Science.gov

Sample records for fcc f-shell metals

  1. Thermodynamic Properties of 4f- and 5f-SHELL Metals at Finite Temperatures:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatt, N. K.; Vyas, P. R.; Jani, A. R.; Gohel, V. B.

    The thermodynamic properties of 4f- and 5f-shell metals have been studied at high temperatures using mean-field potential approach. The MFP seen by the lattice ion is constructed in terms of the total energy-volume relation using local pseudopotentials due to Pandya et al. [Physica B 307, 138 (2001)]. We have calculated static compression, shock-wave compression, volume thermal expansion, isothermal and adiabatic bulk moduli (BT and BS), specific heats (CV and CP), thermodynamic Grüneisen parameter (γth), anharmonic contribution to the specific heat and temperature along shock Hugoniot for 4f (γ-Ce)- and 5f (fcc-Th)-shell metals. The results are well compared with the other theoretical and experimental findings, which ensure the use of pseudopotentials for studying thermodynamic properties at higher temperatures in case of lanthanides and actinides.

  2. Core and shallow-core d- to f-shell excitations in rare-earth metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, J. A.; Moore, K. T.; van der Laan, G.; Bradley, J. P.; Gordon, R. A.

    2011-11-01

    We report on the results of probing the light lanthanide metals Ce, Pr, and Nd with inelastic x-ray and electron scattering. Aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope-based electron spectroscopy and nonresonant inelastic x-ray scattering are shown to be in a high degree of accord and here serve as complementary probes of electronic structure. The high resolution and high signal-to-noise electron technique allows for the measurement of the complex and subtle excitation spectra in the lanthanide metals, validating the applicability of the screened trivalent atomic model used for these materials. In addition, the momentum transfer dependence of the x-ray scattering is extracted and compared against atomic calculations for the most tightly bound excitonic resonances, which provides a direct test of the predicted atomic radial wave functions.

  3. Structural and elastic properties of fcc/fcc metallic multilayers: A molecular-dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tȩcza, Grzegorz W.

    1992-12-01

    Interplanar and intraplanar spacings as well as the elastic constants of fcc/fcc metallic multilayers stacked along [001] were determined via variable-cell molecular-dynamics simulation in (HtN) and (EhN) ensembles at room temperature. Qualitative differences in the structural and elastic properties of the multilayers, simulated using various 12-6 Lennard-Jones potentials, were observed. The anomalous behavior of the elastic constants and the biaxial modulus was linked to the modulation wavelength dependence of various structural parameters. The importance of the fluctuation contributions for the calculation of the full elastic constants is demonstrated.

  4. Interaction of hydrogen with transition metal fcc(111) surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löautber, R.; Hennig, D.

    1997-02-01

    The interaction of atomic hydrogen with the fcc(111) surfaces of Pd and Rh was investigated theoretically with an ab initio method, to find out the differences and similiarities between these neighboring metals. At the Rh surface the hcp site of the threefold-coordinated adsorption sites is preferred, while at Pd almost no difference between the hcp and fcc sites was found. For Pd, the occupation of subsurface positions was calculated to be more stable than bulklike positions. The energy gain caused by hydrogen absorption in subsurface positions is only about 100 meV lower than for hydrogen adsorption at the surface. In contrast, for Rh, significant differences between adsorption and absorption were calculated. The diffusion barrier for hydrogen diffusion from surface to subsurface positions was calculated and compared to the diffusion barrier in bulk. The hydrogen-induced work-function changes for the considered 4d transition-metal surfaces were positive for coverage θ=1.

  5. Deformation twinning mechanisms in FCC and HCP metals

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jian; Tome, Carlos N; Beyerlein, Irene J; Misra, Amit; Mara, N

    2011-01-31

    We report the recent work on twinning and detwinning in fcc and hcp metals based on the in situ and ex situ TEM observations and molecular dynamics simulations. Three aspects are discussed in this paper. (1) Detwinning in single-phase Cu with respect to growth twins, (2) deformation twinning in Ag-Cu composites, and (3) deformation twinning mechanisms in hcp metals. The main conclusion is that atomic structures of interfaces (twin boundaries, two-phases interface, and grain boundaries) play a crucial role in nucleating and propagating of deformation twins.

  6. Folding in FCC metal single crystals under compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lychagin, D. V.; Alfyorova, E. A.

    2015-10-01

    Results of the analysis of folding during compression deformation of metals with fcc lattice are presented. Single crystals with orientations at angles of the standard stereographic triangle and different crystallographic orientations of lateral faces have been studied. It has been found that the major factor affecting the folding intensity is the slip plane shear with respect to lateral faces. Such a shear results in face bending and the formation of fold systems in maximum curvature regions. It has been shown that, among all considered orientations, the maximum susceptibility to the formation of different folds is inherent in single crystals with bar 1 compression axis orientation. For this orientation, the development of shear and rotational components during folding is traced by interference microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction methods. It has been found that an excess dislocation density is accumulated when shear is activated in the folding region, which results in an increase in fold misorientation. The activation of this process in fcc metals is promoted by an increase in the homologous deformation temperature and stacking fault energy.

  7. Defect structures in deformed F.C.C. metals

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Y.; Victoria, M.

    1997-08-01

    A high density of small defect clusters, similar to those observed in irradiated or quenched metals, has been observed in the deformed f.c.c. metals Cu, Au and Ni. The preliminary results show that the defect clusters are predominantly stacking fault tetrahedral (SFT). The SFT number density, rather than the size distribution, is deformation dependent. The defect cluster density is greater in the vicinities of dislocation tangles and grain boundaries. Their size distribution is wider than that produced by irradiation with an important number of larger clusters being formed. It is argued that these deformation-produced clusters may play a role in determining the flow stress and work hardening at low deformations.

  8. Dislocation Interactions with Voids and Helium Bubbles in FCC Metals

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, I; Robach, J; Wirth, B; Young, J

    2003-11-18

    The formation of a high number density of helium bubbles in FCC metals irradiated within the fusion energy environment is well established. Yet, the role of helium bubbles in radiation hardening and mechanical property degradation of these steels remains an outstanding issue. In this paper, we present the results of a combined molecular dynamics simulation and in-situ straining transmission electron microscopy study, which investigates the interaction mechanisms between glissile dislocations and nanometer-sized helium bubbles. The molecular dynamics simulations, which directly account for dislocation core effects through semi-empirical interatomic potentials, provide fundamental insight into the effect of helium bubble size and internal gas pressure on the dislocation/bubble interaction and bypass mechanisms. The combination of simulation and in-situ straining experiments provides a powerful approach to determine the atomic to microscopic mechanisms of dislocation-helium bubble interactions, which govern the mechanical response of metals irradiated within the fusion environment.

  9. Formation of fivefold axes in the FCC-metal nanoclusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myasnichenko, Vladimir S.; Starostenkov, Mikhail D.

    2012-11-01

    Formation of atomistic structures of metallic Cu, Au, Ag clusters and bimetallic Cu-Au clusters was studied with the help of molecular dynamics using the many-body tight-binding interatomic potential. The simulation of the crystallization process of clusters with the number of atoms ranging from 300 to 1092 was carried out. The most stable configurations of atoms in the system, corresponding to the minimum of potential energy, was found during super-fast cooling from 1000 K. Atoms corresponding to fcc, hcp, and Ih phases were identified by the method of common neighbor analysis. Incomplete icosahedral core can be discovered at the intersection of one of the Ih axes with the surface of monometallic cluster. The decahedron-shaped structure of bimetallic Cu-Au cluster with seven completed icosahedral cores was obtained. The principles of the construction of small bimetallic clusters with icosahedral symmetry and increased fractal dimensionality were offered.

  10. Attrition resistant catalysts and sorbents based on heavy metal poisoned FCC catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Gangwal, S.; Jothimurugesan, K.

    1999-07-27

    A heavy metal poisoned, spent FCC catalyst is treated by chemically impregnating the poisoned catalyst with a new catalytic metal or metal salt to provide an attrition resistant catalyst or sorbent for a different catalytic or absorption process, such as catalysts for Fischer-Tropsh Synthesis, and sorbents for removal of sulfur gases from fuel gases and flue-gases. The heavy metal contaminated FCC catalyst is directly used as a support for preparing catalysts having new catalytic properties and sorbents having new sorbent properties, without removing or passivating the heavy metals on the spent FCC catalyst as an intermediate step.

  11. Attrition resistant catalysts and sorbents based on heavy metal poisoned FCC catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Gangwal, Santosh; Jothimurugesan, Kandaswamy

    1999-01-01

    A heavy metal poisoned, spent FCC catalyst is treated by chemically impregnating the poisoned catalyst with a new catalytic metal or metal salt to provide an attrition resistant catalyst or sorbent for a different catalytic or absorption processes, such as catalysts for Fischer-Tropsh Synthesis, and sorbents for removal of sulfur gasses from fuel gases and flue-gases. The heavy metal contaminated FCC catalyst is directly used as a support for preparing catalysts having new catalytic properties and sorbents having new sorbent properties, without removing or "passivating" the heavy metals on the spent FCC catalyst as an intermediate step.

  12. Scaling Laws and Critical Properties for fcc and hcp Metals.

    PubMed

    Desgranges, Caroline; Widhalm, Leanna; Delhommelle, Jerome

    2016-06-16

    The determination of the critical parameters of metals has remained particularly challenging both experimentally, because of the very large temperatures involved, and theoretically, because of the many-body interactions that take place in metals. Moreover, experiments have shown that these systems exhibit an unusually strong asymmetry of their binodal. Recent theoretical work has led to new similarity laws, based on the calculation of the Zeno line and of the underlying Boyle parameters, which provided results for the critical properties of atomic and molecular systems in excellent agreement with experiments. Using the recently developed expanded Wang-Landau (EWL) simulation method, we evaluate the grand-canonical partition function, over a wide range of conditions, for 11 fcc and hcp metals (Ag, Al, Au, Be, Cu, Ir, Ni, Pb, Pd, Pt, and Rh), modeled with a many-body interaction potential. This allows us to calculate the binodal, Zeno line, and Boyle parameters and, in turn, obtain the critical properties for these systems. We also propose two scaling laws for the enthalpy and entropy of vaporization, and identify critical exponents of 0.4 and 1.22 for these two laws, respectively. PMID:27228416

  13. Continuum modeling of plastic flow localization in irradiated fcc metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Po, Giacomo; Ghoniem, Nasr

    2013-11-01

    Under mechanical loading, neutron or ion irradiated metals may develop a mechanical instability characterized by the localization of plastic flow in narrow channels that are cleared of irradiation-induced defects. The resulting highly heterogeneous deformation can play a significant role in crack nucleation, fracture propagation, and premature failure of structural components used in nuclear applications. In this work, we develop a two-dimensional continuum model of plastic flow localization based on the continuum theory of dislocations. This framework allows a mechanism-based description of deformation in which plastic distortion is directly calculated from the evolution of dislocation density tensor fields on each slip system. The dislocation densities mutually interact through the self-consistent stress field derived from the deformation gradient and through back and flow stress corrections. The interaction between dislocation fields and irradiation-induced defects (mainly stacking fault tetrahedra (SFTs) in fcc metals) is twofold. First, the flow stress depends locally on the SFT density. Second, and based on existing molecular dynamics (MD) simulation results, dislocation fluxes are included as sink terms in the evolution equation of the SFT density. The model is implemented numerically using the finite element method (FEM) and simulation results for simple shear loading are presented. It is demonstrated here that small spatial fluctuations in the density of SFTs, coupled with their destruction by dislocation interaction, leads to plastic flow localization.

  14. Properties of Helium Defects in BCC and FCC Metals Investigated with Density Functional Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Zu, Xiaotao T.; Yang, Li; Gao, Fei; Peng, SM; Heinisch, Howard L.; Long, XG; Kurtz, Richard J.

    2009-08-03

    The relative stability of single He defects in bcc and fcc metals is investigated using ab initio calculations based on density functional theory (DFT). The results indicate that the tetrahedral position is energetically more favorable for a He interstitial than the octahedral site in bcc metals, but the relative stability of He defects in fcc metals varies, depending on local environments. The He formation energies in bcc Fe and fcc Ni at the tetrahedral and octahedral positions with and without spin polarization are investigated. It is of interest to find that the magnetism of host atoms does not directly affect the relative stabilities of He in interstitial sites in bcc Fe and fcc Ni.

  15. Dislocation dissociation in some f.c.c. metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esterling, D. M.

    1980-01-01

    The dissociation of a perfect screw dislocation into a stacking fault in an f.c.c. lattice is modeled by the modified lattice statics. The interatomic potentials are obtained from the work of Esterling and Swaroop and differ substantially from those empirical potentials usually employed in defect simulations. The calculated stacking fault widths for aluminum, copper, and silver are in good agreement with weak beam microscopy results.

  16. Multilayer Relaxation and Surface Energies of FCC and BCC Metals Using Equivalent Crystal Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, Agustin M.; Bozzolo, Guillermo; Ferrante, John

    1993-01-01

    The multilayer relaxation of fcc and bcc metal surfaces is calculated using equivalent crystal theory. The results for changes in interplanar spacings of planes close to the surface and the ensuing surface energies are discussed in reference to other theoretical results and compared to available experimental data. The calculation includes high-index surfaces for which no other theoretical results are known.

  17. Melting and solidification point of fcc-metal nanoparticles with respect to particle size: A molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibuta, Yasushi; Suzuki, Toshio

    2010-10-01

    The phase transition between liquid droplets and solid nanoparticles of face-centered cubic (fcc) metals is investigated by the molecular dynamics simulation. Depression of both the melting and solidification points is negatively correlated with the inverse of particle radius. Polycrystalline nanoparticles are obtained by cooling and the polycrystalline structure causes a fluctuation in the trend of the melting point with respect to particle size. It was found that the Gibbs-Thomson coefficient is proportional to the melting point among various body-centered cubic (bcc) and fcc metals in the same matter, even though different interatomic potentials are employed between bcc and fcc metals.

  18. Phonon instabilities in uniaxially compressed fcc metals as seen in molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimminau, Giles; Erhart, Paul; Bringa, Eduardo M.; Remington, Bruce; Wark, Justin S.

    2010-03-01

    We show that the generation of stacking faults in perfect face-centered-cubic (fcc) crystals, uniaxially compressed along [001], is due to transverse-acoustic phonon instabilities. The position in reciprocal space where the instability first manifests itself is not a point of high symmetry in the Brillouin zone. This model provides a useful explanation for the magnitude of the elastic limit, in addition to the affects of box size, temperature, and compression on the time scale for the generation of stacking faults. We observe this phenomenon in both simulations that use the Lennard-Jones potential and embedded atom potentials. Not only does this work provide fundamental insight into the microscopic response of the material but it also describes certain behavior seen in previous molecular dynamics simulations of single-crystal fcc metals shock compressed along the principal axis.

  19. Pressure Induced Metal-Nonmetal and FCC-BCC Transitions in Calcium*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, G. M.; Blaisten-Barojas, E.; Papaconstantopoulos, D. A.

    2001-04-01

    The band structure of fcc and bcc calcium at different densities is obtained with the Augmented Plane Wave (APW) method using a soft-core approximation and Gaspar-Kohn-Sham potential. A tight-binding(TB) model is then built successfully to reproduce the first principles band structure and density of states. Properties examined within TB include bulk modulus, elastic constants, metal-nonmetal transition and fcc to bcc structural transition under pressure. Results are in an excellent agreement with experimental observations. Several dynamical properties of calcium under pressure are further explored with TB molecular dynamics at finite temperature. *Work supported in part by the Office of Naval Research grant N00014-98-1-0832

  20. Thermal and mechanical stability of nanograined FCC metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hattar, Khalid Mikhiel

    The mechanisms governing and factors controlling the thermal and mechanical stability of nanograined free-standing face-centered cubic thin films were investigated through in situ transmission electron microscopy annealing and straining experiments. A variety of sample preparation techniques were developed to investigate the active mechanisms. The results obtained from the select face-centered cubic metals studied were used to develop a general understanding of face-centered cubic metals with microstructure limited to the nanometer scale. The films were analyzed, both prior to and following the in situ transmission electron microscopy experiments, via a range of analytical techniques in order to characterize chemical and microstructural details. The mechanisms observed were compared to the pertinent theories and models. In situ transmission electron microscopy heating and annealing experiments were performed on free-standing pulsed-laser deposited Au, Cu, and Ni thin films. The grain growth of pulsed-laser deposited Ni films was studied and the growth rate was found to be a function of time, temperature, film thickness, and surface abnormalities. The grain growth was classified as abnormal in nature resulting in a bimodal grain size distribution. Abnormal grain growth was found to increase with an increase in film thickness. This increase was attributed to the presence of a higher density of preferred nanograins for abnormal grain growth in thicker films, although the mechanisms that induce the rapid growth were not determined. A higher percentage of abnormal large grains were found along ridges templated from the substrate, and in regions with extensive electron beam exposure. Post-annealing analysis of pulsed-laser deposited Ni films revealed an unexpected myriad of microstructural defects including dislocations, twins, stacking faults, dislocation loops, and stacking-fault tetrahedra, as well as a metastable hexagonal closed-packed phase. The production of these

  1. Dislocation creation and void nucleation in FCC ductile metals under tensile loading: A general microscopic picture

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Wei-Wei; Zhang, Ping; Zhang, Guang-Cai; Xu, Ai-Guo; Zhao, Xian-Geng

    2014-01-01

    Numerous theoretical and experimental efforts have been paid to describe and understand the dislocation and void nucleation processes that are fundamental for dynamic fracture modeling of strained metals. To date an essential physical picture on the self-organized atomic collective motions during dislocation creation, as well as the essential mechanisms for the void nucleation obscured by the extreme diversity in structural configurations around the void nucleation core, is still severely lacking in literature. Here, we depict the origin of dislocation creation and void nucleation during uniaxial high strain rate tensile processes in face-centered-cubic (FCC) ductile metals. We find that the dislocations are created through three distinguished stages: (i) Flattened octahedral structures (FOSs) are randomly activated by thermal fluctuations; (ii) The double-layer defect clusters are formed by self-organized stacking of FOSs on the close-packed plane; (iii) The stacking faults are formed and the Shockley partial dislocations are created from the double-layer defect clusters. Whereas, the void nucleation is shown to follow a two-stage description. We demonstrate that our findings on the origin of dislocation creation and void nucleation are universal for a variety of FCC ductile metals with low stacking fault energies. PMID:25382029

  2. A simple model for large-scale simulations of fcc metals with explicit treatment of electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, D. R.; Foulkes, W. M. C.; Sutton, A. P.

    2010-01-01

    The continuing advance in computational power is beginning to make accurate electronic structure calculations routine. Yet, where physics emerges through the dynamics of tens of thousands of atoms in metals, simplifications must be made to the electronic Hamiltonian. We present the simplest extension to a single s-band model [A.P. Sutton, T.N. Todorov, M.J. Cawkwell and J. Hoekstra, Phil. Mag. A 81 (2001) p.1833.] of metallic bonding, namely, the addition of a second s-band. We show that this addition yields a reasonable description of the density of states at the Fermi level, the cohesive energy, formation energies of point defects and elastic constants of some face-centred cubic (fcc) metals.

  3. Effect of vacancy defects on generalized stacking fault energy of fcc metals.

    PubMed

    Asadi, Ebrahim; Zaeem, Mohsen Asle; Moitra, Amitava; Tschopp, Mark A

    2014-03-19

    Molecular dynamics (MD) and density functional theory (DFT) studies were performed to investigate the influence of vacancy defects on generalized stacking fault (GSF) energy of fcc metals. MEAM and EAM potentials were used for MD simulations, and DFT calculations were performed to test the accuracy of different common parameter sets for MEAM and EAM potentials in predicting GSF with different fractions of vacancy defects. Vacancy defects were placed at the stacking fault plane or at nearby atomic layers. The effect of vacancy defects at the stacking fault plane and the plane directly underneath of it was dominant compared to the effect of vacancies at other adjacent planes. The effects of vacancy fraction, the distance between vacancies, and lateral relaxation of atoms on the GSF curves with vacancy defects were investigated. A very similar variation of normalized SFEs with respect to vacancy fractions were observed for Ni and Cu. MEAM potentials qualitatively captured the effect of vacancies on GSF. PMID:24589571

  4. Defect clusters formed from large collision cascades in fcc metals irradiated with spallation neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satoh, Y.; Matsuda, Y.; Yoshiie, T.; Kawai, M.; Matsumura, H.; Iwase, H.; Abe, H.; Kim, S. W.; Matsunaga, T.

    2013-11-01

    Fcc pure metals were irradiated with spallation neutrons (energies up to 500 MeV) at room temperature to a neutron fluence of 1 × 1018 n m-2 at KENS, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK). Defect clusters induced by large collision cascades were examined using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). In Au, large groups of defects included more than 10 clusters, and the damage zone extended over 50 nm, which was larger than that induced by fusion neutron irradiation (<20 nm). Although small stacking fault tetrahedra (SFT) are formed in subcascades by fission and fusion neutron irradiation, dislocation loops were also observed in the present experiments. Large dislocation loops (>10 nm) were identified as vacancy type by the conventional inside-outside contrast method. Because of the low neutron fluence, spatial overlapping of collision cascades was ignored. Large vacancy loops are formed through cooperative reactions among subcascades in a single collision cascade with large recoil energy.

  5. On the interaction between perfect interstitial clusters and a vacancy in BCC, FCC and HCP metals

    SciTech Connect

    Puigvi, Mary Angels; Serra, Anna; de Diego, Nieves; Osetskiy, Yury N; Bacon, David J

    2004-01-01

    Point defects and defect clusters have been observed in metals irradiated by high-energy particles. Interactions of these defects between themselves and with existing microstructure features cause microstructure evolution and lead to changes in mechanical and physical properties of the irradiated materials. Models for prediction of radiation-induced changes should include details of reactions involving defects, and so in this paper we present the results of atomic-scale computer modelling of interactions between a cluster of self-interstitial atoms (SIAs) and a single vacancy in models of bcc, fcc and hcp metals. The vacancy is taken to lie on or within the glide prism of the cluster. This type of reaction is considered to be one of the most frequent because formation of SIA clusters, particularly glissile clusters, is commonly observed in high-energy displacement cascades in all metals. The interaction depends strongly on the dislocation nature of the cluster and therefore these interactions are different in the three crystal structures. Vacancy-SIA recombination, in particular, is inhibited by dissociation of the SIA loop on its glide prism.

  6. Effect of the FCC to HCP Phase Transition on Trace Element Partitioning Between Metal and Sulfide Melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, A. J.; Thomas, R. B.; Fei, Y.

    2006-12-01

    Most of what we understand about the chemical behavior of iron alloys, even at high pressure, pertains to the fcc phase. However, it is widely thought that the relevant structure in the Earth's core is hcp, not fcc. In this study we aim to understand the effect of the fcc-hcp transition on siderophile element partitioning between metal and coexisting sulfide melt. This is important, for example, in evaluating models in which Re-Os-Pt isotope fractionations are attributed to partitioning between the Earth's inner and outer core. Experiments were doped with trace elements Ni, Re, Os, Ir, and Pt, which partitioned between Fe-Ru alloys and sulfide melt. Most experiments were performed at 1 bar in sealed silica tubes in a tube furnace, and some experiments were performed at 6 GPa in a multi-anvil press. The fcc-hcp transition was investigated by varying the Ru content of the experiments; the metal is fcc at Ru-poor compositions but hcp at higher Ru contents. The sulfur content of the melt varied with temperature and with bulk composition. The run products were characterized by electron microprobe, and abundances of the trace elements in both metal and melt were determined by laser ablation ICP-MS. The effect on partitioning of the phase transition can be distinguished from compositional effects because a range of Ru contents was studied. Our Ru-free dataare in good agreement with previously published data in the Fe-S system at 1 bar. However, our highest-Ru compositions show significant differences in their D values, attributable to the phase transition in the metal.

  7. 3D dislocation dynamics: stress-strain behavior and hardening mechanisms in FCC and BCC metals

    SciTech Connect

    Hirth, J P; Rhee, M; Zhib, H M; de la Rubia, T D

    1999-02-19

    A dislocation dynamics (DD) model for plastic deformation, connecting the macroscopic mechanical properties to basic physical laws governing dislocation mobility and related interaction mechanisms, has been under development. In this model there is a set of critical reactions that determine the overall results of the simulations, such as the stress-strain curve. These reactions are, annihilation, formation of jogs, junctions, and dipoles, and cross-slip. In this paper we discuss these reactions and the manner in which they influence the simulated stress- strain behavior in fcc and bcc metals. In particular, we examine the formation (zipping) and strength of dipoles and junctions, and effect of jogs, using the dislocation dynamics model. We show that the strengths (unzipping) of these reactions for various configurations can be determined by direct evaluation of the elastic interactions. Next, we investigate the phenomenon of hardening in metals subjected to cascade damage dislocations. The microstructure investigated consists of small dislocation loops decorating the mobile dislocations. Preliminary results reveal that these loops act as hardening agents, trapping the dislocations and resulting in increased hardening.

  8. Grain Size Dependence of Uniform Elongation in Single-Phase FCC/BCC Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Haiting; Shen, Yao; Ma, Jiawei; Zheng, Pengfei; Zhang, Lei

    2016-07-01

    We studied the dependence of uniform elongation on grain size in the range of submicron to millimeter for single-phase FCC/BCC metals by reviewing recent experimental results and applying crystal plasticity finite element method simulation. In the order of increasing grain size, uniform elongation can be divided into three stages, namely low elongation stage, nearly constant elongation stage, and decreased elongation with large scatters stage. Low elongation stage features a dramatic increase near the critical grain size at the end of the stage, which is primarily attributed to the emergence of dislocation cell size transition from ultrafine to mid-size grain. Other factors can be neglected due to their negligible influence on overall variation trend. In nearly constant elongation stage, uniform elongation remains unchanged at a high level in general. As grain size keeps growing, uniform elongation starts decreasing and becomes scattered upon a certain grain size, indicating the initiation of decreased elongation with large scatters stage. It is shown that the increase is not linear or smooth but rather sharp at the end of low elongation stage, leading to a wider range in nearly constant elongation stage. The grain size dependence of uniform elongation can serve as a guiding principle for designing small uniaxial tensile specimens for mechanical testing, where size effect matters in most cases.

