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Sample records for fatal pulmonary edema

  1. Fatal reexpansion pulmonary edema in a kitten following surgical correction of pectus excavatum.

    PubMed

    Soderstrom, M J; Gilson, S D; Gulbas, N

    1995-01-01

    Fulminant, fatal pulmonary edema developed in an eight-week-old kitten following external splint correction of severe pectus excavatum. History, signalment, onset of clinical signs, and gross pathological findings were most compatible with a diagnosis of reexpansion pulmonary edema (RPE). This report presents case findings and a literature review of RPE. PMID:7773758

  2. Pulmonary edema

    MedlinePlus

    ... congestion; Lung water; Pulmonary congestion; Heart failure - pulmonary edema ... Pulmonary edema is often caused by congestive heart failure . When the heart is not able to pump efficiently, blood ...

  3. Pulmonary Edema

    PubMed Central

    Tanser, Paul H.

    1980-01-01

    The physician who deals with pulmonary edema from a pathophysiologic basis will seldom make a diagnostic or therapeutic error. Recent additions to preload and afterload therapy have greatly helped in the emergency and ambulatory treatment of pulmonary edema due to left heart failure. Careful follow-up and patient self-monitoring are the most effective means of reducing hospitalization of chronic heart failure patients. PMID:21293700

  4. Molecular pathology of pulmonary edema in forensic autopsy cases with special regard to fatal hyperthermia and hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qi; Ishikawa, Takaki; Michiue, Tomomi; Zhu, Bao-Li; Guan, Da-Wei; Maeda, Hitoshi

    2013-05-10

    Fatalities due to an extreme ambient temperature might present with poor or nonspecific pathologies; thus, the diagnosis of the cause of death in such cases is one of the most difficult tasks in forensic pathology. The present study investigated the molecular pathology of alveolar damage involving pulmonary edema with special regard to hyperthermia (heatstroke) and hypothermia (cold exposure) in forensic autopsy cases (total, n=122; within 48 h postmortem). Intrapulmonary mRNA and immunohistochemical expressions of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), claudin-5 (CLDN-5) and aquaporins (AQPs) were examined. Relative mRNA quantification using Taqman real-time PCR assay demonstrated higher expressions of all markers except for AQP-5 in fatal hyperthermia, and higher expression of MMP-9 in fatal hypothermia. Acute cardiac death, mechanical asphyxiation, fire fatality and intoxication did not present any characteristic findings. In immunostaining, only MMPs showed evident differences among the causes of death: MMP-9 was intensely positive in most cases of hyperthermia and hypothermia, but MMP-2 expression was evident only in hyperthermia. These findings suggest alveolar damage involving pulmonary edema, characteristic of fatal hyperthermia and hypothermia. Systematic analysis of gene expressions using real-time PCR might be a useful procedure in forensic death investigation. PMID:23597750

  5. [Case of fluminant myocarditis with fatal pulmonary edema even after introduction of bi-ventricular assist devices].

    PubMed

    Sawada, Masahiro; Hashiba, Eiji; Kudo, Tomoyuki; Okawa, Hirobumi; Tsubo, Toshihito; Ishihara, Hironori; Hirota, Kazuyoshi

    2012-07-01

    A 15-year-old man developed cardiopulmonary dysfunction 4 days after flu-like symptom, and was transfered to our hospital and diagnosed as a fulminant myocarditis (FM). Intraaortic ballon pumping (IABP) and percutaneous cardiopulmonary support (PCPS) were immediately initiated. However, cardiac function did not recover until 7 days after admission to the ICU, and bilateral ventricular assist devices (BiVAD) were introduced with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). Right ventricular assist device (RVAD) with ECMO was established by right atrial blood withdrawal and pulmonary arterial blood supply using centrifugal pump. After operation of BiVAD, to main LVAD flow, frequent blood-and-fluids volume loading and increase in RVAD flow were necessary due to postoperative bleeding and massive foamy sputum. However, even after hemostasis had been established, the pulmonary edema continued and it was difficult to maintain LVAD flow because of endless transudation from the lungs. Eventually, he developed MOF and passed away 9 days after the admission to ICU. As in cases of end-stage dilated cardiomyopathy, outflow of RVAD into the left atrium instead of the pulmonary artery was demonstrated effective in avoiding trans-pulmonary leakage, and outflow of RVAD into the left atrium may be beneficial to patients with FM who need BiVAD but suffered severe pulmonary edema. PMID:22860309

  6. An uncommon cause of acute pulmonary edema.

    PubMed

    Nepal, Santosh; Giri, Smith; Bhusal, Mohan; Siwakoti, Krishmita; Pathak, Ranjan

    2016-09-01

    Acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema secondary to catecholamine-induced cardiomyopathy is a very uncommon and fatal initial presentation of pheochromocytoma. However, with early clinical suspicion and aggressive management, the condition is reversible. This case report describes a patient who presented with hypertension, dyspnea, and cough with bloody streaks, and who recovered within 48 hours after appropriate treatment. PMID:27575897

  7. Reexpansion pulmonary edema in children

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Antonio Lucas L.; Lopes, Carlos Eduardo; Romaneli, Mariana Tresoldi das N.; Fraga, Andrea de Melo A.; Pereira, Ricardo Mendes; Tresoldi, Antonia Teresinha

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To present a case of a patient with clinical and radiological features of reexpansion pulmonary edema, a rare and potentially fatal disease. CASE DESCRIPTION An 11-year-old boy presenting fever, clinical signs and radiological features of large pleural effusion initially treated as a parapneumonic process. Due to clinical deterioration he underwent tube thoracostomy, with evacuation of 3,000 mL of fluid; he shortly presented acute respiratory insufficiency and needed mechanical ventilation. He had an atypical evolution (extubated twice with no satisfactory response). Computerized tomography findings matched those of reexpansion edema. He recovered satisfactorily after intensive care, and pleural tuberculosis was diagnosed afterwards. COMMENTS Despite its rareness in the pediatric population (only five case reports gathered), the knowledge of this pathology and its prevention is very important, due to high mortality rates. It is recommended, among other measures, slow evacuation of the pleural effusion, not removing more than 1,500 mL of fluid at once. PMID:24142327

  8. Hyskon-induced pulmonary edema.

    PubMed

    Mangar, D

    1993-12-01

    Hyskon (32 percent dextran-70) (Hyskon Division, Pharmacia) is used during hysteroscopy to help visualization of the uterine surfaces. Pulmonary edema of an uncertain cause has occurred in many patients. Because this study could not be conducted in humans, we determined if Hyskon caused cardiogenic or non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema in a dog model. Dogs were randomly assigned to receive an infusion of Hyskon or whole blood to sustain left ventricular end-diastolic pressure between 20 and 23 millimeters of mercury for 60 minutes. In dogs receiving blood, there was no protein in the bronchoalveolar lavage before or after blood was given. In the Hyskon group, there was no protein in the bronchoalveolar lavage before Hyskon and 0.6 +/- 1.4 milligrams per deciliter (range of 0.1 to 3.7 milligram per deciliter) after Hyskon. The ratio of bronchoalveolar lavage protein to plasma protein after Hyskon was 8.0 +/- 18.0 percent compared with zero percent in the blood group. Hyskon altered pulmonary microvascular membrane permeability, causing alveolar flooding with plasma proteins and possibly accounting for the deterioration of oxygenation and pulmonary compliance seen in patients. These results suggest a significant noncardiogenic component of Hyskon induced pulmonary edema. PMID:7505487

  9. [Pulmonary circulation in embolic pulmonary edema].

    PubMed

    Sanotskaia, N V; Polikarpov, V V; Matsievskiĭ, D D

    1989-02-01

    The ultrasonic method was used in acute experiments on cats with open chest under artificial lung ventilation to obtain blood flow in low-lobar pulmonary artery and vein, the blood pressure in pulmonary artery, as well as the left atrial pressure in fat (olive oil) and mechanical (Lycopodium spores) pulmonary embolism. It is shown that pulmonary embolism produces the decrease in the blood flow in pulmonary artery and vein, the increase of the pressure in pulmonary artery and left atria, the increase of lung vessels resistance. The decrease is observed of systemic arterial pressure, bradycardia, and extrasystole. After 5-10 min the restoration of arterial pressure and heart rhythm occur and partial restoration of blood flow in pulmonary artery and vein. In many experiments the blood flow in vein outdoes that in the artery--it allows to suppose the increase of the blood flow in bronchial artery. After 60-90 min there occur sudden decrease of systemic arterial pressure, the decrease of the blood flow in pulmonary artery and vein. The pressure in pulmonary artery and resistance of pulmonary vessels remain high. Pulmonary edema developed in all animals. The death occurs in 60-100 min after the beginning of embolism. PMID:2923969

  10. Naloxone-induced pulmonary edema.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, J A; Koenigsberg, M D

    1987-11-01

    We present the case of a 68-year-old woman with acute pulmonary edema secondary to the administration of naloxone to reverse an inadvertent narcotic overdose. The patient presented following a 12-hour history of increasingly bizarre behavior and confusion. A total IV dose of 1.6 mg naloxone was administered in an attempt to reverse the suspected overconsumption of a codeine-containing cough suppressant. She immediately became agitated, tachycardic, and diaphoretic; a clinical diagnosis of acute pulmonary edema was made. Following treatment with furosemide, nitroglycerin, and morphine sulfate, the patient recovered completely without further incident. Although naloxone is thought to be a safe drug with few complications, it should not be used indiscriminantly, and the smallest doses necessary to elicit the desired response should be used. PMID:3662194

  11. [Neurogenic pulmonary edema. Report of 2 cases].

    PubMed

    Dragosavac, D; Falcão, A L; Araújo, S; Terzi, R G

    1997-06-01

    Neurogenic pulmonary edema is a rare and serious complication in patients with head injury. It also may develop after a variety of cerebral insults such as subarachnoid hemorrhage, brain tumors and after epileptic seizures. Thirty six patients with severe head injury and four patients with cerebrovascular insults treated in Intensive Care Unit of HC-UNICAMP from January to September 1995 were evaluated. In this period there were two patients with neurogenic pulmonary edema, one with head injury and other with intracerebral hemorrhage. Diagnosis was made by rapid onset of pulmonary edema, severe hypoxemia, decrease of pulmonary complacence and diffuse pulmonary infiltrations, without previous history of tracheal aspiration or any other risk factor for development of adult respiratory distress syndrome. In the first case, with severe head trauma, neurogenic pulmonary edema was diagnosed at admission one hour after trauma, associated with severe systemic inflammatory reaction, and good outcome in three days. The second case, with hemorrhagic vascular insult, developed neurogenic pulmonary edema the fourth day after drainage of intracerebral hematoma and died. PMID:9629392

  12. Acute pulmonary edema caused by quinine.

    PubMed

    Everts, Richard J; Hayhurst, Michael D; Nona, Basim P

    2004-09-01

    A 57-year-old man who had been intermittently taking one 300-mg tablet of quinine sulfate orally for leg cramps experienced transient acute pulmonary edema and hypotension 30-40 minutes after ingestion on two consecutive occasions. He was not taking any concomitant drugs, and there was no alternative explanation for either event. Serial troponin T tests and electrocardiograms, obtained on admission to the hospital, followed by an outpatient echocardiogram and a coronary angiogram, were essentially normal. We compared this case with one previously published and nine previously unpublished reports of quinine-associated pulmonary edema and conclude that some cases of pulmonary edema or adult respiratory distress syndrome in patients with malaria may be caused by an adverse reaction to quinine. Although infrequent, clinicians should be aware of this potentially serious and costly adverse reaction. PMID:15460183

  13. Acute Pulmonary Edema Associated With Propofol: An Unusual Complication

    PubMed Central

    Waheed, Mian Adnan; Oud, Lavi

    2014-01-01

    Propofol is frequently used in the emergency department to provide procedural sedation for patients undergoing various procedures and is considered to be safe when administered by trained personnel. Pulmonary edema after administration of propofol has rarely been reported. We report a case of a 23-year-old healthy male who developed acute cough, hemoptysis and hypoxia following administration of propofol for splinting of a foot fracture. Chest radiography showed bilateral patchy infiltrates. The patient was treated successfully with supportive care. This report emphasizes the importance of this potentially fatal propofol-associated complication and discusses possible underlying mechanisms and related literature. PMID:25493132

  14. Influenza leaves a TRAIL to pulmonary edema.

    PubMed

    Brauer, Rena; Chen, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Influenza infection can cause acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), leading to poor disease outcome with high mortality. One of the driving features in the pathogenesis of ARDS is the accumulation of fluid in the alveoli, which causes severe pulmonary edema and impaired oxygen uptake. In this issue of the JCI, Peteranderl and colleagues define a paracrine communication between macrophages and type II alveolar epithelial cells during influenza infection where IFNα induces macrophage secretion of TRAIL that causes endocytosis of Na,K-ATPase by the alveolar epithelium. This reduction of Na,K-ATPase expression decreases alveolar fluid clearance, which in turn leads to pulmonary edema. Inhibition of the TRAIL signaling pathway has been shown to improve lung injury after influenza infection, and future studies will be needed to determine if blocking this pathway is a viable option in the treatment of ARDS. PMID:26999598

  15. The evolution of scuba divers pulmonary edema.

    PubMed

    Edmonds, Carl

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of scuba divers pulmonary edema is described. When discovered in 1981, it was believed to be a cold-induced response in a submerged, otherwise healthy, scuba diver. The clinical features are described and discussed, as are the demographics. An alleged prevalence of 1.1% was complicated by problematic statistics and an apparent increase in reported cases. Recurrences both while diving and swimming or snorkeling were common. More recent case reports and surveys are described, identifying predisposing factors and associations, including cardiac pathology. Stress cardiomyopathies, reversible myocardial disorder or Takotsubo cardiomyopathy, may complicate the presentation, especially in older females. Relevant cardiac investigations and autopsy findings are reviewed. Disease severity and potential lethality of scuba divers pulmonary edema became more apparent early this century, and these influence our current recommendations to survivors. First aid and treatment are also discussed. PMID:27265985

  16. An unusual cause of pulmonary edema.

    PubMed

    Chong, Adrian; Wahi, Sudhir; Harvey, Ryan; Finn, Chris; Shah, Pallav; Gould, Paul

    2014-03-01

    Primary cardiac tumors are rare malignancies. Patients may present with congestive cardiac failure due to intracavitary obstruction to blood flow, valvular dysfunction, embolic phenomena, local invasion resulting in arrhythmias, pericardial involvement, constitutional symptoms, or paraneoplastic syndromes. We describe the case of a previously fit 79-year-old woman who presented with acute pulmonary edema due to a large left atrial pleomorphic sarcoma causing severe functional mitral stenosis. She underwent palliative debulking surgery with good symptomatic relief. PMID:24585913

  17. High altitude pulmonary edema in mountain climbers.

    PubMed

    Korzeniewski, Krzysztof; Nitsch-Osuch, Aneta; Guzek, Aneta; Juszczak, Dariusz

    2015-04-01

    Every year thousands of ski, trekking or climbing fans travel to the mountains where they stay at the altitude of more than 2500-3000m above sea level or climb mountain peaks, often exceeding 7000-8000m. High mountain climbers are at a serious risk from the effects of adverse environmental conditions prevailing at higher elevations. They may experience health problems resulting from hypotension, hypoxia or exposure to low temperatures; the severity of those conditions is largely dependent on elevation, time of exposure as well as the rate of ascent and descent. A disease which poses a direct threat to the lives of mountain climbers is high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE). It is a non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema which typically occurs in rapidly climbing unacclimatized lowlanders usually within 2-4 days of ascent above 2500-3000m. It is the most common cause of death resulting from the exposure to high altitude. The risk of HAPE rises with increased altitude and faster ascent. HAPE incidence ranges from an estimated 0.01% to 15.5%. Climbers with a previous history of HAPE, who ascent rapidly above 4500m have a 60% chance of illness recurrence. The aim of this article was to present the relevant details concerning epidemiology, pathophysiology, clinical symptoms, prevention, and treatment of high altitude pulmonary edema among climbers in the mountain environment. PMID:25291181

  18. The Curious Question of Exercise-Induced Pulmonary Edema

    PubMed Central

    Bates, Melissa L.; Farrell, Emily T.; Eldridge, Marlowe W.

    2011-01-01

    The question of whether pulmonary edema develops during exercise on land is controversial. Yet, the development of pulmonary edema during swimming and diving is well established. This paper addresses the current controversies that exist in the field of exercise-induced pulmonary edema on land and with water immersion. It also discusses the mechanisms by which pulmonary edema can develop during land exercise, swimming, and diving and the current gaps in knowledge that exist. Finally, this paper discusses how these fields can continue to advance and the areas where clinical knowledge is lacking. PMID:21660232

  19. New Compton densitometer for measuring pulmonary edema

    SciTech Connect

    Loo, B.W.; Goulding, F.S.; Simon, D.S.

    1985-10-01

    Pulmonary edema is the pathological increase of extravascular lung water found most often in patients with congestive heart failure and other critically ill patients who suffer from intravenous fluid overload. A non-invasive lung density monitor that is accurate, easily portable, safe and inexpensive is needed for clinical evaluation of pulmonary edema. Other researchers who have employed Compton scattering techniques generally used systems of extended size and detectors with poor energy resolution. This has resulted in significant systematic biases from multiply-scattered photons and larger errors in counting statistics at a given radiation dose to the patient. We are proposing a patented approach in which only backscattered photons are measured with a high-resolution HPGe detector in a compact system geometry. By proper design and a unique data extraction scheme, effects of the variable chest wall on lung density measurements are minimized. Preliminary test results indicate that with a radioactive source of under 30 GBq, it should be possible to make an accurate lung density measurement in one minute, with a risk of radiation exposure to the patient a thousand times smaller than that from a typical chest x-ray. The ability to make safe, frequent lung density measurements could be very helpful for monitoring the course of P.E. at the hospital bedside or outpatient clinics, and for evaluating the efficacy of therapy in clinical research. 6 refs., 5 figs.

  20. Amiodarone-induced pulmonary toxicity mimicking acute pulmonary edema.

    PubMed

    Fabiani, Iacopo; Tacconi, Danilo; Grotti, Simone; Brandini, Rossella; Salvadori, Claudia; Caremani, Marcello; Bolognese, Leonardo

    2011-05-01

    Amiodarone is a highly effective antiarrhythmic drug. Its long-term use may, however, lead to several adverse effects, with pulmonary toxicity being the most serious. The article presents the case of a 78-year-old woman with a history of cardiac surgery, who after 2 years of amiodarone therapy for prophylactic treatment of atrial fibrillation developed amiodarone pneumonitis mimicking an acute pulmonary edema. The patient failed to respond to diuretic therapy and several courses of anti-infective therapy. Differential diagnosis of different causes of pulmonary infiltrates did not demonstrate any other abnormality. Lung biopsy findings were consistent with the diagnosis of amiodarone pneumonitis. Given the widespread use of amiodarone as an antiarrhythmic agent, pneumologists and cardiologists should consider this important adverse effect as a differential diagnosis of pulmonary distress refractory to therapy in all patients treated with amiodarone who present with respiratory symptoms and pneumonia-like illness. PMID:19924000

  1. Serotonin syndrome presenting as pulmonary edema

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Nilima Deepak; Jain, Ajay B.

    2016-01-01

    Serotonin syndrome (SS) is a potentially life-threatening condition resulting from excessive central and peripheral serotonergic activity. Clinically, it is a triad of mental-status changes, neuromuscular abnormalities, and autonomic disturbances. It can be caused by intentional self-poisoning, overdose, or inadvertent drug interactions. We report the case of a 58-year-old male with type 2 diabetes mellitus and obsessive compulsive disorder who developed pulmonary edema as a possible complication of SS. SS was caused by a combination of three specific serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (fluoxetine, fluvoxamine, and sertraline), linezolid, and fentanyl. The hospital course was further complicated by difficult weaning from the ventilator. SS was identified and successfully treated with cyproheptadine and lorazepam. The case highlights the importance of effective consultation-liaison and prompt recognition of SS as the presentation may be complex in the presence of co-morbid medical illness. PMID:26997733

  2. Serotonin syndrome presenting as pulmonary edema.

    PubMed

    Shah, Nilima Deepak; Jain, Ajay B

    2016-01-01

    Serotonin syndrome (SS) is a potentially life-threatening condition resulting from excessive central and peripheral serotonergic activity. Clinically, it is a triad of mental-status changes, neuromuscular abnormalities, and autonomic disturbances. It can be caused by intentional self-poisoning, overdose, or inadvertent drug interactions. We report the case of a 58-year-old male with type 2 diabetes mellitus and obsessive compulsive disorder who developed pulmonary edema as a possible complication of SS. SS was caused by a combination of three specific serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (fluoxetine, fluvoxamine, and sertraline), linezolid, and fentanyl. The hospital course was further complicated by difficult weaning from the ventilator. SS was identified and successfully treated with cyproheptadine and lorazepam. The case highlights the importance of effective consultation-liaison and prompt recognition of SS as the presentation may be complex in the presence of co-morbid medical illness. PMID:26997733

  3. [Cardiogenic and non cardiogenic pulmonary edema: pathomechanisms and causes].

    PubMed

    Glaus, T; Schellenberg, S; Lang, J

    2010-07-01

    The development of pulmonary edema is divided in cardiogenic and non-cardiogenic. Cardiogenic edema pathogenically is caused by elevated hydrostatic pressure in the pulmonary capillaries due to left sided congestive heart failure. Non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema is categorized depending on the underlying pathogenesis in low-alveolar pressure, elevated permeability or neurogenic edema. Some important examples of causes are upper airway obstruction like in laryngeal paralysis or strangulation for low alveolar pressure, leptospirosis and ARDS for elevated permeability, and epilepsy, brain trauma and electrocution for neurogenic edema. The differentiation between cardiogenic versus non-cardiogenic genesis is not always straightforward, but most relevant, because treatment markedly differs between the two. Of further importance is the identification of the specific underlying cause in non-cardiogenic edema, not only for therapeutic but particularly for prognostic reasons. Depending on the cause the prognosis ranges from very poor to good chance of complete recovery. PMID:20582896

  4. High-altitude pulmonary edema: diagnosis, prevention, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Pennardt, Andre

    2013-01-01

    High-altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) is a lethal, noncardiogenic form of pulmonary edema that afflicts susceptible individuals after rapid ascent to high altitude above 2,500 m. Prevention of HAPE is achieved most effectively by gradual ascent allowing time for proper acclimatization. Certain prophylactic medications may further reduce the risk of ascending to high altitude in individuals with a prior history of HAPE. The most effective and reliable treatment of HAPE is immediate descent and administration of supplemental oxygen. PMID:23478563

  5. Three plasma metabolite signatures for diagnosing high altitude pulmonary edema

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Li; Tan, Guangguo; Liu, Ping; Li, Huijie; Tang, Lulu; Huang, Lan; Ren, Qian

    2015-10-01

    High-altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) is a potentially fatal condition, occurring at altitudes greater than 3,000 m and affecting rapidly ascending, non-acclimatized healthy individuals. However, the lack of biomarkers for this disease still constitutes a bottleneck in the clinical diagnosis. Here, ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled with Q-TOF mass spectrometry was applied to study plasma metabolite profiling from 57 HAPE and 57 control subjects. 14 differential plasma metabolites responsible for the discrimination between the two groups from discovery set (35 HAPE subjects and 35 healthy controls) were identified. Furthermore, 3 of the 14 metabolites (C8-ceramide, sphingosine and glutamine) were selected as candidate diagnostic biomarkers for HAPE using metabolic pathway impact analysis. The feasibility of using the combination of these three biomarkers for HAPE was evaluated, where the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) was 0.981 and 0.942 in the discovery set and the validation set (22 HAPE subjects and 22 healthy controls), respectively. Taken together, these results suggested that this composite plasma metabolite signature may be used in HAPE diagnosis, especially after further investigation and verification with larger samples.

  6. Three plasma metabolite signatures for diagnosing high altitude pulmonary edema

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Li; Tan, Guangguo; Liu, Ping; Li, Huijie; Tang, Lulu; Huang, Lan; Ren, Qian

    2015-01-01

    High-altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) is a potentially fatal condition, occurring at altitudes greater than 3,000 m and affecting rapidly ascending, non-acclimatized healthy individuals. However, the lack of biomarkers for this disease still constitutes a bottleneck in the clinical diagnosis. Here, ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled with Q-TOF mass spectrometry was applied to study plasma metabolite profiling from 57 HAPE and 57 control subjects. 14 differential plasma metabolites responsible for the discrimination between the two groups from discovery set (35 HAPE subjects and 35 healthy controls) were identified. Furthermore, 3 of the 14 metabolites (C8-ceramide, sphingosine and glutamine) were selected as candidate diagnostic biomarkers for HAPE using metabolic pathway impact analysis. The feasibility of using the combination of these three biomarkers for HAPE was evaluated, where the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) was 0.981 and 0.942 in the discovery set and the validation set (22 HAPE subjects and 22 healthy controls), respectively. Taken together, these results suggested that this composite plasma metabolite signature may be used in HAPE diagnosis, especially after further investigation and verification with larger samples. PMID:26459926

  7. Synthetic smoke with acrolein but not HCl produces pulmonary edema

    SciTech Connect

    Hales, C.A.; Barkin, P.W.; Jung, W.; Trautman, E.; Lamborghini, D.; Herrig, N.; Burke, J.

    1988-03-01

    The chemical toxins in smoke and not the heat are responsible for the pulmonary edema of smoke inhalation. We developed a synthetic smoke composed of carbon particles (mean diameter of 4.3 microns) to which toxins known to be in smoke, such as HCl or acrolein, could be added one at a time. We delivered synthetic smoke to dogs for 10 min and monitored extravascular lung water (EVLW) accumulation thereafter with a double-indicator thermodilution technique. Final EVLW correlated highly with gravimetric values (r = 0.93, P less than 0.01). HCl in concentrations of 0.1-6 N when added to heated carbon (120 degrees C) and cooled to 39 degrees C produced airway damage but no pulmonary edema. Acrolein, in contrast, produced airway damage but also pulmonary edema, whereas capillary wedge pressures remained stable. Low-dose acrolein smoke (less than 200 ppm) produced edema in two of five animals with a 2- to 4-h delay. Intermediate-dose acrolein smoke (200-300 ppm) always produced edema at an average of 147 +/- 57 min after smoke, whereas high-dose acrolein (greater than 300 ppm) produced edema at 65 +/- 16 min after smoke. Thus acrolein but not HCl, when presented as a synthetic smoke, produced a delayed-onset, noncardiogenic, and peribronchiolar edema in a roughly dose-dependent fashion.

  8. Synthetic smoke with acrolein but not HCl produces pulmonary edema.

    PubMed

    Hales, C A; Barkin, P W; Jung, W; Trautman, E; Lamborghini, D; Herrig, N; Burke, J

    1988-03-01

    The chemical toxins in smoke and not the heat are responsible for the pulmonary edema of smoke inhalation. We developed a synthetic smoke composed of carbon particles (mean diameter of 4.3 microns) to which toxins known to be in smoke, such as HCl or acrolein, could be added one at a time. We delivered synthetic smoke to dogs for 10 min and monitored extravascular lung water (EVLW) accumulation thereafter with a double-indicator thermodilution technique. Final EVLW correlated highly with gravimetric values (r = 0.93, P less than 0.01). HCl in concentrations of 0.1-6 N when added to heated carbon (120 degrees C) and cooled to 39 degrees C produced airway damage but no pulmonary edema. Acrolein, in contrast, produced airway damage but also pulmonary edema, whereas capillary wedge pressures remained stable. Low-dose acrolein smoke (less than 200 ppm) produced edema in two of five animals with a 2- to 4-h delay. Intermediate-dose acrolein smoke (200-300 ppm) always produced edema at an average of 147 +/- 57 min after smoke, whereas high-dose acrolein (greater than 300 ppm) produced edema at 65 +/- 16 min after smoke. Thus acrolein but not HCl, when presented as a synthetic smoke, produced a delayed-onset, noncardiogenic, and peribronchiolar edema in a roughly dose-dependent fashion. PMID:3284867

  9. Fumonisin toxicosis in swine: an overview of porcine pulmonary edema and current perspectives.

    PubMed Central

    Haschek, W M; Gumprecht, L A; Smith, G; Tumbleson, M E; Constable, P D

    2001-01-01

    Fumonisin toxicosis in swine was named porcine pulmonary edema (PPE) after outbreaks of a fatal disease in pigs fed Fusarium verticillioides (F. moniliforme)-contaminated corn screenings from the 1989 corn crop in Iowa, Illinois, and Georgia. Pigs that died had severe pulmonary edema, which has not been identified in other species after exposure to fumonisins. The disease has been reproduced experimentally by feeding of naturally contaminated corn, F. verticillioides culture material, and by intravenous administration of fumonisin B1 (FB1). Hepatic lesions consisting of apoptosis, necrosis, and hepatocyte proliferation also are observed. As in other species, alterations in clinical pathology reflect hepatic injury as well as elevated serum cholesterol concentration. In chronic studies, esophageal plaques, hyperplastic hepatic nodules, and right ventricular hypertrophy were found. In pigs, as in other species, fumonisin alters sphingolipid biosynthesis, with the greatest alterations in sphingosine and sphinganine concentrations in kidney, liver, lung, and heart. Our recent studies on fumonisin toxicosis in pigs have focused on immune effects and the pathogenesis of pulmonary edema. The specific immune system was not affected; however, FB1 inhibited phagocytosis and sphingolipid biosynthesis in pulmonary macrophages. Fumonisin induced an accumulation of membranous material in pulmonary capillary endothelial cells; this change appears specific to this cell type and to swine. In short-term cardiovascular studies, fumonisin decreased left ventricular dP/dt(max) (an index of cardiac contractility), mean systemic arterial pressure, heart rate, and cardiac output, and increased mean pulmonary artery pressure and pulmonary artery wedge pressure. These changes are compatible with the inhibition of L-type calcium channels by increased sphingosine and/or sphinganine concentration. Therefore, fumonisin-induced pulmonary edema in swine appears to result from acute left

  10. Negative pressure pulmonary edema following choking on a cookie.

    PubMed

    Toukan, Yazeed; Gur, Michal; Bentur, Lea

    2016-07-01

    A 12-year-old boy developed severe acute respiratory distress during a school break requiring resuscitative measures. The episode started shortly after a short choking episode with a cookie. History, physical examination, laboratory results, chest X-ray, and clinical course supported the diagnosis of negative pressure pulmonary edema (NPPE). NPPE occurring outside a hospital setting, especially following a short episode of choking on a cookie, is rarely reported in children. Understanding the pathophysiological mechanisms contributing to pulmonary edema can help in distinguishing NPPE from other causes of fulminant respiratory distress, and especially from other causes of noncardiogenic pulmonary edema. Pediatr Pulmonol. 2016;51:E25-E27. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26785085

  11. Pulmonary edema: a complication following dental treatment under general anesthesia.

    PubMed Central

    Yanko, R.; Garfunkel, A. A.; Kaufman, E.

    1996-01-01

    This article describes pulmonary edema in two young, physically healthy individuals following routine intensive dental treatment under general anesthesia. The etiology, diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment are discussed. This paper demonstrates that young, healthy patients may develop pulmonary edema in the perianesthesia period or even during anesthesia itself. Obstructive events, which occur especially in the post extubation period, may trigger this condition, as may other well-known phenomena. Early diagnosis and intensive treatment are mandatory in order to effectively resolve the situation. PMID:10323128

  12. [Acute heart failure: acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema and cardiogenic shock].

    PubMed

    Sánchez Marteles, Marta; Urrutia, Agustín

    2014-03-01

    Acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema and cardiogenic shock are two of the main forms of presentation of acute heart failure. Both entities are serious, with high mortality, and require early diagnosis and prompt and aggressive management. Acute pulmonary edema is due to the passage of fluid through the alveolarcapillary membrane and is usually the result of an acute cardiac episode. Correct evaluation and clinical identification of the process is essential in the management of acute pulmonary edema. The initial aim of treatment is to ensure hemodynamic stability and to correct hypoxemia. Other measures that can be used are vasodilators such as nitroglycerin, loop diuretics and, in specific instances, opioids. Cardiogenic shock is characterized by sustained hypoperfusion, pulmonary wedge pressure > 18 mmHg and a cardiac index < 2.2l/min/m(2). The process typically presents with hypotension (systolic blood pressure < 90 mmHg or a decrease in mean arterial pressure > 30 mmHg) and absent or reduced diuresis (< 0.5 ml/kg/h). The most common cause is left ventricular failure due to acute myocardial infarction. Treatment consists of general measures to reverse acidosis and hypoxemia, as well as the use of vasopressors and inotropic drugs. Early coronary revascularization has been demonstrated to improve survival in shock associated with ischaemic heart disease. PMID:24930078

  13. Evaluation of meteorological and epidemiological characteristics of fatal pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Törő, Klára; Pongrácz, Rita; Bartholy, Judit; Váradi-T, Aletta; Marcsa, Boglárka; Szilágyi, Brigitta; Lovas, Attila; Dunay, György; Sótonyi, Péter

    2016-03-01

    The objective of the present study was to identify risk factors among epidemiological factors and meteorological conditions in connection with fatal pulmonary embolism. Information was collected from forensic autopsy records in sudden unexpected death cases where pulmonary embolism was the exact cause of death between 2001 and 2010 in Budapest. Meteorological parameters were detected during the investigated period. Gender, age, manner of death, cause of death, place of death, post-mortem pathomorphological changes and daily meteorological conditions (i.e. daily mean temperature and atmospheric pressure) were examined. We detected that the number of registered pulmonary embolism (No 467, 211 male) follows power law in time regardless of the manner of death. We first described that the number of registered fatal pulmonary embolism up to the nth day can be expressed as Y(n) = α ⋅ n (β) where Y denotes the number of fatal pulmonary embolisms up to the nth day and α > 0 and β > 1 are model parameters. We found that there is a definite link between the cold temperature and the increasing incidence of fatal pulmonary embolism. Cold temperature and the change of air pressure appear to be predisposing factors for fatal pulmonary embolism. Meteorological parameters should have provided additional information about the predisposing factors of thromboembolism. PMID:26178756

  14. Evaluation of meteorological and epidemiological characteristics of fatal pulmonary embolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Törő, Klára; Pongrácz, Rita; Bartholy, Judit; Váradi-T, Aletta; Marcsa, Boglárka; Szilágyi, Brigitta; Lovas, Attila; Dunay, György; Sótonyi, Péter

    2016-03-01

    The objective of the present study was to identify risk factors among epidemiological factors and meteorological conditions in connection with fatal pulmonary embolism. Information was collected from forensic autopsy records in sudden unexpected death cases where pulmonary embolism was the exact cause of death between 2001 and 2010 in Budapest. Meteorological parameters were detected during the investigated period. Gender, age, manner of death, cause of death, place of death, post-mortem pathomorphological changes and daily meteorological conditions (i.e. daily mean temperature and atmospheric pressure) were examined. We detected that the number of registered pulmonary embolism (No 467, 211 male) follows power law in time regardless of the manner of death. We first described that the number of registered fatal pulmonary embolism up to the nth day can be expressed as Y( n) = α ṡ n β where Y denotes the number of fatal pulmonary embolisms up to the nth day and α > 0 and β > 1 are model parameters. We found that there is a definite link between the cold temperature and the increasing incidence of fatal pulmonary embolism. Cold temperature and the change of air pressure appear to be predisposing factors for fatal pulmonary embolism. Meteorological parameters should have provided additional information about the predisposing factors of thromboembolism.

