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Sample records for fast light particles

  1. Fast Light-Sheet Scanner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, William W., Jr.; Humphreys, William M., Jr.; Bartram, Scott M.

    1995-01-01

    Optomechanical apparatus maintains sheet of pulsed laser light perpendicular to reference axis while causing sheet of light to translate in oscillatory fashion along reference axis. Produces illumination for laser velocimeter in which submicrometer particles entrained in flow illuminated and imaged in parallel planes displaced from each other in rapid succession. Selected frequency of oscillation range upward from tens of hertz. Rotating window continuously shifts sheet of light laterally while maintaining sheet parallel to same plane.

  2. Silicon Timing Response to Particles and Light

    SciTech Connect

    Ronzhin, Anatoly; Spiropulu, Maria

    2015-01-01

    It is observed growing interest to fast timing detectors in high energy physics, related, for example, with collider luminosity increase (LHC) [1]. The options of CMS [2] calorimeter upgrade based on silicon detectors renewed interest to the timing study of this type of detectors. The article is devoted to study of silicon timing response to particles and light.

  3. REVIEW ARTICLE: Fast light in atomic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akulshin, Alexander M.; McLean, Russell J.

    2010-10-01

    Atomic media have played a major role in studies of fast light. One of their attractive features is the ability to manipulate experimental parameters to control the dispersive properties that determine the group velocity of a propagating light pulse. We give an overview of the experimental methods, based on both linear and nonlinear atom-light interaction, that have produced superluminal propagation in atomic media, and discuss some of the significant theoretical contributions to the issues of pulse preservation and reconciling faster-than-light propagation and the principle of causality. The comparison of storage of light, enhanced Kerr nonlinearity and efficient wave mixing processes in slow and fast light atomic media illustrates their common and distinct features.

  4. Slow and fast light switching in ruby

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajan, Rajitha P.; Riesen, Hans

    2015-05-01

    Studies about light propagation have been undertaken for more than a century. It is now well established that any material that has normal or anomalous dispersion generates slow or fast light. In this paper, we demonstrate an experimental technique to rapidly switch between slow and fast light in ruby. The experiment utilizes transient holeburning to create drastic variation in refractive index of ruby to produce slow as well as fast light. Transient hole-burning involves the depletion of the ground state leading to a highly populated excited state by single frequency laser excitation. This leads to a hole in the absorption spectrum when readout by a laser. We observed a delay of 29 ns and advancement of -11 ns in an external magnetic field of B║c = 12 mT corresponding to a group velocity of c/961 and negative group velocity of -c/365 respectively.

  5. Particle Filtration for Ultra Fast Laser Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakschik, S.; Kesslau, D.

    Ultra fast laser processing is marketed for processes which require small thermal impact to the product. The process has its advantages in processing speed and quality. Recent applications have been in photo-voltaic processing, surface treatment or preparation of electrodes for lithium ion batteries. As soon as the fast laser is utilized for ablation, particles are generated. Driven by product quality, tool conservation and governmental restrictions a well-defined air filter is necessary for laser processes. The layout and design of such a filter system is not strait forward. First of all acquisition plays a major role on the overall quality of the system. In addition the filter itself needs to be well defined in terms of deposition rate and endurance. The latter is determined by the generated particles. We present an investigation of particles as generated by ultra fast laser processing of silicon, inox and ceramics. Our investigation proves thermal impact on generated particles by the ultra-fast laser. The particle spectrum is clearly determined by sub micrometer particles, making nano-filtration a necessary step. Based on this investigation an extraction and filter solution was designed and successfully demonstrated on silicon, inox and ceramic process. A filter quality according to governmental regulation is achieved, based on an extraction which delivers best product quality.

  6. Fast Particle Pair Detection Algorithms for Particle Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwai, T.; Hong, C.-W.; Greil, P.

    New algorithms with O(N) complexity have been developed for fast particle-pair detections in particle simulations like the discrete element method (DEM) and molecular dynamic (MD). They exhibit robustness against broad particle size distributions when compared with conventional boxing methods. Almost similar calculation speeds are achieved at particle size distributions from is mono-size to 1:10 while the linked-cell method results in calculations more than 20 times. The basic algorithm, level-boxing, uses the variable search range according to each particle. The advanced method, multi-level boxing, employs multiple cell layers to reduce the particle size discrepancy. Another method, indexed-level boxing, reduces the size of cell arrays by introducing the hash procedure to access the cell array, and is effective for sparse particle systems with a large number of particles.

  7. Slow and fast light in semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedgwick, Forrest Grant

    Slow and fast light are the propagation of optical signals at group velocities below and above the speed of light in a given medium. There has been great interest in the use of nonlinear optics to engineer slow and fast light dispersion for applications in optical communications and radio-frequency or microwave photonics. Early results in this field were primarily confined to dilute atomic systems. While these results were impressive, they had two major barriers to practical application. First, the wavelengths were not compatible with fiber optic telecommunications. More importantly, the bandwidth obtainable in these experiments was inherently low; 100 kHz or less. Within the last five years slow and fast light effects have been observed and engineered in a much wider variety of systems. In this work, we detail our efforts to realize slow and fast light in semiconductor systems. There are three primary advantages of semiconductor systems: fiber-compatible wavelengths, larger bandwidth, and simplification of integration with other optical components. In this work we will explore three different types of physical mechanisms for implementing slow and fast light. The first is electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT). In transporting this process to semiconductors, we initially turn our attention to quantum dots or "artificial atoms". We present simulations of a quantum dot EIT-based device within the context of an optical communications link and we derive results which are generally applicable to a broad class of slow light devices. We then present experimental results realizing EIT in quantum wells by using long-lived electron spin coherence. The second mechanism we will explore is coherent population oscillations (CPO), also known as carrier density pulsations (CDP). We examine for the first time how both slow and fast light may be achieved in a quantum well semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) while operating in the gain regime. Again, we simulate the device

  8. Light Scattering by Nonspherical Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mishchenko, Michael I.; Travis, Larry D.; Hovenier, Joop W.

    1998-01-01

    Improved understanding of electromagnetic scattering by nonspherical particles is important to many science and engineering disciplines and was the subject of the Conference on Light Scattering by Nonspherical Particles: Theory, Measurements, and Applications. The conference was held 29 September-1 October 1998 at the Goddard Institute for Space Studies in New York City and brought together 115 participants from 18 countries. The main objective of the conference was to highlight and summarize the rapid advancements in the field, including numerical methods for computing the single and multiple scattering of electromagnetic radiation by nonspherical and heterogeneous particles, measurement approaches, knowledge of characteristic features in scattering patterns, retrieval and remote sensing techniques, nonspherical particle sizing, and various practical applications. The conference consisted of twelve oral and one poster sessions. The presentations were loosely grouped based on broad topical categories. In each of these categories invited review talks highlighted and summarized specific active areas of research. To ensure a high-quality conference, all abstracts submitted had been reviewed by members of the Scientific Organizing Committee for technical merit and content. The conference program was published in the June 1998 issue of the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society and is available on the World Wide Web at http://www.giss.nasa.gov/-crmim/conference/program.html. Authors of accepted papers and review presentations contributed to a volume of preprints published by the American Meteorological Society' and distributed to participants at the conference.

  9. Metallic nano-particles for trapping light

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    We study metallic nano-particles for light trapping by investigating the optical absorption efficiency of the hydrogenated amorphous silicon thin film with and without metallic nano-particles on its top. The size and shape of these nano-particles are investigated as to their roles of light trapping: scattering light to the absorption medium and converting light to surface plasmons. The optical absorption enhancement in the red light region (e.g., 650nm) due to the light trapping of the metallic nano-particles is observed when a layer of metallic nano-particle array has certain structures. The investigation of the light with incident angles shows the importance of the coupling efficiency of light to surface plasmons in the metallic nano-particle light trapping. PACS 73.20.Mf, 42.25.s, 88.40.hj PMID:23391493

  10. Fast multipole methods for particle dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Kurzak, J.; Pettitt, B. M.

    2008-01-01

    The growth of simulations of particle systems has been aided by advances in computer speed and algorithms. The adoption of O(N) algorithms to solve N-body simulation problems has been less rapid due to the fact that such scaling was only competitive for relatively large N. Our work seeks to find algorithmic modifications and practical implementations for intermediate values of N in typical use for molecular simulations. This article reviews fast multipole techniques for calculation of electrostatic interactions in molecular systems. The basic mathematics behind fast summations applied to long ranged forces is presented along with advanced techniques for accelerating the solution, including our most recent developments. The computational efficiency of the new methods facilitates both simulations of large systems as well as longer and therefore more realistic simulations of smaller systems. PMID:19194526

  11. Fast optical switch having reduced light loss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Bruce N. (Inventor); Cooper, Ronald F. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    An electrically controlled optical switch uses an electro-optic crystal of the type having at least one set of fast and slow optical axes. The crystal exhibits electric field induced birefringence such that a plane of polarization oriented along a first direction of a light beam passing through the crystal may be switched to a plane of polarization oriented along a second direction. A beam splitting polarizer means is disposed at one end of the crystal and directs a light beam passing through the crystal whose plane of polarization is oriented along the first direction differently from a light beam having a plane of polarization oriented along the second direction. The electro-optic crystal may be chosen from the crystal classes 43m, 42m, and 23. In a preferred embodiment, the electro-optic crystal is a bismuth germanium oxide crystal or a bismuth silicon oxide crystal. In another embodiment of the invention, polarization control optics are provided which transmit substantially all of the incident light to the electro-optic crystal, substantially reducing the insertion loss of the switch.

  12. Any Light Particle Search (ALPS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spector, Aaron; Any Light Particle Search (ALPS) Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    High power laser fields enabled by technologies developed for ground-based gravitational-wave observatories open up new opportunities for fundamental physics studies. One of these options is the search for axions and axion-like particles in a pure laboratory experiment. The axion is a solution to the strong CP-problem and a potential dark matter candidate. The axion has also been proposed as an additional channel to cool stars as well as a potential explanation for the TeV transparency problem. The German-US ALPS collaboration is setting up a light-shining-through-walls (LSW) experiment at DESY. LSW experiments are based on the simple idea that a high power laser field traversing a static magnetic field will transform partly into a relativistic axion field. This axion field will travel through an opaque wall into a second static magnetic field region where it turns partly back into an electromagnetic wave field with the same frequency as the laser. The ALPS collaboration is working towards a large scale LSW experiment at DESY in Hamburg, Germany. I will report on the status of the ALPS experiment. This work is supported by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft, PRISMA, the Helmholtz Association, the National Science Foundation and the Heising-Simons Foundation.

  13. Fast Multipole Methods for Particle Dynamics.

    SciTech Connect

    Kurzak, Jakub; Pettitt, Bernard M.

    2006-08-30

    The research described in this product was performed in part in the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The growth of simulations of particle systems has been aided by advances in computer speed and algorithms. The adoption of O(N) algorithms to solve N-body simulation problems has been less rapid due to the fact that such scaling was only competitive for relatively large N. Our work seeks to find algorithmic modifications and practical implementations for intermediate values of N in typical use for molecular simulations. This article reviews fast multipole techniques for calculation of electrostatic interactions in molecular systems. The basic mathematics behind fast summations applied to long ranged forces is presented along with advanced techniques for accelerating the solution, including our most recent developments. The computational efficiency of the new methods facilitates both simulations of large systems as well as longer and therefore more realistic simulations of smaller systems.

  14. Polarization of fast particle beams by collisional pumping

    DOEpatents

    Stearns, J. Warren; Kaplan, Selig N.; Pyle, Robert V.; Anderson, L. Wilmer; Ruby, Lawrence; Schlachter, Alfred S.

    1988-01-01

    Method and apparatus for highly polarizing a fast beam of particles by collisional pumping, including generating a fast beam of particles, and also generating a thick electron-spin-polarized medium positioned as a target for the beam. The target is made sufficiently thick to allow the beam to interact with the medium to produce collisional pumping whereby the beam becomes highly polarized.

  15. Light scattering by nonspherical particles: some practical aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farafonov, Victor G.; Il'in, Vladimir; Voshchinnikov, Nikolai V.; Prokopjeva, M. S.

    2005-03-01

    Real scatterers are known to usually have complex shape and some structure. Therefore, to perform light scattering simulations, one should specify their models and select proper computational methods. To help in solution of these problems, we have created an internet cite DOP (Database of Optical Properties of non-spherical particles). The currnet content of the DOP (optical constants, reviews and bibliographies, codes, etc.) is briefly described. A special attention is paid to recently developed fast methods and codes to treat light scattering by non-spherical inhomogeneous particles using the layered models. First results of application of these tools to comparable study of the optical properties of layered particles and particles with inclusions are presented.

  16. Polarization of fast particle beams by collisional pumping

    DOEpatents

    Stearns, J.W.; Kaplan, S.N.; Pyle, R.V.; Anderson, L.W.; Schlachter, A.S.; Ruby, L.

    1984-10-19

    The invention relates to method and apparatus for polarizing a fast beam of particles by collisional pumping, including generating a fast beam of particles, and generating a thick electron-spin-polarized medium positioned as a target for said beam, said medium being sufficiently thick to allow said beam to interact with said medium to produce collisional pumping whereby said particle beam becomes highly polarized.

  17. Light as a Fundamental Particle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinberg, Steven

    1975-01-01

    Presents two arguments concerning the role of the photon. One states that the photon is just another particle distinguished by a particular value of charge, spin, mass, lifetime, and interaction properties. The second states that the photon plays a fundamental role with a deep relation to ultimate formulas of physics. (GS)

  18. Phase measurement of fast light pulse in electromagnetically induced absorption.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yoon-Seok; Lee, Hee Jung; Moon, Han Seb

    2013-09-23

    We report the phase measurement of a fast light pulse in electromagnetically induced absorption (EIA) of the 5S₁/₂ (F = 2)-5P₃/₂ (F' = 3) transition of ⁸⁷Rb atoms. Using a beat-note interferometer method, a stable measurement without phase dithering of the phase of the probe pulse before and after it has passed through the EIA medium was achieved. Comparing the phases of the light pulse in air and that of the fast light pulse though the EIA medium, the phase of the fast light pulse at EIA resonance was not shifted and maintained to be the same as that of the free-space light pulse. The classical fidelity of the fast light pulse according to the advancement of the group velocity by adjusting the atomic density was estimated to be more than 97%. PMID:24104135

  19. Fast Particle Methods for Multiscale Phenomena Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koumoutsakos, P.; Wray, A.; Shariff, K.; Pohorille, Andrew

    2000-01-01

    We are developing particle methods oriented at improving computational modeling capabilities of multiscale physical phenomena in : (i) high Reynolds number unsteady vortical flows, (ii) particle laden and interfacial flows, (iii)molecular dynamics studies of nanoscale droplets and studies of the structure, functions, and evolution of the earliest living cell. The unifying computational approach involves particle methods implemented in parallel computer architectures. The inherent adaptivity, robustness and efficiency of particle methods makes them a multidisciplinary computational tool capable of bridging the gap of micro-scale and continuum flow simulations. Using efficient tree data structures, multipole expansion algorithms, and improved particle-grid interpolation, particle methods allow for simulations using millions of computational elements, making possible the resolution of a wide range of length and time scales of these important physical phenomena.The current challenges in these simulations are in : [i] the proper formulation of particle methods in the molecular and continuous level for the discretization of the governing equations [ii] the resolution of the wide range of time and length scales governing the phenomena under investigation. [iii] the minimization of numerical artifacts that may interfere with the physics of the systems under consideration. [iv] the parallelization of processes such as tree traversal and grid-particle interpolations We are conducting simulations using vortex methods, molecular dynamics and smooth particle hydrodynamics, exploiting their unifying concepts such as : the solution of the N-body problem in parallel computers, highly accurate particle-particle and grid-particle interpolations, parallel FFT's and the formulation of processes such as diffusion in the context of particle methods. This approach enables us to transcend among seemingly unrelated areas of research.

  20. Nuclear diagnostic for fast alpha particles

    DOEpatents

    Grisham, L.R.; Post, D.E. Jr.; Dawson, J.M.

    1983-11-23

    This invention relates generally to high energy confined plasmas and more particularly is directed to measuring the velocity distribution of confined energetic alpha particles resulting from deuterium-tritium fusion reactions in a confined energetic plasma.

  1. Diffraction of entangled particles by light gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sancho, Pedro

    2015-04-01

    We analyze the diffraction regime of the Kapitza-Dirac effect for particles entangled in momentum. The detection patterns show two-particle interferences. In the single-mode case we identify a discontinuity in the set of joint detection probabilities, associated with the disconnected character of the space of non-separable states. For Gaussian multi-mode states we derive the diffraction patterns, providing an example of the dependence of the light-matter interaction on entanglement. When the particles are identical, we can explore the relation between exchange and entanglement effects. We find a complementary behavior between overlapping and Schmidt's number. In particular, symmetric entanglement can cancel the exchange effects.

  2. Particles That Travel Faster than Light?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newton, Roger G.

    1970-01-01

    A discussion of the possible existence of tachyons, particles that travel faster than light, and their theoretical properties. Suggests that if tachyons were found, the consequences for relativity theory, quantum mechanics and the concept of casuality would be far-reaching. Concludes that the final answer rests with the experimentalist.…

  3. Fast particle loss channels in Wendelstein 7-X

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faustin, J. M.; Cooper, W. A.; Graves, J. P.; Pfefferlé, D.; Geiger, J.

    2016-09-01

    One of the main goals of Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X) is to demonstrate the fast particle confinement properties of the quasi-isodynamic stellarator concept. Fast particle populations will be produced either by Neutral Beam Injection (NBI) or by minority Ion Cyclotron Resonant Heating (ICRH). A fraction of these particles are expected to be lost (even without collisions), despite the optimisation procedure used for the W7-X design. Confinement properties of NBI particles in W7-X were presented in the paper of Drevlak et al (2014 Nucl. Fusion 54 073002). A detailed study is presented here where the loss patterns of an NBI population are described. In particular, focussing on a high-mirror equilibrium, the confinement of fast ions with varying energy injection is studied under collisional conditions. It is found that collisions are not only responsible for classical transport losses but also enhance drift induced losses caused by trapped particles. Moreover, an asymmetry is found in the toroidal position of particle losses which can be explained by local variation in the equilibrium field. The effects of a neoclassically resolved radial electric field are also investigated. Fast particle confinement is significantly improved by the associated \\boldsymbol{E}× \\boldsymbol{B} drift. In particular, an increasing radial electric field helps to reduce and even stop the losses due to the 3D equilibrium structure for times comparable to slowing down time.

  4. Nuclear diagnostic for fast alpha particles

    DOEpatents

    Grisham, Larry R.; Post Jr., Douglass E.; Dawson, John M.

    1986-06-03

    Measurement of the velocity distribution of confined energetic alpha particles resulting from deuterium-tritium fusion reactions in a magnetically contained plasma is provided. The fusion plasma is seeded with energetic boron neutrals for producing, by means of the reaction .sup.10 B (.alpha.,n) .sup.13 N reaction, radioactive nitrogen nuclei which are then collected by a probe. The radioactivity of the probe is then measured by conventional techniques in determining the energy distribution of the alpha particles in the plasma. In a preferred embodiment, diborane gas (B.sub.2 H.sub.6) is the source of the boron neutrals to produce .sup.13 N which decays almost exclusively by positron emission with a convenient half-life of 10 minutes.

  5. Nuclear diagnostic for fast alpha particles

    DOEpatents

    Grisham, Larry R.; Post, Jr., Douglass E.; Dawson, John M.

    1986-01-01

    Measurement of the velocity distribution of confined energetic alpha particles resulting from deuterium-tritium fusion reactions in a magnetically contained plasma is provided. The fusion plasma is seeded with energetic boron neutrals for producing, by means of the reaction .sup.10 B (.alpha.,n) .sup.13 N reaction, radioactive nitrogen nuclei which are then collected by a probe. The radioactivity of the probe is then measured by conventional techniques in determining the energy distribution of the alpha particles in the plasma. In a preferred embodiment, diborane gas (B.sub.2 H.sub.6) is the source of the boron neutrals to produce .sup.13 N which decays almost exclusively by positron emission with a convenient half-life of 10 minutes.

  6. Fast and accurate propagation of coherent light

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, R. D.; Beylkin, G.; Monzón, L.

    2013-01-01

    We describe a fast algorithm to propagate, for any user-specified accuracy, a time-harmonic electromagnetic field between two parallel planes separated by a linear, isotropic and homogeneous medium. The analytical formulation of this problem (ca 1897) requires the evaluation of the so-called Rayleigh–Sommerfeld integral. If the distance between the planes is small, this integral can be accurately evaluated in the Fourier domain; if the distance is very large, it can be accurately approximated by asymptotic methods. In the large intermediate region of practical interest, where the oscillatory Rayleigh–Sommerfeld kernel must be applied directly, current numerical methods can be highly inaccurate without indicating this fact to the user. In our approach, for any user-specified accuracy ϵ>0, we approximate the kernel by a short sum of Gaussians with complex-valued exponents, and then efficiently apply the result to the input data using the unequally spaced fast Fourier transform. The resulting algorithm has computational complexity , where we evaluate the solution on an N×N grid of output points given an M×M grid of input samples. Our algorithm maintains its accuracy throughout the computational domain. PMID:24204184

  7. Modeling light scattering from diesel soot particles

    SciTech Connect

    Hull, Patricia; Shepherd, Ian; Hunt, Arlon

    2002-07-16

    The Mie model is widely used to analyze light scattering from particulate aerosols. The Diesel Particle Scatterometer (DPS), for example, determines the size and optical properties of diesel exhaust particles that are characterized by measuring three angle-dependent elements of the Mueller scattering matrix. These elements are then fitted using Mie calculations with a Levenburg-Marquardt optimization program. This approach has achieved good fits for most experimental data. However, in many cases, the predicted real and imaginary parts of the index of refraction were less than that for solid carbon. To understand this result and explain the experimental data, we present an assessment of the Mie model by use of a light scattering model based on the coupled dipole approximation. The results indicate that the Mie calculation can be used to determine the largest dimension of irregularly shaped particles at sizes characteristic of Diesel soot and, for particles of known refractive index, tables can be constructed to determine the average porosity of the particles from the predicted index of refraction.

  8. Light scattering by randomly oriented spheroidal particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asano, S.; Sato, M.

    1980-01-01

    A study of the light scattering properties of randomly oriented, identical spheroidal particles is presented. A computation method was developed to integrate the Asano and Yamomoto solution (1975) for scattering from a homogeneous spheroid over all particle orientations; the extinction and scattering cross-sections, the asymmetry factor, and scattering matrix elements are calculated for randomly oriented prolate and oblate spheroids and compared with the calculations for spheres and laboratory measurements. The angular scattering behavior of spheroids is found to be different from that of the spheres for side scattering to backscattering directions, and prolate and oblate spheroids of the same shape parameter have similar angular scattering patterns.

  9. Energy-loss rate of a fast particle in graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Ang, Yee Sin; Zhang, C.; Kee, Chun Yun

    2011-08-01

    The energy-loss rate of a fast particle in graphene is studied. The energy-loss rate always increases with increasing incident particle energy, which is quite unusual when compared to electron gas in normal metal. Graphene exhibits a ''discriminating'' behavior where there exists a low energy cut-off below which the scattering process is strictly forbidden, leading to lossless traverse of an external particle in graphene. This low energy cutoff is of the order of nearest neighbor hopping bandwidth. Our results suggest that backscattering is also absent in the external particle scattering of graphene.

  10. Optical imaging of fast light-evoked fast neural activation in amphibian retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Xin-Cheng; George, John S.

    2006-02-01

    High performance functional imaging is needed for dynamic measurements of neural processing in retina. Emerging techniques of visual prosthesis also require advanced methodology for reliable validation of electromagnetic stimulation of the retina. Imaging of fast intrinsic optical responses associated with neural activation promises a variety of technical advantages over traditional single and multi-channel electrophysiological techniques for these purposes, but the application of fast optical signals for neural imaging has been limited by low signal to noise ratio and high background light intensity. However, using optimized near infrared probe light and improved optical systems, we have improved the optical signals substantially, allowing single pass measurements. Fast photodiode measurements typically disclose dynamic transmitted light changes of whole retina at the level of 10 -4 dI/I, where dI is the dynamic optical change and I is the baseline light intensity. Using a fast high performance CCD, we imaged fast intrinsic optical responses from isolated retina activated by a visible light flash. Fast, high resolution imaging disclosed larger local optical responses, and showed evidence of multiple response components with both negative- and positive-going signals, on different timescales. Darkfield imaging techniques further enhanced the sensitivity of optical measurements. At single cell resolution, brightfield imaging disclosed maxima of optical responses ~5% dI/I, while darkfield imaging showed maxima of optical responses exceeding 10% dI/I. In comparison with simultaneous electrophysiological recording, optical imaging provided much better localized patterns of response over the activated area of the retina.

  11. Fast Solar Polarimeter: First Light Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnappa, N.; Feller, A.; Iglesia, F. A.; Solanki, S.

    2013-12-01

    Accurate measurements of magnetic fields on the Sun are crucial to understand various physical processes that take place in the solar atmosphere such as solar eruptions, coronal heating, solar wind acceleration, etc. The Fast Solar Polarimeter (FSP) is a new instrument that is being developed to probe magnetic fields on the Sun. One of the main goals of this polarimeter is to carry out high precision spectropolarimetric observations with spatial resolution close to the telescope diffraction limit. The polarimeter is based on pnCCD technology with split frame transfer and simultaneous multi-channel readout, resulting in frame rate upto 1 kHz. The FSP prototype instrument uses a small format pnCCD of 264x264 pixels which has been developed by PNSensor and by the semiconductor lab of the Max Planck Society. The polarization modulator is based on two ferro-electric liquid crystals (FLCs) interlaced between two static retarders. The first solar observations have been carried out with this prototype during May-June, 2013 at German Vacuum Tower Telescope (VTT) on Tenerife, Canary Islands, Spain. Here we present the instrument performance assessments and the first results on the magnetic field measurements. Further, we briefly discuss about the next phase of FSP which will be a dual beam system with 1k x 1k CCDs.

  12. Lagrangian statistics of light particles in turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercado, Julián Martínez; Prakash, Vivek N.; Tagawa, Yoshiyuki; Sun, Chao; Lohse, Detlef; (International CollaborationTurbulence Research)

    2012-05-01

    We study the Lagrangian velocity and acceleration statistics of light particles (micro-bubbles in water) in homogeneous isotropic turbulence. Micro-bubbles with a diameter db = 340 μm and Stokes number from 0.02 to 0.09 are dispersed in a turbulent water tunnel operated at Taylor-Reynolds numbers (Reλ) ranging from 160 to 265. We reconstruct the bubble trajectories by employing three-dimensional particle tracking velocimetry. It is found that the probability density functions (PDFs) of the micro-bubble acceleration show a highly non-Gaussian behavior with flatness values in the range 23 to 30. The acceleration flatness values show an increasing trend with Reλ, consistent with previous experiments [G. Voth, A. La Porta, A. M. Crawford, J. Alexander, and E. Bodenschatz, "Measurement of particle accelerations in fully developed turbulence," J. Fluid Mech. 469, 121 (2002)], 10.1017/S0022112002001842 and numerics [T. Ishihara, Y. Kaneda, M. Yokokawa, K. Itakura, and A. Uno, "Small-scale statistics in highresolution direct numerical simulation of turbulence: Reynolds number dependence of one-point velocity gradient statistics," J. Fluid Mech. 592, 335 (2007)], 10.1017/S0022112007008531. These acceleration PDFs show a higher intermittency compared to tracers [S. Ayyalasomayajula, Z. Warhaft, and L. R. Collins, "Modeling inertial particle acceleration statistics in isotropic turbulence," Phys. Fluids. 20, 095104 (2008)], 10.1063/1.2976174 and heavy particles [S. Ayyalasomayajula, A. Gylfason, L. R. Collins, E. Bodenschatz, and Z. Warhaft, "Lagrangian measurements of inertial particle accelerations in grid generated wind tunnel turbulence," Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 144507 (2006)], 10.1103/PhysRevLett.97.144507 in wind tunnel experiments. In addition, the micro-bubble acceleration autocorrelation function decorrelates slower with increasing Reλ. We also compare our results with experiments in von Kármán flows and point-particle direct numerical simulations with periodic

  13. Storage and retrieval of light pulses in atomic media with 'slow' and 'fast' light

    SciTech Connect

    Lezama, A.; Akulshin, A. M.; Sidorov, A. I.; Hannaford, P.

    2006-03-15

    We report experimental evidence that light storage, understood as the controlled release of a light pulse by an atomic sample dependent on the past presence of a writing pulse, is not restricted to small-group-velocity media but can also occur in a negative-group-velocity medium. We present a numerical modeling in close agreement with our observations and a simple physical picture applicable to light storage experiments in both 'slow' and 'fast' light media.

  14. A photodiode-based neutral particle bolometer for characterizing charge-exchanged fast-ion behavior.

    PubMed

    Clary, R; Smirnov, A; Dettrick, S; Knapp, K; Korepanov, S; Ruskov, E; Heidbrink, W W; Zhu, Y

    2012-10-01

    A neutral particle bolometer (NPB) has been designed and implemented on Tri Alpha Energy's C-2 device in order to spatially and temporally resolve the charge-exchange losses of fast-ion populations originating from neutral beam injection into field-reversed configuration plasmas. This instrument employs a silicon photodiode as the detection device with an integrated tungsten filter coating to reduce sensitivity to light radiation. Here we discuss the technical aspects and calibration of the NPB, and report typical NPB measurement results of wall recycling effects on fast-ion losses. PMID:23126887

  15. Relativistic laser nano-plasmonics for effective fast particle production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, A.; Platonov, K.; Braenzel, J.; Lübcke, A.; Das, S.; Messaoudi, H.; Grunwald, R.; Gray, C.; McGlynn, E.; Schnürer, M.

    2016-01-01

    We have studied particle acceleration in different nanostructured targets irradiated by high intensity laser pulses of high contrast. We find that the maximum energy of emitted particles and their directionality is significantly enhanced in the case of nanostructured targets with respect to plane targets. We have studied theoretically in detail the generation and propagation of fast electrons in nanowire targets. Such targets exhibit an extraordinary high conversion efficiency of laser energy into electron kinetic energy. We observe guiding of electron bunches along the wires. Results from theory and simulation compare reasonably well with the experimental data.

  16. The polarization of light scattered by small particles: A personal review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hovenier, J. W.

    2012-12-01

    A personal review of the author's field of research is presented at the occasion of his receipt of the first Van de Hulst Light-Scattering Award. Special attention is given to the relation between the author's work and the contributions of Professor H.C. van de Hulst to the field of light scattering by small particles. History, people and research are intertwined in this paper. The polarization of light scattered by particles is brought into focus. First, the interpretation of the polarization of Venus in terms of properties of its cloud particles is recorded, followed by a discussion of symmetry principles and their interrelationships. The structure of a variety of Mueller matrices is exposed. Experimental work on light scattering is also considered. Finally, the fast growth of knowledge over the past few decades pertaining to light scattering by non-spherical particles is indicated.

  17. Outdoor ultrafine particle concentrations in front of fast food restaurants.

    PubMed

    Vert, Cristina; Meliefste, Kees; Hoek, Gerard

    2016-01-01

    Ultrafine particles (UFPs) have been associated with negative effects on human health. Emissions from motor vehicles are the principal source of UFPs in urban air. A study in Vancouver suggested that UFP concentrations were related to density of fast food restaurants near the monitoring sites. A previous monitoring campaign could not separate the contribution of restaurants from road traffic. The main goal of this study has been the quantification of fast food restaurants' contribution to outdoor UFP concentrations. A portable particle number counter (DiscMini) has been used to carry out mobile monitoring in a largely pedestrianized area in the city center of Utrecht. A fixed route passing 17 fast food restaurants was followed on 8 days. UFP concentrations in front of the restaurants were 1.61 times higher than in a nearby square without any local sources used as control area and 1.22 times higher compared with all measurements conducted in between the restaurants. Adjustment for other sources such as passing mopeds, smokers or candles did not explain the increase. In conclusion, fast food restaurants result in significant increases in outdoor UFP concentrations in front of the restaurant. PMID:26531805

  18. Fast and slow light in zigzag microring resonator chains.

    PubMed

    Chamorro-Posada, P; Fraile-Pelaez, F J

    2009-03-01

    We analyze fast- and slow-light transmission in a zigzag microring resonator chain. In the superluminal case, a new light-transmission effect is found whereby the input optical pulse is reproduced in an almost-simultaneous manner at the various system outputs. When the input carrier is tuned to a different frequency, the system permits to slow down the propagating optical signal. Between these two extreme cases, the relative delay can be tuned within a broad range. We propose, and analyze numerically, a laser-array configuration for the stable operation of active devices. PMID:19252573

  19. Fast imaging of live organisms with sculpted light sheets.

    PubMed

    Chmielewski, Aleksander K; Kyrsting, Anders; Mahou, Pierre; Wayland, Matthew T; Muresan, Leila; Evers, Jan Felix; Kaminski, Clemens F

    2015-01-01

    Light-sheet microscopy is an increasingly popular technique in the life sciences due to its fast 3D imaging capability of fluorescent samples with low photo toxicity compared to confocal methods. In this work we present a new, fast, flexible and simple to implement method to optimize the illumination light-sheet to the requirement at hand. A telescope composed of two electrically tuneable lenses enables us to define thickness and position of the light-sheet independently but accurately within milliseconds, and therefore optimize image quality of the features of interest interactively. We demonstrated the practical benefit of this technique by 1) assembling large field of views from tiled single exposure each with individually optimized illumination settings; 2) sculpting the light-sheet to trace complex sample shapes within single exposures. This technique proved compatible with confocal line scanning detection, further improving image contrast and resolution. Finally, we determined the effect of light-sheet optimization in the context of scattering tissue, devising procedures for balancing image quality, field of view and acquisition speed. PMID:25893952

  20. Fast imaging of live organisms with sculpted light sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chmielewski, Aleksander K.; Kyrsting, Anders; Mahou, Pierre; Wayland, Matthew T.; Muresan, Leila; Evers, Jan Felix; Kaminski, Clemens F.

    2015-04-01

    Light-sheet microscopy is an increasingly popular technique in the life sciences due to its fast 3D imaging capability of fluorescent samples with low photo toxicity compared to confocal methods. In this work we present a new, fast, flexible and simple to implement method to optimize the illumination light-sheet to the requirement at hand. A telescope composed of two electrically tuneable lenses enables us to define thickness and position of the light-sheet independently but accurately within milliseconds, and therefore optimize image quality of the features of interest interactively. We demonstrated the practical benefit of this technique by 1) assembling large field of views from tiled single exposure each with individually optimized illumination settings; 2) sculpting the light-sheet to trace complex sample shapes within single exposures. This technique proved compatible with confocal line scanning detection, further improving image contrast and resolution. Finally, we determined the effect of light-sheet optimization in the context of scattering tissue, devising procedures for balancing image quality, field of view and acquisition speed.

  1. Fast imaging of live organisms with sculpted light sheets

    PubMed Central

    Chmielewski, Aleksander K.; Kyrsting, Anders; Mahou, Pierre; Wayland, Matthew T.; Muresan, Leila; Evers, Jan Felix; Kaminski, Clemens F.

    2015-01-01

    Light-sheet microscopy is an increasingly popular technique in the life sciences due to its fast 3D imaging capability of fluorescent samples with low photo toxicity compared to confocal methods. In this work we present a new, fast, flexible and simple to implement method to optimize the illumination light-sheet to the requirement at hand. A telescope composed of two electrically tuneable lenses enables us to define thickness and position of the light-sheet independently but accurately within milliseconds, and therefore optimize image quality of the features of interest interactively. We demonstrated the practical benefit of this technique by 1) assembling large field of views from tiled single exposure each with individually optimized illumination settings; 2) sculpting the light-sheet to trace complex sample shapes within single exposures. This technique proved compatible with confocal line scanning detection, further improving image contrast and resolution. Finally, we determined the effect of light-sheet optimization in the context of scattering tissue, devising procedures for balancing image quality, field of view and acquisition speed. PMID:25893952

  2. Fast Probabilistic Particle Identification algorithm using silicon strip detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Fino, L.; Zaconte, V.; Ciccotelli, A.; Larosa, M.; Narici, L.

    2012-08-01

    Active detectors used as radiation monitors in space are not usually able to perform Particle Identification (PID). Common techniques need energy loss spectra with high statistics to estimate ion abundances. The ALTEA-space detector system is a set of silicon strip particle telescopes monitoring the radiation environment on board the International Space Station since July 2006 with real-time telemetry capabilities. Its large geometrical factor due to the concurrent use of six detectors permits the acquisition of good energy loss spectra even in a short period of observation. In this paper we present a novel Fast Probabilistic Particle Identification (FPPI) algorithm developed for the ALTEA data analysis in order to perform nuclear identification with low statistics and, with some limitations, also in real time.

  3. On the energy losses of fast charged particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matveev, V. I.; Makarov, D. N.; Gusarevich, E. S.

    2010-09-01

    The energy losses of fast charged particles colliding with atoms have been considered in the eikonal approximation. It has been shown that the nonperturbative contribution to the effective stopping from the region of the intermediate impact parameters (comparable with the characteristic sizes of the electron shells of the target) not only can be significant as compared to shell corrections to the Bethe-Bloch formula (usually considered in the first order of perturbation theory), but also can provide significant (up to 50%) corrections to this formula.

  4. Capillary electrophoresis characterization of molecularly imprinted polymer particles in fast binding with 17β-estradiol.

    PubMed

    DeMaleki, Zack; Lai, Edward P C; Dabek-Zlotorzynska, Ewa

    2010-09-01

    Molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) submicron particles were synthesized, using either ethylene glycol dimethacrylate or trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate as a cross-linker, specifically for recognition of 17β-estradiol (E2). HPLC with fluorescence detection (HPLC-FD) results showed that 90(±5)% of E2 bound onto these particles after 2 min of incubation, and 96(±3)% after long equilibrium. The binding capacity was 8(±3) μmol/g for MIP particles prepared using ethylene glycol dimethacrylate, and 33-43(±8) μmol/g for using trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate. CE separation of MIP and non-imprinted polymer particles was successful when 50 mM borate buffer (pH 8.5) containing 0.005% w/v EOTrol™ LN in reverse polarity (-30 kV) was used. The electrophoretic mobilities of MIP and non-imprinted polymer particles, together with dynamic light scattering measurement of particle sizes, allowed for an estimation of their surface charges. Automated injection of E2 and particles in mixture set a lower limit of 20(±1) s on incubation time for the study of fast binding kinetics. The presence of E2 and bisphenol A (BPA) together tested the selectivity of MIP particles, when the two compounds competed for available binding cavities or sites. Addition of E2 after BPA confirmed E2 occupation of the specific binding cavities, via displacement of BPA. PMID:20658488

  5. A fast and light stream cipher for smartphones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidal, G.; Baptista, M. S.; Mancini, H.

    2014-06-01

    We present a stream cipher based on a chaotic dynamical system. Using a chaotic trajectory sampled under certain rules in order to avoid any attempt to reconstruct the original one, we create a binary pseudo-random keystream that can only be exactly reproduced by someone that has fully knowledge of the communication system parameters formed by a transmitter and a receiver, sharing the same initial conditions. The plaintext is XOR'ed with the keystream creating the ciphertext, the encrypted message. This keystream passes the NIST's randomness test and has been implemented in a videoconference App for smartphones, in order to show the fast and light nature of the proposed encryption system.

  6. Slow and fast light propagation in nonlinear Kerr media.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Qiguang; Ma, Seongmin; Wang, Huitian; Jung, S. S.

    2005-04-01

    Sub- and superluminal propagation of light pulse in Kerr materials has been investigated. Group velocities as slow as much less than 1 millimeter per second to as fast as negative several hundreds meters per second can be easily obtained in Kerr medium, which possesses large nonlinear refractive index and long relaxation time, such as Cr doped Alexandrite, Ruby, and GdAlO3. The physical mechanism is the strong highly dispersive coupling between different frequency components of the pulse. The new mechanism of slowing down pulses as well as producing superluminal pulses enlarges the very specific materials to all kinds of nonlinear optical materials.

  7. Fast, parallel implementation of particle filtering on the GPU architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelencsér-Horváth, Anna; Tornai, Gábor János; Horváth, András; Cserey, György

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, we introduce a modified cellular particle filter (CPF) which we mapped on a graphics processing unit (GPU) architecture. We developed this filter adaptation using a state-of-the art CPF technique. Mapping this filter realization on a highly parallel architecture entailed a shift in the logical representation of the particles. In this process, the original two-dimensional organization is reordered as a one-dimensional ring topology. We proposed a proof-of-concept measurement on two models with an NVIDIA Fermi architecture GPU. This design achieved a 411- μs kernel time per state and a 77-ms global running time for all states for 16,384 particles with a 256 neighbourhood size on a sequence of 24 states for a bearing-only tracking model. For a commonly used benchmark model at the same configuration, we achieved a 266- μs kernel time per state and a 124-ms global running time for all 100 states. Kernel time includes random number generation on the GPU with curand. These results attest to the effective and fast use of the particle filter in high-dimensional, real-time applications.

  8. Fast frame scanning camera system for light-sheet microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wu, Di; Zhou, Xing; Yao, Baoli; Li, Runze; Yang, Yanlong; Peng, Tong; Lei, Ming; Dan, Dan; Ye, Tong

    2015-10-10

    In the interest of improving the temporal resolution for light-sheet microscopy, we designed a fast frame scanning camera system that incorporated a galvanometer scanning mirror into the imaging path of a home-built light-sheet microscope. This system transformed a temporal image sequence to a spatial one so that multiple images could be acquired during one exposure period. The improvement factor of the frame rate was dependent on the number of sub-images that could be tiled on the sensor without overlapping each other and was therefore a trade-off with the image size. As a demonstration, we achieved 960 frames/s (fps) on a CCD camera that was originally capable of recording images at only 30 fps (full frame). This allowed us to observe millisecond or sub-millisecond events with ordinary CCD cameras. PMID:26479797

  9. White dwarfs constraints on dark sector models with light particles

    SciTech Connect

    Ubaldi, Lorenzo

    2014-06-24

    The white dwarf luminosity function is well understood in terms of standard model physics and leaves little room for exotic cooling mechanisms related to the possible existence of new weakly interacting light particles. This puts significant constraints on the parameter space of models that contain a massive dark photon and light dark sector particles.

  10. Particle detection by a light-scattering technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kormanyos, S.; Mastroeni, J.

    1972-01-01

    Instrument measures concentration of small particles in aqueous medium in terms of amount of light scattered and degree to which light transmission is attenuated. Sensitivity to small particles is optimized because both scattered and transmitted illumination levels are detected by photodiodes.

  11. Measurements of Escaping Fast Particles Using a Thin-Foil Charge Collector

    SciTech Connect

    Jarvis, Owen N.; Belle, Pieter van; Hone, Malcolm A.; Sadler, Guy J.; Whitfield, G.A.H.; Cecil, F. Edward; Darrow, Douglass S.; Esposito, Basilio

    2001-01-15

    Two screened, thin-foil charge collectors were mounted just beyond the plasma edge at an outboard position (below midplane) in the Joint European Torus to detect lost alpha particles during the 1997 high fusion power D-T experiments. No convincing observations of alpha-particle collection were obtained, possibly because of the low level of alpha-particle losses but more probably because the positioning of the detector was not ideal for the high fusion power discharges that were run at high plasma current and toroidal field. Under such conditions, alpha particles on escaping orbits leading toward the detector are highly likely to be intercepted by the nearby poloidal limiter. Moreover, a small alpha-particle signal would have been obscured by interference from a large and unexpected signal attributed here to fast neutrals, leaving the plasma and ionizing in the low density scrape-off region outside the plasma boundary. The interpretation of this unexpected signal is discussed. In all probability, it will also be encountered in any future attempts to detect lost alpha particles in a current measuring detector unless suitable precautions are taken, e.g., provision of a thin first foil to remove light charged particles with energies below {approx}0.5 MeV.

  12. Communications overlapping in fast multipole particle dynamics methods

    SciTech Connect

    Kurzak, Jakub; Pettitt, B. Montgomery . E-mail: pettitt@uh.edu

    2005-03-01

    In molecular dynamics the fast multipole method (FMM) is an attractive alternative to Ewald summation for calculating electrostatic interactions due to the operation counts. However when applied to small particle systems and taken to many processors it has a high demand for interprocessor communication. In a distributed memory environment this demand severely limits applicability of the FMM to systems with O(10 K atoms). We present an algorithm that allows for fine grained overlap of communication and computation, while not sacrificing synchronization and determinism in the equations of motion. The method avoids contention in the communication subsystem making it feasible to use the FMM for smaller systems on larger numbers of processors. Our algorithm also facilitates application of multiple time stepping techniques within the FMM. We present scaling at a reasonably high level of accuracy compared with optimized Ewald methods.

  13. Light-Particle Emission from Fissioning Hot Rotating Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartel, Johann; Pomorski, Krzysztof; Nerlo-Pomorska, Bożena

    2012-05-01

    The decay process of hot and rotating compound nuclei is studied. In particular the competition between fission and n, p and α-particle emission is discussed. The nuclear fission process is described by a Langevin equation coupled to Master equations for particle evaporation. Light particle emission rates obtained with the Weisskopf theory and the semiclassical phase-space distribution-function approach are compared. Coulomb barriers for the emission of charged particles are studied.

  14. Light emission during impact stressing of a particle layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisarevskiy, A.; Aman, S.; Tatmyshevskiy, K.; Hirsch, S.; Tomas, J.

    2015-04-01

    The mechanical stress detection technique was developed based on light emission properties of ZnS:Mn particles. The light emission properties of ZnS:Mn particles were characterized by the use of the impact tester that includes a stressing tool, photomultiplier and a contact time measurement system. The mechanical stressing of particles was caused by the impact of a metallic ball, dropped from different heights. At impact, the metallic ball achieves direct contact with the upper surface of the metallic anvil. This allows the measurement of the contact time by means of the electrical current that flows between the anvil and the metallic ball during contact time. The stress, caused at the collision, is transmitted through a metallic anvil to the layer of particles and produces the deformation of particles. The applied stress was detected using a piezoelectric sensor. It was shown that the ZnS:Mn particles generate the light during the action of the loading force. After removal of the loading force the light emission from the particle layer disappears in a few microseconds. The measurement was carried out using different ranges of applied forces. In this way, it was shown that the particle layer exhibits a high damping factor and failure resistance. One of the possible applications of these sensor systems based on light emission properties of ZnS:Mn particles is structural health monitoring.

  15. Effects of dust particle internal structure on light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemppinen, O.; Nousiainen, T.; Jeong, G. Y.

    2015-07-01

    There is a large variety of internal structures inside atmospheric dust particles, making them inherently inhomogeneous. Such structures may have a large effect on ground-level and atmospheric radiation. So far, dust particle internal structures and their effect on the light scattering properties have proved to be hard to quantify, in part due to challenges in obtaining information about these structures. Recently, internal structures of individual dust particles were revealed through focused ion beam milling and analyzed. Here, we perform a sensitivity study to evaluate the optical impacts of some of the typical internal structures revealed. To obtain suitable model particles, the first step is to generate inhomogeneous particles with varying internal structures by using an algorithm that is based on three-dimensional Voronoi tessellation. The parameters for the particle generation are obtained from studies of real-world Asian dust particles. The second step is to generate homogeneous versions of the generated particles by using an effective-medium approximation, for comparison. Third, light scattering by both versions of these particles is simulated with discrete-dipole approximation code. This allows us to see how different internal structures affect light scattering, and how important it is to account for these structures explicitly. Further, this allows us to estimate the potential inaccuracies caused by using only homogeneous model particles for atmospheric studies and remote sensing measurements. The results show that the effects vary greatly between different kinds of internal structures and single-scattering quantity considered, but for most structure types the effects are overall notable. Most significantly, hematite inclusions in particles impact light scattering heavily. Furthermore, internal pores and hematite-rich coating both affect some form of light scattering noticeably. Based on this work, it seems that it is exceedingly important that the

  16. Effects of dust particle internal structure on light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemppinen, O.; Nousiainen, T.; Jeong, G. Y.

    2015-10-01

    There is a large variety of internal structures inside atmospheric dust particles, making them inherently inhomogeneous. Such structures may have a large effect on ground-level and atmospheric radiation. So far, dust particle internal structures and their effect on the light scattering properties have proved to be hard to quantify, in part due to challenges in obtaining information about these structures. Recently, internal structures of individual dust particles were revealed through focused ion beam milling and analyzed. Here, we perform a sensitivity study to evaluate the optical impacts of some of the typical internal structures revealed. To obtain suitable model particles, the first step is to generate inhomogeneous particles with varying internal structures by using an algorithm that is based on three-dimensional Voronoi tessellation. The parameters for the particle generation are obtained from studies of real-world Asian dust particles. The second step is to generate homogeneous versions of the generated particles by using an effective-medium approximation, for comparison. Third, light scattering by both versions of these particles is simulated with discrete dipole approximation code. This allows us to see how different internal structures affect light scattering, and how important it is to account for these structures explicitly. Further, this allows us to estimate the potential inaccuracies caused by using only homogeneous model particles for atmospheric studies and remote-sensing measurements. The results show that the effects vary greatly between different kinds of internal structures and single-scattering quantity considered, but for most structure types the effects are overall notable. Most significantly, hematite inclusions in particles impact light scattering heavily. Furthermore, internal pores and hematite-rich coating both affect some form of light scattering noticeably. Based on this work, it seems that it is exceedingly important that the

  17. Light Attenuation Method for 3D data acquisition (LAM3D) of bottom particle deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Er, Jenn Wei; Law, Adrian W. K.; Adams, E. Eric; Yang, Yang

    2015-11-01

    We have developed a novel experimental technique, Light Attenuation Method for 3D data acquisition (LAM3D), to acquire three-dimensional spatial characteristics and temporal development of bottom particle deposits. The new technique performs data acquisition with higher spatial and temporal resolution than existing approaches with laser and ultrasonic 3D profilers, and is therefore ideal for laboratory investigations with fast varying changes in the sediment bed, such as the developing deposition profile from sediment clouds commonly formed during dredging or land reclamation projects and the dynamic evolution in movable bed processes in rivers. The principle of the technique is based on the analysis of the light attenuation due to multiple light scattering through the particle deposits layer compared to the clear water column. With appropriate calibration, the particles size and distribution thickness can be quantified by the transmitted light spectrum. In the presentation, we will first show our measurement setup with a light panel for calibrated illumination and a system of DSLR cameras for the light capturing. Subsequently, we shall present the experimental results of fast evolving deposition profile of a barge-disposed sediment cloud upon its bottom impact on the sea bed.

  18. Fast Acting Optical Forces From Far Detuned, High Intensity Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corder, Christopher; Arnold, Brian; Hua, Xiang; Metcalf, Harold

    2015-05-01

    We are exploring fast acting, strong optical forces from standing wave light fields with high intensity and large detuning δ >> γ , where γ is the transition linewidth. We observe these fast acting forces on a time scale of a few times the excited state lifetime τ ≡ 1 / γ thus an atom may experience at most one or two spontaneous emission events. The dipole force is typically considered when the Rabi frequency Ω << δ , but we use Ω ~ δ so the usual approximations break down because a significant excited state population can occur, even for our short interaction times that limit spontaneous emission. Our experiment measures the transverse velocity distribution of a beam of 23S He after a chosen interaction time with a perpendicular standing wave detuned from the 23S -->33P transition near 389 nm. The distribution shows velocity resonance effects that persist over a large range of Ω. We also simulate the experiment numerically using the Optical Bloch Equations and the results are consistent with our measurements. Supported by ONR and Dept. of Education GAANN

  19. Diffraction of entangled particles by light gratings

    SciTech Connect

    Sancho, Pedro

    2015-04-15

    We analyze the diffraction regime of the Kapitza–Dirac effect for particles entangled in momentum. The detection patterns show two-particle interferences. In the single-mode case we identify a discontinuity in the set of joint detection probabilities, associated with the disconnected character of the space of non-separable states. For Gaussian multi-mode states we derive the diffraction patterns, providing an example of the dependence of the light–matter interaction on entanglement. When the particles are identical, we can explore the relation between exchange and entanglement effects. We find a complementary behavior between overlapping and Schmidt’s number. In particular, symmetric entanglement can cancel the exchange effects. - Highlights: • Kapitza–Dirac diffraction of entangled particles shows multiparticle interference. • There is a discontinuity in the set of joint detection patterns of entangled states. • We find a complementary behavior between overlapping and Schmidt’s number. • Symmetric entanglement can cancel the exchange effects.

  20. Open LED Illuminator: A Simple and Inexpensive LED Illuminator for Fast Multicolor Particle Tracking in Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Bosse, Jens B.; Tanneti, Nikhila S.; Hogue, Ian B.; Enquist, Lynn W.

    2015-01-01

    Dual-color live cell fluorescence microscopy of fast intracellular trafficking processes, such as axonal transport, requires rapid switching of illumination channels. Typical broad-spectrum sources necessitate the use of mechanical filter switching, which introduces delays between acquisition of different fluorescence channels, impeding the interpretation and quantification of highly dynamic processes. Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs), however, allow modulation of excitation light in microseconds. Here we provide a step-by-step protocol to enable any scientist to build a research-grade LED illuminator for live cell microscopy, even without prior experience with electronics or optics. We quantify and compare components, discuss our design considerations, and demonstrate the performance of our LED illuminator by imaging axonal transport of herpes virus particles with high temporal resolution. PMID:26600461

  1. Fast and accurate line scanner based on white light interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambelet, Patrick; Moosburger, Rudolf

    2013-04-01

    White-light interferometry is a highly accurate technology for 3D measurements. The principle is widely utilized in surface metrology instruments but rarely adopted for in-line inspection systems. The main challenges for rolling out inspection systems based on white-light interferometry to the production floor are its sensitivity to environmental vibrations and relatively long measurement times: a large quantity of data needs to be acquired and processed in order to obtain a single topographic measurement. Heliotis developed a smart-pixel CMOS camera (lock-in camera) which is specially suited for white-light interferometry. The demodulation of the interference signal is treated at the level of the pixel which typically reduces the acquisition data by one orders of magnitude. Along with the high bandwidth of the dedicated lock-in camera, vertical scan-speeds of more than 40mm/s are reachable. The high scan speed allows for the realization of inspection systems that are rugged against external vibrations as present on the production floor. For many industrial applications such as the inspection of wafer-bumps, surface of mechanical parts and solar-panel, large areas need to be measured. In this case either the instrument or the sample are displaced laterally and several measurements are stitched together. The cycle time of such a system is mostly limited by the stepping time for multiple lateral displacements. A line-scanner based on white light interferometry would eliminate most of the stepping time while maintaining robustness and accuracy. A. Olszak proposed a simple geometry to realize such a lateral scanning interferometer. We demonstrate that such inclined interferometers can benefit significantly from the fast in-pixel demodulation capabilities of the lock-in camera. One drawback of an inclined observation perspective is that its application is limited to objects with scattering surfaces. We therefore propose an alternate geometry where the incident light is

  2. Scattering of light by stochastically rough particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peltoniemi, Jouni I.; Lumme, Kari; Muinonen, Karri; Irvine, William M.

    1989-01-01

    The single particle phase function and the linear polarization for large stochastically deformed spheres have been calculated by Monte Carlo simulation using the geometrical optics approximation. The radius vector of a particle is assumed to obey a bivariate lognormal distribution with three free parameters: mean radius, its standard deviation and the coherence length of the autocorrelation function. All reflections/refractions which include sufficient energy have been included. Real and imaginary parts of the refractive index can be varied without any restrictions. Results and comparisons with some earlier less general theories are presented. Applications of this theory to the photometric properties of atmosphereless bodies and interplanetary dust are discussed.

  3. Light Absorbing Particle (LAP) Measurements in the Lower Stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumgardner, D.; Raga, G. B.; Anderson, B.; Diskin, G.; Sachse, G.; Kok, G.

    2003-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation covers the capabilities and design of the Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP-2), and reviews its role on the Sage III Ozone Loss Validation Experiment (SOLVE II) field campaign during 2003. On SOLVE II the SP-2 was carried into the Arctic onboard a DC-8 aircraft, in order to determine the size distribution of light-absorbing and non light-absorbing particles in the stratosphere. Graphs and tables relate some of the results from SOLVE II.

  4. Ultrafine particles near a roadway intersection: origin and apportionment of fast changes in concentration.

    PubMed

    Klems, Joseph P; Pennington, M Ross; Zordan, Christopher A; Johnston, Murray V

    2010-10-15

    A wavelet-based algorithm was implemented to separate the high frequency portion of ambient nanoparticle measurements taken during the summer and winter of 2009 in Wilmington, Delaware. These measurements included both number concentration and size distributions recorded once every second by a condensation particle counter (CPC) and a fast mobility particle sizer (FMPS). The high frequency portion of the signal, consisting of a series of abrupt spikes in number concentration that varied in length from a few seconds to tens of seconds, accounted for 6-35% of the daily ambient number concentration with hourly contributions sometimes greater than 50%. When the data were weighted by particle volume, this portion of the signal contributed an average of 20% to the daily PM(0.1) concentration. Particle concentration spikes were preferentially observed from locations surrounding the measurement site where motor vehicles accelerate after a red traffic light turns green. As the distance or transit time from emission to sampling increased, the size distribution shifted to larger particle diameters. PMID:20843065

  5. Particle-in-cell simulations of particle energization from low Mach number fast mode shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jaehong; Workman, Jared; Blackman, Eric; Ren, Chuang; Siller, Robert

    2012-10-01

    Low Mach number, high plasma beta, fast mode shocks likely occur in the outflows from reconnection sites associated with solar flares. These shocks are sites of particle energization with observable consequences, but there has been much less work on understanding the underlying physics compared to that of Mach number shocks. To make progress, we have simulated a low Mach number/high beta shock using 2D particle-in-cell simulations with a ``moving wall'' method and studied the shock structure and particle acceleration processes therein [Park et. al (2012), Phys. Plasmas, 19, 062904]. The moving wall method can control the shock speed in the simulation frame to allow smaller simulation boxes and longer simulation times. We found that the modified two-stream instability in the shock transition region is responsible for shock sustenance via turbulent dissipation and entropy creation throughout the downstream region long after the initial shock formation. Particle tracking and the particle energy distributions show that both electrons and ions participate in shock-drift-acceleration (SDA). The simulation combined with a theoretical analysis reveals a two-temperature Maxwellian distribution for the electron energy distribution via SDA.

  6. Three-dimensional light trap for reflective particles

    DOEpatents

    Neal, Daniel R.

    1999-01-01

    A system for containing either a reflective particle or a particle having an index of refraction lower than that of the surrounding media in a three-dimensional light cage. A light beam from a single source illuminates an optics system and generates a set of at least three discrete focussed beams that emanate from a single exit aperture and focus on to a focal plane located close to the particle. The set of focal spots defines a ring that surrounds the particle. The set of focussed beams creates a "light cage" and circumscribes a zone of no light within which the particle lies. The surrounding beams apply constraining forces (created by radiation pressure) to the particle, thereby containing it in a three-dimensional force field trap. A diffractive element, such as an aperture multiplexed lens, or either a Dammann grating or phase element in combination with a focusing lens, may be used to generate the beams. A zoom lens may be used to adjust the size of the light cage, permitting particles of various sizes to be captured and contained.

  7. Three-dimensional light trap for reflective particles

    DOEpatents

    Neal, D.R.

    1999-08-17

    A system is disclosed for containing either a reflective particle or a particle having an index of refraction lower than that of the surrounding media in a three-dimensional light cage. A light beam from a single source illuminates an optics system and generates a set of at least three discrete focused beams that emanate from a single exit aperture and focus on to a focal plane located close to the particle. The set of focal spots defines a ring that surrounds the particle. The set of focused beams creates a ``light cage`` and circumscribes a zone of no light within which the particle lies. The surrounding beams apply constraining forces (created by radiation pressure) to the particle, thereby containing it in a three-dimensional force field trap. A diffractive element, such as an aperture multiplexed lens, or either a Dammann grating or phase element in combination with a focusing lens, may be used to generate the beams. A zoom lens may be used to adjust the size of the light cage, permitting particles of various sizes to be captured and contained. 10 figs.

  8. Radially polarized light for detection and nanolocalization of dielectric particles on a planar substrate.

    PubMed

    Roy, S; Ushakova, K; van den Berg, Q; Pereira, S F; Urbach, H P

    2015-03-13

    A fast noninvasive method based on scattering from a focused radially polarized light to detect and localize subwavelength nanoparticles on a substrate is presented. The technique relies on polarization matching in the far field between scattered and spurious reflected fields. Results show a localization uncertainty of ≈10^{-4}λ^{2} is possible for a particle of area ≈λ^{2}/16. The effect of simple pupil shaping is also shown. PMID:25815935

  9. Particle-in-cell simulations for fast ignition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, C.; Tonge, J.; Li, G.; Fiuza, F.; Fonseca, R. A.; May, J.; Mori, W. B.; Silva, L. O.; Wang, T. L.; Yan, R.

    2008-07-01

    The hole-boring scheme in fast ignition is studied via largee-scale, two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations in two steps. First, laser channeling in millimeter-scale underdense plasmas is simulated. The results show a highly nonlinear and dynamic process involving longitudinal plasma buildup, laser hosing, channel bifurcation and self-correction, and electron heating to relativistic temperatures. The channeling speed is much less than the linear group velocity of the laser. Low-intensity channeling pulses are preferred to minimize the required laser energy. The channel is also shown to significantly increase the transmission of an ignition pulse. In the second step, the interactions of the ignition pulse and a hundred-critical-density plasma are simulated to study hot electron generation and transport. The results show that at ultra-high intensities, I > 5 × 1019W/cm2, most of the electrons transporting energy through 50μm of 100 times critical density plasma are in a relatively low energy range. The fraction of laser power that transits the dense plasma and is deposited into a dense core increases with laser intensity. Overall these results show the promise of using ultra-high-intensity ignition pulses in the hole-boring scheme.

  10. Communications Overlapping in Fast Multipole Particle Dynamics Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Kurzak, Jakub; Pettitt, Bernard M.

    2005-03-01

    The research described in this product was performed in part in the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. In molecular dynamics the fast multipole method (FMM) is an attractive alternative to Ewald summation for calculating electrostatic interactions due to the operation counts. However when applied to small particle systems and taken to many processors it has a high demand for interprocessor communication. In a distributed memory environment this demand severely limits applicability of the FMM to systems with O(10 K atoms). We present an algorithm that allows for fine grained overlap of communication and computation, while not sacrificing synchronization and determinism in the equations of motion. The method avoids contention in the communication subsystem making it feasible to use the FMM for smaller systems on larger numbers of processors. Our algorithm also facilitates application of multiple time stepping techniques within the FMM. We present scaling at a reasonably high level of accuracy compared with optimized Ewald methods.

  11. QUANTUM CONTROL OF LIGHT: From Slow Light and FAST CARS to Nuclear γ-ray Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scully, Marlan

    2007-06-01

    In recent work we have demonstrated strong coherent backward wave oscillation using forward propagating fields only. This surprising result is achieved by applying laser fields to an ultra-dispersive medium with proper chosen detunings to excite a molecular vibrational coherence that corresponds to a backward propagating wave [PRL, 97, 113001 (2006)]. The physics then has much in common with propagation of ultra-slow light. Applications of coherent scattering and remote sensing to the detection of bio and chemical pathogens (e.g., anthrax) via Coherent Anti-Raman Scattering together with Femtosecond Adaptive Spectroscopic Techniques (FAST CARS [Opt. Comm., 244, 423 (2005)]) will be discussed. Furthermore, the interplay between quantum optics (Dicke super and sub-radiant states) and nuclear physics (forward scattering of γ radiation) provides interesting problems and insights into the quantum control of scattered light [PRL, 96, 010501 (2005)].

  12. SMARTIES: User-friendly codes for fast and accurate calculations of light scattering by spheroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somerville, W. R. C.; Auguié, B.; Le Ru, E. C.

    2016-05-01

    We provide a detailed user guide for SMARTIES, a suite of MATLAB codes for the calculation of the optical properties of oblate and prolate spheroidal particles, with comparable capabilities and ease-of-use as Mie theory for spheres. SMARTIES is a MATLAB implementation of an improved T-matrix algorithm for the theoretical modelling of electromagnetic scattering by particles of spheroidal shape. The theory behind the improvements in numerical accuracy and convergence is briefly summarized, with reference to the original publications. Instructions of use, and a detailed description of the code structure, its range of applicability, as well as guidelines for further developments by advanced users are discussed in separate sections of this user guide. The code may be useful to researchers seeking a fast, accurate and reliable tool to simulate the near-field and far-field optical properties of elongated particles, but will also appeal to other developers of light-scattering software seeking a reliable benchmark for non-spherical particles with a challenging aspect ratio and/or refractive index contrast.

  13. A study of the scintillation light induced in liquid xenon by electrons and alpha particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aprile, Elena; Mukherjee, Reshmi; Suzuki, Masayo

    1990-01-01

    The time dependence and the intensity of the primary scintillation light in liquid Xe excited by Am-241 alpha particles and Bi-207 internal-conversion electrons were measured at different electric-field strengths. High-purity liquid Xe was used to fill a parallel-plate ionization chamber equipped with a CaF2 window coupled to a UV-sensitive photomultiplier tube. The effect of the specific ionization density on the scintillation light and the time correlation between the light signal and the charge signal is reported. It is demonstrated that the fast scintillation signal produced in liquid Xe by an ionizing particle provides an ideal trigger in a detector aiming at a complete three-dimensional event reconstruction with an excellent background rejection capability.

  14. Light induced particle organization in paramagnetic fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacia, Marcin; Masajada, Jan; Drobczyński, Sławomir; Lamperska, Weronika; Kutrowska, Joanna; Walczak, Katarzyna

    2014-12-01

    Magnetic fluids (ferrofluids) consist of magnetic nanoparticles (diameter ~10nm) which are dispersed in a liquid, often with the use of surfactants. They were first developed by NASA to address the unique requirements of moving liquid fuel in microgravity conditions. With a help of a holographic optical tweezers, interaction of magnetic nanoparticles with strongly focused laser beam was observed. When the light intensity was high enough, magnetic nanoparticles were removed from the beam center and they formed a dark ring. Creation process lasts less than 330μs and cannot be observed precisely even with ultrafast camera. Such rings exist when the laser beam is affecting the sample and disappear (with a lifespan of 10'th second range) after the laser is switched off. Moreover, when several rings are created simultaneously, complex interactions between them can be observed. In this work, the results of our experiments will be presented with hypotheses about the physical background of such a behavior.

  15. Coherent Light induced in Optical Fiber by a Charged Particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artru, Xavier; Ray, Cédric

    2016-07-01

    Coherent light production in an optical fiber by a charged particle (named PIGL, for particle-induced guided, light) is reviewed. From the microscopic point of view, light is emitted by transient electric dipoles induced in the fiber medium by the Coulomb field of the particle. The phenomenon can also considered as the capture of virtual photons of the particle field by the fiber. Two types of captures are distinguished. Type-I takes place in a uniform part of the fiber; then the photon keeps its longitudinal momentum pz . Type-II takes place near an end or in a non-uniform part of the fiber; then pz is not conserved. Type-I PIGL is not affected by background lights external to the fiber. At grazing incidence it becomes nearly monochromatic. Its circular polarization depends on the angular momentum of the particle about the fiber and on the relative velocity between the particle and the guided wave. A general formula for the yield of Type-II radiation, based on the reciprocity theorem, is proposed. This radiation can be assisted by metallic objects stuck to the fiber, via plasmon excitation. A periodic structure leads to a guided Smith-Purcell radiation. Applications of PIGL in beam diagnostics are considered.

  16. Scattering of dark particles with light mediators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soper, Davison E.; Spannowsky, Michael; Wallace, Chris J.; Tait, Tim M. P.

    2014-12-01

    We present a treatment of the high energy scattering of dark Dirac fermions from nuclei, mediated by the exchange of a light vector boson. The dark fermions are produced by proton-nucleus interactions in a fixed target and, after traversing shielding that screens out strongly interacting products, appear similarly to neutrino neutral current scattering in a detector. Using the Fermilab experiment E613 as an example, we place limits on a secluded dark matter scenario. Visible scattering in the detector includes both the familiar regime of large momentum transfer to the nucleus (Q2) described by deeply inelastic scattering, as well as small Q2 kinematics described by the exchanged vector mediator fluctuating into a quark-antiquark pair whose interaction with the nucleus is described by a saturation model. We find that the improved description of the low Q2 scattering leads to important corrections, resulting in more robust constraints in a regime where a description entirely in terms of deeply inelastic scattering cannot be trusted.

