Science.gov

Sample records for fast event recorder

  1. Rare-event recorder interface

    SciTech Connect

    Kuts, V.N.

    1984-03-01

    The author describes an interface for a BPA2-95 analog-digital computer with PL-80 and a Perfomom 30 perferator for rare event recording. This interface allows the height of each pulse that passes through the analog-digital converter to be recorded on punch tape. A series of three block diagrams illustrates in thorough detail the system described.

  2. 49 CFR 229.135 - Event recorders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    .... The event recorder shall record the most recent 48 hours of operation of the electrical system of the... an event recorder with a certified crashworthy event recorder memory module that meets the... certified crashworthy event recorder memory module that meets the requirements of Appendix D of this...

  3. 49 CFR 229.135 - Event recorders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    .... The event recorder shall record the most recent 48 hours of operation of the electrical system of the... an event recorder with a certified crashworthy event recorder memory module that meets the... certified crashworthy event recorder memory module that meets the requirements of Appendix D of this...

  4. 49 CFR 229.135 - Event recorders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    .... The event recorder shall record the most recent 48 hours of operation of the electrical system of the... an event recorder with a certified crashworthy event recorder memory module that meets the... certified crashworthy event recorder memory module that meets the requirements of Appendix D of this...

  5. Fast events in protein folding

    SciTech Connect

    Woodruff, W.; Callender, R.; Causgrove, T.; Dyer, R.; Williams, S.

    1996-04-01

    The primary objective of this work was to develop a molecular understanding of how proteins achieve their native three-dimensional (folded) structures. This requires the identification and characterization of intermediates in the protein folding process on all relevant timescales, from picoseconds to seconds. The short timescale events in protein folding have been entirely unknown. Prior to this work, state-of-the-art experimental approaches were limited to milliseconds or longer, when much of the folding process is already over. The gap between theory and experiment is enormous: current theoretical and computational methods cannot realistically model folding processes with lifetimes longer than one nanosecond. This unique approach to employ laser pump-probe techniques that combine novel methods of laser flash photolysis with time-resolved vibrational spectroscopic probes of protein transients. In this scheme, a short (picosecond to nanosecond) laser photolysis pulse was used to produce an instantaneous pH or temperature jump, thereby initiating a protein folding or unfolding reaction. Structure-specific, time-resolved vibrational probes were then used to identify and characterize protein folding intermediates.

  6. 49 CFR 229.135 - Event recorders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Event recorders. 229.135 Section 229.135 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD LOCOMOTIVE SAFETY STANDARDS Safety Requirements Cabs and Cab Equipment § 229.135 Event recorders. (a) Duty to...

  7. 49 CFR 229.135 - Event recorders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Event recorders. 229.135 Section 229.135 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD LOCOMOTIVE SAFETY STANDARDS Safety Requirements Cabs and Cab Equipment § 229.135 Event recorders. (a) Duty to...

  8. Adverse event recording post hip fracture surgery.

    PubMed

    Doody, K; Mohamed, K M S; Butler, A; Street, J; Lenehan, B

    2013-01-01

    Accurate recording of adverse events post hip fracture surgery is vital for planning and allocating resources. The purpose of this study was to compare adverse events recorded prospectively at point of care with adverse recorded by the Hospital In-Patient Enquiry (HIPE) System. The study examined a two month period from August to September 2011 at University Hospital Limerick. Out of a sample size of 39, there were 7 males (17.9%) and 32 females (82.1%) with an age range of between 53 and 98 years. The mean age was 80.5 years. 55 adverse events were recorded, in contrast to the HIPE record of 13 (23.6%) adverse events. The most common complications included constipation 10 (18.2%), anaemia 8 (14.5%), urinary retention 8 (14.50%), pneumonia 5 (9.1%) and delirium 5 (9.1%). Of the female cohort, 24 (68.8%) suffered an adverse event, while only 4 (57%) males suffered an adverse event. PMID:24579408

  9. Event-recording devices with identification codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watters, David G. (Inventor); Huestis, David L. (Inventor); Bahr, Alfred J. (Inventor); Vidmar, Robert J. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A recording device allows wireless interrogation to determine its identity and its state. The state indicates whether one or more physical or chemical events have taken place. In effect, the one or more physical or chemical events are recorded by the device. The identity of the device allows it to be distinguished from a number of similar devices. The recording device may be used in an array of devices that allows wireless probing by an interrogation unit. When probed, each device tells the interrogator who it is and what state it is in. The devices allow multiple use and the interrogator may use a logical reset to determine the state of each device. The interrogator can thus easily identify particular items in an array that have reached a particular condition. The device may record the status of each device in a database to maintain a history for each.

  10. 77 FR 59566 - Event Data Recorders

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-28

    ... National Highway Traffic Safety Administration 49 CFR Part 563 RIN 2127-AL14 Event Data Recorders..., 2012, make the following correction: Sec. 563.8 Data format On page 47557 in the table titled ``Table III--Reported Data Element Format'', in the ``Accuracy \\1\\'' column, in the twenty-fifth row, ``...

  11. Biomarker Records Associated with Mass Extinction Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whiteside, Jessica H.; Grice, Kliti

    2016-06-01

    The history of life on Earth is punctuated by a series of mass extinction episodes that vary widely in their magnitude, duration, and cause. Biomarkers are a powerful tool for the reconstruction of historical environmental conditions and can therefore provide insights into the cause and responses to ancient extinction events. In examining the five largest mass extinctions in the geological record, investigators have used biomarkers to elucidate key processes such as eutrophy, euxinia, ocean acidification, changes in hydrological balance, and changes in atmospheric CO2. By using these molecular fossils to understand how Earth and its ecosystems have responded to unusual environmental activity during these extinctions, models can be made to predict how Earth will respond to future changes in its climate.

  12. Time-Lapse Photography in Recording Classroom Events.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Rob; Adelman, Clem

    An observational recording system was devised to record and to replay the stream of classroom events--nonverbal events, as well as verbal. Although videotape recording/closed circuit television has been used in similar systems, the one here used selected 35mm. stills made from 16mm. film. The stills were then synchronized with tape recordings and…

  13. Fast drift kilometric radio bursts and solar proton events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahler, S. W.; Cane, H. V.; Vonrosenvinge, T. T.; Stone, R. G.; Cliver, E. W.; Mcguire, R. E.

    1985-01-01

    Initial results of a comparative study of major fast drift kilometric bursts and solar proton events from Sep. 1978 to Feb. 1983 are presented. It was found that only about half of all intense, long duration ( 40 min above 500 sfu) 1 MHz bursts can be associated with F 20 MeV proton events. However, for the subset of such fast drift bursts accompanied by metric Type 2 and/or 4 activity (approximately 40% of the total), the degree of association with 20 MeV events is 80%. For the reverse association, it was found that proton events with J( 20 MeV) 0.01 1 pr cm(-2)s(-1)sr(-1)MeV(-1) were typically (approximately 80% of the time) preceded by intense 1 MHz bursts that exceeded the 500 sfu level for times 20 min (median duration approximately 35 min).

  14. Strong imprint of past orogenic events on the thermochronological record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Jean

    2016-06-01

    Using a simple solution to the heat conduction equation, I show how, at the end of an orogenic event, the relaxation of isotherms from a syn-orogenic advection-dominated geometry to a post-orogenic conduction-dominated geometry leads to the creation of a thick iso-age crustal layer. Subsequent erosion of this layer yields peculiar age-elevation profiles and detrital age distributions that cannot be easily interpreted using traditional techniques. I illustrate these points by using a simple analytical solution of the heat equation as well as a transient, three-dimensional numerical model. I also demonstrate that the age of the end of an orogenic event is so strongly imprinted in the thermochronological record that it erases most of the information pertaining to the orogenic phase itself and the subsequent isostatically-driven exhumation. The concept is used to explain two thermochronological datasets from the Himalayas and demonstrate that their most likely interpretation involves the sudden interruption of extremely fast exhumation accommodated by movement along the South Tibetan Detachment in the Higher Himalayas around 15 Ma.

  15. Fast optical recording media based on semiconductor nanostructures for image recording and processing

    SciTech Connect

    Kasherininov, P. G. Tomasov, A. A.

    2008-11-15

    Fast optical recording media based on semiconductor nanostructures (CdTe, GaAs) for image recording and processing with a speed to 10{sup 6} cycle/s (which exceeds the speed of known recording media based on metal-insulator-semiconductor-(liquid crystal) (MIS-LC) structures by two to three orders of magnitude), a photosensitivity of 10{sup -2}V/cm{sup 2}, and a spatial resolution of 5-10 (line pairs)/mm are developed. Operating principles of nanostructures as fast optical recording media and methods for reading images recorded in such media are described. Fast optical processors for recording images in incoherent light based on CdTe crystal nanostructures are implemented. The possibility of their application to fabricate image correlators is shown.

  16. 77 FR 48492 - Event Data Recorders

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-14

    ... performance requirements. \\1\\ 71 FR 50998. \\2\\ Walk-in van-type trucks or vehicles designed to be sold...: \\3\\ 73 FR 2168. We clarified the event storage definitions to alleviate any uncertainties in multiple...\\ NHTSA issued a Federal Register notice on February 8, 2008 (73 FR 8408) to correct the placement...

  17. Meteoritic event recorded in Antarctic ice

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, R.P.; Dunbar, N.W.; McIntosh, W.C.; Esser, R.P.; Nishiizumi, Kuni; Taylor, S.; Caffee, M.W.

    1998-07-01

    During systematic sampling of volcanic ash (tephra) layers at a well-known Antarctic meteorite collection site (the Allan Hills main ice field), a band of unusually dark and rounded (many spheroidal) particles was discovered. This debris layer (BIT-58) extends parallel to the stratigraphy of the ice established from the tephra bands, apparently marking a single depositional event. The shapes, internal texture, major element composition, and levels of cosmogenic nuclides of particles from within BIT-58 all strongly suggest that this material represents ablation debris from the passage of a large H-group ordinary chondrite. Preliminary cosmogenic isotope dating suggests an age of 2.8 Ma, implying that the East Antarctic ice sheet has been stable since that time. The relationship of the Bit-58 layer to known impact events is not clear.

  18. Fast and robust microseismic event detection using very fast simulated annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velis, Danilo R.; Sabbione, Juan I.; Sacchi, Mauricio D.

    2013-04-01

    The study of microseismic data has become an essential tool in many geoscience fields, including oil reservoir geophysics, mining and CO2 sequestration. In hydraulic fracturing, microseismicity studies permit the characterization and monitoring of the reservoir dynamics in order to optimize the production and the fluid injection process itself. As the number of events is usually large and the signal-to-noise ratio is in general very low, fast, automated, and robust detection algorithms are required for most applications. Also, real-time functionality is commonly needed to control the fluid injection in the field. Generally, events are located by means of grid search algorithms that rely on some approximate velocity model. These techniques are very effective and accurate, but computationally intensive when dealing with large three or four-dimensional grids. Here, we present a fast and robust method that allows to automatically detect and pick an event in 3C microseismic data without any input information about the velocity model. The detection is carried out by means of a very fast simulated annealing (VFSA) algorithm. To this end, we define an objective function that measures the energy of a potential microseismic event along the multichannel signal. This objective function is based on the stacked energy of the envelope of the signals calculated within a predefined narrow time window that depends on the source position, receivers geometry and velocity. Once an event has been detected, the source location can be estimated, in a second stage, by inverting the corresponding traveltimes using a standard technique, which would naturally require some knowledge of the velocity model. Since the proposed technique focuses on the detection of the microseismic events only, the velocity model is not required, leading to a fast algorithm that carries out the detection in real-time. Besides, the strategy is applicable to data with very low signal-to-noise ratios, for it relies

  19. Late Eocene impact events recorded in deep-sea sediments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, B. P.

    1988-01-01

    Raup and Sepkoski proposed that mass extinctions have occurred every 26 Myr during the last 250 Myr. In order to explain this 26 Myr periodicity, it was proposed that the mass extinctions were caused by periodic increases in cometary impacts. One method to test this hypothesis is to determine if there were periodic increases in impact events (based on crater ages) that correlate with mass extinctions. A way to test the hypothesis that mass extinctions were caused by periodic increases in impact cratering is to look for evidence of impact events in deep-sea deposits. This method allows direct observation of the temporal relationship between impact events and extinctions as recorded in the sedimentary record. There is evidence in the deep-sea record for two (possibly three) impact events in the late Eocene. The younger event, represented by the North American microtektite layer, is not associated with an Ir anomaly. The older event, defined by the cpx spherule layer, is associated with an Ir anomaly. However, neither of the two impact events recorded in late Eocene deposits appears to be associated with an unusual number of extinctions. Thus there is little evidence in the deep-sea record for an impact-related mass extinction in the late Eocene.

  20. 10,000 yr record of extreme hydrologic events

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, S.L.; Bierman, P.R.; Lini, A.; Southon, J.

    2000-04-01

    Well-dated lacustrine sediments provide a hydrologic record indicating that the frequency and magnitude of runoff events, and by inference, storms, have varied over the past 10 k.y. in northern New England. The authors used five sediment cores and radiocarbon dating to develop a chronology of Holocene hydrologic events for the Ritterbush Pond basin, northern Vermont. Chemical and physical analyses allow them to identify 52 distinct layers of predominantly inorganic sediment that represent terrestrially derived material delivered to the pond by runoff events. The thickness of some layers suggests hydrologic events at least equal in size to, and probably much larger than, any storm or flood recorded during nearly 300 yr of written regional history. Layer thickness and frequency and, by analogy, storm size and recurrence, change through the Holocene. The largest events occurred 2620, 6840, and 9440 calibrated {sup 14}C years before present (cal {sup 14}C yr B.P.). The most frequent hydrologic events occurred in three periods: 1,750 to 2,620, 6,330 to 6,840, and > 8,600 cal yr B.P. The recurrence interval of layer deposition during stormy periods averages 130 {+-} 100 cal yr, whereas the recurrence interval during less stormy periods is longer, 270 {+-} 170 cal yr. The Ritterbush Pond event record illustrates the potential of inorganic lacustrine sediment to serve as a proxy record for estimating paleoflood frequency and deciphering climate change.

  1. Limb Event Brightenings and Fast Ejection Using IRIS Mission Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavabi, E.; Koutchmy, S.; Golub, L.

    2015-10-01

    The Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) of the recently commissioned NASA small explorer mission provides significantly more complete and higher resolution spectral coverage of the dynamical conditions inside the chromosphere and transition region (TR) than has been available ever before. High temporal, spatial (0.3'') and spectral resolution observations from the ultraviolet IRIS spectra near the solar limb reveal high-energy limb event brightenings (LEBs) at low chromospheric heights at about 1 Mm above the limb. They can be characterized as explosive events producing jets. We selected two events showing spectra of a confined eruption just off or near the quiet-Sun limb, the jet part showing obvious moving material with short-duration large Doppler shifts in three directions that were identified as macrospicules on slit-jaw (SJ) images in Si iv and He ii 304 Å. The events were analyzed from a sequence of very close rasters taken near the central meridian and the South Pole limb. We analyzed the processed SJ images and the simultaneously observed fast spectral sequences, which have large Doppler shifts, with a pair of redshifted elements together with a faster blueshifted element from almost the same position. Shifts correspond to velocities of up to 100 km s^{-1} in projection on the plane of the sky. Erupting spicules and macrospicules from these regions are visible in images taken before and after the spectra. The cool low first ionization potential (FIP) element simultaneous line emissions of the Mg ii h and k resonance lines do not clearly show a similar signature because of optical thickness effects, but the Si iv broadband SJ images do. The bidirectional plasma jets ejected from a small reconnection site are interpreted to be the result of coronal loop-loop interactions that lead to reconnection in nearby sites.

  2. Ultra fast all-optical fiber pressure sensor for blast event evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Nan; Wang, Wenhui; Tian, Ye; Niezrecki, Christopher; Wang, Xingwei

    2011-05-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a great potential threat to soldiers who are exposed to explosions or athletes who receive cranial impacts. Protecting people from TBI has recently attracted a significant amount of attention due to recent military operations in the Middle East. Recording pressure transient data in a blast event is very critical to the understanding of the effects of blast events on TBI. However, due to the fast change of the pressure during blast events, very few sensors have the capability to effectively track the dynamic pressure transients. This paper reports an ultra fast, miniature and all-optical fiber pressure sensor which could be mounted at different locations of a helmet to measure the fast changing pressure simultaneously. The sensor is based on Fabry-Perot (FP) principle. The end face of the fiber is wet etched. A well controlled thickness silicon dioxide diaphragm is thermal bonded on the end face to form an FP cavity. A shock tube test was conducted at Natick Soldier Research Development and Engineering Center, where the sensors were mounted in a shock tube side by side with a reference sensor to measure the rapidly changing pressure. The results of the test demonstrated that the sensor developed had an improved rise time (shorter than 0.4 μs) when compared to a commercially available reference sensor.

  3. Wireless event-recording device with identification codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watters, David G. (Inventor); Huestis, David L. (Inventor); Bahr, Alfred J. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A wireless recording device can be interrogated to determine its identity and its state. The state indicates whether a particular physical or chemical event has taken place. In effect, the physical or chemical event is recorded by the device. The identity of the device allows it to be distinguished from a number of similar devices. Thus the sensor device may be used in an array of devices that can be probed by a wireless interrogation unit. The device tells the interrogator who it is and what state it is in. The interrogator can thus easily identify particular items in an array that have reached a particular condition.

  4. Fast, Deep-Record-Length, Fiber-Coupled Photodiode Imaging Array for Plasma Diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brockington, Samuel; Case, Andrew; Witherspoon, F. Douglas

    2014-10-01

    HyperV Technologies has been developing an imaging diagnostic comprised of an array of fast, low-cost, long-record-length, fiber-optically-coupled photodiode channels to investigate plasma dynamics and other fast, bright events. By coupling an imaging fiber bundle to a bank of amplified photodiode channels, imagers and streak imagers of 100 to 1000 pixels can be constructed. By interfacing analog photodiode systems directly to commercial analog-to-digital converters and modern memory chips, a prototype 100 pixel array with an extremely deep record length (128 k points at 20 Msamples/s) and 10 bit pixel resolution has already been achieved. HyperV now seeks to extend these techniques to construct a prototype 1000 Pixel framing camera with up to 100 Msamples/sec rate and 10 to 12 bit depth. Preliminary experimental results as well as Phase 2 plans will be discussed. Work supported by USDOE Phase 2 SBIR Grant DE-SC0009492.

  5. Fast, Deep-Record-Length, Fiber-Coupled Photodiode Imaging Array for Plasma Diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brockington, Samuel; Case, Andrew; Witherspoon, F. Douglas

    2015-11-01

    HyperV Technologies has been developing an imaging diagnostic comprised of an array of fast, low-cost, long-record-length, fiber-optically-coupled photodiode channels to investigate plasma dynamics and other fast, bright events. By coupling an imaging fiber bundle to a bank of amplified photodiode channels, imagers and streak imagers can be constructed. By interfacing analog photodiode systems directly to commercial analog-to-digital converters and modern memory chips, a scalable solution for 100 to 1000 pixel systems with 14 bit resolution and record-lengths of 128k frames has been developed. HyperV is applying these techniques to construct a prototype 1000 Pixel framing camera with up to 100 Msamples/sec rate and 10 to 14 bit depth. Preliminary experimental results as well as future plans will be discussed. Work supported by USDOE Phase 2 SBIR Grant DE-SC0009492.

  6. A diary after dinner: How the time of event recording influences later accessibility of diary events.

    PubMed

    Szőllősi, Ágnes; Keresztes, Attila; Conway, Martin A; Racsmány, Mihály

    2015-01-01

    Recording the events of a day in a diary may help improve their later accessibility. An interesting question is whether improvements in long-term accessibility will be greater if the diary is completed at the end of the day, or after a period of sleep, the following morning. We investigated this question using an internet-based diary method. On each of five days, participants (n = 109) recorded autobiographical memories for that day or for the previous day. Recording took place either in the morning or in the evening. Following a 30-day retention interval, the diary events were free recalled. We found that participants who recorded their memories in the evening before sleep had best memory performance. These results suggest that the time of reactivation and recording of recent autobiographical events has a significant effect on the later accessibility of those diary events. We discuss our results in the light of related findings that show a beneficial effect of reduced interference during sleep on memory consolidation and reconsolidation. PMID:26088958

  7. Extreme Drought Events Revealed in Amazon Tree Ring Records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, H. S.; Baker, P. A.; Guilderson, T. P.

    2010-12-01

    The Amazon basin is a center of deep atmospheric convection and thus acts as a major engine for global hydrologic circulation. Yet despite its significance, a full understanding of Amazon rainfall variability remains elusive due to a poor historical record of climate. Temperate tree rings have been used extensively to reconstruct climate over the last thousand years, however less attention has been given to the application of dendrochronology in tropical regions, in large part due to a lower frequency of tree species known to produce annual rings. Here we present a tree ring record of drought extremes from the Madre de Dios region of southeastern Peru over the last 190 years. We confirm that tree ring growth in species Cedrela odorata is annual and show it to be well correlated with wet season precipitation. This correlation is used to identify extreme dry (and wet) events that have occurred in the past. We focus on drought events identified in the record as drought frequency is expected to increase over the Amazon in a warming climate. The Cedrela chronology records historic Amazon droughts of the 20th century previously identified in the literature and extends the record of drought for this region to the year 1816. Our analysis shows that there has been an increase in the frequency of extreme drought (mean recurrence interval = 5-6 years) since the turn of the 20th century and both Atlantic and Pacific sea surface temperature (SST) forcing mechanisms are implicated.

  8. Public support for restrictions on fast food company sponsorship of community events.

    PubMed

    Pettigrew, Simone; Pescud, Melanie; Rosenberg, Michael; Ferguson, Renee; Houghton, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated community attitudes to fast food companies' sponsorship of community events. The aim was to inform future efforts to introduce greater restrictions on these marketing activities to reduce child obesity. While previous research has focused on the sponsorship of sporting events, the present study included all community events and gauged public support for fast food company sponsorships in general as well as specific sponsorship activities such as securing event naming rights, advertising on event premises, and distributing free items to children in the form of food and redeemable vouchers. A large and diverse sample of Western Australian adults (n=2,005) responded to a community attitudes telephone survey that included questions relating to event sponsorship. Almost half of the respondents reported that the promotion of fast foods is inappropriate at community events, and only a third considered it appropriate at events where children are likely to be present. Around two-thirds agreed that promoting fast foods at such events sends contradictory messages to children and just a quarter of respondents considered it acceptable for free fast food to be distributed at events or for children to be rewarded for participation with fast food vouchers. The results suggest that efforts to reduce child obesity that involve restrictions on the sponsorship of community events by organisations promoting unhealthy foods may be supported by a substantial proportion of the population. PMID:23017320

  9. An ultra-fast fiber optic pressure sensor for blast event measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Nan; Zou, Xiaotian; Tian, Ye; Fitek, John; Maffeo, Michael; Niezrecki, Christopher; Chen, Julie; Wang, Xingwei

    2012-05-01

    Soldiers who are exposed to explosions are at risk of suffering traumatic brain injury (TBI). Since the causal relationship between a blast and TBI is poorly understood, it is critical to have sensors that can accurately quantify the blast dynamics and resulting wave propagation through a helmet and skull that are imparted onto and inside the brain. To help quantify the cause of TBI, it is important to record transient pressure data during a blast event. However, very few sensors feature the capabilities of tracking the dynamic pressure transients due to the rapid change of the pressure during blast events, while not interfering with the physical material layers or wave propagation. In order to measure the pressure transients efficiently, a pressure sensor should have a high resonant frequency and a high spatial resolution. This paper describes an ultra-fast fiber optic pressure sensor based on the Fabry-Perot principle for the application of measuring the rapid pressure changes in a blast event. A shock tube experiment performed in US Army Natick Soldier Research, Development and Engineering Center has demonstrated that the resonant frequency of the sensor is 4.12 MHz, which is relatively close to the designed theoretical value of 4.113 MHz. Moreover, the experiment illustrated that the sensor has a rise time of 120 ns, which demonstrates that the sensor is capable of observing the dynamics of the pressure transient during a blast event.

  10. Fast and reliable identification of axons, axon initial segments and dendrites with local field potential recording

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Anders V.; Johansen, Emil Ø.; Perrier, Jean-François

    2015-01-01

    The axon initial segment (AIS) is an essential neuronal compartment. It is usually where action potentials are initiated. Recent studies demonstrated that the AIS is a plastic structure that can be regulated by neuronal activity and by the activation of metabotropic receptors. Studying the AIS in live tissue can be difficult because its identification is not always reliable. Here we provide a new technique allowing a fast and reliable identification of the AIS in live brain slice preparations. By simultaneous recording of extracellular local field potentials and whole-cell patch-clamp recording of neurons, we can detect sinks caused by inward currents flowing across the membrane. We determine the location of the AIS by comparing the timing of these events with the action potential. We demonstrate that this method allows the unequivocal identification of the AIS of different types of neurons from the brain. PMID:26578887

  11. Seismic recording of small zero frequency displacement from moderate events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pino, Nicola Alessandro; Di Luccio, Francesca

    2005-06-01

    The use of modern broadband seismometers allows the observation of dynamic and static near-field effects. In the fortunate case of the great 1994 Bolivia earthquake a 6 mm coseismic permanent offset was observed at distances of about 600 km. On the other hand no surface static displacement from moderate events has been observed yet. This is mainly due to the intrinsic difficulties in the instrument removal. In the present paper we analyze broadband waveforms from a couple of events in southern Italy, recorded at distance of 50 km, by applying the technique for instrument removal recently introduced by Zhu [2003]. We derive stable and reliable measures of very small coseismic static offset produced by moderate magnitude earthquakes. Our results, successfully tested against synthetic prediction, give permanent displacement of a few tenths of millimeters, one order of magnitude smaller than usual geodetic resolution.

  12. A transient digitiser for fast air shower events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wild, N. R.; Clay, R. W.

    1985-01-01

    Air shower structure are often measured on time scales of a few nanoseconds. Longitudinal disk structure near the core is of the order of meters in dimension, air Cerenkov pulses have full widths at half maximum of the order of tens of nanoseconds, and fast timing over typical arrays is usually measured to nanosecond accuracy. oscilloscopes can be used but have very limited dynamic range and are expensive if measurements down to a few nanoseconds are to be made. For the fast Cerenkov work, an instrument with better dynamic range than an oscilloscope and with a time resolution sufficient to allow measurements limited only by system risetime of a few nanoseconds is needed. A 16/32 channel, 8 bit, fast transient digitizer was designed and built which runs at sample intervals down to approx. 1 nanosecond per channel.

  13. Adaptive Sparse Signal Processing for Discrimination of Satellite-based Radiofrequency (RF) Recordings of Lightning Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moody, D. I.; Smith, D. A.; Heavner, M.; Hamlin, T.

    2014-12-01

    Ongoing research at Los Alamos National Laboratory studies the Earth's radiofrequency (RF) background utilizing satellite-based RF observations of terrestrial lightning. The Fast On-orbit Recording of Transient Events (FORTE) satellite, launched in 1997, provided a rich RF lightning database. Application of modern pattern recognition techniques to this dataset may further lightning research in the scientific community, and potentially improve on-orbit processing and event discrimination capabilities for future satellite payloads. We extend sparse signal processing techniques to radiofrequency (RF) transient signals, and specifically focus on improved signature extraction using sparse representations in data-adaptive dictionaries. We present various processing options and classification results for on-board discharges, and discuss robustness and potential for capability development.

  14. Exupery volcano fast response system - The event detection and waveform classification system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, Conny; Ohrnberger, Matthias

    2010-05-01

    Volcanic eruptions are often preceded by seismic activity which can be used to quantify the volcanic activity since the number and the size of certain types of seismic events usually increase before periods of volcanic crisis. The implementation of an automatic detection and classification system for seismic signals of volcanic origin allows not only for the processing of large amounts of data in short time, but also provides consistent and time-invariant results. Here, we have developed a system based upon a combination of different methods. To enable a first robust event detection in the continuous data stream different modules are implemented in the real time system Earthworm which is widely distributed in active volcano monitoring observatories worldwide. Among those software modules are classical trigger algorithm like STA/LTA and cross-correlation master event matching which is also used to detect different classes of signals. Furthermore an additional module is implemented in the real time system to compute continuous activity parameters which are also used to quantify the volcanic activity. Most automatic classification systems need a sufficiently large pre-classified data set for training the system. However in case of a volcanic crisis we are often confronted with a lack of training data due to insufficient prior observations because prior data acquisition might be carried out with different equipment at a low number of sites and due to the imminent crisis there might be no time for the time-consuming and tedious process of preparing a training data set. For this reason we have developed a novel seismic event spotting technique in order to be less dependent on the existence of previously acquired data bases of event classes. One main goal is therefore to provide observatory staff with a robust event classification based on a minimum number of reference waveforms. By using a "learning-while-recording" approach we are allowing for the fast build-up of a

  15. Analysis of Continuous Microseismic Recordings: Resonance Frequencies and Unconventional Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tary, J.; van der Baan, M.

    2012-12-01

    Hydrofracture experiments, where fluids and proppant are injected into reservoirs to create fractures and enhance oil recovery, are often monitored using microseismic recordings. The total stimulated volume is then estimated by the size of the cloud of induced micro-earthquakes. This implies that only brittle failure should occur inside reservoirs during the fracturing. Yet, this assumption may not be correct, as the total energy injected into the system is orders of magnitude larger than the total energy associated with brittle failure. Instead of using only triggered events, it has been shown recently that the frequency content of continuous recordings may also provide information on the deformations occurring inside reservoirs. Here, we use different kinds of time-frequency transforms to track the presence of resonance frequencies. We analyze different data sets using regular, long-period and broadband geophones. The resonance frequencies observed are mainly included in the frequency band of 5-60 Hz. We systematically examine first the possible causes of resonance frequencies, dividing them into source, path and receiver effects. We then conclude that some of the observed frequency bands likely result from source effects. The resonance frequencies could be produced by either interconnected fluid-filled fractures in the order of tens of meters, or by small repetitive events occurring at a characteristic periodicity. Still, other mechanisms may occur or be predominant during reservoir fracturing, depending on the lithology as well as the pressure and temperature conditions at depth. During one experiment, both regular micro-earthquakes, long-period long-duration events (LPLD) and resonance frequencies are observed. The lower part of the frequency band of these resonance frequencies (5-30 Hz) overlaps with the anticipated frequencies of observed LPLDs in other experiments (<50 Hz). The exact origin of both resonance frequencies and LPLDs is still under debate

  16. Adaptive sparse signal processing of satellite-based radio frequency (RF) recordings of lightning events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moody, Daniela I.; Smith, David A.

    2014-05-01

    Ongoing research at Los Alamos National Laboratory studies the Earth's radio frequency (RF) background utilizing satellite-based RF observations of terrestrial lightning. Such impulsive events are dispersed through the ionosphere and appear as broadband nonlinear chirps at a receiver on-orbit. They occur in the presence of additive noise and structured clutter, making their classification challenging. The Fast On-orbit Recording of Transient Events (FORTE) satellite provided a rich RF lightning database. Application of modern pattern recognition techniques to this database may further lightning research in the scientific community, and potentially improve on-orbit processing and event discrimination capabilities for future satellite payloads. Conventional feature extraction techniques using analytical dictionaries, such as a short-time Fourier basis or wavelets, are not comprehensively suitable for analyzing the broadband RF pulses under consideration here. We explore an alternative approach based on non-analytical dictionaries learned directly from data, and extend two dictionary learning algorithms, K-SVD and Hebbian, for use with satellite RF data. Both algorithms allow us to learn features without relying on analytical constraints or additional knowledge about the expected signal characteristics. We then use a pursuit search over the learned dictionaries to generate sparse classification features, and discuss their performance in terms of event classification. We also use principal component analysis to analyze and compare the respective learned dictionary spaces to the real data space.

  17. Demanding response time requirements on coherent receivers due to fast polarization rotations caused by lightning events.

    PubMed

    Krummrich, Peter M; Ronnenberg, David; Schairer, Wolfgang; Wienold, Daniel; Jenau, Frank; Herrmann, Maximilian

    2016-05-30

    Lightning events can cause fast polarization rotations and phase changes in optical transmission fibers due to strong electrical currents and magnetic fields. Whereas these are unlikely to affect legacy transmission systems with direct detection, different mechanisms have to be considered in systems with local oscillator based coherent receivers and digital signal processing. A theoretical analysis reveals that lightning events can result in polarization rotations with speeds as fast as a few hundred kRad/s. We discuss possible mechanisms how such lightning events can affect coherent receivers with digital signal processing. In experimental investigations with a high current pulse generator and transponder prototypes, we observed post FEC errors after polarization rotation events which can be expected from lightning strikes. PMID:27410158

  18. Controls on Flood Event Frequencies Recorded in Stalagmites from Cave KNI-51, Australian Tropics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denniston, Rhawn; Gonzales, Angelique; Villarini, Gabriele; Polyak, Victor; Asmerom, Yemane; Wanamaker, Alan, Jr.; Lachniet, Matthew; Ummenhofer, Caroline; Cugley, John; Woods, David; Humphreys, William

    2016-04-01

    Extreme rainfall events in the central Australia tropics are largely driven by tropical cyclones and the Australian summer monsoon, both of which are sensitive to external forcing. To better understand baseline variability in extreme rainfall, we produced a record of cave flooding events spanning the last two millennia from a suite of precisely-dated and fast-growing aragonite stalagmites from cave KNI-51 (Denniston et al., 2015, PNAS, 112, 4576). During cave flooding events, sediment deposited on stalagmite surfaces becomes preserved within the stalagmite when floodwaters recede and stalagmite growth resumes. Ages of individual flood events are determined using growth models constructed from linear interpolation of 230Th-dated intervals of stalagmite carbonate (2 s.d. errors of ±1-30 yr in most cases). The robustness of this stalagmite flood record was tested, in part, by comparing accumulations of sediment layers in coeval stalagmites. Absolute values and temporal trends in flood recurrence rates were generally quite similar between stalagmites, arguing that each stalagmite was equally sensitive to flood events. We have now extended this cave flooding record back to 3600 yr BP using three additional stalagmites, each of which contains multi-decadal to centennial variations in flood frequency. The longest duration (1000 yr) and tallest (1.1m) of these stalagmites, KNI-51-7, is marked by a secular trend toward reduced flood occurrence rates, with the 30 yr running mean of floods/yr reaching 0.0, a value lower than in any other of the other nine samples analyzed in this study. However, KNI-51-N, which overlaps with KNI-51-7 for 300 yr, contains nearly identical sub-centennial variations to KNI-51-7 but KNI-51-N does not trend toward lower values. We argue that the decreasing average number of flood events with time in KNI-51-7 is a result of the stalagmite having grown above average flood height, thereby restricting its ability to record more frequent, smaller

  19. Patient records: from single events to elements for health planning.

    PubMed

    Pisanelli, D M; Ricci, F L

    1994-12-01

    Data collected in patient records are not only the kernel of a ward information system, but also the groundwork for planning and evaluating services in health care. The aim of this study was to analyze the problem of aggregate data generation starting from separate items in patient records. After describing the different uses of patient record data, we outline the process which generates aggregates data starting from individual records. This process leads to the definition of the "view on aggregation" as an intermediate step between patient records and aggregate data. A simplified schema is presented based on the Entity-Relationship model representing a conceptual model of the integration of aggregate data and patient record items. Finally, the role is discussed of automation in this process and the perspectives for its implementation. PMID:7869944

  20. Note: Tangential x-ray diagnosis for investigating fast MHD events in EAST tokamak.

    PubMed

    Li, Erzhong; Hu, Liqun; Chen, Kaiyun; Zhang, Jizong; Chen, Yiebin; Zhou, Ruijie; Gan, Kaifu; Liu, Yong

    2010-10-01

    A tangential x-ray diagnosis has been installed in the experimental advanced superconducting tokamakvacuum vessel for the study of fast magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) events. This system is based on absolute x-ray ultraviolet detectors with a collimator which is processed by laser machine. The first experimental results have proved its ability to measure the small-scale and transient MHD perturbations. PMID:21034130

  1. Limits on the Event Rates of Fast Radio Transients from the V-FASTR Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wayth, Randall B.; Tingay, Steven J.; Deller, Adam T.; Brisken, Walter F.; Thompson, David R.; Wagstaff, Kiri L.; Majid, Walid A.

    2012-07-01

    We present the first results from the V-FASTR experiment, a commensal search for fast transient radio bursts using the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA). V-FASTR is unique in that the widely spaced VLBA antennas provide a discriminant against non-astronomical signals and a mechanism for the localization and identification of events that is not possible with single dishes or short baseline interferometers. Thus, far V-FASTR has accumulated over 1300 hr of observation time with the VLBA, between 90 cm and 3 mm wavelength (327 MHz-86 GHz), providing the first limits on fast transient event rates at high radio frequencies (>1.4 GHz). V-FASTR has blindly detected bright individual pulses from seven known pulsars but has not detected any single-pulse events that would indicate high-redshift impulsive bursts of radio emission. At 1.4 GHz, V-FASTR puts limits on fast transient event rates comparable with the PALFA survey at the Arecibo telescope, but generally at lower sensitivities, and comparable to the "fly's eye" survey at the Allen Telescope Array, but with less sky coverage. We also illustrate the likely performance of the Phase 1 SKA dish array for an incoherent fast transient search fashioned on V-FASTR.

  2. LIMITS ON THE EVENT RATES OF FAST RADIO TRANSIENTS FROM THE V-FASTR EXPERIMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Wayth, Randall B.; Tingay, Steven J.; Deller, Adam T.; Brisken, Walter F.; Thompson, David R.; Wagstaff, Kiri L.; Majid, Walid A.

    2012-07-10

    We present the first results from the V-FASTR experiment, a commensal search for fast transient radio bursts using the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA). V-FASTR is unique in that the widely spaced VLBA antennas provide a discriminant against non-astronomical signals and a mechanism for the localization and identification of events that is not possible with single dishes or short baseline interferometers. Thus, far V-FASTR has accumulated over 1300 hr of observation time with the VLBA, between 90 cm and 3 mm wavelength (327 MHz-86 GHz), providing the first limits on fast transient event rates at high radio frequencies (>1.4 GHz). V-FASTR has blindly detected bright individual pulses from seven known pulsars but has not detected any single-pulse events that would indicate high-redshift impulsive bursts of radio emission. At 1.4 GHz, V-FASTR puts limits on fast transient event rates comparable with the PALFA survey at the Arecibo telescope, but generally at lower sensitivities, and comparable to the 'fly's eye' survey at the Allen Telescope Array, but with less sky coverage. We also illustrate the likely performance of the Phase 1 SKA dish array for an incoherent fast transient search fashioned on V-FASTR.

  3. Temperature variability and early clustering of record-breaking events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Amalia; Kostinski, Alex

    2016-05-01

    As the number of climatological studies using record-breaking statistics is growing rapidly, understanding the sensitivity of the chosen time period becomes essential. To that end, here we examine the evolving variability of monthly mean temperatures and its dependence on beginning and final year. Specifically, we use an index, α, based on record-breaking statistics and employing reversibility such that < α>=0 indicates no trend in variability. Generally, < α> has decreased between 1900 and 2013, indicating decreasing variability relative to early decades for stations from the contiguous USA (United States Historical Climatology Network, version 2.5). We find, somewhat surprisingly, that the observed decrease is due to an early excess of records beginning in 1917 (record low value) and 1921 (record high value). While detailed results depend on whether the data is gridded, detrended, etc., the general finding appears remarkably robust and holds globally as well.

  4. Safety design approach for external events in Japan sodium-cooled fast reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Yamano, H.; Kubo, S.; Tani, A.; Nishino, H.; Sakai, T.

    2012-07-01

    This paper describes a safety design approach for external events in the design study of Japan sodium-cooled fast reactor. An emphasis is introduction of a design extension external condition (DEEC). In addition to seismic design, other external events such as tsunami, strong wind, abnormal temperature, etc. were addressed in this study. From a wide variety of external events consisting of natural hazards and human-induced ones, a screening method was developed in terms of siting, consequence, frequency to select representative events. Design approaches for these events were categorized on the probabilistic, statistical and deterministic basis. External hazard conditions were considered mainly for DEECs. In the probabilistic approach, the DEECs of earthquake, tsunami and strong wind were defined as 1/10 of exceedance probability of the external design bases. The other representative DEECs were also defined based on statistical or deterministic approaches. (authors)

  5. Record-breaking events during the compressive failure of porous materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pál, Gergő; Raischel, Frank; Lennartz-Sassinek, Sabine; Kun, Ferenc; Main, Ian G.

    2016-03-01

    An accurate understanding of the interplay between random and deterministic processes in generating extreme events is of critical importance in many fields, from forecasting extreme meteorological events to the catastrophic failure of materials and in the Earth. Here we investigate the statistics of record-breaking events in the time series of crackling noise generated by local rupture events during the compressive failure of porous materials. The events are generated by computer simulations of the uniaxial compression of cylindrical samples in a discrete element model of sedimentary rocks that closely resemble those of real experiments. The number of records grows initially as a decelerating power law of the number of events, followed by an acceleration immediately prior to failure. The distribution of the size and lifetime of records are power laws with relatively low exponents. We demonstrate the existence of a characteristic record rank k*, which separates the two regimes of the time evolution. Up to this rank deceleration occurs due to the effect of random disorder. Record breaking then accelerates towards macroscopic failure, when physical interactions leading to spatial and temporal correlations dominate the location and timing of local ruptures. The size distribution of records of different ranks has a universal form independent of the record rank. Subsequences of events that occur between consecutive records are characterized by a power-law size distribution, with an exponent which decreases as failure is approached. High-rank records are preceded by smaller events of increasing size and waiting time between consecutive events and they are followed by a relaxation process. As a reference, surrogate time series are generated by reshuffling the event times. The record statistics of the uncorrelated surrogates agrees very well with the corresponding predictions of independent identically distributed random variables, which confirms that temporal and spatial

  6. Statistics of Record-Breaking Events in the Self-Organized Critical Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shcherbakov, R.; Newman, W. I.; Turcotte, D. L.; Davidsen, J.; Tiampo, K.; Rundle, J. B.

    2010-12-01

    Record-breaking events generated by the dynamics of driven nonlinear threshold systems are extracted and analyzed. They are compared to the record-breaking events extracted from the sequences of independent identically distributed (i.i.d.) random variables drawn from the Weibull distribution. Several statistical measures of record-breaking events are derived analytically and confirmed through numerical simulations for Weibull and power-law distributed random variables. Driven nonlinear threshold systems usually exhibit avalanche type behavior, where slow buildup of energy is punctuated by an abrupt release of energy through avalanche events which usually follow scale invariant statistics. From the simulations of these systems it is possible to extract a sequence of record-breaking avalanches, where each subsequent record-breaking event is larger in magnitude than the previous one and all events in between are smaller than the current record-breaking event and the previous one. In the present work, several cellular automata are analyzed among them the sandpile model, Manna model, Olami-Feder-Christensen (OFC) model, and the forest-fire model to investigate the record-breaking statistics of model avalanches exhibiting temporal and spatial correlations. It is found that the statistics of record-breaking events for the above cellular automata exhibit behavior different from that observed for i.i.d. random variables which signifies their complex spatio-temporal dynamics. The most pronounced deviations are observed in the case of the OFC model with a strong dependence on the conservation parameter of the model.

  7. Fast-track extreme event attribution: How fast can we disentangle thermodynamic (forced) and dynamic (internal) contributions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haustein, Karsten; Otto, Friederike; Uhe, Peter; Allen, Myles; Cullen, Heidi

    2016-04-01

    provide sufficient guidance to determine the dynamic contribution to the event on the basis of monthly mean values. No such link can be made (North Atlantic/Western Europe region) for shorter time-scales, unless the observed state of the circulation is taken as reference for the model analysis (e.g. Christidis et al. 2014). We present results from our most recent attribution analysis for the December 2015 UK floods (Storm Desmond and Eva), during which we find a robust teleconnection link between Pacific SSTs and North Atlantic Jetstream anomalies. This is true for both experiments, with forecast and observed SSTs. We propose a fast and simple analysis method based on the comparison of current climatological circulation patterns with actual and natural conditions. Alternative methods are discussed and analysed regarding their potential for fast-track attribution of the role of dynamics. Also, we briefly revisit the issue of internal vs forced dynamic contributions.

  8. Wheelchair type biomedical system with event-recorder function.

    PubMed

    Han, Dong-Kyoon; Kim, Jong-Myoung; Cha, Eun-Jong; Lee, Tae-Soo

    2008-01-01

    The present study is about a biometric system for a wheelchair, which can measure both bio-signal (ECG-Electrocardiogram, BCG-Ballistocardiogram) and kinetic signal (acceleration) simultaneously and send the data to a remote medical server. The equipment was developed with the object of building a system that measures the bio-signal and kinetic signal of a subject who is moving or at rest on a wheelchair and transmits the measured signals to a remote server through a CDMA (Code Division Multiple Access) network. The equipment is composed of body area network and remote medical server. The body area network was designed to obtain bio-signal and kinetic signal simultaneously and, on the occurrence of an event, to transmit data to a remote medical server through a CDMA network. The remote medical server was designed to display event data transmitted from the body area network in real time. The performance of the developed system was evaluated through two experiments. First, we measured battery life on the occurrence of events, and second, we tested whether biometric data are transmitted accurately to the remote server on the occurrence of an event. In the first experiment using the developed equipment, events were triggered 16 times and the battery worked stably for around 29 hours. In the second experiment, when an event took place, the corresponding data were transmitted accurately to the remote medical server through a CDMA network. This system is expected to be usable for the healthcare of those moving on a wheelchair and applicable to a mobile healthcare system. PMID:19162939

  9. DEFLECTIONS OF FAST CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS AND THE PROPERTIES OF ASSOCIATED SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLE EVENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Kahler, S. W.; Akiyama, S.; Gopalswamy, N.

    2012-08-01

    The onset times and peak intensities of solar energetic particle (SEP) events at Earth have long been thought to be influenced by the open magnetic fields of coronal holes (CHs). The original idea was that a CH lying between the solar SEP source region and the magnetic footpoint of the 1 AU observer would result in a delay in onset and/or a decrease in the peak intensity of that SEP event. Recently, Gopalswamy et al. showed that CHs near coronal mass ejection (CME) source regions can deflect fast CMEs from their expected trajectories in space, explaining the appearance of driverless shocks at 1 AU from CMEs ejected near solar central meridian (CM). This suggests that SEP events originating in CME-driven shocks may show variations attributable to CH deflections of the CME trajectories. Here, we use a CH magnetic force parameter to examine possible effects of CHs on the timing and intensities of 41 observed gradual E {approx} 20 MeV SEP events with CME source regions within 20 Degree-Sign of CM. We find no systematic CH effects on SEP event intensity profiles. Furthermore, we find no correlation between the CME leading-edge measured position angles and SEP event properties, suggesting that the widths of CME-driven shock sources of the SEPs are much larger than the CMEs. Independently of the SEP event properties, we do find evidence for significant CME deflections by CH fields in these events.

  10. Deflections of Fast Coronal Mass Ejections and the Properties of Associated Solar Energetic Particle Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahler, S. W.; Akiyama, S.; Gopalswamy, N.

    2012-01-01

    The onset times and peak intensities of solar energetic particle (SEP) events at Earth have long been thought to be influenced by the open magnetic fields of coronal holes (CHs). The original idea was that a CH lying between the solar SEP source region and the magnetic footpoint of the 1 AU observer would result in a delay in onset and/or a decrease in the peak intensity of that SEP event. Recently, Gopalswamy et al. showed that CHs near coronal mass ejection (CME) source regions can deflect fast CMEs from their expected trajectories in space, explaining the appearance of driverless shocks at 1 AU from CMEs ejected near solar central meridian (CM). This suggests that SEP events originating in CME-driven shocks may show variations attributable to CH deflections of the CME trajectories. Here, we use a CH magnetic force parameter to examine possible effects of CHs on the timing and intensities of 41 observed gradual E approx 20 MeV SEP events with CME source regions within 20 deg. of CM. We find no systematic CH effects on SEP event intensity profiles. Furthermore, we find no correlation between the CME leading-edge measured position angles and SEP event properties, suggesting that the widths of CME-driven shock sources of the SEPs are much larger than the CMEs. Independently of the SEP event properties, we do find evidence for significant CME deflections by CH fields in these events

  11. Fast determination of earthquake magnitude and fault extent from real-time P-wave recordings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colombelli, Simona; Zollo, Aldo

    2015-08-01

    This work is aimed at the automatic and fast characterization of the extended earthquake source, through the progressive measurement of the P-wave displacement amplitude along the recorded seismograms. We propose a straightforward methodology to quickly characterize the earthquake magnitude and the expected length of the rupture, and to provide an approximate estimate of the average stress drop to be used for Earthquake Early Warning and rapid response purposes. We test the methodology over a wide distance and magnitude range using a massive Japan earthquake, accelerogram data set. Our estimates of moment magnitude, source duration/length and stress drop are consistent with the ones obtained by using other techniques and analysing the whole seismic waveform. In particular, the retrieved source parameters follow a self-similar, constant stress-drop scaling (median value of stress drop = 0.71 MPa). For the M 9.0, 2011 Tohoku-Oki event, both magnitude and length are underestimated, due to limited, available P-wave time window (PTWs) and to the low-frequency cut-off of analysed data. We show that, in a simulated real-time mode, about 1-2 seconds would be required for the source parameter determination of M 4-5 events, 3-10 seconds for M 6-7 and 30-40 s for M 8-8.5. The proposed method can also provide a rapid evaluation of the average slip on the fault plane, which can be used as an additional discriminant for tsunami potential, associated to large magnitude earthquakes occurring offshore.

  12. Event Management of RFID Data Streams: Fast Moving Consumer Goods Supply Chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, John P. T.; Li, Xue

    Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) is a wireless communication technology that uses radio-frequency waves to transfer information between tagged objects and readers without line of sight. This creates tremendous opportunities for linking real world objects into a world of "Internet of things". Application of RFID to Fast Moving Consumer Goods sector will introduce billions of RFID tags in the world. Almost everything is tagged for tracking and identification purposes. This phenomenon will impose a new challenge not only to the network capacity but also to the scalability of processing of RFID events and data. This chapter uses two national demonstrator projects in Australia as case studies to introduce an event managementframework to process high volume RFID data streams in real time and automatically transform physical RFID observations into business-level events. The model handles various temporal event patterns, both simple and complex, with temporal constraints. The model can be implemented in a data management architecture that allows global RFID item tracking and enables fast, large-scale RFID deployment.

  13. Event-related fast optical signal in a rapid object recognition task: improving detection by the Independent Component Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Medvedev, Andrei V.; Kainerstorfer, Jana; Borisov, Sergey V.; Barbour, Randall L.; VanMeter, John

    2008-01-01

    Noninvasive recording of fast optical signals presumably reflecting neuronal activity is a challenging task because of a relatively low signal-to-noise ratio. To improve detection of those signals in rapid object recognition tasks, we used the Independent Component Analysis (ICA) to reduce “global interference” (heartbeat and contribution of superficial layers). We recorded optical signals from the left prefrontal cortex in 10 right-handed participants with a continuous-wave instrument (DYNOT, NIRx, Brooklyn, NY). Visual stimuli were pictures of urban, landscape and seashore scenes with various vehicles as targets (target-to-non-target ratio 1:6) presented at ISI = 166 ms or 250 ms. Subjects mentally counted targets. Data were filtered at 2–30 Hz and artifactual components were identified visually (for heartbeat) and using the ICA weight matrix (for superficial layers). Optical signals were restored from the ICA components with artifactual components removed and then averaged over target and non-target epochs. After ICA processing, the event-related response was detected in 70–100% of subjects. The refined signal showed a significant decrease from baseline within 200–300 ms after targets and a slight increase after non-targets. The temporal profile of the optical signal corresponded well to the profile of a “differential ERP response”, the difference between targets and non-targets which peaks at 200 ms in similar object detection tasks. These results demonstrate that the detection of fast optical responses with continuous-wave instruments can be improved through the ICA method capable to remove noise, global interference and the activity of superficial layers. Fast optical signals may provide further information on brain processing during higher-order cognitive tasks such as rapid categorization of objects. PMID:18725213

  14. Fast magnetic reconnection with plasmoid / current sheet ejection events in laboratory experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inomoto, Michiaki; Ono, Yasushi; Hayashi, Yoshinori

    2012-07-01

    Non-steady and fast magnetic reconnections due to plasmoid or current sheet ejection events have been investigated in laboratory experiments using TS-3, TS-4 and UTST plasma merging devices in the University of Tokyo. In these devices, magnetic reconnection is induced by two different schemes, a) push reconnection driven by flux injection from the upstream region, b) pull reconnection driven by flux extraction to the downstream region. Current sheet or plasmoid ejection events are observed in these reconnection experiments particularly with strong guide magnetic field parallel to the reconnection electric field. In push reconnection experiments, anomalous resistivity is induced by the ion's kinetic effect (meandering motion) when the current sheet width is compressed shorter than the ion gyroradius by the strongly injected inflow flux. This fast reconnection regime does not involve plasmoid / current sheet ejection events. On the other hand, the guide field reduces the ion gyroradius and suppresses the onset of the anomalous resistivity, providing slow and steady magnetic reconnection. Impulsive fast reconnection with strong guide field develops, nevertheless, due to plasmoid / current sheet ejection events in pull and push reconnection experiments with extremely large external driving forces. In such a situation, the inflow flux is forcedly pushed into the reconnection region even faster than the maximal reconnection rate, resulting in flux pile up in front of the diffusion region. This piled flux induces large current density inside the current sheet in which plasmoid structure with closed flux surface is formed in pull reconnection case. The induced large current density or plasmoid is then ejected from the diffusion region with significant increase of reconnection electric field. As a result, magnetic reconnection condition with even larger reconnection rate than that obtained by anomalous resistivity was achieved under strong guide field and large external

  15. ANTARES explosion as recorded by the US-ARRAY: an unprecedented ground-truth infrasound event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergoz, Julien; Millet, Christophe; Le Pichon, Alexis

    2016-04-01

    The 28th October 2014 in Wallops Flight Facility, orbital's Antares launch vehicle failed and heavily exploded onto the launch pad area. At that time, the US transportable array of more than 200 operating stations (all equipped with microbarometers), was located on the east coast of the US and surrounded the accident. A large amount and variety of infrasound phases were observed at some stations, highlighting interesting propagation effects. The variety of recorded signals on such a dense network is unprecedented and offers the opportunity to better understand some propagation features, such as (1) the frequency content changes of stratospheric phases; (2) the dispersion of tropospheric phases propagating over thousands of kilometers within a stable and thin waveguide at fast phase speeds (350m/s) with low attenuation; (3) the non-linear effects associated with slow thermospheric phases (180m/s), especially in terms of shape, amplitude and duration. These 3 points will be addressed, and pieces of interpretations will be given thanks to the different propagation techniques: full waveform modelling (Normal Modes, finite element method), parabolic equation and ray tracing technique. Location issues of such an acoustic event based on tens of infrasound arrival times only will also be shown and discussed.

  16. The Cusp Ion Outflow up to 6 Re: Statistical Study on Polar and FAST Conjunction Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, S.; Wygant, J. R.; Cattell, C. A.; Scudder, J. D.; McFadden, J. P.; Mozer, F.; Russell, C. T.

    2015-12-01

    We examine Polar and FAST conjunction events along the cusp magnetic flux tubes to study the energization process of ion outflows in the mid- and low-altitude cusp, after these ions leave the upper ionosphere. FAST provides information on the boundary conditions at low-altitudes (~1.6 Re geocentric distance). Polar traverses cusp flux tubes at radial distances of 2 to 9 Re, providing good coverage of the low- and mid-altitude cusp. We compare the wave Poynting flux in the 1 mHz to 1 Hz range and the kinetic energy fluxes of the electrons and ions. The comparisons of these quantities between Polar and FAST determine the energy gain of the particles, especially the ion outflows between the two spacecraft. The Poynting flux is binned into major frequency bands, because it is important to understand the frequency spectrum of the wave energy, and which frequency bands energize the ions. Based on the conjunction events, altitude profiles of various quantities can be obtained. These altitude profiles will reveal the energy conversion between wave and particle in the low- and mid-altitude cusp. Determining the altitude where the most intense energy conversion occurs and what wave frequency bands provide the energy are important to explaining the physics of the heating and acceleration of the ion outflows.

  17. Joint Determination of Event Location and Magnitude from Historical Seismic Damage Records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, S.; Hong, T. K.

    2014-12-01

    Large earthquakes have long recurrence intervals. It is crucial to consider long-time seismicity for a proper assessment of potential seismic hazards. It is required to use historical earthquake records to complement the long-time seismicity records. Historical earthquake records remain as in seismic damage description with limited accuracy in source parameters including event location and its size. It is important to determine epicenters and magnitudes of historical earthquakes accurately. A noble method to determine the event location and magnitude from historical seismic damage records is introduced. Seismic damage is typically proportional to the event magnitude, and is inversely proportional to the distance. This feature allows us to deduce the event magnitude and location from spatial distribution of seismic intensities. However, the magnitude and distance trade off each other, inhibiting unique determination of event magnitude and location. The Gutenberg-Richter frequency-magnitude relationship is additionally considered to constrain the source parameters. The Gutenberg-Richter frequency-magnitude relationship is assumed to be consistent between instrumental and historical seismicity. A set of event location and magnitude that satisfy the chance of event occurrence according to the Gutenberg-Richter frequency-magnitude relationship is selected. The accuracy of the method is tested for synthetic data sets, and the validity of the method is examined. The synthetic tests present high accuracy of the method. The method is applied to historical seismic damage records, which allows us to calibrate the source parameters of historical earthquakes.

  18. Analysis of extreme top event frequency percentiles based on fast probability integration

    SciTech Connect

    Staple, B.; Haskin, F.E.

    1993-10-01

    In risk assessments, a primary objective is to determine the frequency with which a collection of initiating and basic events, E{sub e} leads to some undesired top event, T. Uncertainties in the occurrence rates, x{sub t}, assigned to the initiating and basic events cause uncertainty in the top event frequency, z{sub T}. The quantification of the uncertainty in z{sub T} is an essential part of risk assessment called uncertainty analysis. In the past, it has been difficult to evaluate the extreme percentiles of output variables like z{sub T}. Analytic methods such as the method of moments do not provide estimates of output percentiles and the Monte Carlo (MC) method can be used to estimate extreme output percentiles only by resorting to large sample sizes. A promising altemative to these methods is the fast probability integration (FPI) methods. These methods approximate the integrals of multi-variate functions, representing percentiles of interest, without recourse to multi-dimensional numerical integration. FPI methods give precise results and have been demonstrated to be more efficient than MC methods for estimating extreme output percentiles. FPI allows the analyst to choose extreme percentiles of interest and perform sensitivity analyses in those regions. Such analyses can provide valuable insights as to the events driving the top event frequency response in extreme probability regions. In this paper, FPI methods are adapted a) to precisely estimate extreme top event frequency percentiles and b) to allow the quantification of sensitivity measures at these extreme percentiles. In addition, the relative precision and efficiency of alternative methods for treating lognormally distributed inputs is investigated. The methodology is applied to the top event frequency expression for the dominant accident sequence from a risk assessment of Grand Gulf nuclear power plant.

  19. Record-breaking events during the compressive failure of porous materials.

    PubMed

    Pál, Gergő; Raischel, Frank; Lennartz-Sassinek, Sabine; Kun, Ferenc; Main, Ian G

    2016-03-01

    An accurate understanding of the interplay between random and deterministic processes in generating extreme events is of critical importance in many fields, from forecasting extreme meteorological events to the catastrophic failure of materials and in the Earth. Here we investigate the statistics of record-breaking events in the time series of crackling noise generated by local rupture events during the compressive failure of porous materials. The events are generated by computer simulations of the uniaxial compression of cylindrical samples in a discrete element model of sedimentary rocks that closely resemble those of real experiments. The number of records grows initially as a decelerating power law of the number of events, followed by an acceleration immediately prior to failure. The distribution of the size and lifetime of records are power laws with relatively low exponents. We demonstrate the existence of a characteristic record rank k(*), which separates the two regimes of the time evolution. Up to this rank deceleration occurs due to the effect of random disorder. Record breaking then accelerates towards macroscopic failure, when physical interactions leading to spatial and temporal correlations dominate the location and timing of local ruptures. The size distribution of records of different ranks has a universal form independent of the record rank. Subsequences of events that occur between consecutive records are characterized by a power-law size distribution, with an exponent which decreases as failure is approached. High-rank records are preceded by smaller events of increasing size and waiting time between consecutive events and they are followed by a relaxation process. As a reference, surrogate time series are generated by reshuffling the event times. The record statistics of the uncorrelated surrogates agrees very well with the corresponding predictions of independent identically distributed random variables, which confirms that temporal and spatial

  20. 49 CFR Appendix D to Part 229 - Criteria for Certification of Crashworthy Event Recorder Memory Module

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Recorder Memory Module D Appendix D to Part 229 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation... STANDARDS Pt. 229, App. D Appendix D to Part 229—Criteria for Certification of Crashworthy Event Recorder...-static pressure contained in one of the two tables shown in this section of appendix D. (See Tables 1...

  1. 49 CFR Appendix D to Part 229 - Criteria for Certification of Crashworthy Event Recorder Memory Module

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Recorder Memory Module D Appendix D to Part 229 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation... STANDARDS Pt. 229, App. D Appendix D to Part 229—Criteria for Certification of Crashworthy Event Recorder...-static pressure contained in one of the two tables shown in this section of appendix D. (See Tables 1...

  2. A Fast Event Preprocessor and Sequencer for the Simbol-X Low Energy Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Schanz, T.; Tenzer, C.; Maier, D.; Kendziorra, E.; Santangelo, A.

    2009-05-11

    The Simbol-X Low Energy Detector (LED), a 128x128 pixel DEPFET (Depleted Field Effect Transistor) array, will be read out at a very high rate (8000 frames/second) and, therefore, requires a very fast on board electronics. We present an FPGA-based LED camera electronics consisting of an Event Preprocessor (EPP) for on board data preprocessing and filtering of the Simbol-X low-energy detector and a related Sequencer (SEQ) to generate the necessary signals to control the readout.

  3. Methods of and apparatus for recording images occurring just prior to a rapid, random event

    DOEpatents

    Kelley, Edward F.

    1994-01-01

    An apparatus and a method are disclosed for recording images of events in a medium wherein the images that are recorded are of conditions existing just prior to and during the occurrence of an event that triggers recording of these images. The apparatus and method use an optical delay path that employs a spherical focusing mirror facing a circular array of flat return mirrors around a central flat mirror. The image is reflected in a symmetric pattern which balances astigmatism which is created by the spherical mirror. Delays on the order of hundreds of nanoseconds are possible.

  4. Methods of and apparatus for recording images occurring just prior to a rapid, random event

    SciTech Connect

    Kelley, E.F.

    1991-12-31

    An apparatus and a method are disclosed for recording images of events in a medium wherein the images that are recorded are of conditions existing just prior to and during the occurrence of an event that triggers recording of these images. The apparatus and method use an optical delay path that employs a spherical focusing mirror facing a circular array of flat return mirrors around a central flat mirror. The image is reflected in a symmetric pattern which balances astigmatism which is created by the spherical mirror. Delays on the order of hundreds of nanoseconds are possible.

  5. Fast and accurate dating of nuclear events using La-140/Ba-140 isotopic activity ratio.

    PubMed

    Yamba, Kassoum; Sanogo, Oumar; Kalinowski, Martin B; Nikkinen, Mika; Koulidiati, Jean

    2016-06-01

    This study reports on a fast and accurate assessment of zero time of certain nuclear events using La-140/Ba-140 isotopic activity ratio. For a non-steady nuclear fission reaction, the dating is not possible. For the hypothesis of a nuclear explosion and for a release from a steady state nuclear fission reaction the zero-times will differ. This assessment is fast, because we propose some constants that can be used directly for the calculation of zero time and its upper and lower age limits. The assessment is accurate because of the calculation of zero time using a mathematical method, namely the weighted least-squares method, to evaluate an average value of the age of a nuclear event. This was done using two databases that exhibit differences between the values of some nuclear parameters. As an example, the calculation method is applied for the detection of radionuclides La-140 and Ba-140 in May 2010 at the radionuclides station JPP37 (Okinawa Island, Japan). PMID:27058322

  6. Event Plane Resolution Simulations for The Fast Interaction Trigger Detector of ALICE at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulaimon, Isiaka; Harton, Austin; Garcia, Edmundo; Alice-Fit Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    CERN (European Center for Nuclear Research) is a global laboratory that studies proton and heavy ion collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) is one of four large experiments of the LHC. ALICE is dedicated to the study of the transition of matter to Quark Gluon Plasma in heavy ion collisions. In the present ALICE detector there are two sub-detectors, (the T0 and V0), that provide minimum bias trigger, multiplicity trigger, beam-gas event rejection, collision time for other sub detectors, on line multiplicity and event plane determination. In order to adapt these functionalities to the collision rates expected for the LHC upgrade after 2020, it is planned to replace these systems by a single detector system, called the Fast Interaction Trigger (FIT). In this presentation we describe the performance parameters of the FIT upgrade; show the proposed characteristics of the T0-Plus and the simulations that support the conceptual design of this detector. In particular we describe the performance simulations of the event plane resolution. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grants NSF-PHY-0968903 and NSF-PHY-1305280.

  7. Semiannual Variation in the Number of Energetic Electron Precipitation Events Recorded in the Polar Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stozhkov, Y. Ivanovich; Makhmutov, V. S.; Bazilevskaya, G. A.; Krainev, M. B.; Svirkhevskaya, A. K.; Svirzhevsky, N. S.; Mailin, S. Y.

    2003-07-01

    The analysis of the monthly numbers of Electron Precipitation Events (EPEs) recorded at Olenya station (Murmansk region) during 1970-1987, shows the semiannual variation with two maxima centered on April and September. We analyse the interplanetary plasma and geomagnetic indices data sets associated with the EPEs recorded. The possible relationship of this variation and RusselMcPherron, Equino ctial and Axial effects is discussed.

  8. A substitution method to improve completeness of events documentation in anesthesia records.

    PubMed

    Lamer, Antoine; De Jonckheere, Julien; Marcilly, Romaric; Tavernier, Benoît; Vallet, Benoît; Jeanne, Mathieu; Logier, Régis

    2015-12-01

    AIMS are optimized to find and display data and curves about one specific intervention but is not retrospective analysis on a huge volume of interventions. Such a system present two main limitation; (1) the transactional database architecture, (2) the completeness of documentation. In order to solve the architectural problem, data warehouses were developed to propose architecture suitable for analysis. However, completeness of documentation stays unsolved. In this paper, we describe a method which allows determining of substitution rules in order to detect missing anesthesia events in an anesthesia record. Our method is based on the principle that missing event could be detected using a substitution one defined as the nearest documented event. As an example, we focused on the automatic detection of the start and the end of anesthesia procedure when these events were not documented by the clinicians. We applied our method on a set of records in order to evaluate; (1) the event detection accuracy, (2) the improvement of valid records. For the year 2010-2012, we obtained event detection with a precision of 0.00 (-2.22; 2.00) min for the start of anesthesia and 0.10 (0.00; 0.35) min for the end of anesthesia. On the other hand, we increased by 21.1% the data completeness (from 80.3 to 97.2% of the total database) for the start and the end of anesthesia events. This method seems to be efficient to replace missing "start and end of anesthesia" events. This method could also be used to replace other missing time events in this particular data warehouse as well as in other kind of data warehouses. PMID:25634428

  9. A fast, programmable, stand-alone pulse generator emulating spectroscopy nuclear events

    SciTech Connect

    Imperiale, C.

    1996-10-01

    The design of a fast, programmable, stand-alone pulse generator emulating spectroscopy nuclear events is described. The generator is one unit in a system aiming to test the validity of the simulation and theoretical work relating to the shaping, acquisition, and processing of spectroscopy signals in different experimental situations arising from different technical and scientific fields. The generator output, which also includes piled-up shapes, can be used in many different ways. For example, it can be used: (1) as an input to a charge sensitive preamplifier and shaping amplifier system; (2) as an input to a module for real-time digital shaping of spectroscopy pulses; and (3) it can generate a digital sequence emulating a digitally sampled analog pulse. The signals that it can emulate include those from simple charge sensitive preamplifiers, from more refined analog shapers, and the signals generated directly from scintillation detectors. The main element of the generator is the Analog Devices 21060, a fast and flexible digital signal processor (DSP). This paper considers various generator configurations arising from the need to reach a compromise among generator speed, shape resolution, and memory requirements. It is possible to program both the emulated average counting rate and the time interval between two consecutive samples (tns) using a predetermined pulse shape. The minimum tns value is equal to 10 ns in parallel configurations.

  10. Assessing Reliability of Medical Record Reviews for the Detection of Hospital Adverse Events

    PubMed Central

    Ock, Minsu; Lee, Sang-il; Jo, Min-Woo; Lee, Jin Yong; Kim, Seon-Ha

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to assess the inter-rater reliability and intra-rater reliability of medical record review for the detection of hospital adverse events. Methods: We conducted two stages retrospective medical records review of a random sample of 96 patients from one acute-care general hospital. The first stage was an explicit patient record review by two nurses to detect the presence of 41 screening criteria (SC). The second stage was an implicit structured review by two physicians to identify the occurrence of adverse events from the positive cases on the SC. The inter-rater reliability of two nurses and that of two physicians were assessed. The intra-rater reliability was also evaluated by using test-retest method at approximately two weeks later. Results: In 84.2% of the patient medical records, the nurses agreed as to the necessity for the second stage review (kappa, 0.68; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.54 to 0.83). In 93.0% of the patient medical records screened by nurses, the physicians agreed about the absence or presence of adverse events (kappa, 0.71; 95% CI, 0.44 to 0.97). When assessing intra-rater reliability, the kappa indices of two nurses were 0.54 (95% CI, 0.31 to 0.77) and 0.67 (95% CI, 0.47 to 0.87), whereas those of two physicians were 0.87 (95% CI, 0.62 to 1.00) and 0.37 (95% CI, -0.16 to 0.89). Conclusions: In this study, the medical record review for detecting adverse events showed intermediate to good level of inter-rater and intra-rater reliability. Well organized training program for reviewers and clearly defining SC are required to get more reliable results in the hospital adverse event study. PMID:26429290

  11. An Analytical Approach for Estimating Fossil Record and Diversification Events in Sharks, Skates and Rays

    PubMed Central

    Guinot, Guillaume; Adnet, Sylvain; Cappetta, Henri

    2012-01-01

    Background Modern selachians and their supposed sister group (hybodont sharks) have a long and successful evolutionary history. Yet, although selachian remains are considered relatively common in the fossil record in comparison with other marine vertebrates, little is known about the quality of their fossil record. Similarly, only a few works based on specific time intervals have attempted to identify major events that marked the evolutionary history of this group. Methodology/Principal Findings Phylogenetic hypotheses concerning modern selachians’ interrelationships are numerous but differ significantly and no consensus has been found. The aim of the present study is to take advantage of the range of recent phylogenetic hypotheses in order to assess the fit of the selachian fossil record to phylogenies, according to two different branching methods. Compilation of these data allowed the inference of an estimated range of diversity through time and evolutionary events that marked this group over the past 300 Ma are identified. Results indicate that with the exception of high taxonomic ranks (orders), the selachian fossil record is by far imperfect, particularly for generic and post-Triassic data. Timing and amplitude of the various identified events that marked the selachian evolutionary history are discussed. Conclusion/Significance Some identified diversity events were mentioned in previous works using alternative methods (Early Jurassic, mid-Cretaceous, K/T boundary and late Paleogene diversity drops), thus reinforcing the efficiency of the methodology presented here in inferring evolutionary events. Other events (Permian/Triassic, Early and Late Cretaceous diversifications; Triassic/Jurassic extinction) are newly identified. Relationships between these events and paleoenvironmental characteristics and other groups’ evolutionary history are proposed. PMID:22957091

  12. Motivation and intention to integrate physical activity into daily school life: the JAM World Record event.

    PubMed

    Vazou, Spyridoula; Vlachopoulos, Symeon P

    2014-11-01

    Research on the motivation of stakeholders to integrate physical activity into daily school life is limited. The purpose was to examine the motivation of stakeholders to participate in a world record physical activity event and whether motivation was associated with future intention to use activity breaks during the daily school life and future participation in a similar event. After the 2012 JAM (Just-a-Minute) World Record event, 686 adults (591 women; 76.1% participated for children <10 years) completed measures of motivational regulations and future intention to (a) use the activity breaks and (b) participate in the event. High intrinsic motivation and low extrinsic motivation and amotivation for participation in the next event were reported. Hierarchical regression analysis, controlling for age, gender, and occupation, showed that intrinsic forms of motivation positively predicted, whereas amotivation negatively predicted, future intention to participate in the event and use the activity breaks. Multivariate analyses of variance revealed that school-related participants were more intrinsically motivated and intended to use the activity breaks and repeat the event more than those who were not affiliated with a school. Nonschool participants reported higher extrinsic motivation and amotivation than school-related participants. PMID:25001232

  13. The incidence of adverse events in Swedish hospitals: a retrospective medical record review study

    PubMed Central

    Soop, Michael; Fryksmark, Ulla; Köster, Max; Haglund, Bengt

    2009-01-01

    Objectives To estimate the incidence, nature and consequences of adverse events and preventable adverse events in Swedish hospitals. Design A three-stage structured retrospective medical record review based on the use of 18 screening criteria. Setting Twenty-eight Swedish hospitals. Population A representative sample (n = 1967) of the 1.2 million Swedish hospital admissions between October 2003 and September 2004. Main Outcome Measures Proportion of admissions with adverse events, the proportion of preventable adverse events and the types and consequences of adverse events. Results In total, 12.3% (n = 241) of the 1967 admissions had adverse events (95% CI, 10.8–13.7), of which 70% (n = 169) were preventable. Fifty-five percent of the preventable events led to impairment or disability, which was resolved during the admission or within 1 month from discharge, another 33% were resolved within 1 year, 9% of the preventable events led to permanent disability and 3% of the adverse events contributed to patient death. Preventable adverse events led to a mean increased length of stay of 6 days. Ten of the 18 screening criteria were sufficient to detect 90% of the preventable adverse events. When extrapolated to the 1.2 million annual admissions, the results correspond to 105 000 preventable adverse events (95% CI, 90 000–120 000) and 630 000 days of hospitalization (95% CI, 430 000–830 000). Conclusions This study confirms that preventable adverse events were common, and that they caused extensive human suffering and consumed a significant amount of the available hospital resources. PMID:19556405

  14. 49 CFR Appendix D to Part 229 - Criteria for Certification of Crashworthy Event Recorder Memory Module

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Criteria for Certification of Crashworthy Event Recorder Memory Module D Appendix D to Part 229 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD LOCOMOTIVE SAFETY STANDARDS Pt. 229, App. D Appendix D...

