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Sample records for family therapy

  1. Family therapy by family doctors

    PubMed Central

    Neighbour, R.

    1982-01-01

    The experiences of a group of general practitioners learning and attempting family therapy are described. Three principles for working with whole families — facilitation, formulation and focussing — are illustrated by case histories. Family therapy in general practice can be effective for patients and worthwhile for family doctors. PMID:7153974

  2. Family Play Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ariel, Shlomo

    This paper examines a case study of family play therapy in Israel. The unique contributions of play therapy are evaluated including the therapy's accessibility to young children, its richness and flexibility, its exposure of covert patterns, its wealth of therapeutic means, and its therapeutic economy. The systematization of the therapy attempts…

  3. Family Therapy and Disturbed Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zuk, Gerald H., Ed.; Boszormenyi-Nagy, Ivan, Ed.

    Presented at a conference at which authors represented major theoretical positions in the field, most of the papers use family therapy as an important source of observations or ideas, or as a means to pinpoint methodological problems. Papers are grouped in sections as follows: four which introduce the reader to the field of specialization, provide…

  4. Therapy for Family Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosmann, Michael R.

    A family therapy model, based on a conceptualization of the family as a behavioral system whose members interact adaptively so that an optimal level of functioning is maintained within the system, is described. The divergent roots of this conceptualization are discussed briefly, as are the treatment approaches based on it. The author's model,…

  5. Family and family therapy in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Wagenaar, Karin; Baars, Jan

    2012-04-01

    This article describes how families are functioning in the Netherlands, and how family therapy is used in mental healthcare. In the open Dutch society, new ideas are easily incorporated, as exemplified by the rapid introduction and growth of family therapy in the 1980s. In recent decades, however, family therapy has lost ground to other treatment models that are more individually orientated, and adhere to stricter protocols. This decline of family therapy has been exacerbated by recent budget cuts in mental healthcare. In regular healthcare institutes family therapy now has a marginal position at best, although family treatment models are used in specific areas such as forensic treatments. In addition, the higher trained family therapists have found their own niches to work with couples and families. We argue that a stronger position of family therapy would be beneficial for patients and for families, in order to counteract the strong individualization of Dutch society. PMID:22515464

  6. Family Psychology and Family Therapy in Japan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kameguchi, Kenji; Murphy-Shigematsu, Stephen

    2001-01-01

    Reviews the development of family psychology and family therapy in Japan, tracing the origins of these movements, explaining how these fields were activated by the problem of school refusal, and describing an approach to family therapy that has been developed to work with families confronting this problem, as well as preventive programs of family…

  7. Collaboration in Family Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Tuerk, Elena Hontoria; McCart, Michael R.; Henggeler, Scott W.

    2015-01-01

    This article summarizes and illustrates the collaboration strategies used by several family therapies. The strategies used within multisystemic therapy (MST) are emphasized because it has demonstrated high rates of treatment completion and favorable outcomes in multiple clinical trials. Many of the collaboration strategies in family work are common to other forms of evidence-based psychotherapy (e.g., reflective listening, empathy, reframing, and displays of authenticity and flexibility); however, some strategies are unique to family systems treatments, such as the identification of strengths across multiple systems in the youth’s social ecology and the maintenance of a family (versus a child) focus during treatment. A case example illustrates collaboration and engagement in the context of MST. PMID:23616297

  8. Cybernetics of Brief Family Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeney, Bradford P.; Ross, Jeffrey M.

    1983-01-01

    Presents a cybernetic view of brief family therapy. Includes a historical discussion of the key ideas underlying brief family therapy, a cybernetic model of therapeutic change, and a clinical case for exemplification. (Author/JAC)

  9. Families and family therapy in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Tse, Samson; Ng, Roger M K; Tonsing, Kareen N; Ran, Maosheng

    2012-04-01

    Family therapy views humans not as separate entities, but as embedded in a network of relationships, highlighting the reciprocal influences of one's behaviours on one another. This article gives an overview of family demographics and the implementation of family therapy in Hong Kong. We start with a review of the family demographics in Hong Kong and brief notes on families in mainland China. Demographics show that the landscape has changed markedly in the past decade, with more cross-border marriages, an increased divorce rate, and an ageing overall population - all of which could mean that there is increasing demand for professional family therapy interventions. However, only a limited number of professionals are practising the systems-based approach in Hong Kong. Some possible reasons as to why family therapy is not well disseminated and practised are discussed. These reasons include a lack of mental health policy to support family therapy, a lack of systematic family therapy training, and a shortage of skilled professionals. Furthermore, challenges in applying the western model in Chinese culture are also outlined. We conclude that more future research is warranted to investigate how family therapy can be adapted for Chinese families. PMID:22515459

  10. Putting the "family" back into family therapy.

    PubMed

    Breunlin, Douglas C; Jacobsen, Elizabeth

    2014-09-01

    In this article, we examine the field of family therapy by drawing a distinction between two forms of practice: Whole Family Therapy (WFT), defined as treating the whole family, and Relational Family Therapy (RFT), defined as working with a subsystem of the family or an individual while retaining a systemic lens. Our thesis is that the practice of WFT has been in decline for some time and steps must be taken to keep it from becoming a defunct practice. We consider the trajectory of WFT and RFT throughout the development of family therapy through reference to the people, the literature, training, and practice patterns associated with family therapy. We remind the reader of the many benefits of WFT and suggest that today WFT is likely to be practiced in conjunction with RFT and individual therapy. Since training of family therapists today is largely located in degree-granting programs, we identify constraints to including WFT in such programs. We conclude by offering suggestions that can enhance a program's ability to train students in WFT. PMID:24948531

  11. Using Dreams in Family Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kane, Connie M.

    1997-01-01

    States that current literature suggests that dreams are seldom used by marriage and family therapists, yet dreams can be powerful tools in therapeutic treatment. Includes clinical examples that demonstrate the effective use of dreams in marriage and family therapy. Discusses the interface between dream interpretation and systems therapy. (MKA)

  12. Family therapy for eating disorders.

    PubMed

    Lemmon, C R; Josephson, A M

    2001-07-01

    It is a perpetual source of debate whether dysfunctional family communication and relationship patterns cause eating disorders or the stress associated with raising a child with an eating disorder elicits such problems. Regardless, family therapy is a necessary component of any comprehensive biopsychosocial approach to the treatment of eating disorders. A careful assessment of the entire family, including the identified patient; his or her parents and siblings; the parents' marriage and families of origin; the child's emotional, social, and physical development; parental regulation of developmental stages; and communication patterns is mandatory. Family therapy for eating-disordered patients attempts to facilitate the elimination of potentially life-threatening symptoms and begin a therapeutic process of change within the entire family. Research has shown significant support for the use of family therapy in this population, but well-controlled treatment outcome research remains somewhat limited. PMID:11449810

  13. Values and Ethics in Family Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doherty, William J.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses the historical context for rising interest in values and ethical issues in family therapy, and presents framework for analyzing core values of prominent models of family therapy. Uses ethical debate over use of paradoxical techniques in family therapy to illustrate values clash between different models of family therapy. (Author)

  14. Family Therapy in a Women's Group: Integrating Marriage and Family Therapy and Group Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Getz, Hildy G.

    2002-01-01

    Describes how a family therapy perspective can be integrated into group as a treatment modality. Concepts from family therapy are illustrated through a description of a specific women's group and case study. Techniques from family therapy applied in group are derived from multigenerational, experiential/humanistic, and cognitive-behavioral…

  15. Queer Youth in Family Therapy.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Rebecca G; Stone Fish, Linda

    2015-09-01

    Trends in popular belief about same-sex relationships have undergone noteworthy change in the United States over the last decade. Yet this change has been marked by stark polarizations and has occurred at varying rates depending upon regional, community, racial, religious, and individual family context. For queer youth and their families, this cultural transformation has broadened opportunities and created a new set of risks and vulnerabilities. At the same time, youth's increasingly open and playful gender fluidity and sexual identity is complicated by unique intersections of class, race, religion, and immigration. Effective family therapy with queer youth requires practitioner's and treatment models that are sensitive to those who bear the burden of multiple oppressions and the hidden resilience embedded in their layered identities. We present case examples of our model of family therapy which addresses refuge, supports difficult dialogs, and nurtures queerness by looking for hidden resilience in the unique intersections of queer youths' lives. These intersections provide transformational potential for youth, their families and even for family therapists as we are all nurtured and challenged to think more complexly about intersectionality, sexuality, and gender. PMID:26283240

  16. Family Therapy in a Biomedical Context.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abroms, Gene M.

    1981-01-01

    Redefines the role of family therapy in terms of the reemergence of the medical model in psychiatry. In this biopsychosocial model the goal of family therapy is defined as the achievement of socialization. Describes the goals of psychotherapy, sociotherapy, and biotherapy and suggests they are combined in family therapy. (Author/JAC)

  17. Value Systems and Psychopathology in Family Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zuk, Gerald H.

    1979-01-01

    Family therapy is a method for resolving conflict in value systems. The family therapist has three role functions: the go-between, the side-taker, and the celebrant. The therapist selectively expresses values that disrupt and then repair destructive family interaction. Short-term therapy works best because it least violates value expectations…

  18. [Systematic family therapy in school refusal behavior].

    PubMed

    Schweitzer, Jochen; Ochs, Matthias

    2003-01-01

    The article deals with systemic-family therapeutic implications of differential diagnostics of school refusal behavior. Systemic therapy elements, that are useful in treatment of school phobia/school anxiety, and family interaction types, in which school refusal behavior occurs, are introduced. Finally two case studies of systemic family therapy are presented. PMID:12951914

  19. Family Therapy: A Very Proper Failure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Midlarsky, Elizabeth

    This first-person account of a case study on family therapy discusses two latency-age boys who were referred for treatment. The assessment was that in both cases it was the family itself that was disturbed and needed treatment. The therapist worked with the first boy and his family together. The therapy model used was the "proper" family…

  20. Functional Family Therapy: A Life Cycle Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wetchler, Joseph L.

    1985-01-01

    Functional family therapy model assesses family behavior from perspectives of interactional process and functional payoffs for the individual family members. Illustrates that functional needs change as a result of development, and that by including a family life cycle perspective in the assessment process, clinicians will get a clearer picture of…

  1. Mode Deactivation Therapy (MDT) Family Therapy: A Theoretical Case Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Apsche, J. A.; Ward Bailey, S. R.

    2004-01-01

    This case study presents a theoretical analysis of implementing mode deactivation therapy (MDT) (Apsche & Ward Bailey, 2003) family therapy with a 13 year old Caucasian male. MDT is a form of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) that combines the balance of dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) (Linehan, 1993), the importance of perception from…

  2. Family Therapy for the "Truncated" Nuclear Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zuk, Gerald H.

    1980-01-01

    The truncated nuclear family consists of a two-generation group in which conflict has produced a polarization of values. The single-parent family is at special risk. Go-between process enables the therapist to depolarize sharply conflicted values and reduce pathogenic relating. (Author)

  3. Functional Family Therapy. Family Strengthening Series. Juvenile Justice Bulletin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sexton, Thomas L.; Alexander, James F.

    Increases in delinquency and violence over the past decade are often rooted in a number of interrelated social problems that may originate within the family structure. The focus of this publication is the effectiveness of family intervention programs and chronicles one type of intervention, the Functional Family Therapy (FFT). FFT draws on a…

  4. Family Therapy, Family Practice, and Child and Family Poverty: Historical Perspectives and Recent Developments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frankel, Harvy; Frankel, Sid

    2006-01-01

    This paper assesses the engagement of family therapy and family practice with families with children, who are living in poverty. It analyzes four promising models from two perspectives. The first perspective relates to critiques, which have been made of the practice of family therapy with families living in poverty; and the second relates to the…

  5. Simulated Family Therapy: A Classroom Demonstration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banyard, Victoria L.; Fernald, Peter S.

    2002-01-01

    In this article, we describe a demonstration and discussion of an initial family therapy interview simulated by 4 student volunteers. Several concepts and principles fundamental to family therapy are illustrated: interview stages, one-person definition of a problem, systemic perspective, clear generation line, unified executive team, disengaged…

  6. Family Mode Deactivation Therapy Results and Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Apsche, Jack A.; Bass, Christopher K.

    2006-01-01

    This article highlights the inclusion of Mode Deactivation Therapy as a treatment modality for families in crisis. As an empirically validated treatment, Mode Deactivation Therapy has been effective in treating a wide variety of psychological issues. Mode Deactivation Therapy, (MDT) was developed to treat adolescents with disorders of conduct…

  7. The Evaluation Phase of Systemic Family Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caille, Philippe

    1982-01-01

    Describes the initial evaluation phase of family therapy, which clarifies the circular interaction maintaining the symptom, the family structure, and its relationship to the therapist. Suggests using first sessions to collect data and organize it meaningfully. Presents phenomenological and mythical models of family functioning as guides for…

  8. Boundaries between Parent and Family Education and Family Therapy: The Levels of Family Involvement Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doherty, William J.

    1995-01-01

    Presents model that addresses issues of where to place parent and family education in the spectrum of professional services to families, and how to distinguish between education and therapy in work with families. Offers five-level model of involvement with families as an alternative to the dichotomous distinction between education and therapy.…

  9. Ecological Structural Family Therapy with Cuban Immigrant Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scopetta, Mercedes A.; And Others

    Research and clinical practice at the Spanish Family Guidance Clinic (Miami, Florida) has suggested that ecological structural family therapy might be a treatment of choice for Cuban immigrants. Such a treatment approach was found to be consistent with the values of this population and was particularly helpful in addressing special problems…

  10. [Family relationships and family therapy of eating disorders].

    PubMed

    Reich, Günter

    2005-04-01

    A multitude of empirical studies clearly demonstrates that the origin and course of eating disorders is closely linked to family factors. The influence is exerted in a direct way by conveying attitudes towards food, eating, weight, shape and appearance within the family and in a more indirect way by the family relationships. Families of bulimics differ from those of anorexics by a higher degree of conflict, impulsivity, expressiveness and by lower affective resonance and cohesion. Family therapy has proven to be effective in the treatment of eating disorders. A sketch of a family therapy describes the conflict oriented approach which includes behavioral elements in oder to stabilize the eating behavior and the weight. PMID:15918543

  11. Combining Individual Psychodynamics with Structural Family Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melito, Richard

    1988-01-01

    Presents integrative framework for combining central aspects of individual psychodynamics with structural family therapy in meaningful way. Explains how framework derives from developmental perspective. Presents case example to illustrate combined approach and demonstrate its utility. (Author/NB)

  12. Family therapy of extrafamilial sexual abuse.

    PubMed

    Roesler, T A; Savin, D; Grosz, C

    1993-09-01

    A significant portion of children referred for psychiatric treatment have been sexually abused. One of the most difficult symptom manifestations to treat in young children is the management of anger. In this case, a 4-year-old boy was sexually abused by persons outside the family. He showed symptoms of regressive behavior including encopresis, enuresis, difficulty sleeping, fearfulness, recurrent nightmares, and had hyperalertness and frequent outbursts of anger. Treatment initially involved group therapy, with a concurrent parents' group. After experiencing little improvement in group therapy, the youngster was put in individual play therapy and family therapy. Family therapy proved essential in creating a safe environment for the patient where he could learn to regulate his affect and process his traumatic experience successfully. PMID:8407771

  13. Filial therapy for enhancing relationships in families.

    PubMed

    Rye, Nina

    2008-01-01

    Filial therapy is a specific mode of child-centred play therapy. The parent or carer conducts structured weekly therapeutic play sessions with the child. The therapist provides coaching, detailed feedback, and support, but does not engage directly with the child. Filial therapy empowers parents and carers to become the agents of therapeutic change. Because parent and child work through problems together, children's attachments become more secure, and family relationships are enhanced. Filial therapy was developed in the 1960s by Louise and Bernard Guerney as an innovative form of child-centred play therapy for three- to 12-year-olds. It is a flexible mode of therapy with three main models currently in use, two of which are group models. Filial therapy is evidence-based. Empirical research has shown it to be effective for intact families, blended families, adoptive families, those with children in public (local authority) care, single parent families, and those in which grandparents or other relatives are the full-time carers. Research also shows it to be effective with families of different cultures and ethnicities. Filial therapy can help parents or carers help children who have experienced difficulties such as trauma and abuse, or who for other reasons have problems with behaviour, relationships and mental health. Filial therapy provides help over the long term and after the therapist has reduced or ended contact with a family. Once parents have learned the filial skills they can continue with play sessions for months, even years. They also naturally adapt the skills for use in every day life. PMID:18973091

  14. Marital and Family Therapy for Alcohol Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Farrell, Timothy J.

    Following a brief review of literature on marital and family treatment for alcohol problems, this paper describes two types of marital therapy frequently used with alcoholics and presents a brief overview of results from a study in progress comparing the two modalities. Behavioral marital therapy uses communication skills training, contracting,…

  15. The Three Crises in Family Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zuk, Gerald H.

    1979-01-01

    The author examines the three crises he feels family therapy has passed through in the last three decades, including the need to transcend its focus on schizophrenia and to deal with families differing widely in socioeconimic origin. The current challenge is the need for professionalization of the field. (Author)

  16. Strategic Family Therapy of Avoidant Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burgess, Thomas A.; Hinkle, J. Scott

    1993-01-01

    Notes that Millon's biopsychosocial model asserts that socioenvironmental factors of parental or peer rejection may shape development of avoidant behavior but does not elaborate on how family system may perpetuate its existence once disorder has evolved. Presents brief overview of avoidant behavior and strategic family therapy case study.…

  17. Respiratory Resistance In Family Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beck, Michael J.

    1975-01-01

    Patients' respiratory problems may interfere with their talking in therapy sessions. Interventions by the therapist must be based on an understanding of the underlying dynamics which produced the respiratory problem. (Author)

  18. Family therapy sessions with refugee families; a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Due to the armed conflicts in the Balkans in the 1990s many families escaped to other countries. The main goal of this study was to explore in more detail the complexity of various family members’ experiences and perceptions from their life before the war, during the war and the escape, and during their new life in Sweden. There is insufficient knowledge of refugee families’ perceptions, experiences and needs, and especially of the complexity of family perspectives and family systems. This study focused on three families from Bosnia and Herzegovina who came to Sweden and were granted permanent residence permits. The families had at least one child between 5 and 12 years old. Method Family therapy sessions were videotaped and verbatim transcriptions were made. Nine family therapy sessions were analysed using a qualitative method with directed content analysis. Results Three main categories and ten subcategories were found - 1. Everyday life at home, with two subcategories: The family, Work and School/preschool; 2. The influence of war on everyday life, with three subcategories: The war, The escape, Reflections; 3. The new life, with five subcategories: Employment, Health, Relatives and friends, Limited future, Transition to the new life. Conclusions Health care and social welfare professionals need to find out what kind of lives refugee families have lived before coming to a new country, in order to determine individual needs of support. In this study the families had lived ordinary lives in their country of origin, and after experiencing a war situation they escaped to a new country and started a new life. They had thoughts of a limited future but also hopes of getting jobs and taking care of themselves and their families. When analysing each person’s point of view one must seek an all-embracing picture of a family and its complexity to tie together the family narrative. To offer refugee families meetings with family-oriented professionals to

