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Sample records for fast optical flaring

  1. Very fast optical flaring from a possible new Galactic magnetar

    SciTech Connect

    Stefanescu, A.; Kanbach, G.; Greiner, J.; Slowikowska, A.; McBreen, S.; Sala, G.

    2009-05-25

    Rapid optical flaring of an unprecedented type was detected from a transient Galactic high-energy source, SWIFT J195509.6+261406[1]. On June 10, 2007, Swift-BAT triggered on GRB 070610, which turned out to be a previously unknown X-ray transient in the Galaxy. Optical emission following this transient was observed after only 421 s with the high-time-resolution single-photon counting photometer OPTIMA. Measurements continued for the following 5 nights.We detected very strong optical flares (>6 mag) with extremely short timescales: duration of individual flares 2-100 s, shortest variability timescales 0.4 s. The scale and magnitude of the observed variability combined with a distance estimate of 4-8 kpc indicate a non-thermal origin of the observed radiation. The morphology of the optical flares is reminiscent of X-ray outbursts of SGRs. The time resolution and high signal-to-noise ratio during the brightest optical outbursts allow to compute their Fourier power spectral density. Features similar to QPOs appear at periods of 6-8 seconds, typical rotational periods for magnetars. X-ray observations independent from our optical analysis show hints of periodicity at a coinciding frequency. We conclude that the timing properties of the fast, bright outbursts of SWIFT J1955 suggest a connection between this transient and magnetars flaring in the optical.

  2. Very fast optical flaring from a possible new Galactic magnetar.

    PubMed

    Stefanescu, A; Kanbach, G; Słowikowska, A; Greiner, J; McBreen, S; Sala, G

    2008-09-25

    Highly luminous rapid flares are characteristic of processes around compact objects like white dwarfs, neutron stars and black holes. In the high-energy regime of X-rays and gamma-rays, outbursts with variabilities on timescales of seconds or less are routinely observed, for example in gamma-ray bursts or soft gamma-ray repeaters. At optical wavelengths, flaring activity on such timescales has not been observed, other than from the prompt phase of one exceptional gamma-ray burst. This is mostly due to the fact that outbursts with strong, fast flaring are usually discovered in the high-energy regime; most optical follow-up observations of such transients use instruments with integration times exceeding tens of seconds, which are therefore unable to resolve fast variability. Here we show the observation of extremely bright and rapid optical flaring in the Galactic transient SWIFT J195509.6+261406. Our optical light curves are phenomenologically similar to high-energy light curves of soft gamma-ray repeaters and anomalous X-ray pulsars, which are thought to be neutron stars with extremely high magnetic fields (magnetars). This suggests that similar processes are in operation, but with strong emission in the optical, unlike in the case of other known magnetars. PMID:18818651

  3. Furiously fast and red: sub-second optical flaring in V404 Cyg during the 2015 outburst peak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gandhi, P.; Littlefair, S. P.; Hardy, L. K.; Dhillon, V. S.; Marsh, T. R.; Shaw, A. W.; Altamirano, D.; Caballero-Garcia, M. D.; Casares, J.; Casella, P.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; Charles, P. A.; Dallilar, Y.; Eikenberry, S.; Fender, R. P.; Hynes, R. I.; Knigge, C.; Kuulkers, E.; Mooley, K.; Muñoz-Darias, T.; Pahari, M.; Rahoui, F.; Russell, D. M.; Hernández Santisteban, J. V.; Shahbaz, T.; Terndrup, D. M.; Tomsick, J.; Walton, D. J.

    2016-06-01

    We present observations of rapid (sub-second) optical flux variability in V404 Cyg during its 2015 June outburst. Simultaneous three-band observations with the ULTRACAM fast imager on four nights show steep power spectra dominated by slow variations on ˜100-1000 s time-scales. Near the peak of the outburst on June 26, a dramatic change occurs and additional, persistent sub-second optical flaring appears close in time to giant radio and X-ray flaring. The flares reach peak optical luminosities of ˜ few × 1036 erg s-1. Some are unresolved down to a time resolution of 24 ms. Whereas the fast flares are stronger in the red, the slow variations are bluer when brighter. The redder slopes, emitted power and characteristic time-scales of the fast flares can be explained as optically thin synchrotron emission from a compact jet arising on size scales ˜140-500 Gravitational radii (with a possible additional contribution by a thermal particle distribution). The origin of the slower variations is unclear. The optical continuum spectral slopes are strongly affected by dereddening uncertainties and contamination by strong Hα emission, but the variations of these slopes follow relatively stable loci as a function of flux. Cross-correlating the slow variations between the different bands shows asymmetries on all nights consistent with a small red skew (i.e. red lag). X-ray reprocessing and non-thermal emission could both contribute to these. These data reveal a complex mix of components over five decades in time-scale during the outburst.

  4. On the 'fast electron hypothesis' for stellar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullan, D. J.

    1990-01-01

    It is pointed out that Gurzadyan's (1988) fast-electron hypothesis for stellar flares encounters certain difficulties. The origin of the fast electrons is obscure. Negative flares and predicted ratios of X-ray to optical fluxes are not necessarily a proof of the fast-electron hypothesis. When the electrons thermalize, they will yield X-ray fluxes which are orders of magnitude too large to be consistent with observations.

  5. Mechanisms for fast flare reconnection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanhoven, G.; Deeds, D.; Tachi, T.

    1988-01-01

    Normal collisional-resistivity mechanisms of magnetic reconnection have the drawback that they are too slow to explain the fast rise of solar flares. Two methods are examined which are proposed for the speed-up of the magnetic tearing instability: the anomalous enhancement of resistivity by the injection of MHD turbulence and the increase of Coulomb resistivity by radiative cooling. The results are described for nonlinear numerical simulations of these processes which show that the first does not provide the claimed effects, while the second yields impressive rates of reconnection, but low saturated energy outputs.

  6. Fast electrons in small solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, R. P.

    1975-01-01

    This review summarizes both the direct spacecraft observations of nonrelativistic solar electrons, and observations of the X-ray and radio emission generated by these particles at the sun and in the interplanetary medium. These observations bear on the basic astrophysical process of particle acceleration in tenuous plasmas. We find that in many small solar flares, the nearly 5-100 keV electrons accelerated during flash phase constitute the bulk of the total flare energy. Thus the basic flare mechanism in these flares essentially converts the available flare energy into fast electrons. These electrons may produce the other flare electromagnetic emissions through their interactions with the solar atmosphere. In large proton flares these electrons may provide the energy to eject material from the sun and to create a shock wave which could accelerate nuclei and electrons to much higher energies.

  7. GAMMA-RAY BURST FLARES: ULTRAVIOLET/OPTICAL FLARING. I

    SciTech Connect

    Swenson, C. A.; Roming, P. W. A.; De Pasquale, M.; Oates, S. R.

    2013-09-01

    We present a previously unused method for the detection of flares in gamma-ray burst (GRB) light curves and use this method to detect flares in the ultraviolet/optical. The algorithm makes use of the Bayesian Information Criterion to analyze the residuals of the fitted light curve, removing all major features, and to determine the statistically best fit to the data by iteratively adding additional ''breaks'' to the light curve. These additional breaks represent the individual components of the detected flares: T{sub start}, T{sub stop}, and T{sub peak}. We present the detection of 119 unique flaring periods detected by applying this algorithm to light curves taken from the Second Swift Ultraviolet/Optical Telescope (UVOT) GRB Afterglow Catalog. We analyzed 201 UVOT GRB light curves and found episodes of flaring in 68 of the light curves. For those light curves with flares, we find an average number of {approx}2 flares per GRB. Flaring is generally restricted to the first 1000 s of the afterglow, but can be observed and detected beyond 10{sup 5} s. More than 80% of the flares detected are short in duration with {Delta}t/t of <0.5. Flares were observed with flux ratios relative to the underlying light curve of between 0.04 and 55.42. Many of the strongest flares were also seen at greater than 1000 s after the burst.

  8. Gamma-Ray Burst Flares: Ultraviolet/Optical Flaring. I.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swenson, C. A.; Roming, P. W. A.; De Pasquale, M.; Oates, S. R.

    2013-09-01

    We present a previously unused method for the detection of flares in gamma-ray burst (GRB) light curves and use this method to detect flares in the ultraviolet/optical. The algorithm makes use of the Bayesian Information Criterion to analyze the residuals of the fitted light curve, removing all major features, and to determine the statistically best fit to the data by iteratively adding additional "breaks" to the light curve. These additional breaks represent the individual components of the detected flares: T start, T stop, and T peak. We present the detection of 119 unique flaring periods detected by applying this algorithm to light curves taken from the Second Swift Ultraviolet/Optical Telescope (UVOT) GRB Afterglow Catalog. We analyzed 201 UVOT GRB light curves and found episodes of flaring in 68 of the light curves. For those light curves with flares, we find an average number of ~2 flares per GRB. Flaring is generally restricted to the first 1000 s of the afterglow, but can be observed and detected beyond 105 s. More than 80% of the flares detected are short in duration with Δt/t of <0.5. Flares were observed with flux ratios relative to the underlying light curve of between 0.04 and 55.42. Many of the strongest flares were also seen at greater than 1000 s after the burst.

  9. Optically thick line widths in pyrotechnic flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Douda, B. E.; Exton, R. J.

    1975-01-01

    Experimentally determined sodium line widths for pyrotechnic flares are compared with simple analytical, optically-thick-line-shape calculations. Three ambient pressure levels are considered (760, 150 and 30 torr) for three different flare compositions. The measured line widths range from 1.3 to 481 A. The analytic procedure emphasizes the Lorentz line shape as observed under optically-thick conditions. Calculated widths are in good agreement with the measured values over the entire range.

  10. EVIDENCE FOR HOT FAST FLOW ABOVE A SOLAR FLARE ARCADE

    SciTech Connect

    Imada, S.; Aoki, K.; Hara, H.; Watanabe, T.; Harra, L. K.; Shimizu, T.

    2013-10-10

    Solar flares are one of the main forces behind space weather events. However, the mechanism that drives such energetic phenomena is not fully understood. The standard eruptive flare model predicts that magnetic reconnection occurs high in the corona where hot fast flows are created. Some imaging or spectroscopic observations have indicated the presence of these hot fast flows, but there have been no spectroscopic scanning observations to date to measure the two-dimensional structure quantitatively. We analyzed a flare that occurred on the west solar limb on 2012 January 27 observed by the Hinode EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) and found that the hot (∼30MK) fast (>500 km s{sup –1}) component was located above the flare loop. This is consistent with magnetic reconnection taking place above the flare loop.

  11. A NEW METHOD FOR CLASSIFYING FLARES OF UV Ceti TYPE STARS: DIFFERENCES BETWEEN SLOW AND FAST FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Dal, H. A.; Evren, S.

    2010-08-15

    In this study, a new method is presented to classify flares derived from the photoelectric photometry of UV Ceti type stars. This method is based on statistical analyses using an independent samples t-test. The data used in analyses were obtained from four flare stars observed between 2004 and 2007. The total number of flares obtained in the observations of AD Leo, EV Lac, EQ Peg, and V1054 Oph is 321 in the standard Johnson U band. As a result flares can be separated into two types, slow and fast, depending on the ratio of flare decay time to flare rise time. The ratio is below 3.5 for all slow flares, while it is above 3.5 for all fast flares. Also, according to the independent samples t-test, there is a difference of about 157 s between equivalent durations of slow and fast flares. In addition, there are significant differences between amplitudes and rise times of slow and fast flares.

  12. A New Method for Classifying Flares of UV Ceti Type Stars: Differences Between Slow and Fast Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dal, H. A.; Evren, S.

    2010-08-01

    In this study, a new method is presented to classify flares derived from the photoelectric photometry of UV Ceti type stars. This method is based on statistical analyses using an independent samples t-test. The data used in analyses were obtained from four flare stars observed between 2004 and 2007. The total number of flares obtained in the observations of AD Leo, EV Lac, EQ Peg, and V1054 Oph is 321 in the standard Johnson U band. As a result flares can be separated into two types, slow and fast, depending on the ratio of flare decay time to flare rise time. The ratio is below 3.5 for all slow flares, while it is above 3.5 for all fast flares. Also, according to the independent samples t-test, there is a difference of about 157 s between equivalent durations of slow and fast flares. In addition, there are significant differences between amplitudes and rise times of slow and fast flares.

  13. FAST CONTRACTION OF CORONAL LOOPS AT THE FLARE PEAK

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Rui; Wang Haimin

    2010-05-01

    On 2005 September 8, a coronal loop overlying the active region NOAA 10808 was observed in TRACE 171 A to contract at {approx}100 km s{sup -1} at the peak of an X5.4-2B flare at 21:05 UT. Prior to the fast contraction, the loop underwent a much slower contraction at {approx}6 km s{sup -1} for about 8 minutes, initiating during the flare preheating phase. The sudden switch to fast contraction is presumably corresponding to the onset of the impulsive phase. The contraction resulted in the oscillation of a group of loops located below, with the period of about 10 minutes. Meanwhile, the contracting loop exhibited a similar oscillatory pattern superimposed on the dominant downward motion. We suggest that the fast contraction reflects a suddenly reduced magnetic pressure underneath due either to (1) the eruption of magnetic structures located at lower altitudes or to (2) the rapid conversion of magnetic free energy in the flare core region. Electrons accelerated in the shrinking trap formed by the contracting loop can theoretically contribute to a late-phase hard X-ray burst, which is associated with Type IV radio emission. To complement the X5.4 flare which was probably confined, a similar event observed in SOHO/EIT 195 A on 2004 July 20 in an eruptive, M8.6 flare is briefly described, in which the contraction was followed by the expansion of the same loop leading up to a halo coronal mass ejection. These observations further substantiate the conjecture of coronal implosion and suggest coronal implosion as a new exciter mechanism for coronal loop oscillations.

  14. Bright flares in supergiant fast X-ray transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakura, N.; Postnov, K.; Sidoli, L.; Paizis, A.

    2014-08-01

    At steady low-luminosity states, supergiant fast X-ray transients (SFXTs) can be at the stage of quasi-spherical settling accretion on to slowly rotating magnetized neutron stars from the OB-companion winds. At this stage, a hot quasi-static shell is formed above the magnetosphere, the plasma entry rate into magnetosphere is controlled by (inefficient) radiative plasma cooling, and the accretion rate on to the neutron star is suppressed by a factor of ˜30 relative to the Bondi-Hoyle-Littleton value. Changes in the local wind velocity and density due to, e.g. clumps, can only slightly increase the mass accretion rate (a factor of ˜10) bringing the system into the Compton-cooling-dominated regime and led to the production of moderately bright flares (Lx ≲ 1036 erg s-1). To interpret the brightest flares (Lx > 1036 erg s-1) displayed by the SFXTs within the quasi-spherical settling accretion regimes, we propose that a larger increase in the mass accretion rate can be produced by sporadic capture of magnetized stellar wind plasma. At sufficiently low accretion rates, magnetic reconnection can enhance the magnetospheric plasma entry rate, resulting in copious production of X-ray photons, strong Compton cooling and ultimately in unstable accretion of the entire shell. A bright flare develops on the free-fall time-scale in the shell, and the typical energy released in an SFXT bright flare corresponds to the mass of the shell. This view is consistent with the energy released in SFXT bright flares (˜1038-1040 erg), their typical dynamic range (˜100) and with the observed dependence of these characteristics on the average unflaring X-ray luminosity of SFXTs. Thus, the flaring behaviour of SFXTs, as opposed to steady HMXBs, may be primarily related to their low X-ray luminosity allowing sporadic magnetic reconnection to occur during magnetized plasma entry into the magnetosphere.

  15. Optical microflaring on the nearby flare star binary UV Ceti

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, J. H. M. M.; Kanbach, G.; Rau, A.; Steinle, H.

    2016-05-01

    We present extremely high time resolution observations of the visual flare star binary UV Cet obtained with the Optical Pulsar Timing Analyzer (OPTIMA) at the 1.3 m telescope at Skinakas Observatory (SKO) in Crete, Greece. OPTIMA is a fiber-fed optical instrument that uses Single Photon Avalanche Diodes to measure the arrival times of individual optical photons. The time resolution of the observations presented here was 4 μs, allowing to resolve the typical millisecond variability time scales associated with stellar flares. We report the detection of very short impulsive bursts in the blue band with well resolved rise and decay time scales of about 2 s. The overall energetics put these flares at the lower end of the known flare distribution of UV Cet.

  16. Multi-wavelength Observations of Fast Infrared Flares from V404 Cygni in 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eikenberry, Stephen S.; Dallilar, Yigit; Garner, Alan; Deno Stelter, R.; Gandhi, Poshak; Dhillon, Vik; Littlefair, Stuart; Marsh, Thomas; Fender, Rob P.; Mooley, Kunal

    2016-04-01

    We used the fast photometry mode of our new Canarias InfraRed Camera Experiment (CIRCE) on the 10.4-meter Gran Telescopio Canarias to observe V404 Cyg, a stellar mass black hole binary, on June 25, 2015 during its 2015 outburst. CIRCE provided 10Hz sampling in the Ks-band (2.2 microns) In addition, we obtained simultaneous multi wavelength data from our collaborators: three GHz radio bands from the AMI telescope and three optical/UV bands (u', g', r') from ULTRACAM on the William Herschel 4.2-meter telescope. We identify fast (1-second) IR flares with optical counterparts of varying strength/color, which we argue arise from a relativistic jet outflow. These observations provide important constraints on the emission processes and physical conditions in the jet forming region in V404 Cygni. We will discuss these results as well as their implications for relativistic jet formation around stellar-mass black holes.

  17. Multi-wavelength Observations of Fast Infrared Flares from V404 Cygni in 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dallilar, Yigit; Casella, Piergiorgio; Marsh, Tom; Gandhi, Poshak; Fender, Rob; Littlefair, Stuart; Eikenberry, Steve; Garner, Alan; Stelter, Deno; Dhillon, Vik; Mooley, Kunal

    2016-07-01

    We used the fast photometry mode of our new Canarias InfraRed Camera Experiment (CIRCE) on the 10.4-meter Gran Telescopio Canarias to observe V404 Cyg, a stellar mass black hole binary, on June 25, 2015 during its 2015 outburst. CIRCE provided 10Hz sampling in the Ks-band (2.2 microns) In addition, we obtained simultaneous multi wavelength data from our collaborators: three GHz radio bands from the AMI telescope and three optical/UV bands (u', g', r') from ULTRACAM on the William Herschel 4.2-meter telescope. We identify fast (1-second) IR flares with optical counterparts of varying strength/color, which we argue arise from a relativistic jet outflow. These observations provide important constraints on the emission processes and physical conditions in the jet forming region in V404 Cygni. We will discuss these results as well as their implications for relativistic jet formation around stellar-mass black holes.

  18. Interferometric at-wavelength flare characterization of EUV optical systems

    DOEpatents

    Naulleau, Patrick P.; Goldberg, Kenneth Alan

    2001-01-01

    The extreme ultraviolet (EUV) phase-shifting point diffraction interferometer (PS/PDI) provides the high-accuracy wavefront characterization critical to the development of EUV lithography systems. Enhancing the implementation of the PS/PDI can significantly extend its spatial-frequency measurement bandwidth. The enhanced PS/PDI is capable of simultaneously characterizing both wavefront and flare. The enhanced technique employs a hybrid spatial/temporal-domain point diffraction interferometer (referred to as the dual-domain PS/PDI) that is capable of suppressing the scattered-reference-light noise that hinders the conventional PS/PDI. Using the dual-domain technique in combination with a flare-measurement-optimized mask and an iterative calculation process for removing flare contribution caused by higher order grating diffraction terms, the enhanced PS/PDI can be used to simultaneously measure both figure and flare in optical systems.

  19. UV-B and B-band Optical Flare Search in AR Lacertae, II Pegasi, and UX Arietis Star Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vander Haagen, G. A.

    2013-11-01

    A high-cadence search was conducted on the known RS CVn-type flare stars AR Lac, II Peg, and UX Ari. Two optical flares were observed in the B-band on AR Lac at 5 milliseconds (ms) resolution for a rate of 0.04 fl/hr. Flare energy of the two B-band fast-flares ranged from 0.55 to 16.7 × 1033 ergs. The UV-B and B-band search of II Peg for 44.5 hours at 5 and 10 ms resolution and UV-B band search of UX Ari for 25.6 hours at 10 ms resolution detected no flare activity.

  20. OPTICAL DISCOVERY OF PROBABLE STELLAR TIDAL DISRUPTION FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Van Velzen, Sjoert; Farrar, Glennys R.; Gezari, Suvi; Morrell, Nidia; Zaritsky, Dennis; Oestman, Linda; Smith, Mathew; Gelfand, Joseph; Drake, Andrew J.

    2011-11-10

    Using archival Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) multi-epoch imaging data (Stripe 82), we have searched for the tidal disruption of stars by supermassive black holes in non-active galaxies. Two candidate tidal disruption events (TDEs) are identified. The TDE flares have optical blackbody temperatures of 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} K and observed peak luminosities of M{sub g} = -18.3 and -20.4 ({nu}L{sub {nu}} = 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 42}, 4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 43} erg s{sup -1}, in the rest frame); their cooling rates are very low, qualitatively consistent with expectations for tidal disruption flares. The properties of the TDE candidates are examined using (1) SDSS imaging to compare them to other flares observed in the search, (2) UV emission measured by GALEX, and (3) spectra of the hosts and of one of the flares. Our pipeline excludes optically identifiable AGN hosts, and our variability monitoring over nine years provides strong evidence that these are not flares in hidden AGNs. The spectra and color evolution of the flares are unlike any SN observed to date, their strong late-time UV emission is particularly distinctive, and they are nuclear at high resolution arguing against these being first cases of a previously unobserved class of SNe or more extreme examples of known SN types. Taken together, the observed properties are difficult to reconcile with an SN or an AGN-flare explanation, although an entirely new process specific to the inner few hundred parsecs of non-active galaxies cannot be excluded. Based on our observed rate, we infer that hundreds or thousands of TDEs will be present in current and next-generation optical synoptic surveys. Using the approach outlined here, a TDE candidate sample with O(1) purity can be selected using geometric resolution and host and flare color alone, demonstrating that a campaign to create a large sample of TDEs, with immediate and detailed multi-wavelength follow-up, is feasible. A by-product of this

  1. Evidence for Optical Flares in Quiescent Soft X-Ray Transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zurita, C.; Casares, J.; Shahbaz, T.

    2003-01-01

    We present the results of high time resolution optical photometry of five quiescent soft X-ray transients (SXTs): V404 Cyg, A0620-00, J0422+32, GS 2000+25, and Cen X-4. We detect fast optical variations superposed on the secondary star's double-humped ellipsoidal modulation. The variability resembles typical flare activity and has amplitudes ranging from 0.06 to 0.6 mag. Flares occur on timescales of minutes to a few hours, with no dependency on orbital phase, and contribute ~19%-46% to the total veiling observed in the R band. We find that the observed level of flaring activity is veiled by the light of the companion star, and therefore, systems with cool companions (e.g., J0422+32) exhibit stronger variability. After correcting for this dilution, we do not find any correlation between the flaring activity and fundamental system parameters. We find no underlying coherent periods in the data, only quasi-periodic variations ranging between 30 and 90 minutes for the short-period SXTs and longer than 1 hr for V404 Cyg. The power-law index of the power spectra is consistent with what is observed at X-rays wavelengths, i.e., a 1/f distribution, which is compatible with the cellular automaton model. Our observed R'-band luminosities, which are in the range 1031-1033 ergs s-1, are too large to be due to chromospheric activity in the rapidly rotating companions. Since the typical timescale of the flares increases with orbital period, they are most likely produced in the accretion disk. The associated dynamical (Keplerian) timescales suggest that flares are produced at ~0.3Rd-0.7Rd. Possible formation mechanisms are magnetic loop reconnection events in the disk or, less likely, optical reprocessing of X-ray flares. In the former scenario, the maximum duration of the flares suggests that the outer disk is responsible for the flare events and so allows us to constrain the sharing timescale to τ~(5-6)Ω-1K.

  2. An unprecedented UV/optical flare in TV Columbae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szkody, P.; Mateo, M.

    1984-01-01

    A surprising, 2 mag, short time scale (hr) outburst of TV Col (2A 0526-328) was observed simultaneously at IUE and optical wavelengths in 1982 November. During this 'flare', the IUE emission lines of N v 1240, C IV 1550, and He II 1640, intensified by more than an order of magnitude and developed P Cygni profiles, indicating mass loss. Continuum fits with a power-law plus a blackbody from the UV through the optical showed a steepening of the UV power-law component and an increase in the temperature and size of the blackbody component during the flare activity. This unusual behavior is discussed in terms of an accretion disk instability.

  3. A coordinated X-ray, optical, and microwave study of the flare star Proxima Centauri

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haisch, B. M.; Linsky, J. L.; Slee, O. B.; Hearn, D. R.; Walker, A. R.; Rydgren, A. E.; Nicolson, G. D.

    1978-01-01

    Results are reported for a three-day coordinated observing program to monitor the flare star Proxima Centauri in the X-ray, optical, and radio spectrum. During this interval 30 optical flares and 12 possible radio bursts were observed. The SAS 3 X-ray satellite made no X-ray detections. An upper limit of 0.08 on the X-ray/optical luminosity ratio is derived for the brightest optical flare. The most sensitive of the radio telescopes failed to detect 6-cm emission during one major and three minor optical flares, and on this basis an upper limit on the flare radio emission (1 hundred-thousandth of the optimal luminosity) is derived.

  4. THE EFFECTS OF WAVE ESCAPE ON FAST MAGNETOSONIC WAVE TURBULENCE IN SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Pongkitiwanichakul, Peera; Chandran, Benjamin D. G.; Karpen, Judith T.; DeVore, C. Richard E-mail: benjamin.chandran@unh.edu E-mail: devore@nrl.navy.mil

    2012-09-20

    One of the leading models for electron acceleration in solar flares is stochastic acceleration by weakly turbulent fast magnetosonic waves ({sup f}ast waves{sup )}. In this model, large-scale flows triggered by magnetic reconnection excite large-wavelength fast waves, and fast-wave energy then cascades from large wavelengths to small wavelengths. Electron acceleration by large-wavelength fast waves is weak, and so the model relies on the small-wavelength waves produced by the turbulent cascade. In order for the model to work, the energy cascade time for large-wavelength fast waves must be shorter than the time required for the waves to propagate out of the solar-flare acceleration region. To investigate the effects of wave escape, we solve the wave kinetic equation for fast waves in weak turbulence theory, supplemented with a homogeneous wave-loss term. We find that the amplitude of large-wavelength fast waves must exceed a minimum threshold in order for a significant fraction of the wave energy to cascade to small wavelengths before the waves leave the acceleration region. We evaluate this threshold as a function of the dominant wavelength of the fast waves that are initially excited by reconnection outflows.

  5. The Effects of Wave Escape on Fast Magnetosonic Wave Turbulence in Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pongkitiwanichakul, Peera; Chandran, Benjamin D. G.; Karpen, Judith T.; DeVore, C. Richard

    2012-01-01

    One of the leading models for electron acceleration in solar flares is stochastic acceleration by weakly turbulent fast magnetosonic waves ("fast waves"). In this model, large-scale flows triggered by magnetic reconnection excite large-wavelength fast waves, and fast-wave energy then cascades from large wavelengths to small wavelengths. Electron acceleration by large-wavelength fast-waves is weak, and so the model relies on the small-wavelength waves produced by the turbulent cascade. In order for the model to work, the energy cascade time for large-wavelength fast waves must be shorter than the time required for the waves to propagate out of the solar-flare acceleration region. To investigate the effects of wave escape, we solve the wave kinetic equation for fast waves in weak turbulence theory, supplemented with a homogeneous wave-loss term.We find that the amplitude of large-wavelength fast waves must exceed a minimum threshold in order for a significant fraction of the wave energy to cascade to small wavelengths before the waves leave the acceleration region.We evaluate this threshold as a function of the dominant wavelength of the fast waves that are initially excited by reconnection outflows.

  6. On reflecting boundary behind the Earth's orbit at propagation of fast particles from solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishkovskikh, A. S.; Filippov, A. T.

    1985-01-01

    The flares of solar cosmic rays (SCR) associated with the presence of shocks in interplanetary magnetic field and with their propagation at significant heliocentric distances were always of great interest. Some events and problems concerning the peculiarities of propagation of flare CR in the interplanetary medium are considered. The distinguishing feature of such events is the presence of shock front behind the Earth's orbit having formed either directly in the process of shock generation on the Sun or at large heliocentric distances as a result of the interaction of fast and slow quasistationary recurrent solar wind (SW) streams. Based on the experimental material it is shown that the significant nonlinear disturbances in IMF behind the Earth's orbit can yield the occurrence of the additional SCR flux from shock front region as a result of the interaction of flare flux with shock and a partial reflection from it.

  7. INTEGRAL study of temporal properties of bright flares in Supergiant Fast X-ray Transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidoli, L.; Paizis, A.; Postnov, K.

    2016-04-01

    We have characterized the typical temporal behaviour of the bright X-ray flares detected from the three Supergiant Fast X-ray Transients (SFXTs) showing the most extreme transient behaviour (XTE J1739-302, IGR J17544-2619, SAX J1818.6-1703). We focus here on the cumulative distributions of the waiting-time (time interval between two consecutive X-ray flares), and the duration of the hard X-ray activity (duration of the brightest phase of an SFXT outburst), as observed by INTEGRAL/IBIS in the energy band 17-50 keV. Adopting the cumulative distribution of waiting-times, it is possible to identify the typical time-scale that clearly separates different outbursts, each composed by several single flares at ˜ks time-scale. This allowed us to measure the duration of the brightest phase of the outbursts from these three targets, finding that they show heavy-tailed cumulative distributions. We observe a correlation between the total energy emitted during SFXT outbursts and the time interval covered by the outbursts (defined as the elapsed time between the first and the last flare belonging to the same outburst as observed by INTEGRAL). We show that temporal properties of flares and outbursts of the sources, which share common properties regardless different orbital parameters, can be interpreted in the model of magnetized stellar winds with fractal structure from the OB-supergiant stars.

  8. A search for fast optical transients in the Pan-STARRS1 medium-deep survey: M-dwarf flares, asteroids, limits on extragalactic rates, and implications for LSST

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, E.; Leibler, C. N.; Chornock, R.; Foley, R. J.; Soderberg, A. M.; Rest, A.; Price, P. A.; Burgett, W. S.; Chambers, K. C.; Flewelling, H.; Huber, M. E.; Magnier, E. A.; Tonry, J. L.; Metcalfe, N.; Stubbs, C. W.

    2013-12-10

    We present a search for fast optical transients (τ ∼ 0.5 hr-1 day) using repeated observations of the Pan-STARRS1 Medium-Deep Survey (PS1/MDS) fields. Our search takes advantage of the consecutive g {sub P1} r {sub P1} observations (16.5 minutes in each filter), by requiring detections in both bands, with non-detections on preceding and subsequent nights. We identify 19 transients brighter than 22.5 AB mag (S/N ≳ 10). Of these, 11 events exhibit quiescent counterparts in the deep PS1/MDS templates that we identify as M4-M9 dwarfs at d ≈ 0.2-1.2 kpc. The remaining eight transients lack quiescent counterparts, exhibit mild but significant astrometric shifts between the g {sub P1} and r {sub P1} images, colors of (g – r){sub P1} ≈ 0.5-0.8 mag, non-varying light curves, and locations near the ecliptic plane with solar elongations of about 130°, which are all indicative of main-belt asteroids near the stationary point of their orbits. With identifications for all 19 transients, we place an upper limit of R {sub FOT}(τ ∼ 0.5 hr) ≲ 0.12 deg{sup –2} day{sup –1} (95% confidence level) on the sky-projected rate of extragalactic fast transients at ≲ 22.5 mag, a factor of 30-50 times lower than previous limits; the limit for a timescale of ∼1 day is R {sub FOT} ≲ 2.4 × 10{sup –3} deg{sup –2} day{sup –1}. To convert these sky-projected rates to volumetric rates, we explore the expected peak luminosities of fast optical transients powered by various mechanisms, and find that non-relativistic events are limited to M ≈ –10 to ≈ – 14 mag for a timescale of ∼0.5 hr to ∼1 day, while relativistic sources (e.g., gamma-ray bursts, magnetar-powered transients) can reach much larger luminosities. The resulting volumetric rates are ≲ 13 Mpc{sup –3} yr{sup –1} (M ≈ –10 mag), ≲ 0.05 Mpc{sup –3} yr{sup –1} (M ≈ –14 mag), and ≲ 10{sup –6} Mpc{sup –3} yr{sup –1} (M ≈ –24 mag), significantly above the nova, supernova

  9. Simultaneous X-ray, ultraviolet, optical, and radio observations of the flare star Proxima Centauri

    SciTech Connect

    Haisch, B.M.; Linsky, J.L.; Slee, O.B.; Siegman, B.C.; Nikoloff, I.; Candy, M.; Harwood, D.; Verveer, A.; Quinn, P.J.; Wilson, I.; Page, A.A.; Higson, P.; Seward, F.D.