  15. 49 CFR Appendix D to Part 229 - Criteria for Certification of Crashworthy Event Recorder Memory Module

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Criteria for Certification of Crashworthy Event Recorder Memory Module D Appendix D to Part 229 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD LOCOMOTIVE SAFETY STANDARDS Pt. 229, App. D Appendix D...

  16. A New Characteristic Function for Fast Time-Reverse Seismic Event Location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendriyana, Andri; Bauer, Klaus; Weber, Michael; Jaya, Makky; Muksin, Muksin

    2015-04-01

    Microseismicity produced by natural activities is usually characterized by low signal-to-noise ratio and huge amount of data as recording is conducted for a long period of time. Locating microseismic events is preferably carried out using migration-based methods such as time-reverse modeling (TRM). The original TRM is based on backpropagating the wavefield from the receiver down to the source location. Alternatively, we are using a characteristic function (CF) derived from the measured wavefield as input for the TRM. The motivation for such a strategy is to avoid undesired contributions from secondary arrivals which may generate artifacts in the final images. In this presentation, we introduce a new CF as input for TRM method. To obtain this CF, initially we apply kurtosis-based automatic onset detection and convolution with a given wavelet. The convolution with low frequency wavelets allows us to conduct time-reverse modeling using coarser sampling hence it will reduce computing time. We apply the method to locate seismic events measured along an active part of the Sumatra Fault around the Tarutung pull-apart basin (North Sumatra, Indonesia). The results show that seismic events are well-determined since they are concentrated along the Sumatran fault. Internal details of the Tarutung basin structure could be derived. Our results are consistent with those obtained from inversion of manually picked travel time data.

  17. Plant microfossil record of the terminal Cretaceous event in the western United States and Canada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, D. J.; Fleming, R. F.

    1988-01-01

    Plant microfossils, principally pollen grains and spores produced by land plants, provide an excellent record of the terminal Cretaceous event in nonmarine environments. The record indicates regional devastation of the latest Cretaceous vegetation with the extinction of many groups, followed by a recolonization of the earliest Tertiary land surface, and development of a permanently changed land flora. The regional variations in depositional environments, plant communities, and paleoclimates provide insight into the nature and effects of the event, which were short-lived but profound. The plant microfossil data support the hypothesis that an abruptly initiated, major ecological crisis occurred at the end of the Cretaceous. Disruption of the Late Cretaceous flora ultimately contributred to the rise of modern vegetation. The plant microfossils together with geochemical and mineralogical data are consistent with an extraterrestrial impact having been the cause of the terminal Cretaceous event.

  18. Geochemical Records of Bleaching Events and the Associated Stressors From the Great Barrier Reef

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roark, E. B.; McCulloch, M.; Ingram, B. L.; Marshall, J. F.

    2003-12-01

    The health of coral reefs world-wide is increasingly threatened by a wide array of stressors. On the Great Barrier Reef (GBR) these stressors include increased sediment flux associated with land use changes, increased sea surface temperatures (SST) and salinity changes due to large floods, the latter two of which are factors in an increased number of bleaching events. The ability to document long-term change in these stressors along with changes in the number of bleaching events would help discern what are natural and anthropogenic changes in this ecosystem. Here we present results of an initial calibration effort aimed at identifying bleaching events and the associated stressors using stable isotopic and trace element analysis in coral cores. Three ˜15-year time series of geochemical measurements (δ 13C, δ 18O, and Sr/Ca) on Porites coral cores obtained from Pandora Reef and the Keppel Islands on the GBR have been developed at near weekly resolution. Since the δ 13C of the coral skeletal carbonate is known to be affected by both environmental factors (e.g. insolation and temperature) and physiological factors (e.g. photosynthesis, calcification, and the statues of the symbiotic relationship between corals and zooxanthellae) it is the most promising proxy for reconstructing past bleaching events. The first record (PAN-98) comes from a coral head that had undergone bleaching and died shortly after the large-scale bleaching events on Pandora Reef in 1998. A second core (PAN-02) was collected from a living coral within 10m of PAN-98 in 2002. Sr/Ca ratios in both cores tracked even the smallest details of an in situ SST record. The increase in SST that occurred three to four weeks prior to bleaching was faithfully recorded by a similar decrease in the Sr/Ca ratio in PAN-98, indicating that calcification continued despite the high SST of 30-31° C. The δ 13C values decreased by about 5‰ , one week after the SST increase, and remained at this value for about 4

  19. Temporal perspective on individual driver behavior using electronic records of undesirable events.

    PubMed

    Musicant, Oren; Bar-Gera, Hillel; Schechtman, Edna

    2014-09-01

    This paper explores In-Vehicle Data Recorders (IVDRs) information about the count of undesirable driving events (such as hard braking, lane changing, and sharp turning) of 148 individuals. The information was logged over three years and included time stamp information about the occurrence of undesirable driving events in each trip (N=573,238). The objective was to gain deeper understanding about the heterogeneity among drivers with respect to behavior change over time, the effect of trip duration and the distribution of events count. Our findings show that in some respects drivers are similar: for all drivers, the variance of the events count was larger than the mean, indicating that the negative binomial distribution is suitable to model the distribution of events count per trip. Most drivers (95%) had lower events rate during longer trips, suggesting that a 'simple' events rate index is problematic when comparing between those driving longer trips and drivers driving short trips. In addition, most drivers (87%) improved their driving behavior throughout the measurement period. However, there are important differences among drivers in terms of the frequency of behavior change and the trends in behavior over time. These findings demonstrate the need for personalized examination of individual drivers. Several tools for such personalized examination were developed and discussed in this study. PMID:24694900

  20. On modelling the Fast Radio Burst population and event rate predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bera, Apurba; Bhattacharyya, Siddhartha; Bharadwaj, Somnath; Bhat, N. D. Ramesh; Chengalur, Jayaram N.

    2016-04-01

    Assuming that Fast Radio Bursts (FRBs) are of extragalactic origin, we have developed a formalism to predict the FRB detection rate and the redshift distribution of the detected events for a telescope with given parameters. We have adopted FRB 110220, for which the emitted pulse energy is estimated to be E0 = 5.4 × 1033 J, as the reference event. The formalism requires us to assume models for (a) pulse broadening due to scattering in the ionized intergalactic medium - we consider two different models for this, (b) the frequency spectrum of the emitted pulse - we consider a power-law model Eν ∝ ν-α with -5 ≤ α ≤ 5, and (c) the comoving number density of the FRB occurrence rate n(E, wi, z) - we ignore the z dependence and assume a fixed intrinsic pulse width wi = 1 ms for all the FRBs. The distribution of the emitted pulse energy E is modelled through (a) a delta function where all the FRBs have the same energy E = E0, and (b) a Schechter luminosity function where the energies have a spread around E0. The models are all normalized using the four FRBs detected by Thornton et al. Our model predictions for the Parkes telescope are all consistent with the inferred redshift distribution of the 14 FRBs detected there to date. We also find that scattering places an upper limit on the redshift of the FRBs detectable by a given telescope; for the Parkes telescope, this is z ˜ 2. Considering the upcoming Ooty Wide Field Array, we predict an FRB detection rate of ˜0.01 to ˜103 d-1.

  1. Spectra of solar proton ground level events using neutron monitor and neutron moderated detector recordings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoker, P. H.

    1985-01-01

    Recordings on relativistic solar flare protons observed at Sanae, Antarctic, show that the percentage increase in counting rates of the neutron moderated detector (4NMD) is larger than the percentage increase in counting rates of the 3NM64 neutron monitor. These relative increases are described by solar proton differential spectra j sub s(P) = AP(beta). The power beta is determined for each event and the hardnesses of the temporal variations of beta, found for the ground level events (GLE) of 7 May, 1978 and 22 November, 1977.

  2. A scheme for recording a fast process at nanosecond scale by using digital holographic interferometry with continuous wave laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun; Zhao, Jianlin; Di, Jianglei; Jiang, Biqiang

    2015-04-01

    A scheme for recording fast process at nanosecond scale by using digital holographic interferometry with continuous wave (CW) laser is described and demonstrated experimentally, which employs delayed-time fibers and angular multiplexing technique and can realize the variable temporal resolution at nanosecond scale and different measured depths of object field at certain temporal resolution. The actual delay-time is controlled by two delayed-time fibers with different lengths. The object field information in two different states can be simultaneously recorded in a composite hologram. This scheme is also suitable for recording fast process at picosecond scale, by using an electro-optic modulator.

  3. Contrasting sulfur isotope records during the Late Devonian punctata and Upper Kellwasser events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sim, M.; Ono, S.; Hurtgen, M. T.

    2013-12-01

    The Late Devonian was a period of intense biological and environmental changes, including terrestrial afforestation, a series of asteroid impacts, and active orogeny due to the accretion of continental blocks. High amplitude positive carbon isotope excursions, the punctata and Kellwasser events, reflect major perturbations in the global carbon cycle during this period, which have been attributed to increased continental weathering and subsequent ocean eutrophication. Despite the comparable carbon isotope anomalies, however, a global biological crisis has been reported only for the Kellwasser events, while very low extinction intensity characterizes the punctata Event. We will present sulfur isotope records of carbonate associated sulfate (CAS) and pyrite from Frasnian-Famennian sections in the Great Basin, USA, and evaluate the role of sulfur during the punctata and Upper Kellwasser events. A positive sulfur isotope shift in both CAS and pyrite accompanies the onset of the punctata Event, but with a larger extent in the latter. As a result, the sulfur isotope offset between CAS and pyrite (Δ34SCAS-py) plummeted to less than 10‰. In the middle of the punctata Event, a sharp negative δ34SCAS excursion occurred just after the Alamo Impact, leading to the negative Δ34SCAS-py values. Unlike the rapid oscillations of δ34Spy and δ34SCAS during the punctata Event, the Upper Kellwasser was a period of stability, except for a brief drop of δ34SCAS before the event. Paired sulfur isotope data, aided by a simple box model, suggests that geochemical cycle of sulfur might be responsible for the contrasting biological responses to these two events. Superheavy pyrite and high stratigraphic variability of δ34Spy and δ34SCAS demonstrate a relatively small oceanic sulfate pool during the punctata Event, and the Alamo Impact likely triggered to the rapid oxidation of microbially-produced sulfide. The expansion of sulfidic bottom water thus may have been impeded, thereby

  4. New records with examples of potential host colonization events for hypopi (Acari: Hypoderatidae) from birds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pence, Danny B.; Spalding, M.G.; Bergan, J.F.; Cole, R.A.

    1997-01-01

    New host, geographic records, or both are established for 14 species of hypoderatid deutonymphs from 14 species of birds in North America. Ten of these records are regarded as examples of a potential host colonization event where these hypopi have become established in hosts other than those with which they are normally associated. Herein, potential host colonization events by hypoderatid deutonymphs are regarded as more of an ecologically determined than physiologically specific phenomenon, often specifically related to sharing of nesting sites in the same rookeries by different host taxa. Neottialges ibisicola Young & Pence is placed as a junior synonym of Neottialges plegadicola Fain. The taxonomic status of Hypodectes propus from columbid versus ardeid hosts needs further study.

  5. Reconstruction of Flooding Events for the Central Valley, California from Instrumental and Documentary Weather Records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodds, S. F.; Mock, C. J.

    2009-12-01

    All available instrumental winter precipitation data for the Central Valley of California back to 1850 were digitized and analyzed to construct continuous time series. Many of these data, in paper or microfilm format, extend prior to modern National Weather Service Cooperative Data Program and Historical Climate Network data, and were recorded by volunteer observers from networks such as the US Army Surgeon General, Smithsonian Institution, and US Army Signal Service. Given incomplete individual records temporally, detailed documentary data from newspapers, personal diaries and journals, ship logbooks, and weather enthusiasts’ instrumental data, were used in conjunction with instrumental data to reconstruct precipitation frequency per month and season, continuous days of precipitation, and to identify anomalous precipitation events. Multilinear regression techniques, using surrounding stations and the relationships between modern and historical records, bridge timeframes lacking data and provided homogeneous nature of time series. The metadata for each station was carefully screened, and notes were made about any possible changes to the instrumentation, location of instruments, or an untrained observer to verify that anomalous events were not recorded incorrectly. Precipitation in the Central Valley varies throughout the entire region, but waterways link the differing elevations and latitudes. This study integrates the individual station data with additional accounts of flood descriptions through unique newspaper and journal data. River heights and flood extent inundating cities, agricultural lands, and individual homes are often recorded within unique documentary sources, which add to the understanding of flood occurrence within this area. Comparisons were also made between dam and levee construction through time and how waters are diverted through cities in natural and anthropogenically changed environments. Some precipitation that lead to flooding events that

  6. Lake isotope records of the 8200-year cooling event in western Ireland: Comparison with model simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, Jonathan A.; Tindall, Julia; Roberts, Neil; Marshall, William; Marshall, Jim D.; Bingham, Ann; Feeser, Ingo; O'Connell, Michael; Atkinson, Tim; Jourdan, Anne-Lise; March, Anna; Fisher, Elizabeth H.

    2016-01-01

    The early Holocene cooling, which occurred around 8200 calendar years before present, was a prominent abrupt event around the north Atlantic region. Here, we investigate the timing, duration, magnitude and regional coherence of the event as expressed in carbonate oxygen-isotope records from three lakes on northwest Europe's Atlantic margin in western Ireland, namely Loch Avolla, Loch Gealáin and Lough Corrib. An abrupt negative oxygen-isotope excursion lasted about 200 years. Comparison of records from three sites suggests that the excursion was primarily the result of a reduction of the oxygen-isotope values of precipitation, which was likely caused by lowered air temperatures, possibly coupled with a change in atmospheric circulation. Comparison of records from two of the lakes (Loch Avolla and Loch Gealáin), which have differing bathymetries, further suggests a reduction in evaporative loss of lake water during the cooling episode. Comparison of climate model experiments with lake-sediment isotope data indicates that effective moisture may have increased along this part of the northeast Atlantic seaboard during the 8200-year climatic event, as lower evaporation compensated for reduced precipitation.

  7. Impulsive event probability in the radiocarbon record in VIII - XI centuries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovylova, E. G.; Konstantinov, A. N.

    2015-12-01

    The abundance of cosmogenic isotopes in natural samples is the main source of information about past variations of cosmic ray intensity, in the solar activity and in the strength of the geomagnetic field. Sharp increases could originate from powerful impulsive events such as solar flares, gamma-rays from supernova explosions and gamma-ray bursts. A significant increase in the radiocarbon record has been detected recently in tree rings around AD 775 [1]. Both large solar proton event (SPE) [2] and gamma-ray burst (GRB) in our Galaxy [3] are favored as a source. However, either of the explanations faces difficulties of low event rate because of detection of a similar peak around AD993 [4], [5]. What is more, we know other similar result [6]. We carried out a statistical analysis of these three data sets. It is shown that AD 775 event differs fundamentally from AD 993 and AD 1006 events, because the last two can be explained without the assumption of the impulsive event.

  8. Unexpected Very Low Frequency (VLF) Radio Events Recorded by the Ionospheric Satellite DEMETER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parrot, M.; Berthelier, J. J.; Blecki, J.; Brochot, J. Y.; Hobara, Y.; Lagoutte, D.; Lebreton, J. P.; Němec, F.; Onishi, T.; Pinçon, J. L.; Píša, D.; Santolík, O.; Sauvaud, J. A.; Slominska, E.

    2015-05-01

    DEMETER was a low Earth orbiting microsatellite in operation between July 2004 and December 2010. Its scientific objective was the study of ionospheric perturbations in relation to seismic activity and man-made activities. Its payload was designed to measure electromagnetic waves over a large frequency range as well as ionospheric plasma parameters (electron and ion densities, fluxes of energetic charged particles). This paper will show both expected and unusual events recorded by the satellite when it was in operation. These latter events have been selected from the DEMETER database because they are rare or even have never been observed before, because they have a very high intensity, or because they are related to abnormalities of the experiments under particular plasma conditions. Some events are related to man-made radio waves emitted by VLF ground-based transmitters or power line harmonic radiation. Natural waves, such as atypical quasi-periodic emissions or uncommon whistlers, are also shown.

  9. A Neuromorphic Event-Based Neural Recording System for Smart Brain-Machine-Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Corradi, Federico; Indiveri, Giacomo

    2015-10-01

    Neural recording systems are a central component of Brain-Machince Interfaces (BMIs). In most of these systems the emphasis is on faithful reproduction and transmission of the recorded signal to remote systems for further processing or data analysis. Here we follow an alternative approach: we propose a neural recording system that can be directly interfaced locally to neuromorphic spiking neural processing circuits for compressing the large amounts of data recorded, carrying out signal processing and neural computation to extract relevant information, and transmitting only the low-bandwidth outcome of the processing to remote computing or actuating modules. The fabricated system includes a low-noise amplifier, a delta-modulator analog-to-digital converter, and a low-power band-pass filter. The bio-amplifier has a programmable gain of 45-54 dB, with a Root Mean Squared (RMS) input-referred noise level of 2.1 μV, and consumes 90 μW . The band-pass filter and delta-modulator circuits include asynchronous handshaking interface logic compatible with event-based communication protocols. We describe the properties of the neural recording circuits, validating them with experimental measurements, and present system-level application examples, by interfacing these circuits to a reconfigurable neuromorphic processor comprising an array of spiking neurons with plastic and dynamic synapses. The pool of neurons within the neuromorphic processor was configured to implement a recurrent neural network, and to process the events generated by the neural recording system in order to carry out pattern recognition. PMID:26513801

  10. The development of a fast method for recording Schroeder-phase masking functions.

    PubMed

    Rahmat, Sarah; O'Beirne, Greg A

    2015-12-01

    Schroeder-phase masking complexes have been used in many psychophysical experiments to examine the phase curvature of cochlear filtering at characteristic frequencies, and other aspects of cochlear nonlinearity. In a normal nonlinear cochlea, changing the "scalar factor" of the Schroeder-phase masker from -1 through 0 to +1 results in a marked difference in the measured masked thresholds, whereas this difference is reduced in ears with damaged outer hair cells. Despite the valuable information it may give, one disadvantage of the Schroeder-phase masking procedure is the length of the test - using the conventional three-alternative forced-choice technique to measure a masking function takes around 45 min for one combination of probe frequency and intensity. As an alternative, we have developed a fast method of recording these functions which uses a Békésy tracking procedure. Testing at 500 Hz in normal hearing participants, we demonstrate that our fast method: i) shows good agreement with the conventional method; ii) shows high test-retest reliability; and iii) shortens the testing time to 8 min. PMID:26209881

  11. Ultra-high throughput real-time instruments for capturing fast signals and rare events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckley, Brandon Walter

    processing. The act of time-stretching effectively boosts the performance of the back-end electronics and digital signal processors. The slowed down signals reach the back-end electronics with reduced bandwidth, and are therefore less affected by high-frequency roll-off and distortion. Time-stretching also increases the effective sampling rate of analog-to-digital converters and reduces aperture jitter, thereby improving resolution. Finally, the instantaneous throughputs of digital signal processors are enhanced by the stretch factor to otherwise unattainable speeds. Leveraging these unique capabilities, TiSER becomes the ideal tool for capturing high-speed signals and characterizing rare phenomena. For this thesis, I have developed techniques to improve the spectral efficiency, bandwidth, and resolution of TiSER using polarization multiplexing, all-optical modulation, and coherent dispersive Fourier transformation. To reduce the latency and improve the data handling capacity, I have also designed and implemented a real-time digital signal processing electronic backend, achieving 1.5 tera-bit per second instantaneous processing throughput. Finally, I will present results from experiments highlighting TiSER's impact in real-world applications. Confocal fluorescence microscopy is the most widely used method for unveiling the molecular composition of biological specimens. However, the weak optical emission of fluorescent probes and the tradeoff between imaging speed and sensitivity is problematic for acquiring blur-free images of fast phenomena and cells flowing at high speed. Here I introduce a new fluorescence imaging modality, which leverages techniques from wireless communication to reach record pixel and frame rates. Termed Fluorescence Imaging using Radio-frequency tagged Emission (FIRE), this new imaging modality is capable of resolving never before seen dynamics in living cells - such as action potentials in neurons and metabolic waves in astrocytes - as well as

  12. The Boltysh crater record of rapid vegetation change during the Dan-C2 hyperthermal event.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolley, D. W.; Daly, R.; Gilmour, I.; Gilmour, M.; Kelley, S. P.

    2012-04-01

    Analysis of a cored borehole drilled through the sedimentary fill of the 24km wide Boltysh meteorite crater, Ukraine has yielded a unique, high resolution record spanning <1my of Early Paleocene terrestrial environmental change. While the oldest crater fill sediments preserve a record of the K/Pg boundary, overlying sediments preserve a record through the earliest Danian Dan-C2 hyperthermal event. This event is preserved in ~220m of lacustrine organic mudrocks and shows close similarities to the carbon isotope records of the Toarcian and PETM CIE's. At Boltysh, the rapid sedimentation rate and lack of bioturbation in the crater fill lacustrine deposits preserve uniquely high resolution pollen, spore and algae records. These records reflect environmental change from the K/Pg1 to the post Dan-C2 Danian. Leading into the CIE, warm temperate gymnosperm - angiosperm - fern communities are replaced by precipitation limited (winterwet) plant communities within the negative CIE. Winterwet plant communities dominate the negative CIE, but are replaced within the isotope recovery stage by warm temperate floras. These in turn give way to cooler temperate floras in the post positive CIE section of the uppermost crater fill. The distribution of temperate taxa about the negative CIE represents the broadest scale of oscillatory variation in the palynofloras. Shorter frequency oscillations are evident from diversity and botanical group distributions reflecting changes in moisture availability over several thousand years. Detailed analysis of variability within one of these oscillations records plant community cyclicity across the inception of the negative CIE. This short term cyclicity provides evidence that the replacement of warm termperate by winterwet floras occurred in a stepwise manner at the negative CIE suggesting cumulative atmospheric forcing. At <1mm scale, lamination within the negative CIE showed no obvious lithological or colour differences, and are not seasonal

  13. Nonlinear Cross-Bridge Elasticity and Post-Power-Stroke Events in Fast Skeletal Muscle Actomyosin

    PubMed Central

    Persson, Malin; Bengtsson, Elina; ten Siethoff, Lasse; Månsson, Alf

    2013-01-01

    Generation of force and movement by actomyosin cross-bridges is the molecular basis of muscle contraction, but generally accepted ideas about cross-bridge properties have recently been questioned. Of the utmost significance, evidence for nonlinear cross-bridge elasticity has been presented. We here investigate how this and other newly discovered or postulated phenomena would modify cross-bridge operation, with focus on post-power-stroke events. First, as an experimental basis, we present evidence for a hyperbolic [MgATP]-velocity relationship of heavy-meromyosin-propelled actin filaments in the in vitro motility assay using fast rabbit skeletal muscle myosin (28–29°C). As the hyperbolic [MgATP]-velocity relationship was not consistent with interhead cooperativity, we developed a cross-bridge model with independent myosin heads and strain-dependent interstate transition rates. The model, implemented with inclusion of MgATP-independent detachment from the rigor state, as suggested by previous single-molecule mechanics experiments, accounts well for the [MgATP]-velocity relationship if nonlinear cross-bridge elasticity is assumed, but not if linear cross-bridge elasticity is assumed. In addition, a better fit is obtained with load-independent than with load-dependent MgATP-induced detachment rate. We discuss our results in relation to previous data showing a nonhyperbolic [MgATP]-velocity relationship when actin filaments are propelled by myosin subfragment 1 or full-length myosin. We also consider the implications of our results for characterization of the cross-bridge elasticity in the filament lattice of muscle. PMID:24138863

  14. A LUMINOUS, FAST RISING UV-TRANSIENT DISCOVERED BY ROTSE: A TIDAL DISRUPTION EVENT?

    SciTech Connect

    Vinkó, J.; Wheeler, J. C.; Chatzopoulos, E.; Marion, G. H.; Yuan, F.; Akerlof, C.; Quimby, R. M.; Ramirez-Ruiz, E.; Guillochon, J.

    2015-01-01

    We present follow-up observations of an optical transient (OT) discovered by ROTSE on 2009 January 21. Photometric monitoring was carried out with ROTSE-IIIb in the optical and Swift in the UV up to +70 days after discovery. The light curve showed a fast rise time of ∼10 days followed by a steep decline over the next 60 days, which was much faster than that implied by {sup 56}Ni—{sup 56}Co radioactive decay. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 10 database contains a faint, red object at the position of the OT, which appears slightly extended. This and other lines of evidence suggest that the OT is of extragalactic origin, and this faint object is likely the host galaxy. A sequence of optical spectra obtained with the 9.2 m Hobby-Eberly Telescope between +8 and +45 days after discovery revealed a hot, blue continuum with no visible spectral features. A few weak features that appeared after +30 days probably originated from the underlying host. Fitting synthetic templates to the observed spectrum of the host galaxy revealed a redshift of z = 0.19. At this redshift, the peak magnitude of the OT is close to –22.5, similar to the brightest super-luminous supernovae; however, the lack of identifiable spectral features makes the massive stellar death hypothesis less likely. A more plausible explanation appears to be the tidal disruption of a Sun-like star by the central supermassive black hole. We argue that this transient likely belongs to a class of super-Eddington tidal disruption events.

  15. Comparison of diatom records of the Heinrich event 1 in the Western North Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil, Isabelle M.; Keigwin, Lloyd D.; Abrantes, Fatima G.

    2010-03-01

    Heinrich event 1 (H1) is a climate event resulting from the release into the North Atlantic of a huge volume of sea ice and icebergs from the northern hemisphere ice sheets. We present here high-resolution diatom records from the Bermuda Rise (Sargasso Sea) and the Laurentian Fan (South of Newfoundland) to assess its impacts on North Atlantic surface circulation and its timing. The event is composed of three phases: the two first correspond to major pulses of Ice Rafted Debris (IRD) and the third phase relates to its immediate aftermath. At both sites, diatom abundances start to rise at 16.8 ka. This increase is marked by diatom species thriving in cold environments over the Laurentian Fan, while brackish and fresh water diatom species characterize this increase over the Bermuda Rise. This last record implies icebergs migration to subtropical latitudes and nutrient-rich meltwater to support such diatom productivity. During the second phase of the event, both sites record maximum diatom abundances, when sea ice conditions are dominant over the Laurentian Fan and the contribution of brackish-fresh water diatoms culminates over the Bermuda Rise. The persistence of lower salinity related diatom species over the Bermuda Rise suggests a continuous injection of cold fresh water by cold-core rings, as observed nowadays. The last phase witnesses the persistence of low salinity water over the Laurentian Fan, while a decrease towards the disappearance of diatoms in the sediment occurs over the Bermuda Rise. Regarding the relationship between IRD and diatom abundance, it appears that a critical amount of icebergs is necessary to stimulate diatom productivity. The disturbances induced by H1 appear to end ~14.6 ka over the Bermuda Rise, while over the Laurentian Fan, the high diatom production persists until 14.1 ka and the salinity anomaly until 13.8 ka.

  16. How do olivines record magmatic events? Insights from major and trace element zoning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Maisonneuve, C. Bouvet; Costa, F.; Huber, C.; Vonlanthen, P.; Bachmann, O.; Dungan, M. A.

    2016-06-01

    Reconciling the diverse records of magmatic events preserved by multiple crystals and minerals in the same sample is often challenging. In the case of basaltic-andesites from Volcán Llaima (Chile), Mg zoning in olivine is always simpler than Ca zoning in plagioclase. A model that explains a number of chemical patterns is that Llaima magmas stall in the upper crust, where they undergo decompression crystallization and form crystal-mush bodies. Frequent magma inputs from deeper reservoirs provide the potential for remobilization and eruption. The records of multiple recharge events in Llaima plagioclase versus an apparent maximum of one such event in coexisting olivine are addressed by using trace element zoning in olivine phenocrysts. We have integrated elements that (1) respond to changes in magma composition due to recharge or mixing (Mg, Fe, Ni, Mn, ±Ca), with (2) elements that are incorporated during rapid, disequilibrium crystal growth (P, Ti, Sc, V, Al). A more complex history is obtained when these elements are evaluated considering their partition coefficients, diffusivities, and crystal growth rates. The olivine archive can then be reconciled with the plagioclase archive of magma reservoir processes. Olivine (and plagioclase) phenocrysts may experience up to three or more recharge events between nucleation and eruption. Diffusion modeling of major and trace element zoning in two dimensions using a new lattice Boltzmann model suggests that recharge events occur on the order of months to a couple of years prior to eruption, whereas crystal residence times are more likely to be on the order of a few years to decades.

  17. Fast Model Adaptation for Automated Section Classification in Electronic Medical Records.

    PubMed

    Ni, Jian; Delaney, Brian; Florian, Radu

    2015-01-01

    Medical information extraction is the automatic extraction of structured information from electronic medical records, where such information can be used for improving healthcare processes and medical decision making. In this paper, we study one important medical information extraction task called section classification. The objective of section classification is to automatically identify sections in a medical document and classify them into one of the pre-defined section types. Training section classification models typically requires large amounts of human labeled training data to achieve high accuracy. Annotating institution-specific data, however, can be both expensive and time-consuming; which poses a big hurdle for adapting a section classification model to new medical institutions. In this paper, we apply two advanced machine learning techniques, active learning and distant supervision, to reduce annotation cost and achieve fast model adaptation for automated section classification in electronic medical records. Our experiment results show that active learning reduces the annotation cost and time by more than 50%, and distant supervision can achieve good model accuracy using weakly labeled training data only. PMID:26262005

  18. Predictive modeling of structured electronic health records for adverse drug event detection

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background The digitization of healthcare data, resulting from the increasingly widespread adoption of electronic health records, has greatly facilitated its analysis by computational methods and thereby enabled large-scale secondary use thereof. This can be exploited to support public health activities such as pharmacovigilance, wherein the safety of drugs is monitored to inform regulatory decisions about sustained use. To that end, electronic health records have emerged as a potentially valuable data source, providing access to longitudinal observations of patient treatment and drug use. A nascent line of research concerns predictive modeling of healthcare data for the automatic detection of adverse drug events, which presents its own set of challenges: it is not yet clear how to represent the heterogeneous data types in a manner conducive to learning high-performing machine learning models. Methods Datasets from an electronic health record database are used for learning predictive models with the purpose of detecting adverse drug events. The use and representation of two data types, as well as their combination, are studied: clinical codes, describing prescribed drugs and assigned diagnoses, and measurements. Feature selection is conducted on the various types of data to reduce dimensionality and sparsity, while allowing for an in-depth feature analysis of the usefulness of each data type and representation. Results Within each data type, combining multiple representations yields better predictive performance compared to using any single representation. The use of clinical codes for adverse drug event detection significantly outperforms the use of measurements; however, there is no significant difference over datasets between using only clinical codes and their combination with measurements. For certain adverse drug events, the combination does, however, outperform using only clinical codes. Feature selection leads to increased predictive performance for both

  19. A fast, robust algorithm for power line interference cancellation in neural recording

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keshtkaran, Mohammad Reza; Yang, Zhi

    2014-04-01

    Objective. Power line interference may severely corrupt neural recordings at 50/60 Hz and harmonic frequencies. The interference is usually non-stationary and can vary in frequency, amplitude and phase. To retrieve the gamma-band oscillations at the contaminated frequencies, it is desired to remove the interference without compromising the actual neural signals at the interference frequency bands. In this paper, we present a robust and computationally efficient algorithm for removing power line interference from neural recordings. Approach. The algorithm includes four steps. First, an adaptive notch filter is used to estimate the fundamental frequency of the interference. Subsequently, based on the estimated frequency, harmonics are generated by using discrete-time oscillators, and then the amplitude and phase of each harmonic are estimated by using a modified recursive least squares algorithm. Finally, the estimated interference is subtracted from the recorded data. Main results. The algorithm does not require any reference signal, and can track the frequency, phase and amplitude of each harmonic. When benchmarked with other popular approaches, our algorithm performs better in terms of noise immunity, convergence speed and output signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). While minimally affecting the signal bands of interest, the algorithm consistently yields fast convergence (<100 ms) and substantial interference rejection (output SNR >30 dB) in different conditions of interference strengths (input SNR from -30 to 30 dB), power line frequencies (45-65 Hz) and phase and amplitude drifts. In addition, the algorithm features a straightforward parameter adjustment since the parameters are independent of the input SNR, input signal power and the sampling rate. A hardware prototype was fabricated in a 65 nm CMOS process and tested. Software implementation of the algorithm has been made available for open access at https://github.com/mrezak/removePLI. Significance. The proposed

  20. Ramadan fasting is not usually associated with the risk of cardiovascular events: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Turin, Tanvir C; Ahmed, Salim; Shommu, Nusrat S; Afzal, Arfan R; Al Mamun, Mohammad; Qasqas, Mahdi; Rumana, Nahid; Vaska, Marcus; Berka, Noureddine

    2016-01-01

    Over one billion Muslims worldwide fast during the month of Ramadan. Ramadan fasting brings about some changes in the daily lives of practicing Muslims, especially in their diet and sleep patterns, which are associated with the risk of cardiovascular diseases. Over the years, many original studies have made the effort to identify the possible impact of the Ramadan fast on cardiovascular diseases. This systematic review and meta-analysis is an attempt to present the summary of key findings from those articles and an appraisal of selected literature. A systematic search using keywords of ";Ramadan fasting" and ";cardiovascular diseases" was conducted in primary research article and gray-literature repositories, in combination with hand searching and snow balling. Fifteen studies were finally selected for data extraction on the outcomes of stroke, myocardial infarction, and congestive heart failure. The analysis revealed that the incidence of cardiovascular events during the Ramadan fast was similar to the nonfasting period. Ramadan fast is not associated with any change in incidence of acute cardiovascular disease. PMID:27186152

  1. Selected plant microfossil records of the terminal Cretaceous event in terrestrial rocks, western North America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nichols, D.J.

    2007-01-01

    Terrestrial or nonmarine rocks of western North America preserve a record of major disruption and permanent alteration of plant communities precisely at the K-T boundary - in the same rocks that preserve geochemical and mineralogical evidence of the terminal Cretaceous impact event. Plant microfossil records from many localities show abrupt disappearance of pollen species (= plant extinctions) closely associated with impact ejecta deposits containing iridium and shocked quartz. Localities discussed in detail in this review are Starkville South, Clear Creek North, Old Raton Pass, and Sugarite in the Raton Basin of Colorado and New Mexico; West Bijou in the Denver Basin, Colorado; Sussex in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming; and Pyramid Butte and Mud Buttes in the Williston Basin, North Dakota. ?? 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Network Event Recording Device: An automated system for Network anomaly detection, and notification. Draft

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, D.G.; Wilkins, R.

    1994-09-01

    The goal of the Network Event Recording Device (NERD) is to provide a flexible autonomous system for network logging and notification when significant network anomalies occur. The NERD is also charged with increasing the efficiency and effectiveness of currently implemented network security procedures. While it has always been possible for network and security managers to review log files for evidence of network irregularities, the NERD provides real-time display of network activity, as well as constant monitoring and notification services for managers. Similarly, real-time display and notification of possible security breaches will provide improved effectiveness in combating resource infiltration from both inside and outside the immediate network environment.

  3. Two Types of Transpolar Arc Development, Event Studies with Data Set of ASTRID-2, DMSP, FAST, and SuperDARN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narita, Yasuhito; Maezawa, Kiyoshi; Toshinori, Mukai; Kullen, A.; Ivchenko, N.; Marklund, G.; Frederick, R.; Carlson, C. W.; Spann, J. F.; Parks, G. K.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Aurorae which appear in the polar cap are called transpolar arcs, polar cap arcs, sun-aligned arcs, or occasionally Theta-aurora because of its spatial distribution resembling Greek character 'Theta.' Morphology, IMF (Interplanetary Magnetic Field) relationship, and ionospheric convection patterns were studied in quest of mechanisms of transpolar arcs. Four events were analyzed: 1999/Jan/22/19:00 - 23/01:30 (1 event: a) 1999/Jan/24/06:00 - 10:00 (1 event: b) 1999/Feb/1 1/20:00 - 12/02:00 (2 events: c, d), with data set of ExB drift velocity data obtained by electric field measurements of ASTRID-2 and FAST, DMSP ion driftmeter data, and line-of-sight velocity data of SuperDARN. POLAR-UVI image data were used for spatial and temporal variations of transpolar arcs and ACE data set were used for investigation of IMF relationship. IMF-Bz was strongly positive (Bz from +8nT to +20 nT) during periods of all four transpolar arcs. In events (a),(b),(c), transpolar arcs appeared immediately after the direction of IMF turned northward, though IMF was fluctuating in event (b). A sudden increase of IMF-By, from +3nT to +18nT, was observed in event (d). Two different types of transpolar arc development were observed in POLAR-UVI: one which begins as a split from dawn or dusk sector of auroral oval and shifts poleward in event (a),(c),(d), and another which is initially a patch of auroral oval disturbed by substorm but develops as a transpolar arc, forming a growing finger-like shape from midnight sector (event b). Sunward flow, associated with positive IMF-Bz, were observed within newly-created polar caps in event (a),(c),(d). Not clear ionospheric convection pattern was seen across the polar cap arc in event (b) die to limitation of data set. In event (c), O+ with energy more than 1 keV were observed by FAST within a transpolar arc, suggesting that their origin be from plasma sheet. Transpolar arcs are thought to be projection of plasma sheet bifurcation into lobe regime. There

  4. R2R Eventlogger: Community-wide Recording of Oceanographic Cruise Science Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maffei, A. R.; Chandler, C. L.; Stolp, L.; Lerner, S.; Avery, J.; Thiel, T.

    2012-12-01

    Methods used by researchers to track science events during a science research cruise - and to note when and where these occur - varies widely. Handwritten notebooks, printed forms, watch-keeper logbooks, data-logging software, and customized software have all been employed. The quality of scientific results is affected by the consistency and care with which such events are recorded and integration of multi-cruise results is hampered because recording methods vary widely from cruise to cruise. The Rolling Deck to Repository (R2R) program has developed an Eventlogger system that will eventually be deployed on most vessels in the academic research fleet. It is based on the open software package called ELOG (http://midas.psi.ch/elog/) originally authored by Stefan Ritt and enhanced by our team. Lessons have been learned in its development and use on several research cruises. We have worked hard to find approaches that encourage cruise participants to use tools like the eventlogger. We examine these lessons and several eventlogger datasets from past cruises. We further describe how the R2R Science Eventlogger works in concert with the other R2R program elements to help coordinate research vessels into a coordinated mobile observing fleet. Making use of data collected on different research cruises is enabled by adopting common ways of describing science events, the science instruments employed, the data collected, etc. The use of controlled vocabularies and the practice of mapping these local vocabularies to accepted oceanographic community vocabularies helps to bind shipboard research events from different cruises into a more cohesive set of fleet-wide events that can be queried and examined in a cross-cruise manner. Examples of the use of the eventlogger during multi-cruise oceanographic research programs along with examples of resultant eventlogger data will be presented. Additionally we will highlight the importance of vocabulary use strategies to the success of the

  5. Ramadan fasting is not usually associated with the risk of cardiovascular events: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Turin, Tanvir C.; Ahmed, Salim; Shommu, Nusrat S.; Afzal, Arfan R.; Al Mamun, Mohammad; Qasqas, Mahdi; Rumana, Nahid; Vaska, Marcus; Berka, Noureddine

    2016-01-01

    Over one billion Muslims worldwide fast during the month of Ramadan. Ramadan fasting brings about some changes in the daily lives of practicing Muslims, especially in their diet and sleep patterns, which are associated with the risk of cardiovascular diseases. Over the years, many original studies have made the effort to identify the possible impact of the Ramadan fast on cardiovascular diseases. This systematic review and meta-analysis is an attempt to present the summary of key findings from those articles and an appraisal of selected literature. A systematic search using keywords of “;Ramadan fasting” and “;cardiovascular diseases” was conducted in primary research article and gray-literature repositories, in combination with hand searching and snow balling. Fifteen studies were finally selected for data extraction on the outcomes of stroke, myocardial infarction, and congestive heart failure. The analysis revealed that the incidence of cardiovascular events during the Ramadan fast was similar to the nonfasting period. Ramadan fast is not associated with any change in incidence of acute cardiovascular disease. PMID:27186152

  6. Late Eocene Antarctic glacial events revealed by radiogenic isotope records from the Kerguelen Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, B. W.; Munn, G. H.; Bohaty, S. M.; Scher, H. D.

    2011-12-01

    Oxygen isotope measurements of benthic foraminifera in ODP Hole 738B (Kerguelen Plateau, Southern Ocean) show a 0.6% shift toward more positive values at ca. 37.1 Ma, near the middle/late Eocene boundary. The δ18O values during this cool event reach 2.2%, which may reflect a combination of both intermediate deep-water cooling and partial glaciation of East Antarctica. We conducted neodymium (Nd) isotope measurements of the terrigenous detrital fraction (i.e., decarbonated and leached) from the same samples used to construct the stable isotope record. Our results reveal a shift in the Nd isotope composition of fine-grained material deposited on Kerguelen Plateau that coincides with the δ18O excursion. The background ɛNd values (i.e., before and after the δ18O shift) are -12 ɛNd, consistent with regionally sourced sediment from along the East Antarctica margin (e.g., Wilkes Land, Prydz Bay). During the δ18O excursion at 37.1 Ma, there is transient decrease in ɛNd values to -15.5. These results strongly indicate that Kerguelen Plateau received an influx of detrital material from ancient sediment sources (i.e., with low ɛNd values), such as those found in nearby Prydz Bay. Our results support an increase in continental ice volume in East Antarctica during this event, resulting in enhanced rates of mechanical weathering. We have also documented a second cool event ca. 36.7 Ma, approximately 400 kyr after the 37 Ma event. Future efforts will focus on determining the timing of middle-to-late Eocene cooling episoides and further documenting changes in weathering during each of these events.

  7. Detection of Pharmacovigilance-Related adverse Events Using Electronic Health Records and automated Methods

    PubMed Central

    Haerian, K; Varn, D; Vaidya, S; Ena, L; Chase, HS; Friedman, C

    2013-01-01

    Electronic health records (EHRs) are an important source of data for detection of adverse drug reactions (ADRs). However, adverse events are frequently due not to medications but to the patients’ underlying conditions. Mining to detect ADRs from EHR data must account for confounders. We developed an automated method using natural-language processing (NLP) and a knowledge source to differentiate cases in which the patient’s disease is responsible for the event rather than a drug. Our method was applied to 199,920 hospitalization records, concentrating on two serious ADRs: rhabdomyolysis (n = 687) and agranulocytosis (n = 772). Our method automatically identified 75% of the cases, those with disease etiology. The sensitivity and specificity were 93.8% (confidence interval: 88.9-96.7%) and 91.8% (confidence interval: 84.0-96.2%), respectively. The method resulted in considerable saving of time: for every 1 h spent in development, there was a saving of at least 20 h in manual review. The review of the remaining 25% of the cases therefore became more feasible, allowing us to identify the medications that had caused the ADRs. PMID:22713699

  8. Joint interpretation of high-precision tilt data and mining induced seismic events recorded underground in deep level gold mine in South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milev, Alexander; Share, Pieter; Durrheim, Ray; Naoi, Makoto; Nakatani, Masao; Yabe, Yasuo; Ogasawara, Hiroshi

    2013-04-01

    Seismicity associated with deep-level mining has for long been a problem, leading to rockburst and other similar hazards. Several studies have been completed in an attempt to minimize the total amount of seismicity. In this study high resolution measurements of ground tilting in combination with seismic monitoring is used to observe how the rock mass responds to mining. A good correspondence between the coseismic and the aseismic tilt was found. The rate of coseismic and aseismic tilt, as well as seismicity recorded by the mine seismic network, are approximately constant until the daily blasting time, which takes place from about 19:30 until shortly before 21:00. During the blasting time and the subsequent seismic events, the coseismic and aseismic tilt shows a rapid increase. In an attempt to distinguish between the different mechanisms of tilting two types of events were recognized. The "fast" seismic events characterized with sharp increase of the tilt during the seismic rupture and "slow" seismic events characterized by creep type post seismic deformations. Tilt behaviour before and after a seismic event was also analysed. The fact that no recognizable aftertilt was observed for more of the "fast" seismic events means that there is no gradual release of stress and an associated continuous strain rate change afterwards. It can therefore be concluded that a large seismic event causes a rapid change in the state of stress rather than a gradual change in the strain rate. The mechanism of the observed "slow" seismic events is more complicated. Although several explanations have been proposed, a suggestion for further work could be to investigate the presence of "slow" events in or after blasting time more closely. During the monitoring period a seismic event with MW 2.2 occurred in the vicinity of the instrumented site. This event was recorded by both the CSIR integrated monitoring system and JAGUARS acoustic emission network. More than 21,000 AE aftershocks were

  9. Digitized pressure-time records, selected nuclear events. Technical report, 1 September 1982-1 April 1986

    SciTech Connect

    McMullan, F.W.; Bryant, E.J.

    1986-04-30

    Pressure-time records are presented for selected atmospheric nuclear events. The records were extracted from published test reports, digitized, and given uniform pressure-time scales for a given event and a given range to permit easier comparison. Data include p-t, q-t, p(tot)-t, Mach No-t, and Impulse-t as appropriate. Selected data were scaled to 1 kT.

  10. A brittle failure model for long-period seismic events recorded at Turrialba Volcano, Costa Rica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eyre, Thomas S.; Bean, Christopher J.; De Barros, Louis; Martini, Francesca; Lokmer, Ivan; Mora, Mauricio M.; Pacheco, Javier F.; Soto, Gerardo J.

    2015-03-01

    A temporary seismic network, consisting of 23 broadband and six short-period stations, was installed in a dense network at Turrialba Volcano, Costa Rica, between 8 March and 4 May 2011. During this time 513 long-period (LP) events were observed. Due to their pulse-like waveforms, the hypothesis that the events are generated by a slow-failure mechanism, based on a recent new model by Bean et al. (2014), is tested. A significant number (107) of the LPs are jointly inverted for their source locations and mechanisms, using full-waveform moment tensor inversion. The locations are mostly shallow, with depths < 800 m below the active Southwest Crater. The results of the decompositions of the obtained moment tensor solutions show complex source mechanisms, composed of high proportions of isotropic and low, but seemingly significant, proportions of compensated linear vector dipole and double-couple components. It is demonstrated that this can be explained as mode I tensile fracturing with a strong shear component. The source mechanism is further investigated by exploring scaling laws within the data. The LPs recorded follow relationships very similar to those of conventional earthquakes, exhibiting frequency-magnitude and corner frequency versus magnitude relationships that can be explained by brittle failure. All of these observations indicate that a slow-failure source model can successfully describe the generation of short-duration LP events at Turrialba Volcano.

  11. The surface of Mars: An unusual laboratory that preserves a record of catastrophic and unusual events

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chapman, M.G.

    2009-01-01

    Catastrophic and unusual events on Earth such as bolide impacts, megafloods, supereruptions, flood volcanism, and subice volcanism may have devastating effects when they occur. Although these processes have unique characteristics and form distinctive features and deposits, we have diffi culties identifying them and measuring the magnitude of their effects. Our diffi culties with interpreting these processes and identifying their consequences are understandable considering their infrequency on Earth, combined with the low preservation potential of their deposits in the terrestrial rock record. Although we know these events do happen, they are infrequent enough that the deposits are poorly preserved on the geologically active face of the Earth, where erosion, volcanism, and tectonism constantly change the surface. Unlike the Earth, on Mars catastrophic and unusual features are well preserved because of the slow modifi cation of the surface. Signifi cant precipitation has not occurred on Mars for billions of years and there appears to be no discrete crustal plates to have undergone subduction and destruction. Therefore the ancient surface of Mars preserves geologic features and deposits that result from these extraordinary events. Also, unlike the other planets, Mars is the most similar to our own, having an atmosphere, surface ice, volcanism, and evidence of onceflowing water. So although our understanding of precursors, processes, and possible biological effects of catastrophic and unusual processes is limited on Earth, some of these mysteries may be better understood through investigating the surface of Mars. ?? 2009 The Geological Society of America.

  12. Paleoclimate Records from New Zealand Maar Lakes, Insights into ENSO Teleconnections and Climatic Events in the South (West) Pacific.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shulmeister, J.; Nobes, D. C.; Striewski, B.

    2008-05-01

    The maar craters of the New Zealand Auckland Volcanic Field (36.5°S, 174.5°E) contain some of the highest resolution late-Quaternary paleoclimate records in the Southern Hemisphere. Here we integrate laminae count results from recent drilling in the Hopua Crater with existing records from the nearby Onepoto Crater (Pepper et al., 2004). In total these records cover many thousands of years between the onset of the last glaciation maximum and the early mid-Holocene. The cores are strongly laminated. Individual laminae in both craters are very fine (sub-mm to mm scale) and form couplets which comprise a darker mineralogenic rich layer and a lighter diatomaceous layer. In places these couplets are annual, and may reflect seasonal algal blooms, but in other sections of the record, notably through the late-Glacial and Holocene, the couplets are deposited at inter-annual time scales. Spectral analyses of couplet thickness counts using a fast Fourier transform (FFT) with 64 to 256-year running windows, and a 50 per cent overlap indicate strong spectral power during the LGM and markedly weaker power during both the deglaciation and early Holocene. In fact there is no spectral strength for most of these periods. Three brief (centennial duration) events punctuate this extended period of low spectral power. These occur at c. 16 ka, c. 14.8 ka and during the early Holocene. They display spectral power in the 5-7yr ENSO window and also at longer time intervals that may be consistent with the Pacific Decadal Oscillation. We infer the local switching on (or up) of ENSO and PDO teleconnections and suspect these are embedded in circum-polar circulation changes. In addition to these spectral power episodes, there is a general increase in the number of couplet cycles per century between the deglaciation and the early mid-Holocene. This matches observations from Equador and Peru and suggests that trans-Pacific ENSO responses are in phase between western tropical South America and New

  13. Parametric Dependence Of Fast-ion Transport Events On The National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Fredrickson, Erik; Gorelenkov, N. N.; Podesta, M.; Gerhardt, S. P.; Bell, R. E.; Diallo, A.; LeBlanc, B.; Bortolon, A.

    2014-03-31

    Neutral-beam heated tokamak plasmas commonly have more than one third of the plasma kinetic energy in the non-thermal energetic beam ion population. This population of fast ions heats the plasma, provides some of the current drive, and can affect the stability (positively or negatively) of magnetohydrodynamic instabilities. This population of energetic ions is not in thermodynamic equilibrium, thus there is free-energy available to drive instabilities, which may lead to redistribution of the fast ion population. Understanding under what conditions beam-driven instabilities arise, and the extent of the resulting perturbation to the fast ion population, is important for predicting and eventually demonstrating non-inductive current ramp-up and sustainment in NSTX-U, as well as the performance of future fusion plasma experiments such as ITER. This paper presents an empirical approach towards characterizing the stability boundaries for some common energetic-ion-driven instabilities seen on NSTX.

  14. Preliminary analysis on faint luminous lightning events recorded by multiple high speed cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, J.; Saraiva, A. V.; Pinto, O.; Campos, L. Z.; Antunes, L.; Luz, E. S.; Medeiros, C.; Buzato, T. S.

    2013-12-01

    The objective of this work is the study of some faint luminous events produced by lightning flashes that were recorded simultaneously by multiple high-speed cameras during the previous RAMMER (Automated Multi-camera Network for Monitoring and Study of Lightning) campaigns. The RAMMER network is composed by three fixed cameras and one mobile color camera separated by, in average, distances of 13 kilometers. They were located in the Paraiba Valley (in the cities of São José dos Campos and Caçapava), SP, Brazil, arranged in a quadrilateral shape, centered in São José dos Campos region. This configuration allowed RAMMER to see a thunderstorm from different angles, registering the same lightning flashes simultaneously by multiple cameras. Each RAMMER sensor is composed by a triggering system and a Phantom high-speed camera version 9.1, which is set to operate at a frame rate of 2,500 frames per second with a lens Nikkor (model AF-S DX 18-55 mm 1:3.5 - 5.6 G in the stationary sensors, and a lens model AF-S ED 24 mm - 1:1.4 in the mobile sensor). All videos were GPS (Global Positioning System) time stamped. For this work we used a data set collected in four RAMMER manual operation days in the campaign of 2012 and 2013. On Feb. 18th the data set is composed by 15 flashes recorded by two cameras and 4 flashes recorded by three cameras. On Feb. 19th a total of 5 flashes was registered by two cameras and 1 flash registered by three cameras. On Feb. 22th we obtained 4 flashes registered by two cameras. Finally, in March 6th two cameras recorded 2 flashes. The analysis in this study proposes an evaluation methodology for faint luminous lightning events, such as continuing current. Problems in the temporal measurement of the continuing current can generate some imprecisions during the optical analysis, therefore this work aim to evaluate the effects of distance in this parameter with this preliminary data set. In the cases that include the color camera we analyzed the RGB

  15. Annually laminated lake sediments as recorders of flood events: evidence from combining monitoring and calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kämpf, Lucas; Brauer, Achim; Mueller, Philip; Güntner, Andreas; Merz, Bruno

    2015-04-01

    The relation of changing climate and the occurrence of strong flood events has been controversially debated over the last years. One major limitation in this respect is the temporal extension of instrumental flood time series, rarely exceeding 50-100 years, which is too short to reflect the full range of natural climate variability in a region. Therefore, geoarchives are increasingly explored as natural flood recorders far beyond the range of instrumental flood time series. Annually laminated (varved) lake sediments provide particularly valuable archives since (i) lakes form ideal traps in the landscape continuously recording sediment flux from the catchment and (ii) individual flood events are recorded as detrital layers and can be dated with seasonal precision by varve counting. Despite the great potential of varved lake sediments for reconstructing long flood time series, there are still some confinements with respect to their interpretation due to a lack in understanding processes controlling the formation of detrital layers. For this purpose, we investigated the formation of detrital flood layers in Lake Mondsee (Upper Austria) in great detail by monitoring flood-related sediment flux and comparing detrital layers in sub-recent sediments with river runoff data. Sediment flux at the lake bottom was trapped over a three-year period (2011-2013) at two locations in Lake Mondsee, one located 0.9 km off the main inflow (proximal) and one in a more distal position at a distance of 2.8 km. The monitoring data include 26 floods of different amplitude (max. hourly discharge=10-110 cbm/s) which triggered variable fluxes of catchment sediment to the lake floor (4-760 g/(sqm*d)). The comparison of runoff and sediment data revealed empiric runoff thresholds for triggering significant detrital sediment influx to the proximal (20 cbm/s) and distal lake basin (30 cbm/s) and an exponential relation between runoff amplitude and the amount of deposited sediment. A succession of

  16. A technique for in-target digital recording during high shock events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menna, Thomas L.; Swann, Jeffrey D.

    An innovative data acquisition technique is described that allows a variety of long duration measurements created from high shock events such as an explosive blast while significantly reducing the risk of data degradation or loss. This technique employs an electronics system that is incorporated into an instrumentation package. The instrumentation package consists of a state-of-the-art high shock resistant analog-to-digital recorder, sensors, battery pack, and signal and trigger conditioning and monitoring circuits. These components are shock isolated and encased in either a protective canister or placed in a hardened recoverable component of the target. Active remote monitoring of this system provides system status information that is necessary for tests utilizing expensive large scale targets that are not accessible for days or weeks before the test.

  17. The record precipitation and flood event in Iberia in December 1876: description and synoptic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trigo, Ricardo; Varino, Filipa; Ramos, Alexandre; Valente, Maria; Zêzere, José; Vaquero, José; Gouveia, Célia; Russo, Ana

    2014-04-01

    The first week of December 1876 was marked by extreme weather conditions that affected the south-western sector of the Iberian Peninsula, leading to an all-time record flow in two large international rivers. As a direct consequence, several Portuguese and Spanish towns and villages located in the banks of both rivers suffered serious flood damage on 7 December 1876. These unusual floods were amplified by the preceding particularly autumn wet months, with October 1876 presenting extremely high precipitation anomalies for all western Iberia stations. Two recently digitised stations in Portugal (Lisbon and Evora), present a peak value on 5 December 1876. Furthermore, the values of precipitation registered between 28 November and 7 December were so remarkable that, the episode of 1876 still corresponds to the maximum average daily precipitation values for temporal scales between 2 and 10 days. Using several different data sources, such as historical newspapers of that time, meteorological data recently digitised from several stations in Portugal and Spain and the recently available 20th Century Reanalysis, we provide a detailed analysis on the socio-economic impacts, precipitation values and the atmospheric circulation conditions associated with this event. The atmospheric circulation during these months was assessed at the monthly, daily and sub-daily scales. All months considered present an intense negative NAO index value, with November 1876 corresponding to the lowest NAO value on record since 1865. We have also computed a multivariable analysis of surface and upper air fields in order to provide some enlightening into the evolution of the synoptic conditions in the week prior to the floods. These events resulted from the continuous pouring of precipitation registered between 28 November and 7 December, due to the consecutive passage of Atlantic low-pressure systems fuelled by the presence of an atmospheric-river tropical moisture flow over central Atlantic Ocean.

  18. Predictors of Arrhythmic Events Detected by Implantable Loop Recorders in Renal Transplant Candidates

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Rodrigo Tavares; Martinelli Filho, Martino; Peixoto, Giselle de Lima; de Lima, José Jayme Galvão; de Siqueira, Sérgio Freitas; Costa, Roberto; Gowdak, Luís Henrique Wolff; de Paula, Flávio Jota; Kalil Filho, Roberto; Ramires, José Antônio Franchini

    2015-01-01

    Background The recording of arrhythmic events (AE) in renal transplant candidates (RTCs) undergoing dialysis is limited by conventional electrocardiography. However, continuous cardiac rhythm monitoring seems to be more appropriate due to automatic detection of arrhythmia, but this method has not been used. Objective We aimed to investigate the incidence and predictors of AE in RTCs using an implantable loop recorder (ILR). Methods A prospective observational study conducted from June 2009 to January 2011 included 100 consecutive ambulatory RTCs who underwent ILR and were followed-up for at least 1 year. Multivariate logistic regression was applied to define predictors of AE. Results During a mean follow-up of 424 ± 127 days, AE could be detected in 98% of patients, and 92% had more than one type of arrhythmia, with most considered potentially not serious. Sustained atrial tachycardia and atrial fibrillation occurred in 7% and 13% of patients, respectively, and bradyarrhythmia and non-sustained or sustained ventricular tachycardia (VT) occurred in 25% and 57%, respectively. There were 18 deaths, of which 7 were sudden cardiac events: 3 bradyarrhythmias, 1 ventricular fibrillation, 1 myocardial infarction, and 2 undetermined. The presence of a long QTc (odds ratio [OR] = 7.28; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.01–26.35; p = 0.002), and the duration of the PR interval (OR = 1.05; 95% CI, 1.02–1.08; p < 0.001) were independently associated with bradyarrhythmias. Left ventricular dilatation (LVD) was independently associated with non-sustained VT (OR = 2.83; 95% CI, 1.01–7.96; p = 0.041). Conclusions In medium-term follow-up of RTCs, ILR helped detect a high incidence of AE, most of which did not have clinical relevance. The PR interval and presence of long QTc were predictive of bradyarrhythmias, whereas LVD was predictive of non-sustained VT. PMID:26351983

  19. Multifocal fluorescence microscope for fast optical recordings of neuronal action potentials.

    PubMed

    Shtrahman, Matthew; Aharoni, Daniel B; Hardy, Nicholas F; Buonomano, Dean V; Arisaka, Katsushi; Otis, Thomas S

    2015-02-01

    In recent years, optical sensors for tracking neural activity have been developed and offer great utility. However, developing microscopy techniques that have several kHz bandwidth necessary to reliably capture optically reported action potentials (APs) at multiple locations in parallel remains a significant challenge. To our knowledge, we describe a novel microscope optimized to measure spatially distributed optical signals with submillisecond and near diffraction-limit resolution. Our design uses a spatial light modulator to generate patterned illumination to simultaneously excite multiple user-defined targets. A galvanometer driven mirror in the emission path streaks the fluorescence emanating from each excitation point during the camera exposure, using unused camera pixels to capture time varying fluorescence at rates that are ∼1000 times faster than the camera's native frame rate. We demonstrate that this approach is capable of recording Ca(2+) transients resulting from APs in neurons labeled with the Ca(2+) sensor Oregon Green Bapta-1 (OGB-1), and can localize the timing of these events with millisecond resolution. Furthermore, optically reported APs can be detected with the voltage sensitive dye DiO-DPA in multiple locations within a neuron with a signal/noise ratio up to ∼40, resolving delays in arrival time along dendrites. Thus, the microscope provides a powerful tool for photometric measurements of dynamics requiring submillisecond sampling at multiple locations. PMID:25650920

  20. Multifocal Fluorescence Microscope for Fast Optical Recordings of Neuronal Action Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Shtrahman, Matthew; Aharoni, Daniel B.; Hardy, Nicholas F.; Buonomano, Dean V.; Arisaka, Katsushi; Otis, Thomas S.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, optical sensors for tracking neural activity have been developed and offer great utility. However, developing microscopy techniques that have several kHz bandwidth necessary to reliably capture optically reported action potentials (APs) at multiple locations in parallel remains a significant challenge. To our knowledge, we describe a novel microscope optimized to measure spatially distributed optical signals with submillisecond and near diffraction-limit resolution. Our design uses a spatial light modulator to generate patterned illumination to simultaneously excite multiple user-defined targets. A galvanometer driven mirror in the emission path streaks the fluorescence emanating from each excitation point during the camera exposure, using unused camera pixels to capture time varying fluorescence at rates that are ∼1000 times faster than the camera’s native frame rate. We demonstrate that this approach is capable of recording Ca2+ transients resulting from APs in neurons labeled with the Ca2+ sensor Oregon Green Bapta-1 (OGB-1), and can localize the timing of these events with millisecond resolution. Furthermore, optically reported APs can be detected with the voltage sensitive dye DiO-DPA in multiple locations within a neuron with a signal/noise ratio up to ∼40, resolving delays in arrival time along dendrites. Thus, the microscope provides a powerful tool for photometric measurements of dynamics requiring submillisecond sampling at multiple locations. PMID:25650920

  1. A population-based temporal logic gate for timing and recording chemical events.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Victoria; Hori, Yutaka; Rothemund, Paul Wk; Murray, Richard M

    2016-01-01

    Engineered bacterial sensors have potential applications in human health monitoring, environmental chemical detection, and materials biosynthesis. While such bacterial devices have long been engineered to differentiate between combinations of inputs, their potential to process signal timing and duration has been overlooked. In this work, we present a two-input temporal logic gate that can sense and record the order of the inputs, the timing between inputs, and the duration of input pulses. Our temporal logic gate design relies on unidirectional DNA recombination mediated by bacteriophage integrases to detect and encode sequences of input events. For an E. coli strain engineered to contain our temporal logic gate, we compare predictions of Markov model simulations with laboratory measurements of final population distributions for both step and pulse inputs. Although single cells were engineered to have digital outputs, stochastic noise created heterogeneous single-cell responses that translated into analog population responses. Furthermore, when single-cell genetic states were aggregated into population-level distributions, these distributions contained unique information not encoded in individual cells. Thus, final differentiated sub-populations could be used to deduce order, timing, and duration of transient chemical events. PMID:27193783

  2. Iridium abundance measurements across bio-event horizons in the geological record

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orth, C. J.; Attrep, M., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Geochemical studies have been performed on thousands of rock samples collected across bio-event horizons in the fossil record using INAA for about 40 common and trace elements and radiochemical isolation procedures for Os, Ir, Pt, and Au on selected samples. These studies were begun soon after the Alvarez team announced their discovery of the Cretaceous-Tertiary (K-T) Ir anomaly in marine rock sequences in Europe. With their encouragement the Authors searched for the anomaly in nearby continental (freshwater coal swamp) deposits. In collaboration with scientists from the U.S.G.S. in Denver, the anomaly was located and it was observed that a floral crisis occurred at the same stratigraphic position as the Ir spike. Further work in the Raton Basin has turned up numerous well-preserved K-T boundary sections. Although the Authors have continued to study the K-T boundary and provide geochemical measurements for other groups trying to precisely locate it, the primary effort was turned to examining the other bio-events in the Phanerozoic, especially to those that are older than the terminal Cretaceous. A list of horizons that were examined in collaboration with paleontologists and geologists is given. Results are also given and discussed.

  3. Calculations of the FLAX events with comparisons to particle velocity data recorded at low stress

    SciTech Connect

    Rambo, J.

    1993-09-01

    The FLAX event, fired in 1972, produced two particle velocity data sets from two devices in the same hole, U2dj. The data are of interest because they contain verification of focusing of a shock wave above the water table. The FLAX data show the peak velocity attenuation from the device buried in saturated tuff are different from those emanating from the upper device buried in porous alluvium. The attenuations of the peaks are different in regions traversed by both waves traveling at the same sound speed and measured by the same particle velocity gages. The attenuation rate from the lower device is due to 2-D effects attributed to wave focusing above the water table and is a feature that should be captured by 2-D calculations. LLNL`s KDYNA calculations used for containment analyses have utilized a material model initially developed by Butkovich, which estimates strength and compressibility based on gas porosity, total porosity, and water content determined from geophysical measurements. Unfortunately, the material model estimates do not correctly model the more important details of strength and compressibility used for matching the velocity data. The velocity gage data contain information that can be related to the strength properties of the medium, provided that there are more than two gages recording in the stress region of plastic deformation of the material. A modification to Butkovich`s model incorporated approximate strengths derived from the data. The mechanisms of focusing will be discussed and will incorporate additional information from the TYBO event.

  4. Construction and laboratory test of a fibre optic sensor for rotational events recording

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurzych, Anna; Krajewski, Zbigniew; Kowalski, Jerzy K.; Jaroszewicz, Leszek R.

    2016-05-01

    We present a novel and technically advanced system - Fibre-Optic System for Rotational Events & Phenomena Monitoring (FOSREM). It has been designed in order to register and monitor rotational events in seismological observatories, engineering constructions, mines and even on glaciers and in their vicinity. Its wide application field is a result of unique parameters and electronic solutions which give an opportunity to measure a component of rotation in the wide range of a signal amplitude from 10-8 rad/s to 10 rad/s, as well as a frequency from 0 Hz to the upper frequency between 2.56 Hz to 328.12 Hz. Moreover, the numerical analysis and simulations indicate that it keeps the theoretical sensitivity equal to 2·10-8 rad/s/Hz1/2. FOSREM is equipped with an advanced communication module which gives the possibility for a remote detection parameter control, as well as the recorded data receiving. It enables the sensor to assemble in any chosen place. In the paper we present laboratory investigations and tests which confirm the wide application field and practical aspects of FOSREM.

  5. Applying a New Event Detection Algorithm to an Ocean Bottom Seismometer Dataset Recorded Offshore Southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishop, J.; Kohler, M. D.; Bunn, J.; Chandy, K. M.

    2015-12-01

    A number of active southern California offshore faults are capable of M>6 earthquakes, and the only permanent Southern California Seismic Network stations that can contribute to ongoing, small-magnitude earthquake detection and location are those located on the coastline and islands. To obtain a more detailed picture of the seismicity of the region, an array of 34 ocean bottom seismometers (OBSs) was deployed to record continuous waveform data off the coast of Southern California for 12 months (2010-2011) as part of the ALBACORE (Asthenospheric and Lithospheric Broadband Architecture from the California Offshore Region Experiment) project. To obtain a local event catalog based on OBS data, we make use of a newly developed data processing platform based on Python. The data processing procedure comprises a multi-step analysis that starts with the identification of significant signals above the time-adjusted noise floor for each sensor. This is followed by a time-dependent statistical estimate of the likelihood of an earthquake based on the aggregated signals in the array. For periods with elevated event likelihood, an adaptive grid-fitting procedure is used that yields candidate earthquake hypocenters with confidence estimates that best match the observed sensor signals. The results are validated with synthetic travel times and manual picks. Using results from ALBACORE, we have created a more complete view of active faulting in the California Borderland.

  6. A convenient method for detecting electrolyte bridges in multichannel electroencephalogram and event-related potential recordings.

    PubMed

    Tenke, C E; Kayser, J

    2001-03-01

    Dense electrode arrays offer numerous advantages over single channel electroencephalogram/event-related potential (EEG/ERP) recordings, but also exaggerate the influence of common error sources arising from the preparation of scalp placements. Even with conventional low density recordings (e.g. 30-channel Electro-Cap), over-application of electrode gel may result in electrolyte leakage and create low impedance bridges, particularly at vertically-aligned sites (e.g. inferior-lateral). The ensuing electrical short produces an artificial similarity of ERPs at neighboring sites that distorts the ERP topography. This artifact is not immediately apparent in group averages, and may even go undetected after visual inspection of the individual ERP waveforms. Besides adding noise variance to the topography, this error source also has the capacity to introduce systematic, localized artifacts (e.g. add or remove evidence of lateralized activity). Electrolyte bridges causing these artifacts can be easily detected by a simple variant of the Hjorth algorithm (intrinsic Hjorth), in which spatial interelectrode distances are replaced by an electrical analog of distance (i.e. the variances of the difference waveforms for all pairwise combinations of electrodes). When a low impedance bridge exists, the Hjorth algorithm identifies all affected sites as flat lines that are readily distinguishable from Hjorth waveforms at unbridged electrodes. PMID:11222978

  7. Glacial seismic events from Greenland recorded by the POLENET/LAPNET seismic array during the IPY 2007-2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlovskaya, E.

    2012-12-01

    Glacial earthquakes are seismic events associated with rapid changes in the dynamics of ice sheets and glaciers. They belong to the class of so-called slow earthquakes caused by a variety of stick-slip and creep processes. Recordings of glacial events are depleted in high frequencies and can be detected from recordings of broadband seismic instruments. Monitoring of such events from Greenland at regional distances was one of the major targets of the POLENET/LAPNET passive seismic experiment in northern Fennoscandia (northern parts of Finland, Sweden, Norway and Russian Karelia) during the IPY 2007-2009. The POLENET/LAPNET array, with the average spacing between stations of 70 km, recorded high-frequency continuous data of 37 temporary stations, which were in operation during the time frame from 01.05.2008 to 31.09.2009, and of 21 stations of selected permanent networks in the Fennoscandia. Glacial events from Greenland were identified using manual analysis of the continuous POLENET/LAPNET data filtered by a bandpass filter from 35 s to 140 s frequency band. The detected events were located using standard array techniques. Our study demonstrated that the POLENET/LAPNET array, located at regional distances from Greenland, recorded more such events than the Global Seismographic Network (GSN) during the same observation period. In addition, the array detected a number of slow earthquakes originating from northern part of Mid-Atlantic Ridge, Iceland, vicinity of Spitsbergen, Jan Mayen Island and a number of events originated from Arctic Canada. This shows that analysis of recordings of broadband stations in low-frequency can provide new information about seismicity and spreading processes in the Arctics. Our study proves that glacial earthquakes in Greenland show a seasonality, with most of events occurring during summer months. We found out that during 2008, significant number of events originated from the northern part of Greenland, where recent investigation using

  8. Quantitative analysis of long-period events recorded during hydrofracture experiments at Fenton Hill, New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrazzini, Valerie; Chouet, Bernard; Fehler, Mike; Aki, Keiiti

    1990-12-01

    A three-dimensional fluid-filled crack model recently developed by Chouet is used to reproduce and explain the spectral characteristics of different classes of long-period events recorded during a hydrofracture experiment conducted at Fenton Hill, New Mexico. We study the dependence on the model parameters of the far-field P-wave radiation due to the vibration of the fluid-filled crack. Those parameters are given by the properties of the fluid and solid, the crack dimensions, the area and location of the crack surface over which the excess pressure is applied, the time history of this excess pressure, and the station location. In this model, the resonance of the crack is sustained by a very slow and dispersive wave called "crack wave". The phase velocity of the crack wave depends critically on the impedance contrast between fluid and solid and on the crack dimensions. We are able to fit the dominant features of the Fenton Hill data in the time and frequency domains and draw inferences on the impedance contrast between the fluid and solid. The various classes of events observed can be modeled by a single crack over which the geometry of the applied excess pressure changes. The length, width, and thickness of the crack are estimated to be on the order of 3 m, 1 m, and 3 mm, respectively. The observed spectral roll-off can be explained by a ramp function time dependence of the pressure transient. The rise time necessary to simulate the observed data varies between 2 and 4 ms, depending on the event considered. Assuming the source-receiver distance of 700 m, the amplitude of displacement of the data agree with the model's prediction if the excess pressure applied on the crack is on the order of 20 bars.

  9. Proposed design for a fast (parallel) preprocessor for the spin spectrometer and other eventful albatrosses

    SciTech Connect

    Hensley, D.C.

    1981-01-01

    Because devices like the Spin Spectrometer described in a previous paper to this conference can produce an extremely fast but fairly simple-to-process data stream, it seems reasonable to consider front-end preprocessors having special characteristics. In general, the kinds of transformations being considered do not require floating point calculations or extensive calculations. In order to be somewhat specific, the particular data acquisition/processing problems posed by the Spin Spectrometer at the Holifield Heavy Ion Facility will be discussed.