  19. Recent developments in family therapy: a review.

    PubMed

    Clarkin, J F; Glick, I D

    1982-07-01

    Since its beginning some 25 years ago, family therapy has become a widely used madality. The field is developing its own theoretical foundations, training institutions, and body of outcome research; the authors review some of the changes, especially those of the last two or three years. One major development is the growing differentiation of family therapy models and techniques; related are increasing attempts to delineate selection criteria and to provide empirical data for special matches of problems and treatments. The field has moved from its early preoccupation with schizophrenia to concern with new target populations, such as families disrupted by divorce. Family therapy is also being used more often in the treatment of hospitalized patients and of substance abusers. The outcome research is growing in extent and sophistication; the positive results indicate a continuing prominent role for this modality. PMID:7106716

  20. Family therapy for conduct disorders.

    PubMed

    Sholevar, G P

    2001-07-01

    Low levels of parental skill and cooperation are the prominent roots of arrested socialization, and a lack of appreciation for intimate and gratifying human relationships is evident in children with CD. The relational problems are exaggerated further by the child's observation of chronic parental discord and internalization of a family image constructed around intrafamilial conflict and isolation. Skills deficits in parental and marital communication and problem solving and conflicts in these relationships play significant roles in producing family dysfunction. The low level of parental differentiation and identity formation plays a fundamental role in family dysfunction by interfering with the development of an adequate self-image, self-esteem, and internal codes of behavior in the child. The transmission of parental antisocial tendencies to their children is facilitated by the low level of differentiation between parent and child. Family treatment should focus on enhancing cooperation between parents and children and between parents as co-parents and as a couple. Enhancing parent management skills can undermine the use of coercive, punitive, and impulsive interactions in the families. The higher divorce rate in parents of children with CD should be addressed with parents directly and early in treatment with the hope of mobilizing the rehabilitative and cooperative marital forces. In terms of future directions, family studies should address and incorporate the expanding knowledge of biologic and psychologic characteristics of children with CD and the possible impact of such characteristics in undermining family development and integrity. Such investigations should include the following information: The role of sustained and intense aggression in some children on family functioning and development. The possible role of diminished response to punishment and excessive search for gratification in children with CD. The role of the child with CD in promoting marital and

  1. Wither Couple/Family Therapy?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoyt, Michael F.; Gurman, Alan S.

    2012-01-01

    Attention is called to disturbing developments in insurance reimbursement that threaten the practice of therapy involving more than one person. This can be seen as part of the movement to marginalize psychotherapy as first-line treatment and replace it with the inappropriate and excessive (and often exclusive) use of medication.

  2. Trauma therapy for death row families.

    PubMed

    Long, Walter C

    2011-01-01

    The family members of death row inmates undergo unique suffering that includes disenfranchised grief and intense psychological trauma. In Texas, where executions occur at a rate of 1 every 2 weeks, this class of trauma victims presumably is large, a fact that should generate public mental health concern. Yet the class remains virtually unknown to the therapeutic community. Very little has been done to address the trauma healing needs of death row families. This theoretical paper proposes that structural therapy designed to reengage attachment relationships and reempower family members' innate resources to emotionally regulate one another may provide one of the most effective means of helping this population survive trauma. PMID:21967176

  3. Family therapy with single, young adults.

    PubMed

    Haber, J

    1981-01-01

    Family therapy with the single, young adult can be successfully carried out using the Bowen family systems theory when the process is staged over time. The therapist who has gone back into his or her own family of origin can be of greatest help as a "coach" to the client in this ongoing process. The therapist assists the client in a process of orderly differentiation that enables the client to develop a more solid sense of self. Reactive distance and emotional cut-offs are modified as solutions to anxiety. More personal, flexible family, peer, and work relationships are promoted. The client's initial presenting problems diminish as he/she comes to terms with his/her ultimate aloneness and self-responsibility, and begins to accept family members as they are and relationships with them for what they can be. PMID:6917974

  4. Postmodern Influence in Family Therapy Research: Reflections of Graduate Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hertlein, Katherine M.; Lambert-Shute, Jennifer; Benson, Kristen

    2004-01-01

    Postmodernism has influenced family therapy in significant ways, from clinical work to family therapy research. Little has been written, however, on how to conduct postmodern research in a manner reflecting marriage and family therapy inquiries. The present study seeks to investigate doctoral students understanding of postmodern family therapy…

  5. Directions in Marriage and Family Therapy, 1994.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cermele, Debra E., Ed.

    1994-01-01

    In an effort to help practitioners deal with the great volume of current literature in the field of marriage and family therapy, this compilation attempts to present clinically relevant material in a user-friendly format. Topics selected for inclusion are believed to be up-to-date, informative, and clinically meaningful--as well as theoretically…

  6. Family Therapy Approach to Incapacitating Migraine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenstock, Harvey A.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    The case of a nine-year-old boy suffering from psycosomatic migraine headaches is discussed. The main article presents the case study and discusses the family systems approach which was successfully used in therapy. The following discussion deals with the psychosomatic personality. (HMV)

  7. Supervision in Family Therapy: A Decade Restudy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nichols, William C.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Replicated Everett's (1980) survey of Approved Supervisors of American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy (AAMFT). Found significant differences in today's supervision including increase in female supervisors, shift toward systemic theoretical orientation, more supervisors in formal training settings, increase in video recording usage,…

  8. Family cognitive remediation therapy for anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Lask, Bryan; Roberts, Alice

    2015-04-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) in childhood and adolescence has a poor prognosis. It is possible that this may in part be due to the fact that cognitive weaknesses that appear to be risk factors for its development and maintenance are not being targeted in treatment. Through its focus on these deficits, cognitive remediation therapy (CRT) has been shown to be a promising intervention for AN. Furthermore, family interventions are widely recommended for this patient population, but to date no studies have reported the use of CRT in a family setting. This paper presents a case series in which family-based CRT was a significant component of the management. It was well received by patients and their families and previously treatment resistant patients became more engaged with the entire treatment process. In addition, all patients receiving family-based CRT went on to make progress towards recovery. These initial clinical observations suggest family-based CRT is likely to be a useful addition to treatment for child and adolescent AN and justifies formal evaluation. PMID:24096368

  9. The Importance of Creativity in Family Therapy: A Preliminary Consideration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carson, David K.

    1999-01-01

    Looks at the importance of creativity in the context of family therapy. Examines creative techniques such as family sculpturing, family art therapy, puppetry, family drawings, and psychodrama. Focuses on the concept of creativity in prominent theories of counseling (i.e., humanistic, Gestalt, cognitive psychology) and the relation of divergent…

  10. Reinventing Family Therapy: Teaching Family Intervention as a New Treatment Modality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Josephson, Allan M.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: This article discusses the pedagogy of teaching family therapy in the new millennium. It draws on the strengths of "family systems therapy" but goes beyond it--suggesting a new paradigm, new terminology, and a new teaching perspective. It discusses the historical background of family therapy training, a scientific foundation for what…

  11. Strategic Family Therapy: A High-Technology Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seligman, Linda

    Historically, family counseling grew from a focus on the individual to an emphasis on the importance of the entire family as the unit of treatment and the structure of the family as the key ingredient in family functioning. Strategic family therapy (SFT) has evolved from these traditional intervention approaches to the use of a brief, directive,…

  12. A Perfect Fit: Connecting Family Therapy Skills to Family Business Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, Patricia M.; Johnson, Kit

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to encourage family therapists to become more interested in family business practice. It does so in three ways: (a) highlighting the number of therapists already involved in family business issues; (b) showing the parallels between family business and family therapy by applying family business research findings to…

  13. Teaching Family Therapy: Ten Key Questions for Understanding the Family as Patient.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Resnikoff, Roy O.

    1981-01-01

    Ten questions for understanding the family as patient are presented as one aspect of an overall teaching plan for family therapy. Seeing the family as patient is important in initial stages of evaluation and therapy. A case study of a large, overly close family is used as an illustration. (Author)

  14. Functional Family Therapy and the Treatment of Inhibited Sexual Desire.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Regas, Susan J.; Sprenkle, Douglas H.

    1984-01-01

    Describes the therapy, assessment, and education principles of Functional Family Therapy and applies them to the treatment of inhibited sexual desire, using a case illustration. Functional Family Therapy works at motivating the couple to want change, rather than providing an understanding of underlying causes of the problem. (JAC)

  15. Family Therapy in Childhood Disorders: A Greek Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dimitriou, Evangelos C.; Didangelos, Pavlos A.

    1987-01-01

    Refers to the child-rearing practices and to the situation of family therapy in Greece. Maintains many children in Greece live in an overprotective, overcontrolling and overdemanding environment, which could promote emotional problems. Comparison of the efficacy of family therapy to that of individual therapy in a child guidance clinic suggests…

  16. The Adolescent in Family Therapy: Breaking the Cycle of Conflict and Control. Guilford Family Therapy Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Micucci, Joseph A.

    Presenting a developmentally grounded approach to treating a wide range of adolescent problems, this book shows how troubled teenagers and their parents can be helped to use family relationships as catalysts for growth and change. Case examples, practical discussions of the process of assessment and therapy, and straightforward clinical advice are…

  17. Family therapy and fundamentalism: One family therapist's exploration of ethics and collaboration with religious fundamentalist families.

    PubMed

    Sherbersky, Hannah

    2016-07-01

    What are the therapeutic limitations of systemic psychotherapy when working with families who hold religious fundamentalist beliefs? At a time of debate about religious fundamentalism, terrorism and radicalisation, where do family therapists position themselves when confronted by extreme beliefs in the therapy room? Research suggests that the increase in modernity within our society equates not just with an increase in secularisation, but rather an increase in pluralism. Contemporary models of family therapy pay explicit attention to issues of gender, culture, ethnicity, discrimination and societal contexts. The author, therefore, proposes that family therapists need to examine their position regarding religious fundamentalism in relation to the social constructionist relativist continuum and engage with uncomfortable questions about whether they believe that fundamentalism has essentially pathological roots. This article will explore whether the dualist position within some religious movements set against a more secular psychotherapeutic and psychiatric cultural milieu can invite a fundamentalised response from clinicians. The author draws on her own work with families who hold religious fundamentalist beliefs and enquires about ethics, transparency and collaboration within family therapy practice. This article invites complex ongoing challenging questions and debate. PMID:26712896

  18. Emphases of the Major Family Therapy Models: A Family FIRO Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doherty, William J.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Analyzes 13 models of family therapy according to their special emphases on the Family FIRO (Fundamental Interpersonal Relationship Orientation) model's dimensions of inclusion, control, and intimacy. Final conceptual analysis of models indicated that four family therapy models emphasized inclusion as a primary focus, four emphasized control, and…

  19. The role of family institutes in promoting the practice of family therapy.

    PubMed

    Rampage, Cheryl

    2014-09-01

    Much of the development of family therapy as a discipline was an outcome of the clinical, training, and theory-building activities conducted at family institutes around the United States. Beginning in the 1960s, these institutes were the crucibles in which the concepts and practices of family therapy flourished. The author, a leader at one of the largest family institutes in the United States, discusses the role of family institutes in promoting the practice of family therapy, as well as the challenges of doing so. PMID:24785549

  20. Family Therapy--Some Questions and Answers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pavlin, Saul; Rabkin, Richard

    1975-01-01

    Two experienced family therapists discuss therapeutic style, involvement, techniques, methods, handling of sexual material, use of self and of cotherapists in family sessions. Issues, relating to the first session, family fights sessions, types of families, family systems, and termination are also detailed. (Author)

  1. Growth behind the Mirror: The Family Therapy Consortium's Group Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wendorf, Donald J.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Charts the development of the Family Therapy Consortium, a group that provides supervision and continuing education in family therapy and explores the peer supervision process at work in the consortium. The focus is on individual and group development, which are seen as complementary aspects of the same growth process. (Author/NRB)

  2. The Family Therapy Institute: A State-Wide Deinstitutionalization Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Family Therapy Inst., Rugby, ND.

    The report--over half of which consists of appendixes--describes the Family Therapy Institute, a statewide program in Rugby, North Dakota devoted to the deinstitutionalization of juvenile delinquent status offenders by means of short term intensive family therapy treatment. Among the aspects covered are a history of the philosophical approach…

  3. Family Therapy Training in Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Fellowship Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rait, Douglas Samuel

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This study describes the current state of family therapy training in a sample of child and adolescent psychiatry fellowship programs. Method: Child and adolescent psychiatry fellows (N = 66) from seven training programs completed a questionnaire assessing demographics, family therapy training experiences, common models of treatment and…

  4. Stuctural Family versus Psychodynamic Child Therapy for Problematic Hispanic Boys.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szapocznik, Jose; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Compared structural family therapy (SFT), individual psychodynamic child therapy (IPCT) and control condition for Hispanic boys (N=69) with behavior and emotional problems. Findings suggest that control condition was less effective in retaining cases than treatment conditions, and SFT was more effective than IPCT in protecting family integrity.…

  5. A Blueprint for Increasing the Relevance of Family Therapy Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Lee M.

    1991-01-01

    Notes that family therapy research and psychotherapy research in general have been criticized for their lack of relevance to clinical practice. Presents five-stage model, based on marketing and developmental perspective, that family therapy researchers can follow to increase relevance of their work for clinicians and other consumers of family…

  6. A Short Course in Family Therapy: Translating Research Into Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Robert

    2005-01-01

    This article outlines a graduate-level, one-time-only family therapy course that prepares counseling trainees to be competent at entry-level family therapy in the United States. The approach outlined addresses the training concerns of programs that significantly emphasize individual-focused paradigms and that have limited time to train counseling…

  7. The Power Equity Guide: attending to gender in family therapy.

    PubMed

    Haddock, S A; Zimmerman, T S; MacPhee, D

    2000-04-01

    In the past two decades, feminist scholars have challenged the field of family therapy to incorporate the organizing principle of gender in its theory, practice, and training. In this paper, we introduce a training, research, and therapeutic tool that provides guidance for addressing or observing gender and power differentials in the practice of family therapy. As a training tool, the Power Equity Guide helps trainees to translate their theoretical understanding of feminist principles into specific behaviors in therapy. Researchers and supervisors can use the Power Equity Guide to evaluate the practice of gender-informed family therapy. We also provide specific suggestions for its use by trainers, supervisors, therapists, and researchers. PMID:10776603

  8. Up close: family therapy challenges and innovations around the world.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Janine; Abu-Baker, Khawla; Diez Fernández, Cristina; Chong Garcia, Nelly; Fredman, Glenda; Kamya, Hugo; Martín Higarza, Yolanda; Fortes de Leff, Jacqueline; Messent, Philip; Nakamura, Shin-Ichi; Torun Reid, Fatma; Sim, Timothy; Subrahmanian, Chitra; Zevallos Vega, Roxana

    2014-09-01

    Family therapists from 10 different countries (China, India, Israel including Palestinian citizens, Japan, Mexico, Peru, Spain, Turkey, Uganda, and the United Kingdom) describe systemic therapy in their contexts and current innovative work and challenges. They highlight the importance of family therapy continuing to cut across disciplines, the power of systems ideas in widely diverse settings and institutions (such as courts, HIV projects, working with people forced into exile), extensive new mental health initiatives (such as in Turkey and India), as well as the range of family therapy journals available (four alone in Spain). Many family therapy groups are collaborating across organizations (especially in Asia) and the article presents other ideas for connections such as a clearing house to inexpensively translate family therapy articles into other languages. PMID:25099431

  9. The Family, Family Therapy, and Borderline Personality Disorder

    PubMed Central

    GLICK, IRA D.; DULIT, REBECCA A.; WACHTER, EILEEN; CLARKIN, JOHN F.

    1995-01-01

    The authors review recent controlled studies on the interrelationship of the family and its members with borderline disorder and propose a new model for understanding and managing this relationship. The focus of the model is on psychopathology, evaluation, and treatment of patient and family as they influence each other. In the authors’ view this illness originates in cerebral dysfunction, in the patient in combination with impaired relationships among family members. When the family is available, we believe that the treatment of choice is a multimodal approach involving family psychoeducation and family systems or dynamic intervention where possible, in combination with medications, individual psychotherapy, or both. PMID:22700254

  10. Strengthening Family Resilience. The Guilford Family Therapy Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, Froma

    Offering an alternative to clinician's prevalent focus on family dysfunction, this book draws upon extensive clinical and research experience to present a framework for therapeutic and preventive work with couples and families who are distressed, vulnerable, or at risk. The book identifies key interactional processes that enable family members to…

  11. A narrative perspective on genograms: revisiting classical family therapy methods.

    PubMed

    Chrzastowski, Szymon K

    2011-10-01

    This article presents how genograms, a classic family therapy technique, can be used in the context of narrative therapy. Genograms create a unique opportunity to explore and re-tell family stories thus enabling their re-authoring. An important aspect of this process is that of tracking down family resources and wisdom. The graphic form of a genogram can be very helpful in distancing a person from the dominant narrations in her/his family. Additionally, genogram analysis is an excellent opportunity to conduct re-membering conversation and introducing the "club of life" metaphor. Finally, the creative approach to drawing genograms can be an invitation for family members to "play" with their family stories and, as a consequence, re-position their roles in these stories. The article completes the presentation of the family therapy case study which was inspired by narrative ideas and genogram analysis. PMID:21613367

  12. Clinical Competencies Specific to Family-Based Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stinchfield, Tracy Anne

    2004-01-01

    Research has indicated that traditional office-based family therapy services are not always effective with at-risk families and that there is an increasing trend toward home-based delivered services (W. Snyder & E. McCollum, 1999). In this qualitative study, the author explored experienced home-based family therapists' perceptions of the…

  13. The Invisible Mirror: In-Home Family Therapy and Supervision.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zarski, John J.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Discusses home-based family therapy intervention programs, designed as a preventive strategy for multiproblem, at-risk families in mental health agencies. Maintains that a review of the literature reveals little information on clinical supervision, which is a major component of home-based family intervention. Focuses on providing an alternative…

  14. Family Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Child Anxiety Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Jeffrey J.; Piacentini, John C.; Southam-Gerow, Michael; Chu, Brian C.; Sigman, Marian

    2006-01-01

    Objective: This study compared family-focused cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT: the Building Confidence Program) with traditional child-focused CBT with minimal family involvement for children with anxiety disorders. Method: Forty clinically anxious youth (6-13 years old) were randomly assigned to a family- or child-focused cognitive-behavioral…

  15. An Art Therapy Exploration of Immigration with Latino Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linesch, Debra; Aceves, Hilda C.; Quezada, Paul; Trochez, Melissa; Zuniga, Elena

    2012-01-01

    This grounded theory study utilized art therapy techniques to explore the experiences of 8 Latino families that had immigrated to the United States. Focus group facilitators invited the parents and adolescent children in the families to share their acculturation experiences verbally and in family drawings. Emergent themes from each of three focus…

  16. Culture and meaning: expanding the metaphorical repertoire of family therapy.

    PubMed

    Paré, D A

    1996-03-01

    This essay proposes that a family therapy founded on a contemporary, postmodern perspective demands an expanded range of metaphors for the family and the work of therapy. It describes a perspective that emphasizes a view of the family as a culture, as opposed to a system. A cultural perspective naturally addresses issues of meaning and language, narrative, politics, and practices of power-critical contemporary concerns not adequately encompassed by traditional systemic formulations. The essay explores the relationship between theory and metaphor, and contrasts the views of persons and of the family offered by the metaphors of culture and system. Case illustrations demonstrate how a cultural view effectively fashions an expanded therapeutic discourse, shifting the focus of family therapy from normative prescriptions for family "functionality" to issues of intercultural harmony. This shift in emphasis also extends to individual work, where the therapeutic task is construed as a peace-making between conflicting stories that intersect in the client's life. PMID:8804965

  17. Re-visioning the Family Life Cycle Theory and Paradigm in Marriage and Family Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erickson, Martin J.