  17. Ultra-fast detection of relativistic charged particle beam bunches using optical techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikas, Dimitrios S.

    The use of light as a carrier of information has been the subject of discussion for many scientific papers. This approach has some unique features which distinguish it from conventional electronics. These are realized in applications like telecommunications where the use of optical fibers and Electro-Optic sampling is the industry standard. Electro-Optic sampling employs the "Pockels" or "Electro-Optic" effect. Pockels discovered that an electric field applied to some crystals changes the birefringence properties of the crystal, and hence the polarization of light that propagates through it. By placing the crystal between crossed polarizers, the transmitted light intensity changes as a function of the applied field. We made the first Electro-Optical (EO) detection of a relativistic charged particle beam, applying its Lorentz contracted electric field on an EO LiNbO 3 crystal. The resulted intensity modulation was initially reconstructed using a fast photodiode and a digital oscilloscope. The signal rise time was bandwidth limited (˜90ps) from the electronics used and a series of tests to establish our signal EO nature was performed. In particular, the amplitude of the EO modulation was found to increase linearly with the charge of the particle beam and decrease with the optical beam path distance from the charged particle beam. Also the signal polarity changed sign when the direction of the applied electric field was reversed. Next an optimized (for maximum modulation), zero bias, EO modulator was constructed for use with the limited dynamic range of the Streak Camera for the first non destructive, completely optical, detection of a charged particle beam. The observed signal may be an image of unexpected piezoelectrically generated sound waves that propagate at the X-axis of the LiNbO3 crystal. In such a case, sound waves generated in the surface as well as inside the crystal, change the index of refraction of the crystal through the photoelastic effect and as a

  18. Light shaping along 3D curves and particle manipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigo, José A.; Alieva, Tatiana

    2015-03-01

    We present a non-iterative holographic technique for efficient and versatile laser beam shaping along arbitrary 3D curves. Light beams with intensity shaped for several 3D curves: Tilted ring, Viviani's curve, Archimedean spiral, and trefoil-knotted curve have been experimentally generated and applied for optical trapping of micrometer-sized dielectric particles. The high intensity gradients and independent phase control prescribed along the curve make this kind of laser trap attractive for multiple particle manipulation and allow for forward and backward motion to the light source. Indeed, different configurations of tractor beam traps are experimentally demonstrated. This technique can also be applied for laser micro-machining.

  19. Morphologic tomography of nonspherical particles using multispectral diffusing light measurements

    PubMed Central

    Hajihashemi, Mohammad Reza; Li, Xiaoqi; Jiang, Huabei

    2011-01-01

    A series of phantom experiments are conducted to demonstrate the ability of a T-matrix–based inverse algorithm for tomographic recovery of morphologic characteristics of nonspherical particles embedded in heterogeneous turbid media. Diffusely scattered light at several wavelengths along the boundary of the phantom are collected and analyzed to allow for simultaneous extraction of the size, concentration, and aspect ratio of the spheroidal particles. PMID:22112119

  20. Measurements of Light Absorbing Particles on Tropical South American Glaciers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, C. G.; All, J.; Schwarz, J. P.; Arnott, W. P.; Warthon, J.; Andrade, M.; Celestian, A. J.; Hoffmann, D.; Cole, R. J.; Lapham, E.; Horodyskyj, U. N.; Froyd, K. D.; Liao, J.

    2014-12-01

    Glaciers in the tropical Andes have been losing mass rapidly in recent decades. In addition to the documented increase in temperature, increases in light absorbing particulates deposited on glaciers could be contributing to the observed glacier loss. Here we present results of measurements of light absorbing particles from glaciers in Peru and Bolivia. Samples have been collected by American Climber Science Program volunteers and scientists at altitudes up to 6770 meters. Collected snow samples were melted and filtered in the field. A new inexpensive technique, the Light Absorption Heating Method (LAHM) has been developed for analysis of light absorbing particles collected on filters. Results from LAHM analysis are calibrated using filters with known amounts of fullerene soot, a common industrial surrogate for black carbon (BC). For snow samples collected at the same field location LAHM analysis and measurements from the Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2) instrument are well correlated (r2 = 0.92). Co-located SP2 and LAHM filter analysis suggest that BC could be the dominant absorbing component of the light absorbing particles in some areas.

  1. Fast particles-wave interaction in the Alfven frequency range on the Joint European Torus tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Fasoli, A.; Borba, D.; Association EURATOM Breizman, B.; Gormezano, C.; Heeter, R. F.; Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, P.O. Box 451, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 ; Juan, A.; Mantsinen, M.; Sharapov, S.; Testa, D.

    2000-05-01

    Wave-particle interaction phenomena in the Alfven Eigenmode (AE) frequency range are investigated at the Joint European Torus [P. H. Rebut and B. E. Keen, Fusion Technol. 11, 13 (1987)] using active and passive diagnostic methods. Fast particles are generated by neutral beam injection, ion cyclotron resonance heating, and fusion reactions. External antennas are used to excite stable AEs and measure fast particle drive and damping separately. Comparisons with numerical calculations lead to an identification of the different damping mechanisms. The use of the active AE diagnostic system to generate control signals based on the proximity to marginal stability limits for AE and low-frequency magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modes is explored. Signatures of the different nonlinear regimes of fast particle driven AE instabilities predicted by theory are found in the measured spectra. The diagnostic use of AE measurements to get information both on the plasma bulk and the fast particle distribution is assessed. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  2. Exact simulation of polarized light reflectance by particle deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramezan Pour, B.; Mackowski, D. W.

    2015-12-01

    The use of polarimetric light reflection measurements as a means of identifying the physical and chemical characteristics of particulate materials obviously relies on an accurate model of predicting the effects of particle size, shape, concentration, and refractive index on polarized reflection. The research examines two methods for prediction of reflection from plane parallel layers of wavelength—sized particles. The first method is based on an exact superposition solution to Maxwell's time harmonic wave equations for a deposit of spherical particles that are exposed to a plane incident wave. We use a FORTRAN-90 implementation of this solution (the Multiple Sphere T Matrix (MSTM) code), coupled with parallel computational platforms, to directly simulate the reflection from particle layers. The second method examined is based upon the vector radiative transport equation (RTE). Mie theory is used in our RTE model to predict the extinction coefficient, albedo, and scattering phase function of the particles, and the solution of the RTE is obtained from adding—doubling method applied to a plane—parallel configuration. Our results show that the MSTM and RTE predictions of the Mueller matrix elements converge when particle volume fraction in the particle layer decreases below around five percent. At higher volume fractions the RTE can yield results that, depending on the particle size and refractive index, significantly depart from the exact predictions. The particle regimes which lead to dependent scattering effects, and the application of methods to correct the vector RTE for particle interaction, will be discussed.

  3. Integrated ultrasonic particle positioning and low excitation light fluorescence imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Bernassau, A. L.; Al-Rawhani, M.; Beeley, J.; Cumming, D. R. S.

    2013-12-09

    A compact hybrid system has been developed to position and detect fluorescent micro-particles by combining a Single Photon Avalanche Diode (SPAD) imager with an acoustic manipulator. The detector comprises a SPAD array, light-emitting diode (LED), lenses, and optical filters. The acoustic device is formed of multiple transducers surrounding an octagonal cavity. By stimulating pairs of transducers simultaneously, an acoustic landscape is created causing fluorescent micro-particles to agglomerate into lines. The fluorescent pattern is excited by a low power LED and detected by the SPAD imager. Our technique combines particle manipulation and visualization in a compact, low power, portable setup.

  4. Integrated ultrasonic particle positioning and low excitation light fluorescence imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernassau, A. L.; Al-Rawhani, M.; Beeley, J.; Cumming, D. R. S.

    2013-12-01

    A compact hybrid system has been developed to position and detect fluorescent micro-particles by combining a Single Photon Avalanche Diode (SPAD) imager with an acoustic manipulator. The detector comprises a SPAD array, light-emitting diode (LED), lenses, and optical filters. The acoustic device is formed of multiple transducers surrounding an octagonal cavity. By stimulating pairs of transducers simultaneously, an acoustic landscape is created causing fluorescent micro-particles to agglomerate into lines. The fluorescent pattern is excited by a low power LED and detected by the SPAD imager. Our technique combines particle manipulation and visualization in a compact, low power, portable setup.

  5. Huge light scattering from active anisotropic spherical particles.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xiaofeng; Shen, Zexiang; Luk'yanchuk, Boris

    2010-11-22

    The light scattering by a spherical particle with radial anisotropic permittivity ε and permeability μ are discussed in detail by expanding Mie theory. With the modified vector potential formulation, the electric anisotropy effects on scattering efficiency are addressed by studying the extinction, scattering, absorption and radar cross sections following the change of the transverse permittivity ε(t), the longitudinal permittivity ε(r) and the particle size q. The huge scattering cross sections are shown by considering the possible coupling between active medium and plasmon polaritons and this will be possible to result in spaser from the active plasmons of small particle. PMID:21164832

  6. An experimental study of light scattering by large, irregular particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcguire, Audrey F.; Hapke, Bruce W.

    1995-01-01

    The intensity and polarization of light scattered by a variety of types of artificial partices large compared to the wavelength were measured as a function of phase angle. Shape, surface roughness, absorption coefficient, and internal scattering coefficient were varied systematically and their effects studied. Scattering by clear, smooth-surfaced spheres is in quantitative agreement with the predictions of the geometrical optics (ray theory) approximation to physical optics (Mie theory). The phase functions of almost all of the particles measured have both forward and backward scattering lobes. A two-parameter, double Henyey-Greenstein function generally provides reasonably good descriptions of the data, while keeping the number of free parameters to the minimum necessary. On a double Henyey- Greenstein parameter plot all of the particles fall into an L-shaped area of restricted size in which the location is characteristic of the particle type. Formalisms based on the equivalent slab model are also given for estimating the scattering efficiency of a large, irregular particle. For most dielectric particles the transmitted, forward scattered light is partially negatively polarized. It is this component that is respopnsible for the well-known maximum in the polarization curves of planetary regoliths at phase angles around 100 deg. For phase angles between about 30 deg and 70 deg the internally scattered light is found to be randomly polarized in the particles studied here, so that the only contribution to the second component of the Stokes vector is by Fresnel reflection from the particle surface. If this empirical result is general, measurement of the second Stokes vector of the light scattered from a regolith at these angles may provide a method of remotely measuring the mean refractive index.

  7. Wave-particle interactions on the FAST satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Temerin, M. A.; Carlson, C. W.; Cattell, C. A.; Ergun, R. E.; Mcfadden, J. P.

    1990-01-01

    NASA's Fast Auroral Snapshot, or 'FAST' satellite, scheduled for launch in 1993, will investigate the plasma physics of the low altitude auroral zone from a 3500-km apogee polar orbit. FAST will give attention to wave, double-layer, and soliton production processes due to electrons and ions, as well as to wave-wave interactions, and the acceleration of electrons and ions by waves and electric fields. FAST will employ an intelligent data-handling system capacle of data acquisition at rates of up to 1 Mb/sec, in addition to a 1-Gbit solid-state memory. The data need be gathered for only a few minutes during passes through the auroral zone, since the most interesting auroral phenomena occur in such narrow regions as auroral arcs, electrostatic shocks, and superthermal electron bursts.

  8. LIGHT SCATTERING: Fast path-integration technique in simulation of light propagation through highly scattering objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voronov, Aleksandr V.; Tret'yakov, Evgeniy V.; Shuvalov, Vladimir V.

    2004-06-01

    Based on the path-integration technique and the Metropolis method, the original calculation scheme is developed for solving the problem of light propagation through highly scattering objects. The elimination of calculations of 'unnecessary' realisations and the phenomenological description of processes of multiple small-angle scattering provided a drastic increase (by nine and more orders of magnitude) in the calculation rate, retaining the specific features of the problem (consideration of spatial inhomogeneities, boundary conditions, etc.). The scheme allows one to verify other fast calculation algorithms and to obtain information required to reconstruct the internal structure of highly scattering objects (of size ~1000 scattered lengths and more) by the method of diffusion optical tomography.

  9. Gyrokinetic particle simulation of fast-electron driven beta-induced Aflvén eigenmode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Junyi; Zhang, Wenlu; Lin, Zhihong; Holod, Ihor; Li, Ding; Chen, Yang; Cao, Jintao

    2016-05-01

    The fast-electron driven beta-induced Alfvén eigenmode (e-BAE) in toroidal plasmas is investigated for the first time using global gyrokinetic particle simulations, where the fast electron is described by the drift kinetic equation. The simulation shows that the e-BAE propagates in the fast electron diamagnetic direction and its polarization is close to an ideal MHD mode. The phase space structure shows that only the fast electron processional resonance is responsible for the e-BAE excitations while fast-ion driven BAE can be excited through all the channels, including transit, bounce, and processional resonance.

  10. Circular polarization of light scattered by asymmetrical particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guirado, D.; Hovenier, J. W.; Moreno, F.

    2007-07-01

    We present calculations of the degree of circular polarization of light singly scattered by some kinds of asymmetrical particles in random orientation as a function of the scattering angle, using the T-matrix method. To clarify the possible contribution of asymmetry of particles to circular polarization we considered aggregates of optically inactive homogeneous identical spheres. We analysed the effect of changing the size of the monomers and the refractive index. We also performed calculations for two different geometries. The values of the computed degree of circular polarization are generally in the range of the observed ones for light scattered by dust particles in comets P/Halley, C/1995 O1 (Hale-Bopp) and C/1999 S4 (LINEAR), in the interplanetary medium and in the interstellar medium of our galaxy.

  11. The impact of dust particle morphological details on light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemppinen, Osku; Nousiainen, Timo; Lindqvist, Hannakaisa; Jeong, Gi Young

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the impact of dust particle surface roughness and internal structure on light scattering. Starting from digital representation of realistically shaped dust particles, we vary the particle morphology, and perform light scattering simulations to both the original and the modified particles. By mapping the changes in morphology to the changes in scattering, we will get information of how strongly and in which way a particular change affects scattering. All investigations have been done with complex, irregular particle shapes. For surface roughness studies we have kept the particle total volume virtually constant during the roughening process, and the roughness element size small enough to keep the overall shape relatively unchanged. For internal structure studies, the size and the external shape are kept constant. These safety measures help ensure that the effects seen are in fact due to the feature studied. The work is notable for model development, because some models can not include surface roughness, for example. In that case, the people who use such models have to adjust for the fact that the results are inaccurate, and by knowing how surface roughness typically changes the scattering results, the adjustment can be made. As a corollary, if it is shown that a particular feature does not change scattering results in any noticeable way, the model developers can confidently ignore or simplify it.

  12. Computation of scattering matrix elements of large and complex shaped absorbing particles with multilevel fast multipole algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yueqian; Yang, Minglin; Sheng, Xinqing; Ren, Kuan Fang

    2015-05-01

    Light scattering properties of absorbing particles, such as the mineral dusts, attract a wide attention due to its importance in geophysical and environment researches. Due to the absorbing effect, light scattering properties of particles with absorption differ from those without absorption. Simple shaped absorbing particles such as spheres and spheroids have been well studied with different methods but little work on large complex shaped particles has been reported. In this paper, the surface Integral Equation (SIE) with Multilevel Fast Multipole Algorithm (MLFMA) is applied to study scattering properties of large non-spherical absorbing particles. SIEs are carefully discretized with piecewise linear basis functions on triangle patches to model whole surface of the particle, hence computation resource needs increase much more slowly with the particle size parameter than the volume discretized methods. To improve further its capability, MLFMA is well parallelized with Message Passing Interface (MPI) on distributed memory computer platform. Without loss of generality, we choose the computation of scattering matrix elements of absorbing dust particles as an example. The comparison of the scattering matrix elements computed by our method and the discrete dipole approximation method (DDA) for an ellipsoid dust particle shows that the precision of our method is very good. The scattering matrix elements of large ellipsoid dusts with different aspect ratios and size parameters are computed. To show the capability of the presented algorithm for complex shaped particles, scattering by asymmetry Chebyshev particle with size parameter larger than 600 of complex refractive index m = 1.555 + 0.004 i and different orientations are studied.

  13. Teaching Conservation Laws, Symmetries and Elementary Particles with Fast Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van den Berg, Ed; Hoekzema, Dick

    2006-01-01

    Lessons about elementary particles at the secondary school level can degenerate into listing a zoo of particles and reactions, resulting in disorganized and rather meaningless knowledge. A more powerful way is to focus on conservation laws, symmetries and reaction diagrams. The conservation laws and symmetries provide generalizing power that…

  14. Angularly-resolved elastic light scattering of micro-particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aptowicz, Kevin B.

    From microbiology to astrophysics, the scientific community has long embraced elastic light scattering from small particles as a diagnostic tool. Elastic light scattering has an extremely large scattering cross-section, allowing for single particle interrogation. This is critical in applications where trace amounts of suspect particles are to be detected in a diverse background of natural aerosols. By angularly-resolving the elastically scattered light, features can be detected in these patterns that are sensitive to a particle's morphology (shape, size, internal structure, and composition). An apparatus to collect LA TAOS (Large-Angle Two-dimensional Angular Optical Scattering) patterns from single particles in-situ and in real-time was designed and constructed. The setup utilizes a cross-beam trigger system to minimize the effects of the aberration coma stemming from the main collection optic, an ellipsoidal mirror. LA TAOS patterns of ambient aerosols were collected and analyzed. Approximately 15% of the ambient aerosol had a sphere-like shape. The refractive index of these spheres was estimated by curve-fitting to Lorenz-Mie theory. In addition, the island features prevalent in the LA TAOS pattern were analyzed. Metrics generated from these were used to get partial discrimination between clusters of Bacillus subtilis spores (a simulant for anthrax) and aerosol particles found in the ambient atmosphere. A novel experimental setup for collecting simultaneously LA TAOS patterns at two wavelengths in the mid-infrared was also implemented. With this setup, the relative strength of single-particle absorption could be discerned at the two illuminating wavelengths.

  15. Absorption and elastic scattering of light by particle aggregates.

    PubMed

    Quinten, M; Kreibig, U

    1993-10-20

    Light scattering and absorption by spherical particles is extended to aggregates of spheres with arbitrary shape and size. We applied the theory of G6rardy and Ausloos [Phys. Rev. B 25, 4204-4229 (1082)] to compute the total extinction loss spectra of several aggregates of nanometer-sized silver spheres from the near IR to the near UV. Silver was best suited to provide quantitative comparison with experiments concerning the scattering and absorption in the visible spectral region. Additional resonant extinction was obtained besides the resonant extinction of the single silver sphere. The spectra were discussed in detail to give general results that are independent of the particle material. PMID:20856447

  16. Detection of fast flying nanoparticles by light scattering over a large volume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettazzi, F.; Bäumer, S.; van der Donck, J.; Deutz, A.

    2015-06-01

    is a well-known detection method which is applied in many different scientific and technology domains including atmospheric physics, environmental control, and biology. It allows contactless and remote detection of sub-micron size particles. However, methods for detecting a single fast moving particle smaller than 100 nm are lacking. In the present work we report a preliminary design study of an inline large area detector for nanoparticles larger than 50 nm which move with velocities up to 100 m/s. The detector design is based on light scattering using commercially available components. The presented design takes into account all challenges connected to the inline implementation of the scattering technique in the system: the need for the detector to have a large field of view to cover a volume with a footprint commensurate to an area of 100mm x 100mm, the necessity to sense nanoparticles transported at high velocity, and the requirement of large capture rate with a false detection as low as one false positive per week. The impact of all these stringent requirements on the expected sensitivity and performances of the device is analyzed by mean of a dedicated performance model.

  17. Fast light-regulated genes of Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed Central

    Sommer, T; Chambers, J A; Eberle, J; Lauter, F R; Russo, V E

    1989-01-01

    Several physiological reactions including the sexual differentiation of the ascomycete Neurospora crassa are triggered by blue light. Mutants in the white-collar genes wc-1 and wc-2 are blind for all the blue light effects tested so far. We have previously shown that blue light induces some translatable mRNAs at different times after beginning the illumination. Here we report the cDNA cloning of four genes that are induced by blue light. Induction of these transcripts is temporally ordered (lag times from 2 to 45 min). Analysis of run-on transcripts show that the increases in mRNA levels are due to de novo transcription. None of these transcripts is inducible in white-collar mutants. Images PMID:2527354

  18. Composite particle representation for light sd shell nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Collinson, D.F.

    1986-01-01

    The Composite Particle Representation is applied to light sd shell nuclei /sup 20/O, /sup 20/F and /sup 20/Ne. The energy spectrum is found to agree exactly with the shell model in all cases. The CPR theory is then used to examine the possible boson structure of sd shell wavefunctions. Only in the case of /sup 20/O are the wavefunctions found to have a high boson probability.

  19. Discrimination of airborne material particles from light scattering (TAOS) patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosta, Giovanni F.; Pan, Yong-Le; Videen, Gorden; Aptowicz, Kevin B.; Chang, Richard K.

    2013-05-01

    Two-dimensional angle-resolved optical scattering (TAOS) is an experimental method which collects the intensity pattern of monochromatic light scattered by a single, micron-sized airborne particle. In general, the interpretation of these patterns and the retrieval of the particle refractive index, shape or size alone, are difficult problems. The solution proposed herewith relies on a learning machine (LM): rather than identifying airborne particles from their scattering patterns, TAOS patterns themselves are classified. The LM consists of two interacting modules: a feature extraction module and a linear classifier. Feature extraction relies on spectrum enhancement, which includes the discrete cosine Fourier transform and non-linear operations. Linear classification relies on multivariate statistical analysis. Interaction enables supervised training of the LM. The application described in this article aims at discriminating the TAOS patterns of single bacterial spores (Bacillus subtilis) from patterns of atmospheric aerosol and diesel soot particles. The latter are known to interfere with the detection of bacterial spores. Classification has been applied to a data set with more than 3000 TAOS patterns from various materials. Some classification experiments are described, where the size of training sets has been varied as well as many other parameters which control the classifier. By assuming all training and recognition patterns to come from the respective reference materials only, the most satisfactory classification result corresponds to ≍ 20% false negatives from Bacillus subtilis particles and <= 11% false positives from environmental and diesel particles.

  20. Fast pyrolysis of an ensemble of biomass particles in a fluidized bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabinovich, O. S.; Borodulya, V. A.; Vinogradov, L. M.; Korban, V. V.

    2010-09-01

    A combined approach to the modeling of fast pyrolysis of biomass particles in a fluidized bed has been used. We used models of different levels: two models of pyrolysis of a single particle — with lumped and distributed parameters — and a model of pyrolysis of an ensemble of biomass particles based on the continuum equations for the gas blown through the bed and the equations of motion for individual particles. We have determined optimal (in terms of the biofuel yield) temperatures of the process for various particle sizes of wood biomass and various values of its moisture.

  1. The wave-particle duality of light: A demonstration experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitrova, T. L.; Weis, A.

    2008-02-01

    The wave-particle duality of light plays a fundamental role in introductory courses on quantum mechanics. Traditionally the wave and particle aspects of light are demonstrated in separate experiments which makes it difficult for students to understand their complementary nature. We present an experiment using a single apparatus that demonstrates the wave aspect, the particle aspect, and most importantly, their coexistence. The apparatus is based on a Mach-Zehnder interferometer in which a light beam is attenuated so that at each instant there is only a single photon in the interferometer. In this way the observation of single photon interference becomes possible. By integrating the single photon events in a storage oscilloscope the evolution toward classical interference fringes can be shown in real time. A second strong laser beam, derived from the same pointer, but slightly displaced, traverses the interferometer at the same time, allowing the simultaneous demonstration of wave aspects. Special features of the setup are low cost, simplicity, didactical power and suitability for presentations in large lecture halls using both multimedia projections and audible signals.

  2. Experimental detection of transverse particle movement with structured light.

    PubMed

    Rosales-Guzmán, Carmelo; Hermosa, Nathaniel; Belmonte, Aniceto; Torres, Juan P

    2013-01-01

    One procedure widely used to detect the velocity of a moving object is by using the Doppler effect. This is the perceived change in frequency of a wave caused by the relative motion between the emitter and the detector, or between the detector and a reflecting target. The relative movement, in turn, generates a time-varying phase which translates into the detected frequency shift. The classical longitudinal Doppler effect is sensitive only to the velocity of the target along the line-of-sight between the emitter and the detector (longitudinal velocity), since any transverse velocity generates no frequency shift. This makes the transverse velocity undetectable in the classical scheme. Although there exists a relativistic transverse Doppler effect, it gives values that are too small for the typical velocities involved in most laser remote sensing applications. Here we experimentally demonstrate a novel way to detect transverse velocities. The key concept is the use of structured light beams. These beams are unique in the sense that their phases can be engineered such that each point in its transverse plane has an associated phase value. When a particle moves across the beam, the reflected light will carry information about the particle's movement through the variation of the phase of the light that reaches the detector, producing a frequency shift associated with the movement of the particle in the transverse plane. PMID:24085150

  3. Online submicron particle sizing by dynamic light scattering using autodilution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicoli, David F.; Elings, V. B.

    1989-01-01

    Efficient production of a wide range of commercial products based on submicron colloidal dispersions would benefit from instrumentation for online particle sizing, permitting real time monitoring and control of the particle size distribution. Recent advances in the technology of dynamic light scattering (DLS), especially improvements in algorithms for inversion of the intensity autocorrelation function, have made it ideally suited to the measurement of simple particle size distributions in the difficult submicron region. Crucial to the success of an online DSL based instrument is a simple mechanism for automatically sampling and diluting the starting concentrated sample suspension, yielding a final concentration which is optimal for the light scattering measurement. A proprietary method and apparatus was developed for performing this function, designed to be used with a DLS based particle sizing instrument. A PC/AT computer is used as a smart controller for the valves in the sampler diluter, as well as an input-output communicator, video display and data storage device. Quantitative results are presented for a latex suspension and an oil-in-water emulsion.

  4. Development of a Bioaerosol single particle detector (BIO IN) for the Fast Ice Nucleus CHamber FINCH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bundke, U.; Reimann, B.; Nillius, B.; Jaenicke, R.; Bingemer, H.

    2010-02-01

    In this work we present the setup and first tests of our new BIO IN detector. This detector was constructed to classify atmospheric ice nuclei (IN) for their biological content. It is designed to be coupled to the Fast Ice Nucleus CHamber FINCH. If one particle acts as an ice nucleus, it will be at least partly covered with ice at the end of the development section of the FINCH chamber. The device combines an auto-fluorescence detector and a circular depolarization detector for simultaneous detection of biological material and discrimination between water droplets, ice crystals and non activated large aerosol particles. The excitation of biological material with UV light and analysis of auto-fluorescence is a common principle used for flow cytometry, fluorescence microscopy, spectroscopy and imaging. The detection of auto-fluorescence of airborne single particles demands some more experimental effort. However, expensive commercial sensors are available for special purposes, e.g. size distribution measurements. But these sensors will not fit the specifications needed for the FINCH IN counter (e.g. high sample flow of up 10 LPM). The newly developed -low cost- BIO IN sensor uses a single high-power UV LED for the electronic excitation instead of much more expensive UV lasers. Other key advantages of the new sensor are the low weight, compact size, and the little effect on the aerosol sample, which allows it to be coupled with other instruments for further analysis. The instrument will be flown on one of the first missions of the new German research aircraft "HALO" (High Altitude and LOng range).

  5. Fast calculation of digitally reconstructed radiographs using light fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russakoff, Daniel B.; Rohlfing, Torsten; Rueckert, Daniel; Shahidi, Ramin; Kim, Daniel; Maurer, Calvin R., Jr.

    2003-05-01

    Calculating digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs)is an important step in intensity-based fluoroscopy-to-CT image registration methods. Unfortunately, the standard techniques to generate DRRs involve ray casting and run in time O(n3),where we assume that n is approximately the size (in voxels) of one side of the DRR as well as one side of the CT volume. Because of this, generation of DRRs is typically the rate-limiting step in the execution time of intensity-based fluoroscopy-to-CT registration algorithms. We address this issue by extending light field rendering techniques from the computer graphics community to generate DRRs instead of conventional rendered images. Using light fields allows most of the computation to be performed in a preprocessing step;after this precomputation step, very accurate DRRs can be generated in time O(n2). Using a light field generated from 1,024 DRRs of resolution 256×256, we can create new DRRs that appear visually identical to ones generated by conventional ray casting. Importantly, the DRRs generated using the light field are computed over 300 times faster than DRRs generated using conventional ray casting(50 vs.17,000 ms on a PC with a 2 GHz Intel Pentium 4 processor).

  6. Light Scattering By Nonspherical Particles: Current Status and Challenging Issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mishchenko, Michael; Hansen, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Quantitative analyses of remote sensing measurements of aerosols, clouds, precipitation, and particulate surfaces as well as computations of the Earth's radiation balance require detailed understanding of the interaction of small particles with light and other electromagnetic radiation. The convenient availability of the Lorenz-Mie theory has led to a widespread practice of treating all particles as if they were spheres. However, many natural and anthropogenic particles have nonspherical shapes, and the accumulated knowledge suggests that their scattering and radiative properties can be dramatically different from those of equivalent spheres. This presentation will summarize the recent significant progress achieved in the area of electromagnetic scattering by nonspherical particles and outline major problems that still await solution. The talk will cover the following specific topics: (1) comparison of most widely used exact and approximate theoretical techniques; (2) outline of laboratory and field measurement techniques; (3) compare theory and experiment; (4) need for a statistical approach in dealing with natural particles; (5) remote sensing and radiative transfer applications; and (6) major unsolved problems.

  7. Improvement in fast particle track reconstruction with robust statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aartsen, M. G.; Abbasi, R.; Abdou, Y.; Ackermann, M.; Adams, J.; Aguilar, J. A.; Ahlers, M.; Altmann, D.; Auffenberg, J.; Bai, X.; Baker, M.; Barwick, S. W.; Baum, V.; Bay, R.; Beatty, J. J.; Bechet, S.; Becker Tjus, J.; Becker, K.-H.; Benabderrahmane, M. L.; BenZvi, S.; Berghaus, P.; Berley, D.; Bernardini, E.; Bernhard, A.; Besson, D. Z.; Binder, G.; Bindig, D.; Bissok, M.; Blaufuss, E.; Blumenthal, J.; Boersma, D. J.; Bohaichuk, S.; Bohm, C.; Bose, D.; Böser, S.; Botner, O.; Brayeur, L.; Bretz, H.-P.; Brown, A. M.; Bruijn, R.; Brunner, J.; Carson, M.; Casey, J.; Casier, M.; Chirkin, D.; Christov, A.; Christy, B.; Clark, K.; Clevermann, F.; Coenders, S.; Cohen, S.; Cowen, D. F.; Cruz Silva, A. H.; Danninger, M.; Daughhetee, J.; Davis, J. C.; Day, M.; De Clercq, C.; De Ridder, S.; Desiati, P.; de Vries, K. D.; de With, M.; DeYoung, T.; Díaz-Vélez, J. C.; Dunkman, M.; Eagan, R.; Eberhardt, B.; Eisch, J.; Euler, S.; Evenson, P. A.; Fadiran, O.; Fazely, A. R.; Fedynitch, A.; Feintzeig, J.; Feusels, T.; Filimonov, K.; Finley, C.; Fischer-Wasels, T.; Flis, S.; Franckowiak, A.; Frantzen, K.; Fuchs, T.; Gaisser, T. K.; Gallagher, J.; Gerhardt, L.; Gladstone, L.; Glüsenkamp, T.; Goldschmidt, A.; Golup, G.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Goodman, J. A.; Góra, D.; Grandmont, D. T.; Grant, D.; Groß, A.; Ha, C.; Haj Ismail, A.; Hallen, P.; Hallgren, A.; Halzen, F.; Hanson, K.; Heereman, D.; Heinen, D.; Helbing, K.; Hellauer, R.; Hickford, S.; Hill, G. C.; Hoffman, K. D.; Hoffmann, R.; Homeier, A.; Hoshina, K.; Huelsnitz, W.; Hulth, P. O.; Hultqvist, K.; Hussain, S.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobi, E.; Jacobsen, J.; Jagielski, K.; Japaridze, G. S.; Jero, K.; Jlelati, O.; Kaminsky, B.; Kappes, A.; Karg, T.; Karle, A.; Kelley, J. L.; Kiryluk, J.; Kläs, J.; Klein, S. R.; Köhne, J.-H.; Kohnen, G.; Kolanoski, H.; Köpke, L.; Kopper, C.; Kopper, S.; Koskinen, D. J.; Kowalski, M.; Krasberg, M.; Krings, K.; Kroll, G.; Kunnen, J.; Kurahashi, N.; Kuwabara, T.; Labare, M.; Landsman, H.; Larson, M. J.; Lesiak-Bzdak, M.; Leuermann, M.; Leute, J.; Lünemann, J.; Macías, O.; Madsen, J.; Maggi, G.; Maruyama, R.; Mase, K.; Matis, H. S.; McNally, F.; Meagher, K.; Merck, M.; Meures, T.; Miarecki, S.; Middell, E.; Milke, N.; Miller, J.; Mohrmann, L.; Montaruli, T.; Morse, R.; Nahnhauer, R.; Naumann, U.; Niederhausen, H.; Nowicki, S. C.; Nygren, D. R.; Obertacke, A.; Odrowski, S.; Olivas, A.; Omairat, A.; O'Murchadha, A.; Paul, L.; Pepper, J. A.; Pérez de los Heros, C.; Pfendner, C.; Pieloth, D.; Pinat, E.; Posselt, J.; Price, P. B.; Przybylski, G. T.; Rädel, L.; Rameez, M.; Rawlins, K.; Redl, P.; Reimann, R.; Resconi, E.; Rhode, W.; Ribordy, M.; Richman, M.; Riedel, B.; Rodrigues, J. P.; Rott, C.; Ruhe, T.; Ruzybayev, B.; Ryckbosch, D.; Saba, S. M.; Salameh, T.; Sander, H.-G.; Santander, M.; Sarkar, S.; Schatto, K.; Scheriau, F.; Schmidt, T.; Schmitz, M.; Schoenen, S.; Schöneberg, S.; Schönwald, A.; Schukraft, A.; Schulte, L.; Schulz, O.; Seckel, D.; Sestayo, Y.; Seunarine, S.; Shanidze, R.; Sheremata, C.; Smith, M. W. E.; Soldin, D.; Spiczak, G. M.; Spiering, C.; Stamatikos, M.; Stanev, T.; Stasik, A.; Stezelberger, T.; Stokstad, R. G.; Stößl, A.; Strahler, E. A.; Ström, R.; Sullivan, G. W.; Taavola, H.; Taboada, I.; Tamburro, A.; Tepe, A.; Ter-Antonyan, S.; Tešić, G.; Tilav, S.; Toale, P. A.; Toscano, S.; Unger, E.; Usner, M.; Vallecorsa, S.; van Eijndhoven, N.; Van Overloop, A.; van Santen, J.; Vehring, M.; Voge, M.; Vraeghe, M.; Walck, C.; Waldenmaier, T.; Wallraff, M.; Weaver, Ch.; Wellons, M.; Wendt, C.; Westerhoff, S.; Whitehorn, N.; Wiebe, K.; Wiebusch, C. H.; Williams, D. R.; Wissing, H.; Wolf, M.; Wood, T. R.; Woschnagg, K.; Xu, D. L.; Xu, X. W.; Yanez, J. P.; Yodh, G.; Yoshida, S.; Zarzhitsky, P.; Ziemann, J.; Zierke, S.; Zoll, M.; Recht, B.; Ré, C.

    2014-02-01

    The IceCube project has transformed 1 km3 of deep natural Antarctic ice into a Cherenkov detector. Muon neutrinos are detected and their direction is inferred by mapping the light produced by the secondary muon track inside the volume instrumented with photomultipliers. Reconstructing the muon track from the observed light is challenging due to noise, light scattering in the ice medium, and the possibility of simultaneously having multiple muons inside the detector, resulting from the large flux of cosmic ray muons. This paper describes work on two problems: (1) the track reconstruction problem, in which, given a set of observations, the goal is to recover the track of a muon; and (2) the coincident event problem, which is to determine how many muons are active in the detector during a time window. Rather than solving these problems by developing more complex physical models that are applied at later stages of the analysis, our approach is to augment the detector's early reconstruction with data filters and robust statistical techniques. These can be implemented at the level of on-line reconstruction and, therefore, improve all subsequent reconstructions. Using the metric of median angular resolution, a standard metric for track reconstruction, we improve the accuracy in the initial reconstruction direction by 13%. We also present improvements in measuring the number of muons in coincident events: we can accurately determine the number of muons 98% of the time.

  8. Measurement of the information velocity in fast- and slow-light optical pulse propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenner, Michael David

    This thesis describes a study of the velocity of information on optical pulses propagating through fast- and slow-light media. In fast- and slow-light media, the group velocity vg is faster than the speed of light in vacuum c (vg > c or vg < 0) or slower than c (0 < vg < c) respectively. While it is largely accepted that optical pulses can travel at these extreme group velocities, the velocity of information encoded on them is still the subject of considerable debate. There are many contradictory theories describing the velocity of information on optical pulses, but no accepted techniques for its experimental measurement. The velocity of information has broad implications for the principle of relativistic causality (which requires that information travels no faster than c) and for modern communications and computation. In this thesis, a new technique for measuring the information velocity vi is described and implemented for fast- and slow-light media. The fast- and slow-light media are generated using modern dispersion-tailoring techniques that use large atomic coherences to generate strong normal and anomalous dispersion. The information velocity in these media can then be measured using information-theoretic concepts by creating an alphabet of two distinct pulse symbols and transmitting the symbols through the media. By performing a detailed statistical analysis of the received information as a function of time, it is possible to calculate vi. This new technique makes it possible for the first time to measure the velocity of information on optical pulses. Applying this technique to fast-light pulses, where vg/c = -0.051 +/- 0.002, it is found that vi /c = 0.4(+0.7--0.2). In the slow-light case, where vg/c = 0.0097 +/- 0.0003, information is found to propagate at vi/c = 0.6. In the slow-light case, the error bars are slightly more complicated. The fast bound is -0.5c (which is faster than positive values) and the slow bound is 0.2c . These results represent the

  9. Fast atrazine photodegradation in water by pulsed light technology.

    PubMed

    Baranda, Ana Beatriz; Barranco, Alejandro; de Marañón, Iñigo Martínez

    2012-03-01

    Pulsed light technology consists of a successive repetition of short duration (325μs) and high power flashes emitted by xenon lamps. These flashlamps radiate a broadband emission light (approx. 200-1000 nm) with a considerable amount of light in the short-wave UV spectrum. In the present work, this technology was tested as a new tool for the degradation of the herbicide atrazine in water. To evaluate the presence and evolution with time of this herbicide, as well as the formation of derivatives, liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (electrospray ionization) ion trap operating in positive mode was used. The degradation process followed first-order kinetics. Fluences about 1.8-2.3 J/cm(2) induced 50% reduction of atrazine concentration independently of its initial concentration in the range 1-1000 μg/L. Remaining concentrations of atrazine, below the current legal limit for pesticides, were achieved in a short period of time. While atrazine was degraded, no chlorinated photoproducts were formed and ten dehalogenated derivatives were detected. The molecular structures for some of these derivatives could be suggested, being hydroxyatrazine the main photoproduct identified. The different formation profiles of photoproducts suggested that the degradation pathway may include several successive and competitive steps, with subsequent degradation processes taking part from the already formed degradation products. According to the degradation efficiency, the short treatment time and the lack of chloroderivatives, this new technology could be considered as an alternative for water treatment. PMID:22153354

  10. Fast excitation of geodesic acoustic mode by energetic particle beams

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Jintao; Qiu, Zhiyong; Zonca, Fulvio

    2015-12-15

    A new mechanism for geodesic acoustic mode (GAM) excitation by a not fully slowed down energetic particle (EP) beam is analyzed to explain experimental observations in Large Helical Device. It is shown that the positive velocity space gradient near the lower-energy end of the EP distribution function can strongly drive the GAM unstable. The new features of this EP-induced GAM (EGAM) are: (1) no instability threshold in the pitch angle; (2) the EGAM frequency can be higher than the local GAM frequency; and (3) the instability growth rate is much larger than that driven by a fully slowed down EP beam.

  11. Resonant Alfven wave instabilities driven by streaming fast particles

    SciTech Connect

    Zachary, A.

    1987-05-08

    A plasma simulation code is used to study the resonant interactions between streaming ions and Alfven waves. The medium which supports the Alfven waves is treated as a single, one-dimensional, ideal MHD fluid, while the ions are treated as kinetic particles. The code is used to study three ion distributions: a cold beam; a monoenergetic shell; and a drifting distribution with a power-law dependence on momentum. These distributions represent: the field-aligned beams upstream of the earth's bow shock; the diffuse ions upstream of the bow shock; and the cosmic ray distribution function near a supernova remnant shock. 92 refs., 31 figs., 12 tabs.

  12. Additivity of light-scattering patterns of aggregated biological particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moskalensky, Alexander E.; Strokotov, Dmitry I.; Chernyshev, Andrei V.; Maltsev, Valeri P.; Yurkin, Maxim A.

    2014-08-01

    The paper is focused on light scattering by aggregates of optically soft particles with a size larger than the wavelength, in particular, blood platelets. We conducted a systematic simulation of light scattering by dimers and larger aggregates of blood platelets, each modeled as oblate spheroids, using the discrete dipole approximation. Two-dimensional (2-D) light scattering patterns (LSPs) and internal fields showed that the multiple scattering between constituent particles can be neglected. Additionally, we derived conditions of the scattering angle and orientation of the dimer, under which the averaging of the 2-D LSPs over the azimuthal scattering angle washes out interference in the far field, resulting in averaged LSPs of the aggregate being equal to the sum of that for its constituents. We verified theoretical conclusions using the averaged LSPs of blood platelets measured with the scanning flow cytometer (SFC). Moreover, we obtained similar results for a model system of aggregates of polystyrene beads, studied both experimentally and theoretically. Finally, we discussed the potential of discriminating platelet aggregates from monomers using the SFC.

  13. Light absorption properties of laboratory-generated tar ball particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffer, A.; Tóth, A.; Nyirő-Kósa, I.; Pósfai, M.; Gelencsér, A.

    2016-01-01

    Tar balls (TBs) are a specific particle type that is abundant in the global troposphere, in particular in biomass smoke plumes. These particles belong to the family of atmospheric brown carbon (BrC), which can absorb light in the visible range of the solar spectrum. Albeit TBs are typically present as individual particles in biomass smoke plumes, their absorption properties have been only indirectly inferred from field observations or calculations based on their electron energy-loss spectra. This is because in biomass smoke TBs coexist with various other particle types (e.g., organic particles with inorganic inclusions and soot, the latter emitted mainly during flaming conditions) from which they cannot be physically separated; thus, a direct experimental determination of their absorption properties is not feasible. Very recently we have demonstrated that TBs can be generated in the laboratory from droplets of wood tar that resemble atmospheric TBs in all of their observed properties. As a follow-up study, we have installed on-line instruments to our laboratory set-up, which generate pure TB particles to measure the absorption and scattering, as well as the size distribution of the particles. In addition, samples were collected for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and total carbon (TC) analysis. The effects of experimental parameters were also studied. The mass absorption coefficients of the laboratory-generated TBs were found to be in the range of 0.8-3.0 m2 g-1 at 550 nm, with absorption Ångström exponents (AAE) between 2.7 and 3.4 (average 2.9) in the wavelength range 467-652 nm. The refractive index of TBs as derived from Mie calculations was about 1.84 - 0.21i at 550 nm. In the brown carbon continuum, these values fall closer to those of soot than to other light-absorbing species such as humic-like substances (HULIS). Considering the abundance of TBs in biomass smoke and the global magnitude of biomass burning emissions, these findings may have

  14. Light absorption properties of laboratory generated tar ball particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffer, A.; Tóth, A.; Nyirő-Kósa, I.; Pósfai, M.; Gelencsér, A.

    2015-06-01

    Tar balls (TBs) are a specific particle type which is abundant in the global troposphere, in particular in biomass smoke plumes. These particles belong to the family of atmospheric brown carbon (BrC) which can absorb light in the visible range of the solar spectrum. Albeit TBs are typically present as individual particles in biomass smoke plumes, their absorption properties have been only indirectly inferred from field observations or calculations based on their electron energy-loss spectra. This is because in biomass smoke TBs coexist with various other particle types (e.g. organic particles with inorganic inclusions and soot, the latter is emitted mainly during flaming conditions) from which they cannot be physically separated; thus, a direct experimental determination of their absorption properties is not feasible. Very recently we have demonstrated that TBs can be generated in the laboratory from droplets of wood tar that resemble atmospheric TBs in all of their observed properties. As a follow-up study we have installed on-line instruments to our laboratory set-up generating pure TB particles to measure the absorption and scattering, as well as size distribution of the particles. In addition, samples were collected for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and total carbon (TC) analysis. The effects of experimental parameters were also studied. The mass absorption coefficients of the laboratory generated TBs were found to be in the range of 0.8-3.0 m2 g-1 at 550 nm, with absorption Ångström exponents (AAE) between 2.7 and 3.4 (average 2.9) in the wavelength range 467-652 nm. The refractive index of TBs as derived from Mie calculations was about 1.84-0.21i at 550 nm. In the brown carbon continuum these values fall closer to those of soot than to other light-absorbing species such as humic-like substances (HULIS). Considering the abundance of TBs in biomass smoke and the global magnitude of biomass burning emissions, these findings may have substantial

  15. Fast particle characterization using digital holography and neural networks.

    PubMed

    Schneider, B; Dambre, J; Bienstman, P

    2016-01-01

    We propose using a neural network approach in conjunction with digital holographic microscopy in order to rapidly determine relevant parameters such as the core and shell diameter of coated, non-absorbing spheres. We do so without requiring a time-consuming reconstruction of the cell image. In contrast to previous approaches, we are able to obtain a continuous value for parameters such as size, as opposed to binning into a discrete number of categories. Also, we are able to separately determine both core and shell diameter. For simulated particle sizes ranging between 7 and 20 μm, we obtain accuracies of (4.4±0.2)% and (0.74±0.01)% for the core and shell diameter, respectively. PMID:26835632

  16. SOLAR NEUTRINO PHYSICS: SENSITIVITY TO LIGHT DARK MATTER PARTICLES

    SciTech Connect

    Lopes, Ilidio; Silk, Joseph E-mail: ilopes@uevora.pt

    2012-06-20

    Neutrinos are produced in several neutrino nuclear reactions of the proton-proton chain and carbon-nitrogen-oxygen cycle that take place at different radii of the Sun's core. Hence, measurements of solar neutrino fluxes provide a precise determination of the local temperature. The accumulation of non-annihilating light dark matter particles (with masses between 5 GeV and 16 GeV) in the Sun produces a change in the local solar structure, namely, a decrease in the central temperature of a few percent. This variation depends on the properties of the dark matter particles, such as the mass of the particle and its spin-independent scattering cross-section on baryon-nuclei, specifically, the scattering with helium, oxygen, and nitrogen among other heavy elements. This temperature effect can be measured in almost all solar neutrino fluxes. In particular, by comparing the neutrino fluxes generated by stellar models with current observations, namely {sup 8}B neutrino fluxes, we find that non-annihilating dark matter particles with a mass smaller than 10 GeV and a spin-independent scattering cross-section with heavy baryon-nuclei larger than 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -37} cm{sup -2} produce a variation in the {sup 8}B neutrino fluxes that would be in conflict with current measurements.

  17. Significant Attenuation of Lightly Damped Resonances Using Particle Dampers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Andrew; LaVerde, Bruce; Hunt, Ron; Knight, Joseph Brent

    2015-01-01

    When equipment designs must perform in a broad band vibration environment it can be difficult to avoid resonances that affect life and performance. This is especially true when an organization seeks to employ an asset from a heritage design in a new, more demanding vibration environment. Particle dampers may be used to provide significant attenuation of lightly damped resonances to assist with such a deployment of assets by including only a very minor set of modifications. This solution may be easier to implement than more traditional attenuation schemes. Furthermore, the cost in additional weight to the equipment can be very small. Complexity may also be kept to a minimum, because the particle dampers do not require tuning. Attenuating the vibratory response with particle dampers may therefore be simpler (in a set it and forget it kind of way) than tuned mass dampers. The paper will illustrate the use of an "equivalent resonance test jig" that can assist designers in verifying the potential resonance attenuation that may be available to them during the early trade stages of the design. An approach is suggested for transforming observed attenuation in the jig to estimated performance in the actual service design. KEY WORDS: Particle Damper, Performance in Vibration Environment, Damping, Resonance, Attenuation, Mitigation of Vibration Response, Response Estimate, Response Verification.

  18. Debye series for light scattering by a coated nonspherical particle

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Feng; Lock, James A.

    2010-06-15

    By using the extended boundary condition method, the Debye series is developed for light scattered by a coated nonspherical particle in order to interpret the angular dependence of the scattered intensity in terms of various physical processes. Numerical calculations are performed to study the influence of the coating thickness and the ellipticity of a coated spheroid on the angular position of the {alpha} and {beta} primary rainbows, which are produced by partial waves experiencing one internal reflection. The hyperbolic umbilic focal section is demonstrated and is analyzed for both the {alpha} and the {beta} rainbows.

  19. Debye series for light scattering by a coated nonspherical particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Feng; Lock, James A.

    2010-06-01

    By using the extended boundary condition method, the Debye series is developed for light scattered by a coated nonspherical particle in order to interpret the angular dependence of the scattered intensity in terms of various physical processes. Numerical calculations are performed to study the influence of the coating thickness and the ellipticity of a coated spheroid on the angular position of the α and β primary rainbows, which are produced by partial waves experiencing one internal reflection. The hyperbolic umbilic focal section is demonstrated and is analyzed for both the α and the β rainbows.

  20. Influence of finite bandwidth on the propagation of information in fast- and slow-light media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amano, Heisuke; Tomita, Makoto

    2016-06-01

    We examined the propagation of information encoded as nonanalytical points on temporally Gaussian-shaped optical pulses in fast- and slow-light systems. The bandwidth of the input pulses determined the sharpness of the nonanalytical points. A sharp bending nonanalytical point propagated with luminal velocity in both fast- and slow-light systems, in good agreement with relativistic causality. As the bandwidth was reduced, the bending point became broad and propagated with the relevant group velocities. This transition was, however, qualitatively different in the fast- and slow-light systems. We also examined the predictability of the future pulse shape beyond the practical nonanalytical point on the basis of the expansion. When the bandwidth was reduced below a critical value, the expansion well predicted the future pulse shape.

  1. O the Penetration of Fast-Charged Particles.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, David John

    The work presented here is intended to provide theoretical support for medical physicists who are interested in improving radiotherapy treatment plans involving charged particle beams. These plans still rely heavily on empirical behavior rather than theory as a basis for making predictions. In the most frequent therapy applications, electron beams, typically with initial energies between 5-20 MeV, penetrate materials of low atomic number. Energy loss is predominately by ionization and the effects of multiple scattering by repeated Coulomb deflections from nuclei are of primary interest. Our development is strongly influenced by these applications and so we begin our work with a review of Fermi-Eyges theory. This theory and ideas which were equivalent to it have dramatically improved electron beam treatment plans over the last several years, as is now generally recognized. This theory also has significant limitations due to the approximations or assumptions that it makes. Since we can improve and extend these results by relaxing some of the key assumptions, we continue by considering some generalizations of this basic theory and we discuss those which were given by Snyder-Scott, Lewis and Yang in some detail. Yang's theory had significant potential for applications but this theory will not work properly unless its time development is handled differently. This leads us to present a wave solution to the penetration problem in our final chapter. Sample calculations of the most important distributions are given there as well.

  2. Energetic-particle-driven instabilities and induced fast-ion transport in a reversed field pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, L.; Brower, D. L.; Ding, W. X.; Anderson, J. K.; Capecchi, W.; Eilerman, S.; Forest, C. B.; Koliner, J. J.; Nornberg, M. D.; Reusch, J.; Sarff, J. S.; Liu, D.

    2014-05-15

    Multiple bursty energetic-particle (EP) driven modes with fishbone-like structure are observed during 1 MW tangential neutral-beam injection in a reversed field pinch (RFP) device. The distinguishing features of the RFP, including large magnetic shear (tending to add stability) and weak toroidal magnetic field (leading to stronger drive), provide a complementary environment to tokamak and stellarator configurations for exploring basic understanding of EP instabilities. Detailed measurements of the EP mode characteristics and temporal-spatial dynamics reveal their influence on fast ion transport. Density fluctuations exhibit a dynamically evolving, inboard-outboard asymmetric spatial structure that peaks in the core where fast ions reside. The measured mode frequencies are close to the computed shear Alfvén frequency, a feature consistent with continuum modes destabilized by strong drive. The frequency pattern of the dominant mode depends on the fast-ion species. Multiple frequencies occur with deuterium fast ions compared to single frequency for hydrogen fast ions. Furthermore, as the safety factor (q) decreases, the toroidal mode number of the dominant EP mode transits from n=5 to n=6 while retaining the same poloidal mode number m=1. The transition occurs when the m=1, n=5 wave-particle resonance condition cannot be satisfied as the fast-ion safety factor (q{sub fi}) decreases. The fast-ion temporal dynamics, measured by a neutral particle analyzer, resemble a classical predator-prey relaxation oscillation. It contains a slow-growth phase arising from the beam fueling followed by a rapid drop when the EP modes peak, indicating that the fluctuation-induced transport maintains a stiff fast-ion density profile. The inferred transport rate is strongly enhanced with the onset of multiple EP modes.

  3. Fast particle confinement with optimized coil currents in the W7-X stellarator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drevlak, M.; Geiger, J.; Helander, P.; Turkin, Y.

    2014-07-01

    One of the principal goals of the W7-X stellarator is to demonstrate good confinement of energetic ions at finite β. This confinement, however, is sensitive to the magnetic field configuration and is thus vulnerable to design modifications of the coil geometry. The collisionless drift orbit losses for 60 keV protons in W7-X are studied using the ANTS code. Particles in this energy range will be produced by the neutral beam injection (NBI) system being constructed for W7-X, and are particularly important because protons at this energy accurately mimick the behaviour of 3.5 MeV α-particles in a HELIAS reactor. To investigate the possibility of improved fast particle confinement, several approaches to adjust the coil currents (5 main field coil currents +2 auxiliary coil currents) were explored. These strategies include simple rules of thumb as well as computational optimization of various properties of the magnetic field. It is shown that significant improvement of collisionless fast particle confinement can be achieved in W7-X for particle populations similar to α particles produced in fusion reactions. Nevertheless, the experimental goal of demonstrating confinement improvement with rising plasma pressure using an NBI-generated population appears to be difficult based on optimization of the coil currents only. The principal reason for this difficulty is that the NBI deposition profile is broader than the region of good fast-ion confinement around the magnetic axis.

  4. Light-induced electronic non-equilibrium in plasmonic particles.

    PubMed

    Kornbluth, Mordechai; Nitzan, Abraham; Seideman, Tamar

    2013-05-01

    We consider the transient non-equilibrium electronic distribution that is created in a metal nanoparticle upon plasmon excitation. Following light absorption, the created plasmons decohere within a few femtoseconds, producing uncorrelated electron-hole pairs. The corresponding non-thermal electronic distribution evolves in response to the photo-exciting pulse and to subsequent relaxation processes. First, on the femtosecond timescale, the electronic subsystem relaxes to a Fermi-Dirac distribution characterized by an electronic temperature. Next, within picoseconds, thermalization with the underlying lattice phonons leads to a hot particle in internal equilibrium that subsequently equilibrates with the environment. Here we focus on the early stage of this multistep relaxation process, and on the properties of the ensuing non-equilibrium electronic distribution. We consider the form of this distribution as derived from the balance between the optical absorption and the subsequent relaxation processes, and discuss its implication for (a) heating of illuminated plasmonic particles, (b) the possibility to optically induce current in junctions, and (c) the prospect for experimental observation of such light-driven transport phenomena. PMID:23656152

  5. Particle sizing by weighted measurements of scattered light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchele, Donald R.

    1988-01-01

    A description is given of a measurement method, applicable to a poly-dispersion of particles, in which the intensity of scattered light at any angle is weighted by a factor proportional to that angle. Determination is then made of four angles at which the weighted intensity is four fractions of the maximum intensity. These yield four characteristic diameters, i.e., the diameters of the volume/area mean (D sub 32 the Sauter mean) and the volume/diameter mean (D sub 31); the diameters at cumulative volume fractions of 0.5 (D sub v0.5 the volume median) and 0.75 (D sub v0.75). They also yield the volume dispersion of diameters. Mie scattering computations show that an average diameter less than three micrometers cannot be accurately measured. The results are relatively insensitive to extraneous background light and to the nature of the diameter distribution. Also described is an experimental method of verifying the conclusions by using two microscopic slides coated with polystyrene microspheres to simulate the particles and the background.

  6. Fast pulsed electroluminescence from polymer light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.; Sun, R. G.; Yu, G.; Heeger, A. J.

    2002-02-01

    Transient electroluminescence (EL) from polymer light emitting diodes is investigated by measurements of the response to short voltage pulses. The carrier mobility is derived from the delay time between the electrical pulse and the onset of EL, μ≈3×10-4 cm2/V s. Bilayer devices with a polyethylene-dioxythiophene (PEDOT), hole injection layer are also studied. The delay time between the electrical pulse and the onset of EL is independent of the thickness of the injection layer, implying that the conducting PEDOT functions as a part of the electrode. When a dc forward bias is applied to the device, the delay time decreases, probably as a result of the shift of the emission zone towards the anode. The EL turn-on depends on the amplitude of the voltage pulse. The data are modeled by an equivalent circuit with a fixed capacitance connected in parallel with a nonlinear resistance. The solution of the differential equation depends on the exact form of the device's I-V curve. Two analytical solutions are provided, and an analysis based on space-charge-limited current is presented. By applying a dc forward bias in advance to precharge the space-charge capacitance, the turn-on response time is reduced to 12 ns. The EL decay consists of two components with time constants of 15 ns and 1 μs. The decay does not depend on either the amplitude of the voltage pulse or the prebias.

  7. Characterization of Mixed Polypeptide Colloidal Particles by Light Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuman, Hannah E.; Gaeckle, Grace K.; Gavin, John; Holland, Nolan B.; Streletzky, Kiril A.

    2014-03-01

    Temperature-dependent polymer surfactants have been developed by connecting three elastin-like polypeptide (ELP) chains to a charged protein domain (foldon), forming a three-armed star polymer. At low temperatures the polymer is soluble, while at higher temperatures it forms micelles. The behavior of mixtures of the three-armed star ELP (E20-Foldon) and H40-Linear ELP chains was analyzed under different salt and protein concentrations and various foldon to linear ELP ratio using Depolarized Dynamic Light Scattering. It was expected that under certain conditions the pure E20-Foldon would form spherical micelles, which upon adding the linear ELP would change in size and possibly shape. The pure E20-Foldon indeed formed largely spherical micelles with Rh of 10-20nm in solutions with 15-100mM salt and protein concentration between 10 μM and 100 μM. For the mixtures of 50 μM E20-Foldon and varying concentrations of H40-Linear in 25mM of salt, it was discovered that low and high H40-Linear concentration (4 μM and 50 μM) had only one transition. For the mixtures with of 10 and 25 μM of H40-Linear the two distinct transition temperatures were observed by spectrophotometry. The first transition corresponded to significantly elongated diffusive particles of apparent Rh of 30-50nm, while the second transition corresponded to slightly anisotropic diffusive particles with apparent Rh of about 20nm. At all H40-Linear concentrations studied, diffusive particles were seen above the second transition. Their radius and ability to depolarize light increased with the increase of H40-Linear concentration.

  8. Light Particle Solution to the Cosmic Lithium Problem.

    PubMed

    Goudelis, Andreas; Pospelov, Maxim; Pradler, Josef

    2016-05-27

    We point out that the cosmological abundance of ^{7}Li can be reduced down to observed values if during its formation, big bang nucleosynthesis is modified by the presence of light electrically neutral particles X that have substantial interactions with nucleons. We find that the lithium problem can be solved without affecting the precisely measured abundances of deuterium and helium if the following conditions are satisfied: the mass (energy) and lifetimes of such particles are bounded by 1.6  MeV≤m_{X}(E_{X})≤20  MeV and few100s≲τ_{X}≲10^{4}  s, and the abundance times the absorption cross section by either deuterium or ^{7}Be are comparable to the Hubble rate, n_{X}σ_{abs}v∼H, at the time of ^{7}Be formation. We include X-initiated reactions into the primordial nucleosynthesis framework, observe that it leads to a substantial reduction of the freeze-out abundances of ^{7}Li+^{7}Be, and find specific model realizations of this scenario. Concentrating on the axionlike-particle case, X=a, we show that all these conditions can be satisfied if the coupling to d quarks is in the range of f_{d}^{-1}∼TeV^{-1}, which can be probed at intensity frontier experiments. PMID:27284644

  9. Light Particle Solution to the Cosmic Lithium Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goudelis, Andreas; Pospelov, Maxim; Pradler, Josef

    2016-05-01

    We point out that the cosmological abundance of 7Li can be reduced down to observed values if during its formation, big bang nucleosynthesis is modified by the presence of light electrically neutral particles X that have substantial interactions with nucleons. We find that the lithium problem can be solved without affecting the precisely measured abundances of deuterium and helium if the following conditions are satisfied: the mass (energy) and lifetimes of such particles are bounded by 1.6 MeV ≤mX(EX)≤20 MeV and few 100 s ≲τX≲104 s , and the abundance times the absorption cross section by either deuterium or 7Be are comparable to the Hubble rate, nXσabsv ˜H , at the time of 7Be formation. We include X -initiated reactions into the primordial nucleosynthesis framework, observe that it leads to a substantial reduction of the freeze-out abundances of 7Li + 7Be, and find specific model realizations of this scenario. Concentrating on the axionlike-particle case, X =a , we show that all these conditions can be satisfied if the coupling to d quarks is in the range of fd-1˜TeV-1 , which can be probed at intensity frontier experiments.

  10. Light scattering Q-space analysis of irregularly shaped particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinson, Yuli W.; Maughan, Justin B.; Heinson, William R.; Chakrabarti, Amitabha; Sorensen, Christopher M.

    2016-01-01

    We report Q-space analysis of light scattering phase function data for irregularly shaped dust particles and of theoretical model output to describe them. This analysis involves plotting the scattered intensity versus the magnitude of the scattering wave vector q = (4π/λ)sin(θ/2), where λ is the optical wavelength and θ is the scattering angle, on a double-logarithmic plot. In q-space all the particle shapes studied display a scattering pattern which includes a q-independent forward scattering regime; a crossover, Guinier regime when q is near the inverse size; a power law regime; and an enhanced backscattering regime. Power law exponents show a quasi-universal functionality with the internal coupling parameter ρ'. The absolute value of the exponents start from 4 when ρ' < 1, the diffraction limit, and decreases as ρ' increases until a constant 1.75 ± 0.25 when ρ' ≳ 10. The diffraction limit exponent implies that despite their irregular structures, all the particles studied have mass and surface scaling dimensions of Dm = 3 and Ds = 2, respectively. This is different from fractal aggregates that have a power law equal to the fractal dimension Df because Df = Dm = Ds < 3. Spheres have Dm = 3 and Ds = 2 but do not show a single power law nor the same functionality with ρ'. The results presented here imply that Q-space analysis can differentiate between spheres and these two types of irregularly shaped particles. Furthermore, they are applicable to analysis of the contribution of aerosol radiative forcing to climate change and of aerosol remote sensing data.

  11. Particle simulations of efficient fast electron generation near the cutoff layer of an electrostatic wave

    SciTech Connect

    Karttunen, S.J.; Paettikangas, T.J.; Tala, T.J.; Cairns, R.A.

    1997-09-01

    Fast electron generation near the cutoff of an electrostatic plasma wave is investigated by particle-in-cell simulations and test particle calculations. Intense electron plasma waves which are excited in an underdense plasma region propagate up the density gradient until they are reflected from the cutoff layer. The density gradient affects the fast electron generation by the wave considerably. At low densities, the phase velocity is fairly close to the thermal distribution, which leads to wave-particle interactions with a large electron population. The trapped electrons are accelerated by the electron plasma wave with increasing phase velocity resulting in a very large and energetic population behind the cutoff layer. Since the accelerating electrons receive energy, the wave must be damped. A simple model based on the conservation of the energy of the wave and the trapped electrons is developed to describe the damping mechanism. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  12. REVIEW ARTICLE: Slow and fast light based on coherent population oscillations in erbium-doped fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arrieta-Yáñez, Francisco; Calderón, Oscar G.; Melle, Sonia

    2010-10-01

    In this paper we review the main results on slow and fast light induced by coherent population oscillations in optical fibres doped with erbium ions. We explain the physics behind this technique and we describe the experimental realization. Finally, we summarize some recent advances in this field and future goals.

  13. Slow/fast light using a very short Er3+/Yb3+ co-doped fiber.

    PubMed

    Gan, Jiulin; Chen, Jiali; Xu, Shanhui; Yang, Zhongmin; Jiang, Zhonghong

    2013-03-01

    A slow/fast light device with a sealed size of 130 mm×30 mm×3 mm has been demonstrated. Ultraslow propagation and superluminal propagation with group velocity values from 8.4 to -14.7 m/s are observed in a 3.86 cm long Er3+/Yb3+ co-doped single-mode phosphate glass fiber. The dependence of pump power, modulation frequency, and wavelength on the slow/fast light effect in this fiber is investigated in detail. These results suggest that this compact slow/fast device is more suitable for all-fiber applications than those made by traditional methods. PMID:23455260

  14. [Particle Size and Number Density Online Analysis for Particle Suspension with Polarization-Differentiation Elastic Light Scattering Spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-kang; Fang, Hui

    2016-03-01

    The basic principle of polarization-differentiation elastic light scattering spectroscopy based techniques is that under the linear polarized light incidence, the singlely scattered light from the superficial biological tissue and diffusively scattered light from the deep tissue can be separated according to the difference of polarization characteristics. The novel point of the paper is to apply this method to the detection of particle suspension and, to realize the simultaneous measurement of its particle size and number density in its natural status. We design and build a coaxial cage optical system, and measure the backscatter signal at a specified angle from a polystyrene microsphere suspension. By controlling the polarization direction of incident light with a linear polarizer and adjusting the polarization direction of collected light with another linear polarizer, we obtain the parallel polarized elastic light scattering spectrum and cross polarized elastic light scattering spectrum. The difference between the two is the differential polarized elastic light scattering spectrum which include only the single scattering information of the particles. We thus compare this spectrum to the Mie scattering calculation and extract the particle size. We then also analyze the cross polarized elastic light scattering spectrum by applying the particle size already extracted. The analysis is based on the approximate expressions taking account of light diffusing, from which we are able to obtain the number density of the particle suspension. We compare our experimental outcomes with the manufacturer-provided values and further analyze the influence of the particle diameter standard deviation on the number density extraction, by which we finally verify the experimental method. The potential applications of the method include the on-line particle quality monitoring for particle manufacture as well as the fat and protein density detection of milk products. PMID:27400522

  15. Observation and interpretation of fast sub-visual light pulses from the night sky

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemzek, R. J.; Winckler, J. R.

    1989-01-01

    Fast large-aperture photometers directed at the zenith on clear nights near Minneapolis have recorded many light pulses in the msec time range, but aside from man-made events these were almost entirely due to Rayleigh-scattered distant lightning, with a residual very low rate (less than 0.1/hr) of unidentified pulses. It is argued that 1-msec light pulses seen in several previous experiments may also be mostly Rayleigh-scattered lightning, rather than fluorescent light due to electron precipitation from lightning-induced whistlers as previously proposed.

  16. The linac coherent light source single particle imaging road map

    SciTech Connect

    Aquila, A.; Barty, A.; Bostedt, C.; Boutet, S.; Carini, G.; dePonte, D.; Drell, P.; Doniach, S.; Downing, K. H.; Earnest, T.; Elmlund, H.; Elser, V.; Gühr, M.; Hajdu, J.; Hastings, J.; Hau-Riege, S. P.; Huang, Z.; Lattman, E. E.; Maia, F. R.N.C.; Marchesini, S.; Ourmazd, A.; Pellegrini, C.; Schlichting, I.; Schroer, C.; Spence, J. C. H.; Vartanyants, I. A.; Wakatsuki, S.; Weis, W. I.; Williams, G. J.

    2015-07-01

    Intense femtosecond x-ray pulses from free-electron laser sources allow the imaging of individual particles in a single shot. Early experiments at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) have led to rapid progress in the field and, so far, coherent diffractive images have been recorded from biological specimens, aerosols, and quantum systems with a few-tens-of-nanometers resolution. In March 2014, LCLS held a workshop to discuss the scientific and technical challenges for reaching the ultimate goal of atomic resolution with single-shot coherent diffractive imaging. This paper summarizes the workshop findings and presents the roadmap toward reaching atomic resolution, 3D imaging at free-electron laser sources.