  10. Two Types of Transpolar Arc Development, Event Studies With Data Set of Astrid-2, Dmsp, Fast, and Superdarn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narita, Y.; Maezawa, K.; Kullen, A.; Ivchenko, N.; Marklund, G.; Carlson, C. W.; Spann, J. F.; Parks, G. K.; Superdarn Team

    Auroras which appear in the polar cap are called transpolar arcs, polar cap arcs, sun- aligned arcs, or occasionally Theta-aurora because of its spatial distribution resem- bling Greek character 'Theta.' Morphology, IMF(Interplanetary Magnetic Field) rela- tionship, and ionospheric convection patterns were studied in quest of mechanisms of transpolar arcs. Four events were analyzed: 1999/Jan/22/19:00 - 23/01:30 (1 event: a) 1999/Jan/24/06:00 - 10:00 (1 event: b) 1999/Feb/11/20:00 - 12/02:00 (2 events: c, d) , with data set of ExB drift velocity data obtained by electric field measurements of ASTRID-2 and FAST, DMSP ion driftmeter data, and line-of- sight velocity data of SuperDARN. POLAR-UVI image data were used for spatial and temporal variations of transpolar arcs and ACE data set were used for investigation of IMF relationship. IMF-Bz was strongly positive (Bz from +8nT to +20 nT) during periods of all four transpolar arcs. In events (a),(b),(c), transpolar arcs appeared immediately after the direction of IMF turned northward, though IMF was fluctuating in event (b). A sudden increase of IMF-By, from +3nT to +18nT, was observed in event (d). Two different types of transpolar arc development were observed by POLAR-UVI: one which begins as a split from dawn or dusk sector of auroral oval and shifts poleward in events (c),(d); another which is initially a patch of auroral oval disturbed by substorm but develops as a transpolar arc, forming a growing finger-like shape from midnight sector in event (b). Sunward flow, associated with positive IMF-Bz, were observed within newly-created polar caps in events (a),(c),(d). Not clear ionospheric convection pattern was seen across the transpolar arc in event (b) due to limitation of data set. Isotropic ions with energy more than 1 keV were observed within transpolar arcs. From these 1 observations it is concluded that the origin of transpolar arcs is from the plasma sheet. This is consistent with the view that transpolar

  11. rbamtools: an R interface to samtools enabling fast accumulative tabulation of splicing events over multiple RNA-seq samples.

    PubMed

    Kaisers, Wolfgang; Schaal, Heiner; Schwender, Holger

    2015-05-15

    The open source environment R isf the most widely used software to statistically explore biological data sets including sequence alignments. BAM is the de facto standard file format for sequence alignment. With rbamtools, we provide now a full spectrum of accessibility to BAM for R users such as reading, writing, extraction of subsets and plotting of alignment depth where the script syntax closely follows the SAM/BAM format. Additionally, rbamtools enables fast accumulative tabulation of splicing events over multiple BAM files. PMID:25563331

  12. Language Processing in Reading and Speech Perception is Fast and Incremental: Implications for Event Related Potential Research

    PubMed Central

    Rayner, Keith; Clifton, Charles

    2009-01-01

    An overview of language processing during reading and listening is provided. Evidence is reviewed indicating that language processing in both domains is fast and incremental. We also discuss some aspects of normal reading and listening that are often obscured in event related potential (ERP) research. We also discuss some apparent limitations of ERP techniques, as well as some recent indications that EEG measures can be used to probe how lexical knowledge and lexical or structural expectations can contribute to the incremental process of language comprehension. PMID:18565638

  13. Optical recording of fast neuronal membrane potential transients in acute mammalian brain slices by second-harmonic generation microscopy.

    PubMed

    Dombeck, Daniel A; Sacconi, Leonardo; Blanchard-Desce, Mireille; Webb, Watt W

    2005-11-01

    Although nonlinear microscopy and fast (approximately 1 ms) membrane potential (Vm) recording have proven valuable for neuroscience applications, their potentially powerful combination has not yet been shown for studies of Vm activity deep in intact tissue. We show that laser illumination of neurons in acute rat brain slices intracellularly filled with FM4-64 dye generates an intense second-harmonic generation (SHG) signal from somatic and dendritic plasma membranes with high contrast >125 microm below the slice surface. The SHG signal provides a linear response to DeltaVm of approximately 7.5%/100 mV. By averaging repeated line scans (approximately 50), we show the ability to record action potentials (APs) optically with a signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of approximately 7-8. We also show recording of fast Vm steps from the dendritic arbor at depths inaccessible with previous methods. The high membrane contrast and linear response of SHG to DeltaVm provides the advantage that signal changes are not degraded by background and can be directly quantified in terms of DeltaVm. Experimental comparison of SHG and two-photon fluorescence Vm recording with the best known probes for each showed that the SHG technique is superior for Vm recording in brain slice applications, with FM4-64 as the best tested SHG Vm probe. PMID:16093337

  14. The 8.2 kyr event recorded at high resolution by a speleothem from the Northern French Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couchoud, Isabelle; Drysdale, Russell; Hellstrom, John; Perrette, Yves

    2016-04-01

    Continental records of Holocene climate variability in the Alps are scarce and they rarely document the "8.2 kyr event". Several reasons have been proposed: records do not have sufficient resolution, are not precisely dated or the proxies are not sufficiently sensitive to climate variations associated with this event. The European records of adequate resolution generally allow the identification of an anomaly but its characterisation is unclear: it seems that the event has triggered significant impacts only for a few decades and mainly expressed in winter (whereas most archives are more sensitive to summer conditions). Thus, the detailed characterisation of the impacts of this event requires records with sub-annual resolution and preferably sensitive to winter conditions. Here we present a multi-proxy, high-resolution analysis of this event, as recorded by a stalagmite of the Bauges massif (Northern French Alps), at ~1400 m altitude. Comparison of these results with other regional and distant data allows for a discussion about climatic impacts and teleconnections at this time.

  15. A relative magnitude scale for microseismic events from surface-recorded data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luh, P. C.; Tibi, R.

    2013-12-01

    Despite the recent staggering growth in microseismic passive monitoring, estimating magnitudes for microseismic events remains challenging due to the small size of the events in sometimes noisy environment and often inadequate local earth model. Moveout-corrected P-wave arrivals of a high-quality microseismic event show amplitude and polarity variations with both receiver distance and azimuth, consistent with the radiation pattern. Provided the waveform contents are undistorted, this study shows that a relative magnitude scale for micro-earthquakes can be derived similar to the Richter scale. Due to the general lack of amplitude calibration and variability in geophone types, the proposed magnitude scale is survey and geophone-specific, but can be readily calibrated once amplitude responses of a recorded earthquake with cataloged magnitude can be found. Such relative magnitude scale is meaningful only if observed amplitudes directly relate to the source and wave-propagation effect, suffering little or no amplitude distortion in data processing. Moveout alignment of a good microseismic event often exhibits distinct doublet (or quadruplet) L2-norm semblance peaks, which can be refined with Alignment-Intensity measure to be singly-centered for consistent location detection and polarity picking (Luh, et al, 2012). The calculated relative magnitudes along with the respective focal-mechanism solutions obtained from P-wave first-motion polarities allow normalized moment-tensor elements to be estimated as well as moment-consistent analysis performed on the resulting normalized moment tensors (Jost and Hermann, 1989; Frohlich and Apperson, 1992; Tibi, et al., 2013). Analyses for two microseismic surveys, one in the northern and the other in the southern hemisphere, show that the approach is robust within the relevant ray-path range with uncertainties of ×0.5 for the estimated relative magnitudes. Frohlich, C. and Apperson, E., 1992. Tectonics: 11, No.2, 279-296 Jost, M. and

  16. Comparison of Offshore Turbidite records and Lake Disturbance Events at the Latitude of Seattle, Washington

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galer, S.; Goldfinger, C.; Morey, A. E.; Black, B.; Romsos, C.; Beeson, J. W.; Erhardt, M.

    2014-12-01

    We are investigating the paleoseismic history of northern Washington using offshore turbidite cores and lake sediments collected from forearc lakes along a transect from offshore to Seattle, Washington. Additional offshore cores, ash determinations and heavy mineral analysis flesh out the turbidite stratigraphy off northern Washington, and support 3-5 proximal turbidites in northern Washington canyons (see Adams, 1990) in addition to the 19 regionally correlated beds. Onshore, we have cored multiple lakes including (west to east) Beaver, Leland, Tarboo, Hall, Sawyer, and Wapato, east of the Cascades, and collected multibeam bathymetry, backscatter and chirp subbottom data. These lakes are small (2-113 ha), 6-18 m deep, and are all kettle lakes except Beaver Lake (landslide-dammed) and Wapato Lake, a glacial scour. These lakes were selected for their limited outside sediment sources and low sensitivity to ground shaking. The sedimentology is mostly organic-rich gyttja. All lakes contain the Mazama ash based on its similar depth occurrence in previously published cores and new EMP analysis. Computed Tomography (CT) density, gamma density, and magnetic susceptibility (ms) data show there is more stratigraphic variability than is visually apparent. Low-energy disturbance events are apparent in the stratigraphy of all lakes (except Hall) as increases in clastics, density, and ms. The number of post Mazama disturbance events is similar to the number of expected great earthquakes found offshore and onshore, though definition of the boundaries of the lake events is much less clear. Initial radiocarbon results and preliminary correlations along this 185 km transect show strong similarities in stratigraphic records between these cores over the past ~7600 years, anchored by the Mazama tephra. Preliminary comparisons with offshore cores show a striking similarity in downcore variability in physical properties. Given the evidence for earthquake origin for the offshore cores

  17. Danngarrd-Oscar events recorded in a terrestrial sequence in central British Columbia, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, B. C.; Geertsema, M.; Telka, A.; Mathewes, R.

    2012-12-01

    Danngarrd-Oscar events recorded in the GISP2 Greenland Ice Core. The increasingly dry and cold conditions indicated by the macrofossil assemblage likely reflect the growth of ice in the Coast Mountains that would reduce the availability of moisture to the Interior Plateau from Pacific air masses. This is confirmed by reconstruction of the growth of the Cordilleran Ice Sheet during the Late Wisconsinan based on published radiocarbon dates.

  18. A compact ECL system for fast data readout and event building in a multidetector environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finocchiaro, Paolo; Calì, Claudio

    1992-11-01

    A totally hardware readout system is described. It was conceived in order to coordinate a number of parallel chains of FERA_bus converters, and to output the event data in a general formal suitable for being directly handled by data acquisition computers.

  19. A Comparison of Reliability Measures for Continuous and Discontinuous Recording Methods: Inflated Agreement Scores with Partial Interval Recording and Momentary Time Sampling for Duration Events

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rapp, John T.; Carroll, Regina A.; Stangeland, Lindsay; Swanson, Greg; Higgins, William J.

    2011-01-01

    The authors evaluated the extent to which interobserver agreement (IOA) scores, using the block-by-block method for events scored with continuous duration recording (CDR), were higher when the data from the same sessions were converted to discontinuous methods. Sessions with IOA scores of 89% or less with CDR were rescored using 10-s partial…

  20. Vents to events: determining an eruption event record from volcanic vent structures for the Harrat Rahat, Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Runge, Melody G.; Bebbington, Mark S.; Cronin, Shane J.; Lindsay, Jan M.; Kenedi, Catherine L.; Moufti, Mohammed Rashad H.

    2014-03-01

    Distributed "monogenetic" volcanic eruptions commonly occur in continental settings without obvious structural alignments or rifting/extensional structures. Nevertheless, these may develop as fissures, representing the surface expression of dykes with a range of orientations, especially when stress regimes vary over time and/or older crustal features and faults are exploited by rising magmas. Dykes reaching the surface as fissures can last hours to months and produce groups of closely aligned vents, hiding the true extent of the source fissure. Grouped or aligned vents in a distributed volcanic environment add complexity to hazard modelling where the majority of eruptions are single-vent, point-source features, represented by cones, craters or domes; i.e. vent groups may represent fissure events, or single eruptions coincidently located but erupted hundreds to tens of thousands of years apart. It is common practice in hazard estimation for intraplate monogenetic volcanism to assume that a single eruption cone or crater represents an individual eruptive event, but this could lead to a significant overestimate of temporal recurrence rates if multiple-site and fissure eruptions were common. For accurate recurrence rate estimates and hazard-event scenarios, a fissure eruption, with its multiple cones, must be considered as a single multi-dimensional eruptive event alongside the single-vent eruptions. We present a statistical method to objectively determine eruptive events from visible vents, and illustrate this using the 968 vents of the 10 Ma to 0.6 ka volcanic field of Harrat Rahat, Saudi Arabia. A further method is presented to estimate the number of hidden vents in a thick volcanic pile. By combining these two methods for Harrat Rahat, we determined an updated spatial recurrence rate estimate, and an average temporal recurrence rate of 7.5 × 10-5 events/year. This new analysis highlights more concentrated regions of higher temporal hazard in parts of Harrat Rahat

  1. Development of a clinical event monitor for use with the Veterans Affairs Computerized Patient Record System and other data sources.

    PubMed Central

    Payne, T. H.; Savarino, J.

    1998-01-01

    We are developing an event monitor to operate with the Veterans Affairs Computerized Patient Record System (CPRS). The event monitor is designed to receive messages when important patient events such as posting of new results, patient movement, and orders occur. Our design separates the event monitor from CPRS itself, using communication via a network connection to receive HL7 messages, to access other data needed to run rules, and to communicate with providers by message display, electronic mail and other mechanisms. Results from operation of the event monitor using patient data in our test account show that a wide variety of data can be accessed by the event monitor with acceptable response times. Images Figure 1 PMID:9929199

  2. New stratigraphic and isotopic record of the Toarcian Oceanic Anoxic Event from Hungary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Tamás; Price, Gregory; Bajnai, Dávid; Nyerges, Anita; Pálfy, József; May, Zoltán

    2016-04-01

    In the Early Toarcian (˜183 Ma) major global environmental changes took place in the ocean-atmosphere system, including the widely discussed Toarcian Oceanic Anoxic Event (T-OAE). This phenomenon is characterized by strong perturbation of the carbon-cycle and other geochemical systems. A peculiar negative carbon-isotope excursion (CIE) is a hallmark of the event, reflecting the injection of large amount of isotopically light carbon into the ocean-atmosphere system, possible due to dissociation of gas-hydrate from shelf areas. This observed negative CIE and a subsequent broad positive anomaly could be also key signals for chemostratigraphical correlation. In our study we obtained new, high-resolution organic carbon isotope data from the Réka Valley section of the Mecsek Mts. in southern Hungary. The Mecsek Basin was located at the European margin where a thick Lower Jurassic succession of siliciclastic hemipelagic sediments is interrupted by 13 m of organic-rich black shales in the Lower Toarcian. The δ13Corg data from the Réka Valley section is characterized by very negative values (averaging -32), with apparently cyclic fluctuation. The shape of the δ13Corg shows that a continuous and complete record can be found in the Réka Valley and also suggests mixed features between the carbon isotope record of the NW European and Tethyan regions. We have also carried out high resolution handheld XRF analyzes to study cyclostratigraphic signals in the section. The distribution of four elements Ti, Ca, Si and Al were used in our studies beside the δ13Corg data. The duration for the negative shift at Réka Valley, calculated from XRF signals, is either 550-750 kyr, 200-275 kyr or 116-158 kyr, based on 100 kyr short eccentricity, 36.6 kyr obliquity or 21.1 kyr precession signals, respectively. Several previous studies concluded that the most probable astronomical forcing factor during the CIE of the Toarcian OAE is obliquity. Therefore, we assume a duration around 200

  3. Genomic selection for producer-recorded health event data in US dairy cattle.

    PubMed

    Parker Gaddis, K L; Cole, J B; Clay, J S; Maltecca, C

    2014-05-01

    Emphasizing increased profit through increased dairy cow production has revealed a negative relationship of production with fitness and health traits. Decreased cow health can affect herd profitability through increased rates of involuntary culling and decreased or lost milk sales. The development of genomic selection methodologies, with accompanying substantial gains in reliability for low-heritability traits, may dramatically improve the feasibility of genetic improvement of dairy cow health. Producer-recorded health information may provide a wealth of information for improvement of dairy cow health, thus improving profitability. The principal objective of this study was to use health data collected from on-farm computer systems in the United States to estimate variance components and heritability for health traits commonly experienced by dairy cows. A single-step analysis was conducted to estimate genomic variance components and heritabilities for health events, including cystic ovaries, displaced abomasum, ketosis, lameness, mastitis, metritis, and retained placenta. A blended H matrix was constructed for a threshold model with fixed effects of parity and year-season and random effects of herd-year and sire. The single-step genomic analysis produced heritability estimates that ranged from 0.02 (standard deviation = 0.005) for lameness to 0.36 (standard deviation = 0.08) for retained placenta. Significant genetic correlations were found between lameness and cystic ovaries, displaced abomasum and ketosis, displaced abomasum and metritis, and retained placenta and metritis. Sire reliabilities increased, on average, approximately 30% with the incorporation of genomic data. From the results of these analyses, it was concluded that genetic selection for health traits using producer-recorded data are feasible in the United States, and that the inclusion of genomic data substantially improves reliabilities for these traits. PMID:24612803

  4. Evaluation of the southern California seismic velocity models through simulation of recorded events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taborda, Ricardo; Azizzadeh-Roodpish, Shima; Khoshnevis, Naeem; Cheng, Keli

    2016-06-01

    Significant effort has been devoted over the last two decades to the development of various seismic velocity models for the region of southern California, United States. These models are mostly used in forward wave propagation simulation studies, but also as base models for tomographic and source inversions. Two of these models, the community velocity models CVM-S and CVM-H, are among the most commonly used for this region. This includes two alternative variations to the original models, the recently released CVM-S4.26 which incorporates results from a sequence of tomographic inversions into CVM-S, and the user-controlled option of CVM-H to replace the near-surface profiles with a VS30-based geotechnical model. Although either one of these models is regarded as acceptable by the modeling community, it is known that they have differences in their representation of the crustal structure and sedimentary deposits in the region, and thus can lead to different results in forward and inverse problems. In this paper, we evaluate the accuracy of these models when used to predict the ground motion in the greater Los Angeles region by means of an assessment of a collection of simulations of recent events. In total, we consider 30 moderate-magnitude earthquakes (3.5 < Mw < 5.5) between 1998 and 2014, and compare synthetics with data recorded by seismic networks during these events. The simulations are done using a finite-element parallel code, with numerical models that satisfy a maximum frequency of 1 Hz and a minimum shear wave velocity of 200 m s-1. The comparisons between data and synthetics are ranked quantitatively by means of a goodness-of-fit (GOF) criteria. We analyse the regional distribution of the GOF results for all events and all models, and draw conclusions from the results and how these correlate to the models. We find that, in light of our comparisons, the model CVM-S4.26 consistently yields better results.

  5. Evaluation of the Southern California Seismic Velocity Models through Simulation of Recorded Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taborda, Ricardo; Azizzadeh-Roodpish, Shima; Khoshnevis, Naeem; Cheng, Keli

    2016-03-01

    Significant effort has been devoted over the last two decades to the development of various seismic velocity models for the region of southern California, United States. These models are mostly used in forward wave propagation simulation studies, but also as base models for tomographic and source inversions. Two of these models, the community velocity models CVM-S and CVM-H, are among the most commonly used for this region. This includes two alternative variations to the original models, the recently released CVM-S4.26 which incorporates results from a sequence of tomographic inversions into CVM-S, and the user-controlled option of CVM-H to replace the near-surface profiles with a VS30-based geotechnical (GTL) model. Although either one of these models is regarded as acceptable by the modeling community, it is known that they have differences in their representation of the crustal structure and sedimentary deposits in the region, and thus can lead to different results in forward and inverse problems. In this article we evaluate the accuracy of these models when used to predict the ground motion in the greater Los Angeles region by means of an assessment of a collection of simulations of recent events. In total, we consider 30 moderate-magnitude earthquakes (3.5 < Mw < 5.5) between 1998 and 2014, and compare synthetics with data recorded by seismic networks during these events. The simulations are done using a finite element parallel code, with numerical models that satisfy a maximum frequency of 1 Hz and a minimum shear wave velocity of 200 m/s. The comparisons between data and synthetics are ranked quantitatively by means of a goodness-of-fit (GOF) criteria. We analyze the regional distribution of the GOF results for all events and all models, and draw conclusions from the results and how these correlate to the models. We find that, in light of our comparisons, the model CVM-S4.26 consistently yields better results.

  6. Diamond Morphology: Link to Metasomatic Events in the Mantle or Record of Evolution of Kimberlitic Fluid?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedortchouk, Y.

    2009-05-01

    Morphology and surface features on diamonds show tremendous variation even within a single kimberlite body reflecting a complex history of growth and dissolution. But does the diamond surface record the conditions in the several mantle sources sampled by the rising kimberlite magma, or evolution of the fluid system in the kimberlite magma itself? To address this question I revised morphological classification of diamonds from several kimberlite pipes from EKATI Mine property, N.W.T., Canada. The novelty of the approach, compared to the existing classifications, is in utilizing a random but large dataset of diamond dissolution experiments accumulated by several researchers including myself. These experiments have shown that similar forms (e.g. trigon etch pits) can be produced in a variety of conditions and environments, whereas their shape and size would depend on the reactant. Similarly, different types of resorption features always form together and can be used for deriving the composition of oxidizing fluid. The proposed classification method is focused on relating various types of diamond surfaces to the composition and conditions of oxidizing media. The study uses parcels of micro-and macro-diamonds (total of 125 carats) from Misery, Grizzly, Leslie and Koala kimberlites, EKATI Mine property, Northwest Territories, Canada. Only octahedron and hexoctahedron diamonds were selected (total ~600 stones). Diamond surfaces were studied using an optical and Field- Emission Scanning Electron Microscope to define resorption elements - simple surface features. These elements were identified for each of the three categories: 1) present on octahedral faces (well-preserved diamonds), 2) present on hexoctahedral faces (rounded resorbed diamonds), and 3) frosting (micro-features). Consistent associations of several elements define Resorption Types of diamonds, which form during a single oxidizing event. We further relate these types to the composition of the C-H-O + chlorides

  7. Incrementally developed slickenfibers — Geological record of repeating low stress-drop seismic events?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fagereng, Åke; Remitti, Francesca; Sibson, Richard H.

    2011-10-01

    An accretionary mélange of Triassic age ocean floor sediments exposed in the Chrystalls Beach Complex, South Island, New Zealand, comprises competent sandstone and chert phacoids set in a cleaved mudstone matrix, deformed in a continuous-discontinuous style at subgreenschist conditions. Deformation structures include a pervasive anastomosing fault-fracture mesh of multiple shearing surfaces, subparallel to cleavage, coated with incrementally developed quartz-calcite slickenfibers. Microstructural observations reveal slickenfiber growth by 'crack-seal' shear slip increments of 10-100 μm, with incremental slip transfer of the same order accommodated by opening of extension fractures that link en echelon slip surfaces. Individual slip surfaces can be traced for meters to tens of meters so that the ratio of average slip, u, to potential rupture length, L, predominantly lies within the range, 10 - 6 < u/ L < 10 - 5 , characteristic of microearthquakes obeying 'constant stress-drop' scaling with a low stress-drop Δτ ~ 30 kPa, typical of low frequency earthquakes. The host-rock assemblage, metamorphic environment, inference of near-lithostatic fluid overpressures, low stress-drop and mixed continuous-discontinuous shearing, resemble conditions and characteristics of low frequency earthquakes as identified within the seismic signals recorded during episodic tremor and slow slip events, at the downdip end of the seismogenic subduction thrust interface and within accretionary prisms.

  8. Tectonically emplaced ultra-depleted lithospheric mantle records garnet, spinel and plagioclase facies events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czertowicz, Thomas; Scott, James; Palin, Mike

    2014-05-01

    The poorly studied Anita Ultramafites in western New Zealand represent a several km wide slice of lithospheric mantle that was tectonically emplaced onto the Gondwana supercontinent margin. The peridotites are almost exclusively spinel facies dunite and harzburgite, although spinel-orthopyroxene symplectites indicate the former presence of Cr-garnet. Pyroxenite dikes are uncommon, and there is no sign of an ophiolitic type structure. Olivine (~Fo93) and chromite (~Cr# 70) attest to extreme degrees of melt depletion, likely under hydrous conditions. The rocks were decompressed and equilibrated at the spinel facies. The ultramafites were then refertilised by a fluid that was rich in Si, Ca, K, OH and LREE, and probably equates to a low-degree silicate melt. The occurrence of negative and positive Eu and Sr anomalies in amphibole points to the influence of plagioclase, and suggests that refertilisation occurred at a very shallow lithospheric level. An added complication is that the peridotite was metamorphosed to upper amphibolite facies in the Cretaceous after tectonic emplacement. This generated talc, tremolite and chlorite. P-T conditions from adjacent gneisses indicate that this event occurred at ~ 10-12 kbar in association with crustal thickening. Thus, the peridotite may have been pushed back out of plagioclase facies conditions, partially melted, and re-equilibrated back in the spinel facies. The Anita Ultramafics therefore record a sequence of attempts to equilibrate at garnet - spinel - plagioclase - spinel facies, before final exhumation.

  9. Neurophysiological Effects of Meditation Based on Evoked and Event Related Potential Recordings

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Nilkamal; Telles, Shirley

    2015-01-01

    Evoked potentials (EPs) are a relatively noninvasive method to assess the integrity of sensory pathways. As the neural generators for most of the components are relatively well worked out, EPs have been used to understand the changes occurring during meditation. Event-related potentials (ERPs) yield useful information about the response to tasks, usually assessing attention. A brief review of the literature yielded eleven studies on EPs and seventeen on ERPs from 1978 to 2014. The EP studies covered short, mid, and long latency EPs, using both auditory and visual modalities. ERP studies reported the effects of meditation on tasks such as the auditory oddball paradigm, the attentional blink task, mismatched negativity, and affective picture viewing among others. Both EP and ERPs were recorded in several meditations detailed in the review. Maximum changes occurred in mid latency (auditory) EPs suggesting that maximum changes occur in the corresponding neural generators in the thalamus, thalamic radiations, and primary auditory cortical areas. ERP studies showed meditation can increase attention and enhance efficiency of brain resource allocation with greater emotional control. PMID:26137479

  10. Medical record validation of maternal recall of pregnancy and birth events from a twin cohort.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianghong; Tuvblad, Catherine; Li, Linda; Raine, Adrian; Baker, Laura A

    2013-08-01

    This study aims to assess the validity of maternal recall for several perinatal variables 8-10 years after pregnancy in a twin sample. Retrospective information was collected 8-10 years after the delivery event in a cohort of mothers from the University of Southern California Twin Study (N = 611) and compared with medical records for validity analysis. Recall of most variables showed substantial to perfect agreement (κ = 0.60-1.00), with notable exceptions for specific medical problems during pregnancy (κ ≤ 0.40) and substance use when mothers provided continuous data (e.g., number of cigarettes per day; r ≤ 0.24). With the exception of delivery method, neonatal intensive care unit admission, birth weight, neonatal information, and post-delivery complications were also recalled with low accuracy. For mothers of twins, maternal recall is generally a valid measure for perinatal variables 10 years after pregnancy. However, caution should be taken regarding variables such as substance use, medical problems, birth length, and post-delivery complications. PMID:23725849

  11. Development of point mass occupant injury criteria using event data recorders.

    PubMed

    Gabauer, Douglas J; Gabler, Hampton C

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents an estimate of the probability of serious occupant injury in frontal crashes based on vehicle kinematics information. Occupant injury risk is developed by modeling the human as a point mass and computing the occupant impact velocity (OIV) using the flail space model. Event Data Recorder data provide vehicle kinematics information for real world crashes with known injury outcomes. A data set of 211 cases is used for methodology development and preliminary insight to the injury prediction capability of the metric. Using logistic regression, injury risk curves are generated for all data, a belted occupant subset and an unbelted occupant subset. Based on the models, an occupant restrained by an airbag and safety belt is found to have a lower risk of injury than an occupant only restrained by an airbag. A 50% probability of serious injury is found to correspond to an OIV of 11.2 m/s and 15.9 m/s for unbelted and belted occupants, respectively. PMID:16817603

  12. High fold computer disk storage DATABASE for fast extended analysis of γ-rays events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stézowski, O.; Finck, Ch.; Prévost, D.

    1999-03-01

    Recently spectacular technical developments have been achieved to increase the resolving power of large γ-ray spectrometers. With these new eyes, physicists are able to study the intricate nature of atomic nuclei. Concurrently more and more complex multidimensional analyses are needed to investigate very weak phenomena. In this article, we first present a software (DATABASE) allowing high fold coincidences γ-rays events to be stored on hard disk. Then, a non-conventional method of analysis, anti-gating procedure, is described. Two physical examples are given to explain how it can be used and Monte Carlo simulations have been performed to test the validity of this method.

  13. SEPServer catalogues of solar energetic particle events at 1 AU based on STEREO recordings: 2007-2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papaioannou, A.; Malandraki, O. E.; Dresing, N.; Heber, B.; Klein, K.-L.; Vainio, R.; Rodríguez-Gasén, R.; Klassen, A.; Nindos, A.; Heynderickx, D.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Gómez-Herrero, R.; Vilmer, N.; Kouloumvakos, A.; Tziotziou, K.; Tsiropoula, G.

    2014-09-01

    The Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) recordings provide an unprecedented opportunity to study the evolution of solar energetic particle (SEP) events from different observation points in the heliosphere, allowing one to identify the effects of the properties of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) and solar wind structures on the interplanetary transport and acceleration of SEPs. Two catalogues based on STEREO recordings, have been compiled as a part of the SEPServer project, a three-year collaborative effort of eleven European partners funded under the Seventh Framework Programme of the European Union (FP7/SPACE). In particular, two instruments on board STEREO have been used to identify all SEP events observed within the descending phase of solar cycle 23 and the rising phase of solar cycle 24 from 2007 to 2012, namely: the Low Energy Telescope (LET) and the Solar Electron Proton Telescope (SEPT). A scan of STEREO/LET protons within the energy range 6-10 MeV has been performed for each of the two STEREO spacecraft. We have tracked all enhancements that have been observed above the background level of this particular channel and cross-checked with available lists of interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs), stream interaction regions (SIRs), and shocks, as well as with the reported events in literature. Furthermore, parallel scanning of the STEREO near relativistic electrons has been performed in order to pinpoint the presence (or absence) of an electron event in the energy range of 55-85 keV, for all of the aforementioned proton events included in our lists. We provide the onset and peak time as well as the peak value of all events for both protons and electrons, the relevant solar associations in terms of electromagnetic emissions, soft and hard X-rays (SXRs and HXRs). Finally, a subset of events with clear recordings at both STEREO spacecraft is presented together with the parent solar events of these multispacecraft SEP events.

  14. Two Extreme Climate Events of the Last 1000 Years Recorded in Himalayan and Andean Ice Cores: Impacts on Humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, L. G.; Mosley-Thompson, E. S.; Davis, M. E.; Kenny, D. V.; Lin, P.

    2013-12-01

    In the last few decades numerous studies have linked pandemic influenza, cholera, malaria, and viral pneumonia, as well as droughts, famines and global crises, to the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO). Two annually resolved ice core records, one from Dasuopu Glacier in the Himalaya and one from the Quelccaya Ice Cap in the tropical Peruvian Andes provide an opportunity to investigate these relationships on opposite sides of the Pacific Basin for the last 1000 years. The Dasuopu record provides an annual history from 1440 to 1997 CE and a decadally resolved record from 1000 to 1440 CE while the Quelccaya ice core provides annual resolution over the last 1000 years. Major ENSO events are often recorded in the oxygen isotope, insoluble dust, and chemical records from these cores. Here we investigate outbreaks of diseases, famines and global crises during two of the largest events recorded in the chemistry of these cores, particularly large peaks in the concentrations of chloride (Cl-) and fluoride (Fl-). One event is centered on 1789 to 1800 CE and the second begins abruptly in 1345 and tapers off after 1360 CE. These Cl- and F- peaks represent major droughts and reflect the abundance of continental atmospheric dust, derived in part from dried lake beds in drought stricken regions upwind of the core sites. For Dasuopu the likely sources are in India while for Quelccaya the sources would be the Andean Altiplano. Both regions are subject to drought conditions during the El Niño phase of the ENSO cycle. These two events persist longer (10 to 15 years) than today's typical ENSO events in the Pacific Ocean Basin. The 1789 to 1800 CE event was associated with a very strong El Niño event and was coincidental with the Boji Bara famine resulting from extended droughts that led to over 600,000 deaths in central India by 1792. Similarly extensive droughts are documented in Central and South America. Likewise, the 1345 to 1360 CE event, although poorly documented

  15. Coherent Events and Spectral Shape at Ion Kinetic Scales in the Fast Solar Wind Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lion, Sonny; Alexandrova, Olga; Zaslavsky, Arnaud

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we investigate spectral and phase coherence properties of magnetic fluctuations in the vicinity of the spectral transition from large, magnetohydrodynamic to sub-ion scales using in situ measurements of the Wind spacecraft in a fast stream. For the time interval investigated by Leamon et al. (1998) the phase coherence analysis shows the presence of sporadic quasi-parallel Alfvén ion cyclotron (AIC) waves as well as coherent structures in the form of large-amplitude, quasi-perpendicular Alfvén vortex-like structures and current sheets. These waves and structures importantly contribute to the observed power spectrum of magnetic fluctuations around ion scales; AIC waves contribute to the spectrum in a narrow frequency range whereas the coherent structures contribute to the spectrum over a wide frequency band from the inertial range to the sub-ion frequency range. We conclude that a particular combination of waves and coherent structures determines the spectral shape of the magnetic field spectrum around ion scales. This phenomenon provides a possible explanation for a high variability of the magnetic power spectra around ion scales observed in the solar wind.

  16. Spectroscopic interpretation and velocimetry analysis of fluctuations in a cylindrical plasma recorded by a fast camera

    SciTech Connect

    Oldenbuerger, S.; Brandt, C.; Brochard, F.; Lemoine, N.; Bonhomme, G.

    2010-06-15

    Fast visible imaging is used on a cylindrical magnetized argon plasma produced by thermionic discharge in the Mirabelle device. To link the information collected with the camera to a physical quantity, fast camera movies of plasma structures are compared to Langmuir probe measurements. High correlation is found between light fluctuations and plasma density fluctuations. Contributions from neutral argon and ionized argon to the overall light intensity are separated by using interference filters and a light intensifier. Light emitting transitions are shown to involve a metastable neutral argon state that can be excited by thermal plasma electrons, thus explaining the good correlation between light and density fluctuations. The propagation velocity of plasma structures is calculated by adapting velocimetry methods to the fast camera movies. The resulting estimates of instantaneous propagation velocity are in agreement with former experiments. The computation of mean velocities is discussed.

  17. 26 CFR 301.9000-4 - Procedure in the event of a request or demand for IRS records or information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Revenue Code, for willful disclosure in an unauthorized manner of return information. (i) No creation of... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Procedure in the event of a request or demand for IRS records or information. 301.9000-4 Section 301.9000-4 Internal Revenue INTERNAL...

  18. Possible explanation of the correlations between events recorded by underground detectors during the Supernova 1987A explosion

    SciTech Connect

    Alexeyev, E. N.

    2010-02-15

    A possible explanation of the time correlations between the data from underground detectors (Baksan telescope, LSD, IMB, Kamiokande II) and from the Rome and Maryland gravitational-wave antennas obtained during the Supernova 1987A explosion is proposed. It is shown that the synchronization of the events recorded by various underground facilities could be produced by gravitational radiation from the Supernova.

  19. 26 CFR 301.9000-4 - Procedure in the event of a request or demand for IRS records or information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... from the authorizing official concerning the response to the request or demand. An IRS officer... and non-IRS matters. If, in response to a demand for IRS records or information, an authorizing... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Procedure in the event of a request or...

  20. 26 CFR 301.9000-4 - Procedure in the event of a request or demand for IRS records or information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... from the authorizing official concerning the response to the request or demand. An IRS officer... and non-IRS matters. If, in response to a demand for IRS records or information, an authorizing... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Procedure in the event of a request or...

  1. 26 CFR 301.9000-4 - Procedure in the event of a request or demand for IRS records or information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... from the authorizing official concerning the response to the request or demand. An IRS officer... and non-IRS matters. If, in response to a demand for IRS records or information, an authorizing... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Procedure in the event of a request or...

  2. 26 CFR 301.9000-4 - Procedure in the event of a request or demand for IRS records or information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Procedure in the event of a request or demand for IRS records or information. 301.9000-4 Section 301.9000-4 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) PROCEDURE AND ADMINISTRATION PROCEDURE AND ADMINISTRATION General Rules Application of Internal...

  3. How can we identify the best implantation site for an ECG event recorder?

    PubMed

    Zellerhoff, C; Himmrich, E; Nebeling, D; Przibille, O; Nowak, B; Liebrich, A

    2000-10-01

    The aim of this study was to show how to find the preferable implantation site for an ECG event recorder (ECG-ER). We compared the quality of bipolar ECG recordings (4-cm electrode distance, vertical position) in 65 patients at the following sites: left and right subclavicular, left and right anterior axillary line (4th-5th interspace), left and right of the sternum (4th-5th interspace), heart apex, and subxyphoidal. The results were compared to the standard ECG lead II. In 30 patients, an additional comparison between vertical and horizontal ECG registrations was done using the same sites. ECG signals in five patients were compared positioning the electrodes towards the skin with turning them towards the muscle during ECG-ER implantation. The best ECG quality (defined as highest QRS amplitude, best visible P wave and/or pacemaker spike, best measurable QRS duration, and QT interval) and best agreement with the standard lead II was found in 68% on the left of the sternum, significantly less often (P < 0.001) on the right of the sternum (14.1%), left subclavicular (6.9%), apical (5.5%) and subxyphoidal (4.2%). A significantly higher QRS amplitude was measured and the P wave was more often visible in the vertical electrode position than in the horizontal position. In all five ECG-ER patients, there was a good agreement between the bipolar surface ECG at the implantation site and ECG-ER stored signals. A significant noise signal occurred in all five patients when the ECG-ER was implanted with electrodes towards the muscle. A P wave was visible in only three of those patients, but there was an insignificantly higher QRS amplitude than in ECG-ERs implanted with electrodes towards the skin. From these results, it can be concluded that the best implantation site for an ECG-ER is right or left of the sternum, positioning the electrodes vertically and towards the skin. PMID:11060877

  4. The Early Toarcian Oceanic Anoxic Event: A Southern Hemisphere record from Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fantasia, Alicia; Föllmi, Karl B.; Adatte, Thierry; Spangenberg, Jorge E.; Bernárdez, Enrique; Mattioli, Emanuela

    2016-04-01

    The Early Toarcian was marked by important environmental changes, marine oxygen deficiency and extensive organic-rich sediment deposition (T-OAE; ˜182 Ma, Early Jurassic). The T-OAE coincides with a marked negative carbon isotope excursion (CIE) recorded in marine carbonate, and marine and terrestrial organic carbon. This is commonly attributed to the massive release of isotopically light carbon to the atmospheric and oceanic reservoirs derived from the destabilization of methane hydrates from marine sediments and/or the emissions of thermogenic methane from the eruption of the Karoo-Ferrar LIP (e.g., Hesselbo et al., 2000; Kemp et al., 2005; Svensen et al., 2007; Mazzini et al., 2010). Moreover, in most documented marine sections, this episode is marked by a generalized crisis in carbonate production and marine invertebrate extinctions (e.g. Jenkyns, 1988; Röhl et al., 2005; Suan et al., 2001). Several studies of the T-OAE have been conducted on sediments in central and northwest Europe, but only few data are available from the Southern Hemisphere, leading to large uncertainty concerning the exact expression of this event in this part of the world. The aims of this study are to characterize the sediments deposited during the Andean equivalents of the tenuicostatum and falciferum European Zones and establish in which way the T-OAE affected this region. In the Early Jurassic, the Andean basin was in a back-arc setting with marine corridors connected to Panthalassa. In this study, we have generated new high-resolution sedimentological, geochemical and mineralogical data from the sections of El Peñon and Quebrada Asiento, located in Chile in the northeastern area of the city of Copiapó, Atacama region. The biostratigraphy of these sections has been studied by von Hillebrandt and Schidt-Effing (1981) and complemented here by a biostratigraphy based on calcareous nannofossils. The sections consist of a succession of marl, limestone and siltstone of Pliensbachian and

  5. Identification of Major Adverse Kidney Events Within the Electronic Health Record.

    PubMed

    Semler, Matthew W; Rice, Todd W; Shaw, Andrew D; Siew, Edward D; Self, Wesley H; Kumar, Avinash B; Byrne, Daniel W; Ehrenfeld, Jesse M; Wanderer, Jonathan P

    2016-07-01

    Acute kidney injury is common among critically ill adults and is associated with increased mortality and morbidity. The Major Adverse Kidney Events by 30 days (MAKE30) composite of death, new renal replacement therapy, or persistent renal dysfunction is recommended as a patient-centered outcome for pragmatic trials involving acute kidney injury. Accurate electronic detection of the MAKE30 endpoint using data within the electronic health record (EHR) could facilitate the use of the EHR in large-scale kidney injury research. In an observational study using prospectively collected data from 200 admissions to a single medical intensive care unit, we tested the performance of electronically-extracted data in identifying the MAKE30 composite compared to the reference standard of two-physician manual chart review. The incidence of MAKE30 on manual-review was 16 %, which included 8.5 % for in-hospital mortality, 3.5 % for new renal replacement therapy, and 8.5 % for persistent renal dysfunction. There was strong agreement between the electronic and manual assessment of MAKE30 (98.5 % agreement [95 % CI 96.5-100.0 %]; kappa 0.95 [95 % CI 0.87-1.00]; P < 0.001), with only three patients misclassified by electronic assessment. Performance of the electronic MAKE30 assessment was similar among patients with and without CKD and with and without a measured serum creatinine in the 12 months prior to hospital admission. In summary, accurately identifying the MAKE30 composite outcome using EHR data collected as a part of routine care appears feasible. PMID:27234478

  6. Patient characteristics associated with venous thromboembolic events: a cohort study using pooled electronic health record data

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Wendy; Gilder, Jason; Love, Thomas E; Jain, Anil K

    2012-01-01

    Objective To demonstrate the potential of de-identified clinical data from multiple healthcare systems using different electronic health records (EHR) to be efficiently used for very large retrospective cohort studies. Materials and methods Data of 959 030 patients, pooled from multiple different healthcare systems with distinct EHR, were obtained. Data were standardized and normalized using common ontologies, searchable through a HIPAA-compliant, patient de-identified web application (Explore; Explorys Inc). Patients were 26 years or older seen in multiple healthcare systems from 1999 to 2011 with data from EHR. Results Comparing obese, tall subjects with normal body mass index, short subjects, the venous thromboembolic events (VTE) OR was 1.83 (95% CI 1.76 to 1.91) for women and 1.21 (1.10 to 1.32) for men. Weight had more effect then height on VTE. Compared with Caucasian, Hispanic/Latino subjects had a much lower risk of VTE (female OR 0.47, 0.41 to 0.55; male OR 0.24, 0.20 to 0.28) and African-Americans a substantially higher risk (female OR 1.83, 1.76 to 1.91; male OR 1.58, 1.50 to 1.66). This 13-year retrospective study of almost one million patients was performed over approximately 125 h in 11 weeks, part time by the five authors. Discussion As research informatics tools develop and more clinical data become available in EHR, it is important to study and understand unique opportunities for clinical research informatics to transform the scale and resources needed to perform certain types of clinical research. Conclusions With the right clinical research informatics tools and EHR data, some types of very large cohort studies can be completed with minimal resources. PMID:22759621

  7. Use of event recorders and loop recorders in clinical practice: results of the European Heart Rhythm Association Survey.

    PubMed

    Sciaraffia, Elena; Chen, Jian; Hocini, Meleze; Larsen, Torben Bierregaard; Potpara, Tatjana; Blomström-Lundqvist, Carina

    2014-09-01

    Several kinds of electrocardiogram monitoring systems are now available in the clinical practice. The aim of this European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) survey was to assess the use of different monitoring techniques in the evaluation of patients with unexplained syncope, palpitations, and in those with established diagnosis of atrial fibrillation. Forty-five centres in Europe answered the questionnaire and the majority (78%) were university hospitals. The answers showed a discrepancy between the recommended use of implantable loop recorders (ILRs) in patients with unexplained syncope and the use of this device in clinical practice. In most of the cases only a minority of patients (<20%) seemed to actually receive an ILR as a part of the diagnostic process in accordance to the current guidelines. Holter monitoring systems and external loop recorders seemed to be the preferred monitoring techniques both in patients with recurrent palpitations and in those with established diagnosis of atrial fibrillation. PMID:25172620

  8. Mass Mortality Events in the NW Adriatic Sea: Phase Shift from Slow- to Fast-Growing Organisms

    PubMed Central

    Di Camillo, Cristina Gioia; Cerrano, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    Massive outbreaks are increasing all over the world, which are likely related to climate change. The North Adriatic Sea, a sub-basin of the Mediterranean Sea, is a shallow semi-closed sea receiving high nutrients inputs from important rivers. These inputs sustain the highest productive basin of the Mediterranean Sea. Moreover, this area shows a high number of endemisms probably due to the high diversity of environmental conditions and the conspicuous food availability. Here, we documented two massive mortalities (2009 and 2011) and the pattern of recovery of the affected biocoenoses in the next two years. Results show an impressive and fast shift of the benthic assemblage from a biocoenosis mainly composed of slow-growing and long-lived species to a biocoenosis dominated by fast-growing and short-lived species. The sponge Chondrosia reniformis, one of the key species of this assemblage, which had never been involved in previous massive mortality events in the Mediterranean Sea, reduced its coverage by 70%, and only few small specimens survived. All the damaged sponges, together with many associated organisms, were detached by rough-sea conditions, leaving large bare areas on the rocky wall. Almost three years after the disease, the survived specimens of C. reniformis did not increase significantly in size, while the bare areas were colonized by fast-growing species such as stoloniferans, hydrozoans, mussels, algae, serpulids and bryozoans. Cnidarians were more resilient than massive sponges since they quickly recovered in less than one month. In the study area, the last two outbreaks caused a reduction in the filtration efficiency of the local benthic assemblage by over 60%. The analysis of the times series of wave heights and temperature revealed that the conditions in summer 2011 were not so extreme as to justify severe mass mortality, suggesting the occurrence of other factors which triggered the disease. The long-term observations of a benthic assemblage in the

  9. Mass Mortality Events in the NW Adriatic Sea: Phase Shift from Slow- to Fast-Growing Organisms.

    PubMed

    Di Camillo, Cristina Gioia; Cerrano, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    Massive outbreaks are increasing all over the world, which are likely related to climate change. The North Adriatic Sea, a sub-basin of the Mediterranean Sea, is a shallow semi-closed sea receiving high nutrients inputs from important rivers. These inputs sustain the highest productive basin of the Mediterranean Sea. Moreover, this area shows a high number of endemisms probably due to the high diversity of environmental conditions and the conspicuous food availability. Here, we documented two massive mortalities (2009 and 2011) and the pattern of recovery of the affected biocoenoses in the next two years. Results show an impressive and fast shift of the benthic assemblage from a biocoenosis mainly composed of slow-growing and long-lived species to a biocoenosis dominated by fast-growing and short-lived species. The sponge Chondrosia reniformis, one of the key species of this assemblage, which had never been involved in previous massive mortality events in the Mediterranean Sea, reduced its coverage by 70%, and only few small specimens survived. All the damaged sponges, together with many associated organisms, were detached by rough-sea conditions, leaving large bare areas on the rocky wall. Almost three years after the disease, the survived specimens of C. reniformis did not increase significantly in size, while the bare areas were colonized by fast-growing species such as stoloniferans, hydrozoans, mussels, algae, serpulids and bryozoans. Cnidarians were more resilient than massive sponges since they quickly recovered in less than one month. In the study area, the last two outbreaks caused a reduction in the filtration efficiency of the local benthic assemblage by over 60%. The analysis of the times series of wave heights and temperature revealed that the conditions in summer 2011 were not so extreme as to justify severe mass mortality, suggesting the occurrence of other factors which triggered the disease. The long-term observations of a benthic assemblage in the

  10. Measurement of patient safety: a systematic review of the reliability and validity of adverse event detection with record review

    PubMed Central

    Hanskamp-Sebregts, Mirelle; Zegers, Marieke; Vincent, Charles; van Gurp, Petra J; de Vet, Henrica C W; Wollersheim, Hub

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Record review is the most used method to quantify patient safety. We systematically reviewed the reliability and validity of adverse event detection with record review. Design A systematic review of the literature. Methods We searched PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsycINFO and the Cochrane Library and from their inception through February 2015. We included all studies that aimed to describe the reliability and/or validity of record review. Two reviewers conducted data extraction. We pooled κ values (κ) and analysed the differences in subgroups according to number of reviewers, reviewer experience and training level, adjusted for the prevalence of adverse events. Results In 25 studies, the psychometric data of the Global Trigger Tool (GTT) and the Harvard Medical Practice Study (HMPS) were reported and 24 studies were included for statistical pooling. The inter-rater reliability of the GTT and HMPS showed a pooled κ of 0.65 and 0.55, respectively. The inter-rater agreement was statistically significantly higher when the group of reviewers within a study consisted of a maximum five reviewers. We found no studies reporting on the validity of the GTT and HMPS. Conclusions The reliability of record review is moderate to substantial and improved when a small group of reviewers carried out record review. The validity of the record review method has never been evaluated, while clinical data registries, autopsy or direct observations of patient care are potential reference methods that can be used to test concurrent validity. PMID:27550650

  11. Records of the paleoclimate during the fast transgression period (13 ka BP-8 ka BP) from the mud area on the inner shelf of the East China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, S.

    2015-12-01

    A 35.30m-long core (MZ02) recovered from a water depth of 32.4m from the inner shelf mud deposit of the East China Sea was analyzed for sedimentary characteristics, color reflectance, clay mineral, and element geochemistry components as well as by AMS 14C dating to research the sedimentation rate, sediment provenance and paleocwan mountainous river and clay fralimate evolution during the fast transgression period in the study area. Rare earth element and clay mineral proxies indicated that the mixed provenance sediment accumulated in the foreshore-nearshore region at the beginning of the fast transgression period, with a higher sedimentation rate of 5.58m/ka. While from 9800-9500 a B.P., the sedimentation rate keep lower about 1.73m/ka, and the sediment provenance changed obviously, silt fraction were apt to Taiction prone to be transported from the Yangtze River. Multiple proxy system including sediment redness (a*), chemical index of alteration (CIA), clay mineral proxy (smectite/kaolinite), major and trace element proxy (CaO/MgO, Ba/Sr) also showed a good paleoclimate record during the fast transgression period, which could be divided into three units. All the proxies changed little during Unit I (13-11.3ka B.P.) and revealed the climate kept in a relative stable level. Obvious fluctuation happened in Unit II (11.3-10.1ka B.P.) and the temperature kept decreasing more than 1ka till the Younger Dryas event, showed a well regional response to global climate changes. While continuous warming trend resumed again in Unit III (10.1-8 ka B.P.), which may be the signal for Holocene warm period. In addition, we also found significant 80yr, 89yr and 100yr cycles in our CIA, CaO/MgO and Ba/Sr records that imply a possible solar influence on the regional climate changes during the fast transgression period. Keywords: East China Sea, provenance, transgression, mud deposit, late Pleistocene, paleoclimate

  12. Near-Source Recordings of Small and Large Earthquakes: Magnitude Predictability only for Medium and Small Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, M. A.; Heaton, T. H.; Clinton, J. F.

    2015-12-01

    The feasibility of Earthquake Early Warning (EEW) applications has revived the discussion on whether earthquake rupture development follows deterministic principles or not. If it does, it may be possible to predict final earthquake magnitudes while the rupture is still developing. EEW magnitude estimation schemes, most of which are based on 3-4 seconds of near-source p-wave data, have been shown to work well for small to moderate size earthquakes. In this magnitude range, the used time window is larger than the source durations of the events. Whether the magnitude estimation schemes also work for events in which the source duration exceeds the estimation time window, however, remains debated. In our study we have compiled an extensive high-quality data set of near-source seismic recordings. We search for waveform features that could be diagnostic of final event magnitudes in a predictive sense. We find that the onsets of large (M7+) events are statistically indistinguishable from those of medium sized events (M5.5-M7). Significant differences arise only once the medium size events terminate. This observation suggests that EEW relevant magnitude estimates are largely observational, rather than predictive, and that whether a medium size event becomes a large one is not determined at the rupture onset. As a consequence, early magnitude estimates for large events are minimum estimates, a fact that has to be taken into account in EEW alert messaging and response design.

  13. Early Oligocene geomagnetic field behavior from ODP Site 1128: Complex records of short-period polarity events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molina-Garza, R. S.; Fuller, M. D.

    2001-12-01

    At Site 1128, in the Great Australian Bight, Leg 182 of the Ocean Drilling Program recovered a thick (~350 m) section of Upper Eocene and Lower Oligocene marine calcareous clays. Shipboard measurements established a magnetostratigraphy that can unambiguously be correlated to chrons C13n to C10n of the global polarity time scale (GPTS), and a less complete record of chrons C17n to C15r (due to poor core recovery). Correlation to the GPTS is further supported by available biostratigraphic data. For the Lower Oligocene sequence, average sedimentation rate is estimated at ~4 cm/kyr. The sediments recovered thus allow to test for the completeness and reliability of the geomagnetic field polarity during the Early Oligocene. The original shipboard long-core measurements suggested the presence of additional short polarity events or geomagnetic field excursions during chrons C13n, C12r, C11r, and C11n. In order to examine the reliability of the record and the nature of possible short-polarity events, we obtained discrete samples from the entire sequence at ~1 m intervals, with a closer sample spacing in critical intervals (~10 cm). The natural remanence of these sediments is normally simple. After removing a small soft overprint, the magnetization decays towards the origin with distributed coercivities and distributed unblocking temperatures. Demagnetization behavior and other rock magnetic data indicate that the remanence resides primarily in a cubic phase such as magnetite or maghemite, with a small contribution from hematite. Discrete samples from chron C12r did not reproduce the long-core record for two of the supposed events, single samples suggest the presence of short events or cryptochrons near the base of both C13n and C12r, and multiple samples suggest the existence of short-period normal polarity events during C11r and near the top of C12r. The records of these events are, however, complex. Demagnetization results indicate that the magnetization consists of an

  14. Geomorphological record of extreme wave events during Roman times in the Guadalquivir estuary (Gulf of Cadiz, SW Spain): An archaeological and paleogeographical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Ramírez, Antonio; Villarías-Robles, Juan J. R.; Pérez-Asensio, José N.; Santos, Ana; Morales, Juan Antonio; Celestino-Pérez, Sebastián; León, Ángel; Santos-Arévalo, Francisco Javier

    2016-05-01

    Analysis of the geological record has made it possible to delimit for the Guadalquivir estuary the traces of extreme wave events (EWEs) during the Roman period in the Iberian Peninsula (218 BCE to 476 CE). The largest event occurred in the 2nd-3rd century CE. It generated clearly visible erosive effects in the coastal barriers, including washover fans and erosional scarps. In the inner estuary, however, the effects were minor: crevasse splays that broke levees and cheniers, as well as a residual sedimentary lag. The significant development of the spits protected the inner estuary from the marine incursion, which only caused a water level rise with low-regime waves. Correlation of the geomorphological and sedimentary marks left by this event with the archaeological and geological evidence of other events recognized elsewhere in the Gulf of Cadiz effectively argues for a tsunami as to the nature of the 2nd-3rd century CE event. Yet this and the other identified EWEs in the Guadalquivir estuary during the pre-Roman and the Roman period all fit a model of paleogeographic evolution dominated by processes of coastal progradation and estuarine infilling. Radiocarbon dating, geomorphological analysis, and historical references fail to warrant the so-called '218-209 BCE' Atlantic tsunami, as hypothesized in the received scientific literature. In pre-Roman and Roman times, human occupation at the mouth of the Guadalquivir River was strongly influenced by various geodynamic processes, the location of the settlements being contingent upon dependable, fast communication with the sea and, above all, upon adequate protection from EWEs, on the leeward side of spits. Progressive progradation of these coastal barriers combined with the gradual infilling of the estuary to make navigation to open sea increasingly difficult and, eventually, to result in the abandonment of settlements.

  15. The Early Toarcian Oceanic Anoxic Event and its sedimentary record in Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fantasia, Alicia; Föllmi, Karl B.; Adatte, Thierry; Spangenberg, Jorge E.; Montero-Serrano, Jean-Carlos

    2015-04-01

    In the Jurassic period, the Early Toarcian Oceanic Anoxic Event (T-OAE), about 183 Ma ago, was a global perturbation of paleoclimatic and paleoenvironmental conditions. This episode was associated with a crisis in marine carbonate accumulation, climate warming, an increase in sea level, ocean acidification, enhanced continental weathering, whereas organic-rich sediments are noticeable for example in the Atlantic and in the Tethys. This episode is associated with a negative carbon excursion, which is recorded both in marine and terrestrial environments. The cause(s) of this environmental crisis remain(s) still controversial. Nevertheless, the development of negative δ13C excursions is commonly interpreted as due to the injection of isotopically-light carbon associated with gas hydrate dissociation, the thermal metamorphism of carbon-rich sediments and input of thermogenic and volcanogenic carbon related to the formation of the Karoo-Ferrar basaltic province in southern Gondwana (Hesselbo et al., 2000, 2007; Beerling et al., 2002; Cohen et al., 2004, 2007; McElwain et al., 2005, Beerling and Brentnall, 2007; Svensen et al., 2007; Hermoso et al., 2009, 2012; Mazzini et al., 2010). Several studies of the T-OAE have been conducted on sediments in central and northwest Europe, but only few data are available concerning the Swiss sedimentary records. Therefore, we focused on two sections in the Jura Plateau (canton Aargau): the Rietheim section (Montero-Serrano et al., submitted) and the Gipf section (current study). A multidisciplinary approach has been chosen and the tools to be used are based on sedimentological observations (sedimentary condensation, etc.), biostratigraphy, mineralogy (bulk-rock composition), facies and microfacies analysis (presence or absence of benthos), clay-mineralogy composition (climatic conditions), major and trace-element analyses (productivity, redox conditions, etc.), phosphorus (trophic levels, anoxia), carbon isotopes and organic

  16. Messinian Salinity Crisis - DREAM (Deep-sea Record of Mediterranean Messinian events) drilling projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lofi, Johanna; Camerlenghi, Angelo

    2014-05-01

    About 6 My ago the Mediterranean Sea was transformed into a giant saline basin. This event, commonly referred to as the Messinian salinity crisis (MSC), changed the chemistry of the global ocean and had a permanent impact on both the terrestrial and marine ecosystems of a huge area surrounding the Mediterranean area. The first fascinating MSC scenario was proposed following DSDP Leg XIII in 1970 and envisaged an almost desiccated deep Mediterranean basin with a dramatic ~1,500 m drop of sea level, the incision of deep canyons by rivers on the continental margins, and a final catastrophic flooding event when the connections between the Mediterranean Sea and the Atlantic were re-established ~5.33 My ago. In spite of 40 years of multi-disciplinary research conducted on the MSC, modalities, timing, causes, chronology and consequence at local and planetary scale are still not yet fully understood, and the MSC event remains one of the longest-living controversies in Earth Science. Key factor for the controversy is the lack of a complete record of the MSC preserved in the deepest Mediterranean basins. Anywhere else, the MSC mostly generated a sedimentary/time lag corresponding to a widespread erosion surface. Correlations with the offshore depositional units are thus complex, preventing the construction of a coherent scenario linking the outcropping MSC evaporites, the erosion on the margins, and the deposition of clastics and evaporites in the abyssal plains. Recent activity by various research groups in order to identify locations for multiple-site drilling (including riser-drilling) in the Mediterranean Sea that would contribute to solve the open questions still existing about the MSC has culminated in two DREAM Magellan+ Workshops held in 2013 and 2014. A strategy and work plan have been established in order to submit an IODP Multi-phase Drilling Project("Uncovering A Salt Giant")including several site-specific drilling proposals addressing different scientific

  17. CHARACTERISTICS OF THE AFTERSHOCK SEQUENCE OF THE BORAH PEAK, IDAHO, EARTHQUAKE DETERMINED FROM DIGITAL RECORDINGS OF THE EVENTS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boatwright, John

    1985-01-01

    The U. S. Geological Survey, Menlo Park, deployed and maintained a network of twelve digital instruments over the 2 weeks following the October 28, 1983, Borah Peak, Idaho, earthquake. The network recorded 45 events with M greater than equivalent to 3. 0, and 6 events with M less than equivalent to 4. 0. The seismic moments of the aftershocks increase with increasing hypocentral depth below 12 km. The dynamic stress drops of the events do not show any systematic variation with depth, however. Most of the events with large stress drops are clustered in the northwest limb of the aftershock distribution; the average stress drop of the southern events is 31 plus or minus 16 bars, while the average stress drop of the events in the northwest limb is 77 plus or minus 52 bars. This clustering of events with large stress drops marks an apparent stress concentration, possibly associated with the arrest of the main shock rupture propagation by a fracture barrier at depth.

  18. Holocene climatic events recorded in palaeoflood slackwater deposits along the middle Yiluohe River valley, middle Yellow River basin, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xueru; Huang, Chun Chang; Pang, Jiangli; Zha, Xiaochun; Guo, Yongqiang; Hu, Guiming

    2016-06-01

    Palaeohydrological investigations were carried out in the middle reaches of the Yiluohe River, a major tributary in the lower-middle Yellow River basin. Typical palaeoflood slackwater deposits (SWDs) were identified in the Holocene pedostratigraphy on the cliffy river banks. Analytical results, including magnetic susceptibility and grain-size distribution data, indicated that these SWDs were deposited from the suspended sediment load in flood water. These SWDs are different from eolian loess, soils and aeolian sands in the riverbank profile. They recorded several episodes of extraordinary palaeoflood events. In the Longmenxia reaches of the Yihe River valley, these flood events were dated at 3100-3000 a, 1800-1700 a, 770-610 a, and 420-340 a using the optically stimulated luminescence method in combination with the pedostratigraphic correlations. In the Longhutan reaches of the Luohe River valley, the palaeoflood events were dated at 1975-1466 a, i.e., from the Han to Wei dynasties (AD 25-534), during which the capital city on the river banks was flooded many times, as recorded in the literature. These extraordinary flood events are well correlated chronologically with the known Holocene climatic events that occurred in the Northern Hemisphere. Thus, the monsoonal climate was highly variable with both floods and droughts occurring frequently during these episodes. These results are important for understanding the response of river systems in eastern Asia to global changes.

  19. Do hurricanes leave unique sedimentological records in floodplain settings? Connecticut River, Tropical Storm Irene and past flood events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yellen, B.; Woodruff, J. D.; Kratz, L. N.; Fallon, A.

    2012-12-01

    In late August, 2011, Tropical Storm Irene passed directly over the Connecticut River watershed causing several low order streams to swell beyond prior historical maximum discharges. Although resultant discharge on the mainstem Connecticut River only amounted to a one in seven year-sized event, its sediment load far exceeded the historical discharge to sediment concentration relationship. Gravity cores taken in off-channel ponds following the hydrograph peak clearly showed deposition of storm-mobilized grains. Samples collected from floodplain forest locations also showed significant accumulation. In both depositional settings, grainsize, lithology and percent organics of flood event deposition differed dramatically from background sedimentation. Long cores collected from these same settings suggest that similar deposits from historical storms of record from the past three centuries are preserved in the floodplain sediment record.; Landsat 5 true color image collected on September 2, 2011 - two days after Tropical Storm Irene left the region.

  20. Ultra-fast three terminal perpendicular spin-orbit torque MRAM (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulle, Olivier; Cubukcu, Murat; Hamelin, Claire; Lamard, Nathalie; Buda-Prejbeanu, Liliana; Mikuszeit, Nikolai; Garello, Kevin; Gambardella, Pietro; Langer, Juergen; Ocker, Berthold; Miron, Mihai; Gaudin, Gilles

    2015-09-01

    The discovery that a current flowing in a heavy metal can exert a torque on a neighboring ferromagnet has opened a new way to manipulate the magnetization at the nanoscale. This "spin orbit torque" (SOT) has been demonstrated in ultrathin magnetic multilayers with structural inversion asymmetry (SIA) and high spin orbit coupling, such as Pt/Co/AlOx multilayers. We have shown that this torque can lead to the magnetization switching of a perpendicularly magnetized nanomagnet by an in-plane current injection. The manipulation of magnetization by SOT has led to a novel concept of magnetic RAM memory, the SOT-MRAM, which combines non volatility, high speed, reliability and large endurance. These features make the SOT-MRAM a good candidate to replace SRAM for non-volatile cache memory application. We will present the proof of concept of a perpendicular SOT-MRAM cell composed of a Ta/FeCoB/MgO/FeCoB magnetic tunnel junction and demonstrate ultra-fast (down to 300 ps) deterministic bipolar magnetization switching. Macrospin and micromagnetic simulations including SOT cannot reproduce the experimental results, which suggests that additional physical mechanisms are at stacks. Our results show that SOT-MRAM is fast, reliable and low power, which is promising for non-volatile cache memory application. We will also discuss recent experiments of magnetization reversal in ultrathin multilayers Pt/Co/AlOx by very short (<200 ps) current pulses. We will show that in this material, the Dzyaloshinskii-Moryia interaction plays a key role in the reversal process.

  1. Multiple impact events recorded in the NWA 7298 H chondrite breccia and the dynamical evolution of an ordinary chondrite asteroid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedrich, Jon M.; Weisberg, Michael K.; Rivers, Mark L.

    2014-05-01

    The major geologic process that has shaped the asteroids and led to development of their regoliths is impact. Petrofabrics in ordinary chondrites are undoubtedly the result of impact events on their asteroidal parent bodies and the foliation present in a chondrite serves as an enduring record of the magnitude of the most intense compacting event experienced by the material. An overwhelming majority of chondrites have an internally consistent petrofabric contained within the spatial dimensions of the entire rock, including across clasts or different petrographic domains. This indicates that the magnitude of the most recent impact to have affected the assembled chondrite was significant enough to impart a foliation across all lithologies. Information of any previous impacts is largely lost because of the consistent, realigned foliations. We present X-ray microtomography derived 3D petrofabric intensity and orientation data for three lithologies in the NWA 7298 breccia. The internally inconsistent petrofabrics among differing lithologies indicate that the magnitude of the final impact event was smaller than previous ones. This latter case preserves fabric information recorded during previous impacts and allows a more complete interpretation of the impact history of a local region of the asteroidal parent. We used our data to infer the sequence and intensity of distinct impact events affecting the NWA 7298 parent asteroid. We suggest a near-surface impact debris zone on the H chondrite parent asteroid as an origin for NWA 7298. These observations yield new opportunities for investigating and interpreting the dynamic collisional evolution of asteroids.

  2. Mergers of Charged Black Holes: Gravitational-wave Events, Short Gamma-Ray Bursts, and Fast Radio Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bing

    2016-08-01

    The discoveries of GW150914, GW151226, and LVT151012 suggest that double black hole (BH–BH) mergers are common in the universe. If at least one of the two merging black holes (BHs) carries a certain amount of charge, possibly retained by a rotating magnetosphere, the inspiral of a BH–BH system would drive a global magnetic dipole normal to the orbital plane. The rapidly evolving magnetic moment during the merging process would drive a Poynting flux with an increasing wind power. The magnetospheric activities during the final phase of the merger would make a fast radio burst (FRB) if the BH charge can be as large as a factor of \\hat{q}∼ ({10}-9{--}{10}-8) of the critical charge Q c of the BH. At large radii, dissipation of the Poynting flux energy in the outflow would power a short-duration high-energy transient, which would appear as a detectable short-duration gamma-ray burst (GRB) if the charge can be as large as \\hat{q}∼ ({10}-5{--}{10}-4). The putative short GRB coincident with GW150914 recorded by Fermi GBM may be interpreted with this model. Future joint GW/GRB/FRB searches would lead to a measurement or place a constraint on the charges carried by isolate BHs.

  3. Mergers of Charged Black Holes: Gravitational-wave Events, Short Gamma-Ray Bursts, and Fast Radio Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bing

    2016-08-01

    The discoveries of GW150914, GW151226, and LVT151012 suggest that double black hole (BH–BH) mergers are common in the universe. If at least one of the two merging black holes (BHs) carries a certain amount of charge, possibly retained by a rotating magnetosphere, the inspiral of a BH–BH system would drive a global magnetic dipole normal to the orbital plane. The rapidly evolving magnetic moment during the merging process would drive a Poynting flux with an increasing wind power. The magnetospheric activities during the final phase of the merger would make a fast radio burst (FRB) if the BH charge can be as large as a factor of \\hat{q}˜ ({10}-9{--}{10}-8) of the critical charge Q c of the BH. At large radii, dissipation of the Poynting flux energy in the outflow would power a short-duration high-energy transient, which would appear as a detectable short-duration gamma-ray burst (GRB) if the charge can be as large as \\hat{q}˜ ({10}-5{--}{10}-4). The putative short GRB coincident with GW150914 recorded by Fermi GBM may be interpreted with this model. Future joint GW/GRB/FRB searches would lead to a measurement or place a constraint on the charges carried by isolate BHs.

  4. Pleistocene ice-rafted debris events recorded at the Agulhas Plateau - indicators of intermittent Indian-Atlantic gateway closure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegler, M.; Hall, I. R.; Siret, P. J.; Zahn, R.

    2012-04-01

    Interocean exchange of heat and salt around South Africa - the so called 'Agulhas Leakage' - is thought to be a key link in the maintenance of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC). It takes place at the Agulhas Retroflection, largely by the intermittent shedding of enormous rings that penetrate into the South Atlantic Ocean (Lutjeharms, 1996, Biastoch et al., 2008; Beal et al., 2011). Recent palaeoceanographic studies suggest that variability in the latitudinal position of the subtropical front (STF) in the Southern Ocean, act as a gatekeeper for the Agulhas retroflection and moreover, that a variable northward migration of the STF potentially modulated the severity of glacial periods by altering the amount of Agulhas leakage with consequences for the AMOC (Bard and Rickaby, 2009). Here we present a high-resolution record of ice rafted debris (IRD) from the southern Agulhas Plateau (sediment core MD02-2588, 41°19,90 S and 25°49,70 E, 2907 m water depth) covering the last 350,000 years. We find distinct millennial scale events with high abundances of IRD in the sediments. Scanning-electron microscope analysis of individual grains shows a wide range of morphologies, with a high degree of angularity being a dominant feature, with surface microfeatures (linear fractures, grooves and troughs) that are typical for glacial origin and transport. We interpret these IRD events as indicators for a northward shift of the Southern Ocean frontal system, thereby allowing sufficient cooling and iceberg survivability as far north as the Agulhas Plateau. Our proxy record suggests significant millennial scale variability of the frontal movements throughout the last three glacial cycles. Largest IRD peaks occur during marine isotope stage 8 (~300 ka BP) and hence during a period for which an extreme northward shift in the STF has been identified previously (Bard and Rickaby, 2009). We compare our IRD record with records of millennial scale climate variability in

  5. Adaptive sparse signal processing for discrimination of satellite-based radiofrequency (RF) recordings of lightning events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moody, Daniela I.; Smith, David A.

    2015-05-01

    For over two decades, Los Alamos National Laboratory programs have included an active research effort utilizing satellite observations of terrestrial lightning to learn more about the Earth's RF background. The FORTE satellite provided a rich satellite lightning database, which has been previously used for some event classification, and remains relevant for advancing lightning research. Lightning impulses are dispersed as they travel through the ionosphere, appearing as nonlinear chirps at the receiver on orbit. The data processing challenge arises from the combined complexity of the lightning source model, the propagation medium nonlinearities, and the sensor artifacts. We continue to develop modern event classification capability on the FORTE database using adaptive signal processing combined with compressive sensing techniques. The focus of our work is improved feature extraction using sparse representations in overcomplete analytical dictionaries. We explore two possible techniques for detecting lightning events, and showcase the algorithms on few representative data examples. We present preliminary results of our work and discuss future development.

  6. Luminescence chronologies for sediments recording paleoseismic events and slip rate for the central Garlock fault, California, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okubo, S. G.; Wolf, E.; Roder, B. J.; Rhodes, E. J.; McGill, S. F.; Dolan, J. F.; Mcauliffe, L. J.; Lawson, M. J.; Barrera, W. A.

    2012-12-01

    Luminescence dating has a significant role to play in providing chronological control for lacustrine and alluvial sediments that record both tectonic and climatic events. However, poor characteristics in some environments mean that the well-established method of OSL (optically stimulated luminescence) dating of quartz is not well-suited for the material available. In order to overcome this significant limitation, a range of methods based on the IRSL (infra-red stimulated luminescence) and ITL (isothermal thermoluminescence) of K-feldspar are currently under development. The site of El Paso Peaks, California has an established C-14 chronology spanning the last 7,000 years for a series of playa sediments comprising silts and fine sands, with occasional incursions of coarser sands and gravels from the alluvial fan that forms one side of the small ephemeral lake basin. Another barrier is formed by a shutter ridge of the left-lateral central Garlock fault, and this succession of sediments records at least six seismic events. Following collection of a suite of 24 luminescence samples distributed throughout the upper part of this succession, this site provides a rare opportunity to test different luminescence dating protocols in a rigorous fashion. At the site of Christmas Canyon West, a few miles further east, numerous small offsets of depositional and erosional alluvial fan features provide the opportunity to determine slip rates for a variety of timescales spanning the past couple of thousand years, besides forming a record of the timing of several discrete depositional episodes representing local high precipitation events. We review the challenges involved in developing a reliable luminescence chronology for sediment deposition in these contexts, and in relating this chronology to significant environmental events.

  7. Depicting adverse events in cardiac theatre: the preliminary conception of the RECORD model

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Human error is a byproduct of the human activity and may results in random unintended events; they may have major consequences when it comes to delivery of medicine. Furthermore the causes of error in surgical practice are multifaceted and complex. This article aims to raise awareness for safety measures in the cardiac surgical room and briefly “touch upon” the human factors that could lead to adverse outcomes. Finally, we describe a model that would enable us to depict and study adverse events in the operating theatre. PMID:23510398

  8. The 5.2 ka climate event: Evidence from stable isotope and multi-proxy palaeoecological peatland records in Ireland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roland, T. P.; Daley, T. J.; Caseldine, C. J.; Charman, D. J.; Turney, C. S. M.; Amesbury, M. J.; Thompson, G. J.; Woodley, E. J.

    2015-09-01

    Evidence for a major climate event at 5.2 ka has been reported globally and is associated with considerable societal disruption, but is poorly characterised in northwest Europe. This event forms part of a broader period of re-organisation in the Earth's ocean-atmosphere circulation system between 6 and 5 ka. This study tests the nature and timing of the event in northwest Europe, a region highly sensitive to change in meridional overturning circulation and mid-latitude westerly airflow. Here we report three high-resolution Irish multi-proxy records obtained from ombrotrophic peatlands that have robust chronological frameworks. We identify the 5.2 ka event by a sustained decrease in δ18Ocellulose at all three sites, with additional and parallel changes in δ13Ccellulose and palaeoecological (testate amoebae, plant macrofossil and humification) data from two sites in northern Ireland. Data from Sluggan Moss demonstrate a particularly coherent shift towards wetter conditions. These data support the hypothesis that the event was caused by a prolonged period of positive North Atlantic Oscillation conditions, resulting in pervasive cyclonic weather patterns across northwest Europe, increasing precipitation over Ireland.

