Science.gov

Sample records for fast light slow

  1. Slow and fast light switching in ruby

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajan, Rajitha P.; Riesen, Hans

    2015-05-01

    Studies about light propagation have been undertaken for more than a century. It is now well established that any material that has normal or anomalous dispersion generates slow or fast light. In this paper, we demonstrate an experimental technique to rapidly switch between slow and fast light in ruby. The experiment utilizes transient holeburning to create drastic variation in refractive index of ruby to produce slow as well as fast light. Transient hole-burning involves the depletion of the ground state leading to a highly populated excited state by single frequency laser excitation. This leads to a hole in the absorption spectrum when readout by a laser. We observed a delay of 29 ns and advancement of -11 ns in an external magnetic field of B║c = 12 mT corresponding to a group velocity of c/961 and negative group velocity of -c/365 respectively.

  2. Slow and fast light in semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedgwick, Forrest Grant

    Slow and fast light are the propagation of optical signals at group velocities below and above the speed of light in a given medium. There has been great interest in the use of nonlinear optics to engineer slow and fast light dispersion for applications in optical communications and radio-frequency or microwave photonics. Early results in this field were primarily confined to dilute atomic systems. While these results were impressive, they had two major barriers to practical application. First, the wavelengths were not compatible with fiber optic telecommunications. More importantly, the bandwidth obtainable in these experiments was inherently low; 100 kHz or less. Within the last five years slow and fast light effects have been observed and engineered in a much wider variety of systems. In this work, we detail our efforts to realize slow and fast light in semiconductor systems. There are three primary advantages of semiconductor systems: fiber-compatible wavelengths, larger bandwidth, and simplification of integration with other optical components. In this work we will explore three different types of physical mechanisms for implementing slow and fast light. The first is electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT). In transporting this process to semiconductors, we initially turn our attention to quantum dots or "artificial atoms". We present simulations of a quantum dot EIT-based device within the context of an optical communications link and we derive results which are generally applicable to a broad class of slow light devices. We then present experimental results realizing EIT in quantum wells by using long-lived electron spin coherence. The second mechanism we will explore is coherent population oscillations (CPO), also known as carrier density pulsations (CDP). We examine for the first time how both slow and fast light may be achieved in a quantum well semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) while operating in the gain regime. Again, we simulate the device

  3. Fast and slow light in zigzag microring resonator chains.

    PubMed

    Chamorro-Posada, P; Fraile-Pelaez, F J

    2009-03-01

    We analyze fast- and slow-light transmission in a zigzag microring resonator chain. In the superluminal case, a new light-transmission effect is found whereby the input optical pulse is reproduced in an almost-simultaneous manner at the various system outputs. When the input carrier is tuned to a different frequency, the system permits to slow down the propagating optical signal. Between these two extreme cases, the relative delay can be tuned within a broad range. We propose, and analyze numerically, a laser-array configuration for the stable operation of active devices. PMID:19252573

  4. Slow and fast light propagation in nonlinear Kerr media.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Qiguang; Ma, Seongmin; Wang, Huitian; Jung, S. S.

    2005-04-01

    Sub- and superluminal propagation of light pulse in Kerr materials has been investigated. Group velocities as slow as much less than 1 millimeter per second to as fast as negative several hundreds meters per second can be easily obtained in Kerr medium, which possesses large nonlinear refractive index and long relaxation time, such as Cr doped Alexandrite, Ruby, and GdAlO3. The physical mechanism is the strong highly dispersive coupling between different frequency components of the pulse. The new mechanism of slowing down pulses as well as producing superluminal pulses enlarges the very specific materials to all kinds of nonlinear optical materials.

  5. EDITORIAL: Slow light Slow light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, Robert; Hess, Ortwin; Denz, Cornelia; Paspalakis, Emmanuel

    2010-10-01

    Research into slow light began theoretically in 1880 with the paper [1] of H A Lorentz, who is best known for his work on relativity and the speed of light. Experimental work started some 60 years later with the work of S L McCall and E L Hahn [2] who explored non-linear self-induced transparency in ruby. This field of research has burgeoned in the last 10 years, starting with the work of L Vestergaard Hau and coworkers on slow light via electromagnetically induced transparency in a Bose-Einstein condensate [3]. Many groups are now able to slow light down to a few metres per second or even stop the motion of light entirely [4]. Today, slow light - or more often `slow and fast light' - has become its own vibrant field with a strongly increasing number of publications. In broad scope, slow light research can be categorized in terms of the sort of physical mechanism used to slow down the light. One sort of slow light makes use of material dispersion. This dispersion can be the natural dispersion of the ordinary refractive index or can be the frequency dependence of some nonlinear optical process, such as electromagnetically induced transparency, coherent population oscillations, stimulated light scattering, or four-wave mixing processes. The second sort of slow light makes use of the wavelength dependence of artificially structured materials, such as photonic crystals, optical waveguides, and collections of microresonators. Material systems in which slow light has been observed include metal vapours, rare-earth-doped materials, Raman and Brillioun gain media, photonic crystals, microresonators and, more recently, metamaterials. A common feature of all of these schemes is the presence of a sharp single resonance or multiple resonances produced by an atomic transition, a resonance in a photonic structure, or in a nonlinear optical process. Current applications of slow light include a series of attractive topics in optical information processing, such as optical data

  6. Storage and retrieval of light pulses in atomic media with 'slow' and 'fast' light

    SciTech Connect

    Lezama, A.; Akulshin, A. M.; Sidorov, A. I.; Hannaford, P.

    2006-03-15

    We report experimental evidence that light storage, understood as the controlled release of a light pulse by an atomic sample dependent on the past presence of a writing pulse, is not restricted to small-group-velocity media but can also occur in a negative-group-velocity medium. We present a numerical modeling in close agreement with our observations and a simple physical picture applicable to light storage experiments in both 'slow' and 'fast' light media.

  7. Measurement of the information velocity in fast- and slow-light optical pulse propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenner, Michael David

    This thesis describes a study of the velocity of information on optical pulses propagating through fast- and slow-light media. In fast- and slow-light media, the group velocity vg is faster than the speed of light in vacuum c (vg > c or vg < 0) or slower than c (0 < vg < c) respectively. While it is largely accepted that optical pulses can travel at these extreme group velocities, the velocity of information encoded on them is still the subject of considerable debate. There are many contradictory theories describing the velocity of information on optical pulses, but no accepted techniques for its experimental measurement. The velocity of information has broad implications for the principle of relativistic causality (which requires that information travels no faster than c) and for modern communications and computation. In this thesis, a new technique for measuring the information velocity vi is described and implemented for fast- and slow-light media. The fast- and slow-light media are generated using modern dispersion-tailoring techniques that use large atomic coherences to generate strong normal and anomalous dispersion. The information velocity in these media can then be measured using information-theoretic concepts by creating an alphabet of two distinct pulse symbols and transmitting the symbols through the media. By performing a detailed statistical analysis of the received information as a function of time, it is possible to calculate vi. This new technique makes it possible for the first time to measure the velocity of information on optical pulses. Applying this technique to fast-light pulses, where vg/c = -0.051 +/- 0.002, it is found that vi /c = 0.4(+0.7--0.2). In the slow-light case, where vg/c = 0.0097 +/- 0.0003, information is found to propagate at vi/c = 0.6. In the slow-light case, the error bars are slightly more complicated. The fast bound is -0.5c (which is faster than positive values) and the slow bound is 0.2c . These results represent the

  8. QUANTUM CONTROL OF LIGHT: From Slow Light and FAST CARS to Nuclear γ-ray Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scully, Marlan

    2007-06-01

    In recent work we have demonstrated strong coherent backward wave oscillation using forward propagating fields only. This surprising result is achieved by applying laser fields to an ultra-dispersive medium with proper chosen detunings to excite a molecular vibrational coherence that corresponds to a backward propagating wave [PRL, 97, 113001 (2006)]. The physics then has much in common with propagation of ultra-slow light. Applications of coherent scattering and remote sensing to the detection of bio and chemical pathogens (e.g., anthrax) via Coherent Anti-Raman Scattering together with Femtosecond Adaptive Spectroscopic Techniques (FAST CARS [Opt. Comm., 244, 423 (2005)]) will be discussed. Furthermore, the interplay between quantum optics (Dicke super and sub-radiant states) and nuclear physics (forward scattering of γ radiation) provides interesting problems and insights into the quantum control of scattered light [PRL, 96, 010501 (2005)].

  9. Influence of finite bandwidth on the propagation of information in fast- and slow-light media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amano, Heisuke; Tomita, Makoto

    2016-06-01

    We examined the propagation of information encoded as nonanalytical points on temporally Gaussian-shaped optical pulses in fast- and slow-light systems. The bandwidth of the input pulses determined the sharpness of the nonanalytical points. A sharp bending nonanalytical point propagated with luminal velocity in both fast- and slow-light systems, in good agreement with relativistic causality. As the bandwidth was reduced, the bending point became broad and propagated with the relevant group velocities. This transition was, however, qualitatively different in the fast- and slow-light systems. We also examined the predictability of the future pulse shape beyond the practical nonanalytical point on the basis of the expansion. When the bandwidth was reduced below a critical value, the expansion well predicted the future pulse shape.

  10. Slow/fast light using a very short Er3+/Yb3+ co-doped fiber.

    PubMed

    Gan, Jiulin; Chen, Jiali; Xu, Shanhui; Yang, Zhongmin; Jiang, Zhonghong

    2013-03-01

    A slow/fast light device with a sealed size of 130 mm×30 mm×3 mm has been demonstrated. Ultraslow propagation and superluminal propagation with group velocity values from 8.4 to -14.7 m/s are observed in a 3.86 cm long Er3+/Yb3+ co-doped single-mode phosphate glass fiber. The dependence of pump power, modulation frequency, and wavelength on the slow/fast light effect in this fiber is investigated in detail. These results suggest that this compact slow/fast device is more suitable for all-fiber applications than those made by traditional methods. PMID:23455260

  11. REVIEW ARTICLE: Slow and fast light based on coherent population oscillations in erbium-doped fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arrieta-Yáñez, Francisco; Calderón, Oscar G.; Melle, Sonia

    2010-10-01

    In this paper we review the main results on slow and fast light induced by coherent population oscillations in optical fibres doped with erbium ions. We explain the physics behind this technique and we describe the experimental realization. Finally, we summarize some recent advances in this field and future goals.

  12. From fast to slow light in a resonantly driven absorbing medium

    SciTech Connect

    Macke, Bruno; Segard, Bernard

    2010-08-15

    We theoretically study the propagation through a resonant absorbing medium of a time-dependent perturbation modulating the amplitude of a continuous wave (cw). Modeling the medium as a two-level system and linearizing the Maxwell-Bloch equations for the perturbation, we establish an exact analytical expression of the transfer function relating the Fourier transforms of the incident and transmitted perturbations. It directly gives the gain and the phase shift undergone in the medium by a harmonic modulation. For the case of a pulse modulation, it enables us to determine the transmission time of the pulse center of mass (group delay), evidencing the relative contributions of the coherent and incoherent (population) relaxations. We show that the group delay has a negative value (fast light) fixed by the coherent effects when the cw intensity is small compared to the saturation intensity and becomes positive (slow light) when this intensity increases, before attaining a maximum that cannot exceed the population relaxation time. The analytical results are completed by numerical determinations of the shape of the transmitted pulses in the different regimes.

  13. Experimental demonstration of enhanced slow and fast light by forced coherent population oscillations in a semiconductor optical amplifier.

    PubMed

    Berger, Perrine; Bourderionnet, Jérôme; de Valicourt, Guilhem; Brenot, Romain; Bretenaker, Fabien; Dolfi, Daniel; Alouini, Mehdi

    2010-07-15

    We experimentally demonstrate enhanced slow and fast light by forced coherent population oscillations in a semiconductor optical amplifier at gigahertz frequencies. This approach is shown to rely on the interference between two different contributions. This opens up the possibility of conceiving a controllable rf phase shifter based on this setup. PMID:20634862

  14. Ultrahigh enhancement in absolute and relative rotation sensing using fast and slow light

    SciTech Connect

    Shahriar, M. S.; Pati, G. S.; Tripathi, R.; Gopal, V.; Messall, M.; Salit, K.

    2007-05-15

    We describe a resonator-based optical gyroscope whose sensitivity for measuring absolute rotation is enhanced via use of the anomalous dispersion characteristic of superluminal light propagation. The enhancement is given by the inverse of the group index, saturating to a bound determined by the group velocity dispersion. We also show how the offsetting effect of the concomitant broadening of the resonator linewidth may be circumvented by using an active cavity. For realistic conditions, the enhancement factor is as high as 10{sup 6}. We also show how normal dispersion used for slow light can enhance relative rotation sensing in a specially designed Sagnac interferometer, with the enhancement given by the slowing factor.

  15. Microwave field controlled slow and fast light with a coupled system consisting of a nanomechanical resonator and a Cooper-pair box.

    PubMed

    Ma, Peng-Cheng; Xiao, Yin; Yu, Ya-Fei; Zhang, Zhi-Ming

    2014-02-10

    We theoretically demonstrate an efficient method to control slow and fast light in microwave regime with a coupled system consisting of a nanomechanical resonator (NR) and a superconducting Cooper-pair box (CPB). Using the pump-probe technique, we find that both slow and fast light effects of the probe field can appear in this coupled system. Furthermore, we show that a tunable switch from slow light to fast light can be achieved by only adjusting the pump-CPB detuning from the NR frequency to zero. Our coupled system may have potential applications, for example, in optical communication, microwave photonics, and nonlinear optics. PMID:24663653

  16. Slow and Fast Light in Room Temperature Solids: Fundamentals and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, Robert W.

    2004-03-01

    In recent years there has been great interest in techniques that can lead to a modification of the propagation velocity of light pulses through optical materials. Interest stems both from the intrinsic interest in the ability to control the velocity of light over large ranges and from the potential for applications such as controllable delay lines, optical data storage devices, optical memories, and devices for quantum information. Matthew Bigelow, Nick Lepeshkin, and I have recently developed a new method for achieving ultra-slow light propagation in room temperature solids. Our method makes use of an effect known as coherent population oscillations. In particular, we apply pump and probe fields to a ruby crystal, and the population of ground-state chromium ions is induced to oscillate coherently at the resulting beat frequency. These oscillations lead to a decreased absorption of the probe beam, and consequently (by the Kramers-Kronig relations) to a steep variation of the refractive index. In our laboratory studies of this effect, we observed reduced light velocities with light speeds as low as 57 m/s. We have also studied light propagation in the reverse saturable absorber alexandrite. In this case, the sign of the effect is inverted, leading to superluminal (but causal) light propagation.

  17. The role of input chirp on phase shifters based on slow and fast light effects in semiconductor optical amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Xue, Weiqi; Chen, Yaohui; Ohman, Filip; Mørk, Jesper

    2009-02-01

    We experimentally investigate the initial chirp dependence of slow and fast light effects in a semiconductor optical amplifier followed by an optical filter. It is shown that the enhancement of the phase shift due to optical filtering strongly depends on the chirp of the input optical signal. We demonstrate approximately 120 degrees phase delay as well as approximately 170 degrees phase advance at a microwave frequency of 19 GHz for different optimum values of the input chirp. The experimental results are shown to be in good agreement with numerical results based on a four-wave mixing model. Finally, a simple physical explanation based on an analytical perturbative approach is presented. PMID:19188968

  18. Tunable phase control of slow and fast light propagation in a slab doped by four-level quantum dot nanostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jafarzadeh, Hossein; Sangachin, Elnaz Ahmadi; Asadpour, Seyyed Hossein

    2015-12-01

    Tunable phase control of the slow and fast light propagation through a defect slab medium doped by four-level InGaN/GaN quantum dot structure is demonstrated. By solving the Schrödinger and Poisson’s equations self-consistently, a spherical InGaN quantum dot with GaN barrier shell which can interact by terahertz (THz) signal field is designed numerically. It is found that the phase variation of THz signal field imparts the tunability in the group velocity of the transmitted and reflected pulses through a dielectric slab.

  19. Controlling slow and fast light and dynamic pulse-splitting with tunable optical gain in a whispering-gallery-mode microcavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asano, M.; Özdemir, Ş. K.; Chen, W.; Ikuta, R.; Yang, L.; Imoto, N.; Yamamoto, T.

    2016-05-01

    We report controllable manipulation of slow and fast light in a whispering-gallery-mode microtoroid resonator fabricated from Erbium (Er3+) doped silica. We observe continuous transition of the coupling between the fiber-taper waveguide and the microresonator from undercoupling to critical coupling and then to overcoupling regimes by increasing the pump power even though the spatial distance between the resonator and the waveguide was kept fixed. This, in turn, enables switching from fast to slow light and vice versa just by increasing the optical gain. An enhancement of delay of two-fold over the passive silica resonator (no optical gain) was observed in the slow light regime. Moreover, we show dynamic pulse splitting and its control in slow/fast light systems using optical gain.

  20. Microwave phase shifter with controllable power response based on slow- and fast-light effects in semiconductor optical amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Xue, Weiqi; Sales, Salvador; Capmany, José; Mørk, Jesper

    2009-04-01

    We suggest and experimentally demonstrate a method for increasing the tunable rf phase shift of semiconductor waveguides while at the same time enabling control of the rf power. This method is based on the use of slow- and fast-light effects in a cascade of semiconductor optical amplifiers combined with the use of spectral filtering to enhance the role of refractive index dynamics. A continuously tunable phase shift of approximately 240 degrees at a microwave frequency of 19 GHz is demonstrated in a cascade of two semiconductor optical amplifiers, while maintaining an rf power change of less than 1.6 dB. The technique is scalable to more amplifiers and should allow realization of an rf phase shift of 360 degrees. PMID:19340174

  1. Large dynamic light-matter entanglement from driving neither too fast nor too slow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acevedo, O. L.; Quiroga, L.; Rodríguez, F. J.; Johnson, N. F.

    2015-09-01

    A significant problem facing next-generation quantum technologies is how to generate and manipulate macroscopic entanglement in light and matter systems. Here we report a regime of dynamical light-matter behavior in which a giant, system-wide entanglement is generated by varying the light-matter coupling at intermediate velocities. This enhancement is far larger, broader ranged, and more experimentally accessible than that occurring near the quantum phase transition of the same model under adiabatic conditions. By appropriate choices of the coupling within this intermediate regime, the enhanced entanglement can be made to spread system-wide or to reside in each subsystem separately.

  2. Slow light and saturable absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selden, A. C.

    2009-06-01

    Quantitative analysis of slow light experiments utilising coherent population oscillation (CPO) in a range of saturably absorbing media, including ruby and alexandrite, Er3+:Y2SiO5, bacteriorhodopsin, semiconductor quantum devices and erbium-doped optical fibres, shows that the observations may be more simply interpreted as saturable absorption phenomena. A basic two-level model of a saturable absorber displays all the effects normally associated with slow light, namely phase shift and modulation gain of the transmitted signal, hole burning in the modulation frequency spectrum and power broadening of the spectral hole, each arising from the finite response time of the non-linear absorption. Only where hole-burning in the optical spectrum is observed (using independent pump and probe beams), or pulse delays exceeding the limits set by saturable absorption are obtained, can reasonable confidence be placed in the observation of slow light in such experiments. Superluminal (“fast light”) phenomena in media with reverse saturable absorption (RSA) may be similarly explained.

  3. Heterogeneity of myofibrillar proteins in lobster fast and slow muscles: variants of troponin, paramyosin, and myosin light chains comprise four distinct protein assemblages

    SciTech Connect

    Mykles, D.L.

    1985-01-01

    Fast and slow muscles from the claws and abdomen of the American lobster Homarus americanus were examined for adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) activity and for differences in myofibrillar proteins. Both myosin and actomyosin ATPase were correlated with fiber composition and contractile speed. Four distinct patterns of myofibrilla proteins observed in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels were distinguished by different assemblages of regulatory and contractile protein variants. A total of three species of troponin-T, five species of troponin-I, and three species of troponin-C were observed. Lobster myosins contained two groups of light chains (LC), termed alpha and beta. There were three ..cap alpha..-LC variants and two ..beta..-LC variants. There were no apparent differences in myosin heavy chain, actin, and tropomyosin. Only paramyosin showed a pattern completely consistent with muscle fiber type: slow fibers contained a species (105 kD) slightly smaller than the principle variant (110 kD) in fast fibers. It is proposed that the type of paramyosin present could provide a biochemical marker to identify the fiber composition of muscles that have not been fully characterized. The diversity of troponin and myosin LC variants suggests that subtle differences in physiological performance exist within the broader categories of fast- and slow-twitch muscles. 31 references, 6 figures, 2 tables.

  4. Can Fast and Slow Intelligence Be Differentiated?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Partchev, Ivailo; De Boeck, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Responses to items from an intelligence test may be fast or slow. The research issue dealt with in this paper is whether the intelligence involved in fast correct responses differs in nature from the intelligence involved in slow correct responses. There are two questions related to this issue: 1. Are the processes involved different? 2. Are the…

  5. Fast wandering of slow birds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toner, John

    2011-12-01

    I study a single slow bird moving with a flock of birds of a different and faster (or slower) species. I find that every species of flocker has a characteristic speed γ≠v0, where v0 is the mean speed of the flock such that if the speed vs of the slow bird equals γ, it will randomly wander transverse to the mean direction of flock motion far faster than the other birds will: Its mean-squared transverse displacement will grow in d=2 with time t like t5/3, in contrast to t4/3 for the other birds. In d=3, the slow bird's mean-squared transverse displacement grows like t5/4, in contrast to t for the other birds. If vs≠γ, the mean-squared displacement of the slow bird crosses over from t5/3 to t4/3 scaling in d=2 and from t5/4 to t scaling in d=3 at a time tc that scales according to tc∝|vs-γ|-2.

  6. Large Deviations in Fast-Slow Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchet, Freddy; Grafke, Tobias; Tangarife, Tomás; Vanden-Eijnden, Eric

    2016-02-01

    The incidence of rare events in fast-slow systems is investigated via analysis of the large deviation principle (LDP) that characterizes the likelihood and pathway of large fluctuations of the slow variables away from their mean behavior—such fluctuations are rare on short time-scales but become ubiquitous eventually. Classical results prove that this LDP involves an Hamilton-Jacobi equation whose Hamiltonian is related to the leading eigenvalue of the generator of the fast process, and is typically non-quadratic in the momenta—in other words, the LDP for the slow variables in fast-slow systems is different in general from that of any stochastic differential equation (SDE) one would write for the slow variables alone. It is shown here that the eigenvalue problem for the Hamiltonian can be reduced to a simpler algebraic equation for this Hamiltonian for a specific class of systems in which the fast variables satisfy a linear equation whose coefficients depend nonlinearly on the slow variables, and the fast variables enter quadratically the equation for the slow variables. These results are illustrated via examples, inspired by kinetic theories of turbulent flows and plasma, in which the quasipotential characterizing the long time behavior of the system is calculated and shown again to be different from that of an SDE.

  7. From slow to fast--the user controls the rate of the release of molecules from masked forms using a photoswitch and different types of light.

    PubMed

    Warford, C Chad; Carling, Carl-Johan; Branda, Neil R

    2015-04-25

    Exposure to UV light generates a ring-closed isomer of a diarylethene, which undergoes very slow bond breaking and release even after the light is turned off. The rate of release is increased by exposing the isomer to UV and/or visible light. PMID:25806619

  8. Slow light SOI slot photonic crystal waveguides with low loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caer, Charles; Combrie, Sylvain; Le Roux, Xavier; De Rossi, Alfredo; Cassan, Eric

    2013-05-01

    Slow light in SOI Slotted Photonic Crystal Waveguides (SPCW) infiltrated by a refractive liquid are investigated. By employing an interferometric technique similar to Optical Coherent Tomography (OCT), we report a group velocity lower than c/20 over a 1 mm-long SPCW. From the OCT measurements, we also infer moderate propagation losses. In the fast light regime (nG <10) propagation loss is about 15 dB.cm-1. Moreover, the coupling to slow modes is efficient. These results show that infiltrated slow light SPCW are a promising route to silicon organic hybrid photonics.

  9. Experimental demonstration of spinor slow light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Meng-Jung; Ruseckas, Julius; Lee, Chin-Yuan; Kudriašov, Viačeslav; Chang, Kao-Fang; Cho, Hung-Wen; JuzeliÅ«nas, Gediminas; Yu, Ite A.

    2016-03-01

    Over the last decade there has been a continuing interest in slow and stored light based on the electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) effect, because of their potential applications in quantum information manipulation. However, previous experimental works all dealt with the single-component slow light which cannot be employed as a qubit. In this work, we report the first experimental demonstration of two-component or spinor slow light (SSL) using a double tripod (DT) atom-light coupling scheme. The oscillations between the two components, similar to the Rabi oscillation of a two-level system or a qubit, were observed. Single-photon SSL can be considered as two-color qubits. We experimentally demonstrated a possible application of the DT scheme as quantum memory and quantum rotator for the two-color qubits. This work opens up a new direction in the slow light research.

  10. Experimental demonstration of spinor slow light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Meng-Jung; Ruseckas, Julius; Lee, Chin-Yuan; Kudriašov, Viačeslav; Chang, Kao-Fang; Cho, Hung-Wen; Juzeliānas, Gediminas; Yu, Ite A.

    2014-11-01

    Slow light based on the effect of electromagnetically induced transparency is of great interest due to its applications in low-light-level nonlinear optics and quantum information manipulation. The previous experiments all dealt with the single-component slow light. Here, we report the experimental demonstration of two-component or spinor slow light using a double-tripod atom-light coupling scheme. The scheme involves three atomic ground states coupled to two excited states by six light fields. The oscillation due to the interaction between the two components was observed. On the basis of the stored light, our data showed that the double-tripod scheme behaves like the two outcomes of an interferometer enabling precision measurements of frequency detuning. We experimentally demonstrated a possible application of the double-tripod scheme as quantum memory/rotator for the two-colour qubit. Our study also suggests that the spinor slow light is a better method than a widely used scheme in the nonlinear frequency conversion.

  11. Experimental demonstration of spinor slow light

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Meng-Jung; Ruseckas, Julius; Lee, Chin-Yuan; Kudriašov, Viačeslav; Chang, Kao-Fang; Cho, Hung-Wen; Juzeliānas, Gediminas; Yu, Ite A.

    2014-01-01

    Slow light based on the effect of electromagnetically induced transparency is of great interest due to its applications in low-light-level nonlinear optics and quantum information manipulation. The previous experiments all dealt with the single-component slow light. Here, we report the experimental demonstration of two-component or spinor slow light using a double-tripod atom–light coupling scheme. The scheme involves three atomic ground states coupled to two excited states by six light fields. The oscillation due to the interaction between the two components was observed. On the basis of the stored light, our data showed that the double-tripod scheme behaves like the two outcomes of an interferometer enabling precision measurements of frequency detuning. We experimentally demonstrated a possible application of the double-tripod scheme as quantum memory/rotator for the two-colour qubit. Our study also suggests that the spinor slow light is a better method than a widely used scheme in the nonlinear frequency conversion. PMID:25417851

  12. Optimized slow light and beam profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalra, Rita; Klein, Mason; Xiao, Yanhong; Hohensee, Michael; Phillips, David F.; Walsworth, Ronald L.

    2008-05-01

    We will present an overview of Electromagnetically Induced Transparency (EIT) and slow light dependence on transverse laser field profile. Idealized treatments typically assume a uniform optical field profile while experiments are typically performed with gaussian beam profiles. Here we present a comparison of EIT lineshapes measured with flat top and gaussian transverse profiles and compare slow light delays observed under such circumstances with those derived from measured EIT line shapes in simple models. Additionally we study the effects of differential AC Stark shifts due to transverse beam profiles and their effect on light storage.

  13. Fast and slow metabolizers of Hoasca.

    PubMed

    Callaway, J C

    2005-06-01

    Harmine, a major alkaloid in ayahuasca (hoasca), is a selective and reversible inhibitor of the enzyme monoamine oxidase-A (MAO-A). It is also a selective inhibitor of the human cytochrome P450 isozyme 2D6 (CYP 2D6), which metabolizes harmine to a more hydrophilic derivative for eventual excretion. CYP 2D6 exhibits a wide range of polymorphisms in human populations, and variations in this enzymatic activity could account for differences in effects between individuals who use hoasca. This report broadly describes two subgroups of CYP 2D6 phenotypes--i.e., fast and slow metabolizers of harmine-in 14 experienced male members of the União do Vegetal (UDV) who received a standardized dosage of hoasca. To compensate for metabolic variations in their normal religious practice, the administered dose of hoasca is always determined by the presiding mestre, who is responsible for deciding the actual amount for each individual. This age-old method compensates for metabolic variations between individuals and variations in both the alkaloid profile and strength of the hoasca. PMID:16149329

  14. Deciding about fast and slow decisions.

    PubMed

    Croskerry, Pat; Petrie, David A; Reilly, James B; Tait, Gordon

    2014-02-01

    Two reports in this issue address the important topic of clinical decision making. Dual process theory has emerged as the dominant model for understanding the complex processes that underlie human decision making. This theory distinguishes between the reflexive, autonomous processes that characterize intuitive decision making and the deliberate reasoning of an analytical approach. In this commentary, the authors address the polarization of viewpoints that has developed around the relative merits of the two systems. Although intuitive processes are typically fast and analytical processes slow, speed alone does not distinguish them. In any event, the majority of decisions in clinical medicine are not dependent on very short response times. What does appear relevant to diagnostic ease and accuracy is the degree to which the symptoms of the disease being diagnosed are characteristic ones. There are also concerns around some methodological issues related to research design in this area of enquiry. Reductionist approaches that attempt to isolate dependent variables may create such artificial experimental conditions that both external and ecological validity are sacrificed. Clinical decision making is a complex process with many independent (and interdependent) variables that need to be separated out in a discrete fashion and then reflected on in real time to preserve the fidelity of clinical practice. With these caveats in mind, the authors believe that research in this area should promote a better understanding of clinical practice and teaching by focusing less on the deficiencies of intuitive and analytical systems and more on their adaptive strengths. PMID:24362398

  15. REVIEW ARTICLE: Fast light in atomic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akulshin, Alexander M.; McLean, Russell J.

    2010-10-01

    Atomic media have played a major role in studies of fast light. One of their attractive features is the ability to manipulate experimental parameters to control the dispersive properties that determine the group velocity of a propagating light pulse. We give an overview of the experimental methods, based on both linear and nonlinear atom-light interaction, that have produced superluminal propagation in atomic media, and discuss some of the significant theoretical contributions to the issues of pulse preservation and reconciling faster-than-light propagation and the principle of causality. The comparison of storage of light, enhanced Kerr nonlinearity and efficient wave mixing processes in slow and fast light atomic media illustrates their common and distinct features.

  16. Synchronized Ion Acceleration by Ultraintense Slow Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brantov, A. V.; Govras, E. A.; Kovalev, V. F.; Bychenkov, V. Yu.

    2016-02-01

    An effective scheme of synchronized laser-triggered ion acceleration and the corresponding theoretical model are proposed for a slow light pulse of relativistic intensity, which penetrates into a near-critical-density plasma, strongly slows, and then increases its group velocity during propagation within a target. The 3D particle-in-cell simulations confirm this concept for proton acceleration by a femtosecond petawatt-class laser pulse experiencing relativistic self-focusing, quantify the characteristics of the generated protons, and demonstrate a significant increase of their energy compared with the proton energy generated from optimized ultrathin solid dense foils.

  17. Synchronized Ion Acceleration by Ultraintense Slow Light.

    PubMed

    Brantov, A V; Govras, E A; Kovalev, V F; Bychenkov, V Yu

    2016-02-26

    An effective scheme of synchronized laser-triggered ion acceleration and the corresponding theoretical model are proposed for a slow light pulse of relativistic intensity, which penetrates into a near-critical-density plasma, strongly slows, and then increases its group velocity during propagation within a target. The 3D particle-in-cell simulations confirm this concept for proton acceleration by a femtosecond petawatt-class laser pulse experiencing relativistic self-focusing, quantify the characteristics of the generated protons, and demonstrate a significant increase of their energy compared with the proton energy generated from optimized ultrathin solid dense foils. PMID:26967421

  18. Kinematics of slow and fast CMEs in soar cycle 23 and 24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Dipankar; Gopalswamy, Nat; Pant, Vaibhav

    2016-07-01

    CMEs are episodic expulsion of plasma and magnetic fields from Sun into heliosphere. CMEs can be classified, based on their speeds, as slow CMEs and fast CMEs. We find that slow CMEs and fast CMEs behave differently in two cycles. While fast CMEs seem to follow the sunspot variations, slow CMEs have much flatter distribution. Thus the distribution of total CMEs is affected by slow CME populations. We find double peak behaviour in fast CMEs, since they follow the sunspot distribution, in both the cycles without any significant delay from sunspot variation. It suggests that most of the fast CMEs originates from active regions associated with sunspots. We also find double peak behaviour in slow CMEs in cycle 24 but not in cycle 23. In addition to this the number of slow CMEs are far more than in cycle 23. These findings point towards the fact that in cycle 24 slow CMEs to some extent are associated with sunspots and due to weak heliospheric field they could somehow escape easily thus giving double peak behaviour and larger distribution in cycle 24. Apart from this we also find that slow and fast CMEs follow different power laws. This may shed light on their origin as well.

