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Sample records for family vibrionaceae reveals

  1. Global and Phylogenetic Distribution of Quorum Sensing Signals, Acyl Homoserine Lactones, in the Family of Vibrionaceae

    PubMed Central

    Barker Rasmussen, Bastian; Fog Nielsen, Kristian; Machado, Henrique; Melchiorsen, Jette; Gram, Lone; Sonnenschein, Eva C.

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial quorum sensing (QS) and the corresponding signals, acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs), were first described for a luminescent Vibrio species. Since then, detailed knowledge has been gained on the functional level of QS; however, the abundance of AHLs in the family of Vibrionaceae in the environment has remained unclear. Three hundred and one Vibrionaceae strains were collected on a global research cruise and the prevalence and profile of AHL signals in this global collection were determined. AHLs were detected in 32 of the 301 strains using Agrobacterium tumefaciens and Chromobacterium violaceum reporter strains. Ethyl acetate extracts of the cultures were analysed by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry (MS) with automated tandem MS confirmation for AHLs. N-(3-hydroxy-hexanoyl) (OH-C6) and N-(3-hydroxy-decanoyl) (OH-C10) homoserine lactones were the most common AHLs found in 17 and 12 strains, respectively. Several strains produced a diversity of different AHLs, including N-heptanoyl (C7) HL. AHL-producing Vibrionaceae were found in polar, temperate and tropical waters. The AHL profiles correlated with strain phylogeny based on gene sequence homology, however not with geographical location. In conclusion, a wide range of AHL signals are produced by a number of clades in the Vibrionaceae family and these results will allow future investigations of inter- and intra-species interactions within this cosmopolitan family of marine bacteria. PMID:25419995

  2. Pathogenicity of members of the vibrionaceae family to cultured juvenile sablefish.

    PubMed

    Arkoosh, Mary R; Dietrich, Joseph P

    2015-06-01

    Sablefish Anoplopoma fimbria are a prized seafood species due to their high oil content and white flaky flesh. Raising these species in culture can help to provide an important source of protein for humans and relief to declining wild fish populations. Understanding the environmental factors that influence the production of Sablefish is important for successful culturing. The significance of host-pathogen interactions in Sablefish culture and the resulting environmental implications are unknown. Pathogens could potentially cause losses of cultured Sablefish stocks due to disease, while Sablefish cultured in net pens may also serve as reservoirs for pathogens and potentially transmit disease to wild fish species. In this initial study, the susceptibility of juvenile Sablefish to three bacterial pathogens from the family Vibrionaceae was examined. Listonella anguillarum, Vibrio ordalii, and V. splendidus can pose serious economic threats to cultured fish and shellfish. Groups of juvenile Sablefish were exposed to five concentrations of each of the pathogens. Sablefish were susceptible to L. anguillarum, but were resistant to V. ordalii and V. splendidus at exposure concentrations of ? 1.32 × 10? CFU/mL and ? 3.57 × 10? CFU/mL, respectively. The greatest L. anguillarum concentration examined (8.7 × 10? CFU/mL) resulted in 24% mortality in juvenile Sablefish. A 24% loss of Sablefish stock could significantly influence an aquaculture program. As determined by multiple logistic regression, the survival of Sablefish to L. anguillarum exposure was significantly affected by their body mass, and larger fish had a greater probability of survival. Aquaculture operations could employ various strategies to minimize the loss of juvenile Sablefish by accounting for their size and known susceptibilities to pathogens. PMID:25970236

  3. Associations and dynamics of Vibrionaceae in the environment, from the genus to the population level

    E-print Network

    Chien, Diana M.

    The Vibrionaceae, which encompasses several potential pathogens, including V. cholerae, the causative agent of cholera, and V. vulnificus, the deadliest seafood-borne pathogen, are a well-studied family of marine bacteria ...

  4. Advanced Microbial Taxonomy Combined with Genome-Based-Approaches Reveals that Vibrio astriarenae sp. nov., an Agarolytic Marine Bacterium, Forms a New Clade in Vibrionaceae

    PubMed Central

    Al-saari, Nurhidayu; Gao, Feng; A.K.M. Rohul, Amin; Sato, Kazumichi; Sato, Keisuke; Mino, Sayaka; Suda, Wataru; Oshima, Kenshiro; Hattori, Masahira; Ohkuma, Moriya; Meirelles, Pedro M.; Thompson, Fabiano L.; Thompson, Cristiane; A. Filho, Gilberto M.; Gomez-Gil, Bruno; Sawabe, Toko; Sawabe, Tomoo

    2015-01-01

    Advances in genomic microbial taxonomy have opened the way to create a more universal and transparent concept of species but is still in a transitional stage towards becoming a defining robust criteria for describing new microbial species with minimum features obtained using both genome and classical polyphasic taxonomies. Here we performed advanced microbial taxonomies combined with both genome-based and classical approaches for new agarolytic vibrio isolates to describe not only a novel Vibrio species but also a member of a new Vibrio clade. Two novel vibrio strains (Vibrio astriarenae sp. nov. C7T and C20) showing agarolytic, halophilic and fermentative metabolic activity were isolated from a seawater sample collected in a coral reef in Okinawa. Intraspecific similarities of the isolates were identical in both sequences on the 16S rRNA and pyrH genes, but the closest relatives on the molecular phylogenetic trees on the basis of 16S rRNA and pyrH gene sequences were V. hangzhouensis JCM 15146T (97.8% similarity) and V. agarivorans CECT 5085T (97.3% similarity), respectively. Further multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) on the basis of 8 protein coding genes (ftsZ, gapA, gyrB, mreB, pyrH, recA, rpoA, and topA) obtained by the genome sequences clearly showed the V. astriarenae strain C7T and C20 formed a distinct new clade protruded next to V. agarivorans CECT 5085T. The singleton V. agarivorans has never been included in previous MLSA of Vibrionaceae due to the lack of some gene sequences. Now the gene sequences are completed and analysis of 100 taxa in total provided a clear picture describing the association of V. agarivorans into pre-existing concatenated network tree and concluded its relationship to our vibrio strains. Experimental DNA-DNA hybridization (DDH) data showed that the strains C7T and C20 were conspecific but were separated from all of the other Vibrio species related on the basis of both 16S rRNA and pyrH gene phylogenies (e.g., V. agarivorans CECT 5085T, V. hangzhouensis JCM 15146T V. maritimus LMG 25439T, and V. variabilis LMG 25438T). In silico DDH data also supported the genomic relationship. The strains C7T also had less than 95% average amino acid identity (AAI) and average nucleotide identity (ANI) towards V. maritimus C210, V. variabilis C206, and V. mediterranei AK1T, V. brasiliensis LMG 20546T, V. orientalis ATCC 33934T, and V. sinaloensis DSM 21326. The name Vibrio astriarenae sp. nov. is proposed with C7 as the type strains. Both V. agarivorans CECT 5058T and V. astriarenae C7T are members of the newest clade of Vibrionaceae named Agarivorans. PMID:26313925

  5. Antibacterial Compounds from Marine Vibrionaceae Isolated on a Global Expedition

    PubMed Central

    Wietz, Matthias; Mansson, Maria; Gotfredsen, Charlotte H.; Larsen, Thomas O.; Gram, Lone

    2010-01-01

    On a global research expedition, over 500 bacterial strains inhibitory towards pathogenic bacteria were isolated. Three hundred of the antibacterial strains were assigned to the Vibrionaceae family. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the phylogeny and bioactivity of five Vibrionaceae strains with pronounced antibacterial activity. These were identified as Vibrio coralliilyticus (two strains), V. neptunius (two strains), and Photobacterium halotolerans (one strain) on the basis of housekeeping gene sequences. The two related V. coralliilyticus and V. neptunius strains were isolated from distant oceanic regions. Chemotyping by LC-UV/MS underlined genetic relationships by showing highly similar metabolite profiles for each of the two V. coralliilyticus and V. neptunius strains, respectively, but a unique profile for P. halotolerans. Bioassay-guided fractionation identified two known antibiotics as being responsible for the antibacterial activity; andrimid (from V. coralliilyticus) and holomycin (from P. halotolerans). Despite the isolation of already known antibiotics, our findings show that marine Vibrionaceae are a resource of antibacterial compounds and may have potential for future natural product discovery. PMID:21339958

  6. Microbial experimental evolution as a novel research approach in the Vibrionaceae and squid-Vibrio symbiosis

    PubMed Central

    Soto, William; Nishiguchi, Michele K.

    2014-01-01

    The Vibrionaceae are a genetically and metabolically diverse family living in aquatic habitats with a great propensity toward developing interactions with eukaryotic microbial and multicellular hosts (as either commensals, pathogens, and mutualists). The Vibrionaceae frequently possess a life history cycle where bacteria are attached to a host in one phase and then another where they are free from their host as either part of the bacterioplankton or adhered to solid substrates such as marine sediment, riverbeds, lakebeds, or floating particulate debris. These two stages in their life history exert quite distinct and separate selection pressures. When bound to solid substrates or to host cells, the Vibrionaceae can also exist as complex biofilms. The association between bioluminescent Vibrio spp. and sepiolid squids (Cephalopoda: Sepiolidae) is an experimentally tractable model to study bacteria and animal host interactions, since the symbionts and squid hosts can be maintained in the laboratory independently of one another. The bacteria can be grown in pure culture and the squid hosts raised gnotobiotically with sterile light organs. The partnership between free-living Vibrio symbionts and axenic squid hatchlings emerging from eggs must be renewed every generation of the cephalopod host. Thus, symbiotic bacteria and animal host can each be studied alone and together in union. Despite virtues provided by the Vibrionaceae and sepiolid squid-Vibrio symbiosis, these assets to evolutionary biology have yet to be fully utilized for microbial experimental evolution. Experimental evolution studies already completed are reviewed, along with exploratory topics for future study. PMID:25538686

  7. Reproducibility of Vibrionaceae population structure in coastal bacterioplankton

    PubMed Central

    Szabo, Gitta; Preheim, Sarah P; Kauffman, Kathryn M; David, Lawrence A; Shapiro, Jesse; Alm, Eric J; Polz, Martin F

    2013-01-01

    How reproducibly microbial populations assemble in the wild remains poorly understood. Here, we assess evidence for ecological specialization and predictability of fine-scale population structure and habitat association in coastal ocean Vibrionaceae across years. We compare Vibrionaceae lifestyles in the bacterioplankton (combinations of free-living, particle, or zooplankton associations) measured using the same sampling scheme in 2006 and 2009 to assess whether the same groups show the same environmental association year after year. This reveals complex dynamics with populations falling primarily into two categories: (i) nearly equally represented in each of the two samplings and (ii) highly skewed, often to an extent that they appear exclusive to one or the other sampling times. Importantly, populations recovered at the same abundance in both samplings occupied highly similar habitats suggesting predictable and robust environmental association while skewed abundances of some populations may be triggered by shifts in ecological conditions. The latter is supported by difference in the composition of large eukaryotic plankton between years, with samples in 2006 being dominated by copepods, and those in 2009 by diatoms. Overall, the comparison supports highly predictable population-habitat linkage but highlights the fact that complex, and often unmeasured, environmental dynamics in habitat occurrence may have strong effects on population dynamics. PMID:23178668

  8. Polar Flagellar Motility of the Vibrionaceae

    PubMed Central

    McCarter, Linda L.

    2001-01-01

    Polar flagella of Vibrio species can rotate at speeds as high as 100,000 rpm and effectively propel the bacteria in liquid as fast as 60 ?m/s. The sodium motive force powers rotation of the filament, which acts as a propeller. The filament is complex, composed of multiple subunits, and sheathed by an extension of the cell outer membrane. The regulatory circuitry controlling expression of the polar flagellar genes of members of the Vibrionaceae is different from the peritrichous system of enteric bacteria or the polar system of Caulobacter crescentus. The scheme of gene control is also pertinent to other members of the gamma purple bacteria, in particular to Pseudomonas species. This review uses the framework of the polar flagellar system of Vibrio parahaemolyticus to provide a synthesis of what is known about polar motility systems of the Vibrionaceae. In addition to its propulsive role, the single polar flagellum of V. parahaemolyticus is believed to act as a tactile sensor controlling surface-induced gene expression. Under conditions that impede rotation of the polar flagellum, an alternate, lateral flagellar motility system is induced that enables movement through viscous environments and over surfaces. Although the dual flagellar systems possess no shared structural components and although distinct type III secretion systems direct the simultaneous placement and assembly of polar and lateral organelles, movement is coordinated by shared chemotaxis machinery. PMID:11528005

  9. Fluorogenic Membrane Overlays to Enumerate Total and Fecal Escherichia coli and Total Vibrionaceae in Shellfish and Seawater.

    PubMed

    Richards, Gary P; Watson, Michael A

    2010-01-01

    Three assays were developed to enumerate total and fecal Escherichia coli and total Vibrionaceae in shellfish, seawater, and other foods and environmental samples. Assays involve membrane overlays of overnight colonies on nonselective agar plates to detect beta-glucuronidase and lysyl aminopeptidase activities for E. coli and Vibrionaceae, respectively. Cellulose membranes containing the substrates 4-methylumbeferyl-beta-D-glucuronide (MUG) produced a bright blue fluorescence when overlaid onto E. coli, while L-lysyl-7-amino-4-trifluoromethylcoumarin produced green fluorescent foci when overlaid onto Vibrionaceae family members. A multiplex assay was also developed for simultaneously enumerating total E. coli and total Vibrionaceae in oysters and seawater. Overall, 65% of overlaid E. coli (non-O157:H7) were MUG-positive, compared with 62% as determined by the most-probable-number-MUG assay. The overlays are rapid, simple, and cost effective for quantification purposes. This research provides practical alternatives for monitoring bacterial indicators and potential pathogens in complex samples, including molluscan shellfish. PMID:20396663

  10. Spatial and Temporal Distribution of the Vibrionaceae in Coastal Waters of Hawaii, Australia, and France

    E-print Network

    Ruby, Edward G.

    Microbial Ecology Spatial and Temporal Distribution of the Vibrionaceae in Coastal Waters of Hawaii and temporal distribution of the Vibrionaceae with respect to V. fischeri and V. logei in Hawaii, southeastern (temperature) and biotic (host distribution) factors both influence popula- tion dynamics. In Hawaii, three

  11. Associations and dynamics of Vibrionaceae in the environment, from the genus to the population level

    PubMed Central

    Takemura, Alison F.; Chien, Diana M.; Polz, Martin F.

    2013-01-01

    The Vibrionaceae, which encompasses several potential pathogens, including V. cholerae, the causative agent of cholera, and V. vulnificus, the deadliest seafood-borne pathogen, are a well-studied family of marine bacteria that thrive in diverse habitats. To elucidate the environmental conditions under which vibrios proliferate, numerous studies have examined correlations with bulk environmental variables—e.g., temperature, salinity, nitrogen, and phosphate—and association with potential host organisms. However, how meaningful these environmental associations are remains unclear because data are fragmented across studies with variable sampling and analysis methods. Here, we synthesize findings about Vibrio correlations and physical associations using a framework of increasingly fine environmental and taxonomic scales, to better understand their dynamics in the wild. We first conduct a meta-analysis to determine trends with respect to bulk water environmental variables, and find that while temperature and salinity are generally strongly predictive correlates, other parameters are inconsistent and overall patterns depend on taxonomic resolution. Based on the hypothesis that dynamics may better correlate with more narrowly defined niches, we review evidence for specific association with plants, algae, zooplankton, and animals. We find that Vibrio are attached to many organisms, though evidence for enrichment compared to the water column is often lacking. Additionally, contrary to the notion that they flourish predominantly while attached, Vibrio can have, at least temporarily, a free-living lifestyle and even engage in massive blooms. Fine-scale sampling from the water column has enabled identification of such lifestyle preferences for ecologically cohesive populations, and future efforts will benefit from similar analysis at fine genetic and environmental sampling scales to describe the conditions, habitats, and resources shaping Vibrio dynamics. PMID:24575082

  12. Fluorogenic membrane overlays to enumerate total coliforms, Escherichia coli, and total Vibrionaceae in shellfish and seawater

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Three assays were developed to enumerate total coliforms, Escherichia coli, and total Vibrionaceae in shellfish and other foods and in seawater and other environmental samples. Assays involve membrane overlays of overnight colonies on non-selective agar plates to detect ß-glucuronidase and lysyl am...

  13. Water quality parameters and total aerobic bacterial and vibrionaceae loads in eastern oysters (Crassostrea virginica) from oyster gardening sites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oyster gardening is a practice designed to restore habitat for marine life and to improve water quality. This study determined physical and chemical water quality parameters at two oyster gardening sites in the Delaware Inland Bays and compared them with total aerobic bacteria and Vibrionaceae conc...

  14. An augmented supermatrix phylogeny of the avian family Picidae reveals uncertainty deep in the family tree.

    PubMed

    Dufort, Matthew J

    2016-01-01

    The accumulation of DNA sequence data in public repositories allows for phylogenetic inference on unprecedented taxonomic scales using supermatrix approaches. Careful analysis of available data allows strategic augmentation with new sequences in order to maximize taxonomic sampling and coverage of informative loci. I inferred relationships among 179 species (76%) in the avian family Picidae (woodpeckers, piculets, and wrynecks), using publicly available sequence data supplemented with targeted sequencing to increase species-level and locus-level sampling and maximize resolution. Results of these analyses generally corroborate previous molecular studies, with consensus on the membership of most genera and tribes. However, several newly placed taxa show surprising affinities, and several genera as currently delineated appear to be paraphyletic. Relationships among major clades of Picidae remain poorly resolved, particularly among the three lineages of piculets, the unusual woodpecker genus Hemicircus, and the remaining woodpeckers, and among the major groups of true woodpeckers (Picinae). If these deep relationships are to be resolved, phylogenomic approaches may be necessary. PMID:26416706

  15. Merging Taxonomy with Ecological Population Prediction in a Case Study of Vibrionaceae ? †

    PubMed Central

    Preheim, Sarah P.; Timberlake, Sonia; Polz, Martin F.

    2011-01-01

    We synthesized population structure data from three studies that assessed the fine-scale distribution of Vibrionaceae among temporally and spatially distinct environmental categories in coastal seawater and animals. All studies used a dynamic model (AdaptML) to identify phylogenetically cohesive and ecologically distinct bacterial populations and their predicted habitats without relying on a predefined genetic cutoff or relationships to previously named species. Across the three studies, populations were highly overlapping, displaying similar phylogenetic characteristics (identity and diversity), and were predominantly congruent with taxonomic Vibrio species previously characterized as genotypic clusters by multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA). The environmental fidelity of these populations appears high, with 9 out of 12 reproducibly associating with the same predicted (micro)habitats when similar environmental categories were sampled. Overall, this meta-analysis provides information on the habitat predictability and structure of previously described species, demonstrating that MLSA-based taxonomy can, at least in some cases, serve to approximate ecologically cohesive populations. PMID:21873482

  16. Characterization of the Avian Trojan Gene Family Reveals Contrasting Evolutionary Constraints

    PubMed Central

    Petrov, Petar; Syrjänen, Riikka; Smith, Jacqueline; Gutowska, Maria Weronika; Uchida, Tatsuya; Vainio, Olli; Burt, David W

    2015-01-01

    “Trojan” is a leukocyte-specific, cell surface protein originally identified in the chicken. Its molecular function has been hypothesized to be related to anti-apoptosis and the proliferation of immune cells. The Trojan gene has been localized onto the Z sex chromosome. The adjacent two genes also show significant homology to Trojan, suggesting the existence of a novel gene/protein family. Here, we characterize this Trojan family, identify homologues in other species and predict evolutionary constraints on these genes. The two Trojan-related proteins in chicken were predicted as a receptor-type tyrosine phosphatase and a transmembrane protein, bearing a cytoplasmic immuno-receptor tyrosine-based activation motif. We identified the Trojan gene family in ten other bird species and found related genes in three reptiles and a fish species. The phylogenetic analysis of the homologues revealed a gradual diversification among the family members. Evolutionary analyzes of the avian genes predicted that the extracellular regions of the proteins have been subjected to positive selection. Such selection was possibly a response to evolving interacting partners or to pathogen challenges. We also observed an almost complete lack of intracellular positively selected sites, suggesting a conserved signaling mechanism of the molecules. Therefore, the contrasting patterns of selection likely correlate with the interaction and signaling potential of the molecules. PMID:25803627

  17. BCL-2 family genetic profiling reveals microenvironment-specific determinants of chemotherapeutic response

    PubMed Central

    Pritchard, Justin R.; Gilbert, Luke A.; Meacham, Corbin E.; Ricks, Jennifer L.; Jiang, Hai; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.; Hemann, Michael T.

    2011-01-01

    The Bcl-2 family encompasses a diverse set of apoptotic regulators that are dynamically activated in response various cell intrinsic and extrinsic stimuli. An extensive variety of cell culture experiments have identified effects of growth factors, cytokines and drugs on BCL-2 family functions, but in vivo studies have tended to focus on role of one or two particular members in development and organ homeostasis. Thus, the ability of physiologically relevant contexts to modulate canonical dependencies that are likely to be more complex has yet to be investigated systematically. In this study, we report findings derived from a pool-based shRNA assay that systematically and comprehensively interrogated the functional dependence of leukemia and lymphoma cells upon various BCL-2 family members across many diverse in vitro and in vivo settings. This approach permitted us to report the first in vivo loss of function screen for modifiers of the response to a frontline chemotherapeutic agent. Notably, our results reveal an unexpected role for the extrinsic death pathway as a tissue-specific modifier of therapeutic response. In particular, our findings demonstrate that particular tissue sites of tumor dissemination play critical roles in demarcating the nature and extent of cancer cell vulnerabilities and mechanisms of chemoresistance. PMID:21784872

  18. Bcl-2 family genetic profiling reveals microenvironment-specific determinants of chemotherapeutic response.

    PubMed

    Pritchard, Justin R; Gilbert, Luke A; Meacham, Corbin E; Ricks, Jennifer L; Jiang, Hai; Lauffenburger, Douglas A; Hemann, Michael T

    2011-09-01

    The Bcl-2 family encompasses a diverse set of apoptotic regulators that are dynamically activated in response to various cell-intrinsic and -extrinsic stimuli. An extensive variety of cell culture experiments have identified effects of growth factors, cytokines, and drugs on Bcl-2 family functions, but in vivo studies have tended to focus on the role of one or two particular members in development and organ homeostasis. Thus, the ability of physiologically relevant contexts to modulate canonical dependencies that are likely to be more complex has yet to be investigated systematically. In this study, we report findings derived from a pool-based shRNA assay that systematically and comprehensively interrogated the functional dependence of leukemia and lymphoma cells upon various Bcl-2 family members across many diverse in vitro and in vivo settings. This approach permitted us to report the first in vivo loss of function screen for modifiers of the response to a front-line chemotherapeutic agent. Notably, our results reveal an unexpected role for the extrinsic death pathway as a tissue-specific modifier of therapeutic response. In particular, our findings show that particular tissue sites of tumor dissemination play critical roles in demarcating the nature and extent of cancer cell vulnerabilities and mechanisms of chemoresistance. PMID:21784872

  19. Comparative mapping in the Poaceae family reveals translocations in the complex polyploid genome of sugarcane

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The understanding of sugarcane genetics has lagged behind that of other members of the Poaceae family such as wheat, rice, barley and sorghum mainly due to the complexity, size and polyploidization of the genome. We have used the genetic map of a sugarcane cultivar to generate a consensus genetic map to increase genome coverage for comparison to the sorghum genome. We have utilized the recently developed sugarcane DArT array to increase the marker density within the genetic map. The sequence of these DArT markers plus SNP and EST-SSR markers was then used to form a bridge to the sorghum genomic sequence by BLAST alignment to start to unravel the complex genomic architecture of sugarcane. Results Comparative mapping revealed that certain sugarcane chromosomes show greater levels of synteny to sorghum than others. On a macrosyntenic level a good collinearity was observed between sugarcane and sorghum for 4 of the 8 homology groups (HGs). These 4 HGs were syntenic to four sorghum chromosomes with from 98% to 100% of these chromosomes covered by these linked markers. Four major chromosome rearrangements were identified between the other four sugarcane HGs and sorghum, two of which were condensations of chromosomes reducing the basic chromosome number of sugarcane from x?=?10 to x?=?8. This macro level of synteny was transferred to other members within the Poaceae family such as maize to uncover the important evolutionary relationships that exist between sugarcane and these species. Conclusions Comparative mapping of sugarcane to the sorghum genome has revealed new information on the genome structure of sugarcane which will help guide identification of important genes for use in sugarcane breeding. Furthermore of the four major chromosome rearrangements identified in this study, three were common to maize providing some evidence that chromosome reduction from a common paleo-ancestor of both maize and sugarcane was driven by the same translocation events seen in both species. PMID:25059596

  20. Structure-function characterization reveals new catalytic diversity in the galactose oxidase and glyoxal oxidase family.

    PubMed

    Yin, DeLu Tyler; Urresti, Saioa; Lafond, Mickael; Johnston, Esther M; Derikvand, Fatemeh; Ciano, Luisa; Berrin, Jean-Guy; Henrissat, Bernard; Walton, Paul H; Davies, Gideon J; Brumer, Harry

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol oxidases, including carbohydrate oxidases, have a long history of research that has generated fundamental biological understanding and biotechnological applications. Despite a long history of study, the galactose 6-oxidase/glyoxal oxidase family of mononuclear copper-radical oxidases, Auxiliary Activity Family 5 (AA5), is currently represented by only very few characterized members. Here we report the recombinant production and detailed structure-function analyses of two homologues from the phytopathogenic fungi Colletotrichum graminicola and C. gloeosporioides, CgrAlcOx and CglAlcOx, respectively, to explore the wider biocatalytic potential in AA5. EPR spectroscopy and crystallographic analysis confirm a common active-site structure vis-à-vis the archetypal galactose 6-oxidase from Fusarium graminearum. Strikingly, however, CgrAlcOx and CglAlcOx are essentially incapable of oxidizing galactose and galactosides, but instead efficiently catalyse the oxidation of diverse aliphatic alcohols. The results highlight the significant potential of prospecting the evolutionary diversity of AA5 to reveal novel enzyme specificities, thereby informing both biology and applications. PMID:26680532

  1. Prosurvival Bcl-2 family members reveal a distinct apoptotic identity between conventional and plasmacytoid dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Carrington, Emma M; Zhang, Jian-Guo; Sutherland, Robyn M; Vikstrom, Ingela B; Brady, Jamie L; Soo, Priscilla; Vremec, David; Allison, Cody; Lee, Erinna F; Fairlie, W Douglas; Bouillet, Philippe; Grabow, Stephanie; Ottina, Eleonora; Herold, Marco J; Pellegrini, Marc; Huang, David C S; Tarlinton, David M; Strasser, Andreas; Lew, Andrew M; Zhan, Yifan

    2015-03-31

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are heterogeneous, comprising subsets with functional specializations that play distinct roles in immunity as well as immunopathology. We investigated the molecular control of cell survival of two main DC subsets: plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs) and conventional DCs (cDCs) and their dependence on individual antiapoptotic BCL-2 family members. Compared with cDCs, pDCs had higher expression of BCL-2, lower A1, and similar levels of MCL-1 and BCL-XL. Transgenic overexpression of BCL-2 increased the pDC pool size in vivo with only minor impact on cDCs. With a view to immune intervention, we tested BCL-2 inhibitors and found that ABT-199 (the BCL-2 specific inhibitor) selectively killed pDCs but not cDCs. Conversely, genetic knockdown of A1 profoundly reduced the proportion of cDCs but not pDCs. We also found that conditional ablation of MCL-1 significantly reduced the size of both DC populations in mice and impeded DC-mediated immune responses. Thus, we revealed that the two DC types have different cell survival requirements. The molecular basis of survival of different DC subsets thus advocates the antagonism of selective BCL-2 family members for treating diseases pertaining to distinct DC subsets. PMID:25775525

  2. New Insights on the Sialidase Protein Family Revealed by a Phylogenetic Analysis in Metazoa

    PubMed Central

    Giacopuzzi, Edoardo; Bresciani, Roberto; Schauer, Roland; Monti, Eugenio; Borsani, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    Sialidases are glycohydrolytic enzymes present from virus to mammals that remove sialic acid from oligosaccharide chains. Four different sialidase forms are known in vertebrates: the lysosomal NEU1, the cytosolic NEU2 and the membrane-associated NEU3 and NEU4. These enzymes modulate the cell sialic acid content and are involved in several cellular processes and pathological conditions. Molecular defects in NEU1 are responsible for sialidosis, an inherited disease characterized by lysosomal storage disorder and neurodegeneration. The studies on the biology of sialic acids and sialyltransferases, the anabolic counterparts of sialidases, have revealed a complex picture with more than 50 sialic acid variants selectively present in the different branches of the tree of life. The gain/loss of specific sialoconjugates have been proposed as key events in the evolution of deuterostomes and Homo sapiens, as well as in the host-pathogen interactions. To date, less attention has been paid to the evolution of sialidases. Thus we have conducted a survey on the state of the sialidase family in metazoan. Using an in silico approach, we identified and characterized sialidase orthologs from 21 different organisms distributed among the evolutionary tree: Metazoa relative (Monosiga brevicollis), early Deuterostomia, precursor of Chordata and Vertebrata (teleost fishes, amphibians, reptiles, avians and early and recent mammals). We were able to reconstruct the evolution of the sialidase protein family from the ancestral sialidase NEU1 and identify a new form of the enzyme, NEU5, representing an intermediate step in the evolution leading to the modern NEU3, NEU4 and NEU2. Our study provides new insights on the mechanisms that shaped the substrate specificity and other peculiar properties of the modern mammalian sialidases. Moreover, we further confirm findings on the catalytic residues and identified enzyme loop portions that behave as rapidly diverging regions and may be involved in the evolution of specific properties of sialidases. PMID:22952925

  3. GRID and docking analyses reveal a molecular basis for flavonoid inhibition of Src family kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Wright, Bernice; Watson, Kimberly A; McGuffin, Liam J; Lovegrove, Julie A; Gibbins, Jonathan M

    2015-11-01

    Flavonoids reduce cardiovascular disease risk through anti-inflammatory, anti-coagulant and anti-platelet actions. One key flavonoid inhibitory mechanism is blocking kinase activity that drives these processes. Flavonoids attenuate activities of kinases including phosphoinositide-3-kinase, Fyn, Lyn, Src, Syk, PKC, PIM1/2, ERK, JNK and PKA. X-ray crystallographic analyses of kinase-flavonoid complexes show that flavonoid ring systems and their hydroxyl substitutions are important structural features for their binding to kinases. A clearer understanding of structural interactions of flavonoids with kinases is necessary to allow construction of more potent and selective counterparts. We examined flavonoid (quercetin, apigenin and catechin) interactions with Src family kinases (Lyn, Fyn and Hck) applying the Sybyl docking algorithm and GRID. A homology model (Lyn) was used in our analyses to demonstrate that high-quality predicted kinase structures are suitable for flavonoid computational studies. Our docking results revealed potential hydrogen bond contacts between flavonoid hydroxyls and kinase catalytic site residues. Identification of plausible contacts indicated that quercetin formed the most energetically stable interactions, apigenin lacked hydroxyl groups necessary for important contacts and the non-planar structure of catechin could not support predicted hydrogen bonding patterns. GRID analysis using a hydroxyl functional group supported docking results. Based on these findings, we predicted that quercetin would inhibit activities of Src family kinases with greater potency than apigenin and catechin. We validated this prediction using in vitro kinase assays. We conclude that our study can be used as a basis to construct virtual flavonoid interaction libraries to guide drug discovery using these compounds as molecular templates. PMID:26140983

  4. Draft Genome Sequences of Two Vibrionaceae Species, Vibrio ponticus C121 and Photobacterium aphoticum C119, Isolated as Coral Reef Microbiota.

    PubMed

    Al-Saari, Nurhidayu; Meirelles, Pedro Milet; Mino, Sayaka; Suda, Wataru; Oshima, Kenshiro; Hattori, Masahira; Ohkuma, Moriya; Thompson, Fabiano L; Gomez-Gil, Bruno; Sawabe, Toko; Sawabe, Tomoo

    2014-01-01

    Here, the draft genome sequences of two Vibrionaceae, Vibrio ponticus C121 and Photobacterium aphoticum C119, which were isolated from the coral reef vicinity in Okinawa, Japan, are reported. The genome provides further insight into the genomic plasticity, biocomplexity, and ecophysiology, including pathogenicity and evolution, of these genera. PMID:25359913

  5. Structure of the Archaeal Pab87 Peptidase Reveals a Novel Self-Compartmentalizing Protease Family

    PubMed Central

    Delfosse, Vanessa; Girard, Eric; Birck, Catherine; Delmarcelle, Michaël; Delarue, Marc; Poch, Olivier; Schultz, Patrick; Mayer, Claudine

    2009-01-01

    Self-compartmentalizing proteases orchestrate protein turnover through an original architecture characterized by a central catalytic chamber. Here we report the first structure of an archaeal member of a new self-compartmentalizing protease family forming a cubic-shaped octamer with D4 symmetry and referred to as CubicO. We solved the structure of the Pyrococcus abyssi Pab87 protein at 2.2 Å resolution using the anomalous signal of the high-phasing-power lanthanide derivative Lu-HPDO3A. A 20 Å wide channel runs through this supramolecular assembly of 0.4 MDa, giving access to a 60 Å wide central chamber holding the eight active sites. Surprisingly, activity assays revealed that Pab87 degrades specifically d-amino acid containing peptides, which have never been observed in archaea. Genomic context of the Pab87 gene showed that it is surrounded by genes involved in the amino acid/peptide transport or metabolism. We propose that CubicO proteases are involved in the processing of d-peptides from environmental origins. PMID:19266066

  6. BCL-2 family genetic profiling reveals microenvironment-specific determinants of chemotherapeutic response

    E-print Network

    Pritchard, Justin Robert

    The Bcl-2 family encompasses a diverse set of apoptotic regulators that are dynamically activated in response to various cell-intrinsic and -extrinsic stimuli. An extensive variety of cell culture experiments have identified ...

  7. Comparative genome analysis of PHB gene family reveals deep evolutionary origins and diverse gene function

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background PHB (Prohibitin) gene family is involved in a variety of functions important for different biological processes. PHB genes are ubiquitously present in divergent species from prokaryotes to eukaryotes. Human PHB genes have been found to be associated with various diseases. Recent studies by our group and others have shown diverse function of PHB genes in plants for development, senescence, defence, and others. Despite the importance of the PHB gene family, no comprehensive gene family analysis has been carried to evaluate the relatedness of PHB genes across different species. In order to better guide the gene function analysis and understand the evolution of the PHB gene family, we therefore carried out the comparative genome analysis of the PHB genes across different kingdoms. Results The relatedness, motif distribution, and intron/exon distribution all indicated that PHB genes is a relatively conserved gene family. The PHB genes can be classified into 5 classes and each class have a very deep evolutionary origin. The PHB genes within the class maintained the same motif patterns during the evolution. With Arabidopsis as the model species, we found that PHB gene intron/exon structure and domains are also conserved during the evolution. Despite being a conserved gene family, various gene duplication events led to the expansion of the PHB genes. Both segmental and tandem gene duplication were involved in Arabidopsis PHB gene family expansion. However, segmental duplication is predominant in Arabidopsis. Moreover, most of the duplicated genes experienced neofunctionalization. The results highlighted that PHB genes might be involved in important functions so that the duplicated genes are under the evolutionary pressure to derive new function. Conclusion PHB gene family is a conserved gene family and accounts for diverse but important biological functions based on the similar molecular mechanisms. The highly diverse biological function indicated that more research needs to be carried out to dissect the PHB gene function. The conserved gene evolution indicated that the study in the model species can be translated to human and mammalian studies. PMID:20946606

  8. Exome sequencing reveals a high genetic heterogeneity on familial Hirschsprung disease.

    PubMed

    Luzón-Toro, Berta; Gui, Hongsheng; Ruiz-Ferrer, Macarena; Sze-Man Tang, Clara; Fernández, Raquel M; Sham, Pak-Chung; Torroglosa, Ana; Kwong-Hang Tam, Paul; Espino-Paisán, Laura; Cherny, Stacey S; Bleda, Marta; Enguix-Riego, María Del Valle; Dopazo, Joaquín; Antiñolo, Guillermo; García-Barceló, María-Mercé; Borrego, Salud

    2015-01-01

    Hirschsprung disease (HSCR; OMIM 142623) is a developmental disorder characterized by aganglionosis along variable lengths of the distal gastrointestinal tract, which results in intestinal obstruction. Interactions among known HSCR genes and/or unknown disease susceptibility loci lead to variable severity of phenotype. Neither linkage nor genome-wide association studies have efficiently contributed to completely dissect the genetic pathways underlying this complex genetic disorder. We have performed whole exome sequencing of 16 HSCR patients from 8 unrelated families with SOLID platform. Variants shared by affected relatives were validated by Sanger sequencing. We searched for genes recurrently mutated across families. Only variations in the FAT3 gene were significantly enriched in five families. Within-family analysis identified compound heterozygotes for AHNAK and several genes (N?=?23) with heterozygous variants that co-segregated with the phenotype. Network and pathway analyses facilitated the discovery of polygenic inheritance involving FAT3, HSCR known genes and their gene partners. Altogether, our approach has facilitated the detection of more than one damaging variant in biologically plausible genes that could jointly contribute to the phenotype. Our data may contribute to the understanding of the complex interactions that occur during enteric nervous system development and the etiopathology of familial HSCR. PMID:26559152

  9. Exome sequencing reveals a high genetic heterogeneity on familial Hirschsprung disease

    PubMed Central

    Luzón-Toro, Berta; Gui, Hongsheng; Ruiz-Ferrer, Macarena; Sze-Man Tang, Clara; Fernández, Raquel M.; Sham, Pak-Chung; Torroglosa, Ana; Kwong-Hang Tam, Paul; Espino-Paisán, Laura; Cherny, Stacey S.; Bleda, Marta; Enguix-Riego, María del Valle; Dopazo, Joaquín; Antiñolo, Guillermo; García-Barceló, María-Mercé; Borrego, Salud

    2015-01-01

    Hirschsprung disease (HSCR; OMIM 142623) is a developmental disorder characterized by aganglionosis along variable lengths of the distal gastrointestinal tract, which results in intestinal obstruction. Interactions among known HSCR genes and/or unknown disease susceptibility loci lead to variable severity of phenotype. Neither linkage nor genome-wide association studies have efficiently contributed to completely dissect the genetic pathways underlying this complex genetic disorder. We have performed whole exome sequencing of 16 HSCR patients from 8 unrelated families with SOLID platform. Variants shared by affected relatives were validated by Sanger sequencing. We searched for genes recurrently mutated across families. Only variations in the FAT3 gene were significantly enriched in five families. Within-family analysis identified compound heterozygotes for AHNAK and several genes (N?=?23) with heterozygous variants that co-segregated with the phenotype. Network and pathway analyses facilitated the discovery of polygenic inheritance involving FAT3, HSCR known genes and their gene partners. Altogether, our approach has facilitated the detection of more than one damaging variant in biologically plausible genes that could jointly contribute to the phenotype. Our data may contribute to the understanding of the complex interactions that occur during enteric nervous system development and the etiopathology of familial HSCR. PMID:26559152

  10. Molecular and Morphological Analyses Reveal Phylogenetic Relationships of Stingrays Focusing on the Family Dasyatidae (Myliobatiformes)

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Kean Chong; Lim, Phaik-Eem; Chong, Ving Ching; Loh, Kar-Hoe

    2015-01-01

    Elucidating the phylogenetic relationships of the current but problematic Dasyatidae (Order Myliobatiformes) was the first priority of the current study. Here, we studied three molecular gene markers of 43 species (COI gene), 33 species (ND2 gene) and 34 species (RAG1 gene) of stingrays to draft out the phylogenetic tree of the order. Nine character states were identified and used to confirm the molecularly constructed phylogenetic trees. Eight or more clades (at different hierarchical level) were identified for COI, ND2 and RAG1 genes in the Myliobatiformes including four clades containing members of the present Dasyatidae, thus rendering the latter non-monophyletic. The uncorrected p-distance between these four ‘Dasytidae’ clades when compared to the distance between formally known families confirmed that these four clades should be elevated to four separate families. We suggest a revision of the present classification, retaining the Dasyatidae (Dasyatis and Taeniurops species) but adding three new families namely, Neotrygonidae (Neotrygon and Taeniura species), Himanturidae (Himantura species) and Pastinachidae (Pastinachus species). Our result indicated the need to further review the classification of Dasyatis microps. By resolving the non-monophyletic problem, the suite of nine character states enables the natural classification of the Myliobatiformes into at least thirteen families based on morphology. PMID:25867639

  11. Exome sequencing of extended families with autism reveals genes shared across neurodevelopmental and neuropsychiatric disorders

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) comprise a range of neurodevelopmental conditions of varying severity, characterized by marked qualitative difficulties in social relatedness, communication, and behavior. Despite overwhelming evidence of high heritability, results from genetic studies to date show that ASD etiology is extremely heterogeneous and only a fraction of autism genes have been discovered. Methods To help unravel this genetic complexity, we performed whole exome sequencing on 100 ASD individuals from 40 families with multiple distantly related affected individuals. All families contained a minimum of one pair of ASD cousins. Each individual was captured with the Agilent SureSelect Human All Exon kit, sequenced on the Illumina Hiseq 2000, and the resulting data processed and annotated with Burrows-Wheeler Aligner (BWA), Genome Analysis Toolkit (GATK), and SeattleSeq. Genotyping information on each family was utilized in order to determine genomic regions that were identical by descent (IBD). Variants identified by exome sequencing which occurred in IBD regions and present in all affected individuals within each family were then evaluated to determine which may potentially be disease related. Nucleotide alterations that were novel and rare (minor allele frequency, MAF, less than 0.05) and predicted to be detrimental, either by altering amino acids or splicing patterns, were prioritized. Results We identified numerous potentially damaging, ASD associated risk variants in genes previously unrelated to autism. A subset of these genes has been implicated in other neurobehavioral disorders including depression (SLIT3), epilepsy (CLCN2, PRICKLE1), intellectual disability (AP4M1), schizophrenia (WDR60), and Tourette syndrome (OFCC1). Additional alterations were found in previously reported autism candidate genes, including three genes with alterations in multiple families (CEP290, CSMD1, FAT1, and STXBP5). Compiling a list of ASD candidate genes from the literature, we determined that variants occurred in ASD candidate genes 1.65 times more frequently than in random genes captured by exome sequencing (P?=?8.55 × 10-5). Conclusions By studying these unique pedigrees, we have identified novel DNA variations related to ASD, demonstrated that exome sequencing in extended families is a powerful tool for ASD candidate gene discovery, and provided further evidence of an underlying genetic component to a wide range of neurodevelopmental and neuropsychiatric diseases. PMID:24410847

  12. Oxylipin diversity in the diatom family Leptocylindraceae reveals DHA derivatives in marine diatoms.

    PubMed

    Nanjappa, Deepak; d'Ippolito, Giuliana; Gallo, Carmela; Zingone, Adriana; Fontana, Angelo

    2014-01-01

    Marine planktonic organisms, such as diatoms, are prospective sources of novel bioactive metabolites. Oxygenated derivatives of fatty acids, generally referred to as oxylipins, in diatoms comprise a highly diverse and complex family of secondary metabolites. These molecules have recently been implicated in several biological processes including intra- and inter-cellular signaling as well as in defense against biotic stressors and grazers. Here, we analyze the production and diversity of C20 and C22 non-volatile oxylipins in five species of the family Leptocylindraceae, which constitute a basal clade in the diatom phylogeny. We report the presence of species-specific lipoxygenase activity and oxylipin patterns, providing the first demonstration of enzymatic production of docosahexaenoic acid derivatives in marine diatoms. The differences observed in lipoxygenase pathways among the species investigated broadly reflected the relationships observed with phylogenetic markers, thus providing functional support to the taxonomic diversity of the individual species. PMID:24445306

  13. Oxylipin Diversity in the Diatom Family Leptocylindraceae Reveals DHA Derivatives in Marine Diatoms

    PubMed Central

    Nanjappa, Deepak; d’Ippolito, Giuliana; Gallo, Carmela; Zingone, Adriana; Fontana, Angelo

    2014-01-01

    Marine planktonic organisms, such as diatoms, are prospective sources of novel bioactive metabolites. Oxygenated derivatives of fatty acids, generally referred to as oxylipins, in diatoms comprise a highly diverse and complex family of secondary metabolites. These molecules have recently been implicated in several biological processes including intra- and inter-cellular signaling as well as in defense against biotic stressors and grazers. Here, we analyze the production and diversity of C20 and C22 non-volatile oxylipins in five species of the family Leptocylindraceae, which constitute a basal clade in the diatom phylogeny. We report the presence of species-specific lipoxygenase activity and oxylipin patterns, providing the first demonstration of enzymatic production of docosahexaenoic acid derivatives in marine diatoms. The differences observed in lipoxygenase pathways among the species investigated broadly reflected the relationships observed with phylogenetic markers, thus providing functional support to the taxonomic diversity of the individual species. PMID:24445306

  14. Whole Genome Sequencing Reveals a De Novo SHANK3 Mutation in Familial Autism Spectrum Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Nemirovsky, Sergio I.; Córdoba, Marta; Zaiat, Jonathan J.; Completa, Sabrina P.; Vega, Patricia A.; González-Morón, Dolores; Medina, Nancy M.; Fabbro, Mónica; Romero, Soledad; Brun, Bianca; Revale, Santiago; Ogara, María Florencia; Pecci, Adali; Marti, Marcelo; Vazquez, Martin; Turjanski, Adrián; Kauffman, Marcelo A.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Clinical genomics promise to be especially suitable for the study of etiologically heterogeneous conditions such as Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). Here we present three siblings with ASD where we evaluated the usefulness of Whole Genome Sequencing (WGS) for the diagnostic approach to ASD. Methods We identified a family segregating ASD in three siblings with an unidentified cause. We performed WGS in the three probands and used a state-of-the-art comprehensive bioinformatic analysis pipeline and prioritized the identified variants located in genes likely to be related to ASD. We validated the finding by Sanger sequencing in the probands and their parents. Results Three male siblings presented a syndrome characterized by severe intellectual disability, absence of language, autism spectrum symptoms and epilepsy with negative family history for mental retardation, language disorders, ASD or other psychiatric disorders. We found germline mosaicism for a heterozygous deletion of a cytosine in the exon 21 of the SHANK3 gene, resulting in a missense sequence of 5 codons followed by a premature stop codon (NM_033517:c.3259_3259delC, p.Ser1088Profs*6). Conclusions We reported an infrequent form of familial ASD where WGS proved useful in the clinic. We identified a mutation in SHANK3 that underscores its relevance in Autism Spectrum Disorder. PMID:25646853

  15. Biochemical characterization of Arabidopsis APYRASE family reveals their roles in regulating endomembrane NDP/NMP homoeostasis.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Tsan-Yu; Lao, Jeemeng; Manalansan, Bianca; Loqué, Dominique; Roux, Stanley J; Heazlewood, Joshua L

    2015-11-15

    Plant apyrases are nucleoside triphosphate (NTP) diphosphohydrolases (NTPDases) and have been implicated in an array of functions within the plant including the regulation of extracellular ATP. Arabidopsis encodes a family of seven membrane bound apyrases (AtAPY1-7) that comprise three distinct clades, all of which contain the five conserved apyrase domains. With the exception of AtAPY1 and AtAPY2, the biochemical and the sub-cellular characterization of the other members are currently unavailable. In this research, we have shown all seven Arabidopsis apyrases localize to internal membranes comprising the cis-Golgi, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and endosome, indicating an endo-apyrase classification for the entire family. In addition, all members, with the exception of AtAPY7, can function as endo-apyrases by complementing a yeast double mutant (?ynd1?gda1) which lacks apyrase activity. Interestingly, complementation of the mutant yeast using well characterized human apyrases could only be accomplished by using a functional ER endo-apyrase (NTPDase6), but not the ecto-apyrase (NTPDase1). Furthermore, the substrate specificity analysis for the Arabidopsis apyrases AtAPY1-6 indicated that each member has a distinct set of preferred substrates covering various NDPs (nucleoside diphosphates) and NTPs. Combining the biochemical analysis and sub-cellular localization of the Arabidopsis apyrases family, the data suggest their possible roles in regulating endomembrane NDP/NMP (nucleoside monophosphate) homoeostasis. PMID:26338998

  16. Vitamin E analyses in seeds reveal a dominant presence of tocotrienols over tocopherols in the Arecaceae family.

    PubMed

    Siles, Laura; Cela, Jana; Munné-Bosch, Sergi

    2013-11-01

    Tocopherols are thought to prevent oxidative damage during seed quiescence and dormancy in all angiosperms. However, several monocot species accumulate tocotrienols in seeds and their role remains elusive. Here, we aimed to unravel the distribution of tocopherols and tocotrienols in seeds of the Arecaceae family, to examine possible trends of vitamin E accumulation within different clades of the same family. We examined the tocopherol and tocotrienol content in seeds of 84 species. Furthermore, we evaluated the vitamin E composition of the seed coat, endosperm and embryo of seeds from 6 species, to determine possible tissue-specific functions of particular vitamin E forms. While seeds of 98.8% (83 out of 84) of the species accumulated tocotrienols, only 58.3% (49 out of 84) accumulated tocopherols. The presence of tocopherols did not follow a clear evolutionary trend, and appeared randomly in some clades only. In addition, the tissue-specific location of vitamin E in seeds revealed that the embryo contains mostly ?-tocopherol (in seed tocopherol-accumulating species) or ?-tocotrienol (in seed tocopherol-deficient species). However, some species such as Socratea exorrhiza mostly accumulate ?-tocotrienol, and Parajubaea torallyi accumulates a mixture of tocopherols and tocotrienols in the embryo. This suggests that tocotrienols can play a similar protective role to that exerted by tocopherols in seeds, at least in some species of the Arecaceae family. We conclude that tocotrienol, rather than tocopherol, accumulation is a conserved trait in seeds of the Arecaceae family. PMID:23920227

  17. Structural basis of the substrate specificity of the FPOD/FAOD family revealed by fructosyl peptide oxidase from Eupenicillium terrenum.

    PubMed

    Gan, Weiqiong; Gao, Feng; Xing, Keke; Jia, Minze; Liu, Haiping; Gong, Weimin

    2015-04-01

    The FAOD/FPOD family of proteins has the potential to be useful for the longterm detection of blood glucose levels in diabetes patients. A bottleneck for this application is to find or engineer a FAOD/FPOD family enzyme that is specifically active towards ?-fructosyl peptides but is inactive towards other types of glycated peptides. Here, the crystal structure of fructosyl peptide oxidase from Eupenicillium terrenum (EtFPOX) is reported at 1.9?Å resolution. In contrast to the previously reported structure of amadoriase II, EtFPOX has an open substrate entrance to accommodate the large peptide substrate. The functions of residues critical for substrate selection are discussed based on structure comparison and sequence alignment. This study reveals the first structural details of group I FPODs that prefer ?-fructosyl substrates and could provide significant useful information for uncovering the mechanism of substrate specificity of FAOD/FPODs and guidance towards future enzyme engineering for diagnostic purposes. PMID:25849495

  18. Physiologic Stresses Reveal a Salmonella Persister State and TA Family Toxins Modulate Tolerance to These Stresses

    PubMed Central

    Silva-Herzog, Eugenia; McDonald, Erin M.; Crooks, Amy L.; Detweiler, Corrella S.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial persister cells are considered a basis for chronic infections and relapse caused by bacterial pathogens. Persisters are phenotypic variants characterized by low metabolic activity and slow or no replication. This low metabolic state increases pathogen tolerance to antibiotics and host immune defenses that target actively growing cells. In this study we demonstrate that within a population of Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium, a small percentage of bacteria are reversibly tolerant to specific stressors that mimic the macrophage host environment. Numerous studies show that Toxin-Antitoxin (TA) systems contribute to persister states, based on toxin inhibition of bacterial metabolism or growth. To identify toxins that may promote a persister state in response to host-associated stressors, we analyzed the six TA loci specific to S. enterica serotypes that cause systemic infection in mammals, including five RelBE family members and one VapBC member. Deletion of TA loci increased or decreased tolerance depending on the stress conditions. Similarly, exogenous expression of toxins had mixed effects on bacterial survival in response to stress. In macrophages, S. Typhimurium induced expression of three of the toxins examined. These observations indicate that distinct toxin family members have protective capabilities for specific stressors but also suggest that TA loci have both positive and negative effects on tolerance. PMID:26633172

  19. Engineered kinase activation reveals unique morphodynamic phenotypes and associated trafficking for Src family isoforms

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Pei-Hsuan; Tsygankov, Denis; Berginski, Matthew E.; Dagliyan, Onur; Gomez, Shawn M.; Elston, Timothy C.; Karginov, Andrei V.; Hahn, Klaus M.

    2014-01-01

    The Src kinase family comprises nine homologous members whose distinct expression patterns and cellular distributions indicate that they have unique roles. These roles have not been determined because genetic manipulation has not produced clearly distinct phenotypes, and the kinases’ homology complicates generation of specific inhibitors. Through insertion of a modified FK506 binding protein (insertable FKBP12, iFKBP) into the protein kinase isoforms Fyn, Src, Lyn, and Yes, we engineered kinase analogs that can be activated within minutes in living cells (RapR analogs). Combining our RapR analogs with computational tools for quantifying and characterizing cellular dynamics, we demonstrate that Src family isoforms produce very different phenotypes, encompassing cell spreading, polarized motility, and production of long, thin cell extensions. Activation of Src and Fyn led to patterns of kinase translocation that correlated with morphological changes in temporally distinct stages. Phenotypes were dependent on N-terminal acylation, not on Src homology 3 (SH3) and Src homology 2 (SH2) domains, and correlated with movement between a perinuclear compartment, adhesions, and the plasma membrane. PMID:25118278

  20. Genetic analysis of long-lived families reveals novel variants influencing high density-lipoprotein cholesterol

    PubMed Central

    Feitosa, Mary F.; Wojczynski, Mary K.; Straka, Robert; Kammerer, Candace M.; Lee, Joseph H.; Kraja, Aldi T.; Christensen, Kaare; Newman, Anne B.; Province, Michael A.; Borecki, Ingrid B.