  9. Breath-by-breath detection of apneic events for OSA severity estimation using non-contact audio recordings.

    PubMed

    Rosenwein, T; Dafna, E; Tarasiuk, A; Zigel, Y

    2015-08-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a prevalent sleep disorder, characterized by recurrent episodes of upper airway obstructions during sleep. We hypothesize that breath-by-breath audio analysis of the respiratory cycle (i.e., inspiration and expiration phases) during sleep can reliably estimate the apnea hypopnea index (AHI), a measure of OSA severity. The AHI is calculated as the average number of apnea (A)/hypopnea (H) events per hour of sleep. Audio signals recordings of 186 adults referred to OSA diagnosis were acquired in-laboratory and at-home conditions during polysomnography and WatchPat study, respectively. A/H events were automatically segmented and classified using a binary random forest classifier. Total accuracy rate of 86.3% and an agreement of κ=42.98% were achieved in A/H event detection. Correlation of r=0.87 (r=0.74), diagnostic agreement of 76% (81.7%), and average absolute difference AHI error of 7.4 (7.8) (events/hour) were achieved in in-laboratory (at-home) conditions, respectively. Here we provide evidence that A/H events can be reliably detected at their exact time locations during sleep using non-contact audio approach. This study highlights the potential of this approach to reliably evaluate AHI in at home conditions. PMID:26738073

  10. Toward a record of Central Pacific El Niño events since 1880

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascolini-Campbell, M.; Zanchettin, D.; Bothe, O.; Timmreck, C.; Matei, D.; Jungclaus, J. H.; Graf, H.-F.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the various methods currently available for distinguishing between the Central Pacific (CP) El Niño (or "El Niño Modoki") and the canonical El Niño by considering nine different methods and five sea surface temperature (SST) datasets from 1880 to 2010. This is aimed to demonstrate the variety which exists between different classification methods as well as to help identify years which can be more confidently classified as CP events. Classifying CP El Niños based on the greatest convergence between methods and between SST datasets provides a more robust identification of these events. Analysis of the SST patterns of the CP years identified demonstrates several misclassifications, stressing the importance of not relying solely on indices. After removal, 14 years which are classified the most consistently as CP events include the following: 1885/1886, 1914/1915, 1940/1941, 1958/1959, 1963/1964, 1968/1969, 1977/1978, 1986/1987, 1990/1991, 1991/1992, 1994/1995, 2002/2003, 2003/2004, and 2004/2005. Our findings also indicate the intermittent appearance of CP events throughout the time period investigated, inciting the role of multidecadal natural climate variability in generating CP El Niños.

  11. Utilisation of Rb/Sr as proxy for mass wasting events in peat records from the Romanian Carpathians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longman, Jack; Ersek, Vasile; Veres, Daniel; Salzmann, Ulrich

    2016-04-01

    Mass wasting events, including landslides, avalanches and flooding related to heavy rains can have a major impact on the local environment. Due to their association to extreme precipitation and glacial retreat, their occurrence is likely to increase as the climate changes in the future. As such, understanding their causation, and predicting their future impact is of paramount importance. To make such predictions, understanding of the relationship between the climate and the mass-wasting event is key. For this to happen, we must use historical records of mass wasting and climate to tie the two together. As a result, a reliable, quick and easy method for determining these events in the sedimentological record must be developed. The Rb/Sr ratio has been suggested as one indicator of mass wasting events, particularly based on lake sediment research in glaciated terrain. Our work was initially developed upon the behaviour of the two elements during weathering, considering that Rb commonly substitutes for K in mineral lattices and Sr commonly for Ca, due to similar ionic radii. Minerals containing K are much more resistant than Ca-bearing ones, and so there is enrichment in weathering products of Ca, and therefore Sr. As a result, Sr should be enriched in weathered material, resulting in a lowering of the Rb/Sr ratio. This assumption has been proven as reliable in similar research involving aeolian deposits and lake sediments. Here we present the first Holocene record based on this proxy from a peat archive from a raised mountain bog in the Romanian Carpathians, nested at the foot of an avalanche-prone glacial cirque. Our geochemical assessments are based on complete digestion of samples, and analysis via ICP-OES, rather than based only on core scanning. Initial results look promising, with the peat core below the active layer (acrotelm) and above the minerogenically-influenced zone producing strong correlation to the estimates of the minerogenic input over the bog based

  12. Implications of variance in biogeochemical proxy records spanning Mesozoic Oceanic Anoxic Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, M. L.; Mills, J. V.; Hurtgen, M. T.; Sageman, B. B.

    2013-12-01

    The cycling of key elements through the ocean and atmosphere varied widely in the Mesozoic in response to changes in primary productivity and organic carbon burial, volcanism, weathering, and evaporite burial. Many of these processes have been proposed as triggers for the discreet periods of widespread organic carbon production and/or preservation termed Ocean Anoxic Events or OAE's. Thus, it might be expected that similar patterns of elemental cycling would characterize most major OAE intervals and could be used to help elucidate the controls on initiation and/or termination of these events. Yet this is not the case. In this study we compare the variability of a series of geochemical proxies, focusing on sulfur (S) isotopes of marine sulfate and sulfide minerals, through a series of Mesozoic OAE's. The data set includes our own results from OAE1a (ca. 125Ma) and OAE2 (ca. 94Ma), as well as published data from other events. The results indicate that S cycling varied significantly among the events, despite many similarities in the behavior of carbon isotopes and geochemical indicators of oxygen deficiency. Specifically, S isotope compositions of seawater sulfate and pyrite are quite variable during OAE2 suggesting that a short-term increase in sulfate levels upon a low background occurred at the onset due to enhanced volcanism and/or weathering. In contrast, S isotope compositions of seawater sulfate and pyrite decrease dramatically through the OAE1a and are completely decoupled from the carbon cycle. We evaluate these trends using coupled sulfur and carbon box models and show that patterns of S cycling during OAE1a were predominantly controlled by volcanism, whereas S cycling during OAE2 represents a stronger interplay between volcanic processes and linkage with the carbon cycle. An analysis of the differences in S cycling among events provides improved insight into the suite of processes that interacted to drive large-scale changes in environmental conditions

  13. Capacitive ECG recording and beat-to-beat interval estimation after major cardiac event.

    PubMed

    Leicht, Lennart; Skobel, Erik; Mathissen, Marcel; Leonhardt, Steffen; Weyer, Soren; Wartzek, Tobias; Reith, Sebastian; Mohler, Werner; Teichmann, Daniel

    2015-08-01

    Today, heart diseases are the most common cause of death in the U.S.. Due to improved healthcare, more and more patients survive a major cardiac event, e.g. a heart attack. However, participation in everyday activity (e.g. driving a car) can be impaired afterwards. Patients might benefit from heart activity monitoring while driving using a capacitive ECG (cECG). However, it is unknown whether cECG is an appropriate monitoring tool for such patients. In this work, first results from a study including 10 patients having survived at least one major cardiac event are presented. It is shown that cECG can be used to diagnose heart rhythm deviations and estimate beat-to-beat intervals similar to conventional ECG. PMID:26738055

  14. Fungal event and palynological record of ecological crisis and recovery across the Permian-Triassic boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eshet, Yoram; Rampino, Michael R.; Visscher, Henk

    1995-11-01

    The end of the Permian Period was marked by the most severe mass extinction in the geologic record. Detailed quantitative study of pollen and spores from shallow-marine deposits spanning the Permian-Triassic (P-Tr) boundary in Israel reveals a sequence of palynological-ecological stages reflecting a major crisis among land plants. The disappearance of the gymnosperm-dominated palynoflora of the Late Permian Lueckisporites virkkiae Zone is recorded at a claystone horizon containing almost exclusively abundant fungal remains and carbonized terrestrial plant debris. This “fungal spike” is followed by a zone dominated by marine acritarchs and a succession showing ecological recovery with abundant lycopod spores and eventual reappearance of bisaccate gymnosperm pollen in the Early Triassic. The latest Permian proliferation of fungi is recognizable worldwide and can be correlated with other paleontological and geochemical markers of a global ecological disaster.

  15. Seawater osmium isotope evidence for a middle Miocene flood basalt event in ferromanganese crust records

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Klemm, V.; Frank, M.; Levasseur, S.; Halliday, A.N.; Hein, J.R.

    2008-01-01

    Three ferromanganese crusts from the northeast, northwest and central Atlantic were re-dated using osmium (Os) isotope stratigraphy and yield ages from middle Miocene to the present. The three Os isotope records do not show evidence for growth hiatuses. The reconstructed Os isotope-based growth rates for the sections older than 10??Ma are higher than those determined previously by the combined beryllium isotope (10Be/9Be) and cobalt (Co) constant-flux methods, which results in a decrease in the maximum age of each crust. This re-dating does not lead to significant changes to the interpretation of previously determined radiogenic isotope neodymium, lead (Nd, Pb) time series because the variability of these isotopes was very small in the records of the three crusts prior to 10??Ma. The Os isotope record of the central Atlantic crust shows a pronounced minimum during the middle Miocene between 15 and 12??Ma, similar to a minimum previously observed in two ferromanganese crusts from the central Pacific. For the other two Atlantic crusts, the Os isotope records and their calibration to the global seawater curve for the middle Miocene are either more uncertain or too short and thus do not allow for a reliable identification of an isotopic minimum. Similar to pronounced minima reported previously for the Cretaceous/Tertiary and Eocene/Oligocene boundaries, possible interpretations for the newly identified middle Miocene Os isotope minimum include changes in weathering intensity and/or a meteorite impact coinciding with the formation of the No??rdlinger Ries Crater. It is suggested that the eruption and weathering of the Columbia River flood basalts provided a significant amount of the unradiogenic Os required to produce the middle Miocene minimum. ?? 2008 Elsevier B.V.

  16. Warm Events At Summit, Greenland During 2012 Relative To An Evolving Climate Record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuman, C. A.; Schnaubelt, M. J.; Mefford, T. K.

    2012-12-01

    An evolving temperature record from the Greenland Summit Station, at approximately 3216 m in elevation, has documented unusual periods of near and above freezing air temperatures in July 2012. Since August 2005, data has been collected from well-calibrated and actively-ventilated temperature sensors at a NOAA-ESRL climate observatory. Comparison of these data from a nominal 2 m height above the ice sheet surface over the past seven summers reveals several periods of unusual warmth at the highest elevations of the ice sheet in 2012. Detailed analysis of the available data indicates that temperatures rose to or above freezing for almost 6.5 hours on July 11 at Summit Station. A maximum air temperature of 1 degree C was recorded repeatedly in the 1-minute averages during this period. NOAA's data also indicated brief periods at or above zero on July 12th and 29th as well. These anomalously warm air-temperature periods can now be compared and contrasted with equivalent-quality data from earlier records (automatic weather stations began operating in May 1987 during the GISP2 project) and used to calibrate indications of warm surface temperatures derived from multi-decadal satellite passive microwave and infrared sensors.

  17. The lacustrine record of the Dan-C2 hyperthermal event of the Boltysh Impact Crater, Ukraine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebinghaus, Alena; Jolley, David W.

    2015-04-01

    Vegetation response to rapid climate change in the geological record is a fundamental element in our understanding of ancient environments; however, the relationships between climate change, plant ecosystems and geological processes are still not fully understood. The filling of the K/Pg Boltysh meteorite crater, Ukraine, comprise a complete terrestrial sedimentological, palynological and δ13C record of the negative carbon isotope excursion of the early Danian hyperthermal episode. The meteorite impact formed a crater of c. 24 km in diameter at c. 65.2 Ma, which was filled with more than 500 m of organic- and fossil-rich claystones, siltstones and marls, interbedded with sandstones and less frequently gravelly sandstones. The sedimentary succession indicates a deep lake setting that was characterised by fluvial input of reworked basement material via a marginal delta system. Palynological investigations indicate a post-impact early- to mid-successional flora followed by a barren zone which coincides with the age of the Chicxulub impact and therefore argues for a series of impact events at the K/Pg boundary. This barren zone was succeeded by a fern spike marking an initial plant re-colonization. The following palynoflora suggests moisture availability oscillations (MAOs) reflecting 41 k.y. obliquity cycles, which can be correlated with lithological fluctuations during lake evolution. The aim is to conduct a detailed, complete facies analysis, and to correlate lake evolutionary aspects with climatic oscillations and vegetation change within the catchment area. This study will be compared with records of similar hyperthermal events, such as the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) in the Western Interior in North America. This integrated approach will help to better understand the controlling factors of global warming events, and their effects on ancient sedimentary environments and ecosystems.

  18. Recording and analyzing high-density event-related potentials with infants. Using the Geodesic sensor net.

    PubMed

    Johnson, M H; de Haan, M; Oliver, A; Smith, W; Hatzakis, H; Tucker, L A; Csibra, G

    2001-01-01

    This article provides an overview of the use of the Geodesic sensor net system for high-density event-related potential (ERP) recording in infants. Some advantages and disadvantages of the system, as applied to infants, are discussed. First, we illustrate that high-density data can be recorded from infants at comparable quality to that observed with conventional (low density) ERP methods. Second, we discuss ways to utilize the greater spatial information available by applying source separation and localization procedures. In particular, we focus on the application of one recent source separation method, Independent Component Analysis (ICA). Finally, we show that source localization can be applied to infant high-density data, although this entails adopting a number of assumptions that remain to be verified. In the future, with improved source separation algorithms, we suggest that single-trial or single-subject analyses may become feasible. PMID:11758670

  19. Examining the Mid- Brunhes Event in the Terrestrial Arctic: an Organic Geochemical Record from Lake El'gygytgyn, Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habicht, H.; Castañeda, I. S.; Brigham-Grette, J.

    2015-12-01

    The characteristic glacial and interglacial cycles of the Pleistocene underwent a climatic transition at ~430 ka known as the Mid- Brunhes Event (MBE). Numerous studies have noted that after this transition, the amplitude of the climatic cycles increased. Despite the indication of an MBE signal in many globally distributed paleoclimate records, the geographic extent of the climatic transition remains unknown. While the MBE is expressed in a number of southern hemisphere records its presence in northern hemisphere and terrestrial records is debated. Lake El'gygytgyn is located in the far- east Russian Arctic and provides the longest, most continuous record of Arctic climate (3.6 Ma). This study examines organic biomarkers in the Lake El'gygytgyn sediment core to determine if the MBE is expressed in the terrestrial Arctic. The paleoclimate reconstruction spans the interval of 0- 730 ka at a resolution of ~1.5 ka. Branched glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (brGDGTs) are utilized to reconstruct temperature variability and plant leaf wax n-alkanes are used to examine vegetation changes throughout the study interval. Statistical analysis of this, and other existing proxy data, indicates that a signal of the MBE is preserved in the Lake El'gygytgyn sediment record. BrGDGT temperature reconstructions indicate the terrestrial Arctic experienced both the warmest interglacial periods and coldest glacial periods after the MBE climatic transition. Arid glacial intervals and wetter interglacials are recorded by changes in the average chain length of n- alkanes, with wetter interglacials predominating after the MBE. Possibly, changes in Antarctic bottom water production and associated variability in North Pacific upwelling are responsible for transmitting the MBE signal from the southern hemisphere to Lake El'gygytgyn.

  20. First record of single event upset on the ground, Cray-1 computer memory at Los Alamos in 1976

    SciTech Connect

    Michalak, Sarah E; Quinn, Heather M; Grider, Gary A; Iwanchuk, Paul N; Morrison, John F; Wender, Stephen A; Normand, Eugene; Wert, Jerry L; Johnson, Steve

    2010-01-01

    Records of bit flips in the Cray-1 computer installed at Los Alamos in 1976 lead to an upset rate in the Cray-1 's bipolar SRAMs that correlates with the SEUs being induced by the atmospheric neutrons. In 1976 the Cray Research Company delivered its first supercomputer, the Cray-1, installing it at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Los Alamos had competed with the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for the Cray-1 and won, reaching an agreement with Seymour Cray to install the machine for a period of six months for free, after which they could decide whether to buy, lease or return it. As a result, Los Alamos personnel kept track of the computer reliability and performance and so we know that during those six months of operation, 152 memory parity errors were recorded. The computer memory consisted of approximately 70,000 1Kx1 bipolar ECL static RAMs, the Fairchild 10415. What the Los Alamos engineers didn't know is that those bit flips were the result of single event upsets (SEUs) caused by the atmospheric neutrons. Thus, these 152 bit flips were the first recorded SEUs on the earth, and were observed 2 years before the SEUs in the Intel DRAMs that had been found by May and Woods in 1978. The upsets in the DRAMs were shown to have been caused by alpha particles from the chip packaging material. In this paper we will demonstrate that the Cray-1 bit flips, which were found through the use of parity bits in the Cray-1, were likely due to atmospheric neutrons. This paper will follow the same approach as that of the very first paper to demonstrate single event effects, which occurred in satellite flip-flop circuits in 1975. The main difference is that in the four events that occurred over the course of 17 satellite years of operation were shown to be due to single event effects just a few years after those satellite anomalies were recorded. In the case of the Cray-1 bit flips, there has been a delay of more than 30 years between the occurrence of the bit flips and the

  1. To what extent are adverse events found in patient records reported by patients and healthcare professionals via complaints, claims and incident reports?

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Patient record review is believed to be the most useful method for estimating the rate of adverse events among hospitalised patients. However, the method has some practical and financial disadvantages. Some of these disadvantages might be overcome by using existing reporting systems in which patient safety issues are already reported, such as incidents reported by healthcare professionals and complaints and medico-legal claims filled by patients or their relatives. The aim of the study is to examine to what extent the hospital reporting systems cover the adverse events identified by patient record review. Methods We conducted a retrospective study using a database from a record review study of 5375 patient records in 14 hospitals in the Netherlands. Trained nurses and physicians using a method based on the protocol of The Harvard Medical Practice Study previously reviewed the records. Four reporting systems were linked with the database of reviewed records: 1) informal and 2) formal complaints by patients/relatives, 3) medico-legal claims by patients/relatives and 4) incident reports by healthcare professionals. For each adverse event identified in patient records the equivalent was sought in these reporting systems by comparing dates and descriptions of the events. The study focussed on the number of adverse event matches, overlap of adverse events detected by different sources, preventability and severity of consequences of reported and non-reported events and sensitivity and specificity of reports. Results In the sample of 5375 patient records, 498 adverse events were identified. Only 18 of the 498 (3.6%) adverse events identified by record review were found in one or more of the four reporting systems. There was some overlap: one adverse event had an equivalent in both a complaint and incident report and in three cases a patient/relative used two or three systems to complain about an adverse event. Healthcare professionals reported relatively more

  2. Development of a Method to Compensate for Signal Quality Variations in Repeated Auditory Event-Related Potential Recordings

    PubMed Central

    Paukkunen, Antti K. O.; Leminen, Miika M.; Sepponen, Raimo

    2010-01-01

    Reliable measurements are mandatory in clinically relevant auditory event-related potential (AERP)-based tools and applications. The comparability of the results gets worse as a result of variations in the remaining measurement error. A potential method is studied that allows optimization of the length of the recording session according to the concurrent quality of the recorded data. In this way, the sufficiency of the trials can be better guaranteed, which enables control of the remaining measurement error. The suggested method is based on monitoring the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and remaining measurement error which are compared to predefined threshold values. The SNR test is well defined, but the criterion for the measurement error test still requires further empirical testing in practice. According to the results, the reproducibility of average AERPs in repeated experiments is improved in comparison to a case where the number of recorded trials is constant. The test-retest reliability is not significantly changed on average but the between-subject variation in the value is reduced by 33–35%. The optimization of the number of trials also prevents excessive recordings which might be of practical interest especially in the clinical context. The efficiency of the method may be further increased by implementing online tools that improve data consistency. PMID:20407635

  3. An optical age chronology of late Quaternary extreme fluvial events recorded in Ugandan dambo soils

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mahan, S.A.; Brown, D.J.

    2007-01-01

    There is little geochonological data on sedimentation in dambos (seasonally saturated, channel-less valley floors) found throughout Central and Southern Africa. Radiocarbon dating is problematic for dambos due to (i) oxidation of organic materials during dry seasons; and (ii) the potential for contemporary biological contamination of near-surface sediments. However, for luminescence dating the equatorial site and semi-arid climate facilitate grain bleaching, while the gentle terrain ensures shallow water columns, low turbidity, and relatively long surface exposures for transported grains prior to deposition and burial. For this study, we focused on dating sandy strata (indicative of high-energy fluvial events) at various positions and depths within a second-order dambo in central Uganda. Blue-light quartz optically stimulated luminescences (OSL) ages were compared with infrared stimulated luminescence (IRSL) and thermoluminescence (TL) ages from finer grains in the same sample. A total of 8 samples were dated, with 6 intervals obtained at ???35, 33, 16, 10.4, 8.4, and 5.9 ka. In general, luminescence ages were stratigraphically, geomorphically and ordinally consistent and most blue-light OSL ages could be correlated with well-dated climatic events registered either in Greenland ice cores or Lake Victoria sediments. Based upon OSL age correlations, we theorize that extreme fluvial dambo events occur primarily during relatively wet periods, often preceding humid-to-arid transitions. The optical ages reported in this study provide the first detailed chronology of dambo sedimentation, and we anticipate that further dambo work could provide a wealth of information on the paleohydrology of Central and Southern Africa. ?? 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Late Holocene record of sedimentologic and paleooceanographic events in western Guaymas Basin, Gulf of California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGann, M.; Paull, C. K.; Herguera, J. C.; Barron, J. A.; Gwiazda, R.; Anderson, K.; Lundsten, E. M.; Edwards, B. D.; Caress, D. W.

    2015-12-01

    Transects of ≤1.5 m-long vibracores obtained with MBARI's ROV Doc Ricketts reveal late Holocene sedimentologic and paleooceanographic events in western Guaymas Basin, Gulf of California (GOC) (~26.87°N, 111.338°W). Cores were located where layered near-seafloor sediments and subtle bedforms occur in 1793 to 1863 m water depths on the SW flank of the basin using detailed bathymetry and chirp profiles. Color banding was observed in the cores and gamma-density, XRF, grain size, and stable isotope data show that most of the banding is attributed to distal deposition from two turbidities. Distinctive white bands ~4 cm thick are present in three cores dispersed across ~300 m. The white bands are diatom oozes composed primarily of Thalassiothrix longissima as well as lesser abundances of Fragilariopsis doliolus and are probably a result of aggregations of Thalassiothrix-dominated mats that settle through the water column and accumulate on the seafloor. An AMS14C date taken ~3 cm above the white band in one core suggests this event occurred shortly before cal AD 1290±30. The core sites were most likely located beneath an important oceanographic front between nutrient-rich and oligotrophic water masses, probably as the result of well-mixed upper intermediate and surface waters in the mid-GOC and better-stratified tropical waters to the south. This implies the existence of a deeper mixed layer to the N in the mid GOC region most likely controlled by equatorial La Niña events fueled by stronger and more persistent NW winds along the GOC. A substantial reduction in diatom abundance evident by low specimen counts and lack of white bands following this mat-forming event seem to correlate with an abrupt decline in biosiliceous productivity and increases in the abundance of tropical diatoms and silicoflagellates in core MD02-2517 (887 m water depth; western Guaymas Basin slope) at the end of the Medieval Climate Anomaly and transition to the Little Ice Age (~AD 1200-1300).

  5. Amazon Paleofires Records: Comparison Between Land Use Change and Palaeoclimatic Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordeiro, R. C.; Turcq, B.; Moreira, L. S.; Rodrigues, R. D. A.; Simões Filho, F. L.; Martins, G. S.; Santos, A. B.; Barbosa, M.; da Conceição, M. C. G.; Rodrigues, R. D. C.; Evangelista, H.; Moreira-Turcq, P. F.; Penido, Y. P.; Sifeddine, A.; Seoane, J.

    2014-12-01

    Interpreting the geological record of Amazon biomass combustion requires comparing charcoal accumulation rates in various biomes at different time scales. Charcoal accumulation rates, a proxy for palaeofire records, were obtained in sediment cores from Amazon lakes surrounded by several vegetation types and from a reservoir in an intense land use change region. The records presented in this study were obtained in the following areas i) a reservoir in Alta Floresta region (northern Mato Grosso State); ii) Lago do Saci (southern Pará State), a lake close to Alta Floresta and located at the southern border of Pará State; iii) a bog in an ecotone area in the Humaitá region (southern Amazonas State); iv) lakes in lateritic iron crust of the Carajás Hills (southeastern Pará State); v) Lago Comprido, a floodplain lake close to the Amazon River and surrounded by tropical rain forest (Monte Alegre, Pará State; vi) Lagoa da Pata in the Morro dos Seis Lagos alkaline complex (São Gabriel da Cachoeira, Amazonas State) and vii) Lago Caracaranã, a secluded lake in the northern Amazon cerrado (Roraima State). The highest charcoal accumulation rates were observed for modern records related to an intense change in land use at Alta Floresta, which had no precedent during the Holocene history of the Amazon. High charcoal accumulation rates that were observed in the Carajás region during low lake level phases in the Amazon in the mid-Holocene were comparable to those at the onset of the human settlement in Alta Floresta region. An increase in charcoal accumulation rate was observed in the late Holocene when the lake level was high, suggesting an interaction between climates and human presence. Low charcoal accumulation rates are typical of modern high rainfall environments, as observed in Lagoa da Pata where the environment is not susceptible to occurrences of wildfires even during relatively drier climatic phases. Low charcoal accumulation rates also exist in the relatively

  6. Apparatus for recording emissions from a rapidly generated plasma from a single plasma producing event

    DOEpatents

    Tan, Tai Ho; Williams, Arthur H.

    1985-01-01

    An optical fiber-coupled detector visible streak camera plasma diagnostic apparatus. Arrays of optical fiber-coupled detectors are placed on the film plane of several types of particle, x-ray and visible spectrometers or directly in the path of the emissions to be measured and the output is imaged by a visible streak camera. Time and spatial dependence of the emission from plasmas generated from a single pulse of electromagnetic radiation or from a single particle beam burst can be recorded.

  7. Apparatus for recording emissions from a rapidly generated plasma from a single plasma producing event

    DOEpatents

    Tan, T.H.; Williams, A.H.

    An optical fiber-coupled detector visible streak camera plasma diagnostic apparatus. Arrays of optical fiber-coupled detectors are placed on the film plane of several types of particle, x-ray and visible spectrometers or directly in the path of the emissions to be measured and the output is imaged by a visible streak camera. Time and spatial dependence of the emission from plasma generated from a single pulse of electromagnetic radiation or from a single particle beam burst can be recorded.

  8. JPL, NASA and the Historical Record: Key Events/Documents in Lunar and Mars Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooks, Michael Q.

    1999-01-01

    This document represents a presentation about the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) historical archives in the area of Lunar and Martian Exploration. The JPL archives documents the history of JPL's flight projects, research and development activities and administrative operations. The archives are in a variety of format. The presentation reviews the information available through the JPL archives web site, information available through the Regional Planetary Image Facility web site, and the information on past missions available through the web sites. The presentation also reviews the NASA historical resources at the NASA History Office and the National Archives and Records Administration.

  9. Iridium abundance measurements across bio-event horizons in the fossil record

    SciTech Connect

    Orth, C.J.; Attrep, M. Jr.; Quintana, L.R. )

    1989-01-01

    Geochemical measurements have been performed on thousands of rock samples collected across bio-event horizons using Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) for about 40 common and trace elements and radiochemical isolation procedures for Ir. On selected samples, Os, Pt and Au were also radiochemically determined. These studies have encompassed the time interval from the Precambrian-Cambrian transition to the Late Eocene impact (microspherule) horizons. Our early work strengthened the Alvarez impact hypothesis by finding the Ir (PGE) anomaly at the K-T boundary in continental sedimentary sequences. In collaborations with paleontologists, weak to moderately string Ir anomalies have been discovered at the Frasnian-Famennian boundary in Australia, in the Early Mississippian of Oklahoma, at the Mississipian-Pennsylvanian boundary of Oklahoma and Texas, and in the Late Cenomanian throughout the western interior of North America and on the south coast of England to date. We have found no compelling evidence for an impact related cause for these anomalies although PGE impact signatures in the two Late Cenomanian anomalies could be masked by the strong terrestrial mafic to ultramafic overprint. Thus far, our evidence for extinction events older than the terminal Cretaceous does not support recent hypotheses which suggest that impacts from cyclic swarms of comets in the inner Solar system were responsible for the periodic mass extinctions. 50 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Sedimentary records of metal speciation in the Yangtze Estuary: role of hydrological events.

    PubMed

    Feng, Chenghong; Zhao, Shou; Wang, Dongxin; Niu, Junfeng; Shen, Zhenyao

    2014-07-01

    Chemical speciation of Al, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, Mn, Ni, Pb, Sb and Zn in two typical (210)Pb-dated sediment cores (i.e., the CJ03 site and CJ06 site) in the Yangtze Estuary was investigated to reveal their different responses to upstream hydrological events. Cluster analysis and correlation analysis (CA) demonstrated that the CJ03 site, which is located in the main river channel, experienced significant influences from river hydrology. Specifically, metals in liable fractions (exchangeable, carbonate, reducible and organic fractions) were sensitive to water fluxes, while conservative fractions (residual fractions) have higher affinity with sediment inputs. By comparison, the CJ06 site in shoal correlated better with total organic carbon (TOC), and was influenced more by the surrounding cities. Evidently decreased sediment discharge and their fluctuated size composition and varied metal concentrations accorded well with the time when the impoundment of dams and disastrous flood occurred. The transformation of metals in liable speciation into conservative phases reflected the intercepting role of dams. Metals in the reducible and organic fractions were significantly affected by the varied redox conditions caused by hydrological events. PMID:24556540

  11. Record of palaeoenvironmental changes in the Mid-Polish Basin during the Valanginian Event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, Chloé; Kujau, Ariane; Heimhofer, Ulrich; Mutterlose, Joerg; Spangenberg, Jorge; Adatte, Thierry; Ploch, Isabela; Föllmi, Karl B.

    2013-04-01

    The Valanginian stage displays the first major perturbation of the carbon cycle of the Cretaceous period. The Valanginian Weissert episode is associated with a positive excursion (CIE) in δ13Ccarb and δ13Corg values, and the occurrence of a crisis in pelagic and neritic carbonate production (Weissert et al., 1998; Erba, 2004, Föllmi et al., 2007). As for Cretaceous oceanic anoxic events (OAEs), the carbon anomaly is explained by the intensification of continental biogeochemical weathering triggering an increase in marine primary productivity and organic-matter preservation. However, to the contrary of OAEs, the organic matter trapped in the Tethyan Ocean during the Valanginian is both marine and continental and the occurrence of a widespread anoxia could not be evidenced (Westermann et al., 2010; Kujau et al., 2012). The resulting marine Corg burial rates were probably not sufficient to explain the shift in δ13C values and an alternative scheme has been proposed by Westermann et al. (2010): the carbonate platform crisis combined with the storage of organic-matter on the continent may be the major triggers of the δ13C positive shift. (Westermann et al., 2010). We present the results of an analysis of the Wawal drilling core (Mid-Polish Trough), which is of particular interest because of its near-coastal setting and its exceptional preservation, demonstrated by the presence of up to 17 wt.% aragonite. The section consists in marine silty to sandy clays deposited on top of a lower Berriasian karstified limestone. It covers the Early and early Late Valanginian, and displays the onset of the positive excursion. The lack of anoxia is evidenced by trace-element and Rock-Eval data. Two intervals of phosphogenesis are emphasised that appear equivalent in time to the condensed horizons of the northern Tethyan region (Helvetic Alps). A rapid climate change toward less humid and seasonally-contrasted conditions that is similar to the northern Tethyan areas is observed

  12. Cu isotopes in marine black shales record the Great Oxidation Event.

    PubMed

    Chi Fru, Ernest; Rodríguez, Nathalie P; Partin, Camille A; Lalonde, Stefan V; Andersson, Per; Weiss, Dominik J; El Albani, Abderrazak; Rodushkin, Ilia; Konhauser, Kurt O

    2016-05-01

    The oxygenation of the atmosphere ∼2.45-2.32 billion years ago (Ga) is one of the most significant geological events to have affected Earth's redox history. Our understanding of the timing and processes surrounding this key transition is largely dependent on the development of redox-sensitive proxies, many of which remain unexplored. Here we report a shift from negative to positive copper isotopic compositions (δ(65)CuERM-AE633) in organic carbon-rich shales spanning the period 2.66-2.08 Ga. We suggest that, before 2.3 Ga, a muted oxidative supply of weathering-derived copper enriched in (65)Cu, along with the preferential removal of (65)Cu by iron oxides, left seawater and marine biomass depleted in (65)Cu but enriched in (63)Cu. As banded iron formation deposition waned and continentally sourced Cu became more important, biomass sampled a dissolved Cu reservoir that was progressively less fractionated relative to the continental pool. This evolution toward heavy δ(65)Cu values coincides with a shift to negative sedimentary δ(56)Fe values and increased marine sulfate after the Great Oxidation Event (GOE), and is traceable through Phanerozoic shales to modern marine settings, where marine dissolved and sedimentary δ(65)Cu values are universally positive. Our finding of an important shift in sedimentary Cu isotope compositions across the GOE provides new insights into the Precambrian marine cycling of this critical micronutrient, and demonstrates the proxy potential for sedimentary Cu isotope compositions in the study of biogeochemical cycles and oceanic redox balance in the past. PMID:27091980

  13. Cu isotopes in marine black shales record the Great Oxidation Event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fru, Ernest Chi; Rodríguez, Nathalie P.; Partin, Camille A.; Lalonde, Stefan V.; Andersson, Per; Weiss, Dominik J.; El Albani, Abderrazak; Rodushkin, Ilia

    2016-05-01

    The oxygenation of the atmosphere ˜2.45-2.32 billion years ago (Ga) is one of the most significant geological events to have affected Earth's redox history. Our understanding of the timing and processes surrounding this key transition is largely dependent on the development of redox-sensitive proxies, many of which remain unexplored. Here we report a shift from negative to positive copper isotopic compositions (δ65CuERM-AE633) in organic carbon-rich shales spanning the period 2.66-2.08 Ga. We suggest that, before 2.3 Ga, a muted oxidative supply of weathering-derived copper enriched in 65Cu, along with the preferential removal of 65Cu by iron oxides, left seawater and marine biomass depleted in 65Cu but enriched in 63Cu. As banded iron formation deposition waned and continentally sourced Cu became more important, biomass sampled a dissolved Cu reservoir that was progressively less fractionated relative to the continental pool. This evolution toward heavy δ65Cu values coincides with a shift to negative sedimentary δ56Fe values and increased marine sulfate after the Great Oxidation Event (GOE), and is traceable through Phanerozoic shales to modern marine settings, where marine dissolved and sedimentary δ65Cu values are universally positive. Our finding of an important shift in sedimentary Cu isotope compositions across the GOE provides new insights into the Precambrian marine cycling of this critical micronutrient, and demonstrates the proxy potential for sedimentary Cu isotope compositions in the study of biogeochemical cycles and oceanic redox balance in the past.

  14. Assessment of an application for touchscreen devices to record calving-related events in dairy herds and monitor personnel performance.

    PubMed

    Barragan, A A; Workman, J D; Bas, S; Proudfoot, K L; Schuenemann, G M

    2016-07-01

    The objectives of the present study were to assess (1) the effectiveness of a calving training workshop and an application (app) for touchscreen devices to capture calving-related events, and (2) personnel compliance with calving protocols (time from birth to feeding of first colostrum and time that cows spent in labor). Calving personnel (n=23) from 5 large dairy farms (range: 800-10,000 cows) participated in the study. Participants received training through an on-farm workshop regarding calving management practices and functioning of the app before recording calving-related events. Pre- and posttest evaluations were administered to each participant to measure their knowledge gain and satisfaction with the workshop. Calving personnel recorded calving-related events (n=323) using the app for 7 d following training. Furthermore, the records collected with the app were used to assess missing and incorrect data and calving personnel compliance with calving management protocols (recording time that cows spent in labor and timing of feeding first colostrum to calves). Calving personnel reported that the information provided during the training was relevant (agree=14.3% and strongly agree=85.7%) and of great immediate use (agree=33.3% and strongly agree=66.7%). The presented materials and hands-on demonstrations substantially increased the knowledge level of the attendees (by 23.7 percentage points from pre- to posttest scores). The follow-up assessment with participants revealed that the app was easy to use (91.3%) and that they would continue to use it (100%). Frequency of incorrect (r=0.77) or missing (r=0.76) data was positively correlated with calving:personnel ratio. Furthermore, calving personnel compliance with calving protocols was significantly different within and between herds. These results substantiated the great variation in compliance with calving management protocols within and between dairy farms. Furthermore, the app may serve as a tool to monitor

  15. Evidence for Holocene faulting events and fast uplift rates along the Selianitika fault (Central Gulf of Corinth - Greece)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palyvos, Nikos; Bantekas, Yiannis; Pantosti, Daniela; De Martini, Paolo Marco; Mancini, Marco; Pesci, Arianna; Casula, Giuseppe; Ford, Mary; Smedile, Alessandra; Pinzi, Stefania; Pucci, Stefano; Sagnotti, Leonardo

    2013-04-01

    Faulting and folding of Late Holocene deposits were observed on a recent roadcut NW of Selianitika village. To understand the origin of these deformations and their significance we started a multidisciplinary investigation, as a contribution to the assessment of the seismic hazard in the area. The roadcut exposes a sequence of silt, fine sand layers and some gravel lens onlapping and interfingering with slope wash deposits draping the local hills. The onlapping sequence likely belongs to an alluvial fan fed by the small stream crossing Selianitika village to the west. Observations on specific lithofacies characteristics and paleontologic content, with the presence of scattered marine bivalve shells and crab fragments, bioturbations (Thalassinoides) and tide-related structures, suggest the vicinity of the sea and possible connection to temporary beach-bay conditions. Merging radiocarbon dating, archaeological estimates and preliminary paleomagnetic data, the onlapping sequence is younger than 6000 BP. Near the roadcut, the alluvial fan is crossed by one of the major splays composing the Selianitika fault. This fault has been recognized as part of the Aigion-NeosErinos-Lambiri fault zone (ANELFZ) one of the potential seismic sources in the area. Unfortunately, the intense modification of the past decades has completely erased the original morphology of the area of the roadcut as well as the fault trace at the surface. However, 1944 RAF airphotos allow a rough reconstruction of the scarp; the roadcut is located near a complex step-over between two sections of the fault, belongs to the fault footwall and is almost parallel the fault itself. Further complexity is added by the presence of a wide amphitheater that may represent a zone of collapse related to the fast fault footwall uplift near the shoreline. The roadcut exposure is slightly curved (orientations between 270° and 300°), is ~150m long, 3-5m high, and dips do the N. It was surveyed through Laser Scanner and

  16. Expanding neurochemical investigations with multi-modal recording: simultaneous fast-scan cyclic voltammetry, iontophoresis, and patch clamp measurements.

    PubMed

    Kirkpatrick, D C; McKinney, C J; Manis, P B; Wightman, R M

    2016-08-01

    Multi-modal recording describes the simultaneous collection of information across distinct domains. Compared to isolated measurements, such studies can more easily determine relationships between varieties of phenomena. This is useful for neurochemical investigations which examine cellular activity in response to changes in the local chemical environment. In this study, we demonstrate a method to perform simultaneous patch clamp measurements with fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) using optically isolated instrumentation. A model circuit simulating concurrent measurements was used to predict the electrical interference between instruments. No significant impact was anticipated between methods, and predictions were largely confirmed experimentally. One exception was due to capacitive coupling of the FSCV potential waveform into the patch clamp amplifier. However, capacitive transients measured in whole-cell current clamp recordings were well below the level of biological signals, which allowed the activity of cells to be easily determined. Next, the activity of medium spiny neurons (MSNs) was examined in the presence of an FSCV electrode to determine how the exogenous potential impacted nearby cells. The activities of both resting and active MSNs were unaffected by the FSCV waveform. Additionally, application of an iontophoretic current, used to locally deliver drugs and other neurochemicals, did not affect neighboring cells. Finally, MSN activity was monitored during iontophoretic delivery of glutamate, an excitatory neurotransmitter. Membrane depolarization and cell firing were observed concurrently with chemical changes around the cell resulting from delivery. In all, we show how combined electrophysiological and electrochemical measurements can relate information between domains and increase the power of neurochemical investigations. PMID:27314130

  17. Classification and evaluation of the documentary-recorded storm events in the Annals of the Choson Dynasty (1392-1910), Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Chulsang; Park, Minkyu; Kim, Hyeon Jun; Choi, Juhee; Sin, Jiye; Jun, Changhyun

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the analysis of documentary records on the storm events in the Annals of the Choson Dynasty, covering the entire period of 519 years from 1392 to 1910, was carried out. By applying various key words related to storm events, a total of 556 documentary records could be identified. The main objective of this study was to develop rules of classification for the documentary records on the storm events in the Annals of the Choson Dynasty. The results were also compared with the rainfall data of the traditional Korean rain gauge, named Chukwooki, which are available from 1777 to 1910 (about 130 years). The analysis is organized as follows. First, the frequency of the documents, their length, comments about the size of the inundated area, the number of casualties, the number of property losses, and the size of the countermeasures, etc. were considered to determine the magnitude of the events. To this end, rules of classification of the storm events are developed. Cases in which the word 'disaster' was used along with detailed information about the casualties and property damages, were classified as high-level storm events. The high-level storm events were additionally sub-categorized into catastrophic, extreme, and severe events. Second, by applying the developed rules of classification, a total of 326 events were identified as high-level storm events during the 519 years of the Choson Dynasty. Among these high-level storm events, only 19 events were then classified as the catastrophic ones, 106 events as the extreme ones, and 201 events as the severe ones. The mean return period of these storm events was found to be about 30 years for the catastrophic events, 5 years for the extreme events, and 2-3 years for the severe events. Third, the classification results were verified considering the records of the traditional Korean rain gauge; it was found that the catastrophic events are strongly distinguished from other events with a mean total rainfall and a

  18. In the name of the migrant father—Analysis of surname origins identifies genetic admixture events undetectable from genealogical records

    PubMed Central

    Larmuseau, M H D; Vanoverbeke, J; Gielis, G; Vanderheyden, N; Larmuseau, H F M; Decorte, R

    2012-01-01

    Patrilineal heritable surnames are widely used to select autochthonous participants for studies on small-scale population genetic patterns owing to the unique link between the surname and a genetic marker, the Y-chromosome (Y-chr). Today, the question arises as to whether the surname origin will be informative on top of in-depth genealogical pedigrees. Admixture events that happened in the period after giving heritable surnames but before the start of genealogical records may be informative about the additional value of the surname origin. In this context, an interesting historical event is the demic migration from French-speaking regions in Northern France to the depopulated and Dutch-speaking region Flanders at the end of the sixteenth century. Y-chr subhaplogroups of individuals with a French/Roman surname that could be associated with this migration event were compared with those of a group with autochthonous Flemish surnames. Although these groups could not be differentiated based on in-depth genealogical data, they were significantly genetically different from each other. Moreover, the observed genetic divergence was related to the differences in the distributions of main Y-subhaplogroups between contemporary populations from Northern France and Flanders. Therefore, these results indicate that the surname origin can be an important feature on top of in-depth genealogical results to select autochthonous participants for a regional population genetic study based on Y-chromosomes. PMID:22511074

  19. Extraterrestrial Impact Event Recorded in the Late Triassic Deep-Sea Deposits from Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, H.; Shirai, N.; Ebihara, M.; Nozaki, T.; Suzuki, K.; Onoue, T.; Kiyokawa, S.

    2014-12-01

    The Late Triassic is marked by the formation of several large impact structures on the Earth, including the 90-km-diameter Manicouagan crater in Canada (Spray and Kelly, 1998). Anomalously high platinum group element (PGE) concentrations have been reported from the Upper Triassic deep-sea deposits in Japan, which have been interpreted to be derived from an extraterrestrial impact event forming the Manicouagan crater (Onoue et al., 2012; Sato et al., 2013). However, previous studies have not clarified the composition of the projectile. Here we report the PGE element ratios and osmium (Os) isotopic compositions of the Upper Triassic ejecta layers in Japan in order to understand the projectile component. Evidence for the Late Triassic impact event has been discovered in the deep-sea claystone layers at four bedded chert sections in the Japanese accretionary complex. The claystone layers contain microspherules, Ni-rich magnetite grains and high abundance of PGEs (Onoue et al., 2012). Biostratigraphic analysis of radiolarian fossils from the studied sections revealed that the claystone layers occur embedded in the upper middle Norian (Sugiyama, 1997; Onoue et al., 2012). Identification of the projectile is attempted by comparing the isotope and elemental ratios of the ejecta deposit with similar data obtained from meteorites. The Ru/Ir and Pt/Ir ratios of all the claystone samples from the study sites are plotted along the mixing line between chondrites and upper continental crust. Although chondrites cannot be distinguished from iron meteorites by using PGE/Ir ratios, the claystone layers have Cr/Ir ratios between 104-105, indicating that the claystone layers are clearly contaminated by chondritic material. The Os isotope data show an abrupt and marked negative excursion from an initial Os isotope ratio of ~0.477 to unradiogenic values of ~0.126 in a claystone layer within a middle Norian bedded chert, indicating the input of chondrite-derived Os into seawater. The

  20. Impulse radio ultra wideband wireless transmission of dopamine concentration levels recorded by fast-scan cyclic voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Ebrazeh, Ali; Bozorgzadeh, Bardia; Mohseni, Pedram

    2015-08-01

    This paper demonstrates the feasibility of utilizing impulse radio ultra wideband (IR-UWB) signaling technique for reliable, wireless transmission of dopamine concentration levels recorded by fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) at a carbon-fiber microelectrode (CFM) to address the problem of elevated data rates in high-channel-count neurochemical monitoring. Utilizing an FSCV-sensing chip fabricated in AMS 0.35μm 2P/4M CMOS, a 3-5-GHz, IR-UWB transceiver (TRX) chip fabricated in TSMC 90nm 1P/9M RF CMOS, and two off-chip, miniature, UWB antennae, wireless transfer of pseudo-random binary sequence (PRBS) data at 50Mbps over a distance of <;1m is first shown with bit-error rates (BER) <; 10(-3). Further, IR-UWB wireless transmission of dopamine concentration levels prerecorded with FSCV at a CFM during flow injection analysis (FIA) is also demonstrated with transmitter (TX) power dissipation of only ~4.4μW from 1.2V, representing two orders of magnitude reduction in TX power consumption compared to that of a conventional frequency-shift-keyed (FSK) link operating at ~433MHz. PMID:26737929

  1. Sulfur record of rising and falling marine oxygen and sulfate levels during the Lomagundi event

    PubMed Central

    Planavsky, Noah J.; Bekker, Andrey; Hofmann, Axel; Owens, Jeremy D.; Lyons, Timothy W.

    2012-01-01

    Carbonates from approximately 2.3–2.1 billion years ago show markedly positive δ13C values commonly reaching and sometimes exceeding +10‰. Traditional interpretation of these positive δ13C values favors greatly enhanced organic carbon burial on a global scale, although other researchers have invoked widespread methanogenesis within the sediments. To resolve between these competing models and, more generally, among the mechanisms behind Earth’s most dramatic carbon isotope event, we obtained coupled stable isotope data for carbonate carbon and carbonate-associated sulfate (CAS). CAS from the Lomagundi interval shows a narrow range of δ34S values and concentrations much like those of Phanerozoic and modern marine carbonate rocks. The δ34S values are a close match to those of coeval sulfate evaporites and likely reflect seawater composition. These observations are inconsistent with the idea of diagenetic carbonate formation in the methanic zone. Toward the end of the carbon isotope excursion there is an increase in the δ34S values of CAS. We propose that these trends in C and S isotope values track the isotopic evolution of seawater sulfate and reflect an increase in pyrite burial and a crash in the marine sulfate reservoir during ocean deoxygenation in the waning stages of the positive carbon isotope excursion. PMID:23090989

  2. Sulfur record of rising and falling marine oxygen and sulfate levels during the Lomagundi event.

    PubMed

    Planavsky, Noah J; Bekker, Andrey; Hofmann, Axel; Owens, Jeremy D; Lyons, Timothy W

    2012-11-01

    Carbonates from approximately 2.3-2.1 billion years ago show markedly positive δ(13)C values commonly reaching and sometimes exceeding +10‰. Traditional interpretation of these positive δ(13)C values favors greatly enhanced organic carbon burial on a global scale, although other researchers have invoked widespread methanogenesis within the sediments. To resolve between these competing models and, more generally, among the mechanisms behind Earth's most dramatic carbon isotope event, we obtained coupled stable isotope data for carbonate carbon and carbonate-associated sulfate (CAS). CAS from the Lomagundi interval shows a narrow range of δ(34)S values and concentrations much like those of Phanerozoic and modern marine carbonate rocks. The δ(34)S values are a close match to those of coeval sulfate evaporites and likely reflect seawater composition. These observations are inconsistent with the idea of diagenetic carbonate formation in the methanic zone. Toward the end of the carbon isotope excursion there is an increase in the δ(34)S values of CAS. We propose that these trends in C and S isotope values track the isotopic evolution of seawater sulfate and reflect an increase in pyrite burial and a crash in the marine sulfate reservoir during ocean deoxygenation in the waning stages of the positive carbon isotope excursion. PMID:23090989

  3. Basaltic impact melts in the Apollo collections: How many impacts and which events are recorded?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spudis, Paul D.

    1992-01-01

    Many of the rocks in the Apollo collections from the lunar highlands are impact melt breccias of basaltic bulk composition. They are known by a variety of names including low-K Fra Mauro basalt, VHA basalt, and basaltic impact melts. These rocks have been studied to understand the compositional nature of the lunar crust, to decipher the processes of large body impact, and to comprehend the record of impact bombardment of the Moon. Study of terrestrial craters has led to a model for impact melt generation whereby target lithologies are totally melted during impact. The impact melt makes up a few percent of the total volume of crater material; superheated silicate liquids of the impact melt have extremely low viscosities and mix intimately. This mixing thoroughly homogenizes the melt chemically during the excavation of the crater. Colder, unmelted debris is overridden by the melt sheet as the crater cavity grows. Incorporation of these cold clasts rapidly chills the melt, with zones of greater and lesser amounts of clasts being primarily responsible for modestly differing thermal regimes. The net effect of this process is the production of a suite of rocks that have extreme chemical homogeneity, but wide petrographic diversity. Strict application of this model to the petrogenesis of basaltic impact melts from the Moon has some fairly significant consequences for how we interpret early lunar history. The consequences are briefly discussed.

  4. Climatic, volcanic and tectonic events recorded in recent sediments of the Rukwa rift, Western Tanzania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delvaux, D.; Mees, F.; Williamson, D.; Macheyeki, A. S.

    2009-04-01

    Lake Rukwa is now a shallow lake occupying the floor of the closed Rukwa depression in the western branch of the East African Rift System. Sediment records of the paleo-lake level show that during the Late Pleistocene to Early Holocene, Lake Rukwa reached the level of the overflow sill, 180 m higher than its present level, and was overflowing into Lake Tanganyika. Lacustrine sediments from this period are now exposed on the margin of the depression, and in particular along the Songwe River, where several large sections up to 35 meters high can be studied. Investigation of selected sections reveals a complex evolution in alternating fluvio-deltaic to lacustrine environment, punctuated by episodic inflow of volcanic material from the nearby Rungwe Volcanic Province. Macroscopic description of the sedimentary packages and their geometry, combined with C14 dating, diatom analysis, and optical microscopy allow to propose a preliminary evolution scheme in which climatically induced lake level change, volcanic input and tectonic influence can be reconstructed. In particular, correlations between sections at different altitudes allow to better constrain the lake level fluctuation than previous estimates based on drill core analysis.

  5. Incidence validation and relationship analysis of producer-recorded health event data from on-farm computer systems in the United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The principal objective of this study was to analyze the credibility of health data recorded through on-farm recording systems throughout the US and the relationships between health events on a large scale. Substantial progress has been made in the genetic improvement of production traits while hea...

  6. Geochemical and palynological records for the end-Triassic Mass-Extinction Event in the NE Paris Basin (Luxemburg)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhlmann, Natascha; van de Schootbrugge, Bas; Thein, Jean; Fiebig, Jens; Franz, Sven-Oliver; Hanzo, Micheline; Colbach, Robert; Faber, Alain

    2016-04-01

    The End-Triassic mass-extinction event is one of the "big five" mass extinctions in Earth's history. Large scale flood basalt volcanism associated with the break-up of Pangaea, which resulted in the opening of the central Atlantic Ocean, is considered as the leading cause. In addition, an asteroid impact in Rochechouart (France; 201 ± 2 Ma) may have had a local influence on ecosystems and sedimentary settings. The Luxembourg Embayment, in the NE Paris Basin, offers a rare chance to study both effects in a range of settings from deltaic to lagoonal. A multidisciplinary study (sedimentology, geochemistry, palynology) has been carried out on a number of outcrops and cores that span from the Norian to lower Hettangian. Combined geochemical and palynological records from the Boust core drilled in the NE Paris Basin, provide evidence for paleoenvironmental changes associated with the end-Triassic mass-extinction event. The Triassic-Jurassic stratigraphy of the Boust core is well constrained by palynomorphs showing the disappaerance of typical Triassic pollen taxa (e.g. Ricciisporites tuberculates) and the occurrence of the marker species Polypodiisporites polymicroforatus within the uppermost Rhaetian, prior to the Hettangian dominance of Classopollis pollen. The organic carbon stable isotope record (δ13Corg) spanning the Norian to Hettangian, shows a series of prominent negative excursions within the middle Rhaetian, followed by a trend towards more positive values (approx -24 per mille) within the uppermost Rhaetian Argiles de Levallois Member. The lowermost Hettangian is characterized by a major negative excursion, reaching - 30 per mille that occurs in organic-rich sediments. This so-called "main negative excursion" is well-known from other locations, for example from Mariental in Northern Germany and from St Audrie's Bay in England, and Stenlille in Denmark. Based on redox-sensitive trace element records (V, Cr, Ni, Co, Th, U) the lowermost Hettangian in most of

  7. Critical gaps in the world's largest electronic medical record: Ad Hoc nursing narratives and invisible adverse drug events.

    PubMed

    Hurdle, John F; Weir, Charlene R; Roth, Beverly; Hoffman, Jennifer; Nebeker, Jonathan R

    2003-01-01

    The Veterans Health Administration (VHA), of the U.S. Department of Veteran Affairs, operates one of the largest healthcare networks in the world. Its electronic medical record (EMR) is fully integrated into clinical practice, having evolved over several decades of design, testing, trial, and error. It is unarguably the world's largest EMR, and as such it makes an important case study for a host of timely informatics issues. The VHA consistently has been at the vanguard of patient safety, especially in its provider-oriented EMR. We describe here a study of a large set of adverse drug events (ADEs) that eluded a rigorous ADE survey based on prospective EMR chart review. These numerous ADEs were undetected (and hence invisible) in the EMR, missed by an otherwise sophisticated ADE detection scheme. We speculate how these invisible nursing ADE narratives persist and what they portend for safety re-engineering. PMID:14728184

  8. Abrupt climatic events during OIS-3 recorded in terrestrial sediments in the Netherlands: a multi-proxy approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bos, J. A. A.; Bohncke, S. J. P.; Kasse, C.; van Huissteden, J.; Schokker, J.; Bunnik, F. P. M.; Wallinga, J.

    2009-04-01

    Abrupt climatic changes during Oxygen Isotope Stage 3 (OIS-3 or Weichselian Middle Pleniglacial) are revealed in the oxygen isotope records of the Greenland ice cores and in the North Atlantic marine cores. In the Greenland ice cores, these so-called D/O cycles start with a rapid warming of 5-10˚C within a few decades, followed by a phase of gradual cooling over several hundred to more than a thousand years and often end with a final reduction in temperature back to cold, stadial conditions. On the adjacent European continent, however, climatic variability during this time interval is poorly known. High-resolution terrestrial records are scarce and the discontinuous nature of sedimentation and repeated erosion on the continent combined with poor dating control often hampers a detailed study of the vegetation and climate. In this contribution, a Middle Weichselian sequence with shallow lacustrine deposits, intercalated by fluvial sediments with permafrost features, is presented from the Netherlands. Within this Middle Weichselian sequence, rapid warming events are assumed to have given rise to thawlake formation and/or deposition of organic-rich lacustrine sediments, while the extreme cooling events of the D/O cycles are probably represented in the sequences by clastic intervals during which periglacial features developed. In the sixties of the last century, two warming events or "interstadials" were first recognized and described from terrestrial Middle Weichselian sequences from the Hengelo basin in the Netherlands, the Hengelo- and Denekamp interstadials, respectively. The shift from a polar desert to shrub tundra (i.e. Hengelo interstadial) and tundra to shrub tundra (i.e. Denekamp interstadial), visible in the pollen diagrams of this area, was interpreted as a temporary amelioration of the climate and were therefore given the names of interstadials. In time the Hengelo- and Denekamp interstadials were also correlated with D/O cycles 12 respectively 8 in the

  9. Complex life histories of fishes revealed through natural information storage devices: case studies of diadromous events as recorded by otoliths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elfman, M.; Limburg, K. E.; Kristiansson, P.; Svedäng, H.; Westin, L.; Wickström, H.; Malmqvist, K.; Pallon, J.

    2000-03-01

    Diadromous fishes - species that move across salinity gradients as part of their life repertoire - form a major part of coastal and inland fisheries. Conventional mark-recapture techniques have long been used to track their movements, but give incomplete information at best. On the other hand, otoliths (ear-stones) of fishes can provide a complete record of major life history events, as reflected both in their microstructure and elemental composition. Strontium, which substitutes for calcium in the aragonite matrix of otoliths, is a powerful tracer of salinity histories in many migratory fishes. We measured Sr and Ca with a nuclear microprobe (PIXE) and show examples (eel, Anguilla anguilla; brown trout, Salmo trutta; American shad, Alosa sapidissima) of how the technique has solved several mysteries within fisheries biology.

  10. Proxy records of Late Holocene climate events in the eastern United States: Medieval Warm Period and Little Ice Age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willard, D. A.; Cronin, T. M.; Hayo, K. M.

    2006-12-01

    We are conducting a multiproxy, regional reconstruction of climate variability during the last two millennia including the Medieval Warm Period (MWP) and Little Ice Age (LIA) in eastern North America. Pollen, benthic foraminifers, ostracodes, and other proxies were analyzed from high-resolution sampling of continuous sedimentary records from lakes, wetlands, and estuaries in Florida, North Carolina, Chesapeake Bay, and Lake Champlain. These records document multi-decadal changes in vegetation, temperature, precipitation, and estuarine salinity across a latitudinal transect. During both the MWP and LIA, decreased precipitation altered plant community composition and distribution in the southeastern United States, and the LIA triggered threshold changes in vegetation that persisted until anthropogenic land-cover change overwhelmed the climate signature. In the mid-Atlantic region, progressively cooler and wetter late Holocene springs culminated in a cool, wet LIA; this trend correlates with observed oceanic changes. Trend analysis of the data suggest that inter-regional correlation of multi-decadal and centennial-scale Holocene climate events will be forthcoming.

  11. Variability in recording and scoring of respiratory events during sleep in Europe: a need for uniform standards.

    PubMed

    Arnardottir, Erna S; Verbraecken, Johan; Gonçalves, Marta; Gjerstad, Michaela D; Grote, Ludger; Puertas, Francisco Javier; Mihaicuta, Stefan; McNicholas, Walter T; Parrino, Liborio

    2016-04-01

    Uniform standards for the recording and scoring of respiratory events during sleep are lacking in Europe, although many centres follow the published recommendations of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine. The aim of this study was to assess the practice for the diagnosis of sleep-disordered breathing throughout Europe. A specially developed questionnaire was sent to representatives of the 31 national sleep societies in the Assembly of National Sleep Societies of the European Sleep Research Society, and a total of 29 countries completed the questionnaire. Polysomnography was considered the primary diagnostic method for sleep apnea diagnosis in 10 (34.5%), whereas polygraphy was used primarily in six (20.7%) European countries. In the remaining 13 countries (44.8%), no preferred methodology was used. Fifteen countries (51.7%) had developed some type of national uniform standards, but these standards varied significantly in terms of scoring criteria, device specifications and quality assurance procedures between countries. Only five countries (17.2%) had published these standards. Most respondents supported the development of uniform recording and scoring criteria for Europe, which might be based partly on the existing American Academy of Sleep Medicine rules, but also take into account differences in European practice when compared to North America. This survey highlights the current varying approaches to the assessment of patients with sleep-disordered breathing throughout Europe and supports the need for the development of practice parameters in the assessment of such patients that would be suited to European clinical practice. PMID:26365742

  12. Identification of Adverse Drug Events from Free Text Electronic Patient Records and Information in a Large Mental Health Case Register

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Richard George; Ball, Michael; Ibrahim, Zina M.; Broadbent, Matthew; Dzahini, Olubanke; Stewart, Robert; Johnston, Caroline; Dobson, Richard J. B.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Electronic healthcare records (EHRs) are a rich source of information, with huge potential for secondary research use. The aim of this study was to develop an application to identify instances of Adverse Drug Events (ADEs) from free text psychiatric EHRs. Methods We used the GATE Natural Language Processing (NLP) software to mine instances of ADEs from free text content within the Clinical Record Interactive Search (CRIS) system, a de-identified psychiatric case register developed at the South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust, UK. The tool was built around a set of four movement disorders (extrapyramidal side effects [EPSEs]) related to antipsychotic therapy and rules were then generalised such that the tool could be applied to additional ADEs. We report the frequencies of recorded EPSEs in patients diagnosed with a Severe Mental Illness (SMI) and then report performance in identifying eight other unrelated ADEs. Results The tool identified EPSEs with >0.85 precision and >0.86 recall during testing. Akathisia was found to be the most prevalent EPSE overall and occurred in the Asian ethnic group with a frequency of 8.13%. The tool performed well when applied to most of the non-EPSEs but least well when applied to rare conditions such as myocarditis, a condition that appears frequently in the text as a side effect warning to patients. Conclusions The developed tool allows us to accurately identify instances of a potential ADE from psychiatric EHRs. As such, we were able to study the prevalence of ADEs within subgroups of patients stratified by SMI diagnosis, gender, age and ethnicity. In addition we demonstrated the generalisability of the application to other ADE types by producing a high precision rate on a non-EPSE related set of ADE containing documents. Availability The application can be found at http://git.brc.iop.kcl.ac.uk/rmallah/dystoniaml. PMID:26273830

  13. Consistently dated records from three Greenland ice cores reveal regional millennial-scale isotope gradients with possible Heinrich Event imprint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seierstad, Inger K.; Rasmussen, Sune O.

    2014-05-01

    We here present records from the NGRIP, GRIP and GISP2 ice cores tied to the same chronology for the past 104 ka at an unprecedented time resolution. The three ice cores have been linked by matching distinct peaks in volcanic proxy records and other impurity records from the three ice cores, assuming that these layers of elevated impurity content represent the same, instantaneous event in the past at all three sites. In total there are more than 900 identified marker horizons between the three cores including previously published match points, of which we introduce a minor revision. Our matching is independently confirmed by new and existing volcanic ash layers (tephra). The depth-depth relationship from the detailed matching is used to transfer the most recent and widely used Greenland ice core chronology, the GICC05modelext timescale, to the two Summit cores, GRIP and GISP2. Furthermore, we provide gas chronologies for the Summit cores that are consistent with the GICC05modelext timescale by utilizing both existing and new unpublished gas data. A comparison of the GICC05modelext and the former GISP2 timescale reveals major discrepancies in short time intervals during the glacial section. We detect a pronounced change in the relative annual layer thickness between the two Summit sites and NGRIP across the Last Glacial termination and early-to-mid Holocene, which can be explained by a relative accumulation increase at NGRIP compared to the Summit region as response to the onset of the Holocene and the climatic optimum. Between stadials and interstadials we infer that the accumulation contrast typically was nearly 10% greater at Summit compared to at NGRIP. The δ18O temperature-proxy records from NGRIP, GRIP and GISP2 are generally very similar and display a synchronous behavior at climate transitions, but the δ18O differences between Summit and NGRIP is slowly changing over the last glacial-interglacial cycle superimposed by abrupt millennial-to centennial scale

  14. Incidence validation and relationship analysis of producer-recorded health event data from on-farm computer systems in the United States.

    PubMed

    Parker Gaddis, K L; Cole, J B; Clay, J S; Maltecca, C

    2012-09-01

    The principal objective of this study was to analyze the plausibility of health data recorded through on-farm recording systems throughout the United States. Substantial progress has been made in the genetic improvement of production traits while health and fitness traits of dairy cattle have declined. Health traits are generally expensive and difficult to measure, but health event data collected from on-farm computer management systems may provide an effective and low-cost source of health information. To validate editing methods, incidence rates of on-farm recorded health event data were compared with incidence rates reported in the literature. Putative relationships among common health events were examined using logistic regression for each of 3 timeframes: 0 to 60, 61 to 90, and 91 to 150 d in milk. Health events occurring on average before the health event of interest were included in each model as predictors when significant. Calculated incidence rates ranged from 1.37% for respiratory problems to 12.32% for mastitis. Most health events reported had incidence rates lower than the average incidence rate found in the literature. This may partially represent underreporting by dairy farmers who record disease events only when a treatment or other intervention is required. Path diagrams developed using odds ratios calculated from logistic regression models for each of 13 common health events allowed putative relationships to be examined. The greatest odds ratios were estimated to be the influence of ketosis on displaced abomasum (15.5) and the influence of retained placenta on metritis (8.37), and were consistent with earlier reports. The results of this analysis provide evidence for the plausibility of on-farm recorded health information. PMID:22916949

  15. Century-scale variability in late-summer rainfall events recorded over seven centuries in subannually laminated lacustrine sediments, White Pass, British Columbia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cockburn, Jaclyn M. H.; Lamoureux, Scott F.

    2007-03-01

    Formation of annually laminated sediments in Summit Lake, White Pass, British Columbia is controlled by runoff generated by snowpack and glacier melt and major rainfall events. The 700-yr varve record is divided into two subannual series (early and late) based on sedimentological criteria and sedimentary structures within each varve. A comparison of recent subannual laminae with nearby meteorological records supports the interpretation they are formed by river discharge events generated by major snow and glacier melt events and large late-summer rainfall events. A significant correlation exists between the late subannual thickness series and the size of the largest rainfall events in late summer. The long record indicates there was an abrupt increase in the thickness and frequency of major rainfall-induced sedimentary events at the end of the seventeenth century. In addition, the frequency of laminae generated by early runoff events also increased. However, early subannual varve thickness component remains statistically the same as the thickness prior to the end of the seventeenth century. This suggests the change in varve thickness at this time is due to increases in major late-summer rainfall frequency rather than increased sediment availability caused by regional Little Ice Age glacier advances.

  16. Hyperimmune globulins and same-day thrombotic adverse events as recorded in a large healthcare database during 2008-2011.

    PubMed

    Menis, Mikhail; Sridhar, Gayathri; Selvam, Nandini; Ovanesov, Mikhail V; Divan, Hozefa A; Liang, Yideng; Scott, Dorothy; Golding, Basil; Forshee, Richard; Ball, Robert; Anderson, Steven A; Izurieta, Hector S

    2013-12-01

    Thrombotic events (TEs) are rare serious complications following administration of hyperimmune globulin (HIG) products. Our retrospective claims-based study assessed occurrence of same-day TEs following administration of HIGs during 2008-2011 and examined potential risk factors using HealthCore's Integrated Research Database (HIRD(SM) ) and laboratory testing of products' procoagulant Factor XIa activity by U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Multivariable regression was used to estimate same-day TE risk for different products. Of 101,956 individuals exposed to 23 different HIG product groups, 86 (0.84 per 1,000 persons) had a TE diagnosis code (DC) recorded on the same day as HIG administration. Unadjusted same-day TE DC rates (per 1,000 persons) ranged from 0.4 to 148.9 for different products. GamaSTAN S/D IG >10 cc had statistically significantly higher same-day TE DC risk compared to Tetanus IG (OR = 57.57; 95% CI = 19.72-168.10). Increased TE risk was also observed with older age (≥45 years), prior thrombotic events, and hypercoagulable state(s). Laboratory investigation identified elevated Factor XIa activity for GamaSTAN S/D, HepaGam B, HyperHep B S/D, WinRho SDF, HyperRHO S/D full dose, and HyperTET S/D. Our study, for the first time, identified increase in the same-day TE DC risk with GamaSTAN S/D IG >10 cc and suggests potentially elevated TE risk with other HIGs. PMID:23907744

  17. Carbon isotope records reveal synchronicity between carbon cycle perturbation and the "Carnian Pluvial Event" in the Tethys realm (Late Triassic)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dal Corso, Jacopo; Gianolla, Piero; Newton, Robert J.; Franceschi, Marco; Roghi, Guido; Caggiati, Marcello; Raucsik, Béla; Budai, Tamás; Haas, János; Preto, Nereo

    2015-04-01

    In the early Late Triassic a period of increased rainfall, named the Carnian Pluvial Event (CPE), is evidenced by major lithological changes in continental and marine successions worldwide. The environmental change seems to be closely associated with a negative carbon isotope excursion that was identified in a stratigraphic succession of the Dolomites (Italy) but the temporal relationship between these phenomena is still not well defined. Here we present organic-carbon isotope data from Carnian deep-water stratigraphic sections in Austria and Hungary, and carbonate petrography of samples from a marginal marine section in Italy. A negative 2-4‰ δ13C shift is recorded by bulk organic matter in the studied sections and is coincident with a similar feature highlighted in higher plant and marine algal biomarker carbon-isotope records from the Dolomites (Italy), thus testifying to a global change in the isotopic composition of the reservoirs of the exchangeable carbon. Our new observations verify that sedimentological changes related to the CPE coincide with the carbon cycle perturbation and therefore occurred synchronously within the western Tethys. Consistent with modern observations, our results show that the injection of 13C-depleted CO2 into the Carnian atmosphere-ocean system may have been directly responsible for the increase in rainfall by intensifying the Pangaean mega-monsoon activity. The consequent increased continental weathering and erosion led to the transfer of large amounts of siliciclastics into the basins that were rapidly filled up, while the increased nutrient flux triggered the local development of anoxia. The new carbonate petrography data show that these changes also coincided with the demise of platform microbial carbonate factories and their replacement with metazoan driven carbonate deposition. This had the effect of considerably decreasing carbonate deposition in shallow water environments.

  18. Palaeoseismic events recorded in Archaean gold-quartz vein networks, Val d'Or, Abitibi, Quebec, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boullier, Anne-Marie; Robert, François

    1992-02-01

    Archaean gold-quartz vein deposits are commonly hosted in high-angle reverse shear zones and are interpreted to have formed in a regime of horizontal compression and high fluid pressure environment. This paper presents the results of a combined structural and fluid inclusion study on three gold-quartz vein deposits of the Val d'Or area (Abitibi, Quebec) consisting of subhorizontal extensional veins and E-W steeply dipping shear veins. Crack-seal structures, tourmaline fibres, stretched quartz crystals and open-space filling textures indicate that the subhorizontal veins formed by hydraulic fracturing under supralithostatic fluid pressure. CO 2-rich and H 2O + NaCl fluid inclusions, interpreted as two coexisting immiscible fluids, occur typically in microcracks of different orientations interpreted to have formed in the σ1- σ2 plane. Horizontal CO 2-rich fluid inclusion planes are contemporaneous with the opening of these veins (σ 3 vertical). Vertical H 2O + NaCl fluid inclusion planes, as well as some microstructures, such as deformed minerals, indicate that the same extensional veins have experienced episodic vertical shortening (σ 3 horizontal) alternating with the opening events. Deformation and slip/opening also occurred in shear veins in which preferred orientation of fluid inclusion planes is not clear, except that the H 2O + NaCl fluid inclusion planes tend to be oriented at high angles to the slip direction. The successive opening and collapse events in subhorizontal extensional veins are correlated with deformation and slip/opening events in shear veins, respectively, and are attributed to cyclic fluid pressure fluctuations in the system. They are thus consistent with the fault-valve model: sudden drop in fluid pressure from supralithostatic to lower values induces fluid unmixing and occurs immediately post-failure following seismic rupturing along the shear zone. Sealing of the shear veins allows the fluid pressure to build up again and the

  19. Possible Pre-Cryogenian Eutrophication Event Recorded In ~770-742 Ma Strata Of The Uinta Mountain Group, Utah, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehler, C. M.; Hayes, D. S.; Nagy, R. M.

    2011-12-01

    Previous mid-Neoproterozoic microfossil diversity studies yield evidence for a relatively sudden biotic change prior to the Cryogenian (Sturtian) glaciations. In an event interpreted as a mass extinction of eukaryotic phytoplankton followed by bacterial dominance, diverse assemblages of complex acritarchs are replaced by more uniform assemblages consisting of simple leiosphaerid acritarchs and bacteria. Recent data from the Chuar Group of the Grand Canyon (770-742 Ma) suggest this biotic change was caused by eutrophication rather than the previous idea that this change was due to the direct effects of Sturtian glaciation. Evidence includes total organic carbon increases indicative of increasing primary productivity followed by iron speciation values that suggest sustained water column anoxia. A new data set (this study) suggests that this same eutrophication event may be recorded in shale units of the formation of Hades Pass and the Red Pine Shale of Utah's Neoproterozoic Uinta Mountain Group (770-742 Ma). Preliminary results of this study include a significant shift in microfossil assemblage from a higher-diversity (H'= 0.60) fauna that includes some ornamented acritarchs to a lower-diversity (H' = 0.11) fauna dominated by smooth leiosphaerids and microfossils of a bacterial origin (Ba|lla/ Sphaerocongregus sp.). This biotic change co-occurs with a significant increase in total organic carbon values that directly follows a positive carbon-isotopic excursion, suggesting increased primary productivity that may have been the result of elevated sediment influx and nutrient availability. Both the biotic change and period of increased total organic carbon values correspond with the onset of an interval of anoxia (indicated by total iron to aluminum ratios above 0.60) and a spike in sulfur concentration. Thus far, these findings support 1) correlations between the Uinta Mountain and Chuar groups, 2) the idea that the biotic turnover preserved in both strata was at least

  20. Flooding of the Great River during the Common Era: A Paleohydrological Record of High Magnitude Flood Events from the Central Mississippi River Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, J. W.; Munoz, S. E.; Gruley, K. E.; Massie, A.