  15. Role of posterior hypothalamus in hypobaric hypoxia induced pulmonary edema.

    PubMed

    Sharma, R K; Choudhary, R C; Reddy, M K; Ray, A; Ravi, K

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the role of posterior hypothalamus and central neurotransmitters in the pulmonary edema due to hypobaric hypoxia, rats were placed in a high altitude simulation chamber (barometric pressure-294.4 mmHg) for 24 h. Exposure to hypobaric hypoxia resulted in increases in mean arterial blood pressure, renal sympathetic nerve activity, right ventricular systolic pressure, lung wet to dry weight ratio and Evans blue dye leakage. There was a significant attenuation in these responses to hypobaric hypoxia (a) after lesioning posterior hypothalamus and (b) after chronic infusion of GABAA receptor agonist muscimol into posterior hypothalamus. No such attenuation was evident with the chronic infusion of the nitric oxide donor SNAP into the posterior hypothalamus. It is concluded that in hypobaric hypoxia, there is over-activity of posterior hypothalamic neurons probably due to a local decrease in GABA-ergic inhibition which increases the sympathetic drive causing pulmonary hypertension and edema. PMID:25448396

  16. Reversible myocardial dysfunction and clinical outcome in scuba divers with immersion pulmonary edema.

    PubMed

    Gempp, Emmanuel; Louge, Pierre; Henckes, Anne; Demaistre, Sebastien; Heno, Phillipe; Blatteau, Jean-Eric

    2013-06-01

    Immersion pulmonary edema in scuba divers is a rare disorder that tends to recur and can be potentially fatal, even in the absence of underlying cardiac disease. Anecdotal cases of reversible myocardial dysfunction have been described in this setting, but little is known of its pathogenesis. The purpose of the present study was to determine the clinical outcomes and the determinants associated with this condition. The data from 54 consecutive divers admitted for acute immersion pulmonary edema during a 5.5-year period were retrospectively studied. A diagnosis of myocardial dysfunction was established by the presence of elevated cardiac troponin T levels, coupled with electrocardiographic changes and/or wall motion abnormalities on the echocardiogram. The demographic, clinical, biologic, and diving characteristics were tested as potential predictors of this disorder. All the patients had complete resolution of symptoms within 72 hours, but 3 required intensive ventilation or hemodynamic support at admission. Reversible myocardial dysfunction was observed in 28% and was associated more with age >50 years (odds ratio [OR] 5.5, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.5 to 21, p = 0.013), hypertension (OR 8.2, 95% CI 2.1 to 32, p = 0.002), diabetes (OR 22.1, 95% CI 1.1 to 458; p = 0.002), and release of natriuretic peptides (OR 9.1, 95% CI 2.4 to 35, p = 0.001). Follow-up investigations at 1 month were obtained for 49 patients and revealed a significant number of patients with occult hypertension. In conclusion, reversible myocardial dysfunction is not uncommon in divers with immersion pulmonary edema. The short-term overall prognosis is not adversely altered, but severe heart failure with a fatal outcome is unpredictable. Close monitoring of older divers with latent cardiovascular risk factors is warranted. PMID:23497776

  17. High-altitude pulmonary edema at a ski resort.

    PubMed Central

    Hultgren, H N; Honigman, B; Theis, K; Nicholas, D

    1996-01-01

    Medical records of 150 patients with high-altitude pulmonary edema seen over a 39-month period in a Colorado Rocky Mountain ski area at 2,928 m (9,600 ft) (mean age 34.4 years; 84% male) were reviewed. The mean time to the onset of symptoms was 3 +/- 1.3 days after arrival. Common symptoms were dyspnea, cough, headache, chest congestion, nausea, fever, and weakness. Orthopnea, hemoptysis, and vomiting were rare, occurring in 7%, 6%, and 16%, respectively. Symptoms of cerebral edema occurred in 14%. A temperature exceeding 100 degrees F occurred in 20%, and 17% had a systolic blood pressure of 150 mm of mercury or higher. Blood pressures were higher in patients older than 50 years (142 mm of mercury). Rales were present in 85%, and a pulmonary infiltrate was present in 88%; both were most commonly bilateral or on the right side. The amount of infiltrate was mild. Men appeared to be more susceptible than women to high-altitude pulmonary edema. Pulse oximetry in 45 patients showed a mean oxygen saturation of 74% (38% to 93%). Treatment methods depended on severity and included a return to quarters for portable nasal oxygen, an overnight stay in the clinic for continuing oxygen, or a descent to Denver for recovery or admission to a hospital. All patients received oxygen for 2 to 4 hours in the clinic. There were no deaths or complications. Images Figure 2. Figure 3. PMID:8775933

  18. Postobstructive pulmonary edema after biopsy of a nasopharyngeal mass

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Keyur Kamlesh; Ahmad, Sabina Qureshi; Shah, Vikas; Lee, Haesoon

    2015-01-01

    We describe a case of 17 year-old male with a nasopharyngeal rhabdomyosarcoma who developed postobstructive pulmonary edema (POPE) after removing the endotracheal tube following biopsy. He developed muffled voice, rhinorrhea, dysphagia, odynophagia, and difficulty breathing through nose and weight loss of 20 pounds in the preceding 2 months. A nasopharyngoscopy revealed a fleshy nasopharyngeal mass compressing the soft and hard palate. Head and neck MRI revealed a large mass in the nasopharynx extending into the bilateral choana and oropharynx. Biopsy of the mass was taken under general anesthesia with endotracheal intubation. Immediately after extubation he developed oxygen desaturation, which did not improve with bag mask ventilation with 100% of oxygen, but improved after a dose of succinylcholine. He was re-intubated and pink, frothy fluid was suctioned from the endotracheal tube. Chest radiograph (CXR) was suggestive of an acute pulmonary edema. He improved with mechanical ventilation and intravenous furosemide. His pulmonary edema resolved over the next 24 h. POPE is a rare but serious complication associated with upper airway obstruction. The pathophysiology of POPE involves hemodynamic changes occurring in the lung and the heart during forceful inspiration against a closed airway due to an acute or chronic airway obstruction. This case illustrates the importance of considering the development of POPE with general anesthesia, laryngospasm and removal of endotracheal tube to make prompt diagnosis and to initiate appropriate management. PMID:26744691

  19. Postobstructive pulmonary edema after biopsy of a nasopharyngeal mass.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Keyur Kamlesh; Ahmad, Sabina Qureshi; Shah, Vikas; Lee, Haesoon

    2015-01-01

    We describe a case of 17 year-old male with a nasopharyngeal rhabdomyosarcoma who developed postobstructive pulmonary edema (POPE) after removing the endotracheal tube following biopsy. He developed muffled voice, rhinorrhea, dysphagia, odynophagia, and difficulty breathing through nose and weight loss of 20 pounds in the preceding 2 months. A nasopharyngoscopy revealed a fleshy nasopharyngeal mass compressing the soft and hard palate. Head and neck MRI revealed a large mass in the nasopharynx extending into the bilateral choana and oropharynx. Biopsy of the mass was taken under general anesthesia with endotracheal intubation. Immediately after extubation he developed oxygen desaturation, which did not improve with bag mask ventilation with 100% of oxygen, but improved after a dose of succinylcholine. He was re-intubated and pink, frothy fluid was suctioned from the endotracheal tube. Chest radiograph (CXR) was suggestive of an acute pulmonary edema. He improved with mechanical ventilation and intravenous furosemide. His pulmonary edema resolved over the next 24 h. POPE is a rare but serious complication associated with upper airway obstruction. The pathophysiology of POPE involves hemodynamic changes occurring in the lung and the heart during forceful inspiration against a closed airway due to an acute or chronic airway obstruction. This case illustrates the importance of considering the development of POPE with general anesthesia, laryngospasm and removal of endotracheal tube to make prompt diagnosis and to initiate appropriate management. PMID:26744691

  20. Molecular pathology of pulmonary edema after injury in forensic autopsy cases.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qi; Ishikawa, Takaki; Michiue, Tomomi; Zhu, Bao-Li; Guan, Da-Wei; Maeda, Hitoshi

    2012-11-01

    The lung is vulnerable to trauma; pulmonary edema starts quickly as part of the systemic responses involved in shock. The present study investigated the molecular pathology of posttraumatic alveolar damage and responses involving pulmonary edema in forensic autopsy cases of injury (n = 66) compared with acute cardiac death cases (n = 13). Intrapulmonary mRNA and immunohistochemical expressions of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs; MMP-2 and MMP-9), intercellular adhesion molecule-1, claudin-5, and aquaporins (AQPs, AQP-1 and AQP-5) were examined. Subacute injury deaths showed an increase in lung weight similar to that in acute cardiac death, but relative mRNA quantification using the Taqman real-time PCR assay demonstrated different findings among the causes of death; higher expressions were detected for all markers, except for AQP-5 in sharp instrument injury, for MMP-2 in blunt brain injury, and for MMP-9 in non-brain blunt injury, but these expression levels were lower in acute cardiac death. In immunostaining, only MMPs showed differences among the causes of death: MMP-2 expression was evident in most subacute deaths due to blunt brain injury and sharp instrument injury, whereas MMP-9 was intensely positive in those of non-brain blunt injury and sharp instrument injury. These findings suggest significant differences in the mechanism of pulmonary edema among fatal injuries and acute cardiac death, especially between blunt and sharp instrument injury. Systematic analysis of gene expressions using real-time PCR in combination with immunohistochemistry may be useful in evaluating pulmonary damage and responses after injury in death investigations, especially in connection with posttraumatic shock. PMID:22885909

  1. A fatal adverse effect of cefazolin administration: severe brain edema in a patient with multiple meningiomas

    PubMed Central

    Tribuddharat, Sirirat; Sathitkarnmanee, Thepakorn; Kitkhuandee, Amnat; Theerapongpakdee, Sunchai; Ngamsaengsirisup, Kriangsak; Chanthawong, Sarinya

    2016-01-01

    Cefazolin is commonly administered before surgery as a prophylactic antibiotic. Hypersensitivity to cefazolin is not uncommon, and the symptoms mostly include urticaria, skin reaction, diarrhea, vomiting, and transient neutropenia, which are rarely life threatening. We present a rare case of fatal cefazolin hypersensitivity in a female who was diagnosed with multiple meningiomas and scheduled for craniotomy and tumor removal. Immediately after cefazolin IV administration, the patient developed acute hypertensive crisis, which resolved within 10 minutes after the treatment. This was followed by unexplained metabolic acidosis. The patient then developed severe brain edema 100 minutes later. The patient had facial edema when her face was exposed for the next 30 minutes. A computed tomography scan revealed global brain edema with herniation. She was admitted to the intensive care unit for symptomatic treatment and died 10 days after surgery from multiorgan failure. The serum IgE level was very high (734 IU/mL). Single-dose administration of cefazolin for surgical prophylaxis may lead to rare, fatal adverse reaction. The warning signs are sudden, unexplained metabolic acidosis, hypertensive crisis, tachycardia, and facial angioedema predominating with or without cutaneous symptoms like urticaria. PMID:26929668

  2. [Non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema, acute respiratory distress syndrome].

    PubMed

    Skalická, Hana; Bělohlávek, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema is a clinical syndrome manifested by rapidly progressive respiratory distress leading, without therapy, to severe respiratory insufficiency and subsequent multiorgan failure. The pathophysiological causes are: the change in the pressure gradients in the pulmonary capillaries, the impaired membrane permeability of the alveolocapillary in the lungs, and impaired lymphatic drainage. Unlike in cardiogenic pulmonary edema, cardiac disease is not a cause, and there is no increase in wedge pressure (< 18 mm Hg). The aetiological base is diverse and includes more clinical pathological factors. The diagnosis and evaluation are usually very difficult due to the rapidly deteriorating clinical condition of the patients. A decisive, quick and comprehensive approach, using all available invasive and non-invasive methods is necessary. The basic steps of treatment are: the use of different types of ventilatory support in order to achieve adequate oxygenation, dealing with possible hemodynamic instability, and, when needed, other specific procedures. It is always important to keep in mind that this is a very serious condition with a high mortality rate. And there is a need for fast and efficient access to the best specialized clinic. PMID:26750623

  3. Rhodiola crenulata Extract Alleviates Hypoxic Pulmonary Edema in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Li, Min-Hui; Shi, Li-Shian; Ho, Cheng-Wen

    2013-01-01

    Sudden exposure of nonacclimatized individuals to high altitude can easily lead to high altitude illnesses. High altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) is the most lethal form of high altitude illness. The present study was designed to investigate the ability of Rhodiola crenulata extract (RCE), an herbal medicine traditionally used as an antiacute mountain sickness remedy, to attenuate hypoxia-induced pulmonary injury. Exposure of animals to hypobaric hypoxia led to a significant increase in pathological indicators for pulmonary edema, including the lung water content, disruption of the alveolar-capillary barrier, and protein-rich fluid in the lungs. In addition, hypobaric hypoxia also increased oxidative stress markers, including (ROS) production, (MDA) level, and (MPO) activity. Furthermore, overexpression of plasma (ET-1), (VEGF) in (BALF), and (HIF-1α) in lung tissue was also found. However, pretreatment with RCE relieved the HAPE findings by curtailing all of the hypoxia-induced lung injury parameters. These findings suggest that RCE confers effective protection for maintaining the integrity of the alveolar-capillary barrier by alleviating the elevated ET-1 and VEGF levels; it does so by reducing hypoxia-induced oxidative stress. Our results offer substantial evidence to support arguments in favor of traditional applications of Rhodiola crenulata for antihigh altitude illness. PMID:23710233

  4. Pulmonary edema following scorpion envenomation: mechanisms, clinical manifestations, diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Bahloul, Mabrouk; Chaari, Anis; Dammak, Hassen; Samet, Mohamed; Chtara, Kamilia; Chelly, Hedi; Ben Hamida, Chokri; Kallel, Hatem; Bouaziz, Mounir

    2013-01-10

    Scorpion envenomation is common in tropical and subtropical regions. Cardio-respiratory manifestations, mainly cardiogenic shock and pulmonary edema, are the leading causes of death after scorpion envenomation. The mechanism of pulmonary edema remains unclear and contradictory conclusions were published. However, most publications confirm that pulmonary edema has been attributed to acute left ventricular failure. Cardiac failure can result from massive release of catecholamines, myocardial damage induced by the venom or myocardial ischemia. Factors usually associated with the diagnosis of pulmonary edema were young age, tachypnea, agitation, sweating, or the presence of high plasma protein concentrations. Treatment of scorpion envenomation has two components: antivenom administration and supportive care. The latter mainly targets hemodynamic impairment and cardiogenic pulmonary edema. In Latin America, and India, the use of Prazosin is recommended for treatment of pulmonary edema because pulmonary edema is associated with arterial hypertension. However, in North Africa, scorpion leads to cardiac failure with systolic dysfunction with normal vascular resistance and dobutamine was recommended. Dobutamine infusion should be used as soon as we have enough evidence suggesting the presence of pulmonary edema, since it has been demonstrated that scorpion envenomation can result in pulmonary edema secondary to acute left ventricular failure. In severe cases, mechanical ventilation can be required. PMID:22075406

  5. Is High Altitude Pulmonary Edema Relevant to Hawai‘i?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    High altitude clinical syndromes have been described in the medical literature but may be under recognized in the state of Hawai‘i. As tourism increases, high altitude injuries may follow given the easy access to high altitude attractions. Visitors and clinicians should be aware of the dangers associated with the rapid ascent to high altitudes in the perceived comfort of a vehicle. This paper will review the basic pathophysiology, prevention, and treatment of the most serious of the high altitude clinical syndromes, high altitude pulmonary edema. PMID:25478294

  6. Acute pulmonary edema secondary to hyperbaric oxygen therapy.

    PubMed

    Obiagwu, Chukwudi; Paul, Vishesh; Chadha, Sameer; Hollander, Gerald; Shani, Jacob

    2015-02-01

    Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) has been shown to be effective in the treatment of diabetic ulcers, air embolism, carbon monoxide poisoning and gas gangrene with minimal adverse effects. Very few cases of HBOT causing acute pulmonary edema (PE) has been described; with a study on dogs suggesting that a complication of this therapy could be PE. We describe the case of an 80-year-old man with a history of stable systolic heart failure and diabetes mellitus presenting with acute PE following treatment with HBOT for diabetic foot. PMID:25988073

  7. Acute pulmonary edema secondary to hyperbaric oxygen therapy

    PubMed Central

    Obiagwu, Chukwudi; Paul, Vishesh; Chadha, Sameer; Hollander, Gerald; Shani, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) has been shown to be effective in the treatment of diabetic ulcers, air embolism, carbon monoxide poisoning and gas gangrene with minimal adverse effects. Very few cases of HBOT causing acute pulmonary edema (PE) has been described; with a study on dogs suggesting that a complication of this therapy could be PE. We describe the case of an 80-year-old man with a history of stable systolic heart failure and diabetes mellitus presenting with acute PE following treatment with HBOT for diabetic foot. PMID:25988073

  8. High-permeability pulmonary edema: nursing assessment, diagnosis, and interventions.

    PubMed

    Roberts, S L

    1990-05-01

    High-permeability pulmonary edema (HPPE) is a problem affecting 150,000 to 200,000 critically ill patients yearly. In HPPE the alveolar-capillary membrane is injured. The resulting increased permeability of the alveolar-capillary membrane allows shifts of fluid and protein into the interstitial fluid space and alveolus. As hypoxemia develops, the nurse assesses cardinal signs and symptoms derived from the physical examination and observations. Clinical data consisting of results from various laboratory and diagnostic studies confirm the diagnosis of HPPE. Finally, nursing diagnoses can be delineated as the basis on which expert nursing care is planned and implemented. PMID:2187834

  9. A fatal case of pulmonary nocardiosis

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Mahantesh; C, Shivaprasad; Varghese, Jaicob; Rajagopalan, Natarajan

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary nocardiosis is a serious, most often considered an opportunistic infection affecting the respiratory tract. Even though it is more common in immunocompromised hosts, it is not infrequently seen in immunocompetent patients as well. The aerosol route is the main portal of entry in to the body. Molecular techniques have revolutionised the identification of Nocardia species. However such tests are limited to referral laboratories. The radiographic appearances of Nocardia infection vary from a small nodule to bilateral infiltrates with cavitation. Traditionally sulphonamides have been considered the treatment of choice. However, resistance to sulphonamides is increasingly recognised. Carbapenems and linezolid have been found to be uniformly active against all the pathogenic species of Nocardia that affect human beings. The authors report a case of pulmonary nocardiosis in an immunocompetent patient, in whom the infection relentlessly progressed to florid sepsis despite prompt institution of right antibiotics. Florid sepsis relating to pulmonary nocardiosis is rare. PMID:22665550

  10. Increased lung vasoreactivity in children from Leadville, Colorado, after recovery from high-altitude pulmonary edema.

    PubMed

    Fasules, J W; Wiggins, J W; Wolfe, R R

    1985-11-01

    Cardiac catheterization was performed on seven children after recovery from high-altitude pulmonary edema. All were life-long residents at elevations above 10,000 feet. Three of the seven had developed pulmonary edema without antecedent travel to low altitude but had an upper respiratory infection. Response of pulmonary arterial pressure to 16% inspired oxygen in all seven was compared with that in six well children who resided at a similar altitude and had no history of high-altitude pulmonary edema. With hypoxia the susceptible patients had a greater mean pulmonary arterial pressure (56.3 +/- 23.8) than the nonsusceptible children (18.8 +/- 3.9, p less than .05). Comparison with historical hemodynamic responses in children at high altitudes showed a similar greater mean pulmonary arterial pressure in the susceptible children. Thus, in children from high altitudes, increased pulmonary vasoreactivity to hypoxia may play a role in the pathogenesis of high-altitude pulmonary edema. The development of pulmonary edema in high-altitude residents with upper respiratory infections and no antecedent low-altitude journey is consistent with the presence of other factors such as inflammation, which may play a role in the pathogenesis of the edema. The finding of right ventricular hypertrophy on an electrocardiogram in children from high altitudes may be predictive of their susceptibility to high-altitude pulmonary edema. PMID:4042303

  11. Edema

    MedlinePlus

    Edema means swelling caused by fluid in your body's tissues. It usually occurs in the feet, ankles ... it can involve your entire body. Causes of edema include Eating too much salt Sunburn Heart failure ...

  12. The Effect of TIP on Pneumovirus-Induced Pulmonary Edema in Mice

    PubMed Central

    van den Berg, Elske; Bem, Reinout A.; Bos, Albert P.; Lutter, Rene; van Woensel, Job B. M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Pulmonary edema plays a pivotal role in the pathophysiology of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV)-induced respiratory failure. In this study we determined whether treatment with TIP (AP301), a synthetic cyclic peptide that mimics the lectin-like domain of human TNF, decreases pulmonary edema in a mouse model of severe human RSV infection. TIP is currently undergoing clinical trials as a therapy for pulmonary permeability edema and has been shown to decrease pulmonary edema in different lung injury models. Methods C57BL/6 mice were infected with pneumonia virus of mice (PVM) and received TIP or saline (control group) by intratracheal instillation on day five (early administration) or day seven (late administration) after infection. In a separate set of experiments the effect of multiple dose administration of TIP versus saline was tested. Pulmonary edema was determined by the lung wet-to-dry (W/D) weight ratio and was assessed at different time-points after the administration of TIP. Secondary outcomes included clinical scores and lung cellular response. Results TIP did not have an effect on pulmonary edema in different dose regimens at different time points during PVM infection. In addition, TIP administration did not affect clinical severity scores or lung cellular response. Conclusion In this murine model of severe RSV infection TIP did not affect pulmonary edema nor course of disease. PMID:25047452

  13. TEVAR for Flash Pulmonary Edema Secondary to Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm to Pulmonary Artery Fistula.

    PubMed

    Bornak, Arash; Baqai, Atif; Li, Xiaoyi; Rey, Jorge; Tashiro, Jun; Velazquez, Omaida C

    2016-01-01

    Enlarging aneurysms in the thoracic aorta frequently remain asymptomatic. Fistulization of thoracic aortic aneurysms (TAA) to adjacent structures or the presence of a patent ductus arteriosus and TAA may lead to irreversible cardiopulmonary sequelae. This article reports on a large aneurysm of the thoracic aorta with communication to the pulmonary artery causing pulmonary edema and cardiorespiratory failure. The communication was ultimately closed after thoracic endovascular aortic aneurysm repair allowing rapid symptom resolution. Early diagnosis and closure of such communication in the presence of TAA are critical for prevention of permanent cardiopulmonary damage. PMID:26522587

  14. Pulmonary edema after photocoagulation of the endometrium with the Nd:YAG laser. A case report.

    PubMed

    Feinberg, B I; Gimpelson, R J; Godier, D E

    1989-06-01

    A woman developed pulmonary edema as a result of fluid overload during Nd:YAG ablation of endometrial tissue. As a result of a miscalculation of fluid administration and collection, she was overhydrated with irrigation fluid. The clinical picture of pulmonary edema was noted in the immediate postoperative period and responded to positive pressure ventilation and diuretic therapy. The mechanism of pulmonary edema is postulated to have been the result of the absorption of irrigating fluid through open venous channels resulting from the laser ablation. PMID:2661818

  15. Fatal Pulmonary Embolus After Uterine Artery Fibroid Embolisation

    SciTech Connect

    Hamoda, Haitham; Tait, P.; Edmonds, D. K.

    2009-09-15

    We report a 44-year-old woman who developed a fatal pulmonary embolus after uterine artery fibroid embolisation (UAE). Bilateral UAE was carried out through a single right-femoral artery puncture. The largest fibroid in the anterior fundal wall measured 4.5 cm, and the largest fibroid in the posterior fundal wall measured 6 cm. The appearances after UAE were satisfactory, and the procedure was apparently uneventful. No immediate complications were noted. The patient developed sudden-onset shortness of breath and went into cardiac arrest 19 h after the procedure. Postmortem autopsy confirmed that the cause of a death was a pulmonary embolism. To our knowledge this is the first reported case in the United Kingdom in which death occurred from a pulmonary embolus after UAE.

  16. PATIENT-VENTILATION ASYNCHRONY CAUSING NEGATIVE PRESSURE PULMONARY EDEMA IN AN INTUBATED OBESE PATIENT.

    PubMed

    Siddik-Sayyid, Sahar M; AlFahel, Waseem; El-Khatib, Mohamad F

    2016-02-01

    Negative pressure pulmonary edema is a potentially life-threatening condition that may occur when a large negative intrathoracic pressure is generated against a 'physically' obstructed upper airway during emergence from anesthesia. We report a 35 year old male patient who is morbidly obese and undergoing laparoscopic gastric bypass who developed negative pressure pulmonary edema without any evidence of a 'physical' upper airway obstruction. In our patient, the negative pressure pulmonary edema occurred after complete reversal of neuromuscular blockade and during manual positive pressure ventilation with the endotracheal tube still in place and in the presence of an oral airway. Since the patient was still intubated and had an airway in place with no possibility for physical obstruction, we speculate that the occurrence of the negative pressure pulmonary edema was mainly due to a 'functional' obstruction secondary to the severe patient-ventilation asynchrony that ensued upon reversal of the neuromuscular blockade. PMID:27382824

  17. Refractory Pulmonary Edema Caused by Late Pulmonary Vein Thrombosis After Lung Transplantation: A Rare Adverse Event.

    PubMed

    Denton, Eve J; Rischin, Adam; McGiffin, David; Williams, Trevor J; Paraskeva, Miranda A; Westall, Glen P; Snell, Greg

    2016-09-01

    After lung transplantation, pulmonary vein thrombosis is a rare, potentially life-threatening adverse event arising at the pulmonary venous anastomosis that typically occurs early and presents as graft failure and hemodynamic compromise with an associated mortality of up to 40%. The incidence, presentation, outcomes, and treatment of late pulmonary vein thrombosis remain poorly defined. Management options include anticoagulant agents for asymptomatic clots, and thrombolytic agents or surgical thrombectomy for hemodynamically significant clots. We present a rare case highlighting a delayed presentation of pulmonary vein thrombosis occurring longer than 2 weeks after lung transplantation and manifesting clinically as graft failure secondary to refractory pulmonary edema. The patient was treated successfully with surgical thrombectomy and remains well. We recommend a high index of suspicion of pulmonary vein thrombosis when graft failure after lung transplantation occurs and is not responsive to conventional therapy, and consideration of investigation with transesophageal echocardiography or computed tomography with venous phase contrast in such patients even more than 2 weeks after lung transplantation. PMID:27549541

  18. A neonate with hand, foot, and mouth disease complicated with brainstem encephalitis and pulmonary edema:A complete recovery.

    PubMed

    Guo, Shi-Jie; Wang, Dong-Xuan; Dai, Chun-Lai; Wu, Hui

    2014-07-01

    Hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) with serious complications and fatal cases have been reported over the last decade worldwide. The authors report a rare case of HFMD in a neonate complicated with brainstem encephalitis and pulmonary edema. She had fever, lethargy, dyspnea. Physical examination revealed shock signs, fine rales on both lungs, absent Moro reflex. The patient had a rapidly progressive course with seizures, coma, no spontaneous breathing, chemosis. There were some vesicles on left sole and red maculopapular rashes on perianal skin. She had a history of exposure to HFMD. Fecal sample was positive for EV71 RNA by real-time PCR. Chest X-rays showed bilateral pulmonary infiltrates. MRI of the brain showed significant hypointensity in the brainstem on T1WI and hyperintensity on T2WI. She recovered well. This case highlights severe HFMD in neonates is rare. Medical history and physical examination are important in making diagnosis. PMID:25097545

  19. A new Compton densitometer for measuring pulmonary edema

    SciTech Connect

    Loo, B.W.; Goulding, F.S.; Simon, S.

    1986-02-01

    Pulmonary edema (PE) is the pathological increase of extravascular lung water found most often in patients with congestive heart failure and other critically ill patients who suffer from intravenous fluid overload. The chest x-ray, the standard method for validating the presence of PE, is neither quantitative nor sensitive. A non-invasive lung density monitor that is accurate, easily portable, safe and inexpensive is needed for clinical use. To deal with the problem of attenuation along the beam paths, previous gamma-ray techniques require simultaneous measurement of transmitted and scattered beams. Since multiple scattering is a strong function of the density of the scattering medium and the mass distribution within the detection geometry, there will be inherent uncertainties in the system calibration unless it is performed on a body structure closely matched to that of each individual patient. Other researchers who have employed Compton scattering techniques generally used systems of extended size and detectors with poor energy resolution. This has resulted in significant systematic biases from multiply-scattered photons and larger errors in counting statistics at a given radiation dose to the patient. We are proposing a patented approach in which only backscattered photons are measured with a high-resolution HPGe detector in a compact system geometry. By proper design and a unique data extraction scheme, effects of the variable chest wall on lung density measurements are minimized. Preliminary test results indicate that with a radioactive source of under 30 GBq, it should be possible to make an accurate lung density, measurement in one minute, with a risk of radiation exposure to the patient a thousand times smaller than that from a typical chest x-ray.

  20. Noninvasive mechanical ventilation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and in acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema.

    PubMed

    Rialp Cervera, G; del Castillo Blanco, A; Pérez Aizcorreta, O; Parra Morais, L

    2014-03-01

    Noninvasive ventilation (NIV) with conventional therapy improves the outcome of patients with acute respiratory failure due to hypercapnic decompensation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) or acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema (ACPE). This review summarizes the main effects of NIV in these pathologies. In COPD, NIV improves gas exchange and symptoms, reducing the need for endotracheal intubation, hospital mortality and hospital stay compared with conventional oxygen therapy. NIV may also avoid reintubation and may decrease the length of invasive mechanical ventilation. In ACPE, NIV accelerates the remission of symptoms and the normalization of blood gas parameters, reduces the need for endotracheal intubation, and is associated with a trend towards lesser mortality, without increasing the incidence of myocardial infarction. The ventilation modality used in ACPE does not affect the patient prognosis. PMID:23158869

  1. Bronchial artery ligation modifies pulmonary edema after exposure to smoke with acrolein.

    PubMed

    Hales, C A; Barkin, P; Jung, W; Quinn, D; Lamborghini, D; Burke, J

    1989-09-01

    Pulmonary edema can follow smoke inhalation and is believed to be due to the multiple chemical toxins in smoke, not the heat. We have developed a synthetic smoke composed of aerosolized charcoal particles to which one toxin at a time can be added to determine whether it produces pulmonary edema. Acrolein, a common component of smoke, when added to the synthetic smoke, produced a delayed-onset pulmonary edema in dogs in which the extravascular lung water (EVLW) as detected by a double-indicator technique began to rise after 42 +/- 2 (SE) min from 148 +/- 16 to 376 +/- 60 ml at 165 min after smoke exposure. The resulting pulmonary edema was widespread macroscopically but appeared focal microscopically with fibrin deposits in alveoli adjacent to small bronchi and bronchioles. Bronchial vessels were markedly dilated and congested. Monastral blue B when injected intravenously leaked into the walls of the bronchial vessels down to the region of the small bronchioles (less than or equal to 0.5 mm ID) of acrolein-smoke-exposed dogs but not into the pulmonary vessels. Furthermore, ligation of the bronchial arteries delayed the onset of pulmonary edema (87 +/- 3 min, P less than 0.05) and lessened the magnitude (232 +/- 30 ml, P less than 0.05) at 166 +/- 3 min after acrolein-smoke exposure.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2793693

  2. Increased pulmonary vascular permeability as a cause of re-expansion edema in rabbits

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlin, D.J.; Nessly, M.L.; Cheney, F.W.

    1981-01-01

    In order to study the mechanism(s) underlying re-expansion edema, we measured the concentration of labeled albumin (RISA) in the extravascular, extracellular water (EVECW) of the lung as a measure of pulmonary vascular permeability. Re-expansion edema was first induced by rapid re-expansion of rabbit lungs that had been collapsed for 1 wk by pneumothorax. The RISA in EVECW was expressed as a fraction of its plasma concentration: (RISA)L/(RISA)PL. The volume of EVECW (ml/gm dry lung) was measured using a /sup 24/Na indicator. Results in re-expansion edema were compared with normal control lungs and with oleic acid edema as a model of permeability edema. In re-expanded lungs, EVECW (3.41 +/- SD 1.24 ml/g) and (RISA)L/(RISA)PL 0.84 +/- SD 0.15) were significantly increased when compared with normal control lungs (2.25 +/- 0.41 ml/g and 0.51 +/- 0.20, respectively). Results in oleic acid edema (5.66 +/- 2.23 ml/g and 0.84 +/- 0.23) were similar to re-expansion edema. This suggested that re-expansion edema is due to increased pulmonary vascular permeability caused by mechanical stresses applied to the lung during re-expansion.

  3. The Effects of Aquaporin-1 in Pulmonary Edema Induced by Fat Embolism Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yiwei; Tian, Kun; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Rong; Shang, Jiawei; Jiang, Wei; Wang, Aizhong

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the role of aquaporin1 (AQP1) in the pathologic process of pulmonary edema induced by fat embolism syndrome (FES) and the effects of a free fatty acid (FFA) mixture on AQP1 expression in pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (PMVECs). In vivo, edema was more serious in FES mice compared with the control group. The expression of AQP1 and the wet-to-dry lung weight ratio (W/D) in the FES group were significantly increased compared with the control group. At the same time, inhibition of AQP1 decreased the pathological damage resulting from pulmonary edema. Then we performed a study in vitro to investigate whether AQP1 was induced by FFA release in FES. The mRNA and protein level of AQP1 were increased by FFAs in a dose- and time-dependent manner in PMVECs. In addition, the up-regulation of AQP1 was blocked by the inhibitor of p38 kinase, implicating the p38 MAPK pathway as involved in the FFA-induced AQP1 up-regulation in PMVECs. Our results demonstrate that AQP1 may play important roles in pulmonary edema induced by FES and can be regarded as a new therapy target for treatment of pulmonary edema induced by FES. PMID:27455237

  4. The Effects of Aquaporin-1 in Pulmonary Edema Induced by Fat Embolism Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yiwei; Tian, Kun; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Rong; Shang, Jiawei; Jiang, Wei; Wang, Aizhong

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the role of aquaporin1 (AQP1) in the pathologic process of pulmonary edema induced by fat embolism syndrome (FES) and the effects of a free fatty acid (FFA) mixture on AQP1 expression in pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (PMVECs). In vivo, edema was more serious in FES mice compared with the control group. The expression of AQP1 and the wet-to-dry lung weight ratio (W/D) in the FES group were significantly increased compared with the control group. At the same time, inhibition of AQP1 decreased the pathological damage resulting from pulmonary edema. Then we performed a study in vitro to investigate whether AQP1 was induced by FFA release in FES. The mRNA and protein level of AQP1 were increased by FFAs in a dose- and time-dependent manner in PMVECs. In addition, the up-regulation of AQP1 was blocked by the inhibitor of p38 kinase, implicating the p38 MAPK pathway as involved in the FFA-induced AQP1 up-regulation in PMVECs. Our results demonstrate that AQP1 may play important roles in pulmonary edema induced by FES and can be regarded as a new therapy target for treatment of pulmonary edema induced by FES. PMID:27455237

  5. Swimming-induced immersion pulmonary edema while snorkeling can be rapidly life-threatening: case reports.

    PubMed

    Cochard, G; Henckes, A; Deslandes, S; Noël-Savina, E; Bedossa, M; Gladu, G; Ozier, Y

    2013-01-01

    It is well known that immersion pulmonary edema can be life-threatening for divers using a self-contained underwater breathing apparatus (scuba). Swimming-induced pulmonary edema in otherwise healthy individuals is not an object of dispute but its real severity is not well known and is probably underestimated. We report two cases of life-threatening acute respiratory distress while swimming and snorkeling, one of which is well documented for swimming-induced pulmonary edema. The interest of these case reports lies in the suddenness of these life-threatening events. Such accidents can mimic a loss of consciousness due to cardiac dysrhythmia and lead to drowning. In the case of swimming-induced pulmonary edema, the prognosis is far better than for a cardiac disorder, but it is also dependent on the efficiency of the supervision. Swimmers, divers, race organizers and supervising physicians should be given knowledge of this pathology and its potentially acute occurrence. Adequate organizational dispositions are mandatory to prevent swimming-induced pulmonary edema-related deaths. PMID:24224285

  6. The Endothelial Glycocalyx: Emerging Concepts in Pulmonary Edema and Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Stephen R.; Blank, Randal S.; Deatherage, Lindy S.; Dull, Randal O.

    2013-01-01

    The endothelial glycocalyx is a dynamic layer of macromolecules at the luminal surface of vascular endothelium that is involved in fluid homeostasis and regulation. Its role in vascular permeability and edema formation is emerging but is still not well understood. In this special article, we highlight key concepts of endothelial dysfunction with regards to the glycocalyx and provide new insights into the glycocalyx as a mediator of processes central to the development of pulmonary edema and lung injury. PMID:23835455

  7. IgA-dominant post-infectious glomerulonephritis presenting as a fatal pulmonary-renal syndrome.

    PubMed

    Saad, Marc; Daoud, Magda; Nasr, Patricia; Syed, Rafeel; El-Sayegh, Suzanne

    2015-01-01

    Over the last decades, post-infectious glomerulonephritis underwent major changes in its epidemiology, pathophysiology, and outcomes. We are reporting a case of IgA-dominant post-infectious glomerulonephritis (IgA-PIGN) presenting as a fatal pulmonary-renal syndrome. An 86-year-old Filipino man presented with worsening dyspnea, hemoptysis, and decreased urine output over 2 weeks. Past medical history is significant for hypertension, chronic kidney disease stage III, and pneumonia 3 weeks prior treated with intravenous cefazolin for methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia. Physical examination was remarkable for heart rate of 109/min and respiratory rate of 25/min saturating 99% on 3 liters via nasal cannula. There were bibasilar rales in the lungs and bilateral ankle edema. A chest radiograph showed bibasilar opacifications. Blood work was significant for hemoglobin of 8.3 g/dL and creatinine of 9.2 mg/dL (baseline of 1.67). TTE showed EF 55%. Urinalysis revealed large blood and red blood cell casts. Kidney ultrasound showed bilateral echogenicity compatible with renal disease. Pulse methylprednisolone therapy and hemodialysis were initiated with patient's condition precluding kidney biopsy. Serology workup for rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis was negative. On day 7, the patient required mechanical ventilation; bronchoscopy showed alveolar hemorrhage and plasmapheresis was initiated. Renal biopsy revealed IgA-PIGN with endocapillary and focal extracapillary proliferative and exudative features. IgA-PIGN occurs in diabetic elderly (mean age of 60 years), 0-16 weeks after an infection mainly by Staphylococcus. However, this nondiabetic patient had normal complement IgA-PIGN with fatal pulmonary-renal syndrome. Understanding the pathogenesis and identifying the nephrotoxic bacteria species and the aberrant IgA molecule will open new insights toward prevention and treatment. PMID:26347210

  8. IgA-dominant post-infectious glomerulonephritis presenting as a fatal pulmonary-renal syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Saad, Marc; Daoud, Magda; Nasr, Patricia; Syed, Rafeel; El-Sayegh, Suzanne

    2015-01-01

    Over the last decades, post-infectious glomerulonephritis underwent major changes in its epidemiology, pathophysiology, and outcomes. We are reporting a case of IgA-dominant post-infectious glomerulonephritis (IgA-PIGN) presenting as a fatal pulmonary-renal syndrome. An 86-year-old Filipino man presented with worsening dyspnea, hemoptysis, and decreased urine output over 2 weeks. Past medical history is significant for hypertension, chronic kidney disease stage III, and pneumonia 3 weeks prior treated with intravenous cefazolin for methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia. Physical examination was remarkable for heart rate of 109/min and respiratory rate of 25/min saturating 99% on 3 liters via nasal cannula. There were bibasilar rales in the lungs and bilateral ankle edema. A chest radiograph showed bibasilar opacifications. Blood work was significant for hemoglobin of 8.3 g/dL and creatinine of 9.2 mg/dL (baseline of 1.67). TTE showed EF 55%. Urinalysis revealed large blood and red blood cell casts. Kidney ultrasound showed bilateral echogenicity compatible with renal disease. Pulse methylprednisolone therapy and hemodialysis were initiated with patient’s condition precluding kidney biopsy. Serology workup for rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis was negative. On day 7, the patient required mechanical ventilation; bronchoscopy showed alveolar hemorrhage and plasmapheresis was initiated. Renal biopsy revealed IgA-PIGN with endocapillary and focal extracapillary proliferative and exudative features. IgA-PIGN occurs in diabetic elderly (mean age of 60 years), 0–16 weeks after an infection mainly by Staphylococcus. However, this nondiabetic patient had normal complement IgA-PIGN with fatal pulmonary-renal syndrome. Understanding the pathogenesis and identifying the nephrotoxic bacteria species and the aberrant IgA molecule will open new insights toward prevention and treatment. PMID:26347210

  9. Brain natriuretic peptide levels in six basic underwater demolitions/SEAL recruits presenting with swimming induced pulmonary edema (SIPE).