  17. The linac coherent light source single particle imaging road map

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Aquila, A.; Barty, A.; Bostedt, C.; Boutet, S.; Carini, G.; dePonte, D.; Drell, P.; Doniach, S.; Downing, K. H.; Earnest, T.; et al

    2015-07-01

    Intense femtosecond x-ray pulses from free-electron laser sources allow the imaging of individual particles in a single shot. Early experiments at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) have led to rapid progress in the field and, so far, coherent diffractive images have been recorded from biological specimens, aerosols, and quantum systems with a few-tens-of-nanometers resolution. In March 2014, LCLS held a workshop to discuss the scientific and technical challenges for reaching the ultimate goal of atomic resolution with single-shot coherent diffractive imaging. This paper summarizes the workshop findings and presents the roadmap toward reaching atomic resolution, 3D imaging at free-electronmore » laser sources.« less

  18. The linac coherent light source single particle imaging road map.

    PubMed

    Aquila, A; Barty, A; Bostedt, C; Boutet, S; Carini, G; dePonte, D; Drell, P; Doniach, S; Downing, K H; Earnest, T; Elmlund, H; Elser, V; Gühr, M; Hajdu, J; Hastings, J; Hau-Riege, S P; Huang, Z; Lattman, E E; Maia, F R N C; Marchesini, S; Ourmazd, A; Pellegrini, C; Santra, R; Schlichting, I; Schroer, C; Spence, J C H; Vartanyants, I A; Wakatsuki, S; Weis, W I; Williams, G J

    2015-07-01

    Intense femtosecond x-ray pulses from free-electron laser sources allow the imaging of individual particles in a single shot. Early experiments at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) have led to rapid progress in the field and, so far, coherent diffractive images have been recorded from biological specimens, aerosols, and quantum systems with a few-tens-of-nanometers resolution. In March 2014, LCLS held a workshop to discuss the scientific and technical challenges for reaching the ultimate goal of atomic resolution with single-shot coherent diffractive imaging. This paper summarizes the workshop findings and presents the roadmap toward reaching atomic resolution, 3D imaging at free-electron laser sources. PMID:26798801

  19. The linac coherent light source single particle imaging road map

    PubMed Central

    Aquila, A.; Barty, A.; Bostedt, C.; Boutet, S.; Carini, G.; dePonte, D.; Drell, P.; Doniach, S.; Downing, K. H.; Earnest, T.; Elmlund, H.; Elser, V.; Gühr, M.; Hajdu, J.; Hastings, J.; Hau-Riege, S. P.; Huang, Z.; Lattman, E. E.; Maia, F. R. N. C.; Marchesini, S.; Ourmazd, A.; Pellegrini, C.; Santra, R.; Schlichting, I.; Schroer, C.; Spence, J. C. H.; Vartanyants, I. A.; Wakatsuki, S.; Weis, W. I.; Williams, G. J.

    2015-01-01

    Intense femtosecond x-ray pulses from free-electron laser sources allow the imaging of individual particles in a single shot. Early experiments at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) have led to rapid progress in the field and, so far, coherent diffractive images have been recorded from biological specimens, aerosols, and quantum systems with a few-tens-of-nanometers resolution. In March 2014, LCLS held a workshop to discuss the scientific and technical challenges for reaching the ultimate goal of atomic resolution with single-shot coherent diffractive imaging. This paper summarizes the workshop findings and presents the roadmap toward reaching atomic resolution, 3D imaging at free-electron laser sources. PMID:26798801

  20. Study of wave-particle interaction between fast Magnetosonic and energetic electrons based on numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, S.

    2015-12-01

    There are many energetic electrons in the radiation belt of Earth. When the geomagnetic activity becomes stronger, the energy flux of energetic electrons will increase to more than ten times in the outer radiation belt, therefore it is very important to study how the energetic electrons generate and the lifetime of energetic electrons for space weather research. The acceleration of electrons in radiation belt is mainly depending on wave-particle interaction: the whistler mode chorus is the main driver for local acceleration mechanism, which could accelerate and loss energetic electrons; the geomagnetic pulsation ULF wave will cause energetic electron inward radial diffusion which will charge the electrons; recently observation results show us that the fast magnetosonic waves may also accelerate energetic electrons. For the reason that we try to study the wave-particle interaction between fast Magnetosonic and energetic electrons based on numerical simulation, in which the most important past is at the storm time the combination of highly warped Earth magnetic field and fast magnetosonic wave field will be applied for the electromagnetic environment of moving test particles. The energy, pitch angle and cross diffusion coefficients will be calculated respectively in this simulation to study how the electrons receive energy from fast magnetosonic wave. The diffusion coefficients within different dipole Earth magnetic field and non-dipole storm magnetic field are compared, while dynamics of electrons at selected initial energys are shown in our study.

  1. Fast light generation through velocity manipulation in two vertically-stacked ring resonators.

    PubMed

    Ciminelli, C; Campanella, C E; Dell'Olio, F; Armenise, M N

    2010-02-01

    Speed manipulation of optical pulses is a very attractive research challenge enabling next-generation high-capacity all-optical communication networks. Pulses can be effectively slowed by using different integrated optical structures such as coupled-resonator waveguiding structures or photonic crystal cavities. Fast light generation by means of integrated photonic devices is currently a quite unexplored research field in spite of its crucial importance for all-optical pulse processing. In this paper, we report on the first theoretical demonstration of fast light generation in an ultra-compact double vertical stacked ring resonator coupled to a bus waveguide. Periodic coupling between the two rings leads to splitting and recombining of symmetric and anti-symmetric resonant modes. Re-established degenerate modes can form when a symmetric and an anti-symmetric mode having different resonance order exhibit the same resonance wavelength. Under degenerate mode conditions, wide wavelength ranges where the group velocity is negative or larger than the speed of light in vacuum are generated. The paper proves how this physical effect can be exploited to design fast light resonant devices. Moreover, conditions are also derived to obtain slow light operation regime. PMID:20174126

  2. A fast multispectral light synthesiser based on LEDs and a diffraction grating

    PubMed Central

    Belušič, Gregor; Ilić, Marko; Meglič, Andrej; Pirih, Primož

    2016-01-01

    Optical experiments often require fast-switching light sources with adjustable bandwidths and intensities. We constructed a wavelength combiner based on a reflective planar diffraction grating and light emitting diodes with emission peaks from 350 to 630 nm that were positioned at the angles corresponding to the first diffraction order of the reversed beam. The combined output beam was launched into a fibre. The spacing between 22 equally wide spectral bands was about 15 nm. The time resolution of the pulse-width modulation drivers was 1 ms. The source was validated with a fast intracellular measurement of the spectral sensitivity of blowfly photoreceptors. In hyperspectral imaging of Xenopus skin circulation, the wavelength resolution was adequate to resolve haemoglobin absorption spectra. The device contains no moving parts, has low stray light and is intrinsically capable of multi-band output. Possible applications include visual physiology, biomedical optics, microscopy and spectroscopy. PMID:27558155

  3. A fast multispectral light synthesiser based on LEDs and a diffraction grating.

    PubMed

    Belušič, Gregor; Ilić, Marko; Meglič, Andrej; Pirih, Primož

    2016-01-01

    Optical experiments often require fast-switching light sources with adjustable bandwidths and intensities. We constructed a wavelength combiner based on a reflective planar diffraction grating and light emitting diodes with emission peaks from 350 to 630 nm that were positioned at the angles corresponding to the first diffraction order of the reversed beam. The combined output beam was launched into a fibre. The spacing between 22 equally wide spectral bands was about 15 nm. The time resolution of the pulse-width modulation drivers was 1 ms. The source was validated with a fast intracellular measurement of the spectral sensitivity of blowfly photoreceptors. In hyperspectral imaging of Xenopus skin circulation, the wavelength resolution was adequate to resolve haemoglobin absorption spectra. The device contains no moving parts, has low stray light and is intrinsically capable of multi-band output. Possible applications include visual physiology, biomedical optics, microscopy and spectroscopy. PMID:27558155

  4. Absolute calibration method for fast-streaked, fiber optic light collection, spectroscopy systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, Mark D.; Frogget, Brent; Oliver, Bryan Velten; Maron, Yitzhak; Droemer, Darryl W.; Crain, Marlon D.

    2010-04-01

    This report outlines a convenient method to calibrate fast (<1ns resolution) streaked, fiber optic light collection, spectroscopy systems. Such a system is used to collect spectral data on plasmas generated in the A-K gap of electron beam diodes fielded on the RITS-6 accelerator (8-12MV, 140-200kA). On RITS, light is collected through a small diameter (200 micron) optical fiber and recorded on a fast streak camera at the output of 1 meter Czerny-Turner monochromator (F/7 optics). To calibrate such a system, it is necessary to efficiently couple light from a spectral lamp into a 200 micron diameter fiber, split it into its spectral components, with 10 Angstroms or less resolution, and record it on a streak camera with 1ns or less temporal resolution.

  5. Size-selective sorting in bubble streaming flows: Particle migration on fast time scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thameem, Raqeeb; Rallabandi, Bhargav; Hilgenfeldt, Sascha

    2015-11-01

    Steady streaming from ultrasonically driven microbubbles is an increasingly popular technique in microfluidics because such devices are easily manufactured and generate powerful and highly controllable flows. Combining streaming and Poiseuille transport flows allows for passive size-sensitive sorting at particle sizes and selectivities much smaller than the bubble radius. The crucial particle deflection and separation takes place over very small times (milliseconds) and length scales (20-30 microns) and can be rationalized using a simplified geometric mechanism. A quantitative theoretical description is achieved through the application of recent results on three-dimensional streaming flow field contributions. To develop a more fundamental understanding of the particle dynamics, we use high-speed photography of trajectories in polydisperse particle suspensions, recording the particle motion on the time scale of the bubble oscillation. Our data reveal the dependence of particle displacement on driving phase, particle size, oscillatory flow speed, and streaming speed. With this information, the effective repulsive force exerted by the bubble on the particle can be quantified, showing for the first time how fast, selective particle migration is effected in a streaming flow. We acknowledge support by the National Science Foundation under grant number CBET-1236141.

  6. Accelerating Particle Filter Using Randomized Multiscale and Fast Multipole Type Methods.

    PubMed

    Shabat, Gil; Shmueli, Yaniv; Bermanis, Amit; Averbuch, Amir

    2015-07-01

    Particle filter is a powerful tool for state tracking using non-linear observations. We present a multiscale based method that accelerates the tracking computation by particle filters. Unlike the conventional way, which calculates weights over all particles in each cycle of the algorithm, we sample a small subset from the source particles using matrix decomposition methods. Then, we apply a function extension algorithm that uses a particle subset to recover the density function for all the rest of the particles not included in the chosen subset. The computational effort is substantial especially when multiple objects are tracked concurrently. The proposed algorithm significantly reduces the computational load. By using the Fast Gaussian Transform, the complexity of the particle selection step is reduced to a linear time in n and k, where n is the number of particles and k is the number of particles in the selected subset. We demonstrate our method on both simulated and on real data such as object tracking in video sequences. PMID:26352448

  7. Particle size distributions from laboratory-scale biomass fires using fast response instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini, S.; Qi, L.; Cocker, D.; Weise, D.; Miller, A.; Shrivastava, M.; Miller, W.; Mahalingam, S.; Princevac, M.; Jung, H.

    2010-04-01

    Particle size distribution from biomass combustion is an important parameter as it affects air quality, climate modelling and health effects. To date particle size distributions reported from prior studies vary not only due to difference in fuels but also difference in experimental conditions. This study aims to report characteristics of particle size distribution in a well controlled repeatable lab scale biomass fires for southwestern US fuels. The combustion facility at the USDA Forest Service's Fire Science Laboratory (FSL), Missoula, MT provided repeatable combustion and dilution environment ideal for particle size distribution study. For a variety of fuels tested the major mode of particle size distribution was in the range of 29 to 52 nm, which was attributable to dilution of the fresh smoke. Comparing volume size distribution from Fast Mobility Particle Sizer (FMPS) and Aerodynamic Particle Sizer (APS) measurements, ~30% of particle volume was attributable to the particles ranging from 0.5 to 10 μm for PM10. Geometric mean diameter rapidly increased during flaming and gradually decreased during mixed and smoldering phase combustion. Most of fuels gave unimodal distribution during flaming phase and strong biomodal distribution during smoldering phase. The mode of combustion (flaming, mixed and smoldering) could be better distinguished using slopes in Modified Combustion Efficiency (MCE) vs. geometric mean diameter from each mode of combustion than only using MCE values.

  8. Scanning radiometer for measurement of forward-scattered light to determine mean diameter of spray particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchele, D. R.

    1976-01-01

    A scanning radiometer is reported that measures forward-scattered light to determine the mean diameter of spray particles. An optical scanning method gives a continuous measurement of the light-scattering angle during spray nozzle tests. A method of calibration and a correction for background light are presented. Mean particle diameters of 10 to 500 micrometers can be measured.

  9. A source-independent empirical correction procedure for the fast mobility and engine exhaust particle sizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmerman, Naomi; Jeong, Cheol-Heon; Wang, Jonathan M.; Ramos, Manuel; Wallace, James S.; Evans, Greg J.

    2015-01-01

    The TSI Fast Mobility Particle Sizer (FMPS) and Engine Exhaust Particle Sizer (EEPS) provide size distributions for 6-560 nm particles with a time resolution suitable for characterizing transient particle sources; however, the accuracy of these instruments can be source dependent, due to influences of particle morphology. The aim of this study was to develop a source-independent correction protocol for the FMPS and EEPS. The correction protocol consists of: (1) broadening the >80 nm size range of the distribution to account for under-sizing by the FMPS and EEPS; (2) applying an existing correction protocol in the 8-93 nm size range; and (3) dividing each size bin by the ratio of total concentration measured by the FMPS or EEPS and a water-based Condensation Particle Counter (CPC) as a surrogate scaling factor to account for particle morphology. Efficacy of the correction protocol was assessed for three sources: urban ambient air, diluted gasoline direct injection engine exhaust, and diluted diesel engine exhaust. Linear regression against a reference instrument, the Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS), before and after applying the correction protocol demonstrated that the correction ensured agreement within 20%.

  10. Solar Energetic Particle Production by Shocks in Fast and Slow Solar Wind Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahler, S. W.; Reames, D. V.; Sheeley, N. R., Jr.

    2002-05-01

    Gradual solar energetic particle (SEP) events at 1 AU are produced by coronal and interplanetary shocks driven by coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Shocks from fast (V > 900 km/s) CMEs should be produced more easily in slow solar wind regions where the flow and fast-mode MHD wave speeds are low and less easily in fast solar wind regions where those speeds are high. We might therefore expect to observe more intense SEP events at 1 AU when the Earth lies in a slow wind region than when it lies in a fast wind region. While stream-stream interactions wash out the slow-fast stream boundaries in the solar wind speed profiles at 1 AU, the O+7/O+6 signatures of the streams are unchanged at 1 AU. We use the 20 MeV proton intensities from the EPACT instrument on Wind, the associated CMEs observed with the Lasco coronagraph on SOHO, and the ACE SWICS/SWIMS solar wind values of O+7/O+6 to look for variations of peak SEP intensities as a function of O+7/O+6. We find no significant dependence of the SEP intensities on O+7/O+6 for either poorly connected or well connected CME source regions or for different CME speed ranges. While a broad range of angular widths are associated with fast (V > 900 km/s) CMEs, we find that no fast CMEs with widths < 60 degrees are associated with SEP events. On the other hand, nearly all fast halo CMEs are associated with SEP events. Thus the CME widths are more important in SEP production than previously thought, but the solar wind source regions in which SEPs are produced are not a significant factor.

  11. Fast Particle Effects on the Internal Kink, Fishbone and Alfven Modes

    SciTech Connect

    N.N. Gorelenkov; S. Bernabei; C.Z. Cheng; G.Y. Fu; K. Hill; S. Kaye; G.J. Kramer; Y. Kusama; K. Shinohara; R. Nazikian; T. Ozeki; W. Park

    2000-11-15

    The issues of linear stability of low frequency perturbative and nonperturbative modes in advanced tokamak regimes are addressed based on recent developments in theory, computational methods, and progress in experiments. Perturbative codes NOVA and ORBIT are used to calculate the effects of TAEs on fast particle population in spherical tokamak NSTX. Nonperturbative analysis of chirping frequency modes in experiments on TFTR and JT-60U is presented using the kinetic code HINST, which identified such modes as a separate branch of Alfven modes - resonance TAE (R-TAE). Internal kink mode stability in the presence of fast particles is studied using the NOVA code and hybrid kinetic-MHD nonlinear code M3D.

  12. Wave-particle duality and polarization properties of light in single-photon interference experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Lahiri, Mayukh

    2011-04-15

    We consider superposition of two states of light polarized along mutually orthogonal directions. We show that partial polarization of the superposed light may be interpreted as a manifestation of the wave-particle duality.

  13. Nonlinear interaction of fast particles with Alfven waves in toroidal plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Candy, J.; Borba, D.; Huysmans, G.T.A.; Kerner, W.; Berk, H.L.

    1996-12-17

    A numerical algorithm to study the nonlinear, resonant interaction of fast particles with Alfven waves in tokamak geometry has been developed. The scope of the formalism is wide enough to describe the nonlinear evolution of fishbone modes, toroidicity-induced Alfven eigenmodes and ellipticity-induced Alfven eigenmodes, driven by both passing and trapped fast ions. When the instability is sufficiently weak, it is known that the wave-particle trapping nonlinearity will lead to mode saturation before wave-wave nonlinearities are appreciable. The spectrum of linear modes can thus be calculated using a magnetohydrodynamic normal-mode code, then nonlinearly evolved in time in an efficient way according to a two-time-scale Lagrangian dynamical wave model. The fast particle kinetic equation, including the effect of orbit nonlinearity arising from the mode perturbation, is simultaneously solved of the deviation, {delta}f = f {minus} f{sub 0}, from an initial analytic distribution f{sub 0}. High statistical resolution allows linear growth rates, frequency shifts, resonance broadening effects, and nonlinear saturation to be calculated quickly and precisely. The results have been applied to an ITER instability scenario. Results show that weakly-damped core-localized modes alone cause negligible alpha transport in ITER-like plasmas--even with growth rates one order of magnitude higher than expected values. However, the possibility of significant transport in reactor-type plasmas due to weakly unstable global modes remains an open question.

  14. Fast Pyrolysis of Wood for Biofuels: Spatiotemporally Resolved Diffuse Reflectance In situ Spectroscopy of Particles.

    PubMed

    Paulsen, Alex D; Hough, Blake R; Williams, C Luke; Teixeira, Andrew R; Schwartz, Daniel T; Pfaendtner, Jim; Dauenhauer, Paul J

    2014-02-20

    Fast pyrolysis of woody biomass is a promising process capable of producing renewable transportation fuels to replace gasoline, diesel, and chemicals currently derived from nonrenewable sources. However, biomass pyrolysis is not yet economically viable and requires significant optimization before it can contribute to the existing oil-based transportation system. One method of optimization uses detailed kinetic models for predicting the products of biomass fast pyrolysis, which serve as the basis for the design of pyrolysis reactors capable of producing the highest value products. The goal of this work is to improve upon current pyrolysis models, usually derived from experiments with low heating rates and temperatures, by developing models that account for both transport and pyrolysis decomposition kinetics at high heating rates and high temperatures (>400 °C). A new experimental technique is proposed herein: spatiotemporally resolved diffuse reflectance in situ spectroscopy of particles (STR-DRiSP), which is capable of measuring biomass composition during fast pyrolysis with high spatial (10 μm) and temporal (1 ms) resolution. Compositional data were compared with a comprehensive 2D single-particle model, which incorporated a multistep, semiglobal reaction mechanism, prescribed particle shrinkage, and thermophysical properties that varied with temperature, composition, and orientation. The STR-DRiSP technique can be used to determine the transport-limited kinetic parameters of biomass decomposition for a wide variety of biomass feedstocks. PMID:24678023

  15. A method based on light scattering to estimate the concentration of virus particles without the need for virus particle standards☆

    PubMed Central

    Makra, István; Terejánszky, Péter; Gyurcsányi, Róbert E.

    2015-01-01

    Most often the determination of the concentration of virus particles is rendered difficult by the availability of proper standards. We have adapted a static light scattering based method for the quantification of virus particles (shown for poliovirus) without the need of virus particle standards. Instead, as standards, well-characterized polymeric nanoparticle solutions are used. The method is applicable for virus particles acting as Rayleigh scatterers, i.e., virus particles with equivalent diameters up to ca. 1/10th of the wavelength of the scattered monochromatic light (∼70 nm diameter). Further limitations may arise if the refractive index of the virus is unavailable or cannot be calculated based on its composition, such as in case of enveloped viruses. The method is especially relevant for preparation of virus particle concentration standards and to vaccine formulations based on attenuated or inactivated virus particles where the classical plaque forming assays cannot be applied. The method consists of: • Measuring the intensity of the light scattered by viruses suspended in an aqueous solution. • Measuring the intensity of the light scattered by polymeric nanoparticles of known concentration and comparable size with the investigated virus particle. • The concentration of virus nanoparticles can be calculated based on the two measured scattered light intensities by knowing the refractive index of the dispersing solution, of the polymer and virus nanoparticles as well as their relative sphere equivalent diameters. PMID:26150976

  16. A method based on light scattering to estimate the concentration of virus particles without the need for virus particle standards.

    PubMed

    Makra, István; Terejánszky, Péter; Gyurcsányi, Róbert E

    2015-01-01

    Most often the determination of the concentration of virus particles is rendered difficult by the availability of proper standards. We have adapted a static light scattering based method for the quantification of virus particles (shown for poliovirus) without the need of virus particle standards. Instead, as standards, well-characterized polymeric nanoparticle solutions are used. The method is applicable for virus particles acting as Rayleigh scatterers, i.e., virus particles with equivalent diameters up to ca. 1/10th of the wavelength of the scattered monochromatic light (∼70 nm diameter). Further limitations may arise if the refractive index of the virus is unavailable or cannot be calculated based on its composition, such as in case of enveloped viruses. The method is especially relevant for preparation of virus particle concentration standards and to vaccine formulations based on attenuated or inactivated virus particles where the classical plaque forming assays cannot be applied. The method consists of: •Measuring the intensity of the light scattered by viruses suspended in an aqueous solution.•Measuring the intensity of the light scattered by polymeric nanoparticles of known concentration and comparable size with the investigated virus particle.•The concentration of virus nanoparticles can be calculated based on the two measured scattered light intensities by knowing the refractive index of the dispersing solution, of the polymer and virus nanoparticles as well as their relative sphere equivalent diameters. PMID:26150976

  17. Fast food restaurant lighting and music can reduce calorie intake and increase satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Wansink, Brian; van Ittersum, Koert

    2012-08-01

    Recent research shows that environmental cues such as lighting and music strongly bias the eating behavior of diners in laboratory situations. This study examines whether changing the atmosphere of a fast food restaurant would change how much patrons ate. The results indicated that softening the lighting and music led people to eat less, to rate the food as more enjoyable, and to spend just as much. In contrast to hypothesized U-shaped curves (people who spend longer eat more), this suggests a more relaxed environment increases satisfaction and decreases consumption. PMID:23045865

  18. Practical Combinations of Light-Water Reactors and Fast-Reactors for Future Actinide Transmutation

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, Emory D; Renier, John-Paul

    2007-01-01

    Multicycle partitioning-transmutation (P-T) studies continue to show that use of existing light-water reactors (LWRs) and new advanced light-water reactors (ALWRs) can effectively transmute transuranic (TRU) actinides, enabling initiation of full actinide recycle much earlier than waiting for the development and deployment of sufficient fast reactor (FR) capacity. The combination of initial P-T cycles using LWRs/ALWRs in parallel with economic improvements to FR usage for electricity production, and a follow-on transition period in which FRs are deployed, is a practical approach to near-term closure of the nuclear fuel cycle with full actinide recycle.

  19. The speed of information in a 'fast-light' optical medium.

    PubMed

    Stenner, Michael D; Gauthier, Daniel J; Neifeld, Mark A

    2003-10-16

    One consequence of the special theory of relativity is that no signal can cause an effect outside the source light cone, the space-time surface on which light rays emanate from the source. Violation of this principle of relativistic causality leads to paradoxes, such as that of an effect preceding its cause. Recent experiments on optical pulse propagation in so-called 'fast-light' media--which are characterized by a wave group velocity upsilon(g) exceeding the vacuum speed of light c or taking on negative values--have led to renewed debate about the definition of the information velocity upsilon(i). One view is that upsilon(i) = upsilon(g) (ref. 4), which would violate causality, while another is that upsilon(i) = c in all situations, which would preserve causality. Here we find that the time to detect information propagating through a fast-light medium is slightly longer than the time required to detect the same information travelling through a vacuum, even though upsilon(g) in the medium vastly exceeds c. Our observations are therefore consistent with relativistic causality and help to resolve the controversies surrounding superluminal pulse propagation. PMID:14562097

  20. The white-light humidified optical particle spectrometer (WHOPS) - a novel airborne system to characterize aerosol hygroscopicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosati, B.; Wehrle, G.; Gysel, M.; Zieger, P.; Baltensperger, U.; Weingartner, E.

    2015-02-01

    Aerosol particles experience hygroscopic growth at enhanced relative humidity (RH), which leads to changes in their optical properties. We developed the white-light humidified optical particle spectrometer (WHOPS), a new instrument to investigate the particles' hygroscopic growth. Here we present a detailed technical description and characterization of the WHOPS in laboratory and field experiments. The WHOPS consists of a differential mobility analyzer, a humidifier/bypass and a white-light aerosol spectrometer (WELAS) connected in series to provide fast measurements of particle hygroscopicity at subsaturated RH and optical properties on airborne platforms. The WELAS employs a white-light source to minimize ambiguities in the optical particle sizing. In contrast to other hygroscopicity instruments, the WHOPS retrieves information of relatively large particles (i.e., diameter D > 280 nm), therefore investigating the more optically relevant size ranges. The effective index of refraction of the dry particles is retrieved from the optical diameter measured for size-selected aerosol samples with a well-defined dry mobility diameter. The data analysis approach for the optical sizing and retrieval of the index of refraction was extensively tested in laboratory experiments with polystyrene latex size standards and ammonium sulfate particles of different diameters. The hygroscopic growth factor (GF) distribution and aerosol mixing state is inferred from the optical size distribution measured for the size-selected and humidified aerosol sample. Laboratory experiments with pure ammonium sulfate particles revealed good agreement with Köhler theory (mean bias of ~3% and maximal deviation of 8% for GFs at RH = 95%). During first airborne measurements in the Netherlands, GFs (mean value of the GF distribution) at RH = 95% between 1.79 and 2.43 with a median of 2.02 were observed for particles with a dry diameter of 500 nm. This corresponds to hygroscopicity parameters (κ

  1. Compact, highly sensitive optical gyros and sensors with fast-light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, Caleb A.; Zavriyev, Anton; Cummings, Malcolm; Beal, A. C.; Lucas, Mark; Lagasse, Michael

    2015-09-01

    Fast-light phenomena can enhance the sensitivity of an optical gyroscope of a given size by several orders of magnitude, and could be applied to other optical sensors as well. MagiQ Technologies has been developing a compact fiber-based fast light Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) using Stimulated Brillouin Scattering in optical fibers with commercially mature technologies. We will report on our findings, including repeatable fast-light effects in the lab, numerical analysis of noise and stability given realistic optical specs, and methods for optimizing efficiency, size, and reliability with current technologies. The technology could benefit inertial navigation units, gyrocompasses, and stabilization techniques, and could allow high grade IMUs in spacecraft, unmanned aerial vehicles or sensors, where the current size and weight of precision gyros are prohibitive. By using photonic integrated circuits and telecom-grade components along with specialty fibers, we also believe that our design is appropriate for development without further advances in the state of the art of components.

  2. Two-dimensional angular light-scattering in aqueous NaCl single aerosol particles during deliquescence and efflorescence.

    PubMed

    Braun, C; Krieger, U

    2001-03-12

    We present a new method to analyze two--dimensional angular light--scattering patterns of single aerosol particles by image processing. An asymmetry parameter can be calculated to determine the solid--to--liquid partitioning in micron sized composite particles similar to using temporal light--scattering intensity fluctuations. We use the scattering patterns of the deliquescence of a NaCl crystal to prove the feasibility of the method. In addition we show that even fast processes like the efflorescence from a supersaturated solution droplet can be analyzed where temporal fluctuation analysis fails. We find that efflorescence cannot be described as a time reversed deliquescence. There is indication that during efflorescence a solid shell grows at the surface of the liquid droplet which finally collapses due to mechanical stress. PMID:19417821

  3. Fast evolution of urban ultrafine particles: Implications for deposition doses in the human respiratory system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manigrasso, Maurizio; Avino, Pasquale

    2012-05-01

    The impact of ultrafine particles (diameters <100 nm) on human health has been addressed in many toxicological studies. It is therefore important to assess relevant respiratory exposure of the population. In this paper, aerosol number-size distribution was measured with 1 s time resolution, in a street canyon, in proximity to traffic, with the purpose of studying the fast evolution of UFP doses deposited in the respiratory system. Close to the traffic, nucleation particle concentrations increase within few seconds and decrease in tens of seconds. As a consequence, the exposure pattern, near to traffic, may be represented as a sequence of short-term peak exposures. The number of UFPs deposited for each tidal volume of air inhaled (instant UFP doses) rapidly reaches level of 107 particles, with maximum values for the alveolar interstitial region. For the correct estimate of short-term exposures, in scenarios involving proximity to traffic, it is therefore crucial to rely on aerosol measurements with a time resolution able to trace the fast evolution of aerosol from vehicle exhausts. When traffic levels drop, spike values of instant UFP doses are comparatively less frequent and the maxima of their size distributions shift from 10 to 20 nm (nucleation particles) to greater diameter (up to about 60 nm).

  4. A fast sorting algorithm for a hypersonic rarefied flow particle simulation on the connection machine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dagum, Leonardo

    1989-01-01

    The data parallel implementation of a particle simulation for hypersonic rarefied flow described by Dagum associates a single parallel data element with each particle in the simulation. The simulated space is divided into discrete regions called cells containing a variable and constantly changing number of particles. The implementation requires a global sort of the parallel data elements so as to arrange them in an order that allows immediate access to the information associated with cells in the simulation. Described here is a very fast algorithm for performing the necessary ranking of the parallel data elements. The performance of the new algorithm is compared with that of the microcoded instruction for ranking on the Connection Machine.

  5. The effect of fast and regeneration in light versus dark on regulation in the hydra-algal symbiosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bossert, P.; Slobodkin, L. B.

    1983-01-01

    Green hydra are able to regenerate tentacles after fast durations which cause brown, i.e., asymbiotic, hydra to fail completely, but the presence of endosymbiotic algae does not always enhance regeneration in fasted hydra. Green hydra whose nutritional state falls below some threshold, exhibit a light induced inhibition of regeneration. That is, hydra, fasted in the light, then randomly assigned to light or dark after decapitation, regenerate better in the dark. This effect of light does not appear to be present either in brown hydra or in normally green hydra from which the algae were removed. In a large strain of Chlorohydra viridissima, after fasts of intermediate duration (10 and 15 days), this light induced inhibition of regeneration is associated with an increase in the number of algae per gastric cell in regenerating hydra relative to non-regenerating controls.

  6. A fast method for optical simulation of flood maps of light-sharing detector modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Han; Du, Dong; Xu, JianFeng; Moses, William W.; Peng, Qiyu

    2015-12-01

    Optical simulation of the detector module level is highly desired for Position Emission Tomography (PET) system design. Commonly used simulation toolkits such as GATE are not efficient in the optical simulation of detector modules with complicated light-sharing configurations, where a vast amount of photons need to be tracked. We present a fast approach based on a simplified specular reflectance model and a structured light-tracking algorithm to speed up the photon tracking in detector modules constructed with polished finish and specular reflector materials. We simulated conventional block detector designs with different slotted light guide patterns using the new approach and compared the outcomes with those from GATE simulations. While the two approaches generated comparable flood maps, the new approach was more than 200-600 times faster. The new approach has also been validated by constructing a prototype detector and comparing the simulated flood map with the experimental flood map. The experimental flood map has nearly uniformly distributed spots similar to those in the simulated flood map. In conclusion, the new approach provides a fast and reliable simulation tool for assisting in the development of light-sharing-based detector modules with a polished surface finish and using specular reflector materials.

  7. Nonlinear evolution of two fast-particle-driven modes near the linear stability threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaleśny, Jarosław; Galant, Grzegorz; Lisak, Mietek; Marczyński, Sławomir; Berczyński, Paweł; Gałkowski, Andrzej; Berczyński, Stefan

    2011-06-01

    A system of two coupled integro-differential equations is derived and solved for the non-linear evolution of two waves excited by the resonant interaction with fast ions just above the linear instability threshold. The effects of a resonant particle source and classical relaxation processes represented by the Krook, diffusion, and dynamical friction collision operators are included in the model, which exhibits different nonlinear evolution regimes, mainly depending on the type of relaxation process that restores the unstable distribution function of fast ions. When the Krook collisions or diffusion dominate, the wave amplitude evolution is characterized by modulation and saturation. However, when the dynamical friction dominates, the wave amplitude is in the explosive regime. In addition, it is found that the finite separation in the phase velocities of the two modes weakens the interaction strength between the modes.

  8. A fibre-optic mode-filtered light sensor for general and fast chemical assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Leiji; Wang, Kemin; Choi, Martin M. F.; Xiao, Dan; Yang, Xiaohai; Chen, Rui; Tan, Weihong

    2004-01-01

    A simple and fast-response fibre-optic chemical sensor based on mode-filtered light detection (MFLD) has been successfully developed. The sensor was constructed by inserting an unmodified fibre core into a silica capillary tubing; a charge-coupled device which acted as a multi-channel detector was positioned alongside the capillary to detect the emanated mode-filtered light. An interesting finding was observed: there was an increase in the signal upon the decrease in the sample refractive index when an unclad optical fibre was employed, which was different from the results of a polymer-clad fibre reported previously. This phenomenon of opposite signal trend can clearly be interpreted by applying a mathematical derivation based on light propagation in the optical fibre. The derived mathematical model correlates well with the experimental results. It also provides a good theoretical foundation for the future development of MFLD-based analyser in conjunction with liquid chromatographic separation and assay. The proposed MFLD sensor was successfully applied to determine acetic acid with a linear response in the range 0-90 v/v % and a correlation coefficient of 0.9959. The sensor has the advantages of high S/N ratio and very fast response time. It offers the potential for use as a general sensor in food and chemical industries.

  9. Fast Orbit Feedback and Beam Stability at the Swiss Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Schlott, V.; Boege, M.; Keil, B.; Pollet, P.; Schilcher, T.

    2004-11-10

    A global, fast orbit feedback (FOFB) based on the digital beam position monitor (DBPM) system has been in user operation at the Swiss Light Source (SLS) since November 2003. The SVD-based correction scheme acts at a sampling rate of 4 kHz using position information from all 72 DBPM stations and applying corrections with all 72 horizontal and 72 vertical corrector magnets. As a result, the FOFB successfully damps orbit distortions, which are mainly caused by ground and girder vibrations as well as the 3-Hz booster crosstalk. It also allows fast and independent ID gap changes, which are completely transparent to all SLS users. With top-up as a regular operation mode at SLS, global beam stability on a {mu}m-level has been achieved from days to milliseconds.

  10. Sensitivity Analysis of Reprocessing Cooling Times on Light Water Reactor and Sodium Fast Reactor Fuel Cycles

    SciTech Connect

    R. M. Ferrer; S. Bays; M. Pope

    2008-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to quantify the effects of variations of the Light Water Reactor (LWR) Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) and fast reactor reprocessing cooling time on a Sodium Fast Reactor (SFR) assuming a single-tier fuel cycle scenario. The results from this study show the effects of different cooling times on the SFR’s transuranic (TRU) conversion ratio (CR) and transuranic fuel enrichment. Also, the decay heat, gamma heat and neutron emission of the SFR’s fresh fuel charge were evaluated. A 1000 MWth commercial-scale SFR design was selected as the baseline in this study. Both metal and oxide CR=0.50 SFR designs are investigated.

  11. Fast Three-Dimensional Single-Particle Tracking in Natural Brain Tissue.

    PubMed

    Sokoll, Stefan; Prokazov, Yury; Hanses, Magnus; Biermann, Barbara; Tönnies, Klaus; Heine, Martin

    2015-10-01

    Observation of molecular dynamics is often biased by the optical very heterogeneous environment of cells and complex tissue. Here, we have designed an algorithm that facilitates molecular dynamic analyses within brain slices. We adjust fast astigmatism-based three-dimensional single-particle tracking techniques to depth-dependent optical aberrations induced by the refractive index mismatch so that they are applicable to complex samples. In contrast to existing techniques, our online calibration method determines the aberration directly from the acquired two-dimensional image stream by exploiting the inherent particle movement and the redundancy introduced by the astigmatism. The method improves the positioning by reducing the systematic errors introduced by the aberrations, and allows correct derivation of the cellular morphology and molecular diffusion parameters in three dimensions independently of the imaging depth. No additional experimental effort for the user is required. Our method will be useful for many imaging configurations, which allow imaging in deep cellular structures. PMID:26445447

  12. Plasma flow and fast particles in a hypervelocity accelerator - A color presentation. [micrometeoroid simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Igenbergs, E. B.; Cour-Palais, B.; Fisher, E.; Stehle, O.

    1975-01-01

    A new concept for particle acceleration for micrometeoroid simulation was developed at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, using a high-density self-luminescent fast plasma flow to accelerate glass beads (with a diameter up to 1.0 mm) to velocities between 15-20 km/sec. After a short introduction to the operation of the hypervelocity range, the eight-converter-camera unit used for the photographs of the plasma flow and the accelerated particles is described. These photographs are obtained with an eight-segment reflecting pyramidal beam splitter. Wratten filters were mounted between the beam splitter and the converter tubes of the cameras. The photographs, which were recorded on black and white film, were used to make the matrices for the dye-color process, which produced the prints shown.

  13. A Fast Induction Motor Speed Estimation based on Hybrid Particle Swarm Optimization (HPSO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aryza, Solly; Abdallah, Ahmed N.; Khalidin, Zulkeflee bin; Lubis, Zulkarnain; Jie, Ma

    Intelligent control and estimation of power electronic systems by fuzzy logic and neural network techniques with fast torque and flux show tremendous promise in future. This paper proposed the application of Hybrid Particle Swarm Optimization (HPSO) for losses and operating cost minimization control in the induction motor drives. The main advantages of the proposed technique are; its simple structure and its straightforward maximization of induction motor efficiency and its operating cost for a given load torque. As will be demonstrated, Hybrid Particle Swarm Optimization (HPSO) is so efficient in finding the optimum operating machine's flux level. The results demonstrate the good quality and robustness in the system dynamic response and reduction in the steady-state and transient motor ripple torque.

  14. Thermodynamic correction of particle concentrations measured by underwing probes on fast flying aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weigel, R.; Spichtinger, P.; Mahnke, C.; Klingebiel, M.; Afchine, A.; Petzold, A.; Krämer, M.; Costa, A.; Molleker, S.; Jurkat, T.; Minikin, A.; Borrmann, S.

    2015-12-01

    Particle concentration measurements with underwing probes on aircraft are impacted by air compression upstream of the instrument body as a function of flight velocity. In particular for fast-flying aircraft the necessity arises to account for compression of the air sample volume. Hence, a correction procedure is needed to invert measured particle number concentrations to ambient conditions that is commonly applicable for different instruments to gain comparable results. In the compression region where the detection of particles occurs (i.e. under factual measurement conditions), pressure and temperature of the air sample are increased compared to ambient (undisturbed) conditions in certain distance away from the aircraft. Conventional procedures for scaling the measured number densities to ambient conditions presume that the particle penetration speed through the instruments' detection area equals the aircraft speed (True Air Speed, TAS). However, particle imaging instruments equipped with pitot-tubes measuring the Probe Air Speed (PAS) of each underwing probe reveal PAS values systematically below those of the TAS. We conclude that the deviation between PAS and TAS is mainly caused by the compression of the probed air sample. From measurements during two missions in 2014 with the German Gulfstream G-550 (HALO - High Altitude LOng range) research aircraft we develop a procedure to correct the measured particle concentration to ambient conditions using a thermodynamic approach. With the provided equation the corresponding concentration correction factor ξ is applicable to the high frequency measurements of each underwing probe which is equipped with its own air speed sensor (e.g. a pitot-tube). ξ-values of 1 to 0.85 are calculated for air speeds (i.e. TAS) between 60 and 260 m s-1. From HALO data it is found that ξ does not significantly vary between the different deployed instruments. Thus, for the current HALO underwing probe configuration a parameterisation of

  15. Fast, Large-Area, Wide-Bandgap UV Photodetector for Cherenkov Light Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrbanek, John D.; Wrbanek, Susan Y.

    2013-01-01

    Due to limited resources available for power and space for payloads, miniaturizing and integrating instrumentation is a high priority for addressing the challenges of manned and unmanned deep space missions to high Earth orbit (HEO), near Earth objects (NEOs), Lunar and Martian orbits and surfaces, and outer planetary systems, as well as improvements to high-altitude aircraft safety. New, robust, and compact detectors allow future instrumentation packages more options in satisfying specific mission goals. A solid-state ultraviolet (UV) detector was developed with a theoretical fast response time and large detection area intended for application to Cherenkov detectors. The detector is based on the wide-bandgap semiconductor zinc oxide (ZnO), which in a bridge circuit can detect small, fast pulses of UV light like those required for Cherenkov detectors. The goal is to replace the role of photomultiplier tubes in Cherenkov detectors with these solid-state devices, saving on size, weight, and required power. For improving detection geometry, a spherical detector to measure high atomic number and energy (HZE) ions from any direction has been patented as part of a larger space radiation detector system. The detector will require the development of solid-state UV photodetectors fast enough (2 ns response time or better) to detect the shockwave of Cherenkov light emitted as the ions pass through a quartz, sapphire, or acrylic ball. The detector must be small enough to fit in the detector system structure, but have an active area large enough to capture enough Cherenkov light from the sphere. The detector is fabricated on bulk single-crystal undoped ZnO. Inter - digitated finger electrodes and contact pads are patterned via photolithography, and formed by sputtered metal of silver, platinum, or other high-conductivity metal.

  16. Wavelet transform fast inverse light scattering analysis for size determination of spherical scatterers

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Derek; Kim, Sanghoon; Drake, Tyler K.; Eldridge, Will J.; Wax, Adam

    2014-01-01

    We present a fast approach for size determination of spherical scatterers using the continuous wavelet transform of the angular light scattering profile to address the computational limitations of previously developed sizing techniques. The potential accuracy, speed, and robustness of the algorithm were determined in simulated models of scattering by polystyrene beads and cells. The algorithm was tested experimentally on angular light scattering data from polystyrene bead phantoms and MCF-7 breast cancer cells using a 2D a/LCI system. Theoretical sizing of simulated profiles of beads and cells produced strong fits between calculated and actual size (r2 = 0.9969 and r2 = 0.9979 respectively), and experimental size determinations were accurate to within one micron. PMID:25360350

  17. Gyrokinetic particle simulations of reversed shear Alfven eigenmode excited by antenna and fast ions

    SciTech Connect

    Deng Wenjun; Holod, Ihor; Xiao Yong; Lin Zhihong; Wang Xin; Zhang Wenlu

    2010-11-15

    Global gyrokinetic particle simulations of reversed shear Alfven eigenmode (RSAE) have been successfully performed and verified. We have excited the RSAE by initial perturbation, by external antenna, and by energetic ions. The RSAE excitation by antenna provides verifications of the mode structure, the frequency, and the damping rate. When the kinetic effects of the background plasma are artificially suppressed, the mode amplitude shows a near-linear growth. With kinetic thermal ions, the mode amplitude eventually saturates due to the thermal ion damping. The damping rates measured from the antenna excitation and from the initial perturbation simulation agree very well. The RSAE excited by fast ions shows an exponential growth. The finite Larmor radius effects of the fast ions are found to significantly reduce the growth rate. With kinetic thermal ions and electron pressure, the mode frequency increases due to the elevation of the Alfven continuum by the geodesic compressibility. The nonperturbative contributions from the fast ions and kinetic thermal ions modify the mode structure relative to the ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) theory. The gyrokinetic simulations have been benchmarked with extended hybrid MHD-gyrokinetic simulations.

  18. Active and fast particle driven Alfvén eigenmodes in Alcator C-Moda)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snipes, J. A.; Basse, N.; Boswell, C.; Edlund, E.; Fasoli, A.; Gorelenkov, N. N.; Granetz, R. S.; Lin, L.; Lin, Y.; Parker, R.; Porkolab, M.; Sears, J.; Sharapov, S.; Tang, V.; Wukitch, S.

    2005-05-01

    Alfvén eigenmodes (AEs) are studied to assess their stability in high density reactor relevant regimes where Ti≈Te and as a diagnostic tool. Stable AEs are excited with active magnetohydrodynamics antennas in the range of the expected AE frequency. Toroidal Alfvén eigenmode (TAE) damping rates between 0.5%<γ/ω<4.5% have been observed in diverted and limited Ohmic plasmas. Unstable AEs are excited with a fast ion tail driven by H minority ion cyclotron radio frequency (ICRF) heating with electron densities in the range of n¯e=0.5-2×1020m-3. Energetic particle modes or TAEs have been observed to decrease in frequency and mode number with time up to a large sawtooth collapse, indicating the role fast particles play in stabilizing sawteeth. In the current rise phase, unstable modes with frequencies that increase rapidly with time are observed with magnetic pick-up coils at the wall and phase contrast imaging density fluctuation measurements in the core. Modeling of these modes constrains the calculated safety factor profile to be very flat or with slightly reversed shear. AEs are found to be more stable for an inboard than for central or outboard ICRF resonances in qualitative agreement with modeling.

  19. ellc: A fast, flexible light curve model for detached eclipsing binary stars and transiting exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxted, P. F. L.

    2016-06-01

    Context. Very high quality light curves are now available for thousands of detached eclipsing binary stars and transiting exoplanet systems as a result of surveys for transiting exoplanets and other large-scale photometric surveys. Aims: I have developed a binary star model (ellc) that can be used to analyse the light curves of detached eclipsing binary stars and transiting exoplanet systems that is fast and accurate, and that can include the effects of star spots, Doppler boosting and light-travel time within binaries with eccentric orbits. Methods: The model represents the stars as triaxial ellipsoids. The apparent flux from the binary is calculated using Gauss-Legendre integration over the ellipses that are the projection of these ellipsoids on the sky. The model can also be used to calculate the flux-weighted radial velocity of the stars during an eclipse (Rossiter-McLaghlin effect). The main features of the model have been tested by comparison to observed data and other light curve models. Results: The model is found to be accurate enough to analyse the very high quality photometry that is now available from space-spaced instruments, flexible enough to model a wide range of eclipsing binary stars and extrasolar planetary systems, and fast enough to enable the use of modern Monte Carlo methods for data analysis and model testing. The software package is available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/591/A111

  20. SPED Light Sheet Microscopy: Fast Mapping of Biological System Structure and Function.

    PubMed

    Tomer, Raju; Lovett-Barron, Matthew; Kauvar, Isaac; Andalman, Aaron; Burns, Vanessa M; Sankaran, Sethuraman; Grosenick, Logan; Broxton, Michael; Yang, Samuel; Deisseroth, Karl

    2015-12-17

    The goal of understanding living nervous systems has driven interest in high-speed and large field-of-view volumetric imaging at cellular resolution. Light sheet microscopy approaches have emerged for cellular-resolution functional brain imaging in small organisms such as larval zebrafish, but remain fundamentally limited in speed. Here, we have developed SPED light sheet microscopy, which combines large volumetric field-of-view via an extended depth of field with the optical sectioning of light sheet microscopy, thereby eliminating the need to physically scan detection objectives for volumetric imaging. SPED enables scanning of thousands of volumes-per-second, limited only by camera acquisition rate, through the harnessing of optical mechanisms that normally result in unwanted spherical aberrations. We demonstrate capabilities of SPED microscopy by performing fast sub-cellular resolution imaging of CLARITY mouse brains and cellular-resolution volumetric Ca(2+) imaging of entire zebrafish nervous systems. Together, SPED light sheet methods enable high-speed cellular-resolution volumetric mapping of biological system structure and function. PMID:26687363

  1. Comparability between PM2.5 and particle light scattering measurements.

    PubMed

    Chow, Judith C; Watson, John G; Lowenthal, Douglas H; Richards, L Willard

    2002-10-01

    Particle light scattering and PM2.5 (particles with aerodynamic diameters less than 2.5 microm) concentration data from air quality studies conducted over the past ten years were examined. Fine particle scattering efficiencies were determined from statistical relationships among measured light scattering and fine and coarse mass concentrations. The resulting fine particle scattering efficiencies ranged from 1.7 m2 g(-1) at Meadview in the Grand Canyon to over 5 m2 g(-1) in Mexico City. Most of the derived line scattering efficiencies were centered around 2 m2 g(-1), which is considerably lower than most values reported from previous studies. PMID:12381021

  2. Unperceivable noise to active light touch effects on fast postural sway.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Tetsuya; Kouzaki, Motoki; Masani, Kei; Moritani, Toshio

    2012-01-01

    Human postural sway during quiet standing is reduced when a fingertip lightly touches a stable surface. The tactile feedback information from the fingertip has been considered responsible for this effect of light touch. Studies have shown that a noise-like minute stimulation to the sensory system can improve the system's weak signal detection. In the present study, we investigated whether a noise-like unperceivable vibration on the fingertip enhances its tactile sensation and facilitates the effect of light touch during quiet standing. Thirteen volunteers maintained quiet standing while lightly touching a touch surface with the index fingertip. Based on each subject's vibrotactile threshold (VT), a noise-like vibration was applied to the touch surface at amplitudes under (0.5VT) or at VT (1.0VT), in addition to the normal light touch condition (no vibration, 0VT). The results showed that the mean velocities of the foot center of pressure (CoP) in both the anteroposterior (AP) and mediolateral (ML) directions were significantly reduced at 0.5VT compared to 0VT and 1.0VT (P<0.05), while there was no significant difference between 1.0VT and 0VT (P>0.05). Frequency analysis of CoP revealed that the power of high-frequency fluctuation (1-10Hz) was significantly reduced at 0.5VT (P<0.05), whereas no significant change was observed in that of low-frequency sway (below 1Hz) (P>0.05). These results indicate that an unperceivable noise-like vibration can facilitate the effect of light touch on postural stability, by further reducing fast postural sway. PMID:22075223

  3. Single-particle light-scattering measurement: photochemical aerosols and atmospheric particulates.

    PubMed

    Phillips, D T; Wyatt, P J

    1972-09-01

    The use of single-particle light-scattering measurements to determine the origin of atmospheric hazes has been explored by measurement of laboratory aerosols, field samples, and computer analysis of the light-scattering data. The refractive index of measured spherical particles 800 nm to 1000 nm in diameter was determined within 2%. For particles of diameter less than 500 nm the measurement of absolute scattering intensity is required for complete analysis. Distinctive nonspherical and absorbing particles were observed both in automotive exhaust and atmospheric samples. Electrostatic suspension of atmospheric particulates is demonstrated to provide a practical approach to optical measurement of single particles. The technique may be used to calibrate optical particle counters or identify particles with unique shape or refractive index. PMID:20119285

  4. Thermo-Mechanical Analysis of Coated Particle Fuel Experiencing a Fast Control Rod Ejection Transient

    SciTech Connect

    Ortensi, J.; Brian Boer; Abderrafi M. Ougouag

    2010-10-01

    A rapid increase of the temperature and the mechanical stress is expected in TRISO coated particle fuel that experiences a fast Total Control Rod Ejection (CRE) transient event. During this event the reactor power in the pebble bed core increases significantly for a short time interval. The power is deposited instantly and locally in the fuel kernel. This could result in a rapid increase of the pressure in the buffer layer of the coated fuel particle and, consequently, in an increase of the coating stresses. These stresses determine the mechanical failure probability of the coatings, which serve as the containment of radioactive fission products in the Pebble Bed Reactor (PBR). A new calculation procedure has been implemented at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), which analyzes the transient fuel performance behavior of TRISO fuel particles in PBRs. This early capability can easily be extended to prismatic designs, given the availability of neutronic and thermal-fluid solvers. The full-core coupled neutronic and thermal-fluid analysis has been modeled with CYNOD-THERMIX. The temperature fields for the fuel kernel and the particle coatings, as well as the gas pressures in the buffer layer, are calculated with the THETRIS module explicitly during the transient calculation. Results from this module are part of the feedback loop within the neutronic-thermal fluid iterations performed for each time step. The temperature and internal pressure values for each pebble type in each region of the core are then input to the PArticle STress Analysis (PASTA) code, which determines the particle coating stresses and the fraction of failed particles. This paper presents an investigation of a Total Control Rod Ejection (TCRE) incident in the 400 MWth Pebble Bed Modular reactor design using the above described calculation procedure. The transient corresponds to a reactivity insertion of $3 (~2000 pcm) reaching 35 times the nominal power in 0.5 seconds. For each position in the core

  5. Multiple particle production processes in the light'' of quantum optics

    SciTech Connect

    Friedlander, E.M.

    1990-09-01

    Ever since the observation that high-energy nuclear active'' cosmic-ray particles create bunches of penetrating particles upon hitting targets, a controversy has raged about whether these secondaries are created in a single act'' or whether many hadrons are just the result of an intra-nuclear cascade, yielding one meson in every step. I cannot escape the impression that: the latter kind of model appeals naturally as a consequence of an innate bio-morphism in our way of thinking and that in one guise or another it has tenaciously survived to this day, also for hadron-hadron collisions, via multi-peripheral models to the modern parton shower approach. Indeed, from the very beginning of theoretical consideration of multiparticle production, the possibility of many particles arising from a single hot'' system has been explored, with many fruitful results, not the least of which are the s{sup 1/4} dependence of the mean produced particle multiplicity and the thermal'' shape of the P{sub T} spectra. An important consequence of the thermodynamical-hydrodynamical models is that particle emission is treated in analogy to black-body radiation, implying for the secondaries a set of specific Quantum-Statistical properties, very similar to those observed in quantum optics. From here on I shall try to review a number of implications and applications of this QS analogy in the study of multiplicity distributions of the produced secondaries. I will touch only in passing another very important topic of this class, the Bose-Einstein two-particle correlations.

  6. Measurement of the light scattering of single micrometer-sized particles captured with a microfluidic trap.

    PubMed

    Dai, Jie; Li, Wei; Gong, Baoyu; Wang, Huimin; Xia, Min; Yang, Kecheng

    2015-11-16

    Light scattering detection of a single particle is significant to both theoretical developments and application progresses of particle scattering. In this work, a new method employing the polydimethylsiloxane microfluidic catcher with self-regulation was developed to detect the light scattering of an individual micro particle (20.42, 23.75, and 31.10 μm) in a wide angular range. This system can rapidly (<2 min) immobilize single particles without aggregations and continuously analyze its light scattering ranging from 2° to 162°. The high success ratio of the capture, good agreement with the anticipation, and moderate time and cost make this method a promising candidate in single-particle-scattering applications. PMID:26698501

  7. Light scattering and dynamics of interacting Brownian particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsang, T.; Tang, H. T.

    1982-01-01

    The relative motions of interacting Brownian particles in liquids may be described as radial diffusion in an effective potential of the mean force. By using a harmonic approximation for the effective potential, the intermediate scattering function may also be evaluated. For polystyrene spheres of 250 A mean radius in aqueous environment at 0.00125 g/cu cm concentration, the results for the calculated mean square displacement are in qualitative agreement with experimental data from photon correlation spectroscopy. Because of the interactions, the functions deviate considerably from the exponential forms for the free particles.

  8. Diffusion of interacting particles: light scattering study of microemulsions

    SciTech Connect

    Cazabat, A.M.; Langevin, D.

    1981-03-15

    The diffusion coefficient data obtained from light scattering experiments on water-in-oil microemulsions have been compared with existing theoretical treatments involving the interaction potential. The observed behavior deviates largely from hard sphere systems and independent information was obtained about the interaction potential to check the theories. This was achieved by measuring simultaneously the intensity and the correlation function of the scattered light. The intensity has been analyzed with a very simple model for interaction forces involving only 2 parameters: a hard sphere radius and the amplitude of a small perturbation added to hard sphere potential. This model allows for the variation of the diffusion coefficient at small volume fractions. Light scattering techniques are a very useful method for obtaining information about sizes and interactions in microemulsions. Some general conclusions have been made: droplet sizes depend mostly on the ratio of water to soap, and interactions on continuous phase polarity and alcohol chain length.

  9. Intensity and polarization of light scattered by size distributions of randomly oriented nonspherical particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mishchenko, M. I.; Travis, L. D.

    1993-01-01

    Calculations of light scattering by small particles are important in many diverse fields of science and engineering. In many cases of practical interest, scattering particles are nonspherical and are distributed over sizes and orientations. However, accurate light scattering computations for ensembles of nonspherical particles are difficult and time-consuming, and the literature in which such calculations are reported is rather scarce. In this paper, the T-matrix approach, as extended recently to randomly oriented particles, is used to calculate rigorously light scattering by size distributions of randomly oriented axially symmetric particles. To model the variation of particle sizes in real ensembles, we use a power law distribution typical of some terrestrial aerosols. Contour plots of intensity and degree of linear polarization for polydisperse prolate and oblate spheroids of different aspect ratios and effective equivalent-sphere size parameters from 0 to 10 are calculated and compared with calculations for equivalent spheres. The angular scattering behavior of nonspherical polydispersions is found to be greatly different from that of spheres, while the scattering properties of oblate and prolate spheroids of the same aspect ratio are similar. With increasing particle size, both intensity and polarization become more shape-dependent. In general, nonspherical particles are stronger side scatterers and weaker backscatterers than equivalent spheres. With increasing aspect ratio of nonspherical particles polarization tends to be predominantly positive. Possible effects of particle nonsphericity on optical remote sensing of atmospheric aerosols are discussed.

  10. Determination of Particle Size by Diffraction of Light

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rinard, Phillip M.

    1974-01-01

    Describes a simplified diffraction experiment offered in a workshop with the purpose of illustrating to high school students the relation of science to society. The radii determined for cigarette smoke particles range from 0.2 to 0.5 micrometer in this experiment. Included is a description of the diffraction theory. (CC)

  11. Investigation of Very Fast Light Detectors: Silicon Photomultiplier and Micro PMT for a Cosmic Ray Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cervantes, Omar; Reyes, Liliana; Hooks, Tyler; Perez, Luis; Ritt, Stefan

    2016-03-01

    To construct a cosmic detector array using 4 scintillation detectors, we investigated 2 recent light sensor technologies from Hamamatsu, as possible readout detectors. First, we investigated several homemade versions of the multipixel photon counter (MPPC) light sensors. These detectors were either biased with internal or external high voltage power supplies. We made extensive measurements to confirm for the coincidence of the MPPC devices. Each sensor is coupled to a wavelength shifting fiber (WSF) that is embedded along a plastic scintillator sheet (30cmx60cmx1/4''). Using energetic cosmic rays, we evaluated several of these homemade detector modules placed above one another in a light proof enclosure. Next, we assembled 2 miniaturized micro photomultiplier (micro PMT), a device recently marketed by Hamamatsu. These sensors showed very fast response times. With 3 WSF embedded in scintillator sheets, we performed coincidence experiments. The detector waveforms were captured using the 5GS/sec domino ring sampler, the DRS4 and our workflow using the CERN PAW package and data analysis results would be presented. Title V Grant.

  12. Light curves and absolute magnitudes of four recent fast LMC novae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hearnshaw, J. B.; Livingston, C. M.; Gilmore, A. C.; Kilmartin, P. M.

    2004-05-01

    The light curves of four recent fast LMC novae (Nova LMC 1988a, 1992, 1995, 2000) have been analysed to obtain the parameter t2, the time for a two magnitude decline below maximum light. Using the calibration of Della Valle & Livio (1995), values of MV at maximum are obtained. The weighted mean distance modulus to the LMC based on these novae is 18.89 ± 0.16. This differs significantly drom the distance modulus adpoted by Della Valle & Livio of 18.50, but only differs at the 1σ-level from Feast's (1999) value of 18.70 ± 0.10. The evidence based on these novae suggests that either: (i) DMLMC = 18.50 is too close for the LMC; or (ii) some novae in the LMC, including these four, are significantly underluminous at maximum light compared with those in M31, by about 0.4 mag. This could be a metallicity effect, given that more metal-rich M31 novae were predominantly used by Della Valle & Livio to obtain their calibration.

  13. Particle-In-Cell modeling of Fast Ignition experiments on the Titan Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Link, Anthony; Akli, K. U.; Beg, F.; Chen, C. D.; Davies, J. R.; Freeman, R. R.; Kemp, G. E.; Li, K.; McLean, H. S.; Morace, A.; Patel, P. K.; Schumacher, D. W.; Sorokovikova, A. V.; Stephens, R.; Streeter, M. J. V.; Wertepny, D.; Westhover, B.

    2012-10-01

    We report on particle-in-cell-modeling (PIC) of fast ignition experiments conducted on the Titan laser. The Titan laser was used to irradiate multilayer planar targets at intensities greater than 10^20 Wcm-2 to diagnose the laser to electron coupling, electron beam divergence, and energy spectrum of the hot electrons at relativistic intensities. Hot electron beam properties were inferred through buried fluors, escaping electrons and bremsstrahlung measurements. The PIC simulations of the experiment were conducted in two stages: a high resolution laser plasma interaction (LPI) simulation using measured on shot laser parameters but with a subscale target; and a lower resolution transport simulation containing the full scale multilayer target. The transport simulation utilized the electron source based on the output of the LPI simulation and included necessary models to simulate the experimental diagnostics. Comparison of the predicted electron source properties and the experimental data will be presented.

  14. Simultaneous light scattering and intrinsic fluorescence measurement for the classification of airborne particles.

    PubMed

    Kaye, P H; Barton, J E; Hirst, E; Clark, J M

    2000-07-20

    We describe a prototype laboratory light-scattering instrument that integrates two approaches to airborne particle characterization: spatial light-scattering analysis and intrinsic fluorescence measurement, with the aim of providing an effective means of classifying biological particles within an ambient aerosol. The system uses a single continuous-wave 266-nm ultraviolet laser to generate both the spatial elastic scatter data (from which an assessment of particle size and shape is made) and the particle intrinsic fluorescence data from particles in the approximate size range of 1-10-mum diameter carried in a sample airflow through the laser beam. Preliminary results suggest that this multiparameter measurement approach can provide an effective means of classifying different particle types and can reduce occurrences of false-positive detection of biological aerosols. PMID:18349949

  15. Visible light photon counters (VLPCs) for high rate tracking medical imaging and particle astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Atac, M.

    1998-02-01

    This paper is on the operation principles of the Visible Light Photon Counters (VLPCs), application to high luminosity-high multiplicity tracking for High Energy Charged Particle Physics, and application to Medical Imaging and Particle Astrophysics. The VLPCs as Solid State Photomultipliers (SSPMS) with high quantum efficiency can detect down to single photons very efficiently with excellent time resolution and high avalanche gains.

  16. Analysis of particulate contamination in ampoules using a light blockage particle analyser.

    PubMed

    Alexander, D M; Veltman, A M

    1985-01-01

    A method of opening ampoules without introducing particles has been developed and the level of particulate contamination in a number of ampoule solutions using a light blockage particle analyser (HIAC) has been determined. Low levels of contamination were found and a method of setting limits of particulate contamination in ampoules is suggested. PMID:2858521

  17. The impact of organic coatings on light scattering by sodium chloride particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yan; Ezell, Michael J.; Finlayson-Pitts, Barbara J.

    2011-08-01

    Light scattering by airborne particles plays a major role in visibility degradation and climate change. The composition and structure of particles in air can be complex, so that predictions of light scattering a priori have significant uncertainties. We report here studies of light scattering by NaCl, a model for airborne salt particles from the ocean and alkaline lakes, with and without an organic coating formed from the low volatility products of the reaction of α-pinene with ozone at room temperature at 1 atm in air. Light scattering at 450, 550 and 700 nm was measured using an integrating nephelometer on particles whose size distribution was independently determined using a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS). For comparison, polystyrene latex spheres (PSL) of a known size and dioctylphthalate (DOP) particles generated with a narrow size distribution were also studied. The measured values were compared to those calculated using Mie theory. Although excellent agreement between experiment and theory was found for the PSL and DOP particles, there were large discrepancies for a polydisperse NaCl sample. These were traced to errors in the size distribution measurements. Despite the use of 85Kr neutralizers, the Boltzmann charge equilibrium distribution assumption used to derive particle size distributions from SMPS data was shown not to be valid, leading to an overestimate of the concentration of larger particles and their contribution to light scattering. Correcting for this, the combination of experiments and theory show that as salt takes up low volatility organics in the atmosphere and the geometric mean diameter increases, the effect on light scattering may be reasonably approximated from the change in size distribution under conditions where the organic coating is small relative to the core size. However, for a given particle diameter, light scattering decreases as the relative contribution of the organic component increases. Thus, light scattering by

  18. Influence of Ultraviolet Light on the Coulomb Coupling between Dust Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Misawa, Tatsuya; Fujita, Hiroharu

    2005-10-31

    The influence of ultraviolet light on the Coulomb coupling between dust particles was experimentally investigated in Radio-Frequency (RF, 13.56MHz) inductively coupled plasma. Flask shape dust cloud and the filamentary structure of dust particles were observed by adopting two turn ring far from the RF antenna. The ultraviolet radiation seemed to be not easy to pick up the polarization of the dust particles in the laboratory.

  19. Light scattering model for individual sub-100-nm particle size determination in an evanescent field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khajornrungruang, Panart; Korkmaz, Sevim; Angshuman, Pal; Suzuki, Keisuke; Kimura, Keiichi; Babu, Suryadevara V.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we propose an optical method for observation and determination of individual nanosized particles that adhere to an interface by applying an evanescent field. Subsequently, we developed a portable (∼350 mm in length) experimental apparatus equipped with an optical microscopy system for particle observation. The observed intensity is consistent with that calculated using a light scattering model of sub-100-nm particles in the evanescent field.

  20. Photoelectric charging of dust particles: Effect of spontaneous and light induced field emission of electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Sodha, M. S.; Dixit, A.

    2009-09-07

    The authors have analyzed the charging of dust particles in a plasma, taking into account the electron/ion currents to the particles, electron/ion generation and recombination, electric field emission, photoelectric emission and photoelectric field emission of electrons under the influence of light irradiation; the irradiance has been assumed to be at a level, which lets the particles retain the negative sign of the charge. Numerical results and discussion conclude the papers.

  1. Photoacoustic Doppler Effect from Flowing Small Light-Absorbing Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Hui; Maslov, Konstantin; Wang, Lihong V.

    2007-11-01

    From the flow of a suspension of micrometer-scale carbon particles, the photoacoustic Doppler shift is observed. As predicted theoretically, the observed Doppler shift equals half of that in Doppler ultrasound and does not depend on the direction of laser illumination. This new physical phenomenon provides a basis for developing photoacoustic Doppler flowmetry, which can potentially be used for detecting fluid flow in optically scattering media and especially low-speed blood flow of relatively deep microcirculation in biological tissue.

  2. Weak-value amplification of the fast-light effect in rubidium vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirhosseini, Mohammad; Viza, Gerardo I.; Magaña-Loaiza, Omar S.; Malik, Mehul; Howell, John C.; Boyd, Robert W.

    2016-05-01

    We use weak-value amplification to enhance the polarization-sensitive fast-light effect from induced Raman absorption in hot rubidium vapor. We experimentally demonstrate that projecting the output signal into an appropriate polarization state enables a pulse advancement of 4.2 μ s , which is more than 15 times larger than that naturally caused by dispersion. More significantly, we show that combining weak-value amplification with the dispersive response of an atomic system provides a clear advantage in terms of the maximum pulse advance achievable for a given value of loss. This technique has potential applications for designing novel quantum-information-processing gates and optical buffers for telecommunication systems.

