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Sample records for fatigue cracking research

  1. Current research on fatigue cracks

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, T.; Jono, M.; Komai, K.

    1987-01-01

    This first volume of CJMR (Current Japanese Materials Research), contains thirteen chapters concerning the above three themes of fatigue cracks. Each chapter is not a single paper as appearing in many academic journals and transactions, but a systematic review of the current achievement by each author with the emphasis on important points. The common feature is that the elaborated experimental techniques and theoretical approaches, some of which are quite unique, are introduced by respective authors to make clear the difficulty arising in the observation of small cracks and analysis of data. Theoretical models are proposed from the viewpoint of fracture mechanics to link the two thresholds of fatigue limit and crack growth, and intensive discussions are made for further development of the theory. Threshold stress intensity factors and the growth rate of medium and long sized cracks are also discussed, together with their opening behavior. The influencing factors are plastic zone size, the stress ratio and residual stress distribution occurring in welded joints. Mode II crack growth is of great significance since the initial fatigue cracks propagate mainly in shear mode. The problems of fatigue crack growth in corrosive environment is highly important since its retardation and enhancement take place in structural steels affected by the variety of factors. Life prediction in such environments poses another important problem. These are systematically discussed in this book.

  2. Fatigue-Crack-Tip Locator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Namkung, Min; Clendenin, C. Gerald; Wincheski, Buzz; Fulton, James P.; Todhunter, Ronald G.; Simpson, John W.

    1994-01-01

    Fatigue-testing system includes automated subsystem continuously tracking location of fatigue-crack tip in metal or other highly electrically conductive specimen. Fatigue-crack-tip-locating subsystem also searches specimen to find initial fatigue crack and its tip and to trace out hidden fatigue cracks and other flaws inside specimen. Subsystem operates under overall control of personal computer, which also controls load frame applying prescribed cyclic stresses to specimen. Electromagnetic flaw detector based on eddy-current principle scanned over surface of specimen. Flaw detector described in "Electromagnetic Flaw Detector Is Easier To Use" (LAR-15046). System provides automated control and monitoring of fatigue experiments, saving time for researchers and enabling experiments to run unattended 24 hours a day. All information on crack-tip trajectories and rates of growth of cracks recorded automatically, so researchers have access to more information.

  3. Crack tip deformation and fatigue crack growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, H.-W.

    1981-01-01

    Recent research on fatigue crack growth is summarized. Topics discussed include the use of the differential stress intensity factor to characterize crack tip deformation, the use of the unzipping model to study the growth of microcracks and the fatigue crack growth in a ferritic-martensitic steel, and the development of a model of fatige crack growth threshold. It is shown that in the case of small yielding, the differential stress intensity factor provides an adequate description of cyclic plastic deformation at the crack tip and correlates well with the crack growth rate. The unzipping model based on crack tip shear decohesion process is found to be in good agreement with the measured crack growth and striation spacing measurements. The proposed model of crack growth threshold gives correct predictions of the crack growth behavior in the near-threshold region.

  4. Mechanics of fatigue crack closure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr. (Editor); Elber, Wolf (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    Papers are presented on plasticity induced crack closure, crack closure in fatigue crack growth, the dependence of crack closure on fatigue loading variables, and a procedure for standardizing crack closure levels. Also considered are a statistical approach to crack closure determination, the crack closure behavior of surface cracks under pure bending, closure measurements on short fatigue cracks, and crack closure under plane strain conditions. Other topics include fatigue crack closure behavior at high stress ratios, the use of acoustic waves for the characterization of closed fatigue cracks, and the influence of fatigue crack wake length and state of stress on crack closure.

  5. Random loading fatigue crack growth: Crack closure considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ortiz, Keith

    1987-01-01

    The prediction of fatigue crack growth is an important element of effective fracture control for metallic structures and mechanical components, especially in the aerospace industry. The prediction techniques available and applied today are mostly based on fatigue crack growth measurements determined in constant amplitude testing. However, while many service loadings are constant amplitude, many more loadings are random amplitude. An investigation to determine which statistics of random loadings are relevant to fatigue crack closure was conducted. The fundamentals of random processes and crack closure are briefly reviewed, then the relevance of certain random process parameters to the crack closure calculation are discussed qualitatively. A course for further research is outlined.

  6. Research on fatigue cracking growth parameters in asphaltic mixtures using computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braz, D.; Lopes, R. T.; Motta, L. M. G.

    2004-01-01

    Distress of asphalt concrete pavement due to repeated bending from traffic loads has been a well-recognized problem in Brazil. If it is assumed that fatigue cracking growth is governed by the conditions at the crack tip, and that the crack tip conditions can be characterized by the stress intensity factor, then fatigue cracking growth as a function of stress intensity range Δ K can be determined. Computed tomography technique is used to detect crack evolution in asphaltic mixtures which were submitted to fatigue tests. Fatigue tests under conditions of controlled stress were carried out using diametral compression equipment and repeat loading. The aim of this work is imaging several specimens at different stages of the fatigue tests. In preliminary studies it was noted that the trajectory of a crack was influenced by the existence of voids in the originally unloaded specimens. Cracks would first be observed in the central region of a specimen, propagating in the direction of the extremities. Analyzing the graphics, that represent the fatigue cracking growth (d c/d N) as a function of stress intensity factor (Δ K), it is noticed that the curve has practically shown the same behavior for all specimens at the same level of the static tension rupture stress. The experimental values obtained for the constants A and n (of the Paris-Erdogan Law) present good agreement with the results obtained by Liang and Zhou.

  7. Mode II fatigue crack propagation.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, R.; Kibler, J. J.

    1971-01-01

    Fatigue crack propagation rates were obtained for 2024-T3 bare aluminum plates subjected to in-plane, mode I, extensional loads and transverse, mode II, bending loads. These results were compared to the results of Iida and Kobayashi for in-plane mode I-mode II extensional loads. The engineering significance of mode I-mode II fatigue crack growth is considered in view of the present results. A fatigue crack growth equation for handling mode I-mode II fatigue crack growth rates from existing mode I data is also discussed.

  8. Fatigue-Crack-Growth Structural Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Elastic and plastic deformations calculated under variety of loading conditions. Prediction of fatigue-crack-growth lives made with FatigueCrack-Growth Structural Analysis (FASTRAN) computer program. As cyclic loads are applied to initial crack configuration, FASTRAN predicts crack length and other parameters until complete break occurs. Loads are tensile or compressive and of variable or constant amplitude. FASTRAN incorporates linear-elastic fracture mechanics with modifications of load-interaction effects caused by crack closure. FASTRAN considered research tool, because of lengthy calculation times. FASTRAN written in FORTRAN IV for batch execution.

  9. Corrosion fatigue crack propagation in metals

    SciTech Connect

    Gangloff, R.P.

    1990-06-01

    This review assesses fracture mechanics data and mechanistic models for corrosion fatigue crack propagation in structural alloys exposed to ambient temperature gases and electrolytes. Extensive stress intensity-crack growth rate data exist for ferrous, aluminum and nickel based alloys in a variety of environments. Interactive variables (viz., stress intensity range, mean stress, alloy composition and microstructure, loading frequency, temperature, gas pressure and electrode potential) strongly affect crack growth kinetics and complicate fatigue control. Mechanistic models to predict crack growth rates were formulated by coupling crack tip mechanics with occluded crack chemistry, and from both the hydrogen embrittlement and anodic dissolution/film rupture perspectives. Research is required to better define: (1) environmental effects near threshold and on crack closure; (2) damage tolerant life prediction codes and the validity of similitude; (3) the behavior of microcrack; (4) probes and improved models of crack tip damage; and (5) the cracking performance of advanced alloys and composites.

  10. Corrosion fatigue crack propagation in metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangloff, Richard P.

    1990-01-01

    This review assesses fracture mechanics data and mechanistic models for corrosion fatigue crack propagation in structural alloys exposed to ambient temperature gases and electrolytes. Extensive stress intensity-crack growth rate data exist for ferrous, aluminum and nickel based alloys in a variety of environments. Interactive variables (viz., stress intensity range, mean stress, alloy composition and microstructure, loading frequency, temperature, gas pressure and electrode potential) strongly affect crack growth kinetics and complicate fatigue control. Mechanistic models to predict crack growth rates were formulated by coupling crack tip mechanics with occluded crack chemistry, and from both the hydrogen embrittlement and anodic dissolution/film rupture perspectives. Research is required to better define: (1) environmental effects near threshold and on crack closure; (2) damage tolerant life prediction codes and the validity of similitude; (3) the behavior of microcrack; (4) probes and improved models of crack tip damage; and (5) the cracking performance of advanced alloys and composites.

  11. Fatigue crack propagation in aerospace aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangloff, R. P.; Piascik, R. S.; Dicus, D. L.; Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reviews fracture mechanics based, damage tolerant characterizations and predictions of fatigue crack growth in aerospace aluminum alloys. The results of laboratory experimentation and modeling are summarized in the areas of: (1) fatigue crack closure, (2) the wide range crack growth rate response of conventional aluminum alloys, (3) the fatigue behavior of advanced monolithic aluminum alloys and metal matrix composites, (4) the short crack problem, (5) environmental fatigue, and (6) variable amplitude loading. Remaining uncertainties and necessary research are identified. This work provides a foundation for the development of fatigue resistant alloys and composites, next generation life prediction codes for new structural designs and extreme environments, and to counter the problem of aging components.

  12. Fatigue crack layer propagation in silicon-iron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birol, Y.; Welsch, G.; Chudnovsky, A.

    1986-01-01

    Fatigue crack propagation in metal is almost always accompanied by plastic deformation unless conditions strongly favor brittle fracture. The analysis of the plastic zone is crucial to the understanding of crack propagation behavior as it governs the crack growth kinetics. This research was undertaken to study the fatigue crack propagation in a silicon iron alloy. Kinetic and plasticity aspects of fatigue crack propagation in the alloy were obtained, including the characterization of damage evolution.

  13. Peridynamic model for fatigue cracking.

    SciTech Connect

    Silling, Stewart Andrew; Abe Askari

    2014-10-01

    The peridynamic theory is an extension of traditional solid mechanics in which the field equations can be applied on discontinuities, such as growing cracks. This paper proposes a bond damage model within peridynamics to treat the nucleation and growth of cracks due to cyclic loading. Bond damage occurs according to the evolution of a variable called the "remaining life" of each bond that changes over time according to the cyclic strain in the bond. It is shown that the model reproduces the main features of S-N data for typical materials and also reproduces the Paris law for fatigue crack growth. Extensions of the model account for the effects of loading spectrum, fatigue limit, and variable load ratio. A three-dimensional example illustrates the nucleation and growth of a helical fatigue crack in the torsion of an aluminum alloy rod.

  14. Analysis of fatigue crack propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, H. W.

    1972-01-01

    The correlation between fatigue crack propagation and stress intensity factor is analyzed. When determining fatigue crack propagation rate, a crack increment, delta a, and its corresponding increment in load cycles, delta N, are measured. Fatigue crack propagation must be caused by a shear and/or a normal separation mode. Both of these two processes are discrete if one looks at the atomic level. If the average deformation and fracture properties over the crack increments, delta a, can be considered as homogeneous, if the characteristic discrete lengths of sigma a, if the plastic zone size is small, and if a plate is thick enough to insure a plane strain case, da/dN is proportional to delta K squared. Any deviation of empirical data from this relation must be caused by the fact that one or more of these conditions are not satisfied. The effects of plate thickness and material inhomogeneity are discussed in detail. A shear separation mode of fatigue crack propagation is described and is used to illustrate the effects of material inhomogeneity.

  15. TV fatigue crack monitoring system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Exton, R. J. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    An apparatus is disclosed for monitoring the development and growth of fatigue cracks in a test specimen subjected to a pulsating tensile load. A plurality of television cameras photograph a test specimen which is illuminated at the point of maximum tensile stress. The television cameras have a modified vidicon tube which has an increased persistence time thereby eliminating flicker in the displayed images.

  16. On the stochastic fatigue crack growth problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enneking, Thomas Joseph

    The research focuses on continuous and discrete stochastic models for fatigue crack growth which are based on Markov process theory. These models account for the random nature of fatigue crack growth which is not adequately explained by a deterministic approach. A hybrid finite element/finite difference solution methodology is developed and shown to be highly effective in determining the solution of the backward Kolmogorov equation and the Pontryagin-Vitt equation yielding the probabilistic description of the time to reach a critical crack size as a function of the initial crack size. Excellent comparisons are shown between this method, previous analytical studies, and experimental results. A significant reduction in computer processing time and storage is achieved with this approach. Alternatively, the forward Fokker-Planck-Kolmogorov equation is formulated, and a two-dimensional initial boundary value problem developed, to determine the distribution of crack sizes as a function of time. A two-dimensional finite element solution approach is used for problem solution. A major advantage of this problem formulation is that the entire probability density function is obtained as a function of cycle number. Studies of discrete Markov process models are also considered for the characterization of fatigue crack growth. A cell-to-cell mapping approach, which has been effectively utilized for other two-state problems in stochastic dynamics, is developed for the stochastic fatigue crack growth problem. In this approach the transitional probability matrix for crack transition from cell i to any other cell is determined using simulation with a two-state lognormal random process model. Repeated matrix multiplication is then used to determine the distribution of crack lengths at other times for a given initial flow size distribution. The effect of varying the initial fatigue quality may be evaluated without repeating the simulation of the probability transition matrix

  17. Shear fatigue crack growth - A literature survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, H. W.

    1985-01-01

    Recent studies of shear crack growth are reviewed, emphasizing test methods and data analyses. The combined mode I and mode II elastic crack tip stress fields are considered. The development and design of the compact shear specimen are described, and the results of fatigue crack growth tests using compact shear specimens are reviewed. The fatigue crack growth tests are discussed and the results of inclined cracks in tensile panels, center cracks in plates under biaxial loading, cracked beam specimens with combined bending and shear loading, center-cracked panels and double edge-cracked plates under cyclic shear loading are examined and analyzed in detail.

  18. Monitoring fatigue cracks in gears

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalpiaz, G.; Meneghetti, U.

    1991-12-01

    Vibration analysis is the most common means of gear monitoring and diagnostics. Gear vibration is affected by faults but the signal is usually picked up at the case, where it is also affected by the structural response. An appropriate filtering function is therefore proposed to recover the torsional gear vibration from the case vibration signal. The restored gear vibration can then be used with greater confidence than case vibration both for particular diagnostics purposes like crack detection and for more general objectives. This technique and its possible advantages in fatigue crack detection are illustrated in the paper.

  19. Effect of crack surface geometry on fatigue crack closure

    SciTech Connect

    Drury, W.J.; Gokhale, A.M.; Antolovich, S.D.

    1995-10-01

    The geometry of crack faces often plays a critical role in reducing crack extension forces when crack closure occurs during fatigue crack growth. Most previous studies of fatigue crack closure are concerned with mechanical measure of closure as related to the crack growth rate; very little attention has been given to the geometry of the crack surfaces. The objective is to identify those aspects of crack surface geometry that are important in the closure process, to develop quantitative fractographic techniques to estimate such attributes in a statistically significant and robust manner, and to correlate them to the physical process of crack closure. For this purpose, fatigue crack propagation experiments were performed on a Ni-base superalloy and crack growth rates and crack closure loads were measured. Digital image profilometry and software-based analysis techniques were used for statistically reliable and detailed quantitative characterization of fatigue crack profiles. It is shown that the dimensionless, scale-independent attributes, such a height-to-width ratio of asperities, fractal dimensions, dimensionless roughness parameters, etc., do not represent the aspects of crack geometry that are of primary importance in the crack closure phenomena. Furthermore, it is shown that the scale-dependent characteristics, such as average asperity height, do represent the aspects of crack geometry that play an interactive role in the closure process. These observations have implications concerning the validity of geometry-dependent, closure-based models for fatigue crack growth.

  20. Effect of crack surface geometry on fatigue crack closure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drury, W. J.; Gokhale, Arun M.; Antolovich, S. D.

    1995-10-01

    The geometry of crack faces often plays a critical role in reducing crack extension forces when crack closure occurs during fatigue crack growth. Most previous studies of fatigue crack closure are concerned with mechanical measures of closure as related to the crack growth rate; very little attention has been given to the geometry of the crack surfaces. Our objective is to identify those aspects of crack surface geometry that are important in the closure process, to develop quantitative fractographic techniques to estimate such attributes in a statistically significant and robust manner, and to correlate them to the physical process of crack closure. For this purpose, fatigue crack propagation experiments were performed on a Ni-base superalloy and crack growth rates and crack closure loads were measured. Digital image profilometry and software-based analysis techniques were used for statistically reliable and detailed quantitative characterization of fatigue crack profiles. It is shown that the dimensionless, scale-independent attributes, such as height-to-width ratio of asperities, fractal dimensions, dimensionless roughness parameters, etc., do not represent the aspects of crack geometry that are of primary importance in the crack closure phenomena. Furthermore, it is shown that the scaledependent characteristics, such as average asperity height, do represent the aspects of crack geometry that play an interactive role in the closure process. These observations have implications concerning the validity of geometry-dependent, closure-based models for fatigue crack growth.

  1. A review of fatigue crack growth analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, H. W.

    1991-01-01

    Stress intensity factor range, Delta K, has been shown to correlate well with fatigue crack growth rate, da/dN. A number of fatigue crack growth theories have been developed for such correlations. Often, conjectory theories of fatigue crack growth are constructed from experimental data. On the other hand, fatigue crack growth theories can also be derived rigorously with deductive logic. Four such deductive theories are reviewed: (1) that for the growth of a small crack in a very wide homogeneous plate, (2) the theory of similitude for the correlation of da/dN with Delta K, (3) a theory of crack growth in homogeneous materials in small-scale yielding, and (4) the unzipping theory of fatigue crack growth. This paper synthesizes these four theories into a logic framework useful for fatigue crack growth analysis. The deductive theories and the conjectory theories complement each other in the advances of the understanding of fatigue crack growth. The applications of logic framework to formulating an overview of fatigue crack growth behavior and to defining the complex issues of the growth of small cracks and crack growth in composites are illustrated.

  2. Detecting Gear Tooth Fatigue Cracks in Advance of Complete Fracture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zakrajsek, James J.; Lewicki, David G.

    1996-01-01

    Results of using vibration-based methods to detect gear tooth fatigue cracks are presented. An experimental test rig was used to fail a number of spur gear specimens through bending fatigue. The gear tooth fatigue crack in each test was initiated through a small notch in the fillet area of a tooth on the gear. The primary purpose of these tests was to verify analytical predictions of fatigue crack propagation direction and rate as a function of gear rim thickness. The vibration signal from a total of three tests was monitored and recorded for gear fault detection research. The damage consisted of complete rim fracture on the two thin rim gears and single tooth fracture on the standard full rim test gear. Vibration-based fault detection methods were applied to the vibration signal both on-line and after the tests were completed. The objectives of this effort were to identify methods capable of detecting the fatigue crack and to determine how far in advance of total failure positive detection was given. Results show that the fault detection methods failed to respond to the fatigue crack prior to complete rim fracture in the thin rim gear tests. In the standard full rim gear test all of the methods responded to the fatigue crack in advance of tooth fracture; however, only three of the methods responded to the fatigue crack in the early stages of crack propagation.

  3. The three thresholds for fatigue crack propagation

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, K.J.

    1997-12-01

    The three governing threshold conditions in metal fatigue are considered, one relating to crack growth in single crystals, one concerned with crack growth in polycrystalline materials, and one based on linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM). All three conditions are examined in relation to the two physical processes of cracking, i.e., Stage I (shear) and Stage II (tensile) crack growth. The LEFM threshold is seen as a lower bound condition for fatigue crack growth rate, and the single crystal threshold is viewed in relation to the fundamental threshold pertaining to the fatigue resistance of polycrystalline metals.

  4. Visual simulation of fatigue crack growth

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, S.; Margolin, H.; Lin, F.B.

    1998-07-01

    An attempt has been made to visually simulate fatigue crack propagation from a precrack. An integrated program was developed for this purpose. The crack-tip shape was determined at four load positions in the first load cycle. The final shape was a blunt front with an ear profile at the precrack tip. A more general model, schematically illustrating the mechanism of fatigue crack growth and striation formation in a ductile material, was proposed based on this simulation. According to the present model, fatigue crack growth is an intermittent process; cyclic plastic shear strain is the driving force applied to both state 1 and 2 crack growth. No fracture mode transition occurs between the two stages in the present study. The crack growth direction alternates, moving up and down successively, producing fatigue striations. A brief examination has been made of the crack growth path in a ductile two-phase material.

  5. Jumplike fatigue crack growth in compressor blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limar', L. V.; Demina, Yu. A.; Botvina, L. R.

    2014-04-01

    It is shown that power relations between the two main fractographic characteristics of fracture surfaces forming during jumplike fatigue crack growth, namely, the crack depth and the corresponding crack front length, can be used to estimate the fracture stress during vibration tests of the compressor blades of an aviation gas turbine engine, which are made of VT3-1 titanium alloy.

  6. Crack tip field and fatigue crack growth in general yielding and low cycle fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minzhong, Z.; Liu, H. W.

    1984-01-01

    Fatigue life consists of crack nucleation and crack propagation periods. Fatigue crack nucleation period is shorter relative to the propagation period at higher stresses. Crack nucleation period of low cycle fatigue might even be shortened by material and fabrication defects and by environmental attack. In these cases, fatigue life is largely crack propagation period. The characteristic crack tip field was studied by the finite element method, and the crack tip field is related to the far field parameters: the deformation work density, and the product of applied stress and applied strain. The cyclic carck growth rates in specimens in general yielding as measured by Solomon are analyzed in terms of J-integral. A generalized crack behavior in terms of delta is developed. The relations between J and the far field parameters and the relation for the general cyclic crack growth behavior are used to analyze fatigue lives of specimens under general-yielding cyclic-load. Fatigue life is related to the applied stress and strain ranges, the deformation work density, crack nucleus size, fracture toughness, fatigue crack growth threshold, Young's modulus, and the cyclic yield stress and strain. The fatigue lives of two aluminum alloys correlate well with the deformation work density as depicted by the derived theory. The general relation is reduced to Coffin-Manson low cycle fatigue law in the high strain region.

  7. On fatigue crack growth under random loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, W. Q.; Lin, Y. K.; Lei, Y.

    1992-09-01

    A probabilistic analysis of the fatigue crack growth, fatigue life and reliability of a structural or mechanical component is presented on the basis of fracture mechanics and theory of random processes. The material resistance to fatigue crack growth and the time-history of the stress are assumed to be random. Analytical expressions are obtained for the special case in which the random stress is a stationary narrow-band Gaussian random process, and a randomized Paris-Erdogan law is applicable. As an example, the analytical method is applied to a plate with a central crack, and the results are compared with those obtained from digital Monte Carlo simulations.

  8. Fatigue crack propagation analysis of plaque rupture.

    PubMed

    Pei, Xuan; Wu, Baijian; Li, Zhi-Yong

    2013-10-01

    Rupture of atheromatous plaque is the major cause of stroke or heart attack. Considering that the cardiovascular system is a classic fatigue environment, plaque rupture was treated as a chronic fatigue crack growth process in this study. Fracture mechanics theory was introduced to describe the stress status at the crack tip and Paris' law was used to calculate the crack growth rate. The effect of anatomical variation of an idealized plaque cross-section model was investigated. The crack initiation was considered to be either at the maximum circumferential stress location or at any other possible locations around the lumen. Although the crack automatically initialized at the maximum circumferential stress location usually propagated faster than others, it was not necessarily the most critical location where the fatigue life reached its minimum. We found that the fatigue life was minimum for cracks initialized in the following three regions: the midcap zone, the shoulder zone, and the backside zone. The anatomical variation has a significant influence on the fatigue life. Either a decrease in cap thickness or an increase in lipid pool size resulted in a significant decrease in fatigue life. Comparing to the previously used stress analysis, this fatigue model provides some possible explanations of plaque rupture at a low stress level in a pulsatile cardiovascular environment, and the method proposed here may be useful for further investigation of the mechanism of plaque rupture based on in vivo patient data. PMID:23897295

  9. Asphalt overlay design methods for rigid pavements considering rutting, reflection cracking, and fatigue cracking. Research report September 1996--August 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Y.H.; Liu, C.; Dossey, T.; McCullough, B.F.

    1998-10-01

    An asphalt concrete pavement (ACP) overlay over a rigid pavement represents a viable rehabilitation strategy. It can provide good serviceability at an initial construction cost that is substantially less than that of a rigid overlay rehabilitation. In addition, ACP overlays require less construction time, which can reduce user costs during construction. However, it may not be the most economical solution for long-term rehabilitation. Because of their relatively short service life, ACP overlays may require maintenance sooner than rigid overlays. And one of the more critical distresses that effectively determine the life span of the structure is reflection cracking. This report investigates alternative strategies that seek to prevent reflection cracking on ACP overlays.

  10. Reliability Studies for Fatigue-Crack Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christner, B. K.; Rummel, W. D.; Knadler, J.

    1985-01-01

    Reusable test panels available to assess reliability of techniques that use fluorescent penetrant to detect fatigue cracks. Ultrasonic cleaning method developed for removing penetrant from panels prior to reuse.

  11. Fatigue life and crack growth prediction methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.; Phillips, E. P.; Everett, R. A., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    The capabilities of a plasticity-induced crack-closure model and life-prediction code to predict fatigue crack growth and fatigue lives of metallic materials are reviewed. Crack-tip constraint factors, to account for three-dimensional effects, were selected to correlate large-crack growth rate data as a function of the effective-stress-intensity factor range (delta(K(sub eff))) under constant-amplitude loading. Some modifications to the delta(K(sub eff))-rate relations were needed in the near threshold regime to fit small-crack growth rate behavior and endurance limits. The model was then used to calculate small- and large-crack growth rates, and in some cases total fatigue lives, for several aluminum and titanium alloys under constant-amplitude, variable-amplitude, and spectrum loading. Fatigue lives were calculated using the crack growth relations and microstructural features like those that initiated cracks. Results from the tests and analyses agreed well.

  12. On Generating Fatigue Crack Growth Thresholds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forth, Scott C.; Newman, James, Jr.; Forman, Royce G.

    2003-01-01

    The fatigue crack growth threshold, defining crack growth as either very slow or nonexistent, has been traditionally determined with standardized load reduction methodologies. These experimental procedures can induce load history effects that result in crack closure. This history can affect the crack driving force, i.e. during the unloading process the crack will close first at some point along the wake or blunt at the crack tip, reducing the effective load at the crack tip. One way to reduce the effects of load history is to propagate a crack under constant amplitude loading. As a crack propagates under constant amplitude loading, the stress intensity factor range, Delta K, will increase, as will the crack growth rate. da/dN. A fatigue crack growth threshold test procedure is experimentally validated that does not produce load history effects and can be conducted at a specified stress ratio, R. The authors have chosen to study a ductile aluminum alloy where the plastic deformations generated during testing may be of the magnitude to impact the crack opening.

  13. Identifying fatigue crack geometric features from acoustic emission signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Jingjing; Poddar, Banibrata; Giurgiutiu, Victor

    2016-04-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) caused by the growth of fatigue crack were well studied by researchers. Conventional approaches predominantly are based on statistical analysis. In this study we focus on identifying geometric features of the crack from the AE signals using physics based approach. One of the main challenges of this approach is to develop a physics of materials based understanding of the generation and propagation of acoustic emissions due to the growth of a fatigue crack. As the geometry changes due to the crack growth, so does the local vibration modes around the crack. Our aim is to understand these changing local vibration modes and find possible relation between the AE signal features and the geometric features of the crack. Finite element (FE) analysis was used to model AE events due to fatigue crack growth. This was done using dipole excitation at the crack tips. Harmonic analysis was also performed on these FE models to understand the local vibration modes. Experimental study was carried out to verify these results. Piezoelectric wafer active sensors (PWAS) were used to excite cracked specimen and the local vibration modes were captured using laser Doppler vibrometry. The preliminary results show that the AE signals do carry the information related to the crack geometry.

  14. Fatigue Crack Growth in Bodies with Thermally Sprayed Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovářík, O.; Haušild, P.; Medřický, J.; Tomek, L.; Siegl, J.; Mušálek, R.; Curry, N.; Björklund, S.

    2016-01-01

    Many applications of thermally sprayed coatings call for increased fatigue resistance of coated parts. Despite the intensive research in this area, the influence of coating on fatigue is still not completely understood. In this paper, the localization of crack initiation sites and the dynamics of crack propagation are studied. The resonance bending fatigue test was employed to test flat specimens with both sides coated. Hastelloy-X substrates coated with classical thermal barrier coating consisting of yttria stabilized zirconia and NiCoCrAlY layers. The strain distribution on the coating surface was evaluated by the Digital Image Correlation method through the whole duration of the fatigue test. Localization of crack initiation sites and the mode of crack propagation in the coated specimen are related to the observed resonance frequency. The individual phases of specimen degradation, i.e., the changes of material properties, crack initiation, and crack propagation, were identified. The tested coatings strongly influenced the first two phases, and the influence on the crack propagation was less significant. In general, the presented crack detection method can be used as a sensitive nondestructive testing method well suited for coated parts.

  15. Fracture mechanics parameters for small fatigue cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents a review of some common small-crack test specimens, the underlying causes of the small-crack effect, and the fracture-mechanics parameters that have been used to correlate or predict their growth behavior. This review concentrates on continuum mechanics concepts and on the nonlinear behavior of small cracks. The paper reviews some stress-intensity factor solutions for small-crack test specimens and develops some simple elastic-plastic J integral and cyclic J integral expressions that include the influence of crack-closure. These parameters were applied to small-crack growth data on two aluminum alloys, and a fatigue life prediction methodology is demonstrated. For these materials, the crack-closure transient from the plastic wake was found to be the major factor in causing the small-crack effect.

  16. Fatigue life and crack growth prediction methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.; Phillips, E. P.; Everett, Richard A., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    This paper reviews the capabilities of a plasticity-induced crack-closure model and life-prediction code to predict fatigue crack growth and fatigue lives of metallic materials. Crack-tip constraint factors, to account for three-dimensional effects, were selected to correlate large-crack growth rate data as a function of the effective stress-intensity factor range (Delta K(sub eff)) under constant amplitude loading. Some modifications to the Delta K(sub eff)-rate relations were needed in the near threshold regime to fit small-crackgrowth rate behavior and endurance limits. The model was then used to calculate small- and large-crack growth rates, and in some cases total fatigue lives, for several aluminum and titanium alloys under constant-amplitude, variable-amplitude, and spectrum loading. Fatigue lives were calculated using the crack-growth relations and microstructural features like those that initiated cracks. Results from the tests and analyses agreed well.

  17. Three-dimensional measurements of fatigue crack closure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, S. K.; Grandt, A. F., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Fatigue crack growth and retardation experiments conducted in polycarbonate test specimen are described. The transparent test material allows optical interferometry measurements of the fatigue crack opening (and closing) profiles. Crack surface displacements are obtained through the specimen thickness and three dimensional aspects of fatigue crack closure are discussed.

  18. Fatigue crack growth in metastable austenitic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Mei, Z.; Chang, G.; Morris, J.W. Jr.

    1988-06-01

    The research reported here is an investigation of the influence of the mechanically induced martensitic transformation on the fatigue crack growth rate in 304-type steels. The alloys 304L and 304LN were used to test the influence of composition, the testing temperatures 298 K and 77 K were used to study the influence of test temperature, and various load ratios (R) were used to determine the influence of the load ratio. It was found that decreasing the mechanical stability of the austenite by changing composition or lowering temperature decreases the fatigue crack growth rate. The R-ratio effect is more subtle. The fatigue crack growth rate increases with increasing R-ratio, even though this change increases the martensite transformation. Transformation-induced crack closure can explain the results in the threshold regime, but cannot explain the R-ratio effect at higher cyclic stress intensities. 26 refs., 6 figs.

  19. Fatigue Crack Growth Threshold Testing of Metallic Rotorcraft Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, John A.; James, Mark A.; Johnson, William M.; Le, Dy D.

    2008-01-01

    Results are presented for a program to determine the near-threshold fatigue crack growth behavior appropriate for metallic rotorcraft alloys. Four alloys, all commonly used in the manufacture of rotorcraft, were selected for study: Aluminum alloy 7050, 4340 steel, AZ91E Magnesium, and Titanium alloy Ti-6Al-4V (beta-STOA). The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) sponsored this research to advance efforts to incorporate damage tolerance design and analysis as requirements for rotorcraft certification. Rotorcraft components are subjected to high cycle fatigue and are typically subjected to higher stresses and more stress cycles per flight hour than fixed-wing aircraft components. Fatigue lives of rotorcraft components are generally spent initiating small fatigue cracks that propagate slowly under near-threshold cracktip loading conditions. For these components, the fatigue life is very sensitive to the near-threshold characteristics of the material.

  20. Fatigue crack growth automated testing method

    SciTech Connect

    Hatch, P.W.; VanDenAvyle, J.A.; Laing, J.

    1989-06-01

    A computer controlled servo-hydraulic mechanical test system has been configured to conduct automated fatigue crack growth testing. This provides two major benefits: it allows continuous cycling of specimens without operator attention over evenings and weekends; and complex load histories, including random loading and spectrum loading, can be applied to the specimens to simulate cyclic loading of engineering structures. The software is written in MTS Multi-User Basic to control test machine output and acquire data at predetermined intervals. Compact tension specimens are cycled according to ASTM specification E647-86. Fatigue crack growth is measured via specimen compliance during the test using a compliance/crack length calibration determined earlier by visual crack length measurements. This setup was used to measure crack growth rates in 6063 aluminum alloy for a variety of cyclic loadings, including spectrum loads. Data collected compared well with tests run manually. 13 figs.

  1. Fatigue crack growth in lithium hydride

    SciTech Connect

    Healy, T.E.

    1993-09-01

    Subcritical fatigue crack growth, from cyclic tensile loading, was demonstrated in warm pressed Polycrystalline lithium hydride. Experiments were performed with cyclic tension-tension crack opening (mode I) loads applied to a pre-cracked compact type specimen in an argon environment at a temperature of 21C (70F). The fatigue crack growth was found to occur between 7.56 {times} 10{sup {minus}ll} M/cycle (2.98 {times} l0{sup {minus}9} in/cycle) and 2.35 {times} l0{sup {minus}8} m/cycle (9.24{times}10{sup {minus}7} in/cycle) for a range of stress intensity factors between 1.04 MPa{center_dot}{radical}m (0.95 ksi{center_dot}{radical}in) and 1.49 MPa{center_dot}{radical}m (1.36 ksi{center_dot}{radical}in). The rate of fatigue crack growth from cyclic tensile loading was found to be in excess of crack growth from sustained loading at an equivalent stress intensity factor. Furthermore, a fatigue threshold was not evident from the acquired data.

  2. Fatigue and fracture research in metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.; Davidson, J. R.

    1982-01-01

    Fatigue and fracture research on monolithic and laminated metals is discussed. The research concentrated on three areas: stress analyses of two and three dimensional cracked bodies, fatigue crack growth, and fracture toughness. Analytical methods were developed to predict fatigue crack growth and fracture strengths of cracked specimens. Such specimens represent typical aircraft structural details (such as cracks from holes). These specimens were subjected to simple constant amplitude loading and to more complex flight load histories. Test data from both in house tests and from the literature are used to substantiate the analytical methods. These analyses extended the theory of fracture mechanics to deal with fatigue crack growth and fracture of complex crack configurations that are typical of aircraft materials and structural details.

  3. Fatigue crack nucleation in metallic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Peralta, P.; Laird, C.; Ramamurty, U.; Suresh, S.; Campbell, G.H.; King, W.E.; Mitchell, T.E.

    1999-04-01

    The process of fatigue crack nucleation in metallic materials is reviewed placing emphasis in results derived for pure FCC metals with wavy slip behavior. The relationship between Persistent Slip Bands (PSB`s) and crack initiation will be examined for both single crystals and polycrystals, including the conditions for inter- and transgranular crack nucleation and their connection to type of loading, crystallography and slip geometry. The latter has been found to be an important parameter in the nucleation of intergranular cracks in polycrystals subjected to high strain fatigue, whereby primary slip bands with long slip lengths impinging on a grain boundary produce intergranular crack nucleation under the right conditions. Recent results related to intergranular crack nucleation in copper bicrystals and crack nucleation in Cu/Sapphire interfaces indicate that this mechanism controls crack nucleation in those simpler systems as well. Furthermore, it is found that under multiple slip conditions the crack nucleation location is controlled by the presence of local single slip conditions and long slip lengths for a particular Burgers vector that does not have to be in the primary slip system.

  4. Mode 2 fatigue crack growth specimen development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buzzard, R. J.; Gross, B.; Srawley, J. E.

    1983-01-01

    A Mode II test specimen was developed which has potential application in understanding phemonena associated with mixed mode fatigue failures in high performance aircraft engine bearing races. The attributes of the specimen are: it contains one single ended notch, which simplifiers data gathering and reduction; the fatigue crack grous in-line with the direction of load application; a single axis test machine is sufficient to perform testing; and the Mode I component is vanishingly small.

  5. Fatigue Crack Closure Analysis Using Digital Image Correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leser, William P.; Newman, John A.; Johnston, William M.

    2010-01-01

    Fatigue crack closure during crack growth testing is analyzed in order to evaluate the critieria of ASTM Standard E647 for measurement of fatigue crack growth rates. Of specific concern is remote closure, which occurs away from the crack tip and is a product of the load history during crack-driving-force-reduction fatigue crack growth testing. Crack closure behavior is characterized using relative displacements determined from a series of high-magnification digital images acquired as the crack is loaded. Changes in the relative displacements of features on opposite sides of the crack are used to generate crack closure data as a function of crack wake position. For the results presented in this paper, remote closure did not affect fatigue crack growth rate measurements when ASTM Standard E647 was strictly followed and only became a problem when testing parameters (e.g., load shed rate, initial crack driving force, etc.) greatly exceeded the guidelines of the accepted standard.

  6. Fatigue-Crack-Growth Computer Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, Royce G.; Shivakumar, V.; Newman, James C., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Fatigue Crack Growth (NASA/FLAGRO) computer program developed as aid in predicting growth of preexisting flaws and cracks in structural components of space systems. Is enhanced version of FLAGRO4 and incorporates state-of-the-art improvements in both fracture mechanics and computer technology. Provides fracture-mechanics analyst with computerized method of evaluating "safe-crack-growth-life" capabilities of structural components. Also used to evaluate tolerance to damage of structure of given design. Designed modular to facilitate revisions and operation on minicomputers. Written in FORTRAN 77.

  7. Analysis of fatigue crack growth from countersunk fastener hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suh, Jungjun

    This research dealt with fatigue cracks that form at countersunk open holes and mainly focused on obtaining stress intensity factor solutions for countersunk holes employing both experimental and computational approaches. Cracks developing from countersunk holes are an extremely important issue for ensuring the structural integrity of many types of aircraft components, and are crucial to aircraft safety. Four different crack shapes (single knee crack, single corner crack, two non-symmetric knee cracks and two non-symmetric corner cracks) were studied in this research. The locations of the cracks were chosen to represent the previous numerical and experimental study by C. Y. Park. A stress ratio (R = sigmamin/sigmamax), 0.3 was used for all the specimens tested to minimize the crack closure effect. The use of transparent PMMA polymer specimens allowed for direct observation of changes in crack size and shape. The stress intensity factor ranges along the crack front were determined using the back calculation method proposed by James and Anderson. Then, the stress intensity factor ranges were normalized as geometric factors to obtain non-dimensional stress intensity factors. The geometric factors for a total of 36 crack fronts are determined for the single crack experiments, and the geometric factors for a total of 76 crack fronts are obtained for the two non-symmetric experiments. The geometric factors obtained in this research can apply to structural metals since the geometric factors only depend on crack geometry and not on material properties. One of the objectives of this research was to assess the validity of finite element predictions of stress intensity factors. Thus, computational approach was conducted with StressCheck. Generally, StressCheck results agree reasonably well with the experimental results. The average percent differences in geometric factor are within 9.1% compared to the experimental results.

  8. Modelling microstructurally sensitive fatigue short crack growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Los Rios, E. R.; Xin, X. J.; Navarro, A.

    1994-10-01

    Microstructurally sensitive fatigue short crack growth can occur in many engineering components devoid of large defects. Continuum mechanics principles, including linear elastic fracture mechanics, used in damage tolerance design and life prediction methods are not applicable in these situations and therefore new concepts need to be developed to characterize this type of growth. A microstructurally sensitive model of fatigue crack growth is presented in which the effect of microstructure is dominant in the early stage of growth but plays a negligible role after the crack has gone through the transition from structure-sensitive to structure-insensitive growth. The effect of both microstructure and structure sensitive variables on the transition from short cracks to continuum mechanics and the conditions for crack instability leading to final failure are examined. The microstructural variables incorporated in the equations that describe the model are those controlling the extent and intensity of crack tip plasticity such as grain size, precipitation and dispersion hardening, strain hardening and mis-orientation between grains. It is expected that the concepts developed within the model will form the basis for the design of new crack-resistant materials.

  9. Life prediction for bridged fatigue cracks

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, B.N.

    1994-08-01

    One of the more promising classes of composites touted for high temperature applications, and certainly the most available, is that of relatively brittle matrices, either ceramic or intermetallic, reinforced by strong, aligned, continuous fibers. Under cyclic loading in the fiber direction, these materials develop matrix cracks that often run perpendicular to the fibers, while the fibers remain intact in the crack wake, supplying bridging tractions across the fracture surfaces. The bridging tractions shield the crack tip from the applied load, dramatically reducing the crack velocity from that expected in an unreinforced material subjected to the same value, {Delta}K{sub a}, of the cyclic applied stress intensity factor. An important issue in reliability is the prediction of the growth rates of the bridged cracks. The growth rates of matrix fatigue cracks bridged by sliding fibers are now commonly predicted by models based on the micromechanics of frictional interfaces. However, there exist many reasons, both theoretical and experimental, for suspecting that the most popular micromechanical models are probably wrong in detail in the context of fatigue cracks. Furthermore, a review of crack growth data reveals that the validity of the micromechanics-based predictive model has never been tested and may never be tested. In this paper, two alternative approaches are suggested to the engineering problem of predicting the growth rates of bridged cracks without explicit recourse to micromechanics. Instead, it is shown that the material properties required to analyze bridging effects can be deduced directly from crack growth data. Some experiments are proposed to test the validity of the proposals.

  10. Prediction of fatigue crack-growth patterns and lives in three-dimensional cracked bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.; Raju, I. S.

    1984-01-01

    Fatigue crack growth patterns and lives for surface cracks, surface cracks at holes, and corner cracks at holes in three dimensional bodies were predicted using linear-elastic fracture mechanics concepts that were modified to account for crack-closure behavior. The predictions were made by using stress intensity factor equations for these crack configurations and the fatigue crack-growth (delta K against rate) relationship for the material of interest. The crack configurations were subjected to constant-amplitude fatigue loading under either remote tension or bending loads. The predicted crack growth patterns and crack growth lives for aluminum alloys agreed well with test data from the literature.

  11. The Growth of Small Corrosion Fatigue Cracks in Alloy 7075

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piascik, R. S.

    2001-01-01

    The corrosion fatigue crack growth characteristics of small (less than 35 microns) surface and corner cracks in aluminum alloy 7075 is established. The early stage of crack growth is studied by performing in situ long focal length microscope (500X) crack length measurements in laboratory air and 1% NaCl environments. To quantify the "small crack effect" in the corrosive environment, the corrosion fatigue crack propagation behavior of small cracks is compared to long through-the-thickness cracks grown under identical experimental conditions. In salt water, long crack constant K(sub max) growth rates are similar to small crack da/dN.

  12. The Growth of Small Corrosion Fatigue Cracks in Alloy 7075

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piascik, Robert S.

    2015-01-01

    The corrosion fatigue crack growth characteristics of small (greater than 35 micrometers) surface and corner cracks in aluminum alloy 7075 is established. The early stage of crack growth is studied by performing in situ long focal length microscope (500×) crack length measurements in laboratory air and 1% sodium chloride (NaCl) environments. To quantify the "small crack effect" in the corrosive environment, the corrosion fatigue crack propagation behavior of small cracks is compared to long through-the-thickness cracks grown under identical experimental conditions. In salt water, long crack constant K(sub max) growth rates are similar to small crack da/dN.

  13. The growth of small corrosion fatigue cracks in alloy 2024

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piascik, Robert S.; Willard, Scott A.

    1993-01-01

    The corrosion fatigue crack growth characteristics of small surface and corner cracks in aluminum alloy 2024 is established. The damaging effect of salt water on the early stages of small crack growth is characterized by crack initiation at constituent particle pits, intergranular microcracking for a less than 100 micrometers, and transgranular small crack growth for a micrometer. In aqueous 1 percent NaCl and at a constant anodic potential of -700 mV(sub SCE), small cracks exhibit a factor of three increase in fatigue crack growth rates compared to laboratory air. Small cracks exhibit accelerated corrosion fatigue crack growth rates at low levels of delta-K (less than 1 MPa square root of m) below long crack delta-K (sub th). When exposed to Paris regime levels of crack tip stress intensity, small corrosion fatigue cracks exhibit growth rates similar to that observed for long cracks. Results suggest that crack closure effects influence the corrosion fatigue crack growth rates of small cracks (a less than or equal to 100 micrometers). This is evidenced by similar small and long crack growth behavior at various levels of R. Contrary to the corrosion fatigue characteristics of small cracks in high strength steels, no pronounced chemical crack length effect is observed for Al by 2024 exposed to salt water.

  14. How fatigue cracks grow, interact with microstructure, and lose similitude

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, D.L.

    1997-12-01

    This paper reviews the processes by which fatigue cracks grow and interact with applied load and microstructure. Fatigue crack growth processes are remarkably similar irrespective of microstructure, crack size, or nature of the loading. Large strains at fatigue crack tips applied over repeated cycles severely alter, or homogenize, microstructures, followed by crack advance. Microstructure affects fatigue crack growth kinetics more than growth processes. But, under marginal conditions, fatigue crack growth rates are also affected by microstructural features. Examples are small cracks growing under low stresses or large cracks growing near threshold. The prediction of safe lifetimes for machine parts, such as gas turbine components, requires that laboratory-generated fatigue crack growth rate data be transferred to field-operating conditions. This transfer depends on the maintenance of similitude: microstructurely, mechanically, and environmentally. However, for many industrially important conditions, similitude with large fatigue crack growth is lost, partially because of changes in fatigue crack closure. The effect of closure on similitude is discussed. New data are presented to illustrate the loss of similitude between applied loading and crack tip strain response. The resulting strain rates of material within the process zone are unexpected. Environmentally influenced fatigue crack growth rates are likely to be influenced by these strain rates.

  15. Stochastic modeling of crack initiation and short-crack growth under creep and creep-fatigue conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kitamura, Takayuki; Ghosn, Louis J.; Ohtani, Ryuichi

    1992-01-01

    A simplified stochastic model is proposed for crack initiation and short-crack growth under creep and creep-fatigue conditions. Material inhomogeneity provides the random nature of crack initiation and early growth. In the model, the influence of microstructure is introduced by the variability of: (1) damage accumulation along grain boundaries, (2) critical damage required for crack initiation or growth, and (3) the grain-boundary length. The probabilities of crack initiation and growth are derived by using convolution integrals. The model is calibrated and used to predict the crack density and crack-growth rate of short cracks of 304 stainless steel under creep and creep-fatigue conditions. The mean-crack initiation lives are predicted to be within an average deviation of about 10 percent from the experimental results. The predicted comulative distributions of crack-growth rate follow the experimental data closely. The applicability of the simplified stochastic model is discussed and the future research direction is outlined.

  16. Stochastic modeling of crack initiation and short-crack growth under creep and creep-fatigue conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kitamura, Takayuki; Ghosn, Louis J.; Ohtani, Ryuichi

    1989-01-01

    A simplified stochastic model is proposed for crack initiation and short-crack growth under creep and creep-fatigue conditions. Material inhomogeneity provides the random nature of crack initiation and early growth. In the model, the influence of microstructure is introduced by the variability of: (1) damage accumulation along grain boundaries, (2) critical damage required for crack initiation or growth, and (3) the grain-boundary length. The probabilities of crack initiation and growth are derived by using convolution integrals. The model is calibrated and used to predict the crack density and crack-growth rate of short cracks of 304 stainless steel under creep and creep-fatigue conditions. The mean-crack initiation lives are predicted to be within an average deviation of about 10 percent from the experimental results. The predicted cumulative distributions of crack-growth rate follow the experimental data closely. The applicability of the simplified stochastic model is discussed and the future research direction is outlined.

  17. Fatigue crack growth under variable amplitude loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidawi, Jihad A.

    1994-09-01

    Fatigue crack growth tests were conducted on an Fe 510 E C-Mn steel and a submerged arc welded joint from the same material under constant, variable, and random loading amplitudes. Paris-Erdogan's crack growth rate law was tested for the evaluation of m and C using the stress intensity factor K, the J-integral, the effective stress intensity factor K(sub eff), and the root mean square stress intensity factor K(sub rms) fracture mechanics concepts. The effect of retardation and residual stresses resulting from welding was also considered. It was found that all concepts gave good life predictions in all cases.

  18. Contact of nonflat crack surfaces during fatigue

    SciTech Connect

    Sehitoglu, H.; Garcia, A.M.

    1999-07-01

    A model has been developed to predict crack opening and closure behavior for propagating fatigue cracks which are nonflat and undergo significant sliding displacements. Crack surfaces were characterized by a random distribution of asperity heights, density of asperities, and asperity radii. The propagating crack was subdivided into ligaments and each ligament was treated as a contact problem between two randomly rough surfaces. The far-field tensile stresses were varied in a cyclic manner for R = 0.1 and {minus}1 loading conditions. The contact stresses at the minimal load were determined by analyzing the local crushing of the asperities. Then, upon loading the crack opening, stresses were computed when the contact stresses were overcome. The results of crack opening stresses were correlated with CTOD/{sigma}{sub 0} where CTOD is the crack-tip opening displacement and {sigma}{sub 0} is the average asperity height. The asperity effects on closure were compared with plasticity-induced closure results from the literature for identification of conditions when one mechanism dominates the other.

  19. The analysis of fatigue crack growth mechanism and oxidation and fatigue life at elevated temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, H. W.

    1988-01-01

    Two quantitative models based on experimentally observed fatigue damage processes have been made: (1) a model of low cycle fatigue life based on fatigue crack growth under general-yielding cyclic loading; and (2) a model of accelerated fatigue crack growth at elevated temperatures based on grain boundary oxidation. These two quantitative models agree very well with the experimental observations.

  20. The Regularities of Fatigue Crack Growth in Airframes Elements at Real Operation Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavelko, Igors; Pavelko, Vitalijs

    The results of analytical and experimental researches concerning predicting of fatigue crack growth in the operating conditions are presented. First of all the main factors causing a fatigue damage initiation and growth are analyzed and divided to two groups. Common conditions of fatigue damage precise predicting are established. The problem of fatigue crack growth at the stresses of variable amplitude was analyzed and an approach of description of this process is performed. Two examples present the efficiency of this approach. Theory of fatigue crack growth indication and the crack growth indicator (CGI) are developed. There is planned and executed a flight experiment using CGI located on two aircraft An-24 and An-26. Results of crack growth in CGI at operational load allowed to evaluate the parameters of generalized Paris-Erdogan law and statistical properties of crack increment per flight.

  1. Aircraft fatigue and crack growth considering loads by structural component

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yost, J. D.

    1994-01-01

    The indisputable 1968 C-130 fatigue/crack growth data is reviewed to obtain additional useful information on fatigue and crack growth. The proven Load Environment Model concept derived empirically from F-105D multichannel recorder data is refined to a simpler method by going from 8 to 5 variables in the spectra without a decrease in accuracy. This approach provides the true fatigue/crack growth and load environment by structural component for both fatigue and strength design. Methods are presented for defining fatigue scatter and damage at crack initiation. These design tools and criteria may be used for both metal and composite aircraft structure.

  2. Fatigue crack propagation at polymer adhesive interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Ritter, J.E.

    1996-12-31

    Delamination of polymer adhesive interfaces often occurs due to slow crack growth under either monotonic or cyclic loading. The author`s previous research showed that moisture-assisted crack growth at epoxy/glass and epoxy acrylate/glass interfaces under monotonic loading was directly related to the applied energy release rate and relative humidity and that cyclic loading could enhance crack growth. The purpose of the present research is to compare crack growth along epoxy acrylate/glass and epoxy/PMMA interfaces under monotonic and cyclic loading.

  3. Fatigue and environmentally assisted cracking in light water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Kassner, T.F.; Ruther, W.E.; Chung, H.M.; Hicks, P.D.; Hins, A.G.; Park, J.Y.; Shack, W.J.

    1991-12-01

    Fatigue and environmentally assisted cracking of piping, pressure vessels, and core components in light water reactors (LWRs) are important concerns as extended reactor lifetimes are envisaged. The degradation processes include intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of austenitic stainless steel (SS) piping in boiling water reactors (BWRs), and propagation of fatigue or SCC cracks (which initiate in sensitized SS cladding) into low-alloy ferritic steels in BWR pressure vessels. Similar cracking has also occurred in upper shell-to-transition cone girth welds in pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generator vessels. Another concern is failure of reactor-core internal components after accumulation of relatively high fluence, which has occurred in both BWRs and PWRs. Research during the past year focused on (1) fatigue and SCC of ferritic steels used in piping and in steam generator and reactor pressure vessels, (2) role of chromate and sulfate in simulated BWR water in SCC of sensitized Type 304 SS, and (3) irradiation-assisted SCC in high- and commercial-purity Type 304 SS specimens from control-blade absorber tubes used in two operating BWRs. Failure after accumulation of relatively high fluence has been attributed to radiation-induced segregation (RIS) of elements such as Si, P, Ni, and Cr. This document provides a summary of research progress in these areas.

  4. Numerical simulation of out-of-plane distortion fatigue crack growth in bridge girders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MIller, Paula A.

    Aging of the United States infrastructure systems has resulted in the degradation of many operational bridge structures throughout the country. Structural deficiencies can result from material fatigue caused by cyclical loadings leading to localized structural damage. While fatigue crack growth is viewed as a serviceability problem, unstable crack growth can compromise the integrity of the structure. Multi-girder bridges designed with transverse cross bracing systems can be prone to distortion fatigue at unstiffened web gaps. Cracking is exhibited within this fatigue prone region from the application of cyclical multi-mode loadings. Focus of fatigue analysis has largely been directed at pure Mode I loading through the development of AASHTO fatigue classifications for crack initiation and the Paris Law for crack propagation. Numerical modeling approaches through the ABAQUS Extended Finite Element Method offers a unique avenue in which this detail can be assessed. Finite element simulations were developed to first evaluate the applicability of the Paris Law crack propagation under multi-mode loading against experimental data. Following the validation, fatigue crack growth in plate girders with various web gap sizes was assessed due to mixed-mode loadings. Modeling results showed enlargement of horizontal initial crack lengths within stiffer web gap regions arrested crack development. Crack directionality was also seen to change as initial crack lengths were increased. From this research it is hypothesized that deterioration of the transverse stiffener connection can be minimized by increasing the horizontal length of initial fatigue cracks. Enlargement of the crack plane away from regions of localized stress concentrations within the web gap may result in arrestment of the out-of-plane distortion induced cracking.

  5. Grain boundary oxidation and fatigue crack growth at elevated temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, H. W.; Oshida, Y.

    1986-01-01

    Fatigue crack growth rate at elevated temperatures can be accelerated by grain boundary oxidation. Grain boundary oxidation kinetics and the statistical distribution of grain boundary oxide penetration depth were studied. At a constant delta K-level and at a constant test temperature, fatigue crack growth rate, da/dN, is a function of cyclic frequency, nu. A fatigue crack growth model of intermittent micro-ruptures of grain boundary oxide is constructed. The model is consistent with the experimental observations that, in the low frequency region, da/dN is inversely proportional to nu, and fatigue crack growth is intergranular.

  6. Fatigue crack growth behavior in equine cortical bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelton, Debbie Renee

    2001-07-01

    Objectives for this research were to experimentally determine crack growth rates, da/dN, as a function of alternating stress intensity factor, DeltaK, for specimens from lateral and dorsal regions of equine third metacarpal cortical bone tissue, and to determine if the results were described by the Paris law. In one set of experiments, specimens were oriented for crack propagation in the circumferential direction with the crack plane transverse to the long axis of the bone. In the second set of experiments, specimens were oriented for radial crack growth with the crack plane parallel to the long axis of the bone. Results of fatigue tests from the latter specimens were used to evaluate the hypothesis that crack growth rates differ regionally. The final experiments were designed to determine if crack resistance was dependent on region, proportion of hooped osteons (those with circumferentially oriented collagen fibers in the outer lamellae) or number of osteons penetrated by the crack, and to address the hypothesis that hooped osteons resist invasion by cracks better than other osteonal types. The transverse crack growth data for dorsal specimens were described by the Paris law with an exponent of 10.4 and suggested a threshold stress intensity factor, DeltaKth, of 2.0 MPa·m1/2 and fracture toughness of 4.38 MPa·m 1/2. Similar results were not obtained for lateral specimens because the crack always deviated from the intended path and ran parallel to the loading direction. Crack growth for the dorsal and lateral specimens in the radial orientation was described by the Paris law with exponents of 8.7 and 10.2, respectively, and there were no regional differences in the apparent DeltaK th (0.5 MPa·m1/2) or fracture toughness (1.2 MPa·m 1/2). Crack resistance was not associated with cortical region, proportion of hooped osteons or the number of osteons penetrated by the crack. The extent to which cracks penetrate osteons was influenced by whether the collagen fiber

  7. Fatigue cracking of coextruded 304L/CS tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Swindeman, R.W.; Keiser, J.R.; Maziasz, P.J.; Singbeil, D.L.

    1998-03-01

    The mechanical and thermal fatigue of authentic stainless steels was examined for the maximum temperature range expected in coextruded floor tubes of recovery boilers to determine the likelihood that the cracking in the 304L stainless steel cladding could be fatigue related. The microstructures and cracking patterns of fatigue-tested specimens were compared to features observed in cracked cladding and significant differences were found which suggested that fatigue was not the most likely cause for failure. Biaxial thermal fatigue testing of coextruded tubes and panels was performed to gather more evidence of cracking patterns. Here, transient thermal stresses were imposed by rapidly heating the tubing surface with lamps. In spite of high surface temperatures, no cracks were produced in the 304L stainless steel cladding, and this observation was interpreted as evidence that cracking must be corrosion related.

  8. The effect of fatigue cracks on fastener flexibility, load distribution, and fatigue crack growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitman, Zachary Layne

    Fatigue cracks typically occur at stress risers such as geometry changes and holes. This type of failure has serious safety and economic repercussions affecting structures such as aircraft. The need to prevent catastrophic failure due to fatigue cracks and other discontinuities has led to durability and damage tolerant methodologies influencing the design of aircraft structures. Holes in a plate or sheet filled with a fastener are common fatigue critical locations in aircraft structure requiring damage tolerance analysis (DTA). Often, the fastener is transferring load which leads to a loading condition involving both far-field stresses such as tension and bending, and localized bearing at the hole. The difference between the bearing stress and the tensile field at the hole is known as load transfer. The ratio of load transfer as well as the magnitude of the stresses plays a significant part in how quickly a crack will progress to failure. Unfortunately, the determination of load transfer in a complex joint is far from trivial. Many methods exist in the open literature regarding the analysis of splices, doublers and attachment joints to determine individual fastener loads. These methods work well for static analyses but greater refinement is needed for crack growth analysis. The first fastener in a splice or joint is typically the most critical but different fastener flexibility equations will all give different results. The constraint of the fastener head and shop end, along with the type of fastener, affects the stiffness or flexibility of the fastener. This in turn will determine the load that the fastener will transfer within a given fastener pattern. However, current methods do not account for the change in flexibility at a fastener as the crack develops. It is put forth that a crack does indeed reduce the stiffness of a fastener by changing its constraint, thus lessening the load transfer. A crack growth analysis utilizing reduced load transfer will result in

  9. Fatigue Crack Growth Analysis Models for Functionally Graded Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Dag, Serkan; Yildirim, Bora; Sabuncuoglu, Baris

    2008-02-15

    The objective of this study is to develop crack growth analysis methods for functionally graded materials (FGMs) subjected to mode I cyclic loading. The study presents finite elements based computational procedures for both two and three dimensional problems to examine fatigue crack growth in functionally graded materials. Developed methods allow the computation of crack length and generation of crack front profile for a graded medium subjected to fluctuating stresses. The results presented for an elliptical crack embedded in a functionally graded medium, illustrate the competing effects of ellipse aspect ratio and material property gradation on the fatigue crack growth behavior.

  10. Generating Fatigue Crack Growth Thresholds with Constant Amplitude Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forth, Scott C.; Newman, James C., J.; Forman, Royce G.

    2002-01-01

    The fatigue crack growth threshold, defining crack growth as either very slow or nonexistent, has been traditionally determined with standardized load reduction methodologies. Some experimental procedures tend to induce load history effects that result in remote crack closure from plasticity. This history can affect the crack driving force, i.e. during the unloading process the crack will close first at some point along the wake, reducing the effective load at the crack tip. One way to reduce the effects of load history is to propagate a crack under constant amplitude loading. As a crack propagates under constant amplitude loading, the stress intensity factor, K, will increase, as will the crack growth rate, da/dN. A fatigue crack growth threshold test procedure is developed and experimentally validated that does not produce load history effects and can be conducted at a specified stress ratio, R.

  11. Designing of a Testing Machine for Shear-Mode Fatigue Crack Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusaba, A.; Okazaki, S.; Endo, M.; Yanase, K.

    As recognized, flaking-type failure is one of the serious problems for railroad tracks and bearings. In essence, flaking-type failure is closely related to the growth of the shear-mode (Mode-II and Mode-III) fatigue crack. In our research group, it is demonstrated that a shear-mode fatigue crack can be reproduced for cylindrical specimens by applying the cyclic torsion in the presence of the static axial compressive stress. However, a biaxial servo-hydraulic fatigue testing machine is quite expensive to purchase and costly to maintain. The low testing speed (about 10Hz) of the testing machine further aggravates the situation. As a result, study on shear-mode fatigue crack growth is still in the nascent stage. To overcome the difficulties mentioned above, in this research activity, we developed a high-performance and cost-effective testing machine to reproduce the shear-mode fatigue crack growth by improving the available resonance-type torsion fatigue testing machine. The primary advantage of using the resonance-type torsion fatigue testing machine is cost-efficiency. In addition, the testing speed effectively can be improved, in comparison with that of a biaxial servo-hydraulic fatigue testing machine. By utilizing the newly-designed testing machine, we have demonstrated that we can successfully reproduce the shear-mode fatigue crack.

  12. FASTRAN II - FATIGUE CRACK GROWTH STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS (UNIX VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C.

    1994-01-01

    Predictions of fatigue crack growth behavior can be made with the Fatigue Crack Growth Structural Analysis (FASTRAN II) computer program. As cyclic loads are applied to a selected crack configuration with an initial crack size, FASTRAN II predicts crack growth as a function of cyclic load history until either a desired crack size is reached or failure occurs. FASTRAN II is based on plasticity-induced crack-closure behavior of cracks in metallic materials and accounts for load-interaction effects, such as retardation and acceleration, under variable-amplitude loading. The closure model is based on the Dugdale model with modifications to allow plastically deformed material to be left along the crack surfaces as the crack grows. Plane stress and plane strain conditions, as well as conditions between these two, can be simulated in FASTRAN II by using a constraint factor on tensile yielding at the crack front to approximately account for three-dimensional stress states. FASTRAN II contains seventeen predefined crack configurations (standard laboratory fatigue crack growth rate specimens and many common crack configurations found in structures); and the user can define one additional crack configuration. The baseline crack growth rate properties (effective stress-intensity factor against crack growth rate) may be given in either equation or tabular form. For three-dimensional crack configurations, such as surface cracks or corner cracks at holes or notches, the fatigue crack growth rate properties may be different in the crack depth and crack length directions. Final failure of the cracked structure can be modelled with fracture toughness properties using either linear-elastic fracture mechanics (brittle materials), a two-parameter fracture criterion (brittle to ductile materials), or plastic collapse (extremely ductile materials). The crack configurations in FASTRAN II can be subjected to either constant-amplitude, variable-amplitude or spectrum loading. The applied

  13. FASTRAN II - FATIGUE CRACK GROWTH STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS (IBM PC VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C.