  19. Slow slip and the transition from fast to slow fronts in the rupture of frictional interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Trømborg, Jørgen Kjoshagen; Sveinsson, Henrik Andersen; Scheibert, Julien; Thøgersen, Kjetil; Amundsen, David Skålid; Malthe-Sørenssen, Anders

    2014-01-01

    The failure of the population of microjunctions forming the frictional interface between two solids is central to fields ranging from biomechanics to seismology. This failure is mediated by the propagation along the interface of various types of rupture fronts, covering a wide range of velocities. Among them are the so-called slow fronts, which are recently discovered fronts much slower than the materials’ sound speeds. Despite intense modeling activity, the mechanisms underlying slow fronts remain elusive. Here, we introduce a multiscale model capable of reproducing both the transition from fast to slow fronts in a single rupture event and the short-time slip dynamics observed in recent experiments. We identify slow slip immediately following the arrest of a fast front as a phenomenon sufficient for the front to propagate further at a much slower pace. Whether slow fronts are actually observed is controlled both by the interfacial stresses and by the width of the local distribution of forces among microjunctions. Our results show that slow fronts are qualitatively different from faster fronts. Because the transition from fast to slow fronts is potentially as generic as slow slip, we anticipate that it might occur in the wide range of systems in which slow slip has been reported, including seismic faults. PMID:24889640

  20. Slow slip and the transition from fast to slow fronts in the rupture of frictional interfaces.

    PubMed

    Trømborg, Jørgen Kjoshagen; Sveinsson, Henrik Andersen; Scheibert, Julien; Thøgersen, Kjetil; Amundsen, David Skålid; Malthe-Sørenssen, Anders

    2014-06-17

    The failure of the population of microjunctions forming the frictional interface between two solids is central to fields ranging from biomechanics to seismology. This failure is mediated by the propagation along the interface of various types of rupture fronts, covering a wide range of velocities. Among them are the so-called slow fronts, which are recently discovered fronts much slower than the materials' sound speeds. Despite intense modeling activity, the mechanisms underlying slow fronts remain elusive. Here, we introduce a multiscale model capable of reproducing both the transition from fast to slow fronts in a single rupture event and the short-time slip dynamics observed in recent experiments. We identify slow slip immediately following the arrest of a fast front as a phenomenon sufficient for the front to propagate further at a much slower pace. Whether slow fronts are actually observed is controlled both by the interfacial stresses and by the width of the local distribution of forces among microjunctions. Our results show that slow fronts are qualitatively different from faster fronts. Because the transition from fast to slow fronts is potentially as generic as slow slip, we anticipate that it might occur in the wide range of systems in which slow slip has been reported, including seismic faults. PMID:24889640

  1. Slow-light-based optical frequency shifter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qian; Bao, Yupan; Thuresson, Axel; Nilsson, Adam N.; Rippe, Lars; Kröll, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate experimentally and theoretically a controllable way of shifting the frequency of an optical pulse by using a combination of spectral hole burning, slow light effect, and linear Stark effect in a rare-earth-ion-doped crystal. We claim that the solid angle of acceptance of a frequency shift structure can be close to 2 π , which means that the frequency shifter could work not only for optical pulses propagating in a specific spatial mode but also for randomly scattered light. As the frequency shift is controlled solely by an external electric field, it works also for weak coherent light fields and can be used, for example, as a frequency shifter for quantum memory devices in quantum communication.

  2. Improved Slow Light Capacity In Graphene-based Waveguide

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Ran; Peng, Xi-Liang; Li, Er-Ping; Xu, Yang; Jin, Jia-Min; Zhang, Xian-Min; Chen, Hong-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    We have systematically investigated the wideband slow light in two-dimensional material graphene, revealing that graphene exhibits much larger slow light capability than other materials. The slow light performances including material dispersion, bandwidth, dynamic control ability, delay-bandwidth product, propagation loss, and group-velocity dispersion are studied, proving graphene exhibits significant advantages in these performances. A large delay-bandwidth product has been obtained in a simple yet functional grating waveguide with slow down factor c/vg at 163 and slow light bandwidth Δω at 94.4 nm centered at 10.38 μm, which is several orders of magnitude larger than previous results. Physical explanation of the enhanced slow light in graphene is given. Our results indicate graphene is an excellent platform for slow light applications, promoting various future slow light devices based on graphene. PMID:26478563

  3. Differentiation of fast and slow muscle fibers by bioimpedance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, M.-V.; Khider, N.; Ribbe, E.; Damez, J.-L.

    2010-04-01

    The differentiation of fast and slow muscle fibers in vivo still requires constraining equipment (ergometer, biopsy ...) and invasive techniques. These fibers conduct the electrical current differently. Therefore the aim of this study is to see if it is possible to differentiate quickly, by bioimpedance, fast and slow fibers, and firstly muscles which are typical composed by slow or fast fibers. To do this, we used a multifrequency impedancemeter Z-Metrix® (BioparHom© Company, France). We collected the electrical characteristics (Longitudinal and Transversal, from 1 to 1000 kHz) for a population of 20 rats aged 70 days, on Soleus muscles (composed principally of slow fibers) and Extensor Digitroum Longus (EDL) muscles (composed principally of fast fibers). We compared the means of alpha (L/T), R (L/T) and X (L/T) with Wilcoxon tests. We obtained non significant differences between electrical data obtained on EDL and Soleus muscles, but we could see differences on graphics representation and with the example of one rat. Therefore, we can assume that differentiation, by bioimpedance, of muscles typed slow and fast fibers, could be possible.

  4. Slow Light and Superluminality in Kerr Media without a Pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Qiguang; Seo, Jae Tae; Tabibi, Bagher; Wang, Huitian

    2005-08-01

    Subluminal and superluminal propagation of a light pulse in Kerr materials has been investigated. Group velocities as slow as much less than 1 mm per second to as fast as negative several thousands meters per second can easily be obtained in the Kerr medium, which possesses a large nonlinear refractive index and long relaxation time, such as Cr3+-doped alexandrite, ruby, and GdAlO3. The physical mechanism is the strong highly dispersive coupling between different frequency components of the pulse.

  5. The slow and fast pyrolysis of cherry seed.

    PubMed

    Duman, Gozde; Okutucu, Cagdas; Ucar, Suat; Stahl, Ralph; Yanik, Jale

    2011-01-01

    The slow and fast pyrolysis of cherry seeds (CWS) and cherry seeds shells (CSS) was studied in fixed-bed and fluidized bed reactors at different pyrolysis temperatures. The effects of reactor type and temperature on the yields and composition of products were investigated. In the case of fast pyrolysis, the maximum bio-oil yield was found to be about 44 wt% at pyrolysis temperature of 500 °C for both CWS and CSS, whereas the bio yields were of 21 and 15 wt% obtained at 500 °C from slow pyrolysis of CWS and CSS, respectively. Both temperature and reactor type affected the composition of bio-oils. The results showed that bio-oils obtained from slow pyrolysis of CWS and CSS can be used as a fuel for combustion systems in industry and the bio-oil produced from fast pyrolysis can be evaluated as a chemical feedstock. PMID:20801019

  6. Threshold Characteristics of Slow-Light Photonic Crystal Lasers.

    PubMed

    Xue, Weiqi; Yu, Yi; Ottaviano, Luisa; Chen, Yaohui; Semenova, Elizaveta; Yvind, Kresten; Mork, Jesper

    2016-02-12

    The threshold properties of photonic crystal quantum dot lasers operating in the slow-light regime are investigated experimentally and theoretically. Measurements show that, in contrast to conventional lasers, the threshold gain attains a minimum value for a specific cavity length. The experimental results are explained by an analytical theory for the laser threshold that takes into account the effects of slow light and random disorder due to unavoidable fabrication imperfections. Longer lasers are found to operate deeper into the slow-light region, leading to a trade-off between slow-light induced reduction of the mirror loss and slow-light enhancement of disorder-induced losses. PMID:26918991

  7. Threshold Characteristics of Slow-Light Photonic Crystal Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Weiqi; Yu, Yi; Ottaviano, Luisa; Chen, Yaohui; Semenova, Elizaveta; Yvind, Kresten; Mork, Jesper

    2016-02-01

    The threshold properties of photonic crystal quantum dot lasers operating in the slow-light regime are investigated experimentally and theoretically. Measurements show that, in contrast to conventional lasers, the threshold gain attains a minimum value for a specific cavity length. The experimental results are explained by an analytical theory for the laser threshold that takes into account the effects of slow light and random disorder due to unavoidable fabrication imperfections. Longer lasers are found to operate deeper into the slow-light region, leading to a trade-off between slow-light induced reduction of the mirror loss and slow-light enhancement of disorder-induced losses.

  8. Characterization of slow and fast phase nystagmus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lessard, Charles S.; Rodriguez-Garcia, Carlos A.; Wong, Wing Chan; Im, Jae J.; Schmidt, Glenn F.

    1991-01-01

    A current literature review of the analog and digital process of vestibular and optical kinetic nystagmus reveals little agreement in the methods used by various labs. The strategies for detection of saccade (fast phase velocity component of nystagmus) vary between labs, and most of the process have not been evaluated and validated with a standard database. A survey was made of major vestibular labs in the U.S. that perform computer analyses of vestibular and optokinetic reflexes to stimuli, and a baseline was established from which to standardize data acquisition and analysis programs. The concept of an Error Index was employed as the criterium for evaluating the performance of the vestibular analysis software programs. The performance criterium is based on the detection of saccades and is the average of the percentages of missed detections and false detections. Evaluation of the programs produced results for lateral gaze with saccadic amplitude of one, two, three, five, and ten degrees with various signal-to-noise ratios. In addition, results were obtained for sinusoidal pursuit of 0.05, 0.10, and 0.50 Hz with saccades from one to ten degrees at various signal-to-noise ratios. Selection of the best program was made from the performance in the lateral gaze with three degrees of saccadic amplitude and in the 0.10 Hz sinusoid with three degrees of saccadic amplitude.

  9. Modeling fast and slow earthquakes at various scales

    PubMed Central

    IDE, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    Earthquake sources represent dynamic rupture within rocky materials at depth and often can be modeled as propagating shear slip controlled by friction laws. These laws provide boundary conditions on fault planes embedded in elastic media. Recent developments in observation networks, laboratory experiments, and methods of data analysis have expanded our knowledge of the physics of earthquakes. Newly discovered slow earthquakes are qualitatively different phenomena from ordinary fast earthquakes and provide independent information on slow deformation at depth. Many numerical simulations have been carried out to model both fast and slow earthquakes, but problems remain, especially with scaling laws. Some mechanisms are required to explain the power-law nature of earthquake rupture and the lack of characteristic length. Conceptual models that include a hierarchical structure over a wide range of scales would be helpful for characterizing diverse behavior in different seismic regions and for improving probabilistic forecasts of earthquakes. PMID:25311138

  10. Slow Magnetosonic Waves and Fast Flows in Active Region Loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ofman, L.; Wang, T. J.; Davila, J. M.

    2012-01-01

    Recent extreme ultraviolet spectroscopic observations indicate that slow magnetosonic waves are present in active region (AR) loops. Some of the spectral data were also interpreted as evidence of fast (approx 100-300 km/s) quasiperiodic flows. We have performed three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (3D MHD) modeling of a bipolar AR that contains impulsively generated waves and flows in coronal loops. The model AR is initiated with a dipole magnetic field and gravitationally stratified density, with an upflow-driven steadily or periodically in localized regions at the footpoints of magnetic loops. The resulting flows along the magnetic field lines of the AR produce higher density loops compared to the surrounding plasma by injection of material into the flux tubes and the establishment of siphon flow.We find that the impulsive onset of flows with subsonic speeds result in the excitation of damped slow magnetosonic waves that propagate along the loops and coupled nonlinearly driven fast-mode waves. The phase speed of the slow magnetosonic waves is close to the coronal sound speed. When the amplitude of the driving pulses is increased we find that slow shock-like wave trains are produced. When the upflows are driven periodically, undamped oscillations are produced with periods determined by the periodicity of the upflows. Based on the results of the 3D MHD model we suggest that the observed slow magnetosonic waves and persistent upflows may be produced by the same impulsive events at the bases of ARs.

  11. SLOW MAGNETOSONIC WAVES AND FAST FLOWS IN ACTIVE REGION LOOPS

    SciTech Connect

    Ofman, L.; Wang, T. J.; Davila, J. M.

    2012-08-01

    Recent extreme ultraviolet spectroscopic observations indicate that slow magnetosonic waves are present in active region (AR) loops. Some of the spectral data were also interpreted as evidence of fast ({approx}100-300 km s{sup -1}) quasi-periodic flows. We have performed three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (3D MHD) modeling of a bipolar AR that contains impulsively generated waves and flows in coronal loops. The model AR is initiated with a dipole magnetic field and gravitationally stratified density, with an upflow-driven steadily or periodically in localized regions at the footpoints of magnetic loops. The resulting flows along the magnetic field lines of the AR produce higher density loops compared to the surrounding plasma by injection of material into the flux tubes and the establishment of siphon flow. We find that the impulsive onset of flows with subsonic speeds result in the excitation of damped slow magnetosonic waves that propagate along the loops and coupled nonlinearly driven fast-mode waves. The phase speed of the slow magnetosonic waves is close to the coronal sound speed. When the amplitude of the driving pulses is increased we find that slow shock-like wave trains are produced. When the upflows are driven periodically, undamped oscillations are produced with periods determined by the periodicity of the upflows. Based on the results of the 3D MHD model we suggest that the observed slow magnetosonic waves and persistent upflows may be produced by the same impulsive events at the bases of ARs.

  12. Slow Light in Coupled Resonator Optical Waveguides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Hongrok; Gates, Amanda L.; Fuller, Kirk A.; Gregory, Don A.; Witherow, William K.; Paley, Mark S.; Frazier, Donald O.; Smith, David D.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Recently, we discovered that a splitting of the whispering gallery modes (WGMs) occurs in coupled resonator optical waveguides (CROWs), and that these split modes are of a higher Q than the single-resonator modes, leading to enormous circulating intensity magnification factors that dramatically reduce thresholds for nonlinear optical (NLO) processes. As a result of the enhancements in Q, pulses propagating at a split resonance can propagate much slower (faster) for over (under)-coupled structures, due to the modified dispersion near the split resonance. Moreover, when loss is considered, the mode-splitting may be thought of as analogous to the Autler-Townes splitting that occurs in atomic three-level lambda systems, i.e., it gives rise to induced transparency as a result of destructive interference. In under- or over-coupled CROWs, this coupled resonator induced transparency (CRIT) allows slow light to be achieved at the single-ring resonance with no absorption, while maintaining intensities such that NLO effects are maximized. The intensity magnification of the circulating fields and phase transfer characteristics are examined in detail.

  13. Effect of Fast and Slow Pranayama Practice on Cognitive Functions In Healthy Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Vivek Kumar; M., Rajajeyakumar; S., Velkumary; Subramanian, Senthil Kumar; Bhavanani, Ananda B.; Madanmohan; Sahai, Ajit; Thangavel, Dinesh

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To compare the cumulative effect of commonly practised slow and fast pranayama on cognitive functions in healthy volunteers. Settings and Design: 84 participants who were in self-reported good health, who were in the age group of 18-25 years, who were randomized to fast pranayama, slow pranayama and control group with 28 participants in each group. Material and Methods: Fast pranayama included kapalabhati, bhastrika and kukkuriya. Slow pranayama included nadishodhana, Pranav and Savitri. Respective pranayama training was given for 35 minutes, three times per week, for a duration of 12 weeks under the supervision of a certified yoga trainer. Parameters were recorded before and after 12 weeks of intervention: Perceived stress scale (PSS), BMI, waist to hip ratio and cognitive parameters-letter cancellation test, trail making tests A and B, forward and reverse digit spans and auditory and visual reaction times for red light and green light. Statistical Analysis: Inter–group comparison was done by one way ANOVA and intra-group comparison was done by paired t-test. Results and Conclusion: Executive functions, PSS and reaction time improved significantly in both fast and slow pranayama groups, except reverse digit span, which showed an improvement only in fast pranayama group. In addition, percentage reduction in reaction time was significantly more in the fast pranayama group as compared to that in slow pranayama group. Both types of pranayamas are beneficial for cognitive functions, but fast pranayama has additional effects on executive function of manipulation in auditory working memory, central neural processing and sensory-motor performance. PMID:24596711

  14. A comparison of rat myosin from fast and slow skeletal muscle and the effect of disuse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Unsworth, B. R.; Witzmann, F. A.; Fitts, R. H.

    1981-01-01

    Certain enzymatic and structural features of myosin, purified from rat skeletal muscles representative of the fast twitch glycolytic (type IIb), the fast twitch oxidative (type IIa), and the slow twitch oxidative (type I) fiber, were determined and the results were compared with the measured contractile properties. Good correlation was found between the shortening velocities and Ca(2+)-activated ATPase activity for each fiber type. Short term hind limb immobilization caused prolongation of contraction time and one-half relaxation time in the fast twitch muscles and a reduction of these contractile properties in slow twitch soleus. Furthermore, the increased maximum shortening velocity in the immobilized soleus could be correlated with increased Ca(2+)-ATPase, but no change was observed in the enzymatic activity of the fast twitch muscles. No alteration in light chain distribution with disuse was observed in any of the fiber types. The myosin from slow twitch soleus could be distinguished from fast twitch myosins on the basis of the pattern of peptides generated by proteolysis of the heavy chains. Six weeks of hind limb immobilization resulted in both an increased ATPase activity and an altered heavy chain primary structure in the slow twitch soleus muscle.

  15. Physiological changes in fast and slow muscle with simulated weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dettbarn, W. D.; Misulis, K. E.

    1984-01-01

    A rat hindlimb suspension model of simulated weightlessness was used to examine the physiological characteristics of skeletal muscle. The physiological sequelae of hindlimb suspension were compared to those of spinal cord section, denervation by sciatic nerve crush, and control. Muscle examined were the predominantly slow (Type 1) soleus (SOL) and the predominantly fast (Type 2) extensor digitorum longus (EDL). Two procedures which alter motor unit activity, hindlimb suspension and spinal cord section, produce changes in characteristics of skeletal muscles that are dependent upon fiber type. The SOL develops characteristics more representative of a fast muscle, including smaller Type 1 fiber proportion and higher AChE activity. The EDL, which is already predominantly fast, loses most of its few Type 1 fibers, thus also becoming faster. These data are in agreement with the studies in which rats experienced actual weightlessness.

  16. Slow-light polaritons in Rydberg gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleischhauer, Michael

    2012-02-01

    Slow-light polaritons are quasi-particles generated in the interaction of photons with laser-driven atoms with a λ- or ladder-type coupling scheme under conditions of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT). They are a superposition of electromagnetic and collective spin excitations. If one of the states making up the atomic spin is a high lying Rydberg level, the polaritons are subject to a strong and non-local interaction mediated by a dipole-dipole or van-der Waals coupling between excited Rydberg atoms. I will present and discuss an effective many-body model for these Rydberg polaritons. Depending on the detuning of the control laser the interaction potential between the polaritons can be repulsive or attractive and can have a large imaginary component for distances less than the so-called blockade radius. The non-local effective interaction gives rize to interesting many-body phenomena such as the generation of photons with an avoided volume, visible in stronlgy suppressed two-particle correlations inside the blockade volume. Moreover the long-range, power-law scaling of the interaction can in the repulsive case give rize to the formation of quasi-crystalline structures of photons. In a one dimensional system the low-energy dynamics of the polaritons can be described in terms of a Luttinger liquid. Using DMRG simulations the Luttinger K parameter is calculated and conditions for the formation of a quasi-crystal are derived. When confined to a two-dimensional geometry, e.g. using a resonator with quasi-degenerate transversal mode spectrum, Rydberg polaritons are an interesting candidate to study the bosonic fractional quantum Hall effect. I will argue that the formation of photons with an avoided volume is essential for explaining recent experiments on stationary EIT in Rydberg gases [1,2].[4pt] [1] J.D. Pritchard et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 193603 (2010). [0pt] [2] D. Petrosyan, J. Otterbach, and M. Fleischhauer, arXiv:1106.1360

  17. Fast-slow climate dynamics and peak global warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seshadri, Ashwin K.

    2016-06-01

    The dynamics of a linear two-box energy balance climate model is analyzed as a fast-slow system, where the atmosphere, land, and near-surface ocean taken together respond within few years to external forcing whereas the deep-ocean responds much more slowly. Solutions to this system are approximated by estimating the system's time-constants using a first-order expansion of the system's eigenvalue problem in a perturbation parameter, which is the ratio of heat capacities of upper and lower boxes. The solution naturally admits an interpretation in terms of a fast response that depends approximately on radiative forcing and a slow response depending on integrals of radiative forcing with respect to time. The slow response is inversely proportional to the "damping-timescale", the timescale with which deep-ocean warming influences global warming. Applications of approximate solutions are discussed: conditions for a warming peak, effects of an individual pulse emission of carbon dioxide (CO2 ), and metrics for estimating and comparing contributions of different climate forcers to maximum global warming.

  18. Commercializing MEMS--too fast or too slow?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, Steven T.; Carr, William N.; Mados, Hillary; Narang, Divjot S.

    1996-09-01

    MEMS as a technology base is coming of age, but as in any vital process growing pains occur. Commercializing MEMS is simultaneously viewed as agonizingly slow by many of its promoters and lightingly quick by many companies whose products are being replaced with MEMS based substitutes. This effort ties current efforts in market analysis, technology evaluations, competency based strategy in an effort to understand the pace of MEMS commercialization.

  19. Superluminal and slow light propagation in a room-temperature solid.

    PubMed

    Bigelow, Matthew S; Lepeshkin, Nick N; Boyd, Robert W

    2003-07-11

    We have observed both superluminal and ultraslow light propagation in an alexandrite crystal at room temperature. Group velocities as slow as 91 meters per second to as fast as -800 meters per second were measured and attributed to the influence of coherent population oscillations involving chromium ions in either mirror or inversion sites within the crystal lattice. Namely, ions in mirror sites are inversely saturable and cause superluminal light propagation, whereas ions in inversion sites experience conventional saturable absorption and produce slow light. This technique for producing large group indices is considerably easier than the existing methods to implement and is therefore suitable for diverse applications. PMID:12855803

  20. Fast optical switch having reduced light loss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Bruce N. (Inventor); Cooper, Ronald F. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    An electrically controlled optical switch uses an electro-optic crystal of the type having at least one set of fast and slow optical axes. The crystal exhibits electric field induced birefringence such that a plane of polarization oriented along a first direction of a light beam passing through the crystal may be switched to a plane of polarization oriented along a second direction. A beam splitting polarizer means is disposed at one end of the crystal and directs a light beam passing through the crystal whose plane of polarization is oriented along the first direction differently from a light beam having a plane of polarization oriented along the second direction. The electro-optic crystal may be chosen from the crystal classes 43m, 42m, and 23. In a preferred embodiment, the electro-optic crystal is a bismuth germanium oxide crystal or a bismuth silicon oxide crystal. In another embodiment of the invention, polarization control optics are provided which transmit substantially all of the incident light to the electro-optic crystal, substantially reducing the insertion loss of the switch.

  1. Measuring Fast and Slow Enzyme Kinetics in Stationary Droplets.

    PubMed

    Fradet, Etienne; Bayer, Christopher; Hollfelder, Florian; Baroud, Charles N

    2015-12-01

    We present a new microfluidic platform for the study of enzymtatic reactions using static droplets on demand. This allows us to monitor both fast and slow reactions with the same device and minute amounts of reagents. The droplets are produced and displaced using confinement gradients, which allows the experiments to be performed without having any mean flow of the external phase. Our device is used to produce six different pairs of drops, which are placed side by side in the same microfluidic chamber. A laser pulse is then used to trigger the fusion of each pair, thus initiating a chemcial reaction. Imaging is used to monitor the time evolution of enzymatic reactions. In the case of slow reactions, the reagents are completely mixed before any reaction is detected. This allows us to use standard Michaelis-Menten theory to analyze the time evolution. In the case of fast reactions, the time evolution takes place through a reaction-diffusion process, for which we develop a model that incorporates enzymatic reactions in the reaction terms. The theoretical predictions from this model are then compared to experiments in order to provide measurements of the chemical kinetics. The approach of producing droplets through confinement gradients and analyzing reactions within stationary drops provides an ultralow consumption platform. The physical principles are simple and robust, which suggests that the platform can be automated to reach large throughput analyses of enzymes. PMID:26524082

  2. Slow and fast solar wind - data selection and statistical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wawrzaszek, Anna; Macek, Wiesław M.; Bruno, Roberto; Echim, Marius

    2014-05-01

    In this work we consider the important problem of selection of slow and fast solar wind data measured in-situ by the Ulysses spacecraft during two solar minima (1995-1997, 2007-2008) and solar maximum (1999-2001). To recognise different types of solar wind we use a set of following parameters: radial velocity, proton density, proton temperature, the distribution of charge states of oxygen ions, and compressibility of magnetic field. We present how this idea of the data selection works on Ulysses data. In the next step we consider the chosen intervals for fast and slow solar wind and perform statistical analysis of the fluctuating magnetic field components. In particular, we check the possibility of identification of inertial range by considering the scale dependence of the third and fourth orders scaling exponents of structure function. We try to verify the size of inertial range depending on the heliographic latitudes, heliocentric distance and phase of the solar cycle. Research supported by the European Community's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007 - 2013) under grant agreement no 313038/STORM.

  3. Energy and energy flux in axisymmetric slow and fast waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreels, M. G.; Van Doorsselaere, T.; Grant, S. D. T.; Jess, D. B.; Goossens, M.

    2015-06-01

    Aims: We aim to calculate the kinetic, magnetic, thermal, and total energy densities and the flux of energy in axisymmetric sausage modes. The resulting equations should contain as few parameters as possible to facilitate applicability for different observations. Methods: The background equilibrium is a one-dimensional cylindrical flux tube model with a piecewise constant radial density profile. This enables us to use linearised magnetohydrodynamic equations to calculate the energy densities and the flux of energy for axisymmetric sausage modes. Results: The equations used to calculate the energy densities and the flux of energy in axisymmetric sausage modes depend on the radius of the flux tube, the equilibrium sound and Alfvén speeds, the density of the plasma, the period and phase speed of the wave, and the radial or longitudinal components of the Lagrangian displacement at the flux tube boundary. Approximate relations for limiting cases of propagating slow and fast sausage modes are also obtained. We also obtained the dispersive first-order correction term to the phase speed for both the fundamental slow body mode under coronal conditions and the slow surface mode under photospheric conditions. Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  4. Demonstration of slow light in semiconductor optical amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Anoop C.; Venkitesh, Deepa; Dexter, Karl; Anandarajah, Prince; Barry, Liam P.

    2011-08-01

    Slow light generation through four wave mixing is experimentally investigated in a non-linear semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA). The mechanism of slow-light generation is analyzed through gain saturation behavior of the SOA. The delay of the probe beam is controlled optically by pump-probe detuning. A delay of 260 ps is achieved for sinusoidal modulation at 0.5 GHz corresponding to a RF phase change of 0.26π.

  5. Demonstration of slow light in semiconductor optical amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Anoop C.; Venkitesh, Deepa; Dexter, Karl; Anandarajah, Prince; Barry, Liam P.

    2010-12-01

    Slow light generation through four wave mixing is experimentally investigated in a non-linear semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA). The mechanism of slow-light generation is analyzed through gain saturation behavior of the SOA. The delay of the probe beam is controlled optically by pump-probe detuning. A delay of 260 ps is achieved for sinusoidal modulation at 0.5 GHz corresponding to a RF phase change of 0.26π.

  6. Fast Computation of Bispectrum Features with Generalized Slow Roll

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adshead, Peter; Hu, Wayne; Dvorkin, Cora; Peiris, Hiranya V.

    2011-08-01

    We develop a fast technique based on the generalized slow-roll (GSR) approach for computing the curvature bispectrum of inflationary models with features. We show that all triangle configurations can be expressed in terms of three simple integrals over the inflationary background with typical accuracy of better than ˜20%. With a first-order GSR approach the typical accuracy can be improved to better than the ˜5% level. We illustrate this technique with the step potential model that has been invoked to explain the WMAP temperature power spectrum glitches at ℓ˜20-40 and show that the maximum likelihood model falls short of observability by more than a factor of 100 in amplitude. We also explicitly demonstrate that the bispectrum consistency relation with the local slope of the power spectrum is satisfied for these models. In the GSR approach, the bispectrum arises from integrals of nearly the same function of the background slow-roll parameters as the power spectrum but with a stronger weight to the epoch before horizon crossing. Hence this technique enables reverse engineering of models with large bispectrum but small power spectrum features.

  7. Fast and Slow Wetting Dynamics on nanostructured surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandyala, Dhiraj; Rahmani, Amir; Cubaud, Thomas; Colosqui, Carlos

    2015-11-01

    This talk will present force-displacement and spontaneous drop spreading measurements on diverse nanostructured surfaces (e.g., mesoporous titania thin films, nanoscale pillared structures, on silica or glass substrates). Experimental measurements are performed for water-air and water-oil systems. The dynamics of wetting observed in these experiments can present remarkable crossovers from fast to slow or arrested dynamics. The emergence of a slow wetting regime is attributed to a multiplicity of metastable equilibrium states induced by nanoscale surface features. The crossover point can be dramatically advanced or delayed by adjusting specific physical parameters (e.g., viscosity of the wetting phases) and geometric properties of the surface nanostructure (e.g., nanopore/pillar radius and separation). Controlling the crossover point to arrested dynamics can effectively modify the degree of contact angle hysteresis and magnitude of liquid adhesion forces observed on surfaces of different materials. This work is supported by a SEED Award from The Office of Brookhaven National Laboratory Affairs at Stony Brook University.

  8. The energy storage in the formation of slow light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakhmuratov, R. N.

    2010-08-01

    Slow light formation in media with (i) an electromagnetically induced transparency, (ii) a doublet structure, and (iii) a single absorption line, detuned from resonance, is considered with the help of a simple model. The model is based on the description of particles in these media by a pseudospin 1/2, which is subject to two 'orthogonal fields'. We mainly focus on the analysis of the reversible process of the particle excitation-de-excitation resulting in the temporal storage of the light-pulse energy without the pulse corruption. The influence of irreversible relaxation processes on the slow light formation is studied.

  9. REVIEW ARTICLE: Slow light enhanced nonlinear optics in periodic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monat, C.; de Sterke, M.; Eggleton, B. J.

    2010-10-01

    We review recent advances related to slow light in periodic structures, where the refractive index varies along one or two directions, i.e. gratings and planar photonic crystals. We focus on how these geometries are conducive to enhancing the nonlinear interaction between light and matter. We describe the underlying theory developed for shallow gratings, but whose conclusions can be extended to planar photonic crystal waveguides, in particular the enhancement of third-order nonlinear processes with slow light. We review some experiments showing how gratings have been used for pulse compression and the generation of slow gap solitons. We then present recent nonlinear experiments performed in photonic crystal waveguides that demonstrate the strong reinforcement of nonlinear third-order optical phenomena with slow light. We discuss the challenges associated with slow light in these 2D structures and their unique advantage—dispersion engineering—for creating broadband nonlinear devices for all-optical signal processing. By breaking down the relation between dispersion and group velocity imposed in gratings, these structures also offer new opportunities for generating soliton-like effects over short length scales, at low powers and with short pulses.

  10. Limit cycles in slow-fast codimension 3 saddle and elliptic bifurcations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huzak, R.; De Maesschalck, P.; Dumortier, F.

    This paper deals with local bifurcations occurring near singular points of planar slow-fast systems. In particular, it is concerned with the study of the slow-fast variant of the unfolding of a codimension 3 nilpotent singularity. The slow-fast variant of a codimension 1 Hopf bifurcation has been studied extensively before and its study has lead to the notion of canard cycles in the Van der Pol system. Similarly, codimension 2 slow-fast Bogdanov-Takens bifurcations have been characterized. Here, the singularity is of codimension 3 and we distinguish slow-fast elliptic and slow-fast saddle bifurcations. We focus our study on the appearance on small-amplitude limit cycles, and rely on techniques from geometric singular perturbation theory and blow-up.

  11. Slow light with electromagnetically induced transparency in optical fibre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhamad Hatta, Agus; Kamli, Ali A.; Al-Hagan, Ola A.; Moiseev, Sergey A.

    2015-08-01

    Slow light with electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) in the core of optical fibre containing three-level atoms is investigated. The guided modes are treated in the weakly guiding approximation which renders the analysis into a manageable form. The transparency window and permittivity profile of the core due to the strong pump field in the EIT scheme is calculated. For a specific permittivity profile of the core due to EIT, the propagation constant of the weak signal field and spatial shape of fundamental guided mode are calculated by solving the vector wave equation using the finite difference method. It is found that the transparency window and slow light field can be controlled via the optical fibre parameters. The reduced group velocity of slow light in this configuration is useful for many technological applications such as optical memories, effective control of single photon fields, optical buffers and delay lines.

  12. Speed of fast and slow rupture fronts along frictional interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trømborg, Jørgen Kjoshagen; Sveinsson, Henrik Andersen; Thøgersen, Kjetil; Scheibert, Julien; Malthe-Sørenssen, Anders

    2015-07-01

    The transition from stick to slip at a dry frictional interface occurs through the breaking of microjunctions between the two contacting surfaces. Typically, interactions between junctions through the bulk lead to rupture fronts propagating from weak and/or highly stressed regions, whose junctions break first. Experiments find rupture fronts ranging from quasistatic fronts, via fronts much slower than elastic wave speeds, to fronts faster than the shear wave speed. The mechanisms behind and selection between these fronts are still imperfectly understood. Here we perform simulations in an elastic two-dimensional spring-block model where the frictional interaction between each interfacial block and the substrate arises from a set of junctions modeled explicitly. We find that material slip speed and rupture front speed are proportional across the full range of front speeds we observe. We revisit a mechanism for slow slip in the model and demonstrate that fast slip and fast fronts have a different, inertial origin. We highlight the long transients in front speed even along homogeneous interfaces, and we study how both the local shear to normal stress ratio and the local strength are involved in the selection of front type and front speed. Last, we introduce an experimentally accessible integrated measure of block slip history, the Gini coefficient, and demonstrate that in the model it is a good predictor of the history-dependent local static friction coefficient of the interface. These results will contribute both to building a physically based classification of the various types of fronts and to identifying the important mechanisms involved in the selection of their propagation speed.

