Science.gov

Sample records for fast high current

  1. Fast high-temperature superconductor switch for high current applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solovyov, Vyacheslav F.; Li, Qiang

    2013-07-01

    Reversible operation of a high current superconductor switch based on the quench of high-resistance second generation high temperature superconducting wire is demonstrated. The quench is induced by a burst of an ac field generated by an inductively coupled radio-frequency coil. The switch makes a superconducting-to-normal transition within 5 ms and also has a rapid recovery to the superconducting state. The device has potential applications as an active current limiter or as a storage switch for superconducting magnetic energy storage systems. Operation in a full flux penetration/flow regime can effectively minimize the detrimental effects of the intrinsic conductor non-uniformity.

  2. Generation of sheet currents by high frequency fast MHD waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Núñez, Manuel

    2016-07-01

    The evolution of fast magnetosonic waves of high frequency propagating into an axisymmetric equilibrium plasma is studied. By using the methods of weakly nonlinear geometrical optics, it is shown that the perturbation travels in the equatorial plane while satisfying a transport equation which enables us to predict the time and location of formation of shock waves. For plasmas of large magnetic Prandtl number, this would result into the creation of sheet currents which may give rise to magnetic reconnection and destruction of the original equilibrium.

  3. Formation of fast ``notched'' current waveforms through a high inductance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spanjers, G.; Nelson, B. A.; Ribe, F. L.

    1991-10-01

    A fast ``notch'' current has been produced on the (4 μH) hardcore central conductor [C. M. Greenfield, M. E. Koepke, and F. L. Ribe, Phys. Fluids B 2, 133 (1990)] of the high beta Q machine, a 2.6 m theta pinch [S. O. Knox, H. Meuth, E. Sevillano, and F. L. Ribe, 3rd IEEE International Pulsed Power Conf., 1981, IEEE Publ. 81 CH1662/6, paper 3.1]. With the notch circuitry, the current can be slowly (τ1/4 = 14 μs) brought to a crowbarred dc value (20 kA) and then quickly (τ1/4 = 1.3 μs) ``notched'' to a different value (typically either 0 kA or twice the dc value) and then quickly returned to the dc value. The use of a new inductively loaded spark gap switch eliminates extraneous ringing in the final crowbarred current waveform. As described here, by driving the hardcore circuit with two isolated capacitor banks, and a voltage stepup transformer, the notch current is created using spark gaps and ignitrons for switching, resulting in an inexpensive and technically simple circuit.

  4. High frequency fast wave current drive for DEMO

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, R.; Lerche, E.; Van Eester, D.

    2011-12-23

    A steady-state tokamak reactor (SSTR) requires a high efficiency current drive system, from plug to driven mega-amps. RF systems working in the ion-cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) have high efficiency from plug to antenna but a limited current drive (CD) efficiency and centrally peaked CD profiles. The latter feature is not adequate for a SSTR where the current should be sufficiently broad to keep the central safety factor (possibly significantly) above 1. In addition, the fact that the fast wave (FW) is evanescent at the edge limits coupling, requiring high voltage operation, which makes the system dependent on plasma edge properties and prone to arcing, reducing its reliability. A possible way to overcome these weaknesses is to operate at higher frequency (10 times or more the cyclotron frequency). The advantages are: (1) The coupling can be much better (waves propagate in vacuum) if the parallel refractive index n{sub ||} is kept below one, (2) The FW group velocity tends to align to the magnetic field, so the power circumnavigates the magnetic axis and can drive off-axis current, (3) Due to the latter property, n{sub ||} can be upshifted along the wave propagation path, allowing low n{sub ||} launch (hence good coupling, large CD efficiency) with ultimately good electron absorption (which requires higher n{sub ||}. Note however that the n{sub ||} upshift is a self-organized feature, that electron absorption is in competition with {alpha}-particle absorption and that uncoupling of the FW from the lower hybrid resonance at the edge requires n{sub ||} slightly above one. The latter possibly counterproductive features might complicate the picture. The different aspects of this potentially attractive off-axis FWCD scheme are discussed.

  5. Fast thermonuclear ignition with two nested high current lower voltage - high voltage lower current magnetically insulated transmission lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winterberg, F.

    2003-11-01

    Fast thermonuclear ignition with a high gain seems possible with two Marx generators feeding two nested magnetically insulated transmission lines, one delivering a high current lower voltage pulse for compression and confinement, and one delivering a high voltage lower current pulse for fast ignition. With an input energy conceivably as small as 100 kJ the gain can be as large as 10 3. The concept not only would be by orders of magnitude less expensive than laser compression and fast ignition schemes, but because of the large gain with a small yield also be more suitable for a thermonuclear reactor.

  6. High-current, fast-switching transistor development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hower, P. L.

    1981-01-01

    The design, wafer-processing techniques, and various measurements which include forward safe operating area, dc characteristics, and switching times are described for a larger-diameter (33) transistor. An improved base contact for equalizing the base-emitter voltage at high currents was developed along with an improved emitter contact preform which increases the silicon area available for current conduction. The electrical performance achieved is consistent with the proposed optimum design.

  7. FAST ACTING CURRENT SWITCH

    DOEpatents

    Batzer, T.H.; Cummings, D.B.; Ryan, J.F.

    1962-05-22

    A high-current, fast-acting switch is designed for utilization as a crowbar switch in a high-current circuit such as used to generate the magnetic confinement field of a plasma-confining and heat device, e.g., Pyrotron. The device particularly comprises a cylindrical housing containing two stationary, cylindrical contacts between which a movable contact is bridged to close the switch. The movable contact is actuated by a differential-pressure, airdriven piston assembly also within the housing. To absorb the acceleration (and the shock imparted to the device by the rapidly driven, movable contact), an adjustable air buffer assembly is provided, integrally connected to the movable contact and piston assembly. Various safety locks and circuit-synchronizing means are also provided to permit proper cooperation of the invention and the high-current circuit in which it is installed. (AEC)

  8. High efficiency off-axis current drive by high frequency fast waves

    SciTech Connect

    Prater, R.; Pinsker, R. I.; Moeller, C. P.; Porkolab, M.; Vdovin, V.

    2014-02-12

    Modeling work shows that current drive can be done off-axis with high efficiency, as required for FNSF and DEMO, by using very high harmonic fast waves (“helicons” or “whistlers”). The modeling indicates that plasmas with high electron beta are needed in order for the current drive to take place off-axis, making DIII-D a highly suitable test vehicle for this process. The calculations show that the driven current is not very sensitive to the launched value of n{sub ∥}, a result that can be understood from examination of the evolution of n{sub ∥} as the waves propagate in the plasma. Because of this insensitivity, relatively large values (∼3) of n{sub ∥} can be launched, thereby avoiding some of the problems with mode conversion in the boundary found in some previous experiments. Use of a traveling wave antenna provides a very narrow n{sub ∥} spectrum, which also helps avoid mode conversion.

  9. Modeling of high harmonic fast wave current drive on EAST tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Li, J. C.; Gong, X. Y. Li, F. Y.; Dong, J. Q.; Gao, Q. D.; Zhang, N.

    2015-10-15

    High harmonic fast waves (HHFW) are among the candidates for non-inductive current drive (CD), which is essential for long-pulse or steady-state operation of tokamaks. Current driven with HHFW in EAST tokamak plasmas is numerically studied. The HHFW CD efficiency is found to increase non-monotonically with the wave frequency, and this phenomenon is attributed to the multi-pass absorption of HHFW. The sensitivity of CD efficiency to the value of the parallel refraction index of the launched wave is confirmed. The quasilinear effects, assessed as significant in HHFW current drive with the GENRAY/CQL3D package, cause a significant increase in CD efficiency as RF power is increased, which is very different from helicon current drive. Simulations for a range of toroidal dc electric fields, in combination with a range of fast wave powers, are also presented and indicate that the presence of the DC field can also enhance the CD efficiency.

  10. Modeling of high harmonic fast wave current drive on EAST tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J. C.; Gong, X. Y.; Dong, J. Q.; Gao, Q. D.; Zhang, N.; Li, F. Y.

    2015-10-01

    High harmonic fast waves (HHFW) are among the candidates for non-inductive current drive (CD), which is essential for long-pulse or steady-state operation of tokamaks. Current driven with HHFW in EAST tokamak plasmas is numerically studied. The HHFW CD efficiency is found to increase non-monotonically with the wave frequency, and this phenomenon is attributed to the multi-pass absorption of HHFW. The sensitivity of CD efficiency to the value of the parallel refraction index of the launched wave is confirmed. The quasilinear effects, assessed as significant in HHFW current drive with the GENRAY/CQL3D package, cause a significant increase in CD efficiency as RF power is increased, which is very different from helicon current drive. Simulations for a range of toroidal dc electric fields, in combination with a range of fast wave powers, are also presented and indicate that the presence of the DC field can also enhance the CD efficiency.

  11. The high current, fast, 100ns, Linear Transformer Driver (LTD) developmental project at Sandia National Laboratories.

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, Kevin S.; Long, Finis W.; Sinebryukhov, Vadim A. , Tomsk, Russia); Kim, Alexandre A. , Tomsk, RUSSIA); Wakeland, Peter Eric; McKee, G. Randall; Woodworth, Joseph Ray; McDaniel, Dillon Heirman; Fowler, William E.; Mazarakis, Michael Gerrassimos; Porter, John Larry, Jr.; Struve, Kenneth William; Stygar, William A.; LeChien, Keith R.; Matzen, Maurice Keith

    2010-04-01

    Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, N.M., USA, in collaboration with the High Current Electronic Institute (HCEI), Tomsk, Russia, is developing a new paradigm in pulsed power technology: the Linear Transformer Driver (LTD) technology. This technological approach can provide very compact devices that can deliver very fast high current and high voltage pulses straight out of the cavity with out any complicated pulse forming and pulse compression network. Through multistage inductively insulated voltage adders, the output pulse, increased in voltage amplitude, can be applied directly to the load. The load may be a vacuum electron diode, a z-pinch wire array, a gas puff, a liner, an isentropic compression load (ICE) to study material behavior under very high magnetic fields, or a fusion energy (IFE) target. This is because the output pulse rise time and width can be easily tailored to the specific application needs. In this paper we briefly summarize the developmental work done in Sandia and HCEI during the last few years, and describe our new MYKONOS Sandia High Current LTD Laboratory.

  12. A DEMO relevant fast wave current drive high harmonic antenna exploiting the high impedance technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milanesio, D.; Maggiora, R.

    2015-12-01

    Ion Cyclotron (IC) antennas are routinely adopted in most of the existing nuclear fusion experiments, even though their main goal, i.e. to couple high power to the plasma (MW), is often limited by rather severe drawbacks due to high fields on the antenna itself and on the unmatched part of the feeding lines. In addition to the well exploited auxiliary ion heating during the start-up phase, some non-ohmic current drive (CD) at the IC range of frequencies may be explored in view of the DEMO reactor. In this work, we suggest and describe a compact high frequency DEMO relevant antenna, based on the high impedance surfaces concept. High-impedance surfaces are periodic metallic structures (patches) usually displaced on top of a dielectric substrate and grounded by means of vertical posts embedded inside the dielectric, in a mushroom-like shape. These structures present a high impedance, within a given frequency band, such that the image currents are in-phase with the currents of the antenna itself, thus determining a significant efficiency increase. After a general introduction on the properties of high impedance surfaces, we analyze, by means of numerical codes, a dielectric based and a full metal solution optimized to be tested and benchmarked on the FTU experiment fed with generators at 433MHz.

  13. A DEMO relevant fast wave current drive high harmonic antenna exploiting the high impedance technique

    SciTech Connect

    Milanesio, D. Maggiora, R.

    2015-12-10

    Ion Cyclotron (IC) antennas are routinely adopted in most of the existing nuclear fusion experiments, even though their main goal, i.e. to couple high power to the plasma (MW), is often limited by rather severe drawbacks due to high fields on the antenna itself and on the unmatched part of the feeding lines. In addition to the well exploited auxiliary ion heating during the start-up phase, some non-ohmic current drive (CD) at the IC range of frequencies may be explored in view of the DEMO reactor. In this work, we suggest and describe a compact high frequency DEMO relevant antenna, based on the high impedance surfaces concept. High-impedance surfaces are periodic metallic structures (patches) usually displaced on top of a dielectric substrate and grounded by means of vertical posts embedded inside the dielectric, in a mushroom-like shape. These structures present a high impedance, within a given frequency band, such that the image currents are in-phase with the currents of the antenna itself, thus determining a significant efficiency increase. After a general introduction on the properties of high impedance surfaces, we analyze, by means of numerical codes, a dielectric based and a full metal solution optimized to be tested and benchmarked on the FTU experiment fed with generators at 433MHz.

  14. Development and fabrication of a high current, fast recovery power diode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berman, A. H.; Balodis, V.; Devance, D. C.; Gaugh, C. E.; Karlsson, E. A.

    1983-01-01

    A high voltage (VR = 1200 V), high current (IF = 150 A), fast recovery ( 700 ns) and low forward voltage drop ( 1.5 V) silicon rectifier was designed and the process developed for its fabrication. For maximum purity, uniformity and material characteristic stability, neutron transmutation n-type doped float zone silicon is used. The design features a hexagonal chip for maximum area utilization of space available in the DO-8 diode package, PIN diffused junction structure with deep diffused D(+) anode and a shallow high concentration n(+) cathode. With the high temperature glass passivated positive bevel mesa junction termination, the achieved blocking voltage is close to the theoretical limit of the starting material. Gold diffusion is used to control the lifetime and the resulting effect on switching speed and forward voltage tradeoff. For solder reflow assembly, trimetal (Al-Ti-Ni) contacts are used. The required major device electrical characteristics were achieved. Due to the tradeoff nature of forward voltage drop and reverse recovery time, a compromise was reached for these values.

  15. High current, 0.5-MA, fast, 100-ns, linear transformer driver experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazarakis, Michael G.; Fowler, William E.; Kim, Alexander A.; Sinebryukhov, Vadim A.; Rogowski, Sonrisa T.; Sharpe, Robin A.; McDaniel, Dillon H.; Olson, Craig L.; Porter, John L.; Struve, Kenneth W.; Stygar, William A.; Woodworth, Joseph R.

    2009-05-01

    The linear transformer driver (LTD) is a new method for constructing high current, high-voltage pulsed accelerators. The salient feature of the approach is switching and inductively adding the pulses at low voltage straight out of the capacitors through low inductance transfer and soft iron core isolation. Sandia National Laboratories are actively pursuing the development of a new class of accelerator based on the LTD technology. Presently, the high current LTD experimental research is concentrated on two aspects: first, to study the repetition rate capabilities, reliability, reproducibility of the output pulses, switch prefires, jitter, electrical power and energy efficiency, and lifetime measurements of the cavity active components; second, to study how a multicavity linear array performs in a voltage adder configuration relative to current transmission, energy and power addition, and wall plug to output pulse electrical efficiency. Here we report the repetition rate and lifetime studies performed in the Sandia High Current LTD Laboratory. We first utilized the prototype ˜0.4-MA, LTD I cavity which could be reliably operated up to ±90-kV capacitor charging. Later we obtained an improved 0.5-MA, LTD II version that can be operated at ±100kV maximum charging voltage. The experimental results presented here were obtained with both cavities and pertain to evaluating the maximum achievable repetition rate and LTD cavity performance. The voltage adder experiments with a series of double sized cavities (1 MA, ±100kV) will be reported in future publications.

  16. New methods for high current fast ion beam production by laser-driven acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Margarone, D.; Krasa, J.; Prokupek, J.; Velyhan, A.; Laska, L.; Jungwirth, K.; Mocek, T.; Korn, G.; Rus, B.; Torrisi, L.; Gammino, S.; Cirrone, P.; Cutroneo, M.; Romano, F.; Picciotto, A.; Serra, E.; Giuffrida, L.; Mangione, A.; Rosinski, M.; Parys, P.; and others

    2012-02-15

    An overview of the last experimental campaigns on laser-driven ion acceleration performed at the PALS facility in Prague is given. Both the 2 TW, sub-nanosecond iodine laser system and the 20 TW, femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser, recently installed at PALS, are used along our experiments performed in the intensity range 10{sup 16}-10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}. The main goal of our studies was to generate high energy, high current ion streams at relatively low laser intensities. The discussed experimental investigations show promising results in terms of maximum ion energy and current density, which make the laser-accelerated ion beams a candidate for new-generation ion sources to be employed in medicine, nuclear physics, matter physics, and industry.

  17. HEATING AND CURRENT DRIVE IN NSTX WITH ELECTRON BERNSTEIN WAVES AND HIGH HARMONIC FAST WAVES

    SciTech Connect

    Ram, Abhay K

    2010-06-14

    A suitable theoretical and computational framework for studying heating and current drive by electron Bernstein waves in the National Spherical Torus Experiment has been developed. This framework can also be used to study heating and current drive by electron Bernstein waves in spherical tori and other magnetic confinement devices. It is also useful in studying the propagation and damping of electron cyclotron waves in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor

  18. The high current, fast, 100ns, Linear Transformer Driver (LTD) developmental project at Sandia Laboratories and HCEI.

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, Kevin S.; Long, Finis W.; Sinebryukhov, Vadim A. , Tomsk, Russia); Kim, Alexandre A. , Tomsk, Russia); Wakeland, Peter Eric; McKee, G. Randall; Woodworth, Joseph Ray; McDaniel, Dillon Heirman; Fowler, William E.; Mazarakis, Michael Gerrassimos; Porter, John Larry, Jr.; Struve, Kenneth William; Savage, Mark Edward; Stygar, William A.; LeChien, Keith R.; Matzen, Maurice Keith

    2010-09-01

    Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, N.M., USA, in collaboration with the High Current Electronic Institute (HCEI), Tomsk, Russia, is developing a new paradigm in pulsed power technology: the Linear Transformer Driver (LTD) technology. This technological approach can provide very compact devices that can deliver very fast high current and high voltage pulses straight out of the cavity with out any complicated pulse forming and pulse compression network. Through multistage inductively insulated voltage adders, the output pulse, increased in voltage amplitude, can be applied directly to the load. The load may be a vacuum electron diode, a z-pinch wire array, a gas puff, a liner, an isentropic compression load (ICE) to study material behavior under very high magnetic fields, or a fusion energy (IFE) target. This is because the output pulse rise time and width can be easily tailored to the specific application needs. In this paper we briefly summarize the developmental work done in Sandia and HCEI during the last few years, and describe our new MYKONOS Sandia High Current LTD Laboratory. An extensive evaluation of the LTD technology is being performed at SNL and the High Current Electronic Institute (HCEI) in Tomsk Russia. Two types of High Current LTD cavities (LTD I-II, and 1-MA LTD) were constructed and tested individually and in a voltage adder configuration (1-MA cavity only). All cavities performed remarkably well and the experimental results are in full agreement with analytical and numerical calculation predictions. A two-cavity voltage adder is been assembled and currently undergoes evaluation. This is the first step towards the completion of the 10-cavity, 1-TW module. This MYKONOS voltage adder will be the first ever IVA built with a transmission line insulated with deionized water. The LTD II cavity renamed LTD III will serve as a test bed for evaluating a number of different types of switches, resistors, alternative capacitor configurations, cores

  19. High Harmonic Fast Wave Heating Efficiency Enhancemen and Current Drive at Longer Wavelength on the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    J. Hosea, R. E. Bell, B.P. LeBlanc, C.K. Phillips, G. Taylor, E. Valeo, J.R. Wilson, E.F. Jaeger, P.M. Ryan, J. Wilgen, H. Yuh, F. Levinton, S. Sabbagh, K. Tritz, J. Parker, P.T. Bonoli, R. Harvey, and the NSTX Team

    2008-01-14

    High harmonic fast wave heating and current drive (CD) are being developed on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [M. Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 41, 1435 (2001)] for supporting startup and sustainment of the ST plasma. Considerable enhancement of the core heating efficiency (η) from 44% to 65% has been obtained for CD phasing of the antenna (strap-to-strap φ = -90o, kφ = -8 m-1) by increasing the magnetic field from 4.5 kG to 5.5 kG. This increase in efficiency is strongly correlated to moving the location of the onset density for perpendicular fast wave propagation (nonset ∝ ΒΦ× k|| 2/w) away from the antenna face and wall, and hence reducing the propagating surface wave fields. RF waves propagating close to the wall at lower BΦ and k|| can enhance power losses from both the parametric decay instability (PDI) and wave dissipation in sheaths and structures around the machine. The improved efficiency found here is attributed to a reduction in the latter, as PDI losses are little changed at the higher magnetic field. Under these conditions of higher coupling efficiency, initial measurements of localized CD effects have been made and compared with advanced RF code simulations

  20. High harmonic fast wave heating efficiency enhancement and current drive at longer wavelength on the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Hosea, J.; Bell, R. E.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Phillips, C. K.; Taylor, G.; Valeo, E.; Wilson, J. R.; Jaeger, E. F.; Ryan, P. M.; Wilgen, J.; Yuh, H.; Levinton, F.; Sabbagh, S.; Tritz, K.; Parker, J.; Bonoli, P. T.; Harvey, R.

    2008-05-15

    High harmonic fast wave heating and current drive (CD) are being developed on the National Spherical Torus Experiment [M. Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 41, 1435 (2001)] for supporting startup and sustainment of the spherical torus plasma. Considerable enhancement of the core heating efficiency ({eta}) from 44% to 65% has been obtained for CD phasing of the antenna (strap-to-strap {phi}=-90 deg., k{sub {phi}}=-8 m{sup -1}) by increasing the magnetic field from 4.5 to 5.5 kG. This increase in efficiency is strongly correlated to moving the location of the onset density for perpendicular fast wave propagation (n{sub onset}{proportional_to}Bxk{sub parallel}{sup 2}/{omega}) away from the antenna face and wall, and hence reducing the propagating surface wave fields. Radio frequency (RF) waves propagating close to the wall at lower B and k{sub parallel} can enhance power losses from both the parametric decay instability (PDI) and wave dissipation in sheaths and structures around the machine. The improved efficiency found here is attributed to a reduction in the latter, as PDI losses are little changed at the higher magnetic field. Under these conditions of higher coupling efficiency, initial measurements of localized CD effects have been made and compared with advanced RF code simulations.

  1. High Harmonic Fast Wave Heating Efficiency Enhancement and Current Drive at Longer Wavelength on the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Hosea, J.; Bell, R. E.; LeBlanc, B; Phillips, Cynthia; Taylor, G.; Valeo, Dr Ernest; Wilson, J. R.; Jaeger, Erwin Frederick; Ryan, Philip Michael; Wilgen, John B; Yuh, H.; Levinton, F.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Tritz, K.; Parker, J.; Bonoli, P.; Harvey, R. W.

    2008-01-01

    High harmonic fast wave heating and current drive CD are being developed on the National Spherical Torus Experiment M. Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 41, 1435 2001 for supporting startup and sustainment of the spherical torus plasma. Considerable enhancement of the core heating efficiency from 44% to 65% has been obtained for CD phasing of the antenna strap-to-strap = 90 , k= 8 m 1 by increasing the magnetic field from 4.5 to 5.5 kG. This increase in efficiency is strongly correlated to moving the location of the onset density for perpendicular fast wave propagation nonsetBk 2 / away from the antenna face and wall, and hence reducing the propagating surface wave fields. Radio frequency RF waves propagating close to the wall at lower B and k can enhance power losses from both the parametric decay instability PDI and wave dissipation in sheaths and structures around the machine. The improved efficiency found here is attributed to a reduction in the latter, as PDI losses are little changed at the higher magnetic field. Under these conditions of higher coupling efficiency, initial measurements of localized CD effects have been made and compared with advanced RF code simulations.

  2. High Non-inductive Fraction H-mode Discharges Generated by High-harmonic Fast Wave Heating and Current Drive in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, G.; Hosea, J.; Kessel, C. E.; LeBlanc, B; Mueller, D.; Phillips, C. K.; Valeo, E. J.; Wilson, J. R.; Ryan, Philip Michael; Bonoli, P.; Harvey, R. W.

    2012-01-01

    A deuterium H-mode discharge with a plasma current of 300 kA, an axial toroidal magnetic field of 0.55 T, and a calculated non-inductive plasma current fraction of 0.7 1 has been generated in the National Spherical Torus Experiment by 1.4MW of 30MHz high-harmonic fast wave (HHFW) heating and current drive. Seventy-five percent of the non-inductive current was generated inside an internal transport barrier that formed at a normalized minor radius 0.4. Three quarters of the non-inductive current was bootstrap current, and the remaining non-inductive current was generated directly by HHFW power inside a normalized minor radius 0.2. VC 2012 American Institute of Physics.

  3. Progress on High Harmonic Fast Wave Heating and Current Drive on NSTX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, P. M.; Berry, L. A.; Jaeger, E. F.; Wilgen, J. B.; Bell, R. E.; Hosea, J. C.; Leblanc, B. P.; Phillips, C. K.; Taylor, G.; Valeo, E. J.; Wilson, J. R.; Yuh, H.

    2008-11-01

    The recent improvement of the 30 MHz HHFW heating efficiency at lower toroidal wavenumbers in helium plasmas [1] has been extended to deuterium operation at BT(0) = 0.55 T on NSTX. The key to effective power penetration of the edge plasma is the reduction of the plasma density near the Faraday screen/first wall [2]. For deuterium plasmas, it was necessary to use lithium wall conditioning to control the density rise that often accompanies high power RF operation, particularly at the lower toroidal wavenumbers achievable with the 12-element phased-array launcher. The HHFW power deposition at k|| = -8 m-1 is comparable to that of k|| = -14 m-1, and core heating at k|| = -3 m-1 has now been observed, albeit at lower efficiency. Central electron temperatures of 5 keV have been achieved in both deuterium and helium plasmas with 3.1 MW at k|| = -14 m-1 (-150^o relative phase shift). Central heating of NBI-driven H-mode plasmas has been observed for both k|| = 14 and 8 m-1. [1] Hosea, J. et al, Physics of Plasmas 15, 056104 (2008) [2] Hosea, J. et al, poster at this conference

  4. Characterization of the electrical resistance of high temperature superconductor coated conductors at high currents using ultra-fast regulated current pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirois, Frédéric; Coulombe, Jonathan; Roy, François; Dutoit, Bertrand

    2010-03-01

    This paper focuses on the experimental determination of the electrical resistance (R) of commercial high temperature superconductor (HTS) coated conductors (CCs) at currents well above the critical current. The major novelty of this work rests on the unique experimental capability of applying constant current pulses in the sample (up to 1000 A) for durations as short as 15 µs, which allows very precise control of the amount of energy dissipated in the sample (the Joule effect), as well as the resulting temperature rise. By varying the applied current and the duration of the pulses, we show that we can achieve a relatively accurate characterization of R(I, T) simply from the measured dynamical V-I characteristics of the CCs. The resistance model obtained in this way is very important, as R(I, T) is the most fundamental design parameter in many practical HTS applications, especially in fault current limiters.

  5. ITER equilibrium with bootstrap currents, lower hybrid current drive and fast wave current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Ehst, D.A.

    1989-03-01

    A current drive system is proposed for the technology phase of ITER which relies on rf power and bootstrap currents. The rf/bootstrap system permits operation at high safety factor, and we consider the axial value to be q/sub a/ approx. = 1.9, which minimizes the need for seed current near the magnetic axis. Lower hybrid power (/approximately/30 MW) provides current density near the surface, ICRF (/approximately/65 MHz, /approximately/30 MW) fast waves generate current near the axis, and high frequency fast waves (/approximately/250 MHz, /approximately/74 MW) supply the remaining current density. The system is not yet optimized but appears to offer great flexibility (ion heating for ignition, current rampup, etc.) with relatively inexpensive and well developed technology. 29 refs., 16 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Fast Wave Current Drive in JET ITB-Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Hellsten, T.; Laxaaback, M.; Bergkvist, T.; Johnson, T.; Brzozowski, J.; Rachlew, E.; Tennfors, E.; Mantsinen, M.; Matthews, G.; Tala, T.; Meo, F.; Nguyen, F.; Eriksson, L.-G.; Joffrin, E.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.; Petty, C.C.; Eester, D. van

    2005-09-26

    Fast wave current drive has been performed in JET plasmas with internal transport barriers, ITBs, and strongly reversed magnetic shear. Although the current drive efficiency of the power absorbed on the electrons is fairly high, only small effects are seen in the central current density. The main reasons are the parasitic absorption of RF power, the strongly inductive nature of the plasma and the interplay between the fast wave driven current and bootstrap current. The direct electron heating in the FWCD experiments is found to be strongly degraded compared to that with the dipole phasing.

  7. Fast wave current drive: Experimental status and reactor prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Ehst, D.A.

    1988-03-01

    The fast wave is one of the two possible wave polarizations which propagate according to the basic theory of cold plasmas. It is distinguished from the other (slow wave) branch by having an electric field vector which is mainly orthogonal to the confining magnetic field of the plasma. The plasma and fast wave qualitatively assume different behavior depending on the frequency range of the launched wave. The high frequency fast wave (HFFW), with a frequency (..omega..2..pi.. )approximately) GHz) much higher than the ion cyclotron frequency (..cap omega../sub i/), suffers electron Landau damping and drives current by supplying parallel momentum to superthermal electrons in a fashion similar to lower hybrid (slow wave) current drive. In the simple theory the HFFW should be superior to the slow wave and can propagate to very high density and temperature without impediment. Experiments, however, have not conclusively shown that HFFW current drive can be achieved at densities above the slow wave current drive limit, possibly due to conversion of the launched fast waves into slow waves by density fluctuations. Alternatively, the low frequency fast wave (LFFW), with frequencies ()approxreverse arrowlt) 100 MHz) only a few times the ion cyclotron frequency, is damped by electron Landau damping and, in a hot plasma ()approxreverse arrowgt) 10 keV), by electron transit time magnetic pumping; current drive is achieved by pushing superthermal electrons, and efficiency is prediocted to be slightly better than for lower hybrid current drive. Most significantly, the slow wave does not propagate in high density plasma when ..omega.. )approximately) ..cap omega../sub i/, so parasitic coupling to the slow wave can be avoided, and no density and temperture limitations are foreseen. Experiments with fast wve current drive invariably find current drive efficiency as good as obtained in lower hybrid experiments at comparable, low temperatures. 45 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  8. High-harmonic Fast Wave Heating and Current Drive Results for Deuterium H-mode Plasmas in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    G. Taylor, P.T. Bonoli, R.W. Harvey, J.C. hosea, E.F. Jaeger, B.P. LeBlanc, C.K. Phillisp, P.M. Ryan, E.J. Valeo, J.R. Wilson, J.C. Wright, and the NSTX Team

    2012-07-25

    A critical research goal for the spherical torus (ST) program is to initiate, ramp-up, and sustain a discharge without using the central solenoid. Simulations of non-solenoidal plasma scenarios in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [1] predict that high-harmonic fast wave (HHFW) heating and current drive (CD) [2] can play an important roll in enabling fully non-inductive (fNI {approx} 1) ST operation. The NSTX fNI {approx} 1 strategy requires 5-6 MW of HHFW power (PRF) to be coupled into a non-inductively generated discharge [3] with a plasma current, Ip {approx} 250-350 kA, driving the plasma into an HHFW H-mode with Ip {approx} 500 kA, a level where 90 keV deuterium neutral beam injection (NBI) can heat the plasma and provide additional CD. The initial approach on NSTX has been to heat Ip {approx} 300 kA, inductively heated, deuterium plasmas with CD phased HHFW power [2], in order to drive the plasma into an H-mode with fNI {approx} 1.

  9. Critical mechanical structure of superconducting high current coils for fast ramped accelerator magnets with high repetition rates in long term operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, E.; Schnizer, P.; Weiss, K.; Nyilas, A.; Mierau, A.; Sikler, G.

    2010-06-01

    The heavy ion synchrotron SIS100 is the core component of the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) currently under construction at GSI in Darmstadt. It is rapidly cycled with a ramp rate of 4 T/s up to 2 T maximum field and a repetition frequency of 1 Hz. The superconducting coils of the Nuclotron-type magnets utilise a hollow cable cooled with a forced two phase helium flow. These coils must operate reliably over a period of at least 20 years and thus survive 2 · 10 load cycles. Intensive R&D is necessary to find the optimal solution preventing any possible damage of the coils by the fast pulsing loads over the life time taking into account the complex fine structure of the cable and coil designs as well as its sensitive influence on the field quality, AC loss generation and quench protection. We used FEM codes to analyse critical aspects of various design options and had manufactured coils for detailed mechanical tests. These tests on samples extracted from the coil are: thermal expansion measurements in all three directions on the cable package itself and its composite elements, compression tests and investigation of the Inter Laminar Shear Stress (ILSS). The stress strain behaviour of the cable package was measured along the transversal direction; the most important one to sustain the cycling load by Lorentz forces. A second sample was fatigue tested. Successful integral operation test results for the coil mechanics have been obtained within our first experimental runs on the prototype dipole magnets already started at GSI in the end of 2008.

  10. Trigger of Fast Reconnection via Collapsing Current Sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenerani, A.; Velli, M.; Rappazzo, A. F.; Pucci, F.