    1994-01-01

    Predictions of fatigue crack growth behavior can be made with the Fatigue Crack Growth Structural Analysis (FASTRAN II) computer program. As cyclic loads are applied to a selected crack configuration with an initial crack size, FASTRAN II predicts crack growth as a function of cyclic load history until either a desired crack size is reached or failure occurs. FASTRAN II is based on plasticity-induced crack-closure behavior of cracks in metallic materials and accounts for load-interaction effects, such as retardation and acceleration, under variable-amplitude loading. The closure model is based on the Dugdale model with modifications to allow plastically deformed material to be left along the crack surfaces as the crack grows. Plane stress and plane strain conditions, as well as conditions between these two, can be simulated in FASTRAN II by using a constraint factor on tensile yielding at the crack front to approximately account for three-dimensional stress states. FASTRAN II contains seventeen predefined crack configurations (standard laboratory fatigue crack growth rate specimens and many common crack configurations found in structures); and the user can define one additional crack configuration. The baseline crack growth rate properties (effective stress-intensity factor against crack growth rate) may be given in either equation or tabular form. For three-dimensional crack configurations, such as surface cracks or corner cracks at holes or notches, the fatigue crack growth rate properties may be different in the crack depth and crack length directions. Final failure of the cracked structure can be modelled with fracture toughness properties using either linear-elastic fracture mechanics (brittle materials), a two-parameter fracture criterion (brittle to ductile materials), or plastic collapse (extremely ductile materials). The crack configurations in FASTRAN II can be subjected to either constant-amplitude, variable-amplitude or spectrum loading. The applied

  14. Environmental Effects on Fatigue Crack Growth in 7075 Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonakdar, A.; Wang, F.; Williams, J. J.; Chawla, N.

    2012-08-01

    The fatigue behavior of aluminum alloys is greatly influenced by the environmental conditions. In this article, fatigue crack growth rates were measured for 7075-T651 Al alloy under ultrahigh vacuum (UHV, ~10-10 Torr), dry air, and water vapor. Standard compact tension (CT) specimens were tested along the L-T orientation under various load ratios of 0.1, 0.5, and 0.8. Fracture surfaces and crack morphologies were studied using scanning electron microscopy and crack deflection analysis. The crack growth behavior under vacuum was affected by friction and possible rewelding of crack surfaces, causing an asymmetry in the crack growth behavior, from load shedding to constant load. The enhancement of crack growth at higher moisture levels was observed and is discussed in terms of moisture decreasing friction between the crack faces. The effect of crack deflection as a function of R ratio and environment is also presented.

  15. Fatigue crack growth with single overload - Measurement and modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, D. L.; Hudak, S. J., Jr.; Dexter, R. J.

    1987-01-01

    This paper compares experiments with an analytical model of fatigue crack growth under variable amplitude. The stereoimaging technique was used to measure displacements near the tips of fatigue cracks undergoing simple variations in load amplitude-single overloads and overload/underload combinations. Measured displacements were used to compute strains, and stresses were determined from the strains. Local values of crack driving force (Delta-K effective) were determined using both locally measured opening loads and crack tip opening displacements. Experimental results were compared with simulations made for the same load variation conditions using Newman's FAST-2 model. Residual stresses caused by overloads, crack opening loads, and growth retardation periods were compared.

  16. Intergranular Strain Evolution near Fatigue Crack Tips in Polycrystalline Metals

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Lili; Gao, Yanfei; Lee, Sooyeol; Barabash, Rozaliya; Lee, Jinhaeng; Liaw, Peter K

    2011-01-01

    The deformation field near a steady fatigue crack includes a plastic zone in front of the crack tip and a plastic wake behind it, and the magnitude, distribution, and history of the residual strain along the crack path depend on the stress multiaxiality, material properties, and history of stress intensity factor and crack growth rate. An in situ, full-field, non-destructive measurement of lattice strain (which relies on the intergranular interactions of the inhomogeneous deformation fields in neighboring grains) by neutron diffraction techniques has been performed for the fatigue test of a Ni-based superalloy compact tension specimen. These microscopic grain level measurements provided unprecedented information on the fatigue growth mechanisms. A two-scale model is developed to predict the lattice strain evolution near fatigue crack tips in polycrystalline materials. An irreversible, hysteretic cohesive interface model is adopted to simulate a steady fatigue crack, which allows us to generate the stress/strain distribution and history near the fatigue crack tip. The continuum deformation history is used as inputs for the micromechanical analysis of lattice strain evolution using the slip-based crystal plasticity model, thus making a mechanistic connection between macro- and micro-strains. Predictions from perfect grain-boundary simulations exhibit the same lattice strain distributions as in neutron diffraction measurements, except for discrepancies near the crack tip within about one-tenth of the plastic zone size. By considering the intergranular damage, which leads to vanishing intergranular strains as damage proceeds, we find a significantly improved agreement between predicted and measured lattice strains inside the fatigue process zone. Consequently, the intergranular damage near fatigue crack tip is concluded to be responsible for fatigue crack growth.

  17. Experimental study of thermodynamics propagation fatigue crack in metals

    SciTech Connect

    Vshivkov, A. Iziumova, A. Plekhov, O.

    2015-10-27

    This work is devoted to the development of an experimental method for studying the energy balance during cyclic deformation and fracture. The studies were conducted on 304 stainless steel AISE samples. The investigation of the fatigue crack propagation was carried out on flat samples with stress concentrators. The stress concentrator was three central holes. The heat flux sensor was developed based on the Seebeck effect. This sensor was used for measuring the heat dissipation power in the examined samples during the fatigue tests. The measurements showed that the rate of fatigue crack growth depends on the heat flux at the crack tip and there are two propagation mode of fatigue crack with different link between the propagation mode and heat flux from crack tip.

  18. Comparison of fatigue crack propagation in Modes I and III

    SciTech Connect

    Ritchie, R.O.

    1985-06-01

    The propagation behavior of fatigue cracks in Mode III (anti-plane shear), measured under cyclic torsion, is described and compared with more commonly encountered behavior under Mode I (tensile opening) loads. It is shown that a unique, global characterization of Mode III growth rates, akin to the Paris ''law'' in Mode I, is only possible if characterizating parameters appropriate to large-scale yielding are employed and allowance is made for crack tip shielding from sliding crack surface interference (i.e., friction and abrasion) between mating fracture surfaces. Based on the crack tip stress and deformation fields for Mode III stationary cracks, the cyclic crack tip displacement, (..delta..CTD/sub III/, and plastic strain intensity range ..delta..GAMMA/sub III/, have been proposed and are found to provide an adequate description of behavior in a range of steels, provided crack surface interference is minimized. The magnitude of this interference, which is somewhat analogous to crack closure in Mode I, is further examined in the light of the complex fractography of torsional fatigue failures and the question of a ''fatigue threshold'' for Mode III crack growth. Finally, micro-mechanical models for cyclic crack extension in anti-plane shear are briefly described, and the contrasting behavior between Mode III and Mode I cracks subjected to simple variable amplitude spectra is examined in terms of the differing role of crack tip blunting and closure in influencing shear, as opposed to tensile opening, modes of crack growth.

  19. Fatigue crack propagation behavior in dual-phase steel

    SciTech Connect

    Sarwar, M.; Priestner, R.

    1999-04-01

    The fatigue crack propagation in dual-phase steel was studied with the objective of developing ferritic-martensitic microstructures via intercritical annealing and thermomechanical processing. It was found that the changes in fatigue crack propagation rates and in the threshold stress intensity range, {Delta}K{sub th}, resulting from microstructural variations, were directly related to tensile strength in the same manner that was observed in other types of structural steels. it was also observed that the relationship between tensile strength and fatigue crack propagation in intercritically annealed and thermomechanically processed dual-phase steel was much the same as for conventional steels of similar strength level.

  20. Fatigue reliability of deck structures subjected to correlated crack growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, G. Q.; Garbatov, Y.; Guedes Soares, C.

    2013-12-01

    The objective of this work is to analyse fatigue reliability of deck structures subjected to correlated crack growth. The stress intensity factors of the correlated cracks are obtained by finite element analysis and based on which the geometry correction functions are derived. The Monte Carlo simulations are applied to predict the statistical descriptors of correlated cracks based on the Paris-Erdogan equation. A probabilistic model of crack growth as a function of time is used to analyse the fatigue reliability of deck structures accounting for the crack propagation correlation. A deck structure is modelled as a series system of stiffened panels, where a stiffened panel is regarded as a parallel system composed of plates and are longitudinal. It has been proven that the method developed here can be conveniently applied to perform the fatigue reliability assessment of structures subjected to correlated crack growth.

  1. Microstructural mechanisms of cyclic deformation, fatigue crack initiation and early crack growth.

    PubMed

    Mughrabi, Haël

    2015-03-28

    In this survey, the origin of fatigue crack initiation and damage evolution in different metallic materials is discussed with emphasis on the responsible microstructural mechanisms. After a historical introduction, the stages of cyclic deformation which precede the onset of fatigue damage are reviewed. Different types of cyclic slip irreversibilities in the bulk that eventually lead to the initiation of fatigue cracks are discussed. Examples of trans- and intercrystalline fatigue damage evolution in the low cycle, high cycle and ultrahigh cycle fatigue regimes in mono- and polycrystalline face-centred cubic and body-centred cubic metals and alloys and in different engineering materials are presented, and some microstructural models of fatigue crack initiation and early crack growth are discussed. The basic difficulties in defining the transition from the initiation to the growth of fatigue cracks are emphasized. In ultrahigh cycle fatigue at very low loading amplitudes, the initiation of fatigue cracks generally occupies a major fraction of fatigue life and is hence life controlling. PMID:25713457

  2. J-integral values for cracks in conventional fatigue specimens

    SciTech Connect

    O`Donnell, T.P.; O`Donnell, W.J.

    1996-12-01

    Comprehensive S-N fatigue data has been developed worldwide using conventional low-cycle fatigue tests. Such tests use smooth unnotched specimens subjected to controlled axial deflection or strain ranges. The tests must be run in the plastic regime in order to achieve the required cycles-to-failure. Recent developments have highlighted the need to understand and interpret the significance of the resulting strain range vs. cycles to failure data in terms of crack initiation and propagation. Since conventional fatigue tests are conducted in the plastic regime, linear elastic fracture mechanics cannot be used to accurately quantify crack growth in such tests. Elastic-plastic J-integral theory, however, has been shown to provide excellent correlations of crack growth in the elastic, elastic-plastic and grossly-plastic regimes for a wide range of geometric and loading conditions. The authors are applying this theory to the low-cycle fatigue specimen crack behavior. As cracks progress in conventional fatigue specimens, bending becomes significant. Since fatigue testing machines are quite stiff relative to the small fatigue specimens, the ends of the specimen are constrained to remain parallel, and this reduces bending in the cracked cross-section. Three-dimensional finite element elastic-plastic analyses are required to include these constraints in the J-integral solutions.

  3. Accommodating and cracking mechanisms in low-cycle fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pineau, A.

    1978-01-01

    The three main stages of fatigue life (accommodation, crack initiation and crack growth) are briefly reviewed. The cyclic behavior of annealed or predeformed face-centered cubic metals is described. Moreover, two types of alloys (Al-4-Cu and WASPALOY) are examined regarding the influence of the interactions between the precipitates and the dislocations on the cyclic behavior. Data on the percent of life to crack initiation (for a microcrack smaller than about 100 microns) are also given. Finally, experimental and theoretical results on crack growth rates in lowcycle fatigue are described.

  4. Kinetics of fatigue cracks in iron in electrolytic hydrogen impregnation

    SciTech Connect

    Pokhmurskii, V.I.; Bilyi, L.M.

    1985-05-01

    Fatigue failure of metals is localized in the zone of plastic deformation at the tip of the developing crack. Crack development depends to a large extent upon the parameters of the deformed volume, the loading conditions, and features of the material microstructure. It may be assumed that the medium, especially a hydrogen-impregnating medium, leads to a change in the zone of plastic deformation and thereby influences the rate of fatigue crack growth. This work is devoted to a study of cyclic crack resistance and determination of the zone of plastic deformation of failure specimens of Armco iron under conditions of the action of a hydrogen-impregnating medium.

  5. Fatigue-Life Prediction Methodology Using Small-Crack Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newmann, James C., Jr.; Phillips, Edward P.; Swain, M. H.

    1997-01-01

    This paper reviews the capabilities of a plasticity-induced crack-closure model to predict fatigue lives of metallic materials using 'small-crack theory' for various materials and loading conditions. Crack-tip constraint factors, to account for three-dimensional state-of-stress effects, were selected to correlate large-crack growth rate data as a function of the effective-stress-intensity factor range (delta K(eff)) under constant-amplitude loading. Some modifications to the delta k(eff)-rate relations were needed in the near-threshold regime to fit measured small-crack growth rate behavior and fatigue endurance limits. The model was then used to calculate small- and large-crack growth rates, and to predict total fatigue lives, for notched and un-notched specimens made of two aluminum alloys and a steel under constant-amplitude and spectrum loading. Fatigue lives were calculated using the crack-growth relations and microstructural features like those that initiated cracks for the aluminum alloys and steel for edge-notched specimens. An equivalent-initial-flaw-size concept was used to calculate fatigue lives in other cases. Results from the tests and analyses agreed well.

  6. Continuous fatigue crack monitoring of bridges: Long-Term Electrochemical Fatigue Sensor (LTEFS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moshier, Monty A.; Nelson, Levi; Brinkerhoff, Ryan; Miceli, Marybeth

    2016-04-01

    Fatigue cracks in steel bridges degrade the load-carrying capacity of these structures. Fatigue damage accumulation caused by the repetitive loading of everyday truck traffic can cause small fatigue cracks initiate. Understanding the growth of these fatigue cracks is critical to the safety and reliability of our transportation infrastructure. However, modeling fatigue in bridges is difficult due to the nature of the loading and variations in connection integrity. When fatigue cracks reach critical lengths failures occur causing partial or full closures, emergency repairs, and even full structural failure. Given the aging US highway and the trend towards asset management and life extension, the need for reliable, cost effective sensors and monitoring technologies to alert bridge owners when fatigue cracks are growing is higher than ever. In this study, an innovative Long-Term Electrochemical Fatigue Sensor (LTEFS) has been developed and introduced to meet the growing NDT marketplace demand for sensors that have the ability to continuously monitor fatigue cracks. The performance of the LTEFS has been studied in the laboratory and in the field. Data was collected using machined specimens with different lengths of naturally initiated fatigue cracks, applied stress levels, applied stress ratios, and for both sinusoidal and real-life bridge spectrum type loading. The laboratory data was evaluated and used to develop an empirically based algorithm used for crack detection. Additionally, beta-tests on a real bridge structure has been completed. These studies have conclusively demonstrated that LTEFS holds great potential for long-term monitoring of fatigue cracks in steel structures

  7. Fatigue crack propagation in aluminum-lithium alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, K. T. V.; Ritchie, R. O.; Piascik, R. S.; Gangloff, R. P.

    1989-01-01

    The principal mechanisms which govern the fatigue crack propagation resistance of aluminum-lithium alloys are investigated, with emphasis on their behavior in controlled gaseous and aqueous environments. Extensive data describe the growth kinetics of fatigue cracks in ingot metallurgy Al-Li alloys 2090, 2091, 8090, and 8091 and in powder metallurgy alloys exposed to moist air. Results are compared with data for traditional aluminum alloys 2024, 2124, 2618, 7075, and 7150. Crack growth is found to be dominated by shielding from tortuous crack paths and resultant asperity wedging. Beneficial shielding is minimized for small cracks, for high stress ratios, and for certain loading spectra. While water vapor and aqueous chloride environments enhance crack propagation, Al-Li-Cu alloys behave similarly to 2000-series aluminum alloys. Cracking in water vapor is controlled by hydrogen embrittlement, with surface films having little influence on cyclic plasticity.

  8. Fatigue and fatigue crack growth processes in hard tissues: The importance of age and surface integrity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majd, Hessam

    With the progressive increase in partially and fully dentate seniors, fracture has become an increasingly common form of restored tooth failure. Dentin undergoes progressive changes in microstructure with patient age, and studies are now suggesting that there is a reduction in fatigue strength and fatigue crack growth resistance of this tissue. This dissertation explores aging of dentin, the influence of flaws that are introduced during restorative processes on the fatigue properties of dentin, and proposes models for characterizing the damage initiation and growth process during fatigue of dentin. Results from this investigation show that the fatigue crack growth properties (Paris Law parameters (C, m) andDeltaKth) of human dentin undergo the most significant changes at a patient age of 42 years. Based on the fatigue crack growth responses, three age groups were established including young (age≤33), aged (34≤age ≤49) and old (50≤age) patients for further analysis. There were significant differences in the initiation and growth behavior between the tissues of patients from the three age groups. With regards to the influence of restorative processes, there was no influence on the quasi-static responses of dentin. However, the endurance limit of dentin treated with the dental burs (28 MPa) and abrasive air jet (35 MPa) were approximately 36% and 20% lower than that of the control (44 MPa), respectively. Both cutting processes caused a significant reduction (p≤0.0001) in fatigue strength. An accumulative damage model was developed to characterize fatigue of the control and bur treated dentin as well as provide a model for fatigue life prediction. The damage models were derived as a function of number of loading cycles (N), and ratio of applied stress to ultimate strength (r). The developed models provide estimations for the initial state of damage, the state of damage during the life, as well as the damage accumulation rate for cyclic loading of dentin

  9. Advances in fatigue crack closure measurement and analysis: Second volume. ASTM special technical publication 1343

    SciTech Connect

    McClung, R.C.; Newman, J.C. Jr.

    1999-07-01

    The discovery of the phenomenon of plasticity-induced fatigue crack closure by Elber was truly a landmark event in the study of fatigue crack growth (FCG) and the development of practical engineering methods for fatigue life management. Subsequent research identified other contributing mechanisms for crack closure, including crack surface roughness and oxide debris. Fatigue crack closure is now understood to be an intrinsic feature of crack growth behavior that must be considered to understand or treat many FCG problems, although closure may not be an issue in all problems and does not always provide a complete explanation of crack growth behavior. As the thirtieth anniversary of the Elber discovery approached, the strong, continuing international interest in crack closure prompted the organization of another ASTM symposium. An international audience numbering over sixty-five persons heard thirty papers contributed by authors from twelve different countries, with more than half of the papers originating from outside the United States. This STP volume contains peer-reviewed manuscripts for twenty-seven of those presentations, plus one peer-reviewed paper that could not be presented at the symposium. Topics covered are: Fundamental Studies; Experimental Characterization of Closure; Load History Effects; Surface Roughness Effects; and Closure Effects on Crack Behavior. Separate abstracts were prepared for all 28 papers.

  10. Fatigue crack growth under general-yielding cyclic-loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minzhong, Z.; Liu, H. W.

    1986-01-01

    In low cycle fatigue, cracks are initiated and propagated under general yielding cyclic loading. For general yielding cyclic loading, Dowling and Begley have shown that fatigue crack growth rate correlates well with the measured delta J. The correlation of da/dN with delta J was also studied by a number of other investigators. However, none of thse studies have correlated da/dN with delta J calculated specifically for the test specimens. Solomon measured fatigue crack growth in specimens in general yielding cyclic loading. The crack tips fields for Solomon's specimens are calculated using the finite element method and the J values of Solomon's tests are evaluated. The measured crack growth rate in Solomon's specimens correlates very well with the calculated delta J.

  11. Fatigue crack growth testing of sub-clad defects

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, D.P.; Leax, T.R.

    1998-04-01

    Fatigue crack growth tests were performed on four point bend specimens with crack like defects intentionally placed in A302B low-alloy pressure vessel steel clad with 308/309L weld deposited stainless steel. The defects were placed in the base metal under the cladding by machining a cavity from the side opposite the cladding, electric-discharge machining a very sharp flaw, fatigue pre-cracking the flaw, and then filling up the cavity by a weld repair process. The specimens were stress relieved before fatigue testing. The specimens were fatigue cycled at positive load ratios until the defects broke through to the surface. The specimens were then fractured at liquid nitrogen temperatures to reveal the fracture surfaces. Seven different sub-clad flaw specimens were tested in room temperature air and each test provides a record of cycles to defect break-through. Changes in defect size and shape as a function of applied load cycles were obtained by benchmarking the crack at various stages of the load history. The results provide a set of embedded defect data which can be used for qualifying fatigue crack growth analysis procedures such as those in Section XI of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. A comparison between calculated and measured values shows that the ASME B and PV Section XI fatigue crack growth procedures conservatively predict cycles to defect break-through for small sub-clad defects.

  12. High speed thin plate fatigue crack monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincheski, Buzz A. (Inventor); Heyman, Joseph S. (Inventor); Namkung, Min (Inventor); Fulton, James P. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A device and method are provided which non-destructively detect crack length and crack geometry in thin metallic plates. A non-contacting vibration apparatus produces resonant vibrations without introducing extraneous noise. Resulting resonant vibration shifts in cracked plates are correlated to known crack length in plates with similar resonant vibration shifts. In addition, acoustic emissions of cracks at resonance frequencies are correlated to acoustic emissions from known crack geometries.

  13. Microstructure-sensitive small fatigue crack growth assessment. Effect of strain ratio multiaxial strain state and geometric discontinuities

    SciTech Connect

    Castelluccio, Gustavo M.; McDowell, David L.

    2015-09-16

    Fatigue crack initiation in the high cycle fatigue regime is strongly influenced by microstructural features. Research efforts have usually focused on predicting fatigue resistance against crack incubation without considering the early fatigue crack growth after encountering the first grain boundary. However, a significant fraction of the variability of the total fatigue life can be attributed to growth of small cracks as they encounter the first few grain boundaries, rather than crack formation within the first grain. Our paper builds on the framework previously developed by the authors to assess microstructure-sensitive small fatigue crack formation and early growth under complex loading conditions. Moreover, the scheme employs finite element simulations that explicitly render grains and crystallographic directions along with simulation of microstructurally small fatigue crack growth from grain to grain. The methodology employs a crystal plasticity algorithm in ABAQUS that was previously calibrated to study fatigue crack initiation in RR1000 Ni-base superalloy. Our work present simulations with non-zero applied mean strains and geometric discontinuities that were not previously considered for calibration. Results exhibit trends similar to those found in experiments for multiple metallic materials, conveying a consistent physical description of fatigue damage phenomena.

  14. Microstructure-sensitive small fatigue crack growth assessment. Effect of strain ratio multiaxial strain state and geometric discontinuities

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Castelluccio, Gustavo M.; McDowell, David L.

    2015-09-16

    Fatigue crack initiation in the high cycle fatigue regime is strongly influenced by microstructural features. Research efforts have usually focused on predicting fatigue resistance against crack incubation without considering the early fatigue crack growth after encountering the first grain boundary. However, a significant fraction of the variability of the total fatigue life can be attributed to growth of small cracks as they encounter the first few grain boundaries, rather than crack formation within the first grain. Our paper builds on the framework previously developed by the authors to assess microstructure-sensitive small fatigue crack formation and early growth under complex loadingmore » conditions. Moreover, the scheme employs finite element simulations that explicitly render grains and crystallographic directions along with simulation of microstructurally small fatigue crack growth from grain to grain. The methodology employs a crystal plasticity algorithm in ABAQUS that was previously calibrated to study fatigue crack initiation in RR1000 Ni-base superalloy. Our work present simulations with non-zero applied mean strains and geometric discontinuities that were not previously considered for calibration. Results exhibit trends similar to those found in experiments for multiple metallic materials, conveying a consistent physical description of fatigue damage phenomena.« less

  15. Deformation fields near a steady fatigue crack with anisotropic plasticity

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gao, Yanfei

    2015-11-30

    In this work, from finite element simulations based on an irreversible, hysteretic cohesive interface model, a steady fatigue crack can be realized if the crack extension exceeds about twice the plastic zone size, and both the crack increment per loading cycle and the crack bridging zone size are smaller than the plastic zone size. The corresponding deformation fields develop a plastic wake behind the crack tip and a compressive residual stress field ahead of the crack tip. In addition, the Hill’s plasticity model is used to study the role of plastic anisotropy on the retardation of fatigue crack growth andmore » the elastic strain fields. It is found that for Mode-I cyclic loading, an enhanced yield stress in directions that are inclined from the crack plane will lead to slower crack growth rate, but this retardation is insignificant for typical degrees of plastic anisotropy. Furthermore, these results provide key inputs for future comparisons to neutron and synchrotron diffraction measurements that provide full-field lattice strain mapping near fracture and fatigue crack tips, especially in textured materials such as wrought or rolled Mg alloys.« less

  16. Deformation fields near a steady fatigue crack with anisotropic plasticity

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Yanfei

    2015-11-30

    In this work, from finite element simulations based on an irreversible, hysteretic cohesive interface model, a steady fatigue crack can be realized if the crack extension exceeds about twice the plastic zone size, and both the crack increment per loading cycle and the crack bridging zone size are smaller than the plastic zone size. The corresponding deformation fields develop a plastic wake behind the crack tip and a compressive residual stress field ahead of the crack tip. In addition, the Hill’s plasticity model is used to study the role of plastic anisotropy on the retardation of fatigue crack growth and the elastic strain fields. It is found that for Mode-I cyclic loading, an enhanced yield stress in directions that are inclined from the crack plane will lead to slower crack growth rate, but this retardation is insignificant for typical degrees of plastic anisotropy. Furthermore, these results provide key inputs for future comparisons to neutron and synchrotron diffraction measurements that provide full-field lattice strain mapping near fracture and fatigue crack tips, especially in textured materials such as wrought or rolled Mg alloys.

  17. Fatigue and/or crack detection in NDE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bettaieb, L.; Kokabi, H.; Poloujadoff, M.; Sentz, A.; Tcharkhtchi, C.

    2010-03-01

    In electromagnetic nondestructive testing (E-NDT), it is possible not only to detect cracks, but also the local variations of resistivity which are correlated with fatigue. We have developed methods to this end. A case when it is not possible to detect a crack directly, but through the accompanying resistivity variation, is described.

  18. Analyses of Fatigue and Fatigue-Crack Growth under Constant- and Variable-Amplitude Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    Studies on the growth of small cracks have led to the observation that fatigue life of many engineering materials is primarily crack growth from micro-structural features, such as inclusion particles, voids, slip-bands or from manufacturing defects. This paper reviews the capabilities of a plasticity-induced crack-closure model to predict fatigue lives of metallic materials using small-crack theory under various loading conditions. Constraint factors, to account for three-dimensional effects, were selected to correlate large-crack growth rate data as a function of the effective stress-intensity factor range (delta K(sub eff)) under constant-amplitude loading. Modifications to the delta K(sub eff)-rate relations in the near-threshold regime were needed to fit measured small-crack growth rate behavior. The model was then used to calculate small- and large-crack growth rates, and to predict total fatigue lives, for notched and un-notched specimens under constant-amplitude and spectrum loading. Fatigue lives were predicted using crack-growth relations and micro-structural features like those that initiated cracks in the fatigue specimens for most of the materials analyzed. Results from the tests and analyses agreed well.

  19. Computer modeling the fatigue crack growth rate behavior of metals in corrosive environments. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Richey, E. III; Wilson, A.W.; Pope, J.M.; Gangloff, R.P.

    1994-09-01

    The emphasis of the second phase of this research project has been to develop a single computer program that would establish the foundation to incorporate deleterious environmental effects on fatigue crack propagation laws into NASA FLAGRO. The program was the result of team research projects conducted by three undergraduates in the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at University of Virginia. Known methods to interpolate and potentially extrapolate environmental fatigue crack propagation (FCP) data were emphasized, including linear superposition and empirical curve-fitting descriptions of fatigue crack growth rate (da/dN) versus applied or effective stress intensity range (delta K). This program contains elements that were extracted from the NASA FLAGRO source code, particularly library data on material fatigue and fracture properties, as well as the Forman equations for calculations on fatigue crack growth rate versus stress intensity relationships, including the effect of crack closure. The program was written in Fortran and is executed by entering MENU from the DOS prompt on an IBM-compatible personal computer. The user can then select one of the following three options that resulted from each undergraduate project. The projects are as follows: Digitization of Crack Growth Rate Data, Interpolation Modeling of Environmental FCP Data, and Linear Superposition Modeling of Environmental FCP Data. Example calculations demonstrating each element of the program are presented in several appendices to this report.

  20. Near-threshold fatigue crack growth in aluminum composite laminates

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, P.B.; Gibeling, J.C.

    1995-03-15

    One promising method for improving the mechanical properties of particulate MMCs is to laminate the brittle composite with a more ductile component. A system currently being developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is a multilayer laminate consisting of alternating layers of AA6090/SiC/25p and more ductile AA5182. In order to further examine the effects of lamination on fatigue crack propagation mechanics and mechanisms, the fatigue crack growth behavior of the aluminum composite laminate developed at LLNL was examined. The laminate and the AA6090/SiC/25p component were studied in the T6 heat treatment condition for subsequent comparison. Fatigue crack surfaces were examined using scanning electron microscopy for further insight into crack growth mechanisms.

  1. Fatigue crack damage detection using subharmonic component with nonlinear boundary condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Weiliang; Shen, Yanfeng; Qu, Wenzhong; Xiao, Li; Giurgiutiu, Victor

    2015-03-01

    In recent years, researchers have focused on structural health monitoring (SHM) and damage detection techniques using nonlinear vibration and nonlinear ultrasonic methods. Fatigue cracks may exhibit contact acoustic nonlinearity (CAN) with distinctive features such as superharmonics and subharmonics in the power spectrum of the sensing signals. However, challenges have been noticed in the practical applications of the harmonic methods. For instance, superharmonics can also be generated by the piezoelectric transducers and the electronic equipment; super/subharmonics may also stem from the nonlinear boundary conditions such as structural fixtures and joints. It is hard to tell whether the nonlinear features come from the structural damage or the intrinsic nonlinear boundary conditions. The objective of this paper is to demonstrate the application of nonlinear ultrasonic subharmonic method for detecting fatigue cracks with nonlinear boundary conditions. The fatigue crack was qualitatively modeled as a single-degree-of-freedom (SDOF) system with non-classical hysteretic nonlinear interface forces at both sides of the crack surfaces. The threshold of subharmonic generation was studied, and the influence of crack interface parameters on the subharmonic resonance condition was investigated. The different threshold behaviors between the nonlinear boundary condition and the fatigue crack was found, which can be used to distinguish the source of nonlinear subharmonic features. To evaluate the proposed method, experiments of an aluminum plate with a fatigue crack were conducted to quantitatively verify the subharmonic resonance range. Two surface-bonded piezoelectric transducers were used to generate and receive ultrasonic wave signals. The fatigue damage was characterized in terms of a subharmonic damage index. The experimental results demonstrated that the subharmonic component of the sensing signal can be used to detect the fatigue crack and further distinguish it from

  2. Fatigue crack damage detection using subharmonic component with nonlinear boundary condition

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Weiliang Qu, Wenzhong E-mail: xiaoli6401@126.com; Xiao, Li E-mail: xiaoli6401@126.com; Shen, Yanfeng Giurgiutiu, Victor

    2015-03-31

    In recent years, researchers have focused on structural health monitoring (SHM) and damage detection techniques using nonlinear vibration and nonlinear ultrasonic methods. Fatigue cracks may exhibit contact acoustic nonlinearity (CAN) with distinctive features such as superharmonics and subharmonics in the power spectrum of the sensing signals. However, challenges have been noticed in the practical applications of the harmonic methods. For instance, superharmonics can also be generated by the piezoelectric transducers and the electronic equipment; super/subharmonics may also stem from the nonlinear boundary conditions such as structural fixtures and joints. It is hard to tell whether the nonlinear features come from the structural damage or the intrinsic nonlinear boundary conditions. The objective of this paper is to demonstrate the application of nonlinear ultrasonic subharmonic method for detecting fatigue cracks with nonlinear boundary conditions. The fatigue crack was qualitatively modeled as a single-degree-of-freedom (SDOF) system with non-classical hysteretic nonlinear interface forces at both sides of the crack surfaces. The threshold of subharmonic generation was studied, and the influence of crack interface parameters on the subharmonic resonance condition was investigated. The different threshold behaviors between the nonlinear boundary condition and the fatigue crack was found, which can be used to distinguish the source of nonlinear subharmonic features. To evaluate the proposed method, experiments of an aluminum plate with a fatigue crack were conducted to quantitatively verify the subharmonic resonance range. Two surface-bonded piezoelectric transducers were used to generate and receive ultrasonic wave signals. The fatigue damage was characterized in terms of a subharmonic damage index. The experimental results demonstrated that the subharmonic component of the sensing signal can be used to detect the fatigue crack and further distinguish it from

  3. Consolidation of fatigue and fatigue-crack-propagation data for design use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, R. C.; Davies, K. B.; Jaske, C. E.; Feddersen, C. E.

    1975-01-01

    Analytical methods developed for consolidation of fatigue and fatigue-crack-propagation data for use in design of metallic aerospace structural components are evaluated. A comprehensive file of data on 2024 and 7075 aluminums, Ti-6Al-4V alloy, and 300M steel was established by obtaining information from both published literature and reports furnished by aerospace companies. Analyses are restricted to information obtained from constant-amplitude load or strain cycling of specimens in air at room temperature. Both fatigue and fatigue-crack-propagation data are analyzed on a statistical basis using a least-squares regression approach. For fatigue, an equivalent strain parameter is used to account for mean stress or stress ratio effects and is treated as the independent variable; cyclic fatigue life is considered to be the dependent variable. An effective stress-intensity factor is used to account for the effect of load ratio on fatigue-crack-propagation and treated as the independent variable. In this latter case, crack-growth rate is considered to be the dependent variable. A two term power function is used to relate equivalent strain to fatigue life, and an arc-hyperbolic-tangent function is used to relate effective stress intensity to crack-growth rate.

  4. Experimental study on fatigue crack propagation rate of RC beam strengthened with carbon fiber laminate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Peiyan; Liu, Guangwan; Guo, Xinyan; Huang, Man

    2008-11-01

    The experimental research on fatigue crack propagation rate of reinforced concrete (RC) beams strengthened with carbon fiber laminate (CFL) is carried out by MTS system in this paper. The experimental results show that, the main crack propagation on strengthened beam can be summarized into three phases: 1) fast propagation phase; 2) steady propagation and rest phase; 3) unsteady propagation phase. The phase 2-i.e. steady propagation and rest stage makes up about 95% of fatigue life of the strengthened beam. The propagation rate of the main crack, da/dN, in phase 2 can be described by Paris formula, and the constant C and m can be confirmed by the fatigue crack propagation experiments of the RC beams strengthened with CFL under three-point bending loads.

  5. A model for the formation of fatigue striations and its relationship with small fatigue crack growth in an aluminum alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Shyam, Amit; Lara-Curzio, Edgar

    2010-01-01

    The fatigue crack growth process involves damage accumulation and crack extension. The two sub-processes that lead to fatigue crack extension were quantified separately in a recent model for small fatigue crack growth applicable to engineering alloys. Here, we report the results of an experimental investigation to assess the assumptions of that model. The fatigue striation formation in an aluminum alloy is modeled and it is verified that the number of cycles required for striation formation is related to the cyclic crack tip opening displacement and that the striation spacing is related to the monotonic crack tip displacement. It is demonstrated that extensive cyclic crack tip plasticity in the aluminum alloy causes a reduction in the magnitude of the slope of the fatigue crack propagation curves. The implications of these results on the fatigue crack propagation lifetime calculations are identified.

  6. Measurement and analysis of critical crack tip processes during fatigue crack growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, D. L.; Hudak, S. J.; Dexter, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    The mechanics of fatigue crack growth under constant-amplitudes and variable-amplitude loading were examined. Critical loading histories involving relatively simple overload and overload/underload cycles were studied to provide a basic understanding of the underlying physical processes controlling crack growth. The material used for this study was 7091-T7E69, a powder metallurgy aluminum alloy. Local crack-tip parameters were measured at various times before, during, and after the overloads, these include crack-tip opening loads and displacements, and crack-tip strain fields. The latter were useed, in combination with the materials cyclic and monotonic stress-strain properties, to compute crack-tip residual stresses. The experimental results are also compared with analytical predictions obtained using the FAST-2 computer code. The sensitivity of the analytical model to constant-amplitude fatigue crack growth rate properties and to through-thickness constrain are studied.

  7. Fatigue Crack Initiation In WASPALOY at 20 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, D. L.; Tryon, R. G.; Oja, M.; Matthews, R.; Ravi Chandran, K. S.

    2007-09-01

    In two WASPALOY specimens, the orientations of grains that initiated fatigue cracks and adjacent ograins were measured using electron backscattered diffraction patterns (EBSP). Crystallographic relationships were found for crack initiating regions that resulted in slip transmission across areas larger than the initiating grain, and the initiating grain was usually larger than average. A similar evaluation of control areas on each specimen found that there was much less likelihood of slip transmission across grain boundaries. Schmid factors (SFs) were also evaluated. It is concluded that the reason that fatigue cracks formed at these locations was due to the lower stress required for slip initiation in these clusters of grains oriented for slip transmission across grain boundaries. Many of the cracks initiated within grain boundaries. A detailed crystallographic analysis of the adjacent grains suggests criteria for intergranular (IG) crack initiation.

  8. Structure-property relations and modeling of small crack fatigue behavior of various magnesium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, Jairus Daniel

    Lightweight structural components are important to the automotive and aerospace industries so that better fuel economy can be realized. Magnesium alloys in particular are being examined to fulfill this need due to their attractive stiffness- and strength-to-weight ratios when compared to other materials. However, when introducing a material into new roles, one needs to properly characterize its mechanical properties. Fatigue behavior is especially important considering aerospace and automotive component applications. Therefore, quantifying the structure-property relationships and accurately predicting the fatigue behavior for these materials are vital. This study has two purposes. The first is to quantify the structure-property relationships for the fatigue behavior in an AM30 magnesium alloy. The second is to use the microstructural-based MultiStage Fatigue (MSF) model in order to accurately predict the fatigue behavior of three magnesium alloys: AM30, Elektron 21, and AZ61. While some studies have previously quantified the MSF material constants for several magnesium alloys, detailed research into the fatigue regimes, notably the microstructurally small crack (MSC) region, is lacking. Hence, the contribution of this work is the first of its kind to experimentally quantify the fatigue crack incubation and MSC regimes that are used for the MultiStage Fatigue model. Using a multi-faceted experimental approach, these regimes were explored with a replica method that used a dual-stage silicone based compound along with previously published in situ fatigue tests. These observations were used in calibrating the MultiStage Fatigue model.

  9. On the interaction of ultrasound with cracks: Applications to fatigue crack growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buck, O.; Thompson, R. B.; Rehbein, D. K.

    1986-01-01

    Partial contact of two rough fatigue crack surfaces leads to transmission and diffraction of an acoustic signal at those contacts. Recent experimental and theoretical efforts to understand and quantify such contact in greater detail are discussed. The objective is to develop an understanding of the closure phenomenon and its application to the interpretation of fatigue data, in particular the R-ratio, spike overload/underload and threshold effects on crack propagation.

  10. Simulating Fatigue Crack Growth in Spiral Bevel Pinion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ural, Ani; Wawrzynek, Paul A.; Ingraffe, Anthony R.

    2003-01-01

    This project investigates computational modeling of fatigue crack growth in spiral bevel gears. Current work is a continuation of the previous efforts made to use the Boundary Element Method (BEM) to simulate tooth-bending fatigue failure in spiral bevel gears. This report summarizes new results predicting crack trajectory and fatigue life for a spiral bevel pinion using the Finite Element Method (FEM). Predicting crack trajectories is important in determining the failure mode of a gear. Cracks propagating through the rim may result in catastrophic failure, whereas the gear may remain intact if one tooth fails and this may allow for early detection of failure. Being able to predict crack trajectories is insightful for the designer. However, predicting growth of three-dimensional arbitrary cracks is complicated due to the difficulty of creating three-dimensional models, the computing power required, and absence of closed- form solutions of the problem. Another focus of this project was performing three-dimensional contact analysis of a spiral bevel gear set incorporating cracks. These analyses were significant in determining the influence of change of tooth flexibility due to crack growth on the magnitude and location of contact loads. This is an important concern since change in contact loads might lead to differences in SIFs and therefore result in alteration of the crack trajectory. Contact analyses performed in this report showed the expected trend of decreasing tooth loads carried by the cracked tooth with increasing crack length. Decrease in tooth loads lead to differences between SIFs extracted from finite element contact analysis and finite element analysis with Hertz contact loads. This effect became more pronounced as the crack grew.

  11. Microbe-enhanced environmental fatigue crack propagation in HY130 steel

    SciTech Connect

    Gangloff, R.P.; Kelly, R.G. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1994-05-01

    Research was undertaken to characterize the effect of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) on aqueous environment-enhanced fatigue cracking in a high-strength alloy steel. Desulfovibrio vulgaris in Postgate C solution greatly increased rates of ambient-temperature fatigue crack propagation (FCP) in tempered martensitic HY130 steel (MIL-S-24371A) under cathodic polarization and low-frequency, constant stress intensity range ([Delta]K) loading. Crack growth rates (da/dN) in the SRB solution increased 50- to 1,000-fold relative to FCP in sterile sodium chloride (NaCl) solution at [minus]1,000 mV[sub SCE] and under vacuum, respectively. The presence of microbes shifted fatigue cracking from a transgranular path (typical in sterile NaCl) to an intergranular crack path consistent with the enhanced growth rates. The SRB reduced fatigue crack initiation resistance, countering the beneficial effect of cathodic polarization for sterile NaCl. Metal embrittlement and increased hydrogen uptake at the occluded crack tip caused by bacterially produced hydrosulfide (HS[sup [minus

  12. Anomolous Fatigue Crack Growth Phenomena in High-Strength Steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forth, Scott C.; James, Mark A.; Johnston, William M., Jr.; Newman, James C., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    The growth of a fatigue crack through a material is the result of a complex interaction between the applied loading, component geometry, three-dimensional constraint, load history, environment, material microstructure and several other factors. Previous studies have developed experimental and computational methods to relate the fatigue crack growth rate to many of the above conditions, with the intent of discovering some fundamental material response, i.e. crack growth rate as a function of something. Currently, the technical community uses the stress intensity factor solution as a simplistic means to relate fatigue crack growth rate to loading, geometry and all other variables. The stress intensity factor solution is a very simple linear-elastic representation of the continuum mechanics portion of crack growth. In this paper, the authors present fatigue crack growth rate data for two different high strength steel alloys generated using standard methods. The steels exhibit behaviour that appears unexplainable, compared to an aluminium alloy presented as a baseline for comparison, using the stress intensity factor solution.

  13. Fatigue crack propagation in self-assembling nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klingler, Andreas; Wetzel, Bernd

    2016-05-01

    Self-assembling block-copolymers allow the easy manufacturing of nanocomposites due to the thermodynamically driven in situ formation of nanosized phases in thermosetting resins during the curing process. Complex mechanical dispersion processes can be avoided. The current study investigates the effect of a block-copolymer on the fatigue crack propagation resistance of a cycloaliphatic amine cured epoxy resin. It was found that a small amount of MAM triblock-copolymer significantly increases the resistance to fatigue crack propagation of epoxy. Crack growth rate and the Paris law exponent for fatigue-crack growth were considerably reduced from m=15.5 of the neat epoxy to m=8.1 of the nanocomposite. To identify the related reinforcing and fracture mechanisms structural analyses of the fractured surfaces were performed by scanning electron microscope. Characteristic features were identified to be deformation, debonding and fracture of the nano-phases as well as crack pinning. However, the highest resistance against fatigue crack propagation was achieved in a bi-continuous microstructure that consisted of an epoxy-rich phase with embedded submicron sized MAM inclusions, and which was surrounded by a block-copolymer-rich phase that showed rupture and plastic deformation.

  14. Fatigue crack growth in unidirectional metal matrix composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghosn, Louis J.; Telesman, Jack; Kantzos, Peter

    1990-01-01

    The weight function method was used to determine the effective stress intensity factor and the crack opening profile for a fatigue tested composite which exhibited fiber bridging. The bridging mechanism was modeled using two approaches; the crack closure approach and the shear lag approach. The numerically determined stress intensity factor values from both methods were compared and correlated with the experimentally obtained crack growth rates for SiC/Ti-15-3 (0)(sub 8) oriented composites. The near crack tip opening profile was also determined for both methods and compared with the experimentally obtained measurements.

  15. Fatigue crack growth analyses and experimental verification of aerospace threaded fasteners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, Kirk William

    Because fatigue crack growth in a threaded fastener can cause the loss of an aircraft, damage tolerant analyses are required. Therefore, aerospace designers must be able to perform accurate crack growth analyses on fasteners. However, threaded fasteners are difficult to analyze and fastener fatigue crack growth data is scant, especially for non-dimensionalized crack depths of (a/d) < 0.1. The objective of this research is to determine the stress intensity multiplication factor (Y), as a function of a/d, in the threads of a nut loaded, aerospace, roll-threaded bolt under tensile fatigue conditions as a/d approaches zero. Y(a/d) can then be used to improve the accuracy of fatigue crack growth life estimations. The research objectives were achieved through bolt material characterization, cyclic testing, and numeric modeling. X-ray diffraction was used to determine the residual stress within the thread root of the test bolts. Unflawed and flawed aerospace bolts were fatigue tested at a maximum stress (S) ranging from the ultimate tensile strength (UTS) to the surface endurance limit of the test bolt and loading ratios of 0.1 < R < 0.9. The following data was collected: cycles to failure (N f), fracture surface striation spacing, and crack front shape. The numeric studies accounted for residual stress. The fracture analysis code, FRANC3D, was used because it could predict crack front shape and stress intensity factor (K). The thread root, residual compressive stress reached 65% of the material UTS. The S-Nf plots showed test bolt fatigue strength decreased as R decreased and 10% reduction in allowable fatigue stress due to flaws. The shape of the crack front in the unflawed and flawed stainless steel, test bolts were different and both changed as the crack grew. The developed numeric models also predicted a changing crack front and the stress intensity factor. By curve fitting the numeric and experimental data, a new Y(a/d) solution was determined. The use of this Y

  16. Accelerated Near-Threshold Fatigue Crack Growth Behavior of an Aluminum Powder Metallurgy Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piascik, Robert S.; Newman, John A.

    2002-01-01

    Fatigue crack growth (FCG) research conducted in the near threshold regime has identified a room temperature creep crack growth damage mechanism for a fine grain powder metallurgy (PM) aluminum alloy (8009). At very low DK, an abrupt acceleration in room temperature FCG rate occurs at high stress ratio (R = Kmin/Kmax). The near threshold accelerated FCG rates are exacerbated by increased levels of Kmax (Kmax less than 0.4 KIC). Detailed fractographic analysis correlates accelerated FCG with the formation of crack-tip process zone micro-void damage. Experimental results show that the near threshold and Kmax influenced accelerated crack growth is time and temperature dependent.

  17. Mode III fatigue crack propagation in low alloy steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritchie, R. O.; McClintock, F. A.; Nayeb-Hashemi, H.; Ritter, M. A.

    1982-01-01

    To provide a basis for estimating fatigue life in large rotating generator shafts subjected to transient oscillations, a study is made of fatigue crack propagation in Mode III (anti-plane shear) in torsionally-loaded spheroidized AISI4340 steel, and results compared to analogous behavior in Mode I. Torsional S/N curves, determined on smooth bars containing surface defects, showed results surprisingly close to expected unnotched Mode I data, with lifetime increasing from 104 cycles at nominal yield to 106 cycles at half yield. Fatigue crack growth rates in Mode III, measured on circumferentially-notched samples, were found to be slower than in Mode I, although still power-law related to the alternating stress intensity (△K III) for small-scale yielding. Mode III growth rates were only a small fraction (0.002 to 0.0005) of cyclic crack tip displacements (△CTD III) per cycle, in contrast to Mode I where the fraction was much larger (0.1 to 0.01). A micromechanical model for Mode III growth is proposed, where crack advance is considered to take place by a Mode II coalescence of cracks, initiated at inclusions ahead of the main crack front. This mechanism is consistent with the crack increment being a small fraction of △CTDIII per cycle.

  18. Fatigue crack propagation in carburized X-2M steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Averbach, B. L.; Lou, Bingzhe; Pearson, P. K.; Fairchild, R. E.; Bamberger, E. N.

    1985-07-01

    The growth rates of fatigue cracks propagating through the case and into the core have been studied for carburized X-2M steel (0.14 C, 4.91 Cr, 1.31 Mo, 1.34 W, 0.42 V). Fatigue cracks were propagated at constant stress intensities, ΔK, and also at a constant cyclic peak load, and the crack growth rates were observed to pass through a minimum value as the crack traversed the carburized case. The reduction in the crack propagation rates is ascribed to the compressive stresses which were developed in the case, and a pinched clothespin model is used to make an approximate calculation of the effects of internal stress on the crack propagation rates. We define an effective stress intensity, Ke = Ka + Ki, where Ka is the applied stress intensity, Ki = σid{i/1/2}, σi is the internal stress, and di is a characteristic distance associated with the depth of the internal stress field. In our work, a value of di = 11 mm (0.43 inch) fits the data quite well. A good combination of resistance to fatigue crack propagation in the case and fracture toughness in the core can be achieved in carburized X-2M steel, suggesting that this material will be useful in heavy duty gears and in aircraft gas turbine mainshaft bearings operating under high hoop stresses.

  19. On the location of crack closure and the threshold condition for fatigue crack growth

    SciTech Connect

    Zaiken, E.; Ritchie, R.O.

    1984-08-01

    These experiments on ingot aluminum alloys provide further confirmation that the development of a threshold for the growth of long fatigue cracks is primarily associated with a reduction in local crack driving force due to crack closure in the wake of the crack tip. Moreover, based on studies of the change in K /SUB c1/ during progressive removal of the wake at threshold levels, it appears that although such closure is fairly evenly distributed over most of the crack length, more than 40% of the closure is confined to the near-tip region.

  20. Electromagnetic Detection of Fatigue Cracks under Protruding Head Ferromagnetic Fasteners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincheski, Buzz; Namkung, Min

    2004-01-01

    The detection of fatigue cracks under installed fasteners has been a major goal of the aging aircraft NDE community. The Sliding Probe, Magneto-Optic Imager, Rotating Self-Nulling Probe, Low Frequency Eddy Current Array, and Eddyscan systems are among the instruments developed for this inspection. It has been verified that the detection of fatigue cracks under flush head aluminum and titanium fasteners can be accomplished with a high resolution by the above techniques. The detection of fatigue cracks under ferromagnetic and protruding head fasteners, however, has been found to be much more difficult. For the present work, the inspection for fatigue cracks under SAE 4340 Steel Hi-Lok fasteners is explored. Modifications to the Rotating Self-Nulling Eddy Current Probe System are presented which enable the detection of fatigue cracks hidden under the protruding head of the ferromagnetic fastener. Inspection results for samples with varying length EDM notches are shown, as well as a comparison between the signature from an EDM notch and an actual fatigue crack. Finite Element Modeling is used to investigate the effect of the ferromagnetic fastener on the induced eddy current distribution in order to help explain the detection characteristics of the system. This paper will also introduce a modification to the Rotating Probe System designed specifically for the detection of deeply buried flaws in multilayer conductors. The design change incorporates a giant magnetoresistive (GMR) sensor as the pickup device to improve the low frequency performance of the probe. The flaw detection capabilities of the GMR based Self- Nulling Probe are presented along with the status of the GMR based Rotating Probe System for detection of deeply buried flaws under installed fasteners.

  1. Mode III fatigue crack propagation in low alloy steel

    SciTech Connect

    Ritchie, R.O.; McClintock, F.A.; Nayeb-Hashemi, H.; Ritter, M.A.

    1982-01-01

    To provide a basis for estimating fatigue life in large rotating generator shafts subjected to transient oscillations, a study is made of fatigue crack propagation in Mode III (anti-plane shear) in torsionally-loaded spheroidized AISI 4340 steel. Results are compared to analogous behavior in Mode I. The approach investigated the feasibility of using continuum fracture mechanics and preliminary mechanistic modeling to serve as a basis for defect-tolerant life estimation procedures. 38 refs.

  2. Fatigue crack propagation resistance of highly crosslinked polyethylene.

    PubMed

    Bradford, Letitia; Baker, David; Ries, Michael D; Pruitt, Lisa A

    2004-12-01

    A higher degree of cross-linking has been shown to improve wear properties of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene in laboratory studies. However, cross-linking can also affect the mechanical properties of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene. Fatigue crack propagation resistance was determined for electron beam cross-linked ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene and compared with gamma irradiation cross-linked and noncross-linked polyethylene fatigue specimens. Crosslinking was done with different dosages of irradiation followed by melting. For one irradiation dose (50 kGy) extrusion and molding processes were compared. A fracture mechanics approach was used to determine how the degree of cross-linking affects resistance to crack propagation in ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene. Fatigue crack propagation resistance was reduced in proportion to the irradiation dose. The type of irradiation (gamma or electron beam) or manufacturing method (extrusion or molding) did not affect fatigue crack propagation resistance. The reduced fatigue strength of highly cross-linked ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene could lead to mechanical failure in conditions that are associated with cyclic local tensile stresses. PMID:15577468

  3. Fatigue crack monitoring via load-differential guided wave methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sang Jun; Michaels, Jennifer E.; Chen, Xin; Michaels, Thomas E.

    2012-05-01

    Detection and localization of fatigue cracks is an important application for inspection and monitoring of civil, mechanical and aerospace structures, but assessment of such damage via ultrasonic guided waves can be problematic when cracks are tightly closed in the absence of applied tensile loads. Proposed here are load-differential methods, which compare signals at one load to those at another load at the same damage state. The main advantage of such methods is that cracks can be detected and localized by analyzing current signals obtained from different loading conditions without using baseline data from the damage-free state. The efficacy of the proposed load-differential imaging method is examined using fatigue test data where multiple cracks grow from a single through-hole. Data were acquired with a spatially distributed array of piezoelectric discs by recording ultrasonic signals as a function of applied uniaxial load at intervals throughout the fatigue test. Load-differential guided wave images are generated from residual signals via delay-and-sum imaging methods, and these images are evaluated in terms of their ability to detect and localize fatigue cracks.

  4. Fatigue crack growth and low cycle fatigue of two nickel base superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoloff, N. S.; Duquette, D. J.; Choe, S. J.; Golwalkar, S.

    1983-01-01

    The fatigue crack growth and low cycle fatigue behavior of two P/M superalloys, Rene 95 and Astroloy, in the hot isostatically pressed (HIP) condition, was determined. Test variables included frequency, temperature, environment, and hold times at peak tensile loads (or strains). Crack initiation sites were identified in both alloys. Crack growth rates were shown to increase in argon with decreasing frequency or with the imposition of hold times. This behavior was attributed to the effect of oxygen in the argon. Auger analyses were performed on oxide films formed in argon. Low cycle fatigue lives also were degraded by tensile hold, contrary to previous reports in the literature. The role of environment in low cycle fatigue behavior is discussed.

  5. Simulating Fatigue Crack Growth in Spiral Bevel Gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spievak, Lisa E.; Wawrzynek, Paul A.; Ingraffea, Anthony R.

    2000-01-01

    The majority of helicopter transmission systems utilize spiral bevel gears to convert the horizontal power from the engine into vertical power for the rotor. Due to the cyclical loading on a gear's tooth, fatigue crack propagation can occur. In rotorcraft applications, a crack's trajectory determines whether the gear failure will be benign or catastrophic for the aircraft. As a result, the capability to predict crack growth in gears is significant. A spiral bevel gear's complex shape requires a three dimensional model of the geometry and cracks. The boundary element method in conjunction with linear elastic fracture mechanics theories is used to predict arbitrarily shaped three dimensional fatigue crack trajectories in a spiral bevel pinion under moving load conditions. The predictions are validated by comparison to experimental results. The sensitivity of the predictions to variations in loading conditions and crack growth rate model parameters is explored. Critical areas that must be understood in greater detail prior to predicting more accurate crack trajectories and crack growth rates in three dimensions are identified.

  6. Real-time sensing of fatigue crack damage for information-based decision and control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Eric Evans

    Information-based decision and control for structures that are subject to failure by fatigue cracking is based on the following notion: Maintenance, usage scheduling, and control parameter tuning can be optimized through real time knowledge of the current state of fatigue crack damage. Additionally, if the material properties of a mechanical structure can be identified within a smaller range, then the remaining life prediction of that structure will be substantially more accurate. Information-based decision systems can rely one physical models, estimation of material properties, exact knowledge of usage history, and sensor data to synthesize an accurate snapshot of the current state of damage and the likely remaining life of a structure under given assumed loading. The work outlined in this thesis is structured to enhance the development of information-based decision and control systems. This is achieved by constructing a test facility for laboratory experiments on real-time damage sensing. This test facility makes use of a methodology that has been formulated for fatigue crack model parameter estimation and significantly improves the quality of predictions of remaining life. Specifically, the thesis focuses on development of an on-line fatigue crack damage sensing and life prediction system that is built upon the disciplines of Systems Sciences and Mechanics of Materials. A major part of the research effort has been expended to design and fabricate a test apparatus which allows: (i) measurement and recording of statistical data for fatigue crack growth in metallic materials via different sensing techniques; and (ii) identification of stochastic model parameters for prediction of fatigue crack damage. To this end, this thesis describes the test apparatus and the associated instrumentation based on four different sensing techniques, namely, traveling optical microscopy, ultrasonic flaw detection, Alternating Current Potential Drop (ACPD), and fiber

  7. Cohesive models of fatigue crack growth and stress-corrosion cracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Olivier T.

    The aim of this dissertation was to develop models of fatigue crack growth and stress-corrosion cracking by investigating cohesive theories of fracture. These models were integrated in a finite-element framework embedding a contact algorithm and techniques of remeshing and adaptive meshing.For the fatigue model, we developed a phenomenological cohesive law which exhibits unloading-reloading hysteresis. This model qualitatively predicts fatigue crack growth rates in metals under constant amplitude regime for short and long cracks, as well as growth retardation due to overload. Quantitative predictions were obtained in the case of long cracks.We developed a chemistry-dependent cohesive law which serves as a basis for the stress-corrosion cracking model. In order to determine this cohesive law, two approaches, based on energy relaxation and the renormalization group, were used for coarse-graining interplanar potentials. We analyzed the cohesive behavior of a large--but finite--number of interatomic planes and found that the macroscopic cohesive law adopts a universal asymptotic form. The resulting stress-corrosion crack growth rates agreed well with those observed experimentally in 'static' fatigue tests given in the literature.

  8. Closure of fatigue cracks at high strains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iyyer, N. S.; Dowling, N. E.

    1985-01-01

    Experiments were conducted on smooth specimens to study the closure behavior of short cracks at high cyclic strains under completely reversed cycling. Testing procedures and methodology, and closure measurement techniques, are described in detail. The strain levels chosen for the study cover from predominantly elastic to grossly plastic strains. Crack closure measurements are made at different crack lengths. The study reveals that, at high strains, cracks close only as the lowest stress level in the cycle is approached. The crack opening is observed to occur in the compressive part of the loading cycle. The applied stress needed to open a short crack under high strain is found to be less than for cracks under small scale yielding. For increased plastic deformations, the value of sigma sub op/sigma sub max is observed to decrease and approaches the value of R. Comparison of the experimental results with existing analysis is made and indicates the limitations of the small scale yielding approach where gross plastic deformation behavior occurs.

  9. Fatigue crack propagation in ceria-partially-stabilized zirconia (Ce-TZP)-alumina composites

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, J.F.; Yu, C.S.; Shetty, D.K.

    1990-10-10

    Fatigue crack propagation rates in tension-tension load cycling were measured in ZrO{sub 2}-12 mol% CeO{sub 2}-10 wt% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} ceramics using precracked and annealed compact tension specimens. The fatigue crack growth behavior was examined for Ce-TZPs. The fatigue crack growth behavior was strongly influenced by the history of crack shielding via the development of the crack-tip transformation zones. Crack growth rates under sustained peak loads were also measured and found to be significantly lower and occurred at higher peak stress intensities as compared to the fatigue crack growth rates.

  10. Investigation of eddy current examination on OD fatigue crack for steam generator tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Yuying; Ding, Boyuan; Li, Ming; Liu, Jinhong; Chen, Huaidong; Meyendorf, Norbert G.

    2015-03-01

    The opening width of fatigue crack was very small, and conventional Bobbin probe was very difficult to detect it in steam generator tubes. Different sizes of 8 fatigue cracks were inspected using bobbin probe rotating probe. The analysis results showed that, bobbin probe was not sensitive for fatigue crack even for small through wall crack mixed with denting signal. On the other hand, the rotating probe was easily to detect all cracks. Finally, the OD phase to depth curve for fatigue crack using rotating probe was established and the results agreed very well with the true crack size.

  11. Fatigue crack detection in a plate girder using Lamb waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greve, D. W.; Oppenheim, I. J.; Wu, Wei; Zheng, Peng

    2007-04-01

    We report on the application of wafer-type PZT transducers to the detection of flaws in steel plate girders. In these experiments one transducer is used to emit a pulse and the second receives the pulse and reflections from nearby boundaries, flaws, or discontinuities (pitch-catch mode). In this application there will typically be numerous reflections observed in the undamaged structure. A major challenge is to recognize new reflections caused by fatigue cracks in the presence of these background reflections. A laboratory specimen plate girder was fabricated at approximately half scale, 910 mm deep with an h/t ratio of 280 for the web and a b/t ratio of 16 for the flanges, and with transverse stiffeners fabricated with a web gap at the tension flange. Two wafer-type transducers were mounted on the web approximately 175 mm from the crack location, one on each side of the stiffener. The transducers were operated in pitch-catch mode, excited by a windowed sinusoid to create a narrowband transient excitation. The transducer location relative to the crack corresponded to a total included angle of roughly 30 degrees in the path reflecting from the crack. Cyclic loading was applied to develop a distortion-induced fatigue crack in the web at the web gap location. After appearance of the crack, ultrasonic measurements were performed at a range of center frequencies below the cutoff frequency of the A1 Lamb wave mode. Subsequently the crack was extended mechanically to simulate crack growth under primary longitudinal (bending) stress and the measurements were repeated. Direct differencing of the signals showed arrivals at times corresponding to reflection from the crack location, growing in amplitude as the crack was lengthened mechanically. These results demonstrate the utility of Lamb waves for crack detection even in the presence of numerous background reflections.

  12. Fatigue crack propagation behavior of stainless steel welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusko, Chad S.

    The fatigue crack propagation behavior of austenitic and duplex stainless steel base and weld metals has been investigated using various fatigue crack growth test procedures, ferrite measurement techniques, light optical microscopy, stereomicroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and optical profilometry. The compliance offset method has been incorporated to measure crack closure during testing in order to determine a stress ratio at which such closure is overcome. Based on this method, an empirically determined stress ratio of 0.60 has been shown to be very successful in overcoming crack closure for all da/dN for gas metal arc and laser welds. This empirically-determined stress ratio of 0.60 has been applied to testing of stainless steel base metal and weld metal to understand the influence of microstructure. Regarding the base metal investigation, for 316L and AL6XN base metals, grain size and grain plus twin size have been shown to influence resulting crack growth behavior. The cyclic plastic zone size model has been applied to accurately model crack growth behavior for austenitic stainless steels when the average grain plus twin size is considered. Additionally, the effect of the tortuous crack paths observed for the larger grain size base metals can be explained by a literature model for crack deflection. Constant Delta K testing has been used to characterize the crack growth behavior across various regions of the gas metal arc and laser welds at the empirically determined stress ratio of 0.60. Despite an extensive range of stainless steel weld metal FN and delta-ferrite morphologies, neither delta-ferrite morphology significantly influence the room temperature crack growth behavior. However, variations in weld metal da/dN can be explained by local surface roughness resulting from large columnar grains and tortuous crack paths in the weld metal.

  13. Fatigue Crack Growth in Peened Friction Stir Welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forth, Scott C.; Hatamleh, Omar

    2008-01-01

    Friction stir welding induces residual stresses that accelerates fatigue crack growth in the weld nugget. Shot peening over the weld had little effect on growth rate. Laser peening over the weld retarded the growth rate: Final crack growth rate was comparable to the base, un-welded material. Crack tunneling evident from residual compressive stresses. 2195-T8 fracture surfaces were highly textured. Texturing makes comparisons difficult as the material system is affecting the data as much as the processing. Material usage becoming more common in space applications requiring additional work to develop useful datasets for damage tolerance analyses.

  14. Acoustic emission monitoring of a fatigue crack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granata, D. M.; Scott, W. R.; Davis, J.; Lee, E. U.; Boodey, J. B.; Kulowitch, P.

    AE monitoring is applied to crack detection in materials containing intermetallic compounds that have very small critical flaw sizes. The tests performed are simpler than structural monitoring since the source location is well defined and extraneous sources are limited. A correlation was found between defect propagation and AE events in the two titanium aluminide alloys studied. Because events that are apparently not crack related can occur, and because the number of events detected is threshold and gain-sensitive, the AE count alone is not an absolute measure of crack length. Parameters denoting the portion of the load cycle where events occur are valuable for identifying AE sources and cracking mechanisms. Pattern recognition algorithms can be developed on the basis of stored waveforms and load level parameters.

  15. Fatigue crack growth behavior of Ti-1100 at elevated temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, D.C.; Nicholas, T.

    1995-12-31

    Effects of temperature, frequency, and cycles with superimposed hold times are evaluated in Ti-1100 in order to study the complex creep-fatigue-environment interactions in this material. Crack growth rate tests conducted at cyclic loading frequency of 1.0 Hz show that raising the temperature from 593 to 650 C has only a slightly detrimental effect on crack growth rate, although these temperatures produce growth rates significantly higher than at room temperature. From constant {Delta}K tests, the effects of temperature at constant frequency show a minimum crack growth rate at 250 C. From the minimum crack growth rate at 250 C, the crack growth rate increases linearly with temperature. Increases in frequency at constant temperatures of 593 and 650 C produce a continuous decrease in growth rate in going from 0.001 to 1.0 Hz, although the behavior is primarily cycle dependent in this region. Tests at 1.0 Hz with superimposed hold times from 1 to 1,000 s are used to evaluate creep-fatigue-environment interactions. Hold times at maximum load are found to initially decrease and then increase the cyclic crack growth rate with increasing duration. This is attributed to crack-tip blunting during short hold times and environmental degradation at long hold times. Hold times at minimum load show no change in growth rates, indicating that there is no net environmental degradation to the bulk material beyond that experienced during the baseline 1 Hz cycling.