  13. Distinguishing Fast and Slow Processes in Accuracy - Response Time Data.

    PubMed

    Coomans, Frederik; Hofman, Abe; Brinkhuis, Matthieu; van der Maas, Han L J; Maris, Gunter

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the relation between speed and accuracy within problem solving in its simplest non-trivial form. We consider tests with only two items and code the item responses in two binary variables: one indicating the response accuracy, and one indicating the response speed. Despite being a very basic setup, it enables us to study item pairs stemming from a broad range of domains such as basic arithmetic, first language learning, intelligence-related problems, and chess, with large numbers of observations for every pair of problems under consideration. We carry out a survey over a large number of such item pairs and compare three types of psychometric accuracy-response time models present in the literature: two 'one-process' models, the first of which models accuracy and response time as conditionally independent and the second of which models accuracy and response time as conditionally dependent, and a 'two-process' model which models accuracy contingent on response time. We find that the data clearly violates the restrictions imposed by both one-process models and requires additional complexity which is parsimoniously provided by the two-process model. We supplement our survey with an analysis of the erroneous responses for an example item pair and demonstrate that there are very significant differences between the types of errors in fast and slow responses. PMID:27167518

  14. Distinguishing Fast and Slow Processes in Accuracy - Response Time Data

    PubMed Central

    Coomans, Frederik; Hofman, Abe; Brinkhuis, Matthieu; van der Maas, Han L. J.; Maris, Gunter

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the relation between speed and accuracy within problem solving in its simplest non-trivial form. We consider tests with only two items and code the item responses in two binary variables: one indicating the response accuracy, and one indicating the response speed. Despite being a very basic setup, it enables us to study item pairs stemming from a broad range of domains such as basic arithmetic, first language learning, intelligence-related problems, and chess, with large numbers of observations for every pair of problems under consideration. We carry out a survey over a large number of such item pairs and compare three types of psychometric accuracy-response time models present in the literature: two ‘one-process’ models, the first of which models accuracy and response time as conditionally independent and the second of which models accuracy and response time as conditionally dependent, and a ‘two-process’ model which models accuracy contingent on response time. We find that the data clearly violates the restrictions imposed by both one-process models and requires additional complexity which is parsimoniously provided by the two-process model. We supplement our survey with an analysis of the erroneous responses for an example item pair and demonstrate that there are very significant differences between the types of errors in fast and slow responses. PMID:27167518

  15. Fast Light-Sheet Scanner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, William W., Jr.; Humphreys, William M., Jr.; Bartram, Scott M.

    1995-01-01

    Optomechanical apparatus maintains sheet of pulsed laser light perpendicular to reference axis while causing sheet of light to translate in oscillatory fashion along reference axis. Produces illumination for laser velocimeter in which submicrometer particles entrained in flow illuminated and imaged in parallel planes displaced from each other in rapid succession. Selected frequency of oscillation range upward from tens of hertz. Rotating window continuously shifts sheet of light laterally while maintaining sheet parallel to same plane.

  16. Mitochondrial divergence between slow- and fast-aging garter snakes.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Tonia S; Arendsee, Zebulun W; Bronikowski, Anne M

    2015-11-01

    Mitochondrial function has long been hypothesized to be intimately involved in aging processes--either directly through declining efficiency of mitochondrial respiration and ATP production with advancing age, or indirectly, e.g., through increased mitochondrial production of damaging free radicals with age. Yet we lack a comprehensive understanding of the evolution of mitochondrial genotypes and phenotypes across diverse animal models, particularly in species that have extremely labile physiology. Here, we measure mitochondrial genome-types and transcription in ecotypes of garter snakes (Thamnophis elegans) that are adapted to disparate habitats and have diverged in aging rates and lifespans despite residing in close proximity. Using two RNA-seq datasets, we (1) reconstruct the garter snake mitochondrial genome sequence and bioinformatically identify regulatory elements, (2) test for divergence of mitochondrial gene expression between the ecotypes and in response to heat stress, and (3) test for sequence divergence in mitochondrial protein-coding regions in these slow-aging (SA) and fast-aging (FA) naturally occurring ecotypes. At the nucleotide sequence level, we confirmed two (duplicated) mitochondrial control regions one of which contains a glucocorticoid response element (GRE). Gene expression of protein-coding genes was higher in FA snakes relative to SA snakes for most genes, but was neither affected by heat stress nor an interaction between heat stress and ecotype. SA and FA ecotypes had unique mitochondrial haplotypes with amino acid substitutions in both CYTB and ND5. The CYTB amino acid change (Isoleucine → Threonine) was highly segregated between ecotypes. This divergence of mitochondrial haplotypes between SA and FA snakes contrasts with nuclear gene-flow estimates, but correlates with previously reported divergence in mitochondrial function (mitochondrial oxygen consumption, ATP production, and reactive oxygen species consequences). PMID:26403677

  17. Gap-Acoustic Solitons: Slowing and Stopping of Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tasgal, Richard S.; Shnaiderman, Roman; Band, Yehuda B.

    Solitons are paradigm localized states in physics. We consider here gapacoustic solitons (GASs), which are stable pulses that exist in Bragg waveguides, and which offer promising new avenues for slowing light. A Bragg grating can be produced by doping the waveguide with ions, and imprinting a periodic variation in the index of refraction with ultraviolet light. The Bragg grating in an optical waveguide reflects rightward-moving light to the left, and vice versa, and creates a gap in the allowed frequency spectrum of light. Nonlinearities, though, add complications to this simple picture. While low intensity light cannot propagate at frequencies inside the band gap, more intense fields can exist where low-intensity fields cannot. An optical gap soliton is an intense optical pulse which can exist in a Bragg waveguide because the intensity and nonlinearity let it dig a hole for itself inside the band gap, in which it can then reside. Far from the center of the pulse, the intensity is weak, and drops off exponentially with distance from the center. The optical gap soliton structure can be stable, and can have velocities from zero (i.e., stopped light) up to the group-velocity of light in the medium. When one also considers the system's electrostrictive effects, i.e., the dependence of the index of refraction on the density of the material, which is a universal light-sound interaction in condensed matter, one obtains GASs. These solitons share many of the properties of standard gap solitons, but they show many fascinating new characteristics. GASs have especially interesting dynamics when their velocities are close to the speed of sound, in which range they interact strongly with the acoustic field. GASs which are moving at supersonic velocities may experience instabilities which leave the GAS whole, but bring the velocity abruptly to almost zero. Furthermore, GASs may be made to change velocity by collision with acoustic pulses. Moving GASs may be retarded by the

  18. Millisecond Photon Lifetime in a Slow-Light Microcavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huet, V.; Rasoloniaina, A.; Guillemé, P.; Rochard, P.; Féron, P.; Mortier, M.; Levenson, A.; Bencheikh, K.; Yacomotti, A.; Dumeige, Y.

    2016-04-01

    Optical microcavities with ultralong photon storage times are of central importance for integrated nanophotonics. To date, record quality (Q ) factors up to 1011 have been measured in millimetric-size single-crystal whispering-gallery-mode (WGM) resonators, and 1010 in silica or glass microresonators. We show that, by introducing slow-light effects in an active WGM microresonator, it is possible to enhance the photon lifetime by several orders of magnitude, thus circumventing both fabrication imperfections and residual absorption. The slow-light effect is obtained from coherent population oscillations in an erbium-doped fluoride glass microsphere, producing strong dispersion of the WGM (group index ng˜106). As a result, a photon lifetime up to 2.5 ms at room temperature has been measured, corresponding to a Q factor of 3 ×1012 at 1530 nm. This system could yield a new type of optical memory microarray with ultralong storage times.

  19. Dynamic wavelength conversion in copropagating slow-light pulses.

    PubMed

    Kondo, K; Baba, T

    2014-06-01

    Dynamic wavelength conversion (DWC) is obtained by controlling copropagating slow-light signal and control pulse trajectories. Our method is based on the understanding that conventional resonator-based DWC can be generalized, and is linked to cross-phase modulation. Dispersion-engineered Si photonic crystal waveguides produce such slow-light pulses. Free carriers generated by two-photon absorption of the control pulse dynamically shift the signal wavelength. Matching the group velocities of the two pulses enhances the shift, elongating the interaction length. We demonstrate an extremely large wavelength shift in DWC (4.9 nm blueshift) for the signal wavelength. Although DWC is similar to the Doppler effect, we highlight their essential differences. PMID:24949770

  20. Spinor Slow Light and Two-Color Qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Ite; Lee, Meng-Jung; Ruseckas, Julius; Lee, Chin-Yuan; Kudriasov, Viaceslav; Chang, Kao-Fang; Cho, Hung-Wen; Juzeliunas, Gediminas; Yu, Ite A.

    2015-05-01

    We report the first experimental demonstration of two-component or spinor slow light (SSL) using a double tripod (DT) atom-light coupling scheme. The scheme involves three atomic ground states coupled to two excited states by six light fields. The oscillation due to the interaction between the two components was observed. SSL can be used to achieve high conversion efficiencies in the sum frequency generation and is a better method than the widely-used double- Λ scheme. On the basis of the stored light, our data showed that the DT scheme behaves like the two outcomes of an interferometer enabling precision measurements of frequency detuning. Furthermore, the single-photon SSL can be considered as the qubit with the superposition state of two frequency modes or, simply, as the two-color qubit. We experimentally demonstrated a possible application of the DT scheme as quantum memory/rotator for the two-color qubit. This work opens up a new direction in the EIT/slow light research. yu@phys.nthu.edu.tw

  1. Slow light in nonlinear photonic crystal coupled-cavity waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Na; Wang, Yige; Ren, Qingqing; Zhu, Li; Yuan, Minmin; An, Guimin

    2014-04-01

    Nonlinear photonic crystals can be formed by inserting Kerr-type nonlinear dielectric rods into perfect photonic crystals. Based on nonlinear photonic crystal, nonlinear photonic crystal coupled-cavity waveguide is constructed and its slow light properties are studied by using the Plane Wave expansion Method (PWM). Both single-defect coupled cavity and two-defect coupled cavity are proposed to optimize slow light properties. The result shows that using single-defect coupled cavity in waveguide is beneficial to obtain larger Normalized Delay-Bandwidth Product (NDBP) but it contributes little to decrease the group velocity of light and enlarging Q factor and delay time; While using two-defect cavity in waveguide can efficiently reduce the group velocity of light and enlarge Q factor and delay time. Compared to normal structures, our new designed nonlinear photonic crystal coupled cavity waveguide owns group velocity that is three magnitudes smaller than the vacuum speed of light. Delay time is of magnitude order of 10 ns and Q factor is of magnitude order of 1000, it means less loss and higher ability of storing energy.

  2. Intrusion detection robust to slow and abrupt lighting changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarov, Aleksej; Vesin, Jean-Marc; Reymond, Florian

    1996-03-01

    In this communication we present an image based object detection algorithm which is applied to intrusion detection. The algorithm is based on the comparison of input edges and temporally filtered edges of the background. It is characterized by very low computational and memory loads, high sensitivity to the presence of physical intruders and high robustness to slow and abrupt lighting changes. The algorithm is implementable on a cheap digital signal processor. It was tested on a data base of about one thousand gray-level CIF-format frames representing static scenes with various contents (light sources, intruders, lighting changes), and neither false alarm nor detection failure occurred. The number of parameters involved by the algorithm is very low, and their values do not require a fine tuning. The same set of parameters performs equally well in different conditions: different scenes, various lighting changes, various object sizes.

  3. Flood Regime Dynamics with Slow-Fast Landscape-Climate Feedbacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perdigão, Rui A. P.; Blöschl, Günter

    2015-04-01

    flood distribution at a given spatiotemporal position given the knowledge of the distribution or its drivers at another, along with their dynamic relation. An example application is thus the estimation of hydroclimatic distributions in ungauged basins and their relation to areas where more information is available. This study ultimately brings to light dynamical signatures of change in flood regimes arising from nonlinear slow-fast feedbacks in the landscape-climate dynamics, and provides dynamical links between flood regimes with nonlinearly interacting factors at different scales. The present work builds on Perdigão and Blöschl (2014). Perdigão, R. A. P., and G. Blöschl (2014), Spatiotemporal flood sensitivity to annual precipitation: Evidence for landscape-climate coevolution, Water Resour. Res., 50, doi:10.1002/2014WR015365.

  4. The Wind of Rotating B Supergiants. I. Domains of Slow and Fast Solution Regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venero, R. O. J.; Curé, M.; Cidale, L. S.; Araya, I.

    2016-05-01

    In the scenario of rotating radiation-driven wind theory for massive stars, three types of stationary hydrodynamic solutions are currently known: the classical (fast) m-CAK solution, the Ω-slow solution that arises for fast rotators, and the so-called δ-slow solution if high values of the δ line-force parameter are allowed independently of the rotation speed. Compared to the fast solution, both “slow solutions” have lower terminal velocities. As the study of the parameter domain for the slow solution is still incomplete, we perform a comprehensive analysis of the distinctive flow regimes for B supergiants that emerge from a fine grid of rotation values, Ω, and various ionization conditions in the wind (δ) parameter. The wind ionization defines two domains: one for fast outflowing winds and the other for slow expanding flows. Both domains are clear-cut by a gap, where a kink/plateau structure of the velocity law could exist for a finite interval of δ. The location and width of the gap depend on T eff and Ω. There is a smooth and continuous transition between the Ω-slow and δ-slow regimes, a single Ω δ-slow regime. We discuss different situations where the slow solutions can be found and the possibility of a switch between fast and slow solutions in B supergiant winds. We compare the theoretical terminal velocity with observations of B and A supergiants and find that the fast regime prevails mostly for early B supergiants while the slow wind regime matches better for A and B mid- and late-type supergiants.

  5. The magnetic monopole and the separation between fast and slow magnetic degrees of freedom.

    PubMed

    Wegrowe, J-E; Olive, E

    2016-03-16

    The Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG) equation that describes the dynamics of a macroscopic magnetic moment finds its limit of validity at very short times. The reason for this limit is well understood in terms of separation of the characteristic time scales between slow degrees of freedom (the magnetization) and fast degrees of freedom. The fast degrees of freedom are introduced as the variation of the angular momentum responsible for the inertia. In order to study the effect of the fast degrees of freedom on the precession, we calculate the geometric phase of the magnetization (i.e. the Hannay angle) and the corresponding magnetic monopole. In the case of the pure precession (the slow manifold), a simple expression of the magnetic monopole is given as a function of the slowness parameter, i.e. as a function of the ratio of the slow over the fast characteristic times. PMID:26871542

  6. Fast and Slow Mode Solitary Waves in a Five Component Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebastian, Sijo; Michael, Manesh; Varghese, Anu; Sreekala, G.; Venugopal, Chandu

    2016-07-01

    We have investigated fast and slow mode solitary profiles in a five component plasma consisting of positively and negatively charged pair ions, hydrogen ions and hotter and colder electrons. Of these, the heavier ions and colder photo-electrons are of cometary origin while the other components are of solar origin; the electrons being described by kappa distributions. The Zakharov-Kuznetzov (ZK) equation is derived and solutions for fast and slow mode solitary structures are plotted for parameters relevant to that of comet Halley. From the figures, it is seen that the presence of hydrogen ion determines the polarity of fast and slow mode solitary structures. Also different pair ions like He, C and O have significant effect on the width of the fast and slow mode solitary structures.

  7. The magnetic monopole and the separation between fast and slow magnetic degrees of freedom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wegrowe, J.-E.; Olive, E.

    2016-03-01

    The Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG) equation that describes the dynamics of a macroscopic magnetic moment finds its limit of validity at very short times. The reason for this limit is well understood in terms of separation of the characteristic time scales between slow degrees of freedom (the magnetization) and fast degrees of freedom. The fast degrees of freedom are introduced as the variation of the angular momentum responsible for the inertia. In order to study the effect of the fast degrees of freedom on the precession, we calculate the geometric phase of the magnetization (i.e. the Hannay angle) and the corresponding magnetic monopole. In the case of the pure precession (the slow manifold), a simple expression of the magnetic monopole is given as a function of the slowness parameter, i.e. as a function of the ratio of the slow over the fast characteristic times.

  8. Interaction of minor ions with fast and slow shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whang, Y. C.

    1990-01-01

    The coronal slow shock was predicted to exist embedded in large coronal holes at 4 to 10 solar radii. A three-fluid model was used to study the jumps in minor ions propertes across the coronal slow shock. The jump conditions were formulated in the de Hoffmann-Teller frame of reference. The Rankine-Hugoniot solution determines the MHD flow and the magnetic field across the shocks. For each minor ion species, the fluid equations for the conservation of mass, momentum, and energy can be solved to determine the velocity and the temperature of the ions across the shock. A simularity solution was also obtained for heavy ions. The results show that on the downstream side of the coronal slow shock the ion temperatures are nearly proportional to the ion masses for He, O, Si, and Fe in agreement with observed ion temperatures in the inner solar wind. This indicates that the possibly existing coronal slow shock can be responsible for the observed heating of minor ions in the solar wind.

  9. Near-infrared Structure of Fast and Slow-rotating Disk Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schechtman-Rook, Andrew; Bershady, Matthew A.

    2014-11-01

    We investigate the stellar disk structure of six nearby edge-on spiral galaxies using high-resolution JHK s-band images and three-dimensional radiative transfer models. To explore how mass and environment shape spiral disks, we selected galaxies with rotational velocities between 69 km s-1 fast-rotating (V rot > 150 km s-1) galaxies, only NGC 4013 has the super-thin+thin+thick nested disk structure seen in NGC 891 and the Milky Way, albeit with decreased oblateness, while NGC 1055, a disturbed massive spiral galaxy, contains disks with hz <~ 200 pc. NGC 4565, another fast-rotator, contains a prominent ring at a radius ~5 kpc but no super-thin disk. Despite these differences, all fast-rotating galaxies in our sample have inner truncations in at least one of their disks. These truncations lead to Freeman Type II profiles when projected face-on. Slow-rotating galaxies are less complex, lacking inner disk truncations and requiring fewer disk components to reproduce their light distributions. Super-thin disk components in undisturbed disks contribute ~25% of the total K s-band light, up to that of the thin-disk contribution. The presence of super-thin disks correlates with infrared flux ratios; galaxies with super-thin disks have f{K_s}/f60 μ m ≤ 0.12 for integrated light, consistent with super-thin disks being regions of ongoing star-formation. Attenuation-corrected vertical color gradients in (J - K s) correlate with the observed disk structure and are consistent with population gradients with young-to-intermediate ages closer to the mid-plane, indicating that disk heating—or cooling—is a ubiquitous phenomenon.

  10. Three-Body Interaction of Rydberg Slow-Light Polaritons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jachymski, Krzysztof; Bienias, Przemysław; Büchler, Hans Peter

    2016-07-01

    We study a system of three photons in an atomic medium coupled to Rydberg states near the conditions of electromagnetically induced transparency. Based on the analytical analysis of the microscopic set of equations in the far-detuned regime, the effective three-body interaction for these Rydberg polaritons is derived. For slow light polaritons, we find a strong three-body repulsion with the remarkable property that three polaritons can become essentially noninteracting at short distances. This analysis allows us to derive the influence of the three-body repulsion on bound states and correlation functions of photons propagating through a one-dimensional atomic cloud.

  11. Three-Body Interaction of Rydberg Slow-Light Polaritons.

    PubMed

    Jachymski, Krzysztof; Bienias, Przemysław; Büchler, Hans Peter

    2016-07-29

    We study a system of three photons in an atomic medium coupled to Rydberg states near the conditions of electromagnetically induced transparency. Based on the analytical analysis of the microscopic set of equations in the far-detuned regime, the effective three-body interaction for these Rydberg polaritons is derived. For slow light polaritons, we find a strong three-body repulsion with the remarkable property that three polaritons can become essentially noninteracting at short distances. This analysis allows us to derive the influence of the three-body repulsion on bound states and correlation functions of photons propagating through a one-dimensional atomic cloud. PMID:27517770

  12. Conventional, Bayesian, and Modified Prony's methods for characterizing fast and slow waves in equine cancellous bone

    PubMed Central

    Groopman, Amber M.; Katz, Jonathan I.; Holland, Mark R.; Fujita, Fuminori; Matsukawa, Mami; Mizuno, Katsunori; Wear, Keith A.; Miller, James G.

    2015-01-01

    Conventional, Bayesian, and the modified least-squares Prony's plus curve-fitting (MLSP + CF) methods were applied to data acquired using 1 MHz center frequency, broadband transducers on a single equine cancellous bone specimen that was systematically shortened from 11.8 mm down to 0.5 mm for a total of 24 sample thicknesses. Due to overlapping fast and slow waves, conventional analysis methods were restricted to data from sample thicknesses ranging from 11.8 mm to 6.0 mm. In contrast, Bayesian and MLSP + CF methods successfully separated fast and slow waves and provided reliable estimates of the ultrasonic properties of fast and slow waves for sample thicknesses ranging from 11.8 mm down to 3.5 mm. Comparisons of the three methods were carried out for phase velocity at the center frequency and the slope of the attenuation coefficient for the fast and slow waves. Good agreement among the three methods was also observed for average signal loss at the center frequency. The Bayesian and MLSP + CF approaches were able to separate the fast and slow waves and provide good estimates of the fast and slow wave properties even when the two wave modes overlapped in both time and frequency domains making conventional analysis methods unreliable. PMID:26328678

  13. Slow-fast effect and generation mechanism of brusselator based on coordinate transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xianghong; Hou, Jingyu; Shen, Yongjun

    2016-08-01

    The Brusselator with different time scales, which behaves in the classical slow-fast effect, is investigated, and is characterized by the coupling of the quiescent and spiking states. In order to reveal the generation mechanism by using the slow-fast analysis method, the coordinate transformation is introduced into the classical Brusselator, so that the transformed system can be divided into the fast and slow subsystems. Furthermore, the stability condition and bifurcation phenomenon of the fast subsystem are analyzed, and the attraction domains of different equilibria are presented by theoretical analysis and numerical simulation respectively. Based on the transformed system, it could be found that the generation mechanism between the quiescent and spiking states is Fold bifurcation and change of the attraction domain of the fast subsystem. The results may also be helpful to the similar system with multiple time scales.

  14. Neurosteroids differentially modulate fast and slow interictal discharges in the hippocampal CA3 area

    PubMed Central

    Herrington, Rochelle; Levesque, Maxime; Avoli, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Two types of spontaneous interictal discharge, identified as fast and slow events, can be recorded from the hippocampal CA3 area in rat brain slices during application of 4-aminopyridine (4AP) (50 μM). Here, we addressed how neurosteroids modulate the occurrence of these interictal events and of the associated high-frequency oscillations (HFOs) (ripples, 80–200 Hz; fast ripples, 250–500 Hz). Under control conditions (i.e. during 4AP application), ripples and fast ripples were detected in 12.3 and 17.5% of fast events, respectively; in contrast, the majority of slow events (> 98%) did not co-occur with HFOs. Application of 0.1, 1 or 5 μM allotetrahydrodeoxycorticosterone (THDOC) to 4AP-treated slices caused a dose-dependent decrease in the duration of the fast events and an increase in the occurrence of ripples, but not fast ripples; in contrast, the duration of slow events increased. THDOC potentiated the slow events that were recorded during pharmacological blockade of glutamatergic transmission, but had no effect on interictal discharges occurring during GABAA receptor antagonism. These results demonstrate that potentiation of GABAA receptor-mediated signaling by THDOC differentially affects slow and fast interictal discharges; these differences may provide insights into how hyperexcitable activity is influenced by neurosteroids. PMID:25471484

  15. Rotary photon drag enhanced by a slow-light medium.

    PubMed

    Franke-Arnold, Sonja; Gibson, Graham; Boyd, Robert W; Padgett, Miles J

    2011-07-01

    Transmission through a spinning window slightly rotates the polarization of the light, typically by a microradian. It has been predicted that the same mechanism should also rotate an image. Because this rotary photon drag has a contribution that is inversely proportional to the group velocity, the image rotation is expected to increase in a slow-light medium. Using a ruby window under conditions for coherent population oscillations, we induced an effective group index of about 1 million. The resulting rotation angle was large enough to be observed by the eye. This result shows that rotary photon drag applies to images as well as polarization. The possibility of switching between different rotation states may offer new opportunities for controlled image coding. PMID:21719672

  16. Ultrafast adiabatic manipulation of slow light in a photonic crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Kampfrath, T.; Kuipers, L.; Beggs, D. M.; White, T. P.; Krauss, T. F.; Melloni, A.

    2010-04-15

    We demonstrate by experiment and theory that a light pulse propagating through a Si-based photonic-crystal waveguide is adiabatically blueshifted when the refractive index of the Si is reduced on a femtosecond time scale. Thanks to the use of slow-light modes, we are able to shift a 1.3-ps pulse at telecom frequencies by 0.3 THz with an efficiency as high as 80% in a waveguide as short as 19{mu}m. An analytic theory reproduces the experimental data excellently, which shows that adiabatic dynamics are possible even on the femtosecond time scale as long as the external stimulus conserves the spatial symmetry of the system.

  17. Tailoring the slow light behavior in terahertz metasurfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Manjappa, Manukumara; Cong, Longqing; Singh, Ranjan; Chiam, Sher-Yi; Bettiol, Andrew A.; Zhang, Weili

    2015-05-04

    We experimentally study the effect of near field coupling on the transmission of light in terahertz metasurfaces. Our results show that tailoring the coupling between the resonators modulates the amplitude of resulting electromagnetically induced transmission, probed under different types of asymmetries in the coupled system. Observed change in the transmission amplitude is attributed to the change in the amount of destructive interference between the resonators in the vicinity of strong near field coupling. We employ a two-particle model to theoretically study the influence of the coupling between bright and quasi-dark modes on the transmission properties of the system and we find an excellent agreement with our observed results. Adding to the enhanced transmission characteristics, our results provide a deeper insight into the metamaterial analogues of atomic electromagnetically induced transparency and offer an approach to engineer slow light devices, broadband filters, and attenuators at terahertz frequencies.

  18. Millisecond Photon Lifetime in a Slow-Light Microcavity.

    PubMed

    Huet, V; Rasoloniaina, A; Guillemé, P; Rochard, P; Féron, P; Mortier, M; Levenson, A; Bencheikh, K; Yacomotti, A; Dumeige, Y

    2016-04-01

    Optical microcavities with ultralong photon storage times are of central importance for integrated nanophotonics. To date, record quality (Q) factors up to 10^{11} have been measured in millimetric-size single-crystal whispering-gallery-mode (WGM) resonators, and 10^{10} in silica or glass microresonators. We show that, by introducing slow-light effects in an active WGM microresonator, it is possible to enhance the photon lifetime by several orders of magnitude, thus circumventing both fabrication imperfections and residual absorption. The slow-light effect is obtained from coherent population oscillations in an erbium-doped fluoride glass microsphere, producing strong dispersion of the WGM (group index n_{g}∼10^{6}). As a result, a photon lifetime up to 2.5 ms at room temperature has been measured, corresponding to a Q factor of 3×10^{12} at 1530 nm. This system could yield a new type of optical memory microarray with ultralong storage times. PMID:27081979

  19. Slow light in ruby: delaying energy beyond the input pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wisniewski-Barker, Emma; Gibson, Graham; Franke-Arnold, Sonja; Shi, Zhimin; Narum, Paul; Boyd, Robert W.; Padgett, Miles J.

    2015-03-01

    The mechanism by which light is slowed through ruby has been the subject of great debate. To distinguish between the two main proposed mechanisms, we investigate the problem in the time domain by modulating a laser beam with a chopper to create a clean square wave. By exploring the trailing edge of the pulsed laser beam propagating through ruby, we can determine whether energy is delayed beyond the input pulse. The effects of a time-varying absorber alone cannot delay energy into the trailing edge of the pulse, as a time-varying absorber can only attenuate a coherent pulse. Therefore, our observation of an increase in intensity at the trailing edge of the pulse provides evidence for a complicated model of slow light in ruby that requires more than just pulse reshaping. In addition, investigating the Fourier components of the modulated square wave shows that harmonic components with different frequencies are delayed by different amounts, regardless of the intensity of the component itself. Understanding the difference in delays of the individual Fourier components of the modulated beam reveals the cause of the distortion the pulse undergoes as it propagates through the ruby.

  20. Bifurcation of Velocity Distributions in Cooperative Transport of Filaments by Fast and Slow Motors

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xin; Lipowsky, Reinhard; Kierfeld, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Several intracellular processes are governed by two different species of molecular motors, fast and slow ones, that both move in the same direction along the filaments but with different velocities. The transport of filaments arising from the cooperative action of these motors has been recently studied by three in vitro experiments, in which the filament velocity was measured for varying fraction of the fast motors adsorbed onto substrate surfaces in a gliding assay. As the fast motor fraction was increased, two experiments found a smooth change whereas the third one observed an abrupt increase of the filament velocity. Here, we show that all of these experimental results reflect the competition between fast and slow motors and can be understood in terms of an underlying saddle-node bifurcation. The comparison between theory and experiment leads to predictions for the detachment forces of the two motor species. Our theoretical study shows the existence of three different motility regimes: 1), fast transport with a single velocity; 2), slow transport with a single velocity; and 3), bistable transport, where the filament velocity stochastically switches between fast and slow transport. We determine the parameter regions for these regimes in terms of motility diagrams as a function of the surface fraction of fast motors and microscopic single-motor parameters. An abrupt increase of the filament velocity for an increasing fraction of fast motors is associated with the occurrence of bistable transport. PMID:23442917

  1. Cooperative dynamics in coupled systems of fast and slow phase oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaguchi, Hidetsugu; Okita, Takayuki

    2016-02-01

    We propose a coupled system of fast and slow phase oscillators. We observe two-step transitions to quasiperiodic motions by direct numerical simulations of this coupled oscillator system. A low-dimensional equation for order parameters is derived using the Ott-Antonsen ansatz. The applicability of the ansatz is checked by the comparison of numerical results of the coupled oscillator system and the reduced low-dimensional equation. We investigate further several interesting phenomena in which mutual interactions between the fast and slow oscillators play an essential role. Fast oscillations appear intermittently as a result of excitatory interactions with slow oscillators in a certain parameter range. Slow oscillators experience an oscillator-death phenomenon owing to their interaction with fast oscillators. This oscillator death is explained as a result of saddle-node bifurcation in a simple phase equation obtained using the temporal average of the fast oscillations. Finally, we show macroscopic synchronization of the order 1 :m between the slow and fast oscillators.

  2. Slow and fast development in two aphidophagous ladybirds on scarce and abundant prey supply.

    PubMed

    Singh, N; Mishra, G; Omkar

    2016-06-01

    Developmental rates are highly variable, both within and between genotypes and populations. But the rationale for two differential (slow and fast) developmental rates within same cohort under varying prey supply has yet not been explored. For this purpose, we investigated the effect of scarce and abundant prey supply on slow and fast development at 27°C in two aphidophagous ladybirds, Menochilus sexmaculatus (Fabricius) and Propylea dissecta (Mulsant) and its effect on their body mass and reproductive attributes. The ladybirds were provided with scarce and abundant supply of Aphis craccivora Koch under standardized abiotic conditions in the laboratory. A clear bimodal (two peaks, where the first peak represented the fast developing individuals and the second peak slow developing individuals) pattern of distribution for both prey supplies was obtained, which got skewed with change in prey supply. On abundant prey supply, more fast developing individuals (139 M. sexmaculatus and 123 P. dissecta) were found and less (46 M. sexmaculatus and 36 P. dissecta) on scarce prey supply. Slow developing individuals had female biased sex ratio, higher longevity and lower body mass. Fast developing females laid higher number of eggs with higher egg viability. Results of the study are indicative of occurrence and constancy of the slow and fast developing individuals in the egg batch. PMID:26898500

  3. Mechanism of Cooperative Behavior in Systems of Slow and Fast Molecular Motors

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Adam G.; Landahl, Eric C.; Rice, Sarah E.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Two recent theoretical advances have described cargo transport by multiple identical motors and by multiple oppositely directed, but otherwise identical motors [1, 2]. Here we combine a similar theoretical approach with a simple experiment to describe the behavior of a system comprised of slow and fast molecular motors having the same directionality. We observed the movement of microtubules by mixtures of slow and fast kinesin motors attached to a glass coverslip in a classic sliding filament assay. The motors are identical, except that the slow ones contain five point mutations that collectively reduce their velocity ∼15-fold without compromising maximal ATPase activity. Our results indicate that a small fraction of fast motors are able to accelerate the dissociation of slow motors from microtubules. Because of this, a sharp, highly cooperative transition occurs from slow to fast microtubule movement as the relative number of fast motors in the assay is increased. Microtubules move at half-maximal velocity when only 15% of the motors in the assay are fast. Our model indicates that this behavior depends primarily on the relative motor velocities and the asymmetry between their forward and backward dissociation forces. It weakly depends on the number of motors and their processivity. We predict that movement of cargoes bound to two types of motors having very different velocities will be dominated by one or the other motor. Therefore, cargoes can potentially undergo abrupt changes in movement in response to regulatory mechanisms acting on only a small fraction of motors. PMID:19506764

  4. Dynamics of fast and slow inhibition from cerebellar Golgi cells allow flexible control of synaptic integration

    PubMed Central

    Crowley, John J.; Fioravante, Diasynou; Regehr, Wade G.

