. A child with Dravet syndrome usually means that one parent cannot work-financial pressures should be anticipated. In Stage 1, the approach to status should include a written protocol. An indwelling catheter for rapid venous access may be helpful. In Stage 2, assistance finding qualified babysitters is required, and the extended family needs encouragement to help. Appropriate equipment, rescue medication and protocols should travel with the child. Siblings may benefit from a system of one parent "on call." An internet support group provides an invaluable lifeline. In Stage 3, family isolation may be extreme-respite care and personal time for parents are important. Death from status, accidents and SUDEP (sudden unexplained death in epilepsy) occurs in 15%. Fear of SUDEP needs to be addressed. Moving from paediatric to adult care is frightening; an epilepsy transition clinic is useful. Attention to these realities may improve the quality of life for both child and family. PMID:27264140

  20. Screening analysis of candidate gene mutations in a kindred with polycystic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Song; Cui, Kai; Sun, Zi-Qiang; Shen, Yang-Yang; Li, Pang; Wang, Zhen-Dan; Li, Fei-Fei; Gong, Ke-Nan; Li, Sheng

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To find potential mutable sites by detecting mutations of the candidate gene in a kindred with polycystic liver disease (PCLD). METHODS: First, we chose a kindred with PCLD and obtained five venous blood samples of this kindred after the family members signed the informed consent form. In the kindred two cases were diagnosed with PCLD, and the left three cases were normal individuals. All the blood samples were preserved at -85 °C. Second, we extracted the genomic DNA from the venous blood samples of the kindred using a QIAamp DNA Mini Kit and then performed long-range polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with different primers. The exons of PKD1 were all sequenced with the forward and reverse primers to ensure the accuracy of the results. Next, we purified the PCR products and directly sequenced them using Big Dye Terminator Chemistry version 3.1. The sequencing reaction was conducted with BiomekFX (Beckman). Finally, we analyzed the results. RESULTS: A total of 42 normal exons were identified in detecting mutations of the PKD1 gene. A synonymous mutation occurred in exon 5. The mutation was a homozygous T in the proband and was C in the reference sequence. This mutation was located in the third codon and did not change the amino acid encoded by the codon. Missense mutations occurred in exons 11 and 35. These mutations were located in the second codon; they changed the amino acid sequence and existed in the dbSNP library. A nonsense mutation occurred in exon 15. The mutation was a heterozygous CT in the proband and was C in the reference sequence. This mutation was located in the first codon and resulted in a termination codon. This mutation had an obvious influence on the encoded protein and changed the length of the protein from 4303 to 2246 amino acids. This was a new mutation that was not present in the dbSNP library. CONCLUSION: The nonsense mutation of exon 15 existed in the proband and in the third individual. Additionally, the proband was heterozygous

  1. Shwachman-Diamond syndrome in a Mexican family.

    PubMed

    Belkind-Gerson, J; Ontiveros-Nevares, P; Ocampo-Roosens, V; Sandoval-Juárez, D

    2001-01-01

    Shwachman-Diamond Syndrome (SDS) is an inherited condition with multisystemic abnormalities including pancreatic exocrine dysfunction, neutropenia, short stature, and skeletal abnormalities. In this report, we describe the case of a 14-year-old female with a history of neutropenia, pancreatic exocrine insufficiency and pancreatic endocrine sufficiency, pancreatic lipomatosis (10), and the development of myeloid leukemia. Postmortem examination revealed a high probability of SDS. We also describe the clinical findings in the patient's six siblings, suggesting this as a familial form of SDS. Because the gene(s) responsible for this syndrome have not yet been identified, genetic confirmation is not yet possible. This is the first report in the literature of a Mexican family with probable SDS. PMID:11440791

  2. Genotype–phenotype correlation in long QT syndrome families

    PubMed Central

    Qureshi, Sameera Fatima; Ali, Altaf; Venkateshwari, Ananthapur; Rao, Hygriv; Jayakrishnan, M.P.; Narasimhan, Calambur; Shenthar, Jayaprakash; Thangaraj, Kumarasamy; Nallari, Pratibha

    2015-01-01

    Heterogeneity in clinical manifestations is a well-known feature in Long QT Syndrome (LQTS). The extent of this phenomenon became evident in families wherein both symptomatic and asymptomatic family members are reported. The study hence warrants genetic testing and/or screening of family members of LQTS probands for risk stratification and prediction. Of the 46 families screened, 18 probands revealed novel variations/compound heterozygosity in the gene/s screened. Families 1–4 revealed probands carrying novel variations in KCNQ1 gene along with compound heterozygosity of risk genotypes of the SCN5A, KCNE1 and NPPA gene/s polymorphisms screened. It was also observed that families- 5, 6 and 7 were typical cases of “anticipation” in which both mother and child were diagnosed with congenital LQTS (cLQTS). Families- 16 and 17 represented aLQTS probands with variations in IKs and INa encoding genes. First degree relatives (FDRs) carrying the same haplotype as the proband were also identified which may help in predictive testing and management of LQTS. Most of the probands exhibiting a family history were found to be genetic compounds which clearly points to the role of cardiac genes and their modifiers in a recessive fashion in LQTS manifestation.

  3. Divorce in Families of Children with Down Syndrome: A Population-Based Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Urbano, Richard C.; Hodapp, Robert M.

    2007-01-01

    In this study, we examined the nature, timing, and correlates of divorce in families of children with Down syndrome (647), other birth defects (10,283) and no identified disability (361,154). Divorce rates among families of children with Down syndrome were lower than in the other two groups. When divorce did occur in the Down syndrome group,…

  4. Large Kindred Evaluation of Mitofusin 2 Novel Mutation, Extremes of Neurologic Presentations, and Preserved Nerve Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Christopher J.; Kimmel, Grace W.; Pittock, Sean J.; Engelstad, JaNean E.; Cunningham, Julie M.; Wu, Yanhong; Dyck, Peter J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Mitofusin 2 (MFN2) is a mitochondrial membrane protein mediating mitochondrial fusion and function. Mutated MFN2 is responsible for Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 2A2. In small kindreds, specific MFN2 mutations have been reported to associate with severity of axonal neuropathy, optic atrophy, and involvement of the central nervous system. The results of the nerve biopsy specimens suggested that the mitochondria are structurally abnormal in patients with MFN2 mutations. Objective To study a newly identified MFN2 mutation, Leu146Phe, and the associated phenotypes in a large kindred. Patients An American kindred of Northern European and Cherokee American Indian descent. Results Genetic analysis revealed a novel GTPase domain MFN2 mutation Leu146Phe that associated with clinical status of 15 studied persons (10 affected and 5 unaffected) and not found in 800 control persons. Clinical manifestations were markedly different. In 1 affected person, optic atrophy and brain magnetic resonance imaging abnormalities led to multiple sclerosis diagnosis and interferon β-1a treatment when neuropathy was initially unrecognized. Age of onset ranged from 1 to 45 years. In some affected family members, severe and rapid-onset motor sensory neuropathy led to early loss of ambulation, whereas other family members experienced minimal neuropathic sensory symptoms. Despite histologically significant loss of nerve fibers, the mitochondria were not distinguishable from diseased sural nerve biopsy specimens and healthy controls. Conclusions Novel MFN2 mutation Leu146Phe causes Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 2A2. Intrafamilial clinical phenotype variability is emphasized and has important implications in genetic counseling. The clinical phenotype may mimic multiple sclerosis when optic atrophy and the characteristic brain lesions of MFN2 on magnetic resonance imaging are present and neuropathy is mild or unrecognized. The predicted molecular pathogenesis may occur without evident histological

  5. [Genetic testing and counseling for familial tumor syndromes].

    PubMed

    Katai, Miyuki; Sakurai, Akihiro; Fukushima, Yoshimitsu

    2002-04-01

    Recent developments in molecular biology have increased our understanding of the genetics of familial tumor syndromes. Isolation of the responsible genes has made it possible to identify gene carriers before they manifest clinical symptoms, which enables early detection of disease and at times prophylactic surgery. Indications for genetic testing of susceptible family members, however, should be carefully considered. Genetic counseling must be provided to clients before genetic tests. Patients should be provided with the latest knowledge on the disease and appropriately informed of the benefits and possible problems associated with genetic test, as such information is essential for clients to decide whether they will undergo such tests. Genetic medicine is not sufficiently available at present in Japan. Establishment of genetic services that deal with genetic counseling, family support and ethical, social and legal issues is strongly desired. PMID:11977532

  6. Molecular characterization of WFS1 in an Iranian family with Wolfram syndrome reveals a novel frameshift mutation associated with early symptoms.

    PubMed

    Sobhani, Maryam; Tabatabaiefar, Mohammad Amin; Rajab, Asadollah; Kajbafzadeh, Abdol-Mohammad; Noori-Daloii, Mohammad Reza

    2013-10-10

    Wolfram syndrome (WS) is a rare autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder that represents a likely source of childhood diabetes especially among countries in the consanguinity belt. The main responsible gene is WFS1 for which over one hundred mutations have been reported from different ethnic groups. The aim of this study was to identify the molecular etiology of WS and to perform a possible genotype-phenotype correlation in Iranian kindred. An Iranian family with two patients was clinically studied and WS was suspected. Genetic linkage analysis via 5 STR markers was carried out. For identification of mutations, DNA sequencing of WFS1 including all the exons, exon-intron boundaries and the promoter was performed. Linkage analysis indicated linkage to the WFS1 region. After DNA sequencing of WFS1, one novel pathogenic mutation, which causes frameshift alteration c.2177_2178insTCTTC (or c.2173_2177dupTCTTC) in exon eight, was found. The genotype-phenotype correlation analysis suggests that the presence of the homozygous mutation may be associated with early onset of disease symptoms. This study stresses the necessity of considering the molecular analysis of WFS1 in childhood diabetes with some symptoms of WS. PMID:23845777

  7. Familial Aggregation and Segregation Analysis in Families Presenting Autoimmunity, Polyautoimmunity, and Multiple Autoimmune Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Castiblanco, John; Sarmiento-Monroy, Juan Camilo; Mantilla, Ruben Dario; Rojas-Villarraga, Adriana; Anaya, Juan-Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Studies documenting increased risk of developing autoimmune diseases (ADs) have shown that these conditions share several immunogenetic mechanisms (i.e., the autoimmune tautology). This report explored familial aggregation and segregation of AD, polyautoimmunity, and multiple autoimmune syndrome (MAS) in 210 families. Familial aggregation was examined for first-degree relatives. Segregation analysis was implemented as in S.A.G.E. release 6.3. Data showed differences between late- and early-onset families regarding their age, age of onset, and sex. Familial aggregation of AD in late- and early-onset families was observed. For polyautoimmunity as a trait, only aggregation was observed between sibling pairs in late-onset families. No aggregation was observed for MAS. Segregation analyses for AD suggested major gene(s) with no clear discernible classical known Mendelian transmission in late-onset families, while for polyautoimmunity and MAS no model was implied. Data suggest that polyautoimmunity and MAS are not independent traits and that gender, age, and age of onset are interrelated factors influencing autoimmunity. PMID:26697508

  8. A clinical variant of familial Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome.

    PubMed

    Iannello, Silvia; Fabbri, Giuseppe; Bosco, Paolo; Cavaleri, Antonina; Cantarella, Santi; Camuto, Massimo; Milazzo, Paolina; Romeo, Francesco; Belfiore, Francesco

    2003-01-27

    Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome (HPS) is an autosomal recessive inherited disease consisting of (1) partial oculocutaneous albinism (with nystagmus, strabism, and visual acuity loss), (2) platelet storage pool deficiency (with bleeding diathesis), and (3) disorder of "ceroid" metabolism with a multisystem tissue lysosomal ceroid deposition. HPS is less uncommon in Puerto Rico, where the most important studies have been performed, but is a very rare disease in Europe. HPS basic defect remains unknown, even if an HPS-causing gene was identified in chromosome segment 10q23-q23.3, and several mutations have been reported. The aim of this article is to discuss, on the basis of a review of relevant literature, a new familial HPS clinical variant observed in 2 young sisters (aged 16 and 23 years old, respectively), characterized by the typical symptoms of this syndrome. Our patients also suffered from diffuse interstitial pulmonary disease and an unexpectedly increased platelet aggregation and were prone to bacterial infections. Interestingly, we observed urinary tract abnormality in the younger HPS sister and a porencephalic cyst in the older HPS sister; both of these developmental defects have been reported in the Cross syndrome (or oculocerebral hypopigmentation syndrome). It seems that in our patients, an overlapping of the phenotypic manifestations of different rare syndromes may be present. The presence of ceroid-like autofluorescent material in urinary sediment together with the histologic aspects and the autofluorescence of oral mucosa biopsy are consistent with a ceroid-like lipofuscin storage. HPS should be carefully tested for in suspected cases to prevent the severe visual impairment, rapidly progressive pulmonary fibrosis, and other complications associated with this disorder. PMID:12827064

  9. Familial Incidence of Cardiovascular Malformations in Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kelle, Angela M; Qureshi, Muhammad Y; Olson, Timothy M; Eidem, Benjamin W; O'Leary, Patrick W

    2015-12-01

    Obstructive left-sided congenital heart lesions exhibit familial clustering, and familial echocardiographic screening for bicuspid aortic valve has become standard practice. Hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS) is a severe left-sided obstructive lesion; however, familial screening is not universally recommended. The purpose of this study was to define the incidence of cardiovascular malformations (CVMs) in first-degree relatives of HLHS probands. First-degree relatives were screened for CVM by transthoracic echocardiography. Screening was completed in 152 family members (97 parents and 55 siblings) of 52 probands. Of these, 17 of 152 (11%) had CVM. Anomalies detected included: bicuspid aortic valve in 5 (3%), isolated dilated ascending aorta in 4 (3%), coarctation of the aorta in 1, partial anomalous pulmonary venous connection in 1, anomalous, intramural coronary artery in 1, bicuspid pulmonary valve in 1, and other anomalies in 4. Most were previously undiagnosed (11 of 17, 65%). Fourteen of 52 families (27%) had ≥1 relative with CVM. Overall, 7 of 55 siblings (13%), 5 of 46 fathers (11%) and 5 of 51 mothers (10%) had CVM. Although the incidence of CVM in first-degree relatives of HLHS probands was lower in this cohort than previously reported, it remained substantial, with at least one additional member having CVM in 27% of families. The frequent occurrence of undiagnosed CVM highlights the importance of routine familial screening in HLHS. In fact, even if screening was done in childhood, it may be appropriate to screen again in the third or fourth decade to exclude isolated enlargement of the ascending aorta. PMID:26433269

  10. Segregation and sporadic cases in families with Hunter's syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Machill, G; Barbujani, G; Danieli, G A; Herrmann, F H

    1991-01-01

    Segregation analysis on five samples of families with Hunter's syndrome (158 cases overall) shows that the mutant allele segregates in agreement with Mendelian expectations for an X linked recessive disease, but the proportion of sporadic cases is significantly lower than expected under mutation-selection equilibrium. Heterogeneity among the samples is apparent, but it is caused entirely by a sample of Ashkenazi families, whose segregation pattern has previously been interpreted as supporting the hypothesis of prenatal selection in favour of the pathological allele. Conversely, our joint analysis of the five samples by a maximum likelihood approach does not suggest segregation distortion. Possible reasons for the apparent lack of sporadic cases include the effect of ascertainment bias. PMID:1908009

  11. Genetic heterogeneity of usher syndrome type 1 in French families

    SciTech Connect

    Larget-Piet, D.; Gerber, S.; Rozet, J.M. ); Bonneau, D. ); Marc, S.; Weissenbach, J. ); Ghazi, I.; Dufier, J.L. ); David, A. ); Bitoun, P. )

    1994-05-01

    Usher syndrome type 1 (US1) is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by profound congenital hearing impairment with unintelligible speech, early retinitis pigmentosa, and constant vestibular dysfunction. Three localizations have been described in US1: USH1A, 14q32; USH1B, 11q13.5; and USH1C, 11p15. Studying a series of 33 affected individuals belonging to 20 US1 pedigrees of French ancestry, the authors found that none of the three localizations accounted for all US1 families in the series. However, when the sample was split into two groups according to the geographic origin of the probands' grandparents, they were able to confirm the presence of a gene for US1 on chromosome 14q32 (USH1A) in 9 families originating from the Poitou region in Western France. Moreover, they refined the genetic mapping of USH1A by showing that the disease gene maps to the D14S13 locus, within the genetic interval defined by loci D14S78 and D14S250 (location score in log base 10 = 4.90). Consistent with this, nonsignificant lod score values for linkage to either USH1B or USH1C were found in this group. With regard to US1 families of other geographic origin (Normandy and Northern France, 11 families), nonsignificant lod scores for linkage to chromosome 11q13.5 were observed. However, the HOMOG test suggested that USH1B might account for the disease in 9/11 families in the series (families 10-19), the latter two families possibly being accounted for by USH1C (maximum likelihood for heterogeneity = 7.91 in lnL; heterogeneity versus homogeneity, P = 0.01; heterogeneity versus nonlinkage, P < 0.01). The present study supports the view that Usher syndrome type 1 is a genetically heterogeneous condition that is caused by at least three genes and possibly many more. 16 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Johnson-McMillin Microtia Syndrome: New Additional Family.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Meguid, Nagwa; Gebril, Ola Hosny; Abdelraouf, Ehab Ragaa; Shafie, Mohammed Akmal; Bahgat, Mohammed

    2014-07-01

    Microtia is a congenital anomaly that is found with different prevalence among various populations. The exact etiology of ear anomalies is still unknown. We describe a new additional family with this rare disorder; Johnson-McMillin syndrome (JMS) where mother, son, and distant grandmother have multiple features of JMS in the form of microtia, facial asymmetry, ear malformation, hearing defect, and hypotrichosis. Variable presentations in this family could be referred to phenotype variation supporting an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance. We observed that the mother was very sad and suffered from feelings of guilt. We found that she had isolated herself from family and community out of fear of being stigmatized and hurt. We concluded that the occurrence of microtia is of public health importance, adhering to traditional marriage customs in Egypt increases women's risk of giving birth to a disabled child, yet the mothers are blamed and shamed for their children's birth defects by their husbands, families, and communities, while the fathers are not stigmatized. PMID:25374870

  13. Familial Binswanger encephalopathy in the absence of hypertension; a new family with the CADASIL syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Schanen, N.C.; Glusker, P.; Chung, M.

    1994-09-01

    Binswanger encephalopathy is a clinicopathologic entity characterized by deep white matter ischaemic lesions associated with hypertension and arteriosclerosis; but a rare inherited form, termed CADASIL (Cerebral Autosomal Dominant Arteriopathy with Subcortical Infarcts and Leukoencephalopathy) has been recently described with earlier onset in the absence of hypertension. This syndrome has been linked to markers in chromosome band 19q12 in of two unrelated French families. We have identified a family of Central American heritage with a similar syndrome also demonstrating an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance. Clinically, the onset of symptoms is between 19-53 years of age with variable progression in loss of neurologic function. Numerous lesions are visible on MRI involving the deep white matter including the corpus callosum as well as basal ganglia. None of the family members has had significant hypertension. Extensive evaluations of metabolic, infectious and inflammatory origin of disease have been noncontributory. In the two patients whose brains were examined pathologically, multiple cystic lesions, frequently centered around blood vessels, were present in the deep white matter and basal ganglia with diffuse loss of myelin and relative preservation of the neurons. The media of large and small parenchymal arteries shows hyaline and hydropic degeneration with replacement of the smooth muscle by a slate-grey amorphous substance on trichrome staining, corresponding to granular osmiophilic material on ultrastructural examination. There was no evidence of amyloid or atherosclerosis in the vessels. Phenotypically, this family appears to have the CADASIL syndrome. We are currently pursuing linkage analysis with chromosome 19 markers to investigate the genetic homogeneity of the disorder. Thirty-three individuals spanning three generations and including seven clinically affected patients are potentially available for study.

  14. Family Environment and Behavior Problems in Children, Adolescents, and Adults with Fragile X Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberg, Jan S.; Seltzer, Marsha Mailick; Baker, Jason K.; Smith, Leann E.; Warren, Steven F.; Brady, Nancy; Hong, Jinkuk

    2012-01-01

    We examine how the family environment is associated with aspects of the Fragile X syndrome phenotype during childhood, adolescence, and adulthood. Mothers of children (n = 48), adolescents (n = 85), and adults (n = 34) with Fragile X syndrome participated in a multisite study. For children and adults with Fragile X syndrome, the presence of warmth…

  15. Familial gigantiform cementoma with Ehlers - Danlos syndrome: A report of 2 cases.

    PubMed

    Şakar, Olcay; Aren, Gamze; Mumcu, Zeynep; Ünalan, Fatma; Aksakallı, Nihan; Tolgay, Ceren Güney

    2015-04-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome is an autosomal dominant hereditary disorder of connective tissue, while familial gigantiform cementoma is a condition that usually manifests as multiple radiopaque cementum-like masses throughout the jaws. This case report discusses the oral management and prosthetic rehabilitation of two patients presenting familial gigantiform cementoma with Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome. PMID:25932318

  16. Familial gigantiform cementoma with Ehlers - Danlos syndrome: A report of 2 cases

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome is an autosomal dominant hereditary disorder of connective tissue, while familial gigantiform cementoma is a condition that usually manifests as multiple radiopaque cementum-like masses throughout the jaws. This case report discusses the oral management and prosthetic rehabilitation of two patients presenting familial gigantiform cementoma with Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome. PMID:25932318

  17. Experiences of Supporting People with Down Syndrome and Alzheimer's Disease in Aged Care and Family Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carling-Jenkins, Rachel; Torr, Jennifer; Iacono, Teresa; Bigby, Christine

    2012-01-01

    Background: Research addressing the experiences of families of adults with Down syndrome and Alzheimer's disease in seeking diagnosis and gaining support is limited. The aim of this study was to gain a greater understanding of these processes by exploring the experiences of families and carers in supporting people with Down syndrome and…

  18. Towards identification of an epilepsy gene in a large family with idiopathic generalized epilepsy

    SciTech Connect

    Roussear, M.; Lopes-Cendes, I.; Berkovic, S.F.

