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Sample records for fat alters pulmonary

  1. [Fat pulmonary embolism after liposuction].

    PubMed

    Rothmann, C; Ruschel, N; Streiff, R; Pitti, R; Bollaert, P E

    2006-02-01

    A 24-year-old woman undergoes buttock's liposuction as an outpatient procedure. As she went back home, progressive dyspnea, respiratory distress and collapse developed. At hospital admission, she was dyspneic with thoracic oppression, tachycardia and anguish. Chest X-ray and thoracic CT scan suggested a pulmonary localisation of fat emboli. Symptomatic treatment allowed complete recovery. This report discusses diagnosis of fat emboli after liposuction as well as epidemiology and physiopathology. PMID:16269230

  2. [Pulmonary alterations in Hodgkin lymphoma].

    PubMed

    Jóna, Ádám; Illés, Árpád; Szemes, Katalin; Miltényi, Zsófia

    2016-01-31

    Most of Hodgkin lymphoma patients survive due to combined chemo/radiotherapy. Improved survival brings long-term side effects to the front, which may determine the patients' subsequent quality of life and expected lifetime. This manuscript aims to analyze lung manifestations of Hodgkin lymphoma and treatment related pulmonary complications, demonstrated with own cases. The lung involvement in Hodgkin lymphoma is often secondary, and primary pulmonary involvement is very rare. The authors found 8-12% of lung involvement among their patients. Side effects of treatment consist of pulmonary infections in conjuction with immunosuppression, while on the other hand bleomycin and chest irradiation as part of current standard of care induced pneumonitis and fibrosis are reported. The pulmonary involvement in Hodgkin lymphoma may cause differential diagnostic difficulty. Lung involvement could modify stage and consequently treatment, and the development of side effects might determine later quality of life and expected lifetime. Therefore, identification of lung involvement is crucial. PMID:26801361

  3. Pulmonary fat and bone marrow embolism in aircraft accident victims.

    PubMed

    Bierre, A R; Koelmeyer, T D

    1983-04-01

    On 28 November 1979, an Air New Zealand DC10 aircraft crashed into Mt Erebus, Antarctica with the loss of 257 passengers and crew. Postmortem examinations were carried out on 231 victims in Auckland, 4641 kilometres north of the crash site, and lung tissue was present in 205 cases. Pulmonary fat emboli were present in 134 cases (65%), pulmonary bone marrow emboli in 60 (29%) and pulmonary edema in 76 cases (37%). Clear relationships were demonstrated, firstly between the extent of fat and bone marrow embolism, secondly between the extent of fat and bone marrow embolism and the presence of pulmonary edema, and thirdly between the extent of fat and bone marrow embolism and the extent of cardiovascular damage. It was apparent that death had occurred immediately following impact, and the extent of fat and bone marrow embolism varied inversely with the severity of the injuries found. The most severely injured victims were those seated in the rear cabin of the aircraft suggesting that this was the site of impact with the ground. Our studies show that pulmonary fat embolism occurs very rapidly after severe injury and is followed by increasing numbers of fat and bone marrow emboli depending on the nature of the mortal injuries. PMID:6888959

  4. Pulmonary and Cerebral Fat Embolism Syndrome After Total Knee Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, Soo Hyun; Chang, Hyuk Won; Sohn, Sung Il; Cho, Chul Hyun; Bae, Ki-Cheor

    2013-01-01

    Fat embolism occurs after long bone fracture or orthopedic surgery and usually shows mild symptom. But it rarely results in fat embolism syndrome, presenting as multiorgan dysfunction such as lung, brain and skin. Although the diagnosis of fat embolism syndrome is mostly based on clinical features, we experienced fat embolism syndrome involving lung and brain, showing typical imaging findings in pulmonary computed tomography and brain magnetic resonance image. So we present interesting case about fat embolism syndrome after total knee replacement with reviewing associated literatures including imaging findings. PMID:23671550

  5. Pulmonary imaging in fat embolism syndrome.

    PubMed

    Park, H M; Ducret, R P; Brindley, D C

    1986-07-01

    Ventilation/perfusion lung scanning can be used to effectively detect fat embolism following skeletal trauma. Typical ventilation/perfusion findings may be present when the chest radiograph is normal, and clinical findings are equivocal. PMID:3731656

  6. Factors that Alter Body Fat, Body Mass, and Fat-Free Mass in Pediatric Obesity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LeMura, Linda M.; Maziekas, Michael T.

    2002-01-01

    Investigated the effects of exercise programs on changes in body mass, fat-free mass, and body fat in obese children and adolescents. Research review indicated that exercise effectively helped reduce children's and adolescents' body composition variables. The most favorable body alterations occurred with low- intensity, long-duration exercise;…

  7. [Surgical reduction of fat surplus leading to pulmonary embolism].

    PubMed

    Richling, Nina; Friedrich, Elisabeth; Deutinger, Maria; Riedmüller, Eva-Maria; Janata, Karin; Laggner, Anton N

    2004-12-30

    Surgical reduction of fat surplus is usually performed on healthy individuals and is reported as a safe procedure as it is not associated with a lethal outcome. Due to the anticipation of peri- and postoperative bleeding as a result of the large wound area, which may have a negative influence on the cosmetic result, patients often receive no or only inadequate anticoagulation. We report three cases in which surgical reduction of fat surplus led to sudden collapse and cardiac arrest. In all of our patients, fatal pulmonary embolism was the cause of cardiac arrest. These patients received only inadequate or no anticoagulation. Early postoperative mobilization, elastic stockings and compressive wound-dressing did not prevent pulmonary embolism. In addition to early postoperative mobilization of the patient and even though there is a risk of perioperative bleeding complications, the use of anticoagulation is highly recommended in surgical procedures like abdominoplasty or dermolipectomy. If sudden dyspnea, chest pain, collapse or cardiac arrest occurs after surgical interventions like these, pulmonary embolism should be considered and further diagnostic steps should be initiated. PMID:15690971

  8. Compounds altering fat storage in Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Jordão, Rita; Garreta, Elba; Campos, Bruno; Lemos, Marco F L; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Tauler, Romà; Barata, Carlos

    2016-03-01

    The analysis of lipid disruptive effects in invertebrates is limited by our poor knowledge of the lipid metabolic pathways. A recent study showed that tributyltin activated the ecdysteroid, juvenile hormone and retinoic X receptor signaling pathways, and disrupted the dynamics of neutral lipids in the crustacean Daphnia magna impairing the transfer of triacylglycerols to eggs and hence promoting their accumulation in post-spawning females. Tributyltin disruptive effects correlated with lower fitness for offspring and adults. The present study aims to addresses effects of existing compounds on storage lipids in post-spawning females and their health effects. D. magna individuals were exposed 12 chemicals that included vertebrate obesogens (tributyltin, triphenyltin, bisphenol A, nonylphenol, di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate), other contaminants known to affect arthropods (pyriproxyfen, fenarimol, methoprene, emamectin benzoate and fluoxetine), as well as the natural hormones methyl farnesoate and 20-hydroxyecdysone. Reproductive effects were also assessed. Quantitative changes in storage lipids accumulated in lipid droplets were studied using Nile red staining, which showed a close relationship with whole organism levels of triacylglycerols. Ten compounds altered storage lipids in a concentration related manner enhancing (tributyltin, bisphenol A, methyl farnesoate, pyriproxyfen and 20-hydroxyecdysone) or decreasing (nonylphenol, fenarimol, emamectin benzoate, methoprene and fluoxetine) their levels in post-spawning females. Eight compounds that altered lipid levels also had detrimental effects on growth and/or reproduction. PMID:26747981

  9. High-fat diet alters gut microbiota physiology in mice.

    PubMed

    Daniel, Hannelore; Moghaddas Gholami, Amin; Berry, David; Desmarchelier, Charles; Hahne, Hannes; Loh, Gunnar; Mondot, Stanislas; Lepage, Patricia; Rothballer, Michael; Walker, Alesia; Böhm, Christoph; Wenning, Mareike; Wagner, Michael; Blaut, Michael; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Kuster, Bernhard; Haller, Dirk; Clavel, Thomas

    2014-02-01

    The intestinal microbiota is known to regulate host energy homeostasis and can be influenced by high-calorie diets. However, changes affecting the ecosystem at the functional level are still not well characterized. We measured shifts in cecal bacterial communities in mice fed a carbohydrate or high-fat (HF) diet for 12 weeks at the level of the following: (i) diversity and taxa distribution by high-throughput 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing; (ii) bulk and single-cell chemical composition by Fourier-transform infrared- (FT-IR) and Raman micro-spectroscopy and (iii) metaproteome and metabolome via high-resolution mass spectrometry. High-fat diet caused shifts in the diversity of dominant gut bacteria and altered the proportion of Ruminococcaceae (decrease) and Rikenellaceae (increase). FT-IR spectroscopy revealed that the impact of the diet on cecal chemical fingerprints is greater than the impact of microbiota composition. Diet-driven changes in biochemical fingerprints of members of the Bacteroidales and Lachnospiraceae were also observed at the level of single cells, indicating that there were distinct differences in cellular composition of dominant phylotypes under different diets. Metaproteome and metabolome analyses based on the occurrence of 1760 bacterial proteins and 86 annotated metabolites revealed distinct HF diet-specific profiles. Alteration of hormonal and anti-microbial networks, bile acid and bilirubin metabolism and shifts towards amino acid and simple sugars metabolism were observed. We conclude that a HF diet markedly affects the gut bacterial ecosystem at the functional level. PMID:24030595

  10. High-fat diet alters gut microbiota physiology in mice

    PubMed Central

    Daniel, Hannelore; Gholami, Amin Moghaddas; Berry, David; Desmarchelier, Charles; Hahne, Hannes; Loh, Gunnar; Mondot, Stanislas; Lepage, Patricia; Rothballer, Michael; Walker, Alesia; Böhm, Christoph; Wenning, Mareike; Wagner, Michael; Blaut, Michael; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Kuster, Bernhard; Haller, Dirk; Clavel, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The intestinal microbiota is known to regulate host energy homeostasis and can be influenced by high-calorie diets. However, changes affecting the ecosystem at the functional level are still not well characterized. We measured shifts in cecal bacterial communities in mice fed a carbohydrate or high-fat (HF) diet for 12 weeks at the level of the following: (i) diversity and taxa distribution by high-throughput 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing; (ii) bulk and single-cell chemical composition by Fourier-transform infrared- (FT-IR) and Raman micro-spectroscopy and (iii) metaproteome and metabolome via high-resolution mass spectrometry. High-fat diet caused shifts in the diversity of dominant gut bacteria and altered the proportion of Ruminococcaceae (decrease) and Rikenellaceae (increase). FT-IR spectroscopy revealed that the impact of the diet on cecal chemical fingerprints is greater than the impact of microbiota composition. Diet-driven changes in biochemical fingerprints of members of the Bacteroidales and Lachnospiraceae were also observed at the level of single cells, indicating that there were distinct differences in cellular composition of dominant phylotypes under different diets. Metaproteome and metabolome analyses based on the occurrence of 1760 bacterial proteins and 86 annotated metabolites revealed distinct HF diet-specific profiles. Alteration of hormonal and anti-microbial networks, bile acid and bilirubin metabolism and shifts towards amino acid and simple sugars metabolism were observed. We conclude that a HF diet markedly affects the gut bacterial ecosystem at the functional level. PMID:24030595

  11. Pentobarbital anesthesia alters pulmonary vascular response to neural antagonists.

    PubMed

    Nyhan, D P; Goll, H M; Chen, B B; Fehr, D M; Clougherty, P W; Murray, P A

    1989-05-01

    We investigated the effects of pentobarbital sodium anesthesia on vasoregulation of the pulmonary circulation. Our specific objectives were to 1) assess the net effect of pentobarbital on the base-line pulmonary vascular pressure-to-cardiac index (P/Q) relationship compared with that measured in conscious dogs, and 2) determine whether autonomic nervous system (ANS) regulation of the intact P/Q relationship is altered during pentobarbital. P/Q plots were constructed by graded constriction of the thoracic inferior vena cava, which produced stepwise decreases in Q. Pentobarbital (30 mg/kg iv) had no net effect on the base-line P/Q relationship. In contrast, changes in the conscious intact P/Q relationship in response to ANS antagonists were markedly altered during pentobarbital. Sympathetic alpha-adrenergic receptor block with prazosin caused active pulmonary vasodilation (P less than 0.01) in conscious dogs but caused vasoconstriction (P less than 0.01) during pentobarbital. Sympathetic beta-adrenergic receptor block with propranolol caused active pulmonary vasoconstriction (P less than 0.01) in both groups, but the magnitude of the vasoconstriction was attenuated (P less than 0.05) during pentobarbital at most levels of Q. Finally, cholinergic receptor block with atropine resulted in active pulmonary vasodilation (P less than 0.01) in conscious dogs, whereas vasoconstriction (P less than 0.01) was observed during pentobarbital. Thus, although pentobarbital had no net effect on the base-line P/Q relationship measured in conscious dogs, ANS regulation of the intact pulmonary vascular P/Q relationship was altered during pentobarbital anesthesia. PMID:2566280

  12. Alterations in lung arginine metabolism in lambs with pulmonary hypertension associated with increased pulmonary blood flow

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Shruti; Kumar, Sanjiv; Sud, Neetu; Wiseman, Dean A.; Tian, Jing; Rehmani, Imran; Datar, Sanjeev; Oishi, Peter; Fratz, Sohrab; Venema, Richard C.; Fineman, Jeffrey R.; Black, Stephen M.

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrate impaired nitric oxide (NO) signaling in children and animal models with congenital heart defects and increased pulmonary blood flow. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying these alterations remain incompletely understood. The purpose of this study was to determine if early changes in arginine metabolic pathways could play a role in the reduced NO signaling demonstrated in our lamb model of congenital heart disease with increased pulmonary blood flow (Shunt lambs). The activities of the arginine recycling enzymes, argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS) and argininosuccinate lyase (ASL) were both decreased in lung tissues of Shunt lambs while arginase activity was increased. Associated with these alterations, lung L-arginine levels were decreased. These changes correlated with an increase in NO synthase-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. This study provides further insights into the molecular mechanisms leading to decreased NO signaling in Shunt lambs and suggests that altered arginine metabolism may play a role in the development of the endothelial dysfunction associated with pulmonary hypertension secondary to increased pulmonary blood flow. PMID:19818875

  13. The role of methylmethacrylate monomer in the formation and haemodynamic outcome of pulmonary fat emboli.

    PubMed

    Elmaraghy, A W; Humeniuk, B; Anderson, G I; Schemitsch, E H; Richards, R R

    1998-01-01

    We examined the roles of methylmethacrylate (MMA) monomer and cementing technique in the formation, and haemodynamic outcome, of pulmonary fat emboli. The preparation of the femoral canal and the cementing technique were studied in four groups of adult dogs as follows: control (no preparation); lavage; cement pressurisation; and cement pressurisation after lavage. We measured the intramedullary pressure, pulmonary artery pressure (PAP), pulmonary capillary wedge pressure and bilateral femoral vein levels of triglyceride, cholesterol and MMA monomer at rest and after reaming, lavage, and cementing. Femoral vein triglyceride and cholesterol levels did not vary significantly from resting levels despite significant elevations in intramedullary pressure with reaming, lavage and cementing (p = 0.001). PAP was seen to rise significantly with reaming (p = 0.0038), lavage (p = 0.0031), cementing (p = 0.0024) and cementing after lavage (p = 0.0028) while the pulmonary capillary wedge pressure remained unchanged. MMA monomer was detected in femoral vein samples when cement pressurisation was used. Intramedullary lavage before cementing had no significant effect on the MMA level. Haemodynamic evidence of pulmonary embolism was noted with reaming and intramedullary canal preparation, irrespective of the presence of MMA monomer. We found no relationship between MMA monomer level and intramedullary pressure, PAP or pulmonary capillary wedge pressure. Our findings suggest that the presence of MMA monomer in femoral venous blood has no effect on the formation of fat emboli or their pulmonary haemodynamic outcome during cemented hip arthroplasty. PMID:9460974

  14. Altered artery mechanics and structure in monocrotaline pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Langleben, D; Szarek, J L; Coflesky, J T; Jones, R C; Reid, L M; Evans, J N

    1988-11-01

    Pulmonary hypertension in rats, induced by an injection of monocrotaline, is associated with changes in the wall structure of the pulmonary arterial bed. We have studied the effects of this remodeling on mechanical properties of cylindrical pulmonary artery segments from rats 21 days after monocrotaline (MCT) injection. Resting and active (KCl induced) circumference-tension relationships were established for segments of extrapulmonary and intrapulmonary arteries isolated from the hilum and the fifth lateral branch from the axial pathway (all preacinar). The thicknesses of the vessel wall, the media, and adventitia were measured at several positions around the circumference of the artery by computerized analysis of histological cross sections of the segments fixed at a standard circumference. Resting and active stress were also calculated. The study shows that active circumferential tension and active stress are reduced in vessels from MCT-treated rats. Based on our findings, it is unlikely that altered contractile function of preacinar arteries contributes significantly to the increased vascular resistance seen in this model. PMID:3145283

  15. Impact-driven, pulmonary emboli of osseous fat in exercise-induced bronchospasm.

    PubMed

    Simkin, Peter A; Snitily, Brian K

    2015-11-01

    Exercise induced bronchospasm (EIB) affects approximately 10% of normal individuals with higher prevalence rates among children, obese adults, and competitive athletes. Although hyperpnea with dry air is the best known cause, the problem is multifactorial with atopy, asthma and chlorine all playing established roles. To date, no clear mechanism has connected musculoskeletal loading with the ensuing pulmonary compromise. This paper reviews evidence that impact-driven pulses in subchondral bone pressure may push osseous fat cells into the local venous sinusoids. The resultant showers of microemboli must then travel to the lung where lysis of membrane phospholipids leads to leukotriene formation with resultant inflammation and bronchial hypersensitivity. Concurrently, the same emboli deliver triglyceride fuels for further physical activity. Thus, pulmonary microemboli derived from osseous fat may resolve the seeming paradox of athletic excellence in persons afflicted with exercise-induced bronchospasm. PMID:26328480

  16. Alteration of biophysical activity of pulmonary surfactant by aluminosilicate nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kondej, Dorota; Sosnowski, Tomasz R

    2013-02-01

    The influence of five different types of aluminosilicate nanoparticles (NPs) on the dynamic surface activity of model pulmonary surfactant (PS) (Survanta) was studied experimentally using oscillating bubble tensiometry. Bentonite, halloysite and montmorillonite (MM) NPs, which are used as fillers of polymer composites, were characterized regarding the size distribution, morphology and surface area. Particle doses applied in the studies were estimated based on the inhalation rate and duration, taking into account the expected aerosol concentration and deposition efficiency after penetration of NPs into the alveolar region. The results indicate that aluminosilicate NPs at concentrations in the pulmonary liquid above 0.1 mg cm(-3) are capable of promoting alterations of the original dynamic biophysical activity of the PS. This effect is indicated by deviation of the minimum surface tension, stability index and the size of surface tension hysteresis. Such response is dependent on the type of NPs present in the system and is stronger when particle concentration increases. It is suggested that interactions between NPs and the PS must be related to the surfactant adsorption on the suspended particles, while in the case of surface-modified clay NPs the additional washout of surface-active components may be expected. It is speculated that observed changes in surface properties of the surfactant may be associated with undesired health effects following extensive inhalation of aluminosilicate NPs in the workplace. PMID:23363039

  17. Fat adaptation science: low-carbohydrate, high- fat diets to alter fuel utilization and promote training adaptation.

    PubMed

    Hawley, John A

    2011-01-01

    The effect of manipulating an individual's habitual diet on skeletal muscle fuel utilization has been of longstanding interest to scientists, and it is now well established that changes in dietary intake that alter the concentration of blood-borne substrates and hormones cause substantial perturbations in the macronutrient storage profile of muscle and exert profound effects on rates of substrate oxidation during exercise. Only recently, however, has it become appreciated that nutrient-exercise interventions can modulate many contraction- induced responses in muscle, and that fuel availability per se provides a 'trigger' for adaptation. Consumption of low-carbohydrate, high- fat diets in the face of endurance training alters patterns of fuel utilization and subsequent exercise responses. Human studies show how low-carbohydrate, fat-rich diets interact with specific contractile stimulus to modulate many of the acute responses to exercise, thereby promoting or inhibiting subsequent training adaptation. PMID:22301836

  18. Pregnancy Complicated by Obesity Induces Global Transcript Expression Alterations in Visceral and Subcutaneous Fat

    PubMed Central

    Bashiri, Asher; Heo, Hye J.; Ben-Avraham, Danny; Mazor, Moshe; Budagov, Temuri; Einstein, Francine H.; Atzmon, Gil

    2014-01-01

    Maternal obesity is a significant risk factor for development of both maternal and fetal metabolic complications. Increase in visceral fat and insulin resistance is a metabolic hallmark of pregnancy, yet little is known how obesity alters adipose cellular function and how this may contribute to pregnancy morbidities. We sought to identify alterations in genome-wide transcription expression in both visceral (omental) and abdominal subcutaneous fat deposits in pregnancy complicated by obesity. Visceral and abdominal subcutaneous fat deposits were collected from normal weight and obese pregnant women (n=4/group) at time of scheduled uncomplicated cesarean section. A genome-wide expression array (Affymetrix Human Exon 1.0 st platform), validated by quantitative real-time PCR, was utilized to establish the gene transcript expression profile in both visceral and abdominal subcutaneous fat in normal weight and obese pregnant women. Global alteration in gene expression was identified in pregnancy complicated by obesity. These regions of variations lead to identification of indolethylamine N-methyltransferase (INMT), tissue factor pathway inhibitor-2 (TFPI-2), and ephrin type-B receptor 6 (EPHB6), not previously associated with fat metabolism during pregnancy. In addition, subcutaneous fat of obese pregnant women demonstrated increased coding protein transcripts associated with apoptosis compared to lean counterparts. Global alteration of gene expression in adipose tissue may contribute to adverse pregnancy outcomes associated with obesity. PMID:24696292

  19. The Effects of Aquaporin-1 in Pulmonary Edema Induced by Fat Embolism Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yiwei; Tian, Kun; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Rong; Shang, Jiawei; Jiang, Wei; Wang, Aizhong

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the role of aquaporin1 (AQP1) in the pathologic process of pulmonary edema induced by fat embolism syndrome (FES) and the effects of a free fatty acid (FFA) mixture on AQP1 expression in pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (PMVECs). In vivo, edema was more serious in FES mice compared with the control group. The expression of AQP1 and the wet-to-dry lung weight ratio (W/D) in the FES group were significantly increased compared with the control group. At the same time, inhibition of AQP1 decreased the pathological damage resulting from pulmonary edema. Then we performed a study in vitro to investigate whether AQP1 was induced by FFA release in FES. The mRNA and protein level of AQP1 were increased by FFAs in a dose- and time-dependent manner in PMVECs. In addition, the up-regulation of AQP1 was blocked by the inhibitor of p38 kinase, implicating the p38 MAPK pathway as involved in the FFA-induced AQP1 up-regulation in PMVECs. Our results demonstrate that AQP1 may play important roles in pulmonary edema induced by FES and can be regarded as a new therapy target for treatment of pulmonary edema induced by FES. PMID:27455237

  20. The Effects of Aquaporin-1 in Pulmonary Edema Induced by Fat Embolism Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yiwei; Tian, Kun; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Rong; Shang, Jiawei; Jiang, Wei; Wang, Aizhong

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the role of aquaporin1 (AQP1) in the pathologic process of pulmonary edema induced by fat embolism syndrome (FES) and the effects of a free fatty acid (FFA) mixture on AQP1 expression in pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (PMVECs). In vivo, edema was more serious in FES mice compared with the control group. The expression of AQP1 and the wet-to-dry lung weight ratio (W/D) in the FES group were significantly increased compared with the control group. At the same time, inhibition of AQP1 decreased the pathological damage resulting from pulmonary edema. Then we performed a study in vitro to investigate whether AQP1 was induced by FFA release in FES. The mRNA and protein level of AQP1 were increased by FFAs in a dose- and time-dependent manner in PMVECs. In addition, the up-regulation of AQP1 was blocked by the inhibitor of p38 kinase, implicating the p38 MAPK pathway as involved in the FFA-induced AQP1 up-regulation in PMVECs. Our results demonstrate that AQP1 may play important roles in pulmonary edema induced by FES and can be regarded as a new therapy target for treatment of pulmonary edema induced by FES. PMID:27455237

  1. Reconciling paradigms of abnormal pulmonary blood flow and quasi-malignant cellular alterations in pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Happé, C M; Szulcek, R; Voelkel, N F; Bogaard, H J

    2016-08-01

    In pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) structural and functional abnormalities of the small lung vessels interact and lead to a progressive increase in pulmonary vascular resistance and right heart failure. A current pathobiological concept characterizes PAH as a 'quasi-malignant' disease focusing on cancer-like alterations in endothelial cells (EC) and the importance of their acquired apoptosis-resistant, hyper-proliferative phenotype in the process of vascular remodeling. While changes in pulmonary blood flow (PBF) have been long-since recognized and linked to the development of PAH, little is known about a possible relationship between an altered PBF and the quasi-malignant cell phenotype in the pulmonary vascular wall. This review summarizes recognized and hypothetical effects of an abnormal PBF on the pulmonary vascular bed and links these to quasi-malignant changes found in the pulmonary endothelium. Here we describe that abnormal PBF does not only trigger a pulmonary vascular cell growth program, but may also maintain the cancer-like phenotype of the endothelium. Consequently, normalization of PBF and EC response to abnormal PBF may represent a treatment strategy in patients with established PAH. PMID:26804008

  2. Small pulmonary vascular alteration and acute exacerbations of COPD: quantitative computed tomography analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhiyue; Chen, Xuesong; Liu, Kouying; Xie, Weiping; Wang, Hong; Wei, Yongyue; Tang, Lijun; Zhu, Yinsu

    2016-01-01

    The morphologic alterations of pulmonary small vessels measured by computed tomography (CT) have been used to evaluate chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, the relationship between small pulmonary vascular alteration and acute exacerbations of COPD (AECOPD) is not well understood. The aim of this study was to evaluate the cross-sectional area (CSA) of small pulmonary vessel alterations measured on CT images and investigate its relationship with the COPD severity staged by the degree of airflow limitation and the occurrence of AECOPD. We retrospectively reviewed CT scans, clinical characteristics, and pulmonary function test results of 153 patients with COPD. All the patients were divided into AECOPD and non-AECOPD group according to the COPD staging and pulmonary function test results. The percentages of the total CSA less than 5 mm(2) and equal to 5-10 mm(2) over the lung area (%CSA<5 and %CSA5-10, respectively) were measured. The %CSA<5 steadily decreased in relation to the increase of COPD severity. In addition, %CSA<5 of the AECOPD group was significantly lower than that of the non-AECOPD group (0.41±0.13 versus 0.68±0.18, P<0.001), and the optimal cutoff value was 0.56 (sensitivity, 0.863; specificity, 0.731). Therefore, small pulmonary vascular alteration, as measured by %CSA<5, could indicate not only the degree of COPD severity, but also the occurrence of AECOPD. PMID:27578971

  3. Small pulmonary vascular alteration and acute exacerbations of COPD: quantitative computed tomography analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhiyue; Chen, Xuesong; Liu, Kouying; Xie, Weiping; Wang, Hong; Wei, Yongyue; Tang, Lijun; Zhu, Yinsu

    2016-01-01

    The morphologic alterations of pulmonary small vessels measured by computed tomography (CT) have been used to evaluate chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, the relationship between small pulmonary vascular alteration and acute exacerbations of COPD (AECOPD) is not well understood. The aim of this study was to evaluate the cross-sectional area (CSA) of small pulmonary vessel alterations measured on CT images and investigate its relationship with the COPD severity staged by the degree of airflow limitation and the occurrence of AECOPD. We retrospectively reviewed CT scans, clinical characteristics, and pulmonary function test results of 153 patients with COPD. All the patients were divided into AECOPD and non-AECOPD group according to the COPD staging and pulmonary function test results. The percentages of the total CSA less than 5 mm2 and equal to 5–10 mm2 over the lung area (%CSA<5 and %CSA5–10, respectively) were measured. The %CSA<5 steadily decreased in relation to the increase of COPD severity. In addition, %CSA<5 of the AECOPD group was significantly lower than that of the non-AECOPD group (0.41±0.13 versus 0.68±0.18, P<0.001), and the optimal cutoff value was 0.56 (sensitivity, 0.863; specificity, 0.731). Therefore, small pulmonary vascular alteration, as measured by %CSA<5, could indicate not only the degree of COPD severity, but also the occurrence of AECOPD. PMID:27578971

  4. Inflammatory and Metabolic Alterations of Kager's Fat Pad in Chronic Achilles Tendinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Fredberg, Ulrich; Kjær, Søren G.; Quistorff, Bjørn; Langberg, Henning; Hansen, Jacob B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Achilles tendinopathy is a painful inflammatory condition characterized by swelling, stiffness and reduced function of the Achilles tendon. Kager’s fat pad is an adipose tissue located in the area anterior to the Achilles tendon. Observations reveal a close physical interplay between Kager’s fat pad and its surrounding structures during movement of the ankle, suggesting that Kager’s fat pad may stabilize and protect the mechanical function of the ankle joint. Aim The aim of this study was to characterize whether Achilles tendinopathy was accompanied by changes in expression of inflammatory markers and metabolic enzymes in Kager’s fat pad. Methods A biopsy was taken from Kager’s fat pad from 31 patients with chronic Achilles tendinopathy and from 13 healthy individuals. Gene expression was measured by reverse transcription-quantitative PCR. Focus was on genes related to inflammation and lipid metabolism. Results Expression of the majority of analyzed inflammatory marker genes was increased in patients with Achilles tendinopathy compared to that in healthy controls. Expression patterns of the patient group were consistent with reduced lipolysis and increased fatty acid β-oxidation. In the fat pad, the pain-signaling neuropeptide substance P was found to be present in one third of the subjects in the Achilles tendinopathy group but in none of the healthy controls. Conclusion Gene expression changes in Achilles tendinopathy patient samples were consistent with Kager’s fat pad being more inflamed than in the healthy control group. Additionally, the results indicate an altered lipid metabolism in Kager’s fat pad of Achilles tendinopathy patients. PMID:25996876

  5. Coronary Artery Calcification, Epicardial Fat Burden, and Cardiovascular Events in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Schwarz, Esther I.; Possner, Mathias; Stehli, Julia; Sievi, Noriane A.; Clarenbach, Christian F.; Dey, Damini; Slomka, Piotr J.; Kaufmann, Philipp A.; Kohler, Malcolm

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) suffer from significantly more cardiovascular comorbidity and mortality than would be anticipated from conventional risk factors. The aim of this study was to determine whether COPD patients have a higher coronary artery calcium score (CACS) and epicardial fat burden, compared to control subjects, and their association with cardiovascular events. Methods From a registry of 1906 patients 81 patients with clinically diagnosed COPD were one-to-one matched to 81 non-COPD control subjects with a smoking history, according to their age, sex, and the number of classic cardiovascular risk factors (arterial hypertension, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, family history of premature coronary artery disease). CACS, epicardial fat, and subsequent major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) during follow-up were compared between groups. Results Patients with COPD (Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease-classification I: 5%, II: 23%, III: 16% and IV: 56%) showed no difference in CACS (median difference 68 Agatston Units [95% confidence interval -176.5 to 192.5], p=0.899) or epicardial fat volume (mean difference -0.5 cm3 [95% confidence interval -20.9 to 21.9], p=0.961) compared with controls. After a median follow-up of 42.6 months a higher incidence of MACE was observed in COPD patients (RR=2.80, p=0.016) compared with controls. Cox proportional hazard regression identified cardiac ischemias and CACS as independent predictors for MACE. Conclusion COPD patients experienced a higher MACE incidence compared to controls despite no baseline differences in coronary calcification and epicardial fat burden. Other mechanisms such as undersupply of medication seem to account for an excess cardiovascular comorbidity in COPD patients. PMID:26011039

  6. Infant formula alters surfactant protein A (SP-A) and SP-B expression in pulmonary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Maurice G; Atkins, Constance L; Bruce, Shirley R; Khan, Amir M; Liu, Yuying; Alcorn, Joseph L

    2011-09-01

    Surfactant proteins A (SP-A) and SP-B are critical in the ability of pulmonary surfactant to reduce alveolar surface tension and provide innate immunity. Aspiration of infant milk formula can lead to lung dysfunction, but direct effects of aspirated formula on surfactant protein expression in pulmonary cells have not been described. The hypothesis that infant formula alters surfactant protein homeostasis was tested in vitro by assessing surfactant protein gene expression in cultured pulmonary epithelial cell lines expressing SP-A and SP-B that were transiently exposed (6 hr) to infant formula. Steady-state levels of SP-A protein and mRNA and SP-B mRNA in human bronchiolar (NCI-H441) and mouse alveolar (MLE15) epithelial cells were reduced in a dose-dependent manner 18 hr after exposure to infant formula. SP-A mRNA levels remained reduced 42 hr after exposure, but SP-B mRNA levels increased 10-fold. Neither soy formula nor non-fat dry milk affected steady-state SP-A and SP-B mRNA levels; suggesting a role of a component of infant formula derived from cow milk. These results indicate that infant formula has a direct, dose-dependent effect to reduce surfactant protein gene expression. Ultimately, milk aspiration may potentially result in a reduced capacity of the lung to defend against environmental insults. PMID:21520433

  7. Pulmonary alterations associated with inhalation of occupational and environmental irritants.

    PubMed

    Castranova, V; Frazer, D G; Manley, L K; Dey, R D

    2002-02-01

    Many gases, vapors, or particles found in occupational and/or environmental settings can act as irritants. In the present study, sensory irritants are characterized by the stimulation of neuropeptide release from sensory nerves in the nasal mucosa, while pulmonary irritants are characterized by recruitment of PMN into bronchoalveolar airspaces, elevation of breathing frequency, and neuropeptide release from sensory fibers innervating the epithelium of the conducting airways. A review of data from our laboratory as well as results from others indicate that asphalt fume is a sensory irritant; toluene diisocyanate (TDI), methyl isocyanate, and machining fluid act as both sensory and pulmonary irritants; while cotton dust, agricultural dusts, microbial products, leather conditioner, and ozone exhibit responses characteristic of pulmonary irritants. PMID:11811921

  8. Rapidly reversible alterations of pulmonary epithelial permeability induced by smoking

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, G.R.; Uszler, J.M.; Effros, R.M.; Reid, E.

    1983-01-01

    A radioaerosol procedure using /sup 99m/Tc-DTPA (diethylene triamine penta acetate) was used to evaluate the permeability of the pulmonary epithelium in smokers and nonsmokers. The average clearance of this indicator from the lungs of smokers without significant airway obstruction exceeded that found in normal subjects by an average factor of more than five. This abnormality was observed throughout all lung regions. /sup 99m/Tc-DTPA clearance decreased rapidly during the week after smoking was discontinued. It is concluded that smoking results in a rapidly reversible increase in pulmonary epithelial permeability.

  9. Molecular mechanisms of hypoxia-inducible factor-induced pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cell alterations in pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Veith, Christine; Schermuly, Ralph T; Brandes, Ralf P; Weissmann, Norbert

    2016-03-01

    Oxygen (O2) is essential for the viability and function of most metazoan organisms and thus is closely monitored at both the organismal and the cellular levels. However, alveoli often encounter decreased O2 levels (hypoxia), leading to activation of physiological or pathophysiological responses in the pulmonary arteries. Such changes are achieved by activation of transcription factors. The hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) are the most prominent hypoxia-regulated transcription factors in this regard. HIFs bind to hypoxia-response elements (HREs) in the promoter region of target genes, whose expression and translation allows the organism, amongst other factors, to cope with decreased environmental O2 partial pressure (pO2). However, prolonged HIF activation can contribute to major structural alterations, especially in the lung, resulting in the development of pulmonary hypertension (PH). PH is characterized by a rise in pulmonary arterial pressure associated with pulmonary arterial remodelling, concomitant with a reduced intravascular lumen area. Patients with PH develop right heart hypertrophy and eventually die from right heart failure. Thus, understanding the molecular mechanisms of HIF regulation in PH is critical for the identification of novel therapeutic strategies. This review addresses the relationship of hypoxia and the HIF system with pulmonary arterial dysfunction in PH. We particularly focus on the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the HIF-driven pathophysiological processes. PMID:26228924

  10. Metabolic alterations following visceral fat removal and expansion: Beyond anatomic location.

    PubMed

    Foster, Michelle T; Pagliassotti, Michael J

    2012-10-01

    Increased visceral adiposity is a risk factor for metabolic disorders such as dyslipidemia, hypertension, insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes, whereas peripheral (subcutaneous) obesity is not. Though the specific mechanisms which contribute to these adipose depot differences are unknown, visceral fat accumulation is proposed to result in metabolic dysregulation because of increased effluent, e.g., fatty acids and/or adipokines/cytokines, to the liver via the hepatic portal vein. Pathological significance of visceral fat accumulation is also attributed to adipose depot/adipocyte-specific characteristics, specifically differences in structural, physiologic and metabolic characteristics compared with subcutaneous fat. Fat manipulations, such as removal or transplantation, have been utilized to identify location dependent or independent factors that play a role in metabolic dysregulation. Obesity-induced alterations in adipose tissue function/intrinsic characteristics, but not mass, appear to be responsible for obesity-induced metabolic dysregulation, thus "quality" is more important than "quantity." This review summarizes the implications of obesity-induced metabolic dysfunction as it relates to anatomic site and inherent adipocyte characteristics. PMID:23700533

  11. Surfactant Protein D Deficiency in Mice Is Associated with Hyperphagia, Altered Fat Deposition, Insulin Resistance, and Increased Basal Endotoxemia

    PubMed Central

    Rahbek, Martin K. U.; Kirketerp-Møller, Katrine L.; Hansen, Pernille B. L.; Bie, Peter; Kejling, Karin; Mandrup, Susanne; Hawgood, Samuel; Nielsen, Ole; Nielsen, Claus H.; Owens, Trevor; Holmskov, Uffe; Sørensen, Grith L.

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary surfactant protein D (SP-D) is a host defence lectin of the innate immune system that enhances clearance of pathogens and modulates inflammatory responses. Recently it has been found that systemic SP-D is associated with metabolic disturbances and that SP-D deficient mice are mildly obese. However, the mechanism behind SP-D's role in energy metabolism is not known. Here we report that SP-D deficient mice had significantly higher ad libitum energy intake compared to wild-type mice and unchanged energy expenditure. This resulted in accumulation but also redistribution of fat tissue. Blood pressure was unchanged. The change in energy intake was unrelated to the basal levels of hypothalamic Pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) and Agouti-related peptide (AgRP) gene expression. Neither short time systemic, nor intracereberoventricular SP-D treatment altered the hypothalamic signalling or body weight accumulation. In ad libitum fed animals, serum leptin, insulin, and glucose were significantly increased in mice deficient in SP-D, and indicative of insulin resistance. However, restricted diets eliminated all metabolic differences except the distribution of body fat. SP-D deficiency was further associated with elevated levels of systemic bacterial lipopolysaccharide. In conclusion, our findings suggest that lack of SP-D mediates modulation of food intake not directly involving hypothalamic regulatory pathways. The resulting accumulation of adipose tissue was associated with insulin resistance. The data suggest SP-D as a regulator of energy intake and body composition and an inhibitor of metabolic endotoxemia. SP-D may play a causal role at the crossroads of inflammation, obesity, and insulin resistance. PMID:22509382

  12. Deregulation of the Protocadherin Gene FAT1 Alters Muscle Shapes: Implications for the Pathogenesis of Facioscapulohumeral Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Caruso, Nathalie; Herberth, Balàzs; Bartoli, Marc; Puppo, Francesca; Dumonceaux, Julie; Zimmermann, Angela; Denadai, Simon; Lebossé, Marie; Roche, Stephane; Geng, Linda; Magdinier, Frederique; Attarian, Shahram; Bernard, Rafaelle; Maina, Flavio; Levy, Nicolas; Helmbacher, Françoise

    2013-01-01

    Generation of skeletal muscles with forms adapted to their function is essential for normal movement. Muscle shape is patterned by the coordinated polarity of collectively migrating myoblasts. Constitutive inactivation of the protocadherin gene Fat1 uncoupled individual myoblast polarity within chains, altering the shape of selective groups of muscles in the shoulder and face. These shape abnormalities were followed by early onset regionalised muscle defects in adult Fat1-deficient mice. Tissue-specific ablation of Fat1 driven by Pax3-cre reproduced muscle shape defects in limb but not face muscles, indicating a cell-autonomous contribution of Fat1 in migrating muscle precursors. Strikingly, the topography of muscle abnormalities caused by Fat1 loss-of-function resembles that of human patients with facioscapulohumeral dystrophy (FSHD). FAT1 lies near the critical locus involved in causing FSHD, and Fat1 mutant mice also show retinal vasculopathy, mimicking another symptom of FSHD, and showed abnormal inner ear patterning, predictive of deafness, reminiscent of another burden of FSHD. Muscle-specific reduction of FAT1 expression and promoter silencing was observed in foetal FSHD1 cases. CGH array-based studies identified deletion polymorphisms within a putative regulatory enhancer of FAT1, predictive of tissue-specific depletion of FAT1 expression, which preferentially segregate with FSHD. Our study identifies FAT1 as a critical determinant of muscle form, misregulation of which associates with FSHD. PMID:23785297

  13. [Hepatic steatosis, visceral fat and metabolic alterations in apparently healthy overweight/obese individuals].

    PubMed

    Ryder, Elena; Mijac, Volga; Fernández, Erika; Palazzi, Nora; Morales, María Carolina; Connell, Lissette; Parra, Agner; Romero, Marlon; Fernández, Nelson

    2014-03-01

    Clinical observation indicates that many obese individuals do not display important metabolic alterations. Consequently, the objective of this study was to establish whether simple obesity, non concurrent with other important risk factors, was associated with metabolic alterations; or if the phenomenon known as "obesity paradox" was present. A clinical history, measurements of anthropometric and metabolic parameters and estimation of hepatic steatosis and visceral fat, were determined in 30, apparently healthy, individuals from Maracaibo, Venezuela, between 20 and 59 years of age and a body mass index (BMI) above 25 kg/m2, and compared to a lean control group of 11 individuals with BMI less than 25 kg/m2. The study demonstrated that only one third of overweight/obese individuals (OW/OB), with high body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC), presented elevated values of insulin, HOMA-IR and triglycerides. Nevertheless, the presence of hepatic steatosis was elevated in the OW/OB group (91%) vs. 9% in the control group. The visceral fat in the lean control group was associated with both, WC and glycemia; however, it was not related to the BMI or insulin, HOMA-IR and HDLc. The visceral fat in the OW/OB group, although elevated in relation to the lean group, revealed a loss of these associations. In the OW/OB it was the BMI that was associated with insulin and HOMA-IR. The results emphasize the importance of investigating for the presence of hepatic steatosis, rather than visceral fat, in individuals with OW/OB, to identify subjects with high cardiometabolic risk. PMID:24758097

  14. MicroRNA Expression Signature Is Altered in the Cardiac Remodeling Induced by High Fat Diets.

    PubMed

    Guedes, Elaine Castilho; França, Gustavo Starvaggi; Lino, Caroline Antunes; Koyama, Fernanda Christtanini; Moreira, Luana do Nascimento; Alexandre, Juliana Gomes; Barreto-Chaves, Maria Luiza M; Galante, Pedro Alexandre Favoretto; Diniz, Gabriela Placoná

    2016-08-01

    Recent studies have revealed the involvement of microRNAs (miRNAs) in the control of cardiac hypertrophy and myocardial function. In addition, several reports have demonstrated that high fat (HF) diet induces cardiac hypertrophy and remodeling. In the current study, we investigated the effect of diets containing different percentages of fat on the cardiac miRNA expression signature. To address this question, male C57Bl/6 mice were fed with a low fat (LF) diet or two HF diets, containing 45 kcal% fat (HF45%) and 60 kcal% fat (HF60%) for 10 and 20 weeks. HF60% diet promoted an increase on body weight, fasting glycemia, insulin, leptin, total cholesterol, triglycerides, and induced glucose intolerance. HF feeding promoted cardiac remodeling, as evidenced by increased cardiomyocyte transverse diameter and interstitial fibrosis. RNA sequencing analysis demonstrated that HF feeding induced distinct miRNA expression patterns in the heart. HF45% diet for 10 and 20 weeks changed the abundance of 64 and 26 miRNAs in the heart, respectively. On the other hand, HF60% diet for 10 and 20 weeks altered the abundance of 27 and 88 miRNAs in the heart, respectively. Bioinformatics analysis indicated that insulin signaling pathway was overrepresented in response to HF diet. An inverse correlation was observed between cardiac levels of GLUT4 and miRNA-29c. Similarly, we found an inverse correlation between expression of GSK3β and the expression of miRNA-21a-3p, miRNA-29c-3p, miRNA-144-3p, and miRNA-195a-3p. In addition, miRNA-1 overexpression prevented cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. Taken together, our results revealed differentially expressed miRNA signatures in the heart in response to different HF diets. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 1771-1783, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26638879

  15. High fat diet induced alterations of atrial electrical activities in mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fan; Hartnett, Sigurd; Sample, Alex; Schnack, Sabrina; Li, Yifan

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is a well-known risk factor for various cardiovascular diseases. Recent clinical data showed that overweight and obese patients have higher incidence of atrial fibrillation (AF) compared with individuals with normal body weights, but the underlying mechanisms remain to be elucidated. In this study, we investigated the effects of a high fat diet on atrial activities in mice. ICR male mice were fed a regular diet (RD) or a high fat diet (HFD) for 8 weeks. Mice fed HFD showed significantly greater body weight gains and visceral fat accumulation compared with RD mice. Under anesthetic condition, baseline arterial blood pressure and heart rate were not significantly different between RD and HFD groups. Although no spontaneous or atrial stimulation-induced atrial fibrillation was observed, this study revealed several alterations in the activities and protein levels in the atria in HFD mice. Surface electrocardiogram (ECG) revealed significantly shortened PR interval in HFD mice. In the atrial stimulation experiments, the sinoatrial (SA) node recovery time was significantly prolonged whereas the atrial effective refractory period was significantly reduced in HFD mice as compared with RD mice. Western blot showed protein levels of two major potassium channels, Kv1.5 and Kv4.2/3, were significantly increased in atria of HFD mice. These data indicate that HFD induces atrial electrophysiological remodeling in mice, which may be a potential mechanism underlying the increased risk for atrial arrhythmias in obesity and metabolic disorders. PMID:27073731

  16. High fat diet alters lactation outcomes: possible involvement of inflammatory and serotonergic pathways.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Laura L; Grayson, Bernadette E; Yadav, Ekta; Seeley, Randy J; Horseman, Nelson D

    2012-01-01

    Delay in the onset of lactogenesis has been shown to occur in women who are obese, however the mechanism altered within the mammary gland causing the delay remains unknown. Consumption of high fat diets (HFD) has been previously determined to result decreased litters and litter numbers in rodent models due to a decrease in fertility. We examined the effects of feeding a HFD (60% kcal from fat) diet versus a low-fat diet (LFD; 10% kcal from fat) to female Wistar rats on lactation outcomes. Feeding of HFD diet resulted in increased pup weights compared to pups from LFD fed animals for 4 d post-partum. Lactation was delayed in mothers on HFD but they began to produce copious milk volumes beginning 2 d post-partum, and milk yield was similar to LFD by day 3. Mammary glands collected from lactating animals on HFD diet, displayed a disrupted morphologies, with very few and small alveoli. Consistently, there was a significant decrease in the mRNA expression of milk protein genes, glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1) and keratin 5 (K5), a luminobasal cell marker in the mammary glands of HFD lactating animals. Expression of tryptophan hydroxylase 1 (TPH1), the rate-limiting enzyme in serotonin (5-HT) biosynthesis, and the 5-HT(7) receptor (HTR7), which regulates mammary gland involution, were significantly increased in mammary glands of HFD animals. Additionally, we saw elevation of the inflammatory markers interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF- α). These results indicate that consumption of HFD impairs mammary parenchymal tissue and impedes its ability to synthesize and secrete milk, possibly through an increase in 5-HT production within the mammary gland leading to an inflammatory process. PMID:22403677

  17. Airway mechanics and lung tissue viscoelasticity: effects of altered blood hematocrit in the pulmonary circulation.

    PubMed

    Peták, Ferenc; Fodor, Gergely H; Babik, Barna; Habre, Walid

    2016-07-01

    The contribution of the hematocrit (Hct) of the blood in the pulmonary vasculature to the overall lung mechanics has not been characterized. We therefore set out to establish how changes of the Hct level in the pulmonary circulation affect the airway and lung tissue viscoelastic properties. The Hct level of the blood in an isolated perfused rat lung model was randomly altered. Intermediate (26.5%), followed by low (6.6%) or normal (43.7%), Hct was set in two consecutive sequences. The pulmonary capillary pressure was maintained constant throughout the experiment, and the pulmonary hemodynamic parameters were monitored continuously. The airway resistance (Raw), the viscous (G) and elastic (H) parameters, and the hysteresivity (η = G/H) of the lung tissues were obtained from measurements of forced oscillatory input impedance data. Raw was not affected by the alterations of the Hct levels. As concerns the lung tissues, the decrease of Hct to intermediate or low levels resulted in close to proportional decreases in the viscoelastic parameters G [16.5 ± 7.7% (SD), 12.1 ± 9.5%, P < 0.005] and H (13.2 ± 8.6%, 10.8 ± 4.7%, P < 0.001). No significant changes in η were detected in a wide range of Hct, which indicates that coupled processes cause alterations in the resistive and elastic properties of the lungs following Hct changes in the pulmonary circulation. The diminishment of the viscous and elastic parameters of the pulmonary parenchyma following a reduction of blood Hct demonstrates the significant contribution of the red blood cells to the overall lung viscoelasticity. PMID:27283919

  18. Altered carnitine homeostasis is associated with decreased mitochondrial function and altered nitric oxide signaling in lambs with pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Shruti; Sud, Neetu; Wiseman, Dean A.; Carter, A. Lee; Kumar, Sanjiv; Hou, Yali; Rau, Thomas; Wilham, Jason; Harmon, Cynthia; Oishi, Peter; Fineman, Jeffrey R.; Black, Stephen M.

    2008-01-01

    Utilizing aortopulmonary vascular graft placement in the fetal lamb, we have developed a model (shunt) of pulmonary hypertension that mimics congenital heart disease with increased pulmonary blood flow. Our previous studies have identified a progressive development of endothelial dysfunction in shunt lambs that is dependent, at least in part, on decreased nitric oxide (NO) signaling. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the possible role of a disruption in carnitine metabolism in shunt lambs and to determine the effect on NO signaling. Our data indicate that at 2 wk of age, shunt lambs have significantly reduced expression (P < 0.05) of the key enzymes in carnitine metabolism: carnitine palmitoyltransferases 1 and 2 as well as carnitine acetyltransferase (CrAT). In addition, we found that CrAT activity was inhibited due to increased nitration. Furthermore, free carnitine levels were significantly decreased whereas acylcarnitine levels were significantly higher in shunt lambs (P < 0.05). We also found that alterations in carnitine metabolism resulted in mitochondrial dysfunction, since shunt lambs had significantly decreased pyruvate, increased lactate, and a reduced pyruvate/lactate ratio. In pulmonary arterial endothelial cells cultured from juvenile lambs, we found that mild uncoupling of the mitochondria led to a decrease in cellular ATP levels and a reduction in both endothelial NO synthase-heat shock protein 90 (eNOS-HSP90) interactions and NO signaling. Similarly, in shunt lambs we found a loss of eNOS-HSP90 interactions that correlated with a progressive decrease in NO signaling. Our data suggest that mitochondrial dysfunction may play a role in the development of endothelial dysfunction and pulmonary hypertension and increased pulmonary blood flow. PMID:18024721

  19. Chronic social stress during adolescence in mice alters fat distribution in late life: prevention by antidepressant treatment.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, M V; Czisch, M; Sterlemann, V; Reinel, C; Sämann, P; Müller, M B

    2009-01-01

    Obesity and visceral fat accumulation are key features of the metabolic syndrome that represents one of the main health problems in western societies due to its neurovascular and cardiovascular complications. Epidemiological studies have identified chronic stress exposure as an important risk factor for the development of obesity and metabolic syndrome, but also psychiatric diseases, especially affective disorders. However, it is still unclear if chronic stress has merely transient or potentially lasting effects on body composition. Here, we investigated the effects of chronic social stress during the adolescent period on body fat composition in mice one year after the cessation of the stressor. We found that stress exposure during the adolescent period decreases subcutaneous fat content, without change in visceral fat, and consequently increases the visceral fat/subcutaneous fat ratio in adulthood. Further, we demonstrated that treatment with a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (paroxetine) during stress exposure prevented later effects on body fat distribution. These results from a recently validated chronic stress paradigm in mice provide evidence that stressful experiences during adolescence can alter body fat distribution in adulthood, thereby possibly contributing to an increased risk for metabolic diseases. Antidepressant treatment disrupted this effect underlining the link between the stress hormone system, metabolic homeostasis and affective disorders. PMID:18951248

  20. Older adults have an altered chylomicron response to a high-fat meal.

    PubMed

    Milan, Amber M; Nuora, Anu; Pundir, Shikha; Pileggi, Chantal A; Markworth, James F; Linderborg, Kaisa M; Cameron-Smith, David

    2016-03-14

    Ageing is associated with a prolonged and exaggerated postprandial lipaemia. This study aimed to examine the contribution of alterations in chylomicron synthesis, size and lipid composition to increased lipaemia. Healthy older (60-75 years; n 15) and younger (20-25 years; n 15) subjects consumed a high-fat breakfast. Chylomicron dynamics and fatty acid composition were analysed for 5 h in the postprandial state. Plasma TAG levels were elevated following the meal in the older subjects, relative to younger subjects (P<0·01). For older subjects compared with younger subjects, circulating chylomicron particle size was smaller (P<0·05), with greater apoB content (P<0·05) at all postprandial time points. However, total chylomicron TAG concentration between the groups was unaltered post-meal. Compared with younger subjects, the older subjects exhibited a greater proportion of oleic acid in the TAG and phospholipid (PL) fraction (P<0·05), plus lower proportions of linoleic acid in the TAG fraction of the chylomicrons (P<0·01). Thus, following the ingestion of a high-fat meal, older individuals demonstrate both smaller, more numerous chylomicrons, with a greater total MUFA and lower PUFA contents. These data suggest that the increased postprandial lipaemia of ageing cannot be attributed to increased chylomicron TAG. Rather, ageing is associated with changes in chylomicron particle size, apoB content and fatty acid composition of the chylomicron TAG and PL fractions. PMID:26767323

  1. Altering the sex determination pathway in Drosophila fat body modifies sex-specific stress responses

    PubMed Central

    Neckameyer, Wendi S.

    2014-01-01

    The stress response in Drosophila melanogaster reveals sex differences in behavior, similar to what has been observed in mammals. However, unlike mammals, the sex determination pathway in Drosophila is well established, making this an ideal system to identify factors involved in the modulation of sex-specific responses to stress. In this study, we show that the Drosophila fat body, which has been shown to be important for energy homeostasis and sex determination, is a dynamic tissue that is altered in response to stress in a sex and time-dependent manner. We manipulated the sex determination pathway in the fat body via targeted expression of transformer and transformer-2 and analyzed these animals for changes in their response to stress. In the majority of cases, manipulation of transformer or transformer-2 was able to change the physiological output in response to starvation and oxidative stress to that of the opposite sex. Our data also uncover the possibility of additional downstream targets for transformer and transformer-2 that are separate from the sex determination pathway and can influence behavioral and physiological responses. PMID:24789992

  2. Diet-induced alterations in gut microflora contribute to lethal pulmonary damage in TLR2/TLR4 deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Yewei; Sun, Shengyi; Goodrich, Julia K.; Kim, Hana; Poole, Angela C.; Duhamel, Gerald E.; Ley, Ruth E.; Qi, Ling

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Chronic intake of Western diet has driven an epidemic of obesity and metabolic syndrome, but how it induces mortality remains unclear. Here we show that chronic intake of a high-fat diet (HFD), not a low-fat diet (LFD), leads to severe pulmonary damage and mortality in mice deficient in Toll-like receptors (TLR) 2 and 4 (DKO hereafter). Diet-induced pulmonary lesions are blocked by antibiotics treatment and transmissible to wildtype mice upon either cohousing or fecal transplantation, pointing to the existence of bacterial pathogens. Indeed, diet and innate deficiency exert significant impact on gut microbiota composition. Thus, chronic intake of HFD promotes severe pulmonary damage and mortality in DKO mice in part via gut dysbiosis, a finding that may be important for immunodeficient patients, particularly those on chemotherapy or radiotherapy, where gut microbiota-caused conditions are often life-threatening. PMID:24953658

  3. Androgen Deficiency Exacerbates High-Fat Diet-Induced Metabolic Alterations in Male Mice.

    PubMed

    Dubois, Vanessa; Laurent, Michaël R; Jardi, Ferran; Antonio, Leen; Lemaire, Katleen; Goyvaerts, Lotte; Deldicque, Louise; Carmeliet, Geert; Decallonne, Brigitte; Vanderschueren, Dirk; Claessens, Frank

    2016-02-01

    Androgen deficiency is associated with obesity, metabolic syndrome, and type 2 diabetes mellitus in men, but the mechanisms behind these associations remain unclear. In this study, we investigated the combined effects of androgen deficiency and high-fat diet (HFD) on body composition and glucose homeostasis in C57BL/6J male mice. Two models of androgen deficiency were used: orchidectomy (ORX) and androgen receptor knockout mice. Both models displayed higher adiposity and serum leptin levels upon HFD, whereas no differences were seen on a regular diet. Fat accumulation in HFD ORX animals was accompanied by increased sedentary behavior and occurred in spite of reduced food intake. HFD ORX mice showed white adipocyte hypertrophy, correlated with decreased mitochondrial content but not function as well as increased lipogenesis and decreased lipolysis suggested by the up-regulation of fatty acid synthase and the down-regulation of hormone-sensitive lipase. Both ORX and androgen receptor knockout exacerbated HFD-induced glucose intolerance by impairing insulin action in liver and skeletal muscle, as evidenced by the increased triglyceride and decreased glycogen content in these tissues. In addition, serum IL-1β levels were elevated, and pancreatic insulin secretion was impaired after ORX. Testosterone but not dihydrotestosterone supplementation restored the castration effects on body composition and glucose homeostasis. We conclude that sex steroid deficiency in combination with HFD exacerbates adiposity, insulin resistance, and β-cell failure in 2 preclinical male mouse models. Our findings stress the importance of a healthy diet in a clinical context of androgen deficiency and may have implications for the prevention of metabolic alterations in hypogonadal men. PMID:26562264

  4. Megalin-Mediated Tubuloglomerular Alterations in High-Fat Diet-Induced Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Kuwahara, Shoji; Hosojima, Michihiro; Kaneko, Reika; Aoki, Hiroyuki; Nakano, Daisuke; Sasagawa, Taiji; Kabasawa, Hideyuki; Kaseda, Ryohei; Yasukawa, Ryota; Ishikawa, Tomomi; Suzuki, Akiyo; Sato, Hiroyoshi; Kageyama, Shun; Tanaka, Takahiro; Kitamura, Nobutaka; Narita, Ichiei; Komatsu, Masaaki; Nishiyama, Akira; Saito, Akihiko

    2016-07-01

    Obesity, an important risk factor for metabolic syndrome (MetS) and cardiovascular disease, is often complicated by CKD, which further increases cardiovascular risk and causes ESRD. To elucidate the mechanism underlying this relationship, we investigated the role of the endocytic receptor megalin in proximal tubule epithelial cells (PTECs). We studied a high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity/MetS model using kidney-specific mosaic megalin knockout (KO) mice. Compared with control littermates fed a normal-fat diet, control littermates fed an HFD for 12 weeks showed autolysosomal dysfunction with autophagy impairment and increased expression of hypertrophy, lipid peroxidation, and senescence markers in PTECs of the S2 segment, peritubular capillary rarefaction with localized interstitial fibrosis, and glomerular hypertrophy with mesangial expansion. These were ameliorated in HFD-fed megalin KO mice, even though these mice had the same levels of obesity, dyslipidemia, and hyperglycemia as HFD-fed control mice. Intravital renal imaging of HFD-fed wild-type mice also demonstrated the accumulation of autofluorescent lipofuscin-like substances in PTECs of the S2 segment, accompanied by focal narrowing of tubular lumens and peritubular capillaries. In cultured PTECs, fatty acid-rich albumin induced the increased expression of genes encoding PDGF-B and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 via megalin, with large (auto)lysosome formation, compared with fatty acid-depleted albumin. Collectively, the megalin-mediated endocytic handling of glomerular-filtered (lipo)toxic substances appears to be involved primarily in hypertrophic and senescent PTEC injury with autophagy impairment, causing peritubular capillary damage and retrograde glomerular alterations in HFD-induced kidney disease. Megalin could be a therapeutic target for obesity/MetS-related CKD, independently of weight, dyslipidemia, and hyperglycemia modification. PMID:26534923

  5. Altered Expression of Bone Morphogenetic Protein Accessory Proteins in Murine and Human Pulmonary Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Noelle; Gaynor, Katherine U; Rowan, Simon C; Walsh, Sinead M; Fabre, Aurelie; Boylan, John; Keane, Michael P; McLoughlin, Paul

    2016-03-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is a chronic, progressive fibrotic disease with a poor prognosis. The balance between transforming growth factor β1 and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling plays an important role in tissue homeostasis, and alterations can result in pulmonary fibrosis. We hypothesized that multiple BMP accessory proteins may be responsible for maintaining this balance in the lung. Using the bleomycin mouse model for fibrosis, we examined an array of BMP accessory proteins for changes in mRNA expression. We report significant increases in mRNA expression of gremlin 1, noggin, follistatin, and follistatin-like 1 (Fstl1), and significant decreases in mRNA expression of chordin, kielin/chordin-like protein, nephroblastoma overexpressed gene, and BMP and activin membrane-bound inhibitor (BAMBI). Protein expression studies demonstrated increased levels of noggin, BAMBI, and FSTL1 in the lungs of bleomycin-treated mice and in the lungs of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis patients. Furthermore, we demonstrated that transforming growth factor β stimulation resulted in increased expression of noggin, BAMBI, and FSTL1 in human small airway epithelial cells. These results provide the first evidence that multiple BMP accessory proteins are altered in fibrosis and may play a role in promoting fibrotic injury. PMID:26765958

  6. Low carbohydrate/high-fat diet attenuates cardiac hypertrophy, remodeling, and altered gene expression in hypertension

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of dietary fat intake on the development of left ventricular hypertrophy and accompanying structural and molecular remodeling in response to hypertension are not understood. The present study compared the effects of a high-fat versus a low-fat diet on development of left ventricular hype...

  7. [Drug-induced alteration of the alveolar content of pulmonary surfactant ].

    PubMed

    Alcindor, L G

    1982-05-01

    Pulmonary surfactant is a lipoprotein made up mostly of tensio-active phospholipids. It is synthesized by type II pneumocytes and accumulates as lamellar bodies before being excreted into pulmonary alveoli where it fills intercellular spaces and results in a liquid film (about 1 micron thick) covering the alveolar wall. Surfactant turnover occurs through the action of phospholipases from the alveolus or pneumocytes. Level of alveolar surfactant dependents on the ratio of synthesis and degradation of its principal constituent, dipalmitoyl-phosphatidylcholine. Many substances are known to be able of alter this ratio. Among these, synthetic glucocorticosteroids appear to be the most active in increasing alveolar surfactant. The multiple possible sites of action of these steroids explain their relative efficacy in the prevention of respiratory distress in humans. Studies in progress should increase the number and the quality of drugs available for this purpose. PMID:6896976

  8. In utero and postnatal exposure to arsenic alters pulmonary structure and function

    SciTech Connect

    Lantz, R. Clark Chau, Binh; Sarihan, Priyanka; Witten, Mark L.; Pivniouk, Vadim I.; Chen, Guan Jie

    2009-02-15

    In addition to cancer endpoints, arsenic exposures can also lead to non-cancerous chronic lung disease. Exposures during sensitive developmental time points can contribute to the adult disease. Using a mouse model, in utero and early postnatal exposures to arsenic (100 ppb or less in drinking water) were found to alter airway reactivity to methacholine challenge in 28 day old pups. Removal of mice from arsenic exposure 28 days after birth did not reverse the alterations in sensitivity to methacholine. In addition, adult mice exposed to similar levels of arsenic in drinking water did not show alterations. Therefore, alterations in airway reactivity were irreversible and specific to exposures during lung development. These functional changes correlated with protein and gene expression changes as well as morphological structural changes around the airways. Arsenic increased the whole lung levels of smooth muscle actin in a dose dependent manner. The level of smooth muscle mass around airways was increased with arsenic exposure, especially around airways smaller than 100 {mu}m in diameter. This increase in smooth muscle was associated with alterations in extracellular matrix (collagen, elastin) expression. This model system demonstrates that in utero and postnatal exposure to environmentally relevant levels of arsenic can irreversibly alter pulmonary structure and function in the adults.

  9. Prolonged high fat diet reduces dopamine reuptake without altering DAT gene expression.

    PubMed

    Cone, Jackson J; Chartoff, Elena H; Potter, David N; Ebner, Stephanie R; Roitman, Mitchell F

    2013-01-01

    The development of diet-induced obesity (DIO) can potently alter multiple aspects of dopamine signaling, including dopamine transporter (DAT) expression and dopamine reuptake. However, the time-course of diet-induced changes in DAT expression and function and whether such changes are dependent upon the development of DIO remains unresolved. Here, we fed rats a high (HFD) or low (LFD) fat diet for 2 or 6 weeks. Following diet exposure, rats were anesthetized with urethane and striatal DAT function was assessed by electrically stimulating the dopamine cell bodies in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and recording resultant changes in dopamine concentration in the ventral striatum using fast-scan cyclic voltammetry. We also quantified the effect of HFD on membrane associated DAT in striatal cell fractions from a separate group of rats following exposure to the same diet protocol. Notably, none of our treatment groups differed in body weight. We found a deficit in the rate of dopamine reuptake in HFD rats relative to LFD rats after 6 but not 2 weeks of diet exposure. Additionally, the increase in evoked dopamine following a pharmacological challenge of cocaine was significantly attenuated in HFD relative to LFD rats. Western blot analysis revealed that there was no effect of diet on total DAT protein. However, 6 weeks of HFD exposure significantly reduced the 50 kDa DAT isoform in a synaptosomal membrane-associated fraction, but not in a fraction associated with recycling endosomes. Our data provide further evidence for diet-induced alterations in dopamine reuptake independent of changes in DAT production and demonstrates that such changes can manifest without the development of DIO. PMID:23516454

  10. A high fat diet alters metabolic and bioenergetic function in the brain: A magnetic resonance spectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Raider, Kayla; Ma, Delin; Harris, Janna L; Fuentes, Isabella; Rogers, Robert S; Wheatley, Joshua L; Geiger, Paige C; Yeh, Hung-Wen; Choi, In-Young; Brooks, William M; Stanford, John A

    2016-07-01

    Diet-induced obesity and associated metabolic effects can lead to neurological dysfunction and increase the risk of developing Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD). Despite these risks, the effects of a high-fat diet on the central nervous system are not well understood. To better understand the mechanisms underlying the effects of high fat consumption on brain regions affected by AD and PD, we used proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) to measure neurochemicals in the hippocampus and striatum of rats fed a high fat diet vs. normal low fat chow. We detected lower concentrations of total creatine (tCr) and a lower glutamate-to-glutamine ratio in the hippocampus of high fat rats. Additional effects observed in the hippocampus of high fat rats included higher N-acetylaspartylglutamic acid (NAAG), and lower myo-inositol (mIns) and serine (Ser) concentrations. Post-mortem tissue analyses revealed lower phosphorylated AMP-activated protein kinase (pAMPK) in the striatum but not in the hippocampus of high fat rats. Hippocampal pAMPK levels correlated significantly with tCr, aspartate (Asp), phosphoethanolamine (PE), and taurine (Tau), indicating beneficial effects of AMPK activation on brain metabolic and energetic function, membrane turnover, and edema. A negative correlation between pAMPK and glucose (Glc) indicates a detrimental effect of brain Glc on cellular energy response. Overall, these changes indicate alterations in neurotransmission and in metabolic and bioenergetic function in the hippocampus and in the striatum of rats fed a high fat diet. PMID:27125544

  11. Frequent loss of heterozygosity and altered expression of the candidate tumor suppressor gene 'FAT' in human astrocytic tumors

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background We had earlier used the comparison of RAPD (Random Amplification of Polymorphic DNA) DNA fingerprinting profiles of tumor and corresponding normal DNA to identify genetic alterations in primary human glial tumors. This has the advantage that DNA fingerprinting identifies the genetic alterations in a manner not biased for locus. Methods In this study we used RAPD-PCR to identify novel genomic alterations in the astrocytic tumors of WHO grade II (Low Grade Diffuse Astrocytoma) and WHO Grade IV (Glioblastoma Multiforme). Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) of the altered region was studied by microsatellite and Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) markers. Expression study of the gene identified at the altered locus was done by semi-quantitative reverse-transcriptase-PCR (RT-PCR). Results Bands consistently altered in the RAPD profile of tumor DNA in a significant proportion of tumors were identified. One such 500 bp band, that was absent in the RAPD profile of 33% (4/12) of the grade II astrocytic tumors, was selected for further study. Its sequence corresponded with a region of FAT, a putative tumor suppressor gene initially identified in Drosophila. Fifty percent of a set of 40 tumors, both grade II and IV, were shown to have Loss of Heterozygosity (LOH) at this locus by microsatellite (intragenic) and by SNP markers. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR showed low FAT mRNA levels in a major subset of tumors. Conclusion These results point to a role of the FAT in astrocytic tumorigenesis and demonstrate the use of RAPD analysis in identifying specific alterations in astrocytic tumors. PMID:19126244

  12. Effects of altered ventilatory patterns of rabbit pulmonary endothelial angiotensin converting enzyme function, in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Toivonen, H.J.; Catravas, J.D.

    1986-03-01

    Because alveolar pressure can influence pulmonary blood flow, volume and surface area, the authors have studied the effects of airway pressure on endothelial angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) function in rabbit lungs in vivo, utilizing indicator dilution techniques with /sup 3/H-Benzoyl-Phe-Ala-Pro (BPAP) as substate. Static inclation of the lungs to a pressure of 0 or 5 mmHg did not change percent transpulmonary metabolism and Amax/Km ratio in comparison to control measurements during conventional mechanical ventilation. When the inflation pressure was increased to 10 mmHg, percent metabolism of /sup 3/H-BPAP remained unaltered but Amax/Km decreased over 40% from control. This decrease was in close relation to the reduction in pulmonary blood flow. Addition of 5 cm H/sub 2/O positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) to the mechanical ventilation also decreased Amax/Km values and pulmonary blood flow but did not influence percent metabolism of /sup 3/H-BPAP. These results suggest that the detected alterations in ACE kinetics were more likely due to hemodynamic changes than enzyme dysfunction. The authors propose that high static alveolar pressures as well as PEEP did not affect angiotensin converting enzyme function, but reduced the fraction of perfused microvessels reflected in changes in Amax/Km ratios.