    1998-01-01

    Discusses some of the specific problems associated with the adoption of the family life-cycles (FLC) theory and paradigm in marriage and family therapy (MFT). Four ideas are offered as ways to "re-vision" the FLC paradigm in MFT in the areas of theory, research, and therapy. (Author/MKA)

  18. Salvador Minuchin's structural family therapy and its application to multicultural family systems.

    PubMed

    Navarre, S E

    1998-01-01

    The structural approach to family therapy offers a useful perspective to the nurse therapist working with families with various cultural backgrounds. Asian and Hispanic families are examined to illustrate using Minuchin's approach to family counseling. The rationale for the structural approach is explored, and specific therapeutic techniques for practice are described. Nurses who work with culturally diverse families might profit by using this approach. PMID:9883131

  19. Family Therapy with Latino Families: An Interview with Patricia Arredondo

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cardona, Betty; Softas-Nall, Lia

    2010-01-01

    In this interview, Patricia Arredondo shares with us her scholarship and expertise working with Latino families. Patricia talks about multicultural competencies, multicultural development as well as diversity assessment when working with Latino families. Dr. Arredondo has published widely on these topics and is the coauthor of "Counseling Latinos…

  20. Child and adolescent psychiatry and family therapy. An overview.

    PubMed

    Malone, C A

    2001-07-01

    This article has provided an overview of the complex relationship between family therapy and child and adolescent psychiatry. Emphasis has been placed on the fact that the controversy and polarization that earlier characterized the relationship have delayed, but not blocked, the full integration of family therapy into child and adolescent psychiatry. Child psychiatrists and family therapists have been able to move beyond dichotomous polemics to combine the two fields in clinical practice, which has led to meaningful convergence in research and services. Family research has yielded important new directions for clinical practice in the areas of attachment, alcoholism, conduct disorder, and schizophrenia spectrum disorders. It also has led to models of family continuity that have considerable potential for interrelating and possibly integrating different family therapy models. Family research also has uncovered family factors in the intergenerational transmission of psychopathology that can inform clinical practice. Convergence in the clinical domain has led to improved assessment and treatment across a wide range of child, adolescent, and family developmental, emotional, behavioral, and mental disorders. Finally, this article has reviewed the controversy over family systems therapy and the development of new directions in theory and practice to which this controversy has led. Despite the possibility that these new directions might lead to significant disruption and interference in the process of convergence, careful examination of the controversy and the new developments in practice suggests that rather than producing division between the two fields, the new developments, especially narrative therapy, are more likely to bring the two fields closer, particularly in the realm of interventive interviewing in family therapy. PMID:11449803

  1. The "Incestuous Family" Revisited: A Critical Analysis of Family Therapy Myths.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Kerrie; MacKinnon, Laurie

    1990-01-01

    Critiques family therapy literature concerning incest. Identifies pervasive myths claiming that (1) fathers and mothers are pathologically disturbed or inadequate; (2) incest is caused by separation and loss; (3) family isolation or a rigid external boundary explains incest; and (4) incest serves a function in maintaining family organization.…

  2. Complementarity as a Function of Stage in Therapy: An Analysis of Minuchin's Structural Family Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laird, Heather; Vande Kemp, Hendrika

    1987-01-01

    Explored the level of family therapist complementarity in the early, middle and late stages of therapy performing a micro-analysis of Salvador Minuchin with one family in successful therapy. Level of therapist complementarity was signficantly greater in the early and late stages than in the middle stage, and was significantly correlated with…

  3. The Therapy Alliance: A Moderator in Therapy Outcome for Families Dealing with Child Abuse and Neglect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Lee N.; Ketring, Scott A.

    2006-01-01

    The role of the therapy alliance in therapy outcome for families dealing with child abuse and neglect was examined using the family as the unit of analysis. The alliance was tested as a moderator in relationship to posttreatment levels of symptom distress and physical violence. Results show that the bonds, goals, and tasks subscale scores are…

  4. Attributional Effects of Therapy With Incestuous Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sagatun, Inger J.

    1982-01-01

    Examines the effects of a self-help program, Parents United, on families in which incest has occurred. Studied male incest offenders (N=56). Results indicated the program was successful in increasing participants' feelings of responsibility, and decreasing recidivism, but less successful in keeping the families together. (Author/JAC)

  5. Juvenile Anorexia Nervosa: Family Therapy's Natural Niche

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fishman, H. Charles

    2006-01-01

    Juvenile Anorexia Nervosa (AN) is a severe problem both in terms of presenting symptomatology and its tendency toward chronicity. Researchers have consistently shown that family-based approaches are superior to individual approaches for the treatment of juvenile AN. This article addresses the capacity deficit of trained family therapists to treat…

  6. Touch in Family Therapy: An Exploratory Study Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moy, Caryl T.

    The use of touch in therapeutic relationships is seldom dealt with as a practice issue except in a proscriptive way. To gather descriptive information on the use of touch in therapy, professional therapists (N=50) whose practice was largely family therapy were interviewed about the successful use of touch in their helping relationships. Interview…

  7. Family Therapy: A Phenomenological and Active Directive Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Albert

    1978-01-01

    A "third force" in family therapy is outlined in this paper, which combines a phenomenological-humanistic approach with a highly active-directive attempt to help family members surrender their misperceptions of themselves and others and to make profound philosophic changes in their intrapersonal and interpersonal attitudes and behaviors. (Author)

  8. Family Therapy of Terroristic Trauma: Psychological Syndromes and Treatment Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Laurence

    2003-01-01

    Reviews pertinent literature on terroristic trauma and combines this information with the author's experience in treating adults, children, and family victims and survivors of recent terrorist attacks. Describes the psychological syndromes resulting from terrorism and discusses the relevant individual and family therapy modalities for treating…

  9. Terminal Stage Leukemia: Integrating Art Therapy and Family Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teufel, Emily Scudder

    1995-01-01

    Through art therapy, children express symbolically what they will not or cannot express emotionally to those close to them, and some children have the added stress of family problems that are magnified due to the situation. Presents the case history of a nine-year-old girl in the terminal stages of leukemia whose artwork symbolized family unity.…

  10. Simulated Family Therapy Interviews in Clinical Social Work Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mooradian, John K.

    2007-01-01

    This article describes a learning method that employed theatre students as family clients in an advanced social work practice course. Students were provided with an opportunity to integrate and apply their learning of theory, clinical skills, and professional conduct in full-length family therapy sessions that occurred in the classroom and were…

  11. Solution-Focused Therapy for Families Coping with Suicide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Castro, Sahily; Guterman, Jeffrey T.

    2008-01-01

    Solution-focused therapy is proposed as a model for families coping with suicide. The nature and incidence of suicide is described along with a consideration of the effects that suicide has on families and prevailing treatment approaches. Three case examples illustrate the application. Implications are discussed pertaining to the theory, practice,…

  12. Human-animal bonds II: the role of pets in family systems and family therapy.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Froma

    2009-12-01

    The vast majority of pet owners regard their companion animals as family members, yet the role of pets in family systems and family therapy has received little attention in research, training, and practice. This article first notes the benefits of family pets and their importance for resilience. It then examines their role in couple and family processes and their involvement in relational dynamics and tensions. Next, it addresses bereavement in the loss of a cherished pet, influences complicating grief, and facilitation of mourning and adaptation. Finally, it explores the ways that clients' pets and the use of therapists' companion animals in animal-assisted therapy can inform and enrich couple and family therapy as valuable resources in healing. PMID:19930434

  13. Multi-Family Therapy for Bulimia Nervosa in Adolescence.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Catherine; Voulgari, Stamatoula; Eisler, Ivan; Hunt, Katrina; Simic, Mima

    2015-01-01

    Existing randomized controlled trials of family therapy for treatment of bulimia nervosa in adolescence highlight the need for further development of treatments. This article describes the development of multi-family treatment for bulimia nervosa in adolescents aged 13-18. It outlines the theory guiding this development, the areas of need identified by previous studies, and the treatment that has been designed to meet these needs. Particular attention is given to the need to increase communication between family members, strategies to reduce high levels of criticism or hostility, and skills to manage emotion dysregulation and low tolerance for negative emotions. To these ends the program draws on the multi-family treatment for anorexia nervosa, cognitive behavioral therapy techniques, and dialectical behavior therapy. PMID:26010166

  14. The FGF family: biology, pathophysiology and therapy

    PubMed Central

    Beenken, Andrew; Mohammadi, Moosa

    2013-01-01

    The family of fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) regulates a plethora of developmental processes, including brain patterning, branching morphogenesis and limb development. Several mitogenic, cytoprotective and angiogenic therapeutic applications of FGFs are already being explored, and the recent discovery of the crucial roles of the endocrine-acting FGF19 subfamily in bile acid, glucose and phosphate homeostasis has sparked renewed interest in the pharmacological potential of this family. This Review discusses traditional applications of recombinant FGFs and small-molecule FGF receptor kinase inhibitors in the treatment of cancer and cardiovascular disease and their emerging potential in the treatment of metabolic syndrome and hypophosphataemic diseases. PMID:19247306

  15. The Effects of Family Therapies for Adolescent Delinquency and Substance Abuse: A Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin, Scott A.; Christian, Sarah; Berkeljon, Arjan; Shadish, William R.

    2012-01-01

    This meta-analysis summarizes results from k = 24 studies comparing either Brief Strategic Family Therapy, Functional Family Therapy, Multidimensional Family Therapy, or Multisystemic Therapy to either treatment-as-usual, an alternative therapy, or a control group in the treatment of adolescent substance abuse and delinquency. Additionally, the…

  16. Solution-focused therapy. Counseling model for busy family physicians.

    PubMed Central

    Greenberg, G.; Ganshorn, K.; Danilkewich, A.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To provide family doctors in busy office practices with a model for counseling compatible with patient-centred medicine, including the techniques, strategies, and questions necessary for implementation. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: The MEDLINE database was searched from 1984 to 1999 using the terms psychotherapy in family practice, brief therapy in family practice, solution-focused therapy, and brief psychotherapy. A total of 170 relevant articles were identified; 75 abstracts were retrieved and a similar number of articles read. Additional resources included seminal books on solution-focused therapy (SFT), bibliographies of salient articles, participation in workshops on SFT, and observation of SFT counseling sessions taped by leaders in the field. MAIN MESSAGE: Solution-focused therapy's concentration on collaborative identification and amplification of patient strengths is the foundation upon which solutions to an array of problems are built. Solution-focused therapy offers simplicity, practicality, and relative ease of application. From the perspective of a new learner, MECSTAT provides a framework that facilitates development of skills. CONCLUSION: Solution-focused therapy recognizes that, even in the bleakest of circumstances, an emphasis on individual strength is empowering. In recognizing patients as experts in self-care, family physicians support and accentuate patient-driven change, and in so doing, are freed from the hopelessness and burnout that can accompany misplaced feelings of responsibility. PMID:11768927

  17. Familial hearing loss and cisplatin therapy.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, B J; Torkelson, J L

    1998-01-01

    Familial high-tone hearing loss in males is a recessive trait often unrecognized. Cisplatin chemotherapy may be associated with hearing loss. A review was made of audiograms in 85 patients with testicular carcinoma prior to cisplatin chemotherapy to determine the extent of preexisting familial hearing loss. Clinical histories defined patients exposed to high noise levels and other common causes of hearing loss. Audiometric findings were classified according to normal hearing or mild, moderate, and severe hearing impairment. Pretreatment audiograms were normal in 51 patients and abnormal in 19 patients with histories of high-level noise exposure, and in 15 patients with high-frequency hearing loss there was no history of noise exposure, ear infection, or other potential causes of hearing loss. These last 15 patients were judged to have recessive familial hearing loss. Awareness of familial hearing loss is important in male patients in whom cisplatin chemotherapy is planned. Pretreatment hearing assessment, including audiograms, is recommended for such male patients. PMID:9589029

  18. Neuro-Linguistic Programming and Family Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Susan L. R.; Davis, Donald I.

    1983-01-01

    Presents a brief introduction to Neuro-Linguistic Programming (NLP), followed by case examples which illustrate some of the substantive gains which NLP techniques have provided in work with couples and families. NLP's major contributions involve understanding new models of human experience. (WAS)

  19. Identifying Separation Threats in Family Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Argles, Paul

    1983-01-01

    Outlines the types of separation threats common in troubled families. Signs that threats are being used may include inappropriate clinging behavior, phobias, psychosomatic symptoms, and anxious attachment. Therapists may find other behaviors, often seen as problems in themselves, that are really reactions to perceived separation threats. (JAC)

  20. Brief Strategic Family Therapy: Engaging Drug Using/Problem Behavior Adolescents and their Families into Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Szapocznik, José; Zarate, Monica; Duff, Johnathan; Muir, Joan

    2013-01-01

    Despite the efficacy of family-based interventions for improving outcomes for adolescent behavior problems such as substance use, engaging and retaining whole families in treatment is one of the greatest challenges therapists confront. This article illustrates how the Brief Strategic Family Therapy® (BSFT®) model, a family-based, empirically validated intervention designed to treat children and adolescents’ problem behaviors, can be used to increase engagement, improve retention, and bring about positive outcomes for families. Research evidence for efficacy and effectiveness is also presented. PMID:23731415

  1. Centering the Voices of International Students in Family Studies and Family Therapy Graduate Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDowell, Teresa; Fang, Shi-Ruei; Kosutic, Iva; Griggs, Julie

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we report the results of a survey that accessed the perceptions of family studies and family therapy international master's and doctoral students across the United States. Our goals included giving collective voice to the experience of international students and gathering their suggestions for improving programs. Themes that…

  2. The advance of poststructuralism and its influence on family therapy.

    PubMed

    Dickerson, Victoria C

    2014-09-01

    Postmodernism began to influence family therapy very early in the 1980s with articles referencing postmodern ideas, focusing on meaning and multiplicity. With the appearance of narrative therapy on the scene in the 1990s there was a shift toward poststructural thinking, which refined the movement and politicized the clinical work. Even with a bit of a backlash, whether because this was a new idea or it somehow threatened a positivistic culture, a poststructural view has continued to have effects on family therapy. This article explores the variety of influences: the expansion of narrative ideas, the innovation of Madsen's collaborative helping, and also more nuanced effects. I argue that a poststructural view has effectively changed how many family therapists think and may also be subtly influencing how they might work. PMID:25039267

  3. Use of an anecdotal client feedback note in family therapy.

    PubMed

    Haber, Russell; Carlson, Ryan G; Braga, Cristina

    2014-06-01

    To attain information about divergent agendas in family therapy, as well as incorporate client feedback, we present the Client Feedback Note (CFN). The CFN elicits information about each family member's feelings, learning, dislikes, and wishes for each session. Anecdotal feedback after each session may help the therapist have better insight into the clients' perceptions and experience of the therapy and the therapist. Sensitivity to information generated by the CFN can help both therapist and client work to coconstruct a therapeutic process that is relevant to the diverse needs of the client system. This manuscript will (a) discuss literature supporting the use of client feedback in therapy; (b) present the CFN and rationale for its development; (c) discuss our experiences utilizing the CFN along with case examples that illustrate its use; and (d) identify practical applications, limitations, and potential research with using the CFN in systemic therapy. PMID:24702034

  4. Integrating Play in Family Therapy: An Interview with Eliana Gil, Ph.D.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christensen, Teresa M.; Thorngren, Jill M.