    2015-12-01

    It has been widely believed that reconnection is the underlying mechanism of many explosive processes observed both in astrophysical and laboratory plasmas. However, both the questions of how magnetic reconnection is triggered in high Lundquist (S) and Reynolds (R) number plasmas, and how it can then occur on fast, ideal, time-scales remain open. Indeed, it has been argued that fast reconnection rates could be achieved once kinetic scales are reached, or, alternatively, by the onset of the so-called plasmoid instability within Sweet-Parker current sheets. However, it has been shown recently that a tearing mode instability (the "ideal tearing") can grow on an ideal, i.e., S-independent, timescale once the width a of a current sheet becomes thin enough with respect to its macroscopic length L, a/L ~ S-1/3. This suggests that current sheet thinning down to such a threshold aspect ratio —much larger, for S>>1, than the Sweet-Parker one that scales as a/L ~ S-1/2— might provide the trigger for fast reconnection even within the fluid plasma framework. Here we discuss the transition to fast reconnection by studying with visco-resistive MHD simulations the onset and evolution of the tearing instability within a single collapsing current sheet. We indeed show that the transition to a fast tearing mode instability takes place when an inverse aspect ratio of the order of the threshold a/L ~ S-1/3 is reached, and that the secondary current sheets forming nonlinearly become the source of a succession of recursive tearing instabilities. The latter is reminiscent of the fractal reconnection model of flares, which we modify in the light of the "ideal tearing" scenario.

  11. Fast wave current drive in DEMO

    SciTech Connect

    Lerche, E.; Van Eestera, D.; Messiaen, A.; Collaboration: EFDA-PPPT Contributors

    2014-02-12

    The ability to non-inductively drive a large fraction of the toroidal plasma current in magnetically confined plasmas is an essential requirement for steady state fusion reactors such as DEMO. Besides neutral beam injection (NBI), electron-cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) and lower hybrid wave heating (LH), ion-cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) is a promising candidate to drive current, in particular at the high temperatures expected in fusion plasmas. In this paper, the current drive (CD) efficiencies calculated with coupled ICRF wave / CD numerical codes for the DEMO-1 design case (R{sub 0}=9m, B{sub 0}=6.8T, a{sub p}=2.25m) [1] are presented. It will be shown that although promising CD efficiencies can be obtained in the usual ICRF frequency domain (20-100MHz) by shifting the dominant ion-cyclotron absorption layers to the high-field side, operation at higher frequencies (100-300MHz) has a stronger CD potential, provided the parasitic RF power absorption of the alpha particles can be minimized.

  12. Fast chirality reversal of the magnetic vortex by electric current

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, W. L. Liu, R. H.; Urazhdin, S.; Tyliszczak, T.; Erokhin, S. G.; Berkov, D.

    2014-12-01

    The possibility of high-density information encoding in magnetic materials by topologically stable inhomogeneous magnetization configurations such as domain walls, skyrmions, and vortices has motivated intense research into mechanisms enabling their control and detection. While the uniform magnetization states can be efficiently controlled by electric current using magnetic multilayer structures, this approach has proven much more difficult to implement for inhomogeneous states. Here, we report direct observation of fast reversal of magnetic vortex by electric current in a simple planar structure based on a bilayer of spin Hall material Pt with a single microscopic ferromagnetic disk contacted by asymmetric electrodes. The reversal is enabled by a combination of the chiral Oersted field and spin current generated by the nonuniform current distribution in Pt. Our results provide a route for the efficient control of inhomogeneous magnetization configurations by electric current.

  13. Spectral Effects on Fast Wave Core Heating and Current Drive

    SciTech Connect

    C.K. Phillips, R.E. Bell, L.A. Berry, P.T. Bonoli, R.W. Harvey, J.C. Hosea, E.F. Jaeger, B.P. LeBlanc, P.M. Ryan, G. Taylor, E.J. Valeo, J.R. Wilson, J.C. Wright, H. Yuh, and the NSTX Team

    2009-05-11

    Recent results obtained with high harmonic fast wave (HHFW) heating and current drive (CD) on NSTX strongly support the hypothesis that the onset of perpendicular fast wave propagation right at or very near the launcher is a primary cause for a reduction in core heating efficiency at long wavelengths that is also observed in ICRF heating experiments in numerous tokamaks. A dramatic increase in core heating efficiency was first achieved in NSTX L-mode helium majority plasmas when the onset for perpendicular wave propagation was moved away from the antenna and nearby vessel structures. Efficient core heating in deuterium majority L mode and H mode discharges, in which the edge density is typically higher than in comparable helium majority plasmas, was then accomplished by reducing the edge density in front of the launcher with lithium conditioning and avoiding operational points prone to instabilities. These results indicate that careful tailoring of the edge density profiles in ITER should be considered to limit rf power losses to the antenna and plasma facing materials. Finally, in plasmas with reduced rf power losses in the edge regions, the first direct measurements of high harmonic fast wave current drive were obtained with the motional Stark effect (MSE) diagnostic. The location and radial dependence of HHFW CD measured by MSE are in reasonable agreement with predictions from both full wave and ray tracing simulations.

  14. High PRF high current switch

    DOEpatents

    Moran, Stuart L.; Hutcherson, R. Kenneth

    1990-03-27

    A triggerable, high voltage, high current, spark gap switch for use in pu power systems. The device comprises a pair of electrodes in a high pressure hydrogen environment that is triggered by introducing an arc between one electrode and a trigger pin. Unusually high repetition rates may be obtained by undervolting the switch, i.e., operating the trigger at voltages much below the self-breakdown voltage of the device.

  15. A thermodynamical analysis of rf current drive with fast electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Bizarro, João P. S.

    2015-08-15

    The problem of rf current drive (CD) by pushing fast electrons with high-parallel-phase-velocity waves, such as lower-hybrid (LH) or electron-cyclotron (EC) waves, is revisited using the first and second laws, the former to retrieve the well-known one-dimensional (1D) steady-state CD efficiency, and the latter to calculate a lower bound for the rate of entropy production when approaching steady state. The laws of thermodynamics are written in a form that explicitly takes care of frictional dissipation and are thus applied to a population of fast electrons evolving under the influence of a dc electric field, rf waves, and collisions while in contact with a thermal, Maxwellian reservoir with a well-defined temperature. Besides the laws of macroscopic thermodynamics, there is recourse to basic elements of kinetic theory only, being assumed a residual dc electric field and a strong rf drive, capable of sustaining in the resonant region, where waves interact with electrons, a raised fast-electron tail distribution, which becomes an essentially flat plateau in the case of the 1D theory for LHCD. Within the 1D model, particularly suited for LHCD as it solely retains fast-electron dynamics in velocity space parallel to the ambient magnetic field, an H theorem for rf CD is also derived, which is written in different forms, and additional physics is recovered, such as the synergy between the dc and rf power sources, including the rf-induced hot conductivity, as well as the equation for electron-bulk heating. As much as possible 1D results are extended to 2D, to account for ECCD by also considering fast-electron velocity-space dynamics in the direction perpendicular to the magnetic field, which leads to a detailed discussion on how the definition of an rf-induced conductivity may depend on whether one works at constant rf current or power. Moreover, working out the collisional dissipated power and entropy-production rate written in terms of the fast-electron distribution, it

  16. A thermodynamical analysis of rf current drive with fast electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bizarro, João P. S.

    2015-08-01

    The problem of rf current drive (CD) by pushing fast electrons with high-parallel-phase-velocity waves, such as lower-hybrid (LH) or electron-cyclotron (EC) waves, is revisited using the first and second laws, the former to retrieve the well-known one-dimensional (1D) steady-state CD efficiency, and the latter to calculate a lower bound for the rate of entropy production when approaching steady state. The laws of thermodynamics are written in a form that explicitly takes care of frictional dissipation and are thus applied to a population of fast electrons evolving under the influence of a dc electric field, rf waves, and collisions while in contact with a thermal, Maxwellian reservoir with a well-defined temperature. Besides the laws of macroscopic thermodynamics, there is recourse to basic elements of kinetic theory only, being assumed a residual dc electric field and a strong rf drive, capable of sustaining in the resonant region, where waves interact with electrons, a raised fast-electron tail distribution, which becomes an essentially flat plateau in the case of the 1D theory for LHCD. Within the 1D model, particularly suited for LHCD as it solely retains fast-electron dynamics in velocity space parallel to the ambient magnetic field, an H theorem for rf CD is also derived, which is written in different forms, and additional physics is recovered, such as the synergy between the dc and rf power sources, including the rf-induced hot conductivity, as well as the equation for electron-bulk heating. As much as possible 1D results are extended to 2D, to account for ECCD by also considering fast-electron velocity-space dynamics in the direction perpendicular to the magnetic field, which leads to a detailed discussion on how the definition of an rf-induced conductivity may depend on whether one works at constant rf current or power. Moreover, working out the collisional dissipated power and entropy-production rate written in terms of the fast-electron distribution, it

  17. Increased Speed: 3D Silicon Sensors. Fast Current Amplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, Sherwood; Kok, Angela; Kenney, Christopher; Jarron, Pierre; Hasi, Jasmine; Despeisse, Matthieu; Da Via, Cinzia; Anelli, Giovanni; /CERN

    2012-05-07

    The authors describe techniques to make fast, sub-nanosecond time resolution solid-state detector systems using sensors with 3D electrodes, current amplifiers, constant-fraction comparators or fast wave-form recorders, and some of the next steps to reach still faster results.

  18. Technology of fast-wave current drive antennas

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, D.J.; Baity, F.W.; Goulding, R.H.; Haste, G.R.; Ryan, P.M.; Taylor, D.J.; Swain, D.W.; Mayberry, M.J.; Yugo, J.J.; General Atomics, San Diego, CA; Oak Ridge National Lab., TN )

    1989-01-01

    The design of fast-wave current drive (FWCD) antennas combines the usual antenna considerations (e.g., the plasma/antenna interface, disruptions, high currents and voltages, and thermal loads) with new requirements for spectral shaping and phase control. The internal configuration of the antenna array has a profound effect on the spectrum and the ability to control phasing. This paper elaborates on these considerations, as epitomized by a proof-of-principle (POP) experiment designed for the DIII-D tokamak. The extension of FWCD for machines such as the International Thermonuclear Engineering Reactor (ITER) will require combining ideas implemented in the POP experiment with reactor-relevant antenna concepts, such as the folded waveguide. 6 refs., 8 figs.

  19. Fast wave current drive in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Petty, C.C.; Callis, R.W.; Chiu, S.C.; deGrassie, J.S.; Forest, C.B.; Freeman, R.L.; Gohil, P.; Harvey, R.W.; Ikezi, H.; Lin-Liu, Y.-R.

    1995-02-01

    The non-inductive current drive from fast Alfven waves launched by a directional four-element antenna was measured in the DIII-D tokamak. The fast wave frequency (60 MHz) was eight times the deuterium cyclotron frequency at the plasma center. An array of rf pickup loops at several locations around the torus was used to verify the directivity of the four-element antenna. Complete non-inductive current drive was achieved using a combination of fast wave current drive (FWCD) and electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) in discharges for which the total plasma current was inductively ramped down from 400 to 170 kA. For discharges with steady plasma current, up to 110 kA of FWCD was inferred from an analysis of the loop voltage, with a maximum non-inductive current (FWCD, ECCD, and bootstrap) of 195 out of 310 kA. The FWCD efficiency increased linearly with central electron temperature. For low current discharges, the FWCD efficiency was degraded due to incomplete fast wave damping. The experimental FWCD was found to agree with predictions from the CURRAY ray-tracing code only when a parasitic loss of 4% per pass was included in the modeling along with multiple pass damping.

  20. Spectral effects on fast wave core heating and current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, Cynthia; Bell, R. E.; Berry, Lee; Jaeger, Erwin Frederick; Ryan, Philip Michael; Wilgen, John B

    2009-01-01

    Recent results obtained with high harmonic fast wave (HHFW) heating and current drive (CD) on NSTX strongly support the hypothesis that the onset of perpendicular fast wave propagation right at or very near the launcher is a primary cause for a reduction in core heating efficiency at long wavelengths that is also observed in ICRF heating experiments in numerous tokamaks. A dramatic increase in core heating efficiency was first achieved in NSTX L-mode helium majority plasmas when the onset for perpendicular wave propagation was moved away from the antenna and nearby vessel structures. Efficient core heating in deuterium majority L-mode and H-mode discharges, in which the edge density is typically higher than in comparable helium majority plasmas, was then accomplished by reducing the edge density in front of the launcher with lithium conditioning and avoiding operational points prone to instabilities. These results indicate that careful tailoring of the edge density profiles in ITER should be considered to limit radio frequency (rf) power losses to the antenna and plasma facing materials. Finally, in plasmas with reduced rf power losses in the edge regions, the first direct measurements of HHFW CD were obtained with the motional Stark effect (MSE) diagnostic. The location and radial dependence of HHFW CD measured by MSE are in reasonable agreement with predictions from both full wave and ray tracing simulations.

  1. Measurements of the Total Charge-Changing Cross Sections for Collisions of Fast Ions with Target Gas Using High Current Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Covo, Michel Kireeff; Molvik, Arthur W.; Kaganovich, Igor D.; Shnidman, Ariel; Vujic, Jasmina L.

    2009-04-13

    The sum of ionization and charge-exchange cross sections of several gas targets (H2, N2, He, Ne, Kr, Xe, Ar, and water vapor) impacted by 1MeV K+ beam are measured. In a high current ion beam, the self-electric field of the beam is high enough that ions produced from the gas ionization or charge exchange by the ion beam are quickly swept to the sides of accelerator. The flux of the expelled ions is measured by a retarding field analyzer. This allows accurate measuring of the total charge-changing cross sections (ionization plus charge exchange) of the beam interaction with gas. Cross sections for H2, He, and N2 are simulated using classical trajectory Monte Carlo (CTMC) method and compared with the experimental results, showing good agreement.

  2. HIGH CURRENT COAXIAL PHOTOMULTIPLIER TUBE

    DOEpatents

    Glass, N.W.

    1960-01-19

    A medium-gain photomultiplier tube having high current output, fast rise- time, and matched output impedance was developed. The photomultiplier tube comprises an elongated cylindrical envelope, a cylindrical anode supported at the axis of the envelope, a plurality of elongated spaced opaque areas on the envelope, and a plurality of light admitting windows. A photo-cathode is supported adjacent to each of the windows, and a plurality of secondary emissive dynodes are arranged in two types of radial arrays which are alternately positioned to fill the annular space between the anode and the envelope. The dynodes are in an array being radially staggered with respect to the dynodes in the adjacent array, the dynodes each having a portion arranged at an angle with respect to the electron path, such that electrons emitted by each cathode undergo multiplication upon impingement on a dynode and redirected flight to the next adjacent dynode.

  3. Fast electron transport in lower-hybrid current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Kupfer, K.; Bers, A.

    1991-01-01

    We generalize the quasilinear-Fokker-Planck formulation for lower-hybrid current drive to include the wave induced radial transport of fast electrons. Toroidal ray tracing shows that the wave fields in the plasma develop a large poloidal component associated with the upshift in k1l and the filling of the "spectral gap". These fields lead to an enhanced radial E x B drift of resonant electrons. Two types of radial flows are obtained: an outward convective flow driven by the asymmetry in the poloidal wave spectrum, and a diffusive flow proportional to the width of the poloidal spectrum. Simulations of Alcator C and JT60, show that the radial convection velocity has a broad maximum of nearly 1 m/sec and is independent of the amplitude of fields. In both cases, the radial diffusion is found to be highly localized near the magnetic axis. For JT60, the peak of the diffusion profile can be quite large, nearly 1 m2/sec.

  4. Setup for fast-pulsed measurements of large critical currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Ovidio, Claudio Alberto; Esparza, Daniel Antonio; Malachevsky, Maria Teresa

    2000-07-01

    We describe a set of equipments for pulsed measurements of transport critical currents in superconducting materials having a critical current of tens or hundreds of amperes. It is based on the appliance of an electrical current for a very short period of time, rapid enough to preserve the integrity of the current leads and to minimize the Joule effect. Power is applied to the wire-sample setup and the voltage drop is measured within seconds, with a resolution of the order of 10 nV. In this way the I- V characteristics can be obtained with a 1% error, if the 1 μV/ cm criterion is employed. The hardware is composed of three parts: the current pulse generator, a fast low-noise voltage amplifier and a PC with a DAC-ADC card. The data acquisition is achieved via an Assembler program.

  5. Direct electron heating and current drive with fast waves in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Pinsker, R.I.; Petty, C.C.; Callis, R.W.; Cary, W.P.; Chiu, S.C.; Freeman, R.L.; deGrassie, J.S.; Harvey, R.W.; Luce, T.C.; Mayberry, M.J.; Prater, R.; Porkolab, M.; Bonoli, P.T.; Baity, F.W.; Goulding, R.H.; Hoffmann, D.J.; James, R.A.; Kawashima, H.

    1992-09-01

    Experiments on the DIII-D tokamak have been performed to evaluate noninductive current drive with direct electron absorption of the fast Alfven wave (FW) in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies. These experiments have employed a 2 MW 60 NM transmitter connected to a four-element toroidally phased array of loop antennas located at the outside midplane of the DIII-D vacuum vessel. Efficient direct electron heating was obtained with (0, {pi}, 0, {pi}) antenna phasing; H-mode confinement was obtained with direct electron absorption of the fast wave as the sole source of auxiliary heating. Current drive experiments were performed with (0,{pi}/2,{pi},3{pi}/2) antenna phasing at fast wave power levels up to 1.2 MW. Preheating with 60 GHz ECH was used to increase the single-pass absorption of the fast wave with a directive spectrum. When the fast wave is lunched in the direction that aids the inductively driven current (co-current drive), up to 40% of the 0.4 MA plasma current is sustained noninductively. Counter-current drive strongly affects the sawtoothing behavior, and results in highly peaked electron temperature profiles (T{sub e}(0) {approx_lt} 6 keV) but much smaller driven currents.

  6. Direct electron heating and current drive with fast waves in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Pinsker, R.I.; Petty, C.C.; Callis, R.W.; Cary, W.P.; Chiu, S.C.; Freeman, R.L.; deGrassie, J.S.; Harvey, R.W.; Luce, T.C.; Mayberry, M.J.; Prater, R. ); Porkolab, M.; Bonoli, P.T. ); Baity, F.W.; Goulding, R.H.; Hoffmann, D.J. ); James, R.A. (Lawrence Livermor

    1992-09-01

    Experiments on the DIII-D tokamak have been performed to evaluate noninductive current drive with direct electron absorption of the fast Alfven wave (FW) in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies. These experiments have employed a 2 MW 60 NM transmitter connected to a four-element toroidally phased array of loop antennas located at the outside midplane of the DIII-D vacuum vessel. Efficient direct electron heating was obtained with (0, [pi], 0, [pi]) antenna phasing; H-mode confinement was obtained with direct electron absorption of the fast wave as the sole source of auxiliary heating. Current drive experiments were performed with (0,[pi]/2,[pi],3[pi]/2) antenna phasing at fast wave power levels up to 1.2 MW. Preheating with 60 GHz ECH was used to increase the single-pass absorption of the fast wave with a directive spectrum. When the fast wave is lunched in the direction that aids the inductively driven current (co-current drive), up to 40% of the 0.4 MA plasma current is sustained noninductively. Counter-current drive strongly affects the sawtoothing behavior, and results in highly peaked electron temperature profiles (T[sub e](0) [approx lt] 6 keV) but much smaller driven currents.

  7. High temperature current mirror amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Patterson, III, Raymond B.

    1984-05-22

    A high temperature current mirror amplifier having biasing means in the transdiode connection of the input transistor for producing a voltage to maintain the base-collector junction reversed-biased and a current means for maintaining a current through the biasing means at high temperatures so that the base-collector junction of the input transistor remained reversed-biased. For accuracy, a second current mirror is provided with a biasing means and current means on the input leg.

  8. A high power experimental traveling wave antenna for fast wave heating and current drive in DIII-D and relevance to ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Phelps, D.A.; Ikezi, H.; Moeller, C.P.

    1995-10-01

    The impact of a contemplated conversion of the directly driven high power antenna arrays in DIII-D to externally tuned and coupled traveling wave antennas (TWAs) is evaluated based on empirical modeling, computer simulation and low power experiments. A regime of operation is predicted within the TWA passband in which the reflected power from the TWA approaches 0.1% during ELM-free H-mode. Furthermore, this reflected power does not exceed 1% and the optimum phase velocity produced by the TWA decreases less than 5% during ELMs. This resilient operating regime is phase shifted using external tuning stubs, thus providing considerable experimental flexibility. Over 90% plasma coupling efficiency is achieved by recovering the TWA output power using a novel traveling wave recirculator. Combining the above attributes with efficient plasma coupling even at large antenna-plasma distances and the lack of need for dynamic tuning, TWAs appear to offer great promise for ITER.

  9. Fast wave current drive experiment on the DIII-D tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Petty, C.C.; Pinsker, R.I.; Chiu, S.C.; deGrassie, J.S.; Harvey, R.W.; Lohr, J.; Luce, T.C.; Mayberry, M.J.; Prater, R. ); Porkolab, M. ); Baity, F.W.; Goulding, R.H.; Hoffman, J.D. ); James, R.A. ); Kawash

    1992-06-01

    One method of radio-frequency heating which shows theoretical promise for both heating and current drive in tokamak plasmas is the direct absorption by electrons of the fast Alfven wave (FW). Electrons can directly absorb fast waves via electron Landau damping and transit-time magnetic pumping when the resonance condition {omega} {minus} {kappa}{sub {parallel}e}{upsilon}{sup {parallel}e} = O is satisfied. Since the FW accelerates electrons traveling the same toroidal direction as the wave, plasma current can be generated non-inductively by launching FW which propagate in one toroidal direction. Fast wave current drive (FWCD) is considered an attractive means of sustaining the plasma current in reactor-grade tokamaks due to teh potentially high current drive efficiency achievable and excellent penetration of the wave power to the high temperature plasma core. Ongoing experiments on the DIII-D tokamak are aimed at a demonstration of FWCD in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF). Using frequencies in the ICRF avoids the possibility of mode conversion between the fast and slow wave branches which characterized early tokamak FWCD experiments in the lower hybrid range of frequencies. Previously on DIII-D, efficient direct electron heating by FW was found using symmetric (non-current drive) antenna phasing. However, high FWCD efficiencies are not expected due to the relatively low electron temperatures (compared to a reactor) in DIII-D.

  10. Application of piezoelectric stress gauges to the measurement of fast-rise-time multimegampere electric currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, D. L.; Spielman, R. B.; Seamen, J. F.; Struve, K. W.

    1993-02-01

    Modeling of load behavior in Z-pinch plasma radiation sources driven by high current generators requires accurate measurement of fast-rise-time multimegampere electrical currents close to the load. Using a novel application of high pressure technology, we have demonstrated that fast-response piezoelectric stress transducers can measure such currents under conditions of extremely high current density, induced electric fields, and bremsstrahlung radiation where conventional current diagnostics fail. Large signal, nanosecond-time-resolution lithium niobate piezoelectric stress gauges are employed to directly measure the magnetic pressure B(sup 2)/2(mu)(sub 0) = (mu)(sub 0)I(sup 2)/8(pi)(sup 2)r(sup 2) generated at radius r by a current I flowing in a radial transmission line near the load of a pulsed power current source. With a current diagnostic consisting of a pure tungsten electrode on a Y-cut lithium niobate stress gauge, current densities up to 1/2(pi)cr = 78MA/m can be measured before the electrode yield strength and piezoelectric operating stress limit are exceeded. Based on this work, we have developed a compact modular current probe for use on the high current (20-25 MA) DECADE simulator being constructed for the Defense Nuclear Agency. We also describe recent work extending this measurement technique to higher current densities (125 MA/m) using a copper-sapphire electrode impedance stack on an X-cut quartz piezoelectric element.

  11. Application of piezoelectric stress gauges to the measurement of fast-rise-time multimegampere electric currents

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, D.L.; Spielman, R.B.; Seamen, J.F.; Struve, K.W.

    1993-07-01

    Modeling of load behavior in Z-pinch plasma radiation sources driven by high current generators requires accurate measurement of fast-rise-time multimegampere electrical currents close to the load. Using a novel application of high pressure technology, we have demonstrated that fast-response piezoelectric stress transducers can measure such currents under conditions of extremely high current density, induced electric fields, and bremsstrahlung radiation where conventional current diagnostics fail. Large signal, nanosecond-time-resolution lithium niobate piezoelectric stress gauges are employed to directly measure the magnetic pressure B{sup 2}/2{mu}{sub 0} = {mu}{sub 0}I{sup 2}/8{pi}{sup 2}r{sup 2} generated at radius r by a current I flowing in a radial transmission line near the load of a pulsed power current source. With a current diagnostic consisting of a pure tungsten electrode on a Y-cut lithium niobate stress gauge, current densities up to 1/2{pi}cr = 78MA/m can be measured before the electrode yield strength and piezoelectric operating stress limit are exceeded. Based on this work, we have developed a compact modular current probe for use on the high current (20--25 MA) DECADE simulator being constructed for the Defense Nuclear Agency. We also describe recent work extending this measurement technique to higher current densities (125 MA/m) using a cooper-sapphire electrode impedance stack on an X-cut quartz piezoelectric element.

  12. Review of tokamak experiments on direct electron heating and current drive with fast waves

    SciTech Connect

    Pinsker, R.I.

    1993-12-01

    Results from tokamak experiments on direct electron interaction with the compressional Alfven wave ({open_quote}fast wave{close_quote}) are reviewed. Experiments aimed at electron heating as well as those in which fast wave electron current drive was investigated are discussed. A distinction is drawn between experiments employing the lower hybrid range of frequencies, where both the lower hybrid wave ({open_quote}slow wave{close_quote}) and the fast wave can propagate in much of the plasma, and those experiments using the fast wave in the range of moderate to high ion cyclotron harmonics, where only the fast wave can penetrate to the plasma core. Most of the early tokamak experiments were in the lower hybrid frequency regime, and the observed electron interaction appeared to be very similar to that obtained with the slow wave at the same frequency. In particular, electron interaction with the fast wave was observed only below a density limit nearly the same as the well known slow wave density limit. In the more recent lower frequency fast wave experiments, electron interaction (heating and current drive) is observed at the center of the discharge, where slow waves are not present.

  13. Limitations of eddy current testing in a fast reactor environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Tao; Bowler, John R.

    2016-02-01

    The feasibility of using eddy current probes for detecting flaws in fast nuclear reactor structures has been investigated with the aim of detecting defects immersed in electrically conductive coolant including under liquid sodium during standby. For the inspections to be viable, there is a need to use an encapsulated sensor system that can be move into position with the aid of visualization tools. The initial objective being to locate the surface to be investigated using, for example, a combination of electromagnetic sensors and sonar. Here we focus on one feature of the task in which eddy current probe impedance variations due to interaction with the external surface of a tube are evaluated in order to monitor the probe location and orientation during inspection.

  14. Application of piezoelectric stress gauges to the measurement of fast-rise-time multimegampere electric currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, D. L.; Struve, K. W.; Spielman, R. B.; Seamen, J. F.

    1994-07-01

    Modeling of load behavior in Z-pinch plasma radiation sources driven by high current generators requires accurate measurement of fast-rise-time multimegampere electrical currents close to the load. Using a novel applications of high pressure technology, we have demonstrated that fast-response piezoelectric stress transducers can measure such currents under conditions of extremely high current density, induced electric fields, and bremsstrahlung radiation where conventional current diagnostics fail. Large signal, nanosecond-time-resolution lithium niobate piezoelectric stress gauges are employed to directly measure the magnetic pressure B2/dμ0=μ0I2/ 8π2r2 generated at radius r by a curret I flowing in a radial transmission line near the load of a pulsed power current source. With a current diagnostic consisting of a pure tungsten electrode of a Y-cut lithium niobate stress gauge, current densities up to I/2πr=78 MA/m can be measured before the electrode yield strength and piezoelectric operating stress limit are exceeded. Based on this work, we have developed a compact modular current probe for use on the high current (20-25 MA) DECADE simulator being constructed for the Defense Nuclear Agency. We also describe recent work extending this measurement technique to higher current densities (125 MA/m) using a copper-sapphire electrode impedance stack on an X-cut quartz piezoelectric element.

  15. Fast wave current drive in neutral beam heated plasmas on DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Petty, C.C.; Forest, C.B.; Pinsker, R.I.

    1997-04-01

    The physics of non-inductive current drive and current profile control using the fast magnetosonic wave has been demonstrated on the DIII-D tokamak. In non-sawtoothing discharges formed by neutral beam injection (NBI), the radial profile of the fast wave current drive (FWCD) was determined by the response of the loop voltage profile to co, counter, and symmetric antenna phasings, and was found to be in good agreement with theoretical models. The application of counter FWCD increased the magnetic shear reversal of the plasma and delayed the onset of sawteeth, compared to co FWCD. The partial absorption of fast waves by energetic beam ions at high harmonics of the ion cyclotron frequency was also evident from a build up of fast particle pressure near the magnetic axis and a correlated increase in the neutron rate. The anomalous fast particle pressure and neutron rate increased with increasing NBI power and peaked when a harmonic of the deuterium cyclotron frequency passed through the center of the plasma. The experimental FWCD efficiency was highest at 2 T where the interaction between the fast waves and the beam ions was weakest; as the magnetic field strength was lowered, the FWCD efficiency decreased to approximately half of the maximum theoretical value.

  16. High temperature current mirror amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Patterson, R.B. III.

    1984-05-22

    Disclosed is a high temperature current mirror amplifier having biasing means in the transdiode connection of the input transistor for producing a voltage to maintain the base-collector junction reversed-biased and a current means for maintaining a current through the biasing means at high temperatures so that the base-collector junction of the input transistor remained reversed-biased. For accuracy, a second current mirror is provided with a biasing means and current means on the input leg. 2 figs.

  17. High current, high bandwidth laser diode current driver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Copeland, David J.; Zimmerman, Robert K., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    A laser diode current driver has been developed for free space laser communications. The driver provides 300 mA peak modulation current and exhibits an optical risetime of less than 400 ps. The current and optical pulses are well behaved and show minimal ringing. The driver is well suited for QPPM modulation at data rates up to 440 Mbit/s. Much previous work has championed current steering circuits; in contrast, the present driver is a single-ended on/off switch. This results in twice the power efficiency as a current steering driver. The driver electrical efficiency for QPPM data is 34 percent. The high speed switch is realized with a Ku-band GaAsFET transistor, with a suitable pre-drive circuit, on a hybrid microcircuit adjacent to the laser diode.

  18. Fast sodium current in cardiac muscle. A quantitative description.

    PubMed Central

    Ebihara, L; Johnson, E A

    1980-01-01

    The voltage and time-dependence of the tetrodotoxin sensitive, fast sodium current in cardiac muscle is described with the Hodgkin-Huxley formalism using two microelectrode, voltage-clamp data obtained by Ebihara et al. (1980, J. Gen. Physiol., 75:437) from small spherical clusters of tissue-cultured 11-d-old embryonic heart cells. The data chosen from that study for quantitative analysis was obtained at 37 degrees C and in standard tissue-culture medium; it was not smoothed, and the capacitive transient was sufficiently brief to make its removal unnecessary. The sodium current, INa, is considered to be given by the following equation: INa = gNa m3h(V - VNa), where gNa is a constant (23 mS), VNa is the sodium equilibrium potential (29 mV), and m and h are independent, first order, dimensionless variables, which can vary between 0 and 1, as defined by the following differential equations, dm/dt = alpha m(1 - m) - beta mm and dh/dt = alpha h(1 - h) - beta hh, where the rate coefficients, alpha m = [0.32 x (V + 47.13)]/[1 - exp(V + 47.13)] and beta m = 0.08 x exp (-V/11). For potentials more positive than -40 mV, alpha h = 0 and beta h = 1/0.13 (exp [(V + 10.66)/ - 11.1] + 1), and for potentials more negative than -40 mV, alpha h = 0.135 x exp [(-80 - V)/6.8] and beta h = 3.56 x exp (0.079V) + 3.1 x 10(5) exp (0.35V). These functions of potential are similar to those of the squid at 15 degrees C, except that their magnitudes are larger (faster). Using these model equations the membrane current in a membrane patch with and without a series resistance was simulated. For the value of series resistance estimated for the preparation from which the analyzed data were obtained, the effects of series resistance on the shape and magnitude of the inward transient current were found to be minimal. It was concluded that their should be no large errors in the data, even in the absence of complete series resistance compensation. PMID:7260301

  19. Superconducting High Resolution Fast-Neutron Spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    Hau, I D

    2006-05-25

    Superconducting high resolution fast-neutron calorimetric spectrometers based on {sup 6}LiF and TiB{sub 2} absorbers have been developed. These novel cryogenic spectrometers measure the temperature rise produced in exothermal (n, {alpha}) reactions with fast neutrons in {sup 6}Li and {sup 10}B-loaded materials with heat capacity C operating at temperatures T close to 0.1 K. Temperature variations on the order of 0.5 mK are measured with a Mo/Cu thin film multilayer operated in the transition region between its superconducting and its normal state. The advantage of calorimetry for high resolution spectroscopy is due to the small phonon excitation energies k{sub B}T on the order of {mu}eV that serve as signal carriers, resulting in an energy resolution {Delta}E {approx} (k{sub B}T{sup 2}C){sup 1/2}, which can be well below 10 keV. An energy resolution of 5.5 keV has been obtained with a Mo/Cu superconducting sensor and a TiB{sub 2} absorber using thermal neutrons from a {sup 252}Cf neutron source. This resolution is sufficient to observe the effect of recoil nuclei broadening in neutron spectra, which has been related to the lifetime of the first excited state in {sup 7}Li. Fast-neutron spectra obtained with a {sup 6}Li-enriched LiF absorber show an energy resolution of 16 keV FWHM, and a response in agreement with the {sup 6}Li(n, {alpha}){sup 3}H reaction cross section and Monte Carlo simulations for energies up to several MeV. The energy resolution of order of a few keV makes this novel instrument applicable to fast-neutron transmission spectroscopy based on the unique elemental signature provided by the neutron absorption and scattering resonances. The optimization of the energy resolution based on analytical and numerical models of the detector response is discussed in the context of these applications.

  20. Modeling of fast wave current drive experiments on DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Luce, T.C.; Chiu, S.C.; Harvey, R.W.; Mayberry, M.J.; Petty, C.C.; Pinsker, R.I.; Prater, R.; Tsunoda, S.I.

