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Sample records for fast speciation alternative

  1. Mn, Fe, Zn and As speciation in a fast-growing ferromanganese marine nodule

    SciTech Connect

    Marcus, Matthew A.; Manceau, Alain; Kersten, Michael

    2004-04-01

    The speciation of Mn, Fe, As and Zn in a fast-growing (0.02mm/yr), shallow-marine ferromanganese nodule has been examined by micro X-ray fluorescence, micro X-ray diffraction, and micro X-ray absorption spectroscopy. This nodule exhibits alternating Fe-rich and Mn-rich layers reflecting redox variations in water chemistry. Fe occurs as two-line ferrihydrite. The As is strictly associated with Fe and is mostly pentavalent, with an environment similar to that of As sorbed on or coprecipitated with synthetic ferrihydrite. The Mn is in the form of turbostratic birnessite with {approx} 10 percent trivalent manganese in the layers and probably {approx} 8 percent corner-sharing metal octahedra in the interlayers. The Zn is enriched on the rim of the nodule, associated with Mn. The Zn is completely (>90 percent) tetrahedrally coordinated and sorbed in the interlayers of birnessite on vacant layer Mn sites. The Zn and Mn species are similar to ones found in soils, suggesting common structural principles, despite the differing formation conditions in these systems.

  2. Boosted Fast Flux Loop Alternative Cooling Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Glen R. Longhurst; Donna Post Guillen; James R. Parry; Douglas L. Porter; Bruce W. Wallace

    2007-08-01

    The Gas Test Loop (GTL) Project was instituted to develop the means for conducting fast neutron irradiation tests in a domestic radiation facility. It made use of booster fuel to achieve the high neutron flux, a hafnium thermal neutron absorber to attain the high fast-to-thermal flux ratio, a mixed gas temperature control system for maintaining experiment temperatures, and a compressed gas cooling system to remove heat from the experiment capsules and the hafnium thermal neutron absorber. This GTL system was determined to provide a fast (E > 0.1 MeV) flux greater than 1.0E+15 n/cm2-s with a fast-to-thermal flux ratio in the vicinity of 40. However, the estimated system acquisition cost from earlier studies was deemed to be high. That cost was strongly influenced by the compressed gas cooling system for experiment heat removal. Designers were challenged to find a less expensive way to achieve the required cooling. This report documents the results of the investigation leading to an alternatively cooled configuration, referred to now as the Boosted Fast Flux Loop (BFFL). This configuration relies on a composite material comprised of hafnium aluminide (Al3Hf) in an aluminum matrix to transfer heat from the experiment to pressurized water cooling channels while at the same time providing absorption of thermal neutrons. Investigations into the performance this configuration might achieve showed that it should perform at least as well as its gas-cooled predecessor. Physics calculations indicated that the fast neutron flux averaged over the central 40 cm (16 inches) relative to ATR core mid-plane in irradiation spaces would be about 1.04E+15 n/cm2-s. The fast-to-thermal flux ratio would be in excess of 40. Further, the particular configuration of cooling channels was relatively unimportant compared with the total amount of water in the apparatus in determining performance. Thermal analyses conducted on a candidate configuration showed the design of the water coolant and

  3. Phylogeny and evolution of the Sulidae (Aves:Pelecaniformes): a test of alternative modes of speciation.

    PubMed

    Friesen, V L; Anderson, D J

    1997-04-01

    Although the allopatric model of speciation is widely accepted, it does not provide a satisfactory explanation for many evolutionary phenomena. Several alternative models exist, but they remain largely untested for vertebrate animals. In the present paper, a molecular phylogeny was used to test competing models of speciation in a seabird family, the Sulidae. A segment including 807 base pairs of the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene was sequenced from all extant sulid species, and phylogenetic methods were used to test model-specific predictions regarding tree topologies, distributions of sister taxa, timing of vicariant events, and comparative biology. Both the neighbor-joining and parsimony analyses placed sequences of gannets (Morus spp.) and boobies of the genus Sula in separate, monophyletic lineages. Sequences of Cape (M. capensis) and Australasian (M. serrator) gannets clustered together, and the sequence of Abbott's booby (Papasula abbotti) was basal to those of the gannets. Sequences of blue-footed (S. nebouxii) and Peruvian (S. variegata) boobies were sisters and formed a monophyletic group with the masked booby (S. dactylatra). The red-footed booby (S. sula) sequence was the most divergent of the Sula boobies. All relationships received strong support from standard-error tests and bootstrap analysis. Substitution rates were similar to those suggested for mammals and suggested that most lineages arose within the last 3 million years. Lineage divergence events for which the mode of speciation could be deduced did not fit the predictions of either allopatric or sympatric models, but apparently involved either peripatric or parapatric processes. PMID:9126567

  4. Oxygen speciation in upgraded fast pyrolysis bio-oils by comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Omais, Badaoui; Crepier, Julien; Charon, Nadège; Courtiade, Marion; Quignard, Alain; Thiébaut, Didier

    2013-04-21

    Biomass fast pyrolysis is considered as a promising route to produce liquid for the transportation field from a renewable resource. However, the derived bio-oils are mainly oxygenated (45-50%w/w O on a wet basis) and contain almost no hydrocarbons. Therefore, upgrading is necessary to obtain a liquid with lower oxygen content and characterization of oxygenated compounds in these products is essential to assist conversion reactions. For this purpose, comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC × GC) can be investigated. Oxygen speciation in such matrices is hampered by the large diversity of oxygenated families and the complexity of the hydrocarbon matrix. Moreover, response factors must be taken into account for oxygenate quantification as the Flame Ionisation Detector (FID) response varies when a molecule contains heteroatoms. To conclude, no distillation cuts were accessible and the analysis had to cover a large range of boiling points (30-630 °C). To take up this analytical challenge, a thorough optimization approach was developed. In fact, four GC × GC column sets were investigated to separate oxygenated compounds from the hydrocarbon matrix. Both model mixtures and the upgraded biomass flash pyrolysis oil were injected using GC × GC-FID to reach a suitable chromatographic separation. The advantages and drawbacks of each column combination for oxygen speciation in upgraded bio-oils are highlighted in this study. Among the four sets, an original polar × semi-polar column combination was selected and enabled the identification by GC × GC-ToF/MS of more than 40 compounds belonging to eight chemical families: ketones, furans, alcohols, phenols, carboxylic acids, guaiacols, anisols, and esters. For quantification purpose, the GC × GC-FID chromatogram was divided into more than 60 blobs corresponding to the previously identified analyte and hydrocarbon zones. A database associating each blob to a molecule and its specific response factor (determined

  5. Dissolved phosphorus speciation of flash carbonization, slow pyrolysis, and fast pyrolysis biochars

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pyrolysis of waste biomass is a promising technology to produce sterile and renewable organic phosphorus fertilizers. Systematic studies are necessary to understand how different pyrolysis platforms influence the chemical speciation of dissolved (bioavailable) phosphorus. This study employed solut...

  6. Determinants of weight loss success with alternate day fasting.

    PubMed

    Varady, Krista A; Hoddy, Kristin K; Kroeger, Cynthia M; Trepanowski, John F; Klempel, Monica C; Barnosky, Adrienne; Bhutani, Surabhi

    2016-01-01

    This study examined what characteristics predict weight loss success with alternate day fasting (ADF). Four 8-week trials of ADF (n=121) were included in the analysis. Subjects aged 50-59 y achieved greater (P=0.01) weight loss than other age groups. Males and females achieved similar weight loss. Caucasian subjects achieved greater (P=0.03) weight loss than other races. Baseline body weight and baseline BMI did not predict degree of weight loss achieved with the diet. These findings may help clinicians to decide which population groups may benefit most from an ADF approach. PMID:26385599

  7. Muscle spindle activity in man during voluntary fast alternating movements.

    PubMed Central

    Hagbarth, K E; Wallen, G; Löfstedt, L

    1975-01-01

    Single unit activity in primary spindle afferent nerve fibres from finger and foot flexors was recorded with tungsten microelectrodes inserted into the median and peroneal nerves of healthy subjects. During voluntary fast alternating finger and foot movements, simulating the tremor of Parkinsonism, two types of discharges were seen in the Ia afferent fibres: (1) stretch responses occurring during the flexor relaxation phases, and (2) discharges occurring during the flexor contraction phases. Contrary to the stretch responses the spindle contraction discharges could be eliminated by a partial lidocaine block of the muscle nerve proximal to the recording site, indicating that they resulted from fusimotor activation of intrafusal fibres. On the basis of the temporal relations between the beginning and end of individual EMG-bursts, the start of the spindle contraction discharges and the latency of the stretch reflex in the muscles concerned, the following conclusions were drawn: the recurrent extrafusal contractions in movements of this type are initiated by the fast direct alpha route, but individual contraction phases generally last long enough to be influenced subsequently by the coactivated fusimotor loop through the spindles. It is postulated that this gamma loop influence during alternating movements helps to keep flexor and extensor muscles working in a regular reciprocal fashion with contractions adjusted in strength to the external loads. Images PMID:125782

  8. Leveraging transcript quantification for fast computation of alternative splicing profiles.

    PubMed

    Alamancos, Gael P; Pagès, Amadís; Trincado, Juan L; Bellora, Nicolás; Eyras, Eduardo

    2015-09-01

    Alternative splicing plays an essential role in many cellular processes and bears major relevance in the understanding of multiple diseases, including cancer. High-throughput RNA sequencing allows genome-wide analyses of splicing across multiple conditions. However, the increasing number of available data sets represents a major challenge in terms of computation time and storage requirements. We describe SUPPA, a computational tool to calculate relative inclusion values of alternative splicing events, exploiting fast transcript quantification. SUPPA accuracy is comparable and sometimes superior to standard methods using simulated as well as real RNA-sequencing data compared with experimentally validated events. We assess the variability in terms of the choice of annotation and provide evidence that using complete transcripts rather than more transcripts per gene provides better estimates. Moreover, SUPPA coupled with de novo transcript reconstruction methods does not achieve accuracies as high as using quantification of known transcripts, but remains comparable to existing methods. Finally, we show that SUPPA is more than 1000 times faster than standard methods. Coupled with fast transcript quantification, SUPPA provides inclusion values at a much higher speed than existing methods without compromising accuracy, thereby facilitating the systematic splicing analysis of large data sets with limited computational resources. The software is implemented in Python 2.7 and is available under the MIT license at https://bitbucket.org/regulatorygenomicsupf/suppa. PMID:26179515

  9. Living organisms as an alternative to hyphenated techniques for metal speciation. Evaluation of baker's yeast immobilized on silica gel for Hg speciation*1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Corona, Teresa; Madrid-Albarrán, Yolanda; Cámara, Carmen; Beceiro, Elisa

    1998-02-01

    The use of living organisms for metal preconcentration and speciation is discussed. Among substrates, Saccharomyces cerevisiae baker's yeast has been successfully used for the speciation of mercury [Hg(II) and CH 3Hg +], selenium [Se(IV) and Se(VI)] and antimony [Sb(III) and Sb(V)]. To illustrate the capabilities of these organisms, the analytical performance of baker's yeast immobilized on silica gel for on-line preconcentration and speciation of Hg(II) and methylmercury is reported. The immobilized cells were packed in a PTFE microcolumn, through which mixtures of organic and inorganic mercury solutions were passed. Retention of inorganic and organic mercury solutions took place simultaneously, with the former retained in the silica and the latter on the yeast. The efficiency uptake for both species was higher than 95% over a wide pH range. The speciation was carried out by selective and sequential elution with 0.02 mol L -1 HCl for methylmercury and 0.8 mol L -1 CN - for Hg(II). This method allows both preconcentration and speciation of mercury. The preconcentration factors were around 15 and 100 for methylmercury and mercury(II), respectively. The method has been successfully applied to spiked sea water samples.

  10. A novel fast gas chromatography method for higher time resolution measurements of speciated monoterpenes in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, C. E.; Kato, S.; Nakashima, Y.; Kajii, Y.

    2014-05-01

    Biogenic emissions supply the largest fraction of non-methane volatile organic compounds (VOC) from the biosphere to the atmospheric boundary layer, and typically comprise a complex mixture of reactive terpenes. Due to this chemical complexity, achieving comprehensive measurements of biogenic VOC (BVOC) in air within a satisfactory time resolution is analytically challenging. To address this, we have developed a novel, fully automated Fast Gas Chromatography (Fast-GC) based technique to provide higher time resolution monitoring of monoterpenes (and selected other C9-C15 terpenes) during plant emission studies and in ambient air. To our knowledge, this is the first study to apply a Fast-GC based separation technique to achieve quantification of terpenes in ambient air. Three chromatography methods have been developed for atmospheric terpene analysis under different sampling scenarios. Each method facilitates chromatographic separation of selected BVOC within a significantly reduced analysis time compared to conventional GC methods, whilst maintaining the ability to quantify individual monoterpene structural isomers. Using this approach, the C9-C15 BVOC composition of single plant emissions may be characterised within a 14.5 min analysis time. Moreover, in-situ quantification of 12 monoterpenes in unpolluted ambient air may be achieved within an 11.7 min chromatographic separation time (increasing to 19.7 min when simultaneous quantification of multiple oxygenated C9-C10 terpenoids is required, and/or when concentrations of anthropogenic VOC are significant). These analysis times potentially allow for a twofold to fivefold increase in measurement frequency compared to conventional GC methods. Here we outline the technical details and analytical capability of this chromatographic approach, and present the first in-situ Fast-GC observations of 6 monoterpenes and the oxygenated BVOC (OBVOC) linalool in ambient air. During this field deployment within a suburban forest

  11. Speciation of antimony in airborne particulate matter using ultrasound probe fast extraction and analysis by HPLC-HG-AFS.

    PubMed

    Bellido-Martín, A; Gómez-Ariza, J L; Smichowsky, P; Sánchez-Rodas, D

    2009-09-01

    A fast extraction procedure has been developed for Sb(III) and Sb(V) oxoanions speciation in airborne particulate matter samples. Different extraction media (diammonium tartrate, hidroxilammonium clorhidrate, citric acid+ascorbic acid, phosphoric acid and citrate solutions) were tried, with assistance of an ultrasonic probe. The operation power and time of extraction were also optimized. The higher extraction recoveries were obtained with a 100 mmol L(-1) hidroxilammonium clorhidrate aqueous solution assisted by the ultrasound probe operated at 50 W during 3 min. The extracts were analyzed by HPLC-HG-AFS. The chromatographic separation of Sb(III) and Sb(V) was also optimized using diammonium tartrate and phthalic acid as mobile phases. The separation of both Sb species was performed in less than 3 min under isocratic conditions, using a 200 mmol L(-1) diammonium tartrate solution. The proposed extraction procedure and the HPLC-HG-AFS instrumental coupling have been successfully applied to airborne particulate matter samples, with high Sb content, collected in heavy traffic streets from Buenos Aires (Argentina). The results showed the presence of both Sb species at similar concentrations in the ng m(-3) level. The extraction yield was higher than 90% for all the analyzed samples. PMID:19699393

  12. Compressed Sensing Photoacoustic Imaging Based on Fast Alternating Direction Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xueyan; Peng, Dong; Guo, Wei; Ma, Xibo; Yang, Xin; Tian, Jie

    2012-01-01

    Photoacoustic imaging (PAI) has been employed to reconstruct endogenous optical contrast present in tissues. At the cost of longer calculations, a compressive sensing reconstruction scheme can achieve artifact-free imaging with fewer measurements. In this paper, an effective acceleration framework using the alternating direction method (ADM) was proposed for recovering images from limited-view and noisy observations. Results of the simulation demonstrated that the proposed algorithm could perform favorably in comparison to two recently introduced algorithms in computational efficiency and data fidelity. In particular, it ran considerably faster than these two methods. PAI with ADM can improve convergence speed with fewer ultrasonic transducers, enabling a high-performance and cost-effective PAI system for biomedical applications. PMID:23365553

  13. Life in the Fast Track: How States Seek to Balance Incentives and Quality in Alternative Teacher Certification Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Susan Moore; Birkeland, Sarah E.; Peske, Heather G.

    2005-01-01

    The prospect of overseeing the rapid preparation of many participants in fast-track alternative certification programs presents several challenges for state education officials who seek to maintain, or even enhance, the quality of the state's teaching force. This study examined a range of fast-track alternative teacher certification programs in 11…

  14. A novel Fast Gas Chromatography based technique for higher time resolution measurements of speciated monoterpenes in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, C. E.; Kato, S.; Nakashima, Y.; Kajii, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Biogenic emissions supply the largest fraction of non-methane volatile organic compounds (VOC) from the biosphere to the atmospheric boundary layer, and typically comprise a complex mixture of reactive terpenes. Due to this chemical complexity, achieving comprehensive measurements of biogenic VOC (BVOC) in air within a satisfactory time resolution is analytically challenging. To address this, we have developed a novel, fully automated Fast Gas Chromatography (Fast-GC) based technique to provide higher time resolution monitoring of monoterpenes (and selected other C9-C15 terpenes) during plant emission studies and in ambient air. To our knowledge, this is the first study to apply a Fast-GC based separation technique to achieve quantification of terpenes in air. Three chromatography methods have been developed for atmospheric terpene analysis under different sampling scenarios. Each method facilitates chromatographic separation of selected BVOC within a significantly reduced analysis time compared to conventional GC methods, whilst maintaining the ability to quantify individual monoterpene structural isomers. Using this approach, the C10-C15 BVOC composition of single plant emissions may be characterised within a ~ 14 min analysis time. Moreover, in situ quantification of 12 monoterpenes in unpolluted ambient air may be achieved within an ~ 11 min chromatographic separation time (increasing to ~ 19 min when simultaneous quantification of multiple oxygenated C9-C10 terpenoids is required, and/or when concentrations of anthropogenic VOC are significant). This corresponds to a two- to fivefold increase in measurement frequency compared to conventional GC methods. Here we outline the technical details and analytical capability of this chromatographic approach, and present the first in situ Fast-GC observations of 6 monoterpenes and the oxygenated BVOC linalool in ambient air. During this field deployment within a suburban forest ~ 30 km west of central Tokyo, Japan, the

  15. Fast-recovery fast spin-echo T2-weighted MR imaging: a free-breathing alternative to fast spin-echo in the pediatric abdomen.

    PubMed

    Huang, I-Hua; Emery, Kathleen H; Laor, Tal; Valentine, Mona; Tiefermann, Jan

    2008-06-01

    In the mid 1990s, the fast spin-echo (FSE) and turbo spin-echo (TSE) T2-weighted (T2-W) sequences became available and are now widely accepted alternatives to conventional spin-echo sequences since they result in reduced acquisition times while maintaining tissue contrast. Since that time, there has been continued development of new sequences to further decrease acquisition times, minimize artifacts, and preserve lesion detection. The purpose of this pictorial essay is to qualitatively illustrate the newly available fast recovery (FR) FSE T2-W MR images of the abdomen compared with the images acquired using the routine FSE T2-W sequence in non-breath-hold studies in children. PMID:18345537

  16. The drivers of tropical speciation.

    PubMed

    Smith, Brian Tilston; McCormack, John E; Cuervo, Andrés M; Hickerson, Michael J; Aleixo, Alexandre; Cadena, Carlos Daniel; Pérez-Emán, Jorge; Burney, Curtis W; Xie, Xiaoou; Harvey, Michael G; Faircloth, Brant C; Glenn, Travis C; Derryberry, Elizabeth P; Prejean, Jesse; Fields, Samantha; Brumfield, Robb T

    2014-11-20

    Since the recognition that allopatric speciation can be induced by large-scale reconfigurations of the landscape that isolate formerly continuous populations, such as the separation of continents by plate tectonics, the uplift of mountains or the formation of large rivers, landscape change has been viewed as a primary driver of biological diversification. This process is referred to in biogeography as vicariance. In the most species-rich region of the world, the Neotropics, the sundering of populations associated with the Andean uplift is ascribed this principal role in speciation. An alternative model posits that rather than being directly linked to landscape change, allopatric speciation is initiated to a greater extent by dispersal events, with the principal drivers of speciation being organism-specific abilities to persist and disperse in the landscape. Landscape change is not a necessity for speciation in this model. Here we show that spatial and temporal patterns of genetic differentiation in Neotropical birds are highly discordant across lineages and are not reconcilable with a model linking speciation solely to landscape change. Instead, the strongest predictors of speciation are the amount of time a lineage has persisted in the landscape and the ability of birds to move through the landscape matrix. These results, augmented by the observation that most species-level diversity originated after episodes of major Andean uplift in the Neogene period, suggest that dispersal and differentiation on a matrix previously shaped by large-scale landscape events was a major driver of avian speciation in lowland Neotropical rainforests. PMID:25209666

  17. Fast pyrolysis char - Assessment of alternative uses within the bioliq® concept.

    PubMed

    Funke, A; Niebel, A; Richter, D; Abbas, M M; Müller, A-K; Radloff, S; Paneru, M; Maier, J; Dahmen, N; Sauer, J

    2016-01-01

    Experiments with a process development unit for fast pyrolysis of biomass residues of 10kgh(-1) have been performed to quantify the impact of two different product recovery options. Wheat straw, miscanthus and scrap wood have been used as feedstock. A separate recovery of char increases the organic oil yield as compared to a combined recovery of char and organic condensate (OC). Furthermore, it allows for an alternative use of the byproduct char which represents an important product fraction for the high ash biomass residues under consideration. The char produced shows little advantage over its biomass precursor when considered as energy carrier due to its high ash content. Significant value can be added by demineralizing and activating the char. The potential to increase the economic feasibility of fast pyrolysis is shown by an assessment of the bioliq® process chain. PMID:26609947

  18. A novel approach for speciation of airborne chromium by convective-interaction media fast-monolithic chromatography with electrothermal atomic-absorption spectrometric detection.

    PubMed

    Scancar, Janez; Milacic, Radmila

    2002-05-01

    A new analytical procedure using an anion-exchange separation support based on convective-interaction media (CIM) was developed for the speciation of chromium. The separation of Cr(VI) was performed on a weak anion-exchange CIM diethylamine (DEAE) fast-monolithic chromatographic disc. Buffer A (0.005 mol dm(-3) TRIS-HCl, pH 8.0) and buffer B (buffer A plus 3 mol dm(-3) NH4NO3) were employed in the separation procedure. The separated chromium species were determined 'off-line' by ETAAS in 0.5 cm3 fractions. The applicability of the CIM DEAE-ETAAS procedure was investigated for the determination of airborne Cr(VI) at a plasma cutting workplace. Aerosols were collected on polycarbonate membrane filters of 8 and 0.4 microm pore size (inhalable and respirable aerosols). Alkaline extraction of filters in a heated ultrasonic bath was applied to leach chromium. Good repeatability of measurement (+/-3.0%) of the alkaline extracts was obtained for Cr(VI). The LOD (3s) was found to be 0.30 microg m(-3) Cr(VI), when 0.25 m3 of air was collected on the filter. The validation of the procedure was performed by spiking filters with Cr(VI) and by the analysis of the standard reference material CRM 545, Cr(VI) in welding dust loaded on a filter. Good recoveries for spiked samples (101-102%) and good agreement between Cr(VI) found and the reported certified value for CRM 545 were obtained. The extracts were also analysed by the FPLC-ETAAS technique. Good agreement between two techniques (r2 = 0.9978) confirmed the reliability of the CIM DEAE-ETAAS procedure developed. The main advantage of the procedure lies in the speed of the chromatographic separation (chromatographic run completed in 15 min). PMID:12081040

  19. Special Speciation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Countryman, Lyn L.; Maroo, Jill D.

    2015-01-01

    Considerable anecdotal evidence indicates that some of the most difficult concepts that both high school and undergraduate elementary-education students struggle with are those surrounding evolutionary principles, especially speciation. It's no wonder that entry-level biology students are confused, when biologists have multiple definitions of…

  20. Alternating high and low climate variability: The context of natural selection and speciation in Plio-Pleistocene hominin evolution.

    PubMed

    Potts, Richard; Faith, J Tyler

    2015-10-01

    Interaction of orbital insolation cycles defines a predictive model of alternating phases of high- and low-climate variability for tropical East Africa over the past 5 million years. This model, which is described in terms of climate variability stages, implies repeated increases in landscape/resource instability and intervening periods of stability in East Africa. It predicts eight prolonged (>192 kyr) eras of intensified habitat instability (high variability stages) in which hominin evolutionary innovations are likely to have occurred, potentially by variability selection. The prediction that repeated shifts toward high climate variability affected paleoenvironments and evolution is tested in three ways. In the first test, deep-sea records of northeast African terrigenous dust flux (Sites 721/722) and eastern Mediterranean sapropels (Site 967A) show increased and decreased variability in concert with predicted shifts in climate variability. These regional measurements of climate dynamics are complemented by stratigraphic observations in five basins with lengthy stratigraphic and paleoenvironmental records: the mid-Pleistocene Olorgesailie Basin, the Plio-Pleistocene Turkana and Olduvai Basins, and the Pliocene Tugen Hills sequence and Hadar Basin--all of which show that highly variable landscapes inhabited by hominin populations were indeed concentrated in predicted stages of prolonged high climate variability. Second, stringent null-model tests demonstrate a significant association of currently known first and last appearance datums (FADs and LADs) of the major hominin lineages, suites of technological behaviors, and dispersal events with the predicted intervals of prolonged high climate variability. Palynological study in the Nihewan Basin, China, provides a third test, which shows the occupation of highly diverse habitats in eastern Asia, consistent with the predicted increase in adaptability in dispersing Oldowan hominins. Integration of fossil, archeological

  1. Fast Multidimensional Ellipsoid-Specific Fitting by Alternating Direction Method of Multipliers.

    PubMed

    Lin, Zhouchen; Huang, Yameng

    2016-05-01

    Many problems in computer vision can be formulated as multidimensional ellipsoid-specific fitting, which is to minimize the residual error such that the underlying quadratic surface is a multidimensional ellipsoid. In this paper, we present a fast and robust algorithm for solving ellipsoid-specific fitting directly. Our method is based on the alternating direction method of multipliers, which does not introduce extra positive semi-definiteness constraints. The computation complexity is thus significantly lower than those of semi-definite programming (SDP) based methods. More specifically, to fit n data points into a p dimensional ellipsoid, our complexity is O(p(6) + np(4))+O(p(3)), where the former O results from preprocessing data once, while that of the state-of-the-art SDP method is O(p(6) + np(4) + n(3/2)p(2)) for each iteration. The storage complexity of our algorithm is about 1/2np(2), which is at most 1/4 of those of SDP methods. Extensive experiments testify to the great speed and accuracy advantages of our method over the state-of-the-art approaches. The implementation of our method is also much simpler than SDP based methods. PMID:27046842

  2. Fast speciation of mercury in seawater by short-column high-performance liquid chromatography hyphenated to inductively coupled plasma spectrometry after on-line cation exchange column preconcentration.

    PubMed

    Jia, Xiao-Yu; Gong, Di-Rong; Han, Yi; Wei, Chao; Duan, Tai-Cheng; Chen, Hang-Ting

    2012-01-15

    A simple and fast method for trace speciation analysis of mercury (Hg(2+)), methylmercury (MeHg(+)) and ethylmercury (EtHg(+)) in seawater has been developed by short-column high-performance liquid chromatography hyphenated to inductively coupled plasma spectrometry (HPLC-ICP-MS) after on-line cation-exchange column (CEC) preconcentration. The analytes were firstly adsorbed on the CEC without any extraneous reagent, and then were eluted rapidly (within seconds) and completely with a very low concentration of l-cysteine solution, which provides the conveniency for the on-line coupling of the preconcentration method and detection technique. To our best knowledge, it is for the first time to employ the CEC preconcentration technique to trap all of the three mercury species simultaneously at their positive charged status for the purpose of speciation analysis. Under the optimized conditions, a very high preconcentration factor up to 1250 has been obtained with 30mL sample solution, which leads to the very low detection limits of 0.042ngL(-1) for Hg(2+), 0.016ngL(-1) for MeHg(+) and 0.008ngL(-1) for EtHg(+) (as Hg), respectively. With the established method, three seawater samples were also analyzed, and all the three mercury species have been found in each sample, albeit at a very low concentration. PMID:22265565

  3. Pleistocene Speciation in North American Lichenized Fungi and the Impact of Alternative Species Circumscriptions and Rates of Molecular Evolution on Divergence Estimates

    PubMed Central

    Leavitt, Steven D.; Lumbsch, H. Thorsten; Stenroos, Soili; Clair, Larry L. St.

    2013-01-01

    Pleistocene climatic fluctuations influenced patterns of genetic variation and promoted speciation across a wide range of species groups. Lichens are commonly found in habitats that were directly impacted by glacial cycles; however, the role of Pleistocene climate in driving speciation in most lichen symbionts remains unclear. This uncertainty is due in part to limitations in our ability to accurately recognize independently evolving lichen-forming fungal lineages and a lack of relevant fossil calibrations. Using a coalescent-based species tree approach, we estimated divergence times for two sister clades in the genus Xanthoparmelia (Parmeliaceae) restricted to western North America. We assessed the influence of two different species circumscription scenarios and various locus-specific rates of molecular evolution on divergence estimates. Species circumscriptions were validated using the program BP&P. although speciation was generally supported in both scenarios, divergence times differed between traditional species circumscriptions and those based on genetic data, with more recent estimates resulting from the former. Similarly, rates of evolution for different loci resulted in variable divergence time estimates. However, our results unambiguously indicate that diversification in the sampled Xanthoparmelia clades occurred during the Pleistocene. Our study highlights the potential impact of ambiguous species circumscriptions and uncertain rates of molecular evolution on estimating divergence times within a multilocus species tree framework. PMID:24386465

  4. Alternative thermodiffusion interface for simultaneous speciation of organic and inorganic lead and mercury species by capillary GC-ICPMS using tri-n-propyl-lead chloride as an internal standard.

    PubMed

    Yan, Dong; Yang, Limin; Wang, Qiuquan

    2008-08-01

    An alternative thermodiffusion interface (TDI) was designed and constructed for the effective online coupling of capillary gas chromatography (cGC) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS). Pb(2+), (CH3)3Pb(+), (C2H5)3Pb(+), Hg(2+), CH3Hg(+) and C2H5Hg(+) were derived as Pb(C4H9)4, (CH3)3PbC4H9, (C2H5)3PbC4H9, (C4H9)2Hg, CH3HgC4H9, and C2H5HgC4H9 when butyl magnesium bromide was employed as a derivatization reagent for a proof-of-concept study, avoiding the loss of their species specific information. All these derivatives together with the neutral fully saturated (CH3)4Pb and (C2H5)4Pb could be quantitatively separated within 7 min using a 15 m long capillary column, allowing the determination and speciation of organic and inorganic Pb and Hg species in a single run. The method detection limits (3sigma) for Me4Pb, Et4Pb, Me3Pb(3+), Pb(2+), MeHg(+), EtHg(+), and Hg(2+) are 0.07, 0.06, 0.04, 7.0, 0.09, 0.1, and 0.2 pg g(-1), respectively. Moreover, tri-n-propyl-lead chloride was synthesized and used as an alternative internal standard for the accurate and simultaneous speciation analysis of Pb and Hg in complicated environmental and biological samples for the first time. This cGC-TDI-ICPMS method was validated by analyzing Pb and Hg species in certified reference materials and then was applied to simultaneous speciation analysis of Pb and Hg in real-life samples. It is expected that these approaches can be extended to the speciation of other organometallic compounds after suitable modifications and so will aid in monitoring the occurrence, pathways, toxicity, and/or biological effects of these compounds in the environment and in organisms. PMID:18576666

  5. Alternate day fasting impacts the brain insulin-signaling pathway of young adult male C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jianghua; E, Lezi; Wang, Wenfang; Frontera, Jennifer; Zhu, Hao; Wang, Wen-Tung; Lee, Phil; Choi, In Young; Brooks, William M; Burns, Jeffrey M; Aires, Daniel; Swerdlow, Russell H

    2011-04-01

    Dietary restriction (DR) has recognized health benefits that may extend to brain. We examined how DR affects bioenergetics-relevant enzymes and signaling pathways in the brains of C57BL/6 mice. Five-month-old male mice were placed in ad libitum or one of two repeated fasting and refeeding (RFR) groups, an alternate day (intermittent fed; IF) or alternate day plus antioxidants (blueberry, pomegranate, and green tea extracts) (IF + AO) fed group. During the 24-h fast blood glucose levels initially fell but stabilized within 6 h of starting the fast, thus avoiding frank hypoglycemia. DR in general appeared to enhance insulin sensitivity. After six weeks brain AKT and glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta phosphorylation were lower in the RFR mice, suggesting RFR reduced brain insulin-signaling pathway activity. Pathways that mediate mitochondrial biogenesis were not activated; AMP kinase phosphorylation, silent information regulator 2 phosphorylation, peroxisomal proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator 1 alpha levels, and cytochrome oxidase subunit 4 levels did not change. ATP levels also did not decline, which suggests the RFR protocols did not directly impact brain bioenergetics. Antioxidant supplementation did not affect the brain parameters we evaluated. Our data indicate in young adult male C57BL/6 mice, RFR primarily affects brain energy metabolism by reducing brain insulin signaling, which potentially results indirectly as a consequence of reduced peripheral insulin production. PMID:21244426

  6. Alternate Day Fasting Impacts the Brain Insulin Signaling Pathway of Young Adult Male C57BL/6 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jianghua; Lezi, E; Wang, WenFang; Frontera, Jennifer; Zhu, Hao; Wang, Wen-Tung; Lee, Sang-Pil; Choi, In Young; Brooks, William M.; Burns, Jeffrey M.; Aires, Daniel; Swerdlow, Russell H.