  9. Twin boundary spacing effects on shock response and spall behaviors of hierarchically nanotwinned fcc metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Fuping; Chen, Liu; Jiang, Ping; Wu, Xiaolei

    2014-02-01

    Atomistic deformation mechanisms of hierarchically nano-twinned (NT) Ag under shock conditions have been investigated using a series of large-scale molecular dynamics simulations. For the same grain size d and the same spacing of primary twins λ1, the average flow stress behind the shock front in hierarchically NT Ag first increases with decreasing spacing of secondary twins λ2, achieving a maximum at a critical λ2, and then drops as λ2 decreases further. Above the critical λ2, the deformation mechanisms are dominated by three type strengthening mechanisms: (a) partial dislocations emitted from grain boundaries (GBs) travel across other boundaries; (b) partial dislocations emitted from twin boundaries (TBs) travel across other TBs; (c) formation of tertiary twins. Below the critical λ2, the deformation mechanism are dominated by two softening mechanisms: (a) detwinning of secondary twins; (b) formation of new grains by cross slip of partial dislocations. Moreover, the twin-free nanocrystalline (NC) Ag is found to have lower average flow stress behind the shock front than those of all hierarchically NT Ag samples except the one with the smallest λ2 of 0.71 nm. No apparent correlation between the spall strength and λ2 is observed in hierarchically NT Ag, since voids always nucleate at both GBs and boundaries of the primary twins. However, twin-free NC Ag is found to have higher spall strength than hierarchically NT Ag. Voids can only nucleate from GBs for twin-free NC Ag, therefore, twin-free NC Ag has less nucleation sources along the shock direction when compared to hierarchically NT Ag, which requiring higher tensile stress to create spallation. These findings should contribute to the understandings of deformation mechanisms of hierarchically NT fcc metals under extreme deformation conditions.

  10. Twin boundary spacing effects on shock response and spall behaviors of hierarchically nanotwinned fcc metals

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Fuping Chen, Liu Jiang, Ping Wu, Xiaolei

    2014-02-14

    Atomistic deformation mechanisms of hierarchically nano-twinned (NT) Ag under shock conditions have been investigated using a series of large-scale molecular dynamics simulations. For the same grain size d and the same spacing of primary twins λ{sub 1}, the average flow stress behind the shock front in hierarchically NT Ag first increases with decreasing spacing of secondary twins λ{sub 2}, achieving a maximum at a critical λ{sub 2}, and then drops as λ{sub 2} decreases further. Above the critical λ{sub 2}, the deformation mechanisms are dominated by three type strengthening mechanisms: (a) partial dislocations emitted from grain boundaries (GBs) travel across other boundaries; (b) partial dislocations emitted from twin boundaries (TBs) travel across other TBs; (c) formation of tertiary twins. Below the critical λ{sub 2}, the deformation mechanism are dominated by two softening mechanisms: (a) detwinning of secondary twins; (b) formation of new grains by cross slip of partial dislocations. Moreover, the twin-free nanocrystalline (NC) Ag is found to have lower average flow stress behind the shock front than those of all hierarchically NT Ag samples except the one with the smallest λ{sub 2} of 0.71 nm. No apparent correlation between the spall strength and λ{sub 2} is observed in hierarchically NT Ag, since voids always nucleate at both GBs and boundaries of the primary twins. However, twin-free NC Ag is found to have higher spall strength than hierarchically NT Ag. Voids can only nucleate from GBs for twin-free NC Ag, therefore, twin-free NC Ag has less nucleation sources along the shock direction when compared to hierarchically NT Ag, which requiring higher tensile stress to create spallation. These findings should contribute to the understandings of deformation mechanisms of hierarchically NT fcc metals under extreme deformation conditions.

  11. Thermal stability and hcp-fcc allotropic transformation in supported Co metal catalysts probed near operando by ferromagnetic NMR.

    PubMed

    Andreev, Andrey S; d'Espinose de Lacaillerie, Jean-Baptiste; Lapina, Olga B; Gerashenko, Alexander

    2015-06-14

    Despite the fact that cobalt based catalysts are used at the industrial scale for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis, it is not yet clear which cobalt metallic phase is actually at work under operando conditions and what is its state of dispersion. As it turns out, the different phases of metallic cobalt, fcc and hcp, give rise to distinct ferromagnetic nuclear magnetic resonance. Furthermore, within one Co metal particle, the occurrence of several ferromagnetic domains of limited sizes can be evidenced by the specific resonance of Co in multi-domain particles. Consequently, by ferromagnetic NMR, one can follow quantitatively the sintering and phase transitions of dispersed Co metal particles in supported catalysts under near operando conditions. The minimal size probed by ferromagnetic Co NMR is not precisely known but is considered to be in the order of 10 nm for supported Co particles at room temperature and increases to about 35 nm at 850 K. Here, in Co metal Fischer-Tropsch synthesis catalysts supported on β-SiC, the resonances of the fcc multi-domain, fcc single-domain and hcp Co were clearly distinguished. A careful rationalization of their frequency and width dependence on temperature allowed a quantitative analysis of the spectra in the temperature range of interest, thus reflecting the state of the catalysts under near operando conditions that is without the uncertainty associated with prior quenching. The allotropic transition temperature was found to start at 600-650 K, which is about 50 K below the bulk transition temperature. The phase transition was fully reversible and a significant part of the hcp phase was found to be stable up to 850 K. This anomalous behavior that was observed without quenching might prove to be crucial to understand and model active species not only in catalysts but also in battery materials. PMID:25970204

  12. Tight-binding study of stacking fault energies and the Rice criterion of ductility in the fcc metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehl, Michael J.; Papaconstantopoulos, Dimitrios A.; Kioussis, Nicholas; Herbranson, M.

    2000-02-01

    We have used the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) tight-binding (TB) method to calculate the generalized stacking fault energy and the Rice ductility criterion in the fcc metals Al, Cu, Rh, Pd, Ag, Ir, Pt, Au, and Pb. The method works well for all classes of metals, i.e., simple metals, noble metals, and transition metals. We compared our results with full potential linear-muffin-tin orbital and embedded atom method (EAM) calculations, as well as experiment, and found good agreement. This is impressive, since the NRL-TB approach only fits to first-principles full-potential linearized augmented plane-wave equations of state and band structures for cubic systems. Comparable accuracy with EAM potentials can be achieved only by fitting to the stacking fault energy.

  13. Linear-in-temperature resistivity close to a topological metal insulator transition in ultra-multi valley fcc-ytterbium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enderlein, Carsten; Fontes, Magda; Baggio-Saitovich, Elisa; Continentino, Mucio A.

    2016-01-01

    The semimetal-to-semiconductor transition in fcc-Yb under modest pressure can be considered a picture book example of a metal-insulator transition of the Lifshitz type. We have performed transport measurements at low temperatures in the closest vicinity of the transition and related DFT calculations of the Fermi surface. Our resistivity measurements show a linear temperature dependence with an unusually low dρ / dT at low temperatures approaching the MIT. The calculations suggest fcc-ytterbium being an ultra-multi valley system with 24 electron and 6 hole pockets in the Brillouin zone. Such Fermi surface topology naturally supports the appearance of strongly correlated phases. An estimation of the quasiparticle-enhanced effective mass shows that the scattering rate is by at least two orders of magnitude lower than in other materials which exhibit linear-in-T behavior at a quantum critical point. However, we cannot exclude an excessive effective mass enhancement, when the van Hove singularity touches the Fermi level.

  14. Effect of stacking fault energy on mechanism of plastic deformation in nanotwinned FCC metals

    SciTech Connect

    Borovikov, Valery; Mendelev, Mikhail I.; King, Alexander H.; LeSar, Richard

    2015-05-15

    Starting from a semi-empirical potential designed for Cu, we have developed a series of potentials that provide essentially constant values of all significant (calculated) materials properties except for the intrinsic stacking fault energy, which varies over a range that encompasses the lowest and highest values observed in nature. In addition, these potentials were employed in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to investigate how stacking fault energy affects the mechanical behavior of nanotwinned face-centered cubic (FCC) materials. The results indicate that properties such as yield strength and microstructural stability do not vary systematically with stacking fault energy, but rather fall into two distinct regimes corresponding to 'low' and 'high' stacking fault energies.

  15. Effect of stacking fault energy on mechanism of plastic deformation in nanotwinned FCC metals

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Borovikov, Valery; Mendelev, Mikhail I.; King, Alexander H.; LeSar, Richard

    2015-05-15

    Starting from a semi-empirical potential designed for Cu, we have developed a series of potentials that provide essentially constant values of all significant (calculated) materials properties except for the intrinsic stacking fault energy, which varies over a range that encompasses the lowest and highest values observed in nature. In addition, these potentials were employed in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to investigate how stacking fault energy affects the mechanical behavior of nanotwinned face-centered cubic (FCC) materials. The results indicate that properties such as yield strength and microstructural stability do not vary systematically with stacking fault energy, but rather fall into twomore » distinct regimes corresponding to 'low' and 'high' stacking fault energies.« less

  16. Deformation and erosion of f.c.c. metals and alloys under cavitation attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, B. C. S.; Buckley, D. H.

    1984-01-01

    Experimental investigations have been conducted to determine the early stages of cavitation attack on 6061-T6 aluminum alloy, electrolytic tough pitch copper, brass, and bronze, all having polycrystalline fcc matrices. The surface profiles and scanning electron micrographs show that the pits are initially formed at the grain boundaries, while the grain surfaces are progressively roughened by multiple slip and twinning. The initial erosion is noted to have occurred from the material in the grain boundaries, as well as by fragmentation of part of the grains. Further erosion occurred by shearing and necking of the surface undulations caused by plastic deformation. The mean penetration depth, computed on the basis of mass loss, was lowest on the bronze and greatest on the copper. Attention is given to the relation of cavitation attack to grain size, glide stress and stacking fault energy.

  17. Kinetics of segregation formation in the vicinity of edge dislocation in fcc metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazarov, A. V.; Mikheev, A. A.; Ershova, I. V.; Zaluzhnyi, A. G.

    2016-04-01

    We use new equations for the interstitial impurity diffusion fluxes under strain to study impurity atom redistribution in the vicinity of dislocations taking into account the strain generated by mentioned defects. Two levels of simulation are applied. First one is evaluation of coefficients that determine the influence of strain tensor components on interstitial diffusion fluxes in fcc structures for different kinds of atom jumps. For this purpose we have developed a model into the framework of molecular static method taking into account an atom environment as near the interstitial site as for the saddle-point configuration. The second level is modeling of interstitial segregation formation based on nonlinear diffusion equations taking strains generated by defects. The results show, that the distributions of the interstitials near the dislocations have quite complicated characters and the vacancy distribution has qualitatively different character as compared with carbon distribution.

  18. Recrystallization as a controlling process in the wear of some f.c.c. metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bill, R. C.; Wisander, D.

    1977-01-01

    Detailed examination of copper specimens after sliding against 440 C steel in liquid methane at speeds up to 25 m/s and loads of up to 2 kg showed the metal comprising the wear surface to possess a fine cell recrystallized structure. Wear proceeded by the plastic shearing of metal in this near surface region without the occurrence of visible metal transfer. A dynamic balance between the intense shear process at the surface and the nucleation of recrystallized grains was proposed to account for the behavior of the metal at the wear surface. Sliding wear experiments were also conducted on Ag, Cu-10% Al, Cu-10% Sn, Ni and Al. It was found that low wear and the absence of heavy metal transfer were associated with those metals observed to undergo recrystallization nucleation without prior recovery.

  19. Ab initio continuum model for the influence of local stress on cross-slip of screw dislocations in fcc metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramírez, Benjamín R.; Ghoniem, Nasr; Po, Giacomo

    2012-09-01

    We develop a model of cross-slip in face-centered cubic (fcc) metals based on an extension of the Peierls-Nabarro representation of the dislocation core. The dissociated core is described by a group of parametric fractional Volterra dislocations, subject to their mutual elastic interaction and a lattice-restoring force. The elastic interaction between them is computed from a nonsingular expression, while the lattice force is derived from the γ surface obtained directly from ab initio calculations. Using a network-based formulation of dislocation dynamics, the dislocation core structure is not restricted to be planar, and the activation energy is determined for a path where the core has three-dimensional equilibrium configurations. We show that the activation energy for cross-slip in Cu is 1.9eV when the core is represented by only two Shockley partials, while this value converges to 1.43eV when the core is distributed over a bundle of 20 Volterra partial fractional dislocations. The results of the model compare favorably with the experimental value of 1.15±0.37eV [J. Bonneville and B. Escaig, Acta Metall.AMETAR0001-616010.1016/0001-6160(79)90170-6 27, 1477 (1979)]. We also show that the cross-slip activation energy decreases significantly when the core is in a particular local stress field. Results are given for a representative uniform “Escaig” stress and for the nonuniform stress field at the head of a dislocation pileup. A local homogeneous stress field is found to result in a significant reduction of the cross-slip energy. Additionally, for a nonhomogeneous stress field at the head of a five-dislocation pileup compressed against a Lomer-Cottrell junction, the cross-slip energy is found to decrease to 0.62eV. The relatively low values of the activation energy in local stress fields predicted by the proposed model suggest that cross-slip events are energetically more favorable in strained fcc crystals.

  20. High Pressure Phase Transformations in Heavy Rare Earth Metals and Connections to Actinide Crystal Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Vohra, Yogesh K.; Sangala, Bagvanth Reddy; Stemshorn, Andrew K.; Hope, Kevin M.

    2008-07-01

    High-pressure studies have been performed on heavy rare earth metals Terbium (Tb) to 155 GPa and Holmium (Ho) to 134 GPa in a diamond anvil cell at room temperature. The following crystal structure sequence was observed in both metals hcp {yields} Sm-type {yields} dhcp {yields} distorted fcc (hR-24) {yields} monoclinic (C2/m) with increasing pressure. The last transformation to a low symmetry monoclinic phase is accompanied by a volume collapse of 5 % for Tb at 51 GPa and a volume collapse of 3 % for Ho at 103 GPa. This volume collapse under high pressure is reminiscent of f-shell delocalization in light rare earth metal Cerium (Ce), Praseodymium (Pr), and heavy actinide metals Americium (Am) and Curium (Cm). The orthorhombic Pnma phase that has been reported in Am and Cm after f-shell delocalization is not observed in heavy rare earth metals under high pressures. (authors)

  1. Chemomechanical Origin of Hydrogen Trapping at Grain Boundaries in fcc Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xiao; Marchand, Daniel; McDowell, David L.; Zhu, Ting; Song, Jun

    2016-02-01

    Hydrogen embrittlement of metals is widely observed, but its atomistic origins remain little understood and much debated. Combining a unique identification of interstitial sites through polyhedral tessellation and first-principles calculations, we study hydrogen adsorption at grain boundaries in a variety of face-centered cubic metals of Ni, Cu, γ -Fe , and Pd. We discover the chemomechanical origin of the variation of adsorption energetics for interstitial hydrogen at grain boundaries. A general chemomechanical formula is established to provide accurate assessments of hydrogen trapping and segregation energetics at grain boundaries, and it also offers direct explanations for certain experimental observations. The present study deepens our mechanistic understanding of the role of grain boundaries in hydrogen embrittlement and points to a viable path towards predictive microstructure engineering against hydrogen embrittlement in structural metals.

  2. Chemomechanical Origin of Hydrogen Trapping at Grain Boundaries in fcc Metals.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiao; Marchand, Daniel; McDowell, David L; Zhu, Ting; Song, Jun

    2016-02-19

    Hydrogen embrittlement of metals is widely observed, but its atomistic origins remain little understood and much debated. Combining a unique identification of interstitial sites through polyhedral tessellation and first-principles calculations, we study hydrogen adsorption at grain boundaries in a variety of face-centered cubic metals of Ni, Cu, γ-Fe, and Pd. We discover the chemomechanical origin of the variation of adsorption energetics for interstitial hydrogen at grain boundaries. A general chemomechanical formula is established to provide accurate assessments of hydrogen trapping and segregation energetics at grain boundaries, and it also offers direct explanations for certain experimental observations. The present study deepens our mechanistic understanding of the role of grain boundaries in hydrogen embrittlement and points to a viable path towards predictive microstructure engineering against hydrogen embrittlement in structural metals. PMID:26943544

  3. A theoretical prediction of the paradoxical surface free energy for FCC metallic nanosolids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdul-Hafidh, Esam H.; Aïssa, Brahim

    2016-08-01

    We report on the development of an efficient and simple method to calculate the surface free energy (surface tension) of a general-shaped metallic nanosolid. Both nanoparticles and nanostructures that account for the crystal structure and size were considered. The surface free energy of a face-centered cubic structure of a metallic nanoparticles was found to decrease as the size decreases, for a shape factor equal to 1.0 (i.e., spherical). However, when the shape factor exceeds this value, which includes disk-like, regular tetrahedral, regular hexahedral, regular octahedral, nanorod, and regular quadrangular structures, the behavior of the surface free energy was found to reverse, especially for small nanoparticles and then increases as the size decreases. Moreover, this behavior was systematically recorded for large nanoparticles when the mechanical distortion was appreciable. As a matter of fact, this model was also applied to the noble transition metals, including gold and silver nanoparticles. This work is a clear step forward establishing a systematic mechanism for controlling the mechanical properties of nanoscale particles by controlling the shape, size and structure.

  4. Molecular Dynamics Study of Void Growth and Dislocations in Dynamic Fracture of FCC and BCC Metals

    SciTech Connect

    Seppala, E T; Belak, J; Rudd, R E

    2003-06-17

    Void growth with concomitant dislocation formation has been studied in single crystal face-centered-cubic and body-centered-cubic metals using molecular dynamics method with Embedded-Atom and Finnis-Sinclair potentials for copper and tantalum, respectively. We have concentrated on the quantitative analysis of the void shape evolution, on the structure of dislocations, which emerge from the void, and on the continuum measures such as plastic strain. The effects of strain-rate, differences between lattice structures, and loading conditions as uniaxial, biaxial, and triaxial expansion on the shape of the void and on the dislocations have been investigated.

  5. Twin Boundaries merely as Intrinsically Kinematic Barriers for Screw Dislocation Motion in FCC Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jiayong; Zhang, Hongwu; Ye, Hongfei; Zheng, Yonggang

    2016-03-01

    Metals with nanoscale twins have shown ultrahigh strength and excellent ductility, attributed to the role of twin boundaries (TBs) as strong barriers for the motion of lattice dislocations. Though observed in both experiments and simulations, the barrier effect of TBs is rarely studied quantitatively. Here, with atomistic simulations and continuum based anisotropic bicrystal models, we find that the long-range interaction force between coherent TBs and screw dislocations is negligible. Further simulations of the pileup behavior of screw dislocations in front of TBs suggest that screw dislocations can be blocked kinematically by TBs due to the change of slip plane, leading to the pileup of subsequent dislocations with the elastic repulsion actually from the pinned dislocation in front of the TB. Our results well explain the experimental observations that the variation of yield strength with twin thickness for ultrafine-grained copper follows the Hall-Petch relationship.

  6. Twin Boundaries merely as Intrinsically Kinematic Barriers for Screw Dislocation Motion in FCC Metals.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiayong; Zhang, Hongwu; Ye, Hongfei; Zheng, Yonggang

    2016-01-01

    Metals with nanoscale twins have shown ultrahigh strength and excellent ductility, attributed to the role of twin boundaries (TBs) as strong barriers for the motion of lattice dislocations. Though observed in both experiments and simulations, the barrier effect of TBs is rarely studied quantitatively. Here, with atomistic simulations and continuum based anisotropic bicrystal models, we find that the long-range interaction force between coherent TBs and screw dislocations is negligible. Further simulations of the pileup behavior of screw dislocations in front of TBs suggest that screw dislocations can be blocked kinematically by TBs due to the change of slip plane, leading to the pileup of subsequent dislocations with the elastic repulsion actually from the pinned dislocation in front of the TB. Our results well explain the experimental observations that the variation of yield strength with twin thickness for ultrafine-grained copper follows the Hall-Petch relationship. PMID:26961273

  7. Twin Boundaries merely as Intrinsically Kinematic Barriers for Screw Dislocation Motion in FCC Metals

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jiayong; Zhang, Hongwu; Ye, Hongfei; Zheng, Yonggang

    2016-01-01

    Metals with nanoscale twins have shown ultrahigh strength and excellent ductility, attributed to the role of twin boundaries (TBs) as strong barriers for the motion of lattice dislocations. Though observed in both experiments and simulations, the barrier effect of TBs is rarely studied quantitatively. Here, with atomistic simulations and continuum based anisotropic bicrystal models, we find that the long-range interaction force between coherent TBs and screw dislocations is negligible. Further simulations of the pileup behavior of screw dislocations in front of TBs suggest that screw dislocations can be blocked kinematically by TBs due to the change of slip plane, leading to the pileup of subsequent dislocations with the elastic repulsion actually from the pinned dislocation in front of the TB. Our results well explain the experimental observations that the variation of yield strength with twin thickness for ultrafine-grained copper follows the Hall-Petch relationship. PMID:26961273

  8. Transition metal solute interactions with point defects in fcc iron from first principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hepburn, D. J.; MacLeod, E.; Ackland, G. J.

    2015-07-01

    We present a comprehensive set of first-principles electronic structure calculations of the properties of substitutional transition metal solutes and point defects in austenite (face-centered cubic, paramagnetic Fe). Clear trends were observed in these quantities across the transition metal series, with solute-defect interactions strongly related to atomic size, and only weakly related to more subtle details of magnetic or electronic structure. Oversized solutes act as strong traps for both vacancy and self-interstitial defects and as nucleation sites for the development of protovoids and small self-interstitial loops. The consequent reduction in defect mobility and net defect concentrations in the matrix explains the observation of reduced swelling and radiation-induced segregation. Our analysis of vacancy-mediated solute diffusion demonstrates that below about 400 K Ni and Co will be dragged by vacancies and their concentrations should be enhanced at defect sinks. Cr and Cu show opposite behavior and are depleted at defect sinks. The stable configuration of some oversized solutes is neither interstitial nor substitutional; rather they occupy two adjacent lattice sites. The diffusion of these solutes proceeds by a novel mechanism, which has important implications for the nucleation and growth of complex oxide nanoparticles contained in oxide dispersion strengthened steels. Interstitial-mediated solute diffusion is negligible for all except the magnetic solutes (Cr, Mn, Co, and Ni). Our results are consistent across several antiferromagnetic states and surprising qualitative similarities with ferromagnetic (body-centered cubic) Fe were observed; this implies that our conclusions will be valid for paramagnetic iron.

  9. Microstructural Characterization of Dislocation Networks During Harper-Dorn Creep of fcc, bcc, and hcp Metals and Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Przystupa, Marek A.

    2007-12-13

    Harper-Dorn (H-D) creep is observed in metals and geological materials exposed to very low stresses at temperatures close to the melting point. It is one of several types of creep processes wherein the steady-state strain rate is proportional to the applied stress, Nabarro-Herring creep and Coble creep being two other important processes. H-D creep can be somewhat insidious because the creep rates are much larger than those expected for Nabarro-Herring or Coble creep. Since the working conditions of structural components of power plants and propulsion systems, as well as the motion of the earth’s mantle all involve very low stresses, an understanding of the factors controlling H-D creep is critical in preventing failures associated with those higher-than-expected creep rates. The purpose of this investigation was to obtain missing microstructural information on the evolution of the dislocation structures during static annealing of materials with fcc, bcc and hcp structure and use obtained results to test predictive capabilities of the dislocation network theory of H-D creep. In our view the evolutionary processes during static annealing and during Harper-Dorn creep are intimately related. The materials used in this study were fcc aluminum, hcp zinc and bcc tin. All characterizations of dislocation structures, densities and dislocation link length distributions were carried out using the etch pit method. To obtain quantitative information on the evolution of the dislocation networks during annealing the pure fcc aluminum samples were pre-deformed by creep at 913 and 620 K and then annealed. The higher deformation temperature was selected to generate starting dislocation networks similar to those forming during Harper-Dorn creep and the lower, to obtain higher dislocation densities suitable for reliable estimates of the parameters of the network growth law. The measured experimental link length distribution were, after scaling, (1) the same for all annealing

  10. The influence of the dislocation distribution heterogeneity degree on the formation of a non-misoriented dislocation cell substructures in f.c.c. metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherepanov, D. N.; Selivanikova, O. V.; Matveev, M. V.

    2016-06-01

    Dislocation loops emitted by Frank-Reed source during crossing dislocations of the non-coplanar slip systems are accumulates jogs on the own dislocation line, resulting in the deceleration of the segments of dislocation loops with high jog density. As a result, bending around of the slowed segments the formation of dynamic dipoles in the shear zone occurs. In the present paper we consider formation mechanism of non-misoriented dislocation cell substructure during plastic deformation of f.c.c. metals and conclude that the increase in the degree heterogeneity of dislocation distribution leads to an increase in the jog density and reduce the mean value of arm dynamic dipoles.