  16. S-N curve for crack initiation and an estimate of fatigue crack nucleus size

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, C.Y.; Palusamy, S.S.; Liaw, P.K.; Ren, W.

    1997-12-01

    A study of fatigue life prediction was made for ASTM A533 Grade B nuclear pressure vessel steel. The objectives of the study were to predict the S-N curve, representing crack initiation, and to estimate the average crack nucleus size using an engineering approach. The plastic replica method was used to monitor crack initiation and growth from well-polished specimens under uniaxial tension-tension stressing. Two methods were used to estimate crack nucleus size: (1) backcalculating crack length via the da/dN versus {Delta}K relationship, and (2) evaluating an assumed relationship between the endurance limit and the threshold stress intensity factor range. Crack nucleus size estimated by these two methods are fairly consistent when the effects of crack closure and plastic zone correction are taken into account.

  17. The application of a logic framework for fatigue crack growth analyses to microstructural effects

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, J.G.; Liu, H.W.

    1995-12-31

    {Delta}K has been widely used to correlate da/dN data. The relation between da/dN and {Delta}K is usually found empirically. However, fatigue crack growth relations can also be derived theoretically. Three fatigue crack growth theories are derived for the state of small scale yielding and plane strain. These three theories constitute a logic framework useful for fatigue crack growth analyses. The application of the logic framework to the analyses of microstructural effects on fatigue crack growth is illustrated. The fatigue crack growth curve of 7075-T651 aluminum alloy has five distinct regions. A fatigue crack grows by crack-tip shear decohesion forming striations and by brittle fractures of particles followed by localized shear decohesion at these microcracks forming dimples. The logic framework helps to relate the fatigue crack growth behaviors in these five regions to the fractures of inclusions and to the resistance of grain boundaries and dispersoids to shear decohesion.

  18. Fatigue crack closure behavior at high stress ratios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, C. Christopher; Carman, C. Davis; Hillberry, Ben M.

    1988-01-01

    Fatigue crack delay behavior at high stress ratio caused by single peak overloads was investigated in two thicknesses of 7475-T731 aluminum alloy. Closure measurements indicated no closure occurred before or throughout the overload plastic zones following the overload. This was further substantiated by comparing the specimen compliance following the overload with the compliance of a low R ratio test when the crack was fully open. Scanning electron microscope studies revealed that crack tunneling and possibly reinitiation of the crack occurred, most likely a result of crack-tip blunting. The number of delay cycles was greater for the thinner mixed mode stress state specimen than for the thicker plane strain stress state specimen, which is similar to low R ratio test results and may be due to a larger plastic zone for the mixed mode cased.

  19. Thermal-mechanical fatigue crack growth in Inconel X-750

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marchand, N.; Pelloux, R. M.

    1984-01-01

    Thermal-mechanical fatigue crack growth (TMFCG) was studied in a gamma-gamma' nickel base superalloy Inconel X-750 under controlled load amplitude in the temperature range from 300 to 650 C. In-phase (T sub max at sigma sub max), out-of-phase (T sub min at sigma sub max), and isothermal tests at 650 C were performed on single-edge notch bars under fully reversed cyclic conditions. A dc electrical potential method was used to measure crack length. The electrical potential response obtained for each cycle of a given wave form and R value yields information on crack closure and crack extension per cycle. The macroscopic crack growth rates are reported as a function of delta k and the relative magnitude of the TMFCG are discussed in the light of the potential drop information and of the fractographic observations.

  20. Accelerated fatigue crack growth behavior of PWA 1480

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Telesman, Jack; Ghosn, Louis J.

    1988-01-01

    An investigation of the fatigue crack growth (FCG) behavior of PWA 1480 single crystal nickel base superalloy was conducted. Typical Paris region behavior was observed above a delta K of 8 MPa sq rt of m. However, below that stress intensity range, the alloy exhibited highly unusual behavior. This behavior consisted of a region where the crack growth rate became essentially independent of the applied stress intensity. The transition in the FCG behavior was related to a change in the observed crack growth mechanisms. In the Paris region, fatigue failure occurred along (111) facets; however, at the lower stress intensities, (001) fatigue failure was observed. A mechanism was proposed, based on barriers to dislocation motion, to explain the changes in the observed FCG behavior. The FCG data were also evaluated in terms of a recently proposed stress intensity parameter, K sub rss. This parameter, based on the resolved shear stresses on the slip planes, quantified the crack driving force as well as the mode I delta K, and at the same time was also able to predict the microscopic crack path under different stress states.

  1. Fatigue Crack Growth Database for Damage Tolerance Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, R. G.; Shivakumar, V.; Cardinal, J. W.; Williams, L. C.; McKeighan, P. C.

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this project was to begin the process of developing a fatigue crack growth database (FCGD) of metallic materials for use in damage tolerance analysis of aircraft structure. For this initial effort, crack growth rate data in the NASGRO (Registered trademark) database, the United States Air Force Damage Tolerant Design Handbook, and other publicly available sources were examined and used to develop a database that characterizes crack growth behavior for specific applications (materials). The focus of this effort was on materials for general commercial aircraft applications, including large transport airplanes, small transport commuter airplanes, general aviation airplanes, and rotorcraft. The end products of this project are the FCGD software and this report. The specific goal of this effort was to present fatigue crack growth data in three usable formats: (1) NASGRO equation parameters, (2) Walker equation parameters, and (3) tabular data points. The development of this FCGD will begin the process of developing a consistent set of standard fatigue crack growth material properties. It is envisioned that the end product of the process will be a general repository for credible and well-documented fracture properties that may be used as a default standard in damage tolerance analyses.

  2. Distribution of Inclusion-Initiated Fatigue Cracking in Powder Metallurgy Udimet 720 Characterized

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonacuse, Peter J.; Kantzos, Pete T.; Barrie, Robert; Telesman, Jack; Ghosn, Louis J.; Gabb, Timothy P.

    2004-01-01

    In the absence of extrinsic surface damage, the fatigue life of metals is often dictated by the distribution of intrinsic defects. In powder metallurgy (PM) alloys, relatively large defects occur rarely enough that a typical characterization with a limited number of small volume fatigue test specimens will not adequately sample inclusion-initiated damage. Counterintuitively, inclusion-initiated failure has a greater impact on the distribution in PM alloy fatigue lives because they tend to have fewer defects than their cast and wrought counterparts. Although the relative paucity of defects in PM alloys leads to higher mean fatigue lives, the distribution in observed lives tends to be broader. In order to study this important failure initiation mechanism without expending an inordinate number of specimens, a study was undertaken at the NASA Glenn Research Center where known populations of artificial inclusions (seeds) were introduced to production powder. Fatigue specimens were machined from forgings produced from the seeded powder. Considerable effort has been expended in characterizing the crack growth rate from inclusion-initiated cracks in seeded PM alloys. A rotating and translating positioning system, with associated software, was devised to map the surface inclusions in low-cycle fatigue (LCF) test bars and to monitor the crack growth from these inclusions. The preceding graph illustrates the measured extension in fatigue cracks from inclusions on a seeded LCF test bar subjected to cyclic loading at a strain range of 0.8 percent and a strain ratio (max/min) of zero. Notice that the observed inclusions fall into three categories: some do not propagate at all (arrest), some propagate with a decreasing crack growth rate, and a few propagate at increasing rates that can be modeled by fracture mechanics. The following graph shows the measured inclusion-initiated crack growth rates from 10 interrupted LCF tests plotted against stress intensities calculated for semi

  3. Effect of CTE on Fatigue Cracking of Stainless Steel Vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Bird, E. L.; Mustaleski, T. M.

    2002-01-31

    Visual examination of lithium hydride reactor vessels revealed cracks that were adjacent to welds. Most cracks were parallel to the weld in the bottom portion of the vessel. Sections were cut out of the vessel containing these cracks and examined using the metallograph, scanning electron microscope, and microprobe to determine the cause of cracking. most of the cracks originated on the outer surface just outside the weld fusion line in the heat affected zone and propagated along grain boundaries. Crack depth of those sections examined ranged from about 300 to 500 {micro}m. Other cracks were reported to have reached a maximum depth of 0.32-cm (0.125-inch). The primary cause of cracking was the creation of high tensile stresses associated with the CTE differences between the filler metal and the base metal during operation of the vessel in a thermally cyclic environment. This failure mechanism could be described as creep-type fatigue whereby crack propagation might have been aided by the presence of brittle chromium carbides along the grain boundaries, which is indicative of a slightly sensitized microstructure.

  4. Effects of crack tip plastic zone on corrosion fatigue cracking of alloy 690(TT) in pressurized water reactor environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, J.; Qiu, S. Y.; Chen, Y.; Fu, Z. H.; Lin, Z. X.; Xu, Q.

    2015-01-01

    Alloy 690(TT) is widely used for steam generator tubes in pressurized water reactor (PWR), where it is susceptible to corrosion fatigue. In this study, the corrosion fatigue behavior of Alloy 690(TT) in simulated PWR environments was investigated. The microstructure of the plastic zone near the crack tip was investigated and labyrinth structures were observed. The relationship between the crack tip plastic zone and fatigue crack growth rates and the environment factor Fen was illuminated.

  5. Velocity-Dependent Fatigue Crack Paths in Nanograined Pt Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meirom, R. A.; Clark, T.; Polcawich, R.; Pulskamp, J.; Dubey, M.; Muhlstein, C. L.

    2008-08-01

    Studies of crack growth in nanograined films assert that mechanical damage accumulates at grain boundaries irrespective of the crack velocity and loading conditions. This work shows that crack advance in nanograined Pt films involves a dislocation-slip mechanism that is a function of the crack growth rate and mode of loading. Crack paths in Pt were initially intergranular, but transitioned to a transgranular mode that persisted until catastrophic failure. This research demonstrates that crack growth mechanisms modeled for nanograined Ni cannot be generalized to other pure, metallic systems.

  6. Fatigue crack growth simulations of interfacial cracks in bi-layered FGMs using XFEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, S.; Singh, I. V.; Mishra, B. K.; Bui, T. Q.

    2013-10-01

    An investigation of fatigue crack growth of interfacial cracks in bi-layered materials using the extended finite element method is presented. The bi-material consists of two layers of dissimilar materials. The bottom layer is made of aluminium alloy while the upper one is made of functionally graded material (FGM). The FGM layer consists of 100 % aluminium alloy on the left side and 100 % ceramic (alumina) on the right side. The gradation in material property of the FGM layer is assumed to be exponential from the alloy side to the ceramic side. The domain based interaction integral approach is extended to obtain the stress intensity factors for an interfacial crack under thermo-mechanical load. The edge and centre cracks are taken at the interface of bi-layered material. The fatigue life of the interface crack plate is obtained using the Paris law of fatigue crack growth under cyclic mode-I, mixed-mode and thermal loads. This study reveals that the crack propagates into the FGM layer under all types of loads.

  7. Fatigue crack initiation and damage evolution of unnotched titanium matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Her, Yung-Chiun

    Fatigue crack initiation, multiplication, matrix crack density evolution, and stiffness reduction of several unnotched SCS-6 silicon carbide fiber-reinforced titanium and titanium aluminide matrix composites have been investigated experimentally and analytically. The effects of the thickness of the interfacial reaction layer and fiber coating on fatigue crack initiation life, crack growth rate, and fatigue damage evolution of the composites were examined. Growth behavior of small fatigue cracks in TMCs was also studied carefully. It was found that fatigue crack initiation and multiplication of TMCs are strongly influenced by the thickness of the interfacial reaction layer. Fatigue crack will not develop from the micro-notches in the interfacial reaction layer until the thickness of the reaction layer exceeds a critical value. Matrix crack growth rate is affected by the applied stress level, however, it appears to be independent of the matrix material and heat treatment. The combined effects of fatigue crack multiplication and propagation result in stiffness degradation of the composites. The Ag/Ta duplex fiber coating significantly improves the transverse tensile and flexural creep resistance of the SCS-6/Ti-25-10 composite. However, the Ag/Ta-coated composite exhibits a shorter crack initiation life, higher number of matrix cracks, and higher crack growth rate than the uncoated composite. The embrittlement of the residual Ag/Ta layer suggests that Ag is not an effective diffusion barrier to prevent the interdiffusion of atomic species across the interface. The high interfacial cracking density and high interfacial bond strength in the Ag/Ta-coated SCS-6/Tisb3Al composite are believed to be responsible for its poor fatigue damage tolerance. For titanium alloys, the threshold intensity factor range, Delta Ksbth, for small fatigue cracks in the matrix alloys of TMCs has been determined to be between 0.9 ˜ 1.0 MPa*msp{1/2} which is much lower than that for long

  8. Structural integrity and fatigue crack propagation life assessment of welded and weld-repaired structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, Mohammad Shah

    2005-11-01

    Structural integrity is the science and technology of the margin between safety and disaster. Proper evaluation of the structural integrity and fatigue life of any structure (aircraft, ship, railways, bridges, gas and oil transmission pipelines, etc.) is important to ensure the public safety, environmental protection, and economical consideration. Catastrophic failure of any structure can be avoided if structural integrity is assessed and necessary precaution is taken appropriately. Structural integrity includes tasks in many areas, such as structural analysis, failure analysis, nondestructive testing, corrosion, fatigue and creep analysis, metallurgy and materials, fracture mechanics, fatigue life assessment, welding metallurgy, development of repairing technologies, structural monitoring and instrumentation etc. In this research fatigue life assessment of welded and weld-repaired joints is studied both in numerically and experimentally. A new approach for the simulation of fatigue crack growth in two elastic materials has been developed and specifically, the concept has been applied to butt-welded joint in a straight plate and in tubular joints. In the proposed method, the formation of new surface is represented by an interface element based on the interface potential energy. This method overcomes the limitation of crack growth at an artificial rate of one element length per cycle. In this method the crack propagates only when the applied load reaches the critical bonding strength. The predicted results compares well with experimental results. The Gas Metal Arc welding processes has been simulated to predict post-weld distortion, residual stresses and development of restraining forces in a butt-welded joint. The effect of welding defects and bi-axial interaction of a circular porosity and a solidification crack on fatigue crack propagation life of butt-welded joints has also been investigated. After a weld has been repaired, the specimen was tested in a universal

  9. Empirical modeling of environment-enhanced fatigue crack propagation in structural alloys for component life prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richey, Edward, III

    1995-01-01

    This research aims to develop the methods and understanding needed to incorporate time and loading variable dependent environmental effects on fatigue crack propagation (FCP) into computerized fatigue life prediction codes such as NASA FLAGRO (NASGRO). In particular, the effect of loading frequency on FCP rates in alpha + beta titanium alloys exposed to an aqueous chloride solution is investigated. The approach couples empirical modeling of environmental FCP with corrosion fatigue experiments. Three different computer models have been developed and incorporated in the DOS executable program. UVAFAS. A multiple power law model is available, and can fit a set of fatigue data to a multiple power law equation. A model has also been developed which implements the Wei and Landes linear superposition model, as well as an interpolative model which can be utilized to interpolate trends in fatigue behavior based on changes in loading characteristics (stress ratio, frequency, and hold times).

  10. Matrix fatigue crack development in a notched continuous fiber SCS-6/Ti-15-3 composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hillberry, B. M.; Johnson, W. S.

    1990-01-01

    In this study the extensive matrix fatigue cracking that has been observed in notched SCS-6/Ti-15-3 composites is investigated. Away from the notch a uniform spacing of the fatigue cracks develops. Closer to the notch, fiber-matrix debonding which occurs increases the crack spacing. Crack spacing and debond length determined from shear-lag cylinder models compare favorably with experimental observations. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) fractography showed that the principal fatigue crack initiation occurred around the zero degree fibers. Interface failure in the 90 degree plies does not lead to the development of the primary fatigue cracking.

  11. Matrix fatigue crack development in a notched continuous fiber SCS-6/Ti-15-3 composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hillberry, B. M.; Johnson, W. S.

    1990-01-01

    In this study the extensive matrix fatigue cracking that has been observed in notched SCS-6/Ti-15-3 composites is investigated. Away from the notch uniform spacing of the fatigue cracks develops. Closer to the notch, fiber-matrix debonding which occurs increases the crack spacing. Crack spacing and debond length determined from shear-lag cylinder models compare favorably with experimental observations. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) fractography showed that the principal fatigue crack initiation occurred around the zero degree fibers. Interface failure in the 90 degree plies does not lead to the development of the primary fatigue cracking.

  12. Fatigue-Crack Propagation in Aluminum-Alloy Tension Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whaley, Richard E.; Kurzhals, Peter R.

    1960-01-01

    Results are presented of a series of fatigue tests to study crack propagation and the resulting stress distributions in tension panels. The panels were all of the same general design, and configurations varied mainly in the relative amount of cross-sectional area in the skin, stiffeners, and flanges. The panels were constructed of 2024-T3 and 7075-T6 aluminum alloys. It was found that the average rate of crack growth was slower in panels made of 2024-T3 aluminum alloy than in panels made of 7075-T6 aluminum alloy. All cracks initiated in the skin, and the slowest crack growth was measured in configurations where the highest percentage of cross-sectional area was in the stiffeners. Strain-gage surveys were made to determine the redistribution of stress as the crack grew across the panels. As a crack approached a given point in the skin, the stress at that point increased rapidly. The stress in the stiffeners also increased as the crack approached the stiffeners. During the propagation of the crack the stress was not distributed uniformly in the remaining area.

  13. Fatigue Crack Growth Fundamentals in Shape Memory Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Y.; Ojha, A.; Patriarca, L.; Sehitoglu, H.

    2015-03-01

    In this study, based on a regression of the crack tip displacements, the stress intensity range in fatigue is quantitatively determined for the shape memory alloy Ni2FeGa. The results are compared to the calculated stress intensity ranges with a micro-mechanical analysis accounting for the transformation-induced tractions. The effective stress intensity ranges obtained with both methods are in close agreement. Also, the fatigue crack closure levels were measured as 30 % of the maximum load using virtual extensometers along the crack flanks. This result is also in close agreement with the regression and micro-mechanical modeling findings. The current work pointed to the importance of elastic moduli changes and the residual transformation strains playing a role in the fatigue crack growth behavior. Additional simulations are conducted for two other important shape memory alloys, NiTi and CuZnAl, where the reductions in stress intensity range were found to be lower than Ni2FeGa.

  14. Crack Growth Behavior in the Threshold Region for High Cycle Fatigue Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, Royce G.; Figert, J.; Beek, J.; Ventura, J.; Martinez, J.; Samonski, F.

    2011-01-01

    This presentation describes results obtained from a research project conducted at the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) that was jointly supported by the FAA Technical Center and JSC. The JSC effort was part of a multi-task FAA program involving several U.S. laboratories and initiated for the purpose of developing enhanced analysis tools to assess damage tolerance of rotorcraft and aircraft propeller systems. The research results to be covered in this presentation include a new understanding of the behavior of fatigue crack growth in the threshold region. This behavior is important for structural life analysis of aircraft propeller systems and certain rotorcraft structural components (e.g., the mast). These components are often designed to not allow fatigue crack propagation to exceed an experimentally determined fatigue crack growth threshold value. During the FAA review meetings for the program, disagreements occurred between the researchers regarding the observed fanning (spread between the da/dN curves of constant R) in the threshold region at low stress ratios, R. Some participants believed that the fanning was a result of the ASTM load shedding test method for threshold testing, and thus did not represent the true characteristics of the material. If the fanning portion of the threshold value is deleted or not included in a life analysis, a significant penalty in the calculated life and design of the component would occur. The crack growth threshold behavior was previously studied and reported by several research investigators in the time period: 1970-1980. Those investigators used electron microscopes to view the crack morphology of the fatigue fracture surfaces. Their results showed that just before reaching threshold, the crack morphology often changed from a striated to a faceted or cleavage-like morphology. This change was reported to have been caused by particular dislocation properties of the material. Based on the results of these early investigations, a

  15. Possible disturbance of invariance of fatigue failure curves caused by the phenomenon of crack closure

    SciTech Connect

    Romaniv, O.N.; Lenets, Y.N.; Tkach, A.N.

    1985-05-01

    Despite the large number of works devoted to the analysis and quantitative determination of the influence of crack closure on the indices of cyclic crack resistance of materials, there has not been reliable information on the conditions of occurrence of one mechanism of crack closure or another, and the degree of its influence on the kinetics of fatigue cracks. The results of investigations of fractures in the zones of contact of fatigue crack edges have been limited and unsystematic. In this connection, the purpose of this work is to further develop concepts of the nature of the crack closure phenomenon and its influence on fatigue crack growth.

  16. Effects of microstructure banding on hydrogen assisted fatigue crack growth in X65 pipeline steels

    SciTech Connect

    Ronevich, Joseph A.; Somerday, Brian P.; San Marchi, Chris W.

    2015-09-10

    Banded ferrite-pearlite X65 pipeline steel was tested in high pressure hydrogen gas to evaluate the effects of oriented pearlite on hydrogen assisted fatigue crack growth. Test specimens were oriented in the steel pipe such that cracks propagated either parallel or perpendicular to the banded pearlite. The ferrite-pearlite microstructure exhibited orientation dependent behavior in which fatigue crack growth rates were significantly lower for cracks oriented perpendicular to the banded pearlite compared to cracks oriented parallel to the bands. Thus the reduction of hydrogen assisted fatigue crack growth across the banded pearlite is attributed to a combination of crack-tip branching and impeded hydrogen diffusion across the banded pearlite.

  17. Analysis and prediction of Multiple-Site Damage (MSD) fatigue crack growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawicke, D. S.; Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    A technique was developed to calculate the stress intensity factor for multiple interacting cracks. The analysis was verified through comparison with accepted methods of calculating stress intensity factors. The technique was incorporated into a fatigue crack growth prediction model and used to predict the fatigue crack growth life for multiple-site damage (MSD). The analysis was verified through comparison with experiments conducted on uniaxially loaded flat panels with multiple cracks. Configuration with nearly equal and unequal crack distribution were examined. The fatigue crack growth predictions agreed within 20 percent of the experimental lives for all crack configurations considered.

  18. Modeling fatigue crack growth in cross ply titanium matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bakuckas, J. G., Jr.; Johnson, W. S.

    1993-01-01

    In this study, the fatigue crack growth behavior of fiber bridging matrix cracks in cross-ply SCS-6/Ti-15-3 and SCS-6/Timetal-21S laminates containing center holes was investigated. Experimental observations revealed that matrix cracking was far more extensive and wide spread in the SCS-6/Ti-15-3 laminates compared to that in the SCS-6/Timetal-21S laminates. In addition, the fatigue life of the SCS-6/Ti-15-3 laminates was significantly longer than that of the SCS-6/Timetal-21S laminates. The matrix cracking observed in both material systems was analyzed using a fiber bridging (FB) model which was formulated using the boundary correction factors and weight functions for center hole specimen configurations. A frictional shear stress is assumed in the FB model and was used as a curve fitting parameter to model matrix crack growth data. The higher frictional shear stresses calculated in the SCS-6/Timetal-21S laminates resulted in lower stress intensity factors in the matrix and higher axial stresses in the fibers compared to those in the SCS-6/Ti-15-3 laminates at the same applied stress levels.

  19. Fatigue Crack Growth Analysis Under Spectrum Loading in Various Environmental Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikheevskiy, S.; Glinka, G.; Lee, E.

    2013-03-01

    The fatigue process consists, from the engineering point of view, of three stages: crack initiation, fatigue crack growth, and the final failure. It is also known that the fatigue process near notches and cracks is governed by local strains and stresses in the regions of maximum stress and strain concentrations. Therefore, the fatigue crack growth can be considered as a process of successive crack increments, and the fatigue crack initiation and subsequent growth can be modeled as one repetitive process. The assumptions mentioned above were used to derive a fatigue crack growth model based, called later as the UniGrow model, on the analysis of cyclic elastic-plastic stresses-strains near the crack tip. The fatigue crack growth rate was determined by simulating the cyclic stress-strain response in the material volume adjacent to the crack tip and calculating the accumulated fatigue damage in a manner similar to fatigue analysis of stationary notches. The fatigue crack growth driving force was derived on the basis of the stress and strain history at the crack tip and the Smith-Watson-Topper (SWT) fatigue damage parameter, D = σmaxΔɛ/2. It was subsequently found that the fatigue crack growth was controlled by a two-parameter driving force in the form of a weighted product of the stress intensity range and the maximum stress intensity factor, Δ K p K {max/1- p }. The effect of the internal (residual) stress induced by the reversed cyclic plasticity has been accounted for and therefore the two-parameter driving force made it possible to predict the effect of the mean stress including the influence of the applied compressive stress, tensile overloads, and variable amplitude spectrum loading. It allows estimating the fatigue life under variable amplitude loading without using crack closure concepts. Several experimental fatigue crack growth datasets obtained for the Al 7075 aluminum alloy were used for the verification of the proposed unified fatigue crack growth

  20. Fatigue crack propagation in carburized high alloy bearing steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Averbach, B. L.; Lou, Bingzhe; Pearson, P. K.; Fairchild, R. E.; Bamberger, E. N.

    1985-07-01

    Fatigue cracks were propagated through carburized cases in M-50NiL (0.1 C,4 Mo, 4 Cr, 1.3 V, 3.5 Ni) and CBS-1000M (0.1 C, 4.5 Mo, 1 Cr, 0.5 V, 3 Ni) steels at constant stress intensity ranges, ΔK, and at a constant cyclic peak load. Residual compressive stresses of the order of 140 MPa (20 Ksi) were developed in the M-50NiL cases, and in tests carried out at constant ΔK values it was observed that the fatigue crack propagation rates, da/dN, slowed significantly. In some tests, at constant peak loads, cracks were stopped in regions with high compressive stresses. The residual stresses in the cases in CBS-1000M steel were predominantly tensile, probably because of the presence of high retained austenite contents, and da/dN was accelerated in these cases. The effects of residual stress on the fatigue crack propagation rates are interpreted in terms of a pinched clothespin model in which the residual stresses introduce an internal stress intensity, Ki where Ki, = σid{i/1/2} (σi = internal stress, di = characteristic distance associated with the internal stress distribution). The effective stress intensity becomes Ke = Ka + Ki where Ka is the applied stress intensity. Values of Ki were calculated as a function of distance from the surface using experimental measurements of σi and a value of di = 11 mm (0.43 inch). The resultant values of Ke were taken to be equivalent to effective ΔK values, and da/dN was determined at each point from experimental measurements of fatigue crack propagation obtained separately for the case and core materials. A reasonably good fit was obtained with data for crack growth at a constant ΔK and at a constant cyclic peak load. The carburized case depths were approximately 4 mm, and the possible effects associated with the propagation of short cracks were considered. The major effects were observed at crack lengths of about 2 mm, but the contributions of short crack phenomena were considered to be small in these experiments, since the

  1. Fatigue crack growth theory and experiment: A comparative analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Sananda, K.

    1983-12-01

    A number of theoretical models have been proposed in the literature which explain the second or the fourth power dependence of fatigue crack growth rate on ..delta..K, the stress intensity factor range in the Paris-Erdogan relation da/dN = C ..delta..K /SUP m/ . All of these models pertain to the intermediate range of crack growth rates where the m values are relatively low in the range of 2 to 4. The values of m for many metals and alloys can be much larger than 4 at near threshold crack growth rates or at stress intensities close to the fast fracture, and in some cases throughout the range of ..delta..K when the faceted mode of crack growth occurs. For such cases, the models appear to have no relevance. In this report predictions of different theoretical models are critically examined in comparison to experimentally determined crack growth rates in a MA 956, oxide dispersion strengthened alloy. Cumulative damage models predict crack growth rates reasonably well except in the range where ductile striations are observed. Lack of agreement with any particular model in this range is related to the fact that at different regions across the specimen thickness different mechanisms, either plastic blunting or cumulative damage, control the crack growth.

  2. Fatigue cracking of aluminum under spectrum loading at various humidities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chappell, D. P.; Nelson, H.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of moisture on Stage I fatigue in aluminum was studied under constant amplitude loading and under a severe log-normal spectrum loading. Crack initiation and early crack growth was monitored using accurate specimen compliance measurements statistically generated using computer-aided data acquisition and analysis. Fatigue strength in aluminum was found to be greatly reduced by humidity under both constant amplitude and log-normal spectrum loading. Use of Miner's theory of cumulative damage to predict the outcome of the spectrum tests, given the results of the constant amplitude tests, was investigated. A systematic pattern of deviation from Miner's theory was found, which was also a function of the humidity level.

  3. Fatigue crack growth behavior of Al-Li alloy 1441

    SciTech Connect

    Prakash, R.V.; Parida, B.K.

    1995-12-31

    Fatigue crack growth behavior of Al-Li alloy 1441 having a marginally lower lithium content, compared to 80xx and 20xx series Al-Li alloys is presented in this paper. This investigation was conducted on single edge tension--SE(T)--specimens, under constant amplitude as well as under MiniLCA flight spectrum loading with the specific objective of determining the effects of stress ratio, orientation, thickness and cladding. Three thicknesses were considered: 1.2 mm(clad and unclad), 2.0 mm(clad and unclad) and 8.0 mm unclad. Constant amplitude fatigue tests were conducted at stress ratios of {minus}0.3, 0.1 and 0.7. Testing was performed under ambient conditions and along three orientations, namely L-T, T-L and L+45 degrees. Crack growth characteristics of this alloy are compared with that of BS:L73 (2014-T4 equivalent) for assessing the possibility of replacing BS:L73. Significant effect of stress ratio on crack growth rate was observed in all thicknesses. However, in case of 1.2 and 2.0 mm thick sheets, the effect was minimal at intermediate-crack growth regime. The orientation of the specimen does not adversely affect the fatigue crack growth behavior of 8.0 mm and 2.0 mm thick specimens. However, for 1.2 mm unclad sheet crack growth resistance in L-T direction was found to be superior to that along T-L direction. In majority of test cases considered, no significant effect was observed on crack growth rate due to thickness or cladding. Crack growth characteristics of Al-Li alloy 1441 and Al-Cu alloy BS:L73 under constant amplitude as well as MiniLCA spectrum loading are similar in the low and intermediate-crack growth rate regime. Based on these observations, it is felt that this Al-Li alloy has the potential for future aerospace applications.

  4. NASA/FLAGRO - FATIGUE CRACK GROWTH COMPUTER PROGRAM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, R. G.

    1994-01-01

    Structural flaws and cracks may grow under fatigue inducing loads and, upon reaching a critical size, cause structural failure to occur. The growth of these flaws and cracks may occur at load levels well below the ultimate load bearing capability of the structure. The Fatigue Crack Growth Computer Program, NASA/FLAGRO, was developed as an aid in predicting the growth of pre-existing flaws and cracks in structural components of space systems. The earlier version of the program, FLAGRO4, was the primary analysis tool used by Rockwell International and the Shuttle subcontractors for fracture control analysis on the Space Shuttle. NASA/FLAGRO is an enhanced version of the program and incorporates state-of-the-art improvements in both fracture mechanics and computer technology. NASA/FLAGRO provides the fracture mechanics analyst with a computerized method of evaluating the "safe crack growth life" capabilities of structural components. NASA/FLAGRO could also be used to evaluate the damage tolerance aspects of a given structural design. The propagation of an existing crack is governed by the stress field in the vicinity of the crack tip. The stress intensity factor is defined in terms of the relationship between the stress field magnitude and the crack size. The propagation of the crack becomes catastrophic when the local stress intensity factor reaches the fracture toughness of the material. NASA/FLAGRO predicts crack growth using a two-dimensional model which predicts growth independently in two directions based on the calculation of stress intensity factors. The analyst can choose to use either a crack growth rate equation or a nonlinear interpolation routine based on tabular data. The growth rate equation is a modified Forman equation which can be converted to a Paris or Walker equation by substituting different values into the exponent. This equation provides accuracy and versatility and can be fit to data using standard least squares methods. Stress

  5. Investigation of the effects of manufacturing variations and materials on fatigue crack detection methods in gear teeth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheitner, Jeffrey A.; Houser, Donald R.

    1994-01-01

    The fatigue life of a gear tooth can be thought of as the sum of the number of cycles required to initiate a crack, N(sub i), plus the number of cycles required to propagate the crack to such a length that fracture occurs, N(sub p). The factors that govern crack initiation are thought to be related to localized stress or strain at a point, while propagation of a fatigue crack is a function of the crack tip parameters such as crack shape, stress state, and stress intensity factor. During a test there is no clear transition between initiation and propagation. The mechanisms of initiation and propagation are quite different and modeling them separately produces a higher degree of accuracy, but then the question that continually arises is 'what is a crack?' The total life prediction in a fracture mechanics model presently hinges on the assumption of an initial crack length, and this length can significantly affect the total life prediction. The size of the initial crack is generally taken to be in the range of 0.01 in. to 0.2 in. Several researchers have used various techniques to determine the beginning of the crack propagation stage. Barhorst showed the relationship between dynamic stiffness changes and crack propagation. Acoustic emissions, which are stress waves produced by the sudden movement of stressed materials, have also been successfully used to monitor the growth of cracks in tensile and fatigue specimens. The purpose of this research is to determine whether acoustic emissions can be used to define the beginning of crack propagation in a gear using a single-tooth bending fatigue test.

  6. Measurement and analysis of critical crack tip processes associated with variable amplitude fatigue crack growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudak, S. J., Jr.; Davidson, D. L.; Chan, K. S.

    1983-01-01

    Crack growth retardation following overloads can result in overly conservative life predictions in structures subjected to variable amplitude fatigue loading when linear damage accumulation procedures are employed. Crack closure is believed to control the crack growth retardation, although the specific closure mechanism is debatable. Information on the relative contributions to crack closure from: (1) plasticity left in the wake of the advancing crack and (2) crack tip residual stresses is provided. The delay period and corresponding crack growth rate transients following overloads are systematically measured as a function of load ratio (R) and overload magnitude. These responses are correlated in terms of the local 'driving force' for crack growth as measured by crack tip opening loads and delta K sub eff. The latter measurements are obtained using a scanning electron microscope equipped with a cyclic loading stage; measurements are quantified using a relatively new stereoimaging technique. Combining experimental results with analytical predictions suggests that both plastic wake and residual stress mechanism are operative, the latter becoming predominate as R increases.

  7. Seeding Cracks Using a Fatigue Tester for Accelerated Gear Tooth Breaking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nenadic, Nenad G.; Wodenscheck, Joseph A.; Thurston, Michael G.; Lewicki, David G.

    2011-01-01

    This report describes fatigue-induced seeded cracks in spur gears and compares them to cracks created using a more traditional seeding method, notching. Finite element analysis (FEA) compares the effective compliance of a cracked tooth to the effective compliance of a notched tooth where the crack and the notch are of the same depth. In this analysis, cracks are propagated to the desired depth using FRANC2D and effective compliances are computed in ANSYS. A compliance-based feature for detecting cracks on the fatigue tester is described. The initiated cracks are examined using both nondestructive and destructive methods. The destructive examination reveals variability in the shape of crack surfaces.

  8. Detection of fatigue cracks by nondestructive testing methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, R. T.; Delacy, T. J.; Stewart, R. C.

    1973-01-01

    The effectiveness was assessed of various NDT methods to detect small tight cracks by randomly introducing fatigue cracks into aluminum sheets. The study included optimizing NDT methods calibrating NDT equipment with fatigue cracked standards, and evaluating a number of cracked specimens by the optimized NDT methods. The evaluations were conducted by highly trained personnel, provided with detailed procedures, in order to minimize the effects of human variability. These personnel performed the NDT on the test specimens without knowledge of the flaw locations and reported on the flaws detected. The performance of these tests was measured by comparing the flaws detected against the flaws present. The principal NDT methods utilized were radiographic, ultrasonic, penetrant, and eddy current. Holographic interferometry, acoustic emission monitoring, and replication methods were also applied on a reduced number of specimens. Generally, the best performance was shown by eddy current, ultrasonic, penetrant and holographic tests. Etching provided no measurable improvement, while proof loading improved flaw detectability. Data are shown that quantify the performances of the NDT methods applied.

  9. Surface Fatigue Crack Growth Behavior from Small Notch in Waspaloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suh, Chang-Min; Kim, Seon-Gab

    We investigated the surface fatigue crack behaviors including initial surface crack appearances depend on three artificial notch lengths applied with the axle load level of the maximum load, 1,103 MPa and minimum load 55.3 MPa at the stress ratio of 0.05. This load level is the F100 engine's maximum operation condition of Waspaloy. The initial cracking site in depth is started from multi-origin. The effectiveness of crack growth rate by ductile striation space measurement on the fractured surface is confirmed by the working load and the stress intensity factor range. The surface cracks of Waspaloy at room temperature in air follow the ΔK vs da/dN and db/dN relation, even though the crack length initiated early in notch size 1 mm and initiated very late in notch size 4 mm. And the ΔK vs da/dN and db/dN relation have similar slope at 3 kinds of notches.

  10. Fatigue Crack Growth and Crack Bridging in SCS-6/Ti-24-11

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghosn, Louis J.; Kantzos, Pete; Telesman, Jack

    1995-01-01

    Interfacial damage induced by relative fiber/matrix sliding was found to occur in the bridged zone of unidirectional SCS-6/Ti-24Al-11Nb intermetallic matrix composite specimens subjected to fatigue crack growth conditions. The degree of interfacial damage was not uniform along the bridged crack wake. Higher damage zones were observed near the machined notch in comparison to the crack tip. The interfacial friction shear strength tau(sub f) measured in the crack wake using pushout testing revealed lower values than the as-received interface. Interfacial wear also reduced the strength of the bridging fibers. The reduction in fiber strength is thought to be a function of the magnitude of relative fiber/matrix displacements ind the degree of interfacial damage. Furthermore, two different fiber bridging models were used to predict the influence of bridging on the fatigue crack driving force. The shear lag model required a variable tau(sub f) in the crack wake (reflecting the degradation of the interface) before its predictions agreed with trends exhibited by the experimental data. The fiber pressure model did an excellent job in predicting both the FCG data and the DeltaCOD in the bridged zone even though it does not require a knowledge of tau(sub f).

  11. Microstructural changes induced near crack tip during corrosion fatigue tests in austenitic-ferritic steel.

    PubMed

    Gołebiowski, B; Swiatnicki, W A; Gaspérini, M

    2010-03-01

    Microstructural changes occurring during fatigue tests of austenitic-ferritic duplex stainless steel (DSS) in air and in hydrogen-generating environment have been investigated. Hydrogen charging of steel samples during fatigue crack growth (FCG) tests was performed by cathodic polarization of specimens in 0.1M H(2)SO(4) aqueous solution. Microstructural investigations of specimens after FCG tests were carried out using transmission electron microscopy to reveal the density and arrangement of dislocations formed near crack tip. To determine the way of crack propagation in the microstructure, electron backscatter diffraction investigations were performed on fatigue-tested samples in both kinds of environment. To reveal hydrogen-induced phase transformations the atomic force microscopy was used. The above investigations allowed us to define the character of fatigue crack propagation and microstructural changes near the crack tip. It was found that crack propagation after fatigue tests in air is accompanied with plastic deformation; a high density of dislocations is observed at large distance from the crack. After fatigue tests performed during hydrogen charging the deformed zone containing high density of dislocations is narrow compared to that after fatigue tests in air. It means that hydrogenation leads to brittle character of fatigue crack propagation. In air, fatigue cracks propagate mostly transgranularly, whereas in hydrogen-generating environment the cracks have mixed transgranular/interfacial character. PMID:20500395

  12. The effect of low cycle fatigue cracks and loading history on high cycle fatigue threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moshier, Monty Allen

    High cycle fatigue (HCF) has been of great concern of late in light of the many HCF gas turbine engine failures experienced by the U.S. Air Force. Due to the high frequency, failures occur rapidly when components sustain damage from other sources. Low cycle fatigue (LCF) can initiate cracks that produce such damage. This study investigates the HCF threshold of Ti-6A1-4V when naturally initiated small surface cracks (2a = 25 mum--600 mum) are present. Small surface cracks are initiated in notched specimens using two different LCF loading histories at room temperature and 10 Hz. Direct current potential difference (DCPD) is used to detect crack initiation. Surface crack measurements are made using a scanning electron microscope prior to HCF testing. Heat tinting prior to HCF testing is used to mark the crack front to allow for post fracture crack measurements. HCF thresholds at R = 0.1 and R = 0.5 are determined for each specimen using step loading at room temperature and 600 Hz. Additionally, the HCF threshold is measured at R = 0.1 for specimens with small cracks that have been stress relief annealed to eliminate residual stresses and load history. Long crack thresholds are determined using a similar step loading procedure at R = 0.1 and R = 0.5 for specimens which have been precracked using a range of Kmax. Long crack threshold measurements are also determined for specimens which have been precracked using a range of Kmax, but stress relief annealed prior to testing. Comparisons show that HCF threshold measurements, when naturally initiated small cracks are present, are dependent on the load histories that are used to initiate the cracks. Further comparisons show that the measured small crack thresholds follow similar trends for load history effects which occur in the long crack threshold data. Additionally, it is found that thresholds can be measured free of load history effects by using a stress relief annealing process after the precracking and prior to the

  13. Fatigue and static crack propagation in yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystals: Crack growth micromechanisms and precracking effects

    SciTech Connect

    Alcala, J.; Anglada, M.

    1997-11-01

    The influence of precracking techniques in the crack growth behavior of yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystals (Y-TZP) is investigated. Load-bridge and cyclic-compression precracking enhance subsequent tensile crack growth rates, in comparison to results that are found with precracks that are extended under four-point bending prior to testing. The actual influence of these precracking techniques in the near-threshold crack growth regime is remarkably different. Although load-bridge precracking produces a pattern of crack growth fluctuations for stress intensity factors, K, lower than the effective crack-growth threshold of the material, compression-fatigue precracks start to propagate under far-field tensile loads at very fast growth rates and for K values that are slightly higher than the effective threshold. Crack-tip shielding by tetragonal-to-monoclinic transformation develops gradually, influencing the crack growth behavior in Y-TZP. Proposed fatigue crack growth micromechanisms involve damage accumulation at the crack-tip region. For K{sub max} > 3 MPa{center_dot}m{sup 1/2}, fatigue crack growth rates are strongly affected by environmental interactions at the crack tip, and postulated fatigue micromechanisms include the cyclic degradation of crack-tip shielding.

  14. The detection of fatigue cracks by nondestructive testing methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rummel, W. D.; Todd, P. H., Jr.; Frecska, S. A.; Rathke, R. A.

    1974-01-01

    X-radiographic penetrant, ultrasonic, eddy current, holographic, and acoustic emission techniques were optimized and applied to the evaluation of 2219-T87 aluminum alloy test specimens. One hundred eighteen specimens containing a total of 328 fatigue cracks were evaluated. The cracks ranged in length from 0.500 inch (1.27 cm) to 0.007 inch (0.018 cm) and in depth from 0.178 inch (0.451 cm) and 0.001 inch (0.003 cm). Specimen thicknesses were nominally 0.060 inch (0.152 cm) and 0.210 inch (0.532 cm) and surface finishes were nominally 32 and 125 rms and 64 and 200 rms respectively. Specimens were evaluated in the as-milled surface condition, in the chemically milled surface condition and, after proof loading, in a randomized inspection sequence. Results of the nondestructive test (NDT) evaluations were compared with actual crack size obtained by measurement of the fractured specimens. Inspection data was then analyzed to provide a statistical basis for determinating the threshold crack detection sensitivity (the largest crack size that would be missed) for each of the inspection techniques at a 95% probability and 95% confidence level.

  15. Fatigue crack retardation of high strength steel in saltwater

    SciTech Connect

    Tokaji, K.; Ando, Z.; Imai, T.; Kojima, T.

    1983-04-01

    A high strength steel was studied in 3 percent saltwater to investigate the effects of a corrosive environment and sheer thickness on fatigue crack propagation behavior following the application of a single tensile overload. Experiments were carried out under sinusoidally varying loads at a load ratio of 0 and frequency of 10 H /SUB z/ . A single tensile overload was found to cause delayed retardation, and the crack propagation rate at first increased, followed by fairly rapid decrease to a minimum value and then increased gradually to its steady-state value, just as it did in air. The overload affected zone size and the retardation cycles increased with decreasing sheet thickness, just as they did in air. However, the zone size and the cycles were larger in 3 percent saltwater than in air. Since the crack propagation rates through the overload affected zone were not affected by the test environment, the longer retardation cycles in 3 percent saltwater were attributed to an enlargement of the overload affected zone size. The crack propagation behavior following the application of a single tensile overload in 3 percent saltwater was well explained by the crack closure concept.

  16. Effects of Different R ratios on Fatigue Crack Growth in Laser Peened Friction Stir Welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hatamleh, Omar; Hackel, Lloyd; Forth, Scott

    2007-01-01

    The influence of laser peening on the fatigue crack growth behavior of friction stir welded (FSW) Aluminum Alloy (AA) 7075-T7351 sheets was investigated. The surface modification resulting from the peening process on the fatigue crack growth of FSW was assessed for two different R ratios. The investigation indicated a significant decrease in fatigue crack growth rates resulting from using laser shock peening compared with unpeened, welded and unwelded specimens. The slower fatigue crack growth rate was attributed to the compressive residual stresses induced by the peening.

  17. A method for the analysis of the growth of short fatigue cracks

    SciTech Connect

    McEvily, A.J.; Shin, Y.S.

    1995-10-01

    A method for the analysis of the fatigue crack growth rate for short cracks has been developed and is applied to the case of fatigue crack growth of short surface cracks in a 1045 carbon steel. The method entails three modifications to standard LEFM procedures. These modifications include the use of a material constant to bridge between smooth and cracked specimen behavior, consideration of the plastic zone size to crack length ratio, and incorporation of the development of crack closure. Comparisons are made between calculations based upon this approach and experimental data.

  18. Accelerated Threshold Fatigue Crack Growth Effect-Powder Metallurgy Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piascik, R. S.; Newman, J. A.

    2002-01-01

    Fatigue crack growth (FCG) research conducted in the near threshold regime has identified a room temperature creep crack growth damage mechanism for a fine grain powder metallurgy (PM) aluminum alloy (8009). At very low (Delta) K, an abrupt acceleration in room temperature FCG rate occurs at high stress ratio (R = K(sub min)/K(sub max)). The near threshold accelerated FCG rates are exacerbated by increased levels of K(sub max) (K(sub max) = 0.4 K(sub IC)). Detailed fractographic analysis correlates accelerated FCG with the formation of crack-tip process zone micro-void damage. Experimental results show that the near threshold and K(sub max) influenced accelerated crack growth is time and temperature dependent.

  19. Load-differential features for automated detection of fatigue cracks using guided waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xin; Lee, Sang Jun; Michaels, Jennifer E.; Michaels, Thomas E.

    2012-05-01

    Guided wave structural health monitoring (SHM) is being considered to assess the integrity of plate-like structures for many applications. Prior research has investigated how guided wave propagation is affected by applied loads, which induce anisotropic changes in both dimensions and phase velocity. In addition, it is well-known that applied tensile loads open fatigue cracks and thus enhance their detectability using ultrasonic methods. Here we describe load-differential methods in which signals recorded from different loads at the same damage state are compared without using previously obtained damage-free data. Changes in delay-and-sum images are considered as a function of differential loads and damage state. Load-differential features are extracted from these images that capture the effects of loading as fatigue cracks are opened. Damage detection thresholds are adaptively set based upon the load-differential behavior of the various features, which enables implementation of an automated fatigue crack detection process. The efficacy of the proposed approach is examined using data from a fatigue test performed on an aluminum plate specimen that is instrumented with a sparse array of surface-mounted ultrasonic guided wave transducers.

  20. Microstructural indicators of transition mechanisms in time-dependent fatigue crack growth in nickel base superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heeter, Ann E.

    Gas turbine engines are an important part of power generation in modern society, especially in the field of aerospace. Aerospace engines are design to last approximately 30 years and the engine components must be designed to survive for the life of the engine or to be replaced at regular intervals to ensure consumer safety. Fatigue crack growth analysis is a vital component of design for an aerospace component. Crack growth modeling and design methods date back to an origin around 1950 with a high rate of accuracy. The new generation of aerospace engines is designed to be efficient as possible and require higher operating temperatures than ever seen before in previous generations. These higher temperatures place more stringent requirements on the material crack growth performance under creep and time dependent conditions. Typically the types of components which are subject to these requirements are rotating disk components which are made from advanced materials such as nickel base superalloys. Traditionally crack growth models have looked at high temperature crack growth purely as a function of temperature and assumed that all crack growth was either controlled by a cycle dependent or time dependent mechanism. This new analysis is trying to evaluate the transition between cycle-dependent and time-dependent mechanism and the microstructural markers that characterize this transitional behavior. The physical indications include both the fracture surface morphology as well as the shape of the crack front. The research will evaluate whether crack tunneling occurs and whether it consistently predicts a transition from cycle-dependent crack growth to time-dependent crack growth. The study is part of a larger research program trying to include the effects of geometry, mission profile and environmental effects, in addition to temperature effects, as a part of the overall crack growth system. The outcome will provide evidence for various transition types and correlate those

  1. Analyses of Fatigue Crack Growth and Closure Near Threshold Conditions for Large-Crack Behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    A plasticity-induced crack-closure model was used to study fatigue crack growth and closure in thin 2024-T3 aluminum alloy under constant-R and constant-K(sub max) threshold testing procedures. Two methods of calculating crack-opening stresses were compared. One method was based on a contact-K analyses and the other on crack-opening-displacement (COD) analyses. These methods gave nearly identical results under constant-amplitude loading, but under threshold simulations the contact-K analyses gave lower opening stresses than the contact COD method. Crack-growth predictions tend to support the use of contact-K analyses. Crack-growth simulations showed that remote closure can cause a rapid rise in opening stresses in the near threshold regime for low-constraint and high applied stress levels. Under low applied stress levels and high constraint, a rise in opening stresses was not observed near threshold conditions. But crack-tip-opening displacement (CTOD) were of the order of measured oxide thicknesses in the 2024 alloy under constant-R simulations. In contrast, under constant-K(sub max) testing the CTOD near threshold conditions were an order-of-magnitude larger than measured oxide thicknesses. Residual-plastic deformations under both constant-R and constant-K(sub max) threshold simulations were several times larger than the expected oxide thicknesses. Thus, residual-plastic deformations, in addition to oxide and roughness, play an integral part in threshold development.

  2. Crack detection and fatigue related delamination in FRP composites applied to concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Jeff; Baker, Rebecca; Kallemeyn, Lisa; Zendler, Andrew

    2008-03-01

    Reinforced concrete beams are designed to allow minor concrete cracking in the tension zone. The severity of cracking in a beam element is a good indicator of how well a structure is performing and whether or not repairs are needed to prevent structural failure. FRP composites are commonly used to increase the flexural and shear capacity of RC beam elements, but one potential disadvantage of this method is that strengthened surfaces are no longer visible and cracks or delaminations that result from excessive loading or fatigue may go undetected. This research investigated thermal imaging techniques for detecting load induced cracking in the concrete substrate and delamination of FRP strengthening systems applied to reinforced concrete (RC). One small-scale RC beam (5 in. x 6 in. x 60 in.) was strengthened with FRP and loaded to failure monotonically. An infrared thermography inspection was performed after failure. A second strengthened beam was loaded cyclically for 1,750,000 cycles to investigate how fatigue might affect substrate cracking and delamination growth throughout the service-life of a repaired element. No changes were observed in the FRP bond during/after the cyclic loading. The thermal imaging component of this research included pixel normalization to enhance detectability and characterization of this specific type of damage.

  3. The role of cyclic plastic zone size on fatigue crack growth behavior in high strength steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korda, Akhmad A.; Miyashita, Y.; Mutoh, Y.

    2015-09-01

    The role of cyclic plastic zone in front of the crack tip was studied in high strength steels. Estimated plastic zone size would be compared with actual observation. Strain controlled fatigue tests of the steels were carried out to obtain cyclic stress-strain curves for plastic zone estimation. Observations of plastic zone were carried out using in situ SEM fatigue crack growth tests under a constant-ΔK. Hard microstructures in structural steels showed to inhibit the extent of plastic deformation around the crack tip. The rate of crack growth can be correlated with the size of plastic zone. The smaller the plastic zone size, the slower the fatigue crack growth.

  4. Through-the-thickness fatigue crack closure behavior in an aluminum alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawicke, D. S.; Newman, J. C., Jr.; Grandt, A. F., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The variation in fatigue crack closure behavior across the thickness of aluminum alloy specimens was investigated. The specimen geometries examined were the middle crack tension M(T) and compact tension C(T). The fatigue crack closure behavior was determined using remote displacement and strain gages, near tip strain gages, and fatigue striations. A hybrid experimental/numerical method was also used to infer the crack opening loads. The results indicate a variation in crack opening load, of 0.2 in the specimen interior to 0.4 to 0.5 at the surface.

  5. Hydride-phase formation and its influence on fatigue crack propagationbehavior in a Zircaloy-4 alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Garlea, Elena; Choo, H.; Wang, G Y; Liaw, Peter K; Clausen, B; Brown, D. W.; Park, Jae-Sung; Rack, P. D.; Kenik, Edward A

    2010-01-01

    The hydride-phase formation and its influence on the fatigue behavior of a Zircaloy-4 alloy charged with hydrogen gas are investigated. First, the microstructure and fatigue crack propagation rate of the alloy in the as-received condition are studied. Second, the formation and homogeneous distribution of delta zirconium hydride ( -ZrH2) in the bulk, and its effect on the fatigue crack propagation rate are presented. The results show that in the presence of hydrides the zirconium alloy exhibits reduced toughness and enhanced crack growth rates. Finally, the influence of a pre-existing fatigue crack in the specimen and the subsequent hydride formation were investigated. The residual lattice strain profile around the fatigue crack tip was measured using neutron diffraction. The combined effects of residual strains and hydride precipitation on the fatigue behavior are discussed.

  6. Fatigue Crack Growth Behavior of Gas Metal Arc Welded AISI 409 Grade Ferritic Stainless Steel Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakshminarayanan, A. K.; Shanmugam, K.; Balasubramanian, V.

    2009-10-01

    The effect of filler metals such as austenitic stainless steel, ferritic stainless steel, and duplex stainless steel on fatigue crack growth behavior of the gas metal arc welded ferritic stainless steel joints was investigated. Rolled plates of 4 mm thickness were used as the base material for preparing single ‘V’ butt welded joints. Center cracked tensile specimens were prepared to evaluate fatigue crack growth behavior. Servo hydraulic controlled fatigue testing machine with a capacity of 100 kN was used to evaluate the fatigue crack growth behavior of the welded joints. From this investigation, it was found that the joints fabricated by duplex stainless steel filler metal showed superior fatigue crack growth resistance compared to the joints fabricated by austenitic and ferritic stainless steel filler metals. Higher yield strength and relatively higher toughness may be the reasons for superior fatigue performance of the joints fabricated by duplex stainless steel filler metal.

  7. Micromechanisms of fatigue crack propagation in particulate-reinforced metal-matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Shang, Jianku.

    1989-01-01

    Consequences of the interaction of cracks with SiC particles are examined with emphasis on micromechanisms influencing fatigue crack propagation in high strength aluminum alloy matrix composites. Fatigue crack propagation is found to show three distinct regimes; each accompanied by growth mechanisms reflecting different roles of SiC particles. At near-threshold levels, SiC particles impeded fatigue crack growth by deflecting the crack to promote roughness-induced crack closure and by acting as crack traps along the crack front. A two-dimensional crack trapping analysis based on the interaction of a finite crack with a SiC particle indicates that a limiting criterion for fatigue crack growth in SiC{sub p}/Al composites can be established, which requires that the maximum plastic-zone size exceed the effective mean particle size or that the tensile stress in the matrix beyond the particle on the crack front exceed the yield strength of the material. Implications of crack closure and crack trapping to near-threshold crack growth, including load-ration and particle-size dependence of fatigue thresholds, are discussed in terms of contributions from each mechanism. At higher stress intensities, limited fracture of SiC particles ahead of the crack tip leads to the development of uncracked ligaments along the crack length, resulting in a reduced crack-tip stress intensity from ligament bridging. Micromechanical models are developed for such bridges induced by both overlapping cracks and co-planar ligaments, based on the notion of a limiting crack opening displacement or limiting strain in the ligament. The predicted reduction in crack tip stress intensity is shown to be consistent with experimental observations.

  8. Fatigue crack growth behavior and overload effect of AISI 304 stainless steel in different atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelestemur, Mehmet Halidun

    1998-12-01

    AISI 304 stainless steel shows strain induced martensitic transformation at the crack tip. Such transformation may have effects on crack closure during fatigue crack propagation. Due to importance of AISI 304 in structural applications, the fatigue crack propagation and martensitic transformation in this material have to be investigated thoroughly. Fatigue crack growth behavior, overload retardation and characterization of martensitic transformation at the crack tip upon fatigue loading were investigated in 304 stainless steel at three different atmospheres, namely dry argon, moist air (75% relative humidity) and hydrogen. Comparison in various atmospheres showed that moist air did not influence that fatigue crack growth rate. However, in hydrogen atmosphere the material did not show threshold behavior and the crack growth rate was considerably higher. It was found that roughness-induced crack closure was the primary mechanism in the threshold region. Fractographic pictures taken by SEM and direct observation of crack profile showed that crack deflection and branching occurred during the fatigue crack propagation and plasticity-induced crack closure was not the primary closure mechanism. The influence of fatigue crack propagation on the rate and size of martensitic transformation at the crack tip was investigated. The overload retardation of the material was lower at hydrogen atmosphere. This low degree of retardation was explained by hydrogen embrittlement mechanism. Fractographic observations show striations at the overload zone in argon atmosphere indicating ductile fracture. In hydrogen atmosphere, overload area shows secondary cracks which represent brittle fracture. Crack closure measurements and modified Paris law did not show evidence for different retardation mechanisms at different atmospheres. It is found that primary retardation mechanisms were crack deflection, crack blunting and roughness-induced crack closure after application of overload(s). An

  9. Prediction of Fatigue Crack Growth Using Regularized Numerical Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meade, Andrew J.

    1999-01-01

    Though it is known in the engineering community that successful analyses rest upon the proper balance of (1) theoretical analysis of mathematical models, (2) physical experimentation and (3) computational simulation, this balance is currently handled in sometimes unwieldy and inefficient manner. It is proposed to investigate and develop rigorous and computationally efficient method to effectively combine all available information, from both experimental measurements and mathematical models, in the emulation of physical systems. This will be specifically applied to fatigue crack growth in metallic structures of interest to NASA.

  10. Improved ultrasonic detection of fatigue cracks in Ti-6A1-4V by thermo-optical modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Zhongyu; Nagy, Peter B.

    2000-05-01

    Pulsed infrared laser irradiation was used to positively identify small fatigue cracks on the surface of fatigue damaged Ti-6Al-4V specimens. The resulting transient thermoelastic deformation perceptibly changes the opening of partially closed surface cracks without affecting other scatterers, such as surface grooves, corrosion pits, coarse grains, etc., that might hide the fatigue crack from ultrasonic detection. We found that this method, which was previously shown to be very effective in 2024 aluminum alloy, must be modified in order to successfully adapt it to Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloy, where significant thermo-optical modulation was found even from straight corners or open notches. This spurious modulation is caused by direct thermal modulation of the sound velocity in the intact material rather than thermal stresses via crack closure. Different methods have been developed to distinguished direct thermal modulation from crack-closure modulation due to thermoelastic stresses. It was found that the modified thermo-optical modulation method can increase the detectability of hidden fatigue cracks in Ti-6Al-4V specimens by approximately one order of magnitude.—This effort was sponsored by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative (MURI), under Air Force Office of Scientific Research grant number F49620-96-1-0442.

  11. Micromechanisms of fatigue crack growth in a single crystal Inconel 718 nickel-based superalloy

    SciTech Connect

    Mercer, C.; Soboyejo, A.B.O.; Soboyejo, W.O. )

    1999-07-09

    The fatigue crack growth behavior of an experimental, single crystal alloy, of equivalent nominal chemical composition to Inconel 718 is presented. Fracture modes under cyclic loading were determined by scanning electron microscopy. The results of the fractographic analyses are presented on a fracture mechanism map that shows the dependence of the fatigue fracture mechanisms on the maximum stress intensity factor, K[sub max], and the stress intensity factor range, [Delta]K. Crack-tip deformation mechanisms associated with fatigue crack growth were studied using transmission electron microscopy. The relative effects of [Delta]K and K[sub max] on the fatigue crack growth behavior of this material are discussed within the context of a two-parameter crack growth law. The influence of grain boundaries on the fatigue crack growth resistance of materials such as Inconel 718 is also discussed in light of the results of this investigation.

  12. Use of Marker Bands for Determination of Fatigue Crack Growth Rates and Crack Front Shapes in Pre-Corroded Coupons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willard, S. A.

    1997-01-01

    Groups of striations called marker bands generated on a fatigue fracture surface can be used to mark the position of an advancing fatigue crack at known intervals. A technique has been developed that uses the distance between multiple sets of marker bands to obtain a vs. N, crack front shape, and fatigue crack growth rate data for small cracks. This technique is particularly usefull for specimens that require crack length measurements during testing that cannot be obtained because corrosion obscures the surface of the specimen. It is also useful for specimens with unusual or non-symmetric shapes where it is difficult to obtain accurate crack lengths using traditional methods such as compliance or electric potential difference in the early stages of testing.

  13. Fatigue crack retardation of low carbon steel in saltwater

    SciTech Connect

    Kokaji, K.; Ando, Z.; Kojima, T.

    1984-01-01

    The crack propagation behavior following the application of a single tensile overload in 3 percent saltwater was examined using a low carbon steel, which has a considerably lower static strength than high strength steel used in previous report. Experiments were carried out under sinusoidally varying loads at a load ratio of O and a frequency of 10 Hz, and the effects of saltwater were evaluated by comparing with the result in air and result on high strength steel. A single tensile overload was found to cause delayed retardation, just as it did in air. The overload affected zone size was not affected by saltwater and showed the same value in both environments. This observed trend differed from the result on high strength steel in which the overload affected zone size was larger in 3 percent saltwater than in air, and thus it was found that the effect of saltwater on retardation behavior was different even in the similar steels. Retardation cycles were smaller in 3 percent saltwater than in air. Since the overload affected zone size was not affected by saltwater, the decrease in retardation cycles was attributed to the higher rates of fatigue crack propagation in 3 percent saltwater. Thinner specimen showed stronger retardation than thicker one. The behavior at midthickness of thicker specimen showed delayed retardation as well as the result in air. Moreover, the crack propagation behavior following the application of a single tensile overload in 3 percent saltwater was well explained by the crack closure concept.

  14. Fatigue crack growth in 2024-T3 aluminum under tensile and transverse shear stresses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viz, Mark J.; Zehnder, Alan T.

    1994-01-01

    The influence of transverse shear stresses on the fatigue crack growth rate in thin 2024-T3 aluminum alloy sheets is investigated experimentally. The tests are performed on double-edge cracked sheets in cyclic tensile and torsional loading. This loading generates crack tip stress intensity factors in the same ratio as the values computed for a crack lying along a lap joint in a pressurized aircraft fuselage. The relevant fracture mechanics of cracks in thin plates along with the details of the geometrically nonlinear finite element analyses used for the test specimen calibration are developed and discussed. Preliminary fatigue crack growth data correlated using the fully coupled stress intensity factor calibration are presented and compared with fatigue crack growth data from pure delta K(sub I)fatigue tests.

  15. The influence of crack closure on fatigue crack growth thresholds in 2024-T3 aluminum alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Edward P.

    1988-01-01

    Crack opening loads were determined in load-shedding fatigue crack growth threshold tests on 2024-T3 aluminum alloy at stress ratios R of -2, -1, 0, 0.33, 0.5, and 0.7. The effects of load-shedding procedure and rate were investigated. Values of threshold Delta-K were found to vary significantly with R, whereas values of threshold effective Delta-K did not. That is, the variation of threshold Delta-K with R was almost completely explained by accounting for the measured variation in crack opening load behavior with R. The load-shedding guidelines of ASTM Test Method for Measurement of Fatigue Crack Growth (E 647) produced a threshold Delta-K value for R = 0.7 that was in agreement with the value determined using a procedure that should minimize closure effects. At both R = 0 and R = 0.7, high load-shedding rates produced high values of threshold Delta-K caused by large closure effects.