    1994-09-01

    To identify the disease gene in a large, multiplex family segregating an autosomal dominant form of idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE). The IGEs have been recognized for several decades as being genetically determined. However, large pedigrees with a clear Mendelian inheritance are not commonly available. This, and the presence of locus heterogeneity have been obstacles to the identification of linkage in several IGE syndromes. We have identified a large IGE kindred with fifty-eight living individuals, including 26 affecteds, showing a clear autosomal dominant inheritance with incomplete penetrance. Forty-fur informative individuals, including 23 affecteds, were selected for the linkage studies. We have chosen 200 polymorphic microsatellite markers, about 20 cM apart, throughout the human autosomes as a genome-search linkage strategy. To date, 47 markers, representing 30% of the human genome, have been excluded for linkage in the Australian kindred. As our study progresses, we will report up-to-date results.

  19. Affected Kindred Analysis of Human X Chromosome Exomes to Identify Novel X-Linked Intellectual Disability Genes

    PubMed Central

    Niranjan, Tejasvi S.; Skinner, Cindy; May, Melanie; Turner, Tychele; Rose, Rebecca; Stevenson, Roger; Schwartz, Charles E.; Wang, Tao

    2015-01-01

    X-linked Intellectual Disability (XLID) is a group of genetically heterogeneous disorders caused by mutations in genes on the X chromosome. Deleterious mutations in ~10% of X chromosome genes are implicated in causing XLID disorders in ~50% of known and suspected XLID families. The remaining XLID genes are expected to be rare and even private to individual families. To systematically identify these XLID genes, we sequenced the X chromosome exome (X-exome) in 56 well-established XLID families (a single affected male from 30 families and two affected males from 26 families) using an Agilent SureSelect X-exome kit and the Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform. To enrich for disease-causing mutations, we first utilized variant filters based on dbSNP, the male-restricted portions of the 1000 Genomes Project, or the Exome Variant Server datasets. However, these databases present limitations as automatic filters for enrichment of XLID genes. We therefore developed and optimized a strategy that uses a cohort of affected male kindred pairs and an additional small cohort of affected unrelated males to enrich for potentially pathological variants and to remove neutral variants. This strategy, which we refer to as Affected Kindred/Cross-Cohort Analysis, achieves a substantial enrichment for potentially pathological variants in known XLID genes compared to variant filters from public reference databases, and it has identified novel XLID candidate genes. We conclude that Affected Kindred/Cross-Cohort Analysis can effectively enrich for disease-causing genes in rare, Mendelian disorders, and that public reference databases can be used effectively, but cautiously, as automatic filters for X-linked disorders. PMID:25679214

  20. Two Cases of Nevoid Basal Cell CarcinomaSyndrome in One Family

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Dong Jin; Kwon, Yeon Sook; Roh, Mi Ryung

    2008-01-01

    The nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome, or Gorlin-Goltz syndrome, is an autosomal dominant multiple system disorder with high penetrance and variable expressions, although it can also arise spontaneously. The diagnostic criteria for nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome include multiple basal cell carcinomas, palmoplantar pits, multiple odontogenic keratocysts, skeletal anomalies, positive family history, ectopic calcification and neurological anomalies. We report a brother and sister who were both diagnosed with nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome. PMID:27303197

  1. Genetics of propionic acidemia in a Mennonite-Amish kindred.

    PubMed

    Kidd, J R; Wolf, B; Hsia, E; Kidd, K K

    1980-03-01

    A large Mennonite kindred was found to have propionic acidemia (complementation group pcc C) in at least four different sibships. Even within this kindred and this complementation group (where etiology may be assumed to be identical), there is a wide range of symptoms exhibited by homozygous pcc C-deficient individuals. The inbreeding coefficients (f) for the affected sibships ranged from 4.776 X 10(3) to 2.003 X 10(-2). Data from this study strongly support the single-locus autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. Three couples were found to be common in the ancestry (9--11 generations ago) of all eight parents of the four affected sibships. Relative likelihoods for a member of each of those couples to have been the early carrier of the defective allele were calculated at 1539, 278, and 1. Thus, one couple was designated the most likely earliest-known transmitter of the pcc-deficient allele. PMID:7386459

  2. Familial pattern of large vestibular aqueduct syndrome in a Chinese family

    PubMed Central

    Hazmi, Mohd; Ab Aziz, A.; Asma, A.

    2013-01-01

    Large Vestibular Aqueduct Syndrome (LVAS) is the most common radiographic malformation in children with early onset of hearing loss. Usually its occurrence is non-familial, however intriguingly a portion of patients with LVAS is found to have evidence of genetic predisposition. We described cases of LVAS in two siblings of a Chinese family. The elder sister first presented with reduced hearing since childhood and her brother has a similar complaint upon further questioning. Their hearing test showed bilateral sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) and computed tomography (CT) of temporal bone showed enlarged vestibular aqueduct in both patients. We described an approach to diagnosis of LVAS and highlight the importance of hearing assessment in genetic link hearing loss. PMID:27034633

  3. Familial pattern of large vestibular aqueduct syndrome in a Chinese family.

    PubMed

    Hazmi, Mohd; Ab Aziz, A; Asma, A

    2013-01-01

    Large Vestibular Aqueduct Syndrome (LVAS) is the most common radiographic malformation in children with early onset of hearing loss. Usually its occurrence is non-familial, however intriguingly a portion of patients with LVAS is found to have evidence of genetic predisposition. We described cases of LVAS in two siblings of a Chinese family. The elder sister first presented with reduced hearing since childhood and her brother has a similar complaint upon further questioning. Their hearing test showed bilateral sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) and computed tomography (CT) of temporal bone showed enlarged vestibular aqueduct in both patients. We described an approach to diagnosis of LVAS and highlight the importance of hearing assessment in genetic link hearing loss. PMID:27034633

  4. Familial pituitary adenomas.

    PubMed

    Vandeva, S; Vasilev, V; Vroonen, L; Naves, L; Jaffrain-Rea, M-L; Daly, A F; Zacharieva, S; Beckers, A

    2010-12-01

    Pituitary adenomas are benign intracranial neoplasms that present a major clinical concern because of hormonal overproduction or compression symptoms of adjacent structures. Most arise in a sporadic setting with a small percentage developing as a part of familial syndromes such as multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1), Carney complex (CNC), and the recently described familial isolated pituitary adenomas (FIPA) and MEN-4. While the genetic alterations responsible for the formation of sporadic adenomas remain largely unknown, considerable advances have been made in defining culprit genes in these familial syndromes. Mutations in MEN1 and PRKAR1A genes are found in the majority of MEN1 and CNC patients, respectively. About 15% of FIPA kindreds present with mutations of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor-interacting protein (AIP) gene. Mutations in the CDKN1B gene, encoding p27(Kip)¹ were identified in MEN4 cases. Familial tumours appear to differ from their sporadic counterparts not only in genetic basis but also in clinical characteristics. Evidence suggests that, especially in MEN1 and FIPA, they are more aggressive and affect patients at younger age, therefore justifying the importance of early diagnosis. In this review, we summarize the genetic and clinical characteristics of these familial pituitary adenomas. PMID:20961530

  5. Behaviour Problems, Maternal Internalising Symptoms and Family Relations in Families of Adolescents and Adults with Fragile X Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, J. K.; Seltzer, M. M.; Greenberg, J. S.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Studies have linked the behaviour problems of children with fragile X syndrome (FXS) to maternal well-being, but less is known about how behaviour problems relate to important family factors such as marital satisfaction and family cohesion. Methods: Married mothers of 115 adolescents and adults with FXS completed questionnaires and…

  6. Gestational, perinatal and family findings of patients with Patau syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Rosa, Rafael Fabiano M.; Sarmento, Melina Vaz; Polli, Janaina Borges; Groff, Daniela de Paoli; Petry, Patrícia; de Mattos, Vinícius Freitas; Rosa, Rosana Cardoso M.; Trevisan, Patrícia; Zen, Paulo Ricardo G.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe gestational, perinatal and family findings of patients with Patau syndrome (PS). METHODS: The study enrolled patients with PS consecutively evaluated during 38 years in a Clinical Genetics Service of a pediatric referral hospital in Southern Brazil. The clinical data and the results of cytogenetic analysis were collected from the medical records. For statistical analysis, the two-tailed Fisher's exact test and the chi-square test with Yates' correction were used, being significant p<0.05. RESULTS: The sample was composed of 27 patients, 63% were male, with a median age of nine days at the first evaluation. Full trisomy of chromosome 13 was the main cytogenetic finding (74%). Only six patients were submitted to obstetric ultrasound and none had prenatal diagnosis of PS. The patients' demographic characteristics, compared to born alive infants in the same Brazilian state showed a higher frequency of: mothers with 35 years old or more (37.5%); multiparous mothers (92.6%); vaginal delivery (77%); preterm birth (34.6%); birth weight <2500g (33.3%), and Apgar scores <7 in the 1st (75%) and in the 5th minute (42.9%). About half of them (53%) died during the first month of life. CONCLUSIONS: The understanding of the PS patients' gestational, perinatal and family findings has important implications, especially on the decision about the actions to be taken in relation to the management of these patients. PMID:24473950

  7. Characterisation of Familial Colorectal Cancer Type X, Lynch syndrome, and non-familial colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shiovitz, S; Copeland, W K; Passarelli, M N; Burnett-Hartman, A N; Grady, W M; Potter, J D; Gallinger, S; Buchanan, D D; Rosty, C; Win, A K; Jenkins, M; Thibodeau, S N; Haile, R; Baron, J A; Marchand, L L; Newcomb, P A; Lindor, N M

    2014-01-01

    Background: Familial Colorectal Cancer Type X (FCCTX) is defined as individuals with colorectal cancer (CRC) who families meet Amsterdam Criteria-1 (AC1), but whose tumours are DNA-mismatch-repair-proficient, unlike Lynch syndrome (LS). FCCTX does not have an increased risk of extra-colonic cancers. This analysis compares epidemiologic and clinicopathologic features among FCCTX, LS, and ‘non-familial' (non-AC1) CRC cases. Methods: From the Colon Cancer Family Registry, FCCTX (n=173), LS (n=303), and non-AC1 (n=9603) CRC cases were identified. Questionnaire-based epidemiologic information and CRC pathologic features were compared across case groups using polytomous logistic regression. Results: Compared with LS, FCCTX cases were less likely to be current (vs never) smokers; have a proximal subsite (vs rectal) tumour; or have mucinous histology, poor differentiation, or tumour-infiltrating lymphocytes. There were no observed differences in co-morbidities or medication usage. Conclusions: FCCTX were less likely to be current tobacco users; other exposures were similar between these groups. Histopathologic differences highly suggestive of LS CRCs do not appear to be shared by FCCTX. PMID:24918813

  8. Hereditary multiple exostoses: report of a kindred.

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, S L; Buchanan, J R; Ladda, R L

    1981-01-01

    In a large family with 37 members with multiple exostoses, only one person has developed sarcomatous degeneration of a lesion. Our review of published reports revealed great variation in the incidence of malignancy in multiple exostoses (10 to 25%). Most studies had sampling errors leading to the apparent overstatement of risk. In large pedigrees with essentially complete ascertainment of affected subjects, the risk of malignancy is nearer 3% or less. This lower risk for malignancy may be more appropriate in counselling affected subjects. Images PMID:6977644

  9. Belief Systems of Families of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders or Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Gillian; Baxter, Donna; Rosenbaum, Peter; Zwaigenbaum, Lonnie; Bates, Anita

    2009-01-01

    Parents in 16 families of children with autism spectrum disorders or Down syndrome participated in a qualitative study examining family (i.e., all caregivers in the home) belief systems. All families had children who had recently entered elementary school or who were in the early years of high school. As a result of their experiences, families…

  10. IRF6 mutation screening in non-syndromic orofacial clefting: analysis of 1521 families.

    PubMed

    Leslie, E J; Koboldt, D C; Kang, C J; Ma, L; Hecht, J T; Wehby, G L; Christensen, K; Czeizel, A E; Deleyiannis, F W-B; Fulton, R S; Wilson, R K; Beaty, T H; Schutte, B C; Murray, J C; Marazita, M L

    2016-07-01

    Van der Woude syndrome (VWS) is an autosomal dominant malformation syndrome characterized by orofacial clefting (OFC) and lower lip pits. The clinical presentation of VWS is variable and can present as an isolated OFC, making it difficult to distinguish VWS cases from individuals with non-syndromic OFCs. About 70% of causal VWS mutations occur in IRF6, a gene that is also associated with non-syndromic OFCs. Screening for IRF6 mutations in apparently non-syndromic cases has been performed in several modestly sized cohorts with mixed results. In this study, we screened 1521 trios with presumed non-syndromic OFCs to determine the frequency of causal IRF6 mutations. We identified seven likely causal IRF6 mutations, although a posteriori review identified two misdiagnosed VWS families based on the presence of lip pits. We found no evidence for association between rare IRF6 polymorphisms and non-syndromic OFCs. We combined our results with other similar studies (totaling 2472 families) and conclude that causal IRF6 mutations are found in 0.24-0.44% of apparently non-syndromic OFC families. We suggest that clinical mutation screening for IRF6 be considered for certain family patterns such as families with mixed types of OFCs and/or autosomal dominant transmission. PMID:26346622

  11. The Importance of Older Family Members in Providing Social Resources and Promoting Cancer Screening in Families with a Hereditary Cancer Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashida, Sato; Hadley, Donald W.; Goergen, Andrea F.; Skapinsky, Kaley F.; Devlin, Hillary C.; Koehly, Laura M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This study evaluates the role of older family members as providers of social resources within familial network systems affected by an inherited cancer susceptibility syndrome. Design and Methods: Respondents who previously participated in a study that involved genetic counseling and testing for Lynch syndrome and their family network…

  12. Two novel mutations identified in familial cases with Donohue syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Falik Zaccai, Tzipora C; Kalfon, Limor; Klar, Aharon; Elisha, Mordechai Ben; Hurvitz, Haggit; Weingarten, Galina; Chechik, Emelia; Fleisher Sheffer, Vered; Haj Yahya, Raid; Meidan, Gal; Gross-Kieselstein, Eva; Bauman, Dvora; Hershkovitz, Sylvia; Yaron, Yuval; Orr-Urtreger, Avi; Wertheimer, Efrat

    2014-01-01

    Donohue syndrome (DS) is a rare and lethal autosomal recessive disease caused by mutations in the insulin receptor (INSR) gene, manifesting marked insulin resistance, severe growth retardation, hypertrichosis, and characteristic dysmorphic features. We report the clinical, molecular, and biochemical characterization of three new patients with DS, and address genotype–phenotype issues playing a role in the pathophysiology of DS. A female infant born to first-degree cousins Muslim Arab parents and two brothers born to first-degree cousins Druze parents presented classical features of DS with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and died in infancy. Each patient was found homozygous for one missense mutation within the extracellular domain of the INSR gene. Western blot analysis identified the proreceptor of INSR, but not its mature subunits alpha and beta. Of 95 healthy Muslims, no heterozygous was found and of 52 healthy Druze from the same village, one was heterozygous. This study presents two novel familial mutations in the alpha subunit of the INSR which appear to impair post-translational processing of the INSR, resulting loss of its function. Both mutations cause DS with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and early death. Identification of the causative mutation enables prevention of this devastating disease. PMID:24498630

  13. Familial partial lipodystrophy: two types of an X linked dominant syndrome, lethal in the hemizygous state.

    PubMed Central

    Köbberling, J; Dunnigan, M G

    1986-01-01

    Familial lipodystrophy (referred to in publications as the Köbberling-Dunnigan syndrome) comprises at least two clinical phenotypes which are consistent within each pedigree. In type 1 familial lipodystrophy, loss of subcutaneous fat is confined to the limbs, sparing the face and trunk. In type 2 familial lipodystrophy, the trunk is also affected with the exception of the vulva, giving an appearance of labial hypertrophy. Diabetes mellitus, hyperlipoproteinaemia, and acanthosis nigricans are present to a variable degree in some but not all patients with familial lipodystrophy, and the abnormal distribution of subcutaneous fat is the essential hallmark of the syndrome. In addition to a survey of published reports, new cases with the syndrome are described. Both types of partial lipodystrophy, occurring either as familial disease or as sporadic cases, have only been observed in female patients. Study of the pedigrees of five families with familial lipodystrophy (two Scottish and three German) suggests an X linked dominant mode of transmission, lethal in the hemizygous (XY) state. The two clinical phenotypes with their variably expressive metabolic abnormalities are consistent either with different mutants of the same allele or with two genes on adjacent loci. Other clinical phenotypes of familial lipodystrophy may exist due to further mutations of the same allele or of genes on adjacent loci. The nature of the disorder in patients with familial lipodystrophy usually escapes recognition for many years and the syndrome is almost certainly much commoner than the few families described to date suggest. Images PMID:3712389

  14. Factors Predicting Mortality in Midlife Adults with and without Down Syndrome Living with Family

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esbensen, A. J.; Seltzer, M. M.; Greenberg, J. S.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Little is known about the mortality of individuals with Down syndrome who have lived at home with their families throughout their lives. The current study evaluates the predictors, causes and patterns of mortality among co-residing individuals in midlife with Down syndrome as compared with co-residing individuals with ID owing to other…

  15. Syndrome Specificity and Behavioural Disorders in Young Adults with Intellectual Disability: Cultural Differences in Family Impact

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blacher, J.; McIntyre, L. L.

    2006-01-01

    Background: This study examined whether behaviour problems and adaptive behaviour of low functioning young adults, and well-being of their families, varied by diagnostic syndrome intellectual disability (ID) only, cerebral palsy, Down syndrome, autism, as well as by cultural group. Methods: Behaviour disorders in young adults with moderate to…

  16. Phenotypic overlap between Blepharo-naso-facial syndrome and Nablus mask-like syndrome. Report from the first Indian family.

    PubMed

    Sachdev, Manav; Rastogi, Anju; Singh, Ankur; Kumar, Kamlesh; Kapoor, Seema; Bansal, Yuvika; Goel, Shilpa

    2013-01-01

    We describe two siblings with epiphora, telecanthus, expressionless face, thick facial skin, bulky nose and profound sensorineural hearing loss. Constellation of these features presented a phenotypic overlap with Blepharo-naso-facial syndrome (BNFS) and Nablus mask-like syndrome (NMLS). They in addition had posterior helical pits. The molecular basis of NMLS is known, while BNFS remains an elusive disorder. We report the first Indian family with features having significant overlap between the two but we attempt to summarize the frequency of reported features and bring out the most consistent features for these two syndromes for the treating clinician. PMID:22697357

  17. Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia: A Genetically Diverse Group of Familial Tumor Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Pacheco, M Cristina

    2016-06-01

    Multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) syndrome is a familial cancer syndrome characterized by neuroendocrine tumors. The syndrome encompasses four major subtypes: MEN1, MEN2A, MEN2B, and MEN4. MEN1 is caused by mutations in the MEN1 gene, MEN2A and MEN2B are caused by mutations in RET, and MEN4 is caused by mutations in CDKNB1. All are inherited in an autosomal dominant pattern, but de novo cases do arise. While all subtypes are associated with neuroendocrine tumors, each has characteristic organ involvement. Identifying patients with the syndrome can aid in proper screening and treatment. PMID:27617149

  18. Three cases of Troyer syndrome in two families of Filipino descent.

    PubMed

    Butler, Shauna; Helbig, Katherine L; Alcaraz, Wendy; Seaver, Laurie H; Hsieh, David T; Rohena, Luis

    2016-07-01

    Troyer syndrome is a complex hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) due to a mutation in SPG20 first reported in the Old Amish population. A genetic mutation in SPG20 is responsible for a loss of function of the protein spartin in this disease. Since its initial report, this syndrome has also been reported in Turkish and Omani families. Here we report the case of three patients of Filipino descent with Troyer syndrome. Whole exome sequencing (WES) identified a homozygous mutation c.364_365delAT which predicts p.Met122Valfs*2 in SPG20. This is the same mutation identified in affected patients from the Omani and Turkish families, and is the first report of this syndrome in the Filipino population. Although Troyer syndrome has characteristic phenotypic manifestations it is likely underdiagnosed due to its rarity and we expect that WES will lead to identifying this disease in other individuals. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27112432

  19. Family Environment and Behavior Problems in Children, Adolescents, and Adults with Fragile X Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Greenberg, Jan S.; Seltzer, Marsha Mailick; Baker, Jason K.; Smith, Leann E.; Warren, Steven F.; Brady, Nancy; Hong, Jinkuk

    2012-01-01

    We examine how the family environment is associated with aspects of the Fragile X syndrome phenotype during childhood, adolescence, and adulthood. Mothers of children (n = 48), adolescents (n = 85), and adults (n = 34) with Fragile X syndrome participated in a multisite study. For children and adults with Fragile X syndrome, the presence of warmth and positivity and the absence of criticism were associated with fewer behavior problems. Although a higher level of criticism was significantly associated with greater behavior problems, there were only trend-level associations between levels of warmth and positivity and behavior problems during the adolescent years. The provision of family psychoeducation programs, which can reduce parental criticism, would likely benefit both the individual with Fragile X syndrome and the family. PMID:22809078

  20. Transient nephrotic syndrome after anaesthesia resulting from a familial cryofibrinogen precipitating at 35 degrees C.