  11. Dependence of Initial Grain Orientation on the Evolution of Anisotropy in FCC and BCC Metals Using Crystal Plasticity and Texture Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raja, Daniel Selvakumar

    Abundant experimental analyses and theoretical computational analyses that had been performed on metals to understand anisotropy and its evolution and its dependence on initial orientation of grains have failed to provide theories that can be used in macro-scale plasticity. Ductile metals fracture after going through a large amount of plastic deformation, during which the anisotropy of the material changes significantly. Processed metal sheets or slabs possess anisotropy due to textures produced by metal forming processes (such as drawing, bending and press braking). Metals that were initially isotropic possess anisotropy after undergoing forming processes, i.e., through texture formation due to large amount of plastic deformation before fracture. It is therefore essential to consider the effect of anisotropy to predict the characteristics of fracture and plastic flow performances in the simulation of ductile fracture and plastic flow of materials. Crystal plasticity simulations carried out on grains at the meso-scale level with different initial orientations (ensembles) help to derive the evolution of anisotropy at the macro-scale level and its dependence on initial orientation of grains. This paper investigates the evolution of anisotropy in BCC and FCC metals and its dependence on grain orientation using crystal plasticity simulations and texture analysis to reveal the mechanics behind the evolution of anisotropy. A comparison of anisotropy evolution between BCC and FCC metals is made through the simulation, which can be used to propose the theory of anisotropy evolution in macro-scale plasticity. Keywords: ensembles; grains; initial orientation; anisotropy; evolution of anisotropy; crystal plasticity; textures; homogeneity; isotropy; inelastic; equivalent strain.

  12. FCC main fractionator revamps

    SciTech Connect

    Golden, S.W.; Martin, G.R.; Sloley, A.W. )

    1993-03-01

    Structured packing use in fluid catalytic cracker (FCC) main fractionators significantly impacts unit pressure profile. Unit pressure balance links the FCC main fractionator, reactor, regenerator, air compressor and wet gas compressor. Unit pressure balance should be viewed as a design variable when evaluating FCC unit revamps. Depending upon limitations of the particular FCC unit, capacity increases of 12.5% to 22.5% have been achieved without modifications to major rotating equipment, by revamping FCC main fractionators with structured packing. An examination of three FCC main fractionator revamps show improvements to pressure profiles and unit capacity. The three revamps described included a wet gas compressor volume limit; an air blower limitation; and a wet gas compressor motor limitation.

  13. Size and symmetry of the superconducting gap in the f.c.c. Cs3C60 polymorph close to the metal-Mott insulator boundary

    PubMed Central

    Potočnik, Anton; Krajnc, Andraž; Jeglič, Peter; Takabayashi, Yasuhiro; Ganin, Alexey Y.; Prassides, Kosmas; Rosseinsky, Matthew J.; Arčon, Denis

    2014-01-01

    The alkali fullerides, A3C60 (A = alkali metal) are molecular superconductors that undergo a transition to a magnetic Mott-insulating state at large lattice parameters. However, although the size and the symmetry of the superconducting gap, Δ, are both crucial for the understanding of the pairing mechanism, they are currently unknown for superconducting fullerides close to the correlation-driven magnetic insulator. Here we report a comprehensive nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) study of face-centred-cubic (f.c.c.) Cs3C60 polymorph, which can be tuned continuously through the bandwidth-controlled Mott insulator-metal/superconductor transition by pressure. When superconductivity emerges from the insulating state at large interfullerene separations upon compression, we observe an isotropic (s-wave) Δ with a large gap-to-superconducting transition temperature ratio, 2Δ0/kBTc = 5.3(2) [Δ0 = Δ(0 K)]. 2Δ0/kBTc decreases continuously upon pressurization until it approaches a value of ~3.5, characteristic of weak-coupling BCS theory of superconductivity despite the dome-shaped dependence of Tc on interfullerene separation. The results indicate the importance of the electronic correlations for the pairing interaction as the metal/superconductor-insulator boundary is approached. PMID:24584087

  14. Retention of Hydrogen in FCC Metals Irradiated at Temperatures Leading to High Densities of Bubbles or Voids

    SciTech Connect

    Garner, Francis A.; Simonen, Edward P.; Oliver, Brian M.; Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Grossbeck, M L.; Wolfer, W. G.; Scott, P M.

    2006-09-15

    Large amounts of hydrogen and helium are generated in structural metals in accelerator-driven systems. It is shown that under certain conditions, hydrogen can be stored in irradiated nickel and stainless steels at levels strongly in excess of that predicted by Sieverts Law. These conditions are first, the availability of hydrogen from various radiolytic and environmental sources and second, the formation of radiation-induced cavities to store hydrogen. These cavities can be highly pressurized bubbles or under-pressurized voids, with concurrent helium in the cavities at either low or very high levels. Transmutant sources of hydrogen are often insufficient to pressurize these cavities, and therefore environmental sources are required. The stored hydrogen appears to be stable for many years at room temperature. A conceptual model to describe such behavior requires the continuous generation of hydrogen from (n, p) reactions and possibly other radiolytic sources which can create a supersaturation of hydrogen in the metal, leading to the pressurization of voids and helium bubbles. Once captured in a bubble, the hydrogen is assumed to be in molecular form. Dissolution back into the metal requires chemisorption and dissociation on the bubble surface. Both of these processes have large activation barriers, particularly when oxygen, carbohydrates, and other impurities poison the bubble surface. However, these chemisorbed poisons may reduce but not entirely restrict the ingress or egress of atomic hydrogen.

  15. Does the 4f-shell contribute to bonding in tetravalent lanthanide halides?

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, Wen-Xin; Xu, Wei; Xiao, Yi; Wang, Shu-Guang

    2014-12-28

    Lanthanide tetrahalide molecules LnX{sub 4} (Ln = Ce, Pr, Tb; X = F, Cl, Br, I) have been investigated by density functional theory at the levels of the relativistic Zero Order Regular Approximation and the relativistic energy-consistent pseudopotentials, using frozen small- and medium-cores. The calculated bond lengths and vibrational frequencies are close to the experimental data. Our calculations indicate 4f shell contributions to bonding in LnX{sub 4}, in particular for the early lanthanides, which show significant overlap between the Ln 4f-shell and the halogen np-shells. The 4f shells contribute to Ln-X bonding in LnX{sub 4} about one third more than in LnX{sub 3}.

  16. Comments on the thermoelectric power of intermetallic rare-earth compounds with well localized 4f shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szukiel, A. E.

    2016-05-01

    The anomalous temperature variation of the thermoelectric power in the metallic rare-earth compounds with well-localized 4f shells is sometimes interpreted as resulting from the conduction electrons scattering in the Born approximation on the acoustic phonons and on the localized spins in the s-f exchange interaction. Such an interpretation relies on the results of some theoretical works where the sign reversal and the maxima of the thermoelectric power were obtained within these simple models. In the present paper we prove that neither the electron-phonon scattering nor the magnetic s-f scattering in the Born approximation (nor both of them) do lead to the effects mentioned above.

  17. The FCC and Broadcasting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Communications Commission, Washington, DC.

    This report outlines the Federal Communications Commission's (FCC) regulatory authority over the licensing and operation of commercial, educational, and public broadcasting in the United States. Also described are rules and regulations governing the program content and advertising, in relation to the fairness doctrine, free speech, and public…

  18. Electrical impedance of FCC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Y. S.

    1972-01-01

    The electrical characteristics of FCC are investigated in the context of multiple transmission lines theory. Analytical expressions for the coefficients of capacitance of conductors in a single cable are obtained. Numerical values calculated with these expressions are in good agreement with experimental data. Crosstalk, attenuation constants and phase angles of the current and voltage in flat conductor cable are also calculated.

  19. FCC catalyst selection

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, G.D.L. ); McElhiney, G. )

    1989-09-01

    This paper discusses a commonly used technique for comparing FCC catalytic selectivities based on the ASTM microactivity test (MAT) procedure, ASTM D-3907-80. In its original form the ASTM test provides only very limited information on selectivity. However, extension of the ASTM MAT procedure by using additional product analyses gives a microselectivity test capable of providing detailed yield structure information. This modified MAT procedure thus provides a cost-effective and rapid means of comparing many catalysts.

  20. In-situ transmission electron microscopy study of ion-irradiated copper : comparison of the temperature dependence of cascade collapse in FCC- and BCC- metals.

    SciTech Connect

    Daulton, T. L.

    1998-10-23

    The kinetics which drive cascade formation and subsequent collapse into point-defect clusters is investigated by analyzing the microstructure produced in situ by low fluence 100 keV Kr ion irradiations of fcc-Cu over a wide temperature range (18-873 K). The yield of collapsed point-defect clusters is demonstrated unequivocally to be temperature dependent, remaining approximately constant up to lattice temperatures of 573 K and then abruptly decreasing with increasing temperature. This drop in yield is not caused by defect loss during or following ion irradiation. This temperature dependence can be explained by a thermal spike effect. These in-situ yield measurements are compared to previous ex-situ yield measurements in fcc-Ni and bcc-Mo.

  1. Regeneration of Hydrotreating and FCC Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    CM Wai; JG Frye; JL Fulton; LE Bowman; LJ Silva; MA Gerber

    1999-09-30

    Hydrotreating, hydrocracking, and fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) catalysts are important components of petroleum refining processes. Hydrotreating and hydrocracking catalysts are used to improve the yield of high-quality light oil fractions from heavier crude oil and petroleum feedstocks containing high levels of impurities. FCC catalysts improve the yield of higher octane gasoline from crude oil. Residuum hydrotreating and cracking catalysts are susceptible to irreversible deactivation caused by adsorption of sulfur and by metals impurities, such as vanadium and nickel. The gradual buildup of these impurities in a hydrotreating catalyst eventually plugs the pores and deactivates it. Nickel and vanadium adversely affect the behavior of cracking catalysts, reducing product yield and quality. Replacing deactivated catalysts represents a significant cost in petroleum refining. Equally important are the costs and potential liabilities associated with treating and disposing spent catalysts. For example, recent US Environmental Protection Agency rulings have listed spent hydrotreating and hydrorefining catalysts as hazardous wastes. FCC catalysts, though more easily disposed of as road-base or as filler in asphalt and cement, are still an economic concern mainly because of the large volumes of spent catalysts generated. New processes are being considered to increase the useful life of catalysts or for meeting more stringent disposal requirements for spent catalysts containing metals. This report discusses a collaborative effort between Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Phillips Petroleum, Inc., to identify promising chemical processes for removing metals adhered to spent hydrodesulfurization (HDS, a type of hydrotreating catalyst) and FCC catalysts. This study, conducted by PNNL, was funded by the US Department of Energy's Bartlesville Project Office. Fresh and spent catalysts were provided by Phillips Petroleum. The FCC catalyst was a rare-earth exchanged

  2. Commercial FCC License Study Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swearer, Harvey F.

    Jobs in radio arts, from serviceman to station engineer, are easier to get if one has a recommendation of the U.S. Government in the form of a license from the Federal Communications Commission (FCC). This study guide for FCC radiotelephone licenses is designed to thoroughly prepare the applicant for any radiotelephone exam and to serve as a…

  3. Increasing FCC regenerator catalyst level

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, R.F. )

    1993-11-01

    A Peruvian FCC unit's operations were improved by increasing the regenerator's catalyst level. This increase resulted in lower stack losses, an improved temperature profile, increased catalyst activity and a lower catalyst consumption rate. A more stable operation saved this Peruvian refiner over $131,000 per year in catalyst alone. These concepts and data may be suitable for your FCC unit as well.

  4. Matrix elements of scalar three-electron operators for the atomic f shell

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, J.E.; Judd, B.R.; Crosswhite H.

    1996-01-01

    Tables are provided for the matrix elements of an orthogonal set of Hermitian three-electron operators t{sub i} for the states of the f shell. The t{sub i} are scalar with respect to the total spin S and total orbital angular momentum L, and they are among the effective operators needed to be included in an f-electron Hamiltonian in order to represent the coupling of the ground configuration f{sup N} to excited configurations via the interelectronic Coulomb interaction. 15 refs., 2 tabs.

  5. Effective three-particle interactions in atoms with partly filled f-shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, Mikhail; Konovalova, Elena; Viatkina, Anna; Safronova, Marianna

    2016-05-01

    Three particle forces are known to be very important in nuclear physics. In atoms such forces appear between valence electrons in the second order of many-body perturbation theory due to the exchange interaction with the core. Usually their contribution to the valence energy is very small, of the order of few inverse centimeters. However, for atoms and ions with partly filled d and f shells the overlap between valence and core electrons may be large. This leads to significant enhancement of the effective three particle interactions. In Ti II (ground configuration (GC) 3 d2 4s) these interactions change binding energy by few hundred inverse centimeters. In Ce I (GC 4f5d 6 s2) these interactions contribute few thousand inverse centimeters. Three particle forces are also important for highly charged ions with low-lying f shell, such as Pr9 + , 10 +, Nd10 + , 11 +, and Sm13+. These ions may have narrow optical transitions and are now considered for the new generation of optical clocks. This work was supported in part by RFBR Grant No. 14-02-00241.

  6. Status and availability of FCC hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romriell, G. K.

    1973-01-01

    The source availability of FCC and/or FCC connectors was surveyed. The results for the following areas are presented: (1) cost of FCC versus standard round cable, (2) qualification status, (3) size of wire available in FCC, (4) availability of hermetic connectors for FCC, (5) conversion from flat cable to round cable and visa versa, (6) availability of shielded flat cable for RF usage, (7) termination techniques, and (8) repair techniques.

  7. Atomic structure of [110] tilt grain boundaries in FCC materials

    SciTech Connect

    Merkle, K.L.; Thompson, L.J.

    1997-04-01

    High-resolution electron microscopy (HREM) has been used to study the atomic-scale structure and localized relaxations at grain boundaries (GBs) in Au, Al, and MgO. The [110] tilt GBs play an important role in polycrystalline fcc metals since among all of the possible GB geometries this series of misorientations as a whole contains the lowest energies, including among others the two lowest energy GBs, the (111) and (113) twins. Therefore, studies of the atomic-scale structure of [110] tilt GBs in fcc metals and systematic investigations of their dependence on misorientation and GB plane is of considerable importance to materials science. [110] tilt GBs in ceramic oxides of the fcc structure are also of considerable interest, since in this misorientation range polar GBs exist, i.e. GBs in which crystallographic planes that are made up of complete layers of cations or anions can join to form a GB.

  8. Consider topped crude for FCC

    SciTech Connect

    Louder, K.E.; Juno, E.J.; Kulapaditharom, L.

    1985-09-01

    A case study is presented that illustrates the mechanics for evaluating use of topped crude to load the FCC for more profit. Declining product demands combined with high crude costs has shut down many refineries and left others operting well below design capacity. The study illustrates the step-by-step requirements to debottleneck an existing Kellogg Orthoflow Model B FCC to process topped crude mixed with gas oils. This study was limited to the catalytic converter defined as the reactor, regenerator, air blower, and wet gas compressor. The scope was to examine the ability to process topped crude and to consider modernizing the FCC to employ riser cracking and complete CO combustion regeneration.

  9. Use desalting for FCC feedstocks

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, J.R.

    1996-08-01

    The heart of profitability in a modern refinery is the fluid catalytic cracking unit (FCCU). As a major process unit, the FCCU generates substantial profits from small improvements. One such improvement, desalting FCC feedstocks, increases refinery profits by over $25,000 per day after a two-month payout period. Desalting improves FCC feedstocks in three distinct ways: (1) reducing feed sodium content, (2) eliminating entrained water or slugs of water, and (3) reducing particulates and contaminants in both the water and hydrocarbon. Each of these improvements reduces or eliminates several problems in the typical FCCU. The paper discusses each of these mechanisms, the cost of desalting, and a typical case.

  10. FCC-ee: Energy Calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Koratzinos, M.; Blondel, A.; Gianfelice-Wendt, E.; Zimmermann, F.

    2015-06-02

    The FCC-ee aims to improve on electroweak precision measurements, with goals of 100 ke V on the Z mass and width, and a fraction of MeV on the W mass. Compared to LEP, this implies a much improved knowledge of the center-of-mass energy when operating at the Z peak and WW threshold. This can be achieved by making systematic use of resonant depolarization. A number of issues have been identified, due in particular to the long polarization times. However the smaller emittance and energy spread of FCC-ee with respect to LEP should help achieve a much improved performance.

  11. FCC, CATV, ETV, and ITFS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Louis; Woods, Robert A.

    Actions taken in 1970 by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) are reviewed and discussed in this paper. These actions include amendment of educational broadcast rules for the first time in 17 years, decisions in the area of educational programing, a decision regarding the ultra high frequency (UHF)-land mobile dilemma, and a promise to…

  12. 47 CFR 95.117 - Where to contact the FCC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... SERVICES General Mobile Radio Service (GMRS) § 95.117 Where to contact the FCC. Additional GMRS information...) FCC World Wide Web homepage: http://www.fcc.gov/wtb/prs. (c) In writing, to the FCC, Attention:...

  13. Three dimensional simulation of flow and heat transfer in an F shell heat exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Prithiviraj, M.; Andrews, M.J.

    1998-12-31

    Shell-and-tube heat exchangers are the most commonly used design in process and petrochemical industries. Over the last four years, a three-dimensional numerical model has been developed at Texas A and M University to model flow and heat transfer within shell-and-tube heat exchangers. This model is based on the distributed resistance concept of Patankar and Spalding (1974). Sub-models used for pressure drop, heat transfer and turbulence generation are briefly described. Leakage flow through the baffle-tube and baffle-shell clearances are modeled using a Bernoulli type approach. The discretized governing equations are solved using a SIMPLE type finite volume method on a colocated grid. The numerical model was previously used to perform E shell simulations. Here the 3D model is used to analyze flow through an F shell heat exchanger. Velocity vector plots for the shellside fluid and temperature contours for the shellside and tubeside fluids are used to study the flow structure. The performance of the 3D model is compared with the Bell Method (1981) for the prediction of overall pressure drop. Good agreement is obtained between the computed overall pressure drop and the pressure drop predicted by the Bell method.

  14. Neutron Skins and Halo Orbits in the s d and p f Shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnard, J.; Lenzi, S. M.; Zuker, A. P.

    2016-05-01

    The strong dependence of Coulomb energies on nuclear radii makes it possible to extract the latter from calculations of the former. The resulting estimates of neutron skins indicate that two mechanisms are involved. The first one—isovector monopole polarizability—amounts to noting that when a particle is added to a system it drives the radii of neutrons and protons in different directions, tending to equalize the radii of both fluids independently of the neutron excess. This mechanism is well understood and the Duflo-Zuker (small) neutron skin values derived 14 years ago are consistent with recent measures and estimates. The alternative mechanism involves halo orbits whose huge sizes tend to make the neutron skins larger and have a subtle influence on the radial behavior of s d and p f shell nuclei. In particular, they account for the sudden rise in the isotope shifts of nuclei beyond N =28 and the near constancy of radii in the A =40 - 56 region. This mechanism, detected here for the first time, is not well understood and may well go beyond the Efimov physics usually associated with halo orbits.

  15. Advances in FCC reactor technology

    SciTech Connect

    Schnaith, M.W.; Gilbert, A.T.; Lomas, D.A.; Myers, D.N.

    1995-09-01

    The riser termination device and the feed distribution system are the key elements that enable FCC reactor technology to achieve the high performance demanded in the 1990s and beyond. UOP`s development efforts have combined cold flow modeling and commercial optimization testing to produce new technology in both areas. A key differentiation of the UOP feed-catalyst contacting system is the use of a catalyst acceleration zone to moderate density and achieve plug flow before feed injection. Commercial data confirm the benefit and importance of elevated feed injection and proper catalyst environment in this three-phase system. A new high-performance Optimix feed nozzle has been developed and cold-flow tested and is currently undergoing commercial demonstration. New riser disengagement technology with prestripping has been extended to internal riser FCC units. The new disengager design will achieve at least 98% hydrocarbon containment. Cold-flow modeling has confirmed catalyst separation efficiency, and the design has been accepted for two FCC reactor revamps scheduled for mid-1995 and for 1996.

  16. Shear responses of [\\bar{1}\\,1\\,0] -tilt {1 1 5}/{1 1 1} asymmetric tilt grain boundaries in fcc metals by atomistic simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Liang; Li, Ju

    2013-07-01

    The shear response of the \\Sigma3 \\ [\\bar{1}\\,1\\,0] -tilt (\\bar{1}\\,\\bar{1}\\,5)/(1\\,1\\,1) and \\Sigma9 \\ [\\bar{1}\\,1\\,0] -tilt (1 1 5)/(1 1 1) asymmetric tilt grain boundaries (GBs) in fcc metals Cu and Al has been studied by atomistic simulation methods with the embedded atom method interatomic potentials and with a bicrystal model. It is found that the structure of the GBs studied can be well described by the coincidence site lattice (CSL) theory. Shear of these GBs at room temperature along eight different directions within the GB plane shows that these two types of GBs can transform between each other by the formation of a coherent twin boundary. The structure transformation of the GBs can also take the form of GB sliding, GB sliding-migration coupled motion, GB faceting, GB 9R structure formation, etc, depending on the shear directions adopted and the material involved (Cu or Al). The detailed structure transformation mechanisms have been analyzed with the aid of the CSL-DSC (displacement shift complete) theory. Several structure transformation paths adherent to these two types of GBs have been identified for the activation of the GB sliding-migration coupled motion. It is concluded that, although CSL-DSC theory can be applied to describe the sliding-migration coupled motion of the GBs studied, some other effects such as the shear direction within the GB plane and the bonding characteristics of the materials should also play a significant role in the shear response of these GBs.

  17. Atomistically-informed Dislocation Dynamics in fcc Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, E; Marian, J; Arsenlis, T; Victoria, M; Perlado, J M

    2006-09-06

    We develop a nodal dislocation dynamics (DD) model to simulate plastic processes in fcc crystals. The model explicitly accounts for all slip systems and Burgers vectors observed in fcc systems, including stacking faults and partial dislocations. We derive simple conservation rules that describe all partial dislocation interactions rigorously and allow us to model and quantify cross-slip processes, the structure and strength of dislocation junctions and the formation of fcc-specific structures such as stacking fault tetrahedra. The DD framework is built upon isotropic non-singular linear elasticity, and supports itself on information transmitted from the atomistic scale. In this fashion, connection between the meso and micro scales is attained self-consistently with core parameters fitted to atomistic data. We perform a series of targeted simulations to demonstrate the capabilities of the model, including dislocation reactions and dissociations and dislocation junction strength. Additionally we map the four-dimensional stress space relevant for cross-slip and relate our findings to the plastic behavior of monocrystalline fcc metals.

  18. New FCC Goal in Ownership Regulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rappaport, Josh

    By first describing the historical stance of the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) toward ownership of broadcast facilities and then describing the FCC's most recent policy statements, this report compares the differing viewpoints and recognizes that the new value or goal that seems to have been established conflicts with the past emphasis…

  19. The FCC and the Electric Church.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abrams, Michael F.

    This newsletter focuses on the relationship between the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) and religious broadcasters. It traces the history of that relationship and discusses some of the pressures put on both. It includes a discussion of a recent avalanche of mail at the FCC supporting the church on the airways. It also summarizes some of…

  20. Attrition Resistant Fischer-Tropsch Catalysts Based on FCC Supports

    SciTech Connect

    Adeyiga, Adeyinka

    2010-02-05

    Commercial spent fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) catalysts provided by Engelhard and Albemarle were used as supports for Fe-based catalysts with the goal of improving the attrition resistance of typical F-T catalysts. Catalysts with the Ruhrchemie composition (100 Fe/5 Cu/4.2 K/25 spent FCC on mass basis) were prepared by wet impregnation. XRD and XANES analysis showed the presence of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} in calcined catalysts. FeC{sub x} and Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} were present in the activated catalysts. The metal composition of the catalysts was analyzed by ICP-MS. F-T activity of the catalysts activated in situ in CO at the same conditions as used prior to the attrition tests was measured using a fixed bed reactor at T = 573 K, P = 1.38 MPa and H{sub 2}:CO ratio of 0.67. Cu and K promoted Fe supported over Engelhard provided spent FCC catalyst shows relatively good attrition resistance (8.2 wt% fines lost), high CO conversion (81%) and C{sub 5}+ hydrocarbons selectivity (18.3%).

  1. 47 CFR 2.926 - FCC identifier.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... representative may receive a grantee code electronically via the Internet at https://gullfoss2.fcc.gov/prod/oet... which has not been granted equipment authorization where such grant is required prior to...

  2. 47 CFR 2.926 - FCC identifier.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... electronically via the Internet at http://www.fcc.gov/eas. The code may be obtained at any time prior to... marketing. Labelling of such equipment may include model or type numbers, but shall not include a...

  3. 47 CFR 2.926 - FCC identifier.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... electronically via the Internet at http://www.fcc.gov/eas. The code may be obtained at any time prior to... marketing. Labelling of such equipment may include model or type numbers, but shall not include a...

  4. 47 CFR 2.926 - FCC identifier.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... electronically via the Internet at http://www.fcc.gov/eas. The code may be obtained at any time prior to... marketing. Labelling of such equipment may include model or type numbers, but shall not include a...

  5. 47 CFR 2.926 - FCC identifier.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... representative may receive a grantee code electronically via the Internet at https://gullfoss2.fcc.gov/prod/oet... which has not been granted equipment authorization where such grant is required prior to...

  6. Ferromagnetic properties of fcc Gd thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Bertelli, T. P. Passamani, E. C.; Larica, C.; Nascimento, V. P.; Takeuchi, A. Y.

    2015-05-28

    Magnetic properties of sputtered Gd thin films grown on Si (100) substrates kept at two different temperatures were investigated using X-ray diffraction, ac magnetic susceptibility, and dc magnetization measurements. The obtained Gd thin films have a mixture of hcp and fcc structures, but with their fractions depending on the substrate temperature T{sub S} and film thickness x. Gd fcc samples were obtained when T{sub S} = 763 K and x = 10 nm, while the hcp structure was stabilized for lower T{sub S} (300 K) and thicker film (20 nm). The fcc structure is formed on the Ta buffer layer, while the hcp phase grows on the fcc Gd layer as a consequence of the lattice relaxation process. Spin reorientation phenomenon, commonly found in bulk Gd species, was also observed in the hcp Gd thin film. This phenomenon is assumed to cause the magnetization anomalous increase observed below 50 K in stressed Gd films. Magnetic properties of fcc Gd thin films are: Curie temperature above 300 K, saturation magnetization value of about 175 emu/cm{sup 3}, and coercive field of about 100 Oe at 300 K; features that allow us to classify Gd thin films, with fcc structure, as a soft ferromagnetic material.