  16. Contributions of aging to the fatigue crack growth resistance of human dentin.

    PubMed

    Ivancik, Juliana; Majd, Hessam; Bajaj, Devendra; Romberg, Elaine; Arola, Dwayne

    2012-07-01

    An evaluation of the fatigue crack resistance of human dentin was conducted to identify the degree of degradation that arises with aging and the dependency on tubule orientation. Fatigue crack growth was achieved in specimens of coronal dentin through application of Mode I cyclic loading and over clinically relevant lengths (0 ≤ a ≤ 2 mm). The study considered two directions of cyclic crack growth in which the crack was either in-plane (0°) or perpendicular (90°) to the dentin tubules. Results showed that regardless of tubule orientation, aging of dentin is accompanied by a significant reduction in the resistance to the initiation of fatigue crack growth, as well as a significant increase in the rate of incremental extension. Perpendicular to the tubules, the fatigue crack exponent increased significantly (from m=14.2 ± 1.5 to 24.1 ± 5.0), suggesting an increase in brittleness of the tissue with age. For cracks extending in-plane with the tubules, the fatigue crack growth exponent does not change significantly with patient age (from m=25.4 ± 3.03 to 22.9 ± 5.3), but there is a significant increase in the incremental crack growth rate. Regardless of age, coronal dentin exhibits the lowest resistance to fatigue crack growth perpendicular to the tubules. While there are changes in the cyclic crack growth rate and mechanisms of cyclic extension with aging, this tissue maintains its anisotropy. PMID:22484693

  17. Contributions of Aging to the Fatigue Crack Growth Resistance of Human Dentin

    PubMed Central

    Ivancik, Juliana; Majd, Hessam; Bajaj, Devendra; Romberg, Elaine; Arola, Dwayne

    2012-01-01

    An evaluation of the fatigue crack resistance of human dentin was conducted to identify the degree of degradation that arises with aging and the dependency on tubule orientation. Fatigue crack growth was achieved in specimens of coronal dentin through application of Mode I cyclic loading and over clinically relevant lengths (0 ≤ a ≤ 2 mm). The study considered two directions of cyclic crack growth in which the crack was either in-plane (0°) or perpendicular (90°) to the dentin tubules. Results showed that regardless of tubule orientation, aging of dentin is accompanied by a significant reduction in the resistance to the initiation of fatigue crack growth, as well as a significant increase in the rate of incremental extension. Perpendicular to the tubules, the fatigue crack exponent increased significantly (from m=14.2±1.5 to 24.1±5.0), suggesting an increase in brittleness of the tissue with age. For cracks extending in plane with the tubules, the fatigue crack growth exponent does not change significantly with patient age (from m=25.4±3.03 to 22.9±5.3), but there is a significant increase in the incremental crack growth rate. Regardless of age, coronal dentin exhibits the lowest resistance to fatigue crack growth perpendicular to the tubules. While there are changes in the cyclic crack growth rate and mechanisms of cyclic extension with aging, this tissue maintains its anisotropy. PMID:22484693

  18. Advanced fatigue-crack detection system in steel bridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleming, Marvin F.; Hersh, S.; Chase, Steven B.

    1995-05-01

    The Federal Highway Administration has sponsored the development of a new system for fatigue crack detection and quantification of fatigue cracks in steel bridges. The NDE technology selected for the new system is based on earlier studies that have identified the best methods for this task. The new system that has been developed is based on previous work which produced two portable instruments that were field tested but were not widely accepted. The best characteristics from these systems have been integrated into a single instrument, using portable computer technology and adapted to the bridge inspection environment. The new system, which has come to be known as the New Ultrasonic-Magnetic Detection System (NUMAC), is configured as a backpack with a heads-up display that leaves the inspectors hands free to climb the structure and to view the inspection site simultaneously while viewing the ultrasonic or magnetic signals. The operation of the system controlled with a mouse or a keyboard. Importantly, the accuracy and repeatability of the NUMAC is combined with the ability to store inspection data. The stored data can be used to document condition, demonstrate and identity important trends, and efficiently channel resources. The flexibility of the portable computer based NDE system is intended to provide a basic, reliable and cost- effective instrument for steel bridge inspection.

  19. An unsupervised learning algorithm for fatigue crack detection in waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzo, Piervincenzo; Cammarata, Marcello; Dutta, Debaditya; Sohn, Hoon; Harries, Kent

    2009-02-01

    Ultrasonic guided waves (UGWs) are a useful tool in structural health monitoring (SHM) applications that can benefit from built-in transduction, moderately large inspection ranges, and high sensitivity to small flaws. This paper describes an SHM method based on UGWs and outlier analysis devoted to the detection and quantification of fatigue cracks in structural waveguides. The method combines the advantages of UGWs with the outcomes of the discrete wavelet transform (DWT) to extract defect-sensitive features aimed at performing a multivariate diagnosis of damage. In particular, the DWT is exploited to generate a set of relevant wavelet coefficients to construct a uni-dimensional or multi-dimensional damage index vector. The vector is fed to an outlier analysis to detect anomalous structural states. The general framework presented in this paper is applied to the detection of fatigue cracks in a steel beam. The probing hardware consists of a National Instruments PXI platform that controls the generation and detection of the ultrasonic signals by means of piezoelectric transducers made of lead zirconate titanate. The effectiveness of the proposed approach to diagnose the presence of defects as small as a few per cent of the waveguide cross-sectional area is demonstrated.

  20. Prediction of fatigue crack propagation life in notched members under variable amplitude loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Z.; Rauf, A.; Younas, M.

    1997-06-01

    One of the interesting phenomenon in the study of fatigue crack propagation under variable amplitude load cycling is the crack growth retardation that normally occurs due to the application of a periodic overload. Fatigue crack growth rate under simple variable amplitude loading sequence incorporating period overloads is studied using single edge notched specimens of AISI304 stainless steel. Load interaction effects due to single and multiple overload have been addressed. Substantial retardation of fatigue crack growth rate is observed due to the introduction of periodic tensile overloads. Estimates of fatigue life have been obtained employing Wheeler model (using Paris and modified Paris equations) and Elber’s model. Analytical predictions are compared with experimental results. Results of these analytical fatigue life predictions show good agreement with the experimental fatigue life data. Fatigue crack propagation rates also have been evaluated from the fractographic study of fatigue striations seen on the fracture surface. Good agreement was found between the experimentally observed crack growth rates and the fatigue crack growth rates determined by the fractographic studies.

  1. Evaluation of Fatigue Crack Growth and Fracture Properties of Cryogenic Model Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, John A.; Forth, Scott C.; Everett, Richard A., Jr.; Newman, James C., Jr.; Kimmel, William M.

    2002-01-01

    The criteria used to prevent failure of wind-tunnel models and support hardware were revised as part of a project to enhance the capabilities of cryogenic wind tunnel testing at NASA Langley Research Center. Specifically, damage-tolerance fatigue life prediction methods are now required for critical components, and material selection criteria are more general and based on laboratory test data. The suitability of two candidate model alloys (AerMet 100 and C-250 steel) was investigated by obtaining the fatigue crack growth and fracture data required for a damage-tolerance fatigue life analysis. Finally, an example is presented to illustrate the newly implemented damage tolerance analyses required of wind-tunnel model system components.

  2. Fatigue crack growth behavior of a single crystal alloy as observed through an in situ fatigue loading stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Telesman, Jack; Kantzos, Peter

    1988-01-01

    An in situ fatigue loading stage inside a scanning electron microscope (SEM) was used to determine the fatigue crack growth behavior of a PWA 1480 single-crystal nickel-based superalloy. The loading stage permits real-time viewing of the fatigue damage processes at high magnification. The PWA 1480 single-crystal, single-edge notch specimens were tested with the load axis parallel to the (100) orientation. Two distinct fatigue failure mechanisms were identified. The crack growth rate differed substantially when the failure occurred on a single slip system in comparison to multislip system failure. Two processes by which crack branching is produced were identified and are discussed. Also discussed are the observed crack closure mechanisms.

  3. Fatigue crack propagation thresholds for long and short cracks in Rene 95 nickel-base super alloy

    SciTech Connect

    McCarver, J.F.; Ritchie, R.O.

    1981-10-01

    A study has been made of the near-threshold fatigue crack propagation behavior of a wroght Ni-base superalloy, Rene 95, with reference to the effect of crack size on the threshold stress intensity ..delta..K/sub 0/ for no detectable crack growth. Measured threshold ..delta..K/sub 0/ values at low load ratios (R = 0.1) for physically short cracks (0.01 to 0.20 mm) were found to be 60% smaller than the corresponding ..delta..K/sub 0/ values for long cracks (approx. 25 mm). However, short crack threshold values at R = 0.1 were found to be similar to long crack thresholds at R = 0.8. Such behavior is rationalized in terms of fatigue crack closure, specifically involving the role of fracture surface roughness from crystallographic crack growth in Ni-base alloys. The large difference observed in threshold values for long and physically-short cracks serves to illustrate the potential problems in applying conventional (long crack) fatigue data to defect-tolerant lifetime predictions for structural components containing small flaws.

  4. Extending non-fatigue Mode I subcritical crack growth data to subcritical fatigue crack growth: Demonstration of the equivalence of the Charles' law and Paris law exponents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keanini, Russell; Eppes, Martha-Cary

    2016-04-01

    Paris's law connects fatigue-induced subcritical crack growth and fatigue loading. Environmentally-driven subcritical crack growth, while a random process, can be decomposed into a spectrum of cyclic processes, where each spectral component is governed by Paris's law. Unfortunately, almost no data exists concerning the Paris law exponent, m; rather, the great majority of existing sub-critical crack growth measurements on rock have been carried out via Mode I tensile tests, where corresponding data are generally correlated using Charles' law, and where the latter, similar to Paris's law, exposes a power law relationship between crack growth rate and stress intensity. In this study, a statistical argument is used to derive a simple, rigorous relationship between the all-important Paris law and Charles law exponents, m and n. This result has a significant practical implication: subcritical fatigue crack growth in rock, driven by various random environmental weathering processes can now be predicted using available Mode I stress corrosion indices, n.

  5. Fatigue-life behavior and matrix fatigue crack spacing in unnotched SCS-6/Timetal 21S metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, G. T.; Herrmann, D. J.; Hillberry, B. M.

    1993-01-01

    Fatigue tests of the SCS-6/Timetal 21S composite system were performed to characterize the fatigue behavior for unnotched conditions. The stress-life behavior of the unnotched (9/90)2s laminates was investigated for stress ratios of R = 0.1 and R = 0.3. The occurrence of matrix cracking was also examined in these specimens. This revealed multiple matrix crack initiation sites throughout the composite, as well as evenly spaced surface cracks along the length of the specimens. No difference in fatigue lives were observed for stress ratios of R = 0.1 and R = 0.3 when compared on a stress range basis. The unnotched SCS-6/Timetal 21S composites had shorter fatigue lives than the SCS-6/Ti-15-3 composites, however the neat Timetal 21S matrix material had a longer fatigue life than the neat Ti-15-3.

  6. Fatigue-life behavior and matrix fatigue crack spacing in unnotched SCS-6/Timetal 21S metal matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, G. T.; Herrmann, D. J.; Hillberry, B. M.

    1993-07-01

    Fatigue tests of the SCS-6/Timetal 21S composite system were performed to characterize the fatigue behavior for unnotched conditions. The stress-life behavior of the unnotched (9/90)2s laminates was investigated for stress ratios of R = 0.1 and R = 0.3. The occurrence of matrix cracking was also examined in these specimens. This revealed multiple matrix crack initiation sites throughout the composite, as well as evenly spaced surface cracks along the length of the specimens. No difference in fatigue lives were observed for stress ratios of R = 0.1 and R = 0.3 when compared on a stress range basis. The unnotched SCS-6/Timetal 21S composites had shorter fatigue lives than the SCS-6/Ti-15-3 composites, however the neat Timetal 21S matrix material had a longer fatigue life than the neat Ti-15-3.

  7. Fatigue Crack Measurement in Composite Materials by Ultrasonic Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, James L.; Russell, Samuel S.; Suits, Michael W.; Workman, Gary L.; Watson, Jason M.; Thom, Robert (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The nondestructive detection of intra-ply microcracking in unlined pressure vessels fabricated from composite materials is critical to ensuring mission success. Microcracking in composite structures due to combined fatigue and cryogenic thermal loading can be very troublesome to detect in-service and when it begins to link through the thickness can cause leakage and failure of the structure. These leaks may lead to loss of pressure/propellant, increased risk of explosion and possible cryo-pumping. The work presented herein develops a method and an instrument to locate and measure intraply fatigue cracking through the thickness of laminated composite material by means of correlation with ultrasonic resonance. Resonant ultrasound spectroscopy provides measurements which are, sensitive to both the microscopic and macroscopic properties of an object. Elastic moduli, acoustic attenuation, and geometry can all be probed. The approach is based on the premise of half-wavelength resonance. The method injects a broadband ultrasonic wave into the test structure using a swept frequency technique. This method provides dramatically increased energy input into the test article, as compared to conventional spike pulsed ultrasonics. This relative energy increase improves the ability to measure finer details in the materials character, such as micro-cracking and porosity. As the micro-crack density increases, more interactions occur with the higher frequency (small wavelength) components of the signal train causing the spectrum to shift toward lower frequencies. Preliminary experiments have verified a measurable effect on the resonance spectrum of the ultrasonic data to detect microcracking. Methods involving self organizing neural networks and other clustering algorithms show that the resonance ultrasound signatures from composites vary with the degree of microcracking and can be separated and identified.

  8. Cyclic fatigue-crack propagation in sapphire in air and simulated physiological environments.

    PubMed

    Asoo, B; McNaney, J M; Mitamura, Y; Ritchie, R O

    2000-12-01

    Single-crystal aluminas are being considered for use in the manufacture of prosthetic heart valves. To characterize such materials for biomedical application, subcritical crack growth by stress corrosion (static fatigue) and by cyclic fatigue has been examined in sapphire along (1100) planes in 24 degrees C humid air and 37 degrees C Ringer's solution (the latter as a simulated physiological environment). The relationships between crack-propagation rates and the linear-elastic stress intensity have been determined for the first time in sapphire for both modes of subcritical cracking. It was found that growth rates were significantly faster at a given stress intensity in the Ringer's solution compared to the humid air environment. Mechanistically, a true cyclic fatigue effect was not found in sapphire as experimentally measured cyclic fatigue-crack growth rates could be closely predicted simply by integrating the static fatigue-crack growth data over the cyclic loading cycle. PMID:11007616

  9. An experimental approach to determining fatigue crack size in polyethylene tibial inserts.

    PubMed

    Lockard, Carly A; Sanders, Anthony P; Raeymaekers, Bart

    2016-02-01

    A major limiting factor to the longevity of prosthetic knee joints is fatigue crack damage of the polyethylene tibial insert. Existing methods to quantify fatigue crack damage have several shortcomings, including limited resolution, destructive testing approach, and high cost. We propose an alternative fatigue crack damage visualization and measurement method that addresses the shortcomings of existing methods. This new method is based on trans-illumination and differs from previously described methods in its ability to non-destructively measure subsurface fatigue crack damage while using a simple and cost-effective bench-top set-up. We have evaluated this method to measure fatigue crack damage in two tibial inserts. This new method improves on existing image-based techniques due to its usability for subsurface damage measurement and its decreased reliance on subjective damage identification and measurement. PMID:26451704

  10. Grain boundary oxidation and oxidation accelerated fatigue crack nucleation and propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, H. W.; Oshida, Y.

    1986-01-01

    Fatigue life at elevated temperatures is often shortened by oxidation. Grain boundary oxidation penetrates deeper than the surface oxidation. Therefore, grain boundary oxide penetration could be the primary cause of accelerated fatigue crack nucleation and propagation, and the shortened fatigue life at elevated temperatures. Grain boundary oxidation kinetics was studied and its statistical scatter was analyzed by the Weibull's distribution function. The effects of grain boundary oxidation on shortened fatigue life was analyzed and discussed. A model of intermittent microruptures of the grain boundary oxide was proposed for the fatigue crack growth in the low frequency region. The proposed model is consistent with the observations that fatigue crack growth rate in the low frequency region with hold time at K sub max is inversely proportional to cyclic frequency and that crack growth is intergranular.

  11. Nonlinear ultrasonic imaging of thermal fatigue cracks of several tens nm gap in glass plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertl, M.; Kawashima, K.; Sekino, K.; Yasui, H.; Aida, T.

    2015-10-01

    Thermal fatigue crack of which gap distance is several tens nm in glass plate is imaged by using an immersion higher harmonic imaging technique. Some parts of the thermal fatigue crack are clearly imaged by the third harmonic amplitude of the 3.5 MHz burst wave by angular incidence. For through-transmission mode across the crack face, the seventh harmonic of a through-thickness resonant frequency also visualizes the thermal fatigue crack. If spatial resolution will reach to a few micron meters, the technique could be applied for detection of disbonds in bonded wafers.

  12. A crystal plasticity based methodology for modeling fatigue crack initiation and estimating material coefficients to predict fatigue crack initiation life at micro, nano and macro scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voothaluru, Rohit

    Fatigue failure is a dominant mechanism that governs the failure of components and structures in many engineering applications. In conventional engineering applications due to the design specifications, a significant proportion of the fatigue life is spent in the crack initiation phase. In spite of the large number of works addressing fatigue life modeling, the problem of modeling crack initiation life still remains a major challenge. In this work, a novel computational methodology based upon crystal plasticity formulations has been developed to predict crack initiation life at macro, micro and nano length scales. The crystal plasticity based constitutive model has been employed to model the micromechanical deformation and damage accumulation under cyclic loading in polycrystalline metals. This work provides a first of its kind, fundamental basis for employing crystal plasticity formulations for evaluating a quantifiable estimate of fatigue crack initiation life. A semi-empirical energy based fatigue crack initiation criterion s employed to allow for accurate modeling of the underlying microstructural phenomenon leading to the initiation of cracks at different material length scales. The results of the fatigue crack initiation life prediction in case of polycrystalline metals such as Copper and Nickel demonstrated that the crack initiation life prediction using the proposed methodology yielded an improvement of more than 30% in comparison to the existing continuum methodologies for fatigue crack initiation prediction and more than 80% improvement compared to the existing analytical models. The computational methodology developed in this work also provides a first of its kind technique to evaluate the fatigue crack initiation coefficient in the form of energy dissipation coefficient that can be used at varying length scales. The methodology and the computational framework proposed in this work, are developed such that experimental inputs are used to improve

  13. Characterization of a soft elastomeric capacitive strain sensor for fatigue crack monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Xiangxiong; Li, Jian; Laflamme, Simon; Bennett, Caroline; Matamoros, Adolfo

    2015-04-01

    Fatigue cracks have been one of the major factors for the deterioration of steel bridges. In order to maintain structural integrity, monitoring fatigue crack activities such as crack initiation and propagation is critical to prevent catastrophic failure of steel bridges due to the accumulation of fatigue damage. Measuring the strain change under cracking is an effective way of monitoring fatigue cracks. However, traditional strain sensors such as metal foil gauges are not able to capture crack development due to their small size, limited measurement range, and high failure rate under harsh environmental conditions. Recently, a newly developed soft elastomeric capacitive sensor has great promise to overcome these limitations. In this paper, crack detection capability of the capacitive sensor is demonstrated through Finite Element (FE) analysis. A nonlinear FE model of a standard ASTM compact tension specimen is created which is calibrated to experimental data to simulate its response under fatigue loading, with the goal to 1) depict the strain distribution of the specimen under the large area covered by the capacitive sensor due to cracking; 2) characterize the relationship between capacitance change and crack width; 3) quantify the minimum required resolution of data acquisition system for detecting the fatigue cracks. The minimum resolution serves as a basis for the development of a dedicated wireless data acquisition system for the capacitive strain sensor.

  14. A novel approach to detecting breathing-fatigue cracks based on dynamic characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Guirong; De Stefano, Alessandro; Matta, Emiliano; Feng, Ruoqiang

    2013-01-01

    During the service life of structures, breathing-fatigue cracks may occur in structural members due to dynamic loadings acting on them. These fatigue cracks, if undetected, might lead to a catastrophic failure of the whole structural system. Although a number of approaches have been proposed to detect breathing-fatigue cracks, some of them appear rather sophisticated or expensive (requiring complicated equipment), and others suffer from a lack of sensitivity. In this study, a simple and efficient approach to detecting breathing-fatigue cracks is developed based on dynamic characteristics of breathing cracks. First, considering that breathing cracks introduce bilinearity into structures, a simple system identification method for bilinear systems is proposed by taking best advantage of dynamic characteristics of bilinear systems. This method transfers nonlinear system identification into linear system identification by dividing impulse or free-vibration responses into different parts corresponding to each stiffness region according to the stiffness interface. In this way, the natural frequency of each region can be identified using any modal identification approach applicable to linear systems. Second, the procedure for identifying the existence of breathing fatigue cracks and quantifying the cracks qualitatively is proposed by looking for the difference in the identified natural frequency between regions. Third, through introducing Hilbert transform, the proposed procedure is extended to identify fatigue cracks in piecewise-nonlinear systems. The proposed system identification method and crack detection procedure have been successfully validated by numerical simulations and experimental tests.

  15. Crack initiation and near-threshold surface fatigue crack propagation behavior of the iron-base superalloy A-286

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daeubler, M. A.; Thompson, A. W.; Bernstein, I. M.

    1988-02-01

    The fatigue behavior of the iron-base superalloy A-286 was studied at room temperature in air for three aging conditions: underaged, peak aged, and overaged. A fatigue strength at 107 cycles of about 200 MPa, independent of aging condition, was measured for an applied load ratio of R =0.1. Surface crack initiation and propagation were measured using hourglass specimens. Surface cracks were invariably initiated in slip bands orientated between 45 and 55 deg to the load axis, and an average ratio of crack depth to crack length of about 0.45 for these semi-elliptical cracks was measured. These earliest observable short surface cracks grew at an accelerated propagation rate in the near-threshold regime but were retarded in a transition stage, resulting in a minimum in crack growth rate. This behavior was correlated to the interaction of the crack with specific microstructure features. Following this minimum, the crack growth accelerated again with increasing Δ K and appeared to converge with the crack growth behavior expected for long through cracks. The crack propagation rate at fixed Δ K was lowest in underaged, compared to peak aged and overaged microstructures. The minimum and trends in crack growth rate appeared to depend on the development of roughness-induced closure.

  16. Short fatigue crack characterization and detection using confocal scanning laser microscopy (CSLM)

    SciTech Connect

    Varvani-Farahani, A.; Topper, T.H.

    1997-12-31

    This paper presents a new technique for studying the growth and morphology of fatigue cracks. The technique allows short fatigue crack growth, crack depth, aspect ratio (crack depth/half crack length), and crack front configuration to be measured using a Confocal Scanning Laser Microscope (CSLM). CSLM measurements of the initial stage of crack growth in Al 2024-T351 revealed that microstructurally short fatigue cracks grew initially along a plane inclined to the applied stress. The angle of the inclined plane (Stage I crack growth) was found to be about 45 degrees to the axis of the applied tensile load. Aspect ratio and the angle of maximum shear plane (Mode II), obtained using the CSLM technique, showed a good agreement with those obtained using a Surface Removal (SR) technique. The aspect ratios obtained using the CSLM technique were found to remain constant with increasing crack length in Al 2024-T351 and SAE 1045 Steel at 0.83 and 0.80, respectively. Optical sectioning along the length of a crack revealed that the crack front in the interior of the materials has a semi-elliptical shape. These results are in good agreement with results obtained using the SR technique. The CSLM technique was employed to characterize the fracture surface of fatigue cracks in an SAE 1045 Steel. CSLM image processing of the fracture surface near the crack tip constructed a three dimensional profile of fracture surface asperities. The heights of asperities were obtained from this profile. Optical sectioning from a post-image-processed crack provided crack depth and crack mouth width at every point along the crack length for each load level. The crack opening stress was taken as the stress level at which the crack depth stopped increasing with increases in a lied stress. 6 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Proof test and fatigue crack growth modeling on 2024-T3 aluminum alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.; Poe, C. C., Jr.; Dawicke, D. S.

    1990-01-01

    Pressure proof testing of aircraft fuselage structures has been suggested as a means of screening critical crack sizes and of extending their useful life. The objective of this paper is to study the proof-test concept and to model the crack-growth process on a ductile material. Simulated proof and operational fatigue life tests have been conducted on cracked panels made of 2024-T3 aluminum alloy sheet material. A fatigue crack-closure model was modified to simulate the proof test and operational fatigue cycling. Using crack-growth rate and resistance-curve data, the model was able to predict crack growth during and after the proof load. These tests and analyses indicate that the proof test increases fatigue life; but the beneficial life, after a 1.33 or 1.5 proof, was less than a few hundred cycles.

  18. Fatigue crack behavior of RC beams strengthened with CFL under cylic bending loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Xiaohong; Huang, Peiyan; Guo, Xinyan

    2008-11-01

    A mechanical model of cracked reinforced concrete (RC) beams strengthened with carbon fiber laminate (CFL) is proposed to establish the theoretical relationship among the crack height (a), the number of fatigue loading cycles (n), and the fatigue life (N), and the main crack growth behavior is discussed. Moreover, some fatigue tests of the RC beams strengthened with CFL were carried out on material testing system (MTS) to investigate the crack growth rate (da/dn). The analysis results show that the crack growth behavior of RC beams strengthened with CFL may be divided into three stages: 1) initiation and rapid growth, 2) steady growth and arrest, 3) unstable growth. At the stage of crack steady growth and arrest, the relationship among, da/dn, n, and N could be expressed as: da/dn=C/(nlnN), where the constant coefficient, C, is determined from the fatigue tests.

  19. Need for ASME code changes for reliable characterization of thermal fatigue cracks in Class 1 components

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, V.N.; Ware, A.G.

    1991-01-01

    This paper evaluates the current inspection requirements for detecting and sizing thermal fatigue cracks in major light water reactor components. A review of field experience indicates that several sites in base metal that are susceptible to thermal fatigue damage are not included in the service inspection programs. Current inservice inspection procedures and conventional ultrasonic inspection techniques are not adequate for reliable detection and sizing of thermal fatigue cracks. This paper makes several recommendations for changes in ASME Section 11 inspection requirements. 12 refs.

  20. Effect of Understress on Fretting Fatigue Crack Initiation of Press-Fitted Axle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubota, Masanobu; Niho, Sotaro; Sakae, Chu; Kondo, Yoshiyuki

    Axles are one of the most important components in railway vehicles with regard to safety, since a fail-safe design is not available. The problems of fretting fatigue crack initiation in a press-fitted axle have not been completely solved even though up-to-date fatigue design methods are employed. The objective of the present study is to clarify the effect of understress on fretting fatigue crack initiation behavior in the press-fitted axle. Most of the stress amplitude given to the axle in service is smaller than the fretting fatigue limit based on the stress to initiate cracks under a constant load σwf1. Rotating bending fatigue tests were performed using a 40mm-diameter press-fitted axle assembly. Two-step variable stresses consisting of σwf1 and half or one-third of σwf1 were used in the experiment. Crack initiation life was defined as the number of cycles when a fretting fatigue crack, which is longer than 30µm, was found using a metallurgical microscope. Fretting fatigue cracks were initiated even when the variable stress did not contain the stress above the fretting fatigue crack initiation limit. The crack initiation life varied from 4.0×107 to 1.2×108 depending on the stress frequency ratio nL/nH. The sum of the number of cycles of higher stress at crack initiation NH was much smaller than the number of cycles to initiate cracks estimated from the modified Miner's rule. The value of the modified Miner's damage ranged from 0.013 to 0.185. To clarify the effect of variable amplitude on the fretting fatigue crack initiation, a comprehensive investigation related to relative slip, tangential force and fretting wear is necessary.

  1. Diffraction-based study of fatigue crack initiation and propagation in aerospace aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Vipul K.

    The crack initiation sites and microstructure-sensitive growth of small fatigue cracks are experimentally characterized in two precipitation-hardened aluminum alloys, 7075-T651 and 7050-T7451, stressed in ambient temperature moist-air (warm-humid) and -50°C dry N2 (cold-dry) environmental conditions. Backscattered electron imaging (BSE) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) of the fracture surfaces showed that Fe-Cu rich constituent particle clusters are the most common initiation sites within both alloys stressed in either environment. The crack growth within each alloy, on average, was observed to be slowed in the cold-dry environment than in the warm-humid environment, but only at longer crack lengths. Although no overwhelming effects of grain boundaries and grain orientations on small-crack growth were observed, crack growth data showed local fluctuations within individual grains. These observations are understood as crack propagation through the underlying substructure at the crack surface and frequent interaction with low/high-angle grain and subgrain boundaries, during cyclic loading, and, are further attributed to periodic changes in crack propagation path and multiple occurrences of crack-branching observed in the current study. SEM-based stereology in combination with electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) established fatigue crack surface crystallography within the region from ˜1 to 50 mum of crack initiating particle clusters. Fatigue crack facets were parallel to a wide variety of crystallographic planes, with pole orientations distributed broadly across the irreducible stereographic triangle between the {001} and {101}-poles within both warm-humid and cold-dry environments. The results indicate environmentally affected fatigue cracking in both cases, given the similarity between the observed morphology and crystallography with that of a variety of aerospace aluminum alloys cracked in the presence of moist-air. There was no evidence of

  2. Monitoring of fatigue crack growth at fastener holes using guided Lamb waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fromme, P.; Sayir, M. B.

    2002-05-01

    An experimental method for the detection of fatigue cracks at holes in aluminum specimens is investigated. The first anti-symmetric Lamb wave mode A0 is excited. Using a heterodyne laser interferometer, the scattered field close to the hole during crack growth is monitored. The fatigue crack is initiated and propagated by cyclic tensile loading of the test specimen in a servo-hydraulic testing machine. The measurements are compared to finite difference calculations. Good qualitative agreement is found.

  3. Fatigue crack growth characteristics and fracture toughness of {gamma}-TiAl base alloy sheet material

    SciTech Connect

    Behr, R.; Wanner, A.; Clemens, H.; Glatz, W.

    1995-07-01

    Room temperature tension-tension fatigue crack growth experiments were performed on single edge notch specimens of Ti-48Al-2Cr sheet materials produced on industrial scale with different microstructures ranging from near gamma to fully lamellar. Crack extension was monitored using a travelling optical microscope and a DC potential method. Crack paths and fracture surfaces were investigated by SEM. Fracture toughness data were determined by monotonic loading of previously fatigued samples.

  4. Noncontact monitoring of fatigue crack growth using high frequency guided waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masserey, B.; Fromme, P.

    2014-03-01

    The development of fatigue cracks at fastener holes due to stress concentration is a common problem in aircraft maintenance. This contribution investigates the use of high frequency guided waves for the non-contact monitoring of fatigue crack growth in tensile, aluminium specimens. High frequency guided ultrasonic waves have a good sensitivity for defect detection and can propagate along the structure, thus having the potential for the inspection of difficult to access parts by means of non-contact measurements. Experimentally the required guided wave modes are excited using standard wedge transducers and measured using a laser interferometer. The growth of fatigue cracks during cyclic loading was monitored optically and the resulting changes in the signal caused by crack growth are quantified. Full three-dimensional simulation of the scattering of the high frequency guided ultrasonic waves at the fastener hole and crack has been implemented using the Finite Difference (FD) method. The comparison of the results shows a good agreement of the measured and predicted scattered field of the guided wave at quarter-elliptical and through-thickness fatigue cracks. The measurements show a good sensitivity for the early detection of fatigue damage and for the monitoring of fatigue crack growth at a fastener hole. The sensitivity and repeatability are ascertained, and the robustness of the methodology for practical in-situ ultrasonic monitoring of fatigue crack growth is discussed.

  5. Crack Growth Behavior in the Threshold Region for High Cycle Fatigue Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, Royce G.; Zanganehgheshlaghi, Mohannad

    2014-01-01

    The research results described in this paper presents a new understanding of the behavior of fatigue crack growth in the threshold region. It is believed by some crack growth experts that the ASTM load shedding test method does not produce true or valid threshold properties. The concern involves the observed fanning of threshold region da/dN data plots for some materials in which the low R-ratio data fans out or away from the high R-ratio data. This data fanning or elevation of threshold values is obviously caused by an increase in crack closure in the low R-ratio tested specimens. This increase in crack closure is assumed by some investigators to be caused by a plastic wake on the crack surfaces that was created during the load shedding test phase. This study shows that the increase in crack closure is the result of an extensive occurrence of crack bifurcation behavior in some materials, particularly in aluminum alloys, when the crack tip cyclic yield zone size becomes less than the grain size of the alloy. This behavior is related to the high stacking fault energy (SFE) property of aluminum alloys which results in easier slip characteristics. Therefore, the particular fanning behavior in aluminum alloys is a function of intrinsic dislocation property of the materials and that the fanned data represents valid material properties. However, for corrosion sensitive steel alloys used in this study the fanning was caused by a build-up of iron oxide at the crack tip from fretting corrosion.

  6. Intrinsic fatigue crack propagation in aluminum-lithium alloys - The effect of gaseous environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piascik, Robert S.; Gangloff, Richard P.

    1989-01-01

    Gaseous environmental effects on intrinsic fatigue crack growth are significant for the Al-Li-Cu alloy 2090, peak aged. For both moderate Delta K-low R and low Delta K-high R regimes, crack growth rates decrease according to the environment order: purified water vapor, moist air, helium and oxygen. Gaseous environmental effects are pronounced near threshold and are not closure dominated. Here, embrittlement by low levels of H2O (ppm) supports hydrogen embrittlement and suggests that molecular transport controlled cracking, established for high Delta K-low R, is modified near threshold. Localized crack tip reaction sites or high R crack opening shape may enable the strong, environmental effect at low levels of Delta K. Similar crack growth in He and O2 eliminates the contribution of surface films to fatigue damage in alloy 2090. While 2090 and 7075 exhibit similar environmental trends, the Al-Li-Cu alloy is more resistant to intrinsic corrosion fatigue crack growth.

  7. Effects of microstructure banding on hydrogen assisted fatigue crack growth in X65 pipeline steels

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ronevich, Joseph A.; Somerday, Brian P.; San Marchi, Chris W.

    2015-09-10

    Banded ferrite-pearlite X65 pipeline steel was tested in high pressure hydrogen gas to evaluate the effects of oriented pearlite on hydrogen assisted fatigue crack growth. Test specimens were oriented in the steel pipe such that cracks propagated either parallel or perpendicular to the banded pearlite. The ferrite-pearlite microstructure exhibited orientation dependent behavior in which fatigue crack growth rates were significantly lower for cracks oriented perpendicular to the banded pearlite compared to cracks oriented parallel to the bands. Thus the reduction of hydrogen assisted fatigue crack growth across the banded pearlite is attributed to a combination of crack-tip branching and impededmore » hydrogen diffusion across the banded pearlite.« less

  8. Rubber Characterization with Fatigue and Crack Growth Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perier, Laurent; Favier, Arnaud

    2010-06-01

    Dynamic Mechanical Analysis brings advanced capabilities to generate quantitative dynamic property data of rubber compounds for modelers and end users. Additionally to the recognized DMA testing benefits, a new METRAVIB Analyzer DMA+300 includes new testing solutions for analyzing rubbers mechanical property data under extended testing conditions closer to the real product's life conditions. The DMA+300 is specifically designed and dimensioned for fatigue tests on elastomers and crack growth tests. Combined with new MULTITEST software, DMA+300 makes possible to generate multi harmonics excitation and to control the application of a specific wave form to the specimen of rubber. This paper presents the main benefits available with this machine in the domain of rubber and elastomer applications.

  9. Fracture mechanics applied to nonisothermal fatigue crack growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, E. H.; Meyers, G. J.

    1986-01-01

    Twelve nonisothermal fatigue crack growth tests were performed on Hastelloy-X tubular specimens in which strain and temperature varied simultaneously. Conditions were selected to include nominally elastic and nominally plastic conditions and temperatures up to 982 C. A number of parameters, including the stress intensity factor, strain intensity factor, and J-integral, were examined for their ability to correlate the data. There was no decisive difference between the success of the three parameters. Each parameter correlated data from different strain ranges to within no worse than a factor of 2.1 on da/dn. The effect of strain temperature cycle shape was investigated and found to be moderate, while a strain hold of 1 min had very little effect. An attempt was made to predict nonisothermal test results from isothermal data. These predictions were better than those made by using peak test temperature isothermal data but still not within scatter.

  10. NDE detectability of fatigue type cracks in high strength alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christner, B. K.; Rummel, W. D.

    1983-01-01

    Specimens suitable for investigating the reliability of production nondestructive evaluation (NDE) to detect tightly closed fatigue cracks in high strength alloys representative of those materials used in spacecraft engine/booster construction were produced. Inconel 718 was selected as representative of nickel base alloys and Haynes 188 was selected as representative of cobalt base alloys used in this application. Cleaning procedures were developed to insure the reusability of the test specimens and a flaw detection reliability assessment of the fluorescent penetrant inspection method was performed using the test specimens produced to characterize their use for future reliability assessments and to provide additional NDE flaw detection reliability data for high strength alloys. The statistical analysis of the fluorescent penetrant inspection data was performed to determine the detection reliabilities for each inspection at a 90% probability/95% confidence level.

  11. Acoustic Emission Detection and Prediction of Fatigue Crack Propagation in Composite Patch Repairs Using Neural Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Okafor, A. Chukwujekwu; Singh, Navdeep; Singh, Navrag

    2007-03-21

    An aircraft is subjected to severe structural and aerodynamic loads during its service life. These loads can cause damage or weakening of the structure especially for aging military and civilian aircraft, thereby affecting its load carrying capabilities. Hence composite patch repairs are increasingly used to repair damaged aircraft metallic structures to restore its structural efficiency. This paper presents the results of Acoustic Emission (AE) monitoring of crack propagation in 2024-T3 Clad aluminum panels repaired with adhesively bonded octagonal, single sided boron/epoxy composite patch under tension-tension fatigue loading. Crack propagation gages were used to monitor crack initiation. The identified AE sensor features were used to train neural networks for predicting crack length. The results show that AE events are correlated with crack propagation. AE system was able to detect crack propagation even at high noise condition of 10 Hz loading; that crack propagation signals can be differentiated from matrix cracking signals that take place due to fiber breakage in the composite patch. Three back-propagation cascade feed forward networks were trained to predict crack length based on the number of fatigue cycles, AE event number, and both the Fatigue Cycles and AE events, as inputs respectively. Network using both fatigue cycles and AE event number as inputs to predict crack length gave the best results, followed by Network with fatigue cycles as input, while network with just AE events as input had a greater error.

  12. Effect of interstitial content on high- temperature fatigue crack propagation and low- cycle fatigue of alloy 720

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bashir, S.; Thomas, M. C.

    1993-08-01

    Alloy 720 is a high-strength cast and wrought turbine disc alloy currently in use for temperatures up to about 650 °C in Allison’s T800, T406, GMA 2100, and GMA 3007 engines. In the original composition in-tended for use as turbine blades, large carbide and boride stringers formed and acted as preferred crack initiators. Stringering was attributed to relatively higher boron and carbon levels. These interstitials are known to affect creep and ductility of superalloys, but the effects on low-cycle fatigue and fatigue crack propagation have not been studied. Recent emphasis on the total life approach in the design of turbine discs necessitates better understanding of the interactive fatigue crack propagation and low-cycle fatigue behavior at high temperatures. The objective of this study was to improve the damage tolerance of Alloy 720 by systematically modifying boron and carbon levels in the master melt, without altering the low-cy-cle fatigue and strength characteristics of the original composition. Improvement in strain-controlled low-cycle fatigue life was achieved by fragmenting the continuous stringers via composition modifica-tion. The fatigue crack propagation rate was reduced by a concurrent reduction of both carbon and bo-ron levels to optimally low levels at which the frequency of brittle second phases was minimal. The changes in composition have been incorporated for production disc forgings.

  13. Effect of interstitial content on high-temperature fatigue crack propagation and low-cycle fatigue of Alloy 720

    SciTech Connect

    Bashir, S. ); Thomas, M.C. . Allison Gas Turbine Div.)

    1993-08-01

    Alloy 720 is a high-strength cast and wrought turbine disc alloy currently in use for temperatures up to about 650 C in Allison's T800, T406, GMA 2100, and GMA 3007 engines. In the original composition intended for use as turbine blades, large carbide and borides stringers formed and acted as preferred crack initiators. Stringering was attributed to relatively higher boron and carbon levels. These interstitial are known to affect creep and ductility of superalloys, but the effects on low-cycle fatigue and fatigue crack propagation have not been studied. Recent emphasis on the total life approach in the design of turbine discs necessitates better understanding of the interactive fatigue crack propagation and low-cycle fatigue behavior at high temperatures. The objective of this study was to improve the damage tolerance of Alloy 720 by systematically modifying boron and carbon levels in the master melt, without altering the low-cycle fatigue and strength characteristics of the original composition. Improvement in strain-controlled low-cycle fatigue life was achieved by fragmenting the continuous stringers via composition modification. The fatigue crack propagation rate was reduced by a concurrent reduction of both carbon and boron levels to optimally low levels at which the frequency of brittle second phases was minimal. The changes in composition have been incorporated for production disc forgings.

  14. Fatigue crack growth behavior of a solid solution-strengthened nickel-base superalloy (Incoloy 825)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartosiewicz, L.; Krause, A. R.; Spis, A.; Raghavan, J.; Putatunda, S. K.

    1992-02-01

    Fatigue crack growth behavior of a solid solution-strengthened nickel-base superalloy (Incoloy 825)* was investigated. The investigation also examined the influence of heat treatment on resultant microstructures and the near-threshold fatigue crack growth behavior. In addition, the influence of load ratios (R), material strength, and grain size on fatigue threshold was studied. Compact tension specimens prepared from Incoloy 825 with transverse-longitudinal (TL) orientation in the as-received, as well as two different heat treated conditions, were used. The heat treatment studies revealed a peak hardness condition after solution treatment at 1200 °C for 1/2 hr, followed by aging at 600 °C for 434 hr. Among all the heat treated conditions, the fatigue threshold was the highest and the near-threshold crack growth rate was lowest in this peak aged condition. Fatigue threshold values were observed to decrease with an increase in load ratio, whereas an increased grain diameter resulted in a higher fatigue threshold. An earlier mathematical model was found applicable to characterize the relationship between load ratio and fatigue threshold. Preferential etching of grain boundary suggests formation of a thin film of carbide precipitation along the grain boundary region in the aged specimens. This carbide precipitation facilitated intergranular crack growth in these samples, resulting in higher roughness-induced crack closure. The highest fatigue threshold in the peak aged condition can be attributed to this large roughness-induced crack closure process.

  15. Evaluation on Fatigue Crack Propagation of Reduced Activation Ferritic Steel (JLF-1) at High Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Han Ki; Kim, Sa Woong; Lee, Sang Pill; Katoh, Yutai; Kohyama, Akira

    Recently, reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel, vanadium alloy and SiC/SiC composite are embossed for nuclear fusion reactor in accordance with the coolant. Especially, reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel is very suitable material for nuclear fusion reactor, because it has low coefficient of thermal expansion and excellent heat conductivity. The objective of this study is to investigate fatigue crack propagation behavior in the Reduced Activation Ferritic Steel (JLF-1). The fatigue crack propagation behavior of the JLF-1 steel was investigated by the constant-amplitude loading test for the stress ratios R = 0.1, 0.3 and 0.5 respectively. The fatigue crack growth tests carried out at room temperature and 400°C for base metal and weld metal. The effects of stress ratio, test temperature, specimen size and TIG welding on the fatigue crack propagation behaviors for JLF-1 steel were discussed within the Paris law. Particularly, the fatigue crack propagation rate of a weld metal was similar to that of base metal at the stress ratio of 0.3. Also, the fatigue crack propagation rate of a half size specimen was similar to that of a full size specimen at the stress ratios of 0.1, 0.3 and 0.5 respectively. From this result, we can recognize that the fatigue crack propagation behavior of this material can be evaluated by using the half size specimens.

  16. Selective Reinforcement to Improve Fracture Toughness and Fatigue Crack Growth Resistance in Metallic Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, Gary L.; Newman, John A.; James, Mark A.

    2004-01-01

    Experimental and analytical investigations of the fatigue crack growth and fracture response of aluminum selectively reinforced compact tension specimens were performed. It was shown that selective reinforcement significantly improved these responses primarily through load sharing by the reinforcement. With the appropriate combination of reinforcement architecture and mechanical properties, as well as reinforcement to base aluminum interface properties, fatigue cracks can be arrested using selective reinforcement. Maximum load associated with fracture increased up to 20 percent for the cases investigated and crack growth at maximum load increased as much as 150 percent. For both fatigue crack growth and fracture, the three most influential properties identified within the bounds of this investigation that influence this response are reinforcement width, reinforcement stiffness and interface stiffness. Considerable coupling occurs between the different fiber architecture and material properties and how they influence fatigue crack growth and fracture responses.

  17. The effect of pre-existing corrosion on the fatigue cracking behavior of aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Hagerdorn, E.L.; Koch, G.H.

    1996-10-01

    In order to assess the effect of preexisting corrosion on the fatigue crack behavior of aluminum alloys 2024-T3 and 7074-T6 crack initiation and growth data were obtained using fracture mechanics specimens. These specimens incorporated mechanically thinned areas and areas that had been preexposed to environments which produced various degrees of pitting or exfoliation corrosion. The data obtained from these laboratory experiments indicate that specific corrosive was most pronounced in the fatigue cracking behavior of aluminum alloys. The effect of preexisting corrosion was most pronounced in the fatigue crack initiation stage. Based on the results of this study, it was concluded that the effect of preexisting corrosion on the fatigue cracking behavior of both aluminum alloys 2024-T3 and 7075-T6 is a combination of stress concentrations as a result of material loss, and altered material properties, possible as a result of hydrogen entry into the lattice.

  18. Investigation of Fatigue Crack Propagation in Spot-Welded Joints Based on Fracture Mechanics Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassanifard, S.; Bonab, M. A. Mohtadi; Jabbari, Gh.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, fatigue crack propagation life of resistance spot welds in tensile-shear specimens is investigated based on the calculation of stress intensity factors and J-integral using three-dimensional finite element method. For comparison, experimental works on 5083-O aluminum alloy spot-welded joints have been carried out to verify the numerical predictions of fatigue crack propagation of welded joints. A lot of analyses have been performed to obtain stress intensity factors and J-integral in tensile-shear specimens of spot-welded joints by using commercial software ANSYS. These gathered data have been formulated by using statistical software SPSS. The results of fatigue propagation life and predicted fatigue crack path revealed very good agreement with the experimental fatigue test data and photograph of cross-section of the fatigued spot-weld specimens.

  19. Subcritical crack growth at bimaterial interfaces. Part 3: Shear-enhanced fatigue crack growth resistance at polymer/metal interface

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z.; Shang, J.K.

    1996-01-01

    Fatigue crack growth along an Al/epoxy interface was examined under different combinations of mode-I and mode-II loadings using the flexural peel technique. Fatigue crack growth rates were obtained as a function of the total strain energy rate for G{sub II}/G{sub I} ratios of 0.3 to 1.4, achieved by varying the relative thickness of the outerlayers for the flexural peel specimen. Fatigue crack growth resistance of the interface was found to increase with increasing G{sub II}/G{sub I} ratio. Such a shear-enhanced crack growth resistance of the interface resulted in a gradual transition of crack growth mechanism from interfacial at the low G{sub II}/G{sub I} ratio to cohesive at the high G{sub II}/G{sub I} ratio. Under predominantly mode-I loading, the damage in the polymer took the form of crazing and cavitation. In contrast, laminar shear occurred under highly shear loading, resulting in a larger amount of plastic dissipation at the crack tip and improved fatigue crack growth resistance.

  20. The reduction in fatigue crack growth resistance of dentin with depth.

    PubMed

    Ivancik, J; Neerchal, N K; Romberg, E; Arola, D

    2011-08-01

    The fatigue crack growth resistance of dentin was characterized as a function of depth from the dentino-enamel junction. Compact tension (CT) specimens were prepared from the crowns of third molars in the deep, middle, and peripheral dentin. The microstructure was quantified in terms of the average tubule dimensions and density. Fatigue cracks were grown in-plane with the tubules and characterized in terms of the initiation and growth responses. Deep dentin exhibited the lowest resistance to the initiation of fatigue crack growth, as indicated by the stress intensity threshold (ΔK(th) ≈ 0.8 MPa•m(0.5)) and the highest incremental fatigue crack growth rate (over 1000 times that in peripheral dentin). Cracks in deep dentin underwent incremental extension under cyclic stresses that were 40% lower than those required in peripheral dentin. The average fatigue crack growth rates increased significantly with tubule density, indicating the importance of microstructure on the potential for tooth fracture. Molars with deep restorations are more likely to suffer from the cracked-tooth syndrome, because of the lower fatigue crack growth resistance of deep dentin. PMID:21628640

  1. Effects of fiber bridging and fiber fracture on fatigue cracking in a titanium-matrix composite

    SciTech Connect

    Herrmann, D.J.; Hillberry, B.M.

    1997-12-31

    Continuous-fiber titanium-matrix composites (TMCs) are being considered for a number of aerospace structures where high specific strength and stiffness are required at elevated temperatures. Potential applications include advanced gas turbine components and hypersonic aircraft structures. To design lightweight, damage-tolerant TMC structures, an understanding of fatigue crack propagation in TMCs is necessary. Here, constant amplitude fatigue tests were performed on [0]{sub 4} and [0/90]{sub s}SCS-6/TIMETAL 21S titanium-matrix composite specimens to study fiber bridging of matrix fatigue cracks. Crack length was monitored throughout the tests, and displacements near the crack surface were measured periodically by placing an Elber gage (1.5-mm gage length point extensometer) across the crack at a number of positions. Specimens were removed prior to failure and mechanically polished to the first layer of fibers and the extent of fiber bridging observed. While some cracks were fully bridged, other cracks contained broken fibers among the intact, bridging fibers. A model has been developed to study the mechanics of a cracked unidirectional composite with any combination of intact and broken fibers in the wake of the matrix crack. Displacements near the crack surface predicted by the model agree with the Elber gage measurements for cracks that were fully bridged. Predictions were also performed for bridged cracks with discrete fiber breaks in the crack wake based on the geometry observed after polishing with good correlation between the predictions and the experimental measurements.

  2. Fatigue-crack propagation in advanced aerospace materials: Aluminum-lithium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Venkateswara Rao, K.T.; Ritchie, R.O.

    1988-10-01

    Characteristics of fatigue-crack propagation behavior are reviewed for recently developed commercial aluminum-lithium alloys, with emphasis on the underlying micromechanisms associated with crack advance and their implications to damage-tolerant design. Specifically, crack-growth kinetics in Alcoa 2090-T8E41, Alcan 8090 and 8091, and Pechiney 2091 alloys, and in certain powder-metallurgy alloys, are examined as a function of microstructure, plate orientation, temperature, crack size, load ratio and loading sequence. In general, it is found that growth rates for long (> 10 mm) cracks are nearly 2--3 orders of magnitude slower than in traditional 2000 and 7000 series alloys at comparable stress-intensity levels. In additions, Al-Li alloys shown enhanced crack-growth retardations following the application of tensile overloads and retain superior fatigue properties even after prolonged exposure at overaging temperatures; however, they are less impressive in the presence of compression overloads and further show accelerated crack-growth behavior for microstructurally-small (2--1000 {mu}m) cracks (some three orders of magnitude faster than long cracks). These contrasting observations are attributed to a very prominent role of crack-tip shielding during fatigue-crack growth in Al-Li alloys, promoted largely by the tortuous and zig-zag nature of the crack-path morphologies. Such crack paths result in locally reduced crack-tip stress intensities, due to crack deflection and consequent crack wedging from fracture-surface asperities (roughness-induced crack closure); however, such mechanisms are far less potent in the presence of compressive loads, which act to crush the asperities, and for small cracks, where the limited crack wake severely restricts the shielding effect. 50 refs., 21 figs.

  3. Recent advances in the modelling of crack growth under fatigue loading conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dekoning, A. U.; Tenhoeve, H. J.; Henriksen, T. K.

    1994-01-01

    Fatigue crack growth associated with cyclic (secondary) plastic flow near a crack front is modelled using an incremental formulation. A new description of threshold behaviour under small load cycles is included. Quasi-static crack extension under high load excursions is described using an incremental formulation of the R-(crack growth resistance)- curve concept. The integration of the equations is discussed. For constant amplitude load cycles the results will be compared with existing crack growth laws. It will be shown that the model also properly describes interaction effects of fatigue crack growth and quasi-static crack extension. To evaluate the more general applicability the model is included in the NASGRO computer code for damage tolerance analysis. For this purpose the NASGRO program was provided with the CORPUS and the STRIP-YIELD models for computation of the crack opening load levels. The implementation is discussed and recent results of the verification are presented.

  4. A study on the influence of microstructure on small fatigue cracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castelluccio, Gustavo M.

    In spite of its significance in industrial applications, the prediction of the influence of microstructure on the early stages of crack formation and growth in engineering alloys remains underdeveloped. The formation and early growth of fatigue cracks in the high cycle fatigue regime lasts for much of the fatigue life, and it is strongly influenced by microstructural features such as grain size, twins and morphological and crystallographic texture. However, most fatigue models do not predict the in uence of the microstructure on early stages of crack formation, or they employ parameters that should be calibrated with experimental data from specimens with microstructures of interest. These post facto strategies are adequate to characterize materials, but they are not fully appropriate to aid in the design of fatigue-resistant engineering alloys. This thesis considers finite element computational models that explicitly render the microstructure of selected FCC metallic systems and introduces a fatigue methodology that estimates transgranular and intergranular fatigue growth for microstructurally small cracks. The driving forces for both failure modes are assessed by means of fatigue indicators, which are used along with life correlations to estimate the fatigue life. Furthermore, cracks with meandering paths are modeled by considering crack growth on a grain-by-grain basis with a damage model embedded analytically to account for stress and strain redistribution as the cracks extend. The methodology is implemented using a crystal plasticity constitutive model calibrated for studying the effect of microstructure on early fatigue life of a powder processed Ni-base RR1000 superalloy at elevated temperature under high cycle fatigue conditions. This alloy is employed for aircraft turbine engine disks, which undergo a thermomechanical production process to produce a controlled bimodal grain size distribution. The prediction of the fatigue life for this complex

  5. Fatigue Analyses Under Constant- and Variable-Amplitude Loading Using Small-Crack Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.; Phillips, E. P.; Everett, R. A., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    Studies on the growth of small cracks have led to the observation that fatigue life of many engineering materials is primarily "crack growth" from micro-structural features, such as inclusion particles, voids, slip-bands or from manufacturing defects. This paper reviews the capabilities of a plasticity-induced crack-closure model to predict fatigue lives of metallic materials using "small-crack theory" under various loading conditions. Constraint factors, to account for three-dimensional effects, were selected to correlate large-crack growth rate data as a function of the effective stress-intensity factor range (delta-Keff) under constant-amplitude loading. Modifications to the delta-Keff-rate relations in the near-threshold regime were needed to fit measured small-crack growth rate behavior. The model was then used to calculate small-and large-crack growth rates, and to predict total fatigue lives, for notched and un-notched specimens under constant-amplitude and spectrum loading. Fatigue lives were predicted using crack-growth relations and micro-structural features like those that initiated cracks in the fatigue specimens for most of the materials analyzed. Results from the tests and analyses agreed well.

  6. Stochastic model for fatigue crack size and cost effective design decisions. [for aerospace structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanagud, S.; Uppaluri, B.

    1975-01-01

    This paper describes a methodology for making cost effective fatigue design decisions. The methodology is based on a probabilistic model for the stochastic process of fatigue crack growth with time. The development of a particular model for the stochastic process is also discussed in the paper. The model is based on the assumption of continuous time and discrete space of crack lengths. Statistical decision theory and the developed probabilistic model are used to develop the procedure for making fatigue design decisions on the basis of minimum expected cost or risk function and reliability bounds. Selections of initial flaw size distribution, NDT, repair threshold crack lengths, and inspection intervals are discussed.

  7. Fatigue crack detection in metallic structures with Lamb waves and 3D laser vibrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staszewski, W. J.; Lee, B. C.; Traynor, R.

    2007-03-01

    The paper presents the application of ultrasonic guided waves for fatigue crack detection in metallic structures. The study involves a simple fatigue test performed to introduce a crack into an aluminium plate. Lamb waves generated by a low-profile, surface-bonded piezoceramic transducer are sensed using a tri-axis, multi-position scanning laser vibrometer. The results demonstrate the potential of laser vibrometry for simple, rapid and robust detection of fatigue cracks in metallic structures. The method could be used in quality inspection and in-service maintenance of metallic structures in aerospace, civil and mechanical engineering industries.

  8. Detection and characterization of fatigue cracks in thin metal plates by low frequency resonant model analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincheski, B.; Namkung, M.; Birt, E. A.

    1992-01-01

    Low-frequency resonant model analysis, a technique for the detection and characterization of fatigue cracks in thin metal plates, which could be adapted to rapid scan or large area testing, is considered. Experimental data displaying a direct correlation between fatigue crack geometry and resonance frequency for the second vibrational plate mode are presented. FEM is used to calculate the mechanical behavior of the plates, and provides a comparison basis for the experimentally determined resonance frequency values. The waveform of the acoustic emission generated at the resonant frequency is examined; it provides the basis for a model of the interaction of fatigue crack faces during plate vibration.

  9. Detection and characterization of fatigue cracks in thin metal plates by low frequency resonant model analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wincheski, B.; Namkung, M.; Birt, E. A.

    Low-frequency resonant model analysis, a technique for the detection and characterization of fatigue cracks in thin metal plates, which could be adapted to rapid scan or large area testing, is considered. Experimental data displaying a direct correlation between fatigue crack geometry and resonance frequency for the second vibrational plate mode are presented. FEM is used to calculate the mechanical behavior of the plates, and provides a comparison basis for the experimentally determined resonance frequency values. The waveform of the acoustic emission generated at the resonant frequency is examined; it provides the basis for a model of the interaction of fatigue crack faces during plate vibration.

  10. Fatigue and Creep Crack Propagation behaviour of Alloy 617 in the Annealed and Aged Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Julian K. Benz; Richard N. Wright

    2013-10-01

    The crack propagation behaviour of Alloy 617 was studied under various conditions. Elevated temperature fatigue and creep-fatigue crack growth experiments were conducted at 650 and 800 degrees C under constant stress intensity (triangle K) conditions and triangular or trapezoidal waveforms at various frequencies on as-received, aged, and carburized material. Environmental conditions included both laboratory air and characteristic VHTR impure helium. As-received Alloy 617 displayed an increase in the crack growth rate (da/dN) as the frequency was decreased in air which indicated a time-dependent contribution component in fatigue crack propagation. Material aged at 650°C did not display any influence on the fatigue crack growth rates nor the increasing trend of crack growth rate with decreasing frequency even though significant microstructural evolution, including y’ (Ni3Al) after short times, occurred during aging. In contrast, carburized Alloy 617 showed an increase in crack growth rates at all frequencies tested compared to the material in the standard annealed condition. Crack growth studies under quasi-constant K (i.e. creep) conditions were also completed at 650 degrees C and a stress intensity of K = 40 MPa9 (square root)m. The results indicate that crack growth is primarily intergranular and increased creep crack growth rates exist in the impure helium environment when compared to the results in laboratory air. Furthermore, the propagation rates (da/dt) continually increased for the duration of the creep crack growth either due to material aging or evolution of a crack tip creep zone. Finally, fatigue crack propagation tests at 800 degrees C on annealed Alloy 617 indicated that crack propagation rates were higher in air than impure helium at the largest frequencies and lowest stress intensities. The rates in helium, however, eventually surpass the rates in air as the frequency is reduced and the stress intensity is decreased which was not observed at 650

  11. NASGRO(registered trademark): Fracture Mechanics and Fatigue Crack Growth Analysis Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, Royce; Shivakumar, V.; Mettu, Sambi; Beek, Joachim; Williams, Leonard; Yeh, Feng; McClung, Craig; Cardinal, Joe

    2004-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes NASGRO, which is a fracture mechanics and fatigue crack growth analysis software package that is used to reduce risk of fracture in Space Shuttles. The contents include: 1) Consequences of Fracture; 2) NASA Fracture Control Requirements; 3) NASGRO Reduces Risk; 4) NASGRO Use Inside NASA; 5) NASGRO Components: Crack Growth Module; 6) NASGRO Components:Material Property Module; 7) Typical NASGRO analysis: Crack growth or component life calculation; and 8) NASGRO Sample Application: Orbiter feedline flowliner crack analysis.

  12. Fatigue Crack Length Sizing Using a Novel Flexible Eddy Current Sensor Array

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Ruifang; Chen, Dixiang; Pan, Mengchun; Tian, Wugang; Wu, Xuezhong; Zhou, Weihong; Tang, Ying

    2015-01-01

    The eddy current probe, which is flexible, array typed, highly sensitive and capable of quantitative inspection is one practical requirement in nondestructive testing and also a research hotspot. A novel flexible planar eddy current sensor array for the inspection of microcrack presentation in critical parts of airplanes is developed in this paper. Both exciting and sensing coils are etched on polyimide films using a flexible printed circuit board technique, thus conforming the sensor to complex geometric structures. In order to serve the needs of condition-based maintenance (CBM), the proposed sensor array is comprised of 64 elements. Its spatial resolution is only 0.8 mm, and it is not only sensitive to shallow microcracks, but also capable of sizing the length of fatigue cracks. The details and advantages of our sensor design are introduced. The working principal and the crack responses are analyzed by finite element simulation, with which a crack length sizing algorithm is proposed. Experiments based on standard specimens are implemented to verify the validity of our simulation and the efficiency of the crack length sizing algorithm. Experimental results show that the sensor array is sensitive to microcracks, and is capable of crack length sizing with an accuracy within ±0.2 mm. PMID:26703608

  13. Fatigue Crack Length Sizing Using a Novel Flexible Eddy Current Sensor Array.

    PubMed

    Xie, Ruifang; Chen, Dixiang; Pan, Mengchun; Tian, Wugang; Wu, Xuezhong; Zhou, Weihong; Tang, Ying

    2015-01-01

    The eddy current probe, which is flexible, array typed, highly sensitive and capable of quantitative inspection is one practical requirement in nondestructive testing and also a research hotspot. A novel flexible planar eddy current sensor array for the inspection of microcrack presentation in critical parts of airplanes is developed in this paper. Both exciting and sensing coils are etched on polyimide films using a flexible printed circuit board technique, thus conforming the sensor to complex geometric structures. In order to serve the needs of condition-based maintenance (CBM), the proposed sensor array is comprised of 64 elements. Its spatial resolution is only 0.8 mm, and it is not only sensitive to shallow microcracks, but also capable of sizing the length of fatigue cracks. The details and advantages of our sensor design are introduced. The working principal and the crack responses are analyzed by finite element simulation, with which a crack length sizing algorithm is proposed. Experiments based on standard specimens are implemented to verify the validity of our simulation and the efficiency of the crack length sizing algorithm. Experimental results show that the sensor array is sensitive to microcracks, and is capable of crack length sizing with an accuracy within ±0.2 mm. PMID:26703608

  14. Mechanics and mechanisms of cyclic fatigue-crack propagation in transformation-toughened zirconia ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, M.J. Sydney Univ., NSW . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering); Dauskardt, R.H.; Ritchie, R.O. ); Mai, Y.W. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1992-05-01

    Damage and cyclic fatigue failure under alternating loading in transformation-toughened zirconia ceramics is reviewed and compared to corresponding behavior under quasi-static loading (static fatigue). Current understanding of the role of transformation toughening in influencing cyclic fatigue-crack propagation behavior is examined based on studies which altered the extent of the tetragonal-to-monoclinic phase transformation in MG-PSZ through subeutectoid aging. These studies suggest that near-tip computations of the crack-driving force (in terms of the local stress intensity) can be used to predict crack-growth behavior under constant amplitude and variable-amplitude (spectrum) loading, using spatially resolved Raman spectroscopy to measure the extent of the transformation zones. In addition, results are reviewed which rationalize distinctions between the crack-growth behavior of preexisting, long'' (> 2 mm), through-thickness cracks and naturally-occurring, small'' (1 to 100 [mu]m), surface cracks in terms of variations in crack-tip shielding with crack size. In the present study, the effect of grain size variations on crack-growth behavior under both monotonic (R-curve) and cyclic fatigue loading are examined. Such observations are used to speculate on the mechanisms associated with cyclic crack advance, involving such processes as alternating shear via transformation-band formation, cyclic modification of the degree of transformation toughening, and uncracked-ligament (or grain) bridging.

  15. Mechanics and mechanisms of cyclic fatigue-crack propagation in transformation-toughened zirconia ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, M.J. |; Dauskardt, R.H.; Ritchie, R.O.; Mai, Y.W.

    1992-05-01

    Damage and cyclic fatigue failure under alternating loading in transformation-toughened zirconia ceramics is reviewed and compared to corresponding behavior under quasi-static loading (static fatigue). Current understanding of the role of transformation toughening in influencing cyclic fatigue-crack propagation behavior is examined based on studies which altered the extent of the tetragonal-to-monoclinic phase transformation in MG-PSZ through subeutectoid aging. These studies suggest that near-tip computations of the crack-driving force (in terms of the local stress intensity) can be used to predict crack-growth behavior under constant amplitude and variable-amplitude (spectrum) loading, using spatially resolved Raman spectroscopy to measure the extent of the transformation zones. In addition, results are reviewed which rationalize distinctions between the crack-growth behavior of preexisting, ``long`` (> 2 mm), through-thickness cracks and naturally-occurring, ``small`` (1 to 100 {mu}m), surface cracks in terms of variations in crack-tip shielding with crack size. In the present study, the effect of grain size variations on crack-growth behavior under both monotonic (R-curve) and cyclic fatigue loading are examined. Such observations are used to speculate on the mechanisms associated with cyclic crack advance, involving such processes as alternating shear via transformation-band formation, cyclic modification of the degree of transformation toughening, and uncracked-ligament (or grain) bridging.