    1991-09-01

    Modeling of fast wave current drive experiments for D3-D has been improved to include calculation of target temperature profiles consistent with the D3-D database and more accurate modeling of the launched spectrum. The calculations indicate that a measurable current will be driven by fast wave in the near-term (30--200 kA). Modeling of the long-range goal of 2 MA non-inductive at high {beta} indicates the proposed 18 MW of rf power will be adequate. The optimum frequency for the intermediate scenario is 120 MHz; this frequency selection is also adequate for the long-term goals. 8 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Turbulence Scattering of High Harmonic Fast Waves

    SciTech Connect

    M. Ono; J. Hosea; B. LeBlanc; J. Menard; C.K. Phillips; R. Wilson; P. Ryan; D. Swain; J. Wilgen; S. Kubota; and T.K. Mau

    2001-05-31

    Effect of scattering of high-harmonic fast-magnetosonic waves (HHFW) by low-frequency plasma turbulence is investigated. Due to the similarity of the wavelength of HHFW to that of the expected low-frequency turbulence in the plasma edge region, the scattering of HHFW can become significant under some conditions. The scattering probability increases with the launched wave parallel-phase-velocity as the location of the wave cut-off layer shifts toward the lower density edge. The scattering probability can be reduced significantly with higher edge plasma temperature, steeper edge density gradient, and magnetic field. The theoretical model could explain some of the HHFW heating observations on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX).

  2. Fast recovery, high voltage silicon diodes for AC motor controllers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balodis, V.; Berman, A. H.; Gaugh, C.

    1982-01-01

    The fabrication and characterization of a high voltage, high current, fast recovery silicon diode for use in AC motor controllers, originally developed for NASA for use in avionics power supplies, is presented. The diode utilizes a positive bevel PIN mesa structure with glass passivation and has the following characteristics: peak inverse voltage - 1200 volts, forward voltage at 50 amperes - 1.5 volts, reverse recovery time of 200 nanoseconds. Characterization data for the diode, included in a table, show agreement with design concepts developed for power diodes. Circuit diagrams of the diode are also given.

  3. Fast vortex core switching at high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebecki, Kristof M.; Legut, Dominik

    2016-08-01

    Fast ferromagnetic vortex core switching is investigated employing micromagnetic simulations. Short pulse (in the range of a few hundreds of picoseconds) of an in-plane oscillating magnetic field is applied to a thin disk (diameter 200 nm and thickness 20 nm) with material parameters resembling permalloy. Fundamental frequency of this excitation field is close to the resonance with the material spin waves. Thermal effects are introduced by replacing the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation by the Landau-Lifshitz-Bloch equation. Temperature from 300 K to 850 K is considered, just below the Curie temperature TC = 870 K. Calculations are done within the OOMMF simulation framework. We find that: (i) Period of the field necessary to switch the vortex increases approximately from 141 ps at 300 K to 572 ps for the high-temperature limit. (ii) Amplitude of the field necessary to switch the vortex core decreases roughly from 60 mT to 15 mT - even at high temperatures this amplitude is nonzero, contrary to the case of quasi-static switching. (iii) Time span between the excitation and switching (switching time) seems not to depend on the temperature. (iv) Duration of the switching itself (movement of the Bloch point in the sample) increases from a few picoseconds at low temperatures to tens of picoseconds at high temperatures.

  4. HIGH VOLTAGE, HIGH CURRENT SPARK GAP SWITCH

    DOEpatents

    Dike, R.S.; Lier, D.W.; Schofield, A.E.; Tuck, J.L.

    1962-04-17

    A high voltage and current spark gap switch comprising two main electrodes insulatingly supported in opposed spaced relationship and a middle electrode supported medially between the main electrodes and symmetrically about the median line of the main electrodes is described. The middle electrode has a perforation aligned with the median line and an irradiation electrode insulatingly supported in the body of the middle electrode normal to the median line and protruding into the perforation. (AEC)

  5. High-current, high-frequency capacitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Renz, D. D.

    1983-01-01

    The NASA Lewis high-current, high-frequency capacitor development program was conducted under a contract with Maxwell Laboratories, Inc., San Diego, California. The program was started to develop power components for space power systems. One of the components lacking was a high-power, high-frequency capacitor. Some of the technology developed in this program may be directly usable in an all-electric airplane. The materials used in the capacitor included the following: the film is polypropylene, the impregnant is monoisopropyl biphenyl, the conductive epoxy is Emerson and Cuming Stycast 2850 KT, the foil is aluminum, the case is stainless steel (304), and the electrode is a modified copper-ceramic.

  6. On Point Designs for High Gain Fast Ignition

    SciTech Connect

    Key, M; Akli, K; Beg, F; Betti, R; Clark, D S; Chen, S N; Freeman, R R; Hansen, S; Hatchett, S P; Hey, D; King, J A; Kemp, A J; Lasinski, B F; Langdon, B; Ma, T; MacKinnon, A J; Meyerhofer, D; Patel, P K; Pasley, J; Phillips, T; Stephens, R B; Stoeckl, C; Foord, M; Tabak, M; Theobald, W; Storm, M; Town, R J; Wilks, S C; VanWoerkom, L; Wei, M S; Weber, R; Zhang, B

    2007-09-27

    Fast ignition research has reached the stage where point designs are becoming crucial to the identification of key issues and the development of projects to demonstrate high gain fast ignition. The status of point designs for cone coupled electron fast ignition and some of the issues they highlight are discussed.

  7. Fast Acting Eddy Current Driven Valve for Massive Gas Injection on ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Lyttle, Mark S; Baylor, Larry R; Carmichael, Justin R; Combs, Stephen Kirk; Ericson, Milton Nance; Ezell, N Dianne Bull; Meitner, S. J.; Rasmussen, David A; Warmack, Robert J Bruce; Maruyama, So; Kiss, Gabor

    2015-01-01

    Tokamak plasma disruptions present a significant challenge to ITER as they can result in intense heat flux, large forces from halo and eddy currents, and potential first-wall damage from the generation of multi-MeV runaway electrons. Massive gas injection (MGI) of high Z material using fast acting valves is being explored on existing tokamaks and is planned for ITER as a method to evenly distribute the thermal load of the plasma to prevent melting, control the rate of the current decay to minimize mechanical loads, and to suppress the generation of runaway electrons. A fast acting valve and accompanying power supply have been designed and first test articles produced to meet the requirements for a disruption mitigation system on ITER. The test valve incorporates a flyer plate actuator similar to designs deployed on TEXTOR, ASDEX upgrade, and JET [1 3] of a size useful for ITER with special considerations to mitigate the high mechanical forces developed during actuation due to high background magnetic fields. The valve includes a tip design and all-metal valve stem sealing for compatibility with tritium and high neutron and gamma fluxes.

  8. High current high accuracy IGBT pulse generator

    SciTech Connect

    Nesterov, V.V.; Donaldson, A.R.

    1995-05-01

    A solid state pulse generator capable of delivering high current triangular or trapezoidal pulses into an inductive load has been developed at SLAC. Energy stored in a capacitor bank of the pulse generator is switched to the load through a pair of insulated gate bipolar transistors (IGBT). The circuit can then recover the remaining energy and transfer it back to the capacitor bank without reversing the capacitor voltage. A third IGBT device is employed to control the initial charge to the capacitor bank, a command charging technique, and to compensate for pulse to pulse power losses. The rack mounted pulse generator contains a 525 {mu}F capacitor bank. It can deliver 500 A at 900V into inductive loads up to 3 mH. The current amplitude and discharge time are controlled to 0.02% accuracy by a precision controller through the SLAC central computer system. This pulse generator drives a series pair of extraction dipoles.

  9. High current capacity electrical connector

    DOEpatents

    Bettis, Edward S.; Watts, Harry L.

    1976-01-13

    An electrical connector is provided for coupling high current capacity electrical conductors such as copper busses or the like. The connector is arranged in a "sandwiched" configuration in which a conductor plate contacts the busses along major surfaces thereof clamped between two stainless steel backing plates. The conductor plate is provided with a plurality of contact buttons affixed therein in a spaced array such that the caps of the buttons extend above the conductor plate surface to contact the busses. When clamping bolts provided through openings in the sandwiched arrangement are tightened, Belleville springs provided under the rim of each button cap are compressed and resiliently force the caps into contact with the busses' contacting surfaces to maintain a predetermined electrical contact area provided by the button cap tops. The contact area does not change with changing thermal or mechanical stresses applied to the coupled conductors.

  10. Performance analyses for fast variable optical attenuator-based optical current transformer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Pu; Chen, Chen; Wang, Xuefeng; Shan, Xuekang; Sun, Xiaohan

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, we analyze the performance of the electro-optic hybrid optical current transformer (HOCT) proposed by ourselves for high-voltage metering and protective relaying application. The transformer makes use of a fast variable optical attenuator (FVOA) to modulate the lightwave according to the voltage from the primary current sensor, such as low-power current transformer (LPCT). In order to improve the performance of the transformer, we use an optic-electro feedback loop with the PID control algorithm to compensate the nonlinearity of the FVOA. The linearity and accuracy of the transformer were analyzed and tested. The results indicate that the nonlinearity of the FVOA is completely compensated by the loop and the ratio and phase errors are under 0.07% and 5 minutes respectively, under the working power of less than 1 mW power. The transformer can be immune to the polarization and wavelength drift, and also robust against the environmental interference.

  11. Development of a prototype T-shaped fast switching device for electron cyclotron current drive systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekiguchi, Kenji; Nagashima, Koji; Honzu, Toshihiko; Saigusa, Mikio; Oda, Yasuhisa; Takahashi, Koji; Sakamoto, Keishi

    2016-09-01

    A T-shaped high-power switching device composed of circular corrugated waveguides with three ports and double dielectric disks made of sapphire was proposed as a fast switching device based on a new principle in electron cyclotron current drive systems. This switching device has the advantages of operating at a fixed frequency and being compact. The design of the prototype switch was obtained by numerical simulations using a finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. The size of these components was optimized for the frequency band of 170 GHz. Low-power tests were carried out in a cross-shaped model.

  12. 60 MHz fast wave current drive experiment for DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Mayberry, M.J.; Chiu, S.C.; Porkolab, M.; Chan, V.; Freeman, R.; Harvey, R.; Pinsker, R. )

    1989-07-01

    The DIII-D facility provides an opportunity to test fast wave current drive appoach. Efficient FWCD is achieved by direct electron absorption due to Landa damping and transit time magnetic pumping. To avoid competing damping mechamisms we seek to maximize the single-pass asorption of the fast waves by electrons. (AIP)

  13. Current status and directions for fast reactor reprocessing

    SciTech Connect

    Burch, W.D.

    1983-01-01

    The development of fast breeder reactors (FBRs) for commercial electric power production has been under way in several countries for more than 20 years. In the United States as elsewhere, early work was centered on small reactors to prove the feasibility of concepts and later was followed by larger reactors to test engineering features and to develop fuel technology. In the early 1970s, with the perceived crisis in electrical generation expected late in this century, major efforts were mounted to plan and carry out comprehensive development programs to ensure the capability to develop and begin using this new form of nuclear power by the end of this century. This comprehensive effort included the first serious efforts directed toward the supporting fuel cycle activities. However, because of the effects of the oil price rise and resulting conservation, a slowdown of industrial growth, and cut-backs in energy needs, there has been a decline in program activities. Unlike the fuel cycle for light-water reactors (LWRs), where supply and the back-end recycle and/or waste disposal activities can largely be uncoupled, recovery and recycle of fissile materials in spent fuel must be accomplished in one or two years in a practical breeder system. 3 references.

  14. Time-resolved observation of fast domain-walls driven by vertical spin currents in short tracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sampaio, Joao; Lequeux, Steven; Metaxas, Peter J.; Chanthbouala, Andre; Matsumoto, Rie; Yakushiji, Kay; Kubota, Hitoshi; Fukushima, Akio; Yuasa, Shinji; Nishimura, Kazumasa; Nagamine, Yoshinori; Maehara, Hiroki; Tsunekawa, Koji; Cros, Vincent; Grollier, Julie

    2013-12-01

    We present time-resolved measurements of the displacement of magnetic domain-walls (DWs) driven by vertical spin-polarized currents in track-shaped magnetic tunnel junctions. In these structures, we observe very high DW velocities (600 m/s) at current densities below 107 A/cm2. We show that the efficient spin-transfer torque combined with a short propagation distance allows avoiding the Walker breakdown process and achieving deterministic, reversible, and fast (≈1 ns) DW-mediated switching of magnetic tunnel junction elements, which is of great interest for the implementation of fast DW-based spintronic devices.

  15. Time-resolved observation of fast domain-walls driven by vertical spin currents in short tracks

    SciTech Connect

    Sampaio, Joao; Lequeux, Steven; Chanthbouala, Andre; Cros, Vincent; Grollier, Julie; Matsumoto, Rie; Yakushiji, Kay; Kubota, Hitoshi; Fukushima, Akio; Yuasa, Shinji; Nishimura, Kazumasa; Nagamine, Yoshinori; Maehara, Hiroki; Tsunekawa, Koji

    2013-12-09

    We present time-resolved measurements of the displacement of magnetic domain-walls (DWs) driven by vertical spin-polarized currents in track-shaped magnetic tunnel junctions. In these structures, we observe very high DW velocities (600 m/s) at current densities below 10{sup 7} A/cm{sup 2}. We show that the efficient spin-transfer torque combined with a short propagation distance allows avoiding the Walker breakdown process and achieving deterministic, reversible, and fast (≈1 ns) DW-mediated switching of magnetic tunnel junction elements, which is of great interest for the implementation of fast DW-based spintronic devices.

  16. Fast Faraday Cup With High Bandwidth

    DOEpatents

    Deibele, Craig E [Knoxville, TN

    2006-03-14

    A circuit card stripline Fast Faraday cup quantitatively measures the picosecond time structure of a charged particle beam. The stripline configuration maintains signal integrity, and stitching of the stripline increases the bandwidth. A calibration procedure ensures the measurement of the absolute charge and time structure of the charged particle beam.

  17. High power fast ramping power supplies

    SciTech Connect

    Marneris,I.; Bajon, E.; Bonati, R.; Sandberg, J.; Roser, T.; Tsoupas, N.

    2009-05-04

    Hundred megawatt level fast ramping power converters to drive proton and heavy ion machines are under research and development at accelerator facilities in the world. This is a leading edge technology. There are several topologies to achieve this power level. Their advantages and related issues will be discussed.

  18. Current fast ion collective Thomson scattering diagnostics at TEXTOR and ASDEX Upgrade, and ITER plans (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Korsholm, S. B.; Bindslev, H.; Meo, F.; Leipold, F.; Michelsen, P. K.; Michelsen, S.; Nielsen, S. K.; Tsakadze, E. L.; Woskov, P.; Westerhof, E.; Oosterbeek, J. W.; Hoekzema, J.; Leuterer, F.; Wagner, D

    2006-10-15

    Fast ion physics will play an important role on ITER where confined alpha particles will affect plasma dynamics and overall confinement. Fast ion collective Thomson scattering (CTS) using gyrotrons has the potential to meet the need for measuring the spatially localized velocity distributions of confined fast ions in ITER. Currently, CTS experiments are performed at TEXTOR using a 150 kW, 0.2 s, 110 GHz gyrotron and a receiver upgraded at the Risoe National Laboratory. The gyrotron and receiver optics have also been upgraded for rapid scanning during a plasma shot. The receiver consists of a nine-mirror quasioptical transmission line including a universal polarizer and a 42-channel data acquisition system, which allows complete coverage of the double sideband scattered spectrum for localized ({approx}10 cm) time resolved (4 ms) measurements of the ion velocity distribution. At ASDEX Upgrade (AUG) a similar 50-channel CTS receiver has been installed. This CTS system will use the 105 GHz frequency of a dual frequency gyrotron. The gyrotron is presently being commissioned. CTS campaigns are scheduled for the summer of 2006 with a probe power of up to 1 MW for 10 s. This report presents the alignment of the quasioptical transmission line, calibration, and gyrotron tuning of the TEXTOR and AUG CTS systems. We will also review the progress on the design of the proposed fast ion CTS diagnostic for ITER. It is envisaged that scattered radiation from two 60 GHz probe beams launched from the low field side midplane port will be received by two arrays of receivers located on the low and high field sides of the plasma. This geometry will allow the ion velocity distribution near perpendicular and near parallel to the magnetic field to be measured in ten or more spatial locations covering the full plasma cross section. The temporal resolution can be significantly better than the required 100 ms.

  19. High current gain transistor laser.

    PubMed

    Liang, Song; Qiao, Lijun; Zhu, Hongliang; Wang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    A transistor laser (TL), having the structure of a transistor with multi-quantum wells near its base region, bridges the functionality gap between lasers and transistors. However, light emission is produced at the expense of current gain for all the TLs reported up to now, leading to a very low current gain. We propose a novel design of TLs, which have an n-doped InP layer inserted in the emitter ridge. Numerical studies show that a current flow aperture for only holes can be formed in the center of the emitter ridge. As a result, the common emitter current gain can be as large as 143.3, which is over 15 times larger than that of a TL without the aperture. Besides, the effects of nonradiative recombination defects can be reduced greatly because the flow of holes is confined in the center region of the emitter ridge. PMID:27282466

  20. High current gain transistor laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Song; Qiao, Lijun; Zhu, Hongliang; Wang, Wei

    2016-06-01

    A transistor laser (TL), having the structure of a transistor with multi-quantum wells near its base region, bridges the functionality gap between lasers and transistors. However, light emission is produced at the expense of current gain for all the TLs reported up to now, leading to a very low current gain. We propose a novel design of TLs, which have an n-doped InP layer inserted in the emitter ridge. Numerical studies show that a current flow aperture for only holes can be formed in the center of the emitter ridge. As a result, the common emitter current gain can be as large as 143.3, which is over 15 times larger than that of a TL without the aperture. Besides, the effects of nonradiative recombination defects can be reduced greatly because the flow of holes is confined in the center region of the emitter ridge.

  1. High current gain transistor laser

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Song; Qiao, Lijun; Zhu, Hongliang; Wang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    A transistor laser (TL), having the structure of a transistor with multi-quantum wells near its base region, bridges the functionality gap between lasers and transistors. However, light emission is produced at the expense of current gain for all the TLs reported up to now, leading to a very low current gain. We propose a novel design of TLs, which have an n-doped InP layer inserted in the emitter ridge. Numerical studies show that a current flow aperture for only holes can be formed in the center of the emitter ridge. As a result, the common emitter current gain can be as large as 143.3, which is over 15 times larger than that of a TL without the aperture. Besides, the effects of nonradiative recombination defects can be reduced greatly because the flow of holes is confined in the center region of the emitter ridge. PMID:27282466

  2. Recent Results from High Harmonic Fast Wave Experiments on NSTX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, G.; Bell, R. E.; Hosea, J. C.; Leblanc, B. P.; Phillips, C. K.; Valeo, E. J.; Wilson, J. R.; Berry, L. A.; Jaeger, E. F.; Ryan, P. M.; Wilgen, J. B.; Bonoli, P. T.; Wright, J. C.; Harvey, R. W.; Yuh, H.

    2008-11-01

    30 MHz high harmonic fast wave (HHFW) heating and current drive experiments in NSTX at an axial toroidal field of 0.55 T show significantly improved core power deposition and heating efficiency at lower launched toroidal wavenumbers (k||) compared to operation at or below 0.45 T. In addition, lithium wall conditioning has been effectively used to reduce the edge density resulting in the first observation of HHFW core heating at k|| = 3 m-1 in a deuterium plasma. Record core electron temperatures of 5 keV were reached with 3.1 MW HHFW power, and for the first time core HHFW electron heating of NBI-driven deuterium H-mode plasmas was obtained. Motional Stark effect measurements of the current driven in 0.55 T L-mode helium plasmas are consistent with predictions from AORSA and TORIC full-wave simulations. These improved HHFW heating results are attributed to moving the onset density for perpendicular fast wave propagation in the plasma further from the wall [1]. [1] J.C. Hosea, et al., Phys. Plasmas 15, 056104 (2008)

  3. In-situ membrane resistance measurements in PEFC by fast current pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Buechi, F.N.; Scherer, G.G.; Marek, A.

    1994-12-31

    A solid-state current pulse generator for in situ membrane resistance measurements by superimposed square current pulses in polymer electrolyte fuel cells was designed and built. The choice of the measuring technique and of parameters of the instrumentation was based on a critical analysis of the relevant electrochemical and physical processes. The last stage of the generator is located in an active head directly attached to the fuel cell. This permits the generation of 5 A pulses with extremely fast and clean trailing edges (decay time {le} 5 ns), which in turn makes it possible to measure the voltage transient induced by the current decay, with GHz resolution. By measurements in this time window it is possible to accurate separate of the ohmic series resistance of the cell (membrane resistance) from the polarization of the electrochemical interfaces. Because the pulse current path is independent of the d.c. loop, the resistance can be measured independently of the d.c. value, i.e. under high current density conditions. The instrument was tested and the results analyzed for accuracy. Resistances down to 2 m{Omega} can be measured with an error of < 5%.

  4. Effect of coupling currents on the dynamic inductance during fast transient in superconducting magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinozzi, V.; Sorbi, M.; Manfreda, G.; Bellina, F.; Bajas, H.; Chlachidze, G.

    2015-03-01

    We present electromagnetic models aiming to calculate the variation of the inductance in a magnet due to dynamic effects such as the variation of magnetization or the coupling with eddy currents. The models are studied with special regard to the calculation of the inductance in superconducting magnets which are affected by interfilament coupling currents. The developed models have been compared with experimental data coming from tests of prototype Nb3Sn magnets designed for the new generation of accelerators. This work is relevant for the quench protection study of superconducting magnets: quench is an unwanted event, when part of the magnet becomes resistive; in these cases, the current should be discharged as fast as possible, in order to maintain the resistive zone temperature under a safe limit. The magnet inductance is therefore a relevant term for the description of the current discharge, especially for the high-field new generation superconducting magnets for accelerators, and this work shows how to calculate the correct value during rapid current changes, providing a mean for simulations of the reached temperature.

  5. Homology Modeling a Fast Tool for Drug Discovery: Current Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Vyas, V. K.; Ukawala, R. D.; Ghate, M.; Chintha, C.

    2012-01-01

    Major goal of structural biology involve formation of protein-ligand complexes; in which the protein molecules act energetically in the course of binding. Therefore, perceptive of protein-ligand interaction will be very important for structure based drug design. Lack of knowledge of 3D structures has hindered efforts to understand the binding specificities of ligands with protein. With increasing in modeling software and the growing number of known protein structures, homology modeling is rapidly becoming the method of choice for obtaining 3D coordinates of proteins. Homology modeling is a representation of the similarity of environmental residues at topologically corresponding positions in the reference proteins. In the absence of experimental data, model building on the basis of a known 3D structure of a homologous protein is at present the only reliable method to obtain the structural information. Knowledge of the 3D structures of proteins provides invaluable insights into the molecular basis of their functions. The recent advances in homology modeling, particularly in detecting and aligning sequences with template structures, distant homologues, modeling of loops and side chains as well as detecting errors in a model contributed to consistent prediction of protein structure, which was not possible even several years ago. This review focused on the features and a role of homology modeling in predicting protein structure and described current developments in this field with victorious applications at the different stages of the drug design and discovery. PMID:23204616

  6. Fast ion absorption of the high harmonic fast wave in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberg, A. L.; Menard, J. E.; Wilson, J. R.; Medley, S. S.; Andre, R.; Phillips, C. K.; Darrow, D. S.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Redi, M. H.; Fisch, N. J.; NSTX Team, Harvey, R. W.; Mau, T. K.; Jaeger, E. F.; Ryan, P. M.; Swain, D. W.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Egedal, J.

    2004-05-01

    Ion absorption of the high harmonic fast wave in a spherical torus [Y.-K. M. Peng et al., Nucl. Fusion 26, 769 (1986)] is of critical importance to assessing the viability of the wave as a means of heating and driving current. Analysis of recent National Spherical Torus Experiment [M. Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 (2000)] shots has revealed that under some conditions when neutral beam and rf power are injected into the plasma simultaneously, a fast ion population with energy above the beam injection energy is sustained by the wave. In agreement with modeling, these experiments find the rf-induced fast ion tail strength and neutron rate at lower B-fields to be less enhanced, likely due to a larger β profile, which promotes greater off-axis absorption where the fast ion population is small. Ion loss codes find the increased loss fraction with decreased B insufficient to account for the changes in tail strength, providing further evidence that this is a rf interaction effect. Though greater ion absorption is predicted with lower k∥, surprisingly little variation in the tail was observed, along with a neutron rate enhancement with higher k∥. Data from the neutral particle analyzer, neutron detectors, x-ray crystal spectrometer, and Thomson scattering are presented, along with results from the TRANSP [R. J. Hawryluk, Physics of Plasmas Close to Thermonuclear Conditions 1, 19 (1981); J. P. H. E. Ongena et al., Fusion Technol. 33, 181 (1998)] transport analysis code, ray-tracing codes HPRT [J. Menard et al., Phys. Plasmas 6, 2002 (1999)], and CURRAY [T. K. Mau et al., RF Power in Plasmas: 13th Topical Conference (1999), p. 148], full-wave code AORSA [E. F. Jaeger et al., RF Power in Plasmas: 14th Topical Conference, 2001, p. 369], quasilinear code CQL3D [R. W. Harvey et al., in Proceedings of the IAEA TCM on Advances in Simulation and Modeling of Thermonuclear Plasmas, 1992], and ion loss codes EIGOL [D. S. Darrow et al., in Proceedings of the 6th IAEA TCM on

  7. High critical current superconducting tapes

    DOEpatents

    Holesinger, Terry G.; Jia, Quanxi; Foltyn, Stephen R.

    2003-09-23

    Improvements in critical current capacity for superconducting film structures are disclosed and include the use of a superconducting RE-BCO layer including a mixture of rare earth metals, e.g., yttrium and europium, where the ratio of yttrium to europium in the RE-BCO layer ranges from about 3 to 1 to from about 1.5 to 1.

  8. Fast demographic traits promote high diversification rates of Amazonian trees

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Timothy R; Pennington, R Toby; Magallon, Susana; Gloor, Emanuel; Laurance, William F; Alexiades, Miguel; Alvarez, Esteban; Araujo, Alejandro; Arets, Eric J M M; Aymard, Gerardo; de Oliveira, Atila Alves; Amaral, Iêda; Arroyo, Luzmila; Bonal, Damien; Brienen, Roel J W; Chave, Jerome; Dexter, Kyle G; Di Fiore, Anthony; Eler, Eduardo; Feldpausch, Ted R; Ferreira, Leandro; Lopez-Gonzalez, Gabriela; van der Heijden, Geertje; Higuchi, Niro; Honorio, Eurídice; Huamantupa, Isau; Killeen, Tim J; Laurance, Susan; Leaño, Claudio; Lewis, Simon L; Malhi, Yadvinder; Marimon, Beatriz Schwantes; Marimon Junior, Ben Hur; Monteagudo Mendoza, Abel; Neill, David; Peñuela-Mora, Maria Cristina; Pitman, Nigel; Prieto, Adriana; Quesada, Carlos A; Ramírez, Fredy; Ramírez Angulo, Hirma; Rudas, Agustin; Ruschel, Ademir R; Salomão, Rafael P; de Andrade, Ana Segalin; Silva, J Natalino M; Silveira, Marcos; Simon, Marcelo F; Spironello, Wilson; ter Steege, Hans; Terborgh, John; Toledo, Marisol; Torres-Lezama, Armando; Vasquez, Rodolfo; Vieira, Ima Célia Guimarães; Vilanova, Emilio; Vos, Vincent A; Phillips, Oliver L; Wiens, John

    2014-01-01

    The Amazon rain forest sustains the world's highest tree diversity, but it remains unclear why some clades of trees are hyperdiverse, whereas others are not. Using dated phylogenies, estimates of current species richness and trait and demographic data from a large network of forest plots, we show that fast demographic traits – short turnover times – are associated with high diversification rates across 51 clades of canopy trees. This relationship is robust to assuming that diversification rates are either constant or decline over time, and occurs in a wide range of Neotropical tree lineages. This finding reveals the crucial role of intrinsic, ecological variation among clades for understanding the origin of the remarkable diversity of Amazonian trees and forests. PMID:24589190

  9. High Resolution Full Wave Modeling of Fast Waves in NSTX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, C. K.; Berk, L.; Hosea, J. C.; Leblanc, B. P.; Taylor, G.; Valeo, E. J.; Wilson, J. R.; Berry, L. A.; Jaeger, E. F.; Ryan, P. M.; Bonoli, P. T.; Wright, J. C.

    2010-11-01

    High Harmonic Fast Waves (HHFW) are being used in NSTX for plasma heating and noninductive current profile control. Numerical solutions for the wave fields obtained with the full wave TORIC and AORSA codes with ultrafine spatial resolution reveal the presence of a short wavelength feature that is predominantly polarized in the direction parallel to the equilibrium magnetic field and which is predicted by the codes to damp on electrons. A similar short wavelength mode also appears in simulations of the rf fields in C-Mod in the ICRF regime. Preliminary analysis indicates that the mode may be related to a slow mode that can propagate above the fundamental ion cyclotron frequency. The predicted power deposition profiles will be compared to those inferred from experimental measurements to see if the mode has a significant effect on the wave propagation and absorption. Possibilities for detecting the mode in NSTX and C-Mod will be discussed.

  10. Numerical Modeling of High Harmonic Fast Wave Heating on NSTX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, C. K.; Hosea, J. C.; Bell, R. E.; Leblanc, B. P.; Parker, J. B.; Valeo, E. J.; Wilson, J. R.; Ryan, P. M.; Jaeger, E. F.; Wilgen, J. B.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Bonoli, P. T.; Wright, J. C.; Harvey, R. W.; Dumont, R. J.

    2007-11-01

    High harmonic fast wave (HHFW) heating and current drive processes, at frequencies up to 15 times the fundamental deuterium cyclotron frequency, are being studied on NSTX. Recent experiments indicate that the core heating efficiency depends strongly on the antenna phasing and plasma conditions [1]. The wave propagation and absorption characteristics for select NSTX discharges will be analyzed using a variety of rf modeling codes, including both ray tracing and full wave models. Both core power deposition profiles and rf power flow in the edge regions will be considered. The possibility of off-axis mode conversion of the HHFW to shorter wavelength modes and the subsequent impact on power deposition will be explored. [1] See invited talk by J. C. Hosea this meeting for details

  11. In situ membrane resistance measurements in polymer electrolyte fuel cells by fast auxiliary current pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Buechi, F.N.; Scherer, G.G.; Marek, A.

    1995-06-01

    A solid-state current Pulse generator for in situ membrane resistance measurements by superimposed square current pulses in polymer electrolyte fuel cells was designed and built. The choice of the measuring technique and of parameters of the instrumentation was based on a critical analysis of the relevant electrochemical and physical processes. The inductance of the current pulse path is very low ({approx}5 nH), because the last stage of the generator is directly attached to the fuel cell. This low inductance -permits the generation of 5 A pulses with extremely fast (decay time {<=}5 ns) trailing edges (accompanied by a moderate ringing), which in turn makes it possible to measure the voltage transient induced by the current decay, with gigahertz resolution. The voltage transient is analyzed in a time window of 200 to 700 ns after the end of the pulse. By measurements in this time window, it is possible to separate accurately the ohmic series resistance of the cell (membrane resistance) from the other over potentials at the electrochemical interfaces. Because the pulse current path is independent of the dc loop, the resistance can be measured independently of the dc value, i.e., at open circuit and under high current density conditions. The instrument was tested, and the results were analyzed for accuracy. Resistances down to 2 m{Omega} can be measured with an error of <5%. The influence of the pulse length and pulse amplitude on the cell voltage response was also investigated. For cell resistances in the order of few milliohms, a current pulse amplitude of 5 A is the minimum requirement for accurate measurements.

  12. ELECTROMIGRATION ISSUES IN HIGH CURRENT HORN.

    SciTech Connect

    ZHANG, S.Y.; BELLAVIA, S.; SANDBERG, J.; ET AL.

    2005-05-16

    The secondary particle focusing horn for the AGS neutrino experiment proposal is a high current and high current density device. The peak current of horn is 300 kA. At the smallest area of horn, the current density is near 8 kA/mm{sup 2}. At very high current density, a few kA/mm{sup 2}, the electromigration phenomena will occur. Momentum transfer between electrons and metal atoms at high current density causes electromigration. The reliability and lifetime of focusing horn can be severely reduced by electromigration. In this paper, we discuss issues such as device reliability model, incubation time of electromigration, and lifetime of horn.

  13. High temperature superconductor current leads

    DOEpatents

    Hull, J.R.; Poeppel, R.B.

    1995-06-20

    An electrical lead is disclosed having one end for connection to an apparatus in a cryogenic environment and the other end for connection to an apparatus outside the cryogenic environment. The electrical lead includes a high temperature superconductor wire and an electrically conductive material distributed therein, where the conductive material is present at the one end of the lead at a concentration in the range of from 0 to about 3% by volume, and at the other end of the lead at a concentration of less than about 20% by volume. Various embodiments are shown for groups of high temperature superconductor wires and sheaths. 9 figs.

  14. High temperature superconductor current leads

    DOEpatents

    Hull, John R.; Poeppel, Roger B.

    1995-01-01

    An electrical lead having one end for connection to an apparatus in a cryogenic environment and the other end for connection to an apparatus outside the cryogenic environment. The electrical lead includes a high temperature superconductor wire and an electrically conductive material distributed therein, where the conductive material is present at the one end of the lead at a concentration in the range of from 0 to about 3% by volume, and at the other end of the lead at a concentration of less than about 20% by volume. Various embodiments are shown for groups of high temperature superconductor wires and sheaths.