  3. Fast and high light yield scintillation in the Ga2O3 semiconductor material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanagida, Takayuki; Okada, Go; Kato, Takumi; Nakauchi, Daisuke; Yanagida, Satoko

    2016-04-01

    We report the distinct scintillation properties of the well-known Ga2O3 semiconductor material. Under UV excitation, the photoluminescence (PL) emission peak appeared near a wavelength of 380 nm with a quantum yield of 6%, and fast decays of 8 and 793 ns were observed. In contrast, the X-ray-induced scintillation spectrum showed an intense emission band near a wavelength of 380 nm, whose decay curve was reproduced using two exponential decay components with time constants of 8 and 977 ns. The pulse height spectrum of 137Cs γ-rays measured using Ga2O3 showed a clear photoabsorption peak with a light yield of 15000 ± 1500 photons/MeV.

  4. Interferometric apparatus and method for detection and characterization of particles using light scattered therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Johnston, Roger G.

    1988-01-01

    Interferometric apparatus and method for detection and characterization of particles using light scattered therefrom. Differential phase measurements on scattered light from particles are possible using the two-frequency Zeeman effect laser which emits two frequencies of radiation 250 kHz apart. Excellent discrimination and reproducibility for various pure pollen and bacterial samples in suspension have been observed with a single polarization element. Additionally, a 250 kHz beat frequency was recorded from an individual particle traversing the focused output from the laser in a flow cytometer.

  5. Study of colloidal particle Brownian aggregation by low-coherence fiber optic dynamic light scattering.

    PubMed

    Xia, Hui; Pang, Ru Yi; Zhang, Rui; Miao, Cai Xia; Wu, Xiao Yun; Hou, Xue Shun; Zhong, Cheng

    2012-06-15

    The aggregation kinetics of particles in dense polystyrene latex suspensions is studied by low-coherence fiber optic dynamic light scattering. Low-coherence fiber optic dynamic light scattering is used to measure the hydrodynamic radius of the aggregates. The aggregation kinetics data obtained can be fitted into a single exponential function, which is the characteristic of slow aggregation. It is found that the aggregation rate of particles increased with higher electrolyte levels and with larger particle concentrations. The experimental results can be explained by use of the Derjaruin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeer (DLVO) theory. PMID:22446146

  6. Apparatus and method for detection and characterization of particles using light scattered therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Johnston, R.G.

    1987-03-23

    Apparatus and method for detection and characterization of particles using light scattered therefrom. Differential phase measurements on scattered light from particles are possible using the two-frequency Zeeman effect laser which emits two frequencies of radiation 250 kHz apart. Excellent discrimination and reproducibility for various pure pollen and bacterial samples in suspension have been observed with a single polarization element. Additionally, a 250 kHz beat frequency was recorded from an individual particle traversing the focused output from the laser in a flow cytometer. 13 figs.

  7. Investigation of light scattering as a technique for detecting discrete soot particles in a luminous flame

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The practicability of using a classical light-scattering technique, involving comparison of angular scattering intensity patterns with theoretically determined Mie and Rayleight patterns, to detect discrete soot particles (diameter less than 50 nm) in premixed propane/air and propane/oxygen-helium flames is considered. The experimental apparatus employed in this investigation included a laser light source, a flat-flame burner, specially coated optics, a cooled photomultiplier detector, and a lock-in voltmeter readout. Although large, agglomerated soot particles were detected and sized, it was not possible to detect small, discrete particles. The limiting factor appears to be background scattering by the system's optics.

  8. Particle acceleration studies with intense lasers and advanced light sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, C. D.; Gray, R. J.; MacLellan, D. A.; Rusby, D.; McKenna, P.; Ridgers, C. P.; Booth, N.; Robinson, A. P. L.; Wilson, L.; Green, J. S.

    2013-10-01

    The interaction of lasers with matter is a subject which has progressed rapidly over the last two decades as higher intensity lasers are found to have possible applications in inertial fusion, laboratory astrophysics and ion acceleration for oncology or ultrafast proton probing. All of these applications require a good understanding of laser-electron coupling and fast electron transport in solid targets which has proven difficult to diagnose. Here we present data from an experiment carried out on the Astra Gemini laser system at STFC-Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, where novel targets and diagnostics illuminate the complex processes at play. An outline of how x-ray free electron lasers may further expand our understanding of such processes will also be described.

  9. Monodisperse spherical mesoporous silica particles: fast synthesis procedure and fabrication of photonic-crystal films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trofimova, E. Yu; Kurdyukov, D. A.; Yakovlev, S. A.; Kirilenko, D. A.; Kukushkina, Yu A.; Nashchekin, A. V.; Sitnikova, A. A.; Yagovkina, M. A.; Golubev, V. G.

    2013-04-01

    A procedure for the synthesis of monodisperse spherical mesoporous silica particles (MSMSPs) via the controlled coagulation of silica/surfactant clusters into spherical aggregates with mean diameters of 250-1500 nm has been developed. The synthesis is fast (taking less than 1 h) because identical clusters are simultaneously formed in the reaction mixture. The results of microscopic, x-ray diffraction, adsorption and optical measurements allowed us to conclude that the clusters are ˜15 nm in size and have hexagonally packed cylindrical pore channels. The channel diameters in MSMSPs obtained with cethyltrimethylammonium bromide and decyltrimethylammonium bromide as structure-directing agents were 3.1 ± 0.15 and 2.3 ± 0.12 nm, respectively. The specific surface area and the pore volume of MSMSP were, depending on synthesis conditions, 480-1095 m2 g-1 and 0.50-0.65 cm3 g-1. The MSMSP were used to grow opal-like photonic-crystal films possessing a hierarchical macro-mesoporous structure, with pores within and between the particles. A selective filling of mesopore channels with glycerol, based on the difference between the capillary pressures in macro- and mesopores, was demonstrated. It is shown that this approach makes it possible to control the photonic bandgap position in mesoporous opal films by varying the degree of mesopore filling with glycerol.

  10. DIFFUSIVE SHOCK ACCELERATION OF HIGH-ENERGY CHARGED PARTICLES AT FAST INTERPLANETARY SHOCKS: A PARAMETER SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Giacalone, Joe

    2015-01-20

    We present results from numerical simulations of the acceleration of solar energetic particles (SEPs) associated with strong, fast, and radially propagating interplanetary shocks. We focus on the phase of the SEP event at the time of the shock passage at 1 AU, which is when the peak intensity at energies below a few MeV is the highest. The shocks in our study start between 2 and 10 solar radii and propagate beyond 1 AU. We study the effect of various shock and particle input parameters, such as the spatial diffusion coefficient, shock speed, solar wind speed, initial location of the shock, and shock deceleration rate, on the total integrated differential intensity, I, of SEPs with kinetic energies > 10 MeV. I is the integral over energy of the differential intensity spectrum at the time of the shock passage at 1 AU. We find that relatively small changes in the parameters can lead to significant event-to-event changes in I. For example, a factor of 2 increase in the diffusion coefficient at a given energy and spatial location, can lead to a decrease in I by as much as a factor of 50. This may help explain why there are fewer large SEP events seen during the current solar maximum compared to previous maxima. It is known that the magnitude of the interplanetary magnetic field is noticeably weaker this solar cycle than it was in the previous cycle and this will naturally lead to a somewhat larger diffusion coefficient of SEPs.

  11. Fast determination of biogenic amines in beverages by a core-shell particle column.

    PubMed

    Preti, Raffaella; Antonelli, Marta Letizia; Bernacchia, Roberta; Vinci, Giuliana

    2015-11-15

    A fast and reliable HPLC method for the determination of 11 biogenic amines in beverages has been performed. After pre-column derivatization with dansyl-chloride a Kinetex C18 core-shell particle column (100 mm × 4.6 mm, 2.6 μm particle size) has been employed and the biogenic amines were identified and quantified in a total run time of 13 min with ultraviolet (UV) or fluorescence detection (FLD). Chromatographic conditions such as column temperature (kept at 50 °C), gradient elution and flow rate have been optimized and the method has been tested on red wine and fruit nectar. The proposed method is enhanced in terms of reduced analysis time and eluent consumption with respect of classical HPLC method as to be comparable to UHPLC methods. Green and cost-effective, this method can be used as a quality-control tool for routine quantitative analysis of biogenic amines in beverages for the average laboratory. PMID:25977063

  12. Variability of light absorption by aquatic particles in the near-infrared spectral region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tassan, Stelvio; Ferrari, Giovanni M.

    2003-08-01

    We have measured the light absorption of a set of particle suspensions of varying nature (pure minerals, particulate standards, aquatic particles) using a double-beam spectrophotometer with a 15-cm-diameter integrating sphere. The sample was located inside the sphere so as to minimize the effect of light scattering by the particles. The results obtained showed highly variable absorption in the near-IR region of the wavelength spectrum. The same particle samples were deposited on glass-fiber filters, and their absorption was measured by the transmittance-reflectance method, based on a theoretical model that corrects for the effect of light scattering. The good agreement found between the results of the measurements carried out inside the sphere and by the transmittance-reflectance method confirms the validity of the scattering correction included in the above method.

  13. Small angle light scattering characterization of single micrometric particles in microfluidic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dannhauser, David; Romeo, Giovanni; Causa, Filippo; Netti, Paolo A.

    2013-04-01

    A CCD-camera based small angle light scattering (SALS) apparatus has been used to characterize single micrometric particles flowing in a micro-channel. The measured scattering vector spans the range 2x10-2 - 6:8x101μm-1. The incident laser light is collimated to a spot of about 50 μm in diameter at the sample position with a divergence lower than 0.045 rad. Such small collimated laser beam opens the possibility to perform on-line SALS of micron-sized particles flowing in micro-channels. By properly designing the micro-channel and using a viscoelastic liquid as suspending medium we are able to realize a precise 3D focusing of the target particles. The forward scattering emitted from the particle is collected by a lens with high numerical aperture. At the focal point of that lens a homemade beam stop is blocking the incident light. Finally, a second lens maps the scattered light on the CCD sensor, allowing to obtain far field images on short distances. Measurements with mono-disperse polystyrene particles, both in quiescent and in-flow conditions have been realized. Experiments in-flow allow to measure the single particle scattering. Results are validated by comparison with calculations based on the Lorenz-Mie theory. The quality of the measured intensity profiles confirms the possibility to use our apparatus in real multiplex applications, with particles down to 1 μm in radius.

  14. Monte Carlo simulation of light reflection from cosmetic powder particles near the human skin surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Takashi; Kumagawa, Tatsuya; Motoda, Masafumi; Igarashi, Takanori; Nakao, Keisuke

    2013-06-01

    The reflection and scattering properties of light incident on human skin covered with powder particles have been investigated. A three-layer skin structure with a pigmented area is modeled, and the propagation of light in the skin's layers and in a layer of particles near the skin's surface is simulated using the Monte Carlo method. Assuming that only single scattering of light occurs in the powder layer, the simulation results show that the reflection spectra of light from the skin change with the size of powder particles. The color difference between normal and discolored skin is found to decrease considerably when powder particles with a diameter of approximately 0.25 μm are present near the skin's surface. The effects of the medium surrounding the particles, and the influence of the distribution of particle size (polydispersity), are also examined. It is shown that a surrounding medium with a refractive index close to that of the skin substantially suppresses the extreme spectral changes caused by the powder particles covering the skin surface.

  15. Quasi-elastic light scattering from structured particles.

    PubMed

    Chen, S H; Holz, M; Tartaglia, P

    1977-01-01

    We present a formulation by which the scattered field correlation function of a nonstationary structured particle can be calculated. Specifically, we consider the case of micron-size bacteria, where the Rayleigh- Gans-Debye approximation may be used to evaluate the correlation function. We show that the width of the intensity correlation spectrum (as measured, for example, by the photon correlation technique) exhibits I an oscillatory behavior which is characteristic of the interference pattern produced by the internal structure. Two cases are of interest: diffusion and motility are considered in detail, and some evidence of the predicted behavior is shown from the photon correlation measurement of E. coli bacteria. PMID:20168450

  16. Resolving Organized Aerosol Structures (Rolls and Layers) with Airborne Fast Mobility Particle Sizer (FMPS) During MILAGRO/INTEX Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapustin, V.; Clarke, A.; Zhou, J.; Howell, S.; Shinozuka, Y.; Brekhovskikh, V.; McNaughton, C.

    2007-12-01

    The Hawaii Group for Environmental Aerosol Research [http://www.soest.hawaii.edu/HIGEAR] deployed a wide range of aerosol instrumentation aboard the C-130 and the NASA DC-8 as part of MILAGRO/INTEX. These were designed to provide rapid information on aerosol composition, state of mixing (internal or external), spectral optical properties (scattering and absorption), the humidity dependence of light scattering-f(RH), and the role of condensed species in changing the absorption properties of black carbon (BC) and inferred properties of organic carbon (OC). These measurements included size distributions from about 7 nm up to about 10,000 nm and their volatility at 150, 300 and 400 C; size selected response to heating (volatility) to resolve the state of mixing of the aerosol; continuous measurements of the light scattering and absorption at 3 wavelengths; measurements of the f(RH). We also flew the first airborne deployment of the new Fast Mobility Particle Sizer (FMPS, TSI Inc.) that provided information on rapid (1Hz) size variations in the Aitken mode. This revealed small scale structure of the aerosol and allowed us to examine size distributions varying over space and time associated with mixing processes previously unresolved etc. Rapid measurements during profiles also revealed variations in size over shallow layers. Other dynamic processes included rapid size distribution measurements within orographically induced aerosol layers and size distribution evolution of the nanoparticles formed by nucleation (C-130 flights 5, 6 and 9). Evidence for fluctuations induced by underlying changes in topography was also detected. These measurements also frequently revealed the aerosol variability in the presence of boundary layer rolls aligned along the wind in the Marine Boundary Layer (Gulf region) both with and without visible cloud streets (DC-8 flight 4 and C-130 flight 7). This organized convection over 1-2 km scales influences the mixing processes (entrainment, RH

  17. Development of Spectral and Atomic Models for Diagnosing Energetic Particle Characteristics in Fast Ignition Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    MacFarlane, Joseph J

    2009-08-07

    This Final Report summarizes work performed under DOE STTR Phase II Grant No. DE-FG02-05ER86258 during the project period from August 2006 to August 2009. The project, “Development of Spectral and Atomic Models for Diagnosing Energetic Particle Characteristics in Fast Ignition Experiments,” was led by Prism Computational Sciences (Madison, WI), and involved collaboration with subcontractors University of Nevada-Reno and Voss Scientific (Albuquerque, NM). In this project, we have: Developed and implemented a multi-dimensional, multi-frequency radiation transport model in the LSP hybrid fluid-PIC (particle-in-cell) code [1,2]. Updated the LSP code to support the use of accurate equation-of-state (EOS) tables generated by Prism’s PROPACEOS [3] code to compute more accurate temperatures in high energy density physics (HEDP) plasmas. Updated LSP to support the use of Prism’s multi-frequency opacity tables. Generated equation of state and opacity data for LSP simulations for several materials being used in plasma jet experimental studies. Developed and implemented parallel processing techniques for the radiation physics algorithms in LSP. Benchmarked the new radiation transport and radiation physics algorithms in LSP and compared simulation results with analytic solutions and results from numerical radiation-hydrodynamics calculations. Performed simulations using Prism radiation physics codes to address issues related to radiative cooling and ionization dynamics in plasma jet experiments. Performed simulations to study the effects of radiation transport and radiation losses due to electrode contaminants in plasma jet experiments. Updated the LSP code to generate output using NetCDF to provide a better, more flexible interface to SPECT3D [4] in order to post-process LSP output. Updated the SPECT3D code to better support the post-processing of large-scale 2-D and 3-D datasets generated by simulation codes such as LSP. Updated atomic physics modeling to provide for

  18. Application of the combinative particle size reduction technology H 42 to produce fast dissolving glibenclamide tablets.

    PubMed

    Salazar, Jaime; Müller, Rainer H; Möschwitzer, Jan P

    2013-07-16

    Standard particle size reduction techniques such as high pressure homogenization or wet bead milling are frequently used in the production of nanosuspensions. The need for micronized starting material and long process times are their evident disadvantages. Combinative particle size reduction technologies have been developed to overcome the drawbacks of the standard techniques. The H 42 combinative technology consists of a drug pre-treatment by means of spray-drying followed by standard high pressure homogenization. In the present paper, spray-drying process parameters influencing the diminution effectiveness, such as drug and surfactant concentration, were systematically analyzed. Subsequently, the untreated and pre-treated drug powders were homogenized for 20 cycles at 1500 bar. For untreated, micronized glibenclamide, the particle size analysis revealed a mean particle size of 772 nm and volume-based size distribution values of 2.686 μm (d50%) and 14.423 μm (d90%). The use of pre-treated material (10:1 glibenclamide/docusate sodium salt ratio spray-dried as ethanolic solution) resulted in a mean particle size of 236 nm and volume-based size distribution values of 0.131 μm (d50%) and 0.285 μm (d90%). These results were markedly improved compared to the standard process. The nanosuspensions were further transferred into tablet formulations. Wet granulation, freeze-drying and spray-drying were investigated as downstream methods to produce dry intermediates. Regarding the dissolution rate, the rank order of the downstream processes was as follows: Spray-drying>freeze-drying>wet granulation. The best drug release (90% within 10 min) was obtained for tablets produced with spray-dried nanosuspension containing 2% mannitol as matrix former. In comparison, the tablets processed with micronized glibenclamide showed a drug release of only 26% after 10 min. The H 42 combinative technology could be successfully applied in the production of small drug nanocrystals. A

  19. Preface: Laser-light and Interactions with Particles (LIP), 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gouesbet, Gérard; Onofri, Fabrice R. A.

    2015-09-01

    The scattering of light and other "electromagnetic radiation" is, since a long time, a very active field of research in physics. This is testified by many textbooks starting, although somewhat arbitrarily, with a book by Stratton [1], and continuing with van de Hulst [2], Jackson [3], Kerker [4], Deirmendjian [5], Bayvel and Jones [6], Bohren and Huffmann [7], Doicu et al. [8], Mishchenko et al. [9,10], or Mishchenko [11]. Radiative transfer and multiple scattering are explicitly discussed by Chandrasekhar [12], Kortüm [13] or van de Hulst [14].

  20. Billion particle linac simulations for future light sources

    SciTech Connect

    Ryne, R. D.; Venturini, M.; Zholents, A. A.; Qiang, J.

    2008-09-25

    In this paper we report on multi-physics, multi-billion macroparticle simulation of beam transport in a free electron laser (FEL) linac for future light source applications. The simulation includes a self-consistent calculation of 3D space-charge effects, short-range geometry wakefields, longitudinal coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) wakefields, and detailed modeling of RF acceleration and focusing. We discuss the need for and the challenges associated with such large-scale simulation. Applications to the study of the microbunching instability in an FEL linac are also presented.

  1. Feasibility Study of Supercritical Light Water Cooled Fast Reactors for Actinide Burning and Electric Power Production

    SciTech Connect

    Mac Donald, Philip Elsworth; Buongiorno, Jacopo; Davis, Cliff Bybee; Weaver, Kevan Dean

    2002-01-01

    The use of supercritical temperature and pressure light water as the coolant in a direct-cycle nuclear reactor offers potential for considerable plant simplification and consequent capital and O&M cost reduction compared with current light water reactor (LWR) designs. Also, given the thermodynamic conditions of the coolant at the core outlet (i.e. temperature and pressure beyond the water critical point), very high thermal efficiencies of the power conversion cycle are possible (i.e. up to 46%). Because no change of phase occurs in the core, the need for steam separators and dryers as well as for BWR-type recirculation pumps is eliminated, which, for a given reactor power, results in a substantially shorter reactor vessel than the current BWRs. Furthermore, in a direct cycle the steam generators are not needed. If a tight fuel rod lattice is adopted, it is possible to significantly reduce the neutron moderation and attain fast neutron energy spectrum conditions. In this project a supercritical water reactor concept with a simple, blanket-free, pancake-shaped core will be developed. This type of core can make use of either fertile or fertile-free fuel and retain the hard spectrum to effectively burn plutonium and minor actinides from LWR spent fuel while efficiently generating electricity.

  2. From fast to slow light in a resonantly driven absorbing medium

    SciTech Connect

    Macke, Bruno; Segard, Bernard

    2010-08-15

    We theoretically study the propagation through a resonant absorbing medium of a time-dependent perturbation modulating the amplitude of a continuous wave (cw). Modeling the medium as a two-level system and linearizing the Maxwell-Bloch equations for the perturbation, we establish an exact analytical expression of the transfer function relating the Fourier transforms of the incident and transmitted perturbations. It directly gives the gain and the phase shift undergone in the medium by a harmonic modulation. For the case of a pulse modulation, it enables us to determine the transmission time of the pulse center of mass (group delay), evidencing the relative contributions of the coherent and incoherent (population) relaxations. We show that the group delay has a negative value (fast light) fixed by the coherent effects when the cw intensity is small compared to the saturation intensity and becomes positive (slow light) when this intensity increases, before attaining a maximum that cannot exceed the population relaxation time. The analytical results are completed by numerical determinations of the shape of the transmitted pulses in the different regimes.

  3. A Proposed New "Nano-Particle" Theory of Light Based on Heat Transfer Principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Ashis

    2004-05-01

    Till date theories of light (visible and other radiations over electromagnetic scale) are divided into two classes viz. particle and wave theory. A particle on the classical view is a concentration of energy and other properties in space and time, whereas a wave is spread out over a larger region of space and time. It is generally understood that particle theory talks about corpuscles of finite measurable mass whereas wave theory is about packets of massless energy. This paper is a summary of thoughts collected so far on building a only - particle theory of light or other radiations assuming the Universe to be filled with "nano-particles" or very small particles and large particles. Although revolutionary and very thought provoking and unbelievably challenging the collected pointers outlined in this account appear very logical and mathematically sound although experiments are required to give this theory a firm basis for wide spread recognition in scientific forums. The major support for nano-particle theory comes from the observation of a term called "radiation pressure" which incorporates a sense of impact or pressure and therefore a force and so some particle impact although very feeble compared to normal large particle impact yielding noticeable effect on most pressure gauges measuring this. Similar feeble impact effects are possible in other phenomena like current, magnetic field etc. whose measurement will require very sensitive instruments. In this paper, I have explained that common method of estimation of momentum and heat transfer applied to very small mass nano-particles can explain at least three major phenomena of visble light viz. rectilinear propagation, reflection and refraction. Other phenomena such as diffraction, interference, polarization, diffusion etc will be presented in a future paper. This presentation is meant for collecting wide readership views to approve or deny this explanation of only particle theory after famous Compton scattering

  4. Heterogeneous Combustion Particles with Distinctive Light-Absorbing and Light-Scattering Phases as Mimics of Internally-Mixed Ambient Atmospheric Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conny, J. M.; Ma, X.; Gunn, L. R.

    2011-12-01

    Particles with heterogeneously-distributed light-absorbing and light-scattering phases were generated from incomplete combustion or thermal decomposition to mimic real atmospheric particles with distinctive optical properties. Individual particles and particle populations were characterized microscopically. The purpose was to examine how optical property measurements of internally-mixed ambient air particles might vary based on the properties of laboratory-generated particles produced under controlled conditions. The project is an initial stage in producing reference samples for calibrating instrumentation for monitoring climatically-important atmospheric aerosols. Binary-phase particles containing black carbon (BC) and a metal or a metal oxide phase were generated from the thermal decomposition or partial combustion of liquid fuels at a variety of temperatures from 600 °C to 1100 °C. Fuels included mixtures of toluene or isooctane and iron pentacarbonyl or titanium tetrachloride. Scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy revealed that burning the fuels at different temperatures resulted in distinctive differences in morphology and carbon vs. metal/metal oxide composition. Particles from toluene/Fe(CO)5 thermal decomposition exhibited aggregated morphologies that were classified as dendritic, soot-like, globular, or composited (dendritic-globular). Particles from isooctane/TiCl4 combustion were typically spherical with surface adducts or aggregates. Diameters of the BC/TiO2 particles averaged 0.68 μm to 0.70 μm. Regardless of combustion temperature, the most abundant particles in each BC/TiO2 sample had an aspect ratio of 1.2. However, for the 600 °C and 900 °C samples the distribution of aspect ratios was skewed toward much larger ratios suggesting significant chainlike aggregation. Carbon and titanium compositions (wt.) for the 600 °C sample were 12 % and 53 %, respectively. In contrast, the composition trended in the opposite

  5. Fast space-varying convolution using matrix source coding with applications to camera stray light reduction.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jianing; Bouman, Charles A; Allebach, Jan P

    2014-05-01

    Many imaging applications require the implementation of space-varying convolution for accurate restoration and reconstruction of images. Here, we use the term space-varying convolution to refer to linear operators whose impulse response has slow spatial variation. In addition, these space-varying convolution operators are often dense, so direct implementation of the convolution operator is typically computationally impractical. One such example is the problem of stray light reduction in digital cameras, which requires the implementation of a dense space-varying deconvolution operator. However, other inverse problems, such as iterative tomographic reconstruction, can also depend on the implementation of dense space-varying convolution. While space-invariant convolution can be efficiently implemented with the fast Fourier transform, this approach does not work for space-varying operators. So direct convolution is often the only option for implementing space-varying convolution. In this paper, we develop a general approach to the efficient implementation of space-varying convolution, and demonstrate its use in the application of stray light reduction. Our approach, which we call matrix source coding, is based on lossy source coding of the dense space-varying convolution matrix. Importantly, by coding the transformation matrix, we not only reduce the memory required to store it; we also dramatically reduce the computation required to implement matrix-vector products. Our algorithm is able to reduce computation by approximately factoring the dense space-varying convolution operator into a product of sparse transforms. Experimental results show that our method can dramatically reduce the computation required for stray light reduction while maintaining high accuracy. PMID:24710398

  6. Light-scattering submicroscopic particles as highly fluorescent analogs and their use as tracer labels in clinical and biological applications.

    PubMed

    Yguerabide, J; Yguerabide, E E

    1998-09-10

    Submicroscopic gold particle suspensions scatter colored light when illuminated with white light, and we have observed that a light-scattering gold particle suspension has the same appearance as a fluorescing solution. Thus, when illuminated by a narrow beam of white light, a 40-nm gold sol displays a clear (not cloudy), green scattered light (Tyndall) beam and has the same appearance as a fluorescing fluorescein solution. These, as well as other, observations have suggested to us that, in general, light-scattering particles can be treated as fluorescent analogs and used as fluorescent analog tracers in immuno- and DNA probe assays as well as in cell and molecular biology studies. Light-scattering particles are advantageous in these applications because particles such as gold and silver have very high light-scattering powers, which allows these particles to be easily detected, by light-scattering, at particle concentrations as low as 10(-16) M. The scattered light can be detected by the unaided eye for qualitative measurements or with a simple light-sensitive detector for quantitative measurements. Moreover, individual particles can be easily detected by eye or a video camera using a simple light microscope with a proper illuminating system. In addition, submicroscopic particles which scatter blue, green, yellow, orange, or red light can be readily synthesized. Antibodies, DNA probes, and other tracer substances can be readily attached to gold and other particles without altering their light-scattering properties. In this article we present the theory which allows one to predict the light-scattering properties of particles of different sizes and compositions and identify those particle sizes and compositions which appear most adequate for particular applications. Furthermore, we calculate molar extinction coefficients and emission efficiencies for particles of different sizes and compositions which allows us to compare the light-producing powers of these particles

  7. Preface: Electromagnetic and Light Scattering by Nonspherical Particles XIV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dubovik, Oleg; Labonnete, Laurent; Litvinov, Pavel; Parol, Frederic; Mischenko, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The 14th Electromagnetic and Light Scattering Conference (ELS-XIV) was held at the Universit de Lille 1, Villeneuve d'Ascq, France on 17-21 June 2013. The conference was attended by 200 scientists from 26 countries. The scientific program included one plenary lecture, 12 invited reviews, 100 contributed oral talks, and 86 poster presentations. The program, the abstracts, and the slides of the oral presentations are available at the conference web site http:www-loa.univ-lille1.frELS-XIV. To highlight one of the traditional ELS themes, the ELS-XIV featured a special session on Remote sensing of aerosols and clouds using polarimetric observations. This session was sponsored and co-organized by the French space agency CNES and attracted representatives from nearly all research teams word-wide involved in the development and active use of space-borne, in situ, and ground-based polarimetric observations.

  8. State of mixture of atmospheric submicrometer black carbon particles and its effect on particulate light absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naoe, Hiroaki; Hasegawa, Shuichi; Heintzenberg, Jost; Okada, Kikuo; Uchiyama, Akihiro; Zaizen, Yuji; Kobayashi, Eriko; Yamazaki, Akihiro

    The state of mixture of light-absorbing carbonaceous particles was investigated in relation to light absorption properties using electron microscopic examinations, black carbon (BC) analyses of quartz filter by thermal/optical reflectance (TOR) method, measurements with two continuous light-absorbing photometers at a suburban site of Tsukuba, about 60 km northeast of Tokyo. The volume fraction of water-soluble material ( ɛ) in individual particles is important for assessing particulate light-absorbing and/or scattering of atmospheric aerosols. The values of ɛ in BC particles were evaluated by electron micrographs before and after dialysis (extraction) of water-soluble material. The mass absorption coefficient (MAC in units of m 2 g -1) tended to increase with increasing the average ɛ in BC particles with the radius range of 0.05-0.5 μm. Thus, our results indicate that coatings of water-soluble material around BC particles can enhance the absorption of solar radiation. Moreover, the single scattering albedo (SSA) will increase because a large amount of coating material will scatter more light.

  9. Exocytosis of Alphaherpesvirus Virions, Light Particles, and Glycoproteins Uses Constitutive Secretory Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Hogue, Ian B.; Scherer, Julian

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Many molecular and cell biological details of the alphaherpesvirus assembly and egress pathway remain unclear. Recently we developed a live-cell fluorescence microscopy assay of pseudorabies virus (PRV) exocytosis, based on total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy and a virus-encoded pH-sensitive fluorescent probe. Here, we use this assay to distinguish three classes of viral exocytosis in a nonpolarized cell type: (i) trafficking of viral glycoproteins to the plasma membrane, (ii) exocytosis of viral light particles, and (iii) exocytosis of virions. We find that viral glycoproteins traffic to the cell surface in association with constitutive secretory Rab GTPases and exhibit free diffusion into the plasma membrane after exocytosis. Similarly, both virions and light particles use these same constitutive secretory mechanisms for egress from infected cells. Furthermore, we show that viral light particles are distinct from cellular exosomes. Together, these observations shed light on viral glycoprotein trafficking steps that precede virus particle assembly and reinforce the idea that virions and light particles share a biogenesis and trafficking pathway. PMID:27273828

  10. Advanced analysis of polymer emulsions: Particle size and particle size distribution by field-flow fractionation and dynamic light scattering.

    PubMed

    Makan, Ashwell C; Spallek, Markus J; du Toit, Madeleine; Klein, Thorsten; Pasch, Harald

    2016-04-15

    Field flow fractionation (FFF) is an advanced fractionation technique for the analyses of very sensitive particles. In this study, different FFF techniques were used for the fractionation and analysis of polymer emulsions/latexes. As model systems, a pure acrylic emulsion and emulsions containing titanium dioxide were prepared and analyzed. An acrylic emulsion polymerization was conducted, continuously sampled from the reactor and subsequently analyzed to determine the particle size, radius of gyration in specific, of the latex particles throughout the polymerization reaction. Asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) and sedimentation field-flow fractionation (SdFFF), coupled to a multidetector system, multi-angle laser light scattering (MALLS), ultraviolet (UV) and refractive index (RI), respectively, were used to investigate the evolution of particle sizes and particle size distributions (PSDs) as the polymerization progressed. The obtained particle sizes were compared against batch-mode dynamic light scattering (DLS). Results indicated differences between AF4 and DLS results due to DLS taking hydration layers into account, whereas both AF4 and SdFFF were coupled to MALLS detection, hence not taking the hydration layer into account for size determination. SdFFF has additional separation capabilities with a much higher resolution compared to AF4. The calculated radii values were 5 nm larger for SdFFF measurements for each analyzed sample against the corresponding AF4 values. Additionally a low particle size shoulder was observed for SdFFF indicating bimodality in the reactor very early during the polymerization reaction. Furthermore, different emulsions were mixed with inorganic species used as additives in cosmetics and coatings such as TiO2. These complex mixtures of species were analyzed to investigate the retention and particle interaction behavior under different AF4 experimental conditions, such as the mobile phase. The AF4 system was coupled online

  11. LOAC (Light Optical Particle Counter): a new small aerosol counter with particle characterization capabilities for surface and airborne measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renard, Jean-Baptiste; Berthet, Gwenael; Jégou, Fabrice; Jeannot, Matthieu; Jourdain, Line; Dulac, François; Mallet, Marc; Dupont, Jean-Charles; Thaury, Claire; Tonnelier, Thierry; Verdier, Nicolas; Charpentier, Patrick

    2013-04-01

    The determination of the size distribution of tropospheric and stratospheric aerosols with conventional optical counters is difficult when different natures of particles are present (droplets, soot, mineral dust, secondary organic or mineral particles...). Also, a light and cheap aerosol counter that can be used at ground, onboard drones or launched under all kinds of atmospheric balloons can be very useful during specific events as volcanic plumes, desert dust transport or local pollution episodes. These goals can be achieved thanks to a new generation of aerosol counter, called LOAC (Light Optical Aerosol Counter). The instrument was developed in the frame of a cooperation between French scientific laboratories (CNRS), the Environnement-SA and MeteoModem companies and the French Space Agency (CNES). LOAC is a small optical particle counter/sizer of ~250 grams, having a low electrical power consumption. The measurements are conducted at two scattering angles. The first one, at 12°, is used to determine the aerosol particle concentrations in 19 size classes within a diameter range of 0.3-100 micrometerers. At such an angle close to forward scattering, the signal is much more intense and the measurements are the least sensitive to the particle nature. The second angle is at 60°, where the scattered light is strongly dependent on the particle refractive index and thus on the nature of the aerosols. The ratio of the measurements at the two angles is used to discriminate between the different types of particles dominating the nature of the aerosol particles in the different size classes. The sensor particularly discriminates wet or liquid particles, soil dust and soot. Since 2011, we have operated LOAC in various environments (Arctic, Mediterranean, urban and peri-urban…) under different kinds of balloons including zero pressure stratospheric, tethered, drifting tropospheric, and meteorological sounding balloons. For the last case, the total weight of the gondola

  12. Independent-particle models for light negative atomic ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganas, P. S.; Talman, J. D.; Green, A. E. S.

    1980-01-01

    For the purposes of astrophysical, aeronomical, and laboratory application, a precise independent-particle model for electrons in negative atomic ions of the second and third period is discussed. The optimum-potential model (OPM) of Talman et al. (1979) is first used to generate numerical potentials for eight of these ions. Results for total energies and electron affinities are found to be very close to Hartree-Fock solutions. However, the OPM and HF electron affinities both depart significantly from experimental affinities. For this reason, two analytic potentials are developed whose inner energy levels are very close to the OPM and HF levels but whose last electron eigenvalues are adjusted precisely with the magnitudes of experimental affinities. These models are: (1) a four-parameter analytic characterization of the OPM potential and (2) a two-parameter potential model of the Green, Sellin, Zachor type. The system O(-) or e-O, which is important in upper atmospheric physics is examined in some detail.

  13. Light flash phenomena induced by HzE particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcnulty, P. J.; Pease, V. P.

    1980-01-01

    Astronauts and Apollo and Skylab missions have reported observing a variety of visual phenomena when their eyes are closed and adapted to darkness. These phenomena have been collectively labelled as light flashes. Visual phenomena which are similar in appearance to those observed in space have been demonstrated at the number of accelerator facilities by expressing the eyes of human subjects to beams of various types of radiation. In some laboratory experiments Cerenkov radiation was found to be the basis for the flashes observed while in other experiments Cerenkov radiation could apparently be ruled out. Experiments that differentiate between Cerenkov radiation and other possible mechanisms for inducing visual phenomena was then compared. The phenomena obtained in the presence and absence of Cerenkov radiation were designed and conducted. A new mechanism proposed to explain the visual phenomena observed by Skylab astronauts as they passed through the South Atlantic Anomaly, namely nuclear interactions in and near the sensitive layer of the retina, is covered. Also some studies to search for similar transient effects of space radiation on sensors and microcomputer memories are described.

  14. Fast-response IR spatial light modulators with a polymer network liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Fenglin; Chen, Haiwei; Tripathi, Suvagata; Twieg, Robert J.; Wu, Shin-Tson

    2015-03-01

    Liquid crystals (LC) have widespread applications for amplitude modulation (e.g. flat panel displays) and phase modulation (e.g. beam steering). For phase modulation, a 2π phase modulo is required. To extend the electro-optic application into infrared region (MWIR and LWIR), several key technical challenges have to be overcome: 1. low absorption loss, 2. high birefringence, 3. low operation voltage, and 4. fast response time. After three decades of extensive development, an increasing number of IR devices adopting LC technology have been demonstrated, such as liquid crystal waveguide, laser beam steering at 1.55μm and 10.6 μm, spatial light modulator in the MWIR (3~5μm) band, dynamic scene projectors for infrared seekers in the LWIR (8~12μm) band. However, several fundamental molecular vibration bands and overtones exist in the MWIR and LWIR regions, which contribute to high absorption coefficient and hinder its widespread application. Therefore, the inherent absorption loss becomes a major concern for IR devices. To suppress IR absorption, several approaches have been investigated: 1) Employing thin cell gap by choosing a high birefringence liquid crystal mixture; 2) Shifting the absorption bands outside the spectral region of interest by deuteration, fluorination and chlorination; 3) Reducing the overlap vibration bands by using shorter alkyl chain compounds. In this paper, we report some chlorinated LC compounds and mixtures with a low absorption loss in the near infrared and MWIR regions. To achieve fast response time, we have demonstrated a polymer network liquid crystal with 2π phase change at MWIR and response time less than 5 ms.

  15. Advanced Fuel Cycle Economic Analysis of Symbiotic Light-Water Reactor and Fast Burner Reactor Systems

    SciTech Connect

    D. E. Shropshire

    2009-01-01

    The Advanced Fuel Cycle Economic Analysis of Symbiotic Light-Water Reactor and Fast Burner Reactor Systems, prepared to support the U.S. Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) systems analysis, provides a technology-oriented baseline system cost comparison between the open fuel cycle and closed fuel cycle systems. The intent is to understand their overall cost trends, cost sensitivities, and trade-offs. This analysis also improves the AFCI Program’s understanding of the cost drivers that will determine nuclear power’s cost competitiveness vis-a-vis other baseload generation systems. The common reactor-related costs consist of capital, operating, and decontamination and decommissioning costs. Fuel cycle costs include front-end (pre-irradiation) and back-end (post-iradiation) costs, as well as costs specifically associated with fuel recycling. This analysis reveals that there are large cost uncertainties associated with all the fuel cycle strategies, and that overall systems (reactor plus fuel cycle) using a closed fuel cycle are about 10% more expensive in terms of electricity generation cost than open cycle systems. The study concludes that further U.S. and joint international-based design studies are needed to reduce the cost uncertainties with respect to fast reactor, fuel separation and fabrication, and waste disposition. The results of this work can help provide insight to the cost-related factors and conditions needed to keep nuclear energy (including closed fuel cycles) economically competitive in the U.S. and worldwide. These results may be updated over time based on new cost information, revised assumptions, and feedback received from additional reviews.

  16. FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION: Phenomenology of the equivalence principle with light scalars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damour, Thibault; Donoghue, John F.

    2010-10-01

    Light scalar particles with couplings of sub-gravitational strength, which can generically be called 'dilatons', can produce violations of the equivalence principle. However, in order to understand experimental sensitivities one must know the coupling of these scalars to atomic systems. We report here on a study of the required couplings. We give a general Lagrangian with five independent dilaton parameters and calculate the 'dilaton charge' of atomic systems for each of these. Two combinations are particularly important. One is due to the variations in the nuclear binding energy, with a sensitivity scaling with the atomic number as A-1/3. The other is due to electromagnetism. We compare limits on the dilaton parameters from existing experiments.

  17. Ultrasensitive and fast detection of denaturation of milk by Coherent backscattering of light

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Manish; Singh, Dilip K.; Senthilkumaran, P.; Joseph, Joby; Kandpal, H. C.

    2014-01-01

    In this work, Coherence backscattering (CBS) of light has been used to detect the onset of denaturation of milk. The CBS cone shape and its enhancement factor are found to be highly sensitive to the physical state of the milk particles. The onset of denaturing of milk not visible to the naked eye, can be easily detected from changes in the CBS cone shape. The onset of denaturation is confirmed by spectral changes in Raman spectra from these milk samples. Further, the possibility to estimate the dilution of milk by water as an adulterant is demonstrated. The method reported has a broad scope in industry for making an inline ultrafast cost effective sensor for milk quality monitoring during production and before consumption. PMID:25435102

  18. Fast single-image dehazing method for visible-light systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Wei; Guo, Bao Long; Li, Da Jian; Jia, Wei

    2013-09-01

    Optical imaging systems are often degraded by scattering due to atmospheric particles such as haze, fog, and mist. According to the physical model of atmospheric scattering, two major factors that affect the effect of fog removal are discussed. By using joint probability density definition and the proposed joint mean shift filtering algorithm, discontinuity preserving smoothing and image segmentation are addressed in the sequel to refine the atmospheric veil and estimate the atmospheric light, which overcomes the inherent limitations of the state-of-the-art methods. Simulation results on a variety of outdoor foggy images demonstrate that the proposed method achieves short computation time and good restoration for visibility and color fidelity. An embedded vision enhanced system based on a DSP is designed and runs the proposed algorithm at 15 fps for a color frame of 720×576 pixels.

  19. Controlling dispersion forces between small particles with artificially created random light fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brügger, Georges; Froufe-Pérez, Luis S.; Scheffold, Frank; José Sáenz, Juan

    2015-06-01

    Appropriate combinations of laser beams can be used to trap and manipulate small particles with optical tweezers as well as to induce significant optical binding forces between particles. These interaction forces are usually strongly anisotropic depending on the interference landscape of the external fields. This is in contrast with the familiar isotropic, translationally invariant, van der Waals and, in general, Casimir-Lifshitz interactions between neutral bodies arising from random electromagnetic waves generated by equilibrium quantum and thermal fluctuations. Here we show, both theoretically and experimentally, that dispersion forces between small colloidal particles can also be induced and controlled using artificially created fluctuating light fields. Using optical tweezers as a gauge, we present experimental evidence for the predicted isotropic attractive interactions between dielectric microspheres induced by laser-generated, random light fields. These light-induced interactions open a path towards the control of translationally invariant interactions with tuneable strength and range in colloidal systems.

  20. Controlling dispersion forces between small particles with artificially created random light fields

    PubMed Central

    Brügger, Georges; Froufe-Pérez, Luis S.; Scheffold, Frank; José Sáenz, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Appropriate combinations of laser beams can be used to trap and manipulate small particles with optical tweezers as well as to induce significant optical binding forces between particles. These interaction forces are usually strongly anisotropic depending on the interference landscape of the external fields. This is in contrast with the familiar isotropic, translationally invariant, van der Waals and, in general, Casimir–Lifshitz interactions between neutral bodies arising from random electromagnetic waves generated by equilibrium quantum and thermal fluctuations. Here we show, both theoretically and experimentally, that dispersion forces between small colloidal particles can also be induced and controlled using artificially created fluctuating light fields. Using optical tweezers as a gauge, we present experimental evidence for the predicted isotropic attractive interactions between dielectric microspheres induced by laser-generated, random light fields. These light-induced interactions open a path towards the control of translationally invariant interactions with tuneable strength and range in colloidal systems. PMID:26096622

  1. Trapped fast particle destabilization of internal kink mode for the locally flattened q-profile with an inflection point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xian-Qu; Zhang, Rui-Bin; Meng, Guo

    2016-07-01

    The destabilization of ideal internal kink modes by trapped fast particles in tokamak plasmas with a "shoulder"-like equilibrium current is investigated. It is found that energetic particle branch of the mode is unstable with the driving of fast-particle precession drifts and corresponds to a precessional fishbone. The mode with a low stability threshold is also more easily excited than the conventional precessional fishbone. This is different from earlier studies for the same equilibrium in which the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) branch of the mode is stable. Furthermore, the stability and characteristic frequency of the mode are analyzed by solving the dispersion relation and comparing with the conventional fishbone. The results suggest that an equilibrium with a locally flattened q-profile, may be modified by localized current drive (or bootstrap current, etc.), is prone to the onset of the precessional fishbone branch of the mode.

  2. Experimental demonstration of enhanced slow and fast light by forced coherent population oscillations in a semiconductor optical amplifier.

    PubMed

    Berger, Perrine; Bourderionnet, Jérôme; de Valicourt, Guilhem; Brenot, Romain; Bretenaker, Fabien; Dolfi, Daniel; Alouini, Mehdi

    2010-07-15

    We experimentally demonstrate enhanced slow and fast light by forced coherent population oscillations in a semiconductor optical amplifier at gigahertz frequencies. This approach is shown to rely on the interference between two different contributions. This opens up the possibility of conceiving a controllable rf phase shifter based on this setup. PMID:20634862

  3. Dual-wavelength light scattering for selective detection of volcanic ash particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurányi, Z.; Burtscher, H.; Loepfe, M.; Nenkov, M.; Weingartner, E.

    2015-08-01

    A new method is presented in this paper which analyses the scattered light of individual aerosol particles simultaneously at two different wavelengths in order to retrieve information on the particle type. We show that dust-like particles, such as volcanic ash, can be unambiguously discriminated from water droplets on a single particle level. As a future application of this method, the detection of volcanic ash particles should be possible in a humid atmosphere in the presence of cloud droplets. We show an example, how the characteristic behaviour of pure water's refractive index can be used to separate water droplets and dust-like particles which are commonly found in the micrometer size-range in the ambient air. The low real part of the water's refractive index around 2700-2800 nm results in low scattered light intensities compared to e.g. the visible wavelength range and this feature can be used for the particle identification. The two-wavelength measurement setup was theoretically and experimentally tested and studied. Theoretical calculations were done using Mie theory. Comparing the ratio of the scattered light at the two wavelengths (R value) for water droplets and different dust types (basalt, andesite, African mineral dust, sand, volcanic ash, pumice) showed at least 9 times higher values (on average 70 times) for water droplets than for the dust types at any diameter within the particle size range of 2-20 μm. The envisaged measurement setup was built up into a laboratory prototype and was tested with different types of aerosols. We generated aerosols from the following powders simulating dust-like particles: cement dust, ISO 12103-1 A1 Ultrafine Test Dust and Ash from the 2012 eruption of the Etna volcano. Our measurements verified the theoretical considerations, the median experimental R value is 8-21 times higher for water than for the "dust" particles.

  4. DEFLECTIONS OF FAST CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS AND THE PROPERTIES OF ASSOCIATED SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLE EVENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Kahler, S. W.; Akiyama, S.; Gopalswamy, N.

    2012-08-01

    The onset times and peak intensities of solar energetic particle (SEP) events at Earth have long been thought to be influenced by the open magnetic fields of coronal holes (CHs). The original idea was that a CH lying between the solar SEP source region and the magnetic footpoint of the 1 AU observer would result in a delay in onset and/or a decrease in the peak intensity of that SEP event. Recently, Gopalswamy et al. showed that CHs near coronal mass ejection (CME) source regions can deflect fast CMEs from their expected trajectories in space, explaining the appearance of driverless shocks at 1 AU from CMEs ejected near solar central meridian (CM). This suggests that SEP events originating in CME-driven shocks may show variations attributable to CH deflections of the CME trajectories. Here, we use a CH magnetic force parameter to examine possible effects of CHs on the timing and intensities of 41 observed gradual E {approx} 20 MeV SEP events with CME source regions within 20 Degree-Sign of CM. We find no systematic CH effects on SEP event intensity profiles. Furthermore, we find no correlation between the CME leading-edge measured position angles and SEP event properties, suggesting that the widths of CME-driven shock sources of the SEPs are much larger than the CMEs. Independently of the SEP event properties, we do find evidence for significant CME deflections by CH fields in these events.

  5. Eikonal approximation in the theory of energy loss by fast charged particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matveev, V. I.; Makarov, D. N.; Gusarevich, E. S.

    2011-05-01

    Energy losses in fast charged particles as a result of collisions with atoms are considered in the eikonal approximation. It is shown that the nonperturbative contribution to effective stopping in the range of intermediate impact parameters (comparable with the characteristic sizes of the electron shells of the target atoms) may turn out to be significant as compared to shell corrections to the Bethe-Bloch formula calculated in perturbation theory. The simplifying assumptions are formulated under which the Bethe-Bloch formula can be derived in the eikonal approximation. It is shown that the allowance for nonperturbative effects may lead to considerable (up to 50%) corrections to the Bethe-Bloch formula. The applicability range for the Bethe-Bloch formula is analyzed. It is concluded that calculation of the energy loss in the eikonal approximation (in the range of impact parameters for which the Bethe-Bloch formula is normally used) is much more advantageous than analysis based on the Bethe-Bloch formula and its modifications because not only the Bloch correction is included in the former calculations, the range of intermediate impact parameters is also taken into account nonperturbatively; in addition, direct generalization to the cases of collisions of complex projectiles and targets is possible in this case.

  6. Advanced laser particle accelerator development at LANL: from fast ignition to radiation oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Flippo, Kirk A; Gaillard, Sandrine A; Offermann, D T; Cobble, J A; Schmitt, M J; Gautier, D C; Kwan, T J T; Montgomery, D S; Kluge, Thomas; Bussmann, Micheal; Bartal, T; Beg, F N; Gall, B; Geissel, M; Korgan, G; Kovaleski, S; Lockard, T; Malekos, S; Schollmeier, M; Sentoku, Y; Cowan, T E

    2010-01-01

    Laser-plasma accelerated ion and electron beam sources are an emerging field with vast prospects, and promise many superior applications in a variety of fields such as hadron cancer therapy, compact radioisotope generation, table-top nuclear physics, laboratory astrophysics, nuclear forensics, waste transmutation, SN M detection, and inertial fusion energy. LANL is engaged in several projects seeking to develop compact high current and high energy ion and electron sources. We are especially interested in two specific applications: ion fast ignition/capsule perturbation and radiation oncology in conjunction with our partners at the ForschungsZentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (FZD). Laser-to-beam conversion efficiencies of over 10% are needed for practical applications, and we have already shown inherent etliciencies of >5% from flat foils, on Trident using only a 5th of the intensity and energy of the Nova Petawatt. With clever target designs, like structured curved cone targets, we have also been able to achieve major ion energy gains, leading to the highest energy laser-accelerated proton beams in the world. These new target designs promise to help usher in the next generation of particle sources realizing the potential of laser-accelerated beams.

  7. Particle collection at the plasma edge by a fast reciprocating probe at the TEXTOR tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emmoth, B.; Wienhold, P.; Rubel, M.; Schweer, B.; Zagórski, R.

    2003-03-01

    A fast reciprocating probe system capable of transferring different types of heads has been constructed and implemented at the TEXTOR tokamak for diagnosing the plasma edge. It gives the possibility of using a particle collector technique to extend studies of material transport from the scrape-off layer to the near plasma edge. For the first time, the system was used for exposures of graphite samples (pure and coated with a-C:H or W) at positions both within and outside the last closed flux surface. Various surface analysis methods were applied to investigate the probe morphology and, by this, to determine radial deposition profiles of boron impurities and deuterium. The profiles for boron are remarkably flat whilst those for deuterium are characterised by a steep decay with the e-folding length of approximately 15 mm. On tungsten-coated samples almost no deuterium was found, most likely because of little carbon co-deposition, shallow implantation and low trapping coefficient of deuterons in the tungsten layer. Reconstruction of experimental results by means of a multifluid TECXY code helped to identify the contribution of impurity sources (limiters, wall) to the observed radial distribution of species.

  8. Deflections of Fast Coronal Mass Ejections and the Properties of Associated Solar Energetic Particle Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahler, S. W.; Akiyama, S.; Gopalswamy, N.

    2012-01-01

    The onset times and peak intensities of solar energetic particle (SEP) events at Earth have long been thought to be influenced by the open magnetic fields of coronal holes (CHs). The original idea was that a CH lying between the solar SEP source region and the magnetic footpoint of the 1 AU observer would result in a delay in onset and/or a decrease in the peak intensity of that SEP event. Recently, Gopalswamy et al. showed that CHs near coronal mass ejection (CME) source regions can deflect fast CMEs from their expected trajectories in space, explaining the appearance of driverless shocks at 1 AU from CMEs ejected near solar central meridian (CM). This suggests that SEP events originating in CME-driven shocks may show variations attributable to CH deflections of the CME trajectories. Here, we use a CH magnetic force parameter to examine possible effects of CHs on the timing and intensities of 41 observed gradual E approx 20 MeV SEP events with CME source regions within 20 deg. of CM. We find no systematic CH effects on SEP event intensity profiles. Furthermore, we find no correlation between the CME leading-edge measured position angles and SEP event properties, suggesting that the widths of CME-driven shock sources of the SEPs are much larger than the CMEs. Independently of the SEP event properties, we do find evidence for significant CME deflections by CH fields in these events

  9. Light concentration in the near-field of dielectric spheroidal particles with mesoscopic sizes.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Manuel J; Tobías, Ignacio; Martí, Antonio; Luque, Antonio

    2011-08-15

    This paper presents a numerical study of the light focusing properties of dielectric spheroids with sizes comparable to the illuminating wavelength. An analytical separation-of-variables method is used to determine the electric field distribution inside and in the near-field outside the particles. An optimization algorithm was implemented in the method to determine the particles' physical parameters that maximize the forward scattered light in the near-field region. It is found that such scatterers can exhibit pronounced electric intensity enhancement (above 100 times the incident intensity) in their close vicinity, or along wide focal regions extending to 10 times the wavelength. The results reveal the potential of wavelength-sized spheroids to manipulate light beyond the limitations of macroscopic geometrical optics. This can be of interest for several applications, such as light management in photovoltaics. PMID:21934983

  10. Miniature Light Scattering Systems For On-Line Process Particle Size And Velocity Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Robert G.; Burnett, J. G.; Chow, K.; Rarity, J. G.

    1989-03-01

    Light scattering techniques for velocity and particle size analysis are well established research and industrial tools. In general, light scattering instruments have been large and expensive, requiring skilled operation. We have constructed and tested a range of light scattering instruments in miniature form using the recently available range of new semiconductor laser diodes, avalanche and PIN photodiodes and optical fibres. Thus is has been possible to demonstrate laser Doppler and transit anemometers for turbulent flow analysis and dynamic light scattering instruments for particle size analysis all of which are small and cheap enough to be of value in on-line process monitoring and control. We describe the critically important features of the new technologies used, and how we have coupled new devices together into systems for industrial applications of importance eg biotechnology, pharmaceuticals, automobile, aerospace, chemicals, etc.

  11. Asymmetric transport of light in linearly arrayed metallic nano-particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horchani, R.

    2016-02-01

    A strong asymmetric light transport in a linear chain of spherical and equidistantly spaced silver metal nano-particles (MNPs) located near a substrate is reported. The contrast ratio of the proposed structure is above 0.95. We have studied the propagation of light in the array with respect to the metal and the size of the last nano-particle of the chain and the nature of the substrate. It is shown also that the presence of a copper or gold substrate enhance the guiding properties of the array. This structure opens the possibility to design various optical devices such as broadband antennae and optical diodes.

  12. Light scattering by irregular particles much larger than the wavelength with wavelength-scale surface roughness.

    PubMed

    Grynko, Yevgen; Shkuratov, Yuriy; Förstner, Jens

    2016-08-01

    We simulate light scattering by random irregular particles that have dimensions much larger than the wavelength of incident light at the size parameter of X=200 using the discontinuous Galerkin time domain method. A comparison of the DGTD solution for smoothly faceted particles with that obtained with a geometric optics model shows good agreement for the scattering angle curves of intensity and polarization. If a wavelength-scale surface roughness is introduced, diffuse scattering at rough interface results in smooth and featureless curves for all scattering matrix elements which is consistent with the laboratory measurements of real samples. PMID:27472601

  13. Rigorous theoretical framework for particle sizing in turbid colloids using light refraction.

    PubMed

    García-Valenzuela, Augusto; Barrera, Rubén G; Gutierrez-Reyes, Edahí

    2008-11-24

    Using a non-local effective-medium approach, we analyze the refraction of light in a colloidal medium. We discuss the theoretical grounds and all the necessary precautions to design and perform experiments to measure the effective refractive index in dilute colloids. As an application, we show that it is possible to retrieve the size of small dielectric particles in a colloid by measuring the complex effective refractive index and the volume fraction occupied by the particles. PMID:19030060

  14. Visible Light Photon Counters (VLPCs) for high rate tracking medical imaging and particle astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Atac, M. |

    1998-11-01

    This paper is on the operation principles of the Visible Light Photon Counters (VLPCs), application to high luminosity-high multiplicity tracking for High Energy Charged Particle Physics, and application to Medical Imaging and Particle Astrophysics. The VLPCs as Solid State Photomultipliers (SSPMs) with high quantum efficiency can detect down to single photons very efficiently with excellent time resolution and high avalanche gains. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  15. On the errors in measuring the particle density by the light absorption method

    SciTech Connect

    Ochkin, V. N.

    2015-04-15

    The accuracy of absorption measurements of the density of particles in a given quantum state as a function of the light absorption coefficient is analyzed. Errors caused by the finite accuracy in measuring the intensity of the light passing through a medium in the presence of different types of noise in the recorded signal are considered. Optimal values of the absorption coefficient and the factors capable of multiplying errors when deviating from these values are determined.

  16. 3D real-time visualization of blood flow in cerebral aneurysms by light field particle image velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlsohn, Matthias F.; Kemmling, André; Petersen, Arne; Wietzke, Lennart

    2016-04-01

    Cerebral aneurysms require endovascular treatment to eliminate potentially lethal hemorrhagic rupture by hemostasis of blood flow within the aneurysm. Devices (e.g. coils and flow diverters) promote homeostasis, however, measurement of blood flow within an aneurysm or cerebral vessel before and after device placement on a microscopic level has not been possible so far. This would allow better individualized treatment planning and improve manufacture design of devices. For experimental analysis, direct measurement of real-time microscopic cerebrovascular flow in micro-structures may be an alternative to computed flow simulations. An application of microscopic aneurysm flow measurement on a regular basis to empirically assess a high number of different anatomic shapes and the corresponding effect of different devices would require a fast and reliable method at low cost with high throughout assessment. Transparent three dimensional 3D models of brain vessels and aneurysms may be used for microscopic flow measurements by particle image velocimetry (PIV), however, up to now the size of structures has set the limits for conventional 3D-imaging camera set-ups. On line flow assessment requires additional computational power to cope with the processing large amounts of data generated by sequences of multi-view stereo images, e.g. generated by a light field camera capturing the 3D information by plenoptic imaging of complex flow processes. Recently, a fast and low cost workflow for producing patient specific three dimensional models of cerebral arteries has been established by stereo-lithographic (SLA) 3D printing. These 3D arterial models are transparent an exhibit a replication precision within a submillimeter range required for accurate flow measurements under physiological conditions. We therefore test the feasibility of microscopic flow measurements by PIV analysis using a plenoptic camera system capturing light field image sequences. Averaging across a sequence of

  17. Fast Strain Mapping of Nanowire Light-Emitting Diodes Using Nanofocused X-ray Beams.

    PubMed

    Stankevič, Tomaš; Hilner, Emelie; Seiboth, Frank; Ciechonski, Rafal; Vescovi, Giuliano; Kryliouk, Olga; Johansson, Ulf; Samuelson, Lars; Wellenreuther, Gerd; Falkenberg, Gerald; Feidenhans'l, Robert; Mikkelsen, Anders

    2015-07-28

    X-ray nanobeams are unique nondestructive probes that allow direct measurements of the nanoscale strain distribution and composition inside the micrometer thick layered structures that are found in most electronic device architectures. However, the method is usually extremely time-consuming, and as a result, data sets are often constrained to a few or even single objects. Here we demonstrate that by special design of a nanofocused X-ray beam diffraction experiment we can (in a single 2D scan with no sample rotation) measure the individual strain and composition profiles of many structures in an array of upright standing nanowires. We make use of the observation that in the generic nanowire device configuration, which is found in high-speed transistors, solar cells, and light-emitting diodes, each wire exhibits very small degrees of random tilts and twists toward the substrate. Although the tilt and twist are very small, they give a new contrast mechanism between different wires. In the present case, we image complex nanowires for nanoLED fabrication and compare to theoretical simulations, demonstrating that this fast method is suitable for real nanostructured devices. PMID:26090689

  18. Fast 3D reconstruction of tool wear based on monocular vision and multi-color structured light illuminator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhongren; Li, Bo; Zhou, Yuebin

    2014-11-01

    Fast 3D reconstruction of tool wear from 2D images has great importance to 3D measuring and objective evaluating tool wear condition, determining accurate tool change and insuring machined part's quality. Extracting 3D information of tool wear zone based on monocular multi-color structured light can realize fast recovery of surface topography of tool wear, which overcomes the problems of traditional methods such as solution diversity and slow convergence when using SFS method and stereo match when using 3D reconstruction from multiple images. In this paper, a kind of new multi-color structured light illuminator was put forward. An information mapping model was established among illuminator's structure parameters, surface morphology and color images. The mathematical model to reconstruct 3D morphology based on monocular multi-color structured light was presented. Experimental results show that this method is effective and efficient to reconstruct the surface morphology of tool wear zone.

  19. Angle-Resolved Second-Harmonic Light Scattering from Colloidal Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, N.; Angerer, W. E.; Yodh, A. G.

    2001-09-03

    We report angle-resolved second-harmonic generation (SHG) measurements from suspensions of centrosymmetric micron-size polystyrene spheres with surface-adsorbed dye (malachite green). The second-harmonic scattering profiles differ qualitatively from linear light scattering profiles of the same particles. We investigated these radiation patterns using several polarization configurations and particle diameters. We introduce a simple Rayleigh-Gans-Debye model to account for the SHG scattering anisotropy. The model compares favorably with our experimental data. Our measurements suggest scattering anisotropy may be used to isolate particle nonlinear optics from other bulk nonlinear optical effects in suspension.

  20. Extinction of polarized light in ferrofluids with different magnetic particle concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Socoliuc, V.; Popescu, L. B.

    2012-01-01

    The magnetic field intensity and nanoparticle concentration dependence of the polarized light extinction in a ferrofluid made of magnetite particles stabilized with technical grade oleic acid dispersed in transformer oil was experimentally investigated. The magnetically induced optical anisotropy, i.e. the dichroism divided by concentration, was found to decrease with increasing sample concentration from 2% to 8%. The magnetically induced change in the optical extinction of light polarized at 54.74° with respect to the magnetic field direction was found to be positive for the less concentrated sample (2%) and negative for the samples with 4% and 8% magnetic nanoparticle concentrations, the more negative the higher the concentration and field intensity. Based on the theoretically proven fact [11] that the particle orientation mechanism has no effect on the extinction of light polarized at 54.74° with respect to the field direction, we analyzed the experimental findings in the frames of the agglomeration and long-range pair correlations theories for the magnetically induced optical anisotropy in ferrofluids. We developed a theoretical model in the approximation of single scattering for the optical extinction coefficient of a ferrofluid with magnetically induced particle agglomeration. The model predicts the existence of a polarization independent component of the optical extinction coefficient that is experimentally measurable at 54.74° polarization angle. The change in the optical extinction of light polarized at 54.74° is positive if only the formation of straight n-particle chains is considered and may become negative in the hypothesis that the longer chains degenerate to more isotropic structures (polymer-like coils, globules or bundles of chains). The model for the influence on the light absorption of the long-range pair correlations, published elsewhere, predicts that the change in the optical extinction of light polarized at 54.74° is always negative, the

  1. Monte Carlo simulation of light scattering from size distributed homogenous and coated spherical particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogoi, Ankur

    Light scattering is a subject of intensive research at the present time in diverse fields of research namely, physics, astronomy, meteorology, biology, nanotechnology, etc. Observation and theoretical calculation of the absorption and scattering properties of particles, whose size ranges from micrometer to nanometer, are not only essential to deduce their physical properties but also capable of giving useful information for better understanding of radiation transfer through a medium containing such scatterer. In addition to such experimental and theoretical studies on light scattering by particulate matter several other groups have been extensively using Monte Carlo (MC) method to simulate light (photon) propagation in scattering media. Importantly such methods of simulating light scattering properties of artificial particles are proving to be a very useful tool in verifying the experimental observations with real samples as well as providing new clues to improve the accuracy of the existing theoretical models. In this contribution we report a MC method developed by implementing Mie theory to simulate the light scattering pattern from size distributed homogenous and coated spherical particles in single scattering regime. The computer program was written in ANSI C-language. The accuracy, efficiency and reliability of the MC method were validated by comparing the results generated by using the MC method with other benchmark theoretical results and experimental results with standard samples. Notably the MC method reported here is found to be stable even for very large spherical particles (size parameters > 1000) with large values of real (= 10) and imaginary part (= 10) of the refractive index. The promising field of application of the reported MC method will be in simulating the light (or electromagnetic) scattering properties of different types of planetary and interplanetary dust particles.

  2. Comparative assessment of nuclear fuel cycles. Light-water reactor once-through, classical fast breeder reactor, and symbiotic fast breeder reactor cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Hardie, R.W.; Barrett, R.J.; Freiwald, J.G.

    1980-06-01

    The object of the Alternative Nuclear Fuel Cycle Study is to perform comparative assessments of nuclear power systems. There are two important features of this study. First, this evaluation attempts to encompass the complete, integrated fuel cycle from mining of uranium ore to disposal of waste rather than isolated components. Second, it compares several aspects of each cycle - energy use, economics, technological status, proliferation, public safety, and commercial potential - instead of concentrating on one or two assessment areas. This report presents assessment results for three fuel cycles. These are the light-water reactor once-through cycle, the fast breeder reactor on the classical plutonium cycle, and the fast breeder reactor on a symbiotic cycle using plutonium and /sup 233/U as fissile fuels. The report also contains a description of the methodology used in this assessment. Subsequent reports will present results for additional fuel cycles.

  3. A Description of the Full Particle Orbit Following SPIRAL Code for Simulating Fast-ion Experiments in Tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, G.J.; Budny, R.V.; Bortolon, A.; Fredrickson, E.D.; Fu, G.Y.; Heidbrink, W.W.; Nazikian, R.; Valeo, E.; Van Zeeland, M.A.

    2012-07-27

    The numerical methods used in the full particle-orbit following SPIRAL code are described and a number of physics studies performed with the code are presented to illustrate its capabilities. The SPIRAL code is a test-particle code and is a powerful numerical tool to interpret and plan fast-ion experiments in Tokamaks. Gyro-orbit effects are important for fast ions in low-field machines such as NSTX and to a lesser extent in DIII-D. A number of physics studies are interlaced between the description of the code to illustrate its capabilities. Results on heat loads generated by a localized error-field on the DIII-D wall are compared to measurements. The enhanced Triton losses caused by the same localized error-field are calculated and compared to measured neutron signals. MHD activity such as tearing modes and Toroidicity-induced Alfven Eigenmodes (TAEs) have a profound effect on the fast-ion content of Tokamak plasmas and SPIRAL can calculate the effects of MHD activity on the confined and lost fast-ion population as illustrated for a burst of TAE activity in NSTX. The interaction between Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequency (ICRF) heating and fast ions depends solely on the gyro-motion of the fast ions and is captured exactly in the SPIRAL code. A calculation of ICRF absorption on beam ions in ITER is presented. The effects of high harmonic fast wave heating on the beam-ion slowing-down distribution in NSTX is also studied.

  4. Fresnel reflectance in refractive index estimation of light scattering solid particles in immersion liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Räty, J.; Niskanen, I.; Peiponen, K.-E.

    2010-06-01

    The refractive index of homogenous particle population can be determined by the so-called immersion liquid method. The idea is to find a known liquid whose refractive index matches the index of the particles. We report on a method that simultaneously obtains the refractive index of particles and that of the immersion liquid. It is based on a system using internal light reflection and Fresnel's theory. The method includes a series of straightforward reflection measurements and a fitting procedure. The validity of the method was tested with CaF2 particles. The method has applications within scientific studies of microparticles and nanoparticles or micro-organism in suspensions. It can be also be utilized in industry for the detection of the refractive index of products involving particles for the purpose of improvement of product quality.

  5. Systematics of the CHON and other light-element particle populations in Comet Halley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Benton; Mason, Larry W.; Kissel, Jochen

    1986-01-01

    Based on chemical signatures measured by the PIA experiment during the Giotto flyby of comet Halley, particle classifications were designated. In addition to silicate-like grains and particles of mixed (cosmic) composition, there appear to be several light-element rich populations, including the CHON, (H,C), (H,C,O), and (H,C,N) particle types. These compositional classes are further distinguished by differences in mass distributions, a density indicator, and variations in relative abundance within the coma. These particle populations are evidence for chemical heterogeneity in the surface of the cometary nucleus. Particles found mainly in the inner coma may be volatile icy grains. Most of the N of the comet may be found in up to three different populations of grains; one or more of these may be responsible for the observation of cyanojets.