  16. Fracture mechanics of propagating 3-D fatigue cracks with parametric dislocations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Akiyuki; Ghoniem, Nasr M.

    2013-07-01

    Propagation of 3-D fatigue cracks is analyzed using a discrete dislocation representation of the crack opening displacement. Three dimensional cracks are represented with Volterra dislocation loops in equilibrium with the applied external load. The stress intensity factor (SIF) is calculated using the Peach-Koehler (PK) force acting on the crack tip dislocation loop. Loading mode decomposition of the SIF is achieved by selection of Burgers vector components to correspond to each fracture mode in the PK force calculations. The interaction between 3-D cracks and free surfaces is taken into account through application of the superposition principle. A boundary integral solution of an elasticity problem in a finite domain is superposed onto the elastic field solution of the discrete dislocation method in an infinite medium. The numerical accuracy of the SIF is ascertained by comparison with known analytical solution of a 3-D crack problem in pure mode I, and for mixed-mode loading. Finally, fatigue crack growth simulations are performed with the Paris law, showing that 3-D cracks do not propagate in a self-similar shape, but they re-configure as a result of their interaction with external boundaries. A specific numerical example of fatigue crack growth is presented to demonstrate the utility of the developed method for studies of 3-D crack growth during fatigue.

  17. Crack initiation in smooth fatigue specimens of austenitic stainless steel in light water reactor environments.

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O. K.; Smith, J. L.

    1999-04-08

    The fatigue design curves for structural materials specified in Section III of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code are based on tests of smooth polished specimens at room temperature in air. The effects of light water reactor (LWR) coolant environments are not explicitly addressed by the Code design curves; however, recent test data illustrate the detrimental effects of LWR coolant environments on the fatigue resistance of austenitic stainless steels (SSs). Certain loading and environmental conditions have led to test specimen fatigue lives that are significantly shorter than those obtained in air. Results of fatigue tests that examine the influence of reactor environments on crack initiation and crack growth of austenitic SSs are presented. Block loading was used to mark the fracture surface to determine crack length as a function of fatigue cycles in water environments, Crack lengths were measured by scanning electron microscopy. The mechanism for decreased fatigue life in LWR environments is discussed, and crack growth rates in the smooth fatigue specimens are compared with existing data from studies of crack growth rates.

  18. The Fatigue Crack and Delamination Behavior on the Fuselage-Wing Intersection Containing Variable Notches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Sam Hong; Kim, Cheol Woong

    The delamination and the fatigue crack propagation behavior in aramid fiber reinforced metal laminates(AFRMLs) containing a saw-cut and circular hole such as the fuselage-wing intersection was investigated. The fatigue crack propagation in aluminum layer is accompanied with the delamination between aluminum layer and fiber layer. The delamination deteriorates the fiber bridging mechanism in the crack tip of AFRMLs. Therefore, this study evaluates the stress distribution of AFRMLs containing a saw-cut and circular hole using the Average Stress Criterion (ASC) model. The delamination zone was observed by ultrasonic C-scan images. As the result of this study, in case of AFRMLs containing a saw-cut specimen. the fatigue crack propagation always occurred in aluminum layer and the delamination zone formed along the fatigue crack. However, in case of AFRMLs containing a circular hole specimen, the delamination zone was formed in two types. First, delamination zone was formed along the fatigue crack in aluminum layer. Second, delamination zone was formed without any fatigue crack around the circular hole. Consequently, delamination zone was formed dependently on the notch shape and the stress distribution.

  19. Stress-induced martensitic transformation in metastable austenitic stainless steels: Effect on fatigue crack growth rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Z.; Ahmed, M.

    1996-04-01

    This paper addresses the influence of cyclic stress-induced martensitic transformation on fatigue crack growth rates in metastable austenitic stainless steels. At low applied stress and mean stress values in AISI type 301 stainless steel, fatigue crack growth rate is substantially retarded due to a cyclic stress-induced γ-α' and γ-ɛ martensitic transformation occurring at the crack-tip plastic zone. It is suggested that the transformation products produce a compressive residual stress at the tip of the fatigue crack, which essentially lowers the effective stress intensity and hence retards the fatigue crack growth rate. At high applied stress or mean stress values, fatigue crack growth rates in AISI type 301 steels become almost equal to those of stable AISI type 302 alloy. As the amount of transformed products increases (with an increase in applied or mean stress), the strain-hardening effect brought about by the transformed martensite phase appears to accelerate fatigue crack growth, offsetting the contribution from the compressive residual stress produced by the positive volume change of γ → α' or ɛ transformation.

  20. Method for testing shell materials for fatigue crack resistance under biaxial bending

    SciTech Connect

    Esiev, T.S.; Basiev, K.D.; Steklov, O.I. |

    1995-10-01

    A method for testing shell materials for fatigue crack resistance is proposed. A stressed state typically occurring in shells is simulated on a specimen with a surface notch by subjecting it to biaxial surface tension. The time of fatigue crack generation or the crack propagation rate is used to evaluate the crack resistance of a material. Cross-shaped test specimens cut out of a real shell had a size and a loading scheme that made it possible to vary the biaxial stress ratio over the range of 0.5 {<=} {lambda} {<=} 1.

  1. Development of detection technique for fatigue crack due to thermal stratification phenomena in RCS piping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sam Lai; Kim, Byoung Chul; Lim, Hyung Taik; Park, Chi Sung; Lee, Jong Po; Chang, Kee Ok

    1993-01-01

    Area highly vulnerable to crack generation has been chosen by calculating the stress and deformation using computer program ANSYS considering thermal stratification phenomena, and for weld area, stress distribution has been investigated in order to perform the intensive ISI. The manufacturing of specimens with inside natural cracks has been done and basic procedure to manufacture mechanical fatigue crack by implanting fatigue cracked specimen into parent metal has been set up. This is a distribution that meets the requirement of ASME code Sec.XI, App.VII and VIII (1989 edition).

  2. Constant amplitude and post-overload fatigue crack growth behavior in PM aluminum alloy AA 8009

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, A. P.

    1991-01-01

    A recently developed, rapidly solidified, powder metallurgy, dispersion strengthened aluminum alloy, AA 8009, was fatigue tested at room temperature in lab air. Constant amplitude/constant delta kappa and single spike overload conditions were examined. High fatigue crack growth rates and low crack closure levels compared to typical ingot metallurgy aluminum alloys were observed. It was proposed that minimal crack roughness, crack path deflection, and limited slip reversibility, resulting from ultra-fine microstructure, were responsible for the relatively poor da/dN-delta kappa performance of AA 8009 as compared to that of typical IM aluminum alloys.

  3. Constant amplitude and post-overload fatigue crack growth behavior in PM aluminum alloy AA 8009

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, A. P.

    1992-01-01

    A recently developed, rapidly solidified, powder metallurgy, dispersion strengthened aluminum alloy, AA 8009, was fatigue tested at room temperature in lab air. Constant amplitude/constant delta kappa and single spike overload conditions were examined. High fatigue crack growth rates and low crack closure levels compared to typical ingot metallurgy aluminum alloys were observed. It was proposed that minimal crack roughness, crack path delection, and limited slip reversibility, resulting from ultra-fine microstructure, were responsible for the relatively poor da/dN-delta kappa performance of AA 8009 as compared to that of typical IM aluminum alloys.

  4. Fatigue-crack propagation behavior in the shape-memory and superelastic alloy nitinol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKelvey, Aindrea Leigh

    This dissertation presents a detailed study on the fatigue-crack propagation behavior in 50Ni-50Ti (at. %), and the effect of a stress-induced martensitic transformation on the material's crack-growth resistance. Furthermore, the effect of environment on crack-growth rates was also investigated. Specifically, fatigue-crack growth was characterized in stable austenite (120°C), superelastic austenite (37°C), and martensite (-65°C and -196°C). In general, as the temperature decreased the fatigue-crack growth resistance increased, where the fatigue threshold was greater and crack-growth rates slower in martensite compared to stable austenite and superelastic austenite. It was found that plane-strain superelastic austenite fatigue specimens did not transform to martensite near the crack tip. The stress-induced transformation was prevented by the existence of the tensile hydrostatic stress-state near the crack tip in fatigue specimens. Plane stress samples, however, did undergo the stress-induced martensitic transformation, as the tensile hydrostatic stress-state was reduced in thinner samples. Fatigue-crack growth rates in Nitinol at a frequency of 10 Hz were found to be essentially identical in air, aerated deionized water, and aerated Hank's solution (a simulated physiological environment), suggesting that at this frequency, any environmentally-assisted contributions to crack growth are minimal. Specifically, the threshold for the onset of fatigue-crack growth was equal to ˜2 MPa√m for all three environments. Furthermore, the slopes of the mid-growth regime were also similar and equal to ˜3; the maximum applied stress-intensity range at instability prior to failure was 30 MPa√m for all three environments. However, when compared to other biomedical implant alloys, the fatigue-crack growth resistance of Nitinol was the lowest. Specifically, the fatigue threshold, at a fixed load ratio value of ˜0.1, was significantly less (by a factor between 2 and 5) than

  5. The effect of initiation feature and environment on fatigue crack formation and early propagation in aluminum zinc magnesium copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, James T.

    The current research provides insight into fatigue crack formation and progression in the poorly understood size regime that bridges safe-life and damage tolerance approaches; particular attention is given to the influences of corrosion-induced degradation and time-cycle dependent loading environment effects. Quantitative analysis of crack formation life (Ni), microstructurally small crack (<500 microm) propagation kinetics (da/dN), and the effect of cold loading environment provide the means to validate mechanism-based modeling. Both pristine and corroded (L-S surface) 7075-T651 specimens were fatigued at 23°C, -50°C and -90°C under various applied stresses. Microscopy of programmed loading-induced crack surface marks produced an unparalleled Ni and small crack da/dN database. Results show that fatigue crack formation involves a complex interaction of elastic stress concentration, due to a 3-dimensional macro-pit, coupled with local micro-feature (and constituent) induced plastic strain concentration. Such interactions cause high Ni variability, but, from an engineering perspective, a broadly corroded surface should contain an extreme group of features driving Ni to ˜0. At low-applied stresses, Ni consumes a significant portion of total life, which is well predicted by coupling elastic-plastic FEA with empirical low-cycle fatigue life models. All pristine and corroded da/dN were uniquely correlated using complex continuum stress intensity (K) and crack opening solutions which account for the stress concentrating formation feature. Multiple crack growth regimes were observed, typical of environment enhanced fatigue in Al alloys. Such behavior is not captured by prominent mechanics-based small crack models. Furthermore, neither local closure nor slip-based models captured the order of magnitude variability in da/dN attributed to microstructure. Low temperature loading produces an order of magnitude increase in Ni, and even larger reduction in da/dN, due to

  6. Fatigue crack growth spectrum simplification: Facilitation of on-board damage prognosis systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adler, Matthew Adam

    2009-12-01

    Better lifetime predictions of systems subjected to fatigue loading are needed in support of the optimization of the costs of life-cycle engineering. In particular, the climate is especially encouraging for the development of safer aircraft. One issue is that aircraft experience complex fatigue loading and current methods for the prediction of fatigue damage accumulation rely on intensive computational tools that are not currently carried onboard during flight. These tools rely on complex models that are made more difficult by the complicated load spectra themselves. This presents an overhead burden as offline analysis must be performed at an offsite facility. This architecture is thus unable to provide online, timely information for on-board use. The direct objective of this research was to facilitate the real-time fatigue damage assessments of on-board systems with a particular emphasis on aging aircraft. To achieve the objective, the goal of this research was to simplify flight spectra. Variable-amplitude spectra, in which the load changes on a cycle-by-cycle basis, cannot readily be supported by an onboard system because the models required to predict fatigue crack growth during variable-amplitude loading are too complicated. They are too complicated because variable-amplitude fatigue crack growth analysis must be performed on a cycle-by-cycle basis as no closed-form solution exists. This makes these calculations too time-consuming and requires impractical, heavy onboard systems or offsite facilities. The hypothesis is to replace a variable-amplitude spectrum with an equivalent constant-amplitude spectrum. The advantage is a dramatic reduction in the complexity of the problem so that damage predictions can be made onboard by simple, fast calculations in real-time without the need to add additional weight to the aircraft. The intent is to reduce the computational burden and facilitate on-board projection of damage evolution and prediction for the accurate

  7. Analysis of fatigue, fatique-crack propagation, and fracture data. [design of metallic aerospace structural components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaske, C. E.; Feddersen, C. E.; Davies, K. B.; Rice, R. C.

    1973-01-01

    Analytical methods have been developed for consolidation of fatigue, fatigue-crack propagation, and fracture data for use in design of metallic aerospace structural components. To evaluate these methods, a comprehensive file of data on 2024 and 7075 aluminums, Ti-6A1-4V, and 300M and D6Ac steels was established. Data were obtained from both published literature and unpublished reports furnished by aerospace companies. Fatigue and fatigue-crack-propagation analyses were restricted to information obtained from constant-amplitude load or strain cycling of specimens in air at room temperature. Fracture toughness data were from tests of center-cracked tension panels, part-through crack specimens, and compact-tension specimens.

  8. Influence of environment on the fatigue crack growth behaviour of 12% Cr steel.

    PubMed

    Schönbauer, Bernd M; Stanzl-Tschegg, Stefanie E

    2013-12-01

    In the present work, the influence of different environments on the fatigue crack growth behaviour of 12% Cr steam turbine blade steel is investigated. Fatigue crack growth rates (FCGRs) in the near threshold regime are measured with ultrasonic fatigue testing technique. Fatigue tests are performed in vacuum, air and different aqueous environments with defined chloride and oxygen content. Furthermore, the influence of different stress ratios is investigated. It is found that crack propagation is not necessarily enhanced with increasing corrosiveness. In the aqueous environments, the FCGRs below 10⁻⁸ m/cycle are lower than in air. The threshold stress intensity factor ranges are higher or equal. Observation of the fracture surfaces shows oxide formation and partly intergranular fracture for specimens tested in aqueous environments. Crack closure effects seem to be responsible for this unexpected behaviour. PMID:23490013

  9. Fracture resistance and fatigue crack growth characteristics of two Al-Cu-Mg-Zr alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarkar, Bhaskar; Lisagor, W. B.

    1992-01-01

    The dependence of strength, fracture resistance, and fatigue crack growth rate on the aging conditions of two alloy compositions based on Al-3.7Cu-1.85Mg-0.2Mn is investigated. Mechanical properties were evaluated in two heat treatment conditions and in two orientations (longitudinal and transverse). Compact tension specimens were used to determine fatigue crack growth characteristics and fracture resistance. The aging response was monitored on coupons using hardness measurements determined with a standard Rockwell hardness tester. Fracture resistance is found to increase with increasing yield strength during artificial aging of age-hardenable 2124-Zr alloys processed by powder metallurgy techniques. Fatigue crack growth rate increases with increasing strength. It is argued that these changes are related to deformation modes of the alloys; a homogeneous deformation mode tends to increase fracture resistance and to decrease the resistance to the fatigue crack propagation rate.

  10. A SMALL-SCALE DAMAGE APPROACH TO PREDICT FATIGUE CRACK GROWTH IN CERAMIC MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Koeppel, Brian J.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2006-05-19

    This paper proposes a small-scale damage modeling approach to predict fatigue crack growth in ceramic materials. A fatigue damage model is formulated that uses two variables. One variable is the scalar damage variable governing the reduction of stiffness, and the other is the number of cycles. The damage evolution law is obtained based on thermodynamics of continuous media and a damage criterion containing a damage threshold function that depends on the damage variable and the cyclic loading parameters. The model has been implemented into the ABAQUS finite element code via user-subroutines and has been used in a modified boundary layer (MBL) modeling approach to analyze fatigue crack growth in a small fracture process zone situated at an initial crack tip. The model application is illustrated through an analysis of fatigue crack growth in an yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia material.

  11. Interlaminar crack growth in fiber reinforced composites during fatigue, part 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, S. S.; Wang, H. T.

    1981-01-01

    Interlaminar crack growth behavior in fiber-reinforced composites subjected to fatigue loading was investigated experimentally and theoretically. In the experimental phase, inter-laminar crack propagation rates and mechanisms were determined for the cases of various geometries, laminate parameters and cyclic stress levels. A singular hybrid-stress finite element method was used in conjuction with the experimental results to examine the local crack-tip behavior and to characterize the crack propagation during fatigue. Results elucidate the basic nature of the cyclic delamination damage, and relate the interlaminar crack growth rate to the range of mixed-mode crack-tip stress intensity factors. The results show that crack growth rates are directly related to the range of the mixed-mode cyclic stress intensity factors by a power law relationship.

  12. Ultrasonic Characterization of Fatigue Cracks in Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L.; Watson, Jason; Johnson, Devin; Walker, James; Russell, Sam; Thom, Robert (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Microcracking in composite structures due to combined fatigue and cryogenic loading can cause leakage and failure of the structure and can be difficult to detect in-service. In aerospace systems, these leaks may lead to loss of pressure/propellant, increased risk of explosion and possible cryo-pumping. The success of nondestructive evaluation to detect intra-ply microcracking in unlined pressure vessels fabricated from composite materials is critical to the use of composite structures in future space systems. The work presented herein characterizes measurements of intraply fatigue cracking through the thickness of laminated composite material by means of correlation with ultrasonic resonance. Resonant ultrasound spectroscopy provides measurements which are sensitive to both the microscopic and macroscopic properties of the test article. Elastic moduli, acoustic attenuation, and geometry can all be probed. The approach is based on the premise of half-wavelength resonance. The method injects a broadband ultrasonic wave into the test structure using a swept frequency technique. This method provides dramatically increased energy input into the test article, as compared to conventional pulsed ultrasonics. This relative energy increase improves the ability to measure finer details in the materials characterization, such as microcracking and porosity. As the microcrack density increases, more interactions occur with the higher frequency (small wavelength) components of the signal train causing the spectrum to shift toward lower frequencies. Several methods are under investigation to correlate the degree of microcracking from resonance ultrasound measurements on composite test articles including self organizing neural networks, chemometric techniques used in optical spectroscopy and other clustering algorithms.

  13. Fatigue Crack Growth Rate of Inconel 718 Sheet at Cryogenic Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wells, Douglas; Wright, Jonathan; Hastings, Keith

    2005-01-01

    Inconel 718 sheet material was tested to determine fatigue crack growth rate (FCGR) at cryogenic conditions representative of a liquid hydrogen (LH2) environment at -423 degree F. Tests utilized M(T) and ESE(T) specimen geometries and environments were either cold gaseous helium or submersion in LH2. The test results support a significant improvement in the fatigue crack growth threshold at -423 degree F compared to -320 degree F or 70 degree F.

  14. Acoustic Emission Technique for Characterizing Deformation and Fatigue Crack Growth in Austenitic Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raj, Baldev; Mukhopadhyay, C. K.; Jayakumar, T.

    2003-03-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) during tensile deformation and fatigue crack growth (FCG) of austenitic stainless steels has been studied. In AISI type 316 stainless steel (SS), AE has been used to detect micro plastic yielding occurring during macroscopic plastic deformation. In AISI type 304 SS, relation of AE with stress intensity factor and plastic zone size has been studied. In AISI type 316 SS, fatigue crack growth has been characterised using acoustic emission.

  15. Fatigue flaw growth and NDI evaluation for preventing through cracks in spacecraft tankage structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pettit, D. E.; Hoeppner, D. W.

    1972-01-01

    A program was conducted to determine the fatigue-crack propagation behavior of parent and welded 2219-T87 aluminum alloy sheet under controlled cyclic stress conditions in room temperature air and 300 F air. Specimens possessing an initial surface defect of controlled dimensions were cycled under constant load amplitude until the propagating fatigue crack penetrated the back surface of the specimen. A series of precracked specimens were prepared to determine optimum penetrant, X-ray, ultrasonic, and eddy current nondestructive inspection procedures.

  16. The development of detection technique for fatigue crack due to thermal stratification phenomena in RCS piping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sam Lai; Kim, Byoung Chul; Lim, Hyung Taik; Lee, Jong Po; Chang, Kee Ok

    1992-01-01

    Piping stress analysis was performed using computer code ANSYS in order to find the stress profile considering thermal stratification phenomena. This kind of analysis can be a useful tool to assist inspection engineers to choose the right method and area of inspection during in-service inspection of nuclear power plants. Mechanical fatigue cracks were generated in order to improve detection reliability of defect ultrasonically since the defects that were searched for are mostly related to fatigue cracks in pressurized water reactors.

  17. The application of acoustic emission technique to fatigue crack measurement. [in aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J.; Davis, W. T.; Crews, J. H., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    The applicability of acoustic emission technique to measure fatigue cracks in aluminum alloy specimens was investigated. There are several variables, such as the metallurgical and the physical treatment of the specimen, that can affect the level of acoustic activity of a fatigue specimen. It is therefore recommended that the acoustic emission technique be supplemented by other nondestructive evaluation methods to obtain quantitative data on crack growth.

  18. Effect of Microstructure on the Fatigue Crack Propagation Behavior of TC4-DT Titanium Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Ping; Zhao, Yongqing; Zeng, Weidong; Liu, Jianglin

    2015-05-01

    This paper focused on the fatigue crack growth behavior of TC4-DT titanium alloy with different microstructures. Heat treatments were performed to produce different microstructures, which varied in α lamella width and cluster size. The fatigue crack propagation route was observed for different microstructures. The deformation characteristic of the crack tip plastic zone was analyzed. The results demonstrated that, for adequate mechanical properties of the alloy, the microstructure formed after performing two treatments (first, air cooling from the β-phase field, and then annealing at 550 °C for 4 h) exhibited a better fatigue anti-crack propagation ability. This result was related to the existing higher plastic deformation field in the crack tip. Wide α lamellae and coarse α colonies were found to contribute to the improvement of the fracture toughness.

  19. Modal analysis for characterization of fatigue cracks in thin metal plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincheski, B.; Namkung, M.

    1991-01-01

    Detailed experimental investigation and numerical analysis were performed on the characterization of fatigue cracks in thin aluminum alloys by a low frequency resonant modal analysis technique. The resonance frequency of plate modes is altered by the presence of fatigue cracks. This frequency shift was analyzed using a finite element approach and the results were compared to experimental data. Acoustic sensors were used to detect the fatigue cracks which were stimulated by standing waves in 0.1 cm aluminum alloy plates. The response of several different sensors to the crack noise was studied, as was the response at higher order modes. It was found that critical crack information can be obtained from the amplitude and phase of the emitted signal with respect to that of the external driving force.

  20. Fatigue crack growth study of SCS6/Ti-15-3 composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kantzos, Peter; Telesman, Jack

    1989-01-01

    A study was performed to determine the fatigue crack growth (FCG) behavior and the associated fatigue damage processes in a (0)(8) and (90)(8) oriented SCS(6)/Ti-15-3 composite. Companion testing (CT) was also done on identically processed Ti-15-3 unreinforced material. The active fatigue crack growth failure processes were very similar for both composite orientations tested. For both orientations, fatigue crack growth was along the fiber direction. It was found that the composite constituent most susceptible to fatigue damage was the interface region and in particular the carbon coating surrounding the fiber. The failure of the interface region lead to crack initiation and also strongly influenced the FCG behavior in this composite. The failure of the interface region was apparently driven by normal stresses perpendicular to the fiber direction. The FCG rates were considerably higher for the (90)(8) oriented CT specimens in comparison to the unreinforced material. This is consistent with the scenario in which the interface has lower fatigue resistance than the matrix, causing lower composite fatigue resistance. The FCG rates of the (0)(8) composite could not be directly compared to the (90)(8) composite but were shown to increase with an increase in the crack length.

  1. Observations of fatigue crack initiation and damage growth in notched titanium matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naik, Rajiv A.; Johnson, W. S.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose was to characterize damage initiation and growth in notched titanium matrix composites at room temperature. Double edge notched or center open hole SCS-6/Ti-15-3 specimens containing 0 deg plies or containing both 0 and 90 deg plies were fatigued. The specimens were tested in the as-fabricated (ASF) and in heat-treated conditions. A local strain criterion using unnotched specimen fatigue data was successful in predicting fatigue damage initiation. The initiation stress level was accurately predicted for both a double edge notched unidirectional specimen and a cross-plied center hole specimen. The fatigue produced long multiple cracks growing from the notches. These fatigue cracks were only in the matrix material and did not break the fibers in their path. The combination of matrix cracking and fiber/matrix debonding appears to greatly reduce the stress concentration around the notches. The laminates that were heat treated showed a different crack growth pattern. In the ASF specimens, matrix cracks had a more tortuous path and showed considerable more crack branching. For the same specimen geometry and cyclic stress, the (0/90/0) laminate with a hole had far superior fatigue resistance than the matrix only specimen with a hole.

  2. Observations of fatigue crack initiation and damage growth in notched titanium matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naik, R. A.; Johnson, W. S.

    1990-01-01

    The purpose was to characterize damage initiation and growth in notched titanium matrix composites at room temperature. Double edge notched or center open hole SCS-6/Ti-15-3 specimens containing 0 deg plies or containing both 0 and 90 deg plies were fatigued. The specimens were tested in the as-fabricated (ASF) and in heat-treated conditions. A local strain criterion using unnotched specimen fatigue data was successful in predicting fatigue damage initiation. The initiation stress level was accurately predicted for both a double edge notched unidirectional specimen and a cross-plied center hole specimen. The fatigue produced long multiple cracks growing from the notches. These fatigue cracks were only in the matrix material and did not break the fibers in their path. The combination of matrix cracking and fiber/matrix debonding appears to greatly reduce the stress concentration around the notches. The laminates that were heat treated showed a different crack growth pattern. In the ASF specimens, matrix cracks had a more tortuous path and showed considerable more crack branching. For the same specimen geometry and cyclic stress, the (0/90/0) laminate with a hole had far superior fatigue resistance than the matrix only specimen with a hole.

  3. Crack bridging by uncracked ligaments during fatigue-crack growth in SiC-reinforced aluminum-alloy composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Jian Ku; Ritchie, R. O.

    1989-05-01

    Micro-mechanisms of crack-tip shielding associated with the growth of fatigue cracks in metalmatrix composites are examined with specific emphasis on the role of crack bridging by uncracked ligaments. Simple analytical models are developed for such bridging induced by both overlapping cracks and by coplanar ligaments in the wake of the crack tip; the models are based on respective notions of a critical tensile strain or critical crack-opening displacement in the ligament. The predicted degree of shielding derived from these mechanisms is not large, but is found to be consistent with experimental observations in high-strength P/M aluminum alloys reinforced with 15 to 20 vol pct of SiC particulate.

  4. The effect of material heterogeneity and random loading on the mechanics of fatigue crack growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivatsan, T. S.; Sambandham, M.; Bharucha-Reid, A. T.

    1985-01-01

    This paper reviews experimental work on the influence of variable amplitude or random loads on the mechanics and micromechanisms of fatigue crack growth. Implications are discussed in terms of the crack driving force, local plasticity, crack closure, crack blunting, and microstructure. Due to heterogeneity in the material's microstructure, the crack growth rate varies with crack tip position. Using the weakest link theory, an expression for crack growth rate is obtained as the expectation of a random variable. This expression is used to predict the crack growth rates for aluminum alloys, a titanium alloy, and a nickel steel in the mid-range region. It is observed, using the present theory, that the crack growth rate obeys the power law for small stress intensity factor range, and that the power is a function of a material constant.

  5. Fatigue of polycrystalline silicon for MEMS applications: Crack growth and stability under resonant loading conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Muhlstein, C.L.; Howe, R.T.; Ritchie, R.O.

    2001-12-05

    Although bulk silicon is not known to exhibit susceptibility to cyclic fatigue, micron-scale structures made from silicon films are known to be vulnerable to degradation by fatigue in ambient air environments, a phenomenon that has been recently modeled in terms of a mechanism of sequential oxidation and stress-corrosion cracking of the native oxide layer.

  6. Fatigue life until small cracks in aircraft structures: Durability and damage tolerance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schijve, J.

    1994-01-01

    Crack initiation in notched elements occurs very early in the fatigue life. This is also true for riveted lap joints, an important fatigue critical element of a pressurized fuselage structure. Crack nucleation in a riveted lap joint can occur at different locations, depending on the riveting operation. It can occur at the edge of the rivet hole, at a small distance away from the hole, but still with subsequent crack growth through the hole, and ahead of the hole with a crack no longer passing through the hole. Moreover, crack nucleation can occur in the top row at the countersunk holes (outer sheet) or in the bottom row at the non-countersunk holes. Fractographic evidence is shown. The initial growth of the small cracks occurs as an (invisible) part through crack. As a consequence, predictions on the crack initiation life are problematic. After a though crack is present, the major part of the fatigue life has been consumed. There is still an apparent lack of empirical data on crack growth and residual strength of riveted lap joints, five years after the Aloha accident. Such data are very much necessary for further developments of prediction models. Some test results are presented.

  7. Three-dimensional observations of magnetic flux density around fatigue crack tips of bearing steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kida, Katsuyuki; Santos, Edson C.; Honda, Takashi; Tanabe, Hirotaka

    2009-12-01

    Fatigue failure of steel occurs when small cracks form in a component and then continue to grow to a size large enough to cause failure. In order to understand the strength of steel components it is important to find these cracks. However, at present, it is not easy to distinguish the cracks that will grow fast and cause failure. We developed a three-dimensional scanning Hall probe microscope (3D-SHPM) and observed fatigue cracks at room temperature while they were growing. Four-point-bending fatigue tests were carried out using pre-cracked specimens (JIS-SUJ2, bearing steel). We observed the two-dimensional magnetic flux density distributions around the crack tips and found that there is a strong correlation between the changes in the magnetic flux densities and the crack growth. In order to understand this, we looked into all the three components of the magnetic flux densities, and found that they shape an arched bridge around a crack. We also found that the magnetic flux density moves in front of the crack tip along the crack growth direction.

  8. Three-dimensional observations of magnetic flux density around fatigue crack tips of bearing steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kida, Katsuyuki; Santos, Edson C.; Honda, Takashi; Tanabe, Hirotaka

    2010-03-01

    Fatigue failure of steel occurs when small cracks form in a component and then continue to grow to a size large enough to cause failure. In order to understand the strength of steel components it is important to find these cracks. However, at present, it is not easy to distinguish the cracks that will grow fast and cause failure. We developed a three-dimensional scanning Hall probe microscope (3D-SHPM) and observed fatigue cracks at room temperature while they were growing. Four-point-bending fatigue tests were carried out using pre-cracked specimens (JIS-SUJ2, bearing steel). We observed the two-dimensional magnetic flux density distributions around the crack tips and found that there is a strong correlation between the changes in the magnetic flux densities and the crack growth. In order to understand this, we looked into all the three components of the magnetic flux densities, and found that they shape an arched bridge around a crack. We also found that the magnetic flux density moves in front of the crack tip along the crack growth direction.

  9. High Speed Research Program Sonic Fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizzi, Stephen A. (Technical Monitor); Beier, Theodor H.; Heaton, Paul

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this sonic fatigue summary is to provide major findings and technical results of studies, initiated in 1994, to assess sonic fatigue behavior of structure that is being considered for the High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT). High Speed Research (HSR) program objectives in the area of sonic fatigue were to predict inlet, exhaust and boundary layer acoustic loads; measure high cycle fatigue data for materials developed during the HSR program; develop advanced sonic fatigue calculation methods to reduce required conservatism in airframe designs; develop damping techniques for sonic fatigue reduction where weight effective; develop wing and fuselage sonic fatigue design requirements; and perform sonic fatigue analyses on HSCT structural concepts to provide guidance to design teams. All goals were partially achieved, but none were completed due to the premature conclusion of the HSR program. A summary of major program findings and recommendations for continued effort are included in the report.

  10. Sensing sheets based on large area electronics for fatigue crack detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yao; Glisic, Branko

    2015-03-01

    Reliable early-stage damage detection requires continuous structural health monitoring (SHM) over large areas of structure, and with high spatial resolution of sensors. This paper presents the development stage of prototype strain sensing sheets based on Large Area Electronics (LAE), in which thin-film strain gauges and control circuits are integrated on the flexible electronics and deposited on a polyimide sheet that can cover large areas. These sensing sheets were applied for fatigue crack detection on small-scale steel plates. Two types of sensing-sheet interconnects were designed and manufactured, and dense arrays of strain gauge sensors were assembled onto the interconnects. In total, four (two for each design type) strain sensing sheets were created and tested, which were sensitive to strain at virtually every point over the whole sensing sheet area. The sensing sheets were bonded to small-scale steel plates, which had a notch on the boundary so that fatigue cracks could be generated under cyclic loading. The fatigue tests were carried out at the Carleton Laboratory of Columbia University, and the steel plates were attached through a fixture to the loading machine that applied cyclic fatigue load. Fatigue cracks then occurred and propagated across the steel plates, leading to the failure of these test samples. The strain sensor that was close to the notch successfully detected the initialization of fatigue crack and localized the damage on the plate. The strain sensor that was away from the crack successfully detected the propagation of fatigue crack based on the time history of measured strain. Overall, the results of the fatigue tests validated general principles of the strain sensing sheets for crack detection.

  11. Experimental study of crack initiation and propagation in high- and gigacycle fatigue in titanium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Bannikov, Mikhail E-mail: oborin@icmm.ru Oborin, Vladimir E-mail: oborin@icmm.ru Naimark, Oleg E-mail: oborin@icmm.ru

    2014-11-14

    Fatigue (high- and gigacycle) crack initiation and its propagation in titanium alloys with coarse and fine grain structure are studied by fractography analysis of fracture surface. Fractured specimens were analyzed by interferometer microscope and SEM to improve methods of monitoring of damage accumulation during fatigue test and to verify the models for fatigue crack kinetics. Fatigue strength was estimated for high cycle fatigue regime using the Luong method [1] by “in-situ” infrared scanning of the sample surface for the step-wise loading history for different grain size metals. Fine grain alloys demonstrated higher fatigue resistance for both high cycle fatigue and gigacycle fatigue regimes. Fracture surface analysis for plane and cylindrical samples was carried out using optical and electronic microscopy method. High resolution profilometry (interferometer-profiler New View 5010) data of fracture surface roughness allowed us to estimate scale invariance (the Hurst exponent) and to establish the existence of two characteristic areas of damage localization (different values of the Hurst exponent). Area 1 with diameter ∼300 μm has the pronounced roughness and is associated with damage localization hotspot. Area 2 shows less amplitude roughness, occupies the rest fracture surface and considered as the trace of the fatigue crack path corresponding to the Paris kinetics.

  12. Intrinsic fatigue crack growth rates for Al-Li-Cu-Mg alloys in vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Slavik, D.C.; Gangloff, R.P.; Starke, E.A. Jr ); Blankenship, C.P. Jr )

    1993-08-01

    The influences of microstructure and deformation mode on inert environment intrinsic fatigue crack propagation were investigated for Al-Li-Cu-Mg alloys AA2090, AA8090, and X2095 compared to AA2024. The amount of coherent shearable [delta][prime] (Al[sub 3]Li) precipitates and extent of localized planar slip deformation were reduced by composition (increased Cu/Li in X2095) and heat treatment (double aging of AA8090). Intrinsic growth rates, obtained at high constant K[sub max] to minimize crack closure and in vacuum to eliminate any environmental effect, were alloy dependent; da/dN varied up to tenfold based on applied [Delta]K or [Delta]K/E. When compared based on a crack tip cyclic strain or opening displacement parameter ([Delta]K/([sigma][sub ys]E)[sup 1/2]), growth rates were equivalent for alloys except X2095-T8 which exhibited unique fatigue crack growth resistance. Tortuous fatigue crack profiles and large fracture surface facets were observed for each Al-Li alloy independent of the precipitates present, particularly [sigma][prime], and the localized slip deformation structure. Reduced fatigue crack propagation rates for X2095 in vacuum are not explained by either residual crack closure or slip reversibility arguments; the origin of apparent slip band facets in a homogeneous slip alloy is unclear. Better understanding of crack tip damage accumulation and fracture surface facet crystallography is required for Al-Li alloys with varying slip localization.

  13. Environment enhanced fatigue crack propagation in metals: Inputs to fracture mechanics life prediction models. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Gangloff, R.P.; Kim, S.

    1993-09-01

    This report is a critical review of both environment-enhanced fatigue crack propagation data and the predictive capabilities of crack growth rate models. This information provides the necessary foundation for incorporating environmental effects in NASA FLAGRO and will better enable predictions of aerospace component fatigue lives. The review presents extensive literature data on stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue.' The linear elastic fracture mechanics approach, based on stress intensity range (Delta(K)) similitude with microscopic crack propagation threshold and growth rates, provides a basis for these data. Results are presented showing enhanced growth rates for gases (viz., H2 and H2O) and electrolytes (e.g. NaCl and H2O) in aerospace alloys including: C-Mn and heat treated alloy steels, aluminum alloys, nickel-based superalloys, and titanium alloys. Environment causes purely time-dependent accelerated fatigue crack growth above the monotonic load cracking threshold (KIEAC) and promotes cycle-time dependent cracking below (KIEAC). These phenomenon are discussed in terms of hydrogen embrittlement, dissolution, and film rupture crack tip damage mechanisms.

  14. The effect of temperature upon the fatigue crack propagation behavior of Alloy 625

    SciTech Connect

    James, L.A.

    1990-12-31

    Fatigue crack propagation of annealed Alloy 625 was studied in air at 24--649 C. Crack growth rates tend to increase with temperature. Two heats were studied; differences in behavior between them suggest a heat-to-heat variability. Characterization of stress ratio (R=K{sub min}/K{sub max}) effects was also done at 538 C.

  15. Holographic evaluation of fatigue cracks by a compressive stress (HYSTERESIS) technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freska, S. A.; Rummel, W. D.

    1974-01-01

    Holographic interferometry compares unknown field of optical waves with known one. Differences are displayed as interference bands or fringes. Technique was evaluated on fatigue-cracked 2219-T87 aluminum-alloy panels. Small cracks were detected when specimen was incrementally unloaded.

  16. Influence of cyclic to mean load ratio on creep/fatigue crack growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimopulos, V.; Nikbin, K. M.; Webster, G. A.

    1988-04-01

    Crack growth data under combined creep and fatigue loading conditions are presented on a nickel base superalloy and a brittle and ductile low alloy steel. The main variables that have been examined are minimum to maximum load ratio R and frequency. It is shown that at high frequencies transgranular fatigue failure dominates and at low frequencies time dependent mechanisms govern. Where fatigue processes control, it is demonstrated that crack growth/cycle can be described by the Paris law and that the influence of R ratio can be accounted for by crack closure caused by fracture surface roughness, oxidation, and creep and plastic strain developed at the crack tip. At the low frequencies where time dependent processes dominate, it is shown that crack growth can be characterized satisfactorily in terms of the creep fracture mechanics parameter C * using a model of crack extension based on ductility exhaustion in a creep damage zone at the crack tip. This model leads to enhanced resistance to creep/fatigue crack growth with increase in material creep ductility.

  17. Environment enhanced fatigue crack propagation in metals: Inputs to fracture mechanics life prediction models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangloff, Richard P.; Kim, Sang-Shik

    1993-01-01

    This report is a critical review of both environment-enhanced fatigue crack propagation data and the predictive capabilities of crack growth rate models. This information provides the necessary foundation for incorporating environmental effects in NASA FLAGRO and will better enable predictions of aerospace component fatigue lives. The review presents extensive literature data on 'stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue.' The linear elastic fracture mechanics approach, based on stress intensity range (Delta(K)) similitude with microscopic crack propagation threshold and growth rates, provides a basis for these data. Results are presented showing enhanced growth rates for gases (viz., H2 and H2O) and electrolytes (e.g. NaCl and H2O) in aerospace alloys including: C-Mn and heat treated alloy steels, aluminum alloys, nickel-based superalloys, and titanium alloys. Environment causes purely time-dependent accelerated fatigue crack growth above the monotonic load cracking threshold (KIEAC) and promotes cycle-time dependent cracking below (KIEAC). These phenomenon are discussed in terms of hydrogen embrittlement, dissolution, and film rupture crack tip damage mechanisms.

  18. Resolved shear stress intensity coefficient and fatigue crack growth in large crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, QI; Liu, Hao-Wen

    1988-01-01

    Fatigue crack growth in large grain Al alloy was studied. Fatigue crack growth is caused primarily by shear decohesion due to dislocation motion in the crack tip region. The crack paths in the large crystals are very irregular and zigzag. The crack planes are often inclined to the loading axis both in the inplane direction and the thickness direction. The stress intensity factors of such inclined cracks are approximated from the two dimensional finite element calculations. The plastic deformation in a large crystal is highly anisotropic, and dislocation motion in such crystals are driven by the resolved shear stress. The resolved shear stress intensity coefficient in a crack solid, RSSIC, is defined, and the coefficients for the slip systems at a crack tip are evaluated from the calculated stress intensity factors. The orientations of the crack planes are closely related to the slip planes with the high RSSIC values. If a single slip system has a much higher RSSIC than all the others, the crack will follow the slip plane, and the slip plane becomes the crack plane. If two or more slip systems have a high RSSIC, the crack plane is the result of the decohesion processes on these active slip planes.

  19. Detection of Fatigue Cracks at Rivets with Self-Nulling Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincheski, Buzz; Fulton, Jim; Nath, Shridhar; Namkung, Min

    1994-01-01

    A new eddy current probe developed at NASA Langley Research Center has been used to detect small cracks at rivets in aircraft lap splices [1]. The device has earlier been used to detect isolated fatigue cracks with a minimum detectable flaw size of roughly 1/2 to 1/3 the diameter of the probe [2]. The present work shows that the detectable flaw size for cracks originating at rivets can be greatly improved upon from that of isolated flaws. The use of a rotating probe method combined with spatial filtering has been used to detect 0.18 cm EDM notches, as measured from the rivet shank, with a 1.27 cm diameter probe and to detect flaws buried under the rivet head, down to a length of 0.076 cm, using a 0.32 cm diameter probe. The Self-Nulling Electromagnetic Flaw Detector induces a high density eddy current ring in the sample under test. A ferromagnetic flux focusing lens is incorporated such that in the absence of any inhomogeneities in the material under test only a minimal magnetic field will reach the interior of the probe. A magnetometer (pickup coil) located in the center of the probe therefore registers a null voltage in the absence of material defects. When a fatigue crack or other discontinuity is present in the test article the path of the eddy currents in the material is changed. The magnetic field associated with these eddy currents then enter into the interior of the probe, producing a large output voltage across the pickup coil leads. Further

  20. Modelling of fatigue crack growth in flat plate weldments and tubular welded joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glinka, Grzegorz; Lambert, S.

    1992-07-01

    Modeling of fatigue crack growth in T-butt plate weldments and tubular joints is discussed. Some of the available stress infinity factor solutions based on the finite element method and the weight function approach are analyzed. It is shown that simultaneous modeling of the fatigue growth of several multiple cracks provides a better simulation of crack shape development than do single crack models; single crack models may be unconservative. The results show that in the case of tubular joints it was necessary to supplement the methodology developed for plate weldments by an additional effect called 'load shedding'. It is believed that the load shedding effect arises due to varying boundary conditions caused by the growing crack.

  1. Morphological study of near threshold fatigue crack growth in a coarse grain aluminum alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maurer, Gerhard; Liu, H. W.

    1984-01-01

    Fatigue crack propagation in the near-threshold region has been studied in coarse grain Al 7029 alloy. Over eighty percent of the crack surfaces are planar areas parallel to either 100-oriented or 111-oriented planes. The 100-plane crack surfaces show 'pine tree' morphological features formed by slip on two sets of intersecting planes. The 111-plane crack surfaces were planar and shiny. They were formed primarily by slip on a single dominant 111-oriented slip plane with sparse and very light secondary slip markings. Crack growth rates were measured and correlated with Delta-K.

  2. Analyses of heterogeneous deformation and subsurface fatigue crack generation in alpha titanium alloy at low temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Umezawa, Osamu; Morita, Motoaki; Yuasa, Takayuki; Morooka, Satoshi; Ono, Yoshinori; Yuri, Tetsumi; Ogata, Toshio

    2014-01-27

    Subsurface crack initiation in high-cycle fatigue has been detected as (0001) transgranular facet in titanium alloys at low temperature. The discussion on the subsurface crack generation was reviewed. Analyses by neutron diffraction and full constraints model under tension mode as well as crystallographic identification of the facet were focused. The accumulated tensile stress along <0001> may be responsible to initial microcracking on (0001) and the crack opening.

  3. Some observations on loss of static strength due to fatigue cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Illg, Walter; Hardrath, Herbert F

    1955-01-01

    Static tensile tests were performed on simple notched specimens containing fatigue cracks. Four types of aluminum alloys were investigated: 2024-T3(formerly 24S-T3) and 7075-T6(formerly 75S-T6) in sheet form, and 2024-T4(formerly 24S-T4) and 7075-T6(formerly 75S-T6) in extruded form. The cracked specimens were tested statically under four conditions: unmodified and with reduced eccentricity of loading by three methods. Results of static tests on C-46 wings containing fatigue cracks are also reported.

  4. 7075-T6 and 2024-T351 Aluminum Alloy Fatigue Crack Growth Rate Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forth, Scott C.; Wright, Christopher W.; Johnston, William M., Jr.

    2005-01-01

    Experimental test procedures for the development of fatigue crack growth rate data has been standardized by the American Society for Testing and Materials. Over the past 30 years several gradual changes have been made to the standard without rigorous assessment of the affect these changes have on the precision or variability of the data generated. Therefore, the ASTM committee on fatigue crack growth has initiated an international round robin test program to assess the precision and variability of test results generated using the standard E647-00. Crack growth rate data presented in this report, in support of the ASTM roundrobin, shows excellent precision and repeatability.

  5. Fatigue crack growth in a unidirectional SCS-6/Ti-15-3 composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kantzos, Peter; Telesman, Jack; Ghosn, Louis

    1989-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to characterize and model the fatigue crack growth (FCG) behavior of a SCS-6/Ti-15-3 metal matrix composite. Part of the study was conducted using a fatigue loading stage mounted inside a scanning electron microscope (SEM). This unique facility allowed high magnification viewing of the composite fatigue processes and measurement of the near crack tip displacements. The unidirectional composite was tested in the (0)8 (i.e., longitudinal) and (90)8 (i.e., transverse) orientations. For comparison purposes unreinforced matrix material produced by the identical process as the reinforced material was also tested. The results of the study reveal that the fatigue crack growth behavior of the composite is a function of specimen geometry, fiber orientation and the interaction of local stress fields with the highly anisotropic composite. In the case of (0)8 oriented single edge notch (SEN) specimens and (90)8 oriented compact tension (CT) specimens, the crack growth was normal to the loading direction. However, for the (0)8 CT specimens the crack grew mostly parallel to the loading and the fiber direction. The unusual fatigue behavior of the (0)8 CT specimens was attributed to the specimen geometry and the associated high tensile bending stresses perpendicular to the fiber direction. These stresses resulted in preferential cracking in the weak interface region perpendicular to the fiber direction. The interface region, and in particular the carbon coating surrounding the fiber proved to be the composites weakest link. In the (0)8 SEN the crack growth was confined to the matrix leaving behind unbroken fibers which bridged the cracked surfaces. As the crack grew longer, more fibers bridged the crack resulting in a progressive decrease in the crack growth rates and eventual crack arrest. The actual near crack tip displacement measurements were used in a proposed formulation for a bridging-corrected effective crack driving force, delta K(sub eff

  6. The effects of pitting on fatigue crack nucleation in 7075-T6 aluminum alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, LI; Hoeppner, David W.

    1994-01-01

    A high-strength aluminum alloy, 7075-T6, was studied to quantitatively evaluate chemical pitting effects of its corrosion fatigue life. The study focused on pit nucleation, pit growth, and fatigue crack nucleation. Pitting corrosion fatigue experiments were conducted in 3.5 percent NaCl aqueous solution under constant amplitude sinusoidal loading at two frequencies, 5 and 20 Hz. Smooth and unnotched specimens were used in this investigation. A video recording system was developed to allow in situ observation of the surface changes of the specimens during testing. The results indicated that pitting corrosion considerably reduces the fatigue strength by accelerating fatigue crack nucleation. A metallographic examination was conducted on the specimens to evaluate the nature of corrosion pits. First, the actual shapes of the corrosion pits were evaluated by cross-sectioning the pits. Secondly, the relation between corrosion pits and microstructure was also investigated. Finally, the possibility of another corrosion mechanism that might be involved in pitting was explored in this investigation. The fractography of the tested specimens showed that corner corrosion pits were responsible for fatigue crack nucleation in the material due to the associated stress concentration. The pits exhibited variance of morphology. Fatigue life for the experimental conditions appeared to be strongly dependent on pitting kinetics and the crack nucleation stage.

  7. Residual stress effect on fatigue crack growth in thick wall cylinders

    SciTech Connect

    Kiciak, A.; Glinka, G.; Burns, D.J.

    1995-11-01

    Recently derived weight functions for a single, semi-elliptical, longitudinal crack in a thick wall cylinder with the diameter ratio D{sub 0}/D{sub i} = 2, have been used to analyze fatigue crack propagation in autofrettaged and non-autofrettaged, pressurized cylinders. Two levels of autofrettage, 30 and 60%, have been considered. The influences of the level of autofrettage, surface crack closure, and different sets of parameters of crack closure, and different sets of parameters of crack propagation relation have been investigated. The development of cracks has been compared to the experimental results. The results of analyses confirm beneficial influence of autofrettage. It has been shown that the discrepancies between the observed and calculated crack developments cannot be ascribed to the influence of surface crack closure. The comparison of the experiments and predictions unveils the need for an additional series of experiments.

  8. Factors Influencing Dwell Fatigue Cracking in Notches of Powder Metallurgy Superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabb, T. P.; Telesman, J.; Ghosn, L.; Garg, A.; Gayda, J.

    2011-01-01

    The influences of heat treatment and cyclic dwells on the notch fatigue resistance of powder metallurgy disk superalloys were investigated for low solvus high refractory (LSHR) and ME3 disk alloys. Disks were processed to produce material conditions with varied microstructures and associated mechanical properties. Notched specimens were first subjected to baseline dwell fatigue cycles having a dwell at maximum load, as well as tensile, stress relaxation, creep rupture, and dwell fatigue crack growth tests at 704 C. Several material heat treatments displayed a bimodal distribution of fatigue life with the lives varying by two orders-of-magnitude, while others had more consistent fatigue lives. This response was compared to other mechanical properties, in search of correlations. The wide scatter in baseline dwell fatigue life was observed only for material conditions resistant to stress relaxation. For selected materials and conditions, additional tests were then performed with the dwells shifted in part or in total to minimum tensile load. The tests performed with dwells at minimum load exhibited lower fatigue lives than max dwell tests, and also exhibited early crack initiation and a substantial increase in the number of initiation sites. These results could be explained in part by modeling evolution of peak stresses in the notch with continued dwell fatigue cycling. Fatigue-environment interactions were determined to limit life for the fatigue cycles with dwells.

  9. Fatigue crack growth rate of Ti-6Al-4V considering the effects of fracture toughness and crack closure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Junhong; Yang, Shuo; Lin, Jiewei

    2015-03-01

    Fatigue fracture is one of the main failure modes of Ti-6Al-4V alloy, fracture toughness and crack closure have strong effects on the fatigue crack growth(FCG) rate of Ti-6Al-4V alloy. The FCG rate of Ti-6Al-4V is investigated by using experimental and analytical methods. The effects of stress ratio, crack closure and fracture toughness on the FCG rate are studied and discussed. A modified prediction model of the FCG rate is proposed, and the relationship between the fracture toughness and the stress intensity factor(SIF) range is redefined by introducing a correcting coefficient. Notched plate fatigue tests (including the fracture toughness test and the FCG rate test) are conducted to investigate the influence of affecting factors on the FCG rate. Comparisons between the predicted results of the proposed model, the Paris model, the Walker model, the Sadananda model, and the experimental data show that the proposed model gives the best agreement with the test data particularly in the near-threshold region and the Paris region, and the corresponding calculated fatigue life is also accurate in the same regions. By considering the effects of fracture toughness and crack closure, the novel FCG rate prediction model not only improves the estimating accuracy, but also extends the adaptability of the FCG rate prediction model in engineering.

  10. Influence of retained austenite on short fatigue crack growth and wear resistance of case carburized steel

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, V.F. da; Canale, L.F.; Spinelli, D.P.; Bose-Filho, W.W.; Crnkovic, O.R.

    1999-10-01

    The influence of the amount of retained austenite on short fatigue crack growth and wear resistance in carburized SAE 8620 steel was studied in this article. Different amounts of retained austenite in the microstructure of the carburized case were obtained through different heat treatment routes applied after the carburizing process. The wear tests were carried out using pin on disk equipment. After every 200 turns the weight loss was registered. Four point bend fatigue tests were carried out at room temperature, using three different levels of stress and R = 0.1. Crack length versus number of cycles and crack growth rate versus mean crack length curves were analyzed. In both tests the results showed that the test pieces with higher levels of retained austenite in the carburized case exhibited longer fatigue life and better wear resistance.

  11. Effect of band-overload on fatigue crack growth rate of HSLA steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abhinay, S. V.; Tenduwe, Om Prakash; Kumar, Ajit; Dutta, K.; Verma, B. B.; Ray, P. K.

    2015-02-01

    Fatigue crack growth behavior is important parameter of structural materials. This parameters can be used to predict their life, service reliability and operational safety in different conditions. The material used in this investigation is an HSLA steel. In this investigation effect of single overload and band-overload on fatigue crack growth of same steel are studied using compact tension (CT) specimens under mode-I condition and R=0.3. It is observed that overload and band-overload applications resulted retardation on the fatigue crack growth rate in most of the cases. It is also noticed that maximum retardation took place on application of seven successive overload cycles. Application of ten and more overload cycles caused no crack growth retardation.

  12. Review of environmental effects on fatigue crack growth of austenitic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Shack, W.J.; Kassner, T.F.

    1994-05-01

    Fatigue and environmentally assisted cracking of piping, pressure vessel cladding, and core components in light water reactors are potential concerns to the nuclear industry and regulatory agencies. The degradation processes include intergranular stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steel (SS) piping in boiling water reactors (BWRs), and propagation of fatigue or stress corrosion cracks (which initiate in sensitized SS cladding) into low-alloy ferritic steels in BWR pressure vessels. Crack growth data for wrought and cast austenitic SSs in simulated BWR water, developed at Argonne National Laboratory under US Nuclear Regulatory Commission sponsorship over the past 10 years, have been compiled into a data base along with similar data obtained from the open literature. The data were analyzed to develop corrosion-fatigue curves for austenitic SSs in aqueous environments corresponding to normal BWR water chemistries, for BWRs that add hydrogen to the feedwater, and for pressurized water reactor primary-system-coolant chemistry.

  13. Quality Factor and Microslipping of Fatigue Cracks in Thin Plates at Resonant Vibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincheski, B.; Namkung, M.; Fulton, J. P.

    1993-01-01

    Resonant vibrations have been stimulated in thin metal plates using a non-contacting electromagnetic driver. A sinusoidal force was applied in a swept frequency fashion and the resulting surface displacements were monitored through the use of an acoustic microphone. It has been found that the presence of a fatigue crack in the sample causes a broadening of the second resonance peak. The Q factors of the resonance curves were determined and are directly correlated with the presence of fatigue cracks in the samples. The broadening of the curves is explained in terms of a microslipping at the crack face walls which reduces the amplitude of the resonant vibration by increasing the damping of the system. A comparison is made between the resonance characteristics of fatigue damaged and notched samples, where the stiffness of the two systems is nearly constant while the interaction between crack face walls is eliminated in the latter.

  14. Microstructural Influences on Very-High-Cycle Fatigue-Crack Initiation in Ti-6246

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szczepanski, C. J.; Jha, S. K.; Larsen, J. M.; Jones, J. W.

    2008-12-01

    The fatigue behavior of an alpha + beta titanium alloy, Ti-6Al-2Sn-4Zr-6Mo, has been characterized in the very-high-cycle fatigue (VHCF) regime using ultrasonic-fatigue (20 kHz) techniques. Stress levels ( σ max) of 40 to 60 pct of the yield strength of this alloy have been examined. Fatigue lifetimes in the range of 106 to 109 cycles are observed, and fatigue cracks initiate from both surface and subsurface sites. This study examines the mechanisms of fatigue-crack formation by quantifying critical microstructural features observed in the fatigue-crack initiation region. The fracture surface near the fatigue-crack-initiation site was crystallographic in nature. Facets, which result from the fracture of primary alpha ( α p ) grains, are associated with the crack-initiation process. The α p grains that form facets are typically larger in size than average. The spatial distribution of α p grains relative to each other observed near the initiation site did not correlate with fatigue life. Furthermore, the spatial distribution of α p grains did not provide a suitable means for discerning crack-initiation sites from randomly selected nominal areas. Stereofractography measurements have shown that the facets observed at or near the initiation sites are oriented for high shear stress; i.e., they are oriented close to 45 deg with respect to the loading axis. Furthermore, a large majority of the grains and laths near the site of crack initiation are preferentially oriented for either basal or prism slip, suggesting that regions where α p grains and α laths have similar crystallographic orientations favor crack initiation. Microtextured regions with favorable and similar orientations of α p grains and the lath α are believed to promote cyclic-strain accumulation by basal and prism slip. Orientation imaging microscopy (OIM) indicates that these facets form on the basal plane of α p grains. The absence of a significant role of spatial clustering of α p grains

  15. Effect of Environment on Fatigue Crack Wake Dislocation Structure in Al-Cu-Mg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ro, Yunjo; Agnew, Sean R.; Gangloff, Richard P.

    2012-07-01

    Fatigue-induced dislocation structure was imaged at the crack surface using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of focused ion beam (FIB)-prepared cross sections of naturally aged Al-4Cu-1.4Mg stressed at a constant stress intensity range (7 MPa√m) concurrent with either ultralow ( 10-8 Pa s) or high-purity (50 Pa s) water vapor exposure at 296 K (23 °C). A 200-to-600-nm-thick recovered-dislocation cell structure formed adjacent to the crack surface from planar slip bands in the plastic zone with the thickness of the cell structure and slip bands decreasing with increasing water vapor exposure. This result suggested lowered plastic strain accumulation in the moist environment relative to the vacuum. The previously reported fatigue crack surface crystallography is explained by the underlying dislocation substructure. For a vacuum, { { 1 1 1} } facets dominate the crack path from localized slip band cracking without resolvable dislocation cells, but cell formation causes some off- { { 1 1 1} } features. With water vapor present, the high level of hydrogen trapped within the developed dislocation structure could promote decohesion manifest as either low-index { { 100} } or { { 1 10} } facets, as well as high-index cracking through the fatigue-formed subgrain structure. These features and damage scenario provide a physical basis for modeling discontinuous environmental fatigue crack growth governed by both cyclic strain range and maximum tensile stress.

  16. Intrinsic fatigue crack growth rates for Al-Li-Cu-Mg alloys in vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavik, D. C.; Blankenship, C. P., Jr.; Starke, E. A., Jr.; Gangloff, R. P.

    1993-01-01

    The influences of microstructure and deformation mode on inert environment intrinsic fatigue crack propagation were investigated for Al-Li-Cu-Mg alloys AA2090, AA8090, and X2095 compared to AA2024. The amount of coherent shearable delta-prime (Al3Li) precipitates and extent of localized planar slip deformation were reduced by composition (increased Cu/Li in X2095) and heat treatment (double aging of AA8090). Intrinsic growth rates, obtained at high constant K(max) to minimize crack closure and in vacuum to eliminate any environmental effect, were alloy dependent; da/dN varied up to tenfold based on applied Delta-K or Delta-K/E. When compared based on a crack tip cyclic strain or opening displacement parameter, growth rates were equivalent for all alloys except X2095-T8, which exhibited unique fatigue crack growth resistance. Tortuous fatigue crack profiles and large fracture surface facets were observed for each Al-Li alloy independent of the precipitates present, particularly delta-prime, and the localized slip deformation structure. Reduced fatigue crack propagation rates for X2095 in vacuum are not explained by either residual crack closure or slip reversibility arguments; the origin of apparent slip band facets in a homogeneous slip alloy is unclear.

  17. Modeling of the variability of fatigue crack growth using cohesive zone elements.

    PubMed

    Beaurepaire, P; Schuëller, G I

    2011-08-01

    By its nature, metal fatigue has random characteristics, leading to extensive scatter in the results. Both initiation and propagation of a fatigue crack can be seen as random processes. This manuscript develops a numerical analysis using cohesive zone elements allowing the use of one single model in the finite element simulation of the complete fatigue life. The present formulation includes a damage evolution mechanism that reflects gradual degradation of the cohesive strength under cyclic loading. The uncertainties inherent to the fatigue process are assumed to be caused by the variability of the material properties, which are modeled using random fields. An extrapolation scheme is proposed to reduce the computational time. First, the accuracy of the proposed formulation is assessed considering a deterministic crack growth problem. Second, the effect of randomness in the material properties on the total fatigue life of a structure is then analyzed. PMID:22049246

  18. Modeling time-dependent corrosion fatigue crack propagation in 7000 series aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Mark E.; Gangloff, Richard P.

    1994-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue experiments were conducted with the susceptible S-L orientation of AA7075-T651, immersed in acidified and inhibited NaCl solution, to provide a basis for incorporating environmental effects into fatigue crack propagation life prediction codes such as NASA FLAGRO. This environment enhances da/dN by five to ten-fold compared to fatigue in moist air. Time-based crack growth rates from quasi-static load experiments are an order of magnitude too small for accurate linear superposition prediction of da/dN for loading frequencies above 0.001 Hz. Alternate methods of establishing da/dt, based on rising-load or ripple-load-enhanced crack tip strain rate, do not increase da/dt and do not improve linear superposition. Corrosion fatigue is characterized by two regimes of frequency dependence; da/dN is proportional to f(exp -1) below 0.001 Hz and to F(exp 0) to F(exp -0.1) for higher frequencies. Da/dN increases mildly both with increasing hold-time at K(sub max) and with increasing rise-time for a range of loading waveforms. The mild time-dependence is due to cycle-time-dependent corrosion fatigue growth. This behavior is identical for S-L nd L-T crack orientations. The frequency response of environmental fatigue in several 7000 series alloys is variable and depends on undefined compositional or microstructural variables. Speculative explanations are based on the effect of Mg on occluded crack chemistry and embritting hydrogen uptake, or on variable hydrogen diffusion in the crack tip process zone. Cracking in the 7075/NaCl system is adequately described for life prediction by linear superposition for prolonged load-cycle periods, and by a time-dependent upper bound relationship between da/dN and delta K for moderate loading times.

  19. Fatigue Crack Propagation from Notched Specimens of 304 SS in elevated Temperature Aqueous Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Wire, G. L.; Mills, W. J.

    2002-08-01

    Fatigue crack propagation (FCP) rates for 304 stainless steel (304SS) were determined in 24 degree C and 288 degree C air and 288 degree C water using double-edged notch (DEN) specimens of 304 stainless steel (304 SS). Test performed at matched loading conditions in air and water at 288 degree C with 20-6- cc h[sub]2/kg h[sub]2O provided a direct comparison of the relative crack growth rates in air and water over a wide range of crack growth rates. The DEN crack extension ranged from short cracks (0.03-0.25 mm) to long cracks up to 4.06 mm, which are consistent with conventional deep crack tests. Crack growth rates of 304 SS in water were about 12 times the air rate. This 12X environmental enhancement persisted to crack extensions up to 4.06 mm, far outside the range associated with short crack effects. The large environmental degradation for 304 SS crack growth is consistent with the strong reduction of fatigue life in high hydrogen water. Further, very similar environmental effects w ere reported in fatigue crack growth tests in hydrogen water chemistry (HWC). Most literature data in high hydrogen water show only a mild environmental effect for 304 SS, of order 2.5 times air or less, but the tests were predominantly performed at high cyclic stress intensity or equivalently, high air rates. The environmental effect in low oxygen environments at low stress intensity depends strongly on both the stress ratio, R, and the load rise time, T[sub]r, as recently reported for austenitic stainless steel in BWR water. Fractography was performed for both tests in air and water. At 288 degree C in water, the fracture surfaces were crisply faceted with a crystallographic appearance, and showed striations under high magnification. The cleavage-like facets on the fracture surfaces suggest that hydrogen embrittlement is the primary cause of accelerated cracking.

  20. Fatigue Crack Growth Mechanisms in High-Pressure Die-Cast Magnesium Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Kadiri, Haitham; Horstemeyer, M. F.; Jordon, J. B.; Xue, Yibin

    2008-01-01

    Microstructure-affected micromechanisms of fatigue crack growth operating near the limit plasticity regime were experimentally identified for the four main commercial high-pressure die-cast (HPDC) magnesium alloys: AM50, AM60, AZ91, and AE44. These fatigue micromechanisms manifested by the concomitant effects of casting pores, interdendritic Al-rich solid solution layer, β-phase particles, Mn-rich inclusions, rare earth-rich intermetallics, dendrite cell size, and surface segregation phenomena. These concomitant mechanisms clearly delineated the fatigue durability observed for the AM50, AM60, AZ91, and AE44 Mg alloys in both the low- and high-cycle fatigue regimes.