  15. 60 MHz fast wave current drive experiments for DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Mayberry, M.J.; Chiu, S.C.; Porkolab, M.; Chan, V.; Freeman, R.; Harvey, R.; Pinsker, R.

    1989-05-01

    Non-inductive current drive is an essential element of the ITER program because it enhances high fluence nuclear testing during the technology phase of operations. By using fast waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF), current drive efficiencies comparable to lower-hybrid current drive can be obtained with good penetration of wave power to the high temperature plasma core. An additional advantage of the low frequency scheme is its technological simplicity due to the present availability of efficient, multi-megawatt rf sources in the ICRF. The DIII-D facility provides an excellent opportunity to test the feasibility of the low frequency FWCD approach. By combining with high power (2 MW) ECH injection at 60 GHz, it should be possible to generate plasmas with central electron temperatures of T/sub e0/ approx. = 4 keV, and by operating at a reduced toroidal field (B = 1T) to increase the electron ..beta.., strong single-pass absorption (/eta//sub abs/ greater than or equal to 0.3) can be achieved. The availability of a wide port recess (1m toroidal by 0.5m poloidal) will enable a travelling wave spectrum to be launched with N/sub parallel/ approx. = 5--7 at 60 MHz, which should be optimum for strong electron interaction. The resulting current drive efficiency should be sufficiently high to demonstrate FWCD at the /approximately/ 0.25--0.5 MA level at moderate densities (/bar n/ approx. = 1.3 /times/ 10/sup 19/ m/sup /minus/3/) using the existing 2 MW ICRF transmitter. 7 refs., 5 figs.

  16. Fast-Recovery, High-Voltage Power Diode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sundberg, G.; Berman, A.; Balodis, V.; Gaugh, C.; Duffin, J.; Karatnicki, H.; Larson, E.

    1985-01-01

    New family of fast-recovery high-voltage power diodes compatible with D60T and D7ST transistors developed. Have wide range of applications in spacecraft and aircraft electrical distribution equipment, dc/dc inverters, and ac motor controllers for high-horsepower electric motors operating from 480-volt ac lines. Fast-Recovery 1,200-V Power Diodes use chip of hexagonal geometry to maximize effective silicon area.

  17. First results on fast wave current drive in advanced tokamak discharges in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Prater, R.; Cary, W.P.; Baity, F.W.

    1995-07-01

    Initial experiments have been performed on the DIII-D tokamak on coupling, direct electron heating, and current drive by fast waves in advanced tokamak discharges. These experiments showed efficient central heating and current drive in agreement with theory in magnitude and profile. Extrapolating these results to temperature characteristic of a power plant (25 keV) gives current drive efficiency of about 0.3 MA/m{sup 2}.

  18. High temperature superconducting fault current limiter

    DOEpatents

    Hull, J.R.

    1997-02-04

    A fault current limiter for an electrical circuit is disclosed. The fault current limiter includes a high temperature superconductor in the electrical circuit. The high temperature superconductor is cooled below its critical temperature to maintain the superconducting electrical properties during operation as the fault current limiter. 15 figs.

  19. High temperature superconducting fault current limiter

    DOEpatents

    Hull, John R.

    1997-01-01

    A fault current limiter (10) for an electrical circuit (14). The fault current limiter (10) includes a high temperature superconductor (12) in the electrical circuit (14). The high temperature superconductor (12) is cooled below its critical temperature to maintain the superconducting electrical properties during operation as the fault current limiter (10).

  20. Optimal spin current pattern for fast domain wall propagation in nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, P.; Sun, Z. Z.; Schliemann, J.; Wang, X. R.

    2010-10-01

    One of the important issues in nanomagnetism is to lower the current needed for a technologically useful domain wall (DW) propagation speed. Based on the modified Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG) equation with both Slonczewski spin-transfer torque and the field-like torque, we derive an optimal temporally and spatially varying spin current pattern for fast DW propagation along nanowires. Under such conditions, the DW velocity in biaxial wires can be enhanced as much as tens of times higher than that achieved in experiments so far. Moreover, the fast variation of spin polarization can efficiently help DW depinning. Possible experimental realizations are discussed.

  1. Fast Food Pattern and Cardiometabolic Disorders: A Review of Current Studies

    PubMed Central

    Bahadoran, Zahra; Mirmiran, Parvin; Azizi, Fereidoun

    2015-01-01

    Background: There are growing concern globally regarding the alarming trend of fast food consumption and its related cardiometabolic outcomes including overweight and obesity. This study aimed to review the current evidences available in relation to adverse effects of fast food pattern on cardiometa­bolic risk factors. Methods: Relevant articles including epidemiological and clinical studies with appropriate design and good quality were obtained through searches of the Medline, PubMed, Scopus databases and Google scholar with related key words including "fast foods", "processed foods", "obesity", "overweight", "insulin resistance", "diabetes", "cardiovascular disease", "metabolic syndrome", "dyslipidemia" and "hypertension". Results: Fast food consumption and out-of-home eating behavior is a main risk factor for lower diet quality, higher calorie and fat intake and lower micronutrients density of diet. Frequent consumption of fast foods was accompanied with overweight and abdominal fat gain, impaired insulin and glucose homeostasis, lipid and lipoprotein disorders, induction of systemic inflammation and oxidative stress. Higher fast food consumption also increases the risk of developmental diabetes, metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease. Conclusion: This review provides further evidence warning us against the irreparable effects of fast food consumption on public health especially the increasing global burden of obesity and cardiovascu­lar diseases. PMID:26933642

  2. A Superconducting transformer system for high current cable testing

    SciTech Connect

    Godeke, A.; Dietderich, D. R.; Joseph, J. M.; Lizarazo, J.; Prestemon, S. O.; Miller, G.; Weijers, H. W.

    2010-02-15

    This article describes the development of a direct-current (dc) superconducting transformer system for the high current test of superconducting cables. The transformer consists of a core-free 10 464 turn primary solenoid which is enclosed by a 6.5 turn secondary. The transformer is designed to deliver a 50 kA dc secondary current at a dc primary current of about 50 A. The secondary current is measured inductively using two toroidal-wound Rogowski coils. The Rogowski coil signal is digitally integrated, resulting in a voltage signal that is proportional to the secondary current. This voltage signal is used to control the secondary current using a feedback loop which automatically compensates for resistive losses in the splices to the superconducting cable samples that are connected to the secondary. The system has been commissioned up to 28 kA secondary current. The reproducibility in the secondary current measurement is better than 0.05% for the relevant current range up to 25 kA. The drift in the secondary current, which results from drift in the digital integrator, is estimated to be below 0.5 A/min. The system's performance is further demonstrated through a voltage-current measurement on a superconducting cable sample at 11 T background magnetic field. The superconducting transformer system enables fast, high resolution, economic, and safe tests of the critical current of superconducting cable samples.

  3. A superconducting transformer system for high current cable testing.

    PubMed

    Godeke, A; Dietderich, D R; Joseph, J M; Lizarazo, J; Prestemon, S O; Miller, G; Weijers, H W

    2010-03-01

    This article describes the development of a direct-current (dc) superconducting transformer system for the high current test of superconducting cables. The transformer consists of a core-free 10,464 turn primary solenoid which is enclosed by a 6.5 turn secondary. The transformer is designed to deliver a 50 kA dc secondary current at a dc primary current of about 50 A. The secondary current is measured inductively using two toroidal-wound Rogowski coils. The Rogowski coil signal is digitally integrated, resulting in a voltage signal that is proportional to the secondary current. This voltage signal is used to control the secondary current using a feedback loop which automatically compensates for resistive losses in the splices to the superconducting cable samples that are connected to the secondary. The system has been commissioned up to 28 kA secondary current. The reproducibility in the secondary current measurement is better than 0.05% for the relevant current range up to 25 kA. The drift in the secondary current, which results from drift in the digital integrator, is estimated to be below 0.5 A/min. The system's performance is further demonstrated through a voltage-current measurement on a superconducting cable sample at 11 T background magnetic field. The superconducting transformer system enables fast, high resolution, economic, and safe tests of the critical current of superconducting cable samples. PMID:20370213

  4. Apparatus for measuring high frequency currents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagmann, Mark J. (Inventor); Sutton, John F. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    An apparatus for measuring high frequency currents includes a non-ferrous core current probe that is coupled to a wide-band transimpedance amplifier. The current probe has a secondary winding with a winding resistance that is substantially smaller than the reactance of the winding. The sensitivity of the current probe is substantially flat over a wide band of frequencies. The apparatus is particularly useful for measuring exposure of humans to radio frequency currents.

  5. Fast magnetic reconnection in thin current sheets: effects of different current profiles and electron inertia in Ohm's law.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pucci, Fulvia; Del Sarto, Daniele; Tenerani, Anna; Velli, Marco

    2015-04-01

    By examining sheets with thicknesses scaling as different powers of the Lundquist number S, we previously showed (Pucci and Velli, 2014) that the growth rate of the tearing mode increases as current sheets thin and, once the inverse aspect ratio reaches a scaling a/L = S-1/3, the time-scale for the instability to develop becomes of the order of the Alfvén time. That means that a fast instability sets in well before Sweet-Parker type current sheets can form. In addition, such an instability produces many islands in the sheet, leading to fast nonlinear evolution and most probably a turbulent disruption of the sheet itself. This has fundamental implications for magnetically driven reconnection throughout the corona, and in particular for coronal heating and the triggering of coronal mass ejections. Here we extend the study of reconnection instabilities to magnetic fields of grater complexity, displaying different current structures such as, for example, multiple or asymmetric current layers. We also consider the possibility of a Δ' dependence on wave-number k-p for different values of p, studying analogies and variations of the trigger scaling relation a/L ~ S-1/3 with respect to the Harris current sheet equilibrium. At large Lundquist numbers in typical Heliospheric plasmas kinetic effects become more important in Ohm's law: we consider the effects of electron skin depth reconnection, showing that we can define a trigger relation similar to the resistive case. The results are important to the transition to fast reconnection in the solar corona, solar wind, magnetosphere as well as laboratory plasmas. F. Pucci and M. Velli, "Reconnection of quasi-singular current sheets: the 'ideal" tearing mode" ApJ 780:L19, 2014.

  6. High-Harmonic Fast-Wave heating in NSTX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LeBlanc, B. P.; Bell, R. E.; Bonoli, P. T.; Hosea, J. C.; Johnson, D. W.; Mau, T. K.; Menard, J.; Mueller, D.; Ono, M.; Paoletti, F.; Paul, S.; Phillips, C. K.; Pinsker, R.; Rosenberg, A.; Ryan, P. M.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Stutman, D.; Swain, D. W.; Takase, Y.; Wilgen, J. B.; Wilson, J. R.

    2001-10-01

    High-Harmonic Fast-Wave (HHFW), a radio-frequency technique scenario applicable to high-beta plasmas, has been selected as one of the main auxiliary heating systems on NSTX. The HHFW antenna assembly comprises 12 toroidally adjacent current elements, extending poloidally and centered on the equatorial plane. This paper reviews experimental results obtained with a symmetrical (vacuum) launching spectrum with k∥=14 m-1 at a frequency of 30 MHz. We describe results obtained when HHFW power is applied to helium and deuterium plasmas, during the plasma-current flattop period of the discharge. Application of 1.8-MW HHFW pulse to MHD quiescent plasmas resulted in strong electron heating, during which the central electron temperature, Teo more than doubled from ≈0.05 keV to 1.15 keV. In deuterium plasmas, HHFW heating was found less efficient, with a Teo increase of the order of 40% during a 1.8-MW HHFW pulse, from ≈400 eV to ≈550 eV. (At HHFW power of 2.4 MW, Teo increased by 60%, reaching 0.625 keV.) HHFW heating in presence of MHD activity is also discussed. A short neutral beam pulse was applied to permit charge-exchange recombination spectroscopy (CHERS) measurement of the impurity ion temperature Ti. Preliminary CHERS analysis show that Ti≈Te during HHFW heating. Of special interest are deuterium discharges, where the application of HHFW power was done during the current ramp-up. We observe the creation of large density gradients in the edge region. In the latter case, the density rose spontaneously to neo⩽8×1013 cm-3.

  7. High-harmonic Fast-wave Heating in NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    B.P. LeBlanc; R.E. Bell; P.T. Bonoli; J.C. Hosea; D.W. Johnson; T.K. Mau; J. Menard; D. Mueller; M. Ono; F. Paoletti; S. Paul; C.K. Phillips; R. Pinsker; A. Rosenberg; P.M. Ryan , S.A. Sabbagh; D. Stutman; D.W. Swain; Y. Takase; J.B. Wilgen; J.R. Wilson

    2001-06-11

    High-Harmonic Fast-Wave (HHFW), a radio-frequency technique scenario applicable to high-beta plasmas, has been selected as one of the main auxiliary heating systems on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). The HHFW antenna assembly comprises 12 toroidally adjacent current elements, extending poloidally and centered on the equatorial plane. This paper reviews experimental results obtained with a symmetrical (vacuum) launching spectrum with k|| = 14 m(superscript ''-1'') at a frequency of 30 MHz. We describe results obtained when HHFW power is applied to helium and deuterium plasmas, during the plasma-current flattop period of the discharge. Application of 1.8-MW HHFW pulse to MHD quiescent plasmas resulted in strong electron heating, during which the central electron temperature T(subscript ''eo'') more than doubled from approximately 0.5 keV to 1.15 keV. In deuterium plasmas, HHFW heating was found less efficient, with a central electron temperature increase of the order of 40% during a 1.8-MW HHFW pulse, from approximately 400 eV to approximately 550 eV. (At HHFW power of 2.4 MW, central electron temperature increased by 60%, reaching 0.625 keV.) HHFW heating in presence of MHD activity is also discussed. A short neutral-beam pulse was applied to permit charge-exchange recombination spectroscopy (CHERS) measurement of the impurity ion temperature T(subscript ''i''). Preliminary CHERS analysis show that ion temperature approximately equals electron temperature during HHFW heating. Of special interest are deuterium discharges, where the application of HHFW power was done during the current ramp-up. We observe the creation of large density gradients in the edge region. In the latter case, the density rose spontaneously to n (subscript ''eo'') less than or equal to 8 x 10 (superscript ''13'') cm (superscript ''-3'').

  8. Initial fast wave heating and current drive experiments on the DIII-D tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Prater, R.; Mayberry, M.J.; Petty, C.C.; Pinsker, R.I.; Chiu, S.C.; Harvey, R.W.; Luce, T.C.; Porkolab, M.; Bonoli, P.; James, R.A.; Kawashima, H.; Baity, F.W.; Goulding, R.H.; Hoffman, D.J.; Becoulet, A.; Moreau, D.; Trukhin, V.

    1991-12-01

    Heating and current drive experiments have been performed on the DIII-D tokamak using a 4-strap fast wave antenna at power up to 1.7 MW at 30--60 MHz. Minority heating experiments using D(H) showed effective wave absorption, confirming that the antenna was launching the fast wave. Experiments on the direct absorption of fast waves by electrons through Landau damping and transit-time magnetic pumping were performed at 60 MHz. These experiments showed effective heating of electrons, with a global heating efficiency comparable to that of neutral injection, even when the calculated single-pass dumping was as small as 5%. It is believed that effective multiple-pass damping is taking place. Fast wave current drive experiments were performed with a toroidally directional spectrum obtained by {pi}/2-phasing of the antenna straps. Although non-inductive currents of up to 160 kA were found, the magnitude of the non-inductive current did not decrease when the wave spectrum was reversed. These results are presently under investigation.

  9. High Temperature Ultrasonic Transducers for In-Service Inspection of Liquid Metal Fast Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, Jeffrey W.; Posakony, Gerald J.; Harris, Robert V.; Baldwin, David L.; Jones, Anthony M.; Bond, Leonard J.

    2011-12-31

    In-service inspection of liquid metal (sodium) fast reactors requires the use of ultrasonic transducers capable of operating at high temperatures (>200°C), high gamma radiation fields, and the chemically reactive liquid sodium environment. In the early- to mid-1970s, the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission supported development of high-temperature, submersible single-element transducers, used for scanning and under-sodium imaging in the Fast Flux Test Facility and the Clinch River Breeder Reactor. Current work is building on this technology to develop the next generation of high-temperature linear ultrasonic transducer arrays for under-sodium viewing and in-service inspections.

  10. An integrating current transformer for fast extraction from the HIRFL-CSR main ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jun-Xia; Zheng, Jian-Hua; Zhao, Tie-Cheng; Mao, Rui-Shi; Yin, Yan; Yuan, You-Jin; Yang, Jian-Cheng

    2010-01-01

    For any experiment that uses the beam of an accelerator, monitoring the beam intensity is always an important concern. It is particularly useful if one can continuously measure the beam current without disturbing the beam. We report here on test experiments for an Integrating Current Transformer (ICT) used to measure fast extraction beams from the HIRFL-CSR main ring (CSRm). The laboratory tests and beam intensity measurement results are presented in this paper. The influence of the kicker noise is also analyzed.

  11. A Current Source Method For t(sub q) Measurement of Fast Switching Thyristors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niedra, Janis M.

    2006-01-01

    A current source driven circuit has been constructed to measure the turn-off time (t(sub q)) of fast-switching SiC thyristors. This circuit operates from a single power supply and a dual channel pulse generator to provide adjustment of forward current, magnitude and duration of reverse applied voltage, and rate of rise of reapplied forward voltage. Values of t(sub q) down to 100 ns can be resolved.

  12. Hybrid high direct current circuit interrupter

    DOEpatents

    Rockot, Joseph H.; Mikesell, Harvey E.; Jha, Kamal N.

    1998-01-01

    A device and a method for interrupting very high direct currents (greater than 100,000 amperes) and simultaneously blocking high voltages (greater than 600 volts). The device utilizes a mechanical switch to carry very high currents continuously with low loss and a silicon controlled rectifier (SCR) to bypass the current around the mechanical switch while its contacts are separating. A commutation circuit, connected in parallel with the SCR, turns off the SCR by utilizing a resonant circuit to divert the SCR current after the switch opens.

  13. Hybrid high direct current circuit interrupter

    DOEpatents

    Rockot, J.H.; Mikesell, H.E.; Jha, K.N.

    1998-08-11

    A device and a method are disclosed for interrupting very high direct currents (greater than 100,000 amperes) and simultaneously blocking high voltages (greater than 600 volts). The device utilizes a mechanical switch to carry very high currents continuously with low loss and a silicon controlled rectifier (SCR) to bypass the current around the mechanical switch while its contacts are separating. A commutation circuit, connected in parallel with the SCR, turns off the SCR by utilizing a resonant circuit to divert the SCR current after the switch opens. 7 figs.

  14. Characterization of Fast Ion Absorption of the High Harmonic Fast Wave in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    A.L. Rosenberg; J.E. Menard; J.R. Wilson; S. Medle; C.K. Phillips; R. Andre; D.S. Darro; R.J. Dumont; B.P. LeBlanc; M.H. Redi; T.K. Mau; E. F. Jaeger; P.M. Ryan; D.W. Swain; R.W. Harvey; J. Egedal; the NSTX Team

    2003-08-19

    Ion absorption of the high harmonic fast wave in a spherical torus is of critical importance to assessing the viability of the wave as a means of heating and driving current. Analysis of recent National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) shots has revealed that under some conditions when neutral beam and radio-frequency (RF) power are injected into the plasma simultaneously, a fast ion population with energy above the beam injection energy is sustained by the wave. In agreement with modeling, these experiments find the RF-induced fast ion tail strength and neutron rate at lower B-fields to be less enhanced, likely due to a larger beta profile, which promotes greater off-axis absorption where the fast ion population is small. Ion loss codes find the increased loss fraction with decreased B insufficient to account for the changes in tail strength, providing further evidence that this is an RF interaction effect. Though greater ion absorption is predicted with lower k(sub)||, surprisingly little variation in the tail was observed, along with a small neutron rate enhancement with higher k(sub)||. Data from the neutral particle analyzer, neutron detectors, X-ray crystal spectrometer, and Thomson scattering is presented, along with results from the TRANSP transport analysis code, ray-tracing codes HPRT and CURRAY, full-wave code and AORSA, quasi-linear code CQL3D, and ion loss codes EIGOL and CONBEAM.

  15. Highly accurate fast lung CT registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rühaak, Jan; Heldmann, Stefan; Kipshagen, Till; Fischer, Bernd

    2013-03-01

    Lung registration in thoracic CT scans has received much attention in the medical imaging community. Possible applications range from follow-up analysis, motion correction for radiation therapy, monitoring of air flow and pulmonary function to lung elasticity analysis. In a clinical environment, runtime is always a critical issue, ruling out quite a few excellent registration approaches. In this paper, a highly efficient variational lung registration method based on minimizing the normalized gradient fields distance measure with curvature regularization is presented. The method ensures diffeomorphic deformations by an additional volume regularization. Supplemental user knowledge, like a segmentation of the lungs, may be incorporated as well. The accuracy of our method was evaluated on 40 test cases from clinical routine. In the EMPIRE10 lung registration challenge, our scheme ranks third, with respect to various validation criteria, out of 28 algorithms with an average landmark distance of 0.72 mm. The average runtime is about 1:50 min on a standard PC, making it by far the fastest approach of the top-ranking algorithms. Additionally, the ten publicly available DIR-Lab inhale-exhale scan pairs were registered to subvoxel accuracy at computation times of only 20 seconds. Our method thus combines very attractive runtimes with state-of-the-art accuracy in a unique way.

  16. Results of High Harmonic Fast Wave Heating Experiments on NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    J.C. Hosea; R.E. Bell; M. Bitter; P. Bonoli; M. Carter; D. Gates; B.P. LeBlanc; R. Majeski; T.K. Mau; J. Menard; D. Mueller; M. Ono; S. Paul; C.K. Phillips; R. Pinsker; A. Rosenberg; P. Ryan; S.A. Sabbagh; D. Stutman; D. Swain; Y. Takase; J. Wilgen; and J.R. Wilson

    2001-08-09

    The study of high-harmonic fast-wave (HHFW) heating and current drive is being conducted on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) device to determine the physics of applying radio-frequency (rf) waves at high harmonics (approximately 10-20) of the ion cyclotron frequency in this high-beta plasma regime and to extend the performance of the NSTX plasma. The magnetic field of this low aspect ratio device is lower (less than or equal to 0.35 T for this work) than that for the typical moderate aspect ratio tokamak regime by about an order of magnitude and the plasma densities achieved are typically in the mid 10(superscript ''19'') m(superscript ''-3'') range. Thus, the dielectric constant of the plasma, epsilon always equals omega (subscript ''pe'')(superscript ''2'') divided by omega (subscript ''ce'')(superscript ''2''), is of order approximately 50-100 resulting in wave physics properties which favor electron heating by TTMP and Landau damping. Radio-frequency power is applied on NSTX at 3 0 MHz using an antenna array with 12 current straps aligned in the poloidal direction. The antenna can be phased to launch waves with toroidal wave numbers, k(subscript ''T'') between 2 m(superscript ''-1'') and 14 m(superscript ''-1'') and can be phased for current drive with peak toroidal directionality at 7 m(superscript ''-1''). To date most of the HHFW experiments have been carried out using k(subscript ''T'') = 14 m(superscript ''-1'') with 0-pi-0-pi-... phasing of the strap currents. The diagnostic complement on NSTX includes a 30-Hz, 10-spatial-channel Thomson scattering (MPTS) system for measuring profiles of electron temperature and density every 33 msec, and a charge-exchange recombination spectroscopy (CHERS) system for measuring profiles of the impurity ion temperature and toroidal rotation during a neutral-beam blip. Strong electron and ion heating are observed in helium discharges, whereas the heating efficiency is noticeably reduced for deuterium

  17. Characteristics of current filamentation in high gain photoconductive semiconductor switching

    SciTech Connect

    Zutavern, F J; Loubriel, G M; O'Malley, M W; Helgeson, W D; McLaughlin, D L; Denison, G J

    1992-01-01

    Characteristics of current filamentation are reported for high gain photoconductive semiconductor switches (PCSS). Infrared photoluminescence is used to monitor carrier recombination radiation during fast initiation of high gain switching in large (1.5 cm gap) lateral GaAs PCSS. Spatial modulation of the optical trigger, a 200--300 ps pulse width laser, is examined. Effects on the location and number of current filaments, rise time, and delay to high gain switching, minimum trigger energy, and degradation of switch contacts are presented. Implications of these measurements for the theoretical understanding and practical development of these switches are discussed. Efforts to increase current density and reduce switch size and optical trigger energy requirements are described. Results from contact development and device lifetime testing are presented and the impact of these results on practical device applications is discussed.

  18. High power l-band fast phase shifter

    SciTech Connect

    Terechkine, I.; Khabiboulline, T.; Solyak, N.; /Fermilab

    2008-10-01

    Following successful testing of a concept prototype of a waveguide-based high power phase shifter, a design of a fast, high power device has been developed. The shifter uses two magnetically biased blocks of Yttrium Iron Garnet (YIG) positioned along the side walls of a rectangular waveguide. The cross-section of the waveguide is chosen to suppress unwanted RF modes that could otherwise compromise performance of the phase shifter. Static bias field in the YIG blocks is created by employing permanent magnets. Low inductance coils in the same magnetic circuit excite fast component of the bias field. Design of the device ensures effective heat extraction from the YIG blocks and penetration of the fast magnetic field inside the waveguide with minimum delay. This paper summarizes main steps in this development and gives brief description of the system.

  19. Fast magnetic reconnection with plasmoid / current sheet ejection events in laboratory experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inomoto, Michiaki; Ono, Yasushi; Hayashi, Yoshinori

    2012-07-01

    Non-steady and fast magnetic reconnections due to plasmoid or current sheet ejection events have been investigated in laboratory experiments using TS-3, TS-4 and UTST plasma merging devices in the University of Tokyo. In these devices, magnetic reconnection is induced by two different schemes, a) push reconnection driven by flux injection from the upstream region, b) pull reconnection driven by flux extraction to the downstream region. Current sheet or plasmoid ejection events are observed in these reconnection experiments particularly with strong guide magnetic field parallel to the reconnection electric field. In push reconnection experiments, anomalous resistivity is induced by the ion's kinetic effect (meandering motion) when the current sheet width is compressed shorter than the ion gyroradius by the strongly injected inflow flux. This fast reconnection regime does not involve plasmoid / current sheet ejection events. On the other hand, the guide field reduces the ion gyroradius and suppresses the onset of the anomalous resistivity, providing slow and steady magnetic reconnection. Impulsive fast reconnection with strong guide field develops, nevertheless, due to plasmoid / current sheet ejection events in pull and push reconnection experiments with extremely large external driving forces. In such a situation, the inflow flux is forcedly pushed into the reconnection region even faster than the maximal reconnection rate, resulting in flux pile up in front of the diffusion region. This piled flux induces large current density inside the current sheet in which plasmoid structure with closed flux surface is formed in pull reconnection case. The induced large current density or plasmoid is then ejected from the diffusion region with significant increase of reconnection electric field. As a result, magnetic reconnection condition with even larger reconnection rate than that obtained by anomalous resistivity was achieved under strong guide field and large external

  20. High-quality thin graphene films from fast electrochemical exfoliation.

    PubMed

    Su, Ching-Yuan; Lu, Ang-Yu; Xu, Yanping; Chen, Fu-Rong; Khlobystov, Andrei N; Li, Lain-Jong

    2011-03-22

    Flexible and ultratransparent conductors based on graphene sheets have been considered as one promising candidate for replacing currently used indium tin oxide films that are unlikely to satisfy future needs due to their increasing cost and losses in conductivity on bending. Here we demonstrate a simple and fast electrochemical method to exfoliate graphite into thin graphene sheets, mainly AB-stacked bilayered graphene with a large lateral size (several to several tens of micrometers). The electrical properties of these exfoliated sheets are readily superior to commonly used reduced graphene oxide, which preparation typically requires many steps including oxidation of graphite and high temperature reduction. These graphene sheets dissolve in dimethyl formamide (DMF), and they can self-aggregate at air-DMF interfaces after adding water as an antisolvent due to their strong surface hydrophobicity. Interestingly, the continuous films obtained exhibit ultratransparency (∼96% transmittance), and their sheet resistance is <1k Ω/sq after a simple HNO3 treatment, superior to those based on reduced graphene oxide or graphene sheets by other exfoliation methods. Raman and STM characterizations corroborate that the graphene sheets exfoliated by our electrochemical method preserve the intrinsic structure of graphene. PMID:21309565

  1. High current ion beam transport using solenoids

    SciTech Connect

    Hollinger, R.; Spaedtke, P.

    2008-02-15

    In the framework of the future project FAIR several upgrade programs and construction of new facilities are in progress such as the U{sup 4+} upgrade for the existing high current injector and the new 70 MeV proton injector. For both injectors solenoids in the low energy beam transport section are foreseen to inject the beam into the following rf accelerator. The paper presents beam quality measurements of high current ion beams behind a solenoid using a slit-grid emittance measurement device, viewing targets, and a pepper pot measurement device at the high current test bench at GSI.

  2. Fast particle confinement with optimized coil currents in the W7-X stellarator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drevlak, M.; Geiger, J.; Helander, P.; Turkin, Y.

    2014-07-01

    One of the principal goals of the W7-X stellarator is to demonstrate good confinement of energetic ions at finite β. This confinement, however, is sensitive to the magnetic field configuration and is thus vulnerable to design modifications of the coil geometry. The collisionless drift orbit losses for 60 keV protons in W7-X are studied using the ANTS code. Particles in this energy range will be produced by the neutral beam injection (NBI) system being constructed for W7-X, and are particularly important because protons at this energy accurately mimick the behaviour of 3.5 MeV α-particles in a HELIAS reactor. To investigate the possibility of improved fast particle confinement, several approaches to adjust the coil currents (5 main field coil currents +2 auxiliary coil currents) were explored. These strategies include simple rules of thumb as well as computational optimization of various properties of the magnetic field. It is shown that significant improvement of collisionless fast particle confinement can be achieved in W7-X for particle populations similar to α particles produced in fusion reactions. Nevertheless, the experimental goal of demonstrating confinement improvement with rising plasma pressure using an NBI-generated population appears to be difficult based on optimization of the coil currents only. The principal reason for this difficulty is that the NBI deposition profile is broader than the region of good fast-ion confinement around the magnetic axis.

  3. High spatial resolution fast-neutron imaging detectors for Pulsed Fast-Neutron Transmission Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mor, I.; Vartsky, D.; Bar, D.; Feldman, G.; Goldberg, M. B.; Katz, D.; Sayag, E.; Shmueli, I.; Cohen, Y.; Tal, A.; Vagish, Z.; Bromberger, B.; Dangendorf, V.; Mugai, D.; Tittelmeier, K.; Weierganz, M.

    2009-05-01

    Two generations of a novel detector for high-resolution transmission imaging and spectrometry of fast-neutrons are presented. These devices are based on a hydrogenous fiber scintillator screen and single- or multiple-gated intensified camera systems (ICCD). This detector is designed for energy-selective neutron radiography with nanosecond-pulsed broad-energy (1-10 MeV) neutron beams. Utilizing the Time-of-Flight (TOF) method, such a detector is capable of simultaneously capturing several images, each at a different neutron energy (TOF). In addition, a gamma-ray image can also be simultaneously registered, allowing combined neutron/gamma inspection of objects. This permits combining the sensitivity of the fast-neutron resonance method to low-Z elements with that of gamma radiography to high-Z materials.

  4. High pressure, high current, low inductance, high reliability sealed terminals

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, John S [Oak Ridge, TN; McKeever, John W [Oak Ridge, TN

    2010-03-23

    The invention is a terminal assembly having a casing with at least one delivery tapered-cone conductor and at least one return tapered-cone conductor routed there-through. The delivery and return tapered-cone conductors are electrically isolated from each other and positioned in the annuluses of ordered concentric cones at an off-normal angle. The tapered cone conductor service can be AC phase conductors and DC link conductors. The center core has at least one service conduit of gate signal leads, diagnostic signal wires, and refrigerant tubing routed there-through. A seal material is in direct contact with the casing inner surface, the tapered-cone conductors, and the service conduits thereby hermetically filling the interstitial space in the casing interior core and center core. The assembly provides simultaneous high-current, high-pressure, low-inductance, and high-reliability service.

  5. Study of the fast ion confinement and current profile control on MAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turnyanskiy, M.; Keeling, D. L.; Akers, R. J.; Cunningham, G.; Conway, N. J.; Meyer, H.; Michael, C. A.; Pinches, S. D.

    2009-06-01

    One of the main operational aims of the MAST experiment (Darke et al 1994 Proc. 18th Symp. on Fusion Technology (Karlsruhe, Germany, 1994) p 799) and the proposed MAST upgrade is to investigate possible mechanisms to control the q-profile and drive off-axis current. Experiments were carried out to determine the extent to which the q-profile may be modified using two different approaches, transient and steady-state. Transient effects during the plasma current ramp-up phase were investigated with the aim of developing a start-up regime that can later be used as a target plasma for non-inductive current drive or to access advanced modes of operation such as the hybrid or improved H-mode. The most significant effect in this case was observed when early neutral beam injection (NBI) was applied to the fast current ramp-rate start-up plasmas causing reversed magnetic shear and the plasma current to 'pile-up' off-axis. In steady-state experiments, in which off-axis NBI was studied, results indicate that broadening the fast ion deposition profile by off-axis neutral beam (NB) injection helps to avoid harmful plasma instabilities and significantly extends the operational window of MAST. Long pulse (>0.65 s) H-mode plasmas were achieved with plasma duration limited only by present machine and NBI engineering limits. In order to match the experimentally observed neutron rate and stored energy a low level of anomalous fast ion diffuse ion (Db ~ 0.5 m2 s-1) is required. The introduction of the fast ion diffusion broadens the neutral beam current drive profile and degrades the relative contribution of NB driven current from ~40% to ~30%. To obtain direct measurements of the current profile, a multi-chord motional stark effect diagnostic has been commissioned on MAST and is currently delivering first results in order to confirm the off-axis location of the NB driven current.