    1981-05-01

    We report on a coordinated program involving X-ray, ultraviolet, optical, and radio observations of the dM5e flare star Proxima Centauri. We detected one major X-ray flare event with L/sub x/(0.2--4.0 keV)roughly-equal6.0 x 10/sup 27/ ergs s/sup -1/, T = 1.7 x 10/sup 7/ K, and EM = 7.5 x 10/sup 50/ cm/sup -3/ during the rise phase and L/sub x/roughly-equal7.4 x 10/sup 27/ ergs s/sup -1/, T = 1.2 x 10/sup 7/ K, and EM = 12.0 x 10/sup 50/ cm/sup -3/ during the decay phase. This is the first detection of a time-resolved stellar X-ray flare that shows changes in its spectral flux distribution. We detected no ultraviolet, optical or radio emission corresponding to this flare, but we did detect a total of five optical and 12 possible radio flares, including one event with simultaneous radio and optical emission. We interpret the absence of optical and ultraviolet emission at the time of the X-ray flare in terms of an arch model in which the flare cools predominently by X-ray radiation. The observed 20 min expotential cooling time is consistent with an electron density of 1.0 x 10/sup 11/ cm/sup -3/ during the decay phase and a flare of total arch length of ..pi.. x 10/sup 10/ cm, comparable to the size of the star itself. We conclude that we have observed an X-ray flare more like a typical strong solar flare than heretofore seen on a flare star.

  10. The runaway of fast electrons into turbulent plasma of solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charikov, Yu. E.; Kudryavtsev, I. V.

    1992-08-01

    Attention is given to the problem in which a beam of fast particles falls into a layer of plasma with induced ion-sound waves and propagates inside the layer scattering by plasmons. A solution is obtained for a turbulent plasma, and, as an application, two model cases are considered: the nonthermal distribution of fast particles and the quasi-thermal one, which are discussed in interpretations of the emissions from solar flares. The scattering on the front with ion-sound waves considerably changes the distribution both quantitatively and qualitatively.

  11. Simultaneous X-ray, ultraviolet, optical, and radio observations of the flare star Proxima Centauri

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haisch, B. M.; Slee, O. B.; Siegman, B. C.; Nikoloff, I.; Candy, M.; Harwood, D.; Verveer, A.; Quinn, P. J.; Wilson, I.; Linsky, J. L.

    1981-01-01

    Results of coordinated program of observations in the X-ray, UV, optical and radio regions of the dM5e flare star Proxima Centauri are presented. Simultaneous observations of the star were obtained on March 6 and March 7, 1979, by the Einstein Observatory IPC, the IUE SWP and LWR cameras at low dispersion, three ground-based optical telescopes in Australia and the Parkes 64-m radio telescope. A total of 10 radio bursts and six optical flares was detected during three nights of simultaneous radio and optical observations, which appear to be broadly correlated. A major X-ray flare event was detected with temperatures of 1.7 x 10 to the 7th and 1.2 x 10 to the 7th K during the rise and decay phases, respectively, respective X-ray fluxes of 3.0 x 10 to the -11th and 3.7 x 10 to the -11th ergs/sq cm per sec, and changes in spectral flux distribution. No radio, optical or UV flare emission corresponding to the X-ray flare was detected. The X-ray flare is interpreted in terms of an arch model with cooling predominantly by X-ray radiation, with an electron density of 1.0 x 10 to the 11th/cu cm during the decay phase and a total arch length comparable to the size of the star itself. The X-ray flare observed is thus more similar to a typical strong solar flare than heretofore seen on a flare star.

  12. Quasi-periodic fast-mode magnetosonic wave trains within coronal waveguides associated with flares and CMEs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei; Ofman, Leon; Broder, Brittany; Karlický, Marian; Downs, Cooper

    2016-03-01

    Quasi-periodic, fast-mode, propagating wave trains (QFPs) are a new observational phenomenon recently discovered in the solar corona by the Solar Dynamics Observatory with extreme ultraviolet (EUV) imaging observations. They originate from flares and propagate at speeds up to ˜2000 km s-1 within funnel-shaped waveguides in the wakes of coronal mass ejections (CMEs). QFPs can carry suffcient energy fluxes required for coronal heating during their occurr ences. They can provide new diagnostics for the solar corona and their associated flares. We present recent observations of QFPs focusing on their spatio-temporal properties, temperature dependence, and statistical correlation with flares and CMEs. Of particular interest is the 2010-Aug-01 C3.2 flare with correlated QFPs and drifting zebra and fiber radio bursts, which might be different manifestations of the same fast-mode wave trains. We also discuss the potential roles of QFPs in accelerating and/or modulating the solar wind.

  13. The starting conditions for an optically small solar gamma ray flare

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simnett, G. M.; Ryan, J. M.

    1985-01-01

    It is suggested that optically small gamma-ray flares result from gradual pre-flare acceleration of protons over approximately 1,000 s by a series of magnetohydrodynamic shocks in the low corona. A fraction of the accelerated protons are trapped in the corona where they form a seed population for future acceleration. If the shock acceleration is sufficiently rapid proton energies may exceed the gamma-ray production threshold and trigger gamma-ray emission. This occurs without the total flare energy being necessarily large. Magnetic field geometry is an important parameter.

  14. Fast-shock formation in line-tied magnetic reconnection models of solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forbes, T. G.

    1986-01-01

    In a previous study by the author, an approximately stationary fast shock was tentatively identified in a numerical experiment designed to study line-tied magnetic reconnection. Here the evidence for the occurrence of a stationary fast shock is reexamined, and the previous identification is confirmed. In the numerical experiment, line-tied reconnection is modeled by a configuration which produces two supermagnetosonic outflow jets - one directed upward, away from the photosphere, and one directed downward, toward an arcade of closed magnetic loops tied to the photosphere. The fast shock occurs when the downward-directed jet encounters the obstacle formed by the closed loops. Although the existence of a stationary, or nearly stationary, fast shock is confirmed, the transition from the supermagnetosonic flow region upstream of the shock to the nearly static region downstream of the shock is more complicated than was previously thought. Immediately downstream of the shock, there exists a deflection sheath in which the submagnetosonic flow coming out of the shock is diverted around the region of static closed loops. The MHD jump conditions are used to investigate the characteristics of the fast shock and to show that a stationary shock cannot exist unless accompanied by a deflection sheath. Analysis of the shock's location and dimensions suggests that such fast shocks may contribute to particle acceleration and to thermal condensation in flares.

  15. VLBI observations of flared optical quasar CGRaBS J0809+5341

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Tao; Cui, Yu-Zhu; Paragi, Zsolt; Frey, Sándor; Gurvits, Leonid I.; Gabányi, Krisztina É.

    2016-08-01

    A bright optical flare was detected in the high-redshift (z = 2.133) quasar CGRaBS J0809+5341 on 2014 April 13. The absolute magnitude of the object reached -30.0 during the flare, making it the brightest one (in flaring stage) among all known quasars so far. The 15-GHz flux density of CGRaBS J0809+5341 monitored in the period from 2008 to 2016 also reached its peak at the same time. To reveal any structural change possibly associated with the flare in the innermost radio structure of the quasar, we conducted a pilot very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) observation of CGRaBS J0809+5341 using the European VLBI Network (EVN) at 5 GHz on 2014 November 18, about seven months after the prominent optical flare. Three epochs of follow-up KaVA (Korean VLBI Network and VLBI Exploration of Radio Astrometry Array) observations were carried out at 22- and 43-GHz frequencies from 2015 February 25 to June 4, with the intention of exploring a possibly emerging new radio jet component associated with the optical flare. However, these high-resolution VLBI observations revealed only the milliarcsecond-scale compact "core" that was known in the quasar from earlier VLBI images, and showed no sign of any extended jet structure. Neither the size nor the flux density of the "core" changed considerably after the flare, according to our VLBI monitoring. The results suggest that any putative radio ejecta associated with the major optical and radio flare could not yet be separated from the "core" component, or the newly-born jet was short-lived.

  16. Optical Photometry of the flaring gamma-ray blazar AO 0235+164

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pursimo, Tapio; Losada, Illa R.; Messa, Matteo; Gafton, Emanuel; Ojha, Roopesh

    2016-03-01

    We report optical photometry of the blazar AO 0235+164 obtained with the 2.56m Nordic Optical Telescope in La Palma to look for any enhanced optical activity associated with a recent flare in the daily averaged gamma-ray flux seen in the public lightcurve of the Fermi/LAT instrument: http://fermi.gsfc.nasa.gov/FTP/glast/data/lat/catalogs/asp/current/lightcurves/0235+164_86400.png Fermi/LAT first reported a detection of gamma-ray activity from this source in Sep, 2008 (ATel#1744) and a short timescale flare in Oct 14, 2008 (ATel#1784).

  17. Optical Spectral Observations of a Flickering White-light Kernel in a C1 Solar Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalski, Adam F.; Cauzzi, Gianna; Fletcher, Lyndsay

    2015-01-01

    We analyze optical spectra of a two-ribbon, long-duration C1.1 flare that occurred on 2011 August 18 within AR 11271 (SOL2011-08-18T15:15). The impulsive phase of the flare was observed with a comprehensive set of space-borne and ground-based instruments, which provide a range of unique diagnostics of the lower flaring atmosphere. Here we report the detection of enhanced continuum emission, observed in low-resolution spectra from 3600 Å to 4550 Å acquired with the Horizontal Spectrograph at the Dunn Solar Telescope. A small, <=0.''5 (1015 cm2) penumbral/umbral kernel brightens repeatedly in the optical continuum and chromospheric emission lines, similar to the temporal characteristics of the hard X-ray variation as detected by the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor on the Fermi spacecraft. Radiative-hydrodynamic flare models that employ a nonthermal electron beam energy flux high enough to produce the optical contrast in our flare spectra would predict a large Balmer jump in emission, indicative of hydrogen recombination radiation from the upper flare chromosphere. However, we find no evidence of such a Balmer jump in the bluemost spectral region of the continuum excess. Just redward of the expected Balmer jump, we find evidence of a "blue continuum bump" in the excess emission which may be indicative of the merging of the higher order Balmer lines. The large number of observational constraints provides a springboard for modeling the blue/optical emission for this particular flare with radiative-hydrodynamic codes, which are necessary to understand the opacity effects for the continuum and emission line radiation at these wavelengths.

  18. OPTICAL SPECTRAL OBSERVATIONS OF A FLICKERING WHITE-LIGHT KERNEL IN A C1 SOLAR FLARE

    SciTech Connect

    Kowalski, Adam F.; Cauzzi, Gianna; Fletcher, Lyndsay

    2015-01-10

    We analyze optical spectra of a two-ribbon, long-duration C1.1 flare that occurred on 2011 August 18 within AR 11271 (SOL2011-08-18T15:15). The impulsive phase of the flare was observed with a comprehensive set of space-borne and ground-based instruments, which provide a range of unique diagnostics of the lower flaring atmosphere. Here we report the detection of enhanced continuum emission, observed in low-resolution spectra from 3600 Å to 4550 Å acquired with the Horizontal Spectrograph at the Dunn Solar Telescope. A small, ≤0.''5 (10{sup 15} cm{sup 2}) penumbral/umbral kernel brightens repeatedly in the optical continuum and chromospheric emission lines, similar to the temporal characteristics of the hard X-ray variation as detected by the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor on the Fermi spacecraft. Radiative-hydrodynamic flare models that employ a nonthermal electron beam energy flux high enough to produce the optical contrast in our flare spectra would predict a large Balmer jump in emission, indicative of hydrogen recombination radiation from the upper flare chromosphere. However, we find no evidence of such a Balmer jump in the bluemost spectral region of the continuum excess. Just redward of the expected Balmer jump, we find evidence of a ''blue continuum bump'' in the excess emission which may be indicative of the merging of the higher order Balmer lines. The large number of observational constraints provides a springboard for modeling the blue/optical emission for this particular flare with radiative-hydrodynamic codes, which are necessary to understand the opacity effects for the continuum and emission line radiation at these wavelengths.

  19. Optical imaging of fast, dynamic neurophysiological function.

    SciTech Connect

    Rector, D. M.; Carter, K. M.; Yao, X.; George, J. S.

    2002-01-01

    Fast evoked responses were imaged from rat dorsal medulla and whisker barrel cortex. To investigate the biophysical mechanisms involved, fast optical responses associated with isolated crustacean nerve stimulation were recorded using birefringence and scattered light. Such studies allow optimization of non-invasive imaging techniques being developed for use in humans.

  20. Solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zirin, H.

    1974-01-01

    A review of the knowledge about solar flares which has been obtained through observations from the earth and from space by various methods. High-resolution cinematography is best carried out at H-alpha wavelengths to reveal the structure, time history, and location of flares. The classification flares in H alpha according to either physical or morphological criteria is discussed. The study of flare morphology, which shows where, when, and how flares occur, is important for evaluating theories of flares. Consideration is given to studies of flares by optical spectroscopy, radio emissions, and at X-ray and XUV wavelengths. Research has shown where and possibly why flares occur, but the physics of the instability involved, of the particle acceleration, and of the heating are still not understood.

  1. Radio Nondetection of the SGR 1806–20 Giant Flare and Implications for Fast Radio Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tendulkar, Shriharsh P.; Kaspi, Victoria M.; Patel, Chitrang

    2016-08-01

    We analyze archival data from the Parkes radio telescope, which was observing a location 35.°6 away from SGR 1806‑20 during its giant γ-ray flare of 2004 December 27. We show that no fast radio burst (FRB)-like burst counterpart was detected, and set a radio limit of 110 MJy at 1.4 GHz, including the estimated 70 dB suppression of the signal due to its location in the far sidelobe of Parkes and the predicted scattering from the interstellar medium. The upper limit for the ratio of magnetar giant flare radio to γ-ray fluence is η SGR ≲ 107 Jy ms erg‑1 cm2. Based on the nondetection of a short and prompt γ-ray counterpart of 15 FRBs in γ-ray transient monitors, we set a lower limit on the fluence ratios of FRBs to be η FRB ≳ 107–9 Jy ms erg‑1 cm2. The fluence ratio limit for SGR 1806‑20 is inconsistent with all but one of the 15 FRBs. We discuss possible variations in the magnetar-FRB emission mechanism and observational caveats that may reconcile the theory with observations.

  2. Flare-associated Fast-mode Coronal Wave Trains Discovered by SDO/AIA: Physical Properties and Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, W.; Ofman, L.; Downs, C.; Cheung, C. M. M.; Broder, B.; De Pontieu, B.

    2015-12-01

    Quasi-periodic Fast Propagating wave trains (QFPs) are a new observational phenomenon discovered in extreme ultraviolet (EUV) by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). They are fast-mode magnetosonic waves, closely related to quasi-periodic pulsations in solar flare emission ranging from radio to X-ray wavelengths. The significance of QFPs lies in their diagnostic potential, because they can provide critical clues to flare energy release and serve as new tools for coronal seismology. In this presentation, we report recent advances in observing and modeling QFPs. For example, using differential emission measure (DEM) inversion, we found clear evidence of heating and cooling cycles that are consistent with alternating compression and rarefaction expected for magnetosonic wave pulses. Moreover, recent IRIS observations of QFP source regions revealed sawtooth-like flare ribbon motions, indicative of pulsed magnetic reconnection, that are correlated with QFP excitation. More interestingly, from a survey of over 100 QFP events, we found a preferential association with eruptive flares rather than confined flares. We will discuss the implications of these results and the potential roles of QFPs in coronal heating, energy transport, and solar eruptions.

  3. The optical flares of active star II Pegasi in 2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Shenghong; Kim, Kang Min; Lee, Byeong-Cheol

    2015-08-01

    We observed the active star II Peg using high-resolution spectrographs of 2.16m telescope at Xinglong station of NAOC and 1.8m telescope at BOAO of KASI from November to December, 2005. By means of spectral subtraction technique, the chromospheric activities of II Peg are analyzed at several activity indicators, including CaII IRT, Hα, NaI D1D2 and HeI D3 lines. The results demonstrate that the magnetic activity of II Peg is very strong, and its chromospheric activities show rotational modulations which imply there are active regions in its chromosphere. Two flare events were hunted during the observations, which were identified by HeI D3 line emission above the continuum. The first flare was happened in November 2005, the second one in December 2005, and they were located in different hemisphere of the star. This may indicate the evolution of active regions. Considering the photospheric spot activities, the possible origin of the detected flares is discussed.

  4. The smallest hard X-ray flare?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glesener, Lindsay; Krucker, Sam; Hannah, Iain; Smith, David M.; Grefenstette, Brian; Marsh, Andrew; Hudson, Hugh S.; White, Stephen M.; Chen, Bin

    2016-05-01

    We report a NuSTAR observation of a small solar flare on 2015 September 1, estimated to be on the order of a GOES class A.05 flare in brightness. This flare is fainter than any hard X-ray (HXR) flares in the existing literature, and with a peak rate of only ∼5 counts s‑1 detector‑1 observed by RHESSI, is effectively the smallest that can just barely be detected by the current standard (indirectly imaging) solar HXR instrumentation, though we expect that smaller flares will continue to be discovered as instrumental and observational techniques progress. The flare occurred during a solar observation by the highly sensitive NuSTAR astrophysical HXR spacecraft, which used its direct focusing optics to produce detailed flare spectra and images. The flare exhibits properties commonly observed in larger flares, including a fast rise and more gradual decay, and similar spatial dimensions to the RHESSI microflares. We will discuss the presence of non-thermal (flare-accelerated) electrons during the impulsive phase. The flare is small in emission measure, temperature, and energy, though not in physical dimensions. Its presence is an indication that flares do indeed scale down to smaller energies and retain what we customarily think of as “flarelike” properties.

  5. Optical flare at RA 15:16:21.2 DEC -20:08:16

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesci, Roberto; Falasca, Vincenzo; Fantaulli, Stefano

    2015-06-01

    On June 4 2015, while monitoring the occultation of the star HD 132885 by the asteroid 322 (Phaeo) in a session open to the public at the Foligno Observatory (IAU K56), we detected an optical flare with our Mintron intensified camera, mounted in parallel to the main telescope as electronic finder, with a 135mm F/2.5 objective.

  6. Fast all-optical switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shay, Thomas M. (Inventor); Poliakov, Evgeni Y. (Inventor); Hazzard, David A. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    An apparatus and method wherein polarization rotation in alkali vapors or other mediums is used for all-optical switching and digital logic and where the rate of operation is proportional to the amplitude of the pump field. High rates of speed are accomplished by Rabi flopping of the atomic states using a continuously operating monochromatic atomic beam as the pump.

  7. At-wavelength, system-level flare characterization of extreme-ultraviolet optical systems.

    PubMed

    Naulleau, P; Goldberg, K A; Gullikson, E M; Bokor, J

    2000-06-10

    The extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) phase-shifting point-diffraction interferometer (PS/PDI) has recently been developed to provide high-accuracy wave-front characterization critical to the development of EUV lithography systems. Here we describe an enhanced implementation of the PS/PDI that significantly extends its measurement bandwidth. The enhanced PS/PDI is capable of simultaneously characterizing both wave front and flare. PS/PDI-based flare characterization of two recently fabricated EUV 10x-reduction lithographic optical systems is presented. PMID:18345220

  8. Impulsively Fast Magnetic Reconnection in Solar Flares and Coronal Mass Ejections and in Laboratory Plasma Merging Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Chio Z.; Ono, Yasushi; Yang, Ya-Hui; Choe, Gwangson

    2012-10-01

    Impulsively fast magnetic reconnection has been shown to be the major mechanism responsible for explosive flare non-thermal energy release and acceleration of coronal mass ejection (CME) motion. It has been observed that for most large solar flares non-thermal emissions in hard X-rays (HXR) and millimeter/submillimeter waves impulsively rise and decade during the soft X-ray (SXR) emission rise phase. Moreover, the filament/CME upward motion is accelerated temporally in correlation with the impulsive enhancement of flare non-thermal emission and reconnection electric field in the current sheet in both simulations and observations. The peak reconnection electric field during flare impulsive phase is on the order of a few kV/m for X-class flares. Here, we demonstrated for the first time in laboratory plasma merging experiments the correlation of the magnetic reconnection rate with the acceleration of plasmoid ejected from the current sheet using the TS-4 device of the Tokyo University. Moreover, we have also found that the electron heating occurs in the current sheet and the ion heating occurs in the down-stream outflow region. Thus, we conclude that the plasmoid/CME acceleration is a key mechanism for the impulsive enhancement of magnetic reconnection rate (electric field).

  9. Final Technical Report CMS fast optical calorimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Winn, David R.

    2012-07-12

    This is the final report of CMS FAST OPTICAL CALORIMETRY, a grant to Fairfield University for development, construction, installation and operation of the forward calorimeter on CMS, and for upgrades of the forward and endcap calorimeters for higher luminosity and radiation damage amelioration.

  10. THE CRAB NEBULA SUPER-FLARE IN 2011 APRIL: EXTREMELY FAST PARTICLE ACCELERATION AND GAMMA-RAY EMISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Striani, E.; Tavani, M.; Cardillo, M; Piano, G.; Donnarumma, I.; Vittorini, V.; Trois, A.; Costa, E.; Argan, A.; De Paris, G.; Bulgarelli, A.; Pittori, C.; Verrecchia, F.; Weisskopf, M.; Tennant, A.; Barbiellini, G.; Caraveo, P.; Chen, A. W.

    2011-11-01

    We report on the extremely intense and fast gamma-ray flare above 100 MeV detected by AGILE from the Crab Nebula in mid-April 2011. This event is the fourth of a sequence of reported major gamma-ray flares produced by the Crab Nebula in the period 2007/mid-2011. These events are attributed to strong radiative and plasma instabilities in the inner Crab Nebula, and their properties are crucial for theoretical studies of fast and efficient particle acceleration up to 10{sup 15} eV. Here we study the very rapid flux and spectral evolution of the event that on 2011 April 16 reached the record-high peak flux of F = (26 {+-} 5) x 10{sup -6} photons cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} with a rise-time timescale that we determine to be in the range 6-10 hr. The peak flaring gamma-ray spectrum reaches a distinct maximum near 500 MeV with no substantial emission above 1 GeV. The very rapid rise time and overall evolution of the Crab Nebula flare strongly constrain the acceleration mechanisms and challenge MHD models. We briefly discuss the theoretical implications of our observations.

  11. CORRELATED OPTICAL AND X-RAY FLARES IN THE AFTERGLOW OF XRF 071031

    SciTech Connect

    Kruehler, T.; Greiner, J.; McBreen, S.; Afonso, P.; Clemens, C.; Filgas, R.; Yoldas, A.; Klose, S.; Rossi, A.; Yoldas, A. Kuepcue; Szokoly, G. P.

    2009-05-20

    We present a densely sampled early light curve of the optical/near-infrared (NIR) afterglow of the X-Ray Flash (XRF) 071031 at z = 2.692. Simultaneous and continuous observations in seven photometric bands from g' to K{sub S} with GROND (Gamma-Ray Burst Optical/Near-InfraRed Detector) at the 2.2-m MPI/ESO telescope on LaSilla were performed between 4 minutes and 7 hr after the burst. The light curve consists of 547 individual points which allows us to study the early evolution of the optical transient associated with XRF 071031 in great detail. The optical/NIR light curve is dominated by an early increase in brightness which can be attributed to the apparent onset of the forward shock emission. There are several bumps which are superimposed onto the overall rise and decay. Significant flaring is also visible in the Swift X-Ray Telescope (XRT) light curve from early to late times. The availability of high-quality, broadband data enables detailed studies of the connection between the X-ray and optical/NIR afterglow and its color evolution during the first night postburst. We find evidence of spectral hardening in the optical bands contemporaneous with the emergence of the bumps from an underlying afterglow component. The bumps in the optical/NIR light curve can be associated with flares in the X-ray regime suggesting late central engine activity as the common origin.

  12. Fast blur removal via optical computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suo, Jinli; Yue, Tao; Dai, Qionghai

    2014-11-01

    Non-uniform image blur caused by camera shake or lens aberration is a common degradation in practical capture. Different from the uniform blur, non-uniform one is hard to deal with for its extremely high computation complexity as the blur model computation cannot be accelerated by Fast Fourier Transform (FFT). We propose to compute the most computational consuming operation, i.e. blur model calculation, by an optical computing system to realize fast and accurate non-uniform image deblur. A prototype system composed by a projector-camera system as well as a high dimensional motion platform (for motion blur) or original camera lens (for optics aberrations) is implemented. Our method is applied on a series of experiments, either on synthetic or real captured images, to verify its effectiveness and efficient.

  13. High-frequency optical oscillation during the flare phase of the red dwarf EV Lac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contadakis, M. E.; Avgoloupis, S.; Seiradakis, J.

    2006-01-01

    The observational support of the presence of high frequency low amplitude oscillations reported by Zhillyaev et al. 2000 and Contadakis et al. 2004, is highly demanding and will be done by the future observations and by carefully reanalysing the data from our files. In this paper we present the results of the analysis of the B-light curve for a flare of magnitude 1.01,which was observed on September,1993. Despite the low time resolution (sampling interval 12s) we were able to detect transient low amplitude oscillations with period ranging between 30s and 125s with a confidence level higher than 70%. This result is in favour of (or does not contradict) the suggested explanation i.e the evolution of a fast mode magneto-acoustic wave generated at the impulsive phase of the flare and travelling through the magnetic loop

  14. High-frequency optical oscillation during the flare phase of the red dwarf EV Lac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contadakis, M.; Avgoloupis, S.; Seiradakis, J.

    2006-01-01

    The observational support of the presence of high frequency low amplitude oscillations reported by Zhillyaev et al. 2000 and Contadakis et al. 2004, is highly demanding and will be done by the future observations and by carefully reanalysing the data from our files. In this paper we present the results of the analysis of the B-light curve for a flare of magnitude 1.01,which was observed on September,1993. Despite the low time resolution (sampling interval 12s) we were able to detect transient low amplitude oscillations with period ranging between 30s and 125s with a confidence level higher than 70%. This result is in favour of (or does not contradict) the suggested explanation i.e the evolution of a fast mode magneto-acoustic wave generated at the impulsive phase of the flare and travelling through the magnetic loop From: Michael E.Contadakis Address: kodadaki@vergina.eng.auth.gr Database: phy

  15. Fast optical switch having reduced light loss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Bruce N. (Inventor); Cooper, Ronald F. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    An electrically controlled optical switch uses an electro-optic crystal of the type having at least one set of fast and slow optical axes. The crystal exhibits electric field induced birefringence such that a plane of polarization oriented along a first direction of a light beam passing through the crystal may be switched to a plane of polarization oriented along a second direction. A beam splitting polarizer means is disposed at one end of the crystal and directs a light beam passing through the crystal whose plane of polarization is oriented along the first direction differently from a light beam having a plane of polarization oriented along the second direction. The electro-optic crystal may be chosen from the crystal classes 43m, 42m, and 23. In a preferred embodiment, the electro-optic crystal is a bismuth germanium oxide crystal or a bismuth silicon oxide crystal. In another embodiment of the invention, polarization control optics are provided which transmit substantially all of the incident light to the electro-optic crystal, substantially reducing the insertion loss of the switch.

  16. Fast launch speeds in radio flares, from a new determination of the intrinsic motions of SS 433's jet bolides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeffrey, Robert M.; Blundell, Katherine M.; Trushkin, Sergei A.; Mioduszewski, Amy J.

    2016-06-01

    We present new high-resolution, multi-epoch, VLBA radio images of the Galactic microquasar SS 433. We are able to observe plasma knots in the milliarcsecond-scale jets more than 50 days after their launch. This unprecedented baseline in time allows us to determine the bulk launch speed of the radio-emitting plasma during a radio flare, using a new method which we present here, and which is completely independent of optical spectroscopy. We also apply this method to an earlier sequence of 39 short daily VLBA observations, which cover a period in which SS 433 moved from quiescence into a flare. In both datasets we find, for the first time at radio wavebands, clear evidence that the launch speeds of the milliarcsecond-scale jets rise as high as 0.32c during flaring episodes. By comparing these images of SS 433 with photometric radio monitoring from the RATAN telescope, we explore further properties of these radio flares.

  17. Fast launch speeds in radio flares, from a new determination of the intrinsic motions of SS 433's jet bolides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeffrey, Robert M.; Blundell, Katherine M.; Trushkin, Sergei A.; Mioduszewski, Amy J.

    2016-09-01

    We present new high-resolution, multi-epoch, Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) radio images of the Galactic microquasar SS 433. We are able to observe plasma knots in the milliarcsecond-scale jets more than 50 d after their launch. This unprecedented baseline in time allows us to determine the bulk launch speed of the radio-emitting plasma during a radio flare, using a new method which we present here, and which is completely independent of optical spectroscopy. We also apply this method to an earlier sequence of 39 short daily VLBA observations, which cover a period in which SS 433 moved from quiescence into a flare. In both data sets we find, for the first time at radio wavebands, clear evidence that the launch speeds of the milliarcsecond-scale jets rise as high as 0.32c during flaring episodes. By comparing these images of SS 433 with photometric radio monitoring from the RATAN-600 telescope, we explore further properties of these radio flares.

  18. Stochastic acceleration of electrons by fast magnetosonic waves in solar flares: the effects of anisotropy in velocity and wavenumber space

    SciTech Connect

    Pongkitiwanichakul, Peera; Chandran, Benjamin D. G.

    2014-11-20

    We develop a model for stochastic acceleration of electrons in solar flares. As in several previous models, the electrons are accelerated by turbulent fast magnetosonic waves ({sup f}ast waves{sup )} via transit-time-damping (TTD) interactions. (In TTD interactions, fast waves act like moving magnetic mirrors that push the electrons parallel or anti-parallel to the magnetic field). We also include the effects of Coulomb collisions and the waves' parallel electric fields. Unlike previous models, our model is two-dimensional in both momentum space and wavenumber space and takes into account the anisotropy of the wave power spectrum F{sub k} and electron distribution function f {sub e}. We use weak turbulence theory and quasilinear theory to obtain a set of equations that describes the coupled evolution of F{sub k} and f {sub e}. We solve these equations numerically and find that the electron distribution function develops a power-law-like non-thermal tail within a restricted range of energies E in (E {sub nt}, E {sub max}). We obtain approximate analytic expressions for E {sub nt} and E {sub max}, which describe how these minimum and maximum energies depend upon parameters such as the electron number density and the rate at which fast-wave energy is injected into the acceleration region at large scales. We contrast our results with previous studies that assume that F{sub k} and f {sub e} are isotropic, and we compare one of our numerical calculations with the time-dependent hard-X-ray spectrum observed during the 1980 June 27 flare. In our numerical calculations, the electron energy spectra are softer (steeper) than in models with isotropic F{sub k} and f {sub e} and closer to the values inferred from observations of solar flares.

  19. Fast optical measurement of intraocular straylight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginis, Harilaos; Sahin, Onurcan; Artal, Pablo

    2015-03-01

    Light scattering in the human eye can deteriorate image quality and limit visual performance especially at the presence of a glare source. Optical measurement of straylight in the human eye is a challenging task where issues related to various inherent artifacts must be addressed. We report on a novel instrument based on the principle of double-pass optical integration that has been adapted for fast measurements suitable for a clinical setting. The instrument utilizes a light source formed by an array of green light emitting diodes that is projected onto the ocular fundus. The source has two concentric parts, a disk (field angle 0-3 degrees) and an annulus (3 - 8 degrees) that are modulated at different frequencies. A silicon photomultiplier receives the light reflected from the central part of the fundus and the Fourier transform of the signal reveals the contribution of each part of the source. Their relative amplitude is used to quantify light scattering by means of the straylight parameter. The instrument was initially validated using known diffusers. Straylight in a cohort of cataract patients (N=39) was measured. The optically measured straylight parameter was correlated to the clinical cataract grade as well to the psychophysically estimated value. The measurement method, utilizing rotational symmetry and coding filed angles with different frequencies eliminates the need for a highperformance camera and allows fast measurements. This approach can be further advanced with multiple wavelengths and field angles to perform other measurements such as that of the macular pigment density.

  20. An ultraviolet-optical flare from the tidal disruption of a helium-rich stellar core.

    PubMed

    Gezari, S; Chornock, R; Rest, A; Huber, M E; Forster, K; Berger, E; Challis, P J; Neill, J D; Martin, D C; Heckman, T; Lawrence, A; Norman, C; Narayan, G; Foley, R J; Marion, G H; Scolnic, D; Chomiuk, L; Soderberg, A; Smith, K; Kirshner, R P; Riess, A G; Smartt, S J; Stubbs, C W; Tonry, J L; Wood-Vasey, W M; Burgett, W S; Chambers, K C; Grav, T; Heasley, J N; Kaiser, N; Kudritzki, R-P; Magnier, E A; Morgan, J S; Price, P A

    2012-05-10

    The flare of radiation from the tidal disruption and accretion of a star can be used as a marker for supermassive black holes that otherwise lie dormant and undetected in the centres of distant galaxies. Previous candidate flares have had declining light curves in good agreement with expectations, but with poor constraints on the time of disruption and the type of star disrupted, because the rising emission was not observed. Recently, two 'relativistic' candidate tidal disruption events were discovered, each of whose extreme X-ray luminosity and synchrotron radio emission were interpreted as the onset of emission from a relativistic jet. Here we report a luminous ultraviolet-optical flare from the nuclear region of an inactive galaxy at a redshift of 0.1696. The observed continuum is cooler than expected for a simple accreting debris disk, but the well-sampled rise and decay of the light curve follow the predicted mass accretion rate and can be modelled to determine the time of disruption to an accuracy of two days. The black hole has a mass of about two million solar masses, modulo a factor dependent on the mass and radius of the star disrupted. On the basis of the spectroscopic signature of ionized helium from the unbound debris, we determine that the disrupted star was a helium-rich stellar core. PMID:22575962

  1. Simultaneous Extreme-Ultraviolet Explorer and Optical Observations of Ad Leonis: Evidence for Large Coronal Loops and the Neupert Effect in Stellar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawley, Suzanne L.; Fisher, George H.; Simon, Theodore; Cully, Scott L.; Deustua, Susana E.; Jablonski, Marek; Johns-Krull, Christopher; Pettersen, Bjorn R.; Smith, Verne; Spiesman, William J.; Valenti, Jeffrey

    1995-01-01

    We report on the first simultaneous Extreme-Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE) and optical observations of flares on the dMe flare star AD Leonis. The data show the following features: (1) Two flares (one large and one of moderate size) of several hours duration were observed in the EUV wavelength range; (2) Flare emission observed in the optical precedes the emission seen with EUVE; and (3) Several diminutions (DIMs) in the optical continuum were observed during the period of optical flare activity. To interpret these data, we develop a technique for deriving the coronal loop length from the observed rise and decay behavior of the EUV flare. The technique is generally applicable to existing and future coronal observations of stellar flares. We also determine the pressure, column depth, emission measure, loop cross-sectional area, and peak thermal energy during the two EUV flares, and the temperature, area coverage, and energy of the optical continuum emission. When the optical and coronal data are combined, we find convincing evidence of a stellar 'Neupert effect' which is a strong signature of chromospheric evaporation models. We then argue that the known spatial correlation of white-light emission with hard X-ray emission in solar flares, and the identification of the hard X-ray emission with nonthermal bremsstrahlung produced by accelerated electrons, provides evidence that flare heating on dMe stars is produced by the same electron precipitation mechanism that is inferred to occur on the Sun. We provide a thorough picture of the physical processes that are operative during the largest EUV flare, compare and contrast this picture with the canonical solar flare model, and conclude that the coronal loop length may be the most important factor in determining the flare rise time and energetics.