  7. Economically recover olefins from FCC offgases

    SciTech Connect

    Netzer, D.

    1997-04-01

    The concept of ethylene and propylene recovery from fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) offgases is not new; however, its application has been infrequent. For typical catalytic cracking of atmospheric and vacuum gas oils, ethylene yields range from 2.0 to 3.5 lb/bbl of FCC feed. The ethylene typically amounts to 8 to 18 vol% of FCC offgas and is normally routed to the fuel gas system. Variations in ethylene concentrations are affected by the FCC feed composition and cracking severity. This ethylene yield is anywhere from 0.7% to 1.1% of the FCC feed, as opposed to 26% to 36% for naphtha or gas oil cracking in conventional olefin plants. Due to high FCC unit feedrates (typically 25,000 to 85,000 bpsd for most North American refineries) even with a low ethylene yield, the olefins production can be significant. Here, two approaches to olefins recovery are addressed. In the first, ethylene is recovered as a dilute gas at a concentration of about 15 vol% and serves as raw material for ethylbenzene and, subsequently, styrene. In the second approach, ethylene is recovered as a pure polymer-grade liquid. Propylene recovery is identical for both approaches. The concept for producing polymer-grade liquid ethylene is described in detail in terms of process technology, cost estimates and economic parameters.

  8. Catalytic reforming of heart cut fcc naphthas

    SciTech Connect

    Gerritsen, L.A.

    1985-03-01

    The anticipated lead phasedown in the USA and the growing demand for unleaded gasoline will require a higher gasoline pool octane number. One of the possibilities to achieve this increase of pool octane will be catalytic reforming of FCC naphtha. In this paper we evaluate the effects of FCC naphtha reforming on the reformer operation and gasoline pool volume for various lead phasedown scenarios. High-stability reforming catalysts, like TPR-8/CK-522 TRILOBE catalyst, will be required to maintain acceptable cycle lengths at the more severe reformer operating conditions. The properties and octane distribution of FCC naphtha are discussed, as well as its hydrotreating with high-active NiMo catalysts.

  9. Deeply etherify FCC light cracked Naphtha (LCN)

    SciTech Connect

    Trotta, R.

    1996-03-01

    Drastic changes in refinery operations and economics resulting from implementation of environmentally driven U.S. legislation such as the Complex Model in 1998, as well as possible changes beyond that will necessitate several changes. An effective method of adjusting to these process challenges is by deep etherification of the entire FCC light cracked naphtha (LCN) stream, which is the FCC product fraction containing C{sub 5}, C{sub 6} and C{sub 7} hydrocarbons having a typical 1 atm boiling range of 95{degrees}F to 212{degrees}F. Deep etherification technology (DET) can solve five or six problems at once. All U.S. refineries which have an FCC unit have an LCN stream (or possibly a separate LCN stream). Snaprogetti`s LCN DET technology is essentially an upgrade of an otherwise already finished product-which in today`s processing and operations environment, would be sent directly to the gasoline pool. The technology is simply an add-on and does not substantially change refinery operations. As the LCN DET does not require changes in the FCC and catalytic reformer, DET does not cause disturbances to the refinery`s operation.

  10. Inside the FCC: A Guide for Information Seekers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Le Duc, Don R., Ed.; Krasnow, Erwin G., Ed.

    1975-01-01

    To aid the public in obtaining information and documents from the files of the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) this guide, written with assistance from the FCC staff, explains which office to approach and in what form to make the request. Ways to obtain informaion by visiting the FCC are explained along with methods for obtaining…

  11. 78 FR 69415 - Proposed Changes to FCC Form 499-A, FCC Form 499-Q, and Accompanying Instructions.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-19

    ..., in FR Doc. 2013-26482, on page 66358 make the following corrections: 1. On page 66358, in the... COMMISSION Proposed Changes to FCC Form 499-A, FCC Form 499-Q, and Accompanying Instructions. AGENCY: Federal... quarterly Telecommunications Reporting Worksheet, FCC Form 499-Q (Form 499-Q) and accompanying...

  12. Computational study of dislocation based mechanisms in FCC materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yellakara, Ranga Nikhil

    Understanding the relationships between microstructures and properties of materials is a key to developing new materials with more suitable qualities or employing the appropriate materials in special uses. In the present world of material research, the main focus is on microstructural control to cost-effectively enhance properties and meet performance specifications. This present work is directed towards improving the fundamental understanding of the microscale deformation mechanisms and mechanical behavior of metallic alloys, particularly focusing on face centered cubic (FCC) structured metals through a unique computational methodology called three-dimensional dislocation dynamics (3D-DD). In these simulations, the equations of motion for dislocations are mathematically solved to determine the evolution and interaction of dislocations. Microstructure details and stress-strain curves are a direct observation in the simulation and can be used to validate experimental results. The effect of initial dislocation microstructure on the yield strength has been studied. It has been shown that dislocation density based crystal plasticity formulations only work when dislocation densities/numbers are sufficiently large so that a statistically accurate description of the microstructure can be obtainable. The evolution of the flow stress for grain sizes ranging from 0.5 to 10 mum under uniaxial tension was simulated using an improvised model by integrating dislocation pile-up mechanism at grain boundaries has been performed. This study showed that for a same initial dislocation density, the Hall--Petch relationship holds well at small grain sizes (0.5--2 mum), beyond which the yield strength remains constant as the grain size increases. Various dislocation-particle interaction mechanisms have been introduced and investigations were made on their effect on the uniaxial tensile properties. These studies suggested that increase in particle volume fraction and decrease in particle

  13. FCC process options for reformulated gasoline

    SciTech Connect

    Chapin, L.E.; Letzsch, W.S.; Martin, T.W.

    1995-12-31

    In addition to certain process modifications, the main focus for RFG in the United States has been the addition of oxygenates, primarily MTBE, and to a lesser extent TAME and ETBE. As FCC-derived isobutylene is the primary feedstock source for MTBE, much interest has been shown in increasing its yield. At the same time, increasing the C3-C5 olefin yield is highly desirable as these olefins can be further processed into alkylate and/or oxygenates for gasoline blending. The incremental volumetric yield associated with these products will help offset the RFG pool volumetric loss due to distillation, benzene, aromatics and sulfur specifications. The paper discusses catalyst and process choices for the future. Three catalytic cracking technologies are described which can be applied to existing FCC units. These are DCC (deep catalytic cracking), MGG (more gasoline and gas), and MIO (maximum iso olefin).

  14. Computer simulation of FCC riser reactors.

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, S. L.; Golchert, B.; Lottes, S. A.; Petrick, M.; Zhou, C. Q.

    1999-04-20

    A three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code, ICRKFLO, was developed to simulate the multiphase reacting flow system in a fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) riser reactor. The code solve flow properties based on fundamental conservation laws of mass, momentum, and energy for gas, liquid, and solid phases. Useful phenomenological models were developed to represent the controlling FCC processes, including droplet dispersion and evaporation, particle-solid interactions, and interfacial heat transfer between gas, droplets, and particles. Techniques were also developed to facilitate numerical calculations. These techniques include a hybrid flow-kinetic treatment to include detailed kinetic calculations, a time-integral approach to overcome numerical stiffness problems of chemical reactions, and a sectional coupling and blocked-cell technique for handling complex geometry. The copyrighted ICRKFLO software has been validated with experimental data from pilot- and commercial-scale FCC units. The code can be used to evaluate the impacts of design and operating conditions on the production of gasoline and other oil products.

  15. Prediction of elastic and vibrational stability for Sc, Ti, Y, Zr, Tc, Ru, Hf, Re, and Os in the fcc structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Coss, Romeo; Cifuentes-Quintal, Eduardo; Aguayo, Aaron; Murrieta, Gabriel

    2014-03-01

    The discovery of a metastable phase for a given material is interesting because corresponds to a new bonding and new properties are expected. The calculation of the total-energy along the Bain path is frequently used as a method to find tetragonal metastable states. However, a local minimum in the tetragonal distortion is not a definitive proof of a metastable state, and the elastic and vibrational stability needs to be evaluated. In a previous work, using the elastic stability criteria for a cubic structure, we have shown that the transition metals with hcp ground state; Ti, Zr, and Hf have a fcc metastable phase. That result is interesting since the fcc crystal structure does not appear in the current pressure-temperature phase diagram of these metals, and support the experimental observations of fcc Ti and Zr in thin films. In the present work, we extend the stability study of the fcc structure to the non-magnetic transition metals with hcp ground state; Sc, Ti, Y, Zr, Tc, Ru, Hf, Re, and Os. We find that all the metals involved in this study have a metastable fcc structure, since the phonon band structure shows only positive frequencies. Finally, substrates on which the fcc structure of these metals could be growth epitaxially are predicted.

  16. Ground state searches in fcc intermetallics

    SciTech Connect

    Wolverton, C.; de Fontaine, D. ); Ceder, G. ); Dreysse, H. . Lab. de Physique du Solide)

    1991-12-01

    A cluster expansion is used to predict the fcc ground states, i.e., the stable phases at zero Kelvin as a function of composition, for alloy systems. The intermetallic structures are not assumed, but derived regorously by minimizing the configurational energy subject to linear constraints. This ground state search includes pair and multiplet interactions which spatially extend to fourth nearest neighbor. A large number of these concentration-independent interactions are computed by the method of direct configurational averaging using a linearized-muffin-tin orbital Hamiltonian cast into tight binding form (TB-LMTO). The interactions, derived without the use of any adjustable or experimentally obtained parameters, are compared to those calculated via the generalized perturbation method extention of the coherent potential approximation within the context of a KKR Hamiltonian (KKR-CPA-GPM). Agreement with the KKR-CPA-GPM results is quite excellent, as is the comparison of the ground state results with the fcc-based portions of the experimentally-determined phase diagrams under consideration.

  17. The impact of quadrupole moment of 4f shell on the hyperfine interactions anisotropy in RAl2 (R=Sm, Tb) intermetallic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delyagin, N. N.; Erzinkyan, A. L.

    2016-03-01

    The magnetic hyperfine interactions for 119Sn impurity atoms in SmAl2 and TbAl2 ferromagnetic compounds have been investigated by Mössbauer spectroscopy technique. These compounds have the same structure but differ in the sign of the quadrupole moment of the R3+ ion. In both cases, the spectrum contains two magnetic subspectra with the ratio of the intensities 1:3, which correspond to a and b Al sites with significantly different hyperfine parameters. The phenomenon change the order the component of inversion component of the Mössbauer spectra was found. This phenomenon is explained by the influence of the quadrupole moment 4f-shell of R3+ ions on the electron density distribution in the valence band. The degree of overlap of electron wave functions being on hybrid orbitals greatly depends on the sign of the 4f-shell quadrupole moment, which gives rise to huge anisotropy in the hyperfine magnetic field and the electric field gradient. Quadrupole deformation induced by the 4f quadrupole moment and the electric field gradient, greatly affects the d-like and p-like components of the electron wave functions, but little effect on the its s-components.

  18. 47 CFR 95.117 - Where to contact the FCC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Where to contact the FCC. 95.117 Section 95.117 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PERSONAL RADIO SERVICES General Mobile Radio Service (GMRS) § 95.117 Where to contact the FCC. Additional GMRS information may be obtained from any...

  19. Guide to Understanding Broadcast License Applications and Other FCC Forms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jennings, Ralph M.

    In order to encourage more citizen action and public awareness in broadcasting, this guide enumerates the step-by-step procedures that citizens must take to deal with the Federal Communications Commission (FCC). The guide exhaustively reviews the policy areas where current FCC television and radio licenses are vulnerable to public scrutiny. It…

  20. 47 CFR 76.1714 - FCC rules and regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false FCC rules and regulations. 76.1714 Section 76.1714 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Documents to be Maintained for Inspection § 76.1714 FCC rules and regulations. (a) The operator of a...

  1. 47 CFR 76.1714 - FCC rules and regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false FCC rules and regulations. 76.1714 Section 76.1714 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Documents to be Maintained for Inspection § 76.1714 FCC rules and regulations. (a) The operator of a...

  2. 47 CFR 76.1714 - FCC rules and regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false FCC rules and regulations. 76.1714 Section 76.1714 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Documents to be Maintained for Inspection § 76.1714 FCC rules and regulations. (a) The operator of a...

  3. 47 CFR 76.1714 - FCC rules and regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false FCC rules and regulations. 76.1714 Section 76.1714 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Documents to be Maintained for Inspection § 76.1714 FCC rules and regulations. (a) The operator of a...

  4. 47 CFR 76.1714 - FCC rules and regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false FCC rules and regulations. 76.1714 Section 76.1714 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Documents to be Maintained for Inspection § 76.1714 FCC rules and regulations. (a) The operator of a...

  5. Modulating fcc and hcp Ruthenium on the Surface of Palladium-Copper Alloy through Tunable Lattice Mismatch.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yancai; He, Dong Sheng; Lin, Yue; Feng, Xiaoqian; Wang, Xin; Yin, Peiqun; Hong, Xun; Zhou, Gang; Wu, Yuen; Li, Yadong

    2016-04-25

    Herein, we report an epitaxial-growth-mediated method to grow face-centered cubic (fcc) Ru, which is thermodynamically unfavorable in the bulk form, on the surface of Pd-Cu alloy. Induced by the galvanic replacement between Ru and Pd-Cu alloy, a shape transformation from a Pd-Cu@Ru core-shell to a yolk-shell structure was observed during the epitaxial growth. The successful coating of the unconventional crystallographic structure is critically dependent on the moderate lattice mismatch between the fcc Ru overlayer and PdCu3 alloy substrate. Further, both fcc and hexagonal close packed (hcp) Ru can be selectively grown through varying the lattice spacing of the Pd-Cu substrate. The presented findings provide a new synthetic pathway to control the crystallographic structure of metal nanomaterials. PMID:27010243

  6. The electronic structure and bonding of hydrogen near a fcc Fe stacking fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moro, L.; Ferullo, R.; Brizuela, G.; Juan, A.

    2000-02-01

    The atom superposition and electron delocalization molecular orbital (ASED-MO) semiempirical method is used to analyse the atomic hydrogen-Fe interaction. The face centred cubic (fcc) Fe model contains a stacking fault and as a comparison the H-fcc Fe (normal) system is also studied. The solid is represented by a cluster of 180 metallic atoms distributed in five layers. The interstitial atoms localized in different geometric positions found an energetic minimum in a zone close to octahedral interstitial holes in the stacking fault. The electronic structure shows that the H-Fe bond involves mainly the Fe 4s and 4p orbitals and the 1s H orbital. The Fe-Fe bond near H is destabilized, to approximately 27% of its original value.

  7. 78 FR 66357 - Proposed Changes to FCC Form 499-A, FCC Form 499-Q, and Accompanying Instructions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-05

    ...In this document the Federal Communications Commission's Wireline Competition Bureau (Bureau) seeks comment on proposed revisions to the annual Telecommunications Reporting Worksheet, FCC Form 499-A (Form 499-A) and accompanying instructions (Form 499-A Instructions) to be used in 2014 to report 2013 revenues, and the quarterly Telecommunications Reporting Worksheet, FCC Form 499-Q (Form......

  8. 77 FR 74010 - Proposed Changes to FCC Form 499-A, FCC Form 499-Q, and Accompanying Instructions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-12

    ... 2013 to report 2012 revenues, and the quarterly Telecommunications Reporting Worksheet, FCC Form 499-Q (Form 499-Q) and accompanying instructions (Form 499-Q Instructions) to be used in 2013 to report... 2013 to report 2012 revenues, and (2) the quarterly Telecommunications Reporting Worksheet, FCC...

  9. Crack Tip Dislocation Nucleation in FCC Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knap, J.; Sieradzki, K.

    1999-02-01

    We present results of molecular dynamic simulations aimed at examining crack tip dislocation emission in fcc solids. The results are analyzed in terms of recent continuum formulations of this problem. In mode II, Au, Pd, and Pt displayed a new unanticipated mechanism of crack tip dislocation emission involving the creation of a pair of Shockley partials on a slip plane one plane below the crack plane. In mode I, for all the materials examined, Rice's continuum formulation [J. Mech. Phys. Solids 40, 239 (1992)] underestimated the stress intensity for dislocation emission by almost a factor of 2. Surface stress corrections to the emission criterion brought the agreement between continuum predictions and simulations to within 20%.

  10. Factorization of the matrix elements of three-electron operators used in configuration-interactions studies of the atomic f shell

    SciTech Connect

    Judd, B.R.; Lo, E.

    1996-01-01

    Single-electron excitations of the atomic f shell are usually taken into account in analyses of lanthanide and actinide spectra by including six three-electron scalar operators t{sub i} in the Hamiltonian. Their matrix elements have been factorized for all f{sup N} by using the Wigner-Eckart theorem applied to Racah`s groups SO(7) and G{sub 2}. The two component parts, namely a reduced matrix element in G{sub 2} and an isoscalar factor, are tabulated. This provides a compact representation of the values of the matrix elements and also enables unusual selection rules and proportionalities to be exposed. 16 refs., 2 tabs.

  11. Epitaxial growth of fcc Cr on Au(100)

    SciTech Connect

    Durbin, S.M.; Berman, L.E.; Batterman, B.W.; Brodsky, M.B.; Hamaker, H.C.

    1988-04-15

    Synchrotron x-ray diffraction and anomalous dispersion measurements of 25A Cr layers epitaxially grown on (100) Au surfaces indicate the presence of fcc Cr domains, while extended x-ray absorption fine-structure spectra are consistent with the usual bcc phase of Cr. Together these data suggest that the fcc phase is a major fraction of the larger epitaxial Cr domains, but that most Cr atoms are in a bcc environment with much smaller domain sizes. This unusual, epitaxially stabilized fcc Cr structure may be related to previously reported low-temperature resistance anomalies.

  12. Finite-temperature elasticity of fcc Al: Atomistic simulations and ultrasonic measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Hieu H.; Williams, Michael E.; Mahaffey, Patrick; Radovic, Miladin; Arroyave, Raymundo; Cagin, Tahir

    2011-08-01

    Though not very often, there are some cases in the literature where discrepancies exist in the temperature dependence of elastic constants of materials. A particular example of this case is the behavior of C12 coefficient of a simple metal, aluminum. In this paper we attempt to provide insight into various contributions to temperature dependence in elastic properties by investigating the thermoelastic properties of fcc aluminum as a function of temperature through the use of two computational techniques and experiments. First, ab initio calculations based on density functional theory (DFT) are used in combination with quasiharmonic theory to calculate the elastic constants at finite temperatures through a strain-free energy approach. Molecular dynamics (MD) calculations using tight-binding potentials are then used to extract the elastic constants through a fluctuation-based formalism. Through this dynamic approach, the different contributions (Born, kinetic, and stress fluctuations) to the elastic constants are isolated and the underlying physical basis for the observed thermally induced softening is elucidated. The two approaches are then used to shed light on the relatively large discrepancies in the reported temperature dependence of the elastic constants of fcc aluminum. Finally, the polycrystalline elastic constants (and their temperature dependence) of fcc aluminum are determined using resonant ultrasound spectroscopy (RUS) and compared to previously published data as well as the atomistic calculations performed in this work.

  13. FCC046: A CANDIDATE GASEOUS POLAR RING DWARF ELLIPTICAL GALAXY IN THE FORNAX CLUSTER

    SciTech Connect

    De Rijcke, S.; Buyle, P.; Koleva, M.

    2013-06-20

    FCC046 is a Fornax Cluster dwarf elliptical galaxy. Optical observations have shown that this galaxy, besides an old and metal-poor stellar population, also contains a very young centrally concentrated population and is actively forming stars, albeit at a very low level. Here, we report on 21 cm observations of FCC046 with the Australia Telescope Compact Array which we conducted in the course of a small survey of Fornax Cluster early-type dwarf galaxies. We have discovered a {approx}10{sup 7} M{sub Sun} H I cloud surrounding FCC046. We show that the presence of this significant gas reservoir offers a concise explanation for this galaxy's optical morphological and kinematical properties. Surprisingly, the H I gas, as evidenced by its morphology and its rotational motion around the galaxy's optical major axis, is kinematically decoupled from the galaxy's stellar body. This is the first time such a ring of gaseous material in minor-axis rotation is discovered around a dwarf galaxy.

  14. Reformulated gasoline will change FCC operations and catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Stokes, G.M.; Wear, C.C.; Suarez, W.; Young, G.W. )

    1990-07-02

    Operation of fluid catalytic cracking units (FCCUs) will be significantly affected by new regulations that will in all probability require gasoline to be produced with lower aromatics and olefins contents, lower vapor pressure, and a minimum oxygen content. This paper reports on a study conducted to better define the basic relationship between operating variables, including catalyst and naphtha quality, in the context of reformulated gasoline. The study helped to define specific operating strategies, potential problem areas, and opportunities for improved FCC unit and catalyst technologies. FCC feedstock quality can have a significant influence on the composition of FCC naphtha. However, even extremely paraffinic or aromatic feeds can yield substantial levels of both olefins and aromatics in FCC naphtha, particularly when compared to the levels proposed in a reformulated gasoline pool.

  15. Cluster expansion of fcc Pd-V intermetallics

    SciTech Connect

    de Fontaine, D.; Wolverton, C.; Ceder, G. ); Dreysse, H. . Lab. de Physique du Solide)

    1991-06-01

    A cluster expansion is used to compute fcc ground states from first principles for the Pd-V system. Intermetallic structures are not assumed but derived rigorously by minimizing the configurational energy subject to linear constraints. A large number of concentration-independent interactions are calculated by the method of direct configurational averaging. Agreement with the fcc-based portion of the experimentally-determined Pd-V phase diagram is quite satisfactory. 25 refs., 2 figs.

  16. Dislocation core fields and forces in FCC metals

    SciTech Connect

    Henager, Charles H.; Hoagland, Richard G.

    2004-04-01

    Atomistic models were used to obtain dislocation core fields for edge, screw, and mixed dislocations in Al and Cu using EAM. Core fields are analyzed using a line force dipole representation, with dilatant and dipole terms. The core field contribution to the force between dislocations is shown to be significant for interactions within 50b.

  17. Strain hardening of fcc metal surfaces induced by microploughing

    SciTech Connect

    Day, R.D.; Dickerson, R.M.; Russell, P.E.

    1998-12-01

    Microploughing experiments were used as a method for better understanding the ploughing mechanism in gold and iridium single crystals. The plough depths ranged from 20 nm in iridium to 1,600 nm in gold. Yield stress profiles and TEM analyses indicate that both materials strain harden even when very small volumes of material are involved. Strain hardening theory, as applied to bulk material, is useful in analyzing the results.

  18. Selection of the Space Station Freedom (SSF) Flat Collector Circuit (FCC) insulation material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emerson, Dawn

    1994-01-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: function of the Space Station Freedom (SSF) Flat Collector Circuit (FCC); requirements of the FCC which affect the selection of the insulation material; data to support the selection of the FCC insulation material; development history; modified design; coverlay testing; effects on modified design on FCC; arc tracking tests performed on FCC; and arc tracking test results.

  19. Understanding Anharmonicity in fcc Materials: From its Origin to ab initio Strategies beyond the Quasiharmonic Approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glensk, A.; Grabowski, B.; Hickel, T.; Neugebauer, J.

    2015-05-01

    We derive the Gibbs energy including the anharmonic contribution due to phonon-phonon interactions for an extensive set of unary fcc metals (Al, Ag, Au, Cu, Ir, Ni, Pb, Pd, Pt, Rh) by combining density-functional-theory (DFT) calculations with efficient statistical sampling approaches. We show that the anharmonicity of the macroscopic system can be traced back to the anharmonicity in local pairwise interactions. Using this insight, we derive and benchmark a highly efficient approach which allows the computation of anharmonic contributions using a few T =0 K DFT calculations only.

  20. Complex band structure with ultrasoft pseudopotentials: fcc Ni and Ni nanowire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smogunov, Alexander; Dal Corso, Andrea; Tosatti, Erio

    2003-06-01

    We generalize to magnetic transition metals the approach proposed by Choi and Ihm for calculating the complex band structure of periodic systems, a key ingredient for future calculations of conductivity of an open quantum system within the Landauer-Buttiker theory. The method is implemented with ultrasoft pseudopotentials and plane wave basis set in a DFT-LSDA ab initio scheme. As a first example, we present the complex band structure of bulk fcc Ni (which constitutes the tips of a Ni nanocontact) and monatomic Ni wire (the junction between two tips). Based on our results, we anticipate some features of the spin-dependent conductance in a Ni nanocontact.