    2011-01-01

    Throughout the brain, multiple interneuron types influence distinct aspects of synaptic processing. Interneuron diversity can thereby promote differential firing from neurons receiving common excitation. In contrast, Golgi cells are the sole interneurons regulating granule cell spiking evoked by mossy fibers, thereby gating inputs to the cerebellar cortex. Here, we examine how this single interneuron type modifies activity in its targets. We find that GABAA-mediated transmission at unitary Golgi cell → granule cell synapses consists of varying contributions of fast synaptic currents and sustained inhibition. Fast IPSCs depress and slow IPSCs gradually build during high frequency Golgi cell activity. Consequently, fast and slow inhibition differentially influence granule cell spike timing during persistent mossy fiber input. Furthermore, slow inhibition reduces the gain of the mossy fiber → granule cell input-output curve, while fast inhibition increases the threshold. Thus, a lack of interneuron diversity need not prevent flexible inhibitory control of synaptic processing. PMID:19778512

  5. Slow to fast alterations in skeletal muscle fibers caused by clenbuterol, a beta(2)-receptor agonist

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeman, Richard J.; Ludemann, Robert; Easton, Thomas G.; Etlinger, Joseph D.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of a beta(2)-receptor agonist, clenbuterol, and a beta(2) antagonist, butoxamine, on the skeletal muscle fibers of rats were investigated. It was found that chronic treatment of rats with clenbuterol caused hypertrophy of histochemically identified fast-twitch, but not slow-twitch, fibers within the soleus, while in the extensor digitorum longus the mean areas of both fiber types were increased; in both muscles, the ratio of the number of fast-twitch to slow-twitch fibers was increased. In contrast, a treatment with butoxamine caused a reduction of the fast-twitch fiber size in both muscles, and the ratio of the fast-twitch to slow-twitch fibers was decreased.

  6. Effect of inaction on function of fast and slow muscle spindles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arutyunyan, R. S.

    1980-01-01

    There is no data on the comparative effect of tenotomy on the function of the muscle spindles of fast and slow muscles. This study covers this question. The experiments were conducted on cats. The musuculus extensor digitorum longus (m. EDL) was selected as the fast muscle, and the musculus soleus (m. Sol.) as the slow. In a comparison of the spontaneous activity of primary and secondary endings of the fast and slow muscle spindles (i.e., the activity with complete relaxation of the muscles) normally no difference between them was successfully found. The authors recorded the integrative, and not the individual activity, and secondly, under conditions of such recording technique, those slight changes that are observed in the fast muscle receptors could remain unnoticed.

  7. Exploring the contrasts between fast and slow rifting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Jason P.; de Monserrat, Albert; White, Lloyd; Hall, Robert

    2016-04-01

    Researchers are now finding that extension sometimes occurs at rates much faster than the mean rates observed in the development of passive margins. Examples of rapid and ultra-rapid extension are found in several locations in Eastern Indonesia. This includes in northern and central Sulawesi as well as in eastern- and westernmost New Guinea. The periods of extension are associated with sedimentary basin growth as well as phases of crustal melting and rapid uplift. This is recorded through seismic imagery of basins offshore Sulawesi and New Guinea as well as through new field studies of the onshore geology in these regions. A growing body of new geochronological and biostratigraphic data provide some control on the rates of processes, indicating that rates of extension are typically at least twice as fast and potentially an order of magnitude faster than the fastest rates applied for more commonly studied rift settings (e.g. Atlantic opening, East African Rift, Australia-Antarctica opening). Here we explore a suite of experiments more appropriate for rifting episodes in Eastern Indonesia, and compare the evolution of these 'fast' (20-100 mm/year full rate) rifting models to experiments with the same crustal geometries rifting at ~5-20 mm/year. In particular, we explore to what depths hot lower crust and mantle can be exhumed by fast rifting, and whether we can produce the p-T-t paths implied by recent onshore geological studies.

  8. Variations of Strahl Properties with Fast and Slow Solar Wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Figueroa-Vinas, Adolfo; Goldstein, Melvyn L.; Gurgiolo, Chris

    2008-01-01

    The interplanetary solar wind electron velocity distribution function generally shows three different populations. Two of the components, the core and halo, have been the most intensively analyzed and modeled populations using different theoretical models. The third component, the strahl, is usually seen at higher energies, is confined in pitch-angle, is highly field-aligned and skew. This population has been more difficult to identify and to model in the solar wind. In this work we make use of the high angular, energy and time resolution and three-dimensional data of the Cluster/PEACE electron spectrometer to identify and analyze this component in the ambient solar wind during high and slow speed solar wind. The moment density and fluid velocity have been computed by a semi-numerical integration method. The variations of solar wind density and drift velocity with the general build solar wind speed could provide some insight into the source, origin, and evolution of the strahl.

  9. Isoflurane enhances both fast and slow synaptic inhibition in the hippocampus at amnestic concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Shuiping; Perouansky, Misha; Pearce, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Inhibition mediated by γ-aminobutyric acid type A (GABAA) receptors has long been considered an important target for a variety of general anesthetics. In the hippocampus, two types of phasic GABAA receptor-mediated inhibition coexist: GABAA,fast, which is expressed primarily at peri-somatic sites, and GABAA,slow, which is expressed primarily in the dendrites. Their spatial segregation suggests distinct functions: GABAA,slow may control plasticity of dendritic synapses, while GABAA,fast controls action potential initiation at the soma. We examined modulation of GABAA,fast and GABAA,slow inhibition by isoflurane at amnesic concentrations, and compared it to modulation by behaviorally equivalent doses of the GABAA receptor-selective drug etomidate. Methods Whole-cell recordings were conducted at near-physiological temperature from pyramidal cells in organotypic hippocampal cultures obtained from C57BL/6 x 129/SvJ F1 hybrid mice. GABAA receptor-mediated currents were isolated using glutamate receptor antagonists. GABAA,slow currents were evoked by electrical stimulation in the stratum lacunosum-moleculare. Miniature GABAA,fast currents were recorded in the presence of tetrodotoxin. Results 100 µM isoflurane (approximately EC50,amnesia) slowed fast and slow inhibitory postsynaptic current decay by approximately 25%. Higher concentrations, up to 400 µM, produced proportionally greater effects without altering current amplitudes. The effects on GABAA,slow were approximately one-half those produced by equi-amnesic concentrations of etomidate. Conclusions Isoflurane enhances both types of phasic GABAA receptor-mediated inhibition to similar degrees at amnesic concentrations. This pattern differs from etomidate, which at low concentrations selectively enhances slow inhibition. These effects of isoflurane are sufficiently large that they may contribute substantially to its suppression of hippocampal learning and memory. PMID:22343472

  10. Demonstration of bicolor slow-light channelization in rubidium vapor

    SciTech Connect

    Bashkansky, Mark; Fatemi, Fredrik K.; Reintjes, John; Dutton, Zachary; Steiner, Michael

    2007-02-15

    We experimentally demonstrate a proof-of-principle of a previously proposed 'channelization' architecture for wideband slow-light propagation in atomic vapors using electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT). We use two optical frequencies to generate a sine wave signal which is delayed in rubidium vapor. The optical frequencies were tuned near the EIT resonances of two Zeeman sublevels, which are shifted from each other well beyond the EIT linewidth by a uniform magnetic field. We varied the Zeeman shift between these two levels (relative to the optical frequency splitting) and measured the delay versus Zeeman shift. Significant delays were observed and were in agreement with a theoretical model treating each Zeeman sublevel as part of an independent three-level system. We achieved delay of a signal with a bandwidth 16 times the EIT linewidth and confirmed our earlier theoretical models that delay occurs only when the optical spectral separation slightly exceeds the Zeeman splitting.

  11. Comparison for the compositions of fast and slow pyrolysis oils by NMR characterization.

    PubMed

    Ben, Haoxi; Ragauskas, Arthur J

    2013-11-01

    The pyrolysis of softwood (SW) kraft lignin and pine wood in different pyrolysis systems were examined at 400, 500 and 600 °C. NMR including quantitative (13)C and Heteronuclear Single-Quantum Correlation (HSQC)-NMR, and Gel Permeation Chromatography (GPC) were used to characterize various pyrolysis oils. The content of methoxyl groups decreased by 76% for pine wood and 70% for lignin when using fast pyrolysis system. The carbonyl groups also decreased by 76% and nearly completely eliminated in 600 °C pine wood fast pyrolysis oil. Compared to the slow pyrolysis process, fast pyrolysis process was found to improve the cleavage of methoxyl groups, aliphatic CC bonds and carbonyl groups and produce more polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) from lignin and aliphatic CO bonds from carbohydrates. Another remarkable difference between fast and slow pyrolysis oils was the molecular weight of fast pyrolysis oils increased by 85-112% for pine wood and 104-112% for lignin. PMID:24013295

  12. Semiempirical Models of the Slow and Fast Solar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.-M.

    2012-11-01

    Coronal holes can produce several types of solar wind with a variety of compositional properties, depending on the location and strength of the heating along their open magnetic field lines. High-speed wind is associated with (relatively) slowly diverging flux tubes rooted in the interiors of large holes with weak, uniform footpoint fields; heating is spread over a large radial distance, so that most of the energy is conducted outward and goes into accelerating the wind rather than increasing the mass flux. In the rapidly diverging open fields present at coronal hole boundaries and around active regions, the heating is concentrated at low heights and the temperature maximum is located near the coronal base, resulting in high oxygen freezing-in temperatures and low asymptotic wind speeds. Polar plumes have a strong additional source of heating at their bases, which generates a large downward conductive flux, raising the densities and enhancing the radiative losses. The relative constancy of the solar wind mass flux at Earth reflects the tendency for the heating rate in coronal holes to increase monotonically with the footpoint field strength, with very high mass fluxes at the Sun offsetting the enormous flux-tube expansion in active region holes. Although coronal holes are its main source, slow wind is also released continually from helmet streamer loops by reconnection processes, giving rise to plasma blobs (small flux ropes) and the heliospheric plasma sheet.

  13. Existence domains of slow and fast ion-acoustic solitons in two-ion space plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Maharaj, S. K.; Bharuthram, R.; Singh, S. V. Lakhina, G. S.

    2015-03-15

    A study of large amplitude ion-acoustic solitons is conducted for a model composed of cool and hot ions and cool and hot electrons. Using the Sagdeev pseudo-potential formalism, the scope of earlier studies is extended to consider why upper Mach number limitations arise for slow and fast ion-acoustic solitons. Treating all plasma constituents as adiabatic fluids, slow ion-acoustic solitons are limited in the order of increasing cool ion concentrations by the number densities of the cool, and then the hot ions becoming complex valued, followed by positive and then negative potential double layer regions. Only positive potentials are found for fast ion-acoustic solitons which are limited only by the hot ion number density having to remain real valued. The effect of neglecting as opposed to including inertial effects of the hot electrons is found to induce only minor quantitative changes in the existence regions of slow and fast ion-acoustic solitons.

  14. Differential effect of denervation on free radical scavenging enzymes in slow and fast muscle of rat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asayama, K.; Dettbarn, W. D.; Burr, I. M.

    1985-01-01

    To determine the effect of denervation on the free radical scavenging systems in relation to the mitochondrial oxidative metabolism in the slow twitch soleus and fast twitch extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles, the sciatic nerve of the rat was crushed in the mid-thigh region and the muscle tissue levels of 5 enzymes were studied 2 and 5 weeks following crush. Radioimmunoassays were utilized for the selective measurement of cuprozinc (cytosolic) and mangano (mitochondrial) superoxide dismutases. These data represent the first systematic report of free radical scavening systems in slow and fast muscles in response to denervation. Selective modification of cuprozinc and manganosuperoxide dismutases and differential regulation of GSH-peroxidase was demonstrated in slow and fast muscle.

  15. Effect of protozoan predation on relative abundance of fast- and slow-growing bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Sinclair, J.L.; Alexander, M.

    1989-01-01

    Survival of six bacterial species with different growth rates was tested in raw sewage and sewage rendered free of protozoa. When the six species were inoculated at the same densities into sewage containing protozoa, the three slow-growing species were rapidly eliminated, and two of the three fast-growing species survived in detectable numbers. It is suggested that in environments with intense protozoan predation, protozoa may alter composition of bacterial communities by eliminating slow-growing bacteria.

  16. Experimental GVD engineering in slow light slot photonic crystal waveguides.

    PubMed

    Serna, Samuel; Colman, Pierre; Zhang, Weiwei; Le Roux, Xavier; Caer, Charles; Vivien, Laurent; Cassan, Eric

    2016-01-01

    The use in silicon photonics of the new optical materials developed in soft matter science (e.g. polymers, liquids) is delicate because their low refractive index weakens the confinement of light and prevents an efficient control of the dispersion properties through the geometry. We experimentally demonstrate that such materials can be incorporated in 700 μm long slot photonic crystal waveguides, and hence can benefit from both slow-light field enhancement effect and slot-induced ultra-small effective areas. Additionally, we show that their dispersion can be engineered from anomalous to normal regions, along with the presence of multiple zero group velocity dispersion (ZGVD) points exhibiting Normalized Delay Bandwidth Product as high as 0.156. The reported results provide experimental evidence for an accurate control of the dispersion properties of fillable periodical slotted structures in silicon photonics, which is of direct interest for on-chip all-optical data treatment using nonlinear optical effects in hybrid-on-silicon technologies. PMID:27243377

  17. Experimental GVD engineering in slow light slot photonic crystal waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serna, Samuel; Colman, Pierre; Zhang, Weiwei; Le Roux, Xavier; Caer, Charles; Vivien, Laurent; Cassan, Eric

    2016-05-01

    The use in silicon photonics of the new optical materials developed in soft matter science (e.g. polymers, liquids) is delicate because their low refractive index weakens the confinement of light and prevents an efficient control of the dispersion properties through the geometry. We experimentally demonstrate that such materials can be incorporated in 700 μm long slot photonic crystal waveguides, and hence can benefit from both slow-light field enhancement effect and slot-induced ultra-small effective areas. Additionally, we show that their dispersion can be engineered from anomalous to normal regions, along with the presence of multiple zero group velocity dispersion (ZGVD) points exhibiting Normalized Delay Bandwidth Product as high as 0.156. The reported results provide experimental evidence for an accurate control of the dispersion properties of fillable periodical slotted structures in silicon photonics, which is of direct interest for on-chip all-optical data treatment using nonlinear optical effects in hybrid-on-silicon technologies.

  18. Experimental GVD engineering in slow light slot photonic crystal waveguides

    PubMed Central

    Serna, Samuel; Colman, Pierre; Zhang, Weiwei; Le Roux, Xavier; Caer, Charles; Vivien, Laurent; Cassan, Eric

    2016-01-01

    The use in silicon photonics of the new optical materials developed in soft matter science (e.g. polymers, liquids) is delicate because their low refractive index weakens the confinement of light and prevents an efficient control of the dispersion properties through the geometry. We experimentally demonstrate that such materials can be incorporated in 700 μm long slot photonic crystal waveguides, and hence can benefit from both slow-light field enhancement effect and slot-induced ultra-small effective areas. Additionally, we show that their dispersion can be engineered from anomalous to normal regions, along with the presence of multiple zero group velocity dispersion (ZGVD) points exhibiting Normalized Delay Bandwidth Product as high as 0.156. The reported results provide experimental evidence for an accurate control of the dispersion properties of fillable periodical slotted structures in silicon photonics, which is of direct interest for on-chip all-optical data treatment using nonlinear optical effects in hybrid-on-silicon technologies. PMID:27243377

  19. Recovery time course in contractile function of fast and slow skeletal muscle after hindlimb immobilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witzmann, F. A.; Kim, D. H.; Fitts, R. H.

    1982-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to characterize the time course and extent of recovery in the isometric and isotonic contractile properties of fast and slow skeletal muscle following 6 wk of hindlimb immobilization. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to an immobilized group or a control group. The results of the study show that fast and slow skeletal muscles possess the ability to completely recover normal contractile function following 6 wk of hindlimb immobilization. The rate of recovery is dependent on the fiber type composition of the affected muscle.

  20. Near-infrared structure of fast and slow-rotating disk galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Schechtman-Rook, Andrew; Bershady, Matthew A.

    2014-11-10

    We investigate the stellar disk structure of six nearby edge-on spiral galaxies using high-resolution JHK {sub s}-band images and three-dimensional radiative transfer models. To explore how mass and environment shape spiral disks, we selected galaxies with rotational velocities between 69 km s{sup –1} fast-rotating (V {sub rot} > 150 km s{sup –1}) galaxies, only NGC 4013 has the super-thin+thin+thick nested disk structure seen in NGC 891 and the Milky Way, albeit with decreased oblateness, while NGC 1055, a disturbed massive spiral galaxy, contains disks with h{sub z} ≲ 200 pc. NGC 4565, another fast-rotator, contains a prominent ring at a radius ∼5 kpc but no super-thin disk. Despite these differences, all fast-rotating galaxies in our sample have inner truncations in at least one of their disks. These truncations lead to Freeman Type II profiles when projected face-on. Slow-rotating galaxies are less complex, lacking inner disk truncations and requiring fewer disk components to reproduce their light distributions. Super-thin disk components in undisturbed disks contribute ∼25% of the total K {sub s}-band light, up to that of the thin-disk contribution. The presence of super-thin disks correlates with infrared flux ratios; galaxies with super-thin disks have f{sub K{sub s}}/f{sub 60} {sub μm}≤0.12 for integrated light, consistent with super-thin disks being regions of ongoing star-formation. Attenuation-corrected vertical color gradients in (J – K {sub s}) correlate with the observed disk structure and are consistent with population gradients with young-to-intermediate ages closer to the mid-plane, indicating that disk heating—or cooling—is a ubiquitous phenomenon.

  1. Electromagnetically induced transparency and slow light with optomechanics.

    PubMed

    Safavi-Naeini, A H; Mayer Alegre, T P; Chan, J; Eichenfield, M; Winger, M; Lin, Q; Hill, J T; Chang, D E; Painter, O

    2011-04-01

    Controlling the interaction between localized optical and mechanical excitations has recently become possible following advances in micro- and nanofabrication techniques. So far, most experimental studies of optomechanics have focused on measurement and control of the mechanical subsystem through its interaction with optics, and have led to the experimental demonstration of dynamical back-action cooling and optical rigidity of the mechanical system. Conversely, the optical response of these systems is also modified in the presence of mechanical interactions, leading to effects such as electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) and parametric normal-mode splitting. In atomic systems, studies of slow and stopped light (applicable to modern optical networks and future quantum networks) have thrust EIT to the forefront of experimental study during the past two decades. Here we demonstrate EIT and tunable optical delays in a nanoscale optomechanical crystal, using the optomechanical nonlinearity to control the velocity of light by way of engineered photon-phonon interactions. Our device is fabricated by simply etching holes into a thin film of silicon. At low temperature (8.7 kelvin), we report an optically tunable delay of 50 nanoseconds with near-unity optical transparency, and superluminal light with a 1.4 microsecond signal advance. These results, while indicating significant progress towards an integrated quantum optomechanical memory, are also relevant to classical signal processing applications. Measurements at room temperature in the analogous regime of electromagnetically induced absorption show the utility of these chip-scale optomechanical systems for optical buffering, amplification, and filtering of microwave-over-optical signals. PMID:21412237

  2. Model reduction for slow-fast stochastic systems with metastable behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruna, Maria; Chapman, S. Jonathan; Smith, Matthew J.

    2014-05-01

    The quasi-steady-state approximation (or stochastic averaging principle) is a useful tool in the study of multiscale stochastic systems, giving a practical method by which to reduce the number of degrees of freedom in a model. The method is extended here to slow-fast systems in which the fast variables exhibit metastable behaviour. The key parameter that determines the form of the reduced model is the ratio of the timescale for the switching of the fast variables between metastable states to the timescale for the evolution of the slow variables. The method is illustrated with two examples: one from biochemistry (a fast-species-mediated chemical switch coupled to a slower varying species), and one from ecology (a predator-prey system). Numerical simulations of each model reduction are compared with those of the full system.

  3. Numerical continuation of canard orbits in slow-fast dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desroches, M.; Krauskopf, B.; Osinga, H. M.

    2010-03-01

    A trajectory of a system with two clearly separated time scales generally consists of fast segments (or jumps) followed by slow segments where the trajectory follows an attracting part of a slow manifold. The switch back to fast dynamics typically occurs when the trajectory passes a fold with respect to a fast direction. A special role is played by trajectories known as canard orbits, which do not jump at a fold but, instead, follow a repelling slow manifold for some time. We concentrate here on the case of a slow-fast system with two slow and one fast variable, where canard orbits arise geometrically as intersection curves of two-dimensional attracting and repelling slow manifolds. Canard orbits are intimately related to the dynamics near special points known as folded singularities, which in turn have been shown to explain small-amplitude oscillations that can be found as part of so-called mixed-mode oscillations. In this paper we present a numerical method to detect and then follow branches of canard orbits in a system parameter. More specifically, we define well-posed two-point boundary value problems (BVPs) that represent orbit segments on the slow manifolds, and we continue their solution families with the package AUTO. In this way, we are able to deal effectively with the numerical challenge of strong attraction to and strong repulsion from the slow manifolds. Canard orbits are detected as the transverse intersection points of the curves along which attracting and repelling slow manifolds intersect a suitable section (near a folded node). These intersection points correspond to a unique pair of orbits segments, one on the attracting and one on the repelling slow manifold. After concatenation of the respective pairs of orbit segments, all detected canard orbits are represented as solutions of a single BVP, which allows us to continue them in system parameters. We demonstrate with two examples—the self-coupled FitzHugh-Nagumo system and a three

  4. Mechanism of cooperative behaviour in systems of slow and fast molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Larson, Adam G; Landahl, Eric C; Rice, Sarah E

    2009-06-28

    Two recent theoretical advances have described cargo transport by multiple identical motors and by multiple oppositely directed, but otherwise identical motors [M. J. Muller, S. Klumpp and R. Lipowsky, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A., 2008, 105(12), 4609-4614; S. Klumpp and R. Lipowsky, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A., 2005, 102(48), 17284-17289]. Here, we combine a similar theoretical approach with a simple experiment to describe the behaviour of a system comprised of slow and fast molecular motors having the same directionality. We observed the movement of microtubules by mixtures of slow and fast kinesin motors attached to a glass coverslip in a classic sliding filament assay. The motors are identical, except that the slow ones contain five point mutations that collectively reduce their velocity approximately 15-fold without compromising maximal ATPase activity. Our results indicate that a small fraction of fast motors are able to accelerate the dissociation of slow motors from microtubules. Because of this, a sharp, highly cooperative transition occurs from slow to fast microtubule movement as the relative number of fast motors in the assay is increased. Microtubules move at half-maximal velocity when only 15% of the motors in the assay are fast. Our model indicates that this behaviour depends primarily on the relative motor velocities and the asymmetry between their forward and backward dissociation forces. It weakly depends on the number of motors and their processivity. We predict that movement of cargoes bound to two types of motors having very different velocities will be dominated by one or the other motor. Therefore, cargoes can potentially undergo abrupt changes in movement in response to regulatory mechanisms acting on only a small fraction of motors. PMID:19506764

  5. Boundary-equilibrium bifurcations in piecewise-smooth slow-fast systems.

    PubMed

    Kowalczyk, P; Glendinning, P

    2011-06-01

    In this paper we study the qualitative dynamics of piecewise-smooth slow-fast systems (singularly perturbed systems) which are everywhere continuous. We consider phase space topology of systems with one-dimensional slow dynamics and one-dimensional fast dynamics. The slow manifold of the reduced system is formed by a piecewise-continuous curve, and the differentiability is lost across the switching surface. In the full system the slow manifold is no longer continuous, and there is an O(ɛ) discontinuity across the switching manifold, but the discontinuity cannot qualitatively alter system dynamics. Revealed phase space topology is used to unfold qualitative dynamics of planar slow-fast systems with an equilibrium point on the switching surface. In this case the local dynamics corresponds to so-called boundary-equilibrium bifurcations, and four qualitative phase portraits are uncovered. Our results are then used to investigate the dynamics of a box model of a thermohaline circulation, and the presence of a boundary-equilibrium bifurcation of a fold type is shown. PMID:21721768

  6. Signatures of fast and slow magnetohydrodynamic shocks in turbulent molecular clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmann, Andrew; Wardle, Mark

    2016-01-01

    The character of star formation is intimately related to the supersonic magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulent dynamics of the molecular clouds in which stars form. A significant amount of the turbulent energy dissipates in low-velocity shocks. Fast and slow MHD shocks differ in how they compress and heat the molecular gas, and so their radiative signatures reveal distinct physical conditions. We use a two-fluid model to compare one-dimensional fast and slow MHD shocks propagating at low speeds (a few km s- 1). Fast shocks are magnetically driven, forcing ion species to stream through the neutral gas ahead of the shock front. This magnetic precursor heats the gas sufficiently to create a large, warm transition zone where all the fluid variables smoothly change in the shock front. In contrast, slow shocks are driven by gas pressure, and neutral species collide with ion species in a thin hot slab that closely resembles an ordinary gas dynamic shock. We consider shocks at velocities vs = 2-4 km s- 1 and pre-shock hydrogen nuclei densities nH = 102-104 cm-3. We include a simple oxygen chemistry and cooling by CO, H2 and H2O. CO rotational lines above J = 6-5 are more strongly excited in slow shocks. These slow-shock signatures may have already been observed in infrared dark clouds in the Milky Way.

  7. How to slow down light and where relativity theory fails

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Meggie

    2013-03-01

    Research found logical errors in mathematics and in physics. After discovered wave-particle duality made an assumption I reinterpreted quantum mechanic and I was able to find new information from existing publications and concluded that photon is not a fundamental particle which has a structure. These work has been presented at several APS meetings and EuNPC2012. During my research I also arrived at the exact same conclusion using Newton's theory of space-time, then found the assumptions that relativity theory made failed logical test and violated basic mathematical logic. And Minkowski space violated Newton's law of motion, Lorenz 4-dimensional transformation was mathematically incomplete. After modifying existing physics theories I designed an experiment to demonstrate where light can be slow down or stop for structural study. Such method were also turn into a continuous room temperature fusion method. However the discoveries involves large amount of complex logical analysis. Physicists are generally not philosophers, therefore to make the discovery fully understood by most physicists is very challenging. This work is supported by Dr. Kursh at Northeastern University.

  8. Regenerating tail muscles in lizard contain Fast but not Slow Myosin indicating that most myofibers belong to the fast twitch type for rapid contraction.

    PubMed

    Alibardi, L

    2015-10-01

    During tail regeneration in lizards a large mass of muscle tissue is formed in form of segmental myomeres of similar size located under the dermis of the new tail. These muscles accumulate glycogen and a fast form of myosin typical for twitch myofibers as it is shown by light and ultrastructural immunocytochemistry using an antibody directed against a Fast Myosin Heavy Chain. High resolution immunogold labeling shows that an intense labeling for fast myosin is localized over the thick filaments of the numerous myofibrils in about 70% of the regenerated myofibers while the labeling becomes less intense in the remaining muscle fibers. The present observations indicate that at least two subtypes of Fast Myosin containing muscle fibers are regenerated, the prevalent type was of the fast twitch containing few mitochondria, sparse glycogen, numerous smooth endoplasmic reticulum vesicles. The second, and less frequent type was a Fast-Oxidative-Glycolitic twitch fiber containing more mitochondria, a denser cytoplasm and myofibrils. Since their initial differentiation, myoblasts, myotubes and especially the regenerated myofibers do not accumulate any immuno-detectable Slow Myosin Heavy Chain. The study indicates that most of the segmental muscles of the regenerated tail serve for the limited bending of the tail during locomotion and trashing after amputation of the regenerated tail, a phenomenon that facilitates predator escape. PMID:26164738

  9. The effect of temperature on the coupled slow and fast dynamics of an electrochemical oscillator.

    PubMed

    Zülke, Alana A; Varela, Hamilton

    2016-01-01

    The coupling among disparate time-scales is ubiquitous in many chemical and biological systems. We have recently investigated the effect of fast and, long-term, slow dynamics in surface processes underlying some electrocatalytic reactions. Herein we report on the effect of temperature on the coupled slow and fast dynamics of a model system, namely the electro-oxidation of formic acid on platinum studied at five temperatures between 5 and 45 °C. The main result was a turning point found at 25 °C, which clearly defines two regions for the temperature dependency on the overall kinetics. In addition, the long-term evolution allowed us to compare reaction steps related to fast and slow evolutions. Results were discussed in terms of the key role of PtO species, which chemically couple slow and fast dynamics. In summary we were able to: (a) identify the competition between two reaction steps as responsible for the occurrence of two temperature domains; (b) compare the relative activation energies of these two steps; and (c) suggest the role of a given reaction step on the period-increasing set of reactions involved in the oscillatory dynamics. The introduced methodology could be applied to other systems to uncover the temperature dependence of complex chemical networks. PMID:27079514

  10. The effect of temperature on the coupled slow and fast dynamics of an electrochemical oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zülke, Alana A.; Varela, Hamilton

    2016-04-01

    The coupling among disparate time-scales is ubiquitous in many chemical and biological systems. We have recently investigated the effect of fast and, long-term, slow dynamics in surface processes underlying some electrocatalytic reactions. Herein we report on the effect of temperature on the coupled slow and fast dynamics of a model system, namely the electro-oxidation of formic acid on platinum studied at five temperatures between 5 and 45 °C. The main result was a turning point found at 25 °C, which clearly defines two regions for the temperature dependency on the overall kinetics. In addition, the long-term evolution allowed us to compare reaction steps related to fast and slow evolutions. Results were discussed in terms of the key role of PtO species, which chemically couple slow and fast dynamics. In summary we were able to: (a) identify the competition between two reaction steps as responsible for the occurrence of two temperature domains; (b) compare the relative activation energies of these two steps; and (c) suggest the role of a given reaction step on the period-increasing set of reactions involved in the oscillatory dynamics. The introduced methodology could be applied to other systems to uncover the temperature dependence of complex chemical networks.

  11. The effect of temperature on the coupled slow and fast dynamics of an electrochemical oscillator

    PubMed Central

    Zülke, Alana A.; Varela, Hamilton

    2016-01-01

    The coupling among disparate time-scales is ubiquitous in many chemical and biological systems. We have recently investigated the effect of fast and, long-term, slow dynamics in surface processes underlying some electrocatalytic reactions. Herein we report on the effect of temperature on the coupled slow and fast dynamics of a model system, namely the electro-oxidation of formic acid on platinum studied at five temperatures between 5 and 45 °C. The main result was a turning point found at 25 °C, which clearly defines two regions for the temperature dependency on the overall kinetics. In addition, the long-term evolution allowed us to compare reaction steps related to fast and slow evolutions. Results were discussed in terms of the key role of PtO species, which chemically couple slow and fast dynamics. In summary we were able to: (a) identify the competition between two reaction steps as responsible for the occurrence of two temperature domains; (b) compare the relative activation energies of these two steps; and (c) suggest the role of a given reaction step on the period-increasing set of reactions involved in the oscillatory dynamics. The introduced methodology could be applied to other systems to uncover the temperature dependence of complex chemical networks. PMID:27079514

  12. General purpose algorithms for characterization of slow and fast phase nystagmus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lessard, Charles S.

    1987-01-01

    In the overall aim for a better understanding of the vestibular and optokinetic systems and their roles in space motion sickness, the eye movement responses to various dynamic stimuli are measured. The vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) and the optokinetic response, as the eye movement responses are known, consist of slow phase and fast phase nystagmus. The specific objective is to develop software programs necessary to characterize the vestibulo-ocular and optokinetic responses by distinguishing between the two phases of nystagmus. The overall program is to handle large volumes of highly variable data with minimum operator interaction. The programs include digital filters, differentiation, identification of fast phases, and reconstruction of the slow phase with a least squares fit such that sinusoidal or psuedorandom data may be processed with accurate results. The resultant waveform, slow phase velocity eye movements, serves as input data to the spectral analysis programs previously developed for NASA to analyze nystagmus responses to pseudorandom angular velocity inputs.