  6. Visualizing fast electron energy transport into laser-compressed high-density fast-ignition targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarrott, L. C.; Wei, M. S.; McGuffey, C.; Solodov, A. A.; Theobald, W.; Qiao, B.; Stoeckl, C.; Betti, R.; Chen, H.; Delettrez, J.; Döppner, T.; Giraldez, E. M.; Glebov, V. Y.; Habara, H.; Iwawaki, T.; Key, M. H.; Luo, R. W.; Marshall, F. J.; McLean, H. S.; Mileham, C.; Patel, P. K.; Santos, J. J.; Sawada, H.; Stephens, R. B.; Yabuuchi, T.; Beg, F. N.

    2016-05-01

    Recent progress in kilojoule-scale high-intensity lasers has opened up new areas of research in radiography, laboratory astrophysics, high-energy-density physics, and fast-ignition (FI) laser fusion. FI requires efficient heating of pre-compressed high-density fuel by an intense relativistic electron beam produced from laser-matter interaction. Understanding the details of electron beam generation and transport is crucial for FI. Here we report on the first visualization of fast electron spatial energy deposition in a laser-compressed cone-in-shell FI target, facilitated by doping the shell with copper and imaging the K-shell radiation. Multi-scale simulations accompanying the experiments clearly show the location of fast electrons and reveal key parameters affecting energy coupling. The approach provides a more direct way to infer energy coupling and guide experimental designs that significantly improve the laser-to-core coupling to 7%. Our findings lay the groundwork for further improving efficiency, with 15% energy coupling predicted in FI experiments using an existing megajoule-scale laser driver.

  7. Optimal spin current pattern for fast domain wall propagation in nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Peng; Sun, Zhouzhou; Schliemann, John; Wang, Xiangrong

    2011-03-01

    One of the important issues in nanomagnetism is to lower the current needed for a technologically useful domain wall (DW) propagation speed. Based on the modified Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG) equation with both Slonczewski spin-transfer torque and the field-like torque, we derive an optimal temporally and spatially varying spin current pattern for fast DW propagation along nanowires. Under such conditions, the DW velocity in biaxial wires can be enhanced as much as tens of times higher than that achieved in experiments so far. Moreover, the fast variation of spin polarization can efficiently help DW depinning. Possible experimental realizations are discussed. This work is supported by Hong Kong RGC grants (#603508, 604109, RPC10SC05 and HKU10/CRF/08-HKUST17/CRF/08), and by Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft via SFB 689. ZZS thanks the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation (Germany) for a grant.

  8. Fast Neutron Irradiation of the Highly Radioresistant Bacterium Deinococcus Radiodurans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Case, Diane Louise

    Fast neutron dose survival curves were generated for the bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans, which is renowned for its unusually high resistance to gamma, x-ray, and ultraviolet radiation, but for which fast neutron response was unknown. The fast neutrons were produced by the University of Massachusetts Lowell 5.5-MV, type CN Van de Graaff accelerator through the ^7Li(p,n)^7 Be reaction by bombarding a thick metallic lithium target with a 4-MeV proton beam. The bacteria were uniformly distributed on 150-mm agar plates and were exposed to the fast neutron beam under conditions of charged particle equilibrium. The plates were subdivided into concentric rings of increasing diameter from the center to the periphery of the plate, within which the average neutron dose was calculated as the product of the precisely known neutron fluence at the average radius of the ring and the neutron energy dependent kerma factor. The neutron fluence and dose ranged from approximately 3 times 1013 n cm^ {-2} to 1 times 1012 n cm^ {-2}, and 200 kilorad to 5 kilorad, respectively, from the center to the periphery of the plate. Percent survival for Deinococcus radiodurans as a function of fast neutron dose was derived from the ability of the irradiated cells to produce visible colonies within each ring compared to that of a nonirradiated control population. The bacterium Escherichia coli B/r (CSH) was irradiated under identical conditions for comparative purposes. The survival response of Deinococcus radiodurans as a result of cumulative fast neutron exposures was also investigated. The quantification of the ability of Deinococcus radiodurans to survive cellular insult from secondary charged particles, which are produced by fast neutron interactions in biological materials, will provide valuable information about damage and repair mechanisms under extreme cellular stress, and may provide new insight into the origin of this bacterium's unprecedented radiation resistance.

  9. Transfer ionization in collisions with a fast highly charged ion.

    PubMed

    Voitkiv, A B

    2013-07-26

    Transfer ionization in fast collisions between a bare ion and an atom, in which one of the atomic electrons is captured by the ion whereas another one is emitted, crucially depends on dynamic electron-electron correlations. We show that in collisions with a highly charged ion a strong field of the ion has a very profound effect on the correlated channels of transfer ionization. In particular, this field weakens (strongly suppresses) electron emission into the direction opposite (perpendicular) to the motion of the ion. Instead, electron emission is redirected into those parts of the momentum space which are very weakly populated in fast collisions with low charged ions. PMID:23931364

  10. Fast wave heating and current drive in tokamak plasmas with negative central shear

    SciTech Connect

    Forest, C.B.; Petty, C.C.; Baity, F.W.

    1996-07-01

    Fast waves provide an excellent tool for heating electrons and driving current in the central region of tokamak plasmas. In this paper, we report the use of centrally peaked electron heating and current drive to study transport in plasmas with negative central shear (NCS). Tokamak plasmas with NCS offer the potential of reduced energy transport and improved MHD stability properties, but will require non-inductive current drive to maintain the required current profiles. Fast waves, combined with neutral beam injection, provide the capability to change the central current density evolution and independently vary {ital T{sub e}}, and {ital T{sub i}} for transport studies in these plasmas. Electron heating also reduces the collisional heat exchange between electrons and ions and reduces the power deposition from neutral beams into electrons, thus improving the certainty in the estimate of the electron heating. The first part of this paper analyzes electron and ion heat transport in the L-mode phase of NCS plasmas as the current profile resistively evolves. The second part of the paper discusses the changes that occur in electron as well as ion energy transport in this phase of improved core confinement associated with NCS.

  11. Focusing of high-current laser-driven ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badziak, J.; Jabłoński, S.

    2007-04-01

    Using a two-dimensional relativistic hydrodynamic code, it is shown that a dense high-current ion beam driven by a short-pulse laser can be effectively focused by curving the target front surface. The focused beam parameters essentially depend on the density gradient scale length of the preplasma Ln and the surface curvature radius RT. When Ln⩽0.5λL (λL is the laser wavelength) and RT is comparable with the laser beam aperture dL, a significant fraction of the accelerated ions is focused on a spot much smaller than dL, which results in a considerable increase in the ion fluence and current density. Using high-contrast multipetawatt picosecond laser pulses of relativistic intensity (˜1020W/cm2), focused ion (proton) current densities approaching those required for fast ignition of DT fuel seem to be feasible.

  12. The structure of fast sausage waves in current-carrying coronal loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bembitov, D. B.; Mikhalyaev, B. B.; Ruderman, M. S.

    2014-09-01

    We study fast sausage waves in a model coronal loop that consists of a cylindrical core with axial magnetic field and coaxial annulus with purely azimuthal magnetic field. The magnetic field is discontinuous at the tube and core boundaries, and there are surface currents with the opposite directions on these boundaries. The principal mode of fast sausage waves in which the magnetic pressure perturbation has no nodes in the radial direction can exist for arbitrary wavelength. The results for the fundamental radial mode of sausage waves are applied to the interpretation of observed periodic pulsations of microwave emission in flaring loops with periods of a few tens of seconds. Radial plasma motion has opposite directions at the tube and core boundaries. This leads to the periodic contraction and expansion of the annulus. We assume that the principal mode of fast sausage waves in the current-carrying coronal loops is able to produce a current sheet. However, the nonlinear analysis is needed to confirm this conjecture.

  13. High frequency eddy current device for near surface material characterizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillmann, S.; Heuer, H.; Meyendorf, N.

    2009-03-01

    For near surface characterization a new high frequency eddy current device was been developed. By using a measurement frequency up to 100 MHz information of near surface areas can be acquired. Depending on the investigated material high resolution depth profiles can be derived. The obtained data with the new device were compared to those obtained with a high precision impedance analyser. It could be demonstrated that the new device measures the eddy current conductivity signal in the high frequencies much better than the impedance analyser. By sweeping the frequency from 100 kHz up to 100 MHz the technique delivers a depth profile of the electrical conductivity of the material. This kind of high frequency eddy current technique can be used for quality assurance, surface contamination control or near surface material characterization e.g. microstructure and cold work influences. It can be a powerful tool to obtain information for process control or a good / bad decision in mass production processes like for example rolling, coating, and surface treatments. The big advantage of the high frequency eddy current method is that it is fast und precise. This paper presents results with a new developed prototype Eddy-Current-Device for measurement frequencies up to 100 MHz which is first time suitable in rough industrial environment and makes expensive lab network analysers unnecessary for this kind of investigations.

  14. A fast algorithm for nonlinear finite element analysis using equivalent magnetization current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Joon-Ho; Park, Il-Han; Kim, Dong-Hun; Lee, Ki-Sik

    2002-05-01

    A fast algorithm for iterative nonlinear finite element analysis is presented in this paper. The algorithm replaces updated permeability by an equivalent magnetization current and moves it to the source current term. Once the initial system matrix is decomposed in the LU form, the iterative procedure involves the trivial step of back-substitution from the LU form. Consequently, the computation time for the nonlinear analysis is greatly reduced. A numerical model of a cylindrical conductor enclosed with saturable iron is tested to validate the proposed algorithm. Numerical results are compared with those obtained using conventional Newton-Raphson algorithm in respect to accuracy and computational time.

  15. Fast current blinking in individual PbS and CdSe quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Maturova, Klara; Nanayakkara, Sanjini U; Luther, Joseph M; van de Lagemaat, Jao

    2013-06-12

    Fast current intermittency of the tunneling current through single semiconductor quantum dots was observed through time-resolved intermittent contact conductive atomic force microscopy in the dark and under illumination at room temperature. The current through a single dot switches on and off at time scales ranging from microseconds to seconds with power-law distributions for both the on and off times. On states are attributed to the resonant tunneling of charges from the electrically conductive AFM tip to the quantum dot, followed by transfer to the substrate, whereas off states are attributed to a Coulomb blockade effect in the quantum dots that shifts the energy levels out of resonance conditions due to the presence of the trapped charge, while at the same bias. The observation of current intermittency due to Coulomb blockade effects has important implications for the understanding of carrier transport through arrays of quantum dots. PMID:23472703

  16. Fast ignition integrated experiments and high-gain point design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiraga, H.; Nagatomo, H.; Theobald, W.; Solodov, A. A.; Tabak, M.

    2014-05-01

    Integrated fast ignition experiments were performed at ILE, Osaka, and LLE, Rochester, in which a nanosecond driver laser implodes a deuterated plastic shell in front of the tip of a hollow metal cone and an intense ultrashort-pulse laser is injected through the cone to heat the compressed plasma. Based on the initial successful results of fast electron heating of cone-in-shell targets, large-energy short-pulse laser beam lines were constructed and became operational: OMEGA-EP at Rochester and LFEX at Osaka. Neutron enhancement due to heating with a ˜kJ short-pulse laser has been demonstrated in the integrated experiments at Osaka and Rochester. The neutron yields are being analysed by comparing the experimental results with simulations. Details of the fast electron beam transport and the electron energy deposition in the imploded fuel plasma are complicated and further studies are imperative. The hydrodynamics of the implosion was studied including the interaction of the imploded core plasma with the cone tip. Theory and simulation studies are presented on the hydrodynamics of a high-gain target for a fast ignition point design.

  17. Fast ignition integrated experiments and high-gain point design

    SciTech Connect

    Shiraga, H.; Nagatomo, H.; Theobald, W.; Solodov, A. A.; Tabak, M.

    2014-04-17

    Here, integrated fast ignition experiments were performed at ILE, Osaka, and LLE, Rochester, in which a nanosecond driver laser implodes a deuterated plastic shell in front of the tip of a hollow metal cone and an intense ultrashort-pulse laser is injected through the cone to heat the compressed plasma. Based on the initial successful results of fast electron heating of cone-in-shell targets, large-energy short-pulse laser beam lines were constructed and became operational: OMEGA-EP at Rochester and LFEX at Osaka. Neutron enhancement due to heating with a ~kJ short-pulse laser has been demonstrated in the integrated experiments at Osaka and Rochester. The neutron yields are being analyzed by comparing the experimental results with simulations. Details of the fast electron beam transport and the electron energy deposition in the imploded fuel plasma are complicated and further studies are imperative. The hydrodynamics of the implosion was studied including the interaction of the imploded core plasma with the cone tip. Theory and simulation studies are presented on the hydrodynamics of a high-gain target for a fast ignition point design.

  18. Fast initial continuous current pulses versus return stroke pulses in tower-initiated lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azadifar, Mohammad; Rachidi, Farhad; Rubinstein, Marcos; Rakov, Vladimir A.; Paolone, Mario; Pavanello, Davide; Metz, Stefan

    2016-06-01

    We present a study focused on pulses superimposed on the initial continuous current of upward negative discharges. The study is based on experimental data consisting of correlated lightning current waveforms recorded at the instrumented Säntis Tower in Switzerland and electric fields recorded at a distance of 14.7 km from the tower. Two different types of pulses superimposed on the initial continuous current were identified: (1) M-component-type pulses, for which the microsecond-scale electric field pulse occurs significantly earlier than the onset of the current pulse, and (2) fast pulses, for which the onset of the field matches that of the current pulse. We analyze the currents and fields associated with these fast pulses (return-stroke type (RS-type) initial continuous current (ICC) pulses) and compare their characteristics with those of return strokes. A total of nine flashes containing 44 RS-type ICC pulses and 24 return strokes were analyzed. The median current peaks associated with RS-type ICC pulses and return strokes are, respectively, 3.4 kA and 8 kA. The associated median E-field peaks normalized to 100 km are 1.5 V/m and 4.4 V/m, respectively. On the other hand, the electric field peaks versus current peaks for the two data sets (RS-type ICC pulses and return strokes) are characterized by very similar linear regression slopes, namely, 3.67 V/(m kA) for the ICC pulses and 3.77 V/(m kA) for the return strokes. Assuming the field-current relation based on the transmission line model, we estimated the apparent speed of both the RS-type ICC pulses and return strokes to be about 1.4 × 108 m/s. A strong linear correlation is observed between the E-field risetime and the current risetime for the ICC pulses, similar to the relation observed between the E-field risetime and current risetime for return strokes. The similarity of the RS-type ICC pulses with return strokes suggests that these pulses are associated with the mixed mode of charge transfer to ground.

  19. A Fast Greedy Sparse Method of Current Sources Reconstruction for Ventricular Torsion Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bing, Lu; Jiang, Shiqin; Chen, Mengpei; Zhao, Chen; Grönemeyer, D.; Hailer, B.; Van Leeuwen, P.

    2015-09-01

    A fast greedy sparse (FGS) method of cardiac equivalent current sources reconstruction is developed for non-invasive detection and quantitative analysis of individual left ventricular torsion. The cardiac magnetic field inverse problem is solved based on a distributed source model. The analysis of real 61-channel magnetocardiogram (MCG) data demonstrates that one or two dominant current source with larger strength can be identified efficiently by the FGS algorithm. Then, the left ventricle torsion during systole is examined on the basis of x, y and z coordination curves and angle change of reconstructed dominant current sources. The advantages of this method are non-invasive, visible, with higher sensitivity and resolution. It may enable the clinical detection of cardiac systolic and ejection dysfunction.

  20. Diamond detector for high rate monitors of fast neutrons beams

    SciTech Connect

    Giacomelli, L.; Rebai, M.; Cippo, E. Perelli; Tardocchi, M.; Fazzi, A.; Andreani, C.; Pietropaolo, A.; Frost, C. D.; Rhodes, N.; Schooneveld, E.; Gorini, G.

    2012-06-19

    A fast neutron detection system suitable for high rate measurements is presented. The detector is based on a commercial high purity single crystal diamond (SDD) coupled to a fast digital data acquisition system. The detector was tested at the ISIS pulsed spallation neutron source. The SDD event signal was digitized at 1 GHz to reconstruct the deposited energy (pulse amplitude) and neutron arrival time; the event time of flight (ToF) was obtained relative to the recorded proton beam signal t{sub 0}. Fast acquisition is needed since the peak count rate is very high ({approx}800 kHz) due to the pulsed structure of the neutron beam. Measurements at ISIS indicate that three characteristics regions exist in the biparametric spectrum: i) background gamma events of low pulse amplitudes; ii) low pulse amplitude neutron events in the energy range E{sub dep}= 1.5-7 MeV ascribed to neutron elastic scattering on {sup 12}C; iii) large pulse amplitude neutron events with E{sub n} < 7 MeV ascribed to {sup 12}C(n,{alpha}){sup 9}Be and 12C(n,n')3{alpha}.

  1. A New High-Current Proton Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Cleland, M. R.; Galloway, R. A.; DeSanto, L.; Jongen, Y.

    2009-03-10

    A high-current (>20 mA) dc proton accelerator is being developed for applications such as boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and the detection of explosive materials by nuclear resonance absorption (NRA) of gamma radiation. The high-voltage dc accelerator (adjustable between 1.4 and 2.8 MeV) will be a single-ended industrial Dynamitron registered system equipped with a compact high-current, microwave-driven proton source. A magnetic mass analyzer inserted between the ion source and the acceleration tube will select the protons and reject heavier ions. A sorption pump near the ion source will minimize the flow of neutral hydrogen gas into the acceleration tube. For BNCT, a lithium target for generating epithermal neutrons is being developed that will be capable of dissipating the high power (>40 kW) of the proton beam. For NRA, special targets will be used to generate gamma rays with suitable energies for exciting nuclides typically present in explosive materials. Proton accelerators with such high-current and high-power capabilities in this energy range have not been developed previously.

  2. A New High-Current Proton Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleland, M. R.; Galloway, R. A.; DeSanto, L.; Jongen, Y.

    2009-03-01

    A high-current (>20 mA) dc proton accelerator is being developed for applications such as boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and the detection of explosive materials by nuclear resonance absorption (NRA) of gamma radiation. The high-voltage dc accelerator (adjustable between 1.4 and 2.8 MeV) will be a single-ended industrial Dynamitron® system equipped with a compact high-current, microwave-driven proton source. A magnetic mass analyzer inserted between the ion source and the acceleration tube will select the protons and reject heavier ions. A sorption pump near the ion source will minimize the flow of neutral hydrogen gas into the acceleration tube. For BNCT, a lithium target for generating epithermal neutrons is being developed that will be capable of dissipating the high power (>40 kW) of the proton beam. For NRA, special targets will be used to generate gamma rays with suitable energies for exciting nuclides typically present in explosive materials. Proton accelerators with such high-current and high-power capabilities in this energy range have not been developed previously.

  3. Demonstration of Effective Control of Fast-Ion-Stabilized Sawteeth by Electron-Cyclotron Current Drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lennholm, M.; Eriksson, L.-G.; Turco, F.; Bouquey, F.; Darbos, C.; Dumont, R.; Giruzzi, G.; Jung, M.; Lambert, R.; Magne, R.; Molina, D.; Moreau, P.; Rimini, F.; Segui, J.-L.; Song, S.; Traisnel, E.

    2009-03-01

    In a tokamak plasma, sawtooth oscillations in the central temperature, caused by a magnetohydrodynamic instability, can be partially stabilized by fast ions. The resulting less frequent sawtooth crashes can trigger unwanted magnetohydrodynamic activity. This Letter reports on experiments showing that modest electron-cyclotron current drive power, with the deposition positioned by feedback control of the injection angle, can reliably shorten the sawtooth period in the presence of ions with energies ≥0.5MeV. Certain surprising elements of the results are evaluated qualitatively in terms of existing theory.

  4. CLOSURE OF THE FAST FLUX TEST FACILITY (FFTF) CURRENT STATUS & FUTURE PLANS

    SciTech Connect

    BURKE, T.M.

    2005-04-13

    Deactivation activities are currently in progress at the Fast Flux Test Facility. These deactivation activities are intended to remove most hazardous materials and prepare the facility for final disposition. The two major hazards to be removed are the nuclear fuel and the alkali metal (most sodium) coolant. The fuel and coolant removal activities are proceeding well and are expected to complete in 2006. Plant systems are being shut down as allowed by completion of various fuel and coolant removal actions. A Decommissioning Environmental Impact Statement is in progress to evaluate a range of potential final disposition end states.

  5. Fast IMRT with narrow high energy scanned photon beams

    SciTech Connect

    Andreassen, Bjoern; Straaring t, Sara Janek; Holmberg, Rickard; Naefstadius, Peder; Brahme, Anders

    2011-08-15

    Purpose: Since the first publications on intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in the early 1980s almost all efforts have been focused on fairly time consuming dynamic or segmental multileaf collimation. With narrow fast scanned photon beams, the flexibility and accuracy in beam shaping increases, not least in combination with fast penumbra trimming multileaf collimators. Previously, experiments have been performed with full range targets, generating a broad bremsstrahlung beam, in combination with multileaf collimators or material compensators. In the present publication, the first measurements with fast narrow high energy (50 MV) scanned photon beams are presented indicating an interesting performance increase even though some of the hardware used were suboptimal. Methods: Inverse therapy planning was used to calculate optimal scanning patterns to generate dose distributions with interesting properties for fast IMRT. To fully utilize the dose distributional advantages with scanned beams, it is necessary to use narrow high energy beams from a thin bremsstrahlung target and a powerful purging magnet capable of deflecting the transmitted electron beam away from the generated photons onto a dedicated electron collector. During the present measurements the scanning system, purging magnet, and electron collimator in the treatment head of the MM50 racetrack accelerator was used with 3-6 mm thick bremsstrahlung targets of beryllium. The dose distributions were measured with diodes in water and with EDR2 film in PMMA. Monte Carlo simulations with geant4 were used to study the influence of the electrons transmitted through the target on the photon pencil beam kernel. Results: The full width at half-maximum (FWHM) of the scanned photon beam was 34 mm measured at isocenter, below 9.5 cm of water, 1 m from the 3 mm Be bremsstrahlung target. To generate a homogeneous dose distribution in a 10 x 10 cm{sup 2} field, the authors used a spot matrix of 100 equal intensity

  6. Fast and Adaptive Sparse Precision Matrix Estimation in High Dimensions

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Weidong; Luo, Xi

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a new method for estimating sparse precision matrices in the high dimensional setting. It has been popular to study fast computation and adaptive procedures for this problem. We propose a novel approach, called Sparse Column-wise Inverse Operator, to address these two issues. We analyze an adaptive procedure based on cross validation, and establish its convergence rate under the Frobenius norm. The convergence rates under other matrix norms are also established. This method also enjoys the advantage of fast computation for large-scale problems, via a coordinate descent algorithm. Numerical merits are illustrated using both simulated and real datasets. In particular, it performs favorably on an HIV brain tissue dataset and an ADHD resting-state fMRI dataset. PMID:25750463

  7. High Bandwidth Short Stroke Rotary Fast Tool Servo

    SciTech Connect

    Montesanti, R C; Trumper, D L

    2003-08-22

    This paper presents the design and performance of a new rotary fast tool servo (FTS) capable of developing the 40 g's tool tip acceleration required to follow a 5 micron PV sinusoidal surface at 2 kHz with a planned accuracy of 50 nm, and having a full stroke of 50 micron PV at lower frequencies. Tests with de-rated power supplies have demonstrated a closed-loop unity-gain bandwidth of 2 kHz with 20 g's tool acceleration, and we expect to achieve 40 g's with supplies providing {+-} 16 Amp to the Lorentz force actuator. The use of a fast tool servo with a diamond turning machine for producing non-axisymmetric or textured surfaces on a workpiece is well known. Our new rotary FTS was designed to specifically accommodate fabricating prescription textured surfaces on 5 mm diameter spherical target components for High Energy Density Physics experiments on the National Ignition Facility Laser (NIF).

  8. SECONDARY ELECTRON TRAJECTORIES IN HIGH-GRADIENT VACUUM INSULATORS WITH FAST HIGH-VOLTAGE PULSES

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y; Blackfield, D; Nelson, S D; Poole, B

    2010-04-21

    Vacuum insulators composed of alternating layers of metal and dielectric, known as high-gradient insulators (HGIs), have been shown to withstand higher electric fields than conventional insulators. Primary or secondary electrons (emitted from the insulator surface) can be deflected by magnetic fields from external sources, the high-current electron beam, the conduction current in the transmission line, or the displacement current in the insulator. These electrons are deflected either toward or away from the insulator surface and this affects the performance of the vacuum insulator. This paper shows the effects of displacement current from short voltage pulses on the performance of high gradient insulators. Generally, vacuum insulator failure is due to surface flashover, initiated by electrons emitted from a triple junction. These electrons strike the insulator surface thus producing secondary electrons, and can lead to a subsequent electron cascade along the surface. The displacement current in the insulator can deflect electrons either toward or away from the insulator surface, and affects the performance of the vacuum insulator when the insulator is subjected to a fast high-voltage pulse. Vacuum insulators composed of alternating layers of metal and dielectric, known as high-gradient insulators (HGIs), have been shown to withstand higher electric fields than conventional insulators. HGIs, being tolerant of the direct view of high-current electron and ion beams, and having desirable RF properties for accelerators, are a key enabling technology for the dielectric-wall accelerators (DWA) being developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Characteristically, insulator surface breakdown thresholds go up as the applied voltage pulse width decreases. To attain the highest accelerating gradient in the DWA, short accelerating voltage pulses are only applied locally, along the HGI accelerator tube, in sync with the charged particle bunch, and the effects of

  9. Ring current development during high speed streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordanova, V. K.; Matsui, H.; Puhl-Quinn, P. A.; Thomsen, M. F.; Mursula, K.; Holappa, L.

    2009-07-01

    Episodes of southward (Bz<0) interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) which lead to disturbed geomagnetic conditions are associated either with coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and possess long and continuous negative IMF Bz excursions, or with high speed solar wind streams (HSS) whose geoeffectiveness is due to IMF Bz profiles fluctuating about zero with various amplitudes and duration. We simulate ring current evolution during a HSS-driven storm that occurred during 24-26 October 2002 and compare its dynamics with a CME-driven storm of similar strength during 22-23 April 2001. We use our kinetic ring current-atmosphere interactions model (RAM), and investigate the mechanisms responsible for trapping particles and for causing their loss. Ring current evolution depends on the interplay of time-dependent inflow of plasma from the magnetotail, particle acceleration and loss (mainly due to charge exchange) along adiabatic drift paths, and outflow of plasma from the dayside magnetopause; all of these processes are incorporated in our model. We compare results from simulations using a newly developed, Cluster data based, University of New Hampshire inner magnetospheric electric field (UNH-IMEF) convection model with simulations using a Volland-Stern (V-S) type convection model. We find that, first, periods of increased magnetospheric convection coinciding with enhancements of plasma sheet density are needed for strong ring current buildup. Second, during the HSS-driven storm the convection potential from UNH-IMEF model is highly variable and causes sporadic shallow injections resulting in a weak ring current. The long period of enhanced convection during the CME-driven storm causes a continuous ion injection penetrating to lower L shells and stronger ring current buildup. V-S model predicts larger ring current injection during both storms. Third, the RAM driven by either convection model underestimates the total ring current energy during the recovery phase of the HSS storm

  10. Extremely High Current, High-Brightness Energy Recovery Linac

    SciTech Connect

    I. Ben-Zvi; D.S. Barton; D.B. Beavis; M. Blaskiewicz; J.M. Brennan; A. Burrill; R. Calaga; P. Cameron; X.Y. Chang; R. Connolly; D.M. Gassner; J.G. Grimes; H. Hahn; A. Hershcovitch; H.-C. Hseuh; P.D.J. Johnson; D. Kayran; J. Kewisch; R.F. Lambiase; V. Litvinenko; G.T. McIntyre; W. Meng; T.C.N. Nehring; T. Nicoletti; B. Oerter; D. Pate; J. Rank; T. Rao; T. Roser; T. Russo; J. Scaduto; Z. Segalov; K. Smith; N.W.W. Williams; K.-C. Wu; V. Yakimenko; K. Yip; A. Zaltsman; Y. Zhao; H. Bluem; A. Burger; M.D. Cole; A.J. Favale; D. Holmes; J. Rathke; T. Schultheiss; A.M.M. Todd; J.R. Delayen; L. W. Funk; P. Kneisel; H.L. Phillips; J.P. Preble

    2005-05-16

    Next generation ERL light-sources, high-energy electron coolers, high-power Free-Electron Lasers, powerful Compton X-ray sources and many other accelerators were made possible by the emerging technology of high-power, high-brightness electron beams. In order to get the anticipated performance level of ampere-class currents, many technological barriers are yet to be broken. BNL's Collider-Accelerator Department is pursuing some of these technologies for its electron cooling of RHIC application, as well as a possible future electron-hadron collider. We will describe work on CW, high-current and high-brightness electron beams. This will include a description of a superconducting, laser-photocathode RF gun and an accelerator cavity capable of producing low emittance (about 1 micron rms normalized) one nano-Coulomb bunches at currents of the order of one ampere average.

  11. COMPILATION OF CURRENT HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS EXPERIMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Wohl, C.G.; Kelly, R.L.; Armstrong, F.E.; Horne, C.P.; Hutchinson, M.S.; Rittenberg, A.; Trippe, T.G.; Yost, G.P.; Addis, L.; Ward, C.E.W.; Baggett, N.; Goldschmidt-Clermong, Y.; Joos, P.; Gelfand, N.; Oyanagi, Y.; Grudtsin, S.N.; Ryabov, Yu.G.

    1981-05-01

    This is the fourth edition of our compilation of current high energy physics experiments. It is a collaborative effort of the Berkeley Particle Data Group, the SLAC library, and nine participating laboratories: Argonne (ANL), Brookhaven (BNL), CERN, DESY, Fermilab (FNAL), the Institute for Nuclear Study, Tokyo (INS), KEK, Serpukhov (SERP), and SLAC. The compilation includes summaries of all high energy physics experiments at the above laboratories that (1) were approved (and not subsequently withdrawn) before about April 1981, and (2) had not completed taking of data by 1 January 1977. We emphasize that only approved experiments are included.

  12. A fast directional algorithm for high-frequency electromagnetic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuji, Paul; Ying Lexing

    2011-06-20

    This paper is concerned with the fast solution of high-frequency electromagnetic scattering problems using the boundary integral formulation. We extend the O(N log N) directional multilevel algorithm previously proposed for the acoustic scattering case to the vector electromagnetic case. We also detail how to incorporate the curl operator of the magnetic field integral equation into the algorithm. When combined with a standard iterative method, this results in an almost linear complexity solver for the combined field integral equations. In addition, the butterfly algorithm is utilized to compute the far field pattern and radar cross section with O(N log N) complexity.

  13. Gastrin Releasing Peptide Modulates Fast Delayed Rectifier Potassium Current in Per1-Expressing SCN Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Gamble, Karen L.; Kudo, Takashi; Colwell, Christopher S.; McMahon, Douglas G.

    2011-01-01

    The mammalian circadian clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) drives and maintains 24-h physiological rhythms, the phases of which are set by the local environmental light-dark cycle. Gastrin releasing peptide (GRP) communicates photic phase setting signals in the SCN by increasing neurophysiological activity of SCN neurons. Here, the ionic basis for persistent GRP-induced changes in neuronal activity was investigated in SCN slice cultures from Per1::GFP reporter mice during the early night. Recordings from Per1-fluorescent neurons in SCN slices several hours after GRP treatment revealed a significantly greater action potential frequency, a significant increase in voltage-activated outward current at depolarized potentials, and a significant increase in 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) sensitive fast delayed rectifier (fDR) potassium currents when compared to vehicle-treated slices. In addition, the persistent increase in spike rate following early night GRP application was blocked in SCN neurons from mice deficient in Kv3 channel proteins. Because fDR currents are regulated by the clock and are elevated in amplitude during the day, the present results support the model that GRP delays the phase of the clock during the early night by prolonging day-like membrane properties of SCN cells. Furthermore, these findings implicate fDR currents in the ionic basis for GRP-mediated entrainment of the primary mammalian circadian pacemaker. PMID:21454290

  14. High-contrast and fast electrochromic switching enabled by plasmonics

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Xu, Ting; Walter, Erich C.; Agrawal, Amit; Bohn, Christopher; Velmurugan, Jeyavel; Zhu, Wenqi; Lezec, Henri J.; Talin, A. Alec

    2016-01-27

    With vibrant colours and simple, room-temperature processing methods, electrochromic polymers have attracted attention as active materials for flexible, low-power-consuming devices. However, slow switching speeds in devices realized to date, as well as the complexity of having to combine several distinct polymers to achieve a full-colour gamut, have limited electrochromic materials to niche applications. Here we achieve fast, high-contrast electrochromic switching by significantly enhancing the interaction of light—propagating as deep-subwavelength-confined surface plasmon polaritons through arrays of metallic nanoslits, with an electrochromic polymer—present as an ultra-thin coating on the slit sidewalls. The switchable configuration retains the short temporal charge-diffusion characteristics of thinmore » electrochromic films, while maintaining the high optical contrast associated with thicker electrochromic coatings. In conclusion, we further demonstrate that by controlling the pitch of the nanoslit arrays, it is possible to achieve a full-colour response with high contrast and fast switching speeds, while relying on just one electrochromic polymer.« less

  15. High-contrast and fast electrochromic switching enabled by plasmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Ting; Walter, Erich C.; Agrawal, Amit; Bohn, Christopher; Velmurugan, Jeyavel; Zhu, Wenqi; Lezec, Henri J.; Talin, A. Alec

    2016-01-01

    With vibrant colours and simple, room-temperature processing methods, electrochromic polymers have attracted attention as active materials for flexible, low-power-consuming devices. However, slow switching speeds in devices realized to date, as well as the complexity of having to combine several distinct polymers to achieve a full-colour gamut, have limited electrochromic materials to niche applications. Here we achieve fast, high-contrast electrochromic switching by significantly enhancing the interaction of light--propagating as deep-subwavelength-confined surface plasmon polaritons through arrays of metallic nanoslits, with an electrochromic polymer--present as an ultra-thin coating on the slit sidewalls. The switchable configuration retains the short temporal charge-diffusion characteristics of thin electrochromic films, while maintaining the high optical contrast associated with thicker electrochromic coatings. We further demonstrate that by controlling the pitch of the nanoslit arrays, it is possible to achieve a full-colour response with high contrast and fast switching speeds, while relying on just one electrochromic polymer.