    PubMed Central

    Lolin, Y; Razis, P A; O'Gorman, P; Hjelm, M; Wierzbicki, A S

    1989-01-01

    Transient nephrotic syndrome, haematuria, and cryofibrinogenuria in a child after anaesthesia were found in association with a plasma cryofibrinogen that precipitated at 35 degrees C. Investigation of the family showed this to be a familial trait probably with dominant inheritance. Images PMID:2585459

  1. Parents of Children with Asperger Syndrome or with Learning Disabilities: Family Environment and Social Support

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heiman, Tali; Berger, Ornit

    2008-01-01

    The study examined the family environment and perceived social support of 33 parents with a child diagnosed with Asperger syndrome and 43 parents with a child with learning disability, which were compared to 45 parents of children without disabilities as a control group. Parents completed the Family Environment Scale and Social Support Scale…

  2. Family Influences on Adaptive Development in Young Children with Down Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hauser-Cram, Penny; And Others

    1999-01-01

    Investigated the extent to which family environment predicted differences in trajectories of adaptive development in young children with Down syndrome. Found that growth in communication, daily living skills, and socialization domains were predicted by family cohesion and mother/child interaction beyond that predicted by maternal education. Bailey…

  3. Tourniquet Syndrome: Interest of a Systematic Analysis of Families' Social Conditions to Detect Neglect Situations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Claudet, Isabelle; Pasian, Nicolas; Debuisson, Cecile; Salanne, Sophie; Rekhroukh, Hocine

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Describe the correlates of tourniquet syndromes, analyze family social situation to detect neglectful behaviors and analyze the tracking of subsequent Pediatric Emergency Department (PED) admissions to identify at risk families. Material and methods: From January 1, 2003 to December 31, 2007 all patients admitted to the PED for…

  4. Use of Equipment and Respite Services and Caregiver Health among Australian Families Living with Rett Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Urbanowicz, Anna; Downs, Jenny; Bebbington, Ami; Jacoby, Peter; Girdler, Sonya; Leonard, Helen

    2011-01-01

    This study assessed factors that could influence equipment and respite services use among Australian families caring for a girl/woman with Rett syndrome and examined relationships between use of these resources and the health of female caregivers. Data was sourced from questionnaires completed by families (n=170) contributing to the Australian…

  5. Williams Syndrome: Daily Challenges and Positive Impact on the Family

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scallan, Susan; Senior, Joyce; Reilly, Colin

    2011-01-01

    Background: Despite the distinctive physical, cognitive, personality and behavioural characteristics associated with Williams syndrome, few studies to date have examined parental experiences of raising a child with this genetic syndrome. Methods: This explorative pilot study employed predominantly qualitative methodologies via face-to-face…

  6. Report of a kindred with x-linked (or autosomal dominant sex-limited) 46, XY partial gonadal dysgenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Fechner, P.Y.; Marcantonio, S.M.; Ogata, T.; Rosales, T.O.; Smith, K.D.; Goodfellow, P.N.; Migeon, C.J.; Berkovitz, G.D. )

    1993-05-01

    The condition termed 46, XY complete gonadal dysgenesis is characterized by the lack of testicular determination with resulting streak gonads, normal Mullerian structures, and female external genitalia. In the partial form, there is incomplete testicular determination with a wide range in the degree of ambiguous genitalia and sexual duct development. The authors evaluated a kindred in which a partial form of 46, XY gonadal dysgenesis occurred in four subjects from two generations. Pedigree analysis indicated an X-linked or possibly an autosomal sex-limited mode of inheritance. All affected subjects were ascertained because of ambiguous genitalia with minimal virilization. At 10 days of age, the proband had a subnormal plasma level of testosterone, and at 4 months, there was no rise in plasma T after stimulation with hCG. At laparotomy, a dysgenetic gonad was found on the right side, but no gonad was found on the left side. A vas deferens was present on the right, indicating the presence of functional leydig cells early in fetal life. In the other affected subjects, gonadal tissue was also limited to one side of the abdomen and showed poorly developed seminiferous tubules. The sex-determining region Y gene, which encodes the testis-determining factor, was present and unaltered in the genomic DNA of all affected subjects. Duplication of the distal short arm of the X-chromosome has been associated with 46, XY complete gonadal dysgenesis in some patients. In the authors studies, Southern blot analysis revealed that sequences of the distal short arm of the X-chromosome were present in single copy, excluding a large duplication in this area of the X. Several kindreds with familial 46, XY complete gonadal dysgenesis have been reported; five of them had evidence of an X-linked mode of inheritance. The authors study of a kindred with 46, XY partial gonadal dysgenesis further supports the role of an X chromosome gene in testicular determination. 44 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  7. Gastric juice in congenital pernicious anemia contains no immunoreactive intrinsic factor molecule: study of three kindreds with variable ages at presentation, including a patient first diagnosed in adulthood.

    PubMed Central

    Carmel, R

    1983-01-01

    The mechanism responsible for the isolated intrinsic factor deficiency in congenital pernicious anemia is unknown. A new second-antibody radioimmunoassay capable of recognizing intrinsic factor independent of the molecule's ability to bind added cobalamin was used to study six patients from three kindreds with this disorder. One of the patients was first diagnosed at age 23 because of unusual circumstances in her case; yet the other patients also demonstrated great age variability at presentation of this presumably congenital disorder, even within the same kindred. The radioimmunoassay failed to detect immunoreactive intrinsic factor in any of the six patients, suggesting that elaboration of an abnormal molecule was not the pathogenetic mechanism. An unexpected incidental finding, contrasting with this observation in congenital pernicious anemia, was immunologic evidence that a previously described patient with familial R binder deficiency clearly elaborated an abnormal R binder molecule. PMID:6823973

  8. Familial spastic paraplegia with distal muscle wasting in the Old Order Amish; atypical Troyer syndrome or "new" syndrome.

    PubMed

    Neuhäuser, G; Wiffler, C; Opitz, J M

    1976-03-01

    The Troyer syndrome was found by Cross & McKusick (1967) in 20 members of 12 Old Order Amish families in Holmes County, Ohio; it is a form of hereditary spastic paraplegia combined with distal muscle wasting, i.e. signs of involvement of lower motor neurons. The condition usually begins at 1 to 2 years and progresses at variable rates. Further manifestations include growth retardation, delayed speech development with dysarthria and drooling, and cerebellar signs; mental functions are usually not affected but severe emotional lability is a common finding. Brothers in a Wisconsin Old Order Amish family are reported with spastic diplegia, mental retardation, behavioral disorder and shortness of stature; the condition apparently is not progressive, and may be a "new" syndrome but could also represent a variant of the Troyer syndrome. Autosomal recessive inheritance is most likely, although consanguinity of the parents could not be proven. Another child in this family suffers from focal scleroderma (morphea) which is not related to the neurological syndrome. PMID:1261070

  9. Cognitive structure from childhood to adulthood in kindreds densely affected by schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Cellard, Caroline; Rouleau, Nancie; Moreau, Isabel; Gilbert, Elsa; Paccalet, Thomas; Roy, Marc-André; Jomphe, Valérie; Mérette, Chantal; Maziade, Michel

    2015-09-30

    The developmental aspects of cognitive structures from childhood until adulthood and across different levels of risk for psychopathology have been little studied. The aim of the current study was to explore the cognitive factorial structure in subsamples from highly familial and densely affected kindreds of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder - i.e. affected adult members, non-affected adult members and high-risk youth. The same neuropsychological battery was administered in a sample of 480 participants: schizophrenia and bipolar patients (n=51), young high-risk offspring (n=61), non-affected adult relatives of patients (n=96), and controls (n=272). Exploratory Factorial Analysis was performed in the control sample and yielded a 5-factor solution: verbal comprehension, processing speed/working memory, visual learning and memory, verbal learning and memory, reasoning and problem solving. Confirmatory factor analysis indicated that the hierarchical 5-factor solution was well suited for the young high-risk offspring, the non-affected adult relatives of patient and the patients. A hierarchical model with a "g" factor was a good fit for all subsamples. These results suggest that cognitive impairments may aggregate in highly familial individuals. PMID:26233828

  10. Exclusion of candidate loci and cholesterol biosynthetic abnormalities in familial Pallister-Hall syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Biesecker, L G; Kang, S; Schäffer, A A; Abbott, M; Kelley, R I; Allen, J C; Clericuzio, C; Grebe, T; Olney, A; Graham, J M

    1996-01-01

    Pallister-Hall syndrome (PHS) was originally described in 1980 in six sporadic cases of children with structural anomalies including hypothalamic hamartoma, polydactyly, imperforate anus, and renal and pulmonary anomalies. In 1993, the first familial cases were reported, including affected sibs and vertical transmission. Three of these families are sufficiently large to allow initial evaluation by linkage studies to candidate genes or loci. We have evaluated candidate loci for PHS based on three clinical observations. The first is a patient with PHS-like malformations, including a hypothalamic hamartoma, and an unbalanced translocation involving 7q and 3p. The second is a family with familial PHS where the founder's father had an autosomal dominant hand malformation previously mapped to 17q. The third is the phenotypic overlap of PHS and Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome. In this report, we exclude these loci as candidates for linkage to the PHS phenotype on the basis of lod scores of less than-2.0. We conclude that hypothalamic hamartoma is not specific to PHS and that the dominant hand malformation in one of the families was a coincidence. To evaluate the relationship of PHS to Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome, we analysed levels of cholesterol and intermediate metabolites of the later stages of cholesterol biosynthesis. There is no evidence of a generalised disorder of cholesterol biosynthesis in patients with familial PHS. On genetic and biochemical grounds, we conclude that PHS and Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome are not allelic variants of a single locus. PMID:8950676

  11. Genetic analysis of a kindred with X-linked mental handicap and retinitis pigmentosa

    SciTech Connect

    Aldred, M.A.; Dry, K.L.; Hardwick, L.J.; Teague, P.W.; Lester, D.H.; Brown, J.; Spowart, G.; Carothers, A.D.; Wright, A.F.; Knight-Jones, E.B.

    1994-11-01

    A kindred is described in which X-linked nonspecific mental handicap segregates together with retinitis pigmentosa. Carrier females are mentally normal but may show signs of the X-linked retinitis pigmentosa carrier state and become symptomatic in their later years. Analysis of polymorphic DNA markers at nine loci on the short arm of the X chromosome shows that no crossing-over occurs between the disease and Xp11 markers DXS255, TIMP, DXS426, MAOA, and DXS228. The 90% confidence limits show that the locus is in the Xp21-q21 region. Haplotype analysis is consistent with the causal gene being located proximal to the Xp21 loci DXS538 and 5{prime}-dystrophin on the short arm of the X chromosome. The posterior probability of linkage to the RP2 region of the X chromosome short arm (Xp11.4-p11.23) is .727, suggesting the possibility of a contiguous-gene-deletion syndrome. No cytogenetic abnormality has been identified. 33 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Genetic Analysis of a Kindred With X-linked Mental Handicap and Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Aldred, M. A.; Dry, K. L.; Knight-Jones, E. B.; Hardwick, L. J.; Teague, P. W.; Lester, D. H.; Brown, J.; Spowart, G.; Carothers, A. D.; Raeburn, J. A.; Bird, A. C.; Fielder, A. R.; Wright, A. F.

    1994-01-01

    A kindred is described in which X-linked nonspecific mental handicap segregates together with retinitis pigmentosa. Carrier females are mentally normal but may show signs of the X-linked retinitis pigmentosa carrier state and become symptomatic in their later years. Analysis of polymorphic DNA markers at nine loci on the short arm of the X chromosome shows that no crossing-over occurs between the disease and Xp11 markers DXS255, TIMP, DXS426, MAOA, and DXS228. The 90% confidence limits show that the locus is in the Xp21-q21 region. Haplotype analysis is consistent with the causal gene being located proximal to the Xp21 loci DXS538 and 5'-dystrophin on the short arm of the X chromosome. The posterior probability of linkage to the RP2 region of the X chromosome short arm (Xp11.4-p11.23) is .727, suggesting the possibility of a contiguous-gene-deletion syndrome. No cytogenetic abnormality has been identified. PMID:7977353

  13. Molecular analysis of FGFR 2 and associated clinical observations in two Chinese families with Crouzon syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ying; Gao, Hongbin; Ai, Siming; Eswarakumar, Jacob V.P.; Li, Tao; Liu, Bingqian; Jiang, Hongye; Liu, Yuhua; Liu, Xialin; Li, Yonghao; Ni, Yao; Chen, Jiangna; Lin, Zhuoling; Liang, Xiaoling; Jin, Chenjin; Huang, Xinhua; Lu, Lin; Liu, Yizhi

    2016-01-01

    Crouzon syndrome, a dominantly inherited disorder and the most common type of craniosynostosis syndrome, is caused by mutations in the fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR 2) gene, and characterized by craniosynostosis, shallow orbits, ocular proptosis, midface hypoplasia and a curved, beak-like nose. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR 2) gene in two Chinese families with Crouzon syndrome and to characterize the associated clinical features. Two families underwent complete ophthalmic examination, and three patients in two families were diagnosed with Crouzon syndrome. Genomic DNA was extracted from leukocytes of peripheral blood samples, which were collected from the family members and 200 unrelated control subjects from the same population. Exons 8 and 10 of the FGFR 2 gene were amplified using polymerase chain reaction analysis and were directly sequenced. Ophthalmic examinations, including best-corrected visual acuity, slit-lamp examination, fundus examination and Computerized Tomography scans, and physical examinations were performed to exclude systemic diseases. These patients were affected with shallow orbits and ocular proptosis, accompanied by midface hypoplasia, craniosynostosis, strabismus or papilloedema, with clinically normal hands and feet. A heterozygous FGFR 2 missense mutation, c.811-812insGAG (p.273insGlu) in exon 8 was identified in the affected individual, but not in the unaffected family members or the normal control individuals in family 1. In family 2, another heterozygous FGFR 2 missense mutation, c.842A>G (P.Tyr281Cys or Y281C), in exon 8 was identified in the affected boy and his mother, but not in the unaffected family members or the normal control individuals. Although FGFR 2 gene mutations and polymorphisms have been reported in various ethnic groups, particularly in the area of osteology, the present study reported for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, the

  14. [Cytogenetic study of a case of Fanconi's syndrome with a familial pericentric inversion].

    PubMed

    Crippa, L; Ferrier, S

    1975-03-01

    The cytogenetic study of a case of Fanconi syndrome in a 16-year-old boy revealed besides chromosomal breakages, quadriradials and dicentric chromosomes, a pericentric inversion of chromosome No. 1. An uncle and an aunt on the paternal side presented likewise this pericentric inversion, however without breakages or clinical signs of Fanconi syndrome. Another paternal aunt showed short thumbs, but without chromosomal anomalies. The authors point to possible genetic repercussions of this familial pericentric inversion. PMID:1165481

  15. Controversies in the surgery of patients with familial adenomatous polyposis and Lynch syndrome.

    PubMed

    Church, James M

    2016-07-01

    Dominantly inherited syndromes of colorectal cancer predisposition are characterized by multifocal neoplasia with an early age of onset. The risk of colorectal cancer is high in affected patients and care of the patients is based on the aims of cancer prevention and cancer cure. At the same time, quality of life should be disturbed as little as possible. Because patients are generally young, the stakes are high. Injudicious decision-making can have unfortunate effects on patients and families. In this article the controversial aspects of surgery in familial adenomatous polyposis and Lynch syndrome are discussed. Specifically the controversies in familial adenomatous polyposis include the timing and the type of surgery while for Lynch syndrome discussion revolves about prophylactic surgery, primary, secondary and tertiary. PMID:26869170

  16. Informing family members of individuals with Lynch syndrome: a guideline for clinical geneticists.

    PubMed

    Menko, Fred H; Aalfs, Cora M; Henneman, Lidewij; Stol, Yrrah; Wijdenes, Miranda; Otten, Ellen; Ploegmakers, Marleen M J; Legemaate, Johan; Smets, Ellen M A; de Wert, Guido M W R; Tibben, Aad

    2013-06-01

    The diagnosis of Lynch syndrome can lead to the prevention of colorectal cancer through periodic colonoscopies and removal of premalignant lesions in susceptible individuals. Therefore, predisposed individuals identified by mutation analysis are advised to inform their at-risk relatives about the options of predictive DNA testing and preventive measures. However, it has now been established that more than half of these relatives do not receive the necessary information. Barriers in conveying information include family communication problems and variable attitudes and practice among clinical geneticists. In this complex field, both medical, psychological, ethical and juridical aspects deserve consideration. Here we summarize the development of a revised guideline for clinical geneticists that allows a more active role of the geneticist, aimed at improving procedures to inform family members in Lynch syndrome and other hereditary and familial cancer syndromes. PMID:23535968

  17. Waardenburg syndrome with familial unilateral renal agenesis: a new syndrome variant?

    PubMed

    Webb, Katie M; Smith, Alisha J; Dansby, Linda M; Diskin, Charles J

    2015-06-01

    A 64-year-old man with Waardenburg syndrome presented with anuria and was subsequently discovered by renal ultrasound to have unilateral renal agenesis. The patient is one of three generations with incidental finding of renal agenesis also marked by the presence of Waardenburg syndrome. To our knowledge, there has been no mention elsewhere in the scientific literature of a variant of Waardenburg syndrome with associated renal agenesis. PMID:25402868

  18. Intrafamilial and interfamilial variability of phenotype in familial velo-cardio-facial syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Hajianpour, M.J.; Covle, M.

    1994-09-01

    Two half-sisters and their mother from one family, and two full-brothers and their mother from another family presented with features of velo-cardio-facial syndrome (VCSF)/DiGeorge syndrome (DS) with intrafamilial and interfamilial variability of phenotypic expression. None of these patients had an apparent cleft palate. Cardiac anomaly, jejunal atresia and hypocalcemia were present only in the newborn patient. Fluorescence in situ hybridization for VCFS/DS with probe D22S75 showed a deletion in the 22q11.2 region in patients available for the study.

  19. Large mesenteric gastrointestinal stromal tumor in a patient with familial adenomatous polyposis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Moschos, John; Tzilves, Dimitrios; Paikos, Dimitrios; Tagarakis, Georgios; Pilpilidis, Ioannis; Antonopoulos, Zissis; Kadis, Savvas; Katsos, Ioannis; Tarpagos, Anestis

    2006-06-01

    We report a case of a 30-year-old man who presented with severe debilitation, anemia and diarrhea over two months. Colonoscopy revealed many (>100) polyps (familial adenomatous polyposis syndrome). Abdominal CT scan showed a large mass at the left upper abdomen in conjunction with the splenic flexure. Total colectomy with mesenteric mass and adjacent small bowel removal and ileoanal pouch was performed. Examination of the resected mesenteric mass showed a gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) with scarce mitosis and infiltration of the adjacent small bowel. We describe for the first time in medical literature the coexistence of familial adenomatous polyposis syndrome and GIST in a 30-year-old man. PMID:16855925

  20. Dual Familial Roles: An Asperger's Syndrome Case Story

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ivey, Julie K.; Ward, A. Kris

    2010-01-01

    Sibling interactions are challenges that all families face on a daily basis. These interactions are significantly more difficult when one child has autism. With the apparent increase in diagnoses of autism, there are more families each year who are dealing with issues of relationships. Children learn, as part of the growing up experience, how to…

  1. A clinical study of a family with Cockayne's syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Proops, Rosalyn; Taylor, A M R; Insley, J

    1981-01-01

    Two sibs with Cockayne's syndrome are described. The recognised cellular sensitivity to ultraviolet light is confirmed. The clinical features in the two children are described and comparisons are made with some forms of xeroderma pigmentosum, a condition in which there is progressive neurological degeneration and cellular sensitivity to ultraviolet irradiation. Images PMID:7277423

  2. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome: A Guide for Families and Communities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Streissguth, Ann

    The 14 chapters of this book review the research and offer guidelines for intervention with infants and children having fetal alcohol syndrome or fetal alcohol effects (FAS/FAE). Chapters are grouped into five sections on the diseases of fetal alcohol, the science of FAS, a life-span approach to FAS, preparing people with FAS for life in the…

  3. Down Syndrome, Birth to Adulthood: Giving Families an EDGE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rynders, John E.; Horrobin, J. Margaret

    This updated book provides a collection of longitudinal perspectives on experiences of individuals with Down Syndrome, from birth to adulthood. The book is an outgrowth of a federally funded early intervention study called Project EDGE (Expanding Developmental Growth through Education). Contents cover the following topics: historical review of…

  4. Developing a Diary Program to Minimize Patient and Family Post-Intensive Care Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Locke, Meaghan; Eccleston, Sarah; Ryan, Claire N; Byrnes, Tiffany J; Mount, Cristin; McCarthy, Mary S

    2016-01-01

    A series of evidence-based interventions beginning with an intensive care unit diary and a patient/family educational pamphlet were implemented to address the long-term consequences of critical illness after discharge from the intensive care unit, bundled as post-intensive care syndrome and post-intensive care syndrome-family. An extensive literature review and nursing observations of the phenomenon highlighted the potential for this project to have a favorable impact on patients, their families, and the health care team. The goal of this article is to explain the education of all stakeholders; the introduction of the diary, video, and educational pamphlet; and the evaluation of the acceptance of these interventions. This process began with an informal evaluation of the educational products and overall perception of the usefulness of the diary by patients, family members, and staff. The efforts described contribute to the evidence base supporting diaries as an adjunct to intensive care. PMID:27153310

  5. Maternal Parenting Stress in Families with a Child with Angelman Syndrome or Prader-Willi Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wulffaert, Josette; Scholte, Evert M.; Van Berckelaer-Onnes, Ina A.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Parenting stress was investigated in mothers with a child with Angelman syndrome (AS) or Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS), which are genetically related. Method: Mothers of 24 children with AS and 23 children with PWS (2-12 years) completed the Nijmegen Parenting Stress Index-Short, Developmental Behaviour Checklist, and Vineland Screener…

  6. Trichohepatoenteric Syndrome or Syndromic Diarrhea—Report of Three Members in a Family, First Report from Iran

    PubMed Central

    Mahjoub, F. E.; Imanzadeh, F.; Mahdavi Izadi, S.; Nahali Moghaddam, A.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Intractable diarrhea of infancy (IDI) includes several types of early onset diarrhea; one of the rare etiologies is trichohepatoenteric (THE) syndrome, also known as syndromic diarrhea (SD) which was primarily described by Stankler et al. Hereby we report a family with several affected members which to our knowledge is the first case report from Iran. Report of Cases. A three-year-old boy referred with short stature, poor weight gain, and intermittent steatotic diarrhea to our center. He was born to healthy, relative parents (cousins). He did not gain any weight after four months of age and began having intermittent steatotic diarrhea, abdominal distension, and fever. He was hospitalized several times. Two other children in the family also showed somewhat similar symptoms. Two sweat tests were negative for cystic fibrosis. Workup for Celiac disease was performed several times which was negative; however, gluten-free diet was tried several times which was not effective. Workup for Hirschsprung's disease was performed but colon was ganglionic. Evidence of liver involvement was approved by elevated liver enzymes and coarse echo of liver on sonography. Discussion. Trichoenterohepatic syndrome should be put in mind in cases of intractable diarrhea presenting in a family with several affected members. Early diagnosis would save patients from unnecessary workups. PMID:26881168

  7. Van der Woude and Popliteal Pterygium Syndromes: Broad intrafamilial variability in a three generation family with mutation in IRF6.