  2. SoFAST: Automated Flare Detection with the PROBA2/SWAP EUV Imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonte, K.; Berghmans, D.; De Groof, A.; Steed, K.; Poedts, S.

    2013-08-01

    The Sun Watcher with Active Pixels and Image Processing (SWAP) EUV imager onboard PROBA2 provides a non-stop stream of coronal extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) images at a cadence of typically 130 seconds. These images show the solar drivers of space-weather, such as flares and erupting filaments. We have developed a software tool that automatically processes the images and localises and identifies flares. On one hand, the output of this software tool is intended as a service to the Space Weather Segment of ESA's Space Situational Awareness (SSA) program. On the other hand, we consider the PROBA2/SWAP images as a model for the data from the Extreme Ultraviolet Imager (EUI) instrument prepared for the future Solar Orbiter mission, where onboard intelligence is required for prioritising data within the challenging telemetry quota. In this article we present the concept of the software, the first statistics on its effectiveness and the online display in real time of its results. Our results indicate that it is not only possible to detect EUV flares automatically in an acquired dataset, but that quantifying a range of EUV dynamics is also possible. The method is based on thresholding of macropixelled image sequences. The robustness and simplicity of the algorithm is a clear advantage for future onboard use.

  3. Optical imaging of fast light-evoked fast neural activation in amphibian retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Xin-Cheng; George, John S.

    2006-02-01

    High performance functional imaging is needed for dynamic measurements of neural processing in retina. Emerging techniques of visual prosthesis also require advanced methodology for reliable validation of electromagnetic stimulation of the retina. Imaging of fast intrinsic optical responses associated with neural activation promises a variety of technical advantages over traditional single and multi-channel electrophysiological techniques for these purposes, but the application of fast optical signals for neural imaging has been limited by low signal to noise ratio and high background light intensity. However, using optimized near infrared probe light and improved optical systems, we have improved the optical signals substantially, allowing single pass measurements. Fast photodiode measurements typically disclose dynamic transmitted light changes of whole retina at the level of 10 -4 dI/I, where dI is the dynamic optical change and I is the baseline light intensity. Using a fast high performance CCD, we imaged fast intrinsic optical responses from isolated retina activated by a visible light flash. Fast, high resolution imaging disclosed larger local optical responses, and showed evidence of multiple response components with both negative- and positive-going signals, on different timescales. Darkfield imaging techniques further enhanced the sensitivity of optical measurements. At single cell resolution, brightfield imaging disclosed maxima of optical responses ~5% dI/I, while darkfield imaging showed maxima of optical responses exceeding 10% dI/I. In comparison with simultaneous electrophysiological recording, optical imaging provided much better localized patterns of response over the activated area of the retina.

  4. Discovery of the optical polarization flare following the X-ray giant outburst of V0332+53.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slowikowska, Agnieszka; Reig, Pablo; Krzeszowski, Krzysztof; Zejmo, M. Michal

    2016-07-01

    V0332+53 is a transient Be X-ray binary that went through a giant outburst between June 2015 and October 2015 registered by the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GMB) on board of the Fermi satellite. We present the discovery of a flare of linearly polarized optical light in V0332+53 that followed the X-ray outburst. We monitored the source with the multi-wavelength optical polarimeter RINGO3 on the 2-m fully robotic Liverpool Telescope located at the Observatorio del Roque de Los Muchachos on La Palma. RINGO3 measures polarization simultaneously in three spectral wavelength bands: blue (350-640 nm), green (650-760 nm) and red (770-1000 nm). The polarized optical flare went off around 90 days after the X-ray burst and lasted another 90 days in all three wavelength bands of RINGO3. Polarization degree reached up to 6% in blue and up to 4% in red, while the PA changed by more than 100 degrees during the flare. This is the first detection of optical polarization flare of high mass X-ray binary correlated with a preceding X-ray outburst. Our observations shed new light on the activities of X-ray binaries.

  5. Optical flare activity in the low-mass eclipsing binary GJ 3236

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parimucha, Š.; Dubovský, P.; Vaňko, M.; Čokina, M.

    2016-09-01

    We present our observations of the low-mass eclipsing binary GJ 3236. We have analyzed a phased RC light-curve and confirmed previously determined fundamental parameters of the components. We detected evolution of the spot(s) and found that there exists a large spot near a polar region of the primary component and another spot either on the primary or the secondary component. We also observed 7 flare events and determined a flare rate of about 0.1 flares per hour. We observed two high energy, long-term flares with a complex light curve and possibly four weak short-term flaring events. A majority of the flares was detected in the RC filter, which indicate their high energy.

  6. RoboPol: optical polarization-plane rotations and flaring activity in blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blinov, D.; Pavlidou, V.; Papadakis, I. E.; Hovatta, T.; Pearson, T. J.; Liodakis, I.; Panopoulou, G. V.; Angelakis, E.; Baloković, M.; Das, H.; Khodade, P.; Kiehlmann, S.; King, O. G.; Kus, A.; Kylafis, N.; Mahabal, A.; Marecki, A.; Modi, D.; Myserlis, I.; Paleologou, E.; Papamastorakis, I.; Pazderska, B.; Pazderski, E.; Rajarshi, C.; Ramaprakash, A.; Readhead, A. C. S.; Reig, P.; Tassis, K.; Zensus, J. A.

    2016-04-01

    We present measurements of rotations of the optical polarization of blazars during the second year of operation of RoboPol, a monitoring programme of an unbiased sample of gamma-ray bright blazars specially designed for effective detection of such events, and we analyse the large set of rotation events discovered in two years of observation. We investigate patterns of variability in the polarization parameters and total flux density during the rotation events and compare them to the behaviour in a non-rotating state. We have searched for possible correlations between average parameters of the polarization-plane rotations and average parameters of polarization, with the following results: (1) there is no statistical association of the rotations with contemporaneous optical flares; (2) the average fractional polarization during the rotations tends to be lower than that in a non-rotating state; (3) the average fractional polarization during rotations is correlated with the rotation rate of the polarization plane in the jet rest frame; (4) it is likely that distributions of amplitudes and durations of the rotations have physical upper bounds, so arbitrarily long rotations are not realized in nature.

  7. Coronal propagation of solar flare particles observed by satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohno, T.; Nitta, N.; Wada, M.; Suda, T.

    1985-01-01

    Propagation of solar flare particles in corona was studied using the satellite data at the geostationary orbit. by selecting very fast rise time events only, the interplanetary propagation were assumed to be scatter free arrival. The results show that the propagation in corona does not depend on particle energy in 4 to 500 MeV protons, and the time delays from optical flare do not depend on the distance between the flare site and the base of the interplanetary magnetic field which connects to the Earth.

  8. Mirroring of fast solar flare electrons on a downstream corotating interaction region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, K. A.; Sommers, J.; Lin, R. P.; Pick, M.; Chaizy, P.; Murphy, N.; Smith, E. J.; Phillips, J. L.

    1995-01-01

    We discuss an example of confinement of fast solar electrons by a discrete solar wind-interplanetary magnetic field structure on February 22, 1991. The structure is about 190,000 km in width and is clearly defined by changes in the direction of the magnetic field at the Ulysses spacecraft. This structure carries electrons moving toward the Sun as well as away from the Sun. A loss cone in the angular distribution of the fast electrons shows that mirroring, presumably magnetic, takes place downstream from the spacecraft. Following passage of this narrow structure, the return flux vanishes for 21 min after which time the mirroring resumes and persists for several hours. We identify the enhanced magnetic field region lying downstream from the Ulysses spacecraft that is responsible for the mirroring to be a corotating stream interaction region. Backstreaming suprathermal electron measurements by the Los Alamos National Laboratory plasma experiment on the Ulysses spacecraft support this interpretation.

  9. Mirroring of fast solar flare electrons on a downstream corotating interaction region

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, K.A.; Sommers, J.; Lin, R.P.; Pick, M.; Chaizy, P.; Murphy, N.; Smith, E.J.; Phillips, J.L.

    1995-01-01

    The authors discuss an example of confinement of fast solar electrons by a discrete solar wind-interplanetary magnetic field structure on February 22, 1991. The structure is about 190,000 km in width and is clearly defined by changes in the direction of the magnetic field at the Ulysses spacecraft. This structure carries electrons moving toward the Sun as well as away from the Sun. A loss cone in the angular distribution of the fast electrons shows that mirroring, presumably magnetic, takes place downstream from the spacecraft. Following passage of this narrow structure, the return flux vanishes for 21 min after which time the mirroring resumes and persists for several hours. The authors identify the enhanced magnetic field region lying downstream from the Ulysses spacecraft that is responsible for the mirroring to be a corotating stream interaction region. Backstreaming suprathermal electron measurements by the Los Alamos National Laboratory plasma experiment on the Ulysses spacecraft support this interpretation. 12 refs., 9 figs.

  10. Optical polarization map of the Polaris Flare with RoboPol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panopoulou, G.; Tassis, K.; Blinov, D.; Pavlidou, V.; King, O. G.; Paleologou, E.; Ramaprakash, A.; Angelakis, E.; Baloković, M.; Das, H. K.; Feiler, R.; Hovatta, T.; Khodade, P.; Kiehlmann, S.; Kus, A.; Kylafis, N.; Liodakis, I.; Mahabal, A.; Modi, D.; Myserlis, I.; Papadakis, I.; Papamastorakis, I.; Pazderska, B.; Pazderski, E.; Pearson, T. J.; Rajarshi, C.; Readhead, A. C. S.; Reig, P.; Zensus, J. A.

    2015-09-01

    The stages before the formation of stars in molecular clouds are poorly understood. Insights can be gained by studying the properties of quiescent clouds, such as their magnetic field structure. The plane-of-the-sky orientation of the field can be traced by polarized starlight. We present the first extended, wide-field (˜10 deg2) map of the Polaris Flare cloud in dust-absorption induced optical polarization of background stars, using the Robotic Polarimeter (RoboPol) polarimeter at the Skinakas Observatory. This is the first application of the wide-field imaging capabilities of RoboPol. The data were taken in the R band and analysed with the automated reduction pipeline of the instrument. We present in detail optimizations in the reduction pipeline specific to wide-field observations. Our analysis resulted in reliable measurements of 641 stars with median fractional linear polarization 1.3 per cent. The projected magnetic field shows a large-scale ordered pattern. At high longitudes it appears to align with faint striations seen in the Herschel-Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver (SPIRE) map of dust emission (250 μm), while in the central 4-5 deg2 it shows an eddy-like feature. The overall polarization pattern we obtain is in good agreement with large-scale measurements by Planck of the dust emission polarization in the same area of the sky.

  11. A Lyman-alpha tunable acousto-optic filter for detecting superthermal flare protons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mickey, Donald L.

    1994-01-01

    The goal of this project was to develop and characterize a narrow-band, tunable filter for use near the Lyman-alpha line of hydrogen at 121.6 nm. Such a filter could form the critical component of an instrument to observe asymmetries in the solar Lyman-alpha line, caused by energetic protons accelerated during the impulsive phase of solar flares. Characteristic charge-exchange nonthermal emission at Lyman alpha should be produced when sub-MeV protons are injected into the chromosphere, but no instrument suitable for their detection has been developed. Such an instrument would require a narrow-band (less than 0.01 nm) tunable filter with aperture and throughput consistent with imaging a solar active region at 0.1 second intervals. The development of acousto-optic tunable filters (AOTF) suitable for use as compact, simple tunable filters for astronomical work suggested an investigation into the use of an AOTF at Lyman-alpha.

  12. Lithographic measurement of EUV flare in the 0.3-NA Micro ExposureTool optic at the Advanced Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Cain, Jason P.; Naulleau, Patrick; Spanos, Costas J.

    2005-01-01

    The level of flare present in a 0.3-NA EUV optic (the MET optic) at the Advanced Light Source at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is measured using a lithographic method. Photoresist behavior at high exposure doses makes analysis difficult. Flare measurement analysis under scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and optical microscopy is compared, and optical microscopy is found to be a more reliable technique. In addition, the measured results are compared with predictions based on surface roughness measurement of the MET optical elements. When the fields in the exposure matrix are spaced far enough apart to avoid influence from surrounding fields and the data is corrected for imperfect mask contrast and aerial image proximity effects, the results match predicted values quite well. The amount of flare present in this optic ranges from 4.7% for 2 {micro}m features to 6.8% for 500 nm features.

  13. Fast integrated optical switching by the protein bacteriorhodopsin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fábián, László; Wolff, Elmar K.; Oroszi, László; Ormos, Pál; Dér, András

    2010-07-01

    State-of-the-art photonic integration technology is ready to provide the passive elements of optical integrated circuits, based either on silicon, glass or plastic materials. The bottleneck is to find the proper nonlinear optical (NLO) materials in waveguide-based integrated optical circuits for light-controlled active functions. Recently, we proposed an approach where the active role is performed by the chromoprotein bacteriorhodopsin as an NLO material, that can be combined with appropriate integrated optical devices. Here we present data supporting the possibility of switching based on a fast photoreaction of bacteriorhodopsin. The results are expected to have important implications for photonic switching technology.

  14. Fast Dynamics for Atoms in Optical Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Łącki, Mateusz; Zakrzewski, Jakub

    2013-02-01

    Cold atoms in optical lattices allow for accurate studies of many body dynamics. Rapid time-dependent modifications of optical lattice potentials may result in significant excitations in atomic systems. The dynamics in such a case is frequently quite incompletely described by standard applications of tight-binding models (such as, e.g., Bose-Hubbard model or its extensions) that typically neglect the effect of the dynamics on the transformation between the real space and the tight-binding basis. We illustrate the importance of a proper quantum mechanical description using a multiband extended Bose-Hubbard model with time-dependent Wannier functions. We apply it to situations directly related to experiments.

  15. Investigation on Radio-Quiet and Radio-Loud Fast CMEs and Their Associated Flares During Solar Cycles 23 and 24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suresh, K.; Shanmugaraju, A.

    2015-03-01

    We present the results of a detailed analysis on the differences between radio-loud (RL) and radio-quiet (RQ) fast coronal mass ejections (CMEs) ( V≥900 km s-1) observed during the period 1996 - 2012. The analysis consists of three different steps in which we examined the properties of (i) RL and RQ CMEs, (ii) accelerating (class-A) and decelerating (class-D) CMEs among RL and RQ CMEs, and (iii) associated flares. The last two steps and events from a longer period are the extensions of the earlier work on RL and RQ CMEs that mainly aimed to determine the reason for the radio-quietness of some fast CMEs. During this period, we found that 38 % of fast CMEs are RL and 62 % of fast CMEs are RQ. Moreover, fewer RQ CMEs occur around the disc centre. The average speeds of RL and RQ CMEs are 1358 km s-1 and 1092 km s-1. Around 10 % of the RQ events are halo CMEs, but ≈ 66 % of RL events are halo CMEs. The mean acceleration or deceleration value of RL-CMEs is slightly greater than that of RQ-CMEs. When we divide these events based on their acceleration behaviour into class A and class D, there are no considerable differences between classes A and D of RL-CMEs or between classes A and D of RQ CMEs, except for their initial acceleration values. But there are significant differences among their associated flare properties. According to our study here, the RQ CMEs are less energetic than RL CMEs, and they are not associated with flares as strong as those associated with RL CMEs. This confirms the previous results that RQ CMEs do not often exceed the critical Alfvén speed of 1000 km s-1 in the outer corona that is needed to produce type II radio bursts.

  16. The 100-month Swift catalogue of supergiant fast X-ray transients. I. BAT on-board and transient monitor flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, P.; Krimm, H. A.; Palmer, D. M.; Ducci, L.; Esposito, P.; Vercellone, S.; Evans, P. A.; Guidorzi, C.; Mangano, V.; Kennea, J. A.; Barthelmy, S. D.; Burrows, D. N.; Gehrels, N.

    2014-02-01

    Context. Supergiant fast X-ray transients (SFXTs) are high mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs) that are defined by their hard X-ray flaring behaviour. During these flares they reach peak luminosities of 1036-1037 erg s-1 for a few hours (in the hard X-ray), which are much shorter timescales than those characterizing Be/X-ray binaries. Aims: We investigate the characteristics of bright flares (detections in excess of 5σ) for a sample of SFXTs and their relation to the orbital phase. Methods: We have retrieved all Swift/BAT Transient Monitor light curves and collected all detections in excess of 5σ from both daily- and orbital-averaged light curves in the time range of 2005 February 12 to 2013 May 31 (MJD 53 413-56 443). We also considered all on-board detections as recorded in the same time span and selected those in excess of 5σ and within 4 arcmin of each source in our sample. Results: We present a catalogue of over a thousand BAT flares from 11 SFXTs, down to 15-150 keV fluxes of ~6 × 10-10 erg cm-2 s-1 (daily timescale) and ~1.5 × 10-9 erg cm-2 s-1 (orbital timescale, averaging ~800 s); the great majority of these flares are unpublished. The catalogue spans 100 months. This population is characterized by short (a few hundred seconds) and relatively bright (in excess of 100 mCrab, 15-50 keV) events. In the hard X-ray, these flares last generally much less than a day. Clustering of hard X-ray flares can be used to indirectly measure the length of an outburst, even when the low-level emission is not detected. We construct the distributions of flares, of their significance (in terms of σ), and of their flux as a function of orbital phase to infer the properties of these binary systems. In particular, we observe a trend of clustering of flares at some phases as Porb increases, which is consistent with a progression from tight circular or mildly eccentric orbits at short periods to wider and more eccentric orbits at longer orbital periods. Finally, we estimate the

  17. Fast frequency hopping codes applied to SAC optical CDMA network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, Shin-Pin

    2015-06-01

    This study designed a fast frequency hopping (FFH) code family suitable for application in spectral-amplitude-coding (SAC) optical code-division multiple-access (CDMA) networks. The FFH code family can effectively suppress the effects of multiuser interference and had its origin in the frequency hopping code family. Additional codes were developed as secure codewords for enhancing the security of the network. In considering the system cost and flexibility, simple optical encoders/decoders using fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) and a set of optical securers using two arrayed-waveguide grating (AWG) demultiplexers (DeMUXs) were also constructed. Based on a Gaussian approximation, expressions for evaluating the bit error rate (BER) and spectral efficiency (SE) of SAC optical CDMA networks are presented. The results indicated that the proposed SAC optical CDMA network exhibited favorable performance.

  18. Fast dispersion estimation in coherent optical 16QAM fast OFDM systems.

    PubMed

    Zhao, J; Shams, H

    2013-01-28

    Fast channel estimation is crucial to increase the payload efficiency which is of particular importance for optical packet networks. In this paper, we propose a novel least-square based dispersion estimation method in coherent optical fast OFDM (F-OFDM) systems. Additionally, we experimentally demonstrate for the first time a 37.5 Gb/s 16QAM coherent F-OFDM system with 480 km transmission using the proposed scheme. The results show that this method outperforms the conventional channel estimation methods in minimizing the overhead load. A single training symbol can achieve near-optimum channel estimation without any prior information of the transmission distance. This makes optical F-OFDM a very promising scheme for the future burst-mode applications. PMID:23389231

  19. Rotation of the optical polarization angle associated with the 2008 γ-ray flare of blazar W Comae

    SciTech Connect

    Sorcia, Marco; Benítez, Erika; Cabrera, José I.; Hiriart, David; López, José M.; Mújica, Raúl

    2014-10-10

    An R-band photopolarimetric variability analysis of the TeV bright blazar W Comae between 2008 February 28 and 2013 May 17 is presented. The source showed a gradual tendency to decrease its mean flux level with a total change of 3 mJy. A maximum and minimum brightness states in the R band of 14.25 ± 0.04 and 16.52 ± 0.1 mag, respectively, were observed, corresponding to a maximum variation of ΔF = 5.40 mJy. We estimated a minimum variability timescale of Δt = 3.3 days. A maximum polarization degree P = 33.8% ± 1.6%, with a maximum variation of ΔP = 33.2%, was found. One of our main results is the detection of a large rotation of the polarization angle from 78° to 315° (Δθ ∼ 237°) that coincides in time with the γ-ray flare observed in 2008 June. This result indicates that both optical and γ-ray emission regions could be co-spatial. During this flare, a correlation between the R-band flux and polarization degree was found with a correlation coefficient of r {sub F} {sub –} {sub p} = 0.93 ± 0.11. From the Stokes parameters, we infer the existence of two optically thin synchrotron components that contribute to the polarized flux. One of them is stable with a constant polarization degree of 11%. Assuming a shock-in jet model during the 2008 flare, we estimated a maximum Doppler factor δ {sub D} ∼ 27 and a minimum of δ {sub D} ∼ 16; a minimum viewing angle of the jet ∼2.°0; and a magnetic field B ∼ 0.12 G.

  20. FAST-Net optical interconnection prototype demonstration program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haney, Michael W.; Christensen, Marc P.; Milojkovik, P.; Ekman, Jeremy T.; Chandramani, Premanand; Rozier, Richard G.; Kiamilev, Fouad E.; Liu, Yue; Hibbs-Brenner, Mary K.; Nohava, Jim; Kalweit, Edith; Bounnak, Sommy; Marta, Terry; Walterson, B.

    1998-05-01

    This paper reports progress toward the experimental demonstration of a smart pixel based optical interconnection prototype currently being developed under the Free-space Accelerator for Switching Terabit Networks (FAST-Net) project. The prototype system incorporates 2D arrays of monolithically integrated high- bandwidth vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs) and photodetectors (PDs). A key aspect of the FAST-Net concept is that all smart pixels are distributed across a single multi-chip plane. This plane is connected to itself via an optical system that consists of an array of matched lenses (one for each smart pixel chip position) and a mirror. The optical interconnect system implements a global point-to-point shuffle pattern. The interleaved 2D arrays of VCSELs and PDs in the prototype are arranged on a clustered self-similar grid pattern with a closest element pitch of 100 micrometers . The circular VCSEL elements have a diameter of 10 micrometers and the square PDs have an active region that is 50 micrometers wide. These arrays are packaged and mounted on circuit boards along with the CMOS driver, receiver, and FPGA controller chips. Micro-positioning mounts are used to effect alignment that is consistent with current MCM chip placement accuracy. Shuffled optical data links between the multiple ICs have been demonstrated in preliminary evaluation of this system. These results suggest that a multi-Terabit optically interconnected MCM module is feasible.

  1. A Change in the Optical Polarization Associated with a Gamma-Ray Flare in the Blazar 3C 279

    SciTech Connect

    Abdo, A.A.

    2011-08-19

    It is widely accepted that strong and variable radiation detected over all accessible energy bands in a number of active galaxies arises from a relativistic, Doppler-boosted jet pointing close to our line of sight. The size of the emitting zone and the location of this region relative to the central supermassive black hole are, however, poorly known, with estimates ranging from light-hours to a light-year or more. Here we report the coincidence of a gamma ({gamma})-ray flare with a dramatic change of optical polarization angle. This provides evidence for co-spatiality of optical and {gamma}-ray emission regions and indicates a highly ordered jet magnetic field. The results also require a non-axisymmetric structure of the emission zone, implying a curved trajectory for the emitting material within the jet, with the dissipation region located at a considerable distance from the black hole, at about 10{sup 5} gravitational radii.

  2. A change in the optical polarization associated with a gamma-ray flare in the blazar 3C 279.

    PubMed

    2010-02-18

    It is widely accepted that strong and variable radiation detected over all accessible energy bands in a number of active galaxies arises from a relativistic, Doppler-boosted jet pointing close to our line of sight. The size of the emitting zone and the location of this region relative to the central supermassive black hole are, however, poorly known, with estimates ranging from light-hours to a light-year or more. Here we report the coincidence of a gamma (gamma)-ray flare with a dramatic change of optical polarization angle. This provides evidence for co-spatiality of optical and gamma-ray emission regions and indicates a highly ordered jet magnetic field. The results also require a non-axisymmetric structure of the emission zone, implying a curved trajectory for the emitting material within the jet, with the dissipation region located at a considerable distance from the black hole, at about 10(5) gravitational radii. PMID:20164923

  3. Flare Hybrids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomczak, M.; Dubieniecki, P.

    2015-12-01

    On the basis of the Solar Maximum Mission observations, Švestka ( Solar Phys. 121, 399, 1989) introduced a new class of flares, the so-called flare hybrids. When they start, they look like typical compact flares (phase 1), but later on, they look like flares with arcades of magnetic loops (phase 2). We summarize the characteristic features of flare hybrids in soft and hard X-rays as well as in the extreme ultraviolet; these features allow us to distinguish flare hybrids from other flares. In this article, additional energy release or long plasma cooling timescales are suggested as possible causes of phase 2. We estimate the frequency of flare hybrids, and study the magnetic configurations favorable for flare hybrid occurrence. Flare hybrids appear to be quite frequent, and the difference between the lengths of magnetic loops in the two interacting loop systems seem to be a crucial parameter for determining their characteristics.

  4. The great flare of 1982 June 6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanaka, K.; Zirin, H.

    1985-01-01

    The great soft X-ray (SXR) flare (X12) of the past solar maximum was observed by Hinotori and by Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO) on June 6, 1982. Hinotori data consist of hard X-ray (HXR) and SXR images in the rise and decay of the flare, high-resolution soft X-ray spectra throughout the flare, and HXR and gamma-ray data. The BBSO data include films of H-alpha, H-alpha blue wing, D3 and longitudinal magnetic field, as well as video tapes of continuum. Images in HXR, SXR, H-alpha, D3 and the continuum are compared and SXR spectra analyzed. The flare resulted from extended motion of a large spot shearing the magnetic field. D3 and white-light images exhibit a progression from fast flashes to two ribbons, while both HXR and SXR are centered on the optical kernels. The continuum emission shows the same temporal behavior as the HXR at 160 keV. In its early phases, the Fe XXV line was double-peaked, and a decreasing blueshifted (up to 400 km/sec) component was observed, from which the evaporation rate of chromospheric material was estimated. It is suggested that this upflow is adequate to supply the coronal cloud. Flare energetics are discussed in detail, and it is concluded that a significant amount of energy was deposited in the corona, and that nonthermal electrons are the major energy input.

  5. Correlated optical, X-ray, and γ-ray flaring activity seen with INTEGRAL during the 2015 outburst of V404 Cygni

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, J.; Cadolle Bel, M.; Alfonso-Garzón, J.; Siegert, T.; Zhang, X.-L.; Grinberg, V.; Savchenko, V.; Tomsick, J. A.; Chenevez, J.; Clavel, M.; Corbel, S.; Diehl, R.; Domingo, A.; Gouiffès, C.; Greiner, J.; Krause, M. G. H.; Laurent, P.; Loh, A.; Markoff, S.; Mas-Hesse, J. M.; Miller-Jones, J. C. A.; Russell, D. M.; Wilms, J.

    2015-09-01

    After 25 years of quiescence, the microquasar V404 Cyg entered a new period of activity in June 2015. This X-ray source is known to undergo extremely bright and variable outbursts seen at all wavelengths. It is therefore an object of prime interest to understand the accretion-ejection connections. These can, however, only be probed through simultaneous observations at several wavelengths. We made use of the INTEGRAL instruments to obtain long, almost uninterrupted observations from 2015 June 20, 15:50 UTC to June 25, 4:05 UTC, from the optical V band up to the soft γ-rays. V404 Cyg was extremely variable in all bands, with the detection of 18 flares with fluxes exceeding 6 Crab (20-40 keV) within three days. The flare recurrence can be as short as ~20 min from peak to peak. A model-independent analysis shows that the >6 Crab flares have a hard spectrum. A simple 10-400 keV spectral analysis of the off-flare and flare periods shows that the variation in intensity is likely to be only due to variations of a cut-off power-law component. The optical flares seem to be at least of two different types: one occurring in simultaneity with the X-ray flares, the other showing a delay greater than 10 min. The former could be associated with X-ray reprocessing by either an accretion disk or the companion star. We suggest that the latter are associated with plasma ejections that have also been seen in radio. Table 1 and Fig. 4 are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  6. Fast optical signals in the peripheral nervous system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Yunjie; Martin, Jeffrey M.; Sassaroli, Angelo; Clervil, Patricia R.; Bergethon, Peter R.; Fantini, Sergio

    2006-07-01

    We present a study of the near-infrared optical response to electrical stimulation of peripheral nerves. The sural nerve of six healthy subjects between the ages of 22 and 41 was stimulated with transcutaneous electrical pulses in a region located approximately 10 cm above the ankle. A two-wavelength (690 and 830 nm) tissue spectrometer was used to probe the same sural nerve below the ankle. We measured optical changes that peaked 60 to 160 ms after the electrical stimulus. On the basis of the strong wavelength dependence of these fast optical signals, we argue that their origin is mostly from absorption rather than scattering. From these absorption changes, we obtain oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin concentration changes that describe a rapid hemodynamic response to electrical nerve activation. In five out of six subjects, this hemodynamic response is an increase in total (oxy+deoxy) hemoglobin concentration, consistent with a fast vasodilation. Our findings support the hypothesis that the peripheral nervous system undergoes neurovascular coupling, even though more data is needed to prove such hypothesis.

  7. Fast Variability and Millimeter/IR Flares in GRMHD Models of Sgr A* from Strong-field Gravitational Lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Chi-kwan; Psaltis, Dimitrios; Özel, Feryal; Medeiros, Lia; Marrone, Daniel; Saḑowski, Aleksander; Narayan, Ramesh

    2015-10-01

    We explore the variability properties of long, high-cadence general relativistic magnetohydrodynamic (GRMHD) simulations across the electromagnetic spectrum using an efficient, GPU-based radiative transfer algorithm. We focus on both standard and normal evolution (SANE) and magnetically arrested disk (MAD) simulations with parameters that successfully reproduce the time-averaged spectral properties of Sgr A* and the size of its image at 1.3 mm. We find that the SANE models produce short-timescale variability with amplitudes and power spectra that closely resemble those inferred observationally. In contrast, MAD models generate only slow variability at lower flux levels. Neither set of models shows any X-ray flares, which most likely indicates that additional physics, such as particle acceleration mechanisms, need to be incorporated into the GRMHD simulations to account for them. The SANE models show strong, short-lived millimeter/infrared (IR) flares, with short (≲1 hr) time lags between the millimeter and IR wavelengths, that arise from the combination of short-lived magnetic flux tubes and strong-field gravitational lensing near the horizon. Such events provide a natural explanation for the observed IR flares with no X-ray counterparts.

  8. Fiber-optic system for monitoring fast photoactivation dynamics of optical highlighter fluorescent proteins

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Zhiguo; Qin, Lingsong; Zhang, Zhihong; Zeng, Shaoqun; Huang, Zhen-Li

    2011-01-01

    Characterizing the photoactivation performance of optical highlighter fluorescent proteins is crucial to the realization of photoactivation localization microscopy. In contrast to those fluorescence-based approaches that require complex data processing and calibration procedures, here we report a simple and quantitative alternative, which relies on the measurement of small absorption spectra changes over time with a fiber-optic system. Using Dronpa as a representative highlighter protein, we have investigated the capacity of this system in monitoring the fast photoactivation process. PMID:21833352

  9. Statistical aspects of solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Robert M.

    1987-01-01

    A survey of the statistical properties of 850 H alpha solar flares during 1975 is presented. Comparison of the results found here with those reported elsewhere for different epochs is accomplished. Distributions of rise time, decay time, and duration are given, as are the mean, mode, median, and 90th percentile values. Proportions by selected groupings are also determined. For flares in general, mean values for rise time, decay time, and duration are 5.2 + or - 0.4 min, and 18.1 + or 1.1 min, respectively. Subflares, accounting for nearly 90 percent of the flares, had mean values lower than those found for flares of H alpha importance greater than 1, and the differences are statistically significant. Likewise, flares of bright and normal relative brightness have mean values of decay time and duration that are significantly longer than those computed for faint flares, and mass-motion related flares are significantly longer than non-mass-motion related flares. Seventy-three percent of the mass-motion related flares are categorized as being a two-ribbon flare and/or being accompanied by a high-speed dark filament. Slow rise time flares (rise time greater than 5 min) have a mean value for duration that is significantly longer than that computed for fast rise time flares, and long-lived duration flares (duration greater than 18 min) have a mean value for rise time that is significantly longer than that computed for short-lived duration flares, suggesting a positive linear relationship between rise time and duration for flares. Monthly occurrence rates for flares in general and by group are found to be linearly related in a positive sense to monthly sunspot number. Statistical testing reveals the association between sunspot number and numbers of flares to be significant at the 95 percent level of confidence, and the t statistic for slope is significant at greater than 99 percent level of confidence. Dependent upon the specific fit, between 58 percent and 94 percent of

  10. Electro-optic polymer waveguide grating with fast tuning capability.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi-Ping; Chen, Jian-Ping; Li, Xin-Wan; Zhou, Jun-He; Shen, Hao; Zhang, Xiao-Hong; Ye, Ai-Lun

    2005-06-10

    A novel fast tunable electro-optic (EO) polymer waveguide grating is proposed and designed. Its resonant wavelength can be linearly tuned via the first-order EO effect with a high sensitivity of 6.1 pm/V. We find that the spectrum characteristics of EO polymer waveguide gratings depend strongly on many grating parameters, such as refractive-index modulation, modulation function, grating period, and period number. Material selection, fabrication technology, EO tuning ability, and polarization dependence of EO polymer waveguide gratings are also discussed. Such a waveguide grating not only overcomes the disadvantages of fiber-optic gratings, such as slow wavelength tuning ability and large-scale integration inconvenience, but also has many advantages, such as high resonant-wavelength tuning sensitivity, the same fabrication technology used for semiconductors, and polarization independence. PMID:16007840

  11. Gamma-ray burst flares: X-ray flaring. II

    SciTech Connect

    Swenson, C. A.; Roming, P. W. A.