  1. Ultra-high strain rate behavior of FCC nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crum, Ryan Scott

    This work addresses the influence of ultra-high strain rates loading observed in our world today via ballistics, explosions and astrophysical collisions on well-defined metal structures. There is a plentiful amount of research examining metals at a macroscopic level that are subjected to ballistics and explosions but observing the microstructure is difficult as those procedures are fairly destructive testing mechanisms. Therefore, to understand the true mechanisms that occur in these loading situations a more novel technique is necessary. Modifications were made to the Laser Spallation Technique in order to load structures under a single transient wave pulse. This study characterized FCC nanostructures shock loaded at extreme pressures, strain rates and temperatures. By utilizing nanostructures, extremely large values of stain could be produced within the structure. It was first observed that at lower laser fluence levels and subsequently low stress states that there was a chemical activation of the surface of Cu nanopillars. This occurred due to nanofacet formation on the surface of the nanopillars which left pristine Cu surfaces to recombine with the environment. Dislocation motion was also observed and clearly identified in Cu nanopillars, Cu nanobenches and Al nanopillars. Further studies analyzed Cu nanopillars subjected to higher laser fluence generated stress waves, which led to bending and axial shortening deformation. These deformations were observed at laser fluence values of 144 kJ/m2 for bending and 300 kJ/m 2 for bulging similar to that of Taylor Impact experiments. To explore an even more extreme loading environment, a specialized test setup was employed to cryogenically cool the copper nanopillars to a temperature of 83K in an attempt to elucidate brittle behavior. Under these loading conditions the nanopillars continued to deform in a ductile manner but with delayed onset of both bending deformation and bulging deformation compared to the room

  2. Magnetic Properties of Diluted Fcc System Nickel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Zhen

    Starting from Ni and Mg nitrates, about 20 samples of Ni_{rm p}Mg _{rm 1-p}O (0.06 <=q p <=q 0.86) were prepared and X-ray diffraction studies showed the samples to have the NaCl structure with the lattice constant fitting the equation a(p) = 4.2115 - 0.0340p A. Temperature dependent dc magnetic susceptibility (chi ) studies of the samples were carried out between 1.8K and 600K using a SQUID magnetometer and the Neel temperature T_{rm N} were determined from the peak in partial(chiT)/ partialT. The variation of t = T _{rm N}(p)/T _{rm N}(1) versus p is compared with that in Co_{rm p}Mg _{rm 1-p}O. For both systems, the variations for p > 0.31 are found to fit the predicted values for a simple cubic Heisenberg antiferromagnet and a theoretical basis for this anomalous results is advanced. The experimental percolation threshold p_{rm c} = 0.15 +/- 0.01. For p_ {rm c} <=q p <=q 0.33, chi below T_{rm N} shows irreversible behavior for the zero-field-cooled and field -cooled cases, suggestive of spin-glass-like behavior, also observed in other diluted fcc antiferromagnets such as Co_{rm p}Mg _{rm 1-p}O and Eu _{rm p}Sr_ {rm 1-p}Te. It is suggested that the differences in the t vs p variations for p < 0.33 in Ni_{rm p} Mg_{rm 1-p}O, Co_{rm p}Mg _{rm 1-p}O and Eu _{rm p}Sr_ {rm 1-p}Te may be related to the differences in the ratio of the next-nearest-neighbor to nearest-neighbor exchange constants in these systems. A higher order correction to Curie-Weiss law was applied for sample with 0.19 <=q p <=q 0.59 which explains why 1/ chi curve versus T bends downward with decreasing temperatures. For the sample Ni_{0.33} Mg_{0.67}O, the magnetization M versus magnetic field H (0 to 0.2T) are measured with temperature ranging from 5.2K to 13.4K at intervals of 0.2K. The magnitude of the non-linear susceptibility, a_3, is determined from the M versus H data at different temperatures. The divergence of a _3 around 9.4 +/- 0.6K indicates spin-glass behavior in this system.

  3. Nucleation of fcc Ta when heating thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Janish, Matthew T.; Mook, William M.; Carter, C. Barry

    2014-10-25

    Thin tantalum films have been studied during in-situ heating in a transmission electron microscope. Diffraction patterns from the as-deposited films were typical of amorphous materials. Crystalline grains were observed to form when the specimen was annealed in-situ at 450°C. Particular attention was addressed to the formation and growth of grains with the face-centered cubic (fcc) crystal structure. As a result, these observations are discussed in relation to prior work on the formation of fcc Ta by deformation and during thin film deposition.

  4. Impact of magnetic fluctuations on lattice excitations in fcc nickel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Körmann, Fritz; Ma, Pui-Wai; Dudarev, Sergei L.; Neugebauer, Jörg

    2016-02-01

    The spin-space averaging formalism is applied to compute atomic forces and phonon spectra for magnetically excited states of fcc nickel. Transverse and longitudinal magnetic fluctuations are taken into account by a combination of magnetic special quasi random structures and constrained spin-density-functional theory. It turns out that for fcc Ni interatomic force constants and phonon spectra are almost unaffected by both kinds of spin fluctuations. Given the computational expense to simulate coupled magnetic and atomic fluctuations, this insight facilitates computational modeling of magnetic alloys such as Ni-based superalloys.

  5. A formulation for the characteristic lengths of fcc materials in first strain gradient elasticity via the Sutton-Chen potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shodja, H. M.; Tehranchi, A.

    2010-05-01

    The usual continuum theories are inadequate in predicting the mechanical behavior of solids in the presence of small defects and stress concentrators; it is well known that such continuum methods are unable to detect the change of the size of the inhomogeneities and defects. For these reasons various augmented continuum theories and strain gradient theories have been proposed in the literature. The major difficulty in implication of these theories lies in the lack of information about the additional material constants which appear in such theories. For fcc metals, for the calculation of the associated characteristic lengths which arise in first strain gradient theory, an atomistic approach based on the Sutton-Chen interatomic potential function is proposed. For the validity of the computed characteristic lengths, the phenomenon of the size effect pertinent to a nano-sized circular void within an fcc (111) plane is examined via both first strain gradient theory and lattice statics. Comparison of the results explains the physical ramifications of the characteristic lengths in improving the usual continuum results. Moreover, by reconsideration of the Kelvin problem it is shown that a commonly employed variant of the first strain gradient theory is only valid for a few fcc metals.

  6. Ab initio study of He point defects in fcc Au-Ag alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Zi Qiang; Yang, Li; Nie, JL; Peng, SM; Long, XG; Zhou, X. S.; Zu, Xiaotao; Gao, Fei

    2013-04-25

    The relative stabilities of He defects in two fcc Au-Ag alloys (Au3Ag2 and AuAg) are investigated using ab initio method based on density functional theory. The results show that the stabilities of He defects in the two alloys mainly depend on the atomic arrangements of the nearest neighboring host metals. A He interstitial prefers to stay at a site with more Ag neighboring atoms, while the favorable substitutional site has more Au neighboring atoms in Au-Ag alloys. Moreover, the substitutional He defects are the most stable configurations in both the alloys, and the octahedral He interstitials are energetically more favorable than the tetrahedral interstitials. It is of interest to note that the properties of He defects slightly depend on the mass-density of Au-Ag alloys. The results also demonstrate that the relative stabilities of He defects are primarily attributed to the hybridization between metals d states and He p states.

  7. A Guide to Federal Regulation; Understanding the FCC Rules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable Television Information Center, Washington, DC.

    While it is apparent that the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) has given a great deal of thought to the regulation of cable systems, the basic success or failure of cable as a communications service will depend on local development. Relatively little guidance has been provided to local franchising authorities for selecting among applicants,…

  8. Statement on CATV from the FCC to the Senate Committee.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Communications Commission, Washington, DC.

    In this statement to the Senate, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) describes in detail their specific policies relevant to cable television (CATV) regulation under four general areas. The rules for the first of these, television broadcast signal carriage, are outlined in terms of three classifications which would divide all signals:…

  9. 47 CFR 73.1226 - Availability to FCC of station logs and records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Availability to FCC of station logs and records... Availability to FCC of station logs and records. The following shall be made available to any authorized representative of the FCC upon request: (a) Station records and logs shall be made available for inspection...

  10. 47 CFR 73.1226 - Availability to FCC of station logs and records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Availability to FCC of station logs and records... Availability to FCC of station logs and records. The following shall be made available to any authorized representative of the FCC upon request: (a) Station records and logs shall be made available for inspection...

  11. 47 CFR 73.1226 - Availability to FCC of station logs and records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Availability to FCC of station logs and records... Availability to FCC of station logs and records. The following shall be made available to any authorized representative of the FCC upon request: (a) Station records and logs shall be made available for inspection...

  12. 47 CFR 73.1226 - Availability to FCC of station logs and records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Availability to FCC of station logs and records... Availability to FCC of station logs and records. The following shall be made available to any authorized representative of the FCC upon request: (a) Station records and logs shall be made available for inspection...

  13. 47 CFR 73.1226 - Availability to FCC of station logs and records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Availability to FCC of station logs and records... Availability to FCC of station logs and records. The following shall be made available to any authorized representative of the FCC upon request: (a) Station records and logs shall be made available for inspection...

  14. Strategies for catalytic octane enhancement in an FCC unit

    SciTech Connect

    Creighton, J.E.; Edwards, G.C.; Rajagopalan, K.; Peters, A.W.; Young, G.W. )

    1987-08-01

    Gasoline quality is largely determined by motor and research octane numbers. There is good correlation between octane number and the structure of the C{sub 5} to C{sub 12} hydrocarbons typically present in gasoline. For paraffins, octane number decreases as molecular weight increases with degree of branching. The same is true of olefins. Catalytic strategies for making high octane gasolines include decreasing the amount of higher molecular weight, less branched paraffins, isomerizing paraffins to a more highly branched product, and producing more olefins or aromatics. A number of catalytic processes in current use make use of these strategies, including reforming, isomerization, dimerization, alkylation and fluid catalytic cracking (FCC). The subject of this paper is to discuss the catalytic strategies available to produce octane number in the FCC unit.

  15. Magneto-optic constants of hcp and fcc Co films

    SciTech Connect

    Osgood, R.M. III,; Riggs, K.T.; Johnson, A.E.; Mattson, J.E.; Sowers, C.H.; Bader, S.D.

    1997-08-01

    We tabulate the wavelength dependence of the complex magneto-optic constants for epitaxial fcc (001) and hcp (1{bar 1}00) Co films with the magnetization along two different in-plane crystallographic directions. The magneto-optic constants of epitaxial hcp Co films are strongly dependent on crystallographic direction for the same sample, while those of epitaxial fcc Co films are not, as anticipated from the trends in the magnetic anisotropy due to the spin-orbit interaction. Our results for (i) the anisotropic magneto-optic constants, (ii) the magnetic anisotropy, and (iii) the indices of refraction, are compared to other studies of Co. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  16. Maximizing the FCC`s potential for RFG production

    SciTech Connect

    Chapin, L.E.

    1996-12-31

    The Fluidized Catalytic Cracking (FCC) unit has traditionally been the dominant conversion process in U.S. refineries. It has served as a major source of high octane naphtha for blending into the gasoline pool. With the passage of the Clean Air Act, U.S. refiners are reformulating their gasoline blends utilizing increasing volumes of {open_quotes}clean burning{close_quotes} alkylate and ethers. Both of these premium products use light olefins including propylene as feedstocks. Environmental trends in other major world markets will force much of the world FCC operating capacity to follow the same path. The intent of this paper is to quantify the impact of deep catalytic cracking on the gasoline pool and overall profitability of a refinery dedicated to producing reformulated gasoline.

  17. Emerging technology for the reduction of sulfur in FCC fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Wormsbecher, R.F.; Weatherbee, G.D.; Kim, G.; Dougan, T.J. )

    1993-01-01

    Passage of the Clean Air Act of 1990 and new regulations issued in California will set new limits on the sulfur content of gasoline. Because most of the sulfur in the gasoline pool comes from FCC naphtha, there is a strong incentive to reduce the sulfur content of this stream in the most cost efficient manner. This work introduces emerging catalytic technology for the direct reduction of the sulfur content of FCC gasolines, called the GSR[trademark] (Gasoline Sulfur Reduction) technology. Studies of this new technology were carried out using the Davison Circulating Riser pilot unit. The GSR technology is shown to reduce the sulfur in FCC naphtha by 15%, with two feedstocks. It is shown that this technology is selective to sulfur species in the middle of the gasoline boiling range, and converts these species to H[sub 2]S, while preserving most of the base catalyst selectivities. Various other catalytic scenarios for minimizing the gasoline sulfur content are also given.

  18. (Al, B)-ZSM-11 FCC additive performance

    SciTech Connect

    Hsing, L.H.; O`Young, C.L.

    1996-10-01

    ZSM-5 additive has been used extensively in the petroleum refining industry to enhance the light olefins production from the FCCU operation. In this paper, an FCC additive, (Al, B)-ZSM-11 was evaluated for its performance on a circulated FCC pilot unit. This additive was prepared by partially replacing the frame-work aluminum with boron, which in turn, will alternate its acid characteristics and performance as an FCC additive in promoting light olefin production. The (Al, B)-ZSM-11 additive increased C3=, C4=, and C5= yields, but was less effective in increasing C3=, C4= yields, particularly I-C4= than ZSM-5 additive. The (Al, B)-ZSM-11 additive increased branched C5= and decreased linear C5= yields resulting from skeletal isomerization. C5= and FC naphtha yields with (Al, B)-ZSM-11 additive are higher than those obtained with ZSM-5 additive indicating lower cracking of FC naphtha and C%= to lower olefins with (Al, B)-ZSM-11 additive than ZSM-5. The product selectivity difference between ZSM-5 and (Al, B)-ZSM-11 additives can be correlated with their respective acidity.

  19. Formation of bcc and fcc during the coalescence of free and supported Fe and Ni clusters.

    PubMed

    Li, Guojian; Wang, Qiang; Sui, Xudong; Wang, Kai; Wu, Chun; He, Jicheng

    2015-09-01

    The formation of bcc and fcc during the coalescence of free and supported Fe and Ni clusters has been studied by molecular dynamics simulation using an embedded atom method. Structural evolution of the clusters, coalesced under varying temperature, Ni content and substrate conditions, was explored by interatomic energy, snapshots, pair distribution functions and bond order parameters. The results show that the formation of bcc and fcc is strongly related to Ni content, substrate and coalescence temperature. Free clusters coalesced at 1200 K form bcc at lower Ni contents with fcc forming at higher Ni concentrations and no observable coexistence of bcc and fcc. Differences in coalescence at 1000 K result from the coexistence of bcc and fcc within the Ni range of 50-70%. Free clusters supported on disordered Ni substrates were shown to transform from spherical morphology to islands of supported clusters with preferred epitaxial orientation. The Ni content required to form bcc and fcc coexistence on supported clusters at 1000 K decreased to 30-50% Ni. Free clusters possessing bcc and fcc generally stacked along the bcc (110) and fcc (111) facets, whereas supported clusters stacked along the (111) bcc and (100) fcc planes. Structural transformation was induced by clusters containing greater numbers of atoms. Spread over the substrate enhanced interatomic energy, order substrates affect the epitaxial growth direction and increase the melting points of the supported clusters. This study can be used to predict the nature of fcc and bcc formation in Fe-Ni films. PMID:26234423

  20. Atomistic simulation of the fcc-hcp transition in single-crystal Al under uniaxial loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L.; Shao, J. L.; Duan, S. Q.; Liang, J. Q.

    2010-03-01

    The dynamic behavior of the single-crystal Al under [001] uniaxial strain is simulated by classic molecular dynamics. The fcc-hcp structural transition is successfully observed when the loading pressure reaches about 90 GPa, and the reverse transition is also found with hysteresis. The mechanism and morphology evolution of both the forward and backward transitions are analyzed in detail. It is found in the process of the structural transition that the (010)fcc or (100)fcc planes transit into (0001)hcp planes, and the twins of the hcp phase along the (112)-plane appear, whose boundaries finally become along the (110)-plane. Besides, we find the twinning (along the (110)fcc planes) in the hcp phase prior to the back transition (hcp-fcc). Our simulations show the coexistence of fcc and hcp phases over a wide range of pressures, and finally, the phase transition is evaluated by using the radial distribution functions.

  1. A general kinetic-flow coupling model for FCC riser flow simulation.

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, S. L.

    1998-05-18

    A computational fluid dynamic (CFD) code has been developed for fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) riser flow simulation. Depending on the application of interest, a specific kinetic model is needed for the FCC flow simulation. This paper describes a method to determine a kinetic model based on limited pilot-scale test data. The kinetic model can then be used with the CFD code as a tool to investigate optimum operating condition ranges for a specific FCC unit.

  2. Polarization Issues in the $e\\pm$ FCC

    SciTech Connect

    Gianfelice-Wendt, E.

    2015-08-10

    After the Higgs boson discovery at LHC, the international physics community is considering the next energy frontier circular collider (FCC). A pp collider of 100 km with a center of mass energy of about 100 TeV is believed to have the necessary discovery potential. The same tunnel could host first a e+e- collider with beam energy ranging between 45 and 175 GeV. In this paper preliminary considerations on the possibility of self-polarization for the e± beams are presented.

  3. Moessbauer spectroscopy evidence of a spinodal mechanism for the thermal decomposition of fcc FeCu

    SciTech Connect

    Crespo, P. |; Barro, M.J.; Hernando, A.; Escorial, A.G.; Menendez, N.; Tornero, J.D.; Barandiaran, J.M.

    1998-07-24

    Moessbauer spectroscopy shows the existence of compositional fluctuations, where different Fe environments coexist, during decomposition upon heat treatment of metastable f.c.c. FeCu solid solution. The presence of isolated Fe atoms in the Cu matrix, f.c.c. Fe{sub rich}Cu, f.c.c. FeCu{sub rich} and b.c.c. Fe has been detected in early decomposition stages. At later decomposition stages, low temperature Moessbauer spectroscopy indicates the presence of a broad distribution of Curie temperatures, coexisting with isolated Fe atoms in the Cu matrix, f.c.c. Fe and b.c.c. Fe.

  4. Electronic Structure of Crystalline Buckyballs: fcc-C60

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalali-Asadabadi, Saeid; Ghasemikhah, E.; Ouahrani, T.; Nourozi, B.; Bayat-Bayatani, M.; Javanbakht, S.; Aliabad, H. A. Rahnamaye; Ahmad, Iftikhar; Nematollahi, J.; Yazdani-Kachoei, M.

    2016-01-01

    The electronic properties of pristine fcc-C60 are calculated by utilizing a variety of density functional theory (DFT) approaches including the Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof generalized gradient approximation (PBE-GGA), PBE-GGA+DFT-D3(vdW), Engel and Vosko GGA (EV-GGA), GGA plus Hubbard U parameter (GGA+U), hybrids Becke-Perdew-Wang hybrid functional (B3PW91), Becke-Lee-Yang-Parr hybrid functional (B3LYP), the PBE exchange-correlation functional (PBE0), and Tran and Blaha regular and non-regular modified Becke and Johnson (TB-mBJ) potential within a DFT frame work using augmented plane waves plus local orbital method. The comparison of the calculated results with the experimental values shows that the non-regular TB-mBJ method reproduces a correct experimental direct band gap of 2.12 eV at X symmetry for this compound. The effectiveness of this theoretical approach in the reproduction of the experimental band gap is due to the proper treatment of the electrons in the interstitial region of the crystal. Our results show that the C60 clusters are weakly interacting with each other in the fcc crystal. This study also reveals that the five-fold degeneracies of the isolated C60 molecule due to its icosahedral symmetry are completely lifted at an X symmetry point by the crystal field.

  5. The effect of feedstock additives on FCC catalyst deactivation

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, R.; Koon, C.L.; McGhee, B.

    1995-12-31

    Fluid catalytic cracking is a major petroleum refining process and because of this the deactivation of FCC catalysts by coke deposition has been the subject of considerable investigation during the past 50 years. Nevertheless, a lack of understanding of the fundamental understanding of processes leading to coke formation still exists. Basic studies using Zeolites have usually involved excessively high levels of coke deposits compared to normal FCC operation. The present study addresses coke formation at realistic levels of 0.5 to 1.0% w/w using a standard MAT reactor in which concentrations of 1% and 10% of various additives were added to the n-hexadecane feedstock. These additives included, quinoline, phenanthrene, benzofuran, thianaphthene and indene. The coke formed was characterised by mass spectrometry and was significantly aliphatic in nature, the amount formed increasing in the order quinoline, phenanthrene, thianaphthene, benzofuran, indene. Quinoline acts primarily as a poison, whereas the other additives tend to promote coke formation in n-hexadecane cracking.

  6. Diversity of Voice? The FCC's Bright-Line "Anti-Monopoly" Rule.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haddock, David D.; Polsby, Daniel D.

    The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) has long had rules that prohibit anyone from owning more than one television station in any given location. Two of the stated purposes behind the FCC's anti-monopoly rules are to foster diversity of programming for the sake of First Amendment interests, and to promote programming among media outlets in…

  7. 47 CFR 11.21 - State and Local Area plans and FCC Mapbook.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false State and Local Area plans and FCC Mapbook. 11.21 Section 11.21 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL EMERGENCY ALERT SYSTEM (EAS) General § 11.21 State and Local Area plans and FCC Mapbook. EAS plans contain guidelines...

  8. 47 CFR 11.21 - State and Local Area plans and FCC Mapbook.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false State and Local Area plans and FCC Mapbook. 11.21 Section 11.21 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL EMERGENCY ALERT SYSTEM (EAS) General § 11.21 State and Local Area plans and FCC Mapbook. EAS plans contain guidelines...

  9. 47 CFR 0.409 - Commission policy on private printing of FCC forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Commission policy on private printing of FCC forms. 0.409 Section 0.409 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL COMMISSION ORGANIZATION General Information General § 0.409 Commission policy on private printing of FCC forms. The Commission has established a policy regarding...

  10. The Impact of Public Affairs Programming Regulation: A Study of the FCC's Effectiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chamberlin, Bill F.

    1979-01-01

    Explores the effectiveness of the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) public affairs program regulation through analysis of annual reports for 75 television stations, examining amount of time for public issues programing, amount of local affairs programing, total prime time programing, and whether FCC standards are met. (CWM)

  11. 47 CFR 97.27 - FCC modification of station license grant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false FCC modification of station license grant. 97.27 Section 97.27 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES AMATEUR RADIO SERVICE General Provisions § 97.27 FCC modification of station...

  12. 47 CFR 97.27 - FCC modification of station license grant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false FCC modification of station license grant. 97.27 Section 97.27 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES AMATEUR RADIO SERVICE General Provisions § 97.27 FCC modification of station...

  13. 47 CFR 97.27 - FCC modification of station license grant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false FCC modification of station license grant. 97.27 Section 97.27 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES AMATEUR RADIO SERVICE General Provisions § 97.27 FCC modification of station...

  14. 47 CFR 97.27 - FCC modification of station license grant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false FCC modification of station license grant. 97.27 Section 97.27 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES AMATEUR RADIO SERVICE General Provisions § 97.27 FCC modification of station...

  15. 47 CFR 97.27 - FCC modification of station license grant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false FCC modification of station license grant. 97.27 Section 97.27 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES AMATEUR RADIO SERVICE General Provisions § 97.27 FCC modification of station...

  16. 47 CFR Appendix A to Subpart A of... - Locations Where GMRS Is Regulated by the FCC

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Locations Where GMRS Is Regulated by the FCC A Appendix A to Subpart A of Part 95 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY.... A, App. A Appendix A to Subpart A of Part 95—Locations Where GMRS Is Regulated by the FCC In...

  17. 47 CFR Appendix A to Subpart A of... - Locations Where GMRS Is Regulated by the FCC

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Locations Where GMRS Is Regulated by the FCC A Appendix A to Subpart A of Part 95 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY.... A, App. A Appendix A to Subpart A of Part 95—Locations Where GMRS Is Regulated by the FCC In...

  18. 47 CFR Appendix A to Subpart A of... - Locations Where GMRS Is Regulated by the FCC

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Locations Where GMRS Is Regulated by the FCC A Appendix A to Subpart A of Part 95 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY.... A, App. A Appendix A to Subpart A of Part 95—Locations Where GMRS Is Regulated by the FCC In...

  19. 47 CFR Appendix A to Subpart A of... - Locations Where GMRS Is Regulated by the FCC

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Locations Where GMRS Is Regulated by the FCC A Appendix A to Subpart A of Part 95 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY.... A, App. A Appendix A to Subpart A of Part 95—Locations Where GMRS Is Regulated by the FCC In...

  20. 47 CFR Appendix A to Subpart A of... - Locations Where GMRS Is Regulated by the FCC

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Locations Where GMRS Is Regulated by the FCC A Appendix A to Subpart A of Part 95 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY.... A, App. A Appendix A to Subpart A of Part 95—Locations Where GMRS Is Regulated by the FCC In...

  1. 47 CFR 0.409 - Commission policy on private printing of FCC forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Commission policy on private printing of FCC forms. 0.409 Section 0.409 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL COMMISSION ORGANIZATION General Information General § 0.409 Commission policy on private printing of FCC forms. The Commission has established a policy regarding...

  2. On Campus Web-Monitoring Rules, Colleges and the FCC Have a Bad Connection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartle, Terry W.

    2006-01-01

    A regulation issued by the US Federal Communications Commission (FCC) requires facilities-based Internet services providers who operate their own equipment, including colleges, to make their Internet systems compliant with a statute known as the Communications Assistance for Law Enforcement Act (Calea) by April 2007. However, the FCC does not…

  3. Investigation of Three-Dimensional Stress Fields and Slip Systems for FCC Single Crystal Superalloy Notched Specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arakere, Nagaraj K.; Magnan, Shannon; Ebrahimi, Fereshteh; Ferroro, Luis

    2004-01-01

    Metals and their alloys, except for a few intermetallics, are inherently ductile, i.e. plastic deformation precedes fracture in these materials. Therefore, resistance to fracture is directly related to the development of the plastic zone at the crack tip. Recent studies indicate that the fracture toughness of single crystals depends on the crystallographic orientation of the notch as well as the loading direction. In general, the dependence of crack propagation resistance on crystallographic orientation arises from the anisotropy of (i) elastic constants, (ii) plastic deformation (or slip), and (iii) the weakest fracture planes (e.g. cleavage planes). Because of the triaxial stress state at the notch tips, many slip systems that otherwise would not be activated during uniaxial testing, become operational. The plastic zone formation in single crystals has been tackled theoretically by Rice and his co-workers and only limited experimental work has been conducted in this area. The study of the stresses and strains in the vicinity of a FCC single crystal notch tip is of relatively recent origin. We present experimental and numerical investigation of 3D stress fields and evolution of slip sector boundaries near notches in FCC single crystal tension test specimens, and demonstrate that a 3D linear elastic finite element model that includes the effect of material anisotropy is shown to predict active slip planes and sectors accurately. The slip sector boundaries are shown to have complex curved shapes with several slip systems active simultaneously near the notch. Results are presented for surface and mid-plane of the specimens. The results demonstrate that accounting for 3D elastic anisotropy is very important for accurate prediction of slip activation near FCC single crystal notches loaded in tension. Results from the study will help establish guidelines for fatigue damage near single crystal notches.