    2011-01-01

    Dietary restriction (DR) has recognized health benefits that may extend to brain. We examined how DR affects bioenergetics-relevant enzymes and signaling pathways in the brains of C57BL/6 mice. Five month-old male mice were placed in ad libitum (AL) or one of two repeated fasting and refeeding (RFR) groups, an alternate day (intermittent fed; IF) or alternate day plus antioxidants (blueberry, pomegranate, and green tea extracts) (IF+AO) fed group. During the 24 hour fast blood glucose levels initially fell but stabilized within 6 hours of starting the fast, thus avoiding frank hypoglycemia. DR in general appeared to enhance insulin sensitivity. After six weeks brain AKT and GSK3β phosphorylation were lower in the RFR mice, suggesting RFR reduced brain insulin signaling pathway activity. Pathways that mediate mitochondrial biogenesis were not activated; AMPK phosphorylation, SIRT1 phosphorylation, PGC1a levels, and COX4 levels did not change. ATP levels also did not decline, which suggests the RFR protocols did not directly impact brain bioenergetics. Antioxidant supplementation did not affect the brain parameters we evaluated. Our data indicate in young adult male C57BL/6 mice, RFR primarily affects brain energy metabolism by reducing brain insulin signaling, which potentially results indirectly as a consequence of reduced peripheral insulin production. PMID:21244426

  7. SPECIATE - EPA'S DATABASE OF SPECIATED EMISSION PROFILES

    EPA Science Inventory

    SPECIATE is the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) repository of total organic compound (TOC) and particulate matter (PM) speciation profiles for emissions from air pollution sources. The data base has recently been updated and an associated report has recently been re...

  8. A survey of alternative once-through fast reactor core designs

    SciTech Connect

    Fei, T.; Richard, J. G.; Kersting, A. R.; Don, S. M.; Oi, C.; Driscoll, M. J.; Shwageraus, E.

    2012-07-01

    Reprocessing of Light Water Reactor (LWR) spent fuel to recover plutonium or transuranics for use in Sodium cooled Fast Reactors (SFRs) is a distant prospect in the U.S.A. This has motivated our evaluation of potentially cost-effective operation of uranium startup fast reactors (USFRs) in a once-through mode. This review goes beyond findings reported earlier based on a UC fueled MgO reflected SFR to describe a broader parametric study of options. Cores were evaluated for a variety of fuel/coolant/reflector combinations: UC/UZr/UO{sub 2}/UN;Na/Pb; MgO/SS/Zr. The challenge is achieving high burnup while minimizing enrichment and respecting both cladding fluence/dpa and reactivity lifetime limits. These parametric studies show that while UC fuel is still the leading contender, UO{sub 2} fuel and ZrH 1.7 moderated metallic fuel are also attractive if UC proves to be otherwise inadequate. Overall, these findings support the conclusion that a competitive fuel cycle cost and uranium utilization compared to LWRs is possible for SFRs operated on a once-through uranium fueled fuel cycle. In addition, eventual transition to TRU recycle mode is studied, as is a small test reactor to demonstrate key features. (authors)

  9. Fast Restoration Based on Alternative Wavelength Paths in a Wide Area Optical IP Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matera, Francesco; Rea, Luca; Venezia, Matteo; Capanna, Lorenzo; Del Prete, Giuseppe

    In this article we describe an experimental investigation of IP network restoration based on wavelength recovery. We propose a procedure for metro and wide area gigabit Ethernet networks that allows us to route the wavelength in case of link failure to another existing link by exploiting wavelength division multiplexing in the fiber. Such a procedure is obtained by means of an optical switch that is managed by a loss-of-light signal that is generated by a router in case of link failure. Such a method has been tested in an IP network consisting of three core routers with optical gigabit Ethernet interfaces connected by means of 50-km-long single-mode fibers between Rome and Pomezia. Compared with other conventional restoration techniques, such as OSPF and MPLS, our method -in very fast (20 ms) and is compatible with real-time TV services and low-cost chips.

  10. Lyme Carditis in the Fast Lane: From Alternating Bundle Branch Block to Asystole in 12 Hours.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Sara; Padala, Santosh K; Hui, Chui Man Carmen; Steckman, David A; Sidhu, Mandeep S; Torosoff, Mikhail T

    2015-10-01

    Lyme borreliosis is a multisystem infectious disease with well-known cardiac involvement, including potential carditis as well as conduction abnormalities. We report a case of Lyme disease in a previously healthy 24-year-old male presenting with alternating right- and left-bundle branch block, indicating infra-Hisian atrioventricular (infra-His) block with an accelerated fascicular escape rhythm. Inless than 12 hours, the conduction abnormalities progressed to asystole requiring the urgent placement of a temporary transvenous pacemaker. Subsequently, with appropriate antibiotic treatment, the patient's conduction abnormalities resolved in a week without the need for a permanent pacemaker. PMID:26630701

  11. Positive Contrast with Alternating Repetition Time SSFP (PARTS): A Fast Imaging Technique for SPIO-Labeled Cells

    PubMed Central

    Çukur, Tolga; Yamada, Mayumi; Overall, William R.; Yang, Phillip; Nishimura, Dwight G.

    2011-01-01

    There has been recent interest in positive-contrast MRI methods for noninvasive tracking of cells labeled with superparamagnetic iron-oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles. Low-tip-angle balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP) sequences have been used for fast, high-resolution, and flow-insensitive positive-contrast imaging; however, the contrast can be compromised by the limited suppression of the on-resonant and fat signals. In this work, a new technique that produces positive contrast with alternating repetition time SSFP (PARTS) is proposed to achieve robust background suppression for a broad range of tissue parameters. In vitro and in vivo experiments demonstrate the reliability of the generated positive contrast. The results indicate that PARTS can enhance the suppression level by up to 18 dB compared with conventional bSSFP. PMID:20099331

  12. Effects of weight loss via high fat vs. low fat alternate day fasting diets on free fatty acid profiles.

    PubMed

    Varady, Krista A; Dam, Vi T; Klempel, Monica C; Horne, Matthew; Cruz, Rani; Kroeger, Cynthia M; Santosa, Sylvia

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease risk is associated with excess body weight and elevated plasma free fatty acid (FFA) concentrations. This study examines how an alternate-day fasting (ADF) diet high (HF) or low (LF) in fat affects plasma FFA profiles in the context of weight loss, and changes in body composition and lipid profiles. After a 2-week weight maintenance period, 29 women (BMI 30-39.9 kg/m(2)) 25-65 years old were randomized to an 8-week ADF-HF (45% fat) diet or an ADF-LF (25% fat) diet with 25% energy intake on fast days and ad libitum intake on feed days. Body weight, BMI and waist circumference were assessed weekly and body composition was measured using dual x-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Total and individual FFA and plasma lipid concentrations were measured before and after weight loss. Body weight, BMI, fat mass, total cholesterol, LDL-C and triglyceride concentrations decreased (P < 0.05) in both groups. Total FFA concentrations also decreased (P < 0.001). In the ADF-LF group, decreases were found in several more FFAs than in the ADF-HF group. In the ADF-HF group, FFA concentrations were positively correlated with waist circumference. Depending on the macronutrient composition of a diet, weight loss with an ADF diet decreases FFA concentrations through potentially different mechanisms. PMID:25557754

  13. Investigations of Alternative Steam Generator Location and Flatter Core Geometry for Lead-Cooled Fast Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Carlsson, Johan; Tucek, Kamil; Wider, Hartmut

    2006-07-01

    This paper concerns two independent safety investigations on critical and sub-critical heavy liquid metal cooled fast reactors using simple flow paths. The first investigation applies to locating the steam generators in the risers instead of the down-comers of a simple flow path designed sub-critical reactor of 600 MW{sub th} power. This was compared to a similar design, but with the steam generators located in the downcomers. The transients investigated were Total-Loss-of-Power and unprotected Loss-Of-Flow. It is shown that this reactor peaks at 1041 K after 29 hours during a Total-Loss-Of-Power accident. The difference between locating the steam generators in the risers and the downcomers is insignificant for this accident type. During an unprotected Loss-Of-Flow accident at full power, the core outlet temperature stabilizes at 1010 K, which is 337 K above nominal outlet temperature. The second investigation concerns a 1426 MW{sub th} critical reactor where the influence of the core height versus the core outlet temperature is studied during an unprotected Loss-Of-Flow and Total-Loss-Of-Power accident. A pancake type core geometry of 1.0 m height and 5.8 m diameter, is compared to a compact core of 2 m height and 4.5 m diameter. Moderators, like BeO and hydrides, and their influence on safety coefficients and burnup swings are also presented. Both cores incinerate transuranics from spent LWR fuel with minor actinide fraction of 5%. We show that LFRs can be designed both to breed and burn transuranics from LWRs. It is shown that the hydrides lead to the most favorable reactivity feedbacks, but the poorest reactivity swing. The computational fluid dynamics code STAR-CD was used for all thermal hydraulic calculations, and the MCNP and MCB for neutronics, and burn-up calculations. (authors)

  14. Demosaicking by alternating projections: theory and fast one-step implementation.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yue M; Karzand, Mina; Vetterli, Martin

    2010-08-01

    Color image demosaicking is a key process in the digital imaging pipeline. In this paper, we study a well-known and influential demosaicking algorithm based upon alternating projections (AP), proposed by Gunturk, Altunbasak and Mersereau in 2002. Since its publication, the AP algorithm has been widely cited and compared against in a series of more recent papers in the demosaicking literature. Despite good performances, a limitation of the AP algorithm is its high computational complexity. We provide three main contributions in this paper. First, we present a rigorous analysis of the convergence property of the AP demosaicking algorithm, showing that it is a contraction mapping, with a unique fixed point. Second, we show that this fixed point is in fact the solution to a constrained quadratic minimization problem, thus, establishing the optimality of the AP algorithm. Finally, using the tool of polyphase representation, we show how to obtain the results of the AP algorithm in a single step, implemented as linear filtering in the polyphase domain. Replacing the original iterative procedure by the proposed one-step solution leads to substantial computational savings, by about an order of magnitude in our experiments. PMID:20236886

  15. Fast wave-front reconstruction by solving the Sylvester equation with the alternating direction implicit method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Hongwu; Dekany, Richard

    2004-07-01

    Large degree-of-freedom real-time adaptive optics (AO) control requires reconstruction algorithms that are computationally efficient and readily parallelized for hardware implementation. In particular, we find the wave-front reconstruction for the Hudgin and Fried geometry can be cast into a form of the well-known Sylvester equation using the Kronecker product properties of matrices. We derive the filters and inverse filtering formulas for wave-front reconstruction in two-dimensional (2-D) Discrete Cosine Transform (DCT) domain for these two geometries using the Hadamard product concept of matrices and the principle of separable variables. We introduce a recursive filtering (RF) method for the wave-front reconstruction on an annular aperture, in which, an imbedding step is used to convert an annular-aperture wave-front reconstruction into a squareaperture wave-front reconstruction, and then solving the Hudgin geometry problem on the square aperture. We apply the Alternating Direction Implicit (ADI) method to this imbedding step of the RF algorithm, to efficiently solve the annular-aperture wave-front reconstruction problem at cost of order of the number of degrees of freedom, O(n). Moreover, the ADI method is better suited for parallel implementation and we describe a practical real-time implementation for AO systems of order 3,000 actuators.

  16. SPECIATE 4.2: speciation Database Development Documentation

    EPA Science Inventory

    SPECIATE is the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) repository of volatile organic gas and particulate matter (PM) speciation profiles of air pollution sources. Among the many uses of speciation data, these source profiles are used to: (1) create speciated emissions inve...

  17. SPECIATE 4.3: Addendum to SPECIATE 4.2--Speciation database development documentation

    EPA Science Inventory

    SPECIATE is the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) repository of volatile organic gas and particulate matter (PM) speciation profiles of air pollution sources. Among the many uses of speciation data, these source profiles are used to: (1) create speciated emissions inve...

  18. Computer-Based Video Instruction to Teach the Use of Augmentative and Alternative Communication Devices for Ordering at Fast-Food Restaurants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mechling, Linda C.; Cronin, Beth

    2006-01-01

    In the study reported on here, the authors used computer-based video instruction (CBVI) to teach 3 high school students with moderate or severe intellectual disabilities how to order in fast-food restaurants by using an augmentative, alternative communication device. The study employed a multiple probe design to institute CBVI as the only…

  19. Investigation of alternative layouts for the supercritical carbon dioxide Brayton cycle for a sodium-cooled fast reactor.

    SciTech Connect

    Moisseytsev, A.; Sienicki, J. J.

    2009-07-01

    Analyses of supercritical carbon dioxide (S-CO{sub 2}) Brayton cycle performance have largely settled on the recompression supercritical cycle (or Feher cycle) incorporating a flow split between the main compressor downstream of heat rejection, a recompressing compressor providing direct compression without heat rejection, and high and low temperature recuperators to raise the effectiveness of recuperation and the cycle efficiency. Alternative cycle layouts have been previously examined by Angelino (Politecnico, Milan), by MIT (Dostal, Hejzlar, and Driscoll), and possibly others but not for sodium-cooled fast reactors (SFRs) operating at relatively low core outlet temperature. Thus, the present authors could not be sure that the recompression cycle is an optimal arrangement for application to the SFR. To ensure that an advantageous alternative layout has not been overlooked, several alternative cycle layouts have been investigated for a S-CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle coupled to the Advanced Burner Test Reactor (ABTR) SFR preconceptual design having a 510 C core outlet temperature and a 470 C turbine inlet temperature to determine if they provide any benefit in cycle performance (e.g., enhanced cycle efficiency). No such benefits were identified, consistent with the previous examinations, such that attention was devoted to optimizing the recompression supercritical cycle. The effects of optimizing the cycle minimum temperature and pressure are investigated including minimum temperatures and/or pressures below the critical values. It is found that improvements in the cycle efficiency of 1% or greater relative to previous analyses which arbitrarily fixed the minimum temperature and pressure can be realized through an optimal choice of the combination of the minimum cycle temperature and pressure (e.g., for a fixed minimum temperature there is an optimal minimum pressure). However, this leads to a requirement for a larger cooler for heat rejection which may impact the

  20. What Is Speciation?

    PubMed

    Shapiro, B Jesse; Leducq, Jean-Baptiste; Mallet, James

    2016-03-01

    Concepts and definitions of species have been debated by generations of biologists and remain controversial. Microbes pose a particular challenge because of their genetic diversity, asexual reproduction, and often promiscuous horizontal gene transfer (HGT). However, microbes also present an opportunity to study and understand speciation because of their rapid evolution, both in nature and in the lab, and small, easily sequenced genomes. Here, we review how microbial population genomics has enabled us to catch speciation "in the act" and how the results have challenged and enriched our concepts of species, with implications for all domains of life. We describe how recombination (including HGT and introgression) has shaped the genomes of nascent microbial, animal, and plant species and argue for a prominent role of natural selection in initiating and maintaining speciation. We ask how universal is the process of speciation across the tree of life, and what lessons can be drawn from microbes? Comparative genomics showing the extent of HGT in natural populations certainly jeopardizes the relevance of vertical descent (i.e., the species tree) in speciation. Nevertheless, we conclude that species do indeed exist as clusters of genetic and ecological similarity and that speciation is driven primarily by natural selection, regardless of the balance between horizontal and vertical descent. PMID:27030977

  1. What Is Speciation?

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, B. Jesse; Leducq, Jean-Baptiste; Mallet, James

    2016-01-01

    Concepts and definitions of species have been debated by generations of biologists and remain controversial. Microbes pose a particular challenge because of their genetic diversity, asexual reproduction, and often promiscuous horizontal gene transfer (HGT). However, microbes also present an opportunity to study and understand speciation because of their rapid evolution, both in nature and in the lab, and small, easily sequenced genomes. Here, we review how microbial population genomics has enabled us to catch speciation “in the act” and how the results have challenged and enriched our concepts of species, with implications for all domains of life. We describe how recombination (including HGT and introgression) has shaped the genomes of nascent microbial, animal, and plant species and argue for a prominent role of natural selection in initiating and maintaining speciation. We ask how universal is the process of speciation across the tree of life, and what lessons can be drawn from microbes? Comparative genomics showing the extent of HGT in natural populations certainly jeopardizes the relevance of vertical descent (i.e., the species tree) in speciation. Nevertheless, we conclude that species do indeed exist as clusters of genetic and ecological similarity and that speciation is driven primarily by natural selection, regardless of the balance between horizontal and vertical descent. PMID:27030977

  2. Cancer: beyond speciation.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Mark D

    2011-01-01

    A good account of the nature of cancer should provide not only a description of its consistent features, but also how they arise, how they are maintained, why conventional chemotherapy succeeds, and fails, and where to look for better targets. Cancer was once regarded as enigmatic and inexplicable; more recently, the "mutation theory," based on random alterations in a relatively small set of proto-oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes, has enjoyed widespread acceptance. The "mutation theory," however, is noticeable for its failure to explain the basis of differential chemosensitivity, for providing a paucity of targets, especially druggable ones, and for justifying the development of targeted therapies with, in general, disappointingly abbreviated clinical benefit. Furthermore, this theory has mistakenly predicted a widespread commonality of consistent genetic abnormalities across the range of cancers, whereas the opposite, that is, roiling macrogenomic instability, is generally the rule. In contrast, concerning what actually is consistent, that is, the suite of metabolic derangements common to virtually all, especially aggressive, cancers, the "Mutation Theory" has nothing to say. Other hypotheses merit serious consideration "aneuploidy theories" posit whole-genome instability and imbalance as causally responsible for the propagation of the tumor. Another approach, that is, "derepression atavism," suggests cancer results from the release of an ancient survival program, characterized by the emergence of remarkably primitive features such as unicellularity, fermentation, and immortality; existential goals are served by heuristic genomic instability coupled with host-to-tumor biomass interconversion, mediated by the Warburg effect, a major component of the program. Carcinogenesis is here seen as a process of de-speciation; however, genomic nonrestabilization raises issues as to where on the tree of life cancers belong, as a genuinely alternative modus vivendi

  3. Characterization of Technetium Speciation in Cast Stone

    SciTech Connect

    Um, Wooyong; Jung, Hun Bok; Wang, Guohui; Westsik, Joseph H.; Peterson, Reid A.

    2013-11-11

    This report describes the results from laboratory tests performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) EM-31 Support Program (EMSP) subtask, “Production and Long-Term Performance of Low Temperature Waste Forms” to provide additional information on technetium (Tc) speciation characterization in the Cast Stone waste form. To support the use of Cast Stone as an alternative to vitrification for solidifying low-activity waste (LAW) and as the current baseline waste form for secondary waste streams at the Hanford Site, additional understanding of Tc speciation in Cast Stone is needed to predict the long-term Tc leachability from Cast Stone and to meet the regulatory disposal-facility performance requirements for the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). Characterizations of the Tc speciation within the Cast Stone after leaching under various conditions provide insights into how the Tc is retained and released. The data generated by the laboratory tests described in this report provide both empirical and more scientific information to increase our understanding of Tc speciation in Cast Stone and its release mechanism under relevant leaching processes for the purpose of filling data gaps and to support the long-term risk and performance assessments of Cast Stone in the IDF at the Hanford Site.

  4. Ecological speciation in tropical reef fishes

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Luiz A; Robertson, D. Ross; Roman, Joe; Bowen, Brian W

    2005-01-01

    The high biodiversity in tropical seas provides a long-standing challenge to allopatric speciation models. Physical barriers are few in the ocean and larval dispersal is often extensive, a combination that should reduce opportunities for speciation. Yet coral reefs are among the most species-rich habitats in the world, indicating evolutionary processes beyond conventional allopatry. In a survey of mtDNA sequences of five congeneric west Atlantic reef fishes (wrasses, genus Halichoeres) with similar dispersal potential, we observed phylogeographical patterns that contradict expectations of geographical isolation, and instead indicate a role for ecological speciation. In Halichoeres bivittatus and the species pair Halichoeres radiatus/brasiliensis, we observed strong partitions (3.4% and 2.3% divergence, respectively) between adjacent and ecologically distinct habitats, but high genetic connectivity between similar habitats separated by thousands of kilometres. This habitat partitioning is maintained even at a local scale where H. bivittatus lineages are segregated between cold- and warm-water habitats in both Bermuda and Florida. The concordance of evolutionary partitions with habitat types, rather than conventional biogeographical barriers, indicates parapatric ecological speciation, in which adaptation to alternative environmental conditions in adjacent locations overwhelms the homogenizing effect of dispersal. This mechanism can explain the long-standing enigma of high biodiversity in coral reef faunas. PMID:15817431

  5. ORGANIC SPECIATION SAMPLING ARTIFACTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sampling artifacts for molecular markers from organic speciation of particulate matter were investigated by analyzing forty-one samples collected in Philadelphia as a part of the Northeast Oxidant and Particulate Study (NEOPS). Samples were collected using a high volume sampler ...

  6. Population differentiation without speciation

    PubMed Central

    Magurran, A. E.

    1998-01-01

    Population differentiation is often viewed as an important step towards speciation, and part of the rationale for conserving variation at the intraspecific level is that the potential to generate more biological diversity should be retained. Yet, speciation is not an inevitable consequence of population divergence. This paper reviews recent work on the Trinidadian guppy, Poecilia reticulata, a species that is renowned for its capacity for population differentiation. Guppy populations evolve rapidly, within 101 to 102 generations, as a response to changes in selection exerted by predators. The rates of evolution involved can be up to seven orders of magnitude greater than those seen in the fossil record. Sexual selection, particuarly female choice, appears to reinforce the divergence that natural selection has generated. Perplexingly, however, there is no reproductive isolation (either prezygotic or postzygotic) between populations, even those that have been separated for at least 106 generations. Sexual conflict may be the key to explaining this absence of speciation. Male reproductive behaviour, particularly the high incidence of sneaky mating, may be instrumental in producing sufficient gene flow to prevent reproductive isolation. Sneaky mating has the potential to undermine female choice, and is known to be an important means of sperm transfer in wild populations. Sexual dimorphism, also a result of sexual conflict in guppies, may inhibit speciation in another way. Morphological differences between the sexes, that have arisen for reproductive reasons, mean that males and females are pre-adapted for different foraging niches. This, in turn, reduces the opportunity for the development of feeding polymorphisms, a mechanism that seems to have been important in the sympatric speciation of other fish species.

  7. Speciation Mapping of Environmental Samples Using XANES Imaging

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fast X-ray detectors with large solid angles and high dynamic ranges open the door to XANES imaging, in which millions of spectra are collected to image the speciation of metals at micrometre resolution, over areas up to several square centimetres. This paper explores how such mu...

  8. The evolutionary genetics of speciation.

    PubMed Central

    Coyne, J A; Orr, H A

    1998-01-01

    The last decade has brought renewed interest in the genetics of speciation, yielding a number of new models and empirical results. Defining speciation as 'the origin of reproductive isolation between two taxa', we review recent theoretical studies and relevant data, emphasizing the regular patterns seen among genetic analyses. Finally, we point out some important and tractable questions about speciation that have been neglected. PMID:9533126

  9. Arsenic Speciation in Groundwater: Role of Thioanions

    EPA Science Inventory

    The behavior of arsenic in groundwater environments is fundamentally linked to its speciation. Understanding arsenic speciation is important because chemical speciation impacts reactivity, bioavailability, toxicity, and transport and fate processes. In aerobic environments arsen...

  10. SPECIATE--EPA'S DATABASE OF SPECIATED EMISSION PROFILES

    EPA Science Inventory

    SPECIATE is EPA's repository of Total Organic Compound and Particulate Matter speciated profiles for a wide variety of sources. The profiles in this system are provided for air quality dispersion modeling and as a library for source-receptor and source apportionment type models. ...

  11. Quantification of the boron speciation in alkali borosilicate glasses by electron energy loss spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Shaodong; Yang, Guang; Zhao, Yanqi; Peng, MingYing; Skibsted, Jørgen; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2015-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy and related analytical techniques have been widely used to study the microstructure of different materials. However, few research works have been performed in the field of glasses, possibly due to the electron-beam irradiation damage. In this paper, we have developed a method based on electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) data acquisition and analyses, which enables determination of the boron speciation in a series of ternary alkali borosilicate glasses with constant molar ratios. A script for the fast acquisition of EELS has been designed, from which the fraction of BO4 tetrahedra can be obtained by fitting the experimental data with linear combinations of the reference spectra. The BO4 fractions (N4) obtained by EELS are consistent with those from 11B MAS NMR spectra, suggesting that EELS can be an alternative and convenient way to determine the N4 fraction in glasses. In addition, the boron speciation of a CeO2 doped potassium borosilicate glass has been analyzed by using the time-resolved EELS spectra. The results clearly demonstrate that the BO4 to BO3 transformation induced by the electron beam irradiation can be efficiently suppressed by doping CeO2 to the borosilicate glasses. PMID:26643370

  12. Asymmetric Flow-Field Flow Fractionation Hyphenated ICP-MS as an Alternative to Cloud Point Extraction for Quantification of Silver Nanoparticles and Silver Speciation: Application for Nanoparticles with a Protein Corona.

    PubMed

    Mudalige, Thilak K; Qu, Haiou; Linder, Sean W

    2015-07-21

    Production and application of nanoparticles in consumer products is at an all-time high due to the emerging field of nanotechnology. Direct detection and quantification of trace levels of nanoparticles within consumer products is very challenging and problematic. Although multiple methodologies are available for this purpose, each method has its own set of limitations. Herein, we developed an analytical platform consisting of asymmetric flow-field flow fractionation (AF4) coupled with inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS) for the speciation and quantification of silver ions and silver nanoparticles at the ng/kg level (ppt). AF4 is utilized to concentrate the nanoparticles, and ICP-MS acts as the detector. The protein corona that forms upon exposure of nanoparticles to bovine serum albumin was utilized as a nanoparticle stabilization and AF4 recovery enhancement mechanism. Speciation of silver ions and nanoparticles was achieved with the assistance of penicillamine as a complexation ligand. The effect of nanoparticle size, surface coating, and ionization state toward the detection and quantification of the developed methodology was evaluated. The detection limit was found to be 4 ng/kg with the application of a 5 mL sample loop. Further application of this developed methodology on environmentally relevant samples was demonstrated by the analysis of Arkansas River water spiked with silver nanoparticles and nanoparticle spiked into humic acid solution (50 mg/L) at an environmentally relevant level. PMID:26095720

  13. Awake intubation using fast-track laryngeal mask airway as an alternative to fiberoptic bronchoscopy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Parnell, J David; Mills, Jeff

    2006-12-01

    Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) pose a unique challenge to the anesthetist. The manifestations of RA may include cervical spine instability, limited range of motion, and temperomandibular joint involvement limiting mouth opening. Therefore, securing the airway while maintaining the head and neck in a neutral position is of particular concern to the anesthetist. While this is most commonly accomplished using an awake fiberoptic technique, the following case is presented as a safe and efficient initial alternative to the primary use of fiberoptic bronchoscopy in the appropriate patient population. PMID:17236388

  14. SPECIATE 4.0: SPECIATION DATABASE DEVELOPMENT DOCUMENTATION--FINAL REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    SPECIATE is the U.S. EPA's repository of total organic compounds (TOC) and particulate matter (PM) speciation profiles of air pollution sources. This report documents how EPA developed the SPECIATE 4.0 database that replaces the prior version, SPECIATE 3.2. SPECIATE 4.0 includes ...

  15. Effects of Age and Hindlimb Immobilization and Remobilization on Fast Troponin T Precursor mRNA Alternative Splicing in Rat Gastrocnemius Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Ravi, Suhana; Schilder, Rudolf J.; Berg, Arthur S.; Kimball, Scot R.

    2016-01-01

    Fast skeletal muscle Troponin T (TNNT3) is an important component of the skeletal muscle contractile machinery. The pre-mRNA encoding TNNT3 is alternatively spliced and changes in the pattern of TNNT3 splice form expression are associated with alterations in thin filament calcium sensitivity and force production during muscle contraction, thereby regulating muscle function. Interestingly, during aging, muscle force/cross sectional area is reduced, suggesting that loss of mass does not completely account for the impaired muscle function that develops during the aging process. Therefore, in the present study, we tested the hypothesis that age- and changes in muscle loading are associated with alterations in TNNT3 alternative splicing in the rat gastrocnemius muscle. We found that the relative abundance of several TNNT3 splice forms varied significantly with age among 2, 9, and 18-month old rats, and the pattern correlated with changes in body weight rather than muscle mass. Hindlimb immobilization for 7 days resulted in dramatic alterations in splice form relative abundance such that the pattern was similar to that observed in lighter animals. Remobilization for 7 days restored the splicing pattern toward that observed in the non-immobilized limb, even though muscle mass had not yet begun to recover. In conclusion, the results suggest that TNNT3 pre-mRNA alternative splicing is rapidly (i.e. within days) modulated in response to changes in the load placed on the muscle. Moreover, the results show that restoration of TNNT3 alternative splicing to control patterns is initiated prior to an increase in muscle mass. PMID:26799695

  16. Environmental speciation of actinides.

    PubMed

    Maher, Kate; Bargar, John R; Brown, Gordon E

    2013-04-01

    Although minor in abundance in Earth's crust (U, 2-4 ppm; Th, 10-15 ppm) and in seawater (U, 0.003 ppm; Th, 0.0007 ppm), light actinides (Th, Pa, U, Np, Pu, Am, and Cm) are important environmental contaminants associated with anthropogenic activities such as the mining and milling of uranium ores, generation of nuclear energy, and storage of legacy waste resulting from the manufacturing and testing of nuclear weapons. In this review, we discuss the abundance, production, and environmental sources of naturally occurring and some man-made light actinides. As is the case with other environmental contaminants, the solubility, transport properties, bioavailability, and toxicity of actinides are dependent on their speciation (composition, oxidation state, molecular-level structure, and nature of the phase in which the contaminant element or molecule occurs). We review the aqueous speciation of U, Np, and Pu as a function of pH and Eh, their interaction with common inorganic and organic ligands in natural waters, and some of the common U-containing minerals. We also discuss the interaction of U, Np, Pu, and Am solution complexes with common Earth materials, including minerals, colloids, gels, natural organic matter (NOM), and microbial organisms, based on simplified model system studies. These surface interactions can inhibit (e.g., sorption to mineral surfaces, formation of insoluble biominerals) or enhance (e.g., colloid-facilitated transport) the dispersal of light actinides in the biosphere and in some cases (e.g., interaction with dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria, NOM, or Mn- and Fe-containing minerals) can modify the oxidation states and, consequently, the behavior of redox-sensitive light actinides (U, Np, and Pu). Finally, we review the speciation of U and Pu, their chemical transformations, and cleanup histories at several U.S. Department of Energy field sites that have been used to mill U ores, produce fissile materials for reactors and weapons, and store

  17. Sexual selection drives speciation in an Amazonian frog

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boul, K.E.; Funk, W.C.; Darst, C.R.; Cannatella, D.C.; Ryan, M.J.

    2007-01-01

    One proposed mechanism of speciation is divergent sexual selection, whereby divergence in female preferences and male signals results in behavioural isolation. Despite the appeal of this hypothesis, evidence for it remains inconclusive. Here, we present several lines of evidence that sexual selection is driving behavioural isolation and speciation among populations of an Amazonian frog (Physalaemus petersi). First, sexual selection has promoted divergence in male mating calls and female preferences for calls between neighbouring populations, resulting in strong behavioural isolation. Second, phylogenetic analysis indicates that populations have become fixed for alternative call types several times throughout the species' range, and coalescent analysis rejects genetic drift as a cause for this pattern, suggesting that this divergence is due to selection. Finally, gene flow estimated with microsatellite loci is an average of 30 times lower between populations with different call types than between populations separated by a similar geographical distance with the same call type, demonstrating genetic divergence and incipient speciation. Taken together, these data provide strong evidence that sexual selection is driving behavioural isolation and speciation, supporting sexual selection as a cause for speciation in the wild. ?? 2006 The Royal Society.

  18. In vitro estimation of fast and slow wave parameters of thin trabecular bone using space-alternating generalized expectation-maximization algorithm.

    PubMed

    Grimes, Morad; Bouhadjera, Abdelmalek; Haddad, Sofiane; Benkedidah, Toufik

    2012-07-01

    In testing cancellous bone using ultrasound, two types of longitudinal Biot's waves are observed in the received signal. These are known as fast and slow waves and their appearance depend on the alignment of bone trabeculae in the propagation path and the thickness of the specimen under test (SUT). They can be used as an effective tool for the diagnosis of osteoporosis because wave propagation behavior depends on the bone structure. However, the identification of these waves in the received signal can be difficult to achieve. In this study, ultrasonic wave propagation in a 4mm thick bovine cancellous bone in the direction parallel to the trabecular alignment is considered. The observed Biot's fast and slow longitudinal waves are superimposed; which makes it difficult to extract any information from the received signal. These two waves can be separated using the space alternating generalized expectation maximization (SAGE) algorithm. The latter has been used mainly in speech processing. In this new approach, parameters such as, arrival time, center frequency, bandwidth, amplitude, phase and velocity of each wave are estimated. The B-Scan images and its associated A-scans obtained through simulations using Biot's finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method are validated experimentally using a thin bone sample obtained from the femoral-head of a 30 months old bovine. PMID:22284937

  19. Fast food (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Fast foods are quick, reasonably priced, and readily available alternatives to home cooking. While convenient and economical for a busy lifestyle, fast foods are typically high in calories, fat, saturated fat, ...

  20. CORRELATING METAL SPECIATION IN SOILS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Understanding bioavailability of metals from exposure to contaminated soils is a challenging aspect of environmental research. This presentation will examine three areas of research with respect to metal speciation in soils as it relates to bioavailability: 1) Pb immobilization a...

  1. Fast circulation of cerebrospinal fluid: an alternative perspective on the protective role of high intracranial pressure in ocular hypertension.