  6. Manipulation of Micro Scale Particles in Optical Traps Using Programmable Spatial Light Modulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seibel, Robin E.; Decker, Arthur J. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    1064 nm light, from an Nd:YAG laser, was polarized and incident upon a programmable parallel aligned liquid crystal spatial light modulator (PAL-SLM), where it was phase modulated according to the program controlling the PAL-SLM. Light reflected from the PAL-SLM was injected into a microscope and focused. At the focus, multiple optical traps were formed in which 9.975 m spheres were captured. The traps and the spheres were moved by changing the program of the PAL-SLM. The motion of ordered groups of micro particles was clearly demonstrated.

  7. Modeling of reflection-type laser-driven white lighting considering phosphor particles and surface topography.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong-Ho; Joo, Jae-Young; Lee, Sun-Kyu

    2015-07-27

    This paper presents a model of blue laser diode (LD)-based white lighting coupled with a yellow YAG phosphor, for use in the proper design and fabrication of phosphor in automotive headlamps. First, the sample consisted of an LD, collecting lens, and phosphor was prepared that matches the model. The light distribution of the LD and the phosphor were modeled to investigate an effect of the surface topography and phosphor particle properties on the laser-driven white lighting systems by using the commercially available optical design software. Based on the proposed model, the integral spectrum distribution and the color coordinates were discussed. PMID:26367551

  8. Giant heating of Si nanoparticles by weak laser light: Optical microspectroscopic study and application to particle modification

    SciTech Connect

    Poborchii, Vladimir; Tada, Tetsuya; Kanayama, Toshihiko

    2005-05-15

    We show that Si particles 20-30 nm in diameter can be heated up to {approx}1500 K in atmospheric conditions by illumination with weak ({approx}1 mW) but sharply focused ({approx}2 {mu}m) visible laser light. Crystallization, oxidation, and color change of the particles occur as the result of the light-induced heating of the particles. These effects can be used for modification of the particles and preparation of Si-based luminescent material.

  9. Radial Transport Characteristics of Fast Ions Due to Energetic-Particle Modes inside the Last Closed-Flux Surface in the Compact Helical System

    SciTech Connect

    Nagaoka, Kenichi; Isobe, Mitsutaka; Toi, Kazuo; Shimizu, Akihiro; Fujisawa, Akihide; Ohshima, Shunsuke; Nakano, Haruhisa; Osakabe, Masaki; Todo, Yasushi; Akiyama, Tsuyoshi; Suzuki, Chihiro; Nishimura, Shin; Yoshimura, Yasuo; Matsuoka, Keisuke; Okamura, Shoichi; Nagashima, Yoshihiko

    2008-02-15

    The internal behavior of fast ions interacting with magnetohydrodynamic bursts excited by energetic ions has been experimentally investigated in the compact helical system. The resonant convective oscillation of fast ions was identified inside the last closed-flux surface during an energetic-particle mode (EPM) burst. The phase difference between the fast-ion oscillation and the EPM, indicating the coupling strength between them, remains a certain value during the EPM burst and drives an anomalous transport of fast ions.

  10. Fast response organic light-emitting diode for visible optical communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuda, Takeshi; Taniguchi, Yoshio

    2008-02-01

    We examined fast response organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) for new applications of visible optical communications. For the practical use in this field, the fast transmission speed of OLEDs is required to be used in many applications, but the low carrier mobility of organic materials and the long fluorescence lifetime (FL) organic emitting materials limit the transmission speed of OLEDs. Therefore, we investigated the influence of the FL on transient properties of photoluminescence (PL), which were evaluated by the frequency dependence of PL intensity excited by a modulated violet laser diode. The FLs of several organic emitting materials were also measured, and we found the clear relationship between the FL and the transient properties of PL intensity. The fastest cutoff frequency of PL intensity was achieved 160 MHz utilizing short FL material, 1,4-bis[2-[4-[N,N-di(ptolyl)amino]phenl]vinyl]benzene. We also investigated another way to increase the transmission speed utilizing a semiconductor-organic multilayer structure, of which ZnS was used as an electron transport layer. The maximum cutoff frequency of this device was achieved 20.3 MHz, while that of the organic multilayer structure was 8.7 MHz at a sine wave voltage of 7 V and a bias voltage of 5 V. This result indicates that the high carrier mobility of the ZnS layer causes the increase in the transmission speed of OLEDs. We demonstrated one institutive demonstrator module of visible optical communications, which consisted of the transceiver module with an OLED and the pen-type receiver module with a photo-diode at a point. The movie files was transmitted at a speed of 230 kbps, when the point of a pen-type receiver module approaches the emitting area of an OLED. Furthermore, the pseudo-random signal with 1Mbps was also transmitted with this visible optical communication system. Such a system enables to connect between transceiver and receiver module without precious alignment because of the large

  11. Irregular spin angular momentum transfer from light to small birefringent particles

    SciTech Connect

    Rothmayer, M.; Tierney, D.; Schmitzer, H.; Frins, E.; Dultz, W.

    2009-10-15

    The transfer of spin angular momentum from photons to small particles is a key experiment of quantum physics. The particles rotate clockwise or counterclockwise depending on the polarization of the light beam which holds them in an optical trap. We show that even perfectly disk shaped particles will in general not rotate with a constant angular speed. The particles will periodically accelerate and decelerate their rotational motion due to a varying spin angular momentum transfer from the light. Using the Poincare sphere we derive the equation of motion of a birefringent plate and verify the results by measuring the time dependent rotation of small crystals of Hg(I) iodide and 3,4,9,10-perylene-tetracarboxylic-dianhydride (PTCDA) in the trap of polarized optical tweezers. For small ellipticities of the polarized light in the tweezers the plate stops in a fixed orientation relative to the axes of the light ellipse. We discuss the origin of this halt and propose an application of small birefringent plates as self-adjusting optical retarders in micro-optics.

  12. Light Scattering by Gaussian Particles: A Solution with Finite-Difference Time Domain Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, W.; Nousiainen, T.; Fu, Q.; Loeb, N. G.; Videen, G.; Muinonen, K.

    2003-01-01

    The understanding of single-scattering properties of complex ice crystals has significance in atmospheric radiative transfer and remote-sensing applications. In this work, light scattering by irregularly shaped Gaussian ice crystals is studied with the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) technique. For given sample particle shapes and size parameters in the resonance region, the scattering phase matrices and asymmetry factors are calculated. It is found that the deformation of the particle surface can significantly smooth the scattering phase functions and slightly reduce the asymmetry factors. The polarization properties of irregular ice crystals are also significantly different from those of spherical cloud particles. These FDTD results could provide a reference for approximate light-scattering models developed for irregular particle shapes and can have potential applications in developing a much simpler practical light scattering model for ice clouds angular-distribution models and for remote sensing of ice clouds and aerosols using polarized light. (copyright) 2003 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The nature of light: a description of photon diffraction based upon virtual particle exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mobley, Michael J.

    2005-08-01

    Any discussion of the nature of light must include a reminder that whenever we make the observation of light (photons), we only observe particle-like properties. This paper provides a reiteration that we don"t need wave-like properties to scattered photons to describe phenomena such as diffraction or refraction of light. This paper updates the original ideas of Duane, later revived by Lande, which provided a description of light diffraction without making reference to a wave nature. These are updated using terminology more common to quantum electrodynamics which describes the interaction of particles in terms of the exchange of virtual photons. Diffraction is described in terms of an ensemble of distinct, probability weighted paths for the scattered photons. The scattering associated with each path results from the quantized momentum exchange with the scattering lattice attributed to the exchange or reflection of virtual photons. The probability for virtual particle exchange/reflection is dependent upon the allowed momentum states of the lattice determined by a Fourier analysis of the lattice geometry. Any scattered photon will exhibit an apparent wavelength inversely proportional to its momentum. Simplified, particle-like descriptions are developed for Young"s double slit diffraction, Fraunhofer diffraction and Fresnel diffraction. This description directly accounts for the quantization of momentum transferred to the scattering lattice and the specific eigenvalues of the lattice based upon the constraints to virtual photon exchange set by the Uncertainty Principle, Δπi = h/ζi.

  14. Description of light charged particle multiplicities in the framework of dinuclear system model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalandarov, Sh. A.; Adamian, G. G.; Antonenko, N. V.

    2012-12-01

    In the framework of dinuclear system (DNS) model we calculate the light charged particle (LCP) multiplicities produced in fusion and quasifission reactions and their kinetic energy spectra. Calculations indicate that with increasing bombarding energy the ratio of LCP multiplicity from fragments MFF to corresponding LCP multiplicity from compound nucleus (CN) MCN strongly increases.

  15. Light-triggered chemical amplification to accelerate degradation and release from polymeric particles.

    PubMed

    Olejniczak, Jason; Nguyen Huu, Viet Anh; Lux, Jacques; Grossman, Madeleine; He, Sha; Almutairi, Adah

    2015-12-11

    We describe a means of chemical amplification to accelerate triggered degradation of a polymer and particles composed thereof. We designed a light-degradable copolymer containing carboxylic acids masked by photolabile groups and ketals. Photolysis allows the unmasked acidic groups in the polymer backbone to accelerate ketal hydrolysis even at neutral pH. PMID:26445896

  16. Validation of a Fast-Fluid-Dynamics Model for Predicting Distribution of Particles with Low Stokes Number

    SciTech Connect

    Zuo, Wangda; Chen, Qingyan

    2011-06-01

    To design a healthy indoor environment, it is important to study airborne particle distribution indoors. As an intermediate model between multizone models and computational fluid dynamics (CFD), a fast fluid dynamics (FFD) model can be used to provide temporal and spatial information of particle dispersion in real time. This study evaluated the accuracy of the FFD for predicting transportation of particles with low Stokes number in a duct and in a room with mixed convection. The evaluation was to compare the numerical results calculated by the FFD with the corresponding experimental data and the results obtained by the CFD. The comparison showed that the FFD could capture major pattern of particle dispersion, which is missed in models with well-mixed assumptions. Although the FFD was less accurate than the CFD partially due to its simplification in numeric schemes, it was 53 times faster than the CFD.

  17. Luke-warm dark matter: Bose-condensation of ultra-light particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondarescu, Mihai; Lundgren, Andrew; Bondarescu, Ruxandra; Balakrishna, Jayashree

    2010-02-01

    We discuss the thermal evolution and Bose condensation of ultra-light dark matter particles with Compton wavelength of galactic scales. Agglomerations of these particles form stable halo structures and naturally exhibit no small scale structure. They are supported against gravitational collapse by Heisenberg's uncertainty principle similar to boson stars. We find that these ultra-light scalars Bose condense at high temperatures. The condensate has a very high critical temperature allowing us to treat the ground state and excited states separately. The particles in excited states are ultra-relativistic and act like radiation, while the bosons in the ground state have the same effect on the universe as presureless matter. We then solve the Friedman-Klein Gordon equations and study the cosmological evolution of this scalar field. )

  18. The Classical Theory of Light Colors: a Paradigm for Description of Particle Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazilu, Nicolae; Agop, Maricel; Gatu, Irina; Iacob, Dan Dezideriu; Butuc, Irina; Ghizdovat, Vlad

    2016-06-01

    The color is an interaction property: of the interaction of light with matter. Classically speaking it is therefore akin to the forces. But while forces engendered the mechanical view of the world, the colors generated the optical view. One of the modern concepts of interaction between the fundamental particles of matter - the quantum chromodynamics - aims to fill the gap between mechanics and optics, in a specific description of strong interactions. We show here that this modern description of the particle interactions has ties with both the classical and quantum theories of light, regardless of the connection between forces and colors. In a word, the light is a universal model in the description of matter. The description involves classical Yang-Mills fields related to color.

  19. Measurements of light-absorbing particles on the glaciers in the Cordillera Blanca, Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, C. G.; All, J. D.; Schwarz, J. P.; Arnott, W. P.; Cole, R. J.; Lapham, E.; Celestian, A.

    2015-02-01

    Glaciers in the tropical Andes have been rapidly losing mass since the 1970s. In addition to the documented increase in temperature, increases in light-absorbing particles deposited on glaciers could be contributing to the observed glacier loss. Here we report on measurements of light-absorbing particles sampled from glaciers during three surveys in the Cordillera Blanca Mountains in Peru. During three research expeditions in the dry seasons (May-August) of 2011, 2012 and 2013, 240 snow samples were collected from 15 mountain peaks over altitudes ranging from 4800 to nearly 6800 m. Several mountains were sampled each of the 3 years and some mountains were sampled multiple times during the same year. Collected snow samples were melted and filtered in the field then later analyzed using the Light Absorption Heating Method (LAHM), a new technique that measures the ability of particles on filters to absorb visible light. LAHM results have been calibrated using filters with known amounts of fullerene soot, a common industrial surrogate for black carbon (BC). As sample filters often contain dust in addition to BC, results are presented in terms of effective black carbon (eBC). During the 2013 survey, snow samples were collected and kept frozen for analysis with a Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2). Calculated eBC mass from the LAHM analysis and the SP2 refractory black carbon (rBC) results were well correlated (r2 = 0.92). These results indicate that a substantial portion of the light-absorbing particles in the more polluted regions were likely BC. The 3 years of data show that glaciers in the Cordillera Blanca Mountains close to human population centers have substantially higher levels of eBC (as high as 70 ng g-1) than remote glaciers (as low as 2.0 ng g-1 eBC), indicating that population centers can influence local glaciers by sourcing BC.

  20. Microwave field controlled slow and fast light with a coupled system consisting of a nanomechanical resonator and a Cooper-pair box.

    PubMed

    Ma, Peng-Cheng; Xiao, Yin; Yu, Ya-Fei; Zhang, Zhi-Ming

    2014-02-10

    We theoretically demonstrate an efficient method to control slow and fast light in microwave regime with a coupled system consisting of a nanomechanical resonator (NR) and a superconducting Cooper-pair box (CPB). Using the pump-probe technique, we find that both slow and fast light effects of the probe field can appear in this coupled system. Furthermore, we show that a tunable switch from slow light to fast light can be achieved by only adjusting the pump-CPB detuning from the NR frequency to zero. Our coupled system may have potential applications, for example, in optical communication, microwave photonics, and nonlinear optics. PMID:24663653

  1. Depolarized light scattering from prolate anisotropic particles: The influence of the particle shape on the field autocorrelation function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passow, Christopher; ten Hagen, Borge; Löwen, Hartmut; Wagner, Joachim

    2015-07-01

    We provide a theoretical analysis for the intermediate scattering function typically measured in depolarized dynamic light scattering experiments. We calculate the field autocorrelation function g1 V H ( Q , t ) in dependence on the wave vector Q and the time t explicitly in a vertical-horizontal scattering geometry for differently shaped solids of revolution. The shape of prolate cylinders, spherocylinders, spindles, and double cones with variable aspect ratio is expanded in rotational invariants flm(r). By Fourier transform of these expansion coefficients, a formal multipole expansion of the scattering function is obtained, which is used to calculate the weighting coefficients appearing in the depolarized scattering function. In addition to translational and rotational diffusion, especially the translational-rotational coupling of shape-anisotropic objects is considered. From the short-time behavior of the intermediate scattering function, the first cumulants Γ(Q) are calculated. In a depolarized scattering experiment, they deviate from the simple proportionality to Q2. The coefficients flm(Q) strongly depend on the geometry and aspect ratio of the particles. The time dependence, in addition, is governed by the translational and rotational diffusion tensors, which are calculated by means of bead models for differently shaped particles in dependence on their aspect ratio. Therefore, our analysis shows how details of the particle shape—beyond their aspect ratio—can be determined by a precise scattering experiment. This is of high relevance in understanding smart materials which involve suspensions of anisotropic colloidal particles.

  2. Depolarized light scattering from prolate anisotropic particles: The influence of the particle shape on the field autocorrelation function.

    PubMed

    Passow, Christopher; ten Hagen, Borge; Löwen, Hartmut; Wagner, Joachim

    2015-07-28

    We provide a theoretical analysis for the intermediate scattering function typically measured in depolarized dynamic light scattering experiments. We calculate the field autocorrelation function g1(VH)(Q,t) in dependence on the wave vector Q and the time t explicitly in a vertical-horizontal scattering geometry for differently shaped solids of revolution. The shape of prolate cylinders, spherocylinders, spindles, and double cones with variable aspect ratio is expanded in rotational invariants flm(r). By Fourier transform of these expansion coefficients, a formal multipole expansion of the scattering function is obtained, which is used to calculate the weighting coefficients appearing in the depolarized scattering function. In addition to translational and rotational diffusion, especially the translational-rotational coupling of shape-anisotropic objects is considered. From the short-time behavior of the intermediate scattering function, the first cumulants Γ(Q) are calculated. In a depolarized scattering experiment, they deviate from the simple proportionality to Q(2). The coefficients flm(Q) strongly depend on the geometry and aspect ratio of the particles. The time dependence, in addition, is governed by the translational and rotational diffusion tensors, which are calculated by means of bead models for differently shaped particles in dependence on their aspect ratio. Therefore, our analysis shows how details of the particle shape--beyond their aspect ratio--can be determined by a precise scattering experiment. This is of high relevance in understanding smart materials which involve suspensions of anisotropic colloidal particles. PMID:26233160

  3. Nanostructure of Metallic Particles in Light Water Reactor Used Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Buck, Edgar C.; Mausolf, Edward J.; Mcnamara, Bruce K.; Soderquist, Chuck Z.; Schwantes, Jon M.

    2015-03-11

    The extraordinary nano-structure of metallic particles in light water reactor fuels points to possible high reactivity through increased surface area and a high concentration of high energy defect sites. We have analyzed the metallic epsilon particles from a high burn-up fuel from a boiling water reactor using transmission electron microscopy and have observed a much finer nanostructure in these particles than has been reported previously. The individual round particles that varying in size between ~20 and ~50 nm appear to consist of individual crystallites on the order of 2-3 nm in diameter. It is likely that in-reactor irradiation induce displacement cascades results in the formation of the nano-structure. The composition of these metallic phases is variable yet the structure of the material is consistent with the hexagonal close packed structure of epsilon-ruthenium. These findings suggest that unusual catalytic behavior of these materials might be expected, particularly under accident conditions.

  4. Fast and efficient loading of a Rb magneto-optical trap using light-induced atomic desorption

    SciTech Connect

    Atutov, S.N.; Calabrese, R.; Guidi, V.; Mai, B.; Rudavets, A.G.; Scansani, E.; Tomassetti, L.; Biancalana, V.; Burchianti, A.; Marinelli, C.; Mariotti, E.; Moi, L.; Veronesi, S.

    2003-05-01

    We have obtained fast loading of a rubidium magneto-optical trap and very high collection efficiency by capturing the atoms desorbed by a light flash from a polydimethylsiloxane film deposited on the internal surface of a cell. The atoms are trapped with an effective loading time of about 65 ms at a loading rate greater than 2x10{sup 8} atoms per second. This rate is larger than the values reported in literature and is obtained by preserving a long lifetime of the trapped atoms. This lifetime exceeds the filling time by nearly two orders of magnitude. Trap loading by light-induced desorption from siloxane compounds can be very effectively applied to store and trap a large number of atoms in the case of very weak atomic flux or extremely low vapor density. It can be also effectively used for fast production of ultracold atoms.

  5. Comparison of near-forward light scattering on oceanic turbulence and particles.

    PubMed

    Bogucki, D J; Domaradzki, J A; Stramski, D; Zaneveld, J R

    1998-07-20

    We examine and compare near-forward light scattering that is caused by turbulence and typical particulate assemblages in the ocean. The near-forward scattering by particles was calculated using Mie theory for homogeneous spheres and particle size distributions representative of natural assemblages in the ocean. Direct numerical simulations of a passive scalar with Prandtl number 7 mixed by homogeneous turbulence were used to represent temperature fluctuations and resulting inhomogeneities in the refractive index of water. Light scattering on the simulated turbulent flow was calculated using the geometrical-optics approximation. We found that the smallest temperature scales contribute the most to scattering, and that scattering on turbulence typically dominates over scattering on particles for small angles as large as 0.1 degrees . The scattering angle deviation that is due to turbulence for a light beam propagating over a 0.25-m path length in the oceanic water can be as large as 0.1 degrees . In addition, we carried out a preliminary laboratory experiment that illustrates the differences in the near-forward scattering on refractive-index inhomogeneities and particles. PMID:18285924

  6. Light scattering from aerosol particles in the El Paso del Norte region / the effect of humidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medina Calderon, Richard

    Atmospheric aerosols play an important role in climate forcing, through scattering and absorption of the incoming solar radiation. The extinction of light by the presence of atmospheric aerosols was studied using two first-principle models, and corresponding computer codes. In the first model the extinction of light from irregularly shaped aerosol particles was analyzed. In the second model it was assumed that the irregularly shaped aerosol particles were covered by a film of water, and the hygroscopicity and the extinction of light by the aerosols was analyzed. These models were then applied to the Paso del Norte region and their light extinction results compared with a local extinctiometer. The inter-comparison of the models extinction results and the extinctiometer values were well correlated. It was observed that for high humidity days the model that used an aerosol particle covered with a water film correlated better with the experimental extinctiometer measurements. While these two models were validated in the Paso del Norte region, they are also applicable to any other region, under humid or dry atmospheric conditions.

  7. Fast-ignition transport studies: Realistic electron source, integrated particle-in-cell and hydrodynamic modeling, imposed magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Strozzi, D. J.; Tabak, M.; Larson, D. J.; Divol, L.; Kemp, A. J.; Bellei, C.; Marinak, M. M.; Key, M. H.

    2012-07-15

    Transport modeling of idealized, cone-guided fast ignition targets indicates the severe challenge posed by fast-electron source divergence. The hybrid particle-in-cell (PIC) code Zuma is run in tandem with the radiation-hydrodynamics code Hydra to model fast-electron propagation, fuel heating, and thermonuclear burn. The fast electron source is based on a 3D explicit-PIC laser-plasma simulation with the PSC code. This shows a quasi two-temperature energy spectrum and a divergent angle spectrum (average velocity-space polar angle of 52 Degree-Sign ). Transport simulations with the PIC-based divergence do not ignite for >1 MJ of fast-electron energy, for a modest (70 {mu}m) standoff distance from fast-electron injection to the dense fuel. However, artificially collimating the source gives an ignition energy of 132 kJ. To mitigate the divergence, we consider imposed axial magnetic fields. Uniform fields {approx}50 MG are sufficient to recover the artificially collimated ignition energy. Experiments at the Omega laser facility have generated fields of this magnitude by imploding a capsule in seed fields of 50-100 kG. Such imploded fields will likely be more compressed in the transport region than in the laser absorption region. When fast electrons encounter increasing field strength, magnetic mirroring can reflect a substantial fraction of them and reduce coupling to the fuel. A hollow magnetic pipe, which peaks at a finite radius, is presented as one field configuration which circumvents mirroring.

  8. Solar Energetic Particle Production by Coronal Mass Ejection-driven Shocks in Solar Fast-Wind Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahler, S. W.; Reames, D. V.

    2003-02-01

    Gradual solar energetic particle (SEP) events at 1 AU are produced by coronal/interplanetary shocks driven by coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Fast (vCME>~900 km s-1) CMEs might produce stronger shocks in solar slow-wind regions, where the flow and fast-mode MHD wave speeds are low, than in fast-wind regions, where those speeds are much higher. At 1 AU the O+7/O+6 ratios distinguish between those two kinds of wind streams. We use the 20 MeV proton event intensities from the EPACT instrument on Wind, the associated CMEs observed with the LASCO coronagraph on SOHO, and the ACE SWICS solar wind values of O+7/O+6 to look for variations of peak SEP intensities as a function of O+7/O+6. No significant dependence of the SEP intensities on O+7/O+6 is found for either poorly connected or well-connected CME source regions or for different CME speed ranges. However, in the 3 yr study period we find only five cases of SEP events in fast wind, defined by regions of O+7/O+6<0.15. We suggest that in coronal holes SEP acceleration may take place only in the plume regions, where the flow and Alfvén speeds are low. A broad range of angular widths are associated with fast (vCME>=900 km s-1) CMEs, but we find that no fast CMEs with widths less than 60° are associated with SEP events. On the other hand, nearly all fast halo CMEs are associated with SEP events. Thus, the CME widths are more important in SEP production than previously thought, but the speed of the solar wind source regions in which SEPs are produced may not be a factor.

  9. [Research on Properties of Light Scattering for Non-Spherical Suspended Particles in Water Based on T Matrix Model].

    PubMed

    Vo, Quang Sang; Feng, Peng; Mi, De-ling; Tang, Bin; Wei, Biao

    2015-10-01

    Scattering light properties of suspended particles in water is an important parameter which influences the accuracy of water quality measurement. In this paper, based on T matrix model, the authors study the UV-Visible light irradiation intensity of 3 kinds of non-spherical suspended. particles including ellipsoid, cylinder and generalized Chebyshev in water. The relationship between light scattering intensity and incident light wavelength, shape parameters of suspended particles, complex refractive index and rotation angle has been presented in detail. Simulation results show that when changing the particle size, adjusting the wavelength of incident light, all light scattering intensity of 3 kinds of non-spherical suspended particles show significant changes. In the wavelength range from 200-800 nm, the impact of geometric on the particles size decreases with increasing wavelength and the sattering properites mainly depends on complex refractive index. The scattering intensity becomes stronger and exhibits strong oscillations for ultraviolet and infrared light when the diameter of particles are less than 0.2 μm or approaching 1 μm. However, the scattering intensity is relatively stable and close to zero, shows small disturbances with the change of wavelength of incident light when the particles sizes are within 0.3 to 0.9 μm. PMID:26904801

  10. Atmospheric fate of oil matter adsorbed on sea salt particles under UV light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaitilingom, M.; Avij, P.; Huang, H.; Valsaraj, K. T.

    2014-12-01

    The presence of liquid petroleum hydrocarbons at the sea water surface is an important source of marine pollution. An oil spill in sea-water will most likely occur due to an involuntary accident from tankers, offshore platforms, etc. However, a large amount of oil is also deliberately spilled in sea-water during the clean-out process of tank vessels (e.g. for the Mediterranean Sea, 490,000 tons/yr). Moreover, the pollution caused by an oil spill does not only affect the aquatic environment but also is of concern for the atmospheric environment. A portion of the oil matter present at the sea-water surface is transported into the atmosphere viaevaporation and adsorption at the surface of sea spray particles. Few studies are related to the presence of oil matter in airborne particles resulting from their adsorption on sea salt aerosols. We observed that the non-volatile oil matter was adsorbed at the surface of sea-salt crystals (av. size of 1.1 μm). Due to their small size, these particles can have a significant residence time in the atmosphere. The hydrocarbon matter adsorbed at the surface of these particles can also be transformed by catalyzers present in the atmosphere (i.e. UV, OH, O3, ...). In this work, we focused on the photo-oxidation rates of the C16 to C30alkanes present in these particles. We utilized a bubble column reactor, which produced an abundance of small sized bubbles. These bubbles generated droplets upon bursting at the air-salt water interface. These droplets were then further dried up and lifted to the top of the column where they were collected as particles. These particles were incubated in a controlled reactor in either dark conditions or under UV-visible light. The difference of alkane content analyzed by GC-MS between the particles exposed to UV or the particles not exposed to UV indicated that up to 20% in mass was lost after 20 min of light exposure. The degradation kinetics varied for each range of alkanes (C16-20, C21-25, C26

  11. Colloids in light fields: Particle dynamics in random and periodic energy landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evers, F.; Hanes, R. D. L.; Zunke, C.; Capellmann, R. F.; Bewerunge, J.; Dalle-Ferrier, C.; Jenkins, M. C.; Ladadwa, I.; Heuer, A.; Castañeda-Priego, R.; Egelhaaf, S. U.

    2013-11-01

    The dynamics of colloidal particles in potential energy landscapes have mainly been investigated theoretically. In contrast, here we discuss the experimental realization of potential energy landscapes with the help of laser light fields and the observation of the particle dynamics by video microscopy. The experimentally observed dynamics in periodic and random potentials are compared to simulation and theoretical results in terms of, e.g. the mean-squared displacement, the time-dependent diffusion coefficient or the non-Gaussian parameter. The dynamics are initially diffusive followed by intermediate subdiffusive behaviour which again becomes diffusive at long times. How pronounced and extended the different regimes are, depends on the specific conditions, in particular the shape of the potential as well as its roughness or amplitude but also the particle concentration. Here we focus on dilute systems, but the dynamics of interacting systems in external potentials, and thus the interplay between particle-particle and particle-potential interactions, are also mentioned briefly. Furthermore, the observed dynamics of dilute systems resemble the dynamics of concentrated systems close to their glass transition, with which it is compared. The effect of certain potential energy landscapes on the dynamics of individual particles appears similar to the effect of interparticle interactions in the absence of an external potential.

  12. Guiding-centre and full-Lorentz orbit solving in 3D magnetic coordinates for fast particle simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Wilfred A.; Pfefferle, David; Graves, Jonathan P.

    2014-10-01

    Designed to accurately solve the motion of energetic particles in the presence of 3D magnetic fields, the VENUS-LEVIS code leans on a non-canonical general coordinate Lagrangian formulation of the equations of motion. It switches between full-orbit particle following and guiding-centre tracing by verifying the perpendicular variation of magnetic vector field, not only including gradients and curvature terms but also the shearing of field-lines. The criteria is particularly relevant for the study of fast ion redistribution in the kinked core of hybrid plasmas, where the compression of flux-surfaces against the axisymmetric outer mantle creates strongly varying magnetic field-lines and large parallel currents. Slowing-down simulations of NBI fast ions show that co-passing particles helically align in the opposite side of the plasma deformation whereas counter-passing particles are barely affected by the kinked structure. Results are compared with experimental neutron camera traces and FIDA measurements during long-lived modes (LLM).

  13. Theory of light scattering at nanoparticles and optical forces between small particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saenz, Juan Jose

    Appropriate combinations of laser beams can be used to trap and manipulate small particles with ``optical tweezers'' as well as to induce significant ``optical binding'' forces between particles. Here we review some basic concepts related to the optical forces on small (subwavelength) particles, focusing on the interplay between scattering asymmetry and momentum transfer. These forces are, in general, non-conservative (curl forces) which lead to a number of intriguing predictions regarding the dynamics of nanoparticles. Optical forces between small particles are usually strongly anisotropic depending on the interference landscape of the external fields. This is in contrast with the familiar isotropic van der Waals and, in general, Casimir-Lifshitz interactions between neutral bodies arising from random electromagnetic waves generated by equilibrium quantum and thermal fluctuations. As we will see, artificially created random fluctuating light fields can be used to induce and control dispersion forces between small colloidal particles. Interestingly, for relatively high refractive index semiconductor nanoparticles, the interactions can be tuned from attractive to strongly repulsive when the frequency of the external fluctuating field is tuned near the first magnetic Mie-resonance. Interactions induced by randomly fluctuating light fields open a path towards the control of translational invariant interactions with tuneable strength and range in colloidal systems.

  14. Giant in-particle field concentration and Fano resonances at light scattering by high-refractive-index particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tribelsky, Michael I.; Miroshnichenko, Andrey E.

    2016-05-01

    We present the results of a detailed analytical study of light scattering by a particle with high refractive index m +i κ and low losses (m ≫1 ,0 <κ ≪1 ) based on the exact Mie solution. We show that there is a dramatic difference in the behavior of the electromagnetic field within the particle (inner problem) and outside it (outer problem). With an increase in m at fixed values of the other parameters, the field within the particle asymptotically converges to a periodic function of m . The electric and magnetic type Mie resonances of different orders overlap substantially. It may lead to a giant concentration of the electromagnetic energy within the particle. At the same time, we demonstrate that the solution for the outer problem makes it possible to present each partial scattered wave as a sum of two partitions. One of them corresponds to the m -independent wave, scattered by a perfectly reflecting particle and plays the role of a background, while the other is associated with the excitation of a sharply m -dependent resonant Mie mode. The interference of the partitions brings about a typical asymmetric Fano profile. The profile is obtained from the exact Mie solution by means of identical transformations without any additional assumptions and/or fitting. It makes it possible to generalize rigorously the Fano theory to the case of finite dissipation. At an increase in m the Fano resonances in the outer problem die out and the scattered field converges to the universal, m -independent profile. The behavior of the resonances at a fixed m and varying particle size parameter (x ) is also discussed in detail. The similarities and differences of the two cases (fixed x , varying m and fixed m , varying x ) are disclosed. We also show that under certain very general conditions the scattering cross section of a large lossy sphere cannot be smaller than half its geometric cross section, while its absorption cross section cannot exceed three halves of the geometric

  15. Novel scheme of assist-light injection through waveguide coupling in a semiconductor optical amplifier for fast gain recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nithin, V.; Kumar, Yogesh; Shenoy, M. R.

    2016-01-01

    We propose a novel scheme for injection of assist-light into the active region of a semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) for fast gain recovery. In the proposed scheme, the assist-light is coupled into the active region of the SOA through an adjacent channel waveguide. Numerical results based on the well established model for carrier dynamics in SOA show that the gain recovery is faster in the proposed scheme as compared to the earlier reported scheme of counter-propagating assist-light injection. Our analysis shows that a desired power profile of the assist-light can be maintained in the active region of the SOA by tailoring the coupling through suitable design of the adjacent channel waveguide. The dependence of gain recovery on the input power of the assist-light in the proposed scheme has also been studied. Under typical operating conditions, it is found that 20 dBm of assist-light power injection in the proposed scheme is as effective as 27 dBm of assist-light power in the counter-propagating scheme.

  16. The Fast-Evolving phy-2 Gene Modulates Sexual Development in Response to Light in the Model Fungus Neurospora crassa

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zheng; Li, Ning; Li, Jigang; Dunlap, Jay C.; Trail, Frances

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Rapid responses to changes in incident light are critical to the guidance of behavior and development in most species. Phytochrome light receptors in particular play key roles in bacterial physiology and plant development, but their functions and regulation are less well understood in fungi. Nevertheless, genome-wide expression measurements provide key information that can guide experiments that reveal how genes respond to environmental signals and clarify their role in development. We performed functional genomic and phenotypic analyses of the two phytochromes in Neurospora crassa, a fungal model adapted to a postfire environment that experiences dramatically variable light conditions. Expression of phy-1 and phy-2 was low in early sexual development and in the case of phy-2 increased in late sexual development. Under light stimulation, strains with the phytochromes deleted exhibited increased expression of sexual development-related genes. Moreover, under red light, the phy-2 knockout strain commenced sexual development early. In the evolution of phytochromes within ascomycetes, at least two duplications have occurred, and the faster-evolving phy-2 gene has frequently been lost. Additionally, the three key cysteine sites that are critical for bacterial and plant phytochrome function are not conserved within fungal phy-2 homologs. Through the action of phytochromes, transitions between asexual and sexual reproduction are modulated by light level and light quality, presumably as an adaptation for fast asexual growth and initiation of sexual reproduction of N. crassa in exposed postfire ecosystems. PMID:26956589

  17. Ultra light-sensitive and fast neuronal activation with the Ca²+-permeable channelrhodopsin CatCh.

    PubMed

    Kleinlogel, Sonja; Feldbauer, Katrin; Dempski, Robert E; Fotis, Heike; Wood, Phillip G; Bamann, Christian; Bamberg, Ernst

    2011-04-01

    The light-gated cation channel channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) has rapidly become an important tool in neuroscience, and its use is being considered in therapeutic interventions. Although wild-type and known variant ChR2s are able to drive light-activated spike trains, their use in potential clinical applications is limited by either low light sensitivity or slow channel kinetics. We present a new variant, calcium translocating channelrhodopsin (CatCh), which mediates an accelerated response time and a voltage response that is ~70-fold more light sensitive than that of wild-type ChR2. CatCh's superior properties stem from its enhanced Ca²(+) permeability. An increase in [Ca²(+)](i) elevates the internal surface potential, facilitating activation of voltage-gated Na(+) channels and indirectly increasing light sensitivity. Repolarization following light-stimulation is markedly accelerated by Ca²(+)-dependent BK channel activation. Our results demonstrate a previously unknown principle: shifting permeability from monovalent to divalent cations to increase sensitivity without compromising fast kinetics of neuronal activation. This paves the way for clinical use of light-gated channels. PMID:21399632

  18. Resonant transmission of light in chains of high-index dielectric particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savelev, Roman S.; Filonov, Dmitry S.; Petrov, Mihail I.; Krasnok, Alexander E.; Belov, Pavel A.; Kivshar, Yuri S.

    2015-10-01

    We study numerically, analytically, and experimentally the resonant transmission of light in a waveguide formed by a periodic array of high-index dielectric nanoparticles with a side-coupled resonator. We demonstrate that a resonator with high enough Q -factor provides the conditions for the Fano-type interference allowing one to control the resonant transmission of light. We suggest a practical realization of this resonant effect based on the quadrupole resonance of a dielectric particle and demonstrate it experimentally for ceramic disks at microwave frequencies.

  19. Metal Optics Based nanoLEDs: In Search of a Fast, Efficient, Nanoscale Light Emitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eggleston, Michael Scott

    Since the invention of the laser, stimulated emission has been the de facto king of optical communication. Lasers can be directly modulated at rates as high as 50GHz, much faster than a typical solid state light-emitting diode (LED) that is limited by spontaneous emission to <1GHz. Unfortunately, lasers have a severe scaling problem; they require large cavities operated at high power to achieve efficient lasing. A properly designed LED can be made arbitrarily small and still operate with high-efficiency. On-chip interconnects is an area that is in desperate need of a high-speed, low-power optical emitter that can enable on-chip links to replace current high-loss metal wires. In this work, I will show that by utilizing proper antenna design, a nanoLED can be created that is faster than a laser while still operating at >50% efficiency. I start by formulating an optical antenna circuit model whose elements are based completely off of antenna geometry. This allows for intuitive antenna design and suggests that rate enhancements up to ~3,000x are possible while keeping antenna efficiency >50%. Such a massive speed-up in spontaneous emission would enable an LED that can be directly modulated at 100's of GHz, much faster than any laser. I then use the circuit model to design an arch-dipole antenna, a dipole antenna with an inductive arch across the feedgap. I experimentally demonstrate a free-standing arch-dipole based nanoLED with rate enhancement of 115x and 66% antenna efficiency. Because the emitter is InGaAsP, a common III-V material, I experimentally show that this device can be easily and efficiently coupled into an InP waveguide. Experimental coupling efficiencies up to 70% are demonstrated and directional antennas are employed that offer front to back emission ratios of 3:1. Finally, I show that a nanoLED can still have high quantum yield by using a transition metal dichalcogenide, WSe2, as the emitter material. By coupling a monolayer of WSe2 to a cavity

  20. Particle and light fragment emission in peripheral heavy ion collisions at Fermi energies

    SciTech Connect

    Piantelli, S.; Maurenzig, P. R.; Olmi, A.; Bardelli, L.; Bartoli, A.; Bini, M.; Casini, G.; Coppi, C.; Mangiarotti, A.; Pasquali, G.; Poggi, G.; Stefanini, A. A.; Taccetti, N.; Vanzi, E.

    2006-09-15

    A systematic investigation of the average multiplicities of light charged particles and intermediate mass fragments emitted in peripheral and semiperipheral collisions is presented as a function of the beam energy, violence of the collision, and mass of the system. The data have been collected with the FIASCO setup in the reactions {sup 93}Nb+{sup 93}Nb at (17,23,30,38)A MeV and {sup 116}Sn+{sup 116}Sn at (30,38)A MeV. The midvelocity emission has been separated from the emission of the projectile-like fragment. This last component appears to be compatible with an evaporation from an equilibrated source at normal density, as described by the statistical code GEMINI at the appropriate excitation energy. On the contrary, the midvelocity emission presents remarkable differences in both the dependence of the multiplicities on the energy deposited in the midvelocity region and the isotopic composition of the emitted light charged particles.

  1. Importance of light scattering properties of cloud particles on calculating the earth energy cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Letu, H.; Nakajima, T. Y.; Nagao, T. M.; Ishimoto, H.

    2013-12-01

    The Earth is an open system, and the energy cycle of the Earth is not always a certain amount. In other words, the energy cycle in the nature is imbalance. A better understanding of the earth energy cycle is very important to study global climate change. the IPCC-AR4 reported that the cloud in the atmosphere are still characterized by large uncertainties in the estimation of their effects on energy sysle of the Earth's atmosphere. There are two types of cloud in the atmosphere, which are Cirrus and warm water cloud. In order to strongly reflect visible wavelength from sun light, thick water cloud has the effect of cooling the earth surface. When Cirrus is compared to water cloud, temperature is almost lower. Thus, there is a feature that Cirrus is easy to absorb long-wave radiation than warm water cloud. However, in order to quantitatively evaluate the reflection and absorption characteristics of cloud on remote senssing application and energy cycle of the imbalance of nature, it is necessary to obtain the scattering properties of cloud particles. Since the shapes of the water cloud particle are close to spherical, scattering properties of the particles can be calculated accurately by the Mie theory. However, Cirrus particles have a complex shape, including hexagonal, plate, and other non- spherical shapes. Different from warm water cloud partical, it is required to use several different light scattering methods when calculating the light scattering properties of the non-spherical Cirrus cloud particals. Ishimoto et al. [2010, 2012] and Masuda et al. [2012] developed the Finite-Difference Time Domain method (FDTD) and Improved Geometrical-Optics Method (IGOM) for the solution of light scattering by non-spherical particles. Nakajima et al [1997,2009] developed the LIght Scattering solver for Arbitral Shape particle (Lisas)-Geometrical-Optics Method (GOM) and Surface Integral Equations Method of Müller-type (SIEMM) to calculate the light scattering properties for

  2. PARTICLE-HOLE NATURE OF THE LIGHT HIGH-SPIN TOROIDAL ISOMERS

    SciTech Connect

    Staszczak, A.; Wong, Cheuk-Yin

    2015-01-01

    Nuclei under non-collective rotation with a large angular momentum above some threshold can assume a toroidal shape. In our previous work, we showed by using cranked Skyrme Hartree Fock approach that even even, N = Z, high-K, toroidal isomeric states may have general occurrences for light nuclei with 28 < A < 52. We present here some additional results and systematics on the particle-hole nature of these high-spin toroidal isomers.

  3. An investigation into particle shape effects on the light scattering properties of mineral dust aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meland, Brian Steven

    Mineral dust aerosol plays an important role in determining the physical and chemical equilibrium of the atmosphere. The radiative balance of the Earth's atmosphere can be affected by mineral dust through both direct and indirect means. Mineral dust can directly scatter or absorb incoming visible solar radiation and outgoing terrestrial IR radiation. Dust particles can also serve as cloud condensation nuclei, thereby increasing albedo, or provide sites for heterogeneous reactions with trace gas species, which are indirect effects. Unfortunately, many of these processes are poorly understood due to incomplete knowledge of the physical and chemical characteristics of the particles including dust concentration and global distribution, as well as aerosol composition, mixing state, and size and shape distributions. Much of the information about mineral dust aerosol loading and spatial distribution is obtained from remote sensing measurements which often rely on measuring the scattering or absorption of light from these particles and are thus subject to errors arising from an incomplete understanding of the scattering processes. The light scattering properties of several key mineral components of atmospheric dust have been measured at three different wavelengths in the visible. In addition, measurements of the scattering were performed for several authentic mineral dust aerosols, including Saharan sand, diatomaceous earth, Iowa loess soil, and palagonite. These samples include particles that are highly irregular in shape. Using known optical constants along with measured size distributions, simulations of the light scattering process were performed using both Mie and T-Matrix theories. Particle shapes were approximated as a distribution of spheroids for the T-Matrix calculations. It was found that the theoretical model simulations differed markedly from experimental measurements of the light scattering, particularly near the mid-range and near backscattering angles. In

  4. Fast Coherent Particle Advection through Time-Varying Unstructured Flow Datasets.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mingcheng; Shadden, Shawn C; Hart, John C

    2016-08-01

    Tracing the paths of collections of particles through a flow field is a key step for many flow visualization and analysis methods. When a flow field is interpolated from the nodes of an unstructured mesh, the process of advecting a particle must first find which cell in the unstructured mesh contains the particle. Since the paths of nearby particles often diverge, the parallelization of particle advection quickly leads to incoherent memory accesses of the unstructured mesh. We have developed a new block advection GPU approach that reorganizes particles into spatially coherent bundles as they follow their advection paths, which greatly improves memory coherence and thus shared-memory GPU performance. This approach works best for flows that meet the CFL criterion on unstructured meshes of uniformly sized elements, small enough to fit at least two timesteps in GPU memory. PMID:26353375

  5. Phase transition observations and discrimination of small cloud particles by light polarization in expansion chamber experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichman, Leonid; Fuchs, Claudia; Järvinen, Emma; Ignatius, Karoliina; Florian Höppel, Niko; Dias, Antonio; Heinritzi, Martin; Simon, Mario; Tröstl, Jasmin; Wagner, Andrea Christine; Wagner, Robert; Williamson, Christina; Yan, Chao; Connolly, Paul James; Dorsey, James Robert; Duplissy, Jonathan; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Frege, Carla; Gordon, Hamish; Hoyle, Christopher Robert; Bjerring Kristensen, Thomas; Steiner, Gerhard; McPherson Donahue, Neil; Flagan, Richard; Gallagher, Martin William; Kirkby, Jasper; Möhler, Ottmar; Saathoff, Harald; Schnaiter, Martin; Stratmann, Frank; Tomé, António

    2016-03-01

    Cloud microphysical processes involving the ice phase in tropospheric clouds are among the major uncertainties in cloud formation, weather, and general circulation models. The detection of aerosol particles, liquid droplets, and ice crystals, especially in the small cloud particle-size range below 50 μm, remains challenging in mixed phase, often unstable environments. The Cloud Aerosol Spectrometer with Polarization (CASPOL) is an airborne instrument that has the ability to detect such small cloud particles and measure the variability in polarization state of their backscattered light. Here we operate the versatile Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets (CLOUD) chamber facility at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) to produce controlled mixed phase and other clouds by adiabatic expansions in an ultraclean environment, and use the CASPOL to discriminate between different aerosols, water, and ice particles. In this paper, optical property measurements of mixed-phase clouds and viscous secondary organic aerosol (SOA) are presented. We report observations of significant liquid-viscous SOA particle polarization transitions under dry conditions using CASPOL. Cluster analysis techniques were subsequently used to classify different types of particles according to their polarization ratios during phase transition. A classification map is presented for water droplets, organic aerosol (e.g., SOA and oxalic acid), crystalline substances such as ammonium sulfate, and volcanic ash. Finally, we discuss the benefits and limitations of this classification approach for atmospherically relevant concentrations and mixtures with respect to the CLOUD 8-9 campaigns and its potential contribution to tropical troposphere layer analysis.

  6. Nanostructure of metallic particles in light water reactor used nuclear fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buck, Edgar C.; Mausolf, Edward J.; McNamara, Bruce K.; Soderquist, Chuck Z.; Schwantes, Jon M.

    2015-06-01

    An extraordinary nano-structure has been observed in the metallic (Mo-Tc-Ru-Rh-Pd) particles that are known to form during irradiated in light water nuclear reactor fuels. This structure points possible high catalytic reactivity through the occurrence of a very high surface area as well as defect sites. We have analyzed separated metallic particles from dissolved high burn-up spent nuclear fuel using scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The larger particles vary in diameter between ∼10 and ∼300 nm and possess a hexagonally close packed epsilon-ruthenium structure. These particles are not always single crystals but often consist of much smaller crystallites on the order of 1-3 nm in diameter with evidence suggesting the occurrence of some amorphous regions. It is possible that neutron irradiation and fission product recoils generated the unusual small crystallite size. The composition of the metallic particles was variable with low levels of uranium present in some of the particles. We hypothesize that the uranium may have induced the formation of the amorphous (or frustrated) metal structure. This unique nano-structure may play an important role in the environmental behavior of nuclear fuels.

  7. Advances in Thermal Spray Deposition of Billets for Particle Reinforced Light Metals

    SciTech Connect

    Wenzelburger, Martin; Zimmermann, Christian; Gadow, Rainer

    2007-04-07

    Forming of light-metals in semi-solid state offers some advantages like low process temperatures, improved mould durability, good flow behavior and fine, globular microstructure of the final material. By the introduction of ceramic particles, increased elastic modulus and yield strength as well as wear resistance and creep behavior can be obtained. By semi-solid forging or semi-solid casting, particle reinforced metals (PRM) can be produced with improved matrix microstructure and beneficial forming process parameters compared to conventional MMC manufacturing techniques. The production of this kind of light metal matrix composites requires the supply of dense semi-finished parts with well defined volume fractions of homogeneously distributed particulate reinforcement. A manufacturing method for cylindrical light metal billets is described that applies thermal spraying as a build-up process for simultaneous deposition of matrix and reinforcement phase with cored wires as spraying material. Thermal spraying leads to small grain sizes and prevents dendrite formation. However, long process cycle times lead to billet heating and recrystallization of the matrix microstructure. In order to preserve small grain sizes that enable semi-solid forming, the thermal spraying process was analyzed by in-flight particle analysis and thermography. As a consequence, the deposition process was optimized by adaptation of the thermal spraying parameters and by application of additional cooling, leading to lower billet temperatures and finer PRM billet microstructure.

  8. Particle Size Distributions During Laboratory-Scale Biomass Burns and Prescribed Burns Using Fast Response Instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, H.; Hosseini, E.; Li, Q.; Cocker, D.; Weise, D.; Miller, A.; Shrivastava, M.; Miller, W.; Princevac, M.; Mahalingam, S.

    2010-12-01

    Particle size distribution from biomass combustion in an important parameter as it affects air quality, climate modelling and health effects. To date particle size distributions reported from prior studies varies not only due to difference in fuels but also difference in experimental conditions. This study aims to report characteristics of particle size distribution in a well controlled repeatable lab scale biomass fires for southwestern US fuels and compare with that from prescribed burns. The combustion laboratory at the USDA Forest Service’s Fire Science Laboratory (FSL), Missoula, MT provided repeatable combustion and dilution environment ideal for particle size distribution study. For a variety of fuels tested the major mode of particle size distribution was in the range of 29 to 52 nm, which is attributable to dilution of the fresh smoke. Comparing volume size distribution from FMPS and APS measurement ~30 % of particle volume was attributable to the particles ranging from 0.5 to 10 µm for PM10. Geometric mean diameter rapidly increased during flaming and gradually decreased during mixed and smoldering phase combustion. Most of fuels gave unimodal distribution during flaming phase and strong biomodal distribution during smoldering phase. The mode of combustion (flaming, mixed and smoldering) could be better distinguished using slopes in MCE vs geometric mean diameter from each mode of combustion than only using MCE values. Prescribed burns were carried out at wildland managed by military bases. Evolution of particle distribution in and out of the plume will be compared with particle distribution from lab scale burning.

  9. A computer controlled television detector for light, X-rays and particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalata, K.

    1981-01-01

    A versatile, high resolution, software configurable, two-dimensional intensified vidicon quantum detector system has been developed for multiple research applications. A thin phosphor convertor allows the detection of X-rays below 20 keV and non-relativistic particles in addition to visible light, and a thicker scintillator can be used to detect X-rays up to 100 keV and relativistic particles. Faceplates may be changed to allow any active area from 1 to 40 mm square, and active areas up to 200 mm square are possible. The image is integrated in a digital memory on any software specified array size up to 4000 x 4000. The array size is selected to match the spatial resolution, which ranges from 10 to 100 microns depending on the operating mode, the active area, and the photon or particle energy. All scan and data acquisition parameters are under software control to allow optimal data collection for each application.

  10. Monochromatic imaging of scattered laser light from in situ generated particles in plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hareland, W.A.; Buss, R.J.; Brown, D.A.; Collins, S.M.

    1996-02-01

    In recent years, there has been a great deal of interest in the behavior of particles in plasmas because of the negative economic impact of contamination during processing of silicon for microelectronics manufacture. Here, spatially resolved images of particle distributions are measured in steady-state plasmas in a GEC (gaseous electronics conference) plasma reactor. Images are obtained by monochromatic imaging of scattered laser light using a microchannel plate (MCP) image intensifier and a high-speed video camera. The observed distributions of particulates generated by adding small quantities of CHF{sub 3} to an argon plasma are extremely complex and diverse. The patterns observed are temporally varying, and rarely as simple as domes and rings observed in other reactors. The forces acting on the particles are sufficiently complex that reproducing specific spatial patterns by controlling processing parameters if often impossible.

  11. [Light scattering extinction properties of atmospheric particle and pollution characteristics in hazy weather in Hangzhou].

    PubMed

    Xu, Chang; Ye, Hui; Shen, Jian-Dong; Sun, Hong-Liang; Hong, Sheng-Mao; Jiao, Li; Huang, Kan

    2014-12-01

    In order to evaluate the influence of particle scattering on visibility, light scattering coefficient, particle concentrations and meteorological factor were simultaneously monitored from July 2011 to June 2012 in Hangzhou. Daily scattering coefficients ranged from 108.4 to 1 098.1 Mm(-1), with an annual average concentration of 428.6 Mm(-1) ± 200.2 Mm(-1). Seasonal variation of scattering coefficients was significant, with the highest concentrations observed in autumn and winter and the lowest in summer. It was found there were two peaks for the average diurnal variations of the scattering coefficient, which could be observed at 08:00 and 21:00. The scattering efficiencies of PM2.5 and PM10 were 7.6 m2 x g(-1) and 4.4 m2 x g(-1), respectively. The particle scattering was about 90.2 percent of the total light extinction. The scattering coefficients were 684.4 Mm(-1) ± 218.1 Mm(-1) and 1 095.4 Mm(-1) ± 397.7 Mm(-1) in hazy and heavy hazy days, respectively, which were 2.6 and 4.2 times as high as in non-hazy weather, indicating that particle scattering is the main factor for visibility degradation and the occurrence of hazy weather in Hangzhou. PMID:25826909

  12. Deducing Shape of Anisotropic Particles in Solution from Light Scattering: Spindles and Nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuper, Ilona; Terrano, Daniel; Streletzky, Kiril A.; Dement'eva, Olga V.; Semyonov, Sergey A.; Rudoy, Victor M.

    Depolarized Dynamic Light Scattering (DDLS) enables to measure rotational and translational diffusion of nanoparticles suspended in solution. The particle size, shape, diffusion, and interactions can then be inferred from the DDLS data using various models of diffusion. Incorporating the technique of DDLS to analyze the dimensions of easily imaged elongated particles, such as Iron (III) oxyhydroxide (FeOOH) Spindles and gold Nanorods, allows testing of the models for rotational and translational diffusion of elongated particles in solution. This, in turn, can help to better interpret DDLS data on hard-to-image anisotropic wet systems such as micelles, microgels, and protein complexes. This study focused on FeOOH Spindles and gold nanorod particles. The light scattering results on FeOOH analyzed using the basic model of non-interacting prolate ellipsoids yielded dimensions within 17% of the SEM measured dimensions. The dimensions of gold nanorod obtained from the straight cylinder model of DDLS data provided results within 25% of the sizes that were obtained from TEM. The nanorod DDLS data was also analyzed by a spherocylinder model.

  13. Observations of aerosol light scattering, absorption, and particle morphology changes as a function of relative humidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnott, W. P.; Lewis, K.; Paredes-Miranda, G.; Winter, S.; Day, D.; Chakrabarty, R.; Moosmuller, H.; Jimenez, J. L.; Ulbrich, I.; Huffman, A.; Onasch, T.; Trimborn, A.; Kreidenweis, S.; Carrico, C.; Wold, C.; Lincoln, E.; Freeborn, P.; Hao, W.; McMeeking, G.

    2006-12-01

    A very interesting case of smoke aerosol with very low single scattering albedo, yet very large hygroscopic growth for scattering is presented. Several samples of chamise (Adenostoma fasciculatum), a common and often dominant species in California chaparral, were recently burned at the USFS Fire Science Laboratory in Missoula Montana, and aerosol optics and chemistry were observed, along with humidity-dependent light scattering, absorption, and particle morphology. Photoacoustic measurements of light absorption by two instruments at 870 nm, one on the dry channel, one on the humidified channel, showed strong reduction of aerosol light absorption with RH above 65 percent, and yet a strong increase in light scattering was observed both at 870 nm and 550 nm with nephelometers. Multispectral measurements of aerosol light absorption indicated an Angstrom coefficient for absorption near unity for the aerosols from chamise combustion. It is argued that the hygroscopic growth of scattering is due to uptake of water by the sulfur bearing aerosol. Furthermore, the reduction of aerosol light absorption is argued to be due to the collapse of chain aggregate aerosol as the RH increases wherein the interior of aerosol does no longer contribute to absorption. Implications for biomass burning in general are that humidity processing of aerosols from this source and others like it tends to substantially increase its single scattering albedo, probably in a non-reversible manner. The chemical pathway to hygroscopicity will be addressed.

  14. Light induced changes in Raman scattering of carotenoid molecules in Photosystem I particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreeva, Atanaska; Abarova, Silviya; Stoitchkova, Katerina; Velitchkova, Maya

    2007-03-01

    The photosynthetic antenna systems are able to regulate the light energy harvesting under different light conditions by dynamic changes in their protein structure protecting the reaction center complexes. The changes modulate the electronic structure of the main antenna pigments (chlorophylls and carotenoids) and distort the characteristic planar structure of carotenoids, allowing their forbidden out of plane vibrations. Electronic absorption and low-temperature resonance Raman spectroscopy were used to study the changes in composition and spectral properties of the major carotenoids in spinach Photosystem I particles due to high light treatment. The duration of the applied intensity of the white light (1800 μE m -2 s -1) was 30, 60 and 120 minutes. We used Raman scattering in an attempt to recognize the type and conformation of photobleached carotenoid molecules. The resonance Raman spectra were measured at 488 and 514.5 nm, coinciding with the absorption maximum positions of the carotenoids neoxanthin and lutein, correspondingly. The results revealed nearly a full photobleaching of the long wavelength lutein molecules, whereas the bleaching of neoxantin molecules is negligible. The involvement of these changes in the photoprotection and photoinactivation of the Photosystem I particles was discussed.

  15. Radiative Forcing of the Lower Stratosphere over the Arctic by Light Absorbing Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumgardner, D.; Raga, G.; Kok, G.

    2003-01-01

    Light absorbing particles (LAP), such as soot and dust, change the thermodynamic structure of the atmosphere and contribute to regional and global climate change. The lower stratosphere (LS) is particularly sensitive to the presence of LAP since the lifetime of particles in the LS may extend from months to years, in contrast to tropospheric lifetimes of at most a few days. The source of particles in the LS may be aircraft, meteorites or emissions from tropospheric sources. There has been a lack, however, of accurate, quantitative measurements made with sufficiently sensitive instruments. This limits our understanding of the origin and lifetime of aerosols in this region of the atmosphere. Here we present recent measurements in the Arctic UT/LS with a new, highly sensitive instrument that has detected black carbon (BC) mass concentrations of 20-1000 ng m(exp -3) that are 10-1000 times larger than those reported in previous studies and are at least 30 times larger than predicted masses based on fuel consumption by commercial aircraft that fly in these regions. Scattering and absorption of solar and terrestrial radiation by the particles in a layer from 8- 12 Km leads to a negative net forcing of -0.5 W sq m at the top of the atmosphere and 9C of heating in this layer during the average aerosol lifetime at these altitudes. The new measurements suggest that the influence of aircraft emissions have been underestimated or that aircraft may not be the only significant source of light absorbing particles in the UT/LS. The presence of these aerosols can cause local changes in the thermal structure of the lower stratosphere and a subsequent modification of stratosphere/tropopause exchange of gases and particles.

  16. Dual-beam multiple wavelength light transmittance measurement for particle sizing in rocket motor plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Kevin B.

    1993-06-01

    A multiple-wavelength light transmittance measurement system previously used in a laboratory environment to study particles in solid rocket propellant exhaust plumes was modified for use in the field, where high levels of vibration can degrade the accuracy of data. The system was converted from a single light beam configuration to a dual beam configuration which was capable of obtaining a complete set of 1024 reference and scene measurements in 10.0 ms. Modifications included designing, building and testing a new analog-to-digital data converter trigger circuit, and a rotating-wheel light chopper. Optical components including beam splitters, lenses, and a fiber optic cable were installed, and existing data collection system software was modified. The new system was tested by measuring soot from an oxyacetylene torch to prove the design concept. Test results and system performance were documented. Recommendations for further modifications, improvements and applications are presented.

  17. Lidar remote sensing of laser-induced incandescence on light absorbing particles in the atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Miffre, Alain; Anselmo, Christophe; Geffroy, Sylvain; Fréjafon, Emeric; Rairoux, Patrick

    2015-02-01

    Carbon aerosol is now recognized as a major uncertainty on climate change and public health, and specific instruments are required to address the time and space evolution of this aerosol, which efficiently absorbs light. In this paper, we report an experiment, based on coupling lidar remote sensing with Laser-Induced-Incandescence (LII), which allows, in agreement with Planck's law, to retrieve the vertical profile of very low thermal radiation emitted by light-absorbing particles in an urban atmosphere over several hundred meters altitude. Accordingly, we set the LII-lidar formalism and equation and addressed the main features of LII-lidar in the atmosphere by numerically simulating the LII-lidar signal. We believe atmospheric LII-lidar to be a promising tool for radiative transfer, especially when combined with elastic backscattering lidar, as it may then allow a remote partitioning between strong/less light absorbing carbon aerosols. PMID:25836102

  18. Indoor anti-occlusion visible light positioning systems based on particle filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Meng; Huang, Zhitong; Li, Jianfeng; Zhang, Ruqi; Ji, Yuefeng

    2015-04-01

    As one of the most popular categories of mobile services, a rapid growth of indoor location-based services has been witnessed over the past decades. Indoor positioning methods based on Wi-Fi, radio-frequency identification or Bluetooth are widely commercialized; however, they have disadvantages such as low accuracy or high cost. An emerging method using visible light is under research recently. The existed visible light positioning (VLP) schemes using carrier allocation, time allocation and multiple receivers all have limitations. This paper presents a novel mechanism using particle filtering in VLP system. By this method no additional devices are needed and the occlusion problem in visible light would be alleviated which will effectively enhance the flexibility for indoor positioning.

  19. Beam-splitting code for light scattering by ice crystal particles within geometric-optics approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konoshonkin, Alexander V.; Kustova, Natalia V.; Borovoi, Anatoli G.

    2015-10-01

    The open-source beam-splitting code is described which implements the geometric-optics approximation to light scattering by convex faceted particles. This code is written in C++ as a library which can be easy applied to a particular light scattering problem. The code uses only standard components, that makes it to be a cross-platform solution and provides its compatibility to popular Integrated Development Environments (IDE's). The included example of solving the light scattering by a randomly oriented ice crystal is written using Qt 5.1, consequently it is a cross-platform solution, too. Both physical and computational aspects of the beam-splitting algorithm are discussed. Computational speed of the beam-splitting code is obviously higher compared to the conventional ray-tracing codes. A comparison of the phase matrix as computed by our code with the ray-tracing code by A. Macke shows excellent agreement.

  20. Determination of single particle mass spectral signatures from light-duty vehicle emissions.

    PubMed

    Sodeman, David A; Toner, Stephen M; Prather, Kimberly A

    2005-06-15

    In this study, 28 light-duty gasoline vehicles (LDV) were operated on a chassis dynamometer at the California Air Resources Board Haagen-Smit Facility in El Monte, CA. The mass spectra of individual particles emitted from these vehicles were measured using aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ATOFMS). A primary goal of this study involves determining representative size-resolved single particle mass spectral signatures that can be used in future ambient particulate matter source apportionment studies. Different cycles were used to simulate urban driving conditions including the federal testing procedure (FTP), unified cycle (UC), and the correction cycle (CC). The vehicles were selected to span a range of catalytic converter (three-way, oxidation, and no catalysts) and engine technologies (vehicles models from 1953 to 2003). Exhaust particles were sampled directly from a dilution and residence chamber system using particle sizing instruments and an ATOFMS equipped with an aerodynamic lens (UF-ATOFMS) analyzing particles between 50 and 300 nm. On the basis of chemical composition, 10 unique chemical types describe the majority of the particles with distinct size and temporal characteristics. In the ultrafine size range (between 50 and 100 nm), three elemental carbon (EC) particle types dominated, all showing distinct EC signatures combined with Ca, phosphate, sulfate, and a lower abundance of organic carbon (OC). The relative fraction of EC particle types decreased as particle size increased with OC particles becoming more prevalent above 100 nm. Depending on the vehicle and cycle, several distinct OC particle types produced distinct ion patterns, including substituted aromatic compounds and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), coupled with other chemical species including ammonium, EC, nitrate, sulfate, phosphate, V, and Ca. The most likely source of the Ca and phosphate in the particles is attributed to the lubricating oil. Significant variability was

  1. Fast changes in chemical composition and size distribution of fine particles during the near-field transport of industrial plumes.

    PubMed

    Marris, Hélène; Deboudt, Karine; Augustin, Patrick; Flament, Pascal; Blond, François; Fiani, Emmanuel; Fourmentin, Marc; Delbarre, Hervé

    2012-06-15

    Aerosol sampling was performed inside the chimneys and in the close environment of a FeMn alloys manufacturing plant. The number size distributions show a higher abundance of ultrafine aerosols (10-100 nm) inside the plume than upwind of the plant, indicating the emissions of nanoparticles by the industrial process. Individual analysis of particles collected inside the plume shows a high proportion of metal bearing particles (Mn-/Fe-) consisting essentially of internally mixed aluminosilicate and metallic compounds. These particles evolve rapidly (in a few minutes) after emission by adsorption of VOC gas and sulfuric acid emitted by the plant but also by agglomeration with pre-existing particles. At the moment, municipalities require a monitoring of industrial emissions inside the chimneys from manufacturers. However those measures are insufficient to report such rapid changes in chemical composition and thus to evaluate the real impact of industrial plumes in the close environment of plants (when those particles leave the industrial site). Consequently, environmental authorities will have to consider such fast evolutions and then to adapt future regulations on air pollution sources. PMID:22542297

  2. The effect of momentum transfer by fast particles on the hydrodynamic instabilities in the ICF targets

    SciTech Connect

    Lykov, V.A.

    1994-10-05

    The results of the investigation into the hydrodynamic instabilities of media movement with the account of particle momentum transfer in ICF targets will be presented. It is shown that both oscillating and exponentially growing solutions for perturbation amplitude may exist depending on the ratio of particle free-path length and perturbation wavelength. The conditions of suppression of the Rayleigh-Taylor and Kelvin-Helmgoltz instabilities by particle momentum fluxes are obtained. The stabilization occurs due to the interaction of aperiodic modes of these instabilities with oscillation mode caused by the tensor anisothropy of particle momentum flux density. The possibility for essential effect of momentum transfer by {alpha}-particles from {ital D}{minus}{ital T} reaction on the development of the hydrodynamic instabilities during the phase of intensive ICF target burn is shown. {copyright} 1994 {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}

  3. The Contribution of Fine Particle Sulfates to Light Scattering in ST. Louis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vossler, Teri Lynn

    In this study the extent to which sulfates produce visibility reduction in the St. Louis area was examined. The contribution of fine aerosol sulfates to total light scattering was calculated from measured sulfur size distributions and Mie theory of light scattering. The aerosol was collected during both a summer and a winter season. Short sampling intervals (10 minutes to 3 hours) permitted observation of the fine structure of the sulfur size distribution and concentration, and involved only small changes in meteorology. Size separation was accomplished with an 8 stage low pressure impactor which yielded size fractions in the range of 4 (mu)m (GREATERTHEQ) d (GREATERTHEQ) 0.05 (mu)m. Elemental sulfur was measured by flash volatilization and flame photometric detection. All fine sulfur was assumed to be in the form of (NH(,4))(,2)SO(,4). Water which might be associated with this deliquescent aerosol was estimated. The measured light scattering coefficient, b(,scat), and (NH(,4))(,2)SO(,4) were extremely well correlated (r = 0.97) in the summer, but not as well correlated (r = 0.63) in the winter. Conversely, b(,scat) and non-sulfate fine mass were well correlated (r = 0.85) in the winter, but poorly correlated (r = 0.24) in the summer. The light scattering efficiency of (NH(,4))(,2)SO(,4) plus associated water calculated from Mie theory and size distributions was 4.2 m('2)/g for the summer aerosol, but only 2.0 m('2)/g for the dry winter (NH(,4))(,2)SO(,4). Two basic types of sulfur size distributions were observed. The most common type observed during the summer had a major sulfur mass peak between 0.5 (mu)m and 1.0 (mu)m in diameter. This size particle scatters light more efficiently than other particles. Its prevalence in the summer aerosol accounts for the high scattering efficiency of sulfates in the summer aerosol when compared to winter sulfate aerosol, which did not have such prominent mass peaks between 0.5 (mu)m and 1.0 (mu)m in diameter. Calculation of

  4. Particle-bed gas-cooled fast reactor (PB-GCFR) design. Project final technical report (Sept 2001 - Aug 2003).

    SciTech Connect

    Taiwo, T. A.; Wei, T. Y. C.; Feldman, E. E.; Hoffman, E. A.; Fatone, M.; Holland, J. W.; Prokofiev, I. G.; Yang, W. S.; Palmiotti, G.; Hill, R. N.; Todosow, M.; Salvatores, M.; Gandini, A.