  13. Correlation of Histologic Subtypes and Molecular Alterations in Pulmonary Adenocarcinoma: Therapeutic and Prognostic Implications.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jiyoon; Jang, Se Jin; Choi, Chang Min; Ro, Jae Y

    2016-09-01

    Major driver mutations of pulmonary adenocarcinomas have been identified and highlighted as actionable targets for precision cancer medicine. As phenotype is largely determined by genotype, genetic changes associated with morphologic features have recently received more attention from both pathologists and clinicians. The morphologic features of adenocarcinomas with mutations in EGFR or KRAS, or translocated ALK, have rarely been described. Pulmonary adenocarcinomas with EGFR mutations, the most common driver mutation encountered in Asian patients with pulmonary adenocarcinoma, show lepidic or papillary organotypic growth patterns. KRAS-mutated adenocarcinomas demonstrate nonorganotypic growth patterns, especially mucin-containing cells. P53 mutations are associated with aggressiveness rather than growth patterns. HER2 mutations are observed in mucinous adenocarcinoma and adenocarcinoma with micropapillary features. The histologic features of BRAF-mutated adenocarcinomas have not yet been established, but papillary, lepidic, solid, and acinar patterns have been observed. Adenocarcinomas with rearrangement of ALK, ROS1, and RET genes share similar histologic features, such as solid signet-ring cells and cribriform formation. However, adenocarcinomas with NRG1 rearrangements frequently show mucinous morphology. The histologic features and related mutations of adenocarcinomas with expression of programmed cell death-1 and programmed cell death ligands-1 may be helpful in guiding immunotherapeutic treatment. This review describes histopathologic features of adenocarcinomas and their correlation with molecular alterations. PMID:27403614

  14. Alterations in Lung Functions Based on BMI and Body Fat % Among Obese Indian Population at National Capital Region

    PubMed Central

    Kamal, Ritul; Bihari, Vipin; Sathian, Brijesh; Srivastava, Anup Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Background In India, non-asthmatic hospital admission case study has been conducted to find out the relationship between obesity and lung functions. The main objective of the present study was to find out the alterations in lung functions due to obesity among Indian population living at National Capital Region (NCR). Materials and Methods We examined 609 non obese and 211 obese subjects in a cross sectional study from National Capital Region, India with age group ranges between 18-70 years. BMI and body fat % was determined using body fat analyzer. Obese and non-obese subjects were classified based on criteria for BMI and Body fat %. Lung function test viz., FEV1 and PEFR were conducted using portable spirometer (PIKO-1). Results A significant correlation (p<0.05) was observed between BMI and PEFR among non-obese male and female subjects. Decline in PEFR and FEV1 values for corresponding increase in body fat % was observed among study subjects. A significant (p<0.01) decline in mean FEV1 and PEFR was observed among non-obese and obese subjects, compared to their Indian reference standards for lung functions. A significant negative correlation (p<0.01) was observed between body fat % and lung functions (FEV1, PEFR). Conclusion It is concluded that obese subjects are at a risk of lung function impairment, based on the criteria followed for BMI and body fat %. The study also demonstrate that body fat% classification as a better index for determination of obese subjects compared to BMI classification, with respect to lung function impairments. PMID:26913206

  15. Altered serum microRNAs as biomarkers for the early diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis infection

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) is a highly lethal infectious disease and early diagnosis of TB is critical for the control of disease progression. The objective of this study was to profile a panel of serum microRNAs (miRNAs) as potential biomarkers for the early diagnosis of pulmonary TB infection. Methods Using TaqMan Low-Density Array (TLDA) analysis followed by quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) validation, expression levels of miRNAs in serum samples from 30 patients with active tuberculosis and 60 patients with Bordetella pertussis (BP), varicella-zoster virus (VZV) and enterovirus (EV) were analyzed. Results The Low-Density Array data showed that 97 miRNAs were differentially expressed in pulmonary TB patient sera compared with healthy controls (90 up-regulated and 7 down-regulated). Following qRT-PCR confirmation and receiver operational curve (ROC) analysis, three miRNAs (miR-361-5p, miR-889 and miR-576-3p) were shown to distinguish TB infected patients from healthy controls and other microbial infections with moderate sensitivity and specificity (area under curve (AUC) value range, 0.711-0.848). Multiple logistic regression analysis of a combination of these three miRNAs showed an enhanced ability to discriminate between these two groups with an AUC value of 0.863. Conclusions Our study suggests that altered levels of serum miRNAs have great potential to serve as non-invasive biomarkers for early detection of pulmonary TB infection. PMID:23272999

  16. Ct Anatomy of Buccal Fat Pad and its Role in Volumetric Alterations of Face

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guryanov, R. A.; Guryanov, A. S.

    2015-05-01

    The aim of our study is the revision of the anatomy of buccal fat pad and its role in a volumetric pattern of face. Bichat fat pad is a fatty anatomical structure with body and numerous process enclosed between the bony and muscular structures in temporal, pterygopalatine fossae and extents to the cheek area. Nevertheless, the opinion about its structure and role in forming of volume pattern of face sometimes could be controversial. The Bichat fat pad consists on predominately hormone insensitive fat tissue with underdeveloped stroma, this leads to the stability of the fat pad volume and lesser radiodensity in contrast to the subcutaneous fat. Moreover, the buccal fat pad is delimited from the subcutaneous fat of cheek area by the strong capsule. This feature allows us to use CT to divide the Bichat fat pad from the surrounding tissues. The thorough embryological data provide the distinction of Bichat fat pad from the subcutaneous fat of cheek area even at the stage of development. On the other hand, the border between the masticatory muscles and the processes of the fat pad is not evident and resembles cellular spaces in the other anatomical areas. To elicit the role of the buccal fat pad in volume pattern of face and its function we have performed the several experiments, analyzed the postoperative results after Bichat fat pad resection using surface scanner and CT data. At first, we have performed the gravity test: the patient's face photogrammetry scanning in horizontal and vertical position of head and it revealed the excess of volume in temporal area in horizontal position. To exclude mechanism of overflowing of the skin and subcutaneous fat over the zygomatic arch we have placed the markers on the skin surface at the different areas of face including the projection of ligaments and found out that the migration of soft tissue over the zygomatic arch is about 3-5 mm and almost the same in temporal area. However, the acquired result was unsatisfying because

  17. High fat-fed diabetic mice present with profound alterations of the osteocyte network.

    PubMed

    Mabilleau, Guillaume; Perrot, Rodolphe; Flatt, Peter R; Irwin, Nigel; Chappard, Daniel

    2016-09-01

    Diabetes mellitus is considered to be an independent risk factor for bone fragility fractures. Reductions in bone mass, observed only with type 1 diabetes mellitus, as well as modifications of bone microarchitectures and tissue material properties are landmarks of diabetes-related bone alterations. An interesting feature observed in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is the augmented concentration in circulating sclerostin. This observation prompts us to hypothesize that modifications of osteocyte network and perilacunar mineralization occur in T2DM. As such, the aims of the present study were to ascertain by quantitative backscattered electron imaging, confocal microscopy and image analysis, modifications of perilacunar tissue mineral density, osteocyte morphology and osteocyte network topology in a mouse model of high fat-induced type 2 diabetes. As compared with lean control animals, diabetic mice exhibited a significant 48% decrease in perilacunar mineralization heterogeneity although mean perilacunar mineralization was unchanged. Furthermore, in diabetic animals, osteocyte volume was significantly augmented by 34% with no change in the overall number of dendrite processes. Finally, the network topology was profoundly modified in diabetic mice with increases in the mean node degree, mean node volume and hub numbers whilst the mean link length was reduced. Overall, it appeared that in diabetic animals, the dendritic network exhibited features of a scale-free network as opposed to the single-scale characteristic observed in lean controls. However, it is important to ascertain whether diabetic patients exhibit such modifications of the osteocyte network and whether anti-diabetic drugs could restore normal osteocyte and network parameters, thereby improving bone quality and protecting against fragility fractures. PMID:27312542

  18. Background diet and fat type alters plasma lipoprotein response but not aortic cholesterol accumulation in F1B golden syrian hamsters

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dietary modification alters plasma lipoprotein profiles and atherosclerotic lesion progression in humans and some animal models. Variability in response to diet induced atherosclerosis has been reported in hamsters. Assessed was the interaction between background diet composition and dietary fat typ...

  19. High Fat Diet Produces Brain Insulin Resistance, Synaptodendritic Abnormalities and Altered Behavior in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Steven E.; Lucki, Irwin; Brookshire, Bethany R.; Carlson, Gregory C.; Browne, Carolyn A.; Kazi, Hala; Bang, Sookhee; Choi, Bo-Ran; Chen, Yong; McMullen, Mary F.; Kim, Sangwon F.

    2014-01-01

    Insulin resistance and other features of the metabolic syndrome are increasingly recognized for their effects on cognitive health. To ascertain mechanisms by which this occurs, we fed mice a very high fat diet (60% kcal by fat) for 17 days or a moderate high fat diet (HFD, 45% kcal by fat) for 8 weeks and examined changes in brain insulin signaling responses, hippocampal synaptodendritic protein expression, and spatial working memory. Compared to normal control diet mice, cerebral cortex tissues of HFD mice were insulin-resistant as evidenced by failed activation of Akt, S6 and GSK3β with ex-vivo insulin stimulation. Importantly, we found that expression of brain IPMK, which is necessary for mTOR/Akt signaling, remained decreased in HFD mice upon activation of AMPK. HFD mouse hippocampus exhibited increased expression of serine-phosphorylated insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1-pS616), a marker of insulin resistance, as well as decreased expression of PSD-95, a scaffolding protein enriched in post-synaptic densities, and synaptopodin, an actin-associated protein enriched in spine apparatuses. Spatial working memory was impaired as assessed by decreased spontaneous alternation in a T-maze. These findings indicate that HFD is associated with telencephalic insulin resistance and deleterious effects on synaptic integrity and cognitive behaviors. PMID:24686304

  20. High-fat maternal diet during pregnancy persistently alters the offspring microbiome in a primate model

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jun; Prince, Amanda L.; Bader, David; Hu, Min; Ganu, Radhika; Baquero, Karalee; Blundell, Peter; Harris, R. Alan; Frias, Antonio E.; Grove, Kevin L.; Aagaard, Kjersti M.

    2014-01-01

    The intestinal microbiome is a unique ecosystem and an essential mediator of metabolism and obesity in mammals. However, studies investigating the impact of the diet on the establishment of the gut microbiome early in life are generally lacking, and most notably so in primate models. Here we report that a high-fat maternal or postnatal diet, but not obesity per se, structures the offspring’s intestinal microbiome in Macaca fuscata (Japanese macaque). The resultant microbial dysbiosis is only partially corrected by a low-fat, control diet after weaning. Unexpectedly, early exposure to a high-fat diet diminished the abundance of non-pathogenic Campylobacter in the juvenile gut, suggesting a potential role for dietary fat in shaping commensal microbial communities in primates. Our data challenge the concept of an obesity-causing gut microbiome, and rather provide evidence for a contribution of the maternal diet in establishing the microbiota, which in turn affects intestinal maintenance of metabolic health. PMID:24846660

  1. Abdominal Fat and Sarcopenia in Women Significantly Alter Osteoblasts Homeostasis In Vitro by a WNT/β-Catenin Dependent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Wannenes, Francesca; Papa, Vincenza; Greco, Emanuela A.; Fornari, Rachele; Marocco, Chiara; Di Luigi, Luigi; Donini, Lorenzo M.; Lenzi, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Obesity and sarcopenia have been associated with mineral metabolism derangement and low bone mineral density (BMD). We investigated whether imbalance of serum factors in obese or obese sarcopenic patients could affect bone cell activity in vitro. To evaluate and characterize potential cellular and molecular changes of human osteoblasts, cells were exposed to sera of four groups of patients: (1) affected by obesity with normal BMD (O), (2) affected by obesity with low BMD (OO), (3) affected by obesity and sarcopenia (OS), and (4) affected by obesity, sarcopenia, and low BMD (OOS) as compared to subjects with normal body weight and normal BMD (CTL). Patients were previously investigated and characterized for body composition, biochemical and bone turnover markers. Then, sera of different groups of patients were used to incubate human osteoblasts and evaluate potential alterations in cell homeostasis. Exposure to OO, OS, and OOS sera significantly reduced alkaline phosphatase, osteopontin, and BMP4 expression compared to cells exposed to O and CTL, indicating a detrimental effect on osteoblast differentiation. Interestingly, sera of all groups of patients induced intracellular alteration in Wnt/β-catenin molecular pathway, as demonstrated by the significant alteration of specific target genes expression and by altered β-catenin cellular compartmentalization and GSK3β phosphorylation. In conclusion our results show for the first time that sera of obese subjects with low bone mineral density and sarcopenia significantly alter osteoblasts homeostasis in vitro, indicating potential detrimental effects of trunk fat on bone formation and skeletal homeostasis. PMID:24963291

  2. Alterations of MEN1 and E-cadherin/β-catenin complex in sporadic pulmonary carcinoids

    PubMed Central

    VESCHI, SERENA; LATTANZIO, ROSSANO; ACETO, GITANA MARIA; CURIA, MARIA CRISTINA; MAGNASCO, SALVATORE; ANGELUCCI, DOMENICO; CAMA, ALESSANDRO; PIANTELLI, MAURO; BATTISTA, PASQUALE

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary carcinoids, distinct in typical and atypical, represent 2–5% of all primary lung tumors. The aim of this study was to investigate the molecular alterations correlated with the development of this form of neoplasms. A collection of 38 paraffin-embedded apparently sporadic carcinoids was investigated, through a combined study, for protein expression/localization of menin, p53, β-catenin and E-cadherin and for mutational analysis of the MEN1, TP53 and CTNNB1 genes. Menin was expressed in 71% of cases, with a prevalent cytoplasmic (c) localization, β-catenin was expressed in 68.4% of cases, of which 36.8% with a membranous (m) and 31.6% with a cytoplasmic localization. Membranous E-cadherin immunoreactivity was detected in 84.2% cases, nuclear p53 expression in 5.3% of cases. Positive correlation was found between c-menin and c-β-catenin expression (rho=0.439, P=0.008). In addition, m-β-catenin showed a positive correlation with both c-β-catenin and E-cadherin expression (rho=0.380, P=0.022 and rho=0.360, P=0.040, respectively). With regard to the E-cadherin/β-catenin complex, we found also a significant positive correlation between c-menin and ‘disarrayed’ β-catenin expression (rho=0.481, P= 0.007). MEN1 gene variants were characterized in 34% of cases. c-menin was more highly expressed in tumors with MEN1 variants, compared to tumors without MEN1 variants (P=0.023). Three nucleotide variants of TP53 were also detected. This study confirms the involvement of the MEN1 gene in the development of sporadic pulmonary carcinoids, demonstrates the accumulation of menin in the cytoplasm, and indicates that the disarrayed pattern of the complex significantly correlates with c-menin accumulation. PMID:22825745

  3. Table grape consumption reduces adiposity and markers of hepatic lipogenesis and alters gut microbiota in butter fat-fed mice.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Jessie; Collins, Brian; Wolf, Patricia G; Martinez, Kristina; Shen, Wan; Chuang, Chia-Chi; Zhong, Wei; Cooney, Paula; Cockrell, Chase; Chang, Eugene; Gaskins, H Rex; McIntosh, Michael K

    2016-01-01

    Our objective was to determine if consuming table grapes reduces adiposity and its metabolic consequences and alters gut microbiota in mice fed a high-fat (HF), butter-rich diet. C57BL/6J mice were fed a low-fat (LF) diet or HF diet with 3% or 5% grapes for 11weeks. Total body and inguinal fat were moderately but significantly reduced in mice fed both levels of grapes compared to their controls. Mice fed 5% grapes had lower liver weights and triglyceride levels and decreased expression of glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase (Gpat1) compared to the 5% controls. Mice fed 3% grapes had lower hepatic mRNA levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma 2, sterol-CoA desaturase 1, fatty-acid binding protein 4 and Gpat1 compared to the 3% controls. Although grape feeding had only a minor impact on markers of inflammation or lipogenesis in adipose tissue or intestine, 3% of grapes decreased the intestinal abundance of sulfidogenic Desulfobacter spp. and the Bilophila wadsworthia-specific dissimilatory sulfite reductase gene and tended to increase the abundance of the beneficial bacterium Akkermansia muciniphila compared to controls. In addition, Bifidobacterium, Lactobacillus, Allobaculum and several other genera correlated negatively with adiposity. Allobaculum in particular was increased in the LF and 3% grapes groups compared to the HF-fed controls. Notably, grape feeding attenuated the HF-induced impairment in epithelial localization of the intestinal tight junction protein zonula occludens. Collectively, these data indicate that some of the adverse health consequences of consuming an HF diet rich in saturated fat can be attenuated by table grape consumption. PMID:26423887

  4. Pulmonary Artery Endothelial Cell Phenotypic Alterations in a Large Animal Model of Pulmonary Arteriovenous Malformations Following the Glenn Shunt

    PubMed Central

    Kavarana, Minoo N.; Mukherjee, Rupak; Eckhouse, Shaina R.; Rawls, William F.; Logdon, Christina; Stroud, Robert E.; Patel, Risha K.; Nadeau, Elizabeth K.; Spinale, Francis G.; Graham, Eric M.; Forbus, Geoffrey A.; Bradley, Scott M.; Ikonomidis, John S.; Jones, Jeffrey A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Longevity of the superior cavopulmonary connection (SCPC) is limited by the development of pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVM). The goal of this study was to determine whether phenotypic changes in pulmonary artery endothelial cells (PAEC) that favor angiogenesis occur with PAVM formation. Methods: A superior vena cava to right pulmonary artery connection was constructed in 5 pigs. Pulmonary arteries were harvested at 6-8 weeks following surgery to establish cultures of PAEC and smooth muscle cells, to determine cell proliferation, gene expression, and tubule formation. Abundance of proteins related to angiogenesis was measured in lung tissue. Results: Contrast echocardiography revealed right-to-left shunting, consistent with PAVM formation. While the proliferation of smooth muscle cells from the right pulmonary artery (RPA) (shunted side) and left pulmonary artery (LPA) (non- shunted side) were similar, right PAEC proliferation was significantly higher. Expression profiles of genes encoding cellular signaling proteins were higher in PAECs from the RPA vs. LPA. Protein abundance of angiopoietin-1, and Tie-2 (angiopoietin receptor) were increased in the right lung (both p<0.05). Tubule formation was increased in endothelial cells from the RPA compared to the LPA (404±16 vs. 199±71 tubules/mm2, respectively p<0.05). Conclusions: These findings demonstrate that PAVMs developed in a clinically relevant animal model of SCPC. This study found that PAVM development occurred concomitantly with differential changes in PAEC proliferative ability and phenotype. Moreover, there was a significant increase in the angiopoietin/Tie-2 complex in the right lung, which may provide novel therapeutic targets to attenuate PAVM formation following a SCPC. PMID:23968766

  5. Alterations in structure of elastic laminae of rat pulmonary arteries in hypoxic hypertension.

    PubMed

    Liu, S Q

    1996-11-01

    The effect of hypoxic hypertension on the remodeling process of the elastic laminae of the rat hilar pulmonary arteries (PAs) was studied by electron microscopy. Rats were exposed to hypoxia (10% O2) for periods of 0.5, 2,6,12,48,96,144, and 240 h. Changes in the structure of the PA elastic laminae were examined and analyzed with respect to changes in the PA wall tensile stress. The PA blood pressure increased rapidly within the first several hours of hypoxia and reached a stable level within 2 days, whereas the PA wall tensile stress increased initially due to elevated blood pressure and then decreased after 48 h due to vessel wall thickening and returned to the control level after 4 days. In association with these changes, the elastic laminae, which appeared homogeneous in normal control rats, changed into structures composed of randomly oriented filaments and edematous contents with an increase in the volume during the early period of hypoxia and regained their homogeneous appearance and normal volume after 4 days. The changes in the elastic laminae were correlated with changes in the tensile stress. These changes were associated with a transient decrease in the stiffness of the PAs. In hypoxic rats given nifedipine, no change was found in the blood pressure, the tensile stress, or the structure of the elastic laminae of the PAs despite continuous exposure to hypoxia. These results suggested that altered tensile stress in the PA wall played a critical role in the initiation and regulation of structural changes in the elastic laminae and that these changes might contribute to alterations in the mechanical properties of the PA in hypoxic hypertension. PMID:8941540

  6. ALTERATIONS IN CARDIOMYOCYTE FUNCTION AFTER PULMONARY TREATMENT WITH STAINLESS STEEL WELDING FUME IN RATS

    PubMed Central

    Popstojanov, Risto; Antonini, James M.; Salmen, Rebecca; Ye, Morgan; Zheng, Wen; Castranova, Vincent; Fekedulegn, Desta B.; Kan, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Welding fume is composed of a complex of different metal particulates. Pulmonary exposure to different welding fumes may exert a negative impact on cardiac function, although the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. To explore the effect of welding fumes on cardiac function, Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed by intratracheal instillation to 2 mg/rat of manual metal arc hard surfacing welding fume (MMA-HS) once per week for 7 wk. Control rats received saline. Cardiomyocytes were isolated enzymatically at d 1 and 7 postexposure. Intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) transients (fluorescence ratio) were measured on the stage of an inverted phase-contrast microscope using a myocyte calcium imaging/cell length system. Phosphorylation levels of cardiac troponin I (cTnI) were determined by Western blot. The levels of nonspecific inflammatory marker C-reactive protein (CRP) and proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6) in serum were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Contraction of isolated cardiomyocytes was significantly reduced at d 1 and d 7 postexposure. Intracellular calcium levels were decreased in response to extracellular calcium stimulation at d 7 postexposure. Changes of intracellular calcium levels after isoprenaline hydrochloride (ISO) stimulation were not markedly different between groups at either time point. Phosphorylation levels of cTnI in the left ventricle were significantly lower at d 1 post-exposure. The serum levels of CRP were not markedly different between groups at either time point. Serum levels of IL-6 were not detectable in both groups. Cardiomyocyte alterations observed after welding fume treatment were mainly due to alterations in intracellular calcium handling and phosphorylation levels of cTnI. PMID:24786677

  7. Effect of feeding fat and altering weaning schedule on rebreeding in primiparous sows.

    PubMed

    Cox, N M; Britt, J H; Armstrong, W D; Alhusen, H D

    1983-01-01

    Primiparous sows that farrowed on a commercial farm during late summer in 1980 (n = 65) or late winter in 1981 (n = 62) and lactated 3 to 4 wk were used. Sows were assigned in a factorial experiment to one of two lactation diets (control or 10% fat-supplemented) and one of three periods (0, 2 or 5 d) of early weaning of the heaviest one-half of the litter. Days from weaning to estrus averaged 16.7 +/- 1.5 and 8.7 +/- 1.6 in summer and winter, respectively, and the season X diet interaction was significant for days from weaning to estrus and percentage of sows that exhibited estrus after weaning. In summer, supplementing diets with fat reduced the weaning-to-estrus interval from 20.9 +/- 2.1 to 12.6 +/- 2.1 d and increased percentage of sows in estrus by 10 d postweaning from 34 to 59. In winter, days from weaning to estrus tended to be greater and percentage of sows in estrus by 10 d postweaning tended to be less in sows fed fat-supplemented diets (10.3 +/- 2.5, 74%) than in sows fed control diets (7.1 +/- 2.9, 82%). Over both seasons, weaning one-half the litter 2 d early (2-d group) increased the percentage of sows in estrus by 10 d after weaning (77%) compared with 5-d (58%) or 0-d (51%) groups. Total litter weight at weaning was not affected by season, diet or days with one-half litter. However, piglets of lightest weight remaining on sows two or five extra days gained .09 +/- .03 kg/d more than lightest weight pigs in control (0-d) litters over the same interval. Early weaning of heaviest pigs may improve reproductive performance of primiparous sows in summer and winter, while supplementing lactation diets with fat may improve performance in summer, when weaning-to-estrus interval is longer than in winter. PMID:6826476

  8. Alterations in welding process voltage affect the generation of ultrafine particles, fume composition, and pulmonary toxicity.

    PubMed

    Antonini, James M; Keane, Michael; Chen, Bean T; Stone, Samuel; Roberts, Jenny R; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Andrews, Ronnee N; Frazer, David G; Sriram, Krishnan

    2011-12-01

    The goal was to determine if increasing welding voltage changes the physico-chemical properties of the fume and influences lung responses. Rats inhaled 40 mg/m³ (3 h/day × 3 days) of stainless steel (SS) welding fume generated at a standard voltage setting of 25 V (regular SS) or at a higher voltage (high voltage SS) of 30 V. Particle morphology, size and composition were characterized. Bronchoalveolar lavage was performed at different times after exposures to assess lung injury. Fumes collected from either of the welding conditions appeared as chain-like agglomerates of nanometer-sized primary particles. High voltage SS welding produced a greater number of ultrafine-sized particles. Fume generated by high voltage SS welding was higher in manganese. Pulmonary toxicity was more substantial and persisted longer after exposure to the regular SS fume. In summary, a modest raise in welding voltage affected fume size and elemental composition and altered the temporal lung toxicity profile. PMID:21281223

  9. PPAR-α agonism improves whole body and muscle mitochondrial fat oxidation, but does not alter intracellular fat concentrations in burn trauma children in a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Cree, Melanie G; Newcomer, Bradley R; Herndon, David N; Qian, Ting; Sun, Dayoung; Morio, Beatrice; Zwetsloot, Jennifer J; Dohm, G Lynis; Fram, Ricki Y; Mlcak, Ronald P; Aarsland, Asle; Wolfe, Robert R

    2007-01-01

    Background Insulin resistance is often associated with increased levels of intracellular triglycerides, diacylglycerol and decreased fat β-oxidation. It was unknown if this relationship was present in patients with acute insulin resistance induced by trauma. Methods A double blind placebo controlled trial was conducted in 18 children with severe burn injury. Metabolic studies to assess whole body palmitate oxidation and insulin sensitivity, muscle biopsies for mitochondrial palmitate oxidation, diacylglycerol, fatty acyl Co-A and fatty acyl carnitine concentrations, and magnetic resonance spectroscopy for muscle and liver triglycerides were compared before and after two weeks of placebo or PPAR-α agonist treatment. Results Insulin sensitivity and basal whole body palmitate oxidation as measured with an isotope tracer increased significantly (P = 0.003 and P = 0.004, respectively) after PPAR-α agonist treatment compared to placebo. Mitochondrial palmitate oxidation rates in muscle samples increased significantly after PPAR-α treatment (P = 0.002). However, the concentrations of muscle triglyceride, diacylglycerol, fatty acyl CoA, fatty acyl carnitine, and liver triglycerides did not change with either treatment. PKC-θ activation during hyper-insulinemia decreased significantly following PPAR-α treatment. Conclusion PPAR-α agonist treatment increases palmitate oxidation and decreases PKC activity along with reduced insulin sensitivity in acute trauma, However, a direct link between these responses cannot be attributed to alterations in intracellular lipid concentrations. PMID:17451602

  10. Changes in Dietary Fat Content Rapidly Alters the Mouse Plasma Coagulation Profile without Affecting Relative Transcript Levels of Coagulation Factors

    PubMed Central

    van Diepen, Janna A.; Verhoef, Daniël; Voshol, Peter J.; Reitsma, Pieter H.; van Vlijmen, Bart J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Obesity is associated with a hypercoagulable state and increased risk for thrombotic cardiovascular events. Objective Establish the onset and reversibility of the hypercoagulable state during the development and regression of nutritionally-induced obesity in mice, and its relation to transcriptional changes and clearance rates of coagulation factors as well as its relation to changes in metabolic and inflammatory parameters. Methods Male C57BL/6J mice were fed a low fat (10% kcal as fat; LFD) or high fat diet (45% kcal as fat; HFD) for 2, 4, 8 or 16 weeks. To study the effects of weight loss, mice were fed the HFD for 16 weeks and switched to the LFD for 1, 2 or 4 weeks. For each time point analyses of plasma and hepatic mRNA levels of coagulation factors were performed after overnight fasting, as well as measurements of circulating metabolic and inflammatory parameters. Furthermore, in vivo clearance rates of human factor (F) VII, FVIII and FIX proteins were determined after 2 weeks of HFD-feeding. Results HFD feeding gradually increased the body and liver weight, which was accompanied by a significant increase in plasma glucose levels from 8 weeks onwards, while insulin levels were affected after 16 weeks. Besides a transient rise in cytokine levels at 2 weeks after starting the HFD, no significant effect on inflammation markers was present. Increased plasma levels of fibrinogen, FII, FVII, FVIII, FIX, FXI and FXII were observed in mice on a HFD for 2 weeks, which in general persisted throughout the 16 weeks of HFD-feeding. Interestingly, with the exception of FXI the effects on plasma coagulation levels were not paralleled by changes in relative transcript levels in the liver, nor by decreased clearance rates. Switching from HFD to LFD reversed the HFD-induced procoagulant shift in plasma, again not coinciding with transcriptional modulation. Conclusions Changes in dietary fat content rapidly alter the mouse plasma coagulation profile, thereby

  11. Effect of high-fructose and high-fat diets on pulmonary sensitivity, motor activity, and body composition of brown Norway rats exposed to ozone.

    PubMed

    Gordon, C J; Phillips, P M; Johnstone, A F M; Beasley, T E; Ledbetter, A D; Schladweiler, M C; Snow, S J; Kodavanti, U P

    2016-04-01

    Diet-induced obesity has been suggested to lead to increased susceptibility to air pollutants such as ozone (O3); however, there is little experimental evidence. Thirty day old male and female Brown Norway rats were fed a normal, high-fructose or high-fat diet for 12 weeks and then exposed to O3 (acute - air or 0.8 ppm O3 for 5 h, or subacute - air or 0.8 ppm O3 for 5 h/d 1 d/week for 4 weeks). Body composition was measured non-invasively using NMR. Ventilatory parameters and exploratory behavior were measured after the third week of subacute exposure. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and blood chemistry data were collected 18 h after acute O3 and 18 h after the fourth week of subacute O3. The diets led to increased body fat in male but not female rats. O3-induced changes in ventilatory function were either unaffected or improved with the fructose and fat diets. O3-induced reduction in exploratory behavior was attenuated with fructose and fat diets in males and partially in females. O3 led to a significant decrease in body fat of males fed control diet but not the fructose or fat diet. O3 led to significant increases in BALF eosinophils, increase in albumin, and reductions in macrophages. Female rats appeared to be more affected than males to O3 regardless of diet. Overall, treatment with high-fructose and high-fat diets attenuated some O3 induced effects on pulmonary function, behavior, and metabolism. Exacerbation of toxicity was observed less frequently. PMID:27092583

  12. A High-Fat Diet Causes Impairment in Hippocampal Memory and Sex-Dependent Alterations in Peripheral Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Underwood, Erica L.; Thompson, Lucien T.

    2016-01-01

    While high-fat diets are associated with rising incidence of obesity/type-2 diabetes and can induce metabolic and cognitive deficits, sex-dependent comparisons are rarely systematically made. Effects of exclusive consumption of a high-fat diet (HFD) on systemic metabolism and on behavioral measures of hippocampal-dependent memory were compared in young male and female LE rats. Littermates were fed from weaning either a HFD or a control diet (CD) for 12 wk prior to testing. Sex-different effects of the HFD were observed in classic metabolic signs associated with type-2 diabetes. Males fed the HFD became obese, and had elevated fasted blood glucose levels, elevated corticosterone, and impaired glucose-tolerance, while females on the HFD exhibited only elevated corticosterone. Regardless of peripheral metabolism alteration, rats of both sexes fed the HFD were equally impaired in a spatial object recognition memory task associated with impaired hippocampal function. While the metabolic changes reported here have been characterized previously in males, the set of diet-induced effects observed here in females are novel. Impaired memory can have significant cognitive consequences, over the short-term and over the lifespan. A significant need exists for comparative research into sex-dependent differences underlying obesity and metabolic syndromes relating systemic, cognitive, and neural plasticity mechanisms. PMID:26819773

  13. A High-Fat Diet Causes Impairment in Hippocampal Memory and Sex-Dependent Alterations in Peripheral Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Underwood, Erica L; Thompson, Lucien T

    2016-01-01

    While high-fat diets are associated with rising incidence of obesity/type-2 diabetes and can induce metabolic and cognitive deficits, sex-dependent comparisons are rarely systematically made. Effects of exclusive consumption of a high-fat diet (HFD) on systemic metabolism and on behavioral measures of hippocampal-dependent memory were compared in young male and female LE rats. Littermates were fed from weaning either a HFD or a control diet (CD) for 12 wk prior to testing. Sex-different effects of the HFD were observed in classic metabolic signs associated with type-2 diabetes. Males fed the HFD became obese, and had elevated fasted blood glucose levels, elevated corticosterone, and impaired glucose-tolerance, while females on the HFD exhibited only elevated corticosterone. Regardless of peripheral metabolism alteration, rats of both sexes fed the HFD were equally impaired in a spatial object recognition memory task associated with impaired hippocampal function. While the metabolic changes reported here have been characterized previously in males, the set of diet-induced effects observed here in females are novel. Impaired memory can have significant cognitive consequences, over the short-term and over the lifespan. A significant need exists for comparative research into sex-dependent differences underlying obesity and metabolic syndromes relating systemic, cognitive, and neural plasticity mechanisms. PMID:26819773

  14. Soluble metals in residual oil fly ash alter innate and adaptive pulmonary immune responses to bacterial infection in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, Jenny R. . E-mail: jur6@cdc.gov; Young, Shih-Houng; Castranova, Vincent; Antonini, James M.

    2007-06-15

    The soluble metals of the pollutant, residual oil fly ash (ROFA), have been shown to alter pulmonary bacterial clearance in rats. The goal of this study was to determine the potential effects on both the innate and adaptive lung immune responses after bacterial infection in rats pre-exposed to the soluble metals in ROFA. Sprague-Dawley rats were intratracheally dosed (i.t.) at day 0 with ROFA (R-Total) (1.0 mg/100 g body weight), the soluble fraction of ROFA (R-Soluble), the soluble sample subject to a chelator (R-Chelex), or phosphate-buffered saline (Saline). On day 3, rats were administered an i.t. dose of 5 x 10{sup 4} Listeria monocytogenes. On days 6, 8, and 10, bacterial pulmonary clearance was monitored and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was performed on days 3 (pre-infection), 6, 8, and 10. A concentrated first fraction of lavage fluid was retained for analysis of lactate dehydrogenase and albumin to assess lung injury. BAL cell number, phenotype, and production of reactive oxygen (ROS) and nitrogen species (RNS) were assessed, and a variety of cytokines were measured in the BAL fluid. Rats pre-treated with R-Soluble showed elevated lung injury/cytotoxicity and increased cellular influx into the lungs. R-Soluble-treatment also altered ROS, RNS, and cytokine levels, and caused a degree of macrophage and T cell inhibition. These effects of R-Soluble result in increased pulmonary bacterial burden after infection. The results suggest that soluble metals in ROFA increase lung injury and inflammation, and alter both innate and adaptive pulmonary immune responses.

  15. Capsaicin-induced transcriptional changes in hypothalamus and alterations in gut microbial count in high fat diet fed mice.

    PubMed

    Baboota, Ritesh K; Murtaza, Nida; Jagtap, Sneha; Singh, Dhirendra P; Karmase, Aniket; Kaur, Jaspreet; Bhutani, Kamlesh K; Boparai, Ravneet K; Premkumar, Louis S; Kondepudi, Kanthi Kiran; Bishnoi, Mahendra

    2014-09-01

    Obesity is a global health problem and recently it has been seen as a growing concern for developing countries. Several bioactive dietary molecules have been associated with amelioration of obesity and associated complications and capsaicin is one among them. The present work is an attempt to understand and provide evidence for the novel mechanisms of anti-obesity activity of capsaicin in high fat diet (HFD)-fed mice. Swiss albino mice divided in three groups (n=8-10) i.e. control, HFD fed and capsaicin (2mg/kg, po)+HFD fed were administered respective treatment for 3months. After measuring phenotypic and serum related biochemical changes, effect of capsaicin on HFD-induced transcriptional changes in hypothalamus, white adipose tissue (WAT) (visceral and subcutaneous), brown adipose tissue (BAT) and gut microbial alterations was studied and quantified. Our results suggest that, in addition to its well-known effects, oral administration of capsaicin (a) modulates hypothalamic satiety associated genotype, (b) alters gut microbial composition, (c) induces "browning" genotype (BAT associated genes) in subcutaneous WAT and (d) increases expression of thermogenesis and mitochondrial biogenesis genes in BAT. The present study provides evidence for novel and interesting mechanisms to explain the anti-obesity effect of capsaicin. PMID:24917046

  16. Juvenile exposure to a high fat diet promotes behavioral and limbic alterations in the absence of obesity.

    PubMed

    Vinuesa, Angeles; Pomilio, Carlos; Menafra, Martin; Bonaventura, Maria Marta; Garay, Laura; Mercogliano, María Florencia; Schillaci, Roxana; Lux Lantos, Victoria; Brites, Fernando; Beauquis, Juan; Saravia, Flavia

    2016-10-01

    The incidence of metabolic disorders including obesity, type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome have seriously increased in the last decades. These diseases - with growing impact in modern societies - constitute major risk factors for neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), sharing insulin resistance, inflammation and associated cognitive impairment. However, cerebral cellular and molecular pathways involved are not yet clearly understood. Thus, our aim was to study the impact of a non-severe high fat diet (HFD) that resembles western-like alimentary habits, particularly involving juvenile stages where the brain physiology and connectivity are in plain maturation. To this end, one-month-old C57BL/6J male mice were given either a control diet or HFD during 4 months. Exposure to HFD produced metabolic alterations along with changes in behavioral and central parameters, in the absence of obesity. Two-month-old HFD mice showed increased glycemia and plasmatic IL1β but these values normalized at the end of the HFD protocol at 5 months of age, probably representing an acute response that is compensated at later stages. After four months of HFD exposure, mice presented dyslipidemia, increased Lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2) activity, hepatic insulin resistance and inflammation. Alterations in the behavioral profile of the HFD group were shown by the impediment in nest building behavior, deficiencies in short and mid-term spatial memories, anxious and depressive- like behavior. Regarding the latter disruptions in emotional processing, we found an increased neural activity in the amygdala, shown by a greater number of c-Fos+ nuclei. We found that hippocampal adult neurogenesis was decreased in HFD mice, showing diminished cell proliferation measured as Ki67+ cells and neuronal differentiation in SGZ by doublecortin labeling. These phenomena were accompanied by a neuroinflammatory and insulin-resistant state in the hippocampus

  17. Effect of alterations in the quality and quantity of dietary fat on 1,2-dimethylhydrazine-induced colon tumorigenesis in rats.

    PubMed

    Nauss, K M; Locniskar, M; Newberne, P M

    1983-09-01

    The effect of alterations in the quality and quantity of dietary fat on 1,2-dimethylhydrazine-induced colon cancer in rats was studied. Weanling Sprague-Dawley rats were fed semipurified diets containing 24% beef fat, 24% corn oil, 24% Crisco, or the three fats in equal parts to make a total of 5% fat with other macronutrients and micronutrients adjusted to balance the ratios of nutrient to calorie. After 4 weeks of dietary treatment, all rats, except vehicle-treated animals, received 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (15 mg/kg) by gavage, once a week for 5 weeks. The animals were fed the experimental diets until intestinal tumors developed, and surviving animals were sacrificed at 60 weeks. There was no effect of any of the high-fat diets tested on intestinal tumor incidence, latency, size, or frequency. All groups contained the same proportion of adenomas (less than 3%) as well as adenocarcinomas classified as mucinous. In the group fed 24% Crisco, tumors occurred with greater frequency in the proximal section of the colon than in lower segments, but the distribution was approximately uniform in the other groups. Cumulative probability of death with colon carcinoma was lowest in the 24% Crisco group, but the other high-fat groups did not differ significantly from the 5% mixed fat group nor from one another. PMID:6871849

  18. Inhalation exposure of rats to asphalt fumes generated at paving temperatures alters pulmonary xenobiotic metabolism pathways without lung injury.

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jane Y C; Rengasamy, Apavoo; Frazer, Dave; Barger, Mark W; Hubbs, Ann F; Battelli, Lori; Tomblyn, Seith; Stone, Samuel; Castranova, Vince

    2003-01-01

    Asphalt fumes are complex mixtures of various organic compounds, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). PAHs require bioactivation by the cytochrome P-450 monooxygenase system to exert toxic/carcinogenic effects. The present study was carried out to characterize the acute pulmonary inflammatory responses and the alterations of pulmonary xenobiotic pathways in rats exposed to asphalt fumes by inhalation. Rats were exposed at various doses and time periods to air or to asphalt fumes generated at paving temperatures. To assess the acute damage and inflammatory responses, differential cell counts, acellular lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity, and protein content of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid were determined. Alveolar macrophage (AM) function was assessed by monitoring generation of chemiluminescence and production of tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-1. Alteration of pulmonary xenobiotic pathways was determined by monitoring the protein levels and activities of P-450 isozymes (CYP1A1 and CYP2B1), glutathioneS-transferase (GST), and NADPH:quinone oxidoreductase (QR). The results show that acute asphalt fume exposure did not cause neutrophil infiltration, alter LDH activity or protein content, or affect AM function, suggesting that short-term asphalt fume exposure did not induce acute lung damage or inflammation. However, acute asphalt fume exposure significantly increased the activity and protein level of CYP1A1 whereas it markedly reduced the activity and protein level of CYP2B1 in the lung. The induction of CYP1A1 was localized in nonciliated bronchiolar epithelial (Clara) cells, alveolar septa, and endothelial cells by immunofluorescence microscopy. Cytosolic QR activity was significantly elevated after asphalt fume exposure, whereas GST activity was not affected by the exposure. This induction of CYP1A1 and QR with the concomitant down-regulation of CYP2B1 after asphalt fume exposure could alter PAH metabolism and may lead to potential

  19. Neonatal Pulmonary Macrophage Depletion Coupled to Defective Mucus Clearance Increases Susceptibility to Pneumonia and Alters Pulmonary Immune Responses.

    PubMed

    Saini, Yogesh; Wilkinson, Kristen J; Terrell, Kristy A; Burns, Kimberlie A; Livraghi-Butrico, Alessandra; Doerschuk, Claire M; O'Neal, Wanda K; Boucher, Richard C

    2016-02-01

    Resident immune cells (e.g., macrophages [MΦs]) and airway mucus clearance both contribute to a healthy lung environment. To investigate interactions between pulmonary MΦ function and defective mucus clearance, a genetic model of lysozyme M (LysM) promoter-mediated MΦ depletion was generated, characterized, and crossed with the sodium channel β subunit transgenic (Scnn1b-Tg) mouse model of defective mucus clearance. Diphtheria toxin A-mediated depletion of LysM(+) pulmonary MΦs in wild-type mice with normal mucus clearance resulted in lethal pneumonia in 24% of neonates. The pneumonias were dominated by Pasteurella pneumotropica and accompanied by emaciation, neutrophilic inflammation, and elevated Th1 cytokines. The incidence of emaciation and pneumonia reached 51% when LysM(+) MΦ depletion was superimposed on the airway mucus clearance defect of Scnn1b-Tg mice. In LysM(+) MΦ-depleted Scnn1b-Tg mice, pneumonias were associated with a broader spectrum of bacterial species and a significant reduction in airway mucus plugging. Bacterial burden (CFUs) was comparable between Scnn1b-Tg and nonpneumonic LysM(+) MΦ-depleted Scnn1b-Tg mice. However, the nonpneumonic LysM(+) MΦ-depleted Scnn1b-Tg mice exhibited increased airway inflammation, the presence of neutrophilic infiltration, and increased levels of inflammatory cytokines in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid compared with Scnn1b-Tg mice. Collectively, these data identify key MΦ-mucus clearance interactions with respect to both infectious and inflammatory components of muco-obstructive lung disease. PMID:26121027

  20. Temporal plasma vitamin concentrations are altered by fat-soluble vitamin administration in suckling pigs.

    PubMed

    Jang, Y D; Ma, J Y; Monegue, J S; Monegue, H J; Stuart, R L; Lindemann, M D

    2015-11-01

    Piglets are born with purportedly low plasma vitamin D levels. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of fat-soluble vitamin administration, primarily vitamin D, by different administration routes on plasma vitamin concentrations in suckling pigs. A total of 45 pigs from 5 litters were allotted at birth to 3 treatments within each litter. Pigs were administered 400 IU of α-tocopherol, 40,000 IU of retinyl palmitate, and 40,000 IU of vitamin D at d 1 of age either orally or by i.m. injection and compared with control pigs with no supplemental vitamin administration. Blood samples were collected at d 0 (initial), 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 9, 14, and 20 after administration. Plasma 25-hydroxycholecalciferol (25OHD), α-tocopherol, retinyl palmitate, and retinol concentrations were analyzed. Except for retinol, the effects of treatment, day, and day × treatment interaction ( < 0.01) were observed on plasma vitamin concentrations. Plasma concentrations of 25OHD and α-tocopherol increased immediately regardless of administration routes to peak at d 2 and 1 after administration, respectively. Plasma retinyl palmitate concentrations increased only with the injection treatment, with the peak at d 1 after administration. Plasma concentrations of 25OHD in both administration treatments and α-tocopherol in the injection treatment were maintained at greater levels than those in the control treatment until d 20 after administration. With regard to the pharmacokinetic parameters for plasma 25OHD concentrations, the injection treatment had greater elimination half-life ( < 0.01), maximum plasma concentrations ( < 0.05), and all area under the curve parameters ( < 0.01) but a lower elimination rate constant ( < 0.01) than the oral treatment. Relative bioavailability of oral administration compared with injection administration was 55.26%. These results indicate that plasma status of 25OHD,α-tocopherol, and retinyl palmitate are differentially changed between types of

  1. Purified blueberry anthocyanins and blueberry juice alter development of obesity in mice fed an obesogenic high fat diet

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Male C57BL/6J mice (25 days of age) were fed a control low-fat diet (10% kcal from fat)(C-LF) or a high-fat diet (45% kcal from fat)(HF45) for a period of 72 days. Dietary treatments included: 1) C-LF; 2) C-LF + blueberry juice in place of drinking water; 3) C-LF + anthocyanins in the drinking water...

  2. Fat accumulation with altered inflammation and regeneration in skeletal muscle of CCR2-/- mice following ischemic injury.

    PubMed

    Contreras-Shannon, Verónica; Ochoa, Oscar; Reyes-Reyna, Sara M; Sun, Dongxu; Michalek, Joel E; Kuziel, William A; McManus, Linda M; Shireman, Paula K

    2007-02-01

    Chemokines recruit inflammatory cells to sites of injury, but the role of the CC chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2) during regenerative processes following ischemia is poorly understood. We studied injury, inflammation, perfusion, capillary formation, monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) levels, muscle regeneration, fat accumulation, and transcription factor activation in hindlimb muscles of CCR2-/- and wild-type (WT) mice following femoral artery excision (FAE). In both groups, muscle injury and restoration of vascular perfusion were similar. Nevertheless, edema and neutrophil accumulation were significantly elevated in CCR2-/- compared with WT mice at day 1 post-FAE and fewer macrophages were present at day 3. MCP-1 levels in post-ischemic calf muscle of CCR2-/- animals were significantly elevated over baseline through 14 days post-FAE and were higher than WT mice at days 1, 7, and 14. In addition, CCR2-/- mice exhibited impaired muscle regeneration, decreased muscle fiber size, and increased intermuscular adipocytes with similar capillaries/mm(2) postinjury. Finally, the transcription factors, MyoD and signal transducers of and activators of transcription-3 (STAT3), were significantly increased above baseline but did not differ significantly between groups at any time point post-FAE. These findings suggest that increases in MCP-1, and possibly, MyoD and STAT3, may modulate molecular signaling in CCR2-/- mice during inflammatory and regenerative events. Furthermore, alterations in neutrophil and macrophage recruitment in CCR2-/- mice may critically alter the normal progression of downstream regenerative events in injured skeletal muscle and may direct myogenic precursor cells in the regenerating milieu toward an adipogenic phenotype. PMID:17020936

  3. Lingonberries alter the gut microbiota and prevent low-grade inflammation in high-fat diet fed mice

    PubMed Central

    Heyman-Lindén, Lovisa; Kotowska, Dorota; Sand, Elin; Bjursell, Mikael; Plaza, Merichel; Turner, Charlotta; Holm, Cecilia; Fåk, Frida; Berger, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Background The gut microbiota plays an important role in the development of obesity and obesity-associated impairments such as low-grade inflammation. Lingonberries have been shown to prevent diet-induced obesity and low-grade inflammation. However, it is not known whether the effect of lingonberry supplementation is related to modifications of the gut microbiota. The aim of the present study was to describe whether consumption of different batches of lingonberries alters the composition of the gut microbiota, which could be relevant for the protective effect against high fat (HF)-induced metabolic alterations. Methods Three groups of C57BL/6J mice were fed HF diet with or without a supplement of 20% lingonberries from two different batches (Lingon1 and Lingon2) during 11 weeks. The composition and functionality of the cecal microbiota were assessed by 16S rRNA sequencing and PICRUSt. In addition, parameters related to obesity, insulin sensitivity, hepatic steatosis, inflammation and gut barrier function were examined. Results HF-induced obesity was only prevented by the Lingon1 diet, whereas both batches of lingonberries reduced plasma levels of markers of inflammation and endotoxemia (SAA and LBP) as well as modified the composition and functionality of the gut microbiota, compared to the HF control group. The relative abundance of Akkermansia and Faecalibacterium, genera associated with healthy gut mucosa and anti-inflammation, was found to increase in response to lingonberry intake. Conclusions Our results show that supplementation with lingonberries to an HF diet prevents low-grade inflammation and is associated with significant changes of the microbiota composition. Notably, the anti-inflammatory properties of lingonberries seem to be independent of effects on body weight gain. PMID:27125264

  4. Alteration of pulmonary immunity to Listeria monocytogenes by diesel exhaust particles (DEPs). I. Effects of DEPs on early pulmonary responses.

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Xue-Jun; Schafer, Rosana; Ma, Jane Y C; Antonini, James M; Weissman, David D; Siegel, Paul D; Barger, Mark W; Roberts, Jenny R; Ma, Joseph K-H

    2002-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that diesel exhaust particles (DEPs) aggravate pulmonary bacterial infection by both innate and cell-mediated immune mechanisms. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the effects of DEP exposure on the functions of alveolar macrophages (AMs) and lymphocytes from lung-draining lymph nodes using a rat Listeria monocytogenes infection model. In the present study, we focused on the effects of DEP exposure on AM functions, including phagocytic activity and secretion of proinflammatory cytokines. The Listeria infection model was characterized by an increase in neutrophil count, albumin content, and acellular lactate dehydrogenase activity in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid at 3 and 7 days postinfection. Short-term DEP inhalation (50 and 100 mg/m(3), 4 hr) resulted in a dose-dependent suppression of lung clearance of Listeria, with the highest bacteria count occurring at day 3. This aggravated bacterial infection was consistent with the inhibitory effect of DEPs on macrophage functions. DEPs suppressed phagocytosis and Listeria-induced basal secretion of interleukin-1ss (IL-1ss) and IL-12 by AMs in a dose-dependent manner. The amount of IL-1ss and IL-12 in the BAL fluid was also reduced by DEP exposure. In addition, DEPs decreased Listeria-induced lipopolysaccharide-stimulated secretion of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), IL-1ss, and IL-12 from AMs. These results suggest that DEPs retard bacterial clearance by inhibiting AM phagocytosis and weaken the innate immunity by inhibiting AM secretion of IL-1ss and TNF-alpha. DEPs may also suppress cell-mediated immunity by inhibiting AM secretion of IL-12, a key cytokine for the initiation of T helper type 1 cell development in Listeria infection. PMID:12417481

  5. An alteration of the gut-liver axis drives pulmonary inflammation after intoxication and burn injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Michael M; Zahs, Anita; Brown, Mary M; Ramirez, Luis; Turner, Jerrold R; Choudhry, Mashkoor A; Kovacs, Elizabeth J

    2014-10-01

    Approximately half of all adult burn patients are intoxicated at the time of their injury and have worse clinical outcomes than those without prior alcohol exposure. This study tested the hypothesis that intoxication alters the gut-liver axis, leading to increased pulmonary inflammation mediated by burn-induced IL-6 in the liver. C57BL/6 mice were given 1.2 g/kg ethanol 30 min prior to a 15% total body surface area burn. To restore gut barrier function, the specific myosin light chain kinase inhibitor membrane-permeant inhibitor of kinase (PIK), which we have demonstrated to reduce bacterial translocation from the gut, was administered 30 min after injury. Limiting bacterial translocation with PIK attenuated hepatic damage as measured by a 47% reduction in serum alanine aminotransferase (P < 0.05), as well as a 33% reduction in hepatic IL-6 mRNA expression (P < 0.05), compared with intoxicated and burn-injured mice without PIK. This mitigation of hepatic damage was associated with a 49% decline in pulmonary neutrophil infiltration (P < 0.05) and decreased alveolar wall thickening compared with matched controls. These results were reproduced by prophylactic reduction of the bacterial load in the intestines with oral antibiotics before intoxication and burn injury. Overall, these data suggest that the gut-liver axis is deranged when intoxication precedes burn injury and that limiting bacterial translocation in this setting attenuates hepatic damage and pulmonary inflammation. PMID:25104501

  6. Effect of High-Fat Diet on the Formation of Pulmonary Neutrophil Extracellular Traps during Influenza Pneumonia in BALB/c Mice.

    PubMed

    Moorthy, Anandi Narayana; Tan, Kong Bing; Wang, Shi; Narasaraju, Teluguakula; Chow, Vincent T

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is an independent risk factor for severe outcome of influenza infection. Higher dietary fat consumption has been linked to greater morbidity and severe influenza in mouse models. However, the extent of generation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs or NETosis) in obese individuals during influenza pneumonia is hitherto unknown. This study investigated pulmonary NETs generation in BALB/c mice fed with high-fat diet (HFD) and low-fat diet (LFD), during the course of influenza pneumonia. Clinical disease progression, histopathology, lung reactive oxygen species, and myeloperoxidase activity were also compared. Consumption of HFD over 18 weeks led to significantly higher body weight, body mass index, and adiposity in BALB/c mice compared with LFD. Lethal challenge of mice (on HFD and LFD) with influenza A/PR/8/34 (H1N1) virus led to similar body weight loss and histopathologic severity. However, NETs were formed at relatively higher levels in mice fed with HFD, despite the absence of significant difference in disease progression between HFD- and LFD-fed mice. PMID:27531997

  7. Effect of High-Fat Diet on the Formation of Pulmonary Neutrophil Extracellular Traps during Influenza Pneumonia in BALB/c Mice

    PubMed Central

    Moorthy, Anandi Narayana; Tan, Kong Bing; Wang, Shi; Narasaraju, Teluguakula; Chow, Vincent T.

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is an independent risk factor for severe outcome of influenza infection. Higher dietary fat consumption has been linked to greater morbidity and severe influenza in mouse models. However, the extent of generation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs or NETosis) in obese individuals during influenza pneumonia is hitherto unknown. This study investigated pulmonary NETs generation in BALB/c mice fed with high-fat diet (HFD) and low-fat diet (LFD), during the course of influenza pneumonia. Clinical disease progression, histopathology, lung reactive oxygen species, and myeloperoxidase activity were also compared. Consumption of HFD over 18 weeks led to significantly higher body weight, body mass index, and adiposity in BALB/c mice compared with LFD. Lethal challenge of mice (on HFD and LFD) with influenza A/PR/8/34 (H1N1) virus led to similar body weight loss and histopathologic severity. However, NETs were formed at relatively higher levels in mice fed with HFD, despite the absence of significant difference in disease progression between HFD- and LFD-fed mice. PMID:27531997

  8. Alterations in Cardiac and Pulmonary Function in Pediatric Rapid Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Disease Progressors

    PubMed Central

    Shearer, William T.; Lipshultz, Steven E.; Easley, Kirk A.; McIntosh, Kenneth; Pitt, Jane; Quinn, Thomas C.; Kattan, Meyer; Goldfarb, Johanna; Cooper, Ellen; Bryson, Yvonne; Kovacs, Andrea; Bricker, Timothy; Peavy, Hannah; Mellins, Robert B.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Infants with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) can be divided into rapid progressors (RPs) and non-rapid progressors (non-RPs) based on symptoms and immunologic status, but detailed information about cardiac and pulmonary function in RP and non-RP children needs to be adequately described. Methodology Cardiac, pulmonary, and immunologic data and HIV-1 RNA burden were periodically measured in 3 groups: group I, 205 vertically infected children enrolled from 1990 to 1994 and followed through 1996; group II, a prospectively studied cohort enrolled at birth that included 93 infected (group IIa); and 463 noninfected infants (group IIb). Results Mean respiratory rates were generally higher in group IIa RP than non-RP children throughout the period of follow-up, achieving statistical signifance at 1 month, 12 months, 24 months, 30 months, and 48 months of follow-up. Non-RP and group IIb (HIV-uninfected children) had similar mean respiratory rates from birth to 5 years of age. Significant differences in mean respiratory rates were found between group I RP and non-RP at 7 age intervals over the first 6 years of life. Mean respiratory rates were higher in RP than in non-RP at <1 year, 2.0 years, 2.5 years, 3.0 years, 3.5 years, 4.0 years, and 6.0 years of age. Mean heart rates in group IIa RP, non-RP, and group IIb differed at every age. Rapid progressors had higher mean heart rates than non-RP at all ages through 24 months. Mean heart rates at 30 months through 60 months of age were similar for RP and non-RP children. Non-RP children had higher mean heart rates than did group IIb at 8 months, 24 months, 36 months, 42 months, 48 months, 54 months, and 60 months of age. In group I, RP had higher mean heart rates than non-RP at 2.0 years, 2.5 years, 3.0 years, and 4.0 years of age. After 4 years of age, the non-RP and RP had similar mean heart rates. Mean fractional shortening differed between the 3 group II subsets (RP, non-RP, and IIb) at 4, 8, 12, 16

  9. PULMONARY ALTERATIONS IN RATS DUE TO ACUTE PHOSGENE INHALATION (JOURNAL VERSION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The study evaluated the relationship between low-level phosgene (COCl2) exposure and pulmonary change or damage. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to phosgene for 4 hr at concentrations of 0.125 to 1.0 ppm (30, 60, 120 and 240 ppm min). Significant changes in lung weights (we...

  10. Type 2 diabetes mellitus is associated with altered CD8+ T and natural killer cell function in pulmonary tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Nathella P; Sridhar, Rathinam; Nair, Dina; Banurekha, Vaithilingam V; Nutman, Thomas B; Babu, Subash

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) is associated with expanded frequencies of mycobacterial antigen-specific CD4+ T helper type 1 (Th1) and Th17 cells in individuals with active pulmonary tuberculosis (TB). No data are available on the role of CD8+ T and natural killer (NK) cells in TB with coincident DM. To identify the role of CD8+ T and NK cells in pulmonary TB with diabetes, we examined mycobacteria-specific immune responses in the whole blood of individuals with TB and DM (TB-DM) and compared them with those without DM (TB-NDM). We found that TB-DM is characterized by elevated frequencies of mycobacterial antigen-stimulated CD8+ T cells expressing type 1 [interferon-γ and interleukin-2 (IL-2)] and type 17 (IL-17F) cytokines. We also found that TB-DM is characterized by expanded frequencies of TB antigen-stimulated NK cells expressing type 1 (tumour necrosis factor-α) and type 17 (IL-17A and IL-17F) cytokines. In contrast, CD8+ T cells were associated with significantly diminished expression of the cytotoxic markers perforin, granzyme B and CD107a both at baseline and following antigen or anti-CD3 stimulation, while NK cells were associated with significantly decreased antigen-stimulated expression of CD107a only. This was not associated with alterations in CD8+ T-cell or NK cell numbers or subset distribution. Therefore, our data suggest that pulmonary TB complicated with type 2 DM is associated with an altered repertoire of cytokine-producing and cytotoxic molecule-expressing CD8+ T and NK cells, possibly contributing to increased pathology. PMID:25363329

  11. Age-dependent alterations in the inflammatory response to pulmonary challenge.

    PubMed

    Linge, Helena M; Ochani, Kanta; Lin, Ke; Lee, Ji Young; Miller, Edmund J

    2015-12-01

    The aging lung is increasingly susceptible to infectious disease. Changes in pulmonary physiology and function are common in older populations, and in those older than 60 years, pneumonia is the major cause of infectious death. Understanding age-related changes in the innate and adaptive immune systems, and how they affect both pulmonary and systemic responses to pulmonary challenge are critical to the development of novel therapeutic strategies for the treatment of the elderly patient. In this observational study, we examined age-associated differences in inflammatory responses to pulmonary challenge with cell wall components from Gram-positive bacteria. Thus, male Sprague-Dawley rats, aged 6 months or greater than 18 months (approximating humans of 20 and 55-65 years), were challenged, intratracheally, with lipoteichoic acid and peptidoglycan. Cellular and cytokine evaluations were performed on both bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BAL) and plasma, 24 h post-challenge. The plasma concentration of free thyroxine, a marker of severity in non-thyroidal illness, was also evaluated. The older animals had an increased chemotactic gradient in favor of the airspaces, which was associated with a greater accumulation of neutrophils and protein. Furthermore, macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), an inflammatory mediator and putative biomarker in acute lung injury, was increased in both the plasma and BAL of the older, but not young animals. Conversely, plasma free thyroxine, a natural inhibitor of MIF, was decreased in the older animals. These findings identify age-associated inflammatory/metabolic changes following pulmonary challenge that it may be possible to manipulate to improve outcome in the older, critically ill patient. PMID:26318747

  12. High pressure processing alters water distribution enabling the production of reduced-fat and reduced-salt pork sausages.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huijuan; Han, Minyi; Bai, Yun; Han, Yanqing; Xu, Xinglian; Zhou, Guanghong

    2015-04-01

    High pressure processing (HPP) was used to explore novel methods for modifying the textural properties of pork sausages with reduced-salt, reduced-fat and no fat replacement additions. A 2×7 factorial design was set up, incorporating two pressure levels (0.1 or 200 MPa) and seven fat levels (0, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25 and 30%). Sausages treated at 200 MPa exhibited improved tenderness at all fat levels compared with 0.1 MPa treated samples, and the shear force of sausages treated at 200 MPa with 15 or 20% fat content was similar to the 0.1 MPa treated sausages with 30% fat. HPP significantly changed the P₂ peak ratio of the four water components in raw sausages, resulting in improved textural properties of emulsion-type sausages with reduced-fat and reduced-salt. Significant correlations were found between pH, color, shear force and water proportions. The scanning and transmission micrographs revealed the formation of smaller fat globules and an improved network structure in the pressure treated sausages. In conclusion, there is potential to manufacture sausages with reduced-fat and reduced-salt by using HPP to maintain textural qualities. PMID:25553411

  13. Pathophysiological roles of microvascular alterations in pulmonary inflammatory diseases: possible implications of tumor necrosis factor-alpha and CXC chemokines

    PubMed Central

    Orihara, Kanami; Matsuda, Akio

    2008-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and bronchial asthma are common respiratory diseases that are caused by chronic inflammation of the airways. Although these diseases are mediated by substantially distinct immunological reactions, especially in mild cases, they both show increased numbers of neutrophils, increased production of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and poor responses to corticosteroids, particularly in patients with severe diseases. These immunological alterations may contribute strongly to airway structural changes, commonly referred to as airway remodeling. Microvascular alterations, a component of airway remodeling and caused by chronic inflammation, are observed and appear to be clinically involved in both diseases. It has been well established that vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) plays important roles in the airway microvascular alterations in mild and moderate cases of both diseases, but any role that VEGF might play in severe cases of these diseases remains unclear. Here, we review recent research findings, including our own data, and discuss the possibility that TNF-α and its associated CXC chemokines play roles in microvascular alterations that are even more crucial than those of VEGF in patients with severe COPD or asthma. PMID:19281078

  14. Adverse Fetal and Neonatal Outcomes Associated with a Life-Long High Fat Diet: Role of Altered Development of the Placental Vasculature

    PubMed Central

    Petrik, Jim J.; Storozhuk, Yaryna; Paez-Parent, Sabrina; Dai, Qin; Samjoo, Imtiaz A.; Mansell, Margaret; Gruslin, Andree; Holloway, Alison C.; Raha, Sandeep

    2012-01-01

    Maternal obesity results in a number of obstetrical and fetal complications with both immediate and long-term consequences. The increased prevalence of obesity has resulted in increasing numbers of women of reproductive age in this high-risk group. Since many of these obese women have been subjected to hypercaloric diets from early childhood we have developed a rodent model of life-long maternal obesity to more clearly understand the mechanisms that contribute to adverse pregnancy outcomes in obese women. Female Sprague Dawley rats were fed a control diet (CON - 16% of calories from fat) or high fat diet (HF - 45% of calories from fat) from 3 to 19 weeks of age. Prior to pregnancy HF-fed dams exhibited significant increases in body fat, serum leptin and triglycerides. A subset of dams was sacrificed at gestational day 15 to evaluate fetal and placental development. The remaining animals were allowed to deliver normally. HF-fed dams exhibited a more than 3-fold increase in fetal death and decreased neonatal survival. These outcomes were associated with altered vascular development in the placenta, as well as increased hypoxia in the labyrinth. We propose that the altered placental vasculature may result in reduced oxygenation of the fetal tissues contributing to premature demise and poor neonatal survival. PMID:22442686

  15. Testosterone replacement alters the cell size in visceral fat but not in subcutaneous fat in hypogonadal aged male rats as a late-onset hypogonadism animal model

    PubMed Central

    Abdelhamed, Amr; Hisasue, Shin-ichi; Shirai, Masato; Matsushita, Kazuhito; Wakumoto, Yoshiaki; Tsujimura, Akira; Tsukamoto, Taiji; Horie, Shigeo

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients with late-onset hypogonadism (LOH) benefit from testosterone replacement by improvement in the parameters of the metabolic syndrome, but fat cell morphology in these patients is still unclear. This study aims to determine the effect of testosterone replacement on the morphology of fat cells in subcutaneous and visceral adipose tissue and on erectile function in hypogonadal aged male rats as a model of LOH. Methods Ten male Sprague-Dawley rats aged 20–22 months were randomly allocated to two groups, ie, aged male controls (control group, n=5) and aged males treated with testosterone replacement therapy (TRT group, n=5). Testosterone enanthate 25 mg was injected subcutaneously every 2 weeks for 6 weeks. At 6 weeks, the intracavernous pressure (ICP) and mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) ratio was assessed. Visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue specimens were collected and analyzed using Image-J software. Results Body weight at 2, 4, and 6 weeks after TRT was 800.0±35.4 g, 767.5±46.3 g, and 780±40.4 g, respectively (not statistically significant). The ICP/MAP ratio was 0.341±0.015 in the TRT group and 0.274±0.049 in the control group (not statistically significant). The median subcutaneous fat cell size was 4.85×103 (range 0.85–12.53×103) μm2 in the control group and 4.93×103 (range 6.42–19.7×103) μm2 in the TRT group (not statistically significant). In contrast, median visceral fat cell size was significantly smaller in the TRT group (4.93×103 μm2 [range 0.51–14.88×103]) than in the control group (6.08×103 μm2 [0.77–19.97×103]; P<0.001, Mann-Whitney U test). Conclusion This is the first study clearly indicating that TRT can decrease visceral fat cell size, which is a key modulator in the metabolic syndrome. However, a short course of TRT could not improve the ICP response in hypogonadal aged male rats. Further investigation is necessary to clarify the exact rationale of TRT on the visceral fat cell. PMID:25767790

  16. Caloric restriction induces energy-sparing alterations in skeletal muscle contraction, fiber composition and local thyroid hormone metabolism that persist during catch-up fat upon refeeding

    PubMed Central

    De Andrade, Paula B. M.; Neff, Laurence A.; Strosova, Miriam K.; Arsenijevic, Denis; Patthey-Vuadens, Ophélie; Scapozza, Leonardo; Montani, Jean-Pierre; Ruegg, Urs T.; Dulloo, Abdul G.; Dorchies, Olivier M.

    2015-01-01

    Weight regain after caloric restriction results in accelerated fat storage in adipose tissue. This catch-up fat phenomenon is postulated to result partly from suppressed skeletal muscle thermogenesis, but the underlying mechanisms are elusive. We investigated whether the reduced rate of skeletal muscle contraction-relaxation cycle that occurs after caloric restriction persists during weight recovery and could contribute to catch-up fat. Using a rat model of semistarvation-refeeding, in which fat recovery is driven by suppressed thermogenesis, we show that contraction and relaxation of leg muscles are slower after both semistarvation and refeeding. These effects are associated with (i) higher expression of muscle deiodinase type 3 (DIO3), which inactivates tri-iodothyronine (T3), and lower expression of T3-activating enzyme, deiodinase type 2 (DIO2), (ii) slower net formation of T3 from its T4 precursor in muscles, and (iii) accumulation of slow fibers at the expense of fast fibers. These semistarvation-induced changes persisted during recovery and correlated with impaired expression of transcription factors involved in slow-twitch muscle development. We conclude that diminished muscle thermogenesis following caloric restriction results from reduced muscle T3 levels, alteration in muscle-specific transcription factors, and fast-to-slow fiber shift causing slower contractility. These energy-sparing effects persist during weight recovery and contribute to catch-up fat. PMID:26441673

  17. Caloric restriction induces energy-sparing alterations in skeletal muscle contraction, fiber composition and local thyroid hormone metabolism that persist during catch-up fat upon refeeding.

    PubMed

    De Andrade, Paula B M; Neff, Laurence A; Strosova, Miriam K; Arsenijevic, Denis; Patthey-Vuadens, Ophélie; Scapozza, Leonardo; Montani, Jean-Pierre; Ruegg, Urs T; Dulloo, Abdul G; Dorchies, Olivier M

    2015-01-01

    Weight regain after caloric restriction results in accelerated fat storage in adipose tissue. This catch-up fat phenomenon is postulated to result partly from suppressed skeletal muscle thermogenesis, but the underlying mechanisms are elusive. We investigated whether the reduced rate of skeletal muscle contraction-relaxation cycle that occurs after caloric restriction persists during weight recovery and could contribute to catch-up fat. Using a rat model of semistarvation-refeeding, in which fat recovery is driven by suppressed thermogenesis, we show that contraction and relaxation of leg muscles are slower after both semistarvation and refeeding. These effects are associated with (i) higher expression of muscle deiodinase type 3 (DIO3), which inactivates tri-iodothyronine (T3), and lower expression of T3-activating enzyme, deiodinase type 2 (DIO2), (ii) slower net formation of T3 from its T4 precursor in muscles, and (iii) accumulation of slow fibers at the expense of fast fibers. These semistarvation-induced changes persisted during recovery and correlated with impaired expression of transcription factors involved in slow-twitch muscle development. We conclude that diminished muscle thermogenesis following caloric restriction results from reduced muscle T3 levels, alteration in muscle-specific transcription factors, and fast-to-slow fiber shift causing slower contractility. These energy-sparing effects persist during weight recovery and contribute to catch-up fat. PMID:26441673

  18. Prenatal fat-rich diet exposure alters responses of embryonic neurons to the chemokine, CCL2, in the hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Poon, K; Abramova, D; Ho, H T; Leibowitz, S

    2016-06-01

    Maternal consumption of a high-fat diet (HFD) during pregnancy is found to stimulate the genesis of hypothalamic orexigenic peptide neurons in the offspring, while HFD intake in adult animals produces a systemic low-grade inflammation which increases neuroimmune factors that may affect neurogenesis and neuronal migration. Building on this evidence and our recent study showing that the inflammatory chemokine, CCL2, stimulates the migration of hypothalamic neurons and expression of orexigenic neuropeptides, we tested here the possibility that prenatal exposure to a HFD in rats affects this chemokine system, both CCL2 and its receptors, CCR2 and CCR4, and alters its actions on hypothalamic neurons, specifically those expressing the neuropeptides, enkephalin (ENK) and galanin (GAL). Using primary dissociated hypothalamic neurons extracted from embryos on embryonic day 19, we found that prenatal HFD exposure compared to chow control actually reduces the expression of CCL2 in these hypothalamic neurons, while increasing CCR2 and CCR4 expression, and also reduces the sensitivity of hypothalamic neurons to CCL2. The HFD abolished the dose-dependent, stimulatory effect of CCL2 on the number of migrated neurons and even shifted its normal stimulatory effect on migrational velocity and distance traveled by control neurons to an inhibition of migration. Further, it abolished the dose-dependent, stimulatory effect of CCL2 on neuronal expression of ENK and GAL. These results demonstrate that prenatal HFD exposure greatly disturbs the functioning of the CCL2 chemokine system in embryonic hypothalamic neurons, reducing its endogenous levels and ability to promote the migration of neurons and their expression of orexigenic peptides. PMID:26979053

  19. Reducing dietary fat from a meal increases the bioavailability of exogenous carbohydrate without altering plasma glucose concentration.