    PubMed

    Wostyn, Peter; De Groot, Veva; Van Dam, Debby; Audenaert, Kurt; Killer, Hanspeter Esriel; De Deyn, Peter Paul

    2016-05-01

    As ocular hypertension refers to a condition in which the intraocular pressure is consistently elevated but without development of glaucoma, study of it may provide important clues to factors that may play a protective role in glaucoma. β-amyloid, one of the key histopathological findings in Alzheimer's disease, has been reported to increase by chronic elevation of intraocular pressure in animals with experimentally induced ocular hypertension and to cause retinal ganglion cell death, pointing to similarities in molecular cell death mechanisms between glaucoma and Alzheimer's disease. On the other hand, recent studies have reported that intracranial pressure is higher in patients with ocular hypertension compared with controls, giving rise to the idea that elevated intracranial pressure may provide a protective effect for the optic nerve by decreasing the trans-lamina cribrosa pressure difference. The speculation that the higher intracranial pressure reported in ocular hypertension patients may protect against glaucoma mainly through a lower trans-lamina cribrosa pressure difference remains at least questionable. Here, we present an alternative viewpoint, according to which the protective effect of higher intracranial pressure could be due, at least in part, to a pressure-independent mechanism, namely faster cerebrospinal fluid production leading to increased cerebrospinal fluid turnover with enhanced removal of potentially neurotoxic waste products that accumulate in the optic nerve. This suggests a new hypothesis for glaucoma, which, just like Alzheimer's disease, may be considered then as an imbalance between production and clearance of neurotoxins, including β-amyloid. If confirmed, then strategies to improve cerebrospinal fluid flow are reasonable and could provide a new therapeutic approach for stopping the neurotoxic β-amyloid pathway in glaucoma. PMID:26691953

  2. Fast food (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... quick, reasonably priced, and readily available alternatives to home cooking. While convenient and economical for a busy lifestyle, fast foods are typically high in calories, fat, saturated fat, ...

  3. Sexual conflict and speciation.

    PubMed Central

    Parker, G A; Partridge, L

    1998-01-01

    We review the significance of two forms of sexual conflict (different evolutionary interests of the two sexes) for genetic differentiation of populations and the evolution of reproductive isolation. Conflicting selection on the alleles at a single locus can occur in males and females if the sexes have different optima for a trait, and there are pleiotropic genetic correlations between the sexes for it. There will then be selection for sex limitation and hence sexual dimorphism. This sex limitation could break down in hybrids and reduce their fitness. Pleiotropic genetic correlations between the sexes could also affect the likelihood of mating in interpopulation encounters. Conflict can also occur between (sex-limited) loci that determine behaviour in males and those that determine behaviour in females. Reproductive isolation may occur by rapid coevolution of male trait and female mating preference. This would tend to generate assortative mating on secondary contact, hence promoting speciation. Sexual conflict resulting from sensory exploitation, polyspermy and the cost of mating could result in high levels of interpopulation mating. If females evolve resistance to make pre- and postmating manipulation, males from one population could be more successful with females from the other, because females would have evolved resistance to their own (but not to the allopatric) males. Between-locus sexual conflict could also occur as a result of conflict between males and females of different populations over the production of unfit hybrids. We develop models which show that females are in general selected to resist such matings and males to persist, and this could have a bearing on both the initial level of interpopulation matings and the likelihood that reinforcement will occur. In effect, selection on males usually acts to promote gene flow and to restrict premating isolation, whereas selection on females usually acts in the reverse direction. We review theoretical models

  4. Arabidopsis hybrid speciation processes

    PubMed Central

    Schmickl, Roswitha; Koch, Marcus A.

    2011-01-01

    The genus Arabidopsis provides a unique opportunity to study fundamental biological questions in plant sciences using the diploid model species Arabidopsis thaliana and Arabidopsis lyrata. However, only a few studies have focused on introgression and hybrid speciation in Arabidopsis, although polyploidy is a common phenomenon within this genus. More recently, there is growing evidence of significant gene flow between the various Arabidopsis species. So far, we know Arabidopsis suecica and Arabidopsis kamchatica as fully stabilized allopolyploid species. Both species evolved during Pleistocene glaciation and deglaciation cycles in Fennoscandinavia and the amphi-Beringian region, respectively. These hybrid studies were conducted either on a phylogeographic scale or reconstructed experimentally in the laboratory. In our study we focus at a regional and population level. Our research area is located in the foothills of the eastern Austrian Alps, where two Arabidopsis species, Arabidopsis arenosa and A. lyrata ssp. petraea, are sympatrically distributed. Our hypothesis of genetic introgression, migration, and adaptation to the changing environment during the Pleistocene has been confirmed: We observed significant, mainly unidirectional gene flow between the two species, which has given rise to the tetraploid A. lyrata. This cytotype was able to escape from the narrow ecological niche occupied by diploid A. lyrata ssp. petraea on limestone outcrops by migrating northward into siliceous areas, leaving behind a trail of genetic differentiation. PMID:21825128

  5. Determining Evapotranspiration with the Eddy Covariance Method: Fast-Response Dry- and Wet-Bulb Thermocouples for Humidity Measurements Can Provide a Cheap Alternative to Infrared Hygrometers.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holwerda, F.; Alvarado-Barrientos, M. S.

    2014-12-01

    Field data on evapotranspiration are of crucial importance for ecohydrological and hydrometeorological studies in the tropics. Probably the most direct way to measure evapotranspiration is with the eddy covariance method, in which the latent heat flux (λE) is calculated from turbulent fluctuations of vertical wind velocity and humidity. The humidity fluctuations are typically measured with some type of fast-response infrared hygrometer. However, these sensors are expensive, which can be problematic if research budgets are limited. Turbulent fluctuations of humidity can also be measured with fast-response dry- and wet-bulb thermocouples, which can be constructed easily and at a fraction of the price of infrared sensors. The idea of using dry- and wet-bulb thermocouples for measuring λE with the eddy covariance method is not new, but hasn't been tested recently, possibly because experiments in the late seventies showed that this approach is not without problems due to the slow response of the wet-bulb thermocouple. In the present study, values of λE derived from dry- and wet-bulb thermocouple measurements were compared with those obtained using a fast-response KH20 hygrometer. Measurements were made above a shaded coffee plantation and a sugarcane crop in central Veracruz, Mexico. The agreement between λE obtained with the thermocouples (y) and the hygrometer (x) was very good for both vegetation covers: y = 0.98x + 5.0 (W m-2), r2 = 0.93 (coffee plantation); y = 0.99x - 13.3 (W m-2), r2 = 0.88 (sugarcane). However, the correction factor (CF) for high frequency loss in the wet-bulb temperature signal was considerably higher for the low-statured sugarcane crop (CF = 1.33) as compared to the taller shaded coffee plantation (CF = 1.09). Nevertheless, as long as care is taken in the derivation of this correction factor, reliable λE data can be obtained using the dry- and wet-bulb thermocouples, offering a cheap alternative to infrared hygrometers.

  6. The effects of modified alternate-day fasting diet on weight loss and CAD risk factors in overweight and obese women

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Obesity is a worldwide health problem with increasing prevalence. Decrease in energy intake has been shown to lower the risk of coronary artery disease in obese subjects. The common form of dietary restriction is daily calorie restriction (CR). Another form is alternate-day fasting (ADF). This study examined the ability of modified ADF to facilitate weight loss and lower cardiovascular risk factors in overweight and obese women. Methods 15 adult subjects completed an 8 weeks trial (2 weeks observed and 6 weeks ADF). All women consumed very low calorie diet on the fast day and usually diet in every other day. Body weight (BW), fat mass and blood pressure (BP) were measured. Fasting blood samples were collected at the first and 57th day of trial for biochemical analysis. Results During the course of the trial, BW of the subjects decreased (p < 0/0001) from 84/3 ± 11/44 kg to 78/3 ± 10/18 kg. Waist Circumference decreased from 87/87 ± 9/74 to 82/86 ± 9/68(p < 0/001). Reduction in systolic BP was seen from 114.8 ± 9.16 to 105.13 ± 10.19 mmHg (p < 0/001) and diastolic BP changed from 82.86 ± 10.6 to 74.5 ± 10.8 (P < 0.05). Total cholesterol decreased from 227/73 ± 49/96 to 214/67 ± 43/27, TG from 160/5 ± 46/18 to 143/9 ± 22/77, LDL from 149/46 ± 49/81 to 131/3 ± 50/97, and FBS from 102 ± 14/7 to 96 ± 11/79 mg/dl but were not significant. HDL increased from 42/32 ± 18/01 to 50/58 ± 19/46 and was not significant. Conclusion These finding suggest that short time ADF is a viable dietary option to help obese individuals lose weight and decrease some CAD risk factors. More and longer-term studies in human subjects are needed to support this important result. PMID:23497604

  7. Iron Speciation in Urban Dust

    SciTech Connect

    E Elzinga; Y Gao; J Fitts; R Tappero

    2011-12-31

    An improved understanding of anthropogenic impacts on ocean fertility requires knowledge of anthropogenic dust mineralogy and associated Fe speciation as a critical step toward developing Fe solubility models constrained by mineralogical composition. This study explored the utility of micro-focused X-ray absorption spectroscopy ({mu}-XAS) in characterizing the speciation of Fe in urban dust samples. A micro-focused beam of 10 x 7 {micro}m made possible the measurement of the Fe K edge XAS spectra of individual dust particles in the PM5.6 size fraction collected in Newark, New Jersey, USA. Spectral analysis indicated the presence of mixtures of Fe-containing minerals within individual dust particles; we observed significant magnetite content along with other Fe(III)-(hydr)oxide minerals which could not be conclusively identified. Our data indicate that detailed quantitative determination of Fe speciation requires extended energy scans to constrain the types and relative abundance of Fe species present. We observe heterogeneity in Fe speciation at the dust particle level, which underscores the importance of analyzing a statistically adequate number of particles within each dust sample. Where possible, {mu}-XAS measurements should be complemented with additional characterization techniques such as {mu}-XRD and bulk XAS to obtain a comprehensive picture of the Fe speciation in dust materials. X-ray microprobes should be used to complement bulk methods used to determine particle composition, methods that fail to record particle heterogeneity.

  8. Matrix-free analysis of selected benzodiazepines in human serum samples using alternating trilinear decomposition modeling of fast liquid chromatography diode array detection data.

    PubMed

    Vosough, Maryam; Iravani, Negar J

    2016-02-01

    This paper describes the development and validation of a simple and efficient bioanalytical procedure for simultaneous determination of alprazolam, clonazepam, diazepam in human serum samples using high performance liquid chromatography with photodiode-array detection, regarding a fast elution methodology in 4 min. Briefly, this method consists of a simple liquid extraction step of serum samples followed by HPLC analysis on a C18 column. After confirming the absence of matrix effect, an external standard methodology has been applied for quantification purposes. Due to the presence of serum endogenous components as uncalibrated components in the sample, the second-order calibration based on alternating trilinear decomposition has been applied on a set of absorbance matrices collected as a function of retention time and wavelengths. Acceptable resolution and quantification results were achieved in the presence of matrix interferences and the second-order advantage was fully exploited. The average recoveries for alprazolam, clonazepam and diazepam were 89.1%, 96.3% and 94.7% and relative standard deviation values for intra- and inter-day precision were equal or lower than 8.1% and 9.4%, respectively. The developed method enabled us to determine the analytes in the various serum samples in the presence of overlapped profiles, while keeping experimental time and extraction step at the minimum. PMID:26653472

  9. Competitive speciation in quantitative genetic models.

    PubMed

    Drossel, B; Mckane, A

    2000-06-01

    We study sympatric speciation due to competition in an environment with a broad distribution of resources. We assume that the trait under selection is a quantitative trait, and that mating is assortative with respect to this trait. Our model alternates selection according to Lotka-Volterra-type competition equations, with reproduction using the ideas of quantitative genetics. The recurrence relations defined by these equations are studied numerically and analytically. We find that when a population enters a new environment, with a broad distribution of unexploited food sources, the population distribution broadens under a variety of conditions, with peaks at the edge of the distribution indicating the formation of subpopulations. After a long enough time period, the population can split into several subpopulations with little gene flow between them. PMID:10816369

  10. Mutation-order divergence by sexual selection: diversification of sexual signals in similar environments as a first step in speciation.

    PubMed

    Mendelson, Tamra C; Martin, Michael D; Flaxman, Samuel M

    2014-09-01

    The origin of species remains a central question, and recent research focuses on the role of ecological differences in promoting speciation. Ecological differences create opportunities for divergent selection (i.e. 'ecological' speciation), a Darwinian hypothesis that hardly requires justification. In contrast, 'mutation-order' speciation proposes that, instead of adapting to different environments, populations find different ways to adapt to similar environments, implying that speciation does not require ecological differences. This distinction is critical as it provides an alternative hypothesis to the prevailing view that ecological differences drive speciation. Speciation by sexual selection lies at the centre of debates about the importance of ecological differences in promoting speciation; here, we present verbal and mathematical models of mutation-order divergence by sexual selection. We develop three general cases and provide a two-locus population genetic model for each. Results indicate that alternative secondary sexual traits can fix in populations that initially experience similar natural and sexual selection and that divergent traits and preferences can remain stable in the face of low gene flow. This stable divergence can facilitate subsequent divergence that completes or reinforces speciation. We argue that a mutation-order process could explain widespread diversity in secondary sexual traits among closely related, allopatric species. PMID:24943881

  11. To speciate, or not to speciate? Resource heterogeneity, the subjectivity of similarity, and the macroevolutionary consequences of niche-width shifts in plant-feeding insects.

    PubMed

    Nyman, Tommi

    2010-05-01

    Coevolutionary studies on plants and plant-feeding insects have significantly improved our understanding of the role of niche shifts in the generation of new species. Evolving plant lineages essentially constitute moving islands and archipelagoes in resource space, and host shifts by insects are usually preceded by colonizations of novel resources. Critical to hypotheses concerning ecological speciation is what happens immediately before and after colonization attempts: if an available plant is too similar to the current host(s), it simply will be incorporated into the existing diet, but if it is too different, it will not be colonized in the first place. It thus seems that the probability of speciation is maximized when alternative hosts are at an 'intermediate' distance in resource space. In this review, I wish to highlight the possibility that resource similarity and, thus, the definition of 'intermediate', are subjective concepts that depend on the herbivore lineage's tolerance to dietary variation. This subjectivity of similarity means that changes in tolerance can either decrease or increase speciation probabilities depending on the distribution of plants in resource space: insect lineages with narrow tolerances are likely to speciate by 'island-hopping' on young, species-rich plant groups, whereas more generalized lineages could speciate by shifting among resource archipelagoes formed by higher plant taxa. Repeated and convergent origins of traits known to broaden or to restrict host-plant use in multiple different insect groups provide opportunities for studying how tolerance and resource heterogeneity may interact to determine speciation rates. PMID:20002390

  12. PASSENGER CAR HYDROCARBON EMISSIONS SPECIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Emission factors for over 60 individual hydrocarbon compounds were determined for four passenger cars. The cars included a 1963 Chevrolet, a 1977 Mustang, and 1978 Monarch, and 1979 LTD II. The speciation data is reported for both tailpipe and evaporative emissions. The tailpipe ...

  13. A PERSONAL PARTICLE SPECIATION SAMPLER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dr. Susanne Hering of Aerosol Dynamics Inc and her colleagues expect to design and validate a personal monitoring sampler for particles smaller than 2.5 µm (PM2.5) that is suitable for subsequent chemical speciation work. The investigators believe the result will be a...

  14. MODELING MONOMETHYLMERCURY AND TRIBUTYLTIN SPECIATION WITH EPA'S GEOCHEMICAL SPECIATION MODEL MINTEQA2

    EPA Science Inventory

    Given the complexity of the various, simultaneous (and competing) equilibrium reactions governing the speciation of ionic species in aquatic systems, EPA has developed and distributed the geochemical speciation model MINTEQA2 (Brown and Allison, 1987, Allison et al., 1991; Hydrog...

  15. Arsenic Speciation of Terrestrial Invertebrates

    SciTech Connect

    Moriarty, M.M.; Koch, I.; Gordon, R.A.; Reimer, K.J. ); )

    2009-07-01

    The distribution and chemical form (speciation) of arsenic in terrestrial food chains determines both the amount of arsenic available to higher organisms, and the toxicity of this metalloid in affected ecosystems. Invertebrates are part of complex terrestrial food webs. This paper provides arsenic concentrations and arsenic speciation profiles for eight orders of terrestrial invertebrates collected at three historical gold mine sites and one background site in Nova Scotia, Canada. Total arsenic concentrations, determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), were dependent upon the classification of invertebrate. Arsenic species were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) ICP-MS and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). Invertebrates were found by HPLC ICP-MS to contain predominantly arsenite and arsenate in methanol/water extracts, while XAS revealed that most arsenic is bound to sulfur in vivo. Examination of the spatial distribution of arsenic within an ant tissue highlighted the differences between exogenous and endogenous arsenic, as well as the extent to which arsenic is transformed upon ingestion. Similar arsenic speciation patterns for invertebrate groups were observed across sites. Trace amounts of arsenobetaine and arsenocholine were identified in slugs, ants, and spiders.

  16. The genetics of speciation: Insights from Fisher's geometric model.

    PubMed

    Fraïsse, Christelle; Gunnarsson, P Alexander; Roze, Denis; Bierne, Nicolas; Welch, John J

    2016-07-01

    Research in speciation genetics has uncovered many robust patterns in intrinsic reproductive isolation, and fitness landscape models have been useful in interpreting these patterns. Here, we examine fitness landscapes based on Fisher's geometric model. Such landscapes are analogous to models of optimizing selection acting on quantitative traits, and have been widely used to study adaptation and the distribution of mutational effects. We show that, with a few modifications, Fisher's model can generate all of the major findings of introgression studies (including "speciation genes" with strong deleterious effects, complex epistasis and asymmetry), and the major patterns in overall hybrid fitnesses (including Haldane's Rule, the speciation clock, heterosis, hybrid breakdown, and male-female asymmetry in the F1). We compare our approach to alternative modeling frameworks that assign fitnesses to genotypes by identifying combinations of incompatible alleles. In some cases, the predictions are importantly different. For example, Fisher's model can explain conflicting empirical results about the rate at which incompatibilities accumulate with genetic divergence. In other cases, the predictions are identical. For example, the quality of reproductive isolation is little affected by the manner in which populations diverge. PMID:27252049

  17. Cadmium Speciation and Release Kinetics in a Thai Paddy Soil Subjected to Varying Redox Regimes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Understanding the factors controlling Cd speciation and bioavailability in flooded, drained, and alternate flooded/drained paddy soil will be crucial to developing and implementing best management practices needed for productive agricultural areas. Transformation of Cd species can occur in response...

  18. Possible method for dissolved organic carbon speciation in forest soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drabek, O.; Tejnecký, V.; Ash, C.; Hubova, P.; Boruvka, L.

    2013-12-01

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) is a natural part of dissolved organic matter and it plays an important role in the biogeochemistry of soil processes. Low Molecular Mass Organic Acids (LMMOA) are an essential part of DOC. These acids play a key role in chemical processes that affect the entire soil environment. Knowing the amount of DOC and the speciation of LMMOA is required for realistic equilibrium modelling of soil chemical processes and transport mechanisms. There have been a number of proposed methods for the quantitative analysis of DOC and for speciation of LMMOA. The first aim of this contribution is to introduce and test a modified spectroscopic method for the determination of water-extractable organic carbon (WEOC) from forest soils. In general this method is based on the oxidization of WEOC by chromium-sulphuric acid. The presented method can be used as an economical alternative to the classical, more financially demanding elemental analysis. However, the main aim is to test the reliability of the method for LMMOA speciation. Ion exchange chromatography (IC) with hydroxide elution has proven to be a useful tool for the determination of LMMOA in many different water-based samples. However, the influence of multivalent cations (often present in environmental samples) on IC results has not yet been sufficiently studied. In order to assess the influence of Al, Fe, Mn, Mg and Ca on the amount of LMMOA determined by IC, an extensive set of model solutions was prepared and immediately analysed by means of IC. Moreover, the influence of pH on determined amounts of LMMOA in model solutions and representative soil aqueous extracts was investigated. These experimental results were compared to expected values and also to results provided by the chemical equilibrium model - PHREEQC. Based on the above listed research, some modifications to the common IC method for LMMOA speciation are presented.

  19. Speciation in fungal and oomycete plant pathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The process of speciation by definition involves evolution of one or more reproductive isolating mechanisms that split a single species into two that can no longer interbreed. Determination of which processes are responsible for speciation is important yet challenging. Several studies have proposed ...

  20. SPECIATION OF ELEMENTS IN INCINERATION RESIDUES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Knowledge as to the speciation of elements in incineration residues is important for the successful management and utilization of the residues and for modelling and predicting their leaching behavior. s part of a larger research effort on speciation in combustion residues, ESP as...

  1. Rapid speciation and chromosomal evolution in mammals.

    PubMed Central

    Bush, G L; Case, S M; Wilson, A C; Patton, J L

    1977-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that population subdivision into small demes promotes both rapid speciation and evolutionary changes in gene arrangement by inbreeding and drift, we estimated rates of speciation and rates of chromosomal evolution in 225 genera of vertebrates. Rates of speciation were estimated by considering the number of living species in each genus and the fossil record of each genus as well as information about extinction rates. Speciation rate was strongly correlated with rate of chromosomal evolution and average rates of speciation in lower vertebrate genera were one-fifth those in mammalian genera. Genera with high karyotypic diversity and rapid speciation rates may generally have small effective population size (Ne), whereas large Ne values may be associated with karyotypically uniform genera and slow rates of speciation. Speciation and chromosomal evolution seem fastest in those genera with species organized into clans or harems (e.g., some primates and horses) or with limited adult vagility and juvenile dispersal, patchy distribution, and strong individual territoriality (e.g., some rodents). This is consistent with the above hypothesis regarding the evolutionary importance of demes. PMID:269445

  2. Speciation genetics: current status and evolving approaches

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Jochen B. W.; Lindell, Johan; Backström, Niclas

    2010-01-01

    The view of species as entities subjected to natural selection and amenable to change put forth by Charles Darwin and Alfred Wallace laid the conceptual foundation for understanding speciation. Initially marred by a rudimental understanding of hereditary principles, evolutionists gained appreciation of the mechanistic underpinnings of speciation following the merger of Mendelian genetic principles with Darwinian evolution. Only recently have we entered an era where deciphering the molecular basis of speciation is within reach. Much focus has been devoted to the genetic basis of intrinsic postzygotic isolation in model organisms and several hybrid incompatibility genes have been successfully identified. However, concomitant with the recent technological advancements in genome analysis and a newfound interest in the role of ecology in the differentiation process, speciation genetic research is becoming increasingly open to non-model organisms. This development will expand speciation research beyond the traditional boundaries and unveil the genetic basis of speciation from manifold perspectives and at various stages of the splitting process. This review aims at providing an extensive overview of speciation genetics. Starting from key historical developments and core concepts of speciation genetics, we focus much of our attention on evolving approaches and introduce promising methodological approaches for future research venues. PMID:20439277

  3. Rates of speciation in the fossil record

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sepkoski, J. J. Jr; Sepkoski JJ, J. r. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Data from palaeontology and biodiversity suggest that the global biota should produce an average of three new species per year. However, the fossil record shows large variation around this mean. Rates of origination have declined through the Phanerozoic. This appears to have been largely a function of sorting among higher taxa (especially classes), which exhibit characteristic rates of speciation (and extinction) that differ among them by nearly an order of magnitude. Secular decline of origination rates is hardly constant, however; many positive deviations reflect accelerated speciation during rebounds from mass extinctions. There has also been general decline in rates of speciation within major taxa through their histories, although rates have tended to remain higher among members in tropical regions. Finally, pulses of speciation appear sometimes to be associated with climate change, although moderate oscillations of climate do not necessarily promote speciation despite forcing changes in species' geographical ranges.

  4. The speciation of behavior analysis

    PubMed Central

    Rider, David P.

    1991-01-01

    The relationship between the Experimental Analysis of Behavior (EAB) and Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) has been the subject of several editorials and commentaries in recent years. Various authors have argued that researchers in these two fields (a) have become isolated from each other, (b) face different requirements for survival in their respective fields, and (c) possess different skills to meet those requirements. The present paper provides an allegory for the relationship between EAB and ABA in terms of biological speciation. The conditions that have changed the relationship between EAB and ABA are parallel to those responsible for biological speciation: (a) isolation of some members of a species from the rest of the population, (b) different contingencies of survival for members of the two separate groups, and (c) divergence in the adaptive characteristics displayed by the two groups. When members of two different groups, descendants of common ancestors, no longer are capable of producing viable offspring by interbreeding, the different groups then represent different species. To the extent that members of the EAB group and members of the ABA group interact with each other only trivially, they each represent allegorically different species. Changes in the relationship between EAB and ABA are part of a natural process that takes place in many other sciences, and the course of that process can hardly be reversed by us. PMID:22478096

  5. Dielectric-wall linear accelerator with a high voltage fast rise time switch that includes a pair of electrodes between which are laminated alternating layers of isolated conductors and insulators

    DOEpatents

    Caporaso, George J.; Sampayan, Stephen E.; Kirbie, Hugh C.

    1998-01-01

    A dielectric-wall linear accelerator is improved by a high-voltage, fast rise-time switch that includes a pair of electrodes between which are laminated alternating layers of isolated conductors and insulators. A high voltage is placed between the electrodes sufficient to stress the voltage breakdown of the insulator on command. A light trigger, such as a laser, is focused along at least one line along the edge surface of the laminated alternating layers of isolated conductors and insulators extending between the electrodes. The laser is energized to initiate a surface breakdown by a fluence of photons, thus causing the electrical switch to close very promptly. Such insulators and lasers are incorporated in a dielectric wall linear accelerator with Blumlein modules, and phasing is controlled by adjusting the length of fiber optic cables that carry the laser light to the insulator surface.

  6. Dielectric-wall linear accelerator with a high voltage fast rise time switch that includes a pair of electrodes between which are laminated alternating layers of isolated conductors and insulators

    DOEpatents

    Caporaso, G.J.; Sampayan, S.E.; Kirbie, H.C.

    1998-10-13

    A dielectric-wall linear accelerator is improved by a high-voltage, fast rise-time switch that includes a pair of electrodes between which are laminated alternating layers of isolated conductors and insulators. A high voltage is placed between the electrodes sufficient to stress the voltage breakdown of the insulator on command. A light trigger, such as a laser, is focused along at least one line along the edge surface of the laminated alternating layers of isolated conductors and insulators extending between the electrodes. The laser is energized to initiate a surface breakdown by a fluence of photons, thus causing the electrical switch to close very promptly. Such insulators and lasers are incorporated in a dielectric wall linear accelerator with Blumlein modules, and phasing is controlled by adjusting the length of fiber optic cables that carry the laser light to the insulator surface. 12 figs.

  7. US EPA's SPECIATE 4.4 Database: Development and Uses

    EPA Science Inventory

    SPECIATE is the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) repository of volatile organic gas and particulate matter (PM) speciation profiles of air pollution sources. EPA released SPECIATE 4.4 in early 2014 and, in total, the SPECIATE 4.4 database includes 5,728 PM, volatile o...

  8. US EPA's SPECIATE 4.4 Database: Development and Uses

    EPA Science Inventory

    SPECIATE is the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) repository of volatile organic gas and particulate matter (PM) speciation profiles of air pollution sources. EPA released SPECIATE 4.4 in early 2014 and, in total, the SPECIATE 4.4 database includes 5,728 PM, vola...

  9. Genomic divergence during speciation: causes and consequences

    PubMed Central

    Nosil, Patrik; Feder, Jeffrey L.

    2012-01-01

    Speciation is a fundamental process responsible for the diversity of life. Progress has been made in detecting individual ‘speciation genes’ that cause reproductive isolation. In contrast, until recently, less attention has been given to genome-wide patterns of divergence during speciation. Thus, major questions remain concerning how individual speciation genes are arrayed within the genome, and how this affects speciation. This theme issue is dedicated to exploring this genomic perspective of speciation. Given recent sequencing and computational advances that now allow genomic analyses in most organisms, the goal is to help move the field towards a more integrative approach. This issue draws upon empirical studies in plants and animals, and theoretical work, to review and further document patterns of genomic divergence. In turn, these studies begin to disentangle the role that different processes, such as natural selection, gene flow and recombination rate, play in generating observed patterns. These factors are considered in the context of how genomes diverge as speciation unfolds, from beginning to end. The collective results point to how experimental work is now required, in conjunction with theory and sequencing studies, to move the field from descriptive studies of patterns of divergence towards a predictive framework that tackles the causes and consequences of genome-wide patterns. PMID:22201163

  10. Rates of speciation and morphological evolution are correlated across the largest vertebrate radiation.

    PubMed

    Rabosky, Daniel L; Santini, Francesco; Eastman, Jonathan; Smith, Stephen A; Sidlauskas, Brian; Chang, Jonathan; Alfaro, Michael E

    2013-01-01

    Several evolutionary theories predict that rates of morphological change should be positively associated with the rate at which new species arise. For example, the theory of punctuated equilibrium proposes that phenotypic change typically occurs in rapid bursts associated with speciation events. However, recent phylogenetic studies have found little evidence linking these processes in nature. Here we demonstrate that rates of species diversification are highly correlated with the rate of body size evolution across the 30,000+ living species of ray-finned fishes that comprise the majority of vertebrate biological diversity. This coupling is a general feature of fish evolution and transcends vast differences in ecology and body-plan organization. Our results may reflect a widespread speciational mode of character change in living fishes. Alternatively, these findings are consistent with the hypothesis that phenotypic 'evolvability'-the capacity of organisms to evolve-shapes the dynamics of speciation through time at the largest phylogenetic scales. PMID:23739623

  11. Liquid phase microextraction for the analysis of trace elements and their speciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Bin; He, Man; Chen, Beibei; Xia, Linbo

    2013-08-01

    Trace/ultra-trace elements and their speciation analysis in complex matrices usually require sample preparation procedures to achieve sample clean-up and analyte preconcentration. Sample preparation is often the bottleneck in trace elements and their speciation analysis which has a direct impact on accuracy, precision and limits of detection and is often the rate-determining step of the analytical process. Recent trends in sample preparation include miniaturization, automation, high-throughput performance and reduction in solvent/sample consumption and operation time. Liquid-phase microextraction (LPME) technique as a novel and promising alternative in sample preparation can meet these requirements and has become a very efficient sample preparation technique. This review updates the state of art of LPME for trace elements and their speciation analysis and discusses its promising prospects. The major thrust of the article highlights the applications of LPME including single-drop microextraction (SDME), hollow fiber-liquid phase microextraction (HF-LPME), dispersive liquid liquid microextraction (DLLME) and solidified floating organic drop microextraction (SFODME) to the fields of elemental and their speciation analysis by atomic spectrometry-based methods, especially inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. General and specific concepts, different extraction formats and characteristics of LPME are described and compared, along with examples of recent innovations and applications presented to demonstrate its potential for trace elements and their speciation analysis in biological and environmental fields. Moreover, the application potential and an outlook on the combination of LPME and atomic spectrometry-based techniques for inorganic analysis are commentated.

  12. Oxidation-state speciation of

    PubMed

    Hu; Heineman

    2000-06-01

    The analytical utility of chemically modified microelectrodes for oxidation-state speciation of redox couples by cyclic voltammetry has been explored. [Re(I)(DMPE)3]+/[Re(II)(DMPE)3]2+, where DMPE = 1,2-bis(dimethylphosphino)ethane, was studied at carbon-fiber microelectrodes of approximately 5 microm in radius coated with Nafion-entrapped solgel-derived silica (Nafion-silica) composite. The results are compared with cyclic voltammetry of [Fe(CN)6]3-/[Fe(CN)6]4- at bare carbon-fiber microelectrodes. At both microelectrodes, the cathodic and anodic limiting currents are linearly proportional to the concentrations of the reducible and oxidizable species of a redox couple, respectively. The shape of the cyclic voltammogram and the magnitude of the steady-state limiting current are not affected by the potential at which the scan starts. Speciation of both forms of a redox couple could be achieved voltammetrically at the microelectrodes. However, a considerably slower scan rate was required to achieve steady state at the modified electrode because of the smaller diffusion coefficients of [Re(I)(DMPE)3]+ and [Re(II)(DMPE)3]2+ in the Nafion-silica composite. The detection limit at the modified electrode was considerably lower (5 x 10(-9) M for [Re(I)(DMPE)3]+) than at the bare electrode (6 x 10(-5) M for [Fe(CN)6]3- and [Fe(CN)6]4-) because of the substantial preconcentration of [Re(I)(DMPE)3]+ by the Nafion-silica composite. PMID:10857611

  13. Alternate-day fasting protects the livers of mice against high-fat diet-induced inflammation associated with the suppression of Toll-like receptor 4/nuclear factor κB signaling.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wanwei; Cao, Meng; Mao, Xiaodong; Wei, Xiao; Li, Xingjia; Chen, Guofang; Zhang, Jiaming; Wang, Zhiguo; Shi, Jianfeng; Huang, HouCai; Yao, Xiaoming; Liu, Chao

    2016-06-01

    Because of unhealthy lifestyles, a large number of people are suffering from hepatic lipid accumulation and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. Energy restriction (ER) is an effective nutritional intervention for preventing chronic disease. However, poor compliance with continuous ER limits its effectiveness. As an alternative to daily ER, alternate-day fasting (ADF) may be more effective. We hypothesized that ADF would improve obesity, hyperglycemia, and insulin resistance and protect the liver against high-fat diet (HFD)-induced steatosis and inflammation. In this study, we used C57BL/6 mice to test the beneficial effects of ADF. Thirty male 6-week-old C57BL/6 mice were divided into 3 groups (10 per group, total N = 30): 1 group was fed chow diet, the second was fed HFD ad libitum, and the third group was submitted to ADF. The mice in the third group were fed the HFD ad libitum every other day and fasted the following day. After 12 months, the mice submitted to ADF exhibited reduced body weights and fasting glucose levels and improved insulin resistance and hepatic steatosis compared with continuous HFD-fed mice. In addition, the serum transaminase levels in the mice of the ADF group were lower than those of the HFD group. Moreover, the ADF regimen suppressed the expression levels of Toll-like receptor 4 and nuclear factor κB protein in the liver and suppressed the inflammatory pathway genes interleukin 1β, tumor necrosis factor α, and serum amyloid A. These finding indicate that long-term ADF protects mouse livers against HFD-induced hepatic steatosis and hepatocellular damage associated with the suppression of Toll-like receptor 4/nuclear factor κB signaling. PMID:27188904

  14. Chromosomes, conflict, and epigenetics: chromosomal speciation revisited.

    PubMed

    Brown, Judith D; O'Neill, Rachel J

    2010-01-01

    Since Darwin first noted that the process of speciation was indeed the "mystery of mysteries," scientists have tried to develop testable models for the development of reproductive incompatibilities-the first step in the formation of a new species. Early theorists proposed that chromosome rearrangements were implicated in the process of reproductive isolation; however, the chromosomal speciation model has recently been questioned. In addition, recent data from hybrid model systems indicates that simple epistatic interactions, the Dobzhansky-Muller incompatibilities, are more complex. In fact, incompatibilities are quite broad, including interactions among heterochromatin, small RNAs, and distinct, epigenetically defined genomic regions such as the centromere. In this review, we will examine both classical and current models of chromosomal speciation and describe the "evolving" theory of genetic conflict, epigenetics, and chromosomal speciation. PMID:20438362

  15. CORRELATING METAL SPECIATION IN SOILS TO RISK

    EPA Science Inventory

    Understanding bioavailability of metals from exposure to contaminated soils is a challenging aspect of environmental research. This presentation will examine three areas of research with respect to metal speciation in soils as it relates to bioavailability: 1) Pb immobilization a...