    2014-06-10

    We present a catalog of 498 flaring periods found in gamma-ray burst (GRB) light curves taken from the online Swift X-Ray Telescope GRB Catalogue. We analyzed 680 individual light curves using a flare detection method developed and used on our UV/optical GRB Flare Catalog. This method makes use of the Bayesian Information Criterion to analyze the residuals of fitted GRB light curves and statistically determines the optimal fit to the light curve residuals in an attempt to identify any additional features. These features, which we classify as flares, are identified by iteratively adding additional 'breaks' to the light curve. We find evidence of flaring in 326 of the analyzed light curves. For those light curves with flares, we find an average number of ∼1.5 flares per GRB. As with the UV/optical, flaring in our sample is generally confined to the first 1000 s of the afterglow, but can be detected to beyond 10{sup 5} s. Only ∼50% of the detected flares follow the 'classical' definition of Δt/t ≤ 0.5, with many of the largest flares exceeding this value.

  12. Fast axis servo for the fast and precise machining of non-rotational symmetric optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Fujing; Yin, Ziqiang; Li, Shengyi

    2014-08-01

    A new long range tool servo-fast axis servo is developed, which is used for fabricating the non-rotational symmetric optics surface with millimeters' sag. The mechanism design, motion modeling and development of FAS device were studied. The FAS consists of a linear motor, aerostatic bearings, high-resolution encoder and a motion controller. A control strategy consists of a proportional, integral and derivative (PID) feedback controller and velocity/acceleration feedforward controller is implemented to accommodate the system control performance. Experimental tests have been carried out to verify the performance of the FAS system.

  13. Fast optically sectioned fluorescence HiLo endomicroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Daryl; Mertz, Jerome

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. We describe a nonscanning, fiber bundle endomicroscope that performs optically sectioned fluorescence imaging with fast frame rates and real-time processing. Our sectioning technique is based on HiLo imaging, wherein two widefield images are acquired under uniform and structured illumination and numerically processed to reject out-of-focus background. This work is an improvement upon an earlier demonstration of widefield optical sectioning through a flexible fiber bundle. The improved device features lateral and axial resolutions of 2.6 and 17 μm, respectively, a net frame rate of 9.5 Hz obtained by real-time image processing with a graphics processing unit (GPU) and significantly reduced motion artifacts obtained by the use of a double-shutter camera. We demonstrate the performance of our system with optically sectioned images and videos of a fluorescently labeled chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) in the developing G. gallus embryo. HiLo endomicroscopy is a candidate technique for low-cost, high-speed clinical optical biopsies. PMID:22463023

  14. Fast fiber-optic multi-wavelength pyrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Tairan; Tan, Peng; Pang, Chuanhe; Zhao, Huan; Shen, Yi

    2011-06-01

    A fast fiber-optic multi-wavelength pyrometer was developed for the ultraviolet-visible-near infrared spectra from 200 nm to 1700 nm using a CCD detector and an InGaAs detector. The pyrometer system conveniently and quickly provides the sufficient choices of multiple measurement wavelengths using optical diffraction, which avoids the use of narrow-band filters. Flexible optical fibers are used to transmit the radiation so the pyrometer can be used for temperature measurements in harsh environments. The setup and calibrations (wavelength calibration, nonlinearity calibration, and radiation response calibration) of this pyrometer system were described. Development of the multi-wavelength pyrometer involved optimization of the bandwidth and temperature discrimination of the multiple spectra data. The analysis results showed that the wavelength intervals, ΔλCCD = 30 nm and ΔλInGaAs = 50 nm, are the suitable choices as a tradeoff between the simple emissivity model assumption and the multiple signal discrimination. The temperature discrimination was also quantificationally evaluated for various wavelengths and temperatures. The measurement performance of the fiber-optic multi-wavelength pyrometer was partially verified through measurements with a high-temperature blackbody and actual hot metals. This multi-wavelength pyrometer can be used for remote high-temperature measurements.

  15. Holographic Adaptive Laser Optics System (HALOS): Fast, Autonomous Aberration Correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, G.; MacDonald, K.; Gelsinger-Austin, P.

    2013-09-01

    We present an adaptive optics system which uses a multiplexed hologram to deconvolve the phase aberrations in an input beam. This wavefront characterization is extremely fast as it is based on simple measurements of the intensity of focal spots and does not require any computations. Furthermore, the system does not require a computer in the loop and is thus much cheaper, less complex and more robust as well. A fully functional, closed-loop prototype incorporating a 32-element MEMS mirror has been constructed. The unit has a footprint no larger than a laptop but runs at a bandwidth of 100kHz over an order of magnitude faster than comparable, conventional systems occupying a significantly larger volume. Additionally, since the sensing is based on parallel, all-optical processing, the speed is independent of actuator number running at the same bandwidth for one actuator as for a million. We are developing the HALOS technology with a view towards next-generation surveillance systems for extreme adaptive optics applications. These include imaging, lidar and free-space optical communications for unmanned aerial vehicles and SSA. The small volume is ideal for UAVs, while the high speed and high resolution will be of great benefit to the ground-based observation of space-based objects.

  16. Discovery of Fast X-ray Oscillations During the 1998 Giant Flare from SGR 1900+14

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strohmayer, T.; Watts, A.

    2005-01-01

    We report the discovery of complex high frequency variability during the August 27, 1998 giant flare from SGR 1900+14 using the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE). We detect an approx. equals 84 Hz oscillation (QPO) during a 1 s interval beginning approximately 1 min after the initial hard spike. The amplitude is energy dependent, reaching a maximum of 26% (rms) for photons above 30 keV, and is not detected below 11 keV, with a 90% confidence upper limit of 14% (rms). Remarkably, additional QPOs are detected in the average power spectrum of data segments centered on the rotational phase at which the 84 Hz signal was detected. Two signals, at 53.5 and 155.1 Hz, are strongly detected, while a third feature at 28 Hz is found with lower significance. These QPOs are not detected at other rotational phases. The phenomenology seen in the SGR 1900+14 flare is similar to that of QPOs recently reported by Israel et al. (2005) from the December 27, 2004 flare from SGR 1806-20, suggesting they may have a common origin, perhaps torsional vibrations of the neutron star crust. Indeed, an association of the four frequencies (in increasing order) found in SGR 1900+14 with l = 2, 4, 7, and 13 toroidal modes appears plausible. We discuss our findings in the context of this model and show that if the stars have similar masses then the magnetic field in SGR 1806-20 must be about twice as large as in SGR 1900+14, broadly consistent with estimates from pulse timing.

  17. A Fast Flare and Direct Redshift Constraint in Far-ultraviolet Spectra of the Blazar S5 0716+714

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danforth, Charles W.; Nalewajko, Krzysztof; France, Kevin; Keeney, Brian A.

    2013-02-01

    The BL Lacertae object S5 0716+714 is one of the most studied blazars on the sky due to its active variability and brightness in many bands, including very-high-energy gamma rays. We present here two serendipitous results from recent far-ultraviolet spectroscopic observations by the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph onboard the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). First, during the course of our 7.3 hr HST observations, the blazar increased in flux rapidly by ~40% (-0.45 mag hr-1) followed by a slower decline (+0.36 mag hr-1) to previous FUV flux levels. We model this flare using asymmetric flare templates and constrain the physical size and energetics of the emitting region. Furthermore, the spectral index of the object softens considerably during the course of the flare from αν ≈ -1.0 to αν ≈ -1.4. Second, we constrain the source redshift directly using the ~30 intervening absorption systems. A system at z = 0.2315 is detected in Lyα, Lyβ, O VI, and N V and defines the lower bound on the source redshift. No absorbers are seen in the remaining spectral coverage (0.2315 < z Lyα <~ 0.47) and we set a statistical upper bound of z < 0.322 (95% confidence) on the blazar. This is the first direct redshift limit for this object and is consistent with literature estimates of z = 0.31 ± 0.08 based on the detection of a host galaxy. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained from the data archive at the Space Telescope Science Institute. STScI is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc. under NASA contract NAS 5-26555.

  18. A FAST FLARE AND DIRECT REDSHIFT CONSTRAINT IN FAR-ULTRAVIOLET SPECTRA OF THE BLAZAR S5 0716+714

    SciTech Connect

    Danforth, Charles W.; Nalewajko, Krzysztof; France, Kevin; Keeney, Brian A.

    2013-02-10

    The BL Lacertae object S5 0716+714 is one of the most studied blazars on the sky due to its active variability and brightness in many bands, including very-high-energy gamma rays. We present here two serendipitous results from recent far-ultraviolet spectroscopic observations by the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph onboard the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). First, during the course of our 7.3 hr HST observations, the blazar increased in flux rapidly by {approx}40% (-0.45 mag hr{sup -1}) followed by a slower decline (+0.36 mag hr{sup -1}) to previous FUV flux levels. We model this flare using asymmetric flare templates and constrain the physical size and energetics of the emitting region. Furthermore, the spectral index of the object softens considerably during the course of the flare from {alpha}{sub {nu}} Almost-Equal-To -1.0 to {alpha}{sub {nu}} Almost-Equal-To -1.4. Second, we constrain the source redshift directly using the {approx}30 intervening absorption systems. A system at z = 0.2315 is detected in Ly{alpha}, Ly{beta}, O VI, and N V and defines the lower bound on the source redshift. No absorbers are seen in the remaining spectral coverage (0.2315 < z {sub Ly{alpha}} {approx}< 0.47) and we set a statistical upper bound of z < 0.322 (95% confidence) on the blazar. This is the first direct redshift limit for this object and is consistent with literature estimates of z = 0.31 {+-} 0.08 based on the detection of a host galaxy.

  19. Fast Acting Optical Forces From Far Detuned, High Intensity Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corder, Christopher; Arnold, Brian; Hua, Xiang; Metcalf, Harold

    2015-05-01

    We are exploring fast acting, strong optical forces from standing wave light fields with high intensity and large detuning δ >> γ , where γ is the transition linewidth. We observe these fast acting forces on a time scale of a few times the excited state lifetime τ ≡ 1 / γ thus an atom may experience at most one or two spontaneous emission events. The dipole force is typically considered when the Rabi frequency Ω << δ , but we use Ω ~ δ so the usual approximations break down because a significant excited state population can occur, even for our short interaction times that limit spontaneous emission. Our experiment measures the transverse velocity distribution of a beam of 23S He after a chosen interaction time with a perpendicular standing wave detuned from the 23S -->33P transition near 389 nm. The distribution shows velocity resonance effects that persist over a large range of Ω. We also simulate the experiment numerically using the Optical Bloch Equations and the results are consistent with our measurements. Supported by ONR and Dept. of Education GAANN

  20. Two-dimensional fast marching for geometrical optics.

    PubMed

    Capozzoli, Amedeo; Curcio, Claudio; Liseno, Angelo; Savarese, Salvatore

    2014-11-01

    We develop an approach for the fast and accurate determination of geometrical optics solutions to Maxwell's equations in inhomogeneous 2D media and for TM polarized electric fields. The eikonal equation is solved by the fast marching method. Particular attention is paid to consistently discretizing the scatterers' boundaries and matching the discretization to that of the computational domain. The ray tracing is performed, in a direct and inverse way, by using a technique introduced in computer graphics for the fast and accurate generation of textured images from vector fields. The transport equation is solved by resorting only to its integral form, the transport of polarization being trivial for the considered geometry and polarization. Numerical results for the plane wave scattering of two perfectly conducting circular cylinders and for a Luneburg lens prove the accuracy of the algorithm. In particular, it is shown how the approach is capable of properly accounting for the multiple scattering occurring between the two metallic cylinders and how inverse ray tracing should be preferred to direct ray tracing in the case of the Luneburg lens. PMID:25401818

  1. Fast Optical Transillumination Tomography with Large-Size Projection Acquisition

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hsuan-Ming; Xia, Jinjun; Haidekker, Mark A.

    2008-01-01

    Techniques such as optical coherence tomography and diffuse optical tomography have been shown to effectively image highly scattering samples such as tissue. An additional modality has received much less attention: Optical transillumination tomography (OT), a modality that promises very high acquisition speed for volumetric scans. With the motivation to image tissue-engineered blood vessels for possible biomechanical testing, we have developed a fast OT device using a collimated, non-coherent beam with a large diameter together with a large-size CMOS camera that has the ability to acquire 3D projections in a single revolution of the sample. In addition, we used accelerated iterative reconstruction techniques to improve image reconstruction speed, while at the same time obtaining better image quality than through filtered back projection. The device was tested using ink-filled PTFE tubes to determine geometric reconstruction accuracy and recovery of absorbance. Even in the presence of minor refractive index mismatch, the weighted error of the measured radius was less than 5% in all cases, and a high linear correlation of ink absorbance determined with a photospectrometer of R 2 =0.99 was found, although the OT device systematically underestimated absorbance. Reconstruction time was improved from several hours (standard arithmetic reconstruction) to 90 seconds per slice with our optimized algorithm. Composed of only a light source, two spatial filters, a sample bath, and a CMOS camera, this device was extremely simple and cost-efficient to build. PMID:18704687

  2. Gamma-ray observational constraints on the origin of the optical continuum emission from the white-light flare of 1980 July 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, J. M.; Chupp, E. L.; Forrest, D. J.; Matz, S. M.; Rieger, E.; Reppin, C.; Kanbach, G.; Share, G. H.

    1983-01-01

    Results are presented for the flare of July 1, 1980, which started at approximately 1627 UT and in which simultaneous measurements were made of X-ray, gamma-ray, and optical continuum emission for the entire duration of the flare. The X-ray and gamma-ray observations were made by the Gamma-Ray Spectrometer on the Solar Maximum Mission satellite. The optical measurements were taken at the Sacramento Peak Observatory and the Big Bear Solar Observatory (Zirin and Neidig, 1981). It is found that the major white-light emission that occurs in the late phase of the flare could not have been due to heating by electron or ion precipitation. This conclusion derives from the fact that the X-ray and gamma-ray flux peaks approximately 1 minute before the maximum of the optical continuum mission emission. It is also found that approximately 73 percent of the optical continuum emission, representing a spatially and temporally distinct bright point, follows this maximum with little or no X-ray or gamma-ray emission in the same period.

  3. Performance analyses for fast variable optical attenuator-based optical current transformer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Pu; Chen, Chen; Wang, Xuefeng; Shan, Xuekang; Sun, Xiaohan

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, we analyze the performance of the electro-optic hybrid optical current transformer (HOCT) proposed by ourselves for high-voltage metering and protective relaying application. The transformer makes use of a fast variable optical attenuator (FVOA) to modulate the lightwave according to the voltage from the primary current sensor, such as low-power current transformer (LPCT). In order to improve the performance of the transformer, we use an optic-electro feedback loop with the PID control algorithm to compensate the nonlinearity of the FVOA. The linearity and accuracy of the transformer were analyzed and tested. The results indicate that the nonlinearity of the FVOA is completely compensated by the loop and the ratio and phase errors are under 0.07% and 5 minutes respectively, under the working power of less than 1 mW power. The transformer can be immune to the polarization and wavelength drift, and also robust against the environmental interference.

  4. Fast neutron dosimeter using Cooled Optically Stimulated Luminescence (COSL)

    SciTech Connect

    Eschbach, P.A.; Miller, S.D.

    1991-10-01

    Data is presented that demonstrates the concept of a fast neutron dosimeter using Cooled Optically Stimulated Luminescence. CaF{sub 2}:Mn powder, compounded with polyethylene, was injection molded and pressed into 0.1-cm-thick sheets. The sheets were then cut to form dosimeters with dimensions, 1.25 cm by 1.25 cm. After a laser anneal, the dosimeters were exposed to various amounts (from 10 mSv to 100 mSv) of fast {sup 252}Cf neutrons. The exposed dosimeters were cooled to liquid nitrogen temperature, stimulated with laser light, and then allowed to warm up to room temperature whereupon the dose dependent luminescence was recorded with a photon counting system. When the control and gamma components were subtracted from the {sup 252}Cf response, a dose-dependent neutron response was observed. The design, construction, and preliminary performance of an automated system for the dose interrogation of individual CaF{sub 2}:Mn grains within the polyethylene matrix will also be discussed. The system uses a small CO{sub 2} laser to heat areas of the cooled dosimeter to room temperature. If the readout of very small grain within the plastic matrix is successful, it will enhance the neutron to gamma response of the dosimeter.

  5. FLARES IN LONG AND SHORT GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Dado, Shlomo; Dar, Arnon E-mail: arnon@physics.technion.ac.i

    2010-04-01

    The many similarities between the prompt emission pulses in gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and X-ray flares during the fast decay and afterglow (AG) phases of GRBs suggest a common origin. In the cannonball (CB) model of GRBs, this common origin is mass accretion episodes of fall-back matter on a newly born compact object. The prompt emission pulses are produced by a bipolar jet of highly relativistic plasmoids (CBs) ejected in the early, major episodes of mass accretion. As the accretion material is consumed, one may expect the engine's activity to weaken. X-ray flares ending the prompt emission and during the AG phase are produced in such delayed episodes of mass accretion. The common engine, environment, and radiation mechanisms (inverse Compton scattering and synchrotron radiation) produce their observed similarities. Flares in both long GRBs and short hard gamma-ray bursts (SHBs) can also be produced by bipolar ejections of CBs following a phase transition in compact objects due to loss of angular momentum and/or cooling. Optical flares, however, are mostly produced in collisions of CBs with massive stellar winds/ejecta or with density bumps along their path. In this paper, we show that the master formulae of the CB model of GRBs and SHBs, which reproduce very well their prompt emission pulses and their smooth AGs, seem to reproduce also very well the light curves and spectral evolution of the prominent X-ray and optical flares that are well sampled.

  6. High frame rate CCD camera with fast optical shutter

    SciTech Connect

    Yates, G.J.; McDonald, T.E. Jr.; Turko, B.T.

    1998-09-01

    A high frame rate CCD camera coupled with a fast optical shutter has been designed for high repetition rate imaging applications. The design uses state-of-the-art microchannel plate image intensifier (MCPII) technology fostered/developed by Los Alamos National Laboratory to support nuclear, military, and medical research requiring high-speed imagery. Key design features include asynchronous resetting of the camera to acquire random transient images, patented real-time analog signal processing with 10-bit digitization at 40--75 MHz pixel rates, synchronized shutter exposures as short as 200pS, sustained continuous readout of 512 x 512 pixels per frame at 1--5Hz rates via parallel multiport (16-port CCD) data transfer. Salient characterization/performance test data for the prototype camera are presented, temporally and spatially resolved images obtained from range-gated LADAR field testing are included, an alternative system configuration using several cameras sequenced to deliver discrete numbers of consecutive frames at effective burst rates up to 5GHz (accomplished by time-phasing of consecutive MCPII shutter gates without overlap) is discussed. Potential applications including dynamic radiography and optical correlation will be presented.

  7. Blazar B2 1156+29 is in a flaring state in optical.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorstad, S.; Larionov, V.; Blinov, D.; Morozova, D.; Kopatskaya, E.; Konstantinova, T.; Pavlova, Yu.; Mokrushina, A.

    2012-04-01

    We perform optical photometric and R-band polarimetric monitoring of FSRQ B2 1156+29 = 4C +29.45 = Ton 599 using 1.8-m Perkins telescope (Az,USA), 70-cm AZT-8 (CrAO, Ukraine) and 0.4-m LX-200 (St.Petersburg, Russia) telescopes, partly in the frames of GASP project. Our data show that starting from 2012 April 2 this blazar entered a phase of violent optical activity.

  8. Terahertz-optical-asymmetric-demultiplexer (TOAD)-based arithmetic units for ultra-fast optical information processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherri, Abdallah K.

    2010-04-01

    In this paper, designs of ultra-fast all-optical based Terahertz-optical-asymmetric-demultiplexer (TOAD)-based devices are reported. Using TOAD switches, adders/subtracters units are demonstrated. The high speed is achieved due to the use of the nonlinear optical materials and the nonbinary modified signed-digit (MSD) number representation. The proposed all-optical circuits are compared in terms of numbers TOAD switches, optical amplifiers and wavelength converters.

  9. On the Location of the 2009 GeV Flares of Blazar PKS 1510-089

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dotson, Amanda; Georganopoulos, Markos; Meyer, Eileen T.; McCann, Kevin

    2015-08-01

    Most of the radiated power of blazars is produced at GeV energies via inverse Compton scattering at an unknown distance from the central engine. Possible seed photon sources map to different locations along the jet spanning two orders of magnitude in distance from the black hole, ranging from the broad-line region (BLR, ˜0.1 pc), to the molecular torus (MT, ˜ 1- few pc), to the very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) radio core zone at ˜10 pc. Here, we apply a diagnostic for identifying the GeV emission zone (GEZ) in blazar PKS 1510-089 using four bright gamma-ray flares detected by Fermi in 2009. As shown by Dotson et al., the flare decay time should be energy-independent for flares in the BLR, but faster at higher energies for flares in the MT. We find that in the two cases where the gamma-ray flare was not accompanied by an optical flare, the decay times show an energy-dependence suggesting a location in the MT. For the two GeV flares accompanied by optical flares, we obtained very fast decay times (≲3 hr) in both low and high energy Fermi bands. For these flares, considering the simultaneous >100 GeV detection by HESS (H.E.S.S. Collaboration et al.) and the ejection of a superluminal component from the VLBI radio core in one case, our results suggest that both flares came from the vicinity of the VLBI core. We thus suggest that the GEZ is spread over a wide range of locations beyond the BLR.

  10. A Dramatic Optical Flare and Microvariability in the Blazar 3C 454.3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balonek, Thomas J.; Boni, Samantha J.; Chapman, Katie J.; Didio, Nicholas A.; Sabyr, Alina; Stahlin, R. William; Weaver, Zachary R.; Zhang, Saiyang

    2016-06-01

    Following up on the report of optical and gamma-ray activity in the blazar 3C 454.3 by Jorstad (ATel# 9150), Lucarelli et al (ATel #9157), and Bulgarelli et al (ATel #9176), we report optical (R) observations which reveal a brightening of over 2 magnitudes in a 10 day interval between 2016 June 10 and 20. The brightness on June 20 (R = 13.7) is 1.2 magnitudes brighter than reported by Jorstad on June 13, and is the brightest 3C 454.3 has been observed in two years.

  11. Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, Sabrina

    2013-01-01

    Because the Earth resides in the atmosphere of our nearest stellar neighbor, events occurring on the Sun's surface directly affect us by interfering with satellite operations and communications, astronaut safety, and, in extreme circumstances, power grid stability. Solar flares, the most energetic events in our solar system, are a substantial source of hazardous space weather affecting our increasingly technology-dependent society. While flares have been observed using ground-based telescopes for over 150 years, modern space-bourne observatories have provided nearly continuous multi-wavelength flare coverage that cannot be obtained from the ground. We can now probe the origins and evolution of flares by tracking particle acceleration, changes in ionized plasma, and the reorganization of magnetic fields. I will walk through our current understanding of why flares occur and how they affect the Earth and also show several examples of these fantastic explosions.

  12. Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, Albert

    2011-01-01

    Solar flares accelerate both ions and electrons to high energies, and their X-ray and gamma-ray signatures not only probe the relationship between their respective acceleration, but also allow for the measurement of accelerated and ambient abundances. RHESSI observations have shown a striking close linear correlation of gamma-ray line fluence from accelerated ions > approx.20 MeV and bremsstrahlung emission from relativistic accelerated electrons >300 keV, when integrated over complete flares, suggesting a common acceleration mechanism. SMM/GRS observations, however, show a weaker correlation, and this discrepancy might be associated with previously observed electron-rich episodes within flares and/or temporal variability of gamma-ray line fluxes over the course of flares. We use the latest RHESSI gamma-ray analysis techniques to study the temporal behavior of the RHESSI flares, and determine what changes can be attributed to an evolving acceleration mechanism or to evolving abundances.

  13. An integrated optic hydrogen sensor for fast detection of hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, M. Z.; Moreno, J.; Aitchison, J. S.; Mojahedi, M.

    2007-09-01

    Hydrogen is used as the main propellant for space shuttles, as an energy source in fuel cells, in oil refineries, and for many other applications. Hydrogen is extremely volatile, easily flammable, and highly explosive. Storage and handling of hydrogen is a challenging task and a good hydrogen sensor is highly desirable. An ideal hydrogen sensor should be fast, reversible, highly selective, compact in size, easy to fabricate, and cheap in price. Unfortunately such a sensor to date is not available. In this paper we propose a multi-channel integrated optical sensor for detection of hydrogen. The sensor consists of a high index waveguide on a low index substrate and uses Pd or Pd alloy thin film as the sensing medium. Since a single channel hydrogen sensor will be affected by the presence of other gases and the variations of temperature, humidity, and input power; a multi-channel sensing scheme and differential measurements are proposed to correct for some of these effects. All the components of the multi-channel sensor can be realized using planar technology and the complete sensor can be fabricated on a single chip. The sensor is compact and the response time is expected to be very short. The concept of multi-channel sensing presented in this work is very general and can be extended to other gas sensors as well.

  14. The flares of August 1972. [solar flare characteristics and spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zirin, H.; Tanaka, K.

    1973-01-01

    Observations of the August, 1972 flares at Big Bear and Tel Aviv, involving monochromatic movies, magnetograms, and spectra, are analyzed. The region (McMath 11976) showed inverted polarity from its inception on July 11; the great activity was due to extremely high shear and gradients in the magnetic field, as well as a constant invasion of one polarity into the opposite; observations in lambda 3835 show remarkable fast flashes in the impulsive flare of 18:38 UT on Aug. 2 with lifetimes of 5 sec, which may be due to dumping of particles in the lower chromosphere. Flare loops show evolutionary increases of their tilts to the neutral line in the flares of Aug. 4 and 7. Spectroscopic observations show red asymmetry and red shift of the H alpha emission in the flash phase of the Aug. 7 flare, as well as substantial velocity shear in the photosphere during the flare, somewhat like earthquake movement along a fault. Finally the total H alpha emission of the Aug. 7 flare could be measured accurately as about 2.5 x 10 to the 30th power erg, considerably less than coarser previous estimates for great flares.

  15. Slow-rise and Fast-rise Phases of an Erupting Solar Filament and Flare Emission Onset

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterling, Alphonse C.; Moore, Ronald L.

    2005-01-01

    We observe the eruption of an active-region solar filament of 1998 July 11 using high time cadence and high spatial resolution EUV observations from the TRACE satellite, along with soft X-ray images from the soft X-ray telescope (SXT) on the Yohkoh satellite, hard X-ray fluxes from the BATSE instrument on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO) satellite and from the hard X-ray telescope (HXT) on Yohkoh, and ground-based magnetograms. We concentrate on the initiation of the eruption in an effort to understand the eruption mechanism. Prior to eruption the filament undergoes slow upward movement in a "slow rise" phase with an approximately constant velocity of about 15 km/s that lasts about 10 min. It then erupts in a "fast-rise" phase, accelerating to a velocity of about 200 km/s in about 5 min, and then decelerating to approximately 150 km/s over the next 5 min. EUV brightenings begin about concurrent with the start of the filament's slow rise, and remain immediately beneath the rising filament during the slow rise; initial soft X-ray brightenings occur at about the same time and location. Strong hard X-ray emission begins after the onset of the fast rise, and does not peak until the filament has traveled to a substantial altitude (to a height about equal to the initial length of the erupting filament) beyond its initial location. Additional information is available in the original extended abstract.

  16. Statistical Analyses of White-Light Flares: Two Main Results about Flare Behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dal, Hasan Ali

    2012-08-01

    We present two main results, based on models and the statistical analyses of 1672 U-band flares. We also discuss the behaviour of white-light flares. In addition, the parameters of the flares detected from two years of observations on CR Dra are presented. By comparing with flare parameters obtained from other UV Ceti-type stars, we examine the behaviour of the optical flare processes along with the spectral types. Moreover, we aimed, using large white-light flare data, to analyse the flare time-scales with respect to some results obtained from X-ray observations. Using SPSS V17.0 and GraphPad Prism V5.02 software, the flares detected from CR Dra were modelled with the OPEA function, and analysed with the t-Test method to compare similar flare events in other stars. In addition, using some regression calculations in order to derive the best histograms, the time-scales of white-light flares were analysed. Firstly, CR Dra flares have revealed that white-light flares behave in a similar way as their counterparts observed in X-rays. As can be seen in X-ray observations, the electron density seems to be a dominant parameter in white-light flare process, too. Secondly, the distributions of the flare time-scales demonstrate that the number of observed flares reaches a maximum value in some particular ratios, which are 0.5, or its multiples, and especially positive integers. The thermal processes might be dominant for these white-light flares, while non-thermal processes might be dominant in the others. To obtain better results for the behaviour of the white-light flare process along with the spectral types, much more stars in a wide spectral range, from spectral type dK5e to dM6e, must be observed in white-light flare patrols.

  17. Solar flare model atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawley, Suzanne L.; Fisher, George H.

    1993-01-01

    Solar flare model atmospheres computed under the assumption of energetic equilibrium in the chromosphere are presented. The models use a static, one-dimensional plane parallel geometry and are designed within a physically self-consistent coronal loop. Assumed flare heating mechanisms include collisions from a flux of non-thermal electrons and x-ray heating of the chromosphere by the corona. The heating by energetic electrons accounts explicitly for variations of the ionized fraction with depth in the atmosphere. X-ray heating of the chromosphere by the corona incorporates a flare loop geometry by approximating distant portions of the loop with a series of point sources, while treating the loop leg closest to the chromospheric footpoint in the plane-parallel approximation. Coronal flare heating leads to increased heat conduction, chromospheric evaporation and subsequent changes in coronal pressure; these effects are included self-consistently in the models. Cooling in the chromosphere is computed in detail for the important optically thick HI, CaII and MgII transitions using the non-LTE prescription in the program MULTI. Hydrogen ionization rates from x-ray photo-ionization and collisional ionization by non-thermal electrons are included explicitly in the rate equations. The models are computed in the 'impulsive' and 'equilibrium' limits, and in a set of intermediate 'evolving' states. The impulsive atmospheres have the density distribution frozen in pre-flare configuration, while the equilibrium models assume the entire atmosphere is in hydrostatic and energetic equilibrium. The evolving atmospheres represent intermediate stages where hydrostatic equilibrium has been established in the chromosphere and corona, but the corona is not yet in energetic equilibrium with the flare heating source. Thus, for example, chromospheric evaporation is still in the process of occurring.

  18. Fast integral methods for integrated optical systems simulations: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleemann, Bernd H.

    2015-09-01

    Boundary integral equation methods (BIM) or simply integral methods (IM) in the context of optical design and simulation are rigorous electromagnetic methods solving Helmholtz or Maxwell equations on the boundary (surface or interface of the structures between two materials) for scattering or/and diffraction purposes. This work is mainly restricted to integral methods for diffracting structures such as gratings, kinoforms, diffractive optical elements (DOEs), micro Fresnel lenses, computer generated holograms (CGHs), holographic or digital phase holograms, periodic lithographic structures, and the like. In most cases all of the mentioned structures have dimensions of thousands of wavelengths in diameter. Therefore, the basic methods necessary for the numerical treatment are locally applied electromagnetic grating diffraction algorithms. Interestingly, integral methods belong to the first electromagnetic methods investigated for grating diffraction. The development started in the mid 1960ies for gratings with infinite conductivity and it was mainly due to the good convergence of the integral methods especially for TM polarization. The first integral equation methods (IEM) for finite conductivity were the methods by D. Maystre at Fresnel Institute in Marseille: in 1972/74 for dielectric, and metallic gratings, and later for multiprofile, and other types of gratings and for photonic crystals. Other methods such as differential and modal methods suffered from unstable behaviour and slow convergence compared to BIMs for metallic gratings in TM polarization from the beginning to the mid 1990ies. The first BIM for gratings using a parametrization of the profile was developed at Karl-Weierstrass Institute in Berlin under a contract with Carl Zeiss Jena works in 1984-1986 by A. Pomp, J. Creutziger, and the author. Due to the parametrization, this method was able to deal with any kind of surface grating from the beginning: whether profiles with edges, overhanging non

  19. Ultra-fast optical switches using 1D polymeric photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katouf, R.; Komikado, T.; Itoh, M.; Yatagai, T.; Umegaki, S.

    2005-12-01

    We report fabrication of ultra-fast optical switches operated at a wavelength of 1064 nm using spin-coated one-dimensional polymeric photonic crystals doped with nonlinear-optical dyes. The optical switches are controlled either by an applied electric-field voltage or by a pump light by use of two different optical-configurations. The response time of the electro-optic switch and the all-optical switch are limited by the applied voltage and the laser used, respectively. The polymeric photonic crystals can be easily fabricated with low cost.