    PubMed

    Busche, Andreas; Hehr, Ute; Sieg, Peter; Gillessen-Kaesbach, Gabriele

    2016-09-01

    Patients with Van der Woude syndrome typically present with cleft lip, cleft lip and palate, or with cleft palate only. In contrast to non-syndromic cleft lip and/or palate, Van der Woude syndrome typically is characterized by bilateral, paramedian lower-lip pits. Popliteal pterygium syndrome shares features with Van der Woude syndrome, but, in addition, is characterized by a popliteal pterygium, genital anomalies, cutaneous syndactyly of the fingers and the toes, and a characteristic pyramidal fold of skin overlying the nail of the hallux. In some patients oral synechiae or eyelid synechiae are present. Van der Woude Syndrome and Popliteal pterygium syndrome are autosomal dominantly inherited disorders caused by heterozygous mutations in IRF6. We present a three generation family with tremendous intrafamilial phenotypic variability. The newborn index patient had a diagnosis of Popliteal pterygium syndrome. The mother presented with a classic Van der Woude Syndrome, while the maternal grandfather had Van der Woude Syndrome as well as minor signs of Popliteal pterygium syndrome. In all three affecteds the known pathogenic mutation c.265A>G, p.Lys89Glu in IRF6 was identified. While inter- as well as intra-familial variability has been described in IRF6-related disorders, the occurrence of a typical Van der Woude Syndrome without any other anomalies as well as a diagnosis of Popliteal pterygium syndrome in the same family is rare. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27286731

  8. Adams Oliver syndrome: Description of a new phenotype with cerebellar abnormalities in a family

    PubMed Central

    D’Amico, Alessandra; Melis, Daniela; D’Arco, Felice; Di Paolo, Nilde; Carotenuto, Barbara; D’Anna, Gennaro; Russo, Carmela; Boemio, Pasquale; Brunetti, Arturo

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background To describe cerebellar abnormalities in a family composed by a father and two affected sibs with Adams Oliver syndrome (AOS) (OMIM 100300). Material/Methods Brain MRI and MR angiography were performed at 1.5T. Results The siblings presented cerebellar cortex dysplasia characterized by the presence of cysts. Conclusions Abnormalities of CNS are an unusual manifestation of AOS. To our knowledge, this is the first report of cerebellar cortical dysplasia in a family with AOS. PMID:24505229

  9. Unique family with Townes-Brocks syndrome, SALL1 mutation, and cardiac defects.

    PubMed

    Surka, W S; Kohlhase, J; Neunert, C E; Schneider, D S; Proud, V K

    2001-08-15

    Townes-Brocks syndrome (TBS) is a condition with imperforate anus, hand anomalies, and ear malformations with sensorineural hearing loss. Many cases are sporadic. Within and between families, the phenotype displays striking variability. Recently, the disease-causing gene for TBS was identified as SALL1, a zinc finger transcription factor. Here, we report a three-generation family with seven affected individuals who have a novel SALL1 mutation. Unique cardiac anomalies seen in this family include lethal truncus arteriosus in one patient and a lethal complicated defect, including pulmonary valve atresia, in a second patient. These severe cardiac anomalies have not previously been reported in a familial case of TBS. This family and a review of the literature indicate that cardiac evaluation is warranted in all individuals with this disorder. In addition, hypoplastic thumbs were seen in two individuals in this family and should, therefore, be considered a true feature of TBS. PMID:11484202

  10. Reduced Uptake of Family Screening in Genotype-Negative Versus Genotype-Positive Long QT Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hanninen, Mikael; Klein, George J; Laksman, Zachary; Conacher, Susan S; Skanes, Allan C; Yee, Raymond; Gula, Lorne J; Leong-Sit, Peter; Manlucu, Jaimie; Krahn, Andrew D

    2015-08-01

    The acceptance and yield of family screening in genotype-negative long QT syndrome (LQTS) remains incompletely characterized. In this study of family screening for phenotype-definite Long QT Syndrome (LQTS, Schwartz score ≥3.5), probands at a regional Inherited Cardiac Arrhythmia clinic were reviewed. All LQTS patients were offered education by a qualified genetic counselor, along with materials for family screening including electronic and paper correspondence to provide to family members. Thirty-eight qualifying probands were identified and 20 of these had family members who participated in cascade screening. The acceptance of screening was found to be lower among families without a known pathogenic mutation (33 vs. 77 %, p = 0.02). A total of 52 relatives were screened; fewer relatives were screened per index case when the proband was genotype-negative (1.7 vs. 3.1, p = 0.02). The clinical yield of screening appeared to be similar irrespective of gene testing results (38 vs. 33 %, p = 0.69). Additional efforts to promote family screening among gene-negative long QT families may be warranted. PMID:25273952

  11. Neural deficits, intelligence, maladjustment and family response in children with the nephrotic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Naidoo, L R; Moodley, T Y; Coovadia, H M; Adhikari, M

    1987-01-10

    An intensive psychomedical study of a small number of children suffering from the nephrotic syndrome is reported. Significant organic and psychological sequelae exist in the nephrotic child. The patient's family also appears to need specialist psychological attention. The urgent need for well-organised liaison psychiatric services in non-psychiatric medical departments is emphasised. PMID:2432669

  12. Family Health and Characteristics in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis, and Emotional Disorders of Childhood.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rangel, Luiza; Garralda, M. Elena; Jeffs, Jim; Rose, Gillian

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To compare family health and characteristics in children with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA), and emotional disorders. Method: Parents of 28 children and adolescents aged 11 to 18 years with CFS, 30 with JRA, and 27 with emotional disorders (i.e., anxiety and/or depressive disorders) were…

  13. Microcephaly-lymphedema syndrome: report of a family with short stature as additional manifestation.

    PubMed

    Strenge, S; Froster, U G

    1998-12-28

    Patients with the rare autosomal dominant microcephaly-lymphedema syndrome have apparently normal intelligence. We report on a boy with microcephaly, lymphedema, and short stature as an additional manifestation. The family history of our patient suggests autosomal dominant inheritance with reduced penetrance and variable expressivity. However, X-linked inheritance cannot be excluded. PMID:9880217

  14. Using an Epidemiological Approach to Examine Outcomes Affecting Young Children with Down Syndrome and Their Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodapp, Robert M.; Urbano, Richard C.; So, Stephanie A.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we utilise an approach drawn from the field of epidemiology to explore what is known and unknown about young children with Down syndrome and their families. After describing what we mean by an epidemiological approach, we review basic findings for children with intellectual disabilities, as well as challenges to performing such…

  15. The Adolescent with Down's Syndrome: Life for the Teenager and for the Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buckley, Sue; Sacks, Ben

    The book presents the results of a survey of the daily life and attitudes of 90 English families with an adolescent with Down Syndrome (DS). The first chapter reviews the typical development of DS children. Chapter 2 provides demographic data including schooling (94% attended schools for children with severe learning difficulties), residence (83%…

  16. Familial congenital anterior cervical hypertrichosis associated with peripheral sensory and motor neuropathy--a new syndrome?

    PubMed

    Trattner, A; Hodak, E; Sagie-Lerman, T; David, M; Nitzan, M; Garty, B Z

    1991-11-01

    We present three patients with familial congenital hypertrichosis localized to the anterior cervical region, associated with peripheral sensory and motor neuropathy. This association may represent a new neurocutaneous syndrome. The association of anterior midline cutaneous lesions with an underlying malformation is discussed. PMID:1666396

  17. Stress and Family Functioning in Parents of Girls with Rett Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Adrienne; And Others

    1992-01-01

    This survey of parents of 29 girls with Rett syndrome found that subjects reported more stress, lower marital satisfaction, and certain adaptations in family functioning compared to norms. However, most parents scored in the normal range. Scores were not related to socioeconomic status or characteristics of the affected child. (DB)

  18. Exploring the genetic basis of 3MC syndrome: Findings in 12 further families.

    PubMed

    Urquhart, Jill; Roberts, Rebecca; de Silva, Deepthi; Shalev, Stavit; Chervinsky, Elena; Nampoothiri, Sheela; Sznajer, Yves; Revencu, Nicole; Gunasekera, Romesh; Suri, Mohnish; Ellingford, Jamie; Williams, Simon; Bhaskar, Sanjeev; Clayton-Smith, Jill

    2016-05-01

    The 3MC syndromes are a group of rare autosomal recessive disorders where the main clinical features are cleft lip and palate, hypertelorism, highly arched eyebrows, caudal appendage, postnatal growth deficiency, and genitourinary tract anomalies. Ophthalmological abnormalities, most notably anterior chamber defects may also be seen. We describe the clinical and molecular findings in 13 individuals with suspected 3MC syndrome from 12 previously unreported families. The exclusion of the MASP1 and COLEC11 Loci in two individuals from different consanguineous families and the absence of mutations in four further individuals sequenced for both genes raises the possibility that that there is further genetic heterogeneity of 3MC syndrome. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26789649

  19. Muckle–Wells syndrome in an Indian family associated with NLRP3 mutation

    PubMed Central

    Abdulla, MC; Alungal, J; Hawkins, PN; Mohammed, S

    2015-01-01

    Muckle — Wells syndrome (MWS) is a rare autosomal dominant disease that belongs to a group of hereditary periodic fever syndromes. It is part of the wider spectrum of the cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome (CAPS) which has only rarely been described in non-Caucasian individuals. It is characterized by recurrent self-limiting episodes of fever, urticaria, arthralgia, myalgia and conjunctivitis from childhood. Progressive sensorineural hearing loss and amyloidosis are two late complications. MWS is caused by gain of function mutations in the NLRP3 gene, which encodes cryopyrin, a protein involved in regulating the production of proinflammatory cytokines. We report two patients with MWS in an Indian family associated with the p.D303N mutation in the NLRP3 gene. These findings promote awareness of these hereditary periodic fever syndromes as a cause for recurrent fevers from childhood in the Indian population. PMID:25766347

  20. Irritable bowel syndrome. Strategy for the family physician.

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, W. G.

    1994-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome is one of the most common reasons for disability and health care seeking. A sensible strategy for management incorporates a confident diagnosis based upon history, physical examination, and pertinent tests. The physician can then reassure the patient, offer dietary and stress management advice, and recommend bran to relieve constipation and to evoke the placebo response. Patients who do not respond could require supportive psychotherapy or a drug for the dominant symptom. A few require careful referral, but overall responsibility should remain with the primary physician. Images Figures 1-2 PMID:8130678

  1. Immotile cilia syndrome: A recombinant family at HLA-linked gene locus

    SciTech Connect

    Gasparini, P.; Grifa, A.; Oggiano, N.; Fabbrizzi, E.; Giorgi, P.L.

    1994-02-15

    The immotile-cilia syndrome (ICS) is an autosomal recessive trait of congenital dismobility or even complete immobility of cilia in the ciliated epithelia (MIM 244400). Recurrent upper respiratory infections in early childhood are the most common clinical findings. Recently a disease locus was mapped by sib pair analysis in two unrelated families on 6p tightly linked to HLA class II loci, such as DR and DQ. In order to confirm this assignment and to test the presence of possible heterogeneity, the authors analyzed several ICS families utilizing DNA makers of HLA class II region. Here they report the identification of a recombinant family at this locus. 3 refs., 1 fig.

  2. Osteochondritis dissecans and Osgood Schlatter disease in a family with Stickler syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Al Kaissi, Ali; Klaushofer, Klaus; Grill, Franz

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Stickler syndrome is among the most common autosomal dominant connective tissue disorders but is often unrecognised and therefore not diagnosed by clinicians. Despite much speculation, the cause of osteochondrosis in general and osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) and Osgood Schlatter syndrome (OSS) in particular remain unclear. Etiological understanding is essential. We describe a pair of family subjects presented with OCD and OSS as a symptom complex rather than a diagnosis. Methods Detailed clinical and radiographic examinations were undertaken with emphasis on the role of MRI imaging. Magnetic resonance imaging may allow early prediction of articular lesion healing potential in patients with Stickler syndrome. Results The phenotype of Stickler syndrome can be diverse and therefore misleading. The expectation that the full clinical criteria of any given genetic disorder such as Stickler syndrome will always be present can easily lead to an underestimation of these serious inheritable disorders. We report here two family subjects, a male proband and his aunt (paternal sister), both presented with the major features of Stickler syndrome. Tall stature with marfanoid habitus, astigmatism/congenital vitreous abnormality and submucus cleft palate/cleft uvula, and enlarged painful joints with early onset osteoarthritis. Osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) and Osgood Schlatter syndrome (OSS) were the predominating joint abnormalities. Conclusion We observed that the nature of the articular and physeal abnormalities was consistent with a localised manifestation of a more generalised epiphyseal dysplasia affecting the weight-bearing joints. In these two patients, OCD and OSS appeared to be the predominant pathologic musculoskeletal consequences of an underlying Stickler's syndrome. It is empirical to consider generalised epiphyseal dysplasia as a major underlying causation that might drastically affect the weight-bearing joints. PMID:19193224

  3. Familial renal cancer as an indicator of hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer syndrome.

    PubMed

    Raymond, Victoria M; Herron, Casey M; Giordano, Thomas J; Gruber, Stephen B

    2012-03-01

    Hereditary Leiomyomatosis and Renal Cell Carcinoma (HLRCC) is a hereditary condition which typically presents with cutaneous and uterine leiomyomata. Papillary type II renal cell carcinoma and other less common histologic subtypes of renal cancer have been reported in HLRCC. We describe the case of a 31-year-old man in which the pathology review of his renal carcinoma and a positive family history of renal carcinoma allowed for the identification of a pathogenic mutation in the FH gene (c.698G>A;p.R233H) confirming the diagnosis of HLRCC. Recognition of this syndrome allowed for appropriate surveillance as well as identification of at-risk family members. Pathology review is essential for accurate diagnosis of a hereditary cancer syndrome in the setting of familial renal cancer. PMID:22127509

  4. Prevalence of metabolic syndrome in the family members of women with polycystic ovary syndrome from North India

    PubMed Central

    Shabir, Iram; Ganie, Mohd Ashraf; Zargar, Mohd Afzal; Bhat, Dilafroz; Mir, Mohd Muzzafar; Jan, Aleem; Shah, Zaffar Amin; Jan, Vicar; Rasool, Riyaz; Naqati, Andleeb

    2014-01-01

    Background: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most complex and common endocrine disorder of women in reproductive years. In addition to irregular menstrual cycles, chronic anovulation and hyperandrogenism, it has many metabolic manifestations such as obesity, hyperlipidemia, hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance, dysglycemia, increased risk of cardiovascular disease or possibly endometrial cancer. Familial clustering of PCOS in consistence with the genetic susceptibility has been described. Materials and Methods: The present study assessed the clinical, biochemical and hormonal parameters including prevalence of metabolic syndrome by two different criteria in the first- degree relatives of patients with PCOS. Results: The average age of 37 index patients was 23 ± 3.6 years, with the mean age of menarche as 13.3 ± 1.2 years. The mean age and age of menarche in mothers (n = 22) was 48.8 ± 5.1 and 13 ± 1.3 years, respectively, whereas as it was 23.5 ± 4.7 and 13.3 ± 1.2 years in sisters (n = 22), respectively. Metabolic syndrome (MS) defined by International Diabetes Federation (IDF) criteria was present in 10 index patients, 1 brother, 4 sisters, 17 mothers and 15 fathers while as by Adult Treatment Panel III (ATP III) it was in 8 index patients, 5 sisters, 16 mothers and 11 fathers. Conclusion: The presence of MS or related metabolic derangements is high in the family members of women with PCOS. PMID:24944933

  5. A novel mutation in PAX3 associated with Waardenburg syndrome type I in a Chinese family.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yun; Luo, Jianfen; Zhang, Fengguo; Li, Jianfeng; Han, Yuechen; Zhang, Daogong; Wang, Mingming; Ma, Yalin; Xu, Lei; Bai, Xiaohui; Wang, Haibo

    2016-05-01

    Conclusion The novel compound heterozygous mutation in PAX3 was the key genetic reason for WS1 in this family, which was useful to the molecular diagnosis of WS1. Purpose Screening the pathogenic mutations in a four generation Chinese family with Waardenburg syndrome type I (WS1). Methods WS1 was diagnosed in a 4-year-old boy according to the Waardenburg syndrome Consortium criteria. The detailed family history revealed four affected members in the family. Routine clinical, audiological examination, and ophthalmologic evaluation were performed on four affected and 10 healthy members in this family. The genetic analysis was conducted, including the targeted next-generation sequencing of 127 known deafness genes combined with Sanger sequencing, TA clone and bioinformatic analysis. Results A novel compound heterozygous mutation c.[169_170insC;172_174delAAG] (p.His57ProfsX55) was identified in PAX3, which was co-segregated with WS1 in the Chinese family. This mutation was absent in the unaffected family members and 200 ethnicity-matched controls. The phylogenetic analysis and three-dimensional (3D) modeling of Pax3 protein further confirmed that the novel compound heterozygous mutation was pathogenic. PMID:26824486

  6. Germ-line p53 mutations in 15 families with Li-Fraumeni syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Frebourg, T.; Barbier, N.; Yan, Yu-xin; Friend, S.H. |; Garber, J.E.; Dreyfus, M.; Li, F.P.; Fraumeni, J. Jr.

    1995-03-01

    Germ-line mutations of the tumor-suppressor gene p53 have been observed in some families with the Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS), a familial cancer syndrome in which affected relatives develop a diverse set of early-onset malignancies including breast carcinoma, sarcomas, and brain tumors. The analysis of the p53 gene in LFS families has been limited, in most studies to date, to the region between exon 5 and exon 9. In order to determine the frequency and distribution of germ-line p53 mutations in LFS, we sequenced the 10 coding exons of the p53 gene in lymphocytes and fibroblast cell lines derived from 14 families with the syndrome. Germ-line mutations were observed in eight families. Six mutations were missense mutations located between exons 5 and 8. One mutation was a nonsense mutation in exon 6, and one mutation was a splicing mutation in intron 4, generating aberrant shorter p53 RNA(s). In three families, a mutation of the p53 gene was observed in the fibroblast cell line derived from the proband. However, the mutation was not found in affected relatives in two families and in the blood from the one individual, indicating that the mutation probably occurred during cell culture in vitro. In four families, no mutation was observed. This study indicates that germ-line p53 mutations in LFS are mostly located between exons 5 and 8 and that {approximately}50% of patients with LFS have no germ-line mutations in the coding region of the p53 gene. The observation of p53 mutations occurring during primary cultures of human fibroblasts shows that analysis for germ-line p53 mutations must be performed on cells that have not been grown in vitro. 49 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  7. The gene responsible for X-linked cleft palate (CPX) in a British Columbia native kindred is localized between PGK1 and DXYS1.