    PubMed

    Knuth, Nicolas D; Shrivastava, Cara R; Horowitz, Jeffrey F

    2009-01-01

    The primary goal of this study was to determine the acute glycemic and endocrine responses to the reduction of fat content from a meal. On three separate occasions, nine overweight subjects (body mass index = 30 +/- 1 kg/m(2); 5 men, 4 women) consumed 1) a control meal ( approximately 800 kcal; 100 g of carbohydrate, 31 g of fat, and 30 g of protein), 2) a low-fat meal ( approximately 530 kcal; 100 g of carbohydrate, 1 g of fat, and 30 g of protein), or 3) a low-fat meal plus lipid infusion [same meal as low-fat meal, but the total energy provided was the same as control (800 kcal), with the "missing" fat ( approximately 30 g) provided via an intravenous lipid infusion]. All three meals contained [(13)C]glucose (3 mg/kg body wt) to assess the bioavailability of ingested glucose. During the 5-h period after each meal, we measured the recovery of [(13)C]glucose in plasma, plasma glucose, and insulin concentrations. We also measured plasma concentration of the gastrointestinal peptides: glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP), glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), and peptide YY(3-36) (PYY(3-36)). The recovery of the ingested [(13)C]glucose in the hour after ingestion was greater (P < 0.05) after the low-fat than after the control meal [area under the curve (AUC): 1,206 +/- 252 and 687 +/- 161 microM.h, respectively]. However, removing dietary fat from the meal did not affect the plasma concentration of glucose or insulin. Importantly, [(13)C]glucose recovery was not different during the low-fat and lipid infusion trials (AUC: 1,206 +/- 252 and 1,134 +/- 247 microM.h, respectively), indicating that the accelerated delivery of exogenous glucose found after removing fat from the meal is due exclusively to the reduction of fat in the gastrointestinal tract. In parallel with these findings, the reduction in fat calories from the meal reduced plasma concentration of GIP, GLP-1, and PYY(3-36). In summary, these data suggest that removing fat from the diet expedited

  20. Partial blood oxygen pressure and pulmonary ventilation changes in patients with fractures with a view to traumatic fat embolism development.

    PubMed

    Kroupa, J; Kusák, I

    1983-01-01

    The body's response to the effects of mechanical injury, taking the form of shock during the first hours and the onset of fat embolism in the subsequent period, is substantially higher in patients with multiple or associated injuries, both as regards the severity of manifestations and prognostic risk. Also the death rate due to this sort of complication is seen rising. Two groups of injured persons with isolated (n = 33) and multiple fractures (n = 33) were used to show that dynamic follow-up of PaO2 in the blood could serve as a criterion of the risk of fat embolism development in the body and, in particular, as a prognostic criterion for the progress of fat embolism. Special point was made of findings demonstrating a time relationship between PaO2 deterioration in the early post-injury period (up to 24-36 hours) as compared with the period of 48-72 hours after the injury. PaO2 is seen dropping rapidly in injured persons showing signs of fat embolism syndrome development. The decrease can be recorded as early as the free interval phase, i.e. prior to the manifestation of the clinical signs of fat embolism. The findings of low PaO2 levels in the blood are in accordance with respiratory ventilation disturbances and impaired diffusion documented in our investigation. PMID:6409565

  1. Streptomycin treatment alters the intestinal microbiome, pulmonary T cell profile and airway hyperresponsiveness in a cystic fibrosis mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Bazett, Mark; Bergeron, Marie-Eve; Haston, Christina K.

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator deficient mouse models develop phenotypes of relevance to clinical cystic fibrosis (CF) including airway hyperresponsiveness, small intestinal bacterial overgrowth and an altered intestinal microbiome. As dysbiosis of the intestinal microbiota has been recognized as an important contributor to many systemic diseases, herein we investigated whether altering the intestinal microbiome of BALB/c Cftrtm1UNC mice and wild-type littermates, through treatment with the antibiotic streptomycin, affects the CF lung, intestinal and bone disease. We demonstrate that streptomycin treatment reduced the intestinal bacterial overgrowth in Cftrtm1UNC mice and altered the intestinal microbiome similarly in Cftrtm1UNC and wild-type mice, principally by affecting Lactobacillus levels. Airway hyperresponsiveness of Cftrtm1UNC mice was ameliorated with streptomycin, and correlated with Lactobacillus abundance in the intestine. Additionally, streptomycin treated Cftrtm1UNC and wild-type mice displayed an increased percentage of pulmonary and mesenteric lymph node Th17, CD8 + IL-17+ and CD8 + IFNγ+ lymphocytes, while the CF-specific increase in respiratory IL-17 producing γδ T cells was decreased in streptomycin treated Cftrtm1UNC mice. Bone disease and intestinal phenotypes were not affected by streptomycin treatment. The airway hyperresponsiveness and lymphocyte profile of BALB/c Cftrtm1UNC mice were affected by streptomycin treatment, revealing a potential intestinal microbiome influence on lung response in BALB/c Cftrtm1UNC mice. PMID:26754178

  2. Neonatal hyperoxia alters the pulmonary alveolar and capillary structure of 40-day-old rats.

    PubMed Central

    Randell, S. H.; Mercer, R. R.; Young, S. L.

    1990-01-01

    High inspired oxygen concentrations during the neonatal period profoundly inhibit rat lung development, an effect that is partly reversed during recovery in air. Persistent effects of neonatal hyperoxia on the size and number of alveoli or the structure of pulmonary capillaries have not been well defined. Using light and electron microscopic morphometry plus quantitative three-dimensional reconstructions of alveoli, we examined the lungs of 40-day-old rats that were exposed to more than 95% oxygen for the first 7 days after birth. Neonatal hyperoxia administered to rats resulted in abnormally enlarged air spaces at age 40 days. The fraction of the lung consisting of parenchyma was significantly increased and alveolar surface area was 13% lower than controls. There was an abnormal enlargement of alveolar ducts, which reduced by 24% the relative amount of air in the alveoli, compared to that in the alveolar ducts. The number of alveoli per lung and the mean volume of an alveolus were not different between the groups, but alveolar size class distributions were different, with significantly more very small and very large alveoli in 40-day-old rats after neonatal hyperoxia. By scanning electron microscopy, the alveolar surface of the exposed animals had a corrugated appearance, which was especially evident along alveolar ducts. Transmission electron microscopy revealed a greater density of capillaries, particularly in the alveolar regions close to terminal airways. Based on a random sample of the entire parenchymal region, capillary blood volume per cm2 of alveolar basal lamina was 18% greater. The results demonstrate that neonatal exposure to hyperoxia can cause abnormalities in the pulmonary alveolar and capillary structure of 40-day-old rats, and that these changes are similar to some features of broncho-pulmonary dysplasia. Images Figure 1 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:2356858

  3. IKK NBD peptide inhibits LPS induced pulmonary inflammation and alters sphingolipid metabolism in a murine model.

    PubMed

    von Bismarck, Philipp; Winoto-Morbach, Supandi; Herzberg, Mona; Uhlig, Ulrike; Schütze, Stefan; Lucius, Ralph; Krause, Martin F

    2012-06-01

    Airway epithelial NF-κB is a key regulator of host defence in bacterial infections and has recently evolved as a target for therapeutical approaches. Evidence is accumulating that ceramide, generated by acid sphingomyelinase (aSMase), and sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1-P) are important mediators in host defence as well as in pathologic processes of acute lung injury. Little is known about the regulatory mechanisms of pulmonary sphingolipid metabolism in bacterial infections of the lung. The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of NF-κB on sphingolipid metabolism in Pseudomonas aeruginosa LPS-induced pulmonary inflammation. In a murine acute lung injury model with intranasal Pseudomonas aeruginosa LPS we investigated TNF-α, KC (murine IL-8), IL-6, MCP-1 and neutrophilic infiltration next to aSMase activity and ceramide and S1-P lung tissue concentrations. Airway epithelial NF-κB was inhibited by topically applied IKK NBD, a cell penetrating NEMO binding peptide. This treatment resulted in significantly reduced inflammation and suppression of aSMase activity along with decreased ceramide and S1-P tissue concentrations down to levels observed in healthy animals. In conclusion our results confirm that changes in sphingolipid metabolim due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa LPS inhalation are regulated by NF-κB translocation. This confirms the critical role of airway epithelial NF-κB pathway for the inflammatory response to bacterial pathogens and underlines the impact of sphingolipids in inflammatory host defence mechanisms. PMID:22469869

  4. Beef Fat Enriched with Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Biohydrogenation Products Improves Insulin Sensitivity Without Altering Dyslipidemia in Insulin Resistant JCR:LA-cp Rats.

    PubMed

    Diane, Abdoulaye; Borthwick, Faye; Mapiye, Cletos; Vahmani, Payam; David, Rolland C; Vine, Donna F; Dugan, Michael E R; Proctor, Spencer D

    2016-07-01

    The main dietary sources of trans fatty acids are partially hydrogenated vegetable oils (PHVO), and products derived from polyunsaturated fatty acid biohydrogenation (PUFA-BHP) in ruminants. Trans fatty acid intake has historically been associated with negative effects on health, generating an anti-trans fat campaign to reduce their consumption. The profiles and effects on health of PHVO and PUFA-BHP can, however, be quite different. Dairy products naturally enriched with vaccenic and rumenic acids have many purported health benefits, but the putative benefits of beef fat naturally enriched with PUFA-BHP have not been investigated. The objective of the present experiment was to determine the effects of beef peri-renal fat (PRF) with differing enrichments of PUFA-BHP on lipid and insulin metabolism in a rodent model of dyslipidemia and insulin resistance (JCR:LA-cp rat). The results showed that 6 weeks of diet supplementation with beef PRF naturally enriched due to flaxseed (FS-PRF) or sunflower-seed (SS-PRF) feeding to cattle significantly improved plasma fasting insulin levels and insulin sensitivity, postprandial insulin levels (only in the FS-PRF) without altering dyslipidemia. Moreover, FS-PRF but not SS-PRF attenuated adipose tissue accumulation. Therefore, enhancing levels of PUFA-BHP in beef PRF with FS feeding may be a useful approach to maximize the health-conferring value of beef-derived fats. PMID:27072368

  5. Mechanisms underlying gas exchange alterations in an experimental model of pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, J H T; Terzi, R G G; Paschoal, I A; Silva, W A; Moraes, A C; Moreira, M M

    2006-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the ventilation/perfusion ratio that contributes to hypoxemia in pulmonary embolism by analyzing blood gases and volumetric capnography in a model of experimental acute pulmonary embolism. Pulmonary embolization with autologous blood clots was induced in seven pigs weighing 24.00 +/- 0.6 kg, anesthetized and mechanically ventilated. Significant changes occurred from baseline to 20 min after embolization, such as reduction in oxygen partial pressures in arterial blood (from 87.71 +/- 8.64 to 39.14 +/- 6.77 mmHg) and alveolar air (from 92.97 +/- 2.14 to 63.91 +/- 8.27 mmHg). The effective alveolar ventilation exhibited a significant reduction (from 199.62 +/- 42.01 to 84.34 +/- 44.13) consistent with the fall in alveolar gas volume that effectively participated in gas exchange. The relation between the alveolar ventilation that effectively participated in gas exchange and cardiac output (V Aeff/Q ratio) also presented a significant reduction after embolization (from 0.96 +/- 0.34 to 0.33 +/- 0.17 fraction). The carbon dioxide partial pressure increased significantly in arterial blood (from 37.51 +/- 1.71 to 60.76 +/- 6.62 mmHg), but decreased significantly in exhaled air at the end of the respiratory cycle (from 35.57 +/- 1.22 to 23.15 +/- 8.24 mmHg). Exhaled air at the end of the respiratory cycle returned to baseline values 40 min after embolism. The arterial to alveolar carbon dioxide gradient increased significantly (from 1.94 +/- 1.36 to 37.61 +/- 12.79 mmHg), as also did the calculated alveolar (from 56.38 +/- 22.47 to 178.09 +/- 37.46 mL) and physiological (from 0.37 +/- 0.05 to 0.75 +/- 0.10 fraction) dead spaces. Based on our data, we conclude that the severe arterial hypoxemia observed in this experimental model may be attributed to the reduction of the V Aeff/Q ratio. We were also able to demonstrate that V Aeff/Q progressively improves after embolization, a fact attributed to the alveolar ventilation

  6. Quadriceps exercise intolerance in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: the potential role of altered skeletal muscle mitochondrial respiration.

    PubMed

    Gifford, Jayson R; Trinity, Joel D; Layec, Gwenael; Garten, Ryan S; Park, Song-Young; Rossman, Matthew J; Larsen, Steen; Dela, Flemming; Richardson, Russell S

    2015-10-15

    This study sought to determine if qualitative alterations in skeletal muscle mitochondrial respiration, associated with decreased mitochondrial efficiency, contribute to exercise intolerance in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Using permeabilized muscle fibers from the vastus lateralis of 13 patients with COPD and 12 healthy controls, complex I (CI) and complex II (CII)-driven State 3 mitochondrial respiration were measured separately (State 3:CI and State 3:CII) and in combination (State 3:CI+CII). State 2 respiration was also measured. Exercise tolerance was assessed by knee extensor exercise (KE) time to fatigue. Per milligram of muscle, State 3:CI+CII and State 3:CI were reduced in COPD (P < 0.05), while State 3:CII and State 2 were not different between groups. To determine if this altered pattern of respiration represented qualitative changes in mitochondrial function, respiration states were examined as percentages of peak respiration (State 3:CI+CII), which revealed altered contributions from State 3:CI (Con 83.7 ± 3.4, COPD 72.1 ± 2.4%Peak, P < 0.05) and State 3:CII (Con 64.9 ± 3.2, COPD 79.5 ± 3.0%Peak, P < 0.05) respiration, but not State 2 respiration in COPD. Importantly, a diminished contribution of CI-driven respiration relative to the metabolically less-efficient CII-driven respiration (CI/CII) was also observed in COPD (Con 1.28 ± 0.09, COPD 0.81 ± 0.05, P < 0.05), which was related to exercise tolerance of the patients (r = 0.64, P < 0.05). Overall, this study indicates that COPD is associated with qualitative alterations in skeletal muscle mitochondria that affect the contribution of CI and CII-driven respiration, which potentially contributes to the exercise intolerance associated with this disease. PMID:26272320

  7. Acute Ozone (O3) Exposure Accelerates Diet-Induced Pulmonary Injury and Metabolic Alterations in a Rat Model of Type II Diabetes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract for Society of Toxicology, March 22-25, 2015, San Diego, CAAcute Ozone (O3) Exposure Accelerates Diet-Induced Pulmonary Injury and Metabolic Alterations in a Rat Model of Type II DiabetesS.J. Snow1,3, D. Miller2, V. Bass2, M. Schladweiler3, A. Ledbetter3, J. Richards3, C...

  8. Partial Inhibition of Adipose Tissue Lipolysis Improves Glucose Metabolism and Insulin Sensitivity Without Alteration of Fat Mass

    PubMed Central

    Girousse, Amandine; Tavernier, Geneviève; Valle, Carine; Moro, Cedric; Mejhert, Niklas; Dinel, Anne-Laure; Houssier, Marianne; Roussel, Balbine; Besse-Patin, Aurèle; Combes, Marion; Mir, Lucile; Monbrun, Laurent; Bézaire, Véronic; Prunet-Marcassus, Bénédicte; Waget, Aurélie; Vila, Isabelle; Caspar-Bauguil, Sylvie; Louche, Katie; Marques, Marie-Adeline; Mairal, Aline; Renoud, Marie-Laure; Galitzky, Jean; Holm, Cecilia; Mouisel, Etienne; Thalamas, Claire; Viguerie, Nathalie; Sulpice, Thierry; Burcelin, Rémy; Arner, Peter; Langin, Dominique

    2013-01-01

    When energy is needed, white adipose tissue (WAT) provides fatty acids (FAs) for use in peripheral tissues via stimulation of fat cell lipolysis. FAs have been postulated to play a critical role in the development of obesity-induced insulin resistance, a major risk factor for diabetes and cardiovascular disease. However, whether and how chronic inhibition of fat mobilization from WAT modulates insulin sensitivity remains elusive. Hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) participates in the breakdown of WAT triacylglycerol into FAs. HSL haploinsufficiency and treatment with a HSL inhibitor resulted in improvement of insulin tolerance without impact on body weight, fat mass, and WAT inflammation in high-fat-diet–fed mice. In vivo palmitate turnover analysis revealed that blunted lipolytic capacity is associated with diminution in FA uptake and storage in peripheral tissues of obese HSL haploinsufficient mice. The reduction in FA turnover was accompanied by an improvement of glucose metabolism with a shift in respiratory quotient, increase of glucose uptake in WAT and skeletal muscle, and enhancement of de novo lipogenesis and insulin signalling in liver. In human adipocytes, HSL gene silencing led to improved insulin-stimulated glucose uptake, resulting in increased de novo lipogenesis and activation of cognate gene expression. In clinical studies, WAT lipolytic rate was positively and negatively correlated with indexes of insulin resistance and WAT de novo lipogenesis gene expression, respectively. In obese individuals, chronic inhibition of lipolysis resulted in induction of WAT de novo lipogenesis gene expression. Thus, reduction in WAT lipolysis reshapes FA fluxes without increase of fat mass and improves glucose metabolism through cell-autonomous induction of fat cell de novo lipogenesis, which contributes to improved insulin sensitivity. PMID:23431266

  9. Partial inhibition of adipose tissue lipolysis improves glucose metabolism and insulin sensitivity without alteration of fat mass.

    PubMed

    Girousse, Amandine; Tavernier, Geneviève; Valle, Carine; Moro, Cedric; Mejhert, Niklas; Dinel, Anne-Laure; Houssier, Marianne; Roussel, Balbine; Besse-Patin, Aurèle; Combes, Marion; Mir, Lucile; Monbrun, Laurent; Bézaire, Véronic; Prunet-Marcassus, Bénédicte; Waget, Aurélie; Vila, Isabelle; Caspar-Bauguil, Sylvie; Louche, Katie; Marques, Marie-Adeline; Mairal, Aline; Renoud, Marie-Laure; Galitzky, Jean; Holm, Cecilia; Mouisel, Etienne; Thalamas, Claire; Viguerie, Nathalie; Sulpice, Thierry; Burcelin, Rémy; Arner, Peter; Langin, Dominique

    2013-01-01

    When energy is needed, white adipose tissue (WAT) provides fatty acids (FAs) for use in peripheral tissues via stimulation of fat cell lipolysis. FAs have been postulated to play a critical role in the development of obesity-induced insulin resistance, a major risk factor for diabetes and cardiovascular disease. However, whether and how chronic inhibition of fat mobilization from WAT modulates insulin sensitivity remains elusive. Hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) participates in the breakdown of WAT triacylglycerol into FAs. HSL haploinsufficiency and treatment with a HSL inhibitor resulted in improvement of insulin tolerance without impact on body weight, fat mass, and WAT inflammation in high-fat-diet-fed mice. In vivo palmitate turnover analysis revealed that blunted lipolytic capacity is associated with diminution in FA uptake and storage in peripheral tissues of obese HSL haploinsufficient mice. The reduction in FA turnover was accompanied by an improvement of glucose metabolism with a shift in respiratory quotient, increase of glucose uptake in WAT and skeletal muscle, and enhancement of de novo lipogenesis and insulin signalling in liver. In human adipocytes, HSL gene silencing led to improved insulin-stimulated glucose uptake, resulting in increased de novo lipogenesis and activation of cognate gene expression. In clinical studies, WAT lipolytic rate was positively and negatively correlated with indexes of insulin resistance and WAT de novo lipogenesis gene expression, respectively. In obese individuals, chronic inhibition of lipolysis resulted in induction of WAT de novo lipogenesis gene expression. Thus, reduction in WAT lipolysis reshapes FA fluxes without increase of fat mass and improves glucose metabolism through cell-autonomous induction of fat cell de novo lipogenesis, which contributes to improved insulin sensitivity. PMID:23431266

  10. Effect of Alterations in Mechanical Ventilator Settings on Pulmonary Gas Exchange in Hyaline Membrane Disease

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, E. O. R.

    1971-01-01

    The effect of altering peak airway pressure, respiratory frequency, and inspiration: expiration ratio on arterial blood gas tensions, blood pressure, and calculated right-to-left shunt was investigated in 6 infants undergoing mechanical ventilation for hyaline membrane disease with a Bennet ventilator. The use of a very long inspiratory phase resulted in a large increase in Pao2 and fall in right-to-left shunt without affecting mean arterial blood pressure. ImagesFIG. 1FIG. 4 PMID:5576023

  11. The dose–response association of urinary metals with altered pulmonary function and risks of restrictive and obstructive lung diseases: a population-based study in China

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Wei; Huang, Xiji; Zhang, Ce; Liu, Chuanyao; Cui, Xiuqing; Zhou, Yun; Sun, Huizhen; Qiu, Gaokun; Guo, Huan; He, Meian; Zhang, Xiaomin; Yuan, Jing; Chen, Weihong; Wu, Tangchun

    2015-01-01

    Objective Reduced pulmonary function is an important predictor of environment-related pulmonary diseases; however, evidence of an association between exposures to various metals from all possible routes and altered pulmonary function is limited. We aimed to investigate the association of various metals in urine with pulmonary function, restrictive lung disease (RLD) and obstructive lung disease (OLD) risks in the general Chinese population. Design A cross-sectional investigation in the Wuhan cohort population. Setting A heavily polluted Chinese city. Participants A total of 2460 community-living Chinese adults from the Wuhan cohort were included in our analysis. Main outcome measures Spirometric parameters (FVC, forced vital capacity; FEV1, forced expiratory volumes in 1 s; FEV1/FVC ratio), RLD and OLD. Results The dose–response associations of pulmonary function, and RLD and OLD, with 23 urinary metals were assessed using regression analysis after adjusting for potential confounders. The false discovery rate (FDR) method was used to correct for multiple hypothesis tests. Our results indicated that there were positive dose–response associations of urinary iron with FEV1 and FEV1/FVC ratio, vanadium with FEV1, and copper and selenium with FEV1/FVC ratio, while a negative dose–response association was observed between urinary lead and FEV1/FVC ratio (all p<0.05). After additional adjusting for multiple comparisons, only iron was dose dependently related to FEV1/FVC ratio (FDR adjusted p<0.05). The dose–response association of iron and lead, with decreased and increased chronic obstructive pulmonary disease risk, respectively, was also observed (both p<0.05). Additionally, we found significant association of urinary zinc with RLD and interaction effects of smoking status with lead on FEV1/FVC, and with cadmium on FVC and FEV1. Conclusions These results suggest that multiple urinary metals are associated with altered pulmonary function, and RLD and OLD

  12. Proteomic identification of altered apolipoprotein patterns in pulmonary hypertension and vasculopathy of sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    Yuditskaya, Susan; Tumblin, Ashaunta; Hoehn, Gerard T.; Wang, Guanghui; Drake, Steven K.; Xu, Xiuli; Ying, Saixia; Chi, Amy H.; Remaley, Alan T.; Shen, Rong-Fong; Munson, Peter J.; Suffredini, Anthony F.

    2009-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is emerging as a major complication and independent risk factor for death among adults with sickle cell disease (SCD). Using surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (SELDI-TOF MS), we searched for biomarkers of PAH in plasma specimens from 27 homozygous sickle cell anemia (HbSS) patients with PAH and 28 without PAH. In PAH patients, analysis consistently showed lower abundance of a 28.1-kDa peak (P < .001), identified by high-resolution mass spectrometry as the oxidant-scavenging protein apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I), which correlated with clinical assays of apoA-I (r = .58, P < .001) and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) levels (r = .50, P = .001). Consistent with endothelial dysfunction that may mediate this effect in PAH, HbSS patients with lower apoA-I levels also displayed impaired vasodilatory responses to acetylcholine (mean ± SEM, 189% ± 34% [n = 13] vs 339% ± 51% [n = 13], P < .001). As a group, patients with SCD demonstrated significantly lower apoA-I levels than African-American control subjects. The PAH cohort was further characterized by high levels of apolipoproteins A-II and B and serum amyloid A, and low levels of haptoglobin dimers and plasminogen. These results imply a relationship of apolipoproteins to the development of PAH vasculopathy in SCD, potentially involving an unexpected mechanistic parallel to atherosclerosis, another proliferative vasculopathy. PMID:19023114

  13. Pulmonary pathological alterations in sheep exposed to a lethal dose of phosgene

    SciTech Connect

    Assaad, A.; Nold, J.; Petrali, J.; Moore, D.; Mitcheltree, L.; Corcoran, K.; Phillips, K. )

    1991-03-11

    In this study, the authors demonstrated the acute pulmonary cellular changes associated with phosgene exposure, by both light (L.M.) and electron microscopy (E.M.). Adult, unanesthetized sheep were exposed for 10 minutes to either 767 ppm/min of phosgene or room air. Four hours post exposure, all animals were killed, wet lung weight was obtained, and lung tissue was collected for L.M. and E.M. In sheep exposed to phosgene, wet lung weight was significantly higher. Grossly, the lung was congested and edematous. Alveolar and interstitial edema, fibrin and neutrophil exudation in the air spaces, and increased alveolar macrophages, were prominent by L.M. E.M. of Type I pneumocytes showed intracellular swelling, necrosis, and denuding of basement membrane with preservation of the tight junctions. Type II pneumocytes showed loss of lamellar bodies, cytoplasmic swelling, and damage to the endoplasmic reticulum. Endothelial cells showed increased density and vesicular activity, cytoplasmic swelling, and displacement of basement membrane. This study supports the biochemical data the authors previously reported.

  14. Altered Cyclooxygenase-2 Expression in Pulmonary Sarcoidosis is not Related to Clinical Classifications.

    PubMed

    Kiszałkiewicz, Justyna; Piotrowski, Wojciech J; Pastuszak-Lewandoska, Dorota; Górski, Paweł; Antczak, Adam; Górski, Witold; Domańska-Senderowska, Daria; Migdalska-Sęk, Monika; Czarnecka, Karolina H; Nawrot, Ewa; Brzeziańska-Lasota, Ewa

    2016-08-01

    Elevated COX-2 activity is associated with the development of chronic lung diseases leading to bronchial obstruction, including sarcoidosis. The aim of the study was to examine expression pattern of COX-2 messenger RNA (mRNA). Expression was performed by q-PCR method in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cells and peripheral blood (PB) lymphocytes in sarcoidosis patients (n = 61) and control group (n = 30). Analysis of COX-2 mRNA expression level in BAL fluid and PB revealed downregulation in sarcoidosis and control groups. In PB lymphocytes, the statistically significant difference between patients and controls was observed (P = 0.003, Mann-Whitney U test), with higher expression in patients. There were no statistically significant differences between patients without and with parenchymal involvement (stages I vs. II-IV), between patients with acute vs. insidious onset of disease and between patients with abnormal vs. normal spirometry (P > 0.05, Mann-Whitney U test). Results suggest that expression of COX-2 mRNA in patients with pulmonary sarcoidosis is not related to clinical classifications. PMID:27188849

  15. The degree of fat saturation does not alter glycemic, insulinemic or satiety responses to a starchy staple in healthy men.

    PubMed

    MacIntosh, Caroline G; Holt, Susanna H A; Brand-Miller, Jennie C

    2003-08-01

    Inclusion of fat reduces the glycemic response to a carbohydate meal, although the effect of different types of fat on glycemic, insulinemic and satiety responses is unclear. Ten healthy men received 50-g carbohydrate portions of mashed potato with isoenergetic amounts of butter (saturated fatty acid), Sunola oil (monounsaturated fatty acid) or sunflower oil (PUFA) and two 50-g glucose loads on separate days. Capillary blood was collected at regular intervals for 2 h. Satiety ratings were assessed by use of a rating scale. The glycemic index (GI), insulin index (II) and satiety index (SI) scores were calculated. Energy intakes from a meal consumed ad libitum at 2 h and for the remainder of the day were quantified. The GI values ranged from 68 +/- 8 to 74 +/- 10 and the II values ranged from 113 +/- 10 to 122 +/- 17, but there was no effect of fat type. SI scores and subsequent energy intake did not differ among the test meals. Substitution of unsaturated fats for saturated fatty acids had no acute benefits on postprandial glycemia, insulin demand or short-term satiety in young men. PMID:12888640

  16. Genetic inhibition of hepatic acetyl-CoA carboxylase activity increases liver fat and alters global protein acetylationa

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Jenny D.Y.; Lawrence, Robert T.; Healy, Marin E.; Dominy, John E.; Liao, Jason A.; Breen, David S.; Byrne, Frances L.; Kenwood, Brandon M.; Lackner, Carolin; Okutsu, Saeko; Mas, Valeria R.; Caldwell, Stephen H.; Tomsig, Jose L.; Cooney, Gregory J.; Puigserver, Pere B.; Turner, Nigel; James, David E.; Villén, Judit; Hoehn, Kyle L.

    2014-01-01

    Lipid deposition in the liver is associated with metabolic disorders including fatty liver disease, type II diabetes, and hepatocellular cancer. The enzymes acetyl-CoA carboxylase 1 (ACC1) and ACC2 are powerful regulators of hepatic fat storage; therefore, their inhibition is expected to prevent the development of fatty liver. In this study we generated liver-specific ACC1 and ACC2 double knockout (LDKO) mice to determine how the loss of ACC activity affects liver fat metabolism and whole-body physiology. Characterization of LDKO mice revealed unexpected phenotypes of increased hepatic triglyceride and decreased fat oxidation. We also observed that chronic ACC inhibition led to hyper-acetylation of proteins in the extra-mitochondrial space. In sum, these data reveal the existence of a compensatory pathway that protects hepatic fat stores when ACC enzymes are inhibited. Furthermore, we identified an important role for ACC enzymes in the regulation of protein acetylation in the extra-mitochondrial space. PMID:24944901

  17. Enzyme-treated wheat bran alters gut microbiota and liver metabolome in mice fed a high fat diet

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Enzyme-treated wheat bran (ETWB) is a fermentable dietary fiber that has been shown to decrease body fat and modify the gut microbiome. However, it is not clear how these microbiome changes impact peripheral tissue metabolism. We hypothesized that supplementation with ETWB would change gut-derived...

  18. Eicosapentaenoic acid reduces high-fat diet-induced insulin resistance by altering adipose tissue glycolytic and inflammatory function

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We previously reported Eicosapentaenoic Acid (EPA)'s ability to prevent high-fat (HF) diet-induced obesity, insulin resistance, and inflammation. In this study, we dissected mechanisms mediating anti-inflammatory and anti-lipogenic actions of EPA, using histology/ immunohistochemistry, transcriptomi...

  19. Alterations in rat pulmonary macrophage function by the immunosuppressive agents cyclosporine, azathioprine, and prednisolone.

    PubMed

    Drath, D B; Kahan, B D

    1983-06-01

    Disturbances of the immune response of the lung induced by the action of immunosuppressive agents on the functional abilities of rat pulmonary alveolar macrophages (PAM) were analyzed following in vitro incubation or in vivo administration (for 30 days) of cyclosporinea, (CsA) azathioprine (Az) or prednisolone (Pr). Two major parameters were analyzed: oxygen consumption and superoxide release as indices of the overall state of oxygen metabolism of these cells reflecting the integrity of PAM oxidative mechanisms of microbicidal activity, and chemotaxis, an event clinically important for normal defense to infection. In vitro incubation with cyclosporine at concentrations as low as 10(-9) M caused a 52% inhibition of PAM superoxide release, but Az had no effect at concentrations up to 10(-6) M. Prednisolone caused a 38% inhibition of superoxide release; comparable levels of inhibition with Pr required concentrations at least 10-fold greater than with cyclosporine. Further experiments indicated that cyclosporine induced a 40% inhibition after contact with PAM for only 30 min. In vivo experiments indicated that cyclosporine (5 mg/kg), Az (20 mg/kg), or Pr (2 or 0.5 mg/kg) administered intraperitoneally had no effect on the number of PAM available for host defense, PAM oxygen consumption, or PAM superoxide release. However, PAM from cyclosporine-treated animals demonstrated complete inhibition of active migration or chemotaxis in modified Boyden chambers upon incubation with formylmethionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP). The effect was apparently dampened by simultaneous administration of Pr with cyclosporine. These experiments suggest that with the exception of a marked effect on chemotaxis the in vivo effects of physiologic amounts of cyclosporine on PAM function are modest compared with the marked depression after in vitro addition. PMID:6306880

  20. Testosterone and farnesoid X receptor agonist INT-747 counteract high fat diet-induced bladder alterations in a rabbit model of metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Morelli, Annamaria; Comeglio, Paolo; Filippi, Sandra; Sarchielli, Erica; Cellai, Ilaria; Vignozzi, Linda; Yehiely-Cohen, Ravit; Maneschi, Elena; Gacci, Mauro; Carini, Marco; Adorini, Luciano; Vannelli, Gabriella B; Maggi, Mario

    2012-10-01

    In the male, metabolic syndrome (MetS) is associated to an increased risk of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). A recently established rabbit model of high fat diet (HFD)-induced MetS showed hypogonadism and the presence of prostate gland alterations, including inflammation, hypoxia and fibrosis. The present study investigated whether HFD-induced MetS might also alter bladder structure and function. Testosterone and the farnesoid X receptor (FXR) agonist INT-747, were evaluated for possible effects on HFD bladder. MetS rabbits develop bladder alterations, including fibrosis (reduced muscle/fiber ratio), hypoxia [2-fold increase as compared to regular diet (RD) group], low-grade inflammation (increased leukocyte infiltration and inflammatory markers) and RhoA/ROCK hyperactivity. Bladder strips from HFD rabbits, pre-contracted with carbachol, showed an overactive response to the selective ROCK inhibitor Y-27632. All these HFD-induced bladder alterations were partially blunted by testosterone and almost completely reverted by INT-747. Both treatments prevented some MetS features (glucose intolerance and visceral fat increase), thus suggesting that their effects on bladder could be ascribed to an improvement of the metabolic and/or hypogonadal state. However, a pathogenetic role for hypogonadism has been ruled out as GnRH analog-induced hypogonadal rabbits, fed a regular diet, did not show any detectable bladder alterations. In addition, INT-747 did not revert the MetS-induced hypogonadal state. FXR mRNA was highly expressed in rabbit bladder and positively associated with visceral fat increase. A direct effect of INT-747 on bladder smooth muscle was further suggested by inhibition of RhoA/ROCK-mediated activity by in vitro experiments on isolated cells. In conclusion, HFD-related MetS features are associated to bladder derangements, which are ameliorated by testosterone or INT-747 administration. INT-747 showed the most marked

  1. Regional structural and biomechanical alterations of the ovine main pulmonary artery during postnatal growth.

    PubMed

    Fata, Bahar; Carruthers, Christopher A; Gibson, Gregory; Watkins, Simon C; Gottlieb, Danielle; Mayer, John E; Sacks, Michael S

    2013-02-01

    The engineering foundation for novel approaches for the repair of congenital defects that involve the main pulmonary artery (PA) must rest on an understanding of changes in the structure-function relationship that occur during postnatal maturation. In the present study, we quantified the postnatal growth patterns in structural and biomechanical behavior in the ovine PA in the juvenile and adult stages. The biaxial mechanical properties and collagen and elastin fiber architecture were studied in four regions of the PA wall, with the collagen recruitment of the medial region analyzed using a custom biaxial mechanical-multiphoton microscopy system. Circumferential residual strain was also quantified at the sinotubular junction and bifurcation locations, which delimit the PA. The PA wall demonstrated significant mechanical anisotropy, except in the posterior region where it was nearly isotropic. Overall, we observed only moderate changes in regional mechanical properties with growth. We did observe that the medial and lateral locations experience a moderate increase in anisotropy. There was an average of about 24% circumferential residual stain present at the luminal surface in the juvenile stage that decreased to 16% in the adult stage with a significant decrease at the bifurcation, implying that the PA wall remodels toward the bifurcation with growth. There were no measurable changes in collagen and elastin content of the tunica media with growth. On average, the collagen fiber recruited more rapidly with strain in the adult compared to the juvenile. Interestingly, the PA thickness remained constant with growth. When this fact is combined with the observed stable overall mechanical behavior and increase in vessel diameter with growth, a simple Laplace Law wall stress estimate suggests an increase in effective PA wall stress with postnatal maturation. This observation is contrary to the accepted theory of maintenance of homeostatic stress levels in the regulation of

  2. Alcohol abuse and smoking alter inflammatory mediator production by pulmonary and systemic immune cells.

    PubMed

    Gaydos, Jeanette; McNally, Alicia; Guo, Ruixin; Vandivier, R William; Simonian, Philip L; Burnham, Ellen L

    2016-03-15

    Alcohol use disorders (AUDs) and tobacco smoking are associated with an increased predisposition for community-acquired pneumonia and the acute respiratory distress syndrome. Mechanisms are incompletely established but may include alterations in response to pathogens by immune cells, including alveolar macrophages (AMs) and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). We sought to determine the relationship of AUDs and smoking to expression of IFNγ, IL-1β, IL-6, and TNFα by AMs and PBMCs from human subjects after stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or lipoteichoic acid (LTA). AMs and PBMCs from healthy subjects with AUDs and controls, matched on smoking, were cultured with LPS (1 μg/ml) or LTA (5 μg/ml) in the presence and absence of the antioxidant precursor N-acetylcysteine (10 mM). Cytokines were measured in cell culture supernatants. Expression of IFNγ, IL-1β, IL-6, and TNFα in AMs and PBMCs was significantly increased in response to stimulation with LPS and LTA. AUDs were associated with augmented production of proinflammatory cytokines, particularly IFNγ and IL-1β, by AMs and PBMCs in response to LPS. Smoking diminished the impact of AUDs on AM cytokine expression. Expression of basal AM and PBMC Toll-like receptors-2 and -4 was not clearly related to differences in cytokine expression; however, addition of N-acetylcysteine with LPS or LTA led to diminished AM and PBMC cytokine secretion, especially among current smokers. Our findings suggest that AM and PBMC immune cell responses to LPS and LTA are influenced by AUDs and smoking through mechanisms that may include alterations in cellular oxidative stress. PMID:26747782

  3. Effect of high-fat and high-carbohydrate diets on pulmonary O2 uptake kinetics during the transition to moderate-intensity exercise

    PubMed Central

    Raper, J. A.; Love, L. K.; Paterson, D. H.; Peters, S. J.; Heigenhauser, G. J. F.

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) regulates the delivery of carbohydrate-derived substrate to the mitochondrial tricarboxylic acid cycle and electron transport chain. PDH activity at rest and its activation during exercise is attenuated following high-fat (HFAT) compared with high-carbohydrate (HCHO) diets. Given the reliance on carbohydrate-derived substrate early in transitions to exercise, this study examined the effects of HFAT and HCHO on phase II pulmonary O2 uptake (V̇o2p) kinetics during transitions into the moderate-intensity (MOD) exercise domain. Eight active adult men underwent dietary manipulations consisting of 6 days of HFAT (73% fat, 22% protein, 5% carbohydrate) followed immediately by 6 days of HCHO (10% fat, 10% protein, 80% carbohydrate); each dietary phase was preceded by a glycogen depletion protocol. Participants performed three MOD transitions from a 20 W cycling baseline to work rate equivalent to 80% of estimated lactate threshold on days 5 and 6 of each diet. Steady-state V̇o2p was greater (P < 0.05), and respiratory exchange ratio and carbohydrate oxidation rates were lower (P < 0.05) during HFAT. The phase II V̇o2p time constant (τV̇o2p) [HFAT 40 ± 16, HCHO 32 ± 19 s (mean ± SD)] and V̇o2p gain (HFAT 10.3 ± 0.8, HCHO 9.4 ± 0.7 ml·min−1·W−1) were greater (P < 0.05) in HFAT. The overall adjustment (effective time constant) of muscle deoxygenation (Δ[HHb]) was not different between diets (HFAT 24 ± 4 s, HCHO 23 ± 4 s), which coupled with a slower τV̇o2p, indicates a slowed microvascular blood flow response. These results suggest that the slower V̇o2p kinetics associated with HFAT are consistent with inhibition and slower activation of PDH, a lower rate of pyruvate production, and/or attenuated microvascular blood flow and O2 delivery. PMID:25277736

  4. Impact of Dietary Fat Type Within the Context of Altered Cholesterol Homeostasis on Cholesterol and Lipoprotein Metabolism in the F1B Hamster

    PubMed Central

    Lecker, Jaime L.; Matthan, Nirupa R.; Billheimer, Jeffrey T.; Rader, Daniel J.; Lichtenstein, Alice H.

    2010-01-01

    Cholesterol status and dietary fat alter several metabolic pathways reflected in lipoprotein profiles. To assess plasma lipoprotein response and mechanisms by which cholesterol and dietary fat type regulate expression of genes involved in lipoprotein metabolism we developed an experimental model system using F1B hamsters fed diets (12 weeks) enriched in 10% (w/w) coconut, olive or safflower oil with either high cholesterol (0.1%; cholesterol-supplemented) or low cholesterol coupled with cholesterol lowering drugs 10-days prior to killing (0.01% cholesterol, 0.15% lovastatin, 2% cholestyramine; cholesterol-depleted). Irrespective of dietary fat, cholesterol-depletion, relative to supplementation, resulted in lower plasma non-high density lipoprotein (HDL) and HDL cholesterol, and triglyceride concentrations (all P<0.05). In the liver, these differences were associated with higher sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP)-2, low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase and 7-α hydroxylase mRNA levels; higher scavenger receptor B1 and apolipoprotein (apo) A-I mRNA and protein levels; and lower apo E protein levels and in intestine modestly lower sterol transporters ATP binding cassette (ABC) A1, ABCG5 and ABCG8 mRNA levels. Irrespective of cholesterol status, coconut oil, relative to olive and safflower oils, resulted in higher non-HDL cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations (both P<0.05) and modestly higher SREBP-2 mRNA levels. These data suggest that in F1B hamsters, differences in plasma lipoprotein profiles in response to cholesterol depletion are associated with changes in the expression of genes involved in cholesterol metabolism, whereas the effect of dietary fat type on gene expression was modest which limits the usefulness of the experimental animal model. PMID:20197195

  5. The rs340874 PROX1 type 2 diabetes mellitus risk variant is associated with visceral fat accumulation and alterations in postprandial glucose and lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Kretowski, Adam; Adamska, Edyta; Maliszewska, Katarzyna; Wawrusiewicz-Kurylonek, Natalia; Citko, Anna; Goscik, Joanna; Bauer, Witold; Wilk, Juliusz; Golonko, Anna; Waszczeniuk, Magdalena; Lipinska, Danuta; Hryniewicka, Justyna; Niemira, Magdalena; Paczkowska, Magdalena; Ciborowski, Michal; Gorska, Maria

    2015-03-01

    Large-scale meta-analyses of genome-wide association studies have recently confirmed that the rs340874 single-nucleotide polymorphism in PROX1 gene is associated with fasting glycemia and type 2 diabetes mellitus; however, the mechanism of this link was not well established. The aim of our study was to evaluate the functional/phenotypic differences related to rs340874 PROX1 variants. The study group comprised 945 subjects of Polish origin (including 634 with BMI > 25) without previously known dysglycemia. We analyzed behavioral patterns (diet, physical activity), body fat distribution and glucose/fat metabolism after standardized meals and during the oral glucose tolerance test. We found that the carriers of the rs340874 PROX1 CC genotype had higher nonesterified fatty acids levels after high-fat meal (p = 0.035) and lower glucose oxidation (p = 0.014) after high-carbohydrate meal in comparison with subjects with other PROX1 genotypes. Moreover, in subjects with CC variant, we found higher accumulation of visceral fat (p < 0.02), but surprisingly lower daily food consumption (p < 0.001). We hypothesize that lipid metabolism alterations in subjects with the PROX1 CC genotype may be a primary cause of higher glucose levels after glucose load, since the fatty acids can inhibit insulin-stimulated glucose uptake by decreasing carbohydrate oxidation. Our observations suggest that the PROX1 variants have pleiotropic effect on disease pathways and it seem to be a very interesting goal of research on prevention of obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus. The study may help to understand the mechanisms of visceral obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus risk development. PMID:25601634

  6. Impact of dietary fat type within the context of altered cholesterol homeostasis on cholesterol and lipoprotein metabolism in the F1B hamster.

    PubMed

    Lecker, Jaime L; Matthan, Nirupa R; Billheimer, Jeffrey T; Rader, Daniel J; Lichtenstein, Alice H

    2010-10-01

    Cholesterol status and dietary fat alter several metabolic pathways reflected in lipoprotein profiles. To assess plasma lipoprotein response and mechanisms by which cholesterol and dietary fat type regulate expression of genes involved in lipoprotein metabolism, we developed an experimental model system using F1B hamsters fed diets (12 weeks) enriched in 10% (wt/wt) coconut, olive, or safflower oil with either high cholesterol (0.1%; cholesterol supplemented) or low cholesterol coupled with cholesterol-lowering drugs 10 days before killing (0.01% cholesterol, 0.15% lovastatin, 2% cholestyramine; cholesterol depleted). Irrespective of dietary fat, cholesterol depletion, relative to supplementation, resulted in lower plasma non-high-density lipoprotein (non-HDL) and HDL cholesterol, and triglyceride concentrations (all Ps < .05). In the liver, these differences were associated with higher sterol regulatory element binding protein-2, low-density lipoprotein receptor, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase, and 7α-hydroxylase messenger RNA (mRNA) levels; higher scavenger receptor B1 and apolipoprotein A-I mRNA and protein levels; lower apolipoprotein E protein levels; and in intestine, modestly lower sterol transporters adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette (ABC) A1, ABCG5, and ABCG8 mRNA levels. Irrespective of cholesterol status, coconut oil, relative to olive and safflower oils, resulted in higher non-HDL cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations (both Ps < .05) and modestly higher sterol regulatory element binding protein-2 mRNA levels. These data suggest that, in F1B hamsters, differences in plasma lipoprotein profiles in response to cholesterol depletion are associated with changes in the expression of genes involved in cholesterol metabolism, whereas the effect of dietary fat type on gene expression was modest, which limits the usefulness of the experimental animal model. PMID:20197195

  7. Adipose tissue NAPE-PLD controls fat mass development by altering the browning process and gut microbiota.

    PubMed

    Geurts, Lucie; Everard, Amandine; Van Hul, Matthias; Essaghir, Ahmed; Duparc, Thibaut; Matamoros, Sébastien; Plovier, Hubert; Castel, Julien; Denis, Raphael G P; Bergiers, Marie; Druart, Céline; Alhouayek, Mireille; Delzenne, Nathalie M; Muccioli, Giulio G; Demoulin, Jean-Baptiste; Luquet, Serge; Cani, Patrice D

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is a pandemic disease associated with many metabolic alterations and involves several organs and systems. The endocannabinoid system (ECS) appears to be a key regulator of energy homeostasis and metabolism. Here we show that specific deletion of the ECS synthesizing enzyme, NAPE-PLD, in adipocytes induces obesity, glucose intolerance, adipose tissue inflammation and altered lipid metabolism. We report that Napepld-deleted mice present an altered browning programme and are less responsive to cold-induced browning, highlighting the essential role of NAPE-PLD in regulating energy homeostasis and metabolism in the physiological state. Our results indicate that these alterations are mediated by a shift in gut microbiota composition that can partially transfer the phenotype to germ-free mice. Together, our findings uncover a role of adipose tissue NAPE-PLD on whole-body metabolism and provide support for targeting NAPE-PLD-derived bioactive lipids to treat obesity and related metabolic disorders. PMID:25757720

  8. Adipose tissue NAPE-PLD controls fat mass development by altering the browning process and gut microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Geurts, Lucie; Everard, Amandine; Van Hul, Matthias; Essaghir, Ahmed; Duparc, Thibaut; Matamoros, Sébastien; Plovier, Hubert; Castel, Julien; Denis, Raphael G. P.; Bergiers, Marie; Druart, Céline; Alhouayek, Mireille; Delzenne, Nathalie M.; Muccioli, Giulio G.; Demoulin, Jean-Baptiste; Luquet, Serge; Cani, Patrice D.

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is a pandemic disease associated with many metabolic alterations and involves several organs and systems. The endocannabinoid system (ECS) appears to be a key regulator of energy homeostasis and metabolism. Here we show that specific deletion of the ECS synthesizing enzyme, NAPE-PLD, in adipocytes induces obesity, glucose intolerance, adipose tissue inflammation and altered lipid metabolism. We report that Napepld-deleted mice present an altered browning programme and are less responsive to cold-induced browning, highlighting the essential role of NAPE-PLD in regulating energy homeostasis and metabolism in the physiological state. Our results indicate that these alterations are mediated by a shift in gut microbiota composition that can partially transfer the phenotype to germ-free mice. Together, our findings uncover a role of adipose tissue NAPE-PLD on whole-body metabolism and provide support for targeting NAPE-PLD-derived bioactive lipids to treat obesity and related metabolic disorders. PMID:25757720

  9. Weight cycling promotes fat gain and altered clock gene expression in adipose tissue in C57BL/6J mice.

    PubMed

    Dankel, S N; Degerud, E M; Borkowski, K; Fjære, E; Midtbø, L K; Haugen, C; Solsvik, M H; Lavigne, A M; Liaset, B; Sagen, J V; Kristiansen, K; Mellgren, G; Madsen, L

    2014-01-15

    Repeated attempts to lose weight by temporary dieting may result in weight cycling, eventually further gain of body fat, and possible metabolic adaptation. We tested this with a controlled experiment in C57BL/6J mice subjected to four weight cycles (WC), continuous hypercaloric feeding (HF), or low-fat feeding (LF). To search for genes involved in an adaptive mechanism to former weight cycling and avoid acute effects of the last cycle, the last hypercaloric feeding period was prolonged by an additional 2 wk before euthanization. Total energy intake was identical in WC and HF. However, compared with HF, the WC mice gained significantly more total body mass and fat mass and showed increased levels of circulating leptin and lipids in liver. Both the HF and WC groups showed increased adipocyte size and insulin resistance. Despite these effects, we also observed an interesting maintenance of circulating adiponectin and free fatty acid levels after WC, whereas changes in these parameters were observed in HF mice. Global gene expression was analyzed by microarrays. Weight-cycled mice were characterized by a downregulation of several clock genes (Dbp, Tef, Per1, Per2, Per3, and Nr1d2) in adipose tissues, which was confirmed by quantitative PCR. In 3T3-L1 cells, we found reduced expression of Dbp and Tef early in adipogenic differentiation, which was mediated via cAMP-dependent signaling. Our data suggest that clock genes in adipose tissue may play a role in metabolic adaptation to weight cycling. PMID:24302006

  10. Timing of fat and liquid sugar intake alters substrate oxidation and food efficiency in male Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Oosterman, Johanneke E; Foppen, Ewout; van der Spek, Rianne; Fliers, Eric; Kalsbeek, Andries; la Fleur, Susanne E

    2015-03-01

    In addition to the amount of ingested calories, both timing of food intake and meal composition are determinants of body weight gain. However, at present, it is unknown if the inappropriate timing of diet components is responsible for body weight gain. In the present study, we therefore studied a time-dependent effect of the diet composition on energy homeostasis. Male Wistar rats were subjected to chow ad libitum (chow group) or a choice diet with saturated fat, a 30% sugar solution, chow and tap water. The choice diet was provided either with all components ad libitum (AL), with ad libitum access to chow, tap water and a 30% sugar solution, but with access to saturated fat only during the light period (LF), or with ad libitum access to chow, tap water and saturated fat, but access to a 30% sugar solution only during the light period (LS). Caloric intake and body weight gain were monitored during 31 days. Energy expenditure was measured in the third week in calorimetric cages. All rats on a choice diet showed hyperphagia and gained more body weight compared to the chow group. Within the choice diet groups, rats on the LS diet were most food efficient (i.e. gained most body weight per ingested calorie) and showed a lower respiratory exchange ratio (RER) with an anti-phasic pattern, whereas no differences in locomotor activity or heat production were found. Collectively these data indicate that the timing of the diet composition affects food efficiency, most likely due to a shifted oxidation pattern, which can predispose for obesity. Further studies are underway to assess putative mechanisms involved in this dysregulation. PMID:25317718

  11. High Fat Diet Administration during Specific Periods of Pregnancy Alters Maternal Fatty Acid Profiles in the Near-Term Rat

    PubMed Central

    Cerf, Marlon E.; Herrera, Emilio

    2016-01-01

    Excessive fat intake is a global health concern as women of childbearing age increasingly ingest high fat diets (HFDs). We therefore determined the maternal fatty acid (FA) profiles in metabolic organs after HFD administration during specific periods of gestation. Rats were fed a HFD for the first (HF1), second (HF2), or third (HF3) week, or for all three weeks (HFG) of gestation. Total maternal plasma non-esterified fatty acid (NEFA) concentrations were monitored throughout pregnancy. At day 20 of gestation, maternal plasma, liver, adipose tissue, and placenta FA profiles were determined. In HF3 mothers, plasma myristic and stearic acid concentrations were elevated, whereas docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) was reduced in both HF3 and HFG mothers. In HF3 and HFG mothers, hepatic stearic and oleic acid proportions were elevated; conversely, DHA and linoleic acid (LA) proportions were reduced. In adipose tissue, myristic acid was elevated, whereas DHA and LA proportions were reduced in all mothers. Further, adipose tissue stearic acid proportions were elevated in HF2, HF3, and HFG mothers; with oleic acid increased in HF1 and HFG mothers. In HF3 and HFG mothers, placental neutral myristic acid proportions were elevated, whereas DHA was reduced. Further, placental phospholipid DHA proportions were reduced in HF3 and HFG mothers. Maintenance on a diet, high in saturated fat, but low in DHA and LA proportions, during late or throughout gestation, perpetuated reduced DHA across metabolic organs that adapt during pregnancy. Therefore a diet, with normal DHA proportions during gestation, may be important for balancing maternal FA status. PMID:26742067

  12. High Fat Diet Administration during Specific Periods of Pregnancy Alters Maternal Fatty Acid Profiles in the Near-Term Rat.

    PubMed

    Cerf, Marlon E; Herrera, Emilio

    2016-01-01

    Excessive fat intake is a global health concern as women of childbearing age increasingly ingest high fat diets (HFDs). We therefore determined the maternal fatty acid (FA) profiles in metabolic organs after HFD administration during specific periods of gestation. Rats were fed a HFD for the first (HF1), second (HF2), or third (HF3) week, or for all three weeks (HFG) of gestation. Total maternal plasma non-esterified fatty acid (NEFA) concentrations were monitored throughout pregnancy. At day 20 of gestation, maternal plasma, liver, adipose tissue, and placenta FA profiles were determined. In HF3 mothers, plasma myristic and stearic acid concentrations were elevated, whereas docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) was reduced in both HF3 and HFG mothers. In HF3 and HFG mothers, hepatic stearic and oleic acid proportions were elevated; conversely, DHA and linoleic acid (LA) proportions were reduced. In adipose tissue, myristic acid was elevated, whereas DHA and LA proportions were reduced in all mothers. Further, adipose tissue stearic acid proportions were elevated in HF2, HF3, and HFG mothers; with oleic acid increased in HF1 and HFG mothers. In HF3 and HFG mothers, placental neutral myristic acid proportions were elevated, whereas DHA was reduced. Further, placental phospholipid DHA proportions were reduced in HF3 and HFG mothers. Maintenance on a diet, high in saturated fat, but low in DHA and LA proportions, during late or throughout gestation, perpetuated reduced DHA across metabolic organs that adapt during pregnancy. Therefore a diet, with normal DHA proportions during gestation, may be important for balancing maternal FA status. PMID:26742067

  13. Dietary fish oil supplements depress milk fat yield and alter milk fatty acid composition in lactating cows fed grass silage-based diets.

    PubMed

    Kairenius, P; Ärölä, A; Leskinen, H; Toivonen, V; Ahvenjärvi, S; Vanhatalo, A; Huhtanen, P; Hurme, T; Griinari, J M; Shingfield, K J

    2015-08-01

    The potential of dietary fish oil (FO) supplements to increase milk 20:5n-3 and 22:6n-3 concentrations and the associated effects on milk fatty acid (FA) composition, intake, and milk production were examined. Four multiparous lactating cows offered a grass silage-based diet (forage:concentrate ratio 58:42, on a dry matter basis) supplemented with 0, 75, 150, or 300g of FO/d (FO0, FO75, FO150, and FO300, respectively) were used in a 4×4 Latin square with 28-d experimental periods. Milk FA composition was analyzed by complementary silver-ion thin-layer chromatography, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and silver-ion HPLC. Supplements of FO decreased linearly dry matter intake, yields of energy-corrected milk, milk fat and protein, and milk fat content. Compared with FO0, milk fat content and yield were decreased by 30.1 and 40.6%, respectively, on the FO300 treatment. Supplements of FO linearly increased milk 20:5n-3 and 22:6n-3 concentrations from 0.07 to 0.18 and 0.03 to 0.10g/100g of FA, respectively. Enrichment of 20:5n-3 and 22:6n-3 was accompanied by decreases in 4- to 18-carbon saturated FA and increases in total conjugated linoleic acid (CLA), trans FA, and polyunsaturated FA concentrations. Fish oil elevated milk fat cis-9,trans-11 CLA content in a quadratic manner, reaching a maximum on FO150 (from 0.61 to 2.15g/100g of FA), whereas further amounts of FO increased trans-10 18:1 with no change in trans-11 18:1 concentration. Supplements of FO also resulted in a dose-dependent appearance of 37 unique 20- and 22-carbon intermediates in milk fat. Concentrations of 16-, 18-, 20-, and 22-carbon trans FA were all increased by FO, with enrichment of trans 18:1 and trans 18:2 being quantitatively the most important. Decreases in milk fat yield to FO were not related to changes in milk trans-10,cis-12 CLA concentration or estimated milk fat melting point. Partial least square regression analysis indicated that FO-induced milk fat depression was associated with

  14. Short communication: Altered expression of specificity protein 1 impairs milk fat synthesis in goat mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zhu, J J; Luo, J; Xu, H F; Wang, H; Loor, J J

    2016-06-01

    Specificity protein 1 (encoded by SP1) is a novel transcription factor important for the regulation of lipid metabolism and the normal function of various hormones in model organisms. Its potential role, if any, on ruminant milk fat is unknown. Despite the lower expression of the lipolysis-related gene ATGL (by 44 and 37% respectively), both the adenoviral overexpression and the silencing of SP1 [via short interfering (si)RNA] markedly reduced cellular triacylglycerol (TAG) content (by 28 and 25%, respectively), at least in part by decreasing the expression of DGAT1 (-36% in adenovirus treatment) and DGAT2 (-81 and -87%, respectively) that are involved in TAG synthesis. Consistent with the markedly lower expression of genes related to lipid droplet formation and secretion (TIP47 by 19 and 32%, and ADFP by 25 and 25%, respectively), cellular lipid droplet content was also decreased sharply, by 9 and 8.5%, respectively, after adenoviral overexpression of SP1 or its silencing via siRNA. Overall, the results underscored a potentially important role of SP1 in maintaining milk-fat droplet synthesis in goat mammary epithelial cells. PMID:26995134

  15. Altered concentrate to forage ratio in cows ration enhanced bioproduction of specific size subpopulation of milk fat globules.

    PubMed

    Mesilati-Stahy, Ronit; Moallem, Uzi; Magen, Yogev; Argov-Argaman, Nurit

    2015-07-15

    The mechanism underlying the shift in milk-fat-globule (MFG) mean diameter upon changing the concentrate-to-forage ratio in dairy cow rations was investigated. Cows were fed high-concentrate low-forage (HCLF) or high-forage low-concentrate (LCHF) rations for 4 weeks. Mean diameter of MFG, determined in raw whole milk, was 0.4 μm larger in the LCHF-fed vs. HCLF-fed group. The main compositional differences between treatments were found in a specific MFG subgroup with the diameter of 3.3 μm (F1), with higher capric, lauric, myristic and lower oleic acid concentrations in HCLF vs. LCHF milk. Similarly, lipid concentration differences between treatments were only found in F1, with higher triglyceride and phosphatidylethanolamine, and lower sphingomyelin concentrations in LCHF vs. HCLF milk. The higher MFG mean diameter in whole raw LCHF milk might therefore be attributed to increased secretion of F1-group MFG, while fat content and composition in the other MFG size groups remains unchanged. PMID:25722155

  16. Mice Long-Term High-Fat Diet Feeding Recapitulates Human Cardiovascular Alterations: An Animal Model to Study the Early Phases of Diabetic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Calligaris, Sebastián D.; Lecanda, Manuel; Solis, Felipe; Ezquer, Marcelo; Gutiérrez, Jaime; Brandan, Enrique; Leiva, Andrea; Sobrevia, Luis; Conget, Paulette

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aim Hypercaloric diet ingestion and sedentary lifestyle result in obesity. Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of clinical features secondary to obesity, considered as a pre-diabetic condition and recognized as an independent risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. To better understand the relationship between obesity, metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease as well as for the development of novel therapeutic strategies, animal models that reproduce the etiology, course and outcomes of these pathologies are required. The aim of this work was to characterize the long-term effects of high-fat diet-induced obesity on the mice cardiovascular system, in order to make available a new animal model for diabetic cardiomyopathy. Methods/Results Male C57BL/6 mice were fed with a standardized high-fat diet (obese) or regular diet (normal) for 16 months. Metabolic syndrome was evaluated testing plasma glucose, triglycerides, cholesterol, insulin, and glucose tolerance. Arterial pressure was measured using a sphygmomanometer (non invasive method) and by hemodynamic parameters (invasive method). Cardiac anatomy was described based on echocardiography and histological studies. Cardiac function was assessed by cardiac catheterization under a stress test. Cardiac remodelling and metabolic biomarkers were assessed by RT-qPCR and immunoblotting. As of month eight, the obese mice were overweight, hyperglycaemic, insulin resistant, hyperinsulinemic and hypercholesterolemic. At month 16, they also presented normal arterial pressure but altered vascular reactivity (vasoconstriction), and cardiac contractility reserve reduction, heart mass increase, cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, cardiac fibrosis, and heart metabolic compensations. By contrast, the normal mice remained healthy throughout the study. Conclusions Mice fed with a high-fat diet for prolonged time recapitulates the etiology, course and outcomes of the early phases of human diabetic cardiomyopathy. PMID:23593350

  17. Oral exposure of pubertal male mice to endocrine-disrupting chemicals alters fat metabolism in adult livers.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yuanxiang; Lin, Xiaojian; Miao, Wenyu; Wang, Linggang; Wu, Yan; Fu, Zhengwei

    2015-12-01

    The potential for the exposure of humans and wildlife to environmental endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) has been increasing. Risk assessment for such EDCs is primarily based on detecting the main endpoints related to the endocrine and reproductive systems, while the effects on glucose and fat metabolism have only received limited attention. In this study, pubertal male C57BL/6J mice were orally administered 10 mg/kg body weight cypermethrin (CYP), 100 mg/kg body weight atrazine (ATZ), and 0.1 mg/kg body weight 17α-ethynyestradiol (EE2) for 4 weeks and then switched to a high-energy diet (HD) for 8 weeks. The body weight gain in the EDC-treated groups was lower than that in the control group during exposure and then tended to show values similar to the HD group. The epididymal fat weight, cell size and serum triacylglycerol (TG) and total cholesterol (TCH) levels in the EDC-HD groups were lower than those in the HD group. The transcription of genes related to glycolytic and gluconeogenic processes in the liver was affected by EDC exposure. Furthermore, the expression levels of transcriptional factors including PPARα, PPARγ, and SREBP1C and their target genes related to fatty acid synthesis and oxidation in the liver were also influenced by early life EDC administration. The results showed that early-life-stage exposure to high doses of various environmental EDCs affected the homeostasis of glucose and fatty acid metabolism in the livers of adult male mice. PMID:24916741

  18. Neurochemical and electrophysiological deficits in the ventral hippocampus and selective behavioral alterations caused by high-fat diet in female C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Krishna, S; Keralapurath, M M; Lin, Z; Wagner, J J; de La Serre, C B; Harn, D A; Filipov, N M

    2015-06-25

    Mounting experimental evidence, predominantly from male rodents, demonstrates that high-fat diet (HFD) consumption and ensuing obesity are detrimental to the brain. To shed additional light on the neurological consequences of HFD consumption in female rodents and to determine the relatively early impact of HFD in the likely continuum of neurological dysfunction in the context of chronic HFD intake, this study investigated effects of HFD feeding for up to 12weeks on selected behavioral, neurochemical, and electrophysiological parameters in adult female C57BL/6 mice; particular focus was placed on the ventral hippocampus (vHIP). Selected locomotor, emotional and cognitive functions were evaluated using behavioral tests after 5weeks on HFD or control (low-fat diet) diets. One week later, mice were sacrificed and brain regional neurochemical (monoamine) analysis was performed. Behaviorally naïve mice were maintained on their respective diets for an additional 5-6weeks at which time synaptic plasticity was determined in ex vivo slices from the vHIP. HFD-fed female mice exhibited increased: (i) locomotor activity in the open field testing, (ii) mean turn time on the pole test, (iii) swimming time in the forced swim test, and (iv) number of marbles buried in the marble burying test. In contrast, the novel object recognition memory was unaffected. Mice on HFD also had decreased norepinephrine and dopamine turnover, respectively, in the prefrontal cortex and the vHIP. HFD consumption for a total of 11-12weeks altered vHIP synaptic plasticity, evidenced by significant reductions in the paired-pulse ratio and long-term potentiation (LTP) magnitude. In summary, in female mice, HFD intake for several weeks induced multiple behavioral alterations of mainly anxiety-like nature and impaired monoamine pathways in a brain region-specific manner, suggesting that in the female, certain behavioral domains (anxiety) and associated brain regions, i.e., the vHIP, are preferentially

  19. Pulmonary hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension; Sporadic primary pulmonary hypertension; Familial primary pulmonary hypertension; Idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension; Primary pulmonary hypertension; PPH; Secondary pulmonary ...

  20. High-fat diet causes bone loss in young mice by promoting osteoclastogenesis through alteration of the bone marrow environment.

    PubMed

    Shu, Lei; Beier, Eric; Sheu, Tzong; Zhang, Hengwei; Zuscik, Michael J; Puzas, Edward J; Boyce, Brendan F; Mooney, Robert A; Xing, Lianping

    2015-04-01

    Obesity is a severe health problem in children, afflicting several organ systems including bone. However, the role of obesity on bone homeostasis and bone cell function in children has not been studied in detail. Here we used young mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD) to model childhood obesity and investigate the effect of HFD on the phenotype of cells within the bone marrow environment. Five-week-old male mice were fed a HFD for 3, 6, and 12 weeks. Decreased bone volume was detected after 3 weeks of HFD treatment. After 6 and 12 weeks, HFD-exposed mice had less bone mass and increased osteoclast numbers. Bone marrow cells, but not spleen cells, from HFD-fed mice had increased osteoclast precursor frequency, elevated osteoclast formation, and bone resorption activity, as well as increased expression of osteoclastogenic regulators including RANKL, TNF, and PPAR-gamma. Bone formation rate and osteoblast and adipocyte numbers were also increased in HFD-fed mice. Isolated bone marrow cells also had a corresponding elevation in the expression of positive regulators of osteoblast and adipocyte differentiation. Our findings indicate that in juvenile mice, HFD-induced bone loss is mainly due to increased osteoclast bone resorption by affecting the bone marrow microenvironment. Thus, targeting osteoclast formation may present a new therapeutic approach for bone complications in obese children. PMID:25673503

  1. Fat embolism syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kwiatt, Michael E.; Seamon, Mark J.

    2013-01-01

    Fat embolism syndrome (FES) is an ill-defined clinical entity that arises from the systemic manifestations of fat emboli within the microcirculation. Embolized fat within capillary beds cause direct tissue damage as well as induce a systemic inflammatory response resulting in pulmonary, cutaneous, neurological, and retinal symptoms. This is most commonly seen following orthopedic trauma; however, patients with many clinical conditions including bone marrow transplant, pancreatitis, and following liposuction. No definitive diagnostic criteria or tests have been developed, making the diagnosis of FES difficult. While treatment for FES is largely supportive, early operative fixation of long bone fractures decreases the likelihood of a patient developing FES. PMID:23724388

  2. Unsuppressed lipolysis in adipocytes is linked with enhanced gluconeogenesis and altered bile acid physiology in InsrP1195L/+ mice fed high-fat-diet

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eun Young; Sakurai, Kenichi; Zhang, Xilin; Toda, Chitoku; Tanaka, Tomoaki; Jiang, Meizi; Shirasawa, Takuji; Tachibana, Kaori; Yokote, Koutaro; Vidal-Puig, Antonio; Minokoshi, Yasuhiko; Miki, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    High-fat diet (HFD) triggers insulin resistance and diabetes mellitus, but their link remains unclear. Characterization of overt hyperglycemia in insulin receptor mutant (InsrP1195L/+) mice exposed to HFD (InsrP1195L/+/HFD mice) revealed increased glucose-6-phosphatase (G6pc) expression in liver and increased gluconeogenesis from glycerol. Lipolysis in white adipose tissues (WAT) and lipolysis-induced blood glucose rise were increased in InsrP1195L/+/HFD mice, while wild-type WAT transplantation ameliorated the hyperglycemia and the increased G6pc expression. We found that the expressions of genes involved in bile acid (BA) metabolism were altered in InsrP1195L/+/HFD liver. Among these, the expression of Cyp7a1, a BA synthesis enzyme, was insulin-dependent and was markedly decreased in InsrP1195L/+/HFD liver. Reduced Cyp7a1 expression in InsrP1195L/+/HFD liver was rescued by WAT transplantation, and the expression of Cyp7a1 was suppressed by glycerol administration in wild-type liver. These findings suggest that unsuppressed lipolysis in adipocytes elicited by HFD feeding is linked with enhanced gluconeogenesis from glycerol and with alterations in BA physiology in InsrP1195L/+/HFD liver. PMID:26615883

  3. Altered Body Weight Regulation in CK1ε Null and tau Mutant Mice on Regular Chow and High Fat Diets

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Lili; Summa, Keith C.; Olker, Christopher; Vitaterna, Martha H.; Turek, Fred W.