  16. Dualism and conflicts in understanding speciation.

    PubMed

    Schilthuizen, M

    2000-12-01

    Speciation is a central but elusive issue in evolutionary biology. Over the past sixty years, the subject has been studied within a framework conceived by Ernst Mayr and Theodosius Dobzhansky and subsequently developed further by numerous other workers. In this "isolation" theory, the evolution of reproductive isolation is a key element of speciation; natural selection is given only secondary importance while gene flow is considered prohibitive to the process. In this paper, I argue that certain elements in this approach have produced confusion and irreconcilability among students of speciation. The more prominent debates in speciation (i.e., the species definition, sympatry/allopatry, and the role of reinforcement) all derive from an inherent conflict between the "isolation" theory and Darwin's "selection" view on species and speciation (in which disruptive selection is crucial). New data, mainly from field ecology, molecular population genetics, laboratory studies with Drosophila and computer analysis, all suggest that the isolation theory may no longer be the most desirable vantage point from which to explore speciation. Instead, environmental selection in large populations, often unimpeded by ongoing gene flow, appears to be the decisive element. The traditional preoccupation with reproductive isolation has created gaps in our knowledge of several crucial issues, mainly regarding the role of environmental selection and its connection with mate selection. PMID:11084629

  17. Habitat preference and the marine-speciation paradox.

    PubMed Central

    Bierne, Nicolas; Bonhomme, François; David, Patrice

    2003-01-01

    Marine organisms challenge the classical theories of local adaptation and speciation because their planktonic larvae have the potential to maintain high gene flow. The marine-speciation paradox is illustrated by contact zones between incipient species that are so large that allopatric divergence seems unlikely. For this reason any mechanism preventing sympatric larvae of two incipient species from coexisting in the same habitats can be a powerful promoter of speciation. The contact zone between two hybridizing taxa of mussel, Mytilus edulis and M. galloprovincialis, in Europe provides an excellent example. Although the zone itself extends over thousands of kilometres, the opportunities for interbreeding are considerably reduced by the small-scale mosaic structure of the zone, where local patches of each taxon alternate at scales of kilometres or less, in response to locally variable ecological factors. Habitat choice by settling larvae would be a less costly mechanism than post-settlement selection to maintain such a mosaic structure. Unfortunately the role of selective settlement has remained hypothetical because larvae could not be scored by classical genetic markers. PCR markers allowed us to study larvae and settlement in ecologically contrasting sites within the zone. We show that only a subset of the genotypes present in the plankton settle in some sites, and that the adults on these sites show the same genetic bias. Genetically based variation in pre-settlement processes therefore accounts for the ecological segregation observed, though it is not the only factor involved in limiting successful interbreeding. The present dataset also supports previous reports of partial spawning asynchrony. PMID:12965032

  18. Microextraction techniques for the non-chromatographic speciation of ultratraces of elements in waters: some significant cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Garcia, Ignacio; Vicente-Martinez, Yesica; Hernandez-Cordoba, Manuel; Martínez-Sanchez, Maria Jose; Perez-Sirvent, Carmen

    2015-04-01

    The speciation of very low concentrations of some elements in waters is of interest due to the different behaviour and toxicity the species can have. This task can be carried out by using liquid chromatographic techniques (LC) for separation together with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) for detection. However, this combination is not easily available in all laboratories mainly due to the relative high cost of acquisition and maintenance of the ICP-MS spectrometer, and so other alternatives are of practical interest. Present knowledge of microextraction techniques involving minimal (or none) amounts of organic solvents allows, in some cases, speciation to be carried out without the need of such an expensive instrument, and even avoiding the use of a chromatographic stage. The selectivity of the separation (fractionation or speciation) can be achieved by modifying the experimental conditions used for microextraction, and a sensitive final measurement be obtained by means of electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). In this way, since an ETAAS instrument is common (and sometimes underused) in all laboratories, the speciation procedures are made available to most laboratories worldwide. The high preconcentration factor achieved by means of the microextraction stage together with the high sensitivity inherent in ETAAS measurements result in extremely sensitive methods that permit the speciation at ultratrace levels. The advantages of this methodology are presented by discussing speciation of chromium and arsenic as representative examples.

  19. Is ecological speciation a major trend in aphids? Insights from a molecular phylogeny of the conifer-feeding genus Cinara

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction In the past decade ecological speciation has been recognized as having an important role in the diversification of plant-feeding insects. Aphids are host-specialised phytophagous insects that mate on their host plants and, as such, they are prone to experience reproductive isolation linked with host plant association that could ultimately lead to species formation. The generality of such a scenario remains to be tested through macroevolutionary studies. To explore the prevalence of host-driven speciation in the diversification of the aphid genus Cinara and to investigate alternative modes of speciation, we reconstructed a phylogeny of this genus based on mitochondrial, nuclear and Buchnera aphidicola DNA sequence fragments and applied a DNA-based method of species delimitation. Using a recent software (PhyloType), we explored evolutionary transitions in host-plant genera, feeding sites and geographic distributions in the diversification of Cinara and investigated how transitions in these characters have accompanied speciation events. Results The diversification of Cinara has been constrained by host fidelity to conifer genera sometimes followed by sequential colonization onto different host species and by feeding-site specialisation. Nevertheless, our analyses suggest that, at the most, only half of the speciation events were accompanied by ecological niche shifts. The contribution of geographical isolation in the speciation process is clearly apparent in the occurrence of species from two continents in the same clades in relatively terminal positions in our phylogeny. Furthermore, in agreement with predictions from scenarios in which geographic isolation accounts for speciation events, geographic overlap between species increased significantly with time elapsed since their separation. Conclusions The history of Cinara offers a different perspective on the mode of speciation of aphids than that provided by classic models such as the pea aphid. In this

  20. Fast Breeder Reactor studies

    SciTech Connect

    Till, C.E.; Chang, Y.I.; Kittel, J.H.; Fauske, H.K.; Lineberry, M.J.; Stevenson, M.G.; Amundson, P.I.; Dance, K.D.

    1980-07-01

    This report is a compilation of Fast Breeder Reactor (FBR) resource documents prepared to provide the technical basis for the US contribution to the International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Evaluation. The eight separate parts deal with the alternative fast breeder reactor fuel cycles in terms of energy demand, resource base, technical potential and current status, safety, proliferation resistance, deployment, and nuclear safeguards. An Annex compares the cost of decommissioning light-water and fast breeder reactors. Separate abstracts are included for each of the parts.

  1. PIntron: a fast method for detecting the gene structure due to alternative splicing via maximal pairings of a pattern and a text

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background A challenging issue in designing computational methods for predicting the gene structure into exons and introns from a cluster of transcript (EST, mRNA) sequences, is guaranteeing accuracy as well as efficiency in time and space, when large clusters of more than 20,000 ESTs and genes longer than 1 Mb are processed. Traditionally, the problem has been faced by combining different tools, not specifically designed for this task. Results We propose a fast method based on ad hoc procedures for solving the problem. Our method combines two ideas: a novel algorithm of proved small time complexity for computing spliced alignments of a transcript against a genome, and an efficient algorithm that exploits the inherent redundancy of information in a cluster of transcripts to select, among all possible factorizations of EST sequences, those allowing to infer splice site junctions that are largely confirmed by the input data. The EST alignment procedure is based on the construction of maximal embeddings, that are sequences obtained from paths of a graph structure, called embedding graph, whose vertices are the maximal pairings of a genomic sequence T and an EST P. The procedure runs in time linear in the length of P and T and in the size of the output. The method was implemented into the PIntron package. PIntron requires as input a genomic sequence or region and a set of EST and/or mRNA sequences. Besides the prediction of the full-length transcript isoforms potentially expressed by the gene, the PIntron package includes a module for the CDS annotation of the predicted transcripts. Conclusions PIntron, the software tool implementing our methodology, is available at http://www.algolab.eu/PIntron under GNU AGPL. PIntron has been shown to outperform state-of-the-art methods, and to quickly process some critical genes. At the same time, PIntron exhibits high accuracy (sensitivity and specificity) when benchmarked with ENCODE annotations. PMID:22537006

  2. Speciation by Symbiosis: the Microbiome and Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Shropshire, J. Dylan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Species are fundamental units of comparison in biology. The newly discovered importance and ubiquity of host-associated microorganisms are now stimulating work on the roles that microbes can play in animal speciation. We previously synthesized the literature and advanced concepts of speciation by symbiosis with notable attention to hybrid sterility and lethality. Here, we review recent studies and relevant data on microbes as players in host behavior and behavioral isolation, emphasizing the patterns seen in these analyses and highlighting areas worthy of additional exploration. We conclude that the role of microbial symbionts in behavior and speciation is gaining exciting traction and that the holobiont and hologenome concepts afford an evolving intellectual framework to promote research and intellectual exchange between disciplines such as behavior, microbiology, genetics, symbiosis, and speciation. Given the increasing centrality of microbiology in macroscopic life, microbial symbiosis is arguably the most neglected aspect of animal and plant speciation, and studying it should yield a better understanding of the origin of species. PMID:27034284

  3. Speciation by Symbiosis: the Microbiome and Behavior.

    PubMed

    Shropshire, J Dylan; Bordenstein, Seth R

    2016-01-01

    Species are fundamental units of comparison in biology. The newly discovered importance and ubiquity of host-associated microorganisms are now stimulating work on the roles that microbes can play in animal speciation. We previously synthesized the literature and advanced concepts of speciation by symbiosis with notable attention to hybrid sterility and lethality. Here, we review recent studies and relevant data on microbes as players in host behavior and behavioral isolation, emphasizing the patterns seen in these analyses and highlighting areas worthy of additional exploration. We conclude that the role of microbial symbionts in behavior and speciation is gaining exciting traction and that the holobiont and hologenome concepts afford an evolving intellectual framework to promote research and intellectual exchange between disciplines such as behavior, microbiology, genetics, symbiosis, and speciation. Given the increasing centrality of microbiology in macroscopic life, microbial symbiosis is arguably the most neglected aspect of animal and plant speciation, and studying it should yield a better understanding of the origin of species. PMID:27034284

  4. Speciation without Pre-Defined Fitness Functions

    PubMed Central

    Gras, Robin; Golestani, Abbas; Hendry, Andrew P.; Cristescu, Melania E.

    2015-01-01

    The forces promoting and constraining speciation are often studied in theoretical models because the process is hard to observe, replicate, and manipulate in real organisms. Most models analyzed to date include pre-defined functions influencing fitness, leaving open the question of how speciation might proceed without these built-in determinants. To consider the process of speciation without pre-defined functions, we employ the individual-based ecosystem simulation platform EcoSim. The environment is initially uniform across space, and an evolving behavioural model then determines how prey consume resources and how predators consume prey. Simulations including natural selection (i.e., an evolving behavioural model that influences survival and reproduction) frequently led to strong and distinct phenotypic/genotypic clusters between which hybridization was low. This speciation was the result of divergence between spatially-localized clusters in the behavioural model, an emergent property of evolving ecological interactions. By contrast, simulations without natural selection (i.e., behavioural model turned off) but with spatial isolation (i.e., limited dispersal) produced weaker and overlapping clusters. Simulations without natural selection or spatial isolation (i.e., behaviour model turned off and high dispersal) did not generate clusters. These results confirm the role of natural selection in speciation by showing its importance even in the absence of pre-defined fitness functions. PMID:26372462

  5. Hydroxyl speciation in felsic magmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malfait, Wim J.; Xue, Xianyu

    2014-09-01

    The hydroxyl speciation of hydrous, metaluminous potassium and calcium aluminosilicate glasses was investigated by 27Al-1H cross polarization and quantitative 1H MAS NMR spectroscopy. Al-OH is present in both the potassium and the calcium aluminosilicate glasses and its 1H NMR partial spectrum was derived from the 27Al-1H cross polarization data. For the calcium aluminosilicate glasses, the abundance of Al-OH could not be determined because of the low spectral resolution. For the potassium aluminosilicate glasses, the fraction of Al-OH was quantified by fitting its partial spectrum to the quantitative 1H NMR spectra. The degree of aluminum avoidance and the relative tendency for Si-O-Si, Si-O-Al and Al-O-Al bonds to hydrolyze were derived from the measured species abundances. Compared to the sodium, lithium and calcium systems, potassium aluminosilicate glasses display a much stronger degree of aluminum avoidance and a stronger tendency for the Al-O-Al linkages to hydrolyze. Combining our results with those for sodium aluminosilicate glasses (Malfait and Xue, 2010a), we predict that the hydroxyl groups in rhyolitic and phonolitic magmas are predominantly present as Si-OH (84-89% and 68-78%, respectively), but with a significant fraction of Al-OH (11-16% and 22-32%, respectively). For both rhyolitic and phonolitic melts, the AlOH/(AlOH + SiOH) ratio is likely smaller than the Al/(Al + Si) ratio for the lower end of the natural temperature range but may approach the Al/(Al + Si) ratio at higher temperatures.

  6. Integrated Computational and Experimental Protocol for Understanding Rh(III) Speciation in Hydrochloric and Nitric Acid Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Samuels, Alex C.; Boele, Cherilynn A.; Bennett, Kevin T.; Clark, Sue B.; Wall, Nathalie; Clark, Aurora E.

    2014-12-01

    A combined experimental and theoretical approach has investigated the complex speciation of Rh(III) in hydrochloric and nitric acid media, as a function of acid concentration. This has relevance to the separation and isolation of Rh(III) from dissolved spent nuclear fuel, which is an emergent and attractive alternative source of platinum group metals, relative to traditional mining efforts.

  7. Evaluation of Alternate Materials for Coated Particle Fuels for the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 2006 Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Paul A. Demkowicz; Karen Wright; Jian Gan; David Petti; Todd Allen; Jake Blanchard

    2006-09-01

    Candidate ceramic materials were studied to determine their suitability as Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor particle fuel coatings. The ceramics examined in this work were: TiC, TiN, ZrC, ZrN, AlN, and SiC. The studies focused on (i) chemical reactivity of the ceramics with fission products palladium and rhodium, (ii) the thermomechanical stresses that develop in the fuel coatings from a variety of causes during burnup, and (iii) the radiation resiliency of the materials. The chemical reactivity of TiC, TiN, ZrC, and ZrN with Pd and Rh were all found to be much lower than that of SiC. A number of important chemical behaviors were observed at the ceramic-metal interfaces, including the formation of specific intermetallic phases and a variation in reaction rates for the different ceramics investigated. Based on the data collected in this work, the nitride ceramics (TiN and ZrN) exhibit chemical behavior that is characterized by lower reaction rates with Pd and Rh than the carbides TiC and ZrC. The thermomechanical stresses in spherical fuel particle ceramic coatings were modeled using finite element analysis, and included contributions from differential thermal expansion, fission gas pressure, fuel kernel swelling, and thermal creep. In general the tangential stresses in the coatings during full reactor operation are tensile, with ZrC showing the lowest values among TiC, ZrC, and SiC (TiN and ZrN were excluded from the comprehensive calculations due to a lack of available materials data). The work has highlighted the fact that thermal creep plays a critical role in the development of the stress state of the coatings by relaxing many of the stresses at high temperatures. To perform ion irradiations of sample materials, an irradiation beamline and high-temperature sample irradiation stage was constructed at the University of Wisconsin’s 1.7MV Tandem Accelerator Facility. This facility is now capable of irradiating of materials to high dose while controlling sample temperature

  8. Complex speciation of humans and chimpanzees.

    PubMed

    Wakeley, John

    2008-03-13

    Genetic data from two or more species provide information about the process of speciation. In their analysis of DNA from humans, chimpanzees, gorillas, orangutans and macaques (HCGOM), Patterson et al. suggest that the apparently short divergence time between humans and chimpanzees on the X chromosome is explained by a massive interspecific hybridization event in the ancestry of these two species. However, Patterson et al. do not statistically test their own null model of simple speciation before concluding that speciation was complex, and--even if the null model could be rejected--they do not consider other explanations of a short divergence time on the X chromosome. These include natural selection on the X chromosome in the common ancestor of humans and chimpanzees, changes in the ratio of male-to-female mutation rates over time, and less extreme versions of divergence with gene flow (see ref. 2, for example). I therefore believe that their claim of hybridization is unwarranted. PMID:18337768

  9. Monte Carlo simulations of parapatric speciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwämmle, V.; Sousa, A. O.; de Oliveira, S. M.

    2006-06-01

    Parapatric speciation is studied using an individual-based model with sexual reproduction. We combine the theory of mutation accumulation for biological ageing with an environmental selection pressure that varies according to the individuals geographical positions and phenotypic traits. Fluctuations and genetic diversity of large populations are crucial ingredients to model the features of evolutionary branching and are intrinsic properties of the model. Its implementation on a spatial lattice gives interesting insights into the population dynamics of speciation on a geographical landscape and the disruptive selection that leads to the divergence of phenotypes. Our results suggest that assortative mating is not an obligatory ingredient to obtain speciation in large populations at low gene flow.

  10. SPECIATE Version 4.4 Database Development Documentation

    EPA Science Inventory

    SPECIATE is the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) repository of volatile organic gas and particulate matter (PM) speciation profiles of air pollution sources. Some of the many uses of these source profiles include: (1) creating speciated emissions inventories for regi...

  11. EPAs SPECIATE 4.4 Database: Development and Uses

    EPA Science Inventory

    SPECIATE is the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) repository of source category-specific particulate matter (PM), volatile organic gas, and other gas speciation profiles of air pollutant emissions. Abt Associates, Inc. developed SPECIATE 4.4 through a collaborat...

  12. Arsenic speciation in manufactured seafood products.

    PubMed

    Vélez, D; Montoro, R

    1998-09-01

    The literature on the speciation of arsenic (As) in seafoods was critically reviewed. Most research has been directed toward fresh seafood products with few papers dealing with As speciation in manufactured seafoods. Predictions concerning As species made on the basis of fresh seafood products cannot be extrapolated to manufactured seafoods. Therefore, due to the numerous species of As, the scarcity of data concerning their presence in foods, the transformations each species may undergo during industrial processing and cooking, and the lack of legislation on permitted As levels in seafood products, As species in manufactured seafood products need to be determined and quantified. PMID:9766084

  13. Instrumentation for Aerosol and Gas Speciation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coggiola, Michael J.

    1998-01-01

    Using support from NASA Grant No. NAG 2-963, SRI International successfully completed the project, entitled, 'Instrumentation for Aerosol and Gas Speciation.' This effort (SRI Project 7383) covered the design, fabrication, testing, and deployment of a real-time aerosol speciation instrument in NASA's DC-8 aircraft during the Spring 1996 SUbsonic aircraft: Contrail and Cloud Effects Special Study (SUCCESS) mission. This final technical report describes the pertinent details of the instrument design, its abilities, its deployment during SUCCESS and the data acquired from the mission, and the post-mission calibration, data reduction, and analysis.

  14. Modeling coevolution and sympatric speciation of flowers and pollinators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyay, A.; Drossel, B.

    2005-01-01

    A model based on quantitative genetics for the coevolution of plants and their pollinators is proposed. The model is characterized by competition for resources and by a two-fold coupling between the two types of species: pollinators depend on plants for resources and plants on pollinators for pollination. Starting with unimodal trait distributions, we study the dynamics of the model using computer simulations with discrete generations and alternating reproduction and selection. Under a variety of conditions we observe an evolution towards bimodal distributions, with two subpopulations that are reproductively isolated to a large extent. We also find sympatric speciation in situations where two pollinators pollinate the same plant, and where one pollinator pollinates two plants.

  15. Demographic history of speciation in a Senecio altitudinal hybrid zone on Mt. Etna.

    PubMed

    Filatov, Dmitry A; Osborne, Owen G; Papadopulos, Alexander S T

    2016-06-01

    Hybrid zones typically form as a result of species coming into secondary contact, but can also be established in situ as an ecotonal hybrid zone, a situation which has been reported far less frequently. An altitudinal hybrid zone on Mount Etna between two ragwort species (the low elevation Senecio chrysanthemifolius and high elevation S. aethnensis) could potentially represent either of these possibilities. However, a scenario of secondary contact vs. speciation with gene flow has not been explicitly tested. Here, we test these alternatives and demonstrate that the data do not support secondary contact. Furthermore, we report that the previous analyses of speciation history of these species were based on admixed populations, which has led to inflated estimates of ongoing, interspecific gene flow. Our new analyses, based on 'pure' S. aethnensis and S. chrysanthemifolius populations, reveal gene exchange of less than one effective migrant per generation, a level low enough to allow the species to accumulate neutral, genomewide differences. Overall, our results are consistent with a scenario of speciation with gene flow and a divergence time which coincides with the rise of Mt. Etna to altitudes above 2000 m (~150 KY). Further work to quantify the role of adaptation to contrasting environments of high and low altitudes will be needed to support the scenario of recent ecological speciation in this system. PMID:26994342

  16. Equilibrium speciation dynamics in a model adaptive radiation of island lizards

    PubMed Central

    Rabosky, Daniel L.; Glor, Richard E.

    2010-01-01

    The relative importance of equilibrium and nonequilibrium processes in shaping patterns of species richness is one of the most fundamental questions in biodiversity studies. If equilibrium processes predominate, then ecological interactions presumably limit species diversity, potentially through diversity dependence of immigration, speciation, and extinction rates. Alternatively, species richness may be limited by the rate at which diversity arises or by the amount of time available for diversification. These latter explanations constitute nonequilibrium processes and can apply only to biotas that are unsaturated or far from diversity equilibria. Recent studies have challenged whether equilibrium models apply to biotas assembled through in situ speciation, as this process may be too slow to achieve steady-state diversities. Here we demonstrate that speciation rates in replicate Caribbean lizard radiations have undergone parallel declines to equilibrium conditions on three of four major islands. Our results suggest that feedback between total island diversity and per-capita speciation rates scales inversely with island area, with proportionately greater declines occurring on smaller islands. These results are consistent with strong ecological controls on species richness and suggest that the iconic adaptive radiation of Caribbean anoles may have reached an endpoint. PMID:21135239

  17. Toxicity, bioavailability and metal speciation.

    PubMed

    Jonnalagadda, S B; Rao, P V

    1993-11-01

    1. Environmental toxicology emphasizes the difference from traditional toxicology in which pure compounds of interest are added to purified diets, or injected into the test animals. When the objective is to study the fate and effects of trace elements in the environment, knowledge of the speciation of the elements and their physico-chemical forms is important. 2. Cadmium salts such as the sulfides, carbonates or oxides, are practically insoluble in water. However, these can be converted to water-soluble salts in nature under the influence of oxygen and acids. Chronic exposure to Cd is associated with renal toxicity in humans once a critical body burden is reached. 3. The solubility of As(III) oxide in water is fairly low, but high in either acid or alkali. In water, arsenic is usually in the form of the arsenate or arsenite. As(III) is systemically more poisonous than the As(V), and As(V) is reduced to the As(III) form before exerting any toxic effects. Organic arsenicals also exert their toxic effects in vivo in animals by first metabolizing to the trivalent arsenoxide form. Some methyl arsenic compounds, such as di- and trimethylarsines, occur naturally as a consequence of biological activity. The toxic effect of arsenite can be potentiated by dithiols, while As has a protective effect against the toxicity of a variety of forms of Se in several species. 4. Selenium occurs in several oxidation states and many selenium analogues of organic sulfur compounds exist in nature. Selenium in selenate form occurs in alkaline soils, where it is soluble and easily available to plants. Selenite binds tightly to iron and aluminum oxides and thus is quite insoluble in soils. Hydrogen selenide is a very toxic gas at room temperature. The methylated forms of Se are much less toxic for the organism than selenite. However, the methylated Se derivatives have strong synergistic toxicity with other minerals such as arsenic. 5. Aquatic organisms absorb and retain Hg in the tissues, as

  18. Misregulation of Gene Expression and Sterility in Interspecies Hybrids: Causal Links and Alternative Hypotheses.

    PubMed

    Civetta, Alberto

    2016-05-01

    Understanding the origin of species is of interest to biologist in general and evolutionary biologist in particular. Hybrid male sterility (HMS) has been a focus in studies of speciation because sterility imposes a barrier to free gene flow between organisms, thus effectively isolating them as distinct species. In this review, I focus on the role of differential gene expression in HMS and speciation. Microarray and qPCR assays have established associations between misregulation of gene expression and sterility in hybrids between closely related species. These studies originally proposed disrupted expression of spermatogenesis genes as a causative of sterility. Alternatively, rapid genetic divergence of regulatory elements, particularly as they relate to the male sex (fast-male evolution), can drive the misregulation of sperm developmental genes in the absence of sterility. The use of fertile hybrids (both backcross and F1 progeny) as controls has lent support to this alternative explanation. Differences in gene expression between fertile and sterile hybrids can also be influenced by a pattern of faster evolution of the sex chromosome (fast-X evolution) than autosomes. In particular, it would be desirable to establish whether known X-chromosome sterility factors can act as trans-regulatory drivers of genome-wide patterns of misregulation. Genome-wide expression studies coupled with assays of proxies of sterility in F1 and BC progeny have identified candidate HMS genes but functional assays, and a better phenotypic characterization of sterility phenotypes, are needed to rigorously test how these genes might contribute to HMS. PMID:27025762

  19. Speciation of VOCs from Animal Feeding Operations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Environmental Pollution Agency (EPA) air consent agreement with animal feeding operations (AFO) specifies the use of EPA TO-15 for the speciation of volatile organic compounds (VOC) emitted from these facilities. However, compounds emitted from AFO are often both volatile and highly polar chara...

  20. ELEMENTAL SPECIATION IN ENVIRONMENTAL EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT MATRICES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arsenic and tin are two trace metals where exposure assessments have moved towards a speciation based approach because the toxicity is very chemical form dependent. This toxicity difference can be one of many factors which influence the formulation of certain regulations. For a...

  1. NICKEL SPECIATION OF RESIDUAL OIL ASH

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA GRANT NUMBER: R827649C002
    Title: Nickel Speciation Of Residual Oil Ash
    Investigators: Kevin C. Galbreath, John Won, Frank E. Huggins, Gerald P. Huffman, Christopher J. Zygarlicke, Donald L. Toman
    Institution: University of North Dakota<...

  2. Speciation: Genomic Archipelagos in a Crater Lake.

    PubMed

    Ronco, Fabrizia; Salzburger, Walter

    2016-03-01

    The opening stages of speciation remain poorly understood, especially from a genomic perspective. The genomes of newly discovered crater-lake cichlid fish shed light on the early phases of diversification and suggest that selection acts on multiple genomic regions. PMID:26954438

  3. Biosensor for metal analysis and speciation

    DOEpatents

    Aiken, Abigail M.; Peyton, Brent M.; Apel, William A.; Petersen, James N.

    2007-01-30

    A biosensor for metal analysis and speciation is disclosed. The biosensor comprises an electron carrier immobilized to a surface of an electrode and a layer of an immobilized enzyme adjacent to the electrode. The immobilized enzyme comprises an enzyme having biological activity inhibited by a metal to be detected by the biosensor.

  4. Chromosome speciation: Humans, Drosophila, and mosquitoes

    PubMed Central

    Ayala, Francisco J.; Coluzzi, Mario

    2005-01-01

    Chromosome rearrangements (such as inversions, fusions, and fissions) may play significant roles in the speciation between parapatric (contiguous) or partly sympatric (geographically overlapping) populations. According to the “hybrid-dysfunction” model, speciation occurs because hybrids with heterozygous chromosome rearrangements produce dysfunctional gametes and thus have low reproductive fitness. Natural selection will, therefore, promote mutations that reduce the probability of intercrossing between populations carrying different rearrangements and thus promote their reproductive isolation. This model encounters a disabling difficulty: namely, how to account for the spread in a population of a chromosome rearrangement after it first arises as a mutation in a single individual. The “suppressed-recombination” model of speciation points out that chromosome rearrangements act as a genetic filter between populations. Mutations associated with the rearranged chromosomes cannot flow from one to another population, whereas genetic exchange will freely occur between colinear chromosomes. Mutations adaptive to local conditions will, therefore, accumulate differentially in the protected chromosome regions so that parapatric or partially sympatric populations will genetically differentiate, eventually evolving into different species. The speciation model of suppressed recombination has recently been tested by gene and DNA sequence comparisons between humans and chimpanzees, between Drosophila species, and between species related to Anopheles gambiae, the vector of malignant malaria in Africa. PMID:15851677

  5. Heavy metal speciation in the composting process.

    PubMed

    Greenway, Gillian M; Song, Qi Jun

    2002-04-01

    Composting is one of the more efficient and environment friendly methods of solid waste disposal and has many advantages when compared with landfill disposal on which the UK and Ireland are currently heavily dependent. Composting is a very complicated process involving intensive microbial activity and the detailed mechanisms of the process have yet to be fully understood. Metal speciation information can provide an insight into the metal-microbial interaction and would help in the evaluation of the quality of compost. This would facilitate the exploitation of composts in remediation of heavy metal contaminated land. In this work a systematic approach to metal speciation in compost has been taken by applying the three-step method for operationally defined metal speciation of soils and sediments, developed by the European Commission's Standards, Measurement and Testing Programme to monitor the change in metal speciation with time (up to 106 days) for four different waste composting processes. The results have shown that in general metals become less available for the first extraction step as the composting process proceeds. This implies that composting tends to redistribute the metals from more labile forms to more fixed forms which may explain why the application of composts could be useful for with heavy metal contaminated land. There are exceptions to this trend and in some cases, certain metals appear to behave differently depending on the source of the compost. PMID:11993774

  6. EFFECT OF SCR CATALYST ON MERCURY SPECIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A pilot-scale research study was conducted to investigate the effect of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) on elemental mercury speciation in bituminous and subbituminous coal combustion flue gases. Three different Illinois bituminous coals and one Powder River Basin (PRB) coal...

  7. ARSENIC SPECIATION ANALYSIS IN HUMAN SALIVA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: Determination of arsenic species in human saliva is potentially useful for biomonitoring of human exposure to arsenic and for studying arsenic metabolism. However, there is no report on the speciation analysis of arsenic in saliva. Methods: Arsenic species in saliva ...

  8. Multispecies Outcomes of Sympatric Speciation after Admixture with the Source Population in Two Radiations of Nicaraguan Crater Lake Cichlids.