    2014-01-01

    The plasma levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL) have an inverse relationship to the risks of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease (CVD), and have also been associated with longevity. We sought to identify novel loci for HDL that could potentially provide new insights into biological regulation of HDL metabolism in healthy-longevous subjects. We performed a genome-wide association (GWA) scan on HDL using a mixed model approach to account for family structure using kinship coefficients. A total of 4114 subjects of European descent (480 families) were genotyped at ~2.3 million SNPs and ~38 million SNPs were imputed using the 1000 Genome Cosmopolitan reference panel in MACH. We identified novel variants near-NLRP1 (17p13) associated with an increase of HDL levels at genome-wide significant level (p < 5.0E-08). Additionally, several CETP (16q21) and ZNF259-APOA5-A4-C3-A1 (11q23.3) variants associated with HDL were found, replicating those previously reported in the literature. A possible regulatory variant upstream of NLRP1 that is associated with HDL in these elderly Long Life Family Study (LLFS) subjects may also contribute to their longevity and health. Our NLRP1 intergenic SNPs show a potential regulatory function in Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE); however, it is not clear whether they regulate NLRP1 or other more remote gene. NLRP1 plays an important role in the induction of apoptosis, and its inflammasome is critical for mediating innate immune responses. Nlrp1a (a mouse ortholog of human NLRP1) interacts with SREBP-1a (17p11) which has a fundamental role in lipid concentration and composition, and is involved in innate immune response in macrophages. The NLRP1 region is conserved in mammals, but also has evolved adaptively showing signals of positive selection in European populations that might confer an advantage. NLRP1 intergenic SNPs have also been associated with immunity/inflammasome disorders which highlights the biological importance of this chromosomal region. PMID:24917880

  1. Conserved evolutionary units in the heme-copper oxidase superfamily revealed by novel homologous protein families

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Jimin; Li, Wenlin; Kinch, Lisa N; Grishin, Nick V

    2014-01-01

    The heme-copper oxidase (HCO) superfamily includes HCOs in aerobic respiratory chains and nitric oxide reductases (NORs) in the denitrification pathway. The HCO/NOR catalytic subunit has a core structure consisting of 12 transmembrane helices (TMHs) arranged in three-fold rotational pseudosymmetry, with six conserved histidines for heme and metal binding. Using sensitive sequence similarity searches, we detected a number of novel HCO/NOR homologs and named them HCO Homology (HCOH) proteins. Several HCOH families possess only four TMHs that exhibit the most pronounced similarity to the last four TMHs (TMHs 9–12) of HCOs/NORs. Encoded by independent genes, four-TMH HCOH proteins represent a single evolutionary unit (EU) that relates to each of the three homologous EUs of HCOs/NORs comprising TMHs 1–4, TMHs 5–8, and TMHs 9–12. Single-EU HCOH proteins could form homotrimers or heterotrimers to maintain the general structure and ligand-binding sites defined by the HCO/NOR catalytic subunit fold. The remaining HCOH families, including NnrS, have 12-TMHs and three EUs. Most three-EU HCOH proteins possess two conserved histidines and could bind a single heme. Limited experimental studies and genomic context analysis suggest that many HCOH proteins could function in the denitrification pathway and in detoxification of reactive molecules such as nitric oxide. HCO/NOR catalytic subunits exhibit remarkable structural similarity to the homotrimers of MAPEG (membrane-associated proteins in eicosanoid and glutathione metabolism) proteins. Gene duplication, fusion, and fission likely play important roles in the evolution of HCOs/NORs and HCOH proteins. PMID:24931479

  2. Characterization of Amphioxus IFN Regulatory Factor Family Reveals an Archaic Signaling Framework for Innate Immune Response.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Shaochun; Zheng, Tingting; Li, Peiyi; Yang, Rirong; Ruan, Jie; Huang, Shengfeng; Wu, Zhenxin; Xu, Anlong

    2015-12-15

    The IFN regulatory factor (IRF) family encodes transcription factors that play important roles in immune defense, stress response, reproduction, development, and carcinogenesis. Although the origin of the IRF family has been dated back to multicellular organisms, invertebrate IRFs differ from vertebrate IRFs in genomic structure and gene synteny, and little is known about their functions. Through comparison of multiple amphioxus genomes, in this study we suggested that amphioxus contains nine IRF members, whose orthologs are supposed to be shared among three amphioxus species. As the orthologs to the vertebrate IRF1 and IRF4 subgroups, Branchiostoma belcheri tsingtauense (bbt)IRF1 and bbtIRF8 bind the IFN-stimulated response element (ISRE) and were upregulated when amphioxus intestinal cells were stimulated with poly(I:C). As amphioxus-specific IRFs, both bbtIRF3 and bbtIRF7 bind ISRE. When activated, they can be phosphorylated by bbtTBK1 and then translocate into nucleus for target gene transcription. As transcriptional repressors, bbtIRF2 and bbtIRF4 can inhibit the transcriptional activities of bbtIRF1, 3, 7, and 8 by competing for the binding of ISRE. Interestingly, amphioxus IRF2, IRF8, and Rel were identified as target genes of bbtIRF1, bbtIRF7, and bbtIRF3, respectively, suggesting a dynamic feedback regulation among amphioxus IRF and NF-?B. Collectively, to our knowledge we present for the first time an archaic IRF signaling framework in a basal chordate, shedding new insights into the origin and evolution of vertebrate IFN-based antiviral networks. PMID:26573836

  3. Lineage-specific evolution of the vertebrate Otopetrin gene family revealed by comparative genomic analyses

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Mutations in the Otopetrin 1 gene (Otop1) in mice and fish produce an unusual bilateral vestibular pathology that involves the absence of otoconia without hearing impairment. The encoded protein, Otop1, is the only functionally characterized member of the Otopetrin Domain Protein (ODP) family; the extended sequence and structural preservation of ODP proteins in metazoans suggest a conserved functional role. Here, we use the tools of sequence- and cytogenetic-based comparative genomics to study the Otop1 and the Otop2-Otop3 genes and to establish their genomic context in 25 vertebrates. We extend our evolutionary study to include the gene mutated in Usher syndrome (USH) subtype 1G (Ush1g), both because of the head-to-tail clustering of Ush1g with Otop2 and because Otop1 and Ush1g mutations result in inner ear phenotypes. Results We established that OTOP1 is the boundary gene of an inversion polymorphism on human chromosome 4p16 that originated in the common human-chimpanzee lineage more than 6 million years ago. Other lineage-specific evolutionary events included a three-fold expansion of the Otop genes in Xenopus tropicalis and of Ush1g in teleostei fish. The tight physical linkage between Otop2 and Ush1g is conserved in all vertebrates. To further understand the functional organization of the Ushg1-Otop2 locus, we deduced a putative map of binding sites for CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF), a mammalian insulator transcription factor, from genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing (ChIP-seq) data in mouse and human embryonic stem (ES) cells combined with detection of CTCF-binding motifs. Conclusions The results presented here clarify the evolutionary history of the vertebrate Otop and Ush1g families, and establish a framework for studying the possible interaction(s) of Ush1g and Otop in developmental pathways. PMID:21261979

  4. Family-wide characterization of matrix metalloproteinases from Arabidopsis thaliana reveals their distinct proteolytic activity and cleavage site specificity.

    PubMed

    Marino, Giada; Huesgen, Pitter F; Eckhard, Ulrich; Overall, Christopher M; Schröder, Wolfgang P; Funk, Christiane

    2014-01-15

    MMPs (matrix metalloproteases) are a family of zinc-dependent endopeptidases widely distributed throughout all kingdoms of life. In mammals, MMPs play key roles in many physiological and pathological processes, including remodelling of the extracellular matrix. In the genome of the annual plant Arabidopsis thaliana, five MMP-like proteins (At-MMPs) are encoded, but their function is unknown. Previous work on these enzymes was limited to gene expression analysis, and so far proteolytic activity has been shown only for At1-MMP. We expressed and purified the catalytic domains of all five At-MMPs as His-tagged proteins in Escherichia coli cells to delineate the biochemical differences and similarities among the Arabidopsis MMP family members. We demonstrate that all five recombinant At-MMPs are active proteases with distinct preferences for different protease substrates. Furthermore, we performed a family-wide characterization of their biochemical properties and highlight similarities and differences in their cleavage site specificities as well as pH- and temperature-dependent activities. Detailed analysis of their sequence specificity using PICS (proteomic identification of protease cleavage sites) revealed profiles similar to human MMPs with the exception of At5-MMP; homology models of the At-MMP catalytic domains supported these results. Our results suggest that each At-MMP may be involved in different proteolytic processes during plant growth and development. PMID:24156403

  5. Vibrational Circular Dichroism (VCD) Reveals Subtle Conformational Aspects and Intermolecular Interactions in the Carnitine Family.

    PubMed

    Mazzeo, Giuseppe; Abbate, Sergio; Longhi, Giovanna; Castiglioni, Ettore; Villani, Claudio

    2015-12-01

    Vibrational circular dichroism spectra (VCD) in the mid-IR region and electronic circular dichroism (ECD) spectra for three carnitine derivatives in the form of hydrochloride salts were recorded in deuterated methanol solutions. Density Functional Theory calculations help one to understand the significance of the observed VCD bands. VCD and ECD spectra are informative about the absolute configuration of the molecule, but VCD data reveal also some conformational aspects in the N,N,N-trimethyl moiety and inform us about intermolecular interactions gained from the carbonyl stretching region for the acyl substituted carnitines. Chirality 27:907-913, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26447810

  6. Structural characterization of Helicobacter pylori dethiobiotin synthetase reveals differences between family members

    SciTech Connect

    Porebski, Przemyslaw J.; Klimecka, Maria; Chruszcz, Maksymilian; Nicholls, Robert A.; Murzyn, Krzysztof; Cuff, Marianne E.; Xu, Xiaohui; Cymborowski, Marcin; Murshudov, Garib N.; Savchenko, Alexei; Edwards, Aled; Minor, Wladek

    2012-07-11

    Dethiobiotin synthetase (DTBS) is involved in the biosynthesis of biotin in bacteria, fungi, and plants. As humans lack this pathway, DTBS is a promising antimicrobial drug target. We determined structures of DTBS from Helicobacter pylori (hpDTBS) bound with cofactors and a substrate analog, and described its unique characteristics relative to other DTBS proteins. Comparison with bacterial DTBS orthologs revealed considerable structural differences in nucleotide recognition. The C-terminal region of DTBS proteins, which contains two nucleotide-recognition motifs, differs greatly among DTBS proteins from different species. The structure of hpDTBS revealed that this protein is unique and does not contain a C-terminal region containing one of the motifs. The single nucleotide-binding motif in hpDTBS is similar to its counterpart in GTPases; however, isothermal titration calorimetry binding studies showed that hpDTBS has a strong preference for ATP. The structural determinants of ATP specificity were assessed with X-ray crystallographic studies of hpDTBS-ATP and hpDTBS-GTP complexes. The unique mode of nucleotide recognition in hpDTBS makes this protein a good target for H. pylori-specific inhibitors of the biotin synthesis pathway.

  7. Molecular Phylogenetic Analysis Reveals the New Genus Hemisphaericaspora of the Family Debaryomycetaceae

    PubMed Central

    Hui, Fengli; Ren, Yongcheng; Chen, Liang; Li, Ying; Zhang, Lin; Niu, Qiuhong

    2014-01-01

    Four strains of a novel ascomycetous yeast species were recovered from the frass of wood-boring beetles collected from the Baotianman Nature Reserve and the Laojieling Nature Reserve in Henan Province, China. This species produced unconjugated and deliquescent asci with hemispheroid or helmet-shaped ascospores. Analysis of gene sequences for the D1/D2 domain of the large subunit (LSU) rRNA, as well as analysis of concatenated gene sequences for the nearly complete small subunit (SSU) rRNA and D1/D2 domain of the large subunit (LSU) rRNA placed the novel species in a small clade including only one recognised species, Candida insectamans, in the family Debaryomycetaceae (Saccharomycotina, Ascomycota). DNA sequence analyses demonstrated that the novel species was distinct from all currently recognised teleomorphic yeast genus. The name Hemisphaericaspora nanyangensis gen nov., sp. nov. is proposed to accommodate the novel genus and species. The new genus can be distinguished from closely related teleomorphic genera Lodderomyces and Spathaspora through sequence comparison and ascospore morphology. The ex-type strain of H. nanyangensis is CBS 13020T (?=?CICC 33021?=?NYNU 13717). Furthermore, based on phenotypic and genotypic characteristics, C. insectamans is transferred to the newly described genus as Hemisphaericaspora insectamans comb. nov., in accordance with the changes in the International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi and plants. PMID:25075963

  8. Exome sequencing reveals a thrombopoietin ligand mutation in a Micronesian family with autosomal recessive aplastic anemia

    PubMed Central

    Rafi, Syed K.; Olm-Shipman, Adam J.; Wilson, Nathan R.; Abhyankar, Sunil; Ganter, Brigitte; Furness, L. Mike; Fang, Jianwen; Calado, Rodrigo T.

    2013-01-01

    We recently identified 2 siblings afflicted with idiopathic, autosomal recessive aplastic anemia. Whole-exome sequencing identified a novel homozygous missense mutation in thrombopoietin (THPO, c.112C>T) in both affected siblings. This mutation encodes an arginine to cysteine substitution at residue 38 or residue 17 excluding the 21-amino acid signal peptide of THPO receptor binding domain (RBD). THPO has 4 conserved cysteines in its RBD that form 2 disulfide bonds. Our in silico modeling predicts that introduction of a fifth cysteine may disrupt normal disulfide bonding to cause poor receptor binding. In functional assays, the mutant-THPO–containing media shows two- to threefold reduced ability to sustain UT7-TPO cells, which require THPO for proliferation. Both parents and a sibling with heterozygous R17C change have reduced platelet counts, whereas a sibling with wild-type sequence has normal platelet count. Thus, the R17C partial loss-of-function allele results in aplastic anemia in the homozygous state and mild thrombocytopenia in the heterozygous state in our family. Together with the recent identification of THPO receptor (MPL) mutations and the effects of THPO agonists in aplastic anemia, our results have clinical implications in the diagnosis and treatment of patients with aplastic anemia and highlight a role for the THPO-MPL pathway in hematopoiesis in vivo. PMID:24085763

  9. First genome sequences of Achromobacter phages reveal new members of the N4 family

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Multi-resistant Achromobacter xylosoxidans has been recognized as an emerging pathogen causing nosocomially acquired infections during the last years. Phages as natural opponents could be an alternative to fight such infections. Bacteriophages against this opportunistic pathogen were isolated in a recent study. This study shows a molecular analysis of two podoviruses and reveals first insights into the genomic structure of Achromobacter phages so far. Methods Growth curve experiments and adsorption kinetics were performed for both phages. Adsorption and propagation in cells were visualized by electron microscopy. Both phage genomes were sequenced with the PacBio RS II system based on single molecule, real-time (SMRT) technology and annotated with several bioinformatic tools. To further elucidate the evolutionary relationships between the phage genomes, a phylogenomic analysis was conducted using the genome Blast Distance Phylogeny approach (GBDP). Results In this study, we present the first detailed analysis of genome sequences of two Achromobacter phages so far. Phages JWAlpha and JWDelta were isolated from two different waste water treatment plants in Germany. Both phages belong to the Podoviridae and contain linear, double-stranded DNA with a length of 72329 bp and 73659 bp, respectively. 92 and 89 putative open reading frames were identified for JWAlpha and JWDelta, respectively, by bioinformatic analysis with several tools. The genomes have nearly the same organization and could be divided into different clusters for transcription, replication, host interaction, head and tail structure and lysis. Detailed annotation via protein comparisons with BLASTP revealed strong similarities to N4-like phages. Conclusions Analysis of the genomes of Achromobacter phages JWAlpha and JWDelta and comparisons of different gene clusters with other phages revealed that they might be strongly related to other N4-like phages, especially of the Escherichia group. Although all these phages show a highly conserved genomic structure and partially strong similarities at the amino acid level, some differences could be identified. Those differences, e.g. the existence of specific genes for replication or host interaction in some N4-like phages, seem to be interesting targets for further examination of function and specific mechanisms, which might enlighten the mechanism of phage establishment in the host cell after infection. PMID:24468270

  10. Structure of the N-terminal fragment of topoisomerase V reveals a new family of topoisomerases

    SciTech Connect

    Taneja, Bhupesh; Patel, Asmita; Slesarev, Alexei; Mondragon, Alfonso

    2010-09-02

    Topoisomerases are involved in controlling and maintaining the topology of DNA and are present in all kingdoms of life. Unlike all other types of topoisomerases, similar type IB enzymes have only been identified in bacteria and eukarya. The only putative type IB topoisomerase in archaea is represented by Methanopyrus kandleri topoisomerase V. Despite several common functional characteristics, topoisomerase V shows no sequence similarity to other members of the same type. The structure of the 61 kDa N-terminal fragment of topoisomerase V reveals no structural similarity to other topoisomerases. Furthermore, the structure of the active site region is different, suggesting no conservation in the cleavage and religation mechanism. Additionally, the active site is buried, indicating the need of a conformational change for activity. The presence of a topoisomerase in archaea with a unique structure suggests the evolution of a separate mechanism to alter DNA.

  11. Reconstitution of a fungal meroterpenoid biosynthesis reveals the involvement of a novel family of terpene cyclases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Takayuki; Tokunaga, Kinya; Matsuda, Yudai; Fujii, Isao; Abe, Ikuro; Ebizuka, Yutaka; Kushiro, Tetsuo

    2010-10-01

    Meroterpenoids are hybrid natural products of both terpenoid and polyketide origin. We identified a biosynthetic gene cluster that is responsible for the production of the meroterpenoid pyripyropene in the fungus Aspergillus fumigatus through reconstituted biosynthesis of up to five steps in a heterologous fungal expression system. The cluster revealed a previously unknown terpene cyclase with an unusual sequence and protein primary structure. The wide occurrence of this sequence in other meroterpenoid and indole-diterpene biosynthetic gene clusters indicates the involvement of these enzymes in the biosynthesis of various terpenoid-bearing metabolites produced by fungi and bacteria. In addition, a novel polyketide synthase that incorporated nicotinyl-CoA as the starter unit and a prenyltransferase, similar to that in ubiquinone biosynthesis, was found to be involved in the pyripyropene biosynthesis. The successful production of a pyripyropene analogue illustrates the catalytic versatility of these enzymes for the production of novel analogues with useful biological activities.

  12. The Genomic Landscape of the Ewing Sarcoma Family of Tumors Reveals Recurrent STAG2 Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Brohl, Andrew S.; Solomon, David A.; Chang, Wendy; Wang, Jianjun; Song, Young; Sindiri, Sivasish; Patidar, Rajesh; Hurd, Laura; Chen, Li; Shern, Jack F.; Liao, Hongling; Wen, Xinyu; Gerard, Julia; Kim, Jung-Sik; Lopez Guerrero, Jose Antonio; Machado, Isidro; Wai, Daniel H.; Picci, Piero; Triche, Timothy; Horvai, Andrew E.; Miettinen, Markku; Wei, Jun S.; Catchpool, Daniel; Llombart-Bosch, Antonio; Waldman, Todd; Khan, Javed

    2014-01-01

    The Ewing sarcoma family of tumors (EFT) is a group of highly malignant small round blue cell tumors occurring in children and young adults. We report here the largest genomic survey to date of 101 EFT (65 tumors and 36 cell lines). Using a combination of whole genome sequencing and targeted sequencing approaches, we discover that EFT has a very low mutational burden (0.15 mutations/Mb) but frequent deleterious mutations in the cohesin complex subunit STAG2 (21.5% tumors, 44.4% cell lines), homozygous deletion of CDKN2A (13.8% and 50%) and mutations of TP53 (6.2% and 71.9%). We additionally note an increased prevalence of the BRCA2 K3326X polymorphism in EFT patient samples (7.3%) compared to population data (OR 7.1, p?=?0.006). Using whole transcriptome sequencing, we find that 11% of tumors pathologically diagnosed as EFT lack a typical EWSR1 fusion oncogene and that these tumors do not have a characteristic Ewing sarcoma gene expression signature. We identify samples harboring novel fusion genes including FUS-NCATc2 and CIC-FOXO4 that may represent distinct small round blue cell tumor variants. In an independent EFT tissue microarray cohort, we show that STAG2 loss as detected by immunohistochemistry may be associated with more advanced disease (p?=?0.15) and a modest decrease in overall survival (p?=?0.10). These results significantly advance our understanding of the genomic and molecular underpinnings of Ewing sarcoma and provide a foundation towards further efforts to improve diagnosis, prognosis, and precision therapeutics testing. PMID:25010205

  13. Family Wide Molecular Adaptations to Underground Life in African Mole-Rats Revealed by Phylogenomic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Kalina T.J.; Bennett, Nigel C.; Tsagkogeorga, Georgia; Rossiter, Stephen J.; Faulkes, Christopher G.

    2015-01-01

    During their evolutionary radiation, mammals have colonized diverse habitats. Arguably the subterranean niche is the most inhospitable of these, characterized by reduced oxygen, elevated carbon dioxide, absence of light, scarcity of food, and a substrate that is energetically costly to burrow through. Of all lineages to have transitioned to a subterranean niche, African mole-rats are one of the most successful. Much of their ecological success can be attributed to a diet of plant storage organs, which has allowed them to colonize climatically varied habitats across sub-Saharan Africa, and has probably contributed to the evolution of their diverse social systems. Yet despite their many remarkable phenotypic specializations, little is known about molecular adaptations underlying these traits. To address this, we sequenced the transcriptomes of seven mole-rat taxa, including three solitary species, and combined new sequences with existing genomic data sets. Alignments of more than 13,000 protein-coding genes encompassed, for the first time, all six genera and the full spectrum of ecological and social variation in the clade. We detected positive selection within the mole-rat clade and along ancestral branches in approximately 700 genes including loci associated with tumorigenesis, aging, morphological development, and sociality. By combining these results with gene ontology annotation and protein–protein networks, we identified several clusters of functionally related genes. This family wide analysis of molecular evolution in mole-rats has identified a suite of positively selected genes, deepening our understanding of the extreme phenotypic traits exhibited by this group. PMID:26318402

  14. Family Wide Molecular Adaptations to Underground Life in African Mole-Rats Revealed by Phylogenomic Analysis.

    PubMed

    Davies, Kalina T J; Bennett, Nigel C; Tsagkogeorga, Georgia; Rossiter, Stephen J; Faulkes, Christopher G

    2015-12-01

    During their evolutionary radiation, mammals have colonized diverse habitats. Arguably the subterranean niche is the most inhospitable of these, characterized by reduced oxygen, elevated carbon dioxide, absence of light, scarcity of food, and a substrate that is energetically costly to burrow through. Of all lineages to have transitioned to a subterranean niche, African mole-rats are one of the most successful. Much of their ecological success can be attributed to a diet of plant storage organs, which has allowed them to colonize climatically varied habitats across sub-Saharan Africa, and has probably contributed to the evolution of their diverse social systems. Yet despite their many remarkable phenotypic specializations, little is known about molecular adaptations underlying these traits. To address this, we sequenced the transcriptomes of seven mole-rat taxa, including three solitary species, and combined new sequences with existing genomic data sets. Alignments of more than 13,000 protein-coding genes encompassed, for the first time, all six genera and the full spectrum of ecological and social variation in the clade. We detected positive selection within the mole-rat clade and along ancestral branches in approximately 700 genes including loci associated with tumorigenesis, aging, morphological development, and sociality. By combining these results with gene ontology annotation and protein-protein networks, we identified several clusters of functionally related genes. This family wide analysis of molecular evolution in mole-rats has identified a suite of positively selected genes, deepening our understanding of the extreme phenotypic traits exhibited by this group. PMID:26318402

  15. The genomic landscape of the Ewing Sarcoma family of tumors reveals recurrent STAG2 mutation.

    PubMed

    Brohl, Andrew S; Solomon, David A; Chang, Wendy; Wang, Jianjun; Song, Young; Sindiri, Sivasish; Patidar, Rajesh; Hurd, Laura; Chen, Li; Shern, Jack F; Liao, Hongling; Wen, Xinyu; Gerard, Julia; Kim, Jung-Sik; Lopez Guerrero, Jose Antonio; Machado, Isidro; Wai, Daniel H; Picci, Piero; Triche, Timothy; Horvai, Andrew E; Miettinen, Markku; Wei, Jun S; Catchpool, Daniel; Llombart-Bosch, Antonio; Waldman, Todd; Khan, Javed

    2014-07-01

    The Ewing sarcoma family of tumors (EFT) is a group of highly malignant small round blue cell tumors occurring in children and young adults. We report here the largest genomic survey to date of 101 EFT (65 tumors and 36 cell lines). Using a combination of whole genome sequencing and targeted sequencing approaches, we discover that EFT has a very low mutational burden (0.15 mutations/Mb) but frequent deleterious mutations in the cohesin complex subunit STAG2 (21.5% tumors, 44.4% cell lines), homozygous deletion of CDKN2A (13.8% and 50%) and mutations of TP53 (6.2% and 71.9%). We additionally note an increased prevalence of the BRCA2 K3326X polymorphism in EFT patient samples (7.3%) compared to population data (OR 7.1, p?=?0.006). Using whole transcriptome sequencing, we find that 11% of tumors pathologically diagnosed as EFT lack a typical EWSR1 fusion oncogene and that these tumors do not have a characteristic Ewing sarcoma gene expression signature. We identify samples harboring novel fusion genes including FUS-NCATc2 and CIC-FOXO4 that may represent distinct small round blue cell tumor variants. In an independent EFT tissue microarray cohort, we show that STAG2 loss as detected by immunohistochemistry may be associated with more advanced disease (p?=?0.15) and a modest decrease in overall survival (p?=?0.10). These results significantly advance our understanding of the genomic and molecular underpinnings of Ewing sarcoma and provide a foundation towards further efforts to improve diagnosis, prognosis, and precision therapeutics testing. PMID:25010205

  16. RNA-Seq Analysis Reveals MAPKKK Family Members Related to Drought Tolerance in Maize

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Wen; Yang, Fengling; He, Hang; Zhao, Jiuran

    2015-01-01

    The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade is an evolutionarily conserved signal transduction pathway that is involved in plant development and stress responses. As the first component of this phosphorelay cascade, mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinases (MAPKKKs) act as adaptors linking upstream signaling steps to the core MAPK cascade to promote the appropriate cellular responses; however, the functions of MAPKKKs in maize are unclear. Here, we identified 71 MAPKKK genes, of which 14 were novel, based on a computational analysis of the maize (Zea mays L.) genome. Using an RNA-seq analysis in the leaf, stem and root of maize under well-watered and drought-stress conditions, we identified 5,866 differentially expressed genes (DEGs), including 8 MAPKKK genes responsive to drought stress. Many of the DEGs were enriched in processes such as drought stress, abiotic stimulus, oxidation-reduction, and metabolic processes. The other way round, DEGs involved in processes such as oxidation, photosynthesis, and starch, proline, ethylene, and salicylic acid metabolism were clearly co-expressed with the MAPKKK genes. Furthermore, a quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis was performed to assess the relative expression levels of MAPKKKs. Correlation analysis revealed that there was a significant correlation between expression levels of two MAPKKKs and relative biomass responsive to drought in 8 inbred lines. Our results indicate that MAPKKKs may have important regulatory functions in drought tolerance in maize. PMID:26599013

  17. Expression profiling of the Arabidopsis ferric chelate reductase (FRO) gene family reveals differential regulation by iron and copper.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Indrani; Campbell, Nathan H; Ash, Joshua S; Connolly, Erin L

    2006-05-01

    The Arabidopsis FRO2 gene encodes the iron deficiency-inducible ferric chelate reductase responsible for reduction of iron at the root surface; subsequent transport of iron across the plasma membrane is carried out by a ferrous iron transporter (IRT1). Genome annotation has identified seven additional FRO family members in the Arabidopsis genome. We used real-time RT-PCR to examine the expression of each FRO gene in different tissues and in response to iron and copper limitation. FRO2 and FRO5 are primarily expressed in roots while FRO8 is primarily expressed in shoots. FRO6 and FRO7 show high expression in all the green parts of the plant. FRO3 is expressed at high levels in roots and shoots, and expression of FRO3 is elevated in roots and shoots of iron-deficient plants. Interestingly, when plants are Cu-limited, the expression of FRO6 in shoot tissues is reduced. Expression of FRO3 is induced in roots and shoots by Cu-limitation. While it is known that FRO2 is expressed at high levels in the outer layers of iron-deficient roots, histochemical staining of FRO3-GUS plants revealed that FRO3 is predominantly expressed in the vascular cylinder of roots. Together our results suggest that FRO family members function in metal ion homeostasis in a variety of locations in the plant. PMID:16362328

  18. Genes Similar to the Vibrio parahaemolyticus Virulence-Related Genes tdh, tlh, and vscC2 Occur in Other Vibrionaceae Species Isolated from a Pristine Estuary

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Savannah L.; Gutierrez West, Casandra K.; Mejia, Diana M.

    2014-01-01

    Detection of the human pathogen Vibrio parahaemolyticus often relies on molecular biological analysis of species-specific virulence factor genes. These genes have been employed in determinations of V. parahaemolyticus population numbers and the prevalence of pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus strains. Strains of the Vibrionaceae species Photobacterium damselae, Vibrio diabolicus, Vibrio harveyi, and Vibrio natriegens, as well as strains similar to Vibrio tubiashii, were isolated from a pristine salt marsh estuary. These strains were examined for the V. parahaemolyticus hemolysin genes tdh, trh, and tlh and for the V. parahaemolyticus type III secretion system 2? gene vscC2 using established PCR primers and protocols. Virulence-related genes occurred at high frequencies in non-V. parahaemolyticus Vibrionaceae species. V. diabolicus was of particular interest, as several strains were recovered, and the large majority (>83%) contained virulence-related genes. It is clear that detection of these genes does not ensure correct identification of virulent V. parahaemolyticus. Further, the occurrence of V. parahaemolyticus-like virulence factors in other vibrios potentially complicates tracking of outbreaks of V. parahaemolyticus infections. PMID:24212573

  19. Predicting the Proteins of Angomonas deanei, Strigomonas culicis and Their Respective Endosymbionts Reveals New Aspects of the Trypanosomatidae Family

    PubMed Central

    Motta, Maria Cristina Machado; Martins, Allan Cezar de Azevedo; de Souza, Silvana Sant’Anna; Catta-Preta, Carolina Moura Costa; Silva, Rosane; Klein, Cecilia Coimbra; de Almeida, Luiz Gonzaga Paula; de Lima Cunha, Oberdan; Ciapina, Luciane Prioli; Brocchi, Marcelo; Colabardini, Ana Cristina; de Araujo Lima, Bruna; Machado, Carlos Renato; de Almeida Soares, Célia Maria; Probst, Christian Macagnan; de Menezes, Claudia Beatriz Afonso; Thompson, Claudia Elizabeth; Bartholomeu, Daniella Castanheira; Gradia, Daniela Fiori; Pavoni, Daniela Parada; Grisard, Edmundo C.; Fantinatti-Garboggini, Fabiana; Marchini, Fabricio Klerynton; Rodrigues-Luiz, Gabriela Flávia; Wagner, Glauber; Goldman, Gustavo Henrique; Fietto, Juliana Lopes Rangel; Elias, Maria Carolina; Goldman, Maria Helena S.; Sagot, Marie-France; Pereira, Maristela; Stoco, Patrícia H.; de Mendonça-Neto, Rondon Pessoa; Teixeira, Santuza Maria Ribeiro; Maciel, Talles Eduardo Ferreira; de Oliveira Mendes, Tiago Antônio; Ürményi, Turán P.; de Souza, Wanderley; Schenkman, Sergio; de Vasconcelos, Ana Tereza Ribeiro

    2013-01-01

    Endosymbiont-bearing trypanosomatids have been considered excellent models for the study of cell evolution because the host protozoan co-evolves with an intracellular bacterium in a mutualistic relationship. Such protozoa inhabit a single invertebrate host during their entire life cycle and exhibit special characteristics that group them in a particular phylogenetic cluster of the Trypanosomatidae family, thus classified as monoxenics. In an effort to better understand such symbiotic association, we used DNA pyrosequencing and a reference-guided assembly to generate reads that predicted 16,960 and 12,162 open reading frames (ORFs) in two symbiont-bearing trypanosomatids, Angomonas deanei (previously named as Crithidia deanei) and Strigomonas culicis (first known as Blastocrithidia culicis), respectively. Identification of each ORF was based primarily on TriTrypDB using tblastn, and each ORF was confirmed by employing getorf from EMBOSS and Newbler 2.6 when necessary. The monoxenic organisms revealed conserved housekeeping functions when compared to other trypanosomatids, especially compared with Leishmania major. However, major differences were found in ORFs corresponding to the cytoskeleton, the kinetoplast, and the paraflagellar structure. The monoxenic organisms also contain a large number of genes for cytosolic calpain-like and surface gp63 metalloproteases and a reduced number of compartmentalized cysteine proteases in comparison to other TriTryp organisms, reflecting adaptations to the presence of the symbiont. The assembled bacterial endosymbiont sequences exhibit a high A+T content with a total of 787 and 769 ORFs for the Angomonas deanei and Strigomonas culicis endosymbionts, respectively, and indicate that these organisms hold a common ancestor related to the Alcaligenaceae family. Importantly, both symbionts contain enzymes that complement essential host cell biosynthetic pathways, such as those for amino acid, lipid and purine/pyrimidine metabolism. These findings increase our understanding of the intricate symbiotic relationship between the bacterium and the trypanosomatid host and provide clues to better understand eukaryotic cell evolution. PMID:23560078

  20. Exome sequencing of a colorectal cancer family reveals shared mutation pattern and predisposition circuitry along tumor pathways

    PubMed Central

    Suleiman, Suleiman H.; Koko, Mahmoud E.; Nasir, Wafaa H.; Elfateh, Ommnyiah; Elgizouli, Ubai K.; Abdallah, Mohammed O. E.; Alfarouk, Khalid O.; Hussain, Ayman; Faisal, Shima; Ibrahim, Fathelrahamn M. A.; Romano, Maurizio; Sultan, Ali; Banks, Lawrence; Newport, Melanie; Baralle, Francesco; Elhassan, Ahmed M.; Mohamed, Hiba S.; Ibrahim, Muntaser E.

    2015-01-01

    The molecular basis of cancer and cancer multiple phenotypes are not yet fully understood. Next Generation Sequencing promises new insight into the role of genetic interactions in shaping the complexity of cancer. Aiming to outline the differences in mutation patterns between familial colorectal cancer cases and controls we analyzed whole exomes of cancer tissues and control samples from an extended colorectal cancer pedigree, providing one of the first data sets of exome sequencing of cancer in an African population against a background of large effective size typically with excess of variants. Tumors showed hMSH2 loss of function SNV consistent with Lynch syndrome. Sets of genes harboring insertions–deletions in tumor tissues revealed, however, significant GO enrichment, a feature that was not seen in control samples, suggesting that ordered insertions–deletions are central to tumorigenesis in this type of cancer. Network analysis identified multiple hub genes of centrality. ELAVL1/HuR showed remarkable centrality, interacting specially with genes harboring non-synonymous SNVs thus reinforcing the proposition of targeted mutagenesis in cancer pathways. A likely explanation to such mutation pattern is DNA/RNA editing, suggested here by nucleotide transition-to-transversion ratio that significantly departed from expected values (p-value 5e-6). NFKB1 also showed significant centrality along with ELAVL1, raising the suspicion of viral etiology given the known interaction between oncogenic viruses and these proteins. PMID:26442106

  1. A DinB variant reveals diverse physiological consequences of incomplete TLS extension by a Y-family DNA polymerase

    E-print Network

    Walker, Graham C.

    The only Y-family DNA polymerase conserved among all domains of life, DinB and its mammalian ortholog pol ?, catalyzes proficient bypass of damaged DNA in translesion synthesis (TLS). Y-family DNA polymerases, including ...

  2. A DinB variant reveals diverse physiological consequences of incomplete extension by a Y-family DNA polymerase

    E-print Network

    Jarosz, Daniel F.

    The only Y-family DNA polymerase conserved among all domains of life, DinB and its mammalian ortholog pol ?, catalyzes proficient bypass of damaged DNA in translesion synthesis (TLS). Y-family DNA polymerases, including ...

  3. Family 

    E-print Network

    Unknown

    2011-09-05

    (ADJFAT) and actual(ACTFAT)), intramuscular fat (MARB), and Warner-Bratzler shear force tenderness (WBSF). Family types with a greater proportion of Bos indicus in the sire in relation to the amount in the dam (F1 x A and B x F1) averaged longer GL... between males and females. Further examination within each sex showed a difference between male reciprocals that was two times that of females. iv Calves with a higher percentage of Bos indicus in the sire compared to the proportion in the dam showed...

  4. Whole Exome Sequencing Reveals Overlap Between Macrophage Activation Syndrome in Systemic Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis and Familial Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Kaufman, Kenneth M.; Linghu, Bolan; Szustakowski, Joseph D.; Husami, Ammar; Yang, Fan; Zhang, Kejian; Filipovich, Alexandra; Fall, Ndate; Harley, John B.; Nirmala, N.R.; Grom, Alexei A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Macrophage activation syndrome (MAS), a life-threatening complication of systemic Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (SJIA), resembles Familial Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis (FHLH), a constellation of autosomal recessive immune disorders resulting from deficiency in cytolytic pathway proteins. We hypothesized that MAS predisposition in SJIA could be attributed to rare gene sequence variants affecting the cytotolytic pathway. Methods Whole exome sequencing (WES) was used in 14 SJIA/MAS patients and their parents to identify protein altering SNPs/indels in the known HLH-associated genes. To discover new candidate genes, the entire WES data were filtered to identify protein altering, rare recessive homozygous, compound heterozygous, and de novo variants with the potential to affect the cytolytic pathway. Results Heterozygous protein-altering rare variants in the known genes (LYST, MUNC13-4, and STXBP2) were found in 5 of 14 SJIA/MAS patients (35.7%). This was in contrast to only 4 variants in 4 of 29 (13,7%) SJIA patients without MAS. Homozygosity and compound heterozygosity analysis applied to the entire WES data in SJIAMAS, revealed 3 recessive pairs in 3 genes, and 76 compound heterozygotes in 75 genes. We also identified 22 heterozygous rare protein altering variants that occurred in at least two patients. Many of the identified genes encode proteins with a role in actin and microtubule reorganization and vesicle-mediated transport. “Cellular assembly and organization” was the top cellular function category based on Ingenuity Pathways Analysis (p<3.10E-05). Conclusion WES performed in SJIA/MAS patients identified rare protein altering variants in the known HLH associated genes as well as new candidate genes. PMID:25047945

  5. Reversal to air-driven sound production revealed by a molecular phylogeny of tongueless frogs, family Pipidae

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Evolutionary novelties often appear by conferring completely new functions to pre-existing structures or by innovating the mechanism through which a particular function is performed. Sound production plays a central role in the behavior of frogs, which use their calls to delimit territories and attract mates. Therefore, frogs have evolved complex vocal structures capable of producing a wide variety of advertising sounds. It is generally acknowledged that most frogs call by moving an air column from the lungs through the glottis with the remarkable exception of the family Pipidae, whose members share a highly specialized sound production mechanism independent of air movement. Results Here, we performed behavioral observations in the poorly known African pipid genus Pseudhymenochirus and document that the sound production in this aquatic frog is almost certainly air-driven. However, morphological comparisons revealed an indisputable pipid nature of Pseudhymenochirus larynx. To place this paradoxical pattern into an evolutionary framework, we reconstructed robust molecular phylogenies of pipids based on complete mitochondrial genomes and nine nuclear protein-coding genes that coincided in placing Pseudhymenochirus nested among other pipids. Conclusions We conclude that although Pseudhymenochirus probably has evolved a reversal to the ancestral non-pipid condition of air-driven sound production, the mechanism through which it occurs is an evolutionary innovation based on the derived larynx of pipids. This strengthens the idea that evolutionary solutions to functional problems often emerge based on previous structures, and for this reason, innovations largely depend on possibilities and constraints predefined by the particular history of each lineage. PMID:21524293

  6. Analysis of families at risk for insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus reveals that HLA antigens influence progression to clinical disease.

    PubMed Central

    Honeyman, M. C.; Harrison, L. C.; Drummond, B.; Colman, P. G.; Tait, B. D.

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Individuals at risk for insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM), with an affected first-degree relative, can be identified by the presence of islet cell antibodies (ICA). ICA-positive relatives progress at variable rates to IDDM and identification of those at highest risk is a prerequisite for possible preventative treatment. Those who develop IDDM may exhibit less genetic heterogeneity than their ICA-positive or ICA-negative relatives. Specific human leucocyte antigen (HLA) genes predispose to IDDM but could also influence the rate of progression of preclinical disease. Therefore, by comparing HLA antigen frequencies between first-degree relatives, we sought to identify HLA genes that influence progression to IDDM. MATERIALS AND METHODS: HLA antigen frequencies were compared in 68 IDDM, 53 ICA-positive, and 96 ICA-negative first-degree relatives from 40 Caucasoid families. Predictions were tested in a panel of 270 unrelated IDDM subjects. HLA typing was performed serologically (HLA class I and II) and by sequence-specific oligotyping (11th International Histocompatibility Workshop protocol) (HLA class II). ICA tests were measured by an internationally standardized indirect immunofluorescence assay. RESULTS: In general, known susceptibility class II HLA antigens increased in frequency and known protective class II HLA antigens decreased in frequency, from ICA-negative to ICA-positive to IDDM relatives. Thus, DR4 and DQ8 increased whereas DR2 and DQ6 decreased; DR3 and DQ2 increased from ICA-negative to ICA-positive relatives, but not further in IDDM relatives. The high-risk DR3, 4 phenotype increased across the three groups; DR4,X was unchanged, and DR3,X and DRX,X both decreased. The HLA class I antigen, A24, occurred more frequently in ICA-positive relatives who developed IDDM and, in 270 unrelated IDDM subjects, was associated with an earlier age at diagnosis of IDDM in those with the lower risk class II phenotypes DR4,4 and DR3,X. CONCLUSIONS: HLA-DR3 and DQ2 predispose to islet autoimmunity, but not development of clinical IDDM in the absence and DR4 and DQ8. DR4 and DQ8 predispose to the development of clinical IDDM in ICA-positive relatives, in combination with DR3-DQ2 and other haplotypes but not when homozygous. HLA-A24 is significantly associated with rapid progression to IDDM in ICA-positive relatives and with an earlier age at clinical diagnosis. Analysis of IDDM families reveals that HLA genes not only predispose to islet autoimmunity but influence progression to clinical disease. The findings have implications for identifying high-risk relatives as candidates for possible preventative therapy. PMID:8529124

  7. Targeted Next-Generation Sequencing Reveals Hot Spots and Doubly Heterozygous Mutations in Chinese Patients with Familial Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yue; Feng, Yue; Zhang, Yun-Mei; Ding, Xiao-Xue; Song, Yu-Zhu; Zhang, A-Mei; Liu, Li; Zhang, Hong; Ding, Jia-Huan; Xia, Xue-Shan

    2015-01-01

    As a common cardiac disease mainly caused by gene mutations in sarcomeric cytoskeletal, calcium-handling, nuclear envelope, desmosomal, and transcription factor genes, inherited cardiomyopathy is becoming one of the major etiological factors of sudden cardiac death (SCD) and heart failure (HF). This disease is characterized by remarkable genetic heterogeneity, which makes it difficult to screen for pathogenic mutations using Sanger sequencing. In the present study, three probands, one with familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (FHCM) and two with familial dilated cardiomyopathy (FDCM), were recruited together with their respective family members. Using next-generation sequencing technology (NGS), 24 genes frequently known to be related to inherited cardiomyopathy were screened. Two hot spots (TNNI3-p.Arg145Gly, and LMNA-p.Arg190Trp) and double (LMNA-p.Arg190Trp plus MYH7-p.Arg1045His) heterozygous mutations were found to be highly correlated with familial cardiomyopathy. FDCM patients with doubly heterozygous mutations show a notably severe phenotype as we could confirm in our study; this indicates that the double mutations had a dose effect. In addition, it is proposed that genetic testing using NGS technology can be used as a cost-effective screening tool and help guide the treatment of patients with familial cardiomyopathy particularly regarding the risk of family members who are clinically asymptomatic. PMID:26199943

  8. Pre-steady-state Kinetic Analysis of a Family D DNA Polymerase from Thermococcus sp. 9°N Reveals Mechanisms for Archaeal Genomic Replication and Maintenance*

    PubMed Central

    Schermerhorn, Kelly M.; Gardner, Andrew F.

    2015-01-01

    Family D DNA polymerases (polDs) have been implicated as the major replicative polymerase in archaea, excluding the Crenarchaeota branch, and bear little sequence homology to other DNA polymerase families. Here we report a detailed kinetic analysis of nucleotide incorporation and exonuclease activity for a Family D DNA polymerase from Thermococcus sp. 9°N. Pre-steady-state single-turnover nucleotide incorporation assays were performed to obtain the kinetic parameters, kpol and Kd, for correct nucleotide incorporation, incorrect nucleotide incorporation, and ribonucleotide incorporation by exonuclease-deficient polD. Correct nucleotide incorporation kinetics revealed a relatively slow maximal rate of polymerization (kpol ?2.5 s?1) and especially tight nucleotide binding (Kd(dNTP) ?1.7 ?m), compared with DNA polymerases from Families A, B, C, X, and Y. Furthermore, pre-steady-state nucleotide incorporation assays revealed that polD prevents the incorporation of incorrect nucleotides and ribonucleotides primarily through reduced nucleotide binding affinity. Pre-steady-state single-turnover assays on wild-type 9°N polD were used to examine 3?-5? exonuclease hydrolysis activity in the presence of Mg2+ and Mn2+. Interestingly, substituting Mn2+ for Mg2+ accelerated hydrolysis rates >40-fold (kexo ?110 s?1 versus ?2.5 s?1). Preference for Mn2+ over Mg2+ in exonuclease hydrolysis activity is a property unique to the polD family. The kinetic assays performed in this work provide critical insight into the mechanisms that polD employs to accurately and efficiently replicate the archaeal genome. Furthermore, despite the unique properties of polD, this work suggests that a conserved polymerase kinetic pathway is present in all known DNA polymerase families. PMID:26160179

  9. Whole Exome Sequencing Reveals Mutations in Known Retinal Disease Genes in 33 out of 68 Israeli Families with Inherited Retinopathies

    PubMed Central

    Beryozkin, Avigail; Shevah, Elia; Kimchi, Adva; Mizrahi-Meissonnier, Liliana; Khateb, Samer; Ratnapriya, Rinki; Lazar, Csilla H.; Blumenfeld, Anat; Ben-Yosef, Tamar; Hemo, Yitzhak; Pe’er, Jacob; Averbuch, Eduard; Sagi, Michal; Boleda, Alexis; Gieser, Linn; Zlotogorski, Abraham; Falik-Zaccai, Tzipora; Alimi-Kasem, Ola; Jacobson, Samuel G.; Chowers, Itay; Swaroop, Anand; Banin, Eyal; Sharon, Dror

    2015-01-01

    Whole exome sequencing (WES) is a powerful technique for identifying sequence changes in the human genome. The goal of this study was to delineate the genetic defects in patients with inherited retinal diseases (IRDs) using WES. WES was performed on 90 patient DNA samples from 68 families and 226 known genes for IRDs were analyzed. Sanger sequencing was used to validate potential pathogenic variants that were also subjected to segregation analysis in families. Thirty-three causative mutations (19 novel and 14 known) in 25 genes were identified in 33 of the 68 families. The vast majority of mutations (30 out of 33) have not been reported in the Israeli and the Palestinian populations. Nine out of the 33 mutations were detected in additional families from the same ethnic population, suggesting a founder effect. In two families, identified phenotypes were different from the previously reported clinical findings associated with the causative gene. This is the largest genetic analysis of IRDs in the Israeli and Palestinian populations to date. We also demonstrate that WES is a powerful tool for rapid analysis of known disease genes in large patient cohorts. PMID:26306921

  10. Genome-wide analysis of tandem repeats in Tribolium castaneum genome reveals abundant and highly dynamic tandem repeat families with satellite DNA features in euchromatic chromosomal arms

    PubMed Central

    Pavlek, Martina; Gelfand, Yevgeniy; Plohl, Miroslav; Meštrovi?, Nevenka

    2015-01-01

    Although satellite DNAs are well-explored components of heterochromatin and centromeres, little is known about emergence, dispersal and possible impact of comparably structured tandem repeats (TRs) on the genome-wide scale. Our bioinformatics analysis of assembled Tribolium castaneum genome disclosed significant contribution of TRs in euchromatic chromosomal arms and clear predominance of satellite DNA-typical 170 bp monomers in arrays of ?5 repeats. By applying different experimental approaches, we revealed that the nine most prominent TR families Cast1–Cast9 extracted from the assembly comprise ?4.3% of the entire genome and reside almost exclusively in euchromatic regions. Among them, seven families that build ?3.9% of the genome are based on ?170 and ?340 bp long monomers. Results of phylogenetic analyses of 2500 monomers originating from these families show high-sequence dynamics, evident by extensive exchanges between arrays on non-homologous chromosomes. In addition, our analysis shows that concerted evolution acts more efficiently on longer than on shorter arrays. Efficient genome-wide distribution of nine TR families implies the role of transposition only in expansion of the most dispersed family, and involvement of other mechanisms is anticipated. Despite similarities in sequence features, FISH experiments indicate high-level compartmentalization of centromeric and euchromatic tandem repeats. PMID:26428853

  11. Systematic Analysis of the Maize PHD-Finger Gene Family Reveals a Subfamily Involved in Abiotic Stress Response

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qianqian; Liu, Jinyang; Wang, Yu; Zhao, Yang; Jiang, Haiyang; Cheng, Beijiu

    2015-01-01

    Plant homeodomain (PHD)-finger proteins were found universally in eukaryotes and known as key players in regulating transcription and chromatin structure. Many PHD-finger proteins have been well studied on structure and function in animals. Whereas, only a few of plant PHD-finger factors had been characterized, and majority of PHD-finger proteins were functionally unclear. In this study, a complete comprehensive analysis of maize PHD family is presented. Sixty-seven PHD-finger genes in maize were identified and further divided into ten groups according to phylogenetic analysis that was supported by motif and intron/exon analysis. These genes were unevenly distributed on ten chromosomes and contained 12 segmental duplication events, suggesting that segmental duplications were the major contributors in expansion of the maize PHD family. The paralogous genes mainly experienced purifying selection with restrictive functional divergence after the duplication events on the basis of the Ka/Ks ratio. Gene digital expression analysis showed that the PHD family had a wide expression profile in maize development. In addition, 15 potential stress response genes were detected by promoter cis-element and expression analysis. Two proteins ZmPHD14 and ZmPHD19 were located in the nucleus. These results provided a solid base for future functional genome study of the PHD-finger family in maize and afforded important clues for characterizing and cloning potentially important candidates in response to abiotic stresses. PMID:26437398

  12. Evolutionary genomics of mycovirus-related dsRNA viruses reveals cross-family horizontal gene transfer and evolution of diverse viral lineages

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Double-stranded (ds) RNA fungal viruses are typically isometric single-shelled particles that are classified into three families, Totiviridae, Partitiviridae and Chrysoviridae, the members of which possess monopartite, bipartite and quadripartite genomes, respectively. Recent findings revealed that mycovirus-related dsRNA viruses are more diverse than previously recognized. Although an increasing number of viral complete genomic sequences have become available, the evolution of these diverse dsRNA viruses remains to be clarified. This is particularly so since there is little evidence for horizontal gene transfer (HGT) among dsRNA viruses. Results In this study, we report the molecular properties of two novel dsRNA mycoviruses that were isolated from a field strain of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, Sunf-M: one is a large monopartite virus representing a distinct evolutionary lineage of dsRNA viruses; the other is a new member of the family Partitiviridae. Comprehensive phylogenetic analysis and genome comparison revealed that there are at least ten monopartite, three bipartite, one tripartite and three quadripartite lineages in the known dsRNA mycoviruses and that the multipartite lineages have possibly evolved from different monopartite dsRNA viruses. Moreover, we found that homologs of the S7 Domain, characteristic of members of the genus phytoreovirus in family Reoviridae are widely distributed in diverse dsRNA viral lineages, including chrysoviruses, endornaviruses and some unclassified dsRNA mycoviruses. We further provided evidence that multiple HGT events may have occurred among these dsRNA viruses from different families. Conclusions Our study provides an insight into the phylogeny and evolution of mycovirus-related dsRNA viruses and reveals that the occurrence of HGT between different virus species and the development of multipartite genomes during evolution are important macroevolutionary mechanisms in dsRNA viruses. PMID:22716092

  13. Genetic and morphological evidence reveals the existence of a new family, genus and species of Echinorhynchida (Acanthocephala).