    2016-01-01

    Disruption of circadian rhythms results in metabolic dysfunction. Casein kinase 1 epsilon (CK1ε) is a canonical circadian clock gene. Null and tau mutations in CK1ε show distinct effects on circadian period. To investigate the role of CK1ε in body weight regulation under both regular chow (RC) and high fat (HF) diet conditions, we examined body weight on both RC and HF diets in CK1ε−/− and CK1εtau/tau mice on a standard 24 hr light-dark (LD) cycle. Given the abnormal entrainment of CK1εtau/tau mice on a 24 hr LD cycle, a separate set of CK1εtau/tau mice were tested under both diet conditions on a 20 hr LD cycle, which more closely matches their endogenous period length. On the RC diet, both CK1ε−/− and CK1εtau/tau mutants on a 24 hr LD cycle and CK1εtau/tau mice on a 20 hr LD cycle exhibited significantly lower body weights, despite similar overall food intake and activity levels. On the HF diet, CK1εtau/tau mice on a 20 hr LD cycle were protected against the development of HF diet-induced excess weight gain. These results provide additional evidence supporting a link between circadian rhythms and energy regulation at the genetic level, particularly highlighting CK1ε involved in the integration of circadian biology and metabolic physiology. PMID:27144030

  4. Exposure to a high fat diet during the perinatal period alters vagal motoneurone excitability, even in the absence of obesity

    PubMed Central

    Bhagat, Ruchi; Fortna, Samuel R; Browning, Kirsteen N

    2015-01-01

    The perinatal period is critically important to the development of autonomic neural circuits responsible for energy homeostasis. Vagal neurocircuits are vital to the regulation of upper gastrointestinal functions, including satiety. Diet-induced obesity modulates the excitability and responsiveness of both peripheral vagal afferents and central vagal efferents but less information is available regarding the effects of diet per se on vagal neurocircuit functions. The aims of this study were to investigate whether perinatal exposure to a high fat diet (HFD) dysregulated dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus (DMV) neurones, prior to the development of obesity. Whole cell patch clamp recordings were made from gastric-projecting DMV neurones in thin brainstem slices from rats that were exposed to either a control diet or HFD from pregnancy day 13. Our data demonstrate that following perinatal HFD: (i) DMV neurones had decreased excitability and input resistance with a reduced ability to fire action potentials; (ii) the proportion of DMV neurones excited by cholecystokinin (CCK) was unaltered but the proportion of neurones in which CCK increased excitatory glutamatergic synaptic inputs was reduced; (iii) the tonic activation of presynaptic group II metabotropic glutamate receptors on inhibitory nerve terminals was attenuated, allowing modulation of GABAergic synaptic transmission; and (iv) the size and dendritic arborization of gastric-projecting DMV neurones was increased. These results suggest that perinatal HFD exposure compromises the excitability and responsiveness of gastric-projecting DMV neurones, even in the absence of obesity, suggesting that attenuation of vago-vagal reflex signalling may precede the development of obesity. PMID:25556801

  5. 4,4'-Methylenedianiline Alters Serotonergic Transport in a Novel, Sex-Specific Model of Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension in Rats.

    PubMed

    Carroll-Turpin, Michelle; Hebert, Valeria; Chotibut, Tanya; Wensler, Heather; Krentzel, Dallas; Varner, Kurt James; Burn, Brendan R; Chen, Yi-Fan; Abreo, Fleurette; Dugas, Tammy Renee

    2015-09-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a cardiovascular disorder characterized by elevated pulmonary artery pressure as a result of arterial wall thickening. Patients are 3-4 times more likely to be women than men. This gender discrepancy demonstrates a need for an animal model with similar sex differences. 4,4'-Methylenedianiline (DAPM) is an aromatic amine used industrially in the synthesis of polyurethanes. Chronic, intermittent treatment of male and female rats with DAPM resulted in medial hyperplasia of pulmonary arterioles, exclusively in females, coupled to increases in pulmonary arterial pressures. Significant increases in plasma levels of endothelin-1 (ET-1) and serotonin, but decreases in nitrite [Formula: see text], were observed in females treated with DAPM. A decrease was observed in the serum ratio of the estrogen metabolites 2-hydroxyestradiol (2-OHE1)/16α-hydroxyestrogen (16α-OHE1). In females, ET-1,[Formula: see text] , and 2-OHE1/16α-OHE1 were significantly correlated with peak pressure gradient, an indirect measure of pulmonary arterial pressure. Expression of the serotonin transport protein (SERT) was significantly higher in the arteries of DAPM-treated females. In vitro, DAPM induced human pulmonary vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation and serotonin uptake, both of which were inhibited by treatment with the estrogen receptor antagonist ICI 182,780 or the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine. DAPM also induced the release of serotonin from human pulmonary endothelial cells in culture, which is blocked by ICI 182,780. Taken together, this suggests that DAPM-mediated dysregulation of serotonin transport is estrogen-receptor dependent. Thus, DAPM-induced PAH pathology may be a new tool to clarify the sex selectivity of PAH disease pathogenesis. PMID:26116029

  6. Adenosine protects Sprague Dawley rats from high-fat diet and repeated acute restraint stress-induced intestinal inflammation and altered expression of nutrient transporters.

    PubMed

    Lee, C Y

    2015-04-01

    This study investigated the effect of repeated acute restraint stress and high-fat diet (HFD) on intestinal expression of nutrient transporters, concomitant to intestinal inflammation. The ability of adenosine to reverse any change was examined. Six-week-old male Sprague Dawley rats were divided into eight groups: control or non-stressed (C), rats exposed to restraint stress for 6 h per day for 14 days (S), control rats fed with HFD (CHF) and restraint-stressed rats fed with HFD (SHF); four additional groups received the same treatments and were also given 50 mg/l adenosine dissolved in drinking water. Fasting blood glucose, plasma insulin, adiponectin and corticosterone were measured. Intestinal expression of SLC5A1, SLC2A2, NPC1L1 and TNF-α was analysed. Histological evaluation was conducted to observe for morphological and anatomical changes in the intestinal tissues. Results showed that HFD feeding increased glucose and insulin levels, and repeated acute restraint stress raised the corticosterone level by 22%. Exposure to both stress and HFD caused a further increase in corticosterone to 41%, while decreasing plasma adiponectin level. Restraint stress altered intestinal expression of SLC5A1, SLC2A2 and NPC1L1. These changes were enhanced in SHF rats. Adenosine was found to alleviate HFD-induced increase in glucose and insulin levels, suppress elevation of corticosterone in S rats and improve the altered nutrient transporters expression profiles. It also prevented upregulation of TNF-α in the intestine of SHF rats. In summary, a combination of stress and HFD exaggerated stress- and HFD-induced pathophysiological changes in the intestine, and biochemical parameters related to obesity. Adenosine attenuated the elevation of corticosterone and altered expression of SLC5A1, NPC1L1 and TNF-α. PMID:25196093

  7. Caloric stress alters fat characteristics and Hsp70 expression in milk somatic cells of lactating beef cows

    PubMed Central

    Eitam, Harel; Brosh, Arieh; Orlov, Alla; Izhaki, Ido

    2008-01-01

    Selection for higher production rate in cattle inhabiting challenging habitats may be considered disadvantageous because of possible deleterious effects on immunity and reproduction and, consequently, on calf crop percentage. In Israel, free-grazing high productive beef cows experience reduction in nutritional quality of forage during up to 8 months of the year. As milk production by dams dictates calf performance, dam’s nutritional needs and rebreeding rates, the aim of the present study was to test how lactating beef cows deal with combined caloric and protein stress both at the productive and self protective levels. For this purpose, we studied the effect of long-term caloric stress on milk characteristics and gene expression of stress and milk components producing proteins. Lactating dams responded to caloric stress by decreased body weight, milk, and milk protein production. To compensate for total energy loses in milk, they produced milk of higher fat concentration and shifted the proportions of its fatty acids towards long and unsaturated ones. This was reflected by increased mRNA transcription of the fatty acid binding protein. Prolonged low-energy diet promoted cell-specific heat shock protein (Hsp) response; whereas significant increase of Hsp90 but unchanged levels of Hsp70 proteins were observed in white blood cells, the expression of Hsp70 in milk somatic cells was markedly attenuated, in parallel with a marked increase of αs1-casein expression. At the mammary gland level, these results may indicate a decrease in turnover of proteins and a shift to an exclusive expression of milk components producing factors. Similar responses to caloric stress were revealed also in ketotic dairy cows. Ketosis promoted a shift towards long and unsaturated fatty acids and an increased expression of αs1-casein in milk somatic cells. These findings may reflect an evolutionary-preserved mechanism in lactating cows for coping with caloric restriction. Overall, our

  8. Maternal Plane of Nutrition during Late Gestation and Weaning Age Alter Angus × Simmental Offspring Longissimus Muscle Transcriptome and Intramuscular Fat.

    PubMed

    Moisá, Sonia J; Shike, Daniel W; Shoup, Lindsay; Rodriguez-Zas, Sandra L; Loor, Juan J

    2015-01-01

    In model organisms both the nutrition of the mother and the young offspring could induce long-lasting transcriptional changes in tissues. In livestock, such changes could have important roles in determining nutrient use and meat quality. The main objective was to evaluate if plane of maternal nutrition during late-gestation and weaning age alter the offspring's Longissimus muscle (LM) transcriptome, animal performance, and metabolic hormones. Whole-transcriptome microarray analysis was performed on LM samples of early (EW) and normal weaned (NW) Angus × Simmental calves born to grazing cows receiving no supplement [low plane of nutrition (LPN)] or 2.3 kg high-grain mix/day [medium plane of nutrition (MPN)] during the last 105 days of gestation. Biopsies of LM were harvested at 78 (EW), 187 (NW) and 354 (before slaughter) days of age. Despite greater feed intake in MPN offspring, blood insulin was greater in LPN offspring. Carcass intramuscular fat content was greater in EW offspring. Bioinformatics analysis of the transcriptome highlighted a modest overall response to maternal plane of nutrition, resulting in only 35 differentially expressed genes (DEG). However, weaning age and a high-grain diet (EW) strongly impacted the transcriptome (DEG = 167), especially causing a lipogenic program activation. In addition, between 78 and 187 days of age, EW steers had an activation of the innate immune system due presumably to macrophage infiltration of intramuscular fat. Between 187 and 354 days of age (the "finishing" phase), NW steers had an activation of the lipogenic transcriptome machinery, while EW steers had a clear inhibition through the epigenetic control of histone acetylases. Results underscored the need to conduct further studies to understand better the functional outcome of transcriptome changes induced in the offspring by pre- and post-natal nutrition. Additional knowledge on molecular and functional outcomes would help produce more efficient beef cattle

  9. Maternal Plane of Nutrition during Late Gestation and Weaning Age Alter Angus × Simmental Offspring Longissimus Muscle Transcriptome and Intramuscular Fat

    PubMed Central

    Moisá, Sonia J.; Shike, Daniel W.; Shoup, Lindsay; Rodriguez-Zas, Sandra L.; Loor, Juan J.

    2015-01-01

    In model organisms both the nutrition of the mother and the young offspring could induce long-lasting transcriptional changes in tissues. In livestock, such changes could have important roles in determining nutrient use and meat quality. The main objective was to evaluate if plane of maternal nutrition during late-gestation and weaning age alter the offspring’s Longissimus muscle (LM) transcriptome, animal performance, and metabolic hormones. Whole-transcriptome microarray analysis was performed on LM samples of early (EW) and normal weaned (NW) Angus × Simmental calves born to grazing cows receiving no supplement [low plane of nutrition (LPN)] or 2.3 kg high-grain mix/day [medium plane of nutrition (MPN)] during the last 105 days of gestation. Biopsies of LM were harvested at 78 (EW), 187 (NW) and 354 (before slaughter) days of age. Despite greater feed intake in MPN offspring, blood insulin was greater in LPN offspring. Carcass intramuscular fat content was greater in EW offspring. Bioinformatics analysis of the transcriptome highlighted a modest overall response to maternal plane of nutrition, resulting in only 35 differentially expressed genes (DEG). However, weaning age and a high-grain diet (EW) strongly impacted the transcriptome (DEG = 167), especially causing a lipogenic program activation. In addition, between 78 and 187 days of age, EW steers had an activation of the innate immune system due presumably to macrophage infiltration of intramuscular fat. Between 187 and 354 days of age (the “finishing” phase), NW steers had an activation of the lipogenic transcriptome machinery, while EW steers had a clear inhibition through the epigenetic control of histone acetylases. Results underscored the need to conduct further studies to understand better the functional outcome of transcriptome changes induced in the offspring by pre- and post-natal nutrition. Additional knowledge on molecular and functional outcomes would help produce more efficient beef

  10. Genetic and hypoxic alterations of the microRNA-210-ISCU1/2 axis promote iron–sulfur deficiency and pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    White, Kevin; Lu, Yu; Annis, Sofia; Hale, Andrew E; Chau, B Nelson; Dahlman, James E; Hemann, Craig; Opotowsky, Alexander R; Vargas, Sara O; Rosas, Ivan; Perrella, Mark A; Osorio, Juan C; Haley, Kathleen J; Graham, Brian B; Kumar, Rahul; Saggar, Rajan; Saggar, Rajeev; Wallace, W Dean; Ross, David J; Khan, Omar F; Bader, Andrew; Gochuico, Bernadette R; Matar, Majed; Polach, Kevin; Johannessen, Nicolai M; Prosser, Haydn M; Anderson, Daniel G; Langer, Robert; Zweier, Jay L; Bindoff, Laurence A; Systrom, David; Waxman, Aaron B; Jin, Richard C; Chan, Stephen Y

    2015-01-01

    Iron–sulfur (Fe-S) clusters are essential for mitochondrial metabolism, but their regulation in pulmonary hypertension (PH) remains enigmatic. We demonstrate that alterations of the miR-210-ISCU1/2 axis cause Fe-S deficiencies in vivo and promote PH. In pulmonary vascular cells and particularly endothelium, hypoxic induction of miR-210 and repression of the miR-210 targets ISCU1/2 down-regulated Fe-S levels. In mouse and human vascular and endothelial tissue affected by PH, miR-210 was elevated accompanied by decreased ISCU1/2 and Fe-S integrity. In mice, miR-210 repressed ISCU1/2 and promoted PH. Mice deficient in miR-210, via genetic/pharmacologic means or via an endothelial-specific manner, displayed increased ISCU1/2 and were resistant to Fe-S-dependent pathophenotypes and PH. Similar to hypoxia or miR-210 overexpression, ISCU1/2 knockdown also promoted PH. Finally, cardiopulmonary exercise testing of a woman with homozygous ISCU mutations revealed exercise-induced pulmonary vascular dysfunction. Thus, driven by acquired (hypoxia) or genetic causes, the miR-210-ISCU1/2 regulatory axis is a pathogenic lynchpin causing Fe-S deficiency and PH. These findings carry broad translational implications for defining the metabolic origins of PH and potentially other metabolic diseases sharing similar underpinnings. PMID:25825391

  11. Genetic and hypoxic alterations of the microRNA-210-ISCU1/2 axis promote iron-sulfur deficiency and pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    White, Kevin; Lu, Yu; Annis, Sofia; Hale, Andrew E; Chau, B Nelson; Dahlman, James E; Hemann, Craig; Opotowsky, Alexander R; Vargas, Sara O; Rosas, Ivan; Perrella, Mark A; Osorio, Juan C; Haley, Kathleen J; Graham, Brian B; Kumar, Rahul; Saggar, Rajan; Saggar, Rajeev; Wallace, W Dean; Ross, David J; Khan, Omar F; Bader, Andrew; Gochuico, Bernadette R; Matar, Majed; Polach, Kevin; Johannessen, Nicolai M; Prosser, Haydn M; Anderson, Daniel G; Langer, Robert; Zweier, Jay L; Bindoff, Laurence A; Systrom, David; Waxman, Aaron B; Jin, Richard C; Chan, Stephen Y

    2015-06-01

    Iron-sulfur (Fe-S) clusters are essential for mitochondrial metabolism, but their regulation in pulmonary hypertension (PH) remains enigmatic. We demonstrate that alterations of the miR-210-ISCU1/2 axis cause Fe-S deficiencies in vivo and promote PH. In pulmonary vascular cells and particularly endothelium, hypoxic induction of miR-210 and repression of the miR-210 targets ISCU1/2 down-regulated Fe-S levels. In mouse and human vascular and endothelial tissue affected by PH, miR-210 was elevated accompanied by decreased ISCU1/2 and Fe-S integrity. In mice, miR-210 repressed ISCU1/2 and promoted PH. Mice deficient in miR-210, via genetic/pharmacologic means or via an endothelial-specific manner, displayed increased ISCU1/2 and were resistant to Fe-S-dependent pathophenotypes and PH. Similar to hypoxia or miR-210 overexpression, ISCU1/2 knockdown also promoted PH. Finally, cardiopulmonary exercise testing of a woman with homozygous ISCU mutations revealed exercise-induced pulmonary vascular dysfunction. Thus, driven by acquired (hypoxia) or genetic causes, the miR-210-ISCU1/2 regulatory axis is a pathogenic lynchpin causing Fe-S deficiency and PH. These findings carry broad translational implications for defining the metabolic origins of PH and potentially other metabolic diseases sharing similar underpinnings. PMID:25825391

  12. Is chronic hypoxemia in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease associated with more marked nutritional deficiency? A study of the fat-free mass evaluated by anthropometry and bioelectrical impedance methods.

    PubMed

    Godoy, I; Castro E Silva, M H; Togashi, R H; Geraldo, R R; Campana, A O

    2000-01-01

    In order to determine wheter blood gases abnormalities, specially hypoxemia, are associated with more marked changes in fat-free mass in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (CPOD), nutritional assessment was performed on 16 normoxemic (PaO2 > 55 mm Hg) and 16 hypoxemic (PaO2 < 55 mm Hg) COPD patients in stable clinical condition. Body weight was expressed as percentage of the ideal body weight. Fat-free mass was estimated by anthropometry (FFM-Anthr) and by bioelectrical impedance (FFM-BI). Handgrip-strength was assessed as a measure of peripheral skeletal muscle strength. Patients were age-matched and presented similar degree of airway obstruction. Malnutrition, defined as body weight less than 90% of the ideal, was observed in 19% of the normoxemic patients and in 25% of the hypoxemic patients (p>0,05). FFM values in hypoxemic patients, estimated by both methods, were not different from those observed in normoxemic patients. No significant difference was observed on handgrip values between the two groups. No correlation was found between nutritional indices and pulmonary function and gases exchange parameters. FFM correlated positively with values of peripheral muscle function in normoxemic and hypoxemic patients. These data add further evidence to the hypothesis that hypoxemia is not a primary cause of the nutritional deficiency observed in COPD patients. PMID:10842422

  13. Genetic manipulation of cardiac Hsp72 levels does not alter substrate metabolism but reveals insights into high-fat feeding-induced cardiac insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Henstridge, Darren C; Estevez, E; Allen, T L; Heywood, S E; Gardner, T; Yang, C; Mellett, N A; Kingwell, B A; Meikle, P J; Febbraio, M A

    2015-05-01

    Heat shock protein 72 (Hsp72) protects cells against a variety of stressors, and multiple studies have suggested that Hsp72 plays a cardioprotective role. As skeletal muscle Hsp72 overexpression can protect against high-fat diet (HFD)-induced insulin resistance, alterations in substrate metabolism may be a mechanism by which Hsp72 is cardioprotective. We investigated the impact of transgenically overexpressing (Hsp72 Tg) or deleting Hsp72 (Hsp72 KO) on various aspects of cardiac metabolism. Mice were fed a normal chow (NC) or HFD for 12 weeks from 8 weeks of age to examine the impact of diet-induced obesity on metabolic parameters in the heart. The HFD resulted in an increase in cardiac fatty acid oxidation and a decrease in cardiac glucose oxidation and insulin-stimulated cardiac glucose clearance; however, there was no difference in Hsp72 Tg or Hsp72 KO mice in these rates compared with their respective wild-type control mice. Although HFD-induced cardiac insulin resistance was not rescued in the Hsp72 Tg mice, it was preserved in the skeletal muscle, suggesting tissue-specific effects of Hsp72 overexpression on substrate metabolism. Comparison of two different strains of mice (BALB/c vs. C57BL/6J) also identified strain-specific differences in regard to HFD-induced cardiac lipid accumulation and insulin resistance. These strain differences suggest that cardiac lipid accumulation can be dissociated from cardiac insulin resistance. Our study finds that genetic manipulation of Hsp72 does not lead to alterations in metabolic processes in cardiac tissue under resting conditions, but identifies mouse strain-specific differences in cardiac lipid accumulation and insulin-stimulated glucose clearance. PMID:25618331

  14. [Pulmonary circulation in embolic pulmonary edema].

    PubMed

    Sanotskaia, N V; Polikarpov, V V; Matsievskiĭ, D D

    1989-02-01

    The ultrasonic method was used in acute experiments on cats with open chest under artificial lung ventilation to obtain blood flow in low-lobar pulmonary artery and vein, the blood pressure in pulmonary artery, as well as the left atrial pressure in fat (olive oil) and mechanical (Lycopodium spores) pulmonary embolism. It is shown that pulmonary embolism produces the decrease in the blood flow in pulmonary artery and vein, the increase of the pressure in pulmonary artery and left atria, the increase of lung vessels resistance. The decrease is observed of systemic arterial pressure, bradycardia, and extrasystole. After 5-10 min the restoration of arterial pressure and heart rhythm occur and partial restoration of blood flow in pulmonary artery and vein. In many experiments the blood flow in vein outdoes that in the artery--it allows to suppose the increase of the blood flow in bronchial artery. After 60-90 min there occur sudden decrease of systemic arterial pressure, the decrease of the blood flow in pulmonary artery and vein. The pressure in pulmonary artery and resistance of pulmonary vessels remain high. Pulmonary edema developed in all animals. The death occurs in 60-100 min after the beginning of embolism. PMID:2923969

  15. LIPGENE food-exchange model for alteration of dietary fat quantity and quality in free-living participants from eight European countries.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Danielle I; Tierney, Audrey C; McCarthy, Sinead; Upritchard, Jane; Vermunt, Susan; Gulseth, Hanne L; Drevon, Christian A; Blaak, Ellen E; Saris, Wim H M; Karlström, Brita; Helal, Olfa; Defoort, Catherine; Gallego, Raquel; López-Miranda, José; Siedlecka, Dominika; Malczewska-Malec, Małgorzata; Roche, Helen M; Lovegrove, Julie A

    2009-03-01

    Controlled human intervention trials are required to confirm the hypothesis that dietary fat quality may influence insulin action. The aim was to develop a food-exchange model, suitable for use in free-living volunteers, to investigate the effects of four experimental diets distinct in fat quantity and quality: high SFA (HSFA); high MUFA (HMUFA) and two low-fat (LF) diets, one supplemented with 1.24 g EPA and DHA/d (LFn-3). A theoretical food-exchange model was developed. The average quantity of exchangeable fat was calculated as the sum of fat provided by added fats (spreads and oils), milk, cheese, biscuits, cakes, buns and pastries using data from the National Diet and Nutrition Survey of UK adults. Most of the exchangeable fat was replaced by specifically designed study foods. Also critical to the model was the use of carbohydrate exchanges to ensure the diets were isoenergetic. Volunteers from eight centres across Europe completed the dietary intervention. Results indicated that compositional targets were largely achieved with significant differences in fat quantity between the high-fat diets (39.9 (sem 0.6) and 38.9 (sem 0.51) percentage energy (%E) from fat for the HSFA and HMUFA diets respectively) and the low-fat diets (29.6 (sem 0.6) and 29.1 (sem 0.5) %E from fat for the LF and LFn-3 diets respectively) and fat quality (17.5 (sem 0.3) and 10.4 (sem 0.2) %E from SFA and 12.7 (sem 0.3) and 18.7 (sem 0.4) %E MUFA for the HSFA and HMUFA diets respectively). In conclusion, a robust, flexible food-exchange model was developed and implemented successfully in the LIPGENE dietary intervention trial. PMID:18680629

  16. Atelectrauma disrupts pulmonary epithelial barrier integrity and alters the distribution of tight junction proteins ZO-1 and claudin 4.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Anne-Marie; Gaver, Donald P

    2012-11-01

    Mechanical ventilation inevitably exposes the delicate tissues of the airways and alveoli to abnormal mechanical stresses that can induce pulmonary edema and exacerbate conditions such as acute respiratory distress syndrome. The goal of our research is to characterize the cellular trauma caused by the transient abnormal fluid mechanical stresses that arise when air is forced into a liquid-occluded airway (i.e., atelectrauma). Using a fluid-filled, parallel-plate flow chamber to model the "airway reopening" process, our in vitro study examined consequent increases in pulmonary epithelial plasma membrane rupture, paracellular permeability, and disruption of the tight junction (TJ) proteins zonula occludens-1 and claudin-4. Computational analysis predicts the normal and tangential surface stresses that develop between the basolateral epithelial membrane and underlying substrate due to the interfacial stresses acting on the apical cell membrane. These simulations demonstrate that decreasing the velocity of reopening causes a significant increase in basolateral surface stresses, particularly in the region between neighboring cells where TJs concentrate. Likewise, pulmonary epithelial wounding, paracellular permeability, and TJ protein disruption were significantly greater following slower reopening. This study thus demonstrates that maintaining a higher velocity of reopening, which reduces the damaging fluid stresses acting on the airway wall, decreases the mechanical stresses on the basolateral cell surface while protecting cells from plasma membrane rupture and promoting barrier integrity. PMID:22898551

  17. Atelectrauma disrupts pulmonary epithelial barrier integrity and alters the distribution of tight junction proteins ZO-1 and claudin 4

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Anne-Marie

    2012-01-01

    Mechanical ventilation inevitably exposes the delicate tissues of the airways and alveoli to abnormal mechanical stresses that can induce pulmonary edema and exacerbate conditions such as acute respiratory distress syndrome. The goal of our research is to characterize the cellular trauma caused by the transient abnormal fluid mechanical stresses that arise when air is forced into a liquid-occluded airway (i.e., atelectrauma). Using a fluid-filled, parallel-plate flow chamber to model the “airway reopening” process, our in vitro study examined consequent increases in pulmonary epithelial plasma membrane rupture, paracellular permeability, and disruption of the tight junction (TJ) proteins zonula occludens-1 and claudin-4. Computational analysis predicts the normal and tangential surface stresses that develop between the basolateral epithelial membrane and underlying substrate due to the interfacial stresses acting on the apical cell membrane. These simulations demonstrate that decreasing the velocity of reopening causes a significant increase in basolateral surface stresses, particularly in the region between neighboring cells where TJs concentrate. Likewise, pulmonary epithelial wounding, paracellular permeability, and TJ protein disruption were significantly greater following slower reopening. This study thus demonstrates that maintaining a higher velocity of reopening, which reduces the damaging fluid stresses acting on the airway wall, decreases the mechanical stresses on the basolateral cell surface while protecting cells from plasma membrane rupture and promoting barrier integrity. PMID:22898551

  18. Fat embolism after liposuction.

    PubMed

    Ross, R M; Johnson, G W

    1988-06-01

    We present a case of adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) after extensive liposuction. On the basis of fever, tachypnea, hypoxia, and ARDS occurring within 48 hours after surgery without evidence of cardiogenic pulmonary edema or sepsis, the etiology is believed to be fat embolism. Although liposuction is generally an effective and safe procedure, awareness of this life-threatening complication is important in order to institute prompt and appropriate treatment. Fat embolism must be differentiated from thromboembolism, as the treatment is different, and heparin is not indicated. It is recommended that training standards and guidelines be devised in order to reduce morbidity and mortality associated with this procedure. PMID:3371109

  19. Substitution of a Commercial Trans Fatty Acid Free Cooking Oil for a Conventional Partially Hydrogenated Fat Favorably Alters Serum Lipoprotein Profile in Moderately Hyperlipidemic Subjects

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In light of the unfavorable effects of partially hydrogenated fats on cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors there are efforts to use alternate cooking fats by industry. The efficacy of one approach was assessed by feeding postmenopausal women (n=19; >50 y; LDL-C >120 mg/dL) diets enriched in eit...

  20. High-fat diet-induced obesity alters nitric oxide-mediated neuromuscular transmission and smooth muscle excitability in the mouse distal colon.

    PubMed

    Bhattarai, Yogesh; Fried, David; Gulbransen, Brian; Kadrofske, Mark; Fernandes, Roxanne; Xu, Hui; Galligan, James

    2016-08-01

    We tested the hypothesis that colonic enteric neurotransmission and smooth muscle cell (SMC) function are altered in mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD). We used wild-type (WT) mice and mice lacking the β1-subunit of the BK channel (BKβ1 (-/-)). WT mice fed a HFD had increased myenteric plexus oxidative stress, a 28% decrease in nitrergic neurons, and a 20% decrease in basal nitric oxide (NO) levels. Circular muscle inhibitory junction potentials (IJPs) were reduced in HFD WT mice. The NO synthase inhibitor nitro-l-arginine (NLA) was less effective at inhibiting relaxations in HFD compared with control diet (CD) WT mice (11 vs. 37%, P < 0.05). SMCs from HFD WT mice had depolarized membrane potentials (-47 ± 2 mV) and continuous action potential firing compared with CD WT mice (-53 ± 2 mV, P < 0.05), which showed rhythmic firing. SMCs from HFD or CD fed BKβ1 (-/-) mice fired action potentials continuously. NLA depolarized membrane potential and caused continuous firing only in SMCs from CD WT mice. Sodium nitroprusside (NO donor) hyperpolarized membrane potential and changed continuous to rhythmic action potential firing in SMCs from HFD WT and BKβ1 (-/-) mice. Migrating motor complexes were disrupted in colons from BKβ1 (-/-) mice and HFD WT mice. BK channel α-subunit protein and β1-subunit mRNA expression were similar in CD and HFD WT mice. We conclude that HFD-induced obesity disrupts inhibitory neuromuscular transmission, SMC excitability, and colonic motility by promoting oxidative stress, loss of nitrergic neurons, and SMC BK channel dysfunction. PMID:27288421

  1. Th2 but Not Th1 Immune Bias Results in Altered Lung Functions in a Murine Model of Pulmonary Cryptococcus neoformans Infection▿

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Aditya V.; Zhang, Yanmei; Fields, W. Bradley; McNamara, David A.; Choe, Mun Y.; Chen, Gwo-hsiao; Erb-Downward, John; Osterholzer, John J.; Toews, Galen B.; Huffnagle, Gary B.; Olszewski, Michal A.

    2009-01-01

    Changes in airway dynamics have been reported in the rat model of pulmonary cryptococcosis. However, it is not known if Cryptococcus neoformans-induced changes in lung functions are related to the immunophenotype that develops in response to cryptococcal infection in the lungs. In this study we performed a parallel analysis of the immunophenotype and airway resistance (standard resistance of the airways [SRAW]) in BALB/c mice infected with highly virulent C. neoformans strain H99 and moderately virulent strain 52D. H99 infection evoked a Th2 response and was associated with increased SRAW, while the SRAW for 52D infection, which resulted in a predominantly Th1-skewed response, did not differ from the SRAW for uninfected mice. We found that an altered SRAW in mice did not positively or negatively correlate with the pulmonary fungal burden, the magnitude of inflammatory response, the numbers of T cells, eosinophils or eosinophil subsets, neutrophils, or monocytes/macrophages, or the levels of cytokines (interleukin-4 [IL-4], IL-10, gamma interferon, or IL-13) produced by lung leukocytes. However, the level of a systemic Th2 marker, serum immunoglobulin E (IgE), correlated significantly with SRAW, indicating that the changes in lung functions were proportional to the level of Th2 skewing in this model. These data also imply that IgE may contribute to the altered SRAW observed in H99-infected mice. Lung histological analysis revealed severe allergic bronchopulmonary mycosis pathology in H99-infected mice and evidence of protective responses in 52D-infected mice with well-marginalized lesions. Taken together, the data show that C. neoformans can significantly affect airflow physiology, particularly in the context of a Th2 immune response with possible involvement of IgE as an important factor. PMID:19752036

  2. The ability of genetically lean or fat slow-growing chickens to synthesize and store lipids is not altered by the dietary energy source.

    PubMed

    Baéza, E; Gondret, F; Chartrin, P; Le Bihan-Duval, E; Berri, C; Gabriel, I; Narcy, A; Lessire, M; Métayer-Coustard, S; Collin, A; Jégou, M; Lagarrigue, S; Duclos, M J

    2015-10-01

    The increasing use of unconventional feedstuffs in chicken's diets results in the substitution of starch by lipids as the main dietary energy source. To evaluate the responses of genetically fat or lean chickens to these diets, males of two experimental lines divergently selected for abdominal fat content were fed isocaloric, isonitrogenous diets with either high lipid (80 g/kg), high fiber (64 g/kg) contents (HL), or low lipid (20 g/kg), low fiber (21 g/kg) contents (LL) from 22 to 63 days of age. The diet had no effect on growth performance and did not affect body composition evaluated at 63 days of age. Glycolytic and oxidative energy metabolisms in the liver and glycogen storage in liver and Sartorius muscle at 63 days of age were greater in chicken fed LL diet compared with chicken fed HL diet. In Pectoralis major (PM) muscle, energy metabolisms and glycogen content were not different between diets. There were no dietary-associated differences in lipid contents of the liver, muscles and abdominal fat. However, the percentages of saturated (SFA) and monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) in tissue lipids were generally higher, whereas percentages of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) were lower for diet LL than for diet HL. The fat line had a greater feed intake and average daily gain, but gain to feed ratio was lower in that line compared with the lean line. Fat chickens were heavier than lean chickens at 63 days of age. Their carcass fatness was higher and their muscle yield was lower than those of lean chickens. The oxidative enzyme activities in the liver were lower in the fat line than in the lean line, but line did not affect energy metabolism in muscles. The hepatic glycogen content was not different between lines, whereas glycogen content and glycolytic potential were higher in the PM muscle of fat chickens compared with lean chickens. Lipid contents in the liver, muscles and abdominal fat did not differ between lines, but fat chickens stored less MUFA and

  3. Fat embolism: a clinical diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Miller, J D

    1987-01-01

    Fat embolism causes a distinctive clinical syndrome usually seen in trauma victims with long bone fractures. Clinical findings include hyperthermia, respiratory distress, petechiae and retinal fat emboli. Neurologic changes include decreased sensorium, decerebrate posturing and seizure activity. Chest radiographs commonly demonstrate bilateral fluffy infiltrates. Laboratory abnormalities include hypoxemia, respiratory alkalosis, anemia and hypocalcemia. Treatment consists of general supportive care with vigorous pulmonary therapy. Most patients have a good recovery. PMID:3799415

  4. Ageing-related tissue-specific alterations in mitochondrial composition and function are modulated by dietary fat type in the rat.

    PubMed

    Quiles, José L; Martínez, Estrella; Ibáñez, Susana; Ochoa, Julio J; Martín, Yolanda; López-Frías, Magdalena; Huertas, Jesús R; Mataix, José

    2002-12-01

    This study investigated the way in which feeding rats with two fat sources (olive or sunflower oils) affected electron-transport components and function of mitotic (liver) and postmitotic (heart and skeletal muscle) tissues during ageing. Rats adapted the mitochondrial-membrane-lipid profile to dietary fat throughout the study, suggesting that the benefits to eat either of the two fats might be maintained lifelong. Liver was more resistant to dietary changes and ageing than heart and skeletal muscle, which showed higher levels of coenzyme Q, cytochrome b, and cytochrome a + a3 with ageing and lower cytochrome c oxidase and complex IV turnover. Dietary fat differentially modulated the response of tissues during ageing, with sunflower oil leading to the highest levels of coenzyme Q and cytochromes b and a + a3. Since high levels of cytochrome b have been related to increased age, it could be hypothesized that olive oil could lead to less aged mitochondria. PMID:12678443

  5. Effect of High Fructose and High Fat Diets on Pulmonary Sensitivity, Motor Activity, and Body Composition of Brown Norway Rats Exposed to Ozone

    EPA Science Inventory

    Diet-induced obesity has been suggested to lead to increased susceptibility to air pollutants such as ozone (03); however, there is little experimental evidence. Thirty day old male and female Brown Norway rats were fed a normal, high-fructose or high-fat diet for 12 weeks and th...

  6. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and inhaled steroids alter surfactant protein D (SP-D) levels: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Sims, Michael W; Tal-Singer, Ruth M; Kierstein, Sonja; Musani, Ali I; Beers, Michael F; Panettieri, Reynold A; Haczku, Angela

    2008-01-01

    Background Surfactant protein D (SP-D), an innate immune molecule, plays an important protective role during airway inflammation. Deficiency of this molecule induces emphysematous changes in murine lungs, but its significance in human COPD remains unclear. Methods We collected bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from 20 subjects with varying degrees of COPD (8 former smokers and 12 current smokers) and 15 asymptomatic healthy control subjects (5 never smokers, 3 remote former smokers, and 7 current smokers). All subjects underwent a complete medical history and pulmonary function testing. SP-D was measured by Enzyme-Linked ImmunoSorbent Assay. Statistical analysis was performed using nonparametric methods and multivariable linear regression for control of confounding. The effect of corticosteroid treatment on SP-D synthesis was studied in vitro using an established model of isolated type II alveolar epithelial cell culture. Results Among former smokers, those with COPD had significantly lower SP-D levels than healthy subjects (median 502 and 1067 ng/mL, respectively, p = 0.01). In a multivariable linear regression model controlling for age, sex, race, and pack-years of tobacco, COPD was independently associated with lower SP-D levels (model coefficient -539, p = 0.04) and inhaled corticosteroid use was independently associated with higher SP-D levels (398, p = 0.046). To support the hypothesis that corticosteroids increase SP-D production we used type II alveolar epithelial cells isolated from adult rat lungs. These cells responded to dexamethasone treatment by a significant increase of SP-D mRNA (p = 0.041) and protein (p = 0.037) production after 4 days of culture. Conclusion Among former smokers, COPD is associated with lower levels of SP-D and inhaled corticosteroid use is associated with higher levels of SP-D in the lung. Dexamethasone induced SP-D mRNA and protein expression in isolated epithelial cells in vitro. Given the importance of this molecule as a modulator

  7. Secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor gene deletion alters bleomycin-induced lung injury, but not development of pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Habgood, Anthony N; Tatler, Amanda L; Porte, Joanne; Wahl, Sharon M; Laurent, Geoffrey J; John, Alison E; Johnson, Simon R; Jenkins, Gisli

    2016-06-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is a progressive, fatal disease with limited treatment options. Protease-mediated transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) activation has been proposed as a pathogenic mechanism of lung fibrosis. Protease activity in the lung is tightly regulated by protease inhibitors, particularly secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI). The bleomycin model of lung fibrosis was used to determine the effect of increased protease activity in the lungs of Slpi(-/-) mice following injury. Slpi(-/-), and wild-type, mice received oropharyngeal administration of bleomycin (30 IU) and the development of pulmonary fibrosis was assessed. Pro and active forms of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9 were measured. Lung fibrosis was determined by collagen subtype-specific gene expression, hydroxyproline concentration, and histological assessment. Alveolar TGF-β activation was measured using bronchoalveolar lavage cell pSmad2 levels and global TGF-β activity was assessed by pSmad2 immunohistochemistry. The active-MMP-9 to pro-MMP-9 ratio was significantly increased in Slpi(-/-) animals compared with wild-type animals, demonstrating enhanced metalloproteinase activity. Wild-type animals showed an increase in TGF-β activation following bleomycin, with a progressive and sustained increase in collagen type I, alpha 1 (Col1α1), III, alpha 1(Col3α1), IV, alpha 1(Col4α1) mRNA expression, and a significant increase in total lung collagen 28 days post bleomycin. In contrast Slpi(-/-) mice showed no significant increase of alveolar TGF-β activity following bleomycin, above their already elevated levels, although global TGF-β activity did increase. Slpi(-/-) mice had impaired collagen gene expression but animals demonstrated minimal reduction in lung fibrosis compared with wild-type animals. These data suggest that enhanced proteolysis does not further enhance TGF-β activation, and inhibits sustained Col1α1, Col3α1, and Col4α1 gene expression

  8. Single injection of the β2-adrenergic receptor agonist, clenbuterol, into newly hatched chicks alters abdominal fat pad mass in growing birds.

    PubMed

    Ishimaru, Yoshitaka; Ijiri, Daichi; Shimamoto, Saki; Ishitani, Kanae; Nojima, Tsutomu; Ohtsuka, Akira

    2015-01-15

    Excessive energy is stored in white adipose tissue as triacylglycerols in birds as well as in mammals. Although β2-adrenergic receptor agonists reduce adipose tissue mass in birds, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. The aim of the current study was to examine the effects of a single intraperitoneal injection of the β2-adrenergic receptor agonist, clenbuterol, on the abdominal fat pad tissue development. Thirty-three chicks at 1-day-old were given a single intraperitoneal injection of clenbuterol (0.1mg/kg body weight) or phosphate-buffered saline. At 2 weeks post-dose, the weight of the abdominal fat tissue was decreased in the clenbuterol-injected chicks, and small adipocyte-like cells were observed in the abdominal fat pad tissue of the clenbuterol-injected chicks. Then, the expression of mRNAs encoding genes related to avian adipogenesis was examined in the abdominal fat pat tissue. The expression of mRNAs encoding Krüppel-like zinc finger transcription factor 5 (KLF-5), KLF-15, and zinc finger protein 423 in the abdominal fat pad tissue of the clenbuterol-injected chicks was significantly lower (P<0.05) than that of the control chicks, while the expression of mRNA encoding peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma was not affected. In addition, both mRNA expression (P<0.05) and enzymatic activity (P<0.05) of fatty acid synthase (FAS) were decreased in the abdominal fat pad tissue of the clenbuterol-injected chicks, while clenbuterol injection did not affect FAS activity in liver. These results suggested that a single injection with clenbuterol into newly hatched chicks reduces their abdominal fat pad mass possibly via disrupting adipocyte development during later growth stages. PMID:25513727

  9. Short-term high-fat diet alters postprandial glucose metabolism and circulating vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 in healthy males.

    PubMed

    Numao, Shigeharu; Kawano, Hiroshi; Endo, Naoya; Yamada, Yuka; Takahashi, Masaki; Konishi, Masayuki; Sakamoto, Shizuo

    2016-08-01

    Short-term intake of a high-fat diet aggravates postprandial glucose metabolism; however, the dose-response relationship has not been investigated. We hypothesized that short-term intake of a eucaloric low-carbohydrate/high-fat diet (LCHF) would aggravate postprandial glucose metabolism and circulating adhesion molecules in healthy males. Seven healthy young males (mean ± SE; age: 26 ± 1 years) consumed either a eucaloric control diet (C, approximately 25% fats), a eucaloric intermediate-carbohydrate/intermediate-fat diet (ICIF, approximately 50% fats), or an LCHF (approximately 70% fats) for 3 days. An oral meal tolerance test (MTT) was performed after the 3-day dietary intervention. The concentrations of plasma glucose, insulin, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), intercellular adhesion molecule-1, and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) were determined at rest and during MTT. The incremental area under the curve (iAUC) of plasma glucose concentration during MTT was significantly higher in LCHF than in C (P = 0.009). The first-phase insulin secretion indexes were significantly lower in LCHF than in C (P = 0.04). Moreover, the iAUC of GLP-1 and VCAM-1 concentrations was significantly higher in LCHF than in C (P = 0.014 and P = 0.04, respectively). The metabolites from ICIF and C were not significantly different. In conclusion, short-term intake of eucaloric diet containing a high percentage of fats in healthy males excessively increased postprandial glucose and VCAM-1 concentrations and attenuated first-phase insulin release. PMID:27454856

  10. Pulmonary artery banding alters the expression of Ca2+ transport proteins in the right atrium in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Subash C; Varian, Kenneth D; Bal, Naresh C; Abraham, Jessica L; Periasamy, Muthu; Janssen, Paul M L

    2009-06-01

    Following pulmonary artery banding (PAB), the contractile function of right ventricle diminishes over time. Subsequently, the right atrium (RA) has to contract against a higher afterload, but it is unknown to what extent ventricular dysfunction has an effect on the atrial contractility. We hypothesized that right ventricular pressure overload may have an affect on atrial contractility and Ca(2+) transport protein expression. Therefore, we induced pressure overload of the right ventricle by PAB for 10 wk in rabbits and examined the changes in the expression of Ca(2+) transport proteins in the atrium. We demonstrate that PAB significantly decreased the expression of sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (Serca) 2a while expression of Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger-1 was significantly upregulated in the RA but not in the left atria of rabbit hearts, indicating that pressure is the major trigger. A decrease in Serca2a expression was concomitant with a significant decrease in sarcolipin (SLN), possibly indicating a compensatory role of SLN. The decreased expression of SLN was unable to completely restore sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) uptake function of Serca2a. Functional contractile assessments in isolated trabeculae showed no difference between PAB- and sham-operated rabbits at 1 Hz but displayed an enhanced force development at higher frequencies and in the presence of isoproterenol, while twitch timing was unaffected. Our results indicate that right ventricular mechanical overload due to PAB affects the expression of the Ca(2+)-handling proteins in the RA in rabbits. PMID:19376811

  11. Altered Right Ventricular Kinetic Energy Work Density and Viscous Energy Dissipation in Patients with Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension: A Pilot Study Using 4D Flow MRI

    PubMed Central

    Han, Q. Joyce; Witschey, Walter R. T.; Fang-Yen, Christopher M.; Arkles, Jeffrey S.; Barker, Alex J.; Forfia, Paul R.; Han, Yuchi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Right ventricular (RV) function has increasingly being recognized as an important predictor for morbidity and mortality in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). The increased RV after-load increase RV work in PAH. We used time-resolved 3D phase contrast MRI (4D flow MRI) to derive RV kinetic energy (KE) work density and energy loss in the pulmonary artery (PA) to better characterize RV work in PAH patients. Methods 4D flow and standard cardiac cine images were obtained in ten functional class I/II patients with PAH and nine healthy subjects. For each individual, we calculated the RV KE work density and the amount of viscous dissipation in the PA. Results PAH patients had alterations in flow patterns in both the RV and the PA compared to healthy subjects. PAH subjects had significantly higher RV KE work density than healthy subjects (94.7±33.7 mJ/mL vs. 61.7±14.8 mJ/mL, p = 0.007) as well as a much greater percent PA energy loss (21.1±6.4% vs. 2.2±1.3%, p = 0.0001) throughout the cardiac cycle. RV KE work density and percent PA energy loss had mild and moderate correlations with RV ejection fraction. Conclusion This study has quantified two kinetic energy metrics to assess RV function using 4D flow. RV KE work density and PA viscous energy loss not only distinguished healthy subjects from patients, but also provided distinction amongst PAH patients. These metrics hold promise as imaging markers for RV function. PMID:26418553

  12. Dietary Fat Alters Body Composition, Mammary Development, and Cytochrome P450 Induction after Maternal TCDD Exposure in DBA/2J Mice with Low-Responsive Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptors

    PubMed Central

    La Merrill, Michele; Kuruvilla, Bittu S.; Pomp, Daniel; Birnbaum, Linda S.; Threadgill, David W.

    2009-01-01

    Background Increased fat intake is associated with obesity and may make obese individuals uniquely susceptible to the effects of lipophilic aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) ligands. Objectives We investigated the consequences of high-fat diet (HFD) and AHR ligands on body composition, mammary development, and hepatic P450 expression. Methods Pregnant C57BL/6J (B6) and DBA/2J (D2) dams, respectively expressing high- or low-responsive AHR, were dosed at mid-gestation with TCDD. At parturition, mice were placed on an HFD or a low-fat diet (LFD). Body fat of progeny was measured before dosing with 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA). Fasting blood glucose was measured, and liver and mammary glands were analyzed. Results Maternal TCDD exposure resulted in reduced litter size in D2 mice and, on HFD, reduced postpartum survival in B6 mice. In D2 mice, HFD increased body mass and fat in off-spring, induced precocious mammary gland development, and increased AHR expression compared with mice given an LFD. Maternal TCDD exposure increased hepatic Cyp1a1 and Cyp1b1 expression in offspring on both diets, but DMBA depressed Cyp1b1 expression only in mice fed an HFD. In D2 progeny, TCDD exposure decreased mammary terminal end bud size, and DMBA exposure decreased the number of terminal end buds. Only in D2 progeny fed HFD did perinatal TCDD increase blood glucose and the size of mammary fat pads, while decreasing both branch elongation and the number of terminal end buds. Conclusions We conclude that despite having a low-responsive AHR, D2 progeny fed a diet similar to that consumed by most people are susceptible to TCDD and DMBA exposure effects blood glucose levels, mammary differentiation, and hepatic Cyp1 expression. PMID:19750107

  13. Green tea, black tea, and epigallocatechin modify body composition, improve glucose tolerance, and differentially alter metabolic gene expression in rats fed a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Chen, Nora; Bezzina, Rebecca; Hinch, Edward; Lewandowski, Paul A; Cameron-Smith, David; Mathai, Michael L; Jois, Markandeya; Sinclair, Andrew J; Begg, Denovan P; Wark, John D; Weisinger, Harrison S; Weisinger, Richard S

    2009-11-01

    The mechanisms of how tea and epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) lower body fat are not completely understood. This study investigated long-term administration of green tea (GT), black tea (BT), or isolated EGCG (1 mg/kg per day) on body composition, glucose tolerance, and gene expression related to energy metabolism and lipid homeostasis; it was hypothesized that all treatments would improve the indicators of metabolic syndrome. Rats were fed a 15% fat diet for 6 months from 4 weeks of age and were supplied GT, BT, EGCG, or water. GT and BT reduced body fat, whereas GT and EGCG increased lean mass. At 16 weeks GT, BT, and EGCG improved glucose tolerance. In the liver, GT and BT increased the expression of genes involved in fatty acid synthesis (SREBP-1c, FAS, MCD, ACC) and oxidation (PPAR-alpha, CPT-1, ACO); however, EGCG had no effect. In perirenal fat, genes that mediate adipocyte differentiation were suppressed by GT (Pref-1, C/EBP-beta, and PPAR-gamma) and BT (C/EBP-beta), while decreasing LPL, HSL, and UCP-2 expression; EGCG increased expression of UCP-2 and PPAR-gamma genes. Liver triacylglycerol content was unchanged. The results suggest that GT and BT suppressed adipocyte differentiation and fatty acid uptake into adipose tissue, while increasing fat synthesis and oxidation by the liver, without inducing hepatic fat accumulation. In contrast, EGCG increased markers of thermogenesis and differentiation in adipose tissue, while having no effect on liver or muscle tissues at this dose. These results show novel and separate mechanisms by which tea and EGCG may improve glucose tolerance and support a role for these compounds in obesity prevention. PMID:19932867

  14. Oncoprotein mdig contributes to silica-induced pulmonary fibrosis by altering balance between Th17 and Treg T cells

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jiaying; Zhang, Yadong; Lu, Yongju; Battelli, Lori; Porter, Dale W.; Chen, Fei

    2015-01-01

    Mineral dust-induced gene (mdig, also named Mina53) was first identified from alveolar macrophages of the coal miners with chronic lung inflammation or fibrosis, but how this gene is involved in lung diseases is poorly understood. Here we show that heterozygotic knockout of mdig (mdig+/−) ameliorates silica-induced lung fibrosis by altering the balance between Th17 cells and Treg cells. Relative to the wild type (WT) mice, infiltration of the macrophages and Th17 cells was reduced in lungs from silica-exposed mdig+/− mice. In contrast, an increased infiltration of the T regulatory (Treg) cells to the lung intestitium was observed in the mdig+/− mice treated with silica. Both the number of Th17 cells in the lung lymph nodes and the level of IL-17 in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluids were decreased in the mdig+/− mice in response to silica. Thus, these results suggest that mdig may contribute to silica-induced lung fibrosis by altering the balance between Th17 and Treg cells. Genetic deficiency of mdig impairs Th17 cell infiltration and function, but favors infiltration of the Treg cells, the immune suppressive T cells that are able to limit the inflammatory responses by repressing the Th17 cells and macrophages. PMID:25669985

  15. Dietary fat source alters hepatic gene expression profile and determines the type of liver pathology in rats overfed via total enteral nutrition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was designed to determine if the fatty acid composition of the diet affects the development and progression of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 5-6/group) were overfed low (5%) or high (70%) fat diets with different fatty acid sources: olive oil (OO,...

  16. Short-Term High Fat Intake Does Not Significantly Alter Markers of Renal Function or Inflammation in Young Male Sprague-Dawley Rats

    PubMed Central

    Crinigan, Catherine; Calhoun, Matthew; Sweazea, Karen L.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic high fat feeding is correlated with diabetes and kidney disease. However, the impact of short-term high fat diets (HFD) is not well-understood. Six weeks of HFD result in indices of metabolic syndrome (increased adiposity, hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, hyperlipidemia, hyperleptinemia, and impaired endothelium-dependent vasodilation) compared to rats fed on standard chow. The hypothesis was that short-term HFD would induce early signs of renal disease. Young male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed either HFD (60% fat) or standard chow (5% fat) for six weeks. Morphology was determined by measuring changes in renal mass and microstructure. Kidney function was measured by analyzing urinary protein, creatinine, and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) concentrations, as well as plasma cystatin C concentrations. Renal damage was measured through assessment of urinary oxDNA/RNA concentrations as well as renal lipid peroxidation, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα), and interleukin 6 (IL-6). Despite HFD significantly increasing adiposity and renal mass, there was no evidence of early stage kidney disease as measured by changes in urinary and plasma biomarkers as well as histology. These findings suggest that moderate hyperglycemia and inflammation produced by short-term HFD are not sufficient to damage kidneys or that the ketogenic HFD may have protective effects within the kidneys. PMID:26185688

  17. Female mice lacking p47phox have altered adipose tissue gene expression and are protected against high fat-induced obesity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oxidative stress in the fat and the liver has been linked to the development of obesity and the metabolic syndrome. However, the molecular origin of reactive oxygen species and the role of these in obesity remain areas of active investigation. The NADPH oxidases (NOX) enzymes are a major source of ...

  18. Substitution of vegetable oil for a partially-hydrogenated fat favorably alters cardiovascular disease risk factors in moderately hypercholesterolemic postmenopausal women

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Partially-hydrogenated fat is associated with increased cardiovascular disease risk. Acceptable alternatives must be adjudicated. The objective was to assess the effect of replacing partially-hydrogenated soybean oil with an alternative currently in use. Using a double-blind cross-over design, 30...

  19. A Low-fat Liquid Diet Increases Protein Accretion and Alters Cellular Signaling for Protein Synthesis in 10-day-old Pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous research shows that neonatal pigs respond to decreases in energy density of liquid diets with increased feed intake, resulting in similar performance to pigs fed a more energy dense diet. The objective of this experiment was to determine if a high-(25%, HF) or low-fat (2%, LF) liquid diet ...

  20. Altered expression of small proteoglycans, collagen, and transforming growth factor-beta 1 in developing bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Westergren-Thorsson, G; Hernnäs, J; Särnstrand, B; Oldberg, A; Heinegård, D; Malmström, A

    1993-01-01

    The development of bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis in rats was studied over a period of 21 d after an intratracheal instillation of bleomycin. The expression of three small proteoglycans (biglycan, decorin, and fibromodulin), collagen III and TGF-beta 1 was studied by RNA-transfer blot analysis. The proteoglycans were also studied by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and Western blots. TGF-beta 1 mRNA increased threefold already on day 3 and remained elevated until day 10. After the increase of TGF-beta 1 mRNA the messages for biglycan and collagen III steadily increased to reach a maximum 10 d after bleomycin instillation. The mRNA for biglycan increased maximally fourfold and that of collagen III 2.5-fold. Decorin mRNA, in contrast to biglycan decreased and reached 20% of control on day 10. The message for fibromodulin remained constant throughout the study period. The amounts of biglycan and decorin in the tissue changed in accordance with the mRNA levels. The results corroborate and extend previous in vitro studies concerning the effect of TGF-beta 1 on the metabolism of small proteoglycans and show that these macromolecules are regulated differently also in vivo. The marked alterations of biglycan and decorin during the development of fibrosis suggests that these proteoglycans have a regulating role in this process. Images PMID:7688761

  1. Pulmonary vascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Mélot, C; Naeije, R

    2011-04-01

    Diseases of the pulmonary vasculature are a cause of increased pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) in pulmonary embolism, chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH), and pulmonary arterial hypertension or decreased PVR in pulmonary arteriovenous malformations on hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, portal hypertension, or cavopulmonary anastomosis. All these conditions are associated with a decrease in both arterial PO2 and PCO2. Gas exchange in pulmonary vascular diseases with increased PVR is characterized by a shift of ventilation and perfusion to high ventilation-perfusion ratios, a mild to moderate increase in perfusion to low ventilation-perfusion ratios, and an increased physiologic dead space. Hypoxemia in these patients is essentially explained by altered ventilation-perfusion matching amplified by a decreased mixed venous PO2 caused by a low cardiac output. Hypocapnia is accounted for by hyperventilation, which is essentially related to an increased chemosensitivity. A cardiac shunt on a patent foramen ovale may be a cause of severe hypoxemia in a proportion of patients with pulmonary hypertension and an increase in right atrial pressure. Gas exchange in pulmonary arteriovenous malformations is characterized by variable degree of pulmonary shunting and/or diffusion-perfusion imbalance. Hypocapnia is caused by an increased ventilation in relation to an increased pulmonary blood flow with direct peripheral chemoreceptor stimulation by shunted mixed venous blood flow. PMID:23737196

  2. Pulmonary edema

    MedlinePlus

    ... congestion; Lung water; Pulmonary congestion; Heart failure - pulmonary edema ... Pulmonary edema is often caused by congestive heart failure . When the heart is not able to pump efficiently, blood ...

  3. High-Fat Diet Promotion of Endometriosis in an Immunocompetent Mouse Model is Associated With Altered Peripheral and Ectopic Lesion Redox and Inflammatory Status.

    PubMed

    Heard, Melissa E; Melnyk, Stepan B; Simmen, Frank A; Yang, Yanqing; Pabona, John Mark P; Simmen, Rosalia C M

    2016-07-01

    Endometriosis is a benign gynecological condition that causes considerable morbidity due to associated infertility, debilitating pelvic pain and inflammatory dysfunctions. Diet is a highly modifiable risk factor for many chronic diseases, but its contribution to endometriosis has not been extensively investigated, due partly to the paradoxical inverse association between obesity and disease incidence. Nevertheless, chronic exposure to dietary high-fat intake has been linked to greater systemic inflammation and oxidative stress, both features of women with endometriosis. Here, we evaluated the effects of a high-fat diet (HFD) (45% fat kcal) on endometriosis progression using an immunocompetent mouse model where ectopic lesion incidence was induced in wild-type recipients by ip administration of endometrial fragments from transcription factor Krüppel-like factor 9-null donor mice. We show that HFD significantly increased ectopic lesion numbers in recipient mice with no significant weight gain and modifications in systemic ovarian steroid hormone and insulin levels, relative to control diet-fed (17% fat kcal) mice. HFD promotion of lesion establishment was associated with reductions in stromal estrogen receptor 1 isoform and progesterone receptor expression, increased F4/80-positive macrophage infiltration, higher stromal but not glandular epithelial proliferation, and enhanced expression of proinflammatory and prooxidative stress pathway genes. Lesion-bearing HFD-fed mice also displayed higher peritoneal fluid TNFα and elevated local and systemic redox status than control diet-fed counterparts. Our results suggest that HFD intake exacerbates endometriosis outcome in the absence of ovarian dysfunction and insulin resistance in mice and warrants further consideration with respect to clinical management of endometriosis progression and recurrence in nonobese patients. PMID:27175969

  4. Salinity does not alter the effectiveness of menthol as an anesthetic and sedative during the handling and transport of juvenile fat snook (Centropomus parallelus).

    PubMed

    Sepulchro, L C O 'r; Carvalho, M A G; Gomes, L C

    2016-04-19

    The effectiveness of menthol as anesthetic and sedative for fat snook (Centropomus parallelus) was tested at different salinities. In the first experiment, the fish were exposed to different concentrations of menthol (25, 37 and 50 mg L-1) in water at different salinities (0, 17 and 36 ppt). In the second experiment, the fish were transported for 10 hours in water with menthol at concentrations of 0, 3.7 and 7.4 mg L-1 under different salinities. Na+ and K+ ions from fish body and water were analyzed after transport. The optimal concentrations of menthol for a short handling period and surgical induction was 37 and 50 mg L-1, respectively, and these values were independent of salinity. After transport, neither mortality nor significant changes in ammonia or dissolved oxygen were observed between treatments at the different salinities. The nitrite levels were lower in freshwater than in brackish and saltwater, but did not change with mentol. The total body levels of Na+ increased with the salinity increase. Menthol is an effective anesthetic for handling of juvenile fat snook at different salinities. Menthol did not influence the measured water parameters and body ions, and it is not necessary for the transport of fat snook. PMID:27097096

  5. Fat Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Keefe, Sean F.; Pike, Oscar A.

    Methods for characterizing edible lipids, fats, and oils can be separated into two categories: those developed to analyze bulk oils and fats, and those focusing on analysis of foodstuffs and their lipid extracts. In evaluating foodstuffs, it is usually necessary to extract the lipids prior to analysis. In these cases, if sufficient quantities of lipids are available, methods developed for bulk fats and oils can be utilized.

  6. CARDIOVASCULAR AND BLOOD COAGULATION EFFECTS OF PULMONARY ZINC EXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cardiovascular damage induced by pulmonary exposure to environmental chemicals can result from direct action or, secondarily, from pulmonary injury. We have developed a rat model of pulmonary exposure to zinc to demonstrate cardiac, coagulative, and fibrinolytic alterations. Mal...

  7. Fat embolism syndrome.

    PubMed

    Williams, A G; Mettler, F A; Christie, J H; Gordon, R E

    1986-07-01

    The fat embolism syndrome is clinically evident in approximately 0.5-2.0% of patients with long bone fractures. The clinical signs and symptoms are evident in 60% of patients within 24 hours and 85% of patients within 48 hours after trauma. A patient is reported who complained of dyspnea and hemoptysis approximately 72 hours after sustaining a fracture to the distal tibia and fibula. Radionuclide ventilation/perfusion imaging was obtained to rule out pulmonary thromboemboli. Perfusion imaging demonstrated the characteristic diffuse, subsegmental ("mottled") appearance of fatty emboli to the lung. PMID:3731649

  8. Pulmonary embolus

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood clot; Blood clot - lung; Embolus; Tumor embolus; Embolism - pulmonary; DVT-pulmonary embolism; Thrombosis - pulmonary embolism ... x-ray CT angiogram of the chest Pulmonary ventilation/perfusion scan, also called a V/Q scan ...

  9. PULMONARY CIRCULATION AT EXERCISE

    PubMed Central

    NAEIJE, R; CHESLER, N

    2012-01-01

    The pulmonary circulation is a high flow and low pressure circuit, with an average resistance of 1 mmHg.min.L−1 in young adults, increasing to 2.5 mmHg.min.L−1 over 4–6 decades of life. Pulmonary vascular mechanics at exercise are best described by distensible models. Exercise does not appear to affect the time constant of the pulmonary circulation or the longitudinal distribution of resistances. Very high flows are associated with high capillary pressures, up to a 20–25 mmHg threshold associated with interstitial lung edema and altered ventilation/perfusion relationships. Pulmonary artery pressures of 40–50 mmHg, which can be achieved at maximal exercise, may correspond to the extreme of tolerable right ventricular afterload. Distension of capillaries that decrease resistance may be of adaptative value during exercise, but this is limited by hypoxemia from altered diffusion/perfusion relationships. Exercise in hypoxia is associated with higher pulmonary vascular pressures and lower maximal cardiac output, with increased likelihood of right ventricular function limitation and altered gas exchange by interstitial lung edema. Pharmacological interventions aimed at the reduction of pulmonary vascular tone have little effect on pulmonary vascular pressure-flow relationships in normoxia, but may decrease resistance in hypoxia, unloading the right ventricle and thereby improving exercise capacity. Exercise in patients with pulmonary hypertension is associated with sharp increases in pulmonary artery pressure and a right ventricular limitation of aerobic capacity. Exercise stress testing to determine multipoint pulmonary vascular pressures-flow relationships may uncover early stage pulmonary vascular disease. PMID:23105961

  10. Substance P (SP)-Neurokinin-1 Receptor (NK-1R) Alters Adipose Tissue Responses to High-Fat Diet and Insulin Action

    PubMed Central

    Stavrakis, Dimitris; Bakirtzi, Kyriaki; Kokkotou, Efi; Pirtskhalava, Tamara; Nayeb-Hashemi, Hamed; Bowe, Collin; Bugni, James M.; Nuño, Miriam; Lu, Bao; Gerard, Norma P.; Leeman, Susan E.; Kirkland, James L.

    2011-01-01

    Peripheral administration of a specific neurokinin-1 receptor (NK-1R) antagonist to mice leads to reduced weight gain and circulating levels of insulin and leptin after high-fat diet (HFD). Here, we assessed the contribution of substance P (SP) and NK-1R in diet-induced obesity using NK-1R deficient [knockout (KO)] mice and extended our previous findings to show the effects of SP-NK-1R interactions on adipose tissue-associated insulin signaling and glucose metabolic responses. NK-1R KO and wild-type (WT) littermates were fed a HFD for 3 wk, and obesity-associated responses were determined. Compared with WT, NK-1 KO mice show reduced weight gain and circulating levels of leptin and insulin in response to HFD. Adiponectin receptor mRNA levels are higher in mesenteric fat and liver in NK-1 KO animals compared with WT, after HFD. Mesenteric fat from NK-1R KO mice fed with HFD has reduced stress-activated protein kinase/c-Jun N-terminal kinase and protein kinase Cθ activation compared with WT mice. After glucose challenge, NK-1R KO mice remove glucose from the circulation more efficiently than WT and pair-fed controls, suggesting an additional peripheral effect of NK-1R-mediated signaling on glucose metabolism. Glucose uptake experiments in isolated rat adipocytes showed that SP directly inhibits insulin-mediated glucose uptake. Our results further establish a role for SP-NK-1R interactions in adipose tissue responses, specifically as they relate to obesity-associated pathologies such as glucose intolerance and insulin resistance. Our results highlight this pathway as an important therapeutic approach for type 2 diabetes. PMID:21467195

  11. A novel polymorphism in the chicken adipocyte fatty acid-binding protein gene (FABP4) that alters ligand-binding and correlates with fatness.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qigui; Guan, Tianzhu; Li, Hui; Bernlohr, David A

    2009-11-01

    Similar to the mammalian FABP4 gene, the chicken (Gallus gallus) FABP4 gene consists of four exons separated by three introns and encodes a 132 amino acid protein termed the adipocyte fatty acid-binding protein (AFABP). In the current study, a novel G/A polymorphism in exon 3 of the chicken FABP4 gene was identified associated with different chicken breeds that leads to either Ser or Asn at amino acid 89 of the AFABP protein. The Baier chicken averages 0.89+/-0.12% abdominal fat and expresses the G allele (Ser 89 isoform) while the Broiler chicken typically has 3.74+/-0.23% abdominal fat and expresses the A allele (Asn 89 isoforms). cDNAs corresponding to the two AFABP isoforms were cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli as GST fusions, purified by using glutathione sepharose 4B chromatography and evaluated for lipid binding using the fluorescent surrogate ligand 1-anilinonaphthalene 8-sulphonic acid (1,8-ANS). The results showed that AFABP Ser89 exhibited a lower ligand-binding affinity with apparent dissociation constants (Kd) of 7.31+/-3.75 microM, while the AFABP Asn89 isoform bound 1,8-ANS with an apparent dissociation constant of 2.99+/-1.00 microM (P=0.02). These results suggest that the Ser89Asn polymorphism may influence chicken AFABP function and ultimately lipid deposition through changing the ligand-binding activity of AFABP. PMID:19595785

  12. Pulmonary Artery Denervation Reduces Pulmonary Artery Pressure and Induces Histological Changes in an Acute Porcine Model of Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Nadine D.; Chang, William; Watson, Oliver; Swift, Andrew J.; Condliffe, Robin; Elliot, Charlie A.; Kiely, David G.; Suvarna, S. Kim; Gunn, Julian; Lawrie, Allan

    2015-01-01

    Background— Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a devastating disease with high morbidity and mortality and limited treatment options. Recent studies have shown that pulmonary artery denervation improves pulmonary hemodynamics in an experimental model and in an early clinical trial. We aimed to evaluate the nerve distribution around the pulmonary artery, to determine the effect of radiofrequency pulmonary artery denervation on acute pulmonary hypertension induced by vasoconstriction, and to demonstrate denervation of the pulmonary artery at a histological level. Methods and Results— Histological evaluation identified a circumferential distribution of nerves around the proximal pulmonary arteries. Nerves were smaller in diameter, greater in number, and located in closer proximity to the luminal aspect of the pulmonary arterial wall beyond the pulmonary artery bifurcation. To determine the effect of pulmonary arterial denervation acute pulmonary hypertension was induced in 8 pigs by intravenous infusion of thromboxane A2 analogue. Animals were assigned to either pulmonary artery denervation, using a prototype radiofrequency catheter and generator, or a sham procedure. Pulmonary artery denervation resulted in reduced mean pulmonary artery pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance and increased cardiac output. Ablation lesions on the luminal surface of the pulmonary artery were accompanied by histological and biochemical alteration in adventitial nerves and correlated with improved hemodynamic parameters. Conclusions— Pulmonary artery denervation offers the possibility of a new treatment option for patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension. Further work is required to determine the long-term efficacy and safety. PMID:26553697

  13. Prenatal Metformin Exposure in a Maternal High Fat Diet Mouse Model Alters the Transcriptome and Modifies the Metabolic Responses of the Offspring

    PubMed Central

    Salomäki, Henriikka; Heinäniemi, Merja; Vähätalo, Laura H.; Ailanen, Liisa; Eerola, Kim; Ruohonen, Suvi T.; Pesonen, Ullamari; Koulu, Markku

    2014-01-01

    Aims Despite the wide use of metformin in metabolically challenged pregnancies, the long-term effects on the metabolism of the offspring are not known. We studied the long-term effects of prenatal metformin exposure during metabolically challenged pregnancy in mice. Materials and Methods Female mice were on a high fat diet (HFD) prior to and during the gestation. Metformin was administered during gestation from E0.5 to E17.5. Male and female offspring were weaned to a regular diet (RD) and subjected to HFD at adulthood (10-11 weeks). Body weight and several metabolic parameters (e.g. body composition and glucose tolerance) were measured during the study. Microarray and subsequent pathway analyses on the liver and subcutaneous adipose tissue of the male offspring were performed at postnatal day 4 in a separate experiment. Results Prenatal metformin exposure changed the offspring's response to HFD. Metformin exposed offspring gained less body weight and adipose tissue during the HFD phase. Additionally, prenatal metformin exposure prevented HFD-induced impairment in glucose tolerance. Microarray and annotation analyses revealed metformin-induced changes in several metabolic pathways from which electron transport chain (ETC) was prominently affected both in the neonatal liver and adipose tissue. Conclusion This study shows the beneficial effects of prenatal metformin exposure on the offspring's glucose tolerance and fat mass accumulation during HFD. The transcriptome data obtained at neonatal age indicates major effects on the genes involved in mitochondrial ATP production and adipocyte differentiation suggesting the mechanistic routes to improved metabolic phenotype at adulthood. PMID:25541979

  14. PPARγ activation alters fatty acid composition in adipose triglyceride, in addition to proliferation of small adipocytes, in insulin resistant high-fat fed rats.

