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Sample records for fda required full

  1. Medical device data systems and FDA regulation. Should medical device data systems require FDA clearance?

    PubMed

    Kelley, Peter

    2010-01-01

    It is widely understood why medical devices need to be regulated by the FDA and other governing bodies. However medical software does not typically require the same level of regulation. Currently the FDA is investigating whether one type of medical software, Medical Device Data Systems (MDDS), should require FDA clearance because of the potential risk they impose when interconnected with medical devices. Hospitals are looking to implement MDDS because the technology allows nursing staff to spend more time on direct patient care and reduces charting errors. This article will explore the FDA's proposal and will review the possible risks and provide a rationale for why MDDS should be regulated by the FDA and why MDDS vendors should have the right level of quality and risk management procedures in place to ensure that they are developing and bringing to market the safest products possible. PMID:20677470

  2. 78 FR 14309 - Implementation of the FDA Food Safety Modernization Act Provision Requiring FDA To Establish...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-05

    ...In September 2011, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA or the Agency) asked the Institute of Food Technologists (IFT) to execute product tracing pilot projects as described in the FDA Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA). FDA recently released a report from IFT on these pilot projects, entitled ``Pilot Projects for Improving Product Tracing along the Food Supply System.'' FDA is announcing......

  3. 78 FR 19715 - Implementation of the FDA Food Safety Modernization Act Provision Requiring FDA To Establish...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-02

    ... and Tracing of Food'' that appeared in the Federal Register of March 5, 2013 (78 FR 14309). In the... Register of March 5, 2013 (78 FR 14309), FDA published a ] notice with a 30-day comment period to...

  4. 10 CFR 35.7 - FDA, other Federal, and State requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false FDA, other Federal, and State requirements. 35.7 Section 35.7 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL General Information § 35.7 FDA, other Federal, and State requirements. Nothing in this part relieves the licensee...

  5. Safe Medical Devices Act: management guidance for hospital compliance with the new FDA requirements.

    PubMed

    Alder, H C

    1993-10-01

    The Safe Medical Devices Act of 1990 (Public Law 101-629) was signed by President George Bush almost three years ago on November 28, 1990. The law expanded the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) authority to regulate medical devices and grew out of congressional concerns about the FDA's ability to quickly learn when a medical device caused an adverse patient event, and to ensure that hazardous devices are removed from hospitals and other health care facilities in a timely manner. The Safe Medical Devices Act is an extension of the Medical Device Amendments of 1976, which imposed production, distribution, and sales rules on medical device manufacturers. It gives the FDA the legal authority to directly regulate the use of medical devices in health care facilities. Among the Safe Medical Devices Act's provisions are specific requirements for hospitals, health professionals, and other users of medical devices to report patient incidents involving medical devices to the manufacturer and to the FDA if a device caused or contributed to a serious injury, death, or other "adverse experience." Adverse experiences are defined by the FDA to include concussions, fractures, burns, temporary paralysis, and temporary loss of sight, hearing, or smell. Hospitals have been required to comply with this provision of the law, called user reporting, since 1991. Hospitals are also required to participate in tracking certain medical devices whose failure could result in a serious adverse health outcome. The law requires distributors and manufacturers of specific devices to adopt a method for device tracking. Hospitals are required to cooperate with and provide device manufacturers with information about patients with permanently implantable devices and life-sustaining and life-supporting devices used outside device user facilities. The law also gives the FDA the authority to designate other devices subject to tracking if the agency determines such tracking is warranted to preserve the

  6. FDA's requirements for in-vivo performance data for prosthetic heart valves.

    PubMed

    Johnson, D M; Sapirstein, W

    1994-07-01

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has recently revised its "Replacement Heart Valve Guidance". That document lists the data FDA deems necessary to support the approval of new prosthetic heart valves of all designs, and which should be contained in Premarket Approval Applications for these devices. The guidance covers detailed data requirements for in vitro, animal, and clinical data. This paper is intended to briefly summarize FDA's requirements for in vivo and clinical data. The clinical study must establish that the device is both safe and effective, as compared to currently marketed replacement heart valves. It is possible to achieve this goal using hypothesis testing to compare the results of an observational study against a set of Objective Performance Criteria (OPC) which have been established by the FDA. The establishment of the OPCs was facilitated by a standardized set of definitions of complications published by the American Association of Thoracic Surgery and Society of Thoracic Surgeons (AATS/STS) in 1987/1988. Papers published in peer reviewed journals have utilized this set of definitions for data analysis, providing an ample pool of data from which to establish OPCs. The number of patients required to establish the safety and efficacy of a replacement heart valve, using this approach, is 800 valve years, 400 in the aortic and 400 in the mitral position. Advantages of this approach are reduction in the number of patients and duration of the study. PMID:7952304

  7. Proton-pump inhibitors in patients requiring antiplatelet therapy: new FDA labeling.

    PubMed

    Johnson, David A; Chilton, Robert; Liker, Harley R

    2014-05-01

    Proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs) are recommended for patients who require antiplatelet therapy and have a history of upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Proton-pump inhibitors should also be considered for patients receiving antiplatelet therapy who have other risk factors for gastrointestinal bleeding, including use of aspirin. Thus, evidence of pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions between PPIs and consequent impaired effectiveness of the antiplatelet agent clopidogrel has caused concern. Here, we discuss comparative studies suggesting that the extent to which a PPI reduces exposure to the active metabolite of clopidogrel and attenuates its antithrombotic effect differs among PPIs. Although a clinically meaningful effect of the interaction between PPIs and clopidogrel on cardiovascular outcomes has not been established, these studies provided the basis for recent changes in US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) labeling for several PPIs and clopidogrel. New labeling suggests that PPI use among patients taking clopidogrel be limited to pantoprazole, rabeprazole, lansoprazole, or dexlansoprazole. Because comparative studies indicate that omeprazole and esomeprazole have a greater effect on the CYP2C19-mediated conversion of clopidogrel to its active metabolite and, consequently, clopidogrel's effect on platelet reactivity, FDA labeling recommends avoiding omeprazole and esomeprazole in patients taking clopidogrel. Even a 12-hour separation of dosing does not appear to prevent drug interactions between omeprazole and clopidogrel. PMID:24918808

  8. Is It Really FDA Approved?

    MedlinePlus

    ... and implantable infusion pumps, require FDA approval before marketing. To receive FDA approval for these devices, the ... and many types of catheters) are cleared for marketing based on an FDA determination that they are ...

  9. Drugs@FDA: FDA Approved Drug Products

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cosmetics Tobacco Products Drugs@FDA: FDA Approved Drug Products FDA Home Drug Databases Drugs@FDA - FAQ | Instructions | ... 6332) Contact FDA For Government For Press Combination Products Advisory Committees Science & Research Regulatory Information Safety Emergency ...

  10. BCS Biowaivers: Similarities and Differences Among EMA, FDA, and WHO Requirements.

    PubMed

    Davit, Barbara M; Kanfer, Isadore; Tsang, Yu Chung; Cardot, Jean-Michel

    2016-05-01

    The Biopharmaceutics Classification System (BCS), based on aqueous solubility and intestinal permeability, has enjoyed wide use since 1995 as a mechanism for waiving in vivo bioavailability and bioequivalence studies. In 2000, the US-FDA was the first regulatory agency to publish guidance for industry describing how to meet criteria for requesting a waiver of in vivo bioavailability and bioequivalence studies for highly soluble, highly permeable (BCS Class I) drugs. Subsequently, the World Health Organization (WHO) and European Medicines Agency (EMA) published guidelines recommending how to obtain BCS biowaivers for BCS Class III drugs (high solubility, low permeability), in addition to Class I drugs. In 2015, the US-FDA became better harmonized with the EMA and WHO following publication of two guidances for industry outlining criteria for obtaining BCS biowaivers for both Class I and Class III drugs. A detailed review and comparison of the BCS Class I and Class III criteria currently recommended by the US-FDA, EMA, and WHO revealed good convergence of the three agencies with respect to BCS biowaiver criteria. The comparison also suggested that, by applying the most conservative of the three jurisdictional approaches, it should be possible for a sponsor to design the same set of BCS biowaiver studies in preparing a submission for worldwide filing to satisfy US, European, and emerging market regulators. It is hoped that the availability of BCS Class I and Class III biowaivers in multiple jurisdictions will encourage more sponsors to request waivers of in vivo bioavailability/bioequivalence testing using the BCS approach. PMID:26943914

  11. FDA 101: Dietary Supplements

    MedlinePlus

    ... professionals. As its resources permit, FDA also reviews product labels and other product information, such as package inserts, ... the address or phone number listed on the product's label. Dietary supplement firms are required to forward reports ...

  12. Consumers' Understanding of FDA Approval Requirements and Composite Scores in Direct-to-Consumer Prescription Drug Print Ads.

    PubMed

    O'Donoghue, Amie C; Sullivan, Helen W; Williams, Pamela A; Squire, Claudia; Betts, Kevin R; Fitts Willoughby, Jessica; Parvanta, Sarah

    2016-08-01

    In 2 studies, we investigated how laypersons perceive the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval process, FDA authority, and the presentation of composite scores in direct-to-consumer (DTC) prescription drug print ads. The 1st study consisted of 4 focus groups (N = 38) in 2 cities. Using a semi-structured guide, a moderator led participants through the viewing of 3 existing DTC print ads that differed in the presence or absence of composite score information, and participants discussed their views of the ads and their understanding of composite scores. The 2nd study surveyed a nationally representative sample of 1,629 individuals from the general population who saw a fictitious DTC print ad and answered closed-ended questions about the same topics. Results showed that knowledge of FDA approval and authority was mixed, with several misconceptions apparent. Many consumers were not familiar with the use of composite scores in a medical context or in advertising and, in the 1st study, expressed distrust of the product and the ad after learning about how composite scores are used. In the 2nd study, receiving composite score information changed the perceived clarity of the ad but not the perceived risk or benefits. Implications for the presentation of complex medical information are discussed. PMID:27414000

  13. FDA's proposed rules on patent listing requirements for new drug and 30-month stays on ANDA approval (proposed Oct. 24, 2002).

    PubMed

    Hui, Yuk Fung

    2003-01-01

    In order to close the loophole in the generic drug approval process that allows a brand name drug patent holder to delay or defeat generic drug application merely by technicality, the FDA recently proposed to modify its regulations. Those proposals affect the patent listing requirements of a new drug application, and the duration of time that a generic drug application could be put on hold in the event of a patent infringement suit. With the modified rules, the FDA expects to see an increase in the availability of generic drugs, which eventually will lead to lower drug costs. Ms. Hui discusses the contents of the proposed regulations and provides an analysis of the proposed rule's legal authority, implications on patent rights, and impact on the pharmaceutical industry. PMID:12856462

  14. Dietary supplement labeling and advertising claims: are clinical studies on the full product required?

    PubMed

    Villafranco, John E; Bond, Katie

    2009-01-01

    Whether labeling and advertising claims for multi-ingredient dietary supplements may be based on the testing of individual, key ingredients--rather than the actual product--has caused a good deal of confusion. This confusion stems from the dearth of case law and the open-endedness of Federal Trade Commission (FTC) and Food and Drug Administration (FDA) guidance on this issue. Nevertheless, the relevant regulatory guidance, case law and self-regulatory case law--when assessed together--indicate that the law allows and even protects "key ingredient claims" (i.e., claims based on efficacy testing of key ingredients in the absence of full product testing). This article provides an overview of the relevant substantiation requirements for dietary supplement claims and then reviews FTC's and FDA's guidance on key ingredient claims; relevant case law; use of key ingredient claims in the advertising of other consumer products; and the National Advertising Division of the Better Business Bureau, Inc.'s (NAD's) approach to evaluating key ingredient claims for dietary supplements. This article concludes that key ingredient claims--provided they are presented in a truthful and non-deceptive manner--are permissible, and should be upheld in litigation and cases subject to industry self-regulation. This article further concludes that the NAD's approach to key ingredient claims provides practical guidance for crafting and substantiating dietary supplement key ingredient claims. PMID:19998572

  15. The requirements for a new full scale subsonic wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, M. W.; Mckinney, M. O.; Luidens, R. W.

    1972-01-01

    Justification and requirements are presented for a large subsonic wind tunnel capable of testing full scale aircraft, rotor systems, and advanced V/STOL propulsion systems. The design considerations and constraints for such a facility are reviewed, and the trades between facility test capability and costs are discussed.

  16. Medical devices; refurbishers, rebuilders, reconditioners, servicers, and "as is" remarketers of medical devices; review and revision of compliance policy guides and regulatory requirements; request for comments and information--FDA. Advance notice of proposed rulemaking.

    PubMed

    1997-12-23

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing its intention to review and, as necessary, to revise or to amend its compliance policy guides and regulatory requirements relating to the remarketing of used medical devices and the persons who refurbish, recondition, rebuild, service, or remarket such devices. The agency is considering these actions because it believes evolving industry practices warrant reevaluation of current policy and the application of certain regulatory requirements in order to ensure that particular remarketed devices meet suitable performance requirements for their intended uses, and are as safe as the originally marketed finished device. FDA is soliciting comments, proposals for alternative regulatory approaches, and information on these issues. In a future issue of the Federal Register, FDA will announce an open meeting of the Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP) Advisory Committee concerning these matters. PMID:10179309

  17. FDA Certified Mammography Facilities

    MedlinePlus

    ... Products Radiation-Emitting Products Home Radiation-Emitting Products Mammography Quality Standards Act and Program Consumer Information (MQSA) ... it Email Print This list of FDA Certified Mammography Facilities is updated weekly. If you click on ...

  18. Full scale subsonic wind tunnel requirements and design studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, M. W.; Mort, K. W.; Hickey, D. H.

    1972-01-01

    The justification and requirements are summarized for a large subsonic wind tunnel capable of testing full-scale aircraft, rotor systems, and advanced V/STOL aircraft propulsion systems. The design considerations and constraints for such a facility are reviewed, and the trades between facility test capability and costs are discussed. The design studies showed that the structural cost of this facility is the most important cost factor. For this reason (and other considerations such as requirements for engine exhaust gas purging) an open-return wind tunnel having two test sections was selected. The major technical problem in the design of an open-return wind tunnel is maintaining good test section flow quality in the presence of external winds. This problem has been studied extensively, and inlet and exhaust systems which provide satisfactory attenuation of the effects of external winds on test section flow quality were developed.

  19. Gaze Stabilization During Locomotion Requires Full Body Coordination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulavara, A. P.; Miller, C. A.; Houser, J.; Richards, J. T.; Bloomberg, J. J.

    2001-01-01

    Maintaining gaze stabilization during locomotion places substantial demands on multiple sensorimotor subsystems for precise coordination. Gaze stabilization during locomotion requires eye-head-trunk coordination (Bloomberg, et al., 1997) as well as the regulation of energy flow or shock-wave transmission through the body at high impact phases with the support surface (McDonald, et al., 1997). Allowing these excessive transmissions of energy to reach the head may compromise gaze stability. Impairments in these mechanisms may lead to the oscillopsia and decreased dynamic visual acuity seen in crewmembers returning from short and long duration spaceflight, as well as in patients with vestibular disorders (Hillman, et al., 1999). Thus, we hypothesize that stabilized gaze during locomotion results from full-body coordination of the eye-head-trunk system combined with the lower limb apparatus. The goal of this study was to determine how multiple, interdependent full- body sensorimotor subsystems aiding gaze stabilization during locomotion are functionally coordinated, and how they adaptively respond to spaceffight.

  20. FDA Approval for Imiquimod

    Cancer.gov

    On July 15, 2004, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced the approval of a new indication for Aldara® (imiquimod) topical cream for the treatment of superficial basal cell carcinoma (sBCC), a type of skin cancer.

  1. Doctors, drugs, and the FDA.

    PubMed

    Shanklin, D R

    1972-11-01

    This communication is directed to obstetricians, to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and to those individuals who might want to impose possibly unnecessary external structures on the practice of medicine. It is considered a positive that the patients of today are well informed and are more actively participating in therapeutic design. There is more veto power on the part of the patient and more concern over the trained ability of the physician. In the past physicians frequently made judgements individually, applying isolated and at times random standards for their decisions. Such actions were inevitable in an era when neither pathogenesis nor treatment was well understood. Now there is no excuse for such actions. Communication is easy, journals are widely circulated, and there are numerous refresher seminars. Increased specialization of knowledge has meant more corporate or group decisions for therapy. Current trends will continue to offer both opportunities and responsibilities. The opportunities are for better diffusion of knowledge, and the responsibility is to be informed. There can be a high level national standard for medical practice. As a beginning, the medical practice laws could use some uniform decisions. The FDA needs to show more responsiveness to changing knowledge and increased willingness to reconsider indications and contraindications in the light of newer experience. There is sufficient information available now to support the revocation of the approval of the use of diuretics in the management of human pregnancy. Another role of the FDA is the approval of new substances or new uses of old substances. The prostaglandins appear in this category, and the December 1972 issue will include the recent Brook Lodge Symposium on prostaglandins. The individual physician requires journal articles, individual experience, and designed trials in order to make judgements on patients who may have some factors not accounted for by groupthink or regulations

  2. Full Virulence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Requires OprF▿

    PubMed Central

    Fito-Boncompte, Laurène; Chapalain, Annelise; Bouffartigues, Emeline; Chaker, Hichem; Lesouhaitier, Olivier; Gicquel, Gwendoline; Bazire, Alexis; Madi, Amar; Connil, Nathalie; Véron, Wilfried; Taupin, Laure; Toussaint, Bertrand; Cornelis, Pierre; Wei, Qing; Shioya, Koki; Déziel, Eric; Feuilloley, Marc G. J.; Orange, Nicole; Dufour, Alain; Chevalier, Sylvie

    2011-01-01

    OprF is a general outer membrane porin of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a well-known human opportunistic pathogen associated with severe hospital-acquired sepsis and chronic lung infections of cystic fibrosis patients. A multiphenotypic approach, based on the comparative study of a wild-type strain of P. aeruginosa, its isogenic oprF mutant, and an oprF-complemented strain, showed that OprF is required for P. aeruginosa virulence. The absence of OprF results in impaired adhesion to animal cells, secretion of ExoT and ExoS toxins through the type III secretion system (T3SS), and production of the quorum-sensing-dependent virulence factors pyocyanin, elastase, lectin PA-1L, and exotoxin A. Accordingly, in the oprF mutant, production of the signal molecules N-(3-oxododecanoyl)-l-homoserine lactone and N-butanoyl-l-homoserine lactone was found to be reduced and delayed, respectively. Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS) production was decreased, while its precursor, 4-hydroxy-2-heptylquinoline (HHQ), accumulated in the cells. Taken together, these results show the involvement of OprF in P. aeruginosa virulence, at least partly through modulation of the quorum-sensing network. This is the first study showing a link between OprF, PQS synthesis, T3SS, and virulence factor production, providing novel insights into virulence expression. PMID:21189321

  3. Full virulence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa requires OprF.

    PubMed

    Fito-Boncompte, Laurène; Chapalain, Annelise; Bouffartigues, Emeline; Chaker, Hichem; Lesouhaitier, Olivier; Gicquel, Gwendoline; Bazire, Alexis; Madi, Amar; Connil, Nathalie; Véron, Wilfried; Taupin, Laure; Toussaint, Bertrand; Cornelis, Pierre; Wei, Qing; Shioya, Koki; Déziel, Eric; Feuilloley, Marc G J; Orange, Nicole; Dufour, Alain; Chevalier, Sylvie

    2011-03-01

    OprF is a general outer membrane porin of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a well-known human opportunistic pathogen associated with severe hospital-acquired sepsis and chronic lung infections of cystic fibrosis patients. A multiphenotypic approach, based on the comparative study of a wild-type strain of P. aeruginosa, its isogenic oprF mutant, and an oprF-complemented strain, showed that OprF is required for P. aeruginosa virulence. The absence of OprF results in impaired adhesion to animal cells, secretion of ExoT and ExoS toxins through the type III secretion system (T3SS), and production of the quorum-sensing-dependent virulence factors pyocyanin, elastase, lectin PA-1L, and exotoxin A. Accordingly, in the oprF mutant, production of the signal molecules N-(3-oxododecanoyl)-l-homoserine lactone and N-butanoyl-l-homoserine lactone was found to be reduced and delayed, respectively. Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS) production was decreased, while its precursor, 4-hydroxy-2-heptylquinoline (HHQ), accumulated in the cells. Taken together, these results show the involvement of OprF in P. aeruginosa virulence, at least partly through modulation of the quorum-sensing network. This is the first study showing a link between OprF, PQS synthesis, T3SS, and virulence factor production, providing novel insights into virulence expression. PMID:21189321

  4. FDA pharmaceutical quality oversight.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lawrence X; Woodcock, Janet

    2015-08-01

    The launch of the Center for Drug Evaluation and Research (CDER) Office of Pharmaceutical Quality (OPQ) is a milestone in FDA's efforts to assure that quality medicines are available to the American public. As a new super-office within CDER, OPQ is strategically organized to streamline regulatory processes, advance regulatory standards, align areas of expertise, and originate surveillance of drug quality. Supporting these objectives will be an innovative and systematic approach to product quality knowledge management and informatics. Concerted strategies will bring parity to the oversight of innovator and generic drugs as well as domestic and international facilities. OPQ will promote and encourage the adoption of emerging pharmaceutical technology to enhance pharmaceutical quality and potentially reinvigorate the pharmaceutical manufacturing sector in the United States. With a motto of "One Quality Voice," OPQ embodies the closer integration of review, inspection, surveillance, policy, and research for the purpose of strengthening pharmaceutical quality on a global scale. PMID:26027494

  5. A Guide to the FDA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Annetta K.

    The United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) collects information in seven areas: foods, cosmetics, human drugs, animal drugs and feeds, medical devices, biologics, and electronic radiological products. By using procedures outlined in the Freedom of Information Act, the public may get specific information from such FDA files as inspection…

  6. 75 FR 43107 - Revocation of Requirements for Full-Size Baby Cribs and Non-Full-Size Baby Cribs

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-23

    ... proposing to revoke? CPSC first published the full-size crib regulation, 16 CFR part 1508, in 1973 (38 FR... CFR part 1509, in 1976 (41 FR 6240 (Feb. 12, 1976)) and amended it in 1982. Both standards currently contain requirements pertaining to dimensions, spacing of components, hardware, construction and...