    2014-12-01

    Streamflow characteristics are known to be sensitive to changes in climate, but few continuous records of flooding exist to evaluate the response of hydrological systems to centennial- and millennia-scale climate changes. Here, we present sedimentary records from two oxbow lakes (Horseshoe Lake and Grassy Lake, Illinois, USA) in the central Mississippi River valley (CMRV) that display abrupt shifts in sediment composition and particle-size consistent with deposition by floodwaters immediately following inundation of the floodplain. The sedimentary record at Horseshoe Lake begins ca. AD 100 and displays five major flood events, with four of these occurring after ca. AD 1100. Situated 200 km downstream, the record from Grassy Lake begins later, ca. AD 800, and also shows four major flood events after ca. AD 1100. An analysis of synchronicity using Bayesian age modelling software shows high likelihoods that the four overlapping flood events occurred at the same time, confirming that these events resulted from flooding of the Mississippi River. The most recent event we record at AD 1840 ± 50 corresponds to the AD 1844 flood, the largest flood by discharge (37 m3/s) measured by the gauging station at St. Louis, Missouri, indicating that our sedimentary records document high magnitude flood events. Together, our two sedimentary records show a major shift in the frequency of high magnitude flooding in the central Mississippi River at ca. AD 1100. From AD 100 - AD 1100, only one relatively subtle flood event is recorded, but from AD 1100 - AD 1900, four high magnitude floods deposited distinctive sediment at both sites. The period of infrequent flooding corresponds to a time of agricultural intensification and population growth in the CMRV, while the entire region was abandoned when flood frequency increased. The pronounced shift in flood frequency we observe in our records at ca. AD 1100 begins during the Medieval Climate Anomaly (MCA; AD 950 - AD 1250), a period of

  1. A Late Miocene-Pliocene Antarctic Deepwater Record of Cyclic Iron Reduction Events (ODP Leg 178 Site 1095)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hepp, D. A.; Moerz, T.

    2007-12-01

    The Pacific margin off the Antarctic Peninsula is very sensitive to climate and ice-sheet volume changes. Climatic variations on the continental shelf control regional sedimentary processes and foster the build-up of giant deep- sea sediment drifts. These drifts represent the most proximal continuous sedimentary recorders for West Antarctic ice sheet evolution and glacial-interglacial cyclicity pattern. Sediment physical, geochemical records and x-ray images derived from ODP Site 1095 (Drift 7) were used to identify pattern in glacial-interglacial cyclicity and associated sedimentary and diagenetic processes during late Miocene and Pliocene. Two boundary types dividing half-cycles have been recognized: (1) interglacial-to-glacial transitions are characterized by a sharp boundary and abrupt change in lithology; (2) glacial-to-interglacial transitions can described as a gradual change from a full glacial to a full interglacial stage. A prominent feature of the glacial-to-interglacial transition is the loss of the magnetic susceptibility signal, caused by diagenetic alteration and demagnetization of magnetic iron minerals in a suboxic to anoxic sediment environment. Similar redox processes are described for organic carbon rich Madeira abyssal plain turbidites and Mediterranean sapropels, but are uncommon for vented Circum- Antarctic deep-sea sediments. Iron reduction zones were coupled to the ice sheet collapse at the end of deglaciation phases. Ice sheet collapse and meltwater formation weaken the bottom water formation and convection, but foster short living diatom blooms resulting in high fluxes of organic matter to the seafloor. Iron reduction zones were observed in sixty-four zones of ODP Site 1095 cores. Thus, the sedimentary record of Drift 7 affords an unique opportunity to study cyclic iron reduction events at long time-scales. The occurrence and intensity of those 'diagenetic zones' reflect long-term trends of global climate change and the related

  2. Investigation of Historic Seismic and Infrasound Records from Events Occurred at the Region of Novaya Zemplya Test Site by the USSR Stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolova, Inna

    2014-05-01

    Located in the north the Novaya Zemlya Test Site was used in Soviet time for conducting unique nuclear weapon tests in different mediums. 130 nuclear explosions with total yield 265 megatons were conducted at the Test Site for the period 1955-1990. During this period the following nuclear explosions were conducted: 1 surface explosion, 85 air explosions, 2 above water explosions, 3 underwater explosions and 39 underground explosions (in boreholes and tunnels). In addition, tectonic earthquakes and induced earthquakes caused by multi-megatons UNE occur near the Test Site. Unfortunately, only few seismic events occurred on the territory of the Test Site were recorded by digital stations. However, the archives of different seismological organizations of the USSR contain huge amount of analogue seismograms recorded by permanent and temporary stations. Historical seismograms of nuclear explosions and earthquakes from Novaya Zemlya Test site territory were digitized by the Complex Seismological Expedition IPE RAS and by the Institute of Geophysical Researches RK; a database of the events from the Test Site containing 470 seismograms at epicentral distance 2100-3800 was created. The database includes seismic records of air, underground nuclear explosions, and records of underwater nuclear explosion conducted within "Korall" exercise. In addition, infrasound records of waves from multi-megatons air nuclear explosions recorded by a microbarograph installed at Talgar seismic station at distance ~3600 km from the Test Site were digitized. Kinematic and dynamic parameters of nuclear explosions records conducted in different mediums (air, under water and underground) were investigated by the digitized records from events at Novaya Zemlya Test Site; specific features of wave pattern for each class of events were found.

  3. RETRACTED: Extreme oceanographic events recorded in the southwest coast of India during the 1998-1999 summer season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna, K. Muni

    2010-01-01

    This article has been removed at the request of the Editor-in-chief and Author. Please see Elsevier Policy on Article Withdrawal ( http://www.elsevier.com/locate/withdrawalpolicy). Reason: This article has been retracted at the request of the Editor-in-Chief and Author as the author has plagiarized part of a paper that had already appeared in another journal, as written by the following authors: Roy, Weeks, Rouault, Nelson, Barlow, Van der Lingen. "Extreme oceanographic events recorded in the Southern Benguela during the 1999-2000 summer season", South African J. Sci., 2001, volume 97 (11-12), pp. 465-471. While the underlying scientific data of Dr Krishna's work may be original, the wording, sentence, and paragraph structure of the entire manuscript shows such strong similarity (in many cases wholesale replication of sentences and phrases) that we must conclude that there has been excessive use of previously published material without appropriate attribution and is consequently not an original contribution. One of the conditions of submission of a paper for publication is that authors declare explicitly that their work is original and has not appeared in a publication elsewhere. Re-use of any data should be appropriately cited. As such this article represents a severe abuse of the scientific publishing system. The scientific community takes a very strong view on this matter and we apologize to readers of the journal that this was not detected during the submission process.

  4. Preservation of submarine event deposits: Where is the most preferable area to reconstruct the past earthquake/tsunami events from marine sediment records?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikehara, K.; Kanamatsu, T.; Ashi, J.; Strasser, M.; Usami, K.; Nakamura, Y.; Kodaira, S.

    2014-12-01

    Large earthquakes and their related tsunami impact submarine geological processes that can form specific submarine event deposits. Most of widely distributed event beds are typically fine-grained turbidites. Examples from the Nankai Trough and the Beppu Bay suggest that a terminal isolated depression is area with the highest potential for the deposition of fine-grained turbidites. The 2004 off the Kii Peninsula earthquakes caused a fine-grained turbidite deposited in a small basin on the Nankai accretionary prism slope, and formed a thick acoustically transparent layer. Off Sanriku thickness of the 2011 Tohoku-oki earthquake and tsunami event beds was usually a few-several cm, but was highest in the Japan Trench with several tens cm. The Japan Trench floor is the deepest and terminal basin. The terminal basin is a potential area for marine paleoseismology. Preservation potential is a factor for usage of submarine event beds as paleoseimsological tool. Repeated sampling of surface sediments from off Sanriku after the 2011 event suggests that the preservation potential of fine-grained event bed is low in the strong benthos activity zone. Sedimentation rate is another factor on the preservation potential. Quick and high sediment accumulation after the event bed deposition diminishes the pressure for the destruction of the event beds by benthos activity. Thus, a small basin covered by the bottom water with low dissolved oxygen concentration, and occurred under the high primary productivity areas is a good example of basins with high preservation potential of event beds. High resolution seismic profiles in the central Japan Trench indicate that occurrence of the well-stratified strata filling the trench and subducting graben depressions. These strata have high potential for seismo-turbidite deposition. Thus, small basins on the mid-slope terrace and the trench floor of the central Japan Trench are most preferable and potential candidates for submarine paleoseismology.

  5. Seasonality and Disturbance Events in the Carbon Isotope Record of Pinus elliottii Tree Rings from Big Pine Key, Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebenack, C.; Anderson, W. T.; Cherubini, P.

    2012-12-01

    The South Florida coastal ecosystem is among the world's subtropical coastlines which are threatened by the potential effects of climate change. A well-developed localized paleohistory is essential in the understanding of the role climate variability/change has on both hydrological dynamics and disturbance event frequency and intensity; this understanding can then aid in the development of better predictive models. High resolution paleoclimate proxies, such as those developed from tree-ring archives, may be useful tools for extrapolating actual climate trends over time from the overlapping long-term and short-term climate cycles, such as the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO) and the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO). In South Florida, both the AMO and ENSO strongly influence seasonal precipitation, and a more complete grasp of how these cycles have affected the region in the past could be applied to future freshwater management practices. Dendrochronology records for the terrestrial subtropics, including South Florida, are sparse because seasonality for this region is precipitation-driven; this is in contrast to the drastic temperature changes experienced in the temperate latitudes. Subtropical seasonality may lead to the complete lack of visible rings or to the formation of ring structures that may or may not represent annual growth. Fortunately, it has recently been demonstrated that Pinus elliottii trees in South Florida produce distinct annual growth rings; however ring width was not found to significantly correlate with either the AMO or ENSO. Dendrochronology studies may be taken a step beyond the physical tree-ring proxies by using the carbon isotope ratios to infer information about physiological controls and environmental factors that affect the distribution of isotopes within the plant. It has been well established that the stable isotope composition of cellulose can be related to precipitation, drought, large-scale ocean/atmospheric oscillations

  6. Fast adaptation of the internal model of gravity for manual interceptions: evidence for event-dependent learning.

    PubMed

    Zago, Myrka; Bosco, Gianfranco; Maffei, Vincenzo; Iosa, Marco; Ivanenko, Yuri P; Lacquaniti, Francesco

    2005-02-01

    We studied how subjects learn to deal with two conflicting sensory environments as a function of the probability of each environment and the temporal distance between repeated events. Subjects were asked to intercept a visual target moving downward on a screen with randomized laws of motion. We compared five protocols that differed in the probability of constant speed (0g) targets and accelerated (1g) targets. Probability ranged from 9 to 100%, and the time interval between consecutive repetitions of the same target ranged from about 1 to 20 min. We found that subjects systematically timed their responses consistent with the assumption of gravity effects, for both 1 and 0g trials. With training, subjects rapidly adapted to 0g targets by shifting the time of motor activation. Surprisingly, the adaptation rate was independent of both the probability of 0g targets and their temporal distance. Very few 0g trials sporadically interspersed as catch trials during immersive practice with 1g trials were sufficient for learning and consolidation in long-term memory, as verified by retesting after 24 h. We argue that the memory store for adapted states of the internal gravity model is triggered by individual events and can be sustained for prolonged periods of time separating sporadic repetitions. This form of event-related learning could depend on multiple-stage memory, with exponential rise and decay in the initial stages followed by a sample-and-hold module. PMID:15456796

  7. A High-Resolution Stalagmite Holocene Paleoclimate Record from Northern Venezuela with Insights into the Timing and Duration of the 8.2 ka Event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Retrum, J. B.; Gonzalez, L. A.; Edwards, R.; Cheng, H.; Tincher, S. M.; Urbani, F.

    2013-12-01

    The dearth of studies and data in the tropics hinders our understanding of atmospheric and oceanic interactions between the low latitudes and the rest of the globe. To understand better the interactions, specifically between the Caribbean and the North Atlantic, three stalagmites were collected from Cueva Zarraga in the Falcón Mountains of northwestern Venezuela and analyzed to determine local paleoclimatic history. Stalagmites ages were determined by U/Th disequilibrium and show a nearly complete Holocene record. The stalagmites have an average temporal resolution of 10.8 years/mm and ranges from 2.1 to 62.7 years. Both the carbon and oxygen isotope records preserve quasi-millennial oscillations and show a major depletion shift from the last glacial period into the Holocene, suggesting warmer and wetter conditions during the Holocene. The preservation of quasi-millennial oscillations and of high frequency multi-decadal changes by the δ13C indicates that the soil-vegetation-stalagmite system is acting as an amplifier of the climatic signal produced by climatic events and changes. In the early Holocene, the δ18O record shows a depletion trend from ~ 11,000 to 8,000 cal yr BP before reaching the Holocene Thermal Maximum. A prominent δ18O enrichment event is recorded in all the stalagmites that correspond to the 8.2 ka event. The 8.2 ka event is represented by a double peak with duration of ~ 180 years. Other short-term δ18O enrichment events likely correspond to Bond events 1, 2, 5, and 6. The late Holocene record, like other Caribbean records, indicates that the climate system diverges from insolation and may represent an atmospheric rearrangement that resulted in ENSO increase instability or in reduced seasonal movement of the Inter-Tropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ). Today, Cueva Zarraga is at the northern extent of the ITCZ and has two rainy seasons. The δ18O enrichment events during the Holocene suggest drier conditions southern displacement of the ITCZ

  8. Stable isotope and benthic foraminiferal records of the Latest Danian Event at ODP Site 1262 (Walvis Ridge)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deprez, Arne; Jehle, Sofie; Bornemann, André; Speijer, Robert P.

    2015-04-01

    The Latest Danian Event (LDE - aka Top Chron 27n Event) is characterized by a >1o negative benthic foraminiferal CIE in various sections in Egypt, which has been correlated with δ13C shifts of ~0.7o in Zumaia (Spain), Wombat Plateau (ODP 761B, Indian Ocean) and Shatsky Rise (ODP 1209, Pacific Ocean) (Bornemann et al., 2009; Westerhold et al., 2011). A concurrent ~0.5o δ18O excursion suggests a 2°C bottom water temperature rise during this event at Shatsky Rise, suggesting a hyperthermal nature for this event (Westerhold et al., 2011). Here we show the first results of benthic foraminiferal faunal and isotope patterns related to the LDE at Walvis Ridge (ODP Site 1262, Southern Atlantic Ocean, paleodepth ~3000 m). The high percentage of planktic foraminifera (on average 99.2%) indicates good carbonate preservation. Stable isotope analyses on the benthic foraminifer Nuttallides truempyi show a ~0.9o δ13C shift at ~62.2 Ma. Lowest values are measured at ~62.15 Ma. A concurrent ~0.8o δ18O excursion indicates a ~3°C temperature rise, larger than at Shatsky Rise. δ13C values recover to reach a transient plateau at 0.75o during the second Fe peak (from ~62.1 to 62.0 Ma), coinciding with a second negative δ18O excursion of 0.7o. Also the ODP Site 1209 (Shatsky Rise) record shows these double Fe, δ18O and δ13C peaks. This is a feature that the LDE shares with some early Eocene hyperthermals, like ETM-2/H1-H2 and I1-I2, and might point to a common origin as the early Eocene hyperthermals. The Walvis Ridge samples show a highly diverse assemblage of benthic foraminifera with a relative abundance of 10-15% of Gyroidinoides spp. and ~10% of Nuttallides spp., Siphogenerinoides spp., Gavelinella spp., Epistominella spp. and Cibicidoides spp. The ~15cm sample interval dataset seems to show no large changes in relative abundance of these species at the onset of the LDE. This is different than faunal response to early Eocene hyperthermals, like ETM2. During ETM2 at DSDP

  9. A high-resolution lake sediment record of glacier activity from SE Greenland defines abrupt Holocene cooling events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balascio, N. L.; Bradley, R. S.; D'Andrea, W. J.

    2013-12-01

    warming. Excursions from this trend occur at c. 8.5 ka and 8.3 ka showing brief periods of readvance that are likely associated with freshwater inputs to the North Atlantic Ocean related to the ';8.2 kyr Event.' The interval from 7.7-4.1 ka is clearly defined by high organic content (>20%) and extremely low magnetic susceptibility values, which we interpret as a lack of glacial input and the complete disappearance of the glaciers in the catchment. From 4.1-1.3 ka indicators of glacial input show a step-wise pattern with significant increases in glacial activity at 4.1 ka, 3.1 ka, 1.4 ka, and 1.3 ka indicating a progressive cooling and regrowth of the glaciers. Over the last 1.3 ka, glacial input was more constant, sedimentation rates were higher (0.8 mm/yr), and the sediment is finely laminated. Analysis of the μ-XRF data shows that the laminations were deposited annually, providing a high-resolution record of changes in glacial activity over the last 1.3 ka that corresponds well with regional temperature reconstructions.

  10. Adverse Event Recording and Reporting in Clinical Trials Comparing Lumbar Disk Replacement with Lumbar Fusion: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Hiratzka, Jayme; Rastegar, Farbod; Contag, Alec G.; Norvell, Daniel C.; Anderson, Paul A.; Hart, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Systematic review. Objectives (1) To compare the quality of adverse event (AE) methodology and reporting among randomized trials comparing lumbar fusion with lumbar total disk replacement (TDR) using established AE reporting systems; (2) to compare the AEs and reoperations of lumbar spinal fusion with those from lumbar TDR; (3) to make recommendations on how to report AEs in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) so that surgeons and patients have more-detailed and comprehensive information when making treatment decisions. Methods A systematic search of PubMed, the Cochrane collaboration database, and the National Guideline Clearinghouse through May 2015 was conducted. Randomized controlled trials with at least 2 years of follow-up comparing lumbar artificial disk replacement with lumbar fusion were included. Patients were required to have axial or mechanical low back pain of ≥3 months' duration due to degenerative joint disease defined as degenerative disk disease, facet joint disease, or spondylosis. Outcomes included the quality of AE acquisition methodology and results reporting, and AEs were defined as those secondary to the procedure and reoperations. Individual and pooled relative risks and their 95% confidence intervals comparing lumbar TDR with fusion were calculated. Results RCTs demonstrated a generally poor description of methods for assessing AEs. There was a consistent lack of clear definition or grading for these events. Furthermore, there was a high degree of variation in reporting of surgery-related AEs. Most studies lacked adequate reporting of the timing of AEs, and there were no clear distinctions between acute or chronic AEs. Meta-analysis of the pooled data demonstrated a twofold increased risk of AEs in patients having lumbar fusion compared with patients having lumbar TDR at 2-year follow-up, and this relative risk was maintained at 5 years. Furthermore, the pooled data demonstrated a 1.7 times greater relative risk of

  11. Adverse Event Recording and Reporting in Clinical Trials Comparing Lumbar Disk Replacement with Lumbar Fusion: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Hiratzka, Jayme; Rastegar, Farbod; Contag, Alec G; Norvell, Daniel C; Anderson, Paul A; Hart, Robert A

    2015-12-01

    Study Design Systematic review. Objectives (1) To compare the quality of adverse event (AE) methodology and reporting among randomized trials comparing lumbar fusion with lumbar total disk replacement (TDR) using established AE reporting systems; (2) to compare the AEs and reoperations of lumbar spinal fusion with those from lumbar TDR; (3) to make recommendations on how to report AEs in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) so that surgeons and patients have more-detailed and comprehensive information when making treatment decisions. Methods A systematic search of PubMed, the Cochrane collaboration database, and the National Guideline Clearinghouse through May 2015 was conducted. Randomized controlled trials with at least 2 years of follow-up comparing lumbar artificial disk replacement with lumbar fusion were included. Patients were required to have axial or mechanical low back pain of ≥3 months' duration due to degenerative joint disease defined as degenerative disk disease, facet joint disease, or spondylosis. Outcomes included the quality of AE acquisition methodology and results reporting, and AEs were defined as those secondary to the procedure and reoperations. Individual and pooled relative risks and their 95% confidence intervals comparing lumbar TDR with fusion were calculated. Results RCTs demonstrated a generally poor description of methods for assessing AEs. There was a consistent lack of clear definition or grading for these events. Furthermore, there was a high degree of variation in reporting of surgery-related AEs. Most studies lacked adequate reporting of the timing of AEs, and there were no clear distinctions between acute or chronic AEs. Meta-analysis of the pooled data demonstrated a twofold increased risk of AEs in patients having lumbar fusion compared with patients having lumbar TDR at 2-year follow-up, and this relative risk was maintained at 5 years. Furthermore, the pooled data demonstrated a 1.7 times greater relative risk of

  12. Paleoceanographic Implications of the Terrestrial Carbon-Isotope Record of the Early Toarcian (Jurassic) Oceanic Anoxic Event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hesselbo, S.; Jenkyns, H. C.; Duarte, L. V.

    2005-12-01

    Macrofossil wood in two European sections representing the Toarcian (Early Jurassic) Oceanic Anoxic Event (OAE) have previously been shown to exhibit a large (~ -6 to -7 %) shift in d13C values which has been interpreted as a massive and geologically short-lived perturbation to the global carbon cycle. This interpretation has recently been challenged on the basis of a compilation of carbon-isotope data from belemnites collected from sections in northern Europe that exhibit carbon isotope values that are heavier than expected at the peak of the OAE. Here we present new carbon isotope measurements from wood collected from a marine record of the early Toarcian at Peniche, Portugal, a section currently under consideration as a GSSP for the base of the Toarcian. A large negative excursion (~ -7%) is confirmed for the OAE in these samples. These cannot have been severely impregnated by hydrocarbons of marine origin and the ages are well defined by ammonite biostratigraphy and by Sr-isotope stratigraphy. Carbon-isotope data is also presented for an early diagenetic silica nodule that formed within jet from the Toarcian of the Yorkshire coast, northeast England; values are indistinguishable from those of stratigraphically equivalent jet samples from which solvent extractable hydrocarbons had been removed. Thus, the early Toarcian negative carbon-isotope excursion is confirmed as a phenomenon of the global shallow-ocean, biosphere and atmosphere. It is likely that the anomalously heavy values obtained from belemnites from the OAE interval derive their isotopic signature from localized and possibly seasonal water masses characterized by dissolved inorganic carbon strongly enriched in heavy carbon by very high organic productivity.

  13. Prevalence, nature and potential preventability of adverse drug events – a population-based medical record study of 4970 adults

    PubMed Central

    Hakkarainen, Katja M; Gyllensten, Hanna; Jönsson, Anna K; Andersson Sundell, Karolina; Petzold, Max; Hägg, Staffan

    2014-01-01

    Aims To estimate the 3 month prevalence of adverse drug events (ADEs), categories of ADEs and preventable ADEs, and the preventability of ADEs among adults in Sweden. Further, to identify drug classes and organ systems associated with ADEs and estimate their seriousness. Methods A random sample of 5025 adults in a Swedish county council in 2008 was drawn from the Total Population Register. All their medical records in 29 inpatient care departments in three hospitals, 110 specialized outpatient clinics and 51 primary care units were reviewed retrospectively in a stepwise manner, and complemented with register data on dispensed drugs. ADEs, including adverse drug reactions (ADRs), sub-therapeutic effects of drug therapy (STEs), drug dependence and abuse, drug intoxications from overdose, and morbidities due to drug-related untreated indication, were detected during a 3 month study period, and assessed for preventability. Results Among 4970 included individuals, the prevalence of ADEs was 12.0% (95% confidence interval (CI) 11.1, 12.9%), and preventable ADEs 5.6% (95% CI 5.0, 6.2%). ADRs (6.9%; 95% CI 6.2, 7.6%) and STEs (6.4%; 95% CI 5.8, 7.1%) were more prevalent than the other ADEs. Of the ADEs, 38.8% (95% CI 35.8–41.9%) was preventable, varying by ADE category and seriousness. ADEs were frequently associated with nervous system and cardiovascular drugs, but the associated drugs and affected organs varied by ADE category. Conclusions The considerable burden of ADEs and preventable ADEs from commonly used drugs across care settings warrants large-scale efforts to redesign safer, higher quality healthcare systems. The heterogeneous nature of the ADE categories should be considered in research and clinical practice for preventing, detecting and mitigating ADEs. PMID:24372506

  14. Automated detection of feeding strikes by larval fish using continuous high-speed digital video: a novel method to extract quantitative data from fast, sparse kinematic events.

    PubMed

    Shamur, Eyal; Zilka, Miri; Hassner, Tal; China, Victor; Liberzon, Alex; Holzman, Roi

    2016-06-01

    Using videography to extract quantitative data on animal movement and kinematics constitutes a major tool in biomechanics and behavioral ecology. Advanced recording technologies now enable acquisition of long video sequences encompassing sparse and unpredictable events. Although such events may be ecologically important, analysis of sparse data can be extremely time-consuming and potentially biased; data quality is often strongly dependent on the training level of the observer and subject to contamination by observer-dependent biases. These constraints often limit our ability to study animal performance and fitness. Using long videos of foraging fish larvae, we provide a framework for the automated detection of prey acquisition strikes, a behavior that is infrequent yet critical for larval survival. We compared the performance of four video descriptors and their combinations against manually identified feeding events. For our data, the best single descriptor provided a classification accuracy of 77-95% and detection accuracy of 88-98%, depending on fish species and size. Using a combination of descriptors improved the accuracy of classification by ∼2%, but did not improve detection accuracy. Our results indicate that the effort required by an expert to manually label videos can be greatly reduced to examining only the potential feeding detections in order to filter false detections. Thus, using automated descriptors reduces the amount of manual work needed to identify events of interest from weeks to hours, enabling the assembly of an unbiased large dataset of ecologically relevant behaviors. PMID:26994179

  15. A direct comparison of the ages of detrital monazite versus detrital zircon in Appalachian foreland basin sandstones: Searching for the record of Phanerozoic orogenic events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hietpas, Jack; Samson, Scott; Moecher, David

    2011-10-01

    The provenance potential of detrital monazite was investigated by in situ measurement of 232Th- 208Pb dates of grains isolated from six Middle Carboniferous-Permian sandstones from the Appalachian foreland basin. Provenance assessment of these units was previously investigated by measuring U-Pb crystallization ages of detrital zircon (Thomas et al., 2004; Becker et al., 2005, 2006). Approximately 90% of the detrital zircon ages record Mesoproterozoic or older ages, with only 10% recording the three major pulses of tectonism (Taconian, Acadian and Alleghanian) that are the hallmark of the Appalachian Orogen. 232Th- 208Pb ages of detrital monazite, however, strongly record the complex phases of Paleozoic orogenesis. Nearly 65% of the ages record Paleozoic events, while 35% record Neoproterozoic or older ages. In several of the analyzed sandstones, detrital monazite ages record Paleozoic orogenic events that are completely missed by detrital zircon ages, demonstrating that monazite ages more accurately reflect the character of the sediment source rocks. The inferred maximum age of sediment deposition, as determined by the youngest monazite grains, is ~ 550 Ma younger for two of the analyzed sandstones compared to depositional constraints based on the youngest detrital zircon. The different physical properties and petrogenesis of zircon and monazite are interpreted to be factors for the dramatic differences in sediment provenance information provided by each mineral. The results from this study have important implications for determining sediment provenance, constraining maximum age of sediment deposition, and developing robust regional tectonic models.

  16. Patient-Reported Safety Events in Chronic Kidney Disease Recorded With an Interactive Voice-Inquiry Dial-Response System: Monthly Report Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Doerfler, Rebecca M; Yoffe, Marni R; Diamantidis, Clarissa J; Blumenthal, Jacob B; Siddiqui, Tariq; Gardner, James F; Snitker, Soren; Zhan, Min

    2016-01-01

    Background Monitoring patient-reported outcomes (PROs) may improve safety of chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. Objective Evaluate the performance of an interactive voice-inquiry dial-response system (IVRDS) in detecting CKD-pertinent adverse safety events outside of the clinical environment and compare the incidence of events using the IVDRS to that detected by paper diary. Methods This was a 6-month study of Stage III-V CKD patients in the Safe Kidney Care (SKC) study. Participants crossed over from a paper diary to the IVDRS for recording patient-reported safety events defined as symptoms or events attributable to medications or care. The IVDRS was adapted from the SKC paper diary to record event frequency and remediation. Participants were auto-called weekly and permitted to self-initiate calls. Monthly reports were reviewed by two physician adjudicators for their clinical significance. Results 52 participants were followed over a total of 1384 weeks. 28 out of 52 participants (54%) reported events using the IVDRS versus 8 out of 52 (15%) with the paper diary; hypoglycemia was the most common event for both methods. All IVDRS menu options were selected at least once except for confusion and rash. Events were reported on 121 calls, with 8 calls reporting event remediation by ambulance or emergency room (ER) visit. The event rate with the IVDRS and paper diary, with and without hypoglycemia, was 26.7 versus 4.7 and 18.3 versus 0.8 per 100 person weeks, respectively (P=.002 and P<.001). The frequent users (ie, >10 events) largely differed by method, and event rates excluding the most frequent user of each were 16.9 versus 2.5 per 100 person weeks, respectively (P<.001). Adjudicators found approximately half the 80 reports clinically significant, with about a quarter judged as actionable. Hypoglycemia was often associated with additional reports of fatigue and falling. Participants expressed favorable satisfaction with the IVDRS. Conclusions Use of the IVDRS

  17. Fast joint detection-estimation of evoked brain activity in event-related FMRI using a variational approach

    PubMed Central

    Chaari, Lotfi; Vincent, Thomas; Forbes, Florence; Dojat, Michel; Ciuciu, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    In standard within-subject analyses of event-related fMRI data, two steps are usually performed separately: detection of brain activity and estimation of the hemodynamic response. Because these two steps are inherently linked, we adopt the so-called region-based Joint Detection-Estimation (JDE) framework that addresses this joint issue using a multivariate inference for detection and estimation. JDE is built by making use of a regional bilinear generative model of the BOLD response and constraining the parameter estimation by physiological priors using temporal and spatial information in a Markovian model. In contrast to previous works that use Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) techniques to sample the resulting intractable posterior distribution, we recast the JDE into a missing data framework and derive a Variational Expectation-Maximization (VEM) algorithm for its inference. A variational approximation is used to approximate the Markovian model in the unsupervised spatially adaptive JDE inference, which allows automatic fine-tuning of spatial regularization parameters. It provides a new algorithm that exhibits interesting properties in terms of estimation error and computational cost compared to the previously used MCMC-based approach. Experiments on artificial and real data show that VEM-JDE is robust to model mis-specification and provides computational gain while maintaining good performance in terms of activation detection and hemodynamic shape recovery. PMID:23096056

  18. Paleoenvironmental Interpretation of Events Leading to Declines in Planktonic Diatoms in the Late Pliocene and Pleistocene Record from Lake El'gygytgyn, Far East Russian Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, J. A.; Cherepanova, M. V.; Wakefield, A. E.

    2014-12-01

    The Lake El'gygytgyn sediment core (ICDP 5011-1) contains a near-continuous record of diatoms extending to approximately 3.46 Ma, providing a means to evaluate past climate-related lake system changes in this unique terrestrial Arctic paleoclimate archive. Systematic down-core diatom counts at an average 4-kyr resolution and SEM observations of dominant planktonic taxa from selected intervals are presented here for the first time. During the Pleistocene, the record is characterized by repeated declines in plankton abundance coinciding with a shift in dominant planktonic genus or species. These events correspond to cold intervals inferred from other proxies, implying a mechanism such as severe ice and snow conditions on the lake leading to an extended decline in the plankton. In contrast, during the Pliocene portion of the record, although similar or longer declines in the plankton abundance occur, the plankton has a more stable character, dominated by previously undescribed species of the genus Pliocaenicus. The most significant change occurs after a plankton decline with sustained periphytic diatoms from approximately 2.93-2.80 Ma, when a species with a rimoportula and distinct alveolae is replaced by a species with relatively flat valves with such structures absent or too insignificant to observe in SEM. This zone does not correspond to a particular cold event, as identified by other proxy records, but corresponds to a consistent warm interval with low insolation variability. Thus, diatoms and diatom-related proxies may be recording different lake-system responses to climate during different portions of the lake's history. Higher resolution analyses of these events will help to characterize the lake system changes occurring during climate events unfavorable for planktonic diatoms.

  19. Cenozoic prograding sequences of the Antarctic continental margin: a record of glacio-eustatic and tectonic events

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cooper, A. K.; Barrett, P.J.; Hinz, K.; Traube, V.; Letichenkov, G.; Stagg, H.M.J.

    1991-01-01

    times, like today, by little or no clastic sedimentation on the continental shelf other than beneath retreated ice shelves lying far from the continental sheld edge. Ice streams carve broad depressions across the shelf and carry abundant basal sediments directly to the continental shelf edge, thereby creating troughmouth fans and sheet-like prograding sequences (i.e. type IA sequences). Numerous acoustic unconformities and multiple overcompacted layers within the prograding sequences suggest major fluctuations of the Antarctic Ice Sheet. The available drilling and seismic interpretations provide the following history: (1) Cenozoic ice sheets have existed in places near the continental shelf since middle to late Eocene time. (2) A grounded Antarctic ice sheet first expanded to the continental shelf edge, with probable overdeepening of the outer shelf, in late Eucene to early Oligocene time in Prydz Bay, possibly in early Miocene time in the Ross Sea, and at least by middle Miocene time in the Weddell Sea. (3) The relative amounts of shelf prograding and inferred ice-volume variations (and related sea-level changes) have increased since middle to late Miocene time in the eastern Ross Sea, Prydz Bay, and possibly Weddell Sea. Our analysis is preliminary. Further acoustic surveys and scientific drilling are needed to resolve the proximal Antarctic record of glacio-eustatic, climatic, and tectonic events recorded by the prograding sequences. ?? 1991.

  20. Uncovering a Salt Giant. Deep-Sea Record of Mediterranean Messinian Events (DREAM) multi-phase drilling project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camerlenghi, Angelo; Aoisi, Vanni; Lofi, Johanna; Hübscher, Christian; deLange, Gert; Flecker, Rachel; Garcia-Castellanos, Daniel; Gorini, Christian; Gvirtzman, Zohar; Krijgsman, Wout; Lugli, Stefano; Makowsky, Yizhaq; Manzi, Vinicio; McGenity, Terry; Panieri, Giuliana; Rabineau, Marina; Roveri, Marco; Sierro, Francisco Javier; Waldmann, Nicolas

    2014-05-01

    In May 2013, the DREAM MagellanPlus Workshop was held in Brisighella (Italy). The initiative builds from recent activities by various research groups to identify potential sites to perform deep-sea scientific drilling in the Mediterranean Sea across the deep Messinian Salinity Crisis (MSC) sedimentary record. In this workshop three generations of scientists were gathered: those who participated in formulation of the deep desiccated model, through DSDP Leg 13 drilling in 1973; those who are actively involved in present-day MSC research; and the next generation (PhD students and young post-docs). The purpose of the workshop was to identify locations for multiple-site drilling (including riser-drilling) in the Mediterranean Sea that would contribute to solve the several open questions still existing about the causes, processes, timing and consequences at local and planetary scale of an outstanding case of natural environmental change in the recent Earth history: the Messinian Salinity Crisis in the Mediterranean Sea. The product of the workshop is the identification of the structure of an experimental design of site characterization, riser-less and riser drilling, sampling, measurements, and down-hole analyses that will be the core for at least one compelling and feasible multiple phase drilling proposal. Particular focus has been given to reviewing seismic site survey data available from different research groups at pan-Mediterranean basin scale, to the assessment of additional site survey activity including 3D seismics, and to ways of establishing firm links with oil and gas industry. The scientific community behind the DREAM initiative is willing to proceed with the submission to IODP of a Multi-phase Drilling Project including several drilling proposals addressing specific drilling objectives, all linked to the driving objectives of the MSC drilling and understanding . A series of critical drilling targets were identified to address the still open questions

  1. Pattern of presenting complaints recorded as near-drowning events in emergency departments: a national surveillance study from Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Drowning is a heavy burden on the health systems of many countries, including Pakistan. To date, no effective large-scale surveillance has been in place to estimate rates of drowning and near-drowning in Pakistan. The Pakistan National Emergency Department Surveillance (Pak-NEDS) study aimed to fill this gap. Methods Patients who presented with a complaint of "near-drowning" were analyzed to explore patterns of true near-drowning (unintentional) and intentional injuries that led to the "near-drowning" complaint. Bivariate analysis was done to establish patterns among patients treated in emergency departments, including socio-demographic information, injury-related information, accompanying injuries, and emergency department resource utilization. Results A total of 133 patients (0.2% of all injury patients) with "near-drowning" as presenting complaints were recorded by the Pak-NEDS system. True near-drowning (50.0%) and intentional injuries that led to "near-drowning" complaints (50.0%) differed in nature of injuries. The highest proportion of true near-drowning incidents occurred among patients aged between 25-44 years (47.5%), and among males (77.5%). True near-drowning patients usually had other accompanying complaints, such as lower limb injury (40.0%). Very few patients were transported by ambulance (5.0%), and triage was done for 15% of patients. Eleven (27.5%) true near-drowning patients received cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Conclusion There was major under-reporting of drowning and near-drowning cases in the surveillance study. The etiology of near-drowning cases should be further studied. Patients who experienced non-fatal drownings were more commonly sent for medical care due to other accompanying conditions, rather than near-drowning event itself. There is also need for recognizing true near-drowning incidents. The results of this study provide information on data source selection, site location, emergency care standardization, and multi

  2. Fast events in single-channel currents activated by acetylcholine and its analogues at the frog muscle end-plate.

    PubMed Central

    Colquhoun, D; Sakmann, B

    1985-01-01

    The fine structure of ion-channel activations by junctional nicotinic receptors in adult frog muscle fibres has been investigated. The agonists used were acetylcholine (ACh), carbachol (CCh), suberyldicholine (SubCh) and decan-1,10-dicarboxylic acid dicholine ester (DecCh). Individual activations (bursts) were interrupted by short closed periods; the distribution of their durations showed a major fast component ('short gaps') and a minor slower component ('intermediate gaps'). The mean duration of both short and intermediate gaps was dependent on the nature of the agonist. For short gaps the mean durations (microseconds) were: ACh, 20; SubCh, 43; DecCh, 71; CCh, 13. The mean number of short gaps per burst were: ACh, 1.9; SubCh, 4.1; DecCh, 2.0. The mean number of short gaps per burst, and the mean number per unit open time, were dependent on the nature of the agonist, but showed little dependence on agonist concentration or membrane potential for ACh, SubCh and DecCh. The short gaps in CCh increased in frequency with agonist concentration and were mainly produced by channel blockages by CCh itself. Partially open channels (subconductance states) were clearly resolved rarely (0.4% of gaps within bursts) but regularly. Conductances of 18% (most commonly) and 71% of the main value were found. However, most short gaps were probably full closures. The distribution of burst lengths had two components. The faster component represented mainly isolated short openings that were much more common at low agonist concentrations. The slower component represented bursts of longer openings. Except at very low concentrations more than 85% of activations were of this type, which corresponds to the 'channel lifetime' found by noise analysis. The frequency of channel openings increased slightly with hyperpolarization. The short gaps during activations were little affected when (a) the [H+]o or [Ca2+]o were reduced to 1/10th of normal, (b) when extracellular Ca2+ was replaced by Mg2

  3. From flood-event to climate in an alpine context (Arve valley, France): methodological issues toward the confrontation of historical documentation and geological records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mélo, Alain; Ployon, Estelle; Wilhelm, Bruno; Arnaud, Fabien

    2014-05-01

    various flood types. We were hence able to distinguish different types of flood events from localised thunderstorms, generalised thunderstorm activity in uppermost catchment areas toward generalised heavy precipitation affecting the whole river Arve Catchment area (~ 2500 km²).We hence point the diversity of meteorological situations susceptible to lead to the recording of flood events. In order to properly confront historical documents- and geological archives-based flood chronicles this diversity must thus be taken into account. In that aim, using time geography-based representations may help in attributing a given record to a given meteorological context.

  4. High risk of adverse events in hospitalised hip fracture patients of 65 years and older: results of a retrospective record review study

    PubMed Central

    Merten, Hanneke; Johannesma, Paul C; Lubberding, Sanne; Zegers, Marieke; Langelaan, Maaike; Jukema, Gerrolt N; Heetveld, Martin J; Wagner, Cordula

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Hip fracture patients of 65 years and older are a complex patient group who often suffer from complications and difficult rehabilitation with disappointing results. It is unknown to what extent suboptimal hospital care contributes to these poor outcomes. This study reports on the scale, preventability, causes and prevention strategies of adverse events in patients, aged 65 years and older, admitted to the hospital with a primary diagnosis of hip fracture. Design, setting and outcome measures A retrospective record review study was conducted of 616 hip fracture patients (≥65 years) admitted to surgical or orthopaedic departments in four Dutch hospitals in 2007. Experienced physician reviewers determined the presence and preventability of adverse events, causes and prevention strategies using a structured review form. The main outcome measures were frequency of adverse events and preventable adverse events in hospitalised hip fracture patients of 65 years and older, and strategies to prevent them in the future. Results 114 (19%) of the 616 patients in the study experienced one or more adverse events; 49 of these were preventable. The majority of the adverse events (70%) was related to the surgical procedure and many resulted in an intervention or additional treatment (67%). Human causes contributed to 53% of the adverse events, followed by patient-related factors (39%). Training and close monitoring of quality of care and the health professional's performance were the most often selected strategies to prevent these adverse events in the future. Conclusions The high percentage of preventable adverse events found in this study shows that care for older hospitalised hip fracture patients should be improved. More training and quality assurance is required to provide safer care and to reduce the number of preventable adverse events in this vulnerable patient group. PMID:26346870

  5. Coral-based climate records from tropical South Atlantic: 2009/2010 ENSO event in C and O isotopes from Porites corals (Rocas Atoll, Brazil).

    PubMed

    Pereira, Natan S; Sial, Alcídes N; Kikuchi, Ruy K P; Ferreira, Valderez P; Ullmann, Clemens V; Frei, Robert; Cunha, Adriana M C

    2015-01-01

    Coral skeletons contain records of past environmental conditions due to their long life span and well calibrated geochemical signatures. C and O isotope records of corals are especially interesting, because they can highlight multidecadal variability of local climate conditions beyond the instrumental record, with high fidelity and sub-annual resolution. Although, in order to get an optimal geochemical signal in coral skeleton, sampling strategies must be followed. Here we report one of the first coral-based isotopic record from the Equatorial South Atlantic from two colonies of Porites astreoides from the Rocas Atoll (offshore Brazil), a new location for climate reconstruction. We present time series of isotopic variation from profiles along the corallite valley of one colony and the apex of the corallite fan of the other colony. Significant differences in the isotopic values between the two colonies are observed, yet both record the 2009/2010 El Niño event - a period of widespread coral bleaching - as anomalously negative δ18O values (up to -1 permil). δ13C is found to be measurably affected by the El Niño event in one colony, by more positive values (+0.39 ‰), and together with a bloom of endolithic algae, may indicate physiological alteration of this colony. Our findings indicate that corals from the Rocas Atoll can be used for monitoring climate oscillations in the tropical South Atlantic Ocean. PMID:26536856

  6. An account of a flare related shock event recorded by the energetic particle detector EPONA of the Giotto spacecraft during September 1985 (STIP interval 18)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckennalawlor, Susan M. P.; Kirsch, E.; Daly, P.; Osullivan, D.; Thompson, A.; Wenzel, P-K

    1987-01-01

    The Energetic Particle Detector EPONA flown on the Giotto Mission to Halley's Comet was designed to measure electrons, protons, and heavier ions (E greater that 20 keV) in the Comet Halley environment and during the Cruise Phase of the mission (EPONA switch on: 22 August 1985 - Halley encounter: 13 March 1986). In September 1985 (STIP Interval XVIII) a well defined shock event was recorded at EPONA in association with a sequence of solar flares and a preliminary account of this event is presented.

  7. Surge Driven Return Flow Results in Deposition of Coarse Grain Horizons Archiving a 4000 Year Record of Extreme Storm Events, Cape Cod, Massachusetts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maio, C. V.; Donnelly, J. P.; Sullivan, R.; Weidman, C. R.; Sheremet, V.

    2014-12-01

    The brevity of the instrumental record and lack of detailed historical accounts is a limiting factor in our understanding of the relationship between climate change and the frequency and intensity of extreme storm events. This study applied paleotempestologic and hydrographic methods to identify the mechanisms of storm-induced coarse grain deposition and reconstruct a late Holocene storm record within Waquoit Bay, Massachusetts. Three sediment cores (6.0 m, 8.4 m, and 8.2 m) were collected in 3 m of water using a vibracore system. Grain sizes were measured along core to identify coarse grain anomalies that serve as a proxy for past storm events. An historical age model (1620-2011 AD) was developed based on Pb pollution chronomarkers derived from X-Ray Florescence bulk Pb data, equating to a sedimentation rate of 8-8.3 mm/yr (R2 = 0.99). A long-term (4000 to 275 years before present) sedimentation rate of 1.1-1.4 mm/yr (R2 = 0.89) was calculated based on twenty-four continuous flow atomic mass spectrometry 14C ages of marine bivalves. To determine hydrographic conditions within the embayment during storm events current meters and tide gauges were deployed during Hurricane Irene (2011) which measured a storm surge of 88 cm above mean sea level. The buildup of storm water against the landward shoreline resulted in a measured 10 cm/s seaward moving bottom current capable of transporting coarse sand eroded from the adjacent shoreface into the coring site. Modeled surges for eleven modern and historic storm events ranged in height from 0.37 m (2011) to 3.72 m (1635) above mean high water. The WAQ1, WAQ2, and WAQ3 cores recorded a total of 89, 139, and 137 positive anomalies that exceeded the lower threshold and 15, 34, and 12 that exceeded the upper threshold respectively. Events recorded during the historic period coincide with documented storm events. The mean frequency within the three cores applying the lower threshold was 2.6 events per century, while applying the

  8. Identification of Paleo-Events Recorded in the Yellow Sea Sediments by Sorting Coefficient of Grain Size

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuhong; Cheng, Wenhan; Jia, Nan

    2012-01-01

    Identification of natural and anthropogenic events in the past is important for studying their patterns and mechanisms; and sensitive proxies in marine sediments are more reliable for identifying these events than those in terrestrial sediments, which are usually disturbed by human activities. Since the main source materials for the sediments in the Northern Yellow Sea Mud are transported by the Yellow River, sedimentary characteristics can be used to reconstruct the historical events that occurred in the Yellow River Valley. In the present study, by analyzing sorting coefficient of grain size in a 250-year sediment core from the Northern Yellow Sea Mud, we identified several major historical events: the Haiyuan Earthquake in AD 1920 and several times of relocation of the Yellow River estuary. The proxy has the potential of detecting and reconstructing historical events; in combination with historical archives, they also provide an accurate dating method. PMID:22970299

  9. A System for Reflective Learning Using Handwriting Tablet Devices for Real-Time Event Bookmarking into Simultaneously Recorded Videos

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nakajima, Taira

    2012-01-01

    The author demonstrates a new system useful for reflective learning. Our new system offers an environment that one can use handwriting tablet devices to bookmark symbolic and descriptive feedbacks into simultaneously recorded videos in the environment. If one uses video recording and feedback check sheets in reflective learning sessions, one can…

  10. A stratigraphic framework for abrupt climatic changes during the Last Glacial period based on three synchronized Greenland ice-core records: refining and extending the INTIMATE event stratigraphy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasmussen, Sune O.; Bigler, Matthias; Blockley, Simon P.; Blunier, Thomas; Buchardt, Susanne L.; Clausen, Henrik B.; Cvijanovic, Ivana; Dahl-Jensen, Dorthe; Johnsen, Sigfus J.; Fischer, Hubertus; Gkinis, Vasileios; Guillevic, Myriam; Hoek, Wim Z.; Lowe, J. John; Pedro, Joel B.; Popp, Trevor; Seierstad, Inger K.; Steffensen, Jørgen Peder; Svensson, Anders M.; Vallelonga, Paul; Vinther, Bo M.; Walker, Mike J. C.; Wheatley, Joe J.; Winstrup, Mai

    2014-12-01

    Due to their outstanding resolution and well-constrained chronologies, Greenland ice-core records provide a master record of past climatic changes throughout the Last Interglacial-Glacial cycle in the North Atlantic region. As part of the INTIMATE (INTegration of Ice-core, MArine and TErrestrial records) project, protocols have been proposed to ensure consistent and robust correlation between different records of past climate. A key element of these protocols has been the formal definition and ordinal numbering of the sequence of Greenland Stadials (GS) and Greenland Interstadials (GI) within the most recent glacial period. The GS and GI periods are the Greenland expressions of the characteristic Dansgaard-Oeschger events that represent cold and warm phases of the North Atlantic region, respectively. We present here a more detailed and extended GS/GI template for the whole of the Last Glacial period. It is based on a synchronization of the NGRIP, GRIP, and GISP2 ice-core records that allows the parallel analysis of all three records on a common time scale. The boundaries of the GS and GI periods are defined based on a combination of stable-oxygen isotope ratios of the ice (δ18O, reflecting mainly local temperature) and calcium ion concentrations (reflecting mainly atmospheric dust loading) measured in the ice. The data not only resolve the well-known sequence of Dansgaard-Oeschger events that were first defined and numbered in the ice-core records more than two decades ago, but also better resolve a number of short-lived climatic oscillations, some defined here for the first time. Using this revised scheme, we propose a consistent approach for discriminating and naming all the significant abrupt climatic events of the Last Glacial period that are represented in the Greenland ice records. The final product constitutes an extended and better resolved Greenland stratotype sequence, against which other proxy records can be compared and correlated. It also provides a

  11. How fast was the Matuyama-Brunhes geomagnetic reversal? A new subcentennial record from the Sulmona Basin, central Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagnotti, Leonardo; Giaccio, Biagio; Liddicoat, Joseph C.; Nomade, Sebastien; Renne, Paul R.; Scardia, Giancarlo; Sprain, Courtney J.

    2016-02-01

    A recent study of the Matuyama-Brunhes (M-B) geomagnetic field reversal recorded in exposed lacustrine sediments from the Sulmona Basin (Italy) provided a continuous, high-resolution record indicating that the reversal of the field direction at the terminus of the M-B boundary (MBB) occurred in less than a century, about 786 ka ago. In the sediment, thin (4-6 cm) remagnetized horizons were recognized above two distinct tephra layers-SUL2-19 and SUL2-20-that occur ˜25 and ˜35 cm below the MBB, respectively. Also, a faint, millimetre-thick tephra (SUL2-18) occurs 2-3 cm above the MBB. With the aim of improving the temporal resolution of the previous Sulmona MBB record and understanding the possible influence of cryptotephra on the M-B record in the Sulmona Basin, we performed more detailed sampling and analyses of overlapping standard and smaller samples from a 50 cm-long block that spans the MBB. The new data indicate that (i) the MBB is even sharper than previously reported and occurs ˜2.5 cm below tephra SUL2-18, in agreement with the previous study; (ii) the MBB coincides with the rise of an intensity peak of the natural remanent magnetization (NRM) intensity, which extends across SUL2-18; (iii) except for a 2-cm-thick interval just above tephra SUL2-18, the rock magnetic parameters (k, ARM, Mr, Ms, Bc, Bcr) indicate exactly the same magnetic mineralogy throughout the sampled sequence. We conclude that either SUL2-18 resulted in the remagnetization of an interval of about 6 cm (i.e. during the NRM intensity peak spanning ˜260 ± 110 yr, according to the estimated local sedimentation rate), and thus the detailed MBB record is lost because it is overprinted, or the MBB is well recorded, occurred abruptly about 2.5 cm below SUL2-18 and lasted less than 13 ± 6 yr. Both hypotheses challenge our understanding of the geomagnetic field behaviour during a polarity transition and/or of the NRM acquisition process in the Sulmona lacustrine sediment.

  12. Searching for events in Chinese ancient records to explain the increase in 14C from AD 774-775 and AD 993-994

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, Ya-Ting; Zou, Yuan-Chuan

    2015-09-01

    According to analysis of the 14C content in two Japanese trees, that grew over a period of approximately 3000 years, with high time resolution, Miyake et al. found a rapid increase at AD 774-775 and another one at AD 993-994. These increases correspond to high-energy events that happened within those years and radiated γ-ray energy of about 7×1024 erg toward the Earth. The origin of these events is a mystery. Such strong events should have an unusual optical counterpart, and have been recorded in historical literatures. We searched Chinese historical materials around AD 744-775 and AD 993-994, but no remarkable event was found except for a violent thunderstorm in AD 775. However, the possibility of a thunderstorm containing so much energy is unlikely. We conclude that the events, which caused the 14C increase, are still unclear. These events most probably had no optical counterpart, and a short gamma-ray burst, giant flare of a soft gamma-ray repeater or a terrestrial γ-ray flash could all be candidates.

  13. A High-Resolution Labrador Sea Surface and Subsurface Water Foraminiferal δ18O Record and its Relation to Heinrich Events.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Z. E.; Hoffman, J. S.; Clark, P. U.

    2015-12-01

    Heinrich events are characterized by episodic iceberg discharge events from the Laurentide ice sheet via the Hudson Strait Ice Stream (HSIS) and into the North Atlantic. Although their occurrence throughout late Pleistocene glaciations has been well documented in the oceanic sediment record, the triggering mechanism for Heinrich events is still poorly understood. Recent work (Marcott et al., 2011) has shown that subsurface ocean (~1200 m) warming in response to a shutdown of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) could lead to accelerated melting and destabilization of an ice shelf fronting the Laurentide Ice Sheet and subsequently trigger Heinrich events. However, evidence for this subsurface warming remains restricted to one core site. Here we use Labrador Sea cores HU2001043-008pc/twc and HU2006040-006pc from the Flemish Cap and Hamilton Spur, respectively, to assess spatial and depth coverage of this signal. We infer surface and subsurface temperature variability using δ18O in benthic and planktic foraminifera. We also develop a corresponding suite of other sediment core proxies in order to identify Heinrich layers, including X-Ray Fluorescence, Ca/Sr, and % dolomite/calcite data. This research will allow us to evaluate changes in the thermodynamic structure of the Labrador basin due to changes in the strength of the AMOC and their relation to Heinrich events. Results will be used to substantiate existing research and coupled ocean-atmospheric models that suggest a reduced AMOC and associated subsurface warming as the trigger for Heinrich events.

  14. MoonRise: Sampling South Pole-Aitken Basin as a Recorder of Solar System Events (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolliff, B. L.; Shearer, C., Jr.; Gaddis, L. R.; Pieters, C. M.; Head, J. W.; Haruyama, J.; Jaumann, R.; Ohtake, M.; Osinski, G.; Papanastassiou, D. A.; Petro, N. E.; Moonrise Science Team

    2010-12-01

    The MoonRise mission, now in a phase A concept study, would launch in 2016 and return samples from the Moon’s South Pole-Aitken basin (SPA) in 2017. These samples would be used to (1) determine the chronology of SPA and test the “cataclysm” hypothesis for bombardment of the inner Solar System some hundreds of millions of years following planetary accretion, (2) investigate the deep crust and upper mantle of the Moon to better understand planetary differentiation, and (3) provide ground truth for orbital remote sensing and geophysics of the SPA basin to better understand giant basin-forming impact processes and the effects of such impacts on an early-formed planetary crust. The key objective that drives site selection for the MoonRise mission is to obtain rock samples that crystallized from the SPA impact-melt complex to date the formation of the basin. Many large impacts, however, occurred subsequent to SPA formation, and volcanic lavas erupted into the interior of SPA over several hundred million years, producing a complex set of geologic formations. Fortunately, the very same impact process also generates a rich diversity of rock types in the regolith that provide a record of all these events. Our focus for landing site selection is in the interior of SPA where the distinctive geochemical signature is strongest. This compositional signature, coupled with modeling of impact ejecta ballistic sedimentation and distribution, ensures that landing sites and sampling locations in the interior of SPA will contain abundant rock fragments derived from the original SPA melt sheet. The wealth of recent remote sensing data provides context to evaluate geologic formations and to establish provenance for the samples. Admixture of impactites derived from younger basins such as Apollo, Poincaré, Planck, Ingenii, Orientale and Schrödinger, as well as other large impact craters, will contribute to a chronology that is bounded by the earliest and the latest of the recognized

  15. An Unsorted Spike-Based Pattern Recognition Method for Real-Time Continuous Sensory Event Detection from Dorsal Root Ganglion Recording.

    PubMed

    Han, Sungmin; Chu, Jun-Uk; Kim, Hyungmin; Choi, Kuiwon; Park, Jong Woong; Youn, Inchan

    2016-06-01

    In functional neuromuscular stimulation systems, sensory information-based closed-loop control can be useful for restoring lost function in patients with hemiplegia or quadriplegia. The goal of this study was to detect sensory events from tactile afferent signals continuously in real time using a novel unsorted spike-based pattern recognition method. The tactile afferent signals were recorded with a 16-channel microelectrode in the dorsal root ganglion, and unsorted spike-based feature vectors were extracted as a novel combination of the time and time-frequency domain features. Principal component analysis was used to reduce the dimensionality of the feature vectors, and a multilayer perceptron classifier was used to detect sensory events. The proposed method showed good performance for classification accuracy, and the processing time delay of sensory event detection was less than 200 ms. These results indicated that the proposed method could be applicable for sensory feedback in closed-loop control systems. PMID:26672029

  16. Coral record of paleoseismic uplifts at Ranongga Island, Western Solomon Islands megathrust: Was the 2007 Mw 8.1 event smaller than usual?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, F. W.; Thirumalai, K.; Shen, C.; WU, C.; Papabatu, A.; Lavier, L. L.; Bevis, M. G.

    2012-12-01

    The timing and amount of vertical displacements associated with past megathrust earthquakes provide the best available insights into the amounts of interplate slip that have been accommodated as coseismic slip versus other mechanisms. At Ranongga Island, Western Solomon Islands, a Mw 8.1 earthquake in 2007 helps us to calibrate the relationship between a megathrust rupture and the geography and amounts of vertical displacement recorded by reef crest corals. Along the coasts of Ranongga, parts of which have uplifted at mean rates exceeding 5 mm/yr, we discovered corals that had been raised by a series of earthquakes in the millennia before the 2007 event. The penultimate earthquake (pre-2007), which occurred around 600 years ago (U-series calendar year), was manifest as a 'level' of raised corals about 1.6 m above the 2007 level. However, in the decades preceding the 2007 event (which had imposed a coseismic uplift of 1.3 m), rapid subsidence had subtracted significant amounts of uplift imposed by the penultimate earthquake. Similarly, the sequence of three additional uplift events, preceding the penultimate event, extending to elevations up to 16 m higher than the corals raised by the 2007 event, appear to have been larger uplifts than the 2007 event. This suggests two things: 1. Many previous megathrust events caused more uplift and perhaps involved greater interplate coseismic slip, and 2. There are too few megathrust rupture events to account for the approximately 80-100 m of plate convergence that must be processed each millennium. Thus, a significant amount of plate convergence must be accommodated by mechanisms other than coseismic slip.

  17. Stable isotope records of convection variability in the West Pacific Warm Pool from fast-growing stalagmites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maupin, C. R.; Partin, J. W.; Quinn, T. M.; Shen, C.; Lin, K.; Taylor, F. W.; Sinclair, D. J.; Banner, J. L.

    2010-12-01

    The potential response of the tropical Pacific to ongoing anthropogenic global warming conditions is informed by instrumental data, model predictions and climate proxy evidence. However, these distinct lines of evidence lead to opposing predictions in terms of the nature of interannual (ENSO) variability in a warming world. Interpreted in an ENSO framework, warming in the tropical Pacific may elicit a zonally asymmetrical response and lead to an intensified Walker Circulation (more ‘La Niña - like’). Alternatively, discrepancies in the increasing rates of latent heat flux and rainfall due to warming conditions may in fact reduce Walker Circulation (more ‘El Niño - like’). However, in order for such a framework to be useful in the context of future climate change, some knowledge of the natural variability in the strength of Walker Circulation components is required. The extant instrumental data are not of sufficient temporal length to fully assess the spectrum of natural variability in such climate components. Oxygen isotope records from tropical speleothems have been successfully used to document the nature of precessional forcing on precipitation and atmospheric circulation patterns throughout the tropics. Typical stalagmite growth rates of 10-100 μm yr-1 allow decadally resolved records of δ18O variability on time scales of centuries to millennia and beyond. Here we present the initial results from calcite stalagmites of heretofore unprecedented growth rates (~1-4 mm yr-1) in a cave in northwest Guadalcanal, Solomon Islands (~9°S, 160°E). These stalagmites have been absolutely dated by U-Th techniques and indicate stalagmite growth spanning ~1650 to 2010 CE. The δ18O records from stalagmites provide evidence for changes in convection in the equatorial WPWP region of the SPCZ: the rising limb of the Pacific Walker Circulation, and therefore provide critical insight into changes in zonal atmospheric circulation across the Pacific.

  18. A space-based radio frequency transient event classifier

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, K.R.; Blain, P.C.; Caffrey, M.P.; Franz, R.C.; Henneke, K.M.; Jones, R.G.

    1996-12-31

    The FORTE (Fast On-Orbit Recording of Transient Events) satellite will record RF transients in space. These transients will be classified onboard the spacecraft with an Event Classifier--specialized hardware that performs signal preprocessing and neural network classification. The authors describe the Event Classifier, future directions, and implications for telecommunications satellites. Telecommunication satellites are susceptible to damage from environmental factors such as deep dielectric charging and surface discharges. The event classifier technology the authors are developing is capable of sensing the surface discharges and could be useful for mitigating their effects. In addition, the techniques they are using for processing weak signals in noisy environments are relevant to telecommunications.

  19. Transverse ion heating, field-aligned electron acceleration, and parallel electric fields in the auroral acceleration region: Modeling several FAST events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lund, E. J.; Nguyen, T. T.; Jasperse, J. R.; Basu, B.

    2008-12-01

    Many of the ions in the magnetosphere originate in the ionosphere, whence they are extracted by wave heating perpendicular to the magnetic field. Much of this ion heating occurs in regions where electrons are also accelerated along the magnetic field, and the differing anisotropies lead to a charge separation which is balanced by a parallel electric field.a Using a recently developed model which includes turbulent heating,b,c we investigate the distribution of parallel electric fields in several events measured with the FAST satellite. We investigate the effects of different model closures on the predicted parallel electric fields. The goal of the research is to develop a physics-based module of ion outflow to include in global models of the magnetosphere. a Alfvén, H., and C.-G. Fälthammar (1963), Cosmical Electrodynamics: Fundamental Principles, Clarendon Press, Oxford. b Jasperse, J. R., et al. (2006), Phys. Plasmas 13, 072903. c Jasperse, J. R., et al. (2006), Phys. Plasmas 13, 112902.

  20. Advance Liquid Metal Reactor Discrete Dynamic Event Tree/Bayesian Network Analysis and Incident Management Guidelines (Risk Management for Sodium Fast Reactors)

    SciTech Connect

    Denman, Matthew R.; Groth, Katrina M.; Cardoni, Jeffrey N.; Wheeler, Timothy A.

    2015-04-01

    Accident management is an important component to maintaining risk at acceptable levels for all complex systems, such as nuclear power plants. With the introduction of self-correcting, or inherently safe, reactor designs the focus has shifted from management by operators to allowing the system's design to manage the accident. Inherently and passively safe designs are laudable, but nonetheless extreme boundary conditions can interfere with the design attributes which facilitate inherent safety, thus resulting in unanticipated and undesirable end states. This report examines an inherently safe and small sodium fast reactor experiencing a beyond design basis seismic event with the intend of exploring two issues : (1) can human intervention either improve or worsen the potential end states and (2) can a Bayesian Network be constructed to infer the state of the reactor to inform (1). ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The authors would like to acknowledge the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Nuclear Energy for funding this research through Work Package SR-14SN100303 under the Advanced Reactor Concepts program. The authors also acknowledge the PRA teams at Argonne National Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and Idaho National Laboratory for their continue d contributions to the advanced reactor PRA mission area.

  1. Strong fast long-period waves in the Efpalio 2010 earthquake records: explanation in terms of leaking modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vackář, Jiří; Zahradník, Jiří; Sokos, Efthimios

    2014-01-01

    The January 18, 2010, shallow earthquake in the Corinth Gulf, Greece ( M w 5.3) generated unusually strong long-period waves (periods 4-8 s) between the P and S wave arrival. These periods, being significantly longer than the source duration, indicated a structural effect. The waves were observed in epicentral distances 40-250 km and were significant on radial and vertical component. None of existing velocity models of the studied region provided explanation of the waves. By inverting complete waveforms, we obtained an 1-D crustal model explaining the observation. The most significant feature of the best-fitting model (as well as the whole suite of models almost equally well fitting the waveforms) is a strong velocity step at depth about 4 km. In the obtained velocity model, the fast long-period wave was modeled by modal summation and identified as a superposition of several leaking modes. In this sense, the wave is qualitatively similar to P long or Pnl waves, which however are usually reported in larger epicentral distances. The main innovation of this paper is emphasis to smaller epicentral distances. We studied properties of the wave using synthetic seismograms. The wave has a normal dispersion. Azimuthal and distance dependence of the wave partially explains its presence at 46 stations of 70 examined. Depth dependence shows that the studied earthquake was very efficient in the excitation of these waves just due to its shallow centroid depth (4.5 km).

  2. Carbon cycle perturbations recorded by δ13C of bulk organic matter: the Carnian Pluvial Event in the Dolomites, northern Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preto, Nereo; Breda, Anna; Dal Corso, Jacopo; Rigo, Manuel; Roghi, Guido; Spötl, Christoph

    2015-04-01

    A period of increased rainfall occurred in the Carnian (Late Triassic), known as Carnian Pluvial Event (CPE), which is evidenced by major lithological changes in continental and marine successions at tropical latitudes. Increased continental weathering and erosion led to the supply of large amounts of siliciclastics into the marginal basins of the Tethys. Seawater anoxia is also observed locally in semi-restricted basins. Simultaneously, microbial factories on high-relief carbonate platforms were replaced by metazoan factories, forming low-relief carbonate ramps and mixed low-gradient shelves. This environmental change has been shown to be closely associated with a negative carbon isotope excursion. A negative δ13C shift is recorded by bulk organic matter in the Milieres section (central Dolomites) and parallels a coeval excursion in carbon-isotope records of higher plant and marine algal biomarker, thus testifying a global change in the isotopic composition of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere and of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in the ocean. This isotopic excursion was identified in organic carbon records throughout the western Tethys, but so far could not be reproduced convincingly using carbon isotope records from carbonate. A long carbon isotope record was produced from bulk organic matter of the early to late Carnian Milieres - Dibona section in the Dolomites, northern Italy. Carbon isotope analyses of carbonate (limestone and dolomite) were also obtained. This new carbon isotope record illustrates the structure of this complex carbon cycle perturbation related to the CPE. But while sharp carbon isotope oscillations are evident in the bulk organic carbon record, there is no evidence of a similar pattern in carbonate record. It can be shown that the carbon isotope record of carbonates is influenced by fractionation and diagenetic processes that completely obliterated the original δ13C signal. We conclude that the Carnian carbonates of the Dolomites do not

  3. The Use of Continuous Wavelet Transform Based on the Fast Fourier Transform in the Analysis of Multi-channel Electrogastrography Recordings.

    PubMed

    Komorowski, Dariusz; Pietraszek, Stanislaw

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the analysis of multi-channel electrogastrographic (EGG) signals using the continuous wavelet transform based on the fast Fourier transform (CWTFT). The EGG analysis was based on the determination of the several signal parameters such as dominant frequency (DF), dominant power (DP) and index of normogastria (NI). The use of continuous wavelet transform (CWT) allows for better visible localization of the frequency components in the analyzed signals, than commonly used short-time Fourier transform (STFT). Such an analysis is possible by means of a variable width window, which corresponds to the scale time of observation (analysis). Wavelet analysis allows using long time windows when we need more precise low-frequency information, and shorter when we need high frequency information. Since the classic CWT transform requires considerable computing power and time, especially while applying it to the analysis of long signals, the authors used the CWT analysis based on the fast Fourier transform (FFT). The CWT was obtained using properties of the circular convolution to improve the speed of calculation. This method allows to obtain results for relatively long records of EGG in a fairly short time, much faster than using the classical methods based on running spectrum analysis (RSA). In this study authors indicate the possibility of a parametric analysis of EGG signals using continuous wavelet transform which is the completely new solution. The results obtained with the described method are shown in the example of an analysis of four-channel EGG recordings, performed for a non-caloric meal. PMID:26573647

  4. Mid Holocene Evidence of High Energy Events in the Geological Record: Sedimentary Deposits from Cauvery Delta Coast, SE Coast of India.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karthikeyan, A.; Seshachalam, S.; Jonathan, M. P.; Roy, P. D.

    2014-12-01

    The Cauvery Basin is one of the important sedimentary basins of southern India and provides information on geological processes since the Cretaceous. Most of the studies in the basin have been carried out on the sediments representing Cretaceous with less emphasis on the Quaternary period with marine high energy event. In the present study, we present the sedimentological and micro fauna assemblages in the 150 cm long trench from the Kameshwaram village, Nagapattinam District, South East Coast of India, in order to reconstruct the past event. OSL and Carbon dating of sand layer sediments from the Cauvery Basin provide the first proxy-record of marine event from the region over the Mid Holocene. A multi proxy approach using trench sediments from Cauvery Delta Coast, East coast of Tamil Nadu provides a high resolution record of high energy event. The dating of the event layer indicates 6 and 8 kyrs also below the layer shell layer was preserved, the radio carbon date of the shell layer was 6545 BC. A combination of sedimentological parameters of grain size, sorting, geochemical analysis (XRF) of Fe, Mn, Ti, Cr, Cu, Ni, Sr, Zr and foraminifera species like Ammonia beccarri, Ammonia dentate and Asterorotalia trispinosa were identified. The sediment layers have thinning-up sequences and it starts from 130 cm to the bottom of the layer 150 cm which included shell debris, and rip-up clasts. In addition, characteristic variations in elemental content at the bottom units of Zr, Ti, Ca is showing higher concentration, which is an indicator of high-energy depositional event often associated with an increase in Ti (2.08 % to 16.016 %) and Sr (116 ppm to 275 ppm). Ca on the other hand suggests a marine influence and Fe, Mn, Cr, Ni values are showing lower concentration indicating that the high marine energy event had inundated the Nagapattinam district in SE coast of India. Based on the multiproxy evidences, we conclude that this could be a major marine event during the Mid

  5. An event-based comparison of two types of automated-recording, weighing bucket rain gauges 1890

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A multi-year, multi-gage comparison of two types of automated-recording weighing-bucket raingages was conducted using precipitation data collected at the United States Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service’s Walnut Gulch Experimental Watershed in Southeast Arizona. The compariso...

  6. Using the significant dust deposition event on the glaciers of Mt.~Elbrus, Caucasus Mountains, Russia on 5 May 2009 to develop a method for dating and "provenancing" of desert dust events recorded in snow pack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahgedanova, M.; Kutuzov, S.; White, K. H.; Nosenko, G.

    2013-02-01

    A significant desert dust deposition event occurred on Mt. Elbrus, Caucasus Mountains, Russia on 5 May 2009, where the deposited dust later appeared as a brown layer in the snow pack. An examination of dust transportation history and analysis of chemical and physical properties of the deposited dust were used to develop a new approach for high-resolution "provenancing" of dust deposition events recorded in snow pack using multiple independent techniques. A combination of SEVIRI red-green-blue composite imagery, MODIS atmospheric optical depth fields derived using the Deep Blue algorithm, air mass trajectories derived with HYSPLIT model and analysis of meteorological data enabled identification of dust source regions with high temporal (hours) and spatial (ca. 100 km) resolution. Dust, deposited on 5 May 2009, originated in the foothills of the Djebel Akhdar in eastern Libya where dust sources were activated by the intrusion of cold air from the Mediterranean Sea and Saharan low pressure system and transported to the Caucasus along the eastern Mediterranean coast, Syria and Turkey. Particles with an average diameter below 8 μm accounted for 90% of the measured particles in the sample with a mean of 3.58 μm, median 2.48 μm. The chemical signature of this long-travelled dust was significantly different from the locally-produced dust and close to that of soils collected in a palaeolake in the source region, in concentrations of hematite. Potential addition of dust from a secondary source in northern Mesopotamia introduced uncertainty in the "provenancing" of dust from this event. Nevertheless, the approach adopted here enables other dust horizons in the snowpack to be linked to specific dust transport events recorded in remote sensing and meteorological data archives.

  7. Using the significant dust deposition event on the glaciers of Mt. Elbrus, Caucasus Mountains, Russia on 5 May 2009 to develop a method for dating and provenancing of desert dust events recorded in snow pack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahgedanova, M.; Kutuzov, S.; White, K.; Nosenko, G.

    2012-09-01

    A significant desert dust deposition event occurred on Mt. Elbrus, Caucasus Mountains, Russia on 5 May 2009, where the deposited dust later appeared as a brown layer in the snow pack. An examination of dust transportation history and analysis of chemical and physical properties of the deposited dust were used to develop a new approach for high-resolution provenancing of dust deposition events recorded in snow pack using multiple independent techniques. A combination of SEVIRI red-green-blue composite imagery, MODIS atmospheric optical depth fields derived using the Deep Blue algorithm, air mass trajectories derived with HYSPLIT model and analysis of meteorological data enabled identification of dust source regions with high temporal (hours) and spatial (ca. 100 km) resolution. Dust, deposited on 5 May 2009, originated in the foothills of the Djebel Akhdar in eastern Libya where dust sources were activated by the intrusion of cold air from the Mediterranean Sea and Saharan low pressure system and transported to the Caucasus along the eastern Mediterranean coast, Syria and Turkey. Particles with an average diameter below 8 μm accounted for 90% of the measured particles in the sample with a mean of 3.58 μm, median 2.48 μm and the dominant mode of 0.60 μm. The chemical signature of this long-travelled dust was significantly different from the locally-produced dust and close to that of soils collected in a palaeolake in the source region, in concentrations of hematite and oxides of aluminium, manganese, and magnesium. Potential addition of dust from a secondary source in northern Mesopotamia introduced uncertainty in the provenancing of dust from this event. Nevertheless, the approach adopted here enables other dust horizons in the snowpack to be linked to specific dust transport events recorded in remote sensing and meteorological data archives.