  1. Evaluation of fatigue-crack growth rates by polynomial curve fitting. [Ti alloy plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davies, K. B.; Feddersen, C. E.

    1973-01-01

    Fundamental characterization of the constant-amplitude fatigue crack propagation is achieved by an analysis of the rate of change of crack length with change in number of applied loading cycles, defining the rate values such that they are consistent with the basic assumption of smoothness and continuity in the fatigue crack growth process. The technique used to satisfy the analytical conditions and minimize the effects of local material anomalies and experimental errors is that of fitting a smooth curve to the entire set of basic data by least square regression. This yields a well-behaved function relating the number of cycles to the crack length. By taking the first derivative of the function, the crack growth rate is obtained for each point. The class of curve fitting functions used in the analysis is the polynomial of degree n.

  2. 3D characterization of trans- and inter-lamellar fatigue crack in (α + β) Ti alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Babout, Laurent; Jopek, Łukasz; Preuss, Michael

    2014-12-15

    This paper presents a three dimensional image processing strategy that has been developed to quantitatively analyze and correlate the path of a fatigue crack with the lamellar microstructure found in Ti-6246. The analysis is carried out on X-ray microtomography images acquired in situ during uniaxial fatigue testing. The crack, the primary β-grain boundaries and the α lamellae have been segmented separately and merged for the first time to allow a better characterization and understanding of their mutual interaction. This has particularly emphasized the role of translamellar crack growth at a very high propagation angle with regard to the lamellar orientation, supporting the central role of colonies favorably oriented for basal 〈a〉 slip to guide the crack in the fully lamellar microstructure of Ti alloy. - Highlights: • 3D tomography images reveal strong short fatigue crack interaction with α lamellae. • Proposed 3D image processing methodology makes their segmentation possible. • Crack-lamellae orientation maps show prevalence of translamellar cracking. • Angle study comforts the influence of basal/prismatic slip on crack path.

  3. Mechanism and estimation of fatigue crack initiation in austenitic stainless steels in LWR environments.

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O. K.; Energy Technology

    2002-08-01

    The ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code provides rules for the construction of nuclear power plant components. Figures I-9.1 through I-9.6 of Appendix I to Section III of the Code specify fatigue design curves for structural materials. However, the effects of light water reactor (LWR) coolant environments are not explicitly addressed by the Code design curves. Existing fatigue strain-vs.-life ({var_epsilon}-N) data illustrate potentially significant effects of LWR coolant environments on the fatigue resistance of pressure vessel and piping steels. This report provides an overview of fatigue crack initiation in austenitic stainless steels in LWR coolant environments. The existing fatigue {var_epsilon}-N data have been evaluated to establish the effects of key material, loading, and environmental parameters (such as steel type, strain range, strain rate, temperature, dissolved-oxygen level in water, and flow rate) on the fatigue lives of these steels. Statistical models are presented for estimating the fatigue {var_epsilon}-N curves for austenitic stainless steels as a function of the material, loading, and environmental parameters. Two methods for incorporating environmental effects into the ASME Code fatigue evaluations are presented. The influence of reactor environments on the mechanism of fatigue crack initiation in these steels is also discussed.

  4. Effects of stress ratio and fiber orientation on fatigue crack growth behavior in APAL

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, S.W.; Park, W.J.; Yoon, H.K.; Lee, K.G.; Cho, J.M.; Lee, K.B.

    1993-12-31

    A new hybrid composite (APAL; Aramid Patched Aluminum Alloy), consisting of 2024-T3 aluminum alloy plate sandwiched between aramid/epoxy prepregs (HK 285/RS 1222), was developed. Fatigue crack growth behavior was examined at stress ratios of R = 0.2, 0.5 using two kinds of APAL with different fiber orientation (0{degree}/90{degree} and {+-} 45{degree} for crack direction). The APAL showed superior fatigue crack growth resistance, which may be attributed to the crack bridging effect imposed by the intact fibers in the crack wave. The magnitude of crack bridging was estimated quantitatively and determined by a new technique on the basis of the compliances of 2024-T3 aluminum alloy and APAL specimens. The crack growth rate of the APAL specimens was reduced significantly as comparison to the monolithic aluminum alloy and was not adequately correlated with the conventional stress intensity factor range ({Delta}K). It was found that the crack growth rate was successfully correlated with the effective stress intensity factor range ( {Delta}K{sub eff} = K{sub br} {minus} K{sub cl}) allowing for the crack closure and the crack bridging. The relation between da/dN and {Delta}K{sub eff} was plotted within a narrow scatter band regardless at loading line of 2024-T3 aluminum alloy, two kinds of the APAL (APAL 0{degree}/90{degree}, APAL {+-} 45{degree}) and two kinds of stress ratios (R = 0.2, 0.5).

  5. Analysis of the Influence of Laser Welding on Fatigue Crack Growth Behavior in a Newly Developed Nickel-Base Superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckson, R. A.; Ojo, O. A.

    2015-01-01

    The influence of laser welding on fatigue crack growth (FCG) behavior of a newly developed nickel-base superalloy, Haynes 282 was studied. Laser welding resulted in cracking in the heat affected zone (HAZ) of the alloy during welding and FCG test results show that this produces deleterious effect on the fatigue crack growth behavior of Haynes 282. However, two post weld heat treatments, including a new thermal treatment schedule developed in this work, are used to significantly improve the resistance of the Haynes 282 fatigue crack growth after laser welding. The effects of laser welding and thermal treatments are discussed in terms of HAZ cracking and heterogeneity of slip, respectively.

  6. Crack growth behavior under creep-fatigue conditions using compact and double edge notch tension-compression specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narasimha Chary, Santosh Balaji

    inspection of fatigue surfaces, it has been found that that better alignment control procedures are needed to ensure symmetric crack fronts for the DEN(T-C) specimen. Creep-fatigue crack growth tests were conducted on 9Cr-1Mo (P91) steels at 625°C with various hold times. These tests were conducted using C(T) specimens under constant load amplitude conditions (tension-tension) and DEN(T-C) specimens under displacement like conditions (tension-compression). Crack growth data generated under creep-fatigue conditions using standard C(T) specimens correlated well with crack growth data generated using DEN(T-C) specimens. The crack growth rates per cycle increased significantly with increase in hold time when crack growth data were plotted with the cyclic stress intensity parameter, Delta-K. A transient behavior in the initial portion of da/dN versus Delta-K plots were observed for the hold time tests, as reported previously by several other researchers. It is shown for the C(T) specimens that the creep-fatigue interactions during crack growth for various hold times are represented better by the (Ct)avg parameter implying that the P91 steel behaves in a creep-ductile manner. Significant differences (factors of 2 to 5) were observed between the calculated values of (Ct)avg and those based on measured values of force-line deflection. It is also shown that there is a high risk of obtaining invalid data in longer hold time tests under force-control conditions. The usefulness of DEN(T-C) specimens for crack growth studies under displacement controlled conditions to combat ratcheting problems in tests conducted under load conditions is established. The tests conditions for the round-robin program on creep-fatigue crack growth testing in support of ASTM E-2760 are finalized. Further developments needed in creep-fatigue crack growth testing are also presented.

  7. Crystallography of Fatigue Crack Propagation in Precipitation-Hardened Al-Cu-Mg/Li

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ro, Yunjo; Agnew, Sean R.; Gangloff, Richard P.

    2007-12-01

    A combined electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD)/stereology method successfully quantifies the orientation of fatigue crack surfaces for Al-Li-Cu and Al-Cu-Mg alloys stressed at low Δ K, in which deformation is localized in slip bands and cracking is highly faceted. The method orients features as small as ˜1 μm in complex microstructures. Vacuum fatigue facets align within 15 deg of up to four variants of {111} slip planes, governed by the distribution of crack tip resolved shear stress. The small fraction of precisely oriented {111} facets suggests that cracking involves complex intraband and multiple-band interface paths. Water vapor and NaCl solution affect a similar dramatic change in the crack path; near-{111} facets are never observed, at odds with mechanisms for H-enhanced slip localization and associated slip band cracking. Rather, two environmental crack facet morphologies, broad flat and repeating step, exhibit a wide range of orientations between {001} and {110}, as governed by crack tip resolved normal stresses. The repetitive stepped facets appear to contain areas parallel to {100}/{110} on the ˜1- μm scale, coupled with surface curvature consistent with a mechanism of discontinuous fatigue crack growth involving H-enhanced {100}/{110} cleavage and intermingled crack tip plasticity. Broad-flat faceted regions are parallel to a variety of planes, consistent with a mechanism combining high crack tip tensile stresses and H trapped at the dislocation structure from cyclic deformation, within 1 μm of the crack tip.

  8. Development of a wireless nonlinear wave modulation spectroscopy (NWMS) sensor node for fatigue crack detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Peipei; Yang, Suyoung; Lim, Hyung Jin; Park, Hyung Chul; Ko, In Chang; Sohn, Hoon

    2014-03-01

    Fatigue crack is one of the main culprits for the failure of metallic structures. Recently, it has been shown that nonlinear wave modulation spectroscopy (NWMS) is effective in detecting nonlinear mechanisms produced by fatigue crack. In this study, an active wireless sensor node for fatigue crack detection is developed based on NWMS. Using PZT transducers attached to a target structure, ultrasonic waves at two distinctive frequencies are generated, and their modulation due to fatigue crack formation is detected using another PZT transducer. Furthermore, a reference-free NWMS algorithm is developed so that fatigue crack can be detected without relying on history data of the structure with minimal parameter adjustment by the end users. The algorithm is embedded into FPGA, and the diagnosis is transmitted to a base station using a commercial wireless communication system. The whole design of the sensor node is fulfilled in a low power working strategy. Finally, an experimental verification has been performed using aluminum plate specimens to show the feasibility of the developed active wireless NWMS sensor node.

  9. Assessment of Crack Path Prediction in Non-Proportional Mixed-Mode Fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Highsmith, Shelby, Jr.; Johnson, Steve; Swanson, Gregory; Sayyah, Tarek; Pettit, Richard

    2008-01-01

    Non-proportional mixed-mode loading is present in many systems and a growing crack can experience any manner of mixed-mode loading. Prediction of the resulting crack path is important when assessing potential failure modes or when performing a failure investigation. Current crack path selection criteria are presented along with data for Inconel 718 under non-proportional mixed-mode loading. Mixed-mode crack growth can transition between path deflection mechanisms with very different orientations. Non-proportional fatigue loadings lack a single parameter for input to current crack path criteria. Crack growth transitions were observed in proportional and non-proportional FCG tests. Different paths displayed distinct fracture surface morphologies. New crack path drivers & transition criteria must be developed.

  10. Small fatigue crack behavior in 7075-T651 aluminum as monitored with Rayleigh wave reflection

    SciTech Connect

    Hirao, M.; Tojo, K.; Fukuoka, H. )

    1993-08-01

    Small fatigue crack growth in 7075-T651 aluminum is periodically monitored with an ultrasonic Rayleigh wave technique. The wideband reflection signals are digitized and stored in the computer memory to permit the signal processing in the frequency domain. With the help of the constructed three-dimensional (3-D) reflection coefficient, the reflection amplitude spectra yield the measurements of the crack depth, if larger than 0.062 mm, and the crack closure stress. Acoustically obtained da/dN-[Delta]K[sub eff] relations describe the anomalous growth behavior of small surface crack, extending from the late small crack regime to the large crack regime passing through the minimum growth rate. The split spectrum processing proves to be useful in removing the grain noises to illuminate the target echoes, which is necessary to detect the nucleation and characterize the cracks smaller than 0.1 mm in depth. Discussions on the computer-controlled, automated, in situ monitoring system are provided.

  11. Effect of strontium modification on near-threshold fatigue crack growth in an Al-Si-Cu die cast alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Schaefer, M.; Fournelle, R.A.

    1996-05-01

    The effects of strontium modification on microstructure and fatigue properties in a die cast commercial aluminum-silicon alloy are demonstrated. Strontium additions of 0.010 and 0.018 wt pct drastically change the morphology of the eutectic silicon. The influence of these microstructural changes on fatigue properties is evaluated through fatigue crack growth testing. Examination of the fracture surfaces and the crack path establish distinct fatigue fracture modes for the modified and unmodified eutectic structures. Changes in fracture mode and crack path are correlated to the microstructure changes. A higher energy fracture mode and increased crack path tortuosity explain the observed improvement in fatigue properties for the modified alloys. Strontium modified alloys exhibit a 10 to 20 pct higher fatigue crack growth threshold compared to an unmodified alloy for testing at a load ratio of 0.5. No difference was observed for testing at a load ratio of 0.1.

  12. Application of cyclic J-integral to low cycle fatigue crack growth of Japanese carbon steel pipe

    SciTech Connect

    Miura, N.; Fujioka, T.; Kashima, K.

    1997-04-01

    Piping for LWR power plants is required to satisfy the LBB concept for postulated (not actual) defects. With this in mind, research has so far been conducted on the fatigue crack growth under cyclic loading, and on the ductile crack growth under excessive loading. It is important, however, for the evaluation of the piping structural integrity under seismic loading condition, to understand the fracture behavior under dynamic and cyclic loading conditions, that accompanies large-scale yielding. CRIEPI together with Hitachi have started a collaborative research program on dynamic and/or cyclic fracture of Japanese carbon steel (STS410) pipes in 1991. Fundamental tensile property tests were conducted to examine the effect of strain rate on tensile properties. Cracked pipe fracture tests under some loading conditions were also performed to investigate the effect of dynamic and/or cyclic loading on fracture behavior. Based on the analytical considerations for the above tests, the method to evaluate the failure life for a cracked pipe under cyclic loading was developed and verified. Cyclic J-integral was introduced to predict cyclic crack growth up to failure. This report presents the results of tensile property tests, cracked pipe fracture tests, and failure life analysis. The proposed method was applied to the cracked pipe fracture tests. The effect of dynamic and/or cyclic loading on pipe fracture was also investigated.

  13. Visualization of non-propagating Lamb wave modes for fatigue crack evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Yun-Kyu; Sohn, Hoon

    2015-03-01

    This article develops a non-propagating Lamb wave mode (NPL) imaging technique for fatigue crack visualization. NPL has a great potential for crack evaluation in that it significantly contributes local mode amplitudes in the vicinity of a crack without spatial propagation. Such unique physical phenomenon is theoretically proven and experimentally measured through laser scanning. Although its measurement is a quite challenging work due to the fact that it is quite localized and coexists with complex propagating Lamb wave modes, a NPL filter proposed in this article overcomes the technical challenge by eliminating all propagating Lamb modes from laser scanned full Lamb wavefields. Through the NPL filtering process, only fatigue crack-induced NPLs can be measured and retained. To verify such physical observation and the corresponding NPL filter, a real micro fatigue crack is created by applying repeated tensile loading, and its detectability is tested using a surface-mounted piezoelectric transducer for generating Lamb waves and a laser Doppler vibrometer for measuring the corresponding responses. The experimental results confirm that even an invisible fatigue crack can be instantaneously visualized and effectively evaluated through the proposed NPL measurement and filtering processes.

  14. Near-Threshold Fatigue Crack Growth Behavior of Fine-Grain Nickel-Based Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, John A.; Piascik, Robert S.

    2003-01-01

    Constant-Kmax fatigue crack growth tests were performed on two finegrain nickel-base alloys Inconel 718 (DA) and Ren 95 to determine if these alloys exhibit near-threshold time-dependent crack growth behavior observed for fine-grain aluminum alloys in room-temperature laboratory air. Test results showed that increases in K(sub max) values resulted in increased crack growth rates, but no evidence of time-dependent crack growth was observed for either nickel-base alloy at room temperature.

  15. Residual strength of five boron/aluminum laminates with crack-like notches after fatigue loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simonds, R. A.

    1984-01-01

    Boron/aluminum specimens were made with crack-like slits in the center and with various proportions of 0 and + or - 45 deg plies. They were fatigue loaded and then fractured to determine their residual strengths. The fatigue loads were generally in the range of 60 to 80 percent of the static tensile strength of the specimen as determined from a previous study, and the stress ratio was .05. For virtually all of the specimens the fatigue loading was continued for 100,000 cycles. The specimens were radiographed after the fatigue loading to determine the nature of the fatigue damage. A few specimens were sectioned and examined in a scanning electron microscope after being radiographed in order to verify the interpretation of the radiographs and also to get a better insight into the nature of the fatigue damage. The results indicate that the fatiguing does not significantly affect the strength of the specimens tested. The results of the radiography and of the scanning electron microscopy indicate that the 45 deg plies suffer extensive damage in the form of split and broken fibers and matrix cracking in the vicinity of the ends of the split. By contrast, the only significant damage to the 0 deg plies was a single 0 deg matric crack growing from the ends of the slit and between the 0 deg fibers.

  16. Residual strength of five boron/aluminum laminates with crack-like notches after fatigue loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simonds, R. A.

    1986-01-01

    Boron/aluminum specimens were made with crack-like slits in the center and with various proportions of 0 and + or - 45 deg plies. They were fatigue loaded and then fractured to determine their residual strengths. The fatigue loads were generally in the range of 60 to 80 percent of the static tensile strength of the specimen as determined from a previous study, and the stress ratio was .05. For virtually all of the specimens the fatigue loading was continued for 100,000 cycles. The specimens were radiographed after the fatigue loading to determine the nature of the fatigue damage. A few specimens were sectioned and examined in a scanning electron microscope after being radiographed in order to verify the interpretation of the radiographs and also to get a better insight into the nature of the fatigue damage. The results indicate that the fatiguing does not significantly affect the strength of the specimens tested. The results of the radiography and of the scanning electron microscopy indicate that the 45 deg plies suffer extensive damage in the form of split and broken fibers and matrix cracking in the vicinity of the ends of the split. By contrast, the only significant damage to the 0 deg plies was a single 0 deg matric crack growing from the ends of the slit and between the 0 deg fibers.

  17. Comparison of the Fatigue Crack Propagation Behavior of Two Different Forms of PMMA Using Two-Stage Zone Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Wenfeng; Ma, Liting; Chen, Xinwen; Yuan, Yanan; Ma, Yinji

    2016-02-01

    The fatigue crack propagation behavior of two different forms of PMMA was studied using two-stage zone model. First, the fatigue crack length and fatigue crack propagation velocities of different specimens were obtained experimentally. Then the effect of material forms and specimen types on the fatigue crack propagation velocities was analyzed. Finally, the data scatter of da/ dN-Δ K curves in different forms and different types of specimens was analyzed. The results show that the expressions of fatigue crack propagation velocities of middle crack tension (MT) specimens and compact tension (CT) specimens in the same form PMMA are similar. And the scatter of MT specimens is larger than CT specimens in two forms of PMMA.

  18. The influence of temperature on fatigue crack growth in a mill annealed Ti-6Al-4V alloy.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wei, R. P.; Ritter, D. L.

    1972-01-01

    To study the influence of temperature on the rate of fatigue crack growth in high strength metal alloys, constant load amplitude fatigue crack growth experiments were carried out using a .25-in.-thick mill annealed Ti-6Al-4V alloy plate. The rates of fatigue crack growth were determined as a function of temperature, ranging from room temperature to about 290 C, and as a function of the crack tip stress intensity factor in a dehumidified high purity argon environment. Limited correlative experiments were carried out in distilled water, dehumidified oxygen and hydrogen, and in vacuum. The results indicate that the rate of fatigue crack growth is essentially independent of test temperature in this alloy, and is affected by residual moisture in very small concentrations. Companion fractographic examinations suggest that the mechanims for fatigue crack growth in the various environments are essentially the same.

  19. The influence of temperature on fatigue-crack growth in a mill-annealed Ti-6Al-4V alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wei, R. P.; Ritter, D. L.

    1971-01-01

    To understand the influence of temperature on the rate of fatigue crack growth in high strength metal alloys, constant load amplitude fatigue crack growth experiments were carried out using a 1/4 inch thick (6.35 mm) mill-annealed Ti-6Al-4V alloy plate as a model material. The rates of fatigue crack growth were determined as a function of temperature, ranging from room temperature to about 290 C and as a function of the crack tip, stress intensity factor K, in dehumidified high purity argon environment. The dependence of the rate of fatigue crack growth on K appears to be separable into two regions. The transition correlates with changes in both the microscopic and macroscopic appearances of the fracture surfaces, and suggests a change in the mechanism and the influence of microstructure on fatigue crack growth.

  20. The effect of pre-stress cycles on fatigue crack growth - An analysis of crack growth mechanism. [in Al alloy plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kang, T. S.; Liu, H. W.

    1974-01-01

    Cyclic prestress increases subsequent fatigue crack growth rate in 2024-T351 aluminum alloy. This increase in growth rate, caused by the prestress, and the increased rate, caused by temper embrittlement as observed by Ritchie and Knott (1973), cannot be explained by the crack tip blunting model alone. Each fatigue crack increment consists of two components, a brittle and a ductile component. They are controlled by the ductility of the material and its cyclic yield strength, respectively.

  1. Fatigue Crack Nucleation Studies on Sulfuric Acid Anodized 7075-T73 Aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savas, Terence P.; Earthman, James C.

    2014-06-01

    The influence of a sulfuric acid anodic coating process on the fatigue crack nucleation behavior of 7075-T73 aluminum alloy was investigated. Silicone surface replication in combination with carbon sputter coating and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) allowed for in situ monitoring of the number of cycles for crack nucleation. A single edge circular notch (SECN) coupon was designed for the present study to localize fatigue damage thus enhancing fatigue crack detection and capture the effects of multiaxial stress conditions indicative of a majority engineering applications. Linear elastic finite element modeling of the SECN coupon was performed to quantify the von Mises equivalent stress distribution and the stress concentration factor of the notched region. The experimental results indicate that the presence of localized pitting corrosion initiated during the anodic coating pretreatment process had an adverse effect on fatigue performance. Specifically, multiple crack nucleation sites were evident as opposed to a single crack origin for the untreated specimens. Post-cycling SEM surface examinations displayed networks of micro-cracks in the anodic coating emanating from the pits although these were not found to be fatigue crack origin sites during post SEM fractographic exams. Thus, the stress concentration effect of the corrosion pits was found to be predominant. The total cycles to failure on average was reduced by approximately 60% for the anodic coated versus untreated specimens. A strategy is also discussed on how to mitigate accelerated crack nucleation by controlled surface pretreatment and use of a chromated chemical conversion coating in lieu of an anodic coating for selective applications.

  2. Effects of Crack Closure and Cyclic Deformation on Thermomechanical Fatigue Crack Growth of a Near α Titanium Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, Kartik; Kumar, Vikas; Bhanu Sankara Rao, K.; Sundararaman, M.

    2016-04-01

    In this study, closure corrected in-phase (IP) and out-of-phase (OP) thermomechanical fatigue crack growth rates at two temperature intervals viz. 573 K to 723 K (300 °C to 450 °C) and 723 K to 873 K (450 °C to 600 °C) of Timetal 834 near α titanium alloy are presented. It is found that closure mechanisms significantly influence the stage I crack growth behavior. Surface roughness-induced crack closure (RICC) predominantly modifies the crack growth rate of near-threshold region at 573 K to 723 K (300 °C to 450 °C) test conditions. However, oxide-induced crack closure further strengthens RICC at 723 K to 873 K (450 °C to 600 °C) TMF loading. In stage II crack growth behavior, the alloy shows higher crack growth rates at 723 K to 873 K (450 °C to 600 °C) OP-TMF loading which is attributed to the combined effect of cyclic hardening occurring at the crack tip and weakening of interlamellar regions due to oxidation.

  3. Effects of Crack Closure and Cyclic Deformation on Thermomechanical Fatigue Crack Growth of a Near α Titanium Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, Kartik; Kumar, Vikas; Bhanu Sankara Rao, K.; Sundararaman, M.

    2016-07-01

    In this study, closure corrected in-phase (IP) and out-of-phase (OP) thermomechanical fatigue crack growth rates at two temperature intervals viz. 573 K to 723 K (300 °C to 450 °C) and 723 K to 873 K (450 °C to 600 °C) of Timetal 834 near α titanium alloy are presented. It is found that closure mechanisms significantly influence the stage I crack growth behavior. Surface roughness-induced crack closure (RICC) predominantly modifies the crack growth rate of near-threshold region at 573 K to 723 K (300 °C to 450 °C) test conditions. However, oxide-induced crack closure further strengthens RICC at 723 K to 873 K (450 °C to 600 °C) TMF loading. In stage II crack growth behavior, the alloy shows higher crack growth rates at 723 K to 873 K (450 °C to 600 °C) OP-TMF loading which is attributed to the combined effect of cyclic hardening occurring at the crack tip and weakening of interlamellar regions due to oxidation.

  4. Fatigue Crack Growth Behavior of Nickel-base Superalloy Haynes 282 at 550-750 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozman, K. A.; Kruzic, J. J.; Hawk, J. A.

    2015-08-01

    The fatigue crack growth rates for nickel-based superalloy Haynes 282 were measured at temperatures of 550, 650, and 750 °C using compact tension specimens with a load ratio of 0.1 and cyclic loading frequencies of 25 Hz and 0.25 Hz. Increasing the temperature from 550 to 750 °C caused the fatigue crack growth rates to increase from ~20 to 60% depending upon the applied stress intensity level. The effect of reducing the applied loading frequency increased the fatigue crack growth rates from ~20 to 70%, also depending upon the applied stress intensity range. The crack path was observed to be transgranular for the temperatures and frequencies used during fatigue crack growth rate testing. At 750 °C, there were some indications of limited intergranular cracking excursions at both loading frequencies; however, the extent of intergranular crack growth was limited and the cause is not understood at this time.

  5. Discrete statistical model of fatigue crack growth in a Ni-base superalloy, capable of life prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd-Lee, Ashley; King, Julia

    1992-07-01

    A discrete statistical model of fatigue crack growth in a nickel base superalloy Waspaloy, which is quantitative from the start of the short crack regime to failure, is presented. Instantaneous crack growth rate distributions and persistence of arrest distributions are used to compute fatigue lives and worst case scenarios without extrapolation. The basis of the model is non-material specific, it provides an improved method of analyzing crack growth rate data. For Waspaloy, the model shows the importance of good bulk fatigue crack growth resistance to resist early short fatigue crack growth and the importance of maximizing crack arrest both by the presence of a proportion of small grains and by maximizing grain boundary corrugation.

  6. Methodology Developed for Modeling the Fatigue Crack Growth Behavior of Single-Crystal, Nickel-Base Superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Because of their superior high-temperature properties, gas generator turbine airfoils made of single-crystal, nickel-base superalloys are fast becoming the standard equipment on today's advanced, high-performance aerospace engines. The increased temperature capabilities of these airfoils has allowed for a significant increase in the operating temperatures in turbine sections, resulting in superior propulsion performance and greater efficiencies. However, the previously developed methodologies for life-prediction models are based on experience with polycrystalline alloys and may not be applicable to single-crystal alloys under certain operating conditions. One of the main areas where behavior differences between single-crystal and polycrystalline alloys are readily apparent is subcritical fatigue crack growth (FCG). The NASA Lewis Research Center's work in this area enables accurate prediction of the subcritical fatigue crack growth behavior in single-crystal, nickel-based superalloys at elevated temperatures.

  7. Prediction of the thermosonic signal from fatigue cracks in metals using vibration damping measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morbidini, Marco; Cawley, Peter; Barden, Tim; Almond, Darryl; Duffour, Philippe

    2006-11-01

    Thermosonics (also known as ultrasound stimulated thermography or sonic infrared imaging) is a potentially attractive nondestructive testing method for the detection of contacting interface-type defects such as fatigue cracks in metals and delaminations in composites. A high power acoustic horn is typically used to excite a complex vibration field, which causes the defect interfaces to rub and dissipate energy as heat. The resulting local increase in temperature at one of the specimen surfaces can then be measured by an infrared camera. In this study a set of steel beams with fatigue cracks of different depth and variable partial crack opening was tested. Each beam was instrumented with strain gages across the crack and at the back face for the measurement of both the "breathing" behavior of the cracks and the excited vibration. The heat released at the crack was predicted from the measured vibration and an experimental estimate of the additional damping introduced in the specimens by each crack. The cracks were modeled analytically as nonuniform heat sources. Hence the temperature rise expected on the monitoring surface of the specimens could be predicted and compared with the infrared camera measurements. The results show good linear correlation between predictions and measurements, thus validating the prediction algorithm. The relationship between the vibration input and the thermal output will allow, as a longer-term goal, the prediction of the general threshold level of vibration needed for reliable crack detection.

  8. Dislocation mechanism based model for stage II fatigue crack propagation rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazumdar, P. K.

    1986-01-01

    Repeated plastic deformation, which of course depends on dislocation mechanism, at or near the crack tip leads to the fatigue crack propagation. By involving the theory of thermally activated flow and the cumulative plastic strain criterion, an effort is made here to model the stage II fatigue crack propagation rate in terms of the dislocation mechanism. The model, therefore, provides capability to ascertain: (1) the dislocation mechanism (and hence the near crack tip microstructures) assisting the crack growth, (2) the relative resistance of dislocation mechanisms to the crack growth, and (3) the fracture surface characteristics and its interpretation in terms of the dislocation mechanism. The local microstructure predicted for the room temperature crack growth in copper by this model is in good agreement with the experimental results taken from the literature. With regard to the relative stability of such dislocation mechanisms as the cross-slip and the dislocation intersection, the model suggests an enhancement of crack growth rate with an ease of cross-slip which in general promotes dislocation cell formation and is common in material which has high stacking fault energy (produces wavy slips). Cross-slip apparently enhances crack growth rate by promoting slip irreversibility and fracture surface brittleness to a greater degree.

  9. Three-dimensional EBSD characterization of thermo-mechanical fatigue crack morphology in compacted graphite iron

    SciTech Connect

    Pirgazi, Hadi; Ghodrat, Sepideh; Kestens, Leo A.I.

    2014-04-01

    In cylinder heads made of compacted graphitic iron (CGI), heating and cooling cycles can lead to localized cracking due to thermo-mechanical fatigue (TMF). To meticulously characterize the complex crack path morphology of CGI under TMF condition, in relation to microstructural features and to find out how and by which mechanisms the cracks predominantly develop, three-dimensional electron back scattering diffraction (EBSD) was employed. Based on the precise quantitative microstructural analysis, it is found that graphite particles not only play a crucial role in the crack initiation, but also are of primary significance for crack propagation, i.e. crack growth is enhanced by the presence of graphite particles. Furthermore, the density of graphite particles on the fracture plane is more than double as high as in any other arbitrary plane of the structure. The obtained results did not indicate a particular crystallographic preference of fracture plane, i.e. the crystal plane parallel to the fracture plane was nearly of random orientation. - Highlights: • Crystallographic features of a thermo-mechanical fatigue (TMF) crack were studied. • Wide-field 3D EBSD is used to characterize the TMF crack morphology. • Data processing was applied on a large length scale of the order of millimeters. • Graphite density in the fracture plane is much higher than any other random plane. • It is revealed that crack growth is enhanced by the presence of graphite particles.

  10. Fatigue of Self-Healing Nanofiber-based Composites: Static Test and Subcritical Crack Propagation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Min Wook; Sett, Soumyadip; Yoon, Sam S; Yarin, Alexander L

    2016-07-20

    Here, we studied the self-healing of composite materials filled with epoxy-containing nanofibers. An initial incision in the middle of a composite sample stretched in a static fatigue test can result in either crack propagation or healing. In this study, crack evolution was observed in real time. A binary epoxy, which acted as a self-healing agent, was encapsulated in two separate types of interwoven nano/microfibers formed by dual-solution blowing, with the core containing either epoxy or hardener and the shell being formed from poly(vinylidene fluoride)/ poly(ethylene oxide) mixture. The core-shell fibers were encased in a poly(dimethylsiloxane) matrix. When the fibers were damaged by a growing crack in this fiber-reinforced composite material because of static stretching in the fatigue test, they broke and released the healing agent into the crack area. The epoxy used in this study was cured and solidified for approximately an hour at room temperature, which then conglutinated and healed the damaged location. The observations were made for at least several hours and in some cases up to several days. It was revealed that the presence of the healing agent (the epoxy) in the fibers successfully prevented the propagation of cracks in stretched samples subjected to the fatigue test. A theoretical analysis of subcritical cracks was performed, and it revealed a jumplike growth of subcritical cracks, which was in qualitative agreement with the experimental results. PMID:27332924

  11. The Effect of the Laboratory Specimen on Fatigue Crack Growth Rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forth, S. C.; Johnston, W. M.; Seshadri, B. R.

    2006-01-01

    Over the past thirty years, laboratory experiments have been devised to develop fatigue crack growth rate data that is representative of the material response. The crack growth rate data generated in the laboratory is then used to predict the safe operating envelope of a structure. The ability to interrelate laboratory data and structural response is called similitude. In essence, a nondimensional term, called the stress intensity factor, was developed that includes the applied stresses, crack size and geometric configuration. The stress intensity factor is then directly related to the rate at which cracks propagate in a material, resulting in the material property of fatigue crack growth response. Standardized specimen configurations and experimental procedures have been developed for laboratory testing to generate crack growth rate data that supports similitude of the stress intensity factor solution. In this paper, the authors present laboratory fatigue crack growth rate test data and finite element analyses that show similitude between standard specimen configurations tested using the constant stress ratio test method is unobtainable.

  12. Influence of dissolved hydrogen on the fatigue crack growth behaviour of AISI 4140 steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramasagara Nagarajan, Varun

    Many metallic structural components come into contact with hydrogen during manufacturing processes or forming operations such as hot stamping of auto body frames and while in service. This interaction of metallic parts with hydrogen can occur due to various reasons such as water molecule dissociation during plating operations, interaction with atmospheric hydrogen due to the moisture present in air during stamping operations or due to prevailing conditions in service (e.g.: acidic or marine environments). Hydrogen, being much smaller in size compared to other metallic elements such as Iron in steels, can enter the material and become dissolved in the matrix. It can lodge itself in interstitials locations of the metal atoms, at vacancies or dislocations in the metallic matrix or at grain boundaries or inclusions (impurities) in the alloy. This dissolved hydrogen can affect the functional life of these structural components leading to catastrophic failures in mission critical applications resulting in loss of lives and structural component. Therefore, it is very important to understand the influence of the dissolved hydrogen on the failure of these structural materials due to cyclic loading (fatigue). For the next generation of hydrogen based fuel cell vehicles and energy systems, it is very crucial to develop structural materials for hydrogen storage and containment which are highly resistant to hydrogen embrittlement. These materials should also be able to provide good long term life in cyclic loading, without undergoing degradation, even when exposed to hydrogen rich environments for extended periods of time. The primary focus of this investigation was to examine the influence of dissolved hydrogen on the fatigue crack growth behaviour of a commercially available high strength medium carbon low alloy (AISI 4140) steel. The secondary objective was to examine the influence of microstructure on the fatigue crack growth behaviour of this material and to determine the

  13. Study of Near-Threshold Fatigue Crack Propagation in Pipeline Steels in High Pressure Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, M.

    1981-01-01

    Near threshold fatigue crack propagation in pipeline steels in high pressure environments was studied. The objective was to determine the level of threshold stress intensity for fatigue crack growth rate behavior in a high strength low alloy X60 pipeline-type steel. Complete results have been generated for gaseous hydrogen at ambient pressure, laboratory air at ambient pressure and approximately 60% relative humidity as well as vacuum of 0.000067 Pa ( 0.0000005 torr) at R-ratios = K(min)/K(max) of 0.1, 0.5, and 0.8. Fatigue crack growth rate behavior in gaseous hydrogen, methane, and methane plus 10 percent hydrogen at 6.89 MPa (100 psi) was determined.

  14. Effect of material heat treatment on fatigue crack initiation in austenitic stainless steels in LWR environments.

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O. K.; Alexandreanu, B.; Shack, W. J.; Energy Technology

    2005-07-31

    The ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code provides rules for the design of Class 1 components of nuclear power plants. Figures I-9.1 through I-9.6 of Appendix I to Section III of the Code specify design curves for applicable structural materials. However, the effects of light water reactor (LWR) coolant environments are not explicitly addressed by the Code design curves. The existing fatigue strain-vs.-life ({var_epsilon}-N) data illustrate potentially significant effects of LWR coolant environments on the fatigue resistance of pressure vessel and piping steels. Under certain environmental and loading conditions, fatigue lives of austenitic stainless steels (SSs) can be a factor of 20 lower in water than in air. This report presents experimental data on the effect of heat treatment on fatigue crack initiation in austenitic Type 304 SS in LWR coolant environments. A detailed metallographic examination of fatigue test specimens was performed to characterize the crack morphology and fracture morphology. The key material, loading, and environmental parameters and their effect on the fatigue life of these steels are also described. Statistical models are presented for estimating the fatigue {var_epsilon}-N curves for austenitic SSs as a function of material, loading, and environmental parameters. Two methods for incorporating the effects of LWR coolant environments into the ASME Code fatigue evaluations are presented.

  15. Prediction of Fatigue Crack Growth of Repaired Al-alloy Structures with Double Sides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benachour, M.; Benachour, N.; Benguediab, M.; Seriari, F. Z.

    During navigation, aircrafts are subject to fatigue damage. In order to rehabilitate damaged structures some techniques are often used to resolve this problem. Efficient repair technique, called composite patch repair, was used to reinforce the damaged structures and stop cracks. In this paper, effect of composite patch repair (Boron/Epoxy) on fatigue crack growth (FCG) was investigated on 2219 T62 Al-alloy. Effects of double patch repair in single notch tensile specimen (SENT) on FCG were studied and compared to single patch repair. Results show beneficial effect of patch repair on fatigue life and FCGR in comparison with the un-patched specimen. In addition, effect of mean stress characterized by stress ratio was highlighted. Fatigue behavior of investigated Al-alloy was compared.

  16. Predicting fatigue properties of cast aluminum by characterizing small-crack propagation behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caton, Michael John

    2001-07-01

    The increased use of cast aluminum in structural components requires a deeper understanding of the mechanisms controlling fatigue properties in order to enable improved predictive capabilities. Of particular interest is the ability to model the influence of processing variables on the fatigue performance of alloys used in automotive applications such as engine blocks and cylinder heads. This thesis describes the results of a study conducted on cast W319 aluminum, a commercial Al-Si-Cu alloy used in automotive engine components, and presents a model that effectively predicts fatigue properties in this alloy as a function of material condition. The very high cycle fatigue regime (˜109 cycles) was examined using ultrasonic testing equipment (20 kHz) and distinct endurance limits were observed. The initiation and propagation of small fatigue cracks (˜5 mum to 2 mm) were monitored by a standard replication technique. It was observed that cracks initiate almost exclusively from microshrinkage pores and that the initiation life is negligible even at stresses below the endurance limit. The endurance limits result from the arrest of small cracks. Small crack growth rates were determined for a variety of material conditions where the influence of solidification time, heat treatment, and grain refinement were investigated. In addition, the influences of applied stress amplitude, stress ratio, and loading frequency on small crack growth were examined. A significant small crack effect was identified in this alloy and standard correlating parameters such as DeltaK and DeltaJ do not adequately characterize small crack growth. A correlating parameter written as [(epsilonmax sigmaa/sigma yield)s a] is proposed and shown to effectively characterize small crack growth for a wide range of stresses and a wide range of solidification conditions. In this parameter, epsilonmax is the total strain corresponding to the maximum applied stress, sigmaa is the stress amplitude, sigma yield is

  17. Effects of a Hydrogen Gas Environment on Fatigue Crack Growth of a Stable Austenitic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamoto, Kyohei; Oda, Yasuji; Noguchi, Hiroshi; Higashida, Kenji

    In order to clarify the effects of a hydrogen gas environment on the fatigue crack growth characteristics of stable austenitic stainless steels, bending fatigue tests were carried out in a hydrogen gas, in a nitrogen gas at 1.0 MPa and in air on a SUS316L using the Japanese Industrial Standards (type 316L). Also, in order to discuss the difference in the hydrogen sensitivity between austenitic stainless steels, the fatigue tests were also carried out on a SUS304 using the Japanese Industrial Standards (type 304) metastable austenitic stainless steel as a material for comparison. The main results obtained are as follows. Hydrogen gas accelerates the fatigue crack growth rate of type 316L. The degree of the fatigue crack growth acceleration is low compared to that in type 304. The fracture surfaces of both the materials practically consist of two parts; the faceted area seemed to be brittle and the remaining area occupying a greater part of the fracture surface and seemed to be ductile. The faceted area does not significantly contribute to the fatigue crack growth rate in both austenitic stainless steels. The slip-off mechanism seems to be valid not only in air and in nitrogen, but also in hydrogen. Also, the main cause of the fatigue crack growth acceleration of both materials occurs by variation of the slip behaviour. The difference in the degree of the acceleration, which in type 316L is lower than in type 304, seems to be caused by the difference in the stability of the γ phase.

  18. Classification of fatigue cracking data in a simulated aircraft fuselage using a self-organizing map

    SciTech Connect

    Marsden, M.L.; Hill, E.V.K.

    1994-12-31

    Many aircraft are being flown beyond their design lifespans and have therefore fallen victim to fatigue cracking. In some cases, such as the 1988 Aloha Airlines 737-200 incident, catastrophic fatigue growth has caused the loss of life. Acoustic emission (AE) nondestructive testing has been used to detect and classical the growth of fatigue cracks in complex structures, such as aircraft fuselages and wings since as early as 1979. In order to simulate an aircraft fuselage undergoing pressurization cycle fatigue, a test was developed in which a thin-walled aluminum pressure vessel was instrumented with AE sensors and cyclically fatigued to promote crack growth at a stress concentration built into the vessel. The AE data acquisition system. extracted the six AE parameters - amplitude, counts, duration, energy, risetime, and count-to-peak from each of the sensor signals. One-third of these parameter data sets were used to tram a Kohonen self-organizing map (SOM) neural network. The remaining data sets were used to test the SOM. The SOM output is a two-dimensional map with similar input data sets located at similar coordinates on the map. Because the continuous AE parameter data are grouped into discrete bands or intervals, e.g., all the events having amplitudes between 51.00 dB and 51.99 dB are classified as 51 dB events, the initial SOM output showed no distinct clustering. However, when the output was transformed into three-dimensions, with the third dimension being the frequency of occurrence of each two-dimensional coordinate, several distinct peaks were evident. These peaks correspond to the three AE source in the vessel: metal rubbing, rivet fretting, and fatigue cracking. Thus, the three-dimensional SOM was able to unambiguously classify fatigue crack growth events in a simulated aircraft fuselage structure.

  19. Crack Growth Behavior in the Threshold Region for High Cycle Fatigue Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, R. G.; Zanganeh, M.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the results of a research program conducted to improve the understanding of fatigue crack growth rate behavior in the threshold growth rate region and to answer a question on the validity of threshold region test data. The validity question relates to the view held by some experimentalists that using the ASTM load shedding test method does not produce valid threshold test results and material properties. The question involves the fanning behavior observed in threshold region of da/dN plots for some materials in which the low R-ratio data fans out from the high R-ratio data. This fanning behavior or elevation of threshold values in the low R-ratio tests is generally assumed to be caused by an increase in crack closure in the low R-ratio tests. Also, the increase in crack closure is assumed by some experimentalists to result from using the ASTM load shedding test procedure. The belief is that this procedure induces load history effects which cause remote closure from plasticity and/or roughness changes in the surface morphology. However, experimental studies performed by the authors have shown that the increase in crack closure is a result of extensive crack tip bifurcations that can occur in some materials, particularly in aluminum alloys, when the crack tip cyclic yield zone size becomes less than the grain size of the alloy. This behavior is related to the high stacking fault energy (SFE) property of aluminum alloys which results in easier slip characteristics. Therefore, the fanning behavior which occurs in aluminum alloys is a function of intrinsic dislocation property of the alloy, and therefore, the fanned data does represent the true threshold properties of the material. However, for the corrosion sensitive steel alloys tested in laboratory air, the occurrence of fanning results from fretting corrosion at the crack tips, and these results should not be considered to be representative of valid threshold properties because the fanning is

  20. Updated Fatigue-Crack-Growth And Fracture-Mechanics Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, Royce G.; Shivakumar, Venkataraman; Newman, James C., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    NASA/FLAGRO 2.0 developed as analytical aid in predicting growth and stability of preexisting flaws and cracks in structural components of aerospace systems. Used for fracture-control analysis of space hardware. Organized into three modules to maximize efficiency in operation. Useful in: (1) crack-instability/crack-growth analysis, (2) processing raw crack-growth data from laboratory tests, and (3) boundary-element analysis to determine stresses and stress-intensity factors. Written in FORTRAN 77 and ANSI C.

  1. Experimental investigation of fatigue of cracked aluminium specimens repaired with fibre composite patches

    SciTech Connect

    Nahas, M.N. )

    1992-08-01

    Standard notched fatigue test specimens are subjected to cyclic loading conditions to a number of cycles enough to initiate cracks, and then the specimens are repaired with fiber-reinforced composite patches to investigate the influence of the repair on their fatigue life. It is found that the repair provides longer life for the test specimens, and substantial reduction in the stress intensity is achieved. 10 refs.

  2. Fatigue-crack propagation behavior of ASTM A27 cast steel in simulated Hanford groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    James, L.A.

    1986-09-01

    Fatigue-crack propagation (FCP) tests were conducted on specimens of cast ASTM A27 steel in simulated Hanford ground-water at 150/sup 0/C and 250C/sup 0/C. Fatigue loadings were employed as the most feasible means of accelerating the environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) process. A tentative threshold for EAC was established, and an example calculation was used to show how such a threshold can be related to allowable stress levels and flaw sizes to assure that EAC will not occur.

  3. The characterization of small fatigue crack growth in PH13-8 molybdenum stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Ohchang

    The rotor hubs of Navy CH-46 helicopters have been made of 4340 steel and had extensive corrosion fatigue problems. Since these helicopters have to be used until the year 2020, the Navy decided to replace 4340 steel with PH 13-8 Mo stainless steel. Because the rotors are exposed to high frequency high cycle fatigue, small fatigue cracks are important in estimating remaining lifetime of the components. The objective of this study was to characterize the small crack growth behavior in the PH 13-8 Mo stainless steel under various loading conditions. Constant amplitude loading was conducted at the stress ratios, R, 0.1 and 0.4. The crack growth rate was affected by the microstructures in early stage of the growth, mainly by the size of the martensite packets and oscillated up to the crack length of 200 mum. It was found that the crack growth rate was little influenced by the stress amplitudes and stress ratios. In addition, the small crack growth rate was found to be similar to the long crack growth rate at R = 0.1 and 0.4. Overload tests and simple block loading were performed to understand load interaction effects on the small crack growth rate. The overload tests indicated that the crack growth rate was little affected by the overload. This might result from the fact that the overload ratio used in this study was low (<1.3). However, the results of the simple block loading showed overall crack growth retardation. The compressive residual stress present at the notch root of the specimen tested at R = 0.1 may lower the effective stress ratio, Reff, from 0.1 to negative R, and may result in the crack growth retardation. The small crack growth behavior was also examined under the saltwater. There was no difference in the crack growth rate between under air and under saltwater. In addition, the crack growth rate of the specimens tested under the saltwater was not affected by the test frequencies of 10, 1 and 0.1 Hz. It was shown that under the saltwater the PH 13-8 Mo

  4. Extreme stress gradient effects on microstructural fatigue crack propagation rates in Ni microbeams

    SciTech Connect

    Sadeghi-Tohidi, F.; Pierron, O. N.

    2015-05-18

    The fatigue crack propagation behavior of microstructurally small cracks growing under extreme stress gradients was investigated in Ni microbeams under fully reversed cyclic loading. A technique to calculate the crack growth rates in microbeams with two different normalized stress gradients (17% and 50% μm{sup −1}) is developed and validated. Decreasing crack propagation rates are observed over the first 2 μm, and the rates are more than 1 order of magnitude slower for the devices with 50% μm{sup −1} stress gradients. This fundamental knowledge is critical to predict the fatigue reliability of advanced metallic microcomponents under bending such as in microelectromechanical systems or flexible/stretchable electronics.

  5. Reference-free fatigue crack detection using nonlinear ultrasonic modulation under various temperature and loading conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Hyung Jin; Sohn, Hoon; DeSimio, Martin P.; Brown, Kevin

    2014-04-01

    This study presents a reference-free fatigue crack detection technique using nonlinear ultrasonic modulation. When low frequency (LF) and high frequency (HF) inputs generated by two surface-mounted lead zirconate titanate (PZT) transducers are applied to a structure, the presence of a fatigue crack can provide a mechanism for nonlinear ultrasonic modulation and create spectral sidebands around the frequency of the HF signal. The crack-induced spectral sidebands are isolated using a combination of linear response subtraction (LRS), synchronous demodulation (SD) and continuous wavelet transform (CWT) filtering. Then, a sequential outlier analysis is performed on the extracted sidebands to identify the crack presence without referring any baseline data obtained from the intact condition of the structure. Finally, the robustness of the proposed technique is demonstrated using actual test data obtained from simple aluminum plate and complex aircraft fitting-lug specimens under varying temperature and loading variations.

  6. Computed tomography part 3: Volumetric, high-resolution x-ray analysis of fatigue crack closure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stock, S. R.; Guvenilir, A.; Breunig, T. M.; Kinney, J. H.; Nichols, M. C.

    1995-01-01

    The study described illustrates how extremely high-resolution volumetric x-ray computed tomography can be applied to a materials problem. The work also gives an example of what choices must be made to tailor an experiment to the capabilities of a computed tomography system. Tomography is used to reconstruct the volume of material enclosing a fatigue crack in Al-Li2090. From the reconstructed volume, the separations of crack faces are quantified as a function of position within the sample, and, through use of a small load frame designed for use in computed tomography, the changing physical crack closure is measured as a function of applied load. In other words, the rate and amounts of physical crack closure are measured at different points of the unloading portion of a fatigue cycle.

  7. An analytical model which combines roughness- and plasticity- induced fatigue crack closure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Nong

    In this study an analytical PICC-RICC Model was developed to describe better the near-threshold fatigue behavior. The PICC-RICC Model was built upon a strip-yield type PICC model originally proposed by Newman and later modified by Hou and Lawrence. A zigzag crack growth path was introduced to simulate surface roughness. The two opposing crack surfaces were considered to be translated and thus mismatched by the mixed-mode displacements occurring near the deflected crack tip. The model is powerful and unique in that it combines the effects of RICC and PICC. Thus, the gradual transition from RICC to PICC dominated crack closure is handled naturally by this model. The influences of the geometrical features of the surface roughness, R-ratio and the cyclic load range on RICC were examined using the PICC-RICC Model. Near-threshold fatigue behavior of various materials was predicted. The effect of microstructure on the RICC level was studied. The predicted results compared favorably with experimental data. The fatigue notch size effect was investigated using the PICC-RICC model. The initial crack length (asb{i}) for propagation was estimated. The predicted notch fatigue strength compared favorably with the Initiation-Propagation (I-P) Model prediction and test data. The existence of a "worst case notch" previously postulated using the I-P Model was confirmed.

  8. Near-threshold fatigue crack growth behavior of 2195 aluminum-lithium-alloy—prediction of crack propagation direction and influence of stress ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, D. L.; Chaturvedi, M. C.

    2000-06-01

    Tensile properties and fatigue crack propagation behavior of a 2195-T8 Al-Li alloy were investigated at different stress ratios, with particular emphasis on their dependence on specimen orientation. Specimens with orientations of 0, 15, 30, 45, and 90 deg to the rolling direction were tested. The alloy contained a strong brass-type texture and a profuse distribution of platelike precipitates of T 1 (Al2CuLi) phase on {111} matrix planes. Both tensile strength and fatigue thresholds were found to be strongly dependent on the specimen orientation, with the lowest values observed along the direction at 45 deg to the rolling direction. The effect of stress ratio on fatigue threshold could generally be explained by a modified crack closure concept. The growth of fatigue crack in this alloy was found to exhibit a significant crystallographic cracking and especially macroscopic crack deflection. The specimens oriented in the L-T + 45 deg had the smallest deflection angle, while the specimens in the L-T and T-L orientations exhibited a large deflection angle. The dependence of the fatigue threshold on the specimen orientation could be rationalized by considering an equivalent fatigue threshold calculated from both mode I and mode II values due to the crack deflection. A four-step approach on the basis of Schmid’s law combined with specific crystallographic textures is proposed to predict the fatigue crack deflection angle. Good agreement between the theoretical prediction and experimental results was observed.

  9. Crossing grain boundaries in metals by slip bands, cleavage and fatigue cracks.

    PubMed

    Pineau, André

    2015-03-28

    The size and the character (low and large angle, special boundaries, tilt and twist boundaries, twins) of the grain boundaries (GBs) in polycrystalline materials influence their strength and their fracture toughness. Recent studies devoted to nanocrystalline (NC) materials have shown a deviation from the Hall-Petch law. Special GBs formed by Σ3 twins in face-centred cubic metals are also known to have a strong effect on the mechanical behaviour of these metals, in particular their work-hardening rate. Grain orientation influences also crack path, the fracture toughness of body-centred cubic (BCC) metals and the fatigue crack growth rate of microstructurally short cracks. This paper deals both with slip transfer at GBs and with the interactions between propagating cracks with GBs. In the analysis of slip transfer, the emphasis is placed on twin boundaries (TBs) for which the dislocation reactions during slip transfer are analysed theoretically, experimentally and using the results of atomic molecular simulations published in the literature. It is shown that in a number of situations this transfer leads to a normal motion of the TB owing to the displacement of partial dislocations along the TB. This motion can generate a de-twinning effect observed in particular in NC metals. Crack propagation across GBs is also considered. It is shown that cleavage crack path behaviour in BCC metals is largely dependent on the twist component of the GBs. A mechanism for the propagation of these twisted cracks involving a segmentation of the crack front and the existence of intergranular parts is discussed and verified for a pressure vessel steel. A similar segmentation seems to occur for short fatigue cracks although, quite surprisingly, this crossing mechanism for fatigue cracks does not seem to have been examined in very much detail in the literature. Metallurgical methods used to improve the strength of the materials, via grain boundaries, are briefly discussed. PMID:25713451

  10. Fatigue Crack Growth Rate and Stress-Intensity Factor Corrections for Out-of-Plane Crack Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forth, Scott C.; Herman, Dave J.; James, Mark A.

    2003-01-01

    Fatigue crack growth rate testing is performed by automated data collection systems that assume straight crack growth in the plane of symmetry and use standard polynomial solutions to compute crack length and stress-intensity factors from compliance or potential drop measurements. Visual measurements used to correct the collected data typically include only the horizontal crack length, which for cracks that propagate out-of-plane, under-estimates the crack growth rates and over-estimates the stress-intensity factors. The authors have devised an approach for correcting both the crack growth rates and stress-intensity factors based on two-dimensional mixed mode-I/II finite element analysis (FEA). The approach is used to correct out-of-plane data for 7050-T7451 and 2025-T6 aluminum alloys. Results indicate the correction process works well for high DeltaK levels but fails to capture the mixed-mode effects at DeltaK levels approaching threshold (da/dN approximately 10(exp -10) meter/cycle).

  11. Small Crack Growth and Fatigue Life Predictions for High-Strength Aluminium Alloys. Part 1; Experimental and Fracture Mechanics Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, X. R.; Newman, J. C.; Zhao, W.; Swain, M. H.; Ding, C. F.; Phillips, E. P.

    1998-01-01

    The small crack effect was investigated in two high-strength aluminium alloys: 7075-T6 bare and LC9cs clad alloy. Both experimental and analytical investigations were conducted to study crack initiation and growth of small cracks. In the experimental program, fatigue tests, small crack and large crack tests A,ere conducted under constant amplitude and Mini-TWIST spectrum loading conditions. A pronounced small crack effect was observed in both materials, especially for the negative stress ratios. For all loading conditions, most of the fatigue life of the SENT specimens was shown to be crack propagation from initial material defects or from the cladding layer. In the analysis program, three-dimensional finite element and A weight function methods were used to determine stress intensity factors and to develop SIF equations for surface and corner cracks at the notch in the SENT specimens. A plastisity-induced crack-closure model was used to correlate small and large crack data, and to make fatigue life predictions, Predicted crack-growth rates and fatigue lives agreed well with experiments. A total fatigue life prediction method for the aluminum alloys was developed and demonstrated using the crack-closure model.

  12. Fatigue-crack initiation and growth in notched 2024-T3 specimens monitored by a video tape system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sova, J. A.; Crews, J. H., Jr.; Exton, R. J.

    1976-01-01

    Fatigue-crack initiation and early stages of growth in notched 2024-T3 aluminum alloy sheet specimens were monitored during constant-amplitude fatigue tests conducted for a range of stress ratios. A video tape system was developed to detect fatigue cracks 0.1 mm in length on the sheet surface and to monitor their growth. Fatigue cracks initiated either at the notch corner or on the notch surface. Most of the first fatigue cracks started as notch-corner cracks, and the crack-initiation period was defined as the number of cycles for which the crack was 0.1 mm in length on the sheet surface. For each of the stress ratios used, the results showed that at the low stress levels, the crack-initiation period constituted at least 90 percent of the fatigue lives. However, for the negative stress ratios at the high stress levels, cracks started as early as at about 40 percent of the fatigue lives.

  13. Experimental stress analysis of fatigue cracks by SPATE

    SciTech Connect

    Pang, H.L.J. )

    1993-04-01

    A computer-aided infrared detector and stress analyzer, called SPATE, was used to detect, monitor, and analyze interacting coplanar part-through surface cracks. It is concluded that thermoelastic stress analysis by the SPATE techique provides approximate stress intensity factors for interacting coplanar semielliptical surface cracks on the plate surface. 4 refs.

  14. Acoustic-emission inspection of the kinetics of fatigue cracks in turbomachinery disks

    SciTech Connect

    Banov, M.D.; Shanyavskii, A.A.; Urbakh, A.I.; Troenkin, D.A.; Konyaev, E.A.; Pykhtin, Yu.A.; Minatsevich, S.F.; Kashin, V.N.

    1988-07-01

    The kinetics of crack growth in turbomachinery disks under low-cycle fatigue conditions was investigated. The relationship between the change in acoustic emission parameters and the processes of loss of continuity of the disk material in cyclic loading was established on the basis of fratographic investigations. A comparative evaluation of the effectiveness of traditional methods of nondestructive testing applicable to the problem of early detection of cracks in disks is given.

  15. [A microstructural approach to fatigue crack processes in poly crystalline BCC materials]. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Gerberich, W.W.

    1992-12-31

    Objective was to study fatigue where a combination of low temperature and cyclic loading produced cyclic cleavage in bcc Fe-base systems. Both dislocation dynamics and quasi-statics of crack growth were probed. This document reviews progress over the past 6 years: hydrogen embrittlement and cleavage, computations (stress near crack tip), dislocation emission from grain boundaries, fracture process zones, and understanding brittle fracture at the atomistic/dislocation scales and at the microscopic/macroscopic scale.

  16. [A microstructural approach to fatigue crack processes in poly crystalline BCC materials

    SciTech Connect

    Gerberich, W.W.

    1992-01-01

    Objective was to study fatigue where a combination of low temperature and cyclic loading produced cyclic cleavage in bcc Fe-base systems. Both dislocation dynamics and quasi-statics of crack growth were probed. This document reviews progress over the past 6 years: hydrogen embrittlement and cleavage, computations (stress near crack tip), dislocation emission from grain boundaries, fracture process zones, and understanding brittle fracture at the atomistic/dislocation scales and at the microscopic/macroscopic scale.

  17. Nondestructive determination of fatigue crack damage in composites using vibration tests.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dibenedetto, A. T.; Gauchel, J. V.; Thomas, R. L.; Barlow, J. W.

    1972-01-01

    The vibration response of glass reinforced epoxy and polyester laminates was investigated. The complex modulus and the damping capacity were measured as fatigue crack damage accumulated. Changes in the Young's modulus as well as the damping capacity correlated with the amount of crack damage. The damping was especially sensitive to debonding of the reinforcement from the resin matrix. Measurement of these vibration response changes shows promise as a means to nondestructively test the structural integrity of filament-reinforced composite structural members.

  18. Detection of Fatigue Damage Prior to Crack Initiation withScanning SQUID Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Tae-Kyu; Morris Jr., J.W.; Lee, Seungkyun; Clarke, John

    2005-11-07

    The remanence fields of fatigued ferritic steel specimens were measured using a scanning microscope based on a high transition temperature Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID). The results show an overall increase of remanence until dislocation density saturates and an additional local remanence increase after saturation during cyclic loading. Because of the combined magnetic and spatial resolution of the SQUID microscope, these local changes of dislocation structures can be detected before a crack actually initiates, and identify the sites where crack nucleation will occur.

  19. The influence of stress ratio and temperature on the fatigue crack growth rate behavior of ARALL

    SciTech Connect

    Salivar, G.C.; Gardini, C.A. Pratt Whitney Group, West Palm Beach, FL )

    1993-01-01

    The fatigue crack growth rate behavior of ARALL (aramid-reinforced aluminum laminate) was investigated as a function of stress ratio and temperature. The particular material was ARALL-3, a 7475-T76 aluminum alloy laminate. Tests were conducted for stress ratios of 0.1 and 0.5 at temperatures of 21, 82, and 93 C (70, 180, and 200 F) using a center-cracked panel geometry (measurements were made in English units and converted to SI units). The objective was to examine the contributions of the effects of crack closure and fiber bridging of the crack on the material behavior. Crack closure was monitored throughout the tests using compliance measurements. Fractography was used to investigate the influence of temperature on the integrity of the aluminum to epoxy/fiber bond to try to identify the effects of fiber bridging. Some crack closure, in the traditional metallic material sense, was evident through compliance measurements. However, the crack tip bridging by the fibers appears to be the dominant mechanism influencing the fatigue crack growth rate behavior in this material under these test conditions. Fractography indicates a considerable difference in fiber-bridging behavior between the room temperature and the elevated temperature tests. 19 refs.

  20. Application of fiber bridging models to fatigue crack growth in unidirectional titanium matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bakuckas, J. G., Jr.; Johnson, W. S.

    1992-01-01

    Several fiber bridging models were reviewed and applied to study the matrix fatigue crack growth behavior in center notched (0)(sub 8) SCS-6/Ti-15-3 and (0)(sub 4) SCS-6/Ti-6Al-4V laminates. Observations revealed that fatigue damage consisted primarily of matrix cracks and fiber matrix interfacial failure in the (0)(sub 8) SCS-6/Ti-15-3 laminates. Fiber-matrix interface failure included fracture of the brittle reaction zone and cracking between the two carbon rich fiber coatings. Intact fibers in the wake of the matrix cracks reduce the stress intensity factor range. Thus, an applied stress intensity factor range is inappropriate to characterize matrix crack growth behavior. Fiber bridging models were used to determine the matrix stress intensity factor range in titanium metal matrix composites. In these models, the fibers in the wake of the crack are idealized as a closure pressure. An unknown constant frictional shear stress is assumed to act along the debond or slip length of the bridging fibers. The frictional shear stress was used as a curve fitting parameter to available data (crack growth data, crack opening displacement data, and debond length data). Large variations in the frictional shear stress required to fit the experimental data indicate that the fiber bridging models in their present form lack predictive capabilities. However, these models provide an efficient and relatively simple engineering method for conducting parametric studies of the matrix growth behavior based on constituent properties.

  1. Subcritical crack-growth behavior of borosilicate glass under cyclic loads: Evidence of a mechanical fatigue effect

    SciTech Connect

    Dill, S.J.; Dauskardt, R.H.; Bennison, S.J.

    1997-03-01

    Amorphous glasses are generally considered immune to mechanical fatigue effects associated with cyclic loading. In this study surprising new evidence is presented for a mechanical fatigue effect in borosilicate glass, in both moist air and dry nitrogen environments. The fatigue effect occurs at near threshold subcritical crack-growth rates (da/dt < 3 {times} 10{sup {minus}8} m/s) as the crack extension per cycle approaches the dimensions of the borosilicate glass network. While subcritical crack growth under cyclic loads at higher load levels is entirely consistent with environmentally assisted crack growth, lower growth rates actually exceed those measured under monotonic loads. This suggests a mechanical fatigue effect which accelerates subcritical crack-growth rates. Likely mechanisms for the mechanical fatigue effect are presented.

  2. Overload and Underload Effects on the Fatigue Crack Growth Behavior of the 2024-T3 Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawicke, David S.

    1997-01-01

    Fatigue crack growth tests were conducted on 0.09 inch thick, 3.0 inch wide middle-crack tension specimens cut from sheets of 2024-T3 aluminum alloy. The tests were conducted using a load sequence that consisted of a single block of 2,500 cycles of constant amplitude loading followed by an overload/underload combination. The largest fatigue crack growth life occurred for the tests with the overload stress equal to 2 times the constant amplitude stress and the underload stress equal to the constant amplitude minimum stress. For the tests with compressive underloads, the fatigue crack growth life decreased with increasing compressive underload stress.