    2003-10-27

    The objective of this project is to develop a conceptual design of a particle-bed, gas-cooled fast reactor (PB-GCFR) core that meets the advanced reactor concept and enhanced proliferation-resistant goals of the US Department of Energy's NERI program. The key innovation of this project is the application of a fast neutron spectrum environment to enhance both the passive safety and transmutation characteristics of the advanced particle-bed and pebble-bed reactor designs. The PB-GCFR design is expected to produce a high-efficiency system with a low unit cost. It is anticipated that the fast neutron spectrum would permit small-sized units ({approx} 150 MWe) that can be built quickly and packaged into modular units, and whose production can be readily expanded as the demand grows. Such a system could be deployed globally. The goals of this two-year project are as follows: (1) design a reactor core that meets the future needs of the nuclear industry, by being passively safe with reduced need for engineered safety systems. This will entail an innovative core design incorporating new fuel form and type; (2) employ a proliferation-resistant fuel design and fuel cycle. This will be supported by a long-life core design that is refueled infrequently, and hence, reduces the potential for fuel diversion; (3) incorporate design features that permit use of the system as an efficient transmuter that could be employed for burning separated plutonium fuel or recycled LWR transuranic fuel, should the need arise; and (4) evaluate the fuel cycle for waste minimization and for the possibility of direct fuel disposal. The application of particle-bed fuel provides the promise of extremely high burnup and fission-product protection barriers that may permit direct disposal.

  5. Influence of water uptake on the aerosol particle light scattering at remote sites (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zieger, P.; Fierz-Schmidhauser, R.; Baltensperger, U.; Weingartner, E.

    2013-12-01

    Since ambient aerosol particles experience hygroscopic growth at enhanced relative humidity (RH), their microphysical and optical properties - especially the aerosol light scattering - are also strongly dependent on RH. The knowledge of this RH effect is of importance for climate forcing calculations or for the comparison of remote sensing with in-situ measurements because in the field aerosol in-situ measurements are often performed under dry conditions. The scattering enhancement factor f(RH,λ) is the key parameter to describe this effect of water uptake on the particle light scattering. It is defined as the particle light scattering coefficient σ(RH) at a certain RH and wavelength λ divided by its dry value. Here, we will present results from two remote sites: the Jungfraujoch located at 3580 m a.s.l. in the Swiss Alps and from Zeppelin station located at 78.5°N in the Arctic (Fierz-Schmidhauser et al., 2010; Zieger et al., 2010). Various aerosol optical and microphysical parameters were recorded at these sites using in-situ and remote sensing techniques. The scattering enhancement varied largely from very low values of f(RH=85%,λ=550 nm) around 1.28 for mineral dust transported to the Jungfraujoch to 3.41 for pristine Arctic aerosol. Compensating effects of size and hygroscopicity were observed in the Arctic, i.e. small but less hygroscopic particles eventually had the same magnitude in f(RH) as large but more hygroscopic particles like sea salt. Closure studies and Mie simulations showed that both size and chemical composition determine the magnitude of f(RH). The f(RH)-values from the two remote sites will also be related to values measured at other maritime, rural, and continental sites in Europe (Zieger et al., 2013). Active and passive remote sensing techniques were used to study the vertical distribution of aerosol optical properties around Jungfraujoch. Part of these in-situ measured parameters, together with the RH-dependent σ(RH) were used to

  6. A fast and explicit algorithm for simulating the dynamics of small dust grains with smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Daniel J.; Laibe, Guillaume

    2015-07-01

    We describe a simple method for simulating the dynamics of small grains in a dusty gas, relevant to micron-sized grains in the interstellar medium and grains of centimetre size and smaller in protoplanetary discs. The method involves solving one extra diffusion equation for the dust fraction in addition to the usual equations of hydrodynamics. This `diffusion approximation for dust' is valid when the dust stopping time is smaller than the computational timestep. We present a numerical implementation using smoothed particle hydrodynamics that is conservative, accurate and fast. It does not require any implicit timestepping and can be straightforwardly ported into existing 3D codes.

  7. Fast evolution of tropospheric Pb- and Zn-rich particles in the vicinity of a lead smelter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choël, M.; Deboudt, K.; Flament, P.; Lecornet, G.; Perdrix, E.; Sobanska, S.

    Dusts collected on air filters at a Pb-Zn refinery located in northern France were sampled in 1997, 1999 and 2002. The low temporal variability in major elements (Pb, Zn and S) abundances suggested chemical composition of particulate emissions was stable over time. In July 2001 and March 2002, atmospheric aerosols were sampled in the vicinity of the Pb-Zn refinery upwind and downwind from the smelters. Bulk concentrations of major elements (Al, Fe, Pb and Zn) and hydrosoluble ions (Na +, NH 4+, Mg 2+, K +, Ca 2+, Cl - NO 3- and SO 42-) were, respectively, determined by atomic absorption spectrometry and ion chromatography. Elemental and molecular individual particle analyses were, respectively, performed by automated SEM-EDX and Raman microspectrometry. Continental air masses (campaign 2001) were characterized by low Na + and high SO 42-, NO 3- and NH 4+ contents upwind from the smelters. Individual particle analysis of Pb- and Zn-rich airborne particles collected downwind from the refinery indicated elemental associations and molecular speciation were similar to those obtained at the emission: Pb compounds were mainly identified as oxides, sulfates and oxy-sulfates whereas Zn compounds were identified as sulfides. Marine air masses (campaign 2002) were characterized by high Na + contents upwind from the smelters. Individual particle analysis of Pb- and Zn-rich particles collected downwind from the refinery pointed out a systematic association with Na, not emitted by the refinery, suggesting internal mixing of marine aerosols with heavy-metals dusts emitted by the refinery. Such fast evolution of airborne particles chemical composition in the vicinity of the refinery was further proven by SEM-EDX and Raman microspectrometry mappings showing physical evolution by aggregation or coagulation of Zn- and Pb-rich particles with aged sea-salts.

  8. UV Attenuation Near Coral Reefs in the Florida Keys: Light Absorption by CDOM and Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shank, G. C.; Zepp, R. G.; Bartels, E.

    2005-12-01

    We have investigated the roles of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) and suspended particles in the attenuation of UV radiation in the middle and lower regions of the Florida Keys. Extended exposure to UV radiation, along with elevated sea surface temperatures, impairs physiological processes in corals and contributes to bleaching episodes. Corals in the Florida Keys experience large variations in UV exposure due to several factors including tidal exchange and fluctuating meteorological conditions. CDOM derived from mangroves and seagrass beds is the primary attenuator of UV radiation near coral reefs in our study area. CDOM accounts for more than 90 percent of the absorption of UVB irradiance (305 nm) throughout the region. However, we have determined using the quantitative filter technique that up to 25 percent of the downwelling UVA irradiance at 380 nm may be directly absorbed by suspended particles. Resuspension from within or near the reef structure appears to be the primary particle source as phytoplankton pigments typically comprise less than 20 percent of the particle UV absorption capacity near reef sampling sites. Our research also has implications for remote sensing applications as light absorbed by particles must be considered when modeling optical data from satellites. Although this work was reviewed by EPA and approved for publication, it may not necessarily reflect official Agency policy.

  9. Ultraviolet broadband light scattering for optically-trapped submicron-sized aerosol particles.

    PubMed

    David, Grégory; Esat, Kıvanç; Ritsch, Irina; Signorell, Ruth

    2016-02-21

    We describe a broadband light scattering setup for the characterization of size and refractive index of single submicron-to-micron sized aerosol particles. Individual particles are isolated in air by a quadruple Bessel beam optical trap or a counter-propagating optical tweezer. The use of very broadband radiation in the wavelength range from 320 to 700 nm covering the ultraviolet region allows to size submicron particles. We show that a broad wavelength range is required to determine the particle radius and the refractive index with an uncertainty of several nanometers and ∼ 0.01, respectively. The smallest particle radius that can be accurately determined lies around 300 nm. Wavelength-dependent refractive index data over a broad range are obtained, including the ultraviolet region where corresponding data are rare. Four different applications are discussed: (1) the sizing of submicron polystyrene latex spheres, (2) the evaporation of binary glycerol water droplets, (3) hydration/dehydration cycling of aqueous potassium carbonate droplets, and (4) photochemical reactions of oleic acid droplets. PMID:26863396

  10. Linear and Nonlinear Study of Fast Particle Excitation of Alfvén Eigemodes

    SciTech Connect

    Berk, H.L.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, C.Z.; Fu, G.Y.; Gorelenkov, N.N; Gorelenkova, M.V.; Nazikian, R.; White, R.B.

    1998-11-01

    Recent new results concerning toroidicity-induced Alfvén eigenmode (TAE) linear stability and nonlinear amplitude saturation and associated fast ion transport are presented for tokamaks, such as the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) and the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), using the numerical codes HINST, NOVA-K, and ORBIT.

  11. Fast fabrication of a novel transparent PMMA light scattering materials with high haze by doping with ordinary polymer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao; Xiong, Ying; Shen, Jiabin; Guo, Shaoyun

    2015-07-13

    Poly(methyl methacrylate)(PMMA)/poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) light scattering materials are fabricated by a simple, low-cost approach of melt blending and compression molding. We find that the competing effects of particle diameter versus number concentration of the scattering particles is the controlling factor to tailoring the optical properties of the materials, which is analyzed according to Mie scattering theory. The results show that the transmittance kept decreasing in the PET concentration range 0-10 wt% followed by a constant level in the range 10-20 wt%; however, the transmittance experienced a significant increase in the range 20-35 wt% and plateaued again after PET content exceeded 35 wt%. Therefore, the application of ordinary polymer dopant makes preparing light scattering sheets with high haze but not decreasing transmittance possible. PMID:26191841

  12. Fast, high-contrast imaging of animal development with scanned light sheet-based structured-illumination microscopy.

    PubMed

    Keller, Philipp J; Schmidt, Annette D; Santella, Anthony; Khairy, Khaled; Bao, Zhirong; Wittbrodt, Joachim; Stelzer, Ernst H K

    2010-08-01

    Recording light-microscopy images of large, nontransparent specimens, such as developing multicellular organisms, is complicated by decreased contrast resulting from light scattering. Early zebrafish development can be captured by standard light-sheet microscopy, but new imaging strategies are required to obtain high-quality data of late development or of less transparent organisms. We combined digital scanned laser light-sheet fluorescence microscopy with incoherent structured-illumination microscopy (DSLM-SI) and created structured-illumination patterns with continuously adjustable frequencies. Our method discriminates the specimen-related scattered background from signal fluorescence, thereby removing out-of-focus light and optimizing the contrast of in-focus structures. DSLM-SI provides rapid control of the illumination pattern, exceptional imaging quality and high imaging speeds. We performed long-term imaging of zebrafish development for 58 h and fast multiple-view imaging of early Drosophila melanogaster development. We reconstructed cell positions over time from the Drosophila DSLM-SI data and created a fly digital embryo. PMID:20601950

  13. Effects of ICRH on the Dynamics of Fast Particle Excited Alfven Eigenmodes

    SciTech Connect

    Bergkvist, T.; Hellsten, T.; Holmstroem, K.

    2007-09-28

    ICRH is often used in experiments to simulate destabilization of Alfven eigenmodes by thermonuclear {alpha}-particles. Whereas the slowing down distribution of {alpha}-particles is nearly isotropic, the ICRH creates an anisotropic distribution function with non-standard orbits. The ICRH does not only build up gradients in phase space, which destabilizes the AEs, but it also provides a strong phase decorrelation mechanism between ions and AEs. Renewal of the distribution function by thermonuclear reactions and losses of {alpha}-particles to the wall lead to a continuous drive of the AEs. Simulations of the non-linear dynamics of AEs and the impact they have on the heating profile due to particle redistribution are presented.

  14. Possible new light pulse expansors and compressors for the ICF fast ignition concept

    SciTech Connect

    Tournois, P.

    1995-12-31

    New kinds of optical diffraction dispersive devices which could be possible candidates for the Chirp Pulse Amplification technique used in the ICF Fast Ignition concept are proposed. These dispersive filters show linear group delay time dispersion versus frequency with either positive and negative slopes avoiding the necessity of slope inversion.

  15. CHANTI: a fast and efficient charged particle veto detector for the NA62 experiment at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambrosino, F.; Capussela, T.; Di Filippo, D.; Massarotti, P.; Mirra, M.; Napolitano, M.; Palladino, V.; Saracino, G.; Roscilli, L.; Vanzanella, A.; Corradi, G.; Tagnani, D.; Paglia, U.

    2016-03-01

    The design, construction and test of a charged particle detector made of scintillation counters read by Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPM) is described. The detector, which operates in vacuum and is used as a veto counter in the NA62 experiment at CERN, has a single channel time resolution of 1.14 ns, a spatial resolution of ~2.5 mm and an efficiency very close to 1 for penetrating charged particles.

  16. Particle size distributions from laboratory-scale biomass fires using fast response instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini, S.; Li, Q.; Cocker, D.; Weise, D.; Miller, A.; Shrivastava, M.; Miller, J. W.; Mahalingam, S.; Princevac, M.; Jung, H.

    2010-08-01

    Particle size distribution from biomass combustion is an important parameter as it affects air quality, climate modelling and health effects. To date, particle size distributions reported from prior studies vary not only due to difference in fuels but also difference in experimental conditions. This study aims to report characteristics of particle size distributions in well controlled repeatable lab scale biomass fires for southwestern United States fuels with focus on chaparral. The combustion laboratory at the United States Department of Agriculture-Forest Service's Fire Science Laboratory (USDA-FSL), Missoula, MT provided a repeatable combustion and dilution environment ideal for measurements. For a variety of fuels tested the major mode of particle size distribution was in the range of 29 to 52 nm, which is attributable to dilution of the fresh smoke. Comparing mass size distribution from FMPS and APS measurement 51-68% of particle mass was attributable to the particles ranging from 0.5 to 10 μm for PM10. Geometric mean diameter rapidly increased during flaming and gradually decreased during mixed and smoldering phase combustion. Most fuels produced a unimodal distribution during flaming phase and strong biomodal distribution during smoldering phase. The mode of combustion (flaming, mixed and smoldering) could be better distinguished using the slopes in MCE (Modified Combustion Efficiency) vs. geometric mean diameter than only using MCE values.

  17. The Fast Declining Type Ia Supernova 2003gs, and Evidence for a Significant Dispersion in Near-Infrared Absolute Magnitudes of Fast Decliners at Maximum Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krisciunas, Kevin; Marion, G. H.; Suntzeff, Nicholas B.; Blanc, Guillaume; Bufano, Filomena; Candia, Pablo; Cartier, Regis; Elias-Rosa, Nancy; Espinoza, Juan; Gonzalez, David; Gonzalez, Luis; Gonzalez, Sergio; Gooding, Samuel D.; Hamuy, Mario; Knox, Ethan A.; Milne, Peter A.; Morrell, Nidia; Phillips, Mark M.; Stritzinger, Maximilian; Thomas-Osip, Joanna

    2009-12-01

    We obtained optical photometry of SN 2003gs on 49 nights, from 2 to 494 days after T(B max). We also obtained near-IR photometry on 21 nights. SN 2003gs was the first fast declining Type Ia SN that has been well observed since SN 1999by. While it was subluminous in optical bands compared to more slowly declining Type Ia SNe, it was not subluminous at maximum light in the near-IR bands. There appears to be a bimodal distribution in the near-IR absolute magnitudes of Type Ia SNe at maximum light. Those that peak in the near-IR after T(B max) are subluminous in the all bands. Those that peak in the near-IR prior to T(B max), such as SN 2003gs, have effectively the same near-IR absolute magnitudes at maximum light regardless of the decline rate Δm 15(B). Near-IR spectral evidence suggests that opacities in the outer layers of SN 2003gs are reduced much earlier than for normal Type Ia SNe. That may allow γ rays that power the luminosity to escape more rapidly and accelerate the decline rate. This conclusion is consistent with the photometric behavior of SN 2003gs in the IR, which indicates a faster than normal decline from approximately normal peak brightness. Based in part on observations taken at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, National Optical Astronomy Observatories, which are operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc. (AURA) under cooperative agreement with the National Science Foundation. The near-IR photometry from La Silla and Paranal was obtained by the European Supernova Collaboration (ESC).

  18. Slow and Fast Light in Room Temperature Solids: Fundamentals and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, Robert W.

    2004-03-01

    In recent years there has been great interest in techniques that can lead to a modification of the propagation velocity of light pulses through optical materials. Interest stems both from the intrinsic interest in the ability to control the velocity of light over large ranges and from the potential for applications such as controllable delay lines, optical data storage devices, optical memories, and devices for quantum information. Matthew Bigelow, Nick Lepeshkin, and I have recently developed a new method for achieving ultra-slow light propagation in room temperature solids. Our method makes use of an effect known as coherent population oscillations. In particular, we apply pump and probe fields to a ruby crystal, and the population of ground-state chromium ions is induced to oscillate coherently at the resulting beat frequency. These oscillations lead to a decreased absorption of the probe beam, and consequently (by the Kramers-Kronig relations) to a steep variation of the refractive index. In our laboratory studies of this effect, we observed reduced light velocities with light speeds as low as 57 m/s. We have also studied light propagation in the reverse saturable absorber alexandrite. In this case, the sign of the effect is inverted, leading to superluminal (but causal) light propagation.

  19. Smectic A Filled Birefringent Elements and Fast Switching Twisted Dual Frequency Nematic Cells Used for Digital Light Deflection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pishnyak, Oleg; Golovin, Andrii; Kreminskia, Liubov; Pouch, John J.; Miranda, Felix A.; Winker, Bruce K.; Lavrentovich, Oleg D.

    2006-01-01

    We describe the application of smectic A (SmA) liquid crystals for beam deflection. SmA materials can be used in digital beam deflectors (DBDs) as fillers for passive birefringent prisms. SmA prisms have high birefringence and can be constructed in a variety of shapes, including single prisms and prismatic blazed gratings of different angles and profiles. We address the challenges of uniform alignment of SmA, such as elimination of focal conic domains. Fast rotation of the incident light polarization in DBDs is achieved by an electrically switched 90 twisted nematic (TN) cell.

  20. The role of input chirp on phase shifters based on slow and fast light effects in semiconductor optical amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Xue, Weiqi; Chen, Yaohui; Ohman, Filip; Mørk, Jesper

    2009-02-01

    We experimentally investigate the initial chirp dependence of slow and fast light effects in a semiconductor optical amplifier followed by an optical filter. It is shown that the enhancement of the phase shift due to optical filtering strongly depends on the chirp of the input optical signal. We demonstrate approximately 120 degrees phase delay as well as approximately 170 degrees phase advance at a microwave frequency of 19 GHz for different optimum values of the input chirp. The experimental results are shown to be in good agreement with numerical results based on a four-wave mixing model. Finally, a simple physical explanation based on an analytical perturbative approach is presented. PMID:19188968

  1. Tunable phase control of slow and fast light propagation in a slab doped by four-level quantum dot nanostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jafarzadeh, Hossein; Sangachin, Elnaz Ahmadi; Asadpour, Seyyed Hossein

    2015-12-01

    Tunable phase control of the slow and fast light propagation through a defect slab medium doped by four-level InGaN/GaN quantum dot structure is demonstrated. By solving the Schrödinger and Poisson’s equations self-consistently, a spherical InGaN quantum dot with GaN barrier shell which can interact by terahertz (THz) signal field is designed numerically. It is found that the phase variation of THz signal field imparts the tunability in the group velocity of the transmitted and reflected pulses through a dielectric slab.

  2. Investigation of unburned carbon particles in fly ash by means of laser light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iannone, R. Q.; Morlacchi, R.; Calabria, R.; Massoli, P.

    2011-02-01

    A new optical method to determine the percentage of unburned carbon particles in fly ash from combustion of pulverized coal has been developed. The technique exploits the different properties of particles of ash and coal in the elastic scattering of polarized light. The polarization measurements were performed using a linearly polarized laser source and a receiving system able to simultaneously detect the scattered radiation polarized in parallel and orthogonal planes, under the scattering angle of 60°. The parallel and perpendicular components of the scattered light intensities are measured in order to determine the polarization ratio. The operation of the system was tested under various conditions using monodisperse glass spheres. The performance of the novel device was assessed in several sets of measurements with samples of fly ash produced from coal fired power plants. A correlation between the relative content of coal and ashes and the polarization ratio of scattered light was demonstrated. The resulting polarization ratio showed values ranging from 1.25 to 0.94 for a carbon content of 1.17 wt% and 16.3 wt%, respectively. The uncertainty on the measured percentage of unburned carbon was about 1%. The proposed device represents an attractive tool for monitoring real-time burnout and combustion efficiency.

  3. Large dynamic light-matter entanglement from driving neither too fast nor too slow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acevedo, O. L.; Quiroga, L.; Rodríguez, F. J.; Johnson, N. F.

    2015-09-01

    A significant problem facing next-generation quantum technologies is how to generate and manipulate macroscopic entanglement in light and matter systems. Here we report a regime of dynamical light-matter behavior in which a giant, system-wide entanglement is generated by varying the light-matter coupling at intermediate velocities. This enhancement is far larger, broader ranged, and more experimentally accessible than that occurring near the quantum phase transition of the same model under adiabatic conditions. By appropriate choices of the coupling within this intermediate regime, the enhanced entanglement can be made to spread system-wide or to reside in each subsystem separately.

  4. Optical Filters to Exclude Non-Doppler-Shifted Light in Fast Velocimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Goosman, D; Avara, G; Wade, J; Rivera, A

    2002-06-19

    We have used optical velocimetry for 25 years at LLNL to measure velocity-time histories of many dynamic experiments. In certain ones, the shifted light was often quite weak compared to non-shifted light returning from surfaces and imperfections in glass components. In an intensity-measuring VISAR system, this would mean failure, and even with Fabry-Perot (FP) based systems which handle multiple frequencies, data is lost where the fringes coincide. We designed, constructed and successfully used an experimental facility for doing experiments under such conditions by selectively eliminating most of the non-shifted light. Instead of making experimental records which were mostly non-shifted light prior to the use of the filter, we now obtain records where almost all of the light is shifted. The first system had a maximum efficiency of 25% for the desired light, but another version is under construction with a maximum efficiency of over 50%. The first version excluded the non-shifted light by a factor of 300 when manually tuned, and by 150 when run in a Window-based auto-tuning mode. Our first version used a 50 mm diameter FP as the filter with a spacing of 1.65 mm and reflectivities of 77%. It was constructed for use in one of our 5-beam velocimeters. Rather than using five separate filters, we multiplexed all five records so that the desired light would reflect from the filter FPl and image onto separate fibers. These five output fibers then fed our standard tau-table with 5 cameras as described in our report for the 1996 HSPC in Santa Fe, USA. One use of the filter system involved embedding optical fibers in long sections of explosives to make continuous detonation velocity-time histories. To date we have recently carried out 6 tests with this new facility, and two prior ones without. Explosive safety required that four shutters be used to assure that no significant light could illuminate the explosive from the end of the embedded fiber when personnel were close. An

  5. The EB factory project. I. A fast, neural-net-based, general purpose light curve classifier optimized for eclipsing binaries

    SciTech Connect

    Paegert, Martin; Stassun, Keivan G.; Burger, Dan M.

    2014-08-01

    We describe a new neural-net-based light curve classifier and provide it with documentation as a ready-to-use tool for the community. While optimized for identification and classification of eclipsing binary stars, the classifier is general purpose, and has been developed for speed in the context of upcoming massive surveys such as the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope. A challenge for classifiers in the context of neural-net training and massive data sets is to minimize the number of parameters required to describe each light curve. We show that a simple and fast geometric representation that encodes the overall light curve shape, together with a chi-square parameter to capture higher-order morphology information results in efficient yet robust light curve classification, especially for eclipsing binaries. Testing the classifier on the ASAS light curve database, we achieve a retrieval rate of 98% and a false-positive rate of 2% for eclipsing binaries. We achieve similarly high retrieval rates for most other periodic variable-star classes, including RR Lyrae, Mira, and delta Scuti. However, the classifier currently has difficulty discriminating between different sub-classes of eclipsing binaries, and suffers a relatively low (∼60%) retrieval rate for multi-mode delta Cepheid stars. We find that it is imperative to train the classifier's neural network with exemplars that include the full range of light curve quality to which the classifier will be expected to perform; the classifier performs well on noisy light curves only when trained with noisy exemplars. The classifier source code, ancillary programs, a trained neural net, and a guide for use, are provided.

  6. The EB Factory Project. I. A Fast, Neural-net-based, General Purpose Light Curve Classifier Optimized for Eclipsing Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paegert, Martin; Stassun, Keivan G.; Burger, Dan M.

    2014-08-01

    We describe a new neural-net-based light curve classifier and provide it with documentation as a ready-to-use tool for the community. While optimized for identification and classification of eclipsing binary stars, the classifier is general purpose, and has been developed for speed in the context of upcoming massive surveys such as the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope. A challenge for classifiers in the context of neural-net training and massive data sets is to minimize the number of parameters required to describe each light curve. We show that a simple and fast geometric representation that encodes the overall light curve shape, together with a chi-square parameter to capture higher-order morphology information results in efficient yet robust light curve classification, especially for eclipsing binaries. Testing the classifier on the ASAS light curve database, we achieve a retrieval rate of 98% and a false-positive rate of 2% for eclipsing binaries. We achieve similarly high retrieval rates for most other periodic variable-star classes, including RR Lyrae, Mira, and delta Scuti. However, the classifier currently has difficulty discriminating between different sub-classes of eclipsing binaries, and suffers a relatively low (~60%) retrieval rate for multi-mode delta Cepheid stars. We find that it is imperative to train the classifier's neural network with exemplars that include the full range of light curve quality to which the classifier will be expected to perform; the classifier performs well on noisy light curves only when trained with noisy exemplars. The classifier source code, ancillary programs, a trained neural net, and a guide for use, are provided.

  7. Development of a radiation-hardened SRAM with EDAC algorithm for fast readout CMOS pixel sensors for charged particle tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, X.; Li, B.; Chen, N.; Wang, J.; Zheng, R.; Gao, W.; Wei, T.; Gao, D.; Hu, Y.

    2014-08-01

    CMOS pixel sensors (CPS) are attractive for use in the innermost particle detectors for charged particle tracking due to their good trade-off between spatial resolution, material budget, radiation hardness, and readout speed. With the requirements of high readout speed and high radiation hardness to total ionizing dose (TID) for particle tracking, fast readout CPS are composed by integrating a data compression block and two SRAM IP cores. However, the radiation hardness of the SRAM IP cores is not as high as that of the other parts in CPS, and thus the radiation hardness of the whole CPS chip is lowered. Especially, when CPS are migrated into 0.18-μm processes, the single event upset (SEU) effects should be also considered besides TID and single event latchup (SEL) effects. This paper presents a radiation-hardened SRAM with enhanced radiation hardness to SEU. An error detection and correction (EDAC) algorithm and a bit-interleaving storage strategy are adopted in the design. The prototype design has been fabricated in a 0.18-μm process. The area of the new SRAM is increased 1.6 times as compared with a non-radiation-hardened SRAM due to the integration of EDAC algorithm and the adoption of radiation hardened layout. The access time is increased from 5 ns to 8 ns due to the integration of EDAC algorithm. The test results indicate that the design satisfy requirements of CPS for charged particle tracking.

  8. Plasma produced by impacts of fast dust particles on a thin film

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Auer, Siegfried

    1994-01-01

    The thin-film impact plasma detector was pioneered by Berg for detecting small cosmic dust particles and measuring their approximate velocities in a time-of-flight configuration. While Berg's device was highly successful in establishing the flux of interplanetary dust, the accuracy of measuring the velocities of individual particles was a moderate 18 percent in magnitude and 27 degrees in angle. A much greater accuracy of less than or equal to 1 percent in determining the velocity components appears desirable in order to associate a particle with its parent body. In order to meet that need, research was initiated to determine if a thin-film detector can be designed to provide such accurate velocity measurements. Previous laboratory investigations of the impact plasma uncovered two difficulties: (1) solid or liquid spray is ejected from a primary impact crater and strikes neighboring walls where it produces secondary impact craters and plasma clouds; as a result, both quantity and time of detection of the plasma can vary significantly with the experiment configuration. Particles from an accelerator rarely have speeds v greater than or equal to 10-15 km/s, while cosmic dust particles typically impact at v = 10-72 km/s. The purpose of the tests discussed in this paper was to resolve the two difficulties mentioned. That is, the experiment configuration was designed to reduce the contribution of plasma from secondary impacts. In addition, most particles with v less than or equal to 25 km/s and all particles with v less than or equal to 10 km/s were eliminated from the beam.

  9. A fast large dynamic range shaping amplifier for particle detector front-end

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivetti, Angelo; Delaurenti, Paolo

    2007-03-01

    The paper describes a fast shaping amplifier with rail-to-rail output swing. The circuit is based on a CMOS operational amplifier with a class AB output stage. A baseline holder, incorporating a closed-loop unity gain buffer with slew rate limitation, performs the AC coupling with the preamplifier and guarantees a baseline shift smaller than 3 mV for unipolar output pulses of 3 V and 10 MHz rate.

  10. Fast particle generation and energy transport in laser-solid interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zepf, Matthew

    2000-10-01

    The generation and propagation of fast electrons is a topic of intense research not least due to its relevance to the Fast Ignitor Scheme [1, 2, 3]. More recently a lot of attention has also focused on the production of highly energetic protons [3,4, 5] which are observed at the rear of the target. Apart from a possible role in a modified Fast Ignitor scenario these are also of interest for generating radioactive isotopes via nuclear reactions and as a probe. We present results from a recent experimental campaign using the Vulcan (70 TW) laser at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory. Using innovative nuclear activation techniques and CR-39 track detectors, the angular and energy distribution of the protons for a range of different targets and intensities has been measured. Various electron acceleration mechanisms are known, both in the underdense region and at the critical density surface. It is vital to understand their interplay in these complex interactions. The subsequent propagation of the electron beams through the overdense plasma is also of great importance. Since the currents generated far exceed the Alfven limit, the fast electron current needs to be almost perfectly compensated. The transport and energy deposition is therefore expected to be dominated by collective effects rather than the single electron scattering stopping range. We will show recent results showing the dependence of electron beam directionality, generation mechanism and energy deposition on a range of laser parameters. [1] M. Tabak et al., Phys. Plasmas 1, pp.1626 (1994) [2] M. Santala et al., Phys. Rev. Lett 84, pp. 1459 (2000) [3] Hatchett et al., Phys. Plasmas 7, pp. 2076 (2000) [4] E. Clark et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 84, pp. 670 (2000) [5] A. Maksimchuk et al. Phys, Rev. Lett 84, pp. 4108 (2000)

  11. Optical Filters to Exclude Non-Doppler-Shifted Light in Fast Velocimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Goosman, D; Avara, G; Wade, J; Rivera, A

    2002-08-22

    We frequently measure velocity-time histories of dynamic experiments. In some, the Doppler-shifted light is often weak compared to non-shifted light reflected from stationary surfaces and imperfections in components. With our Fabry-Perot (FP) based systems which handle multiple frequencies, data is lost where the fringes coincide; if we had used an intensity-measuring VISAR system, it would probably fail. We designed a facility for doing experiments under such conditions by selectively eliminating most of the non-shifted light. Our first filter excluded non-shifted light by a factor of 300 when manually tuned, and by 150 when run in an auto-tuning mode. It used a single 50 mm diameter FP as the filter with a spacing of 1.65 mm and reflectivities of 77%, and filters five channels prior to use in one of our 5-beam velocimeters. One use of the filter system was to embed optical fibers in long sections of explosives to make continuous detonation velocity-time histories. We have carried out many such tests with this filter, and two without. A special single-beam filter was constructed with a 40% efficiency for shifted light that rejected non-shifted light by 4 million times, with a bandpass of a few GHz.

  12. FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION: 'Evaporation' of a flavor-mixed particle from a gravitational potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medvedev, Mikhail V.

    2010-09-01

    We demonstrate that a stable particle with flavor mixing, confined in a gravitational potential can gradually and irreversibly escape—or 'evaporate'—from it. This effect is due to mass eigenstate conversions which occur in interactions (scattering) of mass states with other particles even when the energy exchange between them is vanishing. The evaporation and conversion are quantum effects not related to flavor oscillations, particle decay, quantum tunneling or other well-known processes. Apart from their profound academic interest, these effects should have tremendous implications for cosmology, e.g., (1) the cosmic neutrino background distortion is predicted and (2) the softening of central cusps in dark matter halos and smearing out or destruction of dwarf halos were suggested.

  13. Calculation of energy relaxation rates of fast particles by phonons in crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Prange, Micah P.; Campbell, Luke W.; Wu, Dangxin; Gao, Fei; Kerisit, Sebastien N.

    2015-03-01

    We present ab initio calculations of the temperature-dependent exchange of energy between a classical charged point-particle and the phonons of a crystalline material. The phonons, which are computed using density functional perturbation theory (DFPT) methods, interact with the mov- ing particle via the Coulomb interaction between the density induced in the material by phonon excitation and the charge of the classical particle. Energy relaxation rates are computed using time- dependent perturbation theory. The method, which is applicable wherever DFPT is, is illustrated with results for CsI, an important scintillator whose performance is affected by electron thermal- ization. We discuss the influence of the form assumed for quasiparticle dispersion on theoretical estimates of electron cooling rates.

  14. Light obscuration measurements of highly viscous solutions: sample pressurization overcomes underestimation of subvisible particle counts.

    PubMed

    Weinbuch, Daniel; Jiskoot, Wim; Hawe, Andrea

    2014-09-01

    Light obscuration (LO) is the current standard technique for subvisible particle analysis in the quality control of parenterally administered drugs, including therapeutic proteins. Some of those, however, exhibit high viscosities due to high protein concentrations, which can lead to false results by LO measurements. In this study, we show that elevated sample viscosities, from about 9 cP, lead to an underestimation of subvisible particle concentrations, which is easily overlooked when considering reported data alone. We evaluated a solution to this problem, which is the application of sample pressurization during analysis. The results show that this is an elegant way to restore the reliability of LO analysis of highly viscous products without the necessity of additional sample preparation. PMID:24934297

  15. Measurement of Leading Particle Effects in Decays of Z0 Bosons into Light Flavors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, K.; Abe, K.; Akagi, T.; Allen, N. J.; Ash, W. W.; Aston, D.; Baird, K. G.; Baltay, C.; Band, H. R.; Barakat, M. B.; Baranko, G.; Bardon, O.; Barklow, T.; Bashindzhagyan, G. L.; Bazarko, A. O.; Ben-David, R.; Benvenuti, A. C.; Bilei, G. M.; Bisello, D.; Blaylock, G.; Bogart, J. R.; Bolen, B.; Bolton, T.; Bower, G. R.; Brau, J. E.; Breidenbach, M.; Bugg, W. M.; Burke, D.; Burnett, T. H.; Burrows, P. N.; Busza, W.; Calcaterra, A.; Caldwell, D. O.; Calloway, D.; Camanzi, B.; Carpinelli, M.; Cassell, R.; Castaldi, R.; Castro, A.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Chou, A.; Church, E.; Cohn, H. O.; Coller, J. A.; Cook, V.; Cotton, R.; Cowan, R. F.; Coyne, D. G.; Crawford, G.; D'Oliveira, A.; Damerell, C. J.; Daoudi, M.; de Sangro, R.; dell'Orso, R.; Dervan, P. J.; Dima, M.; Dong, D. N.; Du, P. Y.; Dubois, R.; Eisenstein, B. I.; Elia, R.; Etzion, E.; Fahey, S.; Falciai, D.; Fan, C.; Fernandez, J. P.; Fero, M. J.; Frey, R.; Furuno, K.; Gillman, T.; Gladding, G.; Gonzalez, S.; Hart, E. L.; Harton, J. L.; Hasan, A.; Hasegawa, Y.; Hasuko, K.; Hedges, S.; Hertzbach, S. S.; Hildreth, M. D.; Huber, J.; Huffer, M. E.; Hughes, E. W.; Hwang, H.; Iwasaki, Y.; Jackson, D. J.; Jacques, P.; Jaros, J.; Johnson, A. S.; Johnson, J. R.; Johnson, R. A.; Junk, T.; Kajikawa, R.; Kalelkar, M.; Kang, H. J.; Karliner, I.; Kawahara, H.; Kendall, H. W.; Kim, Y.; King, M. E.; King, R.; Kofler, R. R.; Krishna, N. M.; Kroeger, R. S.; Labs, J. F.; Langston, M.; Lath, A.; Lauber, J. A.; Leith, D. W.; Lia, V.; Liu, M. X.; Liu, X.; Loreti, M.; Lu, A.; Lynch, H. L.; Ma, J.; Mancinelli, G.; Manly, S.; Mantovani, G.; Markiewicz, T. W.; Maruyama, T.; Masuda, H.; Mazzucato, E.; McKemey, A. K.; Meadows, B. T.; Messner, R.; Mockett, P. M.; Moffeit, K. C.; Moore, T. B.; Muller, D.; Nagamine, T.; Narita, S.; Nauenberg, U.; Neal, H.; Nussbaum, M.; Ohnishi, Y.; Onoprienko, D.; Osborne, L. S.; Panvini, R. S.; Park, C. H.; Park, H.; Pavel, T. J.; Peruzzi, I.; Piccolo, M.; Piemontese, L.; Pieroni, E.; Pitts, K. T.; Plano, R. J.; Prepost, R.; Prescott, C. Y.; Punkar, G. D.; Quigley, J.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Reeves, T. W.; Reidy, J.; Reinertsen, P. L.; Rensing, P. E.; Rochester, L. S.; Rowson, P. C.; Russell, J. J.; Saxton, O. H.; Schalk, T.; Schindler, R. H.; Schumm, B. A.; Schwiening, J.; Sen, S.; Serbo, V. V.; Shaevitz, M. H.; Shank, J. T.; Shapiro, G.; Sherden, D. J.; Shmakov, K. D.; Simopoulos, C.; Sinev, N. B.; Smith, S. R.; Smy, M. B.; Snyder, J. A.; Stamer, P.; Steiner, H.; Steiner, R.; Strauss, M. G.; Su, D.; Suekane, F.; Sugiyama, A.; Suzuki, S.; Swartz, M.; Szumilo, A.; Takahashi, T.; Taylor, F. E.; Torrence, E.; Trandafir, A. I.; Turk, J. D.; Usher, T.; Va'Vra, J.; Vannini, C.; Vella, E.; Venuti, J. P.; Verdier, R.; Verdini, P. G.; Wagner, D. L.; Wagner, S. R.; Waite, A. P.; Watts, S. J.; Weidemann, A. W.; Weiss, E. R.; Whitaker, J. S.; White, S. L.; Wickens, F. J.; Williams, D. A.; Williams, D. C.; Williams, S. H.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, R. J.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Woods, M.; Word, G. B.; Wyss, J.; Yamamoto, R. K.; Yamartino, J. M.; Yang, X.; Yashima, J.; Yellin, S. J.; Young, C. C.; Yuta, H.; Zapalac, G.; Zdarko, R. W.; Zhou, J.

    1997-05-01

    We present evidence for leading particle production in hadronic decays of the Z0 boson to light-flavor jets. A polarized electron beam was used to tag quark and antiquark jets, and a vertex detector was employed to reject heavy-flavor events. Charged hadrons were identified with a Cherenkov ring imaging detector. In the quark jets, more high-momentum p, Λ, K-, and K¯*0 were observed than their antiparticles, and vice versa for antiquark jets, providing direct evidence that the higher-momentum particles in jets are more likely to carry the primary quark or antiquark from the Z0 decay, and that ss¯ production is suppressed in fragmentation.

  16. Fast and efficient particle reconstruction on a 3D grid using sparsity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornic, P.; Champagnat, F.; Cheminet, A.; Leclaire, B.; Le Besnerais, G.

    2015-03-01

    We propose an approach for efficient localization and intensity reconstruction of particles on a 3D grid based on sparsity principles. The computational complexity of the method is limited by using the particle volume reconstruction paradigm (Champagnat et al. in Meas Sci Technol 25, 2014) and a reduction in the problem dimension. Tests on synthetic and experimental data show that the proposed method leads to more efficient detections and to reconstructions of higher quality than classical tomoPIV approaches on a large range of seeding densities, up to ppp ≈ 0.12.

  17. Fast acoustic tweezers for the two-dimensional manipulation of individual particles in microfluidic channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, S. B. Q.; Marmottant, P.; Thibault, P.

    2012-09-01

    This paper presents a microfluidic device that implements standing surface acoustic waves in order to handle single cells, droplets, and generally particles. The particles are moved in a very controlled manner by the two-dimensional drifting of a standing wave array, using a slight frequency modulation of two ultrasound emitters around their resonance. These acoustic tweezers allow any type of motion at velocities up to few ×10 mm/s, while the device transparency is adapted for optical studies. The possibility of automation provides a critical step in the development of lab-on-a-chip cell sorters and it should find applications in biology, chemistry, and engineering domains.

  18. SU-E-T-334: Track Structure Simulations of Charged Particles at Low and Intermediate Energies: Cross Sections Needs for Light and Heavy Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Dingfelder, M

    2014-06-01

    Purpose/Methods: Monte Carlo (MC) track structure simulations follow the primary as well as all produced secondary particles in an event-by-event manner, from starting or ejection energy down to total stopping. They provide useful information on physics and chemistry of the biological response to radiation. They depend on reliable interaction cross sections and transport models of the considered radiation quality with biologically relevant materials. Most transport models focus on sufficiently fast and bare (i.e., fully ionized) ions and cross sections calculated within the (relativistic) first Born or Bethe approximations. These theories consider the projectile as a point particle and rely on proton cross sections and simple charge-scaling methods; they neglect the atomic nature of the ion and break down at low and intermediate ion energies. Heavier ions are used in particle therapy and slow to intermediate and low energies in the biologically interesting Bragg peak. Lighter and slower fragment ions, including alpha particles, protons, and neutrons are also produced in nuclear and break up reactions of charged particles. Secondary neutrons also produce recoil protons and ions, mainly in the intermediate energy range. Results/Conclusion: This work reviews existing models for track structure simulations and cross section calculations for light and heavy ions focusing on the low and intermediate energy range. It also presents new and updated aspects on cross section calculations and simulation techniques for ions and discusses the need for new models, calculations, and experimental data.

  19. Determination of particle-size distributions from light-scattering measurement using Lucy-Richardson algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Fugui; Wang, Anting; Dong, Lei; Ming, Hai

    2013-04-01

    A classical iterative Lucy-Richardson (LR) inversion algorithm used for recovering particle-size distributions (PSD) from light-scattering data is proposed. The convergence of iteration is validated in the numerical simulation for three different distributions: the gamma, the log-normal, and the Rosin-Rammler. The accuracy of the inversion is checked graphically against the exact distribution with good results, even for the synthesized intensity data of a signal-noise-ratio smaller than 20 dB. Finally, an experiment with linear charge coupled device as the detector is carried out, and the PSD is recovered successfully by the LR inversion method.

  20. Polarimetric Studies of Solar Light Scattered by Interplanetary Dust Particles and the Eye-Sat Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levasseur-Regourd, A. C.; Lasue, J.

    2014-12-01

    Studying intensity and linear polarization of the solar light scattered by interplanetary dust is of interest for various reasons. This so-called zodiacal light constitutes a faint polarized glow that constitutes a changing foreground for observations of faint extended astronomical sources. Besides, analysis of its polarization provides information on properties of the dust particles, such as spatial density, morphology and complex refractive index. Previous observations, mostly from the Earth and with a resolution in the 10° range, have been used to infer that the local polarization at 90° phase angle increases with increasing solar distance. Numerical simulations suggest that, in the inner solar system, interplanetary dust particles consist of a mixture of absorbing and less absorbing materials, and that radial changes originate in a decrease of organic materials with decreasing solar distance under alteration or evaporation processes. To improve the quality of data on zodiacal light polarimetry, Eye-Sat nanosat is being developed in the context of the JANUS CNES cubesats program for students. The project is now in phase C-D, for a piggy-back launch in 2016. Eye-Sat triple cubesat is anticipated to demonstrate the feasibility of a series of new on-board technologies. Moreover, during its one-year mission, zodiacal light intensity and polarization are to be measured, for the first time with a spatial resolution of about 1° over a wide portion of the sky and in four different wavelengths (visible to near-IR), leading to a better assessment of interplanetary dust properties. Finally, a significant fraction of the interplanetary dust is estimated to come from comets, the most pristine objects to be found in the inner solar system. While similarities have indeed been noticed between polarimetric properties of interplanetary and cometary dust particles, the latter being currently extensively documented by the Rosetta mission to comet 67P

  1. Scattering of light by large nonspherical particles: ray-tracing approximation versus T-matrix method.

    PubMed

    Macke, A; Mishchenko, M I; Muinonen, K; Carlson, B E

    1995-10-01

    We report, for the f irst time to our knowledge, comparisons of light-scattering computations for large, randomly oriented, moderately absorbing spheroids based on the geometric-optics approximation and the exact T-matrix method. We show that in most cases the geometric-optics approximation is (much) more accurate for spheroids than for surface-equivalent spheres and can be used in phase function computations (but not in polarization computations) for nonspherical particles with size parameters as small as 60. Differences in the single-scattering albedo between geometric-optics and T-matrix results are surprisingly small, even for small size parameters. PMID:19862208

  2. Gravitational deflection of light and massive particles by a moving Kerr-Newman black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Guansheng; Lin, Wenbin

    2016-05-01

    The gravitational deflection of test particles including light, due to a radially moving Kerr-Newman (KN) black hole with an arbitrary constant velocity that is perpendicular to its angular momentum, is investigated. In harmonic coordinates, we derive the second post-Minkowskian (2PM) equations of motion for test particles, and solve them by high-accuracy numerical calculations. We then concentrate on discussing the kinematical corrections caused by the motion of the gravitational source to second-order deflection. The analytical formula of the light-deflection angle up to the second order by a moving lens is obtained. For a massive particle moving with a relativistic velocity, there are two different analytical results for the Schwarzschild deflection angle up to the second order reported in the previous works, i.e. α (w)=2≤ft(1+\\tfrac{1}{{w}2}\\right)\\tfrac{M}{b}+3π ≤ft(\\tfrac{1}{4}+\\tfrac{1}{{w}2}\\right)\\tfrac{{M}2}{{b}2} and α (w)=2≤ft(1+\\tfrac{1}{{w}2}\\right)\\tfrac{M}{b}+≤ft[3π ≤ft(\\tfrac{1}{4}+\\tfrac{1}{{w}2}\\right)+2≤ft(1-\\tfrac{1}{{w}4}\\right)\\right]\\tfrac{{M}2}{{b}2}, where M, b, and w are the mass of the lens, the impact parameter, and the particle’s initial velocity, respectively. Our numerical result is in perfect agreement with the former result. Furthermore, the analytical formula for massive particle deflection up to the second order in the Kerr geometry is achieved. Finally, the possibilities of detecting the motion effects on the second-order deflection are also analyzed.

  3. Fast Pb-glass neutron-to-light converter for ICF (inertial confinement fusion) target burn history measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Lerche, R.A.; Cable, M.D.; Phillion, D.W.

    1990-09-01

    We are developing a streak camera based instrument to diagnose the fusion reaction rate (burn history) within laser-driven ICF targets filled with D-T fuel. Recently, we attempted measurements using the 16.7-MeV gamma ray emitted in the T(d,{gamma}){sup 5}He fusion reaction. Pb glass which has a large cross section for pair production acts as a gamma-ray-to-light converter. Gamma rays interact within the glass to form electron-positron pairs that produce large amounts (1000 photons/gamma ray) of prompt (<10 ps) Cerenkov light as they slow down. In our experimental instrument, an f/10 Cassegrain telescope optically couples light produced within the converter to a streak camera having 20-ps resolution. Experiments using high-yield (10{sup 13} D-T neutrons), direct-drive targets at Nova produced good signals with widths of 200 ps. Time-of-flight measurements show the signals to be induced by neutrons rather than gamma rays. The Pb glass appears to act as a fast neutron-to-light converter. We continue to study the interactions process and the possibility of using the 16.7-MeV gamma rays for burn time measurements.

  4. Modeling Filamentous Cyanobacteria Reveals the Advantages of Long and Fast Trichomes for Optimizing Light Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Tamulonis, Carlos; Postma, Marten; Kaandorp, Jaap

    2011-01-01

    Cyanobacteria form a very large and diverse phylum of prokaryotes that perform oxygenic photosynthesis. Many species of cyanobacteria live colonially in long trichomes of hundreds to thousands of cells. Of the filamentous species, many are also motile, gliding along their long axis, and display photomovement, by which a trichome modulates its gliding according to the incident light. The latter has been found to play an important role in guiding the trichomes to optimal lighting conditions, which can either inhibit the cells if the incident light is too weak, or damage the cells if too strong. We have developed a computational model for gliding filamentous photophobic cyanobacteria that allows us to perform simulations on the scale of a Petri dish using over 105 individual trichomes. Using the model, we quantify the effectiveness of one commonly observed photomovement strategy—photophobic responses—in distributing large populations of trichomes optimally over a light field. The model predicts that the typical observed length and gliding speeds of filamentous cyanobacteria are optimal for the photophobic strategy. Therefore, our results suggest that not just photomovement but also the trichome shape itself improves the ability of the cyanobacteria to optimize their light exposure. PMID:21789215

  5. Fast-particle-driven Alfvénic modes in a reversed field pinch.

    PubMed

    Koliner, J J; Forest, C B; Sarff, J S; Anderson, J K; Liu, D; Nornberg, M D; Waksman, J; Lin, L; Brower, D L; Ding, W X; Spong, D A

    2012-09-14

    Alfvénic modes are observed due to neutral beam injection for the first time in a reversed field pinch plasma. Modeling of the beam deposition and slowing down shows that the velocity and radial localization are high. This allows instability drive from inverse Landau damping of a bump-on-tail in the parallel distribution function or from free energy in the fast ion density gradient. Mode switching from a lower frequency toroidal mode number n=5 mode that scales with beam injection velocity to a higher frequency n=4 mode with Alfvénic scaling is observed. PMID:23005639

  6. Modelling neutral beams in fusion devices: Beamlet-based model for fast particle simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asunta, O.; Govenius, J.; Budny, R.; Gorelenkova, M.; Tardini, G.; Kurki-Suonio, T.; Salmi, A.; Sipilä, S.

    2015-03-01

    Neutral beam injection (NBI) will be one of the main sources of heating and non-inductive current drive in ITER. Due to high level of injected power the beam induced heat loads present a potential threat to the integrity of the first wall of the device, particularly in the presence of non-axisymmetric perturbations of the magnetic field. Neutral beam injection can also destabilize Alfvén eigenmodes and energetic particle modes, and act as a source of plasma rotation. Therefore, reliable and accurate simulation of NBI is important for making predictions for ITER, as well as for any other current or future fusion device. This paper introduces a new beamlet-based neutral beam ionization model called BBNBI. It takes into account the fine structure of the injector, follows the injected neutrals until ionization, and generates a source ensemble of ionized NBI test particles for slowing down calculations. BBNBI can be used as a stand-alone model but together with the particle following code ASCOT it forms a complete and sophisticated tool for simulating neutral beam injection. The test particle ensembles from BBNBI are found to agree well with those produced by PENCIL for JET, and those produced by NUBEAM both for JET and ASDEX Upgrade plasmas. The first comprehensive comparisons of beam slowing down profiles of interest from BBNBI + ASCOT with results from PENCIL and NUBEAM/TRANSP, for both JET and AUG, are presented. It is shown that, for an axisymmetric plasma, BBNBI + ASCOT and NUBEAM agree remarkably well. Together with earlier 3D studies, these results further validate using BBNBI + ASCOT also for studying phenomena that require particle following in a truly three-dimensional geometry.

  7. Feasibility of the preparation of silica monoliths for gas chromatography: fast separation of light hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Azzouz, Imadeddine; Essoussi, Anouar; Fleury, Joachim; Haudebourg, Raphael; Thiebaut, Didier; Vial, Jerome

    2015-02-27

    The preparation conditions of silica monoliths for gas chromatography were investigated. Silica-based monolithic capillary columns based on sol-gel process were tested in the course of high-speed gas chromatographic separations of light hydrocarbons mixture (C1-C4). The impact of modifying the amount of porogen and/or catalyst on the monolith properties were studied. At the best precursor/catalyst/porogen ratio evaluated, a column efficiency of about 6500 theoretical plates per meter was reached with a very good resolution (4.3) for very light compounds (C1-C2). The test mixture was baseline separated on a 70cm column. To our knowledge for the first time a silica-based monolithic capillary column was able to separate light hydrocarbons from methane to n-butane at room temperature with a back pressure in the range of gas chromatography facilities (under 4.1bar). PMID:25622518

  8. Use of fast scopes to enable Thomson scattering measurement in presence of fluctuating plasma light.

    SciTech Connect

    McLean, H; Moller, J; Hill, D

    2004-04-19

    The addition of inexpensive high-speed oscilloscopes has enabled higher Te Thomson scattering measurements on the SSPX spheromak. Along with signal correlation techniques, the scopes allow new analyses based on the shape of the scattered laser pulse to discriminate against fluctuating background plasma light that often make gated-integrator measurements unreliable. A 1.4 J Nd:YAG laser at 1064 nm is the scattering source. Spatial locations are coupled by viewing optics and fibers to 4-wavelength-channel filter polychrometers. Ratios between the channels determine Te while summations of the channels determine density. Typically, the channel that provides scattered signal at higher Te is contaminated by fluctuating background light. Individual channels are correlated with either a modeled representation of the laser pulse or a noise-free stray light signal to extract channel amplitudes.

  9. Ultrahigh enhancement in absolute and relative rotation sensing using fast and slow light

    SciTech Connect

    Shahriar, M. S.; Pati, G. S.; Tripathi, R.; Gopal, V.; Messall, M.; Salit, K.

    2007-05-15

    We describe a resonator-based optical gyroscope whose sensitivity for measuring absolute rotation is enhanced via use of the anomalous dispersion characteristic of superluminal light propagation. The enhancement is given by the inverse of the group index, saturating to a bound determined by the group velocity dispersion. We also show how the offsetting effect of the concomitant broadening of the resonator linewidth may be circumvented by using an active cavity. For realistic conditions, the enhancement factor is as high as 10{sup 6}. We also show how normal dispersion used for slow light can enhance relative rotation sensing in a specially designed Sagnac interferometer, with the enhancement given by the slowing factor.

  10. Controlling slow and fast light and dynamic pulse-splitting with tunable optical gain in a whispering-gallery-mode microcavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asano, M.; Özdemir, Ş. K.; Chen, W.; Ikuta, R.; Yang, L.; Imoto, N.; Yamamoto, T.

    2016-05-01

    We report controllable manipulation of slow and fast light in a whispering-gallery-mode microtoroid resonator fabricated from Erbium (Er3+) doped silica. We observe continuous transition of the coupling between the fiber-taper waveguide and the microresonator from undercoupling to critical coupling and then to overcoupling regimes by increasing the pump power even though the spatial distance between the resonator and the waveguide was kept fixed. This, in turn, enables switching from fast to slow light and vice versa just by increasing the optical gain. An enhancement of delay of two-fold over the passive silica resonator (no optical gain) was observed in the slow light regime. Moreover, we show dynamic pulse splitting and its control in slow/fast light systems using optical gain.

  11. Optimizing and extending light-sculpting microscopy for fast functional imaging in neuroscience

    PubMed Central

    Rupprecht, Peter; Prevedel, Robert; Groessl, Florian; Haubensak, Wulf E.; Vaziri, Alipasha

    2015-01-01

    A number of questions in system biology such as understanding how dynamics of neuronal networks are related to brain function require the ability to capture the functional dynamics of large cellular populations at high speed. Recently, this has driven the development of a number of parallel and high speed imaging techniques such as light-sculpting microscopy, which has been used to capture neuronal dynamics at the whole brain and single cell level in small model organisms. However, the broader applicability of light-sculpting microcopy is limited by the size of volumes for which high speed imaging can be obtained and scattering in brain tissue. Here, we present strategies for optimizing the present tradeoffs in light-sculpting microscopy. Various scanning modalities in light-sculpting microscopy are theoretically and experimentally evaluated, and strategies to maximize the obtainable volume speeds, and depth penetration in brain tissue using different laser systems are provided. Design-choices, important parameters and their trade-offs are experimentally demonstrated by performing calcium-imaging in acute mouse-brain slices. We further show that synchronization of line-scanning techniques with rolling-shutter read-out of the camera can reduce scattering effects and enhance image contrast at depth. PMID:25780729

  12. Fast bistable intensive light scattering in helix-free ferroelectric liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Andreev, Alexander; Andreeva, Tatiana; Kompanets, Igor; Zalyapin, Nikolay; Xu, Huan; Pivnenko, Mike; Chu, Daping

    2016-05-01

    A new type of ferroelectric liquid crystal (FLC) is considered, where the reorientation of the director (main optical axes) at the interaction of an electric field with the FLC's spontaneous polarization is due to the movement of spatially localized waves with a stationary profile: solitons arise at the transition due to the Maxwellian mechanism of energy dissipation. Under certain conditions, the appearance of such waves leads to the formation of a structure of transient domains, and as a consequence, to the scattering of light. The Maxwellian mechanism of energy dissipation allows one to reduce the electric field strength at which the maximum efficiency of light scattering is achieved down to 2-3 V/μm and to increase the frequency of light modulation up to 3-5 kHz. Intensive bistable light scattering in an electro-optical cell filled with a specially designed helix-free FLC was studied, and a stable scattering state can be switched on and off for a few tens of microseconds and memorized for a few tens of seconds. PMID:27140360

  13. Hot-Electron Temperature and Laser-Light Absorption in Fast Ignition

    SciTech Connect

    Haines, M. G.; Wei, M. S.; Beg, F. N.; Stephens, R. B.

    2009-01-30

    Experimental data [F. N. Beg et al., Phys. Plasmas 4, 447 (1997)] indicate that for intense short-pulse laser-solid interactions at intensities up to 5x10{sup 18} W cm{sup -2} the hot-electron temperature {proportional_to}(I{lambda}{sup 2}){sup 1/3}. A fully relativistic analytic model based on energy and momentum conservation laws for the laser interaction with an overdense plasma is presented here. A general formula for the hot-electron temperature is found that closely agrees with the experimental scaling over the relevant intensity range. This scaling is much lower than ponderomotive scaling. Examination of the electron forward displacement compared to the collisionless skin depth shows that electrons experience only a fraction of a laser-light period before being accelerated forward beyond the laser light's penetration region. Inclusion of backscattered light in a modified model indicates that light absorption approaches 80%-90% for intensity >10{sup 19} W cm{sup -2}.

  14. Application of the pseudospectral time-domain method to the scattering of light by nonspherical particles.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guang; Yang, Ping; Kattawar, George W

    2008-03-01

    The pseudospectral time-domain (PSTD) method is a powerful approach for computing the single-scattering properties of arbitrarily shaped particles with small-to-moderate-sized parameters. In the PSTD method, the spatial derivative approximation based on the spectral method is more accurate than its counterpart based on the finite-difference technique. Additionally, the PSTD method can substantially diminish accumulated errors that increase with the spatial scale and temporal duration of simulation. We report on the application of the PSTD method to the scattering of light by nonspherical ice particles. The applicability of the PSTD method is validated against the Lorenz-Mie theory and the T-matrix method. The phase functions computed from the PSTD method and the Lorenz-Mie theory agree well for size parameters as large as 80. Furthermore, the PSTD code is also applied to the scattering of light by nonspherical ice crystals, namely, hollow hexagonal columns and aggregates, which are frequently observed in cirrus clouds. The phase functions computed from the PSTD method are compared with the counterparts computed from the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method for a size parameter of 20 and an incident wavelength of 3.7 microm. The comparisons show good agreement between the two methods. PMID:18311250

  15. Measurement of light charged particles in the decay channels of medium-mass excited compound nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdré, S.; Barlini, S.; Casini, G.; Pasquali, G.; Piantelli, S.; Carboni, S.; Cinausero, M.; Gramegna, F.; Marchi, T.; Baiocco, G.; Bardelli, L.; Benzoni, G.; Bini, M.; Blasi, N.; Bracco, A.; Brambilla, S.; Bruno, M.; Camera, F.; Corsi, A.; Crespi, F.; D'Agostino, M.; Degerlier, M.; Kravchuk, V. L.; Leoni, S.; Million, B.; Montanari, D.; Morelli, L.; Nannini, A.; Nicolini, R.; Poggi, G.; Vannini, G.; Wieland, O.; Bednarczyk, P.; Ciemała, M.; Dudek, J.; Fornal, B.; Kmiecik, M.; Maj, A.; Matejska-Minda, M.; Mazurek, K.; Męczyński, W. M.; Myalski, S.; Styczeń, J.; Ziębliński, M.

    2014-03-01

    The 48Ti on 40Ca reactions have been studied at 300 and 600 MeV focusing on the fusion-evaporation (FE) and fusion-fission (FF) exit channels. Energy spectra and multiplicities of the emitted light charged particles have been compared to Monte Carlo simulations based on the statistical model. Indeed, in this mass region (A ~ 100) models predict that shape transitions can occur at high spin values and relatively scarce data exist in the literature about coincidence measurements between evaporation residues and light charged particles. Signals of shape transitions can be found in the variations of the lineshape of high energy gamma rays emitted from the de-excitation of GDR states gated on different region of angular momenta. For this purpose it is important to keep under control the FE and FF processes, to regulate the statistical model parameters and to control the onset of possible pre-equilibrium emissions from 300 to 600 MeV bombarding energy.

  16. Influence of the gas and particle residence time on fast pyrolysis of lignite

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, L.J.; Song, W.L.; Zhang, J.Y.; Yao, J.Z.; Lin, W.G.

    2007-06-15

    Coal resource is abundant in China, while the reserves of natural gas and petroleum are limited. Due to the rapid increase in the number of automobiles, a competitive way to produce liquid fuels from coal is urgently needed in China. A so-called 'coal topping process' is under development at the Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, from which liquid products can be obtained by flash pyrolysis in an integrated circulating fluidized bed system. In order to achieve a high yield of liquid products from high volatile coal, controlling the residence time of coal particles and produced gas may be of importance for minimizing the degree of the secondary reactions; i.e., polymerization and cracking of the liquid products. Experiments of the flash pyrolysis of coal have been conducted in an entrained bed reactor which is especially designed to study the influence of the coal particle residence time on the product distribution. The results show that the gaseous, liquid, and solid product distribution, the gas compositions as well as the liquid compositions depend strongly on the gas and particle residence time.

  17. Biological activity of particle exhaust emissions from light-duty diesel engines.

    PubMed

    Carraro, E; Locatelli, A L; Ferrero, C; Fea, E; Gilli, G

    1997-01-01

    Whole diesel exhaust has been classified recently as a probable carcinogen, and several genotoxicity studies have found particulate exhaust to be clearly mutagenic. Moreover, genotoxicity of diesel particulate is greatly influenced by fuel nature and type of combustion. In order to obtain an effective environmental pollution control, combustion processes using alternative fuels are being analyzed presently. The goal of this study is to determine whether the installation of exhaust after treatment-devices on two light-duty, exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) valve-equipped diesel engines (1930 cc and 2500 cc) can reduce the mutagenicity associated with particles collected during U.S.A. and European driving cycles. Another interesting object was to compare the ability of alternative biodiesel and conventional diesel fuels to reduce the mutagenic activity associated with collected particles from two light duty diesel engines (both 1930 cc) during the European driving cycle. SOF mutagenicity was assayed using the Salmonella/microsome test (TA 98 and TA 100 strains, +/- S9 fraction). In the first part of our study, the highest mutagenicity was revealed by TA98 strain without enzymatic activation, suggesting a direct-acting mutagenicity prevalence in diesel particulate. The 2500 cc engine revealed twofold mutagenic activity compared with the 1930 cc engine (both EGR valve equipped), whereas an opposite result was found in particulate matter amount. The use of a noncatalytic ceramic trap produced a decrease of particle mutagenic activity in the 2500 cc car, whereas an enhancement in the 1930 cc engine was found. The catalytic converter and the electrostatic filter installed on the 2500 cc engine yielded a light particle amount and an SOF mutagenicity decrease. A greater engine stress was obtained using European driving cycles, which caused the strongest mutagenicity/km compared with the U.S.A. cycles. In the second part of the investigation, even though a small number of

  18. Weathering of a carbon nanotube/epoxy nanocomposite under UV light and in water bath: impact on abraded particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlagenhauf, Lukas; Kianfar, Bahareh; Buerki-Thurnherr, Tina; Kuo, Yu-Ying; Wichser, Adrian; Nüesch, Frank; Wick, Peter; Wang, Jing

    2015-11-01

    Weathering processes can influence the surface properties of composites with incorporated nanoparticles. These changes may affect the release behavior of nanoparticles when an abrasion process is applied. Therefore, the influence of two different weathering processes, immersion in water and exposure to UV light, on the properties of abraded particles from a carbon nanotube (CNT)/epoxy nanocomposite was investigated. The investigation included the measurement of the weathering impact on the surface chemistry of the exposed samples, the particle size of abraded particles, the quantity of exposed CNTs in the respirable part of the abraded particles, and the toxicity of abraded particles, measured by in vitro toxicity tests using the THP-1 monocyte-derived macrophages. The results showed that weathering by immersion in water had no influence on the properties of abraded particles. The exposure to UV light caused a degradation of the epoxy on the surface, followed by delamination of an approx. 2.5 μm thick layer. An increased quantity of exposed CNTs in abraded particles was not found; on the contrary, longer UV exposure times decreased the released fraction of CNTs from 0.6% to 0.4%. The toxicity tests revealed that abraded particles from the nanocomposites did not induce additional acute cytotoxic effects compared to particles from the neat epoxy.Weathering processes can influence the surface properties of composites with incorporated nanoparticles. These changes may affect the release behavior of nanoparticles when an abrasion process is applied. Therefore, the influence of two different weathering processes, immersion in water and exposure to UV light, on the properties of abraded particles from a carbon nanotube (CNT)/epoxy nanocomposite was investigated. The investigation included the measurement of the weathering impact on the surface chemistry of the exposed samples, the particle size of abraded particles, the quantity of exposed CNTs in the respirable part of

  19. Dynamic light scattering and angular dissymmetry for the in situ measurement of silicon dioxide particle synthesis in flames.

    PubMed

    Zachariah, M R; Chin, D; Semerjian, H G; Katz, J L

    1989-02-01

    Particle size measurements have been made of silica formation in a counterflow diffusion flame reactor utilizing dynamic light scattering and angular dissymmetry methods. The results suggest that the techniques compare quite favorably in conditions of high signal to noise. However, the dynamic light scattering technique degrades rapidly as the signal strength declines, resulting in erroneously small particle diameters. As a general rule dynamic light scattering does not seem to possess the versatility and robustness of the classical techniques as a possible on-line diagnostic for process control. The drawbacks and limitations of the two techniques are also discussed. PMID:20548515

  20. Fast synthesis of high-quality reduced graphene oxide at room temperature under light exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Some, Surajit; Kim, Sungjin; Samanta, Khokan; Kim, Youngmin; Yoon, Yeoheung; Park, Younghun; Lee, Sae Mi; Lee, Keunsik; Lee, Hyoyoung

    2014-09-01

    An approach of presenting new reducing reagents, sodium-benzophenone (Na-B) or Na-B in the presence of the hydrazine (Na-B-H) system under light exposure could produce rGOs with/without N-doping at room temperature in both the solution phase and on a solid substrate. Benzophenone activated those solutions acting as a photosensitizer under light. It was assumed that the newly generated radical anions with electrons from Na-B under light can reduce GO to rGO sheets (rGONa-B1). In addition, the Na-B-H system can allow a higher degree of reduction with the doping of nitrogen atoms by the introduction of hydrazine to produce radical anions and electrons with a sodium hydrazide complex, which helps decrease the sheet resistance of the as-made rGONa-B-H2. The excellent properties (very low oxygen content (C/O ~16.2), and low sheet resistance (~130 Ω square-1)) of the rGOs were confirmed by XPS, XRD, IR, Raman spectroscopy, TGA, wettability, and sheet resistance measurements. High-quality rGO films on flexible substrates could be prepared by directly immersing the GO films in these solutions for several minutes.An approach of presenting new reducing reagents, sodium-benzophenone (Na-B) or Na-B in the presence of the hydrazine (Na-B-H) system under light exposure could produce rGOs with/without N-doping at room temperature in both the solution phase and on a solid substrate. Benzophenone activated those solutions acting as a photosensitizer under light. It was assumed that the newly generated radical anions with electrons from Na-B under light can reduce GO to rGO sheets (rGONa-B1). In addition, the Na-B-H system can allow a higher degree of reduction with the doping of nitrogen atoms by the introduction of hydrazine to produce radical anions and electrons with a sodium hydrazide complex, which helps decrease the sheet resistance of the as-made rGONa-B-H2. The excellent properties (very low oxygen content (C/O ~16.2), and low sheet resistance (~130 Ω square-1)) of the r

  1. On reflecting boundary behind the Earth's orbit at propagation of fast particles from solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishkovskikh, A. S.; Filippov, A. T.