    PubMed

    Sato, Daisuke; Oda, Kanako; Kusunoki, Masataka; Nishina, Atsuyoshi; Takahashi, Kazuaki; Feng, Zhonggang; Tsutsumi, Kazuhiko; Nakamura, Takao

    2016-02-15

    It was reported that adipocyte size is potentially correlated in part to amount of long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and insulin resistance because several long chain PUFAs can be ligands of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs). In our previous study, marked reduction of PUFAs was observed in insulin-resistant high-fat fed rats, which may indicate that PUFAs are consumed to improve insulin resistance. Although PPARγ agonist, well known as an insulin sensitizer, proliferates small adipocytes, the effects of PPARγ agonist on FA composition in adipose tissue have not been clarified yet. In the present study, we administered pioglitazone, a PPARγ agonist, to high-fat fed rats, and measured their FA composition of triglyceride fraction in adipose tissue and adipocyte diameters in pioglitazone-treated (PIO) and non-treated (control) rats. Insulin sensitivity was obtained with hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp. Average adipocyte diameter in the PIO group were smaller than that in the control one without change in tissue weight. In monounsaturated FAs (MUFAs), 14:1n-5, 16:1n-7, and 18:1n-9 contents in the PIO group were lower than those, respectively, in the control group. In contrast, 22:6n-3, 20:3n-6, 20:4n-6, and 22:4n-6 contents in the PIO group were higher than those, respectively, in the control group. Insulin sensitivity was higher in the PIO group than in the control one. These findings suggest that PPARγ activation lowered MUFAs whereas suppressed most of C20 or C22 PUFAs reduction, and that the change of fatty acid composition may be relevant with increase in small adipocytes. PMID:26825545

  15. Diet-Induced Maternal Obesity Alters Insulin Signalling in Male Mice Offspring Rechallenged with a High-Fat Diet in Adulthood

    PubMed Central

    de Fante, Thaís; Simino, Laís Angélica; Reginato, Andressa; Payolla, Tanyara Baliani; Vitoréli, Débora Cristina Gustavo; de Souza, Monique; Torsoni, Márcio Alberto; Milanski, Marciane; Torsoni, Adriana Souza

    2016-01-01

    Modern lifestyle has resulted in an increase in the prevalence of obesity and its comorbidities in pregnant women and the young population. It has been well established that the consumption of a high-fat diet (HFD) has many direct effects on glucose metabolism. However, it is important to assess whether maternal consumption of a HFD during critical periods of development can lead to metabolic changes in the offspring metabolism. This study evaluated the potential effects of metabolic programming on the impairment of insulin signalling in recently weaned offspring from obese dams. Additionally, we investigated if early exposure to an obesogenic environment could exacerbate the impairment of glucose metabolism in adult life in response to a HFD. Swiss female mice were fed with Standard Chow (SC) or a HFD during gestation and lactation and tissues from male offspring were analysed at d28 and d82. Offspring from obese dams had greater weight gain and higher adiposity and food intake than offspring from control dams. Furthermore, they showed impairment in insulin signalling in central and peripheral tissues, which was associated with the activation of inflammatory pathways. Adipose tissue was ultimately the most affected in adult offspring after HFD rechallenge; this may have contributed to the metabolic deregulation observed. Overall, our results suggest that diet-induced maternal obesity leads to increased susceptibility to obesity and impairment of insulin signalling in offspring in early and late life that cannot be reversed by SC consumption, but can be aggravated by HFD re-exposure. PMID:27479001

  16. Nigella sativa Relieves the Altered Insulin Receptor Signaling in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats Fed with a High-Fat Diet

    PubMed Central

    El-Zeftawy, Marwa; Taha, Nabil; Mandour, Abdel Wahab

    2016-01-01

    The black cumin (Nigella sativa) “NS” or the black seeds have many pharmacological activities such as antioxidant, anticarcinogenic, antihypertensive, and antidiabetic properties. In this work, streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats fed with a high-fat diet were treated daily with NS oil (NSO) in order to study the effect on the blood glucose, lipid profile, oxidative stress parameters, and the gene expression of some insulin receptor-induced signaling molecules. This treatment was combined also with some drugs (metformin and glimepiride) and the insulin receptor inhibitor I-OMe-AG538. The administration of NSO significantly induced the gene expression of insulin receptor compared to rats that did not receive NSO. Also, it upregulated the expression of insulin-like growth factor-1 and phosphoinositide-3 kinase, whereas the expression of ADAM-17 was downregulated. The expression of ADAM-17 is corroborated by the analysis of TIMP-3 content. In addition, the NSO significantly reduced blood glucose level, components of the lipid profile, oxidative stress parameters, serum insulin/insulin receptor ratio, and the tumor necrosis factor-α, confirming that NSO has an antidiabetic activity. Thus, the daily NSO treatment in our rat model indicates that NSO has a potential in the management of diabetes as well as improvement of insulin-induced signaling. PMID:27579151

  17. Diet-Induced Maternal Obesity Alters Insulin Signalling in Male Mice Offspring Rechallenged with a High-Fat Diet in Adulthood.

    PubMed

    Fante, Thaís de; Simino, Laís Angélica; Reginato, Andressa; Payolla, Tanyara Baliani; Vitoréli, Débora Cristina Gustavo; Souza, Monique de; Torsoni, Márcio Alberto; Milanski, Marciane; Torsoni, Adriana Souza

    2016-01-01

    Modern lifestyle has resulted in an increase in the prevalence of obesity and its comorbidities in pregnant women and the young population. It has been well established that the consumption of a high-fat diet (HFD) has many direct effects on glucose metabolism. However, it is important to assess whether maternal consumption of a HFD during critical periods of development can lead to metabolic changes in the offspring metabolism. This study evaluated the potential effects of metabolic programming on the impairment of insulin signalling in recently weaned offspring from obese dams. Additionally, we investigated if early exposure to an obesogenic environment could exacerbate the impairment of glucose metabolism in adult life in response to a HFD. Swiss female mice were fed with Standard Chow (SC) or a HFD during gestation and lactation and tissues from male offspring were analysed at d28 and d82. Offspring from obese dams had greater weight gain and higher adiposity and food intake than offspring from control dams. Furthermore, they showed impairment in insulin signalling in central and peripheral tissues, which was associated with the activation of inflammatory pathways. Adipose tissue was ultimately the most affected in adult offspring after HFD rechallenge; this may have contributed to the metabolic deregulation observed. Overall, our results suggest that diet-induced maternal obesity leads to increased susceptibility to obesity and impairment of insulin signalling in offspring in early and late life that cannot be reversed by SC consumption, but can be aggravated by HFD re-exposure. PMID:27479001

  18. Nigella sativa Relieves the Altered Insulin Receptor Signaling in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats Fed with a High-Fat Diet.

    PubMed

    Balbaa, Mahmoud; El-Zeftawy, Marwa; Ghareeb, Doaa; Taha, Nabil; Mandour, Abdel Wahab

    2016-01-01

    The black cumin (Nigella sativa) "NS" or the black seeds have many pharmacological activities such as antioxidant, anticarcinogenic, antihypertensive, and antidiabetic properties. In this work, streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats fed with a high-fat diet were treated daily with NS oil (NSO) in order to study the effect on the blood glucose, lipid profile, oxidative stress parameters, and the gene expression of some insulin receptor-induced signaling molecules. This treatment was combined also with some drugs (metformin and glimepiride) and the insulin receptor inhibitor I-OMe-AG538. The administration of NSO significantly induced the gene expression of insulin receptor compared to rats that did not receive NSO. Also, it upregulated the expression of insulin-like growth factor-1 and phosphoinositide-3 kinase, whereas the expression of ADAM-17 was downregulated. The expression of ADAM-17 is corroborated by the analysis of TIMP-3 content. In addition, the NSO significantly reduced blood glucose level, components of the lipid profile, oxidative stress parameters, serum insulin/insulin receptor ratio, and the tumor necrosis factor-α, confirming that NSO has an antidiabetic activity. Thus, the daily NSO treatment in our rat model indicates that NSO has a potential in the management of diabetes as well as improvement of insulin-induced signaling. PMID:27579151

  19. The fat embolism syndrome. A review.

    PubMed

    Levy, D

    1990-12-01

    While fat embolism occurs in most (more than 90%) patients with traumatic injury, the fat embolism syndrome (FES) occurs in only 3%-4% of patients with long-bone fractures. FES involves multiple organ systems and can cause a devastating clinical deterioration within hours. The major clinical features of FES include hypoxia, pulmonary edema, central nervous system depression, and axillary or subconjunctive petechiae. Improvements have been made in supporting the respiratory compromise and adult respiratory distress syndrome that these patients develop. Aggressive measures to improve the pulmonary function, i.e., positive pressure ventilation and effective fluid management, are important and expedite fixation of bone fractures. PMID:2245559

  20. Alteration in Intrapulmonary Pharmacokinetics of Aerosolized Model Compounds Due to Disruption of the Alveolar Epithelial Barriers Following Bleomycin-Induced Pulmonary Fibrosis in Rats.

    PubMed

    Togami, Kohei; Chono, Sumio; Tada, Hitoshi

    2016-03-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is a lethal lung disease that is characterized by the accumulation of extracellular matrix and a change in lung structure. In this study, intrapulmonary pharmacokinetics of aerosolized model compounds were evaluated using rats with bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis. Aerosol formulations of indocyanine green, 6-carboxyfluorescein (6-CF), and fluorescein isothiocyanate dextrans (FD; 4.4, 10, 70, and 250 kDa) were administered to rat lungs using a MicroSprayer. Indocyanine green fluorescence signals were significantly weaker in fibrotic lungs than in control lungs and 6-CF and FD concentrations in the plasma of pulmonary fibrotic animals were markedly higher than in the plasma of control animals. Moreover, disrupted epithelial tight junctions, including claudins-1, -3, and -5, were observed in pulmonary fibrotic lesions using immunofluorescence microscopy. In addition, destruction of tight junctions on model alveolar epithelial cells (NCI-H441) by transforming growth factor-β1 treatment enhanced the permeability of 6-CF and FDs through NCI-H441 cell monolayers. These results indicate that aerosolized drugs are easily distributed into the plasma after leakage through damaged tight junctions of alveolar epithelium. Therefore, the development of delivery systems for anti-fibrotic agents to improve intrapulmonary pharmacokinetics may be necessary for effective idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis therapy. PMID:26886341

  1. High saturated fat diet alters the lipid composition of triacylglycerol and polar lipids in the femur of dam and offspring rats.

    PubMed

    Miotto, Paula M; Castelli, Laura M; Amoye, Foyinsola; Ward, Wendy E; LeBlanc, Paul J

    2015-06-01

    Previous work has shown that dietary lipids alter femur lipid composition. Specifically, we have shown that exposure to high saturated fatty acid (SFA) diets in utero, during suckling, or post-weaning alters femur total lipid composition, resulting in higher percent bone mass in males and females and bone mineral density (BMD) in female offspring with no effect on bone mineral outcomes in dams. Comparatively, high n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) diets increase femur polar (PL) lipid n-3 content, which has been associated with increased bone mineral content and strength. However, the extent that PL or triacylglycerol (TAG) lipids change with high SFA diets is unknown. The current investigation examined the influence of a high SFA diet (20 % lard by weight) on femur PL and TAG lipid composition in 5-month old female Wistar rats (fed high SFA diet from age 28 days onwards; dams) and their 19-day old offspring (exposed to high SFA in utero and during suckling; pups). High SFA exposure resulted in increased monounsaturates and decreased n-3 and n-6 PUFA in the TAG fraction in both dams and pups, and higher SFA and n-6:n-3 ratio in dams only. The PL fraction showed decreased n-6 PUFA in both dams and pups. The magnitude of the diet-mediated responses, specifically TAG 18:1 and PL n-6 PUFA, may have contributed to the previously reported altered BMD, which was supported with correlation analysis. Future research should investigate the relationship of diet-induced changes in bone lipids on bone structure, as quantified through micro-computed tomography. PMID:25920746

  2. Pulmonary Rehabilitation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topics Bronchitis COPD Cystic Fibrosis Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis Sarcoidosis Send a link to NHLBI to someone by ... people who have COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), sarcoidosis (sar-koy-DOE-sis), idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis , or ...

  3. Pulmonary embolus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Blood clot - lung; Embolus; Tumor embolus; Embolism - pulmonary; DVT-pulmonary embolism; Thrombosis - pulmonary embolism ... area). This type of clot is called a deep vein thrombosis (DVT) . The blood clot breaks off and travels ...

  4. Exposure to Bisphenol-A during Pregnancy Partially Mimics the Effects of a High-Fat Diet Altering Glucose Homeostasis and Gene Expression in Adult Male Mice

    PubMed Central

    García-Arevalo, Marta; Alonso-Magdalena, Paloma; Rebelo Dos Santos, Junia; Quesada, Ivan; Carneiro, Everardo M.; Nadal, Angel

    2014-01-01

    Bisphenol-A (BPA) is one of the most widespread EDCs used as a base compound in the manufacture of polycarbonate plastics. The aim of our research has been to study how the exposure to BPA during pregnancy affects weight, glucose homeostasis, pancreatic β-cell function and gene expression in the major peripheral organs that control energy flux: white adipose tissue (WAT), the liver and skeletal muscle, in male offspring 17 and 28 weeks old. Pregnant mice were treated with a subcutaneous injection of 10 µg/kg/day of BPA or a vehicle from day 9 to 16 of pregnancy. One month old offspring were divided into four different groups: vehicle treated mice that ate a normal chow diet (Control group); BPA treated mice that also ate a normal chow diet (BPA); vehicle treated animals that had a high fat diet (HFD) and BPA treated animals that were fed HFD (HFD-BPA). The BPA group started to gain weight at 18 weeks old and caught up to the HFD group before week 28. The BPA group as well as the HFD and HFD-BPA ones presented fasting hyperglycemia, glucose intolerance and high levels of non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA) in plasma compared with the Control one. Glucose stimulated insulin release was disrupted, particularly in the HFD-BPA group. In WAT, the mRNA expression of the genes involved in fatty acid metabolism, Srebpc1, Pparα and Cpt1β was decreased by BPA to the same extent as with the HFD treatment. BPA treatment upregulated Pparγ and Prkaa1 genes in the liver; yet it diminished the expression of Cd36. Hepatic triglyceride levels were increased in all groups compared to control. In conclusion, male offspring from BPA-treated mothers presented symptoms of diabesity. This term refers to a form of diabetes which typically develops in later life and is associated with obesity. PMID:24959901

  5. Increased intramyocellular lipid/impaired insulin sensitivity is associated with altered lipid metabolic genes in muscle of high responders to a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Kakehi, Saori; Tamura, Yoshifumi; Takeno, Kageumi; Sakurai, Yuko; Kawaguchi, Minako; Watanabe, Takahiro; Funayama, Takashi; Sato, Fumihiko; Ikeda, Shin-Ichi; Kanazawa, Akio; Fujitani, Yoshio; Kawamori, Ryuzo; Watada, Hirotaka

    2016-01-01

    The accumulation of intramyocellular lipid (IMCL) is recognized as an important determinant of insulin resistance, and is increased by a high-fat diet (HFD). However, the effects of HFD on IMCL and insulin sensitivity are highly variable. The aim of this study was to identify the genes in muscle that are related to this inter-individual variation. Fifty healthy men were recruited for this study. Before and after HFD for 3 days, IMCL levels in the tibialis anterior were measured by (1)H magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and peripheral insulin sensitivity was evaluated by glucose infusion rate (GIR) during the euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp. Subjects who showed a large increase in IMCL and a large decrease in GIR by HFD were classified as high responders (HRs), and subjects who showed a small increase in IMCL and a small decrease in GIR were classified as low responders (LRs). In five subjects from each group, the gene expression profile of the vastus lateralis muscle was analyzed by DNA microarray analysis. Before HFD, gene expression profiles related to lipid metabolism were comparable between the two groups. Gene Set Enrichment Analysis demonstrated that five gene sets related to lipid metabolism were upregulated by HFD in the HR group but not in the LR group. Changes in gene expression patterns were confirmed by qRT-PCR using more samples (LR, n = 9; HR, n = 11). These results suggest that IMCL accumulation/impaired insulin sensitivity after HFD is closely associated with changes in the expression of genes related to lipid metabolism in muscle. PMID:26487001

  6. Early life stress and post-weaning high fat diet alter tyrosine hydroxylase regulation and AT1 receptor expression in the adrenal gland in a sex dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Bobrovskaya, Larisa; Maniam, Jayanthi; Ong, Lin Kooi; Dunkley, Peter R; Morris, Margaret J

    2013-04-01

    Previous studies have shown that early life stress induced by maternal separation or non-handling can lead to behavioural deficits in rats and that these deficits can be alleviated by providing palatable cafeteria high-fat diet (HFD). In these studies we investigated the effects of maternal separation or non-handling and HFD on tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) protein and TH phosphorylation at Ser40 (pSer40TH) and the expression of angiotensin II receptor type 1 (AT1R) protein in the adrenal gland as markers of sympatho-adrenomedullary activation. After littering, Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned to short maternal separation, S15 (15 min), prolonged maternal separation, S180 (180 min) daily from postnatal days 2-14 or were non-handled (NH) until weaning. Siblings were exposed to HFD or chow from day 21 until 19 weeks when adrenals were harvested. Maternal separation and non-handling had no effects on adrenal TH protein in both sexes. We found an effect of HFD only in the females; HFD significantly increased TH levels in NH rats and pSer40TH in S180 rats (relative to corresponding chow-fed groups), but had no effect on AT1R expression in any group. In contrast, in male rats HFD had no effect on TH protein levels, but significantly increased pSer40TH across all treatment groups. There was no effect of HFD on AT1R expression in male rats; however, maternal separation (for 15 or 180 min) caused significant increases in AT1R expression (relative to NH group regardless of diet). This is the first study to report that early life stress and diet modulate TH protein, pSer40TH and AT1R protein levels in the adrenal gland in a sex dependent manner. These results are interpreted in respect to the potential adverse effects that these changes in the adrenal gland may have in males and females in adult life. PMID:23389660

  7. Both Food Restriction and High-Fat Diet during Gestation Induce Low Birth Weight and Altered Physical Activity in Adult Rat Offspring: The “Similarities in the Inequalities” Model

    PubMed Central

    Portella, André Krumel; Benetti, Carla da Silva; Noschang, Cristie; Goldani, Marcelo Zubaran; Silveira, Patrícia Pelufo

    2015-01-01

    We have previously described a theoretical model in humans, called “Similarities in the Inequalities”, in which extremely unequal social backgrounds coexist in a complex scenario promoting similar health outcomes in adulthood. Based on the potential applicability of and to further explore the “similarities in the inequalities” phenomenon, this study used a rat model to investigate the effect of different nutritional backgrounds during gestation on the willingness of offspring to engage in physical activity in adulthood. Sprague-Dawley rats were time mated and randomly allocated to one of three dietary groups: Control (Adlib), receiving standard laboratory chow ad libitum; 50% food restricted (FR), receiving 50% of the ad libitum-fed dam’s habitual intake; or high-fat diet (HF), receiving a diet containing 23% fat. The diets were provided from day 10 of pregnancy until weaning. Within 24 hours of birth, pups were cross-fostered to other dams, forming the following groups: Adlib_Adlib, FR_Adlib, and HF_Adlib. Maternal chow consumption and weight gain, and offspring birth weight, growth, physical activity (one week of free exercise in running wheels), abdominal adiposity and biochemical data were evaluated. Western blot was performed to assess D2 receptors in the dorsal striatum. The “similarities in the inequalities” effect was observed on birth weight (both FR and HF groups were smaller than the Adlib group at birth) and physical activity (both FR_Adlib and HF_Adlib groups were different from the Adlib_Adlib group, with less active males and more active females). Our findings contribute to the view that health inequalities in fetal life may program the health outcomes manifested in offspring adult life (such as altered physical activity and metabolic parameters), probably through different biological mechanisms. PMID:25738800

  8. Fat Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Michael C.; Pike, Oscar A.

    Lipids in food are subjected to many chemical reactions during processing and storage. While some of these reactions are desirable, others are undesirable; so, efforts are made to minimize the reactions and their effects. The laboratory deals with the characterization of fats and oils with respect to composition, structure, and reactivity.

  9. Pulmonary valve stenosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... valve pulmonary stenosis; Pulmonary stenosis; Stenosis - pulmonary valve; Balloon valvuloplasty - pulmonary ... water pills) Treat abnormal heartbeats and rhythms Percutaneous balloon pulmonary dilation (valvuloplasty) may be performed when no ...

  10. Fecal Fat: The Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Fecal Fat Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Qualitative or Quantitative Stool Fat; Stool Lipids; 72 Hour Fecal Fat; Fat Stain ...

  11. Fats and Your Child

    MedlinePlus

    ... Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Fats and Your Child KidsHealth > For Parents > Fats and ... an important part of a healthy diet. About Fat Fats are nutrients in food that the body ...

  12. Learning about Fats

    MedlinePlus

    ... Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Learning About Fats KidsHealth > For Kids > Learning About Fats Print A ... over each gram of fat. continue Types of Fat You might see ads for foods that say ...

  13. Know Your Fats

    MedlinePlus

    ... Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Know Your Fats Updated:Mar 28,2016 LDL cholesterol is affected ... eat for a period of time. Know Your Fats Saturated fat The majority of saturated fat comes ...

  14. Saturated fat (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... saturated fats. Vegetable sources of saturated fat include coconut and palm oils. When looking at a food ... saturated fats. Vegetable sources of saturated fat include coconut and palm oils. When looking at a food ...

  15. Consequences of a Maternal High-Fat Diet and Late Gestation Diabetes on the Developing Rat Lung

    PubMed Central

    Forred, Benjamin J.; Larsen, Tricia D.; Jensen, Danielle N.; Wachal, Angela L.; Khan, Muhammad Ali; Vitiello, Peter F.

    2016-01-01

    Rationale Infants born to diabetic or obese mothers are at risk of respiratory distress and persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn (PPHN), conceivably through fuel-mediated pathogenic mechanisms. Prior research and preventative measures focus on controlling maternal hyperglycemia, but growing evidence suggests a role for additional circulating fuels including lipids. Little is known about the individual or additive effects of a maternal high-fat diet on fetal lung development. Objective The objective of this study was to determine the effects of a maternal high-fat diet, alone and alongside late-gestation diabetes, on lung alveologenesis and vasculogenesis, as well as to ascertain if consequences persist beyond the perinatal period. Methods A rat model was used to study lung development in offspring from control, diabetes-exposed, high-fat diet-exposed and combination-exposed pregnancies via morphometric, histologic (alveolarization and vasculogenesis) and physiologic (echocardiography, pulmonary function) analyses at birth and 3 weeks of age. Outcomes were interrogated for diet, diabetes and interaction effect using ANOVA with significance set at p≤0.05. Findings prompted additional mechanistic inquiry of key molecular pathways. Results Offspring exposed to maternal diabetes or high-fat diet, alone and in combination, had smaller lungs and larger hearts at birth. High-fat diet-exposed, but not diabetes-exposed offspring, had a higher perinatal death rate and echocardiographic evidence of PPHN at birth. Alveolar mean linear intercept, septal thickness, and airspace area (D2) were not significantly different between the groups; however, markers of lung maturity were. Both diabetes-exposed and diet-exposed offspring expressed more T1α protein, a marker of type I cells. Diet-exposed newborn pups expressed less surfactant protein B and had fewer pulmonary vessels enumerated. Mechanistic inquiry revealed alterations in AKT activation, higher endothelin-1

  16. Pulmonary cachexia.

    PubMed

    Schols, Annemie M W J

    2002-09-01

    Weight loss is a frequent complication in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and is a determining factor of functional capacity, health status, and mortality. Weight loss in COPD is a consequence of increased energy requirements unbalanced by dietary intake. Both metabolic and mechanical inefficiency contribute to the elevated energy expenditure during physical activity, while systemic inflammation is a determinant of hypermetabolism at rest. A disbalance between protein synthesis and protein breakdown may cause a disproportionate depletion of fat-free mass in some patients. Nutritional support is indicated for depleted patients with COPD because it provides not only supportive care, but direct intervention through improvement in respiratory and peripheral skeletal muscle function and in exercise performance. A combination of oral nutritional supplements and exercise or anabolic stimulus appears to be the best treatment approach to obtaining significant functional improvement. Patients responding to this treatment even demonstrated a decreased mortality. Poor response was related to the effects of systemic inflammation on dietary intake and catabolism. The effectiveness of anticatabolic modulation requires further investigation. PMID:12163214

  17. Fat Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, David B.; Ellefson, Wayne C.

    Lipids, proteins, and carbohydrates constitute the principal structural components of foods. Lipids are a group of substances that, in general, are soluble in ether, chloroform, or other organic solvents but are sparingly soluble in water. However, there exists no clear scientific definition of a lipid, primarily due to the water solubility of certain molecules that fall within one of the variable categories of food lipids (1). Some lipids, such as triacylglycerols, are very hydrophobic. Other lipids, such as di- and monoacylglycerols, have both hydrophobic and hydrophilic moieties in their molecules and are soluble in relatively polar solvents (2). Short-chain fatty acids such as C1-C4 are completely miscible in water and insoluble in nonpolar solvents (1). The most widely accepted definition is based on solubility as previously stated. While most macromolecules are characterized by common structural features, the designation of "lipid" being defined by solubility characteristics is unique to lipids (2). Lipids comprise a broad group of substances that have some common properties and compositional similarities (3). Triacylglycerols are fats and oils that represent the most prevalent category of the group of compounds known as lipids. The terms lipids, fats, and oils are often used interchangeably. The term "lipid" commonly refers to the broad, total collection of food molecules that meet the definition previously stated. Fats generally refer to those lipids that are solid at room temperature and oils generally refer to those lipids that are liquid at room temperature. While there may not be an exact scientific definition, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has established a regulatory definition for nutrition labeling purposes. The FDA has defined total fat as the sum of fatty acids from C4 to C24, calculated as triglycerides. This definition provides a clear path for resolution of any nutrition labeling disputes.

  18. Imaging of congenital pulmonary malformations.

    PubMed

    Praticò, Francesco Emanuele; Corrado, Michele; Della Casa, Giovanni; Parziale, Raffaele; Russo, Giuseppe; Gazzani, Silvia Eleonora; Rossi, Enrica; Borgia, Daniele; Mostardi, Maurizio; Bacchini, Emanuele; Cella, Simone; De Filippo, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Congenital pulmonary malformations represent a broad spectrum of anomalies that may result in varied clinical and pathologic pictures, ranging from recurrent pulmonary infections and acute respiratory distress syndrome, which require timely drug therapy, up to large space-occupying lesions needing surgical treatment. This classification includes three distinct anatomical and pathological entities, represented by Congenital Cystic Adenomatoid Malformation, Bronchopulmonary Sequestration and Congenital Lobar Emphysema. The final result in terms of embryological and fetal development of these alterations is a Congenital Lung Hypoplasia. Since even Bronchial Atresia, Pulmonary Bronchogenic Cysts and Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernias are due to Pulmonary Hypoplasia, these diseases will be discussed in this review (1, 2). PMID:27467867

  19. Prior Exercise Increases Subsequent Utilization of Dietary Fat.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Votruba, Susan B.; Atkinson, Richard L.; Hirvonen, Matt D.; Schoeller, Dale A.

    2002-01-01

    Investigated whether exercise would alter the partitioning of dietary fat between oxidation and storage. Seven women participated in rest, light exercise, and heavy exercise. Researchers calculated stationary cycle exercise sessions and dietary fat oxidation. Prior exercise had a positive effect on oxidation of dietary monosaturated fat but not…

  20. The genetics of fat distribution.

    PubMed

    Schleinitz, Dorit; Böttcher, Yvonne; Blüher, Matthias; Kovacs, Peter

    2014-07-01

    Fat stored in visceral depots makes obese individuals more prone to complications than subcutaneous fat. There is good evidence that body fat distribution (FD) is controlled by genetic factors. WHR, a surrogate measure of FD, shows significant heritability of up to ∼60%, even after adjusting for BMI. Genetic variants have been linked to various forms of altered FD such as lipodystrophies; however, the polygenic background of visceral obesity has only been sparsely investigated in the past. Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) for measures of FD revealed numerous loci harbouring genes potentially regulating FD. In addition, genes with fat depot-specific expression patterns (in particular subcutaneous vs visceral adipose tissue) provide plausible candidate genes involved in the regulation of FD. Many of these genes are differentially expressed in various fat compartments and correlate with obesity-related traits, thus further supporting their role as potential mediators of metabolic alterations associated with a distinct FD. Finally, developmental genes may at a very early stage determine specific FD in later life. Indeed, genes such as TBX15 not only manifest differential expression in various fat depots, but also correlate with obesity and related traits. Moreover, recent GWAS identified several polymorphisms in developmental genes (including TBX15, HOXC13, RSPO3 and CPEB4) strongly associated with FD. More accurate methods, including cardiometabolic imaging, for assessment of FD are needed to promote our understanding in this field, where the main focus is now to unravel the yet unknown biological function of these novel 'fat distribution genes'. PMID:24632736

  1. Traumatic fat embolism syndrome.

    PubMed

    Al-Khuwaitir, Tarig S; Al-Moghairi, Abdurahman M; Sherbeeni, Suphia M; Subh, Hamed M

    2002-12-01

    Traumatic fat embolism syndrome occurs most often following fractures of long bones sustained in road traffic accidents and is a common cause of medical consultation from the orthopedic surgery department. The sub-clinical presentation is subtle and expresses itself by the presence of hypoxemia, while the full clinical syndrome compromises respiratory insufficiency, an altered consciousness and a characteristic petechial rash. Recognition is simple once the patient is viewed in the context of his or her clinical setting. Diagnosis is aided further by the presence of hematological and biochemical abnormalities including anemia, thrombocytopenia, an elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate and fat macroglobulinemia. Imaging by chest radiograph, computed tomography or magnetic resonance of the brain is used to confirm the extent of the respective organ involvement and to exclude alternative pathologies. The release of free fatty acids into the circulation and their subsequent effects is the key pathological event. Treatment is based on supportive care and high-dose corticosteroid therapy. We report a patient with traumatic fat embolism syndrome who developed the syndromes classical symptoms and signs following fracture of the long bones of his left lower leg. Admission to an intensive care unit, mechanical ventilatory support with positive end-expiratory pressure and corticosteroid therapy lead to his improvement and allowed eventual open reduction and internal fixation and discharge of our patient. Modern therapy offers a relatively good prognosis for patients with traumatic fat embolism syndrome; the optimal dose and timing of corticosteroid therapy in prophylaxis and treatment however, remain the subject of intense debate. PMID:12518208

  2. Pulmonary Fibrosis

    MedlinePlus

    Pulmonary fibrosis is a condition in which the tissue deep in your lungs becomes scarred over time. This tissue ... may not get enough oxygen. Causes of pulmonary fibrosis include environmental pollutants, some medicines, some connective tissue ...

  3. Pulmonary Embolism

    MedlinePlus

    ... pulmonary embolism is a sudden blockage in a lung artery. The cause is usually a blood clot ... loose and travels through the bloodstream to the lung. Pulmonary embolism is a serious condition that can ...

  4. Pulmonary Rehabilitation

    MedlinePlus

    Pulmonary Rehabilitation If you have shortness of breath because of lung problems, you may have asked yourself: • Can I ... medications do I really need to take? Pulmonary rehabilitation can help answer these and other questions. Enrolling ...

  5. Nontraumatic Fat Embolism Found Following Maternal Death after Cesarean Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Schrufer-Poland, Tabitha; Singh, Paul; Jodicke, Cristiano; Reynolds, Sara; Maulik, Dev

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Fat embolism is a rare form of nonthrombotic embolization. Limited literature exists regarding the diagnosis of fat embolism during the perinatal period. We present the first case of maternal death that resulted from nontraumatic fat embolization following Cesarean delivery. Case Description A 29-year-old gravida 1 with a complex medical and surgical history underwent a primary Cesarean delivery at term. On postoperative day 2 the patient was found to be unresponsive. Despite resuscitative efforts, the patient succumbed. Autopsy findings were remarkable for diffuse pulmonary fat emboli. Furthermore, there was no histological evidence of either amniotic fluid embolism or thromboembolism. The primary cause of death was attributed to nontraumatic fat embolization. Discussion Multiple risk factors may have contributed to the development of nontraumatic fat embolization in our patient. Obstetricians should maintain a high level of suspicion for nontraumatic fat embolization in cases of maternal respiratory decompression and sudden maternal mortality. PMID:26199788

  6. Nontraumatic Fat Embolism Found Following Maternal Death after Cesarean Delivery.

    PubMed

    Schrufer-Poland, Tabitha; Singh, Paul; Jodicke, Cristiano; Reynolds, Sara; Maulik, Dev

    2015-04-01

    Introduction Fat embolism is a rare form of nonthrombotic embolization. Limited literature exists regarding the diagnosis of fat embolism during the perinatal period. We present the first case of maternal death that resulted from nontraumatic fat embolization following Cesarean delivery. Case Description A 29-year-old gravida 1 with a complex medical and surgical history underwent a primary Cesarean delivery at term. On postoperative day 2 the patient was found to be unresponsive. Despite resuscitative efforts, the patient succumbed. Autopsy findings were remarkable for diffuse pulmonary fat emboli. Furthermore, there was no histological evidence of either amniotic fluid embolism or thromboembolism. The primary cause of death was attributed to nontraumatic fat embolization. Discussion Multiple risk factors may have contributed to the development of nontraumatic fat embolization in our patient. Obstetricians should maintain a high level of suspicion for nontraumatic fat embolization in cases of maternal respiratory decompression and sudden maternal mortality. PMID:26199788

  7. Pulmonary Embolism.

    PubMed

    Rali, Parth; Gandhi, Viral; Malik, Khalid

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary embolism covers a wide spectrum of presentation from an asymptomatic individual to a life-threatening medical emergency. It is of paramount importance to appropriately risk stratify patients with pulmonary embolism, particularly with those who present without hypotension. Right ventricular dysfunction can evolve after a patient has received a diagnosis of pulmonary embolism, necessitating aggressive measures rather than simple anticoagulation. In this review, we discuss definition, risk stratification, pathogenesis, diagnostic approach, and management, with particular focus on massive pulmonary embolism. PMID:26919674

  8. [Pulmonary vasoconstrictor responses].

    PubMed

    Onodera, S

    1992-12-01

    Alterations in the physiological balance to maintain the pulmonary circulation at a normal low pressure level result in an elevation in pulmonary vascular tone. Pulmonary vasoconstrictor responses were analyzed under some experimental conditions, which included microembolism, administration of vasoactive agents, hypoxia, and monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension. It is widely accepted that these responses are highly localized and complex. In the present study, excised canine lung lobes, rat lungs, and pulmonary arterial rings from the rat were employed according to the particular experimental design. The mechanism of the initial rapid elevation followed by a gradual decline in perfusion pressure in microembolism was considered to be related not only to the size of the emboli, but to the degree of mechanical injury of the endothelium. The main sites of constriction of the pulmonary vasculature by several drugs were determined in the pulsatile perfused canine lung lobes, according to the degree of decrease in inflow wave amplitude during antegrade or retrograde perfusion. Further, by applying the same method it was confirmed that the site of hypoxic vasoconstriction is located in the peripheral pulmonary vascular bed between the muscular arteries and veins, which are constricted mainly by serotonin and histamine, respectively. A cross perfusion system was set up, employing two lobes from the same dog, in which normoxic blood was perfused into the hypoxic ventilated lobe and vice versa. As a result, the pulmonary vessels showed a response to ventilation hypoxia that was far more sensitive than that to perfusion hypoxia. The effects of a beta-agonist (isoproterenol) and beta-antagonists (propranolol, pindolol) on hypoxic vasoconstriction were observed. Although pindolol (a vasodilatory beta-blocker) abolished hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction, which was similar to the effect of isoproterenol, the mechanism of action of pindolol was suggested to be different

  9. Dietary Fat and Cholesterol

    MedlinePlus

    ... Gynecology Medical Conditions Nutrition & Fitness Emotional Health Dietary Fat and Cholesterol Posted under Health Guides . Updated 23 ... warm What are the different types of dietary fat? The four main types of fat found in ...

  10. Facts about polyunsaturated fats

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/ency/patientinstructions/000747.htm Facts about polyunsaturated fats To use the sharing features on this page, ... Alternative names Polyunsaturated fatty acid; PUFA How Polyunsaturated Fats Affect Your Health Polyunsaturated fats can help lower ...

  11. Facts about monounsaturated fats

    MedlinePlus

    ... plant foods, such as nuts, avocados, and vegetable oils. Eating moderate amounts of monounsaturated (and polyunsaturated) fats ... amounts of healthy fats than others. Foods and oils with higher amounts of monounsaturated fats include: Nuts ...

  12. Facts about trans fats

    MedlinePlus

    Trans fatty acids; Partially hydrogenated oils (PHOs); Cholesterol-trans fats; Hyperlipidemia-trans fats ... partially hydrogenated" in the ingredient list. It means oils have been turned to solids and trans fats. ...

  13. Saturated fat (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Saturated fat can raise blood cholesterol and can put you at risk for heart disease and stroke. You should ... limit any foods that are high in saturated fat. Sources of saturated fat include whole-milk dairy ...

  14. Dietary fat and children

    MedlinePlus

    ... These include fats found in fish, nuts, and vegetable oils. Limit foods with saturated and trans fats (such as meats, full-fat dairy products, and processed foods). Fruits and vegetables are healthy snack foods. Children should be taught ...

  15. Dietary fat and children

    MedlinePlus

    Children and fat-free diets; Fat-free diet and children ... Some fat in the diet is needed for normal growth and development. However, many conditions such as obesity, heart disease, and diabetes are linked to ...

  16. Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Newman, John H.

    2005-01-01

    The modern era in cardiopulmonary medicine began in the 1940s, when Cournand and Richards pioneered right-heart catheterization. Until that time, no direct measurement of central vascular pressure had been performed in humans. Right-heart catheterization ignited an explosion of insights into function and dysfunction of the pulmonary circulation, cardiac performance, ventilation–perfusion relationships, lung–heart interactions, valvular function, and congenital heart disease. It marked the beginnings of angiocardiography with its diagnostic implications for diseases of the left heart and peripheral circulation. Pulmonary hypertension was discovered to be the consequence of a large variety of diseases that either raised pressure downstream of the pulmonary capillaries, induced vasoconstriction, increased blood flow to the lung, or obstructed the pulmonary vessels, either by embolism or in situ fibrosis. Hypoxic vasoconstriction was found to be a major cause of acute and chronic pulmonary hypertension, and surprising vasoreactivity of the pulmonary vascular bed was discovered to be present in many cases of severe pulmonary hypertension, initially in mitral stenosis. Diseases as disparate as scleroderma, cystic fibrosis, kyphoscoliosis, sleep apnea, and sickle cell disease were found to have shared consequences in the pulmonary circulation. Some of the achievements of Cournand and Richards and their scientific descendents are discussed in this article, including success in the diagnosis and treatment of idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension, chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension, and management of hypoxic pulmonary hypertension. PMID:15994464

  17. Pulmonary Impedance and Pulmonary Doppler Trace in the Perioperative Period.

    PubMed

    Tousignant, Claude; Van Orman, Jordan R

    2015-09-01

    Pulmonary hypertension and associated vascular changes may frequently accompany left-sided heart disease in the adult cardiac surgical population. Perioperative assessment of right ventricular function using echocardiography is well established. In general, understanding the constraints upon which the right ventricle must work is mostly limited to invasive monitoring consisting of pulmonary artery pressures, cardiac output, and pulmonary vascular resistance. The latter 2 measurements assume constant (mean) flows and pressures. The systolic and diastolic pressures offer a limited understanding of the pulsatile constraints, which may become significant in disease. In normal physiology, pressure and flow waves display near-similar contours. When left atrial pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance are increased, changes in pulmonary arterial compliance will result in elevated impedance to right ventricular ejection. Pressure reflections, the result of strong reflectors, return more quickly in a noncompliant system. They augment pulmonary artery pressure causing a premature reduction in flow. As a result, pressure and flow waves will now be dissimilar. The impact of vascular changes on right ventricular ejection can be assessed using pulmonary artery Doppler spectral imaging. The normal flow velocity profile is rounded at its peak. Earlier peaks and premature reductions in flow will make it appear more triangular. In some cases, the flow pattern may appear notched. The measurement of acceleration time, the time from onset to peak flow velocity is an indicator of constraint to ejection; shortened times have been associated with increased pulmonary vascular resistance and pressure. Understanding the changes in the pulmonary arterial system in disease and the physics of the hemodynamic alterations are essential in interpreting pulmonary artery Doppler data. Analyzing pulmonary artery Doppler flow signals may assist in the evaluation of right ventricular function in

  18. Pulmonary interstitial emphysema.

    PubMed Central

    Greenough, A; Dixon, A K; Roberton, N R

    1984-01-01

    Forty one of 210 preterm infants ventilated for respiratory distress syndrome in a three year period had radiological evidence of pulmonary interstitial emphysema. The development of this condition was significantly associated with malpositioning of the endotracheal tube in a main bronchus and the use of high peak pressure ventilation. Pulmonary interstitial emphysema was associated with a significant increase in the number of pneumothoraces, intraventricular haemorrhages, and the need for prolonged respiratory support, but did not increase mortality. Although in 12 infants in whom fast rate ventilation was used there was a significant reduction in the number of pneumothoraces, outcome was not altered in any other way. Fast rate ventilation may be of greater benefit if initiated before the development of pulmonary interstitial emphysema. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:6508339

  19. 7-T (35)Cl and (23)Na MR Imaging for Detection of Mutation-dependent Alterations in Muscular Edema and Fat Fraction with Sodium and Chloride Concentrations in Muscular Periodic Paralyses.

    PubMed

    Weber, Marc-André; Nagel, Armin M; Marschar, Anja M; Glemser, Philip; Jurkat-Rott, Karin; Wolf, Maya B; Ladd, Mark E; Schlemmer, Heinz-Peter; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Lehmann-Horn, Frank

    2016-09-01

    Purpose To determine whether altered sodium (Na(+)) and chloride (Cl(-)) homeostasis can be visualized in periodic paralyses by using 7-T sodium 23 ((23)Na) and chlorine 35 ((35)Cl) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Materials and Methods Institutional review board approval and informed consent of all participants were obtained. (23)Na (repetition time msec/echo time msec, 160/0.35) and (35)Cl (40/0.6) MR imaging of both lower legs was performed with a 7-T whole-body system in patients with genetically confirmed hypokalemic periodic paralysis (Cav1.1-R1239H mutation, n = 5; Cav1.1-R528H mutation, n = 8) and Andersen-Tawil syndrome (n = 3) and in 16 healthy volunteers. Additionally, each participant underwent 3-T proton MR imaging on the same day by using T1-weighted, short-tau inversion-recovery, and Dixon-type sequences. Muscle edema was assessed on short-tau inversion-recovery images, fatty degeneration was assessed on T1-weighted images, and muscular fat fraction was quantified with Dixon-type imaging. Na(+) and Cl(-) were quantified in the soleus muscle by using three phantoms that contained 10-, 20-, and 30-mmol/L NaCl solution and 5% agarose gel as a reference. Parametric data for all subpopulations were tested by using one-way analysis of variance with the Dunnett test, and correlations were assessed with the Spearman rank correlation coefficient. Results Median muscular (23)Na concentration was higher in patients with Cav1.1-R1239H (34.7 mmol/L, P < .001), Cav1.1-R528H (32.0 mmol/L, P < .001), and Kir2.1 (24.3 mmol/L, P = .035) mutations than in healthy volunteers (19.9 mmol/L). Median muscular normalized (35)Cl signal intensity was higher in patients with Cav1.1-R1239H (27.6, P < .001) and Cav1.1-R528H (23.6, P < .001) than in healthy volunteers (12.6), but not in patients with the Kir2.1 mutation (14.3, P = .517). When compared with volunteers, patients with Cav1.1-R1239H and Cav1.1-R528H showed increased muscular edema (P < .001 and P = .003, respectively

  20. Purinergic dysregulation in pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Visovatti, Scott H; Hyman, Matthew C; Goonewardena, Sascha N; Anyanwu, Anuli C; Kanthi, Yogendra; Robichaud, Patrick; Wang, Jintao; Petrovic-Djergovic, Danica; Rattan, Rahul; Burant, Charles F; Pinsky, David J

    2016-07-01

    Despite the fact that nucleotides and adenosine help regulate vascular tone through purinergic signaling pathways, little is known regarding their contributions to the pathobiology of pulmonary arterial hypertension, a condition characterized by elevated pulmonary vascular resistance and remodeling. Even less is known about the potential role that alterations in CD39 (ENTPD1), the ectonucleotidase responsible for the conversion of the nucleotides ATP and ADP to AMP, may play in pulmonary arterial hypertension. In this study we identified decreased CD39 expression on the pulmonary endothelium of patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension. We next determined the effects of CD39 gene deletion in mice exposed to normoxia or normobaric hypoxia (10% oxygen). Compared with controls, hypoxic CD39(-/-) mice were found to have a markedly elevated ATP-to-adenosine ratio, higher pulmonary arterial pressures, more right ventricular hypertrophy, more arterial medial hypertrophy, and a pro-thrombotic phenotype. In addition, hypoxic CD39(-/-) mice exhibited a marked increase in lung P2X1 receptors. Systemic reconstitution of ATPase and ADPase enzymatic activities through continuous administration of apyrase decreased pulmonary arterial pressures in hypoxic CD39(-/-) mice to levels found in hypoxic CD39(+/+) controls. Treatment with NF279, a potent and selective P2X1 receptor antagonist, lowered pulmonary arterial pressures even further. Our study is the first to implicate decreased CD39 and resultant alterations in circulating purinergic signaling ligands and cognate receptors in the pathobiology of pulmonary arterial hypertension. Reconstitution and receptor blocking experiments suggest that phosphohydrolysis of purinergic nucleotide tri- and diphosphates, or blocking of the P2X1 receptor could serve as treatment for pulmonary arterial hypertension. PMID:27208163

  1. Figuring Out Fat and Calories

    MedlinePlus

    ... I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Figuring Out Fat and Calories KidsHealth > For Teens > Figuring Out Fat ... the truth on fat and calories? What Are Fat and Calories? Fats, or lipids , are nutrients in ...

  2. Therapeutic aspects of fat embolism syndrome.

    PubMed

    Habashi, Nader M; Andrews, Penny L; Scalea, Thomas M

    2006-10-01

    Signs and symptoms of clinical fat embolism syndrome (FES) usually begin within 24-48 hours after trauma. The classic triad involves pulmonary changes, cerebral dysfunction, and petechial rash. Clinical diagnosis is key because laboratory and radiographic diagnosis is not specific and can be inconsistent. The duration of FES is difficult to predict because it is often subclinical or may be overshadowed by other illnesses or injuries. Medical care is prophylactic or supportive, including early fixation and general ICU management to ensure adequate oxygenation and ventilation, hemodynamic stability, prophylaxis of deep venous thrombosis, stress-related gastrointestinal bleeding, and nutrition. Studies support early fracture fixation as a method to reduce recurrent fat embolism and FES. The main therapeutic interventions once FES has been clinically diagnosed are directed towards support of pulmonary and neurological manifestations and management of acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). PMID:16990063

  3. Pulmonary rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Troosters, Thierry; Demeyer, Heleen; Hornikx, Miek; Camillo, Carlos Augusto; Janssens, Wim

    2014-03-01

    Pulmonary rehabilitation is a therapy that offers benefits to patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease that are complementary to those obtained by pharmacotherapy. The main objective of pulmonary rehabilitation is to restore muscle function and exercise tolerance, reverse other nonrespiratory consequences of the disease, and help patients to self-manage chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and its exacerbations and symptoms. To do so, a multidisciplinary program tailored to the patient in terms of program content, exercise prescription, and setting must be offered. Several settings and programs have shown to spin off in significant immediate results. The challenge lies in maintaining the benefits outside the program. PMID:24507849

  4. [Respiratory and circulatory regulation during microembolism of the pulmonary vessels].

    PubMed

    Kulik, A M; Kurygin, G V; Sanotskaia, N V; Polikarpov, V V; Matsievskiĭ, D D

    1988-11-01

    In the studies on cats anaesthetized with sodium pentobarbital (40 mg/kg i.p.) respiration, circulation and microcirculation of lungs were studied under conditions of fat (olive oil) and mechanical (Lycopodium spores) pulmonary embolism. It was stated, that fat and mechanical microembolisms are different in pattern, intensity, the speed of the development, and also in final result. PMID:3196844

  5. Comparative integromics on FAT1, FAT2, FAT3 and FAT4.

    PubMed

    Katoh, Yuriko; Katoh, Masaru

    2006-09-01

    WNT5A, WNT5B, WNT11, FZD3, FZD6, VANGL1, VANGL2, DVL1, DVL2, DVL3, PRICKLE1, PRICKLE2, ANKRD6, NKD1, NKD2, DAAM1, DAAM2, CELSR1, CELSR2, CELSR3, ROR1 and ROR2 are planar cell polarity (PCP) signaling molecules implicated in the regulation of cellular polarity, convergent extension, and invasion. FAT1, FAT2, FAT3 and FAT4 are Cadherin superfamily members homologous to Drosophila Fat, functioning as a positive regulator of PCP in the Drosophila wing. Complete coding sequence (CDS) for human FAT1 (NM_005245.3) and FAT2 (NM_001447.1) are available, while artificial CDS for human FAT3 (XM_926199 and XM_936538) and partial CDS for FAT4 (NM_024582.2). Here, complete CDS of human FAT3 and FAT4 were determined by using bioinformatics and human intelligence (Humint). FAT3 gene, consisting of 26 exons, encoded a 4557-aa protein with extracellular 33 Cadherin repeats, one Laminin G (LamG) domain and two EGF domains. FAT4 gene encoded a 4924-aa protein with extracellular 34 Cadherin repeats, two LamG domains and three EGF domains. Cytoplasmic VCSVxPxLP and SDYxS motifs were identified as novel motifs conserved among FAT1, FAT2 and FAT3 orthologs. Domain architecture comparison and phylogenetic analysis revealed that FAT1, FAT2 and FAR3 were divergent from FAT4. FAT1-MTNR1A locus at 4q35.2 and FAT3-MTNR1B locus at 11q14.3-q21 were paralogous regions within the human genome. FAT1 mRNA was expressed in embryonic stem (ES) cells, neural tissues, gastric cancer, pancreatic cancer, colorectal cancer, breast cancer, lung cancer and brain tumors. FAT2 mRNA was expressed in infant brain, cerebellum, gastric cancer, pancreatic cancer, ovarian cancer, esophageal cancer, skin squamous cell carcinoma, head and neck cancer. FAT3 mRNA was expressed in ES cells, primitive neuroectoderm, fetal brain, infant brain, adult neural tissues and prostate. FAT4 mRNA was expressed in fetal brain, infant brain, brain tumor and colorectal cancer. FAT family members were revealed to be targets of systems

  6. N-3 fatty acid intake altered fat content and fatty acid distribution in chicken breast muscle, but did not influence mRNA expression of lipid-related enzymes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The conversions of the n-3 and n-6 fatty acid of plant origin to the C20 and C22 very long chain fatty acids (LCPUFAs) is regulated by several cellular enzymes such as elongases and desaturases. Methods Sixty-five male one-day old chickens (Ross 308) were randomly divided into four groups and given one of four diets; with or without linseed oil (LO), (the diets contained equal amounts of fat) and with low or high selenium (Se). Final body weight, amount of Se and fat in breast muscle, fatty acid profile, and gene expression for fatty acid desaturases (Fads1, Fads2, Fads9), HMG-CoA reductase, Acyl-CoA oxidase (Acox), carnitine palmitoyl transferase1 (Cpt1), superoxide dismutase (Sod) and glutathione peroxidase4 (Gpx4) were analyzed in all animals, and Gpx activity in whole blood was determined. Results mRNA expression of elongases and desaturases in chicken breast muscle was not affected by feed rich in C18:3n-3. The highly positive correlation between amount of fat in breast muscle and the product/precursor indices of monounsaturated fatty acid synthesis, and the negative correlation between muscle fat and indices of LCPUFA synthesis should be further studied. Conclusion mRNA expression in chicken breast muscle of elongases and desaturases was not affected by feed rich in C18:3n-3. The highly positive correlation between amount of fat in breast muscle and the product/precursor indices of monounsaturated fatty acid synthesis, and the negative correlation between muscle fat and indices of LCPUFA synthesis should be further studied. PMID:24894510

  7. [Fat embolism after total hip prosthesis replacement preserving the femoral stem].

    PubMed

    Messant, I; Ouardirhi, Y; Vernet, M; Lile, A; Girard, C

    2003-11-01

    Fat embolism is a known complication of traumatology, especially in long bone fractures. It may also occur in liposuction and articular surgery (0.1%). Fat embolic events are most often clinically insignificant and difficult to recognize since clinical manifestations are varied and there is no routine laboratory or radiographic diagnosis. Classically, fat embolism syndrome presents with the triad of pulmonary distress, mental status changes, and cutaneous manifestations. We report the case of a 33-year-old woman who developed acute respiratory distress 10 days after hip arthroplasty. Several aetiologies such as fibrinocruoric pulmonary embolism, pulmonary aspiration and bacterial pneumonia were discussed. Fat embolism was diagnosed, based on suggestive clinical manifestations, radiographic and laboratory findings, although fat embolism after hip arthroplasty without intramedullary pressurization is infrequent. PMID:14612171

  8. Intramedullary nailing and pulmonary embolism: does unreamed nailing prevent embolization? An in vivo study in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Heim, D; Regazzoni, P; Tsakiris, D A; Aebi, T; Schlegel, U; Marbet, G A; Perren, S M

    1995-06-01

    Pulmonary embolism in reamed femoral nailing has been reported and discussed over recent years. Does an unreamed nailing technique with a solid nail prevent this rare but serious complication of intramedullary fixation? In an animal model in rabbits, we studied the pathophysiologic impact on pulmonary function and the impact on hemostasis of reamed and unreamed nailing of intact femora and tibiae, and of femoral fracture in relation to intramedullary pressure. No statistical difference of PaO2, PaCO2, and PCO2et was found in the femur whether a reamed or unreamed procedure was performed. Two of six animals with unreamed femoral nailing, one of six animal with reamed femoral nailing, and one of five animals with a femoral fracture fulfilled four of four or three of four criteria for embolization (increase of the difference of PaCO2 and PCO2et, decrease of PaO2, increase of blast cells in central-venous blood and bone marrow/fat in histologic section of the lungs and bone). Tibial nailing did not alter pulmonary function in either group. Intramedullary pressure was increased in all animals with perioperative impairment of pulmonary function (375 to 676 mbar). Analysis of the hemostatic results showed a significant difference of platelet activation in reamed versus unreamed nailing of the femur 1 hour after nailing (p < 0.01) and a significant decrease of fibrinogen and antithrombin III (p < 0.001/p < 0.01) in reamed femoral nailing. We conclude that unreamed nailing of the femur with a solid rod may also cause bone marrow embolization with alteration of pulmonary function as long as an important increase of the intramedullary pressure is generated during the nailing procedure.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7602632

  9. Pulmonary function in space.

    PubMed

    West, J B; Elliott, A R; Guy, H J; Prisk, G K

    1997-06-25

    The lung is exquisitely sensitive to gravity, and so it is of interest to know how its function is altered in the weightlessness of space. Studies on National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Spacelabs during the last 4 years have provided the first comprehensive data on the extensive changes in pulmonary function that occur in sustained microgravity. Measurements of pulmonary function were made on astronauts during space shuttle flights lasting 9 and 14 days and were compared with extensive ground-based measurements before and after the flights. Compared with preflight measurements, cardiac output increased by 18% during space flight, and stroke volume increased by 46%. Paradoxically, the increase in stroke volume occurred in the face of reductions in central venous pressure and circulating blood volume. Diffusing capacity increased by 28%, and the increase in the diffusing capacity of the alveolar membrane was unexpectedly large based on findings in normal gravity. The change in the alveolar membrane may reflect the effects of uniform filling of the pulmonary capillary bed. Distributions of blood flow and ventilation throughout the lung were more uniform in space, but some unevenness remained, indicating the importance of nongravitational factors. A surprising finding was that airway closing volume was approximately the same in microgravity and in normal gravity, emphasizing the importance of mechanical properties of the airways in determining whether they close. Residual volume was unexpectedly reduced by 18% in microgravity, possibly because of uniform alveolar expansion. The findings indicate that pulmonary function is greatly altered in microgravity, but none of the changes observed so far will apparently limit long-term space flight. In addition, the data help to clarify how gravity affects pulmonary function in the normal gravity environment on Earth. PMID:9200637

  10. Pulmonary function in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, J. B.; Elliott, A. R.; Guy, H. J.; Prisk, G. K.

    1997-01-01

    The lung is exquisitely sensitive to gravity, and so it is of interest to know how its function is altered in the weightlessness of space. Studies on National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Spacelabs during the last 4 years have provided the first comprehensive data on the extensive changes in pulmonary function that occur in sustained microgravity. Measurements of pulmonary function were made on astronauts during space shuttle flights lasting 9 and 14 days and were compared with extensive ground-based measurements before and after the flights. Compared with preflight measurements, cardiac output increased by 18% during space flight, and stroke volume increased by 46%. Paradoxically, the increase in stroke volume occurred in the face of reductions in central venous pressure and circulating blood volume. Diffusing capacity increased by 28%, and the increase in the diffusing capacity of the alveolar membrane was unexpectedly large based on findings in normal gravity. The change in the alveolar membrane may reflect the effects of uniform filling of the pulmonary capillary bed. Distributions of blood flow and ventilation throughout the lung were more uniform in space, but some unevenness remained, indicating the importance of nongravitational factors. A surprising finding was that airway closing volume was approximately the same in microgravity and in normal gravity, emphasizing the importance of mechanical properties of the airways in determining whether they close. Residual volume was unexpectedly reduced by 18% in microgravity, possibly because of uniform alveolar expansion. The findings indicate that pulmonary function is greatly altered in microgravity, but none of the changes observed so far will apparently limit long-term space flight. In addition, the data help to clarify how gravity affects pulmonary function in the normal gravity environment on Earth.

  11. Fat embolism syndrome

    PubMed Central

    George, Jacob; George, Reeba; Dixit, R.; Gupta, R. C.; Gupta, N.

    2013-01-01

    Fat embolism syndrome is an often overlooked cause of breathlessness in trauma wards. Presenting in a wide range of clinical signs of varying severity, fat embolism is usually diagnosed by a physician who keeps a high degree of suspicion. The clinical background, chronology of symptoms and corroborative laboratory findings are instrumental in a diagnosis of fat embolism syndrome. There are a few diagnostic criteria which are helpful in making a diagnosis of fat embolism syndrome. Management is mainly prevention of fat embolism syndrome, and organ supportive care. Except in fulminant fat embolism syndrome, the prognosis is usually good. PMID:23661916

  12. Pulmonary arteriole gene expression signature in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Patel, Nina M; Kawut, Steven M; Jelic, Sanja; Arcasoy, Selim M; Lederer, David J; Borczuk, Alain C

    2013-06-01

    A third of patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) develop pulmonary hypertension (PH-IPF), which is associated with increased mortality. Whether an altered gene expression profile in the pulmonary vasculature precedes the clinical onset of PH-IPF is unknown. We compared gene expression in the pulmonary vasculature of IPF patients with and without PH with controls. Pulmonary arterioles were isolated using laser capture microdissection from 16 IPF patients: eight with PH (PH-IPF) and eight with no PH (NPH-IPF), and seven controls. Probe was prepared from extracted RNA, and hybridised to Affymetrix Hu133 2.0 Plus genechips. Biometric Research Branch array tools and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis software were used for analysis of the microarray data. Univariate analysis revealed 255 genes that distinguished IPF arterioles from controls (p<0.001). Mediators of vascular smooth muscle and endothelial cell proliferation, Wnt signalling and apoptosis were differentially expressed in IPF arterioles. Unsupervised and supervised clustering analyses revealed similar gene expression in PH-IPF and NPH-IPF arterioles. The pulmonary arteriolar gene expression profile is similar in IPF patients with and without coexistent PH. Pathways involved in vascular proliferation and aberrant apoptosis, which may contribute to pulmonary vascular remodelling, are activated in IPF patients. PMID:23728404

  13. Facts About Fat

    MedlinePlus

    ... Current Issue Past Issues Health Lines Facts About Fat Past Issues / Fall 2008 Table of Contents For ... Writer, NLM Scientists are learning more about our fat cells, and their findings could explain why some ...

  14. Facts about trans fats

    MedlinePlus

    ... of servings you eat in one sitting. Many fast food restaurants use solid oils with trans fat for ... frozen yogurt, milk shakes, and pudding Snack foods Fast food Solid fats, such as shortening and margarine Nondairy ...

  15. Lipocytes (fat cells) (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... to energy output, there is no expansion of fat cells (lipocytes) to accommodate excess. It is only when more calories are taken in than used that the extra fat is stored in the lipocytes and the person ...

  16. Body Fat Measurement Tools

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cyberkitchen Fitness Center Shape Up & Drop 10 Body Fat Lab BMI Calculator Pregnancy Weight Gain Children Assessing ... Contact List Request for Support Measurement Tools Body fat has many important functions. It is: a "storage ...

  17. Anticoagulation in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Jeffrey C; Pugliese, Steven C; Fox, Daniel L; Badesch, David B

    2016-06-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is characterized by molecular and pathologic alteration to the pulmonary circulation, resulting in increased pulmonary vascular resistance, right ventricular failure, and eventual death. Pharmacologic treatment of PAH consists of use of a multitude of pulmonary vasodilators, sometimes in combination. PAH has been associated with increased thrombosis and disrupted coagulation and fibrinolysis, making anticoagulation an attractive and frequently employed therapeutic modality. Observational studies have provided some insight into the therapeutic potential of anticoagulation in idiopathic PAH, but there is a distinct lack of well-controlled prospective trials. Due to the conflicting evidence, there is a large amount of heterogeneity in the application of therapeutic anticoagulation in PAH and further well-controlled prospective trials are needed to clarify its role in treating PAH. PMID:27137522

  18. Fat embolism syndrome after liposuction: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Laub, D R; Laub, D R

    1990-07-01

    There have been three previous case reports of fat embolism syndrome (FES) after lipectomy. We present a case of FES diagnosed by pulmonary angiography. It seems likely that there is an incidence of subclinical fat embolization after liposuction, but conservative patient selection and aggressive postoperative management can lessen the morbidity and mortality of FES. PMID:2198844

  19. Links between ectopic fat and vascular disease in humans.

    PubMed

    Lim, Soo; Meigs, James B

    2014-09-01

    The average of overweight individual can have differential fat depots in target organs or specific compartments of the body. This ectopic fat distribution may be more of a predictive factor for cardiovascular risk than obesity. Abdominal visceral obesity, a representative ectopic fat, is robustly associated with insulin resistance and cardiovascular risk. Fat depots in the liver and muscle tissue cause adverse cardiometabolic risk by affecting glucose and lipid metabolism. Pericardial fat and perivascular fat affect coronary atherosclerosis, cardiac function, and hemodynamics. Fat around the neck is associated with systemic vascular resistance. Fat around the kidney may increase blood pressure and induce albuminuria. Fat accumulation in or around the pancreas alters glucose metabolism, conferring cardiovascular risk. Ectopic fat may act as an active endocrine and paracrine organ that releases various bioactive mediators that influence insulin resistance, glucose and lipid metabolism, coagulation, and inflammation, which all contribute to cardiovascular risk. Because both obese and apparently lean individuals can have ectopic fat, regional fat distribution may play an important role in the development of cardiovascular diseases in both nonobese and obese people. PMID:25035342

  20. Pulmonary Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is high blood pressure in the arteries to your lungs. It is a serious condition. If you have ... and you can develop heart failure. Symptoms of PH include Shortness of breath during routine activity, such ...

  1. Pulmonary aspergilloma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Coccidioidomycosis Cystic fibrosis Histoplasmosis Lung abscess Lung cancer Sarcoidosis See also: Aspergillosis Symptoms You may not have ... fibrosis Histoplasmosis Lung cancer - small cell Pulmonary tuberculosis Sarcoidosis Update Date 8/31/2014 Updated by: Jatin ...

  2. Pulmonary Atresia

    MedlinePlus

    ... to repair the defect. Return to main topic: Congenital Heart Disease See on other sites: MedlinePlus https://medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001091.htm Pulmonary atresia American Heart Association www. ...

  3. Pulmonary atresia

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood flow from the right ventricle (right side pumping chamber) to the lungs. In pulmonary atresia, a ... Reconstructing the heart as a single ventricle (1 pumping chamber instead of 2) Heart transplant

  4. Pulmonary atresia

    MedlinePlus

    ... form of heart disease that occurs from birth (congenital heart disease), in which the pulmonary valve does not form ... As with most congenital heart diseases, there is no known cause of ... is associated with another type of congenital heart defect ...

  5. [Pulmonary rehabilitation].

    PubMed

    Senjyu, Hideaki

    2016-05-01

    Pulmonary rehabilitation commenced in Japan in 1957. However, the development of pulmonary rehabilitation took a long time due to the lack of the necessary health and medical services. Pulmonary rehabilitation is a comprehensive intervention based on a thorough patient assessment followed by patient-tailored therapies that include, but are not limited to, exercise training, education, and behavior change, designed to improve the physical and psychological condition of people with chronic respiratory disease and to promote the long-term adherence to health-enhancing behaviors. The benefits of pulmonary rehabilitation include a decrease in breathlessness and an improvement in exercise tolerance. It is important that the gains in exercise tolerance lead to an increase in daily physical activity. PMID:27254948

  6. Pulmonary Embolism

    MedlinePlus

    ... is a sudden blockage in a lung artery. The cause is usually a blood clot in the leg called a deep vein thrombosis that breaks loose and travels through the bloodstream to the lung. Pulmonary embolism is a ...

  7. Weighing in on Dietary Fats

    MedlinePlus

    ... our exit disclaimer . Subscribe Weighing in on Dietary Fats Some Fats Are Healthier Than Others With the winter holidays ... of these foods, though, can be high in fat. Learn which fats are naughty and which are ...

  8. Pulmonary Edema

    PubMed Central

    Tanser, Paul H.

    1980-01-01

    The physician who deals with pulmonary edema from a pathophysiologic basis will seldom make a diagnostic or therapeutic error. Recent additions to preload and afterload therapy have greatly helped in the emergency and ambulatory treatment of pulmonary edema due to left heart failure. Careful follow-up and patient self-monitoring are the most effective means of reducing hospitalization of chronic heart failure patients. PMID:21293700

  9. Sugar and fat: cravings and aversions.

    PubMed

    Yanovski, Susan

    2003-03-01

    Food cravings are extremely common, particularly among women. Cravings are frequently reported for specific types of foods, including chocolate and foods high in both sugar and fat. Cravings for specific macronutrients, such as carbohydrate, have been postulated to result from a physiological need to alter neurotransmitters in such states as eating disorders, affective disorders or obesity. However, studies of such cravings are often confounded by differing sensory properties of high and low carbohydrate foods. There is some evidence that sweet, high fat foods are preferred by women with binge-eating disorders and that those preferences are mediated by the endogenous opioid system. Aversion to fat is seen primarily in women with anorexia nervosa. However, it is possible that changes in fat preference may be achieved through behavioral or pharmacological approaches. An understanding of food cravings and aversions may lead to improved methods for the prevention and treatment of obesity and eating disorders. PMID:12612163

  10. Types of Pulmonary Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. Types of Pulmonary Hypertension The World Health Organization divides pulmonary hypertension (PH) ... are called pulmonary hypertension.) Group 1 Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension Group 1 PAH includes: PAH that has no ...

  11. Metabolomic Heterogeneity of Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yidan; Peng, Jenny; Lu, Catherine; Hsin, Michael; Mura, Marco; Wu, Licun; Chu, Lei; Zamel, Ricardo; Machuca, Tiago; Waddell, Thomas; Liu, Mingyao; Keshavjee, Shaf; Granton, John; de Perrot, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Although multiple gene and protein expression have been extensively profiled in human pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), the mechanism for the development and progression of pulmonary hypertension remains elusive. Analysis of the global metabolomic heterogeneity within the pulmonary vascular system leads to a better understanding of disease progression. Using a combination of high-throughput liquid-and-gas-chromatography-based mass spectrometry, we showed unbiased metabolomic profiles of disrupted glycolysis, increased TCA cycle, and fatty acid metabolites with altered oxidation pathways in the human PAH lung. The results suggest that PAH has specific metabolic pathways contributing to increased ATP synthesis for the vascular remodeling process in severe pulmonary hypertension. These identified metabolites may serve as potential biomarkers for the diagnosis of PAH. By profiling metabolomic alterations of the PAH lung, we reveal new pathogenic mechanisms of PAH, opening an avenue of exploration for therapeutics that target metabolic pathway alterations in the progression of PAH. PMID:24533144

  12. Fat embolism in patients with fractured hips.

    PubMed

    Sevitt, S

    1972-04-29

    Fat embolism was assessed at necropsy and correlated with clinical findings in the patients who died among 854 with fractured hips admitted to hospital between 1967 and August 1971. Sixteen cases of clinical importance were found, eight of which were judged to have been fatal or to have seriously contributed to death. Frequencies were as follows: 2.4 to 3.3% among 424 patients with subcapital fractures; 0.7 to 0.8% in the 405 with trochanteric fractures; 4.1 to 7% among subjects treated without operation, representing 30% of those who died within seven days; and 0.9 to 1.1% among patients treated by pinning, nailing, or nail-plating. The higher frequency in the conservatively treated group is probably related to selection of poor-risk subjects. Fat embolism was found in 6.8 to 8.0% of those with subcapital fractures treated by primary Thompson's arthroplasty which utilizes acrylic cement, and in none of those given Moore's prostheses for which cement is not used. Study of a larger group after Moore's prosthesis is required to establish its lack of special risk. Fat embolism accounted for all the deaths within seven days of Thompson's arthroplasty and for most within 14 days; it was clearly related to surgery in some cases.A possible explanation of the hazard of Thompson's arthroplasty is that fat globule entry is enhanced by a rise of intramedullary pressure due to proximal occlusion of the reamed marrow cavity. A controlled trial of the effect of venting the marrow cavity on the frequency of fat embolism is warranted. It is possible that the acrylic monomer may also contribute to venous entry of medullary fat. The higher-age group of those with subcapital fractures and associated chronic cardiac and pulmonary disease might make them more susceptible to fat embolization than those in whom arthroplasty is also carried out for chronic hip disease. PMID:5022012

  13. Fat Embolism in Patients with Fractured Hips

    PubMed Central

    Sevitt, Simon

    1972-01-01

    Fat embolism was assessed at necropsy and correlated with clinical findings in the patients who died among 854 with fractured hips admitted to hospital between 1967 and August 1971. Sixteen cases of clinical importance were found, eight of which were judged to have been fatal or to have seriously contributed to death. Frequencies were as follows: 2·4 to 3·3% among 424 patients with subcapital fractures; 0·7 to 0·8% in the 405 with trochanteric fractures; 4·1 to 7% among subjects treated without operation, representing 30% of those who died within seven days; and 0·9 to 1·1% among patients treated by pinning, nailing, or nail-plating. The higher frequency in the conservatively treated group is probably related to selection of poor-risk subjects. Fat embolism was found in 6·8 to 8·0% of those with subcapital fractures treated by primary Thompson's arthroplasty which utilizes acrylic cement, and in none of those given Moore's prostheses for which cement is not used. Study of a larger group after Moore's prosthesis is required to establish its lack of special risk. Fat embolism accounted for all the deaths within seven days of Thompson's arthroplasty and for most within 14 days; it was clearly related to surgery in some cases. A possible explanation of the hazard of Thompson's arthroplasty is that fat globule entry is enhanced by a rise of intramedullary pressure due to proximal occlusion of the reamed marrow cavity. A controlled trial of the effect of venting the marrow cavity on the frequency of fat embolism is warranted. It is possible that the acrylic monomer may also contribute to venous entry of medullary fat. The higher-age group of those with subcapital fractures and associated chronic cardiac and pulmonary disease might make them more susceptible to fat embolization than those in whom arthroplasty is also carried out for chronic hip disease. PMID:5022012

  14. Pulmonary embolism

    SciTech Connect

    Dunnick, N.R.; Newman, G.E.; Perlmutt, L.M.; Braun, S.D.

    1988-11-01

    Pulmonary embolism is a common medical problem whose incidence is likely to increase in our aging population. Although it is life-threatening, effective therapy exists. The treatment is not, however, without significant complications. Thus, accurate diagnosis is important. Unfortunately, the clinical manifestations of pulmonary embolism are nonspecific. Furthermore, in many patients the symptoms of an acute embolism are superimposed on underlying chronic heart or lung disease. Thus, a high index of suspicion is needed to identify pulmonary emboli. Laboratory parameters, including arterial oxygen tensions and electrocardiography, are as nonspecific as the clinical signs. They may be more useful in excluding another process than in diagnosing pulmonary embolism. The first radiologic examination is the chest radiograph, but the clinical symptoms are frequently out of proportion to the findings on the chest films. Classic manifestations of pulmonary embolism on the chest radiograph include a wedge-shaped peripheral opacity and a segmental or lobar diminution in vascularity with prominent central arteries. However, these findings are not commonly seen and, even when present, are not specific. Even less specific findings include cardiomegaly, pulmonary infiltrate, elevation of a hemidiaphragm, and pleural effusion. Many patients with pulmonary embolism may have a normal chest radiograph. The chest radiograph is essential, however, for two purposes. First, it may identify another cause of the patient's symptoms, such as a rib fracture, dissecting aortic aneurysm, or pneumothorax. Second, a chest radiograph is essential to interpretation of the radionuclide V/Q scan. The perfusion scan accurately reflects the perfusion of the lung. However, a perfusion defect may result from a variety of etiologies. Any process such as vascular stenosis or compression by tumor may restrict blood flow. 84 references.