  13. Fast men slow more than fast women in a 10 kilometer road race.

    PubMed

    Deaner, Robert O; Addona, Vittorio; Carter, Rickey E; Joyner, Michael J; Hunter, Sandra K

    2016-01-01

    Background. Previous studies have demonstrated that men are more likely than women to slow in the marathon (footrace). This study investigated whether the sex difference in pacing occurs for a shorter race distance. Materials & Methods. Data were acquired from the Bolder Boulder 10 km road race for the years 2008-2013, which encompassed 191,693 performances. There were two pacing measures, percentage change in pace of the first 3 miles relative to the final 3.2 miles and percentage change in pace of the first mile relative to the final 5.2 miles. Pacing was analyzed as a continuous variable and as two categorical variables, as follows: "maintain the pace," defined as slowing <5% and "marked slowing," defined as slowing ≥10%. Results. Among the fastest (men < 48:40; women < 55:27) and second fastest (men < 53:54; women < 60:28) sex-specific finishing time sextiles, men slowed significantly more than women with both pacing measures, but there were no consistently significant sex differences in pacing among the slower four sextiles. For the fastest sextile, the odds for women were 1.96 (first pacing measure) and 1.36 (second measure) times greater than men to maintain the pace. For the fastest sextile, the odds for women were 0.46 (first measure) and 0.65 (second measure) times that of men to exhibit marked slowing. Multiple regression indicated that being older was associated with lesser slowing, but the sex difference among faster runners persisted when age was controlled. Conclusions. There was a sex difference in pacing during a 10 km race where glycogen depletion is not typically relevant. These results support the hypothesis that the sex difference in pacing partly reflects a sex difference in decision making. PMID:27547544

  14. Fast men slow more than fast women in a 10 kilometer road race

    PubMed Central

    Addona, Vittorio; Carter, Rickey E.; Joyner, Michael J.; Hunter, Sandra K.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Previous studies have demonstrated that men are more likely than women to slow in the marathon (footrace). This study investigated whether the sex difference in pacing occurs for a shorter race distance. Materials & Methods. Data were acquired from the Bolder Boulder 10 km road race for the years 2008–2013, which encompassed 191,693 performances. There were two pacing measures, percentage change in pace of the first 3 miles relative to the final 3.2 miles and percentage change in pace of the first mile relative to the final 5.2 miles. Pacing was analyzed as a continuous variable and as two categorical variables, as follows: “maintain the pace,” defined as slowing <5% and “marked slowing,” defined as slowing ≥10%. Results. Among the fastest (men < 48:40; women < 55:27) and second fastest (men < 53:54; women < 60:28) sex-specific finishing time sextiles, men slowed significantly more than women with both pacing measures, but there were no consistently significant sex differences in pacing among the slower four sextiles. For the fastest sextile, the odds for women were 1.96 (first pacing measure) and 1.36 (second measure) times greater than men to maintain the pace. For the fastest sextile, the odds for women were 0.46 (first measure) and 0.65 (second measure) times that of men to exhibit marked slowing. Multiple regression indicated that being older was associated with lesser slowing, but the sex difference among faster runners persisted when age was controlled. Conclusions. There was a sex difference in pacing during a 10 km race where glycogen depletion is not typically relevant. These results support the hypothesis that the sex difference in pacing partly reflects a sex difference in decision making. PMID:27547544

  15. Reduction of calcium release site models via fast/slow analysis and iterative aggregation/disaggregation.

    PubMed

    Hao, Yan; Kemper, Peter; Smith, Gregory D

    2009-09-01

    Mathematical models of calcium release sites derived from Markov chain models of intracellular calcium channels exhibit collective gating reminiscent of the experimentally observed phenomenon of calcium puffs and sparks. Such models often take the form of stochastic automata networks in which the transition probabilities of each channel depend on the local calcium concentration and thus the state of the other channels. In order to overcome the state-space explosion that occurs in such compositionally defined calcium release site models, we have implemented several automated procedures for model reduction using fast/slow analysis. After categorizing rate constants in the single channel model as either fast or slow, groups of states in the expanded release site model that are connected by fast transitions are lumped, and transition rates between reduced states are chosen consistent with the conditional probability distribution among states within each group. For small problems these conditional probability distributions can be numerically calculated from the full model without approximation. For large problems the conditional probability distributions can be approximated without the construction of the full model by assuming rapid mixing of states connected by fast transitions. Alternatively, iterative aggregation/disaggregation may be employed to obtain reduced calcium release site models in a memory-efficient fashion. Benchmarking of several different iterative aggregation/disaggregation-based fast/slow reduction schemes establishes the effectiveness of automated calcium release site reduction utilizing the Koury-McAllister-Stewart method. PMID:19792032

  16. On forward inferences of fast and slow readers. An eye movement study

    PubMed Central

    Hawelka, Stefan; Schuster, Sarah; Gagl, Benjamin; Hutzler, Florian

    2015-01-01

    Unimpaired readers process words incredibly fast and hence it was assumed that top-down processing, such as predicting upcoming words, would be too slow to play an appreciable role in reading. This runs counter the major postulate of the predictive coding framework that our brain continually predicts probable upcoming sensory events. This means, it may generate predictions about the probable upcoming word during reading (dubbed forward inferences). Trying to asses these contradictory assumptions, we evaluated the effect of the predictability of words in sentences on eye movement control during silent reading. Participants were a group of fluent (i.e., fast) and a group of speed-impaired (i.e., slow) readers. The findings indicate that fast readers generate forward inferences, whereas speed-impaired readers do so to a reduced extent - indicating a significant role of predictive coding for fluent reading. PMID:25678030

  17. Required coefficient of friction during turning at self-selected slow, normal, and fast walking speeds

    PubMed Central

    Fino, Peter; Lockhart, Thurmon

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship of required coefficient of friction to gait speed, obstacle height, and turning strategy as participants walked around obstacles of various heights. Ten healthy, young adults performed 90° turns around corner pylons of four different heights at their self selected normal, slow, and fast walking speeds using both step and spin turning strategies. Kinetic data was captured using force plates. Results showed peak required coefficient of friction (RCOF) at push off increased with increased speed (slow µ= 0.38, normal µ=0.45, fast µ=0.54). Obstacle height had no effect on RCOF values. The average peak RCOF for fast turning exceeded the OSHA safety guideline for static COF of µ>0.50, suggesting further research is needed into the minimum static COF to prevent slips and falls, especially around corners. PMID:24581815

  18. Solar Energetic Particle Production by Shocks in Fast and Slow Solar Wind Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahler, S. W.; Reames, D. V.; Sheeley, N. R., Jr.

    2002-05-01

    Gradual solar energetic particle (SEP) events at 1 AU are produced by coronal and interplanetary shocks driven by coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Shocks from fast (V > 900 km/s) CMEs should be produced more easily in slow solar wind regions where the flow and fast-mode MHD wave speeds are low and less easily in fast solar wind regions where those speeds are high. We might therefore expect to observe more intense SEP events at 1 AU when the Earth lies in a slow wind region than when it lies in a fast wind region. While stream-stream interactions wash out the slow-fast stream boundaries in the solar wind speed profiles at 1 AU, the O+7/O+6 signatures of the streams are unchanged at 1 AU. We use the 20 MeV proton intensities from the EPACT instrument on Wind, the associated CMEs observed with the Lasco coronagraph on SOHO, and the ACE SWICS/SWIMS solar wind values of O+7/O+6 to look for variations of peak SEP intensities as a function of O+7/O+6. We find no significant dependence of the SEP intensities on O+7/O+6 for either poorly connected or well connected CME source regions or for different CME speed ranges. While a broad range of angular widths are associated with fast (V > 900 km/s) CMEs, we find that no fast CMEs with widths < 60 degrees are associated with SEP events. On the other hand, nearly all fast halo CMEs are associated with SEP events. Thus the CME widths are more important in SEP production than previously thought, but the solar wind source regions in which SEPs are produced are not a significant factor.

  19. Calculation of coupling to slow and fast waves in the LHRF from phased waveguide arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Pinsker, R.I.; Duvall, R.E.; Fortgang, C.M.; Colestock, P.L.

    1986-04-01

    A previously reported algorithm for solving the problem of coupling electromagnetic energy in the LHRF from a phased array of identical rectangular waveguides to a plane-stratified, magnetized cold plasma is numerically implemented. The resulting computer codes are sufficiently general to allow for an arbitrary number of waveguides with finite dimensions in both poloidal and toroidal directions, and are thus capable of computing coupling to both slow and fast waves in the plasma. Some of the details of the implementation and the extension of the algorithm to allow study of the Fourier spectrum of slow and fast waves launched by the array are discussed. Good agreement is found with previously reported, less general work for the slow wave launching case. The effect of phasing multirow arrays in the poloidal direction is studied, and an asymmetry between phasing 'up' and 'down' is found that persists in the case where the plasma adjacent to the array is uniform. A 4 x 3 array designed to launch fast waves of high phase velocity is studied. By using the optimal poloidal phasing, low reflection coefficients (absolute value of R/sup 2/ less than or equal to 20%) are found under some not unrealistic edge plasma conditions, but most of the input power is trapped in the outermost layer of the plasma. Implications of our results for fast wave current drive experiments are discussed.

  20. On the existence of 'fast' and 'slow' directionally sensitive motion detector neurons in insects.

    PubMed

    Horridge, G A; Marcelja, L

    1992-04-22

    In a fly, butterfly, locust and dragonfly we examined the responses of a variety of directional motion-sensitive neurons which run from the brain down the ventral cord. The stimulus was a sinusoidally modulated moving pattern of regular stripes presented at a range of velocities in random order for either 0.1 s or 2.0 s. The response was measured as the total number of spikes to each stimulus. The neurons fall into two groups, 'fast' and 'slow'. The responses of the fast type rise progressively to a peak contrast frequency at 15-20 Hz for all four insects, and decline at higher contrast frequencies. The responses of slow neurons rise rapidly to a peak at 1-10 Hz and then decline more slowly across the range where the fast neurons are at their peak. The existence of two groups of neurons with overlapping response ranges to different velocities of the same pattern, presented in exactly the same way, provides the insect with a means of measuring angular velocity irrespective of contrast, spatial frequency or intensity. As an input mechanism it is proposed that there are two types of unit motion detector, fast and slow, the latter being the main input to the optomotor system. It is also argued that even these inputs are not sufficient to provide a mechanism for the whole repertoire of normal insect vision. PMID:1355911

  1. Not so fast: hippocampal amnesia slows word learning despite successful fast mapping.

    PubMed

    Warren, David E; Duff, Melissa C

    2014-08-01

    The human hippocampus is widely believed to be necessary for the rapid acquisition of new declarative relational memories. However, processes supporting on-line inferential word use ("fast mapping") may also exercise a dissociable learning mechanism and permit rapid word learning without the hippocampus (Sharon et al. (2011) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 108:1146-1151). We investigated fast mapping in severely amnesic patients with hippocampal damage (N = 4), mildly amnesic patients (N = 6), and healthy comparison participants (N = 10) using on-line measures (eye movements) that reflected ongoing processing. All participants studied unique word-picture associations in two encoding conditions. In the explicit-encoding condition, uncommon items were paired with their names (e.g., "This is a numbat."). In the fast mapping study condition, participants heard an instruction using a novel word (e.g., "Click on the numbat.") while two items were presented (an uncommon target such as a numbat, and a common distracter such as a dog). All groups performed fast mapping well at study, and on-line eye movement measures did not reveal group differences. However, while comparison participants showed robust word learning irrespective of encoding condition, severely amnesic patients showed no evidence of learning after fast mapping or explicit encoding on any behavioral or eye-movement measure. Mildly amnesic patients showed some learning, but performance was unaffected by encoding condition. The findings are consistent with the following propositions: the hippocampus is not essential for on-line fast mapping of novel words; but is necessary for the rapid learning of arbitrary relational information irrespective of encoding conditions. PMID:24719218

  2. Effect of disuse on sarcoplasmic reticulum in fast and slow skeletal muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, D. H.; Witzmann, F. A.; Fitts, R. H.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of 6 weeks of hindlimb immobilization on rat skeletal muscle sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) was determined in the slow-twitch, type 1 soleus (SOL), the fast-twitch, type 2A deep region of the vastus lateralis (DVL), and the fast-twitch, type 2B superficial region of the vastus lateralis (SVL). Immobilization produced a significant decline in the Ca(2+) uptake rate (V sub max) of SR vesicles from the slow SOL, while the SR V sub max increased in the fast SVL and was unaltered in the DVL. Vesicles from the fast SVL and DVL also exhibited a higher total Ca(2+) uptake capacity following immobilization. An evaluation of the time course of the immobilization-mediated effect revealed an increased Ca(2+) uptake capacity in all three samples after 1 wk. In the SOL total Ca(2+) uptake returned to control level after 2 wk, while in the fast-twitch muscles the higher capacities were maintained. The Ca(2+)-stimulated SR ATPase activity was not altered in any of the muscle studies.

  3. Crossover between fast and slow excitation of magnetization by spin torque

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taniguchi, Tomohiro

    2016-07-01

    A crossover between two mechanisms destabilizing the magnetization in equilibrium by the spin transfer effect is found in a ferromagnetic multilayer consisting of an in-plane magnetized free layer and a perpendicularly magnetized pinned layer, where an in-plane magnetic field is applied, and electric current flows from the pinned to the free layer. A fast transition from the in-plane to the out-of-plane state occurs in the low-field region, whereas a slow transition with small-amplitude oscillation becomes dominant in the high-field region. On the other hand, only the fast transition mechanism appears for the opposite current direction.

  4. On the global structure of normal forms for slow-fast Hamiltonian systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avendaño Camacho, M.; Vorobiev, Yu.

    2013-04-01

    In the framework of Lie transforms and the global method of averaging, the normal forms of a multidimensional slow-fast Hamiltonian system are studied in the case when the flow of the unperturbed (fast) system is periodic and the induced {S}^1 1-action is not necessarily free and trivial. An intrinsic splitting of the second term in a {S}^1 1-invariant normal form of first order is derived in terms of the Hannay-Berry connection assigned to the periodic flow.

  5. Coordinated Action of Fast and Slow Reserves for Optimal Sequential and Dynamic Emergency Reserve Activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salkuti, Surender Reddy; Bijwe, P. R.; Abhyankar, A. R.

    2016-04-01

    This paper proposes an optimal dynamic reserve activation plan after the occurrence of an emergency situation (generator/transmission line outage, load increase or both). An optimal plan is developed to handle the emergency situation, using coordinated action of fast and slow reserves, for secure operation with minimum overall cost. This paper considers the reserves supplied by generators (spinning reserves) and loads (demand-side reserves). The optimal backing down of costly/fast reserves and bringing up of slow reserves in each sub-interval in an integrated manner is proposed. The simulation studies are performed on IEEE 30, 57 and 300 bus test systems to demonstrate the advantage of proposed integrated/dynamic reserve activation plan over the conventional/sequential approach.

  6. Fast and slow magnetosonic waves in two-dimensional spin-1/2 quantum plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Mushtaq, A.; Vladimirov, S. V.

    2010-10-15

    Using the spin-1/2 resistive quantum magnetohydrodynamics model, linear and nonlinear relations for slow and fast magnetosonic modes are derived. Spin effects are incorporated via spin force and macroscopic spin magnetization current. The plasma resistivity is shown to play a role of dissipation in the system. With the aid of tanh method the traveling wave solution of Kadomstev-Petviashvili-Burgers is obtained. The solution shows a general shock wave profile superposed by a perturbative solitary-wave contribution. The dynamics of fast and slow magnetosonic shock and soliton, respectively, in the presence and absence of dissipation is investigated with respect to electron spin magnetization, quantum diffraction, and plasma statistic. It is found that results obtained from the spin quantum plasmas differ significantly from the nonspin quantum plasmas. The relevance of the present work to dense astrophysical plasmas such as pulsar magnetosphere is pointed out.

  7. Quantitative analysis of RNA produced by slow and fast alleles of Adh in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed Central

    Laurie, C C; Stam, L F

    1988-01-01

    The alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) locus (Adh) of Drosophila melanogaster in polymorphic on a world-wide basis for two allozymes, Fast and Slow. This study was undertaken to determine whether the well-established difference in ADH protein concentration between the allozymes is due to a difference in mRNA levels. RNA gel blot hybridization and an RNase protection assay were used to quantify ADH mRNA levels. Each method used an Adh null mutant as an internal standard. Several Slow and Fast allele pairs of different geographic origins were analyzed. The results provide strong evidence that the ADH protein concentration difference is not accounted for by RNA level. Images PMID:2455893

  8. Fast and Slow Precipitation Responses to Individual Climate Forcers: A PDRMIP Multimodel Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samset, B. H.; Myhre, G.; Forster, P.M.; Hodnebrog, O.; Andrews, T.; Faluvegi, G.; Flaschner, D.; Kasoar, M.; Kharin, V.; Kirkevag, A.; Shindell, D.; Voulgarakis, A.

    2016-01-01

    Precipitation is expected to respond differently to various drivers of anthropogenic climate change. We present the first results from the Precipitation Driver and Response Model Intercomparison Project (PDRMIP), where nine global climate models have perturbed CO2, CH4, black carbon, sulfate, and solar insolation. We divide the resulting changes to global mean and regional precipitation into fast responses that scale with changes in atmospheric absorption and slow responses scaling with surface temperature change. While the overall features are broadly similar between models, we find significant regional intermodel variability, especially over land. Black carbon stands out as a component that may cause significant model diversity in predicted precipitation change. Processes linked to atmospheric absorption are less consistently modeled than those linked to top-of-atmosphere radiative forcing. We identify a number of land regions where the model ensemble consistently predicts that fast precipitation responses to climate perturbations dominate over the slow, temperature-driven responses.

  9. Coupling of Fast and Slow Modes in the Reaction Pathway of the Minimal Hammerhead Ribozyme Cleavage

    PubMed Central

    Radhakrishnan, Ravi

    2007-01-01

    By employing classical molecular dynamics, correlation analysis of coupling between slow and fast dynamical modes, and free energy (umbrella) sampling using classical as well as mixed quantum mechanics molecular mechanics force fields, we uncover a possible pathway for phosphoryl transfer in the self-cleaving reaction of the minimal hammerhead ribozyme. The significance of this pathway is that it initiates from the minimal hammerhead crystal structure and describes the reaction landscape as a conformational rearrangement followed by a covalent transformation. The delineated mechanism is catalyzed by two metal (Mg2+) ions, proceeds via an in-line-attack by CYT 17 O2′ on the scissile phosphorous (ADE 1.1 P), and is therefore consistent with the experimentally observed inversion configuration. According to the delineated mechanism, the coupling between slow modes involving the hammerhead backbone with fast modes in the cleavage site appears to be crucial for setting up the in-line nucleophilic attack. PMID:17545240

  10. Fast and slow precipitation responses to individual climate forcers: A PDRMIP multimodel study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samset, B. H.; Myhre, G.; Forster, P. M.; Hodnebrog, Ø.; Andrews, T.; Faluvegi, G.; Fläschner, D.; Kasoar, M.; Kharin, V.; Kirkevâg, A.; Lamarque, J.-F.; Olivié, D.; Richardson, T.; Shindell, D.; Shine, K. P.; Takemura, T.; Voulgarakis, A.

    2016-03-01

    Precipitation is expected to respond differently to various drivers of anthropogenic climate change. We present the first results from the Precipitation Driver and Response Model Intercomparison Project (PDRMIP), where nine global climate models have perturbed CO2, CH4, black carbon, sulfate, and solar insolation. We divide the resulting changes to global mean and regional precipitation into fast responses that scale with changes in atmospheric absorption and slow responses scaling with surface temperature change. While the overall features are broadly similar between models, we find significant regional intermodel variability, especially over land. Black carbon stands out as a component that may cause significant model diversity in predicted precipitation change. Processes linked to atmospheric absorption are less consistently modeled than those linked to top-of-atmosphere radiative forcing. We identify a number of land regions where the model ensemble consistently predicts that fast precipitation responses to climate perturbations dominate over the slow, temperature-driven responses.

  11. Fast and slow flexural waves in a deviated borehole in homogeneous and layered anisotropic formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xiao; Hu, Hengshan; Guan, Wei

    2010-04-01

    Dipole acoustic fields in an arbitrarily deviated well penetrating a homogeneous as well as a stratified transversely isotropic formation are simulated using a 3-D finite-difference time-domain algorithm in cylindrical coordinates. The modelling results show that a dipole source can excite a fast- and a slow-flexural mode due to the shear wave anisotropy when the borehole is inclined with respect to the symmetry axis of transverse isotropy. Both flexural slownesses change with the wellbore deviation angle. The splitting of flexural modes is prominent in full wave arrays when the shear anisotropy is strong enough. It is revealed that the dipole orientation influences the relative amplitudes of the fast- and slow-flexural waves but it has no effect on their slownesses or phases. In a vertical well parallel to the symmetry axis, the two flexural waves degenerate and propagate at the same speed. The degenerated flexural wave travels approximately at the shear speed along the borehole wall except in a few formations. Our study shows, for example, that it is about 10 per cent slower than the shear wave in Mesaverde clayshale 5501. Even in that kind of formations, however, extraction of the fast- and slow-shear velocities from the flexural modes is still possible if the borehole deviation is large enough. To examine the effect of layering, we modelled the full waves in a formation with a sandwich. When the well is perpendicular to the layer interfaces, reflection is obvious and can be recognized. It becomes weaker or even invisible as the deviation angle increases, so it is difficult to detect a thin layer embedded in a formation directly from reflected waves. The sandwich can, instead, be recognized from the irregularity in the spectra of the full waveforms displayed versus depth. [Correction added after online publication 25th February 2009; the original spelling of `homogenous' in the title has been corrected to `homogeneous'.[

  12. Endothermic force generation in fast and slow mammalian (rabbit) muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Ranatunga, K W

    1996-10-01

    Isometric tension responses to rapid temperature jumps (T-jumps) of 3-7 degrees C were examined in single skinned fibers isolated from rabbit psoas (fast) and soleus (slow) muscles. T-jumps were induced by an infrared laser pulse (wavelength 1.32 microns, pulse duration 0.2 ms) obtained from a Nd-YAG laser, which heated the fiber and bathing buffer solution in a 50-microliter trough. After a T-jump, the temperature near the fiber remained constant for approximately 0.5 s, and the temperature could be clamped for longer periods by means of Peltier units assembled on the back trough wall. A T-jump produced a step decrease in tension in both fast and slow muscle fibers in rigor, indicating thermal expansion. In maximally Ca-activated (pCa approximately 4) fibers, the increase of steady tension with heating (3-35 degrees C) was approximately sigmoidal, and a T-jump at any temperature induced a more complex tension transient than in rigor fibers. An initial (small amplitude) step decrease in tension followed by a rapid recovery (tau(1); see Davis and Harrington, 1993) was seen in some records from both fiber types, which presumably was an indirect consequence of thermal expansion. The net rise in tension after a T-jump was biexponential, and its time course was characteristically different in the two fibers. At approximately 12 degrees C the reciprocal time constants for the two exponential components (tau(2) and tau(3), respectively, were approximately 70.s(-1) and approximately 15.s(-1) in fast fibers and approximately 20.s(-1) and approximately 3.s(-1) in slow fibers. In both fibers, tau(2) ("endothermic force regeneration") became faster with an increase in temperature. Furthermore, tau(3) was temperature sensitive in slow fibers but not in fast fibers. The results are compared and contrasted with previous findings from T-jump experiments on fast fibers. It is observed that the fast/slow fiber difference in the rate of endothermic force generation (three- to

  13. Functional properties of slow and fast gastrocnemius muscle fibers after a 17-day spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Widrick, J. J.; Romatowski, J. G.; Norenberg, K. M.; Knuth, S. T.; Bain, J. L.; Riley, D. A.; Trappe, S. W.; Trappe, T. A.; Costill, D. L.; Fitts, R. H.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to study the effects of a 17-day spaceflight on the contractile properties of individual fast- and slow-twitch fibers isolated from biopsies of the fast-twitch gastrocnemius muscle of four male astronauts. Single chemically skinned fibers were studied during maximal Ca2+-activated contractions with fiber myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoform expression subsequently determined by SDS gel electrophoresis. Spaceflight had no significant effect on the mean diameter or specific force of single fibers expressing type I, IIa, or IIa/IIx MHC, although a small reduction in average absolute force (P(o)) was observed for the type I fibers (0.68 +/- 0.02 vs. 0.64 +/- 0.02 mN, P < 0.05). Subject-by-flight interactions indicated significant intersubject variation in response to the flight, as postflight fiber diameter and P(o) where significantly reduced for the type I and IIa fibers obtained from one astronaut and for the type IIa fibers from another astronaut. Average unloaded shortening velocity [V(o), in fiber lengths (FL)/s] was greater after the flight for both type I (0.60 +/- 0.03 vs. 0.76 +/- 0.02 FL/s) and IIa fibers (2.33 +/- 0.25 vs. 3.10 +/- 0.16 FL/s). Postflight peak power of the type I and IIa fibers was significantly reduced only for the astronaut experiencing the greatest fiber atrophy and loss of P(o). These results demonstrate that 1) slow and fast gastrocnemius fibers show little atrophy and loss of P(o) but increased V(o) after a typical 17-day spaceflight, 2) there is, however, considerable intersubject variation in these responses, possibly due to intersubject differences in in-flight physical activity, and 3) in these four astronauts, fiber atrophy and reductions in P(o) were less for slow and fast fibers obtained from the phasic fast-twitch gastrocnemius muscle compared with slow and fast fibers obtained from the slow antigravity soleus [J. J. Widrick, S. K. Knuth, K. M. Norenberg, J. G. Romatowski, J. L. W. Bain, D. A

  14. Fast and Slow Responses of the South Asian Monsoon System to Anthropogenic Aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Ganguly, Dilip; Rasch, Philip J.; Wang, Hailong; Yoon, Jin-Ho

    2012-09-25

    Using a global climate model with fully predictive aerosol life cycle, we investigate the fast and slow responses of the South Asian monsoon system to anthropogenic aerosol forcing. Our results show that the feedbacks associated with sea surface temperature (SST) change caused by aerosols play a more important role than the aerosol's direct impact on radiation, clouds and land surface (rapid adjustments) in shaping the total equilibrium climate response of the monsoon system to aerosol forcing. Inhomogeneous SST cooling caused by anthropogenic aerosols eventually reduces the meridional tropospheric temperature gradient and the easterly shear of zonal winds over the region, slowing down the local Hadley cell circulation, decreasing the northward moisture transport, and causing a reduction in precipitation over South Asia. Although total responses in precipitation are closer to the slow responses in general, the fast component dominates over land areas north of 25°N. Our results also show an east-west asymmetry in the fast responses to anthropogenic aerosols causing increases in precipitation west of 80°E but decreases east of it.

  15. Fast and slow activation kinetics of voltage-gated sodium channels in molluscan neurons.

    PubMed

    Gilly, W F; Gillette, R; McFarlane, M

    1997-05-01

    Whole cell patch-clamp recordings of Na current (I(Na)) were made under identical experimental conditions from isolated neurons from cephalopod (Loligo, Octopus) and gastropod (Aplysia, Pleurobranchaea, Doriopsilla) species to compare properties of activation gating. Voltage dependence of peak Na conductance (gNa) is very similar in all cases, but activation kinetics in the gastropod neurons studied are markedly slower. Kinetic differences are very pronounced only over the voltage range spanned by the gNa-voltage relation. At positive and negative extremes of voltage, activation and deactivation kinetics of I(Na) are practically indistinguishable in all species studied. Voltage-dependent rate constants underlying activation of the slow type of Na channel found in gastropods thus appear to be much more voltage dependent than are the equivalent rates in the universally fast type of channel that predominates in cephalopods. Voltage dependence of inactivation kinetics shows a similar pattern and is representative of activation kinetics for the two types of Na channels. Neurons with fast Na channels can thus make much more rapid adjustments in the number of open Na channels at physiologically relevant voltages than would be possible with only slow Na channels. This capability appears to be an adaptation that is highly evolved in cephalopods, which are well known for their high-speed swimming behaviors. Similarities in slow and fast Na channel subtypes in molluscan and mammalian neurons are discussed. PMID:9163364

  16. LSP simulations of fast ions slowing down in cool magnetized plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Eugene S.; Cohen, Samuel A.

    2015-11-01

    In MFE devices, rapid transport of fusion products, e.g., tritons and alpha particles, from the plasma core into the scrape-off layer (SOL) could perform the dual roles of energy and ash removal. Through these two processes in the SOL, the fast particle slowing-down time will have a major effect on the energy balance of a fusion reactor and its neutron emissions, topics of great importance. In small field-reversed configuration (FRC) devices, the first-orbit trajectories of most fusion products will traverse the SOL, potentially allowing those particles to deposit their energy in the SOL and eventually be exhausted along the open field lines. However, the dynamics of the fast-ion energy loss processes under conditions expected in the FRC SOL, where the Debye length is greater than the electron gyroradius, are not fully understood. What modifications to the classical slowing down rate are necessary? Will instabilities accelerate the energy loss? We use LSP, a 3D PIC code, to examine the effects of SOL plasma parameters (density, temperature and background magnetic field strength) on the slowing down time of fast ions in a cool plasma with parameters similar to those expected in the SOL of small FRC reactors. This work supported by DOE contract DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  17. Intermittency and Multifractal behavior in the Slow and Fast Solar Wind Beyond the Ecliptic Plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wawrzaszek, Anna; Echim, Marius; Macek, Wiesław M.; Bruno, Roberto

    2016-04-01

    In this work we study the evolution of intermittency in the solar wind magnetic turbulence at heliocentric distances between 1.5 and 5.4 AU and at heliolatitudes between -80 and 70o. We use the a multifractal analysis based on the partition function formalism. More precisely, we consider magnetic field intensity for the solar wind data from Ulysses spacecraft measured during two solar minima (1997-1998, 2007-2008) and one solar maximum (1999-2001). By modeling multifractal spectrum we reveal intermittent character of turbulence in the small-scale fluctuations of the magnetic field embedded in the slow and fast solar wind. Generally, at small distances from the Sun both in the slow and fast solar wind we observe the high degree of multifractality (intermittency) which decreases somewhat slowly with distance and slowly with latitude. The results seem to suggest that generally intermittency in the solar wind has solar origin. However, the fast and slow streams, shocks and other nonlinear interaction can only be considered as the drivers of the intermittent turbulence. It seems that analysis shows that turbulence beyond the ecliptic plane evolves too slowly to maintain the intermittency with the distance and latitude. Moreover, we confirm the lower level of multifractality and intermittency than in the ecliptic, as well as the existence of symmetry with respect to the ecliptic plane, suggesting similar turbulent properties observed in the two hemispheres. Research supported by the European Community's Seventh Framework Programme

  18. Evolution of Intermittency in the Slow and Fast Solar Wind beyond the Ecliptic Plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wawrzaszek, A.; Echim, M.; Macek, W. M.; Bruno, R.

    2015-12-01

    We study intermittency as a departure from self-similarity of the solar wind magnetic turbulence and investigate the evolution with the heliocentric distance and latitude. We use data from the Ulysses spacecraft measured during two solar minima (1997–1998 and 2007–2008) and one solar maximum (1999–2001). In particular, by modeling a multifractal spectrum, we revealed the intermittent character of turbulence in the small-scale fluctuations of the magnetic field embedded in the slow and fast solar wind. Generally, at small distances from the Sun, in both the slow and fast solar wind, we observe the high degree of multifractality (intermittency) that decreases somewhat slowly with distance and slowly with latitude. The obtained results seem to suggest that generally intermittency in the solar wind has a solar origin. However, the fast and slow streams, shocks, and other nonlinear interactions can only be considered as the drivers of the intermittent turbulence. It seems that analysis shows that turbulence beyond the ecliptic plane evolves too slowly to maintain the intermittency with the distance and latitude. Moreover, we confirm that the multifractality and intermittency are at a lower level than in the ecliptic, as well as the existence of symmetry with respect to the ecliptic plane, suggesting that there are similar turbulent properties observed in the two hemispheres.

  19. REM sleep behaviour disorder is associated with lower fast and higher slow sleep spindle densities.

    PubMed

    O'Reilly, Christian; Godin, Isabelle; Montplaisir, Jacques; Nielsen, Tore

    2015-12-01

    To investigate differences in sleep spindle properties and scalp topography between patients with rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder (RBD) and healthy controls, whole-night polysomnograms of 35 patients diagnosed with RBD and 35 healthy control subjects matched for age and sex were compared. Recordings included a 19-lead 10-20 electroencephalogram montage and standard electromyogram, electrooculogram, electrocardiogram and respiratory leads. Sleep spindles were automatically detected using a standard algorithm, and their characteristics (amplitude, duration, density, frequency and frequency slope) compared between groups. Topological analyses of group-discriminative features were conducted. Sleep spindles occurred at a significantly (e.g. t34 = -4.49; P = 0.00008 for C3) lower density (spindles ∙ min(-1) ) for RBD (mean ± SD: 1.61 ± 0.56 for C3) than for control (2.19 ± 0.61 for C3) participants. However, when distinguishing slow and fast spindles using thresholds individually adapted to the electroencephalogram spectrum of each participant, densities smaller (31-96%) for fast but larger (20-120%) for slow spindles were observed in RBD in all derivations. Maximal differences were in more posterior regions for slow spindles, but over the entire scalp for fast spindles. Results suggest that the density of sleep spindles is altered in patients with RBD and should therefore be investigated as a potential marker of future neurodegeneration in these patients. PMID:26041532

  20. Separate activation of fast and slow inhibitory postsynaptic potentials in rat neocortex in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Benardo, L S

    1994-01-01

    Synaptic inhibition was investigated by stimulating inhibitory neurones with focal microapplications of glutamate, while recording from layer V pyramidal neurones of rat somatosensory cortical slices. One class of inhibitory postsynaptic potentials (IPSPs) thus elicited was characterized as a fast, chloride-mediated, GABAA IPSP in part by its fast time-to-peak (mean 2.5 ms) and brief duration, but primarily on the basis of its reversal potential at -68 mV, and its blockade by picrotoxin. The average peak amplitude for these fast IPSPs was -1.5 mV, measured at -60 mV. The peak conductance calculated for these events was about 10 nS. The conductance change associated with the maximal fast inhibitory postsynaptic potential resulting from electrical stimulation of afferent pathways ranged up to 116 nS. A second class of IPSP was encountered much less frequently. These glutamate-triggered events were characterized as slow, potassium-mediated GABAB IPSPs partly because of their longer times-to-peak (mean, 45 ms) and duration, but especially because of their extrapolated equilibrium potential at about -89 mV and blockade by 2-hydroxysaclofen. The average peak amplitude for these slow IPSPs was -2.3 mV, measured at -60 mV. The peak conductance for these events was about 8 nS. IPSPs resulting from the excitation of individual inhibitory interneurones were elicited by glutamate microapplication at particular locations relative to recording sites. Both fast and slow IPSPs were generated, but these occurred as separate events, and mixed responses were never seen. Thus, the two mechanistically distinct types of IPSPs which result from GABA interaction at GABAA and GABAB receptors on neocortical neurones may be mediated by separate classes of inhibitory neurones. PMID:7913968

  1. SBS slow light using a novel optical fiber doped with nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ying; Lang, Peilin; Zhang, Ru

    2008-11-01

    As the key of these all optical techniques which would be widely used in the future optical fiber communication, the stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) slow light draws a great of attention and shows several advantages over other slow light methods. With recent growth of nano-technology, researchers are hoping to improve the nonlinearity of the optical fiber by using the nano-technology. According to this current situation, a numerical model of the SBS slow light and three typical experiments are discussed. A novel optical fiber doped with nano material as InP is manufactured and introduced into the SBS slow light, serving as the nonlinear medium of SBS process. And the numerical simulations are performed to validate our method. The results show a considerable time delay of the optical light can be achieved through this novel optical fiber.

  2. Cytoplasm-to-myonucleus ratios and succinate dehydrogenase activities in adult rat slow and fast muscle fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tseng, B. S.; Kasper, C. E.; Edgerton, V. R.