  3. Al-Li alloy AA2198's very high cycle fatigue crack initiation mechanism and its fatigue thermal effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Luopeng; Cao, Xiaojian; Chen, Yu; Wang, Qingyuan

    2015-10-01

    AA2198 alloy is one of the third generation Al-Li alloys which have low density, high elastic modulus, high specific strength and specific stiffness. Compared With the previous two generation Al-Li alloys, the third generation alloys have much improved in alloys strength, corrosion resistance and weldable characteristic. For these advantages, the third generation Al-Li alloys are used as aircraft structures, such as C919 aviation airplane manufactured by China and Russia next generation aviation airplane--MS-21. As we know, the aircraft structures are usually subjected to more than 108 cycles fatigue life during 20-30 years of service, however, there is few reported paper about the third generation Al-Li alloys' very high cycle fatigue(VHCF) which is more than 108 cycles fatigue. The VHCF experiment of AA2198 have been carried out. The two different initiation mechanisms of fatigue fracture have been found in VHCF. The cracks can initiate from the interior of the testing material with lower stress amplitude and more than 108 cycles fatigue life, or from the surface or subsurface of material which is the dominant reason of fatigue failures. During the experiment, the infrared technology is used to monitor the VHCF thermal effect. With the increase of the stress, the temperature of sample is also rising up, increasing about 15 °C for every 10Mpa. The theoretical thermal analysis is also carried out.

  4. Detection of Steel Fatigue Cracks with Strain Sensing Sheets Based on Large Area Electronics

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Yao; Glisic, Branko

    2015-01-01

    Reliable early-stage damage detection requires continuous monitoring over large areas of structure, and with sensors of high spatial resolution. Technologies based on Large Area Electronics (LAE) can enable direct sensing and can be scaled to the level required for Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) of civil structures and infrastructure. Sensing sheets based on LAE contain dense arrangements of thin-film strain sensors, associated electronics and various control circuits deposited and integrated on a flexible polyimide substrate that can cover large areas of structures. This paper presents the development stage of a prototype strain sensing sheet based on LAE for crack detection and localization. Two types of sensing-sheet arrangements with size 6 × 6 inch (152 × 152 mm) were designed and manufactured, one with a very dense arrangement of sensors and the other with a less dense arrangement of sensors. The sensing sheets were bonded to steel plates, which had a notch on the boundary, so the fatigue cracks could be generated under cyclic loading. The sensors within the sensing sheet that were close to the notch tip successfully detected the initialization of fatigue crack and localized the damage on the plate. The sensors that were away from the crack successfully detected the propagation of fatigue cracks based on the time history of the measured strain. The results of the tests have validated the general principles of the proposed sensing sheets for crack detection and identified advantages and challenges of the two tested designs. PMID:25853407

  5. Stress intensity, stress concentration and fatigue crack growth along evacuators of pressurized, autofrettaged tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, A.P.; Underwood, J.H.

    1995-11-01

    The geometry analyzed consists of a thick-walled cylinder having a small diameter evacuator hole penetrating radially through the wall. The loading involves pressure acting on the ID of the tube and all or part of this pressure acting on the evacuator hole. In addition the tube may be fully or partially autofrettaged. Total hoop stress concentrations are determined for a range of radial locations along the evacuator, as are stress intensity factors along a crack emanating from the evacuator hole. Fatigue crack growth rates, and hence crack profiles, are predicted at each of the radial locations. These predictions indicate that the critical location for the crack in a non-autofrettaged tube is at the ID whereas in a fully autofrettaged tube it is located approximately half way through the wall thickness. Taking account of the influence of stress ratio, minimum value of direct stress/maximum value of direct stress has a significantly influence on crack shape in autofrettaged tubes, but a limited effect upon lifetime. The effect upon fatigue lifetime of axial residual stresses due to the autofrettage process is described and it is demonstrated that an insignificant reduction in lifetime results from the presence of such stresses. Finally the predicted profiles are compared with experimental observations of fatigue cracked evacuators and a limited comparison of predicted and actual lifetimes is presented. Agreement is considered good.

  6. Stress concentration, stress intensity, and fatigue crack growth along evacuators of pressurized, autofrettaged tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, A. P.; Underwood, J. H.

    1994-12-01

    A stress analysis has been conducted on a pressurized, fully or partially autofrettaged cylinder with a small diameter evacuator hole penetrating radially through the wall. Pressure was applied on the inside diameter (ID) of the tube, and all or part of this pressure was applied on the evacuator hole surfaces. Total hoop stress concentrations have been determined for a range of radial locations along the evacuator and stress intensity factors have been determined along a crack emanating from the evacuator hole. Fatigue crack growth rates. and hence crack profiles, were predicted at each of the radial locations. These predictions indicate that the critical location for the crack in a non-autofrettaged tube is at the ID, whereas in a fully autofrettaged tube, it is located approximately halfway through the wall thickness. Stress ratio has a significant influence on crack shape in autofrettaged tubes, however, it has a limited effect upon lifetime. The effect of axial residual stresses upon fatigue lifetime due to the autofrettage process has been described and an insignificant reduction in lifetime was a result of such stresses. Finally, the predicted profiles are compared with experimental observations of fatigue crack evacuators, and a limited comparison of predicted and actual lifetimes is presented. Good agreement has been observed in both comparisons.

  7. Fatigue crack propagation under variable amplitude loading in PMMA and bone cement.

    PubMed

    Evans, S L

    2007-09-01

    Fatigue failure of PMMA bone cement is an important factor in the failure of cemented joint replacements. Although these devices experience widely varying loads within the body, there has been little or no study of the effects of variable amplitude loading (VAL) on fatigue damage development. Fatigue crack propagation tests were undertaken using CT specimens made from pure PMMA and Palacos R bone cement. In PMMA, constant amplitude loading tests were carried out at R- ratios ranging from 0.1 to 0.9, and VAL tests at R = 0.1 with 30% overloads every 100 cycles. Palacos R specimens were tested with and without overloads every 100 cycles and with a simplified load spectrum representing daily activities. The R- ratio had a pronounced effect on crack propagation in PMMA consistent with the effects of slow crack growth under constant load. Single overloads caused pronounced crack retardation, especially at low da/dN. In Palacos R, similar overloads had little effect, whilst individual overloads at low da/dN caused pronounced acceleration and spectrum loading retarded crack growth relative to Paris Law predictions. These results demonstrate that VAL can have dramatic effects on crack growth, which should be considered when testing bone cements. PMID:17483908

  8. NASA GRC Fatigue Crack Initiation Life Prediction Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arya, Vinod K.; Halford, Gary R.

    2002-01-01

    Metal fatigue has plagued structural components for centuries, and it remains a critical durability issue in today's aerospace hardware. This is true despite vastly improved and advanced materials, increased mechanistic understanding, and development of accurate structural analysis and advanced fatigue life prediction tools. Each advance is quickly taken advantage of to produce safer, more reliable, more cost effective, and better performing products. In other words, as the envelope is expanded, components are then designed to operate just as close to the newly expanded envelope as they were to the initial one. The problem is perennial. The economic importance of addressing structural durability issues early in the design process is emphasized. Tradeoffs with performance, cost, and legislated restrictions are pointed out. Several aspects of structural durability of advanced systems, advanced materials and advanced fatigue life prediction methods are presented. Specific items include the basic elements of durability analysis, conventional designs, barriers to be overcome for advanced systems, high-temperature life prediction for both creep-fatigue and thermomechanical fatigue, mean stress effects, multiaxial stress-strain states, and cumulative fatigue damage accumulation assessment.

  9. Fracture toughness and fatigue crack propagation rate of short fiber reinforced epoxy composites for analogue cortical bone.

    PubMed

    Chong, Alexander C M; Miller, Forrest; Buxton, McKee; Friis, Elizabeth A

    2007-08-01

    Third-generation mechanical analogue bone models and synthetic analogue cortical bone materials manufactured by Pacific Research Laboratories, Inc. (PRL) are popular tools for use in mechanical testing of various orthopedic implants and biomaterials. A major issue with these models is that the current third-generation epoxy-short fiberglass based composite used as the cortical bone substitute is prone to crack formation and failure in fatigue or repeated quasistatic loading of the model. The purpose of the present study was to compare the tensile and fracture mechanics properties of the current baseline (established PRL "third-generation" E-glass-fiber-epoxy) composite analogue for cortical bone to a new composite material formulation proposed for use as an enhanced fourth-generation cortical bone analogue material. Standard tensile, plane strain fracture toughness, and fatigue crack propagation rate tests were performed on both the third- and fourth-generation composite material formulations using standard ASTM test techniques. Injection molding techniques were used to create random fiber orientation in all test specimens. Standard dog-bone style tensile specimens were tested to obtain ultimate tensile strength and stiffness. Compact tension fracture toughness specimens were utilized to determine plane strain fracture toughness values. Reduced thickness compact tension specimens were also used to determine fatigue crack propagation rate behavior for the two material groups. Literature values for the same parameters for human cortical bone were compared to results from the third- and fourth-generation cortical analogue bone materials. Tensile properties of the fourth-generation material were closer to that of average human cortical bone than the third-generation material. Fracture toughness was significantly increased by 48% in the fourth-generation composite as compared to the third-generation analogue bone. The threshold stress intensity to propagate the crack

  10. Advanced Finite Element Modeling of Low Cycle Fatigue Crack Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregg, Wayne; McGill, Preston; Swanson, Greg; Wells, Doug; Throckmorton, D. A. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This document (a viewgraph presentation) assumes a crack-like defect of a size which may be missed in inspection will exist in most critical location of any critical structure or component. Flaw existence assumption is usually, but not always, conservative based on past experiences in NASA and knowledge of manufacturing processes. Cyclic, environmental, and sustained loads used to generate stresses on models. Fracture Mechanics analysis used to predict crack growth and residual strength. Must show that defective structure will still provide four times required mission lifetime. Special exemptions cover redundant structures, low risk parts, etc. Assessments require specialized software tools, experienced analysts, and reliable material crack growth rate test database.

  11. Fatigue crack growth monitoring of idealized gearbox spline component using acoustic emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lu; Ozevin, Didem; Hardman, William; Kessler, Seth; Timmons, Alan

    2016-04-01

    The spline component of gearbox structure is a non-redundant element that requires early detection of flaws for preventing catastrophic failures. The acoustic emission (AE) method is a direct way of detecting active flaws; however, the method suffers from the influence of background noise and location/sensor based pattern recognition method. It is important to identify the source mechanism and adapt it to different test conditions and sensors. In this paper, the fatigue crack growth of a notched and flattened gearbox spline component is monitored using the AE method in a laboratory environment. The test sample has the major details of the spline component on a flattened geometry. The AE data is continuously collected together with strain gauges strategically positions on the structure. The fatigue test characteristics are 4 Hz frequency and 0.1 as the ratio of minimum to maximum loading in tensile regime. It is observed that there are significant amount of continuous emissions released from the notch tip due to the formation of plastic deformation and slow crack growth. The frequency spectra of continuous emissions and burst emissions are compared to understand the difference of sudden crack growth and gradual crack growth. The predicted crack growth rate is compared with the AE data using the cumulative AE events at the notch tip. The source mechanism of sudden crack growth is obtained solving the inverse mathematical problem from output signal to input signal. The spline component of gearbox structure is a non-redundant element that requires early detection of flaws for preventing catastrophic failures. In this paper, the fatigue crack growth of a notched and flattened gearbox spline component is monitored using the AE method The AE data is continuously collected together with strain gauges. There are significant amount of continuous emissions released from the notch tip due to the formation of plastic deformation and slow crack growth. The source mechanism of

  12. Biaxial Fatigue Crack Growth Behavior in Aluminum Alloy 5083-H116 Under Ambient Laboratory and Saltwater Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perel, V. Y.; Misak, H. E.; Mall, S.; Jain, V. K.

    2015-04-01

    Crack growth of aluminum alloy 5083 was investigated when subjected to the in-plane biaxial tension-tension fatigue with stress ratio of 0.5 under ambient laboratory and saltwater environments. Cruciform specimens with a center hole, containing a notch and precrack at 45° to the specimen's arms, were tested in a biaxial fatigue test machine. Two biaxiality ratios, λ = 1 and λ = 1.5, were studied. For λ = 1, crack propagated along a straight line collinearly with the precrack, while for λ = 1.5 case, the crack path was curved and non-collinear with the precrack. Uniaxial fatigue tests were also conducted. Crack growth rates were faster under the biaxiality fatigue in comparison to uniaxial fatigue at a given crack driving force (Δ K I or Δ G) in both environments. Further, an increase in biaxiality ratio increased the crack growth rate, i.e., faster for λ = 1.5 case than λ = 1 case. Both biaxial fatigue and saltwater environment showed detrimental effects on the fatigue crack growth resistance of 5083, and its combination is highly detrimental when compared to uniaxial fatigue.

  13. Fracture mechanics and surface chemistry studies of fatigue crack growth in an aluminum alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, R. P.; Pao, P. S.; Hart, R. G.; Weir, T. W.; Simmons, G. W.

    1980-12-01

    Fracture mechanics and surface chemistry studies were carried out to develop further understanding of the influence of water vapor on fatigue crack growth in aluminum alloys. The room temperature fatigue crack growth response was determined for 2219-T851 aluminum alloy exposed to water vapor at pressures from 1 to 30 Pa over a range of stress intensity factors ( K). Data were also obtained in vacuum (at < 0.50 μPa), and dehumidified argon. The test results showed that, at a frequency of 5 Hz, the rate of crack growth is essentially unaffected by water vapor until a threshold pressure is reached. Above this threshold, the rates increased, reaching a maximum within one order of magnitude increase in vapor pressure. This maximum crack growth rate is equal to that obtained in air (40 to 60 pct relative humidity), distilled water and 3.5 pct NaCl solution on the same material. Parallel studies of the reactions of water vapor with fresh alloy surfaces (produced either by in situ impact fracture or by ion etching) were made by Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The extent of surface reaction was monitored by changes in the oxygen AES and XPS signals. Correlation between the fatigue crack growth response and the surface reaction kinetics has been made, and is consistent with a transport-limited model for crack growth. The results also suggest that enhancement of fatigue crack growth by water vapor in the aluminum alloys occurs through a “hydrogen embrittle ment” mechanism.

  14. Elastic analysis of a mode II fatigue crack test specimen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, B.; Buzzard, R. J.; Brown, W. F., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Elastic displacements and stress intensity measurements for a mode II specimen have been obtained over a range of a/W values between 0.500 and 0.900 using the MARC general purpose finite element program. Stress intensity factors were experimentally determined using load point displacement values. Good general agreement between numerical and experimental results for crack mouth, crack surface, and load point displacements, and for stress intensity factors, demonstrates the accuracy of the present method.

  15. Fatigue crack growth in the highly plastic regime

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.S.; Baik, Y.M.

    1997-12-31

    This paper evaluates the performance of {Delta}J{sup {star}}, {Delta}J[superscript karet] and {Delta}K as fracture parameters for center-cracked plate specimens of Alloy 718 under R{sub {sigma}} = 0, nominally elastic and plastic loading at elevated temperatures. The parameters {Delta}J{sup {star}} and {Delta}J[superscript caret] are computed from the results of an elastic-plastic finite element analysis of crack growth. At 538 C the results show, in contrast to the previous results of R{sup {var_epsilon}} = {minus}1 strain control tests, that the correlation of crack growth rates with {Delta}J{sup {star}} or {Delta}J[superscript caret] deviates from the relation of the Paris law type while {Delta}K gives a satisfactory correlation. The correlation at 649 C is poor for all three parameters. The finite element analysis shows that the crack closing behavior diminishes and eventually disappears as the crack tip plasticity increases due to crack growth or increased applied stress.

  16. High Temperature Fatigue Crack Growth Behavior of Alloy 10

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayda, John

    2001-01-01

    Methods to improve the high temperature, dwell crack growth resistance of Alloy 10, a high strength, nickel-base disk alloy, were studied. Two approaches, heat treat variations and composition modifications, were investigated. Under the heat treat approach, solution temperature, cooling rates, and stabilization, were studied. It was found that higher solution temperatures, which promote coarser grain sizes, coupled with a 1550 F stabilization treatment were found to significantly reduce dwell crack growth rates at 1300 F Changes in the niobium and tantalum content were found to have a much smaller impact on crack growth behavior. Lowering the niobium:tantalum ratio did improve crack growth resistance and this effect was most pronounced for coarse grain microstructures. Based on these findings, a coarse grain microstructure for Alloy 10 appears to be the best option for improving dwell crack growth resistance, especially in the rim of a disk where temperatures can reach or exceed 1300 T. Further, the use of advanced processing technologies, which can produce a coarse grain rim and fine grain bore, would be the preferred option for Alloy 10 to obtain the optimal balance between tensile, creep, and crack growth requirements for small gas turbine engines.

  17. A structural health monitoring fastener for tracking fatigue crack growth in bolted metallic joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakow, Alexi Schroder

    Fatigue cracks initiating at fastener hole locations in metallic components are among the most common form of airframe damage. The fastener hole site has been surveyed as the second leading initiation site for fatigue related accidents of fixed wing aircraft. Current methods for inspecting airframes for these cracks are manual, whereby inspectors rely on non-destructive inspection equipment or hand-held probes to scan over areas of a structure. Use of this equipment often demands disassembly of the vehicle to search appropriate hole locations for cracks, which elevates the complexity and cost of these maintenance inspections. Improved reliability, safety, and reduced cost of such maintenance can be realized by the permanent integration of sensors with a structure to detect this damage. Such an integrated system of sensors would form a structural health monitoring (SHM) system. In this study, an Additive, Interleaved, Multi-layer Electromagnetic (AIME) sensor was developed and integrated with the shank of a fastener to form a SHM Fastener, a new SHM technology targeted at detection of fastener hole cracks. The major advantages of the SHM Fastener are its installation, which does not require joint layer disassembly, its capability to detect inner layer cracks, and its capability to operate in a continuous autonomous mode. Two methods for fabricating the proposed SHM Fastener were studied. The first option consisted of a thin flexible printed circuit film that was bonded around a thin metallic sleeve placed around the fastener shank. The second option consisted of coating sensor materials directly to the shank of a part in an effort to increase the durability of the sensor under severe loading conditions. Both analytical and numerical models were developed to characterize the capability of the sensors and provide a design tool for the sensor layout. A diagnostic technique for crack growth monitoring was developed to complete the SHM system, which consists of the

  18. The Growth of Naturally-Generated Small Fatigue Cracks in a Nickel-Base Single-Crystal Superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yandt, Scott A.

    An experimental and analytical study on the formation and growth small fatigue cracks embedded in a notch in single-crystal superalloy has been investigated. The experimental program consisted of 12 constant amplitude fatigue tests performed on single-edge notch (SEN) fatigue specimens oriented with the loading axis along [010] and with a notch factor of 2.7. The fatigue tests concentrated on one temperature (650°C) and loading condition with the secondary crystallographic orientation---the notch orientation---being the primary variable. Two secondary crystallographic orientations were considered in the present study, [101] and [100]. In the analytical study, the distribution of stresses and strains in the notch region and the stress-intensity factors and the elastic-plastic J-integral for Mode-I semi-elliptical surface cracks embedded at the notch root were investigated using the finite element method (FEM). The anisotropic material properties were shown to have a significant effect on both the stress and strain distribution in the notch region and the crack-tip parameters. The results of the experimental study have shown that fatigue cracks formation occurs via expansion of elliptical subsurface interdendritic pores located at high stress regions in the notch. Once the subsurface crack intersected the notch surface, subsequent crack growth occurred as semi-elliptical surface cracks. The secondary crystallographic orientation had a marked effect on crack-initiation life (the number of cycles to form a crack with a surface length of 760 mum) but no effect on small crack propagation behaviour. Crack initiation life predictions were made using a holistic lifing approach that considers the size, distribution and local stresses acting at the subsurface pores and utilizes the small fatigue crack growth data obtained from the experimental study. The predictions were found to agree reasonably well with the experimental test results and to account for the crack initiation

  19. Hydrogen Isotope Effect on the Fatigue Crack Growth Rate in Pipeline Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connolly, Matthew; Slifka, Andrew; Drexler, Elizabeth; Hydrogen Pipeline Safety Team

    Hydrogen (H2) is desirable for energy storage as it is cleaner burning and can store a larger amount of energy than an equal mass of gasoline. One problem in the development of a hydrogen economy is to find or develop materials that ensure the safe, reliable, and cost-effective flow of energy from the source to the user. It is expected steels will be needed to serve this function. However, the existing network of natural gas pipeline, for example, is constructed of ferrous materials which are susceptible to embrittlement and subsequent increased fatigue crack growth rates after exposure to hydrogen. It is expected that diffusion rates play an important role on fatigue crack growth rates. We report the measurement of the fatigue crack growth rate in a high strength pipeline steel in a gaseous deuterium (D2) environment, in an effort to determine the role of diffusion rate on FCGR, because D2 is chemically identical to H2, but with twice the mass. We found that the D2 fatigue crack growth rate was not enhanced compared to air as is seen in an H2 environment; in fact our D2 rate measurement was slightly slower than in air, a result which is not expected to be due to diffusion rates alone. NIST Materials Measurement Laboratory, Applied Chemicals and Materials Division.

  20. Review of environmental effects on fatigue crack growth of austenitic stainless steels.

    SciTech Connect

    Shack, W. J.; Kassner, T. F.; Energy Technology

    1994-07-11

    Fatigue and environmentally assisted cracking of piping, pressure vessel cladding, and core components in light water reactors are potential concerns to the nuclear industry and regulatory agencies. The degradation processes include intergranular stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steel (SS) piping in boiling water reactors (BWRs), and propagation of fatigue or stress corrosion cracks (which initiate in sensitized SS cladding) into low-alloy ferritic steels in BWR pressure vessels. Crack growth data for wrought and cast austenitic SSs in simulated BWR water, developed at Argonne National Laboratory under US Nuclear Regulatory Commission sponsorship over the past 10 years, have been compiled into a data base along with similar data obtained from the open literature. The data were analyzed to develop corrosion-fatigue curves for austenitic SSs in aqueous environments corresponding to normal BWR water chemistries, for BWRs that add hydrogen to the feedwater, and for pressurized water reactor primary-system-coolant chemistry. The corrosion-fatigue data and curves in water were compared with the air line in Section XI of the ASME Code.

  1. Procedures for evaluating filament cracking during fatigue testing of Nb3Sn strand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheth, M. K.; Lee, Peter; McRae, D. M.; Walsh, Robert; Starch, W. L.; Jewell, M. C.; Devred, A.; Larbalestier, D. C.

    2012-06-01

    In Tokamak fusion reactors, such as ITER, superconducting strands are subjected to repeated Lorentz force loading and unloading which may degrade performance over time. The Cu matrix which surrounds the brittle Nb3Sn filaments allows the possibility of some elastic-plastic deformation that can initiate filament cracking. We seek to understand if there are strand design variables that might ameliorate such degradation but before being able to do such experiments, we need to establish procedures that can unambiguously detect the cracking caused by loading, rather than by subsequent metallographic examination. Here we make a first report of our procedures after fatigue testing at 77K. Filament crack densities were quantified from large montages covering ≈20 mm length of strand. Three types of cracks were present. The most common were cracks transverse to the filament axis adjacent to voids. Cracks away from voids were of low density until close to the fracture strain. A third kind of crack which generally initiates at unreacted Nb cores of filaments extends radially and in the plane parallel to the wire axis. Example results on one bronze strand fatigued for 1000 loading cycles at axial strains from 0.4% to 1.14% are shown.

  2. Changes in magnetic flux density around fatigue crack tips of carbon tool steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honda, Takashi; Kida, Katsuyuki; Santos, Edson C.; Tanabe, Hirotaka

    2010-03-01

    Fatigue failure of steel occurs when small cracks form in a component and then continue to grow to a size large enough to cause failure. In order to understand the strength of steel components it is important to find the cracks which eventually grow to cause failures. However, at present, it is not easy to distinguish, in the early stages of growth, the cracks which will grow fast and cause failure. We hypothesized that it may be possible to distinguish them by comparing changes in the magnetic flux density around the tips of those cracks that grew large enough to cause failure. In order to measure these changes in magnetic flux density, we developed a scanning Hall probe microscope and observed the fatigue cracks growing from artificial slits in carbon tool steels (JIS SKS93). We also compared the changes in magnetic flux density around crack tips which grew under different loads and found that there is a strong correlation between the magnetic flux density, crack growth and stress intensity factors. In order to understand this relation, we measured the changes in the magnetic flux density and residual tensile stress by using an X-ray system, and found that the magnetic flux density changes not only in the plastic deformation area but also in the area of elastic stress field with increased stress.

  3. Changes in magnetic flux density around fatigue crack tips of carbon tool steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honda, Takashi; Kida, Katsuyuki; Santos, Edson C.; Tanabe, Hirotaka

    2009-12-01

    Fatigue failure of steel occurs when small cracks form in a component and then continue to grow to a size large enough to cause failure. In order to understand the strength of steel components it is important to find the cracks which eventually grow to cause failures. However, at present, it is not easy to distinguish, in the early stages of growth, the cracks which will grow fast and cause failure. We hypothesized that it may be possible to distinguish them by comparing changes in the magnetic flux density around the tips of those cracks that grew large enough to cause failure. In order to measure these changes in magnetic flux density, we developed a scanning Hall probe microscope and observed the fatigue cracks growing from artificial slits in carbon tool steels (JIS SKS93). We also compared the changes in magnetic flux density around crack tips which grew under different loads and found that there is a strong correlation between the magnetic flux density, crack growth and stress intensity factors. In order to understand this relation, we measured the changes in the magnetic flux density and residual tensile stress by using an X-ray system, and found that the magnetic flux density changes not only in the plastic deformation area but also in the area of elastic stress field with increased stress.

  4. Characterization of Pore Defects and Fatigue Cracks in Die Cast AM60 Using 3D X-ray Computed Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhuofei; Kang, Jidong; Wilkinson, David S.

    2015-08-01

    AM60 high pressure die castings have been used in automobile applications to reduce the weight of vehicles. However, the pore defects that are inherent in die casting may negatively affect mechanical properties, especially the fatigue properties. Here we have studied damage ( e.g., pore defects, fatigue cracks) during strained-controlled fatigue using 3-dimensional X-ray computed tomography (XCT). The fatigue test was interrupted every 2000 cycles and the specimen was removed to be scanned using a desktop micro-CT system. XCT reveals pore defects, cracks, and fracture surfaces. The results show that pores can be accurately measured and modeled in 3D. Defect bands are found to be made of pores under 50 µm (based on volume-equivalent sphere diameter). Larger pores are randomly distributed in the region between the defect bands. Observation of fatigue cracks by XCT is performed in three ways such that the 3D model gives the best illustration of crack-porosity interaction while the other two methods, with the cracks being viewed on transverse or longitudinal cross sections, have better detectability on crack initiation and crack tip observation. XCT is also of value in failure analysis on fracture surfaces. By assessing XCT data during fatigue testing and observing fracture surfaces on a 3D model, a better understanding on the crack initiation, crack-porosity interaction, and the morphology of fracture surface is achieved.

  5. Experimental Evaluation of Fatigue Crack Initiation from Corroded Hemispherical Notches in Aerospace Structural Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Daniel B.; Forman, Royce; Shindo, David

    2010-01-01

    A test program was developed and executed to evaluate the influence of corroded hemispherical notches on the fatigue crack initiation and propagation in aluminum 7075-T7351, 4340 steel, and D6AC steel. Surface enhancements such as shot peening and laser shock peening were also incorporated as part of the test effort with the intent of improving fatigue performance. In addition to the testing, fracture mechanics and endurance limit based analysis methods were evaluated to characterize the results with the objective of challenging typical assumptions used in modeling fatigue cracks from corrosion pits. The results specifically demonstrate that the aluminum and steel alloys behave differently with respect to fatigue crack initiation from hemispherical corrosion pits. The aluminum test results were bounded by the fracture mechanics and endurance limit models while exhibiting a general insensitivity to the residual stress field generated by shot peening. The steel specimens were better characterized by the endurance limit fatigue properties and did exhibit sensitivities to residual stresses from the shot peening and laser shock peening

  6. A crack-closure model for predicting fatigue-crack growth under aircraft spectrum loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    The development and application of an analytical model of cycle crack growth is presented that includes the effects of crack closure. The model was used to correlate crack growth rates under constant amplitude loading and to predict crack growth under aircraft spectrum loading on 2219-T851 aluminum alloy sheet material. The predicted crack growth lives agreed well with experimental data. The ratio of predicted to experimental lives ranged from 0.66 to 1.48. These predictions were made using data from an ASTM E24.06.01 Round Robin.

  7. Effect of thermal aging on the fatigue crack growth behavior of cast duplex stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lü, Xu-ming; Li, Shi-lei; Zhang, Hai-long; Wang, Yan-li; Wang, Xi-tao

    2015-11-01

    The effect of thermal aging on the fatigue crack growth (FCG) behavior of Z3CN20?09M cast duplex stainless steel with low ferrite content was investigated in this study. The crack surfaces and crack growth paths were analyzed to clarify the FCG mechanisms. The microstructure and micromechanical properties before and after thermal aging were also studied. Spinodal decomposition in the aged ferrite phase led to an increase in the hardness and a decrease in the plastic deformation capacity, whereas the hardness and plastic deformation capacity of the austenite phase were almost unchanged after thermal aging. The aged material exhibited a better FCG resistance than the unaged material in the near-threshold regime because of the increased roughness-induced crack closure associated with the tortuous crack path and rougher fracture surface; however, the tendency was reversed in the Paris regime because of the cleavage fracture in the aged ferrite phases.

  8. Fatigue crack initiation and small crack growth in several airframe alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swain, M. H.; Newman, J. C., Jr.; Phillips, E. P.; Everett, R. A.

    1990-01-01

    The growth of naturally-initiated small cracks under a variety of constant amplitude and variable amplitude load sequences is examined for several airframe materials: the conventional aluminum alloys, 2024-T3 and 7075-T6, the aluminum-lithium alloy, 2090-T8E41 and 4340 steel. Loading conditions investigated include constant amplitude loading at R = 0.5, 0, -1 and -2 and the variable amplitude sequences FALSTAFF, Mini-TWIST, and FELIX/28. Crack growth was measured at the root of semicircular edge notches using acetate replicas. Crack growth rates are compared on a stress intensity factor basis, to those for large cracks to evaluate the extent of the small crack effect in each alloy. In addition, the various alloys are compared on a crack initiation and crack growth morphology basis.

  9. Fatigue crack initiation and small crack growth in several airframe alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swain, M. H.; Newman, J. C., Jr.; Phillips, E. P.; Everett, R. A., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The growth of naturally-initiated small cracks under a variety of constant amplitude and variable amplitude load sequences is examined for several airframe materials: the conventional aluminum alloys, 2024-T3 and 7075-T6, the aluminum-lithium alloy, 2090-T8E41, and 4340 steel. Loading conditions investigated include constant amplitude loading at R = 0.5, 0, -1 and -2 and the variable amplitude sequences FALSTAFF, Mini-TWIST and FELIX/28. Crack growth was measured at the root of semicircular edge notches using acetate replicas. Crack growth rates are compared on a stress intensity factor basis, to those for large cracks to evaluate the extent of the small crack effect in each alloy. In addition, the various alloys are compared on a crack initiation and crack growth morphology basis.

  10. Initiation and Propagation Behavior of a Fatigue Crack of Alloy 718

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawagoishi, Norio; Goto, Masahiro; Wang, Xishu; Wang, Qingyuan

    Rotating bending fatigue tests were carried out at room temperature and 500°C for alloy 718 with nearly the same static strength but different precipitated particles, i.e. a peak aged condition (720°C-10h) and a double aged one (720°C-8h, 620°C-8h), in order to investigate the effect of precipitated particles on crack initiation and propagation behavior. Fatigue strength was higher in the double aged material than in the peak one at both temperatures. The main reason for high fatigue strength of the double aged material was that the propagation of a small crack with a few grain sizes was suppressed by the carbide particles precipitated in a grain.

  11. A Practical Engineering Approach to Predicting Fatigue Crack Growth in Riveted Lap Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, C. E.; Piascik, R. S.; Newman, J. C., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    An extensive experimental database has been assembled from very detailed teardown examinations of fatigue cracks found in rivet holes of fuselage structural components. Based on this experimental database, a comprehensive analysis methodology was developed to predict the onset of widespread fatigue damage in lap joints of fuselage structure. Several computer codes were developed with specialized capabilities to conduct the various analyses that make up the comprehensive methodology. Over the past several years, the authors have interrogated various aspects of the analysis methods to determine the degree of computational rigor required to produce numerical predictions with acceptable engineering accuracy. This study led to the formulation of a practical engineering approach to predicting fatigue crack growth in riveted lap joints. This paper describes the practical engineering approach and compares predictions with the results from several experimental studies.

  12. A Practical Engineering Approach to Predicting Fatigue Crack Growth in Riveted Lap Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Charles E.; Piascik, Robert S.; Newman, James C., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    An extensive experimental database has been assembled from very detailed teardown examinations of fatigue cracks found in rivet holes of fuselage structural components. Based on this experimental database, a comprehensive analysis methodology was developed to predict the onset of widespread fatigue damage in lap joints of fuselage structure. Several computer codes were developed with specialized capabilities to conduct the various analyses that make up the comprehensive methodology. Over the past several years, the authors have interrogated various aspects of the analysis methods to determine the degree of computational rigor required to produce numerical predictions with acceptable engineering accuracy. This study led to the formulation of a practical engineering approach to predicting fatigue crack growth in riveted lap joints. This paper describes the practical engineering approach and compares predictions with the results from several experimental studies.

  13. On the fatigue crack propagation behavior of superalloys at intermediate temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayda, J.; Miner, R. V.; Gabb, T. P.

    1984-01-01

    Two superalloys used in gas-turbine disks, Rene 95 and IN-100 were tested in several forms at 0.33 Hz in air, and the results were compared with earlier data on Astroloy to gain a better understanding of the effects of grain size, strength, and alloy composition on the fatigue crack propagation behavior. In addition, selected forms of Rene 95 were tested at 0.33 Hz in vacuum and in air using a cycle with a 120-sec tensile dwell to evaluate the effects of environment and creep. Results of the study emphasize the beneficial effect of large grain size on the fatigue and crep-fatigue crack growth resistance of the superalloys in the temperature range corresponding to the operating temperatures of aircraft gas-turbine engine disk rims.

  14. Effects of frequency and temperature on short fatigue crack growth in aqueous environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakai, Y.; Alavi, A.; Wei, R. P.

    1988-03-01

    The growth of short fatigue cracks in a NiCrMoV steel forging was examined, under constant applied stress intensity range (ΔK = 31 MPa-m1/2) in deaerated deionized water and 0.3 M Na2SO4 solution, as a function of frequency and temperature. Measurements were also made of the kinetics of electrochemical reactions of bare steel surfaces with the deaerated 0.3 M Na2SO4 solution, under free corrosion, to provide for comparison and correlation. Fatigue crack growth rate increased with reductions in frequency and with increases in temperature. The maximum amount of crack growth enhancement by the different environments appeared to be equal, although the crack growth response in deionized water appeared to be consistent with a faster reaction rate. The temperature and frequency dependence for corrosion fatigue crack growth corresponded directly with that for charge transfer between the “bare” and “filmed” metal surfaces under free corrosion. The results showed that shortcrack growth in the aqueous environments is controlled by the rate of electrochemical reactions, and is thermally activated with an apparent activation energy of about 40 kJ/M.

  15. Applications of infrared thermography for nondestructive testing of fatigue cracks in steel bridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakagami, Takahide; Izumi, Yui; Kobayashi, Yoshihiro; Mizokami, Yoshiaki; Kawabata, Sunao

    2014-05-01

    In recent years, fatigue crack propagations in aged steel bridge which may lead to catastrophic structural failures have become a serious problem. For large-scale steel structures such as orthotropic steel decks in highway bridges, nondestructive inspection of deteriorations and fatigue damages are indispensable for securing their safety and for estimating their remaining strength. As conventional NDT techniques for steel bridges, visual testing, magnetic particle testing and ultrasonic testing have been commonly employed. However, these techniques are time- and labor- consuming techniques, because special equipment is required for inspection, such as scaffolding or a truck mount aerial work platform. In this paper, a new thermography NDT technique, which is based on temperature gap appeared on the surface of structural members due to thermal insulation effect of the crack, is developed for detection of fatigue cracks. The practicability of the developed technique is demonstrated by the field experiments for highway steel bridges in service. Detectable crack size and factors such as measurement time, season or spatial resolution which influence crack detectability are investigated.

  16. Detection of fatigue crack on a rotating steel shaft using air-coupled nonlinear ultrasonic modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Byeongju; Park, Byeongjin; Sohn, Hoon; Lim, Cheol-Woo; Park, Jae-Roung

    2015-04-01

    Rotating shafts in drop lifts of manufacturing facilities are susceptible to fatigue cracks as they are under repetitive heavy loading and high speed spins. However, it is challenging to use conventional contact transducers to monitor these shafts as they are continuously spinning with a high speed. In this study, a noncontact crack detection technique for a rotating shaft is proposed using air-coupled transducers (ACTs). (1) Low frequency (LF) and high frequency (HF) sinusoidal inputs are simultaneously applied to a shaft using two ACTs, respectively. A fatigue crack can provide a mechanism for nonlinear ultrasonic modulation and create spectral sidebands at the modulation frequencies, which are the sum and difference of the two input frequencies Then LF and HF inputs are independently applied to the shaft using each ACT. These three ultrasonic responses are measured using another ACT. (2) The damage index (DI) is defined as the energy of the first sideband components, which corresponding to the frequency sum and difference between HF and LF inputs. (3) Steps 1 and 2 are repeated with various combinations of HF and LF inputs. Crack existence is detected through an outlier analysis of the DIs. The effectiveness of the proposed technique is investigated using a steel shaft with a real fatigue crack.

  17. Effects of friction and high torque on fatigue crack propagation in Mode III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayeb-Hashemi, H.; McClintock, F. A.; Ritchie, R. O.

    1982-12-01

    Turbo-generator and automotive shafts are often subjected to complex histories of high torques. To provide a basis for fatigue life estimation in such components, a study of fatigue crack propagation in Mode III (anti-plane shear) for a mill-annealed AISI 4140 steel (RB88, 590 MN/m2 tensile strength) has been undertaken, using torsionally-loaded, circumferentially-notched cylindrical specimens. As demonstrated previously for higher strength AISI 4340 steel, Mode III cyclic crack growth rates (dc/dN) IIIcan be related to the alternating stress intensity factor ΔKIII for conditions of small-scale yielding. However, to describe crack propagation behavior over an extended range of crack growth rates (˜10-6 to 10-2 mm per cycle), where crack growth proceeds under elastic-plastic and full plastic conditions, no correlation between (dc/dN) III and ΔKIII is possible. Accordingly, a new parameter for torsional crack growth, termed the plastic strain intensity Γ III, is introduced and is shown to provide a unique description of Mode III crack growth behavior for a wide range of testing conditions, provided a mean load reduces friction, abrasion, and interlocking between mating fracture surfaces. The latter effect is found to be dependent upon the mode of applied loading (i.e., the presence of superimposed axial loads) and the crack length and torque level. Mechanistically, high-torque surfaces were transverse, macroscopically flat, and smeared. Lower torques showed additional axial cracks (longitudinal shear cracking) perpendicular to the main transverse surface. A micro-mechanical model for the main radi l Mode III growth, based on the premise that crack advance results from Mode II coalescence of microcracks initiated at inclusions ahead of the main crack front, is extended to high nominal stress levels, and predicts that Mode III fatigue crack propagation rates should be proportional to the range of plastic strain intensity (ΔΓIII if local Mode II growth rates are

  18. Fatigue of graphite/epoxy buffer strip panels with center cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bigelow, C. A.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of fatigue loading on the behavior of graphite/epoxy panels with either S-Glass or Kevlar-49 buffer strips is studied. Buffer strip panels are fatigued and tested in tension to measure their residual strength with crack-like damage. Panels are made with 45/0/-45/90 sub 2s layup with either S-Glass or Kevlar-49 buffer strip material. The buffer strips are parallel to the loading direction and made by replacing narrow strips of the 0-degree graphite plies with strips of either 0-degree S-Glass/epoxy or Kevlar-49/epoxy on a one-for-one basis. The panels are subjected to a fatigue loading spectrum MINITWIST, the shortened version of the standardized load program for the wing lower surface of a transport aircraft. Two levels of maximum strain are used in the spectrum with three durations of the fatigue spectrum. One group of panels is preloaded prior to the application of the fatigue cycling. The preload consists of statistically loading the spectrum in tension until the crack-tip damage zone reaches the ajacent buffer strips. After fatigue loading, all specimens are statistically loaded in tension to failure to determine their residual strengths.

  19. Microstructure and mesh sensitivities of mesoscale surrogate driving force measures for transgranular fatigue cracks in polycrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Castelluccio, Gustavo M.; McDowell, David L.

    2015-05-22

    The number of cycles required to form and grow microstructurally small fatigue cracks in metals exhibits substantial variability, particularly for low applied strain amplitudes. This variability is commonly attributed to the heterogeneity of cyclic plastic deformation within the microstructure, and presents a challenge to minimum life design of fatigue resistant components. Our paper analyzes sources of variability that contribute to the driving force of transgranular fatigue cracks within nucleant grains. We also employ crystal plasticity finite element simulations that explicitly render the polycrystalline microstructure and Fatigue Indicator Parameters (FIPs) averaged over different volume sizes and shapes relative to the anticipated fatigue damage process zone. Volume averaging is necessary to both achieve description of a finite fatigue damage process zone and to regularize mesh dependence in simulations. Furthermore, results from constant amplitude remote applied straining are characterized in terms of the extreme value distributions of volume averaged FIPs. Grain averaged FIP values effectively mitigate mesh sensitivity, but they smear out variability within grains. Furthermore, volume averaging over bands that encompass critical transgranular slip planes appear to present the most attractive approach to mitigate mesh sensitivity while preserving variability within grains.

  20. Microstructure and mesh sensitivities of mesoscale surrogate driving force measures for transgranular fatigue cracks in polycrystals

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Castelluccio, Gustavo M.; McDowell, David L.

    2015-05-22

    The number of cycles required to form and grow microstructurally small fatigue cracks in metals exhibits substantial variability, particularly for low applied strain amplitudes. This variability is commonly attributed to the heterogeneity of cyclic plastic deformation within the microstructure, and presents a challenge to minimum life design of fatigue resistant components. Our paper analyzes sources of variability that contribute to the driving force of transgranular fatigue cracks within nucleant grains. We also employ crystal plasticity finite element simulations that explicitly render the polycrystalline microstructure and Fatigue Indicator Parameters (FIPs) averaged over different volume sizes and shapes relative to the anticipatedmore » fatigue damage process zone. Volume averaging is necessary to both achieve description of a finite fatigue damage process zone and to regularize mesh dependence in simulations. Furthermore, results from constant amplitude remote applied straining are characterized in terms of the extreme value distributions of volume averaged FIPs. Grain averaged FIP values effectively mitigate mesh sensitivity, but they smear out variability within grains. Furthermore, volume averaging over bands that encompass critical transgranular slip planes appear to present the most attractive approach to mitigate mesh sensitivity while preserving variability within grains.« less

  1. Fatigue-crack monitoring in-flight using acoustic emission - hardware, technique, and testing

    SciTech Connect

    Hutton, P.H.; Skorpik, J.R.; Lemon, D.K.

    1981-07-01

    The three programs described represent a logical evolutionary process toward effective flaw surveillance in aircraft using AE. The Macchi tests showed that an AE system can withstand extended in-flight service and collect meaningful information relative to fatigue crack growth at a single specific location. The MIrage aircraft work seeks to extend the methods demonstrated on the Macchi into a more complex circumstance. We are now attempting to detect and locate crack growth at any of twenty fastener locations in a relatively complex geometry. The DARPA pattern recognition program seeks to develop signal identification capability that would pave the way for general monitoring of aircraft structures using AE to detect fatigue crack growth. It appears that AE technology may be capable of enhancing aircraft safety assurance while reducing inspection requirements with the associated costs.

  2. A predictive model for corrosion fatigue crack growth rates in RPV steels exposed to PWR environments

    SciTech Connect

    Atkinson, J.D.; Chen, Z.; Yu, J.

    1995-12-31

    Corrosion fatigue crack propagation rates have been measured in A533B Class 1 plate in stagnant PWR primary water for a range of steel sulphur contents, temperature and corrosion potential values. Parametric descriptions of the data collected under constant rig conditions give good correlations for each variable and are consistent with a crack tip environment controlled process related to sulphur chemistry. A modified crack velocity equation is proposed to include temperature, sulphur content, polarization potential, frequency and {Delta}K values and it is shown how the predictions compare with the proposed ASME XI revision. Critical fatigue situations are identified for 0.003% and 0.019% sulphur steels typical of modern and old plant. The use of the equation in assessing the synergistic effect of variables is discussed.

  3. Fatigue crack propagation in Ni-base superalloy single crystals under multiaxial cyclic loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, K. S.; Hack, J. E.; Leverant, G. R.

    1986-10-01

    The effects of crystallographic orientation and stress state on the multiaxial fatigue behavior of MAR-M200* single crystals were examined. Using notched tubular specimens subjected to combined tension/torsion cyclic loads, crack growth rates were determined at ambient temperature as functions of stress intensity range, the shear stress range-to-normal stress range ratio, and crystallographic orientation. Comparison of crack growth data at the same effective ΔK reveals a weak dependence of the crack growth rate on both the tube axis and the notch orientation. For a given set of tube axis and notch orientation, the crack growth rate might or might not vary with the applied stress state, depending on whether roughness-induced crack closure is present. In most cases, subcritical cracking occurs either along a single 111 slip plane or on ridges formed with two 111 slip planes. Neither fracture mode is altered by a change in the applied stress state. This complex crack growth behavior will be discussed in terms of the crack-tip stress field, slip morphology, and crack closure.

  4. Fatigue crack propagation behavior of a single crystalline superalloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lerch, B. A.; Antolovich, Stephen D.

    1990-01-01

    Crack propagation mechanisms occurring at various temperatures in a single crystalline Ni-base alloy, Rene N4, were investigated. The rates of crack growth at 21, 704, 927, 1038, and 1093 C were measured in specimens with 001-line and 110-line directions parallel to the load axis and the machined notch, respectively, using a pulsed dc potential drop apparatus, and the fracture surfaces at each temperature were examined using SEM. Crack growth rates (CGRs) for specimens tested at or below 927 C were similar, while at two higher temperatures, the CGRs were about an order of magnitude higher than at the lower temperatures. Results of SEM observations showed that surface morphologies depended on temperature.

  5. Effects of microstructure on the fatigue crack propagation resistance in composite microstructure by 3D fabric modeling for energy transport

    SciTech Connect

    Ishihara, T.; Kim, J.K.; Kobayashi, Y.

    1995-10-01

    In this study, martensite-ferrite dual phase steel composed of martensite in hard phase and ferrite in soft phase is made 3 dimensions fabric composite for energy transport and the difference in fatigue crack propagation behavior resulting from the structural size is investigated by fracture mechanics and microstructural method. The main results obtained are as follows: (1) the fatigue crack propagation rate is influenced by the ferrite grain size, in other words, in the low {Delta}K region the fatigue crack propagation rate is decreased with decreasing of the grain size but the difference of propagation rate resulted from the structural size is decreased as {Delta}K is increased; (2) the above results are explained by the degree of crack arrest effect of the martensite phase for the fatigue crack propagation depending on the ratio of reversed plastic zone size to the ferrite grain size.

  6. Review of fatigue and fracture research at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everett, Richard A., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Most dynamic components in helicopters are designed with a safe-life constant-amplitude testing approach that has not changed in many years. In contrast, the fatigue methodology in other industries has advanced significantly in the last two decades. Recent research at the NASA Langley Research Center and the U.S. Army Aerostructures Directorate at Langley are reviewed relative to fatigue and fracture design methodology for metallic components. Most of the Langley research was directed towards the damage tolerance design approach, but some work was done that is applicable to the safe-life approach. In the areas of testing, damage tolerance concepts are concentrating on the small-crack effect in crack growth and measurement of crack opening stresses. Tests were conducted to determine the effects of a machining scratch on the fatigue life of a high strength steel. In the area of analysis, work was concentrated on developing a crack closure model that will predict fatigue life under spectrum loading for several different metal alloys including a high strength steel that is often used in the dynamic components of helicopters. Work is also continuing in developing a three-dimensional, finite-element stress analysis for cracked and uncracked isotropic and anisotropic structures. A numerical technique for solving simultaneous equations called the multigrid method is being pursued to enhance the solution schemes in both the finite-element analysis and the boundary element analysis. Finally, a fracture mechanics project involving an elastic-plastic finite element analysis of J-resistance curve is also being pursued.

  7. Numerical Modeling of the Surface Fatigue Crack Propagation Including the Closure Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guchinsky, Ruslan; Petinov, Sergei

    2016-01-01

    Presently modeling of surface fatigue crack growth for residual life assessment of structural elements is almost entirely based on application of the Linear Elastic Fracture Mechanics (LEFM). Generally, it is assumed that the crack front does not essentially change its shape, although it is not always confirmed by experiment. Furthermore, LEFM approach cannot be applied when the stress singularity vanishes due to material plasticity, one of the leading factors associated with the material degradation and fracture. Also, evaluation of stress intensity factors meets difficulties associated with changes in the stress state along the crack front circumference. An approach proposed for simulation the evolution of surface cracks based on application of the Strain-life criterion for fatigue failure and of the finite element modeling of damage accumulation. It takes into account the crack closure effect, the nonlinear behavior of damage accumulation and material compliance increasing due to the damage advance. The damage accumulation technique was applied to model the semi-elliptical crack growth from the initial defect in the steel compact specimen. The results of simulation are in good agreement with the published experimental data.

  8. Stress-corrosion fatigue-crack growth in a Zr-based bulk amorphousmetal

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, V.; Ritchie, R.O.

    2005-09-21

    Electrochemical and mechanical experiments were conducted to analyze the environmentally-influenced cracking behavior of a bulk amorphous metal, Zr41.2Ti13.8Cu12.5Ni10Be22.5. This study was motivated by a scientific interest in mechanisms of fatigue-crack propagation in an amorphous metal, and by a practical interest in the use of this amorphous metal in applications that take advantage of its unique properties, including high specific strength, large elastic strains and low damping. The objective of the work was to determine the rate and mechanisms of subcritical crack growth in this metallic glass in an aggressive environment. Specifically, fatigue-crack propagation behavior was investigated at a range of stress intensities in air and aqueous salt solutions by examining the effects of loading cycle, stress-intensity range, solution concentration, anion identity, solution de-aeration, and bulk electrochemical potential. Results indicate that crack growth in aqueous solution in this alloy is driven by a stress-assisted anodic reaction at the crack tip. Rate-determining steps for such behavior are reasoned to be electrochemical, stress-dependent reaction at near-threshold levels, and mass transport at higher (steady-state) growth rates.

  9. Fatigue-crack propagation in aluminum-lithium alloys processed by power and ingot metallurgy

    SciTech Connect

    Venkateswara Rao, K.T.; Ritchie, R.O. ); Kim, N.J. ); Pizzo, P.P. )

    1990-04-01

    Fatigue-crack propagation behavior in powder-metallurgy (P/M) aluminum-lithium alloys, namely, mechanically-alloyed (MA) Al-4.0Mg-1.5Li-1.1C-0.80{sub 2} (Inco 905-XL) and rapid-solidification-processed (RSP) Al-2.6Li-1.0Cu-0.5Mg-0.5Zr (Allied 644-B) extrusions, has been studied, and results compared with data on an equivalent ingot-metallurgy (I/M) Al-Li alloy, 2090-T81 plate. Fatigue-crack growth resistance of the RSP Al-Li alloy is found to be comparable to the I/M Al-Li alloy; in contrast, crack velocities in MA 905-XL extrusions are nearly three orders of magnitude faster. Growth-rate response in both P/M Al-Li alloys, however, is high anisotropic. Results are interpreted in terms of the microstructural influence of strengthening mechanism, slip mode, grain morphology and texture on the development of crack-tip shielding from crack-path deflection and crack closure. 14 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Design features and results from fatigue reliability research machines.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lalli, V. R.; Kececioglu, D.; Mcconnell, J. B.

    1971-01-01

    The design, fabrication, development, operation, calibration and results from reversed bending combined with steady torque fatigue research machines are presented. Fifteen-centimeter long, notched, SAE 4340 steel specimens are subjected to various combinations of these stresses and cycled to failure. Failure occurs when the crack in the notch passes through the specimen automatically shutting down the test machine. These cycles-to-failure data are statistically analyzed to develop a probabilistic S-N diagram. These diagrams have many uses; a rotating component design example given in the literature shows that minimum size and weight for a specified number of cycles and reliability can be calculated using these diagrams.

  11. The influence of hold times on LCF and FCG behavior in a P/M Ni-base superalloy. [Low Cycle Fatigue/Fatigue Crack Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choe, S. J.; Golwalker, S. V.; Duquette, D. J.; Stoloff, N. S.

    1984-01-01

    The relative importance of creep and environmental interactions in high temperature fatigue behavior has been investigated for as-HIP Rene 95. Strain-controlled low cycle fatigue and load-controlled fatigue crack growth tests were performed at elevated temperatures in argon, followed by fractographic analyses of the fracture surfaces by scanning electron microscopy. Fatigue lives were drastically reduced and crack growth rates increased one hundred fold as a result of superposition of hold times on continuous cycling. A change in fracture mode with hold time also was noted. Chromium oxide was detected on the fracture surface by Auger electron spectroscopy. The drastic changes in fatigue resistance due to hold times were attributed primarily to environmental interactions with fatigue processes.

  12. Environmental fatigue of an Al-Li-Cu alloy. Part 2: Microscopic hydrogen cracking processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piascik, Robert S.; Gangloff, Richard P.

    1992-01-01

    Based on a fractographic analysis of fatigue crack propagation (FCP) in Al-Li-Cu alloy 2090 stressed in a variety of inert and embrittling environments, microscopic crack paths are identified and correlated with intrinsic da/dN-delta K kinetics. FCP rates in 2090 are accelerated by hydrogen producing environments (pure water vapor, moist air, and aqueous NaCl), as defined in Part 1. For these cases, subgrain boundary fatigue cracking (SGC) dominates for delta K values where the crack tip process zone, a significant fraction of the cyclic plastic zone, is sufficiently large to envelop 5 micron subgrains in the unrecrystallized microstructure. SGC may be due to strong hydrogen trapping at T1 precipitates concentrated at sub-boundaries. At low delta K, the plastic zone diameter is smaller than the subgrain size and FCP progresses along (100) planes due to either local lattice decohesion or aluminum-lithium hydride cracking. For inert environments (vacuum, helium, and oxygen), or at high delta K where the hydrogen effect on da/dN is small, FCP is along (111) slip planes; this mode does not transition with increasing delta K and plastic zone size. The SGC and (100) crystallographic cracking modes, and the governing influence of the crack tip process zone volume (delta K), support hydrogen embrittlement rather than a surface film rupture and anodic dissolution mechanism for environmental FCP. Multi-sloped log da/dN-log delta K behavior is produced by changes in process zone hydrogen-microstructure interactions, and not by purely micromechanical-microstructure interactions, in contradiction to microstructural distance-based fatigue models.

  13. Evolution of Residual-Strain Distribution through an Overload-Induced Retardation Period during Fatigue Crack Growth

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S. Y.; Sun, Yinan; An, Ke; Choo, Hahn; Hubbard, Camden R; Liaw, Peter K

    2010-01-01

    Neutron diffraction was employed to investigate the crack-growth retardation phenomenon after a single tensile overload by mapping both one-dimensional and two-dimensional residual-strain distributions around the crack tip in a series of compact-tension specimens representing various crack-growth stages through an overload-induced retardation period. The results clearly show a large compressive residual-strain field near the crack tip immediately after the overload. As the fatigue crack propagates through the overload-induced plastic zone, the compressive residual strains are gradually relaxed, and a new compressive residual-strain field is developed around the propagating crack tip, illustrating that the subsequent fatigue-induced plastic zone grows out of the large plastic zone caused by the overloading. The relationship between the overload-induced plastic zone and subsequent fatigue-induced plastic zone, and its influence on the residual-strain distributions in the perturbed plastic zone are discussed.

  14. Grain boundary oxidation and an analysis of the effects of oxidation on fatigue crack nucleation life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oshida, Y.; Liu, H. W.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of preoxidation on subsequent fatigue life were studied. Surface oxidation and grain boundary oxidation of a nickel-base superalloy (TAZ-8A) were studied at 600 to 1000 C for 10 to 1000 hours in air. Surface oxides were identified and the kinetics of surface oxidation was discussed. Grain boundary oxide penetration and morphology were studied. Pancake type grain boundary oxide penetrates deeper and its size is larger, therefore, it is more detrimental to fatigue life than cone-type grain boundary oxide. Oxide penetration depth, a (sub m), is related to oxidation temperature, T, and exposure time, t, by an empirical relation of the Arrhenius type. Effects of T and t on statistical variation of a (sub m) were analyzed according to the Weibull distribution function. Once the oxide is cracked, it serves as a fatigue crack nucleus. Statistical variation of the remaining fatigue life, after the formation of an oxide crack of a critical length, is related directly to the statistical variation of grain boundary oxide penetration depth.

  15. An ultrasonic method for dynamic monitoring of fatigue crack initiation and growth.

    PubMed

    Mi, Bao; Michaels, Jennifer E; Michaels, Thomas E

    2006-01-01

    Attached ultrasonic sensors can detect changes caused by crack initiation and growth if the wave path is directed through the area of critical crack formation. Dynamics of cracks opening and closing under load cause nonlinear modulation of received ultrasonic signals, enabling small cracks to be detected by stationary sensors. A methodology is presented based upon the behavior of ultrasonic signals versus applied load to detect and monitor formation and growth of cracks originating from fastener holes. Shear wave angle beam transducers operating in through transmission mode are mounted on either side of the hole such that the transmitted wave travels through the area of expected cracking. Time shift is linear with respect to load, and is well explained by path changes due to strain combined with wave speed changes due to acoustoelasticity. During subsequent in situ monitoring with unknown loads, the measured time of flight is used to estimate the load, and behavior of the received energy as a function of load is the basis for crack detection. Results are presented from low cycle fatigue tests of several aluminum specimens and illustrate the efficacy of the method in both determining the applied load and monitoring crack initiation and growth. PMID:16454266

  16. Assessing the severity of fatigue crack using acoustics modulated by hysteretic vibration for a cantilever beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Qingbo; Lin, Yin

    2016-05-01

    This paper investigates fatigue crack severity assessment using acoustics modulated by hysteretic vibration for a cantilever beam. In this study, a nonlinear oscillator system is constructed to induce the hysteretic frequency response of the cantilever beam in dynamics, and the hysteretic vibration is then used to modulate the acoustic waves to generate the vibro-acoustic modulation (VAM) effect. Through modulation of hysteretic vibration, the hysteretic response of the VAM can be achieved. The experimental results further validated that the VAM hysteresis phenomenon can be enhanced with the increase of crack severity owing to the change of beam's effective stiffness. Simulations in the proposed physical model explained the reason of enhancement of hysteresis phenomenon. Combined with nonlinear bistable structural model, a fatigue crack severity assessment approach was proposed by evaluating the hysteretic region (e.g., bandwidth or jumping frequency) in the vibration frequency response of the VAM effect. The reported study is valuable in building a monotonic relationship to assess the severity of fatigue crack by a nonlinear acoustics approach.

  17. Fatigue Analysis of the Piston Rod in a Kaplan Turbine Based on Crack Propagation under Unsteady Hydraulic Loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X.; Y Luo, Y.; Wang, Z. W.

    2014-03-01

    As an important component of the blade-control system in Kaplan turbines, piston rods are subjected to fluctuating forces transferred by the turbines blades from hydraulic pressure oscillations. Damage due to unsteady hydraulic loads might generate unexpected down time and high repair cost. In one running hydropower plant, the fracture failure of the piston rod was found twice at the same location. With the transient dynamic analysis, the retainer ring structure of the piston rod existed a relative high stress concentration. This predicted position of the stress concentration agreed well with the actual fracture position in the plant. However, the local strain approach was not able to explain why this position broke frequently. Since traditional structural fatigue analyses use a local stress strain approach to assess structural integrity, do not consider the effect of flaws which can significantly degrade structural life. Using linear elastic fracture mechanism (LEFM) approaches that include the effect of flaws is becoming common practice in many industries. In this research, a case involving a small semi-ellipse crack was taken into account at the stress concentration area, crack growth progress was calculated by FEM. The relationship between crack length and remaining life was obtained. The crack propagation path approximately agreed with the actual fracture section. The results showed that presence of the crack had significantly changed the local stress and strain distributions of the piston rod compared with non-flaw assumption.

  18. Fatigue Crack Growth Characteristics of Thin Sheet Titanium Alloy Ti 6-2-2-2-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Stephen W.; Piascik, Robert S.

    2001-01-01

    Fatigue crack growth rates of Ti 6-2-2-2-2 as a function of stress ratio, temperature (24 or 177 C), tensile orientation and environment (laboratory air or ultrahigh vacuum) are presented. Fatigue crack growth rates of Ti 6-2-2-2-2 are also compared with two more widely used titanium alloys (Timetal 21S and Ti 6Al-4V). The fatigue crack growth rate (da/dN) of Ti 6-2-2-2-2 in laboratory air is dependent upon stress ratio (R), particularly in the near-threshold and lower-Paris regimes. For low R (less than approximately 0.5), da/dN is influenced by crack closure behavior. At higher R (> 0.5), a maximum stress-intensity factor (K(sub max)) dependence is observed. Fatigue crack growth behavior is affected by test temperature between 24 and 177 C. For moderate to high applied cyclic-stress-intensity factors (delta-K), the slope of the log da/dN versus log delta-K curve is lower in 177 C laboratory air than 24 C laboratory air. The difference in slope results in lower values of da/dN for exposure to 177 C laboratory air compared to room temperature laboratory air. The onset of this temperature effect is dependent upon the applied R. This temperature effect has not been observed in ultrahigh vacuum. Specimen orientation has been shown to affect the slope of the log da/dN versus log delta-K curve in the Paris regime.

  19. Fracture Toughness and Fatigue Crack Growth Behavior of As-Cast High-Entropy Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifi, Mohsen; Li, Dongyue; Yong, Zhang; Liaw, Peter K.; Lewandowski, John J.

    2015-08-01

    The fracture toughness and fatigue crack growth behavior of two as-vacuum arc cast high-entropy alloys (HEAs) (Al0.2CrFeNiTi0.2 and AlCrFeNi2Cu) were determined. A microstructure examination of both HEA alloys revealed a two-phase structure consisting of body-centered cubic (bcc) and face-centered cubic (fcc) phases. The notched and fatigue precracked toughness values were in the range of those reported in the literature for two-phase alloys but significantly less than recent reports on a single phase fcc-HEA that was deformation processed. Fatigue crack growth experiments revealed high fatigue thresholds that decreased significantly with an increase in load ratio, while Paris law slopes exhibited metallic-like behavior at low R with significant increases at high R. Fracture surface examinations revealed combinations of brittle and ductile/dimpled regions at overload, with some evidence of fatigue striations in the Paris law regime.

  20. Evaluation of fatigue crack behavior in electron beam irradiated polyethylene pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokharel, Pashupati; Jian, Wei; Choi, Sunwoong

    2016-09-01

    A cracked round bar (CRB) fatigue test was employed to determine the slow crack growth (SCG) behavior of samples from high density polyethylene (HDPE) pipes using PE4710 resin. The structure property relationships of fatigue failure of polyethylene CRB specimens which have undergone various degree of electron beam (EB) irradiation were investigated by observing fatigue failure strength and the corresponding fracture surface morphology. Tensile test of these HDPE specimens showed improvements in modulus and yield strength while the failure strain decreased with increasing EB irradiation. The CRB fatigue test of HDPE pipe showed remarkable effect of EB irradiation on number of cycles to failure. The slopes of the stress-cycles to failure curve were similar for 0-100 kGy; however, significantly higher slope was observed for 500 kGy EB irradiated pipe. Also, the cycle to fatigue failure was seen to decrease as with EB irradiation in the high stress range, ∆σ=(16 MPa to 10.8 MPa); however, 500 kGy EB irradiated samples showed longer cycles to failure than the un-irradiated specimens at the stress range below 9.9 MPa and the corresponding initial stress intensity factor (∆KI,0)=0.712 MPa m1/2. The fracture surface morphology indicated that the cross-linked network in 500 kGy EB irradiated PE pipe can endure low dynamic load more effectively than the parent pipe.

  1. Strength distribution of fatigue crack initiation sites in an Al-Li alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, T.

    2006-10-01

    The stress-number of cycles to failure (S-N) curves were measured along the short-transverse (S) and rolling (L) directions of a hot-cross-rolled AA 8090 Al-Li alloy plate (45-mm thick). The alloy was solution heat treated, quenched in water, strained by 6 pct, and peak aged. Fatigue tests were carried out in four-point bend at room temperature, 20 Hz, R=0.1, in air. It was found that the fatigue limits in the S and L directions were 147 and 197 MPa, respectively. The crack population on the surface of a sample at failure increased with the applied stress level and was found to be a Weibull function of the applied maximum stress in this alloy. The strength distribution of fatigue weakest links, where cracks were initiated, was derived from the Weibull function determined by the experimental data. The fatigue weakest-link density was defined as the crack population per unit area at a stress level close to the ultimate tensile stress and can be regarded as a materials property. The density and strength distribution of fatigue weakest links were found to be markedly different between the L and S directions, accounting for the difference in fatigue limit between the directions in this alloy. They were also found to be different between S-L and S-T samples, and between L-T and L-S samples of this alloy, which could not be revealed by the corresponding S-N curves measured. These differences were due to the anisotropy of the microstructures in different directions in this alloy.