    PubMed

    Braicovich, Paola E; Lanfranchi, Ana L; Farber, Marisa D; Marvaldi, Adriana E; Luque, José L; Timi, Juan T

    2014-08-01

    Gymnorhadinorhynchus gen. n. is proposed to accommodate its type species, G. decapteri sp. n., a parasite of the marine fish Decapterus punctatus (Cuvier), caught from the coastal waters of Brazil. Gymnorhadinorhynchus decapteri sp. n. was morphologically most similar to species of two echinorhynchid families, the Rhadinorhynchidae and the Cavisomidae, particularly in the structure of the proboscis and the absence of somatic spines, respectively. This combination of morphological features made it difficult to assign our specimen to an extant family of the Acanthocephala. Therefore, in order to clarify the systematic placement of G. decapteri, a molecular phylogenetic analysis was performed based on the SSU and LSU rDNA and the mitochondrial cox1 gene sequences obtained for the new taxon and other 26 acanthocephalan species. The results of parsimony and maximum likelihood analyses, using individual, combined and concatenated sequence data, consistently indicate that the specimens do not belong to any known family of the Echinorhynchida. Rather, G. decapteri represents a distinct lineage that is closely related to the Transvenidae, but distantly related to both the Rhadinorhynchidae and the Cavisomidae. Gymnorhadinorhynchidae fam. n. is therefore erected. This newly described family can be distinguished from other families of Echinorhynchida by the combination of the following morphological characters: a proboscis cylindrical with 10 rows of 22-26 hooks, dorsoventral differences in proboscis hooks, basal hooks forming a ring and being abruptly larger than anterior hooks, absence of trunk spines and presence of four tubular cement glands. This combination, in addition to several molecular autapomorphies, justifies the erection of a new genus, Gymnorhadinorhynchus gen. n., in order to accommodate this new species. PMID:25185409

  14. Revealing a cancer diagnosis to patients: attitudes of patients, families, friends, nurses, and physicians in Lebanon—results of a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Farhat, F.; Othman, A.; el Baba, G.; Kattan, J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Disclosure of a cancer diagnosis to patients is a major problem for physicians in Lebanon. Our survey aimed to identify the attitudes of patients, families and friends, nurses, and physicians regarding disclosure of a cancer diagnosis. Methods Study participants included 343 physicians, nurses, cancer patients, families, and friends from clinics in two major hospitals in Lebanon. All completed a 29-item questionnaire that assessed, by demographic group, the information provided about cancer, opinions about the disclosure of the diagnosis to cancer patients, perceived consequences to patients, and the roles of family, friends, and religion. Results Overall, 7.8% of the patients were convinced that cancer is incurable. Nearly 82% preferred to be informed about their diagnosis. Similarly, 83% of physicians were in favour of disclosing a cancer diagnosis to their patients. However, only 14% of the physicians said that they revealed the truth to the patients themselves, with only 9% doing so immediately after confirmation of the diagnosis. Disclosure of a cancer diagnosis was preferred before the start of the treatment by 59% of the patients and immediately after confirmation of the diagnosis by 72% of the physicians. Overall, 86% of physicians, 51% of nurses, and 69% of patients and their families believed that religion helped with the acceptance of a cancer diagnosis. A role for family in accepting the diagnosis was reported by 74% of the patients, 56% of the nurses, and 88% of the physicians. All participants considered that fear was the most difficult feeling (63%) experienced by cancer patients, followed by pain (29%), pity (8%), and death (1%), with no statistically significant difference between the answers given by the participant groups. Conclusions The social background in Lebanese society is the main obstacle to revealing the truth to cancer patients. Lebanese patients seem to prefer direct communication of the truth, but families take the opposite approach. Physicians also prefer to communicate the reality of the disease at the time of diagnosis, but in actuality, they instead disclose it progressively during treatment. Faith is helpful for acceptance of the diagnosis, and families play a key role in the support of the patients. An open discussion involving all members of society is necessary to attain a better understanding of this issue and to promote timely disclosure of a cancer diagnosis. PMID:26300677

  15. Clade classification of monolignol biosynthesis gene family members reveals target genes to decrease lignin in Lolium perenne.

    PubMed

    van Parijs, F R D; Ruttink, T; Boerjan, W; Haesaert, G; Byrne, S L; Asp, T; Roldán-Ruiz, I; Muylle, H

    2015-07-01

    In monocots, lignin content has a strong impact on the digestibility of the cell wall fraction. Engineering lignin biosynthesis requires a profound knowledge of the role of paralogues in the multigene families that constitute the monolignol biosynthesis pathway. We applied a bioinformatics approach for genome-wide identification of candidate genes in Lolium perenne that are likely to be involved in the biosynthesis of monolignols. More specifically, we performed functional subtyping of phylogenetic clades in four multigene families: 4CL, COMT, CAD and CCR. Essential residues were considered for functional clade delineation within these families. This classification was complemented with previously published experimental evidence on gene expression, gene function and enzymatic activity in closely related crops and model species. This allowed us to assign functions to novel identified L. perenne genes, and to assess functional redundancy among paralogues. We found that two 4CL paralogues, two COMT paralogues, three CCR paralogues and one CAD gene are prime targets for genetic studies to engineer developmentally regulated lignin in this species. Based on the delineation of sequence conservation between paralogues and a first analysis of allelic diversity, we discuss possibilities to further study the roles of these paralogues in lignin biosynthesis, including expression analysis, reverse genetics and forward genetics, such as association mapping. We propose criteria to prioritise paralogues within multigene families and certain SNPs within these genes for developing genotyping assays or increasing power in association mapping studies. Although L. perenne was the target of the analyses presented here, this functional subtyping of phylogenetic clades represents a valuable tool for studies investigating monolignol biosynthesis genes in other monocot species. PMID:25683375

  16. Characterization of two avian MHC-like genes reveals an ancient origin of the CD1 family.

    PubMed

    Miller, Marcia M; Wang, Carren; Parisini, Emilio; Coletta, Ricardo D; Goto, Ronald M; Lee, Stella Y; Barral, Duarte C; Townes, Maria; Roura-Mir, Carme; Ford, Heide L; Brenner, Michael B; Dascher, Christopher C

    2005-06-14

    Many of the genes that comprise the vertebrate adaptive immune system are conserved across wide evolutionary time scales. Most notably, homologs of the mammalian MHC gene family have been found in virtually all jawed vertebrates, including sharks, bony fishes, reptiles, and birds. The CD1 family of antigen-presenting molecules are related to the MHC class I family but have evolved to bind and present lipid antigens to T cells. Here, we describe two highly divergent nonclassical MHC class I genes found in the chicken (Gallus gallus) that have sequence homology to the mammalian CD1 family of proteins. One of the chicken CD1 genes expresses a full-length transcript, whereas the other has multiple splice variants. Both Southern blot and single nucleotide polymorphism analysis indicates that chicken CD1 is relatively nonpolymorphic. Moreover, cross-hybridizing bands are present in other bird species, suggesting broad conservation in the avian class. Northern analysis of chicken tissue shows a high level of CD1 expression in the bursa and spleen. In addition, molecular modeling predicts that the potential antigen-binding pocket is probably hydrophobic, a universal characteristic of CD1 molecules. Genomic analysis indicates that the CD1 genes are located on chicken chromosome 16 and maps to within 200 kb of the chicken MHC B locus, suggesting that CD1 genes diverged from classical MHC genes while still linked to the major histocompatibility complex locus. The existence of CD1 genes in an avian species suggests that the origin of CD1 extends deep into the evolutionary history of terrestrial vertebrates. PMID:15939884

  17. Analysis of plant LTR-retrotransposons at the fine-scale family level reveals individual molecular patterns

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Sugarcane is an important crop worldwide for sugar production and increasingly, as a renewable energy source. Modern cultivars have polyploid, large complex genomes, with highly unequal contributions from ancestral genomes. Long Terminal Repeat retrotransposons (LTR-RTs) are the single largest components of most plant genomes and can substantially impact the genome in many ways. It is therefore crucial to understand their contribution to the genome and transcriptome, however a detailed study of LTR-RTs in sugarcane has not been previously carried out. Results Sixty complete LTR-RT elements were classified into 35 families within four Copia and three Gypsy lineages. Structurally, within lineages elements were similar, between lineages there were large size differences. FISH analysis resulted in the expected pattern of Gypsy/heterochromatin, Copia/euchromatin, but in two lineages there was localized clustering on some chromosomes. Analysis of related ESTs and RT-PCR showed transcriptional variation between tissues and families. Four distinct patterns were observed in sRNA mapping, the most unusual of which was that of Ale1, with very large numbers of 24nt sRNAs in the coding region. The results presented support the conclusion that distinct small RNA-regulated pathways in sugarcane target the lineages of LTR-RT elements. Conclusions Individual LTR-RT sugarcane families have distinct structures, and transcriptional and regulatory signatures. Our results indicate that in sugarcane individual LTR-RT families have distinct behaviors and can potentially impact the genome in diverse ways. For instance, these transposable elements may affect nearby genes by generating a diverse set of small RNA's that trigger gene silencing mechanisms. There is also some evidence that ancestral genomes contribute significantly different element numbers from particular LTR-RT lineages to the modern sugarcane cultivar genome. PMID:22507400

  18. Biochemical and structural characterization of a novel ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme E2 from Agrocybe aegeria reveals Ube2w family-specific properties

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Chao; Li, De-Feng; Feng, Lei; Hou, Yanjie; Sun, Hui; Wang, Da-Cheng; Liu, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Ubiquitination is a post-translational modification that is involved in myriad cellar regulation and disease pathways. The ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme (E2) is an important player in the ubiquitin transfer pathway. Although many E2 structures are available, not all E2 families have known structures, and three-dimensional structures from fungal organisms other than yeast are lacking. We report here the crystal structure of UbcA1, which is a novel ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme identified from the edible and medicinal mushroom Agrocybe aegerita and displays potential antitumor properties. The protein belongs to the Ube2w family and shows similar biochemical characteristics to human Ube2w, including monomer-dimer equilibrium in solution, ?-NH2 ubiquitin-transfer activity and a mechanism to recognize backbone atoms of intrinsically disordered N-termini in substrates. Its structure displays a unique C-terminal conformation with an orientation of helix ?3 that is completely different from the reported E2 structures but similar to a recently reported NMR ensemble of Ube2w. A mutagenesis study on this novel enzyme revealed that an intact C-terminus is significant for protein dimerization and enzymatic activity. As the first crystallized full-length protein of this family, UbcA1 may supersede the truncated X-ray structure of Ube2w (PDB entry 2A7L) as the representative structure of the Ube2w family. PMID:26525192

  19. Diversifying selection in the wheat stem rust fungus acts predominantly on pathogen-associated gene families and reveals candidate effectors.

    PubMed

    Sperschneider, Jana; Ying, Hua; Dodds, Peter N; Gardiner, Donald M; Upadhyaya, Narayana M; Singh, Karam B; Manners, John M; Taylor, Jennifer M

    2014-01-01

    Plant pathogens cause severe losses to crop plants and threaten global food production. One striking example is the wheat stem rust fungus, Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici, which can rapidly evolve new virulent pathotypes in response to resistant host lines. Like several other filamentous fungal and oomycete plant pathogens, its genome features expanded gene families that have been implicated in host-pathogen interactions, possibly encoding effector proteins that interact directly with target host defense proteins. Previous efforts to understand virulence largely relied on the prediction of secreted, small and cysteine-rich proteins as candidate effectors and thus delivered an overwhelming number of candidates. Here, we implement an alternative analysis strategy that uses the signal of adaptive evolution as a line of evidence for effector function, combined with comparative information and expression data. We demonstrate that in planta up-regulated genes that are rapidly evolving are found almost exclusively in pathogen-associated gene families, affirming the impact of host-pathogen co-evolution on genome structure and the adaptive diversification of specialized gene families. In particular, we predict 42 effector candidates that are conserved only across pathogens, induced during infection and rapidly evolving. One of our top candidates has recently been shown to induce genotype-specific hypersensitive cell death in wheat. This shows that comparative genomics incorporating the evolutionary signal of adaptation is powerful for predicting effector candidates for laboratory verification. Our system can be applied to a wide range of pathogens and will give insight into host-pathogen dynamics, ultimately leading to progress in strategies for disease control. PMID:25225496

  20. Reassessing Breeding Investment in Birds: Class-Wide Analysis of Clutch Volume Reveals a Single Outlying Family

    PubMed Central

    Watson, David M.; Anderson, Susan E.; Olson, Valerie

    2015-01-01

    Reproductive investment is typically considered in terms of size and number of propagules produced. Compared with a thorough understanding of the overall patterns and ecological correlates of avian clutch size, egg size has received less attention and the total effort invested in laying a clutch of eggs is rarely considered. We used clutch volume as an alternative estimate of reproductive investment and present the first class-level analysis of clutch volume in birds using 1,364 randomly-selected species in 204 families. The relationship between body mass and egg volume was very strong (r2 = 0.946), validating previous studies identifying four families (Apterygidae, Pelecanoidiididae, Sternidae and Dromadidiae) with disproportionately large eggs. Clutch volume was also closely related to body mass (r2 = 0.909) and all but one of the taxa with disproportionately large eggs conformed to the overall relationship, their greater egg dimensions compensated by diminished clutch size. The only family which departed significantly from the relationship between body mass and clutch volume was the mound builders (Megapodiidae)—the only group of birds that do not rely on body heat for incubation. Although previously known for laying large clutches of large eggs containing disproportionately large yolks, the remarkable investment of megapodes in reproduction (more than seven times greater than other birds of comparable mass) has been hitherto overlooked. We consider the evolutionary basis and ecological implications of this finding, suggesting that energetic costs associated with incubation act as an upper limit on reproductive output of other birds. We recommend clutch volume as a sensitive, fine-grained measure of reproductive effort for research at a wide range of scales and advocate further analysis of ecological correlates of clutch volume in birds and amniotes generally. PMID:25633998

  1. Structural analyses of the CRISPR protein Csc2 reveal the RNA-binding interface of the type I-D Cas7 family

    PubMed Central

    Hrle, Ajla; Maier, Lisa-Katharina; Sharma, Kundan; Ebert, Judith; Basquin, Claire; Urlaub, Henning; Marchfelder, Anita; Conti, Elena

    2014-01-01

    Upon pathogen invasion, bacteria and archaea activate an RNA-interference-like mechanism termed CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats). A large family of Cas (CRISPR-associated) proteins mediates the different stages of this sophisticated immune response. Bioinformatic studies have classified the Cas proteins into families, according to their sequences and respective functions. These range from the insertion of the foreign genetic elements into the host genome to the activation of the interference machinery as well as target degradation upon attack. Cas7 family proteins are central to the type I and type III interference machineries as they constitute the backbone of the large interference complexes. Here we report the crystal structure of Thermofilum pendens Csc2, a Cas7 family protein of type I-D. We found that Csc2 forms a core RRM-like domain, flanked by three peripheral insertion domains: a lid domain, a Zinc-binding domain and a helical domain. Comparison with other Cas7 family proteins reveals a set of similar structural features both in the core and in the peripheral domains, despite the absence of significant sequence similarity. T. pendens Csc2 binds single-stranded RNA in vitro in a sequence-independent manner. Using a crosslinking - mass-spectrometry approach, we mapped the RNA-binding surface to a positively charged surface patch on T. pendens Csc2. Thus our analysis of the key structural and functional features of T. pendens Csc2 highlights recurring themes and evolutionary relationships in type I and type III Cas proteins. PMID:25483036

  2. Structure-Guided Functional Characterization of DUF1460 Reveals a New, Highly Specific NlpC/P60 Amidase Family

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qingping; Mengin-Lecreulx, Dominique; Patin, Delphine; Grant, Joanna C.; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Knuth, Mark W.; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Elsliger, Marc-André; Deacon, Ashley M.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY GlcNAc-1,6-anhydro-MurNAc-tetrapeptide is a major peptidoglycan degradation intermediate and a cytotoxin. It is generated by lytic transglycosylases and further degraded and recycled by various enzymes. We have identified and characterized a novel, highly specific N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase (AmiA) from Bacteroides uniformis, a member of the DUF1460 protein family, that hydrolyzes GlcNAc-1,6-anhydro-MurNAc-peptide into disaccharide and stem peptide. The high-resolution apo-structure at 1.15 Å resolution shows that AmiA is related to NlpC/P60 ?-D-Glu-meso-diaminopimelic acid amidases and shares a common catalytic core and cysteine peptidase-like active site. AmiA has evolved structural adaptations that reconfigure the substrate recognition site. The preferred substrates for AmiA were predicted in silico based on structural and bioinformatics data, and were subsequently characterized experimentally. Further crystal structures of AmiA in complexes with GlcNAc-1,6-anhydro-MurNAc and GlcNAc have enabled us to elucidate substrate recognition and specificity. DUF1460 is highly conserved in structure and defines a new amidase family. PMID:25465128

  3. Sequence comparisons of odorant receptors among tortricid moths reveal different rates of molecular evolution among family members.

    PubMed

    Carraher, Colm; Authier, Astrid; Steinwender, Bernd; Newcomb, Richard D

    2012-01-01

    In insects, odorant receptors detect volatile cues involved in behaviours such as mate recognition, food location and oviposition. We have investigated the evolution of three odorant receptors from five species within the moth genera Ctenopseustis and Planotrotrix, family Tortricidae, which fall into distinct clades within the odorant receptor multigene family. One receptor is the orthologue of the co-receptor Or83b, now known as Orco (OR2), and encodes the obligate ion channel subunit of the receptor complex. In comparison, the other two receptors, OR1 and OR3, are ligand-binding receptor subunits, activated by volatile compounds produced by plants--methyl salicylate and citral, respectively. Rates of sequence evolution at non-synonymous sites were significantly higher in OR1 compared with OR2 and OR3. Within the dataset OR1 contains 109 variable amino acid positions that are distributed evenly across the entire protein including transmembrane helices, loop regions and termini, while OR2 and OR3 contain 18 and 16 variable sites, respectively. OR2 shows a high level of amino acid conservation as expected due to its essential role in odour detection; however we found unexpected differences in the rate of evolution between two ligand-binding odorant receptors, OR1 and OR3. OR3 shows high sequence conservation suggestive of a conserved role in odour reception, whereas the higher rate of evolution observed in OR1, particularly at non-synonymous sites, may be suggestive of relaxed constraint, perhaps associated with the loss of an ancestral role in sex pheromone reception. PMID:22701634

  4. Exome sequencing reveals a heterozygous DLX5 mutation in a Chinese family with autosomal-dominant split-hand/foot malformation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xue; Xin, Qian; Li, Lin; Li, Jiangxia; Zhang, Changwu; Qiu, Rongfang; Qian, Chenmin; Zhao, Hailing; Liu, Yongchao; Shan, Shan; Dang, Jie; Bian, Xianli; Shao, Changshun; Gong, Yaoqin; Liu, Qiji

    2014-01-01

    Split-hand/foot malformation (SHFM) is a congenital limb deformity due to the absence or dysplasia of central rays of the autopod. Six SHFM loci have already been identified. Here we describe a Chinese family with autosomal-dominant SHFM1 that has previously been mapped to 7q21.2-21.3. The two affected family members, mother and son, showed deep median clefts between toes, ectrodactyly and syndactyly; the mother also showed triphalangeal thumbs. Exome sequencing and variant screening of candidate genes in the six loci known to be responsible for SHFM revealed a novel heterozygous mutation, c.558G>T (p.(Gln186His)), in distal-less homeobox 5 (DLX5). As DLX5 encodes a transcription factor capable of transactivating MYC, we also tested whether the mutation could affect DLX5 transcription acitivity. Results from luciferase reporter assay revealed that a mutation in DLX5 compromised its transcriptional activity. This is the first report of a mutation in DLX5 leading to autosomal-dominant SHFM1. PMID:24496061

  5. Structure- and context-based analysis of the GxGYxYP family reveals a new putative class of Glycoside Hydrolase

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Gut microbiome metagenomics has revealed many protein families and domains found largely or exclusively in that environment. Proteins containing the GxGYxYP domain are over-represented in the gut microbiota, and are found in Polysaccharide Utilization Loci in the gut symbiont Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, suggesting their involvement in polysaccharide metabolism, but little else is known of the function of this domain. Results Genomic context and domain architecture analyses support a role for the GxGYxYP domain in carbohydrate metabolism. Sparse occurrences in eukaryotes are the result of lateral gene transfer. The structure of the GxGYxYP domain-containing protein encoded by the BT2193 locus reveals two structural domains, the first composed of three divergent repeats with no recognisable homology to previously solved structures, the second a more familiar seven-stranded ?/? barrel. Structure-based analyses including conservation mapping localise a presumed functional site to a cleft between the two domains of BT2193. Matching to a catalytic site template from a GH9 cellulase and other analyses point to a putative catalytic triad composed of Glu272, Asp331 and Asp333. Conclusions We suggest that GxGYxYP-containing proteins constitute a novel glycoside hydrolase family of as yet unknown specificity. PMID:24938123

  6. Structure of Natural Killer Receptor 2B4 Bound to CD48 Reveals Basis for Heterophilic Recognition in Signaling Lymphocyte Activation Molecule Family

    SciTech Connect

    Velikovsky,C.; Deng, L.; Chlewicki, L.; Fernandez, M.; Kumar, V.; Mariuzza, R.

    2007-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells eliminate virally infected and tumor cells. Among the receptors regulating NK cell function is 2B4 (CD244), a member of the signaling lymphocyte-activation molecule (SLAM) family that binds CD48. 2B4 is the only heterophilic receptor of the SLAM family, whose other members, e.g., NK-T-B-antigen (NTB-A), are self-ligands. We determined the structure of the complex between the N-terminal domains of mouse 2B4 and CD48, as well as the structures of unbound 2B4 and CD48. The complex displayed an association mode related to, yet distinct from, that of the NTB-A dimer. Binding was accompanied by the rigidification of flexible 2B4 regions containing most of the polymorphic residues across different species and receptor isoforms. We propose a model for 2B4-CD48 interactions that permits the intermixing of SLAM receptors with major histocompatibility complex-specific receptors in the NK cell immune synapse. This analysis revealed the basis for heterophilic recognition within the SLAM family.

  7. Mycobacterial Phylogenomics: An Enhanced Method for Gene Turnover Analysis Reveals Uneven Levels of Gene Gain and Loss among Species and Gene Families

    PubMed Central

    Librado, Pablo; Vieira, Filipe G.; Sánchez-Gracia, Alejandro; Kolokotronis, Sergios-Orestis; Rozas, Julio

    2014-01-01

    Species of the genus Mycobacterium differ in several features, from geographic ranges, and degree of pathogenicity, to ecological and host preferences. The recent availability of several fully sequenced genomes for a number of these species enabled the comparative study of the genetic determinants of this wide lifestyle diversity. Here, we applied two complementary phylogenetic-based approaches using information from 19 Mycobacterium genomes to obtain a more comprehensive view of the evolution of this genus. First, we inferred the phylogenetic relationships using two new approaches, one based on a Mycobacterium-specific amino acid substitution matrix and the other on a gene content dissimilarity matrix. Then, we utilized our recently developed gain-and-death stochastic models to study gene turnover dynamics in this genus in a maximum-likelihood framework. We uncovered a scenario that differs markedly from traditional 16S rRNA data and improves upon recent phylogenomic approaches. We also found that the rates of gene gain and death are high and unevenly distributed both across species and across gene families, further supporting the utility of the new models of rate heterogeneity applied in a phylogenetic context. Finally, the functional annotation of the most expanded or contracted gene families revealed that the transposable elements and the fatty acid metabolism-related gene families are the most important drivers of gene content evolution in Mycobacterium. PMID:24904011

  8. A novel family of fluorescent hypoxia sensors reveal strong heterogeneity in tumor hypoxia at the cellular level.

    PubMed

    Erapaneedi, Raghu; Belousov, Vsevolod V; Schäfers, Michael; Kiefer, Friedemann

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia is an intensively investigated condition with profound effects on cell metabolism, migration, and angiogenesis during development and disease. Physiologically, hypoxia is linked to tissue homeostasis and maintenance of pluripotency. Hypoxia also contributes to pathologies including cardiovascular diseases and cancer. Despite its importance, microscopic visualization of hypoxia is largely restricted to the detection of reductively activated probes by immunostaining. Here, we describe a novel family of genetically encoded fluorescent sensors that detect the activation of HIF transcription factors reported by the oxygen-independent fluorescent protein UnaG. It comprises sensors with different switching and memory behavior and combination sensors that allow the distinction of hypoxic and reoxygenated cells. We tested these sensors on orthotopically transplanted glioma cell lines. Using a cranial window, we could visualize hypoxia intravitally at cellular resolution. In tissue samples, sensor activity was detected in regions, which were largely devoid of blood vessels, correlated with HIF-1? stabilization, and were highly heterogeneous at a cellular level. Frequently, we detected recently reoxygenated cells outside hypoxic areas in the proximity of blood vessels, suggestive of hypoxia-promoted cell migration. PMID:26598532

  9. Mitogenomics reveals phylogeny and repeated motifs in control regions of the deep-sea family Siboglinidae (Annelida).

    PubMed

    Li, Yuanning; Kocot, Kevin M; Schander, Christoffer; Santos, Scott R; Thornhill, Daniel J; Halanych, Kenneth M

    2015-04-01

    Deep-sea tubeworms in the annelid family Siboglinidae have drawn considerable interest regarding their ecology and evolutionary biology. As adults, they lack a digestive tract and rely on endosymbionts for nutrition. Moreover, they are important members of chemosynthetic environments including hydrothermal vents, cold seeps, muddy sediments, and whale bones. Evolution and diversification of siboglinids has been associated with host-symbiont relationships and reducing habitats. Despite their importance, the taxonomy and phylogenetics of this clade are debated due to conflicting results. In this study, 10 complete and 2 partial mitochondrial genomes and one transcriptome were sequenced and analyzed to address siboglinid evolution. Notably, repeated nucleotide motifs were found in control regions of these mt genomes, which may explain previous challenges of sequencing siboglinid mt genomes. Phylogenetic analyses of amino acid and nucleotide datasets were conducted in order to infer evolutionary history. Both analyses generally had strong nodal support and suggest Osedax is most closely related to the Vestimentifera+Sclerolinum clade, rather than Frenulata, as recently reported. These results imply Osedax, the only siboglinid lineage with heterotrophic endosymbionts, evolved from a lineage utilizing chemoautotrophic symbionts. PMID:25721539

  10. Phylogeographic Analyses of Submesophotic Snappers Etelis coruscans and Etelis “marshi” (Family Lutjanidae) Reveal Concordant Genetic Structure across the Hawaiian Archipelago

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, Kimberly R.; Moriwake, Virginia N.; Wilcox, Christie; Grau, E. Gordon; Kelley, Christopher; Pyle, Richard L.; Bowen, Brian W.

    2014-01-01

    The Hawaiian Archipelago has become a natural laboratory for understanding genetic connectivity in marine organisms as a result of the large number of population genetics studies that have been conducted across this island chain for a wide taxonomic range of organisms. However, population genetic studies have been conducted for only two species occurring in the mesophotic or submesophotic zones (30+m) in this archipelago. To gain a greater understanding of genetic connectivity in these deepwater habitats, we investigated the genetic structure of two submesophotic fish species (occurring ?200–360 m) in this archipelago. We surveyed 16 locations across the archipelago for submesophotic snappers Etelis coruscans (N?=?787) and E. “marshi” (formerly E. carbunculus; N?=?770) with 436–490 bp of mtDNA cytochrome b and 10–11 microsatellite loci. Phylogeographic analyses reveal no geographic structuring of mtDNA lineages and recent coalescence times that are typical of shallow reef fauna. Population genetic analyses reveal no overall structure across most of the archipelago, a pattern also typical of dispersive shallow fishes. However some sites in the mid-archipelago (Raita Bank to French Frigate Shoals) had significant population differentiation. This pattern of no structure between ends of the Hawaiian range, and significant structure in the middle, was previously observed in a submesophotic snapper (Pristipomoides filamentosus) and a submesophotic grouper (Hyporthodus quernus). Three of these four species also have elevated genetic diversity in the mid-archipelago. Biophysical larval dispersal models from previous studies indicate that this elevated diversity may result from larval supplement from Johnston Atoll, ?800 km southwest of Hawaii. In this case the boundaries of stocks for fishery management cannot be defined simply in terms of geography, and fishery management in Hawaii may need to incorporate external larval supply into management plans. PMID:24722193

  11. Functional Genomics Reveals That a Compact Terpene Synthase Gene Family Can Account for Terpene Volatile Production in Apple1[W

    PubMed Central

    Nieuwenhuizen, Niels J.; Green, Sol A.; Chen, Xiuyin; Bailleul, Estelle J.D.; Matich, Adam J.; Wang, Mindy Y.; Atkinson, Ross G.

    2013-01-01

    Terpenes are specialized plant metabolites that act as attractants to pollinators and as defensive compounds against pathogens and herbivores, but they also play an important role in determining the quality of horticultural food products. We show that the genome of cultivated apple (Malus domestica) contains 55 putative terpene synthase (TPS) genes, of which only 10 are predicted to be functional. This low number of predicted functional TPS genes compared with other plant species was supported by the identification of only eight potentially functional TPS enzymes in apple ‘Royal Gala’ expressed sequence tag databases, including the previously characterized apple (E,E)-?-farnesene synthase. In planta functional characterization of these TPS enzymes showed that they could account for the majority of terpene volatiles produced in cv Royal Gala, including the sesquiterpenes germacrene-D and (E)-?-caryophyllene, the monoterpenes linalool and ?-pinene, and the homoterpene (E)-4,8-dimethyl-1,3,7-nonatriene. Relative expression analysis of the TPS genes indicated that floral and vegetative tissues were the primary sites of terpene production in cv Royal Gala. However, production of cv Royal Gala floral-specific terpenes and TPS genes was observed in the fruit of some heritage apple cultivars. Our results suggest that the apple TPS gene family has been shaped by a combination of ancestral and more recent genome-wide duplication events. The relatively small number of functional enzymes suggests that the remaining terpenes produced in floral and vegetative and fruit tissues are maintained under a positive selective pressure, while the small number of terpenes found in the fruit of modern cultivars may be related to commercial breeding strategies. PMID:23256150

  12. Conserved synteny at the protein family level reveals genes underlying Shewanella species cold tolerance and predicts their novel phenotypes

    SciTech Connect

    Karpinets, Tatiana V.; Obraztsova, Anna; Wang, Yanbing; Schmoyer, Denise D.; Kora, Guruprasad; Park, Byung H.; Serres, Margrethe H.; Romine, Margaret F.; Land, Miriam L.; Kothe, Terence B.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Nealson, Kenneth H.; Uberbacher, Edward

    2010-03-01

    Bacteria of the genus Shewanella can thrive in different environments and demonstrate significant variability in their metabolic and ecophysiological capabilities including cold and salt tolerance. Genomic characteristics underlying this variability across species are largely unknown. In this study we address the problem by a comparison of the physiological, metabolic and genomic characteristics of 19 sequenced Shewanella species. We have employed two novel approaches based on association of a phenotypic trait with the number of the trait-specific protein families (Pfam domains) and on the conservation of synteny (order in the genome) of the trait-related genes. Our first approach is top-down and involves experimental evaluation and quantification of the species’ cold tolerance followed by identification of the correlated Pfam domains and genes with a conserved synteny. The second, a bottom-up approach, predicts novel phenotypes of the species by calculating profiles of each Pfam domain among their genomes and following pair-wise correlation of the profiles and their network clustering. Using the first approach we find a link between cold and salt tolerance of the species and the presence in the genome of a Na+/H+ antiporter gene cluster. Other cold tolerance related genes includes peptidases, chemotaxis sensory transducer proteins, a cysteine exporter, and helicases. Using the bottom-up approach we found several novel phenotypes in the newly sequenced Shewanella species, including degradation of aromatic compounds by an aerobic hybrid pathway in S. woodyi, degradation of ethanolamine by S. benthica, and propanediol degradation by S. putrefaciens CN32 and S. sp. W3-18-1.

  13. IDENTIFICATION OF NICOTINAMIDE MONONUCLEOTIDE DEAMIDASE OF THE BACTERIAL PYRIDINE NUCLEOTIDE CYCLE REVEALS A NOVEL BROADLY CONSERVED AMIDOHYDROLASE FAMILY

    SciTech Connect

    Galeazzi, Luca; Bocci, Paolo; Amici, Adolfo; Brunetti, Lucia; Ruggieri, Silverio; Romine, Margaret F.; Reed, Samantha B.; Osterman, Andrei; Rodionov, Dmitry A.; Sorci, Leonardo; Raffaelli, Nadia

    2011-09-27

    The pyridine nucleotide cycle (PNC) is a network of salvage and recycling routes maintaining homeostasis of NAD(P) cofactor pool in the cell. Nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN) deamidase (EC 3.5.1.42), one of the key enzymes of the bacterial PNC was originally described in Enterobacteria, but the corresponding gene eluded identification for over 30 years. A genomics-based reconstruction of NAD metabolism across hundreds bacterial species suggested that NMN deamidase reaction is the only possible way of nicotinamide salvage in the marine bacterium Shewanella oneidensis. This prediction was verified via purification of native NMN deamidase from S. oneidensis followed by the identification of the respective gene, termed pncC. Enzymatic characterization of the PncC protein, as well as phenotype analysis of deletion mutants, confirmed its proposed biochemical and physiological function in S. oneidensis. Of the three PncC homologs present in E. coli, NMN deamidase activity was confirmed only for the recombinant purified product of the ygaD gene. A comparative analysis at the level of sequence and three dimensional structure, which is available for one of the PncC family member, shows no homology with any previously described amidohydrolases. Multiple alignment analysis of functional and non functional PncC homologs, together with NMN docking experiments, allowed us to tentatively identify the active site area and conserved residues therein. An observed broad phylogenomic distribution of predicted functional PncCs in bacterial kingdom is consistent with a possible role in detoxification of NMN, resulting from NAD utilization by DNA ligase.

  14. Phylogenetic and experimental characterization of an acyl-ACP thioesterase family reveals significant diversity in enzymatic specificity and activity

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Acyl-acyl carrier protein thioesterases (acyl-ACP TEs) catalyze the hydrolysis of the thioester bond that links the acyl chain to the sulfhydryl group of the phosphopantetheine prosthetic group of ACP. This reaction terminates acyl chain elongation of fatty acid biosynthesis, and in plant seeds it is the biochemical determinant of the fatty acid compositions of storage lipids. Results To explore acyl-ACP TE diversity and to identify novel acyl ACP-TEs, 31 acyl-ACP TEs from wide-ranging phylogenetic sources were characterized to ascertain their in vivo activities and substrate specificities. These acyl-ACP TEs were chosen by two different approaches: 1) 24 TEs were selected from public databases on the basis of phylogenetic analysis and fatty acid profile knowledge of their source organisms; and 2) seven TEs were molecularly cloned from oil palm (Elaeis guineensis), coconut (Cocos nucifera) and Cuphea viscosissima, organisms that produce medium-chain and short-chain fatty acids in their seeds. The in vivo substrate specificities of the acyl-ACP TEs were determined in E. coli. Based on their specificities, these enzymes were clustered into three classes: 1) Class I acyl-ACP TEs act primarily on 14- and 16-carbon acyl-ACP substrates; 2) Class II acyl-ACP TEs have broad substrate specificities, with major activities toward 8- and 14-carbon acyl-ACP substrates; and 3) Class III acyl-ACP TEs act predominantly on 8-carbon acyl-ACPs. Several novel acyl-ACP TEs act on short-chain and unsaturated acyl-ACP or 3-ketoacyl-ACP substrates, indicating the diversity of enzymatic specificity in this enzyme family. Conclusion These acyl-ACP TEs can potentially be used to diversify the fatty acid biosynthesis pathway to produce novel fatty acids. PMID:21831316

  15. Hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy (HMSN) type X1 in an Argentinean family reveals independent GJB1/Cx32 mutations at the identical nucleotide position.

    PubMed

    Gerding, Wanda Maria; Koetting, Judith; Rey, Lucía Paola; Bibas Bonet, Hilda; Abdala, Mirta Esther; Mazzeo, Anna; Mostacciuolo, Maria Luisa; Arning, Larissa; Carrero-Valenzuela, Roque

    2013-01-01

    X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT Type X1, OMIM: 302800) represents a frequent cause of hereditary peripheral motor and sensory neuropathies and is associated with mutations in GJB1 encoding the gap junction beta 1 protein connexin 32 (Cx32). Studying an Argentinean family of Italian origin with seven affected males in three generations exhibiting clinical signs of CMT, eight obligate female carriers were identified genealogically. DNA sequencing of exon 2 and adjacent regions of the GJB1 gene in two symptomatic males whose respective maternal grandfathers, both affected, were brothers, revealed mutations in GJB1/Cx32. Surprisingly, each of the two affected patients had a different mutation in hemizygous state at the same nucleotide position: c.383C>T (p.S128L) and c.383C>A (p.S128X). In both cases, the identified mutation was present in heterozygous state in the corresponding maternal genomic DNA. Furthermore, X-chromosomal microsatellite analysis showed identical marker alleles in both patients. Together with the genealogical information, these molecular data imply that a primarily mutated allele mutated for a second time. In conclusion, two different mutations at the same nucleotide position in this Argentinean family represent a finding with a very low probability of occurrence. PMID:23384994

  16. The Structure of RdDddP from Roseobacter denitrificans Reveals That DMSP Lyases in the DddP-Family Are Metalloenzymes

    PubMed Central

    Hehemann, Jan-Hendrik; Law, Adrienne; Redecke, Lars; Boraston, Alisdair B.

    2014-01-01

    Marine microbes degrade dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP), which is produced in large quantities by marine algae and plants, with DMSP lyases into acrylate and the gas dimethyl sulfide (DMS). Approximately 10% of the DMS vents from the sea into the atmosphere and this emission returns sulfur, which arrives in the sea through rivers and runoff, back to terrestrial systems via clouds and rain. Despite their key role in this sulfur cycle DMSP lyases are poorly understood at the molecular level. Here we report the first X-ray crystal structure of the putative DMSP lyase RdDddP from Roseobacter denitrificans, which belongs to the abundant DddP family. This structure, determined to 2.15 Å resolution, shows that RdDddP is a homodimeric metalloprotein with a binuclear center of two metal ions located 2.7 Å apart in the active site of the enzyme. Consistent with the crystallographic data, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TRXF) revealed the bound metal species to be primarily iron. A 3D structure guided analysis of environmental DddP lyase sequences elucidated the critical residues for metal binding are invariant, suggesting all proteins in the DddP family are metalloenzymes. PMID:25054772

  17. Genetic testing in Tunisian families with heritable retinoblastoma using a low cost approach permits accurate risk prediction in relatives and reveals incomplete penetrance in adults.

    PubMed

    Ayari Jeridi, Hajer; Bouguila, Hédi; Ansperger-Rescher, Birgit; Baroudi, Olfa; Mdimegh, Imen; Omran, Ines; Charradi, Khaoula; Bouzayene, Hssan; Benammar-Elgaaïed, Amel; Lohmann, Dietmar R

    2014-07-01

    Heritable retinoblastoma is caused by oncogenic mutations in the RB1 tumor suppressor gene. Identification of these mutations in patients is important for genetic counseling and clinical management of relatives at risk. In order to lower analytical efforts, we designed a stepwise mutation detection strategy that was adapted to the spectrum of oncogenic RB1 gene mutations. We applied this strategy on 20 unrelated patients with familial and/or de novo bilateral retinoblastoma from Tunisia. In 19 (95%) patients, we detected oncogenic mutations including base substitutions, small length mutations, and large deletions. Further analyses on the origin of the mutations showed mutational mosaicism in one unilaterally affected father of a bilateral proband and incomplete penetrance in two mothers. In a large family with several retinoblastoma patients, the mutation identified in the index patient was also detected in several non-penetrant relatives. RNA analyses showed that this mutation results in an in-frame loss of exon 9. In summary, our strategy can serve as a model for RB1 mutation identification with high analytical sensitivity. Our results point out that genetic testing is needed to reveal or exclude incomplete penetrance specifically in parents of patients with sporadic disease. PMID:24810223

  18. Spitzer Reveals Stellar 'Family Tree'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] High resolution poster version

    Generations of stars can be seen in this new infrared portrait from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope. In this wispy star-forming region, called W5, the oldest stars can be seen as blue dots in the centers of the two hollow cavities (other blue dots are background and foreground stars not associated with the region). Younger stars line the rims of the cavities, and some can be seen as pink dots at the tips of the elephant-trunk-like pillars. The white knotty areas are where the youngest stars are forming. Red shows heated dust that pervades the region's cavities, while green highlights dense clouds.

    W5 spans an area of sky equivalent to four full moons and is about 6,500 light-years away in the constellation Cassiopeia. The Spitzer picture was taken over a period of 24 hours.

    Like other massive star-forming regions, such as Orion and Carina, W5 contains large cavities that were carved out by radiation and winds from the region's most massive stars. According to the theory of triggered star-formation, the carving out of these cavities pushes gas together, causing it to ignite into successive generations of new stars.

    This image contains some of the best evidence yet for the triggered star-formation theory. Scientists analyzing the photo have been able to show that the ages of the stars become progressively and systematically younger with distance from the center of the cavities.

    This is a three-color composite showing infrared observations from two Spitzer instruments. Blue represents 3.6-micron light and green shows light of 8 microns, both captured by Spitzer's infrared array camera. Red is 24-micron light detected by Spitzer's multiband imaging photometer.

  19. Spitzer Reveals Stellar 'Family Tree'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] High resolution poster version

    Generations of stars can be seen in this new infrared portrait from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope. In this wispy star-forming region, called W5, the oldest stars can be seen as blue dots in the centers of the two hollow cavities (other blue dots are background and foreground stars not associated with the region). Younger stars line the rims of the cavities, and some can be seen as dots at the tips of the elephant-trunk-like pillars. The white knotty areas are where the youngest stars are forming.

    W5 spans an area of sky equivalent to four full moons and is about 6,500 light-years away in the constellation Cassiopeia. The Spitzer picture was taken over a period of 24 hours.

    Like other massive star-forming regions, such as Orion and Carina, W5 contains large cavities that were carved out by radiation and winds from the region's most massive stars. According to the theory of triggered star-formation, the carving out of these cavities pushes gas together, causing it to ignite into successive generations of new stars.

    This image contains some of the best evidence yet for the triggered star-formation theory. Scientists analyzing the photo have been able to show that the ages of the stars become progressively and systematically younger with distance from the center of the cavities.

    This picture was taken with Spitzer's infrared array camera. It is a four-color composite, in which light with a wavelength of 3.6 microns is blue; 4.5-micron light is green; 5.8-micron light is orange; and 8-micron light is red.

  20. Non-monophyly and intricate morphological evolution within the avian family Cettiidae revealed by multilocus analysis of a taxonomically densely sampled dataset

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The avian family Cettiidae, including the genera Cettia, Urosphena, Tesia, Abroscopus and Tickellia and Orthotomus cucullatus, has recently been proposed based on analysis of a small number of loci and species. The close relationship of most of these taxa was unexpected, and called for a comprehensive study based on multiple loci and dense taxon sampling. In the present study, we infer the relationships of all except one of the species in this family using one mitochondrial and three nuclear loci. We use traditional gene tree methods (Bayesian inference, maximum likelihood bootstrapping, parsimony bootstrapping), as well as a recently developed Bayesian species tree approach (*BEAST) that accounts for lineage sorting processes that might produce discordance between gene trees. We also analyse mitochondrial DNA for a larger sample, comprising multiple individuals and a large number of subspecies of polytypic species. Results There are many topological incongruences among the single-locus trees, although none of these is strongly supported. The multi-locus tree inferred using concatenated sequences and the species tree agree well with each other, and are overall well resolved and well supported by the data. The main discrepancy between these trees concerns the most basal split. Both methods infer the genus Cettia to be highly non-monophyletic, as it is scattered across the entire family tree. Deep intraspecific divergences are revealed, and one or two species and one subspecies are inferred to be non-monophyletic (differences between methods). Conclusions The molecular phylogeny presented here is strongly inconsistent with the traditional, morphology-based classification. The remarkably high degree of non-monophyly in the genus Cettia is likely to be one of the most extraordinary examples of misconceived relationships in an avian genus. The phylogeny suggests instances of parallel evolution, as well as highly unequal rates of morphological divergence in different lineages. This complex morphological evolution apparently misled earlier taxonomists. These results underscore the well-known but still often neglected problem of basing classifications on overall morphological similarity. Based on the molecular data, a revised taxonomy is proposed. Although the traditional and species tree methods inferred much the same tree in the present study, the assumption by species tree methods that all species are monophyletic is a limitation in these methods, as some currently recognized species might have more complex histories. PMID:22142197

  1. Interaction of a putative BH3 domain of clusterin with anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins as revealed by NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Dong-Hwa; Ha, Ji-Hyang; Kim, Yul; Bae, Kwang-Hee; Park, Jae-Yong; Choi, Wan Sung; Yoon, Ho Sup; Park, Sung Goo; Park, Byoung Chul; Yi, Gwan-Su; Chi, Seung-Wook

    2011-05-20

    Highlights: {yields} Identification of a conserved BH3 motif in C-terminal coiled coil region of nCLU. {yields} The nCLU BH3 domain binds to BH3 peptide-binding grooves in both Bcl-X{sub L} and Bcl-2. {yields} A conserved binding mechanism of nCLU BH3 and the other pro-apoptotic BH3 peptides with Bcl-X{sub L}. {yields} The absolutely conserved Leu323 and Asp328 of nCLU BH3 domain are critical for binding to Bcl-X{sub L.} {yields} Molecular understanding of the pro-apoptotic function of nCLU as a novel BH3-only protein. -- Abstract: Clusterin (CLU) is a multifunctional glycoprotein that is overexpressed in prostate and breast cancers. Although CLU is known to be involved in the regulation of apoptosis and cell survival, the precise molecular mechanism underlying the pro-apoptotic function of nuclear CLU (nCLU) remains unclear. In this study, we identified a conserved BH3 motif in C-terminal coiled coil (CC2) region of nCLU by sequence analysis and characterized the molecular interaction of the putative nCLU BH3 domain with anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The chemical shift perturbation data demonstrated that the nCLU BH3 domain binds to pro-apoptotic BH3 peptide-binding grooves in both Bcl-X{sub L} and Bcl-2. A structural model of the Bcl-X{sub L}/nCLU BH3 peptide complex reveals that the binding mode is remarkably similar to those of other Bcl-X{sub L}/BH3 peptide complexes. In addition, mutational analysis confirmed that Leu323 and Asp328 of nCLU BH3 domain, absolutely conserved in the BH3 motifs of BH3-only protein family, are critical for binding to Bcl-X{sub L}. Taken altogether, our results suggest a molecular basis for the pro-apoptotic function of nCLU by elucidating the residue specific interactions of the BH3 motif in nCLU with anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins.

  2. The Vanadium Iodoperoxidase from the Marine Flavobacteriaceae Species Zobellia galactanivorans Reveals Novel Molecular and Evolutionary Features of Halide Specificity in the Vanadium Haloperoxidase Enzyme Family

    PubMed Central

    Fournier, Jean-Baptiste; Rebuffet, Etienne; Delage, Ludovic; Grijol, Romain; Meslet-Cladière, Laurence; Rzonca, Justyna; Potin, Philippe; Michel, Gurvan; Czjzek, Mirjam

    2014-01-01

    Vanadium haloperoxidases (VHPO) are key enzymes that oxidize halides and are involved in the biosynthesis of organo-halogens. Until now, only chloroperoxidases (VCPO) and bromoperoxidases (VBPO) have been characterized structurally, mainly from eukaryotic species. Three putative VHPO genes were predicted in the genome of the flavobacterium Zobellia galactanivorans, a marine bacterium associated with macroalgae. In a phylogenetic analysis, these putative bacterial VHPO were closely related to other VHPO from diverse bacterial phyla but clustered independently from eukaryotic algal VBPO and fungal VCPO. Two of these bacterial VHPO, heterogeneously produced in Escherichia coli, were found to be strictly specific for iodide oxidation. The crystal structure of one of these vanadium-dependent iodoperoxidases, Zg-VIPO1, was solved by multiwavelength anomalous diffraction at 1.8 ?, revealing a monomeric structure mainly folded into ?-helices. This three-dimensional structure is relatively similar to those of VCPO of the fungus Curvularia inaequalis and of Streptomyces sp. and is superimposable onto the dimeric structure of algal VBPO. Surprisingly, the vanadate binding site of Zg-VIPO1 is strictly conserved with the fungal VCPO active site. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we showed that specific amino acids and the associated hydrogen bonding network around the vanadate center are essential for the catalytic properties and also the iodide specificity of Zg-VIPO1. Altogether, phylogeny and structure-function data support the finding that iodoperoxidase activities evolved independently in bacterial and algal lineages, and this sheds light on the evolution of the VHPO enzyme family. PMID:25261522

  3. Genome-Wide Analysis Reveals Diverged Patterns of Codon Bias, Gene Expression, and Rates of Sequence Evolution in Picea Gene Families

    PubMed Central

    De La Torre, Amanda R.; Lin, Yao-Cheng; Van de Peer, Yves; Ingvarsson, Pär K.

    2015-01-01

    The recent sequencing of several gymnosperm genomes has greatly facilitated studying the evolution of their genes and gene families. In this study, we examine the evidence for expression-mediated selection in the first two fully sequenced representatives of the gymnosperm plant clade (Picea abies and Picea glauca). We use genome-wide estimates of gene expression (>50,000 expressed genes) to study the relationship between gene expression, codon bias, rates of sequence divergence, protein length, and gene duplication. We found that gene expression is correlated with rates of sequence divergence and codon bias, suggesting that natural selection is acting on Picea protein-coding genes for translational efficiency. Gene expression, rates of sequence divergence, and codon bias are correlated with the size of gene families, with large multicopy gene families having, on average, a lower expression level and breadth, lower codon bias, and higher rates of sequence divergence than single-copy gene families. Tissue-specific patterns of gene expression were more common in large gene families with large gene expression divergence than in single-copy families. Recent family expansions combined with large gene expression variation in paralogs and increased rates of sequence evolution suggest that some Picea gene families are rapidly evolving to cope with biotic and abiotic stress. Our study highlights the importance of gene expression and natural selection in shaping the evolution of protein-coding genes in Picea species, and sets the ground for further studies investigating the evolution of individual gene families in gymnosperms. PMID:25747252

  4. Genomic Resources of Three Pulsatilla Species Reveal Evolutionary Hotspots, Species-Specific Sites and Variable Plastid Structure in the Family Ranunculaceae

    PubMed Central

    Szczeci?ska, Monika; Sawicki, Jakub

    2015-01-01

    Background: The European continent is presently colonized by nine species of the genus Pulsatilla, five of which are encountered only in mountainous regions of southwest and south-central Europe. The remaining four species inhabit lowlands in the north-central and eastern parts of the continent. Most plants of the genus Pulsatilla are rare and endangered, which is why most research efforts focused on their biology, ecology and hybridization. The objective of this study was to develop genomic resources, including complete plastid genomes and nuclear rRNA clusters, for three sympatric Pulsatilla species that are most commonly found in Central Europe. The results will supply valuable information about genetic variation, which can be used in the process of designing primers for population studies and conservation genetics research. The complete plastid genomes together with the nuclear rRNA cluster can serve as a useful tool in hybridization studies. Methodology/principal findings: Six complete plastid genomes and nuclear rRNA clusters were sequenced from three species of Pulsatilla using the Illumina sequencing technology. Four junctions between single copy regions and inverted repeats and junctions between the identified locally-collinear blocks (LCB) were confirmed by Sanger sequencing. Pulsatilla genomes of 120 unique genes had a total length of approximately 161–162 kb, and 21 were duplicated in the inverted repeats (IR) region. Comparative plastid genomes of newly-sequenced Pulsatilla and the previously-identified plastomes of Aconitum and Ranunculus species belonging to the family Ranunculaceae revealed several variations in the structure of the genome, but the gene content remained constant. The nuclear rRNA cluster (18S-ITS1-5.8S-ITS2-26S) of studied Pulsatilla species is 5795 bp long. Among five analyzed regions of the rRNA cluster, only Internal Transcribed Spacer 2 (ITS2) enabled the molecular delimitation of closely-related Pulsatilla patens and Pulsatilla vernalis. Conclusions/significance: The determination of complete plastid genome and nuclear rRNA cluster sequences in three species of the genus Pulsatilla is an important contribution to our knowledge of the evolution and phylogeography of those endangered taxa. The resulting data can be used to identify regions that are particularly useful for barcoding, phylogenetic and phylogeographic studies. The investigated taxa can be identified at each stage of development based on their species-specific SNPs. The nuclear and plastid genomic resources enable advanced studies on hybridization, including identification of parent species, including their roles in that process. The identified nonsynonymous mutations could play an important role in adaptations to changing environments. The results of the study will also provide valuable information about the evolution of the plastome structure in the family Ranunculaceae. PMID:26389887

  5. Biochemical studies on Mycobacterium tuberculosis UreG and comparative modeling reveal structural and functional conservation among the bacterial UreG family.