  15. Wasting among Uganda men with pulmonary tuberculosis is associated with linear regain in lean tissue mass during and after treatment in contrast to women with wasting who regain fat tissue mass: prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Nutritional changes during and after tuberculosis treatment have not been well described. We therefore determined the effect of wasting on rate of mean change in lean tissue and fat mass as measured by bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA), and mean change in body mass index (BMI) during and after tuberculosis treatment. Methods In a prospective cohort study of 717 adult patients, BMI and height-normalized indices of lean tissue (LMI) and fat mass (FMI) as measured by BIA were assessed at baseline, 3, 12, and 24 months. Results Men with wasting at baseline regained LMI at a greater rate than FMI (4.55 kg/m2 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.26, 7.83 versus 3.16 (95% CI: 0.80, 5.52)) per month, respectively during initial tuberculosis therapy. In contrast, women with wasting regained FMI at greater rate than LMI (3.55 kg/m2 (95% CI: 0.40, 6.70) versus 2.07 (95% CI: -0.74, 4.88)), respectively. Men with wasting regained BMI at a rate of 6.45 kg/m2 (95% CI: 3.02, 9.87) in the first three months whereas women, had a rate of 3.30 kg/m2 (95% CI: -0.11, 6.72). There were minimal changes in body composition after month 3 and during months 12 to 24. Conclusion Wasted tuberculosis patients regain weight with treatment but the type of gain differs by gender and patients may remain underweight after the initial phase of treatment. PMID:24410970

  16. Dietary fat, fat subtypes and hepatocellular carcinoma in a large European cohort.

    PubMed

    Duarte-Salles, Talita; Fedirko, Veronika; Stepien, Magdalena; Aleksandrova, Krasimira; Bamia, Christina; Lagiou, Pagona; Laursen, Anne Sofie Dam; Hansen, Louise; Overvad, Kim; Tjønneland, Anne; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Fagherazzi, Guy; His, Mathilde; Boeing, Heiner; Katzke, Verena; Kühn, Tilman; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Valanou, Elissavet; Kritikou, Maria; Masala, Giovanna; Panico, Salvatore; Sieri, Sabina; Ricceri, Fulvio; Tumino, Rosario; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B As; Peeters, Petra H; Hjartåker, Anette; Skeie, Guri; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Ardanaz, Eva; Bonet, Catalina; Chirlaque, Maria-Dolores; Dorronsoro, Miren; Quirós, J Ramón; Johansson, Ingegerd; Ohlsson, Bodil; Sjöberg, Klas; Wennberg, Maria; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Travis, Ruth C; Wareham, Nick; Ferrari, Pietro; Freisling, Heinz; Romieu, Isabelle; Cross, Amanda J; Gunter, Marc; Lu, Yunxia; Jenab, Mazda

    2015-12-01

    The role of amount and type of dietary fat consumption in the etiology of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is poorly understood, despite suggestive biological plausibility. The associations of total fat, fat subtypes and fat sources with HCC incidence were investigated in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort, which includes 191 incident HCC cases diagnosed between 1992 and 2010. Diet was assessed by country-specific, validated dietary questionnaires. A single 24-hr diet recall from a cohort subsample was used for measurement error calibration. Hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were estimated from Cox proportional hazard models. Hepatitis B and C viruses (HBV/HCV) status and biomarkers of liver function were assessed separately in a nested case-control subset with available blood samples (HCC = 122). In multivariable calibrated models, there was a statistically significant inverse association between total fat intake and risk of HCC (per 10 g/day, HR = 0.80, 95% CI: 0.65-0.99), which was mainly driven by monounsaturated fats (per 5 g/day, HR = 0.71, 95% CI: 0.55-0.92) rather than polyunsaturated fats (per 5 g/day, HR = 0.92, 95% CI: 0.68-1.25). There was no association between saturated fats (HR = 1.08, 95% CI: 0.88-1.34) and HCC risk. The ratio of polyunsaturated/monounsaturated fats to saturated fats was not significantly associated with HCC risk (per 0.2 point, HR = 0.86, 95% CI: 0.73-1.01). Restriction of analyses to HBV/HCV free participants or adjustment for liver function did not substantially alter the findings. In this large prospective European cohort, higher consumption of monounsaturated fats is associated with lower HCC risk. PMID:26081477

  17. Oral supplementations with L-glutamine or L-alanyl-L-glutamine do not change metabolic alterations induced by long-term high-fat diet in the B6.129F2/J mouse model of insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Bock, Patricia Martins; Krause, Mauricio; Schroeder, Helena Trevisan; Hahn, Gabriela Fernandes; Takahashi, Hilton Kenji; Schöler, Cinthia Maria; Nicoletti, Graziella; Neto, Luiz Domingos Zavarize; Rodrigues, Maria Inês Lavina; Bruxel, Maciel Alencar; Homem de Bittencourt, Paulo Ivo

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we aimed to investigate the effects of long-term supplementations with L-glutamine or L-alanyl-L-glutamine in the high-fat diet (HFD)-fed B6.129SF2/J mouse model over insulin sensitivity response and signaling, oxidative stress markers, metabolism and HSP70 expression. Mice were fed in a standard low-fat diet (STA) or a HFD for 20 weeks. In the 21th week, mice from the HFD group were allocated in five groups and supplemented for additional 8 weeks with different amino acids: HFD control group (HFD-Con), HFD + dipeptide L-alanyl-L-glutamine group (HFD-Dip), HFD + L-alanine group (HFD-Ala), HFD + L-glutamine group (HFD-Gln), or the HFD + L-alanine + L-glutamine (in their free forms) group (HFD-Ala + Gln). HFD induced higher body weight, fat pad, fasted glucose, and total cholesterol in comparison with STA group. Amino acid supplementations did not induce any modifications in these parameters. Although insulin tolerance tests indicated insulin resistance in all HFD groups, amino acid supplementations did not improve insulin sensitivity in the present model. There were also no significant differences in the immunocontents of insulin receptor, Akt, and Toll-like receptor-4. Notably, total 70 kDa heat shock protein (HSP72 + HSP73) contents in the liver was markedly increased in HFD-Con group as compared to STA group, which might suggest that insulin resistance is only in the beginning. Apparently, B6.129SF2/J mice are more resistant to the harmful effects of HFD through a mechanism that may include gut adaptation, reducing the absorption of nutrients, including amino acids, which may explain the lack of improvements in our intervention. PMID:26530165

  18. Measuring breath acetone for monitoring fat loss: Review

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Objective Endogenous acetone production is a by‐product of the fat metabolism process. Because of its small size, acetone appears in exhaled breath. Historically, endogenous acetone has been measured in exhaled breath to monitor ketosis in healthy and diabetic subjects. Recently, breath acetone concentration (BrAce) has been shown to correlate with the rate of fat loss in healthy individuals. In this review, the measurement of breath acetone in healthy subjects is evaluated for its utility in predicting fat loss and its sensitivity to changes in physiologic parameters. Results BrAce can range from 1 ppm in healthy non‐dieting subjects to 1,250 ppm in diabetic ketoacidosis. A strong correlation exists between increased BrAce and the rate of fat loss. Multiple metabolic and respiratory factors affect the measurement of BrAce. BrAce is most affected by changes in the following factors (in descending order): dietary macronutrient composition, caloric restriction, exercise, pulmonary factors, and other assorted factors that increase fat metabolism or inhibit acetone metabolism. Pulmonary factors affecting acetone exchange in the lung should be controlled to optimize the breath sample for measurement. Conclusions When biologic factors are controlled, BrAce measurement provides a non‐invasive tool for monitoring the rate of fat loss in healthy subjects. PMID:26524104

  19. On fat oppression.

    PubMed

    Eller, G M

    2014-09-01

    Contemporary Western societies are obsessed with the "obesity epidemic," dieting, and fitness. Fat people violate the Western conscience by violating a thinness norm. In virtue of violating the thinness norm, fat people suffer many varied consequences. Is their suffering morally permissible, or even obligatory? In this paper, I argue that the answer is no. I examine contemporary philosophical accounts of oppression and draw largely on the work of Sally Haslanger to generate a set of conditions sufficient for some phenomena to count as oppression, and I illustrate the account's value using the example of gender oppression. I then apply the account to fat people, examine empirical evidence, and argue that the suffering of fat people counts as oppression (and therefore, generally, discriminating against fat people in virtue of their being fat is morally wrong). PMID:25423849

  20. Pulmonary vasculature in COPD: The silent component.

    PubMed

    Blanco, Isabel; Piccari, Lucilla; Barberà, Joan Albert

    2016-08-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by airflow obstruction that results from an inflammatory process affecting the airways and lung parenchyma. Despite major abnormalities taking place in bronchial and alveolar structures, changes in pulmonary vessels also represent an important component of the disease. Alterations in vessel structure are highly prevalent and abnormalities in their function impair gas exchange and may result in pulmonary hypertension (PH), an important complication of the disease associated with reduced survival and worse clinical course. The prevalence of PH is high in COPD, particularly in advanced stages, although it remains of mild to moderate severity in the majority of cases. Endothelial dysfunction, with imbalance between vasodilator/vasoconstrictive mediators, is a key determinant of changes taking place in pulmonary vasculature in COPD. Cigarette smoke products may perturb endothelial cells and play a critical role in initiating vascular changes. The concurrence of inflammation, hypoxia and emphysema further contributes to vascular damage and to the development of PH. The use of drugs that target endothelium-dependent signalling pathways, currently employed in pulmonary arterial hypertension, is discouraged in COPD due to the lack of efficacy observed in randomized clinical trials and because there is compelling evidence indicating that these drugs may worsen pulmonary gas exchange. The subgroup of patients with severe PH should be ideally managed in centres with expertise in both PH and chronic lung diseases because alterations of pulmonary vasculature might resemble those observed in pulmonary arterial hypertension. Because this condition entails poor prognosis, it warrants specialist treatment. PMID:27028849

  1. Pulmonary Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is high blood pressure in the arteries to your lungs. It is a serious condition. If you have it, the blood ... heart has to work harder to pump the blood through. Over time, your heart weakens and ... of PH include Shortness of breath during routine activity, such ...

  2. PULMONARY TOXICOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pulmonary disease and dysfunction exact a tremendous health burden on society. In a recent survey of lung disease published by the American Lung Association in 2012, upwards of 10 million Americans were diagnosed with chronic bronchitis while over 4 million Americans had emphysem...

  3. Pulmonary ascariasis.

    PubMed

    Mukerjee, C M; Thompson, J E

    1979-07-28

    A case of pulmonary ascariasis is reported for the first time in Australia. Because of increasing immigration from countries which have a high incidence of ascariasis (especially those of South-East Asia), and increasing travel to Asian countries, the awareness of this infestation as a cause of respiratory disease may be of great importance. PMID:40103

  4. Pulmonary nocardiosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... infection from returning. Alternative Names Nocardiosis - pulmonary Images Respiratory system References Limper AH. Overview of pneumonia. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 24th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ... of Respiratory Medicine . 5th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2010: ...

  5. Pulmonary Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    ... Anticoagulants (blood-thinning medicine) Calcium channel blockers Diuretics (water pills) Digoxin Your doctor will decide what type of medicine is right for you. In some cases, people who have pulmonary hypertension need surgical treatment. Surgical treatment options include a lung transplant and ...

  6. Fat harvesting techniques for facial fat transfer.

    PubMed

    Lam, Samuel M; Glasgold, Robert A; Glasgold, Mark J

    2010-10-01

    Fat grafting has become popular as a stand-alone technique or as part of a combined procedure for facial rejuvenation, as volume restoration has increasingly become recognized as an important component in overall facial aging. Many facial plastic surgeons who are experienced in operating only in the head and neck region are unaccustomed to working elsewhere in the body. Accordingly, this article sets out to detail the specific technique for safe and effective lipoharvesting for facial fat transfer. In addition, site-specific considerations for the lower abdomen, inner/anterior/outer thighs, triceps, inner knee, buttock, and lower back are also discussed. PMID:20853226

  7. Fats and fatty acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The absolute fat requirement of the human species is the amount of essential fatty acids needed to maintain optimal fatty acid composition of all tissues and normal eicosanoid synthesis. At most, this requirement is no more than about 5% of an adequate energy intake. However, fat accounts for appro...

  8. Face the Fats Quiz 2

    MedlinePlus

    Face the Fats Quiz II Do you know your fats by heart? Ready to make informed choices about the foods you ... to fried chicken, test your knowledge about the fats in some familiar foods. Welcome to Face the ...

  9. Fat Necrosis and Oil Cysts

    MedlinePlus

    ... Previous Topic Granular cell tumors Next Topic Mastitis Fat necrosis and oil cysts Fat necrosis happens when ... lumpy area if it becomes bothersome. How do fat necrosis and oil cysts affect your risk for ...

  10. Nutritional modulation as part of the integrated management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Schols, Annemie

    2003-11-01

    Weight loss is a frequent complication in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and is a determining factor for functional capacity, health status and mortality. Weight loss in COPD is a consequence of an inbalance between increased energy requirements and dietary intake. Both metabolic and mechanical inefficiency may contribute to elevated energy expenditure during physical activity, while systemic inflammation has been associated with hypermetabolism at rest. Disease-specific symptoms and systemic inflammation may impair appetite and dietary intake. Altered intermediary metabolism may cause disproportionate wasting of fat-free mass in some patients. A combination of nutritional support and exercise as an anabolic stimulus appears to be the best approach to obtaining marked functional improvement. Patients responding to this treatment even demonstrated a decreased mortality. The effectiveness of anti-catabolic modulation requires further investigation. PMID:15018476

  11. Beneficial effect of a weight-stable, low-fat/low-saturated fat/low-glycaemic index diet to reduce liver fat in older subjects.

    PubMed

    Utzschneider, Kristina M; Bayer-Carter, Jennifer L; Arbuckle, Matthew D; Tidwell, Jaime M; Richards, Todd L; Craft, Suzanne

    2013-03-28

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is associated with insulin resistance and dyslipidaemia and can progress to steatohepatitis and cirrhosis. We sought to determine whether dietary fat and saturated fat content alter liver fat in the absence of weight change in an older population. Liver fat was quantified by magnetic resonance spectroscopy before and after 4 weeks on an isoenergetic low-fat/low-saturated fat/low-glycaemic index (LGI) (LSAT: 23 % fat/7 % saturated fat/GI < 55) or a high-fat/high-saturated fat/high-GI (HSAT: 43 % fat/24 % saturated fat/GI>70) diet in older subjects. In the present study, twenty subjects (seven males/thirteen females; age 69.3 (SEM 1.6) years, BMI 26.9 (SEM 0.8) kg/m2) were randomised to the LSAT diet and fifteen subjects (six males/nine females; age 68.6 (SEM 1.8) years, BMI 28.1 (SEM 0.9) kg/m2) to the HSAT diet. Weight remained stable. Liver fat decreased significantly on the LSAT diet (median 2.2 (interquartile range (IQR) 3.1) to 1.7 (IQR 1.8) %, P= 0.002) but did not change on the HSAT diet (median 1.2 (IQR 4.1) to 1.6 (IQR 3.9) %). The LSAT diet lowered fasting glucose and total cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol and raised TAG (P< 0.05), while the HSAT diet had no effect on glucose or HDL-cholesterol but increased total cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol (P< 0.05). Fasting insulin and homeostasis model of insulin resistance did not change significantly on either diet, but the Matsuda index of insulin sensitivity improved on the LSAT diet (P< 0.05). Assignment to the LSAT v. HSAT diet was a predictor of changes in lipid parameters but not liver fat. We conclude that diet composition may be an important factor in the accumulation of liver fat, with a low-fat/low-saturated fat/LGI diet being beneficial. PMID:22849970

  12. Beneficial effect of a weight-stable, low-fat/low-saturated fat/low-glycaemic index diet to reduce liver fat in older subjects

    PubMed Central

    Utzschneider, Kristina M.; Bayer-Carter, Jennifer L.; Arbuckle, Matthew D.; Tidwell, Jaime M.; Richards, Todd L.; Craft, Suzanne

    2014-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is associated with insulin resistance and dyslipidaemia and can progress to steatohepatitis and cirrhosis. We sought to determine whether dietary fat and saturated fat content alter liver fat in the absence of weight change in an older population. Liver fat was quantified by magnetic resonance spectroscopy before and after 4 weeks on an isoenergetic low-fat/low-saturated fat/low-glycaemic index (LGI) (LSAT: 23% fat/7% saturated fat/GI < 55) or a high-fat/high-saturated fat/high-GI (HSAT: 43% fat/24% saturated fat/GI > 70) diet in older subjects. In the present study, twenty subjects (seven males/thirteen females; age 69·3 (sem 1·6) years, BMI 26·9 (sem 0·8) kg/m2) were randomised to the LSAT diet and fifteen subjects (six males/nine females; age 68·6 (sem 1·8) years, BMI 28·1 (sem 0·9) kg/m2) to the HSAT diet. Weight remained stable. Liver fat decreased significantly on the LSAT diet (median 2·2 (interquartile range (IQR) 3·1) to 1·7 (IQR 1·8) %, P=0·002) but did not change on the HSAT diet (median 1·2 (IQR 4·1) to 1·6 (IQR 3·9) %). The LSAT diet lowered fasting glucose and total cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol and raised TAG (P<0·05), while the HSAT diet had no effect on glucose or HDL-cholesterol but increased total cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol (P<0·05). Fasting insulin and homeostasis model of insulin resistance did not change significantly on either diet, but the Matsuda index of insulin sensitivity improved on the LSAT diet (P<0·05). Assignment to the LSAT ν. HSAT diet was a predictor of changes in lipid parameters but not liver fat. We conclude that diet composition may be an important factor in the accumulation of liver fat, with a low-fat/low-saturated fat/LGI diet being beneficial. PMID:22849970

  13. [Pulmonary melioidosis].

    PubMed

    Perret, J L; Vidal, D; Thibault, F

    1998-12-01

    Melioidosis is most frequently encountered in pulmonary localization. Melioidosis is an infectious disease caused by Burkholderia pseudomallei first described by Whitmore in 1912 in Burma. B. pseudomallei is a Gram negative rod belonging to the Pseudomonadaceae family. Soil and water are the natural reservoirs for the germ which is a specific pathogen for several mammal species. Long endemic in Southeast Asia and several tropical zones, B. pseudomallei has recently been found in temperate zones, including France. Human contamination occurs via the transcutaneous route and often leads to dormant inapparent infection. Many conditions, such as diabetes, renal lithiasis, various circumstances of immunodepression or stress, facilitate clinical manifestations which vary greatly. Pulmonary manifestations may be acute and extensive, producing a torpid pseudo-tuberculous condition or a variety of clinical and radiological features mimicking other diseases. Bacteriological and serological tests may be negative. Exposure in an endemic zone, the notion of a favorable context, weight loss, cavitary images on successive chest x-rays and the presence of extra-pulmonary localizations may be suggestive. Ceftazidime or the amoxicillin-clavulanic acid combination are indicated, but mortality in acute forms still reaches 40%. Relapse can be expected if the treatment duration is too short. PMID:10100350

  14. Hyskon-induced pulmonary edema.

    PubMed

    Mangar, D

    1993-12-01

    Hyskon (32 percent dextran-70) (Hyskon Division, Pharmacia) is used during hysteroscopy to help visualization of the uterine surfaces. Pulmonary edema of an uncertain cause has occurred in many patients. Because this study could not be conducted in humans, we determined if Hyskon caused cardiogenic or non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema in a dog model. Dogs were randomly assigned to receive an infusion of Hyskon or whole blood to sustain left ventricular end-diastolic pressure between 20 and 23 millimeters of mercury for 60 minutes. In dogs receiving blood, there was no protein in the bronchoalveolar lavage before or after blood was given. In the Hyskon group, there was no protein in the bronchoalveolar lavage before Hyskon and 0.6 +/- 1.4 milligrams per deciliter (range of 0.1 to 3.7 milligram per deciliter) after Hyskon. The ratio of bronchoalveolar lavage protein to plasma protein after Hyskon was 8.0 +/- 18.0 percent compared with zero percent in the blood group. Hyskon altered pulmonary microvascular membrane permeability, causing alveolar flooding with plasma proteins and possibly accounting for the deterioration of oxygenation and pulmonary compliance seen in patients. These results suggest a significant noncardiogenic component of Hyskon induced pulmonary edema. PMID:7505487

  15. Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    ... What Is Pulmonary Hypertension? To understand pulmonary hypertension (PH) it helps to understand how blood ows throughout ... is too high, it is called pulmonary hypertension (PH). How the pressure in the right side of ...

  16. What Causes Pulmonary Hypertension?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes Pulmonary Hypertension? Pulmonary hypertension (PH) begins with inflammation and changes in the ... different types of PH. Group 1 pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) may have no known cause, or the ...

  17. The incidence, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of fat embolism.

    PubMed

    Müller, C; Rahn, B A; Pfister, U; Meinig, R P

    1994-02-01

    Fat embolism syndrome is a potentially serious and life threatening complication of long bone trauma, blunt trauma, and intramedullary manipulation. In long bone fractures, fat embolism is encountered in 0.9% to 2.2% of cases. During intramedullary manipulations, such as prosthetic stem insertion or reaming, the incidence is typically lower (range, 0.5% to 0.8%). Diagnosis is dependent upon the clinical recognition of dyspnea, petechiae, and cognitive dysfunction in the first several days following fracture, trauma, or intramedullary surgery. Treatment consists of pulmonary support and aggressive resuscitation. Studies support early fracture fixation, but the role of systemic steroids, heparin, and other modalities remains speculative. PMID:8196970

  18. Simple pulmonary eosinophilia

    MedlinePlus

    Pulmonary infiltrates with eosinophilia; Loffler syndrome; Eosinophilic pneumonia; Pneumonia - eosinophilic ... simple pulmonary eosinophilia is a severe type of pneumonia called acute idiopathic eosinophilic pneumonia.

  19. Effects of methylprednisolone on experimental pulmonary injury.

    PubMed Central

    Cheney, F W; Huang, T H; Gronka, R

    1979-01-01

    We studied the effects of methylprednisolone on pulmonary function of unanesthetized dogs with oleic acid induced pulmonary edema observed over a four day period. Methylprednisolone (30 mg/kg) was administered to 11 dogs three and 24 hours after pulmonary injury. Eleven animals were untreated after pulmonary injury and served as controls. There was no difference between the two groups until 72 hours after injury, when the venous admixture of the steroid treated animals was 11 +/- 3% (SD) compared to 22 +/- 8% (p less than 0.001) in the untreated with respective PaO2 values of 76 +/- 6 torr and 64 +/- 8 torr (p less than 0.001). Light microscopic examination of the lungs 96 hours after injury revealed a marked proliferation of Type II pneumocytes in the methylprednisolone treated animals. We conclude that, in the oleic acid or fat embolism model of pulmonary injury, methylprednisolone significantly increases resolution of the pulmonary injury presumably by stimulation of active proliferation and maturation of Type II pneumocytes. Images Fig. 6. Fig. 7. PMID:464693

  20. Facts about monounsaturated fats

    MedlinePlus

    ... are found in plant foods, such as nuts, avocados, and vegetable oils. Eating moderate amounts of monounsaturated ( ... with higher amounts of monounsaturated fats include: Nuts Avocado Canola oil Olive oil Safflower oil (high oleic) ...

  1. Dietary fats explained

    MedlinePlus

    ... milk, ice cream, cream, and fatty meats. Some vegetable oils, such as coconut, palm, and palm kernel oil, ... fats can help lower your LDL cholesterol. Most vegetable oils that are liquid at room temperature have unsaturated ...

  2. Facts about saturated fats

    MedlinePlus

    ... at room temperature. Foods like butter, palm and coconut oils, cheese, and red meat have high amounts ... cream, cheese, whole milk) Solid fats such as coconut oil, palm, and palm kernel oils (found in ...

  3. Dietary fat overload reprograms brown fat mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Lettieri Barbato, Daniele; Tatulli, Giuseppe; Vegliante, Rolando; Cannata, Stefano M; Bernardini, Sergio; Ciriolo, Maria R; Aquilano, Katia

    2015-01-01

    Chronic nutrient overload accelerates the onset of several aging-related diseases reducing life expectancy. Although the mechanisms by which overnutrition affects metabolic processes in many tissues are known, its role on BAT physiology is still unclear. Herein, we investigated the mitochondrial responses in BAT of female mice exposed to high fat diet (HFD) at different steps of life. Although adult mice showed an unchanged mitochondrial amount, both respiration and OxPHOS subunits were strongly affected. Differently, offspring pups exposed to HFD during pregnancy and lactation displayed reduced mitochondrial mass but high oxidative efficiency that, however, resulted in increased bioenergetics state of BAT rather than augmented uncoupling respiration. Interestingly, the metabolic responses triggered by HFD were accompanied by changes in mitochondrial dynamics characterized by decreased content of the fragmentation marker Drp1 both in mothers and offspring pups. HFD-induced inactivation of the FoxO1 transcription factor seemed to be the up-stream modulator of Drp1 levels in brown fat cells. Furthermore, HFD offspring pups weaned with normal diet only partially reverted the mitochondrial dysfunctions caused by HFD. Finally these mice failed in activating the thermogenic program upon cold exposure. Collectively our findings suggest that maternal dietary fat overload irreversibly commits BAT unresponsiveness to physiological stimuli such as cool temperature and this dysfunction in the early stage of life might negatively modulate health and lifespan. PMID:26483700

  4. Dietary fat overload reprograms brown fat mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Lettieri Barbato, Daniele; Tatulli, Giuseppe; Vegliante, Rolando; Cannata, Stefano M.; Bernardini, Sergio; Ciriolo, Maria R.; Aquilano, Katia

    2015-01-01

    Chronic nutrient overload accelerates the onset of several aging-related diseases reducing life expectancy. Although the mechanisms by which overnutrition affects metabolic processes in many tissues are known, its role on BAT physiology is still unclear. Herein, we investigated the mitochondrial responses in BAT of female mice exposed to high fat diet (HFD) at different steps of life. Although adult mice showed an unchanged mitochondrial amount, both respiration and OxPHOS subunits were strongly affected. Differently, offspring pups exposed to HFD during pregnancy and lactation displayed reduced mitochondrial mass but high oxidative efficiency that, however, resulted in increased bioenergetics state of BAT rather than augmented uncoupling respiration. Interestingly, the metabolic responses triggered by HFD were accompanied by changes in mitochondrial dynamics characterized by decreased content of the fragmentation marker Drp1 both in mothers and offspring pups. HFD-induced inactivation of the FoxO1 transcription factor seemed to be the up-stream modulator of Drp1 levels in brown fat cells. Furthermore, HFD offspring pups weaned with normal diet only partially reverted the mitochondrial dysfunctions caused by HFD. Finally these mice failed in activating the thermogenic program upon cold exposure. Collectively our findings suggest that maternal dietary fat overload irreversibly commits BAT unresponsiveness to physiological stimuli such as cool temperature and this dysfunction in the early stage of life might negatively modulate health and lifespan. PMID:26483700

  5. High- and low-throughput scoring of fat mass and body fat distribution in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Wählby, Carolina; Lee-Conery, Annie; Bray, Mark-Anthony; Kamentsky, Lee; Larkins-Ford, Jonah; Sokolnicki, Katherine L.; Veneskey, Matthew; Michaels, Kerry; Carpenter, Anne E.; O’Rourke, Eyleen J.

    2014-01-01

    Fat accumulation is a complex phenotype affected by factors such as neuroendocrine signaling, feeding, activity, and reproductive output. Accordingly, the most informative screens for genes and compounds affecting fat accumulation would be those carried out in whole living animals. Caenorhabditis elegans is a well-established and effective model organism, especially for biological processes that involve organ systems and multicellular interactions, such as metabolism. Every cell in the transparent body of C. elegans is visible under a light microscope. Consequently, an accessible and reliable method to visualize worm lipid-droplet fat depots would make C. elegans the only metazoan in which genes affecting not only fat mass but also body fat distribution could be assessed at a genome-wide scale. Here we present a radical improvement in oil red O worm staining together with high-throughput image-based phenotyping. The three-step sample preparation method is robust, formaldehyde-free, and inexpensive, and requires only 15 minutes of hands-on time to process a 96-well plate. Together with our free and user-friendly automated image analysis package, this method enables C. elegans sample preparation and phenotype scoring at a scale that is compatible with genome-wide screens. Thus we present a feasible approach to small-scale phenotyping and large-scale screening for genetic and/or chemical perturbations that lead to alterations in fat quantity and distribution in whole animals. PMID:24784529

  6. Obesity and Pulmonary Function in Polio Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Han, Soo Jeong; Lim, Jae-Young

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine the correlation between obesity and pulmonary function in polio survivors. Methods This study was conducted based on a questionnaire survey and physical examination. The questionnaire included gender, age, paralyzed regions, physical activity levels, and accompanying diseases. The physical examination included measuring body mass index, waist circumference, muscle power, total fat amount, body fat percentage, and lean body mass. In addition, pulmonary function was tested based on forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1), ratio of FEV1 to FVC, and chest circumference. Five university hospitals and a local health clinic participated in this study. Results Pearson and partial correlation coefficients that used data collected from 73 polio survivors showed that obesity had a negative correlation with pulmonary function. Conclusion This study found that pulmonary function has a negative correlation with obesity for polio survivors. Therefore, it is necessary to develop specialized exercise programs to help polio survivors reduce their weight and strengthen their respiratory muscles. PMID:26798602

  7. [Pulmonary embolism].

    PubMed

    Söffker, Gerold; Kluge, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Acute pulmonary embolism is an important differential diagnosis of acute chest pain. The clinical signs are often non-specific. However, diagnosis and therapy must be done quickly in order to reduce morbidity and mortality. The new (2014) European guidelines for acute pulmonary embolism (PE) focus on risk-adapted diagnostic algorithms and prognosis adapted therapy concepts. According to the hemodynamic presentation the division in a high-risk group (unstable patient with persistent hypotension or shock) or in non-high-risk groups (hemodynamically stable) was proposed. In the high-risk group the immediate diagnosis is usually done by multidetector spiral computed tomography (MDCT) and primarily the medical therapy of right ventricular dysfunction and thrombolysis is recommended.In the non-high-risk group, this is subdivided into an intermediate-risk group and low-risk group, the diagnosis algorithm based on the PE-pretest probability--determined by validated scores. Moreover, the diagnosis is usually secured by MDCT--the new gold standard in the PE-diagnosis, scores, or it can be primarily ruled out due to the high negative predictive value of D-dimer determination. To improve the prognostic risk stratification in non-high-risk group patients the additional detection of right ventricular dysfunction (MDCT, echocardiography), cardiac biomarkers (troponin, NT proBNP) and validated scores (e.g. Pulmonary Embolism Severity Index) is recommended. Therefore, the intermediate-risk group can be further subdivided. For treatment of non-high-risk group patients, the initial anticoagulation (except those with severe renal insufficiency) using low molecular weight heparin/fondaparinux and conversion to vitamin-K antagonists or alternatively with direct oral anticoagulants (DOAK) is recommended. Hemodynamically stable patients with right ventricular dysfunction and myocardial ischemia (Intermediate-high-risk group patients) but with clinically progressive hemodynamic

  8. Metabolic effects of intra-abdominal fat in GHRKO mice

    PubMed Central

    Masternak, Michal M.; Bartke, Andrzej; Wang, Feiya; Spong, Adam; Gesing, Adam; Fang, Yimin; Salmon, Adam B.; Hughes, Larry F.; Liberati, Teresa; Boparai, Ravneet; Kopchick, John J.; Westbrook, Reyhan

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Mice with targeted deletion of the growth hormone receptor (GHRKO mice) are GH resistant, small, obese, hypoinsulinemic, highly insulin sensitive and remarkably long-lived. To elucidate the unexpected coexistence of adiposity with improved insulin sensitivity and extended longevity, we examined effects of surgical removal of visceral (epididymal and perinephric) fat on metabolic traits related to insulin signaling and longevity. Comparison of results obtained in GHRKO mice and in normal animals from the same strain revealed disparate effects of visceral fat removal (VFR) on insulin and glucose tolerance, adiponectin levels, accumulation of ectopic fat, phosphorylation of insulin signaling intermediates, body temperature and respiratory quotient (RQ). Overall, VFR produced the expected improvements in insulin sensitivity and reduced body temperature and RQ in normal mice and had opposite effects in GHRKO mice. Some of the examined parameters were altered by VFR in opposite directions in GHRKO and normal mice, others were affected in only one genotype or exhibited significant genotype × treatment interactions. Functional differences between visceral fat of GHRKO and normal mice were confirmed by measurements of adipokine secretion, lipolysis and expression of genes related to fat metabolism. We conclude that in the absence of GH signaling the secretory activity of visceral fat is profoundly altered and unexpectedly promotes enhanced insulin sensitivity. The apparent beneficial effects of visceral fat in GHRKO mice may also explain why reducing adiposity by calorie restriction fails to improve insulin signaling or further extend longevity in these animals. PMID:22040032

  9. Metabolic effects of intra-abdominal fat in GHRKO mice.

    PubMed

    Masternak, Michal M; Bartke, Andrzej; Wang, Feiya; Spong, Adam; Gesing, Adam; Fang, Yimin; Salmon, Adam B; Hughes, Larry F; Liberati, Teresa; Boparai, Ravneet; Kopchick, John J; Westbrook, Reyhan

    2012-02-01

    Mice with targeted deletion of the growth hormone receptor (GHRKO mice) are growth hormone (GH) resistant, small, obese, hypoinsulinemic, highly insulin sensitive and remarkably long-lived. To elucidate the unexpected coexistence of adiposity with improved insulin sensitivity and extended longevity, we examined effects of surgical removal of visceral (epididymal and perinephric) fat on metabolic traits related to insulin signaling and longevity. Comparison of results obtained in GHRKO mice and in normal animals from the same strain revealed disparate effects of visceral fat removal (VFR) on insulin and glucose tolerance, adiponectin levels, accumulation of ectopic fat, phosphorylation of insulin signaling intermediates, body temperature, and respiratory quotient (RQ). Overall, VFR produced the expected improvements in insulin sensitivity and reduced body temperature and RQ in normal mice and had opposite effects in GHRKO mice. Some of the examined parameters were altered by VFR in opposite directions in GHRKO and normal mice, and others were affected in only one genotype or exhibited significant genotype × treatment interactions. Functional differences between visceral fat of GHRKO and normal mice were confirmed by measurements of adipokine secretion, lipolysis, and expression of genes related to fat metabolism. We conclude that in the absence of GH signaling, the secretory activity of visceral fat is profoundly altered and unexpectedly promotes enhanced insulin sensitivity. The apparent beneficial effects of visceral fat in GHRKO mice may also explain why reducing adiposity by calorie restriction fails to improve insulin signaling or further extend longevity in these animals. PMID:22040032

  10. Pulmonary Langerhans cell Histiocytosis.

    PubMed

    Harari, S; Comel, A

    2001-10-01

    Pulmonary Langerhans cell Histiocytosis is a rare granulomatous disease affecting both sexes, with greater incidence in the second and third decades of life; smoking appears to be the most important risk factor. Its etiology is unknown, although there are data indicating an uncontrolled immune response as possible cause, sustained by the Langerhans cells, antigen presenting cells for T lymphocytes, and their accumulation in the distal bronchioles; these cells express on their surface the CD1a and CD1c antigens, and the B7 molecule, essential for activating quiescent T lymphocytes. In its evolution the granuloma is characterized by the progressive reduction in the LC number, with the increase of fibrosis, surrounding and destroying the bronchiolar lumen; the remaining of the lumen, or the traction exerted by fibrous tissue on the adjacent alveolar spaces leads to the cyst development. Vascular involvement occurs frequently, and may explain the onset of pulmonary hypertension in advanced cases of the disease. The disease may be asymptomatic, or it may present with aspecific respiratory signs and symptoms, and has characteristic radiological findings, being included in the group of cysticaerial parenchymal alterations. The diagnosis could be suggested by the finding of a number of LC in BAL greater than 5%. Different therapies have been proposed, but it seems that the most important measure is smoking cessation. PMID:11587096

  11. Effects of intravenous fat emulsion on respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Hwang, T L; Huang, S L; Chen, M F

    1990-04-01

    The effects of intravenous fat emulsion on ventilated normal, diseased or distressed lungs were studied. Forty-eight patients with different types of respiratory failure were divided into four groups. Group A was composed of the patients with a normal lung condition; group B, patients with infectious pulmonary condition and respiratory failure; group C, patients with COPD and respiratory failure; and, group D was composed of the patients with ARDS due to various causes. Five hundred milliliters of 10 percent fat emulsion was infused within 4 h as partial parenteral nutritional support. We concluded that intravenous fat infusion decreased PaO2/FIO2 and increased P(A-a)O2 and intrapulmonary shunt in the patients with ARDS, while it had little effect on the patients with infectious pulmonary disease or COPD. The infusion of fat emulsion had positive effects on the patients with normal lung condition with increased PaO2/FIO2 and decreased P(A-a)O2 and shunt. PMID:2108849

  12. Pulmonary actinomycosis.

    PubMed

    Celebi, Solmaz; Sevinir, Betul; Saraydaroglu, Ozlem; Gurpinar, Arif; Hacimustafaoglu, Mustafa

    2009-02-01

    Pulmonary actinomycosis is rarely reported in pediatric age. An 11-year-old girl with history of two-month back pain was admitted to our hospital. On physical examination respiratory sounds were diminished on the left upper lung. Chest radiograph revealed a mass in the left upper lobe. Computed tomography showed solitary lesion (5.6 x 4.5 cm in size) in the left upper lobe. We could not rule out the possibility of malignant thoracic tumor. The patient underwent surgery. Histological examination of the resected tissue revealed, numerous sulfur granules, characteristic of Actinomyces, surrounded by purulent exudates, which are consistent with actinomycosis. She was treated with penicillin G. The patient responded well to penicillin therapy and the lesions regressed completely. She remained well throughout the three-year follow-up. PMID:19129990

  13. Pulmonary embolism

    PubMed Central

    Tarbox, Abigail K.; Swaroop, Mamta

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary embolism (PE) is responsible for approximately 100,000 to 200,000 deaths in the United States each year. With a diverse range of clinical presentations from asymptomatic to death, diagnosing PE can be challenging. Various resources are available, such as clinical scoring systems, laboratory data, and imaging studies which help guide clinicians in their work-up of PE. Prompt recognition and treatment are essential for minimizing the mortality and morbidity associated with PE. Advances in recognition and treatment have also enabled treatment of some patients in the home setting and limited the amount of time spent in the hospital. This article will review the risk factors, pathophysiology, clinical presentation, evaluation, and treatment of PE. PMID:23724389

  14. Pulmonary kinematics from image data: a review.

    PubMed

    Tustison, Nicholas J; Cook, Tessa S; Song, Gang; Gee, James C

    2011-04-01

    The effects of certain lung pathologies include alterations in lung physiology negatively affecting pulmonary compliance. Current approaches to diagnosis and treatment assessment of lung disease commonly rely on pulmonary function testing. Such testing is limited to global measures of lung function, neglecting regional measurements, which are critical for early diagnosis and localization of disease. Increased accessibility to medical image acquisition strategies with high spatiotemporal resolution coupled with the development of sophisticated intensity-based and geometric registration techniques has resulted in the recent exploration of modeling pulmonary motion for calculating local measures of deformation. In this review, the authors provide a broad overview of such research efforts for the estimation of pulmonary deformation. This includes discussion of various techniques, current trends in validation approaches, and the public availability of software and data resources. PMID:21377592

  15. Fat embolism syndrome.

    PubMed

    Taviloglu, Korhan; Yanar, Hakan

    2007-01-01

    Fat embolism syndrome (FES) was first described in 1862, but its frequency today is still unclear. A diagnosis of FES is often missed because of a subclinical illness or coexisting confusing injuries or disease. Fat embolism syndrome develops most commonly after orthopedic injuries, but it has also been reported after other forms of trauma such as severe burns, liver injury, closed-chest cardiac massage, bone marrow transplantation, and liposuction. Although FES usually presents as a multisystem disorder, the most seriously affected organs are the lung, brain, cardiovascular system, and skin. Fat embolism syndrome is a self-limiting disease and treatment should be mainly supportive. Many drugs have been used to treat FES, but the results are inconclusive. PMID:17186337

  16. Fat chance for longevity

    PubMed Central

    Kniazeva, Marina; Han, Min

    2013-01-01

    The health benefits of specific fatty acids and physiological roles of fat metabolism are important subjects that are still poorly understood. In this issue of Genes & Development, O'Rourke and colleagues (pp. 429–440) uncovered a role for lipase-generated ω-6 fatty acids in promoting autophagy and, consequently, life span extension under both fed and fasting conditions. The impact of this finding is discussed with regard to the nutritional value of ω-6 fatty acids and regulatory functions of fat metabolism beyond its well-known role in energy storage. PMID:23431052

  17. Pulmonary rehabilitation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Saey, D; Bernard, S; Gagnon, P; Laviolette, L; Soicher, J; Maltais, F; Esgagne, P; Coats, V; Devost, A-A

    2009-06-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide and an important worldwide cause of disability and handicap. Centered around exercise training, pulmonary rehabilitation is a global, multidisciplinary, individualized and comprehensive approach acting on the patient as a whole and not only on the pulmonary component of the disease. Pulmonary rehabilitation is now well recognized as an effective and key intervention in the management of several respiratory diseases particularly in COPD. Modern and effective pulmonary rehabilitation programs are global, multidisciplinary, individualized and use comprehensive approach acting on the patient as a whole and not only on the pulmonary component of the disease. In the last two decades interest for pulmonary rehabilitation is on the rise and a growing literature including several guidelines is now available. This review addresses the recent developments in the broad area of pulmonary rehabilitation as well as new methods to consider in the development of future and better programs. Modern literature for rationale, physiopathological basis, structure, exercise training as well challenges for pulmonary rehabilitation programs are addressed. Among the main challenges of pulmonary rehabilitation, efforts have to be devoted to improve accessibility to early rehabilitation strategies, not only to patients with COPD but to those with other chronic respiratory diseases. PMID:19776711

  18. Estimation of body fat from skinfold thickness.

    PubMed

    Aboul-Seoud, M A; Aboul-Seoud, A L

    2001-06-01

    The fat content of the human body has physiological and medical importance. It may influence morbidity and mortality, it may affect the ability to withstand exposure to cold and starvation, and it may alter the effectiveness of drugs and anaesthetics. It may also be the cause of reduced insulin sensitivity in some population groups. Thus, the measurement of the total body fat provides useful information. A computer program, written in quick basic language, was developed, to compute the equivalent fat content, as a percentage of body-weight, for a range of values for the sum of the four skinfolds, of Egyptian males and females of different ages. This is based on a table developed by Durnin and Womersley. The computer program was run using skinfolds of Egyptian males and females of different ages. Satisfactory results were obtained. This program can be used to calculate the total body fat with relative ease and reasonable accuracy. This should make it of common use in many fields of medicine, physiology, nutrition and anthropology, particularly in population studies comprising a large number of subjects. PMID:11339982

  19. Trans Fat Now Listed With Saturated Fat and Cholesterol

    MedlinePlus

    ... you are not seeing trans fat on a product's label. First, products entering interstate commerce on or after ... already begun to declare trans fat on their products' labels. Second, FDA has granted enforcement discretion to some ...

  20. Pulmonary hypertension complicating pulmonary sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Huitema, M P; Grutters, J C; Rensing, B J W M; Reesink, H J; Post, M C

    2016-06-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a severe complication of sarcoidosis, with an unknown prevalence. The aetiology is multifactorial, and the exact mechanism of PH in the individual patient is often difficult to establish. The diagnostic work-up and treatment of PH in sarcoidosis is complex, and should therefore be determined by a multidisciplinary expert team in a specialised centre. It is still a major challenge to identify sarcoidosis patients at risk for developing PH. There is no validated algorithm when to refer a patient suspected for PH, and PH analysis itself is difficult. Until present, there is no established therapy for PH in sarcoidosis. Besides optimal treatment for sarcoidosis, case series evaluating new therapeutic options involving PH-targeted therapy are arising for a subgroup of patients. This review summarises the current knowledge regarding the aetiology, diagnosis and possible treatment options for PH in sarcoidosis. PMID:27194118

  1. Depot-Specific Changes in Fat Metabolism with Aging in a Type 2 Diabetic Animal Model

    PubMed Central

    Park, Se Eun; Choi, Jung Mook; Chang, Eugene; Rhee, Eun-Jung; Lee, Won-Young; Oh, Ki Won; Park, Sung Woo; Kang, Eun Seok; Lee, Hyun Chul

    2016-01-01

    Visceral fat accretion is a hallmark of aging and is associated with aging-induced metabolic dysfunction. PPARγ agonist was reported to improve insulin sensitivity by redistributing fat from visceral fat to subcutaneous fat. The purpose of this study was to investigate the underlying mechanisms by which aging affects adipose tissue remodeling in a type 2 diabetic animal model and through which PPARγ activation modulates aging-related fat tissue distribution. At the ages of 21, 31 and 43 weeks, OLETF rats as an animal model of type 2 diabetes were evaluated for aging-related effects on adipose tissue metabolism in subcutaneous and visceral fat depots. During aging, the ratio of visceral fat weight to subcutaneous fat weight (V/S ratio) increased. Aging significantly increased the mRNA expression of genes involved in lipogenesis such as lipoprotein lipase, fatty acid binding protein aP2, lipin 1, and diacylglycerol acyltransferase 1, which were more prominent in visceral fat than subcutaneous fat. The mRNA expression of adipose triglyceride lipase, which is involved in basal lipolysis and fatty acid recycling, was also increased, more in visceral fat compared to subcutaneous fat during aging. The mRNA levels of the genes associated with lipid oxidation were increased, whereas the mRNA levels of genes associated with energy expenditure showed no significant change during aging. PPARγ agonist treatment in OLETF rats resulted in fat redistribution with a decreasing V/S ratio and improved glucose intolerance. The genes involved in lipogenesis decreased in visceral fat of the PPARγ agonist-treated rats. During aging, fat distribution was changed by stimulating lipid uptake and esterification in visceral fat rather than subcutaneous fat, and by altering the lipid oxidation. PMID:26894429

  2. Depot-Specific Changes in Fat Metabolism with Aging in a Type 2 Diabetic Animal Model.

    PubMed

    Park, Se Eun; Park, Cheol-Young; Choi, Jung Mook; Chang, Eugene; Rhee, Eun-Jung; Lee, Won-Young; Oh, Ki Won; Park, Sung Woo; Kang, Eun Seok; Lee, Hyun Chul; Cha, Bong Soo

    2016-01-01

    Visceral fat accretion is a hallmark of aging and is associated with aging-induced metabolic dysfunction. PPARγ agonist was reported to improve insulin sensitivity by redistributing fat from visceral fat to subcutaneous fat. The purpose of this study was to investigate the underlying mechanisms by which aging affects adipose tissue remodeling in a type 2 diabetic animal model and through which PPARγ activation modulates aging-related fat tissue distribution. At the ages of 21, 31 and 43 weeks, OLETF rats as an animal model of type 2 diabetes were evaluated for aging-related effects on adipose tissue metabolism in subcutaneous and visceral fat depots. During aging, the ratio of visceral fat weight to subcutaneous fat weight (V/S ratio) increased. Aging significantly increased the mRNA expression of genes involved in lipogenesis such as lipoprotein lipase, fatty acid binding protein aP2, lipin 1, and diacylglycerol acyltransferase 1, which were more prominent in visceral fat than subcutaneous fat. The mRNA expression of adipose triglyceride lipase, which is involved in basal lipolysis and fatty acid recycling, was also increased, more in visceral fat compared to subcutaneous fat during aging. The mRNA levels of the genes associated with lipid oxidation were increased, whereas the mRNA levels of genes associated with energy expenditure showed no significant change during aging. PPARγ agonist treatment in OLETF rats resulted in fat redistribution with a decreasing V/S ratio and improved glucose intolerance. The genes involved in lipogenesis decreased in visceral fat of the PPARγ agonist-treated rats. During aging, fat distribution was changed by stimulating lipid uptake and esterification in visceral fat rather than subcutaneous fat, and by altering the lipid oxidation. PMID:26894429

  3. [Fat overload syndrome].

    PubMed

    Picon, J; Carsin, A; Baravalle-Einaudi, M; Coste, M-E; Wasier, A-P; Stremler-Le Bel, N; Bosdure, E; Dubus, J-C

    2016-08-01

    We report the case of a 21-month-old child suffering from pulmonary fibrosis, who presented with acute respiratory distress and liver damage, due to an accidental overdose of intravenous lipid emulsion. This poisoning is a rare entity, whose potential severity and almost exclusive iatrogenic effect deserve to be remembered. PMID:27369104

  4. Exercise and Fat Reduction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, H. Harrison, Ed.

    1975-01-01

    This document analyzes the problems encountered by the obese individual and the effects of regular exercise on weight loss and fat reduction. Part one compares the psychological traits of obese children with age groups of normal weight and discusses the organic disorders and social attitudes which plague the overweight individual. Part two states…

  5. Bone marrow fat.

    PubMed

    Hardouin, Pierre; Pansini, Vittorio; Cortet, Bernard

    2014-07-01

    Bone marrow fat (BMF) results from an accumulation of fat cells within the bone marrow. Fat is not a simple filling tissue but is now considered as an actor within bone microenvironment. BMF is not comparable to other fat depots, as in subcutaneous or visceral tissues. Recent studies on bone marrow adipocytes have shown that they do not appear only as storage cells, but also as cells secreting adipokines, like leptin and adiponectin. Moreover bone marrow adipocytes share the same precursor with osteoblasts, the mesenchymal stem cell. It is now well established that high BMF is associated with weak bone mass in osteoporosis, especially during aging and anorexia nervosa. But numerous questions remain discussed: what is the precise phenotype of bone marrow adipocytes? What is the real function of BMF, and how does bone marrow adipocyte act on its environment? Is the increase of BMF during osteoporosis responsible for bone loss? Is BMF involved in other diseases? How to measure BMF in humans? A better understanding of BMF could allow to obtain new diagnostic tools for osteoporosis management, and could open major therapeutic perspectives. PMID:24703396

  6. That Fat Cat

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambert, Phyllis Gilchrist

    2012-01-01

    This activity began with a picture book, Nurit Karlin's "Fat Cat On a Mat" (HarperCollins; 1998). The author and her students started their project with a 5-inch circular template for the head of their cats. They reviewed shapes as they drew the head and then added the ears and nose, which were triangles. Details to the face were added when…

  7. Subcutaneous encapsulated fat necrosis.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Dogu; Berg, Jais O

    2016-04-01

    We have described subcutaneous encapsulated fat necrosis, which is benign, usually asymptomatic and underreported. Images have only been published on two earlier occasions, in which the necrotic nodules appear "pearly" than the cloudy yellow surface in present case. The presented image may help future surgeons to establish the diagnosis peroperatively. PMID:27099753

  8. [Idiopathic pulmonary trunk aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Uehara, Mayuko; Kuroda, Yosuke; Ohori, Syunsuke; Mawatari, Toru; Morishita, Kiyofumi

    2010-07-01

    Pulmonary trunk aneurysm is generally associated with congenital cardiac defects, pulmonary hypertension, or infection. Idiopathic pulmonary trunk aneurysm without any associated diseases is a rare lesion and has seldom been reported. Here, we report a case of a 68-year-old woman with idiopathic pulmonary trunk aneurysm. The maximum diameter of the aneurysm was 53 mm while she was 142 cm in height. We successfully performed aneurysmorrhaphy and her postoperative course was uneventful. Aneurysmorrhaphy was an effective technique for idiopathic pulmonary trunk aneurysm without pulmonary hypertention. PMID:20662238

  9. Pentobarbital anesthesia modifies pulmonary vasoregulation after hypoperfusion.

    PubMed

    Chen, B B; Nyhan, D P; Goll, H M; Clougherty, P W; Fehr, D M; Murray, P A

    1988-09-01

    Our objectives were 1) to investigate the extent to which the pulmonary vascular response to increasing cardiac index after a period of hypotension and hypoperfusion (defined as reperfusion) measured in conscious dogs is altered during pentobarbital sodium anesthesia, and 2) to determine whether pentobarbital anesthesia modifies autonomic nervous system (ANS) regulation of the pulmonary circulation during reperfusion. Base-line and reperfusion pulmonary vascular pressure-cardiac index (P/Q) plots were generated by stepwise inflation and deflation, respectively, of an inferior vena caval occluder to vary Q in conscious and pentobarbital-anesthetized (30 mg/kg iv) dogs. During pentobarbital anesthesia, controlled ventilation (without positive end-expiratory pressure) allowed matching of systemic arterial and mixed venous blood gases to conscious values. Marked pulmonary vasoconstriction (P less than 0.01) was observed during reperfusion in pentobarbital-anesthetized but not in conscious dogs. Both sympathetic alpha-adrenergic receptor block and total ANS ganglionic block attenuated, but did not abolish, the pulmonary vasoconstriction during reperfusion in pentobarbital-anesthetized dogs. Neither sympathetic beta-adrenergic receptor block nor cholinergic receptor block enhanced the magnitude of the pulmonary vasoconstrictor response to reperfusion during pentobarbital anesthesia. Thus, in contrast to the conscious state, the pulmonary vascular response to reperfusion is characterized by active, non-flow-dependent pulmonary vasoconstriction during pentobarbital anesthesia. This response is primarily, but not exclusively, mediated by sympathetic alpha-adrenergic vasoconstriction and is not offset by either sympathetic beta-adrenergic or cholinergic vasodilation. These results indicate, that, compared with the conscious state, pentobarbital anesthesia modifies pulmonary vasoregulation, during reperfusion following hypotension and hypoperfusion.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250

  10. A Matter of Fat.

    PubMed

    Calder, Philip C

    2015-09-01

    Acute respiratory disease syndrome (ARDS) is a common complication of critical illness, associated with significant morbidity, prolonged intensive care unit (ICU) and hospital stay, and increased mortality. Inflammation plays a central role in ARDS, with inflammatory eicosanoid mediators produced from the ω-6 fatty acid arachidonic acid, such as leukotriene B4, being involved. The ω-3 fatty acids found in fish oil exert anti-inflammatory effects, including decreasing production of inflammatory eicosanoids from arachidonic acid. The ω-3 fatty acids are effective in models relevant to ARDS. Several randomized controlled trials of enteral formulas rich in ω-3 fatty acids, often in combination with other bioactive substances, have been conducted in patients with ARDS. Four of these trials reported marked clinical benefits, 2 reported no effect, and 1 reported a negative impact. A systematic review and meta-analysis of these 7 trials identified no overall effect on ventilator-free days or on ICU-free days. There was a small reduction in ICU length of stay and no overall effect on mortality. However, the authors formally identified that trials that used high fat in both treatment and control groups showed a significant reduction in mortality, while trials that used a high, or higher, fat treatment and a low-fat control group showed a trend toward an increase in mortality. It is concluded that differences in outcome reported among these studies largely relate to the relative fat contents of the treatment and control formulas. Further, it is concluded that high-fat enteral formulas should not be used in this patient group. PMID:25533963

  11. Pulmonary endarterectomy after pulmonary infectious embolisms

    PubMed Central

    Heiberg, Johan; Ilkjær, Lars B.

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary endarterectomy (PEA) is a well-established procedure in the treatment of chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTPH). The procedure is known to increase functional outcome and to raise the 5-year survival rate. We report 2 cases of pulmonary valve endocarditis and secondary embolisms causing sustained pulmonary hypertension. Both were treated with PEA. In none of the cases, a cleavage between the thrombotic masses and the vessel wall was obtainable, and both attempts were therefore inadequate. Based on our reports, we recommend not attempting PEA in cases of CTPH after infectious embolisms. PMID:23248168

  12. [Effects on the pulmonary function after single dose of exogenous pulmonary surfactant in children with acute respiratory distress syndrome].

    PubMed

    de Carvalho, W B; Mângia, C M

    1997-01-01

    The Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) is a pulmonary lesion of multifactorial cause in which the surfactant system is altered owing to inactivation and impairment of composition and metabolism. The use of exogenous pulmonary surfactant is a therapeutic option with the objective to maintain alveolar stability thus improving the pulmonary compliance (increasing the residual functional capacity), oxygenation and ventilatory mechanics. A study carried out on two pediatric patients with ARDS submitted to mechanic pulmonary ventilation, applying a single dose of exogenous pulmonary surfactant is described. The patients were evaluated using arterial and venous gasometry before and after the use of surfactant, observing increment in oxygenation, reduction of shunt fraction, improvement in ventilation immediately after exogenous pulmonary surfactant instillation and return to the previous situation after 240 minutes in case 1 and 120 minutes in case 2. More prospective clinical and randomized studies are needed to effectively evaluate this therapeutic modality. PMID:9336050

  13. Cocaine's appetite for fat and the consequences on body weight.

    PubMed

    Billing, Lawrence; Ersche, Karen D

    2015-03-01

    For many individuals in treatment for cocaine dependence, weight gain is a substantial problem during recovery. This weight gain causes significant distress and seems to increase the risk of relapse. The mechanisms underlying cocaine's effects on weight remain elusive. It is widely assumed that this weight gain reflects a metabolic or behavioural compensatory response to the cessation of cocaine use. Here we challenge this assumption and outline potential mechanisms by which chronic cocaine use produces disturbances in the regulation of fat intake and storage, through its effects on the central and peripheral nervous systems, specifically the sympathetic nervous system. We hypothesize that the cocaine-induced alteration in fat regulation results in cocaine users developing a pronounced appetite for fatty food but keeps their fat mass low. This altered fat appetite subsequently leads to excessive weight gain when individuals enter treatment and stop using cocaine. Our aim is to shed light on the neurobiological mechanisms that may underlie the alterations in eating and fat regulation in cocaine-dependent individuals, to open up potential new avenues to support these individuals in recovery. PMID:25321424

  14. Protect Your Heart: Choose Healthy Fats

    MedlinePlus

    Toolkit No. 9 Protect Your Heart: Choose Healthy Fats Why should I choose healthy fats? Diabetes raises your chances of having a heart ... protect your heart and blood vessels by choosing fats wisely. Some kinds of fat, such as butter ...

  15. Maternal obesity and post-natal high fat diet disrupt hepatic circadian rhythm in rat offspring

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Offspring of obese (Ob) rat dams gain greater body wt and fat mass when fed high-fat diet (HFD) as compared to controls. Alterations of diurnal circadian rhythm are known to detrimentally impact metabolically active tissues such as liver. We sought to determine if maternal obesity (MOb) leads to p...

  16. Evidence and Mechanisms of Fat Depletion in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ebadi, Maryam; Mazurak, Vera C.

    2014-01-01

    The majority of cancer patients experience wasting characterized by muscle loss with or without fat loss. In human and animal models of cancer, body composition assessment and morphological analysis reveals adipose atrophy and presence of smaller adipocytes. Fat loss is associated with reduced quality of life in cancer patients and shorter survival independent of body mass index. Fat loss occurs in both visceral and subcutaneous depots; however, the pattern of loss has been incompletely characterized. Increased lipolysis and fat oxidation, decreased lipogenesis, impaired lipid depositionand adipogenesis, as well as browning of white adipose tissue may underlie adipose atrophy in cancer. Inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), and interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) produced by the tumor or adipose tissue may also contribute to adipose depletion. Identifying the mechanisms and time course of fat mass changes in cancer may help identify individuals at risk of adipose depletion and define interventions to circumvent wasting. This review outlines current knowledge of fat mass in cancer and illustrates the need for further studies to assess alterations in visceral and subcutaneous adipose depots and possible mechanisms for loss of fat during cancer progression. PMID:25415607

  17. Pulmonary arteriovenous fistula

    MedlinePlus

    Pulmonary arteriovenous fistula is an abnormal connection between an artery and vein in the lungs. As a result, blood passes ... Pulmonary arteriovenous fistulas are usually the result of abnormal development of the blood vessels of the lung. Most occur in ...

  18. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000091.htm Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a common lung disease. Having COPD ...

  19. Who Needs Pulmonary Rehabilitation?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topics Bronchitis COPD Cystic Fibrosis Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis Sarcoidosis Send a link to NHLBI to someone by ... other symptoms. Examples of interstitial lung diseases include sarcoidosis and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis . Cystic fibrosis (CF). CF ...

  20. Familial Pulmonary Fibrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... are here: Health Information > Condition Information Familial Pulmonary Fibrosis: Overview When two or more members within the ... Associate Professor View full profile More Familial Pulmonary Fibrosis Information Forms Causes Genetic Counseling Print Page Email ...

  1. Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis? Pulmonary fibrosis (PULL-mun-ary fi-BRO-sis) is a ... time. The formation of scar tissue is called fibrosis. As the lung tissue thickens, your lungs can' ...

  2. Absent pulmonary valve

    MedlinePlus

    ... can occur with absent pulmonary valve include: Abnormal tricuspid valve Atrial septal defect Double outlet right ventricle Ductus arteriosis Endocardial cushion defect Marfan syndrome Tricuspid atresia Heart problems that occur with absent pulmonary ...

  3. Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome (HPS)

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: About CDC.gov . Hantavirus Share Compartir Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome (HPS) Severe HPS. Image courtesy D. ... the workers showed evidence of infection or illness. Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome (HPS) Topics Transmission Where HPS is ...

  4. Pulmonary arteriovenous fistula

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001090.htm Pulmonary arteriovenous fistula To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Pulmonary arteriovenous fistula is an abnormal connection between an artery and ...

  5. Absent pulmonary valve

    MedlinePlus

    ... absent pulmonary valve syndrome associated with bronchial obstruction. Ann Thoracic Surg. 2006;82:2221-2226. PMID: 17126138 ... of airway compression in absent pulmonary valve syndrome. Ann Thorac Surg . 2006;81:1802-1807. PMID: 16631676 ...

  6. Assessment of Airway Resistance in Normal Trained and Fat Untrained Adolescent Boys Influenced by Exercise Experiences

    PubMed Central

    Ghanbarzadeh, Mohsen; Habibi, Abdolhamid; Shakeriyan, Said

    2013-01-01

    Background Overweight and obese children are at increased risk of a wide range of health conditions including respiratory diseases. In addition, inactivity can decrease pulmonary function. This study assessed the effect of obesity and inactivity on pulmonary function impairment in adolescents. Materials and Methods This study was conducted on 80 adolescents. Subjects were divided into two groups. Group I included 40 untrained (VO2max= 29.30±4.20) fat adolescents (UO). Group II included 40 healthy trained (VO2max= 58.11±2.23) normal weight adolescents (TN). Body mass index (BMI), body fat percentage and waist to hip ratio (WHR) were calculated and pulmonary function tests were carried out according to the standard protocols. Data were analyzed using student's “t” test and Pearson's correlation coefficient. Results UO had significantly lower pulmonary function values than the TN group. They also showed lower FEV1/FVC ratio when compared to TN group (P < 0.05). In UO group, BMI, body fat percentage and WHR had a significant negative correlation with pulmonary function whereas in TN group only BMI had significant negative correlation with pulmonary function. A significant decrease in FEV1 was observed in the two groups, which led to a decrease in FEV1/FVC% after the exercise compared to before. Thus, exercise test induced airway resistance in both groups. Conclusion untrained obese adolescents have more respiratory symptoms than their normal weight trained peers, and these factors are recommended to be used as a predictor of pulmonary function in assessment of obese children in epidemiological studies. In addition, obesity and inactivity can surcharge pulmonary function abnormalities in adolescents. PMID:25191449

  7. Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, Caroline; Montani, David; Savale, Laurent; Sitbon, Olivier; Parent, Florence; Seferian, Andrei; Bulifon, Sophie; Fadel, Elie; Mercier, Olaf; Mussot, Sacha; Fabre, Dominique; Dartevelle, Philippe; Humbert, Marc; Simonneau, Gérald; Jaïs, Xavier

    2015-12-01

    Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) is a form of pulmonary hypertension (PH) characterized by the persistence of thromboembolic obstructing the pulmonary arteries as an organized tissue and the presence of a variable small vessel arteriopathy. The consequence is an increase in pulmonary vascular resistance resulting in progressive right heart failure. CTEPH is classified as group IV pulmonary hypertension according to the WHO classification of pulmonary hypertension. CTEPH is defined as precapillary pulmonary hypertension (mean pulmonary artery pressure ≥ 25 mmHg with a pulmonary capillary wedge pressure ≤ 15 mmHg) associated with mismatched perfusion defects on ventilation-perfusion lung scan and signs of chronic thromboembolic disease on computed tomography pulmonary angiogram and/or conventional pulmonary angiography, in a patient who received at least 3 months of therapeutic anticoagulation. CTEPH as a direct consequence of symptomatic pulmonary embolism (PE) is rare, and a significant number of CTEPH cases develop in the absence of history of PE. Thus, CTEPH should be considered in any patient with unexplained PH. Splenectomy, chronic inflammatory conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease, indwelling catheters and cardiac pacemakers have been identified as associated conditions increasing the risk of CTEPH. Ventilation-perfusion scan (V/Q) is the best test available for establishing the thromboembolic nature of PH. When CTEPH is suspected, patients should be referred to expert centres where pulmonary angiography, right heart catheterization and high-resolution CT scan will be performed to confirm the diagnosis and to assess the operability. Pulmonary endarterectomy (PEA) remains the gold standard treatment for CTEPH when organized thrombi involve the main, lobar or segmental arteries. This operation should only be performed by experienced surgeons in specialized centres. For inoperable patients, current ESC/ERS guidelines for the

  8. Arrhythmias in pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Rajdev, Archana; Garan, Hasan; Biviano, Angelo

    2012-01-01

    Cardiac arrhythmias are important contributors to morbidity and mortality in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Such patients manifest a substrate resulting from altered autonomics, repolarization abnormalities, and ischemia. Supraventricular arrhythmias such as atrial fibrillation and flutter are associated with worsened outcomes, and maintenance of sinus rhythm is a goal. Sudden death is a relatively common issue, though the contribution of malignant ventricular arrhythmias versus bradyarrhythmias differs from non-PAH patients. Congenital heart disease patients with PAH benefit from catheter ablation of medically refractory arrhythmias. Clinical studies of defibrillator/pacemaker therapy for primary prevention against sudden death in PAH patients are lacking. PMID:23009914

  9. Arrhythmias in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Rajdev, Archana; Garan, Hasan; Biviano, Angelo

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac arrhythmias are important contributors to morbidity and mortality in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Such patients manifest a substrate resulting from altered autonomics, repolarization abnormalities, and ischemia. Supraventricular arrhythmias such as atrial fibrillation and flutter are associated with worsened outcomes, and maintenance of sinus rhythm is a goal. Sudden death is a relatively common issue, though the contribution of malignant ventricular arrhythmias versus bradyarrhythmias differs from non-PAH patients. Congenital heart disease patients with PAH benefit from catheter ablation of medically refractory arrhythmias. Clinical studies of defibrillator/pacemaker therapy for primary prevention against sudden death in PAH patients are lacking. PMID:23009914

  10. Alveolar epithelial disintegrity in pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Tejaswini; de Andrade, Joao; Zhou, Yong; Luckhardt, Tracy; Thannickal, Victor J

    2016-08-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a chronic lung disease characterized by progressive decline in lung function, resulting in significant morbidity and mortality. Current concepts of the pathogenesis of IPF primarily center on dysregulated epithelial cell repair and altered epithelial-mesenchymal communication and extracellular matrix deposition following chronic exposure to cigarette smoke or environmental toxins. In recent years, increasing attention has been directed toward the role of the intercellular junctional complex in determining the specific properties of epithelia in pulmonary diseases. Additionally, recent genomewide association studies suggest that specific genetic variants predictive of epithelial cell dysfunction may confer susceptibility to the development of sporadic idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. A number of genetic disorders linked to pulmonary fibrosis and familial interstitial pneumonias are associated with loss of epithelial integrity. However, the potential links between extrapulmonary clinical syndromes associated with defects in epithelial cells and the development of pulmonary fibrosis are not well understood. Here, we report a case of hereditary mucoepithelial dysplasia that presented with pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema on high-resolution computed tomography. This case illustrates a more generalizable concept of epithelial disintegrity in the development of fibrotic lung diseases, which is explored in greater detail in this review article. PMID:27233996

  11. [Spuriously healthy plant fats].

    PubMed

    Cichosz, Grazyna; Czeczot, Hanna

    2011-10-01

    Since long plant fats are considered by nutritionists, dieticians and doctors, as main source of essential unsaturated fatty acids) n-6 and n-3 in human diet. On the market there is plenty of oils that can be consumed directly or used to frying. Last four decades consumption of oils increased several times due to stimulated by advertisement popularization of their pro-health activity. Plant oils supply mostly multi unsaturated fatty acids n-6 excess of which disadvantageously influence human health. Determinations of changes of oxidative stability of plant fats (during processing and storage) proved that consumption of oxidation products of fatty acids and sterols may be a reason of various diseases. Both epidemiologic and clinic studies indicated that if plant fats (both oils except this from olives and margarines) have possessed pro-health properties, their several times increased consumption would liquidate the problem of arteriosclerosis and its clinical complications (heart attack, stroke). For the present, every second death in the industrial countries results from the cardiovascular disease. Morbidity of cancer is also increasing and of neurological and neurodegenerative diseases is growing up vigorously. PMID:22097183

  12. Get the fat out!

    PubMed

    Ignatenko, Natalia A; Gerner, Eugene W

    2013-03-01

    Obesity is associated with increased risk of a number of cancers in humans, but the mechanism(s) responsible for these associations have not been established. It is estimated that 68% of adults are overweight or obese and that obesity may be causative in 4% to 7% of cancers in the United States. Several hypotheses have been put forward to explain the association between obesity and cancer including adipose-directed signaling (e.g., mTOR, AMPK), production of factors (e.g., insulin growth factor 1, fibroblast growth factor 1, and/or chronic inflammation associated with obesity. Huffman and colleagues used surgical methods to determine if visceral fat was causally related to intestinal tumorigenesis in the Apc(1638/N+) mouse in a manner independent of confounding factors such as caloric restriction. They found that caloric restriction could extend survival in both male and female Apc(1638/N+) mice but found that surgical removal of visceral fat was only effective in reducing macroadenomas in females. The results of this study do not identify the specific mechanism of association between visceral fat and intestinal carcinogenesis in female mice but do support the rationale for future cancer prevention trials that evaluate pharmacologic and behavioral strategies to reduce abdominal obesity in humans. Cancer Prev Res; 6(3); 161-4. ©2013 AACR. PMID:23466814

  13. Fat Quality Influences the Obesogenic Effect of High Fat Diets.

    PubMed

    Crescenzo, Raffaella; Bianco, Francesca; Mazzoli, Arianna; Giacco, Antonia; Cancelliere, Rosa; di Fabio, Giovanni; Zarrelli, Armando; Liverini, Giovanna; Iossa, Susanna

    2015-11-01

    High fat and/or carbohydrate intake are associated with an elevated risk for obesity and chronic diseases such as diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. The harmful effects of a high fat diet could be different, depending on dietary fat quality. In fact, high fat diets rich in unsaturated fatty acids are considered less deleterious for human health than those rich in saturated fat. In our previous studies, we have shown that rats fed a high fat diet developed obesity and exhibited a decrease in oxidative capacity and an increase in oxidative stress in liver mitochondria. To investigate whether polyunsaturated fats could attenuate the above deleterious effects of high fat diets, energy balance and body composition were assessed after two weeks in rats fed isocaloric amounts of a high-fat diet (58.2% by energy) rich either in lard or safflower/linseed oil. Hepatic functionality, plasma parameters, and oxidative status were also measured. The results show that feeding on safflower/linseed oil diet attenuates the obesogenic effect of high fat diets and ameliorates the blood lipid profile. Conversely, hepatic steatosis and mitochondrial oxidative stress appear to be negatively affected by a diet rich in unsaturated fatty acids. PMID:26580650

  14. Fat Quality Influences the Obesogenic Effect of High Fat Diets

    PubMed Central

    Crescenzo, Raffaella; Bianco, Francesca; Mazzoli, Arianna; Giacco, Antonia; Cancelliere, Rosa; di Fabio, Giovanni; Zarrelli, Armando; Liverini, Giovanna; Iossa, Susanna

    2015-01-01

    High fat and/or carbohydrate intake are associated with an elevated risk for obesity and chronic diseases such as diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. The harmful effects of a high fat diet could be different, depending on dietary fat quality. In fact, high fat diets rich in unsaturated fatty acids are considered less deleterious for human health than those rich in saturated fat. In our previous studies, we have shown that rats fed a high fat diet developed obesity and exhibited a decrease in oxidative capacity and an increase in oxidative stress in liver mitochondria. To investigate whether polyunsaturated fats could attenuate the above deleterious effects of high fat diets, energy balance and body composition were assessed after two weeks in rats fed isocaloric amounts of a high-fat diet (58.2% by energy) rich either in lard or safflower/linseed oil. Hepatic functionality, plasma parameters, and oxidative status were also measured. The results show that feeding on safflower/linseed oil diet attenuates the obesogenic effect of high fat diets and ameliorates the blood lipid profile. Conversely, hepatic steatosis and mitochondrial oxidative stress appear to be negatively affected by a diet rich in unsaturated fatty acids. PMID:26580650

  15. Radiologic atlas of pulmonary abnormalities in children

    SciTech Connect

    Singleton, E.B.; Wagner, M.L.; Dutton, R.V.