  2. Fatigue-crack growth properties of thin-walled superelastic austenitic Nitinol tube for endovascular stents.

    PubMed

    Stankiewicz, J M; Robertson, S W; Ritchie, R O

    2007-06-01

    Over the past 10 years, the supereleastic nickel-titanium alloy Nitinol has found widespread application in the manufacture of small-scale biomedical devices, such as self-expanding endovascular stents. Although conventional stress/strain-life (S/N) analyses are invariably used as the primary method for design against fatigue loading and for predicting safe lifetimes, fracture mechanics-based methodologies provide a vital means of assessing the quantitative effect of defects on such lifetimes. Unfortunately, fracture mechanics studies on fatigue in Nitinol are scarce, and most results do not pertain to the (thin-walled tube) product forms that are typically used in the manufacture of endovascular stents. In the current work, we document the basic fatigue-crack growth properties of flattened thin-walled ( approximately 400 microm thick) Nitinol tubing in a 37 degrees C air environment. Crack-growth behavior is characterized over a wide range of growth rates ( approximately 6 orders of magnitude) and load ratios, that is, as a function of the alternating and maximum stress intensities, at 50 Hz. Limited experiments at both 5 and 50 Hz were also performed in 37 degrees C air and simulated body fluid to determine whether the cyclic frequency affects the fatigue behavior. Fatigue-crack growth-rate properties in such thin-walled Nitinol tube are found to be quite distinct from limited published data on other (mainly bulk) product forms of Nitinol, for example, bar and strip, both in terms of the relative fatigue thresholds and the variation in steady-state growth rates. PMID:17187394

  3. Crystallographic study of fatigue cracking in Ni{sub 3}Al(CrB) single crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, G.P.; Wang, Z.G.; Li, G.Y.; Wu, S.D.

    1997-03-01

    The effect of crystallographic orientation on the fatigue-crack initiation and propagation in Ni{sub 3}Al(CrB) single crystal was studied using a compact-tension specimen. Stage I crystallographic cracking and cleavage fracture were observed. Crystallographic cracking can occur on two or more {l_brace}111{r_brace} slip planes simultaneously. It was shown that the threshold stress intensity for crack initiation from the notch root exhibits a dependence on crystallographic orientation. In addition, an effect of orientation on microcracking behavior was also shown. The number of {l_brace}111{r_brace} planes intersecting with each other determines the different microscopic features on the cleavage fracture surface.

  4. Development of a Fatigue Crack Growth Coupon for Highly Plastic Stress Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Phillip A.; Aggarwal, Pravin K.; Swanson, Gregory R.

    2003-01-01

    The analytical approach used to develop a novel fatigue crack growth coupon for highly plastic stress field condition is presented in this paper. The flight hardware investigated is a large separation bolt that has a deep notch, which produces a large plastic zone at the notch root when highly loaded. Four test specimen configurations are analyzed in an attempt to match the elastic-plastic stress field and crack constraint conditions present in the separation bolt. Elastic-plastic finite element analysis is used to compare the stress fields and critical fracture parameters. Of the four test specimens analyzed, the modified double-edge notch tension - 3 (MDENT-3) most closely approximates the stress field, J values, and crack constraint conditions found in the flight hardware. The MDENT-3 is also most insensitive to load misalignment and/or load redistribution during crack growth.

  5. Power Law Versus Exponential Form of Slow Crack Growth of Advanced Structural Ceramics: Dynamic Fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    2002-01-01

    The life prediction analysis based on an exponential crack velocity formulation was examined using a variety of experimental data on glass and advanced structural ceramics in constant stress-rate ("dynamic fatigue") and preload testing at ambient and elevated temperatures. The data fit to the strength versus In (stress rate) relation was found to be very reasonable for most of the materials. It was also found that preloading technique was equally applicable for the case of slow crack growth (SCG) parameter n > 30. The major limitation in the exponential crack velocity formulation, however, was that an inert strength of a material must be known priori to evaluate the important SCG parameter n, a significant drawback as compared to the conventional power-law crack velocity formulation.

  6. Study on probability of detection for fatigue cracks in sonic infrared imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jun-zhen; Zhang, Chao-sheng; Feng, Fu-zhou; Min, Qing-xu; Xu, Chao

    2016-07-01

    Detection reliability of sonic infrared imaging is one of the increasingly important aspects for out of lab applications. And for the detection reliability evaluation, probability of detection (POD) for different defects under given test conditions has been successfully used as an accepted quantitative measurement. In this study, we test a set of C45 ferritic steel plates with artificial fatigue cracks. Experimental results show that the crack heating response increases with the increasing crack length, and the relationship between the logarithmic form of heat response signal and the crack length appears to be linear. Based on the above statistic characteristics, the linear regression analysis and the Wald method are adopted to estimate the POD function and its confidence interval. The study aims to provide a quantitative evaluation method for detection reliability in sonic infrared imaging.

  7. Fatigue crack propagation rate model based on a dislocation mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazumdar, P. K.; Jeelani, S.

    1986-01-01

    It has been noted that the crack propagation exponent p for most metals usually varies between values of 2 and 4, and that the motion of dislocations plays an important part in determining the exponent p. Attention is presently given to the significance of the exponent p in terms of the motion of dislocations, in view of the theory of thermally activated plastic flow and the cumulative plastic strain concept for a failure criterion.

  8. Mixed-mode fatigue-crack growth thresholds in Ti-6Al-4V at high frequency

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, J.P.; Ritchie, R.O.

    1999-10-22

    Multiaxial loading conditions exist at fatigue-critical locations within turbine engine components, particularly in association with fretting fatigue in the blade dovetail/disk contact section. For fatigue-crack growth in such situations, the resultant crack-driving force is a combination of the influence of a mode I (tensile opening) stress-intensity range, {Delta}K{sub I}, as well as mode II (in-plane shear) and/or mode III (anti-plane shear) stress-intensity ranges, {Delta}K{sub II} and {Delta}K{sub III}, respectively. For the case of the high-cycle fatigue of turbine-engine alloys, it is critical to quantify such behavior, as the extremely high cyclic loading frequencies ({approximately}1--2 kHz) and correspondingly short times to failure may necessitate a design approached based on the fatigue-crack growth threshold. Moreover, knowledge of such thresholds is required for accurate prediction of fretting fatigue failures. Accordingly, this paper presents the mixed-mode fatigue crack growth thresholds for mode I + II loading (phase angles from 0{degree} to 82{degree}) in a Ti-6Al-4V blade alloy. These results indicate that when fatigue-crack growth in this alloy is characterized in terms of the crack-driving force {Delta}G, which incorporates both the applied tensile and shear loading, the mode 1 fatigue-crack growth threshold is a lower bound (worst case) with respect to mixed-mode (I + II) crack-growth behavior.

  9. A novel closure based approach for fatigue crack length estimation using the acoustic emission technique in structural health monitoring applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagar, Daniel; Foote, Peter; Irving, Philip

    2014-10-01

    Use of Acoustic Emission (AE) for detecting and locating fatigue cracks in metallic structures is widely reported but studies investigating its potential for fatigue crack length estimation are scarce. Crack growth information enables prediction of the remaining useful life of a component using well established fracture mechanics principles. Hence, the prospects of AE for use in structural health monitoring applications would be significantly improved if it could be demonstrated not only as a means of detecting crack growth but also for estimation of crack lengths. A new method for deducing crack length has been developed based on correlations between AE signals generated during fatigue crack growth and corresponding cyclic loads. A model for crack length calculation was derived empirically using AE data generated during fatigue crack growth tests in 2 mm thick SEN aluminium 2014 T6 specimens subject to a tensile stress range of 52 MPa and an R ratio of 0.1. The model was validated using AE data generated independently in separate tests performed with a stress range of 27 MPa. The results showed that predictions of crack lengths over a range of 10 mm to 80 mm can be obtained with the mean of the normalised absolute errors ranging between 0.28 and 0.4. Predictions were also made using existing AE feature-based methods and the results compared to those obtained with the novel approach developed.

  10. A fracture mechanics approach for estimating fatigue crack initiation in carbon and low-alloy steels in LWR coolant environments

    SciTech Connect

    Park, H. B.; Chopra, O. K.

    2000-04-10

    A fracture mechanics approach for elastic-plastic materials has been used to evaluate the effects of light water reactor (LWR) coolant environments on the fatigue lives of carbon and low-alloy steels. The fatigue life of such steel, defined as the number of cycles required to form an engineering-size crack, i.e., 3-mm deep, is considered to be composed of the growth of (a) microstructurally small cracks and (b) mechanically small cracks. The growth of the latter was characterized in terms of {Delta}J and crack growth rate (da/dN) data in air and LWR environments; in water, the growth rates from long crack tests had to be decreased to match the rates from fatigue S-N data. The growth of microstructurally small cracks was expressed by a modified Hobson relationship in air and by a slip dissolution/oxidation model in water. The crack length for transition from a microstructurally small crack to a mechanically small crack was based on studies on small crack growth. The estimated fatigue S-N curves show good agreement with the experimental data for these steels in air and water environments. At low strain amplitudes, the predicted lives in water can be significantly lower than the experimental values.

  11. Environmental fatigue of an Al-Li-Cu alloy. Part 3: Modeling of crack tip hydrogen damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piascik, Robert S.; Gangloff, Richard P.

    1992-01-01

    Environmental fatigue crack propagation rates and microscopic damage modes in Al-Li-Cu alloy 2090 (Parts 1 and 2) are described by a crack tip process zone model based on hydrogen embrittlement. Da/dN sub ENV equates to discontinuous crack advance over a distance, delta a, determined by dislocation transport of dissolved hydrogen at plastic strains above a critical value; and to the number of load cycles, delta N, required to hydrogenate process zone trap sites that fracture according to a local hydrogen concentration-tensile stress criterion. Transgranular (100) cracking occurs for process zones smaller than the subgrain size, and due to lattice decohesion or hydride formation. Intersubgranular cracking dominates when the process zone encompasses one or more subgrains so that dislocation transport provides hydrogen to strong boundary trapping sites. Multi-sloped log da/dN-log delta K behavior is produced by process zone plastic strain-hydrogen-microstructure interactions, and is determined by the DK dependent rates and proportions of each parallel cracking mode. Absolute values of the exponents and the preexponential coefficients are not predictable; however, fractographic measurements theta sub i coupled with fatigue crack propagation data for alloy 2090 established that the process zone model correctly describes fatigue crack propagation kinetics. Crack surface films hinder hydrogen uptake and reduce da/dN and alter the proportions of each fatigue crack propagation mode.

  12. Effects of Laser Peening Treatment on High Cycle Fatigue and Crack Propagation Behaviors in Austenitic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masaki, Kiyotaka; Ochi, Yasuo; Matsumura, Takashi; Ikarashi, Takaaki; Sano, Yuji

    Laser peening without protective coating (LPwC) treatment is one of surface enhancement techniques using an impact wave of high pressure plasma induced by laser pulse irradiation. High compressive residual stress was induced by the LPwC treatment on the surface of low-carbon type austenitic stainless steel SUS316L. The affected depth reached about 1mm from the surface. High cycle fatigue tests with four-points rotating bending loading were carried out to confirm the effects of the LPwC treatment on fatigue strength and surface fatigue crack propagation behaviors. The fatigue strength was remarkably improved by the LPwC treatment over the whole regime of fatigue life up to 108 cycles. Specimens with a pre-crack from a small artificial hole due to fatigue loading were used for the quantitative study on the effect of the LPwC treatment. The fracture mechanics investigation on the pre-cracked specimens showed that the LPwC treatment restrained the further propagation of the pre-crack if the stress intensity factor range ΔK on the crack tip was less than 7.6 MPa√m. Surface cracks preferentially propagated into the depth direction as predicted through ΔK analysis on the crack by taking account of the compressive residual stresses due to the LPwC treatment.

  13. The Purpose of Generating Fatigue Crack Growth Threshold Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forth, Scott

    2006-01-01

    Test data shows that different width and thickness C(T), M(T) and ESE(T) specimens generate different thresholds Structures designed for "infinite life" are being re-evaluated: a) Threshold changes from 6 to 3 ksi in(sup 1/2); b) Computational life changes from infinite to 4 missions. Multi-million dollar test programs required to substantiate operation. Using ASTM E647 as standard guidance to generate threshold data is not practical. A threshold test approach needs to be standardized that will provide positive margin for high cycle fatigue applications.

  14. Influence of fatigue crack wake length and state of stress on crack closure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Telesman, J.; Fisher, D. M.

    1986-01-01

    The location of crack closure with respect to crack wake and specimen thickness under different loading conditions was determined. The rate of increase of K sub CL in the crack wake was found to be significantly higher for plasticity induced closure in comparison to roughness induced closure. Roughness induced closure was uniform throughout the thickness of the specimen while plasticity induced closure levels were 50 percent higher in the near surface region than in the midthickness. The influence of state of stress on low-high load interaction effects was also examined. Load interaction effects differed depending upon the state of stress and were explained in terms of delta K sub eff.

  15. Environmental Fatigue-Crack Surface Crystallography for Al-Zn-Cu-Mg-Mn/Zr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ro, Yunjo; Agnew, Sean R.; Gangloff, Richard P.

    2008-06-01

    The scanning electron microscope (SEM)-based electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD)/stereology technique quantitatively establishes distributions of the crystallographic characteristics of environmental-fatigue crack features for slightly overaged Al-Zn-Cu-Mg-X (X = Zr or Mn) alloys stressed in the low-growth-rate regime. Results for these homogeneous slip alloys conform to a substantial companion study of planar slip-prone Al-Cu-Mg/Li. Transgranular-crack characteristics are similar for the Mn and Zr variants, independent of grain size and recrystallization. Two morphologies of facetlike features exhibit a wide range of crystallographic orientations, change character at grain boundaries indicating an important role of grain orientation, and form in highly tensile-stressed spatial orientations about a crack tip. Similar characteristics for Al-Zn and Al-Cu suggest a common damage mechanism, speculatively attributed to hydrogen-environment embrittlement by decohesion. Slip-deformation band cracking resulting in facets near {111}, stimulated by H-enhanced localized plasticity, is not a viable mechanism for environmental fatigue. Repetitively stepped facets with surface curvature may involve H-enhanced cleavage along {100} or {110} planes subsequently distorted by plasticity. Broad-flat facets speculatively result from tensile stress-based cracking through dislocation cell structure, evolved by cyclic plasticity and containing trapped H.

  16. Fatigue induced cracking in aluminum LN-2 shroud of 39 foot vacuum chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, A. A.

    1984-01-01

    Fourteen years after completion of Ford's 39-foot space simulation chamber, leaks began to appear in its LN2 shroud. Although the shroud had been tight since its acceptance, cracks appeared in 1983 in some of the field welds of the one inch tubes which interconnect the LN2 panels. The resulting leaks were large enough to prevent pump down to high vacuum and could be heard easily when the chamber was at ambient conditions. New cracks appeared during each thermal cycle making it impossible to utilize the chamber for thermal vacuum testing. The analysis presented here implies that many, if not all, of the aluminum LN2 shrouds now in use may be in various stages of fatigue failure. The probability is high that fatigue cracks are working through the aluminum tubing in heat-affected zones of some field welds. The cracks may not be apparent yet, but after the shroud has experienced a certain number of thermal cycles these cracks will work through the material and become serious leaks. Fortunately, appropriate planning, analysis, and checking can, with a relatively small expenditure of money, help to avoid large and unexpected shroud failures and keep the chamber operational as long as it is needed.

  17. Fatigue life calculation of desuperheater for solving pipe cracking issue using finite element method (FEM) software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Aravinda; Singh, Jeetendra Kumar; Mohan, K.

    2012-06-01

    Desuperheater assembly experiences thermal cycling in operation by design. During power plant's start up, load change and shut down, thermal gradient is highest. Desuperheater should be able to handle rapid ramp up or ramp down of temperature in these operations. With "hump style" two nozzle desuperheater, cracks were appearing in the pipe after only few cycles of operation. From the field data, it was clear that desuperheater is not able to handle disproportionate thermal expansion happening in the assembly during temperature ramp up and ramp down in operation and leading to cracks appearing in the piping. Growth of thermal fatigue crack is influenced by several factors including geometry, severity of thermal stress and applied mechanical load. This paper seeks to determine cause of failure of two nozzle "hump style" desuperheater using Finite Element Method (FEM) simulation technique. Thermal stress simulation and fatigue life calculation were performed using commercial FEA software "ANSYS" [from Ansys Inc, USA]. Simulation result showed that very high thermal stress is developing in the region where cracks are seen in the field. From simulation results, it is also clear that variable thermal expansion of two nozzle studs is creating high stress at the water manifold junction. A simple and viable solution is suggested by increasing the length of the manifold which solved the cracking issues in the pipe.

  18. An experimental study on the effects of compressive stress on the fatigue crack growth of low-alloy steel

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, D.P.; Hoppe, R.G.; Hechmer, J.L.; James, B.A.

    1993-12-01

    A series of fatigue crack growth rate tests was conducted in order to study effects of negative stress ratio on fatigue crack growth rate of low-alloy steel in air. Four-point bend specimens were used to simulate linear stress distributions typical of pressure vessel applications. This type of testing adds to knowledge on negative stress ratio effects for low-alloy steels obtained in the past from uniform tension-compression tests. Applied bending stress range was varied over twice the yield strength. Load control was used for tests for which the stress range was less than twice the yield strength and deflection control was used for the higher stress range tests. Crack geometries were both short and long fatigue cracks started at notches and tight fatigue cracks for which crack closure could occur over the full crack face. Results are presented in terms of the stress intensity factor ratio R = K{sub MIN}/K{sub MAX}. The negative R-ratio test results were correlated to an equation of the form da/dN = C[{Delta}K/(A-R)]{sup n}, where A, C, and n are curve fitting parameters. It was found that effects of negative R-ratio on fatigue crack growth rates for even the high stress range tests could be bounded by correlating the above equation to only positive R-ratio test results and extending the resulting equation into the negative R-ratio regime.

  19. The effect of water vapor on fatigue crack Growth in 7475-t651 aluminum alloy plate. [for aerospace applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicus, D. L.

    1982-01-01

    The effects of water vapor on fatigue crack growth in 7475-T651 aluminum alloy plate at frequencies of 1 Hz and 10 Hz were investigated. Twenty-five mm thick compact specimens were subjected to constant amplitude fatigue testing at a load ratio of 0.2. Fatigue crack growth rates were calculated from effective crack lengths determined using a compliance method. Tests were conducted in hard vacuum and at water vapor partial pressures ranging from 94 Pa to 3.8 kPa. Fatigue crack growth rates were frequency insensitive under all environment conditions tested. For constant stress intensity factor ranges crack growth rate transitions occurred at low and high water vapor pressures. Crack growth rates at intermediate pressures were relatively constant and showed reasonable agreement with published data for two Al-Cu-Mg alloys. The existence of two crack growth rate transitions suggests either a change in rate controlling kinetics or a change in corrosion fatigue mechanism as a function of water vapor pressure. Reduced residual deformation and transverse cracking specimens tested in water vapor versus vacuum may be evidence of embrittlement within the plastic zone due to environmental interaction.

  20. Effect of water vapor on fatigue crack growth in 7475-T651 aluminum alloy plate. [for aerospace applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicus, D. L.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of water vapor on fatigue crack growth in 7475-T651 aluminum alloy plate at frequencies of 1 Hz and 10 Hz were investigated. Twenty-five mm thick compact specimens were subjected to constant amplitude fatigue testing at a load ratio of 0.2. Fatigue crack growth rates were calculated from effective crack lengths determined using a compliance method. Tests were conducted in hard vacuum and at water vapor partial pressures ranging from 94 Pa to 3.8 kPa. Fatigue crack growth rates were frequency insensitive under all environment conditions tested. For constant stress intensity factor ranges crack growth rate transitions occurred at low and high water vapor pressures. Crack growth rates at intermediate pressures were relatively constant and showed reasonable agreement with published data for two Al-Cu-Mg alloys. The existence of two crack growth rate transitions suggests either a change in rate controlling kinetics or a change in corrosion fatigue mechanism as a function of water vapor pressure. Reduced residual deformation and transverse cracking specimens tested in water vapor versus vacuum may be evidence of embrittlement within the plastic zone due to environmental interaction.

  1. The effect of hot isostatic pressing on crack initiation, fatigue, and mechanical properties of two cast aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Rich, T.P.; Orbison, J.G.; Duncan, R.S.; Olivero, P.G.; Peterec, R.H.

    1999-06-01

    This article presents the results of an experimental materials testing program on the effect of hot isostatic pressing (HIP) on the crack initiation, fatigue, and mechanical properties of two cast aluminum alloys: AMS 4220 and 4225. These alloys are often used in castings for high temperature applications. Standard tensile and instrumented Charpy impact tests were performed at room and elevated temperatures. The resulting data quantify improvements in ultimate tensile strength, ductility, and Charpy impact toughness from the HIP process while indicating little change in yield strength for both alloys. In addition standard fracture mechanics fatigue tests along with a set of unique fatigue crack initiation tests were performed on the alloys. Hot isostatic pressing was shown to produce a significant increase in cycles to crack initiation for AMS 4225, while no change was evident in traditional da/dN fatigue crack growth. The data permits comparisons of the two alloys both with and without the HIP process.

  2. Fatique crack growth behavior of a single crystal alloy as observed through an in situ fatigue loading stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Telesman, Jack; Kantzos, Peter

    1988-01-01

    An in situ fatigue loading stage inside a scanning electron microscope (SEM) was used to determine the fatigue crack growth behavior of a PWA 1480 single-crystal nickel-based superalloy. The loading stage permits real-time viewing of the fatigue damage processes at high magnification. The PWA 1480 single-crystal, single-edge notch specimens were tested with the load axis parallel to the (100) orientation. Two distinct fatigue failure mechanisms were identified. The crack growth rate differed substantially when the failure occurred on a single slip system in comparison to multislip system failure. Two processes by which crack branching is produced were identified and are discussed. Also discussed are the observed crack closure mechanisms.

  3. In situ short fatigue crack characterization of a nickel-base superalloy at ambient and elevated temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, R.R.

    1991-01-01

    Fatigue experiments were performed using a nickel-base superalloy at various temperatures in a load frame attached to a scanning electron microscope. An elevated temperature stage was designed, constructed, and coupled to the apparatus, allowing temperatures in excess of 700 C. Experiments on Waspaloy at 25, 500, and 700 C showed similar crack nucleation characteristics. The dominant mechanism of fatigue crack growth for the short cracks at 25 and 500 C was one of mixed mode 1 and 2 by slip band cracking. At 700 C, crack growth proceeded by a stage II cracking process showing very little signs of crystallographic growth. Discontinuous crack growth rates at 25 and 500 C were attributed to microstructural barriers such as grain boundaries, twin boundaries, and carbides.

  4. Fatigue cracking of a bare steel first wall in an inertial confinement fusion chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, R. M.; Abbott, R. P.; Havstad, M. A.; Dunne, A. M.

    2013-06-01

    Inertial confinement fusion power plants will deposit high energy X-rays onto the outer surfaces of the first wall many times a second for the lifetime of the plant. These X-rays create brief temperature spikes in the first few microns of the wall, which cause an associated highly compressive stress response on the surface of the material. The periodicity of this stress pulse is a concern due to the possibility of fatigue cracking of the wall. We have used finite element analyses to simulate the conditions present on the first wall in order to evaluate the driving force of crack propagation on fusion-facing surface cracks. Analysis results indicate that the X-ray induced plastic compressive stress creates a region of residual tension on the surface between pulses. This tension film will likely result in surface cracking upon repeated cycling. Additionally, the compressive pulse may induce plasticity ahead of the crack tip, leaving residual tension in its wake. However, the stress amplitude decreases dramatically for depths greater than 80–100 μm into the fusion-facing surface. Crack propagation models as well as stress-life estimates agree that even though small cracks may form on the surface of the wall, they are unlikely to propagate further than 100 μm without assistance from creep or grain erosion phenomena.

  5. The application of Newman crack-closure model to predicting fatigue crack growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Si, Erjian

    1994-01-01

    Newman crack-closure model and the relevant crack growth program were applied to the analysis of crack growth under constant amplitude and aircraft spectrum loading on a number of aluminum alloy materials. The analysis was performed for available test data of 2219-T851, 2024-T3, 2024-T351, 7075-T651, 2324-T39, and 7150-T651 aluminum materials. The results showed that the constraint factor is a significant factor in the method. The determination of the constraint factor is discussed. For constant amplitude loading, satisfactory crack growth lives could be predicted. For the above aluminum specimens, the ratio of predicted to experimental lives, Np/Nt, ranged from 0.74 to 1.36. The mean value of Np/Nt was 0.97. For a specified complex spectrum loading, predicted crack growth lives are not in very good agreement with the test data. Further effort is needed to correctly simulate the transition between plane strain and plane stress conditions, existing near the crack tip.

  6. The application of Newman crack-closure model to predicting fatigue crack growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Si, Erjian

    1994-09-01

    Newman crack-closure model and the relevant crack growth program were applied to the analysis of crack growth under constant amplitude and aircraft spectrum loading on a number of aluminum alloy materials. The analysis was performed for available test data of 2219-T851, 2024-T3, 2024-T351, 7075-T651, 2324-T39, and 7150-T651 aluminum materials. The results showed that the constraint factor is a significant factor in the method. The determination of the constraint factor is discussed. For constant amplitude loading, satisfactory crack growth lives could be predicted. For the above aluminum specimens, the ratio of predicted to experimental lives, Np/Nt, ranged from 0.74 to 1.36. The mean value of Np/Nt was 0.97. For a specified complex spectrum loading, predicted crack growth lives are not in very good agreement with the test data. Further effort is needed to correctly simulate the transition between plane strain and plane stress conditions, existing near the crack tip.

  7. Hydrogen Concentration and Strain Fields Near Fatigue Cracks in Pipeline Steel Measured Via Neutron Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connolly, Matthew; Slifka, Andrew; Drexler, Elizabeth; Hydrogen Pipeline Safety Team

    Hydrogen (H2) is desirable for energy storage as it is cleaner burning and can store a larger amount of energy than an equal mass of gasoline. One problem in the development of a hydrogen economy is to find or develop materials that ensure the safe, reliable, and cost-effective flow of energy from the source to the user. It is expected steels will be needed to serve this function. However, the existing network of natural gas pipeline, for example, is constructed of ferrous materials which are susceptible to embrittlement and subsequent increased fatigue crack growth rates after exposure to hydrogen. In order to improve current modeling efforts, experimental determination of hydrogen concentration, hydrogen diffusion rates, and strain fields are required to inform and validate the model. Here we report neutron imaging measurements of the hydrogen concentration near a fatigue crack and the corresponding strain field, measured via neutron transmission Bragg edge spectroscopy. Nist Materials Measurement Laboratory, Applied Chemicals and Materials Division.

  8. A Review of Fatigue Crack Growth for Pipeline Steels Exposed to Hydrogen

    PubMed Central

    Nanninga, N.; Slifka, A.; Levy, Y.; White, C.

    2010-01-01

    Hydrogen pipeline systems offer an economical means of storing and transporting energy in the form of hydrogen gas. Pipelines can be used to transport hydrogen that has been generated at solar and wind farms to and from salt cavern storage locations. In addition, pipeline transportation systems will be essential before widespread hydrogen fuel cell vehicle technology becomes a reality. Since hydrogen pipeline use is expected to grow, the mechanical integrity of these pipelines will need to be validated under the presence of pressurized hydrogen. This paper focuses on a review of the fatigue crack growth response of pipeline steels when exposed to gaseous hydrogen environments. Because of defect-tolerant design principles in pipeline structures, it is essential that designers consider hydrogen-assisted fatigue crack growth behavior in these applications. PMID:27134796

  9. High frequency guided ultrasonic waves for hidden fatigue crack growth monitoring in multi-layer model aerospace structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Henry; Masserey, Bernard; Fromme, Paul

    2015-02-01

    Especially for ageing aircraft the development of fatigue cracks at fastener holes due to stress concentration and varying loading conditions constitutes a significant maintenance problem. High frequency guided waves offer a potential compromise between the capabilities of local bulk ultrasonic measurements with proven defect detection sensitivity and the large area coverage of lower frequency guided ultrasonic waves. High frequency guided waves have energy distributed through all layers of the specimen thickness, allowing in principle hidden (2nd layer) fatigue damage monitoring. For the integration into structural health monitoring systems the sensitivity for the detection of hidden fatigue damage in inaccessible locations of the multi-layered components from a stand-off distance has to be ascertained. The multi-layered model structure investigated consists of two aluminium plate-strips with an epoxy sealant layer. During cyclic loading fatigue crack growth at a fastener hole was monitored. Specific guided wave modes (combination of fundamental A0 and S0 Lamb modes) were selectively excited above the cut-off frequencies of higher modes using a standard ultrasonic wedge transducer. Non-contact laser measurements close to the defect were performed to qualify the influence of a fatigue crack in one aluminium layer on the guided wave scattering. Fatigue crack growth monitoring using laser interferometry showed good sensitivity and repeatability for the reliable detection of small, quarter-elliptical cracks. Standard ultrasonic pulse-echo equipment was employed to monitor hidden fatigue damage from a stand-off distance without access to the damaged specimen layer. Sufficient sensitivity for the detection of fatigue cracks located in the inaccessible aluminium layer was verified, allowing in principle practical in situ ultrasonic monitoring of fatigue crack growth.

  10. Refurbishment of fatigue-cracked generator rotor forgings

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, B.W.; Zielke, W.; Puri, A.

    1996-12-31

    In a paper presented at the 1994 IJPGC in Phoenix, AZ, TVA discussed the management of a fleet of fourteen generator rotors which had developed cracks in the axial cooling holes under the retaining rings and in the radial cooling holes in the rotor body. The management consisted of establishing the root cause of the crack initiation and propagation, initially establishing the flaw size distribution by eddy-current testing (ECT), performing reinspection at appropriate intervals, preheating the rotor prior to startup, lowering overspeed trip settings to 105%, confirming overspeed trip response by simulation rather than actual overspeed, and maintaining a spare generator rotor. Since the 1994 paper, one of the rotors developed an electrical liability, forcing its removal from service. While a replacement rotor which was on hand resolved the immediate crisis, the long term options were: (1) operate without a spare, (b) procure a new rotor with substantially improved mechanical properties and slightly improved electrical performance, or (c) refurbish the existing forging. After an exhaustive economic analysis, option C was identified as the most cost effective solution. This paper addresses the 43-inch rotor rehabilitation and rewind that has been successfully executed for less than half the cost of a new replacement rotor, without loss in operating flexibility.

  11. On the use of ultrasonic fatigue testing technique--variable amplitude loadings and crack growth monitoring.

    PubMed

    Müller, T; Sander, M

    2013-12-01

    In the very high cycle fatigue regime high-frequency testing techniques are required. Using the ultrasonic fatigue technique, testing time could be reduced significantly in comparison to conventional servo-hydraulic machines. An ultrasonic fatigue testing system developed by the BOKU Vienna with load frequencies of about 20kHz is used for variable amplitude loading investigations in the VHCF regime. Therefore, the amplitude level during fatigue tests is controlled by a PC using an own developed software. Additionally, an in situ reconstruction of a damage equivalent load spectrum based on a load time history is introduced schematically. To optimize the experimental procedure a temperature-controlled pulse-pause adaption has been developed and implemented into the software. For quantifying the influence of variable amplitude loadings on the fatigue life, e.g. load interaction effects, the crack growth is measured by using the potential drop technique that is adapted to the ultrasonic fatigue testing system. Finally, the results of two-step-block loading tests are presented. PMID:23597637

  12. Sensitivity Analysis of Fatigue Crack Growth Model for API Steels in Gaseous Hydrogen

    PubMed Central

    Amaro, Robert L; Rustagi, Neha; Drexler, Elizabeth S; Slifka, Andrew J

    2014-01-01

    A model to predict fatigue crack growth of API pipeline steels in high pressure gaseous hydrogen has been developed and is presented elsewhere. The model currently has several parameters that must be calibrated for each pipeline steel of interest. This work provides a sensitivity analysis of the model parameters in order to provide (a) insight to the underlying mathematical and mechanistic aspects of the model, and (b) guidance for model calibration of other API steels. PMID:26601024

  13. Fatigue crack growth rate (FCGR) behavior of nicalon/SiC composites

    SciTech Connect

    Miriyala, N.; Liaw, P.K.; Yu, N.

    1995-04-01

    The objective is to develop a fundamental understanding of fatigue crack growth phenomenon in Nicalon/SiC composites. Ultrasonic measurements were continued on the Nicalon/SiC composite specimens to correlate elastic moduli with percentage porosity in the in-plane as well as through-thickness directions. A micromechanics model based on periodic microstructure was developed to predict the elastic stiffness constants of the Nicalon/SiC composites. The predicted values were in good agreement with the experimental results.

  14. Sensitivity Analysis of Fatigue Crack Growth Model for API Steels in Gaseous Hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Amaro, Robert L; Rustagi, Neha; Drexler, Elizabeth S; Slifka, Andrew J

    2014-01-01

    A model to predict fatigue crack growth of API pipeline steels in high pressure gaseous hydrogen has been developed and is presented elsewhere. The model currently has several parameters that must be calibrated for each pipeline steel of interest. This work provides a sensitivity analysis of the model parameters in order to provide (a) insight to the underlying mathematical and mechanistic aspects of the model, and (b) guidance for model calibration of other API steels. PMID:26601024

  15. Toughened epoxy polymers: Fatigue crack propagation mechanisms. Ph.D. Thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Azimi, H.R.

    1994-01-01

    This study examines several mechanisms by which the fatigue crack propagation (FCP) resistance of shear-yielding thermoset polymers can be improved. Specifically, this research has four objectives as follows: first, to develop a mechanistic understanding of the FCP behavior of rubber-modified thermoset polymers; second, to understand the effect of strength and shape of the inorganic fillers on the FCP resistance and micromechanisms in filled epoxy polymers; third, to elucidate the nature of the interactions among the crack-tip shielding mechanisms in thermoset polymers subjected to cyclic loading and synergistically toughened with both rubber and inorganic particles (i.e., hybrid composites); fourth, to study the role of interfaces on the synergistic interactions in FCP behavior of hybrid composites. The model - matrix material consists of a diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA) based type epoxy cured with piperidine. Parallel to the first objective, the epoxy matrix was modified with rubber while changing volume fraction, type, and size of the rubber particles. To accomplish the second goal, the epoxy polymers were modified by a total 10 volume percent of either one of the following three types of inorganic modifiers: hollow glass spheres (HGS); solid glass spheres (SGS); and short glass fibers (SGF). The third goal was met by processing three different systems of hybrid epoxy composites modified by (1) CTBN rubber and HGS, (2) CTBN rubber and SGS, and (3) CTBN rubber and SGF. The total volume fraction of the two modifiers in each hybrid system was kept constant at 10 percent while systematically changing their ratio. To meet the fourth objective, the surface properties of the SGS particles in the hybrid system were altered using adhesion promoter. A mechanistic understanding of the FCP behavior of rubber-modified epoxies was achieved by relating fractographs to observed FCP behavior.

  16. Rutting and Fatigue Cracking Resistance of Waste Cooking Oil Modified Trinidad Asphaltic Materials

    PubMed Central

    Maharaj, Rean; Ramjattan-Harry, Vitra; Mohamed, Nazim

    2015-01-01

    The influence of waste cooking oil (WCO) on the performance characteristics of asphaltic materials indigenous to Trinidad, namely, Trinidad Lake Asphalt (TLA), Trinidad Petroleum Bitumen (TPB), and TLA : TPB (50 : 50) blend, was investigated to deduce the applicability of the WCO as a performance enhancer for the base asphalt. The rheological properties of complex modulus (G∗) and phase angle (δ) were measured for modified base asphalt blends containing up to 10% WCO. The results of rheology studies demonstrated that the incremental addition of WCO to the three parent binders resulted in incremental decreases in the rutting resistance (decrease in G∗/sinδ values) and increases in the fatigue cracking resistance (decrease in G∗sinδ value). The fatigue cracking resistance and rutting resistance for the TLA : TPB (50 : 50) blends were between those of the blends containing pure TLA and TPB. As operating temperature increased, an increase in the resistance to fatigue cracking and a decrease in the rutting resistance were observed for all of the WCO modified asphaltic blends. This study demonstrated the capability to create customized asphalt-WCO blends to suit special applications and highlights the potential for WCO to be used as an environmentally attractive option for improving the use of Trinidad asphaltic materials. PMID:26336652

  17. Rutting and Fatigue Cracking Resistance of Waste Cooking Oil Modified Trinidad Asphaltic Materials.

    PubMed

    Maharaj, Rean; Ramjattan-Harry, Vitra; Mohamed, Nazim

    2015-01-01

    The influence of waste cooking oil (WCO) on the performance characteristics of asphaltic materials indigenous to Trinidad, namely, Trinidad Lake Asphalt (TLA), Trinidad Petroleum Bitumen (TPB), and TLA : TPB (50 : 50) blend, was investigated to deduce the applicability of the WCO as a performance enhancer for the base asphalt. The rheological properties of complex modulus (G (∗) ) and phase angle (δ) were measured for modified base asphalt blends containing up to 10% WCO. The results of rheology studies demonstrated that the incremental addition of WCO to the three parent binders resulted in incremental decreases in the rutting resistance (decrease in G (∗) /sinδ values) and increases in the fatigue cracking resistance (decrease in G (∗) sinδ value). The fatigue cracking resistance and rutting resistance for the TLA : TPB (50 : 50) blends were between those of the blends containing pure TLA and TPB. As operating temperature increased, an increase in the resistance to fatigue cracking and a decrease in the rutting resistance were observed for all of the WCO modified asphaltic blends. This study demonstrated the capability to create customized asphalt-WCO blends to suit special applications and highlights the potential for WCO to be used as an environmentally attractive option for improving the use of Trinidad asphaltic materials. PMID:26336652

  18. The Effects of Shot and Laser Peening on Fatigue Life and Crack Growth in 2024 Aluminum Alloy and 4340 Steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everett, R. A., Jr.; Matthews, W. T.; Prabhakaran, R.; Newman, J. C., Jr.; Dubberly, M. J.

    2001-01-01

    Fatigue and crack growth tests have been conducted on 4340 steel and 2024-T3 aluminum alloy, respectively, to assess the effects of shot peening on fatigue life and the effects of shot and laser peening on crack growth. Two current programs involving fixed and rotary-wing aircraft will not be using shot peened structures. Since the shot peening compressive residual stress depth is usually less than the 0.05-inch initial damage tolerance crack size, it is believed by some that shot peening should have no beneficial effects toward retarding crack growth. In this study cracks were initiated from an electronic-discharged machining flaw which was cycled to produce a fatigue crack of approximately 0.05-inches in length and then the specimens were peened. Test results showed that after peening the crack growth rates were noticeably slower when the cracks were fairly short for both the shot and laser peened specimens resulting in a crack growth life that was a factor of 2 to 4 times greater than the results of the average unpeened test. Once the cracks reached a length of approximately 0.1-inches the growth rates were about the same for the peened and unpeened specimens. Fatigue tests on 4340 steel showed that the endurance limit of a test specimen with a 0.002-inch-deep machining-like scratch was reduced by approximately 40 percent. However, if the "scratched" specimen was shot peened after inserting the scratch, the fatigue life returned to almost 100 percent of the unflawed specimens original fatigue life.

  19. The role of passive surface films on corrosion fatigue crack initiation

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, A.W.

    1992-01-01

    Fatigue testing on commercially pure titanium with low and high oxygen contents, chosen to produce quite different slip behaviors, wavy and planar, respectively, was carried out in air and in 1M H[sub 2]SO[sub 4] solution, a strongly passivating environment for Ti. Goal was comparison of experimental fatigue data with a published model which rationalizes fatigue crack initiation under passive corrosion conditions. Although the general features of the experimental data were consistent with the tenets of the model, as was also the case in prior work using the stainless steel superalloy A-286, it appeared that the passivation conditions were so strong as to preclude the primary event proposed as the basis for the model, namely the emergence of slip steps through the passive film, thus permitting corrosive fatigue crack initiation. It is possible that choice of a less strong passivating environment would permit a better comparison of model and experiment for the CP Ti, an otherwise suitable experimental material.

  20. An Experimental Investigation of the Effects of Vacuum Environment on the Fatigue Life, Fatigue-Crack-Growth Behavior, and Fracture Toughness of 7075-T6 Aluminum Alloy. Ph.D. Thesis - North Carolina State Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, C. M.

    1972-01-01

    Axial load fatigue life, fatigue-crack propagation, and fracture toughness tests were conducted on 0.090-inch thick specimens made of 7075-T6 aluminum alloy. The fatigue life and fatigue-crack propagation experiments were conducted at a stress ratio of 0.02. Maximum stresses ranged from 33 to 60 ksi in the fatigue life experiments, and from 10 to 40 ksi in the fatigue-crack propagation experiments, and fatigue life experiments were conducted at gas pressures of 760, 0.5, 0.05, and 0.00000005 torr. Fatigue-crack-growth and fracture toughness experiments were conducted at gas pressures of 760 and 5 x 10 to the minus 8th power torr. Residual stress measurements were made on selected fatigue life specimens to determine the effect of such stresses on fatigue life. Analysis of the results from the fatigue life experiments indicated that fatigue life progressively increased as the gas pressure decreased. Analysis of the results from the fatigue-crack-growth experiments indicates that at low values of stress-intensity range, the fatigue crack growth rates were approximately twice as high in air as in vacuum. Fracture toughness data showed there was essentially no difference in the fracture toughness of 7075-T6 in vacuum and in air.

  1. Stress-ratio effect on mode II propagation of interlaminar fatigue cracks in graphite/epoxy composites

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Keisuke; Tanaka, Hiroshi

    1997-12-31

    The effect of the stress ratio on the propagation behavior of Mode II interlaminar fatigue cracks was studied with unidirectional graphite/epoxy laminates, Toray T800H/{number_sign}3631. End-notched flexure (ENF) specimens were used for fatigue tests under the stress ratios of R = 0.2, 0.5, and 0.6; and end-loaded split (ELS) specimens were used for tests under R = {minus}1.0, {minus}0.5, and 0.2. For each stress ratio, the crack propagation rate was given by a power function of the stress intensity range, {Delta}K{sub 11}, in the region of rates above 10{sup {minus}9} m/cycle. Below this region, there exists the threshold for fatigue crack propagation. The threshold condition is given by a constant value of the stress intensity range, {Delta}K{sub 11th} = 1.8 MPa{radical}m. The crack propagation rate is determined by {Delta}K{sub 11} near the threshold, while by the maximum stress identity factor, K{sub 11max}, at high rates. A fracture mechanics equation is proposed for predicting the propagation rate of Mode II fatigue cracks under various stress ratios. The effect of the stress ratio on the micromechanism of Mode II fatigue crack propagation was discussed on the basis of the microscopic observations of fracture surfaces and near-crack-tip regions.

  2. High Temperature Slow Crack Growth of Si3N4 Specimens Subjected to Uniaxial and Biaxial Dynamic Fatigue Loading Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Nemeth, Noel N.; Salem, Jonathan A.; Powers, Lynn M.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    1995-01-01

    The slow crack growth of a hot-pressed silicon nitride was determined at 1300 C in air using dynamic fatigue testing under both uniaxial and biaxial stress states. Good agreement in fatigue parameter exists between the data obtained from uniaxial and biaxial loading conditions. A reasonable prediction of dynamic fatigue from one stress state to another was made using the recently developed CARES/LIFE computer code.

  3. Development of a Practical Methodology for Elastic-Plastic and Fully Plastic Fatigue Crack Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McClung, R. C.; Chell, G. G.; Lee, Y.-D.; Russell, D. A.; Orient, G. E.

    1999-01-01

    A practical engineering methodology has been developed to analyze and predict fatigue crack growth rates under elastic-plastic and fully plastic conditions. The methodology employs the closure-corrected effective range of the J-integral, (Delta)J(sub eff), as the governing parameter. The methodology contains original and literature J and (Delta)J solutions for specific geometries, along with general methods for estimating J for other geometries and other loading conditions, including combined mechanical loading and combined primary and secondary loading. The methodology also contains specific practical algorithms that translate a J solution into a prediction of fatigue crack growth rate or life, including methods for determining crack opening levels, crack instability conditions, and material properties. A critical core subset of the J solutions and the practical algorithms has been implemented into independent elastic-plastic NASGRO modules. All components of the entire methodology, including the NASGRO modules, have been verified through analysis and experiment, and limits of applicability have been identified.

  4. Development of a Practical Methodology for Elastic-Plastic and Fully Plastic Fatigue Crack Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McClung, R. C.; Chell, G. G.; Lee, Y. -D.; Russell, D. A.; Orient, G. E.

    1999-01-01

    A practical engineering methodology has been developed to analyze and predict fatigue crack growth rates under elastic-plastic and fully plastic conditions. The methodology employs the closure-corrected effective range of the J-integral, delta J(sub eff) as the governing parameter. The methodology contains original and literature J and delta J solutions for specific geometries, along with general methods for estimating J for other geometries and other loading conditions, including combined mechanical loading and combined primary and secondary loading. The methodology also contains specific practical algorithms that translate a J solution into a prediction of fatigue crack growth rate or life, including methods for determining crack opening levels, crack instability conditions, and material properties. A critical core subset of the J solutions and the practical algorithms has been implemented into independent elastic-plastic NASGRO modules. All components of the entire methodology, including the NASGRO modules, have been verified through analysis and experiment, and limits of applicability have been identified.

  5. Specific Features of the Nucleation and Growth of Fatigue Cracks in Steel under Cyclic Dynamic Compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popelyukh, A. I.; Popelyukh, P. A.; Bataev, A. A.; Nikulina, A. A.; Smirnov, A. I.

    2016-03-01

    The processes of the fracture of 40Kh and U8 steels under cyclic dynamic compression are studied. It has been found that the main cause for the fracture of the cyclically compressed specimens is the propagation of cracks due to the effect of residual tensile stresses, which arise near the tips of the cracks at the stage of the unloading of the specimens. The growth rate of a crack has the maximum value at the initial stage of its propagation in the vicinity of the stress concentrator. As the crack propagates deep into the specimen, its growth rate decreases and depends only slightly on the real cross section of the specimen. The model of the process of the fatigue fracture of the steels under dynamic loading by a cyclically varied compressive force is proposed. It has been found that the high fatigue endurance is provided by tempering at 200°C for the 40Kh steel and at 300°C for the U8 steel.

  6. Multiscale approach to micro/macro fatigue crack growth in 2024-T3 aluminum panel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sih, G. C.

    2014-01-01

    When two contacting solid surfaces are tightly closed and invisible to the naked eye, the discontinuity is said to be microscopic regardless of whether its length is short or long. By this definition, it is not sufficient to distinguish the difference between a micro- and macro-crack by using the length parameter. Microcracks in high strength metal alloys have been known to be several centimeters or longer. Considered in this work is a dual scale fatigue crack growth model where the main crack can be micro or macro but there prevails an inherent microscopic tip region that is damaged depending on the irregularities of the microstructure. This region is referred to as the "micro-tip" and can be simulated by a sharp wedge with different angles in addition to mixed boundary conditions. The combination is sufficient to model microscopic entities in the form of voids, inclusions, precipitations, interfaces, in addition to subgrain imperfections, or cluster of dislocations. This is accomplished by using the method of "singularity representation" such that closed form asymptotic solutions can be obtained for the development of fatigue crack growth rate relations with three parameters. They include: (1) the crack surface tightness σ* represented by σ o/ σ ∞ = 0.3-0.5 for short cracks in region I, and 0.1-0.2 for long cracks in region II, (2) the micro/macro material properties reflected by the shear modulus ratio µ* (=µmicro/µmacro varying between 2 and 5) and (3) the most sensitive parameter d* being the micro-tip characteristic length d* (= d/ d o) whose magnitude decreases in the direction of region I→II. The existing fatigue crack growth data for 2024-T3 and 7075-T6 aluminum sheets are used to reinterpret the two-parameter d a/d N= C(Δ K) n relation where Δ K has now been re-derived for a microcrack with surfaces tightly in contact. The contact force will depend on the mean stress σm or mean stress ratio R as the primary parameter and on the stress

  7. Some remarks on the engineering application of the fatigue crack growth approach under nonzero mean loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duran, Jorge Alberto Rodriguez; Boloy, Ronney Mancebo; Leoni, Rafael Raider

    2015-09-01

    The well-known fatigue crack growth (FCG) curves are two-parameter dependents. The range of the stress intensity factor Δ K and the load ratio R are the parameters normally used for describing these curves. For engineering purposes, the mathematical representation of these curves should be integrated between the initial and final crack sizes in order to obtain the safety factors for stresses and life. First of all, it is necessary to reduce the dependence of the FCG curves to only one parameter. Δ K is almost always selected and, in these conditions, considered as the crack driving force. Using experimental data from literature, the present paper shows how to perform multiple regression analyses using the traditional Walker approach and the more recent unified approach. The correlations so obtained are graphically analyzed in three dimensions. Numerical examples of crack growth analysis for cracks growing under nominal stresses of constant amplitude in smooth and notched geometries are performed, assuming an identical material component as that of the available experimental data. The resulting curves of crack size versus number of cycles ( a vs. N) are then compared. The two models give approximately the same ( a vs. N) curves in both geometries. Differences between the behaviors of the ( a vs. N) curves in smooth and notched geometries are highlighted, and the reasons for these particular behaviors are discussed.

  8. Residual Static Strength of ALuminum-Alloy Beams Containing Fatigue Cracks in the Tension Covers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leybold, Herbert A.

    1961-01-01

    Static tests were performed on 31 box beams containing fatigue cracks in order to determine their residual static strengths. The beams were constructed of 7075 and 2024 aluminum alloy according to several designs and employed stringers that were either bonded, riveted, or an integral part of the skin. skin (both aaterials) had the highest residual static strengths, whereas 7075 beams with integrally stiffened covers had the lowest residual static strengths. Except for the integrally stiffened beams, the skin material did not contribute to the residual static strength of the beams because the crack propagated across the skin before maximum load was reached. For the integrally stiffened beams, crack propagation and failure were synonymous. The test results are compared with predictions of the residual static strength. Fair agreement between predicted strength and actual strength was obtained for all beams tested.

  9. Measurement of Fatigue Crack Growth Relationships in Hydrogen Gas for Pressure Swing Adsorber Vessel Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Somerday, Brian P.; Barney, Monica

    2014-12-04

    We measured the hydrogen-assisted fatigue crack growth rates (da/dN) for SA516 Grade 70 steel as a function of stress-intensity factor range (ΔK) and load-cycle frequency to provide life-prediction data relevant to pressure swing adsorber (PSA) vessels. For ΔK values up to 18.5 MPa m1/2, the baseline da/dN versus ΔK relationship measured at 1Hz in 2.8 MPa hydrogen gas represents an upper bound with respect to crack growth rates measured at lower frequency. However, at higher ΔK values, we found that the baseline da/dN data had to be corrected to account for modestly higher crack growth rates at the lower frequencies relevant to PSA vessel operation.

  10. Measurement of Fatigue Crack Growth Relationships in Hydrogen Gas for Pressure Swing Adsorber Vessel Steels

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Somerday, Brian P.; Barney, Monica

    2014-12-04

    We measured the hydrogen-assisted fatigue crack growth rates (da/dN) for SA516 Grade 70 steel as a function of stress-intensity factor range (ΔK) and load-cycle frequency to provide life-prediction data relevant to pressure swing adsorber (PSA) vessels. For ΔK values up to 18.5 MPa m1/2, the baseline da/dN versus ΔK relationship measured at 1Hz in 2.8 MPa hydrogen gas represents an upper bound with respect to crack growth rates measured at lower frequency. However, at higher ΔK values, we found that the baseline da/dN data had to be corrected to account for modestly higher crack growth rates at the lower frequenciesmore » relevant to PSA vessel operation.« less

  11. A study of subsurface crack initiation produced by rolling contact fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, Arun M.; Hahn, George T.; Rubin, Carol A.

    1993-01-01

    Results of subsurface crack initiation studies produced by pure rolling contact fatigue in 7075-T6 aluminum alloy are presented in this article. Microstructural changes and subsequent crack initiation below the contacting surface in cylindrical test specimens subjected to repeated rolling contact are illustrated. The rolling conditions are simulated in a three-dimensional elastic-plastic finite element model in order to estimate the plastic strains and residual stresses in the test material. The numerically estimated distribution of plastic strains in the model correlate well with the extent of microstructural changes observed in the test specimen. Results also indicate that a combination of plastic strains and low values of residual stresses is conducive to subsurface crack initiation and growth.

  12. The effect of microstructure on 650 C fatigue crack growth in P/M Astroloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayda, J.; Miner, R. V.

    1983-01-01

    The effect of microstructure on fatigue crack propagation at 650 C has been studied in a P/M nickel-base superalloy, Astroloy. Crack propagation data were obtained in air and vacuum at 20 cpm with a modified compact tension specimen. The rate of crack growth, da/dn, was correlated with the stress intensity range. Key microstructural variables examined were grain size and the distribution and size of the strengthening gamma prime phase. A fine grain size less than 20 microns always promoted rapid, intergranular failure, while a large grain size promoted slower, transgranular failure which decreased as the size and volume fraction of aging gamma prime was manipulated so as to increase alloy strength. The rapid, intergranular mode of failure of the fine grain microstructures was suppressed in vacuum.

  13. Moisture-heat effects on unidirectional composite laminates fracture toughness and fatigue crack growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fusheng; Pzinz, R.; Zichy, J. H.

    1993-04-01

    The heat-moisture effect on interlaminar fracture toughness of T300/914C graphite/epoxy unidirectional composite laminates is investigated under mode I opening loading witb DCB specimen. The fracture toughness in moisture-heat conditioning increases, and the glass transition temperature decreases. SEM fractographs revealed no discernible difference in the fracture surface morphology of moisture-heat and dry conditioned specimens. No fiber bridging occurs in the testing. Delamination fatigue crack growth experiments are carried out on T300/914C graphite/epoxy unidirectional laminates. It is found that the mode I cyclic crack growth rate yields a power low relationship between da/dN and the maximum cyclic strain energy release rate. The crack growth rate of the moisture-heat conditioned specimen is lower than that of the dry conditioned. The environmental effects are explained on the basis of fractography and fracture mechanisms and fracture mechanics.

  14. Characterization of exposure dependent fatigue crack growth kinetics and damage mechanisms for aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ro, Yunjo

    The effect of environmental exposure [given by the ratio of water vapor pressure to the loading frequency (PH2O/f)] on fatigue crack growth rates (FCGR) and damage mechanisms has been investigated for Al-Cu-Li/Mg alloys tested at constant stress intensity range (DeltaK = KMAX - KMIN). Different exposure dependences of the FCGR are explained by H-embrittlement and 3 rate-limiting processes that are similar for each alloy and aging condition. It is shown that the dislocation slip character (heterogeneous planar vs. wavy) controls FCGR at low to moderate exposures, rather than alloy composition and strengthening precipitate reactivity. However, the benefit of planar slip is significantly reduced at higher exposures. An SEM-based electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD)/stereology method was used to successfully quantify changes in fatigue fracture surface crystallography as a function of exposure for a peak aged Al-Cu-Li alloy and an under-aged Al-Cu-Mg alloy. Near-{111} slip band cracking (SBC) observed under high vacuum conditions is gradually replaced by near-{001}/{011} and high index, {hkl}, cracking planes as PH2O/f is increased. The complete absence of near-{111} SBC at higher exposures suggests H enhanced decohesion rather than slip based damage process enhanced by H. This conclusion was substantiated by direct TEM observation. Focused Ion Beam (FIB) milling was used to produce thin foils for TEM, which successfully revealed the underlying dislocation structure at the crack surface and within surrounding materials in under-aged Al-Cu-Mg tested at exposure conditions of ˜10 -8 and 50 Pa·sec. Both conditions exhibit a similar layer of dislocation cells just below the fracture surface which abruptly changes to localized slip bands away from the fracture surface, confirming the presence of a strain gradient at the crack tip. However, the thickness of the substructure layer and slip band width observed at ˜10-8 Pa·sec was larger than those observed at 50 Pa

  15. The fatigue crack propagation behavior of a polycrystalline nickel-base superalloy in the near threshold region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padula, Santo A., II

    Fatigue crack propagation tests were performed on the polycrystalline, powder metallurgy Ni-base superalloy, KM4. Two different heat treatments, producing grain sizes of 6 mum and 55 mum, were investigated. Tests were conducted at load ratios ranging from R = 0.3 to R = 0.7 at two different frequencies, 100 and 1000 Hz. Fatigue crack propagation behavior was studied at 20°C, 550°C and 650°C. Intermediate growth rate observations showed results similar to those observed by other researchers at frequencies lower than those employed in this study. The general observations showed that increasing the grain size, decreasing the load ratio, decreasing the temperature and increasing the frequency all had the effect of increasing the fatigue crack propagation resistance at intermediate growth rates. Threshold FCP behavior showed a much more complicated dependence on load ratio, grain size, frequency and temperature. In some cases, increased frequency resulted in decreased FCP threshold while in other cases, it produced the opposite effect. This complex behavior can, in part, be attributed to a transition in the mode of failure from transgranular to intergranular, however, analysis also revealed that system variable interactions (for instance frequency/temperature interactions or grain size/temperature interactions) must also be accounted for in order to understand the complex threshold behavior. Optical profilometry was utilized to obtain a quantitative assessment of the fracture surface roughness in an attempt to correlate measured threshold values. Typical roughness parameters such as RL, R a, and Rq (or RMS) were studied. An alternate parameter, the average microscopic slope ( m), was also investigated. No direct correlation was observed between fracture surface roughness, as defined by these parameters, and measured threshold. Compliance measurements did, however, reveal the presence of fatigue crack closure for some conditions at room temperature and 550°C. It was

  16. Experimental and Finite Element Modeling of Near-Threshold Fatigue Crack Growth for the K-Decreasing Test Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Stephen W.; Seshadri, Banavara R.; Newman, John A.

    2015-01-01

    The experimental methods to determine near-threshold fatigue crack growth rate data are prescribed in ASTM standard E647. To produce near-threshold data at a constant stress ratio (R), the applied stress-intensity factor (K) is decreased as the crack grows based on a specified K-gradient. Consequently, as the fatigue crack growth rate threshold is approached and the crack tip opening displacement decreases, remote crack wake contact may occur due to the plastically deformed crack wake surfaces and shield the growing crack tip resulting in a reduced crack tip driving force and non-representative crack growth rate data. If such data are used to life a component, the evaluation could yield highly non-conservative predictions. Although this anomalous behavior has been shown to be affected by K-gradient, starting K level, residual stresses, environmental assisted cracking, specimen geometry, and material type, the specifications within the standard to avoid this effect are limited to a maximum fatigue crack growth rate and a suggestion for the K-gradient value. This paper provides parallel experimental and computational simulations for the K-decreasing method for two materials (an aluminum alloy, AA 2024-T3 and a titanium alloy, Ti 6-2-2-2-2) to aid in establishing clear understanding of appropriate testing requirements. These simulations investigate the effect of K-gradient, the maximum value of stress-intensity factor applied, and material type. A material independent term is developed to guide in the selection of appropriate test conditions for most engineering alloys. With the use of such a term, near-threshold fatigue crack growth rate tests can be performed at accelerated rates, near-threshold data can be acquired in days instead of weeks without having to establish testing criteria through trial and error, and these data can be acquired for most engineering materials, even those that are produced in relatively small product forms.

  17. Environmental fatigue of an Al-Li-Cu alloy; Part II: Microscopic hydrogen cracking processes

    SciTech Connect

    Piascik, R.S.; Gangloff, R.P.

    1993-12-01

    Microscopic fatigue crack propagation (FCP) paths in peak-aged unrecrystallized alloy 2090 are identified as functions of intrinsic da/dN-{Delta}K kinetics and environment. The FCP rates in longitudinal-transverse (LT)-oriented 2090 are accelerated by hydrogen-producing environments (pure water vapor, moist air, and aqueous NaCl), as defined in Part 1. Subgrain boundary cracking (SGC) dominates for {Delta}K values where the cyclic plastic zone is sufficient to envelop subgrains. At low {Delta}K, when this crack tip process zone is smaller than the subgrain size, environmental FCP progresses on or near [100] or [110] planes, based on etch-pit shape. For inert environments (vacuum and He) and pure O{sub 2} with crack surface oxidation, FCP produces large facets along [111] oriented slip bands. This mode does not change with {Delta}K, and T{sub 1} decorated subgrain boundaries do not effect an expected da/dN-{Delta}K transition for the inert environments. Rather, the complex dependence of da/dN on {Delta}K is controlled by the environmental contribution to process zone microstructure-plastic strain interactions. A hydrogen embrittlement mechanism for FCP in 2090 is supported by similar brittle crack paths for low pressure water vapor and the electrolyte, the SGC and [100]/[110] crystallographic cracking modes, the influence of cyclic plastic zone volume ({Delta}K), and the benignancy of O{sub 2}. The SGC may be due to hydrogen production and trapping at T{sub 1} bearing sub-boundaries after process zone dislocation transport, while crystallographic cracking may be due to lattice decohesion or hydride cracking.

  18. Fatigue crack propagation in single-crystal CMSX- 2 at elevated temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antolovich, B. F.; Saxena, A.; Antolovich, S. D.

    1993-08-01

    The fatigue crack propagation (FCP) behavior of the nickel-base superalloy CMSX-2 in single-crystal form was investigated. Tests were conducted for two temperatures (25 and 700 °C), two orientations ([001][110] and [001][010]), and in two environments (laboratory air and ultra-high vacuum 10-7 torr). Following FCP testing, the fracture surfaces were examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The FCP rates were found to be relatively independent of the temperature, environment, and orientation when correlated with the conventional mode I stress-intensity factor. Examination of the fracture sur-faces revealed two distinct types of fracture. One type was characterized by 111 fracture surfaces, which were inclined relative to both the loading and crack propagation directions. These features, al-though clearly a result of the fatigue process, resembled cleavage fractures along 111 planes. Such fea-tures were observed at 25 and 700 °C; they were the only features observed for the 25 °C tests. The second type had a macroscopically dull loading appearance, was microscopically rough, and grew normal to the loading axis. These features were observed on the specimens tested at 700 °C (in both air and vacuum) and appeared similar to conventional fatigue fractures. Although in this region the crack plane was mac-roscopically normal to the loading direction, it deviated microscopically to avoid shearing the y ’ precipi-tates. In view of the complex crack growth mechanisms, mixed fracture modes, and lack of any difference in FCP rates, it is hypothesized that the correlation between FCP rates and the stress-intensity parameter is probably coincidental. The implications for life prediction of higher temperature turbine components based on conventional fracture mechanics are significant and should be investigated further.

  19. Metal magnetic memory technique used to predict the fatigue crack propagation behavior of 0.45%C steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chongchong, Li; Lihong, Dong; Haidou, Wang; Guolu, Li; Binshi, Xu

    2016-05-01

    Monitoring fatigue crack propagation behavior of ferromagnetic components is very important. In this paper, the tension-tension fatigue tests of center cracked tension (CCT) specimens were carried out; the variation regularity of both tangential and normal components of magnetic signals during fatigue process were investigated. The results showed that the initial abnormal signals which appeared at the notch were reversed after cyclic loading. The abnormal magnetic signals became more significant with the increase of fatigue cycles and reversed again after failure. The characteristic parameters, i.e., the peak value of tangential component, Btp, and maximum gradient value of normal component, Km, showed similar variation trends during the fatigue process, which can be divided into three different stages. An approximate linear relationship was found between the characteristic parameters and fatigue crack length 2a. The feasibility of predicting the fatigue crack propagation using the abnormal magnetic signals was discussed. What's more, the variation and distribution of the magnetic signals were also analyzed based on the theory of magnetic charge.

  20. Effect of service exposure on fatigue crack propagation of Inconel 718 turbine disc material at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, Dae-Ho; Choi, Myung-Je; Goto, Masahiro; Lee, Hong-Chul; Kim, Sangshik

    2014-09-15

    In this study, the fatigue crack propagation behavior of Inconel 718 turbine disc with different service times from 0 to 4229 h was investigated at 738 and 823 K. No notable change in microstructural features, other than the increase in grain size, was observed with increasing service time. With increasing service time from 0 to 4229 h, the fatigue crack propagation rates tended to increase, while the ΔK{sub th} value decreased, in low ΔK regime and lower Paris' regime at both testing temperatures. The fractographic observation using a scanning electron microscope suggested that the elevated temperature fatigue crack propagation mechanism of Inconel 718 changed from crystallographic cleavage mechanism to striation mechanism in the low ΔK regime, depending on the grain size. The fatigue crack propagation mechanism is proposed for the crack propagating through small and large grains in the low ΔK regime, and the fatigue crack propagation behavior of Inconel 718 with different service times at elevated temperatures is discussed. - Highlights: • The specimens were prepared from the Inconel 718 turbine disc used for 0 to 4229 h. • FCP rates were measured at 738 and 823 K. • The ΔK{sub th} values decreased with increasing service time. • The FCP behavior showed a strong correlation with the grain size of used turbine disc.