  8. Detection and Magnetic Source Imaging of Fast Oscillations (40-160 Hz) Recorded with Magnetoencephalography in Focal Epilepsy Patients.

    PubMed

    von Ellenrieder, Nicolás; Pellegrino, Giovanni; Hedrich, Tanguy; Gotman, Jean; Lina, Jean-Marc; Grova, Christophe; Kobayashi, Eliane

    2016-03-01

    We present a framework to detect fast oscillations (FOs) in magnetoencephalography (MEG) and to perform magnetic source imaging (MSI) to determine the location and extent of their generators in the cortex. FOs can be of physiologic origin associated to sensory processing and memory consolidation. In epilepsy, FOs are of pathologic origin and biomarkers of the epileptogenic zone. Seventeen patients with focal epilepsy previously confirmed with identified FOs in scalp electroencephalography (EEG) were evaluated. To handle data deriving from large number of sensors (275 axial gradiometers) we used an automatic detector with high sensitivity. False positives were discarded by two human experts. MSI of the FOs was performed with the wavelet based maximum entropy on the mean method. We found FOs in 11/17 patients, in only one patient the channel with highest FO rate was not concordant with the epileptogenic region and might correspond to physiologic oscillations. MEG FOs rates were very low: 0.02-4.55 per minute. Compared to scalp EEG, detection sensitivity was lower, but the specificity higher in MEG. MSI of FOs showed concordance or partial concordance with proven generators of seizures and epileptiform activity in 10/11 patients. We have validated the proposed framework for the non-invasive study of FOs with MEG. The excellent overall concordance with other clinical gold standard evaluation tools indicates that MEG FOs can provide relevant information to guide implantation for intracranial EEG pre-surgical evaluation and for surgical treatment, and demonstrates the important added value of choosing appropriate FOs detection and source localization methods. PMID:26830767

  9. CareTrack Kids—part 3. Adverse events in children's healthcare in Australia: study protocol for a retrospective medical record review

    PubMed Central

    Hibbert, Peter D; Hallahan, Andrew R; Muething, Stephen E; Lachman, Peter; Hooper, Tamara D; Wiles, Louise K; Jaffe, Adam; White, Les; Wheaton, Gavin R; Runciman, William B; Dalton, Sarah; Williams, Helena M; Braithwaite, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    Introduction A high-quality health system should deliver care that is free from harm. Few large-scale studies of adverse events have been undertaken in children's healthcare internationally, and none in Australia. The aim of this study is to measure the frequency and types of adverse events encountered in Australian paediatric care in a range of healthcare settings. Methods and analysis A form of retrospective medical record review, the Institute of Healthcare Improvement's Global Trigger Tool, will be modified to collect data. Records of children aged <16 years managed during 2012 and 2013 will be reviewed. We aim to review 6000–8000 records from a sample of healthcare practices (hospitals, general practices and specialists). Ethics and dissemination Human Research Ethics Committee approvals have been received from the Sydney Children's Hospital Network, Children's Health Queensland Hospital and Health Service, and the Women's and Children's Hospital Network in South Australia. An application is under review with the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners. The authors will submit the results of the study to relevant journals and undertake national and international oral presentations to researchers, clinicians and policymakers. PMID:25854978

  10. Arrhythmia Detection in Pediatric Patients: ECG Quality and Diagnostic Yield of a Patient-Triggered Einthoven Lead-I Event Recorder (Zenicor EKG-2™).

    PubMed

    Usadel, Lea; Haverkämper, Guido; Herrmann, Susanne; Löber, Rebekka; Weiss, Katja; Opgen-Rhein, Bernd; Berger, Felix; Will, Joachim C

    2016-03-01

    Symptoms that may be caused by arrhythmia are common in pediatric outpatient departments, though it remains challenging to reveal paroxysmal tachycardia. This investigation evaluated prospectively the quality and diagnostic yield of a newly available handheld patient-activated event recorder (ER) in children. In 226 children (pts) aged 0-17 years with or without congenital heart defects, pacemaker/ICDs or arrhythmia, a lead-I ER ECG was created. ER ECGs were recorded by pressing the patients' thumbs on the device and were analyzed in comparison with a lead-12 ECG, as gold standard. Event recording and data transmission were possible in all cases. ECG quality of the ER showed a high accordance in measuring heart rate (ICC = 0.962), duration of QRS complexes (κ = 0.686), and PR interval (ICC = 0.750) (p < 0.001) although P wave detection remained challenging (p = 0.120). 36 % (n = 82) of the pts had heart rhythm disturbances. The ER yielded 92 % sensitivity in diagnosing supraventricular tachycardia plus 77 % sensitivity and 92 % specificity in identifying abnormal ECGs. In children, the application of the tested ER was suitable. ECGs of good quality could be performed and transmitted easily, and also complex arrhythmia analysis was possible. This ER is an excellent diagnostic device for the detection and exclusion of tachycardia in children. PMID:26573815

  11. Fast analysis of terbutaline in pharmaceuticals using multi-walled nanotubes modified electrodes from recordable compact disc.

    PubMed

    Felix, Fabiana S; Daniel, Daniela; Matos, Jivaldo R; Lucio do Lago, Claudimir; Angnes, Lúcio

    2016-07-20

    In this study, homemade disposable gold electrodes made from recordable compact disks were modified with carbon nanotubes for amperometric quantification of terbutaline sulfate in pharmaceutical products. A flow cell using an impingent jet of solution on the electrode surface was build and used for amperometric detection, and a series of experiments were carried out to find the best experimental conditions for the new electrode in a specially designed cell. A linear response for terbutaline was obtained in the range from 3.0 × 10(-6) to 5.0 × 10(-4) mol L(-1) (at 0.63 V vs. Ag/AgCl). The limits of detection and quantification were calculated as 5.8 × 10(-7) mol L(-1) (S/N = 3) and 1.9 × 10(-6) mol L(-1) (S/N = 10), respectively. A frequency of 30 injections h(-1) was attained. The proposed method was successfully applied to the analyses of commercial syrup samples, and all results were in good agreement with those obtained by using high performance liquid chromatography and capillary electrophoresis-tandem mass spectrometry. PMID:27251854

  12. A 50,000-year record of climate oscillations from Florida and its temporal correlation with the heinrich events.

    PubMed

    Grimm, E C; Jacobson, G L; Watts, W A; Hansen, B C; Maasch, K A

    1993-07-01

    Oscillations of Pinus (pine) pollen in a 50,000-year sequence from Lake Tulane, Florida, indicate that there were major vegetation shifts during the last glacial cycle. Episodes of abundant Pinus populations indicate a climate that was more wet than intervening phases dominated by Quercus (oak) and Ambrosia-type (ragweed and marsh-elder). The Pinus episodes seem to be temporally correlated with the North Atlantic Heinrich events, which were massive, periodic advances of ice streams from the eastern margin of the Laurentide Ice Sheet. Possible links between the Tulane Pinus and Heinrich events include hemispheric cooling, the influences of Mississippi meltwater on sea-surface temperatures in the Gulf of Mexico, and the effects of North Atlantic thermohaline circulation on currents in the Gulf. PMID:17829277

  13. A 50,000-year record of climate oscillations from Florida and its temporal correlation with the Heinrich events

    SciTech Connect

    Grimm, E.C. ); Jacobson, G.L. Jr.; Maasch, K.A. ); Watts, W.A. ); Hansen, B.C.S. )

    1993-07-09

    Oscillations of Pinus (pine) pollen in a 50,000-year sequence from Lake Tulane, Florida, indicate that there were major vegetation shifts during the last glacial cycle. Episodes of abundant Pinus populations indicate a climate that was more wet than intervening phases dominated by Quercus (oak) and Ambrosia-type (ragweed and marsh-elder). The Pinus episodes seem to be temporally correlated with the North Atlantic Heinrich events, which were massive, periodic advances of ice streams from the eastern margin of the Laurentide Ice Sheet. Possible links between the Tulane Pinus and Heinrich events include hemispheric cooling, the influences of Mississippi meltwater on sea-surface temperatures in the Gulf of Mexico, and the effects of North Atlantic thermohaline circulation on currents in the Gulf. 33 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Neurosteroids differentially modulate fast and slow interictal discharges in the hippocampal CA3 area

    PubMed Central

    Herrington, Rochelle; Levesque, Maxime; Avoli, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Two types of spontaneous interictal discharge, identified as fast and slow events, can be recorded from the hippocampal CA3 area in rat brain slices during application of 4-aminopyridine (4AP) (50 μM). Here, we addressed how neurosteroids modulate the occurrence of these interictal events and of the associated high-frequency oscillations (HFOs) (ripples, 80–200 Hz; fast ripples, 250–500 Hz). Under control conditions (i.e. during 4AP application), ripples and fast ripples were detected in 12.3 and 17.5% of fast events, respectively; in contrast, the majority of slow events (> 98%) did not co-occur with HFOs. Application of 0.1, 1 or 5 μM allotetrahydrodeoxycorticosterone (THDOC) to 4AP-treated slices caused a dose-dependent decrease in the duration of the fast events and an increase in the occurrence of ripples, but not fast ripples; in contrast, the duration of slow events increased. THDOC potentiated the slow events that were recorded during pharmacological blockade of glutamatergic transmission, but had no effect on interictal discharges occurring during GABAA receptor antagonism. These results demonstrate that potentiation of GABAA receptor-mediated signaling by THDOC differentially affects slow and fast interictal discharges; these differences may provide insights into how hyperexcitable activity is influenced by neurosteroids. PMID:25471484

  15. Problems with identifying the 8200-year cold event in terrestrial records of the Atlantic seaboard: a case study from Dooagh, Achill Island, Ireland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Head, Katie; Turney, Chris S. M.; Pilcher, Jon R.; Palmer, J. G.; Baillie, M. G. L.

    2007-01-01

    The Northern Hemisphere cooling event 8200 years ago is believed to represent the last known major freshwater pulse into the North Atlantic as a result of the final collapse of the North American Laurentide ice sheet. This pulse of water is generally believed to have occurred independently of orbital variations and provides an analogue for predicted increases in high-latitude precipitation and ice melt as a result of anthropogenically driven future climate change. The precise timing, duration and magnitude of this event, however, are uncertain, with suggestions that the 100-yr meltwater cooling formed part of a longer-term cold period in the early Holocene. Here we undertook a multiproxy, high-resolution investigation of a peat sequence at Dooagh, Achill Island, on the west coast of Ireland, to determine whether the 8200-year cold event impacted upon the terrestrial vegetation immediately downwind of the proposed changes in the North Atlantic. We find clear evidence for an oscillation in the early Holocene using various measures of pollen, indicating a disruption in the vegetation leading to a grassland-dominated landscape, most probably driven by changes in precipitation rather than temperature. Radiocarbon dating was extremely problematic, however, with bulk peat samples systematically too young for the North Atlantic event, suggesting significant contamination from downward root penetration. The sustained disruption to vegetation over hundreds of years at Dooagh indicates the landscape was impacted by a long-term cooling event in the early Holocene, and not the single century length 8200-year meltwater event proposed in many other records in the North Atlantic region. Copyright

  16. Heinrich Stadial 4: sequence of events from North to South seen in high resolution Greenland and Antarctic ice cores and suggestion of synchronization to North Atlantic marine records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillevic, Myriam; Bazin, Lucie; Stowasser, Christopher; Landais, Amaelle; Masson-Delmotte, Valérie; Prié, Frédéric; Blunier, Thomas; Eynaud, Frédérique; Michel, Elisabeth; Vinther, Bo M.

    2013-04-01

    The last glacial period was affected by the occurrence of rapid climatic events at the millennial time scale known as Dansgaard-Oeschger (DO) events. In Greenland, these events are composed of a rapid temperature increase of 5-16° in less than a century, a warm phase lasting several centuries (InterStadial, GI) followed by a more gradual temperature decrease, and finally a cold phase (Stadial, GS). An Antarctic counterpart to each GI of the Last Glacial Period has been identified in Antarctic ice cores. In the North Atlantic Ocean, marine cores also record changes in surface temperature as well as the occurrence during cold phases of ice rafted debris horizons, corresponding to massive icebergs discharges, known as Heinrich (H) events. It has never been possible to identify the presence of H events from temperature proxies in Greenland ice cores. It thus remains difficult to compare the durations of H events and GS. Here, we focus on the time period covering DO 9 to 7 (41 to 34 ka b2k according to the GICC05/AICC2012 time scales), with H event 4 occurring during GS 9. We present a compilation of high resolution measurements (about 60 years) of this period based on Greenland and Antarctic ice cores data (ice and gas) synchronized on the new time scale AICC2012. Proxies for local Greenland temperature (δ15N-N2, δ18O-H2O) record GS9 as a uniform period lasting ~1850 years, followed by a sharp transition to GI8. This pattern is also seen in continuous methane concentration data (NEEM ice core, Greenland) showing a large increase by ~100 ppbv at the GS9 - GI8 transition. However, using additional proxies and a detailed inspection of the methane profile, GS9 can be divided into 3 phases. The first 600 years of GS9 (phase 1) are characterized by low CO2 and methane concentration, intermediate δD of CH4 (tracer of methane sources), high NEEM 17O-excess (proxy for vapor source relative humidity) and a progressive increase in EDML δ18O. The transition between phase 1

  17. Problem-dependent 3-d Inversion of P-wave Arrivals From Local Events Recorded During The Svekalapko Deep Seismic Experiment In Finland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlovskaya, E.; Hjelt, S.-E.; Yliniemi, J.; Korhonen, J.; Elo, S.; Svekalapko Seismic Tomography Working Group

    The SVEKALAPKO temporary seismic array was originally designed for studying the lithospheric structure beneath the southern Finland by means of teleseismic events. In addition, the high quality recordings of local seismic events (earthquakes and quarry blasts) registered by the SVEKALAPKO array contain a lot of information about the structure of the upper lithosphere beneath the southern Finland. However, the traditional local event tomography of SVEKALAPKO data cannot result in the ve- locity model valid for proper geological interpretation. The main reasons for this is the lack of the space resolution, which results in strong non-uniqueness of the to- mographic inversion. This problem can be treated by introducing various kinds of a-priori information into the inversion algorithm. The a-priori information available for the SVEKALAPKO study area includes not only the information from previous control source seismic experiments, but also potential fields data and petrophysical data. Usage of such a non-homogeneous a-priori information required a problem- dependent algorithm of seismic data inversion, which was developed on the base of non-probabilistic uncertainty measures. An example of this algorithm application to SVEKALAPKO local seismic event data is presented.

  18. Ichno-sedimentological record of short-term climate-controlled redox events and cycles in organic-rich strata

    SciTech Connect

    Savrda, C.E. ); Bottjher, D.J. ); Ozalas, K. )

    1990-05-01

    Reduced rates of biochemical degradation of organic matter in oxygen-depleted marine settings generally result in the accumulation of laminated strata with high hydrocarbon source potential. Periods of improved oxygenation, during which the quantity and quality of organic matter are effectively reduced, are reflected by interbedded bioturbated intervals. Such benthic redox excursions may reflect variable paleooceanographic responses to climatic events or cycles. The potential role of climate in the short-term modulation of source rock potential is exemplified by bioturbated intervals within three predominantly laminated organic-rich units. The Jurassic Posidonia Shale (Germany) contains bioturbated beds whose ichnologic characteristics reflect a spectrum from short, low-magnitude redox events to longer episodes of greater magnitude. The character and distribution of these event beds appear to be controlled by sea level mediated variations in the frequency and intensity of storm-induced basin turnover. Bioturbated beds of the Upper Cretaceous Niobrara Formation (Colorado) are characterized by four oxygen-related ichnocoenoses, the distribution of which reflects cyclic variations in redox conditions. Relationships between paleooxygenation and organic-carbon and carbonate contents, and estimated cycle periodicities, suggest that redox variations were controlled by wet-dry climatic cycles modulated by the Milankovitch cycle of axial precession. Bioturbated beds within slope and basinal facies of the Miocene Monterey Formation (California) are variable in character, reflecting differences in duration and magnitude of associated oxygenation episodes, and may be in response to short-term variations in wind-stress-induced upwelling and/or ice-volume-controlled eustatic sea level changes.

  19. U-Th dating of broken speleothems from Cacahuamilpa cave, Mexico: Are they recording past seismic events?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Méjean, Pauline; Garduño-Monroy, Victor-Hugo; Pinti, Daniele L.; Ghaleb, Bassam; Bouvier, Laura; Gomez-Vasconcelos, Martha G.; Tremblay, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Cacahuamilpa cave is one of the largest karst systems in Central Mexico. The cave contains numerous massive speleothems broken and fallen following oriented directions, damaged during cataclysmic geological events. One fallen and two broken speleothems were sampled in the Cacahuamilpa cave for dating the rupture event using measured U-Th disequilibrium ages. A total of eight small carbonate cores were drilled perpendicular and longitudinal to the rupture surface. Results showed three groups of ages (weighted average): 0.95 ± 0.02 ka, 28.8 ± 0.2 ka and 88.0 ± 0.7 ka. This indicates that the construction of the Cacahuamilpa karst system, for which no absolute ages existed before this study, initiated at least since Late Pleistocene. The first two groups of ages might be related to two distinct episodes of intense seismic activity. Calculated minimum horizontal ground acceleration and frequency values of the seismic events needed to create the rupture of the stalagmites dated at 0.95 ± 0.02 ka and 28.8 ± 0.2 ka range between 1.3 and 2.0 m s-2 and between 13.4 and 20.8 Hz, respectively. These parameters are compatible with earthquakes of magnitude equal or higher than 7 M, with an epicentral distance between 50 and 100 km from the Cacahuamilpa cave. The stalagmite rupture dated at 88.0 ± 0.7 ka might result from the invasion of the cave by one of the older lahars deposits of the nearby volcano Nevado del Toluca, and successively fell by gravity instability.

  20. Statistical study of ELF/VLF emissions recorded by a low-altitude satellite during seismic events

    SciTech Connect

    Parrot, M.

    1994-12-01

    The author reports a study of correlations between 325 earthquakes registering M{sub s}>5, and frequency filtered data observed by the low altitude satellite AUREOL 3 within a 24 hour window around the event. Data is sorted by time difference, difference in longitude, and difference in invariant latitude, between the satellite location and the epicenter. It is found that for the averaged data, the strongest signals are observed when the longitudinal differences are less than 10{degrees}, independent of latitude. The collected data was not continuous in nature, and therefore limits the nature of the statistical study which can be done.

  1. Late Pleistocene and Holocene palaeoflood events recorded by slackwater deposits in the upper Hanjiang River valley, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tao; Huang, Chun Chang; Pang, Jiangli; Zha, Xiaochun; Zhou, Yali; Zhang, Yuzhu; Ji, Lin

    2015-10-01

    Slackwater palaeoflood deposits (SWDs) were identified in a bedrock gorge in the upper reaches of the Hanjiang River of central China. The Hanjiang River is the longest tributary of the Yangtze River, one of the most flood-prone rivers in China, and the main source of water for the South-to-North Water Transfer Project (SNWTP). Three main loess-soil profiles with late Pleistocene and Holocene palaeoflood SWD bedsets were found. Palaeoflood SWDs identified interbedded in the loess-soil sequence of late Pleistocene and Holocene age within the cliff riverbanks were studied by field observations and laboratory analysis, including particle-size distribution and Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) dating. At least eight extreme flood events documented by palaeoflood SWDs occurred in the Wufeng reaches of the upper Hanjiang River. The discharge estimation associated with palaeoflood SWDs, indicates that the minimum flood peak discharges of these flood episodes range from 42,220 to 63,400 m3/s. The SWDs were OSL dated to between 12,600-12,400, 4200-4000, 3200-2800 and 1900-1700 a BP and these dates were corroborated with pottery remains retrieved from the profiles and dated by archaeological methods. These periods of increased flood magnitude coincide with contemporaneous global climatic events dated to 12,500, 4200, 3100 and 1900 a BP worldwide. These findings are of great significance in understanding the interactions between hydrological systems and climatic change in monsoonal zones.

  2. Record-low primary productivity and high plant damage in the Nordic Arctic Region in 2012 caused by multiple weather events and pest outbreaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjerke, Jarle W.; Rune Karlsen, Stein; Arild Høgda, Kjell; Malnes, Eirik; Jepsen, Jane U.; Lovibond, Sarah; Vikhamar-Schuler, Dagrun; Tømmervik, Hans

    2014-08-01

    The release of cold temperature constraints on photosynthesis has led to increased productivity (greening) in significant parts (32-39%) of the Arctic, but much of the Arctic shows stable (57-64%) or reduced productivity (browning, <4%). Summer drought and wildfires are the best-documented drivers causing browning of continental areas, but factors dampening the greening effect of more maritime regions have remained elusive. Here we show how multiple anomalous weather events severely affected the terrestrial productivity during one water year (October 2011-September 2012) in a maritime region north of the Arctic Circle, the Nordic Arctic Region, and contributed to the lowest mean vegetation greenness (normalized difference vegetation index) recorded this century. Procedures for field data sampling were designed during or shortly after the events in order to assess both the variability in effects and the maximum effects of the stressors. Outbreaks of insect and fungal pests also contributed to low greenness. Vegetation greenness in 2012 was 6.8% lower than the 2000-11 average and 58% lower in the worst affected areas that were under multiple stressors. These results indicate the importance of events (some being mostly neglected in climate change effect studies and monitoring) for primary productivity in a high-latitude maritime region, and highlight the importance of monitoring plant damage in the field and including frequencies of stress events in models of carbon economy and ecosystem change in the Arctic. Fourteen weather events and anomalies and 32 hypothesized impacts on plant productivity are summarized as an aid for directing future research.

  3. Extreme events in the sedimentary record of maar Lake Pavin: Implications for natural hazards assessment in the French Massif Central

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chassiot, Léo; Chapron, Emmanuel; Di Giovanni, Christian; Albéric, Patrick; Lajeunesse, Patrick; Lehours, Anne-Catherine; Meybeck, Michel

    2016-06-01

    A set of sedimentary cores, high resolution swath bathymetry and subbottom profiler data provides new insights on sedimentary processes in meromictic maar Lake Pavin, France. Three sedimentary environments (i.e., littoral, plateau and basin) have been identified in the lake from sediment composition using bulk organic geochemistry and the analysis of hydroacoustic images. Various forms of rapidly deposited layers (RDLs) have been identified and radiocarbon dated. An up to date stratigraphy of sedimentary events matching coeval RDLs across the lake is presented and illustrates a wide range of natural hazards linked to Lake Pavin during the last 2000 years. In AD 600, a sudden lake outburst triggered a slump deposit along with a 9 m lake-level drop that drove shifts in sedimentary organic matter composition. Outside the lake, outburst flood deposits have been described downstream and provide sedimentary evidence for this event. The lake-level drop also favored the generation of gravity reworking processes, as shown by (1) a regional earthquake-triggered large slope failure on the plateau connected to a mass-wasting deposit in the basin dated to AD 1300, and (2) a succession of turbidites in AD 1825 and AD 1860 contemporaneous to two historic earthquakes, suggesting that this lake is sensitive to earthquakes with a minimum epicentral intensity of V. Finally, past observations of lake water color changes in AD 1783 and AD 1936, similar to reports in other meromictic lakes, match iron-rich deposits identified in maar lake sediments and suggest that Lake Pavin could have undergone limnic eruptions.

  4. Holocene aeolian sedimentation and episodic mass-wasting events recorded in lacustrine sediments on Langøya in Vesterålen, northern Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, Pål Ringkjøb; Dahl, Svein Olaf; Jansen, Henrik Løseth; Støren, Eivind N.

    2016-09-01

    In this study, the frequency of mass-wasting events and past storminess has been reconstructed throughout the Holocene (11,500 cal yr BP to present) from lacustrine sediments in lake Trehynnvatnet (33 m a.s.l.), which is located in a glacially carved valley at Nykvåg on the outmost coast of western Langøya, Vesterålen, northern Norway. Sediment cores (∼2-5 m long) have been examined by use of high-resolution magnetic susceptibility and XRF-scanning as well as grain size and loss-on-ignition analysis. In total 35 episodic event layers have been identified throughout the Holocene. The majority of these events are characterized as discrete coarse-grained sediment layers followed by normal grading, and are related to past mass-wasting activity within the catchment. Periods with high mass-wasting activity are dated to 11,000-10,500, 5500-4500, 4000-3500, 3000-2500, 2000-1000 and 500-0 cal yr BP. The continuous input of sand grains (>250 μm) has been systematically investigated throughout the sediment cores. The sand grains are related to catchment samples from the sandy beach deposits in Sandvikbukta c. 750 m away in SW direction, and are suggested to indicate (niveo-) aeolian influx to the lake. The content of sand grains varies greatly throughout the record, although there is a clear increase in influx of sand during the last 2800 years. Periods with high aeolian influx are proposed to indicate increased storminess, which occurred between 1600 and 1550 (350-400 CE), 1400-1300 (450-550 CE), 750-550 (1200-1400 CE) and 250-20 cal yr BP (1700-1930 CE), which to some degree coincides with periods of increased storminess and winter precipitation recorded in other studies around the North Eastern Atlantic region.

  5. Impact of warming events on reef-scale temperature variability as captured in two Little Cayman coral Sr/Ca records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Reumont, J.; Hetzinger, S.; Garbe-Schönberg, D.; Manfrino, C.; Dullo, W.-Chr.

    2016-03-01

    The rising temperature of the world's oceans is affecting coral reef ecosystems by increasing the frequency and severity of bleaching and mortality events. The susceptibility of corals to temperature stress varies on local and regional scales. Insights into potential controlling parameters are hampered by a lack of long term in situ data in most coral reef environments and sea surface temperature (SST) products often do not resolve reef-scale variations. Here we use 42 years (1970-2012) of coral Sr/Ca data to reconstruct seasonal- to decadal-scale SST variations in two adjacent but distinct reef environments at Little Cayman, Cayman Islands. Our results indicate that two massive Diploria strigosa corals growing in the lagoon and in the fore reef responded differently to past warming events. Coral Sr/Ca data from the shallow lagoon successfully record high summer temperatures confirmed by in situ observations (>33°C). Surprisingly, coral Sr/Ca from the deeper fore reef is strongly affected by thermal stress events, although seasonal temperature extremes and mean SSTs at this site are reduced compared to the lagoon. The shallow lagoon coral showed decadal variations in Sr/Ca, supposedly related to the modulation of lagoonal temperature through varying tidal water exchange, influenced by the 18.6 year lunar nodal cycle. Our results show that reef-scale SST variability can be much larger than suggested by satellite SST measurements. Thus, using coral SST proxy records from different reef zones combined with in situ observations will improve conservation programs that are developed to monitor and predict potential thermal stress on coral reefs.

  6. Is there a normal magnetic-polarity event during the Palaeocene-Eocene thermal maximum (˜55 Ma)? Insights from the palaeomagnetic record of the Belluno Basin (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dallanave, Edoardo; Muttoni, Giovanni; Agnini, Claudia; Tauxe, Lisa; Rio, Domenico

    2012-08-01

    In the lowermost Eocene sedimentary record of Ocean Drilling Program Site 1262 (Leg 208, Walvis Ridge, South Atlantic Ocean), the presence of a ˜53-kyr-long normal polarity event has been recorded within the ˜2.55-Myr-long reverse polarity Chron C24r (˜53.3-55.9 Ma) and termed Palaeocene-Eocene magnetic reversal (PEMR). The origin of the PEMR has been speculatively related to a change in the Earth's rotation rate that was in turn influenced by an abrupt overturning of the ocean-atmosphere circulation that occurred during the Palaeocene-Eocene thermal maximum (PETM) at ˜55 Ma. Such provocative genesis for a magnetic-polarity reversal demands the PEMR to be confirmed (or refuted) in additional PETM sections. Here, we present detailed palaeomagnetic and rock-magnetic data from the Forada and Cicogna sections of the Belluno Basin in NE Italy, which contain an expanded and continuous record of the PETM termed clay marl unit (CMU). Our data indicate that these sediments were deposited during a continuous interval of reverse geomagnetic field polarity. We therefore conclude that no magnetic-polarity reversals occurred throughout the PETM. In addition, we studied the origin of the high degree of flattening affecting the characteristic magnetic component directions of the sediments, which we interpret as due to a combination of depositional inclination shallowing typical of detrital haematite, and post-depositional compaction of clays, particularly abundant in the carbonate-depleted CMU.

  7. The global event system

    SciTech Connect

    Winans, J.

    1994-03-02

    The support for the global event system has been designed to allow an application developer to control the APS event generator and receiver boards. This is done by the use of four new record types. These records are customized and are only supported by the device support modules for the APS event generator and receiver boards. The use of the global event system and its associated records should not be confused with the vanilla EPICS events and the associated event records. They are very different.

  8. High-resolution late Maastrichtian early Danian oceanic 87Sr/86Sr record: Implications for Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vonhof, H. B.; Smit, J.

    1997-04-01

    A high-resolution late Maastrichtian early Danian seawater 87Sr/86Sr reference curve is constructed from two Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary (K-T boundary) sections: Bidart (France) and El Kef (Tunisia). The 87Sr/86Sr curve shows maxima at 0.3 0.4 Ma before the K-T boundary and at the K-T boundary. The first maximum could mark the onset of a major outflow of the Deccan Traps. The second maximum, a rapid 0.000 06 87Sr/86Sr, shift, extends from ˜3 4 m below to ˜1 m above the K-T boundary. This profile probably results from diagenetic smoothing of an originally sharp K-T boundary 87Sr/86Sr anomaly, rather than from a gradual process. The sharp shift could result from (1) the vaporization of the Chicxulub target rocks, (2) global wildfires, and (3) acid-rain leaching of soils and sialic surface rocks. Of these three possibilities, only Sr release by soil leaching combined with increased rainfall associated with the K-T event appears to be sufficiently large to produce the observed K-T 87Sr/86Sr anomaly.

  9. Extreme Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nott, Jonathan

    2006-04-01

    The assessment of risks posed by natural hazards such as floods, droughts, earthquakes, tsunamis or cyclones, is often based on short-term historical records that may not reflect the full range or magnitude of events possible. As human populations grow, especially in hazard-prone areas, methods for accurately assessing natural hazard risks are becoming increasingly important. In Extreme Events Jonathan Nott describes the many methods used to reconstruct such hazards from natural long-term records. He demonstrates how long-term (multi-century to millennial) records are essential in gaining a realistic understanding of the variability of natural hazards, and how short-term historical records can often misrepresent the likely risks associated with natural hazards. This book will form a useful resource for students taking courses covering natural hazards and risk assessment. It will also be valuable for urban planners, policy makers and non-specialists as a guide to understanding and reconstructing long-term records of natural hazards. Explains mechanisms that cause extreme events and discusses their prehistoric records Describes how to reconstruct long-term records of natural hazards in order to make accurate risk assessments Demonstrates that natural hazards can follow cycles over time and do not occur randomly

  10. Precursory slow crustal deformation before short-term slow slip event in January 2006, recorded at Shingu borehole station southern Kii Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuda, M.; Sagiya, T.

    2007-12-01

    In January 2006, a deep low frequency tremor activity and an associated short-term slow slip event occurred in the eastern Kii Peninsula and this coupled activity migrated to the northeast at a rate of 10km/day. We are monitoring crustal deformation at Shingu borehole station in the southeastern Kii peninsula. The Shingu borehole site is located about 100km landward from the Nankai Trough axis, and close to the epicenter of the 1944 Tonankai Earthquake. The borehole is 500 m deep and is equipped with an integrated multi-component borehole monitoring system developed by Ishii et al. (2002), consisting of 6 strain sensors (4 in horizontal, 2 in vertical), 2 pendulum tilt sensors, a magnetic direction finder, and a quartz thermometer. Each signal is originally recorded with a sampling frequency of 50 Hz. We decimated the original data into hourly data, which we decomposed into tidal response, barometric response, smoothed trend and random noise component by applying BAYTAP-G software [Tamura et al., 1991]. In the trend component from November 2005 to March 2006, we did not found deformation signal at the time of the Jan. 2006 tremor event. However, we found three significant slow strain changes from the processed records. Two of them coincide with the occurrence of the tremor activities in the southern Kii Peninsula, and are characterized by N-S contraction (0.019-0.031 ppm) and E-W extension (0.025-0.038 ppm). These are the first evidence of the short-term slow slip event in this area. The third change is characterized by NW-SE extension (0.026 ppm), N-S contraction (0.012 ppm), E-W extension (0.022 ppm), and southwestward tilting (0.23 micro rad). It occurred from December 29, 2005 to January 2, 2006, just before the tremor and slip event in January 2006, but was not accompanied by any tremor activity. We conducted a series of inversion analysis to infer the source of this possible slow slip event. We assumed that the slow slip event was caused by a reverse fault

  11. Are historical pollution events on the Delaware River recorded as geochemical marker horizons in adjacent marsh sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, R.; Yemane, K. . Dept. of Geology Bryn Mawr Coll., PA . Geology Dept.)

    1993-03-01

    In the last two hundred years of massive population and industrial growth, the Delaware River has been subjected to several minor and major pollutions. For example, as recently as June 1989 the tanker Presidente Rivera spilled an estimated hundred thousand to million gallons of oil into the river. In the Lower Delaware Basin tides affect the river and its tributaries up to a hundred kilometers inland. The freshwater marshes adjacent to the creeks that empty into the Delaware River experience diurnal tidal sedimentation. It is thus expected that the pollutants in the waterway would be transported via the tidal channels into the adjacent wetlands. The high sedimentation rate, clay-rich sediments, accumulation of terrestrial organic matter, and the low energy environments in these marshes should ensure rapid burial which may preserve some of the contaminants transported into the marshes. To test this hypothesis the authors selected a freshwater marsh along the Raccoon Creek just south of Philadelphia in New Jersey, and collected a 2 m core from a relatively undisturbed portion of the marsh, about 15 m away from the tidal channels. The pH averages around 6.2, ranges from 5.5--6.8, but, is slightly higher in the middle part of the core. The bulk mineralogy comprises chlorite, illite, kaolinite, feldspars and quartz. Vivianite and vermiculite were observed at places lower in the core. Graminae dominates the pollen/spore taxa. The organic debris is unaltered throughout the core. The authors will measure heavy metals and toxic chemicals on < 2[mu]m clay fractions. Also pristane/phytane ratios, indicative of hydrocarbons (crude oils), will be determined on organic matter extracts. The authors will compare and correlate the results to historically documented events of chemical and petroleum spills on the Delaware River.

  12. Plant wax δD values record changing Eastern Mediterranean atmospheric circulation patterns during the 8.2 kyr B.P. climatic event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schemmel, Fabian; Niedermeyer, Eva M.; Schwab, Valérie F.; Gleixner, Gerd; Pross, Jörg; Mulch, Andreas

    2016-02-01

    Throughout the Holocene, the climate of the Mediterranean region has been strongly influenced by variability in the atmospheric circulation of the high and low latitudes. A prominent example for such Holocene climate perturbations is the '8.2 kyr B.P. climatic event'. Reorganization of Northern Hemisphere atmospheric circulation patterns resulted in variations of temperature and precipitation distribution across the Mediterranean. The effects of changing high- and low-latitude atmospheric circulation on Mediterranean climate in relation to the 8.2 kyr B.P. climatic event are, however, not well understood. Here we present a high-resolution record of stable hydrogen isotope composition of plant-wax n-alkanes (δDwax) across the 8.2 kyr B.P. climatic event from the Tenaghi Philippon peat deposit (NE Greece) in order to characterize patterns of precipitation and changes in atmospheric circulation in the Eastern Mediterranean region. Our record reveals pronounced changes in δDwax that correlate closely with previously published palynological data. A long-term decline in δDwax values characterizes the lower part of the section. The 8.2 kyr B.P. climatic event itself is connected to two distinct positive δDwax excursions: a minor shift in δDwax around 8.2 kyr B.P. and a major shift in δDwax between ca. 8.1 and 8.0 kyr B.P.. The upper part of the section shows a progressive trend towards higher δDwax values. We link shifts in δDwax to changes in Mediterranean air mass trajectories supplying precipitation to NE Greece caused by variations in the relative contributions of northerly-derived, D-depleted moisture and southerly-derived, D-enriched moisture. Possible control mechanisms for alternating air mass trajectories include changes in the influence of the Siberian High and differences in the influence of the African and Asian monsoon circulation on anticyclonic conditions in the Mediterranean region as well as regional inflow of moist air masses from the Aegean Sea.

  13. Missing Rings in Pinus halepensis - The Missing Link to Relate the Tree-Ring Record to Extreme Climatic Events.

    PubMed

    Novak, Klemen; de Luis, Martin; Saz, Miguel A; Longares, Luis A; Serrano-Notivoli, Roberto; Raventós, Josep; Čufar, Katarina; Gričar, Jožica; Di Filippo, Alfredo; Piovesan, Gianluca; Rathgeber, Cyrille B K; Papadopoulos, Andreas; Smith, Kevin T

    2016-01-01

    Climate predictions for the Mediterranean Basin include increased temperatures, decreased precipitation, and increased frequency of extreme climatic events (ECE). These conditions are associated with decreased tree growth and increased vulnerability to pests and diseases. The anatomy of tree rings responds to these environmental conditions. Quantitatively, the width of a tree ring is largely determined by the rate and duration of cell division by the vascular cambium. In the Mediterranean climate, this division may occur throughout almost the entire year. Alternatively, cell division may cease during relatively cool and dry winters, only to resume in the same calendar year with milder temperatures and increased availability of water. Under particularly adverse conditions, no xylem may be produced in parts of the stem, resulting in a missing ring (MR). A dendrochronological network of Pinus halepensis was used to determine the relationship of MR to ECE. The network consisted of 113 sites, 1,509 trees, 2,593 cores, and 225,428 tree rings throughout the distribution range of the species. A total of 4,150 MR were identified. Binomial logistic regression analysis determined that MR frequency increased with increased cambial age. Spatial analysis indicated that the geographic areas of south-eastern Spain and northern Algeria contained the greatest frequency of MR. Dendroclimatic regression analysis indicated a non-linear relationship of MR to total monthly precipitation and mean temperature. MR are strongly associated with the combination of monthly mean temperature from previous October till current February and total precipitation from previous September till current May. They are likely to occur with total precipitation lower than 50 mm and temperatures higher than 5°C. This conclusion is global and can be applied to every site across the distribution area. Rather than simply being a complication for dendrochronology, MR formation is a fundamental response of trees

  14. Missing Rings in Pinus halepensis – The Missing Link to Relate the Tree-Ring Record to Extreme Climatic Events

    PubMed Central

    Novak, Klemen; de Luis, Martin; Saz, Miguel A.; Longares, Luis A.; Serrano-Notivoli, Roberto; Raventós, Josep; Čufar, Katarina; Gričar, Jožica; Di Filippo, Alfredo; Piovesan, Gianluca; Rathgeber, Cyrille B. K.; Papadopoulos, Andreas; Smith, Kevin T.

    2016-01-01

    Climate predictions for the Mediterranean Basin include increased temperatures, decreased precipitation, and increased frequency of extreme climatic events (ECE). These conditions are associated with decreased tree growth and increased vulnerability to pests and diseases. The anatomy of tree rings responds to these environmental conditions. Quantitatively, the width of a tree ring is largely determined by the rate and duration of cell division by the vascular cambium. In the Mediterranean climate, this division may occur throughout almost the entire year. Alternatively, cell division may cease during relatively cool and dry winters, only to resume in the same calendar year with milder temperatures and increased availability of water. Under particularly adverse conditions, no xylem may be produced in parts of the stem, resulting in a missing ring (MR). A dendrochronological network of Pinus halepensis was used to determine the relationship of MR to ECE. The network consisted of 113 sites, 1,509 trees, 2,593 cores, and 225,428 tree rings throughout the distribution range of the species. A total of 4,150 MR were identified. Binomial logistic regression analysis determined that MR frequency increased with increased cambial age. Spatial analysis indicated that the geographic areas of south-eastern Spain and northern Algeria contained the greatest frequency of MR. Dendroclimatic regression analysis indicated a non-linear relationship of MR to total monthly precipitation and mean temperature. MR are strongly associated with the combination of monthly mean temperature from previous October till current February and total precipitation from previous September till current May. They are likely to occur with total precipitation lower than 50 mm and temperatures higher than 5°C. This conclusion is global and can be applied to every site across the distribution area. Rather than simply being a complication for dendrochronology, MR formation is a fundamental response of trees

  15. Multiple metasomatic events recorded in Kilbourne Hole peridotite xenoliths: the relative contribution of host basalt interaction vs. silicate metasomatic glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammond, S. J.; Yoshikawa, M.; Harvey, J.; Burton, K. W.

    2010-12-01

    Stark differences between bulk-rock lithophile trace element budgets and the sum of the contributions from their constituent minerals are common, if not ubiquitous in peridotite xenoliths [1]. In the absence of modal metasomatism this discrepancy is often attributed to the “catch-all”, yet often vague process of cryptic metasomatism. This study presents comprehensive Sr-Nd isotope ratios for variably metasomatized bulk-rock peridotites, host basalts, constituent peridotite mineral phases and interstitial glass from 13 spinel lherzolite and harzburgite xenoliths from the Kilbourne Hole volcanic maar, New Mexico, USA. Similar measurements were also made on hand-picked interstitial glass from one of the most highly metasomatized samples (KH03-16) in an attempt to unravel the effects of multiple metasomatic events. In all Kilbourne Hole peridotites analysed, hand-picked, optically clean clinopyroxenes preserve a more primitive Sr isotope signature than the corresponding bulk-rock; a pattern preserved in all but one sample for Nd isotope measurements. Reaction textures, avoided during hand-picking, around clinopyroxene grains are evident in the most metasomatized samples and accompanied by films of high-SiO2 interstitial glass. The margins of primary minerals appear partially resorbed and trails of glassy melt inclusions similar in appearance to those previously reported from the same locality [2], terminate in these films. Hand-picked glass from KH03-16 reveals the most enriched 87Sr/86Sr of any component recovered from these xenoliths (87Sr/86Sr = 0.708043 ± 0.00009; [Sr] = 81 ppm). Similarly, the 143Nd/144Nd of the glass is amongst the most enriched of the peridotite components (143Nd/144Nd = 0.512893 ± 0.000012; [Nd] = 10 ppm). However, the host basalt (87Sr/86Sr = 0.703953 ± 0.00012; 143Nd/144Nd = 0.512873 ± 0.000013), similar in composition to nearby contemporaneous Potrillo Volcanic Field basalts [3], contains nearly an order of magnitude more Sr and more

  16. Is our Future Written in the Geological Record of Oceanic Anoxic Events? The Calcareous Nannoplankton Perspective (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erba, E.

    2013-12-01

    The topical emergence of climate change as a crucial issue for society and governments has urged the understanding of the future state of the planet within the context of increasing carbon dioxide concentrations. In the near future, the ocean's uptake of CO2 is expected to rapidly decline because of surface warming, increased vertical stratification, and slowed thermohaline circulation. The Anthropocene CO2 emissions are inferred to be the cause of global warming and alteration of ocean chemistry, triggering unknown responses of marine biota in terms of extinction, innovation and/or temporary adaptations. During the Mesozoic under excess CO2 and greenhouse conditions, the ocean became depleted of oxygen, promoting the burial of massive amounts of organic matter. These episodes are named Oceanic Anoxic Events (OAEs) and might provide guidance as to the response of marine biota to massive CO2 releases and how and at what rate pre-perturbation conditions are eventually restored. After over three decades of research on OAEs, an impressive amount of data has been generated: there is a general consensus on the role of Large Igneous Provinces (LIPs) inducing CO2 increases, greenhouse climate and profound variations in chemical, physical and trophic characteristics of the ocean. OAEs can be studied to decipher the complexity of drivers and of responses within and among different organisms to CO2 pulses, extreme warmth, weathering changes, ocean fertilization and acidification to add the long-term and large-scale prospective to investigations on current, very-short-term and local responses. In Jurassic and Cretaceous oceans, coccolithophores were already a most efficient carbonate-forming group and OAEs offer the opportunity of characterizing variations in their abundance, diversity, and morphology to trace ecological affinities and adaptations to oceanic ecosystem perturbations. We quantitatively investigated the Toarcian OAE, the early Aptian OAE1a and the latest

  17. Record of Plio-Pleistocene extreme event in the Lesser Antilles fore-arc basin. Example of Grande-Terre (Guadeloupe, French West Indies).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeanlèn, L.; Philippon, M. M.; Randrianasolo, A.; Jean-Frederic, L.; Cornée, J. J.; Münch, P.

    2015-12-01

    Guadeloupe archipelago is part of the Lesser Antilles active volcanic arc and is therefore subjected to both enhanced seismic and volcanic activity related to the Lesser Antilles subduction zone, along which the Atlantic plate is subducted westward bellow the Caribbean plate. The volcanic arc is composed of several immerged volcanic islands (St Kitts, Nevis Montserrat, Basse Terre, Dominica, Martinique, St Lucia, Grenada) and submerged volcanoes (Kick em'Jenny). These volcanoes are known to be explosives and when they are entering in an eruptive cycle, debris flow could potentially initiate a tsunami and generate peculiar deposits within the sedimentary record recognized as tsunami deposits (or tsunamite). Subduction- related earthquakes might also initiate slope instabilities and trigger debris flow. Another controlling factor of slope (in-)-stabilities and debris flow is massive rainfalls. During cyclonic season (June to December), massive rainfalls are recorded in the area, which moreover is located on the trajectory of Atlantic Hurricanes that are responsible for numerous landslides. As a consequence, tsunami deposit are described and well studied in the Lesser Antilles arc as the islands shoreline and coastal plain are perpetually re-shaped by hurricanes responsible for tempestite deposits. However, the report of these deposit concern recent to actual events, for example present-day deposits consisting of large (metric) boulders, more or less aligned, located in the supralittoral fringe can be observed along Guadeloupe shore. In this study, we investigate the Plio-pleistocene sedimentary sequence of Grande Terre carbonate platform (Guadeloupe), and track the presence of such extreme-event related deposits and discuss our findings in the frame of the Lesser Antilles geological context.

  18. Facies analyses of cold-water spring-fed fluvial carbonates: Implications for a terrestrial Holocene (?) record of wet events in Southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibarra, Y.; Corsetti, F. A.; Feakins, S. J.

    2012-12-01

    was active. The presence of groundwater-fed carbonate deposits in this region constitute a unique opportunity to compare/compliment a record of terrestrial wet events to proximal high-resolution records of Holocene climate from the sediments of Zaca Lake located about 2km away and the diverse assemblage of Holocene climate records from the Santa Barbara Basin located about 50km to the south.

  19. Pyrite framboid size distribution as a record for relative variations in sedimentation rate: An example on the Toarcian Oceanic Anoxic Event in Southiberian Palaeomargin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallego-Torres, David; Reolid, Matías; Nieto-Moreno, Vanesa; Martínez-Casado, Francisco Javier

    2015-12-01

    The Early Toarcian Oceanic Anoxic Event (T-OAE) represents one of the major alterations of the carbon cycle of the Mesozoic period. Despite being globally recognized, and particularly represented within the Tethys realm, its expression in the sedimentary record is highly variable depending on the studied section, which suggests local environmental factors exert a major control on the resulting lithological appearance of the event. We investigated the Fuente Vidriera section, in the eastern External Subbetic of the Betic Cordillera (Spain), where the Lower Jurassic is represented by alternate layers of marls and marly limestones, and the T-OAE is identified by a major δ13C excursion, micropalaeontological, ichnofacies and geochemical evidences. For this study, we analyzed pyrite framboid size distribution of the sedimentary sequence in Fuente Vidriera. The outcome, according to previous studies on pyrite framboid distribution, is contradictory when compared to all other evidences, suggesting oxygen depletion during the T-OAE. The results have been reinterpreted in the light of Crystal Size Distribution Theory and we conclude that not only growth time but also geochemical environment controls pyrite formation. Since growth time is directly related to burial rates, this approach allows us to reconstruct relative variations of sedimentation rates during the Early Jurassic in this location. Based on the obtained results, we provide new evidences for wide-spread transgression during the Early Toarcian in the South Iberian palaeomargin, which induced low sedimentation rate and lower energetic conditions, as well as favored oxygen impoverished bottom waters.

  20. FAST: FAST Analysis of Sequences Toolbox.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Travis J; Kauffman, Kyle T; Amrine, Katherine C H; Carper, Dana L; Lee, Raymond S; Becich, Peter J; Canales, Claudia J; Ardell, David H

    2015-01-01

    FAST (FAST Analysis of Sequences Toolbox) provides simple, powerful open source command-line tools to filter, transform, annotate and analyze biological sequence data. Modeled after the GNU (GNU's Not Unix) Textutils such as grep, cut, and tr, FAST tools such as fasgrep, fascut, and fastr make it easy to rapidly prototype expressive bioinformatic workflows in a compact and generic command vocabulary. Compact combinatorial encoding of data workflows with FAST commands can simplify the documentation and reproducibility of bioinformatic protocols, supporting better transparency in biological data science. Interface self-consistency and conformity with conventions of GNU, Matlab, Perl, BioPerl, R, and GenBank help make FAST easy and rewarding to learn. FAST automates numerical, taxonomic, and text-based sorting, selection and transformation of sequence records and alignment sites based on content, index ranges, descriptive tags, annotated features, and in-line calculated analytics, including composition and codon usage. Automated content- and feature-based extraction of sites and support for molecular population genetic statistics make FAST useful for molecular evolutionary analysis. FAST is portable, easy to install and secure thanks to the relative maturity of its Perl and BioPerl foundations, with stable releases posted to CPAN. Development as well as a publicly accessible Cookbook and Wiki are available on the FAST GitHub repository at https://github.com/tlawrence3/FAST. The default data exchange format in FAST is Multi-FastA (specifically, a restriction of BioPerl FastA format). Sanger and Illumina 1.8+ FastQ formatted files are also supported. FAST makes it easier for non-programmer biologists to interactively investigate and control biological data at the speed of thought. PMID:26042145

  1. FAST: FAST Analysis of Sequences Toolbox

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, Travis J.; Kauffman, Kyle T.; Amrine, Katherine C. H.; Carper, Dana L.; Lee, Raymond S.; Becich, Peter J.; Canales, Claudia J.; Ardell, David H.

    2015-01-01

    FAST (FAST Analysis of Sequences Toolbox) provides simple, powerful open source command-line tools to filter, transform, annotate and analyze biological sequence data. Modeled after the GNU (GNU's Not Unix) Textutils such as grep, cut, and tr, FAST tools such as fasgrep, fascut, and fastr make it easy to rapidly prototype expressive bioinformatic workflows in a compact and generic command vocabulary. Compact combinatorial encoding of data workflows with FAST commands can simplify the documentation and reproducibility of bioinformatic protocols, supporting better transparency in biological data science. Interface self-consistency and conformity with conventions of GNU, Matlab, Perl, BioPerl, R, and GenBank help make FAST easy and rewarding to learn. FAST automates numerical, taxonomic, and text-based sorting, selection and transformation of sequence records and alignment sites based on content, index ranges, descriptive tags, annotated features, and in-line calculated analytics, including composition and codon usage. Automated content- and feature-based extraction of sites and support for molecular population genetic statistics make FAST useful for molecular evolutionary analysis. FAST is portable, easy to install and secure thanks to the relative maturity of its Perl and BioPerl foundations, with stable releases posted to CPAN. Development as well as a publicly accessible Cookbook and Wiki are available on the FAST GitHub repository at https://github.com/tlawrence3/FAST. The default data exchange format in FAST is Multi-FastA (specifically, a restriction of BioPerl FastA format). Sanger and Illumina 1.8+ FastQ formatted files are also supported. FAST makes it easier for non-programmer biologists to interactively investigate and control biological data at the speed of thought. PMID:26042145

  2. Integrated wireless fast-scan cyclic voltammetry recording and electrical stimulation for reward-predictive learning in awake, freely moving rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yu-Ting; Wickens, Jeffery R.; Huang, Yi-Ling; Pan, Wynn H. T.; Chen, Fu-Yu Beverly; Chen, Jia-Jin Jason

    2013-08-01

    Objective. Fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) is commonly used to monitor phasic dopamine release, which is usually performed using tethered recording and for limited types of animal behavior. It is necessary to design a wireless dopamine sensing system for animal behavior experiments. Approach. This study integrates a wireless FSCV system for monitoring the dopamine signal in the ventral striatum with an electrical stimulator that induces biphasic current to excite dopaminergic neurons in awake freely moving rats. The measured dopamine signals are unidirectionally transmitted from the wireless FSCV module to the host unit. To reduce electrical artifacts, an optocoupler and a separate power are applied to isolate the FSCV system and electrical stimulator, which can be activated by an infrared controller. Main results. In the validation test, the wireless backpack system has similar performance in comparison with a conventional wired system and it does not significantly affect the locomotor activity of the rat. In the cocaine administration test, the maximum electrically elicited dopamine signals increased to around 230% of the initial value 20 min after the injection of 10 mg kg-1 cocaine. In a classical conditioning test, the dopamine signal in response to a cue increased to around 60 nM over 50 successive trials while the electrically evoked dopamine concentration decreased from about 90 to 50 nM in the maintenance phase. In contrast, the cue-evoked dopamine concentration progressively decreased and the electrically evoked dopamine was eliminated during the extinction phase. In the histological evaluation, there was little damage to brain tissue after five months chronic implantation of the stimulating electrode. Significance. We have developed an integrated wireless voltammetry system for measuring dopamine concentration and providing electrical stimulation. The developed wireless FSCV system is proven to be a useful experimental tool for the continuous

  3. Mapping South American Summer Monsoon Changes during Heinrich Event 1 and the LGM: Insights from New Paleolake Records from the Central Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C. Y.; McGee, D.; Quade, J.

    2015-12-01

    Cave stalagmite records show strong evidence of abrupt changes in summer monsoons during Heinrich events, but we lack rigorous constraints on the amount of wetting or drying occurring in monsoon regions. Studies on shoreline deposits of closed-basin lakes can establish quantitative bounds on water balance changes through mapping-based estimates of lake volume variations. We present new dating constraints on lake level variations in Agua Caliente I and Laguna Loyoques, two closed-basin, high-altitude paleolakes on the Altiplano-Puna plateau of the Central Andes (23.1°S, 67.4°W, 4250 masl). Because this area receives >70% of its total annual precipitation during austral summer, the region is ideally suited to capture a pure response to changes in the South American summer monsoon (SASM). The plateau is home to several small (<40 km2) lakes surrounded by well-preserved paleoshorelines that indicate past wetter conditions. Agua Caliente I is unique, having multiple shorelines encrusted with biologically-mediated calcium carbonate "tufa" deposits. Initial U-Th dating of these massive shoreline tufas reveals that these deposits are dateable to within ±50 to 300 years due to high U concentrations and low initial Th content (as indicated by high 230Th/232Th). Our U-Th dates show that Agua Caliente I was greater in lake surface area during two periods: 17.5-14.5 kyrs BP, coincident with Heinrich Event 1 (HE1), and 24-23 kyrs BP, roughly coincident with the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). At these times, Agua Caliente I also overflowed into a neighboring lake basin (Loyoques) through an 8-km long southeast-trending stream channel. Thus, during HE1 and the LGM, the lake was ~9 times larger in surface area relative to modern. Hydrologic modeling constrained by paleotemperature estimates is used to provide bounds for these past precipitation changes. We also tentatively explore physical mechanisms linking Heinrich events and the regional hydroclimate by comparing freshwater

  4. A 400-kyr record of millennial-scale carbonate preservation events in the Southern Ocean: Implications for Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation and atmospheric CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodell, D. A.; Vautravers, M. J.; Barker, S.; Charles, C.; Crowhurst, S.

    2014-12-01

    Hodell et al. (2001) suggested that carbonate preservation in the deep Cape Basin represented a qualitative, high-resolution record of the temporal evolution of the carbonate saturation state of the deep sea. The carbonate signal reflects both transient events in the redistribution of alkalinity and DIC in the deep ocean and steady-state mass balance processes. Here we re-analyzed the carbonate records of Sites 1089/TN057-21 using an Avaatech XRF core scanner and measured elemental variations at 2.5-mm resolution for the past 400 kyrs. Log Ca/Ti is highly correlated to weight percent carbonate content and other dissolution proxies and resolves millennial-scale events in carbonate preservation. A high-pass filter removes the low-frequency (orbital) variability in carbonate preservation, which is attributed mainly to steady-state mass balance processes. The high-frequency (suborbital) component reflects transient responses to the redistribution of carbonate ion that is related mainly to changing deep-water circulation. During the last glacial period, distinct millennial-scale increases in carbonate preservation in piston core TN057-21 occurred during times of enhanced Atlantic Meridional Overtunring Circulation (AMOC) (Barker et al., 2010; Barker and Diz, 2014), as supported by increases in benthic δ13C and less radiogenic ɛNd values. Carbonate preservation peaked particularly during long, warm interstadials in Greenland when a deep water mass with high carbonate ion concentration was formed in the North Atlantic. Export of NADW may have been greater than the Holocene during some of these events ("overshoots") and/or preformed carbonate ion concentrations in North Atlantic source areas may have been higher owing to lower atmospheric CO2 and less carbonate production in surface water. Each South Atlantic carbonate peak is associated with the start of Antarctic cooling and declining or leveling of atmospheric CO2, reflecting the signature of a thermal bipolar seesaw

  5. Freshwater input into the Gulf of Mexico Prior to the 8.2 cal kyr BP Cool Event in Greenland Ice Core Records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lodico, J. M.; Flower, B. P.; Quinn, T. M.

    2004-12-01

    The most prominent event recorded in Greenland ice core records over the past 10 calendar kiloyears before present (cal kyr BP) is an abrupt cooling at 8.2 cal kyr BP, which lasted for 300-400 yrs. It has been proposed that this climatic event was caused by a weakening of the thermohaline circulation in the North Atlantic forced by a vast outflow of freshwater through the Hudson Strait from glacial lakes Agassiz and Ojibway. Sediment core MD02-2550 from Orca Basin located in the northern Gulf of Mexico (GOM) provides an early Holocene record (10 to 7 cal kyr BP) of GOM climate changes, input from the Mississippi River system and adjacent continental areas. Paired analysis of Mg/Ca, a proxy of sea surface temperatures (SSTs), and \\delta18O on the planktonic foraminifera { \\it Globigerinoides ruber } (white variety; 250 -350 μ m) sampled at 0.5 cm (providing ˜20 year resolution), indicate a large isotopic excursion of ˜ -1 ‰ \\delta18O seawater from 8.5 to 8.4 cal kyr BP, coincident with the drainage of glacial lakes Agassiz and Ojibway at 8.47 cal kyr BP. We consider three possible sources for this freshwater pulse: freshwater input from glacial lakes, meltwater input from the drainage of the Laurentide Ice Sheet's final dome, and/or increased precipitation in North American drainage basins. Mg/Ca-SSTs show minimal mean change across the freshwater interval and an average of ˜28 ° C from 7 to 10 cal kyr BP, which is within the current mean SSTs for GOM ( ˜28 ° C). Mg/Ca-SST and \\delta18O seawater time series contain concentrations of variance near 500, 220, 146, and 60 years, significant at the 90 % confidence level, indicating possible sensitivity to solar variations. Ongoing faunal assemblage work will provide additional assessment for SST, sea surface salinity (SSS) and nutrient changes during the early Holocene in the GOM.

  6. News Particle Physics: ATLAS unveils mural at CERN Prize: Corti Trust invites essay entries Astrophysics: CERN holds cosmic-ray conference Researchers in Residence: Lord Winston returns to school Music: ATLAS scientists record physics music Conference: Champagne flows at Reims event Competition: Students triumph at physics olympiad Teaching: Physics proves popular in Japanese schools Forthcoming Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-01-01

    Particle Physics: ATLAS unveils mural at CERN Prize: Corti Trust invites essay entries Astrophysics: CERN holds cosmic-ray conference Researchers in Residence: Lord Winston returns to school Music: ATLAS scientists record physics music Conference: Champagne flows at Reims event Competition: Students triumph at physics olympiad Teaching: Physics proves popular in Japanese schools Forthcoming Events

  7. Fast neutron imaging device and method

    DOEpatents

    Popov, Vladimir; Degtiarenko, Pavel; Musatov, Igor V.

    2014-02-11

    A fast neutron imaging apparatus and method of constructing fast neutron radiography images, the apparatus including a neutron source and a detector that provides event-by-event acquisition of position and energy deposition, and optionally timing and pulse shape for each individual neutron event detected by the detector. The method for constructing fast neutron radiography images utilizes the apparatus of the invention.

  8. The possible importance of synchrotron/inverse Compton losses to explain fast MM-wave and hard X-ray emission of a solar event

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Correia, E.; Kaufmann, P.; Costa, J. E. R.; Vaz, A. M. Z.; Dennis, B. R.

    1986-01-01

    The solar burst of 21 May 1984 presented a number of unique features. The time profile consisted of seven major structures (seconds), with a turnover frequency or approx. 90 GHz, well correlated in time to hard X-ray emission. Each structure consisted of multiple fast pulses (.1 seconds), which were analyzed in detail. A proportionality between the repetition rate of the pulses and the burst fluxes at 90 GHz and or approx. 100 keV hard X-rays, and an inverse proportionality between repetition rates and hard X-rays power law indices have been found. A synchrotron/inverse Compton model has been applied to explain the emission of the fast burst structures, which appear to be possible for the first three or four structures.

  9. The possible importance of synchrotron/inverse Compton losses to explain fast mm-wave and hard X-ray emission of a solar event

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Correia, E.; Kaufmann, P.; Costa, J. E. R.; Zodivaz, A. M.; Dennis, B. R.

    1986-01-01

    The solar burst of 21 May 1984, presented a number of unique features. The time profile consisted of seven major structures (seconds), with a turnover frequency of greater than or approximately 90 GHz, well correlated in time to hard X-ray emission. Each structure consisted of multiple fast pulses (0.1 seconds), which were analyzed in detail. A proportionality between the repetition rate of the pulses and the burst fluxes at 90 GHz and greater than or approximately 100 keV hard X-rays, and an inverse proportionality between repetition rates and hard X-ray power law indices were found. A synchrotron/inverse Compton model was applied to explain the emission of the fast burst structures, which appear to be possible for the first three or four structures.

  10. Seasonality and Disturbance Events in the Carbon Isotope Record of Slash Pine (Pinus elliottii) Tree Rings from Big Pine Key, Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebenack, C.; Anderson, W. T.; Cherubini, P.

    2011-12-01

    The South Florida coastal ecosystem is among the world's subtropical coastlines which are threatened by the potential effects of climate change. A well-developed localized paleohistory is essential in the understanding of the role climate variability/change has on both hydrological dynamics and disturbance event frequency and intensity; this understanding can then aid in the development of better predictive models. High resolution paleoclimate proxies, such as those developed from tree-ring archives, may be useful tools for extrapolating actual climate trends over time from the overlapping long-term and short-term climate cycles, such as the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO) and the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO). In South Florida, both the AMO and ENSO strongly influence seasonal precipitation, and a more complete grasp of how these cycles have affected the region in the past could be applied to future freshwater management practices. Dendrochronology records for the terrestrial subtropics, including South Florida, are sparse because seasonality for this region is precipitation driven; this is in contrast to the drastic temperature changes experienced in the temperate latitudes. Subtropical seasonality may lead to the complete lack of visible rings or to the formation of ring structures that may or may not represent annual growth. Fortunately, it has recently been demonstrated that Pinus elliottii trees in South Florida produce distinct annual growth rings; however ring width was not found to significantly correlate with either the AMO or ENSO. Dendrochronology studies may be taken a step beyond the physical tree-ring proxies by using the carbon isotope ratios to infer information about physiological controls and environmental factors that affect the distribution of isotopes within the plant. It has been well established that the stable isotope composition of cellulose can be related to precipitation, drought, large-scale ocean/atmospheric oscillations

  11. Holter and Event Monitors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Holter and event monitors are similar to an EKG (electrocardiogram). An EKG is a simple test that detects and records ... for diagnosing heart rhythm problems. However, a standard EKG only records the heartbeat for a few seconds. ...

  12. Strong ground motion generated by controlled blasting experiments and mining induced seismic events recorded underground at deep level mines in South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milev, A.; Selllers, E.; Skorpen, L.; Scheepers, L.; Murphy, S.; Spottiswoode, S. M.

    2011-12-01

    A number of simulated rockbursts were conducted underground at deep level gold mines in South Africa in order to estimate the rock mass response when subjected to strong ground motion. The rockbursts were simulated by means of large blasts detonated in solid rock close to the sidewall of a tunnel. The simulated rockbursts involved the design of the seismic source, seismic observations in the near and far field, high-speed video filming, a study of rock mass conditions such as fractures, joints, rock strength etc. Knowledge of the site conditions before and after the simulated rockbursts was also gained. The numerical models used in the design of the simulated rockbursts were calibrated by small blasts taking place at each experimental site. A dense array of shock type accelerometers was installed along the blasting wall to monitor the attenuation of the strong ground motion as a function of the distance from the source. The attenuation of peak particle velocities, was found to be proportional to R^-1.7. Special investigations were carried out to evaluate the mechanism and the magnitude of damage, as well as the support behaviour under excessive dynamic loading. The strong ground motion generated by mining induced seismic events was studied, as part of this work, not only to characterize the rock mass response, but also to estimate the site effect on the surface of the underground excavations. A stand-alone instrument especially designed for recording strong ground motions was used to create a large database of peak particle velocities measured on stope hangingwalls. A total number of 58 sites located in stopes where the Carbon Leader Reef, Ventersdorp Contact Reef, Vaal Reef and Basal Reef are mined, were monitored. The peak particle velocities were measured at the surface of the excavations to identify the effect of the free surface and the fractures surrounding the underground mining. Based on these measurements the generally accepted velocity criterion of 3 m

  13. Location Estimation of the Bow Shock and Theta angle (B, n) cuasiperpendicular magnetospheric, using data from 14 different events crossings shock recorded by THEMIS-C.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amazo-Gomez, Eliana; Alvarado-Gomez, Julian David; Calvo Mozo, Benjamin

    In this Work we calculated the average position of the bow shock, through the eigenvalues ​​and corresponding eigenvectors of the covariance matrix for the magnetic field developed from 10 different crosses shock events recorded by THEMIS A, during the years 2009 and 2010. With data obtained from previous calibration and the propagation direction of the magnetic field of the plasma is able to find the interaction quasi perpendicular angle Theta (B,n) which depends on the direction normal shock and the direction of incidence of field magnetic plasma. The importance of this type of analysis is that the understanding of the phenomenology of the bow shock, which is vital for the characterization of processes such as magnetic reconnection between magnetospheric lines terrestrial and interplanetary field lines carrying a large contribution from the Sun apparently lines will also be important for the description of how to enter the plasma charged particles from impacting the bow shock to the internal field lines to these particles subsequently lead to the Earth's atmosphere, these initially enter through the polar region (Polar Cusp) and then disseminated depending on the conditions of the plasma into the Earth's atmosphere , and parameters such as the position of the bow shock, this variation and interaction angle Theta (B,n) are basic to reach a minimal representation of the phenomenon. In events of great magnitude can have undesirable effects on satellites, power lines, communications and air travel, the latter is the interest on discrimination of some parameters of the phenomenon presented in this work. The study of the Bow shock, bow shock and Magnetospheric has as its starting point a detailed description of Earth's magnetosphere and solar wind phenomena must be understood independently initially and then trying to relate in terms of their interaction and communion in their respective limits, parameters such as the balance between dynamic and magnetic pressure

  14. A New Oceanic Anoxic Event 2 record from the Central North Atlantic at South East Newfoundland Ridge, IODP Expedition 342, Newfoundland Drifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junium, C. K.; Bornemann, A.; Bown, P. R.; Friedrich, O.; Moriya, K.; Kirtland Turner, S.; Whiteside, J. H.

    2013-12-01

    The recovery of Cretaceous, Cenomanian-Turonian black shales deposited during Oceanic Anoxic Event 2 (OAE 2) at Site U1407, South East Newfoundland Ridge (SENR), was an unexpected but fortuitous discovery that fills a gap in the pelagic Tethyan and North Atlantic geologic records. Drilling operations recovered the OAE sequence in all three holes drilled at Site U1407 defined initially on the basis of lithology and calcareous nannofossil biostratigraphy and confirmed by carbon isotope stratigraphy post-expedition. The SENR OAE 2 sequence is a classic chalk sequence punctuated by a prominent black band. Prior to OAE 2, greenish white pelagic carbonate is interrupted by thin, 2 to 5 cm thick organic-rich, gray calcareous clays. A sharp transition from greenish-white chalk to carbonate-poor sediments marks the occurrence of the organic carbon-rich black band. Within the black band are finely laminated to massive, pyritic black shales and laminated gray clays that are relatively organic carbon-lean, free of preserved benthic foraminifera and rich in radiolarians. Finely laminated greenish-gray marls overlay the black band and grade into approximately 1 meter of greenish white chalks with common 1cm chert layers and nodules. The remainder of the Turonian sequence is characterized by a notable transition to pink chalks. The thickness of the black band ranges from 15-40 cm between Holes A through C. The differences in the thickness of beds between Holes is due in part to drilling disturbances and mass wasting indicated by slump features in the overlying Turonian strata. Core scanning XRF and carbon isotopes can help resolve the nature of these differences and inform future sampling and study. Carbonate and organic carbon isotopes reveal that the δ13C excursion marking the initiation of OAE 2 is below the base of the black band. At U1407A the δ13C rise is immediately below (3 cm) the black shale, with δ13C maxima in the black band. At U1407C the initial δ13C rise is

  15. FAST User Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walatka, Pamela P.; Clucas, Jean; McCabe, R. Kevin; Plessel, Todd; Potter, R.; Cooper, D. M. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The Flow Analysis Software Toolkit, FAST, is a software environment for visualizing data. FAST is a collection of separate programs (modules) that run simultaneously and allow the user to examine the results of numerical and experimental simulations. The user can load data files, perform calculations on the data, visualize the results of these calculations, construct scenes of 3D graphical objects, and plot, animate and record the scenes. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) visualization is the primary intended use of FAST, but FAST can also assist in the analysis of other types of data. FAST combines the capabilities of such programs as PLOT3D, RIP, SURF, and GAS into one environment with modules that share data. Sharing data between modules eliminates the drudgery of transferring data between programs. All the modules in the FAST environment have a consistent, highly interactive graphical user interface. Most commands are entered by pointing and'clicking. The modular construction of FAST makes it flexible and extensible. The environment can be custom configured and new modules can be developed and added as needed. The following modules have been developed for FAST: VIEWER, FILE IO, CALCULATOR, SURFER, TOPOLOGY, PLOTTER, TITLER, TRACER, ARCGRAPH, GQ, SURFERU, SHOTET, and ISOLEVU. A utility is also included to make the inclusion of user defined modules in the FAST environment easy. The VIEWER module is the central control for the FAST environment. From VIEWER, the user can-change object attributes, interactively position objects in three-dimensional space, define and save scenes, create animations, spawn new FAST modules, add additional view windows, and save and execute command scripts. The FAST User Guide uses text and FAST MAPS (graphical representations of the entire user interface) to guide the user through the use of FAST. Chapters include: Maps, Overview, Tips, Getting Started Tutorial, a separate chapter for each module, file formats, and system

  16. Ionospheric effects of the simultaneous occurrence of a solar proton event and relativistic electron precipitation as recorded by ground-based instruments at different latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirochkov, A. V.; Makarova, L. N.; Sokolov, S. N.; Sheldon, W. R.

    2004-08-01

    The intense event of highly relativistic electron (HRE) precipitation of May 1992 has been analyzed using data from ground-based observations (riometers and VLF phase measurements). Special attention was given to some features of this event observed at high and very high geomagnetic latitudes, since this aspect of the event was not well documented in previous studies. A remarkable feature of the HRE event of May 1992 was the simultaneous occurrence of a strong solar proton event (SPE), although reliable evidence shows that the simultaneous appearance of SPE and HRE events is not unique. It was demonstrated that a meridian chain of riometers with high latitudinal resolution is an effective and low-cost (as compared with satellite observations) tool to separate the effects of solar proton and relativistic electrons in the lower ionosphere. A significant conclusion is that the polar cap area is free from relativistic electron precipitation. Other interesting aspects of this complex geophysical phenomenon are also discussed.

  17. Deformation History of the Haymana Basin: Structural Records of Closure-Collision and Subsequent Convergence (Indentation) Events at the North-Central Neotethys (Central Anatolia, Turkey)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gülyüz, Erhan; Özkaptan, Murat; Kaymakcı, Nuretdin

    2016-04-01

    Gondwana- (Tauride Platfrom and Kırşehir Block) and Eurasia (Pontides) - derived continental blocks bound the Haymana basin, in the south and north, respectively. Boundaries between these blocks are signed by İzmir-Ankara-Erzincan and debatable Intra-Tauride Suture zones which are straddled by the Haymana Basin in the region. In this regard, deformation recorded in the upper Cretaceous to middle Eocene deposits of the basin is mainly controlled by the relative movements of these blocks. Therefore, understanding the structural evolution of the Haymana Basin in a spatio-temporal concept is crucial to shed some light on some debatable issues such as ; (1) timing of late stage subduction histories of various branches of Neotethys and subsequent collision events, (2) effects of post-collisional tectonic activity in the Haymana region. Fault kinematic analyses (based on 623 fault-slip data from 73 stations) indicate that the basin was subjected to initially N-S to NNE-SSW extension until middle Paleocene and then N-S- to NNE-SSW- directed continuous compression and coeval E-W to ESE-WNW extension up to middle Miocene. These different deformation phases correspond to the fore-arc (closure) and foreland (collision and further convergence) stages of the basin. Additionally, fold analyses (based on 1017 bedding attitudes) and structural mapping studies show that development of folds and major faults are coeval and they can be explained by principle stress orientations of the second deformation phase. The Haymana basin is, based on the trends of E-W- and WNW-ESE- directed structures at the south-eastern and the north-western parts of the basin, respectively, divided into two structural segments. The balanced cross-sections also indicate ~4% and ~25% shortening at the north-western and south-eastern segments, respectively. The differences in amounts of shortenings are explained by reduce in effectiveness zone of basin-bounding thrust faults towards west. On the other hand

  18. Radial fast-neutron fluence gradients during rotating 40Ar/39Ar sample irradiation recorded with metallic fluence monitors and geological age standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutte, Daniel; Pfänder, Jörg A.; Koleška, Michal; Jonckheere, Raymond; Unterricker, Sepp

    2015-01-01

    the neutron-irradiation parameter J is one of the major uncertainties in 40Ar/39Ar dating. The associated uncertainty of the individual J-value for a sample of unknown age depends on the accuracy of the age of the geological standards, the fast-neutron fluence distribution in the reactor, and the distances between standards and samples during irradiation. While it is generally assumed that rotating irradiation evens out radial neutron fluence gradients, we observed axial and radial variations of the J-values in sample irradiations in the rotating channels of two reactors. To quantify them, we included three-dimensionally distributed metallic fast (Ni) and thermal- (Co) neutron fluence monitors in three irradiations and geological age standards in three more. Two irradiations were carried out under Cd shielding in the FRG1 reactor in Geesthacht, Germany, and four without Cd shielding in the LVR-15 reactor in Řež, Czech Republic. The 58Ni(nf,p)58Co activation reaction and γ-spectrometry of the 811 keV peak associated with the subsequent decay of 58Co to 58Fe allow one to calculate the fast-neutron fluence. The fast-neutron fluences at known positions in the irradiation container correlate with the J-values determined by mass-spectrometric 40Ar/39Ar measurements of the geological age standards. Radial neutron fluence gradients are up to 1.8 %/cm in FRG1 and up to 2.2 %/cm in LVR-15; the corresponding axial gradients are up to 5.9 and 2.1 %/cm. We conclude that sample rotation might not always suffice to meet the needs of high-precision dating and gradient monitoring can be crucial.