  20. A recent strong X-ray flaring activity of 1ES 1959+650 with possibly less efficient stochastic acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapanadze, B.; Dorner, D.; Vercellone, S.; Romano, P.; Kapanadze, S.; Mdzinarishvili, T.

    2016-09-01

    We present an X-ray flaring activity of 1ES 1959+650 in 2015 August-2016 January, which was the most powerful and prolonged during the 10.75 yr period since the start of its monitoring with X-ray Telescope onboard Swift. A new highest historical 0.3-10 keV count rate was recorded three times that makes this object the third BL Lacertae source exceeding the level of 20 counts s-1. Along with the overall variability by a factor of 5.7, this epoch was characterized by fast X-ray flares by a factor of 2.0-3.1, accompanied with an extreme spectral variability. The source also shows a simultaneous flaring activity in the optical - UV and 0.3-100 GeV bands, although a fast γ-ray flare without significant optical - X-ray counterparts is also found. In contrast to the X-ray flares in the previous years, the stochastic acceleration seems be less important for the electrons responsible for producing X-ray emission during this flare that challenges the earlier suggestion that the electrons in the jets of TeV-detected BL Lacertae objects should undergo an efficient stochastic acceleration resulting in a lower X-ray spectral curvature.

  1. A recent strong X-ray flaring activity of 1ES 1959+650 with possibly less efficient stochastic acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapanadze, B.; Dorner, D.; Vercellone, S.; Romano, P.; Kapanadze, S.; Mdzinarishvili, T.

    2016-03-01

    We present an X-ray flaring activity of 1ES 1959+650 in 2015 August - 2016 January, which was the most powerful and prolonged during the 10.75 yr period since the start of its monitoring with X-ray Telescope onboard Swift. A new highest historical 0.3 - 10 keV count rate was recorded three times that makes this object the third BL Lacertae source exceeding the level of 20 cts s-1. Along with the overall variability by a factor of 5.7, this epoch was characterized by fast X-ray flares by a factor of 2.0 - 3.1, accompanied with an extreme spectral variability. The source also shows a simultaneous flaring activity in the optical - UV and 0.3 - 100 GeV bands, although a fast γ-ray flare without significant optical - X-ray counterparts is also found. In contrast to the X-ray flares in the previous years, the stochastic acceleration seems be less important for the electrons responsible for producing X-ray emission during this flare that challenges the earlier suggestion that the electrons in the jets of TeV-detected BL Lacertae objects should undergo an efficient stochastic acceleration resulting in a lower X-ray spectral curvature.

  2. Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rust, David

    1998-01-01

    The Sun is constantly changing. Not an hour goes by without a rise or fall in solar x-radiation or radio emission. Not a day goes by without a solar flare. Our active star, this inconsistent Sun, this gaseous cloud that blows in all directions, warms the air we breathe and nourishes the food we eat. From Earth, it seems the very model of stability, but in space it often creates havoc. Over the past century, solar physicists have learned how to detect even the weakest of solar outbursts or flares. We know that flares must surely trace their origins to the magnetic strands stretched and tangled by the rolling plasma of the solar interior. Although a century of astrophysical research has produced widely accepted, fundamental understanding about the Sun, we have yet to predict successfully the emergence of any magnetic fields from inside the Sun or the ignition of any flare. As in any physical experiment, the ability to predict events not only validates the scientific ideas, it also has practical value. In astrophysics, a demonstrated understanding of sunspots, flares, and ejections of plasma would allow us to approach many other mysteries, such as stellar X-ray bursters, with tested theories.

  3. Fast magneto-optic switch based on nanosecond pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, Zi-Hua; Ruan, Jian-Jian; Lin, Shao-Han; Chen, Zhi-Min

    2011-09-01

    The paper studies an all fiber high-speed magneto-optic switch which includes an optical route, a nanosecond pulse generator, and a magnetic field module in order to reduce the switching time of the optical switch in the all optical network. A compact nanosecond pulse generator can be designed based on the special character of the avalanche transistor. The output current pulse of the nanosecond pulse generator is less than 5 ns, while the pulse amplitude is more than 100 V and the pulse width is about 10 to 20 ns, which is able to drive a high-speed magnetic field. A solenoid is used as the magnetic field module, and a bismuth-substituted rare-earth iron garnet single crystal is chosen as the Faraday rotator. By changing the direction of current in the solenoid quickly, the magnetization of the magneto-optic material is reversed, and the optical beam can be rapidly switched. The experimental results indicate that the switching time of the device is about 100 to 400 ns, which can partially meet the demand of the rapid development of the all optical network.

  4. Optical properties of fast-diffusing solid-state plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Forchel, A.; Schweizer, H.; Mahler, G.

    1983-08-08

    Transmission and emission spectra of fast-diffusing nonequilibrium electron-hole plasmas in semiconductors are calculated with use of displaced Fermi distributions. The carrier drift significantly alters the plasma spectra and removes previously reported incomprehensible discrepancies between experimental and theoretical plasma parameters, indicating the necessity to reinterpret entirely the spectroscopic data from nonequilibrium plasmas.

  5. A radio jet from the optical and x-ray bright stellar tidal disruption flare ASASSN-14li

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Velzen, S.; Anderson, G. E.; Stone, N. C.; Fraser, M.; Wevers, T.; Metzger, B. D.; Jonker, P. G.; van der Horst, A. J.; Staley, T. D.; Mendez, A. J.; Miller-Jones, J. C. A.; Hodgkin, S. T.; Campbell, H. C.; Fender, R. P.

    2016-01-01

    The tidal disruption of a star by a supermassive black hole leads to a short-lived thermal flare. Despite extensive searches, radio follow-up observations of known thermal stellar tidal disruption flares (TDFs) have not yet produced a conclusive detection. We present a detection of variable radio emission from a thermal TDF, which we interpret as originating from a newly launched jet. The multiwavelength properties of the source present a natural analogy with accretion-state changes of stellar mass black holes, which suggests that all TDFs could be accompanied by a jet. In the rest frame of the TDF, our radio observations are an order of magnitude more sensitive than nearly all previous upper limits, explaining how these jets, if common, could thus far have escaped detection.

  6. A radio jet from the optical and x-ray bright stellar tidal disruption flare ASASSN-14li.

    PubMed

    van Velzen, S; Anderson, G E; Stone, N C; Fraser, M; Wevers, T; Metzger, B D; Jonker, P G; van der Horst, A J; Staley, T D; Mendez, A J; Miller-Jones, J C A; Hodgkin, S T; Campbell, H C; Fender, R P

    2016-01-01

    The tidal disruption of a star by a supermassive black hole leads to a short-lived thermal flare. Despite extensive searches, radio follow-up observations of known thermal stellar tidal disruption flares (TDFs) have not yet produced a conclusive detection. We present a detection of variable radio emission from a thermal TDF, which we interpret as originating from a newly launched jet. The multiwavelength properties of the source present a natural analogy with accretion-state changes of stellar mass black holes, which suggests that all TDFs could be accompanied by a jet. In the rest frame of the TDF, our radio observations are an order of magnitude more sensitive than nearly all previous upper limits, explaining how these jets, if common, could thus far have escaped detection. PMID:26612833

  7. Flare models: Chapter 9 of solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturrock, P. A. (Editor)

    1979-01-01

    By reviewing the properties of solar flares analyzed by each of the seven teams of the Skylab workshop, a set of primary and secondary requirements of flare models are derived. A number of flare models are described briefly and their properties compared with the primary requirements. It appears that, at this time, each flare model has some strong points and some weak points. It has not yet been demonstrated that any one flare model meets all the proposed requirements.

  8. Fast, externally triggered, digital phase controller for an optical lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadgrove, Mark; Nakagawa, Ken'ichi

    2011-11-01

    We present a method to control the phase of an optical lattice according to an external trigger signal. The method has a latency of less than 30 μs. Two phase locked digital synthesizers provide the driving signal for two acousto-optic modulators which control the frequency and phase of the counter-propagating beams which form a standing wave (optical lattice). A micro-controller with an external interrupt function is connected to the desired external signal, and updates the phase register of one of the synthesizers when the external signal changes. The standing wave (period λ/2 = 390 nm) can be moved by units of 49 nm with a mean jitter of 28 nm. The phase change is well known due to the digital nature of the synthesizer, and does not need calibration. The uses of the scheme include coherent control of atomic matter-wave dynamics.

  9. Optical emission spectroscopy observations of fast pulsed capillary discharge plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avaria, G.; Ruiz, M.; Guzmán, F.; Favre, M.; Wyndham, E. S.; Chuaqui, H.; Bhuyan, H.

    2014-05-01

    We present time resolved optical emission spectroscopic (OES) observations of a low energy, pulsed capillary discharage (PCD). The optical emission from the capillary plasma and plasma jets emitted from the capillary volume was recorded with with a SpectraPro 275 spectrograph, fitted with a MCP gated OMA system, with 15 ns time resolution. The discharge was operated with different gases, including argon, nitrogen, hydrogen and methane, in a repetitive pulsed discharge mode at 10-50 Hz, with, 10-12 kV pulses applied at the cathode side. The time evolution of the electron density was measured using Stark broadening of the Hβ line. Several features of the capillary plasma dynamics, such as ionization growth, wall effects and plasma jet evolution, are inferred from the time evolution of the optical emission.

  10. Long-stroke fast tool servo and a tool setting method for freeform optics fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qiang; Zhou, Xiaoqin; Liu, Zhiwei; Lin, Chao; Ma, Long

    2014-09-01

    Diamond turning assisted by fast tool servo is of high efficiency for the fabrication of freeform optics. This paper describes a long-stroke fast tool servo to obtain a large-amplitude tool motion. It has the advantage of low cost and higher stiffness and natural frequency than other flexure-based long-stroke fast tool servo systems. The fast tool servo is actuated by a voice coil motor and guided by a flexure-hinge structure. Open-loop and close-loop control tests are conducted on the testing platform. While fast tool servo system is an additional motion axis for a diamond turning machine, a tool center adjustment method is described to confirm tool center position in the machine tool coordinate system when the fast tool servo system is fixed on the diamond turning machine. Last, a sinusoidal surface is machined and the results demonstrate that the tool adjustment method is efficient and precise for a flexure-based fast tool servo system, and the fast tool servo system works well on the fabrication of freeform optics.

  11. Fast optical recording media based on semiconductor nanostructures for image recording and processing

    SciTech Connect

    Kasherininov, P. G. Tomasov, A. A.

    2008-11-15

    Fast optical recording media based on semiconductor nanostructures (CdTe, GaAs) for image recording and processing with a speed to 10{sup 6} cycle/s (which exceeds the speed of known recording media based on metal-insulator-semiconductor-(liquid crystal) (MIS-LC) structures by two to three orders of magnitude), a photosensitivity of 10{sup -2}V/cm{sup 2}, and a spatial resolution of 5-10 (line pairs)/mm are developed. Operating principles of nanostructures as fast optical recording media and methods for reading images recorded in such media are described. Fast optical processors for recording images in incoherent light based on CdTe crystal nanostructures are implemented. The possibility of their application to fabricate image correlators is shown.

  12. Development of a small scintillation detector with an optical fiber for fast neutrons.

    PubMed

    Yagi, T; Unesaki, H; Misawa, T; Pyeon, C H; Shiroya, S; Matsumoto, T; Harano, H

    2011-02-01

    To investigate the characteristics of a reactor and a neutron generator, a small scintillation detector with an optical fiber with ThO(2) has been developed to measure fast neutrons. However, experimental facilities where (232)Th can be used are limited by regulations, and S/N ratio is low because the background counts of this detector are increase by alpha decay of (232)Th. The purpose of this study is to develop a new optical fiber detector for measuring fast neutrons that does not use nuclear material such as (232)Th. From the measured and calculated results, the new optical fiber detector which uses ZnS(Ag) as a converter material together with a scintillator have the highest detection efficiency among several developed detectors. It is applied for the measurement of reaction rates generated from fast neutrons; furthermore, the absolute detection efficiency of this detector was obtained experimentally. PMID:21129989

  13. Solar flares controlled by helicity conservation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gliner, Erast B.; Osherovich, Vladimir A.

    1995-01-01

    The energy release in a class of solar flares is studied on the assumption that during burst events in highly conducting plasma the magnetic helicity of plasma is approximately conserved. The available energy release under a solar flare controlled by the helicity conservation is shown to be defined by the magnetic structure of the associated prominence. The approach throws light on some solar flare enigmas: the role of the associated prominence. The approach throws light on some solar flare enigmas: the role of the associated prominences; the discontinuation of the reconnection of magnetic lines long before the complete reconnection of participated fields occurs; the existence of quiet prominences which, in spite of their usual optical appearance, do not initiate any flare events; the small energy release under a solar flare in comparison with the stockpile of magnetic energy in surrounding fields. The predicted scale of the energy release is in a fair agreement with observations.

  14. Optical digital coherent detection technology enabled flexible and ultra-fast quantitative phase imaging.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yuan-Hua; Lu, Xing; Song, Lu; Guo, Xiaojie; Wang, Yawei; Zhu, Linyan; Sui, Qi; Li, Jianping; Shi, Kebin; Li, Zhaohui

    2016-07-25

    Quantitative phase imaging has been an important labeling-free microscopy modality for many biomedical and material science applications. In which, ultra-fast quantitative phase imaging is indispensable for dynamic or transient characteristics analysis. Conventional wide field optical interferometry is a common scheme for quantitative phase imaging, while its data acquisition rate is usually hindered by the frame rate of arrayed detector. By utilizing novel balanced-photo-detector based digital optics coherent detection techniques, we report on a method of constructing ultra-fast quantitative phase microscopy at the line-scan rate of 100 MHz with ~2 μm spatial resolution. PMID:27464166

  15. Fast gain and phase recovery of semiconductor optical amplifiers based on submonolayer quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Herzog, Bastian Owschimikow, Nina; Kaptan, Yücel; Kolarczik, Mirco; Switaiski, Thomas; Woggon, Ulrike; Schulze, Jan-Hindrik; Rosales, Ricardo; Strittmatter, André; Bimberg, Dieter; Pohl, Udo W.

    2015-11-16

    Submonolayer quantum dots as active medium in opto-electronic devices promise to combine the high density of states of quantum wells with the fast recovery dynamics of self-assembled quantum dots. We investigate the gain and phase recovery dynamics of a semiconductor optical amplifier based on InAs submonolayer quantum dots in the regime of linear operation by one- and two-color heterodyne pump-probe spectroscopy. We find an as fast recovery dynamics as for quantum dot-in-a-well structures, reaching 2 ps at moderate injection currents. The effective quantum well embedding the submonolayer quantum dots acts as a fast and efficient carrier reservoir.

  16. Fast optical pH manipulation and imaging.

    PubMed

    Filevich, Oscar; Carrone, Guillermo; Pavlovsky, Victoria Andino; Etchenique, Roberto

    2012-07-01

    We describe a complete system for optical pH manipulation and imaging. The system consists of a photoactive Ruthenium complex capable of inducing a change of more than 5 pH units at the nanosecond time scale. A compatible imaging system acquires microscopic pH images at 1200 fps using a nonexpensive commercial digital camera and an LED illumination system. We use the system as a superb tool to investigate flow in Flow Injection Analysis (FIA) models. PMID:22703044

  17. Optical observations of the fast nova V2491 Cyg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomov, T.; Mikolajewski, M.; Ragan, E.; Swierczynski, E.; Wychudzki, P.

    2008-04-01

    We report on optical spectral observations and UBVRI brightness estimations obtained with 60/90 cm Schmidt and 60 cm Cassegrain telescopes of the Nicolaus Copernicus University Observatory (Torun, Poland). The nova V2491 Cyg was discovered on Apr. 10.728 UT with about 7.7 mag on unfiltered CCD frames (IAUC#8934). Additionally, the X-ray emission was detected for the prenova several months ago (ATel#1473).

  18. Fast laser optical CT scanner with rotating mirror and Fresnel lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conklin, J.; Deshpande, R.; Battista, J.; Jordan, K.

    2006-12-01

    Single laser beam and detector computed tomography (CT) scanner geometries provide excellent stray light rejection and these systems likely provide the largest dynamic range for optical CT scanning of gel dosimeters. In this work a rotating mirror, lens pair, laser scanner has been developed for a 10 x 15 cm2 field of view demonstrating a fast 3D single ray-detector optical CT scanner.

  19. On Flare and CME Predictability Based on Sunspot Group Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korsós, M. B.; Ruderman, M. S.

    2016-04-01

    We propose to apply the weighted horizontal magnetic gradient (WGM), introduced in Korsós et al. (2015), for analysing the pre-flare and pre-CME behaviour and evolution of Active Regions (ARs) using the SDO/HMI-Debrecen Data catalogue. To demonstrate the power of investigative capabilities of the WGM method in terms of flare/CME eruptions, we show the results of studying three typical active regions, namely, AR11818, AR12017 and AR11495. The choice of ARs represent typical cases of flaring with a fast CME, flare eruption without a CME and non-flaring cases, respectively. AR11818 produced an M1.4 energetic flare with a fast "halo" CME (vlinear=1202 km/s) while in AR12017 occurred an X1.0 flare without a CME. The AR11495 is a good example for non-flaring ARs. The value and temporal variation of WGM is found to possess potentially important diagnostic information about the intensity of expected flares. However, this test turns out not only to provide information about the intensity of expected flares but may also show whether a flare will occur with/without a fast CME.

  20. Fast figuring of large optics by reactive atom plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castelli, Marco; Jourdain, Renaud; Morantz, Paul; Shore, Paul

    2012-09-01

    The next generation of ground-based astronomical observatories will require fabrication and maintenance of extremely large segmented mirrors tens of meters in diameter. At present, the large production of segments required by projects like E-ELT and TMT poses time frames and costs feasibility questions. This is principally due to a bottleneck stage in the optical fabrication chain: the final figuring step. State-of-the-art figure correction techniques, so far, have failed to meet the needs of the astronomical community for mass production of large, ultra-precise optical surfaces. In this context, Reactive Atom Plasma (RAP) is proposed as a candidate figuring process that combines nanometer level accuracy with high material removal rates. RAP is a form of plasma enhanced chemical etching at atmospheric pressure based on Inductively Coupled Plasma technology. The rapid figuring capability of the RAP process has already been proven on medium sized optical surfaces made of silicon based materials. In this paper, the figure correction of a 3 meters radius of curvature, 400 mm diameter spherical ULE mirror is presented. This work demonstrates the large scale figuring capability of the Reactive Atom Plasma process. The figuring is carried out by applying an in-house developed procedure that promotes rapid convergence. A 2.3 μm p-v initial figure error is removed within three iterations, for a total processing time of 2.5 hours. The same surface is then re-polished and the residual error corrected again down to λ/20 nm rms. These results highlight the possibility of figuring a metre-class mirror in about ten hours.

  1. Fast calibration of high-order adaptive optics systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasper, Markus; Fedrigo, Enrico; Looze, Douglas P.; Bonnet, Henri; Ivanescu, Liviu; Oberti, Sylvain

    2004-06-01

    We present a new method of calibrating adaptive optics systems that greatly reduces the required calibration time or, equivalently, improves the signal-to-noise ratio. The method uses an optimized actuation scheme with Hadamard patterns and does not scale with the number of actuators for a given noise level in the wave-front sensor channels. It is therefore highly desirable for high-order systems and/or adaptive secondary systems on a telescope without a Gregorian focal plane. In the latter case, the measurement noise is increased by the effects of the turbulent atmosphere when one is calibrating on a natural guide star.

  2. Fast calibration of high-order adaptive optics systems.

    PubMed

    Kasper, Markus; Fedrigo, Enrico; Looze, Douglas P; Bonnet, Henri; Ivanescu, Liviu; Oberti, Sylvain

    2004-06-01

    We present a new method of calibrating adaptive optics systems that greatly reduces the required calibration time or, equivalently, improves the signal-to-noise ratio. The method uses an optimized actuation scheme with Hadamard patterns and does not scale with the number of actuators for a given noise level in the wavefront sensor channels. It is therefore highly desirable for high-order systems and/or adaptive secondary systems on a telescope without a Gregorian focal plane. In the latter case, the measurement noise is increased by the effects of the turbulent atmosphere when one is calibrating on a natural guide star. PMID:15191182

  3. Fast localization of optic disc and fovea in retinal images for eye disease screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, H.; Barriga, S.; Agurto, C.; Echegaray, S.; Pattichis, M.; Zamora, G.; Bauman, W.; Soliz, P.

    2011-03-01

    Optic disc (OD) and fovea locations are two important anatomical landmarks in automated analysis of retinal disease in color fundus photographs. This paper presents a new, fast, fully automatic optic disc and fovea localization algorithm developed for diabetic retinopathy (DR) screening. The optic disc localization methodology comprises of two steps. First, the OD location is identified using template matching and directional matched filter. To reduce false positives due to bright areas of pathology, we exploit vessel characteristics inside the optic disc. The location of the fovea is estimated as the point of lowest matched filter response within a search area determined by the optic disc location. Second, optic disc segmentation is performed. Based on the detected optic disc location, a fast hybrid level-set algorithm which combines the region information and edge gradient to drive the curve evolution is used to segment the optic disc boundary. Extensive evaluation was performed on 1200 images (Messidor) composed of 540 images of healthy retinas, 431 images with DR but no risk of macular edema (ME), and 229 images with DR and risk of ME. The OD location methodology obtained 98.3% success rate, while fovea location achieved 95% success rate. The average mean absolute distance (MAD) between the OD segmentation algorithm and "gold standard" is 10.5% of estimated OD radius. Qualitatively, 97% of the images achieved Excellent to Fair performance for OD segmentation. The segmentation algorithm performs well even on blurred images.

  4. GRB 090313 AND THE ORIGIN OF OPTICAL PEAKS IN GAMMA-RAY BURST LIGHT CURVES: IMPLICATIONS FOR LORENTZ FACTORS AND RADIO FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Melandri, A.; Kobayashi, S.; Mundell, C. G.; Guidorzi, C.; Bersier, D.; Steele, I. A.; Smith, R. J.; De Ugarte Postigo, A.; Pooley, G.; Yoshida, M.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; Gorosabel, J.; Kubanek, P.; Sota, A.; Gomboc, A.; Bremer, M.; Winters, J. M.; De Gregorio-Monsalvo, I.; GarcIa-Appadoo, D.

    2010-11-10

    We use a sample of 19 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) that exhibit single-peaked optical light curves to test the standard fireball model by investigating the relationship between the time of the onset of the afterglow and the temporal rising index. Our sample includes GRBs and X-ray flashes for which we derive a wide range of initial Lorentz factors (40 < {Gamma} < 450). Using plausible model parameters, the typical frequency of the forward shock is expected to lie close to the optical band; within this low typical frequency framework, we use the optical data to constrain {epsilon}{sub e} and show that values derived from the early time light-curve properties are consistent with published typical values derived from other afterglow studies. We produce expected radio light curves by predicting the temporal evolution of the expected radio emission from forward and reverse shock components, including synchrotron self-absorption effects at early time. Although a number of GRBs in this sample do not have published radio measurements, we demonstrate the effectiveness of this method in the case of Swift GRB 090313, for which millimetric and centimetric observations were available, and conclude that future detections of reverse-shock radio flares with new radio facilities such as the EVLA and ALMA will test the low-frequency model and provide constraints on magnetic models.

  5. Fast multi-copy entanglement purification with linear optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Chun; Zhou, Lan; Sheng, Yu-Bo

    2015-12-01

    We describe an entanglement purification protocol for a polarization Bell state. Different from the previous protocols, it does not require the controlled-not gate, and only uses linear optical elements to complete the task. This protocol requires multi-copy degraded mixed states, which can make this protocol obtain a high fidelity in one purification step. It can also be extended to purify the multi-photon Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) state. This protocol may be useful in future long-distance communication. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11474168 and 61401222), the Qing Lan Project of Jiangsu Province, China, the STITP Project in Nanjing University of Posts and Telecommunications, the Natural Science Foundation of Jiangsu Province, China (Grant No. BK20151502), the Natural Science Foundation of the Jiangsu Higher Education Institutions (Grant No. 15KJA120002), and the Project Funded by the Priority Academic Program Development of Jiangsu Higher Education Institutions, China.

  6. Fast Optical Photometry of V404 Cyg at the MDM Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terndrup, D.; Wagner, R. M.; Starrfield, S.

    2015-06-01

    We obtained continuous fast differential optical photometry of V404 Cyg with the 1.3 m McGraw-Hill Telescope of the MDM Observatory on Kitt Peak on the nights of 2015 June 19.220-19.474, 20.194-20.472, 21.199-21.460, and 22.188-22.421 UT.

  7. Solar flare nomenclature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cliver, E. W.

    1995-03-01

    The evolution of solar flare nomenclature is reviewed in the context of the paradigm shift, in progress, from flares to coronal mass ejections (CMEs) in solar-terrestrial physics. Emphasis is placed on: the distinction between eruptive (Class II) flares and confined (Class I) flares; and the underlying similarity of eruptive flares inside (two-ribbon flares) and outside (flare-like brightenings accompanying disappearing filaments) of active regions. A list of reserach questions/ problems raised, or brought into focus, by the new paradigm is suggested; in general, these questions bear on the inter- relationships and associations of the two classes (or phases) or flares. Terms such as 'eruptive flare' and 'eruption' (defined to encompass both the CME and its associated eruptive flare) may be useful as nominal links between opposing viewpoints in the 'flares vs CMEs' controversy.

  8. Absolute calibration method for fast-streaked, fiber optic light collection, spectroscopy systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, Mark D.; Frogget, Brent; Oliver, Bryan Velten; Maron, Yitzhak; Droemer, Darryl W.; Crain, Marlon D.

    2010-04-01

    This report outlines a convenient method to calibrate fast (<1ns resolution) streaked, fiber optic light collection, spectroscopy systems. Such a system is used to collect spectral data on plasmas generated in the A-K gap of electron beam diodes fielded on the RITS-6 accelerator (8-12MV, 140-200kA). On RITS, light is collected through a small diameter (200 micron) optical fiber and recorded on a fast streak camera at the output of 1 meter Czerny-Turner monochromator (F/7 optics). To calibrate such a system, it is necessary to efficiently couple light from a spectral lamp into a 200 micron diameter fiber, split it into its spectral components, with 10 Angstroms or less resolution, and record it on a streak camera with 1ns or less temporal resolution.

  9. Measurement of the information velocity in fast- and slow-light optical pulse propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenner, Michael David

    This thesis describes a study of the velocity of information on optical pulses propagating through fast- and slow-light media. In fast- and slow-light media, the group velocity vg is faster than the speed of light in vacuum c (vg > c or vg < 0) or slower than c (0 < vg < c) respectively. While it is largely accepted that optical pulses can travel at these extreme group velocities, the velocity of information encoded on them is still the subject of considerable debate. There are many contradictory theories describing the velocity of information on optical pulses, but no accepted techniques for its experimental measurement. The velocity of information has broad implications for the principle of relativistic causality (which requires that information travels no faster than c) and for modern communications and computation. In this thesis, a new technique for measuring the information velocity vi is described and implemented for fast- and slow-light media. The fast- and slow-light media are generated using modern dispersion-tailoring techniques that use large atomic coherences to generate strong normal and anomalous dispersion. The information velocity in these media can then be measured using information-theoretic concepts by creating an alphabet of two distinct pulse symbols and transmitting the symbols through the media. By performing a detailed statistical analysis of the received information as a function of time, it is possible to calculate vi. This new technique makes it possible for the first time to measure the velocity of information on optical pulses. Applying this technique to fast-light pulses, where vg/c = -0.051 +/- 0.002, it is found that vi /c = 0.4(+0.7--0.2). In the slow-light case, where vg/c = 0.0097 +/- 0.0003, information is found to propagate at vi/c = 0.6. In the slow-light case, the error bars are slightly more complicated. The fast bound is -0.5c (which is faster than positive values) and the slow bound is 0.2c . These results represent the

  10. Characterization of total flare energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, H. S.

    1986-01-01

    It is concluded that the estimates of total energy in the prime flares lie well below the Active Cavity Radiometer Irradiance Monitor upper limits. This is consistent with our knowledge of the energy distribution in solar flares. Insufficient data exist for us to be very firm about this conclusion, however, and major energetic components could exist undetected, especially in the EUV-XUV and optical bands. In addition, the radiant energy cannot quantitatively be compared at this time with non-radiant terms because of even larger uncertainties in the latter.

  11. COMBUSTION EFFICIENCY OF FLARES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of a study to provide data on industrial flare emissions. (Emissions of incompletely burned hydrocarbons from industrial flares may contribute to air pollution. Available data on flare emissions are sparse, and methods to sample operating flares are unavai...

  12. An integrated fiber-optic probe combined with support vector regression for fast estimation of optical properties of turbid media.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yang; Fu, Xiaping; Ying, Yibin; Fang, Zhenhuan

    2015-06-23

    A fiber-optic probe system was developed to estimate the optical properties of turbid media based on spatially resolved diffuse reflectance. Because of the limitations in numerical calculation of radiative transfer equation (RTE), diffusion approximation (DA) and Monte Carlo simulations (MC), support vector regression (SVR) was introduced to model the relationship between diffuse reflectance values and optical properties. The SVR models of four collection fibers were trained by phantoms in calibration set with a wide range of optical properties which represented products of different applications, then the optical properties of phantoms in prediction set were predicted after an optimal searching on SVR models. The results indicated that the SVR model was capable of describing the relationship with little deviation in forward validation. The correlation coefficient (R) of reduced scattering coefficient μ'(s) and absorption coefficient μ(a) in the prediction set were 0.9907 and 0.9980, respectively. The root mean square errors of prediction (RMSEP) of μ'(s) and μ(a) in inverse validation were 0.411 cm(-1) and 0.338 cm(-1), respectively. The results indicated that the integrated fiber-optic probe system combined with SVR model were suitable for fast and accurate estimation of optical properties of turbid media based on spatially resolved diffuse reflectance. PMID:26092344

  13. Optical delay encoding for fast timing and detector signal multiplexing in PET

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Alexander M.; Levin, Craig S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The large number of detector channels in modern positron emission tomography (PET) scanners poses a challenge in terms of readout electronics complexity. Multiplexing schemes are typically implemented to reduce the number of physical readout channels, but often result in performance degradation. Novel methods of multiplexing in PET must be developed to avoid this data degradation. The preservation of fast timing information is especially important for time-of-flight PET. Methods: A new multiplexing scheme based on encoding detector interaction events with a series of extremely fast overlapping optical pulses with precise delays is demonstrated in this work. Encoding events in this way potentially allows many detector channels to be simultaneously encoded onto a single optical fiber that is then read out by a single digitizer. A two channel silicon photomultiplier-based prototype utilizing this optical delay encoding technique along with dual threshold time-over-threshold is demonstrated. Results: The optical encoding and multiplexing prototype achieves a coincidence time resolution of 160 ps full width at half maximum (FWHM) and an energy resolution of 13.1% FWHM at 511 keV with 3 × 3 × 5 mm3 LYSO crystals. All interaction information for both detectors, including timing, energy, and channel identification, is encoded onto a single optical fiber with little degradation. Conclusions: Optical delay encoding and multiplexing technology could lead to time-of-flight PET scanners with fewer readout channels and simplified data acquisition systems. PMID:26233181

  14. Model of slowly evolving flare.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiuderi Drago, F.; Landini, M.; Monsignori Fossi, B. C.

    A gradual rise and fall flare with a duration of about one hour was observed on June 10, 1980 in the radio (Toyokawa and VLA), optical (Bing Bear) and XUV (SMM satellite) ranges of wavelengths. The flare developed as a large loop connecting two regions of opposite polarity in a pre-existing active region. A model of the differential emission measure of the loop observed at three different stages of the flare is deduced from the analysis of the XUV images in C IV (1549 Å), O VIII (18.97 Å), Ne IX (13.45 Å), Mg XI (9.17 Å) and Si XIII (6.65 Å) emission lines. The differential emission measure as a function of temperature is controlled by the conductive flux via the temperature gradient; the evaluation of the divergence of the conductive flux is used in the energy balance to have information on the power deposition function.

  15. Compact, highly sensitive optical gyros and sensors with fast-light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, Caleb A.; Zavriyev, Anton; Cummings, Malcolm; Beal, A. C.; Lucas, Mark; Lagasse, Michael

    2015-09-01

    Fast-light phenomena can enhance the sensitivity of an optical gyroscope of a given size by several orders of magnitude, and could be applied to other optical sensors as well. MagiQ Technologies has been developing a compact fiber-based fast light Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) using Stimulated Brillouin Scattering in optical fibers with commercially mature technologies. We will report on our findings, including repeatable fast-light effects in the lab, numerical analysis of noise and stability given realistic optical specs, and methods for optimizing efficiency, size, and reliability with current technologies. The technology could benefit inertial navigation units, gyrocompasses, and stabilization techniques, and could allow high grade IMUs in spacecraft, unmanned aerial vehicles or sensors, where the current size and weight of precision gyros are prohibitive. By using photonic integrated circuits and telecom-grade components along with specialty fibers, we also believe that our design is appropriate for development without further advances in the state of the art of components.

  16. Connection of Very High Energy Gamma-ray Flares in Blazars to Activity at Lower Frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marscher, Alan P.; Jorstad, Svetlana G.