  16. High-contrast and fast electrochromic switching enabled by plasmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talin, Albert; Xu, Ting; Walter, Erich; Agrawal, Amit; Bohn, Christopher; Velmurugan, Jeyavel; Zhu, Wenqi; Lezec, Henri

    With vibrant colors and simple, room-temperature processing methods, electrochromic polymers have long attracted attention as active materials for flexible, low-power consuming devices such as smart windows and displays. However, despite their many advantages, slow switching speed and complexity of combining several separate polymers to achieve full-color gamut has limited electrochromic materials to niche applications. Here we exploit the enhanced light-matter interaction associated with the deep-subwavelength mode confinement of surface plasmon polaritons propagating in metallic nanoslit arrays coated with ultra-thin electrochromic polymers to build a novel configuration for achieving high-contrast and fast electrochromic switching. The switchable configuration retains the short temporal charge-diffusion characteristics of thin electrochromic films while maintaining the high optical-contrast associated with thicker electrochromic coatings. We further demonstrate that by controlling the pitch of the nanoslit arrays, it is possible to achieve a full-color response with high-contrast and fast switching-speeds while relying on just one electrochromic polymer.

  17. High-contrast and fast electrochromic switching enabled by plasmonics.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ting; Walter, Erich C; Agrawal, Amit; Bohn, Christopher; Velmurugan, Jeyavel; Zhu, Wenqi; Lezec, Henri J; Talin, A Alec

    2016-01-01

    With vibrant colours and simple, room-temperature processing methods, electrochromic polymers have attracted attention as active materials for flexible, low-power-consuming devices. However, slow switching speeds in devices realized to date, as well as the complexity of having to combine several distinct polymers to achieve a full-colour gamut, have limited electrochromic materials to niche applications. Here we achieve fast, high-contrast electrochromic switching by significantly enhancing the interaction of light--propagating as deep-subwavelength-confined surface plasmon polaritons through arrays of metallic nanoslits, with an electrochromic polymer--present as an ultra-thin coating on the slit sidewalls. The switchable configuration retains the short temporal charge-diffusion characteristics of thin electrochromic films, while maintaining the high optical contrast associated with thicker electrochromic coatings. We further demonstrate that by controlling the pitch of the nanoslit arrays, it is possible to achieve a full-colour response with high contrast and fast switching speeds, while relying on just one electrochromic polymer. PMID:26814453

  18. High-contrast and fast electrochromic switching enabled by plasmonics

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ting; Walter, Erich C.; Agrawal, Amit; Bohn, Christopher; Velmurugan, Jeyavel; Zhu, Wenqi; Lezec, Henri J.; Talin, A. Alec

    2016-01-01

    With vibrant colours and simple, room-temperature processing methods, electrochromic polymers have attracted attention as active materials for flexible, low-power-consuming devices. However, slow switching speeds in devices realized to date, as well as the complexity of having to combine several distinct polymers to achieve a full-colour gamut, have limited electrochromic materials to niche applications. Here we achieve fast, high-contrast electrochromic switching by significantly enhancing the interaction of light—propagating as deep-subwavelength-confined surface plasmon polaritons through arrays of metallic nanoslits, with an electrochromic polymer—present as an ultra-thin coating on the slit sidewalls. The switchable configuration retains the short temporal charge-diffusion characteristics of thin electrochromic films, while maintaining the high optical contrast associated with thicker electrochromic coatings. We further demonstrate that by controlling the pitch of the nanoslit arrays, it is possible to achieve a full-colour response with high contrast and fast switching speeds, while relying on just one electrochromic polymer. PMID:26814453

  19. High current pulse testing for ground rod integrity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walko, Lawrence C.

    1991-01-01

    A test technique was developed to assess various grounding system concepts used for mobile facilities. The test technique involves applying a high current pulse to the grounding system with the proper waveshape and magnitude to simulate a lightning return stroke. Of concern were the step voltages present along the ground near the point of lightning strike. Step voltage is equated to how fast the current pulse is dissipated by the grounding system. The applied current pulse was produced by a high current capacitor bank with a total energy content of 80 kilojoules. A series of pulse tests were performed on two types of mobile facility grounding systems. One system consisted of an array of four 10 foot copper clad steel ground rods connected by 1/0 gauge wire. The other system was an array of 10 inch long tapered ground rods, strung on stainless steel cable. The focus here is on the pulse test technique used and its relevance to actual lightning strike conditions.

  20. A Robust High Current Density Electron Gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mako, F.; Peter, W.; Shiloh, J.; Len, L. K.

    1996-11-01

    Proof-of-principle experiments are proposed to validate a new concept for a robust, high-current density Pierce electron gun (RPG) for use in klystrons and high brightness electron sources for accelerators. This rugged, long-life electron gun avoids the difficulties associated with plasma cathodes, thermionic emitters, and field emission cathodes. The RPG concept employs the emission of secondary electrons in a transmission mode as opposed to the conventional mode of reflection, i.e., electrons exit from the back face of a thin negative electron affinity (NEA) material, and in the same direction as the incident beam. Current amplification through one stage of a NEA material could be over 50 times. The amplification is accomplished in one or more stages consisting of one primary emitter and one or more secondary emitters. The primary emitter is a low current density robust emitter (e.g., thoriated tungsten). The secondary emitters are thin NEA electrodes which emit secondary electrons in the same direction as the incident beam. Specific application is targeted for a klystron gun to be used by SLAC with a cold cathode at 30-40 amps/cm^2 output from the secondary emission stage, a ~2 μs pulse length, and ~200 pulses/second.

  1. Scanning fast and slow: current limitations of 3 Tesla functional MRI and future potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boubela, Roland N.; Kalcher, Klaudius; Nasel, Christian; Moser, Ewald

    2014-02-01

    Functional MRI at 3T has become a workhorse for the neurosciences, e.g., neurology, psychology, and psychiatry, enabling non-invasive investigation of brain function and connectivity. However, BOLD-based fMRI is a rather indirect measure of brain function, confounded by fluctuation related signals, e.g. head or brain motion, brain pulsation, blood flow, intermixed with susceptibility differences close or distant to the region of neuronal activity. Even though a plethora of preprocessing strategies have been published to address these confounds, their efficiency is still under discussion. In particular, physiological signal fluctuations closely related to brain supply may mask BOLD signal changes related to "true" neuronal activation. Here we explore recent technical and methodological advancements aimed at disentangling the various components, employing fast multiband vs. standard EPI, in combination with fast temporal ICA.Our preliminary results indicate that fast (TR< 0.5s) scanning may help to identify and eliminate physiologic components, increasing tSNR and functional contrast. In addition, biological variability can be studied and task performance better correlated to other measures. This should increase specificity and reliability in fMRI studies. Furthermore, physiological signal changes during scanning may then be recognized as a source of information rather than a nuisance. As we are currently still undersampling the complexity of the brain, even at a rather coarse macroscopic level, we should be very cautious in the interpretation of neuroscientific findings, in particular when comparing different groups (e.g., age, sex, medication, pathology, etc.). From a technical point of view our goal should be to sample brain activity at layer specific resolution with low TR, covering as much of the brain as possible without violating SAR limits. We hope to stimulate discussion towards a better understanding and a more quantitative use of fMRI.

  2. Versatile high current metal ion implantation facility

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, I.G.; Dickinson, M.R.; Galvin, J.E.; Godechot, X.; MacGill, R.A.

    1991-06-01

    A metal ion implantation facility has been developed with which high current beams of practically all the solid metals of the periodic table can be produced. A multi-cathode, broad beam, metal vapor vacuum arc ion source is used to produce repetitively pulsed metal ion beams at an extraction voltage of up to 100 kV, corresponding to an ion energy of up to several hundred keV because of the ion-charge state multiplicity, and with a beam current of up to several amperes peak pulsed and several tens of mA time averaged delivered onto a downstream target. Implantation is done in a broad-beam mode, with a direct line-of-sight from ion source to target. Here we summarize some of the features of the ion source and the implantation facility that has been built up around it. 28 refs., 5 figs.

  3. Controllable high voltage source having fast settling time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doong, H.; Acuna, M. H. (Inventor)

    1975-01-01

    A high voltage dc stepping power supply for sampling a utilization device such as an electrostatic analyzer has a relatively fast settling time for voltage steps. The supply includes a waveform generator for deriving a low voltage staircase waveform that feeds a relatively long response time power supply, deriving a high output voltage generally equal to a predetermined multiple of the input voltage. In the power supply, an ac voltage modulated by the staircase waveform is applied to a step-up transformer and then to a voltage multiplier stack to form a high voltage, relatively poor replica of the input waveform at an intermediate output terminal. A constant dc source, applied to the input of the power supply, biases the voltage at the intermediate output terminal to be in excess of the predetermined multiple of the input voltage.

  4. Zn(2+) modulation of neuronal transient K(+) current: fast and selective binding to the deactivated channels

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, CC; Chen, FP

    1999-01-01

    Modulation of voltage-dependent transient K(+) currents (A type K(+) or K(A) current) by Zn(2+) was studied in rat hippocampal neurons by the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. It is found that Zn(2+) selectively binds to the resting (deactivated or closed) K(A) channels with a dissociation constant (K(d)) of approximately 3 &mgr;M, whereas the affinity between Zn(2+) and the inactivated K(A) channels is 1000-fold lower. Zn(2+) therefore produces a concentration-dependent shift of the K(A) channel inactivation curve and enhances the K(A) current elicited from relatively positive holding potentials. It is also found that the kinetics of Zn(2+) action are fast enough to compete with the transition rates between different gating states of the channel. The rapid and selective binding of Zn(2+) to the closed K(A) channels keeps the channel in the closed state and explains the ion's concentration-dependent slowing effect on the activation of K(A) current. This in turn accounts for the inhibitory effect of Zn(2+) on the K(A) current elicited from hyperpolarized holding potentials. Because the molecular mechanisms underlying these gating changes are kinetic interactions between the binding-unbinding of Zn(2+) and the intrinsic gating processes of the channel, the shift of the inactivation curve and slowing of K(A) channel activation are quantitatively correlated with ambient Zn(2+) over a wide concentration range without "saturation"; i.e., The effects are already manifest in micromolar Zn(2+), yet are not saturated even in millimolar Zn(2+). Because the physiological concentration of Zn(2+) could vary over a similarly wide range according to neural activities, Zn(2+) may be a faithful physiological "fine tuner," controlling and controlled by neural activities through its effect on the K(A) current. PMID:10545356

  5. Low power fast settling multi-standard current reusing CMOS fractional-N frequency synthesizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenfeng, Lou; Peng, Feng; Haiyong, Wang; Nanjian, Wu

    2012-04-01

    A low power fast settling multi-standard CMOS fractional-N frequency synthesizer is proposed. The current reusing and frequency presetting techniques are adopted to realize the low power fast settling multi-standard fractional-N frequency synthesizer. An auxiliary non-volatile memory (NVM) is embedded to avoid the repetitive calibration process and to save power in practical application. This PLL is implemented in a 0.18 μm technology. The frequency range is 0.3 to 2.54 GHz and the settling time is less than 5 μs over the entire frequency range. The LC-VCO with the stacked divide-by-2 has a good figure of merit of -193.5 dBc/Hz. The measured phase noise of frequency synthesizer is about -115 dBc/Hz at 1 MHz offset when the carrier frequency is 2.4 GHz and the reference spurs are less than -52 dBc. The whole frequency synthesizer consumes only 4.35 mA @ 1.8 V.

  6. HIGH CURRENT RADIO FREQUENCY ION SOURCE

    DOEpatents

    Abdelaziz, M.E.

    1963-04-01

    This patent relates to a high current radio frequency ion source. A cylindrical plasma container has a coil disposed around the exterior surface thereof along the longitudinal axis. Means are provided for the injection of an unionized gas into the container and for applying a radio frequency signal to the coil whereby a radio frequency field is generated within the container parallel to the longitudinal axis thereof to ionize the injected gas. Cathode and anode means are provided for extracting transverse to the radio frequency field from an area midway between the ends of the container along the longitudinal axis thereof the ions created by said radio frequency field. (AEC)

  7. High-current SRF cavity design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meidlinger, D.; Grimm, T. L.; Hartung, W.

    2006-07-01

    For high current applications, it is desirable for the cavity shape to have a low longitudinal loss factor and to have a high beam-breakup threshold current. This paper briefly describes three different cavities designed for this purpose: a six-cell elliptical cavity for particles traveling at the speed of light, a two-cell elliptical cavity for subluminal particle speeds, and a single cell cavity which uses the TM012 mode for acceleration. SUPERFISH simulations predict the peak fields in both of the elliptical cavities will not exceed the TeSLA values by more than 10% but both will have 28.7% larger apertures. The elliptical designs assume the bunch frequency equals the accelerating mode frequency. The beam pipe radius is chosen so that the cutoff frequency is less than twice that of the accelerating mode. Hence all of the monopole and dipole higher-order modes (HOMs) that can be driven by the beam have low loaded Q values. This simplifies the problem of HOM damping. The TM012 cavity is predicted to have much higher peak fields than a π-mode elliptical cavity, but offers potential advantages from its simplified shape; it is essentially a circular waveguide with curved end plates. This basic shape results in easier fabrication and simplified tuning.

  8. Fast Acting Optical Forces From Far Detuned, High Intensity Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corder, Christopher; Arnold, Brian; Hua, Xiang; Metcalf, Harold

    2015-05-01

    We are exploring fast acting, strong optical forces from standing wave light fields with high intensity and large detuning δ >> γ , where γ is the transition linewidth. We observe these fast acting forces on a time scale of a few times the excited state lifetime τ ≡ 1 / γ thus an atom may experience at most one or two spontaneous emission events. The dipole force is typically considered when the Rabi frequency Ω << δ , but we use Ω ~ δ so the usual approximations break down because a significant excited state population can occur, even for our short interaction times that limit spontaneous emission. Our experiment measures the transverse velocity distribution of a beam of 23S He after a chosen interaction time with a perpendicular standing wave detuned from the 23S -->33P transition near 389 nm. The distribution shows velocity resonance effects that persist over a large range of Ω. We also simulate the experiment numerically using the Optical Bloch Equations and the results are consistent with our measurements. Supported by ONR and Dept. of Education GAANN

  9. Current drive with fast waves, electron cyclotron waves, and neutral injection in the DIII-D tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Prater, R.; Petty, C.C.; Pinsker, R.I.; Chiu, S.C.; deGrassie, J.S.; Harvey, R.W.; Ikel, H.; Lin-Liu, Y.R.; Luce, T.C. ); James, R.A. ); Porkolab, M. ); Baity, F.W.; Goulding, R.H.; Hoffmann, D.J. ); Kawash

    1992-09-01

    Current drive experiments have been performed on the DIII-D tokamak using fast waves, electron cyclotron waves, and neutral injection. Fast wave experiments were performed using a 4-strap antenna with 1 MW of power at 60 MHz. These experiments showed effective heating of electrons, with a global heating efficiency equivalent to that of neutral injection even when the single pass damping was calculated to be as small as 5%. The damping was probably due to the effect of multiple passes of the wave through the plasma. Fast wave current drive experiments were performed with a toroidally directional phasing of the antenna straps. Currents driven by fast wave current drive (FWCD) in the direction of the main plasma current of up to 100 kA were found, not including a calculated 40 kA of bootstrap current. Experiments with FWCD in the counter current direction showed little current drive. In both cases, changes in the sawtooth behavior and the internal inductance qualitatively support the measurement of FWCD. Experiments on electron cyclotron current drive have shown that 100 kA of current can be driven by 1 MW of power at 60 GHz. Calculations with a Fokker-Planck code show that electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) can be well predicted when the effects of electron trapping and of the residual electric field are included. Experiments on driving current with neutral injection showed that effective current drive could be obtained and discharges with full current drive were demonstrated. Interestingly, all of these methods of current drive had about the same efficiency, 0.015 {times} 10{sup 20} MA/MW/m{sup 2}.

  10. Fasting therapy for treating and preventing disease - current state of evidence.

    PubMed

    Michalsen, Andreas; Li, Chenying

    2013-01-01

    Periods of deliberate fasting with restriction of solid food intake are practiced worldwide, mostly based on traditional, cultural or religious reasons. There is large empirical and observational evidence that medically supervised modified fasting (fasting cure, 200-500 kcal nutritional intake per day) with periods of 7-21 days is efficacious in the treatment of rheumatic diseases, chronic pain syndromes, hypertension, and metabolic syndrome. The beneficial effects of fasting followed by vegetarian diet in rheumatoid arthritis are confirmed by randomized controlled trials. Further beneficial effects of fasting are supported by observational data and abundant evidence from experimental research which found caloric restriction and intermittent fasting being associated with deceleration or prevention of most chronic degenerative and chronic inflammatory diseases. Intermittent fasting may also be useful as an accompanying treatment during chemotherapy of cancer. A further beneficial effect of fasting relates to improvements in sustainable lifestyle modification and adoption of a healthy diet, possibly mediated by fasting-induced mood enhancement. Various identified mechanisms of fasting point to its potential health-promoting effects, e.g., fasting-induced neuroendocrine activation and hormetic stress response, increased production of neurotrophic factors, reduced mitochondrial oxidative stress, general decrease of signals associated with aging, and promotion of autophagy. Fasting therapy might contribute to the prevention and treatment of chronic diseases and should be further evaluated in controlled clinical trials and observational studies. PMID:24434759

  11. Mode conversion and absorption of fast waves at high ion cyclotron harmonics in inhomogeneous magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Suwon; Kwak, Jong-Gu

    2014-04-15

    The propagation and absorption of high harmonic fast waves is of interest for non-inductive current drives in fusion experiments. The fast wave can be coupled with the ion Bernstein wave that propagates in the high magnetic field side of an ion cyclotron harmonic resonance layer. This coupling and the absorption are analyzed using the hot plasma dispersion relation and a wave equation that was converted from an approximate dispersion relation for the case where λ{sub i}=k{sub ⊥}{sup 2}ρ{sub i}{sup 2}/2≳1 (where k{sub ⊥} is the perpendicular wave number and ρ{sub i} is the ion Larmor radius). It is found that both reflection and conversion may occur near the harmonic resonance layer but that they decrease rapidly, giving rise to a sharp increase in the absorption as the parallel wave number increases.

  12. Fast solver for large scale eddy current non-destructive evaluation problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Naiguang

    Eddy current testing plays a very important role in non-destructive evaluations of conducting test samples. Based on Faraday's law, an alternating magnetic field source generates induced currents, called eddy currents, in an electrically conducting test specimen. The eddy currents generate induced magnetic fields that oppose the direction of the inducing magnetic field in accordance with Lenz's law. In the presence of discontinuities in material property or defects in the test specimen, the induced eddy current paths are perturbed and the associated magnetic fields can be detected by coils or magnetic field sensors, such as Hall elements or magneto-resistance sensors. Due to the complexity of the test specimen and the inspection environments, the availability of theoretical simulation models is extremely valuable for studying the basic field/flaw interactions in order to obtain a fuller understanding of non-destructive testing phenomena. Theoretical models of the forward problem are also useful for training and validation of automated defect detection systems. Theoretical models generate defect signatures that are expensive to replicate experimentally. In general, modelling methods can be classified into two categories: analytical and numerical. Although analytical approaches offer closed form solution, it is generally not possible to obtain largely due to the complex sample and defect geometries, especially in three-dimensional space. Numerical modelling has become popular with advances in computer technology and computational methods. However, due to the huge time consumption in the case of large scale problems, accelerations/fast solvers are needed to enhance numerical models. This dissertation describes a numerical simulation model for eddy current problems using finite element analysis. Validation of the accuracy of this model is demonstrated via comparison with experimental measurements of steam generator tube wall defects. These simulations generating two

  13. Overview of past and current activities on fuels for fast reactors at the Institute for Transuranium Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, A.; McGinley, J.; Somers, J.; Walter, M.

    2009-07-01

    Nuclear energy has the potential to provide a secure and sustainable electricity supply at a competitive price and to make a significant contribution to the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions. The renewal of interest in fast neutron spectra reactors to meet more ambitious sustainable development criteria (i.e., resource maximisation and waste minimisation), opens a favourable framework for R&D activities in this area. The Institute for Transuranium Elements has extensive experience in the fabrication, characterization and irradiation testing (Phénix, Dounreay, Rapsodie) of fast reactor fuels, in oxide, nitride and carbide forms. An overview of these past and current activities on fast reactor fuels is presented.

  14. High Current Energy Recovery Linac at BNL

    SciTech Connect

    Vladimir N. Litvinenko; Donald Barton; D. Beavis; Ilan Ben-Zvi; Michael Blaskiewicz; J.M. Brennan; A. Burrill; R. Calaga; P. Cameron; X. Chang; Roger Connolly; D. Gassner; H. Hahn; A. Hershcovitch; H.C. Hseuh; P. Johnson; D. Kayran; J. Kewisch; R. Lambiase; G. McIntyre; W. Meng; T. C. Nehring; A. Nicoletti; D. Pate; J. Rank; T. Roser; T. Russo; J. Scaduto; K. Smith; T. Srinivasan-Rao; N. Williams; K.-C. Wu; Vitaly Yakimenko; K. Yip; A. Zaltsman; Y. Zhao; H. Bluem; A. Burger; Mike Cole; A. Favale; D. Holmes; John Rathke; Tom Schultheiss; A. Todd; J. Delayen; W. Funk; L. Phillips; Joe Preble

    2004-08-01

    We present the design, the parameters of a small test Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) facility, which is under construction at Collider-Accelerator Department, BNL. This R&D facility has goals to demonstrate CW operation of ERL with average beam current in the range of 0.1 - 1 ampere, combined with very high efficiency of energy recovery. A possibility for future up-grade to a two-pass ERL is considered. The heart of the facility is a 5-cell 700 MHz super-conducting RF linac with HOM damping. Flexible lattice of ERL provides a test-bed for testing issues of transverse and longitudinal instabilities and diagnostics of intense CW e-beam. ERL is also perfectly suited for a far-IR FEL. We present the status and our plans for construction and commissioning of this facility.

  15. HIGH CURRENT ENERGY RECOVERY LINAC AT BNL.

    SciTech Connect

    LITVINENKO,V.N.; BEN-ZVI,I.; BARTON,D.S.; ET AL.

    2005-05-16

    We present the design and parameters of an energy recovery linac (ERL) facility, which is under construction in the Collider-Accelerator Department at BNL. This R&D facility has the goal of demonstrating CW operation of an ERL with an average beam current in the range of 0.1-1 ampere and with very high efficiency of energy recovery. The possibility of a future upgrade to a two-pass ERL is also being considered. The heart of the facility is a 5-cell 703.75 MHz super-conducting RF linac with strong Higher Order Mode (HOM) damping. The flexible lattice of the ERL provides a test-bed for exploring issues of transverse and longitudinal instabilities and diagnostics of intense CW electron beams. This ERL is also perfectly suited for a far-IR FEL. We present the status and plans for construction and commissioning of this facility.

  16. A Lean, Fast Mars Round-trip Mission Architecture: Using Current Technologies for a Human Mission in the 2030s

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Lora; Folta, David; Barbee, Brent W.; Vaughn, Frank; Kirchman, Frank; Englander, Jacob; Campbell, Bruce; Thronson, Harley; Lin, Tzu Yu

    2013-01-01

    We present a lean fast-transfer architecture concept for a first human mission to Mars that utilizes current technologies and two pivotal parameters: an end-to-end Mars mission duration of approximately one year, and a deep space habitat of approximately 50 metric tons. These parameters were formulated by a 2012 deep space habitat study conducted at the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) that focused on a subset of recognized high- engineering-risk factors that may otherwise limit space travel to destinations such as Mars or near-Earth asteroid (NEA)s. With these constraints, we model and promote Mars mission opportunities in the 2030s enabled by a combination of on-orbit staging, mission element pre-positioning, and unique round-trip trajectories identified by state-of-the-art astrodynamics algorithms.

  17. High performance infrared fast cooled detectors for missile applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reibel, Yann; Espuno, Laurent; Taalat, Rachid; Sultan, Ahmad; Cassaigne, Pierre; Matallah, Noura

    2016-05-01

    SOFRADIR was selected in the late 90's for the production of 320×256 MW detectors for major European missile programs. This experience has established our company as a key player in the field of missile programs. SOFRADIR has since developed a vast portfolio of lightweight, compact and high performance JT-based solutions for missiles. ALTAN is a 384x288 Mid Wave infrared detector with 15μm pixel pitch, and is offered in a miniature ultra-fast Joule- Thomson cooled Dewar. Since Sofradir offers both Indium Antimonide (InSb) and Mercury Cadmium Telluride technologies (MCT), we are able to deliver the detectors best suited to customers' needs. In this paper we are discussing different figures of merit for very compact and innovative JT-cooled detectors and are highlighting the challenges for infrared detection technologies.

  18. Fast, High-Precision Readout Circuit for Detector Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rider, David M.; Hancock, Bruce R.; Key, Richard W.; Cunningham, Thomas J.; Wrigley, Chris J.; Seshadri, Suresh; Sander, Stanley P.; Blavier, Jean-Francois L.

    2013-01-01

    The GEO-CAPE mission described in NASA's Earth Science and Applications Decadal Survey requires high spatial, temporal, and spectral resolution measurements to monitor and characterize the rapidly changing chemistry of the troposphere over North and South Americas. High-frame-rate focal plane arrays (FPAs) with many pixels are needed to enable such measurements. A high-throughput digital detector readout integrated circuit (ROIC) that meets the GEO-CAPE FPA needs has been developed, fabricated, and tested. The ROIC is based on an innovative charge integrating, fast, high-precision analog-to-digital circuit that is built into each pixel. The 128×128-pixel ROIC digitizes all 16,384 pixels simultaneously at frame rates up to 16 kHz to provide a completely digital output on a single integrated circuit at an unprecedented rate of 262 million pixels per second. The approach eliminates the need for off focal plane electronics, greatly reducing volume, mass, and power compared to conventional FPA implementations. A focal plane based on this ROIC will require less than 2 W of power on a 1×1-cm integrated circuit. The ROIC is fabricated of silicon using CMOS technology. It is designed to be indium bump bonded to a variety of detector materials including silicon PIN diodes, indium antimonide (InSb), indium gallium arsenide (In- GaAs), and mercury cadmium telluride (HgCdTe) detector arrays to provide coverage over a broad spectral range in the infrared, visible, and ultraviolet spectral ranges.

  19. The high current experiment: First results

    SciTech Connect

    Seidl, Peter A.; Baca, D.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Faltens, A.; Lund, S.M.; Molvik, A.W.; Prost, L.R.; Waldron, W.L.

    2002-05-26

    The High Current Experiment (HCX) is being assembled at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory as part of the US program to explore heavy-ion beam transport at a scale representative of the low-energy end of an induction linac driver for fusion energy production. The primary mission of this experiment is to investigate aperture fill factors acceptable for the transport of space-charge dominated heavy-ion beams at high spacecharge intensity (line-charge density {approx} 0.2 {micro}C/m) over long pulse durations (>4 {micro}s). This machine will test transport issues at a driver-relevant scale resulting from nonlinear space-charge effects and collective modes, beam centroid alignment and beam steering, matching, image charges, halo, lost-particle induced electron effects, and longitudinal bunch control. We present the first experimental results carried out with the coasting K{sup +} ion beam transported through the first 10 electrostatic transport quadrupoles and associated diagnostics. Later phases of the experiment will include more electrostatic lattice periods to allow more sensitive tests of emittance growth, and also magnetic quadrupoles to explore similar issues in magnetic channels with a full driver scale beam.

  20. The high current experiment: First results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidl, P. A.; Baca, D.; Bieniosek, F. M.; Faltens, A.; Lund, S. M.; Molvik, A. W.; Prost, L. R.; Waldron, W. L.

    2002-07-01

    The High Current Experiment (HCX) is being assembled at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory as part of the U.S. program to explore heavy ion beam transport at a scale representative of the low-energy end of an induction linac driver for fusion energy production. The primary mission of this experiment is to investigate aperture fill factors acceptable for the transport of space-charge dominated heavy ion beams at high space-charge intensity (line-charge density [similar] 0.2 [mu]C/m) over long pulse durations (>4 [mu]s). This machine will test transport issues at a driver-relevant scale resulting from nonlinear space-charge effects and collective modes, beam centroid alignment and beam steering, matching, image charges, halo, lost-particle induced electron effects, and longitudinal bunch control. We present the first experimental results carried out with the coasting K+ ion beam transported through the first 10 electrostatic transport quadrupoles and associated diagnostics. Later phases of the experiment will include more electrostatic lattice periods to allow more sensitive tests of emittance growth, and also magnetic quadrupoles to explore similar issues in magnetic channels with a full driver scale beam.

  1. Advances in High Harmonic Fast Wave Heating of NSTX H-mode Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, Philip Michael; Ahn, Joonwook; Bell, R. E.; Bonoli, P.; Chen, Guangye; Green, David L; Harvey, R. W.; Hosea, J.; Jaeger, Erwin Frederick; Kaye, S.; LeBlanc, B; Maingi, Rajesh; Phillips, Cynthia; Podesta, M.; Taylor, G.; Wilgen, John B; Wilson, J. R.

    2010-01-01

    High-harmonic fast wave (HHFW) heating and current drive is being developed in NSTX to provide bulk electron heating and q(0) control during non-inductively sustained Hmode plasmas fuelled by deuterium neutral-beam injection (NBI). In addition, it is used to assist the plasma current ramp-up. A major modification to increase the RF power limit was made in 2009; the original end-grounded, single end-powered current straps of the 12- element array were replaced with center-grounded, double end-powered straps. Greater than 3 MW have been coupled into NBI-driven, ELMy H-mode plasmas with this upgraded antenna. Improved core HHFW heating, particularly at longer wavelengths and during low-density start-up and plasma current ramp-up, has been obtained by lowering the edge density with lithium wall conditioning, thereby moving the critical density for fast-wave propagation away from the vessel wall [1]. Significant core electron heating of NBI-fuelled H-modes has been observed for the first time over a range of launched wavelengths and H-modes can be accessed by HHFW alone. Visible and IR camera images of the antenna and divertor indicate that fast wave interactions can deposit considerable RF energy on the outboard divertor plate, especially at longer wavelengths that begin to propagate closer to the vessel walls. Edge power loss can also arise from HHFWgenerated parametric decay instabilities; edge ion heating is observed that is wavelength dependent. During plasmas where HHFW is combined with NBI, there is a significant enhancement in neutron rate, and fast-ion D-alpha (FIDA) emission measurements clearly show broadening of the fast-ion profile in the plasma core. Large edge localized modes (ELMs) have been observed immediately following the termination of RF power, whether the power turn off is programmed or due to antenna arcing. Causality has not been established but new experiments are planned and will be reported. Fast digitization of the reflected power signal

  2. High voltage compliance constant current ballast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenthal, L. A.

    1976-01-01

    A ballast circuit employing a constant current diode and a vacuum tube that can provide a constant current over a voltage range of 1000 volts. The simple circuit can prove useful in studying voltage breakdown characteristics.

  3. Advances in High-harmonic Fast Wave Physics in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, G; Hosea, J C; LeBlanc, B P; Phillips, C K; Podesta, M; Valeo, E J; Wilson, J R; Ahn, J -W; Chen, G; Green, D L; Jaeger, E F; Maingi, R; Ryan, P M; Wilgen, J B; Heidbrink, W W; Liu, D; Bonoli, P T; Brecht, T; Choi, M

    2009-12-01

    Improved core high-harmonic fast wave (HHFW) heating at longer wavelengths and during start-up and plasma current ramp-up, has now been obtained by lowering the edge density with lithium wall conditioning, thereby moving the critical density for perpendicular fast-wave propagation away from the vessel wall. Lithium conditioning allowed significant HHFW core electron heating of deuterium neutral beam injection (NBI) fuelled H-mode plasmas to be observed for the first time. Large edge localized modes were observed immediately after the termination of rf power. Visible and infrared camera images show that fast wave interactions can deposit considerable rf energy on the outboard divertor. HHFW-generated parametric decay instabilities were observed to heat ions in the plasma edge and may be the cause for a measured drag on edge toroidal rotation during HHFW heating. A significant enhancement in neutron rate and fast-ion profile were measured in NBI-fuelled plasmas when HHFW heating was applied. __________________________________________________

  4. Advances in high-harmonic fast wave physics in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, G.; Bell, R. E.; Hosea, J. C.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Phillips, C. K.; Podesta, M.; Valeo, E. J.; Wilson, J. R.; Ahn, J-W.; Chen, G.; Green, D. L.; Jaeger, E. F.; Maingi, R.; Ryan, P. M.; Wilgen, J. B.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Liu, D.; Bonoli, P. T.; Brecht, T.; Choi, M.