    PubMed

    Shearer, Damon; Mahon, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Swimming induced pulmonary edema (SIPE) is associated with both SCUBA diving and strenuous surface swimming; however, the majority of reported cases and clinically observed cases tend to occur during or after aggressive surface swimming. Capillary stress failure appears to be central to the pathophysiology of this disorder. Regional pulmonary capillaries are exposed to relatively high pressures secondary to increased vascular volume, elevation of pulmonary vascular resistance, and regional differences in perfusion secondary to forces of gravity and high cardiac output. Acute pulmonary edema can be classified as either cardiogenic or noncardiogenic or both. Cardiogenic pulmonary edema occurs when the pulmonary capillary hydrostatic pressure exceeds plasma oncotic pressure. Noncardiogenic pulmonary edema occurs when pulmonary capillary permeability is increased. Given the pathophysiology noted above, SIPE can be described as a cardiogenic pulmonary edema, at least in part, since an increased transalveolar pressure gradient has been implicated in the pathogenesis of SIPE. Brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) is used in the clinical setting to differentiate cardiac from pulmonary sources of dyspnea, specifically to diagnose cardiogenic pulmonary edema. During clinical management, BNP levels were drawn on six BUD/S recruits simultaneously presenting with pulmonary complaints consistent with SIPE, after an extended surface bay swim. This paper analyzes that data after de-identification and reviews the pathophysiology and clinical management of SIPE. PMID:19739476

  10. Diagnosis and treatment of presumptive postobstructive pulmonary edema in a Florida panther (Puma concolor coryi).

    PubMed

    Fiorello, Christine V; Cunningham, Mark W; Cantwell, Shauna L; Levy, Julie K; Neer, Erin M; Conley, Kenneth; Rist, Paul M

    2007-06-01

    A free-ranging, adult male Florida panther (Puma concolor coryi) was immobilized and evaluated for hematuria following routine capture. Prior to anesthetic recovery, the panther was fitted with a telemetry collar. After an initially quiet recovery, the panther began thrashing in the transport cage, and was again immobilized. Pink foam was evident from the nostrils, and crackles were ausculted over the chest, indicating pulmonary edema. Postobstructive pulmonary edema was diagnosed based on history, clinical signs, radiographic evaluation, and blood gas analysis. The animal was treated intensively for several hours with diuretics, oxygen, and manual ventilation. The panther responded rapidly to therapy and was released back into the wild 48 hr after presentation. Postobstructive pulmonary edema, also called negative-pressure pulmonary edema, may be underrecognized in veterinary medicine. In this case, the telemetry collar, in conjunction with anesthetic recovery in a small transport crate, may have contributed to tracheal obstruction. Wildlife veterinarians and biologists should be aware of the risk of airway obstruction when placing tracking collars, and animals should be continuously monitored during anesthetic recovery to ensure the presence of a patent airway. PMID:17679517

  11. Acute pulmonary edema due to stress cardiomyopathy in a patient with aortic stenosis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Stress cardiomyopathy is a condition of chest pain, breathlessness, abnormal heart rhythms and sometimes congestive heart failure or shock precipitated by intense mental or physical stress. Case presentation A 64-year-old male with a known diagnosis of moderate-to-severe aortic stenosis and advised that valve replacement was not urgent, presented with acute pulmonary edema following extraordinary mental distress. The patient was misdiagnosed as having a "massive heart attack" and died when managed by a traditional protocol for acute myocardial infarction/coronary artery disease, irrespective of his known aortic stenosis. Conclusion Intense mental stress poses a considerable risk, particularly to patients with significant aortic stenosis. As described here, it can precipitate acute pulmonary edema. Importantly, effective management of acute pulmonary edema due to stress cardiomyopathy in patients with known aortic stenosis requires its distinction from acute pulmonary edema caused by an acute myocardial infarction. Treatment options include primarily urgent rhythm and/or rate control, as well as cautious vasodilation. PMID:20062645

  12. Fatal pulmonary embolism in hospitalized patients: a large autopsy-based matched case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho Bricola, Solange Aparecida Petilo; Paiva, Edison Ferreira; Lichtenstein, Arnaldo; Gianini, Reinaldo José; Duarte, Jurandir Godoy; Shinjo, Samuel Katsuyuki; Eluf-Neto, Jose; Arruda Martins, Milton

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Pulmonary embolism is an underdiagnosed major cause of death for hospitalized patients. The objective of this study was to identify the conditions associated with fatal pulmonary embolism in this population. METHODS: A total of 13,074 autopsy records were evaluated in a case-control study. Patients were matched by age, sex, and year of death, and factors potentially associated with fatal pulmonary embolism were analyzed using univariate and multivariate conditional logistic regression. RESULTS: Pulmonary embolism was considered fatal in 328 (2.5%) patients. In the multivariate analysis, conditions that were more common in patients who died of pulmonary embolism were atherosclerosis, congestive heart failure, and neurological surgery. Some conditions were negatively associated with fatal pulmonary embolism, including hemorrhagic stroke, aortic aneurism, cirrhosis, acquired immune deficiency syndrome, and pneumonia. In the control group, patients with hemorrhagic stroke and aortic aneurism had short hospital stays (8.5 and 8.8 days, respectively), and the hemorrhage itself was the main cause of death in most of them (90.6% and 68.4%, respectively), which may have prevented the development of pulmonary embolism. Cirrhotic patients in the control group also had short hospital stays (7 days), and 50% died from bleeding complications. CONCLUSIONS: In this large autopsy study, atherosclerosis, congestive heart failure, and neurological surgery were diagnoses associated with fatal pulmonary embolism. PMID:23778403

  13. [Hyponatremic encephalopathy with non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema. Development following marathon run].

    PubMed

    Wellershoff, G

    2013-04-01

    This article presents the case of a 52-year-old woman who developed exercise-associated hyponatremia (EAH) complicated by non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema after a marathon run. The condition of EAH is a potentially life-threatening complication of endurance exercise. The main cause seems to be inadequate intake of free water during or following exercise with enduring antidiuresis due to nonosmotic stimulation of ADH secretion. Known risk factors are female gender, slow running pace and lack of weight loss. Emergency therapy is fluid restriction and bolus infusion of 3% NaCl solution to rapidly reduce brain edema. PMID:23381723

  14. Inhibition of chlorine-induced pulmonary inflammation and edema by mometasone and budesonide

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jing; Mo, Yiqun; Schlueter, Connie F.; Hoyle, Gary W.

    2013-10-15

    Chlorine gas is a widely used industrial compound that is highly toxic by inhalation and is considered a chemical threat agent. Inhalation of high levels of chlorine results in acute lung injury characterized by pneumonitis, pulmonary edema, and decrements in lung function. Because inflammatory processes can promote damage in the injured lung, anti-inflammatory therapy may be of potential benefit for treating chemical-induced acute lung injury. We previously developed a chlorine inhalation model in which mice develop epithelial injury, neutrophilic inflammation, pulmonary edema, and impaired pulmonary function. This model was used to evaluate nine corticosteroids for the ability to inhibit chlorine-induced neutrophilic inflammation. Two of the most potent corticosteroids in this assay, mometasone and budesonide, were investigated further. Mometasone or budesonide administered intraperitoneally 1 h after chlorine inhalation caused a dose-dependent inhibition of neutrophil influx in lung tissue sections and in the number of neutrophils in lung lavage fluid. Budesonide, but not mometasone, reduced the levels of the neutrophil attractant CXCL1 in lavage fluid 6 h after exposure. Mometasone or budesonide also significantly inhibited pulmonary edema assessed 1 day after chlorine exposure. Chlorine inhalation resulted in airway hyperreactivity to inhaled methacholine, but neither mometasone nor budesonide significantly affected this parameter. The results suggest that mometasone and budesonide may represent potential treatments for chemical-induced lung injury. - Highlights: • Chlorine causes lung injury when inhaled and is considered a chemical threat agent. • Corticosteroids may inhibit lung injury through their anti-inflammatory actions. • Corticosteroids inhibited chlorine-induced pneumonitis and pulmonary edema. • Mometasone and budesonide are potential rescue treatments for chlorine lung injury.

  15. Pulmonary Hypertension and Other Potentially Fatal Pulmonary Complications in Systemic Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Yukiko; Weiss, Jennifer E.; Haroldson, Kathryn L.; Lee, Tzielan; Punaro, Marilynn; Oliveira, Sheila; Rabinovich, Egla; Riebschleger, Meredith; Antón, Jordi; Blier, Peter R.; Gerloni, Valeria; Hazen, Melissa M; Kessler, Elizabeth; Onel, Karen; Passo, Murray H; Rennebohm, Robert M; Wallace, Carol A; Woo, Patricia; Wulffraat, Nico

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Systemic Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (sJIA) is characterized by fevers, rash and arthritis, for which IL1 and IL6 inhibitors appear effective. Pulmonary artery hypertension (PAH), interstitial lung disease (ILD) and alveolar proteinosis (AP) have been recently reported in sJIA patients with increased frequency. Our aim was to characterize and compare these cases to a larger cohort of sJIA patients. Methods sJIA patients who developed PAH, ILD and/or AP were identified through an electronic listserv, and their demographic, sJIA and pulmonary disease characteristics, and medication exposure information were collected. These features were compared to a cohort of sJIA patients enrolled in the Childhood Arthritis and Rheumatology Research Alliance (CARRA) Registry. Results Patients (N=25) were significantly (p<0.05) more likely than the CARRA registry cohort (N=389) to be female, have more systemic features, and to have been exposed to an IL-1 inhibitor, tocilizumab, infliximab, corticosteroids, intravenous immunoglobulin, cyclosporine and cyclophosphamide. Eighty% were diagnosed after 2004. Twenty (80%) patients had MAS during their disease course and 15 (60%) had MAS at pulmonary diagnosis. Sixteen patients had PAH, 5 AP and 7 ILD. Seventeen (68%) patients were taking or recently (≤1 month) discontinued a biologic agent at pulmonary symptom onset; 12 (48%) were taking anti-IL1 therapy (primarily anakinra). Seventeen (68%) patients died at a mean of 8.8 months from pulmonary diagnosis. Conclusions PAH, AP and ILD are under-recognized complications of sJIA which are frequently fatal. These may be the result of severe uncontrolled systemic disease activity, and may be influenced by medication exposure. PMID:23139240

  16. Radiographically Severe but Clinically Mild Reexpansion Pulmonary Edema following Decompression of a Spontaneous Pneumothorax.

    PubMed

    Harner, William E; Crawley, Eric A

    2014-01-01

    The case is a 48-year-old female who presented with mild dyspnea on exertion and cough with unremarkable vital signs and was found to have a large right sided pneumothorax. She underwent small bore chest tube decompression with immediate reexpansion of the collapsed lung. However, she rapidly developed moderate hypoxemia and radiographic evidence of reexpansion pulmonary edema (REPE) on both the treated and contralateral sides. Within a week, she had a normal chest X-ray and was asymptomatic. This case describes a rare complication of spontaneous pneumothorax and highlights the lack of correlation between symptoms, sequelae, and radiographic severity of pneumothorax and reexpansion pulmonary edema. Proposed pathophysiologic mechanisms include increased production of reactive oxygen species with subsequent loss of surfactant and increased vascular permeability, and loss of vasoregulatory tone. PMID:25165607

  17. High altitude pulmonary edema among “Amarnath Yatris”

    PubMed Central

    Koul, Parvaiz A.; Khan, Umar Hafiz; Hussain, Tajamul; Koul, Ajaz Nabi; Malik, Sajjad; Shah, Sanaullah; Bazaz, Sajjad Rajab; Rashid, Wasim; Jan, Rafi Ahmad

    2013-01-01

    Background: Annual pilgrimage (Yatra) to the cave shrine of Shri Amarnath Ji’ is a holy ritual among the Hindu devotees of Lord Shiva. Located in the Himalayan Mountain Range (altitude 13,000 ft) in south Kashmir, the shrine is visited by thousands of devotees and altitude sickness is reportedly common. Materials and Methods: More than 600,000 pilgrims visited the cave shrine in 2011 and 2012 with 239 recorded deaths. Thirty one patients with suspected altitude sickness were referred from medical centers en-route the cave to Sher-i-Kashmir Institute of Medical Sciences, a tertiary-care center in capital Srinagar (5,000 ft). The clinical features and the response to treatment were recorded. Results: Thirty-one patients (all lowlanders, 19 male; age 18-60 years, median 41) had presented with acute onset breathlessness of 1-4 days (median 1.9 d) starting within 12-24 h of a rapid ascent; accompanied by cough (68%), headache (8%), dizziness and nausea (65%). Sixteen patients had associated encephalopathy. Clinical features on admission included tachypnea (n = 31), tachycardia (n = 23), bilateral chest rales (n = 29), cyanosis (n = 22) and grade 2-4 encephalopathy. Hypoxemia was demonstrable in 24 cases and bilateral infiltrates on radiologic imaging in 29. Ten patients had evidence of high-altitude cerebral edema. All patients were managed with oxygen, steroids, nifedipine, sildenafil and other supportive measures including invasive ventilation (n = 3). Three patients died due to multiorgan dysfunction. Conclusions: Altitude sickness is common among Amaranath Yatris from the plains and appropriate educational strategies should be invoked for prevention and prompt treatment. PMID:24049253

  18. Morphine blocks the Mesobuthus tamulus venom-induced augmentation of phenyldiguanide reflex and pulmonary edema in anesthetized rats

    PubMed Central

    Akella, Aparna; Tiwari, Anil K.; Rai, Om P.; Deshpande, Shripad B.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Pulmonary edema, a manifestation of scorpion envenomation syndrome, is attributed to cardiogenic or noncardiogenic factors. Morphine is a drug used for cardiogenic pulmonary edema and its effect on Mesobuthus tamulus (MBT) venom-induced changes is not known. Therefore, we hypothesized that morphine blocks the MBT venom-induced augmentation of phenyldiguanide (PDG) reflex and pulmonary edema. Materials and Methods: Experiments were performed on anesthetized adult female rats. Trachea and jugular vein were cannulated, and the electrocardiographic potentials were recorded by connecting needle electrodes in limb lead II configuration. PDG (10 ΅g/kg, IV, bolus injection) responses were elicited by bolus injection initially, after saline/morphine (1 mg/kg) and after injecting MBT venom (100 μg/kg). The time-response area of the PDG-induced bradycardiac response after treatment was calculated as % of the initial PDG response area. At the end of experiments, lungs were excised for determination of pulmonary water content. Results: PDG produced bradycardiac response that lasted for >60 s. MBT venom augmented the PDG reflex response by 2.5 times. In morphine pretreated group, augmentation of bradycardiac response induced by MBT venom was absent. MBT venom increased the pulmonary water content, and the increase was absent in morphine pretreated animals. Conclusion: The results reveal that morphine prevents the MBT venom-induced augmentation of PDG reflex response and pulmonary edema. Thus, morphine can be useful in scorpion envenomation syndrome associated with pulmonary edema. PMID:26997727

  19. Hypoxic preconditioning with cobalt ameliorates hypobaric hypoxia induced pulmonary edema in rat.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Dhananjay; Saxena, Saurabh; Purushothaman, Jayamurthy; Shrivastava, Kalpana; Singh, Mrinalini; Shukla, Shirish; Malhotra, Vineet Kumar; Mustoori, Sairam; Bansal, Anju

    2011-04-10

    Exposure to high altitude results in hypobaric hypoxia which is considered as an acute physiological stress and often leads to high altitude maladies such as high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) and high altitude cerebral edema (HACE). The best way to prevent high altitude injuries is hypoxic preconditioning which has potential clinical usefulness and can be mimicked by cobalt chloride. Preconditioning with cobalt has been reported to provide protection in various tissues against ischemic injury. However, the effect of preconditioning with cobalt against high altitude induced pulmonary edema has not been investigated in vivo. Therefore, in the present study, rats pretreated with saline or cobalt (12.5mg/kg body weight) for 7days were exposed to hypobaric hypoxia of 9142m for 5h at 24°C. Formation of pulmonary edema was assessed by measuring transvascular leakage of sodium fluorescein dye and lung water content. Total protein content, albumin content, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and cytokine levels were measured in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Expression of HO-1, MT, NF-κB DNA binding activity and lung tissue pathology were evaluated to determine the effect of preconditioning on HAPE. Hypobaric hypoxia induced increase in transvascular leakage of sodium fluorescein dye, lung water content, lavage total protein, albumin, VEGF levels, pro-inflammatory cytokine levels, tissue expression of cell adhesion molecules and NF-κB DNA binding activity were reduced significantly after hypoxic preconditioning with cobalt. Expression of anti-inflammatory protein HO-1, MT, TGF-β and IL-6 were increased after hypoxic preconditioning. These data suggest that hypoxic preconditioning with cobalt has protective effect against HAPE. PMID:21296072

  20. Case Report: Bilateral reexpansion pulmonary edema following treatment of a unilateral hemothorax

    PubMed Central

    de Wolf, Steven P; Deunk, Jaap; Cornet, Alexander D; Elbers, Paul WG

    2014-01-01

    Bilateral re-expansion pulmonary edema (RPE) is an extremely rare entity. We report the unique case of bilateral RPE following a traumatic, unilateral hemopneumothorax in a young healthy male. Bilateral RPE occurred only one hour after drainage of a unilateral hemopneumothorax. The patient was treated with diuretics and supplemental oxygen. Diagnosis was confirmed by excluding other causes, using laboratory findings, chest radiography, pulmonary and cardiac ultrasound and high resolution computed tomography. His recovery was uneventful. The pathophysiology of bilateral RPE is not well known. Treatment is mainly supportive and consists of diuretics, mechanical ventilation, inotropes and steroids. In case of a pulmonary deterioration after the drainage of a traumatic pneumothorax, bilateral RPE should be considered after exclusion of more common causes of dyspnea. PMID:25713699

  1. Case Report: Bilateral reexpansion pulmonary edema following treatment of a unilateral hemothorax.

    PubMed

    de Wolf, Steven P; Deunk, Jaap; Cornet, Alexander D; Elbers, Paul Wg

    2014-01-01

    Bilateral re-expansion pulmonary edema (RPE) is an extremely rare entity. We report the unique case of bilateral RPE following a traumatic, unilateral hemopneumothorax in a young healthy male. Bilateral RPE occurred only one hour after drainage of a unilateral hemopneumothorax. The patient was treated with diuretics and supplemental oxygen. Diagnosis was confirmed by excluding other causes, using laboratory findings, chest radiography, pulmonary and cardiac ultrasound and high resolution computed tomography. His recovery was uneventful. The pathophysiology of bilateral RPE is not well known. Treatment is mainly supportive and consists of diuretics, mechanical ventilation, inotropes and steroids. In case of a pulmonary deterioration after the drainage of a traumatic pneumothorax, bilateral RPE should be considered after exclusion of more common causes of dyspnea. PMID:25713699

  2. Fatal idiopathic pulmonary haemosiderosis in association with pregnancy - medico-legal evaluation.

    PubMed

    Töro, Klára; Herjavecz, Irén; Vereckei, Edit; Kovács, Margit

    2012-02-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary haemosiderosis is a rare disorder characterised by repeated episodes of intra-alveolar bleeding in association with consecutive anaemia, pulmonary fibrosis, pulmonary hypertension and respiratory failure. Pregnancy may exacerbate the symptoms of idiopathic pulmonary haemosiderosis typically worsening in the third trimester. A 32-year-old female after delivery was admitted to hospital with progressive dyspnoea of about 1-month duration. Sudden circulatory collapse caused fatal complication. During the post-mortem investigation, lung haemorrhage and histologically abundant iron deposition in macrophages and interstitial fibrosis were found. Medico-legal post-mortem evaluation of fatal cases may support the clinico-pathological context of the diagnosis of this entity. PMID:22281220

  3. A fatal case of pulmonary infection by Mycobacterium colombiense in Para State, Amazon Region, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Barretto, Adriana Rodrigues; Felício, João Soares; Sales, Lucia Helena Messias; Yamada, Elizabeth Sumi; Lopes, Maria Luiza; da Costa, Ana Roberta Fusco

    2016-07-01

    Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) is a heterogeneous group of species found in several environmental sources and that exhibit variable degrees of pathogenicity. Among the MAC members, Mycobacterium colombiense has been related to pulmonary disease and disseminated infection in HIV-infected patients in Colombia. Lymphadenopathy cases have also been reported. We have described a fatal case of M. colombiense pulmonary disease in a Brazilian patient without evidence of HIV infection or other known causes of immunosuppression. PMID:27133309

  4. A 45-Year-Old Man With Recurrent Dyspnea and Hemoptysis during Exercise: Exercise-Induced Pulmonary Hemorrhage/Edema

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dae Sung; Lee, Minhyeok; Kwon, Oh Jung; Jeong, Inbeom; Son, Ji Woong; Na, Moon Jun

    2015-01-01

    A 45-year-old man presented with dyspnea and hemoptysis during exercise. A chest computed tomography (CT) revealed multifocal diffuse patchy ground glass opacity and interlobular septal thickening in both the lungs. Permeability pulmonary edema or pulmonary hemorrhage was suspected. Serologic studies for autoimmune disorders and vasculitis were negative. There was no laboratory evidence of coagulopathy, other hematopoietic disease or infectious disease. Considering correlation with exercise, we diagnosed exercise-induced pulmonary hemorrhage (EIPH) or exercise-induced pulmonary edema (EIPE). The patient was managed with antifibrinolytics, antibiotics, and antitussive agent. After a week, follow-up chest CT revealed completely resolved pulmonary hemorrhage. About 2 months after the first event, he visited again with dyspnea and hemoptysis during running. In the present study, we report a case of recurrent pulmonary hemorrhage after exercise. PMID:26508928

  5. Reexpansion pulmonary edema after surgery for spontaneous pneumothorax in a patient with anorexia nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Ozawa, Yuichiro; Ichimura, Hideo; Sakai, Mitsuaki

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Several adverse effects on the pulmonary system in patients with anorexia nervosa (AN) have been reported. We present a case of AN who presented with a complicated reexpansion pulmonary edema (RPE) after video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) for spontaneous pneumothorax. Presentation of case A 23-year-old woman with severe anorexia nervosa (weight: 25 kg, body mass index: 8.96 kg/m2) underwent VATS for spontaneous pneumothorax. Five hours after the surgery, she immediately presented acute cardiorespiratory insufficiency. Chest radiography showed an infiltrating shadow in the entire right lung. She was diagnosed with reexpansion pulmonary edema that was treated with methylprednisolone pulse therapy and mechanical ventilation. She recovered and was extubated on postoperative day 4. The chest drain tube was removed on postoperative day 5. Discussion Bullectomy or ligation of bullae for spontaneous pneumothorax in a patient with AN has never been reported. In our case, bullae were identified in preoperative CT and we chose ligation of the bullae instead of the bullectomy using automatic suture device because of poor wound healing concerned. Conclusion We present a case of RPE after VATS for spontaneous pneumothorax in a patient with AN. Malnutrition owing to AN results in critical complications such as RPE. PMID:27158490

  6. Exercise-induced interstitial pulmonary edema at sea-level in young and old healthy humans

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Bryan J.; Carlson, Alex R.; Miller, Andrew D.; Johnson, Bruce D.

    2014-01-01

    We asked whether aged adults are more susceptible to exercise-induced pulmonary edema relative to younger individuals. Lung diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide (DLCO), alveolar-capillary membrane conductance (Dm) and pulmonary-capillary blood volume (Vc) were measured before and after exhaustive discontinuous incremental exercise in 10 young (YNG; 27±3 yr) and 10 old (OLD; 69±5 yr) males. In YNG subjects, Dm increased (11±7%, P=0.031), Vc decreased (−10±9%, P=0.01) and DLCO was unchanged (30.5±4.1 vs. 29.7±2.9 ml/min/mmHg, P=0.44) pre- to post-exercise. In OLD subjects, DLCO and Dm increased (11±14%, P=0.042; 16±14%, P=0.025) but Vc was unchanged (58±23 vs. 56±23 ml, P=0.570) pre- to post-exercise. Group-mean Dm/Vc was greater after vs. before exercise in the YNG and OLD subjects. However, Dm/Vc was lower post-exercise in 2 of the 10 YNG (−7±4%) and 2 of the 10 OLD subjects (−10±5%). These data suggest that exercise decreases interstitial lung fluid in most YNG and OLD subjects, with a small number exhibiting evidence for exercise-induced pulmonary edema. PMID:24200644

  7. Caspase-1 inhibitor Prevents Neurogenic Pulmonary Edema after Subarachnoid Hemorrhage in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Hidenori; Sozen, Takumi; Hasegawa, Yu; Chen, Wanqiu; Zhang, John H.

    2009-01-01

    Background and Purpose We examined the effects of a caspase-1 inhibitor, N-Ac-Tyr-Val-Ala-Asp-chloromethyl ketone (Ac-YVAD-CMK), on neurogenic pulmonary edema (NPE) in the endovascular perforation model of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) in mice. Methods Ninety-seven mice were assigned to sham, SAH+vehicle, SAH+Ac-YVAD-CMK (6 or 10mg/kg) and SAH+Z-Val-Ala-Asp-fluoromethylketone (Z-VAD-FMK, 6mg/kg) groups. Drugs were intraperitoneally injected 1 hour post-SAH. Pulmonary edema measurements, Western blot for interleukin-1β, interleukin-18, myeloperoxidase, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, MMP-9, cleaved caspase-3 and zona occludens (ZO)-1, MMP zymography, TUNEL staining and immunostaining were performed on the lung at 24 hours post-SAH. Results Ten- but not 6-mg/kg of Ac-YVAD-CMK significantly inhibited a post-SAH increase in the activation of interleukin-1β and caspase-3 and the number of TUNEL-positive pulmonary endothelial cells, preventing NPE. Another antiapoptotic drug Z-VAD-FMK also reduced NPE. SAH did not change interleukin-18, myeloperoxidase, MMP-2, MMP-9, ZO-1 levels and MMP activity. Conclusions We report for the first time that Ac-YVAD-CMK prevents lung cell apoptosis and NPE after SAH in mice. PMID:19875734

  8. Agonist of growth hormone-releasing hormone reduces pneumolysin-induced pulmonary permeability edema

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, Rudolf; Sridhar, Supriya; Rick, Ferenc G.; Gorshkov, Boris; Umapathy, Nagavedi S.; Yang, Guang; Oseghale, Aluya; Verin, Alexander D.; Chakraborty, Trinad; Matthay, Michael A.; Zemskov, Evgeny A.; White, Richard; Block, Norman L.; Schally, Andrew V.

    2012-01-01

    Aggressive treatment with antibiotics in patients infected with Streptococcus pneumoniae induces release of the bacterial virulence factor pneumolysin (PLY). Days after lungs are sterile, this pore-forming toxin can still induce pulmonary permeability edema in patients, characterized by alveolar/capillary barrier dysfunction and impaired alveolar liquid clearance (ALC). ALC is mainly regulated through Na+ transport by the apically expressed epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) and the basolaterally expressed Na+/K+-ATPase in type II alveolar epithelial cells. Because no standard treatment is currently available to treat permeability edema, the search for novel therapeutic candidates is of high priority. We detected mRNA expression for the active receptor splice variant SV1 of the hypothalamic polypeptide growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH), as well as for GHRH itself, in human lung microvascular endothelial cells (HL-MVEC). Therefore, we have evaluated the effect of the GHRH agonist JI-34 on PLY-induced barrier and ALC dysfunction. JI-34 blunts PLY-mediated endothelial hyperpermeability in monolayers of HL-MVEC, in a cAMP-dependent manner, by means of reducing the phosphorylation of myosin light chain and vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin. In human airway epithelial H441 cells, PLY significantly impairs Na+ uptake, but JI-34 restores it to basal levels by means of increasing cAMP levels. Intratracheal instillation of PLY into C57BL6 mice causes pulmonary alveolar epithelial and endothelial hyperpermeability as well as edema formation, all of which are blunted by JI-34. These findings point toward a protective role of the GHRH signaling pathway in PLY-induced permeability edema. PMID:22308467

  9. A multicenter prospective cohort study of volume management after subarachnoid hemorrhage: circulatory characteristics of pulmonary edema after subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Obata, Yoshiki; Takeda, Junichi; Sato, Yohei; Ishikura, Hiroyasu; Matsui, Toru; Isotani, Eiji

    2016-08-01

    OBJECT Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is often accompanied by pulmonary complications, which may lead to poor outcomes and death. This study investigated the incidence and cause of pulmonary edema in patients with SAH by using hemodynamic monitoring with PiCCO-plus pulse contour analysis. METHODS A total of 204 patients with SAH were included in a multicenter prospective cohort study to investigate hemodynamic changes after surgical clipping or coil embolization of ruptured cerebral aneurysms by using a PiCCO-plus device. Changes in various hemodynamic parameters after SAH were analyzed statistically. RESULTS Fifty-two patients (25.5%) developed pulmonary edema. Patients with pulmonary edema (PE group) were significantly older than those without pulmonary edema (non-PE group) (p = 0.017). The mean extravascular lung water index was significantly higher in the PE group than in the non-PE group throughout the study period. The pulmonary vascular permeability index (PVPI) was significantly higher in the PE group than in the non-PE group on Day 6 (p = 0.029) and Day 10 (p = 0.011). The cardiac index of the PE group was significantly decreased biphasically on Days 2 and 10 compared with that of the non-PE group. In the early phase (Days 1-5 after SAH), the daily water balance of the PE group was slightly positive. In the delayed phase (Days 6-14 after SAH), the serum C-reactive protein level and the global end-diastolic volume index were significantly higher in the PE group than in the non-PE group, whereas the PVPI tended to be higher in the PE group. CONCLUSIONS Pulmonary edema that occurs in the early and delayed phases after SAH is caused by cardiac failure and inflammatory (i.e., noncardiogenic) conditions, respectively. Measurement of the extravascular lung water index, cardiac index, and PVPI by PiCCO-plus monitoring is useful for identifying pulmonary edema in patients with SAH. PMID:26613172

  10. Elevated plasma atrial natriuretic factor and vasopressin in high-altitude pulmonary edema.

    PubMed

    Cosby, R L; Sophocles, A M; Durr, J A; Perrinjaquet, C L; Yee, B; Schrier, R W

    1988-11-15

    A diagnosis of acute high-altitude pulmonary edema was made in five male skiers (age, 35.0 +/- 1.8 years) by history and physical examination and was confirmed by a characteristic chest radiogram showing alveolar infiltrates associated with a normal cardiac silhouette. Five healthy age- and sex-matched subjects with similar physical activity at the same altitude served as controls. Plasma sodium was 135.0 +/- 1.5 mmol/L in the acutely ill patients compared with 144.0 +/- 3.3 mmol/L in the controls (P less than 0.025). Mean plasma atrial natriuretic factor immunoreactivity averaged 17.6 +/- 5.6 pmol/L in patients with high-altitude pulmonary edema compared with 6.8 +/- 0.7 pmol/L in the controls at the same altitude (P less than 0.05). Elevated atrial natriuretic factor levels normalized to 7.5 +/- 1.9 pmol/L (P less than 0.05) during recovery in Denver (altitude, 1600 meters) 24 hours later. Plasma arginine vasopressin levels were 1.8 +/- 0.37 pmol/L in patients with high-altitude pulmonary edema at diagnosis compared with 0.92 +/- 0.28 pmol/L in controls (P = 0.07). The inappropriately elevated arginine vasopressin levels decreased to 1.29 +/- 0.37 pmol/L during recovery (P less than 0.025), but the lowered plasma sodium concentration had not normalized by discharge within 24-hours of transfer to Denver and averaged 135.8 +/- 1.2 mmol/L. The pathophysiologic implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:2973274

  11. Fatal Pulmonary Tumor Embolic Microangiopathy in Young Lady without Known Primary Malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Al-Azem, M. Ali; Hanafy, Ahmed; Nakkar, Talal

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary embolism (PE) is a common cause of morbidity and mortality in hospitalized patients. Malignancy, prolonged recumbence, and chemotherapy are renowned risk factors for development of clinically significant PE. Cancer exerts a multitude of pathophysiological processes, for example, hypercoagulability and abnormal vessels with sluggish circulation that can lead to PE. One of the peculiar characteristics of tumor cells is their ability to reach the circulation and behave as blood clot—not a metastasis-occluding the pulmonary circulation. We present a case of fatal pulmonary embolism diagnosed histologically to be due to tumor cell embolism. PMID:25478243

  12. Pulmonary edema

    MedlinePlus

    ... failure: pathophysiology and diagnosis. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 24th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ... failure: management and prognosis. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 24th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ...

  13. Nicardipine-Induced Acute Pulmonary Edema: A Rare but Severe Complication of Tocolysis

    PubMed Central

    Serena, Claire; Begot, Emmanuelle; Cros, Jérôme; Hodler, Charles; Fedou, Anne Laure; Nathan-Denizot, Nathalie; Clavel, Marc

    2014-01-01

    We report four cases of acute pulmonary edema that occurred during treatment by intravenous tocolysis using nicardipine in pregnancy patients with no previous heart problems. Clinical severity justified hospitalization in intensive care unit (ICU) each time. Acute dyspnea has begun at an average of 63 hours after initiation of treatment. For all patients, the first diagnosis suspected was pulmonary embolism. The patients' condition improved rapidly with appropriate diuretic treatment and by modifying the tocolysis. The use of intravenous nicardipine is widely used for tocolysis in France even if its prescription does not have a marketing authorization. The pathophysiological mechanisms of this complication remain unclear. The main reported risk factors are spontaneous preterm labor, multiple pregnancy, concomitant obstetrical disease, association with beta-agonists, and fetal lung maturation corticotherapy. A better knowledge of this rare but serious adverse event should improve the management of patients. Nifedipine or atosiban, the efficiency of which tocolysis was also studied, could be an alternative. PMID:25215245

  14. Nicardipine-induced acute pulmonary edema: a rare but severe complication of tocolysis.

    PubMed

    Serena, Claire; Begot, Emmanuelle; Cros, Jérôme; Hodler, Charles; Fedou, Anne Laure; Nathan-Denizot, Nathalie; Clavel, Marc

    2014-01-01

    We report four cases of acute pulmonary edema that occurred during treatment by intravenous tocolysis using nicardipine in pregnancy patients with no previous heart problems. Clinical severity justified hospitalization in intensive care unit (ICU) each time. Acute dyspnea has begun at an average of 63 hours after initiation of treatment. For all patients, the first diagnosis suspected was pulmonary embolism. The patients' condition improved rapidly with appropriate diuretic treatment and by modifying the tocolysis. The use of intravenous nicardipine is widely used for tocolysis in France even if its prescription does not have a marketing authorization. The pathophysiological mechanisms of this complication remain unclear. The main reported risk factors are spontaneous preterm labor, multiple pregnancy, concomitant obstetrical disease, association with beta-agonists, and fetal lung maturation corticotherapy. A better knowledge of this rare but serious adverse event should improve the management of patients. Nifedipine or atosiban, the efficiency of which tocolysis was also studied, could be an alternative. PMID:25215245

  15. [Effectiveness of artificial ventilation in oil microembolism followed by pulmonary edema].

    PubMed

    Tarakanov, I A; Kuz'michev, S A; Semkina, G A

    1992-07-01

    In experiments on sodium pentobarbital (40 mg/kg, i.p.) anesthetized mongrel cats of either sex weighting from 2.0 to 4.0 kg, it was found, that in conditions of oil pulmonary microembolization, followed by pulmonary edema, the most suitable is rapid and shallow pattern of ventilation, ensuring optimal ventilation/perfusion interrelation. The oil microembolization was introduced with intravenous administration (1 mg per kg of body weight during 2 min) of olive oil. It is necessary to provide flexible regimens of artificial ventilation and conformity of respiratory pattern and body's demands can be controlled according to pHa and PaO2. It is desirable that pH and pO2 can be evaluated continuously. PMID:1421295

  16. Pulmonary Edema Due to Oral Gavage in a Toxicological Study Related to Aquaporin-1, -4 and -5 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Singha, Ornuma; Kengkoom, Kanchana; Chaimongkolnukul, Khuanjit; Cherdyu, Sompong; Pongponratn, Emsri; Ketjareon, Taweesak; Panavechkijkul, Yaowaluk; Ampawong, Sumate

    2013-01-01

    A one-time oral gavage can be enough to cause of alveologenic edema with higher expression of AQP-1 and -4 than that with repeated-dose oral gavage, which caused both profound perivascular edema and hydrostatic pressure edema, while AQP-5 was similarly expressed. The alteration of AQPs expression was probably related to alveolar fluid clearance across the alveolar and bronchiolar epithelium in different stages of lung injury. The results clarified the type of lung edema in acute and sub-chronic toxicity studies without treatment related effect of tested material. The pathogenesis of pulmonary edema due to oral gavage toxicological study is associated with the cellular immune response to the reflux materials. Mast cell and leukocyte accumulation may contribute to increase vascular permeability leading to permeability edema. The increase in alveolar septum epithelium, perivascular and peribronchial cuffing, accumulation alveolar lipid containing macrophage and medial hyperplasia of the pulmonary artery might have been caused to increase airway resistance, which resulted in hydrostatic pressure edema. PMID:24155561

  17. A fatal outcome due to pulmonary hemorrhage following Russell’s viper bite

    PubMed Central

    Palangasinghe, Dhammika R.; Weerakkody, Ranga M.; Dalpatadu, Chamila G.; Gnanathasan, Christeine A.

    2015-01-01

    Russell’s viper (RV) envenomation causes local effects, coagulopathy, thrombosis, rhabdomyolysis, acute kidney injury, and neurological manifestations. Although coagulopathy and endothelial destruction causing local and mucosal surface bleeding is known, isolated severe pulmonary hemorrhage is not commonly reported. We report a previously healthy 18-year-old male who had bilateral severe pulmonary hemorrhages, which resulted in a fatal outcome following RV bite. This diagnosis was supported by persistent alveolar shadows, with minimum improvement despite hemodialysis without heparin, mixed acidosis and endotracheal tube bleeding. Other bleeding manifestations were absent. Polyvalent antivenom was administered in lieu of prolonged whole blood clotting time. Thrombocytopenia and mildly deranged clotting parameters were noted. Pulmonary hemorrhages were significant enough to require transfusion. This case highlights the importance of suspecting pulmonary hemorrhages in patients with alveolar shadows and desaturation following RV bite despite the absence of other bleeding manifestations in light of failure of optimum therapy including hemodialysis. PMID:25935188

  18. VA/Q distribution during heavy exercise and recovery in humans: implications for pulmonary edema

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaffartzik, W.; Poole, D. C.; Derion, T.; Tsukimoto, K.; Hogan, M. C.; Arcos, J. P.; Bebout, D. E.; Wagner, P. D.

    1992-01-01

    Ventilation-perfusion (VA/Q) inequality has been shown to increase with exercise. Potential mechanisms for this increase include nonuniform pulmonary vasoconstriction, ventilatory time constant inequality, reduced large airway gas mixing, and development of interstitial pulmonary edema. We hypothesized that persistence of VA/Q mismatch after ventilation and cardiac output subside during recovery would be consistent with edema; however, rapid resolution would suggest mechanisms related to changes in ventilation and blood flow per se. Thirteen healthy males performed near-maximal cycle ergometry at an inspiratory PO2 of 91 Torr (because hypoxia accentuates VA/Q mismatch on exercise). Cardiorespiratory variables and inert gas elimination patterns were measured at rest, during exercise, and between 2 and 30 min of recovery. Two profiles of VA/Q distribution behavior emerged during heavy exercise: in group 1 an increase in VA/Q mismatch (log SDQ of 0.35 +/- 0.02 at rest and 0.44 +/- 0.02 at exercise; P less than 0.05, n = 7) and in group 2 no change in VA/Q mismatch (n = 6). There were no differences in anthropometric data, work rate, O2 uptake, or ventilation during heavy exercise between groups. Group 1 demonstrated significantly greater VA/Q inequality, lower vital capacity, and higher forced expiratory flow at 25-75% of forced vital capacity for the first 20 min during recovery than group 2. Cardiac index was higher in group 1 both during heavy exercise and 4 and 6 min postexercise. However, both ventilation and cardiac output returned toward baseline values more rapidly than did VA/Q relationships. Arterial pH was lower in group 1 during exercise and recovery. We conclude that greater VA/Q inequality in group 1 and its persistence during recovery are consistent with the hypothesis that edema occurs and contributes to the increase in VA/Q inequality during exercise. This is supported by observation of greater blood flows and acidosis and, presumably therefore

  19. Fatal pulmonary embolization after reaming of the femoral medullary cavity in sclerosing osteomyelitis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Pape, H C; Krettek, C; Maschek, H; Regel, G; Tscherne, H

    1996-01-01

    Reaming of the medullary may be used in cases of sclerosing osteomyelitis (type Garré), refractory to other methods. We report a case of fatal intraoperative complication related to this procedure. An otherwise healthy young patient died during reaming using a machine-driven reamer of the femoral medullary canal due to pulmonary bone embolism. The technique and the indication for this procedure as well as the intraoperative monitoring options are discussed. PMID:8854322

  20. [Reexpansion Pulmonary Edema during Emergency Surgery in a Patient with Spontaneous Hemopneumothorax].