    2016-04-01

    The author will briefly review the results of multi-wavelength observations of blazars that emit very high-energy (VHE) gamma rays. The VHE gamma-ray emission is generally episodic, including flares that are often very short-lived. While many of these flares have counterparts only at X-ray energies, or no counterparts at all, some events are seen also at optical wavelengths, and a number are associated with the passage of new superluminal knots passing through the core in mm-wave VLBA images. Two explanations for the short-term VHE flares in the relativistic jets are supersonic turbulence and ultra-fast plasma jets resulting from magnetic reconnections. Observations of frequency-dependent linear polarization during flares can potentially decide between these models. VLBA images can help to locate VHE events that are seen at millimeter wavelengths. In some cases, the flares take place near the parsec-scale core, while in others they occur closer to the black hole.This research is supported in part by NASA through Swift Guest Investigator grants NNX15AR45G and NNX15AR34G.

  17. An active M star with X-ray double flares disguised as an ultra-luminous X-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jin-Cheng; Liu, Ji-Feng; Wang, Song; Wu, Yue; Qin, Yu-Xiang

    2016-02-01

    Here we present research on an ultra-luminous X-ray source (ULX) candidate 2XMM J140229.91+542118.8. The X-ray light curves of this ULX candidate in M101 exhibit features of a flare star. More importantly, the Chandra light curve displays unusual X-ray double flares, which is comprised of two close peaks. The X-ray (0.3-11.0 keV) flux of the first peak was derived from the two-temperature APEC model as ˜ 1.1 ± 0.1 × 10-12 erg cm-2 s-1. The observed flux at its first peak increased by about two orders of magnitude in X-ray as compared to quiescence. The slope of the second fast decay phase is steeper than the slope of the first fast decay phase, indicating that the appearance of a second flare accelerated the cooling of the first flare in a way we do not understand yet. We also observed its optical counterpart using a 2.16 m telescope administered by National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences. By optical spectral fitting, it is confirmed to be a late type dMe2.5 star. According to the spectral type and apparent magnitude of its optical counterpart, we estimate the photometric distance to be ˜ 133.4 ± 14.2 pc. According to the X-ray spectral fitting, a possible explanation is provided. However, more similar close double flares are needed to confirm whether this accelerated cooling event is a unique coincidence or a common physical process during double flaring.

  18. Identification of complex scattered signals with a fast real-time hybrid electro-optical correlator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majumdar, Arun K.; Sandomirsky, Sergey

    1997-10-01

    The goal of this work was to develop a fast optical correlator for automatic real-time target recognition. The tremendous importance of optical correlators for military and civilian applications was recognized recently and approved by a US conference committee of senators nd representatives. This publication presents the experimental results of detecting and identifying complex scattered signals by using an innovative, hybrid electro-optical correlator. Our technique is based on achieving optical correlation by utilizing state-of-the-art devices: time delay integration, charge coupled devices, liquid crystal displays, and electronically controllable light sources. Results of the experiment with our optical correlator, performed with simulated sonar signals with a center frequency of 100 kHz and duration of 8 to 512 pulses, show the possibility of recognizing a Doppler shift of 20 Hz. This Doppler shift corresponds to a target velocity of 20.7 m/sec. Simulation results indicate that we can achieve significant correlation for a noisy signal by using appropriate signal length. Our experiments demonstrate that we can perform approximately 1010 multiply accumulate operations per second with the high parallel optical corrector, compared to approximately 106 multiply accumulate operations per second using a Pentium 133 MHz personal computer. This new optical correlation scheme can provide solutions for overcoming the inherent shortcomings attributable to the low dynamic range of CCD, and the problem of compatibility caused by different pixel patterns between LCD and CCD by making use of high-quality optics and modern means of achieving uniform illumination.

  19. The H-alpha/H-beta ratio in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zirin, H.; Liggett, M.; Patterson, A.

    1982-01-01

    The present investigation involves the study of an extensive body of data accumulated of simultaneous H-alpha and H-beta cinematography of flares. The data were obtained with two telescopes simultaneously photographing flares in H-alpha and H-beta. The results of measurements in a number of flares are presented in a table. The flares were selected purely by optical quality of the data. That the measured ratios are not too different from those in stellar flares is suggested by the last two columns of the table. These columns show that a variety of possible line width ratios could give an integrated intensity ratio of less than unity.

  20. Interferometric adaptive optics for high-power laser beam correction in fast ignition experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Homoelle, D C; Baker, K L; Patel, P K; Utterback, E; Rushford, M C; Siders, C W; Barty, C J

    2009-10-22

    We present the design for a high-speed adaptive optics system that will be used to achieve the necessary laser pointing and beam-quality performance for initial fast-ignition coupling experiments. This design makes use of a 32 x 32 pixellated MEMS device as the adaptive optic and a two-channel interferometer as the wave-front sensor. We present results from a system testbed that demonstrates improvement of the Strehl ratio from 0.09 to 0.61 and stabilization of beam pointing from {approx}75{micro}rad to <2{micro}rad.

  1. ADAHELI: exploring the fast, dynamic Sun in the x-ray, optical, and near-infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berrilli, Francesco; Soffitta, Paolo; Velli, Marco; Sabatini, Paolo; Bigazzi, Alberto; Bellazzini, Ronaldo; Bellot Rubio, Luis Ramon; Brez, Alessandro; Carbone, Vincenzo; Cauzzi, Gianna; Cavallini, Fabio; Consolini, Giuseppe; Curti, Fabio; Del Moro, Dario; Di Giorgio, Anna Maria; Ermolli, Ilaria; Fabiani, Sergio; Faurobert, Marianne; Feller, Alex; Galsgaard, Klaus; Gburek, Szymon; Giannattasio, Fabio; Giovannelli, Luca; Hirzberger, Johann; Jefferies, Stuart M.; Madjarska, Maria S.; Manni, Fabio; Mazzoni, Alessandro; Muleri, Fabio; Penza, Valentina; Peres, Giovanni; Piazzesi, Roberto; Pieralli, Francesca; Pietropaolo, Ermanno; Pillet, Valentin Martinez; Pinchera, Michele; Reale, Fabio; Romano, Paolo; Romoli, Andrea; Romoli, Marco; Rubini, Alda; Rudawy, Pawel; Sandri, Paolo; Scardigli, Stefano; Spandre, Gloria; Solanki, Sami K.; Stangalini, Marco; Vecchio, Antonio; Zuccarello, Francesca

    2015-10-01

    Advanced Astronomy for Heliophysics Plus (ADAHELI) is a project concept for a small solar and space weather mission with a budget compatible with an European Space Agency (ESA) S-class mission, including launch, and a fast development cycle. ADAHELI was submitted to the European Space Agency by a European-wide consortium of solar physics research institutes in response to the "Call for a small mission opportunity for a launch in 2017," of March 9, 2012. The ADAHELI project builds on the heritage of the former ADAHELI mission, which had successfully completed its phase-A study under the Italian Space Agency 2007 Small Mission Programme, thus proving the soundness and feasibility of its innovative low-budget design. ADAHELI is a solar space mission with two main instruments: ISODY: an imager, based on Fabry-Pérot interferometers, whose design is optimized to the acquisition of highest cadence, long-duration, multiline spectropolarimetric images in the visible/near-infrared region of the solar spectrum. XSPO: an x-ray polarimeter for solar flares in x-rays with energies in the 15 to 35 keV range. ADAHELI is capable of performing observations that cannot be addressed by other currently planned solar space missions, due to their limited telemetry, or by ground-based facilities, due to the problematic effect of the terrestrial atmosphere.

  2. Radiation studies of optical interferometric modulators with fast neutrons and high energy gamma-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Tsang, T.; Radeka, V. ); Bulmer, C.H.; Burns, W.K. )

    1991-11-01

    The possibility of using Ti : LiNbO{sub 3} and single mode fibers for nuclear particle detection and transmission in large-scale machines, such as Superconducting Super Collider, calls for a detailed radiation damage study. In this report, we present radiation studies on Ti : LiNbO{sub 3} Mach-Zehnder interferometric optical modulators with fast neutrons and high energy Gamma-rays.

  3. FLARES AND THEIR UNDERLYING MAGNETIC COMPLEXITY

    SciTech Connect

    Engell, Alexander J.; Golub, Leon; Korreck, Kelly; Siarkowski, Marek; Gryciuk, Magda; Sylwester, Janusz; Sylwester, Barbara; Cirtain, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    SphinX (Solar PHotometer IN X-rays), a full-disk-integrated spectrometer, observed 137 flare-like/transient events with active region (AR) 11024 being the only AR on disk. The Hinode X-Ray Telescope (XRT) and Solar Optical Telescope observe 67 of these events and identified their location from 12:00 UT on July 3 through 24:00 UT 2009 July 7. We find that the predominant mechanisms for flares observed by XRT are (1) flux cancellation and (2) the shearing of underlying magnetic elements. Point- and cusp-like flare morphologies seen by XRT all occur in a magnetic environment where one polarity is impeded by the opposite polarity and vice versa, forcing the flux cancellation process. The shearing is either caused by flux emergence at the center of the AR and separation of polarities along a neutral line or by individual magnetic elements having a rotational motion. Both mechanisms are observed to contribute to single- and multiple-loop flares. We observe that most loop flares occur along a large portion of a polarity inversion line. Point- and cusp-like flares become more infrequent as the AR becomes organized with separation of the positive and negative polarities. SphinX, which allows us to identify when these flares occur, provides us with a statistically significant temperature and emission scaling law for A and B class flares: EM = 6.1 x 10{sup 33} T{sup 1.9{+-}0.1}.

  4. Flares and Their Underlying Magnetic Complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engell, Alexander J.; Siarkowski, Marek; Gryciuk, Magda; Sylwester, Janusz; Sylwester, Barbara; Golub, Leon; Korreck, Kelly; Cirtain, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    SphinX (Solar PHotometer IN X-rays), a full-disk-integrated spectrometer, observed 137 flare-like/transient events with active region (AR) 11024 being the only AR on disk. The Hinode X-Ray Telescope (XRT) and Solar Optical Telescope observe 67 of these events and identified their location from 12:00 UT on July 3 through 24:00 UT 2009 July 7. We find that the predominant mechanisms for flares observed by XRT are (1) flux cancellation and (2) the shearing of underlying magnetic elements. Point- and cusp-like flare morphologies seen by XRT all occur in a magnetic environment where one polarity is impeded by the opposite polarity and vice versa, forcing the flux cancellation process. The shearing is either caused by flux emergence at the center of the AR and separation of polarities along a neutral line or by individual magnetic elements having a rotational motion. Both mechanisms are observed to contribute to single- and multiple-loop flares. We observe that most loop flares occur along a large portion of a polarity inversion line. Point- and cusp-like flares become more infrequent as the AR becomes organized with separation of the positive and negative polarities. SphinX, which allows us to identify when these flares occur, provides us with a statistically significant temperature and emission scaling law for A and B class flares: EM = 6.1 × 1033 T 1.9±0.1.

  5. High speed all-optical data processing in fast semiconductor and optical fiber based devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hongzhi

    Future generations of communication systems demand ultra high speed data processing and switching components. Conventional electrical parts have reached their bottleneck both speed-wise and efficiency-wise. The idea of manipulating high speed data in optical domain is gaining more popularity. In this PhD thesis work, we proposed and demonstrated various schemes of all-optical Boolean logic gate at data rate as high as 80Gb/s by using semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA), SOA Mach-Zehnder interferometer (SOA-MZI), highly nonlinear fiber (HNLF) and optical fiber based components. With the invention of quantum dot (QD) based semiconductor devices, speed limit of all optical data processing has a chance to boost up to 250Gb/s. We proposed and simulated QD-SOA based Boolean functions, and their application such as shift register and pseudorandom bit sequence generation (PRBS). Clock and data recovery of high speed data signals has been simulated and demonstrated by injection lock and phase lock loop techniques in a fiber and SOA ring and an optical-electrical (OE) feedback loop.

  6. Solar Flare Aimed at Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    At the height of the solar cycle, the Sun is finally displaying some fireworks. This image from the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) shows a large solar flare from June 6, 2000 at 1424 Universal Time (10:24 AM Eastern Daylight Savings Time). Associated with the flare was a coronal mass ejection that sent a wave of fast moving charged particles straight towards Earth. (The image was acquired by the Extreme ultaviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT), one of 12 instruments aboard SOHO) Solar activity affects the Earth in several ways. The particles generated by flares can disrupt satellite communications and interfere with power transmission on the Earth's surface. Earth's climate is tied to the total energy emitted by the sun, cooling when the sun radiates less energy and warming when solar output increases. Solar radiation also produces ozone in the stratosphere, so total ozone levels tend to increase during the solar maximum. For more information about these solar flares and the SOHO mission, see NASA Science News or the SOHO home page. For more about the links between the sun and climate change, see Sunspots and the Solar Max. Image courtesy SOHO Extreme ultaviolet Imaging Telescope, ESA/NASA

  7. Automatic Detection of the Optic Disc of the Retina: A Fast Method.

    PubMed

    Jamshidi, M; Rabbani, H; Amini, Z; Kafieh, R; Ommani, A; Lakshminarayanan, V

    2016-01-01

    Localizing the optic disc (OD) in retinal fundus images is of critical importance and many techniques have been developed for OD detection. In this paper, we present the results obtained from two fast methods, correlation and least square, to approximate the location of optic cup. These methods are simple and are not complex, while most of the OD detection algorithms are. The methods were tested on two groups of data (a total of 100 color fundus images) and were 98% successful in the detection of the optic cup. An algorithm using the vessel mask of fundus images is proposed to be run after correlation to ensure that the localization of OD in all images is successful. It was tested on 40 of the test images and had a 100% rate of success. PMID:27014613

  8. Fast spatial beam shaping by acousto-optic diffraction for 3D non-linear microscopy.

    PubMed

    Akemann, Walther; Léger, Jean-François; Ventalon, Cathie; Mathieu, Benjamin; Dieudonné, Stéphane; Bourdieu, Laurent

    2015-11-01

    Acousto-optic deflection (AOD) devices offer unprecedented fast control of the entire spatial structure of light beams, most notably their phase. AOD light modulation of ultra-short laser pulses, however, is not straightforward to implement because of intrinsic chromatic dispersion and non-stationarity of acousto-optic diffraction. While schemes exist to compensate chromatic dispersion, non-stationarity remains an obstacle. In this work we demonstrate an efficient AOD light modulator for stable phase modulation using time-locked generation of frequency-modulated acoustic waves at the full repetition rate of a high power laser pulse amplifier of 80 kHz. We establish the non-local relationship between the optical phase and the generating acoustic frequency function and verify the system for temporal stability, phase accuracy and generation of non-linear two-dimensional phase functions. PMID:26561090

  9. Automatic Detection of the Optic Disc of the Retina: A Fast Method

    PubMed Central

    Jamshidi, M.; Rabbani, H.; Amini, Z.; Kafieh, R.; Ommani, A.; Lakshminarayanan, V.

    2016-01-01

    Localizing the optic disc (OD) in retinal fundus images is of critical importance and many techniques have been developed for OD detection. In this paper, we present the results obtained from two fast methods, correlation and least square, to approximate the location of optic cup. These methods are simple and are not complex, while most of the OD detection algorithms are. The methods were tested on two groups of data (a total of 100 color fundus images) and were 98% successful in the detection of the optic cup. An algorithm using the vessel mask of fundus images is proposed to be run after correlation to ensure that the localization of OD in all images is successful. It was tested on 40 of the test images and had a 100% rate of success. PMID:27014613

  10. A novel fast optical switch based on two cascaded Terahertz Optical Asymmetric Demultiplexers (TOAD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bing; Baby, Varghese; Tong, Wilson; Xu, Lei; Friedman, Michelle; Runser, Robert J.; Glesk, Ivan; Prucnal, Paul R.

    2002-01-01

    A novel optical switch based on cascading two terahertz optical asymmetric demultiplexers (TOAD) is presented. By utilizing the sharp edge of the asymmetric TOAD switching window profile, two TOAD switching windows are overlapped to produce a narrower aggregate switching window, not limited by the pulse propagation time in the SOA of the TOAD. Simulations of the cascaded TOAD switching window show relatively constant window amplitude for different window sizes. Experimental results on cascading two TOADs, each with a switching window of 8ps, but with the SOA on opposite sides of the fiber loop, show a minimum switching window of 2.7ps.

  11. White-light Flares on Close Binaries Observed with Kepler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Qing; Xin, Yu; Liu, Ji-Feng; Zhang, Xiao-Bin; Gao, Shuang

    2016-06-01

    Based on Kepler data, we present the results of a search for white light flares on 1049 close binaries. We identify 234 flare binaries, of which 6818 flares are detected. We compare the flare-binary fraction in different binary morphologies (“detachedness”). The result shows that the fractions in over-contact and ellipsoidal binaries are approximately 10%–20% lower than those in detached and semi-detached systems. We calculate the binary flare activity level (AL) of all the flare binaries, and discuss its variations along the orbital period (P orb) and rotation period (P rot, calculated for only detached binaries). We find that the AL increases with decreasing P orb or P rot, up to the critical values at P orb ∼ 3 days or P rot ∼ 1.5 days, and thereafter the AL starts decreasing no matter how fast the stars rotate. We examine the flaring rate as a function of orbital phase in two eclipsing binaries on which a large number of flares are detected. It appears that there is no correlation between flaring rate and orbital phase in these two binaries. In contrast, when we examine the function with 203 flares on 20 non-eclipse ellipsoidal binaries, bimodal distribution of amplitude-weighted flare numbers shows up at orbital phases 0.25 and 0.75. Such variation could be larger than what is expected from the cross section modification.

  12. Observational aspects of stellar radio flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bookbinder, Jay A.

    1991-01-01

    The study of stellar flares in the radio regime provides a nearly unique observational perspective, as the emission generally arises from the particle acceleration region. Continuum and spectral studies of radio burst emission for several classes of stars are reviewed, and some preliminary connections with the quiescent radio emission from flare stars are made. Further, the radio observations are placed in a broader observational context provided by X-ray, UV, and optical observations.

  13. Demonstration of 720×720 optical fast circuit switch for intra-datacenter networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueda, Koh; Mori, Yojiro; Hasegawa, Hiroshi; Matsuura, Hiroyuki; Ishii, Kiyo; Kuwatsuka, Haruhiko; Namiki, Shu; Sato, Ken-ichi

    2016-03-01

    Intra-datacenter traffic is growing more than 20% a year. In typical datacenters, many racks/pods including servers are interconnected via multi-tier electrical switches. The electrical switches necessitate power-consuming optical-to- electrical (OE) and electrical-to-optical (EO) conversion, the power consumption of which increases with traffic. To overcome this problem, optical switches that eliminate costly OE and EO conversion and enable low power consumption switching are being investigated. There are two major requirements for the optical switch. First, it must have a high port count to construct reduced tier intra-datacenter networks. Second, switching speed must be short enough that most of the traffic load can be offloaded from electrical switches. Among various optical switches, we focus on those based on arrayed-waveguide gratings (AWGs), since the AWG is a passive device with minimal power consumption. We previously proposed a high-port-count optical switch architecture that utilizes tunable lasers, route-and-combine switches, and wavelength-routing switches comprised of couplers, erbium-doped fiber amplifiers (EDFAs), and AWGs. We employed conventional external cavity lasers whose wavelength-tuning speed was slower than 100 ms. In this paper, we demonstrate a large-scale optical switch that offers fast wavelength routing. We construct a 720×720 optical switch using recently developed lasers whose wavelength-tuning period is below 460 μs. We evaluate the switching time via bit-error-ratio measurements and achieve 470-μs switching time (includes 10-μs guard time to handle EDFA surge). To best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of such a large-scale optical switch with practical switching time.

  14. Internal model control of a fast steering mirror for electro-optical fine tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Yun-xia; Bao, Qi-liang; Wu, Qiong-yan

    2010-11-01

    The objective of this research is to develop advanced control methods to improve the bandwidth and tracking precision of the electro-optical fine tracking system using a fast steering mirror (FSM). FSM is the most important part in this control system. The model of FSM is established at the beginning of this paper. Compared with the electro-optical fine tracking system with ground based platform, the electro-optical fine tracking system with movement based platform must be a wide bandwidth and a robustness system. An advanced control method based on internal model control law is developed for electro-optical fine tracking system. The IMC is an advanced algorithm. Theoretically, it can eliminate disturbance completely and make sure output equals to input even there is model error. Moreover, it separates process to the system dynamic characteristic and the object perturbation. Compared with the PID controller, the controller is simpler and the parameter regulation is more convenient and the system is more robust. In addition, we design an improved structure based on classic IMC. The tracking error of the two-port control system is much better than which of the classic IMC. The simulation results indicate that the electro-optical control system based on the internal model control algorithm is very effective. It shows a better performance at the tracing precision and the disturbance suppresses. Thus a new method is provided for the high-performance electro-optical fine tracking system.

  15. Understanding Solar Flare Statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheatland, M. S.

    2005-12-01

    A review is presented of work aimed at understanding solar flare statistics, with emphasis on the well known flare power-law size distribution. Although avalanche models are perhaps the favoured model to describe flare statistics, their physical basis is unclear, and they are divorced from developing ideas in large-scale reconnection theory. An alternative model, aimed at reconciling large-scale reconnection models with solar flare statistics, is revisited. The solar flare waiting-time distribution has also attracted recent attention. Observed waiting-time distributions are described, together with what they might tell us about the flare phenomenon. Finally, a practical application of flare statistics to flare prediction is described in detail, including the results of a year of automated (web-based) predictions from the method.

  16. Fast inspection of bulk and surface defects of large aperture optics in high power lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yuan'an; Hu, Guohang; Liu, Shijie; Yi, Kui; Shao, Jianda

    2015-05-01

    Laser induced damage for nanosecond pulse duration is attributed to the existence of defects. The growth and polishing, as well as coating deposition, may induce versatile kinds of defects, including dig, scratch and inclusion. It is special important to get the information of the defects, such as size and location, which is the basis to know the origin of the defects and figures out effective techniques to eliminate it. It is quite easy to get the information of the defects with micron-level resolution, but it is time-consuming and is not suitable for fast inspection of the large aperture (hundreds of millimeters). In this work, on-the-fly image capture technique was employed to realize fast inspection of large aperture optics. A continuous green laser was employed as illumination source to enhance and enlarge the image of bulk defects. So it could detect the submicron-scale defects. A transmission microscopy with white light illumination was employed to detect the surface defect. Its field of view was about 2.8mm×1.6mm. The sample was raster scanned driving by a stepper motor through the stationary illumination laser and digital camera, and the speed to scan the sample was about 10mm/s. The results of large aperture optics proved the functions of this fast inspection technique.

  17. A fibre-optic mode-filtered light sensor for general and fast chemical assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Leiji; Wang, Kemin; Choi, Martin M. F.; Xiao, Dan; Yang, Xiaohai; Chen, Rui; Tan, Weihong

    2004-01-01

    A simple and fast-response fibre-optic chemical sensor based on mode-filtered light detection (MFLD) has been successfully developed. The sensor was constructed by inserting an unmodified fibre core into a silica capillary tubing; a charge-coupled device which acted as a multi-channel detector was positioned alongside the capillary to detect the emanated mode-filtered light. An interesting finding was observed: there was an increase in the signal upon the decrease in the sample refractive index when an unclad optical fibre was employed, which was different from the results of a polymer-clad fibre reported previously. This phenomenon of opposite signal trend can clearly be interpreted by applying a mathematical derivation based on light propagation in the optical fibre. The derived mathematical model correlates well with the experimental results. It also provides a good theoretical foundation for the future development of MFLD-based analyser in conjunction with liquid chromatographic separation and assay. The proposed MFLD sensor was successfully applied to determine acetic acid with a linear response in the range 0-90 v/v % and a correlation coefficient of 0.9959. The sensor has the advantages of high S/N ratio and very fast response time. It offers the potential for use as a general sensor in food and chemical industries.

  18. Plasma flares in high power impulse magnetron sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Ni, Pavel A.; Hornschuch, Christian; Panjan, Matjaz; Anders, Andre

    2012-11-26

    Self-organized ionization zones and associated plasma flares were recorded with fast cameras in side-on view. Flare velocities were estimated to be about 20 000 m/s suggesting that the local tangential field E{sub {xi}} is about 2000 V/m based on a concept where flare-causing electrons are initially ejected by E{sub {xi}} Multiplication-Sign B drift. At distances of 10 mm and greater from the target, where the electric field is very small, plasma flares are guided by the magnetic field B.

  19. LYRA Observations of Two Oscillation Modes in a Single Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Doorsselaere, T.; De Groof, A.; Zender, J.; Berghmans, D.; Goossens, M.

    2011-10-01

    We analyze light curves from the LYRA irradiance experiment on board PROBA2 during the flare of 2010 February 8. We see both long- and short-period oscillations during the flare. The long-period oscillation is interpreted in terms of standing slow sausage modes; the short-period oscillation is thought to be a standing fast sausage mode. The simultaneous presence of two oscillation modes in the same flaring structure allows for new coronal seismological applications. The periods are used to find seismological estimates of the plasma-β and the density contrast of the flaring loop. Also the wave mode number is estimated from the observed periods.

  20. Adaptive optics in spinning disk microscopy: improved contrast and brightness by a simple and fast method.

    PubMed

    Fraisier, V; Clouvel, G; Jasaitis, A; Dimitrov, A; Piolot, T; Salamero, J

    2015-09-01

    Multiconfocal microscopy gives a good compromise between fast imaging and reasonable resolution. However, the low intensity of live fluorescent emitters is a major limitation to this technique. Aberrations induced by the optical setup, especially the mismatch of the refractive index and the biological sample itself, distort the point spread function and further reduce the amount of detected photons. Altogether, this leads to impaired image quality, preventing accurate analysis of molecular processes in biological samples and imaging deep in the sample. The amount of detected fluorescence can be improved with adaptive optics. Here, we used a compact adaptive optics module (adaptive optics box for sectioning optical microscopy), which was specifically designed for spinning disk confocal microscopy. The module overcomes undesired anomalies by correcting for most of the aberrations in confocal imaging. Existing aberration detection methods require prior illumination, which bleaches the sample. To avoid multiple exposures of the sample, we established an experimental model describing the depth dependence of major aberrations. This model allows us to correct for those aberrations when performing a z-stack, gradually increasing the amplitude of the correction with depth. It does not require illumination of the sample for aberration detection, thus minimizing photobleaching and phototoxicity. With this model, we improved both signal-to-background ratio and image contrast. Here, we present comparative studies on a variety of biological samples. PMID:25940062

  1. Fast mode-hop-free acousto-optically tuned laser: theoretical and experimental investigations.

    PubMed

    Bösel, André; Salewski, Klaus-Dieter

    2009-02-10

    We developed a theory that describes fast mode-hop-free tuning of an external cavity diode laser in Littrow configuration with two acousto-optic modulators (AOMs) inside the laser cavity. The theory is based on synchronous shifting of the external cavity modes and the Littrow grating selectivity. It allows calculating the driving signals of both AOMs in order to reach a desired temporal variation of the laser frequency, including particularly fast tuning as well as an arbitrary shape of the tuning function. Furthermore, we present a laser setup for which the needed signals for both AOMs are generated by two direct digital synthesizer circuits. Thereby we were able to verify the theoretical predictions experimentally, achieving, e.g., sinusoidal single-mode tuning of the laser frequency over 40 GHz at a repetition rate of 10 kHz and over 12 GHz at 25 kHz. Finally, the limitations of the theory are discussed. PMID:19209191

  2. A fast IPv6 route lookup scheme for high-speed optical link

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Xingmiao; Li, Lemin

    2004-05-01

    A fast IPv6 route lookup scheme implemented by hardware is proposed in this paper. It supports a fast IP address lookup and can insert and delete the prefixes effectively. A novel compressed multibit trie algorithm that decreases the memory space occupied and the average searching time is applied. The scheme proposed in this paper is superior to other IPV6 route lookup ones, for example, by using SRAM pipeline, a lookup speed of 125 x 106 per second can be realized to satisfy 40Gbps optical link rate with only 1.9Mbyte consumption of memory space. As there is no actual IPv6 route prefix, we generate various simulation databases in which prefix length distribution is different. Simulation results show that our scheme has reasonable lookup time, memory space for all the prefix length distribution.

  3. Fast left ventricle tracking in CMR images using localized anatomical affine optical flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Queirós, Sandro; Vilaça, João. L.; Morais, Pedro; Fonseca, Jaime C.; D'hooge, Jan; Barbosa, Daniel

    2015-03-01

    In daily cardiology practice, assessment of left ventricular (LV) global function using non-invasive imaging remains central for the diagnosis and follow-up of patients with cardiovascular diseases. Despite the different methodologies currently accessible for LV segmentation in cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) images, a fast and complete LV delineation is still limitedly available for routine use. In this study, a localized anatomically constrained affine optical flow method is proposed for fast and automatic LV tracking throughout the full cardiac cycle in short-axis CMR images. Starting from an automatically delineated LV in the end-diastolic frame, the endocardial and epicardial boundaries are propagated by estimating the motion between adjacent cardiac phases using optical flow. In order to reduce the computational burden, the motion is only estimated in an anatomical region of interest around the tracked boundaries and subsequently integrated into a local affine motion model. Such localized estimation enables to capture complex motion patterns, while still being spatially consistent. The method was validated on 45 CMR datasets taken from the 2009 MICCAI LV segmentation challenge. The proposed approach proved to be robust and efficient, with an average distance error of 2.1 mm and a correlation with reference ejection fraction of 0.98 (1.9 +/- 4.5%). Moreover, it showed to be fast, taking 5 seconds for the tracking of a full 4D dataset (30 ms per image). Overall, a novel fast, robust and accurate LV tracking methodology was proposed, enabling accurate assessment of relevant global function cardiac indices, such as volumes and ejection fraction

  4. Fast Simulators for Satellite Cloud Optical Centroid Pressure Retrievals, 1. Evaluation of OMI Cloud Retrievals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joiner, J.; Vasilkov, A.; Gupta, P.; Bhartia, P. K.; Veefkind, P.; Sneep, M.; de Haan, J.; Polonsky, I.; Spurr, R.

    2012-01-01

    The cloud Optical Centroid Pressure (OCP), also known as the effective cloud pressure, is a satellite-derived parameter that is commonly used in trace-gas retrievals to account for the effects of clouds on near-infrared through ultraviolet radiance measurements. Fast simulators are desirable to further expand the use of cloud OCP retrievals into the operational and climate communities for applications such as data assimilation and evaluation of cloud vertical structure in general circulation models. In this paper, we develop and validate fast simulators that provide estimates of the cloud OCP given a vertical profile of optical extinction. We use a pressure-weighting scheme where the weights depend upon optical parameters of clouds and/or aerosol. A cloud weighting function is easily extracted using this formulation. We then use fast simulators to compare two different satellite cloud OCP retrievals from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) with estimates based on collocated cloud extinction profiles from a combination of CloudS at radar and MODIS visible radiance data. These comparisons are made over a wide range of conditions to provide a comprehensive validation of the OMI cloud OCP retrievals. We find generally good agreement between OMI cloud OCPs and those predicted by CloudSat. However, the OMI cloud OCPs from the two independent algorithms agree better with each other than either does with the estimates from CloudSat/MODIS. Differences between OMI cloud OCPs and those based on CloudSat/MODIS may result from undetected snow/ice at the surface, cloud 3-D effects, low altitude clouds missed by CloudSat, and the fact that CloudSat only observes a relatively small fraction of an OMI field-of-view.

  5. SOHO Captures CME From X5.4 Solar Flare

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Solar Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) captured this movie of the sun's coronal mass ejection (CME) associated with an X5.4 solar flare on the evening of March 6, 2012. The extremely fast and en...

  6. Immunobiosensor for fast detection of bacteria in water using plastic optical fiber (POF) bended

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Domingos M. C.; Lopes, Rafaela N.; Queiroz, Vanessa M.; Allil, Regina C. S. B.; Werneck, Marcelo M.

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents an immunobiosensor of fast response time to detection of bacteria, made by Plastic Optical Fiber. Probes were tested in U-shaped and Meander-shaped to investigate the best sensitivity, accuracy and repeatability. During calibration was used for sucrose solutions refractive index (RI) from 1.33 to 1.39. This is equivalent to IR range of the water and the highest concentration of bacteria, respectively. Immunobiosensor was able to detecting the presence of enteropathogenic Escherichia coli in water from suspensions of different concentrations of 106 and 104 colonies forming units per millilitre (CFU/mL) in twenty minutes.

  7. Self-Balancing, Optical-Center-Pivot, Fast-Steering Mirror

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, James D.; Carson, Johnathan W.

    2011-01-01

    A complete, self-contained fast-steering- mirror (FSM) mechanism is reported consisting of a housing, a mirror and mirror-mounting cell, three PZT (piezoelectric) actuators, and a counterbalance mass. Basically, it is a comparatively stiff, two-axis (tip-tilt), self-balanced FSM. The present invention requires only three (or three pairs for flight redundancy) actuators. If a PZT actuator degrades, the inherent balance remains, and compensation for degraded stroke is made by simply increasing the voltage to the PZT. Prior designs typically do not pivot at the mirror optical center, creating unacceptable beam shear.

  8. Fast optical sectioning obtained by structured illumination microscopy using a digital mirror device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Dongli; Jiang, Tao; Li, Anan; Hu, Bihe; Feng, Zhao; Gong, Hui; Zeng, Shaoqun; Luo, Qingming

    2013-06-01

    High-throughput optical imaging is critical to obtain large-scale neural connectivity information of brain in neuroscience. Using a digital mirror device and a scientific complementary metal-oxide semiconductor camera, we report a significant speed improvement of structured illumination microscopy (SIM), which produces a maximum SIM net frame rate of 133 Hz. We perform three-dimensional (3-D) imaging of mouse brain slices at diffraction-limited resolution and demonstrate the fast 3-D imaging capability to a large sample with an imaging rate of 6.9 pixel/s of our system, an order of magnitude faster than previously reported.