  7. Will the Requirement by the US FDA to Simultaneously Co-Develop Companion Diagnostics (CDx) Delay the Approval of Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors for RTK-Rearranged (ROS1-, RET-, AXL-, PDGFR-α-, NTRK1-) Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Globally?

    PubMed

    Ou, Sai-Hong Ignatius; Soo, Ross A; Kubo, Akihito; Kawaguchi, Tomoya; Ahn, Myung-Ju

    2014-01-01

    the availability of crizotinib in most countries, a more cost-effective way is for crizotinib to gain compendium listing for ROS1-rearranged NSCLC in treatment guidelines. However, without a formal indication from the FDA, a drug cannot be marketed for off label use, it is unlikely that payers public or private will routinely pay for molecular testing for ROS1-rearrangement in NSCLC let alone reimburse off label use of crizotinib. Similarly, several marketed tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) in the US (sorafenib, sunitinib, vandetanib, cabozantinib, regorafenib) are potent RET inhibitors in vitro. It does not make sense for any one pharmaceutical company to shoulder the full cost of developing a particular CDx for RET-rearranged NSCLC where, once approved, it may be used by other pharmaceutical companies to gain addition labeling approval for their own RET inhibitors. Thus, the requirement by the US FDA that a specific CDx have to be co-developed and standardized for each of the molecular subtype of NSCLC as part of the drug approval process, while prudent, may have the un-intended consequence of deterring clinical development of these TKIs in these very rare molecular subsets of NSCLC. While we all march to the drumbeat of precision cancer medicine, the stringent requirement of co-development CDx for each molecular subtype of solid tumor may inadvertently make this goal substantially more difficult to achieve. PMID:24744988

  8. FDA-Approved HIV Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    ... and acronyms) Brand Name FDA Approval Date Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors (NRTIs) NRTIs block reverse transcriptase, an enzyme HIV ... AZT, ZDV) Retrovir March 19, 1987 Non-Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors (NNRTIs) NNRTIs bind to and later alter reverse ...

  9. Expediting drug development--the FDA's new "breakthrough therapy" designation.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Rachel E; Li, Jun; Shapley, Stephanie; Robb, Melissa; Woodcock, Janet

    2013-11-14

    The FDA's new "breakthrough therapy" designation for investigational drugs adds to the agency's portfolio of expedited programs for serious conditions. The designation requires preliminary clinical evidence demonstrating substantial improvement over existing therapies. PMID:24224621

  10. 76 FR 38184 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; FDA Recall...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-29

    ... Collection; Comment Request; FDA Recall Regulations AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice... reporting requirements on FDA recalls. DATES: Submit either electronic or written comments on the collection... techniques, when appropriate, and other forms of information technology. FDA Recall Regulations--21 CFR...

  11. FDA-Approved Biosimilar Insulin

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    If a biosimilar insulin is discovered postmarketing to be subpotent, superpotent, or contaminated or the contents mislabeled, it is an adulterated product and must be quarantined for removal including from a patient’s home. Adulterated products could be considered “counterfeit” since they do not meet the original standards established by the FDA. The FDA must establish a method of regularly assaying samples of biosimilar insulin drawn directly from the supply pipeline to help ensure patient safety and evaluate clinical performance. Independent groups without conflict of interest would perform confidential comparison assay. For less than 5 cents per vial/pen, manufacturers could easily support an independent, FDA-recognized, random sample program and create a functional postmarket surveillance system that better protects the public and the manufacturer from undesired outcomes. PMID:25172881

  12. 16 CFR 1219.2 - Requirements for full-size baby cribs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... CFR part 51. You may obtain a copy from ASTM International, 100 Barr Harbor Drive, P.O. Box 0700, West... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Requirements for full-size baby cribs. 1219... REGULATIONS SAFETY STANDARD FOR FULL-SIZE BABY CRIBS (Eff. June 28, 2011) § 1219.2 Requirements for...

  13. FDA regulation of tobacco: blessing or curse for FDA professionals?

    PubMed

    O'Reilly, James T

    2009-01-01

    Upwards of 400,000 Americans will die that year from the effects of cigarettes, which FDA will now "regulate" very gently, with its hands tied by a slick statutory protection for the largest existing tobacco marketers. Career FDA professionals will be criticized as enablers of mega-marketers' continued sales, working at the margins, arranging the paperwork for protection of megafirms' market share, and sitting by as the deaths and addictive behaviors continue. "Join the Public Health Service, inspired by a public health mission," they were told, and yet they will be unable to do much regulating of the addictive and fatal products for which they now have titular responsibility. This essay observes that these fine FDA professionals are handed the sticky remains of a messy bargain, negotiated in a distracted Congress by expensive lawyers with clients who were potent contributors to political action committees. The only formula that is not secret about the 2009 law is the way in which industry purchased sufficient allegiance to gather the votes for its adoption. The remaining mystery is how FDA could be expected to do these tasks without losing its best and brightest professionals to other fields. PMID:19999639

  14. FDA's regulation of tanning beds: how much heat?

    PubMed

    Knapp, Veronica

    2011-01-01

    This paper considers the problem of indoor tanning bed use by teenagers. The paper explores FDA's current authority to regulate tanning lamps as Class I medical devices, concluding that FDA's authority is poorly tailored to affect teenagers' repeated use of these products. An outright ban is unlikely; therefore, the best available options are to regulate access by minors and to amend the warning label requirements to reflect the current state of knowledge about the risks of tanning bed use. PMID:24505845

  15. 78 FR 23137 - Implementation of Full-Service Intelligent Mail Requirements for Automation Prices

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-18

    ...The Postal Service is revising Mailing Standards of the United States Postal Service, Domestic Mail Manual (DMM[supreg]), throughout various sections to modify eligibility requirements for mailers to qualify for automation prices. Effective January 26, 2014, use of ``full-service'' Intelligent Mail[supreg] is required to qualify for automation prices for postcards (First-Class Mail[supreg]......

  16. 16 CFR 1500.82 - Exemption from full labeling and other requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Exemption from full labeling and other requirements. 1500.82 Section 1500.82 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES AND ARTICLES; ADMINISTRATION AND ENFORCEMENT REGULATIONS § 1500.82 Exemption from full...

  17. 16 CFR 1500.82 - Exemption from full labeling and other requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Exemption from full labeling and other requirements. 1500.82 Section 1500.82 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES AND ARTICLES; ADMINISTRATION AND ENFORCEMENT REGULATIONS § 1500.82 Exemption from full...

  18. FDA Approves New Weight-Loss Device

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/news/fullstory_159362.html FDA Approves New Weight-Loss Device Surgically implanted port allows obese patients to ... have been unable to lose weight and maintain weight loss using nonsurgical treatments. The FDA approval is for ...

  19. FDA Warns About Stem Cell Claims

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home For Consumers Consumer Updates FDA Warns About Stem Cell Claims Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... blood-forming system. back to top Regulation of Stem Cells FDA regulates stem cells in the U.S. to ...

  20. Internet Database Review: The FDA BBS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomaiuolo, Nicholas G.

    1993-01-01

    Describes the electronic bulletin board system (BBS) of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) that is accessible through the Internet. Highlights include how to gain access; the menu-driven software; other electronic sources of FDA information; and adding value. Examples of the FDA BBS menu and the help screen are included. (LRW)

  1. 75 FR 81788 - Revocation of Requirements for Full-Size Baby Cribs and Non-Full-Size Baby Cribs

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-28

    ... products under section 104 of the CPSIA. The new consumer product safety standards for cribs will include... (38 FR 32129 (Nov. 21, 1973)) and amended it in 1982. The CPSC published the regulation for non-full-size cribs, 16 CFR part 1509, in 1976 (41 FR 6240 (Feb. 12, 1976)), and amended it in 1982....

  2. 16 CFR 1219.2 - Requirements for full-size baby cribs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...-Size Baby Cribs, approved June 1, 2010. The Director of the Federal Register approves this incorporation by reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. You may obtain a copy from ASTM... REGULATIONS SAFETY STANDARD FOR FULL-SIZE BABY CRIBS (Eff. June 28, 2011) § 1219.2 Requirements for...

  3. Analytical Performance Requirements for Systems for Self-Monitoring of Blood Glucose With Focus on System Accuracy: Relevant Differences Among ISO 15197:2003, ISO 15197:2013, and Current FDA Recommendations.

    PubMed

    Freckmann, Guido; Schmid, Christina; Baumstark, Annette; Rutschmann, Malte; Haug, Cornelia; Heinemann, Lutz

    2015-07-01

    In the European Union (EU), the ISO (International Organization for Standardization) 15197 standard is applicable for the evaluation of systems for self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) before the market approval. In 2013, a revised version of this standard was published. Relevant revisions in the analytical performance requirements are the inclusion of the evaluation of influence quantities, for example, hematocrit, and some changes in the testing procedures for measurement precision and system accuracy evaluation, for example, number of test strip lots. Regarding system accuracy evaluation, the most important change is the inclusion of more stringent accuracy criteria. In 2014, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in the United States published their own guidance document for the premarket evaluation of SMBG systems with even more stringent system accuracy criteria than stipulated by ISO 15197:2013. The establishment of strict accuracy criteria applicable for the premarket evaluation is a possible approach to further improve the measurement quality of SMBG systems. However, the system accuracy testing procedure is quite complex, and some critical aspects, for example, systematic measurement difference between the reference measurement procedure and a higher-order procedure, may potentially limit the apparent accuracy of a given system. Therefore, the implementation of a harmonized reference measurement procedure for which traceability to standards of higher order is verified through an unbroken, documented chain of calibrations is desirable. In addition, the establishment of regular and standardized post-marketing evaluations of distributed test strip lots should be considered as an approach toward an improved measurement quality of available SMBG systems. PMID:25872965

  4. FDA moves to permit oral contraceptive prescriptions without initial pelvic exam.

    PubMed

    1993-05-28

    The Planned Parenthood Federation of America (PPFA) submitted recommendations to the US Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) Fertility and Maternal Health Drugs Advisory Committee. The PPFA wanted the FDA to remove requirements for a pelvic examination and blood tests before an oral contraceptive (OC) is prescribed. Two representatives of the Family Planning Council of Southeastern Pennsylvania told the FDA advisory committee about the evaluation results of its Smart Start program. 23% of teenagers wanting to use OCs opted to delay the pelvic examination, and 40% opted to delay the blood tests. 83% of these same teenagers were already sexually active. 69% returned for pelvic exams at 3 months. Increased education and counseling over several sessions probably explained why more study participants used condoms and fewer of them became pregnant during the 6-month study. Physicians from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and the American Fertility Society also attended the committee hearing and supported PPFA's recommendations. The National Women's Health Network wanted to delay the discussion until the committee could also address the sale of OCs over-the-counter. The statements convinced the committee to allow physicians to defer to full physical examination as long as there are no contraindications. This May 20, 1993 approval emphasized the need for physicians to continue taking a complete medical history and conducting other tests that may uncover contraindications (e.g. pregnancy and blood pressure). FDA staff now must write the exact language needed for the OC labeling change to be approved by the FDA commissioner. PMID:12286460

  5. Pharmaceutical trademarks: navigating through the FDA's pilot program.

    PubMed

    Ferrer, Elisa

    2010-06-01

    Creation and clearance of pharmaceutical trademarks continues to be one of the most difficult and challenging areas of trademark law. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently initiated a 2-year Pilot Program under Prescription Drug User Fee Act (PDUFA) IV. The intent of the program is to enable participating pharmaceutical firms to evaluate proposed pharmaceutical marks and submit the data generated from those evaluations to the FDA for review. Submitting a trademark to the FDA warrants questions: What supporting data is needed and accepted when proposing a mark? What issues might arise, and how can they be averted? In a recent Thomson Reuters on-demand webinar (http://science.thomsonreuters.com/news/2010-02/8580404/), a group of renowned experts in the field of trademark development review the FDA pilot program, outline the requirements for submission and discuss what the changes will mean in clearing new pharmaceutical marks. They also present various approaches to trademark development and evaluation in light of the FDA's views. PMID:20603657

  6. US FDA oncology drug approvals in 2014.

    PubMed

    Wolford, Juliet E; Tewari, Krishnansu S

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is a close second to heart disease for cause of death in the USA, and could soon surpass heart disease as the population ages and the incidence of cancer continues to increase. While heart disease can be addressed through behavior modification and education (e.g., smoking cessation, dietary changes, exercises that promote cardiovascular fitness), pharmacology and improved surgical devices and methods, cancer ultimately requires improved and novel drug treatments to bring mortality rates down. In 2014, the US FDA approved 17 drugs and/or drug combinations in 12 disease sites for a total of 19 indications in melanoma, hematologic malignancies, gastrointestinal carcinoma, non-small-cell lung cancer, gynecologic malignancies and lymphoma/lymphoproliferative disorders. PMID:26039742

  7. 21 CFR 806.30 - FDA access to records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES MEDICAL DEVICES; REPORTS OF CORRECTIONS AND REMOVALS Reports and Records § 806.30 FDA access to records. Each device manufacturer or importer required under this part to maintain records and...

  8. 21 CFR 806.30 - FDA access to records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES MEDICAL DEVICES; REPORTS OF CORRECTIONS AND REMOVALS Reports and Records § 806.30 FDA access to records. Each device manufacturer or importer required under this part to maintain records and...

  9. 21 CFR 806.30 - FDA access to records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES MEDICAL DEVICES; REPORTS OF CORRECTIONS AND REMOVALS Reports and Records § 806.30 FDA access to records. Each device manufacturer or importer required under this part to maintain records and...

  10. 21 CFR 806.30 - FDA access to records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES MEDICAL DEVICES; REPORTS OF CORRECTIONS AND REMOVALS Reports and Records § 806.30 FDA access to records. Each device manufacturer or importer required under this part to maintain records and...

  11. 21 CFR 806.30 - FDA access to records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES MEDICAL DEVICES; REPORTS OF CORRECTIONS AND REMOVALS Reports and Records § 806.30 FDA access to records. Each device manufacturer or importer required under this part to maintain records and...

  12. 21 CFR 316.34 - FDA recognition of exclusive approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE ORPHAN DRUGS Orphan-drug Exclusive Approval § 316.34 FDA recognition of... written notice recognizing exclusive approval once the marketing application for a designated orphan-drug... orphan-drug exclusive approval for the full 7-year term of exclusive approval. (b) When a...

  13. Access to F.D.A. Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinovic, Dianna

    Prior to the enactment of the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA), little of the data collected by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) was made public or could be obtained from the agency. Although the FDA files are now open, information is considered exempt from public disclosure when it involves regulatory procedures, program guidelines, work…

  14. A functional 4-hydroxybenzoate degradation pathway in the phytopathogen Xanthomonas campestris is required for full pathogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jia-Yuan; Zhou, Lian; Chen, Bo; Sun, Shuang; Zhang, Wei; Li, Ming; Tang, Hongzhi; Jiang, Bo-Le; Tang, Ji-Liang; He, Ya-Wen

    2015-01-01

    Plants contain significant levels of natural phenolic compounds essential for reproduction and growth, as well as defense mechanisms against pathogens. Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Xcc) is the causal agent of crucifers black rot. Here we showed that genes required for the synthesis, utilization, transportation, and degradation of 4-hydroxybenzoate (4-HBA) are present in Xcc. Xcc rapidly degrades 4-HBA, but has no effect on 2-hydroxybenzoate and 3-hydroxybenzoate when grown in XOLN medium. The genes for 4-HBA degradation are organized in a superoperonic cluster. Bioinformatics, biochemical, and genetic data showed that 4-HBA is hydroxylated by 4-HBA 3-hydroxylase (PobA), which is encoded by Xcc0356, to yield PCA. The resulting PCA is further metabolized via the PCA branches of the β-ketoadipate pathway, including Xcc0364, Xcc0365, and PcaFHGBDCR. Xcc0364 and Xcc0365 encode a new form of β-ketoadipate succinyl-coenzyme A transferase that is required for 4-HBA degradation. pobA expression was induced by 4-HBA via the transcriptional activator, PobR. Radish and cabbage hydrolysates contain 2-HBA, 3-HBA, 4-HBA, and other phenolic compounds. Addition of radish and cabbage hydrolysates to Xcc culture significantly induced the expression of pobA via PobR. The 4-HBA degradation pathway is required for full pathogenicity of Xcc in radish. PMID:26672484

  15. A functional 4-hydroxybenzoate degradation pathway in the phytopathogen Xanthomonas campestris is required for full pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jia-Yuan; Zhou, Lian; Chen, Bo; Sun, Shuang; Zhang, Wei; Li, Ming; Tang, Hongzhi; Jiang, Bo-Le; Tang, Ji-Liang; He, Ya-Wen

    2015-01-01

    Plants contain significant levels of natural phenolic compounds essential for reproduction and growth, as well as defense mechanisms against pathogens. Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Xcc) is the causal agent of crucifers black rot. Here we showed that genes required for the synthesis, utilization, transportation, and degradation of 4-hydroxybenzoate (4-HBA) are present in Xcc. Xcc rapidly degrades 4-HBA, but has no effect on 2-hydroxybenzoate and 3-hydroxybenzoate when grown in XOLN medium. The genes for 4-HBA degradation are organized in a superoperonic cluster. Bioinformatics, biochemical, and genetic data showed that 4-HBA is hydroxylated by 4-HBA 3-hydroxylase (PobA), which is encoded by Xcc0356, to yield PCA. The resulting PCA is further metabolized via the PCA branches of the β-ketoadipate pathway, including Xcc0364, Xcc0365, and PcaFHGBDCR. Xcc0364 and Xcc0365 encode a new form of β-ketoadipate succinyl-coenzyme A transferase that is required for 4-HBA degradation. pobA expression was induced by 4-HBA via the transcriptional activator, PobR. Radish and cabbage hydrolysates contain 2-HBA, 3-HBA, 4-HBA, and other phenolic compounds. Addition of radish and cabbage hydrolysates to Xcc culture significantly induced the expression of pobA via PobR. The 4-HBA degradation pathway is required for full pathogenicity of Xcc in radish. PMID:26672484

  16. Performance of a full-scale ITER metal hydride storage bed in comparison with requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Beloglazov, S.; Glugla, M.; Fanghaenel, E.; Perevezentsev, A.; Wagner, R.