    PubMed

    Kautt, Andreas F; Machado-Schiaffino, Gonzalo; Meyer, Axel

    2016-06-01

    The formation of species in the absence of geographic barriers (i.e. sympatric speciation) remains one of the most controversial topics in evolutionary biology. While theoretical models have shown that this most extreme case of primary divergence-with-gene-flow is possible, only a handful of accepted empirical examples exist. And even for the most convincing examples uncertainties remain; complex histories of isolation and secondary contact can make species falsely appear to have originated by sympatric speciation. This alternative scenario is notoriously difficult to rule out. Midas cichlids inhabiting small and remote crater lakes in Nicaragua are traditionally considered to be one of the best examples of sympatric speciation and lend themselves to test the different evolutionary scenarios that could lead to apparent sympatric speciation since the system is relatively small and the source populations known. Here we reconstruct the evolutionary history of two small-scale radiations of Midas cichlids inhabiting crater lakes Apoyo and Xiloá through a comprehensive genomic data set. We find no signs of differential admixture of any of the sympatric species in the respective radiations. Together with coalescent simulations of different demographic models our results support a scenario of speciation that was initiated in sympatry and does not result from secondary contact of already partly diverged populations. Furthermore, several species seem to have diverged simultaneously, making Midas cichlids an empirical example of multispecies outcomes of sympatric speciation. Importantly, however, the demographic models strongly support an admixture event from the source population into both crater lakes shortly before the onset of the radiations within the lakes. This opens the possibility that the formation of reproductive barriers involved in sympatric speciation was facilitated by genetic variants that evolved in a period of isolation between the initial founding

  9. Multispecies Outcomes of Sympatric Speciation after Admixture with the Source Population in Two Radiations of Nicaraguan Crater Lake Cichlids

    PubMed Central

    Kautt, Andreas F.; Machado-Schiaffino, Gonzalo; Meyer, Axel

    2016-01-01

    The formation of species in the absence of geographic barriers (i.e. sympatric speciation) remains one of the most controversial topics in evolutionary biology. While theoretical models have shown that this most extreme case of primary divergence-with-gene-flow is possible, only a handful of accepted empirical examples exist. And even for the most convincing examples uncertainties remain; complex histories of isolation and secondary contact can make species falsely appear to have originated by sympatric speciation. This alternative scenario is notoriously difficult to rule out. Midas cichlids inhabiting small and remote crater lakes in Nicaragua are traditionally considered to be one of the best examples of sympatric speciation and lend themselves to test the different evolutionary scenarios that could lead to apparent sympatric speciation since the system is relatively small and the source populations known. Here we reconstruct the evolutionary history of two small-scale radiations of Midas cichlids inhabiting crater lakes Apoyo and Xiloá through a comprehensive genomic data set. We find no signs of differential admixture of any of the sympatric species in the respective radiations. Together with coalescent simulations of different demographic models our results support a scenario of speciation that was initiated in sympatry and does not result from secondary contact of already partly diverged populations. Furthermore, several species seem to have diverged simultaneously, making Midas cichlids an empirical example of multispecies outcomes of sympatric speciation. Importantly, however, the demographic models strongly support an admixture event from the source population into both crater lakes shortly before the onset of the radiations within the lakes. This opens the possibility that the formation of reproductive barriers involved in sympatric speciation was facilitated by genetic variants that evolved in a period of isolation between the initial founding

  10. Sample treatment in chromatography-based speciation of organometallic pollutants.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Riza, J L; Morales, E; Giráldez, I; Sánchez-Rodas, D; Velasco, A

    2001-12-14

    Speciation analysis is nowadays performed routinely in many laboratories to control the quality of the environment, food and health. Chemical speciation analyses generally include the study of different oxidation state of elements or individual organometallic compounds. The determination of the different chemical forms of elements is still an analytical challenge, since they are often unstable and concentrations in different matrices of interest are in the microg l(-1) or even in the ng l(-1) range (e.g., estuarine waters) or ng g(-1) in sediments and biological tissues. For this reason, sensitive and selective analytical atomic techniques are being used as available detectors for speciation, generally coupled with chromatography for the time-resolved introduction of analytes into the atomic spectrometer. The complexity of these instrumental couplings has a straightforward consequence on the duration of the analysis, but sample preparation to separate and transfer the chemical species present in the sample into a solution to be accepted readily by a chromatographic column is the more critical step of total analysis, and demands considerable operator skills and time cost. Traditionally, liquid-liquid extraction has been employed for sample treatment with serious disadvantages, such as consumption, disposal and long-term exposure to organic solvent. In addition, they are usually cumbersome and time-consuming. Therefore, the introduction of new reagents such as sodium tetraethylborate for the simultaneous derivatization of several elements has been proposed. Other possibilities are based in the implementation of techniques for efficient and accelerated isolation of species from the sample matrix. This is the case for microwave-assisted extraction, solid-phase extraction and microextraction, supercritical fluid extraction or pressurized liquid extraction, which offer new possibilities in species treatment, and the advantages of a drastic reduction of the extraction

  11. Adding to the Mercury Speciation Toolbox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitts, J. P.; Northrup, P. A.; Chidambaram, D.; Kalb, P. D.

    2007-12-01

    Mercury was used to separate lithium-6 isotope for weapons production at the Y-12 Plant in Oak Ridge, TN in the 1950s and 1960s. A large portion of the waste Hg entered the environment and continues to move throughout the sub-surface and surface waters in the area. Environmental management of Hg contamination within this complex hydrologic system, where Hg speciation and the mobile fraction have been found to vary widely, will require ongoing characterization and predictive modeling of Hg speciation. State-of-the-art spectroscopic tools that can directly probe Hg speciation in preserved aqueous and sediment samples with greater sensitivity, however, are required to determine rates and mechanisms of biogeochemical reactions. We will present the first results demonstrating the use of x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) at the Hg M5 edge (2295 eV) to fingerprint Hg species. Heavy-metal M5 absorption edges can have very sharp features due to local electron transitions, and therefore, we are developing this edge as a tool for quantitative measurement of Hg species. In addition, sulfur speciation using the sulfur K absorption edge, which is at a similar energy (2472 eV), can be measured in the same scan as the Hg M5 edge. Potentially important organic and inorganic sulfur species (sulfide, disulfide, elemental sulfur, sulfite and sulfate) are readily differentiated, and thereby, provides an independent method for monitoring the redox state of the system along with changes in S-Hg bonding. We will also present x-ray microprobe 2-D concentration maps of Hg and other elements at the grain and pore scales to identify its microscopic distribution and chemical associations. When used in combination with established sequential extraction and direct spectroscopic methods, the addition of XAS at the Hg M5 edge should provide a significant advancement in the determination of Hg speciation in complex biogeochemical environments.

  12. Prolonging the Past Counteracts the Pull of the Present: Protracted Speciation Can Explain Observed Slowdowns in Diversification

    PubMed Central

    Etienne, Rampal S.; Rosindell, James

    2012-01-01

    Phylogenetic trees show a remarkable slowdown in the increase of number of lineages towards the present, a phenomenon which cannot be explained by the standard birth–death model of diversification with constant speciation and extinction rates. The birth–death model instead predicts a constant or accelerating increase in the number of lineages, which has been called the pull of the present. The observed slowdown has been attributed to nonconstancy of the speciation and extinction rates due to some form of diversity dependence (i.e., species-level density dependence), but the mechanisms underlying this are still unclear. Here, we propose an alternative explanation based on the simple concept that speciation takes time to complete. We show that this idea of “protracted” speciation can be incorporated in the standard birth–death model of diversification. The protracted birth–death model predicts a realistic slowdown in the rate of increase of number of lineages in the phylogeny and provides a compelling fit to four bird phylogenies with realistic parameter values. Thus, the effect of recognizing the generally accepted fact that speciation is not an instantaneous event is significant; even if it cannot account for all the observed patterns, it certainly contributes substantially and should therefore be incorporated into future studies. PMID:21873376

  13. Characterization of the molecular species of glycerophospholipids from rabbit kidney: an alternative approach to the determination of the fatty acyl chain position by negative ion fast atom bombardment combined with mass-analysed ion kinetic energy analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, S; Curcuruto, O; Catinella, S; Traldi, P; Menon, G

    1992-12-01

    An alternative approach to identifying fatty acid chain position in the molecular species of glycerophospholipids has been studied and developed. The fatty acyl groups esterified to the glycerol backbone in isomeric glycerophosphatidyl-choline, -serine and -ethanolamine as well as glycerophosphatidic acid can be detected by the presence of a pair of anions derived from phosphatidic acid parent ions (M minus the polar head groups in glycerophospholipids), designed to be [M--polar head--R2COOH]- and [M--polar head--R2CO--H]-, produced by negative ion fast atom bombardment combined with mass-analysed ion kinetic energy analysis. Because of the significant abundance of [M--polar head--R2COOH]- anion, fatty acid chains differing by 2 Da can be distinguished by accurate measurements of the electrostatic voltage related to this ion. Three-volt differences can be evidenced. Using this approach, the molecular species of glycerophosphatidyl-choline, -serine, -ethanolamine and -inositol from rabbit kidney were characterized after the separation of both class and species by normal and reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography, respectively. We identified 11 arachidonoyl-containing molecular species of glycerophospholipids and the other 17 lipid molecules in this biological material. A couple of 1- alkenyl-2-arachidonoyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphoethanolamine species, identified as plasmalogen GPE 16:0-20:4 and plasmalogen GPE 18:0-20:4, were found for the first time in rabbit kidney. PMID:1477110

  14. The Fast Alternative Cryogenic Experiment Testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nash, Alfred; Holmes, Warren

    2000-01-01

    One of the challenges in the area of cryogenics for space exploration in the next millennium is providing the capability for inexpensive, frequent, access to space. Faced with this challenge during the International Space Station (ISS) build era, when other Space Shuttle manifesting opportunities are unavailable, a "proof of concept" cryostat has been developed to demonstrate the ability to accommodate low temperature science investigations within the constraints of the Hitchhiker siderail carrier. The Hitchhiker siderail carrier is available on a "mass available" basis during the ISS build era. In fact, several hitchhiker payloads flew with the deployment of the Unity module. Hitchhiker siderail carrier payloads have historically flown an average of about four times a year. A hybrid Solid Neon - Superfluid Helium cryostat has been developed with Janis Research Company to accommodate instruments of 16.5 cm diameter and 30 cm. length. This hybrid approach was taken in part to provide adequate on-orbit lifetime for instruments with high (conducted) heat loads from the instrumentation wiring. Mass, volume, lifetime and the launch hold scenario were all design drivers. In addition, with Ball Aerospace and Technologies Corporation, a multichannel VME architecture Germanium Resistance Thermometer (GRT) readout and heater control servo system has been developed. In a flight system, the cryostat and electronics payloads would be umbilically attached in a paired Hitchhiker siderail mount, and permit on-orbit command and telemetry capability. The results of performance tests of both the cryostat, and a helium sample instrument will be presented. The instrument features a self contained, miniaturized, nano-Kelvin resolution High Resolution Thermometer (HRT). This high level of thermal resolution is achieved through the utilization of a dc Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID). Although developed for the Low Temperature Microgravity Fundamental Physics investigator community, many design features are applicable in fields such as infrared and x-ray astronomy.

  15. Multiply associating electrolytes in the binding mean spherical approximation: Thermodynamic properties and speciation

    SciTech Connect

    Bernard, O. Simonin, J.-P.; Torres-Arenas, J.

    2014-01-21

    Ionic solutions exhibiting multiple association are described within the binding mean spherical approximation (BiMSA). This model is based on the Wertheim formalism, in the framework of the primitive model at the McMillan-Mayer level. The cation and the anion form the various complexes according to stepwise complexation-equilibria. Analytic expressions for the Helmholtz energy, the internal energy, the speciation, and for the osmotic and activity coefficients are given considering a binary solution with an arbitrary number of association sites on one type of ion (polyion) and one site on the ions of opposite sign (counterions). As an alternative, mean field expressions, as developed in SAFT-type theories, are also presented. The result obtained from the latter approximate method exhibits a reasonable agreement with those from BiMSA for the speciation, and a remarkable one for the osmotic coefficient.

  16. Sample preparation for arsenic speciation in terrestrial plants--a review.

    PubMed

    Amaral, Clarice D B; Nóbrega, Joaquim A; Nogueira, Ana R A

    2013-10-15

    Arsenic is an element widely present in nature. Additionally, it may be found as different species in several matrices and therefore it is one of the target elements in chemical speciation. Although the number of studies in terrestrial plants is low, compared to matrices such as fish or urine, this number is raising due to the fact that this type of matrix are closely related to the human food chain. In speciation analysis, sample preparation is a critical step and several extraction procedures present drawbacks. In this review, papers dealing with extraction procedures, analytical methods, and studies of species conservation in plants cultivated in terrestrial environment are critically discussed. Analytical procedures based on extractions using water or diluted acid solutions associated with HPLC-ICP-MS are good alternatives, owing to their versatility and sensitivity, even though less expensive strategies are shown as feasible choices. PMID:24054594

  17. Phosphorous Speciation in WTR-treated Biosolids Using XANES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, T. Q.; Huff, D.; Lin, Z.-Q.

    2009-04-01

    The concept of co-application of biosolids and drinking water treatment residues (DWTRs) represents an environmentally sustainable and economically sound strategy for the management of municipal solid wastes. This study demonstrated the effectiveness of reducing water-soluble P in biosolids-amended agricultural soil by the addition of DWTRs. Results showed that total P in soil leachate was significantly reduced during the initial 42-days of a 200-day greenhouse study when biosolids (50 g kg-1) were applied along with DWTRs (40 g kg-1). Particulate P was the dominant fraction of P in the soil leachate, which decreases with increasing DWTR application rate. The application of DWTRs does not significantly decrease the growth and yield of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). The primary P chemical composition in biosolids include cupper phytate [Cu(IP6)6], barium phytate [Ba6IP6], and cupper phosphate [Cu3(PO4)2]. The addition of DWTRs to biosolids alternated the P speciation, and the P speciation change became significant with increasing the incubation time of the mixture of biosolids and DWTRs. The chemical component of Cu3(PO4)2 became non significant (<5%) with the addition of DWTRs. During the 14-day incubation time period, the proportion of P that was adsorbed on amorphous Fe(OH)3 increased substantially from 8 to 46% and Ba6IP6 increased steadily from 30 to 50%, while the proportion of Cu(IP6)6 decreased significantly from 53 to 5%. The amorphous Fe(OH)3-adsorbed P and Ba6IP6 formed the dominant P chemical components in the mixture of biosolids and DWTRs.

  18. Comparison of gas chromatographic hyphenated techniques for mercury speciation analysis.

    PubMed

    Nevado, J J Berzas; Martín-Doimeadios, R C Rodríguez; Krupp, E M; Bernardo, F J Guzmán; Fariñas, N Rodríguez; Moreno, M Jiménez; Wallace, D; Ropero, M J Patiño

    2011-07-15

    In this study, we evaluate advantages and disadvantages of three hyphenated techniques for mercury speciation analysis in different sample matrices using gas chromatography (GC) with mass spectrometry (GC-MS), inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (GC-ICP-MS) and pyrolysis atomic fluorescence (GC-pyro-AFS) detection. Aqueous ethylation with NaBEt(4) was required in all cases. All systems were validated with respect to precision, with repeatability and reproducibility <5% RSD, confirmed by the Snedecor F-test. All methods proved to be robust according to a Plackett-Burnham design for 7 factors and 15 experiments, and calculations were carried out using the procedures described by Youden and Steiner. In order to evaluate accuracy, certified reference materials (DORM-2 and DOLT-3) were analyzed after closed-vessel microwave extraction with tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH). No statistically significant differences were found to the certified values (p=0.05). The suitability for water samples analysis with different organic matter and chloride contents was evaluated by recovery experiments in synthetic spiked waters. Absolute detection and quantification limits were in the range of 2-6 pg for GC-pyro-AFS, 1-4 pg for GC-MS, with 0.05-0.21 pg for GC-ICP-MS showing the best limits of detection for the three systems employed. However, all systems are sufficiently sensitive for mercury speciation in environmental samples, with GC-MS and GC-ICP-MS offering isotope analysis capabilities for the use of species-specific isotope dilution analysis, and GC-pyro-AFS being the most cost effective alternative. PMID:21641604

  19. Speciation in aqueous solutions of nitric acid.

    PubMed

    Hlushak, S; Simonin, J P; De Sio, S; Bernard, O; Ruas, A; Pochon, P; Jan, S; Moisy, P

    2013-02-28

    In this study, speciation in aqueous solutions of nitric acid at 25 °C was assessed in two independent ways. First, Raman experiments were carried out and interpreted in terms of free nitrate ions, ion pairs and neutral HNO(3) molecules. In parallel, a model was developed to account for the formation of these two kinds of pairs. It was based on an extension of the binding mean spherical approximation (BiMSA), or associative MSA (AMSA), in which the size and the charge of the ions in the chemical pair may differ from those of the free ions. A simultaneous fit of the osmotic coefficient and of the proportion of free ions (obtained from Raman spectroscopy experiments) led to an estimation of the speciation in nitric acid solutions. The result obtained using this procedure was compared with the estimation obtained from the Raman experiments. PMID:23258765

  20. Alternative security

    SciTech Connect

    Weston, B.H. )

    1990-01-01

    This book contains the following chapters: The Military and Alternative Security: New Missions for Stable Conventional Security; Technology and Alternative Security: A Cherished Myth Expires; Law and Alternative Security: Toward a Just World Peace; Politics and Alternative Security: Toward a More Democratic, Therefore More Peaceful, World; Economics and Alternative Security: Toward a Peacekeeping International Economy; Psychology and Alternative Security: Needs, Perceptions, and Misperceptions; Religion and Alternative Security: A Prophetic Vision; and Toward Post-Nuclear Global Security: An Overview.

  1. Interactions among quantitative traits in the course of sympatric speciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondrashov, Alexey S.; Kondrashov, Fyodor A.

    1999-07-01

    Sympatric speciation, the origin of two or more species from a single local population, has almost certainly been involved in formation of several species flocks, and may be fairly common in nature. The most straightforward scenario for sympatric speciation requires disruptive selection favouring two substantially different phenotypes, and consists of the evolution of reproductive isolation between them followed by the elimination of all intermediate phenotypes. Here we use the hypergeometric phenotypic model to show that sympatric speciation is possible even when fitness and mate choice depend on different quantitative traits, so that speciation must involve formation of covariance between these traits. The increase in the number of variable lociaffecting fitness facilitates sympatric speciation, whereas the increase in the number of variable loci affecting mate choice has the opposite effect. These predictions may enable more cases of sympatric speciation to be identified.

  2. Floral symmetry affects speciation rates in angiosperms.

    PubMed Central

    Sargent, Risa D.

    2004-01-01

    Despite much recent activity in the field of pollination biology, the extent to which animal pollinators drive the formation of new angiosperm species remains unresolved. One problem has been identifying floral adaptations that promote reproductive isolation. The evolution of a bilaterally symmetrical corolla restricts the direction of approach and movement of pollinators on and between flowers. Restricting pollinators to approaching a flower from a single direction facilitates specific placement of pollen on the pollinator. When coupled with pollinator constancy, precise pollen placement can increase the probability that pollen grains reach a compatible stigma. This has the potential to generate reproductive isolation between species, because mutations that cause changes in the placement of pollen on the pollinator may decrease gene flow between incipient species. I predict that animal-pollinated lineages that possess bilaterally symmetrical flowers should have higher speciation rates than lineages possessing radially symmetrical flowers. Using sister-group comparisons I demonstrate that bilaterally symmetric lineages tend to be more species rich than their radially symmetrical sister lineages. This study supports an important role for pollinator-mediated speciation and demonstrates that floral morphology plays a key role in angiosperm speciation. PMID:15156918

  3. Chiral Speciation in Terrestrial Pulmonate Snails

    PubMed Central

    Gittenberger, Edmund; Hamann, Thomas D.; Asami, Takahiro

    2012-01-01

    On the basis of data in the literature, the percentages of dextral versus sinistral species of snails have been calculated for western Europe, Turkey, North America (north of Mexico), and Japan. When the family of Clausiliidae is represented, about a quarter of all snail species may be sinistral, whereas less than one per cent of the species may be sinistral where that family does not occur. The number of single-gene speciation events on the basis of chirality, resulting in the origin of mirror image species, is not closely linked to the percentage of sinistral versus dextral species in a particular region. Turkey is nevertheless exceptional by both a high percentage of sinistral species and a high number of speciation events resulting in mirror image species. Shell morphology and genetic background may influence the ease of chirality-linked speciation, whereas sinistrality may additionally be selected against by internal selection. For the Clausiliidae, the fossil record and the recent fauna suggest that successful reversals in coiling direction occurred with a frequency of once every three to four million years. PMID:22532825

  4. Evaluation of Regenerated Catalyst for Mercury Speciation

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis Laudal

    2007-06-01

    In March of 2005, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) promulgated the Clean Air Mercury Rule (CAMR). Mercury from coal-fired power plants was to be reduced from the current 48 to 38 tons/yr by 2010 and then 15 tons/yr by 2018. It is expected that the first phase reduction of {approx}21% will be achieved by cobenefits that will occur as a result of installing additional selective catalytic reduction (SCR) and flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems to meet the new Clean Air Interstate Rule (CAIR). Detroit Edison (DTE) is installing SCR at all four units at its Monroe Station and will eventually install wet-FGD systems. As such, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and DTE have contracted with the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) to determine the extent of mercury oxidation that occurs at Monroe Station. The EERC originally did mercury speciation sampling at Monroe Station in 2004 and then went back in 2005 to determine if any changes occurred as a result of catalyst aging. During the second test, in addition to measuring the mercury speciation at the inlet and outlet of the SCR, the EERC also completed sampling at a location between the catalyst layers. The results are shown in Table 1. In Table 1, the results show that {approx}40% of the Hg was in oxidized form (Hg{sup 2+}) at the inlet and nearly 100% Hg{sup 2+} at the outlet. The results at the midpoint were between 40% and 100%. As part of their overall strategy to reduce SCR costs, utilities and SCR vendors are attempting to regenerate catalyst layers that have degenerated over time. If these regenerated catalysts are used, the question remains as to the effect this process will have on the ability of these catalysts to oxidize mercury as well as reduce NO{sub x}. The current project is designed to measure the Hg speciation across an SCR using a regenerated catalyst. The results were compared to previous results to determine what, if any, changes

  5. Non-chromatographic atomic spectrometric methods in speciation analysis: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, Mariana A.; Grinberg, Patricia; Bobeda, Cláudio R. R.; Reyes, Mariela N. M.; Campos, Reinaldo C.

    2009-06-01

    In recent years, knowledge of the different chemical forms of the elements has gained increasing importance. There has been significant progress in methods that hyphenate chromatographic separations with atomic spectrometry. These hyphenated methods can provide the most complete information on the species distribution and even structure. However, they can be lengthy, relatively costly and difficult to bring to the routine. On the other hand, it is important to remember that chromatographic techniques represent only a minor part of the separation procedures available and, in certain cases, the application of basic chemistry to sample treatments can give quantitative information about specific chemical forms. In this sense, non-chromatographic procedures can provide methods that offer sufficient information on the elemental speciation for a series of situations. Moreover, these non-chromatographic strategies can be less time consuming, more cost effective and available, and present competitive limits of detection. Thus, non-chromatographic speciation analysis continues to be a promising research area and has been applied to the development of several methodologies that facilitate this type of analytical approach. In view of their importance, the present work overviews and discusses different non-chromatographic methods as alternatives for the speciation analysis of clinical, environmental and food samples using atomic spectrometry for detection.

  6. Application of Hyphenated Techniques in Speciation Analysis of Arsenic, Antimony, and Thallium

    PubMed Central

    Michalski, Rajmund; Szopa, Sebastian; Jabłońska, Magdalena; Łyko, Aleksandra

    2012-01-01

    Due to the fact that metals and metalloids have a strong impact on the environment, the methods of their determination and speciation have received special attention in recent years. Arsenic, antimony, and thallium are important examples of such toxic elements. Their speciation is especially important in the environmental and biomedical fields because of their toxicity, bioavailability, and reactivity. Recently, speciation analytics has been playing a unique role in the studies of biogeochemical cycles of chemical compounds, determination of toxicity and ecotoxicity of selected elements, quality control of food products, control of medicines and pharmaceutical products, technological process control, research on the impact of technological installation on the environment, examination of occupational exposure, and clinical analysis. Conventional methods are usually labor intensive, time consuming, and susceptible to interferences. The hyphenated techniques, in which separation method is coupled with multidimensional detectors, have become useful alternatives. The main advantages of those techniques consist in extremely low detection and quantification limits, insignificant interference, influence as well as high precision and repeatability of the determinations. In view of their importance, the present work overviews and discusses different hyphenated techniques used for arsenic, antimony, and thallium species analysis, in different clinical, environmental and food matrices. PMID:22654649

  7. Case studies and mathematical models of ecological speciation. 4. Hybrid speciation in butterflies in a jungle.

    PubMed

    Duenez-Guzman, Edgar A; Mavárez, Jesus; Vose, Michael D; Gavrilets, Sergey

    2009-10-01

    We build a spatial individual-based multilocus model of homoploid hybrid speciation tailored for a tentative case of hybrid origin of Heliconius heurippa from H. melpomene and H. cydno in South America. Our model attempts to account for empirical patterns and data on genetic incompatibility, mating preferences and selection by predation (both based on coloration patterns), habitat preference, and local adaptation for all three Heliconius species. Using this model, we study the likelihood of recombinational speciation and identify the effects of various ecological and genetic parameters on the dynamics, patterns, and consequences of hybrid ecological speciation. Overall, our model supports the possibility of hybrid origin of H. heurippa under certain conditions. The most plausible scenario would include hybridization between H. melpomene and H. cydno in an area geographically isolated from the rest of both parental species with subsequent long-lasting geographic isolation of the new hybrid species, followed by changes in the species ranges, the secondary contact, and disappearance of H. melpomene-type ecomorph in the hybrid species. However, much more work (both empirical and theoretical) is necessary to be able to make more definite conclusions on the importance of homoploid hybrid speciation in animals. PMID:19545268

  8. Mercury speciation analysis in terrestrial animal tissues.

    PubMed

    Berzas Nevado, J J; Rodríguez Martín-Doimeadios, R C; Guzmán Bernardo, F J; Rodríguez Fariñas, N; Patiño Ropero, M J

    2012-09-15

    No previous analytical procedures are available and validated for mercury speciation analysis in terrestrial animal tissues. This analysis is a difficult task both because the expected concentrations are low, since important accumulation process are not likely to occur, and also because there are not commercially available certified reference material. Thus, an analytical methodology has been developed and validated for mercury speciation for the specific case of terrestrial animal tissues. The proposed method is based on the quantitative extraction of the species by closed-vessel microwave assisted heating with an alkaline reagent, followed by ethylation. The ethylated derivatives were then submitted to head-space solid phase microextraction with a 100 μm polidimethylsiloxane-coated fiber, and desorbed onto a gas chromatograph coupled to atomic fluorescence detection via pyrolysis unit (HS-SPME-GC-pyro-AFS). Procedural detection limits were 31.8 ng g(-1) and 52.5 ng g(-1) for CH(3)Hg(+) and Hg(2+), respectively, for liver and 35.3 ng g(-1) and 58.1 ng g(-1) for CH(3)Hg(+) and Hg(2+), respectively, for kidney. These limits of detection are 5.5 and 6 times better than the obtained without solid phase microextraction for CH(3)Hg(+) and Hg(2+), respectively. The methodology was found linear up to 120 μg L(-1) and reproducible from one day to the following. It was validated with certified reference materials NCS ZC 71001 (beef liver) and BCR No 186 (pig kidney) for total mercury, calculated as the sum of species, and with spiked red deer liver and kidney for speciation. Finally, it was applied to the analysis of samples of red deer liver, red deer kidney and wild boar kidney coming from the Almadén's mercury mining area (Ciudad Real, Spain), the longest and largest producer of mercury in the world until its closure in 2002. PMID:22967634

  9. Complementary arsenic speciation methods: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nearing, Michelle M.; Koch, Iris; Reimer, Kenneth J.

    2014-09-01

    The toxicity of arsenic greatly depends on its chemical form and oxidation state (speciation) and therefore accurate determination of arsenic speciation is a crucial step in understanding its chemistry and potential risk. High performance liquid chromatography with inductively coupled mass spectrometry (HPLC-ICP-MS) is the most common analysis used for arsenic speciation but it has two major limitations: it relies on an extraction step (usually from a solid sample) that can be incomplete or alter the arsenic compounds; and it provides no structural information, relying on matching sample peaks to standard peaks. The use of additional analytical methods in a complementary manner introduces the ability to address these disadvantages. The use of X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) with HPLC-ICP-MS can be used to identify compounds not extracted for HPLC-ICP-MS and provide minimal processing steps for solid state analysis that may help preserve labile compounds such as those containing arsenicsbnd sulfur bonds, which can degrade under chromatographic conditions. On the other hand, HPLC-ICP-MS is essential in confirming organoarsenic compounds with similar white line energies seen by using XAS, and identifying trace arsenic compounds that are too low to be detected by XAS. The complementary use of electrospray mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) with HPLC-ICP-MS provides confirmation of arsenic compounds identified during the HPLC-ICP-MS analysis, identification of unknown compounds observed during the HPLC-ICP-MS analysis and further resolves HPLC-ICP-MS by identifying co-eluting compounds. In the complementary use of HPLC-ICP-MS and ESI-MS, HPLC-ICP-MS helps to focus the ESI-MS selection of ions. Numerous studies have shown that the information obtained from HPLC-ICP-MS analysis can be greatly enhanced by complementary approaches.

  10. Bayesian estimation of speciation and extinction from incomplete fossil occurrence data.

    PubMed

    Silvestro, Daniele; Schnitzler, Jan; Liow, Lee Hsiang; Antonelli, Alexandre; Salamin, Nicolas

    2014-05-01

    The temporal dynamics of species diversity are shaped by variations in the rates of speciation and extinction, and there is a long history of inferring these rates using first and last appearances of taxa in the fossil record. Understanding diversity dynamics critically depends on unbiased estimates of the unobserved times of speciation and extinction for all lineages, but the inference of these parameters is challenging due to the complex nature of the available data. Here, we present a new probabilistic framework to jointly estimate species-specific times of speciation and extinction and the rates of the underlying birth-death process based on the fossil record. The rates are allowed to vary through time independently of each other, and the probability of preservation and sampling is explicitly incorporated in the model to estimate the true lifespan of each lineage. We implement a Bayesian algorithm to assess the presence of rate shifts by exploring alternative diversification models. Tests on a range of simulated data sets reveal the accuracy and robustness of our approach against violations of the underlying assumptions and various degrees of data incompleteness. Finally, we demonstrate the application of our method with the diversification of the mammal family Rhinocerotidae and reveal a complex history of repeated and independent temporal shifts of both speciation and extinction rates, leading to the expansion and subsequent decline of the group. The estimated parameters of the birth-death process implemented here are directly comparable with those obtained from dated molecular phylogenies. Thus, our model represents a step towards integrating phylogenetic and fossil information to infer macroevolutionary processes. PMID:24510972

  11. Bayesian Estimation of Speciation and Extinction from Incomplete Fossil Occurrence Data

    PubMed Central

    Silvestro, Daniele; Schnitzler, Jan; Liow, Lee Hsiang; Antonelli, Alexandre; Salamin, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    The temporal dynamics of species diversity are shaped by variations in the rates of speciation and extinction, and there is a long history of inferring these rates using first and last appearances of taxa in the fossil record. Understanding diversity dynamics critically depends on unbiased estimates of the unobserved times of speciation and extinction for all lineages, but the inference of these parameters is challenging due to the complex nature of the available data. Here, we present a new probabilistic framework to jointly estimate species-specific times of speciation and extinction and the rates of the underlying birth-death process based on the fossil record. The rates are allowed to vary through time independently of each other, and the probability of preservation and sampling is explicitly incorporated in the model to estimate the true lifespan of each lineage. We implement a Bayesian algorithm to assess the presence of rate shifts by exploring alternative diversification models. Tests on a range of simulated data sets reveal the accuracy and robustness of our approach against violations of the underlying assumptions and various degrees of data incompleteness. Finally, we demonstrate the application of our method with the diversification of the mammal family Rhinocerotidae and reveal a complex history of repeated and independent temporal shifts of both speciation and extinction rates, leading to the expansion and subsequent decline of the group. The estimated parameters of the birth-death process implemented here are directly comparable with those obtained from dated molecular phylogenies. Thus, our model represents a step towards integrating phylogenetic and fossil information to infer macroevolutionary processes. PMID:24510972

  12. Speciation and release kinetics of zinc in contaminated paddy soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Zinc is an important nutrient for plants, but it can be toxic at high concentrations. The solubility and speciation of Zn is controlled by many factors, especially soil pH and Eh, which can vary in lowland rice culture. This study determined Zn speciation and release kinetics in Cd-Zn co-contamina...

  13. The Development and Uses of EPA's SPECIATE Database

    EPA Science Inventory

    SPECIATE is the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) repository of volatile organic compounds (VOC) and particulate matter (PM) speciation profiles of air pollution sources. These source profiles can be used to (l) provide input to chemical mass balance (CMB) receptor mod...

  14. Passenger car hydrocarbon emissions speciation. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Black, F.; High, L.

    1980-05-01

    Emission factors for over 60 individual hydrocarbon compounds were determined for four passenger cars. The cars included a 1963 Chevrolet, a 1977 Mustang, and 1978 Monarch, and 1979 LTD II. The speciation data is reported for both tailpipe and evaporative emissions. The tailpipe emissions were for the urban driving conditions of the Federal Test Procedure used in motor vehicle certification. The evaporative emissions were for both diurnal and hot soak conditions, also prescribed in the Federal Test Procedure for certification. The vehicle tests involved four gasoline fuels of varying composition.

  15. Plutonium Speciation, Solubilization and Migration in Soils

    SciTech Connect

    Neu, M.; Runde, W.

    1999-06-01

    This report summarizes research completed in the first half of a three-year project. As outlined in the authors' proposal they are focusing on (1) characterizing the plutonium at an actinide contaminated site, RFETS, including determining the origin, dispersion, and speciation of the plutonium, (2) studying environmentally important plutonium complexes, primarily hydroxides and carbonates, and (3) examining the interactions of plutonium species with manganese minerals. In the first year the authors focused on site based studies. This year they continue to characterize samples from the RFETS, study the formation and structural and spectroscopic features of environmentally relevant Pu species, and begin modeling the environmental behavior of plutonium.