    PubMed

    Gorski, S M; Adams, K J; Birch, P H; Friedman, J M; Goodfellow, P J

    1992-05-01

    Human craniofacial malformations are a class of common congenital anomalies in which the etiology is heterogeneous and often poorly understood. To better delineate the molecular basis of craniofacial development, we have undertaken a series of experiments directed toward the isolation of a gene involved in human secondary palate formation. DNA marker linkage studies have been performed in a large British Columbia (B.C.) Native family in which cleft palate segregates as an X-linked trait. We have examined 62 family members, including 15 affected males and 8 obligate carrier females. A previous clinical description of the clefting defect in this kindred included submucous cleft palate and bifid or absent uvula. Our recent reevaluation of the family has indicated that ankyloglossia (tongue-tie) is also a feature of X-linked cleft palate in some of the affected males and carrier females. Ankyloglossia has previously been associated with X-linked cleft palate in an Icelandic kindred in which a gene responsible for cleft palate (CPX) was assigned to the Xq21.3-q22 region between DXYS12 and DXS17. For the B.C. kindred reported here, we have mapped the gene responsible for cleft palate and/or ankyloglossia to a more proximal position on the X chromosome. No recombination was observed between B.C. CPX and the DNA marker DXS72 (peak lod score [Zmax] = 7.44 at recombination fraction [theta] = .0) localized to Xq21.1. Recombination was observed between CPX and PGK1 (Zmax = 7.35 at theta = .03) and between CPX and DXYS1 (Zmax = 5.59 at theta = .04). These recombination events localize B.C. CPX between PGK1 and DXYS1 in the Xq13-q21.31 region. PMID:1570839

  8. Quantitative and qualitative insights into the experiences of children with Rett syndrome and their families.

    PubMed

    Downs, Jenny; Leonard, Helen

    2016-09-01

    Rett syndrome is a rare neurodevelopmental disorder caused by a mutation in the MECP2 gene. It is associated with severe functional impairments and medical comorbidities such as scoliosis and poor growth. The population-based and longitudinal Australian Rett Syndrome Database was established in 1993 and has supported investigations of the natural history of Rett syndrome and effectiveness of treatments, as well as a suite of qualitative studies to identify deeper meanings. This paper describes the early presentation of Rett syndrome, including regression and challenges for families seeking a diagnosis. We discuss the importance of implementing strategies to enhance daily communication and movement, describe difficulties interpreting the presence of pain and discomfort, and argue for a stronger evidence base in relation to management. Finally, we outline a framework for understanding quality of life in Rett syndrome and suggest areas of life to which we can direct efforts in order to improve quality of life. Each of these descriptions is illustrated with vignettes of child and family experiences. Clinicians and researchers must continue to build this framework of knowledge and understanding with efforts committed to providing more effective treatments and supporting the best quality of life for those affected. PMID:27491552

  9. Imprinting mutations suggested by abnormal DNA methylation patterns in familial angelman and Prader-Willi syndromes

    SciTech Connect

    Reis, A. ); Dittrich, B.; Buiting, K.; Gillessen-Kaesbach, G.; Horsthemke, B. ); Greger, V.; Lalande, M. ); Anvret, M. )

    1994-05-01

    The D15S9 and D15S63 loci in the Prader-Willi/Angelman syndrome region on chromosome 15 are subject to parent-of-origin-specific DNA methylation. The authors have found two Prader-Willi syndrome families in which the patients carry a maternal methylation imprint on the paternal chromosome. In one of these families, the patients have a small deletion encompassing the gene for the small nuclear ribonucleoprotein polypeptide N, which maps 130 kb telomeric to D15S63. Furthermore, they have identified a pair of nondeletion Angelman syndrome sibs and two isolated Angelman syndrome patients who carry a paternal methylation imprint on the maternal chromosome. These Angelman and Prader-Willi syndrome patients may have a defect in the imprinting process in 15q11-13. The authors propose a model in which a cis-acting mutation prevents the resetting of the imprinting signal in the germ line and thus disturbs the expression of imprinted genes in this region. 39 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS). Case report and family history.

    PubMed

    Ries, F; Ferster, A; Rieux-Laucat, F; Biwer, A; Dicato, M

    2010-01-01

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is a rare disease caused by defective lymphocyte apoptosis and is characterized by non-malignant lymphoproliferation, hepatosplenomegaly, autoimmune manifestations and increased risk of both Hodgkin's and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Most forms of the disease are due to germ line mutations of the FAS gene and manifest during the first years of life with fluctuating lymphadenopathies, hemolysis, immune thrombocytopenia. During the second decade of life disease manifestations improve spontaneously but autoimmune problems still occur and there is an increased risk of lymphoproliferative malignancy. We describe a typical case of ALPS in a now 44 year old man, followed since the age of 2 for disease manifestations that were unclear at the beginning. PMID:20882745

  11. Infantile Pain Episodes Associated with Novel Nav1.9 Mutations in Familial Episodic Pain Syndrome in Japanese Families

    PubMed Central

    Kondo, Daiki; Harada, Kouji H.; Youssefian, Shohab; Shioi, Hirotomo; Kabata, Risako; Domon, Yuki; Kubota, Kazufumi; Kitano, Yutaka; Takayama, Yasunori; Hitomi, Toshiaki; Ohno, Kousaku; Saito, Yoshiaki; Asano, Takeshi; Tominaga, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Painful peripheral neuropathy has been correlated with various voltage-gated sodium channel mutations in sensory neurons. Recently Nav1.9, a voltage-gated sodium channel subtype, has been established as a genetic influence for certain peripheral pain syndromes. In this study, we performed a genetic study in six unrelated multigenerational Japanese families with episodic pain syndrome. Affected participants (n = 23) were characterized by infantile recurrent pain episodes with spontaneous mitigation around adolescence. This unique phenotype was inherited in an autosomal-dominant mode. Linkage analysis was performed for two families with 12 affected and nine unaffected members, and a single locus was identified on 3p22 (LOD score 4.32). Exome analysis (n = 14) was performed for affected and unaffected members in these two families and an additional family. Two missense variants were identified: R222H and R222S in SCN11A. Next, we generated a knock-in mouse model harboring one of the mutations (R222S). Behavioral tests (Hargreaves test and cold plate test) using R222S and wild-type C57BL/6 (WT) mice, young (8–9 weeks old; n = 10–12 for each group) and mature (36–38 weeks old; n = 5–6 for each group), showed that R222S mice were significantly (p < 0.05) more hypersensitive to hot and cold stimuli than WT mice. Electrophysiological studies using dorsal root ganglion neurons from 8–9-week-old mice showed no significant difference in resting membrane potential, but input impedance and firing frequency of evoked action potentials were significantly increased in R222S mice compared with WT mice. However, there was no significant difference among Nav1.9 (WT, R222S, and R222H)-overexpressing ND7/23 cell lines. These results suggest that our novel mutation is a gain-of-function mutation that causes infantile familial episodic pain. The mouse model developed here will be useful for drug screening for familial episodic pain syndrome associated with SCN11A mutations

  12. Molecular analysis of FGFR 2 and associated clinical observations in two Chinese families with Crouzon syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ying; Gao, Hongbin; Ai, Siming; Eswarakumar, Jacob V P; Li, Tao; Liu, Bingqian; Jiang, Hongye; Liu, Yuhua; Liu, Xialin; Li, Yonghao; Ni, Yao; Chen, Jiangna; Lin, Zhuoling; Liang, Xiaoling; Jin, Chenjin; Huang, Xinhua; Lu, Lin; Liu, Yizhi

    2016-09-01

    Crouzon syndrome, a dominantly inherited disorder and the most common type of craniosynostosis syndrome, is caused by mutations in the fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR 2) gene, and characterized by craniosynostosis, shallow orbits, ocular proptosis, midface hypoplasia and a curved, beak‑like nose. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR 2) gene in two Chinese families with Crouzon syndrome and to characterize the associated clinical features. Two families underwent complete ophthalmic examination, and three patients in two families were diagnosed with Crouzon syndrome. Genomic DNA was extracted from leukocytes of peripheral blood samples, which were collected from the family members and 200 unrelated control subjects from the same population. Exons 8 and 10 of the FGFR 2 gene were amplified using polymerase chain reaction analysis and were directly sequenced. Ophthalmic examinations, including best‑corrected visual acuity, slit‑lamp examination, fundus examination and Computerized Tomography scans, and physical examinations were performed to exclude systemic diseases. These patients were affected with shallow orbits and ocular proptosis, accompanied by midface hypoplasia, craniosynostosis, strabismus or papilloedema, with clinically normal hands and feet. A heterozygous FGFR 2 missense mutation, c.811‑812insGAG (p.273insGlu) in exon 8 was identified in the affected individual, but not in the unaffected family members or the normal control individuals in family 1. In family 2, another heterozygous FGFR 2 missense mutation, c.842A>G (P.Tyr281Cys or Y281C), in exon 8 was identified in the affected boy and his mother, but not in the unaffected family members or the normal control individuals. Although FGFR 2 gene mutations and polymorphisms have been reported in various ethnic groups, particularly in the area of osteology, the present study reported for the first time, to the best of

  13. Employment Impact and Financial Burden for Families of Children with Fragile X Syndrome: Findings from the National Fragile X Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ouyang, L.; Grosse, S.; Raspa, M.; Bailey, D.

    2010-01-01

    Background: The employment impact and financial burden experienced by families of children with fragile X syndrome (FXS) has not been quantified in the USA. Method: Using a national fragile X family survey, we analysed data on 1019 families with at least one child who had a full FXS mutation. Out-of-pocket expenditures related to fragile X were…

  14. Waardenburg syndrome type I: Dental phenotypes and genetic analysis of an extended family

    PubMed Central

    de Aquino, Sibele-Nascimento; Paranaíba, Lívia-Maris-R.; Gomes, Andreia; dos-Santos-Neto, Pedro; Coletta, Ricardo-D.; Cardoso, Aline-Francoise; Frota, Ana-Cláudia; Martelli-Júnior, Hercílio

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to describe the pattern of inheritance and the clinical features in a large family with Waardenburg syndrome type I (WS1), detailing the dental abnormalities and screening for PAX3 mutations. Material and Methods To characterize the pattern of inheritance and clinical features, 29 family members were evaluated by dermatologic, ophthalmologic, otorhinolaryngologic and orofacial examination. Molecular analysis of the PAX3 gene was performed. Results The pedigree of the family,including the last four generations, was constructed and revealed non-consanguineous marriages. Out of 29 descendants, 16 family members showed features of WS1, with 9 members showing two major criteria indicative of WS1. Five patients showed white forelock and iris hypopigmentation, and four showed dystopia canthorum and iris hypopigmentation. Two patients had hearing loss. Dental abnormalities were identified in three family members, including dental agenesis, conical teeth and taurodontism. Sequencing analysis failed to identify mutations in the PAX3 gene. Conclusions These results confirm that WS1 was transmitted in this family in an autosomal dominant pattern with variable expressivity and high penetrance. The presence of dental manifestations, especially tooth agenesis and conical teeth which resulted in considerable aesthetic impact on affected individuals was a major clinical feature. Clinical relevance: This article reveals the presence of well-defined dental changes associated with WS1 and tries to establish a possible association between these two entities showing a new spectrum of WS1. Key words:Waardenburg syndrome, hearing loss, oral manifestations, mutation. PMID:27031059

  15. Genetic and functional analysis of a Li Fraumeni syndrome family in China

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Huaying; Liu, Jingping; Liao, Xinbin; Zhang, Shuju; Li, Haibo; Lu, Renbin; Li, Xianfeng; Lin, Wei; Liu, Minji; Xia, Zanxian; Qing, Guoliang; Li, Jia-Da

    2016-01-01

    Li Fraumeni syndrome (LFS) is a rare familial cancer predisposition syndrome with autosomal-dominant inheritance, occurring as frequently as one in 5,000–20,000 individuals. However, no LFS case has been reported from mainland China although it constitutes one quarter of population on earth. In this study, we identified, to our best knowledge, the first Li Fraumeni syndrome family in China. Six family members were affected with various tumors. A TP53 mutation (c.730G > A; p.G244S) co-segregated with the tumor phenotype within this family. Functional analysis indicated that G244S mutation disrupted the transactivity, DNA-binding and cell growth inhibition activity of p53 protein. Two available tumor samples (medulloblastoma and choroid plexus papilloma) underwent large rearrangement in the chromosomes and loss of wild-type TP53. Our data warranted further studies on the prevalence of germline TP53 mutation in various tumor patients in China. PMID:26818906

  16. Novel Loci for Non-Syndromic Coarctation of the Aorta in Sporadic and Familial Cases

    PubMed Central

    Dittrich, Sven; Rüffer, André; Ekici, Arif B.; Toka, Okan

    2015-01-01

    Backround Coarctation of the aorta (CoA) accounts for 5-8% of all congenital heart defects. CoA can be detected in up to 20% of patients with Ullrich-Turner syndrome (UTS), in which a part or all of one of the X chromosomes is absent. The etiology of non-syndromic CoA is poorly understood. In the present work, we test the hypothesis that rare copy number variation (CNV) especially on the gonosomes, contribute to the etiology of non-syndromic CoA. Methods We performed high-resolution genome-wide CNV analysis using the Affymetrix SNP 6.0 microarray platform for 70 individuals with sporadic CoA, 3 families with inherited CoA (n=13) and 605 controls. Our analysis comprised genome wide association, CNV burden and linkage. CNV was validated by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification. Results We identified a significant abundance of large (>100 kb) CNVs on the X chromosome in males with CoA (p=0.005). 11 out of 51 (~ 22%) male cases had these large CNVs. Association analysis in the sporadic cohort revealed 14 novel loci for CoA. The locus on 21q22.3 in the sporadic CoA cohort overlapped with a gene locus identified in all familial cases of CoA (candidate gene TRPM2). We identified one CNV locus within a locus with high multipoint LOD score from a linkage analysis of the familial cases (SEPT9); another locus overlapped with a region implicated in Kabuki syndrome. In the familial cases, we identified a total of 7 CNV loci that were exclusively present in cases but not in unaffected family members. Conclusion Of all candidate loci identified, the TRPM2 locus was the most frequently implicated autosomal locus in sporadic and familial cases. However, the abundance of large CNVs on the X chromosome of affected males suggests that gonosomal aberrations are not only responsible for syndromic CoA but also involved in the development of sporadic and non-syndromic CoA and their male dominance. PMID:25984793

  17. Familial occurrence of the aniridia-Wilms tumor syndrome with deletion 11p13-14.1.

    PubMed

    Yunis, J J; Ramsay, N K

    1980-06-01

    A report of a family with two half-brothers and a maternal aunt affected with the aniridia-Wilms tumor syndrome is presented. The proband showed a deletion of most of band 11p13 and of subband 11p14.1 of one chromosome 11, and the proband's mother and an older brother, both phenotypically normal, showed a balanced chromosomal rearrangement. This family demonstrates that deletion of a small chromosome segment (11p13-14.1) is responsible for the aniridia-Wilms tumor syndrome and, that in some cases, the syndrome can be familial. PMID:6246230

  18. Netherton syndrome: mutation analysis of two Taiwanese families.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shuan-Pei; Huang, Shu-Yi; Tu, Mei-Eng; Wu, Yu-Hung; Lin, Cheng-Yueh; Lin, Hsiang-Yu; Lee-Chen, Guey-Jen

    2007-06-01

    Netherton syndrome (NS) is a severe autosomal recessive skin disorder characterized by congenital ichthyosiform erythroderma, hair shaft abnormalities, and atopic diathesis. Recently, pathogenic mutations were identified in serine protease inhibitor Kazal-type 5 (SPINK5), the gene that encodes lympho-epithelial Kazal-type related inhibitor (LEKTI), a type of serine protease inhibitor involved in the regulation of skin barrier formation and immunity. In the present report, we describe the mutation analysis of two Taiwanese patients with NS. Patient 1 has heterozygous mutations; the maternal allele has novel T808I (C-T transition in codon 808) and the paternal allele has recurrent R790X (C-T transition in codon 790). Patient 2 is homozygous for a novel polymorphism R267Q (G-A transition in codon 267). The change was not detected in the patient's father. Haplotype analysis revealed that the patient was homozygous for the 5 single nucleotide polymorphisms in the genomic sequence of SPINK5 as well as the flanking (GT)(17) and D5S413, in addition to the discrepancy of R267Q. Nevertheless real-time quantitative PCR analysis revealed no microdeletion in the genomic sequence of SPINK5. Thus uniparental disomy of maternal SPINK5 allele was indicated. PMID:17415575

  19. [Molecular genetics of familial tumour syndromes of the central nervous system].

    PubMed

    Murnyák, Balázs; Szepesi, Rita; Hortobágyi, Tibor

    2015-02-01

    Although most of the central nervous system tumours are sporadic, rarely they are associated with familial tumour syndromes. These disorders usually present with an autosomal dominant inheritance and neoplasia develops at younger age than in sporadic cases. Most of these tumours are bilateral, multiplex or multifocal. The causative mutations occur in genes involved in cell cycle regulation, cell growth, differentiation and DNA repair. Studying these hereditary cancer predisposition syndromes associated with nervous system tumours can facilitate the deeper understanding of the molecular background of sporadic tumours and the development of novel therapeutic agents. This review is an update on hereditary tumour syndromes with nervous system involvement with emphasis on molecular genetic characteristics and their clinical implications. PMID:25618858

  20. Protracted febrile myalgia syndrome in a kidney transplant recipient with familial Mediterranean fever.

    PubMed

    Abdel Halim, Medhat M; Al-Otaibi, Torki; Donia, Farouk; Gheith, Osama; Asif, Ponnambath; Nawas, Moideen; Rashad, Rashad H; Said, Tarek; Nair, Prasad; Nampoory, Narayanan

    2015-04-01

    Drug-induced toxic myopathy is a complication of familial Mediterranean fever in patients who receive colchicine, especially when combined with cyclosporine. Protracted febrile myalgia syndrome is a severe form of familial Mediterranean fever. A 34-year-old man who had familial Mediterranean fever for > 15 years developed kidney failure because of secondary amyloidosis. He received living-unrelated-donor kidney transplant that functioned normally. He was on colchicine prophylaxis that was continued after transplant, and he received immuno-suppression induction with antithymocyte globulin and maintenance with prednisolone, mycophenolate mofetil, and cyclosporine. After 2 months, he presented with severe myopathy and elevated creatine kinase. Muscle biopsy showed evidence of drug-induced toxic myopathy, most likely caused by cyclosporine in combination with colchicine. Cyclosporine was replaced with sirolimus and colchicine was stopped. Symptoms partially improved and creatine kinase decreased to normal. The prednisolone dosage was reduced gradually to 5 mg daily. At 8 months after transplant, he was readmitted because of severe arthralgia, prolonged fever, pleuritic chest pain, diffuse abdominal pain, purpuric rash, macroscopic hematuria, proteinuria, and diarrhea. The C-reactive protein and erythrocyte sedimentation rate were elevated. The clinical diagnosis was recurrent familial Mediterranean fever presenting as protracted febrile myalgia syndrome. Despite the history of toxic myopathy, he was restarted on colchicine (0.5 mg, twice daily), and colchicine was well tolerated. There was marked improvement of most symptoms within several days. Follow-up 5 years later showed normal kidney graft function and no familial Mediterranean fever activity on colchicine prophylaxis. In summary, familial Mediterranean fever reactivation and protracted febrile myalgia syndrome after kidney transplant may be treated with colchicine and modulation of immunosuppressive therapy

  1. Familial translocation resulting in Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome in two related unbalanced individuals: Clinical evaluation of a 39-year-old man with Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Wheeler, P.G.; Weaver, D.D.; Palmer, C.G.

    1995-02-13

    A chromosomal translocation between chromosomes 4 and 8 resulting in Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome in 2 individuals has been traced through 4 generations of a family. Ascertainment of the family was through a newborn infant with evident Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome who had an unbalanced chromosomal translocation (46,XY,-4,+der(4),t(4;8) (p15.32;p22)). Discussion with the family documented a paternal great-uncle who also had a similar phenotype and profound mental retardation. Subsequently this individual was found to have the same unbalanced chromosome constitution as the propositus. The 39-year-old great-uncle is the oldest reported individual with the Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome. The importance of chromosome evaluation of older individuals with mental retardation syndromes is emphasized. 4 refs., 6 figs.

  2. [Considerations on family dynamics and the malnutrition syndrome in Mexican children].

    PubMed

    Vásquez-Garibay, Edgar Manuel; González-Rico, José Luis; Romero-Velarde, Enrique; Sánchez-Talamantes, Eva; Navarro-Lozano, María Eugenia; Nápoles-Rodríguez, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Since the early 1990s we noted that family dysfunction was more common in children with severe primary malnutrition than in children admitted to the hospital without malnutrition. Defects on feeding habits during the first year of life, especially early weaning and inadequate complementary feeding were more common in dysfunctional families. We also observed that chronic malnutrition in preschool children, and overweight and obesity in schoolchildren were more common in children from dysfunctional families. Once the association between dysfunctional family dynamics and obesity in schoolchildren was demonstrated, it was observed that low education of fathers and mothers increased twofold the possibility of family dysfunction: OR: 2.06; 95% CI: 1.37-3.10 and OR: 2.47; 95% CI: 1.57-3.89, respectively. In addition, the low-income and the lower purchasing power of foods were associated to family dysfunction (p<0.05). A remaining task is to explore how to assess family dysfunction in composite, extended, single-parent families where there exist other persons vulnerable to the different entities of malnutrition syndrome and indeed depend on adults for their care, food and nutrition. PMID:26581537

  3. The diagnosis of Liddle syndrome by identification of a mutation in the beta subunit of the epithelial sodium channel.