    1985-01-01

    The flares of solar cosmic rays (SCR) associated with the presence of shocks in interplanetary magnetic field and with their propagation at significant heliocentric distances were always of great interest. Some events and problems concerning the peculiarities of propagation of flare CR in the interplanetary medium are considered. The distinguishing feature of such events is the presence of shock front behind the Earth's orbit having formed either directly in the process of shock generation on the Sun or at large heliocentric distances as a result of the interaction of fast and slow quasistationary recurrent solar wind (SW) streams. Based on the experimental material it is shown that the significant nonlinear disturbances in IMF behind the Earth's orbit can yield the occurrence of the additional SCR flux from shock front region as a result of the interaction of flare flux with shock and a partial reflection from it.

  2. Gustav Mie and the evolving subject of light scattering by particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishchenko, Michael I.; Travis, Larry D.

    2009-03-01

    The year 2008 marks the centenary of the seminal paper by Gustav Mie on light scattering by homogeneous spherical particles. With more than 3,800 citations, Mie's paper has been among the most influential physics publications of the twentieth century. It has affected profoundly the development of a great variety of science disciplines including atmospheric radiation, meteorological optics, remote sensing, aerosol physics, nanoscience, astrophysics, and biomedical optics. Mie's paper represented a fundamental advancement over the earlier publications by Ludvig Lorenz in that it was explicitly based on the Maxwell equations, gave the final solution in a convenient and closed form suitable for practical computations, and imparted physical reality to the abstract concept of electromagnetic scattering. The Mie solution anticipated such general concepts as far-field scattering and the Sommerfeld-Silver-Müller boundary conditions at infinity as well as paved the way to such important extensions as the separation of variables method for spheroids and the T-matrix method. Among illustrative uses of the Mie solution are the explanation of the spectacular optical displays caused by cloud and rain droplets, the detection of sulfuric acid particles in the atmosphere of Venus from Earth-based polarimetry, and optical particle characterization based on measurements of morphology-dependent resonances. Yet there is no doubt that the full practical potential of the Mie theory is still to be revealed.

  3. Light scattering by multilayered axisymmetric particles: Solution of the problem by the separation of variables method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farafonov, V. G.; Vinokurov, A. A.

    2008-08-01

    A new solution to the problem of light scattering by multilayered particles possessing axial symmetry is obtained. Two methods are applied for this purpose. One is the separation of variables method with expansion of fields in terms of spherical wave functions, and the other is a novel approach based on the separation of fields into axisymmetric and nonaxisymmetric parts and on the choice of specific scalar potentials for each of them. A specific feature of the new solution is that the dimension of truncated linear algebraic systems used for determining unknown expansion coefficients of fields does not increase with an increasing number of layers. Using double-and three-layer spheroidal and Chebyshev particles of different shape and size as examples, the domain of applicability of the solution presented is compared with that of the solution previously obtained by the extended boundary conditions method. Except for nearly spherical particles, the solution presented is shown to be more favorable than the previously obtained solution.

  4. FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION Host-free, yellow phosphorescent material in white organic light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Meng-Ting; Chu, Miao-Tsai; Lin, Jin-Sheng; Tseng, Mei-Rurng

    2010-11-01

    A white organic light-emitting diode (WOLED) with a high power efficiency has been demonstrated by dispersing a host-free, yellow phosphorescent material in between double blue phosphorescent emitters. The device performance achieved a comparable value to that of using a complicated host-guest doping system to form the yellow emitter in WOLEDs. Based on this device concept as well as the molecular engineering of blue phosphorescent host material and light-extraction film, a WOLED with a power efficiency of 65 lm W-1 at a practical brightness of 1000 cd m-2 with Commission Internationale d'Echariage coordinates (CIEx,y) of (0.37, 0.47) was achieved.

  5. ITER Plasma at Ion Cyclotron Frequency Domain: The Fusion Alpha Particles Diagnostics Based on the Stimulated Raman Scattering of Fast Magnetosonic Wave off High Harmonic Ion Bernstein Modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefan, V. Alexander

    2014-10-01

    A novel method for alpha particle diagnostics is proposed. The theory of stimulated Raman scattering, SRS, of the fast wave and ion Bernstein mode, IBM, turbulence in multi-ion species plasmas, (Stefan University Press, La Jolla, CA, 2008). is utilized for the diagnostics of fast ions, (4)He (+2), in ITER plasmas. Nonlinear Landau damping of the IBM on fast ions near the plasma edge leads to the space-time changes in the turbulence level, (inverse alpha particle channeling). The space-time monitoring of the IBM turbulence via the SRS techniques may prove efficient for the real time study of the fast ion velocity distribution function, spatial distribution, and transport. Supported by Nikola Tesla Labs., La Jolla, CA 92037.

  6. Synechococcus elongatus UTEX 2973, a fast growing cyanobacterial chassis for biosynthesis using light and CO2

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Jingjie; Liberton, Michelle; Cliften, Paul F.; Head, Richard D.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Smith, Richard D.; Koppenaal, David W.; Brand, Jerry J.; Pakrasi, Himadri B.

    2015-01-30

    Photosynthetic microbes are of emerging interest as production organisms in biotechnology because they can grow autotrophically using sunlight, an abundant energy source, and CO2, a greenhouse gas. Important traits for such microbes are fast growth and amenability to genetic manipulation. Here we describe Synechococcus elongatus UTEX 2973, a unicellular cyanobacterium capable of rapid autotrophic growth, comparable to heterotrophic industrial hosts such as yeast. Synechococcus 2973 can be readily transformed for facile generation of desired knockout and knock-in mutations. Genome sequencing coupled with global proteomics studies revealed that Synechococcus 2973 is a close relative of the widely studied cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942, an organism that grows more than two times slower. A small number of nucleotide changes are the only significant differences between the genomes of these two cyanobacterial strains. Thus, our study has unraveled genetic determinants necessary for rapid growth of cyanobacterial strains of significant industrial potential.

  7. Synechococcus elongatus UTEX 2973, a fast growing cyanobacterial chassis for biosynthesis using light and CO2

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yu, Jingjie; Liberton, Michelle; Cliften, Paul F.; Head, Richard D.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Smith, Richard D.; Koppenaal, David W.; Brand, Jerry J.; Pakrasi, Himadri B.

    2015-01-30

    Photosynthetic microbes are of emerging interest as production organisms in biotechnology because they can grow autotrophically using sunlight, an abundant energy source, and CO2, a greenhouse gas. Important traits for such microbes are fast growth and amenability to genetic manipulation. Here we describe Synechococcus elongatus UTEX 2973, a unicellular cyanobacterium capable of rapid autotrophic growth, comparable to heterotrophic industrial hosts such as yeast. Synechococcus 2973 can be readily transformed for facile generation of desired knockout and knock-in mutations. Genome sequencing coupled with global proteomics studies revealed that Synechococcus 2973 is a close relative of the widely studied cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatusmore » PCC 7942, an organism that grows more than two times slower. A small number of nucleotide changes are the only significant differences between the genomes of these two cyanobacterial strains. Thus, our study has unraveled genetic determinants necessary for rapid growth of cyanobacterial strains of significant industrial potential.« less

  8. THE CRAB NEBULA SUPER-FLARE IN 2011 APRIL: EXTREMELY FAST PARTICLE ACCELERATION AND GAMMA-RAY EMISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Striani, E.; Tavani, M.; Cardillo, M; Piano, G.; Donnarumma, I.; Vittorini, V.; Trois, A.; Costa, E.; Argan, A.; De Paris, G.; Bulgarelli, A.; Pittori, C.; Verrecchia, F.; Weisskopf, M.; Tennant, A.; Barbiellini, G.; Caraveo, P.; Chen, A. W.

    2011-11-01

    We report on the extremely intense and fast gamma-ray flare above 100 MeV detected by AGILE from the Crab Nebula in mid-April 2011. This event is the fourth of a sequence of reported major gamma-ray flares produced by the Crab Nebula in the period 2007/mid-2011. These events are attributed to strong radiative and plasma instabilities in the inner Crab Nebula, and their properties are crucial for theoretical studies of fast and efficient particle acceleration up to 10{sup 15} eV. Here we study the very rapid flux and spectral evolution of the event that on 2011 April 16 reached the record-high peak flux of F = (26 {+-} 5) x 10{sup -6} photons cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} with a rise-time timescale that we determine to be in the range 6-10 hr. The peak flaring gamma-ray spectrum reaches a distinct maximum near 500 MeV with no substantial emission above 1 GeV. The very rapid rise time and overall evolution of the Crab Nebula flare strongly constrain the acceleration mechanisms and challenge MHD models. We briefly discuss the theoretical implications of our observations.

  9. Multiple correlative immunolabeling for light and electron microscopy using fluorophores and colloidal metal particles.

    PubMed

    Kandela, Irawati K; Bleher, Reiner; Albrecht, Ralph M

    2007-10-01

    Multiple correlative immunolabeling permits colocalization of molecular species for sequential observation of the same sample in light microscopy (LM) and electron microscopy (EM). This technique allows rapid evaluation of labeling via LM, prior to subsequent time-consuming preparation and observation with transmission electric microscopy (TEM). The procedure also yields two different complementary data sets. In LM, different fluorophores are distinguished by their respective excitation and emission wavelengths. In EM, colloidal metal nanoparticles of different elemental composition can be differentiated and mapped by energy-filtering transmission electron microscopy with electron spectroscopic imaging. For the highest level of spatial resolution in TEM, colloidal metal particles were conjugated directly to primary antibodies. For LM, fluorophores were conjugated to secondary antibodies, which did not affect the spatial resolution attainable by fluorescence microscopy but placed the fluorophore at a sufficient distance from the metal particle to limit quenching of the fluorescence signal. It also effectively kept the fluorophore at a sufficient distance from the colloidal metal particles, which resulted in limiting quenching of the fluorescent signal. Two well-defined model systems consisting of myosin and alpha-actinin bands of skeletal muscle tissue and also actin and alpha-actinin of human platelets in ultrathin Epon sections were labeled using both fluorophores (Cy2 and Cy3) as markers for LM and equally sized colloidal gold (cAu) and colloidal palladium (cPd) particles as reporters for TEM. Each sample was labeled by a mixture of conjugates or labels and observed by LM, then further processed for TEM. PMID:17652267

  10. Microwave phase shifter with controllable power response based on slow- and fast-light effects in semiconductor optical amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Xue, Weiqi; Sales, Salvador; Capmany, José; Mørk, Jesper

    2009-04-01

    We suggest and experimentally demonstrate a method for increasing the tunable rf phase shift of semiconductor waveguides while at the same time enabling control of the rf power. This method is based on the use of slow- and fast-light effects in a cascade of semiconductor optical amplifiers combined with the use of spectral filtering to enhance the role of refractive index dynamics. A continuously tunable phase shift of approximately 240 degrees at a microwave frequency of 19 GHz is demonstrated in a cascade of two semiconductor optical amplifiers, while maintaining an rf power change of less than 1.6 dB. The technique is scalable to more amplifiers and should allow realization of an rf phase shift of 360 degrees. PMID:19340174

  11. Electron correlations in single-electron capture from helium by fast protons and α particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mančev, Ivan; Milojević, Nenad

    2010-02-01

    Single-electron capture from heliumlike atomic systems by bare projectiles is investigated by means of the four-body boundary-corrected first Born approximation (CB1-4B). The effect of the dynamic electron correlation is explicitly taken into account through the complete perturbation potential. The quantum-mechanical post and prior transition amplitudes for single charge exchange encompassing symmetric and/or asymmetric collisions are derived in terms of two-dimensional real integrals in the case of the prior form and five-dimensional quadratures for the post form. An illustrative computation is performed for single-electron capture from helium by protons and α particles at intermediate and high impact energies. The role of dynamic correlations is examined as a function of increased projectile energy. The validity and utility of the proposed CB1-4B method is critically assessed in comparison with the existing experimental data for total cross sections, and excellent agreement is obtained.

  12. Electron correlations in single-electron capture from helium by fast protons and {alpha} particles

    SciTech Connect

    Mancev, Ivan; Milojevic, Nenad

    2010-02-15

    Single-electron capture from heliumlike atomic systems by bare projectiles is investigated by means of the four-body boundary-corrected first Born approximation (CB1-4B). The effect of the dynamic electron correlation is explicitly taken into account through the complete perturbation potential. The quantum-mechanical post and prior transition amplitudes for single charge exchange encompassing symmetric and/or asymmetric collisions are derived in terms of two-dimensional real integrals in the case of the prior form and five-dimensional quadratures for the post form. An illustrative computation is performed for single-electron capture from helium by protons and {alpha} particles at intermediate and high impact energies. The role of dynamic correlations is examined as a function of increased projectile energy. The validity and utility of the proposed CB1-4B method is critically assessed in comparison with the existing experimental data for total cross sections, and excellent agreement is obtained.

  13. Three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of laser channeling in fast ignition

    SciTech Connect

    Li, G.; Yan, R.; Ren, C.; Tonge, J.; Mori, W. B.

    2011-04-15

    Three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations with an underdense plasma length up to 540 {mu}m are presented to show that laser channeling in 3D is qualitatively similar to that shown in previous 2D simulations [Li et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 125002 (2008)], but quantitative differences exist. Due to a larger laser ponderomotive force resulting from self-focusing and easier channel formation in 3D, the channeling speed in 3D is larger compared to 2D. Laser hosing and channel bending are also observed in 3D. Decoupling of the laser and plasma is observed when the electrons are heated to relativistic temperatures during the channeling process.

  14. Integrated interferometric injection laser; Novel fast and broad-band tunable monolithic light source

    SciTech Connect

    Schilling, M.; Idler, W.; Kuehn, E.; Laube, G.; Schweizer, H.; Wuenstel, K.; Hildebrand, O. )

    1991-06-01

    This paper reports on a new wide-range electronically wavelength-tunable InGaAsP-InP laser that has been developed. This monolithic single-mode light source is based on interferometric principles. We report on successful fabrication and first experimental device characteristic obtained with these novel Y-coupled-cavity integrated interferometric injection (YCC-I{sup 3}) lasers. For both the 1300 and 1500 nm wavelength regions, very large tuning ranges of 22 and 23 nm, respectively, were achieved by proper current adjustment. The minimum achieved linewidth of the present nonoptimized devices is 35 MHz. Within the complete tuning range, the selection of 12 individual single-mode channels spaced by 2 nm is demonstrated with high-modulation bandwidths up to 5 GHz. A preliminary test of the wavelength switching behavior between two individual single modes additionally indicates promising high-speed switching capabilities in the gigahertz range. Thus, the new monolithic YCC-I{sup 3} laser light source shows excellent potential for a wide range of applications in lightwave communications.

  15. Optically active biological particle distinguishing apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Salzman, Gary C.; Kupperman, Robert H.

    1989-01-01

    The disclosure is directed to organic particle sorting and identification. High frequency pulses of circularly polarized light, alternating between left and right, intersect a fast moving stream of organic particles. Circular intensity differential scattering and linear intensity differential scattering are monitored to uniquely identify a variety of organic particles.

  16. Elastic light scattering from aerosol particles and direct coupling of micro-resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, Gustavo Eddino

    Two unrelated topics are treated in this thesis. In Part I the measurement and interpretation of two-angle optical scattering (TAOS) patterns from aerosol particles in the respiratory size-range (1-10 microm) is discussed. Three experiments are presented. The first experiment introduces a different light-collection scheme than previously used, which allows for the simultaneous measurement of TAOS patterns in both the forward and backward scattering hemispheres of aerosols in real-time. In the second experiment, the collection of TAOS patterns in the near-backward hemisphere, which is important for remote sensing applications such as light detection and ranging (LIDAR) applications, is explored. In particular, a light collection scheme is introduced which allows for the simultaneous measurement of TAOS patterns in both parallel and perpendicular polarizations for single aerosol particles. Finally, a study that correlates the appearance of speckles in the TAOS patterns of aerosol aggregates with their surface roughness, and uses speckle characteristics to sort between several types of aerosol aggregates is presented. In Part 2, a study of semiconductor micro-disk resonators that are seamlessly (end-to-end) coupled to one another is presented. The seamless coupling scheme, referred to as "direct-coupling", enables coupling not only of the lasing modes, but also of the amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) produced in the resonators. The exchange of ASE between the elements in a coupled micro-disk device is shown to lead to many unique characteristics in the light output versus injection current (L-I) curves of' these devices. Devices consisting of two and three directly-coupled micro-disk elements are considered. In particular, it is shown that ON-OFF-ON switching of the output intensity as well as discontinuous shifts in the output wavelength as a function of increasing injected current in one of the elements can be achieved in the three-element devices. These

  17. Design and expected performance of a fast neutron attenuation probe for light element density measurements

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sweany, M.; Marleau, P.

    2016-07-08

    In this paper, we present the design and expected performance of a proof-of-concept 32 channel material identification system. Our system is based on the energy-dependent attenuation of fast neutrons for four elements: hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen and oxygen. We describe a new approach to obtaining a broad range of neutron energies to probe a sample, as well as our technique for reconstructing the molar densities within a sample. The system's performance as a function of time-of-flight energy resolution is explored using a Geant4-based Monte Carlo. Our results indicate that, with the expected detector response of our system, we will be ablemore » to determine the molar density of all four elements to within a 20–30% accuracy in a two hour scan time. In many cases this error is systematically low, thus the ratio between elements is more accurate. This degree of accuracy is enough to distinguish, for example, a sample of water from a sample of pure hydrogen peroxide: the ratio of oxygen to hydrogen is reconstructed to within 8±0.5% of the true value. Lastly, with future algorithm development that accounts for backgrounds caused by scattering within the sample itself, the accuracy of molar densities, not ratios, may improve to the 5–10% level for a two hour scan time.« less

  18. [Anxiety in patients undergoing fast-track knee arthroplasty in the light of recent literature].

    PubMed

    Ziętek, Paweł; Ziętek, Joanna; Szczypiór, Karina

    2014-01-01

    The rapid progress in knee implants technology and operational techniques go together with more and more modem medical programs, designed to optimize the patients' care and shorten their stay in hospital. However, this does not guarantee any elimination ofperioperative stress in patients. Anxiety is a negative emotional state arising from stressful circumstances accompanied by activation of the autonomous nervous system. Anxiety causes negative physiological changes, including wound healing, resistance to anesthetic induction, it is associated with an increased perioperative pain and prolong recovery period. The purpose of this work is to present the current state of knowledge on the preoperative anxiety and discuss its impact on pain and other parameters in patients undergoing fast-track arthroplasty of big joints. The work also shows selected issues of anxiety pathomechanism, and actual methods reducing preoperative anxiety in hospitalized patients. The common prevalence of anxiety in patients undergoing surgery induces the attempt to routinely identify patients with higher anxiety, which may be a predictive factor of worse results after TKA. Undertaking widely understood psychological support in these patients before and after the operation could be a favorable element, which would influence thefinal result of the treatment of patients after big joints arthroplasties. PMID:25639020

  19. Single-particle light scattering study of polyethyleneglycol-grafted poly(ureaurethane) microcapsule in ethanol.

    PubMed

    Terao, Ken; Ohsawa, Akane; Mori, Yasutaka; Narita, Takayuki; Ichikawa, Kimio; Dobashi, Toshiaki

    2004-09-01

    Microcapsules having polyethyleneglycol-grafted poly(ureaurethane) (PUU) membrane and di-2ethylhexyl phthalate core have been prepared, and the structure when they were suspended in dispersing ethanol have been studied by means of single-particle light scattering method. The PUU membrane was synthesized from monomers with aromatic functional groups (microcapsule MC110) and hexamethylene functional groups (microcapsule MC160). Because the outer and inner solvent passed through the membrane easily, the outside and inside of the membrane were the same at the equilibrium state. The thickness of the wall membrane was significantly smaller than that calculated from the overall weight ratio of the wall-forming material and the core solvents. It was attributed to low affinity of PUU membranes and ethanol. PMID:15342022

  20. Temperature control of light transmission using mixed system of silica hollow particles with nanoparticle shell and organic components.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Masahiro; Shiokawa, Kumi; Monobe, Hirosato; Shimizu, Yo

    2015-01-21

    We reported before that a silica hollow particle whose shell consists of silica nanoparticle (SHP-NP) has a high light reflection ability to prevent light transmission through the particle, which is caused from the intensive light diffusion by the hollow structure and the nanoparticle of the shell. Since the difference in the refractive indices between silica and air is responsible for the strong light reflection, the mixing of the particle with organic components having refractive indices close to that of silica such as tetradecane produced transparent mixtures by suppression of the light reflection. The transparency of the mixtures thus prepared could be controlled by temperature variation. For example, the mixture of the particle SHP-NP with tetradecane was transparent at 20 °C and opaque at 70 °C, while the mixture with n-hexyl cyclohexane was opaque at 20 °C and transparent at 70 °C. As the refractive indices of organic components changed with temperature more than 10 times wider than that of silica, the temperature alternation produced a significant change in the difference of the refractive indices between them to achieve complete control of the transparency of the mixtures. This simple control of the light transmission that can automatically regulate sunlight into the room with temperature alteration is expected to be suitable for smart glass technology for energy conservation. PMID:25536370

  1. Solid polystyrene and deuterated polystyrene light output response to fast neutrons.

    PubMed

    Simpson, R; Danly, C; Glebov, V Yu; Hurlbut, C; Merrill, F E; Volegov, P L; Wilde, C

    2016-04-01

    The Neutron Imaging System has proven to be an important diagnostic in studying DT implosion characteristics at the National Ignition Facility. The current system depends on a polystyrene scintillating fiber array, which detects fusion neutrons born in the DT hotspot as well as neutrons that have scattered to lower energies in the surrounding cold fuel. Increasing neutron yields at NIF, as well as a desire to resolve three-dimensional information about the fuel assembly, have provided the impetus to build and install two additional next-generation neutron imaging systems. We are currently investigating a novel neutron imaging system that will utilize a deuterated polystyrene (CD) fiber array instead of standard hydrogen-based polystyrene (CH). Studies of deuterated xylene or deuterated benzene liquid scintillator show an improvement in imaging resolution by a factor of two [L. Disdier et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 75, 2134 (2004)], but also a reduction in light output [V. Bildstein et al., Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res., Sect. A 729, 188 (2013); M. I. Ojaruega, Ph.D. thesis, University of Michigan, 2009; M. T. Febbraro, Ph.D. thesis, University of Michigan, 2014] as compared to standard plastic. Tests of the relative light output of deuterated polystyrene and standard polystyrene were completed using 14 MeV fusion neutrons generated through implosions of deuterium-tritium filled capsules at the OMEGA laser facility. In addition, we collected data of the relative response of these two scintillators to a wide energy range of neutrons (1-800 MeV) at the Weapons Neutrons Research Facility. Results of these measurements are presented. PMID:27131680

  2. Solid polystyrene and deuterated polystyrene light output response to fast neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, R.; Danly, C.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Hurlbut, C.; Merrill, F. E.; Volegov, P. L.; Wilde, C.

    2016-04-01

    The Neutron Imaging System has proven to be an important diagnostic in studying DT implosion characteristics at the National Ignition Facility. The current system depends on a polystyrene scintillating fiber array, which detects fusion neutrons born in the DT hotspot as well as neutrons that have scattered to lower energies in the surrounding cold fuel. Increasing neutron yields at NIF, as well as a desire to resolve three-dimensional information about the fuel assembly, have provided the impetus to build and install two additional next-generation neutron imaging systems. We are currently investigating a novel neutron imaging system that will utilize a deuterated polystyrene (CD) fiber array instead of standard hydrogen-based polystyrene (CH). Studies of deuterated xylene or deuterated benzene liquid scintillator show an improvement in imaging resolution by a factor of two [L. Disdier et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 75, 2134 (2004)], but also a reduction in light output [V. Bildstein et al., Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res., Sect. A 729, 188 (2013); M. I. Ojaruega, Ph.D. thesis, University of Michigan, 2009; M. T. Febbraro, Ph.D. thesis, University of Michigan, 2014] as compared to standard plastic. Tests of the relative light output of deuterated polystyrene and standard polystyrene were completed using 14 MeV fusion neutrons generated through implosions of deuterium-tritium filled capsules at the OMEGA laser facility. In addition, we collected data of the relative response of these two scintillators to a wide energy range of neutrons (1-800 MeV) at the Weapons Neutrons Research Facility. Results of these measurements are presented.

  3. Light Induced Degradation of Eight Commonly Used Pesticides Adsorbed on Atmospheric Particles: Kinetics and Product Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Socorro, J.; Durand, A.; Gligorovski, S.; Wortham, H.; Quivet, E.

    2014-12-01

    Pesticides are widely used all over the world whether in agricultural production or in non-agricultural settings. They may pose a potential human health effects and environmental risks due to their physico-chemical properties and their extensive use which is growing every year. Pesticides are found in the atmosphere removed from the target area by volatilization or wind erosion, and carried over long distances. These compounds are partitioned between the gaseous and particulate atmospheric phases. The increasingly used pesticides are semi-volatile compounds which are usually adsorbed on the surface of the atmospheric particles. These pesticides may undergo chemical and photo-chemical transformation. New compounds may then be formed that could be more hazardous than the primary pesticides. The atmospheric fate and lifetime of adsorbed pesticides on particles are controlled by the these (photo)chemical processes. However, there is a lack of kinetic data regarding the pesticides in the particle phase. This current work focuses on the photolytic degradation of commonly used pesticides in particulate phase. It aims at estimating the photolytic rates and thus the lifetimes of pesticides adsorbed on silica particles as a proxy of atmospheric particles. The following eight commonly used pesticides, cyprodinil, deltamethrin, difenoconazole, fipronil, oxadiazon, pendimethalin, permethrin, tetraconazole, were chosen because of their physico-chemical properties. The photolysis rates of tetraconazole and permethrin were extremely slow ≤ 1.2 · 10-6 s-1. The photolysis rates for the other pesticides were determined in the range of: (5.9 ± 0.3) · 10-6 < k < (1.7 ± 0.1) · 10-4 s-1 from slowest to the fastest: pendimethalin < cyprodinil < deltamethrin < difenoconazole < oxadiazon < fipronil. Finally, the identification of the surface products upon light irradiation was performed, using GC-(QqQ)-MS/MS and LC-(Q-IMS-ToF)-MS/MS. The potentially formed gas-phase products during

  4. A fast object-oriented Matlab implementation of the Reproducing Kernel Particle Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbieri, Ettore; Meo, Michele

    2012-05-01

    Novel numerical methods, known as Meshless Methods or Meshfree Methods and, in a wider perspective, Partition of Unity Methods, promise to overcome most of disadvantages of the traditional finite element techniques. The absence of a mesh makes meshfree methods very attractive for those problems involving large deformations, moving boundaries and crack propagation. However, meshfree methods still have significant limitations that prevent their acceptance among researchers and engineers, namely the computational costs. This paper presents an in-depth analysis of computational techniques to speed-up the computation of the shape functions in the Reproducing Kernel Particle Method and Moving Least Squares, with particular focus on their bottlenecks, like the neighbour search, the inversion of the moment matrix and the assembly of the stiffness matrix. The paper presents numerous computational solutions aimed at a considerable reduction of the computational times: the use of kd-trees for the neighbour search, sparse indexing of the nodes-points connectivity and, most importantly, the explicit and vectorized inversion of the moment matrix without using loops and numerical routines.

  5. Fast parallel interferometric 3D tracking of numerous optically trapped particles and their hydrodynamic interaction.

    PubMed

    Ruh, Dominic; Tränkle, Benjamin; Rohrbach, Alexander

    2011-10-24

    Multi-dimensional, correlated particle tracking is a key technology to reveal dynamic processes in living and synthetic soft matter systems. In this paper we present a new method for tracking micron-sized beads in parallel and in all three dimensions - faster and more precise than existing techniques. Using an acousto-optic deflector and two quadrant-photo-diodes, we can track numerous optically trapped beads at up to tens of kHz with a precision of a few nanometers by back-focal plane interferometry. By time-multiplexing the laser focus, we can calibrate individually all traps and all tracking signals in a few seconds and in 3D. We show 3D histograms and calibration constants for nine beads in a quadratic arrangement, although trapping and tracking is easily possible for more beads also in arbitrary 2D arrangements. As an application, we investigate the hydrodynamic coupling and diffusion anomalies of spheres trapped in a 3 × 3 arrangement. PMID:22109012

  6. Revisiting alpha decay-based near-light-speed particle propulsion.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenwu; Liu, Zhen; Yang, Yang; Du, Shiyu

    2016-08-01

    Interplanet and interstellar travels require long-term propulsion of spacecrafts, whereas the conventional schemes of propulsion are limited by the velocity of the ejected mass. In this study, alpha particles released by nuclear decay are considered as a potential solution for long-time acceleration. The principle of near-light-speed particle propulsion (NcPP) was elucidated and the stopping and range of ions in matter (SRIM) was used to predict theoretical accelerations. The results show that NcPP by means of alpha decay is feasible for long-term spacecraft propulsion and posture adjustment in space. A practical NcPP sail can achieve a speed >150km/s and reach the brink of the solar system faster than a mass equivalent solar sail. Finally, to significantly improve the NcPP sail, the hypothesis of stimulated acceleration of nuclear decay (SAND) was proposed, which may shorten the travel time to Mars to within 20 days. PMID:27161512

  7. Thermally induced light-driven microfluidics using a MOEMS-based laser scanner for particle manipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kremer, Matthias P.; Tortschanoff, Andreas

    2014-03-01

    One key challenge in the field of microfluidics and lab-on-a-chip experiments for biological or chemical applications is the remote manipulation of fluids, droplets and particles. These can be volume elements of reactants, particles coated with markers, cells or many others. Light-driven microfluidics is one way of accomplishing this challenge. In our work, we manipulated micrometre sized polystyrene beads in a microfluidic environment by inducing thermal flows. Therefore, the beads were held statically in an unstructured microfluidic chamber, containing a dyed watery solution. Inside this chamber, the beads were moved along arbitrary trajectories on a micrometre scale. The experiments were performed, using a MOEMS (micro-opto-electro-mechanical-systems)-based laser scanner with a variable focal length. This scanner system is integrated in a compact device, which is flexibly applicable to various microscope setups. The device utilizes a novel approach for varying the focal length, using an electrically tunable lens. A quasi statically driven MOEMS mirror is used for beam steering. The combination of a tunable lens and a dual axis micromirror makes the device very compact and robust and is capable of positioning the laser focus at any arbitrary location within a three dimensional working space. Hence, the developed device constitutes a valuable extension to manually executed microfluidic lab-on-chip experiments.

  8. Dynamics of nuclear single-particle structure in covariant theory of particle-vibration coupling: From light to superheavy nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Litvinova, E. V.; Afanasjev, A. V.

    2011-07-15

    The impact of particle-vibration coupling and polarization effects due to deformation and time-odd mean fields on single-particle spectra is studied systematically in doubly magic nuclei from low-mass {sup 56}Ni up to superheavy ones. Particle-vibration coupling is treated fully self-consistently within the framework of the relativistic particle-vibration coupling model. Polarization effects due to deformation and time-odd mean field induced by odd particle are computed within covariant density functional theory. It has been found that among these contributions the coupling to vibrations makes a major impact on the single-particle structure. The impact of particle-vibration coupling and polarization effects on calculated single-particle spectra, the size of the shell gaps, the spin-orbit splittings and the energy splittings in pseudospin doublets is discussed in detail; these physical observables are compared with experiment. Particle-vibration coupling has to be taken into account when model calculations are compared with experiment since this coupling is responsible for observed fragmentation of experimental levels; experimental spectroscopic factors are reasonably well described in model calculations.

  9. A recursive regularization algorithm for estimating the particle size distribution from multiangle dynamic light scattering measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lei; Yang, Kecheng; Li, Wei; Wang, Wanyan; Guo, Wenping; Xia, Min

    2016-07-01

    Conventional regularization methods have been widely used for estimating particle size distribution (PSD) in single-angle dynamic light scattering, but they could not be used directly in multiangle dynamic light scattering (MDLS) measurements for lack of accurate angular weighting coefficients, which greatly affects the PSD determination and none of the regularization methods perform well for both unimodal and multimodal distributions. In this paper, we propose a recursive regularization method-Recursion Nonnegative Tikhonov-Phillips-Twomey (RNNT-PT) algorithm for estimating the weighting coefficients and PSD from MDLS data. This is a self-adaptive algorithm which distinguishes characteristics of PSDs and chooses the optimal inversion method from Nonnegative Tikhonov (NNT) and Nonnegative Phillips-Twomey (NNPT) regularization algorithm efficiently and automatically. In simulations, the proposed algorithm was able to estimate the PSDs more accurately than the classical regularization methods and performed stably against random noise and adaptable to both unimodal and multimodal distributions. Furthermore, we found that the six-angle analysis in the 30-130° range is an optimal angle set for both unimodal and multimodal PSDs.

  10. Laser light scattering from silicon particles generated in an argon diluted silane plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Y.; Bilik, N.; Kortshagen, U. R.; Aydil, E. S.

    2016-03-01

    We conducted laser light scattering (LLS) measurements in a 13.56 MHz capacitively coupled dusty plasma maintained in silane and argon to study the spatial distribution of silicon nanoparticles and nanoparticle agglomerates. Specifically, we focused on the temporal evolution of their spatial distribution in the plasma as a function of pressure and power. We observed three distinct types of temporal evolution behavior of the nanoparticle dust cloud in the plasma and classified these into three regimes based on pressure and power. Each regime features a distinct pattern in laser light scattering measurements. At low pressures (∼80–100 mTorr) and high powers (∼40–60 W) we observed periodically repeating expansions and contractions of a continuous dust cloud for the first time. Dust voids, which have been reported before, were also observed at high pressures (∼100–150 mTorr) and low powers (∼20–40 W) in the center of the plasma. A mechanism is proposed to explain the observed dynamics of the nanoparticles. The balance between the ion drag force and electrostatic forces and their dependence on particle size are hypothesized to be the dominant factors that determine the nanoparticle cloud dynamics.

  11. Visible light photocatalytic activity of BiVO4 particles with different morphologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Xue; Yu, Lili; Yan, Lina; Li, Hongji; Yan, Yongsheng; Liu, Chunbo; Zhai, Hongju

    2014-06-01

    Bismuth vanadate (BiVO4) particles with different morphologies were synthesized by a one-step hydrothermal process and their optical and photocatalytic properties were investigated. Their crystal structure and microstructures were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). XRD patterns demonstrate that the as-prepared samples are monoclinic cell. FESEM shows that BiVO4 crystals can be fabricated in different morphologies by simply manipulating the reaction parameters of hydrothermal process. The UV-visible diffuse reflectance spectra (UV-vis DRS) reveal that the band gaps of BiVO4 photocatalysts are about 2.07-2.21 eV. The as-prepared BiVO4 photocatalysts exhibit higher photocatalytic activities in the degradation of rhodamine B (Rh B) under visible light irradiation (λ > 420 nm) compared with traditional N-doped TiO2 (N-TiO2). Furthermore, wheat like BiVO4 sample reveals the highest photocatalytic activity. Up to 100% Rh B is decolorized after visible light irradiation for 180 min. The reason for the difference in the photocatalytic activities for BiVO4 samples obtained at different conditions were systematically studied based on their shape, size and the variation of local structure.

  12. Fast fabrication of copper nanowire transparent electrodes by a high intensity pulsed light sintering technique in air.

    PubMed

    Ding, Su; Jiu, Jinting; Tian, Yanhong; Sugahara, Tohru; Nagao, Shijo; Suganuma, Katsuaki

    2015-12-14

    Copper nanowire transparent electrodes have received increasing interest due to the low price and nearly equal electrical conductivity compared with other TEs based on silver nanowires and indium tin oxide (ITO). However, a post-treatment at high temperature in an inert atmosphere or a vacuum environment was necessary to improve the conductivity of Cu NW TEs due to the easy oxidation of copper in air atmosphere, which greatly cancelled out the low price advantage of Cu NWs. Here, a high intensity pulsed light technique was introduced to sinter and simultaneously deoxygenate these Cu NWs into a highly conductive network at room temperature in air. The strong light absorption capacity of Cu NWs enabled the welding of the nanowires at contact spots, as well as the removal of the thin layer of residual organic compounds, oxides and hydroxide of copper even in air. The Cu NW TE with a sheet resistance of 22.9 Ohm sq(-1) and a transparency of 81.8% at 550 nm has been successfully fabricated within only 6 milliseconds exposure treatment, which is superior to other films treated at high temperature in a hydrogen atmosphere. The HIPL process was simple, convenient and fast to fabricate easily oxidized Cu NW TEs in large scale in an air atmosphere, which will largely extend the application of cheap Cu NW TEs. PMID:26536570

  13. Trapping of quantum particles and light beams by switchable potential wells

    SciTech Connect

    Sonkin, Eduard; Malomed, Boris A.; Granot, Er'el; Marchewka, Avi

    2010-09-15

    We consider basic dynamical effects in settings based on a pair of local potential traps that may be effectively switched on and off, or suddenly displaced, by means of appropriate control mechanisms, such as scanning tunneling microscopy or photo-switchable quantum dots. The same models, based on the linear Schroedinger equation with time-dependent trapping potentials, apply to the description of optical planar systems designed for the switching of trapped light beams. The analysis is carried out in the analytical form, using exact solutions of the Schroedinger equation. The first dynamical problem considered in this work is the retention of a particle released from a trap which was suddenly turned off, while another local trap was switched on at a distance--immediately or with a delay. In this case, we demonstrate that the maximum of the retention rate is achieved at a specific finite value of the strength of the new trap, and at a finite value of the temporal delay, depending on the distance between the two traps. Another problem is retrapping of the bound particle when the addition of the second trap transforms the single-well setting into a double-well potential (DWP). In that case, we find probabilities for the retrapping into the ground or first excited state of the DWP. We also analyze effects entailed by the application of a kick to a bound particle, the most interesting one being a kick-induced transition between the DWP's ground and excited states. In the latter case, the largest transition probability is achieved at a particular strength of the kick.

  14. PREFACE: 1st Conference on Light and Particle Beams in Materials Science 2013 (LPBMS2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumai, Reiji; Murakami, Youichi

    2014-04-01

    From 29-31 August 2013, the 1st International Conference on Light and Particle Beams in Materials Science, LPBMS 2013, took place in the Tsukuba International Congress Center in the city of Tsukuba, Japan. The conference was a continuation of the international series Synchrotron Radiation in Materials Science (SRMS), which started in 1994. The last one, SRMS-7, was held in Oxford UK 11-14 July 2010, where the International Advisory Committee (IAC) recommended the conference be enlarged to incorporate Materials Research from Neutron, Muon, and Slow Positron Sources, as well as the science emerging from Synchrotron Light Sources. The conference brought together contributions from academics and industrial researchers with a diverse background and experience from the physics, chemistry and engineering communities. The topics covered in the LPBMS2013 include strongly correlated electron systems, magnetism and magnetic materials, soft matter, interface and surface defects, catalysts, biomaterials, and ceramics. In the 3-day scientific program, the conference consisted of 9 plenary talks, 33 invited talks, 20 oral presentations, and 126 poster presentations. We are pleased to publish the proceedings of the LPBMS2013 in this volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series. This volume contains 58 papers representing the work that was presented and discussed at the conference. We hope that this volume will promote further development of this interdisciplinary materials research emerging from synchrotron light, neutron, muon, and slow positron sciences. Finally, we would like to thank the International Advisory Committee (Chair: Professor G N Greaves), sponsors, all the participants and contributors for making possible this international meeting of researchers. Reiji Kumai & Youichi Murakami Conference photograph Details of the program and organizing committees are available in the pdf

  15. Causes of variability in light absorption by particles in snow at sites in Idaho and Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doherty, Sarah J.; Hegg, Dean A.; Johnson, James E.; Quinn, Patricia K.; Schwarz, Joshua P.; Dang, Cheng; Warren, Stephen G.

    2016-05-01

    A characterization of black carbon (BC) and other light-absorbing particles in snow is presented for three mountain valley sites in Idaho in early 2014 and for one site near Vernal, Utah, in early 2013 and 2014. The focus of the study was on constraining the magnitude and drivers of variations in particulate absorbers in midlatitude U.S. seasonal snow. Mass mixing ratios of BC in newly fallen snow were similar at all three Idaho sites, with a median of 4.7 ± 4.2 ng BC per gram of snow. The median total light-absorbing particulate mixing ratios in new snow, expressed as an equivalent mixing ratio of BC, was 18 ± 23 ng g-1. At the Utah site, which is near sources of both fossil fuel and dust, the mixing ratios of BC varied from 7 to 45 ng g-1 across seven new snowfall samples, and the BC-equivalent mixing ratios varied from 9 to 1500 ng g-1. At all sites, dry deposition and in-snow processes increase the mixing ratio of BC by up to an order of magnitude and increase the mixing ratio of all light-absorbing particulates by up to 2 orders of magnitude, highlighting the importance of capturing these processes for accurately representing snow albedo in climate models. Spatial variability at a range of scales is found to be considerably smaller than the temporal variations at a given site, with implications for the representativeness of field samples used in observation/model comparisons.

  16. Dual-wavelength light-scattering technique for selective detection of volcanic ash particles in the presence of water droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurányi, Z.; Burtscher, H.; Loepfe, M.; Nenkov, M.; Weingartner, E.

    2015-12-01

    A new method is presented in this paper which analyses the scattered light of individual aerosol particles simultaneously at two different wavelengths in order to retrieve information on the particle type. We show that dust-like particles, such as volcanic ash, can be unambiguously discriminated from water droplets on a single-particle level. As a future application of this method, the detection of volcanic ash particles should be possible in a humid atmosphere in the presence of cloud droplets. The characteristic behaviour of pure water's refractive index can be used to separate water droplets and dust-like particles which are commonly found in the micrometre size range in the ambient air. The low real part of the water's refractive index around 2700-2800 nm results in low scattered light intensities compared to e.g. the visible wavelength range, and this feature can be used for the desired particle identification. The two-wavelength measurement set-up was theoretically and experimentally tested and studied. Theoretical calculations were done using Mie theory. Comparing the ratio of the scattered light at the two wavelengths (visible-to-IR (infrared), R value) for water droplets and different dust types (basalt, andesite, African mineral dust, sand, volcanic ash, pumice) showed at least 9-times-higher values (on average 70 times) for water droplets than for the dust types at any diameter within the particle size range of 2-20 μm. The envisaged measurement set-up was built up into a laboratory prototype and was tested with different types of aerosols. We generated aerosols from the following powders, simulating dust-like particles: cement dust, ISO 12103-1 A1 Ultrafine Test Dust and ash from the 2012 eruption of the Etna volcano. Our measurements verified the theoretical considerations; the median experimental R value is 8-21 times higher for water than for the "dust" particles.

  17. High-throughput spatial light modulation two-photon microscopy for fast functional imaging.

    PubMed

    Pozzi, Paolo; Gandolfi, Daniela; Tognolina, Marialuisa; Chirico, Giuseppe; Mapelli, Jonathan; D'Angelo, Egidio

    2015-01-01

    The optical monitoring of multiple single neuron activities requires high-throughput parallel acquisition of signals at millisecond temporal resolution. To this aim, holographic two-photon microscopy (2PM) based on spatial light modulators (SLMs) has been developed in combination with standard laser scanning microscopes. This requires complex coordinate transformations for the generation of holographic patterns illuminating the points of interest. We present a simpler and fully digital setup (SLM-2PM) which collects three-dimensional two-photon images by only exploiting the SLM. This configuration leads to an accurate placement of laser beamlets over small focal volumes, eliminating mechanically moving parts and making the system stable over long acquisition times. Fluorescence signals are diffraction limited and are acquired through a pixelated detector, setting the actual limit to the acquisition rate. High-resolution structural images were acquired by raster-scanning the sample with a regular grid of excitation focal volumes. These images allowed the selection of the structures to be further investigated through an interactive operator-guided selection process. Functional signals were collected by illuminating all the preselected points with a single hologram. This process is exemplified for high-speed (up to 1 kHz) two-photon calcium imaging on acute cerebellar slices. PMID:26157984

  18. In situ measurements of particulate number density and size distribution from an aircraft. [using light scattering particle counter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briehl, D.

    1974-01-01

    Two different commercial particulate measuring instruments were flown aboard the NASA Convair 990. A condensation nuclei monitor was utilized to measure particles larger than approximately 0.003 micron in diameter. A specially designed pressurization system was used with this monitor at cabin altitude pressure. A near-forward light scattering counter was used to measure the number and size distribution particles in the size range from 0.5 to 5 microns and greater in diameter. Considerable variation in number density was encountered for both classes of particles at the test altitudes ranging from 5 to 12 km. Presence of clouds could be detected by the light scattering instrument because large numbers of particles would then be registered by the instrument, especially in the size range above 5.0 microns in diameter.

  19. Separation and characterization of poly(tetrafluoroethylene) latex particles by asymmetric flow field flow fractionation with light-scattering detection.

    PubMed

    Collins, Melissa E; Soto-Cantu, Erick; Cueto, Rafael; Russo, Paul S

    2014-04-01

    Poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE) latex particles have been analyzed and sorted according to size using asymmetric flow field flow fractionation (AF4) coupled with multiple-angle light scattering (MALS). Characterization of fractions by regular and depolarized dynamic light scattering confirmed that smaller particles elute prior to larger ones, as expected for field flow fractionation. The measured radii of the optically and geometrically anisotropic particles are consistent with those determined from transmission electron microscopy (TEM). A certain amount of heterogeneity remains in the fractions, but their uniformity for use as diffusion probes is improved. Full characterization of PTFE colloids will require a difficult assessment of the distribution, even within fractions, of the optical anisotropy. A general method to obtain number versus size distributions is presented. This approach is valid even when an online concentration detector is not available or ineffective. The procedure is adaptable to particles of almost any regular shape. PMID:24635125

  20. Near-infrared light responsive multi-compartmental hydrogel particles synthesized through droplets assembly induced by superhydrophobic surface.

    PubMed

    Luo, Rongcong; Cao, Ye; Shi, Peng; Chen, Chia-Hung

    2014-12-10

    Light-responsive hydrogel particles with multi-compartmental structure are useful for applications in microreactors, drug delivery and tissue engineering because of their remotely-triggerable releasing ability and combinational functionalities. The current methods of synthesizing multi-compartmental hydrogel particles typically involve multi-step interrupted gelation of polysaccharides or complicated microfluidic procedures with limited throughput. In this study, a two-step sequential gelation process is developed to produce agarose/alginate double network multi-compartmental hydrogel particles using droplets assemblies induced by superhydrophobic surface as templates. The agarose/alginate double network multi-compartmental hydrogel particles can be formed with diverse hierarchical structures showing combinational functionalities. The synthesized hydrogel particles, when loaded with polypyrrole (PPy) nanoparticles that act as photothermal nanotransducers, are demonstrated to function as near-infrared (NIR) light triggerable and deformation-free hydrogel materials. Periodic NIR laser switching is applied to stimulate these hydrogel particles, and pulsatile release profiles are collected. Compared with massive reagents released from single-compartmental hydrogel particles, more regulated release profiles of the multi-compartmental hydrogel particles are observed. PMID:25059988

  1. Fluorescence imaging of microbe-containing particles shot from a two-stage Light-gas gun into an aerogel.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Yuko; Sugino, Tomohiro; Tabata, Makoto; Okudaira, Kyoko; Imai, Eichi; Yano, Hajime; Hasegawa, Sunao; Hashimoto, Hirofumi; Yabuta, Hikaru; Kobayashi, Kensei; Kawai, Hideyuki; Mita, Hajime; Yokobori, Shin-ichi; Yamagishi, Akihiko

    2014-02-01

    We have proposed an experiment (the Tanpopo mission) to capture microbes on the Japan Experimental Module of the International Space Station. An ultra low-density silica aerogel will be exposed to space for more than 1 year. After retrieving the aerogel, particle tracks and particles found in it will be visualized by fluorescence microscopy after staining it with a DNA-specific fluorescence dye. In preparation for this study, we simulated particle trapping in an aerogel so that methods could be developed to visualize the particles and their tracks. During the Tanpopo mission, particles that have an orbital velocity of ~8 km/s are expected to collide with the aerogel. To simulate these collisions, we shot Deinococcus radiodurans-containing Lucentite particles into the aerogel from a two-stage light-gas gun (acceleration 4.2 km/s). The shapes of the captured particles, and their tracks and entrance holes were recorded with a microscope/camera system for further analysis. The size distribution of the captured particles was smaller than the original distribution, suggesting that the particles had fragmented. We were able to distinguish between microbial DNA and inorganic compounds after staining the aerogel with the DNA-specific fluorescence dye SYBR green I as the fluorescence of the stained DNA and the autofluorescence of the inorganic particles decay at different rates. The developed methods are suitable to determine if microbes exist at the International Space Station altitude. PMID:25086872

  2. LIGHT PRESSURE: Theoretical study of the light pressure force acting on a spherical dielectric particle of an arbitrary size in the interference field of two plane monochromatic electromagnetic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzatov, D. V.; Gaida, L. S.; Afanas'ev, Anatolii A.

    2008-12-01

    The light pressure force acting on a spherical dielectric particle in the interference field of two plane monochromatic electromagnetic waves is studied in detail for different particle radii and angles of incidence of waves.

  3. Lighting.

    SciTech Connect

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1992-09-01

    Since lighting accounts for about one-third of the energy used in commercial buildings, there is opportunity to conserve. There are two ways to reduce lighting energy use: modify lighting systems so that they used less electricity and/or reduce the number of hours the lights are used. This booklet presents a number of ways to do both. Topics covered include: reassessing lighting levels, reducing lighting levels, increasing bulb & fixture efficiency, using controls to regulate lighting, and taking advantage of daylight.

  4. Smart light random memory sprays Retinex: a fast Retinex implementation for high-quality brightness adjustment and color correction.

    PubMed

    Banić, Nikola; Lončarić, Sven

    2015-11-01

    Removing the influence of illumination on image colors and adjusting the brightness across the scene are important image enhancement problems. This is achieved by applying adequate color constancy and brightness adjustment methods. One of the earliest models to deal with both of these problems was the Retinex theory. Some of the Retinex implementations tend to give high-quality results by performing local operations, but they are computationally relatively slow. One of the recent Retinex implementations is light random sprays Retinex (LRSR). In this paper, a new method is proposed for brightness adjustment and color correction that overcomes the main disadvantages of LRSR. There are three main contributions of this paper. First, a concept of memory sprays is proposed to reduce the number of LRSR's per-pixel operations to a constant regardless of the parameter values, thereby enabling a fast Retinex-based local image enhancement. Second, an effective remapping of image intensities is proposed that results in significantly higher quality. Third, the problem of LRSR's halo effect is significantly reduced by using an alternative illumination processing method. The proposed method enables a fast Retinex-based image enhancement by processing Retinex paths in a constant number of steps regardless of the path size. Due to the halo effect removal and remapping of the resulting intensities, the method outperforms many of the well-known image enhancement methods in terms of resulting image quality. The results are presented and discussed. It is shown that the proposed method outperforms most of the tested methods in terms of image brightness adjustment, color correction, and computational speed. PMID:26560928

  5. A Study of the Jacobi Shape Transition in Light, Fast Rotating Nuclei with the EUROBALL IV, HECTOR and EUCLIDES Arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Maj, A.; Kmiecik, M.; Brekiesz, M.; Grebosz, J.; Meczynski, W.; Styczen, J.; Zieblinski, M.; Zuber, K.; Bracco, A.; Camera, F.; Benzoni, G.; Million, B.; Blasi, N.; Brambilla, S.; Leoni, S.; Pignanelli, M.; Wieland, O.; Airoldi, A.; Herskind, B.; Bednarczyk, P.

    2004-02-27

    The high-energy and discrete {gamma}-ray spectra, as well as the charged particle angular distribution have been measured in the reaction 105 MeV 18O+28Si using the EUROBALL IV, HECTOR and EUCLIDES arrays in order to investigate the predicted Jacobi shape transition in light nuclei. A comparison of the GDR line shape data with the predictions of the thermal shape fluctuation model, based on the most recent rotating liquid drop LSD calculations, shows evidence for such Jacobi shape transition in hot, rapidly rotating 46Ti. The found narrow low-energy component in the GDR line shape is interpreted as the consequence both of the elongated shape and of the Coriolis effect.

  6. Dynamics of statistically confident particle sizes and concentrations in blood plasma obtained by the dynamic light scattering method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaikov, Leonid L.; Kirichenko, Marina N.; Krivokhizha, Svetlana V.; Zaritskiy, Alexander R.

    2015-05-01

    The work is devoted to the study of sizes and concentrations of proteins, and their aggregates in blood plasma samples, using static and dynamic light scattering methods. A new approach is proposed based on multiple repetition of measurements of intensity size distribution and on counting the number of registrations of different sizes, which made it possible to obtain statistically confident particle sizes and concentrations in the blood plasma. It was revealed that statistically confident particle sizes in the blood plasma were stable during 30 h of observations, whereas the concentrations of particles of different sizes varied as a result of redistribution of material between them owing to the protein degradation processes.

  7. A FOCUSED TRANSPORT APPROACH TO THE TIME-DEPENDENT SHOCK ACCELERATION OF SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLES AT A FAST TRAVELING SHOCK

    SciTech Connect

    Le Roux, J. A.; Webb, G. M.

    2012-02-10

    Some of the most sophisticated models for solar energetic particle (SEP) acceleration at coronal mass ejection driven shocks are based on standard diffusive shock acceleration theory. However, this theory, which only applies when SEP pitch-angle anisotropies are small, might have difficulty in describing first-order Fermi acceleration or the shock pre-heating and injection of SEPs into first-order Fermi acceleration accurately at lower SEP speeds where SEP pitch-angle anisotropies upstream near the shock can be large. To avoid this problem, we use a time-dependent focused transport model to reinvestigate first-order Fermi acceleration at planar parallel and quasi-parallel spherical traveling shocks between the Sun and Earth with high shock speeds associated with rare extreme gradual SEP events. The focused transport model is also used to investigate and compare three different shock pre-heating mechanisms associated with different aspects of the nonuniform cross-shock solar wind flow, namely, the convergence of the flow (adiabatic compression), the shear tensor of the flow, and the acceleration of the flow, and a fourth shock pre-heating mechanism associated with the cross-shock electric field, to determine which pre-heating mechanism contributes the most to injecting shock pre-heated source particles into the first-order Fermi acceleration process. The effects of variations in traveling shock conditions, such as increasing shock obliquity and shock slowdown, and variations in the SEP source with increasing shock distance from the Sun on the coupled processes of shock pre-heating, injection, and first-order Fermi acceleration are analyzed. Besides the finding that the cross-shock acceleration of the solar wind flow yields the dominant shock pre-heating mechanism at high shock speeds, we find that first-order Fermi acceleration at fast traveling shocks differs in a number of respects from the predictions and assumptions of standard steady-state diffusive shock

  8. Light induced heterogeneous ozone processing on the pesticides adsorbed on silica particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Socorro, J.; Désert, M.; Quivet, E.; Gligorovski, S.; Wortham, H.

    2013-12-01

    In France, in 2010, the sales of pesticides reached 1.8 billion euros for 61 900 tons of active ingredients, positioning France as a first European consumer of pesticides, as reported by the European Crop Protection Association. About 19 million hectares of crops are sprayed annually with pesticides, i.e., 35% of the total surface area of France. This corresponds to an average pesticide dose of 3.2 kg ha-1. The consumption of herbicide and fungicide is favoured in comparison to the use of insecticides in France and the other European countries, as well. The partitioning of pesticides between the gas and particulate phases influences the atmospheric fate of these compounds such as their photo-chemical degradation. There is much uncertainty concerning the behavior of the pesticides in the atmosphere. Especially, there is a gap of knowledge concerning the degradation of the pesticides induced by heterogeneous reactions in absence and especially in presence of solar light. Considering that most of the pesticides currently used are semi-volatile, it is of crucial importance to investigate the heterogeneous reactivity of particulate pesticides with light and with atmospheric oxidants such as ozone and OH radical. The aim of the present work is to evaluate the light induced heterogeneous ozonation of suspended pesticide particles. 8 pesticides (cyprodinil, deltamethrin, difenoconazole, fipronil, oxadiazon, pendimethalin, permethrin and tetraconazole) were chosen for their physico-chemical properties and their concentration levels in the PACA (Région Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur) region, France. Silica particles with well-known properties were chosen as model particles of atmospheric relevance. Kinetic rate constants were determined to allow estimate the atmospheric lifetimes relating to ozone. The rate constants were determined as follows: k = (6.6 × 0.2) 10-19, (7.2 × 0.3) 10-19, (5.1 × 0.5) 10-19, (3.9 × 0.3) 10-19 [cm3 molecules-1 s-1] for Cyprodinil

  9. Particle simulations of mode conversion between slow mode and fast mode in lower hybrid range of frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Guozhang; Xiang, Nong; Wang, Xueyi; Huang, Yueheng; Lin, Yu

    2016-01-01

    The propagation and mode conversion of lower hybrid waves in an inhomogeneous plasma are investigated by using the nonlinear δf algorithm in a two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation code based on the gyrokinetic electron and fully kinetic ion (GeFi) scheme [Lin et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 47, 657 (2005)]. The characteristics of the simulated waves, such as wavelength, frequency, phase, and group velocities, agree well with the linear theoretical analysis. It is shown that a significant reflection component emerges in the conversion process between the slow mode and the fast mode when the scale length of the density variation is comparable to the local wavelength. The dependences of the reflection coefficient on the scale length of the density variation are compared with the results based on the linear full wave model for cold plasmas. It is indicated that the mode conversion for the waves with a frequency of 2.45 GHz (ω ˜ 3ωLH, where ωLH represents the lower hybrid resonance) and within Tokamak relevant amplitudes can be well described in the linear scheme. As the frequency decreases, the modification due to the nonlinear term becomes important. For the low-frequency waves (ω ˜ 1.3ωLH), the generations of the high harmonic modes and sidebands through nonlinear mode-mode coupling provide new power channels and thus could reduce the reflection significantly.

  10. A fast, ultra-low and frequency-scalable power consumption, 10-bit SAR ADC for particle physics detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firlej, M.; Fiutowski, T.; Idzik, M.; Kulis, S.; Moron, J.; Swientek, K.

    2015-11-01

    The design and measurements results of a fast 10-bit SAR ADC with ultra-low and scalable with frequency power consumption, developed for readout systems for detectors at future particle physics colliders (ILC, CLIC, LHC Upgrade), are described. A prototype ASIC was designed and fabricated in 130 nm CMOS technology and a wide spectrum of static (INLlesssim0.5 LSB, DNLlesssim0.5 LSB) and dynamic (SINAD ~58 dB, ENOB~9.3) measurements was performed to study and quantify the ADC performance. The ADC works in wide 10 kS/s - 40 MS/s sampling frequency range, covering more than three orders of magnitude. In most of the range the power consumption scales linearly with sampling rate with a factor of about 22 μW/MS/s. A dynamic and asynchronous internal logic makes the ADC very well suited not only for commonly used synchronous sampling but also for applications with asynchronous sampling and/or the ones requiring power cycling, like the experiments at future linear collider (ILC/CLIC). The ADC layout is drawn with a small pitch of 146 μm to facilitate multi-channel integration. The obtained figure of Merit is in range 32-37 fJ/conversion for sampling frequencies 10-40 MS/s, placing the ADC among the best State of the Art designs with similar technology and specifications.

  11. Theoretical studies on particle shape classification based on simultaneous small forward angle light scattering and aerodynamic sizing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin-Bi, Zhang; Lei, Ding; Ying-Ping, Wang; Li, Zhang; Jin-Lei, Wu; Hai-Yang, Zheng; Li, Fang

    2016-03-01

    Particle shape contributes to understanding the physical and chemical processes of the atmosphere and better ascertaining the origins and chemical compositions of the particles. The particle shape can be classified by the aspect ratio, which can be estimated through the asymmetry factor measured with angularly resolved light scattering. An experimental method of obtaining the asymmetry factor based on simultaneous small forward angle light scattering and aerodynamic size measurements is described briefly. The near forward scattering intensity signals of three detectors in the azimuthal angles at 120° offset are calculated using the methods of T-matrix and discrete dipole approximation. Prolate spheroid particles with different aspect ratios are used as the shape models with the assumption that the symmetry axis is parallel to the flow axis and perpendicular to the incident light. The relations between the asymmetry factor and the optical size and aerodynamic size at various equivalent sizes, refractive indices, and mass densities are discussed in this paper. The numerically calculated results indicate that an elongated particle may be classified at diameter larger than 1.0 μm, and may not be distinguished from a sphere at diameter less than 0.5 μm. It is estimated that the lowest detected aspect ratio is around 1.5:1 in consideration of the experimental errors. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 41275132).

  12. Potential climatic effects of light absorbing particles over the Third Pole regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Zhenming; Kang, Shichang

    2016-04-01

    Light absorbing particles (LAPs) have important impact on regional climate over the Third Pole regions. Carbonaceous and mineral aerosols, which are considered as the anthropogenic and natural sources respectively, can absorb and scatter incident solar radiation in the atmosphere. Meanwhile, LAPs deposition in snow/ice can also change the surface albedo, resulting in perturbations in the surface radiation balance. However, most studies that have made quantitative assessments of the climatic effect of LAPs over the Third Pole regions did not consider the impact of dust on snow/ice at the surface. In this study, a regional climate model RegCM4.3.4 (Regional Climate Model version 4.3.4) coupled with an aerosol-snow/ice feedback module was used to investigate the emission, distribution, and deposition of carbonaceous and dust aerosols. The study was focused on the two issues: 1) the evaluation of model performance; 2) the assessment of climatic effects induced by carbonaceous and mineral dust aerosols, respectively.

  13. Light-absorbing Particles in Snow and Ice: Measurement and Modeling of Climatic and Hydrological Impact

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, Yun; Yasunari, Teppei J.; Doherty, Sarah J.; Flanner, M. G.; Lau, William K.; Ming, J.; Wang, Hailong; Wang, Mo; Warren, Stephen G.; Zhang, Rudong

    2015-01-01

    Light absorbing particles (LAP, e.g., black carbon, brown carbon, and dust) influence water and energy budgets of the atmosphere and snowpack in multiple ways. In addition to their effects associated with atmospheric heating by absorption of solar radiation and interactions with clouds, LAP in snow on land and ice can reduce the surface reflectance (a.k.a., surface darkening), which is likely to accelerate the snow aging process and further reduces snow albedo and increases the speed of snowpack melt. LAP in snow and ice (LAPSI) has been identified as one of major forcings affecting climate change, e.g. in the fourth and fifth assessment reports of IPCC. However, the uncertainty level in quantifying this effect remains very high. In this review paper, we document various technical methods of measuring LAPSI and review the progress made in measuring the LAPSI in Arctic, Tibetan Plateau and other mid-latitude regions. We also report the progress in modeling the mass concentrations, albedo reduction, radiative forcing, andclimatic and hydrological impact of LAPSI at global and regional scales. Finally we identify some research needs for reducing the uncertainties in the impact of LAPSI on global and regional climate and the hydrological cycle.

  14. Multianalyte detection using fiber optic particle plasmon resonance sensor based on plasmonic light scattering interrogation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Hsing-Ying; Huang, Chen-Han; Chau, Lai-Kwan

    2013-05-01

    A highly sensitive fiber optic particle plasmon resonance sensor (FO-PPR) is demonstrated for label-free biochemical detection. The sensing strategy relies on interrogating the plasmonic scattering of light from gold nanoparticles on the optical fiber in response to the surrounding refractive index changes or molecular binding events. The refractive index resolution is estimated to be 3.8 × 10-5 RIU. The limit of detection for anti-DNP antibody spiked in buffer is 1.2 × 10-9 g/ml (5.3 pM) by using the DNP-functionalized FO-PPR sensor. The image processing of simultaneously recorded plasmonic scattering photographs at different compartments of the sensor is also demonstrated. Results suggest that the compact sensor can perform multiple independent measurements simultaneously by means of monitoring the plasmonic scattering intensity via photodiodes or a CCD. The potential of using a combination of different kinds of noble metal nanoparticles with different types of functionalized probes in multiple cascaded detection windows on a single fiber to become an inexpensive and ultrasensitive linear-array sensing platform for higher-throughput biochemical detection is provided.

  15. Application of data on seawater light scattering for the study of marine particles: a selective review focusing on Russian literature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopelevich, Oleg V.

    2012-04-01

    This paper presents a selective review of applications of data on seawater light scattering for the study and monitoring of marine particles. Particular emphasis is placed on ocean waters and the seas surrounding Russia, where earlier studies by the author with his coworkers are little known because published mostly in Russian. In those assessments, methods of solving the inverse problem of seawater light scattering have been developed. Low-parametric models of optical properties were created by means of statistical analyses of experimental data, solving the inverse problem and comparing results derived from optical methods with those based on particle counts. Estimates of the volume and mass concentrations of suspended matter and its components were derived from light-scattering data for different regions. The potential of using optical methods for assessing spatiotemporal variability in suspended matter supply, propagation, and distribution is also considered.

  16. Light or Heat? The Origin of Cargo Release from Nanoimpeller Particles Containing Upconversion Nanocrystals under IR Irradiation.

    PubMed

    Dong, Juyao; Zink, Jeffrey I

    2015-09-01

    Nanoimpellers are mesoporous silica nanoparticles that contain azobenzene derivatives bonded inside the pores and rely on the continuous photoisomerization of multiple azobenzenes to release cargo under near UV irradiation. A recent study employs upconversion nanocrystal embedded particles to replace UV light with IR light to stimulate nanoimpellers. However, the photothermal effect of IR irradiation and its likely contribution to the observed release behavior are not examined. It is found that, in the absence of upconversion nanocrystals, the azobenzene co-condensed silica particles still respond to 980 nm illumination, which increases the nanoparticle temperature by 25 °C in 15 min, experimentally measured by an encapsulated nanothermometer. After suppressing the heating, the IR irradiation does not initiate the release, indicating that optical heating, not upconverted light, is responsible for the triggered cargo release. The results are explained by numerical analyses. PMID:26034008

  17. EFFECT OF LASER LIGHT ON MATTER. LASER PLASMAS: Threshold for gas breakdown initiated by an interaction of laser light with aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borets-Pervak, I. Yu; Vorob'ev, V. S.

    1993-03-01

    A model constructed previously for plasma production through the laser heating, evaporation, and ionization of a microscopic surface defect is refined in an effort to determine the breakdown conditions in an aerosol. Simple analytic expressions are derived for the threshold laser intensity as a function of the wavelength of the laser light, the dimensions and material of the aerosol particles, the shape of the laser pulse, and the evaporated volume of the particle. The results are compared with experiments on the laser breakdown of air caused by beams from CO2 and Nd lasers in the presence of an aerosol consisting of carbon particles 0.1-25 μm in radius. The results are also compared with the predictions of the explosion model.

  18. Spectral shape of a signal in light-induced diffusive pulling (pushing) of particles into a light beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkhomenko, A. I.; Shalagin, A. M.

    2015-02-01

    We study theoretically how the dependences of transport collision frequencies νi, collision broadening γ and collision shift Δ of the levels on the velocity v of resonant particles influence lightinduced diffusive pulling (pushing) (LDP) effects in the framework of a generalised model of strong collisions in the case of velocitydependent collision rates (so-called kangaroo model). It is found that allowance for the dependences νi(v), γ(v) and Δ(v) does not change the spectral shape of an LDP signal. In particular, in the case of low-intensity radiation, the spectral dependence of the LDP signal coincides with the absorption line shape. It is shown that the magnitude of the LDP effect is proportional to the difference between the diffusion coefficients of particles in the excited and ground states. It is found that the spectral anomalies previously predicted in the LDP effect [Gel'mukhanov F.Kh. JETP Lett., 55, 214 (1992)] for an idealised model of the Lorentz gas (the limiting case of heavy buffer particles), which arise due to the dependences νi(v), γ(v) and Δ(v), are typical only for this gas. At a realistic ratio of the masses of absorbing and buffer particles, spectral anomalies do not occur in the LDP effect.