  16. Arsenic speciation in natural sulfidic geothermal waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Nicole S.; Stefánsson, Andri; Sigfússon, Bergur

    2014-10-01

    The speciation of arsenic in natural sulfidic geothermal waters was studied using chemical analyses and thermodynamic aqueous speciation calculations. Samples were collected in three geothermal systems in Iceland, having contrasting H2S concentrations in the reservoir (high vs. low). The sampled waters contained 7-116 ppb As and <0.01-77.6 ppm H2S with pH of 8.56-9.60. The analytical setup used for the determination of arsenic species (Ion Chromatography-Hydride Generation Atomic Fluorescence Spectrometry, IC-HG-AFS) was field-deployed and the samples analyzed within ∼5 min of sampling in order to prevent changes upon storage, which were shown to be considerable regardless of the sample storage method used. Nine aqueous arsenic species were detected, among others arsenite (HnAsO3n-3), thioarsenite (HnAsS3n-3), arsenate (HnAsO4n-3), monothioarsenate (HnAsSO3n-3), dithioarsenate (HnAsS2O2n-3), trithioarsenate (HnAsS3O) and tetrathioarsenate (HnAsS4n-3). The results of the measured aqueous arsenic speciation in the natural geothermal waters and comparison with thermodynamic calculations reveal that the predominant factors determining the species distribution are sulfide concentration and pH. In alkaline waters with low sulfide concentrations the predominant species are AsIII oxyanions. This can be seen in samples from a liquid-only well, tapping water that is H2S-poor and free of oxygen. At intermediate sulfide concentration AsIII and AsV thio species become important and predominate at high sulfide concentration, as seen in two-phase well waters, which have high H2S concentrations in the reservoir. Upon oxidation, for instance due to mixing of the reservoir fluid with oxygenated water upon ascent to the surface, AsV oxyanions form, as well as AsV thio complexes if the sulfide concentration is intermediate to high. This oxidation process can be seen in samples from hot springs in the Geysir geothermal area. While the thermodynamic modeling allows for a first

  17. Chemoselective Boronic Ester Synthesis by Controlled Speciation**

    PubMed Central

    Fyfe, James W B; Seath, Ciaran P; Watson, Allan J B

    2014-01-01

    Control of boronic acid solution speciation is presented as a new strategy for the chemoselective synthesis of boronic esters. Manipulation of the solution equilibria within a cross-coupling milieu enables the formal homologation of aryl and alkenyl boronic acid pinacol esters. The generation of a new, reactive boronic ester in the presence of an active palladium catalyst also facilitates streamlined iterative catalytic C=C bond formation and provides a method for the controlled oligomerization of sp2-hybridized boronic esters. PMID:25267096

  18. Climate adaptation and speciation: particular focus on reproductive barriers in Ficedula flycatchers.

    PubMed

    Qvarnström, Anna; Ålund, Murielle; McFarlane, S Eryn; Sirkiä, Päivi M

    2016-01-01

    Climate adaptation is surprisingly rarely reported as a cause for the build-up of reproductive isolation between diverging populations. In this review, we summarize evidence for effects of climate adaptation on pre- and postzygotic isolation between emerging species with a particular focus on pied (Ficedula hypoleuca) and collared (Ficedula albicollis) flycatchers as a model for research on speciation. Effects of climate adaptation on prezygotic isolation or extrinsic selection against hybrids have been documented in several taxa, but the combined action of climate adaptation and sexual selection is particularly well explored in Ficedula flycatchers. There is a general lack of evidence for divergent climate adaptation causing intrinsic postzygotic isolation. However, we argue that the profound effects of divergence in climate adaptation on the whole biochemical machinery of organisms and hence many underlying genes should increase the likelihood of genetic incompatibilities arising as side effects. Fast temperature-dependent co-evolution between mitochondrial and nuclear genomes may be particularly likely to lead to hybrid sterility. Thus, how climate adaptation relates to reproductive isolation is best explored in relation to fast-evolving barriers to gene flow, while more research on later stages of divergence is needed to achieve a complete understanding of climate-driven speciation. PMID:27087843

  19. Linking emergence of fungal plant diseases and ecological speciation

    PubMed Central

    Giraud, Tatiana; Gladieux, Pierre; Gavrilets, Sergey

    2010-01-01

    Emerging diseases represent a growing worldwide problem accompanying global environmental changes, and there is tremendous interest in identifying the factors controlling the appearance and spread of these diseases. Here, we discuss emerging fungal plant diseases, and argue that they often result from host shift speciation, a particular case of ecological speciation. We consider the factors controlling local adaptation and ecological speciation and show that certain life-history traits of many fungal plant pathogens are conducive for rapid ecological speciation, thus favoring the emergence of novel pathogen species adapted to new hosts. We argue that placing the problem of emerging fungal diseases of plants within the context of ecological speciation can significantly improve our understanding of the biological mechanisms governing emergence of such diseases. PMID:20434790

  20. Sympatric speciation as a consequence of male pregnancy in seahorses

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Adam G.; Moore, Glenn I.; Kvarnemo, Charlotta; Walker, DeEtte; Avise, John C.

    2003-01-01

    The phenomenon of male pregnancy in the family Syngnathidae (seahorses, pipefishes, and sea dragons) undeniably has sculpted the course of behavioral evolution in these fishes. Here we explore another potentially important but previously unrecognized consequence of male pregnancy: a predisposition for sympatric speciation. We present microsatellite data on genetic parentage that show that seahorses mate size-assortatively in nature. We then develop a quantitative genetic model based on these empirical findings to demonstrate that sympatric speciation indeed can occur under this mating regime in response to weak disruptive selection on body size. We also evaluate phylogenetic evidence bearing on sympatric speciation by asking whether tiny seahorse species are sister taxa to large sympatric relatives. Overall, our results indicate that sympatric speciation is a plausible mechanism for the diversification of seahorses, and that assortative mating (in this case as a result of male parental care) may warrant broader attention in the speciation process for some other taxonomic groups as well. PMID:12732712

  1. Pleistocene Speciation in the Genus Populus (Salicaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Levsen, Nicholas D.; Tiffin, Peter; Olson, Matthew S.

    2012-01-01

    The macroevolutionary consequences of recent climate change remain controversial, and there is little paleobotanical or morphological evidence that Pleistocene (1.8–0.12 Ma) glacial cycles acted as drivers of speciation, especially among lineages with long generation times, such as trees. We combined genetic and ecogeographic data from 2 closely related North American tree species, Populus balsamifera and P. trichocarpa (Salicacaeae), to determine if their divergence coincided with and was possibly caused by Pleistocene climatic events. We analyzed 32 nuclear loci from individuals of P. balsamifera and P. trichocarpa to produce coalescent-based estimates of the divergence time between the 2 species. We coupled the coalescent analyses with paleodistribution models to assess the influence of climate change on species' range. Furthermore, measures of niche overlap were used to investigate patterns of ecological differentiation between species. We estimated the divergence date of P. balsamifera and P. trichocarpa at approximately 75 Ka, which corresponds closely with the onset of Marine Isotope Stage 4 (∼76 Ka) and a rapid increase in global ice volume. Significance tests of niche overlap, in conjunction with genetic estimates of migration, suggested that speciation occurred in allopatry, possibly resulting from the environmental effects of Pleistocene glacial cycles. Our results indicate that the divergence of keystone tree species, which have shaped community diversity in northern North American ecosystems, was recent and may have been a consequence of Pleistocene-era glaciation and climate change. PMID:22213709

  2. Gene regulation and speciation in house mice.

    PubMed

    Mack, Katya L; Campbell, Polly; Nachman, Michael W

    2016-04-01

    One approach to understanding the process of speciation is to characterize the genetic architecture of post-zygotic isolation. As gene regulation requires interactions between loci, negative epistatic interactions between divergent regulatory elements might underlie hybrid incompatibilities and contribute to reproductive isolation. Here, we take advantage of a cross between house mouse subspecies, where hybrid dysfunction is largely unidirectional, to test several key predictions about regulatory divergence and reproductive isolation. Regulatory divergence betweenMus musculus musculusandM. m. domesticuswas characterized by studying allele-specific expression in fertile hybrid males using mRNA-sequencing of whole testes. We found extensive regulatory divergence betweenM. m. musculusandM. m. domesticus, largely attributable tocis-regulatory changes. When bothcisandtranschanges occurred, they were observed in opposition much more often than expected under a neutral model, providing strong evidence of widespread compensatory evolution. We also found evidence for lineage-specific positive selection on a subset of genes related to transcriptional regulation. Comparisons of fertile and sterile hybrid males identified a set of genes that were uniquely misexpressed in sterile individuals. Lastly, we discovered a nonrandom association between these genes and genes showing evidence of compensatory evolution, consistent with the idea that regulatory interactions might contribute to Dobzhansky-Muller incompatibilities and be important in speciation. PMID:26833790

  3. A genomic perspective on hybridization and speciation

    PubMed Central

    Payseur, Bret A.; Rieseberg, Loren H.

    2016-01-01

    Hybridization among diverging lineages is common in nature. Genomic data provide a special opportunity to characterize the history of hybridization and the genetic basis of speciation. We review existing methods and empirical studies to identify recent advances in the genomics of hybridization, as well as issues that need to be addressed. Notable progress has been made in the development of methods for detecting hybridization and inferring individual ancestries. However, few approaches reconstruct the magnitude and timing of gene flow, estimate the fitness of hybrids or incorporate knowledge of recombination rate. Empirical studies indicate that the genomic consequences of hybridization are complex, including a highly heterogeneous landscape of differentiation. Inferred characteristics of hybridization differ substantially among species groups. Loci showing unusual patterns – which may contribute to reproductive barriers – are usually scattered throughout the genome, with potential enrichment in sex chromosomes and regions of reduced recombination. We caution against the growing trend of interpreting genomic variation in summary statistics across genomes as evidence of differential gene flow. We argue that converting genomic patterns into useful inferences about hybridization will ultimately require models and methods that directly incorporate key ingredients of speciation, including the dynamic nature of gene flow, selection acting in hybrid populations and recombination rate variation. PMID:26836441

  4. Global patterns of speciation and diversity.

    PubMed

    de Aguiar, M A M; Baranger, M; Baptestini, E M; Kaufman, L; Bar-Yam, Y

    2009-07-16

    In recent years, strikingly consistent patterns of biodiversity have been identified over space, time, organism type and geographical region. A neutral theory (assuming no environmental selection or organismal interactions) has been shown to predict many patterns of ecological biodiversity. This theory is based on a mechanism by which new species arise similarly to point mutations in a population without sexual reproduction. Here we report the simulation of populations with sexual reproduction, mutation and dispersal. We found simulated time dependence of speciation rates, species-area relationships and species abundance distributions consistent with the behaviours found in nature. From our results, we predict steady speciation rates, more species in one-dimensional environments than two-dimensional environments, three scaling regimes of species-area relationships and lognormal distributions of species abundance with an excess of rare species and a tail that may be approximated by Fisher's logarithmic series. These are consistent with dependences reported for, among others, global birds and flowering plants, marine invertebrate fossils, ray-finned fishes, British birds and moths, North American songbirds, mammal fossils from Kansas and Panamanian shrubs. Quantitative comparisons of specific cases are remarkably successful. Our biodiversity results provide additional evidence that species diversity arises without specific physical barriers. This is similar to heavy traffic flows, where traffic jams can form even without accidents or barriers. PMID:19606148

  5. Alternate Alternates: A Medley of Alternate Assessments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burdette, Paula J.; Olsen, Ken

    This paper highlights eight states that have implemented alternate assessments for children with disabilities who cannot participate in their state and district-wide assessment programs. The alternate assessment systems in Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Indiana, Minnesota, North Dakota, Utah, and West Virginia are briefly described, along with their…

  6. Fast valve

    DOEpatents

    Van Dyke, W.J.

    1992-04-07

    A fast valve is disclosed that can close on the order of 7 milliseconds. It is closed by the force of a compressed air spring with the moving parts of the valve designed to be of very light weight and the valve gate being of wedge shaped with O-ring sealed faces to provide sealing contact without metal to metal contact. The combination of the O-ring seal and an air cushion create a soft final movement of the valve closure to prevent the fast air acting valve from having a harsh closing. 4 figs.

  7. Fast valve

    DOEpatents

    Van Dyke, William J.

    1992-01-01

    A fast valve is disclosed that can close on the order of 7 milliseconds. It is closed by the force of a compressed air spring with the moving parts of the valve designed to be of very light weight and the valve gate being of wedge shaped with O-ring sealed faces to provide sealing contact without metal to metal contact. The combination of the O-ring seal and an air cushion create a soft final movement of the valve closure to prevent the fast air acting valve from having a harsh closing.

  8. EPA’s SPECIATE 4.4 Database:Development and Uses

    EPA Science Inventory

    SPECIATE is the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA)repository of volatile organic gas and particulate matter (PM) speciation profiles for air pollution sources. EPA released SPECIATE 4.4 in early 2014 and, in total, the SPECIATE 4.4 database includes 5,728 PM, VOC, total...

  9. EPA’s SPECIATE 4.4 Database: Development and Uses

    EPA Science Inventory

    SPECIATE is the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA)repository of volatile organic gas and particulate matter (PM) speciation profiles for air pollution sources. EPA released SPECIATE 4.4 in early 2014 and, in total, the SPECIATE 4.4 database includes 5,728 PM, VOC, total...

  10. EPA’s SPECIATE 4.4 Database: Bridging Data Sources and Data Users

    EPA Science Inventory

    SPECIATE is the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA)repository of volatile organic gas and particulate matter (PM) speciation profiles for air pollution sources. EPA released SPECIATE 4.4 in early 2014 and, in total, the SPECIATE 4.4 database includes 5,728 PM, VOC, total...

  11. Alternative Therapies

    MedlinePlus

    ... Late Effects of Poliomyelitis for Physicians and Survivors © Alternative Therapies Alternative therapies, also called complementary, can support ... of motion, pain, and fatigue are often reported. Energy work includes acupuncture and acupressure, traditional Chinese medicine ...

  12. Project FAST.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Essexville-Hampton Public Schools, MI.

    Described are components of Project FAST (Functional Analysis Systems Training) a nationally validated project to provide more effective educational and support services to learning disordered children and their regular elementary classroom teachers. The program is seen to be based on a series of modules of delivery systems ranging from mainstream…

  13. Ecological speciation in an island snail: evidence for the parallel evolution of a novel ecotype and maintenance by ecologically dependent postzygotic isolation.

    PubMed

    Stankowski, Sean

    2013-05-01

    Speciation is the process by which reproductive isolation evolves between populations. Two general models of speciation have been proposed: ecological speciation, where reproductive barriers evolve due to ecologically based divergent selection, and mutation-order speciation, where populations fix different mutations as they adapt to similar selection pressures. I evaluate these alternative models and determine the progress of speciation in a diverse group of land snails, genus Rhagada, inhabiting Rosemary Island. A recently derived keeled-flat morphotype occupies two isolated rocky hills, while globose-shelled snails inhabit the surrounding plains. The study of one hill reveals that they are separated by a narrow hybrid zone. As predicted by ecological speciation theory, there are local and landscape level associations between shell shape and habitat, and the morphological transition coincides with a narrow ecotone between the two distinct environments. Microsatellite DNA revealed a cline of hybrid index scores much wider than the morphological cline, further supporting the ecological maintenance of the morphotypes. The hybrid zone does not run through an area of low population density, as is expected for mutation-order hybrid zones, and there is a unimodal distribution of phenotypes at the centre, suggesting that there is little or no prezygotic isolation. Instead, these data suggest that the ecotypes are maintained by ecologically dependent postzygotic isolation (i.e. ecological selection against hybrids). Mitochondrial and Microsatellite DNA indicate that the keeled-flat form evolved recently, and without major historical disruptions to gene flow. The data also suggest that the two keeled-flat populations, inhabiting similar rocky hills, have evolved in parallel. These snails provide a complex example of ecological speciation in its early stages. PMID:23506623

  14. PM2.5 speciation -- objectives, requirements, and approach

    SciTech Connect

    Homolya, J.B.; Rice, J.; Scheffe, R.D.

    1998-12-31

    Chemical speciation of selected PM2.5 monitor samples is included in the discussion of major monitoring requirements and principles described in the Part 58 Rule. The regulation requires the implementation of a modest chemical speciation network of 50 PM2.5 sites that provides a first order characterization of the metals, ions, and carbon constituents of PM2.5. These data are to be used to support several areas of interest, including: (1) Helping to implement the PM2.5 standard through the use of speciated data as inputs to air quality modeling analyses and as indicators to track progress of controls; (2) Aiding the interpretation of health studies by linking effects to PM2.5 constituents; (3) Understanding the effects of atmospheric constituents on visibility impairment; and (4) Using speciated particulate data to aid in monitoring network design and siting adjustment. For these reasons, EPA has developed plans for the initial 50-site speciation monitoring network that include collocating at least 25 monitors within the Photochemical Air Monitoring System (PAMS) which collect data for a range of volatile hazardous air pollutants and ozone. Therefore these initial speciation sites will provide EPA and the research community a baseline of gaseous and particulate atmospheric characterization information. Current plans include the outfitting of up to 300 PM2.5 speciation monitoring sites. The speciation monitors are currently being fabricated under EPA National Federal Reference Method monitor procurement contracts and are projected to begin to be deployed in 10/98. This paper will present a detailed discussion of the design and implementation of the speciation monitoring network and explain EPA`s approach to implementation of the monitoring activities which includes siting, target analytes of interest, sample handling, analytical SOPs, and data reduction, validation and reporting.

  15. Fast electrochemical actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uvarov, I. V.; Postnikov, A. V.; Svetovoy, V. B.

    2016-03-01

    Lack of fast and strong microactuators is a well-recognized problem in MEMS community. Electrochemical actuators can develop high pressure but they are notoriously slow. Water electrolysis produced by short voltage pulses of alternating polarity can overcome the problem of slow gas termination. Here we demonstrate an actuation regime, for which the gas pressure is relaxed just for 10 μs or so. The actuator consists of a microchamber filled with the electrolyte and covered with a flexible membrane. The membrane bends outward when the pressure in the chamber increases. Fast termination of gas and high pressure developed in the chamber are related to a high density of nanobubbles in the chamber. The physical processes happening in the chamber are discussed so as problems that have to be resolved for practical applications of this actuation regime. The actuator can be used as a driving engine for microfluidics.

  16. Lead Speciation in remote Mountain Lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plöger, A.; van den Berg, C. M. G.

    2003-04-01

    In natural waters trace metals can become complexed by organic matter. This complexation can change the geochemistry of the metals by preventing them being scavenged, thereby increasing their residence time in the water column. The chemical speciation of trace metals also affects the bioavalability and their toxicological impact on organisms. It is therefore important to determine the chemical speciation of trace metals as well as their concentrations. Mountain lakes have been less studied in the past than other lakes- partly because of their remoteness and partly because they were perceived to be unpolluted and undisturbed. But work so far on mountain lakes has shown that most sites are affected and threatened, for example by transboundary air pollutants like trace metals. One of the important features that distinguishes these lakes from lowland lakes at similar latitudes is the fact that they may be isolated from the atmosphere for six months or more during the winter by a thick ice cover. Also, as these lakes are remote from direct anthropogenic influences, they reflect the regional distribution of pollutants transferred via the atmosphere. For this work, under the framework of the EMERGE (European Mountain lake Ecosystems: Regionalisation, diaGnostic and socio-economic Evaluation) programme, two remote mountain lakes have been studied in detail, with water sampling taking place at different times of the year to investigate possible seasonal differences in lead concentrations and speciation. Results so far have shown that lead-complexing ligand concentrations are in excess to dissolved lead concentrations, indicating that dissolved lead probably occurs fully complexed in these lakes. Therefore the toxic fraction is likely to be less than the dissolved lead concentration. Also, lead concentrations at the time of the spring thaw are higher than autumn concentrations just before ice cover, indicating that a significant proportion of fallout onto the lake catchment

  17. Genome-wide congealing and rapid transitions across the speciation continuum during speciation with gene flow.

    PubMed

    Feder, Jeffrey L; Nosil, Patrik; Wacholder, Aaron C; Egan, Scott P; Berlocher, Stewart H; Flaxman, Samuel M

    2014-01-01

    Our current understanding of speciation is often based on considering a relatively small number of genes, sometimes in isolation of one another. Here, we describe a possible emergent genome process involving the aggregate effect of many genes contributing to the evolution of reproductive isolation across the speciation continuum. When a threshold number of divergently selected mutations of modest to low fitness effects accumulate between populations diverging with gene flow, nonlinear transitions can occur in which levels of adaptive differentiation, linkage disequilibrium, and reproductive isolation dramatically increase. In effect, the genomes of the populations start to "congeal" into distinct entities representing different species. At this stage, reproductive isolation changes from being a characteristic of specific, divergently selected genes to a property of the genome. We examine conditions conducive to such genome-wide congealing (GWC), describe how to empirically test for GWC, and highlight a putative empirical example involving Rhagoletis fruit flies. We conclude with cautious optimism that the models and concepts discussed here, once extended to large numbers of neutral markers, may provide a framework for integrating information from genome scans, selection experiments, quantitative trait loci mapping, association studies, and natural history to develop a deeper understanding of the genomics of speciation. PMID:25149256

  18. Mercury speciation in the Adriatic Sea.

    PubMed

    Kotnik, Jože; Horvat, Milena; Ogrinc, Nives; Fajon, Vesna; Žagar, Dušan; Cossa, Daniel; Sprovieri, Francesca; Pirrone, Nicola

    2015-07-15

    Mercury and its speciation were studied in surface and deep waters of the Adriatic Sea. Several mercury species (i.e. DGM – dissolved gaseous Hg, RHg – reactive Hg, THg – total Hg, MeHg – monomethyl Hg and DMeHg – dimethylmercury) together with other water parameters were measured in coastal and open sea deep water profiles. THg concentrations in the water column, as well as in sediments and pore waters, were the highest in the northern, most polluted part of the Adriatic Sea as the consequence of Hg mining in Idrija and the heavy industry of northern Italy. Certain profiles in the South Adriatic Pit exhibit an increase of DGM just over the bottom due to its diffusion from sediment as a consequence of microbial and/or tectonic activity. Furthermore, a Hg mass balance for the Adriatic Sea was calculated based on measurements and literature data. PMID:26013591

  19. Genetics of ecological divergence during speciation

    PubMed Central

    Arnegard, Matthew E.; McGee, Matthew D.; Matthews, Blake; Marchinko, Kerry B.; Conte, Gina L.; Kabir, Sahriar; Bedford, Nicole; Bergek, Sara; Chan, Yingguang Frank; Jones, Felicity C.; Kingsley, David M.; Peichel, Catherine L.; Schluter, Dolph

    2014-01-01

    Ecological differences often evolve early in speciation as divergent natural selection drives adaptation to distinct ecological niches, leading ultimately to reproductive isolation. Though this process is a major generator of biodiversity, its genetic basis remains poorly understood. Here we investigate the genetic architecture of niche differentiation in a sympatric species pair of threespine stickleback fish by mapping the environment-dependent effects of phenotypic traits on hybrid feeding and performance under semi-natural conditions. We show that multiple, unlinked loci act largely additively to determine position along the major niche axis separating these recently diverged species. We also find that functional mismatch between phenotypic traits reduces growth of some stickleback hybrids beyond that expected from an intermediate phenotype, suggesting a role for epistasis between the underlying genes. This functional mismatch might lead to hybrid incompatibilities that are analogous to those underlying intrinsic reproductive isolation but that depend on the ecological context. PMID:24909991

  20. NICKEL SPECIATION OF URBAN PARTICULATE MATTER

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin C. Galbreath; Charlene R. Crocker; Carolyn M. Nyberg; Frank E. Huggins; Gerald P. Huffman

    2003-10-01

    A four-step sequential Ni extraction method, summarized in Table AB-1, was evaluated for identifying and quantifying the Ni species occurring in urban total suspended particulate (TSP) matter and fine particulate matter (<10 {micro}m [PM{sub 10}] and <2.5 {micro}m [PM{sub 2.5}] in aerodynamic diameter). The extraction method was originally developed for quantifying soluble, sulfidic, elemental, and oxidic forms of Ni that may occur in industrial atmospheres. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy were used to evaluate the Ni species selectivity of the extraction method. Uncertainties in the chemical speciation of Ni in urban PM{sub 10} and PM{sub 2.5} greatly affect inhalation health risk estimates, primarily because of the large variability in acute, chronic, and cancer-causing effects for different Ni compounds.

  1. Carbon speciation and surface tension of fog

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Capel, P.D.; Gunde, R.; Zurcher, F.; Giger, W.

    1990-01-01

    The speciation of carbon (dissolved/particulate, organic/inorganic) and surface tension of a number of radiation fogs from the urban area of Zurich, Switzerland, were measured. The carbon species were dominated by "dissolved" organic carbon (DOC; i.e., the fraction that passes through a filter), which was typically present at levels of 40-200 mg/L. Less than 10% of the DOC was identified as specific individual organic compounds. Particulate organic carbon (POC) accounted for 26-41% of the mass of the particles, but usually less than 10% of the total organic carbon mass. Inorganic carbon species were relatively minor. The surface tensions of all the measured samples were less than pure water and were correlated with their DOC concentrations. The combination of high DOC and POC and low surface tension suggests a mechanism for the concentration of hydrophobic organic contaminants in the fog droplet, which have been observed by numerous investigators. ?? 1990 American Chemical Society.

  2. Chemical speciation of radionuclides migrating in groundwaters

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, D.; Schilk, A.; Abel, K.; Lepel, E.; Thomas, C.; Pratt, S.; Cooper, E.; Hartwig, P.; Killey, R.

    1994-04-01

    In order to more accurately predict the rates and mechanisms of radionuclide migration from low-level waste disposal facilities via groundwater transport, ongoing studies are being conducted at field sites at Chalk River Laboratories to identify and characterize the chemical speciation of mobile, long-lived radionuclides migrating in groundwaters. Large-volume water sampling techniques are being utilized to separate and concentrate radionuclides into particular, cationic, anionic, and nonionic chemical forms. Most radionuclides are migrating as soluble, anionic species that appear to be predominantly organoradionuclide complexes. Laboratory studies utilizing anion exchange chromatography have separated several anionically complexed radionuclides, e.g., {sup 60}Co and {sup 106}Ru, into a number of specific compounds or groups of compounds. Further identification of the anionic organoradionuclide complexes is planned utilizing high resolution mass spectrometry. Large-volume ultra-filtration experiments are characterizing the particulate forms of radionuclides being transported in these groundwaters.

  3. Speciation of arsenic in sulfidic waters

    PubMed Central

    Wilkin, Richard T; Wallschläger, Dirk; Ford, Robert G

    2003-01-01

    Formation constants for thioarsenite species have been determined in dilute solutions at 25°C, ΣH2S from 10-7.5 to 10-3.0 M, ΣAs from 10-5.6 to 10-4.8 M, and pH 7 and 10. The principal inorganic arsenic species in anoxic aquatic systems are arsenite, As(OH)30, and a mononuclear thioarsenite with an S/As ratio of 3:1. Thioarsenic species with S/As ratios of 1 : 1,2 : 1, and 4 : 1 are lesser components in sulfidic solutions that might be encountered in natural aquatic environments. Thioarsenites dominate arsenic speciation at sulfide concentrations > 10-4.3 M at neutral pH. Conversion from neutral As(OH)30 to anionic thioarsenite species may regulate the transport and fate of arsenic in sulfate-reducing environments by governing sorption and mineral precipitation reactions.

  4. Horizontal Gene Transfer, Dispersal and Haloarchaeal Speciation

    PubMed Central

    Papke, R. Thane; Corral, Paulina; Ram-Mohan, Nikhil; de la Haba, Rafael R.; Sánchez-Porro, Cristina; Makkay, Andrea; Ventosa, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    The Halobacteria are a well-studied archaeal class and numerous investigations are showing how their diversity is distributed amongst genomes and geographic locations. Evidence indicates that recombination between species continuously facilitates the arrival of new genes, and within species, it is frequent enough to spread acquired genes amongst all individuals in the population. To create permanent independent diversity and generate new species, barriers to recombination are probably required. The data support an interpretation that rates of evolution (e.g., horizontal gene transfer and mutation) are faster at creating geographically localized variation than dispersal and invasion are at homogenizing genetic differences between locations. Therefore, we suggest that recurrent episodes of dispersal followed by variable periods of endemism break the homogenizing forces of intrapopulation recombination and that this process might be the principal stimulus leading to divergence and speciation in Halobacteria. PMID:25997110

  5. Fast Ignitor coupling physics

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, R.J.; Tabak, M.

    1997-10-01

    The Fast Ignitor is an alternate approach to ICF in which short pulse lasers are used to initiate burn at the surface of the compressed DT fuel. The aim is to avoid the need for careful central focusing of final shocks, and possibly to lower substantially the energy requirements for ignition. Ultimately, both goals may prove crucial to Science Based Stockpile Stewardship (SBSS). This will be the case should either emerging energetic needs, or finding difficulties render the presently planned radiative fusion approach to ignition with the NIF impractical. Ignition is a first step towards the achievement of substantial energy and neutron outputs for such Stewardship.

  6. Nitrogen speciation in mantle and crustal fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuan; Keppler, Hans

    2014-03-01

    Seventy-nine experiments have been carried out at 600-1400 °C, 2-35 kbar, and oxygen fugacities ranging from the Fe-FeO to the Re-ReO2 buffer to investigate the nitrogen speciation in mantle and crustal N-H-O fluids. Laser Raman analyses of fluid inclusions trapped in situ in quartz and olivine crystals show that N2 and/or NH3 are the only detectable nitrogen species in the fluids at the conditions of the present study. The results further show that in the fluids of the oxidized shallow upper mantle, nitrogen is mostly present as N2, while in the deep reduced upper mantle, NH3 is the dominant nitrogen species. Nitrogen speciation in subduction zone fluids is also calculated from the experimental data to constrain the efficiency of nitrogen recycling. The data show that a hot, oxidized slab is an efficient barrier for deep nitrogen subduction, while a cold, reduced slab would favor recycling nitrogen into the deep mantle. The nitrogen species in magmatic fluids of mid-ocean ridge basalt and arc magmas are predominantly N2, but a significant fraction of nitrogen can be NH3 at certain conditions. The nitrogen species in fluids released from the solidifying magma ocean and the reduced young mantle may have been mostly NH3. The release of such fluids may have created a reduced atmosphere on the every early Earth, with an elevated concentration of NH3. This may not only resolve the faint young Sun paradox but may also have created favorable conditions for the formation of biomolecules through Miller-Urey type reactions.

  7. A mechanistic accounting of SOM speciation and kinetics in soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggi, F.; Riley, W. J.; Guerry, N.; Torn, M. S.; Kleber, M.

    2012-12-01

    The nature and dynamics of soil organic matter (SOM) are arguably far from being understood and accurately represented in current site, regional, and global land use and climate models. Whereas consolidated models make use of aggregated pools describing SOM with characteristic turnover times such as inert, passive, slow cycling, and fast cycling, or linking the turnover time to the molecular weight of the compound, recent analyses of SOM below the top soil suggest that those approaches only partially capture SOM dynamics, and that SOM stability may largely be determined by biological and chemical protection as well as other environmental factors rather than the molecular structure of the compound and its molecular weight. We introduce here a new paradigm of SOM speciation and kinetics that explicitly decouples the assumed recalcitrance and turnover time from the SOM molecular density and structure in favour of a mechanistic accounting of microbially mediated processes and chemo-physical interactions among the various SOM species and soil environment. These processes include microbial assimilation, respiration and C recycling; depolymerization of solid litter, root exudates, and dead cells into various decomposed SOM groups; and incorporation of soluble SOM species into a protected phase not available to chemical and biological agents. SOM was described by means of functional compounds including mono- and polysaccharides, lignin, amino compounds, organic acids, nucleic acids, lipids, and phenols, each being accounted for by one or more representative species in the model. Fungal and bacterial microbial functional groups were used to characterize depolymerization and respiration rates. The SOM reaction network and characteristics, its mathematical inclusion within the TOUGHREACT framework, and some preliminary results of modeling grasslands and forested ecosystems are presented here. Biogeochemical reaction network of SOC pathways. Steady state vertical contentration

  8. Male competition fitness landscapes predict both forward and reverse speciation.

    PubMed

    Keagy, Jason; Lettieri, Liliana; Boughman, Janette W

    2016-01-01

    Speciation is facilitated when selection generates a rugged fitness landscape such that populations occupy different peaks separated by valleys. Competition for food resources is a strong ecological force that can generate such divergent selection. However, it is unclear whether intrasexual competition over resources that provide mating opportunities can generate rugged fitness landscapes that foster speciation. Here we use highly variable male F2 hybrids of benthic and limnetic threespine sticklebacks, Gasterosteus aculeatus Linnaeus, 1758, to quantify the male competition fitness landscape. We find that disruptive sexual selection generates two fitness peaks corresponding closely to the male phenotypes of the two parental species, favouring divergence. Most surprisingly, an additional region of high fitness favours novel hybrid phenotypes that correspond to those observed in a recent case of reverse speciation after anthropogenic disturbance. Our results reveal that sexual selection through male competition plays an integral role in both forward and reverse speciation. PMID:26612568

  9. ACTINIDE-ALUMINATE SPECIATION IN ALKALINE RADIOACTIVE WASTE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Highly alkaline radioactive waste tanks contain a number of transuranic species, in particular U, Np, Pu, and Am - the exact forms of which are currently unknown. Knowledge of actinide speciation under highly alkaline conditions is essential towards understanding and predicting ...

  10. Polyploidy in relation to plant evolution and speciation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polyploidy is a dominant force in plant evolution and speciation. Allopolyploids, resulting from interspecific or intergeneric hybridization coupled with chromosome doubling, are preponderant in nature. For the meiotic and reproductive stability of the allopolyploids, a precise genetic control of ...

  11. PARTICLE SPECIATION AND EMISSION PROFILES OF SMALL 2-STROKE ENGINES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Human Exposure and Atmospheric Sciences Division (HEASD) conducts studies designed to acquire information from emission sources for use in source apportionment studies. The objective of this work is to characterize a complete, speciated emission profile (PM and air toxics) ...