    1994-01-01

    The relationship between myonuclear number, cellular size, succinate dehydrogenase activity, and myosin type was examined in single fiber segments (n = 54; 9 +/- 3 mm long) mechanically dissected from soleus and plantaris muscles of adult rats. One end of each fiber segment was stained for DNA before quantitative photometric analysis of succinate dehydrogenase activity; the other end was double immunolabeled with fast and slow myosin heavy chain monoclonal antibodies. Mean +/- S.D. cytoplasmic volume/myonucleus ratio was higher in fast and slow plantaris fibers (112 +/- 69 vs. 34 +/- 21 x 10(3) microns3) than fast and slow soleus fibers (40 +/- 20 vs. 30 +/- 14 x 10(3) microns3), respectively. Slow fibers always had small volumes/myonucleus, regardless of fiber diameter, succinate dehydrogenase activity, or muscle of origin. In contrast, smaller diameter (< 70 microns) fast soleus and plantaris fibers with high succinate dehydrogenase activity appeared to have low volumes/myonucleus while larger diameter (> 70 microns) fast fibers with low succinate dehydrogenase activity always had large volume/myonucleus. Slow soleus fibers had significantly greater numbers of myonuclei/mm than did either fast soleus or fast plantaris fibers (116 +/- 51 vs. 55 +/- 22 and 44 +/- 23), respectively. These data suggest that the myonuclear domain is more limited in slow than fast fibers and in the fibers with a high, compared to a low, oxidative metabolic capability.

  3. REVIEW ARTICLE: Dispersion engineered slow light in photonic crystals: a comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, S. A.; O'Faolain, L.; Beggs, D. M.; White, T. P.; Melloni, A.; Krauss, T. F.

    2010-10-01

    We review the different types of dispersion engineered photonic crystal waveguides that have been developed for slow light applications. We introduce the group index bandwidth product (GBP) and the loss per delay in terms of dB ns - 1 as two key figures of merit to describe such structures and compare the different experimental realizations based on these figures. A key outcome of the comparison is that slow light based on photonic crystals performs as well or better than slow light based on coupled ring resonators.

  4. Fast or Slow? Compressions (or Not) in Number-to-Line Mappings

    PubMed Central

    Candia, Victor; Deprez, Paola; Wernery, Jannis; Núñez, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    We investigated, in a university student population, spontaneous (non-speeded) fast and slow number-to-line mapping responses using non-symbolic (dots) and symbolic (words) stimuli. Seeking for less conventionalized responses, we used anchors 0–130, rather than the standard 0–100. Slow responses to both types of stimuli only produced linear mappings with no evidence of non-linear compression. In contrast, fast responses revealed distinct patterns of non-linear compression for dots and words. A predicted logarithmic compression was observed in fast responses to dots in the 0–130 range, but not in the reduced 0–100 range, indicating compression in proximity of the upper anchor 130, not the standard 100. Moreover, fast responses to words revealed an unexpected significant negative compression in the reduced 0–100 range, but not in the 0–130 range, indicating compression in proximity to the lower anchor 0. Results show that fast responses help revealing the fundamentally distinct nature of symbolic and non-symbolic quantity representation. Whole number words, being intrinsically mediated by cultural phenomena such as language and education, emphasize the invariance of magnitude between them—essential for linear mappings, and therefore, unlike non-symbolic (psychophysical) stimuli, yield spatial mappings that don’t seem to be influenced by the Weber-Fechner law of psychophysics. However, high levels of education (when combined with an absence of standard upper anchors) may lead fast responses to overestimate magnitude invariance on the lower end of word numerals. PMID:25816010

  5. Fast or slow? Compressions (or not) in number-to-line mappings.

    PubMed

    Candia, Victor; Deprez, Paola; Wernery, Jannis; Núñez, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    We investigated, in a university student population, spontaneous (non-speeded) fast and slow number-to-line mapping responses using non-symbolic (dots) and symbolic (words) stimuli. Seeking for less conventionalized responses, we used anchors 0-130, rather than the standard 0-100. Slow responses to both types of stimuli only produced linear mappings with no evidence of non-linear compression. In contrast, fast responses revealed distinct patterns of non-linear compression for dots and words. A predicted logarithmic compression was observed in fast responses to dots in the 0-130 range, but not in the reduced 0-100 range, indicating compression in proximity of the upper anchor 130, not the standard 100. Moreover, fast responses to words revealed an unexpected significant negative compression in the reduced 0-100 range, but not in the 0-130 range, indicating compression in proximity to the lower anchor 0. Results show that fast responses help revealing the fundamentally distinct nature of symbolic and non-symbolic quantity representation. Whole number words, being intrinsically mediated by cultural phenomena such as language and education, emphasize the invariance of magnitude between them—essential for linear mappings, and therefore, unlike non-symbolic (psychophysical) stimuli, yield spatial mappings that don't seem to be influenced by the Weber-Fechner law of psychophysics. However, high levels of education (when combined with an absence of standard upper anchors) may lead fast responses to overestimate magnitude invariance on the lower end of word numerals. PMID:25816010

  6. Superluminal and Ultra-Slow Light Propagation in Room-Temperature Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, Robert W.; Bigelow, Matthew S.; Lepeshkin, Nick N.

    2004-12-01

    We have observed ultra-slow light propagation (57 m s-1) in ruby and superluminal (-800 m s-1) light propagation in alexandrite at room temperature. The modified light speed results from the rapid variation in refractive index associated with spectral holes and antiholes produced by the process of coherent population oscillations.

  7. Explicit and Implicit Processes Constitute the Fast and Slow Processes of Sensorimotor Learning

    PubMed Central

    Bond, Krista M.; Taylor, Jordan A.

    2015-01-01

    A popular model of human sensorimotor learning suggests that a fast process and a slow process work in parallel to produce the canonical learning curve (Smith et al., 2006). Recent evidence supports the subdivision of sensorimotor learning into explicit and implicit processes that simultaneously subserve task performance (Taylor et al., 2014). We set out to test whether these two accounts of learning processes are homologous. Using a recently developed method to assay explicit and implicit learning directly in a sensorimotor task, along with a computational modeling analysis, we show that the fast process closely resembles explicit learning and the slow process approximates implicit learning. In addition, we provide evidence for a subdivision of the slow/implicit process into distinct manifestations of motor memory. We conclude that the two-state model of motor learning is a close approximation of sensorimotor learning, but it is unable to describe adequately the various implicit learning operations that forge the learning curve. Our results suggest that a wider net be cast in the search for the putative psychological mechanisms and neural substrates underlying the multiplicity of processes involved in motor learning. PMID:26134640

  8. A thermodynamically based definition of fast verses slow heating in secondary explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henson, Bryan; Smilowitz, Laura

    2013-06-01

    The thermal response of energetic materials is often categorized according to the rate of heating as either fast or slow, e.g. slow cook-off. Such categorizations have most often followed some operational rationale, without a material based definition. We have spent several years demonstrating that for the energetic material octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX) a single mechanism of thermal response reproduces times to ignition independent of rate or means of heating over the entire range of thermal response. HMX is unique in that bulk melting is rarely observed in either thermal ignition or combustion. We have recently discovered a means of expressing this mechanism for HMX in a reduced form applicable to many secondary explosives. We will show that with this mechanism a natural definition of fast versus slow rates of heating emerges, related to the rate of melting, and we use this to illustrate why HMX does not exhibit melting, and why a number of other secondary explosives do, and require the two separate categories.

  9. The Parkfield Tremors: Slow and Fast Ruptures on the Same Asperity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mele Veedu, Deepa; Barbot, Sylvain

    2016-04-01

    A number of tremor sources have been burst into low-frequency earthquakes (LFEs) in the deep extension of the San Andreas Fault in the last decade. Among the tremor sources, a particular LFE family near Parkfield exhibited doubling recurrence intervals alternating between about three and six days. A simple physical model producing successive slow and fast ruptures on the same asperity can explain the doubling recurrence intervals (manuscript accepted by Nature, 2016), but the source characteristics of the LFEs may not be fully explained by this simple model. The source characteristics show that tremor bursts containing more LFEs and lasting longer are associated with lower-amplitude ground motion. We find that the number of LFEs per burst is controlled by peak velocity of the modeled slip event. However, the duration of the tremor burst is not directly controlled by the duration of the underlying slip. The findings imply that the LFEs occur contemporaneous with the underlying slow and fast ruptures successively. Our results bring a better understanding of the mechanics of tectonic tremors associated with underlying slow-slip events.

  10. Does the Speed of Light Slow Down Over Time?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ebert, Ronald

    1997-01-01

    The speed of light is a fundamental characteristic of the universe. So many processes are related to and dependent upon it that, if creationist claims were true, the universe would be far different from the way it is now. The speed of light has never been shown to vary based on the direction from which it was measured. (PVD)

  11. Phase measurement of fast light pulse in electromagnetically induced absorption.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yoon-Seok; Lee, Hee Jung; Moon, Han Seb

    2013-09-23

    We report the phase measurement of a fast light pulse in electromagnetically induced absorption (EIA) of the 5S₁/₂ (F = 2)-5P₃/₂ (F' = 3) transition of ⁸⁷Rb atoms. Using a beat-note interferometer method, a stable measurement without phase dithering of the phase of the probe pulse before and after it has passed through the EIA medium was achieved. Comparing the phases of the light pulse in air and that of the fast light pulse though the EIA medium, the phase of the fast light pulse at EIA resonance was not shifted and maintained to be the same as that of the free-space light pulse. The classical fidelity of the fast light pulse according to the advancement of the group velocity by adjusting the atomic density was estimated to be more than 97%. PMID:24104135

  12. Commercializing MEMS--too fast or too slow? (Same as Vols. 2881 and 2882, p. 12)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, S.; Carr, W. N.; Mados, H.; Narang, D. S.

    1996-09-01

    MEMS as a technology base is coming of age, but as in any vital process growing pains occur. Commercializing MEMS is simultaneously viewed as agonizingly slow by many of its promoters and lightingly quick by many companies whose products are being replaced with MEMS based substitutes. This effort ties current efforts in market analysis, technology evaluations, competency based strategy in an effort to understand the pace of MEMS commercialization.

  13. Commercializing MEMS--too fast or too slow? (Same as Vols. 2880 and 2881, p. 12)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, S.; Carr, W. N.; Mados, H.; Narang, D. S.

    1996-09-01

    MEMS as a technology base is coming of age, butas in any vital process growing pains occur. Commercializing MEMS is simultaneously viewed asagonizingly slow by many ofits promoters and lightingly quick by many companies whose products are being replaced with MEMS based substitutes. This effort ties current efforts in market analysis, technology evaluations, competency based strategy in an effort to understand the pace ofMEMS commercialization.

  14. Commercializing MEMS--too fast or too slow? ((Same as Vols. 2880 and 2882, p. 12)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, S.; Carr, W. N.; Mados, H.; Narang, D. S.

    1996-09-01

    MEMS as a technology base is coming ofage, butas in any vital process growing pains occur. Commercializing MEMS is simultaneously viewed asagonizingly slow by many ofits promoters and lightingly quick by many companies whose products are beingreplaced with MEMS based substitutes. This effort ties current efforts in market analysis, technology evaluations, competency based strategy in an effort to understand the pace ofMEMS commercialization.

  15. Reduced dynamics in spin-boson models: A method for both slow and fast bath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golosov, Andrei A.; Friesner, Richard A.; Pechukas, Philip

    2000-02-01

    We study a model for treating dissipative systems, a one dimensional quantum system coupled to a harmonic bath. The dynamics of such a system can be described by Feynman's path integral expression for the reduced density matrix. In this formulation the interaction of the system with the environment is stored in the influence functional. Recently we showed that fast environmental modes that give rise to correlations in the influence functional which are short range in time can be treated efficiently by a memory equation algorithm, which is a discretized version of a master equation. In this work we extend this approach to treat slow environmental modes as well, thereby efficiently linking adiabatic and nonadiabatic regimes. In this extended method the long range correlations in the influence functional arising from slow bath modes are taken into account through Stock's semiclassical self-consistent-field approach.

  16. Reconstruction of shifting elbow joint compliant characteristics during fast and slow movements.

    PubMed

    Latash, M L; Gottlieb, G L

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to experimentally investigate the applicability of the equilibrium-point hypothesis to the dynamics of single-joint movements. Subjects were trained to perform relatively slow (movement time 600-1000 ms) or fast (movement time 200-300 ms) single-joint elbow flexion movements against a constant extending torque bias. They were instructed to reproduce the same time pattern of central motor command for a series of movements when the external torque could slowly and unpredictably increase, decrease, or remain constant. For fast movements, the total muscle torque was calculated as a sum of external and inertial components. Analysis of the data allowed reconstruction of the elbow joint compliant characteristics at different times during execution of the learned motor command. "Virtual" trajectories of the movements, representing time-varying changes in a central control parameter, were reconstructed and compared with the "actual" trajectories. For slow movements, the actual trajectories lagged behind the virtual ones. There were no consistent changes in the joint stiffness during slow movements. Similar analysis of experiments without voluntary movements demonstrated a lack of changes in the central parameters, supporting the assumption that the subjects were able to keep the same central motor command in spite of externally imposed unexpected torque perturbations. For the fast movements, the virtual trajectories were N-shaped, and the joint stiffness demonstrated a considerable increase near the middle of the movement. These findings contradict an hypothesis of monotonic joint compliant characteristic translation at a nearly constant rate during such movements. PMID:1922790

  17. Contrasting Responses to Harvesting and Environmental Drivers of Fast and Slow Life History Species.

    PubMed

    Quetglas, Antoni; Rueda, Lucía; Alvarez-Berastegui, Diego; Guijarro, Beatriz; Massutí, Enric

    2016-01-01

    According to their main life history traits, organisms can be arranged in a continuum from fast (species with small body size, short lifespan and high fecundity) to slow (species with opposite characteristics). Life history determines the responses of organisms to natural and anthropogenic factors, as slow species are expected to be more sensitive than fast species to perturbations. Owing to their contrasting traits, cephalopods and elasmobranchs are typical examples of fast and slow strategies, respectively. We investigated the responses of these two contrasting strategies to fishing exploitation and environmental conditions (temperature, productivity and depth) using generalized additive models. Our results confirmed the foreseen contrasting responses of cephalopods and elasmobranchs to natural (environment) and anthropogenic (harvesting) influences. Even though a priori foreseen, we did expect neither the clear-cut differential responses between groups nor the homogeneous sensitivity to the same factors within the two taxonomic groups. Apart from depth, which affected both groups equally, cephalopods and elasmobranchs were exclusively affected by environmental conditions and fishing exploitation, respectively. Owing to its short, annual cycle, cephalopods do not have overlapping generations and consequently lack the buffering effects conferred by different age classes observed in multi-aged species such as elasmobranchs. We suggest that cephalopods are sensitive to short-term perturbations, such as seasonal environmental changes, because they lack this buffering effect but they are in turn not influenced by continuous, long-term moderate disturbances such as fishing because of its high population growth and turnover. The contrary would apply to elasmobranchs, whose multi-aged population structure would buffer the seasonal environmental effects, but they would display strong responses to uninterrupted harvesting due to its low population resilience. Besides

  18. Fast-slow continuum and reproductive strategies structure plant life-history variation worldwide.

    PubMed

    Salguero-Gómez, Roberto; Jones, Owen R; Jongejans, Eelke; Blomberg, Simon P; Hodgson, David J; Mbeau-Ache, Cyril; Zuidema, Pieter A; de Kroon, Hans; Buckley, Yvonne M

    2016-01-01

    The identification of patterns in life-history strategies across the tree of life is essential to our prediction of population persistence, extinction, and diversification. Plants exhibit a wide range of patterns of longevity, growth, and reproduction, but the general determinants of this enormous variation in life history are poorly understood. We use demographic data from 418 plant species in the wild, from annual herbs to supercentennial trees, to examine how growth form, habitat, and phylogenetic relationships structure plant life histories and to develop a framework to predict population performance. We show that 55% of the variation in plant life-history strategies is adequately characterized using two independent axes: the fast-slow continuum, including fast-growing, short-lived plant species at one end and slow-growing, long-lived species at the other, and a reproductive strategy axis, with highly reproductive, iteroparous species at one extreme and poorly reproductive, semelparous plants with frequent shrinkage at the other. Our findings remain consistent across major habitats and are minimally affected by plant growth form and phylogenetic ancestry, suggesting that the relative independence of the fast-slow and reproduction strategy axes is general in the plant kingdom. Our findings have similarities with how life-history strategies are structured in mammals, birds, and reptiles. The position of plant species populations in the 2D space produced by both axes predicts their rate of recovery from disturbances and population growth rate. This life-history framework may complement trait-based frameworks on leaf and wood economics; together these frameworks may allow prediction of responses of plants to anthropogenic disturbances and changing environments. PMID:26699477

  19. Contrasting Responses to Harvesting and Environmental Drivers of Fast and Slow Life History Species

    PubMed Central

    Quetglas, Antoni; Rueda, Lucía; Alvarez-Berastegui, Diego; Guijarro, Beatriz; Massutí, Enric

    2016-01-01

    According to their main life history traits, organisms can be arranged in a continuum from fast (species with small body size, short lifespan and high fecundity) to slow (species with opposite characteristics). Life history determines the responses of organisms to natural and anthropogenic factors, as slow species are expected to be more sensitive than fast species to perturbations. Owing to their contrasting traits, cephalopods and elasmobranchs are typical examples of fast and slow strategies, respectively. We investigated the responses of these two contrasting strategies to fishing exploitation and environmental conditions (temperature, productivity and depth) using generalized additive models. Our results confirmed the foreseen contrasting responses of cephalopods and elasmobranchs to natural (environment) and anthropogenic (harvesting) influences. Even though a priori foreseen, we did expect neither the clear-cut differential responses between groups nor the homogeneous sensitivity to the same factors within the two taxonomic groups. Apart from depth, which affected both groups equally, cephalopods and elasmobranchs were exclusively affected by environmental conditions and fishing exploitation, respectively. Owing to its short, annual cycle, cephalopods do not have overlapping generations and consequently lack the buffering effects conferred by different age classes observed in multi-aged species such as elasmobranchs. We suggest that cephalopods are sensitive to short-term perturbations, such as seasonal environmental changes, because they lack this buffering effect but they are in turn not influenced by continuous, long-term moderate disturbances such as fishing because of its high population growth and turnover. The contrary would apply to elasmobranchs, whose multi-aged population structure would buffer the seasonal environmental effects, but they would display strong responses to uninterrupted harvesting due to its low population resilience. Besides

  20. Slow-light effect via Rayleigh anomaly and the effect of finite gratings

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyoung-Youm; Chong, Xinyuan; Ren, Fanghui; Wang, Alan X.

    2016-01-01

    In this Letter, we investigate the slow-light effect of sub-wavelength diffraction gratings via the Rayleigh anomaly using a fully analytical approach without needing to consider specific grating structures. Our results show that the local group velocity of the transmitted light can be significantly reduced due to the optical vortex, which can inspire a new mechanism to enhance light–matter interactions for optical sensing and photodetection. However, the slow-light effect will diminish as the transmitted light propagates farther from the grating surface, and the slowdown factor decreases as the grating size shrinks. PMID:26565869

  1. Coexisting attractors and chaotic canard explosions in a slow-fast optomechanical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marino, Francesco; Marin, Francesco

    2013-05-01

    The multiple time scale dynamics induced by radiation pressure and photothermal effects in a high-finesse optomechanical resonator is experimentally studied. At difference with two-dimensional slow-fast systems, the transition from the quasiharmonic to the relaxational regime occurs via chaotic canard explosions, where large-amplitude relaxation spikes are separated by an irregular number of subthreshold oscillations. We also show that this regime coexists with other periodic attractors, on which the trajectories evolve on a substantially faster time scale. The experimental results are reproduced and analyzed by means of a detailed physical model of our system.

  2. Coexisting attractors and chaotic canard explosions in a slow-fast optomechanical system.

    PubMed

    Marino, Francesco; Marin, Francesco

    2013-05-01

    The multiple time scale dynamics induced by radiation pressure and photothermal effects in a high-finesse optomechanical resonator is experimentally studied. At difference with two-dimensional slow-fast systems, the transition from the quasiharmonic to the relaxational regime occurs via chaotic canard explosions, where large-amplitude relaxation spikes are separated by an irregular number of subthreshold oscillations. We also show that this regime coexists with other periodic attractors, on which the trajectories evolve on a substantially faster time scale. The experimental results are reproduced and analyzed by means of a detailed physical model of our system. PMID:23767597

  3. A geometric analysis of fast-slow models for stochastic gene expression.

    PubMed

    Popović, Nikola; Marr, Carsten; Swain, Peter S

    2016-01-01

    Stochastic models for gene expression frequently exhibit dynamics on several different scales. One potential time-scale separation is caused by significant differences in the lifetimes of mRNA and protein; the ratio of the two degradation rates gives a natural small parameter in the resulting chemical master equation, allowing for the application of perturbation techniques. Here, we develop a framework for the analysis of a family of 'fast-slow' models for gene expression that is based on geometric singular perturbation theory. We illustrate our approach by giving a complete characterisation of a standard two-stage model which assumes transcription, translation, and degradation to be first-order reactions. In particular, we present a systematic expansion procedure for the probability-generating function that can in principle be taken to any order in the perturbation parameter, allowing for an approximation of the corresponding propagator probabilities to that same order. For illustrative purposes, we perform this expansion explicitly to first order, both on the fast and the slow time-scales; then, we combine the resulting asymptotics into a composite fast-slow expansion that is uniformly valid in time. In the process, we extend, and prove rigorously, results previously obtained by Shahrezaei and Swain (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 105(45):17256-17261, 2008) and Bokes et al. (J Math Biol 64(5):829-854, 2012; J Math Biol 65(3):493-520, 2012). We verify our asymptotics by numerical simulation, and we explore its practical applicability and the effects of a variation in the system parameters and the time-scale separation. Focussing on biologically relevant parameter regimes that induce translational bursting, as well as those in which mRNA is frequently transcribed, we find that the first-order correction can significantly improve the steady-state probability distribution. Similarly, in the time-dependent scenario, inclusion of the first-order fast asymptotics results in a

  4. Simultaneous realization of negative group velocity, fast and slow acoustic waves in a metamaterial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiao-juan; Xue, Cheng; Fan, Li; Zhang, Shu-yi; Chen, Zhe; Ding, Jin; Zhang, Hui

    2016-06-01

    An acoustic metamaterial is designed based on a simple and compact structure of one string of side pipes arranged along a waveguide, in which diverse group velocities are achieved. Owing to Fabry-Perot resonance of the side pipes, a negative phase time is achieved, and thus, acoustic waves transmitting with negative group velocities are produced near the resonant frequency. In addition, both fast and slow acoustic waves are also observed in the vicinity of the resonance frequency. The extraordinary group velocities can be explained based on spectral rephasing induced by anomalous dispersion on the analogy of Lorentz dispersion in electromagnetic waves.

  5. Reversing the Emotional Stroop Effect Reveals That It Is Not What It Seems: The Role of Fast and Slow Components

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKenna, Frank P.; Sharma, Dinkar

    2004-01-01

    The relative contributions of slow and fast (online) components in a modified emotional Stroop task were evaluated. The slow component, neglected in previous research, was shown to lead to the prediction of a reversed emotional intrusion effect using pseudorandomly mixed negative and neutral stimuli. This prediction was supported in Experiments 1…

  6. Fast light generation through velocity manipulation in two vertically-stacked ring resonators.

    PubMed

    Ciminelli, C; Campanella, C E; Dell'Olio, F; Armenise, M N

    2010-02-01

    Speed manipulation of optical pulses is a very attractive research challenge enabling next-generation high-capacity all-optical communication networks. Pulses can be effectively slowed by using different integrated optical structures such as coupled-resonator waveguiding structures or photonic crystal cavities. Fast light generation by means of integrated photonic devices is currently a quite unexplored research field in spite of its crucial importance for all-optical pulse processing. In this paper, we report on the first theoretical demonstration of fast light generation in an ultra-compact double vertical stacked ring resonator coupled to a bus waveguide. Periodic coupling between the two rings leads to splitting and recombining of symmetric and anti-symmetric resonant modes. Re-established degenerate modes can form when a symmetric and an anti-symmetric mode having different resonance order exhibit the same resonance wavelength. Under degenerate mode conditions, wide wavelength ranges where the group velocity is negative or larger than the speed of light in vacuum are generated. The paper proves how this physical effect can be exploited to design fast light resonant devices. Moreover, conditions are also derived to obtain slow light operation regime. PMID:20174126

  7. Thin filament diversity and physiological properties of fast and slow fiber types in astronaut leg muscles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, Danny A.; Bain, James L W.; Thompson, Joyce L.; Fitts, Robert H.; Widrick, Jeffrey J.; Trappe, Scott W.; Trappe, Todd A.; Costill, David L.

    2002-01-01

    Slow type I fibers in soleus and fast white (IIa/IIx, IIx), fast red (IIa), and slow red (I) fibers in gastrocnemius were examined electron microscopically and physiologically from pre- and postflight biopsies of four astronauts from the 17-day, Life and Microgravity Sciences Spacelab Shuttle Transport System-78 mission. At 2.5-microm sarcomere length, thick filament density is approximately 1,012 filaments/microm(2) in all fiber types and unchanged by spaceflight. In preflight aldehyde-fixed biopsies, gastrocnemius fibers possess higher percentages (approximately 23%) of short thin filaments than soleus (9%). In type I fibers, spaceflight increases short, thin filament content from 9 to 24% in soleus and from 26 to 31% in gastrocnemius. Thick and thin filament spacing is wider at short sarcomere lengths. The Z-band lattice is also expanded, except for soleus type I fibers with presumably stiffer Z bands. Thin filament packing density correlates directly with specific tension for gastrocnemius fibers but not soleus. Thin filament density is inversely related to shortening velocity in all fibers. Thin filament structural variation contributes to the functional diversity of normal and spaceflight-unloaded muscles.

  8. The Parkfield tremors reveal slow and fast ruptures on the same asperity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veedu, Deepa Mele; Barbot, Sylvain

    2016-04-01

    The deep extension of the San Andreas Fault is believed to be creeping, but the recent observations of tectonic tremors from these depths indicate a complex deformation style. In particular, an isolated tremor source near Parkfield has been producing a sequence of low-frequency earthquakes that indicates an uncommon mechanism of stress accumulation and release. The tremor pattern regularly oscillated between three and six days from mid-2003 until it was disrupted by the 2004 magnitude 6.0 Parkfield earthquake. After that event, the tremor source ruptured only about every three days, but over the next two years it gradually returned to its initial alternating recurrence pattern. The mechanism that drives this recurrence pattern is unknown. Here we use physics-based models to show that the same tremor asperity—the region from which the low-frequency earthquakes radiate—can regularly slip in slow and fast ruptures, naturally resulting in recurrence intervals alternating between three and six days. This unusual slip behaviour occurs when the tremor asperity size is close to the critical nucleation size of earthquakes. We also show that changes in pore pressure following the Parkfield earthquake can explain the sudden change and gradual recovery of the recurrence intervals. Our findings suggest a framework for fault deformation in which the same asperity can release tectonic stress through both slow and fast ruptures.

  9. Preliminary study of slow and fast ultrasonic waves using MR images of trabecular bone phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solis-Najera, S. E.; Neria-Pérez, J. A.; Medina, L.; Garipov, R.; Rodríguez, A. O.

    2014-11-01

    Cancellous bone is a complex tissue that performs physiological and biomechanical functions in all vertebrates. It is made up of trabeculae that, from a simplified structural viewpoint, can be considered as plates and beams in a hyperstatic structure that change with time leading to osteoporosis. Several methods has been developed to study the trabecular bone microstructure among them is the Biot's model which predicts the existence of two longitudinal waves in porous media; the slow and the fast waves, that can be related to porosity of the media. This paper is focused on the experimental detection of the two Biot's waves of a trabecular bone phantom, consisting of a trabecular network of inorganic hydroxyapatite. Experimental measurements of both waves were performed using through transmission ultrasound. Results had shown clearly that the propagation of two waves propagation is transversal to the trabecular alignment. Otherwise the waves are overlapped and a single wave seems to be propagated. To validate these results, magnetic resonance images were acquired to assess the trabecular direction, and to assure that the pulses correspond to the slow and fast waves. This approach offers a methodology for non-invasive studies of trabecular bones.

  10. Preliminary study of slow and fast ultrasonic waves using MR images of trabecular bone phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Solis-Najera, S. E. E-mail: angel.perez@ciencias.unam.mx Neria-Pérez, J. A. E-mail: angel.perez@ciencias.unam.mx Medina, L. E-mail: angel.perez@ciencias.unam.mx; Garipov, R.; Rodríguez, A. O.

    2014-11-07

    Cancellous bone is a complex tissue that performs physiological and biomechanical functions in all vertebrates. It is made up of trabeculae that, from a simplified structural viewpoint, can be considered as plates and beams in a hyperstatic structure that change with time leading to osteoporosis. Several methods has been developed to study the trabecular bone microstructure among them is the Biot’s model which predicts the existence of two longitudinal waves in porous media; the slow and the fast waves, that can be related to porosity of the media. This paper is focused on the experimental detection of the two Biot’s waves of a trabecular bone phantom, consisting of a trabecular network of inorganic hydroxyapatite. Experimental measurements of both waves were performed using through transmission ultrasound. Results had shown clearly that the propagation of two waves propagation is transversal to the trabecular alignment. Otherwise the waves are overlapped and a single wave seems to be propagated. To validate these results, magnetic resonance images were acquired to assess the trabecular direction, and to assure that the pulses correspond to the slow and fast waves. This approach offers a methodology for non-invasive studies of trabecular bones.

  11. Identification of separate slow and fast muscle precursor cells in vivo, prior to somite formation.

    PubMed

    Devoto, S H; Melançon, E; Eisen, J S; Westerfield, M

    1996-11-01

    We have examined the development of specific muscle fiber types in zebrafish axial muscle by labeling myogenic precursor cells with vital fluorescent dyes and following their subsequent differentiation and fate. Two populations of muscle precursors, medial and lateral, can be distinguished in the segmental plate by position, morphology and gene expression. The medial cells, known as adaxial cells, are large, cuboidal cells adjacent to the notochord that express myoD. Surprisingly, after somite formation, they migrate radially away from the notochord, becoming a superficial layer of muscle cells. A subset of adaxial cells develop into engrailed-expressing muscle pioneers. Adaxial cells differentiate into slow muscle fibers of the adult fish. We have named the lateral population of cells in the segmental plate, lateral presomitic cells. They are smaller, more irregularly shaped and separated from the notochord by adaxial cells; they do not express myoD until after somite formation. Lateral presomitic cells remain deep in the myotome and they differentiate into fast muscle fibers. Thus, slow and fast muscle fiber types in zebrafish axial muscle arise from distinct populations of cells in the segmental plate that develop in different cellular environments and display distinct behaviors. PMID:8951054

  12. The Parkfield tremors reveal slow and fast ruptures on the same asperity.

    PubMed

    Veedu, Deepa Mele; Barbot, Sylvain

    2016-04-21

    The deep extension of the San Andreas Fault is believed to be creeping, but the recent observations of tectonic tremors from these depths indicate a complex deformation style. In particular, an isolated tremor source near Parkfield has been producing a sequence of low-frequency earthquakes that indicates an uncommon mechanism of stress accumulation and release. The tremor pattern regularly oscillated between three and six days from mid-2003 until it was disrupted by the 2004 magnitude 6.0 Parkfield earthquake. After that event, the tremor source ruptured only about every three days, but over the next two years it gradually returned to its initial alternating recurrence pattern. The mechanism that drives this recurrence pattern is unknown. Here we use physics-based models to show that the same tremor asperity--the region from which the low-frequency earthquakes radiate--can regularly slip in slow and fast ruptures, naturally resulting in recurrence intervals alternating between three and six days. This unusual slip behaviour occurs when the tremor asperity size is close to the critical nucleation size of earthquakes. We also show that changes in pore pressure following the Parkfield earthquake can explain the sudden change and gradual recovery of the recurrence intervals. Our findings suggest a framework for fault deformation in which the same asperity can release tectonic stress through both slow and fast ruptures. PMID:27042936

  13. Estimation of material parameters from slow and fast shear waves in an incompressible, transversely isotropic material.

    PubMed

    Tweten, Dennis J; Okamoto, Ruth J; Schmidt, John L; Garbow, Joel R; Bayly, Philip V

    2015-11-26

    This paper describes a method to estimate mechanical properties of soft, anisotropic materials from measurements of shear waves with specific polarization and propagation directions. This method is applicable to data from magnetic resonance elastography (MRE), which is a method for measuring shear waves in live subjects or in vitro samples. Here, we simulate MRE data using finite element analysis. A nearly incompressible, transversely isotropic (ITI) material model with three parameters (shear modulus, shear anisotropy, and tensile anisotropy) is used, which is appropriate for many fibrous, biological tissues. Both slow and fast shear waves travel concurrently through such a material with speeds that depend on the propagation direction relative to fiber orientation. A three-parameter estimation approach based on directional filtering and isolation of slow and fast shear wave components (directional filter inversion, or DFI) is introduced. Wave speeds of each isolated shear wave component are estimated using local frequency estimation (LFE), and material properties are calculated using weighted least squares. Data from multiple finite element simulations are used to assess the accuracy and reliability of DFI for estimation of anisotropic material parameters. PMID:26476762

  14. Slowing and stopping light with an optomechanical crystal array

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, D. E.; Safavi-Naeini, A. H.; Painter, O.; Hafezi, M.

    2010-10-07

    The ability to coherently store and retrieve optical information in a rapidly tunable manner is an important ingredient for all-optical information processing. In the classical domain, this optical buffering is necessary to manage information flow in complex networks. In quantum information processing, such a system can also serve as a long-term memory capable of storing the full quantum information contained in an optical pulse. Here we suggest a novel approach to light storage involving an optical waveguide coupled to an optomechanical crystal array, where light in the waveguide can be dynamically and reversibly mapped into long-lived mechanical vibrations in the array. This technique enables large bandwidths and long storage and delay times in a compact, on-chip platform.