  19. Identifying and directly dating Plio-Pleistocene geomagnetic reversals and events from speleothems at South African archaeological and fossil bearing palaeocaves: implications for extending archaeomagnetic records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herries, A. I.; Pickering, R.; Kappen, P.

    2013-05-01

    In the last 10 years palaeomagnetic research on speleothems from archaeological and fossil bearing palaeokarst in northern South Africa has led to the identification of apparent short geomagnetic field events that were initially thought to represent one or both of the Réunion events. More recently the development of uranium-lead dating techniques for speleothem in the 5 Ma to 500 ka time range has allowed us to directly date these events for the first time, as well as date more recently discovered events and reversals. This work now indicates that the same reversals events are often found in speleothems in different caves throughout the region. An event has been directly dated at two sites to between 2.047 and 2.0005 Ma and likely represents what has been termed the 'Huckleberry Ridge' event at other localities. Another event sometime between 2.33 and 2.15 Ma likely represents the Réunion event while another between 1.111 to 1.087 Ma is thought to represent the Punaruu event. X-ray Fluorescence Microscopy work at the Australian Synchrotron has been used to map the iron distribution in the speleothems and in tandem with the demagnetisation spectra has enabled the mineralogy and mode of acquisition of remanence to be determined and the potential effects of recrystalisation on the palaeomagnetic signal to be accessed. Further work on speleothem sequences in the caves has the potential to refine the ages of geomagnetic field reversals, events and excursions over almost any time range for which speleothems exist, if certain conditions are met. Given the rapid lock-in time of the remanence and low alteration rates and effects of speleothems they provide a powerful new medium for reconstructing Plio-Pleistocene geomagnetic field variation.

  20. A fast data acquisition system for the study of transient events by high repetition rate time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lincoln, K. A.; Bechtel, R. D.

    1986-01-01

    Recent advances in commercially available data acquisition electronics embodying high speed A/D conversion coupled to increased memory storage have now made practical (at least within time intervals of a third of a millisecond or more) the capturing of all of the data generated by a high repetition rate time-of-flight mass spectrometer producing complete spectra every 25 to 35 microseconds. Such a system was assembled and interfaced with a personal computer for control and management of data. The applications are described for recording time-resolved spectra of individual vapor plumes induced from the pulsed-laser heating of material. Each laser pulse triggers the system to generate automatically a 3-dimensional (3-D) presentation of the time-resolved spectra with m/z labeling of the major mass peaks, plus an intensity versus time display of both the laser pulse and the resulting vapor pulse. The software also permits storing of data and its presentation in various additional forms.

  1. Adapting machine learning techniques to censored time-to-event health record data: A general-purpose approach using inverse probability of censoring weighting.

    PubMed

    Vock, David M; Wolfson, Julian; Bandyopadhyay, Sunayan; Adomavicius, Gediminas; Johnson, Paul E; Vazquez-Benitez, Gabriela; O'Connor, Patrick J

    2016-06-01

    Models for predicting the probability of experiencing various health outcomes or adverse events over a certain time frame (e.g., having a heart attack in the next 5years) based on individual patient characteristics are important tools for managing patient care. Electronic health data (EHD) are appealing sources of training data because they provide access to large amounts of rich individual-level data from present-day patient populations. However, because EHD are derived by extracting information from administrative and clinical databases, some fraction of subjects will not be under observation for the entire time frame over which one wants to make predictions; this loss to follow-up is often due to disenrollment from the health system. For subjects without complete follow-up, whether or not they experienced the adverse event is unknown, and in statistical terms the event time is said to be right-censored. Most machine learning approaches to the problem have been relatively ad hoc; for example, common approaches for handling observations in which the event status is unknown include (1) discarding those observations, (2) treating them as non-events, (3) splitting those observations into two observations: one where the event occurs and one where the event does not. In this paper, we present a general-purpose approach to account for right-censored outcomes using inverse probability of censoring weighting (IPCW). We illustrate how IPCW can easily be incorporated into a number of existing machine learning algorithms used to mine big health care data including Bayesian networks, k-nearest neighbors, decision trees, and generalized additive models. We then show that our approach leads to better calibrated predictions than the three ad hoc approaches when applied to predicting the 5-year risk of experiencing a cardiovascular adverse event, using EHD from a large U.S. Midwestern healthcare system. PMID:26992568

  2. A 38,000-year record of floods and debris flows in the Ilo region of southern Peru and its relation to El Niño events and great earthquakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Keefer, David K.; Moseley, Michael E.; DeFrance, Susan D.

    2003-01-01

    Previous work throughout the Ilo region of south coastal Peru has documented the existence of flood and debris-flow deposits produced by two El Niño events evidently much more severe than any in recent history. These two events have been dated to ca. AD 1300–1400 and AD 1607–08. The Late Pleistocene to Holocene record of older sedimentary deposits in this region is dominated by flood and debris-flow deposits of similar scale. These older deposits have been described and dated from three coastal, alluvial-fan sites. These deposits, which are as old as 38 200 years, are dominated by massive debris-flow deposits, several tens of cm thick, typically composed of cobble- and boulder-sized clasts in a matrix of silty sand, with characteristics indicating generation by heavy rainfall in an arid environment. Twenty-two radiocarbon dates and a single infrared-stimulated luminescence date show that particularly severe El Niño events occurred throughout the Late Pleistocene and two of three divisions of the Holocene with significantly different frequencies. The period of greatest activity was during the Early Holocene when at least six such events took place during a period of ca. 3600 years, beginning near the end of the Younger Dryas ca. 12 000 years ago. One of these events produced a debris flow that may have caused abandonment of the Paleo-Indian site at Quebrada Tacahuay, one of the oldest on the Andean coast. No severe events took place during the Middle Holocene between ca. 8400 and 5300 years ago, when a wide variety of other paleoclimate proxy records indicate that the El Niño–Southern Oscillation regime was particularly weak. Since ca. 5300 years ago, four of these severe events have taken place. The Late Pleistocene sequence is constrained by only two dates, which indicate that at least ten severe events took place between ca. 38 200 and 12 900 years ago. Mechanisms probably responsible for generating these large-scale deposits include: (1)

  3. Diamond detector for high rate monitors of fast neutrons beams

    SciTech Connect

    Giacomelli, L.; Rebai, M.; Cippo, E. Perelli; Tardocchi, M.; Fazzi, A.; Andreani, C.; Pietropaolo, A.; Frost, C. D.; Rhodes, N.; Schooneveld, E.; Gorini, G.

    2012-06-19

    A fast neutron detection system suitable for high rate measurements is presented. The detector is based on a commercial high purity single crystal diamond (SDD) coupled to a fast digital data acquisition system. The detector was tested at the ISIS pulsed spallation neutron source. The SDD event signal was digitized at 1 GHz to reconstruct the deposited energy (pulse amplitude) and neutron arrival time; the event time of flight (ToF) was obtained relative to the recorded proton beam signal t{sub 0}. Fast acquisition is needed since the peak count rate is very high ({approx}800 kHz) due to the pulsed structure of the neutron beam. Measurements at ISIS indicate that three characteristics regions exist in the biparametric spectrum: i) background gamma events of low pulse amplitudes; ii) low pulse amplitude neutron events in the energy range E{sub dep}= 1.5-7 MeV ascribed to neutron elastic scattering on {sup 12}C; iii) large pulse amplitude neutron events with E{sub n} < 7 MeV ascribed to {sup 12}C(n,{alpha}){sup 9}Be and 12C(n,n')3{alpha}.

  4. Avian mortality events in the United States caused by anticholinesterase pesticides: a retrospective summary of National Wildlife Health Center records from 1980 to 2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fleischli, Margaret A.; Franson, J.C.; Thomas, N.J.; Finley, D.L.; Riley, W., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    We reviewed the U.S. Geological Survey National Wildlife Health Center (NWHC) mortality database from 1980 to 2000 to identify cases of poisoning caused by organophosphorus and carbamate pesticides. From the 35,022 cases from which one or more avian carcasses were submitted to the NWHC for necropsy, we identified 335 mortality events attributed to anticholinesterase poisoning, 119 of which have been included in earlier reports. Poisoning events were classified as confirmed (n = 205) when supported by findings of ≥50% inhibition of cholinesterase (ChE) activity in brain tissue and the detection of a specific pesticide in the gastrointestinal contents of one or more carcasses. Suspected poisonings (n = 130) were defined as cases where brain ChE activity was ≥50% inhibited or a specific pesticide was identified in gastrointestinal contents. The 335 avian mortality events occurred in 42 states. Washington, Virginia, and Ohio had the highest frequency of events, with 24 (7.2%), 21 (6.3%), and 20 (6.0%) events, respectively. A total of 8877 carcasses of 103 avian species in 12 orders was recovered. Because carcass counts underestimate total mortality, this represents the minimum actual mortality. Of 24 different pesticides identified, the most frequent were famphur (n = 59; 18%), carbofuran (n = 52; 15%), diazinon (n = 40; 12%), and fenthion (n = 17; 5.1%). Falconiformes were reported killed most frequently (49% of all die-offs) but Anseriformes were found dead in the greatest numbers (64% of 8877 found dead). The majority of birds reported killed by famphur were Passeriformes and Falconiformes, with the latter found dead in 90% of famphur-related poisoning events. Carbofuran and famphur were involved in mortality of the greatest variety of species (45 and 33, respectively). Most of the mortality events caused by diazinon involved waterfowl.

  5. Increased oscillatory theta activation evoked by violent digital game events.

    PubMed

    Salminen, Mikko; Ravaja, Niklas

    2008-04-11

    The authors examined electroencephalographic (EEG) oscillatory responses to two violent events, the player character wounding and killing an opponent character with a gun, in the digital game James Bond 007: NightFire. EEG was recorded from 25 (16 male) right-handed healthy young adults. EEG data were segmented into one 1-s baseline epoch before each event and two 1-s epochs after event onset. Power estimates (microV(2)) were derived with the fast Fourier transform (FFT) for each artefact free event. Both of the studied events evoked increased occipital theta (4-6Hz) responses as compared to the pre-event baseline. The wounding event evoked also increased occipital high theta (6-8Hz) response and the killing event evoked low alpha (8-10Hz) asymmetry over the central electrodes, both relative to the pre-event baseline. The results are discussed in light of facial electromyographic and electrodermal activity responses evoked by these same events, and it is suggested that the reported EEG responses may be attributable to affective processes related to these violent game events. PMID:18325669

  6. Fasting during the month of Ramadan among patients with chronic kidney disease: renal and cardiovascular outcomes

    PubMed Central

    NasrAllah, Mohamed M.; Osman, Noha A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Fasting during the month of Ramadan is a religious obligation for Muslims who represent 20% of the world population. This study explores the safety of fasting for a whole month among patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) with the possible risk of dehydration and hyperviscosity leading to deterioration of kidney functions and vascular thrombosis. Methods We followed CKD patients with stable kidney function who chose to fast during the month of Ramadan. A group of nonfasting CKD patients served as controls. Serum creatinine was recorded at the beginning of the month, after 1 week of fasting, at the end of the month and 3 months later. Patients were followed for major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE). Results A total of 131 CKD patients were recruited and included in two groups: fasting and nonfasting (mean baseline estimated glomerular filtration rate 27.7, SD 13 and 21.5, SD 11.8 mL/min/1.73 m2, respectively). A rise of serum creatinine was noted during fasting in 60.4% of patients by Day 7 and was associated with intake of renin angiotensin aldosterone system antagonists [relative risk (RR) 2, P = 0.002]. Adverse cardiovascular events were observed in six patients in the fasting cohort and were associated with a rise of serum creatinine after 1 week of fasting (P = 0.009) and the presence of pre-existing cardiovascular disease (RR 15, P = 0.001); the latter association was confirmed by logistic regression analysis. Only one event was recorded in the nonfasting group, P = 0.036. Conclusions MACE occurred more frequently among fasting CKD patients with pre-existing cardiovascular disease and were predicted by an early rise of serum creatinine. PMID:25349694

  7. Picosecond Chemical and Biological Events.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rentzepis, P. M.

    1978-01-01

    Describes a currently used picosecond spectroscopy system capable of reliably recording picosecond events. Two areas of picosecond research are discussed: one concerns the interaction of electrons in fluids; the second, the primary events in vision. (Author/HM)

  8. Mapping Cortical Responses to Somatosensory Stimuli in Human Infants with Simultaneous Near-Infrared Spectroscopy and Event-Related Potential Recording.

    PubMed

    Verriotis, Madeleine; Fabrizi, Lorenzo; Lee, Amy; Cooper, Robert J; Fitzgerald, Maria; Meek, Judith

    2016-01-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and electroencephalography (EEG) have recently provided fundamental new information about how the newborn brain processes innocuous and noxious somatosensory information. However, results derived independently from these two techniques are not entirely consistent, raising questions about the relationship between hemodynamic and electrophysiological responses in the study of touch and pain processing in the newborn. To address this, we have recorded NIRS and EEG responses simultaneously for the first time in the human infant following noxious (time-locked clinically required heel lances) and innocuous tactile cutaneous stimulation in 30 newborn infants. The results show that both techniques can be used to record quantifiable and distinct innocuous and noxious evoked activity at a group level in the newborn cortex. Noxious stimulation elicits a peak hemodynamic response that is 10-fold larger than that elicited by an innocuous stimulus (HbO2: 2.0 vs 0.3 µM) and a distinct nociceptive-specific N3P3 waveform in electrophysiological recordings. However, a novel single-trial analysis revealed that hemodynamic and electrophysiological responses do not always co-occur at an individual level, although when they do (64% of noxious test occasions), they are significantly correlated in magnitude. These data show that, while hemodynamic and electrophysiological touch and pain brain activity in newborn infants are comparable in group analyses, important individual differences remain. These data indicate that integrated and multimodal brain monitoring is required to understand central touch and pain processing in the newborn. PMID:27200413

  9. Mapping Cortical Responses to Somatosensory Stimuli in Human Infants with Simultaneous Near-Infrared Spectroscopy and Event-Related Potential Recording123

    PubMed Central

    Fabrizi, Lorenzo; Lee, Amy; Cooper, Robert J.; Fitzgerald, Maria; Meek, Judith

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and electroencephalography (EEG) have recently provided fundamental new information about how the newborn brain processes innocuous and noxious somatosensory information. However, results derived independently from these two techniques are not entirely consistent, raising questions about the relationship between hemodynamic and electrophysiological responses in the study of touch and pain processing in the newborn. To address this, we have recorded NIRS and EEG responses simultaneously for the first time in the human infant following noxious (time-locked clinically required heel lances) and innocuous tactile cutaneous stimulation in 30 newborn infants. The results show that both techniques can be used to record quantifiable and distinct innocuous and noxious evoked activity at a group level in the newborn cortex. Noxious stimulation elicits a peak hemodynamic response that is 10-fold larger than that elicited by an innocuous stimulus (HbO2: 2.0 vs 0.3 µm) and a distinct nociceptive-specific N3P3 waveform in electrophysiological recordings. However, a novel single-trial analysis revealed that hemodynamic and electrophysiological responses do not always co-occur at an individual level, although when they do (64% of noxious test occasions), they are significantly correlated in magnitude. These data show that, while hemodynamic and electrophysiological touch and pain brain activity in newborn infants are comparable in group analyses, important individual differences remain. These data indicate that integrated and multimodal brain monitoring is required to understand central touch and pain processing in the newborn. PMID:27200413

  10. Combined oxygen- and carbon-isotope records through the Early Jurassic: multiple global events and two modes of carbon-cycle/temperature coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hesselbo, S. P.; Korte, C.

    2010-12-01

    The Jurassic comprises some 55 million years of Earth history. However, within the Jurassic, only one major environmental change (hyperthermal) event is really well known - the Early Toarcian Oceanic Anoxic Event (OAE) at ~183 Ma - and until very recently the extent to which the accompanying environmental changes were global has been strongly debated. Nevertheless, partly as a result of the international effort to define Global Stratotype Sections and Points (GSSPs), much more is now being discovered about environmental changes taking place at and around the other Jurassic Age (Stage) boundaries, to the extent that meaningful comparisons between these events can begin to be made. Here we present new carbon and oxygen isotope data from mollusks (bivalves and belemnites) and brachiopods collected through the marine Early Jurassic succession of NE England, including the Sinemurian-Plienbachian boundary GSSP. All materials have been screened by chemical analysis and scanning electron microscopy to check for diagenetic alteration. Analysis of carbon isotopes from marine calcite is supplemented by analysis of carbon-isotope values from fossil wood collected through the same section. It is demonstrated that both long-term and short-term carbon-isotope shifts from the UK Early Jurassic represent global changes in carbon cycle balances. The Sinemurian-Pliensbachian boundary event is an event of global significance and shows several similarities to the Toarcian OAE (relative sea-level change, carbon-isotope signature), but also some significant contrasts (oxygen-isotope based paleotemperatures which provide no evidence for warming). Significant contrast in oxygen- and carbon-isotope co-variation also occurs on a long timescale. There appear to be two modes in the co-variation of carbon and oxygen isotopes through this time interval: mode 1 shows positive correlation and may be explained by conventional sources and sinks for carbon-dioxide; mode 2, representing negative

  11. A Southern Alps and Northern Pyrenees Holocene record of snowmelt-induced flood events and clastic layers associated with negative NAO phases in Western Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonneau, Anaëlle; Chapron, Emmanuel; Galop, Didier; Tachikawa, Kazuyo; Magny, Michel; Bard, Edouard

    2014-05-01

    The origin of both extreme flood events in Lake Ledro (southern Italian Alps) and coarse sandy layers in two disconnected lakes from the Bassies valley (Lakes Majeur and Sigriou, northern Pyrenees) have been related to the impact of snowmelt processes enhancing erosion of mountainous drainage basins (1, 2) throughout the Holocene. Because of increasing human impact on catchment erosion processes since the mid-Holocene in these western European mountain ranges, this study compares these well-dated lacustrine sequences in order to further document the influence of westerlies and of the North Atlantic Oscillation on clastic supply in contrasted lake basins. The integrative approaches performed on each site allow us to show that organic and minerogenic markers, such as non-pollen microsfossils, Rock-Eval pyrolysis or X-ray microfluorescence, are powerful tools to identify clastic sediment source areas. At Ledro, we therefore demonstrated that over the Late Holocene snowmelt-induced flood events essentially remobilized high altitude pasture areas whereas afterwards the flood events affected former forested areas from lower altitude1. In the Pyrenees, the southern slopes of lakes Majeur and Sigriou are characterized by two narrow canyons whose drainage basins are disconnected, relatively small and limited to the high altitude part of the valley of Bassiès. Our results demonstrated that the mid-late Holocene period was regularly interrupted by coarse sandy layers affecting both lakes Majeur and Sigriou and reflecting the high sensitivity of the two active canyons to intense rainfall or snowmelt periods². While extreme flood deposits in Lake Ledro during the Bronze Age period may result from the combination of both climate and human activities, contemporaneous extreme flood events in Ledro and coarse sandy layers in the Bassiès lakes, dated to AD 1710, AD1530, AD1360, AD940, AD570 and 1850, 1050, 1410, 1850, 2690, 4190, 4800 cal BP, testify of regional hydrological

  12. The Annual Cosmic-Radiation Intensities 1391 - 2014; The Annual Heliospheric Magnetic Field Strengths 1391 - 1983, and Identification of Solar Cosmic-Ray Events in the Cosmogenic Record 1800 - 1983

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCracken, K. G.; Beer, J.

    2015-10-01

    The annual cosmogenic ^{10}Be ice-core data from Dye 3 and the North Greenland Ice-core Project (NGRIP), and neutron-monitor data, 1951 - 2014, are combined to yield a record of the annual cosmic-ray intensity, 1391 - 2014. These data were then used to estimate the intensity of the heliospheric magnetic field (HMF), 1391 - 1983. All of these annual data are provided in the Electronic Supplementary Material. Analysis of these annual data shows that there were significant impulsive increases in ^{10}Be production in the year following the very large solar cosmic-ray events of 1942, 1949, and 1956. There was an additional enhancement that we attribute to six high-altitude nuclear explosions in 1962. All of these enhancements result in underestimates of the strength of the HMF. An identification process is defined, resulting in a total of seven impulsive ^{10}Be events in the interval 1800 - 1942 prior to the first detection of a solar cosmic-ray event using ionization chambers. Excision of the ^{10}Be impulsive enhancements yields a new estimate of the HMF, designated B(PCR-2). Five of the seven ^{10}Be enhancements prior to 1941 are well correlated with the occurrence of very great geomagnetic storms. It is shown that a solar cosmic-ray event similar to that of 25 July 1946, and occurring in the middle of the second or third year of the solar cycle, may merge with the initial decreasing phase of the 11-year cycle in cosmic-ray intensity and be unlikely to be detected in the ^{10}Be data. It is concluded that the occurrence rate for solar energetic-particle (SEP) events such as that on 23 February 1956 is about seven per century, and that there is an upper limit to the size of solar cosmic-ray events.

  13. Hydride VPE: the unexpected process for the fast growth of GaAs and GaN nanowires with record aspect ratio and polytypism-free crystalline structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    André, Yamina; Trassoudaine, Agnès.; Avit, Geoffrey; Lekhal, Kaddour; Ramdani, Mohammed R.; Leroux, Christine; Monier, Guillaume; Varenne, Christelle; Hoggan, Philip; Castelluci, Dominique; Bougerol, Catherine; Réveret, François; Leymarie, Joël.; Petit, Elodie; Dubrovskii, Vladimir G.; Gil, Evelyne

    2013-12-01

    Hydride Vapor Phase Epitaxy (HVPE) makes use of chloride III-Cl and hydride V-H3 gaseous growth precursors. It is known as a near-equilibrium process, providing the widest range of growth rates from 1 to more than 100 μm/h. When it comes to metal catalyst-assisted VLS (vapor-liquid-solid) growth, the physics of HVPE growth is maintained: high dechlorination frequency, high axial growth rate of nanowires (NWs) up to 170 μm/h. The remarkable features of NWs grown by HVPE are the untapered morphology with constant diameter and the stacking fault-free crystalline phase. Record pure zinc blende cubic phase for 20 μm long GaAs NWs with radii of 10 and 5 nm is shown. The absence of wurtzite phase in GaAs NWs grown by HVPE whatever the diameter is discussed with respect to surface energetic grounds and kinetics. Ni assisted, Ni-Au assisted and catalyst-free HVPE growth of wurtzite GaN NWs is also addressed. Micro-photoluminescence spectroscopy analysis revealed GaN nanowires of great optical quality, with a FWHM of 1 meV at 10 K for the neutral donor bound exciton transition.

  14. Paleomagnetic records of core samples of the plate-boundary thrust drilled during the IODP Japan Trench Fast Drilling Project (JFAST)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishima, T.; Yang, T.; Ujiie, K.; Kirkpatrick, J. D.; Chester, F. M.; Moore, J. C.; Rowe, C. D.; Regalla, C.; Remitti, F.; Kameda, J.; Wolfson-Schwehr, M.; Bose, S.; Ishikawa, T.; Toy, V. G.

    2013-12-01

    IODP Expedition 343, Japan Trench Fast Drilling Project (JFAST), drilled across the plate-boundary décollement zone near the Japan Trench where large slip occurred during the March 2011 Tohoku-oki earthquake. We conducted paleomagnetic measurements of the core sample retrieved from the highly-deformed sediments comprising the plate-boundary décollement zone. Whole-round samples for structural analyses from five depth intervals of the core (0-12 cm, 12-30 cm, 43-48 cm, 48-58 cm, and 87.5-105 cm), were trimmed into oriented slabs with typical dimensions of 3x3x5 cm that are now being used to make petrographic sections for microstructural and chemical study. The remainder of the core sample was split into working and archive halves. We measured remanent magnetization of 16 trimmed slabs and the archive half of the core sample. The slabs were subjected to natural remanent magnetization (NRM) measurements in 0.5-1 cm intervals and progressive alternating field demagnetization (AFD) up to 80 mT with a 2G755 pass-through superconducting rock magnetometer at Kochi University. The archive half of the core sample was subjected to NRM measurement and AFD up to 20 mT with a 2G760 superconducting rock magnetometer installed on R/V Chikyu. Typically, two or three paleomagnetic components were isolated during the AFD of slab samples up to 80 mT. One ';soft' component was demagnetized below 20-30 mT, and another ';hard' component was not demagnetized even with AFD in 80 mT. A third component may be separated during AFD at the intermediate demagnetizing field, and may overlap the soft and hard components. The multiple slab samples cut from an identical whole-round sample have generally consistent paleomagnetic direction of the hard component. Contrastingly, the direction of the soft component is less consistent between adjacent slabs, and even varies within a single slab. The direction variation of the soft component possibly reflects the cm-scale strain and rotation of the

  15. The potential ocean acidification event at the Triassic-Jurassic boundary: Constraining carbonate chemistry using the presence of corals and coral reefs in the fossil record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martindale, R. C.; Berelson, W.; Corsetti, F. A.; Bottjer, D. J.; West, A.

    2011-12-01

    Ocean acidification associated with emplacement of the Central Atlantic Magmatic Province (CAMP) has been hypothesized as a kill mechanism for the Triassic-Jurassic (T-J) mass extinction (~200Ma), but few direct proxies for ancient ocean acidity are available. Here, we suggest that the presence of fossil corals and coral reefs can constrain palaeocean acidity. Modern scleractinian corals lose the ability to biomineralize a robust skeleton below aragonite saturation states (ΩArag) of 2 and modern shallow water coral reefs are only found in ΩArag > 3; we use these minima to constrain ancient ocean carbonate chemistry when corals or coral reefs are preserved in the fossil record. Atmospheric pCO2 reconstructions are combined with the coral ΩArag limitations to calculate the total dissolved inorganic carbon (TCO2) in the Late Triassic Ocean, which is a measure of the buffering capacity or ocean sensitivity to acidification. Our results suggest that Late Triassic TCO2 values were low to moderate (2000-3000 μmol/kg) such that the pCO2 increases across the T-J boundary would have depressed saturation state to the point where coral biomineralization would have been challenging (ΩArag < 2), likely resulting in the observed coral and reef gap in the fossil record. While the average pCO2 elevations recorded in stomatal and pedogenic proxies are not sufficient to cause complete carbonate undersaturation, modeled scenarios for CAMP-related T-J pCO2 increases suggest that aragonite undersaturation is plausible and in extreme cases calcite undersaturation is possible. Thus, a short but extreme acidification in an ocean with a low TCO2 concentration could occur and would satisfactorily explain the significant extinction of calcareous organisms, the coral gap, and possibly the T-J carbonate crisis.

  16. Tephra constraints on Rapid Climate Events (TRACE): precise correlation of marine and ice-core records during the last glacial period in the North Atlantic region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, S. M.; Griggs, A. J.; Abbott, P. M.; Bourne, A. J.; Purcell, C. S.; Hall, I. R.; Scourse, J. D.

    2014-12-01

    Little has challenged our understanding of climate change more so than the abruptness with which large-scale shifts in temperature occurred during the last glacial period. Atmospheric temperature jumps occurring within decades over Greenland were closely matched by rapid changes in North Atlantic sea surface temperatures and major re-organisation of the deep ocean circulation. Although these climatic instabilities are well-documented in various proxy records, the causal mechanisms of such short-lived oscillations remain poorly understood, largely due to the dating uncertainties that prevent the integration of different archives. Synchronisation of palaeoclimate records on a common timescale is inherently problematic, and unravelling the lead/lag responses (hence cause and effect) between the Earth's climate components is currently beyond our reach. TRACE - a 5 year project funded by the European Research Council - exploits the use of microscopic traces of tephra deposits to precisely correlate the Greenland ice-cores with North Atlantic marine records. Here we draw upon examples of how these time-lines can be used to constrain the lead/lag responses between the atmospheric and oceanic systems during the last glacial period. High-resolution proxy data from North Atlantic marine cores MD04-2829CQ from the Rosemary Bank and MD04 2820CQ from the Goban Spur are integrated with the Greenland ice-cores according to the position of common tephra isochrons. These direct tie-lines allow us to focus in detail on the relative timing of rapid warming transitions between Greenland and the North Atlantic ocean during the last glacial period.

  17. Climatic stress events in the source region of modern man - Matching the last 20 ka of the Chew Bahir climate record with occupation history of adjacent refugia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foerster, Verena; Vogelsang, Ralf; Junginger, Annett; Asrat, Asfawossen; Lamb, Henry F.; Viehberg, Finn; Trauth, Martin H.; Schaebitz, Frank

    2014-05-01

    A rapidly changing environment is considered an important driver not just for human evolution but also for cultural and technological innovation and migration. To evaluate the impact that climatic shifts on different timescales might have had on the living conditions of prehistoric humans is one of the cornerstones in current research, but continuous paleo-climate records in the vicinity of archaeological sites are still rare. As a contribution towards a better understanding of this human-climate interaction we here present a match between the last 20 ka of the just recently developed paleo-climate record from Chew Bahir in southern Ethiopia and the settlement history of adjacent possible refugia. The Chew Bahir basin, as a newly explored reliable climatic archive, lies in a biogeographically highly sensitive transition zone between the Main Ethiopian Rift and the Omo-Turkana basin and hence represents an ideal site to study climatic variability in the source region of modern man. The climatic history with a temporal resolution of up to 3 years is showing besides orbitally driven long-term transitions in and out of favourable living conditions several short abrupt excursions towards drier or wetter episodes. Comparing the frequency of archaeological findings as a parameter for human occupation to this close-by climate record that allows us to outline how complex the interplay between humans and environment during the last 20 ka really was, which dynamics might have been involved and which role the temporal dimension of environmental changes could have played for the adaption of humans.

  18. Orbital control on carbon cycle alterations and hyperthermal events in a cooling world: the late Early to Mid Eocene record at Possagno (southern Alps, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galeotti, Simone; Sprovieri, Mario; Moretti, Matteo; Rio, Domenico; Fornaciari, Eliana; Giusberti, Luca; Agnini, Claudia; Backman, Jan; Lanci, Luca; Luciani, Valeria

    2013-04-01

    The late Early Eocene to Middle Eocene ~50-45 Million years ago (Ma) time interval in the middle bathyal, pelagic/hemipelagic succession of the Western Tethys Possagno section (southern Alps, Veneto), contains several episodes of negative carbon isotope excursions (CIEs) and concomitant dissolution of carbonates. These episodes are superimposed on a long term global climate cooling that started at about 51 Ma following the Early Eocene Climatic Optimum (EECO). Spectral analysis indicates that CIEs and dissolution events are paced by orbital forcing, confirming the global significance of previous finding on the same interval from Western and Southern Atlantic and Equatorial Pacific sites. The frequency and magnitude of CIEs through time is controlled by long-term modulations of orbital parameters, including long eccentricity (400 kyr) and a 1.2 million year modulation. Highest frequency of events - at the orbital scale - is observed across the EECO, which provides an observational basis to validate theoretical models predicting a threshold effect resulting from orbital forcing superimposed on gradually changing mean global boundary conditions. The observation of the 1.2 million year beat (long-term modulation of obliquity) together with previously published observation of enhanced obliquity (41 kyr) forcing across major CIEs and dissolution intervals indicates that high latitude feedbacks to orbital forcing played a fundamental role in the emplacement of the hyperthermals. The observed orbital forcing signature closely match that of early Eocene hyperthermals, suggesting similar driving processes.

  19. An extended Cretaceous-Tertiary (K/T) stable isotope record. Implications for paleoclimate and the nature of the K/T boundary event

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dhondt, Steven

    1988-01-01

    In order to obtain a detailed single site record of marine productivity and temperature across the Cretaceous-Tertiary (K/T) boundary, both delta C-13 and delta O-18 values were measured in paired surface and deep water microfossil and nannofossil samples of mid-latitude South Atlantic Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP) Site 528. Additionally, the percent sedimentary carbonate content of the rock samples from which the analyzed fossil samples were taken, were determined. The analyzed interval spanned the last approximately 1 million years of the Cretaceous (the Abathomphalus mayaroensis foraminiferal zone) and the first approximately 9 million years of the Tertiary (the Paleocene). Paired samples were analyzed every 150 cm of the entire 165 m sampled interval (1 sample per recovered DSDP section), every 20 cm for 2.0 m below and 2.5 m above the K/T boundary, and every 0.25 cm immediately below, at, and above the K/T boundary clay. The Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary and earliest Paleocene record of DSDP Site 528 is marked by at least two strong decreases in the surface-to-deep delta C-13 gradient (one at the K/T boundary (66.4 mybp1) and one approximately 150,000 to 200,000 years later). Both of these decreases co-occur with radical decreases in percent carbonate content and appear to indicate not one, but two, strong decreases in marine primary productivity during the analyzed interval.

  20. Event Index — an LHCb Event Search System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ustyuzhanin, A.; Artemov, A.; Kazeev, N.; Redkin, A.

    2015-12-01

    During LHC Run 1, the LHCb experiment recorded around 1011 collision events. This paper describes Event Index — an event search system. Its primary function is to quickly select subsets of events from a combination of conditions, such as the estimated decay channel or number of hits in a subdetector. Event Index is essentially Apache Lucene [1] optimized for read-only indexes distributed over independent shards on independent nodes.

  1. Latest Paleocene benthic extinction event on the southern Tethyan shelf (Egypt): Foraminiferal stable isotopic (δ13C, δ18O) records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, B.; Speijer, R. P.; Aubry, M.-P.

    1996-04-01

    The dramatic global extinction of 35% 50% of benthic foraminifera species in the deep sea in the latest Paleocene and associated negative excursions in δ13C and δ18O may be related to spreading of warm, saline bottom water from subtropical Tethyan shallow regions over the sea floor worldwide. Our study of neritic sections in Egypt shows that in the southern shallow Tethys, a prominent long-term change in bottom-water chemistry, sedimentation, and benthic foraminifera fauna was initiated at the time when the deep-sea benthic extinction event (BEE) took place. Bottom-water δ13C values on the Tethyan shelf show a sudden 3.0‰ negative shift at this event; however, contrary to the deep sea, in which the δ13C excursion was of short duration, Tethyan δ13C values did not fully return to preboundary values, but remained depressed by ˜1.5‰ for at least 1 m.y. The δ13C values at the Egyptian shelf during the BEE are much lower than would be expected if this was a source region for global deep water. The δ18O values indicate no significant change in bottom-water salinity or temperature at the BEE. The long-lasting environmental changes that began on the Egyptian shelf at the BEE may be related to, for example, gateway reorganization along the Tethyan seaway. Paleogeographic changes possibly also triggered a change in the loci of global deep-water formation; however, these loci must be sought in another part of the Tethys.

  2. New Proxy for Recent Hurricane Events Using Stalagmite Stable Isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frappier, A.; Sahagian, D.

    2002-12-01

    Using recently developed micro-sampling techniques for stable isotope analyses, we obtained monthly to weekly temporal resolution in a fast growing stalagmite from Belize that recorded the last 3 decades of carbonate deposition. The stable oxygen isotope record (O-18 values) varies at interannual to sub-seasonal scales. The largest variations in O-18 values are interannual (corresponding to El Nino events) and annual (corresponding to the strong wet-dry seasonality of the region). Smaller amplitude O-18 variations related to short-term weather fluctuations are also apparent. Brief, low excursions in O-18 values can be identified with hurricane events that impacted Belize in recent decades. This dataset demonstrates that at least some stalagmites can record measurable, low stable oxygen isotope excursions from individual hurricane rainfall events. The proxy is sensitive to storm intensity and distance of storm track to the cave site. This paleotempestology proxy allows estimates of individual storm rainfall amounts and recurrence interval. Pre-historic hurricane events should be detectable using this technique; however, cave sites and individual stalagmites must be selected carefully to recover samples with measurable hurricane records.

  3. Lacustrine anoxic event 1 (LAE1) recorded by rock magnetism of Unit 1 of Qingshankou Formation, Late Cretaceous Songliao Basin in Northeast China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, H.; Zhang, S.; Zhao, K.; Wu, H.; Yang, T.

    2011-12-01

    Songliao Basin, located in northeastern China, is one of the biggest cretaceous lakes in Asia, with most completely developed cretaceous stratigraphy. Therefore, it is a key area to study cretaceous palaeontology evolution and paleoenvironmental changes. Especially, anoxic events and marine transgressional events have been the research focuses for a long time. The lacustrine anoxic event 1 (LAE1) has been reported to happen in Songliao Basin during the deposition of unit 1 of Qingshankou Formation (K2qn1). In this study, K2qn1 was sampled from China Cretaceous Continental Scientific Drilling-Songke Ι (CCSD-SK-Ι) south borehole. The K2qn1, from 1700 m to 1782.8 m in the well log, mainly consists black shale and mudstone. LAE1 is the section from 1750 m to 1775 m. Detailed rock magnetic measurements were conducted, including magnetic susceptibility (χ) and susceptibility of anhysteretic remanence (χARM), saturation isothermal remanence (SIRM), S-ratio (IRM-100mT/SIRM), medial destroyed field of ARM (MDFARM), and temperature-dependence of magnetic susceptibilities (χ/T curves), acquiring curves and reverse demagnetic curves of IRM and thermal demagnetization of ARM and SIRM and Lowrie experiment for selected samples. X-ray diffraction (XRD) was also carried out for selected samples. The acquiring curves and reverse demagnetic curves of typical specimens and the thermal demagnetization of ARM and SIRM and the Lowrie experiment confirm that the major remanence-carrier is soft magnetite. Results of χ/T curves indicate that: for some specimens, pyrite exists (Li and Zhang, 2005); for most specimens, their χ decreases slowly during heating, suggesting a dominant contribution from paramagnetic minerals. Results of XRD suggest that these paramagnetic minerals may be feldspar, kaolinite and pyrite. So paramagnetic clay minerals control χ of K2qn1; and more clay minerals may induce higher natural gamma ray (GR). Therefore, χ and GR should be positive. On the contrary

  4. Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide and its Relation to Carbon Cycle Perturbations During Ocean Anoxic Event 1d: A High Resolution Record From Dispersed Plant Cuticle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richey, J. D.; Upchurch, G. R.; Joeckel, R.; Smith, J. J.; Ludvigson, G. A.; Lomax, B. H.

    2013-12-01

    Past geological greenhouse intervals are associated with Ocean Anoxic Events (OAEs), which result from an increase in marine primary productivity and/or an increase in the preservation of organic matter. The end point is widespread black shale deposition combined with a long-term atmospheric positive δ13C excursion and an increase in the burial of 12C. Some OAEs show a negative δ13C excursion preceding the positive excursion, indicating a perturbation in the global carbon cycle prior to the initiation of these events. The Rose Creek (RCP) locality, southeastern Nebraska, is the only known terrestrial section that preserves OAE1d (Cretaceous, Albian-Cenomanian Boundary) and has abundant charcoal and plant cuticle. These features allow for a combined carbon isotope and stomatal index (SI) analysis to determine both changes in the cycling between carbon pools (C isotope analysis) and changes in paleo-CO2 via changes in SI. Preliminary (and ongoing) SI data analysis using dispersed cuticle of Pandemophyllum kvacekii (an extinct Laurel) collected at 30 cm intervals indicate changes in SI consistent with changes in CO2. Fitting our samples to a published RCP δ13C profile, pre-excursion CO2 concentrations are high. CO2 decreases to lower concentrations in the basal 1.2 m of the RCP section, where δ13Cbulk shows a negative excursion and δ13Ccharcoal remains at pre-excursion values. CO2 concentrations become higher toward the top of the negative δ13C excursion, where δ13Cbulk and δ13Ccharcoal are at their most negative values, and drop as the negative carbon excursion terminates. Using published transfer functions, we estimate that pre-excursion CO2 concentrations were a maximum of 900 ppm. In the basal 1.2 m of RCP, CO2 drops to a maximum of 480 ppm, and rises to a maximum of 710 ppm near the top of the negative excursion. As δ13C values rise towards pre-excursion values, CO2 declines to a maximum of 400 ppm. The trend in SI is comparable to the trend in δ13

  5. Spontaneous Decoding of the Timing and Content of Human Object Perception from Cortical Surface Recordings Reveals Complementary Information in the Event-Related Potential and Broadband Spectral Change

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Kai J.; Schalk, Gerwin; Hermes, Dora; Ojemann, Jeffrey G.; Rao, Rajesh P. N.

    2016-01-01

    The link between object perception and neural activity in visual cortical areas is a problem of fundamental importance in neuroscience. Here we show that electrical potentials from the ventral temporal cortical surface in humans contain sufficient information for spontaneous and near-instantaneous identification of a subject’s perceptual state. Electrocorticographic (ECoG) arrays were placed on the subtemporal cortical surface of seven epilepsy patients. Grayscale images of faces and houses were displayed rapidly in random sequence. We developed a template projection approach to decode the continuous ECoG data stream spontaneously, predicting the occurrence, timing and type of visual stimulus. In this setting, we evaluated the independent and joint use of two well-studied features of brain signals, broadband changes in the frequency power spectrum of the potential and deflections in the raw potential trace (event-related potential; ERP). Our ability to predict both the timing of stimulus onset and the type of image was best when we used a combination of both the broadband response and ERP, suggesting that they capture different and complementary aspects of the subject’s perceptual state. Specifically, we were able to predict the timing and type of 96% of all stimuli, with less than 5% false positive rate and a ~20ms error in timing. PMID:26820899

  6. Spontaneous Decoding of the Timing and Content of Human Object Perception from Cortical Surface Recordings Reveals Complementary Information in the Event-Related Potential and Broadband Spectral Change.

    PubMed

    Miller, Kai J; Schalk, Gerwin; Hermes, Dora; Ojemann, Jeffrey G; Rao, Rajesh P N

    2016-01-01

    The link between object perception and neural activity in visual cortical areas is a problem of fundamental importance in neuroscience. Here we show that electrical potentials from the ventral temporal cortical surface in humans contain sufficient information for spontaneous and near-instantaneous identification of a subject's perceptual state. Electrocorticographic (ECoG) arrays were placed on the subtemporal cortical surface of seven epilepsy patients. Grayscale images of faces and houses were displayed rapidly in random sequence. We developed a template projection approach to decode the continuous ECoG data stream spontaneously, predicting the occurrence, timing and type of visual stimulus. In this setting, we evaluated the independent and joint use of two well-studied features of brain signals, broadband changes in the frequency power spectrum of the potential and deflections in the raw potential trace (event-related potential; ERP). Our ability to predict both the timing of stimulus onset and the type of image was best when we used a combination of both the broadband response and ERP, suggesting that they capture different and complementary aspects of the subject's perceptual state. Specifically, we were able to predict the timing and type of 96% of all stimuli, with less than 5% false positive rate and a ~20ms error in timing. PMID:26820899

  7. Ice core δD(CH4) record precludes marine hydrate CH4 emissions at the onset of Dansgaard-Oeschger events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bock, M.; Schmitt, J.; Möller, L.; Spahni, R.; Blunier, T.; Fischer, H.

    2010-12-01

    Air enclosures in polar ice cores represent the only direct paleoatmospheric archive (besides firn air) and show that atmospheric CH4 concentrations changed in concert with northern hemisphere temperature during both glacial/interglacial transitions as well as rapid climate changes (Dansgaard-Oeschger events). For stadials and interstadials during Marine Isotope Stage 3 concentration jumps of 100 - 200 ppbv within a few decades are observed. A concentration gradient with higher values in the northern versus the southern hemisphere during warm stages was reconstructed from ice core methane data from Greenland and Antarctica. This gradient indicates additional methane emissions during warm periods located in the northern hemisphere. However, the underlying processes for these changes are still not well understood. With tropical and boreal wetlands, biomass burning, thermokarst lakes, ruminants, termites, UV-induced emissions from organic matter and marine gas hydrates all contributing to the natural atmospheric CH4 level, an unambiguous source attribution remains difficult. Also changes in the methane sinks can modify the tropospheric CH4 budget, as trace gases like volatile organic compounds are competing for the major reactant - the OH radical. Additionally, the changing global atmospheric methane concentration itself feeds back on its lifetime. Together with the CH4 interhemispheric gradient, stable hydrogen and carbon isotopic studies on methane (δD(CH4) and δ13CH4) in ice cores allow to constrain individual CH4 source/sink changes. Here we present clear evidence from the North Greenland Ice Core Project ice core based on the hydrogen isotopic composition of methane δD(CH4) that clathrates did not cause atmospheric methane concentration to rise at the onset of Dansgaard-Oeschger (DO) events 7 and 8 (34 - 41 kilo years before present), however, we can not exclude that they played a minor role during and at the end of an interstadial. Box modeling supports

  8. Deteriorating haze situation and the severe haze episode during December 18-25 of 2013 in Xi'an, China, the worst event on record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaodong; Hui, Ying; Yin, Zhi-Yong; Wang, Zhaosheng; Xie, Xiaoning; Fang, Jiangang

    2016-07-01

    Frequent occurrence of haze weather has been considered an urgent environmental problem in China and has attracted much attention worldwide in recent years. In this study, we examined the trend in the occurrence of haze days based on horizontal visibility in Xi'an, a major city in central China, since 2000. There were 49 haze days per year on average in Xi'an during 2000-2013, and the number of haze days has increased significantly since 2008, reaching 102 days in 2013. December is the month of the highest frequency of occurrence. During December 18-25 of 2013, the longest-lasting and most severe haze event in the recent decades occurred. The 8-day mean visibility in Xi'an was only 2.5 km with 5 days below 2 km. The mean air quality index in Xi'an during this period was 486.5, and in four of those days, it reached or exceeded the index's upper limit of 500. The exceptionally high level of PM2.5 concentration was inferred as the main reason of this severe haze episode. The local weather conditions were characterized by weak winds, enhanced atmospheric stability, and high relative humidity. Strong mid-tropospheric zonal flows in combination with weakened East Asian winter monsoon limited the cold air invasion from the higher latitudes, creating a condition of low pressure gradients in the lower troposphere and near the surface for a large region in central and eastern China. With high background emission levels, the suppressed dispersion of air pollutants eventually caused this severe haze episode affecting a large region in China.

  9. Isorenieratane record in black shales from the Paris Basin, France: Constraints on recycling of respired CO2 as a mechanism for negative carbon isotope shifts during the Toarcian oceanic anoxic event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Breugel, Yvonne; Baas, Marianne; Schouten, Stefan; Mattioli, Emanuela; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.

    2006-12-01

    The prominent negative stable carbon isotope excursion in both carbonate and organic carbon recorded in organic-rich sediments deposited during the Toarcian oceanic anoxic event (OAE) has commonly been explained by recycling of 13C-depleted CO2 (the so-called Küspert model). More recently, the massive release of 13C-depleted methane or other forms of 13C-depleted carbon was also proposed to account for the observed negative δ13C excursions in organic carbon of terrigenous as well as of marine origin. The occurrence of diagenetic products of the carotenoid isorenieratene (isorenieratane and other aryl isoprenoids) in Toarcian black shales has been regarded as supporting evidence for the Küspert hypothesis as they point to strong stratification of the epicontinental seas. A section of a drill core straddling the Toarcian of the Paris Basin (Cirfontaine-en-Ornois) contained intact isorenieratane, providing evidence that photosynthetic green sulphur bacteria were present at the time of deposition, even prior to the OAE. However, the isorenieratane abundances are very low in the section where the negative δ13C excursion in organic carbon and phytane, a chemical fossil derived from chlorophyll, occurs. The abundance of the isorenieratene derivatives increases, once the δ13C records have shifted to more positive values. The δ13C of isorenieratane (generally circa -13.1 ± 0.5 ‰) indicates that the respired CO2 contribution at the chemocline was low and is thus not likely to be the main cause of the prominent up to 7‰ negative δ13C shift recorded in Toarcian organic carbon records.

  10. Effects of rupture directivity on ground motions and macroseismic intensities. Study of a Mw 4.1 earthquake recorded in the Alps and a Mw 6 event simulated using Empirical Green's Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courboulex, F.; Dujardin, A.; Vallée, M.; Delouis, B.; Sira, C.; Honoré, L.; Thouvenot, F.; Deschamps, A.

    2013-12-01

    We first conduct a detailed analysis of a moderate earthquake in the French Alps (2012/02/26, Mw 4.1), that has been much more distinctly felt South of the event than North of it. This discrepancy was especially clear in the two large cities of Nice and Grenoble, both situated at 100 km from the epicenter. This observation was confirmed by ground motion measurements that were eight times larger in one city than in the other one, for the same site conditions. Using a time domain deconvolution between the broadband recordings of the mainshock and an aftershock used as empirical Green's Functions, we show that the rupture process of this event had a strong directivity effect towards a direction of N 155° +/- 5 on a ~ 2-km-long fault, detectable only at frequencies higher than 1 Hz. These fault size and direction are in good accordance with the location of the early aftershocks (4 days). The potential directivity effect of 232 aftershocks of the sequence has been also analyzed using their PGA values on broad band stations. We obtained that no preferential directivity effect can be evidenced on aftershocks. In a second step, we take advantage of the good recordings of this Mw=4.1 earthquake and its aftershocks to simulate the ground motions (and compute the macroseismic intensities using GMICES conversion relations) that would be generated by a larger event (Mw 6) occurring on the same fault. We consider separately the cases where the directivity effect is present or absent. The ground motions values (mainly PGA and PGV) and the macroseismic intensities are compared with the values predicted using Ground Motions Equations (GMPEs). The values obtained for the directive scenario on directive stations are almost always larger than the median values +1 sigma predicted by the GMPEs; this highlights the fact that a simple directivity effect of the rupture process can produce much larger damages than expected. Effects of rupture directivity on ground motions and macroseismic

  11. Assessing the Record of Anoxic/Dysoxic Events in Lower Aptian Cupido/La Peña Formations, Northeastern Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurrasse, F. J.; Barragan-Manzo, R.; Ponton, C.

    2008-05-01

    -thick each that are remarkably devoid of benthic foraminifers. They occur at 5. 72 m, 11.45m and 29.6 m, respectively, below the La Peña Fm. Variations within the Cupido Fm are consistent with fluctuating high- productivity, well-oxygenated neritic environment punctuated by development of hypoxic to anoxic bottom waters (Maurrasse et al., 2006). These recurrent episodes of severe oxygen depletion fall within the time interval that may be correlational with the infrajacent D. deshayesi to possibly the D. wessi zones in the Mediterranean ammonite biozonation scheme. We interpret these horizons to represent recurrent hypoxic to anoxic bottom conditions that are local expression of global forcing factors during Cretaceous greenhouse conditions that lead to well-defined OAE-1a and the subsequent anoxic events. Barragan-Manzo, R., and Maurrasse, F., (2008) Revista Mexicana de Ciencias Geologicas, v. 25, 1, p. 145-157. Barragan-Manzo, R., and Mendez-Franco, 2005, Towards a standard ammonite zonation for the Aptian (Lower Cretaceous) of northern Mexico. Revista Mexicana de Ciencias Geologicas, v. 22, 1, p. 39-47. Maurrasse, F. J-M. R., Barragan-Manzo, R., and Ponton, C. 2006, Cupido- La Peña Formations: High-Productivity to Super-Productivity during the Cretaceous Enhanced Greenhouse Conditions, GSA Abst.with programs v. 38, no 7, p. 491.

  12. Oxygen isotope perspective on crustal evolution on early Earth: A record of Precambrian shales with emphasis on Paleoproterozoic glaciations and Great Oxygenation Event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bindeman, I. N.; Bekker, A.; Zakharov, D. O.

    2016-03-01

    We present stable isotope and chemical data for 206 Precambrian bulk shale and tillite samples that were collected mostly from drillholes on all continents and span the age range from 0.5 to 3.5 Ga with a dense coverage for 2.5-2.2 Ga time interval when Earth experienced four Snowball Earth glaciations and the irreversible rise in atmospheric O2. We observe significant, downward shift of several ‰ and a smaller range of δ18 O values (7 to 9‰) in shales that are associated with the Paleoproterozoic and, potentially, Neoproterozoic glaciations. The Paleoproterozoic samples consist of more than 50% mica minerals and have equal or higher chemical index of alteration than overlying and underlying formations and thus underwent equal or greater degrees of chemical weathering. Their pervasively low δ18 O and δD (down to - 85 ‰) values provide strong evidence of alteration and diagenesis in contact with ultra-low δ18 O glacial meltwaters in lacustrine, deltaic or periglacial lake (sikussak-type) environments associated with the Paleoproterozoic glaciations. The δDsilicate values for the rest of Precambrian shales range from -75 to - 50 ‰ and are comparable to those for Phanerozoic and Archean shales. Likewise, these samples have similar ranges in δ13Corg values (-23 to - 33 ‰ PDB) and Corg content (0.0 to 10 wt%) to Phanerozoic shales. Precambrian shales have a large range of δ18 O values comparable to that of the Phanerozoic shales in each age group and formation, suggesting similar variability in the provenance and intensity of chemical weathering, except for the earliest 3.3-3.5 Ga Archean shales, which have consistently lower δ18 O values. Moreover, Paleoproterozoic shales that bracket in age the Great Oxidation Event (GOE) overlap in δ18 O values. Absence of a step-wise increase in δ18 O and δD values suggests that despite the first-order change in the composition of the atmosphere, weathering cycle was not dramatically affected by the GOE at ∼2

  13. 12 CFR 749.2 - Vital records preservation program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... RECORDS PRESERVATION PROGRAM AND APPENDICES-RECORD RETENTION GUIDELINES; CATASTROPHIC ACT PREPAREDNESS... using duplicate records to restore vital member services in the event of catastrophic act. Credit...

  14. Fast valve

    DOEpatents

    Van Dyke, William J.

    1992-01-01

    A fast valve is disclosed that can close on the order of 7 milliseconds. It is closed by the force of a compressed air spring with the moving parts of the valve designed to be of very light weight and the valve gate being of wedge shaped with O-ring sealed faces to provide sealing contact without metal to metal contact. The combination of the O-ring seal and an air cushion create a soft final movement of the valve closure to prevent the fast air acting valve from having a harsh closing.

  15. Fast valve

    DOEpatents

    Van Dyke, W.J.

    1992-04-07

    A fast valve is disclosed that can close on the order of 7 milliseconds. It is closed by the force of a compressed air spring with the moving parts of the valve designed to be of very light weight and the valve gate being of wedge shaped with O-ring sealed faces to provide sealing contact without metal to metal contact. The combination of the O-ring seal and an air cushion create a soft final movement of the valve closure to prevent the fast air acting valve from having a harsh closing. 4 figs.

  16. Direct Fast-Neutron Detection

    SciTech Connect

    DC Stromswold; AJ Peurrung; RR Hansen; PL Reeder

    2000-01-18

    Direct fast-neutron detection is the detection of fast neutrons before they are moderated to thermal energy. We have investigated two approaches for using proton-recoil in plastic scintillators to detect fast neutrons and distinguish them from gamma-ray interactions. Both approaches use the difference in travel speed between neutrons and gamma rays as the basis for separating the types of events. In the first method, we examined the pulses generated during scattering in a plastic scintillator to see if they provide a means for distinguishing fast-neutron events from gamma-ray events. The slower speed of neutrons compared to gamma rays results in the production of broader pulses when neutrons scatter several times within a plastic scintillator. In contrast, gamma-ray interactions should produce narrow pulses, even if multiple scattering takes place, because the time between successive scattering is small. Experiments using a fast scintillator confirmed the presence of broader pulses from neutrons than from gamma rays. However, the difference in pulse widths between neutrons and gamma rays using the best commercially available scintillators was not sufficiently large to provide a practical means for distinguishing fast neutrons and gamma rays on a pulse-by-pulse basis. A faster scintillator is needed, and that scintillator might become available in the literature. Results of the pulse-width studies were presented in a previous report (peurrung et al. 1998), and they are only summarized here.

  17. Solar extreme events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, Hugh S.

    2015-08-01

    Solar flares and CMEs have a broad range of magnitudes. This review discusses the possibility of “extreme events,” defined as those with magnitudes greater than have been seen in the existing historical record. For most quantitative measures, this direct information does not extend more than a century and a half into the recent past. The magnitude distributions (occurrence frequencies) of solar events (flares/CMEs) typically decrease with the parameter measured or inferred (peak flux, mass, energy etc. Flare radiation fluxes tend to follow a power law slightly flatter than S-2, where S represents a peak flux; solar particle events (SPEs) follow a still flatter power law up to a limiting magnitude, and then appear to roll over to a steeper distribution, which may take an exponential form or follow a broken power law. This inference comes from the terrestrial 14C record and from the depth dependence of various radioisotope proxies in the lunar regolith and in meteorites. Recently major new observational results have impacted our use of the relatively limited historical record in new ways: the detection of actual events in the 14C tree-ring records, and the systematic observations of flares and “superflares” by the Kepler spacecraft. I discuss how these new findings may affect our understanding of the distribution function expected for extreme solar events.

  18. Stable isotopes of oxygen and carbon compositions in the Neoproterozoic of South Gabon (Schisto-Calcaire Subgroup, Nyanga Basin): Are cap carbonates and lithoherms recording a particular destabilization event after the Marinoan glaciation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Préat, Alain; Prian, Jean-Pierre; Thiéblemont, Denis; Obame, Rolf Mabicka; Delpomdor, Franck

    2011-06-01

    Geologic evidence of tropical sea level glaciation in the Neoproterozoic remains a matter of debate in the Snowball Earth hypothesis. The Niari Tillite Formation and the cap carbonates record the late Neoproterozoic Marinoan glaciation in South Gabon. These cap carbonates are located at the base of the Schisto-Calcaire Subgroup a predominantly carbonate succession that rests with sharp contact on top of the Niari Tillite. Integrating sedimentological and stable isotope data, a consistent sequence of precipitation events is proposed, with strongly negative δ 13C values pointing to a particular event in the cap carbonates (average δ 13C value = -3.2‰ V-PDB) and in a further newly defined lithohermal unit (average δ 13C value = -4.6‰ V-PDB). Subsequent shallow evaporitive platform carbonates display carbon and oxygen isotopic compositions indicative of relatively unaltered seawater values. Strongly negative δ 18O values in the lithoherms and replacement of aragonite fans by equigranular calcite suggest flushing of meteoric water derived from glacial meltwater.

  19. Adaptive noise estimation and suppression for improving microseismic event detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousavi, S. Mostafa; Langston, Charles A.

    2016-09-01

    Microseismic data recorded by surface arrays are often strongly contaminated by unwanted noise. This background noise makes the detection of small magnitude events difficult. A noise level estimation and noise reduction algorithm is presented for microseismic data analysis based upon minimally controlled recursive averaging and neighborhood shrinkage estimators. The method might not be compared with more sophisticated and computationally expensive denoising algorithm in terms of preserving detailed features of seismic signal. However, it is fast and data-driven and can be applied in real-time processing of continuous data for event detection purposes. Results from application of this algorithm to synthetic and real seismic data show that it holds a great promise for improving microseismic event detection.

  20. V-FASTR: THE VLBA FAST RADIO TRANSIENTS EXPERIMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Wayth, Randall B.; Tingay, Steven J.; Brisken, Walter F.; Deller, Adam T.; Majid, Walid A.; Thompson, David R.; Wagstaff, Kiri L.

    2011-07-10

    Recent discoveries of dispersed, non-periodic impulsive radio signals with single-dish radio telescopes have sparked significant interest in exploring the relatively uncharted space of fast transient radio signals. Here we describe V-FASTR, an experiment to perform a blind search for fast transient radio signals using the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA). The experiment runs entirely in a commensal mode, alongside normal VLBA observations and operations. It is made possible by the features and flexibility of the DiFX software correlator that is used to process VLBA data. Using the VLBA for this type of experiment offers significant advantages over single-dish experiments, including a larger field of view, the ability to easily distinguish local radio-frequency interference from real signals, and the possibility to localize detected events on the sky to milliarcsecond accuracy. We describe our software pipeline, which accepts short integration ({approx} ms) spectrometer data from each antenna in real time during correlation and performs an incoherent dedispersion separately for each antenna, over a range of trial dispersion measures. The dedispersed data are processed by a sophisticated detector and candidate events are recorded. At the end of the correlation, small snippets of the raw data at the time of the events are stored for further analysis. We present the results of our event detection pipeline from some test observations of the pulsars B0329+54 and B0531+21 (the Crab pulsar).

  1. V-FASTR: The VLBA Fast Radio Transients Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wayth, Randall B.; Brisken, Walter F.; Deller, Adam T.; Majid, Walid A.; Thompson, David R.; Tingay, Steven J.; Wagstaff, Kiri L.

    2011-07-01

    Recent discoveries of dispersed, non-periodic impulsive radio signals with single-dish radio telescopes have sparked significant interest in exploring the relatively uncharted space of fast transient radio signals. Here we describe V-FASTR, an experiment to perform a blind search for fast transient radio signals using the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA). The experiment runs entirely in a commensal mode, alongside normal VLBA observations and operations. It is made possible by the features and flexibility of the DiFX software correlator that is used to process VLBA data. Using the VLBA for this type of experiment offers significant advantages over single-dish experiments, including a larger field of view, the ability to easily distinguish local radio-frequency interference from real signals, and the possibility to localize detected events on the sky to milliarcsecond accuracy. We describe our software pipeline, which accepts short integration (~ ms) spectrometer data from each antenna in real time during correlation and performs an incoherent dedispersion separately for each antenna, over a range of trial dispersion measures. The dedispersed data are processed by a sophisticated detector and candidate events are recorded. At the end of the correlation, small snippets of the raw data at the time of the events are stored for further analysis. We present the results of our event detection pipeline from some test observations of the pulsars B0329+54 and B0531+21 (the Crab pulsar).

  2. Project FAST.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Essexville-Hampton Public Schools, MI.

    Described are components of Project FAST (Functional Analysis Systems Training) a nationally validated project to provide more effective educational and support services to learning disordered children and their regular elementary classroom teachers. The program is seen to be based on a series of modules of delivery systems ranging from mainstream…

  3. U-Pb isotopic results for single shocked and polycrystalline zircons record 550-65.5-Ma ages for a K-T target site and 2700-1850-Ma ages for the Sudbury impact event

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krogh, T. E.; Kamo, S. L.; Bohor, B. F.

    1992-01-01

    The refractory mineral zircon develops distinct morphological features during shock metamorphism and retains these features under conditions that would anneal them in other minerals. In addition, weakly shocked zircon grains give primary ages for the impact site, while highly reconstituted (polycrystalline) single grains give ages that approach the age of the impact event. Data for a series of originally coeval grains will define a mixing line that gives both of these ages providing that no subsequent geological disturbances have overprinted the isotopic systematics. In this study, we have shown that the three zircon grain types described by Bohor, from both K-T distal ejecta (Fireball layer, Raton Basin, Colorado) and the Onaping Formation, represent a progressive increase in impact-related morphological change that coincides with a progressive increase in isotopic resetting in zircons from the ejecta and basement rocks. Unshocked grains are least affected by isotopic resetting while polycrystalline grains are most affected. U-Pb isotopic results for 12 of 14 single zircon grains from the Fireball layer plot on or close to a line recording a primary age of 550 +/- 10 Ma and a secondary age of 65.5 +/- 3 Ma. Data for the least and most shocked grains plot closest to the primary and secondary ages respectively. The two other grains each give ages between 300 and 350 Ma. This implies that the target ejecta was dominated by 550-Ma rocks and that the recrystallization features of the zircon were superimposed during the impact event at 65.5 Ma. A predominant age of 550 Ma for zircons from the Fireball layer provides an excellent opportunity to identify the impact site and to test the hypothesis that multiple impacts occurred at this time. A volcanic origin for the Fireball layer is ruled out by shock-related morphological changes in zircon and the fact that the least shocked grains are old. Basement Levack gneisses north of the Sudbury structure have a primary age of

  4. Contrasting Large Solar Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanzerotti, Louis J.

    2010-10-01

    After an unusually long solar minimum, solar cycle 24 is slowly beginning. A large coronal mass ejection (CME) from sunspot 1092 occurred on 1 August 2010, with effects reaching Earth on 3 August and 4 August, nearly 38 years to the day after the huge solar event of 4 August 1972. The prior event, which those of us engaged in space research at the time remember well, recorded some of the highest intensities of solar particles and rapid changes of the geomagnetic field measured to date. What can we learn from the comparisons of these two events, other than their essentially coincident dates? One lesson I took away from reading press coverage and Web reports of the August 2010 event is that the scientific community and the press are much more aware than they were nearly 4 decades ago that solar events can wreak havoc on space-based technologies.

  5. Separate activation of fast and slow inhibitory postsynaptic potentials in rat neocortex in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Benardo, L S

    1994-01-01

    Synaptic inhibition was investigated by stimulating inhibitory neurones with focal microapplications of glutamate, while recording from layer V pyramidal neurones of rat somatosensory cortical slices. One class of inhibitory postsynaptic potentials (IPSPs) thus elicited was characterized as a fast, chloride-mediated, GABAA IPSP in part by its fast time-to-peak (mean 2.5 ms) and brief duration, but primarily on the basis of its reversal potential at -68 mV, and its blockade by picrotoxin. The average peak amplitude for these fast IPSPs was -1.5 mV, measured at -60 mV. The peak conductance calculated for these events was about 10 nS. The conductance change associated with the maximal fast inhibitory postsynaptic potential resulting from electrical stimulation of afferent pathways ranged up to 116 nS. A second class of IPSP was encountered much less frequently. These glutamate-triggered events were characterized as slow, potassium-mediated GABAB IPSPs partly because of their longer times-to-peak (mean, 45 ms) and duration, but especially because of their extrapolated equilibrium potential at about -89 mV and blockade by 2-hydroxysaclofen. The average peak amplitude for these slow IPSPs was -2.3 mV, measured at -60 mV. The peak conductance for these events was about 8 nS. IPSPs resulting from the excitation of individual inhibitory interneurones were elicited by glutamate microapplication at particular locations relative to recording sites. Both fast and slow IPSPs were generated, but these occurred as separate events, and mixed responses were never seen. Thus, the two mechanistically distinct types of IPSPs which result from GABA interaction at GABAA and GABAB receptors on neocortical neurones may be mediated by separate classes of inhibitory neurones. PMID:7913968

  6. 77 FR 47552 - Event Data Recorders

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-09

    ... with any available EDR technology that meets the specified performance requirements. \\1\\ 71 FR 50998... August 2006 final rule, and made the following amendments to Part 563: \\3\\ 73 FR 2168. Clarified the... Register notice on February 8, 2008 (73 FR 8408) to correct the placement of decimal points for data...

  7. 76 FR 47478 - Event Data Recorders

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-05

    ... Federal Register issued a correction notice for the data in Table II of the final rule. See 73 FR 8408... future use. \\2\\ See 71 FR 50998. Specifically, the regulation, 49 CFR part 563 (Part 563), applies to... that meets the specified performance requirements. In January 2008 (73 FR 2168), the agency amended...

  8. A multi-proxy approach to tracing a regressive event at Ferguson's Gulf, Lake Turkana, Kenya: Implications for modern analogues to assist in interpretations of the Plio-Pleistocene record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Catherine; Feibel, Craig; Wright, James; Mortlock, Richard

    2014-05-01

    Located in the East African Rift Valley, the Turkana Basin has long been central to our understanding of how early hominins evolved. In particular, there is great curiosity as to the relationship between the paleoenvironment/paleoclimate conditions and evolution. Historical records aid in the interpretation of Plio-Pleistocene sediments by creating the opportunity to ground truth assumptions through the use of modern analogues. This project uses high-resolution, multi-proxy records from a series of short cores spanning the Little Ice Age to the modern, to suggest one possible model for how regressive events are recorded in lacustrine sequences. Because Lake Turkana is hydrologically closed, changes in lake level affect the water chemistry and thereby the ecosystems that depend upon it. Ferguson's Gulf is a 13 km2, shallow embayment located on the western shore of Lake Turkana. The gulf is connected to the rest of the lake by a narrow mouth on its northern end which is ~1 m deep. Therefore, relatively minor drops in lake level have the potential to restrict flow from Lake Turkana into Ferguson's Gulf, creating localized evaporative water chemistry which effects the suitability of this area for sustaining various benthic populations. Six short cores collected in 2011 and 2012 were picked for ostracods at 1-5 cm intervals to study the changes in assemblages and total abundances through time. An age model, generated using radiocarbon dating of ostracods, demonstrated that the record extending into the Little Ice Age (1550-1850 AD), a period when wetter conditions prevailed within the Turkana Basin. The ostracod faunal results were compared with sedimentology/stratigraphy, XRF data, and stable isotope analysis on ostracod shells for a multiproxy approach to reconstructing hydrologic conditions during the past ~500 years. The Ferguson's Gulf record can be subdivided into three bins based on the ostracod assemblages. The lowest third of the core shows high ostracod total

  9. Discrimination of events in superheated liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archambault, Simon

    2010-02-01

    PICASSO is a Dark Matter search experiment using superheated droplets of C4F10 as the active detector material, suspended in an elastic polymer. If a WIMP (Weakly Interacting Massive Particle) hits a nucleus inside a droplet, the recoiling nucleus will deposit its energy in a heat spike, triggering a phase transition. The setup, installed at SNOLab, 2 km underground, consists of 32 cylindrical detectors of 4.5L. The acoustic signals emitted during a phase transition are recorded by nine piezo-electric transducers mounted on the detector walls and the waveforms are analysed offline. In this way, different types of events can be identified using different variables. One of these variables, which is proportional to the total energy of the acoustic signal, allows discrimination among neutron or WIMP-induced events, background alpha particle induced events and electronic noise; another discrimination variable is constructed from the Fast Fourier Transform of the signal and allows the discrimination of other classes of backgrounds. )

  10. Event Perception

    PubMed Central

    Radvansky, Gabriel; Zacks, Jeffrey M.

    2012-01-01

    Events are central elements of human experience. Formally, they can be individuated in terms of the entities that compose them, the features of those entities, and the relations amongst entities. Psychologically, representations of events capture their spatiotemporal location, the people and objects involved, and the relations between these elements. Here, we present an account of the nature of psychological representations of events and how they are constructed and updated. Event representations are like images in that they are isomorphic to the situations they represent. However, they are like models or language in that they are constructed of components rather than being holistic. Also, they are partial representations that leave out some elements and abstract others. Representations of individual events are informed by schematic knowledge about general classes of events. Event representations are constructed in a process that segments continuous activity into discrete events. The construction of a series of event representations forms a basis for predicting the future, planning for that future, and imagining alternatives. PMID:23082236

  11. Optical imaging of fast, dynamic neurophysiological function.

    SciTech Connect

    Rector, D. M.; Carter, K. M.; Yao, X.; George, J. S.

    2002-01-01

    Fast evoked responses were imaged from rat dorsal medulla and whisker barrel cortex. To investigate the biophysical mechanisms involved, fast optical responses associated with isolated crustacean nerve stimulation were recorded using birefringence and scattered light. Such studies allow optimization of non-invasive imaging techniques being developed for use in humans.

  12. Event selection services in ATLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cranshaw, J.; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T.; Gallas, E.; Hrivnac, J.; Kenyon, M.; McGlone, H.; Malon, D.; Mambelli, M.; Nowak, M.; Viegas, F.; Vinek, E.; Zhang, Q.

    2010-04-01

    ATLAS has developed and deployed event-level selection services based upon event metadata records ("TAGS") and supporting file and database technology. These services allow physicists to extract events that satisfy their selection predicates from any stage of data processing and use them as input to later analyses. One component of these services is a web-based Event-Level Selection Service Interface (ELSSI). ELSSI supports event selection by integrating run-level metadata, luminosity-block-level metadata (e.g., detector status and quality information), and event-by-event information (e.g., triggers passed and physics content). The list of events that survive after some selection criterion is returned in a form that can be used directly as input to local or distributed analysis; indeed, it is possible to submit a skimming job directly from the ELSSI interface using grid proxy credential delegation. ELSSI allows physicists to explore ATLAS event metadata as a means to understand, qualitatively and quantitatively, the distributional characteristics of ATLAS data. In fact, the ELSSI service provides an easy interface to see the highest missing ET events or the events with the most leptons, to count how many events passed a given set of triggers, or to find events that failed a given trigger but nonetheless look relevant to an analysis based upon the results of offline reconstruction, and more. This work provides an overview of ATLAS event-level selection services, with an emphasis upon the interactive Event-Level Selection Service Interface.

  13. CD Recorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falk, Howard

    1998-01-01

    Discussion of CD (compact disc) recorders describes recording applications, including storing large graphic files, creating audio CDs, and storing material downloaded from the Internet; backing up files; lifespan; CD recording formats; continuous recording; recording software; recorder media; vulnerability of CDs; basic computer requirements; and…

  14. Video Event Trigger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Glenn L.; Lichter, Michael J.

    1994-01-01

    Video event trigger (VET) processes video image data to generate trigger signal when image shows significant change like motion or appearance, disappearance, change in color, change in brightness, or dilation of object. System aids in efficient utilization of image-data-storage and image-data-processing equipment in applications in which many video frames show no changes and are wasteful to record and analyze all frames when only relatively few frames show changes of interest. Applications include video recording of automobile crash tests, automated video monitoring of entrances, exits, parking lots, and secure areas.