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Hirakawa, Kei

    2015-06-01

    A 43-year-old male patient with spontaneous hemopneumothorax of the right lung underwent emergency video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery for drainage, hemostasis and bullae resection. Fifteen minutes after reexpansion of the right lung, we found bubbly sputum coming out from the right tracheal tube and cloudy shadow in the right field of his chest X-ray. The occurrence of reexpansion pulmonary edema (RPE) was considered. Subsequent mechanical ventilation with PEEP and administration of steroid and diuretic was done as his treatment. His respiratory state was stabiized in the next two days. As the lung collapse following spontaneous hemopneumothorax often becomes more severe, we should pay attention to the occurrence of RPE after expansion of affected side lung. And, if it occurred, appropriate and prompt treatment as above should be done because of its high mortality. PMID:26437555

  1. High-altitude pulmonary edema among visitors to Summit County, Colorado.

    PubMed

    Sophocles, A M; Bachman, J

    1983-12-01

    Twenty-nine cases of high-altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) affecting visitors to Summit County, Colorado, were analyzed. The mean age of the group was 37.8 years, and all the patients were male. These results differ from previous studies and suggest that there are two varieties of HAPE. The first type (type 1, or nonresident-ascent HAPE) affects visitors to altitudes above 8,000 ft (2,439 m). At altitudes up to 11,000 ft (3,354 m), it is a disease that affects primarily adult men. The second variety (type 2, or resident-reascent HAPE) affects residents of high altitudes when they descend to an elevation below 8,000 ft (2,430 m) and then return to high altitude. This type of HAPE affects male and female residents almost equally and is a disease of childhood and adolescence. PMID:6644250

  2. High-altitude pulmonary edema in Vail, Colorado, 1975-1982.

    PubMed

    Sophocles, A M

    1986-05-01

    Between 1975 and 1982 a total of 47 cases of high-altitude pulmonary edema occurred in Vail, Colorado, elevation 2,500 m (8,200 ft). All occurred in visitors from lower altitudes. The mean age of the patients was 35.6 years, and 93% were men. Most patients had tachycardia, tachypnea and fever. The mean time of onset of cough and shortness of breath was 2.5 days after arrival. The average total ascent of the patients was 2,330 m (7,644 ft) in less than one day from a mean residential elevation of 170 m (556 ft). Also, 91% of the cases occurred between December and April, when the average daily temperature was -4.3 degrees C (24.3 degrees F) and the ambient barometric pressure was 22.37 in of mercury. PMID:3716417

  3. Rural treatment of acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema: applying the evidence to achieve success with failure.

    PubMed

    Bosomworth, John

    2008-01-01

    Rural management of acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema should be based on avoidance of adverse outcomes such as in-hospital mortality, the need for intensive care unit care, and the need for intubation and mechanical ventilation. Current evidence suggests that early noninvasive continuous positive airway pressure and early aggressive preload reduction with intravenous nitroglycerin are first-line interventions. Afterload reduction with sublingual captopril, with or without nitroglycerin, improves outcomes and is a second-line intervention. Furosemide is associated with adverse outcomes when used alone and should be given only after vasodilator therapy as a third-line intervention. Inotropes should be used only with demonstrably poor perfusion as they do not improve outcomes and may indeed be associated with increased mortality. Concurrent vasodilator therapy should be considered as soon as possible. Morphine should not be used as it is associated with adverse outcomes. If sedation is desirable, benzodiazepines should be considered. PMID:18796257

  4. Transpulmonary Thermodilution-Based Management of Neurogenic Pulmonary Edema After Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Mutoh, Tatsushi; Kazumata, Ken; Ueyama-Mutoh, Tomoko; Taki, Yasuyuki; Ishikawa, Tatsuya

    2015-11-01

    Neurogenic pulmonary edema (NPE) is a potentially catastrophic but treatable systemic event after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). The development of NPE most frequently occurs immediately after SAH, and the severity is usually self-limiting. Despite extensive research efforts and a breadth of collective clinical experience, accurate diagnosis of NPE can be difficult, and effective hemodynamic treatment options are limited. Recently, a bedside transpulmonary thermodilution device has been introduced that traces physiological patterns consistent with current theories regarding the mechanism (hydrostatic or permeability PE) of NPE. This article provides an overview of the clinical usefulness of the advanced technique for use in the neurointensive care unit for the diagnosis and management of post-SAH NPE. PMID:26517502

  5. Pulmonary edema following post-operative laryngospasm: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Halow, K D; Ford, E G

    1993-07-01

    The pathophysiology of acute, negative-pressure pulmonary edema following post-anesthetic laryngospasm (PLPE) is unclear. We present a patient and review the literature to propose etiology and management. Nineteen reported patients (3 female, 16 male, aged 3 months to 60 years) with PLPE had undergone 10 otolaryngologic, three orthopedic, four skin/soft tissue, one intraabdominal, and one ophthalmologic procedures. Twelve patients (63%) had significant medical history. Initial intubation was performed without difficulty in 17 patients, there were no predisposing trends in anesthetic management, and post-anesthetic extubation was performed without difficulty in 18 patients. Thirteen patients developed laryngospasm in less than 2 minutes. Eight were ventilated with bag/mask, 15 required reintubation, and nine required paralysis. Onset of PLPE was less than 3 minutes in 12 patients; chest roentgenograms showed edema in 17 patients. Mechanical ventilation was required for less than 24 hours in all patients. PLPE cleared in less than 24 hours in most patients. Furosemide was administered in nine patients, digoxin in one, theophylline in two, and steroids in four patients. The precise pathophysiologic mechanism of PLPE is unclear despite numerous proposed mechanisms. PLPE resolves rapidly with short-term ventilatory support. Use of diuretics/airway dilators is variable, and their contribution to management is unclear. PMID:8323077

  6. Baroreflex failure increases the risk of pulmonary edema in conscious rats with normal left ventricular function.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Kazuo; Hosokawa, Kazuya; Saku, Keita; Sakamoto, Takafumi; Tobushi, Tomoyuki; Oga, Yasuhiro; Kishi, Takuya; Ide, Tomomi; Sunagawa, Kenji

    2016-01-15

    In heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF), the complex pathogenesis hinders development of effective therapies. Since HFpEF and arteriosclerosis share common risk factors, it is conceivable that stiffened arterial wall in HFpEF impairs baroreflex function. Previous investigations have indicated that the baroreflex regulates intravascular stressed volume and arterial resistance in addition to cardiac contractility and heart rate. We hypothesized that baroreflex dysfunction impairs regulation of left atrial pressure (LAP) and increases the risk of pulmonary edema in freely moving rats. In 15-wk Sprague-Dawley male rats, we conducted sinoaortic denervation (SAD, n = 6) or sham surgery (Sham, n = 9), and telemetrically monitored ambulatory arterial pressure (AP) and LAP. We compared the mean and SD (lability) of AP and LAP between SAD and Sham under normal-salt diet (NS) or high-salt diet (HS). SAD did not increase mean AP but significantly increased AP lability under both NS (P = 0.001) and HS (P = 0.001). SAD did not change mean LAP but significantly increased LAP lability under both NS (SAD: 2.57 ± 0.43 vs. Sham: 1.73 ± 0.30 mmHg, P = 0.01) and HS (4.13 ± 1.18 vs. 2.45 ± 0.33 mmHg, P = 0.02). SAD markedly increased the frequency of high LAP, and SAD with HS prolonged the duration of LAP > 18 mmHg by nearly 20-fold compared with Sham (SAD + HS: 2,831 ± 2,366 vs. Sham + HS: 148 ± 248 s, P = 0.01). We conclude that baroreflex failure impairs volume tolerance and together with salt loading increases the risk of pulmonary edema even in the absence of left ventricular dysfunction. Baroreflex failure may contribute in part to the pathogenesis of HFpEF. PMID:26589328

  7. [Successful perioperative use of noninvasive positive pressure ventilation in a pregnant woman with acute pulmonary edema].

    PubMed

    Fujita, Naoko; Tachibana, Kazuya; Takeuchi, Muneyuki; Kinouchi, Keiko

    2014-05-01

    A 32-year-old woman (148 cm, 59 kg, gravida 2, para 2) with quadruplet pregnancy was admitted to our hospital for the threatened preterm labor at 23 weeks and 2 days of gestation. She was treated with ritodrine, magnesium sulfate and nifedipine to maintain tocolysis. Betamethasone was administered to accelerate fetal lung maturity. After ritodrine dose was increased at 23 weeks and 5 days of gestation, she developed dyspnea with desaturation. Acute pulmonary edema was revealed on chest X-ray. The decision was made to proceed with emergency cesarean delivery. On arrival at the operating room, the blood pressure was 123/53 mmHg, heart rate 111 beats x min(-1), and oxygen saturation (SpO2) 84% with supplemental oxygen 15 l x min(-1) via a reserved face mask. Noninvasive positive pressure ventilation (NPPV) was initiated with S/T mode (FIO2 1.0, inspiratory positive airway pressure 10 cmH2O, expiratory positive airway pressure 6 cmH2O). The dyspnea was improved with her SpO2 100%. Spinal anesthesia was performed at L 34 using 2.5 ml of 0.5% bupivacaine and 100 microg morphine. Throughout the operation (operation time 44 minutes), she did not develop dyspnea under NPPV. NPPV was discontinued after the operation. Her SpO2 declined, and pulmonary edema on chest X-ray was exacerbated. She was transferred to the intensive care unit and NPPV was continued for 22 hours after the operation. She was discharged from the intensive care unit on the next day and was discharged from the hospital on the 6th postoperative day. PMID:24864580

  8. Adenosine protected against pulmonary edema through transporter- and receptor A2-mediated endothelial barrier enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Qing; Harrington, Elizabeth O.; Newton, Julie; Casserly, Brian; Radin, Gregory; Warburton, Rod; Zhou, Yang; Blackburn, Michael R.

    2010-01-01

    development of edema before ALI but also partially reversed edema after ALI. The data suggest that adenosine deaminase inhibition may be useful in treatment of pulmonary edema in settings of ALI. PMID:20228181

  9. Fatal broncho-pulmonary artery fistula after lobectomy for lung cancer†

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Jiro; Hasumi, Toru; Takahashi, Satomi; Tanaka, Ryota; Sato, Taku; Okazaki, Toshimasa

    2015-01-01

    A broncho-pulmonary artery fistula is one of the most fatal complications of lung cancer surgery. This article discusses the case of a patient who died of massive hemoptysis after a left upper lobectomy. There were no previous signs of broncho-pleural fistula except for an obstinate dry cough and slightly elevated serum C-reactive protein levels after surgery. An autopsy revealed that a fistula had formed between the bronchial stump and the pulmonary artery, leading to prolonged inflammation and ultimately a broncho-pulmonary artery fistula. The left lobectomy and right upper sleeve resection are the procedures most affected by this complication, according to the reviewed literature. The median period from the surgery to the events is 4 weeks. Abrupt onset of recurrent hemoptysis in that period is the most critical sign that should not be ignored. PMID:26341785

  10. Postobstructive Pulmonary Edema following Tonsillectomy/Adenoidectomy in a 2-Year-Old with Poland-Moebius Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Tanisha; Sharma, Nirupma; McKie, Kathleen T.

    2016-01-01

    A 2-year-old male with Poland-Moebius syndrome was transferred from a local hospital to the Pediatric ICU at Children's Hospital of Georgia for suspected postobstructive pulmonary edema (POPE) after tonsillectomy/adenoidectomy (T&A). The patient's respiratory status ultimately declined and he developed respiratory failure. Imaging suggested pulmonary edema as well as a left-sided pneumonia. Echocardiogram showed pulmonary hypertension and airway exam via direct fiberoptic bronchoscopy revealed tracheomalacia and bronchomalacia. He developed acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and remained intubated for ten days. This case highlights the association between congenital upper body abnormalities with cranial nerve dysfunction and the development of POPE with delayed resolution of symptoms. Patients with upper body abnormalities as above are at great risk of postoperative complications and should therefore be managed in a tertiary-care facility. PMID:26942029

  11. Elevated pulmonary artery pressure and brain natriuretic peptide in high altitude pulmonary edema susceptible non-mountaineers

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Rajinder K.; Himashree, G.; Singh, Krishan; Soree, Poonam; Desiraju, Koundinya; Agrawal, Anurag; Ghosh, Dishari; Dass, Deepak; Reddy, Prassana K.; Panjwani, Usha; Singh, Shashi Bala

    2016-01-01

    Exaggerated pulmonary pressor response to hypoxia is a pathgonomic feature observed in high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) susceptible mountaineers. It was investigated whether measurement of basal pulmonary artery pressure (Ppa) and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) could improve identification of HAPE susceptible subjects in a non-mountaineer population. We studied BNP levels, baseline hemodynamics and the response to hypoxia (FIo2 = 0.12 for 30 min duration at sea level) in 11 HAPE resistant (no past history of HAPE, Control) and 11 HAPE susceptible (past history of HAPE, HAPE-S) subjects. Baseline Ppa (19.31 ± 3.63 vs 15.68 ± 2.79 mm Hg, p < 0.05) and plasma BNP levels (52.39 ± 32.9 vs 15.05 ± 9.6 pg/ml, p < 0.05) were high and stroke volume was less (p < 0.05) in HAPE-S subjects compared to control. Acute hypoxia produced an exaggerated increase in heart rate (p < 0.05), mean arterial pressure (p < 0.05) and Ppa (28.2 ± 5.8 vs 19.33 ± 3.74 mm Hg, p < 0.05) and fall in peripheral oxygen saturation (p < 0.05) in HAPE-S compared to control. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves showed that Ppa response to acute hypoxia was the best variable to identify HAPE susceptibility (AUC 0.92) but BNP levels provided comparable information (AUC 0.85). BNP levels are easy to determine and may represent an important marker for the determination of HAPE susceptibility. PMID:26892302

  12. Elevated pulmonary artery pressure and brain natriuretic peptide in high altitude pulmonary edema susceptible non-mountaineers.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Rajinder K; Himashree, G; Singh, Krishan; Soree, Poonam; Desiraju, Koundinya; Agrawal, Anurag; Ghosh, Dishari; Dass, Deepak; Reddy, Prassana K; Panjwani, Usha; Singh, Shashi Bala

    2016-01-01

    Exaggerated pulmonary pressor response to hypoxia is a pathgonomic feature observed in high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) susceptible mountaineers. It was investigated whether measurement of basal pulmonary artery pressure (Ppa) and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) could improve identification of HAPE susceptible subjects in a non-mountaineer population. We studied BNP levels, baseline hemodynamics and the response to hypoxia (FIo2 = 0.12 for 30 min duration at sea level) in 11 HAPE resistant (no past history of HAPE, Control) and 11 HAPE susceptible (past history of HAPE, HAPE-S) subjects. Baseline Ppa (19.31 ± 3.63 vs 15.68 ± 2.79 mm Hg, p < 0.05) and plasma BNP levels (52.39 ± 32.9 vs 15.05 ± 9.6 pg/ml, p < 0.05) were high and stroke volume was less (p < 0.05) in HAPE-S subjects compared to control. Acute hypoxia produced an exaggerated increase in heart rate (p < 0.05), mean arterial pressure (p < 0.05) and Ppa (28.2 ± 5.8 vs 19.33 ± 3.74 mm Hg, p < 0.05) and fall in peripheral oxygen saturation (p < 0.05) in HAPE-S compared to control. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves showed that Ppa response to acute hypoxia was the best variable to identify HAPE susceptibility (AUC 0.92) but BNP levels provided comparable information (AUC 0.85). BNP levels are easy to determine and may represent an important marker for the determination of HAPE susceptibility. PMID:26892302

  13. Successful lung salvage by ex vivo reconditioning of neurogenic pulmonary edema: case report.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, P G; Iacono, A T; Rajagopal, K; Griffith, B P

    2014-09-01

    Liberalization in donor selection criteria allowed centers to increase the number of lung transplants, yet less than 25% of all donors had lungs utilized for transplantation in the United States in 2013. Less than 5% of all transplanted donors deviate 3 or more criteria from the ideal donor. Ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) provides the opportunity to increase the percentage of used donors by acting on modifiable selection criteria such as oxygenation, contusion and pulmonary infiltrates. We report the pre-transplant use of EVLP in the salvage of lungs from a donor that developed neurogenic pulmonary edema -PaO2 188 mmHg-. The recipient had a lung allocation score of 69.3. The post-operative course was excellent and was discharged home after 15 days. He is alive and doing well 780 days after transplant. In this report the pre-transplant use of EVLP led not only to transplanting lungs that otherwise would not have been used by many centers, but also to a very short and typical period of post-operative mechanical ventilation and hospital stay. PMID:25242800

  14. Superior Vena Cava Stent Migration into the Pulmonary Artery Causing Fatal Pulmonary Infarction

    SciTech Connect

    Anand, Girija Lewanski, Conrad R.; Cowman, Steven A.; Jackson, James E.

    2011-02-15

    Migration of superior vena cava (SVC) stents is a well-recognised complication of their deployment, and numerous strategies exist for their retrieval. To our knowledge, only three cases of migration of an SVC stent to the pulmonary vasculature have previously been reported. None of these patients developed complications that resulted in death. We report a case of SVC stent migration to the pulmonary vasculature with delayed pulmonary artery thrombosis and death from pulmonary infarction. We conclude that early retrieval of migrated stents should be performed to decrease the risk of serious complications.

  15. Raised HIF1α during normoxia in high altitude pulmonary edema susceptible non-mountaineers.

    PubMed

    Soree, Poonam; Gupta, Rajinder K; Singh, Krishan; Desiraju, Koundinya; Agrawal, Anurag; Vats, Praveen; Bharadwaj, Abhishek; Baburaj, T P; Chaudhary, Pooja; Singh, Vijay K; Verma, Saroj; Bajaj, Amir Chand; Singh, Shashi Bala

    2016-01-01

    High altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) susceptibility is associated with EGLN1 polymorphisms, we hypothesized that HAPE-susceptible (HAPE-S, had HAPE episode in past) subjects may exhibit abnormal HIF1α levels in normoxic conditions. We measured HIF1α levels in HAPE-S and HAPE resistant (HAPE-R, no HAPE episode) individuals with similar pulmonary functions. Hemodynamic responses were also measured before and after normobaric hypoxia (Fi02 = 0.12 for 30 min duration at sea level) in both groups. . HIF1α was higher in HAPE-S (320.3 ± 267.5 vs 58.75 ± 33.88 pg/ml, P < 0.05) than HAPE-R, at baseline, despite no significant difference in baseline oxygen saturations (97.7 ± 1.7% and 98.8 ± 0.7). As expected, HAPE-S showed an exaggerated increase in pulmonary artery pressure (27.9 ± 6 vs 19.3 ± 3.7 mm Hg, P < 0.05) and a fall in peripheral oxygen saturation (66.9 ± 11.7 vs 78.7 ± 3.8%, P < 0.05), when exposed to hypoxia. HIF1α levels at baseline could accurately classify members of the two groups (AUC = 0.87). In a subset of the groups where hemoglobin fractions were additionally measured to understand the cause of elevated hypoxic response at baseline, two of four HAPE-S subjects showed reduced HbA. In conclusion, HIF 1 α levels during normoxia may represent an important marker for determination of HAPE susceptibility. PMID:27210110

  16. Raised HIF1α during normoxia in high altitude pulmonary edema susceptible non-mountaineers

    PubMed Central

    Soree, Poonam; Gupta, Rajinder K.; Singh, Krishan; Desiraju, Koundinya; Agrawal, Anurag; Vats, Praveen; Bharadwaj, Abhishek; Baburaj, T. P.; Chaudhary, Pooja; Singh, Vijay K.; Verma, Saroj; Bajaj, Amir Chand; Singh, Shashi Bala

    2016-01-01

    High altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) susceptibility is associated with EGLN1 polymorphisms, we hypothesized that HAPE-susceptible (HAPE-S, had HAPE episode in past) subjects may exhibit abnormal HIF1α levels in normoxic conditions. We measured HIF1α levels in HAPE-S and HAPE resistant (HAPE-R, no HAPE episode) individuals with similar pulmonary functions. Hemodynamic responses were also measured before and after normobaric hypoxia (Fi02 = 0.12 for 30 min duration at sea level) in both groups. . HIF1α was higher in HAPE-S (320.3 ± 267.5 vs 58.75 ± 33.88 pg/ml, P < 0.05) than HAPE-R, at baseline, despite no significant difference in baseline oxygen saturations (97.7 ± 1.7% and 98.8 ± 0.7). As expected, HAPE-S showed an exaggerated increase in pulmonary artery pressure (27.9 ± 6 vs 19.3 ± 3.7 mm Hg, P < 0.05) and a fall in peripheral oxygen saturation (66.9 ± 11.7 vs 78.7 ± 3.8%, P < 0.05), when exposed to hypoxia. HIF1α levels at baseline could accurately classify members of the two groups (AUC = 0.87). In a subset of the groups where hemoglobin fractions were additionally measured to understand the cause of elevated hypoxic response at baseline, two of four HAPE-S subjects showed reduced HbA. In conclusion, HIF 1 α levels during normoxia may represent an important marker for determination of HAPE susceptibility. PMID:27210110

  17. A human disease model of drug toxicity-induced pulmonary edema in a lung-on-a-chip microdevice.

    PubMed

    Huh, Dongeun; Leslie, Daniel C; Matthews, Benjamin D; Fraser, Jacob P; Jurek, Samuel; Hamilton, Geraldine A; Thorneloe, Kevin S; McAlexander, Michael Allen; Ingber, Donald E

    2012-11-01

    Preclinical drug development studies currently rely on costly and time-consuming animal testing because existing cell culture models fail to recapitulate complex, organ-level disease processes in humans. We provide the proof of principle for using a biomimetic microdevice that reconstitutes organ-level lung functions to create a human disease model-on-a-chip that mimics pulmonary edema. The microfluidic device, which reconstitutes the alveolar-capillary interface of the human lung, consists of channels lined by closely apposed layers of human pulmonary epithelial and endothelial cells that experience air and fluid flow, as well as cyclic mechanical strain to mimic normal breathing motions. This device was used to reproduce drug toxicity-induced pulmonary edema observed in human cancer patients treated with interleukin-2 (IL-2) at similar doses and over the same time frame. Studies using this on-chip disease model revealed that mechanical forces associated with physiological breathing motions play a crucial role in the development of increased vascular leakage that leads to pulmonary edema, and that circulating immune cells are not required for the development of this disease. These studies also led to identification of potential new therapeutics, including angiopoietin-1 (Ang-1) and a new transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) ion channel inhibitor (GSK2193874), which might prevent this life-threatening toxicity of IL-2 in the future. PMID:23136042

  18. The lung at high altitude: bronchoalveolar lavage in acute mountain sickness and pulmonary edema.

    PubMed

    Schoene, R B; Swenson, E R; Pizzo, C J; Hackett, P H; Roach, R C; Mills, W J; Henderson, W R; Martin, T R

    1988-06-01

    High-altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE), a severe form of altitude illness that can occur in young healthy individuals, is a noncardiogenic form of edema that is associated with high concentrations of proteins and cells in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid (Schoene et al., J. Am. Med. Assoc. 256: 63-69, 1986). We hypothesized that acute mountain sickness (AMS) in which gas exchange is impaired to a milder degree is a precursor to HAPE. We therefore performed BAL with 0.89% NaCl by fiberoptic bronchoscopy in eight subjects at 4,400 m (barometric pressure = 440 Torr) on Mt. McKinley to evaluate the cellular and biochemical responses of the lung at high altitude. The subjects included one healthy control (arterial O2 saturation = 83%), three climbers with HAPE (mean arterial O2 saturation = 55.0 +/- 5.0%), and four with AMS (arterial O2 saturation = 70.0 +/- 2.4%). Cell counts and differentials were done immediately on the BAL fluid, and the remainder was frozen for protein and biochemical analysis to be performed later. The results of this and of the earlier study mentioned above showed that the total leukocyte count (X10(5)/ml) in BAL fluid was 3.5 +/- 2.0 for HAPE, 0.9 +/- 4.0 for AMS, and 0.7 +/- 0.6 for controls, with predominantly alveolar macrophages in HAPE. The total protein concentration (mg/dl) was 616.0 +/- 3.3 for HAPE, 10.4 +/- 8.3 for AMS, and 12.0 +/- 3.4 for controls, with both large- (immunoglobulin M) and small- (albumin) molecular-weight proteins present in HAPE.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3403445

  19. A pulmonary aspergillosis case with fatal course in a patient with SIRS clinic.

    PubMed

    Cekmen, Nedim; Açiksöz, Sonay; Serdaroğlu, Hacer; Erdemli, Ozcan

    2011-02-01

    A 77-year-old male patient with a history of tuberculosis applied to emergency service with complaints of confusion, shortness of breath, tachycardia, hypothermia and hypotension. A bronchoalveolar lavage culture was collected because a fungus ball was seen on repeat chest X-ray and thoracic CT of the patient. Aspergillus fumigatus grew and voricona-zole treatment was started, but the patient was lost from multiple organ failure (MOF). In diagnosis of patients with SIRS clinic, causative factor may be aspergillus located in an old tuberculosis cavity, and this may have a fatal course in an old patient having previous pulmonary and systemic diseases. PMID:22091235

  20. Inositol-trisphosphate reduces alveolar apoptosis and pulmonary edema in neonatal lung injury.

    PubMed

    Preuss, Stefanie; Stadelmann, Sabrina; Omam, Friede D; Scheiermann, Julia; Winoto-Morbach, Supandi; von Bismarck, Philipp; Knerlich-Lukoschus, Friederike; Lex, Dennis; Adam-Klages, Sabine; Wesch, Daniela; Held-Feindt, Janka; Uhlig, Stefan; Schütze, Stefan; Krause, Martin F

    2012-08-01

    D-myo-inositol-1,2,6-trisphosphate (IP3) is an isomer of the naturally occurring second messenger D-myo-inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate, and exerts anti-inflammatory and antiedematous effects in the lung. Myo-inositol (Inos) is a component of IP3, and is thought to play an important role in the prevention of neonatal pulmonary diseases such as bronchopulmonary dysplasia and neonatal acute lung injury (nALI). Inflammatory lung diseases are characterized by augmented acid sphingomyelinase (aSMase) activity leading to ceramide production, a pathway that promotes increased vascular permeability, apoptosis, and surfactant alterations. A novel, clinically relevant triple-hit model of nALI was developed, consisting of repeated airway lavage, injurious ventilation, and lipopolysaccharide instillation into the airways, every 24 hours. Thirty-five piglets were randomized to one of four treatment protocols: control (no intervention), surfactant alone, surfactant + Inos, and surfactant + IP3. After 72 hours of mechanical ventilation, lungs were excised from the thorax for subsequent analyses. Clinically, oxygenation and ventilation improved, and extravascular lung water decreased significantly with the S + IP3 intervention. In pulmonary tissue, we observed decreased aSMase activity and ceramide concentrations, decreased caspase-8 concentrations, reduced alveolar epithelial apoptosis, the reduced expression of interleukin-6, transforming growth factor-β1, and amphiregulin (an epithelial growth factor), reduced migration of blood-borne cells and particularly of CD14(+)/18(+) cells (macrophages) into the airspaces, and lower surfactant surface tensions in S + IP3-treated but not in S + Inos-treated piglets. We conclude that the admixture of IP3 to surfactant, but not of Inos, improves gas exchange and edema in our nALI model by the suppression of the governing enzyme aSMase, and that this treatment deserves clinical evaluation. PMID:22403805

  1. Platelet-activating factor-induced pulmonary edema is partly mediated by prostaglandin E(2), E-prostanoid 3-receptors, and potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Göggel, Rolf; Hoffman, Sven; Nüsing, Rolf; Narumiya, Suh; Uhlig, Stefan

    2002-09-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is an important endogenous mediator of pulmonary edema in many models of acute lung injury. PAF triggers edema formation by simultaneous activation of two independent pathways; one is mediated by a cyclooxygenase metabolite, and the other is blocked by quinine. We examined the hypothesis that the cyclooxygenase-dependent part of PAF-induced edema is mediated by prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)). In isolated rat lungs, PAF administration stimulated release of PGE(2) into the venous effluate and increased lung weight as a measure of edema formation. Perfusion with a neutralizing PGE(2) antibody attenuated the PAF-induced edema formation. In vivo, E-prostanoid 3-receptor-deficient mice showed less pulmonary Evans blue extravasation in response to PAF injection than did mice deficient in EP1, EP2, or EP4 receptors. Perfusion of rat lungs with PGE(2) caused pulmonary edema, which was largely prevented by inhibition of voltage-gated potassium channels (25 nM beta-dendrotoxin), but not by blocking calcium-dependent potassium currents (100 micro M paxilline). In line with its effects on PGE(2)-induced edema formation, beta-dendrotoxin attenuated PAF-induced edema partly if given alone, and completely in combination with quinine. Our findings suggest that PAF-triggered edema is partly mediated by the release of PGE(2), activation of EP3 receptors, and activation of voltage-gated potassium channels. PMID:12204861

  2. Novel Peptide for Attenuation of Hyperoxia-induced Disruption of Lung Endothelial Barrier and Pulmonary Edema via Modulating Peroxynitrite Formation*

    PubMed Central

    Kondrikov, Dmitry; Gross, Christine; Black, Stephen M.; Su, Yunchao

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary damages of oxygen toxicity include vascular leakage and pulmonary edema. We have previously reported that hyperoxia increases the formation of NO and peroxynitrite in lung endothelial cells via increased interaction of endothelial nitric oxide (eNOS) with β-actin. A peptide (P326TAT) with amino acid sequence corresponding to the actin binding region of eNOS residues 326–333 has been shown to reduce the hyperoxia-induced formation of NO and peroxynitrite in lung endothelial cells. In the present study, we found that exposure of pulmonary artery endothelial cells to hyperoxia (95% oxygen and 5% CO2) for 48 h resulted in disruption of monolayer barrier integrity in two phases, and apoptosis occurred in the second phase. NOS inhibitor NG-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester attenuated the endothelial barrier disruption in both phases. Peroxynitrite scavenger uric acid did not affect the first phase but ameliorated the second phase of endothelial barrier disruption and apoptosis. P326TAT inhibited hyperoxia-induced disruption of monolayer barrier integrity in two phases and apoptosis in the second phase. More importantly, injection of P326TAT attenuated vascular leakage, pulmonary edema, and endothelial apoptosis in the lungs of mice exposed to hyperoxia. P326TAT also significantly reduced the increase in eNOS-β-actin association and protein tyrosine nitration. Together, these results indicate that peptide P326TAT ameliorates barrier dysfunction of hyperoxic lung endothelial monolayer and attenuates eNOS-β-actin association, peroxynitrite formation, endothelial apoptosis, and pulmonary edema in lungs of hyperoxic mice. P326TAT can be a novel therapeutic agent to treat or prevent acute lung injury in oxygen toxicity. PMID:25315770

  3. Bolus intravenous 0.9% saline, but not 4% albumin or 5% glucose, causes interstitial pulmonary edema in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Bihari, Shailesh; Wiersema, Ubbo F; Schembri, David; De Pasquale, Carmine G; Dixon, Dani-Louise; Prakash, Shivesh; Lawrence, Mark D; Bowden, Jeffrey J; Bersten, Andrew D

    2015-10-01

    Rapid intravenous (iv) infusion of 0.9% saline alters respiratory mechanics in healthy subjects. However, the relative cardiovascular and respiratory effects of bolus iv crystalloid vs. colloid are unknown. Six healthy male volunteers were given 30 ml/kg iv 0.9% saline, 4% albumin, and 5% glucose at a rate of 100 ml/min on 3 separate days in a double-blinded, randomized crossover study. Impulse oscillometry, spirometry, lung volumes, diffusing capacity (DLCO), and blood samples were measured before and after fluid administration. Lung ultrasound B-line score (indicating interstitial pulmonary edema) and Doppler echocardiography indices of cardiac preload were measured before, midway, immediately after, and 1 h after fluid administration. Infusion of 0.9% saline increased small airway resistance at 5 Hz (P = 0.04) and lung ultrasound B-line score (P = 0.01) without changes in Doppler echocardiography measures of preload. In contrast, 4% albumin increased DLCO, decreased lung volumes, and increased the Doppler echocardiography mitral E velocity (P = 0.001) and E-to-lateral/septal e' ratio, estimated blood volume, and N-terminal pro B-type natriuretic peptide (P = 0.01) but not lung ultrasound B-line score, consistent with increased pulmonary blood volume without interstitial pulmonary edema. There were no significant changes with 5% glucose. Plasma angiopoietin-2 concentration increased only after 0.9% saline (P = 0.001), suggesting an inflammatory mechanism associated with edema formation. In healthy subjects, 0.9% saline and 4% albumin have differential pulmonary effects not attributable to passive fluid filtration. This may reflect either different effects of these fluids on active signaling in the pulmonary circulation or a protective effect of albumin. PMID:26228998

  4. Amiodarone-induced pulmonary toxicity--a fatal case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Range, Felix T; Hilker, Ekkehard; Breithardt, Günter; Buerke, Boris; Lebiedz, Pia

    2013-06-01

    Amiodarone is a widely used and very potent antiarrhythmic substance. Among its adverse effects, pulmonary toxicity is the most dangerous without a causal treatment option. Due to a very long half-life, accumulation can only be prevented by strict adherence to certain dosage patterns. In this review, we outline different safe and proven dosing schemes of amiodarone and compare the incidence and description of pulmonary toxicity. Reason for this is a case of fatal pulmonary toxicity due to a subacute iatrogenic overdosing of amiodarone in a 74-year-old male patient with known severe coronary artery disease, congestive heart failure and ectopic atrial tachycardia with reduced function of kidneys and liver but without preexisting lung disease. Within 30 days, the patient received 32.2 g of amiodarone instead of 15.6 g as planned. Despite early corticosteroid treatment after fast exclusion of all other differential diagnoses, the patient died another month later in our intensive care unit from respiratory failure due to bipulmonal pneumonitis. PMID:23397327

  5. Two fatal cases of immersion pulmonary oedema - using dive accident investigation to assist the forensic pathologist.

    PubMed

    Smart, David R; Sage, Martin; Davis, F Michael

    2014-06-01

    Immersion pulmonary oedema (IPE) is being increasingly recognized in swimmers, snorkellers and scuba divers presenting with acute symptoms of respiratory distress following immersion, but fatal case reports are uncommon. We report two fatal cases of probable IPE in middle-aged women, one whilst snorkelling and the other associated with a scuba dive. In the snorkeller's case, an episode of exercise-related chest tightness and shortness of breath that occurred 10 months previously was investigated but this proved negative, and she was on no medications. However, at autopsy, moderate left ventricular hypertrophy was noted. The scuba diver had suffered several previous episodes of severe shortness of breath following dives, one being so severe it led to cyanosis and impaired consciousness. At inquest, the pathologist's diagnosis was given as drowning and IPE was not mentioned. Expert input from doctors trained in diving medicine should be compulsory in the investigation of diving deaths, and forensic pathologists should be properly trained in and have guidelines for the conduct of post-immersion and post-diving autopsies. PMID:24986728

  6. Evaluation of a thoracic ultrasound training module for the detection of pneumothorax and pulmonary edema by prehospital physician care providers

    PubMed Central

    Noble, Vicki E; Lamhaut, Lionel; Capp, Roberta; Bosson, Nichole; Liteplo, Andrew; Marx, Jean-Sebastian; Carli, Pierre

    2009-01-01

    Background While ultrasound (US) has continued to expedite diagnosis and therapy for critical care physicians inside the hospital system, the technology has been slow to diffuse into the pre-hospital system. Given the diagnostic benefits of thoracic ultrasound (TUS), we sought to evaluate image recognition skills for two important TUS applications; the identification of B-lines (used in the US diagnosis of pulmonary edema) and the identification of lung sliding and comet tails (used in the US diagnosis of pneumothorax). In particular we evaluated the impact of a focused training module in a pre-hospital system that utilizes physicians as pre-hospital providers. Methods 27 Paris Service D'Aide Médicale Urgente (SAMU) physicians at the Hôpital Necker with varying levels of US experience were given two twenty-five image recognition pre-tests; the first test had examples of both normal and pneumothorax lung US and the second had examples of both normal and pulmonary edema lung US. All 27 physicians then underwent the same didactic training modules. A post-test was administered upon completing the training module and results were recorded. Results Pre and post-test scores were compared for both the pneumothorax and the pulmonary edema modules. For the pneumothorax module, mean test scores increased from 10.3 +/- 4.1 before the training to 20.1 +/- 3.5 after (p < 0.0001), out of 25 possible points. The standard deviation decreased as well, indicating a collective improvement. For the pulmonary edema module, mean test scores increased from 14.1 +/- 5.2 before the training to 20.9 +/- 2.4 after (p < 0.0001), out of 25 possible points. The standard deviation decreased again by more than half, indicating a collective improvement. Conclusion This brief training module resulted in significant improvement of image recognition skills for physicians both with and without previous ultrasound experience. Given that rapid diagnosis of these conditions in the pre-hospital system

  7. Fatal diffuse pulmonary arterial thrombosis as a complication of nephrotic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Akiko; Tsuchiya, Ken; Yabuki, Yasuko; Naito, Masayo; Koike, Minako; Yumura, Wako; Nitta, Kosaku

    2007-12-01

    A 21-year-old man was admitted to our hospital because of leg edema. Because laboratory findings revealed massive proteinuria and hypoproteinemia, he was diagnosed as having nephritic syndrome caused by minimal change disease. He was given a continuous heparin infusion and intravenous steroid therapy, at a prednisolone dose of 1 mg/kg per day, and his condition gradually improved. Five months after discharge, the patient's proteinuria relapsed. He was readmitted to our hospital and we restarted anticoagulant treatment with intravenous heparin and 60 mg prednisolone. On the third hospital day, he complained of chest pain with sudden onset and dyspnea. He quickly developed shock and died. The findings of an autopsy confirmed the presence of diffuse fibrin thrombi in bilateral pulmonary arteries, and we diagnosed the cause of death as diffuse pulmonary artery thrombosis. A coagulation test for activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) had already shown that aPTT was prolonged before the initiation of treatment. There may have been a deficit of antithrombin III (ATIII) - a cofactor of heparin - because of the proteinuria; thus, the continuous heparin treatment might not have been effective for the prevention of thrombosis. Alternatives to heparin treatment that do not suppress AT III, such as nafamostat mesilate or argatroban, which do not require the presence of AT III for their anticoagulant action, should be considered in cases similar to the that in the patient reported here. In patients with nephrotic syndrome who exhibit altered coagulation test results, the choice of anticoagulation therapy for treatment of the hypercoagulabilty status associated with nephrotic syndrome should be carefully considered. PMID:18085394

  8. Pathophysiological and diagnostic implications of cardiac biomarkers and antidiuretic hormone release in distinguishing immersion pulmonary edema from decompression sickness.