  12. Speciation, Ecological Opportunity, and Latitude (American Society of Naturalists Address).

    PubMed

    Schluter, Dolph

    2016-01-01

    Evolutionary hypotheses to explain the greater numbers of species in the tropics than the temperate zone include greater age and area, higher temperature and metabolic rates, and greater ecological opportunity. These ideas make contrasting predictions about the relationship between speciation processes and latitude, which I elaborate and evaluate. Available data suggest that per capita speciation rates are currently highest in the temperate zone and that diversification rates (speciation minus extinction) are similar between latitudes. In contrast, clades whose oldest analyzed dates precede the Eocene thermal maximum, when the extent of the tropics was much greater than today, tend to show highest speciation and diversification rates in the tropics. These findings are consistent with age and area, which is alone among hypotheses in predicting a time trend. Higher recent speciation rates in the temperate zone than the tropics suggest an additional response to high ecological opportunity associated with low species diversity. These broad patterns are compelling but provide limited insights into underlying mechanisms, arguing that studies of speciation processes along the latitudinal gradient will be vital. Using threespine stickleback in depauperate northern lakes as an example, I show how high ecological opportunity can lead to rapid speciation. The results support a role for ecological opportunity in speciation, but its importance in the evolution of the latitudinal gradient remains uncertain. I conclude that per capita evolutionary rates are no longer higher in the tropics than the temperate zone. Nevertheless, the vast numbers of species that have already accumulated in the tropics ensure that total rate of species production remains highest there. Thus, tropical evolutionary momentum helps to perpetuate the steep latitudinal biodiversity gradient. PMID:26814593

  13. Ecological Impacts of Reverse Speciation in Threespine Stickleback.

    PubMed

    Rudman, Seth M; Schluter, Dolph

    2016-02-22

    Young species are highly prone to extinction via increased gene flow after human-caused environmental changes. This mechanism of biodiversity loss, often termed reverse speciation or introgressive extinction, is of exceptional interest because the parent species are typically highly differentiated ecologically. Reverse speciation events are potentially powerful case studies for the role of evolution in driving ecological changes, as the phenotypic shifts associated with introgressive extinction can be large and they occur over particularly short timescales. Furthermore, reverse speciation can lead to novel phenotypes, which may in turn produce novel ecological effects. Here we investigate the ecological shift associated with reverse speciation in threespine stickleback fish using a field study and a replicated experiment. We find that an instance of introgressive extinction had cascading ecological consequences that altered the abundance of both aquatic prey and the pupating aquatic insects that emerged into the terrestrial ecosystem. The community and ecosystem impacts of reverse speciation were novel, and yet they were also predictable based on ecological and morphological considerations. The study suggests that knowledge about the community ecology and changes in functional morphology of a dominant species may lead to some predictive power for the ecological effects of evolutionary change. Moreover, the rapid nature and resultant ecological impacts associated with reverse speciation demonstrates the interplay between biodiversity, evolutionary change, and ecosystem function. PMID:26804556

  14. How humans drive speciation as well as extinction

    PubMed Central

    Maron, M.

    2016-01-01

    A central topic for conservation science is evaluating how human activities influence global species diversity. Humanity exacerbates extinction rates. But by what mechanisms does humanity drive the emergence of new species? We review human-mediated speciation, compare speciation and known extinctions, and discuss the challenges of using net species diversity as a conservation objective. Humans drive rapid evolution through relocation, domestication, hunting and novel ecosystem creation—and emerging technologies could eventually provide additional mechanisms. The number of species relocated, domesticated and hunted during the Holocene is of comparable magnitude to the number of observed extinctions. While instances of human-mediated speciation are known, the overall effect these mechanisms have upon speciation rates has not yet been quantified. We also explore the importance of anthropogenic influence upon divergence in microorganisms. Even if human activities resulted in no net loss of species diversity by balancing speciation and extinction rates, this would probably be deemed unacceptable. We discuss why, based upon ‘no net loss’ conservation literature—considering phylogenetic diversity and other metrics, risk aversion, taboo trade-offs and spatial heterogeneity. We conclude that evaluating speciation alongside extinction could result in more nuanced understanding of biosphere trends, clarifying what it is we actually value about biodiversity. PMID:27358365

  15. How humans drive speciation as well as extinction.

    PubMed

    Bull, J W; Maron, M

    2016-06-29

    A central topic for conservation science is evaluating how human activities influence global species diversity. Humanity exacerbates extinction rates. But by what mechanisms does humanity drive the emergence of new species? We review human-mediated speciation, compare speciation and known extinctions, and discuss the challenges of using net species diversity as a conservation objective. Humans drive rapid evolution through relocation, domestication, hunting and novel ecosystem creation-and emerging technologies could eventually provide additional mechanisms. The number of species relocated, domesticated and hunted during the Holocene is of comparable magnitude to the number of observed extinctions. While instances of human-mediated speciation are known, the overall effect these mechanisms have upon speciation rates has not yet been quantified. We also explore the importance of anthropogenic influence upon divergence in microorganisms. Even if human activities resulted in no net loss of species diversity by balancing speciation and extinction rates, this would probably be deemed unacceptable. We discuss why, based upon 'no net loss' conservation literature-considering phylogenetic diversity and other metrics, risk aversion, taboo trade-offs and spatial heterogeneity. We conclude that evaluating speciation alongside extinction could result in more nuanced understanding of biosphere trends, clarifying what it is we actually value about biodiversity. PMID:27358365

  16. Speciation in birds: Genes, geography, and sexual selection

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Scott V.; Kingan, Sarah B.; Calkins, Jennifer D.; Balakrishnan, Christopher N.; Jennings, W. Bryan; Swanson, Willie J.; Sorenson, Michael D.

    2005-01-01

    Molecular studies of speciation in birds over the last three decades have been dominated by a focus on the geography, ecology, and timing of speciation, a tradition traceable to Mayr's Systematics and the Origin of Species. However, in the recent years, interest in the behavioral and molecular mechanisms of speciation in birds has increased, building in part on the older traditions and observations from domesticated species. The result is that many of the same mechanisms proffered for model lineages such as Drosophila—mechanisms such as genetic incompatibilities, reinforcement, and sexual selection—are now being seriously entertained for birds, albeit with much lower resolution. The recent completion of a draft sequence of the chicken genome, and an abundance of single-nucleotide polymorphisms on the autosomes and sex chromosomes, will dramatically accelerate research on the molecular mechanisms of avian speciation over the next few years. The challenge for ornithologists is now to inform well studied examples of speciation in nature with increased molecular resolution—to clone speciation genes if they exist—and thereby evaluate the relative roles of extrinsic, intrinsic, deterministic, and stochastic causes for avian diversification. PMID:15851678

  17. A new specific polymeric material for mercury speciation: Application to environmental and food samples.

    PubMed

    Zarco-Fernández, S; Mancheño, M J; Muñoz-Olivas, R; Cámara, C

    2015-10-15

    A new polymeric material (Patent: P201400535) highly specific for mercury is presented. Its great capability to pre-concentrate and selectively elute inorganic mercury and methylmercury are the main figures of merit. The polymer can be reused several times. To our knowledge, this is the only polymer proposed in the literature for direct inorganic mercury and methylmercury speciation without need of chromatography or quantification by difference. The polymer formation is based on the reaction of a vinyl derivative of 8-hydroxiquinoline as monomer, and 2-(Methacryloylamino) ethyl 2-Methyl Acrylate (NOBE) as co-monomer. Random radical polymerization by the precipitation method was carried out using Azobisisobutyronitrile (AIBN) as initiator. The polymer was characterized by SEM and FTIR. Adsorption binding isotherms were evaluated using Langmuir and Freundlich models, showing high adsorption capacity for both inorganic and organic mercury species. The polymer was employed to sequentially determine inorganic mercury and methylmercury, using a solid phase extraction (SPE) scheme. Cross reactivity of several ions, as well as matrix effects from a high saline matrix like seawater was irrelevant as the retained fractions mostly eluted during the washing step. The procedure was first validated by analyzing a certified reference material (BCR 464) and finally applied to commercial fish samples. The speciation proposed procedure is cheap, fast, and easy to use and minimizes reagents waste. PMID:26515012

  18. Breakdown in the Process of Incipient Speciation in Anopheles gambiae

    PubMed Central

    Nwakanma, Davis C.; Neafsey, Daniel E.; Jawara, Musa; Adiamoh, Majidah; Lund, Emily; Rodrigues, Amabelia; Loua, Kovana M.; Konate, Lassana; Sy, Ngayo; Dia, Ibrahima; Awolola, T. Samson; Muskavitch, Marc A. T.; Conway, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding genetic causes and effects of speciation in sympatric populations of sexually reproducing eukaryotes is challenging, controversial, and of practical importance for controlling rapidly evolving pests and pathogens. The major African malaria vector mosquito Anopheles gambiae sensu stricto (s.s.) is considered to contain two incipient species with strong reproductive isolation, hybrids between the M and S molecular forms being very rare. Following recent observations of higher proportions of hybrid forms at a few sites in West Africa, we conducted new surveys of 12 sites in four contiguous countries (The Gambia, Senegal, Guinea-Bissau, and Republic of Guinea). Identification and genotyping of 3499 A. gambiae s.s. revealed high frequencies of M/S hybrid forms at each site, ranging from 5 to 42%, and a large spectrum of inbreeding coefficient values from 0.11 to 0.76, spanning most of the range expected between the alternative extremes of panmixia and assortative mating. Year-round sampling over 2 years at one of the sites in The Gambia showed that M/S hybrid forms had similar relative frequencies throughout periods of marked seasonal variation in mosquito breeding and abundance. Genome-wide scans with an Affymetrix high-density single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) microarray enabled replicate comparisons of pools of different molecular forms, in three separate populations. These showed strong differentiation between M and S forms only in the pericentromeric region of the X chromosome that contains the molecular form-specific marker locus, with only a few other loci showing minor differences. In the X chromosome, the M/S hybrid forms were more differentiated from M than from S forms, supporting a hypothesis of asymmetric introgression and backcrossing. PMID:23335339

  19. Fast ignitor coupling physics

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, R.J.; Tabak, M.

    1997-10-01

    The Fast Ignitor is an alternate approach to ICF in which short pulse lasers are used to initiate burn at the surface of the compressed DT fuel. The aim is to avoid the need for careful central focusing of final shocks, and possibly to lower substantially the energy requirements for ignition. Ultimately, both goals may prove crucial to Science Based Stockpile Stewardship (SBSS). This will be the case should either emerging energetic needs, or funding difficulties render the presently planned radiative fusion approach to ignition with the NIF impractical. Ignition is a first step towards the achievement of substantial energy and neutron outputs for such Stewardship. For success with the Fast Ignitor, the laser energy must be efficiently deposited into megavolt electrons (suprathermal), which must, in turn, couple to the background ions within an alpha particle range. To understand the electron fuel coupling, we have used ANTHEM plasma simulation code to model the transport of hot electrons generated by an intense short pulse laser into plasma targets over a broad range of densities. Our study will spell out the acceleration and transport mechanisms active in the Fast Ignitor environment.

  20. Iodine speciation in rain, snow and aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilfedder, B. S.; Lai, S. C.; Petri, M.; Biester, H.; Hoffmann, T.

    2008-10-01

    Iodine oxides, such as iodate, should be the only thermodynamically stable sink species for iodine in the troposphere. However, field observations have increasingly found very little iodate and significant amounts of iodide and soluble organically bound iodine (SOI) in precipitation and aerosols. The aim of this study was to investigate iodine speciation, including the organic fraction, in rain, snow, and aerosols in an attempt to further clarify aqueous phase iodine chemistry. Diurnal aerosol samples were taken with a 5 stage cascade impactor and a virtual impactor (PM2.5) from the Mace Head research station, Ireland, during summer 2006. Rain was collected from Australia, New Zealand, Patagonia, Germany, Ireland, and Switzerland and snow was obtained from Greenland, Germany, Switzerland, and New Zealand. Aerosols were extracted from the filters with water and all samples were analysed for total soluble iodine (TSI) by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and iodine speciation was determined by coupling an ion chromatography unit to the ICP-MS. The median concentration of TSI in aerosols from Mace Head was 222 pmol m-3 (summed over all impactor stages) of which the majority was associated with the SOI fraction (median day: 90±4%, night: 94±2% of total iodine). Iodide exhibited higher concentrations than iodate (median 6% vs. 1.2% of total iodine), and displayed significant enrichment during the day compared to the night. Interestingly, up to 5 additional, presumably anionic iodo-organic peaks were observed in all IC-ICP-MS chromatograms, composing up to 15% of the TSI. Soluble organically bound iodine was also the dominant fraction in all rain and snow samples, with lesser amounts of iodide and iodate (iodate was particularly low in snow). Two of the same unidentified peaks found in aerosols were also observed in precipitation from both Southern and Northern Hemispheres. This suggests that these species are transferred from the aerosols into

  1. Analytical speciation of chromium in in-vitro cultures of chromate-resistant filamentous fungi.

    PubMed

    Acevedo Aguilar, Francisco Javier; Wrobel, Kazimierz; Lokits, Kirk; Caruso, Joseph A; Coreño Alonso, Alejandro; Gutiérrez Corona, J Felix; Wrobel, Katarzyna

    2008-09-01

    In this work, different analytical speciation schemes have been used to study the reduction of Cr(VI) by a chromate-resistant strain of filamentous fungi Ed8 (Aspergillus sp), indigenous to contaminated industrial wastes. As demonstrated previously, this strain has the capability to reduce chromate present in the growth medium without its accumulation in the biomass, yet the reduced chromium end-products have not been characterized. Liquid growth medium, initially containing 50 mg L(-1) Cr(VI), was analyzed for Cr(III)/Cr(VI) and for total Cr at different time intervals (0-24 h) after inoculation with fungi. Three hyphenated procedures, based on the Cr(III)-EDTA formation and species separation by anion-exchange or ion-pairing reversed-phase chromatography with ICP-MS or DAD detection were used. The results obtained for Cr(VI) in each case were consistent, demonstrating efficient reduction of chromate during 24 h of Ed8 growth. However, pre-column complexation with EDTA did not ensure complete recovery of the reduced forms of chromium in the above procedures. An alternative speciation scheme, based on extraction of Cr(VI)-benzyltributylammonium bromide (BTAB) ion pairs into chloroform and subsequent determination of residual chromium by ICP-MS has provided evidence on the effective conversion of chromate into reduced chromium species in the growth medium. The results indicate the feasibility of using Ed8 strain for chromate bioremediation purposes. Analytically it can be concluded that speciation of chromium in biological systems should not be limited to its two most common oxidation states, because the actual reduced chromium species are not converted quantitatively to Cr(III)-EDTA. PMID:18665354

  2. The biological speciation and toxicokinetics of aluminum.

    PubMed Central

    DeVoto, E; Yokel, R A

    1994-01-01

    This review discusses recent literature on the chemical and physiological factors that influence the absorption, distribution, and excretion of aluminum in mammals, with particular regard to gastrointestinal absorption and speciation in plasma. Humans encounter aluminum, a ubiquitous yet highly insoluble element in most forms, in foods, drinking water, and pharmaceuticals. Exposure also occurs by inhalation of dust and aerosols, particularly in occupational settings. Absorption from the gut depends largely on pH and the presence of complexing ligands, particularly carboxylic acids, with which the metal can form absorbable neutral aluminum species. Uremic animals and humans experience higher than normal body burdens of aluminum despite increased urinary clearance of the metal. In plasma, 80-90% of aluminum binds to transferrin, an iron-transport protein for which receptors exist in many tissue. The remaining fraction of plasma aluminum takes the form of small-molecule hydroxy species and small complexes with carboxylic acids, phosphate, and, to a much lesser degree, amino acids. Most of these species have not been observed in vivo but are predicted from equilibrium models derived from potentiometric methods and NMR investigations. These models predict that the major small-molecule aluminum species under plasma conditions are charged and hence unavailable for uptake into tissues. PMID:9738208

  3. Selenium speciation in flue desulfurization residues.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Liping; Cao, Yan; Li, Wenying; Xie, Kechang; Pan, Wei-Ping

    2011-01-01

    Flue gas from coal combustion contains significant amounts of volatile selenium (Se). The capture of Se in the flue gas desulfurization (FGD) scrubber unit has resulted in a generation of metal-laden residues. It is important to determine Se speciation to understand the environmental impact of its disposal. A simple method has been developed for selective inorganic Se(IV), Se(VI) and organic Se determination in the liquid-phase FGD residues by hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS). It has been determined that Se(IV), Se(VI) and organic Se can be accurately determined with detection limits (DL) of 0.05, 0.06 and 0.06 microg/L, respectively. The accuracy of the proposed method was evaluated by analyzing the certified reference material, NIST CRM 1632c, and also by analyzing spiked tap-water samples. Analysis indicates that the concentration of Se is high in FGD liquid residues and primarily exists in a reduced state as selenite (Se(IV)). The toxicity of Se(IV) is the strongest of all Se species. Flue gas desulfurization residues pose a serious environmental risk. PMID:21476358

  4. Speciation and phylogeography of giant petrels Macronectes.

    PubMed

    Techow, N M S M; O'Ryan, C; Phillips, R A; Gales, R; Marin, M; Patterson-Fraser, D; Quintana, F; Ritz, M S; Thompson, D R; Wanless, R M; Weimerskirch, H; Ryan, P G

    2010-02-01

    We examine global phylogeography of the two forms of giant petrel Macronectes spp. Although previously considered to be a single taxon, and despite debate over the status of some populations and the existence of minimal genetic data (one mitochondrial cytochrome b sequence per form), the current consensus based on morphology is that there are two species, Northern Giant Petrel M. halli and Southern Giant Petrel M. giganteus. This study examined genetic variation at cytochrome b as well as six microsatellite loci in giant petrels from 22 islands, representing most island groups at which the two species breed. Both markers support separate species status, although sequence divergence in cytochrome b was only 0.42% (corrected). Divergence was estimated to have occurred approximately 0.2mya, but with some colonies apparently separated for longer (up to 0.5 my). Three clades were found within giant petrels, which separated approximately 0.7mya, with the Southern Giant Petrel paraphyletic to a monophyletic Northern Giant Petrel. There was evidence of past fragmentation during the Pleistocene, with subsequent secondary contact within Southern Giant Petrels. The analysis also suggested a period of past population expansion that corresponded roughly to the timing of speciation and the separation of an ancestral giant petrel population from the fulmar Fulmarus clade. PMID:19755164

  5. Geographically multifarious phenotypic divergence during speciation

    PubMed Central

    Gompert, Zachariah; Lucas, Lauren K; Nice, Chris C; Fordyce, James A; Alex Buerkle, C; Forister, Matthew L

    2013-01-01

    Speciation is an important evolutionary process that occurs when barriers to gene flow evolve between previously panmictic populations. Although individual barriers to gene flow have been studied extensively, we know relatively little regarding the number of barriers that isolate species or whether these barriers are polymorphic within species. Herein, we use a series of field and lab experiments to quantify phenotypic divergence and identify possible barriers to gene flow between the butterfly species Lycaeides idas and Lycaeides melissa. We found evidence that L. idas and L. melissa have diverged along multiple phenotypic axes. Specifically, we identified major phenotypic differences in female oviposition preference and diapause initiation, and more moderate divergence in mate preference. Multiple phenotypic differences might operate as barriers to gene flow, as shown by correlations between genetic distance and phenotypic divergence and patterns of phenotypic variation in admixed Lycaeides populations. Although some of these traits differed primarily between species (e.g., diapause initiation), several traits also varied among conspecific populations (e.g., male mate preference and oviposition preference). PMID:23532669

  6. Speciation and distribution of cadmium and lead in salinized horizons of antrosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulgariu, D.; Bulgariu, L.; Astefanei, D.

    2009-04-01

    soils have been estimated on the basis of Raman and FT-IR spectra, recorded for fractions obtained after each extraction step. These data were correlated with those obtained by chemical analysis and UV-VIS spectrometry, and were used for to establish the type and weight of Cd and Pb speciation forms in studied antrosol. Our studies have been show that in medium and inferior horizons of hortic antrosols, the heavy metals have a general accumulation tendency, preferential by binding on organic matter and organic-mineral complexes, components with higher abundance in such type of soils. The selectivity and complexation mechanisms are controlled by speciation forms of the two metals. This phenomenon has two important consequences, the strong fixation of heavy metals in hortic antrosol and significant modification of structure and conformation of organic macromolecules. A specific phenomenon of hortic antrosols is that the accumulation rate of heavy metals is higher than levigation rate, and the mobile forms of these have a higher biodisponibility, being relative easy assimilated by plants. The progressive salinization of superior horizons of soils from glass houses, determined a sever perturbation of equilibrium between Cd and Pb speciation forms. In consequence these will have an accentuated migration tendency in superior horizons, as complexes with inorganic ligands, with a high mobility and biodsiponibility. The accumulation of soluble salts in superior horizons, and the formation of frangipane horizon (horizon of geochemical segregation of hortic antrosols) modified the ionic strength from soil solution and the thermodynamic activity of cadmium and lead species. Under these conditions, the levigation rate of cadmium and lead is higher than the accumulation rate, which means that the migration of these metals in soil solution occurs fast and in high concentrations. Acknowledgments The authors would like to acknowledge the financial support from Romanian Ministry of

  7. Speciation of triphenyltin compounds using Moessbauer spectroscopy. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Eng, G.

    1993-11-01

    Organotin compounds have been used widely as the active agent in antifouling marine paints. Organotin compounds, i.e., tributyltin compounds (TBTs) and triphenyltin compounds (TPTs) have been found to be effective in preventing the unwanted attachment and development of aquatic organisms such as barnacles, sea grass and hydroids on ships, hulls and underwater surfaces. However, these organotin compounds have been found to be toxic to non-targeted marine species as well. While speciation of tributyltins in environmental water systems has received much attention in the literature, little information concerning the speciation of triphenyltins is found. Therefore, it would be important to study the fate of TPTs in the aquatic environment, particularly in sediments, both oxic and anoxic, in order to obtain speciation data. Since marine estuaries consist of areas with varying salinity and pH, it is important to investigate the speciation of these compounds under varying salinity conditions. In addition, evaluation of the speciation of these compounds as a function of pH would give an insight into how these compounds might interact with sediments in waters where industrial chemical run-offs can affect the pH of the estuarine environment. Finally, since organotins are present in both salt and fresh water environments, the speciation of the organotins in seawater and distilled water should also be studied. Moessbauer spectroscopy would provide a preferred method to study the speciation of triphenyltins as they leach from marine paints into the aquatic environment. Compounds used in this study are those triphenyltin compounds that are commonly incorporated into marine paints such as triphenyltin fluoride (TPTF), triphenyltin acetate (TPTOAc), triphenyltin chloride (TPTCl) and triphenyltin hydroxide (TPTOH).

  8. Alternative Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pritchett, Stanley; Kimsey, Steve

    2002-01-01

    Describes the design of the DeKalb Alternative School in Atlanta, Georgia, located in a renovated shopping center. Purchasing commercial land and renovating the existing building saved the school system time and money. (EV)

  9. Inferring phylogeny and speciation of Gymnosporangium species, and their coevolution with host plants

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Peng; Liu, Fang; Li, Ying-Ming; Cai, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Gymnosporangium species (Pucciniaceae, Pucciniales) cause serious diseases and significant economic losses to apple cultivars. Most of the reported species are heteroecious and complete their life cycles on two different plant hosts belonging to two unrelated genera, i.e. Juniperus and Malus. However, the phylogenetic relationships among Gymnosporangium species and the evolutionary history of Gymnosporangium on its aecial and telial hosts were still undetermined. In this study, we recognized species based on rDNA sequence data by using coalescent method of generalized mixed Yule-coalescent (GMYC) and Poisson Tree Processes (PTP) models. The evolutionary relationships of Gymnosporangium species and their hosts were investigated by comparing the cophylogenetic analyses of Gymnosporangium species with Malus species and Juniperus species, respectively. The concordant results of GMYC and PTP analyses recognized 14 species including 12 known species and two undescribed species. In addition, host alternations of 10 Gymnosporangium species were uncovered by linking the derived sequences between their aecial and telial stages. This study revealed the evolutionary process of Gymnosporangium species, and clarified that the aecial hosts played more important roles than telial hosts in the speciation of Gymnosporangium species. Host switch, losses, duplication and failure to divergence all contributed to the speciation of Gymnosporangium species. PMID:27385413

  10. Toward chromium speciation in solids using wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry Cr Kβ lines.

    PubMed

    Malherbe, J; Claverie, F

    2013-04-22

    The determination of chromium speciation in solid samples is critical for environmental and industrial purposes. Several analytical methods exist to perform such a determination either directly in solid state or liquid state after an extraction step, each of them having some limitations. In this study, the use of a high-resolution wavelength-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometer to determine and quantify chromium species is investigated by looking at the differences in the Kβ transition profiles between Cr(0), Cr(III) and Cr(VI) compounds. Three different approaches were tested and compared to determine the Cr(VI) fraction of known mixtures: relative height and peak fitting using calibration mixtures, partial least square regression (PLS) of pure compounds, and principal component regression (PCR) of pure compounds. The accuracy of these methods was found to be about the same with an average relative error in the range of 15%. However, PLS and PCR can be easily implemented in an automated way contrary to peak fitting which can be sometimes perceived as analyst-dependant. Another advantage of using PLS and PCR is that information concerning the other oxidation states present in the sample can be retrieved. Finally, PLS and the peak height approach can be used up to 0.5% total chromium which make the XRF an alternative technique to X-ray induced photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) for chromium speciation in solid state. PMID:23561904

  11. The Interplay of Al and Mg Speciation in Advanced Mg Battery Electrolyte Solutions.

    PubMed

    See, Kimberly A; Chapman, Karena W; Zhu, Lingyang; Wiaderek, Kamila M; Borkiewicz, Olaf J; Barile, Christopher J; Chupas, Peter J; Gewirth, Andrew A

    2016-01-13

    Mg batteries are an attractive alternative to Li-based energy storage due to the possibility of higher volumetric capacities with the added advantage of using sustainable materials. A promising emerging electrolyte for Mg batteries is the magnesium aluminum chloride complex (MACC) which shows high Mg electrodeposition and stripping efficiencies and relatively high anodic stabilities. As prepared, MACC is inactive with respect to Mg deposition; however, efficient Mg electrodeposition can be achieved following an electrolytic conditioning process. Through the use of Raman spectroscopy, surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy, (27)Al and (35)Cl nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and pair distribution function analysis, we explore the active vs inactive complexes in the MACC electrolyte and demonstrate the codependence of Al and Mg speciation. These techniques report on significant changes occurring in the bulk speciation of the conditioned electrolyte relative to the as-prepared solution. Analysis shows that the active Mg complex in conditioned MACC is very likely the [Mg2(μ-Cl)3·6THF](+) complex that is observed in the solid state structure. Additionally, conditioning creates free Cl(-) in the electrolyte solution, and we suggest the free Cl(-) adsorbs at the electrode surface to enhance Mg electrodeposition. PMID:26636472

  12. Inferring phylogeny and speciation of Gymnosporangium species, and their coevolution with host plants.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Peng; Liu, Fang; Li, Ying-Ming; Cai, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Gymnosporangium species (Pucciniaceae, Pucciniales) cause serious diseases and significant economic losses to apple cultivars. Most of the reported species are heteroecious and complete their life cycles on two different plant hosts belonging to two unrelated genera, i.e. Juniperus and Malus. However, the phylogenetic relationships among Gymnosporangium species and the evolutionary history of Gymnosporangium on its aecial and telial hosts were still undetermined. In this study, we recognized species based on rDNA sequence data by using coalescent method of generalized mixed Yule-coalescent (GMYC) and Poisson Tree Processes (PTP) models. The evolutionary relationships of Gymnosporangium species and their hosts were investigated by comparing the cophylogenetic analyses of Gymnosporangium species with Malus species and Juniperus species, respectively. The concordant results of GMYC and PTP analyses recognized 14 species including 12 known species and two undescribed species. In addition, host alternations of 10 Gymnosporangium species were uncovered by linking the derived sequences between their aecial and telial stages. This study revealed the evolutionary process of Gymnosporangium species, and clarified that the aecial hosts played more important roles than telial hosts in the speciation of Gymnosporangium species. Host switch, losses, duplication and failure to divergence all contributed to the speciation of Gymnosporangium species. PMID:27385413

  13. Genomics of Rapid Incipient Speciation in Sympatric Threespine Stickleback

    PubMed Central

    Marques, David A.; Lucek, Kay; Meier, Joana I.; Mwaiko, Salome; Wagner, Catherine E.; Excoffier, Laurent; Seehausen, Ole

    2016-01-01

    Ecological speciation is the process by which reproductively isolated populations emerge as a consequence of divergent natural or ecologically-mediated sexual selection. Most genomic studies of ecological speciation have investigated allopatric populations, making it difficult to infer reproductive isolation. The few studies on sympatric ecotypes have focused on advanced stages of the speciation process after thousands of generations of divergence. As a consequence, we still do not know what genomic signatures of the early onset of ecological speciation look like. Here, we examined genomic differentiation among migratory lake and resident stream ecotypes of threespine stickleback reproducing in sympatry in one stream, and in parapatry in another stream. Importantly, these ecotypes started diverging less than 150 years ago. We obtained 34,756 SNPs with restriction-site associated DNA sequencing and identified genomic islands of differentiation using a Hidden Markov Model approach. Consistent with incipient ecological speciation, we found significant genomic differentiation between ecotypes both in sympatry and parapatry. Of 19 islands of differentiation resisting gene flow in sympatry, all were also differentiated in parapatry and were thus likely driven by divergent selection among habitats. These islands clustered in quantitative trait loci controlling divergent traits among the ecotypes, many of them concentrated in one region with low to intermediate recombination. Our findings suggest that adaptive genomic differentiation at many genetic loci can arise and persist in sympatry at the very early stage of ecotype divergence, and that the genomic architecture of adaptation may facilitate this. PMID:26925837

  14. Host shift and speciation in a coral-feeding nudibranch.

    PubMed

    Faucci, Anuschka; Toonen, Robert J; Hadfield, Michael G

    2007-01-01

    While the role of host preference in ecological speciation has been investigated extensively in terrestrial systems, very little is known in marine environments. Host preference combined with mate choice on the preferred host can lead to population subdivision and adaptation leading to host shifts. We use a phylogenetic approach based on two mitochondrial genetic markers to disentangle the taxonomic status and to investigate the role of host specificity in the speciation of the nudibranch genus Phestilla (Gastropoda, Opisthobranchia) from Guam, Palau and Hawaii. Species of the genus Phestilla complete their life cycle almost entirely on their specific host coral (species of Porites, Goniopora and Tubastrea). They reproduce on their host coral and their planktonic larvae require a host-specific chemical cue to metamorphose and settle onto their host. The phylogenetic trees of the combined cytochrome oxidase I and ribosomal 16S gene sequences clarify the relationship among species of Phestilla identifying most of the nominal species as monophyletic clades. We found a possible case of host shift from Porites to Goniopora and Tubastrea in sympatric Phestilla spp. This represents one of the first documented cases of host shift as a mechanism underlying speciation in a marine invertebrate. Furthermore, we found highly divergent clades within Phestilla sp. 1 and Phestilla minor (8.1-11.1%), suggesting cryptic speciation. The presence of a strong phylogenetic signal for the coral host confirms that the tight link between species of Phestilla and their host coral probably played an important role in speciation within this genus. PMID:17134995

  15. Speciation with gene flow on Lord Howe Island

    PubMed Central

    Papadopulos, Alexander S. T.; Baker, William J.; Crayn, Darren; Butlin, Roger K.; Kynast, Ralf G.; Hutton, Ian; Savolainen, Vincent

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the processes underlying the origin of species is a fundamental goal of biology. It is widely accepted that speciation requires an interruption of gene flow between populations: ongoing gene exchange is considered a major hindrance to population divergence and, ultimately, to the evolution of new species. Where a geographic barrier to reproductive isolation is lacking, a biological mechanism for speciation is required to counterbalance the homogenizing effect of gene flow. Speciation with initially strong gene flow is thought to be extremely rare, and few convincing empirical examples have been published. However, using phylogenetic, karyological, and ecological data for the flora of a minute oceanic island (Lord Howe Island, LHI), we demonstrate that speciation with gene flow may, in fact, be frequent in some instances and could account for one in five of the endemic plant species of LHI. We present 11 potential instances of species divergence with gene flow, including an in situ radiation of five species of Coprosma (Rubiaceae, the coffee family). These results, together with the speciation of Howea palms on LHI, challenge current views on the origin of species diversity. PMID:21730151

  16. On the origin of species by sympatric speciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dieckmann, Ulf; Doebeli, Michael

    1999-07-01

    Understanding speciation is a fundamental biological problem. It is believed that many species originated through allopatric divergence, where new species arise from geographically isolated populations of the same ancestral species. In contrast, the possibility of sympatric speciation (in which new species arise without geographical isolation) has often been dismissed, partly because of theoretical difficulties,. Most previous models analysing sympatric speciation concentrated on particular aspects of the problem while neglecting others. Here we present a model that integrates a novel combination of different features and show that sympatric speciation is a likely outcome of competition for resources. We use multilocus genetics to describe sexual reproduction in an individual-based model, and we consider the evolution of assortative mating (where individuals mate preferentially with like individuals) depending either on an ecological character affecting resource use or on a selectively neutral marker trait. In both cases, evolution of assortative mating often leads to reproductive isolation between ecologically diverging subpopulations. When assortative mating depends on a marker trait, and is therefore not directly linked to resource competition, speciation occurs when genetic drift breaks the linkage equilibrium between the marker and the ecological trait. Our theory conforms well with mounting empirical evidence for the sympatric origin of many species.

  17. Aluminium (Al) fractionation and speciation; getting closer to describing the factors influencing Al(3+) in water impacted by acid mine drainage.