    2000-01-01

    Presents an interview with Eliana Gil, the current director of the Starbright Training Institute for child abuse and neglect, play therapy, and family play therapy in Springfield, Virginia. Gil's publications and experiences have spoken to coconstructing family therapy sessions that effectively integrate the paradigms of play and family therapy.…

  5. Attachment-Based Family Therapy: "Adherence" and Differentiation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diamond, Gary M.; Diamond, Guy S.; Hogue, Aaron

    2007-01-01

    This study examined the fidelity of attachment-based family therapy (ABFT) for depressed adolescents. Trained observers used the therapist behavior rating scale (3rd version) to code therapist behaviors in 45 sessions of ABFT and 45 sessions each from two empirically based treatments for adolescent substance abusers: multidimensional family…

  6. The Use of Family Therapy within a University Counseling Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Kathryn

    2009-01-01

    As a counterpoint to the oftentimes adversarial way that parents are viewed when they appear to be overinvolved in the lives of their college-aged students, this article advocates for the use of a family therapy perspective in university counseling centers. Benefits of this perspective include a broadening of the lens through which individual…

  7. Beyond law and ethics: an interdisciplinary course in family law and family therapy.

    PubMed

    Riley, P; Hartwell, S; Sargent, G; Patterson, J E

    1997-10-01

    The professions of family therapy and law share many clients and areas of overlap. Law-related coursework in family therapy programs is typically limited to legal, ethical, and professional issues. However, students can also benefit from understanding other areas of overlap, such as divorce, child custody, and mediation. This article discusses the curriculum for an interdisciplinary course that educates both family therapy and law students. The course provides: (1) a substantive education about similarities and differences between the professions, how they operate as systems, and specific areas of overlap, (2) opportunities to learn clinical skills, and (3) opportunities for personal insight about skills, personality types, and negotiation styles, and how these may differ between the professions. PMID:9338862

  8. Stress-related asthma and family therapy: Case study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    This paper applies the Biobehavioral Family Model (BBFM) of stress- related illness to the study and treatment of an adolescent with intractable asthma. The model is described, along with supportive research findings. Then a case study is presented, demonstrating how the model is clinically applied. We tell the story of an asthmatic adolescent presenting for therapy due to her intense asthmatic crises, and the case is presented to exemplify how the BBFM can help understand the family-psychobiological contribution to exacerbation of disease activity, and therefore guide treatment towards the amelioration of severe physical symptoms. Facets of the patient’s intra-familial interactions are consistent with the BBFM, which support clinical validation of the model. In the case described, it is likely that additional asthma medications would not have had the desired ameliorative effect, because they did not target the family relational processes contributing to the symptoms. The recognition of the influences of family relational processes on the disease was crucial for effective intervention. The therapy incorporates and weaves together BBFM understanding of family patterns of interaction and physiological/medical concerns integrated with Bowenian intervention strategies. This case study validates the importance and usefulness of BBFM for intervention with stress-sensitive illnesses such as asthma. PMID:23148727

  9. A follow-up study of the impact of family therapy in the pediatric office.

    PubMed

    Karofsky, P S; Keith, D V; Hoornstra, L L; Clune, C S

    1983-05-01

    Fifteen families received family therapy from a pediatrician and nurse practitioner. Most families began therapy because of school problems or behavior problems with one of the children. There was serious marital discord in nine families that resulted in divorce in two of them. At least one year after the families began therapy, they were recalled for interviews by a psychologist who was unknown to them. Information was obtained during these interviews that indicates (1) pediatricians and nurse practitioners were accepted in their roles as therapists by 14 of the 15 families and (2) all families rated their family therapy experiences as useful. PMID:6839618

  10. Key Issues to Consider in Therapy with Muslim Families.

    PubMed

    Weatherhead, Stephen; Daiches, Anna

    2015-12-01

    We present the key issues to consider in therapy with Muslim families. Following a brief introduction, five themes are presented: self, family dynamics, causation, and coping strategies. The section on "self" includes a discussion of three terms which link the four Islamic models of "self" identified through the review. The family dynamics section pays particular attention to interconnectedness, family roles, and gender. Causation is discussed with reference to supernatural and spiritual causes. On the theme of coping strategies, religious responses are discussed as are the roles of religious leaders, and professional mental health services. Clinical implications from the key themes are also discussed in addition to limitations of the published literature in this area. This includes a discussion of the epistemological and paradigmatic issues related to the research. The review concludes by summarising these issues and presenting areas for further research. PMID:25801751

  11. Notes for a cultural history of family therapy.

    PubMed

    Beels, C Christian

    2002-01-01

    The official history of family therapy describes its beginnings as a daring technical and philosophical departure from traditional individual treatment in the 1960s, inspired especially by the "system thinking" of Gregory Bateson. This celebrated origin story needs to be supplemented with a longer and larger history of both practice and thought about the family, and that is the subject of this article. The longer history goes back to the founding of social work by Mary Richmond, of pragmatism by William James, and of the organic view of social systems intervention by John Dewey. Seen against this background, family therapy is, among other things, a consequence of the development of persistent elements of American professional culture, experience, and philosophy. The taking of this historical-anthropological view discloses also the origins of two other histories that have made their contribution to the development of family therapy: a science of observing communication processes that starts with Edward Sapir and leads to contemporary conversation analysis, and a history of mesmerism in the United States that culminates in Milton Erickson and his followers. PMID:11924091

  12. Families and Individual Development: Provocations from the Field of Family Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minuchin, Patricia

    1985-01-01

    Focuses on systems theory as the paradigm underlying family therapy and considers the implications of this framework for conceptions of the individual, the study of parent-child interaction, and new research formulations and areas of study. Considers trends in the developmental field that move toward such formulations. (RH)

  13. Family Therapy in Iran: A Case Study of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khodayarifard, Mohammad; McClenon, James

    2011-01-01

    Iranian clinical psychologists have devised family therapy methods that use cognitive behavior models that ft with their collectivist Islamic culture. The authors review Islamic-based strategies and describe family therapy with a culturally specific case of childhood obsessive-compulsive disorder. Family therapy, adapted to integrated,…

  14. Family Therapy as a Dialogue of Living Persons: A Perspective Inspired by Bakhtin, Voloshinov, and Shotter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rober, Peter

    2005-01-01

    There are not a lot of conceptual tools that can help a family therapy teacher to talk and teach about the importance of the therapeutic relationship in family therapy practice. The idea that family therapy can be conceived as a dialogue might offer a fresh and promising perspective. Mainly inspired by the work of Bakhtin, Voloshinov, and Shotter,…

  15. Dyadic research in marriage and family therapy: methodological considerations.

    PubMed

    Wittenborn, Andrea K; Dolbin-MacNab, Megan L; Keiley, Margaret K

    2013-01-01

    With training that emphasizes relationship systems, marriage and family therapists are uniquely attuned to interpersonal dynamics, interdependence, and the influence of relationships on individuals' perceptions, beliefs, and attitudes. While recent statistical advances have contributed to a proliferation of resources designed to introduce researchers to dyadic data analysis, guidelines related to the methodological aspects of dyadic research design have received less attention. Given the potential advantages of dyadic designs for examining couple and family relational and therapeutic processes, the purpose of this article is to introduce marriage and family therapy researchers to dyadic research methodology. Using examples from our own research, we discuss methodological considerations and lessons learned related to sampling, measurement, data collection, and ethics. Recommendations for future dyadic research are provided. PMID:25073839

  16. A case of functional urinary retention: the use of family play therapy.

    PubMed

    Stoddard, F R; Wilberger, M S; Olafson, E

    1993-09-01

    This case presents a technique for doing family therapy in families with young children. In family play therapy, the entire family plays together, allowing full participation of even the youngest children in the therapeutic process. Standard family therapy interventions in the latter part of each session make use of family interaction patterns and unconscious processes revealed during the earlier play. In the case presented here, the technique was successfully applied to a family with a 3-year-old son who had functional urinary retention. This case also provided an opportunity for interdisciplinary collaboration between the separate Child and Family Services at a major teaching hospital. PMID:8243618

  17. Multisystemic Therapy: An Empirically Supported, Home-Based Family Therapy Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheidow, Ashli J.; Woodford, Mark S.

    2003-01-01

    Multisystemic Therapy (MST) is a well-validated, evidenced-based treatment for serious clinical problems presented by adolescents and their families. This article is an introduction to the MST approach and outlines key clinical features, describes the theoretical underpinnings, and discusses the empirical support for MST's effectiveness with a…

  18. Targeting Hyaluronic Acid Family for Cancer Chemoprevention and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lokeshwar, Vinata B.; Mirza, Summan; Jordan, Andre

    2016-01-01

    Hyaluronic acid or hyaluronan (HA) is perhaps one of the most uncomplicated large polymers that regulates several normal physiological processes and, at the same time, contributes to the manifestation of a variety of chronic and acute diseases, including cancer. Members of the HA signaling pathway (HA synthases, HA receptors, and HYAL-1 hyaluronidase) have been experimentally shown to promote tumor growth, metastasis, and angiogenesis, and hence each of them is a potential target for cancer therapy. Furthermore, as these members are also overexpressed in a variety of carcinomas, targeting of the HA family is clinically relevant. A variety of targeted approaches have been developed to target various HA family members, including small-molecule inhibitors and antibody and vaccine therapies. These treatment approaches inhibit HA-mediated intracellular signaling that promotes tumor cell proliferation, motility, and invasion, as well as induction of endothelial cell functions. Being nontoxic, nonimmunogenic, and versatile for modifications, HA has been used in nanoparticle preparations for the targeted delivery of chemotherapy drugs and other anticancer compounds to tumor cells through interaction with cell-surface HA receptors. This review discusses basic and clinical translational aspects of targeting each HA family member and respective treatment approaches that have been described in the literature. PMID:25081525

  19. Religion, Spirituality, and Marriage and Family Therapy: A Study of Family Therapists' Beliefs about the Appropriateness of Addressing Religious and Spiritual Issues in Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Thomas D.; Kirkpatrick, Dwight; Hecker, Lorna; Killmer, Mark

    2002-01-01

    Although increasing attention has been given to spirituality, to date, no published studies in marriage and family therapy journals have explored marriage and family therapists' beliefs about the appropriateness of addressing spirituality in therapy. This study fills this gap by examining the beliefs of a sample of clinical members of AAMFT about…

  20. Scaling Up Family Therapy in Fragile, Conflict-Affected States.

    PubMed

    Charlés, Laurie L

    2015-09-01

    This article discusses the design and delivery of two international family therapy-focused mental health and psychosocial support training projects, one in a fragile state and one in a post-conflict state. The training projects took place in Southeast Asia and the Middle East/North Africa. Each was funded, supported, and implemented by local, regional, and international stakeholders, and delivered as part of a broader humanitarian agenda to develop human resource capacity to work with families affected by atrocities. The two examples illustrate how task-shifting/task-sharing and transitional justice approaches were used to inform the scaling-up of professionals involved in each project. They also exemplify how state-citizen phenomena in each location affected the project design and delivery. PMID:25315510

  1. Use of simulated clients in marriage and family therapy education.

    PubMed

    Hodgson, Jennifer L; Lamson, Angela L; Feldhousen, Elizabeth B

    2007-01-01

    Knowledge of how one should manage suicidal, homicidal, child maltreatment, and domestic violence situations is paramount in the training of marriage and family therapists (MFTs). Simulated patient modules were created to help clinical faculty address these crisis situations in a protected learning environment. The modules were implemented by the MFT faculty in collaboration with the Office of Clinical Skills Assessment and Education at East Carolina University's Brody School of Medicine. Qualitative data over the course of 2 years revealed six thematic domains regarding therapists' performance, therapists' emotions, the simulation experiences, and lessons learned. Educational, clinical, and research recommendations include tools to implement simulation exercises into marriage and family therapy programs as well as suggestions to assess for teaching effectiveness. PMID:17257379

  2. Therapeutic Management of Familial Hypercholesterolemia: Current and Emerging Drug Therapies.

    PubMed

    Patel, Roshni S; Scopelliti, Emily M; Savelloni, Julie

    2015-12-01

    Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is a genetic disorder characterized by significantly elevated low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) concentrations that result from mutations of the LDL receptor, apolipoprotein B (apo B-100), and proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9). Early and aggressive treatment can prevent premature atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease in these high-risk patients. Given that the cardiovascular consequences of FH are similar to typical hypercholesterolemia, traditional therapies are utilized to decrease LDL-C levels. Patients with FH should receive statins as first-line treatment; high-potency statins at high doses are often required. Despite the use of statins, additional treatments are often necessary to achieve appropriate LDL-C lowering in this patient population. Novel drug therapies that target the pathophysiologic defects of the condition are continuously emerging. Contemporary therapies including mipomersen (Kynamro, Genzyme), an oligonucleotide inhibitor of apo B-100 synthesis; lomitapide (Juxtapid, Aegerion), a microsomal triglyceride transfer protein inhibitor; and alirocumab (Praluent, Sanofi-Aventis/Regeneron) and evolocumab (Repatha, Amgen), PCSK9 inhibitors, are currently approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for use in FH. This review highlights traditional as well as emerging contemporary therapies with supporting clinical data to evaluate current recommendations and discuss the future direction of FH management. PMID:26684558

  3. The Saigon of the Family's Mind: Family Therapy with Families of Vietnam Veterans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jurich, Anthony P.

    1983-01-01

    Describes problems associated with Vietnam veterans and their families, including Posttraumatic Stress Disorder. Veterans may establish enmeshed relationships with their children, leading to problems with adolescent individualization. Presents a five-stage treatment method including Intake, Ventilation, Bridging, Education, and Taking Therapy…

  4. Early Therapeutic Alliance and Treatment Outcome in Individual and Family Therapy for Adolescent Behavior Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hogue, Aaron; Dauber, Sarah; Stambaugh, Leyla Faw; Cecero, John J.; Liddle, Howard A.

    2006-01-01

    The impact of early therapeutic alliance was examined in 100 clients receiving either individual cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) or family therapy for adolescent substance abuse. Observational ratings of adolescent alliance in CBT and adolescent and parent alliance in family therapy were used to predict treatment retention (in CBT only) and…

  5. Ethical Considerations for the Use of Family Therapy in Substance Abuse Treatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whittinghill, David

    2002-01-01

    This article examines the unique ethical considerations for the provision of family therapy as substance abuse treatment. Use of family therapy as substance abuse treatment has grown rapidly, but the ethical codes that guide clinical practice have not kept pace. Ethical pitfalls specific to family counseling within alcohol and drug treatment…

  6. Comparison of Family Therapy Outcome with Alcohol-Abusing, Runaway Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slesnick, Natasha; Prestopnik, Jillian L

    2009-01-01

    Treatment evaluation for alcohol problem, runaway adolescents and their families is rare. This study recruited primary alcohol problem adolescents (N = 119) and their primary caretakers from two runaway shelters and assigned them to (a) home-based ecologically based family therapy (EBFT), (b) office-based functional family therapy (FFT), or (c)…

  7. Integrating Gender on Multiple Levels: A Conceptual Model for Teaching Gender Issues in Family Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Lee; McBain, Heidi

    2006-01-01

    As the field of family therapy has evolved, there has been growing recognition as to the importance of gender in family therapy. To prepare the next generation of family therapists adequately, it is important that they recognize the many and complex ways in which gender permeates their work. In this article we present an integrative model to help…

  8. A Descriptive Study of Marital and Family Therapy: A Social Learning Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinstein, Charles D.; And Others

    The social learning approach to marital and family therapy is a didactic approach calling for an active and directive therapist and a collaborative client. To examine the variability of therapist and client behaviors within sessions and across the course of treatment, 24 families, in marital and family therapy, participated in the study. Families…

  9. Adolescent and Parent Alliances with Therapists in Brief Strategic Family Therapy[TM] with Drug-Using Hispanic Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robbins, Michael S.; Mayorga, Carla C.; Mitrani, Victoria B.; Szapocznik, Jose; Turner, Charles W.; Alexander, James F.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between alliance and retention in family therapy. Alliance was examined at the individual (parent, adolescent) and family level (within-family differences) for families that either dropped out or completed family therapy. Participants were 31 Hispanic adolescents and their family members who received brief…

  10. Family Therapy and Children of Alcoholics Implications for Continuing Education and Certification in Substance Abuse Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crespi, Tony D.; Rueckert, Quentin H.

    2006-01-01

    Clinicians involved in family therapy are increasingly concerned with the impact of parental alcoholism on individual development and family functioning. With more than 20 million adults raised within an alcoholic family, and with widespread problems associated with parental alcoholism, clinicians providing family treatment have a potentially…

  11. Basic Techniques in Marriage and Family Counseling and Therapy. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Robert L.; Stevens-Smith, Patricia

    Counselors working in the areas of marriage and family counseling and therapy are expected to work effectively with couples and families experiencing a variety of issues and problems. Structural, strategic, and transgenerational family therapists may seem to be operating in similar manners, and it appears that many practicing family therapists go…

  12. Integration of Sexual Counseling and Family Therapy with Surgical Treatment of Breast Cancer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    May, Harold J.

    1981-01-01

    The impact of breast cancer and mastectomy on women and their families is examined from a family systems orientation. Sexual counseling and family therapy are advocated to reduce the psychological and sexual trauma of mastectomy and enhance family adjustment. Clinical case studies provide support for therapeutic intervention. (Author)

  13. Family therapy with unmarried African American mothers and their adolescents.

    PubMed

    Becker, D; Liddle, H A

    2001-01-01

    Almost two-thirds of African American births are to unmarried mothers, and these single parents are among the most economically vulnerable in the United States. The effects of chronic stressors such as poverty can compromise the ability of these mothers to parent effectively, particularly during the developmental period of adolescence, typically a stressful phase of parenting. This article describes a multidimensional family therapy (MDFT) approach to working with African American adolescents who have drug and/or behavior problems. It is maintained that addressing the intrapersonal functioning of African American single mothers is vital if they are to re-establish the attachment bonds necessary for the maintenance of essential parental influence in the lives of their adolescents. Through systematic attention to the parent as an individual, leading to a balance between self-care and care for others, parental supervision is more easily achieved and relational impasses between parent and adolescent more equitably resolved. PMID:11802488

  14. Targeted Therapies for Advanced Ewing Sarcoma Family of Tumours

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yunyun; Ludwig, Joseph; Janku, Filip

    2015-01-01

    The prognosis of adolescent and young adult patients battling metastatic Ewing Sarcoma Family of Tumours (ESFT) remains less than 30% despite the development of systemic therapies. In the era of personalized medicine, novel molecular targets have been tested in preclinical or clinical settings in ESFT. In this review, we focus on early clinical and translational research that identified multiple molecular targets, including IGF-1R; mTOR; tyrosine kinase inhibitors; EWS-FLI1-related targets, and others. Overall, novel targeted therapies demonstrated modest efficacy; however pronounced and durable antineoplastic responses have been observed in small subsets of treated patients, for example with IGF-1R antibodies. Identifying outcome-predicting biomarkers and overcoming treatment resistance remain major challenges. Due to the rarity of ESFT, multi-institutional collaboration efforts of clinicians, basic and translational scientists are needed in order to understand biology of therapeutic response or resistance, which can lead to development of novel therapeutic methods and improved patient outcomes. PMID:25869102

  15. Enhanced cognitive behaviour therapy for adolescents with anorexia nervosa: An alternative to family therapy?

    PubMed Central

    Dalle Grave, Riccardo; Calugi, Simona; Doll, Helen A.; Fairburn, Christopher G.

    2013-01-01

    A specific form of family therapy (family-based treatment) is the leading treatment for adolescents with anorexia nervosa. As this treatment has certain limitations, alternative approaches are needed. “Enhanced” cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT-E) is a potential candidate given its utility as a treatment for adults with eating disorder psychopathology. The aim of the present study was to establish, in a representative cohort of patients with marked anorexia nervosa, the immediate and longer term outcome following CBT-E. Forty-nine adolescent patients were recruited from consecutive referrals to a community-based eating disorder clinic. Each was offered 40 sessions of CBT-E over 40 weeks from a single therapist. Two-thirds completed the full treatment with no additional input. In these patients there was a substantial increase in weight together with a marked decrease in eating disorder psychopathology. Over the 60-week post-treatment follow-up period there was little change despite minimal subsequent treatment. These findings suggest that CBT-E may prove to be a cost-effective alternative to family-based treatment. PMID:23123081

  16. Integrative Families and Systems Treatment: A Middle Path toward Integrating Common and Specific Factors in Evidence-Based Family Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraser, J. Scott; Solovey, Andrew D.; Grove, David; Lee, Mo Yee; Greene, Gilbert J.

    2012-01-01

    A moderate common factors approach is proposed as a synthesis or middle path to integrate common and specific factors in evidence-based approaches to high-risk youth and families. The debate in family therapy between common and specific factors camps is reviewed and followed by suggestions from the literature for synthesis and creative flexibility…

  17. The Clinical and Theoretical Impact of a Controlled Trial of Family Therapy in Anorexia Nervosa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dare, Christopher; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Compared family therapy with individual, supportive psychotherapy for management of severe eating disorder. Findings showed family therapy more effective for patients with early onset, short duration disorder but not in other subgroups (early onset, duration more than 3 years; late onset, after age of 18 years; and those with bulimia nervosa).…

  18. Family Therapy for Drug Abuse: Review and Updates 2003-2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowe, Cynthia L.