    1988-01-01

    This book is an atlas about thoracic abnormalities in infants and children. The authors include computed tomographic, digital subtraction angiographic, ultrasonographic, and a few magnetic resonance (MR) images. They recognize and discuss how changes in the medical treatment of premature infants and the management of infection and pediatric tumors have altered some of the appearances and considerations in these diseases. Oriented toward all aspects of pulmonary abnormalities, the book starts with radiographic techniques and then discusses the normal chest, the newborn, infections, tumors, and pulmonary vascular diseases. There is comprehensive treatment of mediastinal abnormalities and a discussion of airway abnormalities.

  16. Percutaneous Pulmonary Valve Placement

    PubMed Central

    Prieto, Lourdes R.

    2015-01-01

    Patients with congenital heart disease and pulmonary valve disease need multiple procedures over their lifetimes to replace their pulmonary valves. Chronic pulmonary stenosis, regurgitation, or both have untoward effects on ventricular function and on the clinical status of these patients. To date, all right ventricle–pulmonary artery conduits have had relatively short lifespans. Percutaneous pulmonary valve implantation, although relatively new, will probably reduce the number of operative procedures that these patients will have to undergo over a lifetime. Refinement and further development of this procedure holds promise for the extension of this technology to other patient populations. PMID:26175629

  17. Pulmonary and generalized lysosomal storage induced by amphiphilic drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Hruban, Z

    1984-01-01

    Administration of amphiphilic drugs to experimental animals causes formation of myelinoid bodies in many cell types, accumulation of foamy macrophages in pulmonary alveoli and pulmonary alveolar proteinosis. These changes are the result of an interaction between the drugs and phospholipids which leads to an alteration in physicochemical properties of the phospholipids. Impairment of the digestion of altered pulmonary secretions in phagosomes of macrophages results in accumulation of foam cells in pulmonary alveoli. Impairment of the metabolism of altered phospholipids removed by autophagy induces an accumulation of myelinoid bodies. The administration of amphiphilic compounds thus causes pulmonary intra-alveolar histiocytosis which is a part of a drug-induced lysosomal storage or generalized lipidosis. The accumulation of drug-lipid complexes in myelinoid bodies and in pulmonary foam cells may lead to alteration of cellular functioning and to clinical disease. Currently over 50 amphiphilic drugs are known. Unique pharmacological properties necessitate clinical use of some of these drugs. The occurrence and severity of potential clinical side effects depend on the nature of each drug, dosage and duration of treatment, simultaneous administration of other drugs and foods, individual metabolic pattern of the patient and other factors. Further studies on factors preventing and potentiating adverse effects of amphiphilic drugs are indicated. Images FIGURE 1. FIGURE 2. FIGURE 3. FIGURE 4. FIGURE 5. FIGURE 6. FIGURE 7. FIGURE 8. FIGURE 9. FIGURE 10. PMID:6376111

  18. Reduced or modified dietary fat for preventing cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Hooper, Lee; Summerbell, Carolyn D; Thompson, Rachel; Sills, Deirdre; Roberts, Felicia G; Moore, Helen; Smith, George Davey

    2014-01-01

    .98, 95% CI 0.93 to 1.04, 71,790 participants) or cardiovascular mortality (RR 0.94, 95% CI 0.85 to 1.04, 65,978 participants). This did not alter with sub-grouping or sensitivity analysis. Few studies compared reduced with modified fat diets, so direct comparison was not possible. Authors’ conclusions The findings are suggestive of a small but potentially important reduction in cardiovascular risk on modification of dietary fat, but not reduction of total fat, in longer trials. Lifestyle advice to all those at risk of cardiovascular disease and to lower risk population groups, should continue to include permanent reduction of dietary saturated fat and partial replacement by unsaturates. The ideal type of unsaturated fat is unclear. PMID:21735388

  19. [The effect of high-frequency ventilation of the lungs on the pulmonary and systemic circulations in microembolism of the pulmonary artery].

    PubMed

    Sanotskaia, N V; Vyzhigina, M A; Matsievskiĭ, D D; Luk'ianov, M V; Aleĭnikov, S O

    1993-11-01

    The linear and volumetric blood flow velocity in the ascending aorta and pulmonary artery conus, right-left ventricular ejection balance, pulmonary and femoral arterial blood pressures, pulmonary microcirculation in fat pulmonary microembolism induced during the routine and high-frequency jet lung ventilation (HFJLV) were studied by ultrasonic techniques in acute experiments on cats with open chest under nembutal narcosis. Pulmonary microembolism was shown to resulted in 487 and 252% increases in pulmonary vascular resistance during the routine and HFJLVs, respectively. There were also 167 and 127% increases in mean pulmonary pressure and 60 and 34% decreases in the volumetric velocity of pulmonary blood flow. The linear velocity of pulmonary blood flow was unchanged with routine lung ventilation, whereas it decreased by 68% with HFJLV. Microembolism impaired the balance between right and left ventricular ejections with blood being redistributed into the greater circulation. The imbalance lasted 5-7 min during HFJLV, while with the routine lung ventilation it was preserved up to the end of the experiment, and systemic blood pressure and total peripheral vascular resistance decreased. Alveolar edema developed in interstitial pulmonary edema. The animals' death occurred 40-60 min later. PMID:8312529

  20. [Pulmonary complications in adult sickle cell disease].

    PubMed

    Maître, B; Mekontso-Dessap, A; Habibi, A; Bachir, D; Parent, F; Godeau, B; Galacteros, F

    2011-02-01

    Sickle cell disease is an autosomal genetic condition which represents the most frequent genetic disease in Île-de-France and Caribbean islands. The main clinical manifestations can be divided into infectious disease, hemolytic anemia and vaso-occlusive events. Pulmonary complications represent 20 to 30% of mortality due to sickle cell and can be divided into acute and chronic events. Acute chest syndrome (ACS) is an acute lung injury often preceded by a vaso-occlusive crisis and triggered by different factors including: hypoventilation, pulmonary infectious disease and vascular occlusions. These occlusions can be secondary to fat embolism, thrombosis or sickling. Treatment is mainly supportive combining oxygen supplementation adequate hydration analgesia and sedation. Exchange transfusion may be indicated in severe forms of ACS, characterized by a right ventricular dysfunction and acute respiratory failure. Pulmonary hypertension is the most serious chronic complication. Its frequency is estimated at 6% in adult patients and is more often described in patients with venous ulcers and higher levels of chronic hemolysis. Prognosis is poor with 12.5% of patients dying in the first two years following diagnosis irrespective of the actual pulmonary artery pressure level. There are currently limited data on the effects of any treatment modality. Other respiratory complications such as sleep disorders and nocturnal hypoxemia, infiltrative lung disease and exertional dyspnea are described and should be considered. PMID:21402228

  1. The effect of quality and quantity of dietary fat on the immune system.

    PubMed

    Locniskar, M; Nauss, K M; Newberne, P M

    1983-05-01

    The effect of the quality and quantity of dietary fats on the morphology and function of the immune system of Sprague-Dawley rats fed either 5% mixed fat, 24% saturated fat, 24% polyunsaturated fat, or 24% partially saturated fat was examined. After 2.5 months of dietary treatment high fat groups showed evidence of splenic hyperplasia, however, no consistent morphologic changes were seen in the mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN). Splenocytes from rats fed the 24% polyunsaturated fat diet were cultured in fetal bovine serum (FBS) and had a depressed lymphocyte transformation response, which persisted after 5 months of dietary treatment. Supplementing the culture medium with 10% rat serum altered the transformation response profile, but high fat serum did not have an immunosuppressive effect. MLN lymphocytes from rats fed the 24% partially saturated diet for 2.5 months had an enhanced response to concanavalin A; at five months the response was elevated in the groups fed saturated as well as partially saturated fat diets. These results suggest that the modulating effect of fat on the immune system depends on the duration of feeding, the type of fat consumed and the organ examined. PMID:6842304

  2. [Tobacco and morphology: pulmonary diseases].

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Lina

    2007-01-01

    Tobacco is implicated in multisystemic carcinogenesis through more than fifty identified carcinogenic metabolites that produce mutations responsible for alterations in cell cycle, immune response and endocrine regulation. Is one of nine risk factors identified in one third of cancer deaths together with obesity, sedentary, alcohol consumption, sexual promiscuity, drug addiction, and open and closed air contamination. Answering for cardiovascular diseases as the first cause of death in civilized world, tobacco is also pointed as the major factor implicated in the development of COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), RB-ILD (respiratory bronchiolitis and interstitial lung disease), DIP (desquamative interstitial pneumonia), bronchiolitis and bronchiolocentric interstitial fibrosis, Langerhans cells histiocytosis, eosinophilic pneumonia, sarcoidosis, epidermoid metaplasia in respiratory epithelium and lung cancer. The chronic tobacco induced inflammatory state is the basis for the acquisition of genetic alterations dependent on the tobacco contaminants. PMID:17632677

  3. Changes in vertebral bone marrow fat and bone mass after gastric bypass surgery: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Schafer, A L; Li, X; Schwartz, A V; Tufts, L S; Wheeler, A L; Grunfeld, C; Stewart, L; Rogers, S J; Carter, J T; Posselt, A M; Black, D M; Shoback, D M

    2015-05-01

    Bone marrow fat may serve a metabolic role distinct from other fat depots, and it may be altered by metabolic conditions including diabetes. Caloric restriction paradoxically increases marrow fat in mice, and women with anorexia nervosa have high marrow fat. The longitudinal effect of weight loss on marrow fat in humans is unknown. We hypothesized that marrow fat increases after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery, as total body fat decreases. In a pilot study of 11 morbidly obese women (6 diabetic, 5 nondiabetic), we measured vertebral marrow fat content (percentage fat fraction) before and 6 months after RYGB using magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Total body fat mass declined in all participants (mean ± SD decline 19.1 ± 6.1 kg or 36.5% ± 10.9%, p<0.001). Areal bone mineral density (BMD) decreased by 5.2% ± 3.5% and 4.1% ± 2.6% at the femoral neck and total hip, respectively, and volumetric BMD decreased at the spine by 7.4% ± 2.8% (p<0.001 for all). Effects of RYGB on marrow fat differed by diabetes status (adjusted p=0.04). There was little mean change in marrow fat in nondiabetic women (mean +0.9%, 95% CI -10.0 to +11.7%, p=0.84). In contrast, marrow fat decreased in diabetic women (-7.5%, 95% CI -15.2 to +0.1%, p=0.05). Changes in total body fat mass and marrow fat were inversely correlated among nondiabetic (r=-0.96, p=0.01) but not diabetic (r=0.52, p=0.29) participants. In conclusion, among those without diabetes, marrow fat is maintained on average after RYGB, despite dramatic declines in overall fat mass. Among those with diabetes, RYGB may reduce marrow fat. Thus, future studies of marrow fat should take diabetes status into account. Marrow fat may have unique metabolic behavior compared with other fat depots. PMID:25603463

  4. Changes in Vertebral Bone Marrow Fat and Bone Mass After Gastric Bypass Surgery: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Schafer, AL; Li, X; Schwartz, AV; Tufts, LS; Wheeler, AL; Grunfeld, C; Stewart, L; Rogers, SJ; Carter, JT; Posselt, AM; Black, DM; Shoback, DM

    2015-01-01

    Bone marrow fat may serve a metabolic role distinct from other fat depots, and it may be altered by metabolic conditions including diabetes. Caloric restriction paradoxically increases marrow fat in mice, and women with anorexia nervosa have high marrow fat. The longitudinal effect of weight loss on marrow fat in humans is unknown. We hypothesized that marrow fat increases after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery, as total body fat decreases. In a pilot study of 11 morbidly obese women (6 diabetic, 5 nondiabetic), we measured vertebral marrow fat content (percentage fat fraction) before and 6 months after RYGB using magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Total body fat mass declined in all participants (mean ±SD decline 19.1 ±6.1 kg or 36.5 ±10.9%, p<0.001). Areal bone mineral density (BMD) decreased by 5.2 ±3.5% and 4.1 ±2.6% at the femoral neck and total hip, respectively, and volumetric BMD decreased at the spine by 7.4 ±2.8% (p<0.001 for all). Effects of RYGB on marrow fat differed by diabetes status (adjusted p=0.04). There was little mean change in marrow fat in nondiabetic women (mean +0.9%, 95% CI -10.0 to +11.7%, p=0.84). In contrast, marrow fat decreased in diabetic women (−7.5%, 95% CI -15.2 to +0.1%, p=0.05). Changes in total body fat mass and marrow fat were inversely correlated among nondiabetic (r=−0.96, p=0.01) but not diabetic (r=0.52, p=0.29) participants. In conclusion, among those without diabetes, marrow fat is maintained on average after RYGB, despite dramatic declines in overall fat mass. Among those with diabetes, RYGB may reduce marrow fat. Thus, future studies of marrow fat should take diabetes status into account. Marrow fat may have unique metabolic behavior compared with other fat depots. PMID:25603463

  5. The Supersymmetric Fat Higgs

    SciTech Connect

    Harnik, Roni

    2004-10-27

    Supersymmetric models have traditionally been assumed to be perturbative up to high scales due to the requirement of calculable unification. In this note I review the recently proposed `Fat Higgs' model which relaxes the requirement of perturbativity. In this framework, an NMSSM-like trilinear coupling becomes strong at some intermediate scale. The NMSSM Higgses are meson composites of an asymptotically-free gauge theory. This allows us to raise the mass of the Higgs, thus alleviating the MSSM of its fine tuning problem. Despite the strong coupling at an intermediate scale, the UV completion allows us to maintain gauge coupling unification.

  6. Molecular and cellular mechanisms of pulmonary fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis is a chronic lung disease characterized by excessive accumulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) and remodeling of the lung architecture. Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is considered the most common and severe form of the disease, with a median survival of approximately three years and no proven effective therapy. Despite the fact that effective treatments are absent and the precise mechanisms that drive fibrosis in most patients remain incompletely understood, an extensive body of scientific literature regarding pulmonary fibrosis has accumulated over the past 35 years. In this review, we discuss three broad areas which have been explored that may be responsible for the combination of altered lung fibroblasts, loss of alveolar epithelial cells, and excessive accumulation of ECM: inflammation and immune mechanisms, oxidative stress and oxidative signaling, and procoagulant mechanisms. We discuss each of these processes separately to facilitate clarity, but certainly significant interplay will occur amongst these pathways in patients with this disease. PMID:22824096

  7. Management of massive and nonmassive pulmonary embolism

    PubMed Central

    Sekhri, Vishal; Mehta, Nimeshkumar; Rawat, Naveen; Lehrman, Stuart G.

    2012-01-01

    Massive pulmonary embolism (PE) is characterized by systemic hypotension (defined as a systolic arterial pressure < 90 mm Hg or a drop in systolic arterial pressure of at least 40 mm Hg for at least 15 min which is not caused by new onset arrhythmias) or shock (manifested by evidence of tissue hypoperfusion and hypoxia, including an altered level of consciousness, oliguria, or cool, clammy extremities). Massive pulmonary embolism has a high mortality rate despite advances in diagnosis and therapy. A subgroup of patients with nonmassive PE who are hemodynamically stable but with right ventricular (RV) dysfunction or hypokinesis confirmed by echocardiography is classified as submassive PE. Their prognosis is different from that of others with non-massive PE and normal RV function. This article attempts to review the evidence-based risk stratification, diagnosis, initial stabilization, and management of massive and nonmassive pulmonary embolism. PMID:23319967

  8. Coordination between Drosophila Arc1 and a specific population of brain neurons regulates organismal fat.

    PubMed

    Mosher, Jeremy; Zhang, Wei; Blumhagen, Rachel Z; D'Alessandro, Angelo; Nemkov, Travis; Hansen, Kirk C; Hesselberth, Jay R; Reis, Tânia

    2015-09-15

    The brain plays a critical yet incompletely understood role in regulating organismal fat. We performed a neuronal silencing screen in Drosophila larvae to identify brain regions required to maintain proper levels of organismal fat. When used to modulate synaptic activity in specific brain regions, the enhancer-trap driver line E347 elevated fat upon neuronal silencing, and decreased fat upon neuronal activation. Unbiased sequencing revealed that Arc1 mRNA levels increase upon E347 activation. We had previously identified Arc1 mutations in a high-fat screen. Here we reveal metabolic changes in Arc1 mutants consistent with a high-fat phenotype and an overall shift toward energy storage. We find that Arc1-expressing cells neighbor E347 neurons, and manipulating E347 synaptic activity alters Arc1 expression patterns. Elevating Arc1 expression in these cells decreased fat, a phenocopy of E347 activation. Finally, loss of Arc1 prevented the lean phenotype caused by E347 activation, suggesting that Arc1 activity is required for E347 control of body fat. Importantly, neither E347 nor Arc1 manipulation altered energy-related behaviors. Our results support a model wherein E347 neurons induce Arc1 in specific neighboring cells to prevent excess fat accumulation. PMID:26209258

  9. Gluteal augmentation with cryopreserved fat.

    PubMed

    Moscatiello, Fabrizio; Aznar-Benitah, Salvador; Grella, Roberto; Jover, Javier Herrero

    2010-03-01

    Gluteal augmentation with autologous fat is becoming a standard ancillary procedure for sculpting the buttock area. The high rate of resorption due to aggressive harvesting techniques or inadequate injection procedures often leads to repeated treatments. Currently, several techniques for storing fat by controlled freezing and thawing procedures can guarantee a high rate of cell viability, similar to that obtained with fresh tissue. This allows surgeons to compile fat tissue available for future repeat injections, decreasing additional costs and morbidity for patients. The authors describe a case of gluteal augmentation with cryopreserved fat in a 42-year-old man. PMID:20442098

  10. Diagnosis and treatment of pulmonary hypertension in infancy

    PubMed Central

    Steinhorn, Robin H.

    2013-01-01

    Normal pulmonary vascular development in infancy requires maintenance of low pulmonary vascular resistance after birth, and is necessary for normal lung function and growth. The developing lung is subject to multiple genetic, pathological and/or environmental influences that can adversely affect lung adaptation, development, and growth, leading to pulmonary hypertension. New classifications of pulmonary hypertension are beginning to account for these diverse phenotypes, and or pulmonary hypertension in infants due to PPHN, congenital diaphragmatic hernia, and bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). The most effective pharmacotherapeutic strategies for infants with PPHN are directed at selective reduction of PVR, and take advantage of a rapidly advancing understanding of the altered signaling pathways in the remodeled vasculature. PMID:24083892

  11. Making Fat Work*

    PubMed Central

    Sargis, Robert M.; Brady, Matthew J.

    2014-01-01

    The burgeoning obesity and metabolic disease epidemics in the developed world are exerting a terrible toll on society, yet the precise mechanisms responsible for the emergence of these dramatic trends over a relatively short period of time remain poorly understood. Philip A. Wood’s book How Fat Works provides important insights into cellular lipid metabolism, as well as discussing some of the important external contributors to the development of human obesity. The foundation provided by this book allows for the exploration of how body fat has gone from hero during the millennia when starvation was the paramount nutritional risk to its current role as villain in our period of caloric excess. With the incredible personal and societal costs brought about by excess body weight, a comprehensive understanding of the mechanisms responsible for obesity is fundamentally necessary if we are to reverse these dire trends. Here, we delve deeper into some of the forces contributing to the obesity epidemic and discuss some individual measures as well as public policy decisions that may help reverse weight trends, while specifically focusing on the growing problem of pediatric obesity. PMID:21037416

  12. [Posttraumatic fat embolism].

    PubMed

    Bouffard, Y; Guillaume, C; Perrot, D; Delafosse, B; Motin, J

    1984-01-01

    Between 1977 and 1982, fifty cases of post-traumatic fat embolism were treated in a general intensive care unit. Average age of patients was 25.5 +/- 13 years; there was no male majority. Mean free interval was 39 +/- 27 h. 12 cases (24%) had single fractures and 38 (76%) multiple fractures. Forty-four patients had a fractured femur. Thirty-two patients presented the complete clinical syndrome with general, respiratory, neurological and cutaneous signs. Thrombocytopaenia and hypocholesterolaemia were the biological signs most often seen. In forty-four patients, orthopaedic treatment consisted of immediate immobilization, usually with traction. Twenty-six patients were reoperated on: intramedullary nail for twenty patients, plate for the other six. Fat embolism appeared in spite of surgery in six cases; it worsened after surgery in six others. Seven patients had per- or postanaesthetic problems. Fourteen per cent of patients died. The decrease in mortality was mainly due to an improvement in mechanical ventilation techniques. Early surgical fixation remained the rule if there was no serious respiratory distress or haemodynamic instability, although it did not seem to change the mortality rate in this group of patients. PMID:6497076

  13. Destructive pulmonary effects of smoke inhalation and simultaneous alterations in circulating IL-6, TNF-α, and IFN-γ levels at different burn depths: an experimental study on rats.

    PubMed

    Abali, Ayse Ebru Sakallioglu; Karakayali, Hamdi; Ozdemir, Binnaz Handan; Bayraktar, Nilufer; Abbas, Ozan Luay; Haberal, Mehmet

    2013-01-01

    The current study sought to examine the interactions between inflammatory and immune events in the lung and circulating interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and interferon-γ (IFN-γ) levels at different burn depths with concomitant smoke inhalation in the rat model. Forty-eight female Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into six groups: S, sham; P, partial-thickness burns; F, full-thickness burns; I, inhalation; Pi, partial-thickness burns + inhalation; and Fi, full-thickness burns + inhalation. Blood samples and lung biopsies were obtained 24 hours later. Blood levels of IL-6, TNF-α, and IF-γ were measured with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The proportions of CD3+ lymphocytes and CD68+ macrophages in the biopsies were studied immunohistochemically. The most severe inflammatory changes, except the neutrophil sequestration, were observed in the Fi group. A dense amount of neutrophils was observed in the F group. Edema and massive alveolar bleeding were seen in the I, Pi, and Fi groups. The amount of CD3+ lymphocytes were dense in the P, F, and Pi groups. The amount of CD68+ macrophages were significantly dense in Pi, F, I, and Fi groups. IL-6, TNF-α, and IF-γ increased in all groups when compared to the S group. The highest IL-6 level was seen in the Fi group. TNF-α significantly increased in the F, Pi, I, and Fi groups. Increase in IFN-γ levels in the Pi and Fi groups was significantly higher than in the P and F groups. In concomitant smoke inhalation and skin burns, pulmonary damage and systemic inflammatory response are related and may be evaluated by blood levels of IL-6, TNF-α, and IFN-γ cytokines. PMID:23128136

  14. Pulmonary hypertension caused by pulmonary venous hypertension

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The effect of pulmonary venous hypertension (PVH) on the pulmonary circulation is extraordinarily variable, ranging from no impact on pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) to a marked increase. The reasons for this are unknown. Both acutely reversible pulmonary vasoconstriction and pathological remodeling (especially medial hypertrophy and intimal hyperplasia) account for increased PVR when present. The mechanisms involved in vasoconstriction and remodeling are not clearly defined, but increased wall stress, especially in small pulmonary arteries, presumably plays an important role. Myogenic contraction may account for increased vascular tone and also indirectly stimulate remodeling of the vessel wall. Increased wall stress may also directly cause smooth muscle growth, migration, and intimal hyperplasia. Even long-standing and severe pulmonary hypertension (PH) usually abates with elimination of PVH, but PVH-PH is an important clinical problem, especially because PVH due to left ventricular noncompliance lacks definitive therapy. The role of targeted PH therapy in patients with PVH-PH is unclear at this time. Most prospective studies indicate that these medications are not helpful or worse, but there is ample reason to think that a subset of patients with PVH-PH may benefit from phosphodiesterase inhibitors or other agents. A different approach to evaluating possible pharmacologic therapy for PVH-PH may be required to better define its possible utility. PMID:25610595

  15. Effects of pineapple byproduct and canola oil as fat replacers on physicochemical and sensory qualities of low-fat beef burger.

    PubMed

    Selani, Miriam M; Shirado, Giovanna A N; Margiotta, Gregório B; Saldaña, Erick; Spada, Fernanda P; Piedade, Sonia M S; Contreras-Castillo, Carmen J; Canniatti-Brazaca, Solange G

    2016-02-01

    Pineapple byproduct and canola oil were evaluated as fat replacers on physicochemical and sensory characteristics of low-fat burgers. Five treatments were performed: conventional (CN, 20% fat) and four low-fat formulations (10% fat): control (CT), pineapple byproduct (PA), canola oil (CO), pineapple byproduct and canola oil (PC). Higher water and fat retention and lower cooking loss and diameter reduction were found in burgers with byproduct addition. In raw burgers, byproduct incorporation reduced L*, a*, and C* values, but these alterations were masked after cooking, leading to products similar to CN. Low-fat treatments were harder, chewier, and more cohesive than full-fat burgers. However, in Warner Bratzler shear measurements, PA and PC were as tender as CN. In QDA, no difference was found between CN and PC. Pineapple byproducts along with canola oil are promising fat replacers in beef burgers. In order to increase the feasibility of use of pineapple byproduct in the meat industry, alternative processes of byproduct preparation should be evaluated in future studies. PMID:26562792

  16. 'Low-dose' corticosteroid prophylaxis against fat embolism.

    PubMed

    Kallenbach, J; Lewis, M; Zaltzman, M; Feldman, C; Orford, A; Zwi, S

    1987-10-01

    The effect of 'low-dose' corticosteroids (9 mg/kg methylprednisolone), given after skeletal trauma, on the incidence of the fat embolism syndrome and isolated arterial hypoxemia was studied in 42 controls and 40 steroid-treated subjects. Fat embolism occurred in ten controls (23.8%) and one steroid-treated subject (2.5%) (p = 0.01). A further 44 subjects developed isolated hypoxemia. This was severe (PaO2 less than 50 mm Hg) in seven of 32 controls (21.9%) and one of 39 steroid-treated subjects (2.6%) (p = 0.01). The overall incidence of hypoxemia was 67.1%, affecting 33 controls (78.6%) and 22 steroid-treated patients (55%) (p less than 0.05). The degree of hypoxemia was severe (PaO2 less than 50 mm Hg) in 12 controls (28.6%) and two (5%) of the steroid-treated subjects (p = 0.005). No control subject died or required mechanical ventilation. One steroid-treated subject without fat embolism died of a fulminant infection. Although methylprednisolone in a relatively low dose provides protection against fat embolism and pulmonary dysfunction after skeletal trauma, the safety of this therapy requires further evaluation. PMID:3312625

  17. DNA ALTERATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The exposure of an organism to genotoxic chemicals may induce a cascade of genetic events. nitially, structural alterations to DNA are formed. ext, the DNA damage is processed and subsequently expressed in mutant gene products. inally, diseases result from the genetic damage. he ...

  18. Effects of pulmonary ischemia on lung morphology.

    PubMed

    Fields, Michael J; Bishai, John M; Mitzner, Wayne; Wagner, Elizabeth M

    2007-07-01

    Pulmonary ischemia resulting from chronic pulmonary embolism leads to proliferation of the systemic circulation within and surrounding the lung. However, it is not clear how well alveolar tissue is sustained during the time of complete pulmonary ischemia. In the present study, we investigated how pulmonary ischemia after left pulmonary artery ligation (LPAL) would alter lung mechanical properties and morphology. In this established mouse model of lung angiogenesis after chronic LPAL (10), we evaluated lung function and structure before (3 days) and after (14 days) a functional systemic circulation to the left lung is established. Age-matched naïve and sham-operated C57Bl/6 mice and mice undergoing chronic LPAL were studied. Left and right lung pressure-volume relationships were determined. Next, lungs were inflated in situ with warmed agarose (25-30 cmH(2)O) and fixed, and mean chord lengths (MCL) of histological sections were quantified. MCL of naïve mice averaged 43.9 +/- 1.8 mum. No significant changes in MCL were observed at either time point after LPAL. Left lung volumes and specific compliances were significantly reduced 3 days after LPAL. However, by 14 days after LPAL, lung pressure-volume relationships were not different from controls. These results suggest that severe pulmonary ischemia causes changes in lung mechanics early after LPAL that are reversed by the time a new systemic vasculature is known to perfuse pulmonary capillaries. The LPAL model thus affords a unique opportunity to study lung functional responses to tissue ischemia and subsequent recovery. PMID:17449796

  19. REACTIVE OXYGEN SPECIES IN PULMONARY VASCULAR REMODELING

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Saurabh; Gross, Christine M.; Sharma, Shruti; Fineman, Jeffrey R.; Black, Stephen M.

    2014-01-01

    The pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension is a complex multifactorial process that involves the remodeling of pulmonary arteries. This remodeling process encompasses concentric medial thickening of small arterioles, neomuscularization of previously nonmuscular capillary-like vessels, and structural wall changes in larger pulmonary arteries. The pulmonary arterial muscularization is characterized by vascular smooth muscle cell (SMC) hyperplasia and hypertrophy. In addition, in uncontrolled pulmonary hypertension, the clonal expansion of apoptosis-resistant endothelial cells leads to the formation of plexiform lesions. Based upon a large number of studies in animal models, the three major stimuli that drive the vascular remodeling process are inflammation, shear stress and hypoxia. Although, the precise mechanisms by which these stimuli impair pulmonary vascular function and structure are unknown, reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated oxidative damage appears to play an important role. ROS are highly reactive due to their unpaired valence shell electron. Oxidative damage occurs when the production of ROS exceeds the quenching capacity of the anti-oxidant mechanisms of the cell. ROS can be produced from complexes in the cell membrane (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-oxidase), cellular organelles (peroxisomes and mitochondria), and in the cytoplasm (xanthine oxidase). Furthermore, low levels of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) and L-arginine the rate limiting co-factor and substrate for endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), can cause the uncoupling of eNOS, resulting in decreased NO production and increased ROS production. This review will focus on the ROS generation systems, scavenger antioxidants, and oxidative stress associated alterations in vascular remodeling in pulmonary hypertension. PMID:23897679

  20. Regulation of neuronal migration by Dchs1-Fat4 planar cell polarity

    PubMed Central

    Zakaria, Sana; Mao, Yaopan; Kuta, Anna; de Sousa, Catia Ferreira; Gaufo, Gary O.; McNeill, Helen; Hindges, Robert; Guthrie, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Summary Planar-cell polarity (PCP) describes the polarisation of cell structures and behaviors within the plane of a tissue. PCP is essential for the generation of tissue architecture during embryogenesis and for post-natal growth and tissue repair, yet how it is oriented to coordinate cell polarity remains poorly understood [1]. In Drosophila, PCP is mediated via the Frizzled-Flamingo (Fz-PCP) and Dachsous-Fat (Fat-PCP) pathways [1-3]. Fz-PCP is conserved in vertebrates but an understanding in vertebrates of whether and how Fat-PCP polarizes cells, and its relationship to Fz-PCP signaling, is lacking. Mutations in human FAT4 and DCHS1 cause Van Maldergem syndrome, characterized by severe neuronal abnormalities indicative of altered neuronal migration [4]. Here, we investigate the role and mechanisms of Fat-PCP during neuronal migration using the murine facial branchiomotor neurons (FBM) as a model. We find that Fat4 and Dchs1, key components of Fat-PCP signaling, are expressed in complementary gradients and are required for the collective tangential migration of FBM and for their PCP. Fat4 and Dchs1 are required intrinsically within the FBM and extrinsically within the neuroepithelium. Remarkably, Fat-PCP and Fz-PCP regulate FBM migration along orthogonal axes. Disruption of the Dchs1 gradients by mosaic inactivation of Dchs1 alters FBM polarity and migration. This study implies that PCP in vertebrates can be regulated via gradients of Fat4 and Dchs1 expression, which establish intracellular polarity across FBM cells during their migration. Our results also identify Fat-PCP as a novel neuronal guidance system, and reveal that Fat-PCP and Fz-PCP can act along orthogonal axes. PMID:24998526

  1. The current treatment of pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, Kenneth Scott

    2009-01-01

    Pulmonary vascular hypertension in general is a progressive, nearly always fatal condition that until recently has had very few treatment options. Our understanding of the pulmonary vascular disease process has opened the window to earlier screening techniques, diagnosis, and treatment options. However, all current treatment options are complex and expensive and therefore require clinical support strategies often necessitating specialized pulmonary hypertension treatment centers. Whether idiopathic or secondary, pulmonary arterial hypertension is characterized by the deregulated proliferation of pulmonary artery endothelial cells and intimal smooth muscle cells, both resistant to cellular apoptosis. Early recognition of such disregulation may lead to earlier diagnosis and treatment and thus alteration in the disease process. Screening of high-risk populations such as those with connective tissue disorders, HIV disease, congenital heart disease, portal hypertension, and those exposed to certain drugs and toxins such as methamphetamines and the diet drugs Dexfenfluramine and Fenfluramine is of utmost importance. Similarly, early symptom recognition in these high-risk groups is essential to earlier diagnosis and treatment. PMID:20073161

  2. Nocturnal periodic breathing in primary pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Schulz, R; Baseler, G; Ghofrani, H A; Grimminger, F; Olschewski, H; Seeger, W

    2002-04-01

    Cheyne-Stokes respiration is frequently observed in congestive heart failure. Among other factors, prolongation of circulation time, hypocapnia and hypoxia are thought to underlie this sleep-related breathing disorder. Primary pulmonary hypertension (PPH) is also characterized by reduced cardiac output and blood gas alterations. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to determine whether a nocturnal periodic breathing (PB) occurs in PPH. A total of 20 consecutive patients with PPH who had been admitted for pharmacological investigation of pulmonary vasoreactivity were investigated by lung function testing, right heart catheterization and full-night attended polysomnography. PB was detected in six patients (30%) (mean +/- SEM: apnoea/hypopnoea index 37 +/- 5 h(-1); arterial oxygen saturation was <90% during 56 +/- 6.5% of total sleep time). The patients with PB had more severe haemodynamic impairment than those without. They also had a more marked reduction in the pulmonary diffusion capacity and greater arterial hypoxia. PB was markedly improved or even eradicated by nasal oxygen during the night. Periodic breathing occurs in patients with advanced primary pulmonary hypertension and can be reversed by nocturnal nasal oxygen. The clinical and prognostic significance of periodic breathing in primary pulmonary hypertension needs to be determined by further studies. PMID:11998995

  3. Smooth Muscle-Mediated Connective Tissue Remodeling in Pulmonary Hypertension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mecham, Robert P.; Whitehouse, Loren A.; Wrenn, David S.; Parks, William C.; Griffin, Gail L.; Senior, Robert M.; Crouch, Edmond C.; Stenmark, Kurt R.; Voelkel, Norbert F.

    1987-07-01

    Abnormal accumulation of connective tissue in blood vessels contributes to alterations in vascular physiology associated with disease states such as hypertension and atherosclerosis. Elastin synthesis was studied in blood vessels from newborn calves with severe pulmonary hypertension induced by alveolar hypoxia in order to investigate the cellular stimuli that elicit changes in pulmonary arterial connective tissue production. A two- to fourfold increase in elastin production was observed in pulmonary artery tissue and medial smooth muscle cells from hypertensive calves. This stimulation of elastin production was accompanied by a corresponding increase in elastin messenger RNA consistent with regulation at the transcriptional level. Conditioned serum harvested from cultures of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells isolated from hypertensive animals contained one or more low molecular weight elastogenic factors that stimulated the production of elastin in both fibroblasts and smooth muscle cells and altered the chemotactic responsiveness of fibroblasts to elastin peptides. These results suggest that connective tissue changes in the pulmonary vasculature in response to pulmonary hypertension are orchestrated by the medial smooth muscle cell through the generation of specific differentiation factors that alter both the secretory phenotype and responsive properties of surrounding cells.

  4. Cystic pulmonary hydatidosis

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Malay; Pathania, Rajnish; Jhobta, Anupam; Thakur, Babu Ram; Chopra, Rajesh

    2016-01-01

    Cystic echinococcosis (CE) is a zoonotic parasitic disease caused by the larval stages of the cestode Echinococcus granulosus. Worldwide, pulmonary hydatid cyst is a significant problem medically, socially, and economically. Surgery is the definitive therapy of pulmonary hydatidosis. Benzimidazoles may be considered in patients with a surgical contraindication. This review will focus on pathogenesis, lifecycle, clinical features, and management of pulmonary hydatid disease. PMID:27051107

  5. Perivascular adipose tissue: An unique fat compartment relevant for the cardiometabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Siegel-Axel, D I; Häring, H U

    2016-03-01

    Type 2 diabetes and its major risk factor, obesity, are an increasing worldwide health problem. The exact mechanisms that link obesity with insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, hypertension, cardiovascular complications and renal diseases, are still not clarified sufficiently. Adipose tissue in general is an active endocrine and paracrine organ that may influence the development of these disorders. Excessive body fat in general obesity may also cause quantitative and functional alterations of specific adipose tissue compartments. Beside visceral and subcutaneous fat depots which exert systemic effects by the release of adipokines, cytokines and hormones, there are also locally acting fat depots such as peri- and epicardial fat, perivascular fat, and renal sinus fat. Perivascular adipose tissue is in close contact with the adventitia of large, medium and small diameter arteries, possesses unique features differing from other fat depots and may act also independently of general obesity. An increasing number of studies are dealing with the "good" or "bad" characteristics and functions of normally sized and dramatically increased perivascular fat mass in lean or heavily obese individuals. This review describes the origin of perivascular adipose tissue, its different locations, the dual role of a physiological and unphysiological fat mass and its impact on diabetes, cardiovascular and renal diseases. Clinical studies, new imaging methods, as well as basic research in cell culture experiments in the last decade helped to elucidate the various aspects of the unique fat compartment. PMID:26995737

  6. Feeding supplemental fat and undegraded intake protein to early lactation dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, P C; Grummer, R R; Shaver, R D; Broderick, G A; Drendel, T R

    1991-10-01

    Forty-eight Holstein cows (16 primiparous) were fed alfalfa silage-based TMR containing 18% CP with 33 or 36% of the CP as undegraded intake protein and with 0 or 2.8% supplemental fat (DM basis). Expeller soybean meal replaced solvent soybean meal to vary undegraded intake protein, and sodium alginate-treated tallow was used as the fat source. A standard diet containing solvent soybean meal without fat was fed during the first 21 d postpartum for covariate adjustment of milk production. A continuous lactation design with 2 x 2 factorial arrangement of treatments was used with supplemental fat and undegraded intake protein as main effects. Feeding supplemental fat increased actual milk (32.9 vs. 31.7 kg/d) but decreased milk protein concentration. Cows fed supplemental fat also had higher BW, and weight gain was significant with time. Increasing undegraded intake protein did not affect milk yield, composition, or component yield. There were no significant interactions between supplemental fat and undegraded intake protein on milk yield or composition. Milk fatty acid composition was not altered by addition of undegraded intake protein, but C6 to C14 fatty acids were reduced by adding supplemental fat. Results do not support the strategy of increasing levels of undegraded intake protein when supplemental fat is fed. Variation in undegraded intake protein content of feed-stuffs appears to be of more importance in ration formulation than interactions between supplemental fat and protein. PMID:1744277

  7. Fat embolism syndrome managed by non-invasive ventilation--a case report.

    PubMed

    Ashok, R; Kumar, R Vinoth; Saravanan, K; Kalaivani

    2012-02-01

    A 31-year-old male was struck by a motor cycle and diagnosed to have closed injury to the thigh involving right sided femur shaft fracture. Patient was operated on the next day by the orthopaedic surgeon. The patient did not have any signs of fat embolism syndrome before and after surgery. But the rare ECG change of S1Q3T3 (pulmonary embolism) was present before and after surgery. The presence of oedematous retina and cherry red spots in the macula was also present in the young patient. Patient developed all the classical signs of fat embolism syndrome 18 hours after surgery. The case had classic presentations of fat embolism syndrome managed by non-invasive ventilation. The role of steroids and albumin is also discussed as it was always a controversy in the management of fat embolism syndrome. PMID:23029849

  8. How Is Pulmonary Hypertension Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Pulmonary Hypertension Diagnosed? Your doctor will diagnose pulmonary hypertension (PH) ... To Look for the Underlying Cause of Pulmonary Hypertension PH has many causes, so many tests may ...

  9. Neostigmine and pulmonary oedema

    PubMed Central

    Nagella, Amrutha Bindu; Bijapur, Mubina Begum; Shreyavathi, Shreyavathi; R S, Raghavendra Rao

    2014-01-01

    A 1-year-old child with no pre-existing cardiac or respiratory disease developed frank pulmonary oedema after administration of a neostigmine–glycopyrrolate mixture to reverse neuromuscular blockade during general anaesthesia. Possible cardiac and extra-cardiac factors that could cause pulmonary oedema in this child were ruled out by appropriate investigations. As the pulmonary oedema manifested shortly after administration of the neostigmine–glycopyrrolate mixture, we concluded that neostigmine was the most probable cause. This article briefly reports the occurrence of events and successful management of perioperative pulmonary oedema. PMID:25199191

  10. Fats and oils: An overview

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dietary fat is a macronutrient that has historically engendered considerable controversy and continues to do so. Contentious areas include optimal amount and type for cardiovascular disease risk reduction, and role in body weight regulation. Dietary fats and oils are unique in modern times in that ...

  11. [Morphological diagnostics of fat embolism].

    PubMed

    Dorosevich, A E; Dmitriev, I V

    2016-01-01

    The present review of the literature concerns the problem of morphological diagnostics of fat embolism, i.e. mechanical obturation of multiple blood vessels with fat globules, that can be detected by a variety of methods including polarization microscopy, staining of native, frozen, and paraffin-embedded histological sections with the use of immunohistochemical techniques, electron microscopy, etc. PMID:27144263

  12. Gluteus augmentation with fat grafting.

    PubMed

    Perén, P A; Gómez, J B; Guerrerosantos, J; Salazar, C A

    2000-01-01

    This study presents the authors' experience with gluteus augmentation with autologus fat grafts and liposuction methods, having recorded the evolution of gluteus reshaping with autologus intramuscular fat graft injections for the past 5 years. Preoperative shape is discussed and patient evaluations, operative techniques, postoperative management, and longterm results are emphasized. PMID:11246428

  13. Oil and fat absorbing polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, H. E., Jr. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A method is described for forming a solid network polymer having a minimal amount of crosslinking for use in absorbing fats and oils. The polymer remains solid at a swelling ratio in oil or fat of at least ten and provides an oil absorption greater than 900 weight percent.

  14. Maternal low protein diet and postnatal high fat diet increases adipose imprinted gene expression

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maternal and postnatal diet can alter Igf2 gene expression and DNA methylation. To test whether maternal low protein and postnatal high fat (HF) diet result in alteration in Igf2 expression and obesity, we fed obese-prone Sprague-Dawley rats 8% (LP) or 20% (NP) protein for 3 wk prior to breeding and...

  15. What Are the Types of Fat?

    MedlinePlus

    ... also found in liquid tropical oils (palm and coconut). Trans fats (partially hydrogenated or hydrogenated fats) are ... fat dairy products (cream/milk) Butter Palm and coconut oil (snack foods, non- dairy creamers, whipped toppings) ...

  16. MR and CT imaging of the structural and functional changes of pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Schiebler, Mark L.; Bhalla, Sanjeev; Runo, James; Jarjour, Nizar; Roldan, Alejandro; Chesler, Naomi; François, Christopher J.

    2013-01-01

    The current Dana Point classification system (2009) divides elevation of pulmonary artery pressure into Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension (PAH) and Pulmonary Hypertension (PH). Fortunately, pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is not a common disease. However, with the aging of the first world’s population, heart failure is now an important cause of pulmonary hypertension with up to 9% of the population involved. PAH is usually asymptomatic until late in the disease process. While there are indirect features of PAH found on noninvasive imaging studies, the diagnosis and management still requires right heart catheterization. Imaging features of PAH include: 1. Enlargement of the pulmonary trunk and main pulmonary arteries, 2. Decreased pulmonary arterial compliance, 3. Tapering of the peripheral pulmonary arteries, 4. Enlargement of the inferior vena cava, and 5. Increased mean transit time. The chronic requirement to generate high pulmonary arterial pressures measurably affects the right heart and main pulmonary artery. This change in physiology causes the following structural and functional alterations that have been shown to have prognostic significance: Relative area change of the pulmonary trunk, RVSVindex, RVSV, RVEDVindex, LVEDVindex, and baseline RVEF <35%. All of these variables can be quantified non-invasively and followed longitudinally in each patient using MRI to modify the treatment regimen. Untreated PAH frequently results in a rapid clinical decline and death within 3 years of diagnosis. Unfortunately, even with treatment, less than 1/2 of these patients are alive at four years. PMID:23612440

  17. Resisting body dissatisfaction: fat women who endorse fat acceptance.

    PubMed

    McKinley, Nita Mary

    2004-05-01

    Fat women who endorsed fat acceptance (N=128) were recruited from Radiance Magazine. Relationships between objectified body consciousness (OBC), body esteem, and psychological well-being for the mostly European American sample were similar to those found in other samples. OBC was independently related to body esteem when weight dissatisfaction was controlled. Those who endorsed the need for social change in attitudes towards fat people had higher body esteem and self-acceptance, and lower body shame, than those who endorsed personal acceptance of body size only. PMID:18089154

  18. [Functional morphology of resistant pulmonary vessels and capillaries in individual and species adaptation to high altitude].

    PubMed

    Kadyraliev, T K; Mirrakhimov, M M

    1992-07-01

    Morphological and structural rearrangement of resistant pulmonary vessels and alveolar capillaries was assessed in lowland animals (rabbits) during high-altitude adaptation, in aboriginal high-altitude species (yaks, mountain goats) and on native highlanders. Structural adaptive developments in pulmonary vessels and capillaries of high-altitude animals contribute to maximal facilitation of gas diffusion. Similar adaptive changes in pulmonary resistant vessels and capillaries of laboratory animals and in native highlanders are associated with pathological alterations manifest in the elevation of pulmonary vascular resistance, right ventricular hypertrophy, increases in the thickness of the basal membrane of the air-blood barrier. In all the subjects studied the process of high-altitude adaptation is associated with hypertrophy of pulmonary endothelium. The intensification of pulmonary endothelium. The intensification of pulmonary endothelium metabolic activity may be directed at regulation of vascular tone. PMID:1421290

  19. Under-recognised co-morbidities in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis: A review.

    PubMed

    de Boer, Kaïssa; Lee, Joyce S

    2016-08-01

    Co-morbidities in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis are common. These co-morbidities include obstructive sleep apnoea, gastro-oesophageal reflux disease, pulmonary hypertension and depression. The presence of co-morbidities among patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis contributes to worse quality of life, morbidity and mortality. Despite the high prevalence of certain co-morbidities in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, the optimal screening and management of many of these conditions remains unclear. The impact of co-morbidities on this patient population is becoming more apparent. Their relevance will only increase as significant effort is being made to develop novel therapeutics that will alter the disease trajectory of patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. The purpose of this review is to focus on the epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis and management of select co-morbidities, including obstructive sleep apnoea, gastro-oesophageal reflux disease, pulmonary hypertension and depression, in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:26365251

  20. Body fatness, related biomarkers and cancer risk: an epidemiological perspective.

    PubMed

    Nimptsch, Katharina; Pischon, Tobias

    2015-05-01

    Higher body fatness is not only associated with a higher risk of hypertension, type 2 diabetes, and coronary heart disease but also with certain types of cancer. The scope of this review is to summarize the epidemiological evidence for an association between body fatness and specific types of cancer and to outline the mediating role of obesity-related biomarkers in this context. Epidemiological studies have gathered convincing evidence that greater body fatness is associated with a higher risk of colorectal cancer, postmenopausal breast cancer, endometrial cancer, esophageal adenocarcinoma, renal cell carcinoma, and pancreatic cancer. Further, evidence for an association between higher body fatness and higher risk of ovarian cancer, advanced prostate cancer, and hepatocellular carcinoma is growing. Abdominal obesity is an independent risk factor for colorectal cancer beyond general obesity, whereas an independent role is less clear for other obesity-related cancer types. Epidemiological biomarker studies have shown that the positive association between body fatness and risk of cancer may be partly explained by hyperinsulinemia and altered concentrations in adipokines and sex-steroid hormones. In addition, obesity-associated low-grade inflammation plays a role in colorectal carcinogenesis. While epidemiology has contributed substantially to the understanding of the role of higher body fatness and related metabolic alterations in the development of cancer, further epidemiological biomarker studies are necessary to elucidate the complex interrelations between mediating pathways as well as to study novel pathways. Knowledge resulting from this research may help identify an obesity phenotype that is particularly strongly associated with cancer risk and thus pave the way for targeted prevention of cancer morbidity and mortality. PMID:25781710

  1. Primary pulmonary leiomyoma

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Peng; Venkatachalam, Jonathen; Lee, Victor Kwan Min

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Leiomyoma is a smooth muscle neoplasm that commonly occurs in the genitourinary system and the gastrointestinal tract of the body. Primary pulmonary leiomyoma is rarely reported in literature. We report a rare case of primary pulmonary leiomyoma of a 55‐year‐old male patient presenting with symptoms of cough for six months. PMID:27516882

  2. Pulmonary Paragonimiasis Mimicking Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Kj; Basu, Arup; Khana, Shilpi; Wattal, Chand

    2015-08-01

    Paragonimiasis is a disease which is frequently misdiagnosed as pulmonary tuberculosis. In the areas where people eat crab/crayfish this disease should be considered in the differential diagnosis to avoid antituberculosis treatment for a non-tubercular condition. We are reporting a case of pulmonary paragonimiasis who had been treated for tuberculosis. PMID:27604443

  3. [Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension].

    PubMed

    Zonzin, Pietro; Vizza, Carmine Dario; Favretto, Giuseppe

    2003-10-01

    Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension is due to unresolved or recurrent pulmonary embolism. In the United States the estimated prevalence is 0.1-0.5% among survived patients with pulmonary embolism. The survival rate at 5 years was 30% among patients with a mean pulmonary artery pressure > 40 mmHg at the time of diagnosis and only 10% among those with a value > 50 mmHg. The interval between the onset of disturbances and the diagnosis may be as long as 3 years. Doppler echocardiography permits to establish the diagnosis of pulmonary hypertension. Radionuclide scanning determines whether pulmonary hypertension has a thromboembolic basis. Right heart catheterization and pulmonary angiography are performed in order to establish the extension and the accessibility to surgery of thrombi and to rule out other causes. The surgical treatment is thromboendarterectomy. A dramatic reduction in the pulmonary vascular resistance can be achieved; corresponding improvements in the NYHA class--from class III or IV before surgery to class I-II after surgery--are usually observed. Patients who are not considered candidates for thromboendarterectomy may be considered candidates for lung transplantation. PMID:14664293

  4. Pulmonary Function Tests

    PubMed Central

    Ranu, Harpreet; Wilde, Michael; Madden, Brendan

    2011-01-01

    Pulmonary function tests are valuable investigations in the management of patients with suspected or previously diagnosed respiratory disease. They aid diagnosis, help monitor response to treatment and can guide decisions regarding further treatment and intervention. The interpretation of pulmonary functions tests requires knowledge of respiratory physiology. In this review we describe investigations routinely used and discuss their clinical implications. PMID:22347750

  5. What Is Pulmonary Hypertension?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More What is Pulmonary Hypertension? Updated:Aug 12,2014 Is pulmonary hypertension different ... content was last reviewed on 08/04/2014. High Blood Pressure • Home • About High Blood Pressure (HBP) Introduction What ...

  6. Primary pulmonary leiomyoma.

    PubMed

    Wu, Peng; Venkatachalam, Jonathen; Lee, Victor Kwan Min; Tan, Sze Khen

    2016-05-01

    Leiomyoma is a smooth muscle neoplasm that commonly occurs in the genitourinary system and the gastrointestinal tract of the body. Primary pulmonary leiomyoma is rarely reported in literature. We report a rare case of primary pulmonary leiomyoma of a 55-year-old male patient presenting with symptoms of cough for six months. PMID:27516882

  7. Mesotherapy for local fat reduction.

    PubMed

    Jayasinghe, S; Guillot, T; Bissoon, L; Greenway, F

    2013-10-01

    Mesotherapy, which is the injection of substances locally into mesodermally derived subcutaneous tissue, developed from empirical observations of a French physician in the 1950s. Although popular in Europe for many medical purposes, it is used for local cosmetic fat reduction in the United States. This paper reviews manuscripts indexed in PubMed/MEDLINE under 'mesotherapy', which pertains to local fat reduction. The history of lipolytic mesotherapy, the physiology of body fat distribution, the mechanism of action of different lipolytic stimulators and their increased efficacy in combination are reviewed. Mesotherapy falls into two categories. Lipolytic mesotherapy using lipolytic stimulators requires more frequent treatments as the fat cells are not destroyed and can refill over time. Ablative mesotherapy destroys fat cells with a detergent, causes inflammation and scarring from the fat necrosis, but requires fewer treatments. The historic and empiric mixing of sodium channel blocking local anaesthetics in mesotherapy solutions inhibits the intended lipolysis. Major mesotherapy safety concerns include injection site infections from poor sterile technique. Cosmetic mesotherapy directs the area from which fat is lost to improve self-image. Studies were of relatively small number, many with limited sample sizes. Future research should be directed towards achieving a Food and Drug Administration indication rather than continuing expansion of off-label use. PMID:23800269

  8. Total dietary fat and omega-3 fatty acids have modest effects on urinary sex hormones in postmenopausal women

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Total fat and omega-3 fatty acids in the diet may affect breast cancer risk by altering estrogen metabolism. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the effects of differing total fat and omega-3 fatty acid content of diets on a panel of urinary estrogens and metabolites. A controlled, cross-ove...

  9. ADRENERGIC RECEPTOR GENOTYPE INFLUENCES THE EFFECTS OF STRENGTH TRAINING ON MID-THIGH INTER-MUSCULAR FAT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is little information regarding the effects of strength training (ST) on intermuscular fat (IMF), which can have adverse effects on health status in the elderly. Regional fat alterations resulting from exercise interventions may be influenced by adrenergic receptor (ADR) Beta2 Gln27Glu and AD...

  10. Pulmonary Complications Resulting from Genetic Cardiovascular Disease in Two Rat Models

    EPA Science Inventory

    Underlying cardiovascular disease (CVD) has been considered a risk factor for exacerbation of air pollution health effects. Therefore, rodent models of CVD are increasingly used to examine mechanisms of variation in susceptibility. Pulmonary complications and altered iron homeost...

  11. Pulmonary oxidative stress, inflammation and dysregulated iron homeostatis in rat models of cardiovascular disease

    EPA Science Inventory

    Underlying cardiovascular disease (CVD) is considered a risk factor for the exacerbation of air pollution health effects. Therefore, rodent models of CVD are increasingly used to examine mechanisms ofvariation in susceptibility. Pulmonary oxidative stress, inflammation and altere...

  12. Ozone-Induced Pulmonary Injury and Inflammation are Modulated by Adrenal-Derived Stress Hormones

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ozone exposure promotes pulmonary injury and inflammation. Previously we have characterized systemic changes that occur immediately after acute ozone exposure and are mediated by neuro-hormonal stress response pathway. Both HPA axis and sympathetic tone alterations induce the rel...

  13. Determination of Fat Content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, Charles

    The term "lipid" refers to a group of compounds that are sparingly soluble in water, but show variable solubility in a number of organic solvents (e.g., ethyl ether, petroleum ether, acetone, ethanol, methanol, benzene). The lipid content of a food determined by extraction with one solvent may be quite different from the lipid content as determined with another solvent of different polarity. Fat content is determined often by solvent extraction methods (e.g., Soxhlet, Goldfish, Mojonnier), but it also can be determined by nonsolvent wet extraction methods (e.g., Babcock, Gerber), and by instrumental methods that rely on the physical and chemical properties of lipids (e.g., infrared, density, X-ray absorption). The method of choice depends on a variety of factors, including the nature of the sample (e.g., dry versus moist), the purpose of the analysis (e.g., official nutrition labeling or rapid quality control), and instrumentation available (e.g., Babcock uses simple glassware and equipment; infrared requires an expensive instrument).

  14. [Pulmonary ventilation/perfusion ratio].

    PubMed

    Guenard, H

    1987-01-01

    The ratios of ventilatory (V) and perfusion (Q) flow rates in the lung are to a large extent responsible for the efficiency of gas exchange. In a simplified monocompartmental model of the lung, the arterial partial pressure of a given gas (Pa) is a function of several factors: the solubility of this gas in blood, its venous and inspired partial pressures and the V/Q ratio. In a multicompartemental model, the mean arterial partial pressure of the gas is a function of the individual values of Pa in each compartment as well as the distribution of V/Q ratios in the lung and the relationship between the concentration and the partial pressure of the gas. The heterogeneity of the distribution of V/Q results from those of both V and Q. Two factors are mainly responsible for this heterogeneity: the gravity and the morphometric characteristics of bronchi and vessels. V/Q ratios are partially controlled at least in low V/Q compartments since hypoxia in these compartments leads to pulmonary arteriolar vasoconstriction. However lungs V/Q ratios range from 0.1 to 10 with a mode around 1. Age, muscular exercise, posture, accelerations, anesthesia, O2 breathing, pulmonary pathology are factors which may alter the distribution of V/Q ratios. PMID:3332289

  15. Pulmonary arteriovenous malformation in chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Arun; Gulati, Gurpreet S; Parakh, Neeraj; Aggarwal, Abhinav

    2016-01-01

    Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension is a morbid condition associated with complications such as hemoptysis, right heart failure, paradoxical embolism, and even death. There is no known association of chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension with pulmonary arteriovenous malformation. Possible hypothesis for this association is an increased pulmonary vascular resistance leading to the compensatory formation of pulmonary arteriovenous malformation. We present one such case presenting with hemoptysis that was managed with endovascular treatment. PMID:27413264

  16. CT of the pulmonary ligament

    SciTech Connect

    Godwin, J.D.; Vock, P.; Osborne, D.R.

    1983-08-01

    Most computed tomographic (CT) scans of the chest show the inferior pulmonary ligament and an associated septum in the lower lobe, although CT descriptions of these structures have not been reported. Conventional radiography of the ligament has relied on indirect signs: the position of the lower lobe in the presence of pneumothorax or pleural effusion, soft-tissue peaks along the upper surface of the diaphragm, and the rare traumatic paramediastinal pneumatocele (attributed to air in the ligament). CT clarifies the anatomic relations of the ligament and alterations caused by pleural effusion and pneumothorax. The ligament is probably responsible for some long linear shadows at the lung bases, and CT helps to distinguish these from scars, walls of bullae, and normal structures such as the phrenic nerve and the interlobar fissures.

  17. Experience of injected fat grafting.

    PubMed

    Matsudo, P K; Toledo, L S

    1988-02-01

    Eighteen months' experience with the injected fat grafting technique used in 208 patients to correct various problems such as buttocks (augmentation and reshaping), trochanteric depressions, breast augmentation, scar depressions, thighs and legs (calf and ankle augmentation), small wrinkles and depressions of the face (Romberg's disease), nasolabial fold, upper outer breast quadrant, liposuction sequela, fingers and hands is presented. This method shows major advantages with few complications. Some technical details and recommendations for successful fat grafting are also presented. PMID:3376783

  18. [Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis].

    PubMed

    Hutyrová, B

    2007-10-01

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis is a rare disease characterised by excessive accumulation of surfactant components in the alveoli and the distal airways with minimum inflammatory reaction and fibrosis of pulmonary interstitium. Three clinical forms of pulmonary alveolar proteinosis are distinguished - congenital, primary and secondary. Results of ultrastructural, biochemical and functional analyses and studies performed on genetically modified mice support the presumption that accumulation of surfactant in pulmonary alveolar proteinosis is a result of a degradation disorder and of diminished clearance of the surfactant from the alveolar space rather than of excessive synthesis of surfactant components. Over the last 15 years, significant discoveries have been made which have helped to clarify the etiology and pathogenesis of the disease. A number of gene mutations have been discovered which lead to the development of congenital pulmonary proteinosis. Apart from impaired surfactant protein function, a key role in the development of pulmonary alveolar proteinosis is played by the signal pathway of granulocyte and macrophage colonies stimulating growth factor (GM-CSF) which is necessary for the functioning of alveolar macrophages and for surfactant homeostasis. The role of GM-CSF has been proven especially in primary pulmonary alveolar proteinosis which is currently considered an auto-immune disease involving the development of GM-CSF neutralising autoantibodies. In most cases, the prognosis for the disease in adult patients is good, even though there is a 10 to 15% rate of patients who develop respiratory failure. Total pulmonary lavage is considered to be the standard method of treatment. In recent years, recombinant human GM-CSF has been studied as a prospective therapy for the treatment of pulmonary alveolar proteinosis. PMID:18072433

  19. Circadian Disorganization Alters Intestinal Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Voigt, Robin M.; Forsyth, Christopher B.; Green, Stefan J.; Mutlu, Ece; Engen, Phillip; Vitaterna, Martha H.; Turek, Fred W.; Keshavarzian, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Intestinal dysbiosis and circadian rhythm disruption are associated with similar diseases including obesity, metabolic syndrome, and inflammatory bowel disease. Despite the overlap, the potential relationship between circadian disorganization and dysbiosis is unknown; thus, in the present study, a model of chronic circadian disruption was used to determine the impact on the intestinal microbiome. Male C57BL/6J mice underwent once weekly phase reversals of the light:dark cycle (i.e., circadian rhythm disrupted mice) to determine the impact of circadian rhythm disruption on the intestinal microbiome and were fed either standard chow or a high-fat, high-sugar diet to determine how diet influences circadian disruption-induced effects on the microbiome. Weekly phase reversals of the light:dark (LD) cycle did not alter the microbiome in mice fed standard chow; however, mice fed a high-fat, high-sugar diet in conjunction with phase shifts in the light:dark cycle had significantly altered microbiota. While it is yet to be established if some of the adverse effects associated with circadian disorganization in humans (e.g., shift workers, travelers moving across time zones, and in individuals with social jet lag) are mediated by dysbiosis, the current study demonstrates that circadian disorganization can impact the intestinal microbiota which may have implications for inflammatory diseases. PMID:24848969

  20. Cell biology of fat storage.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Paul; Spiegelman, Bruce M

    2016-08-15

    The worldwide epidemic of obesity and type 2 diabetes has greatly increased interest in the biology and physiology of adipose tissues. Adipose (fat) cells are specialized for the storage of energy in the form of triglycerides, but research in the last few decades has shown that fat cells also play a critical role in sensing and responding to changes in systemic energy balance. White fat cells secrete important hormone-like molecules such as leptin, adiponectin, and adipsin to influence processes such as food intake, insulin sensitivity, and insulin secretion. Brown fat, on the other hand, dissipates chemical energy in the form of heat, thereby defending against hypothermia, obesity, and diabetes. It is now appreciated that there are two distinct types of thermogenic fat cells, termed brown and beige adipocytes. In addition to these distinct properties of fat cells, adipocytes exist within adipose tissue, where they are in dynamic communication with immune cells and closely influenced by innervation and blood supply. This review is intended to serve as an introduction to adipose cell biology and to familiarize the reader with how these cell types play a role in metabolic disease and, perhaps, as targets for therapeutic development. PMID:27528697

  1. Numerous Genes in Loci Associated With Body Fat Distribution Are Linked to Adipose Function.

    PubMed

    Dahlman, Ingrid; Rydén, Mikael; Brodin, David; Grallert, Harald; Strawbridge, Rona J; Arner, Peter

    2016-02-01

    Central fat accumulation is a strong risk factor for type 2 diabetes. Genome-wide association studies have identified numerous loci associated with body fat distribution. The objectives of the current study are to examine whether genes in genetic loci linked to fat distribution can be linked to fat cell size and number (morphology) and/or adipose tissue function. We show, in a cohort of 114 women, that almost half of the 96 genes in these loci are indeed associated with abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue parameters. Thus, adipose mRNA expression of the genes is strongly related to adipose morphology, catecholamine-induced lipid mobilization (lipolysis), or insulin-stimulated lipid synthesis in adipocytes (lipogenesis). In conclusion, the genetic influence on body fat distribution could be mediated via several specific alterations in adipose tissue morphology and function, which in turn may influence the development of type 2 diabetes. PMID:26798124

  2. Mitochondrial Dynamics in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, John; Dasgupta, Asish; Huston, Jessica; Chen, Kuang-Huieh; Archer, Stephen L.

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is an idiopathic cardiopulmonary disease characterized by obstruction of small pulmonary arteries by excessive proliferation and apoptosis-resistance of vascular cells, as well as inflammation, thrombosis and vasoconstriction. Vascular obstruction increases the afterload faced by the right ventricle (RV), leading to RV failure. The proliferative, obstructive vasculopathy of PAH shares several mitochondrial abnormalities with cancer, notably a shift to aerobic glycolysis and mitochondrial fragmentation. Mitochondria in the pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell (PASMC) normally serve as oxygen sensors. In PAH, acquired mitochondrial abnormalities, including epigenetic silencing of superoxide dismutase (SOD2), disrupt oxygen sensing creating a pseudo-hypoxic environment characterized by normoxic activation of Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1α (HIF-1α). The resulting metabolic shift to aerobic glycolysis (the Warburg phenomenon) reflects inhibition of pyruvate dehydrogenase by pyruvate dehydrogenase kinases. In addition, altered mitochondrial dynamics result in mitochondrial fragmentation. The molecular basis of this structural change includes upregulation and activation of fission mediators, notably dynamin-related protein 1 (DRP-1), and downregulation of fusion mediators, especially mitofusin-2 (MFN2). These pathogenic mitochondrial abnormalities offer new therapeutic targets. Inhibition of mitotic fission or enhancement of fusion in PAH PASMC slows cell proliferation, causes cell cycle arrest, and induces apoptosis. DRP-1 inhibition or MFN2 gene therapy can regress PAH in experimental models of PAH. This review focuses on the etiology of mitochondrial fragmentation in PAH and explores the therapeutic implications of mitochondrial dynamics in the pulmonary vasculature and RV. PMID:25672499

  3. Fat Grafting for Facial Filling and Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Sydney R; Katzel, Evan B

    2015-07-01

    Plastic surgeons have come to realize that fat grafting can rejuvenate an aging face by restoring or creating fullness. However, fat grafting does much more than simply add volume. Grafted fat can transform or repair the tissues into which it is placed. Historically, surgeons have hesitated to embrace the rejuvenating potential of fat grafting because of poor graft take, fat necrosis, and inconsistent outcomes. This article describes fat grafting techniques and practices to assist readers in successful harvesting, processing, and placement of fat for optimal graft retention and facial esthetic outcomes. PMID:26116934

  4. Frequent mutations in chromatin-remodeling genes in pulmonary carcinoids

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xin; Sun, Ruping; Ozretić, Luka; Seidal, Danila; Zander, Thomas; Leenders, Frauke; George, Julie; Müller, Christian; Dahmen, Ilona; Pinther, Berit; Bosco, Graziella; Konrad, Kathryn; Altmüller, Janine; Nürnberg, Peter; Achter, Viktor; Lang, Ulrich; Schneider, Peter M; Bogus, Magdalena; Soltermann, Alex; Brustugun, Odd Terje; Helland, Åslaug; Solberg, Steinar; Lund-Iversen, Marius; Ansén, Sascha; Stoelben, Erich; Wright, Gavin M.; Russell, Prudence; Wainer, Zoe; Solomon, Benjamin; Field, John K; Hyde, Russell; Davies, Michael PA.; Heukamp, Lukas C; Petersen, Iver; Perner, Sven; Lovly, Christine; Cappuzzo, Federico; Travis, William D; Wolf, Jürgen; Vingron, Martin; Brambilla, Elisabeth; Haas, Stefan A.; Buettner, Reinhard; Thomas, Roman K

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary carcinoids are rare neuroendocrine tumors of the lung. The molecular alterations underlying the pathogenesis of these tumors have not been systematically studied so far. Here we perform gene copy number analysis (n=54), genome/exome (n=44) and transcriptome (n=69) sequencing of pulmonary carcinoids and observe frequent mutations in chromatin-remodeling genes. Covalent histone modifiers and subunits of the SWI/SNF complex are mutated in 40% and 22.2% of the cases respectively, with MEN1, PSIP1 and ARID1A being recurrently affected. In contrast to small-cell lung cancer and large-cell neuroendocrine tumors, TP53 and RB1 mutations are rare events, suggesting that pulmonary carcinoids are not early progenitor lesions of the highly aggressive lung neuroendocrine tumors but arise through independent cellular mechanisms. These data also suggest that inactivation of chromatin remodeling genes is sufficient to drive transformation in pulmonary carcinoids. PMID:24670920

  5. Pulmonary phospholipidosis in rats respiring air containing diesel particulates

    SciTech Connect

    Eskelson, C.D.; Chvapil, M.; Strom, K.A.; Vostal, J.J.

    1987-12-01

    Rats chronically exposed to diesel particulates (dp) or given intratracheally a single dose of dp show increased levels of phospholipids in the lungs and in pulmonary lavage fluid. Pulmonary phospholipidosis is accompanied by increase lecithin levels and by increased palmitate content in lecithin of both lungs and pulmonary lavage fluid. A de novo increase of pulmonary and hepatic phospholipid (PL) formation was detected 5 days after rats were treated with dp. The authors hypothesize that a dp-stressed lung releases a pulmonary lipogenic factor (PLF), which stimulates hepatic lipogenesis. This was further tested by an in vitro study in which primary cultures of free hepatocytes were incubated with (2-/sup 14/C)acetate and various molecular weight fractions of a pulmonary homogenate from rats. The results from these studies indicated that in rat lung homogenates a PLF exists of greater than 100,000 Da molecular mass. The results also indicate that respired air containing a dp concentration of greater than 750 ..mu..g dp/m/sup 3/ of air would result in a mild phospholipidosis in the lung, whereas a dp dose in respired air of 250 ..mu..g dp/m/sup 3/ of air for 2 years did not alter pulmonary PL content in rats.