  15. Slow light and chromatic temporal dispersion in photonic crystal waveguides using femtosecond time of flight.

    PubMed

    Finlayson, C E; Cattaneo, F; Perney, N M B; Baumberg, J J; Netti, M C; Zoorob, M E; Charlton, M D B; Parker, G J

    2006-01-01

    We report time-of-flight experiments on photonic-crystal waveguide structures using optical Kerr gating of a femtosecond white-light supercontinuum. These photonic-crystal structures, based on engineered silicon-nitride slab waveguides, possess broadband low-loss guiding properties, allowing the group velocity dispersion of optical pulses to be directly tracked as a function of wavelength. This dispersion is shown to be radically disrupted by the spectral band gaps associated with the photonic-crystal periodicity. Increased time-of-flight effects, or "slowed light," are clearly observed at the edges of band gaps in agreement with two-dimensional plane-wave theoretical models of group velocity dispersion. A universal model for slow light in such photonic crystals is proposed, which shows that slow light is controlled predominantly by the detuning from, and the size of, the photonic band gaps. Slowed light observed up to time delays of approximately 1 ps, corresponds to anomalous dispersion of approximately 3.5 ps/nm per mm of the photonic crystal structure. From the decreasing intensity of time-gated slow light as a function of time delay, we estimate the characteristic losses of modes which are guided in the spectral proximity of the photonic band gaps. PMID:16486307

  16. Ultraslow, slow, or fast spreading ridges: an interplay between plate tectonics and mantle convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husson, Laurent; Yamato, Philippe; Bézos, Antoine

    2015-04-01

    Oceanic spreading rates are highly variable. These variations are known to correlate to a variety of surface observables, like magmatic production, heat flow or bathymetry, which lead to classify ridges into fast and slow spreading ridges, but also as the more peculiar ultraslow spreading regime. Here we explore the dynamic relationships between spreading ridges, plate tectonics and mantle flow. For this, we first focus on the thermal signature at deeper levels that we infer from the global S-wave seismic tomography model of Debayle and Ricard (2012). We show that the thermal structure of ridges gradually departs from the half-space cooling model for slow, and above all ultraslow spreading ridges. We also infer that the sub- lithospheric mantle temperature decreases by more than 180K from fast spreading to ultraslow spreading regimes. Both observations indicate that the mantle convection pattern is increasingly altered underneath slow and ultraslow spreading ridges. We suggest that this is due to far-field tectonics on the other ends of lithospheric plates. Not only it modulates the spreading rates but it also alters the convection regime: collisions at active plate boundaries obstruct plate motion and decrease their velocities. We then test this hypothesis using a thermo-mechanical model that represents a convection cell carrying a positively buoyant continental lithosphere on top. The continent gradually drifts away from the spreading ridge, from which the oceanic lithosphere grows and cools while the continent eventually collides at the opposite side. In turn, this event drastically modifies the upper kinematic condition for the convecting mantle that evolves from a mobile lid regime to an almost stagnant lid regime. Implications on spreading ridges are prominent: heat advection is slower than thermal diffusion, which causes the oceanic lithosphere to thicken faster; the oceanic plates get compressed and destabilized by a growing number of small scale transient

  17. Spatial Heat Maps from Fast Information Matching of Fast and Slow Degrees of Freedom: Application to Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Kovacs, Julio A; Wriggers, Willy

    2016-08-25

    We introduce a fast information matching (FIM) method for transforming time domain data into spatial images through handshaking between fast and slow degrees of freedom. The analytics takes advantage of the detailed time series available from biomolecular computer simulations, and it yields spatial heat maps that can be visualized on 3D molecular structures or in the form of interaction networks. The speed of our efficient mutual information solver is on the order of a basic Pearson cross-correlation calculation. We demonstrate that the FIM method is superior to linear cross-correlation for the detection of nonlinear dependence in challenging situations where measures for the global dynamics (the "activity") diverge. The analytics is applied to the detection of hinge-bending hot spots and to the prediction of pairwise contacts between residues that are relevant for the global activity exhibited by the molecular dynamics (MD) trajectories. Application examples from various MD laboratories include the millisecond bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI) trajectory using canonical MD, a Gaussian accelerated MD folding trajectory of chignolin, and the heat-induced unfolding of engrailed homeodomain (EnHD). The FIM implementation will be freely disseminated with our open-source package, TimeScapes. PMID:27169521

  18. RNA Sequencing Reveals a Slow to Fast Muscle Fiber Type Transition after Olanzapine Infusion in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Christopher J.; Xu, Yuping; Hajnal, Andras; Salzberg, Anna C.; Kawasawa, Yuka Imamura

    2015-01-01

    Second generation antipsychotics (SGAs), like olanzapine, exhibit acute metabolic side effects leading to metabolic inflexibility, hyperglycemia, adiposity and diabetes. Understanding how SGAs affect the skeletal muscle transcriptome could elucidate approaches for mitigating these side effects. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were infused intravenously with vehicle or olanzapine for 24h using a dose leading to a mild hyperglycemia. RNA-Seq was performed on gastrocnemius muscle, followed by alignment of the data with the Rat Genome Assembly 5.0. Olanzapine altered expression of 1347 out of 26407 genes. Genes encoding skeletal muscle fiber-type specific sarcomeric, ion channel, glycolytic, O2- and Ca2+-handling, TCA cycle, vascularization and lipid oxidation proteins and pathways, along with NADH shuttles and LDH isoforms were affected. Bioinformatics analyses indicate that olanzapine decreased the expression of slower and more oxidative fiber type genes (e.g., type 1), while up regulating those for the most glycolytic and least metabolically flexible, fast twitch fiber type, IIb. Protein turnover genes, necessary to bring about transition, were also up regulated. Potential upstream regulators were also identified. Olanzapine appears to be rapidly affecting the muscle transcriptome to bring about a change to a fast-glycolytic fiber type. Such fiber types are more susceptible than slow muscle to atrophy, and such transitions are observed in chronic metabolic diseases. Thus these effects could contribute to the altered body composition and metabolic disease olanzapine causes. A potential interventional strategy is implicated because aerobic exercise, in contrast to resistance exercise, can oppose such slow to fast fiber transitions. PMID:25893406

  19. A data-driven prediction method for fast-slow systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groth, Andreas; Chekroun, Mickael; Kondrashov, Dmitri; Ghil, Michael

    2016-04-01

    In this work, we present a prediction method for processes that exhibit a mixture of variability on low and fast scales. The method relies on combining empirical model reduction (EMR) with singular spectrum analysis (SSA). EMR is a data-driven methodology for constructing stochastic low-dimensional models that account for nonlinearity and serial correlation in the estimated noise, while SSA provides a decomposition of the complex dynamics into low-order components that capture spatio-temporal behavior on different time scales. Our study focuses on the data-driven modeling of partial observations from dynamical systems that exhibit power spectra with broad peaks. The main result in this talk is that the combination of SSA pre-filtering with EMR modeling improves, under certain circumstances, the modeling and prediction skill of such a system, as compared to a standard EMR prediction based on raw data. Specifically, it is the separation into "fast" and "slow" temporal scales by the SSA pre-filtering that achieves the improvement. We show, in particular that the resulting EMR-SSA emulators help predict intermittent behavior such as rapid transitions between specific regions of the system's phase space. This capability of the EMR-SSA prediction will be demonstrated on two low-dimensional models: the Rössler system and a Lotka-Volterra model for interspecies competition. In either case, the chaotic dynamics is produced through a Shilnikov-type mechanism and we argue that the latter seems to be an important ingredient for the good prediction skills of EMR-SSA emulators. Shilnikov-type behavior has been shown to arise in various complex geophysical fluid models, such as baroclinic quasi-geostrophic flows in the mid-latitude atmosphere and wind-driven double-gyre ocean circulation models. This pervasiveness of the Shilnikow mechanism of fast-slow transition opens interesting perspectives for the extension of the proposed EMR-SSA approach to more realistic situations.

  20. Fast and slow wave detection in bovine cancellous bone in vitro using bandlimited deconvolution and Prony's method.

    PubMed

    Wear, Keith; Nagatani, Yoshiki; Mizuno, Katsunori; Matsukawa, Mami

    2014-10-01

    Fast and slow waves were detected in a bovine cancellous bone sample for thicknesses ranging from 7 to 12 mm using bandlimited deconvolution and the modified least-squares Prony's method with curve fitting (MLSP + CF). Bandlimited deconvolution consistently isolated two waves with linear-with-frequency attenuation coefficients as evidenced by high correlation coefficients between attenuation coefficient and frequency: 0.997 ± 0.002 (fast wave) and 0.986 ± 0.013 (slow wave) (mean ± standard deviation). Average root-mean-squared (RMS) differences between the two algorithms for phase velocities were 5 m/s (fast wave, 350 kHz) and 13 m/s (slow wave, 750 kHz). Average RMS differences for signal loss were 1.6 dB (fast wave, 350 kHz) and 0.4 dB (slow wave, 750 kHz). Phase velocities for thickness = 10 mm were 1726 m/s (fast wave, 350 kHz) and 1455 m/s (slow wave, 750 kHz). Results show support for the model of two waves with linear-with frequency attenuation, successful isolation of fast and slow waves, good agreement between bandlimited deconvolution and MLSP + CF as well as with a Bayesian algorithm, and potential variations of fast and/or slow wave properties with bone sample thickness. PMID:25324100

  1. Slow and stored light by photo-isomerization induced transparency in dye doped chiral nematics.

    PubMed

    Wei, D; Bortolozzo, U; Huignard, J P; Residori, S

    2013-08-26

    Decelerating and stopping light is fundamental for optical processing, high performance sensor technologies and digital signal treatment, many of these applications relying on the ability of controlling the amplitude and phase of coherent light pulses. In this context, slow-light has been achieved by various methods, as coupling light into resonant media, Brillouin scattering in optical fibers, beam coupling in photorefractive and liquid crystal media or engineered dispersion in photonic crystals. Here, we present a different mechanism for slowing and storing light, which is based on photo-isomerization induced transparency of azo-dye molecules hosted in a chiral liquid crystal structure. Sharp spectral features of the medium absorption/dispersion, and the long population lifetime of the dye metastable state, enable the storage of light pulses with a significant retrieval after times much longer than the medium response time. PMID:24105502

  2. Effect of Slow and Fast Pranayama Training on Handgrip Strength and Endurance in Healthy Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Thangavel, Dinesh; Gaur, Girwar Singh; Bhavanani, Ananda Balayogi; Rajajeyakumar, M.; Syam, Sunder A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Pranayama has been assigned very important role in yogic system of exercises and is said to be much more important than yogasanas for keeping sound health. Also different pranayamas produce divergent physiological effects. Aim: To study the effect of 12 weeks training of slow and fast pranayama on handgrip strength and endurance in young, healthy volunteers of JIPMER population. Settings and Design: Present study was conducted in the Department of Physiology, JIPMER in 2011-12 (1.06.11 to 1.04.12). Materials and Methods: Total of 91 volunteer subjects were randomised into slow pranayama (SPG) (n=29), fast pranayama (FPG) (n=32) and control groups (CG) (n=30). Supervised pranayama training (SPG - Nadisodhana, Pranav pranayama and Savitri pranayama; FPG - Kapalabhati, Bhastrika and Kukkuriya pranayama) was given for 30 minutes thrice a week for 12 weeks to both slow and fast pranayama groups by certified yoga trainer. Hand grip strength (HGS) and endurance (HGE) parameters were recorded using handgrip dynamometer (Rolex, India) at baseline and after 12 weeks of pranayama training. Statistical Analysis Used: Longitudinal changes in each group were compared by using Student’s paired t-test. Delta changes in each group were analysed by ANOVA with Tukey post-hoc analysis. Results: In SPG significant improvement occurred only in HGE parameter from 83.95±45.06 to 101.62±53.87 (seconds) (p<0.001) whereas in FPG, significant improvement was observed in HGS from 33.31±9.83 to 37.9±9.41 (Kilograms) (p=0.01) as well as in HGE from 92.78±41.37 to 116.56±58.54 (seconds) (p=0.004). Using Students unpaired t-test difference between the groups in HGS is found to be 1.17±5.485 in SPG and in FPG is 4.59±7.26 (p=0.39); HGE difference in SPG is 1.77±21.17 and in FPG is 2.38±43.27 (p>0.05). Conclusion: Pranayama training decreases sympathetic activity, resulting in mental relaxation and decreased autonomic arousal thereby, decreasing force fluctuations during

  3. Wideband slow light based on plasmon-induced transparency at telecom frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chunlei; Qi, Dawei; Wang, Yuxiao; Zhang, Xueru

    2015-09-01

    We propose and demonstrate a metal-insulator-metal (MIM) waveguide side coupled with a series of stubs to realize broadband slow surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) around the telecom wavelength 193.5 THz. The obviously slow light effect results from the strong normal dispersion around the frequency of the plasmon-induced transparency. Theoretical calculations indicate that the plasmonic waveguide system of the length 11 μm works on a broad bandwidth of 20 THz. The group velocity of SPPs predicted by the improved transmission line theory is about 0.2c (c is light speed in vacuum), which is confirmed by the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) numerical simulation. The waveguide system for slow light effect has important potential application in optical delay lines.

  4. LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Driving slow-light solitons by a controlling laser field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybin, Andrei V.; Vadeiko, Ilya P.; Bishop, Alan R.

    2005-05-01

    In the framework of the nonlinear Λ-model we investigate propagation of a slow-light soliton in atomic vapours and Bose-Einstein condensates. The velocity of the slow-light soliton is controlled by a time-dependent background field created by a controlling laser. For a fairly arbitrary time dependence of the field we find the dynamics of the slow-light soliton inside the medium. We provide an analytical description for the nonlinear dependence of the velocity of the signal on the controlling field. If the background field is turned off at some moment of time, the signal stops. We find the location and shape of the spatially localized memory bit imprinted into the medium. We show that the process of writing optical information can be described in terms of scattering data for the underlying scattering problem.

  5. Evaluation of Slow Light Periodic Signals Considering the Distortion in EDF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fu; Wu, Chong-Qing; Wang, Zhi; Liu, Guo-Dong; Liu, Lan-Lan; Sun, Zhen-Chao

    2014-03-01

    Based on the fundamental harmonic phase delay, a new definition of fundamental harmonic fractional delay (FHFD) is proposed to evaluate slow light with the consideration of signal distortion, to eliminate the dependence on the choice of the reference point. By solving the rate equation of erbium-doped fiber (EDF), it is shown that the slow light always accompanies the signal distortion when the periodic signal propagates in EDF, and FHFD depends on the signal distortion, as well as the average input power, the modulation depth and the length of EDF. The results of simulations and experiments indicate that the definition of FHFD is reasonable and effective to evaluate the slow light of periodic signals.

  6. Slow light Mach-Zehnder interferometer as label-free biosensor with scalable sensitivity

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Qin, Kun; Hu, Shuren; Retterer, Scott T.; Kravchenko, Ivan I.; Weiss, Sharon M.

    2016-02-05

    Our design, fabrication, and characterization of a label-free Mach–Zehnder interferometer (MZI) optical biosensor that incorporates a highly dispersive one-dimensional (1D) photonic crystal in one arm are presented. The sensitivity of this slow light MZI-based sensor scales with the length of the slow light photonic crystal region. The numerically simulated sensitivity of a MZI sensor with a 16 μm long slow light region is 115,000 rad/RIU-cm, which is sevenfold higher than traditional MZI biosensors with millimeter-length sensing regions. Moreover, the experimental bulk refractive index detection sensitivity of 84,000 rad/RIU-cm is realized and nucleic acid detection is also demonstrated.

  7. Pathological scattering by a defect in a slow-light periodic layered medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shipman, Stephen P.; Welters, Aaron T.

    2016-02-01

    Scattering of electromagnetic fields by a defect layer embedded in a slow-light periodically layered ambient medium exhibits phenomena markedly different from typical scattering problems. In a slow-light periodic medium, constructed by Figotin and Vitebskiy, the energy velocity of a propagating mode in one direction slows to zero, creating a "frozen mode" at a single frequency within a pass band, where the dispersion relation possesses a flat inflection point. The slow-light regime is characterized by a 3 × 3 Jordan block of the log of the 4 × 4 monodromy matrix for EM fields in a periodic medium at special frequency and parallel wavevector. The scattering problem breaks down as the 2D rightward and leftward mode spaces intersect in the frozen mode and therefore span only a 3D subspace V ˚ of the 4D space of EM fields. Analysis of pathological scattering near the slow-light frequency and wavevector is based on the interaction between the flux-unitary transfer matrix T across the defect layer and the projections to the rightward and leftward spaces, which blow up as Laurent-Puiseux series. Two distinct cases emerge: the generic, non-resonant case when T does not map V ˚ to itself and the quadratically growing mode is excited and the resonant case, when V ˚ is invariant under T and a guided frozen mode is resonantly excited.

  8. Modeling of nonlinear physiological systems with fast and slow dynamics. II. Application to cerebral autoregulation.

    PubMed

    Mitsis, G D; Zhang, R; Levine, B D; Marmarelis, V Z

    2002-04-01

    Dynamic autoregulation of cerebral hemodynamics in healthy humans is studied using the novel methodology of the Laguerre-Volterra network for systems with fast and slow dynamics (Mitsis, G. D., and V. Z. Marmarelis, Ann. Biomed. Eng. 30:272-281, 2002). Since cerebral autoregulation is mediated by various physiological mechanisms with significantly different time constants, it is used to demonstrate the efficacy of the new method. Results are presented in the time and frequency domains and reveal that cerebral autoregulation is a nonlinear and dynamic (frequency-dependent) system with considerable nonstationarities. Quantification of the latter reveals greater variability in specific frequency bands for each subject in the low and middle frequency range (below 0.1 Hz). The nonlinear dynamics are prominent also in the low and middle frequency ranges, where the frequency response of the system exhibits reduced gain. PMID:12086006

  9. Modeling of low- and high-frequency noise by slow and fast fluctuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesterov, Alexander I.; Berman, Gennady P.

    2012-05-01

    We study the dynamics of dephasing in a quantum two-level system by modeling both 1/f and high-frequency noise by random telegraph processes. Our approach is based on a so-called spin-fluctuator model in which a noisy environment is modeled by a large number of fluctuators. In the continuous limit we obtain an effective random process (ERP) that is described by a distribution function of the fluctuators. In a simplified model, we reduce the ERP to the two (slow and fast) ensembles of fluctuators. Using this model, we study decoherence in a superconducting flux qubit and we compare our theoretical results with the available experimental data. We demonstrate good agreement of our theoretical predictions with the experiments. Our approach can be applied to many quantum systems, such as biological complexes, semiconductors, superconducting, and spin qubits, where the effects of interaction with the environment are essential.

  10. Pattern of arborization of the motor nerve terminals in the fast and slow mammalian muscles.

    PubMed

    Tomas, J; Santafé, M; Fenoll, R; Mayayo, E; Batlle, J; Lanuza, A; Piera, V

    1992-01-01

    A silver impregnation method and a morphometric approach were used to define differences existing in the motor nerve terminal branching pattern between a fast-twitch muscle (extensor digitorum longus) and a slow-twitch one (soleus) of the normal adult rat. Because no single measure can describe precisely all geometrical properties (ie both topology and metrics) of the nerve terminals, we evaluated morphologic parameters defining length and angular characteristics in the different terminal segments classified according to their centrifugal order. The main results indicate that the distal free-end segments in the extensor digitorum longus muscle are shorter and less divergent than in the soleus nerve terminals. The endings in the two muscles have different fractal dimensions. Findings are discussed in the context of the hypothetical mechanisms governing motor nerve terminal size and complexity. PMID:1628112

  11. Experimental observation of ultrasound fast and slow waves through three-dimensional printed trabecular bone phantoms.

    PubMed

    Mézière, F; Juskova, P; Woittequand, J; Muller, M; Bossy, E; Boistel, Renaud; Malaquin, L; Derode, A

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, ultrasound measurements of 1:1 scale three-dimensional (3D) printed trabecular bone phantoms are reported. The micro-structure of a trabecular horse bone sample was obtained via synchrotron x-ray microtomography, converted to a 3D binary data set, and successfully 3D-printed at scale 1:1. Ultrasound through-transmission experiments were also performed through a highly anisotropic version of this structure, obtained by elongating the digitized structure prior to 3D printing. As in real anisotropic trabecular bone, both the fast and slow waves were observed. This illustrates the potential of stereolithography and the relevance of such bone phantoms for the study of ultrasound propagation in bone. PMID:26936578

  12. Hybrid stochastic simulation of reaction-diffusion systems with slow and fast dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Strehl, Robert; Ilie, Silvana

    2015-12-21

    In this paper, we present a novel hybrid method to simulate discrete stochastic reaction-diffusion models arising in biochemical signaling pathways. We study moderately stiff systems, for which we can partition each reaction or diffusion channel into either a slow or fast subset, based on its propensity. Numerical approaches missing this distinction are often limited with respect to computational run time or approximation quality. We design an approximate scheme that remedies these pitfalls by using a new blending strategy of the well-established inhomogeneous stochastic simulation algorithm and the tau-leaping simulation method. The advantages of our hybrid simulation algorithm are demonstrated on three benchmarking systems, with special focus on approximation accuracy and efficiency.

  13. Distinct fast and slow processes contribute to the selection of preferred step frequency during human walking.

    PubMed

    Snaterse, Mark; Ton, Robert; Kuo, Arthur D; Donelan, J Maxwell

    2011-06-01

    Humans spontaneously select a step frequency that minimizes the energy expenditure of walking. This selection might be embedded within the neural circuits that generate gait so that the optimum is pre-programmed for a given walking speed. Or perhaps step frequency is directly optimized, based on sensed feedback of energy expenditure. Direct optimization is expected to be slow due to the compounded effect of delays and iteration, whereas a pre-programmed mechanism presumably allows for faster step frequency selection, albeit dependent on prior experience. To test for both pre-programmed selection and direct optimization, we applied perturbations to treadmill walking to elicit transient changes in step frequency. We found that human step frequency adjustments (n = 7) occurred with two components, the first dominating the response (66 ± 10% of total amplitude change; mean ± SD) and occurring quite quickly (1.44 ± 1.14 s to complete 95% of total change). The other component was of smaller amplitude (35 ± 10% of total change) and took tens of seconds (27.56 ± 16.18 s for 95% completion). The fast process appeared to be too fast for direct optimization and more indicative of a pre-programmed response. It also persisted even with unusual closed-loop perturbations that conflicted with prior experience and rendered the response energetically suboptimal. The slow process was more consistent with the timing expected for direct optimization. Our interpretation of these results is that humans may rely heavily on pre-programmed gaits to rapidly select their preferred step frequency and then gradually fine-tune that selection with direct optimization. PMID:21393467

  14. Motor units in cross-reinnervated fast and slow twitch muscle of the cat.

    PubMed Central

    Bagust, J; Lewis, D M; Westerman, R A

    1981-01-01

    1. Isometric contractile properties of motor units were measured in cross-reinnervated fast (flexor digitorum longus) and slow (soleus) twitch muscles of the cat. All but one cross was at least 95% pure. 2. There was a reduction in the number of motor units in all muscles, but totals remained about equal in cross-reinnervated soleus and flexor digitorum longus. 3. Motor unit tensions (mean and maximum values) were higher in cross-reinnervated soleus than in cross-reinnervated flexor digitorum longus, reversing the differences between normal muscles. This was due to increases in muscle mass and in the tension developed per unit cross-sectional area. There were motor unit tensions larger and smaller than those seen in normal muscle, but the range was comparable with that seen in self-reinnervated muscle. 4. The changes in twitch time to peak of whole muscle following cross-reinnervations resulted from a change over the whole range of motor units. The conversion of soleus was less complete than that of flexor digitorum longus, and the time to peak of its fastest motor unit was twice as long as any seen in normal flexor digitorum longus. 5. In neither of the cross-reinnervated muscles were the fast contracting motor units larger than the slow contracting ones, and in cross-reinnervated soleus they were smaller. 6. Axonal conduction velocity was correlated with motor unit tension in both muscles and with twitch time to peak in cross-reinnervated flexor digitorum longus, but in all cases less clearly than in normal muscles. 7. The ratio of twitch to tetanic tension increased with increasing twitch time to peak, as in normal muscles. PMID:7277217

  15. Spatiotemporal properties of fast and slow neurons in the pretectal nucleus lentiformis mesencephali in pigeons.

    PubMed

    Wylie, D R; Crowder, N A

    2000-11-01

    Neurons in the pretectal nucleus lentiformis mesencephali (LM) are involved in the analysis of optic flow that results from self-motion. Previous studies have shown that LM neurons have large receptive fields in the contralateral eye, are excited in response to largefield stimuli moving in a particular (preferred) direction, and are inhibited in response to motion in the opposite (anti-preferred) direction. We investigated the responses of LM neurons to sine wave gratings of varying spatial and temporal frequency drifting in the preferred and anti-preferred directions. The LM neurons fell into two categories. "Fast" neurons were maximally excited by gratings of low spatial [0.03-0.25 cycles/ degrees (cpd)] and mid-high temporal frequencies (0.5-16 Hz). "Slow" neurons were maximally excited by gratings of high spatial (0.35-2 cpd) and low-mid temporal frequencies (0.125-2 Hz). Of the slow neurons, all but one preferred forward (temporal to nasal) motion. The fast group included neurons that preferred forward, backward, upward, and downward motion. For most cells (81%), the spatial and temporal frequency that elicited maximal excitation to motion in the preferred direction did not coincide with the spatial and temporal frequency that elicited maximal inhibition to gratings moving in the anti-preferred direction. With respect to motion in the anti-preferred direction, a substantial proportion of the LM neurons (32%) showed bi-directional responses. That is, the spatiotemporal plots contained domains of excitation in addition to the region of inhibition. Neurons tuned to stimulus velocity across different spatial frequency were rare (5%), but some neurons (39%) were tuned to temporal frequency. These results are discussed in relation to previous studies of the responses of neurons in the accessory optic system and pretectum to drifting gratings and other largefield stimuli. PMID:11067995

  16. Relationship of fast- and slow-timescale neuronal dynamics in human MEG and SEEG.

    PubMed

    Zhigalov, Alexander; Arnulfo, Gabriele; Nobili, Lino; Palva, Satu; Palva, J Matias

    2015-04-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that the neuronal dynamics are poised at criticality. Neuronal avalanches and long-range temporal correlations (LRTCs) are hallmarks of such critical dynamics in neuronal activity and occur at fast (subsecond) and slow (seconds to hours) timescales, respectively. The critical dynamics at different timescales can be characterized by their power-law scaling exponents. However, insight into the avalanche dynamics and LRTCs in the human brain has been largely obtained with sensor-level MEG and EEG recordings, which yield only limited anatomical insight and results confounded by signal mixing. We investigated here the relationship between the human neuronal dynamics at fast and slow timescales using both source-reconstructed MEG and intracranial stereotactical electroencephalography (SEEG). Both MEG and SEEG revealed avalanche dynamics that were characterized parameter-dependently by power-law or truncated-power-law size distributions. Both methods also revealed robust LRTCs throughout the neocortex with distinct scaling exponents in different functional brain systems and frequency bands. The exponents of power-law regimen neuronal avalanches and LRTCs were strongly correlated across subjects. Qualitatively similar power-law correlations were also observed in surrogate data without spatial correlations but with scaling exponents distinct from those of original data. Furthermore, we found that LRTCs in the autonomous nervous system, as indexed by heart-rate variability, were correlated in a complex manner with cortical neuronal avalanches and LRTCs in MEG but not SEEG. These scalp and intracranial data hence show that power-law scaling behavior is a pervasive but neuroanatomically inhomogeneous property of neuronal dynamics in central and autonomous nervous systems. PMID:25834062

  17. Slow-fast stochastic diffusion dynamics and quasi-stationarity for diploid populations with varying size.

    PubMed

    Coron, Camille

    2016-01-01

    We are interested in the long-time behavior of a diploid population with sexual reproduction and randomly varying population size, characterized by its genotype composition at one bi-allelic locus. The population is modeled by a 3-dimensional birth-and-death process with competition, weak cooperation and Mendelian reproduction. This stochastic process is indexed by a scaling parameter K that goes to infinity, following a large population assumption. When the individual birth and natural death rates are of order K, the sequence of stochastic processes indexed by K converges toward a new slow-fast dynamics with variable population size. We indeed prove the convergence toward 0 of a fast variable giving the deviation of the population from quasi Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, while the sequence of slow variables giving the respective numbers of occurrences of each allele converges toward a 2-dimensional diffusion process that reaches (0,0) almost surely in finite time. The population size and the proportion of a given allele converge toward a Wright-Fisher diffusion with stochastically varying population size and diploid selection. We insist on differences between haploid and diploid populations due to population size stochastic variability. Using a non trivial change of variables, we study the absorption of this diffusion and its long time behavior conditioned on non-extinction. In particular we prove that this diffusion starting from any non-trivial state and conditioned on not hitting (0,0) admits a unique quasi-stationary distribution. We give numerical approximations of this quasi-stationary behavior in three biologically relevant cases: neutrality, overdominance, and separate niches. PMID:25840519

  18. MAGNETIC FLUX DENSITY MEASURED IN FAST AND SLOW SOLAR WIND STREAMS

    SciTech Connect

    Erdos, G.; Balogh, A.

    2012-07-10

    The radial component of the heliospheric magnetic field vector is used to estimate the open magnetic flux density of the Sun. This parameter has been calculated using observations from the Ulysses mission that covered heliolatitudes from 80 Degree-Sign S to 80 Degree-Sign N, from 1990 to 2009 and distances from 1 to 5.4 AU, the Advanced Composition Explorer mission at 1 AU from 1997 to 2010, the OMNI interplanetary database from 1971, and the Helios 1 and 2 missions that covered the distance range from 0.3 to 1 AU. The flux density was found to be much affected by fluctuations in the magnetic field which make its calculated value dependent on heliospheric location, type of solar wind (fast or slow), and the level of solar activity. However, fluctuations are distributed symmetrically perpendicular to the average Parker direction. Therefore, distributions of the field vector in the two-dimensional plane defined by the radial and azimuthal directions in heliospheric coordinates provide a way to reduce the effects of the fluctuations on the measurement of the flux density. This leads to a better defined flux density parameter; the distributions modified by removing the effects of fluctuations then allow a clearer assessment of the dependence of the flux density on heliospheric location, solar wind type, and solar activity. This assessment indicates that the flux density normalized to 1 AU is independent of location and solar wind type (fast or slow). However, there is a residual dependence on solar activity which can be studied using the modified flux density measurements.

  19. Fast associative memory + slow neural circuitry = the computational model of the brain.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkovich, Simon; Berkovich, Efraim; Lapir, Gennady

    1997-08-01

    We propose a computational model of the brain based on a fast associative memory and relatively slow neural processors. In this model, processing time is expensive but memory access is not, and therefore most algorithmic tasks would be accomplished by using large look-up tables as opposed to calculating. The essential feature of an associative memory in this context (characteristic for a holographic type memory) is that it works without an explicit mechanism for resolution of multiple responses. As a result, the slow neuronal processing elements, overwhelmed by the flow of information, operate as a set of templates for ranking of the retrieved information. This structure addresses the primary controversy in the brain architecture: distributed organization of memory vs. localization of processing centers. This computational model offers an intriguing explanation of many of the paradoxical features in the brain architecture, such as integration of sensors (through DMA mechanism), subliminal perception, universality of software, interrupts, fault-tolerance, certain bizarre possibilities for rapid arithmetics etc. In conventional computer science the presented type of a computational model did not attract attention as it goes against the technological grain by using a working memory faster than processing elements.

  20. One dimensional full wave analysis of slow-to-fast mode conversion in lower hybrid frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, Guo-Zhang; Gao, Zhe

    2014-12-15

    The linear conversion from the slow wave to the fast wave in the lower hybrid range of frequencies is analyzed numerically by using the set of field equations describing waves in a cold plane-stratified plasma. The equations are solved as a two-point boundary value problem, where the polarizations of each mode are set consistently in the boundary conditions. The scattering coefficients and the field patterns are obtained for various density profiles. It is shown that, for large density scale length, the results agree well with the traditional cognitions. In contrast, the reflected component and the probable transmitted-converted component from the conversion region, which are neglected in the usual calculations, become significant when the scale length is smaller than the wavelength of the mode. The inclusion of these new components will improve the accuracy of the simulated propagation and deposition for the injected rf power when the conversion process is involved within a sharp-varying density profile. Meanwhile, the accessibility of the incident slow wave for the low frequency case is also affected by the scale length of the density profile.

  1. Coupled slow and fast surface dynamics in an electrocatalytic oscillator: Model and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nascimento, Melke A.; Nagao, Raphael; Eiswirth, Markus; Varela, Hamilton

    2014-12-01

    The co-existence of disparate time scales is pervasive in many systems. In particular for surface reactions, it has been shown that the long-term evolution of the core oscillator is decisively influenced by slow surface changes, such as progressing deactivation. Here we present an in-depth numerical investigation of the coupled slow and fast surface dynamics in an electrocatalytic oscillator. The model consists of four nonlinear coupled ordinary differential equations, investigated over a wide parameter range. Besides the conventional bifurcation analysis, the system was studied by means of high-resolution period and Lyapunov diagrams. It was observed that the bifurcation diagram changes considerably as the irreversible surface poisoning evolves, and the oscillatory region shrinks. The qualitative dynamics changes accordingly and the chaotic oscillations are dramatically suppressed. Nevertheless, periodic cascades are preserved in a confined region of the resistance vs. voltage diagram. Numerical results are compared to experiments published earlier and the latter reinterpreted. Finally, the comprehensive description of the time-evolution in the period and Lyapunov diagrams suggests further experimental studies correlating the evolution of the system's dynamics with changes of the catalyst structure.

  2. Response of slow and fast muscle to hypothyroidism: maximal shortening velocity and myosin isoforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caiozzo, V. J.; Herrick, R. E.; Baldwin, K. M.