    PubMed

    Zambelli, Barbara; Musiani, Francesco; Savini, Matteo; Tucker, Paul; Ciurli, Stefano

    2007-03-20

    Nickel is a fundamental micronutrient for cellular life, but it is toxic in soluble form at nonphysiological concentrations. Such potentially contradictory features required living organisms to develop efficient systems for nickel utilization and homeostasis. This is the case for incorporation of nickel into the active site of urease, a multistep, tightly regulated process, requiring the interplay of various accessory proteins. The understanding of this activation mechanism may find medical applications against ureolytic bacteria, among which Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a deadly pathogen for humans. The topic of this study is UreG, an essential chaperone in the in vivo activation of urease upon insertion of Ni2+ into the active site. The protein was examined using both experimental and computational approaches. In particular, the soluble M. tuberculosis UreG (MtUreG) was overexpressed in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity. The identity of the isolated protein was established by mass spectrometry. On-line size-exclusion chromatography and light scattering indicated that MtUreG exists as a dimeric form in solution. Determination of the free thiol concentration revealed that a disulfide bond is present in the dimer. The isolated MtUreG shows low GTPase activity under native conditions, with a kcat of 0.01 min-1. Circular dichroism spectroscopy demonstrated the presence of a well-defined secondary structure (8% alpha-helices, 29% beta-strands) in MtUreG, whereas NMR spectroscopy indicated that this protein does not behave as a rigid three-dimensional fold and thus can be assigned to the class of intrinsically unstructured polypeptides. The molecular model of MtUreG in the fully folded and functional form was built using fold recognition algorithms. An extensive similarity search was performed to determine conservation patterns in all known bacterial UreG sequences. The generation of a multiple-sequence alignment and the related phylogenetic tree allowed us to recognize key residues and motifs that are likely important for protein function. A structural database containing the homology-built models of the most representative UreG proteins was created, confirming the structural analogies among the UreG family. A flexible region, likely to be important for protein function, is identified. The structural conservation among this class of GTPases is discussed on the basis of their function in the urease assembly process. PMID:17309280

  6. Global Mapping of Cell Type–Specific Open Chromatin by FAIRE-seq Reveals the Regulatory Role of the NFI Family in Adipocyte Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jing; Hirose-Yotsuya, Lisa; Take, Kazumi; Sun, Wei; Iwabu, Masato; Okada-Iwabu, Miki; Fujita, Takanori; Aoyama, Tomohisa; Tsutsumi, Shuichi; Ueki, Kohjiro; Kodama, Tatsuhiko; Sakai, Juro; Aburatani, Hiroyuki; Kadowaki, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    Identification of regulatory elements within the genome is crucial for understanding the mechanisms that govern cell type–specific gene expression. We generated genome-wide maps of open chromatin sites in 3T3-L1 adipocytes (on day 0 and day 8 of differentiation) and NIH-3T3 fibroblasts using formaldehyde-assisted isolation of regulatory elements coupled with high-throughput sequencing (FAIRE-seq). FAIRE peaks at the promoter were associated with active transcription and histone modifications of H3K4me3 and H3K27ac. Non-promoter FAIRE peaks were characterized by H3K4me1+/me3-, the signature of enhancers, and were largely located in distal regions. The non-promoter FAIRE peaks showed dynamic change during differentiation, while the promoter FAIRE peaks were relatively constant. Functionally, the adipocyte- and preadipocyte-specific non-promoter FAIRE peaks were, respectively, associated with genes up-regulated and down-regulated by differentiation. Genes highly up-regulated during differentiation were associated with multiple clustered adipocyte-specific FAIRE peaks. Among the adipocyte-specific FAIRE peaks, 45.3% and 11.7% overlapped binding sites for, respectively, PPAR? and C/EBP?, the master regulators of adipocyte differentiation. Computational motif analyses of the adipocyte-specific FAIRE peaks revealed enrichment of a binding motif for nuclear family I (NFI) transcription factors. Indeed, ChIP assay showed that NFI occupy the adipocyte-specific FAIRE peaks and/or the PPAR? binding sites near PPAR?, C/EBP?, and aP2 genes. Overexpression of NFIA in 3T3-L1 cells resulted in robust induction of these genes and lipid droplet formation without differentiation stimulus. Overexpression of dominant-negative NFIA or siRNA–mediated knockdown of NFIA or NFIB significantly suppressed both induction of genes and lipid accumulation during differentiation, suggesting a physiological function of these factors in the adipogenic program. Together, our study demonstrates the utility of FAIRE-seq in providing a global view of cell type–specific regulatory elements in the genome and in identifying transcriptional regulators of adipocyte differentiation. PMID:22028663

  7. Clinical and molecular studies reveal a PSEN1 mutation (L153V) in a Peruvian family with early-onset Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Cornejo-Olivas, Mario R; Yu, Chang-En; Mazzetti, Pilar; Mata, Ignacio F; Meza, Maria; Lindo-Samanamud, Saul; Leverenz, James B; Bird, Thomas D

    2014-03-20

    Presenilin 1 (PSEN1) gene mutations are found in 30-70% of familial early-onset Alzheimer disease (EOAD) cases (onset <60 years). Prevalence of these mutations is highly variable including ethnic differences worldwide. No Peruvian kindred with familial AD (FAD) have been described. Standardized clinical evaluation and cognitive assessment were completed in a Peruvian family with severe EOAD. Clinical course was characterized by very early onset (before age 35 years), progressive cognitive impairment with early memory loss, spatial disorientation and executive dysfunction. We sequenced all exons of PSEN1 in the proband and identified a c.475C>G DNA change resulting in a p.L153V missense mutation in the transmembrane domain 2 of the gene. This mutation is also present in the three additional affected siblings but not in a non-affected family member consistent with segregation of this mutation with the disease. This is the first report of a Peruvian family affected with EOAD associated with a PSEN1 mutation. This same mutation has been reported previously in English and French families, but a novel variants very close to the mutation and ancestry informative markers analysis suggests the mutation might be of Amerindian or African origin in this Peruvian family. PMID:24495933

  8. Structure of the first representative of Pfam family PF09410 (DUF2006) reveals a structural signature of the calycin superfamily that suggests a role in lipid metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Bakolitsa, Constantina; Skerra, Arne; Lomize, Andrei; Carlton, Dennis; Miller, Mitchell D.; Krishna, S. Sri; Abdubek, Polat; Astakhova, Tamara; Axelrod, Herbert L.; Clayton, Thomas; Deller, Marc C.; Duan, Lian; Feuerhelm, Julie; Grant, Joanna C.; Grzechnik, Slawomir K.; Han, Gye Won; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Jin, Kevin K.; Klock, Heath E.; Knuth, Mark W.; Kozbial, Piotr; Kumar, Abhinav; Marciano, David; McMullan, Daniel; Morse, Andrew T.; Nigoghossian, Edward; Okach, Linda; Paulsen, Jessica; Reyes, Ron; Rife, Christopher L.; van den Bedem, Henry; Weekes, Dana; Xu, Qingping; Hodgson, Keith O.; Wooley, John; Elsliger, Marc-Andre; Deacon, Ashley M.; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2015-10-15

    The first structural representative of the domain of unknown function DUF2006 family, also known as Pfam family PF09410, comprises a lipocalin-like fold with domain duplication. The finding of the calycin signature in the N-terminal domain, combined with remote sequence similarity to two other protein families (PF07143 and PF08622) implicated in isoprenoid metabolism and the oxidative stress response, support an involvement in lipid metabolism. Clusters of conserved residues that interact with ligand mimetics suggest that the binding and regulation sites map to the N-terminal domain and to the interdomain interface, respectively.

  9. Comparative genomic and proteomic analyses of PE/PPE multigene family of Mycobacterium tuberculosis H??Rv and H??Ra reveal novel and interesting differences with implications in virulence.

    PubMed

    Kohli, Sakshi; Singh, Yadvir; Sharma, Khushbu; Mittal, Aditya; Ehtesham, Nasreen Z; Hasnain, Seyed E

    2012-08-01

    Tuberculosis, caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, remains a leading infectious disease taking one human life every 15?s globally. The two well-characterized strains H(37)Rv and H(37)Ra, derived from the same parental strain M. tuberculosis H(37), show dramatically different pathogenic phenotypes. PE/PPE gene family, comprising of 176 open reading frames and present exclusively in genus Mycobacterium, accounts for ?10% of the M. tuberculosis genome. Our comprehensive in silico analyses of PE/PPE family of H(37)Ra and virulent H(37)Rv strains revealed genetic differences between these strains in terms of several single nucleotide variations and InDels and these manifested in changes in physico-chemical properties, phosphorylation sites, and protein: protein interacting domains of the corresponding proteomes. Similar comparisons using the 13 sigma factor genes, 36 members of the mammalian cell entry family, 13 mycobacterial membrane protein large family members and 11 two-component signal transduction systems along with 5 orphaned response regulators and 2 orphaned sensor kinases failed to reveal very significant difference between H(37)Rv and H(37)Ra, reinforcing the importance of PE/PPE genes. Many of these changes between H(37)Rv and H(37)Ra can be correlated to differences in pathogenesis and virulence of the two strains. PMID:22618876

  10. A novel ?-xylosidase structure from Geobacillus thermoglucosidasius: the first crystal structure of a glycoside hydrolase family GH52 enzyme reveals unpredicted similarity to other glycoside hydrolase folds.

    PubMed

    Espina, Giannina; Eley, Kirstin; Pompidor, Guillaume; Schneider, Thomas R; Crennell, Susan J; Danson, Michael J

    2014-05-01

    Geobacillus thermoglucosidasius is a thermophilic bacterium that is able to ferment both C6 and C5 sugars to produce ethanol. During growth on hemicellulose biomass, an intracellular ?-xylosidase catalyses the hydrolysis of xylo-oligosaccharides to the monosaccharide xylose, which can then enter the pathways of central metabolism. The gene encoding a G. thermoglucosidasius ?-xylosidase belonging to CAZy glycoside hydrolase family GH52 has been cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant enzyme has been characterized and a high-resolution (1.7 Å) crystal structure has been determined, resulting in the first reported structure of a GH52 family member. A lower resolution (2.6 Å) structure of the enzyme-substrate complex shows the positioning of the xylobiose substrate to be consistent with the proposed retaining mechanism of the family; additionally, the deep cleft of the active-site pocket, plus the proximity of the neighbouring subunit, afford an explanation for the lack of catalytic activity towards the polymer xylan. Whilst the fold of the G. thermoglucosidasius ?-xylosidase is completely different from xylosidases in other CAZy families, the enzyme surprisingly shares structural similarities with other glycoside hydrolases, despite having no more than 13% sequence identity. PMID:24816105

  11. Analysis of the WUSCHEL-RELATED HOMEOBOX gene family in the conifer picea abies reveals extensive conservation as well as dynamic patterns

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Members of the WUSCHEL-RELATED HOMEOBOX (WOX) gene family have important functions during all stages of plant development and have been implicated in the development of morphological novelties during evolution. Most studies have examined the function of these genes in angiosperms and very little is known from other plant species. Results In this study we examine the presence and expression of WOX genes in the conifer Picea abies. We have cloned 11 WOX genes from both mRNA and genomic DNA and examined their phylogenetic relationship to WOX genes from other species as well as their expression during somatic embryogenesis and in adult tissues. Conclusions Our study shows that all major radiations within the WOX gene family took place before the angiosperm-gymnosperm split and that there has been a recent expansion within the intermediate clade in the Pinaceae family. Furthermore, we show that the genes from the intermediate clade are preferentially expressed during embryo development in Picea abies. Our data also indicates that there are clear orthologs of both WUS and WOX5 present in the P. abies genome. PMID:23758772

  12. UPF201 Archaeal Specific Family Members Reveals Structural Similarity to RNA-Binding Proteins but Low Likelihood for RNA-Binding Function

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, K.N.; Swaminathan, S.; Burley, S. K.

    2008-12-11

    We have determined X-ray crystal structures of four members of an archaeal specific family of proteins of unknown function (UPF0201; Pfam classification: DUF54) to advance our understanding of the genetic repertoire of archaea. Despite low pairwise amino acid sequence identities (10-40%) and the absence of conserved sequence motifs, the three-dimensional structures of these proteins are remarkably similar to one another. Their common polypeptide chain fold, encompassing a five-stranded antiparallel {beta}-sheet and five {alpha}-helices, proved to be quite unexpectedly similar to that of the RRM-type RNA-binding domain of the ribosomal L5 protein, which is responsible for binding the 5S- rRNA. Structure-based sequence alignments enabled construction of a phylogenetic tree relating UPF0201 family members to L5 ribosomal proteins and other structurally similar RNA binding proteins, thereby expanding our understanding of the evolutionary purview of the RRM superfamily. Analyses of the surfaces of these newly determined UPF0201 structures suggest that they probably do not function as RNA binding proteins, and that this domain specific family of proteins has acquired a novel function in archaebacteria, which awaits experimental elucidation.

  13. Comparative Evolutionary Histories of the Fungal Chitinase Gene Family Reveal Non-Random Size Expansions and Contractions due to Adaptive Natural Selection

    PubMed Central

    Karlsson, Magnus; Stenlid, Jan

    2008-01-01

    Gene duplication and loss play an important role in the evolution of novel functions and for shaping an organism’s gene content. Recently, it was suggested that stress-related genes frequently are exposed to duplications and losses, while growth-related genes show selection against change in copy number. The fungal chitinase gene family constitutes an interesting case study of gene duplication and loss, as their biological roles include growth and development as well as more stress-responsive functions. We used genome sequence data to analyze the size of the chitinase gene family in different fungal taxa, which range from 1 in Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis and Schizosaccharomyces pombe to 20 in Hypocrea jecorina and Emericella nidulans, and to infer their phylogenetic relationships. Novel chitinase subgroups are identified and their phylogenetic relationships with previously known chitinases are discussed. We also employ a stochastic birth and death model to show that the fungal chitinase gene family indeed evolves non-randomly, and we identify six fungal lineages where larger-than-expected expansions (Pezizomycotina, H. jecorina, Gibberella zeae, Uncinocarpus reesii, E. nidulans and Rhizopus oryzae), and two contractions (Coccidioides immitis and S. pombe) potentially indicate the action of adaptive natural selection. The results indicate that antagonistic fungal-fungal interactions are an important process for soil borne ascomycetes, but not for fungal species that are pathogenic in humans. Unicellular growth is correlated with a reduction of chitinase gene copy numbers which emphasizes the requirement of the combined action of several chitinases for filamentous growth. PMID:19204807

  14. Genome-Wide Transcription Profiles Reveal Genotype-Dependent Responses of Biological Pathways and Gene-Families in Daphnia Exposed to Single and Mixed Stressors

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigated the possibilities and limitations of implementing a genome-wide transcription-based approach that takes into account genetic and environmental variation to better understand the response of natural populations to stressors. When exposing two different Daphnia pulex genotypes (a cadmium-sensitive and a cadmium-tolerant one) to cadmium, the toxic cyanobacteria Microcystis aeruginosa, and their mixture, we found that observations at the transcriptomic level do not always explain observations at a higher level (growth, reproduction). For example, although cadmium elicited an adverse effect at the organismal level, almost no genes were differentially expressed after cadmium exposure. In addition, we identified oxidative stress and polyunsaturated fatty acid metabolism-related pathways, as well as trypsin and neurexin IV gene-families as candidates for the underlying causes of genotypic differences in tolerance to Microcystis. Furthermore, the whole-genome transcriptomic data of a stressor mixture allowed a better understanding of mixture responses by evaluating interactions between two stressors at the gene-expression level against the independent action baseline model. This approach has indicated that ubiquinone pathway and the MAPK serine-threonine protein kinase and collagens gene-families were enriched with genes showing an interactive effect in expression response to exposure to the mixture of the stressors, while transcription and translation-related pathways and gene-families were mostly related with genotypic differences in interactive responses to this mixture. Collectively, our results indicate that the methods we employed may improve further characterization of the possibilities and limitations of transcriptomics approaches in the adverse outcome pathway framework and in predictions of multistressor effects on natural populations. PMID:24552364

  15. Characterization of Bipolar Disorder Patient-Specific Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells from a Family Reveals Neurodevelopmental and mRNA Expression Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Madison, Jon M.; Zhou, Fen; Nigam, Aparna; Hussain, Ali; Barker, Douglas D.; Nehme, Ralda; van der Ven, Karlijn; Hsu, Jenny; Wolf, Pavlina; Fleishman, Morgan; O’Dushlaine, Colm; Rose, Sam; Chambert, Kimberly; Lau, Frank H.; Ahfeldt, Tim; Rueckert, Erroll H.; Sheridan, Steven D.; Fass, Daniel M.; Nemesh, James; Mullen, Thomas E.; Daheron, Laurence; McCarroll, Steve; Sklar, Pamela; Perlis, Roy H.; Haggarty, Stephen J.

    2014-01-01

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is a common neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by chronic recurrent episodes of depression and mania. Despite evidence for high heritability of BD, little is known about its underlying pathophysiology. To develop new tools for investigating the molecular and cellular basis of BD we applied a family-based paradigm to derive and characterize a set of 12 induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) lines from a quartet consisting of two BD-affected brothers and their two unaffected parents. Initially, no significant phenotypic differences were observed between iPSCs derived from the different family members. However, upon directed neural differentiation we observed that CXCR4 (CXC chemokine receptor-4) expressing central nervous system (CNS) neural progenitor cells (NPCs) from both BD patients compared to their unaffected parents exhibited multiple phenotypic differences at the level of neurogenesis and expression of genes critical for neuroplasticity, including WNT pathway components and ion channel subunits. Treatment of the CXCR4+ NPCs with a pharmacological inhibitor of glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3), a known regulator of WNT signaling, was found to rescue a progenitor proliferation deficit in the BD-patient NPCs. Taken together, these studies provide new cellular tools for dissecting the pathophysiology of BD and evidence for dysregulation of key pathways involved in neurodevelopment and neuroplasticity. Future generation of additional iPSCs following a family-based paradigm for modeling complex neuropsychiatric disorders in conjunction with in-depth phenotyping holds promise for providing insights into the pathophysiological substrates of BD and is likely to inform the development of targeted therapeutics for its treatment and ideally prevention. PMID:25733313

  16. Mutation analysis of the gene encoding Bruton`s tyrosine kinase in a family with a sporadic case of X-linked agammaglobulinemia reveals three female carriers

    SciTech Connect

    Hagemann, T.L.; Kwan, Sau-Ping; Assa`ad, A.H.

    1995-11-06

    Bruton`s tyrosine kinase (Btk) has been identified as the protein responsible for the primary immunodeficiency X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA). We and others have cloned the gene for Btk and recently reported the genomic organization. Nineteen exons were positioned within the 37 kb gene. With the sequence data derived from our genomic map, we have designed a PCR based assay to directly identify mutations of the Btk gene in germline DNA of patients with XLA. In this report, the assay was used to analyze a family with a sporadic case of XLA to determine if other female relatives carry the disease. A four base-pair deletion was found in the DNA of the affected boy and was further traced through three generations. With the direct identification of the mutations responsible for XLA, we can now diagnose conclusively the disease and identify the immunologically normal female carriers. This same technique can easily be applied to prenatal diagnosis in families where the mutation can be identified. 34 refs., 3 figs.

  17. Genome-Wide Microarrray Analysis Reveals Roles for the REF-1 Family Member HLH-29 in Ferritin Synthesis and Peroxide Stress Response

    PubMed Central

    Quach, Thanh K.; Chou, Han Ting; Wang, Kun; Milledge, Gaolin Zheng; Johnson, Casonya M.

    2013-01-01

    In Caenorhabditis elegans, the six proteins that make up the REF-1 family have been identified as functional homologs of the Hairy/Enhancer of Split (HES) proteins. These transcription factors act in both Notch dependent and Notch-independent pathways to regulate embryonic events during development; however, their post-embryonic functions are not well defined. As a first step toward understanding how the REF-1 family works together to coordinate post-embryonic events, we used gene expression microarray analysis to identify transcriptional targets of HLH-29 in L4/young adult stage animals. Here we show that HLH-29 targets are genes needed for the regulation of growth and lifespan, including genes required for oxidative stress response and fatty acid metabolism, and the ferritin genes, ftn-1 and ftn-2. We show that HLH-29 regulates ftn-1 expression via promoter sequences upstream of the iron-dependent element that is recognized by the hypoxia inducible factor, HIF-1. Additionally, hlh-29 mutants are more resistant to peroxide stress than wild-type animals and ftn-1(RNAi) animals, even in the presence of excess iron. Finally we show that HLH-29 acts parallel to DAF-16 but upstream of the microphthalmia transcription factor ortholog, HLH-30, to regulate ftn-1 expression under normal growth conditions. PMID:23533643

  18. Secondary structure analysis of swine pasivirus (family Picornaviridae) RNA reveals a type-IV IRES and a parechovirus-like 3' UTR organization.

    PubMed

    Boros, Ákos; Fenyvesi, Hajnalka; Pankovics, Péter; Biró, Hunor; Phan, Tung Gia; Delwart, Eric; Reuter, Gábor

    2015-05-01

    The potential RNA structures of the 5' and 3' untranslated regions (UTRs) and cis-acting replication elements (CREs) of a novel pasivirus (PaV) genotype (family Picornaviridae) were analysed. PaV-A3 (KM259923) was identified in a faecal sample from a domestic pig in Hungary with posterior paraplegia of unknown etiology. Based on likely structural features of the 5' UTR, the pasiviruses were inferred to possess Hepacivirus/Pestivirus-like type-IV IRES. The pasivirus CRE was mapped to the 2B genome region, similar to Ljungan virus. The secondary RNA structure of the pasivirus 3' UTR was structurally similar to that of human parechoviruses. The genome, CRE, and 3' UTR of pasiviruses provide further evidence of the common origin of the members of the genera Parechovirus and Pasivirus, although their different 5' UTR IRES types suggest that a recombination event occurred during the divergence these viruses. PMID:25716922

  19. Profiling of the Early Nitrogen Stress Response in the Diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum Reveals a Novel Family of RING-Domain Transcription Factors.

    PubMed

    Matthijs, Michiel; Fabris, Michele; Broos, Stefan; Vyverman, Wim; Goossens, Alain

    2016-01-01

    Diatoms often inhabit highly variable habitats where they are confronted with a wide variety of stresses, frequently including starvation of nutrients such as nitrogen. In this study, the transcriptome of the model diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum was profiled during the onset of nitrogen starvation by RNA sequencing, and overrepresented motifs were determined in promoters of genes that were early and strongly up-regulated during the nitrogen stress response. One of these motifs could be bound by a nitrogen starvation-inducible RING-domain protein termed RING-GAF-Gln-containing protein (RGQ1), which was shown to act as a transcription factor and belongs to a previously uncharacterized family that is conserved in heterokont algae. PMID:26582725

  20. A Comparative Metagenome Survey of the Fecal Microbiota of a Breast- and a Plant-Fed Asian Elephant Reveals an Unexpectedly High Diversity of Glycoside Hydrolase Family Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Ilmberger, Nele; Güllert, Simon; Dannenberg, Joana; Rabausch, Ulrich; Torres, Jeremy; Wemheuer, Bernd; Alawi, Malik; Poehlein, Anja; Chow, Jennifer; Turaev, Dimitrij; Rattei, Thomas; Schmeisser, Christel; Salomon, Jesper; Olsen, Peter B.; Daniel, Rolf; Grundhoff, Adam; Borchert, Martin S.; Streit, Wolfgang R.

    2014-01-01

    A phylogenetic and metagenomic study of elephant feces samples (derived from a three-weeks-old and a six-years-old Asian elephant) was conducted in order to describe the microbiota inhabiting this large land-living animal. The microbial diversity was examined via 16S rRNA gene analysis. We generated more than 44,000 GS-FLX+454 reads for each animal. For the baby elephant, 380 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were identified at 97% sequence identity level; in the six-years-old animal, close to 3,000 OTUs were identified, suggesting high microbial diversity in the older animal. In both animals most OTUs belonged to Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes. Additionally, for the baby elephant a high number of Proteobacteria was detected. A metagenomic sequencing approach using Illumina technology resulted in the generation of 1.1 Gbp assembled DNA in contigs with a maximum size of 0.6 Mbp. A KEGG pathway analysis suggested high metabolic diversity regarding the use of polymers and aromatic and non-aromatic compounds. In line with the high phylogenetic diversity, a surprising and not previously described biodiversity of glycoside hydrolase (GH) genes was found. Enzymes of 84 GH families were detected. Polysaccharide utilization loci (PULs), which are found in Bacteroidetes, were highly abundant in the dataset; some of these comprised cellulase genes. Furthermore the highest coverage for GH5 and GH9 family enzymes was detected for Bacteroidetes, suggesting that bacteria of this phylum are mainly responsible for the degradation of cellulose in the Asian elephant. Altogether, this study delivers insight into the biomass conversion by one of the largest plant-fed and land-living animals. PMID:25208077

  1. Temporal and spatial expression of polygalacturonase gene family members reveals divergent regulation during fleshy fruit ripening and abscission in the monocot species oil palm

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Cell separation that occurs during fleshy fruit abscission and dry fruit dehiscence facilitates seed dispersal, the final stage of plant reproductive development. While our understanding of the evolutionary context of cell separation is limited mainly to the eudicot model systems tomato and Arabidopsis, less is known about the mechanisms underlying fruit abscission in crop species, monocots in particular. The polygalacturonase (PG) multigene family encodes enzymes involved in the depolymerisation of pectin homogalacturonan within the primary cell wall and middle lamella. PG activity is commonly found in the separation layers during organ abscission and dehiscence, however, little is known about how this gene family has diverged since the separation of monocot and eudicots and the consequence of this divergence on the abscission process. Results The objective of the current study was to identify PGs responsible for the high activity previously observed in the abscission zone (AZ) during fruit shedding of the tropical monocot oil palm, and to analyze PG gene expression during oil palm fruit ripening and abscission. We identified 14 transcripts that encode PGs, all of which are expressed in the base of the oil palm fruit. The accumulation of five PG transcripts increase, four decrease and five do not change during ethylene treatments that induce cell separation. One PG transcript (EgPG4) is the most highly induced in the fruit base, with a 700–5000 fold increase during the ethylene treatment. In situ hybridization experiments indicate that the EgPG4 transcript increases preferentially in the AZ cell layers in the base of the fruit in response to ethylene prior to cell separation. Conclusions The expression pattern of EgPG4 is consistent with the temporal and spatial requirements for cell separation to occur during oil palm fruit shedding. The sequence diversity of PGs and the complexity of their expression in the oil palm fruit tissues contrast with data from tomato, suggesting functional divergence underlying the ripening and abscission processes has occurred between these two fruit species. Furthermore, phylogenetic analysis of EgPG4 with PGs from other species suggests some conservation, but also diversification has occurred between monocots and eudicots, in particular between dry and fleshy fruit species. PMID:22920238

  2. Familial progressive supranuclear palsy.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, J; Lantos, P; Stratton, M; Roques, P; Rossor, M

    1993-01-01

    A progressive extrapyramidal syndrome and dementia occurred in three members of one family. The age of onset was in the seventh decade and the affected individuals showed many of the clinical features of progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP). Necropsy of one individual revealed the neuropathological features of PSP. We propose that this family has a familial form of PSP and review the evidence in the literature that a familial form exists. Images PMID:8505637

  3. Analysis of the Fam181 gene family during mouse development reveals distinct strain-specific expression patterns, suggesting a role in nervous system development and function.

    PubMed

    Marks, Matthias; Pennimpede, Tracie; Lange, Lisette; Grote, Phillip; Herrmann, Bernhard G; Wittler, Lars

    2016-01-10

    During somitogenesis differential gene expression can be observed for so-called cyclic genes, which display expression changes with a periodicity of 120min in the mouse. In screens to identify novel cyclic genes in murine embryos, Fam181b was predicted to be an oscillating gene in the presomitic mesoderm (psm). This gene, and its closely related paralog Fam181a, belong to the thus far uncharacterized Fam181 gene family. Here we describe the expression of Fam181b and Fam181a during murine embryonic development. In addition, we confirm oscillation of Fam181b in the psm in-phase with targets of, and regulated by, Notch signaling. Fam181b expression in the psm, as well as in the lateral plate mesoderm, was found to be affected by genetic background. We show that Fam181a and b exhibit partially overlapping mRNA expression patterns, and encode for proteins containing highly-conserved motifs, which predominantly localize to the nucleus. A Fam181b loss-of-function model was generated and found to result in no obvious phenotype. PMID:26407640

  4. Phylogenetic and transcriptomic analyses reveal the evolution of bioluminescence and light detection in marine deep-sea shrimps of the family Oplophoridae (Crustacea: Decapoda).

    PubMed

    Wong, Juliet M; Pérez-Moreno, Jorge L; Chan, Tin-Yam; Frank, Tamara M; Bracken-Grissom, Heather D

    2015-02-01

    Bioluminescence is essential to the survival of many organisms, particularly in the deep sea where light is limited. Shrimp of the family Oplophoridae exhibit a remarkable mechanism of bioluminescence in the form of a secretion used for predatory defense. Three of the ten genera possess an additional mode of bioluminescence in the form of light-emitting organs called photophores. Phylogenetic analyses can be useful for tracing the evolution of bioluminescence, however, the few studies that have attempted to reconcile the relationships within Oplophoridae have generated trees with low-resolution. We present the most comprehensive phylogeny of Oplophoridae to date, with 90% genera coverage using seven genes (mitochondrial and nuclear) across 30 oplophorid species. We use our resulting topology to trace the evolution of bioluminescence within Oplophoridae. Previous studies have suggested that oplophorid visual systems may be tuned to differentiate the separate modes of bioluminescence. While all oplophorid shrimp possess a visual pigment sensitive to blue-green light, only those bearing photophores have an additional pigment sensitive to near-ultraviolet light. We attempt to characterize opsins, visual pigment proteins essential to light detection, in two photophore-bearing species (Systellaspis debilis and Oplophorus gracilirostris) and make inferences regarding their function and evolutionary significance. PMID:25482362

  5. Identification and characterization of plant-specific NAC gene family in canola (Brassica napus L.) reveal novel members involved in cell death.

    PubMed

    Wang, Boya; Guo, Xiaohua; Wang, Chen; Ma, Jieyu; Niu, Fangfang; Zhang, Hanfeng; Yang, Bo; Liang, Wanwan; Han, Feng; Jiang, Yuan-Qing

    2015-03-01

    NAC transcription factors are plant-specific and play important roles in plant development processes, response to biotic and abiotic cues and hormone signaling. However, to date, little is known about the NAC genes in canola (or oilseed rape, Brassica napus L.). In this study, a total of 60 NAC genes were identified from canola through a systematical analysis and mining of expressed sequence tags. Among these, the cDNA sequences of 41 NAC genes were successfully cloned. The translated protein sequences of canola NAC genes with the NAC genes from representative species were phylogenetically clustered into three major groups and multiple subgroups. The transcriptional activities of these BnaNAC proteins were assayed in yeast. In addition, by quantitative real-time RT-PCR, we further observed that some of these BnaNACs were regulated by different hormone stimuli or abiotic stresses. Interestingly, we successfully identified two novel BnaNACs, BnaNAC19 and BnaNAC82, which could elicit hypersensitive response-like cell death when expressed in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves, which was mediated by accumulation of reactive oxygen species. Overall, our work has laid a solid foundation for further characterization of this important NAC gene family in canola. PMID:25616736

  6. Molecular characterization of WFS1 in an Iranian family with Wolfram syndrome reveals a novel frameshift mutation associated with early symptoms.

    PubMed

    Sobhani, Maryam; Tabatabaiefar, Mohammad Amin; Rajab, Asadollah; Kajbafzadeh, Abdol-Mohammad; Noori-Daloii, Mohammad Reza

    2013-10-10

    Wolfram syndrome (WS) is a rare autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder that represents a likely source of childhood diabetes especially among countries in the consanguinity belt. The main responsible gene is WFS1 for which over one hundred mutations have been reported from different ethnic groups. The aim of this study was to identify the molecular etiology of WS and to perform a possible genotype-phenotype correlation in Iranian kindred. An Iranian family with two patients was clinically studied and WS was suspected. Genetic linkage analysis via 5 STR markers was carried out. For identification of mutations, DNA sequencing of WFS1 including all the exons, exon-intron boundaries and the promoter was performed. Linkage analysis indicated linkage to the WFS1 region. After DNA sequencing of WFS1, one novel pathogenic mutation, which causes frameshift alteration c.2177_2178insTCTTC (or c.2173_2177dupTCTTC) in exon eight, was found. The genotype-phenotype correlation analysis suggests that the presence of the homozygous mutation may be associated with early onset of disease symptoms. This study stresses the necessity of considering the molecular analysis of WFS1 in childhood diabetes with some symptoms of WS. PMID:23845777

  7. Comparative analysis of the Dicer-like gene family reveals loss of miR162 target site in SmDCL1 from Salvia miltiorrhiza

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Fenjuan; Qiu, Deyou; Lu, Shanfa

    2015-01-01

    DCL1, the core component for miRNA biogenesis, is itself regulated by miR162 in Arabidopsis. MiRNA-mediated feedback regulation of AtDCL1 is important to maintain the proper level of DCL1 transcripts. However, it is unknown whether the miRNA-mediated regulation of DCL1 is conserved among plants. We analyzed the SmDCL gene family in Salvia miltiorrhiza, an emerging model plant for Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) studies, using a comprehensive approach integrating genome-wide prediction, molecular cloning, gene expression profiling, and posttranscriptional regulation analysis. A total of five SmDCLs were identified. Comparative analysis of SmDCLs and AtDCLs showed an apparent enlargement of SmDCL introns in S. miltiorrhiza. The absence of miR162 in S. miltiorrhiza and the loss of miR162 target site in SmDCL1 were unexpectedly found. Further analysis showed that the miR162 target site was not present in DCL1 from ancient plants and was gained during plant evolution. The gained miR162 target site might be lost in a few modern plants through nucleotide mutations. Our results provide evidence for the gain and loss of miR162 and its target sites in Dicer-like genes during evolution. The data is useful for understanding the evolution of miRNA-mediated feedback regulation of DCLs in plants. PMID:25970825

  8. DNA methylation analyses of the connexin gene family reveal silencing of GJC1 (Connexin45) by promoter hypermethylation in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Sirnes, Solveig; Honne, Hilde; Ahmed, Deeqa; Danielsen, Stine Aske; Rognum, Torleiv O; Meling, Gunn Iren; Leithe, Edward; Rivedal, Edgar; Lothe, Ragnhild A; Lind, Guro E

    2011-05-01

    Gap junctions are specialized plasma membrane domains consisting of channels formed by members of the connexin protein family. Gap junctional intercellular communication is often lost in cancers due to aberrant localization or downregulation of connexins, and connexins are therefore suggested to act as tumor suppressor genes in various tissues. The aim of this study was to investigate the expression pattern and DNA promoter methylation status of connexins in colorectal cancer. Expression of six (GJA1, GJA9, GJB1, GJB2, GJC1 and GJD3) connexin genes was detected in normal colonic tissue samples. GJC1 expression was reduced in colorectal carcinomas compared to normal tissue samples. All analyzed connexins were hypermethylated in colon cancer cell lines, although at various frequencies. GJA4, GJB6 and GJD2 were hypermethylated in 60% (29/48), 25% (12/48) and 96% (46/48) of primary colorectal carcinomas, respectively. However, the methylation status was not associated with gene expression. GJC1 has two alternative promoters, which were methylated in 42% (32/76) and 38% (25/65) of colorectal tumors, and in none of the normal mucosa samples. Expression of GJC1 was significantly lower in methylated compared with unmethylated samples (p < 0.01) and was restored in cell lines treated with the demethylating drug 5-aza-2'deoxycytidine. Taken together, DNA hypermethylation of the promoter region of GJC1, encoding connexin45, is an important mechanism in silencing gene expression in colorectal cancer. PMID:21406965

  9. Familial Dysautonomia (FD) Human Embryonic Stem Cell Derived PNS Neurons Reveal that Synaptic Vesicular and Neuronal Transport Genes Are Directly or Indirectly Affected by IKBKAP Downregulation

    PubMed Central

    Kantor, Gal; Cheishvili, David; Even, Aviel; Birger, Anastasya; Turetsky, Tikva; Gil, Yaniv; Even-Ram, Sharona; Aizenman, Einat; Bashir, Nibal; Maayan, Channa; Razin, Aharon; Reubinoff, Benjamim E.; Weil, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    A splicing mutation in the IKBKAP gene causes Familial Dysautonomia (FD), affecting the IKAP protein expression levels and proper development and function of the peripheral nervous system (PNS). Here we found new molecular insights for the IKAP role and the impact of the FD mutation in the human PNS lineage by using a novel and unique human embryonic stem cell (hESC) line homozygous to the FD mutation originated by pre implantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) analysis. We found that IKBKAP downregulation during PNS differentiation affects normal migration in FD-hESC derived neural crest cells (NCC) while at later stages the PNS neurons show reduced intracellular colocalization between vesicular proteins and IKAP. Comparative wide transcriptome analysis of FD and WT hESC-derived neurons together with the analysis of human brains from FD and WT 12 weeks old embryos and experimental validation of the results confirmed that synaptic vesicular and neuronal transport genes are directly or indirectly affected by IKBKAP downregulation in FD neurons. Moreover we show that kinetin (a drug that corrects IKBKAP alternative splicing) promotes the recovery of IKAP expression and these IKAP functional associated genes identified in the study. Altogether, these results support the view that IKAP might be a vesicular like protein that might be involved in neuronal transport in hESC derived PNS neurons. This function seems to be mostly affected in FD-hESC derived PNS neurons probably reflecting some PNS neuronal dysfunction observed in FD. PMID:26437462

  10. Combined microarray analysis of small cell lung cancer reveals altered apoptotic balance and distinct expression signatures of MYC family gene amplification.

    PubMed

    Kim, Y H; Girard, L; Giacomini, C P; Wang, P; Hernandez-Boussard, T; Tibshirani, R; Minna, J D; Pollack, J R

    2006-01-01

    DNA amplifications and deletions frequently contribute to the development and progression of lung cancer. To identify such novel alterations in small cell lung cancer (SCLC), we performed comparative genomic hybridization on a set of 24 SCLC cell lines, using cDNA microarrays representing approximately 22,000 human genes (providing an average mapping resolution of <70 kb). We identified localized DNA amplifications corresponding to oncogenes known to be amplified in SCLC, including MYC (8q24), MYCN (2p24) and MYCL1 (1p34). Additional highly localized DNA amplifications suggested candidate oncogenes not previously identified as amplified in SCLC, including the antiapoptotic genes TNFRSF4 (1p36), DAD1 (14q11), BCL2L1 (20q11) and BCL2L2 (14q11). Likewise, newly discovered PCR-validated homozygous deletions suggested candidate tumor-suppressor genes, including the proapoptotic genes MAPK10 (4q21) and TNFRSF6 (10q23). To characterize the effect of DNA amplification on gene expression patterns, we performed expression profiling using the same microarray platform. Among our findings, we identified sets of genes whose expression correlated with MYC, MYCN or MYCL1 amplification, with surprisingly little overlap among gene sets. While both MYC and MYCN amplification were associated with increased and decreased expression of known MYC upregulated and downregulated targets, respectively, MYCL1 amplification was associated only with the latter. Our findings support a role of altered apoptotic balance in the pathogenesis of SCLC, and suggest that MYC family genes might affect oncogenesis through distinct sets of targets, in particular implicating the importance of transcriptional repression. PMID:16116477

  11. Comparative genomic analysis reveals independent expansion of a lineage-specific gene family in vertebrates: The class II cytokine receptors and their ligands in mammals and fish

    PubMed Central

    Lutfalla, Georges; Crollius, Hugues Roest; Stange-thomann, Nicole; Jaillon, Olivier; Mogensen, Knud; Monneron, Danièle

    2003-01-01

    Background The high degree of sequence conservation between coding regions in fish and mammals can be exploited to identify genes in mammalian genomes by comparison with the sequence of similar genes in fish. Conversely, experimentally characterized mammalian genes may be used to annotate fish genomes. However, gene families that escape this principle include the rapidly diverging cytokines that regulate the immune system, and their receptors. A classic example is the class II helical cytokines (HCII) including type I, type II and lambda interferons, IL10 related cytokines (IL10, IL19, IL20, IL22, IL24 and IL26) and their receptors (HCRII). Despite the report of a near complete pufferfish (Takifugu rubripes) genome sequence, these genes remain undescribed in fish. Results We have used an original strategy based both on conserved amino acid sequence and gene structure to identify HCII and HCRII in the genome of another pufferfish, Tetraodon nigroviridis that is amenable to laboratory experiments. The 15 genes that were identified are highly divergent and include a single interferon molecule, three IL10 related cytokines and their potential receptors together with two Tissue Factor (TF). Some of these genes form tandem clusters on the Tetraodon genome. Their expression pattern was determined in different tissues. Most importantly, Tetraodon interferon was identified and we show that the recombinant protein can induce antiviral MX gene expression in Tetraodon primary kidney cells. Similar results were obtained in Zebrafish which has 7 MX genes. Conclusion We propose a scheme for the evolution of HCII and their receptors during the radiation of bony vertebrates and suggest that the diversification that played an important role in the fine-tuning of the ancestral mechanism for host defense against infections probably followed different pathways in amniotes and fish. PMID:12869211

  12. Complete Proteomic-Based Enzyme Reaction and Inhibition Kinetics Reveal How Monolignol Biosynthetic Enzyme Families Affect Metabolic Flux and Lignin in Populus trichocarpa[W

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jack P.; Naik, Punith P.; Chen, Hsi-Chuan; Shi, Rui; Lin, Chien-Yuan; Liu, Jie; Shuford, Christopher M.; Li, Quanzi; Sun, Ying-Hsuan; Tunlaya-Anukit, Sermsawat; Williams, Cranos M.; Muddiman, David C.; Ducoste, Joel J.; Sederoff, Ronald R.; Chiang, Vincent L.

    2014-01-01

    We established a predictive kinetic metabolic-flux model for the 21 enzymes and 24 metabolites of the monolignol biosynthetic pathway using Populus trichocarpa secondary differentiating xylem. To establish this model, a comprehensive study was performed to obtain the reaction and inhibition kinetic parameters of all 21 enzymes based on functional recombinant proteins. A total of 104 Michaelis-Menten kinetic parameters and 85 inhibition kinetic parameters were derived from these enzymes. Through mass spectrometry, we obtained the absolute quantities of all 21 pathway enzymes in the secondary differentiating xylem. This extensive experimental data set, generated from a single tissue specialized in wood formation, was used to construct the predictive kinetic metabolic-flux model to provide a comprehensive mathematical description of the monolignol biosynthetic pathway. The model was validated using experimental data from transgenic P. trichocarpa plants. The model predicts how pathway enzymes affect lignin content and composition, explains a long-standing paradox regarding the regulation of monolignol subunit ratios in lignin, and reveals novel mechanisms involved in the regulation of lignin biosynthesis. This model provides an explanation of the effects of genetic and transgenic perturbations of the monolignol biosynthetic pathway in flowering plants. PMID:24619611

  13. Structure analysis of the flavoredoxin from Desulfovibrio vulgaris Miyazaki F reveals key residues that discriminate the functions and properties of the flavin reductase family.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Naoki; Ueda, Yasufumi; Takeuchi, Daisuke; Haruyama, Yoshihiro; Kojima, Shuichi; Sato, Junichi; Niimura, Youichi; Kitamura, Masaya; Higuchi, Yoshiki

    2009-09-01

    The crystal structure of flavoredoxin from Desulfovibrio vulgaris Miyazaki F was determined at 1.05 A resolution and its ferric reductase activity was examined. The aim was to elucidate whether flavoredoxin has structural similarity to ferric reductase and ferric reductase activity, based on the sequence similarity to ferric reductase from Archaeoglobus fulgidus. As expected, flavoredoxin shared a common overall structure with A. fulgidus ferric reductase and displayed weak ferric reductase and flavin reductase activities; however, flavoredoxin contains two FMN molecules per dimer, unlike A. fulgidus ferric reductase, which has only one FMN molecule per dimer. Compared with A. fulgidus ferric reductase, flavoredoxin forms three additional hydrogen bonds and has a significantly smaller solvent-accessible surface area. These observations explain the higher affinity of flavoredoxin for FMN. Unexpectedly, an electron-density map indicated the presence of a Mes molecule on the re-side of the isoalloxazine ring of FMN, and that two zinc ions are bound to the two cysteine residues, Cys39 and Cys40, adjacent to FMN. These two cysteine residues are close to one of the putative ferric ion binding sites of ferric reductase. Based on their structural similarities, we conclude that the corresponding site of ferric reductase is the most plausible site for ferric ion binding. Comparing the structures with related flavin proteins revealed key structural features regarding the discrimination of function (ferric ion or flavin reduction) and a unique electron transport system. PMID:19708087

  14. Genetic analysis of the Replication Protein A large subunit family in Arabidopsis reveals unique and overlapping roles in DNA repair, meiosis and DNA replication

    PubMed Central

    Aklilu, Behailu B.; Soderquist, Ryan S.; Culligan, Kevin M.

    2014-01-01

    Replication Protein A (RPA) is a heterotrimeric protein complex that binds single-stranded DNA. In plants, multiple genes encode the three RPA subunits (RPA1, RPA2 and RPA3), including five RPA1-like genes in Arabidopsis. Phylogenetic analysis suggests two distinct groups composed of RPA1A, RPA1C, RPA1E (ACE group) and RPA1B, RPA1D (BD group). ACE-group members are transcriptionally induced by ionizing radiation, while BD-group members show higher basal transcription and are not induced by ionizing radiation. Analysis of rpa1 T-DNA insertion mutants demonstrates that although each mutant line is likely null, all mutant lines are viable and display normal vegetative growth. The rpa1c and rpa1e single mutants however display hypersensitivity to ionizing radiation, and combination of rpa1c and rpa1e results in additive hypersensitivity to a variety of DNA damaging agents. Combination of the partially sterile rpa1a with rpa1c results in complete sterility, incomplete synapsis and meiotic chromosome fragmentation, suggesting an early role for RPA1C in promoting homologous recombination. Combination of either rpa1c and/or rpa1e with atr revealed additive hypersensitivity phenotypes consistent with each functioning in unique repair pathways. In contrast, rpa1b rpa1d double mutant plants display slow growth and developmental defects under non-damaging conditions. We show these defects in the rpa1b rpa1d mutant are likely the result of defective DNA replication leading to reduction in cell division. PMID:24335281

  15. Getting a High-Speed Family Connection: Associations between Family Media Use and Family Connection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Padilla-Walker, Laura M.; Coyne, Sarah M.; Fraser, Ashley M.

    2012-01-01

    The way families have used the media has substantially changed over the past decade. Within the framework of family systems theory, this paper examines the relations between family media use and family connection in a sample of 453 adolescents (mean age of child = 14.32 years, SD = 0.98, 52% female) and their parents. Results revealed that cell…

  16. Segregation analysis in a family at risk for the Maroteaux–Lamy syndrome conclusively reveals c.1151G>A (p.S384N) as to be a polymorphism

    PubMed Central

    Zanetti, Alessandra; Ferraresi, Elena; Picci, Luigi; Filocamo, Mirella; Parini, Rossella; Rosano, Camillo; Tomanin, Rosella; Scarpa, Maurizio

    2009-01-01

    Maroteaux–Lamy syndrome is an autosomal-recessive disorder due to the deficit of the lysosomal enzyme, arylsulfatase B (ARSB). Among the numerous genomic lesions reported till now, the sequence variant, c.1151G>A (p.S384N), has been associated with a severe phenotype in more than 10% of the patients. We now report the first in vivo demonstration of the polymorphic nature of p.S384N, revealed during the segregation analysis in a family at risk for Maroteaux–Lamy syndrome. The proband, compound heterozygous for c.[944G>A]+[245T>G] (p.[R315Q]+[L82R]), did not carry the p.S384N change, which was instead present in two healthy members of the family, in trans with the causative mutations, p.R315Q and p.L82R, respectively. The hypothesis that p.S384N was a polymorphism was further addressed by reverse dot-blot analysis of 400 control alleles, estimating an allele frequency of 4.5%. To predict the consequences of p.R315Q, p.L82R and p.S384N, we also modeled and compared the three amino-acid changes in the three-dimensional ARSB structure. The in silico analysis predicted a local protein misfolding in the presence of p.R315Q and p.L82R. On the contrary, no evident problem was predicted in the case of p.S384N, occurring on the protein surface, far from the active site. Overall, these findings strongly support the hypothesis that the non-synonymous change p.S384N is a polymorphism. Moreover, our results emphasize the need for caution in drawing conclusions from a novel variant allele before screening at least 50 healthy control subjects. PMID:19259130

  17. Family Issues

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Living with Autism > Family Issues Family Issues A child’s autism diagnosis affects every member of the family in ... can help their family by informing their other children about autism and the complications it introduces, understanding the challenges ...

  18. Indicators of Familial Alcoholism in Children's Kinetic Family Drawings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holt, Elizabeth S.; Kaiser, Donna H.

    2001-01-01

    Attempts to delineate indicators in children's depictions of family that suggest the presence of parental alcoholism. Kinetic Family Drawings from two groups of children were collected. Statistical analysis revealed two of six items of the evaluation - depiction of isolation of self and isolation of other family members - were significantly higher…

  19. The crystal structures of apo and cAMP-bound GlxR from Corynebacterium glutamicum reveal structural and dynamic changes upon cAMP binding in CRP/FNR family transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Townsend, Philip D; Jungwirth, Britta; Pojer, Florence; Bußmann, Michael; Money, Victoria A; Cole, Stewart T; Pühler, Alfred; Tauch, Andreas; Bott, Michael; Cann, Martin J; Pohl, Ehmke

    2014-01-01

    The cyclic AMP-dependent transcriptional regulator GlxR from Corynebacterium glutamicum is a member of the super-family of CRP/FNR (cyclic AMP receptor protein/fumarate and nitrate reduction regulator) transcriptional regulators that play central roles in bacterial metabolic regulatory networks. In C. glutamicum, which is widely used for the industrial production of amino acids and serves as a non-pathogenic model organism for members of the Corynebacteriales including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the GlxR homodimer controls the transcription of a large number of genes involved in carbon metabolism. GlxR therefore represents a key target for understanding the regulation and coordination of C. glutamicum metabolism. Here we investigate cylic AMP and DNA binding of GlxR from C. glutamicum and describe the crystal structures of apo GlxR determined at a resolution of 2.5 Å, and two crystal forms of holo GlxR at resolutions of 2.38 and 1.82 Å, respectively. The detailed structural analysis and comparison of GlxR with CRP reveals that the protein undergoes a distinctive conformational change upon cyclic AMP binding leading to a dimer structure more compatible to DNA-binding. As the two binding sites in the GlxR homodimer are structurally identical dynamic changes upon binding of the first ligand are responsible for the allosteric behavior. The results presented here show how dynamic and structural changes in GlxR lead to optimization of orientation and distance of its two DNA-binding helices for optimal DNA recognition. PMID:25469635

  20. The Crystal Structures of Apo and cAMP-Bound GlxR from Corynebacterium glutamicum Reveal Structural and Dynamic Changes upon cAMP Binding in CRP/FNR Family Transcription Factors

    PubMed Central

    Townsend, Philip D.; Jungwirth, Britta; Pojer, Florence; Bußmann, Michael; Money, Victoria A.; Cole, Stewart T.; Pühler, Alfred; Tauch, Andreas; Bott, Michael; Cann, Martin J.; Pohl, Ehmke

    2014-01-01

    The cyclic AMP-dependent transcriptional regulator GlxR from Corynebacterium glutamicum is a member of the super-family of CRP/FNR (cyclic AMP receptor protein/fumarate and nitrate reduction regulator) transcriptional regulators that play central roles in bacterial metabolic regulatory networks. In C. glutamicum, which is widely used for the industrial production of amino acids and serves as a non-pathogenic model organism for members of the Corynebacteriales including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the GlxR homodimer controls the transcription of a large number of genes involved in carbon metabolism. GlxR therefore represents a key target for understanding the regulation and coordination of C. glutamicum metabolism. Here we investigate cylic AMP and DNA binding of GlxR from C. glutamicum and describe the crystal structures of apo GlxR determined at a resolution of 2.5 Å, and two crystal forms of holo GlxR at resolutions of 2.38 and 1.82 Å, respectively. The detailed structural analysis and comparison of GlxR with CRP reveals that the protein undergoes a distinctive conformational change upon cyclic AMP binding leading to a dimer structure more compatible to DNA-binding. As the two binding sites in the GlxR homodimer are structurally identical dynamic changes upon binding of the first ligand are responsible for the allosteric behavior. The results presented here show how dynamic and structural changes in GlxR lead to optimization of orientation and distance of its two DNA-binding helices for optimal DNA recognition. PMID:25469635

  1. Family History

    MedlinePLUS

    Your family history includes health information about you and your close relatives. Families have many factors in common, including their genes, ... as heart disease, stroke, and cancer. Having a family member with a disease raises your risk, but ...

  2. Family Folklore

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kotkin, Amy J.; Baker, Holly C.

    1977-01-01

    Discusses the Family Folklore Program of the Smithsonian Institution's annual Festival of American Folklife, in which the whole family can be involved in tracing family history through story telling, photographs, etc. (MS)

  3. Family Privilege

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seita, John R.

    2014-01-01

    Family privilege is defined as "strengths and supports gained through primary caring relationships." A generation ago, the typical family included two parents and a bevy of kids living under one roof. Now, every variation of blended caregiving qualifies as family. But over the long arc of human history, a real family was a…

  4. [Family Involvement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alliance: The Newsletter of the National Transition Alliance, 1996

    1996-01-01

    This theme issue provides four articles that address family involvement in the transition of youth with disabilities from school to work. The first article, "Family Involvement" by Marge Goldberg and Shauna McDonald, offers evidence of the importance of family involvement at this stage of the individual's life, reports on families' experiences,…

  5. Family Recovery.

    PubMed

    Spaniol, LeRoy; Nelson, Ann

    2015-10-01

    This paper describes the recovery process of families of people with severe mental illnesses. The paper describes the phases of family recovery and useful interventions by phase with the family by professionals. The recovery process of people with serious mental illnesses has been well documented but that of the family has been neglected. Hopefully, this paper will generate further research into the impact of serious mental illnesses on family members. PMID:25947133

  6. Family Member Involvement in Hastened Death

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starks, Helene; Back, Anthony L.; Pearlman, Robert A.; Koenig, Barbara A.; Hsu, Clarissa; Gordon, Judith R.; Bharucha, Ashok J.