    2010-05-15

    Improved core high-harmonic fast wave (HHFW) heating at longer wavelengths and during start-up and plasma current ramp-up has now been obtained by lowering the edge density with lithium wall conditioning, thereby moving the critical density for perpendicular fast-wave propagation away from the vessel wall. Lithium conditioning allowed significant HHFW core electron heating of deuterium neutral beam injection (NBI) fuelled H-mode plasmas to be observed for the first time. Large edge localized modes were observed immediately after the termination of rf power. Visible and infrared camera images show that fast wave interactions can deposit considerable rf energy on the outboard divertor. HHFW-generated parametric decay instabilities were observed to heat ions in the plasma edge and may be the cause for a measured drag on edge toroidal rotation during HHFW heating. A significant enhancement in neutron rate and fast-ion profile was measured in NBI-fuelled plasmas when HHFW heating was applied.

  5. Power transfer and current generation of fast ions with large-{ital k}{sub {theta}} waves in tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Heikkinen, J.A.; Sipilae, S.K.

    1995-10-01

    The direction and magnitude of power and momentum exchange between fast ions and electrostatic waves in slab and toroidal systems are obtained from global Monte Carlo simulations that include the quasilinear wave-induced ion diffusion both in velocity space and through a radially localized (lower hybrid) wave structure with propagation in one preferential poloidal direction in tokamaks. The model considers a full linearized collision model, finite fast ion orbits, and losses in toroidal geometry, and can properly treat the boundary effects on the particle--wave interaction in the configuration space. For an isotropic steady ion source, reduction of wave Landau damping but no wave amplification by wave localization is found for a Gaussian wave intensity distribution in radius, irrespective of the steepness of the radial gradient of the fast ion source rate. Enhanced wave-driven fast ion current, with magnitude, direction, and profile determined by the boundary conditions, net power transfer, and fast ion radial transport, is found to follow from the asymmetry in the parallel wave number spectrum created by the finite poloidal magnetic field. In the presence of intense well-penetrated waves the current carried by fusion {alpha} particles can be controlled by the choice of the poloidal wave number spectrum and the total current can greatly exceed the neoclassical bootstrap current of the {alpha} particles in a reactor. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  6. High frame rate CCD camera with fast optical shutter

    SciTech Connect

    Yates, G.J.; McDonald, T.E. Jr.; Turko, B.T.

    1998-09-01

    A high frame rate CCD camera coupled with a fast optical shutter has been designed for high repetition rate imaging applications. The design uses state-of-the-art microchannel plate image intensifier (MCPII) technology fostered/developed by Los Alamos National Laboratory to support nuclear, military, and medical research requiring high-speed imagery. Key design features include asynchronous resetting of the camera to acquire random transient images, patented real-time analog signal processing with 10-bit digitization at 40--75 MHz pixel rates, synchronized shutter exposures as short as 200pS, sustained continuous readout of 512 x 512 pixels per frame at 1--5Hz rates via parallel multiport (16-port CCD) data transfer. Salient characterization/performance test data for the prototype camera are presented, temporally and spatially resolved images obtained from range-gated LADAR field testing are included, an alternative system configuration using several cameras sequenced to deliver discrete numbers of consecutive frames at effective burst rates up to 5GHz (accomplished by time-phasing of consecutive MCPII shutter gates without overlap) is discussed. Potential applications including dynamic radiography and optical correlation will be presented.

  7. Design of a transportable high efficiency fast neutron spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roecker, C.; Bernstein, A.; Bowden, N. S.; Cabrera-Palmer, B.; Dazeley, S.; Gerling, M.; Marleau, P.; Sweany, M. D.; Vetter, K.

    2016-08-01

    A transportable fast neutron detection system has been designed and constructed for measuring neutron energy spectra and flux ranging from tens to hundreds of MeV. The transportability of the spectrometer reduces the detector-related systematic bias between different neutron spectra and flux measurements, which allows for the comparison of measurements above or below ground. The spectrometer will measure neutron fluxes that are of prohibitively low intensity compared to the site-specific background rates targeted by other transportable fast neutron detection systems. To measure low intensity high-energy neutron fluxes, a conventional capture-gating technique is used for measuring neutron energies above 20 MeV and a novel multiplicity technique is used for measuring neutron energies above 100 MeV. The spectrometer is composed of two Gd containing plastic scintillator detectors arranged around a lead spallation target. To calibrate and characterize the position dependent response of the spectrometer, a Monte Carlo model was developed and used in conjunction with experimental data from gamma ray sources. Multiplicity event identification algorithms were developed and used with a Cf-252 neutron multiplicity source to validate the Monte Carlo model Gd concentration and secondary neutron capture efficiency. The validated Monte Carlo model was used to predict an effective area for the multiplicity and capture gating analyses. For incident neutron energies between 100 MeV and 1000 MeV with an isotropic angular distribution, the multiplicity analysis predicted an effective area of 500 cm2 rising to 5000 cm2. For neutron energies above 20 MeV, the capture-gating analysis predicted an effective area between 1800 cm2 and 2500 cm2. The multiplicity mode was found to be sensitive to the incident neutron angular distribution.

  8. Hydrodynamic Simulation of Laser-Driven Generation of Fast High-Density Plasma Blocks

    SciTech Connect

    Glowacz, S.; Badziak, J.; Jablonski, S.; Hora, H.

    2006-01-15

    The laser-induced skin-layer ponderomotive acceleration (S-LPA) is considered to be an efficient method of producing dense plasma blocks of very high ion current densities ({>=}1010A/cm2) and ion beam intensities having the potential to be applied in high energy density physics or for fast ignition of fusion targets. In this contribution properties of plasma blocks generation by S-LPA are studied using a two-fluid relativistic hydrodynamic model of laser-plasma interaction. The main mechanisms, which lead to the generation of high current density ion beams are briefly described and illustrated by numerical calculations performed for the subpicosecond neodymium-glass laser pulses of intensities up to 1019W/cm2 interacting with inhomogeneous hydrogen plasma. The impact of the relativistic effects (e.g. the relativistic change of critical electron density, the appearance of higher harmonics) as well as laser light polarisation on plasma block generation is analysed.

  9. Development of a Current Sheet in the Wake of a Fast Coronal Mass Ejection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, A. G.; Webb, D. F.; Burkepile, J. T.; Cliver, E. W.

    2014-04-01

    A bright ray that developed in the wake of a fast coronal mass ejection (CME) on 2005 September 7 presents a unique opportunity to study the early development and physical characteristics of a reconnecting current sheet (CS). Polarization brightness images from the Mk4 K-Coronameter at the Mauna Loa Solar Observatory are used to determine the structure of the ray along its axis low in the corona as it progressed outward. Coverage of the early development of the ray out to ~1.3 R ⊙ for a period of ~27 hr after the start of the event enables for the first time in white light a measurement of a CME CS from the top of the arcade to the base of the flux rope. Measured widths of the ray are combined to obtain the kinematics of the upper and lower "Y"-points described in reconnection flux-rope models such as that of Lin & Forbes. The time dependence of these points are used to derive values for the speed and acceleration of the growth of the CS. We note the appearance of a large structure which increases in size as it expands outward in the early development of the ray and an apparent oscillation with a period of ~0.5 hr in the position angle of the ray.

  10. Development of a current sheet in the wake of a fast coronal mass ejection

    SciTech Connect

    Ling, A. G.; Webb, D. F.; Burkepile, J. T.

    2014-04-01

    A bright ray that developed in the wake of a fast coronal mass ejection (CME) on 2005 September 7 presents a unique opportunity to study the early development and physical characteristics of a reconnecting current sheet (CS). Polarization brightness images from the Mk4 K-Coronameter at the Mauna Loa Solar Observatory are used to determine the structure of the ray along its axis low in the corona as it progressed outward. Coverage of the early development of the ray out to ∼1.3 R {sub ☉} for a period of ∼27 hr after the start of the event enables for the first time in white light a measurement of a CME CS from the top of the arcade to the base of the flux rope. Measured widths of the ray are combined to obtain the kinematics of the upper and lower {sup Y-}points described in reconnection flux-rope models such as that of Lin and Forbes. The time dependence of these points are used to derive values for the speed and acceleration of the growth of the CS. We note the appearance of a large structure which increases in size as it expands outward in the early development of the ray and an apparent oscillation with a period of ∼0.5 hr in the position angle of the ray.

  11. MACHINE PROTECTION FOR HIGH AVERAGE CURRENT LINACS

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, Kevin; Allison, Trent; Evans, Richard; Coleman, James; Grippo, Albert

    2003-05-01

    A fully integrated Machine Protection System (MPS) is critical to efficient commissioning and safe operation of all high current accelerators. The Jefferson Lab FEL [1,2] has multiple electron beam paths and many different types of diagnostic insertion devices. The MPS [3] needs to monitor both the status of these devices and the magnet settings which define the beam path. The matrix of these devices and beam paths are programmed into gate arrays, the output of the matrix is an allowable maximum average power limit. This power limit is enforced by the drive laser for the photocathode gun. The Beam Loss Monitors (BLMs), RF status, and laser safety system status are also inputs to the control matrix. There are 8 Machine Modes (electron path) and 8 Beam Modes (average power limits) that define the safe operating limits for the FEL. Combinations outside of this matrix are unsafe and the beam is inhibited. The power limits range from no beam to 2 megawatts of electron beam power.

  12. High Current Hollow Cathode Plasma Plume Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Robert E.; Kamhawi, Hani; Williams, George J., Jr.

    2014-01-01

    Plasma plume measurements are reported for a hollow cathode assembly (HCA) operated at discharge currents of 50, 70, and 100 A at xenon flow rates between 19 - 46 standard cubic centimeter per minute. The HCA was centrally mounted in the NASA-300MS Hall Thruster and was operated in the "spot" and "plume" modes with additional data taken with an applied magnetic field. Langmuir probes, retarding potential analyzers, and optical emission spectroscopy were employed to measure plasma properties near the orifice of the HCA and to assess the charge state of the near-field plasma. Electron temperatures (2-6 electron volt) and plasma potentials are consistent with probe-measured values in previous investigations. Operation with an applied-field yields higher discharge voltages, increased Xe III production, and increased signals from the 833.5 nm C I line. While operating in plume mode and with an applied field, ion energy distribution measurements yield ions with energies significantly exceeding the applied discharge voltage. These findings are correlated with high-frequency oscillations associated with each mode.

  13. High Current Hollow Cathode Plasma Plume Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Robert E.; Kamhawi, Hani; Williams, George J., Jr.

    2013-01-01

    Plasma plume measurements are reported for a hollow cathode assembly (HCA) oper-ated at discharge currents of 50, 70, and 100 A at xenon ow rates between 19 - 46 sccm.The HCA was centrally mounted in the annulus of the NASA-300MS Hall Thruster andwas operated in the spot and plume modes with additional data taken with an appliedmagnetic eld. Langmuir probes, retarding potential analyzers, and optical emission spec-troscopy were employed to measure plasma properties near the orice of the HCA and toassess the charge state of the near-eld plasma. Electron temperatures (2-6 eV) and plasmapotentials are consistent with probe-measured values in previous investigations. Operationwith an applied-eld yields higher discharge voltages, increased Xe III production, andincreased signals from the 833.5 nm C I line. While operating in plume mode and with anapplied eld, ion energy distribution measurements yield ions with energies signicantlyexceeding the applied discharge voltage. These ndings are correlated with high-frequencyoscillations associated with each mode.

  14. 4 MW upgrade to the DIII-D fast wave current drive system

    SciTech Connect

    deGrassie, J.S.; Pinsker, R.I.; Cary, W.P.

    1993-10-01

    The DIII-D fast wave current drive (FWCD) system is being upgraded by an additional 4 MW in the 30 to 120 MHz frequency range. This capability adds to the existing 2 MW 30 to 60 MHz system. Two new ABB transmitters of the type that are in use on the ASDEX-Upgrade tokamak in Garching will be used to drive two new water-cooled four-strap antennas to be installed in DIII-D in early 1994. The transmission and tuning system for each antenna will be similar to that now in use for the first 2 MW system on DIII-D, but with some significant improvements. One improvement consists of adding a decoupler element to counter the mutual coupling between the antenna straps which results in large imbalances in the power to a strap for the usual current drive intrastrap phasing of 90{degrees}. Another improvement is to utilize pressurized, ceramic-insulated transmission lines. The intrastrap phasing will again be controlled in pairs, with a pair of straps coupled in a resonant loop configuration, locking their phase difference at either 0 or 180{degrees}, depending upon the length of line installed. These resonant loops will incorporate a phase shifter so that they will be able to be tuned to resonance at several frequencies in the operating band of the transmitter. With the frequency change capability of the ABB generators, the FWCD frequency will thus be selectable on a shot-to-shot basis, from this preselected set of frequencies. The schedule is for experiments to begin with this added 4 MW capability in mid-1994. The details of the system are described.

  15. Compact, highly sensitive optical gyros and sensors with fast-light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, Caleb A.; Zavriyev, Anton; Cummings, Malcolm; Beal, A. C.; Lucas, Mark; Lagasse, Michael

    2015-09-01

    Fast-light phenomena can enhance the sensitivity of an optical gyroscope of a given size by several orders of magnitude, and could be applied to other optical sensors as well. MagiQ Technologies has been developing a compact fiber-based fast light Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) using Stimulated Brillouin Scattering in optical fibers with commercially mature technologies. We will report on our findings, including repeatable fast-light effects in the lab, numerical analysis of noise and stability given realistic optical specs, and methods for optimizing efficiency, size, and reliability with current technologies. The technology could benefit inertial navigation units, gyrocompasses, and stabilization techniques, and could allow high grade IMUs in spacecraft, unmanned aerial vehicles or sensors, where the current size and weight of precision gyros are prohibitive. By using photonic integrated circuits and telecom-grade components along with specialty fibers, we also believe that our design is appropriate for development without further advances in the state of the art of components.

  16. A high-energy, high-current ion implantation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, Peter H.; Faretra, Ronald; Ryding, Geoffery

    1985-01-01

    High current (Pre-DepTM) ion implanters, operating at 80 keV, have met a need in the semiconductor industry. For certain processes, higher energies are required, either to penetrate a surface layer or to place the dopant ion at a greater depth. The Eaton/Nova Model NV10-160 Pre-DepTM Ion Implanter has been developed to meet those special needs. Beam currents as high as 10.0 mA are available at energies up to 160 keV for routine production applications. The system has also been qualified for low current, low dose operation (1011 ions cm-2) and this unique versatility provides the Process and Equipment Engineers with a powerful new tool. The Model NV10-160 also utilizes the Nova-designed, double disk interchange processing system to minimize inactive beam time so that wafer throughputs, up to 300 wafers/h, are achievable on a routine basis. DatalockTM, a computer driven implant monitoring system and AT-4, the Nova cassette-to-cassette wafer loader, are available as standard options. As a production machine, the Model NV10-160 with its high throughput capability, will reduce the implant cost per wafer significantly for doses above 10 × 1015 ions/cm2. Performance patterns are now emerging as some twenty-five systems have now been shipped. This paper summarizes the more important characteristics and reviews the major design features of the NV10-160.

  17. Observation of a fast beta collapse during high poloidal-beta discharges in JT-60

    SciTech Connect

    Ishida, S.; Koide, Y.; Ozeki, T.; Kikuchi, M.; Tsuji, S.; Shirai, H.; Naito, O.; Azumi, M. )

    1992-03-09

    A nondisruptive {beta}-limiting phenomenon in a large tokamak under a large bootstrap current fraction, up to {similar to}80% of the plasma current, is described; {beta}=(plasma pressure)/(magnetic pressure). During long-pulse neutral-beam-heated discharges in the JT-60 tokamak, it occurs at {beta}{sub {ital p}}{similar to}3, leading to a limit of the normalized {beta} lower than the Troyon limit. The MHD feature is characterized by a large-amplitude partial relaxation with a fast growth time. A hollow current profile evolution in the high-{beta}{sub {ital p}} regime plays an essential role in the MHD stability, analysis of which shows that the ideal {ital n}=1 kink-ballooning modes can be unstable just before the collapse.

  18. Fast valve based on double-layer eddy-current repulsion for disruption mitigation in Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, H. D.; Zhang, X. D.

    2015-05-01

    A fast valve based on the double-layer eddy-current repulsion mechanism has been developed on Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST). In addition to a double-layer eddy-current coil, a preload system was added to improve the security of the valve, whereby the valve opens more quickly and the open-valve time becomes shorter, making it much safer than before. In this contribution, testing platforms, open-valve characteristics, and throughput of the fast valve are discussed. Tests revealed that by choosing appropriate parameters the valve opened within 0.15 ms, and open-valve times were no longer than 2 ms. By adjusting working parameter values, the maximum number of particles injected during this open-valve time was estimated at 7 × 1022. The fast valve will become a useful tool to further explore disruption mitigation experiments on EAST in 2015.

  19. Fast valve based on double-layer eddy-current repulsion for disruption mitigation in Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, H D; Zhang, X D

    2015-05-01

    A fast valve based on the double-layer eddy-current repulsion mechanism has been developed on Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST). In addition to a double-layer eddy-current coil, a preload system was added to improve the security of the valve, whereby the valve opens more quickly and the open-valve time becomes shorter, making it much safer than before. In this contribution, testing platforms, open-valve characteristics, and throughput of the fast valve are discussed. Tests revealed that by choosing appropriate parameters the valve opened within 0.15 ms, and open-valve times were no longer than 2 ms. By adjusting working parameter values, the maximum number of particles injected during this open-valve time was estimated at 7 × 10(22). The fast valve will become a useful tool to further explore disruption mitigation experiments on EAST in 2015. PMID:26026520

  20. High Harmonic Fast Wave Propagation and Heating on NSTX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, J. B.; Phillips, C. K.; Hosea, J. C.; Valeo, E. J.; Wilson, J. R.; Harvey, R. W.

    2007-11-01

    Recent experiments on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) show that the high harmonic fast wave (HHFW) core heating efficiency depends on the antenna phasing and plasma conditions. [1]. Power losses in the edge due to rf sheath formation or other parasitic absorption processes could occur if the waves propagate nearly parallel to the wall in the edge regions and intersect nearby vessel structures. To investigate this possibility, the 3D HHFW propagation in NSTX has been studied both analytically and numerically with the ray tracing code GENRAY. Initial calculations show that for certain values of the launched parallel wave number and magnetic field, the waves in NSTX are launched at a shallow angle to the vessel wall. In contrast, for ICRF heating in C-Mod or ITER, the initial ray trajectories tend to be more radially oriented. Comparisons of the GENRAY results with 2D TORIC full wave simulations for the power deposition will also be discussed. [1] See invited talk by J. C. Hosea this meeting.

  1. Characterization of high-current, high-temperature superconductor current lead elements

    SciTech Connect

    Niemann, R.C.; Evans, D.J.; Fisher, B.L.; Brockenborough, W.E.; Roberts, P.R.; Rodenbush, A.J.

    1996-08-01

    The refrigeration loads of current leads for superconducting magnets can be significantly reduced by using high-temperature superconductor (HTS) leads. An HTS conductor type that is well suited for this application is a laminated sintered stack of HTS powder-in-tube (PIT) tapes. The superconducting elements are normally characterized by their manufacturer by measuring critical currents at 77 K in self field. Additional characterization, which correlates electrical performance at 77 K and at lower temperatures with applied magnetic fields, provides the current lead designer and conductor element manufacturer with critical information. For HTS conductor elements comprising a laminated and sintered stack of Bi-2223 PIT tapes having an alloyed Ag sheath, this characterization uses variable applied fields and operating temperatures.

  2. Lightweight, High-Current Welding Gun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starck, Thomas F.; Brennan, Andrew D.

    1989-01-01

    Lighweight resistance-welding, hand-held gun supplies alternating or direct current over range of 600 to 4,000 A and applies forces from 40 to 60 lb during welding. Used to weld metal sheets in multilayered stacks.

  3. A fast alignment method for breast MRI follow-up studies using automated breast segmentation and current-prior registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lei; Strehlow, Jan; Rühaak, Jan; Weiler, Florian; Diez, Yago; Gubern-Merida, Albert; Diekmann, Susanne; Laue, Hendrik; Hahn, Horst K.

    2015-03-01

    In breast cancer screening for high-risk women, follow-up magnetic resonance images (MRI) are acquired with a time interval ranging from several months up to a few years. Prior MRI studies may provide additional clinical value when examining the current one and thus have the potential to increase sensitivity and specificity of screening. To build a spatial correlation between suspicious findings in both current and prior studies, a reliable alignment method between follow-up studies is desirable. However, long time interval, different scanners and imaging protocols, and varying breast compression can result in a large deformation, which challenges the registration process. In this work, we present a fast and robust spatial alignment framework, which combines automated breast segmentation and current-prior registration techniques in a multi-level fashion. First, fully automatic breast segmentation is applied to extract the breast masks that are used to obtain an initial affine transform. Then, a non-rigid registration algorithm using normalized gradient fields as similarity measure together with curvature regularization is applied. A total of 29 subjects and 58 breast MR images were collected for performance assessment. To evaluate the global registration accuracy, the volume overlap and boundary surface distance metrics are calculated, resulting in an average Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC) of 0.96 and root mean square distance (RMSD) of 1.64 mm. In addition, to measure local registration accuracy, for each subject a radiologist annotated 10 pairs of markers in the current and prior studies representing corresponding anatomical locations. The average distance error of marker pairs dropped from 67.37 mm to 10.86 mm after applying registration.

  4. Developing high brightness and high current beams for HIF injectors

    SciTech Connect

    Ahle, Larry; Grote, Dave; Kwan, Joe

    2002-05-24

    The US Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory is continuing research into ion sources and injectors that simultaneously provide high current (0.5-1.0 Amps) and high brightness (normalized emittance better than 1.0 {pi}-mm-mr). The central issue of focus is whether to continue pursuing the traditional approach of large surface ionization sources or to adopt a multiaperture approach that transports many smaller ''beamlets'' separately at low energies before allowing them to merge. For the large surface source concept, the recent commissioning of the 2-MeV injector for the High Current eXperiment has increased our understanding of the beam quality limitations for these sources. We have also improved our techniques for fabricating large diameter aluminosilicate sources to improve lifetime and emission uniformity. For the multiaperture approach, we are continuing to study the feasibility of small surface sources and a RF induced plasma source in preparation for beamlet merging experiments, while continuing to run computer simulations for better understanding of this alternate concept. Experiments into both architectures will be performed on a newly commissioned ion source test stand at LLNL called STS-500. This stand test provides a platform for testing a variety of ion sources and accelerating structures with 500 kV, 17-microsecond pulses. Recent progress in these areas will be discussed as well as plans for future experiments.

  5. Ultra high energy density and fast discharge nanocomposite capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Haixiong; Sodano, Henry A.

    2013-04-01

    Nanocomposites containing high dielectric permittivity ceramics embedded in high breakdown strength polymers are currently of considerable interest as a solution for the development of high energy density capacitors. However, the improvement of dielectric permittivity comes at expense of the breakdown strength leading to limit the final energy density. Here, an ultra-high energy density nanocomposite was fabricated based on high aspect ratio barium strontium titanate nanowires. The pyroelectric phase Ba0.2Sr0.8TiO3 was chosen for the nanowires combined with quenched PVDF to fabricate high energy density nanocomposite. The energy density with 7.5% Ba0.2Sr0.8TiO3 nanowires reached 14.86 J/cc at 450 MV/m, which represented a 42.9% increase in comparison to the PVDF with an energy density of 10.4 J/cc at the same electric field. The capacitors have 1138% greater than higher energy density than commercial biaxial oriented polypropylene capacitors (1.2 J/cc at 640). These results demonstrate that the high aspect ratio nanowires can be used to produce nanocomposite capacitors with greater performance than the neat polymers thus providing a novel process for the development of future pulsed-power capacitors.

  6. Exploration of High Harmonic Fast Wave Heating on the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    J.R. Wilson; R.E. Bell; S. Bernabei; M. Bitter; P. Bonoli; D. Gates; J. Hosea; B. LeBlanc; T.K. Mau; S. Medley; J. Menard; D. Mueller; M. Ono; C.K. Phillips; R.I. Pinsker; R. Raman; A. Rosenberg; P. Ryan; S. Sabbagh; D. Stutman; D. Swain; Y. Takase; J. Wilgen; the NSTX Team

    2003-02-11

    High Harmonic Fast Wave (HHFW) heating has been proposed as a particularly attractive means for plasma heating and current drive in the high-beta plasmas that are achievable in spherical torus (ST) devices. The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [Ono, M., Kaye, S.M., Neumeyer, S., et al., Proceedings, 18th IEEE/NPSS Symposium on Fusion Engineering, Albuquerque, 1999, (IEEE, Piscataway, NJ (1999), p. 53.)] is such a device. An radio-frequency (rf) heating system has been installed on NSTX to explore the physics of HHFW heating, current drive via rf waves and for use as a tool to demonstrate the attractiveness of the ST concept as a fusion device. To date, experiments have demonstrated many of the theoretical predictions for HHFW. In particular, strong wave absorption on electrons over a wide range of plasma parameters and wave parallel phase velocities, wave acceleration of energetic ions, and indications of current drive for directed wave spectra have been observed. In addition HHFW heating has been used to explore the energy transport properties of NSTX plasmas, to create H-mode (high-confinement mode) discharges with a large fraction of bootstrap current and to control the plasma current profile during the early stages of the discharge.

  7. Modular High Current Test Facility at LLNL

    SciTech Connect

    Tully, L K; Goerz, D A; Speer, R D; Ferriera, T J

    2008-05-20

    This paper describes the 1 MA, 225 kJ test facility in operation at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The capacitor bank is constructed from three parallel 1.5 mF modules. The modules are capable of switching simultaneously or sequentially via solid dielectric puncture switches. The bank nominally operates up to 10 kV and reaches peak current with all three cabled modules in approximately 30 {micro}s. Parallel output plates from the bank allow for cable or busbar interfacing to the load. This versatile bank is currently in use for code validation experiments, railgun related activities, switch testing, and diagnostic development.

  8. Fast-ion transport in q min > 2 , high- β steady-state scenarios on DIII-Da)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holcomb, C. T.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Ferron, J. R.; Van Zeeland, M. A.; Garofalo, A. M.; Solomon, W. M.; Gong, X.; Mueller, D.; Grierson, B.; Bass, E. M.; Collins, C.; Park, J. M.; Kim, K.; Luce, T. C.; Turco, F.; Pace, D. C.; Ren, Q.; Podesta, M.

    2015-05-01

    Results from experiments on DIII-D [J. L. Luxon, Fusion Sci. Technol. 48, 828 (2005)] aimed at developing high β steady-state operating scenarios with high- q min confirm that fast-ion transport is a critical issue for advanced tokamak development using neutral beam injection current drive. In DIII-D, greater than 11 MW of neutral beam heating power is applied with the intent of maximizing β N and the noninductive current drive. However, in scenarios with q min > 2 that target the typical range of q 95 = 5-7 used in next-step steady-state reactor models, Alfvén eigenmodes cause greater fast-ion transport than classical models predict. This enhanced transport reduces the absorbed neutral beam heating power and current drive and limits the achievable βN. In contrast, similar plasmas except with q min just above 1 have approximately classical fast-ion transport. Experiments that take q min > 3 plasmas to higher β P with q 95 = 11-12 for testing long pulse operation exhibit regimes of better than expected thermal confinement. Compared to the standard high- q min scenario, the high β P cases have shorter slowing-down time and lower ∇ β fast , and this reduces the drive for Alfvénic modes, yielding nearly classical fast-ion transport, high values of normalized confinement, β N , and noninductive current fraction. These results suggest DIII-D might obtain better performance in lower- q 95 , high- q min plasmas using broader neutral beam heating profiles and increased direct electron heating power to lower the drive for Alfvén eigenmodes.

  9. Fast-ion transport in qmin>2, high- β steady-state scenarios on DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, C. T.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Ferron, J. R.; Van Zeeland, M. A.; Garofalo, A. M.; Solomon, W. M.; Gong, X.; Mueller, D.; Grierson, B.; Bass, E. M.; Collins, C.; Park, J. M.; Kim, K.; Luce, T. C.; Turco, F.; Pace, D. C.; Ren, Q.; Podesta, M.

    2015-05-22

    The results from experiments on DIII-D [J. L. Luxon, Fusion Sci. Technol. 48, 828 (2005)] aimed at developing high β steady-state operating scenarios with high-qminqmin confirm that fast-ion transport is a critical issue for advanced tokamak development using neutral beam injection current drive. In DIII-D, greater than 11 MW of neutral beam heating power is applied with the intent of maximizing βN and the noninductive current drive. However, in scenarios with qmin>2 that target the typical range of q95= 5–7 used in next-step steady-state reactor models, Alfvén eigenmodes cause greater fast-ion transport than classical models predict. This enhanced transport reduces the absorbed neutral beam heating power and current drive and limits the achievable βN. Conversely similar plasmas except with qmin just above 1 have approximately classical fast-ion transport. Experiments that take qmin>3 plasmas to higher βP with q95= 11–12 for testing long pulse operation exhibit regimes of better than expected thermal confinement. Compared to the standard high-qmin scenario, the high βP cases have shorter slowing-down time and lower ∇βfast, and this reduces the drive for Alfvénic modes, yielding nearly classical fast-ion transport, high values of normalized confinement, βN, and noninductive current fraction. These results suggest DIII-D might obtain better performance in lower-q95, high-qmin plasmas using broader neutral beam heating profiles and increased direct electron heating power to lower the drive for Alfvén eigenmodes.

  10. Fast-ion transport in qmin>2, high- β steady-state scenarios on DIII-D

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Holcomb, C. T.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Ferron, J. R.; Van Zeeland, M. A.; Garofalo, A. M.; Solomon, W. M.; Gong, X.; Mueller, D.; Grierson, B.; Bass, E. M.; et al

    2015-05-22

    The results from experiments on DIII-D [J. L. Luxon, Fusion Sci. Technol. 48, 828 (2005)] aimed at developing high β steady-state operating scenarios with high-qminqmin confirm that fast-ion transport is a critical issue for advanced tokamak development using neutral beam injection current drive. In DIII-D, greater than 11 MW of neutral beam heating power is applied with the intent of maximizing βN and the noninductive current drive. However, in scenarios with qmin>2 that target the typical range of q95= 5–7 used in next-step steady-state reactor models, Alfvén eigenmodes cause greater fast-ion transport than classical models predict. This enhanced transport reducesmore » the absorbed neutral beam heating power and current drive and limits the achievable βN. Conversely similar plasmas except with qmin just above 1 have approximately classical fast-ion transport. Experiments that take qmin>3 plasmas to higher βP with q95= 11–12 for testing long pulse operation exhibit regimes of better than expected thermal confinement. Compared to the standard high-qmin scenario, the high βP cases have shorter slowing-down time and lower ∇βfast, and this reduces the drive for Alfvénic modes, yielding nearly classical fast-ion transport, high values of normalized confinement, βN, and noninductive current fraction. These results suggest DIII-D might obtain better performance in lower-q95, high-qmin plasmas using broader neutral beam heating profiles and increased direct electron heating power to lower the drive for Alfvén eigenmodes.« less

  11. High-current ion-ring accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Sudan, R.N. )

    1993-03-15

    An accelerator concept is outlined which enables 10[sup 15] to 10[sup 18] ions in the form of a charge neutralized ion ring to be accelerated to GeV energies. A repetition rate of 10 Hz will deliver an average current in the range of 0.1 A.

  12. Insulator damage in high current discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranon, P. M.; Kristiansen, M.; Lehr, F. M.; Hatfield, L. L.

    1986-11-01

    The degradation of the hold-off voltage capability of several composite candidates for railgun insulators was studied experimentally. The materials examined were BN, alumina (Coor's ceramic), and two types of laminated fiberglass/epoxy (FGE I and FGE II). Sample 1 cm thick plates of the insulators were inserted into a surface discharge switch (SDS) with a gap of 1.6 in., i.e., an initial hold-off voltage of 40 kV. FGE I retained the hold-off voltage for more than 10,000 shots at a current of 1 kA maximum, but degraded significantly after 50 shots at currents over 200 kA. BN shattered when the repetition rate exceeded 1 pulse/sec.

  13. A high performance current source inverter

    SciTech Connect

    Joos, G.; Moschopoulos, G.; Ziogas, P.D.

    1993-10-01

    A recent innovation in current source inverter (CSI) drives has been the introduction of pulsewidth modulation (PWM) for the purpose of improving the quality of the load currents and voltages. However, the typical six switch CSI circuit is not compatible with all standard PWM techniques thus limiting the number of schemes that can be used. The modified CSI circuit discussed in this paper removes most of the restrictions at the ``cost`` of an extra switch. Additional advantages include faster response times through modulation index control and higher efficiency. This paper includes a detailed steady-state analysis and design procedure. The feasibility and performance of the modified CSI are verified by simulation and experimental implementation on a 5 kVA converter.

  14. A compact submicrosecond, high current generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalchuk, B. M.; Kharlov, A. V.; Zorin, V. B.; Zherlitsyn, A. A.

    2009-08-01

    Pulsed current generator was developed for experiments with current carrying pulsed plasma. Main parts of the generator are capacitor bank, low inductive current driving lines, and central load part. Generator consists of four identical sections, connected in parallel to one load. Capacitor bank is assembled from 24 capacitor blocks (100 kV, 80 nF), connected in parallel. It stores 9.6 kJ at 100 kV charging voltage. Each capacitor block incorporates a multigap spark switch, which is able to commute by six parallel channels. Switches operate in dry air at atmospheric pressure. The generator was tested with an inductive load and a liner load. At 17.5 nH inductive load and 100 kV of charging voltage it provides 650 kA of current amplitude with 390 ns rise time with 0.6 Ω damping resistors in discharge circuit of each capacitor block. The net generator inductance without a load was optimized to be as low as 15 nH, which results in extremely low impedance of the generator (˜0.08 Ω). It ensures effective energy coupling with a low impedance load such as Z pinch. The generator operates reliably without any adjustments in 70-100 kV range of charging voltage. Jitter in delay between output pulse and triggering pulse is less than 5 ns at 70-100 kV charging voltage. Operation and handling are very simple, because no oil or purified gases are required for the generator. The generator has dimensions 5.24×1.2×0.18 m3 and total weight about 1400 kg, thus manifesting itself as simple, robust, and cost effective apparatus.