    1992-01-01

    This study examined both the shortening velocity and myosin isoform distribution of slow- (soleus) and fast-twitch (plantaris) skeletal muscles under hypothyroid conditions. Adult female Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to one of two groups: control (n = 7) or hypothyroid (n = 7). In both muscles, the relative contents of native slow myosin (SM) and type I myosin heavy chain (MHC) increased in response to the hypothyroid treatment. The effects were such that the hypothyroid soleus muscle expressed only the native SM and type I MHC isoforms while repressing native intermediate myosin and type IIA MHC. In the plantaris, the relative content of native SM and type I MHC isoforms increased from 5 to 13% and from 4 to 10% of the total myosin pool, respectively. Maximal shortening velocity of the soleus and plantaris as measured by the slack test decreased by 32 and 19%, respectively, in response to hypothyroidism. In contrast, maximal shortening velocity as estimated by force-velocity data decreased only in the soleus (-19%). No significant change was observed for the plantaris.

  3. Coupled slow and fast surface dynamics in an electrocatalytic oscillator: Model and simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Nascimento, Melke A.; Nagao, Raphael; Eiswirth, Markus; Varela, Hamilton

    2014-12-21

    The co-existence of disparate time scales is pervasive in many systems. In particular for surface reactions, it has been shown that the long-term evolution of the core oscillator is decisively influenced by slow surface changes, such as progressing deactivation. Here we present an in-depth numerical investigation of the coupled slow and fast surface dynamics in an electrocatalytic oscillator. The model consists of four nonlinear coupled ordinary differential equations, investigated over a wide parameter range. Besides the conventional bifurcation analysis, the system was studied by means of high-resolution period and Lyapunov diagrams. It was observed that the bifurcation diagram changes considerably as the irreversible surface poisoning evolves, and the oscillatory region shrinks. The qualitative dynamics changes accordingly and the chaotic oscillations are dramatically suppressed. Nevertheless, periodic cascades are preserved in a confined region of the resistance vs. voltage diagram. Numerical results are compared to experiments published earlier and the latter reinterpreted. Finally, the comprehensive description of the time-evolution in the period and Lyapunov diagrams suggests further experimental studies correlating the evolution of the system's dynamics with changes of the catalyst structure.

  4. Multiscale analysis of slow-fast neuronal learning models with noise

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    This paper deals with the application of temporal averaging methods to recurrent networks of noisy neurons undergoing a slow and unsupervised modification of their connectivity matrix called learning. Three time-scales arise for these models: (i) the fast neuronal dynamics, (ii) the intermediate external input to the system, and (iii) the slow learning mechanisms. Based on this time-scale separation, we apply an extension of the mathematical theory of stochastic averaging with periodic forcing in order to derive a reduced deterministic model for the connectivity dynamics. We focus on a class of models where the activity is linear to understand the specificity of several learning rules (Hebbian, trace or anti-symmetric learning). In a weakly connected regime, we study the equilibrium connectivity which gathers the entire ‘knowledge’ of the network about the inputs. We develop an asymptotic method to approximate this equilibrium. We show that the symmetric part of the connectivity post-learning encodes the correlation structure of the inputs, whereas the anti-symmetric part corresponds to the cross correlation between the inputs and their time derivative. Moreover, the time-scales ratio appears as an important parameter revealing temporal correlations. PMID:23174307

  5. Enhanced four-wave mixing in graphene-silicon slow-light photonic crystal waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Hao E-mail: tg2342@columbia.edu; Gu, Tingyi E-mail: tg2342@columbia.edu McMillan, James F.; Wong, Chee Wei E-mail: tg2342@columbia.edu; Petrone, Nicholas; Zande, Arend van der; Hone, James C.; Yu, Mingbin; Lo, Guoqiang; Kwong, Dim-Lee; Feng, Guoying; Zhou, Shouhuan

    2014-09-01

    We demonstrate the enhanced four-wave mixing of monolayer graphene on slow-light silicon photonic crystal waveguides. 200-μm interaction length, a four-wave mixing conversion efficiency of −23 dB is achieved in the graphene-silicon slow-light hybrid, with an enhanced 3-dB conversion bandwidth of about 17 nm. Our measurements match well with nonlinear coupled-mode theory simulations based on the measured waveguide dispersion, and provide an effective way for all-optical signal processing in chip-scale integrated optics.

  6. Slow light in a simple metamaterial structure constructed by cut and continuous metal strips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, M.; Li, Y. N.; Chen, J.; Chen, J.; Bai, Q.; Wang, H. T.; Wu, P. H.

    2010-09-01

    Recently, slow light in metamaterials has been investigated based on the coupling between two quasi-bound states, in classic analogue of electromagnetically induced transparency in atomic systems. Here we demonstrate the feasibility in achieving slow light in metamaterials, based on the mechanism of coupling between a quasi-bound state and a continuum state. The theoretical prediction by a two-particle model is in good agreement with the experimental result in the metamaterial composed of the cut and continuous metal strips. The present work illustrates the versatility of metamaterials, implying the great potential in many applications.

  7. Effect of loss on slow-light-enhanced second-harmonic generation in periodic nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Saravi, Sina; Quintero-Bermudez, Rafael; Setzpfandt, Frank; Asger Mortensen, N; Pertsch, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    We theoretically analyze the dependence of second-harmonic generation efficiency on the group index in periodic optical waveguides with loss. We investigate different possible scenarios of using slow light to enhance the efficiency of this process and show that in some cases there exists a maximally achievable efficiency reached for finite values of the group index at the point of phase-matching. Furthermore, we identify situations for which slow light, surprisingly, does not enhance the second-harmonic generation efficiency. Our results are corroborated by rigorous nonlinear simulations of second-harmonic generation in periodic nanobeam waveguides with loss. PMID:27367114

  8. Fast and accurate propagation of coherent light

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, R. D.; Beylkin, G.; Monzón, L.

    2013-01-01

    We describe a fast algorithm to propagate, for any user-specified accuracy, a time-harmonic electromagnetic field between two parallel planes separated by a linear, isotropic and homogeneous medium. The analytical formulation of this problem (ca 1897) requires the evaluation of the so-called Rayleigh–Sommerfeld integral. If the distance between the planes is small, this integral can be accurately evaluated in the Fourier domain; if the distance is very large, it can be accurately approximated by asymptotic methods. In the large intermediate region of practical interest, where the oscillatory Rayleigh–Sommerfeld kernel must be applied directly, current numerical methods can be highly inaccurate without indicating this fact to the user. In our approach, for any user-specified accuracy ϵ>0, we approximate the kernel by a short sum of Gaussians with complex-valued exponents, and then efficiently apply the result to the input data using the unequally spaced fast Fourier transform. The resulting algorithm has computational complexity , where we evaluate the solution on an N×N grid of output points given an M×M grid of input samples. Our algorithm maintains its accuracy throughout the computational domain. PMID:24204184

  9. NOTCH Signaling Regulates Asymmetric Cell Fate of Fast- and Slow-Cycling Colon Cancer-Initiating Cells.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Tara; Walters, Jewell; Bu, Pengcheng; Than, Elaine Bich; Tung, Kuei-Ling; Chen, Kai-Yuan; Panarelli, Nicole; Milsom, Jeff; Augenlicht, Leonard; Lipkin, Steven M; Shen, Xiling

    2016-06-01

    Colorectal cancer cells with stem-like properties, referred to as colon cancer-initiating cells (CCIC), have high tumorigenic potential. While CCIC can differentiate to promote cellular heterogeneity, it remains unclear whether CCIC within a tumor contain distinct subpopulations. Here, we describe the co-existence of fast- and slow-cycling CCIC, which can undergo asymmetric division to generate each other, highlighting CCIC plasticity and interconvertibility. Fast-cycling CCIC express markers, such as LGR5 and CD133, rely on MYC for their proliferation, whereas slow-cycling CCIC express markers, such as BMI1 and hTERT, are independent of MYC. NOTCH signaling promotes asymmetric cell fate, regulating the balance between these two populations. Overall, our results illuminate the basis for CCIC heterogeneity and plasticity by defining a direct interconversion mechanism between slow- and fast-cycling CCIC. Cancer Res; 76(11); 3411-21. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27197180

  10. Fast and slow crystal growth kinetics in glass-forming melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orava, J.; Greer, A. L.

    2014-06-01

    Published values of crystal growth rates are compared for supercooled glass-forming liquids undergoing congruent freezing at a planar crystal-liquid interface. For the purposes of comparison pure metals are considered to be glass-forming systems, using data from molecular-dynamics simulations. For each system, the growth rate has a maximum value Umax at a temperature Tmax that lies between the glass-transition temperature Tg and the melting temperature Tm. A classification is suggested, based on the lability (specifically, the propensity for fast crystallization), of the liquid. High-lability systems show "fast" growth characterized by a high Umax, a low Tmax / Tm, and a very broad peak in U vs. T / Tm. In contrast, systems showing "slow" growth have a low Umax, a high Tmax / Tm, and a sharp peak in U vs. T / Tm. Despite the difference of more than 11 orders of magnitude in Umax seen in pure metals and in silica, the range of glass-forming systems surveyed fit into a common pattern in which the lability increases with lower reduced glass-transition temperature (Tg / Tm) and higher fragility of the liquid. A single parameter, a linear combination of Tg / Tm and fragility, can show a good correlation with Umax. For all the systems, growth at Umax is coupled to the atomic/molecular mobility in the liquid. It is found that, across the diversity of glass-forming systems, Tmax / Tg = 1.48 ± 0.15.

  11. Strength of density feedback in census data increases from slow to fast life histories

    PubMed Central

    Herrando-Pérez, Salvador; Delean, Steven; Brook, Barry W; Bradshaw, Corey J A

    2012-01-01

    Life-history theory predicts an increasing rate of population growth among species arranged along a continuum from slow to fast life histories. We examine the effects of this continuum on density-feedback strength estimated using long-term census data from >700 vertebrates, invertebrates, and plants. Four life-history traits (Age at first reproduction, Body size, Fertility, Longevity) were related statistically to Gompertz strength of density feedback using generalized linear mixed-effects models and multi-model inference. Life-history traits alone explained 10 to 30% of the variation in strength across species (after controlling for time-series length and phylogenetic nonindependence). Effect sizes were largest for body size in mammals and longevity in birds, and density feedback was consistently stronger for smaller-bodied and shorter-lived species. Overcompensatory density feedback (strength <−1) occurred in 20% of species, predominantly at the fast end of the life-history continuum, implying relatively high population variability. These results support the idea that life history leaves an evolutionary signal in long-term population trends as inferred from census data. Where there is a lack of detailed demographic data, broad life-history information can inform management and conservation decisions about rebound capacity from low numbers, and propensity to fluctuate, of arrays of species in areas planned for development, harvesting, protection, and population recovery. PMID:22957193

  12. Velocity, force, power, and Ca2+ sensitivity of fast and slow monkey skeletal muscle fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitts, R. H.; Bodine, S. C.; Romatowski, J. G.; Widrick, J. J.

    1998-01-01

    In this study, we determined the contractile properties of single chemically skinned fibers prepared from the medial gastrocnemius (MG) and soleus (Sol) muscles of adult male rhesus monkeys and assessed the effects of the spaceflight living facility known as the experiment support primate facility (ESOP). Muscle biopsies were obtained 4 wk before and immediately after an 18-day ESOP sit, and fiber type was determined by immunohistochemical techniques. The MG slow type I fiber was significantly smaller than the MG type II, Sol type I, and Sol type II fibers. The ESOP sit caused a significant reduction in the diameter of type I and type I/II (hybrid) fibers of Sol and MG type II and hybrid fibers but no shift in fiber type distribution. Single-fiber peak force (mN and kN/m2) was similar between fiber types and was not significantly different from values previously reported for other species. The ESOP sit significantly reduced the force (mN) of Sol type I and MG type II fibers. This decline was entirely explained by the atrophy of these fiber types because the force per cross-sectional area (kN/m2) was not altered. Peak power of Sol and MG fast type II fiber was 5 and 8.5 times that of slow type I fiber, respectively. The ESOP sit reduced peak power by 25 and 18% in Sol type I and MG type II fibers, respectively, and, for the former fiber type, shifted the force-pCa relationship to the right, increasing the Ca2+ activation threshold and the free Ca2+ concentration, eliciting half-maximal activation. The ESOP sit had no effect on the maximal shortening velocity (Vo) of any fiber type. Vo of the hybrid fibers was only slightly higher than that of slow type I fibers. This result supports the hypothesis that in hybrid fibers the slow myosin heavy chain would be expected to have a disproportionately greater influence on Vo.

  13. Dynamics of slow light and light storage in a Doppler-broadened electromagnetically-induced-transparency medium: A numerical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Shih-Wei; Chen, Yi-Hsin; Gou, Shih-Chuan; Horng, Tzyy-Leng; Yu, Ite A.

    2011-01-01

    We present a numerical scheme to study the dynamics of slow light and light storage in an electromagnetically-induced-transparency (EIT) medium at finite temperatures. Allowing for the motional coupling, we derive a set of coupled Schrödinger equations describing a boosted closed three-level EIT system according to the principle of Galilean relativity. The dynamics of a uniformly moving EIT medium can thus be determined by numerically integrating the coupled Schrödinger equations for atoms plus one ancillary Maxwell-Schrödinger equation for the probe pulse. The central idea of this work rests on the assumption that the loss of ground-state coherence at finite temperatures can be ascribed to the incoherent superposition of density matrices representing the EIT systems with various velocities. Close agreements are demonstrated in comparing the numerical results with the experimental data for both slow light and light storage. In particular, the distinct characters featuring the decay of ground-state coherence can be well verified for slow light and light storage. This warrants that the current scheme can be applied to determine the decaying profile of the ground-state coherence as well as the temperature of the EIT medium.

  14. Optical imaging of fast light-evoked fast neural activation in amphibian retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Xin-Cheng; George, John S.

    2006-02-01

    High performance functional imaging is needed for dynamic measurements of neural processing in retina. Emerging techniques of visual prosthesis also require advanced methodology for reliable validation of electromagnetic stimulation of the retina. Imaging of fast intrinsic optical responses associated with neural activation promises a variety of technical advantages over traditional single and multi-channel electrophysiological techniques for these purposes, but the application of fast optical signals for neural imaging has been limited by low signal to noise ratio and high background light intensity. However, using optimized near infrared probe light and improved optical systems, we have improved the optical signals substantially, allowing single pass measurements. Fast photodiode measurements typically disclose dynamic transmitted light changes of whole retina at the level of 10 -4 dI/I, where dI is the dynamic optical change and I is the baseline light intensity. Using a fast high performance CCD, we imaged fast intrinsic optical responses from isolated retina activated by a visible light flash. Fast, high resolution imaging disclosed larger local optical responses, and showed evidence of multiple response components with both negative- and positive-going signals, on different timescales. Darkfield imaging techniques further enhanced the sensitivity of optical measurements. At single cell resolution, brightfield imaging disclosed maxima of optical responses ~5% dI/I, while darkfield imaging showed maxima of optical responses exceeding 10% dI/I. In comparison with simultaneous electrophysiological recording, optical imaging provided much better localized patterns of response over the activated area of the retina.

  15. Time-reversal constraint limits unidirectional photon emission in slow-light photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Lang, Ben; Beggs, Daryl M; Oulton, Ruth

    2016-08-28

    Photonic crystal waveguides are known to support C-points-point-like polarization singularities with local chirality. Such points can couple with dipole-like emitters to produce highly directional emission, from which spin-photon entanglers can be built. Much is made of the promise of using slow-light modes to enhance this light-matter coupling. Here we explore the transition from travelling to standing waves for two different photonic crystal waveguide designs. We find that time-reversal symmetry and the reciprocal nature of light places constraints on using C-points in the slow-light regime. We observe two distinctly different mechanisms through which this condition is satisfied in the two waveguides. In the waveguide designs, we consider a modest group velocity of vg≈c/10 is found to be the optimum for slow-light coupling to the C-points.This article is part of the themed issue 'Unifying physics and technology in light of Maxwell's equations'. PMID:27458258

  16. Fast Solar Polarimeter: First Light Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnappa, N.; Feller, A.; Iglesia, F. A.; Solanki, S.

    2013-12-01

    Accurate measurements of magnetic fields on the Sun are crucial to understand various physical processes that take place in the solar atmosphere such as solar eruptions, coronal heating, solar wind acceleration, etc. The Fast Solar Polarimeter (FSP) is a new instrument that is being developed to probe magnetic fields on the Sun. One of the main goals of this polarimeter is to carry out high precision spectropolarimetric observations with spatial resolution close to the telescope diffraction limit. The polarimeter is based on pnCCD technology with split frame transfer and simultaneous multi-channel readout, resulting in frame rate upto 1 kHz. The FSP prototype instrument uses a small format pnCCD of 264x264 pixels which has been developed by PNSensor and by the semiconductor lab of the Max Planck Society. The polarization modulator is based on two ferro-electric liquid crystals (FLCs) interlaced between two static retarders. The first solar observations have been carried out with this prototype during May-June, 2013 at German Vacuum Tower Telescope (VTT) on Tenerife, Canary Islands, Spain. Here we present the instrument performance assessments and the first results on the magnetic field measurements. Further, we briefly discuss about the next phase of FSP which will be a dual beam system with 1k x 1k CCDs.

  17. Quantifying Fast and Slow Responses of Terrestrial Carbon Exchange across a Water Availability Gradient in North American Flux Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biederman, J. A.; Scott, R. L.; Goulden, M.

    2014-12-01

    Climate change is predicted to increase the frequency and severity of water limitation, altering terrestrial ecosystems and their carbon exchange with the atmosphere. Here we compare site-level temporal sensitivity of annual carbon fluxes to interannual variations in water availability against cross-site spatial patterns over a network of 19 eddy covariance flux sites. This network represents one order of magnitude in mean annual productivity and includes western North American desert shrublands and grasslands, savannahs, woodlands, and forests with continuous records of 4 to 12 years. Our analysis reveals site-specific patterns not identifiable in prior syntheses that pooled sites. We interpret temporal variability as an indicator of ecosystem response to annual water availability due to fast-changing factors such as leaf stomatal response and microbial activity, while cross-site spatial patterns are used to infer ecosystem adjustment to climatic water availability through slow-changing factors such as plant community and organic carbon pools. Using variance decomposition, we directly quantify how terrestrial carbon balance depends on slow- and fast-changing components of gross ecosystem production (GEP) and total ecosystem respiration (TER). Slow factors explain the majority of variance in annual net ecosystem production (NEP) across the dataset, and their relative importance is greater at wetter, forest sites than desert ecosystems. Site-specific offsets from spatial patterns of GEP and TER explain one third of NEP variance, likely due to slow-changing factors not directly linked to water, such as disturbance. TER and GEP are correlated across sites as previously shown, but our site-level analysis reveals surprisingly consistent linear relationships between these fluxes in deserts and savannahs, indicating fast coupling of TER and GEP in more arid ecosystems. Based on the uncertainty associated with slow and fast factors, we suggest a framework for improved

  18. Ultraslow, slow, or fast spreading ridges: Arm wrestling between mantle convection and far-field tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husson, Laurent; Yamato, Philippe; Bézos, Antoine

    2015-11-01

    Oceanic spreading rates are highly variable, and these variations are known to correlate to a variety of surface observables, like magmatic production, heat flow or bathymetry. This correlation lead to classify ridges into fast and slow spreading ridges, but also into the more peculiar ultraslow spreading regime. Here we explore the dynamic relationships between spreading ridges, plate tectonics and mantle flow. We first focus on the thermal signature of the mantle, that we infer from the global S-wave seismic tomography model of Debayle and Ricard (2012). We show that the thermal structure of ridges gradually departs from the half-space cooling model for slow, and above all ultraslow spreading ridges. We also infer that the sublithospheric mantle temperature decreases by more than 150 °C from fast to ultraslow spreading regimes. Both observations overall indicate that the mantle convection pattern is increasingly chaotic underneath slow and ultraslow spreading ridges. We suggest that this is due to far-field tectonics at the other ends of lithospheric plates: not only it modulates the spreading rates but it also alters the convection regime by obstructing the circulation of plates, which in turn modifies the surface kinematic conditions for the convecting mantle. We test this hypothesis using a thermo-mechanical model that represents a convection cell carrying a continental lithosphere atop. The continent gradually drifts away from the spreading ridge, from which the oceanic lithosphere grows and cools while the continent eventually collides at the opposite side. In turn, this event drastically modifies the upper kinematic condition for the convecting mantle that evolves from a mobile lid regime to an almost stagnant lid regime. Implications on spreading ridges are prominent: heat advection decreases with respect to thermal conduction, which causes the oceanic lithosphere to thicken faster; the oceanic plates get compressed and destabilized by a growing number of

  19. Ultraslow, slow, or fast spreading ridges: Arm wrestling between mantle convection and far-field tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husson, Laurent; Yamato, Philippe; Bezos, Antoine

    2016-04-01

    Oceanic spreading rates are highly variable, and these variations are known to correlate to a variety of surface observables, like magmatic production, heat flow or bathymetry. This correlation lead to classify ridges into fast and slow spreading ridges, but also into the more peculiar ultraslow spreading regime. Here we explore the dynamic relationships between spreading ridges, plate tectonics and mantle flow. We first focus on the thermal signature of the mantle, that we infer from the global S-wave seismic tomography model of Debayle and Ricard (2012). We show that the thermal structure of ridges gradually departs from the half-space cooling model for slow, and above all ultraslow spreading ridges. We also infer that the sublithospheric mantle temperature decreases by more than 150 degrees C from fast to ultraslow spreading regimes. Both observations overall indicate that the mantle convection pattern is increasingly chaotic underneath slow and ultraslow spreading ridges. We suggest that this is due to far-field tectonics at the other ends of lithospheric plates: not only it modulates the spreading rates but it also alters the convection regime by obstructing the circulation of plates, which in turn modifies the surface kinematic conditions for the convecting mantle. We test this hypothesis using a thermo-mechanical model that represents a convection cell carrying a continental lithosphere atop. The continent gradually drifts away from the spreading ridge, from which the oceanic lithosphere grows and cools while the continent eventually collides at the opposite side. In turn, this event drastically modifies the upper kinematic condition for the convecting mantle that evolves from a mobile lid regime to an almost stagnant lid regime. Implications on spreading ridges are prominent: heat advection decreases with respect to thermal conduction, which causes the oceanic lithosphere to thicken faster; the oceanic plates get compressed and destabilized by a growing

  20. The pCa-tension and force-velocity characteristics of skinned fibres isolated from fish fast and slow muscles

    PubMed Central

    Altringham, J. D.; Johnston, I. A.

    1982-01-01

    1. Single fast fibres and small bundles of two to six slow fibres were dissected from the myotomal muscles of the cod, Gadus morhua, and the dogfish, Scyliorhinus canicula. Fibres were chemically skinned with the non-ionic detergent Brij 58. 2. The isometric tension properties were investigated. Maximal isometric tensions (mean ± S.E. of mean) were 18·65±1·18 (n = 11) and 8·34±0·98 (n = 13) N cm-2 for cod fast and slow fibres, and 18·34±0·88 (n = 28) and 8·24±0·39 (n = 12) N cm-2 for dogfish fast and slow fibres respectively. The values are comparable to those observed in mammalian and amphibian skinned fibres. The lower tensions generated by the slow fibres cannot be fully explained on the basis of their lower myofibrillar fractional volume. 3. In common with previous studies, a steep sigmoid relationship between pCa and tension was observed. The threshold for tension generation was around pCa 7·2. Half-maximal pCas were 6·08 and 6·42 for cod fast and slow muscle, and 6·41 and 6·50 for dogfish fast and slow fibres respectively. Cod fibres were maximally activated at around pCa 5·18, and dogfish fibres at pCa 5·62. 4. Contraction-induced residual tensions were observed in cod fast fibres after return to relaxing solution. This phenomenon is a feature common to many skinned fibre studies, but the mechanism behind it has yet to be resolved. 5. The force-velocity characteristics of fast and slow fibres have been investigated (at 8 °C). 6. Points below 0·6 P0 on the P-V curves could be fitted to a linear form of the Hill equation. Extrapolated Vmaxs were calculated as follows: cod fast fibre Vmax = 1·01 muscle length sec-1 (Lsec-1) (a = 0·21 P0; b = 0·21 Lsec-1). Slow fibre = 0·53 Lsec-1 (a = 0·28P0; b = 0·21 Lsec-1). Dogfish fast fibre Vmax = 2·34 Lsec-1 (a = 0·06 P0; b = 0·14 Lsec-1). Slow fibre = 0·67 Lsec-1 (a = 0·19 P0; b = 0·13 Lsec-1). 7. Contraction velocity in cod slow fibres decreased continuously to produce markedly non

  1. Light harvesting in photonic crystals revisited: why do slow photons at the blue edge enhance absorption?

    PubMed

    Deparis, O; Mouchet, S R; Su, B-L

    2015-11-11

    Light harvesting enhancement by slow photons in photonic crystal catalysts or dye-sensitized solar cells is a promising approach for increasing the efficiency of photoreactions. This structural effect is exploited in inverse opal TiO2 photocatalysts by tuning the red edge of the photonic band gap to the TiO2 electronic excitation band edge. In spite of many experimental demonstrations, the slow photon effect is not fully understood yet. In particular, observed enhancement by tuning the blue edge has remained unexplained. Based on rigorous couple wave analysis simulations, we quantify light harvesting enhancement in terms of absorption increase at a specific wavelength (monochromatic UV illumination) or photocurrent increase (solar light illumination), with respect to homogeneous flat slab of equivalent material thickness. We show that the commonly accepted explanation relying on light intensity confinement in high (low) dielectric constant regions at the red (blue) edge is challenged in the case of TiO2 inverse opals because of the sub-wavelength size of the material skeleton. The reason why slow photons at the blue edge are also able to enhance light harvesting is the loose confinement of the field, which leads to significant resonantly enhanced field intensity overlap with the skeleton in both red and blue edge tuning cases, yet with different intensity patterns. PMID:26517229

  2. Slow light in dual-periodic photonic crystals based slotted-waveguide coupled cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Na; Li, Yuanyuan; Chen, Cheng; Yan, Shu

    2016-09-01

    Considering the capacity of the nanoscale width area with the low-refractive index can confine light waves, the dual-periodic slotted photonic crystals, which is constructed by coupling low-refractive index's slotted-waveguide with high-refractive index's cavity is proposed in this paper. The best slow light properties and the optimal slotted-waveguide coupled cavity are achieved by adjusting the slotted-width and the period of cavity respectively. In this structure, the slow-light properties are simulated by Plane Wave Expansion (PWE), the result reveals that the group velocities are all three orders of magnitude smaller than the speed of light in vacuum, the slowest value is 7.96 ×10-4 c when the slotted-width is 0.54a and the period of cavity is 0.95a. Moreover, the corresponding Normalized Delay-Bandwidth Product (NDBP) values are larger than 0.24. Besides, the slotted-waveguide coupled cavity can be reconfigured, which accordingly changes the corresponding slow-light property. At last, the numerical results provide a new thought and method for decreasing group velocity and potential application for optical buffer in photonic crystals field.

  3. Coded output photonic A/D converter based on photonic crystal slow-light structures.

    PubMed

    Yu, Sunkyu; Koo, Sukmo; Park, Namkyoo

    2008-09-01

    A photonic analog-to-digital converter (PADC) utilizing a slow-light photonic crystal Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI) is proposed, to enable the optically coded output of a PADC with reduced device size and power consumption. Assuming an index modulation for the MZI on the Taylor's PADC structure, limiting factors in device size, speed, and effective number of bits are derived considering the signal transition time of the light and the slow light dispersion effects. Details of the device design and results of a time domain assessment of the device performance is described with discussions on the feasibility of sub-mm size, 20GS/s operation of the device having the ENOB (effective number of bits) > 5. PMID:18772986

  4. Deflection of slow light by magneto-optically controlled atomic media

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, D. L.; Wang, R. Q.; Zhou, Lan; Yi, S.; Sun, C. P.

    2007-11-15

    We present a semiclassical theory for light deflection by a coherent {lambda}-type three-level atomic medium in an inhomogeneous magnetic field or an inhomogeneous control laser. When the atomic energy levels (or the Rabi coupling by the control laser) are position-dependent due to the Zeeman effect caused by the inhomogeneous magnetic field (or due to inhomogeneity of the control field profile), the spatial dependence of the refraction index of the atomic medium will result in an observable deflection of slow signal light when the electromagnetically induced transparency cancels medium absorption. Our theoretical approach based on Fermat's principle in geometrical optics not only provides a consistent explanation for the most recent experiment in a straightforward way, but also predicts the two-photon detuning dependent behaviors and larger deflection angles by three orders of magnitude for the slow signal light deflection by the atomic media in an inhomogeneous off-resonant control laser field.

  5. Stochastic 16-state model of voltage gating of gap-junction channels enclosing fast and slow gates.

    PubMed

    Paulauskas, Nerijus; Pranevicius, Henrikas; Mockus, Jonas; Bukauskas, Feliksas F

    2012-06-01

    Gap-junction (GJ) channels formed of connexin (Cx) proteins provide a direct pathway for electrical and metabolic cell-cell interaction. Each hemichannel in the GJ channel contains fast and slow gates that are sensitive to transjunctional voltage (Vj). We developed a stochastic 16-state model (S16SM) that details the operation of two fast and two slow gates in series to describe the gating properties of homotypic and heterotypic GJ channels. The operation of each gate depends on the fraction of Vj that falls across the gate (VG), which varies depending on the states of three other gates in series, as well as on parameters of the fast and slow gates characterizing 1), the steepness of each gate's open probability on VG; 2), the voltage at which the open probability of each gate equals 0.5; 3), the gating polarity; and 4), the unitary conductances of the gates and their rectification depending on VG. S16SM allows for the simulation of junctional current dynamics and the dependence of steady-state junctional conductance (gj,ss) on Vj. We combined global coordinate optimization algorithms with S16SM to evaluate the gating parameters of fast and slow gates from experimentally measured gj,ss-Vj dependencies in cells expressing different Cx isoforms and forming homotypic and/or heterotypic GJ channels. PMID:22713562

  6. Measurements of the fast ion slowing-down times in the HL-2A tokamak and comparison to classical theory

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y. P.; Liu, Yi; Yuan, G. L.; Yang, J. W.; Song, X. Y.; Song, X. M.; Cao, J. Y.; Lei, G. J.; Wei, H. L.; Li, Y. G.; Shi, Z. B.; Li, X.; Yan, L. W.; Yang, Q. W.; Duan, X. R.; Isobe, M.; Collaboration: HL-2A Team

    2012-11-15

    Physics related to fast ions in magnetically confined fusion plasmas is a very important issue, since these particles will play an important role in future burning plasmas. Indeed, they will act as primary heating source and will sustain the self-ignited condition. To measure the fast ion slowing-down times in a magnetohydrodynamic-quiescent plasmas in different scenarios, very short pulses of a deuterium neutral beam, so-called 'blip,' with duration of about 5 ms were tangentially co-injected into a deuterium plasmas at the HuanLiuqi-2A (commonly referred to as HL-2A) tokamak [L. W. Yan, Nucl. Fusion 51, 094016 (2011)]. The decay rate of 2.45 MeV D-D fusion neutrons produced by beam-plasma reactions following neutral beam termination was measured by means of a {sup 235}U fission chamber. Experimental results were compared with those predicted by a classical slowing-down model. These results show that the fast ions are well confined with a peaked profile and the ions are slowed down classically without significant loss in the HL-2A tokamak. Moreover, it has been observed that during electron cyclotron resonance heating the fast ions have a longer slowing-down time and the neutron emission rate decay time becomes longer.

  7. A Descriptive Study of High School and University Students' Focus of Attention in Fast and Slow Orchestral Excerpts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacLeod, Rebecca B.; Geringer, John M.; Scott, Laurie

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate listener discrimination of orchestral performances and to ascertain focus of listener attention to technical and expressive music elements of those performances. High School (n = 84) and University (n = 84) music students listened to four orchestral excerpts: two slow/soft excerpts and two fast/loud…

  8. An Active Learning Mammalian Skeletal Muscle Lab Demonstrating Contractile and Kinetic Properties of Fast- and Slow-Twitch Muscle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Head, S. I.; Arber, M. B.

    2013-01-01

    The fact that humans possess fast and slow-twitch muscle in the ratio of approximately 50% has profound implications for designing exercise training strategies for power and endurance activities. With the growth of exercise and sport science courses, we have seen the need to develop an undergraduate student laboratory that demonstrates the basic…

  9. A NEW METHOD FOR CLASSIFYING FLARES OF UV Ceti TYPE STARS: DIFFERENCES BETWEEN SLOW AND FAST FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Dal, H. A.; Evren, S.

    2010-08-15

    In this study, a new method is presented to classify flares derived from the photoelectric photometry of UV Ceti type stars. This method is based on statistical analyses using an independent samples t-test. The data used in analyses were obtained from four flare stars observed between 2004 and 2007. The total number of flares obtained in the observations of AD Leo, EV Lac, EQ Peg, and V1054 Oph is 321 in the standard Johnson U band. As a result flares can be separated into two types, slow and fast, depending on the ratio of flare decay time to flare rise time. The ratio is below 3.5 for all slow flares, while it is above 3.5 for all fast flares. Also, according to the independent samples t-test, there is a difference of about 157 s between equivalent durations of slow and fast flares. In addition, there are significant differences between amplitudes and rise times of slow and fast flares.

  10. A New Method for Classifying Flares of UV Ceti Type Stars: Differences Between Slow and Fast Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dal, H. A.; Evren, S.

    2010-08-01

    In this study, a new method is presented to classify flares derived from the photoelectric photometry of UV Ceti type stars. This method is based on statistical analyses using an independent samples t-test. The data used in analyses were obtained from four flare stars observed between 2004 and 2007. The total number of flares obtained in the observations of AD Leo, EV Lac, EQ Peg, and V1054 Oph is 321 in the standard Johnson U band. As a result flares can be separated into two types, slow and fast, depending on the ratio of flare decay time to flare rise time. The ratio is below 3.5 for all slow flares, while it is above 3.5 for all fast flares. Also, according to the independent samples t-test, there is a difference of about 157 s between equivalent durations of slow and fast flares. In addition, there are significant differences between amplitudes and rise times of slow and fast flares.