  4. Germanium FCC structure from a colloidal crystal template

    SciTech Connect

    Miguez, H.; Meseguer, F.; Lopez, C.; Holgado, M.; Andreasen, G.; Mifsud, A.; Fornes, V.

    2000-05-16

    Here, the authors show a method to fabricate a macroporous structure in which the pores, essentially identical, arrange regularly in a face-centered cubic (FCC) lattice. The result is a network of air spheres in a germanium medium. This structure presents the highest dielectric contrast ({epsilon}{sub Ge}/{epsilon}{sub air} = 16) ever achieved in the optical regime in such periodic structures, which could result in important applications in photonics. The authors employ solid silica colloidal crystals (opals) as templates within which a cyclic germanium growth process is carried out. Thus, the three-dimensional periodicity of the host is inherited by the guest. Afterward, the silica is removed and a germanium opal replica is obtained.

  5. Mechanism of aromatic hydrocarbon formation in FCC naphtha

    SciTech Connect

    Mota, C.J.A.; Rawet, R.

    1995-12-01

    A microactivity test study of the FCC naphtha composition at increasing conversions was carried out. At low conversions (ca. 10--20%), the naphtha is rich in olefinic and aromatic hydrocarbons. As the conversion increases, the composition changes dramatically. The olefins initially increase and then decrease sharply. The paraffins increase continually, and the aromatics initially decrease and then increase slightly. The naphthenics remain constant in the conversion range studied. These results indicate that, at low conversions, the aromatics in the gasoline are mainly formed by dealkylation of heavy aromatic molecules present in the feed. At higher conversions, however, the aromatics in the naphtha are mainly formed by cyclization followed by hydrogen transfer of the olefins formed during cracking. This reaction also increases the relative concentration of paraffinic hydrocarbons. The distribution of C9 aromatics showed that, as the conversion increases, there occurs an isomerization of the alkyl chain, to increase the branching of the ring.

  6. Interactions of multiphase hydrodynamics, droplet evaporation, and chemical kinetics in FCC riser reactors.

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, S. L.

    1998-02-17

    A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) computer code, ICRKFLO, has been developed for flow simulation of fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) riser reactors, which convert crude oil into gasoline and other valuable products. The FCC flow, especially in the entry region, is a three-phase reacting flow including hot catalyst particles, inert lift gas, and feed oil droplets. The impact of the hydrodynamics processes of heat transfer, droplet evaporation, and mixing on the chemical kinetics or riser performance can be significant. ICRKFLO was used to evaluate the impact of these processes on the performance of an advanced FCC unit. The code solves for major flow properties of all three phases in an FCC riser, with models governing the transport of catalyst particles and feed oil droplet, the vaporization of the feed oil droplets, the cracking of the oil vapor, and the formation and deposition of coke on particles. First, the code was validated against available test data of a pilot-scale FCC unit. Then, flow calculations for the FCC unit were performed. Computational results indicate that the heat transfer and droplet vaporization processes have a significant impact on the performance of a pilot-scale FCC unit. The impact is expected to be even greater on commercial scale units.

  7. Controlled FCC/on-top binding of H/Pt(111) using surface stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuttleworth, I. G.

    2016-08-01

    The preferred binding site of H/Pt(111) has been shown to be change from the on-top to FCC as the Pt(111) surface goes approximately from a state of compressive to tensile strain. A chemical analysis of the system has shown that for both FCC and on-top bound cases the H ssbnd Pt s and H ssbnd Pt d interactions have a similar importance in determining the preferred binding position. It has been seen that FCC-bound H forms a distinct state below the Pt d-band, whereas the on-top bound H does not.

  8. [In situ FTIR and XPS study on selective hydrodesulfurization catalyst of FCC gasoline].

    PubMed

    Qiherima; Yuan, Hui; Zhang, Yun-hong; Li, Hui-feng; Xu, Guang-tong

    2011-07-01

    Improvement of the selectivity of hydrodesulfurization (HDS) for hydrogenation (HYD) of olefins is crucial to produce sulfur-free (S < 0.001%) gasoline from fluid catalytic-cracked (FCC) gasoline. A series of sulfided CoMo/Al2O3 catalysts with different metal loading were prepared by pore-filling impregnation. MoS2 and COMoS active phases on the surface of sulfided COMo/Al2O3 catalyst were identified and analyzed quantitatively by XPS and in-situ FTIR of adsorbed CO. The results reveal that the increase in COMoS phase on the catalyst surface improves the HDS activity and selectivity. And the HDS selectivity correlates linearly with the ratio of active site number of CoMoS and MoS2, the higher the ratio of active site number of CoMoS and MoS2, the better the HDS selectivity. In situ variable temperature FTIR analysis shows that CoMoS phase has stronger electron accepting ability than MoS2. The strong electron deficient property of CoMoS active sites is the main reason for its excellent HDS activity and selectivity. PMID:21942017

  9. Specific features of defect and mass transport in concentrated fcc alloys

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Osetsky, Yuri N.; Béland, Laurent K.; Stoller, Roger E.

    2016-06-15

    We report that diffusion and mass transport are basic properties that control materials performance, such as phase stability, solute decomposition and radiation tolerance. While understanding diffusion in dilute alloys is a mature field, concentrated alloys are much less studied. Here, atomic-scale diffusion and mass transport via vacancies and interstitial atoms are compared in fcc Ni, Fe and equiatomic Ni-Fe alloy. High temperature properties were determined using conventional molecular dynamics on the microsecond timescale, whereas the kinetic activation-relaxation (k-ART) approach was applied at low temperatures. The k-ART was also used to calculate transition states in the alloy and defect transport coefficients.more » The calculations reveal several specific features. For example, vacancy and interstitial defects migrate via different alloy components, diffusion is more sluggish in the alloy and, notably, mass transport in the concentrated alloy cannot be predicted on the basis of diffusion in its pure metal counterparts. Lastly, the percolation threshold for the defect diffusion in the alloy is discussed and it is suggested that this phenomenon depends on the properties and diffusion mechanisms of specific defects.« less

  10. Specific features of defect and mass transport in concentrated fcc alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Osetskiy, Yury N; Stoller, Roger E

    2016-01-01

    Diffusion and mass transport are basic properties that control materials performance, such as phase stability, solute decomposition and radiation tolerance. While understanding diffusion in dilute alloys is a mature field, concentrated alloys are much less studied. Here, atomic-scale diffusion and mass transport via vacancies and interstitial atoms are compared in fcc Ni, Fe and equiatomic Ni-Fe alloy. High temperature properties were determined using conventional molecular dynamics on the microsecond timescale, whereas the kinetic activation-relaxation (k-ART) approach was applied at low temperatures. The k-ART was also used to calculate transition states in the alloy and defect transport coefficients. The calculations reveal several specific features. For example, vacancy and interstitial defects migrate via different alloy components, diffusion is more sluggish in the alloy and, notably, mass transport in the concentrated alloy cannot be predicted on the basis of diffusion in its pure metal counterparts. The percolation threshold for the defect diffusion in the alloy is discussed and it is suggested that this phenomenon depends on the properties and diffusion mechanisms of specific defects.

  11. Highly anisotropic exchange interactions of jeff=1/2 iridium moments on the fcc lattice in La2B IrO6 (B =Mg ,Zn )

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aczel, A. A.; Cook, A. M.; Williams, T. J.; Calder, S.; Christianson, A. D.; Cao, G.-X.; Mandrus, D.; Kim, Yong-Baek; Paramekanti, A.

    2016-06-01

    We have performed inelastic neutron scattering (INS) experiments to investigate the magnetic excitations in the weakly distorted face-centered-cubic (fcc) iridate double perovskites La2ZnIrO6 and La2MgIrO6 , which are characterized by A-type antiferromagnetic ground states. The powder inelastic neutron scattering data on these geometrically frustrated jeff=1/2 Mott insulators provide clear evidence for gapped spin-wave excitations with very weak dispersion. The INS results and thermodynamic data on these materials can be reproduced by conventional Heisenberg-Ising models with significant uniaxial Ising anisotropy and sizeable second-neighbor ferromagnetic interactions. Such a uniaxial Ising exchange interaction is symmetry forbidden on the ideal fcc lattice, so that it can only arise from the weak crystal distortions away from the ideal fcc limit. This may suggest that even weak distortions in jeff=1/2 Mott insulators might lead to strong exchange anisotropies. More tantalizingly, however, we find an alternative viable explanation of the INS results in terms of spin models with a dominant Kitaev interaction. In contrast to the uniaxial Ising exchange, the highly directional Kitaev interaction is a type of exchange anisotropy which is symmetry allowed even on the ideal fcc lattice. The Kitaev model has a magnon gap induced by quantum order by disorder, while weak anisotropies of the Kitaev couplings generated by the symmetry lowering due to lattice distortions can pin the order and enhance the magnon gap. Our findings highlight how even conventional magnetic orders in heavy transition metal oxides may be driven by highly directional exchange interactions rooted in strong spin-orbit coupling.

  12. Highly anisotropic exchange interactions of jeff=12 iridium moments on the fcc lattice in La2BIrO6 (B=Mg,Zn)

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Aczel, A. A.; Cook, A. M.; Williams, T. J.; Calder, S.; Christianson, A. D.; Cao, G. -X.; Mandrus, D.; Kim, Yong-Baek; Paramekanti, A.

    2016-06-20

    Here we have performed inelastic neutron scattering (INS) experiments to investigate the magnetic excitations in the weakly distorted face-centered-cubic (fcc) iridate double perovskites Lamore » $_2$ZnIrO$_6$ and La$_2$MgIrO$_6$, which are characterized by A-type antiferromagnetic ground states. The powder inelastic neutron scattering data on these geometrically frustrated $$j_{\\rm eff}=1/2$$ Mott insulators provide clear evidence for gapped spin wave excitations with very weak dispersion. The INS results and thermodynamic data on these materials can be reproduced by conventional Heisenberg-Ising models with significant uniaxial Ising anisotropy and sizeable second-neighbor ferromagnetic interactions. Such a uniaxial Ising exchange interaction is symmetry-forbidden on the ideal fcc lattice, so that it can only arise from the weak crystal distortions away from the ideal fcc limit. This may suggest that even weak distortions in $$j_{\\rm eff}=1/2$$ Mott insulators might lead to strong exchange anisotropies. More tantalizingly, however, we find an alternative viable explanation of the INS results in terms of spin models with a dominant Kitaev interaction. In contrast to the uniaxial Ising exchange, the highly-directional Kitaev interaction is a type of exchange anisotropy which is symmetry-allowed even on the ideal fcc lattice. The Kitaev model has a magnon gap induced by quantum order-by-disorder, while weak anisotropies of the Kitaev couplings generated by the symmetry-lowering due to lattice distortions can pin the order and enhance the magnon gap. In conclusion, our findings highlight how even conventional magnetic orders in heavy transition metal oxides may be driven by highly-directional exchange interactions rooted in strong spin-orbit coupling.« less

  13. Orbitide Composition of the Flax Core Collection (FCC).

    PubMed

    Burnett, Peta-Gaye Gillian; Olivia, Clara Marisa; Okinyo-Owiti, Denis Paskal; Reaney, Martin John Tarsisius

    2016-06-29

    The flax (Linum usitatissimum L.) core collection (FCC) was regenerated in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan and Morden, Manitoba in 2009. Seed orbitide content and composition from successfully propagated plants of 391 accessions were analyzed using high-throughput analyses employing high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with reverse-phase monolithic HPLC columns and diode array detection (HPLC-DAD). Seed from plants regenerated in Morden had comparatively higher orbitide content than those grown in Saskatoon. Concentrations of orbitides encoded by contig AFSQ01016651.1 (1, 3, and 8) were higher than those encoded by AFSQ01025165.1 (6, 13, and 17) for most accessions in both locations. The cultivar 'Primus' from Poland and an unnamed accession (CN 101580 of unknown origin) exhibited the highest ratio of sum of [1,3,8] to a sum of [6,13,17]. Conversely, the lowest orbitide concentrations and ratio of [1,3,8] to [6,13,17] were observed in cultivars 'Hollandia' and 'Z 11637', both from The Netherlands. Orbitide expression did not correlate with flax morphological and other chemical traits. PMID:27256931

  14. Improvements in FCC catalyst technology for light hydrocarbon production

    SciTech Connect

    Ritter, R.E.; Habib, E.T.; Peters, A.W.; Rheaume, L.; Thiel, P.G.; Wallace, D.N.; Wormsbecher, R.F.

    1985-03-01

    As the refining industry continues to undergo dramatic changes due to crude pricing, environmental demands, and product demand, cracking catalyst manufacturers continue to make significant strides in the understanding of the processes and products to meet the refiners' needs. This paper builds on information reported to the industry in previous articles, with the aim of keeping the industry informed of the many dramatic changes taking place in cracking catalyst technology. From our vantage point, the key refining industry concerns today are gasoline octane quality due to the lead phase-down, atmospheric emissions due to increasingly strict EPA and local limits on SOx emissions, and catalytic upgrading of resid feeds due to an expected long term price differential between high and low quality crudes. Hence, we focus here on the significant changes in cracking catalyst technology which will help the refiner handle these issues. In particular, we discuss the catalytic enhancement of gasoline octane with Davison's Octacat and GXO catalyst families, the reduction of FCC SOx emissions with Davison's Additive R SOx catalyst, and the passivation of vanadium with Davison's DVT, so that catalyst deactivation is minimized.

  15. Chevron process reduces FCC/coker corrosion and saves energy

    SciTech Connect

    Knowlton, H.E.; Coombs, J.W.; Allen, E.R.

    1980-01-01

    The Chevron Polysulfide process for controlling cyanide-induced corrosion was installed in seven fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) and coker fractionation systems at six Chevron refineries. Besides reducing corrosion, the process conserves energy that would otherwise be required for foul water stripping, and provides environmental benefits that include a reduction in effluent volume due to less-stripped foul water, less ammonia in effluent, low cyanide in the stripped foul-water, additional foul-water stripper capacity, and reduced foul-water stripper corrosion. In all units, the process was economically justified by the energy and additive savings associated with its use (no credits were taken for corrosion benefits). The mechanism by which cyanide induces corrosion and hydrogen blistering, i.e., removal of the protective iron sulfide film, in vapor lines, knockout drums, compressors, heat exchangers, and fractionation columns, and their elimination by the Chevron Polysulfide process, which involves the reaction of purchased ammonium polysulfide with cyanide to form thiocyanate, are discussed based on the above case histories.

  16. Role of distortion in the hcp vs fcc competition in rare-gas solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krainyukova, N. V.

    2011-05-01

    As a prototype of an initial or intermediate structure between hcp and fcc lattices we consider a distorted bcc crystal. We calculate the temperature and pressure dependences of the lattice parameters for the heavier rare gas solids Ar, Kr, Xe in a quasiharmonic approximation with Aziz potentials, and confirm earlier predictions that the hcp structure predominates over fcc in the bulk within wide ranges of P and T. The situation is different for confined clusters with up to 105 atoms, where, owing to the specific surface energetics and terminations, structures with five-fold symmetry made up of fcc fragments are dominant. As a next step we consider the free relaxation of differently distorted bcc clusters, and show that two types (monoclinic and orthorhombic) of initial distortion are a driving force for the final hcp vs fcc configurations. Possible energy relationships between the initial and final structures are obtained and analyzed.

  17. Cesium under pressure: First-principles calculation of the bcc-to-fcc phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlesi, S.; Franchini, A.; Bortolani, V.; Martinelli, S.

    1999-05-01

    In this paper we present the ab initio calculation of the structural properties of cesium under pressure. The calculation of the total energy is done in the local-density approximation of density-functional theory, using a nonlocal pseudopotential including the nonlinear core corrections proposed by Louie et al. The calculation of the pressure-volume diagram for both bcc and fcc structures allows us to prove that the transition from bcc to fcc structure is a first-order transition.

  18. Bond-Energy and Surface-Energy Calculations in Metals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eberhart, James G.; Horner, Steve

    2010-01-01

    A simple technique appropriate for introductory materials science courses is outlined for the calculation of bond energies in metals from lattice energies. The approach is applied to body-centered cubic (bcc), face-centered cubic (fcc), and hexagonal-closest-packed (hcp) metals. The strength of these bonds is tabulated for a variety metals and is…

  19. Synthesis and microstructure of electrodeposited and sputtered nanotwinned face-centered-cubic metals

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bufford, Daniel C.; Wang, Morris; Liu, Yue; Lu, Lei

    2016-04-01

    The remarkable properties of nanotwinned (NT) face-centered-cubic (fcc) metals arise directly from twin boundaries, the structures of which can be initially determined by growth twinning during the deposition process. When we understand the synthesis process and its relation to the resulting microstructure, and ultimately to material properties, we realize how key it is to understanding and utilizing these materials. Furthermore, our article presents recent studies on electrodeposition and sputtering methods that produce a high density of nanoscale growth twins in fcc metals. Nanoscale growth twins tend to form spontaneously in monolithic and alloyed fcc metals with lower stacking-fault energies, whilemore » engineered approaches are necessary for fcc metals with higher stacking-fault energies. Finally, growth defects and other microstructural features that influence nanotwin behavior and stability are introduced here, and future challenges in fabricating NT materials are highlighted.« less

  20. High-pressure behavior of fcc phase FeHx

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, E. C.; Chidester, B.; Fischer, R. A.; Prakapenka, V.; Bi, W.; Alp, E. E.; Campbell, A. J.

    2015-12-01

    Earth's core is composed of iron with the inclusion of light elements to compensate for the difference between seismically obtained densities and the density of pure Fe at relevant pressure and temperature conditions. As the most abundant and lightest element in the solar system, hydrogen is a plausible contributor to this core density deficit. Nearly stoichiometric iron hydride (FeHx) has been shown to result from the reaction of Fe and hydrous silicates, and is stable up to at least 80 GPa [1]. Iron hydride formation at Earth's surface is unlikely because the equilibrium hydrogen solubility in iron at atmospheric conditions is prohibitively low, yet as hydrogen solubility increases with pressure, so does the likelihood of FeHx formation within the Earth's interior [2]. Recent experimental and ab initio attempts disagree on the equation of state parameters needed to describe the compressional behavior of FeHx [3-5]. The work presented here combines synchrotron x-ray diffraction of laser-heated diamond anvil cell compressed samples with high-pressure, ambient temperature nuclear resonant inelastic scattering (NRIXS) and synchrotron Mössbauer spectroscopy (SMS) to better constrain the behavior of the fcc phase of FeHx at elevated pressures and temperatures. By pairing P-V-T data for iron hydride with the sound velocity information available through high-pressure NRIXS studies, we can better understand the degree to which hydrogen may contribute to the density deficit of Earth's iron core. [1] Antonov et al. (1998) J. Alloys Compd. 264, 214-222 [2] Fukai and Akimoto (1983) Proc. Japan Acad. 59, 158-162 [3] Pépin et al. (2014) Phys. Rev. Lett. 265504, 1-5 [4] Hirao (2004) Geophys. Res. Lett. 31, L06616 [5] Badding et al. (1991) Science. 253, 421-424

  1. CFD code development for performance evaluation of a pilot-scale FCC riser reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, S.L.; Lottes, S.A.; Zhou, C.Q.; Golchert, B.; Petrick, M.

    1997-09-01

    Fluid Catalytic Cracking (FCC) is an important conversion process for the refining industry. The improvement of FCC technology could have a great impact on the public in general by lowering the cost of transportation fuel. A recent review of the FCC technology development by Bienstock et al. of Exxon indicated that the use of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation can be very effective in the advancement of the technology. Theologos and Markatos used a commercial CFD code to model an FCC riser reactor. National Laboratories of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) have accumulated immense CFD expertise over the years for various engineering applications. A recent DOE survey showed that National Laboratories are using their CFD expertise to help the refinery industry improve the FCC technology under DOE`s Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA). Among them are Los Alamos National Laboratory with Exxon and Amoco and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) with Chevron and UOP. This abstract briefly describes the current status of ANL`s work. The objectives of the ANL CRADA work are (1) to use a CFD code to simulate FCC riser reactor flow and (2) to evaluate the impacts of operating conditions and design parameters on the product yields. The CFD code used in this work was originally developed for spray combustion simulation in early 1980 at Argonne. It has been successfully applied to diagnosing a number of multi-phase reacting flow problems in a magneto-hydrodynamic power train. A new version of the CFD code developed for the simulation of the FCC riser flow is called Integral CRacKing FLOw (ICRKFLO). The CFD code solves conservation equations of general flow properties for three phases: gaseous species, liquid droplets, and solid particles. General conservation laws are used in conjunction with rate equations governing the mass, momentum, enthalpy, and species for a multi-phase flow with gas species, liquid droplets, and solid particles.

  2. Magnetic ordering temperatures in rare earth metal dysprosium under ultrahigh pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samudrala, Gopi K.; Tsoi, Georgiy M.; Weir, Samuel T.; Vohra, Yogesh K.

    2014-04-01

    Magnetic ordering temperatures in heavy rare earth metal dysprosium (Dy) have been studied using an ultrasensitive electrical transport measurement technique in a designer diamond anvil cell to a pressure of 69 GPa and a temperature of 10 K. Previous studies using magnetic susceptibility measurements at high pressures were able to track magnetic ordering temperature only till 7 GPa in the hexagonal close packed (hcp) phase of Dy. Our studies indicate that the magnetic ordering temperature shows an abrupt drop of 80 K at the hcp-Sm phase transition followed by a gradual decrease that continues till 17 GPa. This is followed by a rapid increase in the magnetic ordering temperatures in the double hcp phase and finally leveling off in the distorted face centered cubic phase of Dy. Our studies reaffirm that 4f-shell remains localized in Dy and there is no loss of magnetic moment or 4f-shell delocalization for pressures up to 69 GPa.

  3. Dynamic damage evolution in aluminum as a model system for understanding FCC materials in extreme conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, Nathaniel Jonathon

    Materials play a key role in many emerging technologies. Future technologies in the energy and defense sectors will place huge demands on material performance with respect to stress, strain, temperature, and pressure. These applications require that the response of materials on dynamic (microsecond) time scales be predictable and controllable. Hence, the goal of this research project was to study the extreme environment of shock loaded damage evolution in aluminum as a model system for understanding dynamic response of FCC metals in these environments. Phase one utilized plate impact experiments to study the influence of spatial effects (in the form of microstructural defect distributions) on the dynamic damage evolution process. Samples were soft recovered for shot analysis and comparison to real time laser velocimetry. Results revealed that the length scale of defects controls the failure mechanisms of the microstructure; suggesting defect density and the spatial distribution of defects are critical factors in the deformation process in extreme environments. Phase two studied the influence of kinetic effects (in the form of dynamic tensile loading rate) to reveal time dependence on the dynamic deformation process. Results concluded damage nucleation and growth rates are highly time dependent and can be overdriven as higher tensile loading rates result in extremely short time durations. It was shown that laser velocimetry provides an adequate means for understanding the dynamic damage evolution process when soft recovery of the sample is unavailable. This was shown by comparing laser velocimetry results with data obtained from optical analysis on recovered specimens. The methodology here provides a means to systematically study materials of interest in extreme conditions and provides a pathway for obtaining the relevant physics needed for model development leading to a predictive capability.

  4. Bulk Nanostructured FCC Steels With Enhanced Radiation Tolerance

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xinghang; Hartwig, K. Ted; Allen, Todd; Yang, Yong

    2012-10-27

    The objective of this project is to increase radiation tolerance in austenitic steels through optimization of grain size and grain boundary (GB) characteristics. The focus will be on nanocrystalline austenitic Fe-Cr-Ni alloys with an fcc crystal structure. The long-term goal is to design and develop bulk nanostructured austenitic steels with enhanced void swelling resistance and substantial ductility, and to enhance their creep resistance at elevated temperatures via GB engineering. The combination of grain refinement and grain boundary engineering approaches allows us to tailor the material strength, ductility, and resistance to swelling by 1) changing the sink strength for point defects, 2) by increasing the nucleation barriers for bubble formation at GBs, and 3) by changing the precipitate distributions at boundaries. Compared to ferritic/martensitic steels, austenitic stainless steels (SS) possess good creep and fatigue resistance at elevated temperatures, and better toughness at low temperature. However, a major disadvantage of austenitic SS is that they are vulnerable to significant void swelling in nuclear reactors, especially at the temperatures and doses anticipated in the Advanced Burner Reactor. The lack of resistance to void swelling in austenitic alloys led to the switch to ferritic/martensitic steels as the preferred material for the fast reactor cladding application. Recently a type of austenitic stainless steel, HT-UPS, was developed at ORNL, and is expected to show enhanced void swelling resistance through the trapping of point defects at nanometersized carbides. Reducing the grain size and increasing the fraction of low energy grain boundaries should reduce the available radiation-produced point defects (due to the increased sink area of the grain boundaries), should make bubble nucleation at the boundaries less likely (by reducing the fraction of high-energy boundaries), and improve the strength and ductility under radiation by producing a higher

  5. Molecular dynamics simulations of the mechanisms controlling the propagation of bcc/fcc semi-coherent interfaces in iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou, X.; Sietsma, J.; Santofimia, M. J.

    2016-06-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been used to study the effects of different orientation relationships between fcc and bcc phases on the bcc/fcc interfacial propagation in pure iron systems at 300 K. Three semi-coherent bcc/fcc interfaces have been investigated. In all the cases, results show that growth of the bcc phase starts in the areas of low potential energy and progresses into the areas of high potential energy at the original bcc/fcc interfaces. The phase transformation in areas of low potential energy is of a martensitic nature while that in the high potential energy areas involves occasional diffusional jumps of atoms.