  6. Percutaneous Pulmonary Valve Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyoung-Doo

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary regurgitation (PR) is a frequent sequelae after repair of tetralogy of Fallot, pulmonary atresia, truncus arteriosus, Rastelli and Ross operation. Due to patient growth and conduit degeneration, these conduits have to be changed frequently due to regurgitation or stenosis. However, morbidity is significant in these repeated operations. To prolong conduit longevity, bare-metal stenting in the right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT) obstruction has been performed. Stenting the RVOT can reduce the right ventricular pressure and symptomatic improvement, but it causes PR with detrimental effects on the right ventricle function and risks of arrhythmia. Percutaneous pulmonary valve implantation has been shown to be a safe and effective treatment for patients with pulmonary valve insufficiency, or stenotic RVOTs. PMID:23170091

  7. Diagnosis of pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Iber, C; Sirr, S

    1988-09-01

    Pulmonary embolism (PE) is often unrecognized or misdiagnosed because of the lack of specificity of clinical signs and symptoms. PE shares many of the clinical features of pneumonia and is therefore often unrecognized in elderly patients who present with low-grade fever, modest leukocytosis, and pulmonary infiltrates. Assessment of clinical risk factors increases the usefulness of diagnostic tests. The accuracy of diagnosis is improved if specific tests are performed. Ventilation-perfusion lung scans, noninvasive or contrast venography, and pulmonary angiography increase the likelihood of correct diagnosis. Since pulmonary angiography is a relatively low-risk procedure, it should be performed in most patients suspected of having PE who have nondiagnostic lung scans and negative lower extremity venous studies. PMID:3055112

  8. Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis (IPF)

    MedlinePlus

    ... cough, shortness of breath, fatigue and low blood oxygen levels. Pulmonary fibrosis can be caused by an ... breath. Your health care provider may notice the oxygen levels in your blood drop when you walk. ...

  9. Pulmonary function tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... fibrosis (scarring or thickening of the lung tissue) Sarcoidosis and scleroderma Muscular weakness can also cause abnormal ... Emphysema Interstitial Lung Diseases Lung Diseases Pulmonary Fibrosis Sarcoidosis Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A.M., Inc. ...

  10. Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Medicine, Pulmonary, Allergy, and Critical Care, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA. Also ... M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health ...

  11. Facts about Pulmonary Atresia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Articles & Key Findings Free Materials Multimedia and Tools Links to Other Websites Information For... Media Policy Makers Facts about Pulmonary Atresia Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Click here to view a ...

  12. Pulmonary rehabilitation in adults.

    PubMed

    2016-06-01

    Pulmonary rehabilitation can help people with long-term lung conditions whose symptoms, such as breathlessness and being easily tired out by daily activities, seriously impact their lives. PMID:27408642

  13. Pulmonary vasodilator responses to sodium nitrite are mediated by an allopurinol-sensitive mechanism in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Casey, David B.; Badejo, Adeleke M.; Dhaliwal, Jasdeep S.; Murthy, Subramanyam N.; Hyman, Albert L.; Nossaman, Bobby D.; Kadowitz, Philip J.

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies show that pulmonary vasodilator responses to nitrite are enhanced by hypoxia. However, the mechanism by which nitrite is converted to vasoactive nitric oxide (NO) is uncertain. In the present study, intravenous injections of sodium nitrite decreased pulmonary and systemic arterial pressures and increased cardiac output. The decreases in pulmonary arterial pressure were enhanced when tone in the pulmonary vascular bed was increased with U-46619. Under elevated tone conditions, decreases in pulmonary and systemic arterial pressures in response to nitrite were attenuated by allopurinol in a dose that did not alter responses to the NO donors, sodium nitroprusside and diethylamine/NO, suggesting that xanthine oxidoreductase is the major enzyme-reducing nitrite to NO. Ventilation with a 10% O2 gas mixture increased pulmonary arterial pressure, and the response to hypoxia was enhanced by NG-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester and not altered by allopurinol. This suggests that NO formed by the endothelium and not from the reduction of plasma nitrite modulates the hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstrictor response. Although intravenous injections of sodium nitrite reversed pulmonary hypertensive responses to U-46619, hypoxia, and NG-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester, the pulmonary vasodilator response to nitrite was not altered by ventilation with 10% O2 when baseline pulmonary arterial pressure was increased to similar values in animals breathing room air or the hypoxic gas. These data provide evidence that xanthine oxidoreductase is the major enzyme-reducing nitrite to vasoactive NO, and that this mechanism is not modified by hypoxia. PMID:19074675

  14. Morphological changes in small pulmonary vessels are associated with severe acute exacerbation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Yoshimura, Katsuhiro; Suzuki, Yuzo; Uto, Tomohiro; Sato, Jun; Imokawa, Shiro; Suda, Takafumi

    2016-01-01

    Background Pulmonary vascular remodeling is essential for understanding the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The total cross-sectional area (CSA) of small pulmonary vessels has been reported to correlate with the pulmonary artery pressure, and this technique has enabled the assessment of pulmonary vascular involvements. We investigated the contribution of morphological alterations in the pulmonary vessels to severe acute exacerbation of COPD (AE-COPD). Methods This study enrolled 81 patients with COPD and 28 non-COPD subjects as control and assessed the percentage of CSA (%CSA) less than 5 mm2 (%CSA<5) and %CSA in the range of 5–10 mm2 (%CSA5–10) on high-resolution computed tomography images. Results Compared with the non-COPD subjects, the COPD patients had lower %CSA<5. %CSA<5 was positively correlated with airflow limitation and negatively correlated with the extent of emphysema. COPD patients with lower %CSA<5 showed significantly increased incidences of severe AE-COPD (Gray’s test; P=0.011). Furthermore, lower %CSA<5 was significantly associated with severe AE-COPD (hazard ratio, 2.668; 95% confidence interval, 1.225–5.636; P=0.010). Conclusion %CSA<5 was associated with an increased risk of severe AE-COPD. The distal pruning of the small pulmonary vessels is a part of the risk associated with AE-COPD, and %CSA<5 might be a surrogate marker for predicting AE-COPD. PMID:27418816

  15. Familial pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Borie, R; Kannengiesser, C; Nathan, N; Tabèze, L; Pradère, P; Crestani, B

    2015-04-01

    The occurrence of pulmonary fibrosis in numerous individuals from the same family suggests a genetic cause for the disease. During the last 10 years, mutations involving proteins from the telomerase complex and from the surfactant system have been identified in association with pulmonary fibrosis. Mutations of TERT, the coding gene for the telomerase reverse transcriptase, are the most frequently identified mutations and are present in 15% of cases of familial pulmonary fibrosis. Other mutations (TERC, surfactant proteins genes) are only rarely evidenced in adults. Patients with mutations involving the telomerase complex may present with pulmonary fibrosis, hematologic, cutaneous or liver diseases. Other genetic variations associated with pulmonary fibrosis such as a polymorphism in the promoter of MUC5B or a polymorphism in TERT have been recently described, and could be considered to be part of a polygenic transmission. Evidence for mutations associated with the development of pulmonary fibrosis raises numerous clinical questions from establishing a diagnosis, providing counselling to deciding on therapy, and requires specific studies. From a pathophysiological point of view, the function of the genes highlights the central role of alveolar epithelium and aging in fibrogenesis. PMID:25596800

  16. Abnormal pulmonary macrophages in lysinuric protein intolerance. Ultrastructural, morphometric, and x-ray microanalytic study.

    PubMed

    Parto, K; Mäki, J; Pelliniemi, L J; Simell, O

    1994-05-01

    Pediatric patients with lysinuric protein intolerance are predisposed to develop alveolar hemorrhage and pulmonary alveolar proteinosis. We evaluated the ultrastructural features of pulmonary alveolar proteinosis and the potential abnormality of pulmonary macrophages in lysinuric protein intolerance. Lung tissue specimens obtained at autopsy were examined by transmission electron microscopy. Pulmonary macrophages from bronchoalveolar lavages were studied by electron microscopy, morphometry, and x-ray microanalysis and compared with control cells. The macrophages of patients with lysinuric protein intolerance contained significantly more multilamellar structures than did control cells and showed electron-dense material identified to contain excess iron. The predisposition to develop alveolar proteinosis and the abnormal ultrastructure of pulmonary macrophages suggest altered phospholipid metabolism in patients with lysinuric protein intolerance. The marked intramacrophageal accumulations of iron might indicate altered iron metabolism or subclinical hemorrhages in lung tissue. PMID:8192561

  17. Interaction of atypical cadherin Fat1 with SoHo adaptor proteins CAP/ponsin and ArgBP2.

    PubMed

    Braun, Gerald S; Kuszka, Andrzej; Dau, Cécile; Kriz, Wilhelm; Moeller, Marcus J

    2016-03-25

    Mammalian Fat1 is a giant atypical cadherin/tumor suppressor involved in the regulation of cellular orientation, migration, and growth. Fat1 is implicated in the development of the brain, eye, and kidney. Altered expression or mutations of FAT1 are also associated with cancer and facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD). Yet, the mechanistic functions of this pathway remain incompletely understood. Here, we report the identification of Sorbin-homology (SoHo) proteins as novel interaction partners of Fat1 by virtue of a yeast-two-hybrid screen. SoHo proteins play diverse roles as adaptor proteins in cell signaling, cell adhesion and sarcomere architecture, including altered expression in cancer and FSHD. Specifically, we found SoHo proteins CAP/ponsin-1 and -2 (Sorbs1) and ArgBP2 (Sorbs2) to interact with the cytoplasmic domain of Fat1. We mapped the interaction to a prolin-rich classic type II PXXP motif within Fat1 and to the three Src-homology (SH3) domains within SoHo proteins using mutant expression in yeast, pulldown assays, and cell culture. Functionally, endogenous ponsin-2 expression of NRK-52E cells at cellular leading edges was lost upon knockdown of Fat1. In summary, our data point to an interaction of Fat1 with SoHo proteins that is able to recruit SoHo proteins to sites of Fat1 expression. PMID:26903299

  18. Autologous fat graft by needle: analysis of complications after 1000 patients.

    PubMed

    Maione, Luca; Vinci, Valeriano; Klinger, Marco; Klinger, Francesco Maria; Caviggioli, Fabio

    2015-03-01

    Autologous fat graft is becoming a widely used procedure in plastic surgery. Its indications are progressively increasing, ranging from functional to aesthetic surgery. The procedure has now entered in the field of regenerative medicine. Although many have commented on the long-term safety implications of fat grafting, especially to the breast, there is no body of information in the literature that analyzes near-term complications associated with this procedure. We performed a retrospective study of 1000 consecutive fat transplantation cases in our hospital since 2005. Complications were divided between donor-site complications and recipient-site complications. Of 1000 procedures, there were 2 donor-site hematomas and 83 local deformities caused by liposuction. In treated patients, the recipient site, there were 4 infections. One patient reported implant rupture at 1 month after fat graft. There was no skin necrosis in the grafted areas and no systemic complications such as pulmonary embolism, cardiac arrest, or deep venous thrombosis. The complications in fat transplantation are dominated by complications of the liposuction-the donor harvesting phase of the procedure. The relatively low complication rates in the recipient site suggest that fat transplantation, especially considering the recipient, is characterized by a high safety level and our device is simple to use. PMID:25003414

  19. Pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Tuder, Rubin M.; Petrache, Irina

    2012-01-01

    The current epidemic of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) has produced a worldwide health care burden, approaching that imposed by transmittable infectious diseases. COPD is a multidimensional disease, with varied intermediate and clinical phenotypes. This Review discusses the pathogenesis of COPD, with particular focus on emphysema, based on the concept that pulmonary injury involves stages of initiation (by exposure to cigarette smoke, pollutants, and infectious agents), progression, and consolidation. Tissue damage entails complex interactions among oxidative stress, inflammation, extracellular matrix proteolysis, and apoptotic and autophagic cell death. Lung damage by cigarette smoke ultimately leads to self-propagating processes, resulting in macromolecular and structural alterations — features similar to those seen in aging. PMID:22850885

  20. Fat tissue and inflammation in patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Rincón Bello, Abraham; Bucalo, Laura; Abad Estébanez, Soraya; Vega Martínez, Almudena; Barraca Núñez, Daniel; Yuste Lozano, Claudia; Pérez de José, Ana; López-Gómez, Juan M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Body weight has been increasing in the general population and is an established risk factor for hypertension, diabetes, and all-cause and cardiovascular mortality. Patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis (PD) gain weight, mainly during the first months of treatment. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between body composition and metabolic and inflammatory status in patients undergoing PD. Methods This was a prospective, non-interventional study of prevalent patients receiving PD. Body composition was studied every 3 months using bioelectrical impedance (BCM®). We performed linear regression for each patient, including all BCM® measurements, to calculate annual changes in body composition. Thirty-one patients in our PD unit met the inclusion criteria. Results Median follow-up was 26 (range 17–27) months. Mean increase in weight was 1.8 ± 2.8 kg/year. However, BCM® analysis revealed a mean increase in fat mass of 3.0 ± 3.2 kg/year with a loss of lean mass of 2.3 ± 4.1 kg/year during follow-up. The increase in fat mass was associated with the conicity index, suggesting that increases in fat mass are based mainly on abdominal adipose tissue. Changes in fat mass were directly associated with inflammation parameters such as C-reactive protein (r = 0.382, P = 0.045) and inversely associated with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (r=−0.50, P = 0.008). Conclusions Follow-up of weight and body mass index can underestimate the fat mass increase and miss lean mass loss. The increase in fat mass is associated with proinflammatory state and alteration in lipid profile. PMID:27274820

  1. Obesity development in neuron-specific lipoprotein lipase deficient mice is not responsive to increased dietary fat content or change in fat composition.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong; Taussig, Matthew D; DiPatrizio, Nicholas V; Bruce, Kimberley; Piomelli, Daniele; Eckel, Robert H

    2016-07-01

    We have previously reported that mice with neuron-specific LPL deficiency (NEXLPL-/-) become obese by 16weeks of age on chow. Moreover, these mice had reduced uptake of triglyceride (TG)-rich lipoprotein-derived fatty acids and lower levels of n-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs) in the hypothalamus. Here, we asked whether increased dietary fat content or altered dietary composition could modulate obesity development in NEXLPL-/- mice. Male NEXLPL-/- mice and littermate controls (WT) were randomly assigned one of three synthetic diets; a high carbohydrate diet (HC, 10% fat), a high-fat diet (HF, 45% fat), or a HC diet supplemented with n-3 PUFAs (HCn-3, 10% fat, Lovaza, GSK®). After 42weeks of HC feeding, body weight and fat mass were increased in the NEXLPL-/- mice compared to WT. WT mice fed a HF diet displayed typical diet-induced obesity, but weight gain was only marginal in HF-fed NEXLPL-/- mice, with no significant difference in body composition. Dietary n-3 PUFA supplementation did not prevent obesity in NEXLPL-/- mice, but was associated with differential modifications in hypothalamic gene expression and PUFA concentration compared to WT mice. Our findings suggest that neuronal LPL is involved in the regulation of body weight and composition in response to either the change in quantity (HF feeding) or quality (n-3 PUFA-enriched) of dietary fat. The precise role of LPL in lipid sensing in the brain requires further investigation. PMID:27282869

  2. Interplay between exercise and dietary fat modulates myelinogenesis in the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Hyesook; Kleven, Andrew; Paulsen, Alex; Kleppe, Laurel; Wu, Jianmin; Ying, Zhe; Gomez-Pinilla, Fernando; Scarisbrick, Isobel A

    2016-04-01

    Here we show that the interplay between exercise training and dietary fat regulates myelinogenesis in the adult central nervous system. Mice consuming high fat with coordinate voluntary running wheel exercise for 7weeks showed increases in the abundance of the major myelin membrane proteins, proteolipid (PLP) and myelin basic protein (MBP), in the lumbosacral spinal cord. Expression of MBP and PLP RNA, as well that for Myrf1, a transcription factor driving oligodendrocyte differentiation were also differentially increased under each condition. Furthermore, expression of IGF-1 and its receptor IGF-1R, known to promote myelinogenesis, were also increased in the spinal cord in response to high dietary fat or exercise training. Parallel increases in AKT signaling, a pro-myelination signaling intermediate activated by IGF-1, were also observed in the spinal cord of mice consuming high fat alone or in combination with exercise. Despite the pro-myelinogenic effects of high dietary fat in the context of exercise, high fat consumption in the setting of a sedentary lifestyle reduced OPCs and mature oligodendroglia. Whereas 7weeks of exercise training alone did not alter OPC or oligodendrocyte numbers, it did reverse reductions seen with high fat. Evidence is presented suggesting that the interplay between exercise and high dietary fat increase SIRT1, PGC-1α and antioxidant enzymes which may permit oligodendroglia to take advantage of diet and exercise-related increases in mitochondrial activity to yield increases in myelination despite higher levels of reactive oxygen species. PMID:26826016

  3. Fat Embolism Syndrome: An Autopsy-Proven Case Involving a Patient on Dialysis and Systemic Scleroderma

    PubMed Central

    Nishimura, Nahoko; Banno, Shogo; Kimura, Yukihiro; Maeda, Sayaka; Kobayashi, Mizuki; Kawai, Kumi; Suga, Norihiro; Suzuki, Keisuke; Miura, Naoto; Yokoi, Toyoharu; Imai, Hirokazu

    2014-01-01

    A 66-year-old woman receiving continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis developed acute respiratory distress 12 hours after a fall. Blood gas analysis revealed hypoxia (PaO2 67.7 torr) and metabolic acidosis with an increased anion gap, consistent with lactic acidosis (lactate, 86.5 mg/dL; normal range, 4.0–16.0). Magnetic resonance imaging showed a lumbar vertebral body fracture. On the fourth hospital day, the patient died of multiorgan failure and disseminated intravascular coagulation. Postmortem studies revealed fat emboli in the systemic circulation, ie, fat embolism syndrome. Diagnosing fat embolism syndrome can be difficult in patients on dialysis or in those with collagen vascular or pulmonary diseases. PMID:24526839

  4. Effects of prior acute exercise on circulating cytokine concentration responses to a high-fat meal.

    PubMed

    Brandauer, Josef; Landers-Ramos, Rian Q; Jenkins, Nathan T; Spangenburg, Espen E; Hagberg, James M; Prior, Steven J

    2013-08-01

    High-fat meal consumption alters the circulating cytokine profile and contributes to cardiometabolic diseases. A prior bout of exercise can ameliorate the triglyceride response to a high-fat meal, but the interactive effects of exercise and high-fat meals on cytokines that mediate cardiometabolic risk are not fully understood. We investigated the effects of prior exercise on the responses of circulating tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-8, leptin, retinol-binding protein 4 (RBP4), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), placental growth factor (PlGF), and soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1 (sFlt-1) to a high-fat meal. Ten healthy men were studied before and 4 h after ingestion of a high-fat meal either with or without ∼50 min of endurance exercise at 70% of VO2 max on the preceding day. In response to the high-fat meal, lower leptin and higher VEGF, bFGF, IL-6, and IL-8 concentrations were evident (P < 0.05 for all). There was no effect of the high-fat meal on PlGF, TNF-α, or RBP4 concentrations. We found lower leptin concentrations with prior exercise (P < 0.05) and interactive effects of prior exercise and the high-fat meal on sFlt-1 (P < 0.05). The high-fat meal increased IL-6 by 59% without prior exercise and 218% with prior exercise (P < 0.05). In conclusion, a prior bout of endurance exercise does not affect all high-fat meal-induced changes in circulating cytokines, but does affect fasting or postprandial concentrations of IL-6, leptin, and sFlt-1. These data may reflect a salutary effect of prior exercise on metabolic responses to a high-fat meal. PMID:24303126

  5. Effects of prior acute exercise on circulating cytokine concentration responses to a high-fat meal

    PubMed Central

    Brandauer, Josef; Landers-Ramos, Rian Q; Jenkins, Nathan T; Spangenburg, Espen E; Hagberg, James M; Prior, Steven J

    2013-01-01

    High-fat meal consumption alters the circulating cytokine profile and contributes to cardiometabolic diseases. A prior bout of exercise can ameliorate the triglyceride response to a high-fat meal, but the interactive effects of exercise and high-fat meals on cytokines that mediate cardiometabolic risk are not fully understood. We investigated the effects of prior exercise on the responses of circulating tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-8, leptin, retinol-binding protein 4 (RBP4), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), placental growth factor (PlGF), and soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1 (sFlt-1) to a high-fat meal. Ten healthy men were studied before and 4 h after ingestion of a high-fat meal either with or without ∼50 min of endurance exercise at 70% of VO2 max on the preceding day. In response to the high-fat meal, lower leptin and higher VEGF, bFGF, IL-6, and IL-8 concentrations were evident (P < 0.05 for all). There was no effect of the high-fat meal on PlGF, TNF-α, or RBP4 concentrations. We found lower leptin concentrations with prior exercise (P < 0.05) and interactive effects of prior exercise and the high-fat meal on sFlt-1 (P < 0.05). The high-fat meal increased IL-6 by 59% without prior exercise and 218% with prior exercise (P < 0.05). In conclusion, a prior bout of endurance exercise does not affect all high-fat meal–induced changes in circulating cytokines, but does affect fasting or postprandial concentrations of IL-6, leptin, and sFlt-1. These data may reflect a salutary effect of prior exercise on metabolic responses to a high-fat meal. PMID:24303126

  6. REACTIVE OXYGEN AND NITROGEN SPECIES IN PULMONARY HYPERTENSION

    PubMed Central

    Tabima, Diana M.; Frizzell, Sheila; Gladwin, Mark T.

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary vascular disease can be defined as either a disease affecting the pulmonary capillaries and pulmonary arterioles, termed pulmonary arterial hypertension, or as a disease affecting the left ventricle, called pulmonary venous hypertension. Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a disorder of the pulmonary circulation characterized by endothelial dysfunction, as well as intimal and smooth muscle proliferation. Progressive increases in pulmonary vascular resistance and pressure impair the performance of the right ventricle, resulting in declining cardiac output, reduced exercise capacity, right heart failure, and ultimately death. While the primary and heritable forms of the disease are thought to affect over 5,000 patients in the U.S., the disease can occur secondary to congenital heart disease, most advanced lung diseases, and many systemic diseases. Multiple studies implicate oxidative stress in the development of PAH. Further, this oxidative stress has been shown to be associated with alterations in reactive oxygen species (ROS), reactive nitrogen species (RNS) and nitric oxide (NO) signaling pathways, whereby bioavailable NO is decreased and ROS and RNS production are increased. Many canonical ROS and NO signaling pathways are simultaneously disrupted in PAH, with increased expression of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidases and xanthine oxidoreductase, uncoupling of endothelial NO synthase (eNOS), and reduction in mitochondrial number, as well as impaired mitochondrial function. Upstream dysregulation of ROS/NO redox homeostasis impairs vascular tone and contributes to the pathological activation of anti-apoptotic and mitogenic pathways, leading to cell proliferation and obliteration of the vasculature. This manuscript will review the available data regarding the role of oxidative and nitrosative stress and endothelial dysfunction in the pathophysiology of pulmonary hypertension, and provide a description of targeted therapies

  7. Pulmonary Hypertension and Pulmonary Aspergilloma-Coexistence of Two Rare Sequelae of Pulmonary Embolism.

    PubMed

    Bhartiya, Manish; Saxena, Puneet; Singh, Dharmender; Sashindran, V K

    2016-06-01

    We report a 42 year old non-smoker male who presented with progressive exertional dyspnoea, productive cough with streaky hemoptysis and progressive pedal edema. His physical examination, ECG, chest X-ray and 2D-ECHO revealed features suggestive of right heart failure and pulmonary hypertension. On further evaluation for the cause of pulmonary hypertension, his CT pulmonary angiography revealed features of chronic pulmonary thromboembolism with calcified thrombus in the main pulmonary artery along with pulmonary hypertension. Incidentally the CT also revealed a cavity in the right lung with soft tissue within it. A, trans-thoracic needle aspiration of this tissue was suggestive of an aspergilloma. This is a rare case report of co-existence of two uncommon complications of pulmonary embolism-chronic thrombo-embolic pulmonary hypertension and pulmonary Aspergilloma in the same patient. PMID:27408402

  8. Fat: an evolving issue

    PubMed Central

    Speakman, John R.; O’Rahilly, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Summary Work on obesity is evolving, and obesity is a consequence of our evolutionary history. In the space of 50 years, we have become an obese species. The reasons why can be addressed at a number of different levels. These include separating between whether the primary cause lies on the food intake or energy expenditure side of the energy balance equation, and determining how genetic and environmental effects contribute to weight variation between individuals. Opinion on whether increased food intake or decreased energy expenditure drives the obesity epidemic is still divided, but recent evidence favours the idea that food intake, rather than altered expenditure, is most important. There is more of a consensus that genetics explains most (probably around 65%) of weight variation between individuals. Recent advances in genome-wide association studies have identified many polymorphisms that are linked to obesity, yet much of the genetic variance remains unexplained. Finding the causes of this unexplained variation will be an impetus of genetic and epigenetic research on obesity over the next decade. Many environmental factors – including gut microbiota, stress and endocrine disruptors – have been linked to the risk of developing obesity. A better understanding of gene-by-environment interactions will also be key to understanding obesity in the years to come. PMID:22915015

  9. [Renal ultrasound in fat necrosis].

    PubMed

    Tizki, S; Lasry, F; Elftoiki, F Z; Hadj Khalifa, H; Itri, M; Khadir, K; Benchikhi, H

    2013-07-01

    Subcutaneous fat necrosis is an uncommon disease that may be complicated with potentially fatal hypercalcemia or with nephrocalcinosis. We report on the case of a patient with a history of significant perinatal asphyxia, hospitalized for a urinary tract infection. Lesions of subcutaneous fat necrosis were noted, with asymptomatic hypercalcemia at 3.9mmol/L. A renal ultrasound was performed and showed echogenic medullary pyramids bilaterally, consistent with nephrocalcinosis and left nephrolithiasis. The treatment of hypercalcemia included hyperhydration, a diuretic and corticosteroids. Progression was characterized by the total regression of skin lesions and normalization of serum calcium. Hypercalcemia is a rare complication of subcutaneous fat necrosis. It develops within days to weeks after the appearance of skin lesions. Nephrocalcinosis appears after several weeks or months. Hypercalcemia must be treated in due time to avoid the impact on the kidney. PMID:23726682

  10. [Primary pulmonary sarcomas].

    PubMed

    Jakubcová, T; Jakubec, P

    2009-01-01

    Primary pulmonary sarcomas are rare diseases unlike lung carcinomas. The occurence of these sarcomas is between 0.013-0.40% of all malignant lung tumours. There are malignant mesenchymal tumours. They are flowing from the soft tissue of lung. The pulmonary sarcomas are heterogenic group with various biological behaviour. Their morfologic structure does not digger from the sarcomas of soft tissue. The primary pulmonary sarcomas occur more often in childhood and in young people unlike lung carcinomas. Radiation and some toxic substances are noted risk factors. Some gene mutations, infectious pathoghens and contraception have a possible impact on the origin of some types of the sarcomas. The current hypothesis is, that most of the sarcomas, if not all sarcomas, stem from primitive multipotent mesenchymal cell by malignant transformation in one or more lines. The diagnostic standard is biopsy from tumour with histologic and immunohistochemistry examination of a sample. The basic diagnostic problem is exclusion of a secondary origin of sarcomatic cells in the lung, because pulmonary metastasis of extrapulmonary sarcomas are more often than the primary pulmonary involvement.The optimal treatment is a resection of the tumour.The other therapeutic modalities are radiotherapy and chemotherapy, but results of these modalities are unsatisfactory. There are various chemotherapeutic regimes, monotherapy or combination regimes. The basic cytostatics are doxorubicine, iphosphamide, dacarbazine. Problems of the chemotherapy are high toxicity and relatively low curative effect about 20%.The first studies with biological treatment of the sarcomas of soft tissue have been published recently.This types of drugs could be a part of the complex management of these primary pulmonary tumours in the future. The primary pulmonary sarcomas have mostly aggresive course and often recur. Their prognosis is usually not very good. The survival median is 48 months and 5-years survival ranges

  11. Predictors of Pulmonary Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Miniati, Massimo; Bottai, Matteo; Ciccotosto, Cesario; Roberto, Luca; Monti, Simonetta

    2015-01-01

    Abstract In the setting of acute pulmonary embolism (PE), pulmonary infarction is deemed to occur primarily in individuals with compromised cardiac function. The current study was undertaken to establish the prevalence of pulmonary infarction in patients with acute PE, and the relationship between infarction and: age, body height, body mass index (BMI), smoking habits, clot burden, and comorbidities. The authors studied prospectively 335 patients with acute PE diagnosed by computed tomographic angiography (CT) in 18 hospitals throughout central Italy. The diagnosis of pulmonary infarction on CT was based on Hampton and Castleman's criteria (cushion-like or hemispherical consolidation lying along the visceral pleura). Multivariable logistic regression was used to model the relationship between covariates and the probability of pulmonary infarction. The prevalence of pulmonary infarction was 31%. Patients with infarction were significantly younger and with significantly lower prevalence of cardiovascular disease than those without (P < 0.001). The frequency of infarction increased linearly with increasing height, and decreased with increasing BMI. In logistic regression, the covariates significantly associated with the probability of infarction were age, body height, BMI, and current smoking. The risk of infarction grew with age, peaked at approximately age 40, and decreased afterwards. Increasing body height and current smoking were significant amplifiers of the risk of infarction, whereas increasing BMI appeared to confer some protection. Our data indicate that pulmonary infarction occurs in nearly one-third of the patients with acute PE. Those with infarction are often young and otherwise healthy. Increasing body height and active smoking are predisposing risk factors. PMID:26469892

  12. Predictors of Pulmonary Infarction.

    PubMed

    Miniati, Massimo; Bottai, Matteo; Ciccotosto, Cesario; Roberto, Luca; Monti, Simonetta

    2015-10-01

    In the setting of acute pulmonary embolism (PE), pulmonary infarction is deemed to occur primarily in individuals with compromised cardiac function.The current study was undertaken to establish the prevalence of pulmonary infarction in patients with acute PE, and the relationship between infarction and: age, body height, body mass index (BMI), smoking habits, clot burden, and comorbidities.The authors studied prospectively 335 patients with acute PE diagnosed by computed tomographic angiography (CT) in 18 hospitals throughout central Italy. The diagnosis of pulmonary infarction on CT was based on Hampton and Castleman's criteria (cushion-like or hemispherical consolidation lying along the visceral pleura). Multivariable logistic regression was used to model the relationship between covariates and the probability of pulmonary infarction.The prevalence of pulmonary infarction was 31%. Patients with infarction were significantly younger and with significantly lower prevalence of cardiovascular disease than those without (P < 0.001). The frequency of infarction increased linearly with increasing height, and decreased with increasing BMI. In logistic regression, the covariates significantly associated with the probability of infarction were age, body height, BMI, and current smoking. The risk of infarction grew with age, peaked at approximately age 40, and decreased afterwards. Increasing body height and current smoking were significant amplifiers of the risk of infarction, whereas increasing BMI appeared to confer some protection.Our data indicate that pulmonary infarction occurs in nearly one-third of the patients with acute PE. Those with infarction are often young and otherwise healthy. Increasing body height and active smoking are predisposing risk factors. PMID:26469892

  13. Rethinking fat as a fuel for endurance exercise.

    PubMed

    Volek, Jeff S; Noakes, Timothy; Phinney, Stephen D

    2015-01-01

    A key element contributing to deteriorating exercise capacity during physically demanding sport appears to be reduced carbohydrate availability coupled with an inability to effectively utilize alternative lipid fuel sources. Paradoxically, cognitive and physical decline associated with glycogen depletion occurs in the presence of an over-abundance of fuel stored as body fat that the athlete is apparently unable to access effectively. Current fuelling tactics that emphasize high-carbohydrate intakes before and during exercise inhibit fat utilization. The most efficient approach to accelerate the body's ability to oxidize fat is to lower dietary carbohydrate intake to a level that results in nutritional ketosis (i.e., circulating ketone levels >0.5 mmol/L) while increasing fat intake for a period of several weeks. The coordinated set of metabolic adaptations that ensures proper interorgan fuel supply in the face of low-carbohydrate availability is referred to as keto-adaptation. Beyond simply providing a stable source of fuel for the brain, the major circulating ketone body, beta-hydroxybutyrate, has recently been shown to act as a signalling molecule capable of altering gene expression, eliciting complementary effects of keto-adaptation that could extend human physical and mental performance beyond current expectation. In this paper, we review these new findings and propose that the shift to fatty acids and ketones as primary fuels when dietary carbohydrate is restricted could be of benefit for some athletes. PMID:25275931

  14. INCREASED PULMONARY DISEASE MEDIATED THROUGH ALTERED BACTERIAL DEFENSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The process of infection has been defined as an interaction of a host, a microbe, and the environment. In the natural environment, healthy individuals exist in equilibrium with potentially pathogenic microorganisms. Using this concept, an animal-model system was developed to stud...

  15. Pulmonary vascular malformations.

    PubMed

    Liechty, Kenneth W; Flake, Alan W

    2008-02-01

    Pulmonary vascular malformations have historically been diagnosed in a wide range of age groups, but the extensive use of prenatal imaging studies has resulted in the majority of lesions being diagnosed in utero. Among this group of lesions, bronchopulmonary sequestrations (BPS), hybrid lesions with both congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation (CCAM) and BPS, aberrant systemic vascular anastomoses, and pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVM), are the most common. The biologic behavior of these lesions and the subsequent therapy is, in large part, determined by the age of the patient at diagnosis. In the fetus, large BPS or hybrid lesions can result in fetal hydrops and in utero fetal demise. In the perinatal period, pulmonary hypoplasia from the mass effect or air trapping within the cystic component of hybrid lesions can result in life-threatening respiratory distress. In the postnatal period, communication of the lesion with the aero-digestive system can result in recurrent pneumonia. Alternatively, increased pulmonary blood flow from the systemic arterial supply can result in hemorrhage, hemoptysis, or high output cardiac failure. In addition, there have been several reports of malignant degeneration. Finally, the broad spectrum encompassed by these lesions makes classification and subsequent communication of the lesions confusing and difficult. This paper will review the components of these lesions, their associated anomalies, the diagnosis and natural history, and finally, current concepts in the management of pulmonary vascular malformations. PMID:18158137

  16. Aberrant Pulmonary Vascular Growth and Remodeling in Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Alvira, Cristina M.

    2016-01-01

    In contrast to many other organs, a significant portion of lung development occurs after birth during alveolarization, thus rendering the lung highly susceptible to injuries that may disrupt this developmental process. Premature birth heightens this susceptibility, with many premature infants developing the chronic lung disease, bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), a disease characterized by arrested alveolarization. Over the past decade, tremendous progress has been made in the elucidation of mechanisms that promote postnatal lung development, including extensive data suggesting that impaired pulmonary angiogenesis contributes to the pathogenesis of BPD. Moreover, in addition to impaired vascular growth, patients with BPD also frequently demonstrate alterations in pulmonary vascular remodeling and tone, increasing the risk for persistent hypoxemia and the development of pulmonary hypertension. In this review, an overview of normal lung development will be presented, and the pathologic features of arrested development observed in BPD will be described, with a specific emphasis on the pulmonary vascular abnormalities. Key pathways that promote normal pulmonary vascular development will be reviewed, and the experimental and clinical evidence demonstrating alterations of these essential pathways in BPD summarized. PMID:27243014

  17. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)

    MedlinePlus

    Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is a preventable and treatable disease that makes it difficult to empty air out of the lungs. This difficulty in ...

  18. Drug-induced pulmonary disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... improve. Some drug-induced lung diseases, such as pulmonary fibrosis, may never go away. ... Complications that may develop include: Diffuse interstitial pulmonary fibrosis Hypoxemia (low blood oxygen) Respiratory failure

  19. The role of airway mucus in pulmonary toxicology.

    PubMed Central

    Samet, J M; Cheng, P W

    1994-01-01

    Airway mucus is a complex airway secretion whose primary function as part of the mucociliary transport mechanism is to to serve as renewable and transportable barrier against inhaled particulates and toxic agents. The rheologic properties necessary for this function are imparted by glycoproteins, or mucins. Some respiratory disease states, e.g., asthma, cystic fibrosis, and bronchitis, are characterized by quantitative and qualitative changes in mucus biosynthesis that contribute to pulmonary pathology. Similar alterations in various aspects of mucin biochemistry and biophysics, leading to mucus hypersecretion and altered mucus rheology, result from inhalation of certain air pollutants, such as ozone, sulfur dioxide, nitrogen dioxide, and cigarette smoke. The consequences of these pollutant-induced alterations in mucus biology are discussed in the context of pulmonary pathophysiology and toxicology. PMID:7925190

  20. Caudal anesthesia in a patient with severe pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Ly, Doanh T

    2010-06-01

    Delivery of anesthesia to patients with severe pulmonary hypertension can be extremely challenging. The profound hemodynamic alterations of the disease can often be exacerbated by alterations in circulatory function brought about by anesthetic and surgical interventions. High perioperative morbidity and mortality rates have been reported. Minimizing adverse outcomes in these patients requires careful perioperative evaluation and planning. Selection of an anesthetic technique suitable for the surgery without causing major hemodynamic alterations, which can lead to cardiac failure and death, is a unique consideration of the anesthesia provider. As shown in this case report, caudal anesthesia, when appropriate, can offer a safe anesthetic for these patients. PMID:20572406

  1. Tobacco smoke and the pulmonary alveolar macrophage.

    PubMed

    Drath, D B; Davies, P; Karnovsky, M L; Huber, G L

    1979-01-01

    Our results indicate that tobacco smoke exposure to varying duration causes morphological, biochemical and functional alterations in pulmonary alveolar macrophages. The results of these changes is a population of alveolar macrophages made up of larger cells, with a reduced nucleus-cytoplasmic ratio, which are heavily loaded with heterolysosomes containing lipid. Though their fractional complement of mitochondria remains the same, an increase in the inner mitochondrial membrane surface area may be related to an enhanced oxidative metabolism. The cell is biochemically activated particularly following chronic exposure and is functionally impaired with respect to phagocytosis. PMID:232822

  2. Effects of covert subject actions on percent body fat by air-displacement plethsymography.

    PubMed

    Tegenkamp, Michelle H; Clark, R Randall; Schoeller, Dale A; Landry, Greg L

    2011-07-01

    Air-displacement plethysmography (ADP) is used for estimation of body composition, however, some individuals, such as athletes in weight classification sports, may use covert methods during ADP testing to alter their apparent percent body fat. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of covert subject actions on percent body fat measured by ADP. Subjects underwent body composition analysis in the Bod Pod following the standard procedure using the manufacturer's guidelines. The subjects then underwent 8 more measurements while performing the following intentional manipulations: 4 breathing patterns altering lung volume, foot movement to disrupt air, hand cupping to trap air, and heat and cold exposure before entering the chamber. Increasing and decreasing lung volume during thoracic volume measurement and during body density measurement altered the percent body fat assessment (p < 0.001). High lung volume during thoracic gas measures overestimated fat by 3.7 ± 2.1 percentage points. Lowered lung volume during body volume measures overestimated body fat by an additional 2.2 ± 2.1 percentage points. The heat and cold exposure, tapping, and cupping treatments provided similar estimates of percent body fat when compared with the standard condition. These results demonstrate the subjects were able to covertly change their estimated ADP body composition value by altering breathing when compared with the standard condition. We recommend that sports conditioning coaches, athletic trainers, and technicians administering ADP should be aware of the potential effects of these covert actions. The individual responsible for administering ADP should remain vigilant during testing to detect deliberate altered breathing patterns by athletes in an effort to gain a competitive advantage by manipulating their body composition assessment. PMID:21499137

  3. Primary Pulmonary Paraganglioma

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xin; Liang, Qi-Lian; Jiang, Liang; Liu, Qiu-Long; Ou, Wen-Ting; Li, Da-Heng; Zhang, Hui-Jie; Yuan, Gao-Le

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Primary pulmonary paraganglioma is a rare disease. We report a case of a 37-year old female patient with space-occupying lesions in the right lower pulmonary lobe during a routine examination without any symptoms. The patient underwent video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) resection of the right middle lobe and dissection of hilar and mediastinal lymph nodes under general anesthesia. She recovered without recrudescence. Preoperative diagnosis is difficult. Accurate diagnosis requires pathological examination, and immunohistochemical test is particularly important. Complete resection is the first treatment option for solitary primary pulmonary paraganglioma; however, VATS is a better technique. Given the high local control rates and few complications of radiotherapy, it is considered as a standard treatment. PMID:26252294

  4. [Diffuse Pulmonary Ossification].

    PubMed

    Avsar, K; Behr, J; Morresi-Hauf, A

    2016-04-01

    Diffuse pulmonary ossification (DPO) represents an uncommon condition usually associated with different underlying pulmonary and extrapulmonary diseases. In this work, we discuss eleven patients of our clinic with the diagnosis of a diffuse pulmonary ossification. We focus on histological changes in the surrounding lung tissue. Clinical and radiological findings were analysed. The aim of the study is to collect data for a better understanding of this condition, especially in association with interstitial lung disease.Three patients with interstitial lung disease had histological findings of UIP. The follow-up data of these patients showed a benign course of the disease.The analysis of the clinical data yielded a very heterogenous group. Regarding these fact we assume, that DPO is not an own entity, but a pathological epiphenomenon in the context of different conditions, possibly with pathogenetic overlap. PMID:26829606

  5. Treatment of pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Rajendrakumar; Aronow, Wilbert S.; Patel, Laxeshkumar; Gandhi, Kaushang; Desai, Harit; Kaul, Dhiraj; Sahgal, Sumir P.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a chronic progressive disease of the pulmonary vasculature characterized by elevated pulmonary arterial pressure and secondary right ventricular failure. PAH is considered a life-threatening condition unless treated. This article provides a comprehensive review of controlled and uncontrolled trials to define the risk-benefit for different therapeutic options of this clinical disorder. Relevant published articles were identified through searches of the National Center for Biotechnology PubMed database. All therapeutic measures for PAH were discussed. Six drugs have been approved in the United States for the treatment of PAH. Extensive medical advancement has been achieved in treatment of PAH. However, none of the approved therapies have shown ability to cure the disease. New research should be performed to develop promising new therapies. PMID:22460104

  6. Neonatal pulmonary hemosiderosis.

    PubMed

    Limme, Boris; Nicolescu, Ramona; Misson, Jean-Paul

    2014-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis (IPH) is a rare complex entity characterized clinically by acute or recurrent episodes of hemoptysis secondary to diffuse alveolar hemorrhage. The radiographic features are variable, including diffuse alveolar-type infiltrates, and interstitial reticular and micronodular patterns. We describe a 3-week-old infant presenting with hemoptysis and moderate respiratory distress. Idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis was the first working diagnosis at the Emergency Department and was confirmed, 2 weeks later, by histological studies (bronchoalveolar lavage). The immunosuppressive therapy by 1 mg/kg/d prednisone was immediately started, the baby returned home on steroid therapy at a dose of 0,5 mg/kg/d. The diagnosis of idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis should be evocated at any age, even in the neonate, when the clinical presentation (hemoptysis and abnormal radiological chest images) is strongly suggestive. PMID:25389504

  7. [Pulmonary nodules and arachnophobia].

    PubMed

    Colinet, B; Dargent, J-L; Fremault, A

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary nodules are a common reason for consultation and their investigation must always exclude a possible neoplastic cause. This means that, in addition to a thorough history, investigations may be necessary which are sometimes invasive and therefore potentially a cause of iatrogenic harm. The toxic aetiologies for pulmonary nodules are rare. We report a case of a patient with pulmonary nodules occurring predominantly in the right lung, about 1cm in diameter, non-cavitating without calcification, and sometimes surrounded by a peripheral halo. The nodules were a chance finding during preoperative evaluation. After a comprehensive review, a reaction to an inhaled irritant was the preferred hypothesis, specifically overuse of a compound insecticide containing, in addition to the propellant gas and solvent type hydrocarbon - a mixture of piperonyl butoxide, of esbiothrine and permethrin. Removal of this led to the complete disappearance of nodules. Pathological examination identified bronchiolitis obliterans with organising pneumonia accompanied by non-necrotizing granulomas and lipid vacuoles. PMID:24461445

  8. The right ventricle: interaction with the pulmonary circulation.

    PubMed

    Pinsky, Michael R

    2016-01-01

    The primary role of the right ventricle (RV) is to deliver all the blood it receives per beat into the pulmonary circulation without causing right atrial pressure to rise. To the extent that it also does not impede left ventricular (LV) filling, cardiac output responsiveness to increased metabolic demand is optimized. Since cardiac output is a function of metabolic demand of the body, during stress and exercise states the flow to the RV can vary widely. Also, instantaneous venous return varies widely for a constant cardiac output as ventilatory efforts alter the dynamic pressure gradient for venous return. Normally, blood flow varies with minimal changes in pulmonary arterial pressure. Similarly, RV filling normally occurs with minimal increases in right atrial pressure. When pulmonary vascular reserve is compromised RV ejection may also be compromised, increasing right atrial pressure and limiting maximal cardiac output. Acute increases in RV outflow resistance, as may occur with acute pulmonary embolism, will cause acute RV dilation and, by ventricular interdependence, markedly decreased LV diastolic compliance, rapidly spiraling to acute cardiogenic shock and death. Treatments include reversing the causes of pulmonary hypertension and sustaining mean arterial pressure higher than pulmonary artery pressure to maximal RV coronary blood flow. Chronic pulmonary hypertension induces progressive RV hypertrophy to match RV contractility to the increased pulmonary arterial elastance. Once fully developed, RV hypertrophy is associated with a sustained increase in right atrial pressure, impaired LV filling, and decreased exercise tolerance. Treatment focuses on pharmacologic therapies to selectively reduce pulmonary vasomotor tone and diuretics to minimize excessive RV dilation. Owning to the irreversible nature of most forms of pulmonary hypertension, when the pulmonary arterial elastance greatly exceeds the adaptive increase in RV systolic elastance, due to RV dilation

  9. Severe Pulmonary Involvement in Leptospirosis

    PubMed Central

    Jayakrishnan, B; Ben Abid, Fatma; Balkhair, Abdullah; Alkaabi, Juma K.; Al-Rawas, Omar A.; George, Jojy; Al-Zeedy, Khalfan

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary complications in leptospirosis, though common, are often unrecognized in a non-endemic area. We report here a patient with leptospirosis and severe pulmonary involvement who was treated with meropenem (1 g every 8 hours), moxifloxacin (400 mg once daily), and high doses of corticosteroids. Systemic steroids were continued for 3 months because of persistent pulmonary lesions. PMID:23862041

  10. Pulmonary talcosis: imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Marchiori, Edson; Lourenço, Sílvia; Gasparetto, Taisa Davaus; Zanetti, Gláucia; Mano, Cláudia Mauro; Nobre, Luiz Felipe

    2010-04-01

    Talc is a mineral widely used in the ceramic, paper, plastics, rubber, paint, and cosmetic industries. Four distinct forms of pulmonary disease caused by talc have been defined. Three of them (talcosilicosis, talcoasbestosis, and pure talcosis) are associated with aspiration and differ in the composition of the inhaled substance. The fourth form, a result of intravenous administration of talc, is seen in drug users who inject medications intended for oral use. The disease most commonly affects men, with a mean age in the fourth decade of life. Presentation of patients with talc granulomatosis can range from asymptomatic to fulminant disease. Symptomatic patients typically present with nonspecific complaints, including progressive exertional dyspnea, and cough. Late complications include chronic respiratory failure, emphysema, pulmonary arterial hypertension, and cor pulmonale. History of occupational exposure or of drug addiction is the major clue to the diagnosis. The high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) finding of small centrilobular nodules associated with heterogeneous conglomerate masses containing high-density amorphous areas, with or without panlobular emphysema in the lower lobes, is highly suggestive of pulmonary talcosis. The characteristic histopathologic feature in talc pneumoconiosis is the striking appearance of birefringent, needle-shaped particles of talc seen within the giant cells and in the areas of pulmonary fibrosis with the use of polarized light. In conclusion, computed tomography can play an important role in the diagnosis of pulmonary talcosis, since suggestive patterns may be observed. The presence of these patterns in drug abusers or in patients with an occupational history of exposure to talc is highly suggestive of pulmonary talcosis. PMID:20155272

  11. Calories and fat per serving (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... and stores the rest in the form of fat. A calorie is a calorie, whether it comes ... between them is the number of calories, nutrients, fat, and other ingredients in a typical serving . Calories ...

  12. HealthLines: Facts About Fat

    MedlinePlus

    ... Current Issue Past Issues Health Lines Facts About Fat Past Issues / Fall 2008 Table of Contents For ... Writer, NLM Scientists are learning more about our fat cells, and their findings could explain why some ...

  13. Hump behind the shoulders (Dorsocervical fat pad)

    MedlinePlus

    Buffalo hump; Dorsocervical fat pad ... Cause of dorsocervical fat pad includes any of the following: Certain medicines used to treat HIV or AIDS Long-term use of certain glucocorticoid medicines, ...

  14. Dietary Fats - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Dietary Fats URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/ ... V W XYZ List of All Topics All Dietary Fats - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on ...

  15. Body composition and exercise performance in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed Central

    Schols, A M; Mostert, R; Soeters, P B; Wouters, E F

    1991-01-01

    To investigate whether a compromised nutritional state may limit exercise performance in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease we studied 54 such patients (FEV1 less than 50% and arterial oxygen tension (PaO2) greater than 7.3 kPa) whose clinical condition was stable and who were admitted to a pulmonary rehabilitation centre. Fat free mass was assessed anthropometrically (from skinfold measurements at four sites) and by bioelectrical impedance; creatinine height index and arm muscle circumference were also assessed. The mean (SD) distance walked in 12 minutes was 845 (178) m. No association was established between the distance walked and spirometric measures. A good correlation was found between the distance walked and fat free mass in the whole group (r = 0.73 for impedance measurements and 0.65 for skinfold thickness) and in a subgroup of 23 lean patients (body weight less than 90% of ideal weight; r = 0.66 for impedance measurements and 0.46 for skinfold thickness). Body weight correlated with the distance walked only in the whole group (r = 0.61). On stepwise regression analysis fat free mass measured by bioelectrical impedance, maximal inspiratory mouth pressure, and PaO2 accounted for 60% of the variation in the distance walked in 12 minutes. We conclude that fat free mass, independently of airflow obstruction, is an important determinant of exercise performance in patients with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. PMID:1750015

  16. [Pulmonary Echinococcosis: Surgical Aspects].

    PubMed

    Eichhorn, M E; Hoffmann, H; Dienemann, H

    2015-10-01

    Pulmonary cystic echinococcosis is a very rare disease in Germany. It is caused by the larvae of the dog tapeworm (echinococcus granulosus). The liver is the most affected organ, followed by the lungs. Surgery remains the main therapeutic approach for pulmonary CE. Whenever possible, parenchyma-preserving lung surgery should be preferred over anatomic lung resections. To ensure best therapeutic results, surgery needs to be performed under precise consideration of important infectiological aspects and patients should be treated in specialised centres based on interdisciplinary consensus. In addition to surgical aspects, this review summarises special infectiological features of this disease, which are crucial to the surgical approach. PMID:26351761

  17. Primary Breast Augmentation with Fat Grafting.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Sydney R; Saboeiro, Alesia P

    2015-07-01

    The controversy over fat grafting to the breasts has now been settled. In 2009, the American Society of Plastic Surgeons Fat Graft Task Force stated that "Fat grafting may be considered for breast augmentation and correction of defects associated with medical conditions and previous breast surgeries; however, results are dependent on technique and surgeon expertise." This article discusses the history, indications, planning, complications, and present technique of fat grafting to the breast using the Coleman technique. PMID:26116935

  18. Endothelin receptor antagonists in the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Langleben, David

    2007-03-01

    The recognition that endothelin-1 contributes to the pathogenesis of pulmonary arterial hypertension has led to the development of clinically useful endothelin receptor antagonists that improve symptoms and functional capacity and alter the natural history of the disease in a beneficial way. The antagonists have varying degrees of selectivity for the two classes of endothelin receptor, termed ETA and ETB, and the varying degrees may translate into clinical differences. Endothelin receptor antagonists have become an integral part of therapy for pulmonary arterial hypertension, and the indications for their use are expanding. PMID:17338931

  19. Bosentan for pulmonary hypertension secondary to idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Onda, Naomi; Tanaka, Yosuke; Hino, Mitsunori; Gemma, Akihiko

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is a poor prognostic factor in patients with interstitial lung disease. No established treatment exists for pulmonary hypertension secondary to interstitial pneumonia. We describe the case of an 81-year-old woman with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), who was admitted to our hospital due to aggravation of dyspnea and decreased oxygen saturation, as well as onset of orthopnea and rapidly progressing edema. The transthoracic echocardiography and right heart catheterization showed the mean pulmonary artery pressure was 39 mmHg and the mean pulmonary capillary wedge pressure was 9 mmHg. After various examinations, the diagnoses of pulmonary hypertension (PH) due to IPF and of congestive heart failure secondary to PH were established. Diuretic therapy was started, but the patient's condition showed poor improvement. Subsequent initiation of oral bosentan therapy led to improvement in symptoms and findings. At the follow-up assessment one year later her pulmonary function showed no significant changes and no apparent worsening of arterial blood gases, with evident improvement of PH, WHO functional class, maximum exercise tolerance on treadmill exercise testing, right heart catheterization, and transthoracic echocardiography. This report describes a case of successful treatment with bosentan for severe pulmonary hypertension in a patient with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. We also present a review of the literature on treatment of pulmonary hypertension in patients with chronic lung disease. Bosentan appears to be efficacious in some patients with pulmonary hypertension secondary to idiopathic interstitial pneumonitis. PMID:26029570

  20. Chronic Thromboembolic Pulmonary Hypertension: the End Result of Pulmonary Embolism.

    PubMed

    Witkin, Alison S; Channick, Richard N

    2015-08-01

    Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) occurs when a pulmonary embolism fails to undergo complete thrombolysis leading to vascular occlusion and pulmonary hypertension. Despite the fact that CTEPH is a potential consequence of pulmonary embolism, diagnosis requires a high degree of vigilance as many patients will not have a history of thromboembolic disease. The ventilation perfusion scan is used to evaluate for the possibility of CTEPH although right heart catheterization and pulmonary artery angiogram are needed to confirm the diagnosis. Pulmonary thromboendarterectomy is the first-line treatment for patients who are surgical candidates. Recently, riociguat has been approved for patients with nonsurgical disease or residual pulmonary hypertension despite surgical intervention. This review describes the pathophysiology, risk factors, diagnosis, and management of CTEPH. PMID:26099554

  1. Lung transcriptional profiling: insights into the mechanisms of ozone-induced pulmonary injury in Wistar Kyoto rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acute ozone-induced pulmonary injury and inflammation are well characterized in rats; however, mechanistic understanding of the pathways involved is limited. We hypothesized that acute exposure of healthy rats to ozone will cause transcriptional alterations, and comprehensive ana...

  2. INHALABLE PARTICLES AND PULMONARY HOST DEFENSE: 'IN VIVO' AND 'IN VITRO' EFFECTS OF AMBIENT AIR AND COMBUSTION PARTICLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ability of particulate air pollutants (and possible constituents) to alter pulmonary host defenses was examined using an in vitro alveolar macrophage cytotoxicity assay and an in vivo bacterial infectivity screening test which employed intratracheal injection of the particles...

  3. Response to consumer demand for reduced-fat foods; multi-functional fat replacers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The excessive dietary fat intake can result in health problems such as obesity and heart-related diseases, resulting in increased consumer demand for reduced fat foods. A number of food ingredients with fat-like functions have been developed as fat alternatives in the food industry. Especially, so...

  4. [Autologous Fat Grafting in Scar Revision].

    PubMed

    Yu, Pan-xi; Cai, Jing-long

    2016-04-01

    Regenerative medicine is an emerging discipline. Adipose tissue is a rich source of fat cells and mesenchymal stem cells, and autologous fat grafting has increasingly been applied in plastic surgeries and dermatological treatments. This paper reviews the latest advances in autologous fat grafting in scar revision. PMID:27181904

  5. Chemical composition of fat and oil products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fats and oils are an important dietary component, and contribute to the nutritional and sensory quality of foods. This chapter focuses on the chemical composition of fats and oils, and how these compositions affect the functional properties of fats and oils in foods. The focus will remain on the mos...

  6. Effective arterial elastance as an index of pulmonary vascular load.

    PubMed

    Morimont, Philippe; Lambermont, Bernard; Ghuysen, Alexandre; Gerard, Paul; Kolh, Philippe; Lancellotti, Patrizio; Tchana-Sato, Vincent; Desaive, Thomas; D'Orio, Vincent

    2008-06-01

    The aim of this study was to test whether the simple ratio of right ventricular (RV) end-systolic pressure (Pes) to stroke volume (SV), known as the effective arterial elastance (Ea), provides a valid assessment of pulmonary arterial load in case of pulmonary embolism- or endotoxin-induced pulmonary hypertension. Ventricular pressure-volume (PV) data (obtained with conductance catheters) and invasive pulmonary arterial pressure and flow waveforms were simultaneously recorded in two groups of six pure Pietran pigs, submitted either to pulmonary embolism (group A) or endotoxic shock (group B). Measurements were obtained at baseline and each 30 min after injection of autologous blood clots (0.3 g/kg) in the superior vena cava in group A and after endotoxin infusion in group B. Two methods of calculation of pulmonary arterial load were compared. On one hand, Ea provided by using three-element windkessel model (WK) of the pulmonary arterial system [Ea(WK)] was referred to as standard computation. On the other hand, similar to the systemic circulation, Ea was assessed as the ratio of RV Pes to SV [Ea(PV) = Pes/SV]. In both groups, although the correlation between Ea(PV) and Ea(WK) was excellent over a broad range of altered conditions, Ea(PV) systematically overestimated Ea(WK). This offset disappeared when left atrial pressure (Pla) was incorporated into Ea [Ea * (PV) = (Pes - Pla)/SV]. Thus Ea * (PV), defined as the ratio of RV Pes minus Pla to SV, provides a convenient, useful, and simple method to assess the pulmonary arterial load and its impact on the RV function. PMID:18424634

  7. Preventing, Recognizing, Treating Pulmonary Embolism

    PubMed Central

    Selzer, Arthur

    1965-01-01

    Pulmonary embolism occurs in three forms: (1) Asymptomatic “silent” embolization of lungs; (2) pulmonary infarction; and (3) massive pulmonary embolization leading to acute cor pulmonale. The commonest source of emboli are veins of the lower extremities and of the pelvic organs. The prevention and the treatment of pulmonary embolism overlap, for except for the heroic procedure of pulmonary embolectomy, treatment is equivalent to the prevention of further emboli. The diagnosis may be easy in typical cases and very difficult in others. PMID:14341314

  8. Erythropoietin upregulation in pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Karamanian, Vanesa A; Harhay, Michael; Grant, Gregory R; Palevsky, Harold I; Grizzle, William E; Zamanian, Roham T; Ihida-Stansbury, Kaori; Taichman, Darren B; Kawut, Steven M; Jones, Peter L

    2014-06-01

    The pathophysiologic alterations of patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) are diverse. We aimed to determine novel pathogenic pathways from circulating proteins in patients with PAH. Multianalyte profiling (MAP) was used to measure 90 specifically selected antigens in the plasma of 113 PAH patients and 51 control patients. Erythropoietin (EPO) functional activity was assessed via in vitro pulmonary artery endothelial cell networking and smooth muscle cell proliferation assays. Fifty-eight patients had idiopathic PAH, whereas 55 had other forms of PAH; 5 had heritable PAH, 18 had connective tissue disease (15 with scleroderma and 3 with lupus erythematosis), 13 had portopulmonary hypertension, 6 had PAH associated with drugs or toxins, and 5 had congenital heart disease. The plasma-antigen profile of PAH revealed increased levels of several novel biomarkers, including EPO. Immune quantitative and histochemical studies revealed that EPO not only was significantly elevated in the plasma of PAH patients but also promoted pulmonary artery endothelial cell network formation and smooth muscle cell proliferation. MAP is a hypothesis-generating approach to identifying novel pathophysiologic pathways in PAH. EPO is upregulated in the circulation and lungs of patients with PAH and may affect endothelial and smooth muscle cell proliferation. PMID:25006446

  9. Colonic inflammation and enhanced-beta-catenin signaling accompany an increase of the Lachnospiraceae/Streptococcaceae in the hind gut of high-fat diet-fed mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Consumption of an obesigenic / high-fat (HF) diet is associated with a high colon cancer risk, and may alter the gut microbiota. To test the hypothesis that a HF feeding accelerates inflammatory process and changes gut microbiome composition, C57BL/6 mice were fed a HF (45% energy) or low-fat (LF) (...

  10. Distinct Disease Phases in Muscles of Facioscapulohumeral Dystrophy Patients Identified by MR Detected Fat Infiltration

    PubMed Central

    Janssen, Barbara H.; Voet, Nicoline B. M.; Nabuurs, Christine I.; Kan, Hermien E.; de Rooy, Jacky W. J.; Geurts, Alexander C.; Padberg, George W.; van Engelen, Baziel G. M.; Heerschap, Arend

    2014-01-01

    with distal fat infiltration and altered energy metabolite levels. Fat replacement then relatively rapidly spreads over the whole muscle. PMID:24454861

  11. Tlr-4 deficiency selectively protects against obesity induced by diets high in saturated fat.

    PubMed

    Davis, Jeremy E; Gabler, Nicholas K; Walker-Daniels, Jennifer; Spurlock, Michael E

    2008-06-01

    Toll-like receptor-4 (Tlr-4), a key pattern recognition receptor involved in innate immune response, is activated by saturated fatty acids (SFAs). To investigate the involvement of this receptor in obesity caused by consumption of diets high in fat, we utilized male Tlr-4-deficient 10ScN mice and 10J controls. Mice were fed either low fat (low-fat control (LFC)), high unsaturated fat (high-fat control (HFC)), or high saturated fat + palmitate (HFP) diets ad libitum for 16 weeks. Relative to the LFC diet, the HFC diet resulted in greater epididymal fat pad weights and adipocyte hypertrophy in both Tlr-4-deficient and normal mice. However, the 10ScN mice were completely protected against the obesigenic effects of the HFP diet. Moreover, macrophage infiltration and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) transcript abundance were lower in adipose tissue of 10ScN mice fed the HFP diet, and the hyperinsulinemic response was negated. Tlr-4-deficient mice also had markedly lower circulating concentrations of MCP-1 and much less nuclear factor-kappaB (NFkappaB) protein in nuclear extracts prepared from adipose tissue, irrespective of diet. In contrast, Tlr-4 deficiency did not attenuate the induction of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) or interleukin-6 (IL-6) expression in adipose tissue. These data indicate that Tlr-4 deficiency selectively protects against the obesigenic effects of SFA and alters obesity-related inflammatory responses in adipose tissue. PMID:18421279

  12. The effects of phenylpropanolamine on Zucker rats selected for fat food preference.

    PubMed

    Svec, F; Muehlenhein, M; Porter, J

    2003-04-01

    Treatments of human and rodent obesity frequently involve administration of amphetamine derivatives, much like phenylpropanolamine, which suppress food intake. The Zucker rat is a commonly employed model of youth-onset obesity in which the homozygous genotype manifests hyperphagia as well as other characteristics that parallel human obesity. Using a macronutrient selection procedure, we examined phenylpropanolamine's differential actions in controlling dietary intake, spontaneous open-field activity, and regional hypothalamic neurotransmitter levels in obese female Zucker rats of varying fat food preference. We hypothesized that phenylpropanolamine would alter hypothalamic monoamine levels differently in low-fat preferring and high-fat preferring Zucker rats, and hence affect feeding behavior and activity differently in these two groups. It was found that in high-fat preferring animals, phenylpropanolamine significantly decreased spontaneous open-field activity, decreased only carbohydrate caloric intake, and increased serotonin and 5-HIAA levels in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN). In low-fat preferring animals, phenylpropanolamine decreased carbohydrate, protein, and total caloric intake, had no significant effect of spontaneous activity, and increased serotonin and 5-hydroxyindole acetic acid levels in the PVN. Inherent and induced physiological differences of low-fat and high-fat preferring animals are discussed as well as phenylpropanolamine's potential in combination drug therapy for the treatment of human hyperphagic obesity. PMID:12722984

  13. Extended lifespan and reduced adiposity in mice lacking the FAT10 gene

    PubMed Central

    Canaan, Allon; DeFuria, Jason; Perelman, Eddie; Schultz, Vincent; Seay, Montrell; Tuck, David; Flavell, Richard A.; Snyder, Michael P.; Obin, Martin S.; Weissman, Sherman M.

    2014-01-01

    The HLA-F adjacent transcript 10 (FAT10) is a member of the ubiquitin-like gene family that alters protein function/stability through covalent ligation. Although FAT10 is induced by inflammatory mediators and implicated in immunity, the physiological functions of FAT10 are poorly defined. We report the discovery that FAT10 regulates lifespan through pleiotropic actions on metabolism and inflammation. Median and overall lifespan are increased 20% in FAT10ko mice, coincident with elevated metabolic rate, preferential use of fat as fuel, and dramatically reduced adiposity. This phenotype is associated with metabolic reprogramming of skeletal muscle (i.e., increased AMP kinase activity, β-oxidation and -uncoupling, and decreased triglyceride content). Moreover, knockout mice have reduced circulating glucose and insulin levels and enhanced insulin sensitivity in metabolic tissues, consistent with elevated IL-10 in skeletal muscle and serum. These observations suggest novel roles of FAT10 in immune metabolic regulation that impact aging and chronic disease. PMID:24706839

  14. Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis.

    PubMed

    Khan, Ajmal; Agarwal, Ritesh

    2011-07-01

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis is a rare but potentially treatable disease, characterized by impaired surfactant metabolism that leads to accumulation in the alveoli of proteinaceous material rich in surfactant protein and its component. Novel insights from an animal model aided the discovery of granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) antibodies as a pathogenetic mechanism in human pulmonary alveolar proteinosis. The vast majority of pulmonary alveolar proteinosis occurs as an autoimmune disease; less commonly, it is congenital or secondary to an underlying disorder such as infection, hematological malignancy, or immunodeficiency. The subacute indolent course of this disease often delays the diagnosis by months to years. Crazy-paving appearance in a geographic distribution is a characteristic feature of this disease visible on high-resolution computed tomography (CT). A definitive diagnosis, however, requires lung biopsy, which typically shows partial or complete filling of alveoli with periodic-acid-Schiff-positive granular and eosinophilic material in preserved alveolar architecture. Patients with minimal symptoms are managed conservatively, whereas patients with hypoxemia require a more aggressive approach. Whole-lung lavage is the most widely accepted therapy for symptomatic pulmonary alveolar proteinosis. Correction of GM-CSF deficiency with exogenous GM-CSF is an alternative therapy. The combination of a systemic treatment (GM-CSF) and a local treatment (whole-lung lavage) augmenting the action of one another is a promising new approach. As the knowledge about this rare disease increases, the role of novel therapies is likely to be better defined and optimized. PMID:21496372

  15. Pulmonary Fibrosis Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... 844.825.5733) to speak with a representative today. LEARN MORE It's Global PF Awareness Month! Download the toolkit to learn ... 19 NEW SITES The Pulmonary Fibrosis Foundation (PFF) today announced the expansion of the PFF Care Center Network with the selection of 19 additional sites, bringing the total number to 40 in 27 states. More Announcements ... SEP 12 ...

  16. Primary Pulmonary Hodgkin Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Tanveer, Shumaila; El Damati, Ahmed; El Baz, Ayman; Alsayyah, Ahmed; ElSharkawy, Tarek

    2015-01-01

    Primary pulmonary Hodgkin lymphoma (PPHL) is a rare disease. Herein, we report a case of PPHL with diagnostic concerns encountered during initial evaluation which is of paramount importance to keep the differential diagnosis in cases with high index of suspicion for this rare entity. PMID:26788271

  17. Idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Souza, Rogerio; Jardim, Carlos; Humbert, Marc

    2013-10-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH), formerly called primary pulmonary hypertension, is a rare disease (incidence and prevalence rates of approximately one and six cases per million inhabitants, respectively) with different clinical phenotypes. A group of diverse conditions manifest pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) and share similar pathological and/or clinical findings with IPAH. By definition, IPAH is diagnosed only after alternative diagnoses have been ruled out. Extensive investigation is needed to determine if PAH is associated with thyroid diseases, infectious diseases, autoimmune conditions, exposure to certain drugs (particularly anorexigens), certain genetic mutations, and so on. The presence of genetic abnormalities and risk factors (such as specific drug exposures) reinforces the "multiple hit" concept for the development of pulmonary hypertension. Fortunately, within the past two decades, therapeutic options have become available for IPAH, resulting in improved survival and clinical outcomes. At least seven different compounds have been registered for PAH treatment. However, even with aggressive PAH-specific therapy, mortality rates remain high (∼40% at 5 years). Given the high mortality rates, the use of combinations of agents that work by different pathways has been advocated (either as "add-on" therapy or initial "up front" therapy). Further, new therapeutic agents and treatment strategies are on the near horizon, aiming to further improve survival from the remarkable progress already seen. PMID:24037625

  18. Pulmonary langerhans cell histiocytosis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis (PLCH) is a relatively uncommon lung disease that generally, but not invariably, occurs in cigarette smokers. The pathologic hallmark of PLCH is the accumulation of Langerhans and other inflammatory cells in small airways, resulting in the formation of nodular inflammatory lesions. While the overwhelming majority of patients are smokers, mechanisms by which smoking induces this disease are not known, but likely involve a combination of events resulting in enhanced recruitment and activation of Langerhans cells in small airways. Bronchiolar inflammation may be accompanied by variable lung interstitial and vascular involvement. While cellular inflammation is prominent in early disease, more advanced stages are characterized by cystic lung destruction, cicatricial scarring of airways, and pulmonary vascular remodeling. Pulmonary function is frequently abnormal at presentation. Imaging of the chest with high resolution chest CT scanning may show characteristic nodular and cystic abnormalities. Lung biopsy is necessary for a definitive diagnosis, although may not be required in instances were imaging findings are highly characteristic. There is no general consensus regarding the role of immunosuppressive therapy in smokers with PLCH. All smokers must be counseled on the importance of smoking cessation, which may result in regression of disease and obviate the need for systemic immunosuppressive therapy. The prognosis for most patients is relatively good, particularly if longitudinal lung function testing shows stability. Complications like pneumothoraces and secondary pulmonary hypertension may shorten life expectancy. Patients with progressive disease may require lung transplantation. PMID:22429393

  19. Immunoreactivity in pulmonary echinococcosis

    PubMed Central

    Todorov, T.; Dakov, I.; Kosturkova, M.; Tenev, S.; Dimitrov, A.

    1979-01-01

    A comparison was made of the diagnostic value of five immunological tests—complement fixation (CF), latex agglutination (LA), bentonite flocculation (BF), passive haemagglutination (PHA), and intradermal (ID)—in patients operated on for pulmonary echinococcosis. The sensitivity of all five tests was significantly lower in the patients with pulmonary echinococcosis than in a comparable group with liver echinococcosis. Some 252 patients with miscellaneous nonhydatid diseases and parasitic infections were also tested; nonspecific reactions were highest in the ID and CF tests and lowest in the LA and BF tests. None of the serological tests was significantly more sensitive than the others, although the CF test was somewhat less sensitive and therefore probably has the least diagnostic value in pulmonary echinococcosis. The ID test showed a significantly higher sensitivity than any of the serological tests. The difficulties encountered in the immunodiagnosis of pulmonary hydatid disease are discussed and it is recommended that at least two serological methods (PHA and either LA or BF) and the ID test should be used in each case. PMID:317251

  20. Solitary pulmonary nodule

    MedlinePlus

    ... chest x-ray Pulmonary nodule, solitary - CT scan Respiratory system References Gotway MB, Panse PM, Gruden JF, Elicker BM. Thoracic radiology. In: Broaddus VC, Mason RJ, Ernst JD, et al, eds. Murray and Nadel's Textbook of Respiratory Medicine . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016: ...