  9. Optical absorption and luminescence studies of fast neutron-irradiated complex oxides for jewellery applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mironova-Ulmane, N.; Skvortsova, V.; Popov, A. I.

    2016-07-01

    We studied the optical absorption and luminescence of agate (SiO2), topaz (Al2[SiO4](F,OH)2), beryl (Be3Al2Si6O18), and prehnite (Ca2Al(AlSi3O10)(OH)2) doped with different concentrations of transition metal ions and exposed to fast neutron irradiation. The exchange interaction between the impurity ions and the defects arising under neutron irradiation causes additional absorption as well as bands' broadening in the crystals. These experimental results allow us to suggest the method for obtaining new radiation-defect induced jewellery colors of minerals due to neutron irradiation.

  10. Fast optical source for quantum key distribution based on semiconductor optical amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Jofre, M; Gardelein, A; Anzolin, G; Amaya, W; Capmany, J; Ursin, R; Peñate, L; Lopez, D; San Juan, J L; Carrasco, J A; Garcia, F; Torcal-Milla, F J; Sanchez-Brea, L M; Bernabeu, E; Perdigues, J M; Jennewein, T; Torres, J P; Mitchell, M W; Pruneri, V

    2011-02-28

    A novel integrated optical source capable of emitting faint pulses with different polarization states and with different intensity levels at 100 MHz has been developed. The source relies on a single laser diode followed by four semiconductor optical amplifiers and thin film polarizers, connected through a fiber network. The use of a single laser ensures high level of indistinguishability in time and spectrum of the pulses for the four different polarizations and three different levels of intensity. The applicability of the source is demonstrated in the lab through a free space quantum key distribution experiment which makes use of the decoy state BB84 protocol. We achieved a lower bound secure key rate of the order of 3.64 Mbps and a quantum bit error ratio as low as 1.14×10⁻² while the lower bound secure key rate became 187 bps for an equivalent attenuation of 35 dB. To our knowledge, this is the fastest polarization encoded QKD system which has been reported so far. The performance, reduced size, low power consumption and the fact that the components used can be space qualified make the source particularly suitable for secure satellite communication. PMID:21369207

  11. Single-shot digital holography for fast measuring optical properties of fibers.

    PubMed

    Agour, Mostafa; El-Farahaty, Keremal; Seisa, Eman; Omar, Emam; Sokkar, Taha

    2015-10-01

    We propose a fast method for measuring optical properties, e.g., the refractive index profile and birefringence, of fibers. It is based on recovering the phase distribution of light refracted by a fiber sample at the recording plane from a single-shot digital hologram. During the recovering process, an optimized approach based on the spatial carrier frequency method was utilized. The proposed approach enhances affects that arise from the limited spatial extent of the bandpass filter associated with the implementation of the spatial carrier frequency method. In contrast to the low spatial resolution of off-axis digital holograms, the method ensures the best utilization of the camera support. From the recovered phase information, the optical path difference is measured; thus, the refractive index profile, the mean refractive index, and the birefringence of isotactic polypropylene (IPP) are determined. Experimental results are given for illustration. PMID:26479652

  12. Test of relativistic time dilation with fast optical atomic clocks at different velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinhardt, Sascha; Saathoff, Guido; Buhr, Henrik; Carlson, Lars A.; Wolf, Andreas; Schwalm, Dirk; Karpuk, Sergei; Novotny, Christian; Huber, Gerhard; Zimmermann, Marcus; Holzwarth, Ronald; Udem, Thomas; Hänsch, Theodor W.; Gwinner, Gerald

    2007-12-01

    Time dilation is one of the most fascinating aspects of special relativity as it abolishes the notion of absolute time. It was first observed experimentally by Ives and Stilwell in 1938 using the Doppler effect. Here we report on a method, based on fast optical atomic clocks with large, but different Lorentz boosts, that tests relativistic time dilation with unprecedented precision. The approach combines ion storage and cooling with optical frequency counting using a frequency comb. 7Li+ ions are prepared at 6.4% and 3.0% of the speed of light in a storage ring, and their time is read with an accuracy of 2×10-10 using laser saturation spectroscopy. The comparison of the Doppler shifts yields a time dilation measurement represented by a Mansouri-Sexl parameter , consistent with special relativity. This constrains the existence of a preferred cosmological reference frame and CPT- and Lorentz-violating `new' physics beyond the standard model.

  13. Fast Restoration Based on Alternative Wavelength Paths in a Wide Area Optical IP Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matera, Francesco; Rea, Luca; Venezia, Matteo; Capanna, Lorenzo; Del Prete, Giuseppe

    In this article we describe an experimental investigation of IP network restoration based on wavelength recovery. We propose a procedure for metro and wide area gigabit Ethernet networks that allows us to route the wavelength in case of link failure to another existing link by exploiting wavelength division multiplexing in the fiber. Such a procedure is obtained by means of an optical switch that is managed by a loss-of-light signal that is generated by a router in case of link failure. Such a method has been tested in an IP network consisting of three core routers with optical gigabit Ethernet interfaces connected by means of 50-km-long single-mode fibers between Rome and Pomezia. Compared with other conventional restoration techniques, such as OSPF and MPLS, our method -in very fast (20 ms) and is compatible with real-time TV services and low-cost chips.

  14. Simultaneous X-ray and optical observations of the flaring X-ray source, Aquila A-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowyer, C. S.; Charles, P. A.

    1979-01-01

    During the summer of 1978 the recurrent transient X-ray source, Aquila X-1, underwent its first major outburst in two years. The results of extensive observations at X-ray and optical wavelengths throughout this event, which lasted for approximately two months are presented. The peak X-ray luminosity was approximately 1.3 times that of the Crab and exhibited spectral dependent flickering on timescales approximately 5 minutes. The observations are interpreted in terms of a standard accretion disk model withparticular emphasis on the similarities to Sco X-1 and other dward X-ray systems, although the transient nature of the system remains unexplained. It was found that Aquila X-1 can be described adequately by the semi-detached Roche lobe model and yields a mass ratio of less than or approximate to 3.5.

  15. Signatures of the coalescence instability in solar flares

    SciTech Connect

    Nakajima, H.; Tajima, T.; Brunel, F.

    1984-11-01

    Double sub-peak structures in the quasi periodic oscillations in the time profiles of solar flares in 1980 and 1982 are discussed. Computer simulations of the coalescence instability of two current loops agree with observations of the (widely differing) flares. The simultaneous accelerations of electrons and ions, and the double sub-peak structure in quasi periodic pulses are well explained. The double sub-peak structure is more pronounced when the currents in the two loops are sufficient for fast coalescence to occur. This corresponds to the 1980 flare. When the currents are insufficient for fast coalescence, the double sub-peak structure is less pronounced, as in the 1982 flare. Observations suggest the collision of the two microwave sources for the 1982 event. It is argued that this mechanism is a plausible particle acceleration mechanism in solar flares. (ESA)

  16. The flare kernel in the impulsive phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dejager, C.

    1986-01-01

    The impulsive phase of a flare is characterized by impulsive bursts of X-ray and microwave radiation, related to impulsive footpoint heating up to 50 or 60 MK, by upward gas velocities (150 to 400 km/sec) and by a gradual increase of the flare's thermal energy content. These phenomena, as well as non-thermal effects, are all related to the impulsive energy injection into the flare. The available observations are also quantitatively consistent with a model in which energy is injected into the flare by beams of energetic electrons, causing ablation of chromospheric gas, followed by convective rise of gas. Thus, a hole is burned into the chromosphere; at the end of impulsive phase of an average flare the lower part of that hole is situated about 1800 km above the photosphere. H alpha and other optical and UV line emission is radiated by a thin layer (approx. 20 km) at the bottom of the flare kernel. The upward rising and outward streaming gas cools down by conduction in about 45 s. The non-thermal effects in the initial phase are due to curtailing of the energy distribution function by escape of energetic electrons. The single flux tube model of a flare does not fit with these observations; instead we propose the spaghetti-bundle model. Microwave and gamma-ray observations suggest the occurrence of dense flare knots of approx. 800 km diameter, and of high temperature. Future observations should concentrate on locating the microwave/gamma-ray sources, and on determining the kernel's fine structure and the related multi-loop structure of the flaring area.

  17. Predicting the Response of the Mars Ionosphere to Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fallows, K.; Withers, P.; Gonzalez, G.

    2015-12-01

    The increased soft X-ray irradiance during solar flares generates increased electron densities in the lower ionosphere of Mars. The relative changes in electron density during a flare are greater for larger flares and also at lower altitudes and larger flares, due to the wavelength dependence of both the flux increase during the flare and the absorption of flux by the neutral atmosphere. These relationships have been explored [Bougher et al. 2001, Fox et al. 2004, Mendillo et al. 2006, Mahajan et al. 2011, Lollo et al. 2012] but not quantified, which has impeded the validation of simulations of the ionospheric effects of solar flares. Such simulations are necessary for developing accurate descriptions of the physical processes governing ionospheric behavior under extreme conditions. We present a response function, a mathematical expression for the change in electron density during a solar flare as a function of the change in solar flux and an optical depth proxy. This response function is based on analysis of 20 Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) radio occultation electron density profiles measured during solar flares. Characterizing the response as a function of optical depth, rather than altitude, provides the best description of ionospheric variability during a flare; otherwise non-negligible solar zenith angle effects are present. We demonstrate that the response function can be used to predict ionospheric electron densities during a specified solar flare by reproducing profiles known to be disturbed by a solar flare. We also demonstrate that the response function can be used to infer the strength of solar flares not visible at Earth by finding the flux enhancement required to reproduce an apparently flare affected profile given an undisturbed profile on the same date.

  18. Fast-response optical and near-infrared GRB science with RATIR and RIMAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capone, John; RIMAS Collaboration, RATIR project Team

    2016-01-01

    As the Universe's most luminous transient events, long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are observed at cosmological distances. The afterglow emission generated by the burst's interaction with the surrounding medium presents the opportunity to study the local environment, as well as intervening systems. The transient nature of these events requires observations starting within minutes of the GRB to maximize the scientific opportunities.This dissertation work comprises efforts to advance the field with a new instrument, the Rapid Infrared Imager and Spectrograph (RIMAS). The optical design is complicated by the broad band coverage (0.97 to 2.39 microns) and the necessity of transmissive optics due to space and weight limitations on the telescope. Additionally, the entire optical system must be cooled to cryogenic temperatures to decrease the background from thermal emission. The completed instrument will be permanently installed on Lowell Observatory's new 4.3 meter Discovery Channel Telescope (DCT) located in Happy Jack, Arizona. The fast slew time of the telescope, combined with the instrument's ability to image in two bands simultaneously and switch to spectroscopic configurations in under a minute will allow observers to obtain photometric data within minutes and spectra within ~ ten minutes.In addition to instrumentation work on RIMAS's optics, early time photometric light curves have been studied primarily using data from the Reionization and Transients Infrared/Optical Project (RATIR). Early time photometric data in six optical and near-infrared (NIR) bands has allowed a study of color evolution in the early to late time SEDs. This study probes possible impacts of the GRB on the local medium as well as intrinsic changes in the afterglow emission.This work is made possible by the RATIR and RIMAS collaborations as well as financial support by the NSF.

  19. Looking for Speed!! Go Optical Ultra-Fast Photonic Logic Gates for the Future Optical Communication and Computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdeldayem, Hossin; Frazier, Donald O.; Penn, Benjamin; Paley, Mark S.

    2003-01-01

    Recently, we developed two ultra-fast all-optical switches in the nanosecond and picosecond regimes. The picosecond switch is made of a polydiacetylene thin film coated on the interior wall of a hollow capillary of approximately 50 micron diameter by a photo-polymerization process. In the setup a picosecond Nd:YAG laser at 10 Hz and at 532 nm with a pulse duration of approximately 40 ps was sent collinearly along a cw He-Ne laser beam and both were waveguided through the hollow capillary. The setup functioned as an Exclusive OR gate. On the other hand, the material used in the nanosecond switch is a phthalocyanine thin film, deposited on a glass substrate by a vapor deposition technique. In the setup a nanosecond, 10 Hz, Nd:YAG laser of 8 ns pulse duration was sent collinearly along a cw He-Ne laser beam and both were wave-guided through the phthalocyanine thin film. The setup in this case functioned as an all-optical AND logic gate. The characteristic table of the ExOR gate in polydiacetylene film was attributed to an excited state absorption process, while that of the AND gate was attributed to a saturation process of the first excited state. Both mechanisms were thoroughly investigated theoretically and found to agree remarkably well with the experimental results. An all-optical inverter gate has been designed but has not yet been demonstrated. The combination of all these three gates form the foundation for building all the necessary gates needed to build a prototype of an all-optical system.

  20. Fast single photon avalanche photodiode-based time-resolved diffuse optical tomography scanner

    PubMed Central

    Mu, Ying; Niedre, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Resolution in diffuse optical tomography (DOT) is a persistent problem and is primarily limited by high degree of light scatter in biological tissue. We showed previously that the reduction in photon scatter between a source and detector pair at early time points following a laser pulse in time-resolved DOT is highly dependent on the temporal response of the instrument. To this end, we developed a new single-photon avalanche photodiode (SPAD) based time-resolved DOT scanner. This instrument uses an array of fast SPADs, a femto-second Titanium Sapphire laser and single photon counting electronics. In combination, the overall instrument temporal impulse response function width was 59 ps. In this paper, we report the design of this instrument and validate its operation in symmetrical and irregularly shaped optical phantoms of approximately small animal size. We were able to accurately reconstruct the size and position of up to 4 absorbing inclusions, with increasing image quality at earlier time windows. We attribute these results primarily to the rapid response time of our instrument. These data illustrate the potential utility of fast SPAD detectors in time-resolved DOT. PMID:26417526

  1. Fast optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy using a 2-axis water-proofing MEMS scanner

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin Young; Lee, Changho; Park, Kyungjin; Lim, Geunbae; Kim, Chulhong

    2015-01-01

    Optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM) is a novel label-free microscopic imaging tool to provide in vivo optical absorbing contrasts. Specially, it is crucial to equip a real-time imaging capability without sacrificing high signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) for identifying and tracking specific diseases in OR-PAM. Herein we demonstrate a 2-axis water-proofing MEMS scanner made of flexible PDMS. This flexible scanner results in a wide scanning range (9 × 4 mm2 in a transverse plane) and a fast imaging speed (5 B-scan images per second). Further, the MEMS scanner is fabricated in a compact footprint with a size of 15 × 15 × 15 mm3. More importantly, the scanning ability in water makes the MEMS scanner possible to confocally and simultaneously reflect both ultrasound and laser, and consequently we can maintain high SNRs. The lateral and axial resolutions of the OR-PAM system are 3.6 and 27.7 μm, respectively. We have successfully monitored the flow of carbon particles in vitro with a volumetric display frame rate of 0.14 Hz. Finally, we have successfully obtained in vivo PA images of microvasculatures in a mouse ear. It is expected that our compact and fast OR-PAM system can be significantly useful in both preclinical and clinical applications. PMID:25604654

  2. Versatile illumination platform and fast optical switch to give standard observation camera gated active imaging capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasser, R.; Peyronneaudi, Benjamin; Yon, Kevin; Aubry, Marie

    2015-10-01

    CILAS, subsidiary of Airbus Defense and Space, develops, manufactures and sales laser-based optronics equipment for defense and homeland security applications. Part of its activity is related to active systems for threat detection, recognition and identification. Active surveillance and active imaging systems are often required to achieve identification capacity in case for long range observation in adverse conditions. In order to ease the deployment of active imaging systems often complex and expensive, CILAS suggests a new concept. It consists on the association of two apparatus working together. On one side, a patented versatile laser platform enables high peak power laser illumination for long range observation. On the other side, a small camera add-on works as a fast optical switch to select photons with specific time of flight only. The association of the versatile illumination platform and the fast optical switch presents itself as an independent body, so called "flash module", giving to virtually any passive observation systems gated active imaging capacity in NIR and SWIR.

  3. A fast method for optical simulation of flood maps of light-sharing detector modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Han; Du, Dong; Xu, JianFeng; Moses, William W.; Peng, Qiyu

    2015-12-01

    Optical simulation of the detector module level is highly desired for Position Emission Tomography (PET) system design. Commonly used simulation toolkits such as GATE are not efficient in the optical simulation of detector modules with complicated light-sharing configurations, where a vast amount of photons need to be tracked. We present a fast approach based on a simplified specular reflectance model and a structured light-tracking algorithm to speed up the photon tracking in detector modules constructed with polished finish and specular reflector materials. We simulated conventional block detector designs with different slotted light guide patterns using the new approach and compared the outcomes with those from GATE simulations. While the two approaches generated comparable flood maps, the new approach was more than 200-600 times faster. The new approach has also been validated by constructing a prototype detector and comparing the simulated flood map with the experimental flood map. The experimental flood map has nearly uniformly distributed spots similar to those in the simulated flood map. In conclusion, the new approach provides a fast and reliable simulation tool for assisting in the development of light-sharing-based detector modules with a polished surface finish and using specular reflector materials.

  4. High-frame-rate intensified fast optically shuttered TV cameras with selected imaging applications

    SciTech Connect

    Yates, G.J.; King, N.S.P.

    1994-08-01

    This invited paper focuses on high speed electronic/electro-optic camera development by the Applied Physics Experiments and Imaging Measurements Group (P-15) of Los Alamos National Laboratory`s Physics Division over the last two decades. The evolution of TV and image intensifier sensors and fast readout fast shuttered cameras are discussed. Their use in nuclear, military, and medical imaging applications are presented. Several salient characteristics and anomalies associated with single-pulse and high repetition rate performance of the cameras/sensors are included from earlier studies to emphasize their effects on radiometric accuracy of electronic framing cameras. The Group`s test and evaluation capabilities for characterization of imaging type electro-optic sensors and sensor components including Focal Plane Arrays, gated Image Intensifiers, microchannel plates, and phosphors are discussed. Two new unique facilities, the High Speed Solid State Imager Test Station (HSTS) and the Electron Gun Vacuum Test Chamber (EGTC) arc described. A summary of the Group`s current and developmental camera designs and R&D initiatives are included.

  5. Ultra fast all-optical fiber pressure sensor for blast event evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Nan; Wang, Wenhui; Tian, Ye; Niezrecki, Christopher; Wang, Xingwei

    2011-05-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a great potential threat to soldiers who are exposed to explosions or athletes who receive cranial impacts. Protecting people from TBI has recently attracted a significant amount of attention due to recent military operations in the Middle East. Recording pressure transient data in a blast event is very critical to the understanding of the effects of blast events on TBI. However, due to the fast change of the pressure during blast events, very few sensors have the capability to effectively track the dynamic pressure transients. This paper reports an ultra fast, miniature and all-optical fiber pressure sensor which could be mounted at different locations of a helmet to measure the fast changing pressure simultaneously. The sensor is based on Fabry-Perot (FP) principle. The end face of the fiber is wet etched. A well controlled thickness silicon dioxide diaphragm is thermal bonded on the end face to form an FP cavity. A shock tube test was conducted at Natick Soldier Research Development and Engineering Center, where the sensors were mounted in a shock tube side by side with a reference sensor to measure the rapidly changing pressure. The results of the test demonstrated that the sensor developed had an improved rise time (shorter than 0.4 μs) when compared to a commercially available reference sensor.

  6. Development of Fast Reactor Structural Integrity Monitoring Technology Using Optical Fiber Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuba, Ken-Ichi; Ito, Chikara; Kawahara, Hirotaka; Aoyama, Takafumi

    Significant thermal stresses are loaded onto the structures of sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) due to high temperature and large temperature gradients associated with employing sodium coolant with its high thermal conductivity and low heat capacity. Therefore, it is important to monitor the temperature variation, related stress and displacement, and vibration in the cooling system piping and components in order to assure structural integrity while the reactor plant is in-service. SFR structural integrity monitoring can be enhanced by an optical fiber sensor, which is capable of continuous or dispersed distribution measurements of various properties such as radiation dose, temperature, strain, displacement and acceleration. In the experimental fast reactor Joyo, displacement and vibration measurements of the primary cooling system have been carried out using Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) sensors to evaluate the durability and measurement accuracy of FBG sensors in a high gamma-ray environment. The data were successfully obtained with no significant signal loss up to an accumulated gamma-ray dose of approximately 4×104 Gy corresponding to 120 EFPDs (effective full power days) operation. Measured displacement of the piping support was nearly equal to the calculated thermal displacement. Measured vibration power spectra of the piping support were similar to those measured with a reference acceleration sensor. The measured results indicate that the FBG sensor is suitable for monitoring the displacement and vibration aspects of fast reactor cooling system integrity in a high gamma-ray environment.

  7. Towards Predicting Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, Lisa; Balasubramaniam, Karatholuvu S.

    2015-04-01

    We present a statistical study of solar X-ray flares observed using GOES X-ray observations of the ~50,000 fares that occurred from 1986 - mid-2014. Observed X-ray parameters are computed for each of the flares, including the 24-hour non-flare X-ray background in the 1-8 A band and the maximum ratio of the short (0.5 - 4 A) to long band (1-8 A) during flares. These parameters, which are linked to the amount of active coronal heating and maximum flare temperature, reveal a separation between the X-, M-, C-, and B- class fares. The separation was quantified and verified through machine-learning algorithms (k nearest neighbor; nearest centroid). Using the solar flare parameters learned from solar cycles 22-23, we apply the models to predict flare categories of solar cycle 24. Skill scores are then used to assess the success of our models, yielding correct predictions for ~80% of M-, C-, and B-class flares and 100% correct predictions for X-flares. We present details of the analysis along with the potential uses of our model in flare forecasting.

  8. Simultaneous detection of a large flare in the X-ray and optical regions on the RS CVn-type star II Peg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, J. G.; Kellett, B. J.; Byrne, P. B.; Avgoloupis, S.; Mavridis, L. N.; Seiradakis, J. H.; Bromage, G. E.; Tsuru, T.; Makishima, K.; Makishima, K.; McHardy, I. M.

    1991-02-01

    Results are presented for a large flare detected simultaneously on the RS CVn star II Peg by the X-ray satellite GINGA and from ground-based Johnson U-band measurements. The total U-band flare energy is estimated to be at least 6.6 x 10 to the 34th erg. This compares with at least 4.6 x 10 to 34th erg in the 1-10 keV energy range. These values are lower limits to the true radiative output, since the U-band data relates only to the rise phase of the flare, while the X-ray data were obtained during part of the decay phase. Using a 'smooth-burst model', the combined U-band plus X-ray radiative output is estimated to be about 3 x 10 to the 34th erg.

  9. High-speed optical shutter coupled to fast-readout CCD camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yates, George J.; Pena, Claudine R.; McDonald, Thomas E., Jr.; Gallegos, Robert A.; Numkena, Dustin M.; Turko, Bojan T.; Ziska, George; Millaud, Jacques E.; Diaz, Rick; Buckley, John; Anthony, Glen; Araki, Takae; Larson, Eric D.

    1999-04-01

    A high frame rate optically shuttered CCD camera for radiometric imaging of transient optical phenomena has been designed and several prototypes fabricated, which are now in evaluation phase. the camera design incorporates stripline geometry image intensifiers for ultra fast image shutters capable of 200ps exposures. The intensifiers are fiber optically coupled to a multiport CCD capable of 75 MHz pixel clocking to achieve 4KHz frame rate for 512 X 512 pixels from simultaneous readout of 16 individual segments of the CCD array. The intensifier, Philips XX1412MH/E03 is generically a Generation II proximity-focused micro channel plate intensifier (MCPII) redesigned for high speed gating by Los Alamos National Laboratory and manufactured by Philips Components. The CCD is a Reticon HSO512 split storage with bi-direcitonal vertical readout architecture. The camera main frame is designed utilizing a multilayer motherboard for transporting CCD video signals and clocks via imbedded stripline buses designed for 100MHz operation. The MCPII gate duration and gain variables are controlled and measured in real time and up-dated for data logging each frame, with 10-bit resolution, selectable either locally or by computer. The camera provides both analog and 10-bit digital video. The camera's architecture, salient design characteristics, and current test data depicting resolution, dynamic range, shutter sequences, and image reconstruction will be presented and discussed.

  10. “Seeing” electroencephalogram through the skull: imaging prefrontal cortex with fast optical signal

    PubMed Central

    Medvedev, Andrei V.; Kainerstorfer, Jana M.; Borisov, Sergey V.; Gandjbakhche, Amir H.; VanMeter, John

    2010-01-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy is a novel imaging technique potentially sensitive to both brain hemodynamics (slow signal) and neuronal activity (fast optical signal, FOS). The big challenge of measuring FOS noninvasively lies in the presumably low signal-to-noise ratio. Thus, detectability of the FOS has been controversially discussed. We present reliable detection of FOS from 11 individuals concurrently with electroencephalogram (EEG) during a Go-NoGo task. Probes were placed bilaterally over prefrontal cortex. Independent component analysis (ICA) was used for artifact removal. Correlation coefficient in the best correlated FOS–EEG ICA pairs was highly significant (p < 10−8), and event-related optical signal (EROS) was found in all subjects. Several EROS components were similar to the event-related potential (ERP) components. The most robust “optical N200” at t = 225 ms coincided with the N200 ERP; both signals showed significant difference between targets and nontargets, and their timing correlated with subject’s reaction time. Correlation between FOS and EEG even in single trials provides further evidence that at least some FOS components “reflect” electrical brain processes directly. The data provide evidence for the early involvement of prefrontal cortex in rapid object recognition. EROS is highly localized and can provide cost-effective imaging tools for cortical mapping of cognitive processes. PMID:21198150

  11. Fast-response fiber-optic anemometer with temperature self-compensation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guigen; Hou, Weilin; Qiao, Wei; Han, Ming

    2015-05-18

    We report a novel fiber-optic anemometer with self-temperature compensation capability based on a Fabry-Pérot interferometer (FPI) formed by a thin silicon film attached to the end face of a single-mode fiber. Guided in the fiber are a visible laser beam from a 635 nm diode laser used to heat the FPI and a white-light in the infrared wavelength range as the signal light to interrogate the optical length of the FPI. Cooling effects on the heated sensor head by wind is converted to a wavelength blueshift of the reflection spectral fringes of the FPI. Self-temperature-compensated measurement of wind speed is achieved by recording the difference in fringe wavelengths when the heating laser is turned on and then off. Large thermal-optic coefficient and thermal expansion coefficient of silicon render a high sensitivity that can also be easily tuned by altering the heating laser power. Furthermore, the large thermal diffusivity and the small mass of the thin silicon film endow a fast sensor response. PMID:26074604

  12. DISCOVERY OF FAST, LARGE-AMPLITUDE OPTICAL VARIABILITY OF V648 Car (=SS73-17)

    SciTech Connect

    Angeloni, R.; Di Mille, F.; Ferreira Lopes, C. E.

    2012-09-01

    We report on the discovery of large-amplitude flickering from V648 Car (= SS73-17), a poorly studied object listed among the very few hard X-ray-emitting symbiotic stars. We performed millimagnitude precision optical photometry with the Swope Telescope at the Las Campanas Observatory, Chile, and found that V648 Car shows large U-band variability over timescales of minutes. To our knowledge, it exhibits some of the largest flickering of a symbiotic star ever reported. Our finding supports the hypothesis that symbiotic white dwarfs producing hard X-rays are predominantly powered by accretion, rather than quasi-steady nuclear burning, and have masses close to the Chandrasekhar limit. No significant periodicity is evident from the flickering light curve. The All Sky Automated Survey long-term V light curve suggests the presence of a tidally distorted giant accreting via Roche lobe overflow, and a binary period of {approx}520 days. On the basis of the outstanding physical properties of V648 Car as hinted at by its fast and long-term optical variability, as well as by its nature as a hard X-ray emitter, we therefore call for simultaneous follow-up observations in different bands, ideally combined with time-resolved optical spectroscopy.

  13. ``Seeing'' electroencephalogram through the skull: imaging prefrontal cortex with fast optical signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medvedev, Andrei V.; Kainerstorfer, Jana M.; Borisov, Sergey V.; Gandjbakhche, Amir H.; Vanmeter, John

    2010-11-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy is a novel imaging technique potentially sensitive to both brain hemodynamics (slow signal) and neuronal activity (fast optical signal, FOS). The big challenge of measuring FOS noninvasively lies in the presumably low signal-to-noise ratio. Thus, detectability of the FOS has been controversially discussed. We present reliable detection of FOS from 11 individuals concurrently with electroencephalogram (EEG) during a Go-NoGo task. Probes were placed bilaterally over prefrontal cortex. Independent component analysis (ICA) was used for artifact removal. Correlation coefficient in the best correlated FOS-EEG ICA pairs was highly significant (p < 10-8), and event-related optical signal (EROS) was found in all subjects. Several EROS components were similar to the event-related potential (ERP) components. The most robust ``optical N200'' at t = 225 ms coincided with the N200 ERP; both signals showed significant difference between targets and nontargets, and their timing correlated with subject's reaction time. Correlation between FOS and EEG even in single trials provides further evidence that at least some FOS components ``reflect'' electrical brain processes directly. The data provide evidence for the early involvement of prefrontal cortex in rapid object recognition. EROS is highly localized and can provide cost-effective imaging tools for cortical mapping of cognitive processes.

  14. Adaptive spatial carrier frequency method for fast monitoring optical properties of fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokkar, T. Z. N.; El-Farahaty, K. A.; El-Bakary, M. A.; Omar, E. Z.; Agour, M.; Hamza, A. A.

    2016-05-01

    We present an extension of the adaptive spatial carrier frequency method which is proposed for fast measuring optical properties of fibrous materials. The method can be considered as a two complementary steps. In the first step, the support of the adaptive filter shall be defined. In the second step, the angle between the sample under test and the interference fringe system generated by the utilized interferometer has to be determined. Thus, the support of the optical filter associated with the implementation of the adaptive spatial carrier frequency method is accordingly rotated. This method is experimentally verified by measuring optical properties of polypropylene (PP) fibre with the help of a Mach-Zehnder interferometer. The results show that errors resulting from rotating the fibre with respect to the interference fringes of the interferometer are reduced compared with the traditional band pass filter method. This conclusion was driven by comparing results of the mean refractive index of drown PP fibre at parallel polarization direction obtained from the new and adaptive spatial carrier frequency method.

  15. Solar Flares: Magnetohydrodynamic Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, Kazunari; Magara, Tetsuya

    2011-12-01

    This paper outlines the current understanding of solar flares, mainly focused on magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) processes responsible for producing a flare. Observations show that flares are one of the most explosive phenomena in the atmosphere of the Sun, releasing a huge amount of energy up to about 10^32 erg on the timescale of hours. Flares involve the heating of plasma, mass ejection, and particle acceleration that generates high-energy particles. The key physical processes for producing a flare are: the emergence of magnetic field from the solar interior to the solar atmosphere (flux emergence), local enhancement of electric current in the corona (formation of a current sheet), and rapid dissipation of electric current (magnetic reconnection) that causes shock heating, mass ejection, and particle acceleration. The evolution toward the onset of a flare is rather quasi-static when free energy is accumulated in the form of coronal electric current (field-aligned current, more precisely), while the dissipation of coronal current proceeds rapidly, producing various dynamic events that affect lower atmospheres such as the chromosphere and photosphere. Flares manifest such rapid dissipation of coronal current, and their theoretical modeling has been developed in accordance with observations, in which numerical simulations proved to be a strong tool reproducing the time-dependent, nonlinear evolution of a flare. We review the models proposed to explain the physical mechanism of flares, giving an comprehensive explanation of the key processes mentioned above. We start with basic properties of flares, then go into the details of energy build-up, release and transport in flares where magnetic reconnection works as the central engine to produce a flare.

  16. Emergency flare tip repair

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, G.A.

    1982-07-01

    Two damaged propane storage tank flares serving a large LPG storage facility near the Arabian Gulf were given emergency service. A diagram of over-all layout and spatial relationships between tanks and piping, and tables with general information relevant to selecting an acceptable radiant heat load factor and flare line flow characteristics were presented. The general equation for predicting radiant heat flux from a point source was used. The ignition of the temporary flare was discussed.

  17. Particle acceleration in flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benz, Arnold O.; Kosugi, Takeo; Aschwanden, Markus J.; Benka, Steve G.; Chupp, Edward L.; Enome, Shinzo; Garcia, Howard; Holman, Gordon D.; Kurt, Victoria G.; Sakao, Taro

    1994-01-01

    Particle acceleration is intrinsic to the primary energy release in the impulsive phase of solar flares, and we cannot understand flares without understanding acceleration. New observations in soft and hard X-rays, gamma-rays and coherent radio emissions are presented, suggesting flare fragmentation in time and space. X-ray and radio measurements exhibit at least five different time scales in flares. In addition, some new observations of delayed acceleration signatures are also presented. The theory of acceleration by parallel electric fields is used to model the spectral shape and evolution of hard X-rays. The possibility of the appearance of double layers is further investigated.

  18. Flared tube attachment fitting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alkire, I. D.; King, J. P., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Tubes can be flared first, then attached to valves and other flow line components, with new fitting that can be disassembled and reused. Installed fitting can be disassembled so parts can be inspected. It can be salvaged and reused without damaging flared tube; tube can be coated, tempered, or otherwise treated after it has been flared, rather than before, as was previously required. Fitting consists of threaded male portion with conical seating surface, hexagonal nut with hole larger than other diameter of flared end of tube, and split ferrule.

  19. Solar flares. [plasma physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rust, D. M.

    1979-01-01

    The present paper deals with explosions in a magnetized solar plasma, known as flares, whose effects are seen throughout the electromagnetic spectrum, from gamma-rays through the visible and to the radio band. The diverse phenomena associated with flares are discussed, along with the physical mechanisms that have been advanced to explain them. The impact of solar flare research on the development of plasma physics and magnetohydrodynamics is noted. The rapid development of solar flare research during the past 20 years, owing to the availability of high-resolution images, detailed magnetic field measurements, and improved spectral data, is illustrated.