    2007-01-01

    When patients pursue a hastened death, how is the labor of family caregiving affected? The authors examined this question in a qualitative study of 35 families. Four cases reveal the main themes: "taking care" included mutual protection between patients and family members; "midwifing the death" without professional support left families unprepared…

  7. Acetone Formation in the Vibrio Family: a New Pathway for Bacterial Leucine Catabolism

    PubMed Central

    Nemecek-Marshall, Michele; Wojciechowski, Cheryl; Wagner, William P.; Fall, Ray

    1999-01-01

    There is current interest in biological sources of acetone, a volatile organic compound that impacts atmospheric chemistry. Here, we determined that leucine-dependent acetone formation is widespread in the Vibrionaceae. Sixteen Vibrio isolates, two Listonella species, and two Photobacterium angustum isolates produced acetone in the presence of l-leucine. Shewanella isolates produced much less acetone. Growth of Vibrio splendidus and P. angustum in a fermentor with controlled aeration revealed that acetone was produced after a lag in late logarithmic or stationary phase of growth, depending on the medium, and was not derived from acetoacetate by nonenzymatic decarboxylation in the medium. l-Leucine, but not d-leucine, was converted to acetone with a stoichiometry of approximately 0.61 mol of acetone per mol of l-leucine. Testing various potential leucine catabolites as precursors of acetone showed that only ?-ketoisocaproate was efficiently converted by whole cells to acetone. Acetone production was blocked by a nitrogen atmosphere but not by electron transport inhibitors, suggesting that an oxygen-dependent reaction is required for leucine catabolism. Metabolic labeling with deuterated (isopropyl-d7)-l-leucine revealed that the isopropyl carbons give rise to acetone with full retention of deuterium in each methyl group. These results suggest the operation of a new catabolic pathway for leucine in vibrios that is distinct from the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A pathway seen in pseudomonads. PMID:10601206

  8. Sibling Ordinal Position and Family Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonough, James J., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Results for the 30 families as seen as "teaching-demonstration" families suggest that Adler's contention that more "first and youngest" children reveal problems and concerns (as defined by their parents) is correct. (Author)

  9. Family Meals

    MedlinePLUS

    ... A With Robert Irvine Pregnant? What to Expect Family Meals KidsHealth > Parents > Nutrition & Fitness Center > Healthy Eating & ... even more important as kids get older. Making Family Meals Happen It can be a big challenge ...

  10. Familial gigantism.

    PubMed

    Herder, Wouter W de

    2012-01-01

    Familial GH-secreting tumors are seen in association with three separate hereditary clinical syndromes: multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1, Carney complex, and familial isolated pituitary adenomas. PMID:22584702

  11. Family History

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Brain Aneurysm Statistics and Facts Seeking Medical Attention Pediatric Aneurysms Brain Aneurysm Causes and Risk Factors Family History ... Brain Aneurysm Statistics and Facts Seeking Medical Attention Pediatric Aneurysms Brain Aneurysm Causes and Risk Factors Family History ...

  12. Rural Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goetz, Kathy, Ed.

    1992-01-01

    This "special focus" journal issue consists of 13 individual articles on the theme of rural family programs relating to school, health services, church, and other institutions. It includes: (1) "Towards a Rural Family Policy" (Judith K. Chynoweth and Michael D. Campbell); (2) "Montana: Council for Families Collaborates for Prevention (Jean…

  13. Family Support.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wieck, Colleen, Ed.; McBride, Marijo, Ed.

    1990-01-01

    This "Feature Issue" of the quarterly journal "Impact" presents 19 brief articles on family support systems in the United States for persons with developmental disabilities and their families. Emphasis is on provisions of Public Law 99-457. Articles include: "Family Support in the United States: Setting a Course for the 1990s" (James Knoll);…

  14. Jamaican families.

    PubMed

    Miner, Dianne Cooney

    2003-01-01

    The study of the family in the Caribbean originated with European scholars who assumed the universality of the patriarchal nuclear family and the primacy of this structure to the healthy functioning of society. Matrifocal Caribbean families thus were seen as chaotic and disorganized and inadequate to perform the essential tasks of the social system. This article provides a more current discussion of the Jamaican family. It argues that its structure is the result of the agency and adaptation of its members and not the root cause of the increasing marginalization of peoples in the developing world. The article focuses on families living in poverty and how the family structure supports essential family functions, adaptations, and survival. PMID:12597672

  15. Revealing Rembrandt

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    The power and significance of artwork in shaping human cognition is self-evident. The starting point for our empirical investigations is the view that the task of neuroscience is to integrate itself with other forms of knowledge, rather than to seek to supplant them. In our recent work, we examined a particular aspect of the appreciation of artwork using present-day functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Our results emphasized the continuity between viewing artwork and other human cognitive activities. We also showed that appreciation of a particular aspect of artwork, namely authenticity, depends upon the co-ordinated activity between the brain regions involved in multiple decision making and those responsible for processing visual information. The findings about brain function probably have no specific consequences for understanding how people respond to the art of Rembrandt in comparison with their response to other artworks. However, the use of images of Rembrandt's portraits, his most intimate and personal works, clearly had a significant impact upon our viewers, even though they have been spatially confined to the interior of an MRI scanner at the time of viewing. Neuroscientific studies of humans viewing artwork have the capacity to reveal the diversity of human cognitive responses that may be induced by external advice or context as people view artwork in a variety of frameworks and settings. PMID:24795552

  16. Siblings and Parents in One-Parent Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shapiro, Edna K.; Wallace, Doris B.

    1987-01-01

    Examination of six one- and two-parent families reveals the following: (1) members of the same family have different perceptions of family experiences, including divorce and its impact on family relationships; (2) single parents seem to become closer to their children than do married parents; and (3) a one-parent two-sibling family differs from a…

  17. Family Empowerment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinclair, Mary F., Ed.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    This feature issue of IMPACT focuses on the empowerment of families with a member who has a developmental disability. It presents strategies and models for a collaborative, respectful approach to service provision, and presents the experiences of families in seeking support and assistance. Feature articles include "Two Generations of Disability: A…

  18. Family Workshops

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Dave; Rees-Jones, Tanny

    1978-01-01

    A Family Workshop is an informal, multidisciplined educational program for adults and children, organized by a team of teachers. This article discusses the Lavender Hill Family Workshop, one of many, which attempts to provide education in various subject areas for adults and for children while also integrating both objectives in order to educate…

  19. Family violence.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, S J

    2000-01-01

    Domestic and intimate partner abuse, child and adolescent physical and sexual abuse, and elder abuse constitute family violence. Such violence is responsible for a significant proportion of intentional injury and, accordingly, is a major public health problem. This chapter provides information on aspects of each type of family violence. PMID:10885265

  20. Family Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naturescope, 1986

    1986-01-01

    Focuses on various aspects of mammal family life ranging from ways different species are born to how different mammals are raised. Learning activities include making butter from cream, creating birth announcements for mammals, and playing a password game on family life. (ML)

  1. Family Potyviridae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The International Committee on the Taxonomy of Viruses potyvirus study group has revised the description of the family Potyviridae for inclusion in the ICTV 9th report. Characteristic features of each genus within the family is presented. Revised criteria for demarcation and nomenclature of viral sp...

  2. FAMILY POTYVIRIDAE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The International Committee on the Taxonomy of Viruses potyvirus study group has revised the description of the family Geminiviridae for inclusion in the ICTV 8th report. Characteristic features of each genus within the family is presented. Revised criteria for demarcation and nomenclature of vira...

  3. FAMILY GEMINIVIRIDAE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The International Committee on the Taxonomy of Viruses geminivirus study group has revised the description of the family Geminiviridae for inclusion in the ICTV 8th report. Characteristic features of each genus within the family is presented. Revised criteria for demarcation and nomenclature of vi...

  4. Family Health and Family Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    World Health Organization, Copenhagen (Denmark). Regional Office for Europe.

    This document is made up of a selection of some of the papers distributed to participants in courses on "Family Health and Family Planning" which have been organized each year since 1973 by the International Children's Center and the World Health Organization Regional Office for Europe. Six courses, held between 1973 and 1978, brought together a…

  5. Genetic recombination at the human RH locus: A family study of the red-cell Evans phenotype reveals a transfer of exons 2-6 from the RHD to the RHCE gene

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, C.H.; Chen, Y.; Reid, M.; Ghosh, S.

    1996-10-01

    The human RH locus appears to consist of two structural genes, D and CE, which map on the short arm p34-36 of chromosome 1 and specify a most complex system of blood-group genetic polymorphisms. Here we describe a family study of the Evans (also known as {open_quotes}D..{open_quotes}) phenotype, a codominant trait associated with both qualitative and quantitative changes in D-antigen expression. A cataract-causing mutation was also inherited in this family and was apparently cotransmitted with Evans, suggesting a chromosomal linkage of these two otherwise unrelated traits. Southern blot analysis and allele-specific PCR showed the linkage of Evans with a SphI RFLP marker and the presence of a hybrid gene in the RH locus. To delineate the pattern of gene expression, the composition and structure of Rh-polypeptide transcripts were characterized by reverse transcriptase-PCR and nucleotide sequencing. This resulted in the identification of a novel Rh transcript expressed only in the Evans-positive erythroid cells. Sequence analysis showed that the transcript maintained a normal open reading frame but occurred as a CE-D-CE composite in which exons 2-6 of the CE gene were replaced by the homologous counterpart of the D gene. This hybrid gene was predicted to encode a CE-D-CE fusion protein whose surface expression correlates with the Evans phenotype. The mode and consequence of such a recombination event suggest the occurrence, in the RH locus, of a segmental DNA transfer via the mechanism of gene conversion. 31 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Family Issues

    MedlinePLUS

    ... not mean that everyone gets along all the time. Conflicts are a part of family life. Many things can lead to conflict, such as illness, disability, addiction, job loss, school problems, and marital issues. Listening to ...

  7. Family Lessons and Funds of Knowledge: College-Going Paths in Mexican American Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiyama, Judy Marquez

    2011-01-01

    Families are crucial in the development of a college-going culture in the home. This qualitative study illustrates that Mexican American families are no exception. Using a multiple case study design, this study explored the funds of knowledge present in Mexican American families. Findings from this study reveal how daily educational practices,…

  8. Families Speak to Early Childhood Teachers: Impressions and Expectations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Suzanne B.; Dykes, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Investigators interviewed 54 families of children with disabilities ages seven through nine to examine the expectations that families of young children hold for their child's teacher. Responses themes were examined to determine if a pattern existed between families of different groups of children. Results reveal many families expressed true…

  9. Seven New Complete Plastome Sequences Reveal Rampant Independent Loss of the ndh Gene Family across Orchids and Associated Instability of the Inverted Repeat/Small Single-Copy Region Boundaries

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Michael J.; Neubig, Kurt M.; Williams, Norris H.; Whitten, W. Mark; Kim, Joo-Hwan

    2015-01-01

    Earlier research has revealed that the ndh loci have been pseudogenized, truncated, or deleted from most orchid plastomes sequenced to date, including in all available plastomes of the two most species-rich subfamilies, Orchidoideae and Epidendroideae. This study sought to resolve deeper-level phylogenetic relationships among major orchid groups and to refine the history of gene loss in the ndh loci across orchids. The complete plastomes of seven orchids, Oncidium sphacelatum (Epidendroideae), Masdevallia coccinea (Epidendroideae), Sobralia callosa (Epidendroideae), Sobralia aff. bouchei (Epidendroideae), Elleanthus sodiroi (Epidendroideae), Paphiopedilum armeniacum (Cypripedioideae), and Phragmipedium longifolium (Cypripedioideae) were sequenced and analyzed in conjunction with all other available orchid and monocot plastomes. Most ndh loci were found to be pseudogenized or lost in Oncidium, Paphiopedilum and Phragmipedium, but surprisingly, all ndh loci were found to retain full, intact reading frames in Sobralia, Elleanthus and Masdevallia. Character mapping suggests that the ndh genes were present in the common ancestor of orchids but have experienced independent, significant losses at least eight times across four subfamilies. In addition, ndhF gene loss was correlated with shifts in the position of the junction of the inverted repeat (IR) and small single-copy (SSC) regions. The Orchidaceae have unprecedented levels of homoplasy in ndh gene presence/absence, which may be correlated in part with the unusual life history of orchids. These results also suggest that ndhF plays a role in IR/SSC junction stability. PMID:26558895

  10. Work, Family and Community Support as Predictors of Work-Family Conflict: A Study of Low-Income Workers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griggs, Tracy Lambert; Casper, Wendy J.; Eby, Lillian T.

    2013-01-01

    This study examines relationships between support from work, family and community domains with time- and strain-based work-family conflict in a sample of low-income workers. Results reveal significant within-domain and cross-domain relationships between support from all three life domains with work--family conflict. With respect to family support,…

  11. Family Hypnotherapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Araoz, Daniel L.; Negley-Parker, Esther

    1985-01-01

    A therapeutic model to help families activate experiential and right hemispheric functioning through hypnosis is presented in detail, together with a clinical illustration. Different situations in which this model is effective are mentioned and one such set of circumstances is described. (Author)

  12. Family Disruptions

    MedlinePLUS

    ... and Returns Do you or your spouse frequently travel on business? These can be disruptive times for your child and for the family as ... these out-of-town trips. Spend as much time as it takes to explain where you are ... before and during your travels. You need to acknowledge and accept her feelings: " ...

  13. Serving Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Link, Geoffrey; Beggs, Marjorie; Seiderman, Ethel

    Parent Services Project (PSP), the first comprehensive program of resources and mental health activities for parents offered at child care centers in the San Francisco Bay Area (California), has expanded to centers in six states, serving over 19,000 families. This report describes the program's history, aims, and achievements, along with specific…

  14. My Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alaska State-Operated Schools, Anchorage.

    This elementary reader is designed for use in a bilingual Inupiat-English program in Buckland and Deering, Alaska. It is the story of a small boy named Paul and his family. The Inupiat text and its English equivalent are never in opposition. The Inupiat text is presented on a picture page, with the English on the back. The illustrations, by J.…

  15. FAMILY TYMOVIRIDAE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This article provides a brief review of the taxonomic structure, virion properties, genome organization and replication strategy, antigenic properties, and biological properties of viruses in the family Tymoviridae. Criteria for demarcation of genus and species are provided. A brief review of each...

  16. Small Families

    MedlinePLUS

    ... or as an individual, if you are a single parent). Taking a few hours off from each other ... last few generations, most American families were two-parent ones; living ... worked outside the home. In many ways, this formula worked well: There ...

  17. Family Caregivers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frazier, Billie H.

    This document contains a brief bibliography of peer-reviewed literature, with abstracts, on family caregiving. It is one of 12 bibliographies on aging prepared by the National Agricultural Library for its "Pathfinders" series of publications. Topics covered by the other 11 bibliographies include aging parents, adult children, dementia and…

  18. Families & Television.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Dyck, Nicholas B.

    1983-01-01

    Argues that television reflects the ideal of American family life in its programs, and that adverse behavior is correlated with amounts of time spent viewing rather than program content. Television can offer rich source material for the imagination, but parents need to actively guide children's viewing throughout their formative years. (MBR)

  19. Functional characterization of two new members of the caffeoyl CoA O-methyltransferase-like gene family from Vanilla planifolia reveals a new class of plastid-localized O-methyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Widiez, Thomas; Hartman, Thomas G; Dudai, Nativ; Yan, Qing; Lawton, Michael; Havkin-Frenkel, Daphna; Belanger, Faith C

    2011-08-01

    Caffeoyl CoA O-methyltransferases (OMTs) have been characterized from numerous plant species and have been demonstrated to be involved in lignin biosynthesis. Higher plant species are known to have additional caffeoyl CoA OMT-like genes, which have not been well characterized. Here, we identified two new caffeoyl CoA OMT-like genes by screening a cDNA library from specialized hair cells of pods of the orchid Vanilla planifolia. Characterization of the corresponding two enzymes, designated Vp-OMT4 and Vp-OMT5, revealed that in vitro both enzymes preferred as a substrate the flavone tricetin, yet their sequences and phylogenetic relationships to other enzymes are distinct from each other. Quantitative analysis of gene expression indicated a dramatic tissue-specific expression pattern for Vp-OMT4, which was highly expressed in the hair cells of the developing pod, the likely location of vanillin biosynthesis. Although Vp-OMT4 had a lower activity with the proposed vanillin precursor, 3,4-dihydroxybenzaldehyde, than with tricetin, the tissue specificity of expression suggests it may be a candidate for an enzyme involved in vanillin biosynthesis. In contrast, the Vp-OMT5 gene was mainly expressed in leaf tissue and only marginally expressed in pod hair cells. Phylogenetic analysis suggests Vp-OMT5 evolved from a cyanobacterial enzyme and it clustered within a clade in which the sequences from eukaryotic species had predicted chloroplast transit peptides. Transient expression of a GFP-fusion in tobacco demonstrated that Vp-OMT5 was localized in the plastids. This is the first flavonoid OMT demonstrated to be targeted to the plastids. PMID:21629984

  20. Familial hypertriglyceridemia.

    PubMed

    Tullu, Milind S; Advirkar, Asmita V; Ghildiyal, Radha G; Tambe, Shrinivas

    2008-12-01

    Familial hypertriglyceridemia (FHTG) is an uncommon primary (genetic) dyslipidemia. FHTG is characterized by moderately elevated serum triglycerides, usually in the absence of significant hypercholesterolemia and rarely manifests in childhood. We report an eight-month-old boy incidentally diagnosed as a case of FHTG due to lipemic serum (patient was admitted for malaria with anemia). He had elevated serum triglycerides with normal serum cholesterol, but had no symptoms related to the primary disorder (FHTG). PMID:19057857

  1. Trematodes of the family Opisthorchiidae: a minireview

    PubMed Central

    King, Sandie

    2001-01-01

    Examination of the original descriptions of genera placed within the family Opisthorchiidae has revealed that only 33 of the original 43 genera are valid members of this family. Further study of these descriptions should also reveal that many of the subfamilies are also invalid. With reference to the original descriptions of these genera, and subsequent literature, a brief survey of the family has been compiled. Information on the spectrum of definitive hosts that these helminths parasitize is provided, as well as information on the life cycles, geographic distribution, and socioeconomic impacts of the family. More in-depth information is given on those species that are of particular medical importance; namely, Clonorchis sinensis, Opisthorchis viverrini, and O. felineus. The final aims of this review are to provide information on the entire genera of the family Opisthorchiidae, which will aid understanding of the phylogenetic relationships not only within the family, but also within the Class Trematoda. PMID:11590910

  2. From Family Therapy to Family Intervention.

    PubMed

    Josephson, Allan M

    2015-07-01

    For many, family therapy refers to sessions in which all family members are present. Yet in contemporary psychiatry there are many ways to work with families in addition to this classic concept. This article proposes family intervention as an encompassing term for a new family paradigm in child and adolescent psychiatry. Developmental psychopathology is a guiding principle of this paradigm. A full range of ways to work with families clinically is described with clinical examples. PMID:26092733

  3. Female-Headed Families: Trends and Implications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wattenberg, Esther; Reinhardt, Hazel

    1979-01-01

    Current demographic data reveal that the form of the American family is undergoing dramatic change. One change is the unprecedented rise in the number of female-headed families. Reviews current demographic trends, examines the factors behind these changes and their implications, and proposes areas for further research. (Author)

  4. Revealing a Child's Pathology: Physicians' Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scelles, Regine; Aubert-Godard, Anne; Gargiulo, Marcela; Avant, Monique; Gortais, Jean

    2010-01-01

    In this study, 12 physicians and 12 care-givers were interviewed using semi-structured interviews. We explored physicians' experiences when they revealed a diagnosis. We also tried to understand which family members the physician was thinking of, with whom they identified themselves, and their first choice of the person to whom they prefer to…

  5. Familial Adenomatous Polyposis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Familial Adenomatous Polyposis Request Permissions Print to PDF Familial Adenomatous Polyposis Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board , 09/2015 What is familial adenomatous polyposis? Classic familial adenomatous polyposis, called FAP or classic ...

  6. Reclaiming Family Privilege

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seita, John

    2012-01-01

    The pull for family is strong, almost primeval, most likely it is evolutionary, and for those lacking the benefit of family or Family Privilege, the loss of family is painful and profoundly sad. Young people who struggle to cope without stable family connections are profoundly aware of their lack of "Family Privilege." In this article, the author…

  7. Family practice in Turkey: views of family practice residents.

    PubMed

    Akdeniz, Melahat; Yaman, Hakan; Senol, Ye?im; Akbayin, Zelal; Cihan, Fatma Gök?in; Celik, Sercan Bulut

    2011-05-01

    Turkey's family practice training program is aimed at providing further training to clinically proficient family physicians who serve the community. A survey conducted in 2001 revealed that there was a need for providing additional training and more time in a specially dedicated family practice placement for family practitioners. Recent changes in the Turkish health care system have also impacted the training environment of family practice residents. Clearly, training needs to change with time. The aims of this study are to investigate the attitudes of resident family practice physicians regarding their training in the health care system in order to gather their views on the hospital learning environment, and to estimate their burnout levels. For this research, the design included a 1-phase cross-sectional study. This study was undertaken in 2008 in departments of family medicine at universities (n = 21) and training and research hospitals of the Ministry of Health (n = 11). Approximately 250 family practice residents in Turkey were approached. In total, 174 residents participated (70% response rate). The survey instruments included a questionnaire with 25 queries and 2 scales: The Postgraduate Hospital Educational Environment Measure and the Maslach Burnout Questionnaire-Human Services Survey. The average age of the participants was 32.2 years (standard deviation, 4.5 years; range, 24-57 years). The gender distribution was 57.6% women and 42.4% men. Marital status was 34.7% single, 62.9% married, and 2.4% divorced/widowed. In our results, residents affirmed that university hospitals were the best facilities for residency training. Their future plans confirmed that most would like to work in family health centers. This sample showed average levels of emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and lack of personal accomplishment. Perceptions of professional autonomy, quality of training, and social support were below average. It may be concluded that certain milestones in the development of family practice in Turkey have been fulfilled. The new regulation for postgraduate training has increased the share of family practice training to 50% (18 months). Establishment of educational family health centers has been planned. Introduction of the formative and summative assessment processes in family practice training is anticipated. It is expected that an assessment such as the Membership of the Royal College of General Practitioners (International) (mRCGP[INT]) examination would be helpful for Turkish residents in reaching these goals. PMID:21566424

  8. Family: Involving Families in Student Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tracy, Jaclynn Rogers

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the importance of family and community involvement to student achievement. Schools can establish an effective partnership among schools, families, and the community by providing support for families, creating family-community learning centers, supporting the community, providing opportunities for shared responsibility, facilitating the…

  9. The Impact of Family Life Events and Changes on the Health of a Chronically Ill Child.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patterson, Joan M.; McCubbin, Hamilton I.

    1983-01-01

    Examined the relationship between family stress and changes in health of a child with cystic fibrosis. Data from parents (N=100) and clinic records revealed that a decline in pulmonary functioning was associated with family life changes, especially in family development and relationships, family management and decisions, and family finances.…

  10. Clustered protocadherin family.

    PubMed

    Yagi, Takeshi

    2008-06-01

    The brain is a complex system composed of enormous numbers of differentiated neurons, and brain structure and function differs among vertebrates. To examine the molecular mechanisms underlying brain structure and function, it is important to identify the molecules involved in generating neural diversity and organization. The clustered protocadherin (Pcdh) family is the largest subgroup of the diverse cadherin superfamily. The clustered Pcdh proteins are predominantly expressed in the brain and their gene structures in vertebrates are diversified. In mammals, the clustered Pcdh family consists of three gene clusters: Pcdh-alpha, Pcdh-beta, and Pcdh-gamma. During brain development, this family is upregulated by neuronal differentiation, and Pcdh-alpha is then dramatically downregulated by myelination. Clustered Pcdh expression continues in the olfactory bulb, hippocampus, and cerebellum until adulthood. Structural analysis of the first cadherin domain of the Pcdh-alpha protein revealed it lacks the features that classical cadherins require for homophilic adhesiveness, but it contains Pcdh-specific loop structures. In Pcdh-alpha, an RGD motif on a specific loop structure binds beta1-integrin. For gene expression, the gene clusters are regulated by multiple promoters and alternative cis splicing. At the single-cell level, several dozen Pcdh-alpha and -gamma mRNA are regulated monoallelically, resulting in the combinatorial expression of distinct variable exons. The Pcdh-alpha and Pcdh-gamma proteins also form oligomers, further increasing the molecular diversity at the cell surface. Thus, the unique features of the clustered Pcdh family may provide the molecular basis for generating individual cellular diversity and the complex neural circuitry of the brain. PMID:18430161

  11. Familism, Family Environment, and Suicide Attempts among Latina Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pena, Juan B.; Kuhlberg, Jill A.; Zayas, Luis H.; Baumann, Ana A.; Gulbas, Lauren; Hausmann-Stabile, Carolina; Nolle, Allyson P.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we examined the relationship between familism and family environment type as well as the relationship between family environment type and suicide attempts among Latina youth. Latina teen attempters (n = 109) and nonattempters (n = 107) were recruited from the New York City area. Latent class analysis revealed three family

  12. Shared vision promotes family firm performance

    PubMed Central

    Neff, John E.

    2015-01-01

    A clear picture of the influential drivers of private family firm performance has proven to be an elusive target. The unique characteristics of private family owned firms necessitate a broader, non-financial approach to reveal firm performance drivers. This research study sought to specify and evaluate the themes that distinguish successful family firms from less successful family firms. In addition, this study explored the possibility that these themes collectively form an effective organizational culture that improves longer-term firm performance. At an organizational level of analysis, research findings identified four significant variables: Shared Vision (PNS), Role Clarity (RCL), Confidence in Management (CON), and Professional Networking (OLN) that positively impacted family firm financial performance. Shared Vision exhibited the strongest positive influence among the significant factors. In addition, Family Functionality (APGAR), the functional integrity of the family itself, exhibited a significant supporting role. Taken together, the variables collectively represent an effective family business culture (EFBC) that positively impacted the long-term financial sustainability of family owned firms. The index of effective family business culture also exhibited potential as a predictive non-financial model of family firm performance. PMID:26042075

  13. Shared vision promotes family firm performance.

    PubMed

    Neff, John E

    2015-01-01

    A clear picture of the influential drivers of private family firm performance has proven to be an elusive target. The unique characteristics of private family owned firms necessitate a broader, non-financial approach to reveal firm performance drivers. This research study sought to specify and evaluate the themes that distinguish successful family firms from less successful family firms. In addition, this study explored the possibility that these themes collectively form an effective organizational culture that improves longer-term firm performance. At an organizational level of analysis, research findings identified four significant variables: Shared Vision (PNS), Role Clarity (RCL), Confidence in Management (CON), and Professional Networking (OLN) that positively impacted family firm financial performance. Shared Vision exhibited the strongest positive influence among the significant factors. In addition, Family Functionality (APGAR), the functional integrity of the family itself, exhibited a significant supporting role. Taken together, the variables collectively represent an effective family business culture (EFBC) that positively impacted the long-term financial sustainability of family owned firms. The index of effective family business culture also exhibited potential as a predictive non-financial model of family firm performance. PMID:26042075

  14. The Changing Family Structure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernard van Leer Foundation Newsletter, 1993

    1993-01-01

    This newsletter issue contains feature articles and short reports on how and why family structures are undergoing substantial change in many parts of the world. These articles include: (1) "The Changing Family Structure," a review of how families are changing and why; (2) "Peru: Families in the Andes"; (3) "Thailand: Families of the Garbage Dump";…

  15. Choosing a Family Doctor

    MedlinePLUS

    ... who takes care of the whole family. Family doctors create caring relationships with patients and their families. They really get know their patients. They listen to them and help them make the right health care decisions. What do family doctors do? Family doctors take care of the physical, ...

  16. Family Reading Night

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutchins, Darcy; Greenfeld, Marsha; Epstein, Joyce

    2007-01-01

    This book offers clear and practical guidelines to help engage families in student success. It shows families how to conduct a successful Family Reading Night at their school. Family Night themes include Scary Stories, Books We Love, Reading Olympics, Dr. Seuss, and other themes. Family reading nights invite parents to come to school with their…

  17. Anticipation in familial leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Horwitz, M.; Jarvik, G.P.; Goode, E.L.

    1996-11-01

    Anticipation refers to worsening severity or earlier age at onset with each generation for an inherited disease and primarily has been described for neurodegenerative illnesses resulting from expansion of trinucleotide repeats. We have tested for evidence of anticipation in familial leukemia. Of 49 affected individuals in nine families transmitting autosomal dominant acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), the mean age at onset is 57 years in the grandparental generation, 32 years in the parental generation, and 13 years in the youngest generation (P < .001). Of 21 parent-child pairs with AML, 19 show younger ages at onset in the child and demonstrate a mean decline in age at onset of 28 years (P < .001). Of 18 affected individuals from seven pedigrees with autosomal dominant chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), the mean age at onset in the parental generation is 66 years versus 51 years in the youngest generation (P = .008). Of nine parent-child pairs with CLL, eight show younger ages at onset in the child and reveal a mean decline in age at onset of 21 years (P = .001). Inspection of rare pedigrees transmitting acute lymphocytic leukemia, chronic myelogenous leukemia, multiple types of leukemia, and lymphoma is also compatible with anticipation. Sampling bias is unlikely to explain these findings. This suggests that dynamic mutation of unstable DNA sequence repeats could be a common mechanism of inherited hematopoietic malignancy with implications for the role of somatic mutation in the more frequent sporadic cases. We speculate on three possible candidate genes for familial leukemia with anticipation: a locus on 21q22.1-22.2, CBL2 on 11q23.3, and CBFB or a nearby gene on 16q22. 55 refs., 4 figs.

  18. Living My Family's Story

    PubMed Central

    Underhill, Meghan L.; Lally, Robin M.; Kiviniemi, Marc T.; Murekeyisoni, Christine; Dickerson, Suzanne S.

    2013-01-01

    Background Based on known or suggested genetic risk factors, a growing number of women now live with knowledge of a potential cancer diagnosis that may never occur. Given this, it is important to understand the meaning of living with high risk for hereditary breast cancer. Objective The objective of the study was to explore how women at high risk for hereditary breast cancer (1) form self-identity, (2) apply self-care strategies toward risk, and (3) describe the meaning of care through a high-risk breast program. Methods Interpretive hermeneutic phenomenology guided the qualitative research method. Women at high risk for hereditary breast cancer were recruited from a high-risk breast program. Open-ended interview questions focused on experiences living as women managing high risk for breast cancer. Consistent with hermeneutic methodology, the principal investigator led a team to analyze the interview transcripts. Results Twenty women participated in in-depth interviews. Analysis revealed that women describe their own identity based on their family story and grieve over actual and potential familial loss. This experience influences self-care strategies, including seeking care from hereditary breast cancer risk experts for early detection and prevention, as well as maintaining a connection for early treatment “when” diagnosis occurs. Conclusions Healthy women living with high risk for hereditary breast cancer are living within the context of their family cancer story, which influences how they define themselves and engage in self-care. Implications for Practice Findings present important practical, research, and policy information regarding health promotion, psychosocial assessment, and support for women living with this risk. PMID:22544165

  19. [Familial transthyretin amyloidosis].

    PubMed

    Pogromov, A P; Diukova, G M; Koval'chuk, M O; Strokov, I A; Akhmedzhanova, L T; Generozov, E V; Markin, S S

    2009-01-01

    A case of familial transthyretin amyloidosis with TTR Cys 114 gene polymorphism is described (first in Russia and third in the world). The clinical picture of the proband was dominated by symptoms of autonomous polyneuropathy (orthostatic hypotension, erectile dysfunction, diarrhea, tachycardia, foot dyshydrosis) and of somatic nerve lesions (dumbness, impaired surface and deep sensitivity in the limbs). The patient presented with vitreous body opacity, disturbed eye movements, lateralized sensory symptoms, and difficulty of speech (baryphonia). Electromyographic quantitative autonomous testing and measurement of evoked sympathetic skin potentials confirmed affection of peripheral nerves. Heart ultrasound revealed restrictive amyloid cardiopathy. Histological analysis showed amyloid deposition in the intestines and sural nerve. The proband, his daughter, brother (monozygous twin), and brother's daughter had mutant TTR Cys 114 gene. The brother also had amyloid deposits in the absence of clinical signs of the disease. Analysis of familial medical history demonstrated autosomal dominant inheritance of this mutation in 4 generations. Its possible origin and clinical features of the disease are discussed. PMID:20143571

  20. Managing a Family Budget 

    E-print Network

    McCorkle, Dean; Klinefelter, Danny A.

    2008-09-16

    Without budgeting, family living expenses may exceed the available income and jeopardize the overall financial goals of the farm and family. This publication offers information on developing a family budget and provides an example of a monthly...

  1. Family Reunion Health Guide

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Phone (Continued) 1. Send a Kidney Health Message Hi Family, I came across this information and thought ... mails to family members. Before the Reunion 1. Hi family! Taking care of your kidneys is important. ...

  2. Family Activities for Fitness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grosse, Susan J.

    2009-01-01

    This article discusses how families can increase family togetherness and improve physical fitness. The author provides easy ways to implement family friendly activities for improving and maintaining physical health. These activities include: walking, backyard games, and fitness challenges.

  3. Solanaceae (Nightshade family) Horsenettle

    E-print Network

    Solanaceae (Nightshade family) Horsenettle Solanum carolinense L. Life cycle Spreading to erect to identifying Christmas tree weeds. #12;Solanaceae (Nightshade family) Horsenettle continued Flowers and fruit

  4. Strengthening Family Practices for Latino Families

    PubMed Central

    Chartier, Karen G.; Negroni, Lirio K.; Hesselbrock, Michie N.

    2010-01-01

    The study examined the effectiveness of a culturally-adapted Strengthening Families Program (SFP) for Latinos to reduce risks for alcohol and drug use in children. Latino families, predominantly Puerto Rican, with a 9–12 year old child and a parent(s) with a substance abuse problem participated in the study. Pre- and post-tests were conducted with each family. Parental stress, parent-child dysfunctional relations, and child behavior problems were reduced in the families receiving the intervention; family hardiness and family attachment were improved. Findings contribute to the validation of the SFP with Latinos, and can be used to inform social work practice with Puerto Rican families. PMID:20871785

  5. How Are Preferences Revealed?

    PubMed Central

    Beshears, John; Choi, James J.; Laibson, David; Madrian, Brigitte C.

    2009-01-01

    Revealed preferences are tastes that rationalize an economic agent’s observed actions. Normative preferences represent the agent’s actual interests. It sometimes makes sense to assume that revealed preferences are identical to normative preferences. But there are many cases where this assumption is violated. We identify five factors that increase the likelihood of a disparity between revealed preferences and normative preferences: passive choice, complexity, limited personal experience, third-party marketing, and intertemporal choice. We then discuss six approaches that jointly contribute to the identification of normative preferences: structural estimation, active decisions, asymptotic choice, aggregated revealed preferences, reported preferences, and informed preferences. Each of these approaches uses consumer behavior to infer some property of normative preferences without equating revealed and normative preferences. We illustrate these issues with evidence from savings and investment outcomes. PMID:24761048

  6. The Family in Treatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunlop, Jean D.

    This paper describes Laurelhurst Manor's family treatment program to help families affected by chemical dependency, a 7-month program which treats family members from the perspective of developmental stages and family roles. The center, located in Portland, Oregon, is a 40-bed, free-standing facility having a 20-bed adolescent unit and a 20-bed…

  7. Black Families. Third Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAdoo, Harriette Pipes, Ed.

    The chapters of this collection explore the experiences of black families in the United States and Africa, today and in the past. They are: (1) "African American Families: A Historical Note" (John Hope Franklin); (2) "African American Families and Family Values" (Niara Sudarkasa); (3) "Old-Time Religion: Benches Can't Say 'Amen'" (William Harrison…

  8. Building Family Capital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamb, Penny

    2007-01-01

    The family is centre stage of many current policy agendas and this is an exciting time to expand the understanding of the wider benefits of learning as a family and in a family. This article aims to open up new discussions and debate on using the concept of "family capital". The author states that as the debate on the social value of learning and…

  9. THE FAMILY FLAVIVIRIDAE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The family Flaviviridae, commonly referred to as the flavivirus family, contains viruses important to both human and veterinary medicine. The term flavivirus can be confusing because it is used both to refer to the family and one of the three genera within that family. The proper name of the viral...

  10. Ecology and population structure of vibrionaceae in the coastal ocean

    E-print Network

    Preheim, Sarah Pacocha

    2010-01-01

    Extensive genetic diversity has been discovered in the microbial world, yet mechanisms that shape and maintain this diversity remain poorly understood. This thesis investigates to what extent populations of the ...

  11. PHYSIOLOGICAL RESPONSES TO STRESS IN THE VIBRIONACEAE WILLIAM SOTO1

    E-print Network

    McFall-Ngai, Margaret

    ocean temperature could have profound effects on ecosystems mediated partly through alterations). Vibrios are facultative anaerobes, having both respiratory and fermentative metabolisms, and the mol% G to grow in a wide range of salinity (0-20% NaCl; Ventosa, 2005) and temperature (5- 50°C; Bartlett, 2006

  12. Mendelian inheritance of familial prostate cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Carter, B S; Beaty, T H; Steinberg, G D; Childs, B; Walsh, P C

    1992-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated familial clustering of prostate cancer. To define the nature of this familial aggregation and to assess whether Mendelian inheritance can explain prostate cancer clustering, proportional hazards and segregation analyses were performed on 691 families ascertained through a single prostate cancer proband. The proportional hazards analyses revealed that two factors, early age at onset of disease in the proband and multiple affected family members, were important determinants of risk of prostate cancer in these families. Furthermore, segregation analyses revealed that this clustering can be best explained by autosomal dominant inheritance of a rare (q = 0.0030) high-risk allele leading to an early onset of prostate cancer. The estimated cumulative risk of prostate cancer for carriers revealed that the allele was highly penetrant: by age 85, 88% of carriers compared to only 5% of noncarriers are projected to be affected with prostate cancer. The best fitting autosomal dominant model further suggested that this inherited form of prostate cancer accounts for a significant proportion of early onset disease but overall is responsible for a small proportion of prostate cancer occurrence (9% by age 85). These data provide evidence that prostate cancer is inherited in Mendelian fashion in a subset of families and provide a foundation for gene mapping studies of heritable prostate cancer. Characterization of genes involved in inherited prostate cancer could provide important insight into the development of this disease in general. PMID:1565627

  13. Familial colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Lung, M S; Trainer, A H; Campbell, I; Lipton, L

    2015-05-01

    Identifying individuals with a genetic predisposition to developing familial colorectal cancer (CRC) is crucial to the management of the affected individual and their family. In order to do so, the physician requires an understanding of the different gene mutations and clinical manifestations of familial CRC. This review summarises the genetics, clinical manifestations and management of the known familial CRC syndromes, specifically Lynch syndrome, familial adenomatous polyposis, MUTYH-associated neoplasia, juvenile polyposis syndrome and Peutz-Jeghers syndrome. An individual suspected of having a familial CRC with an underlying genetic predisposition should be referred to a familial cancer centre to enable pre-test counselling and appropriate follow up. PMID:25955461

  14. Comparative genomic and proteomic analyses of PE/PPE multigene family of Mycobacterium

    E-print Network

    Mittal, Aditya

    . Complete genome sequencing of M.tb revealed the ex- istence of unique family of protein, PE/PPE, found family has 107 PE and 69 PPE proteins. The PE family has been further classified into two subgroups: PEComparative genomic and proteomic analyses of PE/PPE multigene family of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

  15. Improving Youth Mental Health through Family-Based Prevention In Family Homeless Shelters

    PubMed Central

    Lynn, Cynthia J.; Acri, Mary C.; Goldstein, Leah; Bannon, William; Beharie, Nisha; McKay, Mary M.

    2014-01-01

    This exploratory study examines changes in suicidal ideation among a sample (N = 28) of homeless youth, ages 11-14, residing within family shelters in a large metropolitan area. Changes in suicidal ideation from pretest to posttest are compared across two group approaches to delivering HIV prevention. Youth and their families participating in the HOPE Family Program, incorporating a family strengthening approach, are compared to those receiving a traditional health education-only approach. Multivariate analyses reveal that youth in the HOPE Family Program were 13 times more likely to report a decrease of suicidal ideation. These findings indicate that health education programs integrating a family strengthening approach hold promise for positively impacting mental health outcomes for vulnerable youth. PMID:25157200

  16. AIDS and the family: families take care.

    PubMed

    1994-01-01

    In 1994, the International Year of the Family, the WHO's Global Program on AIDS (GPA) is marking World AIDS Day under the banner AIDS and the Family. Traditional and non-traditional families have a crucial role to play in addressing the HIV/AIDS pandemic. In the run-up to World AIDS Day--and on 1 December itself--GPA urges the world to focus on how families of all kinds are affected by AIDS, on how they can be more effective in prevention and care, and on how they can contribute to global efforts against the disease. For GPA, any group of people linked by feelings of trust, mutual support and a common destiny may be seen as a family. The concept need not be limited to ties of blood, marriage, sexual partnership or adoption. In this light, religious congregations, workers' associations, support groups of people with HIV/AIDS, gangs of street children, circles of drug injectors, collectives of sex workers and networks of governmental, nongovernmental and intergovernmental organizations may all be regarded as families within the over-arching family of humankind. Every kind of family should take care to protect its members from HIV. And all families should take care of those among them who fall ill with AIDS. Families take care. "Families whose bonds are based on love, trust, nurturing and openness are best placed to protect their members from infection and give compassionate care and support to those affected by HIV or AIDS," says Dr. Hiroshi Nakajima, Director-General of the WHO [World Health Organization]. PMID:12287963

  17. Karyotype analysis and achiasmatic meiosis in pseudoscorpions of the family Chthoniidae (Arachnida: Pseudoscorpiones)

    E-print Network

    Stahlavsky, Frantisek

    Karyotype analysis and achiasmatic meiosis in pseudoscorpions of the family Chthoniidae (Arachnida. 2004. Karyotype analysis and achiasmatic meiosis in pseudoscorpions of the family Chthoniidae of prophase I chromosomes in males revealed an achiasmatic mode of meiosis. Findings of the achiasmatic

  18. Family Roles, Alcoholism, and Family Dysfunction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alford, Karola M.

    1998-01-01

    Examines family roles in college undergraduates (N=748). Comparing role identification found no differences between children of alcoholics (ACOA) and non-ACOAs. Differences were found in participants from dysfunctional families. Results suggest a need for clinicians to re-think the use of role conceptualization in therapeutic work with ACOAs, with…

  19. Strengthening Family Practices for Latino Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chartier, Karen G.; Negroni, Lirio K.; Hesselbrock, Michie N.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of a culturally adapted Strengthening Families Program (SFP) for Latinos to reduce risks for alcohol and drug use in children. Latino families, predominantly Puerto Rican, with a 9- to 12-year-old child and a parent(s) with a substance abuse problem participated in the study. Pre- and post-tests were conducted…

  20. Conceptualising Family Life and Family Policies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edgar, Don

    The United Nations International Year of the Family 1994 will give policymakers the opportunity to bring together threads of social life that have previously been treated separately. The danger in talking about the concept of "the family" lies both in its abstractness and in its emotional, religious, and political overtones. To avoid this…

  1. Invest in Family*

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Nilesh; De Sousa, Avinash

    2015-01-01

    The family is an integral part of one's life. It is very essential that every individual employed or unemployed invests time therein. The family is a source of support and growth for an individual, and the lack of family support or loneliness may be a causative factor in the genesis of psychiatric disorders, especially depression. In India, family plays a paramount role when it comes to mental health of the individual. Tips on how one should invest time in one's family along with the role of a family in one's personal and social structure are discussed. PMID:25838732

  2. Schizophrenia Genetics Revealed | The Scientist http://the-scientist.com/2011/08/08/schizophrenia-genetics-revealed/[8/9/2011 10:03:33 AM

    E-print Network

    Schizophrenia Genetics Revealed | The Scientist http://the-scientist.com/2011/08/08/schizophrenia-genetics-revealed/[8/9/2011 10:03:33 AM] FLICKR, MARCO CASTELLANI The Nutshell Schizophrenia Genetics Revealed Researchers identify new mutations in schizophrenia patients without a family history of the disease. By Jef

  3. On the validity of within-nuclear-family genetic association analysis in samples of extended families.

    PubMed

    Bureau, Alexandre; Duchesne, Thierry

    2015-12-01

    Splitting extended families into their component nuclear families to apply a genetic association method designed for nuclear families is a widespread practice in familial genetic studies. Dependence among genotypes and phenotypes of nuclear families from the same extended family arises because of genetic linkage of the tested marker with a risk variant or because of familial specificity of genetic effects due to gene-environment interaction. This raises concerns about the validity of inference conducted under the assumption of independence of the nuclear families. We indeed prove theoretically that, in a conditional logistic regression analysis applicable to disease cases and their genotyped parents, the naive model-based estimator of the variance of the coefficient estimates underestimates the true variance. However, simulations with realistic effect sizes of risk variants and variation of this effect from family to family reveal that the underestimation is negligible. The simulations also show the greater efficiency of the model-based variance estimator compared to a robust empirical estimator. Our recommendation is therefore, to use the model-based estimator of variance for inference on effects of genetic variants. PMID:26544107

  4. 24 CFR 982.515 - Family share: Family responsibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Family share: Family responsibility... Assistance Payment § 982.515 Family share: Family responsibility. (a) The family share is calculated by... administrative fee reserve) to pay any part of the family share, including the family rent to owner. Payment...

  5. 24 CFR 982.515 - Family share: Family responsibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Family share: Family responsibility... Assistance Payment § 982.515 Family share: Family responsibility. (a) The family share is calculated by... administrative fee reserve) to pay any part of the family share, including the family rent to owner. Payment...

  6. 24 CFR 982.515 - Family share: Family responsibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Family share: Family responsibility... Assistance Payment § 982.515 Family share: Family responsibility. (a) The family share is calculated by... administrative fee reserve) to pay any part of the family share, including the family rent to owner. Payment...

  7. 24 CFR 982.515 - Family share: Family responsibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Family share: Family responsibility... Assistance Payment § 982.515 Family share: Family responsibility. (a) The family share is calculated by... administrative fee reserve) to pay any part of the family share, including the family rent to owner. Payment...

  8. 24 CFR 982.515 - Family share: Family responsibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Family share: Family responsibility... Assistance Payment § 982.515 Family share: Family responsibility. (a) The family share is calculated by... administrative fee reserve) to pay any part of the family share, including the family rent to owner. Payment...

  9. Family Policy in Scotland 

    E-print Network

    Wasoff, Fran; Hill, Malcolm

    This briefing looks at the development of family policy in Scotland, considers the interplay between devolved and reserved matters, outlines the Departments of the Scottish Executive responsible for family policy, and ...

  10. Efficient haplotyping for families

    E-print Network

    Williams, Amy Lynne, Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2010-01-01

    Hapi is a novel dynamic programming algorithm for haplotyping nuclear families that outperforms contemporary family-based haplotyping algorithms. Haplotypes are useful for mapping and identifying genes which cause and ...

  11. Family Caregiver Alliance

    MedlinePLUS

    ... path forward. Discover ways to survive, post-caregiving. >> FAMILY CARE NAVIGATOR ? Click on Your State AL AK ... FCA’s 30 Days of Caregiving blog during National Family Caregivers Month, former FCA staff members were asked ...

  12. Familial Pulmonary Fibrosis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... are here: Health Information > Condition Information Familial Pulmonary Fibrosis: Overview When two or more members within the ... of Programs & Services Doctors Who Treat Familial Pulmonary Fibrosis No doctors are currently listed for this condition. ...

  13. American Families Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Medeiros, Ray

    1992-01-01

    Describes the "American Families Project," in which students from two or more schools participate in a creative writing, historical research activity, each playing a role in a fictitious family living in 1838 and corresponding with each other. (RS)

  14. The Changing American Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joseph, Pamela B.

    1986-01-01

    Reviews recent statistics which demonstrate how different modern families are from the stereotyped model American nuclear family. Provides suggestions for elementary social studies teachers and includes an annotated bibliography of instructional resources. (JDH)

  15. Fields of Toil: A Migrant Family's Journey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valle, Isabel

    Journalist Isabel Valle lived and traveled for 1 year with the family of Raul and Maria Elena Martinez, migrant farmworkers who make their permanent home in south Texas. Her reports appeared every Sunday in the Walla Walla Union-Bulletin's award-winning series "Fields of Toil." This book compiles those weekly reports, which reveal the issues that…

  16. What College Does for the Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowen, Howard R.

    1979-01-01

    The effects of college education on the family are discussed, and outcomes are revealed through controlled data. Impacts include: narrowing differences between sexes, selection of marriage partners, delay in marriage, reduction in divorce rate and birth rate, increased time and money devoted to children, increased achievement of children, etc.…

  17. Methadone Maintenance: The Addict's Family Recreated.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartzman, John; Bokos, Peter

    1979-01-01

    A study of four methadone clinics, the addicts treated at these clinics, and their families, reveals basic dissonances in treatment ideology and professional-paraprofessional relationships which, combined with the addict's particular mode of functioning, make significant change in his behavior improbable. (Author)

  18. Family strategies in a post-reform Chinese village 

    E-print Network

    Wu, Xiaolei

    2002-01-01

    This thesis is based on my fieldwork conducted in Kong Huayuan Village, a North China village, during the summer of 2000. I will present an empirical case study addressing the changes in family strategies to reveal the ...

  19. Family Violence: An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center on Child Abuse and Neglect (DHHS/OHDS), Washington, DC.

    Family violence is a widespread problem; research has shown multiple factors are associated with family violence. Types of family violence include spouse abuse; elder abuse and neglect; child abuse and neglect; parent abuse; and sibling abuse. There are three types of spouse abuse: physical abuse, sexual violence, and psychological/emotional…

  20. The Resiliency of Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrison, T. R.

    According to researchers, the family may be changing but it is still one of the central institutions in society. Studies report a shift in more than 20 attitudes and values, most of which relate to the context of family life. Specifically, these include attitudes toward marriage, divorce, childbearing, childrearing, working women, family violence,…

  1. Learning from Latino Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Auerbach, Susan

    2011-01-01

    As a researcher in parent engagement in school and former parent activist, the author shares three lessons for sparking more authentic partnerships between schools and immigrant families. First, schools need to move away from deficit thinking and validate families' cultures. In the case of Latino immigrant families, this entails understanding…

  2. Rape: A Family Crisis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Priscilla N.; Rollins, Judith C.

    1981-01-01

    Rape is a crisis shared by the victim and her family. The family's reaction is influenced by cultural views such as viewing rape as sex rather than violence. Adaptive responses can be supported by open expression, education, and family, as well as individual counseling. (JAC)

  3. Families and Assisted Living*

    PubMed Central

    Gaugler, Joseph E.; Kane, Robert L.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose Despite growing research on assisted living (AL) as a residential care option for older adults, the social ramifications of residents' transitions to assisted living is relatively unexplored. This article examines family involvement in AL, including family structures of residents, types of involvement from family members living outside the AL, and outcomes for these family members. Design and Methods We reviewed current literature utilizing the MEDLINE, PSYCINFO, and CINAHL databases to identify AL studies that examined issues pertaining to families or informal care. Following the screening of abstracts, 180 reports were retrieved for further review, and 62 studies were selected for inclusion. Results Families visit residents frequently and provide a wide range of instrumental assistance but provide only minimal personal care. Studies of family outcomes indicated relatively high satisfaction, but potential care burden as well. Implications How family care and involvement occurs in AL in relation to formal care provision and whether various types of formal-informal care integration influence family outcomes remains unclear. We suggest a research agenda that attempts to tease out causal relationships for family involvement, differentiate family roles, and implement longitudinal analyses for a range of family outcomes. PMID:18162571

  4. Strengths of Remarried Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knaub, Patricia Kain; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Focuses on remarried families' (N=80) perceptions of family strengths, marital satisfaction, and adjustment to the remarried situation. Results indicated that although most would like to make some changes, scores on the measurements used were high. A supportive environment was the most important predictor of family strength and success. (JAC)

  5. Focus on the Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardy, James M.

    This research attempts to evaluate the YMCA's program in terms of its effect upon the family members it serves. The study was designed to: (1) classify, by descriptive types, the various kinds of YMCA operations which serve the family, identifying their characteristic differences; (2) examine and describe operating practices of family YMCAs…

  6. Year of the Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Agriculture, 1994

    1994-01-01

    This special issue focuses on problems and challenges confronting the California family and on research and extension efforts to provide at least partial answers. Research briefs by staff include "Challenges Confront the California Family" (state trends in poverty, divorce, single-parent families, child abuse, delinquency, teen births, limited…

  7. Family Customs and Traditions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacGregor, Cynthia

    Recognizing the importance of maintaining open communication with immediate and extended family members, this book provides a compilation of ideas for family traditions and customs that are grounded in compassion and human kindness. The traditions were gathered from families in the United States and Canada who responded to advertisements in…

  8. Families in Multicultural Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ingoldsby, Bron B., Ed.; Smith, Suzanna, Ed.