    2008-07-15

    The storage of hydrogen isotopes as metal hydride is the technique chosen for the ITER Tritium Plant Storage and Delivery System (SDS). A prototype storage bed of a full-scale has been designed, manufactured and intensively tested at the Tritium Laboratory, addressing main performance parameters specified for the ITER application. The main requirements for the hydrogen storage bed are a strict physical limitation of the tritium storage capacity (currently 70 g T{sub 2}), a high supply flow rate of hydrogen isotopes, in-situ calorimetry capabilities with an accuracy of 1 g and a fully tritium compatible design. The pressure composition isotherm of the ZrCo hydrogen system, as a reference material for ITER, is characterised by significant slope. As a result technical implementation of the ZrCo hydride bed in the SDS system requires further considerations. The paper presents the experience from the operation of ZrCo getter bed including loading/de-loading operation, calorimetric loop performance, and active gas cooling of the bed for fast absorption operation. The implications of hydride material characteristics on the SDS system configuration and design are discussed. (authors)

  17. TroA of Streptococcus suis Is Required for Manganese Acquisition and Full Virulence▿

    PubMed Central

    Schreur, Paul J. Wichgers; Rebel, Johanna M. J.; Smits, Mari A.; van Putten, Jos P. M.; Smith, Hilde E.

    2011-01-01

    Streptococcus suis causes infections in pigs and occasionally in humans, resulting in manifestations as meningitis, sepsis, arthritis, and septic shock. For survival within the host, S. suis requires numerous nutrients including trace metals. Little is known about the specific proteins involved in metal scavenging in S. suis. In this study we evaluated the role of the putative high-affinity metal binding lipoprotein TroA in metal acquisition and virulence. A mutant strain deficient in the expression of TroA (ΔtroA mutant) was constructed. Growth of the ΔtroA mutant in Todd-Hewitt broth was similar to wild-type growth; however, growth of the ΔtroA mutant in cation-deprived Todd-Hewitt broth and in porcine serum was strongly reduced compared to growth of wild-type bacteria. Supplementing the medium with extra manganese but not with magnesium, zinc, copper, nickel, or iron restored growth to wild-type levels, indicating that TroA is specifically required for growth in environments low in manganese. The ΔtroA mutant also showed increased susceptibility to H2O2, suggesting that TroA is involved in counteracting oxidative stress. Furthermore, the expression of the troA gene was subject to environmental regulation at the transcript level. In a murine S. suis infection model, the ΔtroA mutant displayed a nonvirulent phenotype. These data indicate that S. suis TroA is involved in manganese acquisition and is required for full virulence in mice. PMID:21784944

  18. EXTENSIN18 is required for full male fertility as well as normal vegetative growth in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Pratibha; Saha, Prasenjit; Ray, Tui; Tang, Yuhong; Yang, David; Cannon, Maura C

    2015-01-01

    EXTENSINS (EXTs) are a 65-member subfamily of hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins (HRGPs) of which 20 putatively form crosslinking networks in the cell wall. These 20 classical EXTs are involved at the start of new wall assembly as evidenced by a requirement for EXT3 during cytokinesis, and the ability of some EXTs to polymerize in vitro into dendritic patterns. EXT3 was previously shown to form pulcherosine (three Tyrosines) cross-links. Little direct data exists on the other 19 classical EXTs. Here, we describe the phenotypes of ext18 mutants and rescued progeny as well as associated expression profiles of all 20 classical EXT genes. We found that EXT18 is required for full male fertility, as well as for normal vegetative growth. EXT18 has potential to form crosslinking networks via di-iso-di-tyrosine (four Tyrosines) covalent bonds, and not via pulcherosine due to deficit of lone Tyrosines. This together with ext18 defective pollen grains and pollen tubes, and reduced plant size, suggests that EXT18-type EXTs are important contributors to wall integrity, in pollen and other rapidly extending walls. The data also show that a knockout of EXT18 had a pleiotropic affect on the expression of several EXTs, as did the reintroduction of the native EXT18 gene, thus supporting the thesis that transcription of groups of EXTs are co-regulated and work in different combinations to make distinctive inputs into wall assembly of different cell types. These insights contribute to basic knowledge of cell wall self-assembly in different cell types, and potentially enable biotechnological advances in biomass increase and plant fertility control. PMID:26257758

  19. EXTENSIN18 is required for full male fertility as well as normal vegetative growth in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Choudhary, Pratibha; Saha, Prasenjit; Ray, Tui; Tang, Yuhong; Yang, David; Cannon, Maura C.

    2015-01-01

    EXTENSINS (EXTs) are a 65-member subfamily of hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins (HRGPs) of which 20 putatively form crosslinking networks in the cell wall. These 20 classical EXTs are involved at the start of new wall assembly as evidenced by a requirement for EXT3 during cytokinesis, and the ability of some EXTs to polymerize in vitro into dendritic patterns. EXT3 was previously shown to form pulcherosine (three Tyrosines) cross-links. Little direct data exists on the other 19 classical EXTs. Here, we describe the phenotypes of ext18 mutants and rescued progeny as well as associated expression profiles of all 20 classical EXT genes. We found that EXT18 is required for full male fertility, as well as for normal vegetative growth. EXT18 has potential to form crosslinking networks via di-iso-di-tyrosine (four Tyrosines) covalent bonds, and not via pulcherosine due to deficit of lone Tyrosines. This together with ext18 defective pollen grains and pollen tubes, and reduced plant size, suggests that EXT18-type EXTs are important contributors to wall integrity, in pollen and other rapidly extending walls. The data also show that a knockout of EXT18 had a pleiotropic affect on the expression of several EXTs, as did the reintroduction of the native EXT18 gene, thus supporting the thesis that transcription of groups of EXTs are co-regulated and work in different combinations to make distinctive inputs into wall assembly of different cell types. These insights contribute to basic knowledge of cell wall self-assembly in different cell types, and potentially enable biotechnological advances in biomass increase and plant fertility control. PMID:26257758

  20. Identification of an Extracellular Endoglucanase That Is Required for Full Virulence in Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Dongling; Zhuo, Tao; Fan, Xiaojing; Zou, Huasong

    2016-01-01

    Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri causes citrus canker disease, which is characterized by the formation of water-soaked lesions, white or yellow spongy pustules and brown corky canker. In this work, we report the contribution of extracellular endoglucanase to canker development during infection. The ectopic expression of nine putative cellulases in Escherichia coli indicated that two endoglucanases, BglC3 and EngXCA, show carboxymethyl cellulase activity. Both bglC3 and engXCA genes were transcribed in X. citri subsp. citri, however, only BglC3 protein was detected outside the cell in western blot analysis. The deletion of bglC3 gene resulted in complete loss of extracellular carboxymethyl cellulase activity and delayed the onset of canker symptoms in both infiltration- and wound-inoculation assays. When growing in plant tissue, the cell density of bglC3 mutant was lower than that of the wild type. Our data demonstrated that BglC3 is an extracellular endoglucanase required for the full virulence of X. citri subsp. citri. PMID:26950296

  1. Intracellular siderophore but not extracellular siderophore is required for full virulence in Metarhizium robertsii.

    PubMed

    Giuliano Garisto Donzelli, Bruno; Gibson, Donna M; Krasnoff, Stuart B

    2015-09-01

    Efficient iron acquisition mechanisms are fundamental for microbial survival in the environment and for pathogen virulence within their hosts. M. robertsii produces two known iron-binding natural products: metachelins, which are used to scavenge extracellular iron, and ferricrocin, which is strictly intracellular. To study the contribution of siderophore-mediated iron uptake and storage to M. robertsii fitness, we generated null mutants for each siderophore synthase gene (mrsidD and mrsidC, respectively), as well as for the iron uptake transcriptional repressor mrsreA. All of these mutants showed impaired germination speed, differential sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide, and differential ability to overcome iron chelation on growth-limiting iron concentrations. RT-qPCR data supported regulation of mrsreA, mrsidC, and mrsidD by supplied iron in vitro and during growth within the insect host, Spodoptera exigua. We also observed strong upregulation of the insect iron-binding proteins, transferrins, during infection. Insect bioassays revealed that ferricrocin is required for full virulence against S. exigua; neither the loss of metachelin production nor the deletion of the transcription factor mrsreA significantly affected M. robertsii virulence. PMID:26135511

  2. The tomato xylem sap protein XSP10 is required for full susceptibility to Fusarium wilt disease.

    PubMed

    Krasikov, Vladimir; Dekker, Henk L; Rep, Martijn; Takken, Frank L W

    2011-01-01

    XSP10 is an abundant 10 kDa protein found in the xylem sap of tomato. The protein displays structural similarity to plant lipid transfer proteins (LTPs). LTPs are involved in various physiological processes, including disease resistance, and some are able to bind and transfer diverse lipid molecules. XSP10 abundance in xylem sap declines upon infection with Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici (Fol), implying involvement of XSP10 in the plant-pathogen interaction. Here, the biochemical characterization of XSP10 with respect to fatty acid-binding properties is reported; a weak but significant binding to saturated fatty acids was found. Furthermore, XSP10-silenced tomato plants were engineered and it was found that these plants exhibited reduced disease symptom development upon infection with a virulent strain of Fol. Interestingly, the reduced symptoms observed did not correlate with an altered expression profile for known reporter genes of plant defence (PR-1 and WIPI). This work demonstrates that XSP10 has lipid-binding properties and is required for full susceptibility of tomato to Fusarium wilt. PMID:20974736

  3. Intracellular acidification is required for full activation of the sweet taste receptor by miraculin.

    PubMed

    Sanematsu, Keisuke; Kitagawa, Masayuki; Yoshida, Ryusuke; Nirasawa, Satoru; Shigemura, Noriatsu; Ninomiya, Yuzo

    2016-01-01

    Acidification of the glycoprotein, miraculin (MCL), induces sweet taste in humans, but not in mice. The sweet taste induced by MCL is more intense when acidification occurs with weak acids as opposed to strong acids. MCL interacts with the human sweet receptor subunit hTAS1R2, but the mechanisms by which the acidification of MCL activates the sweet taste receptor remain largely unexplored. The work reported here speaks directly to this activation by utilizing a sweet receptor TAS1R2 + TAS1R3 assay. In accordance with previous data, MCL-applied cells displayed a pH dependence with citric acid (weak acid) being right shifted to that with hydrochloric acid (strong acid). When histidine residues in both the intracellular and extracellular region of hTAS1R2 were exchanged for alanine, taste-modifying effect of MCL was reduced or abolished. Stronger intracellular acidification of HEK293 cells was induced by citric acid than by HCl and taste-modifying effect of MCL was proportional to intracellular pH regardless of types of acids. These results suggest that intracellular acidity is required for full activation of the sweet taste receptor by MCL. PMID:26960429

  4. Intracellular acidification is required for full activation of the sweet taste receptor by miraculin

    PubMed Central

    Sanematsu, Keisuke; Kitagawa, Masayuki; Yoshida, Ryusuke; Nirasawa, Satoru; Shigemura, Noriatsu; Ninomiya, Yuzo

    2016-01-01

    Acidification of the glycoprotein, miraculin (MCL), induces sweet taste in humans, but not in mice. The sweet taste induced by MCL is more intense when acidification occurs with weak acids as opposed to strong acids. MCL interacts with the human sweet receptor subunit hTAS1R2, but the mechanisms by which the acidification of MCL activates the sweet taste receptor remain largely unexplored. The work reported here speaks directly to this activation by utilizing a sweet receptor TAS1R2 + TAS1R3 assay. In accordance with previous data, MCL-applied cells displayed a pH dependence with citric acid (weak acid) being right shifted to that with hydrochloric acid (strong acid). When histidine residues in both the intracellular and extracellular region of hTAS1R2 were exchanged for alanine, taste-modifying effect of MCL was reduced or abolished. Stronger intracellular acidification of HEK293 cells was induced by citric acid than by HCl and taste-modifying effect of MCL was proportional to intracellular pH regardless of types of acids. These results suggest that intracellular acidity is required for full activation of the sweet taste receptor by MCL. PMID:26960429

  5. The full-of-bacteria gene is required for phagosome maturation during immune defense in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Akbar, Mohammed Ali; Tracy, Charles; Kahr, Walter H.A.

    2011-01-01

    Arthrogryposis, renal dysfunction, and cholestasis (ARC) syndrome is a fatal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the VPS33B or VPS16B genes. Both encode homologues of the Vps33p and Vps16p subunits of the HOPS complex necessary for fusions of vacuoles in yeast. Here, we describe a mutation in the full-of-bacteria (fob) gene, which encodes Drosophila Vps16B. Flies null for fob are homozygous viable and fertile. They exhibit, however, a defect in their immune defense that renders them hypersensitive to infections with nonpathogenic bacteria. fob hemocytes (fly macrophages) engulf bacteria but fail to digest them. Phagosomes undergo early steps of maturation and transition to a Rab7-positive stage, but do not mature to fully acidified phagolysosomes. This reflects a specific requirement of fob in the fusion of phagosomes with late endosomes/lysosomes. In contrast, cargo of autophagosomes as well as endosomes exhibit normal lysosomal delivery in fob cells. These findings suggest that defects in phagosome maturation may contribute to symptoms of ARC patients including recurring infections. PMID:21282466

  6. The full-of-bacteria gene is required for phagosome maturation during immune defense in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Akbar, Mohammed Ali; Tracy, Charles; Kahr, Walter H A; Krämer, Helmut

    2011-02-01

    Arthrogryposis, renal dysfunction, and cholestasis (ARC) syndrome is a fatal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the VPS33B or VPS16B genes. Both encode homologues of the Vps33p and Vps16p subunits of the HOPS complex necessary for fusions of vacuoles in yeast. Here, we describe a mutation in the full-of-bacteria (fob) gene, which encodes Drosophila Vps16B. Flies null for fob are homozygous viable and fertile. They exhibit, however, a defect in their immune defense that renders them hypersensitive to infections with nonpathogenic bacteria. fob hemocytes (fly macrophages) engulf bacteria but fail to digest them. Phagosomes undergo early steps of maturation and transition to a Rab7-positive stage, but do not mature to fully acidified phagolysosomes. This reflects a specific requirement of fob in the fusion of phagosomes with late endosomes/lysosomes. In contrast, cargo of autophagosomes as well as endosomes exhibit normal lysosomal delivery in fob cells. These findings suggest that defects in phagosome maturation may contribute to symptoms of ARC patients including recurring infections. PMID:21282466

  7. FDA Approves Eye Implant for Aging Boomers

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_159648.html FDA Approves Eye Implant for Aging Boomers Tiny lens reshapes cornea to improve focus ... 2016 (HealthDay News) -- An implant that helps the aging eye focus on small print and nearby objects ...

  8. Traumatic Brain Injury: FDA Research and Actions

    MedlinePlus

    ... For Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Traumatic Brain Injury: FDA Research and Actions Share Tweet Linkedin ... top What to Do if You Suspect Traumatic Brain Injury Anyone with signs of moderate or severe ...

  9. FDA Approves Implant to Battle Opioid Addiction

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_159050.html FDA Approves Implant to Battle Opioid Addiction Experts say steady dosing ... 26, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A new long-acting implant that can help treat people addicted to heroin ...

  10. FDA Approves Eye Implant for Aging Boomers

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus/news/fullstory_159648.html FDA Approves Eye Implant for Aging Boomers Tiny lens reshapes cornea to ... 2016 THURSDAY, June 30, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- An implant that helps the aging eye focus on small ...

  11. FDA Bolsters Warnings about Class of Antibiotics

    MedlinePlus

    ... html FDA Bolsters Warnings About Class of Antibiotics Fluoroquinolones such as Cipro, Levaquin should be reserved for ... label warnings on a class of antibiotics called fluoroquinolones because the drugs can lead to disabling side ...

  12. FDA Approves First Fully Dissolvable Stent

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_159721.html FDA Approves First Fully Dissolvable Stent Device is absorbed by the body after about ... July 5, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The first coronary stent to be gradually absorbed by the body has ...

  13. FDA Launches Ad Campaign Against Chewing Tobacco

    MedlinePlus

    ... 158385.html FDA Launches Ad Campaign Against Chewing Tobacco Health officials targeting rural teens with messages about health risks of smokeless tobacco products To use the sharing features on this ...

  14. FDA Expands Advice on Statin Risks

    MedlinePlus

    ... of liver damage. back to top Reports of Memory Loss FDA has been investigating reports of cognitive ... included assessments of cognitive function. The reports about memory loss, forgetfulness and confusion span all statin products ...

  15. FDA Approves First Immunotherapy for Lymphoma

    Cancer.gov

    The FDA has approved nivolumab (Opdivo®) for the treatment of patients with classical Hodgkin lymphoma whose disease has relapsed or worsened after receiving an autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation followed by brentuximab vedotin (Adcetris®)

  16. FDA Approves Implant to Battle Opioid Addiction

    MedlinePlus

    ... 159050.html FDA Approves Implant to Battle Opioid Addiction Experts say steady dosing eliminates need to take ... U.S. Food and Drug Administration. "Opioid abuse and addiction have taken a devastating toll on American families. ...

  17. 21 CFR 60.20 - FDA action on regulatory review period determinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... October 9, 1984, in PTO's Official Gazette and as required by 37 CFR chapter I. (b) After determining the... established for the application in FDA's Division of Dockets Management (HFA-305), 5630 Fishers Lane, rm....

  18. Pictorial Health Warnings on Cigarette Packs in the United States: An Experimental Evaluation of the Proposed FDA Warnings

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Jessica L.; Driezen, Pete; Boudreau, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: In 2010, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) developed 36 proposed health warnings for cigarette packages, from which 9 were subsequently selected for implementation. The current study aimed to evaluate the perceived efficacy of the 36 proposed FDA warnings. Methods: Web-based surveys were conducted with 783 adult smokers and 510 youth in United States. Participants were randomized to view and rate two sets of 6–7 warnings, each set corresponding to one of nine health effect statements required under the Tobacco Control Act. Warnings included all 36 FDA-proposed warnings and additional warnings for comparison. Results: Youth and adults rated individual warnings similarly; in all cases where differences were found, youth perceived warnings as more effective. Comparisons on specific elements indicated that warnings were perceived as more effective if they were: full color (vs. black and white), featured real people (vs. comic book style), contained graphic images (vs. nongraphic), and included a telephone “quitline” number or personal information. Few sociodemographic differences were observed in overall perceived effectiveness: younger respondents, non-White respondents, and smokers intending to quit rated warnings higher. Conclusions: Seven of the nine health warnings selected by the FDA for implementation were among the proposed warnings rated as most effective in the current study. However, the warning(s) added for comparison were rated higher than the FDA-selected warning for five of the nine sets, suggesting some warnings could be improved for greater impact. The findings support the inclusion of a telephone “quitline” number and reinforce the importance of depicting “real” people and health effects. PMID:22505660

  19. 77 FR 23643 - Advance Notice of Implementation of Full-Service Intelligent Mail Required for Automation Prices

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-20

    ....gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2012-03-02/html/2012-5050.htm ). There are secondary benefits to using Full-Service... 111 Advance Notice of Implementation of Full-Service Intelligent Mail Required for Automation Prices... Postal Service is planning to move to the Full-Service Intelligent Mail option to access...