  19. Impact of organic coating on growth of ammonium sulfate particles: light extinction measurements relevant for the direct effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, C. B.; Zarzana, K. J.; Hasenkopf, C. A.; Tolbert, M. A.

    2012-12-01

    Light extinction by particles is strongly dependent on chemical composition, particle size, and water uptake. Relative humidity affects extinction by causing changes in refractive index and particle size due to hygroscopic growth. The ability of particles to take up water depends on their composition and structure. In both laboratory and field studies, inorganic salts completely covered by an organic coating have been observed. The impact of this coating on water uptake is uncertain, and a systematic study that examines water uptake as a function of relative humidity is highly desirable. These data are critical to evaluate the aerosol direct effect on climate, which is one of the most uncertain aspects of future climate change. In this study, we probe the connection between aerosol composition, size and light extinction directly by measuring fRHext, the ratio of the extinction coefficient for humidified particles to the extinction coefficient for dry particles. Particles were composed of 1,2,6-hexanetriol and ammonium sulfate, a system that forms organic coatings around the inorganic core. A cavity ring-down aerosol extinction spectrometer at 532 nm is used to measure the optical growth factor as a function of relative humidity. The fRHext values for a range of %RH for pure ammonium sulfate, pure 1,2,6-hexanetriol, and ammonium sulfate particles with 1,2,6-hexanetriol coatings were measured. The coated particles are created using a method of liquid-liquid separation, where the particles are exposed to water vapor creating a RH% above their deliquescence RH%. The particles are then dried with a Nafion dryer to a RH% that is below the point where liquid-liquid phase separation is observed, but above the efflorescence RH%. Pure 1,2,6-hexanetriol takes up little water over the observed RH range of 45-65%, and therefore fRHext ~ 1. With pure ammonium sulfate for the same RH% range, the fRHext varied from 1.5 - 2, depending on the RH% and the particle size. For the

  20. Light scattering by ensemble of nonabsorbing correlated two-layered particles: specific feature for spectral dependence of extinction coefficient.

    PubMed

    Berdnik, Vladimir V; Loiko, Valery A

    2011-08-01

    Scattering of light by an ensemble of nonabsorbing spherical concentric two-layered particles is considered. It has been shown that exponent of the power function describing the wavelength dependence of the extinction coefficient of the medium with subwavelength-sized particles can exceed considerably the value of 4, which takes place for the Rayleigh scattering. Spatial correlation of particles enhances this "anomalous" dependence on the wavelength. Bleaching and darkening effects can be implemented. In the first case transmittance increases, while in the second case transmittance decreases with increased volume concentration. These effects can be used to get a sharp spectral dependence of transmittance. Comparison with the data for spatially correlated homogeneous particles is carried out. PMID:21833095

  1. Measurement of nano-particle diffusion in the simulated dynamic light scattering by contrast of dynamic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiaobin; Qiu, Jian; Luo, Kaiqing; Han, Peng

    2015-08-01

    Dynamic Light Scattering is used for measuring particle size distribution of nano-particle under Brownian motion. Signal is detected through a photomultiplier and processed by correlation analysis, and results are inverted at last. Method by using CCD camera can record the procedure of motion. However, there are several weaknesses such as low refresh speed and noise from CCD camera, and this method depends on particle size and detecting angle. A simulation of nano-particle under Brownian motion is proposed to record dynamic images, studies contrast of dynamic images which can represent speed of diffusion, and its characteristic under different conditions. The results show that through contrast of dynamic images diffusion coefficient can be obtained, which is independent on density of scattering volume.

  2. LIGHT MICROSCOPY DETECTION OF NANOSCALE PARTICLE INTERNALIZATION BY HUMAN LUNG CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    RATIONALE. Ultrafine particulate matter (PM) is reported to be more strongly correlated with adverse health effects relative to larger particle size fractions. These epidemiological findings are supported by toxicological studies suggesting that particle size is inversely associa...

  3. Very high pressure liquid chromatography using fully porous particles: quantitative analysis of fast gradient separations without post-run times.

    PubMed

    Stankovich, Joseph J; Gritti, Fabrice; Stevenson, Paul G; Beaver, Lois Ann; Guiochon, Georges

    2014-01-10

    Using a column packed with fully porous particles, four methods for controlling the flow rates at which gradient elution runs are conducted in very high pressure liquid chromatography (VHPLC) were tested to determine whether reproducible thermal conditions could be achieved, such that subsequent analyses would proceed at nearly the same initial temperature. In VHPLC high flow rates are achieved, producing fast analyses but requiring high inlet pressures. The combination of high flow rates and high inlet pressures generates local heat, leading to temperature changes in the column. Usually in this case a post-run time is input into the analytical method to allow the return of the column temperature to its initial state. An alternative strategy involves operating the column without a post-run equilibration period and maintaining constant temperature variations for subsequent analysis after conducting one or a few separations to bring the column to a reproducible starting temperature. A liquid chromatography instrument equipped with a pressure controller was used to perform constant pressure and constant flow rate VHPLC separations. Six replicate gradient separations of a nine component mixture consisting of acetophenone, propiophenone, butyrophenone, valerophenone, hexanophenone, heptanophenone, octanophenone, benzophenone, and acetanilide dissolved in water/acetonitrile (65:35, v/v) were performed under various experimental conditions: constant flow rate, two sets of constant pressure, and constant pressure operation with a programmed flow rate. The relative standard deviations of the response factors for all the analytes are lower than 5% across the methods. Programming the flow rate to maintain a fairly constant pressure instead of using instrument controlled constant pressure improves the reproducibility of the retention times by a factor of 5, when plotting the chromatograms in time. PMID:24296292

  4. Unsteady Fast Random Particle Mesh method for efficient prediction of tonal and broadband noises of a centrifugal fan unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heo, Seung; Cheong, Cheolung; Kim, Taehoon

    2015-09-01

    In this study, efficient numerical method is proposed for predicting tonal and broadband noises of a centrifugal fan unit. The proposed method is based on Hybrid Computational Aero-Acoustic (H-CAA) techniques combined with Unsteady Fast Random Particle Mesh (U-FRPM) method. The U-FRPM method is developed by extending the FRPM method proposed by Ewert et al. and is utilized to synthesize turbulence flow field from unsteady RANS solutions. The H-CAA technique combined with U-FRPM method is applied to predict broadband as well as tonal noises of a centrifugal fan unit in a household refrigerator. Firstly, unsteady flow field driven by a rotating fan is computed by solving the RANS equations with Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) techniques. Main source regions around the rotating fan are identified by examining the computed flow fields. Then, turbulence flow fields in the main source regions are synthesized by applying the U-FRPM method. The acoustic analogy is applied to model acoustic sources in the main source regions. Finally, the centrifugal fan noise is predicted by feeding the modeled acoustic sources into an acoustic solver based on the Boundary Element Method (BEM). The sound spectral levels predicted using the current numerical method show good agreements with the measured spectra at the Blade Pass Frequencies (BPFs) as well as in the high frequency range. On the more, the present method enables quantitative assessment of relative contributions of identified source regions to the sound field by comparing predicted sound pressure spectrum due to modeled sources.

  5. Finite-Difference Time Domain Solution of Light Scattering and Absorption by Particles in an Absorbing Medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, W.; Loeb, N. G.; Fu, Q.

    2002-01-01

    The three-dimensional (3-D) finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) technique has been extended to simulate light scattering and absorption by nonspherical particles embedded in an absorbing dielectric medium. A uniaxial perfectly matched layer (UPML) absorbing boundary condition is used to truncate the computational domain. When computing the single-scattering properties of a particle in an absorbing dielectric medium, we derive the single-scattering properties including scattering phase functions, extinction, and absorption efficiencies using a volume integration of the internal field. A Mie solution for light scattering and absorption by spherical particles in an absorbing medium is used to examine the accuracy of the 3-D UPML FDTD code. It is found that the errors in the extinction and absorption efficiencies from the 3-D UPML FDTD are less than similar to 2%. The errors in the scattering phase functions are typically less than similar to 5%. The errors in the asymmetry factors are less than similar to 0.l%. For light scattering by particles in free space, the accuracy of the 3-D UPML FDTD scheme is similar to a previous model.

  6. Slow light performance enhancement of Bragg slot photonic crystal waveguide with particle swarm optimization algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abedi, Kambiz; Mirjalili, Seyed Mohammad

    2015-03-01

    Recently, majority of current research in the field of designing Phonic Crystal Waveguides (PCW) focus in extracting the relations between output slow light properties of PCW and structural parameters through a huge number of tedious non-systematic simulations in order to introduce better designs. This paper proposes a novel systematic approach which can be considered as a shortcut to alleviate the difficulties and human involvements in designing PCWs. In the proposed method, the problem of PCW design is first formulated as an optimization problem. Then, an optimizer is employed in order to automatically find the optimum design for the formulated PCWs. Meanwhile, different constraints are also considered during optimization with the purpose of applying physical limitations to the final optimum structure. As a case study, the structure of a Bragg-like Corrugation Slotted PCWs (BCSPCW) is optimized by using the proposed method. One of the most computationally powerful techniques in Computational Intelligence (CI) called Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) is employed as an optimizer to automatically find the optimum structure for BCSPCW. The optimization process is done by considering five constraints to guarantee the feasibility of the final optimized structures and avoid band mixing. Numerical results demonstrate that the proposed method is able to find an optimum structure for BCSPCW with 172% and 100% substantial improvements in the bandwidth and Normalized Delay-Bandwidth Product (NDBP) respectively compared to the best current structure in the literature. Moreover, there is a time domain analysis at the end of the paper which verifies the performance of the optimized structure and proves that this structure has low distortion and attenuation simultaneously.

  7. Supramolecularly self-organized nanomaterials: A voyage from inorganic particles to organic light-harvesting materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varotto, Alessandro

    In 2009 the U.S. National Science Foundation announced the realignment of the Chemistry Divisions introducing the new interdisciplinary program of "Macromolecular, Supramolecular and Nanochemistry." This statement officially recognizes a field of studies that has already seen the publication of many thousands of works in the past 20 years. Nanotechnology and supramolecular chemistry can be found in the most diverse disciplines, from biology to engineering, to physics. Furthermore, many technologies rely on nanoscale dimensions for more than one component. Nanomaterials and technologies are on the market with a range of applications from composite materials, to electronics, to medicine, to sensing and more. This thesis will introduce a variety of studies and applications of supramolecular chemistry to form nanoscale photonic materials from soft matter. We will first illustrate a method to synthesize metallic nanoparticles using plasmids DNA as a mold. The circular DNA functions as a sacrificial template to shape the particles into narrowly monodispersed nanodiscs. Secondly, we will describe the synthesis of a highly fluorinated porphyrin derivative and how the fluorines improve the formation of ultra thin films when the porphyrin is blended with fullerene C60. Finally, we will show how to increase the short-circuit current in a solar cell built with an internal parallel tandem light harvesting design. A blend of phthalocyanines, each with a decreasing optical band gap, is supramolecularly self-organized with pyridyl-C60 within thin films. The different band gaps of the single phthalocyanines capture a wider segment of the solar spectrum increasing the overall efficiency of the device. In conclusion, we have presented a number of studies for the preparation of inorganic and organic nanomaterials and their application in supramolecularly organized photonic devices.

  8. Search for lightly ionizing particles using CDMS-II data and fabrication of CDMS detectors with improved homogeneity in properties

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, Kunj Bihari

    2013-12-01

    Fundamental particles are always observed to carry charges which are integral multiples of one-third charge of electron, e/3. While this is a well established experimental fact, the theoretical understanding for the charge quantization phenomenon is lacking. On the other hand, there exist numerous theoretical models that naturally allow for existence of particles with fractional electromagnetic charge. These particles, if existing, hint towards existence of physics beyond the standard model. Multiple high energy, optical, cosmological and astrophysical considerations restrict the allowable mass-charge parameter space for these fractional charges. Still, a huge unexplored region remains. The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS-II), located at Soudan mines in northern Minnesota, employs germanium and silicon crystals to perform direct searches for a leading candidate to dark matter called Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs). Alternately, the low detection threshold allows search for fractional electromagnetic-charged particles, or Lightly Ionizing Particles (LIPs), moving at relativistic speed. Background rejection is obtained by requiring that the magnitude and location of energy deposited in each detector be consistent with corresponding \\signatures" resulting from the passage of a fractionally charged particle. In this dissertation, the CDMS-II data is analyzed to search for LIPs, with an expected background of 0.078 0.078 events. No candidate events are observed, allowing exclusion of new parameter space for charges between e/6 and e/200.

  9. Feasibility studies for light scattering experiments to determine the velocity relaxation of small particles in a fluid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acquista, C.; Narducci, L. M.

    1980-01-01

    An approach for measuring the non-Markoffian component in the relaxation mechanism of a Brownian particle is proposed which combines desirable features of both the shock wave experiment and conventional light scattering experiments. It is suggested that the radiation pressure generated by a C.W. laser be used to guide an individual spherical particle to terminal velocity. At an appropriate time, the beam intensity is suddenly lowered to a value at which the radiation pressure is negligible, and the ensuing velocity relaxation is measured directly.

  10. Constraining the Physical Properties of Meteor Stream Particles by Light Curve Shapes Using the Virtual Meteor Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koschny, D.; Gritsevich, M.; Barentsen, G.

    2011-01-01

    Different authors have produced models for the physical properties of meteoroids based on the shape of a meteor's light curve, typically from short observing campaigns. We here analyze the height profiles and light curves of approx.200 double-station meteors from the Leonids and Perseids using data from the Virtual Meteor Observatory, to demonstrate that with this web-based meteor database it is possible to analyze very large datasets from different authors in a consistent way. We compute the average heights for begin point, maximum luminosity, and end heights for Perseids and Leonids. We also compute the skew of the light curve, usually called the F-parameter. The results compare well with other author's data. We display the average light curve in a novel way to assess the light curve shape in addition to using the F-parameter. While the Perseids show a peaked light curve, the average Leonid light curve has a more flat peak. This indicates that the particle distribution of Leonid meteors can be described by a Gaussian distribution; the Perseids can be described with a power law. The skew for Leonids is smaller than for Perseids, indicating that the Leonids are more fragile than the Perseids.

  11. Portable sample preparation and analysis system for micron and sub-micron particle characterization using light scattering and absorption spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Stark, Peter C.; Zurek, Eduardo; Wheat, Jeffrey V.; Dunbar, John M.; Olivares, Jose A.; Garcia-Rubio, Luis H.; Ward, Michael D.

    2011-07-26

    There is provided a method and device for remote sampling, preparation and optical interrogation of a sample using light scattering and light absorption methods. The portable device is a filtration-based device that removes interfering background particle material from the sample matrix by segregating or filtering the chosen analyte from the sample solution or matrix while allowing the interfering background particles to be pumped out of the device. The segregated analyte is then suspended in a diluent for analysis. The device is capable of calculating an initial concentration of the analyte, as well as diluting the analyte such that reliable optical measurements can be made. Suitable analytes include cells, microorganisms, bioparticles, pathogens and diseases. Sample matrixes include biological fluids such as blood and urine, as well as environmental samples including waste water.

  12. Entrainment of mouse peripheral circadian clocks to <24 h feeding/fasting cycles under 24 h light/dark conditions

    PubMed Central

    Hamaguchi, Yutaro; Tahara, Yu; Kuroda, Hiroaki; Haraguchi, Atsushi; Shibata, Shigenobu

    2015-01-01

    The circadian clock system in peripheral tissues can endogenously oscillate and is entrained by the light-dark and fasting-feeding cycles in mammals. Although the system’s range of entrainment to light-dark cycles with a non-24 h (<24 h) interval has been studied, the range of entrainment to fasting-feeding cycles with shorter periods (<24 h) has not been investigated in peripheral molecular clocks. In the present study, we measured this range by monitoring the mouse peripheral PER2::LUCIFERASE rhythm in vivo at different periods under each feeding cycle (Tau (T) = 15–24 h) under normal light-dark conditions. Peripheral clocks could be entrained to the feeding cycle with T = 22–24 h, but not to that with T = 15–21 h. Under the feeding cycle with T = 15–18 h, the peripheral clocks oscillated at near the 24-h period, suggesting that they were entrained to the light-dark cycle. Thus, for the first time, we demonstrated the range of entrainment to the non-24 h feeding cycle, and that the circadian range (T = 22–24 h) of feeding stimulus is necessary for peripheral molecular clock entrainment under light-dark cycles. PMID:26395309

  13. Radiation Force Caused by Scattering, Absorption, and Emission of Light by Nonspherical Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mishchenko, Michael I.; Hansen, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    General formulas for computing the radiation force exerted on arbitrarily oriented and arbitrarily shaped nonspherical particles due to scattering, absorption, and emission of electromagnetic radiation are derived. For randomly oriented particles with a plane of symmetry, the formula for the average radiation force caused by the particle response to external illumination reduces to the standard Debye formula derived from the Lorenz-Mie theory, whereas the average radiation force caused by emission vanishes.

  14. Numerical simulation on the performance of the vortex pump for transporting solid-liquid two-phase with light particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, W. Y.; Song, P. Y.; Deng, Q. G.; Xu, H. J.

    2016-05-01

    With the purpose of studying performance of the vortex pump for transporting solid-liquid two-phase with light particles whose relative density smaller than 1, the numerical simulation of solid-liquid two phase flowing in the whole channel of a vortex pump with the particle diameter being 0.5 mm, 1 mm, 2 mm, 3 mm and the initial solid phase volume concentrations being 10%, 20% and 30% are respectively carried out by using the commercial software ANSYS Fluent by adopting RNG κ-ɛ turbulent flow model, Eulerian-Eulerian multi-phase flow model and SIMPLEC algorithm. The simulation results show that in the impeller region, the particles concentrate on the non-working surface of the blades, and the particles are rare on the working surface of the blades. As the initial solid phase volume concentration and particle diameter increase, the pump delivery head of vortex pump decrease. The pump delivery head of vortex pump with different initial solid phase concentrations and different particle diameters are predicted and compared with those obtained by an empirical formula, and they shows good agreement.

  15. Light scattering by tenuous particles - A generalization of the Rayleigh-Gans-Rocard approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acquista, C.

    1976-01-01

    We consider scattering by arbitrarily shaped particles that satisfy two conditions: (1) that the polarizability of the particle relative to the ambient medium be small compared to 1 and (2) that the phase shift introduced by the particle be less than 2. We solve the integro-differential equation proposed by Shifrin by using the method of successive iterations and then applying a Fourier transform. For the second iteration, results are presented that accurately describe scattering by a broad class of particles. The phase function and other elements of the scattering matrix are shown to be in excellent agreement with Mie theory for spherical scatterers.

  16. First direct limits on lightly ionizing particles with electric charge less than e/6.

    PubMed

    Agnese, R; Anderson, A J; Balakishiyeva, D; Basu Thakur, R; Bauer, D A; Billard, J; Borgland, A; Bowles, M A; Brandt, D; Brink, P L; Bunker, R; Cabrera, B; Caldwell, D O; Cerdeno, D G; Chagani, H; Chen, Y; Cooley, J; Cornell, B; Crewdson, C H; Cushman, P; Daal, M; Di Stefano, P C F; Doughty, T; Esteban, L; Fallows, S; Figueroa-Feliciano, E; Godfrey, G L; Golwala, S R; Hall, J; Harris, H R; Hertel, S A; Hofer, T; Holmgren, D; Hsu, L; Huber, M E; Jastram, A; Kamaev, O; Kara, B; Kelsey, M H; Kennedy, A; Kiveni, M; Koch, K; Leder, A; Loer, B; Lopez Asamar, E; Mahapatra, R; Mandic, V; Martinez, C; McCarthy, K A; Mirabolfathi, N; Moffatt, R A; Moore, D C; Nelson, H; Nelson, R H; Ogburn, R W; Page, K; Page, W A; Partridge, R; Pepin, M; Phipps, A; Prasad, K; Pyle, M; Qiu, H; Rau, W; Redl, P; Reisetter, A; Ricci, Y; Rogers, H E; Saab, T; Sadoulet, B; Sander, J; Schneck, K; Schnee, R W; Scorza, S; Serfass, B; Shank, B; Speller, D; Upadhyayula, S; Villano, A N; Welliver, B; Wright, D H; Yellin, S; Yen, J J; Young, B A; Zhang, J

    2015-03-20

    While the standard model of particle physics does not include free particles with fractional charge, experimental searches have not ruled out their existence. We report results from the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS II) experiment that give the first direct-detection limits for cosmogenically produced relativistic particles with electric charge lower than e/6. A search for tracks in the six stacked detectors of each of two of the CDMS II towers finds no candidates, thereby excluding new parameter space for particles with electric charges between e/6 and e/200. PMID:25839256

  17. First Direct Limits on Lightly Ionizing Particles with Electric Charge Less than e/6

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Agnese, R.; Anderson, A. J.; Balakishiyeva, D.; Basu Thakur, R.; Bauer, D. A.; Billard, J.; Borgland, A.; Bowles, M. A.; Brandt, D.; Brink, P. L.; et al

    2015-03-18

    While the Standard Model of particle physics does not include free particles with fractional charge, experimental searches have not ruled out their existence. We report results from the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS II) experiment that give the first direct-detection limits for cosmogenically- produced relativistic particles with electric charge lower than e/6. A search for tracks in the six stacked detectors of each of two of the CDMS II towers found no candidates, thereby excluding new parameter space for particles with electric charges between e/6 and e/200.

  18. Elements and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in exhaust particles emitted by light-duty vehicles.

    PubMed

    Alves, Célia A; Barbosa, Cátia; Rocha, Sónia; Calvo, Ana; Nunes, Teresa; Cerqueira, Mário; Pio, Casimiro; Karanasiou, Angeliki; Querol, Xavier

    2015-08-01

    The main purpose of this work was to evaluate the chemical composition of particulate matter (PM) emitted by eight different light-duty vehicles. Exhaust samples from petrol and diesel cars (Euro 3 to Euro 5) were collected in a chassis dynamometer facility. To simulate the real-world driving conditions, three ARTEMIS cycles were followed: road, to simulate a fluid traffic flow and urban with hot and cold starts, to simulate driving conditions in cities. Samples were analysed for the water-soluble ions, for the elemental composition and for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), respectively, by ion chromatography, inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES), inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Nitrate and phosphate were the major water-soluble ions in the exhaust particles emitted from diesel and petrol vehicles, respectively. The amount of material emitted is affected by the vehicle age. For vehicles ≥Euro 4, most elements were below the detection limits. Sodium, with emission factors in the ranges 23.5-62.4 and 78.2-227μg km(-1), for petrol and diesel Euro 3 vehicles, respectively, was the major element. The emission factors of metallic elements indicated that diesel vehicles release three to five times more than petrol automobiles. Element emissions under urban cycles are higher than those found for on-road driving, being three or four times higher, for petrol vehicles, and two or three times, for diesel vehicles. The difference between cycles is mainly due to the high emissions for the urban cycle with hot start-up. As registered for elements, most of the PAH emissions for vehicles ≥Euro 4 were also below the detection limits. Regardless of the vehicle models or driving cycles, the two- to four-ring PAHs were always dominant. Naphthalene, with emission factors up to 925 μg km(-1), was always the most abundant PAH. The relative cancer risk associated with

  19. Graphene-enhanced visible-light photocatalysis of large-sized CdS particles for wastewater treatment

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The hybrid composites of graphene decorated by large-sized CdS particles (G/M-CdS) were prepared by a one-pot solvothermal route in which the reduction of graphite oxide into graphene was accompanied by the generation of microsized CdS particles. The structure and composition of the obtained nanocomposites were studied by means of X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The CdS particles with the average sizes of approximately 640 nm were formed on graphene sheets. The as-prepared composite was used as adsorbent to remove dye from wastewater using the organic dye Rhodamine B as the adsorbate. The G/M-CdS composite reveals a high photodegradation rate under visible light irradiation. Our results demonstrate that the G/M-CdS is very promising for removing organic dyes from wastewater. PMID:24666436

  20. Graphene-enhanced visible-light photocatalysis of large-sized CdS particles for wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Lü, Wei; Chen, Jie; Wu, Yao; Duan, Lianfeng; Yang, Yue; Ge, Xin

    2014-01-01

    The hybrid composites of graphene decorated by large-sized CdS particles (G/M-CdS) were prepared by a one-pot solvothermal route in which the reduction of graphite oxide into graphene was accompanied by the generation of microsized CdS particles. The structure and composition of the obtained nanocomposites were studied by means of X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The CdS particles with the average sizes of approximately 640 nm were formed on graphene sheets. The as-prepared composite was used as adsorbent to remove dye from wastewater using the organic dye Rhodamine B as the adsorbate. The G/M-CdS composite reveals a high photodegradation rate under visible light irradiation. Our results demonstrate that the G/M-CdS is very promising for removing organic dyes from wastewater. PMID:24666436

  1. Graphene-enhanced visible-light photocatalysis of large-sized CdS particles for wastewater treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lü, Wei; Chen, Jie; Wu, Yao; Duan, Lianfeng; Yang, Yue; Ge, Xin

    2014-03-01

    The hybrid composites of graphene decorated by large-sized CdS particles (G/M-CdS) were prepared by a one-pot solvothermal route in which the reduction of graphite oxide into graphene was accompanied by the generation of microsized CdS particles. The structure and composition of the obtained nanocomposites were studied by means of X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The CdS particles with the average sizes of approximately 640 nm were formed on graphene sheets. The as-prepared composite was used as adsorbent to remove dye from wastewater using the organic dye Rhodamine B as the adsorbate. The G/M-CdS composite reveals a high photodegradation rate under visible light irradiation. Our results demonstrate that the G/M-CdS is very promising for removing organic dyes from wastewater.

  2. Light particle emission measurements in heavy ion reactions: Progress report, June 1, 1987-May 31, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Petitt, G.A.

    1988-01-01

    This paper discusses work on heavy ion reactions done at Georgia State University. Topics and experiments discussed are: energy division in damped reactions between /sup 58/Ni projectiles and /sup 165/Ho and /sup 58/Ni targets using time-of-flight methods; particle-particle correlations; and development works on the Hili detector system. 10 refs., 9 figs. (DWL

  3. Acceleration of heavy and light particles in turbulence: Comparison between experiments and direct numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volk, R.; Calzavarini, E.; Verhille, G.; Lohse, D.; Mordant, N.; Pinton, J.-F.; Toschi, F.

    2008-08-01

    We compare experimental data and numerical simulations for the dynamics of inertial particles with finite density in turbulence. In the experiment, bubbles and solid particles are optically tracked in a turbulent flow of water using an Extended Laser Doppler Velocimetry technique. The probability density functions (PDF) of particle accelerations and their auto-correlation in time are computed. Numerical results are obtained from a direct numerical simulation in which a suspension of passive pointwise particles is tracked, with the same finite density and the same response time as in the experiment. We observe a good agreement for both the variance of acceleration and the autocorrelation time scale of the dynamics; small discrepancies on the shape of the acceleration PDF are observed. We discuss the effects induced by the finite size of the particles, not taken into account in the present numerical simulations.

  4. Fast-cycling superconducting synchrotrons and possible path to the future of US experimental high-energy particle physics

    SciTech Connect

    Piekarz, Henryk; /Fermilab

    2008-02-01

    The authors outline primary physics motivation, present proposed new arrangement for Fermilab accelerator complex, and then discuss possible long-range application of fast-cycling superconducting synchrotrons at Fermilab.

  5. Hydrogen-rich gas production via fast pyrolysis of biophysical dried sludge: Effect of particle size and moisture content on product yields and syngas composition.

    PubMed

    Han, Rong; Liu, Jinwen; Zhao, Chenxi; Li, Yuliang; Chen, Aixia

    2016-06-01

    After biophysical drying, a novel biophysical dried sludge particle was obtained. This work aims to investigate the function and effects of particle sizes and moisture contents on the fast pyrolysis of biophysical dried sludge particles. The results showed that large particles (>4 mm) favoured the oil generation with a maximum value of 19.0%, and small particles (<0.27 mm) favoured the char yield with a maximum value of 60.6%. Medium particle fractions (between 0.27 mm and 4 mm) benefited syngas production and induced higher H2 and CO emission, owing to the well-developed microstructure, enrichment of cellulose, and enhanced catalytic effects during the charring process. The introduction of proper moisture content (53.9% to 62.6%) to biophysical dried sludge was found to dramatically enhance syngas yield, hydrogen production, and carbon conversion efficiency. H2 molar concentration reached a maximum of 46.02% at a moisture content of 53.9%, which was attributed to the steam reforming and steam gasification accompanying the initial biophysical dried sludge pyrolysis. PMID:27118735

  6. An efficient algorithm for cooling particles in a controlled light standing wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, D. A.; Ivanova, T. Yu

    2016-04-01

    A new approach to feedback cooling of many-particle ensembles is considered. The homodyne detection of counter-propagating probe beams is shown to provide enough information to realize an efficient ‘bang-bang’ cooling algorithm. The feasibility of the method is demonstrated via numerical Monte Carlo simulations of classical trajectories of the particles taking into account the spontaneous emission noise. The numerical analysis and approximate theoretical treatment predict the cooling rate as being inverse proportional to the square root of the number of particles in the ensemble.

  7. Fast drying of biocompatible polymer films loaded with poorly water-soluble drug nano-particles via low temperature forced convection.

    PubMed

    Susarla, Ramana; Sievens-Figueroa, Lucas; Bhakay, Anagha; Shen, Yueyang; Jerez-Rozo, Jackeline I; Engen, William; Khusid, Boris; Bilgili, Ecevit; Romañach, Rodolfo J; Morris, Kenneth R; Michniak-Kohn, Bozena; Davé, Rajesh N

    2013-10-15

    Fast drying of nano-drug particle laden strip-films formed using water-soluble biocompatible polymers via forced convection is investigated in order to form films having uniform drug distribution and fast dissolution. Films were produced by casting and drying a mixture of poorly water soluble griseofulvin (GF) nanosuspensions produced via media milling with aqueous hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC E15LV) solutions containing glycerin as a plasticizer. The effects of convective drying parameters, temperature and air velocity, and film-precursor viscosity on film properties were investigated. Two major drying regimes, a constant rate period as a function of the drying conditions, followed by a single slower falling rate period, were observed. Films dried in an hour or less without any irreversible aggregation of GF nanoparticles with low residual water content. Near-infrared chemical imaging (NIR-CI) and the content uniformity analysis indicated a better drug particle distribution when higher viscosity film-precursors were used. Powder X-ray diffraction showed that the GF in the films retained crystallinity and the polymorphic form. USP IV dissolution tests showed immediate release (~20 min) of GF. Overall, the films fabricated from polymer-based suspensions at higher viscosity dried at different conditions exhibited similar mechanical properties, improved drug content uniformity, and achieved fast drug dissolution. PMID:23911341

  8. FAST MAGNETIC RECONNECTION AND PARTICLE ACCELERATION IN RELATIVISTIC LOW-DENSITY ELECTRON-POSITRON PLASMAS WITHOUT GUIDE FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Bessho, Naoki; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2012-05-10

    Magnetic reconnection and particle acceleration in relativistic Harris sheets in low-density electron-positron plasmas with no guide field have been studied by means of two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. Reconnection rates are of the order of one when the background density in a Harris sheet is of the order of 1% of the density in the current sheet, which is consistent with previous results in the non-relativistic regime. It has been demonstrated that the increase of the Lorentz factors of accelerated particles significantly enhances the collisionless resistivity needed to sustain a large reconnection electric field. It is shown analytically and numerically that the energy spectrum of accelerated particles near the X-line is the product of a power law and an exponential function of energy, {gamma}{sup -1/4}exp (- a{gamma}{sup 1/2}), where {gamma} is the Lorentz factor and a is a constant. However, in the low-density regime, while the most energetic particles are produced near X-lines, many more particles are energized within magnetic islands. Particles are energized in contracting islands by multiple reflection, but the mechanism is different from Fermi acceleration in magnetic islands for magnetized particles in the presence of a guide field. In magnetic islands, strong core fields are generated and plasma beta values are reduced. As a consequence, the fire-hose instability condition is not satisfied in most of the island region, and island contraction and particle acceleration can continue. In island coalescence, reconnection between two islands can accelerate some particles, however, many particles are decelerated and cooled, which is contrary to what has been discussed in the literature on particle acceleration due to reconnection in non-relativistic hydrogen plasmas.

  9. A reliable light scattering computing for black carbon-containing particles: Hybrid discrete dipole approximation (h-DDA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moteki, N.

    2015-12-01

    Black carbon (BC) is a light-absorbing carbonaceous aerosol emitted from combustions of fossil fuels and biomasses and is estimated as the second most important contributor to positive climate forcing after the carbon dioxide. In the atmosphere, the fractal aggregate of BC-spherules may be mixed with non-absorbing (or weakly absorbing) compounds that forms morphologically complex "BC-containing particle". A reliable scattering code for BC-containing particles is necessary for predicting mass absorption efficiency of BC and designing/evaluating optical techniques for estimating microphysical properties (i.e., size distribution, mixing state, shape, refractive index) of BC-containing particles. The computational methods that derived from the volume-integral form of the Maxwell equation, such as discrete dipole approximation (DDA), are method of choice for morphologically complex object like BC-containing particles. In ordinary DDA, the entire particle volume is approximated as a collection of tiny cubical dipoles (with side length d) placed on a 3D cubic lattice. For several model BC-containing particles, the comparisons with numerically exact T-matrix method reveals that the ordinary DDA suffered from persistent positive systematic error (up to +30%) in absorption even under d <<λ. The cause of this DDA error is identified to be the shape error in BC-spherules. To eliminate the shape error in BC-spherules, we propose a new DDA methodology which may be called hybrid DDA (h-DDA): each primary BC sphere is assumed as a spherical dipole, while remaining particle volume of coating material is approximated by a collection of tiny cubical dipoles on a 3D cubic lattice. Positive absorption bias up to +30% in ordinary DDA is suppressed to within 3% in h-DDA. In h-DDA code, an efficient FFT-based algorithm for solving the matrix equation has been implemented, by utilizing the multilevel block-Toeplitz property of the submatrix corresponding to inter-dipole interaction within

  10. ''Magic'' Energies for Detecting Light Elements with Resonant Alpha Particle Backscattering

    SciTech Connect

    Wetteland, C.J.; Maggiore, C.J.; Tesmer, J.R.; He, X-M.; Lee, D-H.

    1998-11-04

    Resonant backscattering is widely used to improve the detection limit of the light elements such as B, C, N and O. One disadvantage, however, is that several incident energies are normally needed if the sample contains a number of the light elements. There are ''magic'' energies at which several light elements can be detected simultaneously with suitable sensitivities. When these energies are used along with the elastic recoil detection of hydrogen, multiple elements can be detected without changing the beam energy, and the analysis time is greatly reduced. These reactions along with examples will be discussed.

  11. Comparison of fine particles emissions of light-duty gasoline vehicles from chassis dynamometer tests and on-road measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tiezhu; Chen, Xudong; Yan, Zhenxing

    2013-04-01

    Fine particles are highly related to human health, especially ultrafine particles and nanoparticles. The mass of emissions from a gasoline vehicle is relatively lower than that of a diesel vehicle, but the number of gasoline vehicles in China is so huge that the number of fine particles can't be ignored. An on-board measurement system was established to measure the instantaneous number and mass size distributions of fine particles emitted from a light-duty gasoline vehicle under a real-world driving condition. The exhaust gas was sampled from the inside of the tailpipe. Measurements were carried out using a light-duty gasoline vehicle for goods on a chassis dynamometer and on urban streets in a downtown area of Nanjing. Size and time resolved data were obtained from an Engine Exhaust Particle Sizer (EEPS). The system was operated under the New European Driving Cycle (NEDC) and steady-state speed tests. The comparisons of size distribution and number concentration (NC) in different driving cycles in the real-world with the results from the chassis dynamometer are shown. The time proportion of operating modes in NEDC is different from that on real urban roads. The particle sizes for the NCs obey a bimodal distribution from the on-road data with mode sizes of 10.8 nm and 39.2 nm, while those from the chassis dynamometer tests obey a unimodal distribution with a mode size of 10.8 nm. The maximum NCs of particles were increased as the vehicle operating modes changed from idling, cursing to deceleration and acceleration from the on-board measurements, while compared to that from the on-board measurements, the maximum concentrations at the mode size were however in different order and the cruising mode became the second highest peak instead of the deceleration mode. The ratios of the NCs from the chassis dynamometers to that from on-road data in the speed of 15 km h-1, 32 km h-1, and 50 km h-1 are 2.78, 2.19, and 0.48, respectively. Similarly for the mass concentration

  12. Aerosol particle absorption spectroscopy by photothermal modulation of Mie scattered light

    SciTech Connect

    Campillo, A.J.; Dodge, C.J.; Lin, H.B.

    1981-09-15

    Absorption spectroscopy of suspended submicron-sized aqueous ammonium-sulfate aerosol droplets has been performed by employing a CO/sub 2/ laser to photothermally modulate visible Mie scattered light. (AIP)

  13. Three dimensional indoor positioning based on visible light with Gaussian mixture sigma-point particle filter technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Wenjun; Zhang, Weizhi; Wang, Jin; Amini Kashani, M. R.; Kavehrad, Mohsen

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decade, location based services (LBS) have found their wide applications in indoor environments, such as large shopping malls, hospitals, warehouses, airports, etc. Current technologies provide wide choices of available solutions, which include Radio-frequency identification (RFID), Ultra wideband (UWB), wireless local area network (WLAN) and Bluetooth. With the rapid development of light-emitting-diodes (LED) technology, visible light communications (VLC) also bring a practical approach to LBS. As visible light has a better immunity against multipath effect than radio waves, higher positioning accuracy is achieved. LEDs are utilized both for illumination and positioning purpose to realize relatively lower infrastructure cost. In this paper, an indoor positioning system using VLC is proposed, with LEDs as transmitters and photo diodes as receivers. The algorithm for estimation is based on received-signalstrength (RSS) information collected from photo diodes and trilateration technique. By appropriately making use of the characteristics of receiver movements and the property of trilateration, estimation on three-dimensional (3-D) coordinates is attained. Filtering technique is applied to enable tracking capability of the algorithm, and a higher accuracy is reached compare to raw estimates. Gaussian mixture Sigma-point particle filter (GM-SPPF) is proposed for this 3-D system, which introduces the notion of Gaussian Mixture Model (GMM). The number of particles in the filter is reduced by approximating the probability distribution with Gaussian components.

  14. Validity of Particle-Counting Method Using Laser-Light Scattering for Detecting Platelet Aggregation in Diabetic Patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakadate, Hiromichi; Sekizuka, Eiichi; Minamitani, Haruyuki

    We aimed to study the validity of a new analytical approach that reflected the phase from platelet activation to the formation of small platelet aggregates. We hoped that this new approach would enable us to use the particle-counting method with laser-light scattering to measure platelet aggregation in healthy controls and in diabetic patients without complications. We measured agonist-induced platelet aggregation for 10 min. Agonist was added to the platelet-rich plasma 1 min after measurement started. We compared the total scattered light intensity from small aggregates over a 10-min period (established analytical approach) and that over a 2-min period from 1 to 3 min after measurement started (new analytical approach). Consequently platelet aggregation in diabetics with HbA1c ≥ 6.5% was significantly greater than in healthy controls by both analytical approaches. However, platelet aggregation in diabetics with HbA1c < 6.5%, i.e. patients in the early stages of diabetes, was significantly greater than in healthy controls only by the new analytical approach, not by the established analytical approach. These results suggest that platelet aggregation as detected by the particle-counting method using laser-light scattering could be applied in clinical examinations by our new analytical approach.

  15. Reduction in biomass burning aerosol light absorption upon humidification: Roles of inorganically-induced hygroscopicity, particle collapse, and photoacoustic heat and mass transfer

    SciTech Connect

    lewis, Kristen A.; Arnott, W. P.; Moosmuller, H.; Chakrabarti, Raj; Carrico, Christian M.; Kreidenweis, Sonia M.; Day, Derek E.; Malm, William C.; Laskin, Alexander; Jimenez, Jose L.; Ulbrich, Ingrid M.; Huffman, John A.; Onasch, Timothy B.; Trimborn, Achim; Liu, Li; Mishchenko, M.

    2009-11-27

    Smoke particle emissions from the combustion of biomass fuels typical for the western and southeastern United States were studied and compared under high humidity and ambient conditions in the laboratory. The fuels used are Montana ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa), southern California chamise (Adenostoma fasciculatum), and Florida saw palmetto (Serenoa repens). Information on the non-refractory chemical composition of biomass burning aerosol from each fuel was obtained with an aerosol mass spectrometer and through estimation of the black carbon concentration from light absorption measurements at 870 nm. Changes in the optical and physical particle properties under high humidity conditions were observed for hygroscopic smoke particles containing substantial inorganic mass fractions that were emitted from combustion of chamise and palmetto fuels. Light scattering cross sections increased under high humidity for these particles, consistent with the hygroscopic growth measured for 100 nm particles in HTDMA measurements. Photoacoustic measurements of aerosol light absorption coefficients reveal a 20% reduction with increasing relative humidity, contrary to the expectation of light absorption enhancement by the liquid coating taken up by hygroscopic particles. This reduction is hypothesized to arise from two mechanisms: 1. Shielding of inner monomers after particle consolidation or collapse with water uptake; 2. The contribution of mass transfer through evaporation and condensation at high relative humidity to the usual heat transfer pathway for energy release by laser heated particles in the photoacoustic measurement of aerosol light absorption. The mass transfer contribution is used to evaluate the fraction of aerosol surface covered with liquid water solution as a function of RH.

  16. Revisiting the ultra-high dose rate effect: implications for charged particle radiotherapy using protons and light ions

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, P; Jones, B; Yokoi, T; Hill, M; Vojnovic, B

    2012-01-01

    Objective To reinvestigate ultra-high dose rate radiation (UHDRR) radiobiology and consider potential implications for hadrontherapy. Methods A literature search of cellular UHDRR exposures was performed. Standard oxygen diffusion equations were used to estimate the time taken to replace UHDRR-related oxygen depletion. Dose rates from conventional and novel methods of hadrontherapy accelerators were considered, including spot scanning beam delivery, which intensifies dose rate. Results The literature findings were that, for X-ray and electron dose rates of around 109 Gy s–1, 5–10 Gy depletes cellular oxygen, significantly changing the radiosensitivity of cells already in low oxygen tension (around 3 mmHg or 0.4 kPa). The time taken to reverse the oxygen depletion of such cells is estimated to be over 20–30 s at distances of over 100 μm from a tumour blood vessel. In this time window, tumours have a higher hypoxic fraction (capable of reducing tumour control), so the next application of radiation within the same fraction should be at a time that exceeds these estimates in the case of scanned beams or with ultra-fast laser-generated particles. Conclusion This study has potential implications for particle therapy, including laser-generated particles, where dose rate is greatly increased. Conventional accelerators probably do not achieve the critical UHDRR conditions. However, specific UHDRR oxygen depletion experiments using proton and ion beams are indicated. PMID:22496068

  17. Pitfalls and novel applications of particle sizing by dynamic light scattering.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Karl; Schmidt, Manfred

    2016-08-01

    After briefly introducing the theoretical equations for DLS based particle size analysis, the need for angular dependent DLS investigations is emphasized to obtain correct particle sizes. Practical examples are given that demonstrate the possible magnitudes of errors in particle size if DLS is measured at one large scattering angle, only, as done by essentially all, most frequently utilized commercial "single angle" particle sizers. The second part is focused on a novel DLS application to sensitively trace (nano)particle interactions with concentrated blood serum or plasma that leads to the formation of large aggregates in a size regime of ≫100 nm. Most likely, such aggregates originate from protein induced bridging of nanoparticles, since it is well known that serum proteins adsorb onto the surface of essentially all nanoparticles utilized in medical applications. Thus, the protein corona around nanoparticles does not only change their biological identity but to a large extend also their size, thus possibly affecting biodistribution and in vivo circulation time. PMID:27179435

  18. Study of translational and rotational dynamics of birefringent colloidal particles by depolarized light scattering in the far- and near-field regimes.

    PubMed

    Escobedo-Sánchez, Manuel A; De la Cruz-Burelo, Hugo A; Arauz-Lara, José L; Haro-Pérez, Catalina; Rojas-Ochoa, Luis F

    2015-07-28

    We characterize the translational and rotational dynamics of birefringent spherical colloidal particles by depolarized light scattering in the far- and near-field regimes. For this purpose, we use depolarized dynamic light scattering and propose an extension of dynamic heterodyne near-field light scattering that takes into account the polarization state of the light. Such a combination of methods allows to access colloidal dynamics in an extended q-range and permits to evaluate different modes of particles motion in suspension. Furthermore, we obtain a good agreement between results from the far- and near-field approaches thus validating our proposal and opening the possibility to investigate simultaneously the subtle interplay between translational and rotational motions of anisotropic colloidal particles in length-scales from the order of the particle size to several interparticle distances. PMID:26233159

  19. Chemical composition of aerosol particles and light extinction apportionment before and during the heating season in Beijing, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qingqing; Sun, Yele; Jiang, Qi; Du, Wei; Sun, Chengzhu; Fu, Pingqing; Wang, Zifa

    2015-12-01

    Despite extensive efforts into characterization of the sources and formation mechanisms of severe haze pollution in the megacity of Beijing, the response of aerosol composition and optical properties to coal combustion emissions in the heating season remain poorly understood. Here we conducted a 3 month real-time measurement of submicron aerosol (PM1) composition by an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor and particle light extinction by a Cavity Attenuated Phase Shift extinction monitor in Beijing, China, from 1 October to 31 December 2012. The average (±σ) PM1 concentration was 82.4 (±73.1) µg/m3 during the heating period (HP, 15 November to 31 December), which was nearly 50% higher than that before HP (1 October to 14 November). While nitrate and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) showed relatively small changes, organics, sulfate, and chloride were observed to have significant increases during HP, indicating the dominant impacts of coal combustion sources on these three species. The relative humidity-dependent composition further illustrated an important role of aqueous-phase processing for the sulfate enhancement during HP. We also observed great increases of hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA) and coal combustion OA (CCOA) during HP, which was attributed to higher emissions at lower temperatures and coal combustion emissions, respectively. The relationship between light extinction and chemical composition was investigated using a multiple linear regression model. Our results showed that the largest contributors to particle extinction were ammonium nitrate (32%) and ammonium sulfate (28%) before and during HP, respectively. In addition, the contributions of SOA and primary OA to particle light extinction were quantified. The results showed that the OA extinction was mainly caused by SOA before HP and by SOA and CCOA during HP, yet with small contributions from HOA and cooking aerosol for the entire study period. Our results elucidate substantial changes of aerosol

  20. Light beam attenuation and backscattering properties of particles in the Bohai Sea and Yellow Sea with relation to biogeochemical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shengqiang; Qiu, Zhongfeng; Sun, Deyong; Shen, Xiaojing; Zhang, Hailong

    2016-06-01

    This study reports the first results of the variability in light beam attenuation and the backscattering properties of particles and their controlling factors during the summer in the Bohai Sea (BS) and Yellow Sea (YS), which are two typical shallow and semienclosed seas. We observe large variations in the particulate beam attenuation (cp) and backscattering coefficients (bbp); such variations are mainly attributed to changes in the total suspended matter, while the cross-sectional area concentration shows tighter relationships with both cp and bbp. The mass-specific beam attenuation (cp*) and backscattering coefficients (bbp*) vary more widely over about two orders of magnitude. The attenuation (Qce) and backscattering efficiencies (Qbbe) are important factors that control cp* and bbp*, which clearly separate all the samples into two types. Type 1 samples show low Qce and Qbbe and contain relatively high proportions of organic or large particles, while type 2 samples have high Qce and Qbbe and mainly contain relatively small mineral particles. The majority of the variability in cp* and bbp* within each type is related to the inverse of the product of particle apparent density (ρa) and mean diameter (DA); ρa plays a major role, while DA exerts only a slight impact. Overall, this study provides general knowledge of particulate beam attenuation and the backscattering properties in the BS and YS, which may improve our understanding of underwater radiative transfer processes, marine biogeochemical processes and ocean color algorithms.

  1. Characterization of optically soft spheroidal particles by multiangle light-scattering data by use of the neural-networks method.

    PubMed

    Berdnik, Vladimir V; Mukhamedjarov, Robert D; Loiko, Valery A

    2004-05-01

    A method for evaluating the size of optically soft spheroidal particles by use of the angular structure of scattered light is proposed. It is based on the use of multilevel neural networks with a linear activation function. The retrieval errors of radius R of the equivolume sphere and aspect ratio e are investigated. The ranges of the size of R, e, and the refractive index are 0.3-1.51 microns, 0.2-1, and 1.01-1.02, respectively. The retrieval errors of the equivolume radius and aspect ratio are 0.004 micron and 0.02, respectively, for a three-level neural network (at a precisely measured angular distribution of scattered light). The retrieval errors of R and e for a one-level neural network are 2-5 times greater. The errors for a multilevel neural network increase faster than those for a single-level network. PMID:15143660

  2. Cosmologically probing ultra-light particle dark matter using 21 cm signals

    SciTech Connect

    Kadota, Kenji; Mao, Yi; Silk, Joseph; Ichiki, Kiyomoto E-mail: mao@iap.fr E-mail: j.silk1@physics.ox.ac.uk

    2014-06-01

    There can arise ubiquitous ultra-light scalar fields in the Universe, such as the pseudo-Goldstone bosons from the spontaneous breaking of an approximate symmetry, which can make a partial contribution to the dark matter and affect the large scale structure of the Universe. While the properties of those ultra-light dark matter are heavily model dependent and can vary in a wide range, we develop a model-independent analysis to forecast the constraints on their mass and abundance using futuristic but realistic 21 cm observables as well as CMB fluctuations, including CMB lensing measurements. Avoiding the highly nonlinear regime, the 21 cm emission line spectra are most sensitive to the ultra-light dark matter with mass m ∼ 10{sup −26} eV for which the precision attainable on mass and abundance bounds can be of order of a few percent.

  3. Production of medical isotopes from a thorium target irradiated by light charged particles up to 70 MeV.

    PubMed

    Duchemin, C; Guertin, A; Haddad, F; Michel, N; Métivier, V

    2015-02-01

    The irradiation of a thorium target by light charged particles (protons and deuterons) leads to the production of several isotopes of medical interest. Direct nuclear reaction allows the production of Protactinium-230 which decays to Uranium-230 the mother nucleus of Thorium-226, a promising isotope for alpha radionuclide therapy. The fission of Thorium-232 produces fragments of interest like Molybdenum-99, Iodine-131 and Cadmium-115g. We focus our study on the production of these isotopes, performing new cross section measurements and calculating production yields. Our new sets of data are compared with the literature and the last version of the TALYS code. PMID:25574934

  4. Production of medical isotopes from a thorium target irradiated by light charged particles up to 70 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duchemin, C.; Guertin, A.; Haddad, F.; Michel, N.; Métivier, V.

    2015-02-01

    The irradiation of a thorium target by light charged particles (protons and deuterons) leads to the production of several isotopes of medical interest. Direct nuclear reaction allows the production of Protactinium-230 which decays to Uranium-230 the mother nucleus of Thorium-226, a promising isotope for alpha radionuclide therapy. The fission of Thorium-232 produces fragments of interest like Molybdenum-99, Iodine-131 and Cadmium-115g. We focus our study on the production of these isotopes, performing new cross section measurements and calculating production yields. Our new sets of data are compared with the literature and the last version of the TALYS code.

  5. Visible light-driven photocatalytic H{sub 2}-generation activity of CuS/ZnS composite particles

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Liang; Chen, Hua; Huang, Jianhua

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • Preparation of CuS/ZnS composite photocatalyst by cation-exchange reaction. • Visible light photocatalytic activity for H{sub 2} evolution without cocatalyst. • The H{sub 2}-evolution rate from water splitting depends on the CuS content. • The highest rate of H{sub 2} evolution is obtained with CuS (0.5 mol%)/ZnS composite. - Abstract: CuS/ZnS composite particles with diameter of 200–400 nm were successfully prepared by a simple cation-exchange reaction using ZnS spheres as a precursor. CuS nanoparticles with a few nanometers in diameter were observed on the surface of composite particles. The synthesized CuS/ZnS composite particles showed photocatalytic property effective for H{sub 2} evolution from an aqueous Na{sub 2}S and Na{sub 2}SO{sub 3} solution under visible light irradiation without any cocatalysts. The rate of H{sub 2} generation was found to be strongly dependent on the CuS content. The highest rate of H{sub 2} evolution reached 695.7 μmol h{sup −1} g{sup −1}, which was almost 7 times as high as that of the mechanical mixture of CuS and ZnS. The enhancement in the photocatalytic activity of CuS/ZnS composite particles is supposed to be due to the direct interfacial charge transfer of the CuS/ZnS heterojunction.

  6. White top-emitting organic light-emitting diodes with solution-processed nano-particle scattering layers

    SciTech Connect

    Schaefer, Tim; Schwab, Tobias; Lenk, Simone; Gather, Malte C.

    2015-12-07

    A random scattering approach to enhance light extraction in white top-emitting organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) is reported. Through solution processing from fluorinated solvents, a nano-particle scattering layer (NPSL) can be deposited directly on top of small molecule OLEDs without affecting their electrical performance. The scattering length for light inside the NPSL is determined from transmission measurements and found to be in agreement with Mie scattering theory. Furthermore, the dependence of the light outcoupling enhancement on electron transport layer thickness is studied. Depending on the electron transport layer thickness, the NPSL enhances the external quantum efficiency of the investigated white OLEDs by between 1.5 and 2.3-fold. For a device structure that has been optimized prior to application of the NPSL, the maximum external quantum efficiency is improved from 4.7% to 7.4% (1.6-fold improvement). In addition, the scattering layer strongly reduces the undesired shift in emission color with viewing angle.

  7. Light scattering by dust particles (PROGRA2 experiment): size and structure effects for transparent and absorbing materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadamcik, E.; Renard, J.-B.; Lasue, J.; Levasseur-Regourd, A. C.

    2007-08-01

    1- Introduction Cometary and possibly interplanetary dust particles seem to be mainly made of agglomerates of submicron and micron-sized grains. These particles are among the most primitive in our solar system. Regoliths on asteroidal and planetary surfaces seem to be loose materials produced by impinging meteorites on the surface of small bodies. Comparing their physical properties is thus fundamental to understand their evolution. To interpret remote observations of solar light scattered by dust particles and regoliths, it is necessary to use numerical and experimental simulations [1,2,3]. 2- PROGRA2 experiment PROGRA2 instruments are polarimeters; the light sources are two randomly polarized lasers (632.8 nm and 543.5 nm). Levitating particles (in microgravity or lifted by an air-draught) are studied by imaging polarimetry. Details on the instruments can be found in [4,5]. 3- Samples Two kinds of samples are studied: compact particles in the (1-400) micrometer size range and fluffy aggregates in the same size range, made from submicron and micronsized grains. The materials are transparent silica and absorbing carbon. Some deposited particles are huge agglomerates of micron-sized grains produced by random ballistic deposition of single grains [6,7] or produced by evaporation of mixtures in alcohol of fluffy aggregates of submicron-sized grains. Two samples are made of silica spheres coated by a carbonaceous black compound. Cometary analogues are mixtures of silica and amorphous carbon or Mg-Fe silicates mixed with amorphous carbon. 4- Results Phase curves and their main parameters (negative polarization at small phase angles and maximum polarization, Pmax, at 90-100° phase angle) for the different materials will be compared and related to the physical properties. For example, it is well known by numerical simulations and/or by experiments that the maximum polarization decreases when the size (submicrometer range) of the grains increases [2,8,9]. An inverse rule

  8. UV ATTENUATION NEAR CORAL REEFS IN THE FLORIDA KEYS: LIGHT ABSORPTION BY CDOM AND PARTICLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have investigated the roles of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) and suspended particles in the attenuation of UV radiation in the middle and lower regions of the Florida Keys. Extended exposure to UV radiation, along with elevated sea surface temperatures, impairs...

  9. Combined Light and Electron Microscopy using Diaminobenzidine Photooxidation to Monitor Trafficking of Lipids Derived from Lipoprotein Particles

    PubMed Central

    Röhrl, Clemens; Meisslitzer-Ruppitsch, Claudia; Bittman, Robert; Li, Zaiguo; Pabst, Georg; Prassl, Ruth; Strobl, Witta; Neumüller, Josef; Ellinger, Adolf; Pavelka, Margit; Stangl, Herbert

    2013-01-01

    Diaminobenzidine (DAB) photooxidation is a method for conversion of fluorescent signals into electron-dense precipitates that are visible in the electron microscope. Recently, we have applied this method to analyze organelles involved in holo-high density lipoprotein (HDL) particle uptake at the ultrastructural level. In the present work we extended the spectrum of molecules visualized via photooxidation to monitor the uptake of HDL-derived lipids in HepG2 cells. By the combined light-electron microscopic method and with the aid of the DAB photooxidation technique, it became possible for the first time to visualize different intracellular pathways of lipoprotein particle-derived lipids and analyze the compartments involved at the ultrastructural level. HDL-Alexa 568 was used to visualize holo-HDL particle uptake. Reconstituted HDL particles containing the fluorescent cholesterol analogues Bodipy-cholesterol, Bodipy-cholesteryl oleate, or cholesteryl Bodipy-ester were used to visualize uptake of the HDL-associated sterol. In Bodipy-cholesteryl oleate and cholesteryl Bodipy-ester, the cholesterol moiety or the fatty acid moiety is fluorescently labeled, respectively; in contrast, Bodipy-cholesterol is an analogue of free cholesterol. The cellular compartments involved in their intracellular routes after uptake were analyzed in the fluorescence and electron microscope after DAB photooxidation. Bodipy-cholesterol was found to be localized in tubular endosomes and multivesicular bodies (MVBs), in the trans-Golgi network, and in stacked Golgi cisternae. In contrast, HepG2 cells incubated with HDL containing Bodipy-cholesteryl oleate or cholesteryl Bodipy-ester gave an uptake pattern comparable to that of holo-HDL particles, with MVBs being involved. Bodipy-cholesteryl oleate was also found in lysosomes. These results indicate that HDL-derived cholesterol and cholesteryl ester are transported by different intracellular pathways in HepG2 cells. Thus, the DAB photooxidation

  10. Particle-in-cell simulations of ultra intense laser pulses propagating through overdense plasma for fast-ignitor and radiography applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasinski, Barbara F.; Langdon, A. Bruce; Hatchett, Stephen P.; Key, Michael H.; Tabak, Max

    1999-05-01

    Zohar (two-dimensions, particle-in-cell) [C. K. Birdsall and A. B. Langdon, Plasma Physics via Computer Simulation (McGraw-Hill, New York, 1985)] simulations of ultra intense laser beams boring into overdense plasmas whose parameters are guided by the fast-ignitor concept and radiography applications are presented. Complex low frequency magnetic field structures, narrow channel formation, and beam deflection are all evident. Particle tracking diagnostics elucidate the nature of the currents that produce and interact with these static magnetic fields which are larger than 109 G for simulations at 1021W/cm2 in a 50nc plasma. Tracking electron orbits provides a more complete understanding of the hot electron generation as the short pulse, high intensity laser penetrates overdense plasma. Particles which constitute the current in the narrow channel are partially confined by the low frequency magnetic field. In contrast, the return current particles on the outside of the channel are defocused by the high magnetic field and move away from the channel.

  11. Particle-in-cell simulations of ultra intense laser pulses propagating through overdense plasma for fast-ignitor and radiography applications

    SciTech Connect

    Lasinski, B.F.; Langdon, A.B.; Hatchett, S.P.; Key, M.H.; Tabak, M.

    1999-05-01

    Zohar (two-dimensions, particle-in-cell) [C. K. Birdsall and A. B. Langdon, {ital Plasma Physics via Computer Simulation} (McGraw{endash}Hill, New York, 1985)] simulations of ultra intense laser beams boring into overdense plasmas whose parameters are guided by the fast-ignitor concept and radiography applications are presented. Complex low frequency magnetic field structures, narrow channel formation, and beam deflection are all evident. Particle tracking diagnostics elucidate the nature of the currents that produce and interact with these static magnetic fields which are larger than 10{sup 9} G for simulations at 10{sup 21} W/cm{sup 2} in a 50n{sub c} plasma. Tracking electron orbits provides a more complete understanding of the hot electron generation as the short pulse, high intensity laser penetrates overdense plasma. Particles which constitute the current in the narrow channel are partially confined by the low frequency magnetic field. In contrast, the return current particles on the outside of the channel are defocused by the high magnetic field and move away from the channel.

  12. Fast and high-fidelity optical initialization of spin state of an electron in a semiconductor quantum dot using light-hole-trion states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Parvendra; Nakajima, Takashi

    2016-07-01

    We theoretically show that under the Faraday geometry fast and high-fidelity optical initialization of electron spin (ES) state in a semiconductor quantum dot (SQD) can be realized by utilizing the light-hole (LH)-trion states. Initialization is completed within the time scale of ten nanoseconds with high fidelity, and the initialization laser pulse can be linearly, right-circularly, or left-circularly polarized. Moreover, we demonstrate that the time required for initialization can be further shortened down to a few hundreds of picoseconds if we introduce a pillar-microcavity to promote the relaxation of a LH-trion state towards the desired ES state through the Purcell effect. We also clarify the role of heavy-hole and light-hole mixing induced transitions on the fidelity of ES state initialization.

  13. Laser light scattering review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaetzel, Klaus

    1989-01-01

    Since the development of laser light sources and fast digital electronics for signal processing, the classical discipline of light scattering on liquid systems experienced a strong revival plus an enormous expansion, mainly due to new dynamic light scattering techniques. While a large number of liquid systems can be investigated, ranging from pure liquids to multicomponent microemulsions, this review is largely restricted to applications on Brownian particles, typically in the submicron range. Static light scattering, the careful recording of the angular dependence of scattered light, is a valuable tool for the analysis of particle size and shape, or of their spatial ordering due to mutual interactions. Dynamic techniques, most notably photon correlation spectroscopy, give direct access to particle motion. This may be Brownian motion, which allows the determination of particle size, or some collective motion, e.g., electrophoresis, which yields particle mobility data. Suitable optical systems as well as the necessary data processing schemes are presented in some detail. Special attention is devoted to topics of current interest, like correlation over very large lag time ranges or multiple scattering.

  14. Laser light scattering review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaetzel, Klaus

    1989-08-01

    Since the development of laser light sources and fast digital electronics for signal processing, the classical discipline of light scattering on liquid systems experienced a strong revival plus an enormous expansion, mainly due to new dynamic light scattering techniques. While a large number of liquid systems can be investigated, ranging from pure liquids to multicomponent microemulsions, this review is largely restricted to applications on Brownian particles, typically in the submicron range. Static light scattering, the careful recording of the angular dependence of scattered light, is a valuable tool for the analysis of particle size and shape, or of their spatial ordering due to mutual interactions. Dynamic techniques, most notably photon correlation spectroscopy, give direct access to particle motion. This may be Brownian motion, which allows the determination of particle size, or some collective motion, e.g., electrophoresis, which yields particle mobility data. Suitable optical systems as well as the necessary data processing schemes are presented in some detail. Special attention is devoted to topics of current interest, like correlation over very large lag time ranges or multiple scattering.

  15. Development of perturbation Monte Carlo methods for polarized light transport in a discrete particle scattering model

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Jennifer; Hayakawa, Carole K.; Mourant, Judith R.; Venugopalan, Vasan; Spanier, Jerome

    2016-01-01

    We present a polarization-sensitive, transport-rigorous perturbation Monte Carlo (pMC) method to model the impact of optical property changes on reflectance measurements within a discrete particle scattering model. The model consists of three log-normally distributed populations of Mie scatterers that approximate biologically relevant cervical tissue properties. Our method provides reflectance estimates for perturbations across wavelength and/or scattering model parameters. We test our pMC model performance by perturbing across number densities and mean particle radii, and compare pMC reflectance estimates with those obtained from conventional Monte Carlo simulations. These tests allow us to explore different factors that control pMC performance and to evaluate the gains in computational efficiency that our pMC method provides. PMID:27231642

  16. Development of perturbation Monte Carlo methods for polarized light transport in a discrete particle scattering model.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Jennifer; Hayakawa, Carole K; Mourant, Judith R; Venugopalan, Vasan; Spanier, Jerome

    2016-05-01

    We present a polarization-sensitive, transport-rigorous perturbation Monte Carlo (pMC) method to model the impact of optical property changes on reflectance measurements within a discrete particle scattering model. The model consists of three log-normally distributed populations of Mie scatterers that approximate biologically relevant cervical tissue properties. Our method provides reflectance estimates for perturbations across wavelength and/or scattering model parameters. We test our pMC model performance by perturbing across number densities and mean particle radii, and compare pMC reflectance estimates with those obtained from conventional Monte Carlo simulations. These tests allow us to explore different factors that control pMC performance and to evaluate the gains in computational efficiency that our pMC method provides. PMID:27231642

  17. Commissioning of the DIAMANT 'Chessboard' Light-Charged-Particle CsI Detector Array with AFRODITE

    SciTech Connect

    Komati, F.S.; Bark, R.A.; Gueorguieva, E.; Lawrie, J.J.; Mullins, S.M.; Murray, S.H.T.; Sharpey-Schafer, J.F.; Gal, J.; Kalinka, G.; Krasznahorkay, A.; Molnar, J.; Nyako, B.M.; Timar, J.; Zolnai, L.; Juhasz, K.; Lipoglavsek, M.; Maliage, M.; Ramashidza, M.; Vymers, P.; Scheurer, J. N.

    2005-11-21

    In a commissioning measurement, the 'Chessboard' section of the DIAMANT charged-particle array has been coupled with the AFRODITE {gamma}-ray spectrometer at the iThemba Laboratory for Accelerator Based Sciences. Two data-sets were obtained following the bombardment of a 170Er target with a 13C beam at energies of 80 and 70 MeV, respectively. Offline analysis has thus far enabled the extension of a number of rotational bands associated with high-K intrinsic states in 176Hf. Also, the A = 172, 173 and 174 stable isotopes of ytterbium were populated via 2{alpha}xn channels with strengths of {approx}30-to-40% of the {alpha}xn yields. This, together with the comparative weakness of the pxn channels, is consistent with incomplete fusion as the dominant reaction mechanism responsible for the {alpha}-particle emission.

  18. A statistical model for simulating the emission of light particles from excited nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sannikov, A. V.; Savitskaya, E. N.

    2016-05-01

    The algorithms and basic equations of a novel evaporation model that have been implemented in the program package EVAP15 are detailed. The level density of an excited nucleus is described by the composite Gilbert-Cameron formula with parameter values as suggested by the IAEA working group RIPL-3. Special attention is paid to the cross sections of inverse reactions and, in particular, to those for the interactions of low-energy neutrons with nuclei and for crossing of the Coulomb barrier by low-energy charged particles. The model predictions are compared with a large volume of experimental data on the spectra of particles emitted in the reactions ( n, xn), ( n, xp), and ( n, xα) induced by neutrons with energy near 14 MeV and on the four spectra for the reaction ( p, xp) induced by 62-MeV protons.

  19. Light scattering by nonspherical particles - A refinement to the coupled-dipole method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dungey, Clifton E.; Bohren, Craig F.

    1991-01-01

    In the coupled-dipole method, an arbitrary particle is modeled as an array of N polarizable subunits, each of which gives rise to only electric dipole radiation. The Clausius-Mosotti relation is widely used to calculate the polarizability of the subunits that correspond to the dielectric function of the particle that the array represents. The Clausius-Mosotti relation is replaced here with an exact expression for the electric dipole polarizability, and improvement is found in extinction calculations for spheres as compared with Mie theory. Near a Froehlich frequency the coupled-dipole method yields extinction cross sections for spheres and spheroids that compare favorably with the continuous distribution of ellipsoids method and measured values.

  20. Nuclear Thermal Propulsion engine based on Particle Bed Reactor using light water steam as a propellant

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, J.R.; Ludewig, H.; Maise, G.

    1993-06-01

    In this paper the possibility of configuring a water cooled Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) rocket, based on a Particle Bed Reactor (PBR) is investigated. This rocket will be used to operate on water obtained from near earth objects. The conclusions reached in this paper indicate that it is possible to configure a PBR based NTP rocket to operate on water and meet the mission requirements envisioned for it. No insurmountable technology issues have been identified.