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, S N; Williams, B; Houtman, P; Trembath, R C

    1998-01-01

    Hypertension is a common multifactorial disorder associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. The kidney plays a major role in the long term regulation of blood pressure. Liddle syndrome (pseudo-hyperaldosteronism) is one of a number of monogenic disorders of salt and water transport. In a kindred with at least four affected members suffering from Liddle syndrome, we confirmed by direct DNA sequencing the identity of a novel heterozygous mutation in h betaENaC, the gene encoding the beta subunit of the amiloride sensitive epithelial sodium channel which is expressed in the distal nephron. Single stranded conformational polymorphism analysis showed cosegregation of the mutant allele within the kindred with the Liddle phenotype. An insertion of an additional cytosine into a string of six located between codons 593 and 595 results in a sequence frameshift and is predicted to produce a protein truncated by 34 amino acids. The availability of a molecular diagnostic tool has implications for the management of hypertension and genetic counselling in families with Liddle syndrome. Images PMID:9643296

  4. [A case of a probable "cancer family syndrome" presenting four synchronous malignancies of the colon].

    PubMed

    Kawamura, O; Harigane, M; Ohara, H; Satoh, H; Oda, M; Kojima, M; Watanabe, H

    1988-06-01

    A 72-year-old male was admitted because of right lower quadrant pain, Barium enema and total colonoscopy disclosed multiple colon cancers and sequentially, a subtotal colectomy was performed. The resected specimen demonstrated 3 advanced carcinomas and an adenomatous cancer with additional multiple polyps. Investigation of his family history revealed that his mother and his elder sister had died of uterine cancer, and that his elder brother, his nephew, and his niece had been operated on for colorectal cancer. We thus supposed a case of "Cancer Family Syndrome" presenting multiple neoplasms of the colon. PMID:3294469

  5. Adaptive functioning in Williams syndrome and its relation to demographic variables and family environment.

    PubMed

    Brawn, Gabrielle; Porter, Melanie

    2014-12-01

    This study assessed adaptive functioning in children and adults with Williams syndrome. The aims were to: (1) profile adaptive functioning; (2) investigate the relationship between adaptive functions and gender, CA, and IQ; (3) investigate the relationship between levels of adaptive functioning and family environment characteristics. In line with predictions: (1) there was extensive variability in adaptive functions; (2) neither gender nor IQ were significantly related to adaptive skills, but Communication skills and Interpersonal Relationship skills failed to make appropriate gains relative to same aged peers and (3) adaptive functioning was significantly related to family environment. Practical and clinical implications are discussed. PMID:25310713

  6. Heterogeneity analysis in 40 X-linked retinitis pigmentosa families

    SciTech Connect

    Teague, P.W.; Aldred, M.A.; Dempster, M.; Harrison, C.; Carothers, A.D.; Hardwick, L.J.; Evans, H.J.; Wright, A.F.; Strain, L.; Brock, D.J.H. )

    1994-07-01

    Analysis of genetic heterogeneity in 40 kindreds with X-linked retinitis pigmentosa (XLRP), with 20 polymorphic markers, showed that significant heterogeneity is present (P=.001) and that 56% of kindreds are of RP3 type and that 26% are of RP2 type. The location of the RP3 locus was found to be 0.4 cM distal to OTC in the Xp21.1 region, and that of the RP2 locus was 6.5 cM proximal to DXS7 in Xp11.2-p11.3. Bayesian probabilities of linkage to RP2, RP3, or to neither locus were calculated. This showed that 20 of 40 kindreds could be assigned to one or the other locus, with a probability >.70 (14 kindreds with RP3 and 6 kindreds with RP2 disease). A further three kindreds were found to be unlinked to either locus, with a probability >.8. The remaining 17 kindreds could not be classified unambiguously. This highlights the difficulty of classifying families in the presence of genetic heterogeneity, where two loci are separated by an estimated 16 cM. 34 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  7. [Clinical heterogeneity of the autistic syndrome: a study of 60 families].

    PubMed

    Moreno, H; Borjas, L; Arrieta, A; Sáez, L; Prassad, A; Estévez, J; Bonilla, E

    1992-01-01

    Sixty families ascertained through a single proband, has helped to better define infantile autism as a heterogeneous group of disorders. Forty four patients showed a characteristic facio- auricular dysplasia. Twenty four of these, showed increased pyruvate and lactate and laboratory findings of metabolic acidosis i.e., anion gap above 18 mEq/L or serum bicarbonate below 21 mEq/L but only nine of these probands demonstrated reduction of plasma bicarbonate below 18 mEq/lt. Plasma amino acids in 17 probands and matched controls showed increased taurine with the rest of amino acids significantly (p less than 0.05) below the control level. Glutamate and aspartate were also significantly elevated (p less than 0.05; Student t-test). Segregation analysis in thirty four of these families which linked through at least one ancestral family name, suggested autosomal recessive inheritance (p = 0.20). Three out of eight probands who received megadoses of pyridoxine (Vitamin B6), subjectively gained in language abilities, affectivity and response to behavior modification therapy. Five autistic patients proved to have clinically defined syndromes: two with the Martin-Bell syndrome, and three girls affected respectively with the Rett syndrome, phenylketonuria and dicarboxylic aciduria. PMID:1391074

  8. Mutational analysis of the androgen receptor gene in two Chinese families with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome

    PubMed Central

    WANG, SONG; XU, HAIKUN; AN, WEI; ZHU, DECHUN; LI, DEJUN

    2016-01-01

    Androgens are essential for normal male sex differentiation and are responsible for the normal development of male secondary sexual characteristics at puberty. The physiological effects of androgens are mediated by the androgen receptor (AR). Mutations in the AR gene are the most common cause of androgen insensitivity syndrome. The present study undertook a genetic analysis of the AR gene in two unrelated families affected by complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS) in China. In family 1, a previously reported nonsense mutation (G-to-A; p.W751X) was identified in exon 5 of the AR gene. In addition, a novel missense mutation was detected in exon 6 of the AR gene from family 2; this mutation resulted in a predicted amino acid change from phenylalanine to serine at codon 804 (T-to-C; p.F804S) in the ligand-binding domain (LBD) of AR. Computer simulation of the structural changes generated by the p.F804S substitution revealed marked conformational alterations in the hydrophobic core responsible for the stability and function of the AR-LBD. In conclusion, the present study identified two mutations from two unrelated Chinese families affected by CAIS. The novel mutation (p.F804S) may provide insights into the molecular mechanism underlying CAIS. Furthermore, it expands on the number of mutational hot spots in the international AR mutation database, which may be useful in the future for prenatal diagnosis and genetic counseling. PMID:27284311

  9. Clinical and genetic investigation of families with type II Waardenburg syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yong; Yang, Fuwei; Zheng, Hexin; Zhou, Jianda; Zhu, Ganghua; Hu, Peng; Wu, Weijing

    2016-03-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the molecular pathology of Waardenburg syndrome type II in three families, in order to provide genetic diagnosis and hereditary counseling for family members. Relevant clinical examinations were conducted on the probands of the three pedigrees. Peripheral blood samples of the probands and related family members were collected and genomic DNA was extracted. The coding sequences of paired box 3 (PAX3), microphthalmia‑associated transcription factor (MITF), sex‑determining region Y‑box 10 (SOX10) and snail family zinc finger 2 (SNAI2) were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction and DNA sequencing. The heterozygous mutation, c.649_651delAGA in exon 7 of the MITF gene was detected in the proband and all patients of pedigree 1; however, no pathological mutation of the relevant genes (MITF, SNAI2, SOX10 or PAX3) was detected in pedigrees 2 and 3. The heterozygous mutation c.649_651delAGA in exon 7 of the MITF gene is therefore considered the disease‑causing mutation in pedigree 1. However, there are novel disease‑causing genes in Waardenburg syndrome type II, which require further research. PMID:26781036

  10. Clinical and genetic investigation of families with type II Waardenburg syndrome

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, YONG; YANG, FUWEI; ZHENG, HEXIN; ZHOU, JIANDA; ZHU, GANGHUA; HU, PENG; WU, WEIJING

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the molecular pathology of Waardenburg syndrome type II in three families, in order to provide genetic diagnosis and hereditary counseling for family members. Relevant clinical examinations were conducted on the probands of the three pedigrees. Peripheral blood samples of the probands and related family members were collected and genomic DNA was extracted. The coding sequences of paired box 3 (PAX3), microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF), sex-determining region Y-box 10 (SOX10) and snail family zinc finger 2 (SNAI2) were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction and DNA sequencing. The heterozygous mutation, c.649_651delAGA in exon 7 of the MITF gene was detected in the proband and all patients of pedigree 1; however, no pathological mutation of the relevant genes (MITF, SNAI2, SOX10 or PAX3) was detected in pedigrees 2 and 3. The heterozygous mutation c.649_651delAGA in exon 7 of the MITF gene is therefore considered the disease-causing mutation in pedigree 1. However, there are novel disease-causing genes in Waardenburg syndrome type II, which require further research. PMID:26781036

  11. Borderline cognitive level in a family with Bazex-Dupré-Christol syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gonfiantini, Michaela Veronika; Armando, Marco; Pucciarini, Maria Laura; Macchiaiolo, Marina; Buonuomo, Paola Sabrina; Diociaiuti, Andrea; Lepri, Francesca Romana; Sirleto, Pietro; Vicari, Stefano; Bartuli, Andrea

    2015-07-01

    Bazex-Dupré-Christol syndrome (BDCS) [OMIM 301845] is an X-linked dominant disorder of the hair follicle characterized by multiple basal cell carcinomas, follicular atrophoderma, congenital hypotrichosis, and hypohidrosis. Additional features include multiple milia, trichoepitheliomas, and axillary hidradenitis suppurativa as well as a variety of other symptoms. Some patients with a diagnosis of BDCS have had poor school performance. But no other associated psychopathological disorders have been described in the literature. We describe the neuropsychological characteristics and the co-occurring psychopathological disorders in an Italian family (brother and sister, and their mother) affected by BDCS. The BDCS phenotype in this family was characterized by hypotrichosis, atrophoderma follicularis, milia, and trichoepitheliomas. No basal cell carcinomas were documented. At neuropsychological assessment the three affected family members all had a borderline cognitive level. Other identified psychopathological disorders included attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, executive deficits, academic difficulties, deficits in lexical skills, and internalizing problems. The presence of cognitive impairment in the three family members affected by BDCS suggests that cognitive impairment may be associated with the syndrome. It may be useful to assess neuropsychological performance in patients with BDCS to identify possible associated neuropsychological disorders. PMID:25820919

  12. Analysis of Families with Lynch Syndrome Complicated by Advanced Serrated Neoplasia: The Importance of Pathology Review and Pedigree Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Michael D; Buchanan, Daniel D; Walters, Rhiannon; Roberts, Aedan; Arnold, Sven; McKeone, Diane; Clendenning, Mark; Ruszkiewicz, Andrew R; Jenkins, Mark A; Hopper, John L; Goldblatt, Jack; George, Jillian; Suthers, Graeme K; Phillips, Kerry; Young, Graeme P; Macrae, Finlay; Drini, Musa; Woods, Michael O; Parry, Susan; Jass, Jeremy R; Young, Joanne P

    2009-01-01

    The identification of Lynch syndrome has been greatly assisted by the advent of tumour immunohistochemistry (IHC) for mismatch repair (MMR) proteins, and by the recognition of the role of acquired somatic BRAF mutation in sporadic MMR-deficient colorectal cancer (CRC). However, somatic BRAF mutation may also be present in the tumours in families with a predisposition to develop serrated polyps in the colorectum. In a subgroup of affected members in these families, CRCs emerge which demonstrate clear evidence of MMR deficiency with absent MLH1 staining and high-level microsatellite instability (MSI). This may result in these families being erroneously classified as Lynch syndrome or, conversely, an individual is considered “sporadic” due to the presence of a somatic BRAF mutation in a tumour. In this report, we describe two Lynch syndrome families who demonstrated several such inconsistencies. In one family, IHC deficiency of both MSH2 and MLH1 was demonstrated in tumours from different affected family members, presenting a confusing diagnostic picture. In the second family, MLH1 loss was observed in the lesions of both MLH1 mutation carriers and those who showed normal MLH1 germline sequence. Both families had Lynch syndrome complicated by an independently segregating serrated neoplasia phenotype, suggesting that in families such as these, tumour and germline studies of several key members, rather than of a single proband, are indicated to clarify the spectrum of risk. PMID:19241144

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging of the endophenotype of a novel familial Möbius-like syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Dumars, Sean; Andrews, Caroline; Chan, Wai-Man; Engle, Elizabeth C.; Demer, Joseph L.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Möbius’ syndrome typically presents as a sporadic trait with congenital facial palsy and abduction impairment. We used high resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and genetic analysis to examine a family with features of Möbius’ syndrome. Methods We examined three related family members having congenital complete opthalmoplegia with ptosis and facial diplegia. Orbits were imaged in quasi-coronal and sagittal planes 2 mm thick. Subarachnoid cranial nerves were imaged in planes 1 mm thick. Linkage and mutation analysis were performed to determine if the pedigree harbored mutations in four candidate genes. Results In affected subjects, MRI showed marked hypoplasia of extraocular muscles and intraorbital motor nerves. In the anterior orbit, rectus extraocular muscles were less hypoplastic but markedly curved toward insertion. Oblique extraocular muscles were hypoplastic and abnormally inserted. Posterior bony orbits were hypoplastic. Optic nerves were markedly straightened. Brainstems and cranial nerves III, VI, VII, and VIII were normal bilaterally. No pathogenic mutations were detected in affected individuals. Conclusions Previous MRI studies have demonstrated brainstem hypoplasia and cranial nerve aplasia in Möbius’ syndrome. The current family had normal brainstems and subarachnoid portions of motor cranial nerves innervating the orbit, but marked extraocular muscle hypoplasia. These clinical and MRI findings are atypical for Möbius’ syndrome and other congenital cranial dysinnervation disorders (CCDDs). Congenital facial weakness and complete ophthalmoplegia may occur despite MRI evidence of normal brainstem anatomy. The endophenotype appears to result from a genetic defect distinct from the CCDDs defined thus far, rather than a global brainstem insult. PMID:18455936

  14. Genotype-phenotype analysis of von Hippel-Lindau syndrome in fifteen Indian families.

    PubMed

    Vikkath, Narendranath; Valiyaveedan, Sindhu; Nampoothiri, Sheela; Radhakrishnan, Natasha; Pillai, Gopal S; Nair, Vasantha; Pooleri, Ginil Kumar; Mathew, Georgie; Menon, Krishnakumar N; Ariyannur, Prasanth S; Pillai, Ashok B

    2015-12-01

    The general prevalence of the familial multi-organ tumor disorder, von Hippel-Lindau syndrome (VHL), was estimated to be 1 in 25-40,000 in western studies two decades back. Few studies were done in Indian sub-continent, amidst a surge in clinical reports on VHL specific manifestations. The syndrome is correlated with mutations of the gene VHL (located in Chr 3p25.3). We aimed to conduct a prospective case series describing phenotypic and genotypic characteristics in Indian population. The VHL-specific clinical and radiological features were collected from patients and family members. Genotypic changes such as deletion/duplication or point mutation in the VHL locus were identified using sequencing and MLPA. Thirty-one subjects, from fifteen families with diagnosed VHL, were included in the study. Multicystic pancreas was found in 71% (22/31), CNS hemangioblastoma in 68% (21/31), renal cell carcinoma and retinal angiomas in 23% (7/31) each, pheochromocytoma in 9.7% (3/31) of the population and endolymphatic sac tumor in one subject. Four families (9 subjects) had full length deletion of VHL, three families (4 subjects) had a deletion of exon 3, eight families (18 subjects) had different exonic, splice-site and intronic point mutations and one subject had a de novo in-frame indel in exon 1. Multicystic pancreas and CNS hemangioblastomas were the most common manifestations in our population. The phenotypic expression patterns in terms of tumorigenesis, tissue tropism and penetrance in comparison to the genotypic features were found to be different from previous correlative studies. PMID:25952756

  15. Hereditary melanoma: Update on syndromes and management: Genetics of familial atypical multiple mole melanoma syndrome.

    PubMed

    Soura, Efthymia; Eliades, Philip J; Shannon, Kristen; Stratigos, Alexander J; Tsao, Hensin

    2016-03-01

    Malignant melanoma is considered the most lethal skin cancer if it is not detected and treated during its early stages. About 10% of melanoma patients report a family history of melanoma; however, individuals with features of true hereditary melanoma (ie, unilateral lineage, multigenerational, multiple primary lesions, and early onset of disease) are in fact quite rare. Although many new loci have been implicated in hereditary melanoma, CDKN2A mutations remain the most common. Familial melanoma in the presence of multiple atypical nevi should raise suspicion for a germline CDKN2A mutation. These patients have a high risk of developing multiple primary melanomas and internal organ malignancies, especially pancreatic cancer; therefore, a multidisciplinary approach is necessary in many cases. The value of dermoscopic examination and total body photography performed at regular intervals has been suggested by a number of studies, and should therefore be considered for these patients and their first-degree relatives. In addition, genetic counseling with the possibility of testing can be a valuable adjunct for familial melanoma patients. This must be performed with care, however, and only by qualified individuals trained in cancer risk analysis. PMID:26892650

  16. AMH gene mutations in two Egyptian families with persistent müllerian duct syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mazen, Inas; Abdel Hamid, M S; El-Gammal, M; Aref, A; Amr, K

    2011-01-01

    The anti-müllerian hormone (AMH) is responsible for regression of müllerian ducts during male sexual differentiation. Mutations in the AMH gene or its type II receptor gene AMHR2 lead to persistence of the uterus and fallopian tubes in male children, i.e. persistent müllerian duct syndrome (PMDS). Both conditions are transmitted according to an autosomal recessive pattern and are symptomatic only in males. We report on 2 unrelated Egyptian consanguineous families with PMDS. The first family comprised 3 affected prepubertal sibs complaining of undescended testes. Pelvic exploration and laparotomy revealed müllerian duct derivatives. The other family was presenting with an adolescent male with impalpable left testis, and pelvic exploration showed remnants of fallopian tubes and rudimentary uterus. AMH levels were very low and almost undetectable in all affected patients in both families. Direct sequencing of the coding region of the AMH gene identified 2 homozygous mutations in exon 1, R95X in the first family and V12G in the second family. These data confirmed the autosomal recessive type of PMDS. Molecular investigation of this rare disorder in a larger number of cases with undescended testes in Egypt is warranted for proper diagnosis and genetic counseling. PMID:22188863

  17. Partial KCNQ1OT1 hypomethylation: A disguised familial Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome as a sporadic adrenocortical tumor.

    PubMed

    H'mida Ben-Brahim, Dorra; Hammami, Sabeur; Haddaji Mastouri, Marwa; Trabelsi, Saoussen; Chourabi, Maroua; Sassi, Sihem; Mougou, Soumaya; Gribaa, Moez; Zakhama, Abdelfattah; Guédiche, Mohamed Neji; Saad, Ali

    2015-03-01

    Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome has a wide spectrum of complications such as embryonal tumors, namely adrenocortical tumor. Tumor predisposition is one of the most challenging manifestations of this syndrome. A 45-day old female with a family history of adrenocortical tumor presented with adrenocortical tumor. The case raised suspicion of a hereditary Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome, therefore molecular analysis was undertaken. The results revealed partial KCNQ1OT1 hypomethylation in the infant's blood DNA which was associated with a complete loss of methylation in the infant's adrenocortical tumor tissue. It is unique for familial Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome caused by KCNQ1OT1 partial hypomethylation to manifest solely through adrenocortical tumor. Incomplete penetrance and specific tissue mosaicism could provide explanations to this novel hereditary Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome presentation. PMID:26937341

  18. Exome analysis of a family with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome identifies a novel disease locus.