    Covering contemporary Third World as well as Western families, this teaching text addresses topics essential for developing a multicultural perspective on the family. It is an ideal text for comparative family courses and includes exercises (as well as exercise guidelines for instructors) developed to challenge students' existing viewpoints and…

  9. Family Support Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lalley, Jacqueline, Ed.; Ahsan, Nilofer, Ed.

    1998-01-01

    The Family Resource Coalition of America (FRCA) and the National Resource Center for Family Centered Practice convened a meeting of evaluators, policymakers, and program practitioners to discuss the issue of evaluation in the field of family support. The goal was to bring together those who were implementing programs, evaluating programs, and…

  10. Fatherhood and Family Support.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goetz, Kathy, Ed.

    1996-01-01

    On the assumption that fathers have been relatively absent from family support programs, this publication of the Family Resource Coalition addresses the role of fathers in family support programs, examines the impact of fathers on their children, and describes programs involving fathers successfully. Articles include: (1) "What's Behind the…

  11. Doing Better for Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    OECD Publishing (NJ3), 2011

    2011-01-01

    All OECD governments want to give parents more choice in their work and family decisions. This book looks at the different ways in which governments support families. It seeks to provide answers to questions like: Is spending on family benefits going up, and how does it vary by the age of the child? Has the crisis affected public support for…

  12. The Family Leukemia Association

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollitt, Eleanor

    1976-01-01

    An association of families of children with leukemia, the Family Leukemia Association (FLA), was recently established in Toronto. This paper discusses (a) philosophy of the FLA; (b) formative years of this organization; (c) problems encountered by leukemic children and their families; and (d) the FLA's past and future educational and social…

  13. Roles & Responsibilities Host Families

    E-print Network

    Olszewski Jr., Edward A.

    countries and assist them in their adjustment to American customs and lifestyles. Many host families relaxing and getting to know one another. Many families invite students to their homes for holidays (LaborRoles & Responsibilities Host Families Hosts should try to get together with their student at least

  14. Detection Of Mutations In KLHL3 And CUL3 In Families With Familial Hyperkalemic Hypertension (FHHt or Gordon Syndrome)

    E-print Network

    Glover, Mark; Ware, James S.; Henry, Amanda; Wolley, Martin; Walsh, Roddy; Wain, Louise V.; Xu, Shengxin; Van't Hoff, William G.; Tobin, Martin D.; Hall, Ian P.; Cook, Stuart; Gordon, Richard D.; Stowasser, Michael; O'Shaughnessy, Kevin M.

    2013-11-25

    The study of families with rare inherited forms of hypo- and hyper-tension has been one of the most successful strategies to probe the molecular pathophysiology of blood pressure control and has revealed dysregulation of distal nephron Na...

  15. Family Environment and Social Development in Gifted Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olszewski-Kubilius, Paula; Lee, Seon-Young; Thomson, Dana

    2014-01-01

    Involving more than 1,500 academically gifted students and their parents, this study examined relationships between family environment and social competence of gifted students. Results from an online survey revealed that our gifted students rated their families as cohesive and flexible with high levels of satisfaction and communication among…

  16. Teaching Family Therapists about Sexual Attraction in Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Steven M.

    2001-01-01

    Reviews the literature on sexual attraction in relation to the practice of marriage and family therapy and investigates how family-therapists-in-training regard this phenomenon. Results reveal that new therapists dealing with attraction in therapy encounter a myriad of emotional responses. Proposes that it is the clinical supervisor's…

  17. The incestoid family.

    PubMed

    Braun-Scharm, H; Frank, R

    1989-01-01

    Following a short overall view on family therapeutic models of close family systems and on incest family models, the concept "incestoid family" is conceived. In this way, families should be exemplified in which it is true that no manifest incest occurs, but by going from one generation to another, relationships between parents and children, resembling a relationship between partners and the constellation of subliminal enticement and seduction situations promote pseudosexual behaviour patterns; the most conspicuous symptom of such a family is hyper- as well as hyposexualised behaviour in children and young people. Definitive and conceptual demarcations to oedipal and incestuous structures were undertaken. Four case descriptions should illustrate the clinic of incestoid families. PMID:2487482

  18. Does Addiction Run in Families?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Addiction? » Does Addiction Run in Families? Does Addiction Run in Families? Listen Addiction can run in ... English Español "Heart disease runs in some families. Addiction runs in ours." Matt's family has a history ...

  19. Creating a Family Health History

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Health History? Click for more information A Family Tree for Health A family health history is a ... family members grew up. It's like a family tree for health. Click for more information What a ...

  20. Revealing power in truth

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kelley

    2015-01-01

    Jeremy Shiffman’s editorial appropriately calls on making all forms of power more apparent and accountable, notably productive power derived from expertise and claims to moral authority. This commentary argues that relationships based on productive power can be especially difficult to reveal in global health policy because of embedded notions about the nature of power and politics. Yet, it is essential to recognize that global health is shot through with power relationships, that they can take many forms, and that their explicit acknowledgement should be part of, rather than factored out of, any reform of global health governance. PMID:25844390

  1. The Universe Revealed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spence, Pam

    1998-10-01

    The Universe is a bewildering place to the uninitiated. The concepts and theories that govern space seem complex and often contradictory. The Universe Revealed provides the keys to unlocking the wonders of the cosmos. Elegantly written and lavishly illustrated, it begins with the Sun and stretches through our solar system into deepest space. Lucid prose, written by many of the people who have shaped our current thinking on space, and spectacular photographs make the physics of the Universe accessible and provide a solid background for understanding the most recent astronomical discoveries. Covering the most intriguing features of the cosmos, the topics discussed range from the Earth and global warming to cosmic collisions and the size of the Universe. Major sections examine the Solar System, stars, galaxies, cosmology, and the observational techniques used by astronomers, both amateur and professional. The Universe Revealed represents the collaboration of internationally renowned experts in astronomy and cosmology, with contributions from authors including David Malin, F. Duccio Macchetto, Iain Nicholson, Neil Bone, Ian Ridpath, Seth Shostak, Mike Lancaster, Steve Miller, Ken Croswell, Geoff McNamara, and Steven Young. This extraordinary blend of astronomy, astrophysics, and cosmology, will appeal to amateur and armchair astronomers alike.

  2. Putting 'family' back in family planning.

    PubMed

    Seifer, David B; Minkoff, Howard; Merhi, Zaher

    2015-01-01

    Family planning visits are designed to help women build families in a manner most compatible with their life goals. Women's knowledge regarding age-related fertility is suboptimal, and first wanted pregnancies are now occurring at older ages. Here we review the issue of diminishing chances of a pregnancy occurring in women over 30 years of age. A debate arises over whether to perform a standard fertility assessment at an age when, for example, oocyte freezing is still practical and feasible, knowing that the proven predictors in subfertile couples may be less informative, or even inappropriate, in women without complaints about fertility. Studies have demonstrated that if women knew that their fertility was diminishing, they might alter life plans, including having children sooner or considering oocyte preservation. Therefore, we argue that physicians need to make an effort to evaluate a woman's childbearing priorities, though not necessarily their fertility, during the initial family planning visit. PMID:25406182

  3. Dynamical portrait of the Hoffmeister asteroid family

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novakovic, Bojan; Maurel, Clara; Tsirvoulis, Georgios; Knezevic, Zoran; Radovic, Viktor

    2015-08-01

    The (1726) Hoffmeister asteroid family is located in the middle of the Main Belt, between 2.75 and 2.82 AU. It draws our attention due to its unusual shape when projected to the semi-major axis vs. inclination plane. Actually, the distribution of family members as seen in this plane clearly suggests different dynamical evolution for the two parts of the family delimited in terms of semi-major axis.Therefore, we investigate here the dynamics of the family members aiming primarily to explain the observed unusual shape, but we also reconstruct the evolution of the whole family in time, and estimated its age.The Hoffmeister family is close to the fourth degree secular resonance z1=g-g6+s-s6, and in the neighborhood of the most massive asteroid (1) Ceres, each of these possibly being responsible for the strange shape of the family. To identify which ones, if any, among the different possible dynamical mechanisms are actually at work here, we performed a set of numerical integrations. We integrate the orbits of test particles over 300 Myr, as the age of the Hoffmeister family was previously roughly estimated to be 300 ± 200 Myr. Moreover, in order to identify and isolate the main perturber(s), we repeat four times the integrations using each time a different dynamical model, taking or not into account the Yarkovsky effect and dwarf planet Ceres as a perturbing body.Our results reveal the significant role of a so far overlooked dynamical aspect, namely a secular resonance between the dwarf planet Ceres and other asteroids. In particular, we show that the post-impact evolution of the Hoffmeister asteroid family is a direct consequence of the nodal secular resonance with Ceres.

  4. Asteroid family ages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spoto, Federica; Milani, Andrea; Kneževi?, Zoran

    2015-09-01

    A new family classification, based on a catalog of proper elements with ?384,000 numbered asteroids and on new methods is available. For the 45 dynamical families with >250 members identified in this classification, we present an attempt to obtain statistically significant ages: we succeeded in computing ages for 37 collisional families. We used a rigorous method, including a least squares fit of the two sides of a V-shape plot in the proper semimajor axis, inverse diameter plane to determine the corresponding slopes, an advanced error model for the uncertainties of asteroid diameters, an iterative outlier rejection scheme and quality control. The best available Yarkovsky measurement was used to estimate a calibration of the Yarkovsky effect for each family. The results are presented separately for the families originated in fragmentation or cratering events, for the young, compact families and for the truncated, one-sided families. For all the computed ages the corresponding uncertainties are provided, and the results are discussed and compared with the literature. The ages of several families have been estimated for the first time, in other cases the accuracy has been improved. We have been quite successful in computing ages for old families, we have significant results for both young and ancient, while we have little, if any, evidence for primordial families. We found 2 cases where two separate dynamical families form together a single V-shape with compatible slopes, thus indicating a single collisional event. We have also found 3 examples of dynamical families containing multiple collisional families, plus a dubious case: for these we have obtained discordant slopes for the two sides of the V-shape, resulting in distinct ages. We have found 2 cases of families containing a conspicuous subfamily, such that it is possible to measure the slope of a distinct V-shape, thus the age of the secondary collision. We also provide data on the central gaps appearing in some families. The ages computed in this paper are obtained with a single and uniform methodology, thus the ages of different families can be compared, providing a first example of collisional chronology of the asteroid main belt.

  5. Does familial breast cancer and thymoma suggest a cancer syndrome? A family perspective.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinxin; Wang, Tao; Wang, Wei; Ding, Yibing; Zhou, Lixing; Chen, Qiuyan; Gao, Xiang; Wu, Yongzheng; Mei, Yuna; Jin, Yu; Gao, Qian; Yi, Long

    2015-12-01

    Concurrence of breast cancer or thymoma with other malignancies in individual families is often observed, but the familial concurrence of breast cancer and thymoma has not yet been reported. Herein we reported a family encompassing five breast/ovarian cancer patients and two thymoma patients. Whole genome linkage analysis detected no haplotype co-segregating with both types of the tumors. In all patients with breast/ovarian cancer, genetic analysis revealed a clinically untested variant c.5141T>G in exon 18 of the BRCA1 gene, which could be a cancer-causing variant based on the functional study of Lee et al. (2010) and our current pedigree analysis. In the two thymoma patients in our family, targeted sequencing of RAD51L1 and BMP2 genes in and near the translocation site of chromosome 14 and 20 previously reported in two thymoma families, did not find any pathogenic mutation. In the present study, we identified a clinically unconfirmed BRCA1 variant segregating with breast/ovarian cancer patients in an individual family, suggesting it to be clinically functional. Our evidence, however, did not support the notion that the concurrent appearance of breast cancer and thymoma in our family represents a familial cancer syndrome caused by the same genetic disorder. PMID:26344711

  6. Strengthening Families: Exploring the Impacts of Family Camp Experiences on Family Functioning and Parenting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garst, Barry A.; Baughman, Sarah; Franz, Nancy K.; Seidel, Richard W.

    2013-01-01

    Research suggests that family camp experiences can enhance family relationships. Families often participate in family camp experiences for a vacation, as part of a therapeutic and/or intervention strategy, or to gain general enrichment or engagement. To better understand the impacts of family camp experiences on family functioning, a mixed-methods…

  7. Population- and Family-Based Studies Associate the "MTHFR" Gene with Idiopathic Autism in Simplex Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Xudong; Solehdin, Fatima; Cohen, Ira L.; Gonzalez, Maripaz G.; Jenkins, Edmund C.; Lewis, M. E. Suzanne; Holden, Jeanette J. A.

    2011-01-01

    Two methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene ("MTHFR") functional polymorphisms were studied in 205 North American simplex (SPX) and 307 multiplex (MPX) families having one or more children with an autism spectrum disorder. Case-control comparisons revealed a significantly higher frequency of the low-activity 677T allele, higher prevalence of the…

  8. Alcohol Consumption Patterns among Adolescents are Related to Family Structure and Exposure to Drunkenness within the Family: Results from the SEYLE Project

    PubMed Central

    Rüütel, Erik; Sisask, Merike; Värnik, Airi; Värnik, Peeter; Carli, Vladimir; Wasserman, Camilla; Hoven, Christina W.; Sarchiapone, Marco; Apter, Alan; Balazs, Judit; Bobes, Julio; Brunner, Romuald; Corcoran, Paul; Cosman, Doina; Haring, Christian; Iosue, Miriam; Kaess, Michael; Kahn, Jean-Pierre; Poštuvan, Vita; Sáiz, Pilar A.; Wasserman, Danuta

    2014-01-01

    There is expedient evidence showing that differences in adolescent alcohol consumption and other risk-behaviour depend on both family structure and family member drunkenness exposure. Data were obtained among adolescents (N = 12,115, mean age 14.9 ± 0.89) in Austria, Estonia, France, Germany, Hungary, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Romania, Slovenia and Spain within the European Union’s 7th Framework Programme funded project, ‘Saving and Empowering Young Lives in Europe (SEYLE)’. The current study reveals how adolescents’ alcohol consumption patterns are related to their family structure and having seen their family member drunk. The results revealed statistically significant differences in adolescent alcohol consumption depending on whether the adolescent lives in a family with both birth parents, in a single-parent family or in a family with one birth parent and one step-parent. The study also revealed that the abstaining from alcohol percentage among adolescents was greater in families with both birth parents compared to other family types. The study also showed that the more often adolescents see their family member drunk the more they drink themselves. There is no difference in adolescent drinking patterns whether they see their family member drunk once a month or once a week. This study gives an insight on which subgroups of adolescents are at heightened risk of alcohol abuse and that decrease of family member drunkenness may have positive effects on the drinking habits of their children. PMID:25493392

  9. Alcohol consumption patterns among adolescents are related to family structure and exposure to drunkenness within the family: results from the SEYLE project.

    PubMed

    Rüütel, Erik; Sisask, Merike; Värnik, Airi; Värnik, Peeter; Carli, Vladimir; Wasserman, Camilla; Hoven, Christina W; Sarchiapone, Marco; Apter, Alan; Balazs, Judit; Bobes, Julio; Brunner, Romuald; Corcoran, Paul; Cosman, Doina; Haring, Christian; Iosue, Miriam; Kaess, Michael; Kahn, Jean-Pierre; Poštuvan, Vita; Sáiz, Pilar A; Wasserman, Danuta

    2014-12-01

    There is expedient evidence showing that differences in adolescent alcohol consumption and other risk-behaviour depend on both family structure and family member drunkenness exposure. Data were obtained among adolescents (N = 12,115, mean age 14.9 ± 0.89) in Austria, Estonia, France, Germany, Hungary, Ireland, Israel, Italy,Romania, Slovenia and Spain within the European Union'ss 7th Framework Programme funded project, 'Saving and Empowering Young Lives in Europe (SEYLE)’. The current study reveals how adolescents' alcohol consumption patterns are related to their family structure and having seen their family member drunk. The results revealed statistically significant differences in adolescent alcohol consumption depending on whether the adolescent lives in a family with both birth parents, in a single-parent family or in a family with one birth parent and one step-parent. The study also revealed that the abstaining from alcohol percentage among adolescents was greater in families with both birth parents compared to other family types. The study also showed that the more often adolescents see their family member drunk the more they drink themselves. There is no difference in adolescent drinking patterns whether they see their family member drunk once a month or once a week. This study gives an insight on which subgroups of adolescents are at heightened risk of alcohol abuse and that decrease of family member drunkenness may have positive effects on the drinking habits of their children. PMID:25493392

  10. The Head of the Family: Authority and Responsibility in the Lineage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenthal, Carolyn J.; And Others

    Family headship has not been systematically investigated in the sociology of the family, yet "head of the family" is a meaningful phrase to most people. A survey of adults (N=464) in Ontario revealed that only two percent of the respondents did not understand the term. Other data showed that traditional male-dominated authority patterns continued…

  11. Children's Literacy: Children's Books for Healthy Families/Libros de Ninos Para Familias Saludables.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kock, Jo Anne

    2003-01-01

    A 2-year project taught reading methods and provided culturally appropriate books for Spanish-speaking and English-speaking families (year 1, 1,013 families; year 2, 1,408 families). Data from home visits and follow-up surveys (n=207) revealed that positive parent/child interaction and time spent reading to children increased and the number of…

  12. Support Services for Victims of Political Violence and Their Families: A Comparison between Israelis and Palestinians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abbott, Douglas A.

    2010-01-01

    This report summarizes interviews with five social workers who helped families that experienced political violence, and with 16 families that lost a family member due to terrorist activity in Israel and Palestine from 2000 to 2005. Results revealed a great disparity between the Israelis and the Palestinians on the types of and extent of benefits…

  13. Diverse Family Types and Out-of-School Learning Time of Young School-Age Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ono, Hiromi; Sanders, James

    2010-01-01

    Sources of differentials in out-of-school learning time between children in first marriage biological parent families and children in six nontraditional family types are identified. Analyses of time diaries reveal that children in four of the six nontraditional family types spend fewer minutes learning than do children in first marriage biological…

  14. Family Functioning and the Development of Trust and Intimacy among Adolescents in Residential Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coll, Kenneth M.; Powell, Stephanie; Thobro, Patti; Haas, Robin

    2010-01-01

    This study examined relations between family cohesion and adaptability (as measured by the Family Adaptability and Cohesion Scales-III) and the formation of trust and intimacy (assessed with the Measure of Psychosocial Development) among adolescents in residential treatment. Bivariate correlation revealed a significant association between family

  15. Families, Risk, and Competence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Michael, Ed.; Feiring, Candice, Ed.

    The problems of studying families arise from the difficulty in studying systems in which there are multiple elements interacting with each other and with the child. This book attests to the growing sophistication of the conceptualization and measurement techniques for understanding family processes. Chapters in the first part of the book, "The…

  16. A Family Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrington, Virginia Clarke

    1983-01-01

    Discusses alcoholism, its effect upon the children in the family, and what teachers can do to help children of alcoholics. Suggests that teachers be caring, nonjudgmental, and empathetic; learn what alcoholism is, how it affects the family, and how to identify affected children in classroom; and provide information on alcoholic help groups. (DMM)

  17. Firearms and family violence.

    PubMed

    Kellermann, A; Heron, S

    1999-08-01

    Firearms contribute significantly to morbidity and mortality in family violence. This article discusses the debate on gun use for protection and guns in the home. Weapons-related risks in the setting of intimate partner violence are closely reviewed. Recommendations for physicians are discussed in the context of firearms and family violence. PMID:10516848

  18. Family-Friendly Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Patterson; Garcia, Maria

    2004-01-01

    In the late 1980s, the Denver Art Museum initiated efforts to make the museum a destination for families. From 1997 to 2001, with a generous grant from The Pew Charitable Trusts, these efforts came to fruition. From the moment they walk through the doors, families' needs are anticipated. For example, they can pick up a welcoming brochure, Free…

  19. Changing Families, Changing Workplaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bianchi, Suzanne M.

    2011-01-01

    American families and workplaces have both changed dramatically over the past half-century. Paid work by women has increased sharply, as has family instability. Education-related inequality in work hours and income has grown. These changes, says Suzanne Bianchi, pose differing work-life issues for parents at different points along the income…

  20. The Working Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boethius, Monica

    1984-01-01

    The working family is today by far the most common family type in Sweden. However, just over 50 percent of the children of working parents have access to day care. Because Swedish income tax policy is based on the concept that all adults will support themselves and does not take into account the number of persons supported on an income, one parent…

  1. Education and the Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Leonard, Ed.

    This book is the report of the Family Ties Commission, which was established by the Association of Teacher Educators to study the relationship between home and school. Following the preface and two introductory essays, "Education and My Family" (K.B. O'Rourke as told to E. Johnson) and "Preparing for Successful Children" (B. Clawson), the book is…

  2. Normalizing Disability in Families.

    PubMed

    Crossley, Mary

    2015-01-01

    This comment shifts Ouellette's frame of reference in linking prenatal selection against disability, laws prohibiting prenatal sex selection, and fertility specialists' discrimination against disabled adults. Viewing decisions about who can reproduce and what children will be born as fundamentally decisions about family suggests ways to promote acceptance of people with disabilities as valued family members — without limiting reproductive liberties. PMID:26242942

  3. Uninsured Rural Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ziller, Erika C.; Coburn, Andrew F.; Anderson, Nathaniel J.; Loux, Stephenie L.

    2008-01-01

    Context: Although research shows higher uninsured rates among rural versus urban individuals, prior studies are limited because they do not examine coverage across entire rural families. Purpose: This study uses the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS) to compare rural and urban insurance coverage within families, to inform the design of…

  4. Family Literacy in Illinois.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois Libraries, 1994

    1994-01-01

    Explains the need for family literacy programs in Illinois and describes efforts to improve adult and child literacy. Topics discussed include poverty; reading, writing, and computing instruction; interaction between parents and children; families and books; partnerships between state agencies, private organizations, and public libraries; and…

  5. Employers, Families and Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Partnership for Family Involvement in Education (ED), Washington, DC.

    Family involvement in education is good for business, critical to children's school achievement, and important in creating strong and vibrant communities. This report discusses the role of businesses and employers in helping partners and family members be more involved in children's learning. Throughout the report, programs at specific companies…

  6. Balancing Family and Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yahnke, Sally; And Others

    The purpose of this monograph is to present a series of activities designed to teach strategies needed for effectively managing the multiple responsibilities of family and work. The guide contains 11 lesson plans dealing with balancing family and work that can be used in any home economics class, from middle school through college. The lesson…

  7. Explaining Family Interactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzpatrick, Mary Anne, Ed.; Vangelisti, Anita L., Ed.

    A detailed review of current research and state-of-the-art ideas concerning both communication processes and family functioning is presented in this collection of articles. The volume is organized around three sections. Part 1, "The Development of Family Communication Patterns," contains: (1) "Communication in Infancy" (Marguerite Stevenson…

  8. Alcohol and Family Violence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cantrell, Leslie A., Comp.

    This document reports on the relationship between alcohol abuse and battering. Several theories, e.g., the disinhibition, disavowal, and learned behavior theories concerning the relationship between alcohol abuse and family violence are discussed. Literature on the relationship between alcohol and family violence is reviewed. Five intervention and…

  9. Marinating the Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hensel, Karen A.

    1982-01-01

    Describes the New York Aquarium's program specifically designed for family learning and teaching. The program's goal is to create an environment where child-parent roles are dropped and where the philosophy that no one of us is as smart as all of us prevails. Strategies for family involvement are outlined. (MH)

  10. [Inclusive Recreation and Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heyne, Linda A., Ed.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    This feature issue focuses on inclusive recreation for persons with developmental disabilities and their families. The articles provide information about the benefits of inclusive recreation for individuals and families, the challenges in attempting to create or access community recreation services that offer inclusive programs, and strategies…

  11. Family Support and Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldstein, Lou Ann

    2013-01-01

    Family involvement is essential to the developmental outcome of infants born into Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU). In this article, evidence has been presented on the parent's perspective of having an infant in the NICU and the context of family. Key points to an educational assessment are also reviewed. Throughout, the parent's concerns and…

  12. Black Families. Interdisciplinary Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheatham, Harold E., Ed.; Stewart, James B., Ed.

    Since the early 1960s, the black family has been characterized as pathological. This six-part collection of 18 research studies presents alternative approaches to understanding the special characteristics of black families. Part I, "Theoretical and Methodological Perspectives," comprises a comparison of the pioneering work of W. E. B. Du Bois and…

  13. Engaging Families in In-Home Family Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Ronald W.; Koley, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Boys Town has created a program called In-Home Family Services to deliver help to families in stress. In-home family intervention programs have become widely used to help more families who are at risk and experiencing difficulties with a wide range of problems including domestic violence, child behavior problems, parent-child and family

  14. [Family therapy in divorce].

    PubMed

    Bauers, B

    1992-09-01

    A multi-generational approach to family therapy with divorce families is presented. Parents and children of such families are faced--with special problems during the phases of ambivalence, divorce and post-divorce. Their problems require varying focal points during therapeutic treatment. It focuses on arriving at a decision, finding constructive solutions for practical and emotional problems caused by the divorce ("psychic divorce" and parental cooperation concerning custody and education of the children) as well as supporting individuation and re-orientations. The main aim of therapeutic treatment is to alter the underlying pathogenic patterns of relationships and conflict-solving in order to prevent its repetition in a new partnership or in the next generation. Family therapy with divorce families is complicated to a high degree by aggressiveness, destructivity and resistance against working on central conflicts which serve to avoid feelings of anxiety, shame, guilt, anger and mourning. PMID:1438053

  15. Familial malignant melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Kopf, A.W.; Hellman, L.J.; Rogers, G.S.; Gross, D.F.; Rigel, D.S.; Friedman, R.J.; Levenstein, M.; Brown, J.; Golomb, F.M.; Roses, D.F.; Gumport, S.L.

    1986-10-10

    Characteristics associated with familial compared with nonfamilial malignant melanoma were assessed. These data were obtained from consecutive prospectively completed questionnaires on 1169 cases of cutaneous malignant melanoma. Of these, 69 patients indicated a positive family history for this cancer. Among the various clinical and histological variables compared, those that significantly correlated with the familial occurrence of malignant melanoma include younger age at first diagnosis, smaller diameter of the lesion, lower Clark level, decreased frequency of nonmelanoma skin cancer, and reduced prevalence of noncutaneous cancer. Increased awareness of malignant melanoma among family members could account for some of these observations. Identification of the familial variety of malignant melanoma has practical implications concerning early detection and prompt intervention.

  16. Distribution of Candida albicans genotypes among family members

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, S. K.; Stevens, D. A.; Mishra, S. K.; Feroze, F.; Pierson, D. L.

    1999-01-01

    Thirty-three families (71 subjects) were screened for the presence of Candida albicans in mouthwash or stool specimens; 12 families (28 subjects) were culture-positive for this yeast. An enrichment procedure provided a twofold increase in the recovery of C. albicans from mouthwash specimens. Nine of the twelve culture-positive families had two positive members each, two families had three positive members each, and one family had four positive members. Genetic profiles were obtained by three methods: pulsed-field gel electrophoresis; restriction endonuclease analysis, and random amplification of polymorphic DNA analysis. DNA fingerprinting of C. albicans isolated from one body site three consecutive times revealed that each of the 12 families carried a distinct genotype. No two families shared the same strain, and two or more members of a family commonly shared the same strain. Intrafamily genotypic identity (i.e., each member within the family harbored the same strain) was demonstrated in six families. Genotypes of isolates from husband and wife differed from one another in five families. All three methods were satisfactory in determining genotypes; however, we concluded that restriction endonuclease analysis provided adequate resolving power.

  17. All in the (engineering) Family? - the Family Occupational Background of Men and Women Engineering Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreuders, Paul D.; Mannon, Susan E.

    This article examines and compares the family occupational background of men and women engineering students. Analyses reveal that around half of the men and women in a sample of student engineers had at least one engineer in their family, with women significantly more likely to have an engineering parent. Women with an engineer in their family were significantly more likely to have decided to study engineering before college. We conclude that engineering family members are passing on engineering-related knowledge, interests, and aspirations to a segment of the student engineering population. This type of occupational inheritance is especially crucial for paving the way into engineering for women, who otherwise lack engineering role models.

  18. The (late?) modern family: the family's significance for adolescents in Germany and Israel.

    PubMed

    Girsh, Yaron

    2014-08-01

    This study presents German and Israeli youth's heroes and role models. Two hundred twenty-six students from 22 high schools took part in small group interviews. Despite differences in the normative place of the family in the two cultures, the comparison reveals significant similarities between their views and what attributes the subjects assign to their families. Three main models of family members as hero arise from the data: The Self-made Person; sacrifice and pro-social action; and contending with everyday reality. The results point to a) the fading of traditional heroes from the imagination of youth in post-industrial societies; b) the substantive place the family holds in young people's lives. I suggest that the rise of uncertainty and risk in the current socio-historical constellation, contributes to adolescents' choice of figures from their immediate environments that embody safety and a moral framework. PMID:24956176

  19. Multiple etiologies for Alzheimer disease are revealed by segregation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, V.S.; Connor-Lacke, L.; Cupplies, L.A.; Growdon, J.H.; Farrer, L.A.; Duijn, C.M. van

    1994-11-01

    We have evaluated several transmission models for Alzheimer disease (AD), using the logistic regressive approach in 401 nuclear families of consecutively ascertained and rigorously diagnosed probands. Models postulating no major gene effect, random environmental transmission, recessive inheritance, and sporadic occurrence were rejected under varied assumptions regarding the associations among sex, age, and major gene susceptibility. Transmission of the disorder was not fully explained by a single Mendelian model for all families. Stratification of families as early- and late-onset by using the median of family mean onset ages showed that, regardless of the model studied, two groups of families fit better than a single group. AD in early-onset families is transmitted as an autosomal dominant trait with full penetrance in both sexes and has a gene frequency of 1.5%. Dominant inheritance also gave the best fit of the data in late-onset families, but this hypothesis was rejected, suggesting the presence of heterogeneity within this subset. Our study also revealed that genetically nonsusceptible males and females develop AD, indicating the presence of phenocopies within early-onset and late-onset groups. Moreover, our results suggest that the higher risk to females is not solely due to their increased longevity. 50 refs., 5 tabs.

  20. Blended Families: Issues of Remarriage

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Gary L.

    1984-01-01

    Canada's divorce rate increased by 50% between 1968 and 1982. This has resulted in new family forms. One of these, the family which has been `blended' through remarriage of a parent, has some unique developmental hardships and differences from traditional nuclear families. Blended families are subject to a number of myths that may adversely affect their formation. In addition, members of these families need more time and patience to form a stable and functioning family group than do traditional families. Family physicians can aid the blended family with frank discussion, preparation and specific information. PMID:21279000

  1. Family intervention for schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Pharoah, Fiona; Mari, Jair; Rathbone, John; Wong, Winson

    2014-01-01

    Background People with schizophrenia from families that express high levels of criticism, hostility, or over involvement, have more frequent relapses than people with similar problems from families that tend to be less expressive of emotions. Forms of psychosocial intervention, designed to reduce these levels of expressed emotions within families, are now widely used. Objectives To estimate the effects of family psychosocial interventions in community settings for people with schizophrenia or schizophrenia-like conditions compared with standard care. Search strategy We updated previous searches by searching the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group Trials Register (September 2008). Selection criteria We selected randomised or quasi-randomised studies focusing primarily on families of people with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder that compared community-orientated family-based psychosocial intervention with standard care. Data collection and analysis We independently extracted data and calculated fixed-effect relative risk (RR), the 95% confidence intervals (CI) for binary data, and, where appropriate, the number needed to treat (NNT) on an intention-to-treat basis. For continuous data, we calculated mean differences (MD). Main results This 2009-10 update adds 21 additional studies, with a total of 53 randomised controlled trials included. Family intervention may decrease the frequency of relapse (n = 2981, 32 RCTs, RR 0.55 CI 0.5 to 0.6, NNT 7 CI 6 to 8), although some small but negative studies might not have been identified by the search. Family intervention may also reduce hospital admission (n = 481, 8 RCTs, RR 0.78 CI 0.6 to 1.0, NNT 8 CI 6 to 13) and encourage compliance with medication (n = 695, 10 RCTs, RR 0.60 CI 0.5 to 0.7, NNT 6 CI 5 to 9) but it does not obviously affect the tendency of individuals/families to leave care (n = 733, 10 RCTs, RR 0.74 CI 0.5 to 1.0). Family intervention also seems to improve general social impairment and the levels of expressed emotion within the family. We did not find data to suggest that family intervention either prevents or promotes suicide. Authors’ conclusions Family intervention may reduce the number of relapse events and hospitalisations and would therefore be of interest to people with schizophrenia, clinicians and policy makers. However, the treatment effects of these trials may be overestimated due to the poor methodological quality. Further data from trials that describe the methods of randomisation, test the blindness of the study evaluators, and implement the CONSORT guidelines would enable greater confidence in these findings. PMID:21154340

  2. Family Day Care Training Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nakatsu, Gail

    California's Family Day Care Training Program was designed to recruit and train in 7 weeks, Lao, Vietnamese, and Chinese refugees to establish their own state-licensed, family day care homes. Topics in the program's curriculum include an introduction to family day care, state licenses for family day care, state licensing requirements for family

  3. Lights, Camera--Families--Action!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Press, Doreen

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the family night concert as a way to involve family members in music education, where they can participate in the orchestra or as part of a family act. Describes how to create the family concert. Includes a sample invitation and a program to a family night performance. (CMK)

  4. An ocular presentation of familial tumoral calcinosis

    PubMed Central

    McGrath, Emer; Harney, Fiona; Kinsella, Frank

    2010-01-01

    This case report presents the ophthalmic features and complications of a 56-year-old Caucasian woman with familial tumoral calcinosis. She presented to our ophthalmology clinic with a 3-month history of blurring of her vision. She had been diagnosed 14 years earlier with familial tumoral calcinosis. Ophthalmological examination revealed calcific depositions on the eyelid margins, perilimbal calcific deposits and angioid streaks. An optical coherence tomography scan of the left eye revealed a choroidal neovascular membrane. Deterioration in vision occurred secondary to subretinal haemorrhage, resulting from the angioid streak. The patient was treated with a series of three intravitreal ranibizumab injections to her left eye, which led to an improvement in her visual acuity (VA). The patient is being closely followed up with monthly appointments, and to date, after 6 months of follow-up, there has been no further deterioration in her VA or reactivation of the choroidal neovascular membrane. PMID:22778290

  5. [Perceptions of newborns' families about the communication of bad news].

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, Eliana Moreira; Balbino, Flávia Simphronio; Balieiro, Maria Magda Ferreira Gomes; De Domenico, Edvane Birelo Lopes; Avena, Marta José

    2009-03-01

    The present study aims to describe how families perceive the communication of bad news about hospitalized newborns given by professionals. A qualitative and descriptive study was carried out with families of hospitalized newborns in the neonatal unit. Five mothers and one father were interviewed The thematic analysis of data revealed four categories: Message content in relation to clarity, detailing and not disclosed information. The way the news was transmitted: leads to ambiguity in reactions. Families' perceptions aboutprofessionals' attitudes to transmit the news: sometimes attitudes are different depending on the professional's experience and involvement with the customer. Use of communication strategies for message transmission: considered by the families as a mean to minimize the gravity of the baby's problem. The results pointed out the use of a non symmetrical communication between professional-family The adoption of a team practice, which incorporates it in its interventions, may meet the families' needs of information and social support. PMID:19653559

  6. Familial Bell's Palsy: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Kubik, Mark; Robles, Liliana; Kung, Doris

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To describe a unique case of familial Bell's palsy and summarize the current literature regarding possible hereditary influences. Design. Case report. Main Outcome Measures. Clinical exam, CSF analysis, and family history provided per the patient. Results. We report the case of a 58-year-old female who presented with recurrent and bilateral episodes of facial palsy. The patient underwent multiple CSF investigations to rule out a possible infectious and rheumatologic etiology that were all negative. Further questioning revealed she was one of seven family members with a history of unilateral facial nerve paralysis. Conclusion. The sheer number of similar case studies to date suggests that familial clustering of Bell's palsy is a real, noncoincidental phenomenon. Our case represents a unique and perplexing example of one such family. Familial Bell's palsy may represent an autoimmune disease secondary to inherited HLA alloantigens or a structural predisposition to disease based on the dimensions of the facial canal. PMID:22934210

  7. 75 FR 9247 - Single Family Mortgage Insurance Premium, Single Family

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-01

    ...DEVELOPMENT [Docket No. FR-5376-N-13] Single Family Mortgage Insurance Premium, Single Family AGENCY: Office of the Chief Information Officer...the subject proposal. Lenders use the Single Family Premium Collection Subsystem-Upfront...

  8. Why family planning matters.

    PubMed

    Upadhyay, U D; Robey, B

    1999-07-01

    This Population Reports issue focuses on family planning and the importance of advocacy in family planning programs. Key evidences supporting family planning programs are summarized. This article presents the importance of advocacy for the improvement of the family planning programs in developing countries. Advocacy for family planning is becoming crucial as demand for reproductive health care grows. As many as 600 million people have used contraception, and millions more would do so with better access to good-quality services. Although fertility levels are falling in much of the world, rapid population growth remains a critical issue in most developing countries. This is where advocacy is very much needed. Through advocacy, many individuals and countries will benefit especially in the area of family planning. The benefits include saving the lives of women and children; offering women more choices; and encouraging adoption of safer sexual behavior. Through effective family planning programs, population growth will also be affected. Slower population growth helps protect the environment and it aids development. PMID:10730298

  9. Orbifold family unification

    SciTech Connect

    Kawamura, Yoshiharu; Kinami, Teppei; Oda, Kin-ya

    2007-08-01

    We study the possibility of complete family unification in higher-dimensional space-time. Three families of matters in SU(5) grand unified theory are derived from a single bulk multiplet of the SU(N) gauge group (N{>=}9) in the framework of S{sup 1}/Z{sub 2} orbifold models. In the case of the direct orbifold breaking down to the standard model gauge group, there are models in which bulk fields from a single multiplet and a few brane fields compose three families of quarks and leptons.

  10. Family Emergency Preparedness Plan 1 Family Emergency Preparedness Plan

    E-print Network

    Noble, James S.

    ......................................................................................9 Floor Plan#12;#12;Family Emergency Preparedness Plan 1 Family Emergency Preparedness Plan Why Plan?.........................................................................................2 Four Steps to Disaster Planning .......................................................3 Disaster

  11. 75 FR 17946 - Family Report, MTW Family Report

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-08

    ... understand demographic, family profile, income, and housing information for participants in the Public... Information and Its Proposed Use: Tenant data is collected to understand demographic, family profile,...

  12. Salmonella pathogenesis reveals that BMP signaling regulates blood cell homeostasis and immune

    E-print Network

    Newfeld, Stuart J.

    Salmonella pathogenesis reveals that BMP signaling regulates blood cell homeostasis and immune that Decapentaplegic (Dpp; a Drosophila BMP family mem- ber) plays a role in blood cell homeostasis and immune and adult homeostasis in many species. In this family Drosophila Dpp shows greatest amino acid similarity

  13. Family Demands, Social Support and Family Functioning in Taiwanese Families Rearing Children with Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsiao, C-Y.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Down syndrome (DS) affects not only children but also their families. Much remains to be learned about factors that influence how families of children with DS function, especially families in non-Western populations. The purpose of this cross-sectional, correlational study was to examine how family demographics, family demands and…

  14. Family Health History and Diabetes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Diabetes > Know Your Family Health History Family Health History and Diabetes En español Haywood, a physical education ... story > 1 2 3 4 5 Family health history is an important risk factor for developing type ...

  15. Familial Mediterranean fever

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Recurrent polyserositis; Benign paroxysmal peritonitis; Periodic disease; Periodic fever; FMF ... Familial Mediterranean fever is most often caused by a mutation in the MEFV gene. This gene creates proteins involved in inflammation. ...

  16. Veterans and their families 

    E-print Network

    McKie, Linda; Morrison, Zoe; Thomson, Fionagh; Alstead, Allan

    This briefing paper reports on the outcomes of a range of activities undertaken with a number of veterans, veterans’ families, and third and public sector organisations located in Scotland. Our aim was to explore the resettlement experiences...

  17. National Military Family Association

    MedlinePLUS

    ... we move into 2016 and beyond? FIND OUT Force of the Future sounds intriguing, but do the ... a kitchen table has expanded into a strong force of military families representing all ranks and Services. ...

  18. Families in the Military

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Activities: Striking the Right Balance Advocating For Your Child Attachment Disorders ... consider donating to the Campaign for America’s Kids . Your support will help us continue to produce and distribute Facts for Families , ...

  19. Natural family planning.

    PubMed

    Smoley, Brian A; Robinson, Christa M

    2012-11-15

    Natural family planning methods provide a unique option for committed couples. Advantages include the lack of medical adverse effects and the opportunity for participants to learn about reproduction. Modern methods of natural family planning involve observation of biologic markers to identify fertile days in a woman's reproductive cycle. The timing of intercourse can be planned to achieve or avoid pregnancy based on the identified fertile period. The current evidence for effectiveness of natural family planning methods is limited to lower-quality clinical trials without control groups. Nevertheless, perfect use of these methods is reported to be at least 95 percent effective in preventing pregnancy. The effectiveness of typical use is 76 percent, which demonstrates that motivation and commitment to the method are essential for success. Depending on the method, couples can learn about natural family planning methods in a single office visit, through online instruction, or from certified instructors. PMID:23157145

  20. Family Adjustment to Aphasia

    MedlinePLUS

    ... this time. Seek additional counseling services as necessary. Communication Skills Family members also can help the person ... aphasia develop new skills to compensate for the communication problems. Some suggestion include: Continue to talk to ...

  1. General Dynamics Atlas family

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oates, James

    Developments concerning the Atlas family of launch vehicles over the last three or four years are summarized. Attention is given to the center of gravity, load factors, acoustics, pyroshock, low-frequency sinusoidal vibration, and high-frequency random vibration.

  2. Family Treatment for Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    FALLOON, IAN R. H.; MCGILL, CHARISTINE W.; MATTHEWS, SUSAN M.; KEITH, SAMUEL J.; SCHOOLER, NINA R.

    1996-01-01

    The NIMH Treatment Strategies in Schizophrenia (TSS) collaborative study group investigated the efficacy of antisychotic drug maintenance strategies involving reduced medication exposure in interaction with applied and supportive family management for the long-term treatment of schizophrenia. Therapy was provided at five centers by 25 clinicians who did not participate in the development of the therapies. They were trained by two of the authors, I.R.H.F and C.W.M, in applied family management, a homebased treatment derived from the behavioral family therapy developed by them. Clinicians’ characteristics, selection, and training methods, as well as patient rehospitalization rates, are reported for the two family management conditions. The TSS study represents a bridge between the development of a novel therapy and its dissemination in general clinical practice. PMID:22700264

  3. Natural Family Planning

    MedlinePLUS

    ... ovaries releases an egg. This process is called ovulation. The egg moves toward the uterus through the ... intercourse takes place just before or just after ovulation. How does natural family planning work? Two methods ...

  4. MSUD Family Support Group

    MedlinePLUS

    Remember me Forgot login? | Register HOT NEWS Zebrafish Research Continues » As noted in Sandy Bulcher’s review of research supported by ... Projects Funded by the MSUD Family Support Group » Over the years, ...

  5. Concepts of family planning.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, C W

    1978-01-01

    Family planning, often equated with birth control consists in the broadest sense of numerous issues and factors. Planning, according to the author entails realistic assessment of ones ability to plan plus recognizing the limitations inherant in planning. The following determinents of parenthood are additional factors one must consider when discussing concepts of family planning: 1) the system of relationships among groups of individuals with differing roles and expectations; 2) values toward family size and parenthood; 3) the concept of parenthood as a career. Successful family planning is often a result of perceiving the goal of planning as either termination of further childbearing or spacing of births; and 4) psychosocial and economic aspects of contraception. The author finally suggests that there are acceptable alternatives to biological parenthood. PMID:255395

  6. Structure of CD84 Provides Insight into SLAM Family Function

    SciTech Connect

    Yan,Q.; Malashkevich, V.; Fedorov, A.; Fedorov, E.; Cao, E.; Lary, J.; Cole, J.; Nathenson, S.; Almo, S.

    2007-01-01

    The signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM) family includes homophilic and heterophilic receptors that modulate both adaptive and innate immune responses. These receptors share a common ectodomain organization: a membrane-proximal immunoglobulin constant domain and a membrane-distal immunoglobulin variable domain that is responsible for ligand recognition. CD84 is a homophilic family member that enhances IFN-{gamma} secretion in activated T cells. Our solution studies revealed that CD84 strongly self-associates with a K{sub d} in the submicromolar range. These data, in combination with previous reports, demonstrate that the SLAM family homophilic affinities span at least three orders of magnitude and suggest that differences in the affinities may contribute to the distinct signaling behavior exhibited by the individual family members. The 2.0 {angstrom} crystal structure of the human CD84 immunoglobulin variable domain revealed an orthogonal homophilic dimer with high similarity to the recently reported homophilic dimer of the SLAM family member NTB-A. Structural and chemical differences in the homophilic interfaces provide a mechanism to prevent the formation of undesired heterodimers among the SLAM family homophilic receptors. These structural data also suggest that, like NTB-A, all SLAM family homophilic dimers adopt a highly kinked organization spanning an end-to-end distance of {approx}140 {angstrom}. This common molecular dimension provides an opportunity for all two-domain SLAM family receptors to colocalize within the immunological synapse and bridge the T cell and antigen-presenting cell.

  7. Brassicaceae (Mustard family) Hoary alyssum

    E-print Network

    Brassicaceae (Mustard family) Hoary alyssum Berteroa incana (L.) DC. Life cycle Annual, biennial to identifying Christmas tree weeds. #12;Brassicaceae (Mustard family) oval and slightly flattened, grayish green

  8. Brassicaceae (Mustard family) Field pennycress

    E-print Network

    Brassicaceae (Mustard family) Field pennycress Thlaspi arvense L. Life cycle Erect winter or summer. Back to identifying Christmas tree weeds. #12;Brassicaceae (Mustard family) Field pennycress continued

  9. Poaceae (Grass family) Rhizomatous perennial.

    E-print Network

    Poaceae (Grass family) Life cycle Rhizomatous perennial. Leaves Bright green leaves are hairless. Patch of Johnsongrass. Back to identifying Christmas tree weeds. #12;Poaceae (Grass family) Johnsongrass

  10. Families and brain death.

    PubMed

    Kompanje, Erwin J O

    2015-04-01

    It is necessary to support the family of a patient with a progressively worsening severe acute brain injury, and to do this with the utmost understanding of their ultimate hopelessness. Any conversation starts with an explanation of the catastrophic nature of the illness, but also with establishing the point of no return. When brainstem reflexes are lost and the patient has become apneic, family members should be appropriately informed. In contrast to circulatory death, the relatives of such a patient do not see a deceased person in the traditional sense, and even the neurologic progression may not have been obvious to family members. The conversation about brain death with the close relatives is therefore different, and is more detailed than a conversation about cardiopulmonary death. In this review, a six-phase approach of communication with the relatives is proposed. Insightful snippets of personal conversations with family members are included. Communicating with family members also necessarily involves a discussion on the potential suitability for organ donation. Some suggestions on how to approach reluctant family members to accept death of their loved one are included. PMID:25839726

  11. Revealing the Beast Within

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-07-01

    Deeply Embedded Massive Stellar Clusters Discovered in Milky Way Powerhouse Summary Peering into a giant molecular cloud in the Milky Way galaxy - known as W49 - astronomers from the European Southern Observatory (ESO) have discovered a whole new population of very massive newborn stars . This research is being presented today at the International Astronomical Union's 25th General Assembly held in Sydney, Australia, by ESO-scientist João Alves. With the help of infrared images obtained during a period of excellent observing conditions with the ESO 3.5-m New Technology Telescope (NTT) at the La Silla Observatory (Chile), the astronomers looked deep into this molecular cloud and discovered four massive stellar clusters, with hot and energetic stars as massive as 120 solar masses. The exceedingly strong radiation from the stars in the largest of these clusters is "powering" a 20 light-year diameter region of mostly ionized hydrogen gas (a "giant HII region"). W49 is one of the most energetic regions of star formation in the Milky Way. With the present discovery, the true sources of the enormous energy have now been revealed for the first time, finally bringing to an end some decades of astronomical speculations and hypotheses. PR Photo 21a/03 : Colour Composite of W49A (NTT+SOFI). PR Photo 21b/03 : Radio and Near-Infrared Composite of W49A Giant molecular clouds Stars form predominantly inside Giant Molecular Clouds which populate our Galaxy, the Milky Way. One of the most prominent of these is W49 , which has a mass of a million solar masses. It is located some 37,000 light-years away and is the most luminous star-forming region known in our home galaxy: its luminosity is several million times the luminosity of our Sun. A smaller region within this cloud is denoted W49A - this is one of the strongest radio-emitting areas known in the Galaxy . Massive stars are excessive in all ways. Compared to their smaller and ligther brethren, they form at an Olympic speed and have a frantic and relatively short life. Formation sites of massive stars are quite rare and, accordingly, most are many thousands of light-years away. For that reason alone, it is in general much more difficult to observe details of massive-star formation. Moreover, as massive stars are generally formed in the main plane of the Galaxy, in the disc where a lot of dust is present, the first stages of such stars are normally hidden behind very thick curtains. In the case of W49A , less than one millionth of the visible light emitted by a star in this region will find its way through the heavy intervening layers of galactic dust and reach the telescopes on Earth. And finally, because massive stars just formed are still very deeply embedded in their natal clouds, they are anyway not detectable at optical wavelengths. Observations of this early phase of the lives of heavy stars must therefore be done at longer wavelengths (where the dust is more transparent), but even so, such natal dusty clouds still absorb a large proportion of the light emitted by the young stars. Infrared observations of W49 ESO PR Photo 21a/03 ESO PR Photo 21a/03 [Preview - JPEG: 464 x 400 pix - 88k [Normal - JPEG: 928 x 800 pix - 972k] ESO PR Photo 21b/03 ESO PR Photo 21b/03 [Preview - JPEG: 400 x 461 pix - 104k [Normal - JPEG: 800 x 922 pix - 1.1M] Captions : PR Photo 21a/03 presents a composite near-infrared colour image from NTT/SofI. It covers a sky area of 5 x 5 arcmin 2 and the red, green and blue colours correspond to the Ks- (wavelength 2.2 µm), H- (1.65 µm) and J-band (1.2 µm), respectively. North is up and East is to the left. The labels identify known radio sources. The main cluster is seen north-east of the region labelled "O3". The colour of a star in this image is mostly a measure of the amount of dust absorption towards this star. Hence, all blue stars in this image are located in front of the star-forming region. PR Photo 21b/03 shows a three-colour composite of the central region of the star-forming region W49A , based on a radio emission map (w

  12. Titan Casts Revealing Shadow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-05-01

    A rare celestial event was captured by NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory as Titan -- Saturn's largest moon and the only moon in the Solar System with a thick atmosphere -- crossed in front of the X-ray bright Crab Nebula. The X-ray shadow cast by Titan allowed astronomers to make the first X-ray measurement of the extent of its atmosphere. On January 5, 2003, Titan transited the Crab Nebula, the remnant of a supernova explosion that was observed to occur in the year 1054. Although Saturn and Titan pass within a few degrees of the Crab Nebula every 30 years, they rarely pass directly in front of it. "This may have been the first transit of the Crab Nebula by Titan since the birth of the Crab Nebula," said Koji Mori of Pennsylvania State University in University Park, and lead author on an Astrophysical Journal paper describing these results. "The next similar conjunction will take place in the year 2267, so this was truly a once in a lifetime event." Animation of Titan's Shadow on Crab Nebula Animation of Titan's Shadow on Crab Nebula Chandra's observation revealed that the diameter of the X-ray shadow cast by Titan was larger than the diameter of its solid surface. The difference in diameters gives a measurement of about 550 miles (880 kilometers) for the height of the X-ray absorbing region of Titan's atmosphere. The extent of the upper atmosphere is consistent with, or slightly (10-15%) larger, than that implied by Voyager I observations made at radio, infrared, and ultraviolet wavelengths in 1980. "Saturn was about 5% closer to the Sun in 2003, so increased solar heating of Titan may account for some of this atmospheric expansion," said Hiroshi Tsunemi of Osaka University in Japan, one of the coauthors on the paper. The X-ray brightness and extent of the Crab Nebula made it possible to study the tiny X-ray shadow cast by Titan during its transit. By using Chandra to precisely track Titan's position, astronomers were able to measure a shadow one arcsecond in diameter, which corresponds to the size of a dime as viewed from about two and a half miles. Illustration of Crab, Titan's Shadow and Chandra Illustration of Crab, Titan's Shadow and Chandra Unlike almost all of Chandra's images which are made by focusing X-ray emission from cosmic sources, Titan's X-ray shadow image was produced in a manner similar to a medical X-ray. That is, an X-ray source (the Crab Nebula) is used to make a shadow image (Titan and its atmosphere) that is recorded on film (Chandra's ACIS detector). Titan's atmosphere, which is about 95% nitrogen and 5% methane, has a pressure near the surface that is one and a half times the Earth's sea level pressure. Voyager I spacecraft measured the structure of Titan's atmosphere at heights below about 300 miles (500 kilometers), and above 600 miles (1000 kilometers). Until the Chandra observations, however, no measurements existed at heights in the range between 300 and 600 miles. Understanding the extent of Titan's atmosphere is important for the planners of the Cassini-Huygens mission. The Cassini-Huygens spacecraft will reach Saturn in July of this year to begin a four-year tour of Saturn, its rings and its moons. The tour will include close flybys of Titan that will take Cassini as close as 600 miles, and the launching of the Huygens probe that will land on Titan's surface. Chandra's X-ray Shadow of Titan Chandra's X-ray Shadow of Titan "If Titan's atmosphere has really expanded, the trajectory may have to be changed." said Tsunemi. The paper on these results has been accepted and is expected to appear in a June 2004 issue of The Astrophysical Journal. Other members of the research team were Haroyoski Katayama (Osaka University), David Burrows and Gordon Garmine (Penn State University), and Albert Metzger (JPL). Chandra observed Titan from 9:04 to 18:46 UT on January 5, 2003, using its Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer instrument. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Ala., manages the Chandra program for the Office of Space Science, NASA Headquarters,

  13. Changing families, changing workplaces.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Suzanne M

    2011-01-01

    American families and workplaces have both changed dramatically over the past half-century. Paid work by women has increased sharply, as has family instability. Education-related inequality in work hours and income has grown. These changes, says Suzanne Bianchi, pose differing work-life issues for parents at different points along the income distribution. Between 1975 and 2009, the labor force rate of mothers with children under age eighteen increased from 47.4 percent to 71.6 percent. Mothers today also return to work much sooner after the birth of a child than did mothers half a century ago. High divorce rates and a sharp rise in the share of births to unmarried mothers mean that more children are being raised by a single parent, usually their mother. Workplaces too have changed, observes Bianchi. Today's employees increasingly work nonstandard hours. The well-being of highly skilled workers and less-skilled workers has been diverging. For the former, work hours may be long, but income has soared. For lower-skill workers, the lack of "good jobs" disconnects fathers from family obligations. Men who cannot find work or have low earnings potential are much less likely to marry. For low-income women, many of whom are single parents, the work-family dilemma is how to care adequately for children and work enough hours to support them financially. Jobs for working-class and lower middle-class workers are relatively stable, except in economic downturns, but pay is low, and both parents must work full time to make ends meet. Family income is too high to qualify for government subsidized child care, but too low to afford high-quality care in the private market. These families struggle to have a reasonable family life and provide for their family's economic well-being. Bianchi concludes that the "work and family" problem has no one solution because it is not one problem. Some workers need more work and more money. Some need to take time off around the birth of a child without permanently derailing a fulfilling career. Others need short-term support to attend to a family health crisis. How best to meet this multiplicity of needs is the challenge of the coming decade. PMID:22013627

  14. Opportunity NYC--Family Rewards: Qualitative Study of Family Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraker, Carolyn A.; Greenberg, David

    2011-01-01

    Aimed at low-income families in six of New York City's highest-poverty communities, the Family Rewards program ties cash rewards to a pre-specified set of activities. This paper presents the qualitative findings from interviews with 77 families. It examines how families incorporated the program into their households, and specifically the…

  15. Families in Demographic Perspective: Implications for Family Counseling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bray, James H.