    2012-01-01

    Just 15 years ago, Liddle and Dakof ("Journal of Marital and Family Therapy," 1995; 21, 511) concluded, based on the available evidence, that family therapy represented a "promising, but not definitive" approach for the treatment of drug problems among adolescents and adults. Seven years later, Rowe and Liddle (2003) review described considerable…

  19. Family Attachment Narrative Therapy: Healing the Experience of Early Childhood Maltreatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    May, Joanne C.

    2005-01-01

    Based on attachment theory and research, Family Attachment Narrative Therapy is introduced as a new family therapy modality developed to heal the experience of early childhood maltreatment. Unresolved childhood trauma has been correlated with impaired and delayed cognitive, behavioral and emotional functioning. Gentle, soothing, nonprovocative and…

  20. Predictors of Substance Use and Family Therapy Outcome among Physically and Sexually Abused Runaway Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slesnick, Natasha; Bartle-Haring, Suzanne; Gangamma, Rashmi

    2006-01-01

    There is a dearth of research that examines the impact of family systems therapy on problems among sexually and/or physically abused youth. Given this void, differential outcome and predictors of substance use change were evaluated for abused, as compared with nonabused, runaway adolescents who were randomly assigned to family therapy or treatment…

  1. Counseling and Family Therapy in India: Evolving Professions in a Rapidly Developing Nation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carson, David K.; Jain, Sachin; Ramirez, Sylvia

    2009-01-01

    Outpatient counseling is a relatively new concept and form of clinical practice in India. This article provides an overview of the need for and current status of counseling and family therapy in India. Examples of training programs are presented, and future prospects for the counseling and family therapy professions are highlighted. The authors…

  2. Better versus Worse Family Therapy Sessions as Reflected in Clients' Alliance-Related Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedlander, Myrna L.; Bernardi, Shaina; Lee, Hsin-Hua

    2010-01-01

    To be responsive to clients' evaluations of the unfolding therapy process, therapists must first accurately "read" client behavior, a particularly challenging task in conjoint family therapy. In this study, the authors compared client behavior in 28 sessions that one family member and the therapist concurred, on the Session Evaluation…

  3. Career Aspirations and Perceived Level of Preparedness among Marriage and Family Therapy Doctoral Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, John K.; Lambert-Shute, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    The authors conducted a survey of marriage and family therapy (MFT) doctoral students in programs accredited by the Commission on Accreditation for Marriage and Family Therapy Education (COAMFTE). MFT doctoral students (N = 82) from across the United States responded to a web-based survey that focused on career aspirations, training opportunities,…

  4. AAMFT Master Series Tapes: An Analysis of the Inclusion of Feminist Principles into Family Therapy Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haddock, Shelley A.; MacPhee, David; Zimmerman, Toni Schindler

    2001-01-01

    Content analysis of 23 American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy Master Series tapes was used to determine how well feminist behaviors have been incorporated into ideal family therapy practice. Feminist behaviors were infrequent, being evident in fewer than 3% of time blocks in event sampling and 10 of 39 feminist behaviors of the…

  5. Family Focused Therapy for Bipolar Adolescents: Lessons from a Difficult Treatment Case

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    George, Elizabeth L.; Taylor, Dawn O.; Goldstein, Benjamin I.; Miklowitz, David J.

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines obstacles and challenges encountered in the manualized Family Focused Therapy-A of an adolescent with bipolar disorder. We begin by describing adolescent bipolar disorder and some of the many complications that frequently accompany it. We summarize Family Focused Therapy (FFT-A), an empirically validated treatment approach for…

  6. The Development of Core Competencies for the Practice of Marriage and Family Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Thorana S.; Chenail, Ronald J.; Alexander, James F.; Crane, D. Russell; Johnson, Susan M.; Schwallie, Linda

    2007-01-01

    In response to a series of national policy reports regarding what has been termed the "quality chasm" in health and mental health care in the United States, in January 2003, the American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy convened a task force to develop core competencies (CC) for the practice of marriage and family therapy (MFT). The…

  7. Families Who Begin versus Decline Therapy for Children Who Are Sexually Abused

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lippert, Tonya; Favre, Tricia; Alexander, Cindy; Cross, Theodore P.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To identify child characteristics, factors related to the therapy referral, and caregivers' psychological and social variables that predict sexually abused children's beginning therapy following a therapy referral. Method: Investigators abstracted data from case records of 101 families whose children were referred to a Children's…

  8. Pilot study comparing multi-family therapy to single family therapy for adults with anorexia nervosa in an intensive eating disorder program.

    PubMed

    Dimitropoulos, Gina; Farquhar, Jamie C; Freeman, Victoria Emily; Colton, Patricia Anne; Olmsted, Marion Patricia

    2015-07-01

    Multi-family therapy (MFT) has yet to be evaluated in families of adults with anorexia nervosa (AN). The study aims were: (i) assess the feasibility of MFT for AN; and, (ii) assess whether MFT is associated with improved outcomes for families compared with single-family therapy (SFT). Adult patients with AN consecutively referred to an eating disorder treatment program were assigned (non-randomly) to receive eight sessions of SFT or MFT. Assessment occurred pre-therapy, immediately post-therapy, and at 3-month follow-up. A total of 37 female patients (13 SFT, 24 MFT) and 45 family members (16 SFT, 29 MFT) completed treatment. There were significant time effects for patients' BMI, eating disorder-related psychopathology and multiple family outcome measures. There were no differences between MFT and SFT on family outcome measures at end of treatment and 3 months post treatment. MFT is a feasible intervention that can be used in adult intensive treatment for those with AN. PMID:25823423

  9. [Family Climate, Parental Partner Relationships and Symptom Formation in Children - Mentalisation- Based Family Therapy for Childhood Headache].

    PubMed

    Hantel-Quitmann, Wolfgang; Weidtmann, Katja

    2016-01-01

    The emotional family climate is considered both an effective risk and protective factor for child development. Factors such as negative experiences parents made during their childhood or adolescence, which can reoccur as intergenerational transmission, a low partnership quality and a high level of conflict seem to be particularly relevant for the quality of the emotional family climate. Consequently, the relationship between partners, as the core relation within families, is particularly important for the family climate and subsequently for the development of the child. For this reason, problems in parent relationships should receive special attention in family therapeutic interventions. Mentalisation-based family therapy (MBF-T) offers promising approaches in this context. The key principles of mentalisation are introduced and the links between family and mentalisation are presented, followed by information on the history, objectives and the procedures of MBF-T. A case study of a family therapy, in which a child suffers from chronic headache, illustrates the connection and interrelation between family climate, family conflicts and the parental relationship, and it will further show the importance of mentalisation-based elements for therapeutic treatments. PMID:26758340

  10. Marriage and Family Therapy Trainees' Reports of Explicit Weight Bias.

    PubMed

    Pratt, Keeley J; Palmer, Elizabeth; Cravens, Jaclyn D; Ferriby, Megan; Balk, Elizabeth; Cai, Yin

    2016-04-01

    Discrimination based on an individual's weight has been observed in health care, education, retail, and other public sectors (Puhl & Huer, Obesity, 17, 941, 2007). Such inequity, known as "weight bias," generates negative short-term and long-term consequences for the individuals that experience it (Puhl & Brownell, Weight bias in health care settings, 2007). Past research has shown that healthcare trainees exhibit weight bias (Phelan et al., Obesity, 22, 1201, 2014; Wigton & McGaghie, Journal of General Internal Medicine, 16, 262, 2001), yet little focus is given to weight bias in marriage and family therapy (MFT) education. The purpose of this study was to survey MFT students (N = 162) to explore weight bias and how contextual factors associate with weight bias. Participants in MFT programs reported explicit weight bias, with specific contextual factors associating with more bias. Female participants reported more fear of gaining weight, and individuals who identified as overweight had higher rates of explicit weight bias. Contextual differences and implications for training programs are discussed. PMID:25728034

  11. Sugar and Spice, Toads and Mice: Gender Issues in Family Therapy Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Janine McGill

    1991-01-01

    Presents methods to help family therapy trainees and clinicians articulate how to address gender in families. Describes four experiential exercises (including gender survival messages, gender framed circular questions, and process observation sheets) for training and use with clients. Can examine learnings about gender from families of origin,…

  12. Therapist Adherence in Brief Strategic Family Therapy for Adolescent Drug Abusers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robbins, Michael S.; Feaster, Daniel J.; Horigian, Viviana E.; Puccinelli, Marc J.; Henderson, Craig; Szapocznik, Jose

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Therapist adherence has been shown to predict clinical outcomes in family therapy. In prior studies, adherence has been represented broadly by core principles and a consistent family (vs. individual) focus. To date, these studies have not captured the range of clinical skills that are represented in complex family-based approaches or…

  13. Brief Structural/Strategic Family Therapy with African American and Hispanic High Risk Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santisteban, Daniel A.; Coatsworth, J. Douglas; Perez-Vidal, Angel; Mitrani, Victoria; Jean-Gilles, Michele; Szapocnik, Jose

    The intervention described in this paper used Brief Strategic/Structural Family Therapy (BSFT) to reduce the likelihood that African American and Hispanic youth would initiate drug use by decreasing existing behavior problems at the individual level and improving maladaptive family functioning at the family level. The program targeted African…

  14. Application of Alternatives for Families: A Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy to School Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herschell, Amy D.; Kolko, David J.; Baumann, Barbara L.; Brown, Elissa J.

    2012-01-01

    Alternatives for Families: A Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (AF-CBT) is an evidence-based treatment for families with children aged 5 to 15 years who have been affected by verbal and physical aggression in the family. AF-CBT was designed to address risks for exposure to emotional and physical aggression as well as common clinical consequences of…

  15. A Piagetian view of family therapy: Selvini-Palazzoli and the Invariant Approach.

    PubMed

    Gelcer, E; Schwartzbein, D

    1989-12-01

    The Invariant Approach of Mara Selvini-Palazzoli is a new development in the Milan approach to family therapy. In order to distinguish and explain it, an overview of the Invariant Approach is given. Jean Piaget's theory of cognitive development is used to provide a framework for explaining how Selvini-Palazzoli's therapy alters the family's epistemology and facilitates change in the "family game." It is suggested that family members in therapy tend to think about their problems in a style that resembles Piaget's preoperational period. The process of therapy can be seen as geared to facilitate a shift from a preoperational to an operational style of cognitive functioning. This shift gives family members access to more adaptive ways of thinking about their problem-solving strategies. PMID:2599068

  16. The Daily Events and Emotions of Master's-Level Family Therapy Trainees in Off-Campus Practicum Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Todd M.; Patterson, Jo Ellen

    2012-01-01

    The Day Reconstruction Method (DRM) was used to assess the daily events and emotions of one program's master's-level family therapy trainees in off-campus practicum settings. This study examines the DRM reports of 35 family therapy trainees in the second year of their master's program in marriage and family therapy. Four themes emerged from the…

  17. [Sibling relations from the family therapy perspective--support, attachment, rivalry and envy].

    PubMed

    Cierpka, M

    2001-01-01

    In family therapy, during the last years more and more importance is attached to the dynamics of the sibling subsystem. In the present paper differences between them as well as similarities are discussed from the point of view of family theory. Relevant dimensions like support, attachment, rivalry and envy between brothers and sisters contribute essentially to the family dynamics. In this clinically orientated paper, we describe by means of a case example how the couple's conflicts after their separation is unconsciously repeated in the sibling subsystem. It is shown how the intergenerational dynamics can be interrupted by the initiative of the children and the initiated family therapy. PMID:11515394

  18. Adolescent and parent alliances with therapists in Brief Strategic Family Therapy with drug-using Hispanic adolescents.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Michael S; Mayorga, Carla C; Mitrani, Victoria B; Szapocznik, José; Turner, Charles W; Alexander, James F

    2008-07-01

    This study examined the relationship between alliance and retention in family therapy. Alliance was examined at the individual (parent, adolescent) and family level (within-family differences) for families that either dropped out or completed family therapy. Participants were 31 Hispanic adolescents and their family members who received brief strategic family therapy for the treatment of adolescent drug use. Videotapes of first sessions were rated to identify parent and adolescent alliances with the therapist. Results demonstrated that Completer cases had significantly higher levels of alliance across all family members than Dropout cases, and Dropout cases had significantly higher unbalanced alliances than Completer cases. Clinical implications are discussed. PMID:18717922

  19. Family-Based Therapy for Parent-Child Reunification.

    PubMed

    Smith, Linda S

    2016-05-01

    Children in highly conflicted, divorced families can become triangulated and polarized in their relationships with their parents. In time, this can lead to a child refusing to have a relationship with a parent, refusing for example, to see or talk to him or her. This access refusal can sometimes become extended, lasting months to years. When this occurs, the courts may request professional involvement to help facilitate parent-child reunification. This article outlines a family-based treatment model for parent-child reunification cases. This family-based treatment incorporates treatment goals for each family member and each family member is asked to be a part of the solution in resolving the family's problems. I provide a case illustration as well as helpful tips for treating these families. PMID:27074348

  20. The family impacts of proton radiation therapy for children with brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Houtrow, Amy J; Yock, Torunn I; Delahaye, Jennifer; Kuhlthau, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Children with brain tumors experience significant alterations to their health and well-being due to the tumors themselves and oncologic treatment. Caring for children with brain tumors can have significant impacts on families, especially during and shortly after treatment. In this study of the impacts on families caring for children undergoing proton radiation therapy for brain tumors, the authors found that families experienced a broad array of negative impacts. Families reported feeling like they were living on a roller coaster, feeling that others treated them differently, and having to give up things as a family. In the multivariable linear regression model, older age of the child and higher reported child health-related quality of life were associated with less family impact. The presence of concurrent chemotherapy was associated with increased family impact. This is the first study to specifically evaluate the families of children being treated with proton radiation therapy. The findings in this study are consistent with the findings in other studies of children treated with standard therapy that show that families experience a variety of stressors and negative impacts while their children are receiving treatment. Health care providers should be aware of the potential impacts on families of children with brain tumors and their treatment to provide robust services to meet the health, psychological, and social needs of such children and their families. PMID:22647729

  1. Integrating gender on multiple levels: a conceptual model for teaching gender issues in family therapy.

    PubMed

    Williams, Lee; McBain, Heidi

    2006-07-01

    As the field of family therapy has evolved, there has been growing recognition as to the importance of gender in family therapy. To prepare the next generation of family therapists adequately, it is important that they recognize the many and complex ways in which gender permeates their work. In this article we present an integrative model to help educators teach family therapists about gender issues. The model examines how gender influences clinical work on multiple levels, including contextual levels such as society and the marriage and family therapy field. The model also acknowledges how gender can influence individuals, including clients, therapists, and supervisors. Finally, the model attempts to capture the complexity of how gender can impact the relational dynamics between two or more individuals. PMID:16933441

  2. Challenges of an outcome-based perspective for marriage and family therapy education.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Thorana S; Smock, Sara A

    2005-09-01

    Marriage and family therapy (MFT) and marriage and family therapy education (MFTE) have undergone many changes during the short history of MFT. This article describes the current trends and controversies in MFTE, including shifts toward outcome-based education (OBE). We present recommendations for MFTE, including the move toward OBE, the development of core competencies of MFT, attention to interdisciplinary issues, and recognition of the need for both foundational education and encouragement of trainees' unique styles and approaches. PMID:16206635

  3. [At-home-therapeutic space. Development of a device intended for family therapy at home].

    PubMed

    Segura, José Adolfo

    2003-01-01

    Inspired by his ethnographic experience with the Mapuche, a native community in the South of Chile and his reflection on family therapy and the literature pertaining to ethnopsychiatry, the author proposes the elaboration of an at-home-therapeutic space (HTS), a specific device for family therapy in the homes of patients. The author describes the various steps of his approach and his first-hand experience of the device. PMID:15368013

  4. Renal replacement therapy for children: a family decision.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Semiramis Melani Melo; Correia, Carolina Camilo; Molzahn, Anita; Nascimento, Lucila Castanheira

    2010-01-01

    Although Anne had many complex health issues and experienced considerable support from her extended family, she wanted freedom from the restrictions posed by peritoneal dialysis. Her quality of life changed after transplantation, with more opportunities to engage in leisure activities, ability to travel, a less restricted diet, and an improved self-image. She required fewer treatments, surgeries, and hospitalizations. She left behind the role of sick child and took up a role more like a healthy child. During the disease and decision-making process, Anne learned coping mechanisms, allowing her to gain autonomy to make decisions. The case study illustrates both the need to listen to children as well as to care for the entire family. The nursing management of this child and her family was continually changing, and multiple strategies were used to support the family. The nurse came to understand the roles of family members in constant change, the sources of their resources, and foci of tensions. Based on this knowledge, the nurse can act by mobilizing resources, strengthening the confidence of family members, and helping them develop coping mechanisms. In conclusion, care of the ill child must be family-centered. Stresses on the family have an impact on the child and vice versa. The potential to influence the quality of life of both the child and the family is considerable. PMID:20830947

  5. Structural Ecosystems Therapy for HIV-Seropositive African American Women: Effects on Psychological Distress, Family Hassles, and Family Support

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szapocznik, Jose; Feaster, Daniel J.; Mitrani, Victoria B.; Prado, Guillermo; Smith, Lila; Robinson-Batista, Carleen; Schwartz, Seth J.; Mauer, Magaly H.; Robbins, Michael S.

    2004-01-01

    This study tests the efficacy of Structural Ecosystems Therapy (SET), a family-ecological intervention, in improving psychosocial functioning when compared with an attention-comparison person-centered condition and a community control condition. A sample of 209 HIV-seropositive, urban, low-income, African American women was randomized into 1 of…

  6. Understanding Radiation Therapy: A Guide for Patients and Families

    MedlinePlus

    ... Saved Articles » My ACS » A Guide to Radiation Therapy Download Printable Version [PDF] » ( En español ) You’ve ... you and your doctor have agreed that radiation therapy is your best choice – either alone or along ...