  20. The role of input chirp on phase shifters based on slow and fast light effects in semiconductor optical amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Xue, Weiqi; Chen, Yaohui; Ohman, Filip; Mørk, Jesper

    2009-02-01

    We experimentally investigate the initial chirp dependence of slow and fast light effects in a semiconductor optical amplifier followed by an optical filter. It is shown that the enhancement of the phase shift due to optical filtering strongly depends on the chirp of the input optical signal. We demonstrate approximately 120 degrees phase delay as well as approximately 170 degrees phase advance at a microwave frequency of 19 GHz for different optimum values of the input chirp. The experimental results are shown to be in good agreement with numerical results based on a four-wave mixing model. Finally, a simple physical explanation based on an analytical perturbative approach is presented. PMID:19188968

  1. Ultra-fast detection of relativistic charged particle beam bunches using optical techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikas, Dimitrios S.

    The use of light as a carrier of information has been the subject of discussion for many scientific papers. This approach has some unique features which distinguish it from conventional electronics. These are realized in applications like telecommunications where the use of optical fibers and Electro-Optic sampling is the industry standard. Electro-Optic sampling employs the "Pockels" or "Electro-Optic" effect. Pockels discovered that an electric field applied to some crystals changes the birefringence properties of the crystal, and hence the polarization of light that propagates through it. By placing the crystal between crossed polarizers, the transmitted light intensity changes as a function of the applied field. We made the first Electro-Optical (EO) detection of a relativistic charged particle beam, applying its Lorentz contracted electric field on an EO LiNbO 3 crystal. The resulted intensity modulation was initially reconstructed using a fast photodiode and a digital oscilloscope. The signal rise time was bandwidth limited (˜90ps) from the electronics used and a series of tests to establish our signal EO nature was performed. In particular, the amplitude of the EO modulation was found to increase linearly with the charge of the particle beam and decrease with the optical beam path distance from the charged particle beam. Also the signal polarity changed sign when the direction of the applied electric field was reversed. Next an optimized (for maximum modulation), zero bias, EO modulator was constructed for use with the limited dynamic range of the Streak Camera for the first non destructive, completely optical, detection of a charged particle beam. The observed signal may be an image of unexpected piezoelectrically generated sound waves that propagate at the X-axis of the LiNbO3 crystal. In such a case, sound waves generated in the surface as well as inside the crystal, change the index of refraction of the crystal through the photoelastic effect and as a

  2. Flare Emission Onset in the Slow-Rise and Fast-Rise Phases of an Erupting Solar Filament Observed with TRACE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterling, A. C.; Moore, R. L.

    2005-01-01

    We observe the eruption of an active-region solar filament of 1998 July 11 using high time cadence and high spatial resolution EUV observations from the TRACE sareiii'ce, along with soft X-ray images from the soft X-ray telescope (SXT) on the Yohkoh satellite, hard X-ray fluxes from the BATSE instrument on the (CGRO) satellite and from the hard X-ray telescope (HXT) on Yohkoh, and ground-based magnetograms. We concentrate on the initiation of the eruption in an effort to understand the eruption mechanism. First the filament undergoes slow upward movement in a "slow rise" phase with an approximately constant velocity of approximately 15 km/s that lasts about 10-min, and then it erupts in a "fast-rise" phase, reaching a velocity of about 200 km/s in about 5-min, followed by a period of deceleration. EUV brightenings begin just before the start of the filament's slow rise, and remain immediately beneath the rising filament during the slow rise; initial soft X-ray brightenings occur at about the same time and location. Strong hard X-ray emission begins after the onset of the fast rise, and does not peak until the filament has traveled a substantial altitude (to a height about equal to the initial length of the erupting filament) beyond its initial location. Our observations are consistent with the slow-rise phase of the eruption resulting from the onset of "tether cutting" reconnection between magnetic fields beneath the filament, and the fast rise resulting from an explosive increase in the reconnection rate or by catastrophic destabilization of the overlying filament-carrying fields. About two days prior to the event new flux emerged near the location of the initial brightenings, and this recently- emerged flux could have been a catalyst for initiating the tether-cutting reconnection. With the exception of the initial slow rise, our findings qualitatively agree with the prediction for erupting-flux-rope height as a function of time in a model discussed by Chen

  3. A kinematic model of a solar flare.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakagawa, Y.; Wu, S. T.; Han, S. M.

    1973-01-01

    Hyder advocated the idea that the optical (H-alpha) flares can be identified with the response of the solar chromosphere to an infalling material stream resulting from the 'disparition brusque' of a prominence. Since some flares are observed without any apparent association with infalling streams, in this paper we examine the possibility of identifying the optical flare with the response of the chromosphere to a supersonic disturbance, i.e., a shock, propagating downward. The undisturbed chromosphere is represented by the Harvard-Smithsonian Reference Atmosphere and the evolution of the shock is evaluated with the use of the CCW (Chisnell, Chester, Whitham) approximation based on the theory of characteristics. It is shown that the chromosphere is heated by the shock, that radiation is enhanced, and that the enhanced radiation terminates the shock around the height of the temperature minimum.

  4. Fast and precise point spread function measurements of IR optics at extreme temperatures based on reversed imaging conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melzer, Volker; Heckmann, Hans-Georg; Ritter, Christian; Barenz, Joachim; Raab, Michael

    2010-04-01

    Point Spread Function (PSF), Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) and Ensquared Energy (EE) are important performance indicators of optical systems for surveillance, imaging and target tracking applications. We report on the development of a new measurement method which facilitates fast real time measurement of the two dimensional PSF and related performance parameters of a MWIR optical module under room temperature as well as under extreme temperature conditions. Our new measurement setup uses the law of reversibility of optical paths to capture a highly resolved, magnified image of the PSF. By using of an easy add-on thermally insulating enclosure the optical module can be exposed to and measured under both variable high and low temperatures (-50°C up to 90°C) without any external impact on the measurement. Also line of sight and various off-axis measurements are possible. Common PSF and MTF measurement methods need much more correction algorithms, whilst our method requires mainly a pinhole diameter correction only and allows fast measurements of optical parameters under temperature as well as fast and easy adjustment. Additionally comparison of the captured, highly resolved PSF with optical design data enables purposeful theoretical investigation of occurring optical artifacts.

  5. Fast response organic light-emitting diode for visible optical communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuda, Takeshi; Taniguchi, Yoshio

    2008-02-01

    We examined fast response organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) for new applications of visible optical communications. For the practical use in this field, the fast transmission speed of OLEDs is required to be used in many applications, but the low carrier mobility of organic materials and the long fluorescence lifetime (FL) organic emitting materials limit the transmission speed of OLEDs. Therefore, we investigated the influence of the FL on transient properties of photoluminescence (PL), which were evaluated by the frequency dependence of PL intensity excited by a modulated violet laser diode. The FLs of several organic emitting materials were also measured, and we found the clear relationship between the FL and the transient properties of PL intensity. The fastest cutoff frequency of PL intensity was achieved 160 MHz utilizing short FL material, 1,4-bis[2-[4-[N,N-di(ptolyl)amino]phenl]vinyl]benzene. We also investigated another way to increase the transmission speed utilizing a semiconductor-organic multilayer structure, of which ZnS was used as an electron transport layer. The maximum cutoff frequency of this device was achieved 20.3 MHz, while that of the organic multilayer structure was 8.7 MHz at a sine wave voltage of 7 V and a bias voltage of 5 V. This result indicates that the high carrier mobility of the ZnS layer causes the increase in the transmission speed of OLEDs. We demonstrated one institutive demonstrator module of visible optical communications, which consisted of the transceiver module with an OLED and the pen-type receiver module with a photo-diode at a point. The movie files was transmitted at a speed of 230 kbps, when the point of a pen-type receiver module approaches the emitting area of an OLED. Furthermore, the pseudo-random signal with 1Mbps was also transmitted with this visible optical communication system. Such a system enables to connect between transceiver and receiver module without precious alignment because of the large

  6. Time-resolved diffuse optical tomography using fast-gated single-photon avalanche diodes

    PubMed Central

    Puszka, Agathe; Di Sieno, Laura; Mora, Alberto Dalla; Pifferi, Antonio; Contini, Davide; Boso, Gianluca; Tosi, Alberto; Hervé, Lionel; Planat-Chrétien, Anne; Koenig, Anne; Dinten, Jean-Marc

    2013-01-01

    We present the first experimental results of reflectance Diffuse Optical Tomography (DOT) performed with a fast-gated single-photon avalanche diode (SPAD) coupled to a time-correlated single-photon counting system. The Mellin-Laplace transform was employed to process time-resolved data. We compare the performances of the SPAD operated in the gated mode vs. the non-gated mode for the detection and localization of an absorbing inclusion deeply embedded in a turbid medium for 5 and 15 mm interfiber distances. We demonstrate that, for a given acquisition time, the gated mode enables the detection and better localization of deeper absorbing inclusions than the non-gated mode. These results obtained on phantoms demonstrate the efficacy of time-resolved DOT at small interfiber distances. By achieving depth sensitivity with limited acquisition times, the gated mode increases the relevance of reflectance DOT at small interfiber distance for clinical applications. PMID:24009998

  7. Nanowire humidity optical sensor system based on fast Fourier transform technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rota-Rodrigo, S.; Pérez-Herrera, R.; Lopez-Aldaba, A.; López Bautista, M. C.; Esteban, O.; López-Amo, M.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, a new sensor system for relative humidity measurements based on its interaction with the evanescent field of a nanowire is presented. The interrogation of the sensing head is carried out by monitoring the fast Fourier transform phase variations of one of the nanowire interference frequencies. This method is independent of the signal amplitude and also avoids the necessity of tracking the wavelength evolution in the spectrum, which can be a handicap when there are multiple interference frequency components with different sensitivities. The sensor is operated within a wide humidity range (20%-70% relative humidity) with a maximum sensitivity achieved of 0.14rad/% relative humidity. Finally, due to the system uses an optical interrogator as unique active element, the system presents a cost-effective feature.

  8. Are fast atmospheric pulsations optical signatures of lightning-induced electron precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    LaBelle, J.

    1987-10-01

    Fast Atmospheric Light Pulsations (FAP's) consist of millisecond time-scale bursts of light which have been observed at L = 1.5--2.2 during searches for atmospheric light emissions associated with supernovae. Their statistics of occurrence resemble those of Lightning-induced Electron Precipitation (Trimpi events) observed at somewhat higher L-shells. Here we propose that FAP's are in fact optical signatures of LEP events associated with the greater than or equal to2 MeV electrons of the inner radiation belt (Lapprox. =1.4). These electrons would precipitate at low altitudes and could be modulated with time scales the order of 1 ms. The total loss rate of electrons from the inner belt resulting from these events would be comparable to, but somewhat smaller than, the loss rate due to Coulomb scattering.

  9. Fast wavelength calibration method for spectrometers based on waveguide comb optical filter

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Zhengang; Huang, Meizhen Zou, Ye; Wang, Yang; Sun, Zhenhua; Cao, Zhuangqi

    2015-04-15

    A novel fast wavelength calibration method for spectrometers based on a standard spectrometer and a double metal-cladding waveguide comb optical filter (WCOF) is proposed and demonstrated. By using the WCOF device, a wide-spectrum beam is comb-filtered, which is very suitable for spectrometer wavelength calibration. The influence of waveguide filter’s structural parameters and the beam incident angle on the comb absorption peaks’ wavelength and its bandwidth are also discussed. The verification experiments were carried out in the wavelength range of 200–1100 nm with satisfactory results. Comparing with the traditional wavelength calibration method based on discrete sparse atomic emission or absorption lines, the new method has some advantages: sufficient calibration data, high accuracy, short calibration time, fit for produce process, stability, etc.

  10. Novel single-beam optical spectrophotometer for fast luminescence, absorption, and reflection measurements of turbid materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Werner

    1995-02-01

    A novel spectrophotometer based on the deflection of a secondary element for measuring clear and highly turbid materials within the millisecond time range is developed. The number of optical components of the monochromator is reduced to the absolute minimum. This results in excellent light throughput and a low stray-light level. The spectrophotometer has been designed allowing spectral measurements of absorption, transmission, reflection, and luminescence in a single-beam mode, as documented by various examples. Its design is highly flexible and the price/quality relation might be adopted to the envisaged purpose. The main philosophy is to relocate as many functions as possible form the hardware to the software part of the spectrophotometer. Several novel procedures based on old concepts are proposed. An appropriate computer program providing data acquisition, control functions as well as numerous analytical capabilities is developed on the basis of the compiler language power basic and indispensably 'fast' routines are written in assembler language.

  11. [Measurement and retrieval of indicators for fast VOCs atmospheric photochemistry with differential optical absorption spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Peng, Fu-Min; Xie, Pin-Hua; Shao, Shi-Yong; Li, Yu-Jin; Lin, Yi-Hui; Li, Su-Wen; Qin, Min; Liu, Wen-Qing

    2008-03-01

    Featuring excellent response characteristics and detection sensitivity and with much lower operational cost, differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) can be a powerful tool to trace concentration variation of trace indicators -O3, Ox (O3 + NO2) and HCHO for fast VOCs atmospheric photochemistry. But it's difficult to measure those gases accurately because of trace concentration. Here using a self-made DOAS system, the accurate measurement of those indicators was achieved through improving the ratio of signal to noise ratio and correcting the background scattering light; the retrieving method of those indicators was developed through eliminating the temperature effect of absorption cross section, accurately removing the intrinsic structure and lamp structure of spectrum. The preference of different spectral windows that could be used for the concentration retrieval of those indicators was analyzed and compared including interfering factors, results retrieved and the accuracy. PMID:18536400

  12. Fast mode-hop-free acousto-optically tuned laser with a simple laser diode.

    PubMed

    Bösel, André; Salewski, Klaus-Dieter; Kinder, Thomas

    2007-07-01

    A mode-hop-free tunable external-cavity Littrow diode laser with intracavity acousto-optic modulators (AOMs) has been built. The modes of the red laser diode without a special antireflection coating are shifted by varying the injection current. The external resonator modes and the grating selectivity are independently electrically alterable by two AOMs. Thus, a tuning of the external resonator over up to 1900 GHz is possible. A precise computer control of laser diode and AOMs allowed a single-mode tuning of the whole laser with a tuning range of 225 GHz in 250 s. Additionally, we demonstrated fast tuning over 90 GHz in 190 micros and a repetition rate of 2.5 kHz. PMID:17603626

  13. TimepixCam: a fast optical imager with time-stamping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher-Levine, M.; Nomerotski, A.

    2016-03-01

    We describe a novel fast optical imager, TimepixCam, based on an optimized silicon pixel sensor with a thin entrance window, read out by a Timepix ASIC. TimepixCam is able to record and time-stamp light flashes in excess of 1,000 photons with high quantum efficiency in the 400-1000nm wavelength range with 20ns timing resolution, corresponding to an effective rate of 50 Megaframes per second. The camera was used for imaging ions impinging on a microchannel plate followed by a phosphor screen. Possible applications include spatial and velocity map imaging of ions in time-of-flight mass spectroscopy; coincidence imaging of ions and electrons, and other time-resolved types of imaging spectroscopy.

  14. Image dissector photocathode solar damage test program. [solar radiation shielding using a fast optical lens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R. A.

    1977-01-01

    Image dissector sensors of the same type which will be used in the NASA shuttle star tracker were used in a series of tests directed towards obtaining solar radiation/time damage criteria. Data were evaluated to determine the predicted level of operability of the star tracker if tube damage became a reality. During the test series a technique for reducing the solar damage effect was conceived and verified. The damage concepts are outlined and the test methods and data obtained which were used for verification of the technique's feasibility are presented. The ability to operate an image dissector sensor with the solar image focussed on the photocathode by a fast optical lens under certain conditions is feasible and the elimination of a mechanical protection device is possible.

  15. Two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy based on conventional optics and fast dual chopper data acquisition

    SciTech Connect

    Heisler, Ismael A. Moca, Roberta; Meech, Stephen R.; Camargo, Franco V. A.

    2014-06-15

    We report an improved experimental scheme for two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy (2D-ES) based solely on conventional optical components and fast data acquisition. This is accomplished by working with two choppers synchronized to a 10 kHz repetition rate amplified laser system. We demonstrate how scattering and pump-probe contributions can be removed during 2D measurements and how the pump probe and local oscillator spectra can be generated and saved simultaneously with each population time measurement. As an example the 2D-ES spectra for cresyl violet were obtained. The resulting 2D spectra show a significant oscillating signal during population evolution time which can be assigned to an intramolecular vibrational mode.

  16. Models of the Solar Atmospheric Response to Flare Heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allred, Joel

    2011-01-01

    I will present models of the solar atmospheric response to flare heating. The models solve the equations of non-LTE radiation hydrodynamics with an electron beam added as a flare energy source term. Radiative transfer is solved in detail for many important optically thick hydrogen and helium transitions and numerous optically thin EUV lines making the models ideally suited to study the emission that is produced during flares. I will pay special attention to understanding key EUV lines as well the mechanism for white light production. I will also present preliminary results of how the model solar atmosphere responds to Fletcher & Hudson type flare heating. I will compare this with the results from flare simulations using the standard thick target model.

  17. Theoretical gravity darkening as a function of optical depth. A first approach to fast rotating stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claret, A.

    2016-04-01

    Aims: Recent observations of very fast rotating stars show systematic deviations from the von Zeipel theorem and pose a challenge to the theory of gravity-darkening exponents (β1). In this paper, we present a new insight into the problem of temperature distribution over distorted stellar surfaces to try to reduce these discrepancies. Methods: We use a variant of the numerical method based on the triangles strategy, which we previously introduced, to evaluate the gravity-darkening exponents. The novelty of the present method is that the theoretical β1 is now computed as a function of the optical depth, that is, β1 ≡ β1(τ). The stellar evolutionary models, which are necessary to obtain the physical conditions of the stellar envelopes/atmospheres inherent to the numerical method, are computed via the code GRANADA. Results: When the resulting theoretical β1(τ) are compared with the best accurate data of very fast rotators, a good agreement for the six systems is simultaneously achieved. In addition, we derive an equation that relates the locus of constant convective efficiency in the Hertzsprung-Russell (HR) diagram with gravity-darkening exponents.

  18. Fast Simulators for Satellite Cloud Optical Centroid Pressure Retrievals, 1. Evaluation of OMI Cloud Retrievals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joiner, J.; Vasilkov, A. P.; Gupta, Pawan; Bhartia, P. K.; Veefkind, Pepijn; Sneep, Maarten; deHaan, Johan; Polonsky, Igor; Spurr, Robert

    2011-01-01

    We have developed a relatively simple scheme for simulating retrieved cloud optical centroid pressures (OCP) from satellite solar backscatter observations. We have compared simulator results with those from more detailed retrieval simulators that more fully account for the complex radiative transfer in a cloudy atmosphere. We used this fast simulator to conduct a comprehensive evaluation of cloud OCPs from the two OMI algorithms using collocated data from CloudSat and Aqua MODIS, a unique situation afforded by the A-train formation of satellites. We find that both OMI algorithms perform reasonably well and that the two algorithms agree better with each other than either does with the collocated CloudSat data. This indicates that patchy snow/ice, cloud 3D, and aerosol effects not simulated with the CloudSat data are affecting both algorithms similarly. We note that the collocation with CloudSat occurs mainly on the East side of OMI's swath. Therefore, we are not able to address cross-track biases in OMI cloud OCP retrievals. Our fast simulator may also be used to simulate cloud OCP from output generated by general circulation models (GCM) with appropriate account of cloud overlap. We have implemented such a scheme and plan to compare OMI data with GCM output in the near future.

  19. Fast electron temperature measurements using a 'multicolor' optical soft x-ray array

    SciTech Connect

    Delgado-Aparicio, L. F.; Stutman, D.; Tritz, K.; Finkenthal, M.; Bell, R.; Hosea, J.; Kaita, R.; LeBlanc, B.; Roquemore, L.; Wilson, J. R.

    2007-10-01

    A fast ({<=}0.1 ms) and compact 'multicolor' scintillator-based optical soft x-ray (OSXR) array has been developed for time- and space-resolved measurements of the electron temperature [T{sub e}(R,t)] profiles in magnetically confined fusion plasmas. The 48-channel tangential multicolor OSXR prototype was tested on the National Spherical Torus Experiment. Each sight line views the same plasma volume at the midplane (0{<=}r/a{<=}1), in three distinct energy ranges determined by beryllium foils with different thicknesses. A tangential view of the toroidally (circular) symmetric plasma allows an Abel inversion of the line-integrated SXR brightness to obtain the x-ray emissivity profiles which are then used to constrain the reconstruction of the fast T{sub e}(R,t). The first assessment of the electron temperature is obtained by modeling the slope of the continuum radiation with the ideal double-foil method using both the line-integrated intensity measurements as well as the inverted SXR emissivity profiles.

  20. Assessment of a fast electro-optical shutter for 1D spontaneous Raman scattering in flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajrouche, Hassan; Lo, Amath; Vervisch, Pierre; Cessou, Armelle

    2015-07-01

    A critical aspect of 1D single-shot spontaneous Raman scattering (SRS) experiments in turbulent flames is the need to ensure highly efficient detection associated with fast temporal gating to remove flame emission. Back-illuminated CCD cameras are remarkable for their high quantum efficiency, large dynamic range, good spatial resolution and low readout noise. However, their full-frame architecture makes these detectors difficult to use for SRS measurements in flame and requires the development of a high-speed shutter. The present work proposes a fast electro-optical shutter composed of a large aperture Pockels cell placed between two crossed polarizers, providing high-speed gating up to 500 ns. The throughput of the shutter and its spatial homogeneity are measured. The angular tolerance of the Pockels cell is determined and its suitability for 1D probing is assessed. Spectra acquired in a premixed methane-air flame show the capacity of the shutter to remove flame emission and increase the signal-to-noise ratio for major Raman species.

  1. The speed of information in a 'fast-light' optical medium.

    PubMed

    Stenner, Michael D; Gauthier, Daniel J; Neifeld, Mark A

    2003-10-16

    One consequence of the special theory of relativity is that no signal can cause an effect outside the source light cone, the space-time surface on which light rays emanate from the source. Violation of this principle of relativistic causality leads to paradoxes, such as that of an effect preceding its cause. Recent experiments on optical pulse propagation in so-called 'fast-light' media--which are characterized by a wave group velocity upsilon(g) exceeding the vacuum speed of light c or taking on negative values--have led to renewed debate about the definition of the information velocity upsilon(i). One view is that upsilon(i) = upsilon(g) (ref. 4), which would violate causality, while another is that upsilon(i) = c in all situations, which would preserve causality. Here we find that the time to detect information propagating through a fast-light medium is slightly longer than the time required to detect the same information travelling through a vacuum, even though upsilon(g) in the medium vastly exceeds c. Our observations are therefore consistent with relativistic causality and help to resolve the controversies surrounding superluminal pulse propagation. PMID:14562097

  2. Fabrication of continuous diffractive optical elements using a fast tool servo diamond turning process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jingbo; Li, Lei; Naples, Neil; Sun, Tao; Yi, Allen Y.

    2013-07-01

    Continuous diffractive optical elements (CDOEs) can be used for laser-beam reshaping, pattern generation and can help reduce large angle scattering. Lithography, the method for the production of binary diffractive surfaces, is not suitable for fabrication of CDOEs. Diamond turning using fast tool servo, on the other hand, is a non-cleanroom method for generating continuous microstructures with high precision and efficiency. In this paper, an algorithm for designing CDOEs is introduced. The moving least-squares (MLS) method is then used to obtain the local fitting equation of the diffractive surface. Based on the MLS fitting equation, the selection of diamond cutting tool geometries (including the tool nose radius, rake angle and clearance angle) is discussed and a tool nose radius compensation algorithm is included. This algorithm is a general method for the diamond turning of complex surfaces that can be represented by a point cloud. Surface measurements and diffractive patterns generated on test samples have shown that continuous diffractive surfaces were successfully machined. In the future, CDOEs can be machined on an optical mold surface for high-volume industrial production using methods such as injection molding.

  3. Fast Face-Recognition Optical Parallel Correlator Using High Accuracy Correlation Filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Eriko; Kodate, Kashiko

    2005-11-01

    We designed and fabricated a fully automatic fast face recognition optical parallel correlator [E. Watanabe and K. Kodate: Appl. Opt. 44 (2005) 5666] based on the VanderLugt principle. The implementation of an as-yet unattained ultra high-speed system was aided by reconfiguring the system to make it suitable for easier parallel processing, as well as by composing a higher accuracy correlation filter and high-speed ferroelectric liquid crystal-spatial light modulator (FLC-SLM). In running trial experiments using this system (dubbed FARCO), we succeeded in acquiring remarkably low error rates of 1.3% for false match rate (FMR) and 2.6% for false non-match rate (FNMR). Given the results of our experiments, the aim of this paper is to examine methods of designing correlation filters and arranging database image arrays for even faster parallel correlation, underlining the issues of calculation technique, quantization bit rate, pixel size and shift from optical axis. The correlation filter has proved its excellent performance and higher precision than classical correlation and joint transform correlator (JTC). Moreover, arrangement of multi-object reference images leads to 10-channel correlation signals, as sharply marked as those of a single channel. This experiment result demonstrates great potential for achieving the process speed of 10000 face/s.

  4. Flares in childhood eczema.

    PubMed

    Langan, S M

    2009-01-01

    Eczema is a major public health problem affecting children worldwide. Few studies have directly assessed triggers for disease flares. This paper presents evidence from a published systematic review and a prospective cohort study looking at flare factors in eczema. This systematic review suggested that foodstuffs in selected groups, dust exposure, unfamiliar pets, seasonal variation, stress, and irritants may be important in eczema flares. We performed a prospective cohort study that focused on environmental factors and identified associations between exposure to nylon clothing, dust, unfamiliar pets, sweating, shampoo, and eczema flares. Results from this study also demonstrated some new key findings. First, the effect of shampoo was found to increase in cold weather, and second, combinations of environmental factors were associated with disease exacerbation, supporting a multiple component disease model. This information is likely to be useful to families and may lead to the ability to reduce disease flares in the future. PMID:20054505

  5. Pre-Hardware Optimization and Implementation Of Fast Optics Closed Control Loop Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kizhner, Semion; Lyon, Richard G.; Herman, Jay R.; Abuhassan, Nader

    2004-01-01

    One of the main heritage tools used in scientific and engineering data spectrum analysis is the Fourier Integral Transform and its high performance digital equivalent - the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT). The FFT is particularly useful in two-dimensional (2-D) image processing (FFT2) within optical systems control. However, timing constraints of a fast optics closed control loop would require a supercomputer to run the software implementation of the FFT2 and its inverse, as well as other image processing representative algorithm, such as numerical image folding and fringe feature extraction. A laboratory supercomputer is not always available even for ground operations and is not feasible for a night project. However, the computationally intensive algorithms still warrant alternative implementation using reconfigurable computing technologies (RC) such as Digital Signal Processors (DSP) and Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGA), which provide low cost compact super-computing capabilities. We present a new RC hardware implementation and utilization architecture that significantly reduces the computational complexity of a few basic image-processing algorithm, such as FFT2, image folding and phase diversity for the NASA Solar Viewing Interferometer Prototype (SVIP) using a cluster of DSPs and FPGAs. The DSP cluster utilization architecture also assures avoidance of a single point of failure, while using commercially available hardware. This, combined with the control algorithms pre-hardware optimization, or the first time allows construction of image-based 800 Hertz (Hz) optics closed control loops on-board a spacecraft, based on the SVIP ground instrument. That spacecraft is the proposed Earth Atmosphere Solar Occultation Imager (EASI) to study greenhouse gases CO2, C2H, H2O, O3, O2, N2O from Lagrange-2 point in space. This paper provides an advanced insight into a new type of science capabilities for future space exploration missions based on on-board image processing

  6. Experimental demonstration of enhanced slow and fast light by forced coherent population oscillations in a semiconductor optical amplifier.

    PubMed

    Berger, Perrine; Bourderionnet, Jérôme; de Valicourt, Guilhem; Brenot, Romain; Bretenaker, Fabien; Dolfi, Daniel; Alouini, Mehdi

    2010-07-15

    We experimentally demonstrate enhanced slow and fast light by forced coherent population oscillations in a semiconductor optical amplifier at gigahertz frequencies. This approach is shown to rely on the interference between two different contributions. This opens up the possibility of conceiving a controllable rf phase shifter based on this setup. PMID:20634862

  7. Flare build-up study - Homologous flares group. I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martres, M.-J.; Mein, N.; Mouradian, Z.; Rayrole, J.; Schmieder, B.; Simon, G.; Soru-Escaut, I.; Woodgate, B. E.

    1984-01-01

    Solar Maximum Mission observations have been used to study the origin and amount of energy, mechanism of storage and release, and conditions for the occurrence of solar flares, and some results of these studies as they pertain to homologous flares are briefly discussed. It was found that every set of flares produced 'rafales' of homologous flares, i.e., two, three, four, or more flares separated in time by an hour or less. No great changes in macroscopic photospheric patterns were observed during these flaring periods. A quantitative brightness parameter of the relation between homologous flares is defined. Scale changes detected in the dynamic spectrum of flare sites are in good agreement with a theoretical suggestion by Sturrock. Statistical results for different homologous flare active regions show the existence in homologous flaring areas of a 'pivot' of previous filaments interpreted as a signature of an anomaly in the solar rotation.

  8. COMPTEL solar flare observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, J. M.; Aarts, H.; Bennett, K.; Debrunner, H.; Devries, C.; Denherder, J. W.; Eymann, G.; Forrest, D. J.; Diehl, R.; Hermsen, W.

    1992-01-01

    COMPTEL as part of a solar target of opportunity campaign observed the sun during the period of high solar activity from 7-15 Jun. 1991. Major flares were observed on 9 and 11 Jun. Although both flares were large GOES events (greater than or = X10), they were not extraordinary in terms of gamma-ray emission. Only the decay phase of the 15 Jun. flare was observed by COMPTEL. We report the preliminary analysis of data from these flares, including the first spectroscopic measurement of solar flare neutrons. The deuterium formation line at 2.223 MeV was present in both events and for at least the 9 Jun. event, was comparable to the flux in the nuclear line region of 4-8 MeV, consistent with Solar-Maximum Mission (SSM) Observations. A clear neutron signal was present in the flare of 9 Jun. with the spectrum extending up to 80 MeV and consistent in time with the emission of gamma-rays, confirming the utility of COMPTEL in measuring the solar neutron flux at low energies. The neutron flux below 100 MeV appears to be lower than that of the 3 Jun. 1982 flare by more than an order of magnitude. The neutron signal of the 11 Jun. event is under study. Severe dead time effects resulting from the intense thermal x-rays require significant corrections to the measured flux which increase the magnitude of the associated systematic uncertainties.

  9. Hot electron bolometer for detection of fast terahertz pulses from optical parametric oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palka, Norbert; Zagrajek, Przemyslaw; Czerwinski, Adam; Trzcinski, Tomasz; Rurka, Elzbieta; Szustakowski, Mieczyslaw; Sypek, Maciej

    2012-10-01

    Detection of nanosecond pulses by fast and sensitive Hot Electron Bolometer (HEB) is reported. Pulses were generated by an Optical Parametric Oscillator (OPO)-based source. The laser can be tuned in the range 0.7-2.5 THz; its repetition rate equals to 53Hz, duration of the pulse is about 10-20ns, energy is 10nJ and spectral width 50GHz. HEB operates at temperature of about 8.8K in a cryogenic refrigeration system. A sensitive element is a bridge from a 4-mm thick NbN film integrated with a planar logarithmic spiral antenna on a high-resistive silicon. HEB works in 0.3-3THz range with NEP ~3x10-13 W/Hz1/2 and dynamic range 0.1 uW. Thanks to exploitation of hot electrons in superconducting state, the detector is very fast with minimum response time equals to 50ps. The THz radiation is focused with a silicon lens, and then is coupled to a sensitive bolometer using the planar antenna. THz radiation from the OPO, through a set of mirrors and attenuators, was coupled to the detector. The distance between the source and detector was about 3m. Full Width at Half Maximum of the recorded pulses was about 20 ns. Moreover, we measured linearity of the detector in the range 0.7- 2.0 THz by rotation of the polarizer axis. The pulses were averaged and integrated for better stability. We obtained a good similarity to the theoretical curve of the polarizer.

  10. SIZE DISTRIBUTIONS OF SOLAR FLARES AND SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLE EVENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Cliver, E. W.; Ling, A. G.; Belov, A.; Yashiro, S.

    2012-09-10

    We suggest that the flatter size distribution of solar energetic proton (SEP) events relative to that of flare soft X-ray (SXR) events is primarily due to the fact that SEP flares are an energetic subset of all flares. Flares associated with gradual SEP events are characteristically accompanied by fast ({>=}1000 km s{sup -1}) coronal mass ejections (CMEs) that drive coronal/interplanetary shock waves. For the 1996-2005 interval, the slopes ({alpha} values) of power-law size distributions of the peak 1-8 A fluxes of SXR flares associated with (a) >10 MeV SEP events (with peak fluxes {>=}1 pr cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} sr{sup -1}) and (b) fast CMEs were {approx}1.3-1.4 compared to {approx}1.2 for the peak proton fluxes of >10 MeV SEP events and {approx}2 for the peak 1-8 A fluxes of all SXR flares. The difference of {approx}0.15 between the slopes of the distributions of SEP events and SEP SXR flares is consistent with the observed variation of SEP event peak flux with SXR peak flux.