    1993-01-01

    Focuses on demographic changes in families and implications for counseling couples and families. Contends that several important demographic changes in families have major impacts on kinds of clients that present for counseling and therapy. Looks at children born to unmarried women, separation and divorce, single-parent families, and remarriage…

  16. Family Support & Health Care: Working Together for Healthy Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lalley, Jacqueline, Ed.; Ahsan, Nilofer, Ed.

    1998-01-01

    This report of the Family Resource Coalition of America examines partnerships between family support programs and health care providers, forged to ensure that the comprehensive needs of families are met. The report begins with two articles, "Family Support and the Emerging Health System" and "Social and Economic Issues Affecting Health--A…

  17. Running in the family: A rare diagnosis of familial papillary thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    O’Connell, L.; Prichard, R.S.; O’Reilly, E.; Skehan, S.; Gibbons, D.; McDermott, E.W.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Whilst inherited medullary thyroid cancer has been extensively reported, familial non-medullary thyroid cancer is a rare and less well described clinical entity. Familial forms of the disease demonstrate more aggressive features than sporadic non-medullary thyroid cancer. Presentation of case A 54 year old lady was referred with globus on a background of a longstanding goitre. Three first degree relatives had a history of non-medullary thyroid carcinoma. Investigations revealed a papillary thyroid carcinoma and the patient proceeded to total thyroidectomy and ipsilateral Level VI neck dissection, followed by adjuvant radioiodine ablation. Discussion Familial papillary thyroid carcinoma syndrome is defined as three or more first degree relatives diagnosed with the disease in the absence of other known associated syndromes. It is often associated with the presence of benign thyroid disorders, and is characterised by the early onset of multi-focal bilateral locally advanced tumours. Conclusion Familial papillary thyroid cancer is a rare clinical entity but should be considered where ?3 first degree relatives are diagnosed with non-medullary thyroid cancer. It is necessary to exclude other familial tumour syndromes to make the diagnosis. It demonstrates more aggressive features with higher rates of local recurrence than its sporadic counterpart, and therefore mandates more aggressive management than might otherwise be indicated. Screening of first degree relatives should be considered. Summary The case of a 54 year old female diagnosed with familial non-medullary thyroid carcinoma is reported. PMID:26432498

  18. Trends in Family Child Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neugebauer, Roger

    2011-01-01

    The author presents insights from various readers of "ExchangeEveryDay" regarding trends in the world of family child care. Kathleen Reticker of Acre Family Child Care in Lowell, Massachusetts thinks an increasing trend in Family Child Care is the pressure to emulate a Center, instead of seeing family child care as a different model. Over the…

  19. Family Involvement with Assistive Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kroth, Roger; Bolson, Mary-Dale

    1996-01-01

    Expectations for family involvement and professional behavior are different when working with families of children who use adaptive technology than they are with families of other children with special needs. The article addresses some of the differences, describing family and professional roles in assessment, interpersonal communication,…

  20. Family Research Project Progress Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, David C.; Bell, Linda G.

    This document presents an overview and progress report on the Family Research Project, started in 1974 to (1) study the relationship between family process and individual development of family members, especially children, (2) conceptualize and measure system level variables describing family structure and process, (3) develop microanalytic…

  1. The Power of Family Literacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Family Literacy, Louisville, KY.

    This report presents the early findings from the analysis of a family literacy demonstration project under the direction of the National Center for Family Literacy. The data in this report are based upon the experiences of over 300 families who participated in the Toyota Families for Learning Program during the 1992-1993 school year. The first…

  2. About Colon Cancer Family Registries

    Cancer.gov

    The Colon CFR includes lifestyle, medical history, and family history data collected from more than 41,000 men and women from 14,500 families with and without colorectal cancer. The Colon CFR began recruiting families in 1997, and all participants are followed up every 5 years to update personal and family histories and expand recruitment if new cases have occurred since baseline.

  3. Characterizing gene family evolution

    PubMed Central

    Liberles, David A.

    2008-01-01

    Gene families are widely used in comparative genomics, molecular evolution, and in systematics. However, they are constructed in different manners, their data analyzed and interpreted differently, with different underlying assumptions, leading to sometimes divergent conclusions. In systematics, concepts like monophyly and the dichotomy between homoplasy and homology have been central to the analysis of phylogenies. We critique the traditional use of such concepts as applied to gene families and give examples of incorrect inferences they may lead to. Operational definitions that have emerged within functional genomics are contrasted with the common formal definitions derived from systematics. Lastly, we question the utility of layers of homology and the meaning of homology at the character state level in the context of sequence evolution. From this, we move forward to present an idealized strategy for characterizing gene family evolution for both systematic and functional purposes, including recent methodological improvements. PMID:19461954

  4. IRAS asteroid families

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veeder, G. J.; Williams, J. G.; Tedesco, E. F.; Matson, D. L.

    1991-01-01

    The Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS) sampled the entire asteroid population at wavelengths from 12 to 100 microns during its 1983 all sky survey. The IRAS Minor Planet Survey (IMPS) includes updated results for more recently numbered as well as other additional asteroids with reliable orbital elements. Albedos and diameters were derived from the observed thermal emission and assumed absolute visual magnitudes and then entered into the IMPS database at the Infrared Processing and Analysis Center (IPAC) for members of the Themis, Eos, Koronis and Maria asteroid families and compared with their visual colors. The IMPS results for the small (down to about 20 km) asteroids within these major families confirm trends previously noted for their larger members. Each of these dynamical families which are defined by their similar proper elements appears to have homogeneous physical properties.

  5. On Being a Father or Sibling in Light of the Humanbecoming Family Model.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Steven L; Braddick, Marybeth

    2016-01-01

    The following article provides an updated discussion on two Parse grounded exploratory descriptive studies in light to her recently added humanbecoming family model. The comments of the fathers and siblings from the studies reveal that family life is unpredictable and that family relationships are paradoxical evolutional emergences of shifting hopes and dreams. The humanbecoming family model provided a useful way to consider fathering and being a sibling, as unexpected unfoldings of joy-sorrow reveal purposeful new possibilities. It guides health professionals to avoid the imposition of their views on what is best for the family in favor of bearing witness to the suffering and disappointments that unfold in family life. It is important to remain open to families' sources of meaning, courage, and hope in the moment. PMID:26660776

  6. Being a family in the midst of living and dying.

    PubMed

    Syrén, Susanne M; Saveman, Britt-Inger; Benzein, Eva G

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to illuminate the way of being a family when one family member is in the midst of living and dying. A family systems frame and a life world perspective were used in interviews with five families. A qualitative analysis inspired by Giorgi revealed dialectic and dynamic processes in constant motion within and between the continua being in affinity-being in loneliness, being in power-being in helplessness, and being in continuity-being in disruption. When families were moving in the direction of being in affinity, power, and continuity, these seemed to be prerequisites for enduring their challenged life situation and for giving them a kind of repose. When the movements were in the opposite direction, existential and emotional suffering were manifested as individual embodied experiences such as depression and anxiety. PMID:16689412

  7. [Familial LCAT deficiency--clinical picture. Case report].

    PubMed

    Idzior-Walu?, B; Sieradzki, J; Rostworowski, W; Hartwich, J; Kaczmarski, F; Dubiel-Bigaj, M; Dabro?, W

    2000-09-01

    We report a case of familial LCAT deficiency, diagnosed in a 35 year old women. The disease manifested itself by a presence of proteinuria, corneal opacities and haemolytic anaemia with target cells. Suspecion of familial LCAT deficiency was based on renal biopsy, which revealed characteristic serpiginous fibrillar deposits in electron microscopy. The diagnosis was confirmed by a marked decrease of estrified cholesterol, low HDL-cholesterol concentration, decrease of LCAT activity in serum, typical "stacked coins" picture of HDL lipoproteins in electron microscopy examination and positive familial history--diagnosis of LCAT deficiency in dialysed brother of patient. PMID:11392166

  8. Familial pityriasis rotunda.

    PubMed

    Lodi, A; Betti, R; Chiarelli, G; Carducci, M; Crosti, C

    1990-09-01

    Pityriasis rotunda is a rare dermatosis characterized by circular, dusty scaling, dyschromic patches, quite asymptomatic and mostly described in Japanese and blacks. The authors have seen three cases of pityriasis rotunda in a Sardinian family that are to be added to two other similar reports. The patients were all in good health. An interesting feature was the association with favism. On inquiry it was discovered that many more members of the family were affected by either or both pathologies. The authors believe this condition to be a form of minor acquired ichthyosis of which Sardinia could be an ethnic center. PMID:2228374

  9. Familial pityriasis rotunda.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Lodi A; Betti R; Chiarelli G; Carducci M; Crosti C

    1990-09-01

    Pityriasis rotunda is a rare dermatosis characterized by circular, dusty scaling, dyschromic patches, quite asymptomatic and mostly described in Japanese and blacks. The authors have seen three cases of pityriasis rotunda in a Sardinian family that are to be added to two other similar reports. The patients were all in good health. An interesting feature was the association with favism. On inquiry it was discovered that many more members of the family were affected by either or both pathologies. The authors believe this condition to be a form of minor acquired ichthyosis of which Sardinia could be an ethnic center.

  10. [Familial LCAT deficiency].

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, M

    1994-12-01

    Familial plasma lecithine: cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) deficiency is a disease that is inherited as an autosomal recessing trait. The main clinical abnormalities are corneal opacities, anemia and frequently, though not invariably, proteinuria. These abnormalities result from a failure of LCAT to esterify cholesterol in plasma. Renal failure can be a life-threatening complication. In plasma, all lipoprotein classes show abnormalities including lipid composition, shape, distribution and concentration. Fish eye disease, which is characterized by corneal opacities and plasma lipoprotein abnormalities, is also a result from deficiency of LCAT activity. As LCAT gene has been cloned, molecular defects of both familial LCAT deficiency and fish eye disease have been reported recently. PMID:7853712

  11. The Collagen Family

    PubMed Central

    Ricard-Blum, Sylvie

    2011-01-01

    Collagens are the most abundant proteins in mammals. The collagen family comprises 28 members that contain at least one triple-helical domain. Collagens are deposited in the extracellular matrix where most of them form supramolecular assemblies. Four collagens are type II membrane proteins that also exist in a soluble form released from the cell surface by shedding. Collagens play structural roles and contribute to mechanical properties, organization, and shape of tissues. They interact with cells via several receptor families and regulate their proliferation, migration, and differentiation. Some collagens have a restricted tissue distribution and hence specific biological functions. PMID:21421911

  12. Emotional Problems — A Family Affair

    PubMed Central

    Weston, W. W.

    1972-01-01

    It is important for the family physician to be able to utilize family treatment concepts to help him understand the families in his care. He should recognize how family dysfunction contributes to the problems of his individual patients. He should be able to help these families recognize and deal with many of their problems and should be aware of his own limitations and when consultation is indicated. PMID:20468782

  13. The Expansion of the PRAME Gene Family in Eutheria

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ti-Cheng; Yang, Yang; Yasue, Hiroshi; Bharti, Arvind K.; Retzel, Ernest F.; Liu, Wan-Sheng

    2011-01-01

    The PRAME gene family belongs to the group of cancer/testis genes whose expression is restricted primarily to the testis and a variety of cancers. The expansion of this gene family as a result of gene duplication has been observed in primates and rodents. We analyzed the PRAME gene family in Eutheria and discovered a novel Y-linked PRAME gene family in bovine, PRAMEY, which underwent amplification after a lineage-specific, autosome-to-Y transposition. Phylogenetic analyses revealed two major evolutionary clades. Clade I containing the amplified PRAMEYs and the unamplified autosomal homologs in cattle and other eutherians is under stronger functional constraints; whereas, Clade II containing the amplified autosomal PRAMEs is under positive selection. Deep-sequencing analysis indicated that eight of the identified 16 PRAMEY loci are active transcriptionally. Compared to the bovine autosomal PRAME that is expressed predominantly in testis, the PRAMEY gene family is expressed exclusively in testis and is up-regulated during testicular maturation. Furthermore, the sense RNA of PRAMEY is expressed specifically whereas the antisense RNA is expressed predominantly in spermatids. This study revealed that the expansion of the PRAME family occurred in both autosomes and sex chromosomes in a lineage-dependent manner. Differential selection forces have shaped the evolution and function of the PRAME family. The positive selection observed on the autosomal PRAMEs (Clade II) may result in their functional diversification in immunity and reproduction. Conversely, selective constraints have operated on the expanded PRAMEYs to preserve their essential function in spermatogenesis. PMID:21347312

  14. Family Support Builds Stronger Families: The Roots of Family-Supportive Child Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seiderman, Ethel

    2009-01-01

    Parent Services Project (PSP) is one model of family support that emerged from the heightened awareness of families' needs. Founded in 1980 to integrate family support into four San Francisco Bay Area early childhood programs, PSP since has spread to more than 800 organizations serving 30,000 families in Alaska, California, Delaware, Florida,…

  15. Family Literacy as a Welfare Reform Strategy. Family Independence Initiative Audioconference. Family Independence Initiative Publication #2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Family Literacy, Louisville, KY.

    In 1997, the National Center for Family Literacy convened four state policymakers for an audioconference to discuss five issues related to family literacy and its role as a welfare reform strategy. First, with regard to the value of family literacy, policymakers saw literacy as the key to employment and job retention. Second, family literacy was a…

  16. Perceived Family Functioning and Family Resources of Hong Kong Families: Implications for Social Work Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ma, Joyce L. C.; Wong, Timothy K. Y.; Lau, Luk King; Pun, Shuk Han

    2009-01-01

    This article reports the results of a telephone survey (n = 1,015 respondents) that aims to identify the perceived general family functioning and family resources of Hong Kong Chinese families and their linkage to each other in a rapidly transforming society. The perceived general family functioning of the respondents was average, and the five…

  17. Systematic chromosome examination of two families with schizophrenia and two families with manic depressive illness

    SciTech Connect

    Friedrich, U.; Mors, O.; Ewald, H.

    1996-02-16

    Systematic and detailed chromosome analysis, combined with a semistructured interview, was performed in 2 families with schizophrenia and in 2 families with manic depressive illness. Prometaphase technique did not reveal any subtle structural chromosome abnormalities. However, in standard techniques, gain and loss of sex chromosomes were observed. This occurred in patients at a younger age than in unaffected persons. This gives rise to the suspicion that sex chromosome aneuploidy may somehow be related to the development of psychosis. But since the data set is small, especially with respect to schizophrenia, further studies are needed to elucidate this observation. In one family, cosegregation of the disease locus with a marker on chromosome 21 was seen. Therefore, further research should determine if chromosome 21 contains a gene for manic depressive illness. 10 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Organizational work-family resources as predictors of job performance and attitudes: the process of work-family conflict and enrichment.

    PubMed

    Odle-Dusseau, Heather N; Britt, Thomas W; Greene-Shortridge, Tiffany M

    2012-01-01

    The goal of the current study was to test a model where organizational resources (aimed at managing work and family responsibilities) predict job attitudes and supervisor ratings of performance through the mechanisms of work-family conflict and work-family enrichment. Employees (n = 174) at a large metropolitan hospital were surveyed at two time periods regarding perceptions of family supportive supervisor behaviors (FSSB), family supportive organizational perceptions (FSOP), bidirectional work-family conflict, bidirectional work-family enrichment, and job attitudes. Supervisors were also asked to provide performance ratings at Time 2. Results revealed FSSB at Time 1 predicted job satisfaction, organizational commitment and intention to leave, as well as supervisor ratings of performance, at Time 2. In addition, both work-family enrichment and family-work enrichment were found to mediate relationships between FSSB and various organizational outcomes, while work-family conflict was not a significant mediator. Results support further testing of supervisor behaviors specific to family support, as well models that include bidirectional work-family enrichment as the mechanism by which work-family resources predict employee and organizational outcomes. PMID:22149204

  19. Poverty among Young Children in Black Immigrant, US-Born Black, and Non-Black Immigrant Families: The Role of Familial Contexts. Discussion Paper Series. DP 2010-02

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Kevin J. A.

    2010-01-01

    This study examines how familial contexts affect poverty disparities between the children of immigrant and US-born Blacks, and among Black and non-Black children of immigrants. Despite lower gross child poverty rates in immigrant than US-born Black families, accounting for differences in family structure reveals that child poverty risks among…

  20. Not Your Family Farm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tenopir, Carol; Baker, Gayle; Grogg, Jill E.

    2007-01-01

    The information industry continues to consolidate, just as agribusiness has consolidated and now dominates farming. Both the family farm and the small information company still exist but are becoming rarer in an age of mergers, acquisitions, and increased economies of scale. Small companies distinguish themselves by high quality, special themes,…

  1. All in the Family

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lum, Lydia

    2010-01-01

    Even as a little girl, Dr. Nitasha Sharma aspired to become a college professor like her parents, whose careers let the family spend entire summers or longer in either her mother's native Brooklyn, New York, or her father's native India. She dreamed of long vacations as a grown-up and going home for lunch on weekdays. But during a stay in India…

  2. It's a Family Affair

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demski, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author features Computers for Youth (CFY), a nonprofit organization that provides computers, software, and training to sixth-grade students and their families at low-income schools. Founded in 1999, Computers for Youth works with low-income schools to put computers in the homes of sixth-grade students and bring parents into…

  3. Profiling Canada's Families II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanier Inst. of the Family, Ottawa (Ontario).

    Noting that Canadians have witnessed profound demographic, economic, social, cultural, and technological changes over the last century and the need for sound demographic information for future planning, this report is the second to identify significant trends affecting Canada's families. Following an introductory section providing relevant…

  4. Perspectives on Family Literacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Literacy Assistance Center, New York, NY.

    This joint publication of the journals of the Literacy Assistance Center (LAC) and the National Even Start Association (NESA) focuses on innovative practices and theory in family literacy education, offers an array of perspectives to members of the literacy community, and critically examines some assumptions about literacy in general, as well as…

  5. Women and Family Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lein, Laura

    Increases in the divorce rate, decreases in women's childbearing, and increases in women's participation in the labor force represent three major trends that have had a great impact on women and on the family as a setting in which to work, raise children, and control resources. Although women's employment is clearly related in part to their…

  6. Incarceration in Fragile Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wildeman, Christopher; Western, Bruce

    2010-01-01

    Since the mid-1970s the U.S. imprisonment rate has increased roughly fivefold. As Christopher Wildeman and Bruce Western explain, the effects of this sea change in the imprisonment rate--commonly called mass imprisonment or the prison boom--have been concentrated among those most likely to form fragile families: poor and minority men with little…

  7. Family Feathers. [Videotape Series].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1999

    Family Feathers is a set of 18 videotapes for parents of preschool children, created by the Alaska Native Home Base Video Project of the Tlingit and Haida Head Start Program. This series offers culturally relevant solutions to the challenges of parenting, drawing on practical advice from Tlingit and Haida parents, wisdom from elders, and some of…

  8. The Family of Adoption.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pavao, Joyce Maguire

    This book aims to provide a broad framework within which to think about adoption as a whole system, so that everyone involved will learn to feel some empathy for the other members of the adoption process. The book, written by a family and adoption therapist who was adopted as an infant, describes predictable developmental stages and challenges for…

  9. Family First Considerations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaFee, Scott

    2012-01-01

    The typical superintendent these days is male (though the percentage of female superintendents is steadily rising, now accounting for one in four, according to AASA's 2010 decennial study of the superintendency), in his 40s and almost always married with children. When educators become superintendents, the issues of family dynamics and related…

  10. Family Science Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCubbins, Sara; Thomas, Bethany; Vetere, Michael

    2014-01-01

    This article describes a family-friendly science day event that encourages scientific discovery through hands-on activities, while also providing an opportunity to learn about scientific careers from actual research scientists and science educators, thereby raising awareness of the importance of STEM in our society. The one-day event bought…

  11. Families in the Military

    MedlinePLUS

    ... stress and possibly serious problems. The responses of children to stress of separation are determined by their individual makeup ... it is a difficult time for families, most children can and do adjust successfully to the separation and stress involved when a parent in the military is ...

  12. Investing in Family Capital.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothstein, Richard

    2001-01-01

    Most discussions about narrowing the achievement gap focus on ways to provide disadvantaged children with schooling comparable to that received by middle-class kids. Addressing deficiencies in children's social environment, health, housing, and family income would be more effective and would probably reduce special-education spending. (MLH)

  13. potentialpotentialpotential Guiding Families through

    E-print Network

    Pevsner, Jonathan

    after a spinal cord injury 4 Lifeline Conquering complex medical conditions together: One family in our International Center for Spinal Cord Injury, and we'll continue to provide care and therapy-death: Emerging Consciousness after Brain Injury A publication of Kennedy Krieger Institute #12;Letter from our

  14. Family Play Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ariel, Shlomo

    This paper examines a case study of family play therapy in Israel. The unique contributions of play therapy are evaluated including the therapy's accessibility to young children, its richness and flexibility, its exposure of covert patterns, its wealth of therapeutic means, and its therapeutic economy. The systematization of the therapy attempts…

  15. Family Problems Single Parenting

    E-print Network

    O'Toole, Alice J.

    Family Problems Single Parenting Dual Careers Anxiety Depression Parent/Child Conflict Job "Burnout Life Transition Aging Parents Unresolved Grief Marital Problems Sexual Problems Personal Concerns to assist employees who may be dealing with personal problems that affect their relationships at home

  16. Family Support Networks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frazier, Billie H.

    This document contains a brief bibliography of peer-reviewed literature, with abstracts, on family support networks. It is one of 12 bibliographies on aging prepared by the National Agricultural Library for its "Pathfinders" series of publications. Topics covered by the other 11 bibliographies include aging parents, adult children, dementia and…

  17. Family acholeplasmataceae (including phytoplasmas)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The family Acholeplasmataceae was originally established to accommodate the genus Acholeplasma, comprising the mollicutes that could be cultivated without the supplement of cholesterol and that use UGA as a stop codon instead of coding for tryptophan. It was later shown that the phytoplasmas, a larg...

  18. Endangered Language Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whalen, D. H.; Simons, Gary F.

    2012-01-01

    Linguists have increased their documentation efforts in response to the sharp decline in the number of languages. Greater awareness and new sources of funding have led to an upsurge in language documentation. While individual languages make unique contributions to the world's linguistic heritage, language families, by virtue of their shared…

  19. Family pathology and the infantile neurosis.

    PubMed

    Calogeras, R C; Alston, T M

    1985-01-01

    In this study we have attempted to investigate the connection (in the sense of a complex interplay) between the infantile and the adult neurosis where severe family pathology has been an important determining force. In the clinical illustrations of two female patients we tried to determine the fate (i.e. in terms of the compulsion to repeat) of the early infantile conflicts and experiences within the purview of their pathological family condition. In sorting this out, we distinguished between those repetitions viewed as passive reproductions and those repetitions viewed, as re-creative; the former finding their way essentially into the adult neurosis, the latter finding their way into parts of the personality under the aegis of their ego's organizing activity. The fashion in which the family pathology impinged upon the adult neurosis made the development of the transference in the analytic situation a most difficult arena for clarification, since there was a tendency to confuse past (early) events, past fantasy, current reality and current fantasy. In concluding we noted that both Oedipus complex and oedipal drama came together in these patients, revealing the link between the tragedy of their life-long family situation and what was termed a 'fate neurosis'. PMID:4044124

  20. Narrative Interaction in Family Dinnertime Conversations

    PubMed Central

    Bohanek, Jennifer G.; Fivush, Robyn; Zaman, Widaad; Lepore, Caitlin E.; Merchant, Shela; Duke, Marshall P.

    2015-01-01

    Reminiscing has been shown to be a critical conversational context for the development of autobiographical memory, self-concept, and emotional regulation (for a review, see Fivush, Haden, & Reese, 2006). Although much past research has examined reminiscing between mothers and their preschool children, very little attention has been given to family narrative interaction with older children. In the present study, we examined family reminiscing in spontaneous narratives that emerged during family dinnertime conversations. The results revealed that mothers contributed more to the narratives than did fathers in that they provided, confirmed, and negated more information, although fathers requested more information than mothers. In exploratory analyses, mothers’ contributions to shared family narratives were found to be related to fewer internalizing and externalizing behaviors in their children, while fathers’ contributions to individual narratives of day-today experiences were related to fewer internalizing and externalizing behaviors in their children. These results indicate that mothers and fathers may play different roles in narrative construction with their children, and there is some suggestion that these differences may also be related to children’s behavioral adjustment.

  1. Evolution of the oligopeptide transporter family.

    PubMed

    Gomolplitinant, Kenny M; Saier, Milton H

    2011-03-01

    The oligopeptide transporter (OPT) family of peptide and iron-siderophore transporters includes members from both prokaryotes and eukaryotes but with restricted distribution in the latter domain. Eukaryotic members were found only in fungi and plants with a single slime mold homologue clustering with the fungal proteins. All functionally characterized eukaryotic peptide transporters segregate from the known iron-siderophore transporters on a phylogenetic tree. Prokaryotic members are widespread, deriving from many different phyla. Although they belong only to the iron-siderophore subdivision, genome context analyses suggest that many of them are peptide transporters. OPT family proteins have 16 or occasionally 17 transmembrane-spanning ?-helical segments (TMSs). We provide statistical evidence that the 16-TMS topology arose via three sequential duplication events followed by a gene-fusion event for proteins with a seventeenth TMS. The proposed pathway is as follows: 2 TMSs ? 4 TMSs ? 8 TMSs ? 16 TMSs ? 17 TMSs. The seventeenth C-terminal TMS, which probably arose just once, is found in just one phylogenetic group of these homologues. Analyses for orthology revealed that a few phylogenetic clusters consist exclusively of orthologues but most have undergone intermixing, suggestive of horizontal transfer. It appears that in this family horizontal gene transfer was frequent among prokaryotes, rare among eukaryotes and largely absent between prokaryotes and eukaryotes as well as between plants and fungi. These observations provide guides for future structural and functional analyses of OPT family members. PMID:21347612

  2. [Molecular defects in familial LCAT deficiency].

    PubMed

    Bujo, H; Saito, Y

    1993-02-01

    Lecithin: cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) is the enzyme that catalyzes the esterification of free cholesterol in plasma lipoproteins. Familial LCAT deficiency, which is a rare hereditary disorder of lipid metabolism, inherited as an autosomal recessive trait, is characterized by corneal opacity, anemia and frequently, though not invariably, renal failure. Recently, LCAT cDNA and gene have been cloned. Studies on DNA samples from unrelated patients with familial LCAT deficiency and fish eye disease, which is characterized by severe corneal opacity alone, revealed both diseases to be caused by respective mutations of the LCAT gene. It is suspected that defect or functional abnormality of LCAT, caused by these genetic defects, underlie the various clinical and biochemical characteristics observed in LCAT deficiency or fish eye disease. PMID:8464161

  3. Familial cavernous hemangioma with atypical neuroimaging.

    PubMed

    Passarin, M G; Salviati, A; Gambina, G; Tezzon, F; Tomelleri, G; Deotto, L; Zanoni, T; Bovi, P; Gerosa, M; Nicolato, A; Mazza, C; Iuzzolino, P; Ghimenton, C; Ferrari, G

    1996-08-01

    Three members of the same family were studied, all of whom had multiple intracerebral cavernous angiomas for which a dominant autosomal inheritance was hypothesised. The proband suffered from headaches, and physical examination revealed evident right hemiparesis. The second case started with a hemorrhagic cerebral stroke and the third was asymptomatic on neurological examination. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), performed in two of the three cases, showed lesions whose number and extent were not radiologically characteristic of cavernous angioma. A cerebral biopsy of the proband enabled the diagnosis to be made. Despite the recent introduction of NMR, the nosological classification of familial forms can be difficult when the radiological lesions are atypical. In such cases, cerebral biopsy is not only a valid diagnostic aid, but is also indispensable for obtaining adequate genetic information. PMID:8915762

  4. Enhancing family resilience through family narrative co-construction.

    PubMed

    Saltzman, William R; Pynoos, Robert S; Lester, Patricia; Layne, Christopher M; Beardslee, William R

    2013-09-01

    We draw upon family resilience and narrative theory to describe an evidence-based method for intervening with military families who are impacted by multiple wartime deployments and psychological, stress-related, or physical parental injuries. Conceptual models of familial resilience provide a guide for understanding the mechanics of how families respond and recover from exposure to extreme events, and underscore the role of specific family processes and interaction patterns in promoting resilient capabilities. Leading family theorists propose that the family's ability to make meaning of stressful and traumatic events and nurture protective beliefs are critical aspects of resilient adaptation. We first review general theoretical and empirical research contributions to understanding family resilience, giving special attention to the circumstances, challenges, needs, and strengths of American military families. Therapeutic narrative studies illustrate the processes through which family members acquire meaning-making capacities, and point to the essential role of parents' in facilitating discussions of stressful experiences and co-constructing coherent and meaningful narratives. This helps children to make sense of these experiences and develop capacities for emotion regulation and coping. Family-based narrative approaches provide a structured opportunity to elicit parents' and children's individual narratives, assemble divergent storylines into a shared family narrative, and thereby enhance members' capacity to make meaning of stressful experiences and adopt beliefs that support adaptation and growth. We discuss how family narratives can help to bridge intra-familial estrangements and re-engage communication and support processes that have been undermined by stress, trauma, or loss. We conclude by describing a family-based narrative intervention currently in use with thousands of military children and families across the USA. PMID:23797387

  5. Familial Aggregation of Lymphoproliferative Disorders from the Scandinavian Family Cancer Database

    Cancer.gov

    Familial aggregation of lymphoproliferative disorders from the Scandinavian family cancer database Print This Page Familial Aggregation of Lymphoproliferative Disorders from the Scandinavian Family Cancer Database Our Research

  6. Counseling Families with Chronic Illness. Family Psychology and Counseling Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDaniel, Susan H., Ed.

    Regardless of whether a patient's health-care provider works from a traditional biomedical or a new biopsychosocial model, therapists and counselors need to work with patients and their families challenged by the onset of a serious illness. This book addresses this need and outlines the five goals of medical family therapy: (1) help the family

  7. Measuring Family Problem Solving: The Family Problem Solving Diary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kieren, Dianne K.

    The development and use of the family problem-solving diary are described. The diary is one of several indicators and measures of family problem-solving behavior. It provides a record of each person's perception of day-to-day family problems (what the problem concerns, what happened, who got involved, what those involved did, how the problem…

  8. [Family Research Council: 1993 Family Issues Survey Results.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Family Research Council of America, Inc., Washington, DC.

    This document contains a variety of information sheets developed from a survey completed on behalf of the Family Research Council to explore the family attitudes of American adults (N=1,100). The top 10 findings from the 1993 Family Issues Survey are enumerated on a summary sheet. Following this summary, each of the top 10 findings is discussed…

  9. Family Structure, Family Processes, and Adolescent Smoking and Drinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Susan L.; Rinelli, Lauren N.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined whether family structure was associated with adolescent risk behaviors, including smoking and drinking. Family living arrangements have become increasingly diverse, yet research on adolescent risk behaviors has typically relied on measures of family structure that do not adequately capture this diversity. Data from the…

  10. Family and Family Change in Ireland: An Overview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canavan, John

    2012-01-01

    In Ireland, historically and in the current era, family has been a central concern for society and the State. This article provides a descriptive overview of family life in Ireland and of major family-related changes over the past 40 years. It presents a general framework of analysis within which these changes can be understood, considers the…

  11. Strengthening Family Resilience. The Guilford Family Therapy Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, Froma

    Offering an alternative to clinician's prevalent focus on family dysfunction, this book draws upon extensive clinical and research experience to present a framework for therapeutic and preventive work with couples and families who are distressed, vulnerable, or at risk. The book identifies key interactional processes that enable family members to…

  12. Family Theory versus the Theories Families Live By.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daly, Kerry

    2003-01-01

    Argues that there is significant disjunction between the way that families live their lives and the way that professionals theorize about families. Using the metaphor of positive and negative spaces, argues that there are many negative spaces in our theorizing--everyday family activities that take up considerable time, energy, and attention but…

  13. Families Around the World. The Japanese Family. Teacher's Resource Unit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota Univ., Minneapolis. Project Social Studies Curriculum Center.

    The resource unit prepared for grade one is the fourth in a series on the theme of Families Around the World. For this study of the Japanese family, background material is presented for the teacher describing the site of Suye Mura, family structure, basic physical needs, a typical day, socialization, communication, village life today, and the…

  14. A family at risk: congenital prosopagnosia, poor face recognition and visuoperceptual deficits within one family.

    PubMed

    Johnen, Andreas; Schmukle, Stefan C; Hüttenbrink, Judith; Kischka, Claudia; Kennerknecht, Ingo; Dobel, Christian

    2014-05-01

    Congenital prosopagnosia (CP) describes a severe face processing impairment despite intact early vision and in the absence of overt brain damage. CP is assumed to be present from birth and often transmitted within families. Previous studies reported conflicting findings regarding associated deficits in nonface visuoperceptual tasks. However, diagnostic criteria for CP significantly differed between studies, impeding conclusions on the heterogeneity of the impairment. Following current suggestions for clinical diagnoses of CP, we administered standardized tests for face processing, a self-report questionnaire and general visual processing tests to an extended family (N=28), in which many members reported difficulties with face recognition. This allowed us to assess the degree of heterogeneity of the deficit within a large sample of suspected CPs of similar genetic and environmental background. (a) We found evidence for a severe face processing deficit but intact nonface visuoperceptual skills in three family members - a father and his two sons - who fulfilled conservative criteria for a CP diagnosis on standardized tests and a self-report questionnaire, thus corroborating findings of familial transmissions of CP. (b) Face processing performance of the remaining family members was also significantly below the mean of the general population, suggesting that face processing impairments are transmitted as a continuous trait rather than in a dichotomous all-or-nothing fashion. (c) Self-rating scores of face recognition showed acceptable correlations with standardized tests, suggesting this method as a viable screening procedure for CP diagnoses. (d) Finally, some family members revealed severe impairments in general visual processing and nonface visual memory tasks either in conjunction with face perception deficits or as an isolated impairment. This finding may indicate an elevated risk for more general visuoperceptual deficits in families with prosopagnosic members. PMID:24704175

  15. Balancing Family and Career

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andam, Aba Bentil; Dawson, Silvina Ponce; Horton, K. Renee; Sandow, Barbara

    2005-10-01

    In essentially all countries, responsibilities for child care, cooking, cleaning, and other homemaking tasks fall predominantly on the wife and mother. In addition, the childbearing years come during the period when a physicist must study hard, work long hours on research, and take temporary positions, often abroad. Thus, balancing family and career has long been one of the major barriers to women's participation in science and engineering fields, including physics. While many young women believe that they must choose between having children and having a science career, the fact is that the majority of women physicists in both developing and developed countries have successfully done both. This paper summarizes some ideas and recommendations raised in discussions, especially focused on easing the challenges of having children while in temporary jobs, returning to physics after a career break, the need for "family-friendly" working conditions, and the dual-career problem facing couples where both are scientists.

  16. [Familial lead poisoning].

    PubMed

    Ríos, E; Dal Borgo, P; Riveros, A; Díaz, S M

    1989-06-01

    A 1 year and 9 month old patient was admitted with ataxia. CBC showed a microcytic, hypocromic anemia with intense basophilic sttipling of erythrocytes. Lead poisoning was suspected and confirmed with a blood lead level of 167 micrograms/dl. The patient was treated with EDTA and BAL. It was discovered that family burned old car batteries for food cooking. Four members were intoxicated, with blood lead levels at or above 50 micrograms/dl. PMID:2519417

  17. A family reunion.

    PubMed

    Kirchheimer, B

    2000-10-23

    In a deal that will combine two companies with familial links to Nashville's HCA-The Healthcare Co., Dallas-based Triad Hospitals last week agreed to acquire Brentwood, Tenn.-based Quorum Health Group for $2.4 billion. The merger would create the nation's third-largest investor-owned hospital chain, behind HCA and Tenet Healthcare Corp. Analysts say sell-offs of some hospitals and Quorum's hospital management business are likely. PMID:11141838

  18. Galileo - Ganymede Family Night

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    This videotape is a continuation of tape number NONP-NASA-VT-2000036029. When the Galileo spacecraft flew by Ganymede, Jupiter's and the solar system's largest satellite, the project scientist and engineers gather together with their friends and family to view the photos as they are received. This videotape presents the last part of that meeting, which culminates in the announcement of the confirmation of the fly-by, and a review of the current trajectory status.

  19. Familial Mediterranean fever in Georgia.

    PubMed

    Pagava, K; Rauscher, B; Korinteli, I A; Shonvadze, D; Kriegshauser, G; Oberkanins, Ch

    2014-05-01

    Familial Mediterranean Fever (FMF) is a hereditary autoinflammatory disorder caused by mutations in the MEFV gene. Carrier rates are known to be particularly high among Sephardic Jews, Turks, Armenians and Arab populations. Our literature survey regarding FMF and MEFV mutations in Georgia revealed a lack of existing studies. We applied multiplex PCR and reverse-hybridization teststrips (FMF StripAssay) to simultaneously analyze twelve common MEFV mutations in DNA samples from dried blood on filter cards, which had been obtained from 202 unselected newborns at various hospitals in Tbilisi, Georgia. We found 30 samples to be heterozygous and one to be compound heterozygous or carrier of a complex allele (two mutations in cis). The carrier rate of MEFV mutations (15.3%) was remarkable. The most frequently observed variants were E148Q (15x), M680I G/C (5x) and M694V (4x). Five other MEFV mutations were found at lower prevalence (V726A, A744S, R761H: 2x each; P369S, F479L: 1x each). Based on these new findings, the awareness for FMF and the availability of appropriate testing should be further promoted in Georgia. PMID:24940862

  20. Advancing Measurement of Family Leisure 

    E-print Network

    Melton, Karen

    2014-08-06

    This study advanced knowledge of the measurement properties of the Family Leisure Activity Profile (FLAP). The FLAP is a sixteen-item index based on the Core and Balance Model of Family Functioning. This study assessed three distinct scaling...

  1. Veterans and Military Family Health

    MedlinePLUS

    Service members and veterans face some different health issues from civilians. Their families also face some unique challenges. Families may have to cope with Separation from their loved ones Anxiety over ...

  2. Roles for the Family Caregiver

    MedlinePLUS

    ... to work together. There may be problems and conflicts in some families, and the stress of caring ... up old issues or make new ones. These conflicts may cause communication problems within the family and ...

  3. 75 FR 63753 - Family Offices

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-18

    ...conditions or terms contained in every...be treated as a member of a family for...orders, which Congress understood. Where terms and conditions...interactions of family members in the management...First, it would limit the...

  4. Higgs family symmetry and supersymmetry

    E-print Network

    Patt, Brian Lawrence

    2006-01-01

    In this thesis we investigate building models of family symmetry that give the Higgs fields family structure. We construct several models, starting with 2 generation models then moving onto 3 generation models. These models ...

  5. Solanaceae (Nightshade family) Smooth groundcherry

    E-print Network

    Solanaceae (Nightshade family) Smooth groundcherry Physalis longifolia Nutt. var. subglabrata Christmas tree weeds. #12;Solanaceae (Nightshade family) Smooth groundcherry continued Smooth groundcherry. Reproduction Seeds and rhizomes. Smooth groundcherry leaf. Smooth groundcherry flower. #12;Solanaceae

  6. Urticaceae (Nettle family) Stinging nettle

    E-print Network

    Urticaceae (Nettle family) Stinging nettle Urtica dioica L. Life cycle Erect, rhizomatous perennial. Reproduction Seeds and rhizomes that form extensive colonies. Stinging nettle seedling. Back to identifying Christmas tree weeds. #12;Urticaceae (Nettle family) Stinging nettle continued Stinging nettle foliage

  7. Family planning for travellers.

    PubMed

    Rustom, A

    1990-11-01

    A public health nurse from London describes the customs of nomadic people in the British Isles, known as "travellers," as they affect provision of family planning services. Most are of British or Irish stock, some migrate and others live in caravan sites all year. Their traditions dictate that men work and women are housewives. Early, often arranged, marriage, early childbearing and large families are the norm. Sex and contraception are not considered appropriate for discussion between the sexes, or in the presence of children. Large families and financial hardship force many women to space pregnancies. Women often have to hide contraceptives from their husbands, difficult in conditions without privacy. Therefore they prefer IUDs, but some use oral contraceptives, although sometimes erratically because most are illiterate. Traveller women are usually unwilling to do self-examination, as needed with IUDs. They often have difficulty attending regular Pap smear clinics. Cervical cancer rates are high. They experience discrimination in clinics, and need extra care about modesty. It is worth while to take time to develop trust in the clinical relationship, to deal with the traveller woman's uneasy among outsiders. PMID:2286082

  8. [Familial LCAT deficiency].

    PubMed

    Idzior-Walu?, B

    2001-01-01

    Familial deficiency of lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) was described by Norum and Gjone in 1967. LCAT (EC 2.3.1.43) is a serum enzyme involved in reverse cholesterol transport. LCAT deficiency is associated with percentage increase of free cholesterol and decrease of esterified cholesterol, and disturbances in lipoprotein particles structure, because cholesterol esters form the lipoprotein core. Lipid disorders involve also other organs, such as kidneys, cornea and erythrocytes; with clinical manifestations of proteinuria, usually associated with renal insufficiency, corneal opacities and haemolytic anemia. Gene encoding LCAT is localized in region q 21-22 on chromosome 16. It consists of 6 exons, divided by 5 introns and spans 4.2 bp. Familial LCAT deficiency is an autosomal recessive disorder. In LCAT deficient patients several mutations in all 6 exons have been described. Clinical manifestations of familial LCAT deficiency are highly variable, although no or only low LCAT activity is present and this may suggests that expression of the disease is modulated by additional environmental factors and genes of minor importance. PMID:11957819

  9. The AVIT protein family

    PubMed Central

    Kaser, Alexandra; Winklmayr, Martina; Lepperdinger, Günther; Kreil, Günther

    2003-01-01

    Homologues of a protein originally isolated from snake venom and frog skin secretions are present in many vertebrate species. They contain 80–90 amino acids, 10 of which are cysteines with identical spacing. Various names have been given to these proteins, such as mamba intestinal protein 1 (MIT1), Bv8 (Bombina variegata molecular mass ?8 kDa), prokineticins and endocrine-gland vascular endothelial growth factor (EG-VEGF). Their amino-terminal sequences are identical, and so we propose that the sequence of their first four residues, AVIT, is used as a name for this family. From a comparison of the sequences, two types of AVIT proteins can be discerned. These proteins seem to be distributed widely in mammalian tissues and are known to bind to G-protein-coupled receptors. Members of this family have been shown to stimulate contraction of the guinea pig ileum, to cause hyperalgesia after injection into rats and to be active as specific growth factors. Moreover, the messenger RNA level of one of these AVIT proteins changes rhythmically in the region of the brain known as the suprachiasmatic nucleus. This shows that members of this new family of small proteins are involved in diverse biological processes. PMID:12728244

  10. About Breast Cancer Family Registries

    Cancer.gov

    The Breast CFR includes lifestyle, medical history, and family history data collected from more than 55,000 women and men from 14,000 families with and without breast cancer. The Breast CFR began recruiting families in 1996, and all participants are followed up 10 years after recruitment to update personal and family histories and expand recruitment if new cases have occurred since baseline.

  11. Eating Disorders and the Family

    PubMed Central

    Burstein, Sam; Sananes, Renee

    1991-01-01

    Eating disorders are complex, often chronic, biopsychosocial disorders characterized by a pursuit for control which, in interaction with familial factors, results in disturbed patterns of relating to food and its meaning. Overt and covert resistance to intervention at the family level can reflect family dynamics but can be mitigated by engaging families of adolescents with eating disorders, by using multidisciplinary teams, and by hospitalization. PMID:21228994

  12. Health Coverage Instability for Mothers in Working Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Steven G.; Eamon, Mary Keegan

    2004-01-01

    Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, the authors examined the health insurance coverage stability of 1,667 women in working families over a three-year period (1995-1997). Findings revealed that coverage instability is common. Nearly one-half of low-income women experienced health coverage instability over the three-year study…

  13. Youths' Socialization to Work and School within the Family

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Bora; Porfeli, Erik J.

    2015-01-01

    We tested a model of socialization to work in the family context and its implications as a lever for school engagement using a sample of 154 parent-youth dyads living in the United States. A path model was fitted to data. Findings revealed that parents' reported work experiences was aligned to youths' perception of their parents' success in the…

  14. The Anatomy of the Knee and Gamma-Families

    E-print Network

    A. D. Erlykin; A. W. Wolfendale

    2006-12-08

    It is shown that the fine stucture of the cosmic ray energy spectrum in the knee region, if explained by the Single Source Model (SSM), can, in principle, be clearly revealed and magnified in the size spectrum of extensive air showers (EAS) associated with gamma families. Existing experimental data on EAS at mountain level give support to this hypothesis.

  15. Familial LCAT deficiency: from renal replacement to enzyme replacement.

    PubMed

    Stoekenbroek, R M; van den Bergh Weerman, M A; Hovingh, G K; Potter van Loon, B J; Siegert, C E H; Holleboom, A G

    2013-01-01

    Familial LCAT deficiency (FLD) is a recessive lipid disorder ultimately leading to end-stage renal disease (ESRD). We present two brothers with considerable variation in the age at which they developed ESRD. Kidney biopsies revealed both tubular and glomerular pathology. To date, no causal therapy is available, yet enzyme replacement therapy is in development. PMID:23412821

  16. Does Money Matter? Foster Parenting and Family Finances

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smithgall, Cheryl; DeCoursey, Jan; Goerge, Robert

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents findings from a longitudinal qualitative study of Illinois foster parents that revealed a connection between how they view their financial situation and the ways in which they understand and carry out their roles as foster parents. The study illuminates the child welfare and family system dynamics that underlie the experiences…

  17. Was Your Glass Left Half Full? Family Dynamics and Optimism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buri, John R.; Gunty, Amy

    2008-01-01

    Students' levels of a frequently studied adaptive schema (optimism) as a function of parenting variables (parental authority, family intrusiveness, parental overprotection, parentification, parental psychological control, and parental nurturance) were investigated. Results revealed that positive parenting styles were positively related to the…

  18. Gender Inequality and the Family and Medical Leave Act

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prohaska, Ariane; Zipp, John F.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, we use feminist theories of the state to examine why the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) has had relatively little impact on increasing men's caregiving after the birth or adoption of a child. An analysis of witness testimonies and of the language of the proposed bill at three different stages of its development revealed that…

  19. Grandparents' Involvement and Support in Families with Children with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Misuk; Gardner, J. Emmett

    2010-01-01

    This study reviews recent literature related to grandparents' involvement and support for grandchildren with disabilities and their grandchildrens' family. The literature reveals that grandparents' initial reactions are similar to parents' reactions of shock, anger, and grief when they learn a grandchild has a disability. Over time, grandparents…

  20. Family Research: An Ethnographic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Howard F.

    1991-01-01

    An ethnographic approach based on in-depth interviewing, naturalistic and participant observation, narrative description, and contextual interpretation is proposed as a tool for family health care research. The multiple meanings of family, both for research clinicians and for society, are considered. The problem of how a family orientation is incorporated into biomedical' health care is discussed. PMID:21229058

  1. Family Day Care Provider Handbook

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Office of Children and Family Services, 2006

    2006-01-01

    Family day care providers are responsible for creating a high-quality program where children have opportunities to grow, learn and thrive. Part of providing high-quality child care includes complying with the family day care regulations from the New York State Office of Children and Family Services (OCFS). This Handbook will help day care…

  2. Families & School. Best of "set."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Podmore, Valerie N., Ed.; Richards, Llyn, Ed.

    Published to celebrate the United Nations' International Year of the Family, this special issue presents selected articles from "set," a twice yearly journal of research information for teachers. These articles look at the contribution of educational research on the relationships between schools and families, and families and learning in Australia…

  3. Remarriage: A Family Developmental Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whiteside, Mary F.

    1982-01-01

    Outlines a developmental perspective for understanding the dynamics of remarried families. Uses case examples to illustrate the importance of adding to the current family situation both a view of critical points in a family's history, and expectation for its future paths. (RC)

  4. NASA Science Served Family Style

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noel-Storr, Jacob; Mitchell, S.; Drobnes, E.

    2010-01-01

    Family oriented innovative programs extend the reach of many traditional out-of-school venues to involve the entire family in learning in comfortable and fun environments. Research shows that parental involvement is key to increasing student achievement outcomes, and family-oriented programs have a direct impact on student performance. Because families have the greatest influence on children's attitudes towards education and career choices, we have developed a Family Science program that provides families a venue where they can explore the importance of science and technology in our daily lives by engaging in learning activities that change their perception and understanding of science. NASA Family Science Night strives to change the way that students and their families participate in science, within the program and beyond. After three years of pilot implementation and assessment, our evaluation data shows that Family Science Night participants have positive change in their attitudes and involvement in science.  Even after a single session, families are more likely to engage in external science-related activities and are increasingly excited about science in their everyday lives.  As we enter our dissemination phase, NASA Family Science Night will be compiling and releasing initial evaluation results, and providing facilitator training and online support resources. Support for NASA Family Science Nights is provided in part through NASA ROSES grant NNH06ZDA001N.

  5. Poaceae (Grass family) Fall panicum

    E-print Network

    Poaceae (Grass family) Fall panicum Panicum dichotomiflorum Michx. Life cycle Erect summer annual to identifying Christmas tree weeds. #12;Poaceae (Grass family) Fall panicum continued Flowers and fruit panicum. #12;Poaceae (Grass family) Fall panicum continued Wild proso millet collar region. Witchgrass

  6. Families with Special Health Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock. Home Economics Curriculum Center.

    This document contains teacher's materials for a five-unit secondary education vocational home economics course on families with special health needs. The units cover: (1) family health needs (including the impact of special needs on financial well-being, the impact on the psychological health of the family, and the relationship of society to…

  7. Cultural Systems and Lifestyles: The Impact of the Occupation of Shrimping on Family Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crumrine, Janice G.; Nix, Harold L.

    The findings of this second phase of a four-phase study of shrimp fishing focus on the effect of this occupation upon the family. Data were collected from a random sample of 87 boat captains, 73 wives, community personnel, and high school students in two Georgia coastal counties. The family structure reveals a traditional conception of male and…

  8. Ethnic Variations in the Connection between Work-Induced Family Separation and Turnover Intent

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Behnke, Andrew O.; MacDermid, Shelley M.; Anderson, James C.; Weiss, Howard M.

    2010-01-01

    Using conservation of resources theory, this study examines the role of resources in the relationship between work-induced family separation and workers' intentions to leave their employment and how these relationships vary across ethnic groups. Analyses of a large representative sample of military members reveal that family separation is…

  9. Positive Coping Strategies among Immigrant Cambodian Families: An Ethnographic Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reiboldt, Wendy; Goldstein, Avery E.

    2000-01-01

    Interviews with two Cambodian immigrant families over 2 years revealed how they relied on each other more than formal service providers to cope with difficulties. They focused on children's education and safety, insulation of the family from external influences, and interdependence with the immigrant community. (SK)

  10. Grandmothers Raising Grandchildren with Disabilities: Sources of Support and Family Quality of Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kresak, Karen E.; Gallagher, Peggy A.; Kelley, Susan J.