  6. Phase stability, ordering, and magnetism of single-phase fcc Fe-Au alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Joonhee M.; Barabash, Sergey V.; Belashchenko, Kirill D.

    2013-03-01

    Motivated by experimental evidence of L10 ordering in single-phase fcc Fe-Au nanoparticles, we study the structural thermodynamics of Fe-Au alloys. First, separate cluster expansions for fcc and bcc lattices are constructed for fully optimized ferromagnetic structures using density functional theory calculations. The optimized structures were assigned to fcc or bcc lattice by a structural filter. Although the lowest formation enthalpy at 50% Au is reached in the bcc lattice, the fcc lattice is preferred for the random alloy. Dynamical stability of specific orderings strongly depends on the magnetic configuration. To analyze the ordering tendencies of the fcc alloy, we restrict uniform lattice relaxations and separate the contributions of chemical interaction and local relaxations. By using the effective tetrahedron model (Ruban et al., Phys. Rev. B 67, 214302 (2003)) and explicit calculations for ordered and special quasi-random structures, we find that the local relaxation energies depend weakly on the magnetization. Although the L10 ordering is the ground state at 50% Au on the ideal lattice, local relaxations make it unfavorable compared to the random alloy. Moderate compression due to the size effect tends to slightly stabilize the L10 ordering.

  7. Crystallographic dependence of CO activation on cobalt catalysts: HCP versus FCC.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jin-Xun; Su, Hai-Yan; Sun, Da-Peng; Zhang, Bing-Yan; Li, Wei-Xue

    2013-11-01

    Identifying the structure sensitivity of catalysts in reactions, such as Fischer-Tropsch synthesis from CO and H2 over cobalt catalysts, is an important yet challenging issue in heterogeneous catalysis. Based on a first-principles kinetic study, we find for the first time that CO activation on hexagonal close-packed (HCP) Co not only has much higher intrinsic activity than that of face centered-cubic (FCC) Co but also prefers a different reaction route, i.e., direct dissociation with HCP Co but H-assisted dissociation on the FCC Co. The origin is identified from the formation of various denser yet favorable active sites on HCP Co not available for FCC Co, due to their distinct crystallographic structure and morphology. The great dependence of the activity on the crystallographic structure and morphology of the catalysts revealed here may open a new avenue for better, stable catalysts with maximum mass-specific reactivity. PMID:24147726

  8. Topology of the spin-polarized charge density in bcc and fcc iron.

    PubMed

    Jones, Travis E; Eberhart, Mark E; Clougherty, Dennis P

    2008-01-11

    We report the first investigation of the topology of spin-polarized charge density, specifically in bcc and fcc iron. While the total spin-density is found to possess the topology of the non-magnetic prototypical structures, the spin-polarized charge densities of bcc and high-spin fcc iron are atypical. In these cases, the two spin densities are correlated: the spin-minority electrons have directional bond paths and deep minima, while the spin-majority electrons fill these holes, reducing bond directionality. The presence of distinct spin topologies allows us to show that the two phase changes seen in fcc iron (paramagnetic to low-spin and low-spin to high-spin) are different. The former follows the Landau symmetry-breaking paradigm and proceeds without a topological transformation, while the latter involves a topological catastrophe. PMID:18232817

  9. Topology of the Spin-Polarized Charge Density in bcc and fcc Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Travis E.; Eberhart, Mark E.; Clougherty, Dennis P.

    2008-01-01

    We report the first investigation of the topology of spin-polarized charge density, specifically in bcc and fcc iron. While the total spin-density is found to possess the topology of the non-magnetic prototypical structures, the spin-polarized charge densities of bcc and high-spin fcc iron are atypical. In these cases, the two spin densities are correlated: the spin-minority electrons have directional bond paths and deep minima, while the spin-majority electrons fill these holes, reducing bond directionality. The presence of distinct spin topologies allows us to show that the two phase changes seen in fcc iron (paramagnetic to low-spin and low-spin to high-spin) are different. The former follows the Landau symmetry-breaking paradigm and proceeds without a topological transformation, while the latter involves a topological catastrophe.

  10. Kinetics of disorder-to-fcc phase transition via an intermediate bcc state

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Yongsheng; Nie Huifen; Bansil, Rama; Steinhart, Milos; Bang, Joona; Lodge, Timothy P.

    2006-06-15

    Time-resolved small-angle x-ray scattering measurements reveal that a long-lived intermediate bcc state forms when a poly(styrene-b-isoprene) diblock copolymer solution in an isoprene selective solvent is rapidly cooled from the disordered micellar fluid at high temperature to an equilibrium fcc state. The kinetics of the epitaxial growth of the [111] fcc peak from the [110] bcc peak was obtained by fitting the scattering data to a simple model of the transformation. The growth of the [111] fcc peak agrees with the Avrami model of nucleation and growth kinetics with an exponent n=1.4, as does the initial decay of the [110] bcc peak, with an exponent n=1.3. The data were also found to be in good agreement with the Cahn model of grain boundary nucleation and growth.

  11. Prediction of a metastable cubic phase for the transition metals with hcp ground state.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Coss, Romeo; Aguayo, Aaron; Murrieta, Gabriel

    2007-03-01

    The discovery of a metastable phase for a given material is interesting because corresponds to a new bonding and new properties are expected. The calculation of the total-energy along the Bain path is frequently used as a method to find tetragonal metastable states. However, a local minimum in the tetragonal distortion is not a definitive proof of a metastable state, and the elastic stability needs to be evaluated. In a previous work, using the elastic stability criteria for a cubic structure, we have shown that the transition metals with hcp ground state; Ti, Zr, and Hf have a fcc metastable phase [Aguayo, G. Murrieta, and R. de Coss, Phys. Rev. B 65, 092106 (2002)]. That result is interesting since the fcc crystal structure does not appear in the current pressure-temperature phase diagram of these metals, and support the experimental observations of fcc Ti and Zr in thin films. In the present work, we extend the elastic stability study of the fcc structure to the non-magnetic transition metals with hcp ground state; Sc, Ti, Y, Zr, Tc, Ru, Hf, Re, and Os. We find that all the metals involved in this study have a metastable fcc structure. From these results, substrates on which the fcc structure of these metals could be growth epitaxially are predicted.

  12. Orthogonalized operators for the f shell

    SciTech Connect

    Judd, B.R.; Crosswhite, H.

    1984-04-01

    Orthogonalized operators are introduced in the atomic configurations f/sup N/ in order to yield parameters that are more precisely defined and more stable than the conventional ones. Of the four Racah operators e/sub 0/, e/sub 1/, e/sub 2/, only e/sub 1/ needs adjusting. The set of two-electron scalars is made complete by the generalized Trees operators e/sub ..cap alpha../', e/sub ..beta../', and e/sub ..gamma../'. Of the three-electron scalars t/sub i/, only t/sub 2/ requires alteration. The theory is illustrated for f/sup 3/ by adding the orthogonalized operators in successive steps and comparing the fits with those obtained if the conventional operators are used.

  13. Spent fluid catalytic cracking catalyst (FCC) applications in the preparation of hydraulic binders: Pozzolanic properties study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velazquez Rodriguez, Sergio

    At the present work the replacement of Portland cement in pastes and mortars by spent fluid catalytic cracking catalyst (FCC) is studied. The study has been focused in four physicochemical characterization, hydrated lime/catalyst and cement/catalyst pastes and mortars studies, and environmental impact aspects. The FCC characterization establishes that it is a silicoaluminate, having a mainly amorphous structure, with a great specific surface, and that is necessary its mechanical activation (grinding) to obtain a pozzolanic behaviour material. The reactivity was studied by: thermogravimetry, X ray diffractometry, aqueous media electrical conductivity measurements, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, mechanical strength development evaluation and cementing effectiveness k-factor evaluation. The very high pozzolanic activity of the material has been demonstrated, besides that this reactivity has been superior to others similar products such as the metakaolin. The products formed in the hydration, pozzolanic and hydration catalysis of cement reactions have been studied, comparing the reactivity characteristics with others better known pozzolans. The nature of the reaction products between FCC and hydrated lime is similar to the ones formed by the metakaolin, being fundamentally calcium silicate hydrates and hydrated gehlenite, and their formation allow to obtain microstructures with higher mechanical strength. The possibility of preparation materials containing cement/FCC with improved mechanical strength and drying shrinkage has been demonstrated, compared to homologous materials without ground FCC. The optimal FCC dosage for the lime fixation maximization has been determined, showing a pozzolanic behaviour similar to metakaolin, nevertheless very superior to others studied pozzolans, behaviour that is improved with the aid of certain chemical activators, and with the increasing of the curing temperature. Measurements of electrical

  14. 76 FR 12733 - Shenzhen Tangreat Technology Co., Ltd., Grantee of Equipment Authorization FCC ID No. XRLTG-VIPJAMM

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-08

    ... COMMISSION Shenzhen Tangreat Technology Co., Ltd., Grantee of Equipment Authorization FCC ID No. XRLTG... hearing proceeding by directing Shenzhen Tangreat Technology Co., Ltd. (``Shenzhen''), Grantee of... Technology Co., Ltd. (``Shenzhen'') to show cause why the equipment authorization it holds under FCC ID...

  15. The Ignominious Death of FCC Docket 19142: Ending the Crusade for Children's Television.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGregor, Michael A.

    On December 22, 1983, the Federal Communications Commission formally ended its consideration of rule making for children's television programing. Opponents of government regulation view the FCC's decision as a victory for the First Amendment freedoms of speech and the press; proponents of mandatory children's programing guidelines feel that the…

  16. The FCC's AM Stereo Experiment: Seven Years in the Uncharted Broadcast Marketplace.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huff, W. A. Kelly

    To examine the success of the Federal Communications Commission's (FCC) 1982 decision not to select a standard transmission system for AM stereophonic broadcasting (instead leaving it to the marketplace), this paper documents and analyzes the first 7 years of the AM stereo marketplace. Following an explanatory introduction, the paper's first…

  17. 47 CFR 95.428 - (CB Rule 28) How do I contact the FCC?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false (CB Rule 28) How do I contact the FCC? 95.428 Section 95.428 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PERSONAL RADIO SERVICES Citizens Band (CB) Radio Service Other Things You Need to Know §...

  18. 47 CFR 95.428 - (CB Rule 28) How do I contact the FCC?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false (CB Rule 28) How do I contact the FCC? 95.428 Section 95.428 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PERSONAL RADIO SERVICES Citizens Band (CB) Radio Service Other Things You Need to Know §...

  19. 47 CFR 95.225 - (R/C Rule 25) How do I contact the FCC?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false (R/C Rule 25) How do I contact the FCC? 95.225 Section 95.225 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PERSONAL RADIO SERVICES Radio Control (R/C) Radio Service Other Things You Need to Know §...

  20. 47 CFR 95.422 - (CB Rule 22) How do I answer correspondence from the FCC?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false (CB Rule 22) How do I answer correspondence from the FCC? 95.422 Section 95.422 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PERSONAL RADIO SERVICES Citizens Band (CB) Radio Service Other...

  1. 47 CFR 95.422 - (CB Rule 22) How do I answer correspondence from the FCC?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false (CB Rule 22) How do I answer correspondence from the FCC? 95.422 Section 95.422 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PERSONAL RADIO SERVICES Citizens Band (CB) Radio Service Other...

  2. 47 CFR 95.422 - (CB Rule 22) How do I answer correspondence from the FCC?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false (CB Rule 22) How do I answer correspondence from the FCC? 95.422 Section 95.422 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PERSONAL RADIO SERVICES Citizens Band (CB) Radio Service Other...

  3. 47 CFR 95.422 - (CB Rule 22) How do I answer correspondence from the FCC?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false (CB Rule 22) How do I answer correspondence from the FCC? 95.422 Section 95.422 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PERSONAL RADIO SERVICES Citizens Band (CB) Radio Service Other...

  4. 47 CFR 95.225 - (R/C Rule 25) How do I contact the FCC?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false (R/C Rule 25) How do I contact the FCC? 95.225 Section 95.225 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PERSONAL RADIO SERVICES Radio Control (R/C) Radio Service Other Things You Need to Know §...

  5. 47 CFR 95.225 - (R/C Rule 25) How do I contact the FCC?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false (R/C Rule 25) How do I contact the FCC? 95.225 Section 95.225 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PERSONAL RADIO SERVICES Radio Control (R/C) Radio Service Other Things You Need to Know §...

  6. 47 CFR 95.428 - (CB Rule 28) How do I contact the FCC?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false (CB Rule 28) How do I contact the FCC? 95.428 Section 95.428 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PERSONAL RADIO SERVICES Citizens Band (CB) Radio Service Other Things You Need to Know §...

  7. 47 CFR 95.225 - (R/C Rule 25) How do I contact the FCC?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false (R/C Rule 25) How do I contact the FCC? 95.225 Section 95.225 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PERSONAL RADIO SERVICES Radio Control (R/C) Radio Service Other Things You Need to Know §...

  8. 47 CFR 95.428 - (CB Rule 28) How do I contact the FCC?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false (CB Rule 28) How do I contact the FCC? 95.428 Section 95.428 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PERSONAL RADIO SERVICES Citizens Band (CB) Radio Service Other Things You Need to Know §...

  9. 47 CFR 95.422 - (CB Rule 22) How do I answer correspondence from the FCC?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false (CB Rule 22) How do I answer correspondence from the FCC? 95.422 Section 95.422 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PERSONAL RADIO SERVICES Citizens Band (CB) Radio Service Other...

  10. 47 CFR 95.225 - (R/C Rule 25) How do I contact the FCC?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false (R/C Rule 25) How do I contact the FCC? 95.225 Section 95.225 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PERSONAL RADIO SERVICES Radio Control (R/C) Radio Service Other Things You Need to Know §...

  11. 47 CFR 95.428 - (CB Rule 28) How do I contact the FCC?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false (CB Rule 28) How do I contact the FCC? 95.428 Section 95.428 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PERSONAL RADIO SERVICES Citizens Band (CB) Radio Service Other Things You Need to Know §...

  12. Exchange coupled L10-FePt/fcc-FePt nanomagnets: Synthesis, characterization and magnetic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Sachchidanand; Gajbhiye, Namdeo S.

    2016-03-01

    We report synthesis, characterization and magnetic properties of exchange-coupled L10-FePt/fcc-FePt nanomagnets. Structural and morphological characterization of exchange-coupled L10-FePt/fcc-FePt was carried out by powder X-ray diffraction, Mössbauer spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Rietveld refinement of powder X-ray diffraction pattern has been used to quantify L10-FePt and fcc-FePt phases present in samples. Room temperature Mössbauer spectroscopy showed sextets of both L10-FePt and fcc-FePt phases with their respective hyperfine interaction parameters. Transmission electron microscopic (TEM and HRTEM) images confirmed nanocrystalline nature of exchange-coupled nanomagnets with particle size ranges from 15 nm to 50 nm after annealing for different time at 700 °C. Room temperature magnetic studies showed ferromagnetic nature of nanomagnets and maximum energy product (BH)max~10.92 MGOe was obtained for sample containing 89.0% volume fraction of L10-FePt phase.

  13. Nitrogen Chemistry and Coke Transformation of FCC Coked Catalyst during the Regeneration Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Junjun; Guan, Jianyu; Guo, Dawei; Zhang, Jiushun; France, Liam John; Wang, Lefu; Li, Xuehui

    2016-06-01

    Regeneration of the coked catalyst is an important process of fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) in petroleum refining, however, this process will emit environmentally harmful gases such as nitrogen and carbon oxides. Transformation of N and C containing compounds in industrial FCC coke under thermal decomposition was investigated via TPD and TPO to examine the evolved gaseous species and TGA, NMR and XPS to analyse the residual coke fraction. Two distinct regions of gas evolution are observed during TPD for the first time, and they arise from decomposition of aliphatic carbons and aromatic carbons. Three types of N species, pyrrolic N, pyridinic N and quaternary N are identified in the FCC coke, the former one is unstable and tends to be decomposed into pyridinic and quaternary N. Mechanisms of NO, CO and CO2 evolution during TPD are proposed and lattice oxygen is suggested to be an important oxygen resource. Regeneration process indicates that coke-C tends to preferentially oxidise compared with coke-N. Hence, new technology for promoting nitrogen-containing compounds conversion will benefit the in-situ reduction of NO by CO during FCC regeneration.

  14. 76 FR 69738 - Revised 2011 Annual Telecommunications Reporting Worksheet (FCC Form 499-A) and Accompanying...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-09

    ...-interconnected VoIP filers subject to TRS contribution obligations must submit the FCC Form 499-A to register... Relay Services Fund (TRS Fund). The revisions to the Form and accompanying instructions include the... for non-interconnected VoIP service providers with interstate end-user revenues subject to TRS...

  15. 47 CFR 11.21 - State and Local Area plans and FCC Mapbook.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false State and Local Area plans and FCC Mapbook. 11.21 Section 11.21 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL EMERGENCY ALERT SYSTEM... emergency alert system is capable of initiating EAS messages formatted in the Common Alerting Protocol...

  16. 47 CFR 11.21 - State and Local Area plans and FCC Mapbook.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false State and Local Area plans and FCC Mapbook. 11.21 Section 11.21 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL EMERGENCY ALERT SYSTEM... emergency alert system is capable of initiating EAS messages formatted in the Common Alerting Protocol...

  17. 47 CFR 11.21 - State and Local Area plans and FCC Mapbook.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false State and Local Area plans and FCC Mapbook. 11.21 Section 11.21 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL EMERGENCY ALERT SYSTEM... emergency alert system is capable of initiating EAS messages formatted in the Common Alerting Protocol...

  18. Two-mode Ginzburg-Landau theory of crystalline anisotropy for fcc-liquid interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Kuo-An; Lin, Shang-Chun; Karma, Alain

    2016-02-01

    We develop a Ginzburg-Landau (GL) theory for fcc crystal-melt systems at equilibrium by employing two sets of order parameters that correspond to amplitudes of density waves of principal reciprocal lattice vectors and amplitudes of density waves of a second set of reciprocal lattice vectors. The choice of the second set of reciprocal lattice vectors is constrained by the condition that this set must form closed triangles with the principal reciprocal lattice vectors in reciprocal space to make the fcc-liquid transition first order. The capillary anisotropy of fcc-liquid interfaces is investigated by GL theory with amplitudes of <111 > and <200 > density waves. Furthermore, we explore the dependence of the anisotropy of the excess free energy of the solid-liquid interface on density waves of higher-order reciprocal lattice vectors such as <311 > by extending the two-mode GL theory with an additional mode. The anisotropy calculated using GL theory with input parameters from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations for fcc Ni is compared to that measured in MD simulations.

  19. 75 FR 34450 - FCC to Hold Open Commission Meeting Thursday, June 17, 2010

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-17

    ... COMMISSION FCC to Hold Open Commission Meeting Thursday, June 17, 2010 DATES: June 10, 2010. The Federal Communications Commission will hold an Open Meeting on the subject listed below on Thursday, June 17, 2010, which... consideration at the open meeting on June 17. BUREAU SUBJECT OFFICE OF THE TITLE: Framework GENERAL COUNSEL....

  20. Nitrogen Chemistry and Coke Transformation of FCC Coked Catalyst during the Regeneration Process.

    PubMed

    Shi, Junjun; Guan, Jianyu; Guo, Dawei; Zhang, Jiushun; France, Liam John; Wang, Lefu; Li, Xuehui

    2016-01-01

    Regeneration of the coked catalyst is an important process of fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) in petroleum refining, however, this process will emit environmentally harmful gases such as nitrogen and carbon oxides. Transformation of N and C containing compounds in industrial FCC coke under thermal decomposition was investigated via TPD and TPO to examine the evolved gaseous species and TGA, NMR and XPS to analyse the residual coke fraction. Two distinct regions of gas evolution are observed during TPD for the first time, and they arise from decomposition of aliphatic carbons and aromatic carbons. Three types of N species, pyrrolic N, pyridinic N and quaternary N are identified in the FCC coke, the former one is unstable and tends to be decomposed into pyridinic and quaternary N. Mechanisms of NO, CO and CO2 evolution during TPD are proposed and lattice oxygen is suggested to be an important oxygen resource. Regeneration process indicates that coke-C tends to preferentially oxidise compared with coke-N. Hence, new technology for promoting nitrogen-containing compounds conversion will benefit the in-situ reduction of NO by CO during FCC regeneration. PMID:27270486

  1. Government Ownership Restrictions and Efficiency: The Case of the FCC's Dupoply Rule.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Keith B.; Woodbury, John R.

    Recently the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) has been considering modifications to its regulations governing local and national media ownership and has indicated more interest in the efficiency consequences of the regulations, including those that might arise from common ownership of multiple radio stations. This paper seeks to determine…

  2. Nitrogen Chemistry and Coke Transformation of FCC Coked Catalyst during the Regeneration Process

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Junjun; Guan, Jianyu; Guo, Dawei; Zhang, Jiushun; France, Liam John; Wang, Lefu; Li, Xuehui

    2016-01-01

    Regeneration of the coked catalyst is an important process of fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) in petroleum refining, however, this process will emit environmentally harmful gases such as nitrogen and carbon oxides. Transformation of N and C containing compounds in industrial FCC coke under thermal decomposition was investigated via TPD and TPO to examine the evolved gaseous species and TGA, NMR and XPS to analyse the residual coke fraction. Two distinct regions of gas evolution are observed during TPD for the first time, and they arise from decomposition of aliphatic carbons and aromatic carbons. Three types of N species, pyrrolic N, pyridinic N and quaternary N are identified in the FCC coke, the former one is unstable and tends to be decomposed into pyridinic and quaternary N. Mechanisms of NO, CO and CO2 evolution during TPD are proposed and lattice oxygen is suggested to be an important oxygen resource. Regeneration process indicates that coke-C tends to preferentially oxidise compared with coke-N. Hence, new technology for promoting nitrogen-containing compounds conversion will benefit the in-situ reduction of NO by CO during FCC regeneration. PMID:27270486

  3. Letter of Complaint to the FCC Against the Columbia Broadcasting System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council on Children, Media, and Merchandising, Washington, DC.

    The Council on Children, Media, and Merchandising, in a letter to the Federal Communication Commission (FCC), issued a formal complaint against the Columbia Broadcasting System (CBS). The Council charges that CBS has failed to meet its public interest obligations, as well as its obligations under the fairness doctrine, with respect to advertising…

  4. Phonons transmission by thin films sandwiched between two similar fcc structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belkacemi, Ghania; Bourahla, Boualem

    2015-09-01

    An analytical and numerical formalism are developed to study the influence of the sandwiched atomic films on the vibration properties and phonon transmission modes in fcc waveguides. The model system consists of two identical semi-infinite fcc leads joined by ultrathin atomic films in between. The matching technique is applied to calculate the local Green's functions for the irreducible set of sites that constitute the inhomogeneous domain. Numerical results are presented for the reflection/transmission, total phonon transmittance and localized vibration states in considered fcc lattices. The results show that vibrational properties of the sandwich materials are strongly dependent on the scattering frequency, the thickness of the insured films, incidence angles and elastic boundary conditions. We note that some of the fluctuations, observed in the vibration spectra, are related to Fano resonances, they are due to the coherent coupling between travelling phonons and the localized vibration modes in the neighborhood of the nanojunction domains. The number of localized modes which interact with the propagating modes of the continuum is proportional to the number of the sandwiched Slabs in the interfacial zone. The results give also the effect of the sandwiched ultrathin films on elastic waves propagation by atomic interfaces in fcc lattices.

  5. The influence of defects on magnetic properties of fcc-Pu

    SciTech Connect

    Shorikov, A. O.; Anisimov, V. I.; Korotin, M. A.; Dremov, V. V. Sapozhnikov, Ph. A.

    2013-10-15

    The influence of vacancies and interstitial atoms on magnetism in Pu is considered in the framework of the density functional theory. The crystal structure relaxation arising due to various types of defects is calculated using the molecular dynamics method with a modified embedded atom model. The local density approximation with explicit inclusion of Coulomb and spin-orbit interactions is applied in matrix invariant form to describe correlation effects in Pu with these types of defects. The calculations show that both vacancies and interstitials give rise to local moments in the f-shell of Pu in good agreement with experimental data for aged Pu. Magnetism appears due to the destruction of a delicate balance between spin-orbit and exchange interactions.

  6. A calculation of the diffusion energies for adatoms on surfaces of F.C.C. metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halicioglu, T.; Pound, G. M.

    1979-01-01

    The activation energies for diffusion were determined for gold, platinum and iridium adatoms on plane and plane PT surfaces and were found to be in good agreement with the measurements reported by Bassett and Webber. The Lennard-Jones pair potentials were used to model the interatomic forces, and relaxation of the substrate atoms in near proximity to the adatom was considered in detail. The present calculations clarify the mechanism of the observed two-dimensional diffusion of platinum and iridium atoms on a plane PT surface. The results are compared with those obtained using Morse potential functions and different relaxation techniques.

  7. Ultra short-time dynamics of radiation damage in fcc metals

    SciTech Connect

    Hayoun, Marc; Coddens, Gerrit; Petite, Guillaume

    2009-11-01

    We have performed molecular-dynamics simulations of displacement cascades in copper in order to investigate the nonequilibrium ultra-short-time damage and to evaluate the possibility of observing it experimentally in situ (e.g., in a pump/probe laser experiment). The atomic trajectories have been analyzed by calculating their x-ray diffraction patterns as a function of time. The results show that an integrated x-ray intensity can indeed be used to evidence the irradiation effects. Even though the number of Frenkel defects is large, the main effect of the irradiation showing up in the x-ray intensities at ultrashort times is an important alteration of the lattice vibrations. On the basis of these results, a pump/probe setup is proposed.