    PubMed

    Bowles, Neil E; Jou, Chuanchau J; Arrington, Cammon B; Kennedy, Brett J; Earl, Aubree; Matsunami, Norisada; Meyers, Lindsay L; Etheridge, Susan P; Saarel, Elizabeth V; Bleyl, Steven B; Yost, H Joseph; Yandell, Mark; Leppert, Mark F; Tristani-Firouzi, Martin; Gruber, Peter J

    2015-12-01

    Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome is a common cause of supraventricular tachycardia that carries a risk of sudden cardiac death. To date, mutations in only one gene, PRKAG2, which encodes the 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase subunit γ-2, have been identified as causative for WPW. DNA samples from five members of a family with WPW were analyzed by exome sequencing. We applied recently designed prioritization strategies (VAAST/pedigree VAAST) coupled with an ontology-based algorithm (Phevor) that reduced the number of potentially damaging variants to 10: a variant in KCNE2 previously associated with Long QT syndrome was also identified. Of these 11 variants, only MYH6 p.E1885K segregated with the WPW phenotype in all affected individuals and was absent in 10 unaffected family members. This variant was predicted to be damaging by in silico methods and is not present in the 1,000 genome and NHLBI exome sequencing project databases. Screening of a replication cohort of 47 unrelated WPW patients did not identify other likely causative variants in PRKAG2 or MYH6. MYH6 variants have been identified in patients with atrial septal defects, cardiomyopathies, and sick sinus syndrome. Our data highlight the pleiotropic nature of phenotypes associated with defects in this gene. PMID:26284702

  19. Exome Analysis of a Family with Wolff–Parkinson–White Syndrome Identifies a Novel Disease Locus

    PubMed Central

    Bowles, Neil E.; Jou, Chuanchau J.; Arrington, Cammon B.; Kennedy, Brett J.; Earl, Aubree; Matsunami, Norisada; Meyers, Lindsay L.; Etheridge, Susan P.; Saarel, Elizabeth V.; Bleyl, Steven B.; Yost, H. Joseph; Yandell, Mark; Leppert, Mark F.; Tristani-Firouzi, Martin; Gruber, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    Wolff–Parkinson–White (WPW) syndrome is a common cause of supraventricular tachycardia that carries a risk of sudden cardiac death. To date, mutations in only one gene, PRKAG2, which encodes the 5’ -AMP-activated protein kinase subunit γ-2, have been identified as causative for WPW. DNA samples from five members of a family with WPW were analyzed by exome sequencing. We applied recently designed prioritization strategies (VAAST/pedigree VAAST) coupled with an ontology-based algorithm (Phevor) that reduced the number of potentially damaging variants to 10: a variant in KCNE2 previously associated with Long QT syndrome was also identified. Of these 11 variants, only MYH6 p.E1885K segregated with the WPW phenotype in all affected individuals and was absent in 10 unaffected family members. This variant was predicted to be damaging by in silico methods and is not present in the 1,000 genome and NHLBI exome sequencing project databases. Screening of a replication cohort of 47 unrelated WPW patients did not identify other likely causative variants in PRKAG2 or MYH6. MYH6 variants have been identified in patients with atrial septal defects, cardiomyopathies, and sick sinus syndrome. Our data highlight the pleiotropic nature of phenotypes associated with defects in this gene. PMID:26284702

  20. Brugada syndrome in a family with a high mortality rate: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Brugada syndrome is a hereditary arrhythmia characterized by a specific electrocardiographic pattern and an increased risk of sudden cardiac death, with an apparent absence of structural abnormalities or ischemic heart disease. To date, mutations in the sodium channel, voltage-gated, type V, alpha subunit gene and glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase 1-like gene are estimated to account for approximately 28% of Brugada syndrome probands. Case presentation We report the case of a 32-year-old mixed-race Brazilian man who is sodium channel, voltage-gated, type V, alpha subunit gene and glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase 1-like gene mutation-negative with a type 1 Brugada electrocardiographic pattern and a history of high family mortality, including five sudden deaths among relatives of whom four were first-degree relatives. Conclusion To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of a patient who has Brugada syndrome and a history of sudden death in four first-degree family members. This case report reinforces the evidence that genetic studies are of limited use while determining risk but remain helpful for diagnosis, and that diagnosis via electrocardiography is of great importance in preventing adverse events and stratifying risk. Although there are several technologically advanced diagnostic tools, they might not be accessible in small towns and hospitals; however, a basic diagnostic tool like electrocardiography is easily accessible. PMID:23506330

  1. [A lethal variant of Netherton syndrome in a large inbred family].

    PubMed

    Capri, Y; Vanlieferinghen, P; Boeuf, B; Dechelotte, P; Hovnanian, A; Lecomte, B

    2011-03-01

    Netherton syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by the triad of ichthyosiform erythrodermia, typical hair dysplasia, and severe atopic features. The broad range of variable expression of this disease is well described and 20% of complications occur during the neonatal period such as hypernatremic dehydration, electrolyte imbalances, recurrent or severe infections, and failure to thrive. Mutation of the SPINK5 gene has been identified as disease-causing in Netherton syndrome, but the pathophysiology still remains unclear. Almost all SPINK5 mutations result in the absence of the serine-protease inhibitor LEKTI protein in both keratinocytes and lymphocytes. In this study, we report on a severe form of Netherton syndrome observed in three patients within a large inbred Rom family. All of them died in the first months of life despite early treatment. They were found to be homozygous for the c.1431-12G>A SPINK5 gene mutation, which has not been associated with a lethal form of the disease thus far. This family illustrates the extreme phenotype of Netherton disease of neonatal onset. Molecular diagnosis allowed further genetic counseling and prenatal testing during other pregnancies. PMID:21255986

  2. Keratitis–ichthyosis–deafness syndrome: first affected family reported in the Middle East

    PubMed Central

    Al Fahaad, Hamad

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Keratitis–ichthyosis–deafness (KID) syndrome is a rare congenital multisystem disorder affecting certain tissues of ectodermal origin such as epidermis, cochlea, and cornea, leading mainly to palmoplantar hyperkeratosis, ichthyosiform scaling, deafness, and blindness. The author reports for the first time in the Middle East three family members suffering from KID syndrome in the southwestern part of Saudi Arabia. Case presentation Three patients from one family (ages 26, 16, and 14 years) of apparently normal parents, with the two eldest being females and the youngest being male. All three patients were referred from a peripheral hospital to our dermatology clinic due to recurrent cutaneous fungal infections on their trunk, forearms, legs, and nails. On full assessment, they also found to have nearly similar cutaneous problems manifested by palmoplantar hyperkeratosis, generalized ichthyosiform scaling, subungual hyperkeratosis, and nail dystrophies. All patients suffered from total hearing loss in both ears since childhood as confirmed by pure tune audiometry. However, there was no blindness in any case; blepharitis with marked photophobia was the only ocular complaint. All these features are classically suggestive of KID syndrome. PMID:24741331

  3. Vanishing lung syndrome in one family: five cases with a 20-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xichun; Wang, Haiying; Gou, Kaihong; Huang, Baosheng; Xia, Dongzhou; Wu, Xiuli; Wei, Ming; Zheng, Shengxi; Ma, Shan; He, Juanxiang

    2015-01-01

    Vanishing lung syndrome, also known as idiopathic giant bullous emphysema, is a rare disease characterized by giant emphysematous bullae. The disease is diagnosed by radiological findings of giant bullae in one, or both, of the upper lobes of the lung, occupying at least one-third of the hemithorax. There have been several reports of vanishing lung syndrome, however it remains to be determined whether genetic inheritance is associated with the disease. In the present study, five patients within one family, with vanishing lung syndrome, were reported during a follow-up period of ~ 20 years. All of the patients were diagnosed by radiological findings, which showed diffuse bullae in the lungs, which were of varying size and asymmetrical distribution, and the occurrence of pneumothorax or emphysema. The Medical Ethics Committee of the People's Hospital of Zhangye Municipality (Zhangye, China) approved this study, and all subjects gave their informed consent During the follow-up period of 20 years, bullae in these patients were shown to progressively increase, and no other pulmonary diseases, including lung cancer, tuberculosis, pneumoconiosis and chronic bronchitis were observed. Autosomal dominant inheritance was observed in five cases, and autosomal recessive inheritance was observed in one case. The present study suggests that vanishing lung syndrome may be associated with autosomal dominant and recessive genetic inheritance. PMID:25322795

  4. Familial DiGeorge/velocardiofacial syndrome with deletions of chromosome area 22q11.2: Report of five families with a review of the literature

    SciTech Connect

    Leana-Cox, J.; Pangkanon, Suthipong; Eanet, K.R.

    1996-11-11

    The DiGeorge (DG), velocardiofacial (VCF), and conotruncal anomaly-face (CTAF) syndromes were originally described as distinct disorders, although overlapping phenotypes have been recognized. It is now clear that all three syndromes result from apparently similar or identical 22q11.2 deletions, suggesting that they represent phenotypic variability of a single genetic syndrome. We report on 12 individuals in five families with del(22)(q11.2) by fluorescent in situ hybridization, and define the frequency of phenotypic abnormalities in those cases and in 70 individuals from 27 del(22)(q11.2) families from the literature. Common manifestations include mental impairment (97%), abnormal face (93%), cardiac malformations (681%), thymic (64%) and parathyroid (63%) abnormalities, and cleft palate or velopharyngeal insufficiency (48%). Familial DG, VCF, and CTAF syndromes due to del(22)(q11.2) show significant inter- and intrafamilial clinical variability consistent with the hypothesis that a single gene or group of tightly linked genes is the common cause of these syndromes. Up to 25% of 22q deletions are inherited, indicating that parents of affected children warrant molecular cytogenetic evaluation. We propose use of the compound term {open_quotes}DiGeorge/velocardiofacial (DGNCF) syndrome{close_quotes} in referring to this condition, as it calls attention to the phenotypic spectrum using historically familiar names. 41 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Targeted next-generation sequencing of 22 mismatch repair genes identifies Lynch syndrome families.

    PubMed

    Talseth-Palmer, Bente A; Bauer, Denis C; Sjursen, Wenche; Evans, Tiffany J; McPhillips, Mary; Proietto, Anthony; Otton, Geoffrey; Spigelman, Allan D; Scott, Rodney J

    2016-05-01

    Causative germline mutations in mismatch repair (MMR) genes can only be identified in ~50% of families with a clinical diagnosis of the inherited colorectal cancer (CRC) syndrome hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC)/Lynch syndrome (LS). Identification of these patients are critical as they are at substantially increased risk of developing multiple primary tumors, mainly colorectal and endometrial cancer (EC), occurring at a young age. This demonstrates the need to develop new and/or more thorough mutation detection approaches. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) was used to screen 22 genes involved in the DNA MMR pathway in constitutional DNA from 14 HNPCC and 12 sporadic EC patients, plus 2 positive controls. Several softwares were used for analysis and functional annotation. We identified 5 exonic indel variants, 42 exonic nonsynonymous single-nucleotide variants (SNVs) and 1 intronic variant of significance. Three of these variants were class 5 (pathogenic) or class 4 (likely pathogenic), 5 were class 3 (uncertain clinical relevance) and 40 were classified as variants of unknown clinical significance. In conclusion, we have identified two LS families from the sporadic EC patients, one without a family history of cancer, supporting the notion for universal MMR screening of EC patients. In addition, we have detected three novel class 3 variants in EC cases. We have, in addition discovered a polygenic interaction which is the most likely cause of cancer development in a HNPCC patient that could explain previous inconsistent results reported on an intronic EXO1 variant. PMID:26811195

  6. Identification of IRF6 gene variants in three families with Van der Woude syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tan, Ene-Choo; Lim, Eileen Chew-Ping; Yap, Shiao-Hui; Lee, Seng-Teik; Cheng, Joanne; Por, Yong-Chen; Yeow, Vincent

    2008-06-01

    Van der Woude syndrome is the most common cause of syndromic orofacial clefting. It is characterised by the presence of lip pits, cleft lip and/or cleft palate. It is transmitted in an autosomal dominant manner, with high penetrance and variable expressivity. Several mutations in the interferon regulatory factor 6 (IRF6) gene have been found in VWS families, suggesting that this gene is the primary locus. We screened for mutations in this gene in three families in our population. There was a recurrent nonsense mutation within exon 9 of the gene for a Malay family consisting of five affected members with different presentations. We also found a co-segregating rare polymorphism which would result in a non-synonymous change 23 bases downstream of the nonsense mutation. This polymorphism was present in <1% of the Malay subjects screened, but was not found among the Chinese and Indians in our population. For another family, a 396C-->T mutation (R45W in the DNA-binding domain) was found in the proband, although the possibility of a genetic defect elsewhere could not be excluded because his mother and twin sister (both unaffected) also had this variant. In the third case with complete absence of family history, a de novo deletion spanning the whole IRF6 gene was detected in the child with VWS. This case of haploinsufficiency caused disruption of orofacial development but not other organ systems as the child has no other medical or developmental abnormalities despite the deletion of at least five other genes. PMID:18506368

  7. Molecular approach in the study of Alström syndrome: Analysis of ten Spanish families

    PubMed Central

    Piñeiro-Gallego, Teresa; Cortón, Marta; Ayuso, Carmen; Baiget, Montserrat

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To describe the clinical and genetic findings in 11 Spanish patients with confirmed (n=5) or suspected (n=6) Alström syndrome (AS). Methods Patients underwent clinical evaluation, and were screened for variations in Alström syndrome 1 gene (ALMS1) using a genotyping microarray from Asper Ophthalmics and by direct sequencing of coding exons 8, 10, and 16 of ALMS1. Furthermore, we analyzed the presence of the A229T variant of retinitis pigmentosa GTPase regulator-interacting protein 1-like gene (RPGRIP1L) with direct sequencing of coding exon 6. Results A great phenotypic variability was observed in our patients. Four mutations in ALMS1—two novel nonsense mutations in one family (p.Y1715X and p.S616X), one previously described mutation in homozygous state in another family (p.V3597Efs*4), and a likely pathogenic missense variation p.P1822L in a third family—were identified with direct sequencing. All patients were homozygous for 229A allele of RPGRIP1L, with the exception of a p.A229T heterozygous patient. Conclusions Our findings expand the spectrum of ALMS1 mutations causing Alström syndrome. The phenotypic differences between patients could be attributed to interactions with other genes inherited independently from the ALMS1 gene or with environmental factors. A clear understanding of the phenotypic spectrum in AS will be important to unravel the molecular mechanisms underlying this syndrome. PMID:22876109

  8. Genetic heterogeneity in benign familial neonatal convulsions: Identification of a new locus on chromosome 8q

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, T.B.; Leach, R.J.; O'Connell, P.; Ryan, S.G. ); Ward, K. )

    1993-09-01

    The syndrome of benign familial neonatal convulsions (BFNC) is a rare autosomal dominant disorder characterized by unprovoked seizures in the first weeks of life. One locus for BFNC has been mapped to chromosome 20 in several pedigrees, but the authors have excluded linkage to chromosome 20 in one large kindred. In order to identify this novel BFNC locus, dinucleotide repeat markers distributed throughout the genome were used to screen this family. Maximum pairwise LOD scores of 4.43 were obtained with markers D8S284 and D8S256 on chromosome 8q. Multipoint analysis placed the BFNC locus in the interval spanned by D8S198-D8S274. This study establishes the presence of a new BFNC locus and confirms genetic heterogeneity of this disorder. 26 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  9. [Informing members of families affected by fragile X syndrome of this diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Carrasco, M

    2001-10-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is a genetic disorder that may seriously affect the development of patients. One of the hardest tasks for the professionals of medicine is to tell the parents that their child is suffering a serious illness that may cause some permanent handicap. This normally implies drastic changes in live projects and expectations for the parents. The knowledge of diagnosis and the supply of information to the parents give rise to an important emotional impact on both parents and the rest of the family. In general terms, the patient implies more than a single ill person--a genetic illness such as FXS, which causes serious cognitive and behavioural disturbances, implies three situations that the family has to face: on one hand, the family has to accept a new world that had never been known; a son or daughter with a genetic disorder unknown not only for them, but also for most of the professionals they have visited before having a diagnosis, and in many cases with special needs and serious behavioural disturbances. On the other hand, the family must accept that the diagnosis may not be restricted to the patient, because some other members of the family could be suffering from the same illness. Finally, they have to face the fact that one of the parents has transmitted the illness, that is, 'the genetic guilt' in the illness of their son or daughter. PMID:12447818

  10. A Brazilian family with Brown-Vialetto-van Laere syndrome with autosomal recessive inheritance.

    PubMed

    Malheiros, José Augusto; Camargos, Sarah Teixeira; Oliveira, José Teotonio de; Cardoso, Francisco E C

    2007-03-01

    We report the first Brazilian family with Brown-Vialetto-van Laere syndrome. The presence of consanguineous marriages and illness affecting three sisters and one niece support an autosomal recessive transmission. The age at onset of the illness ranged from 12 to 20 years old. The time interval between hearing loss and involvement of other cranial nerves varied from 3 to 12 years. MRI demonstrated bulbar atrophy and also high intensity signal at T2 weighted and fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) sequences. PMID:17420823

  11. The first report of a Chinese family with McLeod syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Man, Bik Ling; Yuen, Yuet Ping; Fu, Yat Pang

    2014-01-01

    We report the first case of a Chinese family with McLeod syndrome (MLS). The two affected brothers show significant phenotypic heterogeneity. The index case has peripheral acanthocytosis, choreoathetosis of his feet, a slowly progressive neuropathy and myopathy, and an elevated serum creatine kinase (CK) level. His elder brother has more prominent chorea of the shoulders, epilepsy, a rapidly progressive neuropathy and normal serum CK. The diagnosis of MLS was confirmed by a genetic test which showed a hemizygous frameshift mutation in the XK gene. PMID:24895410

  12. Mapping the gene causing hereditary primary hyperparathyroidism in a Portuguese kindred to chromosome 1q22-q31.

    PubMed

    Williamson, C; Cavaco, B M; Jauch, A; Dixon, P H; Forbes, S; Harding, B; Holtgreve-Grez, H; Schoell, B; Pereira, M C; Font, A P; Loureiro, M M; Sobrinho, L G; Santos, M A; Thakker, R V; Jausch, A

    1999-02-01

    A Portuguese kindred with autosomal dominant isolated primary hyperparathyroidism (HPT) that was associated with parathyroid adenomas and carcinomas was investigated with the aim of determining the chromosomal location of this gene, designated HPTPort. Leukocyte DNA from 9 affected and 16 unaffected members and 7 parathyroid tumors from 4 patients was used in comparative genomic hybridization (CGH), tumor loss of heterozygosity (LOH), and family linkage studies. The CGH studies revealed abnormalities of chromosomes 1 and 13, and the results of LOH studies were consistent with the involvements of tumor suppressor genes from these regions. Family segregation studies mapped HPTPort to chromosome 1q22-q31 by establishing linkage with eight loci (D1S254, D1S222, D1S202, D1S238, D1S428, D1S2877, D1S422, and D1S412) (peak two-point LOD scores = 3. 46-5.14 at 0% recombination), and defined the location of HPT Port to a 21 cM region flanked centromerically by D1S215 and telomerically by D1S306. Thus, HPTPort has been mapped to chromosome 1q22-q31, and a characterization of this gene will help to elucidate further the mechanisms that are involved in the development of parathyroid tumors. PMID:9933477

  13. Lennox–Gastaut syndrome: impact on the caregivers and families of patients

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, Patricia A

    2014-01-01

    Lennox–Gastaut syndrome (LGS) has a major impact on the health-related quality of life (HRQL) of the affected children as well as their caregivers. The primary caregiver in the family is generally the mother, with support from the father and siblings. The burden of care and the effects of the disease on the child necessitate adjustments in virtually all aspects of the lives of their family. These adjustments inevitably affect the physical, emotional, social, and financial health of the whole family. Numerous sources of support for families can help to ease the burden of care. Improvements in the treatment of LGS, in addition to helping the child with LGS, would likely help improve the HRQL of the family members. This pilot parent survey was designed to explore the impact of epilepsy on caregiver HRQL. Parents of children with epilepsy who had contacted the Epilepsy Information Service at the Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC, USA, were sent questionnaires comprising open- and closed-ended questions. A total of 200 surveys were distributed, with a return rate of 48%. The results revealed that 74% of the parents believed that having a child with epilepsy brought them and their partner closer together. However, when the parents were asked to explain the manner in which epilepsy affected their families, answers included continuous stress, major financial distress, and lack of time to spend with other children. Information and resources for the families of children with LGS could help improve the HRQL of both the patients and their relatives. PMID:25336963

  14. Lennox-Gastaut syndrome: impact on the caregivers and families of patients.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Patricia A

    2014-01-01

    Lennox-Gastaut syndrome (LGS) has a major impact on the health-related quality of life (HRQL) of the affected children as well as their caregivers. The primary caregiver in the family is generally the mother, with support from the father and siblings. The burden of care and the effects of the disease on the child necessitate adjustments in virtually all aspects of the lives of their family. These adjustments inevitably affect the physical, emotional, social, and financial health of the whole family. Numerous sources of support for families can help to ease the burden of care. Improvements in the treatment of LGS, in addition to helping the child with LGS, would likely help improve the HRQL of the family members. This pilot parent survey was designed to explore the impact of epilepsy on caregiver HRQL. Parents of children with epilepsy who had contacted the Epilepsy Information Service at the Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC, USA, were sent questionnaires comprising open- and closed-ended questions. A total of 200 surveys were distributed, with a return rate of 48%. The results revealed that 74% of the parents believed that having a child with epilepsy brought them and their partner closer together. However, when the parents were asked to explain the manner in which epilepsy affected their families, answers included continuous stress, major financial distress, and lack of time to spend with other children. Information and resources for the families of children with LGS could help improve the HRQL of both the patients and their relatives. PMID:25336963

  15. Genetic analysis of an Indian family with members affected with Waardenburg syndrome and Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, Saketh; Bindu, Parayil Sankaran; Taly, Arun B.; Sinha, Sanjib; Gayathri, Narayanappa; Rani, S. Vasantha; Chandak, Giriraj Ratan