    PubMed

    Louge, Pierre; Coulange, Mathieu; Beneton, Frederic; Gempp, Emmanuel; Le Pennetier, Olivier; Algoud, Maxime; Dubourg, Lorene; Naibo, Pierre; Marlinge, Marion; Michelet, Pierre; Vairo, Donato; Kipson, Nathalie; Kerbaul, François; Jammes, Yves; Jones, Ian M; Steinberg, Jean-Guillaume; Ruf, Jean; Guieu, Régis; Boussuges, Alain; Fenouillet, Emmanuel

    2016-06-01

    Immersion pulmonary edema (IPE) is a misdiagnosed environmental illness caused by water immersion, cold, and exertion. IPE occurs typically during SCUBA diving, snorkeling, and swimming. IPE is sometimes associated with myocardial injury and/or loss of consciousness in water, which may be fatal. IPE is thought to involve hemodynamic and cardiovascular disturbances, but its pathophysiology remains largely unclear, which makes IPE prevention difficult. This observational study aimed to document IPE pathogenesis and improve diagnostic reliability, including distinguishing in some conditions IPE from decompression sickness (DCS), another diving-related disorder.Thirty-one patients (19 IPE, 12 DCS) treated at the Hyperbaric Medicine Department (Ste-Anne hospital, Toulon, France; July 2013-June 2014) were recruited into the study. Ten healthy divers were recruited as controls. We tested: (i) copeptin, a surrogate marker for antidiuretic hormone and a stress marker; (ii) ischemia-modified albumin, an ischemia/hypoxia marker; (iii) brain-natriuretic peptide (BNP), a marker of heart failure, and (iv) ultrasensitive-cardiac troponin-I (cTnI), a marker of myocardial ischemia.We found that copeptin and cardiac biomarkers were higher in IPE versus DCS and controls: (i) copeptin: 68% of IPE patients had a high level versus 25% of DCS patients (P < 0.05) (mean ± standard-deviation: IPE: 53 ± 61 pmol/L; DCS: 15 ± 17; controls: 6 ± 3; IPE versus DCS or controls: P < 0.05); (ii) ischemia-modified albumin: 68% of IPE patients had a high level versus 16% of DCS patients (P < 0.05) (IPE: 123 ± 25 arbitrary-units; DCS: 84 ± 25; controls: 94 ± 7; IPE versus DCS or controls: P < 0.05); (iii) BNP: 53% of IPE patients had a high level, DCS patients having normal values (P < 0.05) (IPE: 383 ± 394 ng/L; DCS: 37 ± 28; controls: 19 ± 15; IPE versus DCS or controls: P < 0.01); (iv) cTnI: 63% of IPE patients had a high

  9. Pathophysiological and diagnostic implications of cardiac biomarkers and antidiuretic hormone release in distinguishing immersion pulmonary edema from decompression sickness

    PubMed Central

    Louge, Pierre; Coulange, Mathieu; Beneton, Frederic; Gempp, Emmanuel; Le Pennetier, Olivier; Algoud, Maxime; Dubourg, Lorene; Naibo, Pierre; Marlinge, Marion; Michelet, Pierre; Vairo, Donato; Kipson, Nathalie; Kerbaul, François; Jammes, Yves; Jones, Ian M.; Steinberg, Jean-Guillaume; Ruf, Jean; Guieu, Régis; Boussuges, Alain; Fenouillet, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Immersion pulmonary edema (IPE) is a misdiagnosed environmental illness caused by water immersion, cold, and exertion. IPE occurs typically during SCUBA diving, snorkeling, and swimming. IPE is sometimes associated with myocardial injury and/or loss of consciousness in water, which may be fatal. IPE is thought to involve hemodynamic and cardiovascular disturbances, but its pathophysiology remains largely unclear, which makes IPE prevention difficult. This observational study aimed to document IPE pathogenesis and improve diagnostic reliability, including distinguishing in some conditions IPE from decompression sickness (DCS), another diving-related disorder. Thirty-one patients (19 IPE, 12 DCS) treated at the Hyperbaric Medicine Department (Ste-Anne hospital, Toulon, France; July 2013–June 2014) were recruited into the study. Ten healthy divers were recruited as controls. We tested: (i) copeptin, a surrogate marker for antidiuretic hormone and a stress marker; (ii) ischemia-modified albumin, an ischemia/hypoxia marker; (iii) brain-natriuretic peptide (BNP), a marker of heart failure, and (iv) ultrasensitive-cardiac troponin-I (cTnI), a marker of myocardial ischemia. We found that copeptin and cardiac biomarkers were higher in IPE versus DCS and controls: (i) copeptin: 68% of IPE patients had a high level versus 25% of DCS patients (P < 0.05) (mean ± standard-deviation: IPE: 53 ± 61 pmol/L; DCS: 15 ± 17; controls: 6 ± 3; IPE versus DCS or controls: P < 0.05); (ii) ischemia-modified albumin: 68% of IPE patients had a high level versus 16% of DCS patients (P < 0.05) (IPE: 123 ± 25 arbitrary-units; DCS: 84 ± 25; controls: 94 ± 7; IPE versus DCS or controls: P < 0.05); (iii) BNP: 53% of IPE patients had a high level, DCS patients having normal values (P < 0.05) (IPE: 383 ± 394 ng/L; DCS: 37 ± 28; controls: 19 ± 15; IPE versus DCS or controls: P < 0.01); (iv) cTnI: 63% of IPE

  10. Inherent variations in CO-H2S-mediated carotid body O2 sensing mediate hypertension and pulmonary edema.

    PubMed

    Peng, Ying-Jie; Makarenko, Vladislav V; Nanduri, Jayasri; Vasavda, Chirag; Raghuraman, Gayatri; Yuan, Guoxiang; Gadalla, Moataz M; Kumar, Ganesh K; Snyder, Solomon H; Prabhakar, Nanduri R

    2014-01-21

    Oxygen (O2) sensing by the carotid body and its chemosensory reflex is critical for homeostatic regulation of breathing and blood pressure. Humans and animals exhibit substantial interindividual variation in this chemosensory reflex response, with profound effects on cardiorespiratory functions. However, the underlying mechanisms are not known. Here, we report that inherent variations in carotid body O2 sensing by carbon monoxide (CO)-sensitive hydrogen sulfide (H2S) signaling contribute to reflex variation in three genetically distinct rat strains. Compared with Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats, Brown-Norway (BN) rats exhibit impaired carotid body O2 sensing and develop pulmonary edema as a consequence of poor ventilatory adaptation to hypobaric hypoxia. Spontaneous Hypertensive (SH) rat carotid bodies display inherent hypersensitivity to hypoxia and develop hypertension. BN rat carotid bodies have naturally higher CO and lower H2S levels than SD rat, whereas SH carotid bodies have reduced CO and greater H2S generation. Higher CO levels in BN rats were associated with higher substrate affinity of the enzyme heme oxygenase 2, whereas SH rats present lower substrate affinity and, thus, reduced CO generation. Reducing CO levels in BN rat carotid bodies increased H2S generation, restoring O2 sensing and preventing hypoxia-induced pulmonary edema. Increasing CO levels in SH carotid bodies reduced H2S generation, preventing hypersensitivity to hypoxia and controlling hypertension in SH rats. PMID:24395806

  11. Levels of interleukin-6, superoxide dismutase and malondialdehyde in the lung tissue of a rat model of hypoxia-induced acute pulmonary edema

    PubMed Central

    GAO, HENGBO; TIAN, YINGPING; WANG, WEI; YAO, DONGQI; ZHENG, TUOKANG; MENG, QINGBING

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and interleukin (IL)-6 in the lung tissue of a rat model of acute pulmonary edema induced by acute hypoxia, and its pathophysiological significance. A total of 48 adult Wistar rats were randomly divided into group A, a normal group; group B, a model of acute pulmonary edema induced by hypoxia for 24 h; group C, a model of acute pulmonary edema induced by hypoxia for 48 h; and group D, a model of acute pulmonary edema induced by hypoxia for 72 h. The rats in groups B-D were intraperitoneally injected with 6% ammonium chloride to establish the model of acute pulmonary edema, and were subsequently sacrificed following successful modeling for 24, 48 and 72 h. The plasma of rats was isolated and the lungs of the rats were removed. Subsequently, a 10% lung homogenate was prepared and the contents and the activities of MDA, SOD and IL-6 in the lung tissue and IL-6 in the plasma were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. MDA and IL-6 expression levels increased and SOD activity decreased in the lung tissue in group B as compared with group A; however the difference did not reach significance (P>0.05). MDA, IL-6 and SOD levels in the lung tissue of rats were significantly altered following the increased duration of pulmonary edema in groups C and D, as compared group A (P<0.05). The plasma IL-6 levels of the rats in groups B-D significantly increased, as compared with those in group A (P<0.05). In conclusion, the results of the present study demonstrated that the incidence of acute pulmonary edema may be associated with oxidative stress. Furthermore, decreased antioxidant capacity and increased free radical levels may be associated with pulmonary edema, as in the present study the levels of IL-6, SOD and MDA in the lung tissue were observed to be associated with the pathological changes of the disease. PMID:26998026

  12. Natural History of Tuberculosis: Duration and Fatality of Untreated Pulmonary Tuberculosis in HIV Negative Patients: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Tiemersma, Edine W.; van der Werf, Marieke J.; Borgdorff, Martien W.; Williams, Brian G.; Nagelkerke, Nico J. D.

    2011-01-01

    Background The prognosis, specifically the case fatality and duration, of untreated tuberculosis is important as many patients are not correctly diagnosed and therefore receive inadequate or no treatment. Furthermore, duration and case fatality of tuberculosis are key parameters in interpreting epidemiological data. Methodology and Principal Findings To estimate the duration and case fatality of untreated pulmonary tuberculosis in HIV negative patients we reviewed studies from the pre-chemotherapy era. Untreated smear-positive tuberculosis among HIV negative individuals has a 10-year case fatality variously reported between 53% and 86%, with a weighted mean of 70%. Ten-year case fatality of culture-positive smear-negative tuberculosis was nowhere reported directly but can be indirectly estimated to be approximately 20%. The duration of tuberculosis from onset to cure or death is approximately 3 years and appears to be similar for smear-positive and smear-negative tuberculosis. Conclusions Current models of untreated tuberculosis that assume a total duration of 2 years until self-cure or death underestimate the duration of disease by about one year, but their case fatality estimates of 70% for smear-positive and 20% for culture-positive smear-negative tuberculosis appear to be satisfactory. PMID:21483732

  13. Fatal haemolytic crisis with microvascular pulmonary obstruction mimicking a pulmonary embolism in a young African man with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Albertsen, Jens; Ommen, Hans Beier; Wandler, Anne; Munk, Kim

    2014-01-01

    We report a fatal case of haemolytic crisis mimicking a pulmonary embolism in a previously healthy 42-year-old African man. The patient was admitted to hospital with fatigue, shortness of breath and jaundice lasting for 2 days. Laboratory tests were consistent with haemolysis and inflammation. The patient was treated as having a mycoplasma pneumonia. His condition deteriorated rapidly, with respiratory distress and circulatory failure. Echocardiography showed pulmonary hypertension and right heart dilation. Despite the fact that he was given fibrinolysis for suspected pulmonary embolism, he developed cardiac arrest and died after a long-lasting resuscitation attempt. Postmortem examinations revealed that the patient had a glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency and disseminated intravascular coagulation with pulmonary microthrombi. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of death caused by right heart failure due to microvascular obstruction resulting from multiple microvascular thrombosis in a patient with acute haemolysis due to glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency. PMID:24713708

  14. Fatal right ventricular failure and pulmonary hypertension after protamine administration during cardiac transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Pannu, Bibek S.; Sanghavi, Devang K.; Guru, Pramod K.; Reddy, Dereddi Raja; Iyer, Vivek N.

    2016-01-01

    Protamine sulfate is the only Food and Drug administration approved medication for reversal of intraoperative heparin-induced anticoagulation during cardiac and vascular surgeries. One of the rare side effects of protamine sulfate is an idiosyncratic reaction resulting in acute pulmonary hypertension (APH) and right ventricular (RV) failure occurring after protamine administration. These reactions are rare but catastrophic with high mortality. A 36-year-old female with severe congestive heart failure was undergoing cardiac transplant surgery. After successful implantation of the donor heart, the patient was weaned off cardiopulmonary bypass. Protamine was then administered to reverse the heparin anticoagulation. She immediately developed APH and RV failure immediately after protamine infusion. The patient required immediate administration of inotropic agents, nitric oxide (NO), and subsequently required a number of mechanical support devices including an RV assist device (RVAD) and ultimately full veno-arterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (VA-ECMO). Despite heroic efforts, the patient developed refractory multi-organ failure in the Intensive Care Unit and died after family requested discontinuation of resuscitative efforts. This case probably represents the first reported occurrence of fatal protamine-induced APH and ventricular failure in the setting of cardiac transplantation surgery. A number of interventions including inhaled NO, systemic vasopressors, RVAD, and ultimately VA-ECMO failed to reverse the situation, and the patient died of multi-organ failure. PMID:27076733

  15. Anti-asthmatic agents alleviate pulmonary edema by upregulating AQP1 and AQP5 expression in the lungs of mice with OVA-induced asthma.

    PubMed

    Dong, Chunling; Wang, Guifang; Li, Bo; Xiao, Kui; Ma, Zhongsen; Huang, Hua; Wang, Xiangdong; Bai, Chunxue

    2012-04-15

    Ovalbumin (OVA)-induced asthma in mouse lungs causes changes in the mRNA and protein levels of aquaporins (AQPs). AQP expression was examined in the presence of various anti-asthmatic agents, including dexamethasone, ambroxol, and terbutaline. The influence of these agents on OVA-induced airway inflammation was also evaluated. The mRNA expression levels of AQP1, 4, and 5 were significantly reduced and that of AQP3 was significantly increased 24h after the last OVA exposure. The protein levels of AQP1, 3, and 5 mirrored the mRNA expression profiles, but AQP4 did not exhibit any changes. Only the mRNA and protein expression levels of AQP1 and AQP5 were significantly increased by these three anti-asthmatic agents. Dexamethasone and ambroxol improved the eosinophil infiltration, mucus secretion, and pulmonary edema caused by OVA, but terbutaline only alleviated pulmonary edema. These results indicate that AQP1 and AQP5 are closely related to pulmonary edema but not to eosinophil infiltration or mucus secretion during asthma. Anti-asthmatic agents could alleviate pulmonary edema through upregulating the expression of AQP1 and AQP5 in mouse lungs that have OVA-induced asthma. PMID:22226856

  16. An uncommon complication of a common clinical scenario: exploring reexpansion pulmonary edema with a case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Meeker, Jared W.; Jaeger, Amy L.; Tillis, William P.

    2016-01-01

    Reexpansion pulmonary edema (RPE) is a rare complication that can occur after rapid reinflation of the lung following thoracentesis of a pleural effusion or chest tube drainage of pneumothorax. The severity in clinical presentation can be widely varied from radiographic changes only to rapidly progressive respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation. The quick nature of onset and potential for serious decline in a previously stable patient makes it important to prepare, recognize, diagnose, and appropriately manage patients who develop RPE. The standard treatment for RPE consists of supportive care, and there are certain measures that may be taken to reduce the risk, including limiting the amount drained and avoiding excessive negative pleural pressure. Exactly how to prevent RPE remains unclear, however, and varying recommendations exist. This is a case report of RPE after thoracentesis for a pleural effusion and a brief review of literature to date, including potential preventative strategies. PMID:27406463

  17. N-acetylcysteine prevents pulmonary edema and acute kidney injury in rats with sepsis submitted to mechanical ventilation.

    PubMed

    Campos, Renata; Shimizu, Maria Heloísa Massola; Volpini, Rildo Aparecido; de Bragança, Ana Carolina; Andrade, Lucia; Lopes, Fernanda Degobbi Tenório Quirino Dos Santos; Olivo, Clarice; Canale, Daniele; Seguro, Antonio Carlos

    2012-04-01

    Sepsis is a common cause of acute kidney injury (AKI) and acute lung injury. Oxidative stress plays as important role in such injury. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects that the potent antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) has on renal and pulmonary function in rats with sepsis. Rats, treated or not with NAC (4.8 g/l in drinking water), underwent cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) 2 days after the initiation of NAC treatment, which was maintained throughout the study. At 24 h post-CLP, renal and pulmonary function were studied in four groups: control, control + NAC, CLP, and CLP + NAC. All animals were submitted to low-tidal-volume mechanical ventilation. We evaluated respiratory mechanics, the sodium cotransporters Na-K-2Cl (NKCC1) and the α-subunit of the epithelial sodium channel (α-ENaC), polymorphonuclear neutrophils, the edema index, oxidative stress (plasma thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and lung tissue 8-isoprostane), and glomerular filtration rate. The CLP rats developed AKI, which was ameliorated in the CLP + NAC rats. Sepsis-induced alterations in respiratory mechanics were also ameliorated by NAC. Edema indexes were lower in the CLP + NAC group, as was the wet-to-dry lung weight ratio. In CLP + NAC rats, α-ENaC expression was upregulated, whereas that of NKCC1 was downregulated, although the difference was not significant. In the CLP + NAC group, oxidative stress was significantly lower and survival rates were significantly higher than in the CLP group. The protective effects of NAC (against kidney and lung injury) are likely attributable to the decrease in oxidative stress, suggesting that NAC can be useful in the treatment of sepsis. PMID:22268121

  18. Positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) does not depress left ventricular function in patients with pulmonary edema

    SciTech Connect

    Calvin, J.E.; Driedger, A.A.; Sibbald, W.J.

    1981-08-01

    Researchers evaluated the effects of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) on left ventricular function in 15 patients with acute respiratory insufficiency secondary to pulmonary edema with invasive (pressure; flow) measurements and radionuclide angiography (RA). Using RNA allowed a definition of the left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), and then calculation of the left ventricular end-diastolic volume (LVEDV), both before and after PEEP. With a mean PEEP of 14.2 +/- 1.8 cm H2O (mean +/- SD) (range, 10 to 15), a fall in the cardiac index (4.34 +/- 1.5 to 3.84 +/- 1.4 L/min/M2; p less than 0.001) was accompanied by a significant decrease in the stroke volume index (42 +/- 13 to 39 +/- 12 ml/beat M2; p less than 0.01) and pulse rate (103.4 +/- 14.3 to 98 +/- 13.5 beats/min; p less than 0.01). The decrease in the stroke volume index was primarily due to a significant decrease in left ventricular preload (LVEDV) from 85.9 +/- 19 to 71.4 +/- 21.4 ml/m2 (p less than 0.01). Simultaneously, the mean LVEF increased from 0.47 +/- 0.10 to 0.53 +/- 0.08 (p less than 0.05), despite a significant increase in the systemic vascular resistance (1,619 +/- 575 to 1,864 +/- 617 dynes . s. cm-5/M2; p less than 0.01). Researchers concluded that the use of PEEP in patients with acute pulmonary edema, to the degree used in this study, may depress cardiac output by simply decreasing left ventricular preload. Researchers were unable to produce any evidence that would support a change in the contractile state of the left ventricle as a cause of depressed forward flow with the use of PEEP.

  19. Passive immunization with Leptospira LPS-specific agglutinating but not non-agglutinating monoclonal antibodies protect guinea pigs from fatal pulmonary hemorrhages induced by serovar Copenhageni challenge.

    PubMed

    Challa, Sreerupa; Nally, Jarlath E; Jones, Carroll; Sheoran, Abhineet S

    2011-06-15

    Leptospira interrogans serovar Copenhageni causes pulmonary hemorrhages with respiratory failure, a major cause of death in leptospirosis patients. Protective immunity to Leptospira is known to correlate with the production of leptospiral lipopolysaccharide (L-LPS)-specific agglutinating antibodies. We generated L-LPS-specific mouse monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) and investigated if these MAbs can protect guinea pigs against fatal pulmonary hemorrhages caused by serovar Copenhageni. The MAbs L8H4 and L9B11 against 22kDa L-LPS agglutinated leptospires and completely protected guinea pigs from the development of fatal pulmonary hemorrhages by serovar Copenhageni, whereas the MAb L4C1 against 8kDa L-LPS neither agglutinated the bacteria nor protected the animals against the fatal pulmonary hemorrhages. PMID:21549788

  20. Ruptured mycotic common femoral artery pseudoaneurysm: fatal pulmonary embolism after emergency stent-grafting in a drug abuser.

    PubMed

    Karkos, Christos D; Kalogirou, Thomas E; Giagtzidis, Ioakeim T; Papazoglou, Konstantinos O

    2014-12-01

    The rupture of a mycotic femoral artery pseudoaneurysm in an intravenous drug abuser is a limb- and life-threatening condition that necessitates emergency intervention. Emergency stent-grafting appears to be a viable, minimally invasive alternative, or a bridge, to subsequent open surgery. Caution is required in cases of suspected concomitant deep vein thrombosis in order to minimize the possibility of massive pulmonary embolism during stent-grafting, perhaps by omitting stent-graft postdilation or by inserting an inferior vena cava filter first. We describe the emergency endovascular management, in a 60-year-old male intravenous drug abuser, of a ruptured mycotic femoral artery pseudoaneurysm, which was complicated by a fatal pulmonary embolism. PMID:25593530

  1. Effects of hyperoxia on ventilation and pulmonary hemodynamics during immersed prone exercise at 4.7 ATA: possible implications for immersion pulmonary edema

    PubMed Central

    Peacher, Dionne F.; Pecorella, Shelly R. H.; Freiberger, John J.; Natoli, Michael J.; Schinazi, Eric A.; Doar, P. Owen; Boso, Albert E.; Walker, Aaron J.; Gill, Matthew; Kernagis, Dawn; Uguccioni, Donna

    2010-01-01

    Immersion pulmonary edema (IPE) can occur in otherwise healthy swimmers and divers, likely because of stress failure of pulmonary capillaries secondary to increased pulmonary vascular pressures. Prior studies have revealed progressive increase in ventilation [minute ventilation (V̇e)] during prolonged immersed exercise. We hypothesized that this increase occurs because of development of metabolic acidosis with concomitant rise in mean pulmonary artery pressure (MPAP) and that hyperoxia attenuates this increase. Ten subjects were studied at rest and during 16 min of exercise submersed at 1 atm absolute (ATA) breathing air and at 4.7 ATA in normoxia and hyperoxia [inspired PO2 (PiO2) 1.75 ATA]. V̇e increased from early (E, 6th minute) to late (L, 16th minute) exercise at 1 ATA (64.1 ± 8.6 to 71.7 ± 10.9 l/min BTPS; P < 0.001), with no change in arterial pH or Pco2. MPAP decreased from E to L at 1 ATA (26.7 ± 5.8 to 22.7 ± 5.2 mmHg; P = 0.003). V̇e and MPAP did not change from E to L at 4.7 ATA. Hyperoxia reduced V̇e (62.6 ± 10.5 to 53.1 ± 6.1 l/min BTPS; P < 0.0001) and MPAP (29.7 ± 7.4 to 25.1 ± 5.7 mmHg, P = 0.002). Variability in MPAP among subjects was wide (range 14.1–42.1 mmHg during surface and depth exercise). Alveolar-arterial Po2 difference increased from E to L in normoxia, consistent with increased lung water. We conclude that increased V̇e at 1 ATA is not due to acidosis and is more consistent with respiratory muscle fatigue and that progressive pulmonary vascular hypertension does not occur during prolonged immersed exercise. Wide variation in MPAP among healthy subjects is consistent with variable individual susceptibility to IPE. PMID:20431020

  2. Pulmonary and central nervous system pathology in fatal cases of hand foot and mouth disease caused by enterovirus A71 infection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zijun; Nicholls, John M; Liu, Fengfeng; Wang, Joshua; Feng, Zijian; Liu, Dongge; Sun, Yanni; Zhou, Cheng; Li, Yunqian; Li, Hai; Qi, Shunxiang; Huang, Xueyong; Sui, Jilin; Liao, Qiaohong; Peiris, Malik; Yu, Hongjie; Wang, Yu

    2016-04-01

    In the past 17 years, neurological disease associated with enterovirus A71 (EV-A71) has increased dramatically in the Asia-Pacific region with a high fatality rate in young infants, often due to pulmonary oedema, however the mechanism of this oedema remains obscure. We analysed the brainstem, heart and lungs of 15 fatal cases of confirmed EV-A71 infection in order to understand the pathophysiological mechanism of death and pulmonary oedema. In keeping with other case studies, the main cause of death was neurogenic pulmonary oedema. In the brainstem, 11 cases showed inflammation and all cases showed parenchymal inflammation with seven cases showing moderate or severe clasmatodendrosis. No viral antigen was detected in sections of the brainstem in any of the cases. All fatal cases showed evidence of pulmonary oedema; however, there was absence of direct pulmonary viral damage or myocarditis-induced damage and EV-A71 viral antigen staining was negative. Though there was no increase in staining for Na/K-ATPase, 11 of the 15 cases showed a marked reduction in aquaporin-4 staining in the lung, and this reduction may contribute to the development of fatal pulmonary oedema. PMID:27020504

  3. Metabolomic analysis of the plasma of patients with high-altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) using 1H NMR.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yongjun; Zhu, Junyu; Gao, Yuqi

    2012-06-01

    Upon rapid ascent to a high altitude, non-acclimatized individuals, although healthy, are highly prone to contracting high-altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE). Early diagnosis is difficult and there is no reliable biomarker available. We used proton ((1)H) NMR metabolomics to profile the altered metabolic patterns of blood plasma from HAPE patients. The plasmas of ten patients with HAPE and ten individuals without HAPE were collected and compared using (1)H NMR spectroscopy. Data were evaluated with several multivariate statistical analyses, including the principal components, the orthogonal partial least-squares discriminant, and the orthogonal signal correction partial least-squares discriminant. Multivariate statistical analyses revealed a significant disparity between subjects with HAPE and those in the control group. Compared to the plasma of the controls, the HAPE patients had significant increases in valine, lysine, leucine, isoleucine, glycerol phosphoryl choline, glycine, glutamine, glutamic acid, creatinine, citrate, and methyl histidine. These were accompanied by decreases in α- and β-glucose, trimethylamine, and the metabolic products of lipids. The data demonstrate that metabolomics may be effective for the diagnosis of HAPE in the future, and can be used for further understanding HAPE pathogenesis. PMID:22498880

  4. Effect of melengestrol acetate on development of 3-methylindole-induced pulmonary edema and emphysema in sheep.

    PubMed Central

    Popp, J D; McAllister, T A; Kastelic, J P; Majak, W; Ayroud, M; VanderKop, M A; Karren, D; Yost, G S; Cheng, K J

    1998-01-01

    The involvement of melengestrol acetate (MGA) in susceptibility to developing pulmonary edema and emphysema following oral administration of 3-methylindole (3MI) was investigated using 10 Suffolk ewes receiving 0 or 0.15 mg of MGA daily (n = 5). Blood, urine and ruminal fluid were collected immediately prior to 3MI dosing (0.2 g/kg BW) and 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 12 and 24 h (blood); 3, 6, 9, 12 and 15 h (urine) and 1, 2, 3 and 12 h (ruminal fluid) afterward. Ewes receiving MGA experienced earlier (P < 0.05) onset of respiratory distress than the control ewes (2.5 vs 4 h), and upon euthanasia at 96 h, their lung weight relative to body weight tended (P < 0.10) to be lower. Ruminal 3MI concentrations did not differ between treatments (P > 0.05). Ewes receiving MGA had higher (P < 0.05) concentrations of 3MI metabolites in plasma prior to dosing than did control ewes, and these values tended to remain higher throughout the sampling period. Immunoreactivity assays indicated more pneumotoxin present in the lungs of MGA-treated ewes than controls. Lung damage was apparently more acute and accelerated in the MGA-treated ewes than in the controls. Urinary 3MI mercapturate concentrations differed (control > MGA-treated, P < 0.05) at 9, 12, and 15 h, but this difference was not apparent when urinary production (as estimated by creatinine concentration) was considered. The implications of these findings for MGA-treated feedlot heifers are currently under investigation. Images Figure 1. PMID:9798092

  5. A rare cause of fatal pulmonary alveolar proteinosis: Niemann-Pick disease type C2 and a novel mutation.

    PubMed

    Yaman, Ayhan; Eminoğlu, Fatma T; Kendirli, Tanıl; Ödek, Çağlar; Ceylaner, Serdar; Kansu, Aydan; İnce, Elif; Deda, Gülhis

    2015-09-01

    Niemann-Pick disease type C (NPC) is a fatal autosomal recessive lipid storage disease associated with impaired trafficking of unesterified cholesterol and glycolipids in lysosomes and late endosomes. This disease is commonly characterized by hepatosplenomegaly and severe progressive neurological dysfunction. There are two defective genes that cause this illness. One of these genes is NPC1 gene which is the cause of illness in 95% of the patients. The other gene is the rare type NPC2 which is the cause of illness in 5% of the patients. Patients with NPC2 usually present with respiratory distress in early infancy, which is rather unusual with NPC1. This article discusses about a patient who died at an early age from pulmonary involvement and who subsequently was found to have a novel homozygous mutation of NPC2 gene. PMID:26024245

  6. Neutrophil depletion causes a fatal defect in murine pulmonary Staphylococcus aureus clearance

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Charles M.; Perrone, Erin E; McConnell, Kevin W.; Dunne, W. Michael; Boody, Barrett; Brahmbhatt, Tejal; Diacovo, M. Julia; Van Rooijen, Nico; Hogue, Lisa A.; Cannon, Carolyn L.; Buchman, Timothy G.; Hotchkiss, Richard S.; Coopersmith, Craig M.

    2008-01-01

    Background Staphylococcus aureus is the most common cause of healthcare-associated pneumonia. Despite the significant morbidity and mortality associated with the disease, animal models of S. aureus pneumonia are rare. Materials and Methods We examined the pathogenicity of four different strains of S. aureus (both methicillin-sensitive and resistant as well as Panton-Valentine leukocidin positive and negative) in four strains of immunocompetent inbred and outbred mice (FVB/N, C57Bl/6, Balb/c, ND4, n=148). The immunologic basis for the development of murine S. aureus pneumonia was then determined by selectively depleting neutrophils, lymphocytes, or pulmonary macrophages prior to the onset of infection. An additional cohort of animals was rendered immunosuppressed by induction of abdominal sepsis via cecal ligation and puncture 2, 4 or 7 days prior to the onset of pneumonia. Results Nearly all immunocompetent mice survived, regardless of which strain of S. aureus was used or which strain of mouse was infected. Among animals with immune depletion or prior immunosuppression, survival was decreased only following neutrophil depletion (26% vs. 90% alive at 7 days, p<0.0001). Compared to immunocompetent animals, neutrophil-depleted mice with S. aureus pneumonia had delayed pulmonary bacterial clearance at 16 and 40 hours but had no difference in levels of bacteremia. Neutrophil-depleted mice also had elevated levels of pulmonary MCP-1 (822 pg/ml vs. 150 pg/ml, p<0.05). In contrast, pulmonary histologic appearance was similar in both groups as was dry/wet lung weight. Conclusions These results suggest that neutrophils play a critical role in the host response to S. aureus pneumonia, and the survival differences observed in neutrophil-depleted mice are associated with alterations in bacterial clearance and pulmonary cytokine response. PMID:18621398

  7. [Fatal outcome of bilateral pulmonary embolism combined with ascending varicophlebitis of the lower limb: case report].

    PubMed

    Nagy, Imre; Skribek, Levente; Dienes, Anna Barbara; Rédei, Csaba; Tar, Márton

    2015-04-19

    The authors review the history and risk factors of thrombophlebitis of the lower limb, and describe the main points of surgical and conservative treatment of varicophlebitis. They present the case of a 71-year-old woman who had ascending varicophlebitis and bilateral pulmonary embolism. The authors draw attention to important points: patients must be followed after phlebitis of the lower limb, and their thrombotic factors must be examined to prevent the new thromboembolic events. PMID:25864140

  8. Soluble Urokinase-Type Plasminogen Activator Receptor Plasma Concentration May Predict Susceptibility to High Altitude Pulmonary Edema

    PubMed Central

    Zügel, Stefanie; Schoeb, Michele; Auinger, Katja; Dehnert, Christoph; Maggiorini, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Acute exposure to high altitude induces inflammation. However, the relationship between inflammation and high altitude related illness such as high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) and acute mountain sickness (AMS) is poorly understood. We tested if soluble urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) plasma concentration, a prognostic factor for cardiovascular disease and marker for low grade activation of leukocytes, will predict susceptibility to HAPE and AMS. Methods. 41 healthy mountaineers were examined at sea level (SL, 446 m) and 24 h after rapid ascent to 4559 m (HA). 24/41 subjects had a history of HAPE and were thus considered HAPE-susceptible (HAPE-s). Out of the latter, 10/24 HAPE-s subjects were randomly chosen to suppress the inflammatory cascade with dexamethasone 8 mg bid 24 h prior to ascent. Results. Acute hypoxic exposure led to an acute inflammatory reaction represented by an increase in suPAR (1.9 ± 0.4 at SL versus 2.3 ± 0.5 at HA, p < 0.01), CRP (0.7 ± 0.5 at SL versus 3.6 ± 4.6 at HA, p < 0.01), and IL-6 (0.8 ± 0.4 at SL versus 3.3 ± 4.9 at HA, p < 0.01) in all subjects except those receiving dexamethasone. The ascent associated decrease in PaO2 correlated with the increase in IL-6 (r = 0.46, p < 0.001), but not suPAR (r = 0.27, p = 0.08); the increase in IL-6 was not correlated with suPAR (r = 0.16, p = 0.24). Baseline suPAR plasma concentration was higher in the HAPE-s group (2.0 ± 0.4 versus 1.8 ± 0.4, p = 0.04); no difference was found for CRP and IL-6 and for subjects developing AMS. Conclusion. High altitude exposure leads to an increase in suPAR plasma concentration, with the missing correlation between suPAR and IL-6 suggesting a cytokine independent, leukocyte mediated mechanism of low grade inflammation. The correlation between IL-6 and PaO2 suggests a direct effect of hypoxia, which is not the case for suPAR. However, suPAR plasma concentration measured before hypoxic exposure may predict

  9. Soluble Urokinase-Type Plasminogen Activator Receptor Plasma Concentration May Predict Susceptibility to High Altitude Pulmonary Edema.

    PubMed

    Hilty, Matthias Peter; Zügel, Stefanie; Schoeb, Michele; Auinger, Katja; Dehnert, Christoph; Maggiorini, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Acute exposure to high altitude induces inflammation. However, the relationship between inflammation and high altitude related illness such as high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) and acute mountain sickness (AMS) is poorly understood. We tested if soluble urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) plasma concentration, a prognostic factor for cardiovascular disease and marker for low grade activation of leukocytes, will predict susceptibility to HAPE and AMS. Methods. 41 healthy mountaineers were examined at sea level (SL, 446 m) and 24 h after rapid ascent to 4559 m (HA). 24/41 subjects had a history of HAPE and were thus considered HAPE-susceptible (HAPE-s). Out of the latter, 10/24 HAPE-s subjects were randomly chosen to suppress the inflammatory cascade with dexamethasone 8 mg bid 24 h prior to ascent. Results. Acute hypoxic exposure led to an acute inflammatory reaction represented by an increase in suPAR (1.9 ± 0.4 at SL versus 2.3 ± 0.5 at HA, p < 0.01), CRP (0.7 ± 0.5 at SL versus 3.6 ± 4.6 at HA, p < 0.01), and IL-6 (0.8 ± 0.4 at SL versus 3.3 ± 4.9 at HA, p < 0.01) in all subjects except those receiving dexamethasone. The ascent associated decrease in PaO2 correlated with the increase in IL-6 (r = 0.46, p < 0.001), but not suPAR (r = 0.27, p = 0.08); the increase in IL-6 was not correlated with suPAR (r = 0.16, p = 0.24). Baseline suPAR plasma concentration was higher in the HAPE-s group (2.0 ± 0.4 versus 1.8 ± 0.4, p = 0.04); no difference was found for CRP and IL-6 and for subjects developing AMS. Conclusion. High altitude exposure leads to an increase in suPAR plasma concentration, with the missing correlation between suPAR and IL-6 suggesting a cytokine independent, leukocyte mediated mechanism of low grade inflammation. The correlation between IL-6 and PaO2 suggests a direct effect of hypoxia, which is not the case for suPAR. However, suPAR plasma concentration measured before hypoxic exposure may predict

  10. Fatal bilateral lower-limb deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism following single digit replantation.

    PubMed

    Leung, Anderson S M; Fok, Margaret W M; Fung, Boris K K

    2015-06-01

    Venous thromboembolism in hand surgery is rare. There is no report in the literature on postoperative mortality from venous thromboembolism following microsurgery in upper limbs. We report the case of a 56-year-old Chinese man who died from pulmonary embolism as a result of bilateral lower-limb deep vein thrombosis following prolonged surgery under general anaesthesia after replantation of a finger. This case raises awareness of the need for precautions against venous thromboembolism following prolonged microsurgery and identification of high-risk patients. PMID:26045073

  11. Atrial natriuretic peptide attenuates agonist-induced pulmonary edema in mice with targeted disruption of the gene for natriuretic peptide receptor-A

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Shu-Whei; Green, Sabrina; Grinnell, Katie L.; Machan, Jason T.; Harrington, Elizabeth O.

    2013-01-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) inhibits agonist-induced pulmonary edema formation, but the signaling pathway responsible is not well defined. To investigate the role of the particulate guanylate cyclase-linked receptor, natriuretic peptide receptor-A (NPR-A), we measured acute lung injury responses in intact mice and pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (PMVEC) with normal and disrupted expression of NPR-A. NPR-A wild-type (NPR-A+/+), heterozygous (NPR-A+/−), and knockout (NPR-A−/−) mice were anesthetized and treated with thrombin receptor agonist peptide (TRAP) or lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Lung injury was assessed by lung wet-to-dry (W/D) weight and by protein and cell concentration of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid. No difference in pulmonary edema formation was seen between NPR-A genotypes under baseline conditions. TRAP and LPS increased lung W/D weight and BAL fluid cell counts more in NPR-A−/− mice than in NPR-A+/− or NPR-A+/+ mice, but no genotype-related differences were seen in TRAP-induced increases in bloodless lung W/D weight or LPS-induced increases in BAL protein concentration. Pretreatment with ANP infusion completely blocked TRAP-induced increases in lung W/D weight and blunted LPS-induced increases in BAL cell counts and protein concentration in both NPR-A−/− and NPR-A+/+ mice. Thrombin decreased transmembrane electrical resistance in monolayers of PMVECs in vitro, and this effect was attenuated by ANP in PMVECs isolated from both genotypes. Administration of the NPR-C-specific ligand, cANF, also blocked TRAP-induced increases in lung W/D weight and LPS-induced increases in BAL cell count and protein concentration in NPR-A+/+ and NPR-A−/− mice. We conclude that ANP is capable of attenuating agonist-induced lung edema in the absence of NPR-A. The protective effect of ANP on agonist-induced lung injury and pulmonary barrier function may be mediated by NPR-C. PMID:23195629

  12. Atrial natriuretic peptide attenuates agonist-induced pulmonary edema in mice with targeted disruption of the gene for natriuretic peptide receptor-A.