  7. Marriage and Family Therapy and Traditional Counselor Education Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beamish, Patricia; Navin, Sally

    This document presents a review of the literature on salient ethical issues in marriage and family counseling. Issues addressed in the paper include: (1) defining the client and the welfare and rights of individuals versus those of the family system; (2) issues of informed consent and manipulative therapeutic interventions; (3) issues related to…

  8. Making family therapy easier for the therapist: burnout prevention.

    PubMed

    Friedman, R

    1985-12-01

    Burnout prevention for family therapists can be enhanced by careful consideration of the degree of responsibility taken by the therapist contrasted with responsibility placed on the family. Attention to issues of expectations, role definition, sharing of feelings, and therapeutic ambition can ease the strain on the therapist. PMID:4085618

  9. Parallel Demand-Withdraw Processes in Family Therapy for Adolescent Drug Abuse

    PubMed Central

    Rynes, Kristina N.; Rohrbaugh, Michael J.; Lebensohn-Chialvo, Florencia; Shoham, Varda

    2013-01-01

    Isomorphism, or parallel process, occurs in family therapy when patterns of therapist-client interaction replicate problematic interaction patterns within the family. This study investigated parallel demand-withdraw processes in Brief Strategic Family Therapy (BSFT) for adolescent drug abuse, hypothesizing that therapist-demand/adolescent-withdraw interaction (TD/AW) cycles observed early in treatment would predict poor adolescent outcomes at follow-up for families who exhibited entrenched parent-demand/adolescent-withdraw interaction (PD/AW) before treatment began. Participants were 91 families who received at least 4 sessions of BSFT in a multi-site clinical trial on adolescent drug abuse (Robbins et al., 2011). Prior to receiving therapy, families completed videotaped family interaction tasks from which trained observers coded PD/AW. Another team of raters coded TD/AW during two early BSFT sessions. The main dependent variable was the number of drug use days that adolescents reported in Timeline Follow-Back interviews 7 to 12 months after family therapy began. Zero-inflated Poisson (ZIP) regression analyses supported the main hypothesis, showing that PD/AW and TD/AW interacted to predict adolescent drug use at follow-up. For adolescents in high PD/AW families, higher levels of TD/AW predicted significant increases in drug use at follow-up, whereas for low PD/AW families, TD/AW and follow-up drug use were unrelated. Results suggest that attending to parallel demand-withdraw processes in parent/adolescent and therapist/adolescent dyads may be useful in family therapy for substance-using adolescents. PMID:23438248

  10. Dramatherapy and Family Therapy in Education: Essential Pieces of the Multi-Agency Jigsaw

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McFarlane, Penny; Harvey, Jenny

    2012-01-01

    A collaborative therapeutic approach often proves the best way to assess and meet the needs of children experiencing barriers to learning. This book gives a concise overview of drama and family therapy and describes how both therapies can work together to provide essential pieces of the jigsaw of emotional support for troubled children within an…

  11. Integrative Problem-Centered Therapy: Toward the Synthesis of Family and Individual Psychotherapies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinsof, William M.

    1983-01-01

    Presents an overview of the Integrative Problem-Centered Therapy (IPCT) Model, and describes its core principles and premises, and basic methodological steps. The IPCT provides a technique for applying individual and family therapy and behavioral, communicational, and psychodynamic orientations to client problems. Its goal is to create efficient…

  12. Treatment Adherence, Competence, and Outcome in Individual and Family Therapy for Adolescent Behavior Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hogue, Aaron; Henderson, Craig E.; Dauber, Sarah; Barajas, Priscilla C.; Fried, Adam; Liddle, Howard A.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the impact of treatment adherence and therapist competence on treatment outcome in a controlled trial of individual cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) and multidimensional family therapy (MDFT) for adolescent substance use and related behavior problems. Participants included 136 adolescents (62 CBT, 74 MDFT) assessed at intake,…

  13. Filial/Family Play Therapy for Single Parents of Young Children Attending Community Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ray, Dee; Bratton, Sue C.; Brandt, Marielle A.

    2000-01-01

    States that many single parents are attending institutions of higher education to qualify for employment that will ensure the economic security of their families. Focuses on the use of filial/family play therapy with single parents attending community colleges as an effective intervention for improving the present and future welfare of these…

  14. Perceptions of Effectiveness among College Students: Toward Marriage and Family Counseling and Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tse, Luke M.; Wantz, Richard A.; Firmin, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Unlike perceptions toward professional counseling, public opinions do not typically associate marriage and family counseling or therapy with treatments of mental disorders. The current survey of college students in this sample confirmed that most would not recommend, specifically, marriage and family therapists (MFTs) for mental health…

  15. Using Mock Trials to Teach Students Forensic Core Competencies in Marriage and Family Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, John K.; Linville, Deanna; Todahl, Jeff; Metcalfe, Joe

    2009-01-01

    This article provides a description of a university-based project that used mock trials to train both practicum-level marriage and family therapy and law students in forensic work, and a qualitative investigation of student experiences with the training. The content of the training focused on American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy…

  16. A Comparison of Short- And Long-Term Family Therapy for Adolescent Anorexia Nervosa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lock, James; Agras, W. Stewart; Bryson, Susan; Kraemer, Helena C.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: Research suggests that family treatment for adolescents with anorexia nervosa may be effective. This study was designed to determine the optimal length of such family therapy. Method: Eighty-six adolescents (12-18 years of age) diagnosed with anorexia nervosa were allocated at random to either a short-term (10 sessions over 6 months) or…

  17. The Role of the Individual and Individual Responsibility in Family Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bienenfeld, Sheila

    Family systems theory's contribution to the world of psychotherapy was its move away from lineal causality toward a view of human relationships as not merely multi-determined, but unavoidably and inextricably inter-related and inter-dependent. Circular causation allows the therapist to assume enormous flexibility. The rise of family therapy in…

  18. An Adapted Brief Strategic Family Therapy for Gang-Affiliated Mexican American Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valdez, Avelardo; Cepeda, Alice; Parrish, Danielle; Horowitz, Rosalind; Kaplan, Charles

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This study assessed the effectiveness of an adapted Brief Strategic Family Therapy (BSFT) intervention for gang-affiliated Mexican American adolescents and their parents. Methods: A total of 200 adolescents and their family caregivers were randomized to either a treatment or a control condition. Outcomes included adolescent substance…

  19. Resolving a Therapeutic Impasse between Parents and Adolescents in Multidimensional Family Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diamond, Guy; Liddle, Howard A.

    1996-01-01

    Explored the process of resolving an in-session impasse between a parent and an adolescent in family therapy. Focusing on altering the content and affective tone of a discussion, the "shift intervention" was used to direct a family's conversation away from trying to solve behavior management problems and toward a discussion of fundamental…

  20. Effects of Structural Family Therapy on Child and Maternal Mental Health Symptomatology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weaver, Addie; Greeno, Catherine G.; Marcus, Steven C.; Fusco, Rachel A.; Zimmerman, Tina; Anderson, Carol

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This pilot study examined the effect of structural family therapy (SFT) on children's impairment and depressive symptomatology and mothers' depressive symptomatology and anxiety for 31 families served by a community mental health clinic. Method: A one group predesign/postdesign, with a baseline and two follow-up time points,…

  1. Medical Family Therapy for a Woman with End-stage Crohn's Disease and Her Son.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDaniel, Susan H.; Harkness, Jennifer L.; Epstein, Ronald M.

    2001-01-01

    Medical family therapy grew out of the experiences of family therapists working with other professionals to provide comprehensive, integrated healthcare for patients. This is the story of one such patient and provides an account of the experience through quotes from videotaped sessions and electronic mail communications that occurred throughout…

  2. Social Class in Family Therapy Education: Experiences of Low SES Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDowell, Teresa; Brown, Andrae' L.; Cullen, Nicole; Duyn, April

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we report the results of a national survey of students in COAMFTE-accredited family therapy programs who self-identify as coming from lower- or working-class backgrounds. Results of the study reveal opportunity and tension relative to family, friends, and community because of social mobility associated with graduate education.…

  3. “The Whole Family Suffered, so the Whole Family Needs to Recover”: Thematic Analysis of Substance-Abusing Mothers’ Family Therapy Sessions

    PubMed Central

    Brakenhoff, Brittany; Slesnick, Natasha

    2014-01-01

    Substance abusing mothers and their children are more likely to experience a range of social, behavioral, and psychological difficulties. Despite the significant challenges faced by these families, little is known about their experiences in treatment. The current study analyzed 12 sessions of family therapy using thematic analysis to identify common themes that arose during substance abusing mothers and their children’s discussion during family therapy. Mothers’ ages ranged from 28 to 35 years and the children’s ages ranged from 12 to 14 years. Four therapy sessions from three families were coded for a total of 12 therapy sessions. An ecological framework was used to classify themes, in which themes related to each level of the families’ ecological systems were identified. Thematic analysis of the therapy sessions indicated that mothers and their children primarily discussed topics related to their relational and emotional needs. The findings indicated that substance use disordered mothers and their children have unique treatment needs that should be addressed when the mother seeks treatment. More research is needed to further clarify and confirm the observations in this study. In particular, future research should include a larger sample and quantitative methodology. PMID:25729116

  4. A Filial Therapy Model through a Family Therapy Lens: See the Possibilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornett, Nick

    2012-01-01

    The call for family-centered therapeutic services, especially for families of young children, has come from governmental organizations, professional associations, practitioners, and families. Play therapists and family therapists are prime candidates to provide such services, but professional research and literature suggest that practitioners…

  5. Music therapy in pediatric palliative care: family-centered care to enhance quality of life.

    PubMed

    Lindenfelser, Kathryn J; Hense, Cherry; McFerran, Katrina

    2012-05-01

    Research into the value of music therapy in pediatric palliative care (PPC) has identified quality of life as one area of improvement for families caring for a child in the terminal stages of a life-threatening illness. This small-scale investigation collected data in a multisite, international study including Minnesota, USA, and Melbourne, Australia. An exploratory mixed method design used the qualitative data collected through interviews with parents to interpret results from the PedsQL Family Impact Module of overall parental quality of life. Parents described music therapy as resulting in physical improvements of their child by providing comfort and stimulation. They also valued the positive experiences shared by the family in music therapy sessions that were strength oriented and family centered. This highlighted the physical and communication scales within the PedsQL Family Impact Module, where minimal improvements were achieved in contrast to some strong results suggesting diminished quality of life in cognitive and daily activity domains. Despite the significant challenges faced by parents during this difficult time, parents described many positive experiences in music therapy, and the overall score for half of the parents in the study did not diminish. The value of music therapy as a service that addresses the family-centered agenda of PPC is endorsed by this study. PMID:22144660

  6. Attachment-based family therapy for depressed and suicidal adolescents: theory, clinical model and empirical support.

    PubMed

    Ewing, E Stephanie Krauthamer; Diamond, Guy; Levy, Suzanne

    2015-01-01

    Attachment-Based Family Therapy (ABFT) is a manualized family-based intervention designed for working with depressed adolescents, including those at risk for suicide, and their families. It is an empirically informed and supported treatment. ABFT has its theoretical underpinnings in attachment theory and clinical roots in structural family therapy and emotion focused therapies. ABFT relies on a transactional model that aims to transform the quality of adolescent-parent attachment, as a means of providing the adolescent with a more secure relationship that can support them during challenging times generally, and the crises related to suicidal thinking and behavior, specifically. This article reviews: (1) the theoretical foundations of ABFT (attachment theory, models of emotional development); (2) the ABFT clinical model, including training and supervision factors; and (3) empirical support. PMID:25778674

  7. The Advancement of Family Therapy Theory Based on the Science of Self-Organizing Complex Systems.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramsey-Kemper, Valerie Ann

    1995-01-01

    Problem. The purpose of this study was to review the literature which presents the latest advancements in the field of family therapy theory. Since such advancement has relied on the scientific developments in the study of autopoietic self-organizing complex systems, then the review began with an historical overview of the development of these natural scientific concepts. The study then examined how the latest scientific concepts have been integrated with family therapy practice. The document is built on the theory that individuals are living, complex, self-organizing, autopoietic systems. When individual systems interact with other individual systems (such as in family interaction, or in interaction between therapist and client), then a third system emerges, which is the relationship. It is through interaction in the relationship that transformation of an individual system can occur. Method. The historical antecedents of the field of family therapy were outlined. It was demonstrated, via literature review, that the field of family therapy has traditionally paralleled developments in the hard sciences. Further, it was demonstrated via literature review that the newest understandings of the development of individuals, family systems, and therapeutic systems also parallel recent natural science developments, namely those developments based on the science of self-organizing complex systems. Outcome. The results of the study are twofold. First, the study articulates an expanded theory of the therapist, individual, and family as autopoietic self-organizing complex systems. Second, the study provides an expanded hypothesis which concerns recommendations for future research which will further advance the latest theories of family therapy. More precisely, the expanded hypothesis suggests that qualitative research, rather than quantitative research, is the method of choice for studying the effectiveness of phenomenological therapy.

  8. [Systemic family therapy in the context of Alzheimer's disease: a theoretical and practical approach].

    PubMed

    Cantegreil-Kallen, Inge; Rigaud, Anne-Sophie

    2009-12-01

    Alzheimer's disease has a negative impact on family relationships and may trigger conflicts between the main caregiver and other family members. The systemic approach evidences the impact of dementia on structural and functional characteristics of the family system. Systemic family therapy is especially indicated in crisis situations such as emergency hospitalization or institutionalization of the patient, and when the family members do not agree on when and how to introduce care and support services at the patient's home. In this case, the aim of the intervention is to restore the communication between all the family members in order to find an agreement for the best management of the patients. Since September 2006, systemic family therapy has been offered in the memory clinic of the Broca Hospital to families having a member suffering from Alzheimer's disease. The involvement of the families was accomplished by the direct participation of the patient, main caregiver (spouse), grown-up children and grandchildren. The aim was to obtain an agreement for the access of support and care services at home from all the family members. The intervention was based on a step-by-step procedure and comprehended five sessions. The primary results of a pilot study are presented. PMID:20031507

  9. Efficacy of Brief Strategic Family Therapy in Modifying Hispanic Adolescent Behavior Problems and Substance Use

    PubMed Central

    Santisteban, Daniel A.; Perez-Vidal, Angel; Coatsworth, J. Douglas; Kurtines, William M.; Schwartz, Seth J.; LaPerriere, Arthur; Szapocznik, José

    2005-01-01

    This study investigated the efficacy of brief strategic family therapy (BSFT) with Hispanic behavior problem and drug using youth, an underrepresented population in the family therapy research literature. One hundred twenty-six Hispanic families with a behavior problem adolescent were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 conditions: BSFT or group treatment control (GC). Results showed that, compared to GC cases, BSFT cases showed significantly greater pre- to post-intervention improvement in parent reports of adolescent conduct problems and delinquency, adolescent reports of marijuana use, and observer ratings and self reports of family functioning. These results extend prior findings on the efficacy of family interventions to a difficult to treat Hispanic adolescent sample. PMID:12666468

  10. Therapeutic Alliance and Retention in Brief Strategic Family Therapy: A Mixed-Methods Study.

    PubMed

    Sheehan, Alyson H; Friedlander, Myrna L

    2015-10-01

    We explored how the therapeutic alliance contributed to retention in Brief Strategic Family Therapy by analyzing videotapes of eight-first sessions in which four therapists worked with one family that stayed in treatment and one family that dropped out. Although behavioral exchange patterns between clients and therapists did not differ by retention status, positive therapist alliance-related behavior followed negative client alliance behavior somewhat more frequently in the retained cases. In the qualitative aspect of the study, four family therapy experts each viewed two randomly assigned sessions and commented on their quality without knowing the families' retention status. A qualitative analysis of the audiotaped commentaries revealed 18 alliance-related themes that were more characteristic of either the retained or the nonretained cases. PMID:25640754

  11. Control of apoptosis by the BCL-2 protein family: implications for physiology and therapy.

    PubMed

    Czabotar, Peter E; Lessene, Guillaume; Strasser, Andreas; Adams, Jerry M

    2014-01-01

    The BCL-2 protein family determines the commitment of cells to apoptosis, an ancient cell suicide programme that is essential for development, tissue homeostasis and immunity. Too little apoptosis can promote cancer and autoimmune diseases; too much apoptosis can augment ischaemic conditions and drive neurodegeneration. We discuss the biochemical, structural and genetic studies that have clarified how the interplay between members of the BCL-2 family on mitochondria sets the apoptotic threshold. These mechanistic insights into the functions of the BCL-2 family are illuminating the physiological control of apoptosis, the pathological consequences of its dysregulation and the promising search for novel cancer therapies that target the BCL-2 family. PMID:24355989

  12. A Randomized Clinical Trial of Family Therapy in Juvenile Drug Court

    PubMed Central

    Dakof, Gayle A.; Henderson, Craig E.; Rowe, Cynthia L.; Boustani, Maya; Greenbaum, Paul E.; Wang, Wei; Hawes, Samuel; Linares, Clarisa; Liddle, Howard A.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this article is to examine the effectiveness of 2 theoretically different treatments delivered in juvenile drug court—family therapy represented by multidimensional family therapy (MDFT) and group-based treatment represented by adolescent group therapy (AGT)—on offending and substance use. Intent-to-treat sample included 112 youth enrolled in juvenile drug court (primarily male [88%], and Hispanic [59%] or African American [35%]), average age 16.1 years, randomly assigned to either family therapy (n = 55) or group therapy (n = 57). Participants were assessed at baseline and 6, 12, 18 and 24 months following baseline. During the drug court phase, youth in both treatments showed significant reduction in delinquency (average d = .51), externalizing symptoms (average d = 2.32), rearrests (average d = 1.22), and substance use (average d = 4.42). During the 24-month follow-up, family therapy evidenced greater maintenance of treatment gains than group-based treatment for externalizing symptoms (d = 0.39), commission of serious crimes (d = .38), and felony arrests (d = .96). There was no significant difference between the treatments with respect to substance use or misdemeanor arrests. The results suggest that family therapy enhances juvenile drug court outcomes beyond what can be achieved with a nonfamily based treatment, especially with respect to what is arguably the primary objective of juvenile drug courts: reducing criminal behavior and rearrests. More research is needed on the effectiveness of juvenile drug courts generally and on whether treatment type and family involvement influence outcomes. PMID:25621927

  13. CFL's Clinical Training Program in Family Systems Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hubbard, Irene Matis; Kautto, Judith Gilbert

    1988-01-01

    Reviews the elements of constancy and the changes that have taken place in the training program of the 15-year-old Center for Family Learning (CFL) in Rye Brook, New York. Includes a discussion of historical and philosophical perspective, the structure of the training program, its theoretical approach, and the makeup of its faculty and student…

  14. Cognitive Developmental Therapy: Aiding Adult Children of Dysfunctional Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Towers, David A.