    PubMed

    Chamier, Jessica; Wicht, Merrill; Cyster, Lilburne; Ndindi, Nosintu P

    2015-07-01

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) severely impacts the water chemistry of a receiving resource, changing the occurrence, speciation and toxicity of metals such as Aluminium (Al). The toxicity of Al is determined by its speciation represented by the labile monomer Al fraction or Al(3+). The purpose of the study was to combine fractionation and Visual MINTEQ speciation to calculate the effect of AMD altered water chemistry on Al speciation and Al(3+) concentration. Water in rivers impacted by AMD presented with monomeric Al (Almon) concentrations between 0.35 and 15.37mgL(-)(1) which existed almost exclusively in the toxic labile form (98%). For the reference site, Almon was less than 2% (10μgL(-1)), suggesting significantly lower Al toxicity. Principal component analysis plots illustrated that labile Al was directly related to the total Al and iron concentrations and strongly influenced by parameters such as pH, electrical conductivity, sulphate and dissolved organic carbon. Visual MINTEQ modelling was used to determine the primary Al species distribution. The dominant form of Al in AMD impacted water was AlSO4(+), which increased proportionally with the sulphate and Al(3+) concentration. Heavily impacted areas, presented with an average of 1mgmL(-)(1) Al(3+), which poses a potential human health risk. A novel centrifugal ultrafiltration method was investigated as an alternative to determining Almon to simplify the speciation of Al. Monomeric and centrifugal ultrafiltrated (<10kD) Al fractions were significantly similar (p=0.74), suggesting that ultrafiltration may present a time, energy and cost saving alternative to organic extraction of Almon. PMID:25747302

  18. Neptunium redox speciation at the illite surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsac, Rémi; Banik, Nidhu lal; Lützenkirchen, Johannes; Marquardt, Christian Michael; Dardenne, Kathy; Schild, Dieter; Rothe, Joerg; Diascorn, Alexandre; Kupcik, Tomas; Schäfer, Thorsten; Geckeis, Horst

    2015-03-01

    Neptunium (Np(V)) sorption onto a purified illite is investigated as a function of pH (3-10) and [NpVO2+]tot(3 × 10-8-3 × 10-4 M) in 0.1 M NaCl under Ar atmosphere. After about one week reaction time, only insignificant variation of Np sorption is observed and the establishment of reaction equilibrium can be assumed. Surprisingly, solid-liquid distribution ratios (Rd) are clearly higher than those measured for Np(V) sorption onto illite under aerobic conditions. The observation that Rd increases with decreasing pe (pe = -log ae-) suggests partial reduction to Np(IV), although measured redox potentials (pe values) at a first glance suggest the predominance of Np(V). Reduction to Np(IV) at the illite surface could indeed be confirmed by X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES). Np speciation in presence of the purified Na-illite under given conditions is consistently described by applying the 2 sites protolysis non-electrostatic surface complexation and cation exchange model. Measured pe data are taken to calculate Np redox state and surface complexation constants for Np(IV) are derived by applying a data fitting procedure. Constants are very consistent with results obtained by applying an existing linear free energy relationship (LFER). Taking Np(IV) surface complexation constants into account shifts the calculated Np(V)/Np(IV) redox borderline in presence of illite surfaces by 3-5 pe units (0.2-0.3 V) towards redox neutral conditions. Our study suggests that Np(V) reduction in presence of a sorbing mineral phase is thermodynamically favored.

  19. Arsenic speciation and reactivity in poultry litter

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arai, Y.; Lanzirotti, A.; Sutton, S.; Davis, J.A.; Sparks, D.L.

    2003-01-01

    Recent U.S. government action to lower the maximum concentration levels (MCL) of total arsenic (As) (10 ppb) in drinking water has raised serious concerns about the agricultural use of As-containing biosolids such as poultry litter (PL). In this study, solid-state chemical speciation, desorbability, and total levels of As in PL and long-term amended soils were investigated using novel synchrotronbased probing techniques (microfocused (??) synchrotron X-ray fluorescence (SXRF) and ??-X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopies) coupled with chemical digestion and batch experiments. The total As levels in the PL were as high as ???50 mg kg-1, and As(II/III and V) was always concentrated in abundant needle-shaped microscopic particles (???20/ ??m x 850 ??m) associated with Ca, Cu, and Fe and to a lesser extent with S, CI, and Zn. Postedge XANES features of litter particles are dissimilar to those of the organo-As(V) compound in poultry feed (i.e., roxarsone), suggesting possible degradation/transformation of roxarsone in the litter and/or in poultry digestive tracts. The extent of As desorption from the litter increased with increasing time and pH from 4.5 to 7, but at most 15% of the total As was released after 5 d at pH 7, indicating the presence of insoluble phases and/or strongly retained soluble compounds. No significant As accumulation (< 15 mg kg-1) was found in long-term PL-a mended agricultural surface soils. This suggests that As in the PL may have undergone surface and subsurface transport processes. Our research results raise concerns about long-term PL amendment effects on As contamination in surrounding soilwater environments.

  20. Wolbachia Infections Mimic Cryptic Speciation in Two Parasitic Butterfly Species, Phengaris teleius and P. nausithous (Lepidoptera: Lycaenidae)

    PubMed Central

    Ritter, Sylvia; Michalski, Stefan G.; Settele, Josef; Wiemers, Martin; Fric, Zdenek F.; Sielezniew, Marcin; Šašić, Martina; Rozier, Yves; Durka, Walter

    2013-01-01

    Deep mitochondrial divergence within species may result from cryptic speciation, from phylogeographic isolation or from endosymbiotic bacteria like Wolbachia that manipulate host reproduction. Phengaris butterflies are social parasites that spend most of their life in close relationship with ants. Previously, cryptic speciation has been hypothesised for two Phengaris species based on divergent mtDNA sequences. Since Phengaris species are highly endangered, the existence of cryptic species would have drastic consequences for conservation and management. We tested for cryptic speciation and alternative scenarios in P. teleius and P. nausithous based on a comprehensive sample across their Palaearctic ranges using COI gene sequences, nuclear microsatellites and tests for Wolbachia. In both species a deep mitochondrial split occurring 0.65–1.97 myrs ago was observed that did not correspond with microsatellite data but was concordant with Wolbachia infection. Haplotypes previously attributed to cryptic species were part of the Wolbachia-infected clades. In both species remaining phylogeographic structure was largely consistent between mitochondrial and nuclear genomes. In P. teleius several mitochondrial and nuclear groups were observed in East Asia while a single haplogroup and nuclear cluster prevailed across continental Eurasia. Neutrality tests suggested rapid demographic expansion into that area. In contrast, P. nausithous had several mitochondrial and nuclear groups in Europe, suggesting a complex phylogeographic history in the western part of the species range. We conclude that deep intraspecific divergences found in DNA barcode studies do not necessarily need to represent cryptic speciation but instead can be due to both infection by Wolbachia and phylogeographic structure. PMID:24223136

  1. Relationship of attitudes toward fast food and frequency of fast-food intake in adults.

    PubMed

    Dave, Jayna M; An, Lawrence C; Jeffery, Robert W; Ahluwalia, Jasjit S

    2009-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the association between attitudes toward fast food and the frequency of fast-food intake in adults. This study is a cross-sectional evaluation of random digit-dial telephone surveys to identify patterns of eating away from home and attitudes toward it. Participants included 530 adults (94% white, 65% women, 70% married, 42% with college educated). Attitudes toward fast food was measured using an 11-item, 4-dimensional scale: perceived convenience of fast food (alpha=0.56); fast food is fun and social (alpha=0.55); fast food perceived as unhealthful (alpha=0.45); and dislike toward cooking (alpha=0.52). Frequency of fast-food intake was found to be significantly associated with age (odds ratios (OR)=0.981, P=0.001), gender (men>women), and marital status of the participants (single>married/partnered and divorced/separated/widowed). Additionally, frequency of fast-food intake was also found to be significantly associated with perceived convenience of fast food (OR=1.162, P<0.001) and dislike toward cooking (OR=1.119, P<0.001) but not with perceived unhealthfulness of fast food (OR=0.692, P=0.207). These findings suggest public education regarding the unhealthfulness of fast food may not influence fast food consumption. Interventions targeting the issue of convenience and quick or efficient preparation of nutritious alternatives to fast food could be more promising. PMID:19247277

  2. The relationship of selenium tolerance and speciation in Lecythidaceae species.

    PubMed

    Németh, Anikó; García Reyes, Juan Francisco; Kosáry, Judit; Dernovics, Mihály

    2013-12-01

    Comparative study of selenium (Se) speciation in hyperaccumulator plants offers an interesting challenge from the analytical point of view. In our study the application of a sophisticated sample clean-up procedure and the combination of elemental and molecular mass spectrometric methods led to the identification of several new selenocompounds. The difference between the Se speciation of the primary accumulator Lecythis minor and the secondary accumulator Bertholletia excelsa confirmed the current opinion that the speciation pattern in hyperaccumulator plants is principally related to the mechanism of accumulation and not to taxonomy. The most abundant new selenocompounds were found to be the derivatives of selenohomocysteine (SeHCy) and selenomethionine (SeMet), including fatty acid metabolism related compounds. A series of SeHCy derived species containing multiple Se atoms (>2) was also detected and their structures were validated by the synthesis of their S-Se analogues. PMID:24136350

  3. Plutonium Speciation in Support of Oxidative-Leaching Demonstration Test

    SciTech Connect

    Sinkov, Sergey I.

    2007-10-31

    Bechtel National, Inc. (BNI) is evaluating the plutonium speciation in caustic solutions that reasonably represent the process streams from the oxidative-leaching demonstration test. Battelle—Pacific Northwest Division (PNWD) was contracted to develop a spectrophotometric method to measure plutonium speciation at submicromolar (< 10-6 M) concentrations in alkaline solutions in the presence of chromate and carbonate. Data obtained from the testing will be used to identify the oxidation state of Pu(IV), Pu(V), and Pu(VI) species, which potentially could exist in caustic leachates. Work was initially conducted under contract number 24590-101-TSA-W000-00004 satisfying the needs defined in Appendix C of the Research and Technology Plan TSS A-219 to evaluate the speciation of chromium, plutonium, and manganese before and after oxidative leaching. In February 2007, the contract mechanism was switched to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Operating Contract MOA: 24590-QL-HC9-WA49-00001.

  4. Rapid acceleration of plant speciation during the Anthropocene.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Chris D

    2015-08-01

    Speciation rates need to be considered when estimating human impacts on the numbers of species on Earth, given that past mass extinctions have been followed by the accelerated origination of new taxa. Here, I suggest that the Anthropocene is already exhibiting a greatly accelerated plant speciation rate due to agriculture, horticulture, and the human-mediated transport of species, followed by hybridisation. For example, more new plant species have come into existence in Europe over the past three centuries than have been documented as becoming extinct over the same period, even though most new hybrid-origin species are likely to remain undetected. Current speciation rates are unusually high and they could be higher than during or after previous mass extinctions. PMID:26115931

  5. SPECIATE 4.4: The Bridge Between Emissions Characterization and Modeling

    EPA Science Inventory

    SPECIATE is the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) repository of volatile organic gas and particulate matter (PM) speciation profiles of air pollution sources. Some of the many uses of these source profiles include: (1) creating speciated emissions inventories for...

  6. Examination of Arsenic Speciation in Sulfidic Solutions Using X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    EPA Science Inventory

    The chemical speciation of arsenic in sulfidic waters is complicated by the existence of thioarsenic species. The purpose of this research was to use advanced spectroscopy techniques along with speciation modeling and chromatography to elucidate the chemical speciation of As in ...

  7. Cosmic alternatives?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregory, Ruth

    2009-04-01

    "Cosmologists are often in error but never in doubt." This pithy characterization by the Soviet physicist Lev Landau sums up the raison d'être of Facts and Speculations in Cosmology. Authors Jayant Narlikar and Geoffrey Burbidge are proponents of a "steady state" theory of cosmology, and they argue that the cosmological community has become fixated on a "Big Bang" dogma, suppressing alternative viewpoints. This book very much does what it says on the tin: it sets out what is known in cosmology, and puts forward the authors' point of view on an alternative to the Big Bang.

  8. Uranium speciation in glass corrosion layers: An XAFS study

    SciTech Connect

    Biwer, B.M.; Soderholm, L.; Greegor, R.B.; Lytle, F.W.

    1997-12-31

    Uranium L{sub 3} X-ray absorption data were obtained from two borosilicate glasses, which are considered as models for radioactive wasteforms, both before and after leaching. Surface sensitivity to uranium speciation was attained by a novel application of simultaneous fluorescence and electron-yield detection. Changes in speciation are clearly discernible, from U(VI) in the bulk to (UO{sub 2}){sup 2+}-uranyl in the corrosion layer. The uranium concentrations within the corrosion layer also show variations with leaching times that can be determined from the data.

  9. XANES Identification of Plutonium Speciation in RFETS Samples

    SciTech Connect

    LoPresti, V.; Conradson, S.D.; Clark, D.L.

    2009-06-03

    Using primarily X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES) with standards run in tandem with samples, probable plutonium speciation was determined for 13 samples from contaminated soil, acid-splash or fire-deposition building interior surfaces, or asphalt pads from the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS). Save for extreme oxidizing situations, all other samples were found to be of Pu(IV) speciation, supporting the supposition that such contamination is less likely to show mobility off site. EXAFS analysis conducted on two of the 13 samples supported the validity of the XANES features employed as determinants of the plutonium valence.

  10. Actinide speciation in glass leach-layers: An EXAFS study

    SciTech Connect

    Biwer, B.M.; Soderholm, L.; Greegor, R.B.; Lytle, F.W.

    1996-12-31

    Uranium L{sub 3} X-ray absorption data were obtained from two borosilicate glasses, which are considered as models for radioactive wasteforms, both before and after leaching. Surface sensitivity to uranium speciation was attained by a novel application of simultaneous fluorescence and electron-yield detection. Changes in speciation are clearly discernible, from U(VI) in the bulk to (UO{sub 2}){sup 2+}-uranyl in the leach layer. The leach-layer uranium concentration variations with leaching times are also determined from the data.

  11. [Speciation and its mechanisms: conceptual background and recent advances].

    PubMed

    Colley, Eduardo; Fischer, Marta Luciane

    2013-10-01

    This paper presents a historical approach on general concepts of speciation and its mechanisms, from the primordial ideas to the most recent theories that seek to elucidate the origin of biodiversity. It is common knowledge that speciation is a controversial and complex issue that encompasses virtually all the lines of research of biology, in addition to geology and paleontology. The main objective of the paper is to clarify the theoretical concepts on the origin of the animal species, in the chronological order in which they became established throughout the whole of the development of evolutionary biology as a science. PMID:24473657

  12. Hybrid speciation and independent evolution in lineages of alpine butterflies.

    PubMed

    Nice, Chris C; Gompert, Zachariah; Fordyce, James A; Forister, Matthew L; Lucas, Lauren K; Buerkle, C Alex

    2013-04-01

    The power of hybridization between species to generate variation and fuel adaptation is poorly understood despite long-standing interest. There is, however, increasing evidence that hybridization often generates biodiversity, including via hybrid speciation. We tested the hypothesis of hybrid speciation in butterflies occupying extreme, high-altitude habitats in four mountain ranges in western North America with an explicit, probabilistic model, and genome-wide DNA sequence data. Using this approach, in concert with ecological experiments and observations and morphological data, we document three lineages of hybrid origin. These lineages have different genome admixture proportions and distinctive trait combinations that suggest unique and independent evolutionary histories. PMID:23550755

  13. Fast ignitor coupling physics

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, R.J.; Tabak, M.

    1997-10-01

    The Fast Ignitor is an alternate approach to ICF in which short pulse lasers are used to initiate burn at the surface of the compressed DT fuel. The aim is to avoid the need for careful central focussing of final shocks, and possibly to lower substantially the energy requirements for ignition. Ultimately, both goals may prove crucial to Stockpile Stewardship. For success with the Fast Ignitor, the laser energy must be efficiently deposited into megavolt electrons, which must, in turn, couple to the background ions within an alpha particle range. To understand this coupling, we have used ANTHEM plasma simulation code to model the transport of hot electrons generated by an intense ({ge} 3 x 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}) short pulse 1.06 {mu}m laser into plasma targets over a broad range of densities (0.35 to 10{sup 4} x n{sub crit}). Ponderomotive effects are included as a force on the cold background and hot emission electrons of the form, F{sub h,c} = -({omega}{sup 2}{sub Ph,c}/2{omega}{sup 2}){del}I, in which I is the laser intensity and {omega}{sub p}{sup 2} = 4{pi}e{sup 2}n/m{sub 0}{gamma} with m{sub 0} the electron rest mass.

  14. ALTERNATIVE OXIDANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This chapter reports on the efforts of the USEPA to study chloramines, chlorine dioxide and ozone as alternative oxidants/disinfectants to chlorine for the control of disinfection by-rpdocuts (DBPs) in drinking water. It examines the control of DBPs like trihalomethanes and haloa...

  15. Alternative Thinking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herman, Dan

    1999-01-01

    Explains how advances in diesel and alternative fuels has caused schools to reconsider their use for their bus fleets. Reductions in air pollution emissions, cost-savings developments, and the economies experienced from less downtime and maintenance requirements are explored. (GR)

  16. Alternative Conceptualizations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borman, Kathryn M., Ed.; O'Reilly, Patricia, Ed.

    1992-01-01

    This theme issue of the serial "Educational Foundations" contains five articles devoted to the topic of "Alternative Conceptualizations" of the foundations of education. In "The Concept of Place in the New Sociology of Education," Paul Theobald examines the notion of place in educational theory and practice. Janice Jipson and Nicholas Paley, in…

  17. Fast weathering of olivine in high-energy shallow seas for cost-effective CO2 capture as a cheap alternative for CCS, and effective mitigation of ocean acidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Boer, P. L.; Schuiling, R. D.

    2013-12-01

    Spreading of olivine in high-energy shelf seas can counteract human CO2 emissions and ocean acidification against a price well below that of CCS and other methods. In the reaction: Mg(Fe)2SiO4 (olivine) + 4 H2O --> 2 Mg(Fe)2+ + 4 OH- + H4SiO4 followed by 4 OH- + 4 CO2 --> 4 HCO3-, CO2 is consumed, while Mg2+, Fe2+, H4SiO4 and HCO3- are produced. Contrary to the paradigm that olivine weathering in nature is a slow process, flume experiments mimicking high-energy shallow marine environments show a fast reaction, consuming CO2, and raising the pH at short notice. This must be because under immobile conditions a silica coating develops and retards or stops the reaction. In high-energy shallow marine environments such silica coatings are abraded so that the chemical reaction can continue. When kept in motion also large olivine grains and gravels rubbing and bumping against each other and against other sediment grains weather quickly. The experiments also show that fine micron- to silt-sized olivine particles are produced, and that the chemical reaction is fast. The chemical weathering of 7 km3 olivine would be needed on a yearly basis in order to compensate the human CO2 emissions. This seems very much. It is, however, of the same order of magnitude as the volume of fossil fuels (in oil equivalents ~10 km3) that are burnt annually. Olivine is readily available at the Earth' surface on all continents, and past mining efforts show that such volume of 7 km3 is exceeded by existing mines; e.g. the Bingham Canyon open pit mine in Utah has an excavated volume of 25 km3. Hydrocarbons, on the other hand, are commonly retrieved with great efforts, from great depths, and often at remote locations. The annual spreading of large amounts of olivine (and/or serpentinite) in high-energy shelf seas where coarse sand and gravel can be transported, will counteract human CO2 production by fossil fuel burning and ocean acidification against a price well below that of other methods. For

  18. FAST: FAST Analysis of Sequences Toolbox.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Travis J; Kauffman, Kyle T; Amrine, Katherine C H; Carper, Dana L; Lee, Raymond S; Becich, Peter J; Canales, Claudia J; Ardell, David H

    2015-01-01

    FAST (FAST Analysis of Sequences Toolbox) provides simple, powerful open source command-line tools to filter, transform, annotate and analyze biological sequence data. Modeled after the GNU (GNU's Not Unix) Textutils such as grep, cut, and tr, FAST tools such as fasgrep, fascut, and fastr make it easy to rapidly prototype expressive bioinformatic workflows in a compact and generic command vocabulary. Compact combinatorial encoding of data workflows with FAST commands can simplify the documentation and reproducibility of bioinformatic protocols, supporting better transparency in biological data science. Interface self-consistency and conformity with conventions of GNU, Matlab, Perl, BioPerl, R, and GenBank help make FAST easy and rewarding to learn. FAST automates numerical, taxonomic, and text-based sorting, selection and transformation of sequence records and alignment sites based on content, index ranges, descriptive tags, annotated features, and in-line calculated analytics, including composition and codon usage. Automated content- and feature-based extraction of sites and support for molecular population genetic statistics make FAST useful for molecular evolutionary analysis. FAST is portable, easy to install and secure thanks to the relative maturity of its Perl and BioPerl foundations, with stable releases posted to CPAN. Development as well as a publicly accessible Cookbook and Wiki are available on the FAST GitHub repository at https://github.com/tlawrence3/FAST. The default data exchange format in FAST is Multi-FastA (specifically, a restriction of BioPerl FastA format). Sanger and Illumina 1.8+ FastQ formatted files are also supported. FAST makes it easier for non-programmer biologists to interactively investigate and control biological data at the speed of thought. PMID:26042145

  19. FAST: FAST Analysis of Sequences Toolbox

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, Travis J.; Kauffman, Kyle T.; Amrine, Katherine C. H.; Carper, Dana L.; Lee, Raymond S.; Becich, Peter J.; Canales, Claudia J.; Ardell, David H.

    2015-01-01

    FAST (FAST Analysis of Sequences Toolbox) provides simple, powerful open source command-line tools to filter, transform, annotate and analyze biological sequence data. Modeled after the GNU (GNU's Not Unix) Textutils such as grep, cut, and tr, FAST tools such as fasgrep, fascut, and fastr make it easy to rapidly prototype expressive bioinformatic workflows in a compact and generic command vocabulary. Compact combinatorial encoding of data workflows with FAST commands can simplify the documentation and reproducibility of bioinformatic protocols, supporting better transparency in biological data science. Interface self-consistency and conformity with conventions of GNU, Matlab, Perl, BioPerl, R, and GenBank help make FAST easy and rewarding to learn. FAST automates numerical, taxonomic, and text-based sorting, selection and transformation of sequence records and alignment sites based on content, index ranges, descriptive tags, annotated features, and in-line calculated analytics, including composition and codon usage. Automated content- and feature-based extraction of sites and support for molecular population genetic statistics make FAST useful for molecular evolutionary analysis. FAST is portable, easy to install and secure thanks to the relative maturity of its Perl and BioPerl foundations, with stable releases posted to CPAN. Development as well as a publicly accessible Cookbook and Wiki are available on the FAST GitHub repository at https://github.com/tlawrence3/FAST. The default data exchange format in FAST is Multi-FastA (specifically, a restriction of BioPerl FastA format). Sanger and Illumina 1.8+ FastQ formatted files are also supported. FAST makes it easier for non-programmer biologists to interactively investigate and control biological data at the speed of thought. PMID:26042145

  20. Speciation dynamics and biogeography of Neotropical spiral gingers (Costaceae).

    PubMed

    André, Thiago; Salzman, Shayla; Wendt, Tânia; Specht, Chelsea D

    2016-10-01

    Species can arise via the divisive effects of allopatry as well as due to ecological and/or reproductive character displacement within sympatric populations. Two separate lineages of Costaceae are native to the Neotropics; an early-diverging clade endemic to South America (consisting of ca. 16 species in the genera Monocostus, Dimerocostus and Chamaecostus); and the Neotropical Costus clade (ca. 50 species), a diverse assemblage of understory herbs comprising nearly half of total familial species richness. We use a robust dated molecular phylogeny containing most of currently known species to inform macroevolutionary reconstructions, enabling us to examine the context of speciation in Neotropical lineages. Analyses of speciation rate revealed a significant variation among clades, with a rate shift at the most recent common ancestor of the Neotropical Costus clade. There is an overall predominance of allopatric speciation in the South American clade, as most species display little range overlap. In contrast, sympatry is much higher within the Neotropical Costus clade, independent of node age. Our results show that speciation dynamics during the history of Costaceae is strongly heterogeneous, and we suggest that the Costus radiation in the Neotropics arose at varied geographic contexts. PMID:27400627

  1. Speciational view of macroevolution: Are micro and macroevolution decoupled?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwämmle, V.; Brigatti, E.

    2006-07-01

    We introduce a simple computational model that, with microscopic dynamics driven by natural selection and mutation alone, allows the description of true speciation events. A statistical analysis of the evolutionary tree so generated captures realistic features showing power laws for frequency distributions in time and size. Finally, some possible interpretations of the absence of punctuated dynamics with mass extinctions are worked out.

  2. Model inadequacy and mistaken inferences of trait-dependent speciation.

    PubMed

    Rabosky, Daniel L; Goldberg, Emma E

    2015-03-01

    Species richness varies widely across the tree of life, and there is great interest in identifying ecological, geographic, and other factors that affect rates of species proliferation. Recent methods for explicitly modeling the relationships among character states, speciation rates, and extinction rates on phylogenetic trees- BiSSE, QuaSSE, GeoSSE, and related models-have been widely used to test hypotheses about character state-dependent diversification rates. Here, we document the disconcerting ease with which neutral traits are inferred to have statistically significant associations with speciation rate. We first demonstrate this unfortunate effect for a known model assumption violation: shifts in speciation rate associated with a character not included in the model. We further show that for many empirical phylogenies, characters simulated in the absence of state-dependent diversification exhibit an even higher Type I error rate, indicating that the method is susceptible to additional, unknown model inadequacies. For traits that evolve slowly, the root cause appears to be a statistical framework that does not require replicated shifts in character state and diversification. However, spurious associations between character state and speciation rate arise even for traits that lack phylogenetic signal, suggesting that phylogenetic pseudoreplication alone cannot fully explain the problem. The surprising severity of this phenomenon suggests that many trait-diversification relationships reported in the literature may not be real. More generally, we highlight the need for diagnosing and understanding the consequences of model inadequacy in phylogenetic comparative methods. PMID:25601943

  3. Latitude, elevational climatic zonation and speciation in New World vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Cadena, Carlos Daniel; Kozak, Kenneth H; Gómez, Juan Pablo; Parra, Juan Luis; McCain, Christy M; Bowie, Rauri C K; Carnaval, Ana C; Moritz, Craig; Rahbek, Carsten; Roberts, Trina E; Sanders, Nathan J; Schneider, Christopher J; VanDerWal, Jeremy; Zamudio, Kelly R; Graham, Catherine H

    2012-01-01

    Many biodiversity hotspots are located in montane regions, especially in the tropics. A possible explanation for this pattern is that the narrow thermal tolerances of tropical species and greater climatic stratification of tropical mountains create more opportunities for climate-associated parapatric or allopatric speciation in the tropics relative to the temperate zone. However, it is unclear whether a general relationship exists among latitude, climatic zonation and the ecology of speciation. Recent taxon-specific studies obtained different results regarding the role of climate in speciation in tropical versus temperate areas. Here, we quantify overlap in the climatic distributions of 93 pairs of sister species of mammals, birds, amphibians and reptiles restricted to either the New World tropics or to the Northern temperate zone. We show that elevational ranges of tropical- and temperate-zone species do not differ from one another, yet the temperature range experienced by species in the temperate zone is greater than for those in the tropics. Moreover, tropical sister species tend to exhibit greater similarity in their climatic distributions than temperate sister species. This pattern suggests that evolutionary conservatism in the thermal niches of tropical taxa, coupled with the greater thermal zonation of tropical mountains, may result in increased opportunities for allopatric isolation, speciation and the accumulation of species in tropical montane regions. Our study exemplifies the power of combining phylogenetic and spatial datasets of global climatic variation to explore evolutionary (rather than purely ecological) explanations for the high biodiversity of tropical montane regions. PMID:21632626

  4. LINKING WATERFOWL WITH CONTAMINANT SPECIATION IN RIPARIAN SOILS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report summarizes the results of Mine Waste Technology Program (MWTP) Activity III, Project 38, Linking Waterfowl with Contaminant Speciation in Riparian Soils, implemented and funded by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and jointly administered by EPA and the U...

  5. Capillary electrophoresis application in metal speciation and complexation characterization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Capillary electrophoresis is amenable to the separation of metal ionic species and the characterization of metal-ligand interactions. This book chapter reviews and discusses three representative case studies in applications of CE technology in speciation and reactions of metal with organic molecules...

  6. Transformation of heavy metal speciation during sludge drying: mechanistic insights

    SciTech Connect

    Weng, Huanxin; Ma, Xue-Wen; Fu, Feng-Xia; Zhang, Jin-Jun; Liu, Zan; Tian, Li-Xun; Liu, Chongxuan

    2014-01-30

    Speciation can fundamentally affect on the stability and toxicity of heavy metals in sludge from wastewater treatment plants. This research investigated the speciation of heavy metals in sludge from both municipal and industrial sources, and metal speciation change as a result of drying process to reduce sludge volume. The changes in sludge properties including sludge moisture content, temperature, density, and electrical conductivity were also monitored to provide insights into the mechanisms causing the change in heavy metal speciation. The results show that the drying process generally stabilized the Cr, Cu, Cd and Pb in sludge by transforming acid-soluble, reducible and oxidizable species into structurally stable forms. Such transformation and stabilization occurred regardless of the sludge source and type, and were primarily caused by the changes in sludge properties associated with decomposition of organic matter and sulfide. The results enhanced our understanding of the geochemical behavior of heavy metals in municipal sludge, and are useful for designing a treatment system for environment-friendly disposal of sludge.

  7. Microscale characterization of sulfur speciation in lake sediments.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Teng; Arnold, William A; Toner, Brandy M

    2013-02-01

    Prairie pothole lakes (PPLs) are naturally sulfur-enriched wetlands in the glaciated prairie region of North America. High sulfate levels and dynamic hydrogeochemistry in combination render PPLs a unique environment to explore the speciation of sedimentary sulfur (S). The goals of this research were to define and quantify the solid-phase S pools in PPL sediments and track seasonal dynamics of S speciation. A quantitative X-ray microprobe method was developed based on S 1s X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy and multienergy X-ray fluorescence mapping. Three S pools-pyritic S, reduced organic S (organic mono- and disulfide), and oxidized S (inorganic sulfate, ester sulfate, and sulfonate)-were identified in PPL sediments. No significant seasonal variation was evident for total S, but S speciation showed a seasonal response. During the spring-summer transition, the reduced organic S decreased from 55 to 15 mol %, with a concomitant rise in the oxidized S. During the summer-fall transition, the trend reversed and the reduced organic S grew to 75 mol % at the expense of the oxidized S. The pyritic S, on the other hand, remained relatively constant (∼22 mol %) over time. The seasonal changes in S speciation have strong potential to force the cycling of elements such as mercury in prairie wetlands. PMID:23282039

  8. PM 2.5 ORGANIC SPECIATION INTERCOMPARISON RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This abstract describes a poster on results to a laboratory intercomparison of organic aerosol speciation analysis to be presented at the 2006 International Aerosol Conference sponsored by the American Association for Aerosol Research in St. Paul, Minnesota on September 10-15. T...

  9. A recombination suppressor contributes to ecological speciation in OSTRINIA moths.

    PubMed

    Wadsworth, C B; Li, X; Dopman, E B

    2015-06-01

    Despite unparalleled access to species' genomes in our post-genomic age, we often lack adequate biological explanations for a major hallmark of the speciation process-genetic divergence. In the presence of gene flow, chromosomal rearrangements such as inversions are thought to promote divergence and facilitate speciation by suppressing recombination. Using a combination of genetic crosses, phenotyping of a trait underlying ecological isolation, and population genetic analysis of wild populations, we set out to determine whether evidence supports a role for recombination suppressors during speciation between the Z and E strains of European corn borer moth (Ostrinia nubilalis). Our results are consistent with the presence of an inversion that has contributed to accumulation of ecologically adaptive alleles and genetic differentiation across roughly 20% of the Ostrinia sex chromosome (~4 Mb). Patterns in Ostrinia suggest that chromosomal divergence may involve two separate phases-one driving its transient origin through local adaptation and one determining its stable persistence through differential introgression. As the evolutionary rate of rearrangements in lepidopteran genomes appears to be one of the fastest among eukaryotes, structural mutations may have had a disproportionate role during adaptive divergence and speciation in Ostrinia and in other moths and butterflies. PMID:25626887

  10. A recombination suppressor contributes to ecological speciation in OSTRINIA moths

    PubMed Central

    Wadsworth, C B; Li, X; Dopman, E B

    2015-01-01

    Despite unparalleled access to species' genomes in our post-genomic age, we often lack adequate biological explanations for a major hallmark of the speciation process—genetic divergence. In the presence of gene flow, chromosomal rearrangements such as inversions are thought to promote divergence and facilitate speciation by suppressing recombination. Using a combination of genetic crosses, phenotyping of a trait underlying ecological isolation, and population genetic analysis of wild populations, we set out to determine whether evidence supports a role for recombination suppressors during speciation between the Z and E strains of European corn borer moth (Ostrinia nubilalis). Our results are consistent with the presence of an inversion that has contributed to accumulation of ecologically adaptive alleles and genetic differentiation across roughly 20% of the Ostrinia sex chromosome (~4 Mb). Patterns in Ostrinia suggest that chromosomal divergence may involve two separate phases—one driving its transient origin through local adaptation and one determining its stable persistence through differential introgression. As the evolutionary rate of rearrangements in lepidopteran genomes appears to be one of the fastest among eukaryotes, structural mutations may have had a disproportionate role during adaptive divergence and speciation in Ostrinia and in other moths and butterflies. PMID:25626887