    PubMed

    Klinger, James R; Tsai, Shu-Whei; Green, Sabrina; Grinnell, Katie L; Machan, Jason T; Harrington, Elizabeth O

    2013-02-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) inhibits agonist-induced pulmonary edema formation, but the signaling pathway responsible is not well defined. To investigate the role of the particulate guanylate cyclase-linked receptor, natriuretic peptide receptor-A (NPR-A), we measured acute lung injury responses in intact mice and pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (PMVEC) with normal and disrupted expression of NPR-A. NPR-A wild-type (NPR-A+/+), heterozygous (NPR-A+/-), and knockout (NPR-A-/-) mice were anesthetized and treated with thrombin receptor agonist peptide (TRAP) or lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Lung injury was assessed by lung wet-to-dry (W/D) weight and by protein and cell concentration of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid. No difference in pulmonary edema formation was seen between NPR-A genotypes under baseline conditions. TRAP and LPS increased lung W/D weight and BAL fluid cell counts more in NPR-A-/- mice than in NPR-A+/- or NPR-A+/+ mice, but no genotype-related differences were seen in TRAP-induced increases in bloodless lung W/D weight or LPS-induced increases in BAL protein concentration. Pretreatment with ANP infusion completely blocked TRAP-induced increases in lung W/D weight and blunted LPS-induced increases in BAL cell counts and protein concentration in both NPR-A-/- and NPR-A+/+ mice. Thrombin decreased transmembrane electrical resistance in monolayers of PMVECs in vitro, and this effect was attenuated by ANP in PMVECs isolated from both genotypes. Administration of the NPR-C-specific ligand, cANF, also blocked TRAP-induced increases in lung W/D weight and LPS-induced increases in BAL cell count and protein concentration in NPR-A+/+ and NPR-A-/- mice. We conclude that ANP is capable of attenuating agonist-induced lung edema in the absence of NPR-A. The protective effect of ANP on agonist-induced lung injury and pulmonary barrier function may be mediated by NPR-C. PMID:23195629

  13. Micromechanics of alveolar edema.

    PubMed

    Perlman, Carrie E; Lederer, David J; Bhattacharya, Jahar

    2011-01-01

    The decrease of lung compliance in pulmonary edema underlies ventilator-induced lung injury. However, the cause of the decrease in compliance is unknown. We tested the hypothesis that in pulmonary edema, the mechanical effects of liquid-filled alveoli increase tissue stress in adjacent air-filled alveoli. By micropuncture of isolated, perfused rat lungs, we established a single-alveolus model of pulmonary edema that we imaged using confocal microscopy. In this model, we viewed a liquid-filled alveolus together with its air-filled neighbor at different transpulmonary pressures, both before and after liquid-filling. Instilling liquid in an alveolus caused alveolar shrinkage. As a result, the interalveolar septum was stretched, causing the neighboring air-filled alveolus to bulge. Thus, the air-filled alveolus was overexpanded by virtue of its adjacency to a liquid-filled alveolus. Confocal microscopy at different depths of the liquid-filled alveolus revealed a meniscus. Lung inflation to near-total lung capacity (TLC) demonstrated decreased compliance of the air-filled but not liquid-filled alveolus. However, at near TLC, the air-filled alveolus was larger than it was in the pre-edematous control tissue. In pulmonary edema, liquid-filled alveoli induce mechanical stress on air-filled alveoli, reducing the compliance of air-filled alveoli, and hence overall lung compliance. Because of increased mechanical stress, air-filled alveoli may be susceptible to overdistension injury during mechanical ventilation of the edematous lung. PMID:20118224

  14. Management of three cardiogenic pulmonary edemas occurring in a patient scheduled for left ventricular assist device implantation: indicators for determining left ventricular assist device pump speed.

    PubMed

    Toyama, Hiroaki; Takei, Yusuke; Saito, Kazutomo; Ota, Takahisa; Kurotaki, Kenji; Ejima, Yutaka; Matsuura, Takeshi; Akiyama, Masatoshi; Saiki, Yoshikatsu; Yamauchi, Masanori

    2016-08-01

    A male patient with Marfan syndrome underwent aortic root replacement and developed left ventricular (LV) failure. Four years later, he underwent aortic arch and aortic valve replacement. Thereafter, his LV failure progressed, and cardiogenic pulmonary edema (CPE) appeared, which we treated with extracorporeal LV assist device (LVAD) placement. Three months later, the patient developed aspiration pneumonia, which caused hyperdynamic right ventricle (RV) and CPE. We treated by changing his pneumatic LVAD to a high-flow centrifugal pump. A month later, he underwent thoracoabdominal aortic replacement. After four weeks, he developed septic thrombosis and LVAD failure, which caused CPE. We treated with LVAD circuit replacement and an additional membrane oxygenator. Four months later, he underwent DuraHeart(®) implantation. During this course, pulmonary artery wedge pressure (PAWP) varied markedly. Additionally, systolic pulmonary artery pressure (sPAP), left atrial diameter (LAD), RV end-diastolic diameter (RVEDD) and estimated RV systolic pressure (esRVP) changed with PAWP changes. In this patient, LV failure and hyperdynamic RV caused the CPEs, which we treated by adjusting the LVAD output to the RV output. Determining LVAD output, RV function and LV end-diastolic diameter are typically referred, and PAWP, LAD, RVEDD, and sPAP could be also referred. PMID:27001080

  15. Peri-partum cardiomyopathy in a pregnant woman at term revealed by acute pulmonary edema: what to do in front this catastrophic situation?

    PubMed Central

    Abdedaim, Hatim El ghadbane; Benali, Zine el abidine; Omari, Driss; Mohammed, Drissi; Hicham, Balkhi; Charki, Haimeur

    2014-01-01

    Peripartum Cardiomyopathy is insufficient congestive heart occurring in the last month of pregnancy and 5 months after delivery, in the absence of preexisting heart disease and identified etiology. This heart disease is associated with echocardiography systolic dysfunction and left ventricular dilatation. Its incidence ranges from 1/3000 to 1/15000, depending on the region, including much higher in some African countries, it particularly concern women over 30 years, multiparous and multiple pregnancies. The pathogenesis remains unclear, the prognosis is closely related to the complete recovery of cardiac function. We report through the clinical case of a woman aged 33 years admitted to the ICU for acute pulmonary edema of sudden onset of a term pregnancy and what to do before this critical situation PMID:25368718

  16. Lipopolysaccharide-induced pulmonary endothelial barrier disruption and lung edema: critical role for bicarbonate stimulation of AC10.

    PubMed

    Nickols, Jordan; Obiako, Boniface; Ramila, K C; Putinta, Kevin; Schilling, Sarah; Sayner, Sarah L

    2015-12-15

    Bacteria-induced sepsis is a common cause of pulmonary endothelial barrier dysfunction and can progress toward acute respiratory distress syndrome. Elevations in intracellular cAMP tightly regulate pulmonary endothelial barrier integrity; however, cAMP signals are highly compartmentalized: whether cAMP is barrier-protective or -disruptive depends on the compartment (plasma membrane or cytosol, respectively) in which the signal is generated. The mammalian soluble adenylyl cyclase isoform 10 (AC10) is uniquely stimulated by bicarbonate and is expressed in pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (PMVECs). Elevated extracellular bicarbonate increases cAMP in PMVECs to disrupt the endothelial barrier and increase the filtration coefficient (Kf) in the isolated lung. We tested the hypothesis that sepsis-induced endothelial barrier disruption and increased permeability are dependent on extracellular bicarbonate and activation of AC10. Our findings reveal that LPS-induced endothelial barrier disruption is dependent on extracellular bicarbonate: LPS-induced barrier failure and increased permeability are exacerbated in elevated bicarbonate compared with low extracellular bicarbonate. The AC10 inhibitor KH7 attenuated the bicarbonate-dependent LPS-induced barrier disruption. In the isolated lung, LPS failed to increase Kf in the presence of minimal perfusate bicarbonate. An increase in perfusate bicarbonate to the physiological range (24 mM) revealed the LPS-induced increase in Kf, which was attenuated by KH7. Furthermore, in PMVECs treated with LPS for 6 h, there was a dose-dependent increase in AC10 expression. Thus these findings reveal that LPS-induced pulmonary endothelial barrier failure requires bicarbonate activation of AC10. PMID:26475732

  17. Severe Tumor Lysis Syndrome and Acute Pulmonary Edema Requiring Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Following Initiation of Chemotherapy for Metastatic Alveolar Rhabdomyosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Sanford, Ethan; Wolbrink, Traci; Mack, Jennifer; Grant Rowe, R

    2016-05-01

    We present an 8-year-old male with metastatic alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma (ARMS) who developed precipitous cardiopulmonary collapse with severe tumor lysis syndrome (TLS) 48 hr after initiation of chemotherapy. Despite no detectable pulmonary metastases, acute hypoxemic respiratory failure developed, requiring extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). Although TLS has been reported in disseminated ARMS, this singular case of life-threatening respiratory deterioration developing after initiation of chemotherapy presented unique therapeutic dilemmas. We review the clinical aspects of this case, including possible mechanisms of respiratory failure, and discuss the role of ECMO utilization in pediatric oncology. PMID:26713672

  18. TRPV4 inhibition counteracts edema and inflammation and improves pulmonary function and oxygen saturation in chemically induced acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Balakrishna, Shrilatha; Song, Weifeng; Achanta, Satyanarayana; Doran, Stephen F.; Liu, Boyi; Kaelberer, Melanie M.; Yu, Zhihong; Sui, Aiwei; Cheung, Mui; Leishman, Emma; Eidam, Hilary S.; Ye, Guosen; Willette, Robert N.; Thorneloe, Kevin S.; Bradshaw, Heather B.; Matalon, Sadis

    2014-01-01

    The treatment of acute lung injury caused by exposure to reactive chemicals remains challenging because of the lack of mechanism-based therapeutic approaches. Recent studies have shown that transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4), an ion channel expressed in pulmonary tissues, is a crucial mediator of pressure-induced damage associated with ventilator-induced lung injury, heart failure, and infarction. Here, we examined the effects of two novel TRPV4 inhibitors in mice exposed to hydrochloric acid, mimicking acid exposure and acid aspiration injury, and to chlorine gas, a severe chemical threat with frequent exposures in domestic and occupational environments and in transportation accidents. Postexposure treatment with a TRPV4 inhibitor suppressed acid-induced pulmonary inflammation by diminishing neutrophils, macrophages, and associated chemokines and cytokines, while improving tissue pathology. These effects were recapitulated in TRPV4-deficient mice. TRPV4 inhibitors had similar anti-inflammatory effects in chlorine-exposed mice and inhibited vascular leakage, airway hyperreactivity, and increase in elastance, while improving blood oxygen saturation. In both models of lung injury we detected increased concentrations of N-acylamides, a class of endogenous TRP channel agonists. Taken together, we demonstrate that TRPV4 inhibitors are potent and efficacious countermeasures against severe chemical exposures, acting against exaggerated inflammatory responses, and protecting tissue barriers and cardiovascular function. PMID:24838754

  19. TRPV4 inhibition counteracts edema and inflammation and improves pulmonary function and oxygen saturation in chemically induced acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Balakrishna, Shrilatha; Song, Weifeng; Achanta, Satyanarayana; Doran, Stephen F; Liu, Boyi; Kaelberer, Melanie M; Yu, Zhihong; Sui, Aiwei; Cheung, Mui; Leishman, Emma; Eidam, Hilary S; Ye, Guosen; Willette, Robert N; Thorneloe, Kevin S; Bradshaw, Heather B; Matalon, Sadis; Jordt, Sven-Eric

    2014-07-15

    The treatment of acute lung injury caused by exposure to reactive chemicals remains challenging because of the lack of mechanism-based therapeutic approaches. Recent studies have shown that transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4), an ion channel expressed in pulmonary tissues, is a crucial mediator of pressure-induced damage associated with ventilator-induced lung injury, heart failure, and infarction. Here, we examined the effects of two novel TRPV4 inhibitors in mice exposed to hydrochloric acid, mimicking acid exposure and acid aspiration injury, and to chlorine gas, a severe chemical threat with frequent exposures in domestic and occupational environments and in transportation accidents. Postexposure treatment with a TRPV4 inhibitor suppressed acid-induced pulmonary inflammation by diminishing neutrophils, macrophages, and associated chemokines and cytokines, while improving tissue pathology. These effects were recapitulated in TRPV4-deficient mice. TRPV4 inhibitors had similar anti-inflammatory effects in chlorine-exposed mice and inhibited vascular leakage, airway hyperreactivity, and increase in elastance, while improving blood oxygen saturation. In both models of lung injury we detected increased concentrations of N-acylamides, a class of endogenous TRP channel agonists. Taken together, we demonstrate that TRPV4 inhibitors are potent and efficacious countermeasures against severe chemical exposures, acting against exaggerated inflammatory responses, and protecting tissue barriers and cardiovascular function. PMID:24838754

  20. An insilico approach to high altitude pulmonary edema - Molecular modeling of human beta2 adrenergic receptor and its interaction with Salmeterol & Nifedipine.

    PubMed

    Chandramoorthi, Gayathri Devi; Piramanayagam, Shanmughavel; Marimuthu, Parthiban

    2008-09-01

    Knowledge of the three-dimensional structures of protein targets from genomic data has the potential to accelerate researches pertaining to drug discovery. Human beta(2) adrenergic receptor is a G-protein-coupled receptor with seven transmembrane helices, and is important in pharmaceutical targeting on pulmonary and cardiovascular diseases. The human beta(2) adrenergic receptor has been found to play a very important role in the pathogenesis of high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE). In the present study, a high quality of protein 3D structure has been predicted for the human beta(2) adrenergic receptor sequence with primary accession number P07550. Homologous template protein sequence with known 3D structure was identified and the template-query protein sequence validation was done by multiple sequence alignment method. The homology model was performed through Modeller and depended on the quality of the sequence alignment by BLAST, template structure and the consolidated result performed by Gene silico meta-server. The statistical verification of the generated model was evaluated by PROCHECK which revealed that the structure modeled through Modeller to be of good quality with 84.1% of residues in the most favored region. Docking studies were carried out after modeling with two well known ligands namely Salmeterol and Nifedipine, and the fitness score revealed that Salmeterol has a higher fitness score than Nifedipine. Estimation of binding affinity by X-Score revealed that Salmeterol had -10.40 binding affinity while Nifedipine showed -9.62 binding affinity. From the present study, it can be concluded that the generated model of human beta(2) adrenergic receptor can be used for further studies related to this receptor and Salmeterol was found to have a high binding affinity with human beta(2) adrenergic receptor. PMID:18512086

  1. Regional pulmonary distribution of iodine-125-labeled oleic acid. Its relationship to the pattern of oleic acid edema and pulmonary blood flow

    SciTech Connect

    Tarver, R.D.; Tsai, J.; Hedlund, L.W.; Sullivan, D.C.; Lischko, M.M.; Harris, C.C.; Effmann, E.L.; Putman, C.E.

    1986-02-01

    Oleic acid infusion in dogs produces a patchy, predominantly peripheral lesion on CT scans. This study correlates the pattern of oleic acid injury with the distribution of infused oleic acid and pulmonary blood flow. Radiolabeled oleic acid (I-125, 0.05 ml/kg) and radiolabeled 15-micron microspheres (Co-57) were infused into the right atria of 11 dogs. Oleic acid was given after the microspheres in six dogs and before microspheres in five dogs. Ten minutes after infusion, the lungs were removed. Four transverse slices (0.5 cm thick) of the lower lobes were taken from each dog and cubed. Samples were grouped into three regions of the transverse slice: outer, middle, and inner concentric rings. In both groups, I-125 (oleic acid) activity was greater in the outer than the middle and inner concentric layers (P less than 0.001). When Cobalt-57 microspheres were given before oleic acid, Cobalt-57 activity was marginally lower in the outer layer compared with the middle and inner layers. However, when oleic acid was given first, microsphere activity in the outer layer was significantly lower (P less than 0.001) than the middle layer. Thus, oleic acid was preferentially distributed to the peripheral regions of the lung, similar to the regions of injury on CT. This distribution did not correspond to the pattern of pulmonary blood flow as indicated by the microspheres. Immediately after oleic acid infusion, pulmonary blood flow to the periphery was reduced, reflecting a response to the predominantly peripheral injury by oleic acid.

  2. Familial Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm with Dissection Presenting as Flash Pulmonary Edema in a 26-Year-Old Man

    PubMed Central

    Omar, Sabry; Moore, Tyler; Payne, Drew; Momeni, Parastoo; Mulkey, Zachary; Nugent, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    We are reporting a case of familial thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection in a 26-year-old man with no significant past medical history and a family history of dissecting aortic aneurysm in his mother at the age of 40. The patient presented with cough, shortness of breath, and chest pain. Chest X-ray showed bilateral pulmonary infiltrates. CT scan of the chest showed a dissection of the ascending aorta. The patient underwent aortic dissection repair and three months later he returned to our hospital with new complaints of back pain. CT angiography showed a new aortic dissection extending from the left carotid artery through the bifurcation and into the iliac arteries. The patient underwent replacement of the aortic root, ascending aorta, total aortic arch, and aortic valve. The patient recovered well postoperatively. Genetic studies of the patient and his children revealed no mutations in ACTA2, TGFBR1, TGFBR2, TGFB2, MYH11, MYLK, SMAD3, or FBN1. This case report focuses on a patient with familial TAAD and discusses the associated genetic loci and available screening methods. It is important to recognize potential cases of familial TAAD and understand the available screening methods since early diagnosis allows appropriate management of risk factors and treatment when necessary. PMID:25104961

  3. Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zaki, Sherif R.; Greer, Patricia w.; Coffield, Lisa M.; Goldsmith, Cynthia S.; Nolte, Kurt B.; Foucar, Kathy; Feddersen, Richard M.; Zumwalt, Ross E.; Miller, Gayle L.; Khan, Ali S.; Rollin, Pierre E.; Ksiazek, Thomas G.; Nichol, Stuart T.; Mahy, Brian W.J.; Peters, Clarence J.

    1995-01-01

    A recent outbreak of a severe pulmonary disease in the southwestern United States was etiologically linked to a previously unrecognized bantavirus. The virus has been isolated from its majorreservoir, the deer mouse, Peromyscus maniculatus,and recently named Sin Nombre virus. Clinically, the disease has become known as the bantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS). Since May 1993, 44 fatal cases of HPS have been identified through clinicopathological review and immunobistochemical(IHC) testing of tissues from 273 patients who died of an unexplained noncardiogenic pulmonary edema. In 158 cases for which suitable specimens were available, serologicaltesting and/or reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) amplification of extracted RNA was also performed. IHC, serological, and PCR results were concordant for virtually all HPS and non-HPS patients when more than one assay was performed. The prodromal ilness of HPS is similar to that of many other viral diseases. Consistent bematological features include thrombocytopenia, bemoconcentration, neutropbilic leukocytosis with a left shift, and reactivel lymphocytes. Pulmonary bistopatbological features were similar in most of the fatal HPS cases (40/44) and consisted of an interstitial pneumonitis with a variable mononuclear cell infiltrate, edema, and focal byaline membranes. In four cases, bowever, pulmonary features were significantly different and included diffuse alveolar damage and variable degrees of severe air space disorganization. IHC analysis showed widespread presence of bantaviral antigens in endothelial cells of the microvasculature, particularly in the lung. Hantaviral antigens were also observed within follicular dendritic cells, macrophages, and lymphocytes. Hantaviral inclusions were observed in endothelial cells of lungs by thinsection electron microscopy, and their identity was verified by immunogold labeling. Virus-like particles were seen in pulmonary endothelial cells and macropbages. HPS is

  4. Pulmonary embolization of immature Fascioloides magna causing fatal hemothorax confirmed by molecular technique in a heifer in the United States.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung Keun; Rosser, Thomas Graham; Cooley, Jim

    2016-09-01

    The current report describes the use of a molecular technique to identify immature Fascioloides magna An 18-month-old Brangus heifer was found dead in the field without any prior clinical signs. The cause of death was exsanguination into the thoracic cavity associated with pulmonary embolization and infection by immature Fascioloides magna resulting in 2 large foci of pulmonary necrosis and focal arteriolar and lung rupture. The liver had a few random migratory tracts with typical iron and porphyrin fluke exhaust, but no identified fluke larvae. A single immature fluke was found in the lungs, and species level identification as F. magna was confirmed by DNA sequence analysis of the ribosomal internal transcribed spacer regions (ITS1 region, 5.8S rRNA gene, and ITS2) and of partial 28S rRNA gene sequence. This is one of only a few pulmonary fascioloidiasis cases associated with hemothorax in the veterinary literature. PMID:27423736

  5. Airway surface liquid volume expansion induces rapid changes in amiloride-sensitive Na+ transport across upper airway epithelium-Implications concerning the resolution of pulmonary edema

    PubMed Central

    Azizi, Fouad; Arredouani, Abdelilah; Mohammad, Ramzi M

    2015-01-01

    During airway inflammation, airway surface liquid volume (ASLV) expansion may result from the movement of plasma proteins and excess liquid into the airway lumen due to extravasation and elevation of subepithelial hydrostatic pressure. We previously demonstrated that elevation of submucosal hydrostatic pressure increases airway epithelium permeability resulting in ASLV expansion by 500 μL cm−2 h−1. Liquid reabsorption by healthy airway epithelium is regulated by active Na+ transport at a rate of 5 μL cm−2 h−1. Thus, during inflammation the airway epithelium may be submerged by a large volume of luminal liquid. Here, we have investigated the mechanism by which ASLV expansion alters active epithelial Na+ transport, and we have characterized the time course of the change. We used primary cultures of tracheal airway epithelium maintained under air interface (basal ASLV, depth is 7 ± 0.5 μm). To mimic airway flooding, ASLV was expanded to a depth of 5 mm. On switching from basal to expanded ASLV conditions, short-circuit current (Isc, a measure of total transepithelial active ion transport) declined by 90% with a half-time (t1/2) of 1 h. 24 h after the switch, there was no significant change in ATP concentration nor in the number of functional sodium pumps as revealed by [3H]-ouabain binding. However, amiloride-sensitive uptake of 22Na+ was reduced by 70% upon ASLV expansion. This process is reversible since after returning cells back to air interface, Isc recovered with a t1/2 of 5–10 h. These results may have important clinical implications concerning the development of Na+ channels activators and resolution of pulmonary edema. PMID:26333829

  6. Fatal Intoxication with Acetyl Fentanyl.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Susan M; Haikal, Nabila A; Kraner, James C

    2016-01-01

    Among the new psychoactive substances encountered in forensic investigations is the opioid, acetyl fentanyl. The death of a 28-year-old man from recreational use of this compound is reported. The decedent was found in the bathroom of his residence with a tourniquet secured around his arm and a syringe nearby. Postmortem examination findings included marked pulmonary and cerebral edema and needle track marks. Toxicological analysis revealed acetyl fentanyl in subclavian blood, liver, vitreous fluid, and urine at concentrations of 235 ng/mL, 2400 ng/g, 131 ng/mL, and 234 ng/mL, respectively. Acetyl fentanyl was also detected in the accompanying syringe. Death was attributed to recreational acetyl fentanyl abuse, likely through intravenous administration. The blood acetyl fentanyl concentration is considerably higher than typically found in fatal fentanyl intoxications. Analysis of this case underscores the need for consideration of a wide range of compounds with potential opioid-agonist activity when investigating apparent recreational drug-related deaths. PMID:26389815

  7. Case Report of Methylone, Oxymorphone and Ethanol in a Fatality Case with Tissue Distribution.

    PubMed

    Shimomura, Eric T; Briones, Alice J; Warren, Wendy S; Addison, Joseph W; Knittel, Jessica L; Shoemaker, Sarah A; King, Taj D; Bosy, Thomas Z

    2016-09-01

    It is reasonable to expect the presence of multiple drugs to present a complicated picture of toxicity. We report a fatal case involving a young man who purchased illicit drugs and knowingly consumed them. After consuming these drugs and going to sleep in his friend's car, he was found unresponsive the next morning with no signs of physical violence. Drugs found in the peripheral blood at autopsy were oxymorphone, methylone and ethanol at concentrations of 0.106, 0.50 and 130 mg/dL, respectively. The levels of oxymorphone and methylone in peripheral blood were comparable to those observed in other reported fatalities. Cocaine and benzoylecgonine were detected in the urine but not in the blood. Measureable concentrations were also observed for oxymorphone and methylone in urine, liver, kidney and bile. The physical findings at autopsy included pulmonary edema. This is the only reported fatal case involving this combination of drugs encountered in our laboratory. PMID:27405363

  8. Diagnostic features in 10 naturally occurring cases of acute fatal canine leptospirosis.

    PubMed

    Rissi, Daniel R; Brown, Cathy A

    2014-11-01

    The current report describes the diagnostic features in 10 cases of acute fatal canine leptospirosis with minimal renal and hepatic changes that may present a diagnostic challenge for the pathologist. Most affected dogs were less than 6 months of age and had a biochemical profile consistent with hepatorenal dysfunction. Clinical signs consisted of vomiting, depression, icterus, dehydration, diarrhea, and anorexia. All dogs died or were humanely euthanized within 3-7 days after the onset of clinical disease. Necropsy findings included pulmonary edema with hemorrhages, icterus, renal and hepatic pallor and swelling, and gastric edema with hemorrhage. Despite severe azotemia, histological changes in the kidneys were subtle in all dogs, and included mild renal tubular simplification, with single-cell necrosis and attenuation, along with minimal interstitial lymphoplasmacytic inflammation, edema, and hemorrhage. Hepatic lesions included scattered hepatocellular single-cell necrosis and hepatocellular dissociation. Prominent extrarenal lesions typically associated with uremia including vascular fibrinoid necrosis in multiple organs, pulmonary mineralization with occasional fibrinosuppurative exudation, and gastric mineralization were also present. Postmortem diagnostic confirmation was based on the detection of leptospiral antigen on fresh renal samples by fluorescent antibody test and on the demonstration of intact spirochetes in sections of kidneys using immunohistochemical staining. Acute fatal canine leptospirosis occurred as a fulminant hepatorenal disease affecting mainly young dogs, and the diagnosis was dependent on the recognition of the subtle renal changes with confirmation via fluorescent antibody testing or immunohistochemical staining. PMID:25274745

  9. Fatal Hyponatremic Encephalopathy as a Result of Child Abuse From Forced Exercise.

    PubMed

    Moritz, Michael L; Lauridson, James R

    2016-03-01

    We report a case of fatal hyponatremic encephalopathy in a child who was forced to exercise as a form of punishment. A 9-year-old girl with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder was forced to run repeated 50-ft sprints to the point of exhaustion by her grandmother as punishment for taking candy from a classmate. After more than 3 hours of forced running, the child collapsed, began to vomit, and had repeated clonic seizures. Upon presentation to the emergency department, she was nonresponsive with a Glasgow Coma Scale score of 11 and had noncardiogenic pulmonary edema with serum sodium of 117 mEq/L. She was treated with antiepilectic medications and transferred to a university children's hospital where she later died. On postmortem examination, she was found to have massive cerebral edema with transtentorial herniation and pulmonary edema. Her clinical presentation closely resembled exercise-associated hyponatremic encephalopathy seen in adult endurance athletes. This appears to be the first report of fatal exercise-associated hyponatremia in a child. PMID:26600233

  10. Elevated blood plasma levels of epinephrine, norepinephrine, tyrosine hydroxylase, TGFβ1, and TNFα associated with high-altitude pulmonary edema in an Indian population

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Priyanka; Ali, Zahara; Mohammad, Ghulam; Pasha, M A Qadar

    2016-01-01

    Biomarkers are essential to unravel the locked pathophysiology of any disease. This study investigated the role of biomarkers and their interactions with each other and with the clinical parameters to study the physiology of high-altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) in HAPE-patients (HAPE-p) against adapted highlanders (HLs) and healthy sojourners, HAPE-controls (HAPE-c). For this, seven circulatory biomarkers, namely, epinephrine, norepinephrine, tyrosine hydroxylase, transforming growth factor beta 1, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα), platelet-derived growth factor beta beta, and C-reactive protein (CRP), were measured in blood plasma of the three study groups. All the subjects were recruited at ~3,500 m, and clinical features such as arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2), body mass index, and mean arterial pressure were measured. Increased levels of epinephrine, norepinephrine, tyrosine hydroxylase, transforming growth factor-beta 1, and TNFα were observed in HAPE-p against the healthy groups, HAPE-c, and HLs (P<0.0001). CRP levels were decreased in HAPE-p against HAPE-c and HLs (P<0.0001). There was no significant difference or very marginal difference in the levels of these biomarkers in HAPE-c and HLs (P>0.01). Correlation analysis revealed a negative correlation between epinephrine and norepinephrine (P=4.6E−06) in HAPE-p and positive correlation in HAPE-c (P=0.004) and HLs (P=9.78E−07). A positive correlation was observed between TNFα and CRP (P=0.004) in HAPE-p and a negative correlation in HAPE-c (P=4.6E−06). SaO2 correlated negatively with platelet-derived growth factor beta beta (HAPE-p; P=0.05), norepinephrine (P=0.01), and TNFα (P=0.005) and positively with CRP (HAPE-c; P=0.02) and norepinephrine (HLs; P=0.04). Body mass index correlated negatively with epinephrine (HAPE-p; P=0.001) and positively with norepinephrine and tyrosine hydroxylase in HAPE-c (P<0.05). Mean arterial pressure correlated positively with TNFα in HAPE-p and norepinephrine in

  11. Elevated blood plasma levels of epinephrine, norepinephrine, tyrosine hydroxylase, TGFβ1, and TNFα associated with high-altitude pulmonary edema in an Indian population.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Priyanka; Ali, Zahara; Mohammad, Ghulam; Pasha, M A Qadar

    2016-01-01

    Biomarkers are essential to unravel the locked pathophysiology of any disease. This study investigated the role of biomarkers and their interactions with each other and with the clinical parameters to study the physiology of high-altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) in HAPE-patients (HAPE-p) against adapted highlanders (HLs) and healthy sojourners, HAPE-controls (HAPE-c). For this, seven circulatory biomarkers, namely, epinephrine, norepinephrine, tyrosine hydroxylase, transforming growth factor beta 1, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα), platelet-derived growth factor beta beta, and C-reactive protein (CRP), were measured in blood plasma of the three study groups. All the subjects were recruited at ~3,500 m, and clinical features such as arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2), body mass index, and mean arterial pressure were measured. Increased levels of epinephrine, norepinephrine, tyrosine hydroxylase, transforming growth factor-beta 1, and TNFα were observed in HAPE-p against the healthy groups, HAPE-c, and HLs (P<0.0001). CRP levels were decreased in HAPE-p against HAPE-c and HLs (P<0.0001). There was no significant difference or very marginal difference in the levels of these biomarkers in HAPE-c and HLs (P>0.01). Correlation analysis revealed a negative correlation between epinephrine and norepinephrine (P=4.6E-06) in HAPE-p and positive correlation in HAPE-c (P=0.004) and HLs (P=9.78E-07). A positive correlation was observed between TNFα and CRP (P=0.004) in HAPE-p and a negative correlation in HAPE-c (P=4.6E-06). SaO2 correlated negatively with platelet-derived growth factor beta beta (HAPE-p; P=0.05), norepinephrine (P=0.01), and TNFα (P=0.005) and positively with CRP (HAPE-c; P=0.02) and norepinephrine (HLs; P=0.04). Body mass index correlated negatively with epinephrine (HAPE-p; P=0.001) and positively with norepinephrine and tyrosine hydroxylase in HAPE-c (P<0.05). Mean arterial pressure correlated positively with TNFα in HAPE-p and norepinephrine in HLs (P

  12. Effect of Vandetanib on Andes virus survival in the hamster model of Hantavirus pulmonary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bird, Brian H; Shrivastava-Ranjan, Punya; Dodd, Kimberly A; Erickson, Bobbie R; Spiropoulou, Christina F

    2016-08-01

    Hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) is a severe disease caused by hantavirus infection of pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells leading to microvascular leakage, pulmonary edema, pleural effusion and high case fatality. Previously, we demonstrated that Andes virus (ANDV) infection caused up-regulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and concomitant downregulation of the cellular adhesion molecule VE-cadherin leading to increased permeability. Analyses of human HPS-patient sera have further demonstrated increased circulating levels of VEGF. Here we investigate the impact of a small molecule antagonist of the VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR-2) activation in vitro, and overall impact on survival in the Syrian hamster model of HPS. PMID:27233645

  13. Fatality due to acute systemic fluoride poisoning following a hydrofluoric acid skin burn.

    PubMed

    Tepperman, P B

    1980-10-01

    Reports indicate that death due to hydrofluoric acid exposure is usually the result of inhalation of vapor causing pulmonary edema and fluoride poisoning. Absorption via the skin route of fluoride ion sufficient to cause serious systemic problems and even death has rarely been reported. A fatality resulting from a severe facial burn, which produced acute systemic fluoride poisoning with profound hypocalcemia and hypomagnesemia, is presented. The importance of proper personal protective equipment as well as the immediate initiation of first aid and appropriate medical measures, including the monitoring and replacement of serum calcium and magnesium, are emphasized. PMID:7431138

  14. Polymorphisms of the Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinase 3 Gene Are Associated with Resistance to High-Altitude Pulmonary Edema (HAPE) in a Japanese Population: A Case Control Study Using Polymorphic Microsatellite Markers

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Nobumitsu; Hanaoka, Masayuki; Droma, Yunden; Ito, Michiko; Katsuyama, Yoshihiko; Kubo, Keishi; Ota, Masao

    2013-01-01

    Introduction High-altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) is a hypoxia-induced, life-threatening, high permeability type of edema attributable to pulmonary capillary stress failure. Genome-wide association analysis is necessary to better understand how genetics influence the outcome of HAPE. Materials and Methods DNA samples were collected from 53 subjects susceptible to HAPE (HAPE-s) and 67 elite Alpinists resistant to HAPE (HAPE-r). The genome scan was carried out using 400 polymorphic microsatellite markers throughout the whole genome in all subjects. In addition, six single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the gene encoding the tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 3 (TIMP3) were genotyped by Taqman® SNP Genotyping Assays. Results The results were analyzed using case-control comparisons. Whole genome scanning revealed that allele frequencies in nine markers were statistically different between HAPE-s and HAPE-r subjects. The SNP genotyping of the TIMP3 gene revealed that the derived allele C of rs130293 was associated with resistance to HAPE [odds ratio (OR) = 0.21, P = 0.0012) and recessive inheritance of the phenotype of HAPE-s (P = 0.0012). A haplotype CAC carrying allele C of rs130293 was associated with resistance to HAPE. Discussion This genome-wide association study revealed several novel candidate genes associated with susceptibility or resistance to HAPE in a Japanese population. Among those, the minor allele C of rs130293 (C/T) in the TIMP3 gene was linked to resistance to HAPE; while, the ancestral allele T was associated with susceptibility to HAPE. PMID:23991023

  15. Brain edema in diseases of different etiology.

    PubMed

    Adeva, María M; Souto, Gema; Donapetry, Cristóbal; Portals, Manuel; Rodriguez, Alberto; Lamas, David

    2012-07-01

    Cerebral edema is a potentially life-threatening complication shared by diseases of different etiology, such as diabetic ketoacidosis, acute liver failure, high altitude exposure, dialysis disequilibrium syndrome, and salicylate intoxication. Pulmonary edema is also habitually present in these disorders, indicating that the microcirculatory disturbance causing edema is not confined to the brain. Both cerebral and pulmonary subclinical edema may be detected before it becomes clinically evident. Available evidence suggests that tissue hypoxia or intracellular acidosis is a commonality occurring in all of these disorders. Tissue ischemia induces physiological compensatory mechanisms to ensure cell oxygenation and carbon dioxide removal from tissues, including hyperventilation, elevation of red blood cell 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate content, and capillary vasodilatation. Clinical, laboratory, and necropsy findings in these diseases confirm the occurrence of low plasma carbon dioxide partial pressure, increased erythrocyte 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate concentration, and capillary vasodilatation with increased vascular permeability in all of them. Baseline tissue hypoxia or intracellular acidosis induced by the disease may further deteriorate when tissue oxygen requirement is no longer matched to oxygen delivery resulting in massive capillary vasodilatation with increased vascular permeability and plasma fluid leakage into the interstitial compartment leading to edema affecting the brain, lung, and other organs. Causative factors involved in the progression from physiological adaptation to devastating clinical edema are not well known and may include uncontrolled disease, malfunctioning adaptive responses, or unknown factors. The role of carbon monoxide and local nitric oxide production influencing tissue oxygenation is unclear. PMID:22579570

  16. Complete Heart Block with Diastolic Heart Failure and Pulmonary Edema Secondary to Enlarging Previously Diagnosed Thrombosed Aneurysm of Sinus of Valsalva in a Patient with History of Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Eltawansy, Sherif Ali; Thomas, Maria Joana; Daniels, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is associated with vascular aneurysms that can affect any part of the vascular tree, like ascending aorta or coronary arteries. Sinus of Valsalva is known as an anatomical dilation at the root of aorta above the aortic valve and very few cases show aneurysm at that site in patients with ADPKD. Sinus of Valsalva aneurysm (SVA) can present with rupture and acute heart failure and infective endocarditis or could be asymptomatic accidentally discovered during cardiac catheterization. We report a case of a 76-year-old male with a unique constellation of cardiovascular anomalies associated with ADPKD. Patient was previously diagnosed with aneurysms affecting ascending aorta, sinus of Valsalva, and coronary arteries. Several years later, he came with complete heart block which was discovered later to be secondary to enlargement of his previously diagnosed thrombosed SVA. His case was complicated with acute heart failure and pulmonary edema. Conclusion. Patients with ADPKD can present with extrarenal manifestations. In our case, aneurysm at sinus of Valsalva was progressively enlarging and presented with complete heart block. PMID:25861484

  17. Postmortem diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction in patients with acute respiratory failure - demographics, etiologic and pulmonary histologic analysis

    PubMed Central

    de Matos Soeiro, Alexandre; Ruppert, Aline D; Canzian, Mauro; Capelozzi, Vera L; Serrano, Carlos V

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Acute respiratory failure is present in 5% of patients with acute myocardial infarction and is responsible for 20% to 30% of the fatal post-acute myocardial infarction. The role of inflammation associated with pulmonary edema as a cause of acute respiratory failure post-acute myocardial infarction remains to be determined. We aimed to describe the demographics, etiologic data and histological pulmonary findings obtained through autopsies of patients who died during the period from 1990 to 2008 due to acute respiratory failure with no diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction during life. METHODS: This study considers 4,223 autopsies of patients who died of acute respiratory failure that was not preceded by any particular diagnosis while they were alive. The diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction was given in 218 (4.63%) patients. The age, sex and major associated diseases were recorded for each patient. Pulmonary histopathology was categorized as follows: diffuse alveolar damage, pulmonary edema, alveolar hemorrhage and lymphoplasmacytic interstitial pneumonia. The odds ratio of acute myocardial infarction associated with specific histopathology was determined by logistic regression. RESULTS: In total, 147 men were included in the study. The mean age at the time of death was 64 years. Pulmonary histopathology revealed pulmonary edema as well as the presence of diffuse alveolar damage in 72.9% of patients. Bacterial bronchopneumonia was present in 11.9% of patients, systemic arterial hypertension in 10.1% and dilated cardiomyopathy in 6.9%. A multivariate analysis demonstrated a significant positive association between acute myocardial infarction with diffuse alveolar damage and pulmonary edema. CONCLUSIONS: For the first time, we demonstrated that in autopsies of patients with acute respiratory failure as the cause of death, 5% were diagnosed with acute myocardial infarction. Pulmonary histology revealed a significant inflammatory response, which has

  18. Lung Edema Clearance: Relevance to Patients with Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Azzam, Zaher S.; Sznajder, Jacob I.