  15. Architecture for high critical current superconducting tapes

    DOEpatents

    Jia, Quanxi; Foltyn, Stephen R.

    2002-01-01

    Improvements in critical current capacity for superconducting film structures are disclosed and include the use of, e.g., multilayer YBCO structures where individual YBCO layers are separated by a layer of an insulating material such as CeO.sub.2 and the like, a layer of a conducting material such as strontium ruthenium oxide and the like or by a second superconducting material such as SmBCO and the like.

  16. Propagation direction reversal of ionization zones in the transition between high and low current magnetron sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    School of Materials Science and Engineering, State Key Lab for Materials Processing and Die & Mold Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074, China; Department of Physics, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720, USA; Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, California 94720, USA; Yang, Yuchen; Liu, Jason; Liu, Lin; Anders, André

    2014-12-11

    Past research has revealed the propagation of dense, asymmetric ionization zones in both high and low current magnetron discharges. Here we report about the direction reversal of ionization zone propagation as observed with fast cameras. At high currents, zones move in the E B direction with velocities of 103 to 104 m/s. However at lower currents, ionization zones are observed to move in the opposite, the -E B direction, with velocities ~;; 103 m/s. It is proposed that the direction reversal is associated with the local balance of ionization and supply of neutrals in the ionization zone.

  17. Closure of the Fast Flux Test Facility: Current Status and Future Plans

    SciTech Connect

    Farabee, O.A.; Witherspoon, W.V.

    2008-01-15

    The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) was a 400 MWt sodium cooled fast reactor designed and constructed in the 1970's. The original purpose of the facility was to develop and test advanced fuels and materials for the liquid metal fast breeder reactor program. The facility operated very successfully from 1982 through 1992, fulfilling its original mission as well as other identified missions. However, in 1993 the Department of Energy concluded that there was no longer a need for the FFTF and thus ordered that it be shut down. Following eight years of additional study of potential new missions, the final decision to shut down the facility was made in 2001. (During this eight year period the plant was maintained in a condition to allow safe and efficient shut down or restart). The complete closure of the FFTF consists of the following phases: - Deactivation - removal/stabilization of hazards to allow long-term storage (2001-2009); - Surveillance and maintenance - minimum cost compliant storage (2010-2015); - Decontamination and decommissioning (2016-2024). All of the FFTF fuel has been removed from the site except the sodium-bonded fuel that is destined for transportation to Idaho National Laboratory for final disposition. The sodium-bonded fuel had metallic sodium inside of the fuel pin to increase the heat transfer from the fuel pellet to the clad in order to reduce pellet centerline temperature. Three hundred and seventy-six (376) fuel assemblies have been washed (sodium removed) and transferred to storage at other Hanford locations. The majority of the spent fuel is stored in interim storage casks designed for a 50 year storage life, holding seven assemblies each. All sodium systems have been drained and the sodium stored under an inert gas blanket at ambient temperature in a Sodium Storage Facility at the FFTF site. This facility consists of four large tanks and associated piping. The main contaminants are sodium-22, cesium-137 and tritium. The sodium-potassium (Na

  18. High-current density coils for high-radiation environments

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, A.

    1981-01-01

    This paper concentrates on the problems of providing normal (that is, nonsuperconducting) magnet coils for present and short-term-future requirements where significant radiation doses are involved. Projects such as 100-mA deuteron accelerators and bundle diverter coils for TOKAMAKS are typical of applications where conventional organic insulation limited to 10/sup 10/ rads makes epoxy-based systems unacceptable. Moreover, even in present-day accelerators, radiation levels can be high enough to give rise to problems with oxidation of copper conductors if water is used in direct contact with the copper. The radiolytic oxygen, being formed in situ, cannot be controlled by external deoxygenators. An acceptable insulation for such environments has been described previously, and is being employed where radiation is expected to be a problem. Being a compacted magnesium oxide powder, the insulation has advantages. Analysis of constraints on maximum current densities achievable in such a coil construction, using computer codes, leads to coil configurations that operate at higher current densities than are usually found in directly cooled coils. An example of the thermal analysis of one coil configuration is given. The problems are addressed here.

  19. High-current plasma contactor neutralizer system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beattie, J. R.; Williamson, W. S.; Matossian, J. N.; Vourgourakis, E. J.; Burch, J. L.

    1989-01-01

    A plasma-contactor neutralizer system is described, for the stabilizing the Orbiter's potential during flights of the Atmospheric Laboratory for Applications and Science missions. The plasma contactor neutralizer will include a Xe plasma source that can provide steady-state ion-emission currents of up to 1.5 A. The Orbiter's potential will be maintained near that of the surrounding space plasma during electron-beam accelerator firings through a combination of ion emission from the Xe plasma source and electron collection from the ambient space plasma. Configuration diagrams and block diagrams are presented along with the performance characteristics of the system.

  20. Fast service discovery mechanism through high speed multimedia network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takagi, A.; Koita, T.; Sato, K.

    2005-12-01

    In the environment that a lot of control equipments are connected discretely to offer those equipments additional flexibility, the network is required to be high speed, high reliability, and real-time responsibility. IEEE 1394 1-3 is preferable as the underlying data transport technology to meet such requirements. IEEE 1394 is an interface that can support Plug and Play between the control equipments without a host device, and guarantee real-time stream and data transmission. Using the technology as a backbone network is suitable for control network due to its characteristics. However, in the current IEEE 1394 specification, there are some issues: band shortage when a lot of devices are connected and the reliability decrease in the communication when the network topology changes. By using the new technology, the bus bridge for IEEE 1394, some of the problems can be handled. Nevertheless, some issues still remain even if the bus bridge technology is applied. In this paper, to address these issues, we have proposed the message-type service discovery method. The message-type service discovery can achieve the efficiency of forwarding communication by transmitting service information of the equipment as a set of messages. The proposed method enables to transmit service information of the equipments at high speed. Then, we actually measured the time required for the service discovery of the proposed method and discussed about the basic characteristics.

  1. The development of a realistic source term for sodium-cooled fast reactors : assessment of current status and future needs.

    SciTech Connect

    LaChance, Jeffrey L.; Phillips, Jesse; Parma, Edward J., Jr.; Olivier, Tara Jean; Middleton, Bobby D.

    2011-06-01

    Sodium-cooled fast reactors (SFRs) continue to be proposed and designed throughout the United States and the world. Although the number of SFRs actually operating has declined substantially since the 1980s, a significant interest in advancing these types of reactor systems remains. Of the many issues associated with the development and deployment of SFRs, one of high regulatory importance is the source term to be used in the siting of the reactor. A substantial amount of modeling and experimental work has been performed over the past four decades on accident analysis, sodium coolant behavior, and radionuclide release for SFRs. The objective of this report is to aid in determining the gaps and issues related to the development of a realistic, mechanistically derived source term for SFRs. This report will allow the reader to become familiar with the severe accident source term concept and gain a broad understanding of the current status of the models and experimental work. Further, this report will allow insight into future work, in terms of both model development and experimental validation, which is necessary in order to develop a realistic source term for SFRs.

  2. High-Harmonic Fast-Wave Power Flow Along Magnetic Field Lines in the Scrape-Off Layer of NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, R. J.; Hosea, J.; Kramer, G.; Ahn, Joonwook; Bell, R. E.; Diallo, A.; Gerhardt, S.; Gray, T. K.; Green, David L; Jaeger, Erwin Frederick; Jaworski, M. A.; LeBlanc, B; McLean, Adam G; Maingi, Rajesh; Phillips, C. K.; Roquemore, L.; Ryan, Philip Michael; Sabbagh, S. A.; Taylor, G.; Wilson, J. R.

    2012-01-01

    A significant fraction of high-harmonic fast-wave (HHFW) power applied to NSTX can be lost to the scrape-off layer (SOL) and deposited in bright and hot spirals on the divertor rather than in the core plasma. We show that the HHFW power flows to these spirals along magnetic field lines passing through the SOL in front of the antenna, implying that the HHFW power couples across the entire width of the SOL rather than mostly at the antenna face. This result will help guide future efforts to understand and minimize these edge losses in order to maximize fast-wave heating and current drive.

  3. High-harmonic fast-wave power flow along magnetic field lines in the scrape-off layer of NSTX.

    PubMed

    Perkins, R J; Hosea, J C; Kramer, G J; Ahn, J-W; Bell, R E; Diallo, A; Gerhardt, S; Gray, T K; Green, D L; Jaeger, E F; Jaworski, M A; LeBlanc, B P; McLean, A; Maingi, R; Phillips, C K; Roquemore, L; Ryan, P M; Sabbagh, S; Taylor, G; Wilson, J R

    2012-07-27

    A significant fraction of high-harmonic fast-wave (HHFW) power applied to NSTX can be lost to the scrape-off layer (SOL) and deposited in bright and hot spirals on the divertor rather than in the core plasma. We show that the HHFW power flows to these spirals along magnetic field lines passing through the SOL in front of the antenna, implying that the HHFW power couples across the entire width of the SOL rather than mostly at the antenna face. This result will help guide future efforts to understand and minimize these edge losses in order to maximize fast-wave heating and current drive. PMID:23006093

  4. Current Perspectives in High Energy Astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ormes, Jonathan F. (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    High energy astrophysics is a space-age discipline that has taken a quantum leap forward in the 1990s. The observables are photons and particles that are unable to penetrate the atmosphere and can only be observed from space or very high altitude balloons. The lectures presented as chapters of this book are based on the results from the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory (CGRO) and Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics (ASCA) missions to which the Laboratory for High Energy Astrophysics at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center made significant hardware contributions. These missions study emissions from very hot plasmas, nuclear processes, and high energy particle interactions in space. Results to be discussed include gamma-ray beaming from active galactic nuclei (AGN), gamma-ray emission from pulsars, radioactive elements in the interstellar medium, X-ray emission from clusters of galaxies, and the progress being made to unravel the gamma-ray burst mystery. The recently launched X-ray Timing Explorer (XTE) and prospects for upcoming Astro-E and Advanced X-ray Astronomy Satellite (AXAF) missions are also discussed.

  5. High-frame-rate intensified fast optically shuttered TV cameras with selected imaging applications

    SciTech Connect

    Yates, G.J.; King, N.S.P.

    1994-08-01

    This invited paper focuses on high speed electronic/electro-optic camera development by the Applied Physics Experiments and Imaging Measurements Group (P-15) of Los Alamos National Laboratory`s Physics Division over the last two decades. The evolution of TV and image intensifier sensors and fast readout fast shuttered cameras are discussed. Their use in nuclear, military, and medical imaging applications are presented. Several salient characteristics and anomalies associated with single-pulse and high repetition rate performance of the cameras/sensors are included from earlier studies to emphasize their effects on radiometric accuracy of electronic framing cameras. The Group`s test and evaluation capabilities for characterization of imaging type electro-optic sensors and sensor components including Focal Plane Arrays, gated Image Intensifiers, microchannel plates, and phosphors are discussed. Two new unique facilities, the High Speed Solid State Imager Test Station (HSTS) and the Electron Gun Vacuum Test Chamber (EGTC) arc described. A summary of the Group`s current and developmental camera designs and R&D initiatives are included.

  6. Note: Fast compact laser shutter using a direct current motor and three-dimensional printing

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Grace H. Braverman, Boris; Kawasaki, Akio; Vuletić, Vladan

    2015-12-15

    We present a mechanical laser shutter design that utilizes a direct current electric motor to rotate a blade which blocks and unblocks a light beam. The blade and the main body of the shutter are modeled with computer aided design (CAD) and are produced by 3D printing. Rubber flaps are used to limit the blade’s range of motion, reducing vibrations and preventing undesirable blade oscillations. At its nominal operating voltage, the shutter achieves a switching speed of (1.22 ± 0.02) m/s with 1 ms activation delay and 10 μs jitter in its timing performance. The shutter design is simple, easy to replicate, and highly reliable, showing no failure or degradation in performance over more than 10{sup 8} cycles.

  7. Note: Fast compact laser shutter using a direct current motor and three-dimensional printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Grace H.; Braverman, Boris; Kawasaki, Akio; Vuletić, Vladan

    2015-12-01

    We present a mechanical laser shutter design that utilizes a direct current electric motor to rotate a blade which blocks and unblocks a light beam. The blade and the main body of the shutter are modeled with computer aided design (CAD) and are produced by 3D printing. Rubber flaps are used to limit the blade's range of motion, reducing vibrations and preventing undesirable blade oscillations. At its nominal operating voltage, the shutter achieves a switching speed of (1.22 ± 0.02) m/s with 1 ms activation delay and 10 μs jitter in its timing performance. The shutter design is simple, easy to replicate, and highly reliable, showing no failure or degradation in performance over more than 108 cycles.

  8. High current density cathode for electrorefining in molten electrolyte

    DOEpatents

    Li, Shelly X.

    2010-06-29

    A high current density cathode for electrorefining in a molten electrolyte for the continuous production and collection of loose dendritic or powdery deposits. The high current density cathode eliminates the requirement for mechanical scraping and electrochemical stripping of the deposits from the cathode in an anode/cathode module. The high current density cathode comprises a perforated electrical insulated material coating such that the current density is up to 3 A/cm.sup.2.

  9. Fast-synchronizing high-fidelity spread-spectrum receiver

    DOEpatents

    Moore, Michael Roy; Smith, Stephen Fulton; Emery, Michael Steven

    2004-06-01

    A fast-synchronizing receiver having a circuit including an equalizer configured for manipulating an analog signal; a detector in communication with the equalizer; a filter in communication with the detector; an oscillator in communication with the filter; a gate for receiving the manipulated signal; a circuit portion for synchronizing and tracking the manipulated signal; a summing circuit in communication with the circuit portion; and an output gate.

  10. High-power RF testing of a 352-MHZ fast-ferrite RF cavity tuner at the Advanced Photon Source.

    SciTech Connect

    Horan, D.; Cherbak, E.; Accelerator Systems Division

    2006-01-01

    A 352-MHz fast-ferrite rf cavity tuner, manufactured by Advanced Ferrite Technology, was high-power tested on a single-cell copper rf cavity at the Advanced Photon Source. These tests measured the fast-ferrite tuner performance in terms of power handling capability, tuning bandwidth, tuning speed, stability, and rf losses. The test system comprises a single-cell copper rf cavity fitted with two identical coupling loops, one for input rf power and the other for coupling the fast-ferrite tuner to the cavity fields. The fast-ferrite tuner rf circuit consists of a cavity coupling loop, a 6-1/8-inch EIA coaxial line system with directional couplers, and an adjustable 360{sup o} mechanical phase shifter in series with the fast-ferrite tuner. A bipolar DC bias supply, controlled by a low-level rf cavity tuning loop consisting of an rf phase detector and a PID amplifier, is used to provide a variable bias current to the tuner ferrite material to maintain the test cavity at resonance. Losses in the fast-ferrite tuner are calculated from cooling water calorimetry. Test data will be presented.

  11. High School Dual Enrollment Programs: Are We Fast-Tracking Students Too Fast? NCPR Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Speroni, Cecilia

    2012-01-01

    The current study constitutes the first attempt to use a quasi-experimental method--the regression discontinuity (RD) design--to gauge the causal effect of dual enrollment (DE) on students' academic outcomes. Since dual enrollment can encompass a wide range of experiences, two separate analyses were performed. The first evaluates the impact of…

  12. Flexible and Array Eddy Current Probes for Fast Inspection of Complex Parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchand, B.; Decitre, J. M.; Casula, O.

    2010-02-01

    Eddy Current is a powerful mean of detection of detects located in conductive parts. This technique has already proved great performances and brought solutions to different industrial issues in nuclear or aeronautics domains for instance. Probes used in Non Destructive Testing (NDT) are mainly based on winding coils. This technology has shown good efficiency and gave good results in a lot of applications. Nonetheless, it reveals some limits in some cases, when the part has a complex shape for instance or when the defect is deeply buried. Therefore, other technologies have been developed at CEA LIST. An original scheme, optimized using the NDT platform CIVA, led to the development of a 32-elements flexible probe, based on micro-coils. Experimental testing reveals its efficiency in the detection of small surface defects. In other hand, magnetic sensors are very attractive for NDT. Thanks to their small size, a 22-GMRs arrays probe and a 96-AMRs array probes have been achieved. Their high spatial resolution and efficiency in the detection of small defects are demonstrated. The high sensitivity of magnetic sensors at low frequency has been used to design a flexible probe dedicated to the detection of deep defects. Its design and experimental testing are given.

  13. A High-Speed Adaptively-Biased Current-to-Current Front-End for SSPM Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Bob; Walder, Jean-Pierre; Lippe, Henrik vonder; Moses, William; Janecek, Martin

    Solid-state photomultiplier (SSPM) arrays are an interesting technology for use in PET detector modules due to their low cost, high compactness, insensitivity to magnetic fields, and sub-nanosecond timing resolution. However, the large intrinsic capacitance of SSPM arrays results in RC time constants that can severely degrade the response time, which leads to a trade-off between array size and speed. Instead, we propose a front-end that utilizes an adaptively biased current-to-current converter that minimizes the resistance seen by the SSPM array, thus preserving the timing resolution for both large and small arrays. This enables the use of large SSPM arrays with resistive networks, which creates position information and minimizes the number of outputs for compatibility with general PET multiplexing schemes. By tuning the bias of the feedback amplifier, the chip allows for precise control of the close-loop gain, ensuring stability and fast operation from loads as small as 50pF to loads as large as 1nF. The chip has 16 input channels, and 4 outputs capable of driving 100 n loads. The power consumption is 12mW per channel and 360mW for the entire chip. The chip has been designed and fabricated in an AMS 0.35um high-voltage technology, and demonstrates a fast rise-time response and low noise performances.

  14. Damage testing of critical optical components for high power ultra-fast lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, Enam; Poole, Patrick; Jiang, Sheng; Taylor, Brittany; Daskalova, Rebecca; Van Woerkom, Linn; Freeman, Richard; Smith, Douglas

    2010-11-01

    Mirrors and gratings used in high power ultra fast lasers require a broad bandwidth and high damage fluence, which is essential to the design and construction of petawatt class short pulse lasers. Damage fluence of several commercially available high energy broad band dielectric mirrors with over 100 nm bandwidth at 45 degree angle of incidence, and pulse compression reflection gratings with gold coating with varying processing conditions is studied using a 25 femtosecond ultra-fast laser.

  15. Co-counter asymmetry in fast wave heating and current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Jaeger, E.F.; Carter, M.D.; Berry, L.A.; Batchelor, D.B.; Forest, C.B.; Weitzner, H.

    1997-04-01

    Full wave ICRF coupling models show differences in plasma response when antenna arrays are phase to drive currents and counter to the plasma current. The source of this difference lies in the natural up- sown asymmetry of the antenna`s radiated power spectrum. This asymmetry is due to Hall terms in the wave equation, and occurs even without a poloidal magnetic field. When a poloidal field is included, the up-down asymmetry acquires a toroidal component. The result is that plasma absorption (i.e. antenna loading) is shifted or skewed toward the co-current drive direction, independent of the direction of the magnetic field. When wave are launched to drive current counter the plasma current , electron heating an current profiles are more peaked on axis, and this peaking becomes more pronounce a lower toroidal magnetic fields.

  16. HIGH DYNAMIC-RANGE HIGH SPEED LINAC CURRENT MEASUREMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Deibele, Craig Edmond; Curry, Douglas E; Dickson, Richard W

    2012-01-01

    It is desired to measure the linac current of a charged particle beam with a consistent accuracy over a dynamic range of over 120 dB. Conventional current transformers suffer from droop, can be susceptible to electromagnetic interference (EMI), and can be bandwidth limited. A novel detector and electronics were designed to maximize dynamic range of about 120 dB and measure rise-times on the order of 10 nanoseconds.

  17. Modeling of high-current devices with explosive electron emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anishchenko, S. V.; Gurinovich, A. A.

    2014-01-01

    Based on a detailed analysis of explosive electron emission in high-current electronic devices, we formulate a system of equations that describes the expansion of cathode plasma and the generation of high-current electron beams. The system underlies the numerical algorithm for the hybrid code which enables the simulation of the charged particles’ dynamics in high-current vircators with open resonators. Using the Gabor-Morlet transform, we perform a time-frequency analysis of vircator radiation.

  18. Stable superconducting magnet. [high current levels below critical temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boom, R. W. (Inventor)

    1967-01-01

    Operation of a superconducting magnet is considered. A method is described for; (1) obtaining a relatively high current in a superconducting magnet positioned in a bath of a gas refrigerant; (2) operating a superconducting magnet at a relatively high current level without training; and (3) operating a superconducting magnet containing a plurality of turns of a niobium zirconium wire at a relatively high current level without training.

  19. Closure of the Fast Flux Test Facility: current status and future plans

    SciTech Connect

    Lesperance, C. P.; Doebler, S. V.; Burke, T. M.

    2007-07-01

    The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) was a 400 MWt sodium-cooled fast reactor situated on the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site in the southeastern portion of Washington State. DOE issued the final order to shut down the facility in 2001, when it was concluded that there was no longer a need for FFTF. Deactivation activities are in progress to remove or stabilize major hazards and deactivate systems to achieve end points documented in the project baseline. The reactor has been de-fueled, and approximately 97% of the fuel has been removed from the facility. Approximately 97% of the sodium has been drained from the plant's systems and placed into an on-site Sodium Storage Facility. The residual sodium will be kept frozen under a blanket of inert gas until it is removed later as part of the facility's decontamination and decommissioning (D and D). Plant systems have been shut down and placed in a low-risk state to minimize requirements for surveillance and maintenance. D and D work cannot begin until an Environmental Impact Statement has been prepared to evaluate various end state options and to provide a basis for selecting one of the options. The Environmental Impact Statement is expected to be issued in 2009. (authors)

  20. Fast track anesthesia for liver transplantation: Review of the current practice.

    PubMed

    Aniskevich, Stephen; Pai, Sher-Lu

    2015-09-18

    Historically, patients undergoing liver transplantation were left intubated and extubated in the intensive care unit (ICU) after a period of recovery. Proponents of this practice argued that these patients were critically ill and need time to be properly optimized from a physiological and pain standpoint prior to extubation. Recently, there has been a growing movement toward early extubation in transplant centers worldwide. Initially fueled by research into early extubation following cardiac surgery, extubation in the operating room or soon after arrival to the ICU, has been shown to be safe with proper patient selection. Additionally, as experience at determining appropriate candidates has improved, some institutions have developed systems to allow select patients to bypass the ICU entirely and be admitted to the surgical ward after transplant. We discuss the history of early extubation and the arguments in favor and against fast track anesthesia. We also described our practice of fast track anesthesia at Mayo Clinic Florida, in which, we extubate approximately 60% of our patients in the operating room and send them to the surgical ward after a period of time in the post anesthesia recovery unit. PMID:26380654

  1. CLOSURE OF THE FAST FLUX TEST FACILITY (FFTF) CURRENT STATUS & FUTURE PLANS

    SciTech Connect

    LESPERANCE, C.P.

    2007-05-23

    The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) was a 400 MWt sodium-cooled fast reactor situated on the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site in the southeastern portion of Washington State. DOE issued the final order to shut down the facility in 2001, when it was concluded that there was no longer a need for FFTF. Deactivation activities are in progress to remove or stabilize major hazards and deactivate systems to achieve end points documented in the project baseline. The reactor has been defueled, and approximately 97% of the fuel has been removed from the facility. Approximately 97% of the sodium has been drained from the plant's systems and placed into an on-site Sodium Storage Facility. The residual sodium will be kept frozen under a blanket of inert gas until it is removed later as part of the facility's decontamination and decommissioning (D&D). Plant systems have been shut down and placed in a low-risk state to minimize requirements for surveillance and maintenance. D&D work cannot begin until an Environmental Impact Statement has been prepared to evaluate various end state options and to provide a basis for selecting one of the options. The Environmental Impact Statement is expected to be issued in 2009.

  2. Towards the understanding of PETN initiation by a fast, high power arc source

    SciTech Connect

    Grant, C D; Tang, V; Glascoe, E A; McCarrick, J F

    2010-03-05

    We present a thorough characterization of a capacitor driven arc source that can deliver up to 200 mJ of energy to the arc and high explosive in a well-controlled, repeatable manner on the hundreds of nanoseconds time-scale. Our ultimate purpose is to create a platform to study high explosive kinetics under extreme conditions of high-temperature. In the current paper, we characterize the behavior of our arc source by electrical discharge over a thin PETN film. Temperature and density are determined by time-resolved atomic emission spectroscopy on the nano- to microsecond time scale along with fast photographic imaging to capture time-resolved images of the expanding plasma. We also discuss preliminary simulations of arc plasma using a 1-D hydrodynamic model. Comparisons of these simulations with experimental data are presented. Ultimately our goal is to create a platform that will generate conditions of high temperature in order to study high explosive kinetics. We believe that our arc source platform can be further combined with a time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy (e.g. IR or Raman) to study chemical kinetics under extreme conditions. High temperature conditions may access novel reactive pathways that are different from either shock or slower thermal processes that are substantially lower in temperature.

  3. Very fast motion planning for highly dexterous-articulated robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Challou, Daniel J.; Gini, Maria; Kumar, Vipin

    1994-01-01

    Due to the inherent danger of space exploration, the need for greater use of teleoperated and autonomous robotic systems in space-based applications has long been apparent. Autonomous and semi-autonomous robotic devices have been proposed for carrying out routine functions associated with scientific experiments aboard the shuttle and space station. Finally, research into the use of such devices for planetary exploration continues. To accomplish their assigned tasks, all such autonomous and semi-autonomous devices will require the ability to move themselves through space without hitting themselves or the objects which surround them. In space it is important to execute the necessary motions correctly when they are first attempted because repositioning is expensive in terms of both time and resources (e.g., fuel). Finally, such devices will have to function in a variety of different environments. Given these constraints, a means for fast motion planning to insure the correct movement of robotic devices would be ideal. Unfortunately, motion planning algorithms are rarely used in practice because of their computational complexity. Fast methods have been developed for detecting imminent collisions, but the more general problem of motion planning remains computationally intractable. However, in this paper we show how the use of multicomputers and appropriate parallel algorithms can substantially reduce the time required to synthesize paths for dexterous articulated robots with a large number of joints. We have developed a parallel formulation of the Randomized Path Planner proposed by Barraquand and Latombe. We have shown that our parallel formulation is capable of formulating plans in a few seconds or less on various parallel architectures including: the nCUBE2 multicomputer with up to 1024 processors (nCUBE2 is a registered trademark of the nCUBE corporation), and a network of workstations.

  4. Fast response double series resonant high-voltage DC-DC converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S. S.; Iqbal, S.; Kamarol, M.

    2012-10-01

    In this paper, a novel double series resonant high-voltage dc-dc converter with dual-mode pulse frequency modulation (PFM) control scheme is proposed. The proposed topology consists of two series resonant tanks and hence two resonant currents flow in each switching period. Moreover, it consists of two high-voltage transformer with the leakage inductances are absorbed as resonant inductor in the series resonant tanks. The secondary output of both transformers are rectified and mixed before supplying to load. In the resonant mode operation, the series resonant tanks are energized alternately by controlling two Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistor (IGBT) switches with pulse frequency modulation (PFM). This topology operates in discontinuous conduction mode (DCM) with all IGBT switches operating in zero current switching (ZCS) condition and hence no switching loss occurs. To achieve fast rise in output voltage, a dual-mode PFM control during start-up of the converter is proposed. In this operation, the inverter is started at a high switching frequency and as the output voltage reaches 90% of the target value, the switching frequency is reduced to a value which corresponds to the target output voltage. This can effectively reduce the rise time of the output voltage and prevent overshoot. Experimental results collected from a 100-W laboratory prototype are presented to verify the effectiveness of the proposed system.

  5. Fast-to-Alfvén Mode Conversion Mediated by the Hall Current. I. Cold Plasma Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cally, Paul S.; Khomenko, Elena

    2015-12-01

    The photospheric temperature minimum in the Sun and solar-like stars is very weakly ionized, with an ionization fraction f as low as 10-4. In galactic star-forming regions, f can be 10-10 or lower. Under these circumstances, the Hall current can couple low-frequency Alfvén and magnetoacoustic waves via the dimensionless Hall parameter ɛ =ω /{{{Ω }}}{{i}}f, where ω is the wave frequency and {{{Ω }}}{{i}} is the mean ion gyrofrequency. This is analyzed in the context of a cold (zero-β) plasma and in less detail for a warm plasma. It is found that Hall coupling preferentially occurs where the wavevector is nearly field-aligned. In these circumstances, Hall coupling in theory produces a continual oscillation between fast and Alfvén modes as the wave passes through the weakly ionized region. At low frequencies (mHz), characteristic of solar and stellar normal modes, ɛ is probably too small for more than a fraction of one oscillation to occur. On the other hand, the effect may be significant at the far higher frequencies (Hz) associated with magnetic reconnection events. In another context, characteristic parameters for star-forming gas clouds suggest that {O}(1) or more full oscillations may occur in one cloud crossing. This mechanism is not expected to be effective in sunspots, due to their high ion gyrofrequencies and Alfvén speeds, since the net effect depends inversely on both and therefore inverse quadratically on field strength.

  6. Investigation of high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HIPIMS) discharge using fast ICCD camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hecimovic, Ante

    2012-10-01

    High power impulse magnetron sputtering (HIPIMS) combines impulse glow discharges at power levels up to the MW range with conventional magnetron cathodes to achieve a highly ionised sputtered flux. The dynamics of the HIPIMS discharge was investigated using fast Intensified Charge Coupled Device (ICCD) camera. In the first experiment the HIPIMS plasma was recorded from the side with goal to analyse the plasma intensity using Abel inversion to obtain the emissivity maps of the plasma species. Resulting emissivity maps provide the information on the spatial distribution of Ar and sputtered material and evolution of the plasma chemistry above the cathode. In the second experiment the plasma emission was recorded with camera facing the target. The images show that the HIPIMS plasma develops drift wave type instabilities characterized by well defined regions of high and low plasma emissivity along the racetrack of the magnetron. The instabilities cause periodic shifts in the floating potential. The structures rotate in ExB direction at velocities of 10 kms-1 and frequencies up to 200 kHz. The high emissivity regions comprise Ar and metal ion emission with strong Ar and metal neutral emission depletion. A detailed analysis of the temporal evolution of the saturated instabilities using four consequently triggered fast ICCD cameras is presented. Furthermore working gas pressure and discharge current variation showed that the shape and the speed of the instability strongly depend on the working gas and target material combination. In order to better understand the mechanism of the instability, different optical interference band pass filters (of metal and gas atom, and ion lines) were used to observe the spatial distribution of each species within the instability.

  7. Multipulse current source offers low power losses and high reliability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1967-01-01

    Pulse current source uses low loss, high reliability, LC circuits to provide the necessary high impedance for magnetic memory cores, frequently used in digital computational equipment. Square-loop reactors replace the semiconductor switches previously used.

  8. High gain, Fast Scan, Broad Spectrum Parallel Beam Wavelength Dispersive X-ray Spectrometer for SEM

    SciTech Connect

    OHara, David

    2009-05-08

    During contract # DE-FG02-ER83545, Parallax Research, Inc. developed a High gain, Fast Scan Broad Spectrum Parallel beam Wavelength Dispersive X-ray Spectrometer for use on Scanning Electron Microscopes (SEM). This new spectrometer allows very fast high resolution elemental analysis of samples in an electron microscope. By comparison to previous WDS spectrometers, it can change from one energy position to another very quickly and has an extended range compared to some similar products.

  9. Measurement of helicon wave coupling for current drive and anticipated role for high beta KSTAR plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, S. J.; Kim, H. J.; Joung, M.; Jeong, J. H.; Kim, J. H.; Bae, Y. S.; Kwak, J. G.; Wi, H. H.; Kim, H.-S.

    2015-11-01

    Helicon wave current drive has been suggested for efficient off-axis current drive in high electron beta tokamak plasmas. Fast wave drives centrally peaking current in the frequency range up to several ion cyclotron harmonics in the present tokamaks, such as KSTAR. Increasing fast wave frequency up to LH resonance frequency at the plasma edge, the spiral propagation of wave at the outer region of plasma lengthens the wave path to the plasma center. Also, optical thickness increases with frequency. It is expected that these effects produce efficient off-axis power deposition depending on the electron beta and magnetic field pitch. A low power TWA for helicon wave was installed and tested in KSTAR tokamak which is aiming for the steady-state high beta plasma requiring off-axis current drive. The power coupling properties of TWA at various plasma conditions will be presented. In addition to the coupling efficiency, issues such as load sensitivity and unwanted slow wave coupling will be addressed. Also, the simulation of plasma performance with the combination of helicon wave current drive and other conventional heating and current drive power in KSTAR will be discussed. This work was supported by the Korean Ministry of Science, ICT and Future Planning and by R&D Program through the National Fusion Research Institute of Korea (NFRI) funded by the Government funds.

  10. Effects of high frequency current in welding aluminum alloy 6061

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fish, R. E.

    1968-01-01

    Uncontrolled high frequency current causes cracking in the heat-affected zone of aluminum alloy 6061 weldments during tungsten inert gas ac welding. Cracking developed when an improperly adjusted superimposed high frequency current was agitating the semimolten metal in the areas of grain boundary.