    The works of Kegan and Guidano have presented cognition and emotion as complementary modes of knowing that develop together. Cognition is conceived of as being concerned with the knowledge of reality, and emotions are conceptualized as people's system for knowing of their relationship to that reality. Adult children of dysfunctional families are a…

  15. Beyond division: convergences between postmodern qualitative research and family therapy.

    PubMed

    De Haene, Lucia

    2010-01-01

    Starting from examples of postmodern research and therapeutic practice, we raise the question on the role of the research-therapy dichotomy within these approaches. The article aims to show the profound convergence between postmodern ethnographic research and constructionist, collaborative therapeutic approaches on a double, epistemological and practice level. First, we point out their converging development toward narrative and constructionist epistemologies. Second, an inquiry into the core features of these disciplinary activities' goal, process, and expert role reveals their profound convergence into a dialogical practice in which the boundaries between research and therapy are radically transgressed. We conclude by questioning the implications and acceptability of this convergence for researchers' and therapists' understanding of their practices. PMID:20074120

  16. A randomised controlled trial evaluating family mediated exercise (FAME) therapy following stroke

    PubMed Central

    Galvin, Rose; Cusack, Tara; Stokes, Emma

    2008-01-01

    Background Stroke is a leading cause of disability among adults worldwide. Evidence suggests that increased duration of exercise therapy following stroke has a positive impact on functional outcome following stroke. The main objective of this randomised controlled trial is to evaluate the impact of additional family assisted exercise therapy in people with acute stroke. Methods/Design A prospective multi-centre single blind randomised controlled trial will be conducted. Forty patients with acute stroke will be randomised into either an experimental or control group. The experimental group will receive routine therapy and additional lower limb exercise therapy in the form of family assisted exercises. The control group will receive routine therapy with no additional formal input from their family members. Participants will be assessed at baseline, post intervention and followed up at three months using a series of standardised outcome measures. A secondary aim of the project is to evaluate the impact of the family mediated exercise programme on the person with stroke and the individual(s) assisting in the delivery of exercises using a qualitative methodology. The study has gained ethical approval from the Research Ethics Committees of each of the clinical sites involved in the study. Discussion This study will evaluate a structured programme of exercises that can be delivered to people with stroke by their 'family members/friends'. Given that the progressive increase in the population of older people is likely to lead to an increased prevalence of stroke in the future, it is important to reduce the burden of this illness on the individual, the family and society. Family mediated exercises can maximise the carry over outside formal physiotherapy sessions, giving patients the opportunity for informal practice. Trial Registration The protocol for this study is registered with the US NIH Clinical trials registry (NCT00666744) PMID:18570643

  17. The Influence of Family Therapy on Flexibility and Cohesion among Family Members Seeking Male Residential Treatment for Adolescent and Young Adult Substance Abuse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marlowe, Stephanie L.

    2011-01-01

    The present study investigated within a substance abuse treatment center the influence of family therapy on flexibility and cohesion among family members. Past studies have suggested adolescents who abuse substances exist in families who have a lack of balance of flexibility and cohesion. Unfortunately, few studies have examined the influence of…

  18. Speaking of privilege: family therapy educators' journeys toward awareness and compassionate action.

    PubMed

    Hernandez-Wolfe, Pilar; McDowell, Teresa

    2012-06-01

    This study explores how family therapy educators from privileged social locations understand issues of privilege and the process by which they integrate their personal and professional journeys to create and model equity in family therapy training and professional development. These educators developed awareness about issues of privilege and oppression and owned their privilege. Increased awareness involved personal struggles with guilt and managing internalized voices of prejudice that are constantly reinforced in society. These educators adopted a stance of action and accountability for equity. We hypothesize that the process leading to owning one's privilege involves the ability to be compassionate for others' suffering and one's own limitations. PMID:22690858

  19. Stress and burden of care in families with children commencing renal replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Watson, A R

    1997-01-01

    A collaborative project was initiated in two pediatric centers to examine the long-term demands and outcomes in families with children commencing renal replacement therapy. Parents returned questionnaires on stress, anxiety, depression, information needs, and intrusion factors pre, at 3 months, 6 months, and annually. A burden of care assessment (BCA) for families was devised using a scoring system based on the domains of patient, sibling, parents, environment, demands of therapy, and dialysis/transplant factors. Team members also documented medical events and family contacts. In 2 years, 38 patients (26 male) were enrolled with an age range 0.2-18.5 years. Mean stress, anxiety, and depression scores were higher in mothers than fathers, and scores were higher in parents of patients > 10 years compared to the patient group < 10 years. In families with a high initial BCA score there was a positive correlation with maternal stress and anxiety scores. Patients from families with a low BCA score had better growth performance. Older children requiring renal replacement therapy may produce more stress and intrusion for parents than younger children. Burden of care assessments may be a useful means of predicting families who require greater support from the multidisciplinary team. PMID:9360703

  20. Two models of multiple family therapy in the treatment of adolescent anorexia nervosa: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Gelin, Zoé; Cook-Darzens, Solange; Simon, Yves; Hendrick, Stéphan

    2016-03-01

    Multiple family therapy (MFT) is a therapeutic method that brings together several families affected by the same pathology. Although from an ideological and conceptual point of view, MFT is often linked to family therapy and group therapy, it is difficult to define it with precision, a weakness which may in turn hinder research on therapeutic effectiveness. This is most notable in the field of eating disorders (ED) where, in spite of MFT's great popularity, research evidence remains limited. Within the context of a systematic review of the literature on MFT in the treatment of anorexia nervosa, the purpose of this article is to provide a theoretical and clinical framework for describing two MFT models, in an attempt to explore their common and distinct concepts, principles, techniques, and factors of change. The first program is a day treatment adaptation of the Maudsley family-based MFT approach, developed in Belgium at the Therapeutic Centre for Adolescents suffering from Eating Disorders: it focuses on the management of ED symptoms, using a strong cognitive behavioral orientation. The second is an integrated systemic MFT outpatient and inpatient program carried out on the ED unit of a pediatric hospital in Paris, France: it emphasizes intra- and inter-family relationships within a systemic framework. Our effort to describe and compare these two models constitutes a first step toward determining the relative value of different models of MFT. Indeed, each model presents specific characteristics that may make it best suited for specific ED populations and/or types of families. PMID:26223191

  1. Family therapy for drug abuse: review and updates 2003-2010.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Cynthia L

    2012-01-01

    Just 15 years ago, Liddle and Dakof (Journal of Marital and Family Therapy, 1995; 21, 511) concluded, based on the available evidence, that family therapy represented a "promising, but not definitive" approach for the treatment of drug problems among adolescents and adults. Seven years later, Rowe and Liddle (2003) review described considerable progress in this specialty with encouraging findings on adolescent-focused models based on rigorous methodology, as well as advances with adult-focused family-based treatments. The current review brings the field up to date with highlights from research conducted in the intervening 7 years, cross-cutting issues, recommendations for new research, and practice implications of these findings. Adolescent-focused family-based models that attend to the ecology of the teen and family show the most consistent and strongest findings in recent studies. Adult-focused models based on behavioral and systems theories of change also show strong effects with drug abusers and their families. The overarching conclusion is that family-based models are not only a viable treatment alternative for the treatment of drug abuse, but are now consistently recognized among the most effective approaches for treating both adults and adolescents with drug problems. PMID:22283381

  2. The Intersection of Catholic Social Teaching, Internationalization, and Marriage and Family Therapy: Lessons from the Borderlands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Estrada, Ana Ulloa

    2011-01-01

    This article explores the relevance and challenge of Catholic Social Teaching (CST) and internationalization to the Marriage and Family Therapy (MFT) program at the University of San Diego. These issues are discussed in the context of a graduate level course on human diversity that culminated in a 1-day cultural immersion and service learning trip…

  3. Transformative Learning through International Immersion: Building Multicultural Competence in Family Therapy and Counseling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDowell, Teresa; Goessling, Kristen; Melendez, Tatiana

    2012-01-01

    This study explores the experiences of graduate students who completed one of two international courses facilitated by family therapy faculty in a U.S. master's-level counseling psychology department. Participants reported that international courses were personally and professionally transformative. Spending time in a foreign country gave them…

  4. Live Supervision in Family Therapy: An Interview With Barbara Okun and Fred Piercy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West, John D.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Describes special program on live supervision in family therapy given at 1988 annual American Association for Counseling and Development (AACD) Conference that featured experts Barbara Okun and Fred Piercy discussing "cotherapy" and "one-way mirror" live supervision approaches. Provides edited transcript of their program. (Author/CM)

  5. A View of the Symbolic-Experiential Family Therapy of Carl Whitaker through Movie Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cag, Pinar; Voltan Acar, Nilufer

    2015-01-01

    The movie "Ya Sonra" is evaluated in respect to the basic concepts and principles of symbolic-experiential family therapy. Carl Whitaker, who called his approach "Psychotherapy of Absurdity" mainly emphasized the concepts of absurdity, experientiality, and symbolism. Based on the hypothesis that film analysis supports and…

  6. Implementing Dialectical Behavior Therapy with Adolescents and Their Families in a Community Outpatient Clinic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodberry, Kristen A.; Popenoe, Ellen J.

    2008-01-01

    Dialectical behavior therapy (DBT), an empirically supported treatment for adult women diagnosed with borderline personality disorder (BPD), has been increasingly adapted for use with adolescents across a variety of settings. This article describes a community-based application of DBT principles and strategies for adolescents and their families.…

  7. Utilization and Indirect Suggestion in Multiple-Family Group Therapy with Alcoholics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lovern, John D.; Zohn, Joseph

    1982-01-01

    Describes techniques of utilization and indirect suggestion in multiple-family group therapy as a component of an alcoholism treatment program. Techniques include: unconscious conditioning, therapeutic binds, indirect suggestion, and the utilization approach. Describes how a set of specific goals can be achieved using these techniques. (Author/KMF)

  8. Decreased Family Accommodation Associated with Improved Therapy Outcome in Pediatric Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merlo, Lisa J.; Lehmkuhl, Heather D.; Geffken, Gary R.; Storch, Eric A.

    2009-01-01

    Pediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a chronic, disabling condition that affects both patients and their families. Despite the identification of efficacious treatments (e.g., cognitive-behavioral therapy and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor medications), not all patients respond fully. The purpose of the present study was to…

  9. TSL Family Therapy Followed by Improved Marital Quality and Reduced Oxidative Stress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Jae Yop; Kim, Dong Goo; Nam, Seok In

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: The current study evaluated the effectiveness of a form of family therapy developed in Korea. The "Thank you--Sorry--Love" (TSL) model was applied to a group of elderly retired men to improve the quality of their marriage and to reduce their stress. Methods: Thirty married retired Korean men were assigned to three groups. Group 1…

  10. Brief Strategic Family Therapy for Young People in Treatment for Drug Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindstrøm, Maia; Filges, Trine; Jørgensen, Anne-Marie Klint

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This review evaluates the evidence on the effects of brief strategic family therapy (BSFT) on drug use reduction for young people in treatment for nonopioid drug use. Method: We followed Campbell Collaboration guidelines to prepare this review and ultimately located three studies for final analysis and interpretation. Results: The results…

  11. Attachment-Based Family Therapy for Adolescents with Suicidal Ideation: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diamond, Guy S.; Wintersteen, Matthew B.; Brown, Gregory K.; Diamond, Gary M.; Gallop, Robert; Shelef, Karni; Levy, Suzanne

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate whether Attachment-Based Family Therapy (ABFT) is more effective than Enhanced Usual Care (EUC) for reducing suicidal ideation and depressive symptoms in adolescents. Method: This was a randomized controlled trial of suicidal adolescents between the ages of 12 and 17, identified in primary care and emergency departments. Of…

  12. Exploring Marriage and Family Therapy Supervisees' Perspectives about Postgraduate Supervision and the Acquisition of Core Competencies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steele, Stephanie J.

    2013-01-01

    The topic of core competencies has been a central focus in the marriage and family therapy field since 2003. There are currently no published studies from the supervisees' perspective about the role of supervision in the acquisition of core competencies. This qualitative study used transcendental phenomenology to explore supervisees' perspectives…

  13. Integrity of the Marriage and Family Therapy Research Literature: Perceptions and Recommendations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brock, Gregory W.; Whiting, Jason B.; Matern, Brianne; Fife, Stephen T.

    2009-01-01

    Reports of falsification, fabrication, plagiarism, and other violations of research integrity across the sciences are on the increase. Joining with other disciplines to actively protect the integrity of the marriage and family therapy (MFT) research literature is of utmost importance to both the discipline and the future of the profession. To…

  14. Voices of Family Therapy Doctoral Students of Color: Aspirations and Factors Influencing Careers in Academia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, John K.; Stone, Dana J.

    2011-01-01

    The authors examined factors influencing career aspirations of doctoral students of color in family therapy doctoral programs across the country, with a special focus on careers in the professoriate. Qualitative interviews were conducted with students at varying levels of degree completion. Respondents discussed barriers to careers in academia as…

  15. Gender and Sexual Orientation in Family Therapy: Toward a Postgender Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knudson-Martin, Carmen; Laughlin, Martha J.

    2005-01-01

    We examine how the issues of gender and sexual orientation have been addressed in family therapy and identify critical issues as the field defines itself in a postmodern, inclusive era. We show how unintentional bias and creation of the category of "other" persist throughout the history of clinical practice despite a rise of interest in diversity.…

  16. Perceived Treatment Effectiveness of Family Therapy for Chinese Patients Suffering from Anorexia Nervosa: A Qualitative Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ma, Joyce L. C.; Lai, Kelly

    2006-01-01

    Although family therapy has become highly acceptable in the West, its applicability and acceptability for Chinese adolescents and young women with anorexia nervosa (AN) remains unknown. In this article, we report the results of a qualitative study using post-treatment in-depth interviews to understand the subjective perceptions of sufferers of AN…

  17. Comparison of Long-Term Outcomes in Adolescents with Anorexia Nervosa Treated with Family Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lock, James; Couturier, Jennifer; Agras, W. Stewart

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To describe the relative effectiveness of a short versus long course of family-based therapy (FBT) for adolescent anorexia nervosa at long-term follow-up. Method: This study used clinical and structured interviews to assess psychological and psychosocial outcomes of adolescents (ages 12-18 years at baseline) who were previously treated…

  18. Systemic Family Therapy Using the Reflecting Team: The Experiences of Adults with Learning Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anslow, Katharine

    2014-01-01

    This research aimed to illuminate the experiences of adults with learning disabilities of the reflecting team, in the context of their systemic family therapy. Five adults with learning disabilities were recruited from one community learning disability team. A qualitative design using interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA) was appropriate…

  19. Cultural Competency as a Relational Process: Scenes from a Family Therapy Training Context in the Philippines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charles, Laurie L.

    2007-01-01

    This article describes the experiences of a U.S.-based family therapy practitioner during a 3-week academic consultation in the Philippines. Revisioning the concept of cultural competency as a performance that occurs in relationship, the author shares three autoethnographic stories that illustrate cultural borderlands in the global arena of family…

  20. Substance Abuse Treatment And Family Therapy. A Treatment Improvement Protocol (TIP) Series 39

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, Jonathan Max; Oliff, Helen; Sutton, David; Bartlett, Catalina; Henderson, Randi

    2004-01-01

    This Treatment Improvement Protocol (TIP) addresses substance abuse treatment in the context of family therapy. TIPs are best-practice guidelines for the treatment of substance use disorders that make the latest research in substance abuse treatment available to counselors and educators. The content was generated by a panel of experts in the…

  1. The Never-Ending Journey: Constraint, Possibility, and Relational Potential in Family Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernal, Anibal Torres

    2004-01-01

    Taking a meta-theoretical perspective, this article presents a critical analytical model through which human knowledge, existence, and behaviour can be understood. The article describes the meta-theoretical model and then explains how this model applies to the evolution of seminal family therapy theories.

  2. The Use of Family Therapy in Drug Abuse Treatment: A National Survey. Services Research Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    George Washington Univ. Medical Center, Washington, DC.

    A survey sought to determine the nature and extent of family therapy practiced in treatment and rehabilitation agencies serving drug abuse clients. Questionnaire responses to a three-phase study were on a voluntary basis. Phase I, with a 60% response rate, gathered information on the number of drug abuse treatment agencies providing family…

  3. Factors Influencing Student Selection of Marriage and Family Therapy Graduate Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hertlein, Katherine M.; Lambert-Shute, Jennifer

    2007-01-01

    To understand which factors students consider most important in choosing a marriage and family therapy (MFT) graduate program and how programs met or did not meet these expectations of students over the course of graduate study, we conducted an online mixed-method investigation. One hundred twelve graduate students in Commission on Accreditation…

  4. Challenge and Urgency in Defining Doctoral Education in Marriage and Family Therapy: Valuing Complementary Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wampler, Karen S.

    2010-01-01

    In this overview, I comment on the strong theme of the need to define and improve the quality of doctoral education in marriage and family therapy that pervades the three essays. Deficits in research training are the central concern, although the essayists take different perspectives on the nature of the research training needed. The different…

  5. The Efficacy of Parent-Child Interaction Therapy with Chinese Families: Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leung, Cynthia; Tsang, Sandra; Sin, Tammy C. S.; Choi, Siu-yan

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to examine the efficacy of the Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT) in Hong Kong Chinese families, using randomized controlled trial design. Methods: The participants included 111 Hong Kong Chinese parents with children aged 2--7 years old, who were randomized into the intervention group (n = 54) and control group (n…

  6. The Core Competency Movement in Marriage and Family Therapy: Key Considerations from Other Disciplines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, John K.; Todahl, Jeff L.; Platt, Jason J.