  20. [Discussion about traditional Chinese medicine pharmacokinetics study based on first botanical drug approved by FDA].

    PubMed

    Huang, Fanghua

    2010-04-01

    Pharmacokinetics study is one of main components of pharmaceuticals development. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved Veregen as the first botanical drug in 2006. This article introduced FDA's requirement on pharmacokinetics study of botanical drug and pharmacokinetics studies of Veregen, summarized current requirement and status quo of pharmacokinetics study on traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) and natural medicine in China, and discussed about pharmacokinetics study strategy for TCM and natural medicine. PMID:20575403

  1. 42 CFR 84.118 - Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, and mouthpieces; fit; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...) Full facepieces shall provide for optional use of corrective spectacles or lenses, which shall not... with the fit of common industrial safety spectacles, as determined by the Institute's facepiece...

  2. 42 CFR 84.75 - Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, mouthpieces; fit; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... and sizes. (b) Full facepieces shall provide for the optional use of corrective spectacles or lenses... provide an airtight seal. (d) Facepieces shall be designed to prevent eyepiece, spectacle, and...

  3. 42 CFR 84.118 - Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, and mouthpieces; fit; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...) Full facepieces shall provide for optional use of corrective spectacles or lenses, which shall not... with the fit of common industrial safety spectacles, as determined by the Institute's facepiece...

  4. 42 CFR 84.118 - Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, and mouthpieces; fit; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...) Full facepieces shall provide for optional use of corrective spectacles or lenses, which shall not... with the fit of common industrial safety spectacles, as determined by the Institute's facepiece...

  5. 42 CFR 84.75 - Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, mouthpieces; fit; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... and sizes. (b) Full facepieces shall provide for the optional use of corrective spectacles or lenses... provide an airtight seal. (d) Facepieces shall be designed to prevent eyepiece, spectacle, and...

  6. 42 CFR 84.118 - Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, and mouthpieces; fit; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...) Full facepieces shall provide for optional use of corrective spectacles or lenses, which shall not... with the fit of common industrial safety spectacles, as determined by the Institute's facepiece...

  7. 42 CFR 84.75 - Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, mouthpieces; fit; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... and sizes. (b) Full facepieces shall provide for the optional use of corrective spectacles or lenses... provide an airtight seal. (d) Facepieces shall be designed to prevent eyepiece, spectacle, and...

  8. 42 CFR 84.118 - Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, and mouthpieces; fit; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...) Full facepieces shall provide for optional use of corrective spectacles or lenses, which shall not... with the fit of common industrial safety spectacles, as determined by the Institute's facepiece...

  9. 42 CFR 84.75 - Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, mouthpieces; fit; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... and sizes. (b) Full facepieces shall provide for the optional use of corrective spectacles or lenses... provide an airtight seal. (d) Facepieces shall be designed to prevent eyepiece, spectacle, and...

  10. 42 CFR 84.75 - Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, mouthpieces; fit; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... and sizes. (b) Full facepieces shall provide for the optional use of corrective spectacles or lenses... provide an airtight seal. (d) Facepieces shall be designed to prevent eyepiece, spectacle, and...

  11. 34 CFR 75.511 - Waiver of requirement for a full-time project director.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... and 3474) Cross reference: See 34 CFR 74.25, Revision of budget and program plans; and 34 CFR 80.30... PROGRAMS What Conditions Must Be Met by a Grantee? Project Staff § 75.511 Waiver of requirement for a...

  12. 34 CFR 75.511 - Waiver of requirement for a full-time project director.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... and 3474) Cross reference: See 34 CFR 74.25, Revision of budget and program plans; and 34 CFR 80.30... PROGRAMS What Conditions Must Be Met by a Grantee? Project Staff § 75.511 Waiver of requirement for a...

  13. 34 CFR 75.511 - Waiver of requirement for a full-time project director.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... and 3474) Cross reference: See 34 CFR 74.25, Revision of budget and program plans; and 34 CFR 80.30... PROGRAMS What Conditions Must Be Met by a Grantee? Project Staff § 75.511 Waiver of requirement for a...

  14. 34 CFR 75.511 - Waiver of requirement for a full-time project director.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... and 3474) Cross Reference: See 34 CFR 74.25, Revision of budget and program plans; and 34 CFR 80.30... PROGRAMS What Conditions Must Be Met by a Grantee? Project Staff § 75.511 Waiver of requirement for a...

  15. 34 CFR 75.511 - Waiver of requirement for a full-time project director.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... and 3474) Cross Reference: See 34 CFR 74.25, Revision of budget and program plans; and 34 CFR 80.30... PROGRAMS What Conditions Must Be Met by a Grantee? Project Staff § 75.511 Waiver of requirement for a...

  16. 77 FR 63771 - Implementation of Full-Service Intelligent Mail Requirements for Automation Prices

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-17

    ... published an advance notice of proposed rulemaking in the Federal Register (77 FR 23643-23647) to require... Mail, Periodicals, and Bound Printed Matter (BPM) when mailing postcards, letters, and flats... FCM, Standard Mail, Periodicals, and BPM). Mailers would be able to more effectively plan...

  17. Epidural steroid warning controversy still dogging FDA.

    PubMed

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Candido, Kenneth D; Singh, Vijay; Gharibo, Christopher G; Boswell, Mark V; Benyamin, Ramsin M; Falco, Frank J E; Grider, Jay S; Diwan, Sudhir; Hirsch, Joshua A

    2014-01-01

    On April 23, 2014, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued a letter of warning that injection of corticosteroids into the epidural space of the spine may result in rare, but serious adverse events, including "loss of vision, stroke, paralysis, and death." The advisory also advocated that patients should discuss the benefits and risks of epidural corticosteroid injections with their health care professionals, along with the benefits and risks associated with other possible treatments. In addition, the FDA stated that the effectiveness and safety of the corticosteroids for epidural use have not been established, and the FDA has not approved corticosteroids for such use. To raise awareness of the risks of epidural corticosteroid injections in the medical community, the FDA's Safe Use Initiative convened a panel of experts including pain management experts to help define the techniques for such injections with the aim of reducing preventable harm. The panel was unable to reach an agreement on 20 proposed items related to technical aspects of performing epidural injections. Subsequently, the FDA issued the above referenced warning and a notice that a panel will be convened in November 2014. This review assesses the inaccuracies of the warning and critically analyzes the available literature. The literature has been assessed in reference to alternate techniques and an understanding of the risk factors when performing transforaminal epidural injections in the cervical, thoracic, and lumbar regions, ultimately resulting in improved safety. The results of this review show the efficacy of epidural injections, with or without steroids, in a multitude of spinal ailments utilizing caudal, cervical, thoracic, and lumbar interlaminar approaches as well as lumbar transforaminal epidural injections . The evidence also shows the superiority of steroids in managing lumbar disc herniation utilizing caudal and lumbar interlaminar approaches without any significant difference as

  18. Full-sky Astrometric Mapping Explorer (FAME): CCD Tests and Optical Requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, K. J.

    2002-12-01

    The FAME project team has pursued several studies in order to resolve technical, schedule, and mission cost concerns and to investigate requirements for future space astrometry missions. Two CCD fabrication runs have been completed with good yields of operating CCDs. The first fabrication run, using a mixture of 37 and 100 ohm cm substrate, produced 100 ohm cm devices with a reduced CTE. Thus, only 37 ohm cm substrate was used in the second run. To mitigate the effects of on-orbit radiation damage, FAME CCDs are designed with charge injection capabilities. The current FAME CCDs have a reduced yield of devices with good operating charge injection. The CCDs are currently being tested for image centroiding accuracy and operating characteristics, both before and after laboratory irradiation. The intent is to learn more about the radiation effects on the CCDs and the methods of mitigating the effects of charge transfer inefficiency. Results of these tests will be given. The requirements for very accurate centroiding of images places strict requirements on the optical design, distortions, and the tolerances on the alignment and thermal variations of the optical components of the instrument. The exact requirements necessary to reach the measurement accuracy have a large effect on the schedule and cost of manufacturing and installing the optics. Therefore, special studies have been conducted to determine the exact requirements for the optical design. The science that would result from the FAME observations remains compelling, which is the reason for the efforts to continue to develop the project. The latest status and future plans for FAME will be included.

  19. 16 CFR 1220.2 - Requirements for non-full-size baby cribs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... CFR part 51. You may obtain a copy from ASTM International, 100 Bar Harbor Drive, PO Box 0700, West Conshohocken, PA 19428; telephone 610-832-9585; http://www.astm.org. You may inspect a copy at the Office of...-full-size baby crib shall comply with all applicable provisions of ASTM F 406-10a, Standard...

  20. 42 CFR 457.930 - Full investigation, resolution, and reporting requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STATE CHILDREN'S HEALTH INSURANCE PROGRAMS (SCHIPs) ALLOTMENTS AND... and apparent instances of fraud and abuse. Once the State determines that a full investigation is... with and refer potential fraud and abuse cases to the State program integrity unit, if such a...

  1. FDA panel finds mifepristone safe and effective.

    PubMed

    1996-07-26

    At a July 19 hearing, the Food and Drug Administration's Advisory Committee for Reproductive Health Drugs found mifepristone to be safe and effective in inducing abortions early in pregnancy and recommended that the drug be approved for marketing in the US. With a 6-0 vote with two abstentions, the eight-member panel found that mifepristone's benefits were greater than its risks; agreed, 7-0, with one abstention, that it is safe; voted 6-2 to accept data from a French study as sufficient to recommend use in this country; and decided unanimously to reconvene if results from US clinical trials differ significantly from those from France. While the FDA is not required to follow the panel's advice, it is highly uncommon for it to do otherwise. The advisory panel scheduled the hearing in response to an application filed this spring by the Population Council, the nonprofit organization that owns the US patent rights to the drug. The meeting began with a presentation by the Population Council on the results of an American mifepristone trial that involved more than 2000 women and a discussion of the data from studies and practical use in France. The second session brought public testimony from 33 speakers, the majority of whom spoke in favor of the drug's approval. A company plans to manufacture mifepristone once it is approved but refuses to reveal its identity out of concern that it will be a target for anti-choice protests and boycotts. The drug would be marketed by Advances in Health Technology, Inc., an enterprise designated by the Population Council as the exclusive US distributor of mifepristone--the abortifacient marketed as RU486 in France and used by nearly 200,000 women in Europe and elsewhere. PMID:12347288

  2. The FDA's Final Rule on Expedited Safety Reporting: Statistical Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Wittes, Janet; Crowe, Brenda; Chuang-Stein, Christy; Guettner, Achim; Hall, David; Jiang, Qi; Odenheimer, Daniel; Xia, H. Amy; Kramer, Judith

    2015-01-01

    In March 2011, a Final Rule for expedited reporting of serious adverse events took effect in the United States for studies conducted under an Investigational New Drug (IND) application. In December 2012, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) promulgated a final Guidance describing the operationalization of this Final Rule. The Rule and Guidance clarified that a clinical trial sponsor should have evidence suggesting causality before defining an unexpected serious adverse event as a suspected adverse reaction that would require expedited reporting to the FDA. The Rule's emphasis on the need for evidence suggestive of a causal relation should lead to fewer events being reported but, among those reported, a higher percentage actually being caused by the product being tested. This article reviews the practices that were common before the Final Rule was issued and the approach the New Rule specifies. It then discusses methods for operationalizing the Final Rule with particular focus on relevant statistical considerations. It concludes with a set of recommendations addressed to Sponsors and to the FDA in implementing the Final Rule. PMID:26550466

  3. CtpV: A putative copper exporter required for full virulence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Sarah K.; Abomoelak, Bassam; Hoye, Elizabeth A.; Steinberg, Howard; Talaat, Adel M.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Copper is a required micronutrient that is also toxic at excess concentrations. Currently, little is known about the role of copper in interactions between bacterial pathogens and their human hosts. In this study, we elucidate a mechanism for copper homeostasis in the human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis via characterization of a putative copper exporter, CtpV. CtpV was shown to be required by M. tuberculosis to maintain resistance to copper toxicity. Furthermore, the deletion of ctpV resulted in a 98-gene transcriptional response which elucidates the increased stress experienced by the bacteria in the absence of this detoxification mechanism. Interestingly, although the ΔctpV mutant survives close to the wild-type levels in both murine and guinea pig models of tuberculosis, animals infected with the ΔctpV mutant displayed decreased lung damage, and mutant-infected mice had a reduced immune response to the bacteria as well as a significant increase in survival time relative to mice infected with wild-type M. tuberculosis. Overall, our study provides the first evidence for a connection between bacterial copper response and the virulence of M. tuberculosis, supporting the hypothesis that copper response could be important to intracellular pathogens, in general. PMID:20624225

  4. Cytokinin Production by the Rice Blast Fungus Is a Pivotal Requirement for Full Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Chanclud, Emilie; Kisiala, Anna; Emery, Neil R. J; Chalvon, Véronique; Ducasse, Aurélie; Romiti-Michel, Corinne; Gravot, Antoine; Kroj, Thomas; Morel, Jean-Benoit

    2016-01-01

    Plants produce cytokinin (CK) hormones for controlling key developmental processes like source/sink distribution, cell division or programmed cell-death. Some plant pathogens have been shown to produce CKs but the function of this mimicry production by non-tumor inducing pathogens, has yet to be established. Here we identify a gene required for CK biosynthesis, CKS1, in the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae. The fungal-secreted CKs are likely perceived by the plant during infection since the transcriptional regulation of rice CK-responsive genes is altered in plants infected by the mutants in which CKS1 gene was deleted. Although cks1 mutants showed normal in vitro growth and development, they were severely affected for in planta growth and virulence. Moreover, we showed that the cks1 mutant triggered enhanced induction of plant defenses as manifested by an elevated oxidative burst and expression of defense-related markers. In addition, the contents of sugars and key amino acids for fungal growth were altered in and around the infection site by the cks1 mutant in a different manner than by the control strain. These results suggest that fungal-derived CKs are key effectors required for dampening host defenses and affecting sugar and amino acid distribution in and around the infection site. PMID:26900703

  5. FDA aprueba la primera inmunoterapia para linfoma

    Cancer.gov

    La FDA ha aprobado nivolumab (Opdivo®) para el tratamiento de pacientes con el linfoma clásico de Hodgkin que ha recaído o empeorado después de recibir un trasplante autólogo hematopoyético seguido de brentuximab vedotin (Adcetris®)

  6. Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii produces an endoglucanase that is required for full virulence in sweet corn.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Mojtaba; Burbank, Lindsey; Roper, M Caroline

    2012-04-01

    Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii, a xylem-dwelling bacterium, is the causal agent of Stewart's wilt and blight of sweet corn. The goal of this study was to characterize the only gene in the P. stewartii subsp. stewartii genome predicted to encode an endoglucanase (EGase); this gene was designated engY. Culture supernatants from P. stewartii subsp. stewartii and Escherichia coli expressing recombinant EngY protein possessed both EGase and xylanase activities. Deletion of engY abolished EGase and xylanase activity, demonstrating that EngY appears to be the major EGase or xylanase produced by P. stewartii subsp. stewartii. Most importantly, our results show that EngY contributes to movement in the xylem and disease severity during the wilting phase of Stewart's wilt but is not required for water-soaked lesion formation. PMID:22122328

  7. The Aspergillus fumigatus Dihydroxyacid Dehydratase Ilv3A/IlvC Is Required for Full Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Oliver, Jason D.; Kaye, Sarah J.; Tuckwell, Danny; Johns, Anna E.; Macdonald, Darel A.; Livermore, Joanne; Warn, Peter A.; Birch, Mike; Bromley, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Dihydroxyacid dehydratase (DHAD) is a key enzyme in the branched-chain amino acid biosynthetic pathway that exists in a variety of organisms, including fungi, plants and bacteria, but not humans. In this study we identified four putative DHAD genes from the filamentous fungus Aspergillus fumigatus by homology to Saccharomyces cerevisiae ILV3. Two of these genes, AFUA_2G14210 and AFUA_1G03550, initially designated AfIlv3A and AfIlv3B for this study, clustered in the same group as S. cerevisiae ILV3 following phylogenetic analysis. To investigate the functions of these genes, AfIlv3A and AfIlv3B were knocked out in A. fumigatus. Deletion of AfIlv3B gave no apparent phenotype whereas the Δilv3A strain required supplementation with isoleucine and valine for growth. Thus, AfIlv3A is required for branched-chain amino acid synthesis in A. fumigatus. A recombinant AfIlv3A protein derived from AFUA_2G14210 was shown to have DHAD activity in an in vitro assay, confirming that AfIlv3A is a DHAD. In addition we show that mutants lacking AfIlv3A and ilv3B exhibit reduced levels of virulence in murine infection models, emphasising the importance of branched-chain amino acid biosynthesis in fungal infections, and hence the potential of targeting this pathway with antifungal agents. Here we propose that AfIlv3A/AFUA_2G2410 be named ilvC. PMID:23028460

  8. Requirement of full TCR repertoire for regulatory T cells to maintain intestinal homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Nishio, Junko; Baba, Minato; Atarashi, Koji; Tanoue, Takeshi; Negishi, Hideo; Yanai, Hideyuki; Habu, Sonoko; Hori, Shohei; Honda, Kenya; Taniguchi, Tadatsugu

    2015-10-13

    The regulation of intestinal homeostasis by the immune system involves the dynamic interplay between gut commensal microbiota and resident immune cells. It is well known that a large and diverse lymphocyte antigen receptor repertoire enables the immune system to recognize and respond to a wide range of invading pathogens. There is also an emerging appreciation for a critical role the T-cell receptor (TCR) repertoire serves in the maintenance of peripheral tolerance by regulatory T cells (Tregs). Nevertheless, how the diversity of the TCR repertoire in Tregs affects intestinal homeostasis remains unknown. To address this question, we studied mice whose T cells express a restricted TCR repertoire. We observed the development of spontaneous colitis, accompanied by the induction of T-helper type 17 cells in the colon that is driven by gut commensal microbiota. We provide further evidence that a restricted TCR repertoire causes a loss of tolerogenicity to microbiota, accompanied by a paucity of peripherally derived, Helios(-) Tregs and hyperactivation of migratory dendritic cells. These results thus reveal a new facet of the TCR repertoire in which Tregs require a diverse TCR repitoire for intestinal homeostasis, suggesting an additional driving force in the evolutional significance of the TCR repertoire. PMID:26420876

  9. Requirement of full TCR repertoire for regulatory T cells to maintain intestinal homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Nishio, Junko; Baba, Minato; Atarashi, Koji; Tanoue, Takeshi; Negishi, Hideo; Yanai, Hideyuki; Habu, Sonoko; Hori, Shohei; Honda, Kenya; Taniguchi, Tadatsugu

    2015-01-01

    The regulation of intestinal homeostasis by the immune system involves the dynamic interplay between gut commensal microbiota and resident immune cells. It is well known that a large and diverse lymphocyte antigen receptor repertoire enables the immune system to recognize and respond to a wide range of invading pathogens. There is also an emerging appreciation for a critical role the T-cell receptor (TCR) repertoire serves in the maintenance of peripheral tolerance by regulatory T cells (Tregs). Nevertheless, how the diversity of the TCR repertoire in Tregs affects intestinal homeostasis remains unknown. To address this question, we studied mice whose T cells express a restricted TCR repertoire. We observed the development of spontaneous colitis, accompanied by the induction of T-helper type 17 cells in the colon that is driven by gut commensal microbiota. We provide further evidence that a restricted TCR repertoire causes a loss of tolerogenicity to microbiota, accompanied by a paucity of peripherally derived, Helios− Tregs and hyperactivation of migratory dendritic cells. These results thus reveal a new facet of the TCR repertoire in which Tregs require a diverse TCR repitoire for intestinal homeostasis, suggesting an additional driving force in the evolutional significance of the TCR repertoire. PMID:26420876

  10. Vitamin B6 Is Required for Full Motility and Virulence in Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Grubman, Alexandra; Phillips, Alexandra; Thibonnier, Marie; Kaparakis-Liaskos, Maria; Johnson, Chad; Thiberge, Jean-Michel; Radcliff, Fiona J.; Ecobichon, Chantal; Labigne, Agnès; de Reuse, Hilde; Mendz, George L.; Ferrero, Richard L.