  8. Plastic flow in FCC metals induced by single-ion impacts.

    SciTech Connect

    Birtcher, R. C.; Donnelly, S. E.

    1997-10-30

    Irradiation of Au and Pb foils with Xe ions at temperatures between 30 and 450 K has been monitored using in-situ transmission electron microscopy. Single ion impacts give rise to surface craters on the irradiated surface with sizes as large as 12 nm. Approximately 2--5% of impinging ions produce craters on Au while only about 0.6% produce craters on Pb. Larger craters on Au frequently have expelled material associated with them. Temporal details of crater formation and annihilation has been recorded on video with a time-resolution of 33 milliseconds. Craters annihilate in discrete steps due to subsequent ion impacts or anneal in a continuous manner due to surface diffusion. Craters production (those persisting for one or more video-frames) as a function of temperature indicates that the surface diffusion process responsible for thermal annealing of craters has an activation energy of 0.76 eV in Au. Crater creation results from plastic flow associated with near surface cascades. Crater annihilation in discrete steps results from plastic flow induced by subsequent ion impacts, including those that do not themselves produce a crater.

  9. Plastic flow in fcc metals induced by single-ion impacts

    SciTech Connect

    Birtcher, R.C.; Donnelly, S.E.

    1997-09-01

    Irradiation of Au and Pb foils with Xe ions at temperatures between 30 and 450 K has been monitored using in-situ transmission electron microscopy. Single ion impacts give rise to surface craters on the irradiated surface with sizes as large as 12 nm. Approximately 2--5% of impinging ions produce craters on Au while only about 0.6% produce craters on Pb. Larger craters on Au frequently have expelled material associated with them. Temporal details of crater formation and annihilation has been recorded on video with a time resolution of 33 milliseconds. Craters annihilate in discrete steps due to subsequent ion impacts or anneal in a continuous manner due to surface diffusion. Craters production (those persisting for one or more video frames) as a function of temperature indicates that the surface diffusion process responsible for thermal annealing of craters has an activation energy of 0.76 eV in Au. Crater creation results from plastic flow associated with near surface cascades. Crater annihilation in discrete steps results from plastic flow induced by subsequent ion impacts, including those that do not themselves produce a crater.

  10. Unusual cluster shapes and directional bonding of an fcc metal: Pt/Pt(111).

    PubMed

    Schmid, Michael; Garhofer, Andreas; Redinger, Josef; Wimmer, Florian; Scheiber, Philipp; Varga, Peter

    2011-07-01

    Small clusters of Pt adatoms grown on Pt(111) exhibit a preference for the formation of linear chains, which cannot be explained by simple diffusion-limited aggregation. Density functional theory calculations show that short chains are energetically favorable to more compact configurations due to strong directional bonding by d(z)(2)-like orbitals, explaining the stability of the chains. The formation of the chains is governed by substrate distortions, leading to funneling towards the chain ends. PMID:21797553

  11. The Hexagonal Close-Packed (HCP) ⇆ Face-Centered Cubic (FCC) Transition in Co-Re-Based Experimental Alloys Investigated by Neutron Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherji, Debashis; Strunz, Pavel; Piegert, Sebastian; Gilles, Ralph; Hofmann, Michael; Hölzel, Markus; Rösler, Joachim

    2012-06-01

    Co-Re-based alloys have been developed to supplement the Ni-base superalloys used in gas turbine applications at high temperatures (1473 K [1200 °C] bare metal temperature). Unlike other commercial Co-based alloys, the Co matrix in the Co-Re alloys has a stable hexagonal close-packed (hcp) structure at room temperature. In situ neutron diffraction measurements on experimental Co-Re alloys hardened by carbide precipitates showed that the matrix undergoes an hcp ⇆ face-centered cubic (fcc) allotropic transformation after heating to high temperatures. Furthermore, it was found that this transformation has a large hysteresis (~100 K). Thermodynamic calculations were undertaken to study the high-temperature phase stability and transformations in the complex multicomponent, multiphase Co-Re-Cr-C system with or without the addition of Ta. The results show that the minor phases (Cr23C6-type carbides and the Cr2Re3-type σ phase) play an important role in the hcp ⇆ fcc hysteresis by influencing the partitioning of Cr and Re between the matrix and the other phases.

  12. In Situ Determination of BCC-, FCC- and HPC-Iron Textures at Simultaneous High- Pressure and -Temperature by Means of the Resistive Heated Radial Diffraction Diamond Anvil Cell (RH-RD-DAC): Implications for the iron core.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liermann, H.; Merkel, S.; Miyagi, L.; Wenk, H.; Shen, G.; Cynn, H.; Evans, W. J.

    2008-12-01

    Radial diffraction in the diamond anvil cell (DAC) has long been used to determine the stress state of materials under non-hydrostatic compression. This technique is also a major tool to investigate textures and infer deformation mechanisms in the earth mantle and core. However, most of these experiments have been conducted at ambient temperatures and therefore the results of these measurements may be difficult to extrapolate to the deep Earth. Here, we present texture data collected at HPCAT sector 16 BMD of the Advanced Photon Source during the plastic deformation of BCC-, FCC- and HPC-iron at simultaneous high-pressure and temperature in the new Resistive Heated Radial Diffraction Diamond Anvil Cell (RH-RD-DAC). Initial results from Rietveld refinements in MAUD indicate that BCC- iron develops a mixed {100} and {111} texture that remains active during heating. Latter is compatible with previous observations on BCC-iron and interpreted as slip along {110}<111>. Texture obtained after formation of FCC-iron at simultaneous high- pressure and temperatures show a pronounced maximum at {110} with minima at {100} and {111}. This texture is typical for FCC metals in compression with slip on {111}<110>. Processing of the HCP-iron textures at high-pressure and -temperature are under way. We will discuss the implications that the experimental results have for the deformation mechanisms of iron at pressure temperature conditions of the inner core.

  13. 3D crack tip fields for FCC single crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Cuitino, A.M.; Ortiz, M.

    1995-12-31

    Cracks in single crystals are of concern in a number of structural and non-structural applications, ranging form single-crystal turbine blades and rotors to metal interconnect lines in microcircuits. In this paper we present 3D numerical simulations of the crack-tip fields of a Cu single crystal, including stress, strain and slip activity patterns. The orientation of the crack tip is along the crystallographic orientation (101), while the crack plane is (010). A material model based on dislocation mechanics is used in these simulations. This model correctly predicts the observed behavior of Cu, including the basic hardening characteristics of single crystals, orientation dependence and stage I-II-III structure of the stress-strain curves, the observed levels of latent hardening and their variation with orientation and deformation in the primary system and slip activities and dislocation densities. We use the FEM within the context of finite deformation plasticity. In the figure below, we show the finite element mesh composed by 12-noded tetrahedrons with 6-noded triangular faces. The model simulates half of a beam, which is subjected to a concentrated load at 1/8 of total length from the support. Detailed results of the stress, deformation and slip activity are presented at different radii from crack tip and at different depths from the surface. In general, the results show a strong difference in the slip activity pattern form the interior to the exterior, while smaller differences are encountered in the stress and strain fields.

  14. Size dependence and phase transition during melting of fcc-Fe nanoparticles: A molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Tong; Meng, Wenjian; Wu, Yongquan; Lu, Xionggang

    2013-07-01

    Continuous melting and cooling of isolated fcc-Fe nanoparticles with 59-9577 atoms are studied by Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulation with Sutton-Chen potential. An energy minimization process was employed to obtain the stable solid structure for simulation of melting. The energy-minimized nanoparticles show lower potential energy and radius compared with the counterparts without energy minimizing. The size dependence of melting point shows perfect linear variation with N-1/3 for particles above a limit of 113 atoms. The bulk melting temperature of 1833.3 K, which is close to the experimental data (1811 K for bcc and 1800.8 K for fcc), has been predicted by a linear relationship. Two different inner structures, including five-fold twinning and lamellar structures, have been found to be the initial stable configurations prior to melting, and both surface premelting and internal defects were verified as the origins for melting behavior.

  15. Atomic Mobilities and Interdiffusivities for fcc Ni-Cr-Nb Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Gaochi; Liu, Yajun; Kang, Zhitao

    2016-06-01

    The atomic mobilities and diffusion characteristics for fcc Ni-Cr-Nb alloys are explored by diffusion couples annealed at 1273 K (1000 °C) for 200 hours. The interdiffusion coefficients are extracted from intersection points of two diffusion paths, after which the atomic mobilities of Ni, Cr, and Nb in fcc Ni-Cr-Nb alloys are inversely obtained within the CALPHAD framework with the aid of related thermodynamic descriptions. In order to verify the quality of obtained kinetic parameters so that an accurate Ni-based atomic mobility database can be established, the composition profiles in diffusion couples and the diffusion paths superimposed upon Gibbs triangle are explored, where the experimentally measured and calculated values show good agreement.

  16. FCC reactor product-catalyst separation: Ten years of commercial experience with closed cyclones

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.B.; Johnson, T.E.; Santner, C.R.; Avidan, A.A.; Johnson, D.L.

    1995-09-01

    FCC reactor closed cyclones were first commercialized ten years ago and have now been installed in over 22 FCC units worldwide. Cumulative commercial experience has shown significant yield benefits, in some cases higher than first estimated, and excellent reliability. By nearly eliminating post-riser cracking, they reduce dry gas make and produce higher yields of desirable liquid products. Trouble-free operation with closed cyclones is attributed to proper design, instrumentation, and operating procedures. The Mobil-Kellogg Closed Cyclone technology is the only design offered for license which uses the positive-pressure riser cyclone system which has proven to be least sensitive to upsets. This paper traces the development and commercialization of closed cyclones, discusses differences between competing closed cyclone designs, and documents the benefits which have been observed for Mobil-Kellogg Closed Cyclones.

  17. The impact of the Family Communication Coordinator (FCC) Protocol on the role stress of hospital chaplains.

    PubMed

    Dodd-McCue, Diane; Tartaglia, Alexander

    2005-01-01

    The Family Communication Coordinator (FCC) Protocol was implemented to provide early family intervention and to facilitate effective communications during potential organ donation cases. Previous studies found the Protocol associated with improved donor outcome measures and with reduced role stress for ICU nurses caring for potential donors. The present study examines the impact of the Protocol on the perceived role stress of hospital chaplains serving as FCCs. All hospital chaplains serving as FCCs at an academic teaching hospital were surveyed. Their perceptions of job dimensions, role stress, job satisfaction, and commitment were measured; interviews and secondary data supplemented the surveys. The findings demonstrate that the FCC Protocol is associated with improved role stress, specifically role ambiguity and role conflict, among hospital chaplains serving as FCCs. Additionally, the findings suggest that satisfaction with the Protocol may be associated with experience with the Protocol. PMID:16392645

  18. Effect of uniaxial tensile stress on the isomer shift of 57Fe in fcc stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratner, E.; Ron, M.

    1982-05-01

    The electron wave-function response to uniaxial tensile stress in fcc steels (SS310 and SS316) was investigated through the isomer shift of the Mössbauer effect. Stresses up to 12 kbar (the ultimate tensile stress is approximately 14 kbar) were applied at room temperature. The isomer shift changes linearly in these circumstances. It is concluded that, as in the case of hydrostatic pressure, the paramount factor here is the volume strain of the wave functions of 4S electrons.

  19. fcc-hcp phase transformation in Co nanoparticles induced by swift heavy-ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprouster, D. J.; Giulian, R.; Schnohr, C. S.; Araujo, L. L.; Kluth, P.; Byrne, A. P.; Foran, G. J.; Johannessen, B.; Ridgway, M. C.

    2009-09-01

    We demonstrate a face-centered cubic (fcc) to hexagonally close-packed (hcp) phase transformation in spherical Co nanoparticles achieved via swift heavy-ion irradiation. Co nanoparticles of mean diameter 13.2 nm and fcc phase were first formed in amorphous SiO2 by ion implantation and thermal annealing and then irradiated at room temperature with 9-185 MeV Au ions. The crystallographic phase was identified with x-ray absorption spectroscopy and electron diffraction and quantified, as functions of the irradiation energy and fluence, with the former. The transformation was complete at low fluence prior to any change in nanoparticle shape or size and was governed by electronic stopping. A direct-impact mechanism was identified with the transformation interaction cross-section correlated with that of a molten ion track in amorphous SiO2 . We suggest the shear stress resulting from the rapid thermal expansion about an ion track in amorphous SiO2 was sufficient to initiate the fcc-to-hcp phase transformation in the Co nanoparticles.

  20. Solidification and fcc- to metastable hcp- phase transition in krypton under modulating dynamic pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jing-Yin; Yoo, Choong-Shik; Kim, Minseob; Liermann, Hanns-Peter; Cynn, Hyunchae; Jenei, Zsolt; Evans, William

    2014-03-01

    We describe high-pressure kinetic studies of the solidification, melting and fcc-hcp transitions of Krypton under dynamic loading conditions, using a dynamic-diamond anvil cell (d-DAC) coupled with time-resolved x-ray diffraction. The time-resolved diffraction patterns and dynamic pressure responses show compression-rate dependencies associated with both the decay and growth time constants of the liquid-solid and solid-liquid transitions. According to the Avrami equation, both the solidified and melting processes are spontaneous nucleation and a rod-like (1-D) growth. Furthermore, under dynamic loading conditions, Kr-hcp forms from fcc close to the melting line. The nucleation time of fcc and hcp are very fast, with little dependence of compression rates or shorter than the time resolutions. The threshold pressure for the formation of Kr-hcp is ~ 0.8 GPa at the dynamic loadings of 0.004-13 GPa/s. This work was carried out at DESY. This work was performed under the auspices of DOE by LLNL under contracts(W-7405-Eng-48 and DE-AC52-07NA27344) and funded by the LDRD(11-ERD-046). The work at WSU was funded by NSF-DMR(1203834), DTRA(HDTRA1-12-01-0020).

  1. Meteorites and thermodynamic equilibrium in f.c.c. iron-nickel alloys /25-50% Ni/

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albertsen, J. F.; Knudsen, J. M.; Roy-Poulsen, N. O.; Vistisen, L.

    Mossbauer spectroscopy and X-ray investigations show that taenite (fcc iron-nickel alloy) in meteorites generally has decomposed into an ordered phase FeNi with the L10 structure and a disordered fcc iron-nickel alloy containing less than 25% Ni. The two phases have the same bravais lattice, i.e., they form a pseudo monocrystal. The decomposition is discussed in terms of Fe-Ni phase diagram.

  2. Mixed valent metals.

    PubMed

    Riseborough, P S; Lawrence, J M

    2016-08-01

    We review the theory of mixed-valent metals and make comparison with experiments. A single-impurity description of the mixed-valent state is discussed alongside the description of the nearly-integer valent or Kondo limit. The degeneracy N of the f-shell plays an important role in the description of the low-temperature Fermi-liquid state. In particular, for large N, there is a rapid cross-over between the mixed-valent and the Kondo limit when the number of f electrons is changed. We discuss the limitations on the application of the single-impurity description to concentrated compounds such as those caused by the saturation of the Kondo effect and those due to the presence of magnetic interactions between the impurities. This discussion is followed by a description of a periodic lattice of mixed-valent ions, including the role of the degeneracy N. The article concludes with a comparison of theory and experiment. Topics covered include the single-impurity Anderson model, Luttinger's theorem, the Friedel sum rule, the Schrieffer-Wolff transformation, the single-impurity Kondo model, Kondo screening, the Wilson ratio, local Fermi-liquids, Fermi-liquid sum rules, the Noziéres exhaustion principle, Doniach's diagram, the Anderson lattice model, the Slave-Boson method, etc. PMID:27376888

  3. Mixed valent metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riseborough, P. S.; Lawrence, J. M.

    2016-08-01

    We review the theory of mixed-valent metals and make comparison with experiments. A single-impurity description of the mixed-valent state is discussed alongside the description of the nearly-integer valent or Kondo limit. The degeneracy N of the f-shell plays an important role in the description of the low-temperature Fermi-liquid state. In particular, for large N, there is a rapid cross-over between the mixed-valent and the Kondo limit when the number of f electrons is changed. We discuss the limitations on the application of the single-impurity description to concentrated compounds such as those caused by the saturation of the Kondo effect and those due to the presence of magnetic interactions between the impurities. This discussion is followed by a description of a periodic lattice of mixed-valent ions, including the role of the degeneracy N. The article concludes with a comparison of theory and experiment. Topics covered include the single-impurity Anderson model, Luttinger’s theorem, the Friedel sum rule, the Schrieffer–Wolff transformation, the single-impurity Kondo model, Kondo screening, the Wilson ratio, local Fermi-liquids, Fermi-liquid sum rules, the Noziéres exhaustion principle, Doniach’s diagram, the Anderson lattice model, the Slave-Boson method, etc.

  4. Atom-atom interactions in continuous metallic nanofilms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirinyan, A. S.; Bilogorodskyy, Yu. S.

    2012-09-01

    Physical reasons of the existence of the nanosystem-size dependence of the potential energy of the neighboring atoms are considered, and a thermodynamic validation of this dependence is given. Solid nanofilms of monoatomic metallic systems having an fcc structure are simulated by the molecular-statics method with the Morse and Sutton-Chen potentials.

  5. The t-matrix resistivity of liquid rare earth metals using pseudopotential

    SciTech Connect

    Bhatia, Kamaldeep G.; Bhatt, N. K.; Vyas, P. R.; Gohel, V. B.

    2015-06-24

    Present theoretical study of liquid metal resistivity of some trivalent (La,Ce,Gd) and divalent (Eu,Yb) rare earth metals using pseudopotential has been carried out employing Ziman’s weak scattering and transition matrix (t-matrix) approaches. Our computed results of liquid metal resistivity using t-matrix approach are better than resistivity computed using Ziman’s approach and are also in excellent agreement with experimental results and other theoretical findings. The present study confirms that for f-shell metals pseudopotential must be determined uniquely and t-matrix approach is more physical in comparison with Ziman’s nearly free electron approach. The present pseudopotential accounts s-p-d hybridization properly. Such success encourages us to study remaining liquid state properties of these metals.

  6. Microstructure and mechanical properties of bulk highly faulted fcc/hcp nanostructured cobalt microstructures

    SciTech Connect

    Barry, Aliou Hamady; Dirras, Guy; Schoenstein, Frederic; Tétard, Florent; Jouini, Noureddine

    2014-05-01

    Nanostructured cobalt powders with an average particle size of 50 nm were synthesized using a polyol method and subsequently consolidated by spark plasma sintering (SPS). SPS experiments performed at 650 °C with sintering times ranging from 5 to 45 min under a pressure of 100 MPa, yielded to dense bulk nanostructured cobalt (relative density greater than 97%). X-ray diffraction patterns of the as-prepared powders showed only a face centered cubic (fcc) crystalline phase, whereas the consolidated samples exhibited a mixture of both fcc and hexagonal close packed (hcp) phases. Transmission electron microscopy observations revealed a lamellar substructure with a high density of nanotwins and stacking faults in every grain of the sintered samples. Room temperature compression tests, carried out at a strain rate of 10{sup −3} s{sup −1}, yielded to highest strain to fracture values of up to 5% for sample of holding time of 15 min, which exhibited a yield strength of 1440 MPa, an ultimate strength as high as 1740 MPa and a Young's modulus of 205 GPa. The modulus of elasticity obtained from the nanoindentation tests, ranges from 181 to 218 GPa. The lowest modulus value of 181 GPa was obtained for the sample with the highest sintering time (45 min), which could be related to mass density loss as a consequence of trapped gases releasing. - Highlights: • Co nanopowder (50 nm) was prepared by reduction in polyol medium. • SPS was used to process bulk nanostructured Co specimens. • Microstructures were made of intricate fcc/hcp, along with nanotwins and SFs. • High strengths and moderate compressive ductility were obtained. • Deformation mechanisms related to complex interplay of different length scales.

  7. FCC – An automated rule-based processing tool for life science data

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Data processing in the bioinformatics field often involves the handling of diverse software programs in one workflow. The field is lacking a set of standards for file formats so that files have to be processed in different ways in order to make them compatible to different analysis programs. The problem is that mass spectrometry vendors at most provide only closed-source Windows libraries to programmatically access their proprietary binary formats. This prohibits the creation of an efficient and unified tool that fits all processing needs of the users. Therefore, researchers are spending a significant amount of time using GUI-based conversion and processing programs. Besides the time needed for manual usage, such programs also can show long running times for processing, because most of them make use of only a single CPU. In particular, algorithms to enhance data quality, e.g. peak picking or deconvolution of spectra, add waiting time for the users. Results To automate these processing tasks and let them run continuously without user interaction, we developed the FGCZ Converter Control (FCC) at the Functional Genomics Center Zurich (FGCZ) core facility. The FCC is a rule-based system for automated file processing that reduces the operation of diverse programs to a single configuration task. Using filtering rules for raw data files, the parameters for all tasks can be custom-tailored to the needs of every single researcher and processing can run automatically and efficiently on any number of servers in parallel using all available CPU resources. Conclusions FCC has been used intensively at FGCZ for processing more than hundred thousand mass spectrometry raw files so far. Since we know that many other research facilities have similar problems, we would like to report on our tool and the accompanying ideas for an efficient set-up for potential reuse. PMID:23311610

  8. Proceedings, High-Precision $\\alpha_s$ Measurements from LHC to FCC-ee

    SciTech Connect

    d'Enterria, David; Skands, Peter Z.

    2015-01-01

    This document provides a writeup of all contributions to the workshop on "High precision measurements of $\\alpha_s$: From LHC to FCC-ee" held at CERN, Oct. 12--13, 2015. The workshop explored in depth the latest developments on the determination of the QCD coupling $\\alpha_s$ from 15 methods where high precision measurements are (or will be) available. Those include low-energy observables: (i) lattice QCD, (ii) pion decay factor, (iii) quarkonia and (iv) $\\tau$ decays, (v) soft parton-to-hadron fragmentation functions, as well as high-energy observables: (vi) global fits of parton distribution functions, (vii) hard parton-to-hadron fragmentation functions, (viii) jets in $e^\\pm$p DIS and $\\gamma$-p photoproduction, (ix) photon structure function in $\\gamma$-$\\gamma$, (x) event shapes and (xi) jet cross sections in $e^+e^-$ collisions, (xii) W boson and (xiii) Z boson decays, and (xiv) jets and (xv) top-quark cross sections in proton-(anti)proton collisions. The current status of the theoretical and experimental uncertainties associated to each extraction method, the improvements expected from LHC data in the coming years, and future perspectives achievable in $e^+e^-$ collisions at the Future Circular Collider (FCC-ee) with $\\cal{O}$(1--100 ab$^{-1}$) integrated luminosities yielding 10$^{12}$ Z bosons and jets, and 10$^{8}$ W bosons and $\\tau$ leptons, are thoroughly reviewed. The current uncertainty of the (preliminary) 2015 strong coupling world-average value, $\\alpha_s(m_Z)$ = 0.1177 $\\pm$ 0.0013, is about 1\\%. Some participants believed this may be reduced by a factor of three in the near future by including novel high-precision observables, although this opinion was not universally shared. At the FCC-ee facility, a factor of ten reduction in the $\\alpha_s$ uncertainty should be possible, mostly thanks to the huge Z and W data samples available.

  9. Elastic compliances and stiffnesses of the fcc Lennard-Jones solid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quesnel, D. J.; Rimai, D. S.; Demejo, L. P.

    1993-09-01

    The isothermal elastic compliances, stiffnesses, and bulk moduli of a Lennard-Jones solid organized into an fcc crystal structure (256 atoms in 43 unit cells) have been calculated as a function of testing temperature (expressed as the mean kinetic energy per atom). Tests conducted in pure shear were used to determine S44 and C44=G100, where 100 refers to crystallographic directions. Tests imposing axial elongation with fixed lateral dimensions established C11 and C12. Axial deformation with zero lateral pressure (a tension test) was used to determine S11, S12, E100 and ν100. This provided an independent set of results for comparison with the dilatational stiffnesses C11 and C12. The bulk modulus K was obtained by independent triaxial tension testing. The stiffnesses, compliances, and moduli were determined by regression analysis and digital filtering applied to combinations of the stress-tensor and strain-tensor data stored at each iteration during the constant-rate deformation experiments. While the cubic fcc Lennard-Jones solid expectedly obeys the Cauchy relations for central-force potentials, it is not isotropic, allowing ν to take on values other than 1/4 as originally proposed by Poisson. The present calculations show ν100=0.347 for the fcc Lennard-Jones solid with a Young's modulus of E100=61.1ɛ/σ3, an initial (as indicated by superscript 0) shear modulus of G0100=57.2ɛ/σ3, and an initial bulk modulus of K0=71.2ɛ/σ3 at zero temperature. The moduli all decreased with increasing temperature. Reuss, Voigt, and Hashin and Shtrikman [J. Mech. Phys. Solids 10, 335 (1962)] bounds on the isotropic elastic properties of polycrystalline aggregates of Lennard-Jones material were also determined. Computed values of the moduli are in reasonable agreement with experimental results for solid argon and crystalline polyethylene.

  10. Simulation of atomic diffusion in the Fcc NiAl system: A kinetic Monte Carlo study

    SciTech Connect

    Alfonso, Dominic R.; Tafen, De Nyago

    2015-04-28

    The atomic diffusion in fcc NiAl binary alloys was studied by kinetic Monte Carlo simulation. The environment dependent hopping barriers were computed using a pair interaction model whose parameters were fitted to relevant data derived from electronic structure calculations. Long time diffusivities were calculated and the effect of composition change on the tracer diffusion coefficients was analyzed. These results indicate that this variation has noticeable impact on the atomic diffusivities. A reduction in the mobility of both Ni and Al is demonstrated with increasing Al content. As a result, examination of the pair interaction between atoms was carried out for the purpose of understanding the predicted trends.