    2010-01-01

    There is a growing movement to define competency within the field of marriage and family therapy (MFT), particularly with respect to the training of practitioners and the evaluation of clinical practice. Efforts to define competency, however, transcend the practice of MFT and much can be learned from the experiences of other disciplines.…

  7. Setting up the On-Site Marriage and Family Therapy Clinical Training Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ratanasiripong, Paul; Ghafoori, Bita

    2009-01-01

    The first clinical training experience or practicum for graduate students in a Marriage and Family Therapy (MFT) program is one of the most important aspects of the entire training program. After a year-long journey through textbook and classroom knowledge, students have the opportunity to finally apply their skills to real life environments with…

  8. Breaking the Patriarchal Vision of Social Science: Lessons from a Family Therapy Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNamee, Sheila

    The Milan model of systemic family therapy, developed in Italy and based on G. Bateson's cybernetic epistemology, can help meet the goals of a feminist/systemic epistemology in research by accepting data in its "traditional" form yet also connecting it to the act of researching, itself, thereby merging a feminist perspective with the domain of…

  9. Reintegrating Family Therapy Training in Psychiatric Residency Programs: Making the Case

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rait, Douglas; Glick, Ira

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Given the marginalization of couples and family therapy in psychiatric residency programs over the past two decades, the authors propose a rationale for the reintegration of these important psychosocial treatments into the mainstream of general psychiatric residency education. Methods: After reviewing recent trends in the field that…

  10. Supervising Family Therapy Trainees in Primary Care Medical Settings: Context Matters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Todd M.; Patterson, Jo Ellen

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to identify and describe four essential skills for effective supervision of family therapy trainees in primary care medical settings. The supervision skills described include: (1) Understand medical culture; (2) Locate the trainee in the treatment system; (3) Investigate the biological/health issues; and (4) Be…

  11. Short-term intensive family therapy for adolescent eating disorders: 30-month outcome.

    PubMed

    Marzola, Enrica; Knatz, Stephanie; Murray, Stuart B; Rockwell, Roxanne; Boutelle, Kerri; Eisler, Ivan; Kaye, Walter H

    2015-05-01

    Family therapy approaches have generated impressive empirical evidence in the treatment of adolescent eating disorders (EDs). However, the paucity of specialist treatment providers limits treatment uptake; therefore, our group developed the intensive family therapy (IFT)-a 5-day treatment based on the principles of family-based therapy for EDs. We retrospectively examined the long-term efficacy of IFT in both single-family (S-IFT) and multi-family (M-IFT) settings evaluating 74 eating disordered adolescents who underwent IFT at the University of California, San Diego, between 2006 and 2013. Full remission was defined as normal weight (≥ 95% of expected for sex, age, and height), Eating Disorder Examination Questionnaire (EDE-Q) global score within 1 SD of norms, and absence of binge-purging behaviours. Partial remission was defined as weight ≥ 85% of expected or ≥ 95% but with elevated EDE-Q global score and presence of binge-purging symptoms (<1/week). Over a mean follow-up period of 30 months, 87.8% of participants achieved either full (60.8%) or partial remission (27%), while 12.2% reported a poor outcome, with both S-IFT and M-IFT showing comparable outcomes. Short-term, intensive treatments may be cost-effective and clinically useful where access to regular specialist treatment is limited. PMID:25783849

  12. Brief Strategic Family Therapy versus Treatment as Usual: Results of a Multisite Randomized Trial for Substance Using Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robbins, Michael S.; Feaster, Daniel J.; Horigian, Viviana E.; Rohrbaugh, Michael; Shoham, Varda; Bachrach, Ken; Miller, Michael; Burlew, Kathleen A.; Hodgkins, Candy; Carrion, Ibis; Vandermark, Nancy; Schindler, Eric; Werstlein, Robert; Szapocznik, Jose

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To determine the effectiveness of brief strategic family therapy (BSFT; an evidence-based family therapy) compared to treatment as usual (TAU) as provided in community-based adolescent outpatient drug abuse programs. Method: A randomized effectiveness trial in the National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network compared BSFT to…

  13. Examination of the Film "My Father and My Son" According to the Basic Concepts of Multigenerational Family Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Acar, Tulin; Voltan-Acar, Nilufer

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the basic concepts of multigenerational Family Therapy and to evaluate the scenes of the film ''My Father and My Son'' according to these concepts. For these purposes firstly basic concepts of Multigenerational Family Therapy such as differentiation of self, triangles/triangulation, nuclear…

  14. Child- And Family-Focused Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Pediatric Bipolar Disorder: Development and Preliminary Results.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pavuluri, Mani N.; Graczyk, Patricia A.; Henry, David B.; Carbray, Julie A.; Heidenreich, Jodi; Miklowitz, David J.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To describe child- and family-focused cognitive-behavioral therapy (CFF-CBT), a new developmentally sensitive psychosocial intervention for pediatric bipolar disorder (PBD) that is intended for use along with medication. CFF-CBT integrates principles of family-focused therapy with those of CBT. The theoretical framework is based on (1)…

  15. Transforming the legacies of childhood trauma in couple and family therapy.

    PubMed

    Basham, Kathryn

    2004-01-01

    A multi-theoretical couple/family therapy clinical social work practice model synthesizes various social, family, trauma, and psychodynamic theories to inform a biopsychosocial assessment that guides clinical interventions. The client population involves adult partners who have negotiated the impact of childhood trauma, i.e., physical, sexual, and emotional abuses, including culturally sanctioned trauma. Couples may also be dealing with the aftermath of acute trauma related to interpersonal violence, political conflict, and/or the dislocations related to refugee or new immigrant status. Clinical examples demonstrate the usefulness of the model as well as contraindications when active physical violence is present. The construct of resilience remains a central focus in assessment and treatment. Specific attention to cultural and racial diversity enriches both assessment and treatment interventions with these high-risk couples and families. This practice model will be explicated in depth in an upcoming publication from Columbia University Press titled Transforming the Legacies of Trauma in Couple Therapy. PMID:15774396

  16. Multidimensional Family Therapy: Addressing Co-Occurring Substance Abuse and Other Problems among Adolescents with Comprehensive Family-Based Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Cynthia L.

    2010-01-01

    Synopsis Adolescent substance abuse rarely occurs without other psychiatric and developmental problems, yet it is often treated and researched as if it can be isolated from comorbid conditions. Few comprehensive interventions are available that effectively address the range of co-occurring problems associated with adolescent substance abuse. This article reviews the clinical interventions and research evidence supporting the use of Multidimensional Family Therapy (MDFT) for adolescents with substance abuse and co-occurring problems. MDFT is uniquely suited to address adolescent substance abuse and related disorders given its comprehensive interventions that systematically target the multiple interacting risk factors underlying many developmental disruptions of adolescence. PMID:20682221

  17. The Effectiveness of Functional Family Therapy in Reducing Adolescent Mental Health Risk and Family Adjustment Difficulties in an Irish Context.

    PubMed

    Hartnett, Dan; Carr, Alan; Sexton, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of Functional Family Therapy (FFT) 42 cases were randomized to FFT and 55 to a waiting-list control group. Minimization procedures controlled the effects of potentially confounding baseline variables. Cases were treated by a team of five therapists who implemented FFT with a moderate degree of fidelity. Rates of clinical recovery were significantly higher in the FFT group than in the control group. Compared to the comparison group, parents in the FFT group reported significantly greater improvement in adolescent problems on the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) and both parents and adolescents reported improvements in family adjustment on the Systemic Clinical Outcomes and Routine Evaluation (SCORE). In addition, 93% of youth and families in the treatment condition completed FFT. Improvements shown immediately after treatment were sustained at 3-month follow-up. Results provide a current demonstration of FFT's effectiveness for youth with behavior problems in community-based settings, expand our understanding of the range of positive outcomes of FFT to include mental health risk and family-defined problem severity and impact, and suggests that it is an effective intervention when implemented in an Irish context. PMID:26542420

  18. Intractable itch relieved by 4-phenylbutyrate therapy in patients with progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis type 1

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis type 1 (PFIC1), an inherited liver disease caused by mutations in ATP8B1, progresses to severe cholestasis with a sustained intractable itch. Currently, no effective therapy has been established for PFIC1. Decreased function of the bile salt export pump (BSEP) in hepatocytes is suggested to be responsible for the severe cholestasis observed in PFIC1. We found a previously unidentified pharmacological effect of 4-phenylbutyrate (4PB) that increases the expression and function of BSEP. Here, we tested 4PB therapy in three patients with PFIC1. Methods The therapeutic potency of 4PB in these patients was tested by oral administration of this drug with gradually increasing dosage (200, 350, and 500 mg/kg/day) for 6 months. Biochemical, histological, and clinical data were collected. Results 4PB therapy had no beneficial effect on the patients’ liver functions, as assessed by biochemical and histological analyses, despite an increase in hepatic BSEP expression. However, therapy with 4PB at a dosage of 350 or 500 mg/kg/day significantly relieved the intractable itch. Serum levels of potential pruritogens in cholestasis were much higher than the reference ranges during the 4PB therapy. Conclusions 4PB therapy may be a new medication for patients with intractable cholestatic pruritus and may improve quality of life for patients and their families. PMID:25022842

  19. Beyond the Binary: Trans-Negotiations in Couple and Family Therapy.

    PubMed

    Giammattei, Shawn V

    2015-09-01

    Dualistic notions about gender and sexuality have permeated the field of couple and family therapy. These binary constructions have been limiting for everyone, especially those who fall outside the male/female dichotomy. This article examines the impact of these binary notions, especially on transgender and gender-creative individuals, couples, and families. Current theory and research in the field as they relate to gender identity, sexuality, and gender minority stress in couples and families are presented. Case examples are used to illustrate affirmative approaches to treatment issues such as coming out, safety, grief and loss, redefining relationships, and social/medical transitions that may arise for transgender or gender nonconforming (TGNC) individuals, couples, and families. PMID:26250935

  20. [Familial forms of central nervous system cavernomas: from recognition to gene therapy].

    PubMed

    Labauge, P

    2007-06-01

    Ten percent of all cavernomas are familial forms. 300 independent families have been identified in France since 1995. Clinical manifestations are more frequent in familial (50%) than in sporadic forms (5%). The symptoms are the same in both forms: epilepsy, hemorrhages, neurological focal deficits and headache, but hemorrhages are more frequent and the age of revelation is younger, before 30 years. It is also frequent to observe extraneural location, cutaneous and retinal. On MRI, four types of lesional aspects were described and lesions are multiple in all cases with numerous "de novo" cavernomas. The prognostic does not depend on the number of lesions, but on their topography, especially in the brain stem. Familial forms may be considered not only as a neurological but as a systemic disease for which global management with a genetic counseling should be considered. Gene therapy is not today available, but perhaps in the future. PMID:17498752

  1. Randomized, Controlled Trial of Behavioral Family Systems Therapy for Diabetes: Maintenance and Generalization of Effects on Parent-Adolescent Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wysocki, Tim; Harris, Michael A.; Buckloh, Lisa M.; Mertlich, Deborah; Lochrie, Amanda Sobel; Taylor, Alexandra; Sadler, Michelle; White, Neil H.

    2008-01-01

    We report a randomized trial of a revised Behavioral Family Systems Therapy for Diabetes (BFST-D) intervention. Families of 104 adolescents with diabetes were randomized to standard care (SC) or to 6 months of an educational support group (ES) or BFST-D. Family communication and problem-solving skills were assessed at 0, 6, 12, and 18 months by…

  2. Systemic Family Therapy of Comorbidity of Anxiety and Depression with Epilepsy in Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing; Meng, Huaqing; Zeng, Kebin; Quan, Fengying; Liu, Fang

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to find if systemic family therapy (SFT) does work in anxiety and depression with epilepsy in adolescents (ADAE). Methods 104 adolescents with epilepsy, aged 13–20 years old, were included from December 2009 to December 2010, the enrolled patients were with anxiety [Hamilton Anxiety Scale (HAMA) score ≥14 points] or depression [Hamilton Depression Scale (HAMD) score ≥20 points]. The patients were randomly divided into the control group (n=52) treated with antiepileptic drugs (AED) and the intervention group (n=52) undergone Systemic Family Therapy (SFT) as well as AED. The AED improvements, anxiety and depression scores, Social Support Rating Scale (SSRS), Family Assessment Device (FAD) and scale of systemic family dynamics (SSFD) were observed after 3-month treatment. Results The frequencies of epileptic seizures in intervention group was decreased much more significantly than the control group (4.22±3.54 times/month vs. 6.20±5.86 times/month, p=0.04); and the scores of anxiety (9.52±6.28 points vs. 13.48±8.47 points, p=0.01) and depression (13.86±9.17 points vs. 18.89±8.73 points, p=0.02) were significantly decreased than the control group; meanwhile, the family dynamics and family functions were significantly improved, and the social support was also increased (p<0.05). Conclusion SFT combined with AEDs had better efficacies than AEDs alone, not only the frequency of epileptic seizures was decreased, but also the patients' anxiety and depression were improved, and the family dynamics, family functions and social support were improved. PMID:27247596

  3. REVIEW OF OUTCOME RESEARCH ON MARITAL AND FAMILY THERAPY IN TREATMENT OF ALCOHOLISM

    PubMed Central

    O’Farrell, Timothy J.

    2011-01-01

    This review of controlled studies of marital and family therapy (MFT) in alcoholism treatment updates our earlier review (XXXXXXX). We conclude that, when the alcoholic is unwilling to seek help, MFT is effective in helping the family cope better and motivating alcoholics to enter treatment. Specifically, both Al-Anon facilitation and referral and spouse coping skills training (based on new findings) help family members cope better; and Community Reinforcement and Family Training (CRAFT) promotes treatment entry and was successfully transported to a community clinic in a new study. Once the alcoholic enters treatment, MFT, particularly behavioral couples therapy (BCT), is clearly more effective than individual treatment at increasing abstinence and improving relationship functioning. New BCT studies showed efficacy with women alcoholics and with gay and lesbian alcoholics; and BCT was successfully transported to a community clinic, a brief BCT version was tested, and BCT was adapted for family members other than spouses. Future studies should evaluate: MFT with couples where both members have a current alcohol problem and with minority patients, mechanisms of change, transportability of evidence-based MFT approaches to clinical practice settings, and replication of MFT outcomes of reduced partner violence and improved child functioning. PMID:22283384

  4. Multi-Family Psychoeducational Support Group Therapy for Families with a Member Afflicted with Irreversible Brain Syndrome (Alzheimer's Disease): Report of a Pilot Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paley, Evelyn S.; And Others

    Alzheimers Disease (AD), an incurable disability which afflicts older adults, can have devastating emotional consequences for the victim and the family. In an attempt to determine the effectiveness of multifamily psychoeducational support, group therapy (MFPSGT), 22 persons (13 families) from the Alzheimer's Disease and Related Disorders…

  5. Canakinumab as rescue therapy in familial Mediterranean fever refractory to conventional treatment

    PubMed Central

    Alpa, Mirella; Roccatello, Dario

    2015-01-01

    Familial Mediterranean fever is an autosomal recessive autoinflammatory disorder mainly affecting Mediterranean populations, which is associated with mutations of the MEFV gene that encodes pyrin. Functional studies suggest that pyrin is implicated in the maturation and secretion of interleukin-1 (IL-1). The IL-1 receptor antagonist or anti-IL-1 monoclonal antibody may therefore represent a rational approach for the treatment of the rare patients who are refractory to conventional therapy. We report the case of a young female affected by familial Mediterranean fever who proved to be resistant to colchicine and was successfully treated with canakinumab. PMID:25945034

  6. Brief Strategic Family Therapy: Implementing evidence-based models in community settings

    PubMed Central

    Szapocznik, José; Muir, Joan A.; Duff, Johnathan H.; Schwartz, Seth J.; Brown, C. Hendricks

    2014-01-01

    Reflecting a nearly 40-year collaborative partnership between clinical researchers and clinicians, the present article reviews the authors’ experience in developing, investigating, and implementing the Brief Strategic Family Therapy (BSFT) model. The first section of the article focuses on the theory, practice, and studies related to this evidence-based family therapy intervention targeting adolescent drug abuse and delinquency. The second section focuses on the implementation model created for the BSFT intervention– a model that parallels many of the recommendations furthered within the implementation science literature. Specific challenges encountered during the BSFT implementation process are reviewed, along with ways of conceptualizing and addressing these challenges from a systemic perspective. The implementation approach that we employ uses the same systemic principles and intervention techniques as those that underlie the BSFT model itself. Recommendations for advancing the field of implementation science, based on our on-the-ground experiences, are proposed. PMID:24274187

  7. Cognitive-Existential Family Therapy: A Proposed Theoretical Integration Model for Pastoral Counselors.

    PubMed

    Saunders, James A

    2015-03-01

    Fundamental Christianity and psychology are frequently viewed as incompatible pursuits. However, proponents of the integrationist movement posit that pastoral counselors can utilize principles from psychology if they adopt the premise that all truth is God's truth. Assuming this perspective, Cognitive-Existential Family Therapy (CEFT) - a theoretical integration model compatible with Christian fundamentalism - is proposed. The philosophical assumptions and models of personality, health, and abnormality are explored. Additionally, the article provides an overview of the therapeutic process. PMID:26162205

  8. The effects of a multiple family therapy on adolescents with eating disorders: an outcome study.

    PubMed

    Gelin, Zoé; Fuso, Silvana; Hendrick, Stephan; Cook-Darzens, Solange; Simon, Yves

    2015-03-01

    Multiple Family Therapy (MFT) has gained increasing popularity in the treatment of eating disorders and many programs have been developed over the past decade. Still, there is little evidence in the literature on the effectiveness on MFT for treating eating disorders. The present study examines the effects of a particular model of Multiple Family Therapy on eating disorder symptoms, quality of life, and percentage of Expected Body Weight (%EBW) in adolescents with eating disorders (ED). Eighty-two adolescents with ED, aged between 11 and 19 years, were assessed before and after treatment using the Eating Disorders Inventory 2 (EDI-2), the Outcome Questionnaire 45 (OQ-45) and %EBW. Results showed a significant increase in %EBW between the beginning and end of treatment, with a large effect size. 52.4% of patients achieved an EBW above 85%. Symptoms relative to all EDI dimensions (except for bulimia) significantly decreased during treatment. The three dimensions related to quality of life assessment also improved over the course of MFT. At the end of treatment, 70.7% of patients had a total OQ-45 score below clinical significance. This study suggests that Multiple Family Therapy may benefit adolescents with eating disorders, with improvement on several outcome measures (%EBW, ED symptoms, and quality of life). However, the lack of a comparison group entails caution when drawing conclusions. PMID:25243337

  9. Talking about violence: a microanalysis of narrative processes in a family therapy session.

    PubMed

    Rober, Peter; Van Eesbeek, Dominiek; Elliott, Robert

    2006-07-01

    In this article, we look at the development in family therapy of narratives about domestic violence. We report on microanalyses of a family therapy session, using narrative research methods, including some conversation analytic tools. The main questions posed in this investigation were: How does storytelling of a highly charged and delicate topic like domestic violence develop in the session?; how do the different actors in the therapy room contribute to telling such stories?; how do actors try to put forward domestic violence as a conversational topic? and how do different actors react to these attempts? Our research illustrates how the recounting of stories of violence seems to go hand in hand with modes of interaction that discourage the telling of these stories. In the back-and-forth process between voices of hesitation and voices of reassurance, the participants weigh the level of safety in the session. In as far as the voices of hesitation can be reassured of the safety, it becomes gradually possible to talk about delicate, problematic experiences, such as violence in the family. PMID:16933436

  10. Save the young--the elderly have lived their lives: ageism in marriage and family therapy.

    PubMed

    Ivey, D C; Wieling, E; Harris, S M

    2000-01-01

    The paucity of literature addressing mental health issues concerning geriatric populations represents the perpetuation of ageist practices and beliefs in the field of marriage and family therapy. The purpose of this study was to assess whether client age and clinical training relate to the evaluation of couples who present for conjoint therapy. Written vignettes describing two couples, one older and one younger, who report issues involving the absence of sexual intimacy, increased frequency of arguments, and increased use of alcohol were evaluated by practicing marriage and family therapists, therapists-in-training, and individuals with no clinical background. It was hypothesized that respondents' views would vary in connection with the age of the couple and with the three levels of participant training. Results indicate that client age and participant training are associated with perceptions of individual and couple functioning. Our findings suggest that the relational and mental health concerns experienced by elder couples are not perceived as seriously as are identical concerns experienced by younger couples. Contrary to our expectations the observed differences between views of the two age conditions did not significantly differ between levels of participant training. Training and experience in marriage and family therapy may not significantly mitigate vulnerability to age-discrepant views. PMID:10907144