    2010-01-01

    Despite recent advances in our understanding of how Helicobacter pylori causes disease, the factors that allow this pathogen to persist in the stomach have not yet been fully characterized. To identify new virulence factors in H. pylori, we generated low-infectivity variants of a mouse-colonizing H. pylori strain using the classical technique of in vitro attenuation. The resulting variants and their highly infectious progenitor bacteria were then analyzed by global gene expression profiling. The gene expression levels of five open reading frames (ORFs) were significantly reduced in low-infectivity variants, with the most significant changes observed for ORFs HP1583 and HP1582. These ORFs were annotated as encoding homologs of the Escherichia coli vitamin B6 biosynthesis enzymes PdxA and PdxJ. Functional complementation studies with E. coli confirmed H. pylori PdxA and PdxJ to be bona fide homologs of vitamin B6 biosynthesis enzymes. Importantly, H. pylori PdxA was required for optimal growth in vitro and was shown to be essential for chronic colonization in mice. In addition to having a well-known metabolic role, vitamin B6 is necessary for the synthesis of glycosylated flagella and for flagellum-based motility in H. pylori. Thus, for the first time, we identify vitamin B6 biosynthesis enzymes as novel virulence factors in bacteria. Interestingly, pdxA and pdxJ orthologs are present in a number of human pathogens, but not in mammalian cells. We therefore propose that PdxA/J enzymes may represent ideal candidates for therapeutic targets against bacterial pathogens. PMID:21151756

  11. N-terminal Serine Dephosphorylation Is Required for KCC3 Cotransporter Full Activation by Cell Swelling*

    PubMed Central

    Melo, Zesergio; de los Heros, Paola; Cruz-Rangel, Silvia; Vázquez, Norma; Bobadilla, Norma A.; Pasantes-Morales, Herminia; Alessi, Dario R.; Mercado, Adriana; Gamba, Gerardo

    2013-01-01

    The K+:Cl− cotransporter (KCC) activity is modulated by phosphorylation/dephosphorylation processes. In isotonic conditions, KCCs are inactive and phosphorylated, whereas hypotonicity promotes their dephosphorylation and activation. Two phosphorylation sites (Thr-991 and Thr-1048) in KCC3 have been found to be critical for its regulation. However, here we show that the double mutant KCC3-T991A/T1048A could be further activated by hypotonicity, suggesting that additional phosphorylation site(s) are involved. We observed that in vitro activated STE20/SPS1-related proline/alanine-rich kinase (SPAK) complexed to its regulatory MO25 subunit phosphorylated KCC3 at Ser-96 and that in Xenopus laevis oocytes Ser-96 of human KCC3 is phosphorylated in isotonic conditions and becomes dephosphorylated during incubation in hypotonicity, leading to a dramatic increase in KCC3 function. Additionally, WNK3, which inhibits the activity of KCC3, promoted phosphorylation of Ser-96 as well as Thr-991 and Thr-1048. These observations were corroborated in HEK293 cells stably transfected with WNK3. Mutation of Ser-96 alone (KCC3-S96A) had no effect on the activity of the cotransporter when compared with wild type KCC3. However, when compared with the double mutant KCC3-T991A/T1048A, the triple mutant KCC3-S96A/T991A/T1048A activity in isotonic conditions was significantly higher, and it was not further increased by hypotonicity or inhibited by WNK3. We conclude that serine residue 96 of human KCC3 is a third site that has to be dephosphorylated for full activation of the cotransporter during hypotonicity. PMID:24043619

  12. FDA's misplaced priorities: premarket review under the Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act.

    PubMed

    Jenson, Desmond; Lester, Joelle; Berman, Micah L

    2016-05-01

    Among other key objectives, the 2009 Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act was designed to end an era of constant product manipulation by the tobacco industry that had led to more addictive and attractive products. The law requires new tobacco products to undergo premarket review by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) before they can be sold. To assess FDA's implementation of its premarket review authorities, we reviewed FDA actions on new product applications, publicly available data on industry applications to market new products, and related FDA guidance documents and public statements. We conclude that FDA has not implemented the premarket review process in a manner that prioritises the protection of public health. In particular, FDA has (1) prioritised the review of premarket applications that allow for the introduction of new tobacco products over the review of potentially non-compliant products that are already on the market; (2) misallocated resources by accommodating the industry's repeated submissions of deficient premarket applications and (3) weakened the premarket review process by allowing the tobacco industry to market new and modified products that have not completed the required review process. PMID:27068243

  13. The new label for erythropoiesis stimulating agents: the FDA'S sentence.

    PubMed

    Fishbane, Steven; Jhaveri, Kenar D

    2012-05-01

    On June 24, 2011, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) revised the prescribing instructions (the label) for erythropoiesis-stimulating agents. The new label, the second revision since publication of the TREAT Study, placed new restrictions on the use of these agents, and increased the strength of warnings. We believe that the new label language may deprive patients of the full benefits of erythropoiesis-stimulating agent treatment and impair the opportunity to individualize treatment through shared decision making. Diminished discovery and innovation in the treatment of one of the most common and important complications of kidney disease may also be an unintended consequence of the label change. PMID:22515844

  14. Mining FDA drug labels for medical conditions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center (CCHMC) has built the initial Natural Language Processing (NLP) component to extract medications with their corresponding medical conditions (Indications, Contraindications, Overdosage, and Adverse Reactions) as triples of medication-related information ([(1) drug name]-[(2) medical condition]-[(3) LOINC section header]) for an intelligent database system, in order to improve patient safety and the quality of health care. The Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) drug labels are used to demonstrate the feasibility of building the triples as an intelligent database system task. Methods This paper discusses a hybrid NLP system, called AutoMCExtractor, to collect medical conditions (including disease/disorder and sign/symptom) from drug labels published by the FDA. Altogether, 6,611 medical conditions in a manually-annotated gold standard were used for the system evaluation. The pre-processing step extracted the plain text from XML file and detected eight related LOINC sections (e.g. Adverse Reactions, Warnings and Precautions) for medical condition extraction. Conditional Random Fields (CRF) classifiers, trained on token, linguistic, and semantic features, were then used for medical condition extraction. Lastly, dictionary-based post-processing corrected boundary-detection errors of the CRF step. We evaluated the AutoMCExtractor on manually-annotated FDA drug labels and report the results on both token and span levels. Results Precision, recall, and F-measure were 0.90, 0.81, and 0.85, respectively, for the span level exact match; for the token-level evaluation, precision, recall, and F-measure were 0.92, 0.73, and 0.82, respectively. Conclusions The results demonstrate that (1) medical conditions can be extracted from FDA drug labels with high performance; and (2) it is feasible to develop a framework for an intelligent database system. PMID:23617267

  15. 42 CFR 84.1135 - Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, hoods, helmets, and mouthpieces; fit; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, hoods, helmets, and mouthpieces; fit; minimum requirements. 84.1135 Section 84.1135 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY...

  16. 42 CFR 84.135 - Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, hoods, and helmets; fit; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, hoods, and helmets; fit; minimum requirements. 84.135 Section 84.135 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE...

  17. 42 CFR 84.175 - Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, hoods, helmets, and mouthpieces; fit; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, hoods, helmets, and mouthpieces; fit; minimum requirements. 84.175 Section 84.175 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY...

  18. 42 CFR 84.198 - Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, mouthpieces, hoods, and helmets; fit; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, mouthpieces, hoods, and helmets; fit; minimum requirements. 84.198 Section 84.198 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY...

  19. FDA Recommends All Blood Donations Be Tested for Zika

    MedlinePlus

    ... FDA Recommends All Blood Donations Be Tested for Zika Updated guidance provides further protection for U.S. blood ... entire blood supply be routinely screened for the Zika virus. In February, the FDA recommended testing of ...

  20. FDA Modernizes Nutrition Facts Label for Packaged Foods

    MedlinePlus

    ... Department of Health and Human Services FDA U.S. Food and Drug Administration Protecting and Promoting Your Health ... Release FDA modernizes Nutrition Facts label for packaged foods Refreshed design and relevant information will help consumers ...

  1. An evaluation of the FDA's analysis of the costs and benefits of the graphic warning label regulation.

    PubMed

    Chaloupka, Frank J; Warner, Kenneth E; Acemoğlu, Daron; Gruber, Jonathan; Laux, Fritz; Max, Wendy; Newhouse, Joseph; Schelling, Thomas; Sindelar, Jody

    2015-03-01

    The Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act of 2009 gave the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulatory authority over cigarettes and smokeless tobacco products and authorised it to assert jurisdiction over other tobacco products. As with other Federal agencies, FDA is required to assess the costs and benefits of its significant regulatory actions. To date, FDA has issued economic impact analyses of one proposed and one final rule requiring graphic warning labels (GWLs) on cigarette packaging and, most recently, of a proposed rule that would assert FDA's authority over tobacco products other than cigarettes and smokeless tobacco. Given the controversy over the FDA's approach to assessing net economic benefits in its proposed and final rules on GWLs and the importance of having economic impact analyses prepared in accordance with sound economic analysis, a group of prominent economists met in early 2014 to review that approach and, where indicated, to offer suggestions for an improved analysis. We concluded that the analysis of the impact of GWLs on smoking substantially underestimated the benefits and overestimated the costs, leading the FDA to substantially underestimate the net benefits of the GWLs. We hope that the FDA will find our evaluation useful in subsequent analyses, not only of GWLs but also of other regulations regarding tobacco products. Most of what we discuss applies to all instances of evaluating the costs and benefits of tobacco product regulation and, we believe, should be considered in FDA's future analyses of proposed rules. PMID:25550419

  2. 21 CFR 312.86 - Focused FDA regulatory research.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Focused FDA regulatory research. 312.86 Section... Severely-debilitating Illnesses § 312.86 Focused FDA regulatory research. At the discretion of the agency, FDA may undertake focused regulatory research on critical rate-limiting aspects of the...

  3. 21 CFR 60.34 - FDA action on petitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false FDA action on petitions. 60.34 Section 60.34 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PATENT TERM RESTORATION Due Diligence Petitions § 60.34 FDA action on petitions. (a) Within 90 days after FDA receives...

  4. 21 CFR 312.86 - Focused FDA regulatory research.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Focused FDA regulatory research. 312.86 Section... Severely-debilitating Illnesses § 312.86 Focused FDA regulatory research. At the discretion of the agency, FDA may undertake focused regulatory research on critical rate-limiting aspects of the...

  5. 75 FR 76992 - Guidance for the Public, FDA Advisory Committee Members, and FDA Staff: The Open Public Hearing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-10

    ... In the February 15, 2005, issue of the Federal Register (70 FR 7747), FDA issued a notice announcing... disclosure. This guidance is being issued consistent with FDA's good guidance practices regulation (21 CFR...

  6. OpenVigil FDA – Inspection of U.S. American Adverse Drug Events Pharmacovigilance Data and Novel Clinical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Böhm, Ruwen; von Hehn, Leocadie; Herdegen, Thomas; Klein, Hans-Joachim; Bruhn, Oliver; Petri, Holger; Höcker, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacovigilance contributes to health care. However, direct access to the underlying data for academic institutions and individual physicians or pharmacists is intricate, and easily employable analysis modes for everyday clinical situations are missing. This underlines the need for a tool to bring pharmacovigilance to the clinics. To address these issues, we have developed OpenVigil FDA, a novel web-based pharmacovigilance analysis tool which uses the openFDA online interface of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to access U.S. American and international pharmacovigilance data from the Adverse Event Reporting System (AERS). OpenVigil FDA provides disproportionality analyses to (i) identify the drug most likely evoking a new adverse event, (ii) compare two drugs concerning their safety profile, (iii) check arbitrary combinations of two drugs for unknown drug-drug interactions and (iv) enhance the relevance of results by identifying confounding factors and eliminating them using background correction. We present examples for these applications and discuss the promises and limits of pharmacovigilance, openFDA and OpenVigil FDA. OpenVigil FDA is the first public available tool to apply pharmacovigilance findings directly to real-life clinical problems. OpenVigil FDA does not require special licenses or statistical programs. PMID:27326858

  7. OpenVigil FDA - Inspection of U.S. American Adverse Drug Events Pharmacovigilance Data and Novel Clinical Applications.

    PubMed

    Böhm, Ruwen; von Hehn, Leocadie; Herdegen, Thomas; Klein, Hans-Joachim; Bruhn, Oliver; Petri, Holger; Höcker, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacovigilance contributes to health care. However, direct access to the underlying data for academic institutions and individual physicians or pharmacists is intricate, and easily employable analysis modes for everyday clinical situations are missing. This underlines the need for a tool to bring pharmacovigilance to the clinics. To address these issues, we have developed OpenVigil FDA, a novel web-based pharmacovigilance analysis tool which uses the openFDA online interface of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to access U.S. American and international pharmacovigilance data from the Adverse Event Reporting System (AERS). OpenVigil FDA provides disproportionality analyses to (i) identify the drug most likely evoking a new adverse event, (ii) compare two drugs concerning their safety profile, (iii) check arbitrary combinations of two drugs for unknown drug-drug interactions and (iv) enhance the relevance of results by identifying confounding factors and eliminating them using background correction. We present examples for these applications and discuss the promises and limits of pharmacovigilance, openFDA and OpenVigil FDA. OpenVigil FDA is the first public available tool to apply pharmacovigilance findings directly to real-life clinical problems. OpenVigil FDA does not require special licenses or statistical programs. PMID:27326858

  8. FDA Approval Summary: Ramucirumab for Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Casak, Sandra J; Fashoyin-Aje, Ibilola; Lemery, Steven J; Zhang, Lillian; Jin, Runyan; Li, Hongshan; Zhao, Liang; Zhao, Hong; Zhang, Hui; Chen, Huanyu; He, Kun; Dougherty, Michele; Novak, Rachel; Kennett, Sarah; Khasar, Sachia; Helms, Whitney; Keegan, Patricia; Pazdur, Richard

    2015-08-01

    The FDA approved ramucirumab (CYRAMZA; Eli Lilly and Company) for previously treated patients with advanced or metastatic gastric or gastroesophageal junction adenocarcinoma initially as monotherapy (April 21, 2014) and subsequently as combination therapy with paclitaxel (November 5, 2014). In the monotherapy trial, 355 patients in the indicated population were randomly allocated (2:1) to receive ramucirumab or placebo, 8 mg/kg intravenously every 2 weeks. In the combination trial, 665 patients were randomly allocated (1:1) to receive ramucirumab or placebo, 8 mg/kg intravenously every 2 weeks, in combination with paclitaxel, 80 mg/m(2) on days 1, 8, and 15 of 28-day cycles. Overall survival (OS) was increased in patients who received ramucirumab in both the monotherapy [HR, 0.78; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.60-0.998; log rank P = 0.047] and combination trials (HR, 0.81; 95% CI, 0.68-0.96; P = 0.017). The most common adverse reactions were hypertension and diarrhea in the monotherapy trial and fatigue, neutropenia, diarrhea, and epistaxis in the combination trial. Because of concerns about the robustness of the monotherapy trial results, FDA approved the original application after receiving the results of the combination trial confirming the OS effect. Based on exploratory exposure-response analyses, there is residual uncertainty regarding the optimal dose of ramucirumab. PMID:26048277

  9. Possible FDA-approved drugs to treat Ebola virus infection.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Shu

    2015-01-01

    There is currently no effective treatment for the Ebola virus (EBOV) thus far. Most drugs and vaccines developed to date have not yet been approved for human trials. Two FDA-approved c-AbI1 tyrosine kinase inhibitors Gleevec and Tasigna block the release of viral particles; however, their clinical dosages are much lower than the dosages required for effective EBOV suppression. An α-1,2-glucosidase inhibitor Miglustat has been shown to inhibit EBOV particle assembly and secretion. Additionally, the estrogen receptor modulators Clomiphene and Toremifene prevent membrane fusion of EBOV and 50-90% of treated mice survived after Clomiphene/Toremifene treatments. However, the uptake efficiency of Clomiphene by oral administration is very low. Thus, I propose a hypothetical treatment protocol to treat Ebola virus infection with a cumulative use of both Miglustat and Toremifene to inhibit the virus effectively and synergistically. EBOV infection induces massive apoptosis of peripheral lymphocytes. Also, cytolysis of endothelial cells triggers disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) and subsequent multiple organ failures. Therefore, blood transfusions and active treatments with FDA-approved drugs to treat DIC are also recommended. PMID:25984303

  10. An evaluation of the FDA's analysis of the costs and benefits of the graphic warning label regulation

    PubMed Central

    Chaloupka, Frank J; Warner, Kenneth E; Acemoğlu, Daron; Gruber, Jonathan; Laux, Fritz; Max, Wendy; Newhouse, Joseph; Schelling, Thomas; Sindelar, Jody

    2015-01-01

    The Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act of 2009 gave the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulatory authority over cigarettes and smokeless tobacco products and authorised it to assert jurisdiction over other tobacco products. As with other Federal agencies, FDA is required to assess the costs and benefits of its significant regulatory actions. To date, FDA has issued economic impact analyses of one proposed and one final rule requiring graphic warning labels (GWLs) on cigarette packaging and, most recently, of a proposed rule that would assert FDA’s authority over tobacco products other than cigarettes and smokeless tobacco. Given the controversy over the FDA's approach to assessing net economic benefits in its proposed and final rules on GWLs and the importance of having economic impact analyses prepared in accordance with sound economic analysis, a group of prominent economists met in early 2014 to review that approach and, where indicated, to offer suggestions for an improved analysis. We concluded that the analysis of the impact of GWLs on smoking substantially underestimated the benefits and overestimated the costs, leading the FDA to substantially underestimate the net benefits of the GWLs. We hope that the FDA will find our evaluation useful in subsequent analyses, not only of GWLs but also of other regulations regarding tobacco products. Most of what we discuss applies to all instances of evaluating the costs and benefits of tobacco product regulation and, we believe, should be considered in FDA's future analyses of proposed rules. PMID:25550419

  11. Target selection for FDA-approved medicines.

    PubMed

    Kinch, Michael S; Hoyer, Denton; Patridge, Eric; Plummer, Mark

    2015-07-01

    The biopharmaceutical industry translates fundamental understanding of disease into new medicines. As part of a comprehensive analysis of FDA-approved new molecular entities (NMEs), we assessed the mechanistic basis of drug efficacy, with emphasis on target selection. Three target families capture almost half of all NMEs and the leading ten families capture more than three-quarters of NME approvals. Target families were related to their clinical application and identify dynamic trends in targeting over time. These data suggest increasing attention toward novel target families, which presumably reflects increased understanding of disease etiology. We also suggest the need to balance the ongoing emphasis on target-based drug discovery with phenotypic approaches to drug discovery. PMID:25462532

  12. The FDA's proposal for public disclosure of adverse events in gene therapy trials.

    PubMed

    Barnbaum, D R

    2000-09-01

    In January 2001, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) proposed annual public disclosure of adverse events during gene therapy and xenotransplantation trials. The proposed policy raises the following questions: (1) Is the reformed policy in accord with the FDA's long-standing informed consent policies? (2) Why pair gene therapy trials and xenotransplantation trials in the revised guidelines? (3) Why single out these trials for public disclosure of adverse events? Each question is examined, and three conclusions are drawn. First, the FDA's own policies on informed consent require prompter public disclosure of adverse events. Second, the coupling of gene therapy and xenotransplantation trials entails a conceptual mistake in the types of communities that are harmed by each therapy's related adverse events. Third, all clinical trials merit such public disclosure of adverse events, not only gene therapy and xenotransplantation trials. PMID:15468489

  13. [Introduction of U.S. FDA mini-sentinel program].