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is characterized by sensorineural hearing loss and pigmentation defects of the eye, skin, and hair. It is caused by mutations in one of the following genes: PAX3 (paired box 3), MITF (microphthalmia-associated transcription factor), EDNRB (endothelin receptor type B), EDN3 (endothelin 3), SNAI2 (snail homolog 2, Drosophila) and SOX10 (SRY-box containing gene 10). Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked recessive disorder caused by mutations in the DMD gene. The purpose of this study was to identify the genetic causes of WS and DMD in an Indian family with two patients: one affected with WS and DMD, and another one affected with only WS. Methods Blood samples were collected from individuals for genomic DNA isolation. To determine the linkage of this family to the eight known WS loci, microsatellite markers were selected from the candidate regions and used to genotype the family. Exon-specific intronic primers for EDN3 were used to amplify and sequence DNA samples from affected individuals to detect mutations. A mutation in DMD was identified by multiplex PCR and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification method using exon-specific probes. Results Pedigree analysis suggested segregation of WS as an autosomal recessive trait in the family. Haplotype analysis suggested linkage of the family to the WS4B (EDN3) locus. DNA sequencing identified a novel missense mutation p.T98M in EDN3. A deletion mutation was identified in DMD. Conclusions This study reports a novel missense mutation in EDN3 and a deletion mutation in DMD in the same Indian family. The present study will be helpful in genetic diagnosis of this family and increases the mutation spectrum of EDN3. PMID:22876130

  16. Familial cytomegalic adrenocortical hypoplasia: an X-linked syndrome of pubertal failure.

    PubMed Central

    Hay, I D; Smail, P J; Forsyth, C C

    1981-01-01

    Five boys with familial cytomegalic adrenocortical hypoplasia have been followed up for an average of 19 years. Despite treatment with replacement corticosteroids, all 5 failed to show a spontaneous onset of puberty and, when assessed at ages 13 to 19 years, all had both sexual infantilism and skeletal immaturity. Hypogonadism was confirmed by low levels of plasma testosterone, and pituitary reserve of gonadotrophin was shown to be inadequate by testing with gonadotrophin-releasing hormone. Two boys, both with adequate testosterone output on human chorionic gonadotrophin stimulation, were given gonadotrophin therapy, whereas the other 3 were treated with parenterally administered testosterone. With treatment, all 5 patients showed advances in pubertal staging. Although the mechanism of the hypogonadotropism remains unclear, the association of hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism with familial cytomegalic adrenocortical hypoplasia appears to be a constant one and may be considered as a treatable inherited syndrome of pubertal failure. PMID:7197507

  17. A Novel Mutation of SMAD3 Identified in a Chinese Family with Aneurysms-Osteoarthritis Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wenwen; Zhou, Min; Liu, Cheng; Liu, Chen; Qiao, Tong; Huang, Dian; Ran, Feng; Wang, Wei; Liu, Changjian; Liu, Zhao

    2015-01-01

    Aneurysms-osteoarthritis syndrome (AOS) is a recently delineated autosomal dominant disorder characterized by aneurysms, dissections, and tortuosity throughout the arterial tree in association with early onset osteoarthritis, mild craniofacial features, and skeletal and cutaneous anomalies. Previous studies have demonstrated that mutations in SMAD3, a key regulator of TGF-β signal transduction, contribute to AOS. Here, we investigated a family of three generations affected by AOS. A novel SMAD3 mutation, c.266G>A (p.C89Y), was identified and cosegregated with the affected individuals in this family. Our finding expands the mutation spectrum of SMAD3 gene and further strengthens the connection between the presence of aneurysms-osteoarthritis phenotype and SMAD3 mutations, which facilitates the understanding of the genotype-phenotype correlation of AOS. PMID:26221609

  18. A new familial case of microdeletion syndrome 10p15.3.

    PubMed

    Eggert, Marlene; Müller, Stefan; Heinrich, Uwe; Mehraein, Yasmin

    2016-04-01

    In 2012 a small terminal deletion in the short arm of chromosome 10 in the region 10p15.3 was reported as a novel microdeletion syndrome. By now 21 patients, including a single familial case, have been reported. Characteristic findings comprise variable cognitive impairment or developmental delay, disorder of speech development, as well as various dysmorphic signs. We here report on a new patient, an eight year old girl, with a microdeletion syndrome 10p15.3. She is a foster child showing intellectual deficits, disorder of speech development, behavioral problems, congenital heart defect, and several dysmorphic signs. The same microdeletion was subsequently found in the six year old maternal half-sister, showing very similar developmental and cognitive issues, including major speech impairment. The mother has not obtained a school degree. She was described as being a dissocial person with severe alcohol abuse and showing minor cognitive disability. Thus inheritance of the microdeletion from a probably symptomatic mother can be assumed. The patients presented here add up to the as yet small number of reported cases of microdeletion 10p15.3 and thereby might help to establish a more comprehensive clinical spectrum of this rather newly discovered syndrome. PMID:26921531

  19. Galanin peptide family as a modulating target for contribution to metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fang, Penghua; Yu, Mei; Shi, Mingyi; Zhang, Zhenwen; Sui, Yumei; Guo, Lili; Bo, Ping

    2012-10-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is defined as abdominal central obesity, atherogenic dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, glucose intolerance and hypertension. The rapid increasing prevalence of MetS and the consequent diseases, such as type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disorder, are becoming a global epidemic health problem. Despite considerable research into the etiology of this complex disease, the precise mechanism underlying MetS and the association of this complex disease with the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus and increased cardiovascular disease remains elusive. Therefore, researchers continue to actively search for new MetS treatments. Recent animal studies have indicated that the galanin peptide family of peptides may increase food intake, glucose intolerance, fat preference and the risk for obesity and dyslipidemia while decreasing insulin resistance and blood pressure, which diminishes the probability of type 2 diabetes mellitus and hypertension. To date, however, few papers have summarized the role of the galanin peptide family in modulating MetS. Through a summary of available papers and our recent studies, this study reviews the updated evidences of the effect that the galanin peptide family has on the clustering of MetS components, including obesity, dyslipidemia, insulin resistance and hypertension. This line of research will further deepen our understanding of the relationship between the galanin peptide family and the mechanisms underlying MetS, which will help develop new therapeutic strategies for this complex disease. PMID:22909974

  20. Linkage analysis in Usher syndrome type I (USH1) families from Spain.

    PubMed Central

    Espinós, C; Nájera, C; Millán, J M; Ayuso, C; Baiget, M; Pérez-Garrigues, H; Rodrigo, O; Vilela, C; Beneyto, M

    1998-01-01

    Usher syndrome (USH) is an autosomal recessive hereditary disorder characterised by congenital sensorineural hearing loss and gradual visual impairment secondary to retinitis pigmentosa (RP). The disorder is clinically and genetically heterogeneous. With regard to Usher type I (USH1), several subtypes have been described, the most frequent being USH1B located on chromosome 11q13.5. Of 18 USH1 families studied by linkage analysis, 12 (67%) showed significant lod score values for locus D11S527 (Zmax=14.032, theta=0.000) situated on chromosome 11q. Our findings suggest considerable genetic heterogeneity in the Spanish USH1 population. It is important to note that one of our families linked to the USH1B locus shows interesting intrafamilial clinical variability. As regards the remaining six USH1 families, the linkage analysis did not provide conclusive data, although two of them show slight linkage to markers located on chromosome 3q (Zmax=1.880, theta=0.000 for D3S1279), the same location that had previously been assigned to some USH3 families. Images PMID:9610802

  1. Familial Currarino syndrome associated with Hirschsprung disease: two cases of a mother and daughter.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Koichi; Nakamura, Tetsuro; Azuma, Takashi; Nakaoka, Tatsuo; Takama, Yuichi; Hayashi, Hiroaki; Horiike, Masaki; Zenitani, Masahiro; Higashio, Atsushi

    2013-01-01

    Currarino syndrome with Hirschsprung disease (CS-HD) is extremely rare. We present the first family with CS-HD. Case 1: A 28-year-old woman was admitted with severe abdominal distension and dyspnea. She was diagnosed with anal stenosis, hemisacrum, anterior sacral meningocele (ASM), tethered cord (TC), and short-segment aganglionosis. She underwent the modified Duhamel operation after meningocele repair and cord detethering. A bicornuate uterus, bilateral ovarian dermoid cysts, and small rectal duplication were also noted intraoperatively. Case 2: The daughter of case 1 was admitted for abdominal distension and anal stenosis at the age of 17 days. Studies revealed a hemisacrum, ASM, TC, presacral mass, atrial septal defect, polyp in the right nasal cavity, right vesicoureteral reflux, and short-segment aganglionosis. She underwent the modified Soave operation at the age of 1 year and 4 months after meningocele repair, cord detethering, and resection of the presacral mass (epidermoid cyst). In both cases, the aganglionic segments were confirmed by preoperative rectal suction biopsy and postoperative pathological examination on full-thickness rectal specimens. Some causal genes for Currarino syndrome (CS) and Hirschsprung disease (HD) are currently investigated. Thus far, 10 CS-HD cases have been reported, including 6 cases of familial CS. However, all the patients had sporadic HD. Recent reports suggest that anomalies of the enteric nerve system contribute to postoperative constipation in CS cases. PMID:23331821

  2. Recovery and outcomes after the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in patients and their family caregivers.

    PubMed

    Herridge, Margaret S; Moss, Marc; Hough, Catherine L; Hopkins, Ramona O; Rice, Todd W; Bienvenu, O Joseph; Azoulay, Elie

    2016-05-01

    Outcomes after acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are similar to those of other survivors of critical illness and largely affect the nerve, muscle, and central nervous system but also include a constellation of varied physical devastations ranging from contractures and frozen joints to tooth loss and cosmesis. Compromised quality of life is related to a spectrum of impairment of physical, social, emotional, and neurocognitive function and to a much lesser extent discrete pulmonary disability. Intensive care unit-acquired weakness (ICUAW) is ubiquitous and includes contributions from both critical illness polyneuropathy and myopathy, and recovery from these lesions may be incomplete at 5 years after ICU discharge. Cognitive impairment in ARDS survivors ranges from 70 to 100 % at hospital discharge, 46 to 80 % at 1 year, and 20 % at 5 years, and mood disorders including depression and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are also sustained and prevalent. Robust multidisciplinary and longitudinal interventions that improve these outcomes are still uncertain and data in our literature are conflicting. Studies are needed in family members of ARDS survivors to better understand long-term outcomes of the post-ICU family syndrome and to evaluate how it affects patient recovery. PMID:27025938

  3. Exclusion of candidate genes in a family with arterial tortuosity syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gardella, Rita; Zoppi, Nicoletta; Assanelli, Deodato; Muiesan, Maria Lorenza; Barlati, Sergio; Colombi, Marina

    2004-04-30

    Arterial tortuosity syndrome (ATS) is a rare hereditary disorder with variable clinical presentation including tortuosity and elongation of the major arteries, often associated with pulmonary artery stenosis, pulmonary hypertension, and skin and joint laxity, suggestive of a connective tissue disorder. ATS is transmitted in an autosomal recessive mode, but the causal gene is unknown. We report an Italian pedigree with three inbred families in which five patients show signs of ATS. In particular, four adult patients present arterial tortuosity and elongation of the main arteries. Two of these patients, with the most severe degree of arterial tortuosity, also show severe peripheral stenosis of the main pulmonary artery. The fifth young patient shows a severe pulmonary valve stenosis in the absence of arterial tortuosity. All patients show signs of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS): soft skin with abundant subcutaneous tissue and joint laxity, hernias, and disorganization of the extracellular matrix (ECM) of fibronectin (FN) and of actin microfilaments in cultured skin fibroblasts. Linkage analysis of the genes involved in EDS and other connective tissue disorders, excluded COL1A1, COL1A2, COL2A1, COL3A1, COL5A1, COL5A2, COL5A3, COL6A1, COL6A2, ADAMTS2, ELN, FN1, TNXA, and TNXB as candidate genes in the family under study, thus indicating that ATS is a distinct clinical and molecular entity. PMID:15054833

  4. Genetic analysis of Tunisian families with Usher syndrome type 1: toward improving early molecular diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Rebeh, Imen; Bonnet, Crystel; Bouassida, Walid; Hadjamor, Imen; Ayadi, Hammadi; Ghorbel, Abdelmonem; Petit, Christine; Masmoudi, Saber

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Usher syndrome accounts for about 50% of all hereditary deaf-blindness cases. The most severe form of this syndrome, Usher syndrome type I (USH1), is characterized by profound congenital sensorineural deafness, vestibular dysfunction, and retinitis pigmentosa. Six USH1 genes have been identified, MYO7A, CDH23, PCDH15, USH1C, SANS, and CIB2, encoding myosin VIIA, cadherin-23, protocadherin-15, harmonin, scaffold protein containing ankyrin repeats and a sterile alpha motif (SAM) domain, and calcium- and integrin-binding member 2, respectively. Methods In the present study, we recruited four Tunisian families with a diagnosis of USH1, together with healthy unrelated controls. Affected members underwent detailed audiologic and ocular examinations. We used the North African Deafness (NADf) chip to search for known North African mutations associated with USH. Then, we selected microsatellite markers covering USH1 known loci to genotype the DNA samples. Finally, we performed DNA sequencing of three known USH1 genes: MYO7A, PCDH15, and USH1C. Results Four biallelic mutations, all single base changes, were found in the MYO7A, USH1C, and PCDH15 genes. These mutations consist of a previously reported splicing defect c.470+1G>A in MYO7A, three novel variants, including two nonsense (p.Arg3X and p.Arg134X) in USH1C and PCDH15, respectively, and one frameshift (p.Lys615Asnfs*6) in MYO7A. Conclusions We found a remarkable genetic heterogeneity in the studied families with USH1 with a variety of mutations, among which three were novel. These novel mutations will be included in the NADf mutation screening chip that will allow a higher diagnosis efficiency of this extremely genetically heterogeneous disease. Ultimately, efficient molecular diagnosis of USH in a patient’s early childhood is of utmost importance, allowing better educational and therapeutic management. PMID:27440999

  5. Genome-wide sequencing to identify the cause of hereditary cancer syndromes: with examples from familial pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Nicholas J.; Klein, Alison P.

    2013-01-01

    Advances in our understanding of the human genome and next-generation technologies have facilitated the use of genome-wide sequencing to decipher the genetic basis of Mendelian disease and hereditary cancer syndromes. The application of genome-wide sequencing in hereditary cancer syndromes has had mixed success, in part, due to complex nature of the underlying genetic architecture. In this review we discuss the use of genome-wide sequencing in both Mendelian diseases and hereditary cancer syndromes, highlighting the potential and challenges of this approach using familial pancreatic cancer as an example. PMID:23196058

  6. Two different mutations in the thyroid peroxidase gene of a large inbred Amish kindred: power and limits of homozygosity mapping.

    PubMed

    Pannain, S; Weiss, R E; Jackson, C E; Dian, D; Beck, J C; Sheffield, V C; Cox, N; Refetoff, S

    1999-03-01

    Approximately 10% of newborns with congenital hypothyroidism are unable to convert iodide into organic iodine. This iodide organification defect has a prevalence of 1 in 40,000 newborns and may be caused by defects in the thyroid peroxidase enzyme (TPO), the hydrogen peroxide-generating system, the TPO substrate thyroglobulin, or inhibitors of TPO. We identified a high incidence of severe hypothyroidism due to a complete iodide organification defect in the youngest generation of five nuclear families belonging to an inbred Amish kindred. Genealogical records permitted us to trace their origin to an ancestral couple 7-8 generations back and to identify an autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance. Initial studies of homozygosity by descent using two polymorphic markers within the TPO gene showed no linkage to the phenotype. In fact, 4 of 15 affected siblings from 2 of the nuclear families were heterozygous, resulting in homozygosity values of 73% and 53% in affected and unaffected family members, respectively. A genome-wide homozygosity screen using DNA pools from affected and unaffected family members localized the defect to a locus close to the TPO gene. Linkage analysis using 4 additional polymorphic markers within the TPO gene reduced the number of homozygous unaffected siblings to zero without altering the percent homozygosity initially found in the affected. Sequencing of the TPO gene revealed 2 missense mutations, E799K and R648Q. TPO 779K was found in both alleles of the 11 affected homozygotes, both mutations were present in each of the 3 affected compound heterozygotes, and there were no TPO mutations in 1 subject with hypothyroidism of different etiology. These results demonstrate the power of the DNA pooling strategy in the localization of a defective gene and the pitfalls of linkage analysis when 2 relatively rare mutations coexist in an inbred population. PMID:10084596

  7. Clinical and Genetic Description of a Family With a High Prevalence of Autosomal Dominant Restless Legs Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Young, Jessica E.; Vilariño-Güell, Carles; Lin, Siong-Chi; Wszolek, Zbigniew K.; Farrer, Matthew J.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To conduct clinical and molecular genetic analyses of the members of an extended family in Central Indiana with a high prevalence of restless legs syndrome (RLS). PARTICIPANTS AND METHODS: From February 1, 2006, through August 31, 2008, we collected data from members of this family, which is of English descent. Genealogical methods were used to expand the family tree, and family members were screened with an RLS questionnaire. Telephone interviews and personal examinations were performed at Mayo Clinic and during a field trip to Central Indiana. Blood samples were collected for molecular genetic analysis. A follow-up telephone interview was conducted 1 year later. RESULTS: The family tree spans 7 generations with 88 living members, 30 of whom meet the criteria for diagnosis of RLS established by the International Restless Legs Syndrome Study Group. Three affected family members also have Parkinson disease or essential tremor. The mode of RLS inheritance is compatible with an autosomal dominant pattern. The affected family members do not exhibit linkage to the 5 known RLS loci or mutations in the RLS susceptibility genes MEIS1 and BTBD9. CONCLUSION: Of 88 members of this single extended family in Central Indiana, 30 were diagnosed as having RLS. Because our analysis shows that the disease is not linked to any of the known RLS loci or risk-associated genes, we postulate that members of this family may carry a gene mutation in a novel genetic locus. PMID:19181647

  8. Linkage of morbid obesity with polymorphic microsatellite markers on chromosome 1q31 in a three-generation Canadian kindred

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, J.D.; Bulman, D.E.; Ebers, G.C. |

    1994-09-01

    Obesity is the most common nutritional disorder affecting Western societies. An estimated 3.7 million Canadians are considered to be overweight, a condition associated with hypertension, accelerated atherosclerosis, diabetes and a host of other medical problems. We have identified a 3 generation kindred in which morbid obesity appears to segregate in an autosomal dominant manner. All individuals were examined. Mass (kg) and heights (m) were measured in order to determine a body mass index (BMI) for each individual. Those individuals with BMI of greater than or equal to 30.0 were designated as affected. In the pedigree studied 25 individuals met this criteria and 12 of these were morbidly obese (BMI greater or equal to 40.0). A search of candidate genes proved unfruitful. A linkage study was initiated. All individuals in the pedigree were genotyped for microsatellite markers which were spaced every 20 centimorgans (cM). Positive evidence of linkage was detected with markers which map to 1q31-32 (lod score of 3.6 at {theta} = 0.05). Notably, strong effects for fatness in pigs have been found on pig chromosome 4 which has synteny with human chromosome 1q21-32. We are currently attempting to refine the position of this gene using linkage analysis with other microsatellite markers from this region of the genome. In addition we are screening other families in which obesity segregates for linkage to 1q31.

  9. [Increased incidence of multiple melanoma in sporadic and familial dysplastic nevus cell syndrome].

    PubMed

    Sigg, C; Pelloni, F; Schnyder, U W

    1989-09-01

    In 280 melanoma patients all data concerning familial and personal history, histology, and therapy were verified. All patients underwent total-body skin examination to check for the presence of dysplastic nevus syndrome (DNS). In 257/280 patients (91.8%) solitary melanomas were found, while in 23/280 patients (8.2%) multiple melanomas occurring simultaneously or consecutively were ascertained. Surprisingly, among the 12/280 patients (4.2%) with familial variants of melanoma, multiple melanomas were not found in a increased frequency. In patients with DNS (regardless of whether sporadic or familial) the frequency of multiple melanomas is higher: in patients with solitary melanomas DNS was found in 27/257 (10.5%), while in patients with multiple melanomas DNS was diagnosed in 11/23 (47.8%) (P less than 0.0005). In both groups (solitary and multiple melanomas) the mean age of patients with DNS was around 10 years lower. The frequency of additional primary malignancies in patients with cutaneous melanomas was 8.6%, and did not vary according as whether patients had solitary or multiple melanomas with or without DNS. PMID:2807914

  10. [Familial spastic paraplegia with severe amyotrophy of the hands. (Silver syndrome?)].

    PubMed

    Feki, I; Miladi, M I; Elleuch, N; Boukhris, A; Stévanin, G; Brice, A; Mhiri, C

    2007-04-01

    Familial spastic paraplegia (FSP) with severe muscular atrophy of hands and feet is exceptional. Autosomal dominant forms were initially described by Silver in 1966. We report two cases, from the same Tunisian family, presenting FSP with severe amyotrophy of the hands. A brother and his sister, aged respectively 37 and 36 years old, presented practically the same clinical picture. Their parents were cousins. The female patient was hospitalized. Both patients developed gait disorders around the age of three years. Muscular atrophy of the hands arose much later, around the age of 20 years. The neurological examination disclosed a spastic gait with distal amyotrophy, severe in the hands and moderate in the feet. Sensitivity was preserved and there was no fasciculation. The spinal cord and cerebral MRI was normal. Electromyography (EMG) showed a neurogenic pattern in the distal muscles. Stimulation of the median, ulnar and sciatica nerves was ineffective. The somatosensory evoked potentials (EP) were delayed (upper limb) or desynchronised (lower limb). The auditory and visual EP were normal. The cerebrospinal fluid contained 1 mononuclear cell/mm3 and 10 mg protein/100 ml. Abnormalities of the cranio-vertebral junction, Arnold-Chiari malformation, syringomyelia and familial juvenile amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) were excluded and the diagnosis of Silver's syndrome was evoked. PMID:17452950