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary edema clearance is necessary for patients with lung injury to recover and survive. The mechanisms regulating edema clearance from the lungs are distinct from the factors contributing edema formation during injury. Edema clearance is effected via vectorial transport of Na+ out of the airspaces which generates an osmotic gradient causing water to follow the gradient out of the cells. This Na+ transport across the alveolar epithelium is mostly effected via apical Na+ and chloride channels and basolateral Na,K-ATPase. The Na,K-ATPase pumps Na+ out of the cell and K+ into the cell against their respective gradients in an ATP-consuming reaction. Two mechanisms contribute to the regulation of the Na,K-ATPase activity:recruitment of its subunits from intracellular compartments into the basolateral membrane, and transcriptional/translational regulation. Na,K-ATPase activity and edema clearance are increased by catecholamines, aldosterone, vasopressin, overexpression of the pump genes, and others. During lung injury, mechanisms regulating edema clearance are inhibited by yet unclear pathways. Better understanding of the mechanisms that regulate pulmonary edema clearance may lead to therapeutic interventions that counterbalance the inhibition of edema clearance during lung injury and improve the lungs’ ability to clear fluid, which is crucial for patient survival. PMID:26241220

  19. Salvage pneumonectomy for pulmonary arteriovenous malformation in a 12-year-old boy with brain abscess and hemiparesis: A fatal outcome

    PubMed Central

    Majumdar, Gauranga; Agarwal, Surendra Kumar; Pande, Shantanu; Chandra, Bipin

    2016-01-01

    Large pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVMs) constitute an uncommon cause of central cyanosis with septic embolism and brain abscess. This large right to left shunt can lead to chronic severe hypoxemia and significant morbidity and mortality if untreated. Conservative parenchyma-sparing lung resection was used widely as treatment of choice. However, with the advent of embolotheraphy, it is considered the preferred mode of treatment with less invasiveness. We here report a 12-year-old boy with large aneurysmal pulmonary arteriovenous fistula presented with brain abscess and hemiparesis. He underwent thoracotomy and pneumonectomy for large PAVMs, and it was complicated with bleeding and massive blood transfusion. The patient developed acute renal failure as a postoperative complication and succumbed to it. We suggest proper look out for systemic collateral and their management by embolitheraphy either alone or in combination should be tried first. We also suggest median sternotomy and intrapericardial approach for pneumonectomy in such difficult situation can be helpful. PMID:27051111

  20. Fatal cerebral edema associated with serine deficiency in CSF.

    PubMed

    Keularts, Irene M L W; Leroy, Piet L J M; Rubio-Gozalbo, Estela M; Spaapen, Leo J M; Weber, Biene; Dorland, Bert; de Koning, Tom J; Verhoeven-Duif, Nanda M

    2010-12-01

    Two young girls without a notable medical history except for asthma presented with an acute toxic encephalopathy with very low serine concentrations both in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) comparable to patients with 3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (3-PGDH) deficiency. Clinical symptoms and enzyme measurement (in one patient) excluded 3-PGDH deficiency. Deficiencies in other serine biosynthesis enzymes were highly unlikely on clinical grounds. On basis of the fasting state, ketone bodies and lactate in plasma, urine and CSF, we speculate that reduced serine levels were due to its use as gluconeogenic substrate, conversion to pyruvate by brain serine racemase or decreased L-serine production because of a lack of glucose. These are the first strikingly similar cases of patients with a clear secondary serine deficiency associated with a toxic encephalopathy. PMID:20300853

  1. Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease in an 11-year-old girl: diagnostic pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Kano, Gen; Nakamura, Keiko; Sakamoto, Izumi

    2014-02-01

    Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD) is a rare chronic lung disease that is difficult to diagnose due to non-specific clinical findings. Little is known about the pathogenesis of PVOD. Reported herein is the case of an 11-year-old girl who initially presented with 'bat-wing' shadows on chest radiography. This finding, coupled with prominent hemosiderosis in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, initially led to a misdiagnosis of idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis. Oral prednisolone dramatically improved signs and symptoms initially, but her condition then gradually deteriorated during maintenance therapy with corticosteroids and other immunosuppressants. PVOD was suspected but not confirmed owing to a lack of hallmark radiographic findings and contraindications for lung biopsy. Three years later, while arranging for lung transplantation, the patient experienced sudden onset of fatal massive pulmonary edema. PVOD was confirmed at autopsy. This case provides insights regarding an unfamiliar presentation of PVOD and may help physicians to avoid diagnostic pitfalls. PMID:24548200

  2. [The twofold face of fatalism: collectivist fatalism and individualist fatalism].

    PubMed

    Blanco, Amalio; Díaz, Darío

    2007-11-01

    Fatalism has been a central framework for understanding the psychological processes in cultures with pronounced collectivism that are economically poorly developed. In this context, fatalism emerges as cognitive schema defined by passive and submissive acceptance of an irremediable destiny, governed by some natural force or the will of some God. This image has now lost such a clear profile. But currently, fatalism also accompanies the life of people from individualist cultures, who live in a highly developed, or even opulent, economic context. In this case, fatalism is like some mood of uncertainty, insecurity, and helplessness following the events that characterize the society of global risk. In this paper, we propose a theory to develop the two faces of fatalism. PMID:17959106

  3. Isolation and Characterization of Two Novel Bacteria Afipia cberi and Mesorhizobium hominis from Blood of a Patient Afflicted with Fatal Pulmonary Illness

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Shyh-Ching; Li, Bingjie; Hung, Guo-Chiuan; Lei, Haiyan; Li, Tianwei; Zhang, Jing; Nagamine, Kenjiro; Tsai, Shien; Zucker, Mark J.; Olesnicky, Ludmilla

    2013-01-01

    We recently isolated and discovered new Bradyrhizobiaceae microbes from the cryopreserved culture broth of blood samples from 3 patients with poorly defined illnesses using modified SP4 media and culture conditions coupled with genomic sequencing. Using a similar protocol, we studied a previously cryopreserved culture broth of blood sample from a patient who had succumbed to an acute onset of fulminant pulmonary illness. We report that two phases of microbial growth were observed in the re-initiated culture. Biochemical and genomic characterization revealed microbes isolated from the first phase of growth were new Afipia species of Bradyrhizobiaceae, tentatively named A. cberi with a ~ 5 MB chromosome that was different from those of all previously known Afipia microbes including the newly discovered A. septicemium. The microbes isolated from the second phase of growth were prominent sugar assimilators, novel Phyllobacteriaceae, phylogenetically most closely related to Mesorhizobium and tentatively named M. hominis with a ~ 5.5 MB chromosome. All A. cberi isolates carry a circular ~ 140 KB plasmid. Some M. hominis isolates possess a circular ~ 412 KB plasmid that can be lost in prolonged culture or passage. No antibiotics resistant genes could be identified in both of the A. cberi and M. hominis plasmids. Antibiotic susceptibility studies using broth culture systems revealed isolates of A. cberi could be sensitive to some antibiotics, but all isolates of M. hominis were resistant to essentially all tested antibiotics. However, the cell-free antibiotics susceptibility test results may not be applicable to clinical treatment against the microbes that are known to be capable of intracellular growth. It remains to be determined if the 2 previously unknown Rhizobiales were indeed pathogenic and played a role in the pulmonary disease process in this patient. Specific probes and methods will be developed to re-examine the diseased lungs from patient's autopsy. PMID

  4. Latest advances in edema

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Villavicencio, J. L.; Hargens, A. R.; Pikoulicz, E.

    1996-01-01

    Basic concepts in the physiopathology of edema are reviewed. The mechanisms of fluid exchange across the capillary endothelium are explained. Interstitial flow and lymph formation are examined. Clinical disorders of tissue and lymphatic transport, microcirculatory derangements in venous disorders, protein disorders, and lymphatic system disorders are explored. Techniques for investigational imaging of the lymphatic system are explained.

  5. A drug fatality involving Kratom.

    PubMed

    Neerman, Michael F; Frost, Randall E; Deking, Janine

    2013-01-01

    A 17-year-old white man who showed no obvious signs of trauma was found unresponsive in bed and was pronounced dead at the scene. The decedent had a documented history of heroin abuse and chronic back pain and reportedly self-medicated with Kratom (mitragynine). The autopsy was remarkable only for pulmonary congestion and edema and a distended bladder, both of which are consistent with, though not diagnostic of, opiate use. A laboratory work-up revealed therapeutic levels of over-the-counter cold medications and benzodiazepines. However, of interest was a level of mitragynine at 0.60 mg/L. Given the facts of the case, the Medical Examiner certified the cause of death as "possible Kratom toxicity" and the manner of death was classified as "accident." PMID:23082895

  6. Mechanics of the left ventricular myocardial interstitium: effects of acute and chronic myocardial edema.

    PubMed

    Desai, Ketaki V; Laine, Glen A; Stewart, Randolph H; Cox, Charles S; Quick, Christopher M; Allen, Steven J; Fischer, Uwe M

    2008-06-01

    Myocardial interstitial edema forms as a result of several disease states and clinical interventions. Acute myocardial interstitial edema is associated with compromised systolic and diastolic cardiac function and increased stiffness of the left ventricular chamber. Formation of chronic myocardial interstitial edema results in deposition of interstitial collagen, which causes interstitial fibrosis. To assess the effect of myocardial interstitial edema on the mechanical properties of the left ventricle and the myocardial interstitium, we induced acute and chronic interstitial edema in dogs. Acute myocardial edema was generated by coronary sinus pressure elevation, while chronic myocardial edema was generated by chronic pulmonary artery banding. The pressure-volume relationships of the left ventricular myocardial interstitium and left ventricular chamber for control animals were compared with acutely and chronically edematous animals. Collagen content of nonedematous and chronically edematous animals was also compared. Generating acute myocardial interstitial edema resulted in decreased left ventricular chamber compliance compared with nonedematous animals. With chronic edema, the primary form of collagen changed from type I to III. Left ventricular chamber compliance in animals made chronically edematous was significantly higher than nonedematous animals. The change in primary collagen type secondary to chronic left ventricular myocardial interstitial edema provides direct evidence for structural remodeling. The resulting functional adaptation allows the chronically edematous heart to maintain left ventricular chamber compliance when challenged with acute edema, thus preserving cardiac function over a wide range of interstitial fluid pressures. PMID:18375722

  7. Diabetic Macular Edema

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobo, Conceição; Pires, Isabel; Cunha-Vaz, José

    The optical coherence tomography (OCT), a noninvasive and noncontact diagnostic method, was introduced in 1995 for imaging macular diseases. In diabetic macular edema (DME), OCT scans show hyporeflectivity, due to intraretinal and/or subretinal fluid accumulation, related to inner and/or outer blood-retinal barrier breakdown. OCT tomograms may also reveal the presence of hard exudates, as hyperreflective spots with a shadow, in the outer retinal layers, among others. In conclusion, OCT is a particularly valuable diagnostic tool in DME, helpful both in the diagnosis and follow-up procedure.

  8. Death by band-aid: fatal misuse of transdermal fentanyl patch.

    PubMed

    Bakovic, Marija; Nestic, Marina; Mayer, Davor

    2015-11-01

    We present a case of fatal intoxication by the application of a transdermal fentanyl patch upon a superficial bleeding abrasion of a 2-year-old girl. The grandmother discovered the body of the child in bed at approximately 7 a.m. External examination revealed a properly developed, nourished, and hydrated child, with some vomit in the nostrils and inside the mouth. There was no evidence of trauma besides small contusions and abrasions on the knees, with a patch placed over the largest abrasion. Closer inspection revealed that this was transdermal fentanyl patch. Internal examination and microscopic analysis revealed regurgitation of stomach content, cerebral and pulmonary edema, and liver congestion. Toxicology analysis revealed trace levels of fentanyl in the blood just above the limit of detection (2 ng/mL), while concentrations in the urine, liver, and kidney were approximately 102, 28, and 10 ng/mL, respectively. Investigation discovered that the child injured her knee while playing the evening before. The grandmother applied the patch to cover the injury, unaware that she had used a fentanyl transdermal patch instead of simple band-aid. Although fatal intoxications are uncommon among young children in high-income countries, it is of major interest to raise awareness of such events especially since a great majority of these are preventable. The presented case points at the need for more thorough education of users and more strict rules in prescribing and handling of this potent medicine. As well, we find this case to be a useful contribution to the evaluation of postmortem fentanyl concentrations in fatal intoxication in a small child. PMID:26055040

  9. Molecular pathophysiology of cerebral edema.

    PubMed

    Stokum, Jesse A; Gerzanich, Volodymyr; Simard, J Marc

    2016-03-01

    Advancements in molecular biology have led to a greater understanding of the individual proteins responsible for generating cerebral edema. In large part, the study of cerebral edema is the study of maladaptive ion transport. Following acute CNS injury, cells of the neurovascular unit, particularly brain endothelial cells and astrocytes, undergo a program of pre- and post-transcriptional changes in the activity of ion channels and transporters. These changes can result in maladaptive ion transport and the generation of abnormal osmotic forces that, ultimately, manifest as cerebral edema. This review discusses past models and current knowledge regarding the molecular and cellular pathophysiology of cerebral edema. PMID:26661240

  10. Molecular pathophysiology of cerebral edema

    PubMed Central

    Gerzanich, Volodymyr; Simard, J Marc

    2015-01-01

    Advancements in molecular biology have led to a greater understanding of the individual proteins responsible for generating cerebral edema. In large part, the study of cerebral edema is the study of maladaptive ion transport. Following acute CNS injury, cells of the neurovascular unit, particularly brain endothelial cells and astrocytes, undergo a program of pre- and post-transcriptional changes in the activity of ion channels and transporters. These changes can result in maladaptive ion transport and the generation of abnormal osmotic forces that, ultimately, manifest as cerebral edema. This review discusses past models and current knowledge regarding the molecular and cellular pathophysiology of cerebral edema. PMID:26661240

  11. Occupational injury fatalities--1994.

    PubMed

    Toscano, G; Jack, T

    1996-01-01

    Factory workers caught in machinery and construction workers falling or struck by huge beams are images that typically come to mind when considering serious hazards in the workplace. But these types of events account for only a small portion of job-related fatalities each year. Transportation-related fatalities, along with assaults and violent acts during work, made up almost two-thirds of the 6,588 fatal work injuries recorded in 1994. The majority of job-related fatal work events occurred on the streets and highways and in public buildings and in areas such as grocery stores and parking lots. Today the most deadly jobs are found in outdoor occupations such as fishing and timber cutting. In fact, in all 10 jobs studied that have high fatality rates, most workers are affected by severe weather conditions while driving on highways, performing farm chores and working at construction sites. Highway crashes are the primary cause of trucker fatalities; falls are the leading cause of death for roofers, construction laborers and structural metal workers, while tractor rollovers account for a third of farm worker fatalities. Another deadly contributing factor for some workers is homicide, which accounted for 16 percent of job-related fatalities in 1994. Workers most at risk are those who work alone, work late at night and handle varying sums of money. Taxicab drivers are the most susceptible and have a work injury fatality rate nine times higher than the national rate of 5 deaths per 100,000 workers. Others at high risk of homicide include gas station cashiers, grocery store employees and workers in retail eating and drinking establishments. Although the risk of a fatal injury at work varies greatly by occupation and industry, no one is immune. For prevention, workers and employers need to know what jobs are risky, what equipment is dangerous and what activities are hazardous. They also should understand that a fatal incident can happen to anyone. PMID:8718711

  12. Fatal pulmonary hemorrhage after taking anticoagulation medication

    PubMed Central

    Hammar, Samuel P.

    2015-01-01

    We describe a 64-year-old man with extensive diffuse acute lung hemorrhage, presumably as a result of anticoagulation therapy. We evaluated reports in the literature concerning acute exacerbation (acute lung injury of unknown cause) in UIP and other forms of fibrotic interstitial pneumonias. We also evaluated autopsy tissue in this case in order to determine the cause of death in this 64-year-old man, who was initially thought to have an asbestos-related disease. Based on the autopsy findings, this man died as a result of anticoagulation therapy; specifically, the use of Xarelto® (rivaroxaban). PMID:26236607

  13. Pulmonary hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension; Sporadic primary pulmonary hypertension; Familial primary pulmonary hypertension; Idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension; Primary pulmonary hypertension; PPH; Secondary pulmonary ...

  14. Pulmonary Aspects of Exercise and Sports

    PubMed Central

    Bove, Alfred A.

    2016-01-01

    Although the lungs are a critical component of exercise performance, their response to exercise and other environmental stresses is often overlooked when evaluating pulmonary performance during high workloads. Exercise can produce capillary leakage, particularly when left atrial pressure increases related to left ventricular (LV) systolic or diastolic failure. Diastolic LV dysfunction that results in elevated left atrial pressure during exercise is particularly likely to result in pulmonary edema and capillary hemorrhage. Data from race horses, endurance athletes, and triathletes support the concept that the lungs can react to exercise and immersion stress with pulmonary edema and pulmonary hemorrhage. Immersion in water by swimmers and divers can also increase stress on pulmonary capillaries and result in pulmonary edema. Swimming-induced pulmonary edema and immersion pulmonary edema in scuba divers are well-documented events caused by the fluid shifts that occur with immersion, elevated pulmonary venous pressure during extreme exercise, and negative alveolar pressure due to inhalation resistance. Prevention strategies include avoiding extreme exercise, avoiding over hydration, and assuring that inspiratory resistance is minimized. PMID:27486491

  15. Pulmonary Aspects of Exercise and Sports.

    PubMed

    Bove, Alfred A

    2016-01-01

    Although the lungs are a critical component of exercise performance, their response to exercise and other environmental stresses is often overlooked when evaluating pulmonary performance during high workloads. Exercise can produce capillary leakage, particularly when left atrial pressure increases related to left ventricular (LV) systolic or diastolic failure. Diastolic LV dysfunction that results in elevated left atrial pressure during exercise is particularly likely to result in pulmonary edema and capillary hemorrhage. Data from race horses, endurance athletes, and triathletes support the concept that the lungs can react to exercise and immersion stress with pulmonary edema and pulmonary hemorrhage. Immersion in water by swimmers and divers can also increase stress on pulmonary capillaries and result in pulmonary edema. Swimming-induced pulmonary edema and immersion pulmonary edema in scuba divers are well-documented events caused by the fluid shifts that occur with immersion, elevated pulmonary venous pressure during extreme exercise, and negative alveolar pressure due to inhalation resistance. Prevention strategies include avoiding extreme exercise, avoiding over hydration, and assuring that inspiratory resistance is minimized. PMID:27486491

  16. Diabetic Macular Edema

    PubMed Central

    Gundogan, Fatih C.; Yolcu, Umit; Akay, Fahrettin; Ilhan, Abdullah; Ozge, Gokhan; Uzun, Salih

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic macular edema (DME), one the most prevalent causes of visual loss in industrialized countries, may be diagnosed at any stage of diabetic retinopathy. The diagnosis, treatment, and follow up of DME have become straightforward with recent developments in fundus imaging, such as optical coherence tomography. Laser photocoagulation, intravitreal injections, and pars plana vitrectomy surgery are the current treatment modalities; however, the positive effects of currently available intravitreally injected agents are temporary. At this point, further treatment choices are needed for a permanent effect. Sources of data selection: The articles published between 1985-2015 years on major databases were searched and most appropriate 40 papers were used to write this review article. PMID:27182271

  17. Pulmonary Hypertension and Pulmonary Aspergilloma-Coexistence of Two Rare Sequelae of Pulmonary Embolism.

    PubMed

    Bhartiya, Manish; Saxena, Puneet; Singh, Dharmender; Sashindran, V K

    2016-06-01

    We report a 42 year old non-smoker male who presented with progressive exertional dyspnoea, productive cough with streaky hemoptysis and progressive pedal edema. His physical examination, ECG, chest X-ray and 2D-ECHO revealed features suggestive of right heart failure and pulmonary hypertension. On further evaluation for the cause of pulmonary hypertension, his CT pulmonary angiography revealed features of chronic pulmonary thromboembolism with calcified thrombus in the main pulmonary artery along with pulmonary hypertension. Incidentally the CT also revealed a cavity in the right lung with soft tissue within it. A, trans-thoracic needle aspiration of this tissue was suggestive of an aspergilloma. This is a rare case report of co-existence of two uncommon complications of pulmonary embolism-chronic thrombo-embolic pulmonary hypertension and pulmonary Aspergilloma in the same patient. PMID:27408402

  18. Mountaineering fatalities on Denali.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, Scott E; Campbell, Aaron D; Dow, Jennifer; Grissom, Colin K

    2008-01-01

    Mount McKinley, or Denali, is the tallest mountain in North America and attracts over 1,000 climbers annually from around the world. Since Denali is located within a national park, the National Park Service (NPS) manages mountaineering activities and attempts to maintain a balance of an adventurous experience while promoting safety. We retrospectively reviewed the fatalities on Denali from 1903 to 2006 to assist the NPS, medical personnel, and mountaineers improve safety and reduce fatalities on the mountain. Historical records and the NPS climber database were reviewed. Demographics, mechanisms, and circumstances surrounding each fatality were examined. Fatality rates and odds ratios for country of origin were calculated. From 1903 through the end of the 2006 climbing season, 96 individuals died on Denali. The fatality rate is declining and is 3.08/1,000 summit attempts. Of the 96 deaths, 92% were male, 51% occurred on the West Buttress route, and 45% were due to injuries sustained from falls. Sixty-one percent occurred on the descent and the largest number of deaths in 1 year occurred in 1992. Climbers from Asia had the highest odds of dying on the mountain. Fatalities were decreased by 53% after a NPS registration system was established in 1995. Although mountaineering remains a high-risk activity, safety on Denali is improving. Certain groups have a significantly higher chance of dying. Registration systems and screening methods provide ways to target at-risk groups and improve safety on high altitude mountains such as Denali. PMID:18331224

  19. PULMONARY CIRCULATION AT EXERCISE

    PubMed Central

    NAEIJE, R; CHESLER, N

    2012-01-01

    The pulmonary circulation is a high flow and low pressure circuit, with an average resistance of 1 mmHg.min.L−1 in young adults, increasing to 2.5 mmHg.min.L−1 over 4–6 decades of life. Pulmonary vascular mechanics at exercise are best described by distensible models. Exercise does not appear to affect the time constant of the pulmonary circulation or the longitudinal distribution of resistances. Very high flows are associated with high capillary pressures, up to a 20–25 mmHg threshold associated with interstitial lung edema and altered ventilation/perfusion relationships. Pulmonary artery pressures of 40–50 mmHg, which can be achieved at maximal exercise, may correspond to the extreme of tolerable right ventricular afterload. Distension of capillaries that decrease resistance may be of adaptative value during exercise, but this is limited by hypoxemia from altered diffusion/perfusion relationships. Exercise in hypoxia is associated with higher pulmonary vascular pressures and lower maximal cardiac output, with increased likelihood of right ventricular function limitation and altered gas exchange by interstitial lung edema. Pharmacological interventions aimed at the reduction of pulmonary vascular tone have little effect on pulmonary vascular pressure-flow relationships in normoxia, but may decrease resistance in hypoxia, unloading the right ventricle and thereby improving exercise capacity. Exercise in patients with pulmonary hypertension is associated with sharp increases in pulmonary artery pressure and a right ventricular limitation of aerobic capacity. Exercise stress testing to determine multipoint pulmonary vascular pressures-flow relationships may uncover early stage pulmonary vascular disease. PMID:23105961

  20. Letter to the Editor Reply to commentary by G. Sikri and S. Dua on the article "Correlation between single nucleotide polymorphisms in hypoxia-related genes and susceptibility to acute high-altitude pulmonary edema" published in Genetics and Molecular Research 14 (3): 11562-11572 to the letter published in Genet. Mol. Res. 14 (4): 15904-15905.

    PubMed

    Wu, L J

    2016-01-01

    The object in this study was a Han Chinese population in Lhasa, with 3658 m in altitude from Chengdu, which has 505 m in altitude by air. Within 24 to 48 h before the subjects arrived in the plateau, they completed a basic situation questionnaire, under the guidance of medical staff. Within 24 to 48 h after they reached the plateau, the subjects completed an acute plateau disease questionnaire. The diagnostic standard of HAPE and the diagnosis of acute plateau disease were adopted by the Lake Louise diagnostic standards in 1991 and the Chinese Medical Association promulgated the domestic diagnostic criteria on the Third National Plateau Medical Academic Seminar. Other diseases that cause acute symptoms of altitude sickness, such as plateau pulmonary edema, plateau cerebral edema, acute respiratory infections and neurosis, were excluded. According to the Lake Louise standard, questionnaire and symptom score values >3 points were diagnosed as HAPE. According to the national standard, the questionnaire and symptom score values >5 points were diagnosed as HAPE. At the present, morbidity of HAPE remains relatively high in China. The research shows that usually in the case of not taking preventive measures, according to the factors such as altitude, speed, and time of arrival, the incidence of HAPE is 30% to 90%. Epidemiological survey shows that HAPE happens at an altitude of 2500 m above the plateau. And an altitude of 3000 m above the plateau of China is occupied 1/6 of the total land area, the population of permanent residents is more than sixty million. We detected the 200 cases who adapted to plateau and the 106 cases of patients with HAPE susceptibility genes SNP locus, and got the key SNP loci of HAPE susceptibility genes. We maked the corresponding gene chip diagnostic kits. PMID:27050977

  1. [Bronchial asthma: clinico-pathological study of fatalities in intensive care units].

    PubMed

    Rabell, S; Piera, O M; Abdo, A; Sotolongo, R

    1975-01-01

    Due to the great amount of asthmatic patients presenting complications which could endanger their lives, a revision of the possible threatening factors is carried out. The factors concurring with the base pathologic mechanism are analyzed and it is demonstrated, that some of these factors intervene independently from bronchial asthma. The study is carried out on the basis of age, sex, hospital stay duration, clinical picture, blood gases analysis, complications and pathology findings: 1) Most of the deceased patients presented various pathologies besides bronchial asthma which contributed to the decease. 2) The physician should be alert in order to establish good therapeutic procedure in these patients which could carry other important complications; these complications are responsible for the fatal outcome in a great number of patients. A complication should always be searched for, e.g. pneumothorax. 3) The vast majority of patients who passed away in status were relatively young. 4) A female predominance was found. 5) All patients before entering our Center, presented asthma crisis at least three days prior to admission. 6) The predominant hospital stay duration was 24 hours. 7) The most common pathologic findings were: pulmonary fibroemphysema, acute bronchopneumonia, bronchial mucoid plugging, atelectasia and cerebral edema. 8) Cerebral edema and compression of the amygdale were common brain pathologic findings. 9) Bronchopneumonia was a common necropsy finding. 10) Based on these findings, ICU treatment is extremely important. 11) The critical status of the patient in the moment of admission, is due to the delay in bringing him to the hospital for proper medical surveyance. This justifies the interest of the Public Health Department in ample distribution of proper information to the asthmatic patients. PMID:1155315

  2. Lung edema due to hydrogen peroxide is independent of cyclooxygenase products.

    PubMed

    Burghuber, O; Mathias, M M; McMurtry, I F; Reeves, J T; Voelkel, N F

    1984-04-01

    Active oxygen species can cause lung injury. Although a direct action on endothelial cells is proposed, the possibility exists that they might cause injury via mediators. We considered that active oxygen species would stimulate the generation of cyclooxygenase metabolites, which then alter pulmonary vasoreactivity and cause edema. We chemically produced hydrogen peroxide by adding glucose oxidase to a plasma- and cell-free, but beta-D-glucose-containing, solution, which perfused isolated rat lungs. Addition of glucose oxidase to the perfusate caused a marked decrease in pulmonary vasoreactivity, accompanied by an increase in the concentrations of prostacyclin, thromboxane A2, and prostaglandin F2 alpha. Pretreatment with catalase, a specific scavenger of hydrogen peroxide, preserved pulmonary vasoreactivity, inhibited the increase of the concentration of the measured prostaglandins, and prevented edema formation. Indomethacin effectively blocked lung prostaglandin production but neither prevented the decrease in vasoreactivity nor inhibited edema formation. From these data we conclude that hydrogen peroxide impaired pulmonary vasoreactivity and subsequently caused edema. Despite the fact that hydrogen peroxide stimulated lung prostaglandin production, cyclooxygenase-derived products neither caused the decrease in vasoreactivity nor the development of edema. PMID:6427146

  3. Fatal Pneumonitis Induced by Oxaliplatin: Description of Three Cases

    PubMed Central

    Pontes, L.B.; Armentano, D.P.D.; Soares, A.; Gansl, R.C.

    2012-01-01

    We describe 3 fatal cases of interstitial pneumonitis rapidly evolving to pulmonary fibrosis and death after the administration of oxaliplatin as part of the FOLFOX regimen. Due to the widespread use of oxaliplatin in oncology, clinicians should be aware of the risk and severity of oxalipatin-induced interstitial pneumonia. PMID:22539922

  4. Excitotoxicity in the lung: N-methyl-D-aspartate-induced, nitric oxide-dependent, pulmonary edema is attenuated by vasoactive intestinal peptide and by inhibitors of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase.

    PubMed Central

    Said, S I; Berisha, H I; Pakbaz, H

    1996-01-01

    Excitatory amino acid toxicity, resulting from overactivation of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) glutamate receptors, is a major mechanism of neuronal cell death in acute and chronic neurological diseases. We have investigated whether excitotoxicity may occur in peripheral organs, causing tissue injury, and report that NMDA receptor activation in perfused, ventilated rat lungs triggered acute injury, marked by increased pressures needed to ventilate and perfuse the lung, and by high-permeability edema. The injury was prevented by competitive NMDA receptor antagonists or by channel-blocker MK-801, and was reduced in the presence of Mg2+. As with NMDA toxicity to central neurons, the lung injury was nitric oxide (NO) dependent: it required L-arginine, was associated with increased production of NO, and was attenuated by either of two NO synthase inhibitors. The neuropeptide vasoactive intestinal peptide and inhibitors of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase also prevented this injury, but without inhibiting NO synthesis, both acting by inhibiting a toxic action of NO that is critical to tissue injury. The findings indicate that: (i) NMDA receptors exist in the lung (and probably elsewhere outside the central nervous system), (ii) excessive activation of these receptors may provoke acute edematous lung injury as seen in the "adult respiratory distress syndrome," and (iii) this injury can be modulated by blockade of one of three critical steps: NMDA receptor binding, inhibition of NO synthesis, or activation of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase. Images Fig. 3 PMID:8643465

  5. Excitotoxicity in the Lung: N-Methyl-D-Aspartate-Induced, Nitric Oxide-Dependent, Pulmonary Edema is Attenuated by Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide and by Inhibitors of Poly(ADP-Ribose) Polymerase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Said, Sami I.; Berisha, Hasan I.; Pakbaz, Hedayatollah

    1996-05-01

    Excitatory amino acid toxicity, resulting from overactivation of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) glutamate receptors, is a major mechanism of neuronal cell death in acute and chronic neurological diseases. We have investigated whether excitotoxicity may occur in peripheral organs, causing tissue injury, and report that NMDA receptor activation in perfused, ventilated rat lungs triggered acute injury, marked by increased pressures needed to ventilate and perfuse the lung, and by high-permeability edema. The injury was prevented by competitive NMDA receptor antagonists or by channel-blocker MK-801, and was reduced in the presence of Mg2+. As with NMDA toxicity to central neurons, the lung injury was nitric oxide (NO) dependent: it required L-arginine, was associated with increased production of NO, and was attenuated by either of two NO synthase inhibitors. The neuropeptide vasoactive intestinal peptide and inhibitors of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase also prevented this injury, but without inhibiting NO synthesis, both acting by inhibiting a toxic action of NO that is critical to tissue injury. The findings indicate that: (i) NMDA receptors exist in the lung (and probably elsewhere outside the central nervous system), (ii) excessive activation of these receptors may provoke acute edematous lung injury as seen in the ``adult respiratory distress syndrome,'' and (iii) this injury can be modulated by blockade of one of three critical steps: NMDA receptor binding, inhibition of NO synthesis, or activation of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase.

  6. Dosimetric Predictors of Laryngeal Edema

    SciTech Connect

    Sanguineti, Giuseppe . E-mail: gisangui@utmb.edu; Adapala, Prashanth; Endres, Eugene J. C; Brack, Collin; Fiorino, Claudio; Sormani, Maria Pia; Parker, Brent

    2007-07-01

    Purpose: To investigate dosimetric predictors of laryngeal edema after radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: A total of 66 patients were selected who had squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck with grossly uninvolved larynx at the time of RT, no prior major surgical operation except for neck dissection and tonsillectomy, treatment planning data available for analysis, and at least one fiberoptic examination of the larynx within 2 years from RT performed by a single observer. Both the biologically equivalent mean dose at 2 Gy per fraction and the cumulative biologic dose-volume histogram of the larynx were extracted for each patient. Laryngeal edema was prospectively scored after treatment. Time to endpoint, moderate or worse laryngeal edema (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Grade 2+), was calculated with log rank test from the date of treatment end. Results: At a median follow-up of 17.1 months (range, 0.4- 50.0 months), the risk of Grade 2+ edema was 58.9% {+-} 7%. Mean dose to the larynx, V30, V40, V50, V60, and V70 were significantly correlated with Grade 2+ edema at univariate analysis. At multivariate analysis, mean laryngeal dose (continuum, hazard ratio, 1.11; 95% confidence interval, 1.06-1.15; p < 0.001), and positive neck stage at RT (N0-x vs. N +, hazard ratio, 3.66; 95% confidence interval, 1.40-9.58; p = 0.008) were the only independent predictors. Further stratification showed that, to minimize the risk of Grade 2+ edema, the mean dose to the larynx has to be kept {<=}43.5 Gy at 2 Gy per fraction. Conclusion: Laryngeal edema is strictly correlated with various dosimetric parameters; mean dose to the larynx should be kept {<=}43.5 Gy.

  7. Fatal measles pneumonitis during Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Wyplosz, Benjamin; Lafarge, Marion; Escaut, Lélia; Stern, Jean-Baptiste

    2013-01-01

    The treatment of measles pneumonitis in immunocompromised adults is not established. We describe a patient with Hodgkin's lymphoma who developed acute pneumonia during a measles infection. On day 13, intravenous ribavirin and immunoglobulins were administrated. On day 18, the patient developed acute respiratory failure. An examination of transbronchial pulmonary biopsies showed Warthin-Finkeldey giant cells that are pathognomonic of measles pneumonitis. The patient died despite aggressive supportive care. Our case and a review of literature show that measles pneumonitis is routinely fatal in patients with cancer. We suggest that antiviral drugs should be considered as soon as the diagnosis has been established. PMID:24105383

  8. Fatal measles pneumonitis during Hodgkin's lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Wyplosz, Benjamin; Lafarge, Marion; Escaut, Lélia; Stern, Jean-Baptiste

    2013-01-01

    The treatment of measles pneumonitis in immunocompromised adults is not established. We describe a patient with Hodgkin's lymphoma who developed acute pneumonia during a measles infection. On day 13, intravenous ribavirin and immunoglobulins were administrated. On day 18, the patient developed acute respiratory failure. An examination of transbronchial pulmonary biopsies showed Warthin-Finkeldey giant cells that are pathognomonic of measles pneumonitis. The patient died despite aggressive supportive care. Our case and a review of literature show that measles pneumonitis is routinely fatal in patients with cancer. We suggest that antiviral drugs should be considered as soon as the diagnosis has been established. PMID:24105383

  9. Fatal flecainide intoxication.

    PubMed Central

    Brazil, E; Bodiwala, G G; Bouch, D C

    1998-01-01

    Flecainide acetate is a potent class 1C antiarrhythmic agent used mainly for the treatment of supraventricular arrhythmias. Acute overdose of this drug is rare but frequently fatal. The clinical course of a patient that ingested a large quantity of flecainide as a suicide attempt is described and current therapeutic strategies discussed. PMID:9825278

  10. Chronic fatal pneumocystosis in nude mice.

    PubMed

    Ueda, K; Goto, Y; Yamazaki, S; Fujiwara, K

    1977-12-01

    A chronic pulmonary disease was encountered in nude mice of a barrier sustained colony, and Pneumocystis carinii was identified as the causative agent histopathologically as well as on impression smear preparations in the affected lungs. Fatal infection was seen only in old nude mice aged more than 6 months, while focal pulmonary lesions were developed without clinical signs in young adult nudes 2 to 3 months of age. The lesions produced in aged nude mice were characterized by propagation of mononuclear cells with the presence of foamy masses of P. carinii. Heterozygous littermates were much less susceptible to the infection but pneumocystic lesions could be produced readily by multiple treatment with immunosuppressants. The infection could be transmitted without immunosuppressant to non-infected nudes but not to heterozygous littermates after intranasal inoculation of affected tissue emulsion or by cage mating with severely affected nudes. PMID:305493

  11. FATALITY ASSESSMENT AND CONTROL EVALUATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Fatality Assessment and Control Evaluation (FACE) surveillance system contains first reports of traumatic occupational fatalities in 15 states obtained through multiple sources of notification including death certificates, coroner and medical examiner reports, OSHA, law enfor...

  12. Laguna Negra Virus Infection Causes Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome in Turkish Hamsters (Mesocricetus brandti).