    PubMed

    Xie, Yan-Ming; Liao, Xing; Shen, Hao

    2013-03-01

    In China, all of traditional Chinese medicine injections should pass clinical trials I, II and III for their safety and effectiveness before coming into the market. However, these clinical tests are mostly restricted to standard treatment for specific groups, and conducted in strict accordance with clinical trial protocols. In the real world, as there are more changes in the post-market clinical application of traditional Chinese medicine injections than in the experiment environment, regulatory bodies set stricter requirements for the post-market re-assessment on traditional Chinese medicine injections. Early-stage studies could only provide the most fundamental and restricted data of efficacy and safety of traditional Chinese medicine injections. In this essay, mini-sentinel program of U. S. FDA is introduced in order to provide reference for large-sample-size post-market clinical safety monitoring studies for traditional Chinese medicine injections. PMID:23724692

  14. 76 FR 61709 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; FDA Form 3728...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-05

    ...The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing an opportunity for public comment on the proposed collection of certain information by the Agency. Under the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (the PRA), Federal Agencies are required to publish a notice in the Federal Register concerning each proposed collection of information, including each proposed extension of an existing collection of......

  15. 76 FR 20588 - FDA Food Safety Modernization Act: Focus on Preventive Controls for Facilities; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-13

    ... examine and update current good manufacturing practice requirements and to develop an animal feed safety... methods in manufacturing, processing, packing, and holding food and feed. FDA is interested in making... three of the following five break-out sessions: Preventive Controls Guidance, On- Farm Manufacturing...

  16. 21 CFR 314.102 - Communications between FDA and applicants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Section 314.102 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE APPLICATIONS FOR FDA APPROVAL TO MARKET A NEW DRUG FDA Action on Applications... application needed to facilitate the agency's review. This early communication is intended to...

  17. 21 CFR 314.102 - Communications between FDA and applicants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Section 314.102 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE APPLICATIONS FOR FDA APPROVAL TO MARKET A NEW DRUG FDA Action on Applications... process. Such communication may take the form of telephone conversations, letters, or meetings,...

  18. 42 CFR 405.203 - FDA categorization of investigational devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Coverage Decisions That Relate to Health Care Technology § 405.203 FDA categorization of investigational... the device as a factor in making Medicare coverage decisions. ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false FDA categorization of investigational devices....

  19. 21 CFR 5.1110 - FDA public information offices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false FDA public information offices. 5.1110 Section 5... ORGANIZATION Organization § 5.1110 FDA public information offices. (a) Division of Dockets Management. The Division of Dockets Management public room is located in rm. 1061, 5630 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD...

  20. Invariant NKT Cell Development Requires a Full Complement of Functional CD3 ζ Immunoreceptor Tyrosine-Based Activation Motifs

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Amy M.; Blevins, Jon S.; Tomson, Farol L.; Eitson, Jennifer L.; Medeiros, Jennifer J.; Yarovinsky, Felix; Norgard, Michael V.; van Oers, Nicolai S. C.

    2010-01-01

    Invariant NKT (iNKT) cells regulate early immune responses to infections, in part because of their rapid release of IFN-γ and IL-4. iNKT cells are proposed to reduce the severity of Lyme disease following Borrelia burgdorferi infection. Unlike conventional T cells, iNKT cells express an invariant αβ TCR that recognizes lipids bound to the MHC class I-like molecule, CD1d. Furthermore, these cells are positively selected following TCR interactions with glycolipid/CD1d complexes expressed on CD4+CD8+ thymocytes. Whereas conventional T cell development can proceed with as few as 4/10 CD3 immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motifs (ITAMs), little is known about the ITAM requirements for iNKT cell selection and expansion. We analyzed iNKT cell development in CD3 ζ transgenic lines with various tyrosine-to-phenylalanine substitutions (YF) that eliminated the functions of the first (YF1,2), third (YF5,6), or all three (YF1–6) CD3 ζ ITAMs. iNKT cell numbers were significantly reduced in the thymus, spleen, and liver of all YF mice compared with wild type mice. The reduced numbers of iNKT cells resulted from significant reductions in the expression of the early growth response 2 and promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger transcription factors. In the mice with few to no iNKT cells, there was no difference in the severity of Lyme arthritis compared with wild type controls, following infections with the spirochete B. burgdorferi. These findings indicate that a full complement of functional CD3 ζ ITAMs is required for effective iNKT cell development. The Journal of Immunology, 2010, 184: 6822–6832. PMID:20483726

  1. A SIX1 Homolog in Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. conglutinans Is Required for Full Virulence on Cabbage

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Jian; Yang, Yuhong; Xie, Bingyan

    2016-01-01

    Fusarium oxysporum is a soil-born fungus that induces wilt and root rot on a variety of plants. F. oxysporum f. sp. conglutinans (Foc) can cause wilt disease on cabbage. This study showed that a homolog of SIX1 protein in the Arabidopsis infecting isolate Fo5176 (Fo5176-SIX1) had four isoforms in the conidia of Foc by proteomic analysis. Thus, we analyzed the roles of protein Foc-SIX1. Gene expression analysis showed that, compared to the expression in mycelia, dramatically altered expression of Foc-SIX1 could be detected after infecting cabbages, and Foc-SIX1 was highly expressed in conidia under axenic culture condition. Furthermore, we knocked out the Foc-SIX1 gene and found that Foc-ΔSIX1 mutants had significantly reduced virulence compared with wild type isolate, and full virulence was restored by complementation of Foc-ΔSIX1 mutants with Foc-SIX1. Thus, we concluded that SIX1 in Foc was required for full virulence on cabbage. We also complemented Foc-ΔSIX1 with SIX1 gene in F. oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici (Fol) and found Foc-ΔSIX1::Fol-SIX1 mutants did not affect the virulence of Foc-ΔSIX1. The results confirmed that Fol-SIX1 was not capable of replacing the role of Foc-SIX1 in Foc on the disease symptom development of cabbage. The roles of Fol-SIX1 on virulence might rely on host specificity. PMID:27010418

  2. A SIX1 Homolog in Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. conglutinans Is Required for Full Virulence on Cabbage.

    PubMed

    Li, Erfeng; Wang, Gang; Xiao, Jiling; Ling, Jian; Yang, Yuhong; Xie, Bingyan

    2016-01-01

    Fusarium oxysporum is a soil-born fungus that induces wilt and root rot on a variety of plants. F. oxysporum f. sp. conglutinans (Foc) can cause wilt disease on cabbage. This study showed that a homolog of SIX1 protein in the Arabidopsis infecting isolate Fo5176 (Fo5176-SIX1) had four isoforms in the conidia of Foc by proteomic analysis. Thus, we analyzed the roles of protein Foc-SIX1. Gene expression analysis showed that, compared to the expression in mycelia, dramatically altered expression of Foc-SIX1 could be detected after infecting cabbages, and Foc-SIX1 was highly expressed in conidia under axenic culture condition. Furthermore, we knocked out the Foc-SIX1 gene and found that Foc-ΔSIX1 mutants had significantly reduced virulence compared with wild type isolate, and full virulence was restored by complementation of Foc-ΔSIX1 mutants with Foc-SIX1. Thus, we concluded that SIX1 in Foc was required for full virulence on cabbage. We also complemented Foc-ΔSIX1 with SIX1 gene in F. oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici (Fol) and found Foc-ΔSIX1::Fol-SIX1 mutants did not affect the virulence of Foc-ΔSIX1. The results confirmed that Fol-SIX1 was not capable of replacing the role of Foc-SIX1 in Foc on the disease symptom development of cabbage. The roles of Fol-SIX1 on virulence might rely on host specificity. PMID:27010418

  3. The Hydrogenase Cytochrome b Heme Ligands of Azotobacter vinelandii Are Required for Full H2 Oxidation Capability

    PubMed Central

    Meek, Laura; Arp, Daniel J.

    2000-01-01

    The hydrogenase in Azotobacter vinelandii, like other membrane-bound [NiFe] hydrogenases, consists of a catalytic heterodimer and an integral membrane cytochrome b. The histidines ligating the hemes in this cytochrome b were identified by H2 oxidation properties of altered proteins produced by site-directed mutagenesis. Four fully conserved and four partially conserved histidines in HoxZ were substituted with alanine or tyrosine. The roles of these histidines in HoxZ heme binding and hydrogenase were characterized by O2-dependent H2 oxidation and H2-dependent methylene blue reduction in vivo. Mutants H33A/Y (H33 replaced by A or Y), H74A/Y, H194A, H208A/Y, and H194,208A lost O2-dependent H2 oxidation activity, H194Y and H136A had partial activity, and H97Y,H98A and H191A had full activity. These results suggest that the fully conserved histidines 33, 74, 194, and 208 are ligands to the hemes, tyrosine can serve as an alternate ligand in position 194, and H136 plays a role in H2 oxidation. In mutant H194A/Y, imidazole (Imd) rescued H2 oxidation activity in intact cells, which suggests that Imd acts as an exogenous ligand. The heterodimer activity, quantitatively determined as H2-dependent methylene blue reduction, indicated that the heterodimers of all mutants were catalytically active. H33A/Y had wild-type levels of methylene blue reduction, but the other HoxZ ligand mutants had significantly less than wild-type levels. Imd reconstituted full methylene blue reduction activity in mutants H194A/Y and H208A/Y and partial activity in H194,208A. These results indicate that structural and functional integrity of HoxZ is required for physiologically relevant H2 oxidation, and structural integrity of HoxZ is necessary for full heterodimer-catalyzed H2 oxidation. PMID:10852874

  4. Methylation-induced G2/M arrest requires a full complement of the mismatch repair protein hMLH1

    PubMed Central

    Cejka, Petr; Stojic, Lovorka; Mojas, Nina; Russell, Anna Marie; Heinimann, Karl; Cannavó, Elda; di Pietro, Massimiliano; Marra, Giancarlo; Jiricny, Josef

    2003-01-01

    The mismatch repair (MMR) gene hMLH1 is mutated in ∼50% of hereditary non-polyposis colon cancers and transcriptionally silenced in ∼25% of sporadic tumours of the right colon. Cells lacking hMLH1 display microsatellite instability and resistance to killing by methylating agents. In an attempt to study the phenotypic effects of hMLH1 downregulation in greater detail, we designed an isogenic system, in which hMLH1 expression is regulated by doxycycline. We now report that human embryonic kidney 293T cells expressing high amounts of hMLH1 were MMR-proficient and arrested at the G2/M cell cycle checkpoint following treatment with the DNA methylating agent N-methyl-N′-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG), while cells not expressing hMLH1 displayed a MMR defect and failed to arrest upon MNNG treatment. Interestingly, MMR proficiency was restored even at low hMLH1 concentrations, while checkpoint activation required a full complement of hMLH1. In the MMR-proficient cells, activation of the MNNG-induced G2/M checkpoint was accompanied by phosphorylation of p53, but the cell death pathway was p53 independent, as the latter polypeptide is functionally inactivated in these cells by SV40 large T antigen. PMID:12727890

  5. Maturation of Streptococcus pneumoniae lipoproteins by a type II signal peptidase is required for ABC transporter function and full virulence

    PubMed Central

    Khandavilli, Suneeta; Homer, Karen A; Yuste, Jose; Basavanna, Shilpa; Mitchell, Timothy; Brown, Jeremy S

    2008-01-01

    Cell surface lipoproteins are important for the full virulence of several bacterial pathogens, including Streptococcus pneumoniae. Processing of prolipoproteins seems to be conserved among different bacterial species, and requires type II signal peptidase (Lsp) mediated cleavage of the N-terminal signal peptide to form the mature lipoprotein. Lsp has been suggested as a target for new antibiotic therapies, but at present there are only limited data on the function of Lsp for Gram-positive bacterial pathogens. We have investigated the function and role during disease pathogenesis of the S. pneumoniae Lsp, which, blast searches suggest, is encoded by the gene Sp0928. Expression of Sp0928 protected Escherichia coli against the Lsp antagonist globomycin, and proteomics and immunoblot analysis demonstrated that deletion of Sp0928 prevented processing of S. pneumoniae prolipoproteins to mature lipoproteins. These data strongly suggest that Sp0928 encodes the S. pneumoniae Lsp. However, immunoblots of membrane-associated proteins, immunoelectron microscopy and flow cytometry assays all confirmed that in the absence of Lsp, immature lipoproteins were still attached to the cell surface. Despite preservation of lipoprotein attachment to the cell membrane, loss of S. pneumoniae Lsp resulted in several phenotypes associated with impaired lipoprotein function and reduced S. pneumoniae replication in animal models of infection. PMID:18086214

  6. A Comparative Review of Waivers Granted in Pediatric Drug Development by FDA and EMA from 2007-2013

    PubMed Central

    Egger, Gunter F.; Wharton, Gerold T.; Malli, Suzanne; Temeck, Jean; Murphy, M. Dianne; Tomasi, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Background The European Union and the United States have different legal frameworks in place for pediatric drug development, which can potentially lead to different pediatric research requirements for the pharmaceutical industry. This manuscript compares pediatric clinical trial waivers granted by the European Medicines Agency (EMA) and the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Methods This is a retrospective review comparing EMA’s Paediatric Committee (PDCO) decisions with FDA’s Pediatric Review Committee (PeRC) recommendations for all product-specific pediatric full waiver applications submitted to EMA from January 2007 through December 2013. Using baseline data from EMA, we matched product-specific waivers with their FDA equivalents during the study period. Results For single active substance products, PDCO and PeRC adopted similar opinions in 42 of 49 indications (86%). For fixed-dose combinations, PDCO and PeRC adopted similar opinions in 24 of 31 indications (77%). Conclusion Despite the different legal frameworks, criteria, and processes of determination, the waiver decisions of the 2 agencies were similar in the majority of cases.

  7. The Global Regulator CodY Regulates Toxin Gene Expression in Bacillus anthracis and Is Required for Full Virulence▿ †

    PubMed Central

    van Schaik, Willem; Château, Alice; Dillies, Marie-Agnès; Coppée, Jean-Yves; Sonenshein, Abraham L.; Fouet, Agnès

    2009-01-01

    In gram-positive bacteria, CodY is an important regulator of genes whose expression changes upon nutrient limitation and acts as a repressor of virulence gene expression in some pathogenic species. Here, we report the role of CodY in Bacillus anthracis, the etiologic agent of anthrax. Disruption of codY completely abolished virulence in a toxinogenic, noncapsulated strain, indicating that the activity of CodY is required for full virulence of B. anthracis. Global transcriptome analysis of a codY mutant and the parental strain revealed extensive differences. These differences could reflect direct control for some genes, as suggested by the presence of CodY binding sequences in their promoter regions, or indirect effects via the CodY-dependent control of other regulatory proteins or metabolic rearrangements in the codY mutant strain. The differences included reduced expression of the anthrax toxin genes in the mutant strain, which was confirmed by lacZ reporter fusions and immunoblotting. The accumulation of the global virulence regulator AtxA protein was strongly reduced in the mutant strain. However, in agreement with the microarray data, expression of atxA, as measured using an atxA-lacZ transcriptional fusion and by assaying atxA mRNA, was not significantly affected in the codY mutant. An atxA-lacZ translational fusion was also unaffected. Overexpression of atxA restored toxin component synthesis in the codY mutant strain. These results suggest that CodY controls toxin gene expression by regulating AtxA accumulation posttranslationally. PMID:19651859

  8. The Adh1 gene of the fungus Metarhizium anisopliae is expressed during insect colonization and required for full virulence.