    2014-01-01

    Sources of support and quality of life of 50 grandmother-headed families raising grandchildren with and without disabilities were examined. Comparative analyses revealed significant differences between grandmothers raising grandchildren with and without disabilities in regard to sources of support and family quality of life. Informal support was…

  11. Canada's Families Today: Some Policy Implications of Changing Forms and Patterns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glossop, Robert

    A summary review of facts, figures, and trends concerning family life in Canada reveals patterns of continuity and patterns of change. Generalizations about the average family no longer suffice (if ever they did) as the basis for government policies and programs, corporate personnel practices, and the organization and administration of schools.…

  12. Home Visitation with Psychologically Vulnerable Families: Developments in the Profession and in the Professional

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harden, Brenda Jones

    2010-01-01

    The evidence of the benefits of home visiting has revealed varying results and little is known about the elements that make programs of value to the families at highest risk for dysfunction. The variability in the effects of home visiting programs is linked to many factors, including program content and goals, the family and community context, the…

  13. Managing To Make It: Urban Families and Adolescent Success. Studies on Successful Adolescent Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furstenberg, Frank F., Jr.; Cook, Thomas D; Eccles, Jacquelynne; Elder, Glenn H., Jr.; Sameroff, Arnold

    Based on nearly 500 interviews and qualitative case studies of families in inner-city Philadelphia (Pennsylvania), this book reveals how parents and their teenage children managed different levels of resources and dangers in low-income neighborhoods and how families and communities contributed to the development of the children. The chapters are:…

  14. Family Functioning, Self-Concept, and Severity of Adolescent Externalizing Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Craig E.; Dakof, Gayle A.; Schwartz, Seth J.; Liddle, Howard A.

    2006-01-01

    We investigated direct and shared effects of family functioning and self-concept on the severity of adolescent externalizing problems in a sample of 224 clinically referred adolescents. Structural equation modeling (SEM) revealed strong, direct relationships between problem behaviors and both family functioning and self-concept. Using R. M. Baron…

  15. Changing Familial Roles for Immigrant Adolescents from the Former Soviet Union to Israel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kosner, Anna; Roer-Strier, Dorit; Kurman, Jenny

    2014-01-01

    This article examines how young immigrants to Israel from the former Soviet Union during their adolescence perceive and cope with the resulting changes in their family roles. Data collected via interviews and focus groups from adolescents and young adults ("N" = 34) revealed six distinct roles: language broker, family navigator,…

  16. The Role of the Family in Heritage Language Use and Learning: Impact on Heritage Language Policies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melo-Pfeifer, Sílvia

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the way children and youngsters perceive the role of family in the use and acquisition of the heritage language (HL), through two complementary means: drawings produced by children and students participating in a discussion forum. Our study reveals: (1) the convergence of perceptions that children and adolescents have about family

  17. Does Family Structure Matter? A Domain-Specific Examination of Identity Exploration and Commitment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartoszuk, Karin; Pittman, Joe F.

    2010-01-01

    This exploratory study examines identity exploration and commitment in different domains and how family structure (original/alternative), gender, and age affect these processes in a convenience sample of 388 college students. Results reveal that participants from alternative family structures explore more in the political and gender role domains…

  18. Social Class in Family Therapy Education: Experiences of Low SES Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDowell, Teresa; Brown, Andrae' L.; Cullen, Nicole; Duyn, April

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we report the results of a national survey of students in COAMFTE-accredited family therapy programs who self-identify as coming from lower- or working-class backgrounds. Results of the study reveal opportunity and tension relative to family, friends, and community because of social mobility associated with graduate education.…

  19. Defining crisis in families of individuals with autism spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Jonathan A; Wingsiong, Aranda; Lunsky, Yona

    2014-11-01

    Parents of children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder often report higher levels of depression, anxiety, and mental health-related issues. The combination of stressors and family adjustment difficulties can cause distress which may develop into a crisis. Understanding crisis in the family is important to mental health practice since it can serve as a guide in delivering service to at-risk families. This study investigated the subjective experience of crisis in 155 mothers of children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder. Thematic analysis revealed that crisis is characterized by factors influencing four major areas: demands, internal capabilities, external resources, and subjective appraisal. Understanding what crisis means to families of individuals with autism spectrum disorder can help inform effective preventative and crisis services. PMID:24254639

  20. Defining crisis in families of individuals with autism spectrum disorders

    PubMed Central

    Wingsiong, Aranda; Lunsky, Yona

    2014-01-01

    Parents of children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder often report higher levels of depression, anxiety, and mental health–related issues. The combination of stressors and family adjustment difficulties can cause distress which may develop into a crisis. Understanding crisis in the family is important to mental health practice since it can serve as a guide in delivering service to at-risk families. This study investigated the subjective experience of crisis in 155 mothers of children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder. Thematic analysis revealed that crisis is characterized by factors influencing four major areas: demands, internal capabilities, external resources, and subjective appraisal. Understanding what crisis means to families of individuals with autism spectrum disorder can help inform effective preventative and crisis services. PMID:24254639

  1. Balancing family and work

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2011-08-01

    More than 45% of women scientists at top universities in the United States have indicated that their careers have kept them from having as many children as they want, according to an 8 August study, “Scientists want more children,” which appears in the journal PLoS ONE. The study, by sociologists Elaine Howard Ecklund of Rice University and Anne Lincoln of Southern Methodist University, indicates that 24.5% of male scientists surveyed indicated the same concerns. The study also found that among junior scientists, 29% of women indicated concern that a science career would prevent them from having a family; 7% of men indicated the same concern.

  2. Food for the Family

    E-print Network

    Higgins, M. Hellen; Alderson, Inez; Taylor, Elma

    1920-01-01

    with left-over cereals, potatoes, or vegetables, and made into dishes appreci- ated by the whole family. The secret of making up meat left-overs is to season them well. Peppers, celery, onions, carrots, turnips, garlic, to- matoes, sage, pickles, cloves... be left over night. Remember that yeast fermentation takes place more quickly in a sponge than in a dough. A beginner might well use the "dough process" with much yeast for the first attempt. In either process avoid working in flour after the first...

  3. The SEQUEST Family Tree

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabb, David L.

    2015-11-01

    Since its introduction in 1994, SEQUEST has gained many important new capabilities, and a host of successor algorithms have built upon its successes. This Account and Perspective maps the evolution of this important tool and charts the relationships among contributions to the SEQUEST legacy. Many of the changes represented improvements in computing speed by clusters and graphics cards. Mass spectrometry innovations in mass accuracy and activation methods led to shifts in fragment modeling and scoring strategies. These changes, as well as the movement of laboratories and lab members, have led to great diversity among the members of the SEQUEST family.

  4. Youth, family and employment.

    PubMed

    Peters, J F

    1987-01-01

    Some of the functions and dysfunctions of youth employment in contemporary society are discussed. The focus then shifts to a third variable: family dynamics. The research indicates that youth unemployment prolongs residence with parents. The younger the youth, the more tolerant are the parents of the unemployment. It was also found that a daughter's lack of employment in the summer months is more acceptable than a son's; that debts are part of the lifestyle of youth after age 18; that males incur more debts than do females; and that parents are the major source of financial loans. PMID:3618347

  5. QUAD FAMILY CENTERING.

    SciTech Connect

    PINAYEV, I.

    2005-11-01

    It is well known that beam position monitors (BPM) utilizing signals from pickup electrodes (PUE) provide good resolution and relative accuracy. The absolute accuracy (i.e. position of the orbit in the vacuum chamber) is not very good due to the various reasons. To overcome the limitation it was suggested to use magnetic centers of quadrupoles for the calibration of the BPM [1]. The proposed method provides accuracy better then 200 microns for centering of the beam position monitors using modulation of the whole quadrupole family.

  6. Family symmetries and CP

    E-print Network

    I. de Medeiros Varzielas

    2015-10-08

    CP-odd invariants, independent of basis and valid for any choice of CP transformation are a powerful tool in the study of CP. They are particularly convenient to study the CP properties of models with family symmetries. After interpreting the consequences of adding specific CP symmetries to a Lagrangian invariant under $\\Delta(27)$, I use the invariant approach to systematically study Yukawa-like Lagrangians with an increasing field content in terms of $\\Delta(27)$ representations. Included in the Lagrangians studied are models featuring explicit CP violation with calculable phases (referred to as explicit geometrical CP violation) and models that automatically conserve CP, despite having all the $\\Delta(27)$ representations.

  7. Managing Your Family Business 

    E-print Network

    Klinefelter, Danny A.

    2003-04-14

    . If such meetings have not been a regular family practice and if there is a potential for conflict, it may be advisable to engage a trained facilitator to keep the meeting on track, to keep the dis- cussion objective, to keep emotions in check and to prevent... skills and attributes and how the successor is expected to fit in and function on the management team. A timetable must be established for the transfer of responsibility and control. This not only reduces the potential frustration for an incumbent...

  8. Galileo - Ganymede Family Night

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    When the Galileo spacecraft flew by Ganymede, Jupiter's and the solar system's largest satellite, on June 26, 1996, the project scientists and engineers gather with their friends and family to view the photos as they are received and to celebrate the mission. This videotape presents that meeting. Representatives from the various instrument science teams discuss many of the instruments aboard Galileo and show videos and pictures of what they have seen so far. This video is continued on Videotape number NONP-NASA-VT-2000036028.

  9. NASA's Astronant Family Support Office

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beven, Gary; Curtis, Kelly D.; Holland, Al W.; Sipes, Walter; VanderArk, Steve

    2014-01-01

    During the NASA-Mir program of the 1990s and due to the challenges inherent in the International Space Station training schedule and operations tempo, it was clear that a special focus on supporting families was a key to overall mission success for the ISS crewmembers pre-, in- and post-flight. To that end, in January 2001 the first Family Services Coordinator was hired by the Behavioral Health and Performance group at NASA JSC and matrixed from Medical Operations into the Astronaut Office's organization. The initial roles and responsibilities were driven by critical needs, including facilitating family communication during training deployments, providing mission-specific and other relevant trainings for spouses, serving as liaison for families with NASA organizations such as Medical Operations, NASA management and the Astronaut Office, and providing assistance to ensure success of an Astronaut Spouses Group. The role of the Family Support Office (FSO) has modified as the ISS Program matured and the needs of families changed. The FSO is currently an integral part of the Astronaut Office's ISS Operations Branch. It still serves the critical function of providing information to families, as well as being the primary contact for US and international partner families with resources at JSC. Since crews launch and return on Russian vehicles, the FSO has the added responsibility for coordinating with Flight Crew Operations, the families, and their guests for Soyuz launches, landings, and Direct Return to Houston post-flight. This presentation will provide a summary of the family support services provided for astronauts, and how they have changed with the Program and families the FSO serves. Considerations for future FSO services will be discussed briefly as NASA proposes one year missions and beyond ISS missions. Learning Objective: 1) Obtain an understanding of the reasons a Family Support Office was important for NASA. 2) Become familiar with the services provided for astronauts and their families and how they changed with the Program and family needs.

  10. Family responses to a child with schizophrenia: An Indonesian experience.

    PubMed

    Wiguna, Tjhin; Ismail, Raden Irawati; Noorhana, Setyawati R; Kaligis, Fransiska; Aji, Arundhati Nugrahaning; Belfer, Myron L

    2015-12-01

    Indonesian culture puts a high value on family bonding. Therefore, support and encouragement for each family member is high that any problems are the responsibility of the whole family. This paper explores the implications of the phenomena whether is a schizophrenic child in the family affected the parental relationship in Indonesian family and trying to find out the implication of parental relationship on medication adherence. This was a cross-sectional study which involved 180 parents of children with schizophrenia and parents with aged matched non-schizophrenic children as a control group; consisting of 45 parents of children with schizophrenia and 135 parents of non-schizophrenic children. The parental relationship was examined by using the Indonesian version of Family Adaptability and Cohesion Evaluation Scale IV (Indonesian version of FACES IV). Our study revealed that 75.6% parents of children with schizophrenia experienced a healthy parental relationship compared to 94.80% in the parents of non-schizophrenic children group. The most prevalent of unhealthy relationship among parents of children with schizophrenia was chaotic disengagement. Parental adherence to give medication for their child with schizophrenia was better if they had a healthy parental relationship. In conclusion, a small number of Indonesian parents with schizophrenic children experienced an unhealthy parental relationship. Therefore, psycho-education and supportive psychotherapy still needed to facilitate those families to express their emotion adapt and cope. PMID:26481170

  11. [Lead poisoning in two families from a car battery workshop].

    PubMed

    Leibovitch, S; Geva, T; Mordel, A; Tirosh, M; Sack, J

    1989-01-15

    Lead poisoning resulting from exposure to lead in a domestic car battery workshop is reported in 10 children in 2 families. 2 girls, aged 2 10/12 and 1 8/12 years, respectively, from 1 of the families were hospitalized for investigation of nausea, vomiting, progressive muscular weakness and peripheral neuropathy. Serum lead levels were 52 and 49 mcg/dl, respectively. Subsequent screening of all members of this family, as well as those of the other family who lived in the same house, revealed abnormally elevated levels of serum lead in all the members of both families. The 2 girls were treated with chelating agents and improved clinically and their serum lead levels decreased to 29 and 34 mcg/dl, respectively. The domestic workshop was closed and the 2 families moved to another neighborhood. These cases illustrate the need to screen all family members and contacts of patients with lead poisoning, as well as the hazards of the uncontrolled use of lead in domestic workshops. PMID:2707678

  12. The MPS1 Family of Protein Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xuedong; Winey, Mark

    2014-01-01

    MPS1 protein kinases are found widely, but not ubiquitously, in eukaryotes. This family of potentially dual-specific protein kinases is among several that regulate a number of steps of mitosis. The most widely conserved MPS1 kinase functions involve activities at the kinetochore in both the chromosome attachment and the spindle checkpoint. MPS1 kinases also function at centrosomes. Beyond mitosis, MPS1 kinases have been implicated in development, cytokinesis, and several different signaling pathways. Family members are identified by virtue of a conserved C-terminal kinase domain, though the N-terminal domain is quite divergent. The kinase domain of the human enzyme has been crystallized, revealing an unusual ATP-binding pocket. The activity, level, and subcellular localization of Mps1 family members are tightly regulated during cell-cycle progression. The mitotic functions of Mps1 kinases and their overexpression in some tumors have prompted the identification of Mps1 inhibitors and their active development as anticancer drugs. PMID:22482908

  13. Surgeon General's Family Health History Initiative

    MedlinePLUS

    ... family health history. My Family Health Portrait Tool Americans know that family history is important to health. A recent survey found that 96 percent of Americans believe that knowing their family history is important. Yet, the same survey found that ...

  14. Family violence: an overview.

    PubMed

    Alpert, E J; Cohen, S; Sege, R D

    1997-01-01

    This article reviews the definitions and epidemiology of the several forms of interpersonal violence in family and intimate relationships. Interpersonal violence includes both fatal and nonfatal violence where physical force, or other means, is used by one person with the intent of causing harm, injury, or death: family violence includes child maltreatment, adult intimate-partner violence, and elder mistreatment; abuse refers to a pattern of behaviors organized around the international use of power by one person to control another; and child maltreatment involves the abrogation of adult responsibilities for the care and protection of children, and includes child abuse, child sexual abuse, and child neglect. Violence is a major public health problem in the United States. Half of assault and homicide victims are related to or acquainted with their assailants, as are two-thirds of rape victims. Children and adolescents are at particular risk of violence. The study of interpersonal violence is a complex and evolving held, and is increasingly a part of training and medical practice in academic settings. PMID:9008581

  15. Paucity of family planning.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, C

    1988-04-01

    A wall chart compiled by the Population Crisis Committee of Washington D.C. called "World Access to Birth Control" is described. The chart compares developing countries and developed countries with respect to need of effective contraception, using data from the World Fertility Surveys. Up to 250 million women need contraception; a substantial percentage want no more children, over half in several large countries. The chart ranks the United Kingdom as 1st in providing family planning services, information, education and advertising. All of the developed countries were considered good except Russia and Romania, although some had deficiencies, such as Japan for lacking sterilization services. The U.S. ranked 7th, failing to provide women the full range of contraceptive methods, to provide adequate sex education and services to adolescents, and to publish information and adequate advertising about birth control. The USSR was placed 14th on the list of 15 because of poor quality and erratic supplies. Among the developing countries, Libya, Kampuchea and Laos were cited as having no services whatsoever. In contrast, several Asian national family planning programs, notably China, Taiwan, Singapore, South Korea and Hong Kong, had such excellent programs that fertility had declined over 30% in 15 years. In China, fertility has fallen 50% in that time. PMID:12179876

  16. Family life education.

    PubMed

    Maniar, N

    1968-01-01

    Family life education is not just instruction of sex and reproduction, but an attitude of love and values that starts from infancy. A child who comes into the world wanted is already loved. Later on, he himself will give love because his 1st contact in the world was a happy one. Most children will go through thumb sucking and masturbation, which is normal and innocent behavior. Toilet training is another important factor in sex education. According to our attitude the child will learn that this part of his body is good or bad. By the age of 3 or 6, children learn to discover the difference in sex from our attitude to each other, and when parents practice double standards, the child is confused and worried. Children's curiousity for knowledge is insatiable. If parents find they are embarressed by their children's questions about sex, it is better to put off answering than to convey the impression that something is not quite nice. 11-year old females should be prepared for menarche with knowledge, and fathers should explain to their sons about voice changes, night emissions and fantasy dreams. Masturbation is normal during adolescence, and the only harm comes from wrong anxiety about it. If 2 young people wish to have premarital intercourse, we must have the courage to tell them that chastity remains a value whether they accept it or not. Education for family life means taking account of the child's attitudes and sex values as a future marriage partner and parent. PMID:12338669

  17. Family Size Evolution in Drosophila Chemosensory Gene Families: A Comparative Analysis with a Critical Appraisal of Methods

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Francisca C.; Sánchez-Gracia, Alejandro; Campos, Jose Luis; Rozas, Julio

    2014-01-01

    Gene turnover rates and the evolution of gene family sizes are important aspects of genome evolution. Here, we use curated sequence data of the major chemosensory gene families from Drosophila—the gustatory receptor, odorant receptor, ionotropic receptor, and odorant-binding protein families—to conduct a comparative analysis among families, exploring different methods to estimate gene birth and death rates, including an ad hoc simulation study. Remarkably, we found that the state-of-the-art methods may produce very different rate estimates, which may lead to disparate conclusions regarding the evolution of chemosensory gene family sizes in Drosophila. Among biological factors, we found that a peculiarity of D. sechellia’s gene turnover rates was a major source of bias in global estimates, whereas gene conversion had negligible effects for the families analyzed herein. Turnover rates vary considerably among families, subfamilies, and ortholog groups although all analyzed families were quite dynamic in terms of gene turnover. Computer simulations showed that the methods that use ortholog group information appear to be the most accurate for the Drosophila chemosensory families. Most importantly, these results reveal the potential of rate heterogeneity among lineages to severely bias some turnover rate estimation methods and the need of further evaluating the performance of these methods in a more diverse sampling of gene families and phylogenetic contexts. Using branch-specific codon substitution models, we find further evidence of positive selection in recently duplicated genes, which attests to a nonneutral aspect of the gene birth-and-death process. PMID:24951565

  18. Familial adenomatous polyposis

    PubMed Central

    Half, Elizabeth; Bercovich, Dani; Rozen, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) is characterized by the development of many tens to thousands of adenomas in the rectum and colon during the second decade of life. FAP has an incidence at birth of about 1/8,300, it manifests equally in both sexes, and accounts for less than 1% of colorectal cancer (CRC) cases. In the European Union, prevalence has been estimated at 1/11,300-37,600. Most patients are asymptomatic for years until the adenomas are large and numerous, and cause rectal bleeding or even anemia, or cancer develops. Generally, cancers start to develop a decade after the appearance of the polyps. Nonspecific symptoms may include constipation or diarrhea, abdominal pain, palpable abdominal masses and weight loss. FAP may present with some extraintestinal manifestations such as osteomas, dental abnormalities (unerupted teeth, congenital absence of one or more teeth, supernumerary teeth, dentigerous cysts and odontomas), congenital hypertrophy of the retinal pigment epithelium (CHRPE), desmoid tumors, and extracolonic cancers (thyroid, liver, bile ducts and central nervous system). A less aggressive variant of FAP, attenuated FAP (AFAP), is characterized by fewer colorectal adenomatous polyps (usually 10 to 100), later age of adenoma appearance and a lower cancer risk. Some lesions (skull and mandible osteomas, dental abnormalities, and fibromas on the scalp, shoulders, arms and back) are indicative of the Gardner variant of FAP. Classic FAP is inherited in an autosomal dominant manner and results from a germline mutation in the adenomatous polyposis (APC) gene. Most patients (~70%) have a family history of colorectal polyps and cancer. In a subset of individuals, a MUTYH mutation causes a recessively inherited polyposis condition, MUTYH-associated polyposis (MAP), which is characterized by a slightly increased risk of developing CRC and polyps/adenomas in both the upper and lower gastrointestinal tract. Diagnosis is based on a suggestive family history, clinical findings, and large bowel endoscopy or full colonoscopy. Whenever possible, the clinical diagnosis should be confirmed by genetic testing. When the APC mutation in the family has been identified, genetic testing of all first-degree relatives should be performed. Presymptomatic and prenatal (amniocentesis and chorionic villous sampling), and even preimplantation genetic testing is possible. Referral to a geneticist or genetic counselor is mandatory. Differential diagnoses include other disorders causing multiple polyps (such as Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, familial juvenile polyps or hyperplastic polyposis, hereditary mixed polyposis syndromes, and Lynch syndrome). Cancer prevention and maintaining a good quality of life are the main goals of management and regular and systematic follow-up and supportive care should be offered to all patients. By the late teens or early twenties, colorectal cancer prophylactic surgery is advocated. The recommended alternatives are total proctocolectomy and ileoanal pouch or ileorectal anastomosis for AFAP. Duodenal cancer and desmoids are the two main causes of mortality after total colectomy, they need to be identified early and treated. Upper endoscopy is necessary for surveillance to reduce the risk of ampullary and duodenal cancer. Patients with progressive tumors and unresectable disease may respond or stabilize with a combination of cytotoxic chemotherapy and surgery (when possible to perform). Adjunctive therapy with celecoxib has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency in patients with FAP. Individuals with FAP carry a 100% risk of CRC; however, this risk is reduced significantly when patients enter a screening-treatment program. PMID:19822006

  19. Family Science Night: Changing Perceptions One Family at a Time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pesnell, W. D.; Drobnes, E.; Mitchell, S.; Colina-Trujillo, M.

    2007-01-01

    If students are not encouraged to succeed in science, mathematics, and technology classes at school, efforts to improve the quality of content and teaching in these subjects may be futile. Parents and families are in a unique position to encourage children to enroll and achieve in these classes. The NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Family Science Night program invites middle school students and their families to explore the importance of science and technology in our daily lives by providing a venue for families to comfortably engage in learning activities that change their perception and understanding of science - making it more practical and approachable for participants of all ages. Family Science Night strives to change the way that students and their families participate in science, within the program and beyond.

  20. 24 CFR 5.516 - Availability of preservation assistance to mixed families and other families.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...Availability of preservation assistance to mixed families and other families. 5.516...Availability of preservation assistance to mixed families and other families. (a) Assistance available for tenant mixed families —(1) General....

  1. Cancer: a family at risk

    PubMed Central

    I?ycki, Dariusz

    2014-01-01

    The diagnosis of cancer is a family experience that changes the lives of all its members, bringing an immense amount of stress and many challenging situations. The daily routine, common activities and distribution of duties all have to change. Family members follow the phases of the disease, very often suffering comparable or greater distress than the patient. They use various coping methods which aim at helping both the sick relative and themselves. These methods, together with emotional responses, change over time according to the phase of the disease. Cancer puts the family at risk since it imposes an alternation in the relations among family members. It affects the couple's relationship, their sex life, and it can also be a cause of major trauma among their children and adolescents. The diagnosis of cancer brings also individual risks for the family members in terms of psychological and physical health impairment. Family caregivers often feel overloaded with the additional obligations and roles they have to pick up. They find it increasingly burdening to care full-time for the household and provide emotional support for the patient. The family's problems and the way family members regard the disease may be also a result of the family system they are in. This article describes the nature of caregiving to a patient with cancer and the biggest concerns for the family. PMID:26327863

  2. Population Landscape of Familial Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Frank, C.; Fallah, M.; Sundquist, J.; Hemminki, A.; Hemminki, K.

    2015-01-01

    Public perception and anxiety of familial cancer have increased demands for clinical counseling, which may be well equipped for gene testing but less prepared for counseling of the large domain of familial cancer with unknown genetic background. The aim of the present study was to highlight the full scope of familial cancer and the variable levels of risk that need to be considered. Data on the 25 most common cancers were obtained from the Swedish Family Cancer Database and a Poisson regression model was applied to estimate relative risks (RR) distinguishing between family histories of single or multiple affected first-degree relatives and their diagnostic ages. For all cancers, individual risks were significantly increased if a parent or a sibling had a concordant cancer. While the RRs were around 2.00 for most cancers, risks were up to 10-fold increased for some cancers. Familial risks were even higher when multiple relatives were affected. Although familial risks were highest at ages below 60 years, most familial cases were diagnosed at older ages. The results emphasized the value of a detailed family history as a readily available tool for individualized counseling and its preventive potential for a large domain of non-syndromatic familial cancers. PMID:26256549

  3. Experiences of family members of patients with colostomies and expectations about professional intervention

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira-Umpiérrez, Augusto; Fort-Fort, Zoraida

    2014-01-01

    Objective the objective was to understand the experience of a group of family members of patients with colostomies, revealing their expectations regarding the intervention of health professionals. Method qualitative research, with the social phenomenological approach of Alfred Schütz, conducted in Montevideo in 2012; twelve family members of patients with colostomies participated, from an ostomy service of a health institution. Results the following categories were identified: family ties, trust in the health care team, the nurse as the articulator of the process, the desire to humanize care, and adaptation to new family life. Conclusions knowing the experience and expectations of the families of colostomy patients was achieved, emphasizing the previous family relationships to build upon them, and the trust in the health team, emphasizing the nurse as articulator of the process. Expectations focused on the desire for humanized care, enhancing adaptation of the nuclear family to the new way of life, restoring and enhancing its strengths, and collaborating in overcoming its weaknesses. PMID:26107831

  4. Opening doors: factors influencing the establishment of a working relationship between paraprofessional home visitors and at-risk families.

    PubMed

    Jack, Susan; DiCenso, Alba; Lohfeld, Lynne

    2002-12-01

    The purpose of this phenomenological study was to identify and describe factors that influence the establishment of a working relationship between paraprofessionals and at-risk families. In-depth, semi-structured interviews were conducted with a purposive sample of 6 family visitors and 6 public health nurses hired to visit at-risk families in their homes. Analysis revealed that nurses have an important role to play in marketing home visiting programs and facilitating family visitor access to the home. Factors related to the family visitor, the client, and the client's household influenced relationship development. Family visitor-client engagement occurred through "finding common ground" and "building trust." Increased understanding of these factors will help both nurses and family visitors to access those families who are hard to reach and resist support and the provision of services. The findings have implications for nurses who are responsible for hiring, training, and supervising family visitors. PMID:12619478

  5. Family Perspectives on the Hospice Experience in Adult Family Homes

    PubMed Central

    Washington, Karla T.; Oliver, Debra Parker; Demiris, George; Wittenberg-Lyles, Elaine; Shaunfield, Sara

    2011-01-01

    Growing numbers of terminally ill older adults receive hospice services in adult family homes (AFHs); however, little is known about the provision and receipt of end-of-life care in such environments. This paper reports findings from a qualitative exploration of family members’ perspectives of the hospice experience in AFHs. Analysis of data obtained during interviews of fifteen residents’ family members exposed significant challenges associated with transition to an AFH, highlighted the importance of AFH and hospice staff in family members’ assessment of overall quality of care, and emphasized the critical nature of communication in AFH settings. PMID:21240714

  6. Teaching the family system concept in family medicine.

    PubMed

    Christie-Seely, J

    1981-09-01

    Teaching the family system concept to physicians is difficult, as it entails a new way of thinking, at odds with the familiar linear medical model that focuses on the individual patient. This conceptual difference and the confusion between working with families in family medicine and family therapy explain the slow or superficial acceptance of family as the unit of care. Five principles have been found to be useful in teaching: (1) specific teaching techniques should take into account previous training and current time constraints; (2) evidence for the relevance of system theory to diagnosis, treatment, and prevention should be evaluated early in the teaching program; (3) clarity of expectations is crucial; (4) emphasis should be on the natural role of the family physician as first-line family advisor and the use of interviewing and observational skills already well developed; and (5) synthesis of the psychosocial and physical aspects of illness will occur naturally if the family physician is the teacher of family system concepts and the role model for their application in practice. PMID:7276849

  7. Selected Internet Resources on Family History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mintz, Steven

    2001-01-01

    Provides a list of Internet resources on family history that cover topics such as colonial families, shifting family ideals, families in the Early Republic, families in bondage, westward migration, families during the Great Depression, journals, reference sources, and lesson plans. (CMK)

  8. Feasibility, acceptability, and preliminary outcomes of the Fortalezas Familiares intervention for Latino families facing maternal depression

    PubMed Central

    Valdez, Carmen R.; Padilla, Brian; Moore, Sarah; Magaña, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    This pilot study examined the feasibility, acceptability, and preliminary outcomes of a linguistically- and culturally-adapted intervention for immigrant Latina mothers with depression and their families. Fortalezas Familiares (Family Strengths) is a community-based, 12-week, multi-family group intervention that aims to increase communication about family processes leading up to and affected by the mother’s depression, build child coping and efficacy, enhance parenting competence and skills, and promote cultural and social assets within the family. In terms of feasibility, of 16 families who enrolled and participated in the intervention, 13 families attended more than 90% of meetings and completed the intervention. Post-tests reported positive changes following the intervention, including improved psychological functioning, increased family and marital support, and enhanced family functioning, as reported by mothers and other caregivers. Mothers also reported decreased conduct and hyperactivity problems among their children. Children reported positive changes in their psychological functioning and coping, peer relations, parenting warmth and acceptance, and overall family functioning. Post-intervention focus groups and surveys measuring acceptability revealed families’ satisfaction with the intervention and suggested areas of improvement. We discuss similarities and differences in outcomes between the adapted intervention, Fortalezas Familiares, and the original intervention, Keeping Families Strong, and propose future areas of intervention adaptation and development. PMID:24033238

  9. Evolutionary analyses of non-family genes in plants

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Chuyu; Li, Ting; Yin, Hengfu; Weston, David; Tuskan, Gerald A; Tschaplinski, Timothy J; Yang, Xiaohan

    2013-01-01

    There are a large number of non-family (NF) genes that do not cluster into families with three or more members per genome. While gene families have been extensively studied, a systematic analysis of NF genes has not been reported. We performed comparative studies on NF genes in 14 plant species. Based on the clustering of protein sequences, we identified ~94 000 NF genes across these species that were divided into five evolutionary groups: Viridiplantae wide, angiosperm specific, monocot specific, dicot specific, and those that were species specific. Our analysis revealed that the NF genes resulted largely from less frequent gene duplications and/or a higher rate of gene loss after segmental duplication relative to genes in both lowcopy- number families (LF; 3 10 copies per genome) and high-copy-number families (HF; >10 copies). Furthermore, we identified functions enriched in the NF gene set as compared with the HF genes. We found that NF genes were involved in essential biological processes shared by all plant lineages (e.g. photosynthesis and translation), as well as gene regulation and stress responses associated with phylogenetic diversification. In particular, our analysis of an Arabidopsis protein protein interaction network revealed that hub proteins with the top 10% most connections were over-represented in the NF set relative to the HF set. This research highlights the roles that NF genes may play in evolutionary and functional genomics research.

  10. Evolutionary analyses of non-family genes in plants

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Chuyu; Li, Ting; Yin, Hengfu; Weston, David; Tuskan, Gerald A; Tschaplinski, Timothy J; Yang, Xiaohan

    2013-03-01

    There are a large number of non-family (NF) genes that do not cluster into families with three or more members per genome. While gene families have been extensively studied, a systematic analysis of NF genes has not been reported. We performed comparative studies on NF genes in 14 plant species. Based on the clustering of protein sequences, we identified ~94,000 NF genes across these species that were divided into five evolutionary groups: Viridiplantae-wide, angiosperm-specific, monocot-specific, dicot-specific, and those that were species-specific. Our analysis revealed that the NF genes resulted largely from less frequent gene duplications and/or a higher rate of gene loss after segmental duplication relative to genes in both low-copy-number families (LF; 3 10 copies per genome) and high-copy-number families (HF; >10 copies). Furthermore, we identified functions enriched in the NF gene set as compared with the HF genes. We found that NF genes were involved in essential biological processes shared by all plant lineages (e.g., photosynthesis and translation), as well as gene regulation and stress responses associated with phylogenetic diversification. In particular, our analysis of an Arabidopsis protein-protein interaction network revealed that hub proteins with the top 10% most connections were over-represented in the NF set relative to the HF set. This research highlights the roles that NF genes may play in evolutionary and functional genomics research.

  11. Heterogeneous growth hormone (GH) gene mutations in familial GH deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Cogan, J.D.; Phillips, J.A. III; Sakati, N.; Frisch, H.; Schober, E.; Milner, R.D.G. )

    1993-05-01

    The GH1 genes of probands of two families with familial isolated GH deficiency (IGHD) were sequenced. Double stranded sequencing of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification products from genomic DNA of two affected cousins in a consanguineous Turkish family revealed a G[yields]A transition in the 20th codon of the GH1 signal peptide. This substitution converts a TGG (Trp) to a TAG (stop) codon and generates a new AluI recognition site. PCR amplification of the GH1 alleles of family members, followed by AluI digestion, revealed that the G[yields]A transition segregated with the IGHD phenotype. In a Saudi Arabian family, a G[yields]C transversion was found that alters the first base of the donor splice site of intron IV. This substitution should perturb mRNA splicing, resulting in an altered protein product which should be unstable or bioinactive. This transversion also destroys an HphI site, which was used to assay samples from relatives. Digestion of PCR amplification products with HphI demonstrated cosegregation of the G[yields]C transversion with IGHD. These results demonstrate that in the expression of the GH1 gene. 24 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  12. American family: looking good.

    PubMed

    Russo, N F; Lieberman, E J; Gould, R E

    1977-07-01

    The American family is becoming stronger because marriage and parenthood are becoming options, not mandates. Previously nearly 95% of Americans were married, a higher percentage than any other country except India. Often people become parents for the wrong reasons, such as parents of the couple wanted grandchildren or the feeling that one must have a baby to have meaning in life. Later marriage is seen as eventually lowering the divorce rate because adults will be mature. Increased use of contraception, and abortion as a last resort, is reducing the number of unplanned, unwanted children who may be abused. Reminders of the motherhood mandate are traditional houses in the suburbs far from jobs. Traditionally commuting times for women have been less than for men, presumably to allow them to spend more time with the children. It is also suggested that schools give realistic courses on parenting and emphasize that having children is not for everyone. PMID:12335166

  13. [Familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis].

    PubMed

    Hesse, C; Hansmann, M L; Janka-Schaub, G E; Rontogianni, D; Radzun, H J; Fischer, R

    1991-01-01

    7 cases of familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis were investigated by morphology and immunohistochemistry. Typical infiltrates composed of macrophages and lymphoid cells were found in various locations such as lymph nodes, spleen, liver, brain, and skin. The macrophages were positive for typical macrophage antibodies (Ki-M1, Ki-M1P) and showed features of activation by displaying a strong reaction with antibodies against lysosomal antigens (Ki-M1P, Ki-M6, Ki-M7, Ki-M8). In addition, they showed antigenic similarity to antigen-presenting cells (Vit-6 pos., S 100 pos.) and no conclusive evidence of in situ proliferation (Ki-67 neg). The lymphoid cells were mainly composed of more or less proliferating T-cells and a few B-cells. PMID:1724833

  14. Familial Pompe Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tecellioglu, Mehmet; Kamisli, Ozden

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Pompe disorder is a rare glycogen storage disorder that is due to a deficiency of the lysosomal alpha glycosidase enzyme. The heart, skeletal muscle, liver and nervous system can be affected from the lysosomal glycogen accumulation. Symptoms such as muscle weakness, hypotony, myopathy and respiratory failure develop. The onset may be at the infantile, adolescent or adult period depending on the enzyme level. The CK level is high in almost all patients. The diagnosis is made with enzyme level measurement and genetic analysis. Case report: We present a family with Pompe disease consisting of the asymptomatic mother and two siblings who presented with muscle weakness and respiratory failure and who had been followed-up with a diagnosis of muscular dystrophy for a long time. PMID:26622091

  15. Family presence during cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Clark, Angela P; Aldridge, Michael D; Guzzetta, Cathie E; Nyquist-Heise, Patty; Reverend Mike Norris; Loper, Patti; Meyers, Theresa A; Voelmeck, Wayne

    2005-03-01

    A recent phenomenon in emergency and critical care settings is the presence of family members during resuscitation events. It remains controversial in most institutions, but evidence is increasing that the experience has positive benefits for family members. In this article, the origin of family presence is described and research evidence about the experience is presented. Three case studies are presented to illustrate typical events, including the potential role of the hospital chaplain. Recommendations for implementation are included. PMID:15749398

  16. Family Medicine Specialty in Singapore

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Santosh Lional

    2013-01-01

    Family Medicine in Singapore has its roots in a generalist ethos and found its origin as a counter culture movement to the increasing sub-specialisation of medicine which resulted in a complex healthcare system where that patients are often cared for by multiple specialists potentially resulting in fragmentation of care. The aim of the discipline of Family Medicine was to train and develop more generalist physicians so as to promote holistic care. Family physicians are the largest pool of generalists who are trained to provide general medical care to patients in the context of the person, the family and the community that they live in. PMID:24479066

  17. The Joy of Family Practice

    PubMed Central

    Ventres, William

    2012-01-01

    Many family physicians have written about how they influence, nurture, and empower people in their communities of practice. In this essay, the author writes of the personal joys that family medicine has brought him. An expression of his appreciation for his work as a family doctor, it touches on 6 themes that continue to rejuvenate his practice: love, faith, mystery, place, dance, and medicine. By examining the emotional and psychological dimensions of these themes, he offers a path by which other family physicians may be able to find sustenance and joy in their daily work. PMID:22585892

  18. Policy implications for familial searching

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    In the United States, several states have made policy decisions regarding whether and how to use familial searching of the Combined DNA Index System (CODIS) database in criminal investigations. Familial searching pushes DNA typing beyond merely identifying individuals to detecting genetic relatedness, an application previously reserved for missing persons identifications and custody battles. The intentional search of CODIS for partial matches to an item of evidence offers law enforcement agencies a powerful tool for developing investigative leads, apprehending criminals, revitalizing cold cases and exonerating wrongfully convicted individuals. As familial searching involves a range of logistical, social, ethical and legal considerations, states are now grappling with policy options for implementing familial searching to balance crime fighting with its potential impact on society. When developing policies for familial searching, legislators should take into account the impact of familial searching on select populations and the need to minimize personal intrusion on relatives of individuals in the DNA database. This review describes the approaches used to narrow a suspect pool from a partial match search of CODIS and summarizes the economic, ethical, logistical and political challenges of implementing familial searching. We examine particular US state policies and the policy options adopted to address these issues. The aim of this review is to provide objective background information on the controversial approach of familial searching to inform policy decisions in this area. Herein we highlight key policy options and recommendations regarding effective utilization of familial searching that minimize harm to and afford maximum protection of US citizens. PMID:22040348

  19. Lie families: theory and applications

    E-print Network

    Jose F. Carinena; Janusz Grabowski; Javier de Lucas

    2010-06-01

    We analyze families of non-autonomous systems of first-order ordinary differential equations admitting a common time-dependent superposition rule, i.e., a time-dependent map expressing any solution of each of these systems in terms of a generic set of particular solutions of the system and some constants. We next study relations of these families, called Lie families, with the theory of Lie and quasi-Lie systems and apply our theory to provide common time-dependent superposition rules for certain Lie families.

  20. An SEU immune logic family

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canaris, J.

    1991-01-01

    A new logic family, which is immune to single event upsets, is described. Members of the logic family are capable of recovery, regardless of the shape of the upsetting event. Glitch propagation from an upset node is also blocked. Logic diagrams for an Inverter, Nor, Nand, and Complex Gates are provided. The logic family can be implemented in a standard, commercial CMOS process with no additional masks. DC, transient, static power, upset recovery and layout characteristics of the new family, based on a commercial 1 micron CMOS N-Well process, are described.

  1. Evolution of the cycloidea gene family in Antirrhinum and Misopates.

    PubMed

    Vieira, C P; Vieira, J; Charlesworth, D

    1999-11-01

    Studies at the nucleotide level on the nuclear flower development gene cycloidea (cyc) in seven Antirrhinum, two Misopates, one Linaria, one Cymbalaria, and one Digitalis species revealed that cyc is a member of a gene family composed of at least five apparently functional genes. The estimated ages of the duplication events that created this gene family are from 7.5 Myr to more than 75 Myr. We also report the first estimates of DNA sequence diversity for species of Antirrhinum and Misopates. Low between-species variability suggests that this group of species may have diverged recently. PMID:10555278

  2. Training Patient and Family Storytellers and Patient and Family Faculty

    PubMed Central

    Morrise, Lisa; Stevens, Katy Jo

    2013-01-01

    Narrative medicine has become a prominent method of developing more empathetic relationships between medical clinicians and patients, on the basis of a deeper understanding of the patient experience. Beyond its usefulness during clinical encounters, patient storytelling can inform processes and procedures in Advisory Councils, Committee Meetings, and Family as Faculty settings, leading to improved quality and safety in health care. Armed with a better understanding of the patient experience, clinicians and administrators can make decisions, hopefully in collaboration with patients, that will enrich the patient experience and increase satisfaction among patients, families, and staff. Patient and family storytelling is a key component of the collaboration that is ideal when an organization seeks to deliver patient- and family-centered care. Providing patients and families with training will make the narratives they share more powerful. Health care organizations will find that purposeful storytelling can be an invaluable aspect of a patient- and family-centered culture. Well-delivered storytelling will support quality- and safety-improvement efforts and contribute to improved patient satisfaction. This article provides instruction for teaching patients and families how to tell stories with purpose and offers advice about how to support patients, families, and clinicians participating in this effort. PMID:24355906

  3. Family Financial Fitness Exercises: Stretching Your Family's Budget 

    E-print Network

    White, Lynn

    2001-03-29

    . Fehlis, Deputy Director, Texas AgriLife Extension Service, The Texas A&M University System. 4MRFtnirpeR ,M01 Stretching Your Family?s Budget L-5188 8-99 Pregunte a los miembros de su familia que piensen maneras en que su tiempo, experiencia, talentos y...

  4. The Role of Family Functioning in Bipolar Disorder in Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Du Rocher Schudlich, Tina D.; Youngstrom, Eric A.; Calabrese, Joseph R.; Findling, Robert L.

    2008-01-01

    Investigated the association between family functioning and conflict and their links with mood disorder in parents and with children's risk for bipolar disorder. Participants were 272 families with a child between the ages of 5-17 years. Parents' history of psychiatric diagnoses and children's current diagnoses were obtained via semi-structured…

  5. The State of Families, 2: Work and Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Family Service America, Milwaukee, WI.

    This report examines trends in the world of work and the economy that affect families. Part 1 presents a futurist's perspective on the changing world of work and how it affects families. Topics include finance capitalism in a global economy, values, work force, compensation and employee benefits, employment and unemployment, government,…

  6. Counseling African American Families. The Family Psychology and Counseling Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanders, Jo-Ann Lipford, Ed.; Bradley, Carla, Ed.

    A major challenge confronting the counseling profession is meeting the needs of African American families. This monograph presents a discussion of the issues involved in the clinical assessment and treatment of these families. It explores their distinct experiences as they navigate through a society often hostile towards them. Chapters include:…

  7. Family Connections: Family Conversations in Informal Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riedinger, Kelly

    2012-01-01

    This article begins with two examples that demonstrate adult interactions with young learners during conversations in informal learning environments. Family visits to informal learning environments provide opportunities to learn together, interact, engage in conversations, and learn more about one another. This article explores family learning in…

  8. Caution: Families at Work = Attention: Families au Travail.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Theilheimer, Ish, Ed.; Eisner, Kathy, Ed.

    1996-01-01

    This publication, in English and French, reports on the work-family conflict in Canada, gauges progress over the past decade, and examines how views have changed. The following articles are featured: (1) "Caution: Families at Work" (Ish Theilheimer), an examination of current workplace innovations, viewpoints of employers and employees, and the…

  9. Family Guide Dear Family Member of a Future Merrillite,

    E-print Network

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    1 Merrill College Family Guide #12;2 Dear Family Member of a Future Merrillite, Welcome to Merrill and nationalities. Merrill's central values are to stimulate respect for all world cultures, in general of students have made their mark in every area including history, art, psychology, politics, Latin American

  10. Understanding Children's Family Worlds: Family Transitions and Children's Outcome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunn, Judy

    2004-01-01

    Increasing numbers of children experience parental separation and formation of stepfamilies. Research into the impact of these family transitions on children's adjustment by family sociologists and psychologists has greatly increased; changes in research perspectives over the last two decades are discussed, including a focus on individual…

  11. Family Members' Influence on Family Meal Vegetable Choices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wenrich, Tionni R.; Brown, J. Lynne; Miller-Day, Michelle; Kelley, Kevin J.; Lengerich, Eugene J.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Characterize the process of family vegetable selection (especially cruciferous, deep orange, and dark green leafy vegetables); demonstrate the usefulness of Exchange Theory (how family norms and experiences interact with rewards and costs) for interpreting the data. Design: Eight focus groups, 2 with each segment (men/women vegetable…

  12. "Family Matters:" Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders and the Family

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Heather Carmichael; Oti, Rosalind; Gelo, Julie; Beck, Sharon

    2009-01-01

    Information about "family matters" is vital to developing targeted interventions, reducing placement disruption, and enhancing outcome in fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD). The quality of the caregiving environment and family function are associated with long-term outcome in natural history study of individuals with FASD. This article…

  13. Acculturative Family Distancing (AFD) and Depression in Chinese American Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hwang, Wei-Chin; Wood, Jeffrey J.; Fujimoto, Ken

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Knowledge of acculturative processes and their impact on immigrant families remains quite limited. Acculturative family distancing (AFD) is the distancing that occurs between immigrant parents and their children and is caused by breakdowns in communication and cultural value differences. It is a more proximal and problem-focused…

  14. Emerging Adults’ Lived Experience of Formative Family Stress: The Family’s Lasting Influence

    PubMed Central

    Valdez, Carmen R.; Chavez, Tom; Woulfe, Julie

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we use a phenomenology framework to explore emerging adults’ formative experiences of family stress. Fourteen college students participated in a qualitative interview about their experience of family stress. We analyzed the interviews using the empirical phenomenological psychology method. Participants described a variety of family stressors, including parental conflict and divorce, physical or mental illness, and emotional or sexual abuse by a family member. Two general types of parallel processes were essential to the experience of family stress for participants. First, the family stressor was experienced in shifts and progressions reflecting the young person’s attempts to manage the stressor, and second, these shifts and progressions were interdependent with deeply personal psychological meanings of self, sociality, physical and emotional expression, agency, place, space, project, and discourse. We describe each one of these parallel processes, and their subprocesses, and conclude with implications for mental health practice and research. PMID:23771635

  15. Family environment in Hispanic college females with a history of childhood sexual abuse.

    PubMed

    Kenny, Maureen C; McEachern, Adriana Garcia

    2007-01-01

    This study sought to examine the family environments of a sample of Hispanic women who reported childhood sexual abuse. Eighteen women, taken from a larger college sample, were individually interviewed and administered the Family Environment Scale (FES; Moos & Moos, 1994). Cultural values and the relationship of family characteristics to the individual's experience of sexual abuse were explored. The abused women obtained significantly higher scores on the Achievement-Orientation subscale of the FES than the normative group. Qualitative data revealed some patterns in these families regarding sexual discussions and poor conflict resolution skills. Implications for treatment of Hispanic victims are discussed. PMID:18032238

  16. Four models of family interests.

    PubMed

    Groll, Daniel

    2014-10-01

    In this article, I distinguish between 4 models for thinking about how to balance the interests of parents, families, and a sick child: (1) the oxygen mask model; (2) the wide interests model; (3) the family interests model; and (4) the direct model. The oxygen mask model - which takes its name from flight attendants' directives to parents to put on their own oxygen mask before putting on their child's - says that parents should consider their own interests only insofar as doing so is, ultimately, good for the sick child. The wide interests model suggests that in doing well by my child I am at the very same time doing well by myself. My interests can, and plausibly do, encompass the interests of others; they are, to that extent, wide. There is, then, no sharp separation between the interests of the sick child and the interests of other family members. In the family interests model, families themselves are seen as having interests that are neither identical to the sum, nor a simple function, of the interests of individual family members. The family has goals, values, and aspirations that are essentially corporate rather than individual. According to this model, these family interests can explain why sacrifices can sometimes be demanded of some family members for the sake of others in a medical setting. Finally, the direct model takes a simpler view of family members' interests; it claims that these interests matter simply on their own and should be taken into account in making treatment decisions for a sick child. This model openly considers the competing interests that parents and other family members often have when caring for a sick child, and advocates for weighing those interests when making decisions for and about the sick child. While there is room for all four models at the bedside, I argue that the direct model should be highlighted in clinical decision-making. PMID:25274879

  17. A Framework for Studying Family Socialization over the Life Cycle: The Case of Family Violence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalmuss, Debra; Seltzer, Judith A.

    1989-01-01

    Uses lifetime perspective on family socialization as framework for understanding effects of divorce and remarriage on family violence. Identifies three family socialization experiences (family of origin, family in transition, and current family) that shape behavior. Recommends extending framework to investigate other family transitions and…

  18. Mutation analysis of two families with inherited congenital cataracts

    PubMed Central

    LIANG, CHANG; LIANG, HAN; YANG, YU; PING, LIU; JIE, QIAO

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to identify the genetic mutations in two families affected with congenital cataracts. Detailed family histories and clinical data of the family members were recorded. The family members with affected phenotypes were recruited, and candidate gene sequencing was performed to determine the disease-causing mutation. Bioinformatics analysis was performed to predict the function of the mutant gene. Green fluorescent protein-tagged human wild-type CRYAA and GJA8 were sub-cloned, and the mutants were generated by site-directed mutagenesis. A novel mutation, c.416T>C (p.L139P), in CRYAA and a known mutation, c.139G>A (p.D47N), in GJA8 were identified. These mutations co-segregated with all affected individuals in each family and were not observed in the unaffected family members or in unrelated controls. The results of the bioinformatics analysis indicated that the amino acid at position 139 was highly conserved and that the p.L139P mutation was predicted to be damaging, as with p.D47N. Finally, overexpression of the two mutants revealed marked alterations, compared with the wild-type proteins. These results extend the mutation spectrum of CRYAA and provides further evidence that the p.D47N mutation in GJA8 is a hot-spot mutation. PMID:26004348

  19. Fertility and the locus of family control in contemporary Japan.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, N; Hodge, R W

    1983-01-01

    Changes in the structure of the traditional Japanese family have been observed to be occurring simultaneously with a decline in Japanese fertility; this suggests a relationship between family structure and fertility behavior in modern Japan. The impact of the locus of family decision making, with respect to fertility and fertility related behavior, upon family formation is, therefore, examined. After statistical adjustment for a variety of controls, no impact upon pregnancies or children ever born could be found for the locus of family control over either abortion or contraception adoption. However, the locus of family control over fertility exhibits, both before and after statistical adjustment for education of spouse, number of children desired, marital duration, and contraceptive use, a significant relationship with both number of pregnancies and number of children ever born. Women who make fertility decisions jointly with their husbands, free from parental influence, have fewer pregnancies and fewer children than women who arrive at their fertility decisions on their own, under the influence of parents, or on the basis of their husband's will. Additional evidence is presented which reveals that women who discuss the number and timing of the children they want with their husbands also tend to have fewer pregnancies and fewer children. More sophisticated methods of study are advocated. PMID:12312638

  20. Genome-wide analysis and functional prediction of the Trihelix transcription factor family in rice.

    PubMed

    Jianhui, Ji; Yingjun, Zhou; Hehe, Wu; Liming, Yang

    2015-12-01

    The Trihelix transcription factor family plays an essential role in plant growth, development and stress response. However, the studies about identification and analysis of this gene family in rice on the genome-wide level have not been reported. In this study, 31 members of the Trihelix family, which contain highly conserved and characteristic trihelix domain through sequence clustering and functional domains analysis, were identified in rice genome database using bioinformatic tools. These members could be classified into 5 subfamilies (I~V) based on the evolutionary relationship and domain characteristics. Clustering analyses of the Trihelix family in rice, Arabidopsis, Brachypodium distachyom and Sorghum bicolor showed that each species contained different members of subfamily although the classification of the Trihelix family were consistent in these four species, which indicated that the differentiation of the Trihelix gene family occur earlier than that of these species. The conserved motifs in the Trihelix family of rice analyzed using the MEME program were highly consistent with the results of clustering analyses. Intraspecific and interspecific chromosomal replication in partial Trihelix family members were found to exist in rice and between rice and other species through chromosome replication analysis. Microarray data analysis revealed diverse expression patterns of Trihelix family genes in different tissues of rice or in response to six different phytohormones. Moreover, 20 members of the Trihelix transcription factor family were found to interact with other proteins in rice using RiceFRIEND online database analysis. Therefore, our results preliminarily identified the evolution, chromosome distribution and replication, expression patterns, phytohormones response of the Trihelix transcription factor family and the interaction between trihelix family proteins and other proteins in rice, which will provide a basis to further reveal the molecular evolution and biological function of the Trihelix transcription factor family. PMID:26704948