  15. News Teaching: The epiSTEMe project: KS3 maths and science improvement Field trip: Pupils learn physics in a stately home Conference: ShowPhysics welcomes fun in Europe Student numbers: Physics numbers increase in UK Tournament: Physics tournament travels to Singapore Particle physics: Hadron Collider sets new record Astronomy: Take your classroom into space Forthcoming Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-05-01

    Teaching: The epiSTEMe project: KS3 maths and science improvement Field trip: Pupils learn physics in a stately home Conference: ShowPhysics welcomes fun in Europe Student numbers: Physics numbers increase in UK Tournament: Physics tournament travels to Singapore Particle physics: Hadron Collider sets new record Astronomy: Take your classroom into space Forthcoming Events

  16. Capabilities of a Global 3D MHD Model for Monitoring Extremely Fast CMEs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, C. C.; Plunkett, S. P.; Liou, K.; Socker, D. G.; Wu, S. T.; Wang, Y. M.

    2015-12-01

    Since the start of the space era, spacecraft have recorded many extremely fast coronal mass ejections (CMEs) which have resulted in severe geomagnetic storms. Accurate and timely forecasting of the space weather effects of these events is important for protecting expensive space assets and astronauts and avoiding communications interruptions. Here, we will introduce a newly developed global, three-dimensional (3D) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model (G3DMHD). The model takes the solar magnetic field maps at 2.5 solar radii (Rs) and intepolates the solar wind plasma and field out to 18 Rs using the algorithm of Wang and Sheeley (1990, JGR). The output is used as the inner boundary condition for a 3D MHD model. The G3DMHD model is capable of simulating (i) extremely fast CME events with propagation speeds faster than 2500 km/s; and (ii) multiple CME events in sequence or simultaneously. We will demonstrate the simulation results (and comparison with in-situ observation) for the fastest CME in record on 23 July 2012, the shortest transit time in March 1976, and the well-known historic Carrington 1859 event.

  17. The siting record: An account of the programs of federal agencies and events that have led to the selection of a potential site for a geologic respository for high-level radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect

    Lomenick, T.F.

    1996-03-01

    This record of siting a geologic repository for high-level radioactive wastes (HLW) and spent fuel describes the many investigations that culminated on December 22, 1987 in the designation of Yucca Mountain (YM), as the site to undergo detailed geologic characterization. It recounts the important issues and events that have been instrumental in shaping the course of siting over the last three and one half decades. In this long task, which was initiated in 1954, more than 60 regions, areas, or sites involving nine different rock types have been investigated. This effort became sharply focused in 1983 with the identification of nine potentially suitable sites for the first repository. From these nine sites, five were subsequently nominated by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) as suitable for characterization and then, in 1986, as required by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA), three of these five were recommended to the President as candidates for site characterization. President Reagan approved the recommendation on May 28, 1986. DOE was preparing site characterization plans for the three candidate sites, namely Deaf Smith County, Texas; Hanford Site, Washington; and YM. As a consequence of the 1987 Amendment to the NWPA, only the latter was authorized to undergo detailed characterization. A final Site Characterization Plan for Yucca Mountain was published in 1988. Prior to 1954, there was no program for the siting of disposal facilities for high-level waste (HLW). In the 1940s and 1950s, the volume of waste, which was small and which resulted entirely from military weapons and research programs, was stored as a liquid in large steel tanks buried at geographically remote government installations principally in Washington and Tennessee.

  18. The Advanced Photon Source event system

    SciTech Connect

    Lenkszus, F.R.; Laird, R.

    1995-12-31

    The Advanced Photon Source, like many other facilities, requires a means of transmitting timing information to distributed control system 1/0 controllers. The APS event system provides the means of distributing medium resolution/accuracy timing events throughout the facility. It consists of VME event generators and event receivers which are interconnected with 10OMbit/sec fiber optic links at distances of up to 650m in either a star or a daisy chain configuration. The systems event throughput rate is 1OMevents/sec with a peak-to-peak timing jitter down to lOOns depending on the source of the event. It is integrated into the EPICS-based A.PS control system through record and device support. Event generators broadcast timing events over fiber optic links to event receivers which are programmed to decode specific events. Event generators generate events in response to external inputs, from internal programmable event sequence RAMS, and from VME bus writes. The event receivers can be programmed to generate both pulse and set/reset level outputs to synchronize hardware, and to generate interrupts to initiate EPICS record processing. In addition, each event receiver contains a time stamp counter which is used to provide synchronized time stamps to EPICS records.

  19. Fast SCR Thyratron Driver

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, M.N.; /SLAC

    2007-06-18

    As part of an improvement project on the linear accelerator at SLAC, it was necessary to replace the original thyratron trigger generator, which consisted of two chassis, two vacuum tubes, and a small thyratron. All solid-state, fast rise, and high voltage thyratron drivers, therefore, have been developed and built for the 244 klystron modulators. The rack mounted, single chassis driver employs a unique way to control and generate pulses through the use of an asymmetric SCR, a PFN, a fast pulse transformer, and a saturable reactor. The resulting output pulse is 2 kV peak into 50 {Omega} load with pulse duration of 1.5 {mu}s FWHM at 180 Hz. The pulse risetime is less than 40 ns with less than 1 ns jitter. Various techniques are used to protect the SCR from being damaged by high voltage and current transients due to thyratron breakdowns. The end-of-line clipper (EOLC) detection circuit is also integrated into this chassis to interrupt the modulator triggering in the event a high percentage of line reflections occurred.

  20. Magnetic Recording.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowman, Charles E.

    A guide to the technology of magnetic recorders used in such fields as audio recording, broadcast and closed-circuit television, instrumentation recording, and computer data systems is presented. Included are discussions of applications, advantages, and limitations of magnetic recording, its basic principles and theory of operation, and its…

  1. Ultraviolet Spectroscopy of Coronal Jets Within the Fast Solar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrzycka, D.; Cranmer, S. R.; Raymond, J. C.; Biesecker, D. A.; Gurman, J. B.

    2001-05-01

    The coronal jets are spectacular dynamic events originating from different structures in the solar corona. We present UVCS/SOHO observations of polar coronal jets. They appear to originate near flaring ultraviolet bright points within polar coronal holes that are source regions of the fast solar wind. UVCS recorded the jets as a significant enhancement in the integrated intensities of the strongest coronal emission lines: mostly H~I Lyα and O~VI λ λ 1032,1037. A number of detected jets are correlated with the EIT Fe~XII 195~Å and LASCO C2 white-light events. Typically, the observed H~I Lyα enhancement was up to a factor of 1.3-1.7 over the ambient corona and lasted for 20-30 minutes. The narrow profiles of the emission lines indicate that the material in the jets is cooler than the underlying corona. We modeled the observable properties of the jets to get estimates on jet plasma conditions. We discuss the model results, the initial electron temperature and the heating rate required to reproduce the observed O~VI ionization state. We also discuss connection of the polar jets to the fast solar wind. This work is supported by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration under grant NAG5--7822 to the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, by Agenzia Spaziale Italiana, and by the ESA PRODEX program (Swiss contribution).

  2. A space-based radio frequency transient event classifier

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, K.R.; Blain, C.P.; Caffrey, M.P.; Franz, R.C.; Henneke, K.M.; Jones, R.G.

    1998-03-01

    The Department of Energy is currently investigating economical and reliable techniques for space-based nuclear weapon treaty verification. Nuclear weapon detonations produce RF transients that are signatures of illegal nuclear weapons tests. However, there are many other sources of RF signals, both natural and man-made. Direct digitization of RF signals requires rates of 300 MSamples per second and produces 10{sup 13} samples per day of data to analyze. it is impractical to store and downlink all digitized RF data from such a satellite without a prohibitively expensive increase in the number and capacities of ground stations. Reliable and robust data processing and information extraction must be performed onboard the spacecraft in order to reduce downlinked data to a reasonable volume. The FORTE (Fast On-Orbit Recording of Transient Events) satellite records RF transients in space. These transients will be classified onboard the spacecraft with an Event Classifier specialized hardware that performs signal preprocessing and neural network classification. The authors describe the Event Classifier requirements, scientific constraints, design and implementation.

  3. Development of ultra-fast 2D ion Doppler tomography using image intensified CMOS fast camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanabe, Hiroshi; Kuwahata, Akihiro; Yamanaka, Haruki; Inomoto, Michiaki; Ono, Yasushi; TS-group Team

    2015-11-01

    The world fastest novel time-resolved 2D ion Doppler tomography diagnostics has been developed using fast camera with high-speed gated image intensifier (frame rate: 200kfps. phosphor decay time: ~ 1 μ s). Time evolution of line-integrated spectra are diffracted from a f=1m, F/8.3 and g=2400L/mm Czerny-Turner polychromator, whose output is intensified and recorded to a high-speed camera with spectral resolution of ~0.005nm/pixel. The system can accommodate up to 36 (9 ×4) spatial points recorded at 5 μs time resolution, tomographic reconstruction is applied for the line-integrated spectra, time-resolved (5 μs/frame) local 2D ion temperature measurement has been achieved without any assumption of shot repeatability. Ion heating during intermittent reconnection event which tends to happen during high guide field merging tokamak was measured around diffusion region in UTST. The measured 2D profile shows ion heating inside the acceleration channel of reconnection outflow jet, stagnation point and downstream region where reconnected field forms thick closed flux surface as in MAST. Achieved maximum ion temperature increases as a function of Brec2 and shows good fit with MAST experiment, demonstrating promising CS-less startup scenario for spherical tokamak. This work is supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number 15H05750 and 15K20921.

  4. Default processing of event sequences.

    PubMed

    Hymel, Alicia; Levin, Daniel T; Baker, Lewis J

    2016-02-01

    In a wide range of circumstances, it is important to perceive and represent the sequence of events. For example, sequence perception is necessary to learn statistical contingencies between events, and to generate predictions about events when segmenting actions. However, viewer's awareness of event sequence is rarely tested, and at least some means of encoding event sequence are likely to be resource-intensive. Therefore, previous research may have overestimated the degree to which viewers are aware of specific event sequences. In the experiments reported here, we tested viewers' ability to detect anomalies during visual event sequences. Participants viewed videos containing events that either did or did not contain an out-of-order action. Participants were unable to consistently detect the misordered events, and performance on the task decreased significantly to very low levels when performing a secondary task. In addition, participants almost never detected misorderings in an incidental version of the task, and performance increased when videos ended immediately after the misordering, We argue that these results demonstrate that viewers can effectively perceive the elements of events, but do not consistently test their expectations about the specific sequence of natural events unless bidden to do so by task-specific demands. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26348070

  5. Short-term fasts increase levels of halogenated flame retardants in tissues of a wild incubating bird.

    PubMed

    Marteinson, Sarah C; Drouillard, Ken G; Verreault, Jonathan

    2016-04-01

    Many species are adapted for fasting during parts of their life cycle. For species undergoing extreme fasts, lipid stores are mobilized and accumulated contaminants can be released to exert toxicological effects. However, it is unknown if short-term fasting events may have a similar effect. The objective of this study was to determine if short successive fasts are related to contaminant levels in liver and plasma of birds. In ring-billed gulls (Larus delawarensis), both members of the pair alternate between incubating the nest for several hours (during which they fast) and foraging, making them a useful model for examining this question. Birds were equipped with miniature data loggers recording time and GPS position for two days to determine the proportion and duration of time birds spent in these two activities. Liver and plasma samples were collected, and halogenated flame retardants (HFRs) (PBDEs and dechlorane plus) and organochlorines (OCs) (PCBs, DDTs, and chlordane-related compounds) were determined. Most birds (79%) exhibited plasma lipid content below 1%, indicating a likely fasted state, and plasma lipid percent declined with the number of hours spent at the nest site. The more time birds spent at their nest site, the higher were their plasma and liver concentrations of HFRs. However, body condition indices were unrelated to either the amount of time birds fasted at the nest site or contaminant levels, suggesting that lipid mobilization might not have been severe enough to affect overall body condition of birds and to explain the relationship between fasting and HFR concentrations. A similar relationship between fasting and OC levels was not observed, suggesting that different factors are affecting short-term temporal variations in concentrations of these two classes of contaminants. This study demonstrates that short fasts can be related to increased internal contaminant exposure in birds and that this may be a confounding factor in research and

  6. Observation and interpretation of fast sub-visual light pulses from the night sky

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemzek, R. J.; Winckler, J. R.

    1989-01-01

    Fast large-aperture photometers directed at the zenith on clear nights near Minneapolis have recorded many light pulses in the msec time range, but aside from man-made events these were almost entirely due to Rayleigh-scattered distant lightning, with a residual very low rate (less than 0.1/hr) of unidentified pulses. It is argued that 1-msec light pulses seen in several previous experiments may also be mostly Rayleigh-scattered lightning, rather than fluorescent light due to electron precipitation from lightning-induced whistlers as previously proposed.

  7. Fast frame scanning camera system for light-sheet microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wu, Di; Zhou, Xing; Yao, Baoli; Li, Runze; Yang, Yanlong; Peng, Tong; Lei, Ming; Dan, Dan; Ye, Tong

    2015-10-10

    In the interest of improving the temporal resolution for light-sheet microscopy, we designed a fast frame scanning camera system that incorporated a galvanometer scanning mirror into the imaging path of a home-built light-sheet microscope. This system transformed a temporal image sequence to a spatial one so that multiple images could be acquired during one exposure period. The improvement factor of the frame rate was dependent on the number of sub-images that could be tiled on the sensor without overlapping each other and was therefore a trade-off with the image size. As a demonstration, we achieved 960 frames/s (fps) on a CCD camera that was originally capable of recording images at only 30 fps (full frame). This allowed us to observe millisecond or sub-millisecond events with ordinary CCD cameras. PMID:26479797

  8. Fast imaging system on Tore Supra

    SciTech Connect

    Geraud, A.; Salasca, S.; Verger, J. M.; Alarcon, T.; Agarici, G.; Bremond, S.; Chenevois, J. P.; Geynet, M.; Migozzi, J. B.; Reux, C.

    2009-03-15

    A new endoscope aiming at transferring the image of a poloidal section of the Tore Supra plasma to a fast camera able to record frames at a speed up to 4800 frames per second at full resolution, or much faster for a limited number of pixel, has been installed on Tore Supra. First movies showing the light emission associated to fast phenomena such as plasma start up, disruptions or gas and pellet injections have been produced.

  9. Innovative use of DSP technology in space: FORTE event classifier

    SciTech Connect

    Briles, S.; Moore, K. Jones, R.; Klingner, P.; Neagley, D.; Caffrey, M.; Henneke, K.; Spurgen, W.; Blain, P.

    1994-08-01

    The Fast On-Orbit Recording of Transient Events (FORTE) small satellite will field a digital signal processor (DSP) experiment for the purpose of classifying radio-frequency (rf) transient signals propagating through the earth`s ionosphere. Designated the Event Classifier experiment, this DSP experiment uses a single Texas Instruments` SMJ320C30 DSP to execute preprocessing, feature extraction, and classification algorithms on down-converted, digitized, and buffered rf transient signals in the frequency range of 30 to 300 MHz. A radiation-hardened microcontroller monitors DSP- abnormalities and supervises spacecraft command communications. On- orbit evaluation of multiple algorithms is supported by the Event Classifier architecture. Ground-based commands determine the subset and sequence of algorithms executed to classify a captured time series. Conventional neural network classification algorithms will be some of the classification techniques implemented on-board FORTE while in a low-earth orbit. Results of all experiments, after being stored in DSP flash memory, will be transmitted through the spacecraft to ground stations. The Event Classifier is a versatile and fault-tolerant experiment that is an important new space-based application of DSP technology.

  10. Helical recorder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, P. T.; Studer, P. A.; Tyler, A. L.

    1969-01-01

    Tape recorder, using metallic tape, has a minimum of moving parts and no belts. It permits long-term bulk storage in extreme environments, and has less weight and bulk than present recording equipment.

  11. Single event mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Conzemius, Robert J.

    1990-01-16

    A means and method for single event time of flight mass spectrometry for analysis of specimen materials. The method of the invention includes pulsing an ion source imposing at least one pulsed ion onto the specimen to produce a corresponding emission of at least one electrically charged particle. The emitted particle is then dissociated into a charged ion component and an uncharged neutral component. The ion and neutral components are then detected. The time of flight of the components are recorded and can be used to analyze the predecessor of the components, and therefore the specimen material. When more than one ion particle is emitted from the specimen per single ion impact, the single event time of flight mass spectrometer described here furnis This invention was made with Government support under Contract No. W-7405-ENG82 awarded by the Department of Energy. The Government has certain rights in the invention.

  12. The ISC Seismic Event Bibliography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Giacomo, Domenico; Storchak, Dmitry

    2015-04-01

    The International Seismological Centre (ISC) is a not-for-profit organization operating in the UK for the last 50 years and producing the ISC Bulletin - the definitive worldwide summary of seismic events, both natural and anthropogenic - starting from the beginning of 20th century. Often researchers need to gather information related to specific seismic events for various reasons. To facilitate such task, in 2012 we set up a new database linking earthquakes and other seismic events in the ISC Bulletin to bibliographic records of scientific articles (mostly peer-reviewed journals) that describe those events. Such association allows users of the ISC Event Bibliography (www.isc.ac.uk/event_bibliography/index.php) to run searches for publications via a map-based web interface and, optionally, selecting scientific publications related to either specific events or events in the area of interest. Some of the greatest earthquakes were described in several hundreds of articles published over a period of few years. The journals included in our database are not limited to seismology but bring together a variety of fields in geosciences (e.g., engineering seismology, geodesy and remote sensing, tectonophysics, monitoring research, tsunami, geology, geochemistry, hydrogeology, atmospheric sciences, etc.) making this service useful in multidisciplinary studies. Usually papers dealing with large data set are not included (e.g., papers describing a seismic catalogue). Currently the ISC Event Bibliography includes over 17,000 individual publications from about 500 titles related to over 14,000 events that occurred in last 100+ years. The bibliographic records in the Event Bibliography start in the 1950s, and it is updated as new publications become available.

  13. Fast rise times and the physical mechanism of deep earthquakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houston, H.; Williams, Q.

    1991-01-01

    A systematic global survey of the rise times and stress drops of deep and intermediate earthquakes is reported. When the rise times are scaled to the seismic moment release of the events, their average is nearly twice as fast for events deeper than about 450 km as for shallower events.

  14. The role of vitamin B12 in fasting hyperhomocysteinemia and its interaction with the homozygous C677T mutation of the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene. A case-control study of patients with early-onset thrombotic events.

    PubMed

    D'Angelo, A; Coppola, A; Madonna, P; Fermo, I; Pagano, A; Mazzola, G; Galli, L; Cerbone, A M

    2000-04-01

    Total fasting plasma homocysteine (tHcy), homozygosity for the C677T mutation of the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene and for the A2756G mutation of the methionine synthase (MS) gene, vitamin B12 and folate plasma levels were evaluated in 170 consecutive patients (89 M, 81 F; mean age 41 +/- 12 yrs) with documented early-onset thrombosis (89 venous, 69 arterial, 12 both; mean age at first episode 36 +/- 11 yrs), and in 182 age- and sex-matched healthy control subjects. Moderate hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy, tHcy >19.5 microM in men and >15 microM in women) was detected in 45 patients (26.5%) and in 18 controls (9.9%, Mantel-Haenszel OR and 95% C.I. after stratification for arterial or venous thrombosis: 3.25, 1.78-5.91). The 677TT MTHFR genotype was not significantly more prevalent in patients (27.6%) than in controls (21.4%, RR = 1.42: 0.84-2.41), and markedly contributed to HHcy (Mantel-Haenszel RR after stratification for case/control status: 8.29, 4.61-14.9). The 2756GG MS genotype, observed in 4 patients (2.4%) and 8 controls (4.4%), was not associated to HHcy. tHcy was negatively correlated to folate and vitamin B12 levels, with better correlation found in subjects with the 677TT mutation (r = -0.42 and -0.25) than with the 677CC or CT MTHFR genotype (r = 0).37 and -0.11). However, folate was similar in patients and controls and vitamin B12 was higher in patients (460 +/- 206 vs. 408 +/-185 pg/ml, p = 0.011). In a generalized linear model, 44% of the variation in tHcy levels was explained by folate and vitamin B12 levels, the MTHFR genotype, gender, and by the interaction of the MTHFR genotype with folate (p < or =0.028); the interactions of vitamin B12 with the MTHFR genotype, gender and patient/control status also significantly contributed to the variation in tHcy levels (p < or =0.028). A 4-week administration of 5-methyltetrahydrofolate (15 mg/day) markedly lowered plasma tHcy in 24 patients with MTHFR 677TT genotype, but the response to

  15. A repeating fast radio burst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spitler, L. G.; Scholz, P.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Bogdanov, S.; Brazier, A.; Camilo, F.; Chatterjee, S.; Cordes, J. M.; Crawford, F.; Deneva, J.; Ferdman, R. D.; Freire, P. C. C.; Kaspi, V. M.; Lazarus, P.; Lynch, R.; Madsen, E. C.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Patel, C.; Ransom, S. M.; Seymour, A.; Stairs, I. H.; Stappers, B. W.; van Leeuwen, J.; Zhu, W. W.

    2016-03-01

    Fast radio bursts are millisecond-duration astronomical radio pulses of unknown physical origin that appear to come from extragalactic distances. Previous follow-up observations have failed to find additional bursts at the same dispersion measure (that is, the integrated column density of free electrons between source and telescope) and sky position as the original detections. The apparent non-repeating nature of these bursts has led to the suggestion that they originate in cataclysmic events. Here we report observations of ten additional bursts from the direction of the fast radio burst FRB 121102. These bursts have dispersion measures and sky positions consistent with the original burst. This unambiguously identifies FRB 121102 as repeating and demonstrates that its source survives the energetic events that cause the bursts. Additionally, the bursts from FRB 121102 show a wide range of spectral shapes that appear to be predominantly intrinsic to the source and which vary on timescales of minutes or less. Although there may be multiple physical origins for the population of fast radio bursts, these repeat bursts with high dispersion measure and variable spectra specifically seen from the direction of FRB 121102 support an origin in a young, highly magnetized, extragalactic neutron star.

  16. A repeating fast radio burst.

    PubMed

    Spitler, L G; Scholz, P; Hessels, J W T; Bogdanov, S; Brazier, A; Camilo, F; Chatterjee, S; Cordes, J M; Crawford, F; Deneva, J; Ferdman, R D; Freire, P C C; Kaspi, V M; Lazarus, P; Lynch, R; Madsen, E C; McLaughlin, M A; Patel, C; Ransom, S M; Seymour, A; Stairs, I H; Stappers, B W; van Leeuwen, J; Zhu, W W

    2016-03-10

    Fast radio bursts are millisecond-duration astronomical radio pulses of unknown physical origin that appear to come from extragalactic distances. Previous follow-up observations have failed to find additional bursts at the same dispersion measure (that is, the integrated column density of free electrons between source and telescope) and sky position as the original detections. The apparent non-repeating nature of these bursts has led to the suggestion that they originate in cataclysmic events. Here we report observations of ten additional bursts from the direction of the fast radio burst FRB 121102. These bursts have dispersion measures and sky positions consistent with the original burst. This unambiguously identifies FRB 121102 as repeating and demonstrates that its source survives the energetic events that cause the bursts. Additionally, the bursts from FRB 121102 show a wide range of spectral shapes that appear to be predominantly intrinsic to the source and which vary on timescales of minutes or less. Although there may be multiple physical origins for the population of fast radio bursts, these repeat bursts with high dispersion measure and variable spectra specifically seen from the direction of FRB 121102 support an origin in a young, highly magnetized, extragalactic neutron star. PMID:26934226

  17. Periodicity in marine extinction events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sepkoski, J. John, Jr.; Raup, David M.

    1986-01-01

    The periodicity of extinction events is examined in detail. In particular, the temporal distribution of specific, identifiable extinction events is analyzed. The nature and limitations of the data base on the global fossil record is discussed in order to establish limits of resolution in statistical analyses. Peaks in extinction intensity which appear to differ significantly from background levels are considered, and new analyses of the temporal distribution of these peaks are presented. Finally, some possible causes of periodicity and of interdependence among extinction events over the last quarter billion years of earth history are examined.

  18. Mid-Carboniferous eustatic event

    SciTech Connect

    Saunders, W.B.; Ramsbottom, W.H.C.

    1986-03-01

    Stratigraphic and paleontologic evidence from mid-Carboniferous (Namurian) basin and shelf successions in widely scattered parts of the world indicates that a major eustatic event occurred about 330 Ma. The event began with a regression that is recorded in most shelf sequences, the regression was followed by a brief transgression about 328 Ma, and the event ended with a transgression that flooded large shelf areas about 325 Ma. The Mississippian-Pennsylvanian unconformity in North America is a well-known product of this event, but equally prominent and contemporaneous unconformity surfaces are also present in Europe, North Africa, and elsewhere. The event is believed to have caused numerous extinctions, and it resulted in marked fluctuations in faunal diversity. 94 references, 2 figures.

  19. Measuring fast calcium fluxes in cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Golebiewska, Urszula; Scarlata, Suzanne

    2011-01-01

    Cardiomyocytes have multiple Ca(2+) fluxes of varying duration that work together to optimize function (1,2). Changes in Ca(2+) activity in response to extracellular agents is predominantly regulated by the phospholipase Cβ- Gα(q;) pathway localized on the plasma membrane which is stimulated by agents such as acetylcholine (3,4). We have recently found that plasma membrane protein domains called caveolae(5,6) can entrap activated Gα(q;)(7). This entrapment has the effect of stabilizing the activated state of Gα(q;) and resulting in prolonged Ca(2+) signals in cardiomyocytes and other cell types(8). We uncovered this surprising result by measuring dynamic calcium responses on a fast scale in living cardiomyocytes. Briefly, cells are loaded with a fluorescent Ca(2+) indicator. In our studies, we used Ca(2+) Green (Invitrogen, Inc.) which exhibits an increase in fluorescence emission intensity upon binding of calcium ions. The fluorescence intensity is then recorded for using a line-scan mode of a laser scanning confocal microscope. This method allows rapid acquisition of the time course of fluorescence intensity in pixels along a selected line, producing several hundreds of time traces on the microsecond time scale. These very fast traces are transferred into excel and then into Sigmaplot for analysis, and are compared to traces obtained for electronic noise, free dye, and other controls. To dissect Ca(2+) responses of different flux rates, we performed a histogram analysis that binned pixel intensities with time. Binning allows us to group over 500 traces of scans and visualize the compiled results spatially and temporally on a single plot. Thus, the slow Ca(2+) waves that are difficult to discern when the scans are overlaid due to different peak placement and noise, can be readily seen in the binned histograms. Very fast fluxes in the time scale of the measurement show a narrow distribution of intensities in the very short time bins whereas longer Ca(2+) waves

  20. Fast P wave propagation in subducted Pacific lithosphere: Refraction from the plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Gideon; Gubbins, David; Mao, Weijian

    1994-12-01

    P waves traveling from events in the Tonga-Kermadec seismic zone to stations in New Zealand are very fast with highly emergent, dispersed waveforms. Ray tracing has shown the waves to travel close to the subducted Pacific plate throughout their length, and synthetic seismogram calculations have shown the dispersion requires a very thin (8-12 km) fast layer. Previous work has been based on data from analog records and one digital, single-component short-period instrument; no polarization analysis was possible, and measurements of dispersion were limited by the bandwidth. From January 1991 to August 1992 we deployed nine broad band, three-component seismometers in good sites for observing these arrivals; the data are augmented by three-component, short-period digital records from new stations of the New Zealand National Network. In this study we analyze 1191 broad-band and 2076 short period seismograms from 71 events for polarization of the initial P wave. The polarization directions are found to be up to 30 deg off the great circle path and consistently steep (20 deg from vertical). They are too steep to be explained by standard ray paths or refraction from a fast horizontal layer. We invert the polarization directions for a tilted interface beneath the array and use arrival times to control the depth to the interface, which is found to lie close to the top of the subducted plate inferred from the seismicity. We conclude that these precursive, emergent P waves have traveled through a fast layer close to the top of the subducted plate and refract upward to the station. A second arrival, with lower dominant frequency near 1 Hz and normal travel time, is occasionally seen on both broad band and short-time stations. Its polarization direction is similarly steep but difficult to measure; the evidence suggests that it also travels within the plate with similar ray path to the precursor.

  1. Events diary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-01-01

    as Imperial College, the Royal Albert Hall, the Royal College of Art, the Natural History and Science Museums and the Royal Geographical Society. Under the heading `Shaping the future together' BA2000 will explore science, engineering and technology in their wider cultural context. Further information about this event on 6 - 12 September may be obtained from Sandra Koura, BA2000 Festival Manager, British Association for the Advancement of Science, 23 Savile Row, London W1X 2NB (tel: 0171 973 3075, e-mail: sandra.koura@britassoc.org.uk ). Details of the creating SPARKS events may be obtained from creating.sparks@britassoc.org.uk or from the website www.britassoc.org.uk . Other events 3 - 7 July, Porto Alegre, Brazil VII Interamerican conference on physics education: The preparation of physicists and physics teachers in contemporary society. Info: IACPE7@if.ufrgs.br or cabbat1.cnea.gov.ar/iacpe/iacpei.htm 27 August - 1 September, Barcelona, Spain GIREP conference: Physics teacher education beyond 2000. Info: www.blues.uab.es/phyteb/index.html

  2. Acid-fast stain

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003766.htm Acid-fast stain To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The acid-fast stain is a laboratory test that determines ...

  3. Fast food (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Fast foods are quick, reasonably priced, and readily available alternatives to home cooking. While convenient and economical for a busy lifestyle, fast foods are typically high in calories, fat, saturated fat, ...

  4. Fast food tips (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... challenge to eat healthy when going to a fast food place. In general, avoiding items that are deep ... challenge to eat healthy when going to a fast food place. In general, avoiding items that are deep ...

  5. Is fast food addictive?

    PubMed

    Garber, Andrea K; Lustig, Robert H

    2011-09-01

    Studies of food addiction have focused on highly palatable foods. While fast food falls squarely into that category, it has several other attributes that may increase its salience. This review examines whether the nutrients present in fast food, the characteristics of fast food consumers or the presentation and packaging of fast food may encourage substance dependence, as defined by the American Psychiatric Association. The majority of fast food meals are accompanied by a soda, which increases the sugar content 10-fold. Sugar addiction, including tolerance and withdrawal, has been demonstrated in rodents but not humans. Caffeine is a "model" substance of dependence; coffee drinks are driving the recent increase in fast food sales. Limited evidence suggests that the high fat and salt content of fast food may increase addictive potential. Fast food restaurants cluster in poorer neighborhoods and obese adults eat more fast food than those who are normal weight. Obesity is characterized by resistance to insulin, leptin and other hormonal signals that would normally control appetite and limit reward. Neuroimaging studies in obese subjects provide evidence of altered reward and tolerance. Once obese, many individuals meet criteria for psychological dependence. Stress and dieting may sensitize an individual to reward. Finally, fast food advertisements, restaurants and menus all provide environmental cues that may trigger addictive overeating. While the concept of fast food addiction remains to be proven, these findings support the role of fast food as a potentially addictive substance that is most likely to create dependence in vulnerable populations. PMID:21999689

  6. Predictability of Rogue Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birkholz, Simon; Brée, Carsten; Demircan, Ayhan; Steinmeyer, Günter

    2015-05-01

    Using experimental data from three different rogue wave supporting systems, determinism, and predictability of the underlying dynamics are evaluated with methods of nonlinear time series analysis. We included original records from the Draupner platform in the North Sea as well as time series from two optical systems in our analysis. One of the latter was measured in the infrared tail of optical fiber supercontinua, the other in the fluence profiles of multifilaments. All three data sets exhibit extreme-value statistics and exceed the significant wave height in the respective system by a factor larger than 2. Nonlinear time series analysis indicates a different degree of determinism in the systems. The optical fiber scenario is found to be driven by quantum noise whereas rogue waves emerge as a consequence of turbulence in the others. With the large number of rogue events observed in the multifilament system, we can systematically explore the predictability of such events in a turbulent system. We observe that rogue events do not necessarily appear without a warning, but are often preceded by a short phase of relative order. This surprising finding sheds some new light on the fascinating phenomenon of rogue waves.

  7. On Astronomical Records of Dangun Chosun Period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La, Daile; Park, Changbom

    1993-10-01

    Events of eclipses as well as other major astronomical events observable in the eastern sector of Asian continent are computed and checked with astronomical records of antiquity. Particular attention was given to two types of the events recorded in remaining records of Dangun Chosun Period (DCP): (1) concentration of major planets near the constellation of Nu-Sung (Beta Aries) and (2) a large ebb-tide. We find them most likely to have occurred in real time. i.e., when the positions of the sun, moon, and planets happen to be aligned in the most appropriate position. For solar eclipses data, however, we find among 10 solar eclipse events recorded, only 6 of them are correct up to months, implying its statistical significance is no less insignificant. We therefore conclude that the remaining history books of DCP indeed contains important astronomical records, thereby the real antiquity of the records of DCP cannot be disproved.

  8. Personal miniature electrophysiological tape recorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, H.

    1981-11-01

    The use of a personal miniature electrophysiological tape recorder to measure the physiological reactions of space flight personnel to space flight stress and weightlessness is described. The Oxford Instruments Medilog recorder, a battery-powered, four-channel cassette tape recorder with 24 hour endurance is carried on the person and will record EKG, EOG, EEG, and timing and event markers. The data will give information about heart rate and morphology changes, and document adaptation to zero gravity on the part of subjects who, unlike highly trained astronauts, are more representative of the normal population than were the subjects of previous space flight studies.

  9. Personal miniature electrophysiological tape recorder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, H.

    1981-01-01

    The use of a personal miniature electrophysiological tape recorder to measure the physiological reactions of space flight personnel to space flight stress and weightlessness is described. The Oxford Instruments Medilog recorder, a battery-powered, four-channel cassette tape recorder with 24 hour endurance is carried on the person and will record EKG, EOG, EEG, and timing and event markers. The data will give information about heart rate and morphology changes, and document adaptation to zero gravity on the part of subjects who, unlike highly trained astronauts, are more representative of the normal population than were the subjects of previous space flight studies.

  10. 10 CFR 73.71 - Reporting of safeguards events.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... revised information. Each licensee shall maintain a copy of the written report of an event submitted under... maintain a current log and record the safeguards events described in paragraphs II (a) and (b) of...

  11. Stress the Local Angle...Keep the Yearbook Currently Eventful.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stano, Randy

    1980-01-01

    Suggests that while current events should be recorded in school yearbooks, the local angle should be stressed. Provides illustrations of how this might be done with such topics as gasoline prices, inflation, foreign events, and political campaigns. (TJ)

  12. An automated cross-correlation based event detection technique and its application to surface passive data set

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Forghani-Arani, Farnoush; Behura, Jyoti; Haines, Seth S.; Batzle, Mike

    2013-01-01

    In studies on heavy oil, shale reservoirs, tight gas and enhanced geothermal systems, the use of surface passive seismic data to monitor induced microseismicity due to the fluid flow in the subsurface is becoming more common. However, in most studies passive seismic records contain days and months of data and manually analysing the data can be expensive and inaccurate. Moreover, in the presence of noise, detecting the arrival of weak microseismic events becomes challenging. Hence, the use of an automated, accurate and computationally fast technique for event detection in passive seismic data is essential. The conventional automatic event identification algorithm computes a running-window energy ratio of the short-term average to the long-term average of the passive seismic data for each trace. We show that for the common case of a low signal-to-noise ratio in surface passive records, the conventional method is not sufficiently effective at event identification. Here, we extend the conventional algorithm by introducing a technique that is based on the cross-correlation of the energy ratios computed by the conventional method. With our technique we can measure the similarities amongst the computed energy ratios at different traces. Our approach is successful at improving the detectability of events with a low signal-to-noise ratio that are not detectable with the conventional algorithm. Also, our algorithm has the advantage to identify if an event is common to all stations (a regional event) or to a limited number of stations (a local event). We provide examples of applying our technique to synthetic data and a field surface passive data set recorded at a geothermal site.

  13. Increased Speed: 3D Silicon Sensors. Fast Current Amplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, Sherwood; Kok, Angela; Kenney, Christopher; Jarron, Pierre; Hasi, Jasmine; Despeisse, Matthieu; Da Via, Cinzia; Anelli, Giovanni; /CERN

    2012-05-07

    The authors describe techniques to make fast, sub-nanosecond time resolution solid-state detector systems using sensors with 3D electrodes, current amplifiers, constant-fraction comparators or fast wave-form recorders, and some of the next steps to reach still faster results.

  14. 21 CFR 880.6305 - Ingestible event marker.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ingestible event marker. 880.6305 Section 880.6305... Devices § 880.6305 Ingestible event marker. (a) Identification. An ingestible event marker is a prescription device used to record time-stamped, patient-logged events. The ingestible component...

  15. Short bouts of vocalization induce long lasting fast gamma oscillations in a sensorimotor nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Lewandowski, Brian; Schmidt, Marc

    2011-01-01

    Performance evaluation is a critical feature of motor learning. In the vocal system, it requires the integration of auditory feedback signals with vocal motor commands. The network activity that supports such integration is unknown, but it has been proposed that vocal performance evaluation occurs offline. Recording from NIf, a sensorimotor structure in the avian song system, we show that short bouts of singing in adult male zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata) induce persistent increases in firing activity and coherent oscillations in the fast gamma range (90–150 Hz). Single units are strongly phase-locked to these oscillations, which can last up to 30 s, often outlasting vocal activity by an order of magnitude. In other systems, oscillations often are triggered by events or behavioral tasks but rarely outlast the event that triggered them by more than 1 second. The present observations are the longest reported gamma oscillations triggered by an isolated behavioral event. In mammals, gamma oscillations have been associated with memory consolidation and are hypothesized to facilitate communication between brain regions. We suggest that the timing and persistent nature of NIf’s fast gamma oscillations make them well suited to facilitate the integration of auditory and vocal motor traces associated with vocal performance evaluation. PMID:21957255

  16. Perceiving Event Dynamics and Parsing Hollywood Films

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cutting, James E.; Brunick, Kaitlin L.; Candan, Ayse

    2012-01-01

    We selected 24 Hollywood movies released from 1940 through 2010 to serve as a film corpus. Eight viewers, three per film, parsed them into events, which are best termed subscenes. While watching a film a second time, viewers scrolled through frames and recorded the frame number where each event began. Viewers agreed about 90% of the time. We then…

  17. Manybeam velocimeter for fast surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Goosman, D.; Avara, G.; Steinmetz, L.; Lai, C.; Perry, S.

    1996-09-01

    For the past 5 years, we have conceived, built and successfully used a new 10 beam laser velocimeter for monitoring velocity vs time histories of fast moving surfaces, and will have a 20 beam capability soon. We conceived a method to multiplex 5 to 10 beams through a single Fabry-Perot interferometer, without losing any light that our equivalently-performing single beam system could use, and with negligible cross- talk. This saves the cost of 16 interferometers, simplifies operation and takes less space than without multiplexing. We devised special efficient light collecting probes, streak cameras that change sweep speed during the course of the record, and a new double cavity interferometer which is better, cheaper and more flexible than our previous versions. With the 10 recorders, we conceived and employ a method of using both a fast and a slow streak camera on each of 5 beams without reducing the light that is available to either camera separately. Five new galvanometrically-driven triggerable CCD streak cameras will be installed soon.

  18. Synopsis of a computer program designed to interface a personal computer with the fast data acquisition system of a time-of-flight mass spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bechtel, R. D.; Mateos, M. A.; Lincoln, K. A.

    1988-01-01

    Briefly described are the essential features of a computer program designed to interface a personal computer with the fast, digital data acquisition system of a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. The instrumentation was developed to provide a time-resolved analysis of individual vapor pulses produced by the incidence of a pulsed laser beam on an ablative material. The high repetition rate spectrometer coupled to a fast transient recorder captures complete mass spectra every 20 to 35 microsecs, thereby providing the time resolution needed for the study of this sort of transient event. The program enables the computer to record the large amount of data generated by the system in short time intervals, and it provides the operator the immediate option of presenting the spectral data in several different formats. Furthermore, the system does this with a high degree of automation, including the tasks of mass labeling the spectra and logging pertinent instrumental parameters.

  19. Direct Fast-Neutron Detection: A Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    AJ Peurrung; DC Stromswold; PL Reeder; RR Hansen

    1998-10-18

    It is widely acknowledged that Mure neutron-detection technologies will need to offer increased performance at lower cost. One clear route toward these goals is rapid and direct detection of fast neutrons prior to moderation. This report describes progress to date in an effort to achieve such neutron detection via proton recoil within plastic scintillator. Since recording proton-recoil events is of little practical use without a means to discriminate effectively against gamma-ray interactions, the present effort is concentrated on demonstrating a method that distinguishes between pulse types. The proposed method exploits the substantial difference in the speed of fission neutrons and gamma-ray photons. Should this effort ultimately prove successful, the resulting. technology would make a valuable contribution toward meeting the neutron-detection needs of the next century. This report describes the detailed investigations that have been part of Pacific Northwest National Laborato@s efforts to demonstrate direct fast-neutron detection in the laboratory. Our initial approach used a single, solid piece of scintillator along with the electronics needed for pulse-type differentiation. Work to date has led to the conclusion that faster scintillator and/or faster electronics will be necessary before satisfactory gamma-ray discrimination is achieved with this approach. Acquisition and testing of both faster scintillator and faster electronics are currently in progress. The "advanced" approach to direct fast-neutron detection uses a scintillating assembly with an overall density that is lower than that of ordinary plastic scintillator. The lower average density leads to longer interaction times for both neutrons and gamma rays, allowing easier discrimination. The modeling, optimization, and design of detection systems using this approach are described in detail.

  20. Creating Special Events

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    deLisle, Lee

    2009-01-01

    "Creating Special Events" is organized as a systematic approach to festivals and events for students who seek a career in event management. This book looks at the evolution and history of festivals and events and proceeds to the nuts and bolts of event management. The book presents event management as the means of planning, organizing, directing,…

  1. El Nino-like events during Miocene

    SciTech Connect

    Casey, R.E.; Nelson, C.O.; Weinheimer, A.L.; Oeth, P.A.; Swanson, R.J.

    1988-03-01

    El Nino-like events have been recorded from the Miocene laminated siliceous facies of the Monterey Formation. These El Nino-like Miocene events are compared to El Nino events recorded from Holocene varved sediments deposited within the anoxic Santa Barbara basin. Strong El Nino events can be recognized from Holocene Santa Barbara basin sediments by increases in radiolarian flux to the sea floor during those events. For the last 100-plus years, frequency of strong El Ninos has been on the order of one extremely strong event about every 100 years, and one easily recognizable event about every 18 years. Frequencies in the laminated (varved) Miocene range from about every 4-5 years to over 20 years. The higher frequencies occur within generally warm intervals and the lower frequencies within generally cold intervals. Perhaps the frequencies of these events may, in fact, be an important indicator in determining whether the intervals were cold or warm. Reconstructions of the paleo-California Current system during El Nino-like periods have been made for the west coast from the Gulf of California to northern California. Strong El Nino-like events occurred 5.5 and 8 Ma, and a strong anti-El Nino-like event occurred at about 6.5 Ma. Evidence from the 5.5 and 8 Ma events combined with other evidence suggests that modern El Ninos, similar to today's, were initiated at 5.5 Ma or earlier.

  2. Fast food (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... quick, reasonably priced, and readily available alternatives to home cooking. While convenient and economical for a busy lifestyle, fast foods are typically high in calories, fat, saturated fat, ...

  3. fast-matmul

    SciTech Connect

    Grey Ballard, Austin Benson

    2014-11-26

    This software provides implementations of fast matrix multiplication algorithms. These algorithms perform fewer floating point operations than the classical cubic algorithm. The software uses code generation to automatically implement the fast algorithms based on high-level descriptions. The code serves two general purposes. The first is to demonstrate that these fast algorithms can out-perform vendor matrix multiplication algorithms for modest problem sizes on a single machine. The second is to rapidly prototype many variations of fast matrix multiplication algorithms to encourage future research in this area. The implementations target sequential and shared memory parallel execution.

  4. A Central Brazil GT5 Event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barros, L. V.; Assumpcao, M.; Caixeta, D.

    2013-05-01

    Ground-truth (GT) events, accurately located with a precision of 5 km (GT5 event) and associated travel times to regional stations are important in developing precise velocity models. The low Brazilian seismicity, with only three continental earthquakes of magnitude five in the last three decades, and the low number of seismic stations explain the difficulty to detect events at regional distances. In the world maps of GT events, Brazil appears almost empty. In Stable Continental Interiors, like Brazil, it is difficult to find an event fulfilling all the GT5 prerequisites, particularly in respect with the number of picked phases and azimuthal gaps. Recently PTS-CTBTO has organized meeting and workshops to encourage seismologists from South and Central America to cooperate with the work of identifying GT5 events in these countries, with a goal of developing a 3-dimentional velocity model for this part of the globe not covered yet like Europe and North America. As a result we studied a recent magnitude 5 event in Central Brazil detected by few regional stations. Aftershock studies with local stations, showed a fault 5 km long. Taking the mainshock epicenter as the center of fault the maximum error would be minimal, 2.5 km, assuming the events were located with zero uncertainty. The parameters depth and origin time source were precisely determined using correlations between waveforms of six events and stations corrections. The event magnitudes range from 3.5 to 5.0 (mainshock, taken as reference event) recorded by regional and local stations. Events recorded at local and regional stations were used to determine the regional station corrections. These events were located only with data from local stations, assigning to the regional stations P and S phases zero weight in order to determine residuals for each regional stations used. The stations corrections were taken as the average of the residuals at each station. Precise pickings of P and S phases for the mainshock

  5. [Medical aspects of fasting].

    PubMed

    Gavrankapetanović, F

    1997-01-01

    Fasting (arabic-savm) was proclaimed through islam, and thus it is an obligation for Holly Prophet Muhammad s.a.v.s.-Peace be to Him-in the second year after Hijra (in 624 after Milad-born of Isa a.s.). There is a month of fasting-Ramadan-each lunar (hijra) year. So, it was 1415th fasting this year. Former Prophets have brought obligative messages on fasting to their people; so there are also certain forms of fasting with other religions i.e. with Catholics, Jews, Orthodox. These kinds of fasting above differ from muslim fasting, but they also appear obligative. All revelations have brought fasting as obligative. From medical point of view, fasting has two basical components: psychical and physical. Psychical sphere correlate closely with its fundamental ideological message. Allah dz.s. says in Quran: "... Fasting is obligative for you, as it was obligative to your precedents, as to avoid sins; during very few days (II, II, 183 & 184)." Will strength, control of passions, effort and self-discipline makes a pure faithfull person, who purify its mind and body through fasting. Thinking about The Creator is more intensive, character is more solid; and spirit and will get stronger. We will mention the hadith saying: "Essaihune humus saimun!" That means: "Travellers at the Earth are fasters (of my ummet)." The commentary of this hadith, in the Collection of 1001 hadiths (Bin bir hadis), number 485, says: "There are no travelling dervishs or monks in islam; thus there is no such a kind of relligousity in islam. In stead, it is changed by fasting and constant attending of mosque. That was proclaimed as obligation, although there were few cases of travelling in the name of relligousity, like travelling dervishs and sheichs." In this paper, the author discusses medical aspects of fasting and its positive characteristics in the respect of healthy life style and prevention of many sicks. The author mentions positive influence of fasting to certain system and organs of human

  6. Integrative Physiology of Fasting.

    PubMed

    Secor, Stephen M; Carey, Hannah V

    2016-04-01

    Extended bouts of fasting are ingrained in the ecology of many organisms, characterizing aspects of reproduction, development, hibernation, estivation, migration, and infrequent feeding habits. The challenge of long fasting episodes is the need to maintain physiological homeostasis while relying solely on endogenous resources. To meet that challenge, animals utilize an integrated repertoire of behavioral, physiological, and biochemical responses that reduce metabolic rates, maintain tissue structure and function, and thus enhance survival. We have synthesized in this review the integrative physiological, morphological, and biochemical responses, and their stages, that characterize natural fasting bouts. Underlying the capacity to survive extended fasts are behaviors and mechanisms that reduce metabolic expenditure and shift the dependency to lipid utilization. Hormonal regulation and immune capacity are altered by fasting; hormones that trigger digestion, elevate metabolism, and support immune performance become depressed, whereas hormones that enhance the utilization of endogenous substrates are elevated. The negative energy budget that accompanies fasting leads to the loss of body mass as fat stores are depleted and tissues undergo atrophy (i.e., loss of mass). Absolute rates of body mass loss scale allometrically among vertebrates. Tissues and organs vary in the degree of atrophy and downregulation of function, depending on the degree to which they are used during the fast. Fasting affects the population dynamics and activities of the gut microbiota, an interplay that impacts the host's fasting biology. Fasting-induced gene expression programs underlie the broad spectrum of integrated physiological mechanisms responsible for an animal's ability to survive long episodes of natural fasting. PMID:27065168

  7. A fast dynamic mode in rare earth based glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, L. Z.; Xue, R. J.; Zhu, Z. G.; Ngai, K. L.; Wang, W. H.; Bai, H. Y.

    2016-05-01

    Metallic glasses (MGs) usually exhibit only slow β-relaxation peak, and the signature of the fast dynamic is challenging to be observed experimentally in MGs. We report a general and unusual fast dynamic mode in a series of rare earth based MGs manifested as a distinct fast β'-relaxation peak in addition to slow β-relaxation and α-relaxation peaks. We show that the activation energy of the fast β'-relaxation is about 12RTg and is equivalent to the activation of localized flow event. The coupling of these dynamic processes as well as their relationship with glass transition and structural heterogeneity is discussed.

  8. A fast dynamic mode in rare earth based glasses.

    PubMed

    Zhao, L Z; Xue, R J; Zhu, Z G; Ngai, K L; Wang, W H; Bai, H Y

    2016-05-28

    Metallic glasses (MGs) usually exhibit only slow β-relaxation peak, and the signature of the fast dynamic is challenging to be observed experimentally in MGs. We report a general and unusual fast dynamic mode in a series of rare earth based MGs manifested as a distinct fast β'-relaxation peak in addition to slow β-relaxation and α-relaxation peaks. We show that the activation energy of the fast β'-relaxation is about 12RTg and is equivalent to the activation of localized flow event. The coupling of these dynamic processes as well as their relationship with glass transition and structural heterogeneity is discussed. PMID:27250316

  9. Fast and effective?

    PubMed

    Trueland, Jennifer

    2013-12-18

    The 5.2 diet involves two days of fasting each week. It is being promoted as the key to sustained weight loss, as well as wider health benefits, despite the lack of evidence on the long-term effects. Nurses need to support patients who wish to try intermittent fasting. PMID:24345130

  10. fastKDE

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, Travis A.; Kashinath, Karthik

    2015-05-22

    This software implements the fast, self-consistent probability density estimation described by O'Brien et al. (2014, doi: ). It uses a non-uniform fast Fourier transform technique to reduce the computational cost of an objective and self-consistent kernel density estimation method.

  11. Fast protein folding kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Gelman, Hannah; Gruebele, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Fast folding proteins have been a major focus of computational and experimental study because they are accessible to both techniques: they are small and fast enough to be reasonably simulated with current computational power, but have dynamics slow enough to be observed with specially developed experimental techniques. This coupled study of fast folding proteins has provided insight into the mechanisms which allow some proteins to find their native conformation well less than 1 ms and has uncovered examples of theoretically predicted phenomena such as downhill folding. The study of fast folders also informs our understanding of even “slow” folding processes: fast folders are small, relatively simple protein domains and the principles that govern their folding also govern the folding of more complex systems. This review summarizes the major theoretical and experimental techniques used to study fast folding proteins and provides an overview of the major findings of fast folding research. Finally, we examine the themes that have emerged from studying fast folders and briefly summarize their application to protein folding in general as well as some work that is left to do. PMID:24641816

  12. Student Records

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morshavitz, Helen

    1974-01-01

    Pupil files are accumulating increasing amounts of sensitive data. Yet parents have been barred from seeing their children's files while law enforcement officials and other public agencies have been given virtually free access. However, a national law in regard to student records is a real possibility. (Author/WM)

  13. Student Records

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fields, Cheryl

    2005-01-01

    Another topic involving privacy has attracted considerable attention in recent months--the "student unit record" issue. The U.S. Department of Education concluded in March that it would be feasible to help address lawmakers' concerns about accountability in higher education by constructing a database capable of tracking students from institution…

  14. RFI Mitigation for FAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Haiyan; Nan, Rendong; Gan, Hengqian; Yue, Youling; Wu, Mingchang; Zhang, Zhiwei; Jin, Chengjin; Peng, Bo

    2015-08-01

    Five-hundred-meter Aperture Spherical radio Telescope (FAST) is a Chinese mega-science project to build the largest single dish radio telescope in the world. The construction was officially commenced in March 2011. The first light of FAST is expected in 2016. Due to the high sensitivity of FAST, Radio Frequency Interference (RFI) mitigation for the telescope is required to assure the realization of the scientific goals. In order to protect the radio environment of FAST site, the local government has established a radio quiet zone with 30 km radius. Moreover, Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMC) designs and measurements for FAST have also been carried out, and some examples, such as EMC designs for actuator and focus cabin, have been introduced briefly.

  15. Continuous recording of seismic signals in Alpine permafrost

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hausmann, H.; Krainer, K.; Staudinger, M.; Brückl, E.

    2009-04-01

    Over the past years various geophysical methods were applied to study the internal structure and the temporal variation of permafrost whereof seismic is of importance. For most seismic investigations in Alpine permafrost 24-channel equipment in combination with long data and trigger cables is used. Due to the harsh environment source and geophone layouts are often limited to 2D profiles. With prospect for future 3D-layouts we introduce an alternative of seismic equipment that can be used for several applications in Alpine permafrost. This study is focussed on controlled and natural source seismic experiments in Alpine permafrost using continuous data recording. With recent data from an ongoing project ("Permafrost in Austria") we will highlight the potential of the used seismic equipment for three applications: (a) seismic permafrost mapping of unconsolidated sediments, (b) seismic tomography in rock mass, and (c) passive seismic monitoring of rock falls. Single recording units (REFTEK 130, 6 channels) are used to continuously record the waveforms of both the seismic signals and a trigger signal. The combination of a small number of recording units with different types of geophones or a trigger allow numerous applications in Alpine permafrost with regard to a high efficiency and flexible seismic layouts (2D, 3D, 4D). The efficiency of the light and robust seismic equipment is achieved by the simple acquisition and the flexible and fast deployment of the (omni-directional) geophones. Further advantages are short (data and trigger) cables and the prevention of trigger errors. The processing of the data is aided by 'Seismon' which is an open source software project based on Matlab® and MySQL (see SM1.0). For active-source experiments automatic stacking of the seismic signals is implemented. For passive data a program for automatic detection of events (e.g. rock falls) is available which allows event localization. In summer 2008 the seismic equipment was used for the

  16. Empirical law for fault-creep events

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crough, S.T.; Burford, R.O.

    1977-01-01

    Fault-creep events measured on the San Andreas and related faults near Hollister, California, can be described by a rheological model consisting of a spring, power-law dashpotand sliding block connected in series. An empirical creep-event law, derived from many creep-event records analyzed within the constraints of the model, provides a remarkably simple and accurate representation of creep-event behavior. The empirical creep law is expressed by the equation: D(t)= Df [1-1/{ct(n-1)Dfn-1+1}/(n-1)] where D is the value of displacement at time t following the onset of an event, Df is the final equilibrium value of the event displacementand C is a proportionality constant. This discovery should help determine whether the time-displacement character of creep events is controlled by the material properties of fault gouge, or by other parameters. ?? 1977.

  17. Records Reaching Recording Data Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gresik, G. W. L.; Siebe, S.; Drewello, R.

    2013-07-01

    The goal of RECORDS (Reaching Recording Data Technologies) is the digital capturing of buildings and cultural heritage objects in hard-to-reach areas and the combination of data. It is achieved by using a modified crane from film industry, which is able to carry different measuring systems. The low-vibration measurement should be guaranteed by a gyroscopic controlled advice that has been , developed for the project. The data were achieved by using digital photography, UV-fluorescence photography, infrared reflectography, infrared thermography and shearography. Also a terrestrial 3D laser scanner and a light stripe topography scanner have been used The combination of the recorded data should ensure a complementary analysis of monuments and buildings.

  18. Oceanic oxygenation events in the anoxic Ediacaran ocean.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, S K; Planavsky, N J; Jiang, G; Kendall, B; Owens, J D; Wang, X; Shi, X; Anbar, A D; Lyons, T W

    2016-09-01

    The ocean-atmosphere system is typically envisioned to have gone through a unidirectional oxygenation with significant oxygen increases in the earliest (ca. 635 Ma), middle (ca. 580 Ma), or late (ca. 560 Ma) Ediacaran Period. However, temporally discontinuous geochemical data and the patchy metazoan fossil record have been inadequate to chart the details of Ediacaran ocean oxygenation, raising fundamental debates about the timing of ocean oxygenation, its purported unidirectional rise, and its causal relationship, if any, with the evolution of early animal life. To better understand the Ediacaran ocean redox evolution, we have conducted a multi-proxy paleoredox study of a relatively continuous, deep-water section in South China that was paleogeographically connected with the open ocean. Iron speciation and pyrite morphology indicate locally euxinic (anoxic and sulfidic) environments throughout the Ediacaran in this section. In the same rocks, redox sensitive element enrichments and sulfur isotope data provide evidence for multiple oceanic oxygenation events (OOEs) in a predominantly anoxic global Ediacaran-early Cambrian ocean. This dynamic redox landscape contrasts with a recent view of a redox-static Ediacaran ocean without significant change in oxygen content. The duration of the Ediacaran OOEs may be comparable to those of the oceanic anoxic events (OAEs) in otherwise well-oxygenated Phanerozoic oceans. Anoxic events caused mass extinctions followed by fast recovery in biologically diversified Phanerozoic oceans. In contrast, oxygenation events in otherwise ecologically monotonous anoxic Ediacaran-early Cambrian oceans may have stimulated biotic innovations followed by prolonged evolutionary stasis. PMID:27027776

  19. Assessing Special Events.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neff, Bonita Dostal

    Special events defined as being "newsworthy events" are becoming a way of American life. They are also a means for making a lot of money. Examples of special events that are cited most frequently are often the most minor of events; e.g., the open house, the new business opening day gala, or a celebration of some event in an organization. Little…

  20. An early extensional event of the South China Block during the Late Mesozoic recorded by the emplacement of the Late Jurassic syntectonic Hengshan Composite Granitic Massif (Hunan, SE China)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Wei; Chen, Yan; Faure, Michel; Martelet, Guillaume; Lin, Wei; Wang, Qingchen; Yan, Quanren; Hou, Quanlin

    2016-03-01

    Continental scaled extension is the major Late Mesozoic (Jurassic and Cretaceous) tectonic event in East Asia, characterized by faulting, magmatic intrusions and half-grabens in an area with a length of > 5000 km and a width of > 1000 km. Numerous studies have been conducted on this topic in the South China Block (SCB), However, the space and time ranges of the compressional or extensional regimes of the SCB during the Jurassic are still unclear, partly due to the lack of structural data. The emplacement fabrics of granitic plutons can help determine the regional tectonic background. In this study, a multidisciplinary approach, including Anisotropy of Magnetic Susceptibility (AMS), macro and microstructural analyses, quartz c-axis preferred orientation, gravity modeling and monazite EPMA dating, was conducted on the Hengshan composite granitic massif in SCB that consists of the Triassic Nanyue biotite granitic pluton and the Late Jurassic Baishifeng two-mica granitic pluton. The magnetic fabrics are characterized by a consistent NW-SE oriented lineation and weakly inclined foliation. A dominant high temperature deformation with a top-to-the-NW shear sense is identified for both plutons. The deformation increasing from the center of the Baishifeng pluton to its western border is associated to the development of the West Hengshan Boundary Fault (WHBF). The gravity modeling shows a "saw tooth-shaped" NE-SW oriented structure of the Baishifeng pluton, which may be considered as NE-SW oriented tension-gashes formed due to the NW-SE extension. All results show that the Triassic Nanyue pluton was deformed under post-solidus conditions by the WHBF coeval with the emplacement of the Late Jurassic Baishifeng pluton. All these observations comply with the NW-SE extensional tectonics coeval with the emplacement of the Baishifeng pluton, which argues that the NW-SE crustal stretching started since the Late Jurassic, at least in this part of the SCB.

  1. Evaluating the provenance of Permian-Triassic and Palaeocene-Eocene ash beds by high precision U-Pb and Lu-Hf isotopic analyses of zircons: linking local sedimentary records to global events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eivind Augland, Lars; Jones, Morgan; Planke, Sverre; Svensen, Henrik; Tegner, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Zircons are a powerful tool in geochronology and isotope geochemistry, as their affinity for U and Hf in the crystal structure and the low initial Pb and Lu allow for precise and accurate dating by U-Pb ID-TIMS and precise and accurate determination of initial Hf isotopic composition by solution MC-ICP-MS analysis. The U-Pb analyses provide accurate chronostratigraphic controls on the sedimentary successions and absolute age frames for the biotic evolution across geological boundaries. Moreover, the analyses of Lu-Hf by solution MC-ICP-MS after Hf-purification column chemistry provide a powerful and robust fingerprinting tool to test the provenance of individual ash beds. Here we focus on ash beds from Permian-Triassic and Palaeocene successions in Svalbard and from the Palaeocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) in Fur, Denmark. Used in combination with whole rock geochemistry from the ash layers and the available geochemical and isotopic data from potential source volcanoes, these data are used to evaluate the provenance of the Permian-Triassic and Palaeocene ashes preserved in Svalbard and PETM ashes in Denmark. If explosive eruptions from volcanic centres such as the Siberian Traps and the North Atlantic Igneous Province (NAIP) can be traced to distal basins as ash layers, they provide robust tests of hypotheses of global synchronicity of environmental changes and biotic crises. In addition, the potential correlation of ash layers with source volcanoes will aid in constraining the extent of explosive volcanism in the respective volcanic centres. The new integrated data sets will also contribute to establish new reference sections for the study of these boundary events when combined with stable isotope data and biostratigraphy.

  2. Solar Eruptive Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, Gordon D.

    2012-01-01

    It s long been known that the Sun plays host to the most energetic explosions in the solar system. But key insights into the forms that energy takes have only recently become available. Solar flares have been phenomena of both academic and practical interest since their discovery in 1859. From the academic point of view, they are the nearest events for studying the explosive release of energy in astrophysical magnetized plasmas. From the practical point of view, they disrupt communication channels on Earth, from telegraph communications in 1859 to radio and television signals today. Flares also wreak havoc on the electrical power grid, satellite operations, and GPS signals, and energetic charged particles and radiation are dangerous to passengers on high-altitude polar flights and to astronauts. Flares are not the only explosive phenomena on the Sun. More difficult to observe but equally energetic are the large coronal mass ejections (CMEs), the ejection of up to ten billion tons of magnetized plasma into the solar wind at speeds that can exceed 1000 km/s. CMEs are primarily observed from the side, with coronagraphs that block out the bright disk of the Sun and lower solar atmosphere so that light scattered from the ejected mass can be seen. Major geomagnetic storms are now known to arise from the interaction of CMEs with Earth's magnetosphere. Solar flares are observed without CMEs, and CMEs are observed without flares. The two phenomena often occur together, however, and almost always do in the case of large flares and fast CMEs. The term solar eruptive event refers to the combination of a flare and a CME. Solar eruptive events generate a lot of heat: They can heat plasma to temperatures as high at 50 million Kelvin, producing radiation across the electromagnetic spectrum. But that s not all. A fascinating aspect of solar eruptive events is the acceleration of electrons and ions to suprathermal often relativistic energies. The accelerated particles are primarily

  3. Modeling of the Nano- and Picoseismicity Rate Changes Resulting from Static Stress Triggering due to Small (MW2.2) Event Recorded at Mponeng Deep Gold Mine, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlowska, M.; Orlecka-Sikora, B.; Kwiatek, G.; Boettcher, M. S.; Dresen, G. H.

    2014-12-01

    Static stress changes following large earthquakes are known to affect the rate and spatio-temporal distribution of the aftershocks. Here we utilize a unique dataset of M ≥ -3.4 earthquakes following a MW 2.2 earthquake in Mponeng gold mine, South Africa, to investigate this process for nano- and pico- scale seismicity at centimeter length scales in shallow, mining conditions. The aftershock sequence was recorded during a quiet interval in the mine and thus enabled us to perform the analysis using Dietrich's (1994) rate and state dependent friction law. The formulation for earthquake productivity requires estimation of Coulomb stress changes due to the mainshock, the reference seismicity rate, frictional resistance parameter, and the duration of aftershock relaxation time. We divided the area into six depth intervals and for each we estimated the parameters and modeled the spatio-temporal patterns of seismicity rates after the stress perturbation. Comparing the modeled patterns of seismicity with the observed distribution we found that while the spatial patterns match well, the rate of modeled aftershocks is lower than the observed rate. To test our model, we used four metrics of the goodness-of-fit evaluation. Testing procedure allowed rejecting the null hypothesis of no significant difference between seismicity rates only for one depth interval containing the mainshock, for the other, no significant differences have been found. Results show that mining-induced earthquakes may be followed by a stress relaxation expressed through aftershocks located on the rupture plane and in regions of positive Coulomb stress change. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the main features of the temporal and spatial distribution of very small, mining-induced earthquakes at shallow depths can be successfully determined using rate- and state-based stress modeling.

  4. Event Segmentation Ability Uniquely Predicts Event Memory

    PubMed Central

    Sargent, Jesse Q.; Zacks, Jeffrey M.; Hambrick, David Z.; Zacks, Rose T.; Kurby, Christopher A.; Bailey, Heather R.; Eisenberg, Michelle L.; Beck, Taylor M.

    2013-01-01

    Memory for everyday events plays a central role in tasks of daily living, autobiographical memory, and planning. Event memory depends in part on segmenting ongoing activity into meaningful units. This study examined the relationship between event segmentation and memory in a lifespan sample to answer the following question: Is the ability to segment activity into meaningful events a unique predictor of subsequent memory, or is the relationship between event perception and memory accounted for by general cognitive abilities? Two hundred and eight adults ranging from 20 to 79 years old segmented movies of everyday events and attempted to remember the events afterwards. They also completed psychometric ability tests and tests measuring script knowledge for everyday events. Event segmentation and script knowledge both explained unique variance in event memory above and beyond the psychometric measures, and did so as strongly in older as in younger adults. These results suggest that event segmentation is a basic cognitive mechanism, important for memory across the lifespan. PMID:23942350

  5. Rain event properties and dimensionless rain event hyetographs at the source of the Blue Nile River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haile, A. T.; Rientjes, T.; Habib, E.; Jetten, V.

    2010-08-01

    In the present study, the spatial and temporal patterns of the rain event properties are analysed. The event properties are rain event depth, event duration, mean event intensity, peak intensity and the time span between two consecutive rain events which is referred to as inter-event time (IET). Dimensionless event hyetographs are established by relating fractions of event intensities to the corresponding fractions of event durations. The spatial variation of the characteristics of the hyetographs is also evaluated. A model in the form of the beta distribution function is applied to reproduce the dimensionless hyetographs. Rainfall data is obtained from a field campaign in two wet seasons of June-August (JJA) of 2007 and 2008 in the Gilgel Abbay watershed that is situated at the source basin of the upper Blue Nile River in Ethiopia. The rainfall data was recorded at eight stations. The results reveal that rain event depth is more related to peak intensity than to event duration. At the start and towards the end of the wet season, the rain events have larger depth with longer duration and longer IET than the rain events in the mid-season. Mean event intensity and IET are strongly related to terrain elevation. Sekela which is on a mountain area has the shortest IET while Bahir Dar which is at the south shore of the lake has the longest IET.

  6. Coherent emission in fast radio bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, J. I.

    2014-05-01

    The fast (ms) radio bursts reported by Lorimer et al. Science 318, 777 (2007) and Thornton et al. Science 341, 53 (2013) have extremely high brightness temperatures if at the inferred cosmological distances. This implies coherent emission by "bunches" of charges. Fast radio bursts, like the giant pulses of the Crab pulsar, display banded spectra that may be harmonics of plasma frequency emission by plasma turbulence and are inconsistent with emission by charge distributions moving relativistically. We model the emission region as a screen of half-wave dipole radiators resonant around the frequencies of observation, the maximally bright emission mechanism of nonrelativistic charges, and calculate the implied charge bunching. From this we infer the minimum electron energy required to overcome electrostatic repulsion. If fast radio bursts are the counterparts of Galactic events, their Galactic counterparts may be detected from any direction above the horizon by radio telescopes in their far sidelobes or by small arrays of dipoles.

  7. Event-Based Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Russell G.

    1992-01-01

    Suggests that an event-based science curriculum can provide the framework for deciding what to retain in an overloaded science curriculum. Provides examples of current events and the science concepts explored related to the event. (MDH)

  8. Fast Vegetational Responses to Late-Glacial Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, J. W.; Post, D. M.; Cwynar, L. C.; Lotter, A. F.; Levesque, A. J.

    2001-12-01

    How rapidly can natural ecosystems respond to rapid climate change? This question can be addressed by studying paired paleoecological and paleoclimatological records spanning the last deglaciation. Between 16 and 10 ka, abrupt climatic oscillations (e.g. Younger Dryas, Gerzensee/Killarney Oscillations) interrupted the general warming trend. Rates of climate change during these events were as fast or faster than projected rates of change for this century. We compiled a dozen high-resolution lacustrine records in North America and Europe with a pollen record and independent climatic proxy, a clear Younger Dryas signal, and good age control. Cross-correlation analysis suggests that vegetation responded rapidly to late-glacial climate change, with significant changes in vegetation composition occurring within the lifespan of individual trees. At all sites, vegetation lagged climate by less than 200 years, and at two-thirds of the sites, the initial vegetational response occurred within 100 years. The finding of rapid vegetational responses is consistent across sites and continents, and is similar to the 100-200 year response times predicted by gap-scale forest models. Likely mechanisms include 1) increased susceptibility of mature trees to disturbances such as fire, wind, and disease, thereby opening up gaps for colonization, 2) the proximity of these sites to late-glacial treeline, where climate may directly control plant population densities and range limits, 3) the presence of herbaceous taxa with short generation times in these plant communities, and 4) rapid migration due to rare long-distance seed dispersals. Our results are consistent with reports that plant ranges are already shifting in response to recent climate change, and suggest that these shifts will persist for the next several centuries. Widespread changes in plant distributions may affect surface-atmosphere interactions and will challenge attempts to manage ecosystems and conserve biodiversity.

  9. Rb-Sr isotopic composition of granites in the Western Krušné hory/Erzgebirge pluton, Central Europe: record of variations in source lithologies, mafic magma input and postmagmatic hydrothermal events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolejš, David; Bendl, Jiří; Štemprok, Miroslav

    2016-03-01

    the chemical composition of crustal sources, in the degree of fractional melting and fractional crystallization, and of possibly repeated postmagmatic hydrothermal events.

  10. Fast Breeder Reactor studies

    SciTech Connect

    Till, C.E.; Chang, Y.I.; Kittel, J.H.; Fauske, H.K.; Lineberry, M.J.; Stevenson, M.G.; Amundson, P.I.; Dance, K.D.

    1980-07-01

    This report is a compilation of Fast Breeder Reactor (FBR) resource documents prepared to provide the technical basis for the US contribution to the International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Evaluation. The eight separate parts deal with the alternative fast breeder reactor fuel cycles in terms of energy demand, resource base, technical potential and current status, safety, proliferation resistance, deployment, and nuclear safeguards. An Annex compares the cost of decommissioning light-water and fast breeder reactors. Separate abstracts are included for each of the parts.

  11. Reusable fast opening switch

    DOEpatents

    Van Devender, J.P.; Emin, D.

    1983-12-21

    A reusable fast opening switch for transferring energy, in the form of a high power pulse, from an electromagnetic storage device such as an inductor into a load. The switch is efficient, compact, fast and reusable. The switch comprises a ferromagnetic semiconductor which undergoes a fast transition between conductive and metallic states at a critical temperature and which undergoes the transition without a phase change in its crystal structure. A semiconductor such as europium rich europhous oxide, which undergoes a conductor to insulator transition when it is joule heated from its conductor state, can be used to form the switch.

  12. fast-matmul

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2014-11-26

    This software provides implementations of fast matrix multiplication algorithms. These algorithms perform fewer floating point operations than the classical cubic algorithm. The software uses code generation to automatically implement the fast algorithms based on high-level descriptions. The code serves two general purposes. The first is to demonstrate that these fast algorithms can out-perform vendor matrix multiplication algorithms for modest problem sizes on a single machine. The second is to rapidly prototype many variations of fastmore » matrix multiplication algorithms to encourage future research in this area. The implementations target sequential and shared memory parallel execution.« less

  13. Fasting and cognitive function.

    PubMed

    Pollitt, E; Lewis, N L; Garza, C; Shulman, R J

    The effects of short-term fasting (skipping breakfast) on the problem-solving performance of 9 to 11 yr old children were studied under the controlled conditions of a metabolic ward. The behavioral test battery included an assessment of IQ, the Matching Familiar Figure Test and Hagen Central Incidental Test. Glucose and insulin levels were measured in blood. All assessments were made under fasting and non-fasting conditions. Skipping breakfast was found to have adverse effects on the children's late morning problem-solving performance. These findings support observations that the timing and nutrient composition of meals have acute and demonstrable effects on behavior. PMID:6764933

  14. 12 CFR 1235.5 - Record hold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... OFFICE OF FINANCE § 1235.5 Record hold. (a) Notification by FHFA. In the event that FHFA is requiring a... regulated entity or the Office of Finance or an employee, or otherwise has actual knowledge that an issue...

  15. 12 CFR 749.3 - Vital records center.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... PRESERVATION PROGRAM AND APPENDICES-RECORD RETENTION GUIDELINES; CATASTROPHIC ACT PREPAREDNESS GUIDELINES § 749... avoid the simultaneous loss of both sets of records in the event of a catastrophic act. A credit...

  16. Fast dynamic processes of solar radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Tomson, Teolan

    2010-02-15

    This paper studies dynamic processes of fast-alternating solar radiation which are assessed by alternation of clouds. Most attention is devoted to clouds of type Cumulus Humilis, identified through visual recognition and/or a specially constructed automatic sensor. One second sampling period was used. Recorded data series were analyzed with regard to duration of illuminated 'windows' between shadows, their stochastic intervals, fronts and the magnitude of increments of solar irradiance. (author)

  17. Acid-fast stain

    MedlinePlus