    PubMed

    Callejas-Negrete, Olga Alicia; Torres-Guzmán, Juan Carlos; Padilla-Guerrero, Israel Enrique; Esquivel-Naranjo, Ulises; Padilla-Ballesteros, Maria Fernanda; García-Tapia, Adriana; Schrank, Augusto; Salazar-Solís, Eduardo; Gutiérrez-Corona, Félix; González-Hernández, Gloria Angélica

    2015-03-01

    Zymography of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) activity in the entomopathogenic fungus Metarhizium anisopliae grown under various conditions revealed that micro-aerobic growth was associated with increased ADH activity. The major ADH protein, AdhIp, was purified to homogeneity by affinity chromatography and has an estimated molecular weight of 41kDa and an isoelectric point (pI) of 6.4. Peptide mass fingerprint analysis allowed the identification and cloning of the gene that encodes this protein, Adh1, as annotated in the M. anisopliae genome database. AdhIp is related to the medium-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (MDR)/zinc-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase-like family and contains conserved ADH sequence motifs, such as the zinc-containing ADH signature, the FAD/NAD binding domain and amino acid residues that are conserved in most microbial ADHs. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed that Adh1 gene expression occurs at low levels during early Plutella xylostella infection and that the Adh1 gene was primarily expressed at larval death and as mycelia emerge from the insect cuticle before conidiation. Antisense-RNA experiments indicated that NAD(+)-dependent ADH activity was diminished by 20-75% in the transformants, and the transformants that had lower ADH activity showed allyl alcohol resistance, which indicates that reduction in ADH activity also occurs in vivo. Bioassays performed using antisense adh1 transformants, which have lower ADH activity, showed that LC50 values were two to five times higher than the wild-type, indicating that AdhIp is required for full capability of the fungus to penetrate and/or colonize the insect. PMID:25534970

  9. Full activation of mouse platelets requires ADP secretion regulated by SERCA3 ATPase-dependent calcium stores.

    PubMed

    Elaïb, Ziane; Adam, Frédéric; Berrou, Eliane; Bordet, Jean-Claude; Prévost, Nicolas; Bobe, Régis; Bryckaert, Marijke; Rosa, Jean-Philippe

    2016-08-25

    The role of the sarco-endoplasmic reticulum calcium (Ca(2+)) adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) 3 (SERCA3) in platelet physiology remains poorly understood. Here, we show that SERCA3 knockout (SERCA3(-/-)) mice exhibit prolonged tail bleeding time and rebleeding. Thrombus formation was delayed both in arteries and venules in an in vivo ferric chloride-induced thrombosis model. Defective platelet adhesion and thrombus growth over collagen was confirmed in vitro. Adenosine 5'-diphosphate (ADP) removal by apyrase diminished adhesion and thrombus growth of control platelets to the level of SERCA3(-/-) platelets. Aggregation, dense granule secretion, and Ca(2+) mobilization of SERCA3(-/-) platelets induced by low collagen or low thrombin concentration were weaker than controls. Accordingly, SERCA3(-/-) platelets exhibited a partial defect in total stored Ca(2+) and in Ca(2+) store reuptake following thrombin stimulation. Importantly ADP, but not serotonin, rescued aggregation, secretion, and Ca(2+) mobilization in SERCA3(-/-) platelets, suggesting specificity. Dense granules appeared normal upon electron microscopy, mepacrine staining, and total serotonin content, ruling out a dense granule defect. ADP induced normal platelet aggregation, excluding a defect in ADP activation pathways. The SERCA3-specific inhibitor 2,5-di-(tert-butyl)-1,4-benzohydroquinone diminished both Ca(2+) mobilization and secretion of control platelets, as opposed to the SERCA2b inhibitor thapsigargin. This confirmed the specific role of catalytically active SERCA3 in ADP secretion. Accordingly, SERCA3-dependent Ca(2+) stores appeared depleted in SERCA3(-/-) platelets. Finally, αIIbβ3 integrin blockade did not affect SERCA3-dependent secretion, therefore proving independent of αIIbβ3 engagement. Altogether, these results show that SERCA3-dependent Ca(2+) stores control a specific ADP secretion pathway required for full platelet secretion induced by agonists at low concentration and independent

  10. Point-Counterpoint: The FDA Has a Role in Regulation of Laboratory-Developed Tests.

    PubMed

    Caliendo, Angela M; Hanson, Kimberly E

    2016-04-01

    Since the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) released its draft guidance on the regulation of laboratory-developed tests (LDTs) in October 2014, there has been a flurry of responses from commercial and hospital-based laboratory directors, clinicians, professional organizations, and diagnostic companies. The FDA defines an LDT as an "in vitrodiagnostic device that is intended for clinical use and is designed, manufactured, and used within a single laboratory." The draft guidance outlines a risk-based approach, with oversight of high-risk and moderate-risk tests being phased in over 9 years. High-risk tests would be regulated first and require premarket approval. Subsequently, moderate-risk tests would require a 510(k) premarket submission to the FDA and low-risk tests would need only to be registered. Oversight discretion would be exercised for LDTs focused on rare diseases (defined as fewer than 4,000 tests, not cases, per year nationally) and unmet clinical needs (defined as those tests for which there is no alternative FDA-cleared or -approved test). There was an open comment period followed by a public hearing in early January of 2015, and we are currently awaiting the final decision regarding the regulation of LDTs. Given that LDTs have been developed by many laboratories and are essential for the diagnosis and monitoring of an array of infectious diseases, changes in their regulation will have far-reaching implications for clinical microbiology laboratories. In this Point-Counterpoint, Angela Caliendo discusses the potential benefits of the FDA guidance for LDTs whereas Kim Hanson discusses the concerns associated with implementing the guidance and why these regulations may not improve clinical care. PMID:26791369

  11. Nanoparticle-Based Medicines: A Review of FDA-Approved Materials and Clinical Trials to Date.

    PubMed

    Bobo, Daniel; Robinson, Kye J; Islam, Jiaul; Thurecht, Kristofer J; Corrie, Simon R

    2016-10-01

    In this review we provide an up to date snapshot of nanomedicines either currently approved by the US FDA, or in the FDA clinical trials process. We define nanomedicines as therapeutic or imaging agents which comprise a nanoparticle in order to control the biodistribution, enhance the efficacy, or otherwise reduce toxicity of a drug or biologic. We identified 51 FDA-approved nanomedicines that met this definition and 77 products in clinical trials, with ~40% of trials listed in clinicaltrials.gov started in 2014 or 2015. While FDA approved materials are heavily weighted to polymeric, liposomal, and nanocrystal formulations, there is a trend towards the development of more complex materials comprising micelles, protein-based NPs, and also the emergence of a variety of inorganic and metallic particles in clinical trials. We then provide an overview of the different material categories represented in our search, highlighting nanomedicines that have either been recently approved, or are already in clinical trials. We conclude with some comments on future perspectives for nanomedicines, which we expect to include more actively-targeted materials, multi-functional materials ("theranostics") and more complicated materials that blur the boundaries of traditional material categories. A key challenge for researchers, industry, and regulators is how to classify new materials and what additional testing (e.g. safety and toxicity) is required before products become available. PMID:27299311

  12. Existing FDA pathways have potential to ensure early access to, and appropriate use of, specialty drugs.

    PubMed

    Kesselheim, Aaron S; Tan, Yongtian Tina; Darrow, Jonathan J; Avorn, Jerry

    2014-10-01

    Specialty drugs are notable among prescription drugs in that they offer the possibility of substantial clinical improvement, come with important risks of adverse events and mortality, can be complex to manufacture or administer, and are usually extremely costly. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) plays a critical role in ensuring that patients who could benefit from specialty drugs have access to them in a timely fashion. In this article we review the different strategies that the FDA can use to approve and influence the post-approval prescribing of specialty drugs. When specialty drugs show promise in early clinical trials, the FDA can expedite the drugs' availability to patients through expanded access programs and expedited approval pathways that speed regulatory authorization. After approval, to ensure that specialty drugs are directed to the patients who are most likely to benefit from them, the FDA can limit the scope of the drugs' indications, encourage the development of companion diagnostic tests to indicate which patients should receive the drugs, or require that manufacturers subject them to Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategies to ensure that their use is appropriately limited to a restricted population that is aware of the drugs' risks and benefits. Implementing these existing regulatory approaches can promote timely patient access to specialty drugs while preventing expensive and potentially inappropriate overuse. PMID:25288421

  13. FDA regulation of labeling and promotional claims in therapeutic color vision devices: a tutorial.

    PubMed

    Drum, Bruce

    2004-01-01

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is responsible for determining whether medical device manufacturers have provided reasonable assurance, based on valid scientific evidence, that new devices are safe and effective for their intended use before they are introduced into the U.S. market. Most existing color vision devices pose so little risk that their manufacturers are not required to submit a premarket notification [510(k)] to FDA prior to market. However, even low-risk devices may not be acceptable if they are marketed on the basis of misleading or excessive claims. Although most color vision devices are diagnostic, two types that are therapeutic rather than diagnostic are colored lenses intended to improve deficient color vision and colored lenses intended to improve reading performance. Both of these devices have presented special regulatory challenges to FDA because the intended uses and effectiveness claims initially proposed by the manufacturers were not supported by valid scientific evidence. In each instance, however, FDA worked with the manufacturer to restrict labeling and promotional claims in ways that were consistent with the available device performance data and that allowed for the legal marketing of the device. PMID:15518230

  14. Think Twice Before You Get That Tattoo: FDA

    MedlinePlus

    ... 159272.html Think Twice Before You Get That Tattoo: FDA Though popular, they carry infection risks and ... 8, 2016 WEDNESDAY, June 8, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Tattoos are increasingly popular in the United States, but ...

  15. FDA Calls for Less Salt in Processed Foods

    MedlinePlus

    ... news/fullstory_159136.html FDA Calls for Less Salt in Processed Foods Agency sets short- and long- ... the food industry to cut back on the salt. In draft voluntary guidelines issued Wednesday, the agency ...

  16. NCI Director Also to Be Interim FDA Commissioner

    Cancer.gov

    Andrew von Eschenbach, M.D., director of the NCI, was asked by President Bush on Friday, September 23, 2005, to assume the additional role of interim Commissioner of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

  17. FDA to Re-Examine What Makes a Food 'Healthy'

    MedlinePlus

    ... should be labeled "healthy"? Raisin bran? Avocados? Granola bars? Going by current -- and perhaps outdated -- U.S. food- ... healthy" is Kind LLC, a producer of granola bars, which was warned by the FDA last year ...

  18. The Facts on the FDA's New Tobacco Rule

    MedlinePlus

    ... agency authority to regulate the manufacturing, distribution, and marketing of tobacco products. Today, the rule does several ... law. And those manufacturers will have to receive marketing authorization from the FDA. The new rule also ...

  19. FDA Approves Experimental Zika Test for Blood Donations

    MedlinePlus

    ... html FDA Approves Experimental Zika Test for Blood Donations But agency still asks those who've possibly ... HealthDay News) -- An experimental test to check blood donations for the Zika virus has been approved by ...

  20. What FDA Learned About Dark Chocolate and Milk Allergies

    MedlinePlus

    ... Updates What FDA Learned About Dark Chocolate and Milk Allergies Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... to top No Message Doesn’t Mean No Milk You shouldn’t assume that dark chocolate contains ...

  1. Drug for Yeast Infections May Raise Miscarriage Risk, FDA Warns

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_158503.html Drug for Yeast Infections May Raise Miscarriage Risk, FDA Warns Agency recommends ... brand name Diflucan) is used to treat vaginal yeast infections. "Patients who are pregnant or actively trying to ...

  2. FDA Approves New Drug to Treat Bladder Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_158937.html FDA Approves New Drug to Treat Bladder Cancer Tecentriq boosted survival ... 2016 THURSDAY, May 19, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A new drug to treat bladder cancer was approved by ...

  3. FDA Calls for Less Salt in Processed Foods

    MedlinePlus

    ... html FDA Calls for Less Salt in Processed Foods Agency sets short- and long-term goals in ... WEDNESDAY, June 1, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration wants the food industry to ...

  4. FDA OKs Non-Prescription Use of Acne Drug

    MedlinePlus

    ... 159779.html FDA OKs Non-Prescription Use of Acne Drug Differin Gel 0.1% is first retinoid ... July 8, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Good news for acne sufferers: The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has ...

  5. Effect of the FDA on health care investments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleary, David J.

    1994-12-01

    The cost of securing FDA approval has long been an important consideration in funding projects involving new medical technologies, but the more stringent regulatory behavior of the FDA in the past few years has led to a discernable decrease in the funding of start-up medical device companies. An abundance of anecdotal evidence, supported with surveys of venture capital firms, investment groups and medical device corporations, indicates a serious shortage of funds available for the development of certain medical technologies.

  6. Leavitt: reforms will improve oversight and openness at FDA.

    PubMed

    2005-01-01

    Health and Human Services Secretary Mike Leavitt says drug safety reforms at the Food and Drug Administration will improve openness and oversight and will enhance the agency's independence. In keeping with this vision, the FDA will create a new independent Drug Safety Oversight Board to oversee the management of drug safety issues and will provide emerging information to doctors and patients about the risks and benefits of medicines. For more information www.fda.gov/cder/drugsafety.htm PMID:16127819

  7. 42 CFR 84.198 - Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, mouthpieces, hoods, and helmets; fit; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... to fit persons with various head sizes, provide for the optional use of corrective spectacles or.... (d) Full facepieces shall provide for optional use of corrective spectacles or lenses which shall...

  8. 42 CFR 84.198 - Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, mouthpieces, hoods, and helmets; fit; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... to fit persons with various head sizes, provide for the optional use of corrective spectacles or.... (d) Full facepieces shall provide for optional use of corrective spectacles or lenses which shall...

  9. 42 CFR 84.135 - Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, hoods, and helmets; fit; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... shapes and sizes. (b) Full facepieces shall provide for optional use of corrective spectacles or lenses... of corrective spectacles or lenses, and insure against any restriction of movement by the wearer....

  10. 42 CFR 84.135 - Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, hoods, and helmets; fit; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... shapes and sizes. (b) Full facepieces shall provide for optional use of corrective spectacles or lenses... of corrective spectacles or lenses, and insure against any restriction of movement by the wearer....

  11. 42 CFR 84.135 - Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, hoods, and helmets; fit; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... shapes and sizes. (b) Full facepieces shall provide for optional use of corrective spectacles or lenses... of corrective spectacles or lenses, and insure against any restriction of movement by the wearer....

  12. 42 CFR 84.198 - Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, mouthpieces, hoods, and helmets; fit; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... to fit persons with various head sizes, provide for the optional use of corrective spectacles or.... (d) Full facepieces shall provide for optional use of corrective spectacles or lenses which shall...

  13. 42 CFR 84.198 - Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, mouthpieces, hoods, and helmets; fit; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... lenses, and insure against any restriction of movement by the wearer. (c) Mouthpieces shall be equipped.... (d) Full facepieces shall provide for optional use of corrective spectacles or lenses which shall...

  14. 42 CFR 84.135 - Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, hoods, and helmets; fit; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... shapes and sizes. (b) Full facepieces shall provide for optional use of corrective spectacles or lenses... of corrective spectacles or lenses, and insure against any restriction of movement by the wearer....

  15. 78 FR 78720 - Deferral of Compliance Date: Full-Service Intelligent Mail Barcode Requirement To Qualify for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-27

    ... automation prices, previously published on April 18, 2013, in a final rule in the Federal Register (78 FR... compliance date of the relevant portions of the final rule published April 18, 2013 (78 FR 23137) is delayed..., 78 FR 23146-23148. All other requirements that were published in the Federal Register (78 FR...

  16. Fusarium verticillioides SGE1 is required for full virulence and regulates expression of protein effector and secondary metabolite biosynthetic genes.

    PubMed

    Brown, Daren W; Busman, Mark; Proctor, Robert H

    2014-08-01

    The transition from one lifestyle to another in some fungi is initiated by a single orthologous gene, SGE1, that regulates markedly different genes in different fungi. Despite these differences, many of the regulated genes encode effector proteins or proteins involved in the synthesis of secondary metabolites (SM), both of which can contribute to pathogenicity. Fusarium verticillioides is both an endophyte and a pathogen of maize and can grow as a saprophyte on dead plant material. During growth on live maize plants, the fungus can synthesize a number of toxic SM, including fumonisins, fusarins, and fusaric acid, that can contaminate kernels and kernel-based food and feed. In this study, the role of F. verticillioides SGE1 in pathogenicity and secondary metabolism was examined by gene deletion analysis and transcriptomics. SGE1 is not required for vegetative growth or conidiation but is required for wild-type pathogenicity and affects synthesis of multiple SM, including fumonisins and fusarins. Induced expression of SGE1 enhanced or reduced expression of hundreds of genes, including numerous putative effector genes that could contribute to growth in planta; genes encoding cell surface proteins; gene clusters required for synthesis of fusarins, bikaverin, and an unknown metabolite; as well as the gene encoding the fumonisin cluster transcriptional activator. Together, our results indicate that SGE1 has a role in global regulation of transcription in F. verticillioides that impacts but is not absolutely required for secondary metabolism and pathogenicity on maize. PMID:24742071

  17. Agonist Met antibodies define the signalling threshold required for a full mitogenic and invasive program of Kaposi's Sarcoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Bardelli, Claudio; Sala, Marilena; Cavallazzi, Umberto; Prat, Maria . E-mail: mprat@med.unipmn.it

    2005-09-09

    We previously showed that the Kaposi Sarcoma line KS-IMM express a functional Met tyrosine kinase receptor, which, upon HGF stimulation, activates motogenic, proliferative, and invasive responses. In this study, we investigated the signalling pathways activated by HGF, as well as by Met monoclonal antibodies (Mabs), acting as full or partial agonists. The full agonist Mab mimics HGF in all biological and biochemical aspects. It elicits the whole spectrum of responses, while the partial agonist Mab induces only wound healing. These differences correlated with a more prolonged and sustained tyrosine phosphorylation of the receptor and MAPK evoked by HGF and by the full agonist Mab, relative to the partial agonist Mab. Since Gab1, JNK and PI 3-kinase are activated with same intensity and kinetics by HGF and by the two agonist antibodies, it is concluded that level and duration of MAPK activation by Met receptor are crucial for the induction of a full HGF-dependent mitogenic and invasive program in KS cells.

  18. Pharmacotherapeutics of Intranasal Scopolamine: FDA Regulations and Procedures for Clinical Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Das, H.; Daniels, V. R.; Vaksman, Z.; Boyd, J. L.; Buckey, J. C.; Locke, J. P.; Putcha, L.

    2007-01-01

    Space Motion Sickness (SMS) is commonly experienced by astronauts and often requires treatment with medications during the early flight days of a space mission. Bioavailability of oral (PO) SMS medications is often low and highly variable; additionally, physiological changes in a microgravity environment exacerbate variability and decrease bioavailability. These factors prompted NASA to develop an intranasal dosage form of scopolamine (INSCOP) suitable for the treatment of SMS. However, to assure safety and efficacy of treatment in space, NASA physicians prescribe commercially available pharmaceutical products only. Development of a pharmaceutical preparation for clinical use must follow distinct clinical phases of testing, phase I through IV to be exact, before it can be approved by the FDA for approval for clinical use. After a physician sponsored Investigative New Drug (IND) application was approved by the FDA, a phase I clinical trial of INSCOP formulation was completed in normal human subjects and results published. The current project includes three phase II clinical protocols for the assessment of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics (PK/PD), efficacy, and safety of INSCOP. Three clinical protocols that were submitted to FDA to accomplish the project objectives: 1) 002-A, a FDA Phase II dose ranging study with four dose levels between 0.1 and 0.4 mg in 12 subjects to assess PK/PD, 2) 002-B, a phase II clinical efficacy study in eighteen healthy subjects to compare efficacy of 0.2 (low dose) and 0.4 mg (high dose) INSCOP for prophylactic treatment of motion-induces (off-axis vertical rotation) symptoms, and (3) 002-C, a phase II clinical study with twelve subjects to determine bioavailability and pharmacodynamics of two doses (0.2 and 0.4 mg) of INSCOP in simulated microgravity, antiorthostatic bedrest. All regulatory procedures were competed that include certification for Good laboratory Procedures by Theradex , clinical documentation, personnel training

  19. FDA Approves Two HPV Vaccines: Cervarix for Girls, Gardasil for Boys | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The FDA has approved a second vaccine to prevent cervical cancer and cervical precancers, the vaccine’s manufacturer, GlaxoSmithKline (GSK), announced last week. The approval is based on data from a large clinical trial showing that the vaccine, Cervarix, prevented precancerous lesions in 93 percent of those who received the full vaccine sequence of three injections over 6 months. |

  20. NagZ is required for beta-lactamase expression and full pathogenicity in Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris str. 17.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tsuey-Ching; Chen, Tzu-Fan; Tsai, Jeffrey J P; Hu, Rouh-Mei

    2014-10-01

    Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris expresses a chromosomally encoded class A β-lactamase Blaxc. Basal expression and induction of blaxc require the transcriptional factor AmpRxc and the peptidoglycan-monomers permease AmpGxc. NagZ is a β-GlcNAcase which cleaves GlcNAc-anhMurNAc peptides (peptidoglycan-monomers) to generate anhMurNAc-peptides. In many bacteria, anhMurNAc-peptides act as activation ligands for AmpR. Nevertheless, the role of NagZ in β-lactamase induction differs among species. In this paper, we studied the roles of nagZxc in the regulation of blaxc and pathogenicity in X. campestris pv. campestris. Our data showed that cells lacking nagZxc dramatically reduced the basal expression and induction of blaxc, suggesting that anhMurNAc-peptides, products of NagZxc, are required for blaxc expression regardless of the presence or absence of inducers. Expression of blaxc is regulated via an ampG-nagZ-ampR pathway. Pathogenicity assay demonstrated that an ampGxc mutant excited more severe symptoms than the wild-type; on the contrary, the nagZxc mutant became less virulent. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of a link between the ampG or nagZ defects and the pathogenicity in a plant pathogen. PMID:25229604