    PubMed

    Hardcastle, K; Scott, D; Safronetz, D; Brining, D L; Ebihara, H; Feldmann, H; LaCasse, R A

    2016-01-01

    Laguna Negra virus (LNV) is a New World hantavirus associated with severe and often fatal cardiopulmonary disease in humans, known as hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS). Five hamster species were evaluated for clinical and serologic responses following inoculation with 4 hantaviruses. Of the 5 hamster species, only Turkish hamsters infected with LNV demonstrated signs consistent with HPS and a fatality rate of 43%. Clinical manifestations in infected animals that succumbed to disease included severe and rapid onset of dyspnea, weight loss, leukopenia, and reduced thrombocyte numbers as compared to uninfected controls. Histopathologic examination revealed lung lesions that resemble the hallmarks of HPS in humans, including interstitial pneumonia and pulmonary edema, as well as generalized infection of endothelial cells and macrophages in major organ tissues. Histologic lesions corresponded to the presence of viral antigen in affected tissues. To date, there have been no small animal models available to study LNV infection and pathogenesis. The Turkish hamster model of LNV infection may be important in the study of LNV-induced HPS pathogenesis and development of disease treatment and prevention strategies. PMID:25722219

  13. Lung edema due to hydrogen peroxide is independent of cyclooxygenase products

    SciTech Connect

    Burghuber, O.; Mathias, M.M.; McMurtry, I.F.; Reeves, J.T.; Voelkel, N.F.

    1984-01-01

    Active oxygen species can cause lung injury. Although a direct action on endothelial cells is proposed, the possibility exists that they might cause injury via mediators. We considered that active oxygen species would stimulate the generation of cyclooxygenase metabolites, which then alter pulmonary vasoreactivity and cause edema. We chemically produced hydrogen peroxide by adding glucose oxidase to a plasma- and cell-free, but ..beta..-D-glucose-containing, solution, which perfused isolated rat lungs. Addition of glucose oxidase to the perfusate caused a marked decrease in pulmonary vasoreactivity, accompanied by an increase in the concentrations of prostacyclin, thromboxane A/sub 2/, and prostaglandin F/sub 2..cap alpha../. Pretreatment with catalase, a specific scavenger of hydrogen peroxide, preserved pulomonary vasoreactivity, inhibited the increase of the concentration of the measured prostaglandins, and prevented edema formation. Indomethacin effectively blocked lung prostaglandin production but neither prevented the decrease in vasoreactivity nor inhibited edema formation. From these data we conclude the hydrogen peroxide impaired pulmonary vasoreactivity and subsequently caused edema. Depsite the fact that hydrogen peroxide stimulated lung prostaglandin production, cyclooxygenase-derived products neither caused the decrease in vasoreactivity nor the development of edema.

  14. [Hereditary angioneurotic edema in children].

    PubMed

    Farkas, H; Harmat, G; Füst, G; Varga, L; Visy, B

    2000-11-19

    Hereditary angioneurotic edema results from the deficiency of C1-esterase inhibitor. The clinical picture of this autosomal dominant disorder is characterized by recurrent attacks of edema formation in the subcutis and/or the submucosa. The clinical records of 21 children with established hereditary angioneurotic edema were reviewed. Follow-up care included laboratory check-ups and abdominal ultrasound. Clinical manifestations of the disease first occurred in 2.5 to 12 years of age. Mechanical trauma was the most common precipitating factor. Pedigree-analysis revealed 19 patients with afflicted relatives. Long-term prophylaxis was initiated with tranexamic acid and danazol in 10 cases; 2 children required short-term prophylaxis. Therapy improved serum complement parameters significantly and reduced the frequency and severity of clinical manifestations. Acute, life-threatening edematous attacks were treated by the administration of C1-inhibitor concentrate, which achieved the resolution of the edema within several hours. Abdominal ultrasonography performed during the attack invariably demonstrated transitory ascites that resolved spontaneously after treatment. Adequate prophylaxis and follow-up care can spare pediatric patients from edematous attacks. Undesirable adverse effects can be avoided and the patient's quality of life can be enhanced considerably by administering the lowest effective drug dose. PMID:11143287

  15. Alcohol and motorcycle fatalities.

    PubMed Central

    Baker, S P; Fisher, R S

    1977-01-01

    A series of 99 fatal motorcycle crashes in Maryland was studied retrospectively, using police and medical examiner records. Blood alcohol concentrations were determined for 62 motorcycle drivers; measurable amounts of alcohol were found in two-thirds (41), and one-half (31) had illegally high concentrations of 100 mg/100 ml or more. The police report mentioned alcohol in only 9 instances. High blood alcohol concentrations were found most commonly among drivers age 20-34. PMID:842762

  16. A fatal mongoose bite.

    PubMed

    Tumram, Nilesh Keshav; Bardale, Rajesh Vaijnathrao; Dixit, Pradeep Gangadhar; Deshmukh, Ashutosh Yashwant

    2012-01-01

    Animal bite is a bite wound from a pet, farm or wild animal. Dog bites make up 80-85% of all reported incidents. Cats amount for about 10% of reported bites and other animals such as rodents, rabbits, horses, raccoons, bats and monkeys amount to 5-10%. Bites by mongoose are uncommon. Here, we present a case of fatal mongoose bite to an elderly woman who died as a complication of streptococcal infection at the bite site. PMID:23166164

  17. Edema Toxin Impairs Anthracidal Phospholipase A2 Expression by Alveolar Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Raymond, Benoit; Leduc, Dominique; Ravaux, Lucas; Goffic, Ronan Le; Candela, Thomas; Raymondjean, Michel; Goossens, Pierre Louis; Touqui, Lhousseine

    2007-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis, the etiological agent of anthrax, is a spore-forming Gram-positive bacterium. Infection with this pathogen results in multisystem dysfunction and death. The pathogenicity of B. anthracis is due to the production of virulence factors, including edema toxin (ET). Recently, we established the protective role of type-IIA secreted phospholipase A2 (sPLA2-IIA) against B. anthracis. A component of innate immunity produced by alveolar macrophages (AMs), sPLA2-IIA is found in human and animal bronchoalveolar lavages at sufficient levels to kill B. anthracis. However, pulmonary anthrax is almost always fatal, suggesting the potential impairment of sPLA2-IIA synthesis and/or action by B. anthracis factors. We investigated the effect of purified ET and ET-deficient B. anthracis strains on sPLA2-IIA expression in primary guinea pig AMs. We report that ET inhibits sPLA2-IIA expression in AMs at the transcriptional level via a cAMP/protein kinase A–dependent process. Moreover, we show that live B. anthracis strains expressing functional ET inhibit sPLA2-IIA expression, whereas ET-deficient strains induced this expression. This stimulatory effect, mediated partly by the cell wall peptidoglycan, can be counterbalanced by ET. We conclude that B. anthracis down-regulates sPLA2-IIA expression in AMs through a process involving ET. Our study, therefore, describes a new molecular mechanism implemented by B. anthracis to escape innate host defense. These pioneering data will provide new molecular targets for future intervention against this deathly pathogen. PMID:18069891

  18. Early Indicators of Fatal Leptospirosis during the 2010 Epidemic in Puerto Rico

    PubMed Central

    Sharp, Tyler M.; Rivera García, Brenda; Pérez-Padilla, Janice; Galloway, Renee L.; Guerra, Marta; Ryff, Kyle R.; Haberling, Dana; Ramakrishnan, Sharada; Shadomy, Sean; Blau, Dianna; Tomashek, Kay M.; Bower, William A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Leptospirosis is a potentially fatal bacterial zoonosis that is endemic throughout the tropics and may be misdiagnosed as dengue. Delayed hospital admission of leptospirosis patients is associated with increased mortality. Methodology/Principal Findings During a concurrent dengue/leptospirosis epidemic in Puerto Rico in 2010, suspected dengue patients that tested dengue-negative were tested for leptospirosis. Fatal and non-fatal hospitalized leptospirosis patients were matched 1:1–3 by age. Records from all medical visits were evaluated for factors associated with fatal outcome. Among 175 leptospirosis patients identified (4.7 per 100,000 residents), 26 (15%) were fatal. Most patients were older males and had illness onset during the rainy season. Fatal case patients first sought medical care earlier than non-fatal control patients (2.5 vs. 5 days post-illness onset [DPO], p < 0.01), but less frequently first sought care at a hospital (52.4% vs. 92.2%, p < 0.01). Although fatal cases were more often diagnosed with leptospirosis at first medical visit (43.9% vs. 9.6%, p = 0.01), they were admitted to the hospital no earlier than non-fatal controls (4.5 vs. 6 DPO, p = 0.31). Cases less often developed fever (p = 0.03), but more often developed jaundice, edema, leg pain, hemoptysis, and had a seizure (p ≤ 0.03). Multivariable analysis of laboratory values from first medical visit associated with fatal outcome included increased white blood cell (WBC) count with increased creatinine (p = 0.001), and decreased bicarbonate with either increased WBC count, increased creatinine, or decreased platelet count (p < 0.001). Conclusions/Significance Patients with fatal leptospirosis sought care earlier, but were not admitted for care any earlier than non-fatal patients. Combinations of routine laboratory values predictive of fatal outcome should be considered in admission decision-making for patients with suspected leptospirosis. PMID:26914210

  19. Acute right atrial and pulmonary artery bone cement mass emboli following vertebroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Diab, Amr; Dihmis, Walid; Diab, Samir

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac and pulmonary artery emboli are lethal complications following vertebroplasty. Clinicians should recognise these fatal complications immediately and surgical extraction is mandatory and provides the best outcome.

  20. Bosentan for pulmonary hypertension secondary to idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Onda, Naomi; Tanaka, Yosuke; Hino, Mitsunori; Gemma, Akihiko

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is a poor prognostic factor in patients with interstitial lung disease. No established treatment exists for pulmonary hypertension secondary to interstitial pneumonia. We describe the case of an 81-year-old woman with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), who was admitted to our hospital due to aggravation of dyspnea and decreased oxygen saturation, as well as onset of orthopnea and rapidly progressing edema. The transthoracic echocardiography and right heart catheterization showed the mean pulmonary artery pressure was 39 mmHg and the mean pulmonary capillary wedge pressure was 9 mmHg. After various examinations, the diagnoses of pulmonary hypertension (PH) due to IPF and of congestive heart failure secondary to PH were established. Diuretic therapy was started, but the patient's condition showed poor improvement. Subsequent initiation of oral bosentan therapy led to improvement in symptoms and findings. At the follow-up assessment one year later her pulmonary function showed no significant changes and no apparent worsening of arterial blood gases, with evident improvement of PH, WHO functional class, maximum exercise tolerance on treadmill exercise testing, right heart catheterization, and transthoracic echocardiography. This report describes a case of successful treatment with bosentan for severe pulmonary hypertension in a patient with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. We also present a review of the literature on treatment of pulmonary hypertension in patients with chronic lung disease. Bosentan appears to be efficacious in some patients with pulmonary hypertension secondary to idiopathic interstitial pneumonitis. PMID:26029570

  1. Pulmonary Complications of Drug Abuse

    PubMed Central

    Gottlieb, Leon S.; Boylen, Thomas C.

    1974-01-01

    Complications resulting from drug abuse more frequently affect the lung than any other organ. The spectrum of pulmonary complications associated with drug abuse is wide. The current practice of using mixtures of drugs is mainly responsible for the increase in pulmonary complications. The chief complications observed in a series of 241 drug abuse patients were aspiration pneumonitis (12.9 percent), pulmonary edema (10.0 percent), and pneumonia (7.5 percent). ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6.Figure 7.Figure 8.Figure 9.Figure 10. PMID:4812215

  2. Air weapon fatalities.

    PubMed Central

    Milroy, C M; Clark, J C; Carter, N; Rutty, G; Rooney, N

    1998-01-01

    AIMS: To describe characteristics of a series of people accidentally and deliberately killed by air powered weapons. METHODS: Five cases of fatal airgun injury were identified by forensic pathologists and histopathologists. The circumstances surrounding the case, radiological examination, and pathological findings are described. The weapon characteristics are also reported. RESULTS: Three of the victims were adult men, one was a 16 year old boy, and one an eight year old child. Four of the airguns were .22 air rifles, the other a .177 air rifle. Two committed suicide, one person shooting himself in the head, the other in the chest. In both cases the guns were fired at contact range. Three of the cases were classified as accidents: in two the pellet penetrated into the head and in one the chest. CONCLUSIONS: One person each year dies from an air powered weapon injury in the United Kingdom. In addition there is considerable morbidity from airgun injuries. Fatalities and injuries are most commonly accidents, but deliberately inflicted injuries occur. Airguns are dangerous weapons when inappropriately handled and should not be considered as toys. Children should not play with airguns unsupervised. Images PMID:9797730

  3. Fatal crocodile attack.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, Saurabh; Shee, Biplab; Sukul, Biswajit

    2013-11-01

    Attacks on human beings by various animals leading to varied types of injuries and even death in some cases are not uncommon. Crocodile attacks on humans have been reported from a number of countries across the globe. Deaths in such attacks are mostly due to mechanical injuries or drowning. Bites by the crocodiles often cause the limbs to be separated from the body. The present case refers to an incident of a fatal attack by a crocodile on a 35 years old female where only the mutilated head of the female was recovered. Multiple lacerated wounds over the face and scalp along with fracture of the cranial bones was detected on autopsy. Two distinct bite marks in the form of punched in holes were noted over the parietal and frontal bones. Injuries on the head with its traumatic amputation from the body were sufficient to cause death. However, the presence of other fatal injuries on the unrecovered body parts could not be ruled out. PMID:24237838

  4. [Fatal intoxication with paramethoxyamphetamine].

    PubMed

    Chodorowski, Zygmunt; Wiergowski, Marek; Sein Anand, Jacek

    2002-01-01

    From August to December of the year 2000 we ascertained 7 rapid deaths because of acute intoxication with tablets colloquially called Ufo. There were five men and two women aged from 20 to 29 (average 24) years. Analytic tests showed that one tablet of Ufo contains 40 mg of paramethoxyamphetamine, 1.0 mg of amphetamine, 0.05 mg of methamphetamine, 0.03 mg of 3-4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine. The levels of paramethoxyamphe-tamine in the blood of the deceased, determined by gas chromatography, were from 0.68 to 10.0 (approx. 3.2) mg/L and in the urine from 16 to 64 (approx. 35) mg/L. The press and television campaign caused elimination of fatal intoxications with parametoxy-amphetamine during the last 13 months. PMID:12184013

  5. Traffic fatalities and economic growth.

    PubMed

    Kopits, Elizabeth; Cropper, Maureen

    2005-01-01

    This paper examines the relationship between traffic fatality risk and per capita income and uses it to forecast traffic fatalities by geographic region. Equations for the road death rate (fatalities/population) and its components--the rate of motorization (vehicles/population) and fatalities per vehicle (F/V)--are estimated using panel data from 1963 to 1999 for 88 countries. The natural logarithm of F/P, V/P, and F/V are expressed as spline (piecewise linear) functions of the logarithm of real per capita GDP (measured in 1985 international prices). Region-specific time trends during the period 1963-1999 are modeled in linear and log-linear form. These models are used to project traffic fatalities and the stock of motor vehicles to 2020. The per capita income at which traffic fatality risk (fatalities/population) begins to decline is 8600 US dollars (1985 international dollars) when separate time trends are used for each geographic region. This turning point is driven by the rate of decline in fatalities/vehicles as income rises since vehicles/population, while increasing with income at a decreasing rate, never declines with economic growth. Projections of future traffic fatalities suggest that the global road death toll will grow by approximately 66% over the next twenty years. This number, however, reflects divergent rates of change in different parts of the world: a decline in fatalities in high-income countries of approximately 28% versus an increase in fatalities of almost 92% in China and 147% in India. The road death rate is projected to rise to approximately 2 per 10,000 persons in developing countries by 2020, while it will fall to less than 1 per 10,000 in high-income countries. PMID:15607288

  6. Celiac disease with pulmonary haemosiderosis and cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Işikay, Sedat; Yilmaz, Kutluhan; Kilinç, Metin

    2012-01-01

    Celiac disease or pulmonary haemosiderosis can be associated with several distinguished conditions. Pulmonary haemosiderosis is a rare, severe and fatal disease characterised by recurrent episodes of alveolar haemorrhage, haemoptysis and anaemia. Association of pulmonary haemosiderosis and celiac disease is extremely rare. We describe a case of celiac disease presented with dilated cardiomyopathy and pulmonary haemosiderosis without gastrointestinal symptoms of celiac disease. In addition, vitamin A deficiency was detected. This case suggests that celiac disease should be considered in patients with cardiomyopathy and/or pulmonary haemosiderosis regardless of the intestinal symptoms of celiac disease. PMID:23169927

  7. [MODELING INFLAMMATORY EDEMA: ARE THE MODELS INTERCHANGEABLE].

    PubMed

    Hanh, Cong Hong; Khaziakhmetova, V N; Ziganshina, L E

    2015-01-01

    Experimental modeling of inflammatory edema by sub-plantar injection of carrageenan and formalin in mice and rats is widely used to evaluate potential anti-inflammatory activity of new drugs. This systematic analysis of published data showed that carrageenan induced paw edema model is used for evaluating the anti-inflammatory activity mostly in rats rather than mice. Formalin induced paw edema in rats and mice is used primarily for evaluation of the analgesic activity of drugs. Taken together, the results of this systematic review of available literature on edema modeling substantiate recommendation to use carrageenan paw edema in rats and formalin paw edema in mice as complementary, but not interchangeable models of inflammation. PMID:26591204

  8. Progress in Drug Treatment of Cerebral Edema.

    PubMed

    Deng, Y Y; Shen, F C; Xie, D; Han, Q P; Fang, M; Chen, C B; Zeng, H K

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral edema causes intracranial hypertension (ICH) which leads to severe outcome of patients in the clinical setting. Effective anti-edema therapy may significantly decrease the mortality in a variety of neurological conditions. At present drug treatment is a cornerstone in the management of cerebral edema. Osmotherapy has been the mainstay of pharmacologic therapy. Mannitol and hypertonic saline (HS) are the most commonly used osmotic agents. The relative safety and efficacy of HS and mannitol in the treatment of cerebral edema and reduction of enhanced ICP have been demonstrated in the past decades. Apart from its osmotic force, HS exerts anti-edema effects partly through inhibition of Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-) Cotransporter-1 (NKCC1) and aquaporin 4 (AQP4) expression in astrocytes. Melatonin may also reduce brain edema and exert neuroprotective effect on several central nervous system diseases through inhibition of inflammatory response. The inhibitors of Na/H exchanger, NKCC and AQP4 may attenuate brain edema formation through inhibition of excessive transportation of ion and water from blood into the cerebral tissue. In this review we survey some of the most recent findings in the drug treatment of brain edema focusing on the use of osmotherapy, melatonin and inhibitors of ion cotransporters and water channels. A better understanding of the molecular mechanism of these agents would help to improve in the clinical management of patients with brain edema. PMID:26948324

  9. Fatal diving accidents in western Norway 1983-2007.

    PubMed

    Ramnefjell, M P; Morild, I; Mørk, S J; Lilleng, P K

    2012-11-30

    Despite efforts to reduce their number, fatal diving accidents still occur. The circumstances and post-mortem findings in 40 fatal diving accidents in western Norway from 1983 through 2007 were investigated. Diving experience, medical history and toxicology reports were retrieved. The material consisted of recreational divers, professional saturation divers and professional divers without experience with saturation. In 33 cases the diving equipment was examined as part of the forensic investigation. In 27 cases defects in the diving equipment were found. For six divers such defects were responsible for the fatal accidents. Eighteen divers died on the surface or less than 10 m below surface. Five divers reached below 100 msw, and two of them died at this depth. The fatalities were not season-dependent. However, wave-height and strength of currents were influential factors in some cases. Twelve divers were diving alone. Twenty divers had one buddy, 9 of these divers were alone at the time of death. The cause of death was drowning in 31 out of 40 divers; one of them had a high blood-ethanol concentration, in two other divers ethanol was found in the urine, indicating previous ethanol consumption. Nine divers died from sudden decompression, pulmonary barotraumas, underwater trauma and natural causes. The study shows that most of the fatal diving accidents could be avoided if adequate diving safety procedures had been followed. PMID:22981212

  10. Fatal toxoplasmosis in a vinaceous Amazon parrot (Amazona vinacea).

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Francisco Carlos; Donatti, Rogerio Venâncio; Marques, Marcus Vinícius Romero; Ecco, Roselene; Preis, Ingred Sales; Shivaprasad, H L; Vilela, Daniel Ambrózio da Rocha; Martins, Nelson Rodrigo da Silva

    2012-12-01

    Toxoplasmosis was diagnosed in a vinaceous Amazon parrot based on histopathology and immunohistochemistry. The bird was prostrate on the bottom of the cage and died. Necropsy revealed edema and congestion of the lungs, cloudy air sacs, and mild hepatomegaly. Histopathology revealed severe pulmonary congestion and edema and interstitial mononuclear cell inflammation associated with many cysts containing bradyzoites of Toxoplasma gondii scattered throughout. The heart had mild multifocal lymphocytic myocarditis and free tachyzoites in the muscle fibers, and the kidneys had mild interstitial nephritis and a few cysts containing bradyzoites of T. gondii. Immunohistochemistry was negative for Sarcocystis falcatula and Neospora caninum and confirmed the protozoa as T. gondii. This is the first description of T. gondii in an endangered species ofa Brazilian psittacine. PMID:23397856

  11. Fatal intoxication with methoxetamine.

    PubMed

    Adamowicz, Piotr; Zuba, Dariusz

    2015-01-01

    Methoxetamine (MXE) is a new synthetic drug of abuse structurally related to ketamine and phencyclidine. A case of a 29-year-old male with acute toxicity related to the analytically confirmed use of MXE is reported. The man was found dead at his residence. Biological material was analyzed using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The concentration of MXE in urine of the deceased was 85 μg/mL. Despite the vial containing the blood sample being destroyed during transportation and the blood leaking out into the cardboard packaging, the blood level of MXE was estimated. After determination of the cardboard grammage (approx. 400 g/m(3) ) and the mean mass of the blood obtained after drying (0.1785 ± 0.0173 g per 1 mL), the estimated blood concentration of MXE was found to be 5.8 μg/mL. The high concentration of MXE in blood and urine and the circumstances of the case indicate an unintentional, fatal intoxication with this substance. PMID:25413263

  12. [Fatal rat bites].

    PubMed

    Yanai, O; Goldin, L; Hiss, J

    1999-04-15

    We present a rare case of infant death due to blood loss resulting from multiple rat bites. Domestic dogs and cats cause most animal bites. Bites of a house rat usually cause bacterial infection, successfully treated with antibiotics. There is little information about death due to house rat bites. Since the wounds they cause tend to occur post-mortem, they are usually wedged, clean and without subcutaneous bleeding. An 11-week-old, malnourished infant girl was bitten to death while sleeping in her mother's bed in a rat-infested home. The infant's clothing was covered with blood, parts of her face were missing and marks of gnawing were present on her neck and extremities. There was subcutaneous bleeding around the wounds indicating that they were inflicted while the child was alive. Autopsy findings revealed profound blood loss. We conclude that a combination of low socio-economic status, severe failure to thrive, and poor hygiene in a rat-infested environment contributed to the fatal outcome in this attack. PMID:10955069

  13. Pulmonary embolus

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood clot; Blood clot - lung; Embolus; Tumor embolus; Embolism - pulmonary; DVT-pulmonary embolism; Thrombosis - pulmonary embolism ... x-ray CT angiogram of the chest Pulmonary ventilation/perfusion scan, also called a V/Q scan ...

  14. Global earthquake fatalities and population

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holzer, Thomas L.; Savage, James C.

    2013-01-01

    Modern global earthquake fatalities can be separated into two components: (1) fatalities from an approximately constant annual background rate that is independent of world population growth and (2) fatalities caused by earthquakes with large human death tolls, the frequency of which is dependent on world population. Earthquakes with death tolls greater than 100,000 (and 50,000) have increased with world population and obey a nonstationary Poisson distribution with rate proportional to population. We predict that the number of earthquakes with death tolls greater than 100,000 (50,000) will increase in the 21st century to 8.7±3.3 (20.5±4.3) from 4 (7) observed in the 20th century if world population reaches 10.1 billion in 2100. Combining fatalities caused by the background rate with fatalities caused by catastrophic earthquakes (>100,000 fatalities) indicates global fatalities in the 21st century will be 2.57±0.64 million if the average post-1900 death toll for catastrophic earthquakes (193,000) is assumed.

  15. Pulmonary reactions caused by welding-induced decomposed trichloroethylene

    SciTech Connect

    Sjoegren, B.P.; Plato, N.; Alexandersson, R.; Eklund, A.; Falkenberg, C. )

    1991-01-01

    This is the report of a welder who performed argon-shielded electric arc welding in an atmosphere containing trichloroethylene. He developed immediate respiratory symptoms, pulmonary edema 12 hours after exposure, and recurring dyspnea ten days after exposure. These pulmonary reactions might be explained by inhalation of decomposition products of trichloroethylene such as dichloroacetyl chloride and phosgene.

  16. Fatal and near-fatal animal bite injuries.

    PubMed

    Clark, M A; Sandusky, G E; Hawley, D A; Pless, J E; Fardal, P M; Tate, L R

    1991-07-01

    Fatal and near-fatal maulings of humans by pit bulls have recently become a topic of major public concern, resulting in the passage of laws in some jurisdictions that make the owner of a pit bull criminally liable for manslaughter if his or her pet causes a human death. The authors recently investigated two cases in which children were fatally injured by pet dogs. In the first case, a 17-day-old girl suffered fatal abdominal injuries when attacked by a pregnant Siberian husky. A 2-year-old girl expired from neck wounds inflicted by a pit bull or a rottweiler or both. Because no expert would testify as to which dog caused the fatal injury, the owner of the animals was not charged under a statute which specified criminality only if a pit bull caused the fatal injury. We also examined a 12-year-old boy who attempted to pet a circus tiger; the animal grabbed his arm with its claws and bit off the arm at the shoulder. The arm could not be reattached, but the child survived. These cases and the differentiation of animal bites from other injuries will be presented. PMID:1919485

  17. Factors affecting regional pulmonary blood flow in chronic ischemic heart disease

    SciTech Connect

    Pistolesi, M.; Miniati, M.; Bonsignore, M.; Andreotti, F.; Di Ricco, G.; Marini, C.; Rindi, M.; Biagini, A.; Milne, E.N.; Giuntini, C.

    1988-07-01

    To assess the effect of left heart disease on pulmonary blood flow distribution, we measured mean pulmonary arterial and wedge pressures, cardiac output, pulmonary vascular resistance, pulmonary blood volume, and arterial oxygen tension before and after treatment in 13 patients with longstanding ischemic heart failure and pulmonary edema. Pulmonary edema was evaluated by a radiographic score, and regional lung perfusion was quantified on a lung scan by the upper to lower third ratio (U:L ratio) of pulmonary blood flow per unit of lung volume. In all cases, redistribution of lung perfusion toward the apical regions was observed; this pattern was not affected by treatment. After treatment, pulmonary vascular pressures, resistance, and edema were reduced, while pulmonary blood volume did not change. At this time, pulmonary vascular resistance showed a positive correlation with the U:L ratio (r = 0.78; P less than 0.01), whereas no correlation was observed between U:L ratio and wedge pressure, pulmonary edema, or arterial oxygen tension. Hence, redistribution of pulmonary blood flow, in these patients, reflects chronic structural vascular changes prevailing in the dependent lung regions.

  18. Reinke Edema: Watch For Vocal Fold Cysts.

    PubMed

    Tüzüner, Arzu; Demirci, Sule; Yavanoglu, Ahmet; Kurkcuoglu, Melih; Arslan, Necmi

    2015-06-01

    Reinke edema is one of the common cause of dysphonia middle-aged population, and severe thickening of vocal folds require surgical treatment. Smoking plays a major role on etiology. Vocal fold cysts are also benign lesions and vocal trauma blamed for acquired cysts. We would like to present 3 cases with vocal fold cyst related with Reinke edema. First case had a subepidermal epidermoid cyst with Reinke edema, which could be easily observed before surgery during laryngostroboscopy. Second case had a mucous retention cyst into the edematous Reinke tissue, which was detected during surgical intervention, and third case had a epidermoid cyst that occurred 2 months after before microlaryngeal operation regarding Reinke edema reduction. These 3 cases revealed that surgical management of Reinke edema needs a careful dissection and close follow-up after surgery for presence of vocal fold cysts. PMID:26080256

  19. Occupational Injuries, Illnesses and Fatalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... that was created by Act of Congress and publishes data related to safety, injuries, and fatalities that are both work-related and non-work related. National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) - a government organization that is part of ...

  20. [Toxic and drug-induced lesions of the pulmonary parenchyma].

    PubMed

    Russi, E

    1992-05-01

    Pulmonary tissue may be damaged by certain toxins or drugs in a dose-dependent way or by a hypersensitivity reaction. Pathological changes consist of a permeability pulmonary edema, an alveolar hemorrhage, an alveolitis and finally the formation of pulmonary fibrosis. Ingestion of the weed killer paraquat may induce a rapidly progressive and lethal form of fibrosing alveolitis, the inhalation of nitrous oxides may elicit lung edema. The most common drugs causing lung damage are cytotoxic agents, often used in combination, and the noncytotoxic drugs amiodarone and nitrofurantoin. PMID:1589677

  1. Radiosurgery for brain metastases and cerebral edema.

    PubMed

    Gazit, Inbal; Har-Nof, Sagi; Cohen, Zvi R; Zibly, Zion; Nissim, Uzi; Spiegelmann, Roberto

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this study was to assess reduction in cerebral edema following linear accelerator radiosurgery (LINAC) as first line therapy for brain metastasis. We reviewed the medical records of all patients who underwent LINAC radiosurgery for brain metastasis at our institution during 2010-2012, and who had not previously undergone either surgery or whole brain radiotherapy. Data were analyzed for 55 brain metastases from 46 patients (24 males), mean age 59.9 years. During the 2 months following LINAC radiosurgery, the mean steroid dose decreased from 4.8 to 2.6 mg/day, the mean metastasis volume decreased from 3.79±4.12 cc to 2.8±4.48 cc (p=0.001), and the mean edema volume decreased from 16.91±30.15 cc to 12.85±24.47 cc (p=0.23). The 17 patients with reductions of more than 50% in brain edema volume had single metastases. Edema volume in the nine patients with two brain metastases remained stable in five patients (volume change <10%, 0-2 cc) and increased in four patients (by >10%, 2-14 cc). In a subanalysis of eight metastases with baseline edema volume greater than 40 cc, edema volume decreased from 77.27±37.21 cc to 24.84±35.6 cc (p=0.034). Reductions in brain edema were greater in metastases for which non-small-cell lung carcinoma and breast cancers were the primary diseases. Overall, symptoms improved in most patients. No patients who were without symptoms or who had no signs of increased intracranial pressure at baseline developed signs of intracranial pressure following LINAC radiosurgery. In this series, LINAC stereotactic radiosurgery for metastatic brain lesions resulted in early reduction in brain edema volume in single metastasis patients and those with large edema volumes, and reduced the need for steroids. PMID:25533053

  2. A case of pulmonary tumour thrombotic microangiopathy.

    PubMed

    McAnearney, Shane; Drain, Maire

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary tumour thrombotic microangiopathy (PTTM) is a rapidly progressive pulmonary disease that is a fatal complication of malignancy. It manifests clinically as subacute respiratory failure with pulmonary hypertension, progressive right sided heart failure, and sudden death. We describe here a case of PTTM associated with occult metastatic signet ring cell carcinoma of the stomach. Although rare, PTTM needs to be considered in the differential diagnosis of dyspnoea of unknown origin, particularly in patients with respiratory failure and also pulmonary hypertension, and in patients were there is no improvement in respiratory symptoms with steroid therapy. PMID:26744641

  3. Melatonin lowers edema after spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Li, Cheng; Chen, Xiao; Qiao, Suchi; Liu, Xinwei; Liu, Chang; Zhu, Degang; Su, Jiacan; Wang, Zhiwei

    2014-01-01

    Melatonin has been shown to diminish edema in rats. Melatonin can be used to treat spinal cord injury. This study presumed that melatonin could relieve spinal cord edema and examined how it might act. Our experiments found that melatonin (100 mg/kg, i.p.) could reduce the water content of the spinal cord, and suppress the expression of aquaporin-4 and glial fibrillary acidic protein after spinal cord injury. This suggests that the mechanism by which melatonin alleviates the damage to the spinal cord by edema might be related to the expression of aquaporin-4 and glial fibrillary acidic protein. PMID:25657743

  4. Firearm fatalities in Delhi, India.

    PubMed

    Kohli, Anil; Aggarwal, Narinder Kumar

    2006-10-01

    Studies on firearm fatalities in various countries have been published. However, pattern and incidence of fatal firearm injuries in Delhi has largely gone unreported. This study was taken up with the objective of reporting the pattern and incidence of fatal firearm injuries in Delhi and comparing it with the pattern seen in other countries. One hundred and seven firearm fatalities autopsied during the last 6 years were studied. 46.7% victims were aged between 20 and 30 years and 90.7% were males; similar findings were seen in other countries. 92.6% were victims of homicidal attacks, 6.5% suicidal and 0.9% accidental. This is in sharp contrast to the pattern in other countries where suicides were the predominant group and homicides accounted for a small number of cases. A high presence of illegal country made guns was an explanation for this trend. Single firings were the norm. Chest (39%) and head (29.6%) were the two most common entry sites for the bullets, a pattern somewhat similar to that of other countries. Survival time, cause of death and recovery of projectiles was also studied. Elimination of illegal country made guns is of the utmost importance in order to curb the high homicidal firearm fatality rate in this region. PMID:16963304

  5. Vascular endothelial growth factor A protein level and gene expression in intracranial meningiomas with brain edema.

    PubMed

    Nassehi, Damoun; Dyrbye, Henrik; Andresen, Morten; Thomsen, Carsten; Juhler, Marianne; Laursen, Henning; Broholm, Helle

    2011-12-01

    Meningiomas are the second most common primary intracranial tumors in adults. Although meningiomas are mostly benign, more than 50% of patients with meningioma develop peritumoral brain edema (PTBE), which may be fatal because of increased intracranial pressure. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is an endothelial cell-specific mitogen and angiogen. VEGF-A protein, which is identical to vascular permeability factor, is a regulator of angiogenesis. In this study, 101 patients with meningiomas, and possible co-factors to PTBE, such as meningioma subtypes and tumor location, were examined. Forty-three patients had primary, solitary, supratentorial meningiomas with PTBE. In these, correlations in PTBE, edema index, VEGF-A protein, VEGF gene expression, capillary length, and tumor water content were investigated. DNA-branched hybridization was used for measuring VEGF gene expression in tissue homogenates prepared from frozen tissue samples. The method for VEGF-A analysis resembled an ELISA assay, but was based on chemiluminescence. The edema index was positively correlated to VEGF-A protein (p = 0.014) and VEGF gene expression (p < 0.05). The capillary length in the meningiomas was positively correlated to the PTBE (p = 0.038). If VEGF is responsible for the formation of PTBE, the edema may be treated with the anti-VEGF drug Bevacizumab (Avastin), which has been shown to reduce PTBE in patients with glioblastoma multiforme. PMID:22085359

  6. Levamisole adulterated cocaine and pulmonary vasculitis: Presentation of two lethal cases and brief literature review.

    PubMed

    Karch, Steven B; Busardò, Francesco Paolo; Vaiano, Fabio; Portelli, Francesca; Zaami, Simona; Bertol, Elisabetta

    2016-08-01

    The first case reports of levamisole-related disease in cocaine users were published in 2010, although levamisole adulteration of cocaine was first recognized several years earlier. Currently, more than 70% of street cocaine seizures, in the US and the EU, contain levamisole, which could potentially be converted to aminorex, though the reasons for this practice still remain obscure. Here we report two fatal cases of isolated pulmonary vasculitis in abusers of levamisole-adulterated cocaine, where a complete autopsy, full toxicological analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) using a previously published method of Karch et al. and histological examination were performed. A control group composed of 11 cases of cocaine related deaths, where the presence of levamisole was excluded in blood, urine and hair, was used. Recent literature on the human pharmacokinetics of levamisole and aminorex is also reviewed. The toxicological analysis revealed positive qualitative and quantitative results for cocaine, benzoylecgonine and levamisole in both cases. In case 1 levamisole was found at the concentration of 13.5 and 61.3mg/L in blood and urine respectively, whereas in case 2 at 17.9 and 70.2mg/L. The histological examination highlighted in case 1 in heart samples microscopic evidence of the typical remodeling changes associated with chronic stimulant abuse, whereas lungs showed numerous lymphocytes surrounding and infiltrating the wall of small pulmonary vessels and a perivascular fibrosis with transforming fibroblasts. In case 2, the myocardial samples showed wide fields of myocardial necrosis characterized by hypercontraction of the myocytes with thickened Z-lines and short sarcomeres, whereas lung samples showed a significant intimal thickening of arteriole walls and lymphocytic infiltration of the wall and edema. Moreover, there were also numerous perivascular lymphocytic infiltrates. Although the pathological cardiac findings have allowed us to establish

  7. Perspectives on edema in childhood nephrotic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Teoh, Chia Wei; Robinson, Lisa A; Noone, Damien

    2015-10-01

    There have been two major theories surrounding the development of edema in nephrotic syndrome (NS), namely, the under- and overfill hypotheses. Edema is one of the cardinal features of NS and remains one of the principal reasons for admission of children to the hospital. Recently, the discovery that proteases in the glomerular filtrate of patients with NS are activating the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC), resulting in intrarenal salt retention and thereby contributing to edema, might suggest that targeting ENaC with amiloride might be a suitable strategy to manage the edema of NS. Other potential agents, particularly urearetics and aquaretics, might also prove useful in NS. Recent evidence also suggests that there may be other areas involved in salt storage, especially the skin, and it will be intriguing to study the implications of this in NS. PMID:26290369

  8. Pedal edema associated with atypical antipsychotics

    PubMed Central

    Munshi, Santanu; Mukherjee, Shatavisa; Saha, Indranil; Sen, Sukanta

    2016-01-01

    This study describes a patient diagnosed as a case of bipolar affective disorder complaining of bothersome incidence of pedal edema 1 month after the initiation of atypical antipsychotic regimen with risperidone and quetiapine. All hematological and biochemical profiles were found to be normal. On discontinuation of risperidone, the condition remained unresolved even after 2 weeks, and the edema progressed reaching her calves. On tapering the dose of quetiapine, she started showing gradual improvement in edematous condition. Quetiapine was slowly discontinued. No further recurrence of edema occurred, and hence, no further medication changes were implemented. Pedal edema was found to be resolved within weeks of dechallenge of the regimen. Naranjo adverse drug reaction probability scale gave a score of 7 which denotes “probable” adverse drug reaction with quetiapine. PMID:26997731

  9. Pulmonary embolus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Blood clot - lung; Embolus; Tumor embolus; Embolism - pulmonary; DVT-pulmonary embolism; Thrombosis - pulmonary embolism ... area). This type of clot is called a deep vein thrombosis (DVT) . The blood clot breaks off and travels ...

  10. Pulmonary Rehabilitation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topics Bronchitis COPD Cystic Fibrosis Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis Sarcoidosis Send a link to NHLBI to someone by ... people who have COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), sarcoidosis (sar-koy-DOE-sis), idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis , or ...