  1. FDA perspectives on health claims for food labels.

    PubMed

    Rowlands, J Craig; Hoadley, James E

    2006-04-01

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration's regulatory authority over health claims was clarified in 1990 legislation known as the Nutrition Labeling and Education Act (NLEA). This law established mandatory nutrition labeling for most foods and placed restrictions on the use of food label claims characterizing the levels or health benefits of nutrients in foods. NLEA set a high threshold for the scientific standard under which the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) may authorize health claims, this standard is known as the significant scientific agreement (SSA) standard. Subsequent legislation known as the Food and Drug Administration Modernization Act (FDAMA) provided an alternative to FDA review of the health claim where an U.S. government scientific body other than FDA concluded that there is SSA for a substance/disease relationship. Courts have since extended the scope of health claims to include qualified health claims (QHC) that are health claims not substantiated on evidence that meets the level of SSA standard, but include a qualifying statement intended to convey to the consumer the level of evidence for the claim. FDA has responded by developing an evidence-based ranking system for scientific data to determine the level of evidence substantiating a health claim. The following is an overview of FDA's regulations and evidence-based method for evaluating health claims. PMID:16480811

  2. Healthy public relations: the FDA's 1930s legislative campaign.

    PubMed

    Kay, G

    2001-01-01

    In this article, I argue that the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is an oft-overlooked government agency that acts to preserve and secure the public's health. From its early years as an agency charged with enforcement of the 1906 Pure Food and Drugs Act, the FDA not only protected the public's health but also made the public aware of its mission, using methods as diverse as displays at county fairs and at the 1933 Chicago World's Fair, radio programming, and active correspondence. The agency encouraged the public to protect itself, particularly in those arenas in which the FDA had no regulatory authority. In addition, it may have overstepped its boundaries when it actively solicited public support for a bill submitted to Congress in the early 1930s. In the dark days of the Great Depression, the FDA contended not only with limited resources and its own feelings of inadequacy in terms of what could and could not be done to protect the populace, but also with "guinea pig" books that horrified and angered many readers. By 1938, when the agency prevailed and the revisions to the 1906 Act passed Congress and were signed into law by President Franklin D. Roosevelt, the FDA had done all that a responsible public health agency should do, and more. PMID:11568487

  3. The evaporative requirement for heat balance determines whole-body sweat rate during exercise under conditions permitting full evaporation

    PubMed Central

    Gagnon, Daniel; Jay, Ollie; Kenny, Glen P

    2013-01-01

    Although the requirements for heat dissipation during exercise are determined by the necessity for heat balance, few studies have considered them when examining sweat production and its potential modulators. Rather, the majority of studies have used an experimental protocol based on a fixed percentage of maximum oxygen uptake (%). Using multiple regression analysis, we examined the independent contribution of the evaporative requirement for heat balance (Ereq) and % to whole-body sweat rate (WBSR) during exercise. We hypothesised that WBSR would be determined by Ereq and not by %. A total of 23 males performed two separate experiments during which they exercised for 90 min at different rates of metabolic heat production (200, 350, 500 W) at a fixed air temperature (30°C, n= 8), or at a fixed rate of metabolic heat production (290 W) at different air temperatures (30, 35, 40°C, n= 15 and 45°C, n= 7). Whole-body evaporative heat loss was measured by direct calorimetry and used to calculate absolute WBSR in grams per minute. The conditions employed resulted in a wide range of Ereq (131–487 W) and % (15–55%). The individual variation in non-steady-state (0–30 min) and steady-state (30–90 min) WBSR correlated significantly with Ereq (P < 0.001). In contrast, % correlated negatively with the residual variation in WBSR not explained by Ereq, and marginally increased (∼2%) the amount of total variability in WBSR described by Ereq alone (non-steady state: R2= 0.885; steady state: R2= 0.930). These data provide clear evidence that absolute WBSR during exercise is determined by Ereq, not by %. Future studies should therefore use an experimental protocol which ensures a fixed Ereq when examining absolute WBSR between individuals, irrespective of potential differences in relative exercise intensity. PMID:23459754

  4. The evaporative requirement for heat balance determines whole-body sweat rate during exercise under conditions permitting full evaporation.

    PubMed

    Gagnon, Daniel; Jay, Ollie; Kenny, Glen P

    2013-06-01

    Although the requirements for heat dissipation during exercise are determined by the necessity for heat balance, few studies have considered them when examining sweat production and its potential modulators. Rather, the majority of studies have used an experimental protocol based on a fixed percentage of maximum oxygen uptake (% ). Using multiple regression analysis, we examined the independent contribution of the evaporative requirement for heat balance (Ereq) and % to whole-body sweat rate (WBSR) during exercise. We hypothesised that WBSR would be determined by Ereq and not by % . A total of 23 males performed two separate experiments during which they exercised for 90 min at different rates of metabolic heat production (200, 350, 500 W) at a fixed air temperature (30°C, n = 8), or at a fixed rate of metabolic heat production (290 W) at different air temperatures (30, 35, 40°C, n = 15 and 45°C, n = 7). Whole-body evaporative heat loss was measured by direct calorimetry and used to calculate absolute WBSR in grams per minute. The conditions employed resulted in a wide range of Ereq (131-487 W) and % (15-55%). The individual variation in non-steady-state (0-30 min) and steady-state (30-90 min) WBSR correlated significantly with Ereq (P < 0.001). In contrast, % correlated negatively with the residual variation in WBSR not explained by Ereq, and marginally increased (∼2%) the amount of total variability in WBSR described by Ereq alone (non-steady state: R(2) = 0.885; steady state: R(2) = 0.930). These data provide clear evidence that absolute WBSR during exercise is determined by Ereq, not by % . Future studies should therefore use an experimental protocol which ensures a fixed Ereq when examining absolute WBSR between individuals, irrespective of potential differences in relative exercise intensity. PMID:23459754

  5. Spe3, which encodes spermidine synthase, is required for full repression through NRE(DIT) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Friesen, H; Tanny, J C; Segall, J

    1998-01-01

    We previously identified a transcriptional regulatory element, which we call NRE(DIT), that is required for repression of the sporulation-specific genes, DIT1 and DIT2, during vegetative growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Repression through this element is dependent on the Ssn6-Tup1 corepressor. In this study, we show that SIN4 contributes to NRE(DIT)-mediated repression, suggesting that changes in chromatin structure are, at least in part, responsible for regulation of DIT gene expression. In a screen for additional genes that function in repression of DIT (FRD genes), we recovered alleles of TUP1, SSN6, SIN4, and ROX3 and identified mutations comprising eight complementation groups of FRD genes. Four of these FRD genes appeared to act specifically in NRE(DIT)mediated repression, and four appeared to be general regulators of gene expression. We cloned the gene complementing the frd3-1 phenotype and found that it was identical to SPE3, which encodes spermidine synthase. Mutant spe3 cells not only failed to support complete repression through NRE(DIT) but also had modest defects in repression of some other genes. Addition of spermidine to the medium partially restored repression to spe3 cells, indicating that spermidine may play a role in vivo as a modulator of gene expression. We suggest various mechanisms by which spermidine could act to repress gene expression. PMID:9725830

  6. The Multifunctional β-Oxidation Enzyme Is Required for Full Symptom Development by the Biotrophic Maize Pathogen Ustilago maydis▿

    PubMed Central

    Klose, Jana; Kronstad, James W.

    2006-01-01

    The transition from yeast-like to filamentous growth in the biotrophic fungal phytopathogen Ustilago maydis is a crucial event for pathogenesis. Previously, we showed that fatty acids induce filamentation in U. maydis and that the resulting hyphal cells resemble the infectious filaments observed in planta. To explore the potential metabolic role of lipids in the morphological transition and in pathogenic development in host tissue, we deleted the mfe2 gene encoding the multifunctional enzyme that catalyzes the second and third reactions in β-oxidation of fatty acids in peroxisomes. The growth of the strains defective in mfe2 was attenuated on long-chain fatty acids and abolished on very-long-chain fatty acids. The mfe2 gene was not generally required for the production of filaments during mating in vitro, but loss of the gene blocked extensive proliferation of fungal filaments in planta. Consistent with this observation, mfe2 mutants exhibited significantly reduced virulence in that only 27% of infected seedlings produced tumors compared to 88% tumor production upon infection by wild-type strains. Similarly, a defect in virulence was observed in developing ears upon infection of mature maize plants. Specifically, the absence of the mfe2 gene delayed the development of teliospores within mature tumor tissue. Overall, these results indicate that the ability to utilize host lipids contributes to the pathogenic development of U. maydis. PMID:16998075

  7. TNFR2 expression by CD4 effector T cells is required to induce full-fledged experimental colitis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xin; Nie, Yingjie; Xiao, Haitao; Bian, Zhaoxiang; Scarzello, Anthony J.; Song, Na-Young; Anna, Trivett L.; Yang, De; Oppenheim, Joost J.

    2016-01-01

    There is now compelling evidence that TNFR2 is constitutively expressed on CD4+ Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) and TNF-TNFR2 interaction is critical for the activation, expansion and functional stability of Tregs. However, we showed that the expression of TNFR2 was also up-regulated on CD4+ Foxp3− effector T cells (Teffs) upon TCR stimulation. In order to define the role of TNFR2 in the pathogenic CD4 T cells, we compared the effect of transferred naïve CD4 cells from WT mice and TNFR2−/− mice into Rag 1−/− recipients. Transfer of TNFR2-deficient Teff cells failed to induce full-fledged colitis, unlike WT Teffs. This was due to defective proliferative expansion of TNFR2-deficient Teff cells in the lymphopenic mice, as well as their reduced capacity to express proinflammatory Th1 cytokine on a per cell basis. In vitro, the proliferative response of TNFR2 deficient naïve CD4 cells to anti-CD3 stimulation was markedly decreased as compared with that of WT naïve CD4 cells. The hypoproliferative response of TNFR2-deficient Teff cells to TCR stimulation was associated with an increased ratio of p100/p52, providing a mechanistic basis for our findings. Therefore, this study clearly indicates that TNFR2 is important for the proliferative expansion of pathogenic Teff cells. PMID:27601345

  8. TNFR2 expression by CD4 effector T cells is required to induce full-fledged experimental colitis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xin; Nie, Yingjie; Xiao, Haitao; Bian, Zhaoxiang; Scarzello, Anthony J; Song, Na-Young; Anna, Trivett L; Yang, De; Oppenheim, Joost J

    2016-01-01

    There is now compelling evidence that TNFR2 is constitutively expressed on CD4(+) Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) and TNF-TNFR2 interaction is critical for the activation, expansion and functional stability of Tregs. However, we showed that the expression of TNFR2 was also up-regulated on CD4(+) Foxp3(-) effector T cells (Teffs) upon TCR stimulation. In order to define the role of TNFR2 in the pathogenic CD4 T cells, we compared the effect of transferred naïve CD4 cells from WT mice and TNFR2(-/-) mice into Rag 1(-/-) recipients. Transfer of TNFR2-deficient Teff cells failed to induce full-fledged colitis, unlike WT Teffs. This was due to defective proliferative expansion of TNFR2-deficient Teff cells in the lymphopenic mice, as well as their reduced capacity to express proinflammatory Th1 cytokine on a per cell basis. In vitro, the proliferative response of TNFR2 deficient naïve CD4 cells to anti-CD3 stimulation was markedly decreased as compared with that of WT naïve CD4 cells. The hypoproliferative response of TNFR2-deficient Teff cells to TCR stimulation was associated with an increased ratio of p100/p52, providing a mechanistic basis for our findings. Therefore, this study clearly indicates that TNFR2 is important for the proliferative expansion of pathogenic Teff cells. PMID:27601345

  9. The FDA and designing clinical trials for chronic cutaneous ulcers.

    PubMed

    Maderal, Andrea D; Vivas, Alejandra C; Eaglstein, William H; Kirsner, Robert S

    2012-12-01

    Treatment of chronic wounds can present a challenge, with many patients remaining refractory to available advanced therapies. As such, there is a strong need for the development of new products. Unfortunately, despite this demand, few new wound-related drugs have been approved over the past decade. This is in part due to unsuccessful clinical trials and subsequent lack of Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval. In this article, we discuss the FDA approval process, how it relates to chronic wound trials, common issues that arise, and how best to manage them. Additionally, problems encountered specific to diabetic foot ulcers (DFU) and venous leg ulcers (VLU) are addressed. Careful construction of a clinical trial is necessary in order to achieve the best possible efficacy outcomes and thereby, gain FDA approval. How to design an optimal trial is outlined. PMID:23063664

  10. 76 FR 13643 - FDA Food Safety Modernization Act: Title III-A New Paradigm for Importers; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-14

    ... accountability for domestic and foreign food and animal feed firms in the supply chain from farm to U.S. table... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket Nos. FDA-2011-N-0134, FDA-2011-N-0143, FDA-2011-N-0144, FDA- 2011-N-0145, and FDA-2011-N-0146] FDA Food Safety Modernization Act: Title III--A...

  11. The COMATOSE ATP-Binding Cassette Transporter Is Required for Full Fertility in Arabidopsis1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Footitt, Steven; Dietrich, Daniela; Fait, Aaron; Fernie, Alisdair R.; Holdsworth, Michael J.; Baker, Alison; Theodoulou, Frederica L.

    2007-01-01

    COMATOSE (CTS) encodes a peroxisomal ATP-binding cassette transporter required not only for β-oxidation of storage lipids during germination and establishment, but also for biosynthesis of jasmonic acid and conversion of indole butyric acid to indole acetic acid. cts mutants exhibited reduced fertilization, which was rescued by genetic complementation, but not by exogenous application of jasmonic acid or indole acetic acid. Reduced fertilization was also observed in thiolase (kat2-1) and peroxisomal acyl-Coenzyme A synthetase mutants (lacs6-1,lacs7-1), indicating a general role for β-oxidation in fertility. Genetic analysis revealed reduced male transmission of cts alleles and both cts pollen germination and tube growth in vitro were impaired in the absence of an exogenous carbon source. Aniline blue staining of pollinated pistils demonstrated that pollen tube growth was affected only when both parents bore the cts mutation, indicating that expression of CTS in either male or female tissues was sufficient to support pollen tube growth in vivo. Accordingly, abundant peroxisomes were detected in a range of maternal tissues. Although γ-aminobutyric acid levels were reduced in flowers of cts mutants, they were unchanged in kat2-1, suggesting that alterations in γ-aminobutyric acid catabolism do not contribute to the reduced fertility phenotype through altered pollen tube targeting. Taken together, our data support an important role for β-oxidation in fertility in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and suggest that this pathway could play a role in the mobilization of lipids in both pollen and female tissues. PMID:17468211

  12. Characteristics of Pivotal Trials and FDA Review of Innovative Devices

    PubMed Central

    Rising, Joshua P.; Moscovitch, Ben

    2015-01-01

    When patients lack sufficient treatment options for serious medical conditions, they rely on the prompt approval and development of new therapeutic alternatives, such as medical devices. Understanding the development of innovative medical devices, including the characteristics of premarket clinical trials and length of Food and Drug Administration (FDA) review, can help identify ways to expedite patient access to novel technologies and inform recent efforts by FDA to more quickly get these products to patients and physicians. We analyzed publicly available information on clinical trials and premarket FDA review for innovative medical devices that fill an unmet medical need. In this first-of-its-kind study focusing on these products, we extracted data on the length of the pivotal trials, primary study endpoint and FDA review; number of patients enrolled in trials; and in what country the device was available first. We identified 27 approved priority review devices from January 2006 through August 2013. The median duration of pivotal clinical trials was 3 years, ranging from 3 months to approximately 7 years. Trials had a median primary outcome measure evaluation time of one year and a median enrollment of 297 patients. The median FDA review time was 1 year and 3 months. Most priority review devices were available abroad before they were approved in the United States. Our study indicates that addressing the length of clinical studies—and contributing factors, such as primary outcome measures and enrollment—could expedite patient access to innovative medical devices. FDA, manufacturers, Congress and other stakeholders should identify the contributing factors to the length of clinical development, and implement appropriate reforms to address those issues. PMID:25651420

  13. The full expression of the ity phenotype in ityr mice requires C3 activation by Salmonella lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed Central

    Nishikawa, F; Yoshikawa, S; Harada, H; Kita, M; Kita, E

    1998-01-01

    Our previous study has shown that the rapid and sufficient activation of complement by Salmonella lipopolysaccharide occurs in genetically resistant (Ityr) A/J mice. To assess whether the level of complement activation by a virulent strain of Salmonella typhimurium regulates the level of murine natural resistance, we compared levels of serum complement activation by S. typhimurium and kinetics of serum-opsonized S. typhimurium grown in macrophages using several strains of resistant (Ityr) and susceptible (Itys) mice. Itys macrophages killed intracellular S. typhimurium to the same extent as did Ityr macrophages when the pathogen was opsonized with Ityr serum. Opsonization of S. typhimurium with Itys serum reduced intracellular killing activity in Ityr macrophages to the same level as seen with Itys macrophages. Incubation of S. typhimurium with 25% Mg2+ EGTA (5 mm MgCl2-3 mm ethylene glycol-bis (beta-aminotheyl either)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid)-chelated Ityr serum resulted in higher levels of C3 deposition onto the surface of this bacteria, C3b generation and also C3 consumption, compared with that with Mg2+ EGTA-chelated Itys serum. Opsonization of S. typhimurium with A/J serum prior to infection increased early resistance in Itys mice. Infection with a virulent strain of S. typhimurium induced the expression of interleukin-10 (IL-10) mRNA at higher levels in C57BL/6 mice than in A/J mice. However, opsonization of S. typhimurium with A/J serum decreased bacterial growth in the spleen of C57BL/6 mice to the same level as observed for A/J mice in association with decreased expression levels of IL-10 mRNA. Moreover, administration of anti-C3 antibodies reduced the resistance of A/J mice in association with a decrease in serum levels of C3. These results indicate that the high level of complement activation via the alternative pathway in Ityr serum by a virulent strain of S. typhimurium reduces the virulence of this pathogen, which may contribute to the full

  14. A tale of two transparency attempts at FDA.

    PubMed

    Tai, Laurence

    2013-01-01

    This Article describes and evaluates two elements of the FDA's recent operations implicating information transparency: the Transparency Initiative and a reduction in the agency's FOIA backlog. After discussing the legal context for information disclosure at the FDA and these two transparency attempts, this Article identifies two reasons that the first has fallen short of expectations compared to the second: unlike the reduction in the FOIA backlog, the Transparency Initiative had legal constraints that it did not adequately address, along with political appointee leadership. These principles may be more generally useful for understanding how to stimulate institutional change in administrative agencies. PMID:24552081

  15. Safety monitoring of drugs granted exclusivity under the Best Pharmaceuticals for Children Act: what the FDA has learned.

    PubMed

    Mathis, L L; Iyasu, S

    2007-08-01

    The Best Pharmaceuticals for Children Act (BPCA) was signed into law on 4 January 2002, shortly after the pediatric exclusivity provision of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Modernization Act expired on 1 January 2002. This Act provides six months of marketing exclusivity for a drug when a pharmaceutical company studies that drug for use in the pediatric population as requested by the FDA. Section 17 of the BPCA specifically requires that the FDA review all adverse events reported for drugs that receive pediatric exclusivity. In most of the cases, no unexpected adverse events were reported in the pediatric population; however, in some cases, this focused safety review provided information important to the safety of medication use in children. PMID:17632537

  16. Changes in FDA enforcement activities following changes in federal administration: the case of regulatory letters released to pharmaceutical companies

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    : Clinton (122.3 ± 36.4), Bush (29.5 ± 16.2) and Obama (41.7 ± 11.1). Conclusions Most regulatory letters released by FDA headquarters were related to marketing and advertising activities of pharmaceutical companies. The number of regulatory letters was highest during the second Clinton administration, diminished during the Bush administrations, and increased again during the Obama administration. A further assessment of the impact of changes in federal administration on the enforcement activities of the FDA is required. PMID:23339419

  17. The FDA's Experience with Emerging Genomics Technologies-Past, Present, and Future.

    PubMed

    Xu, Joshua; Thakkar, Shraddha; Gong, Binsheng; Tong, Weida

    2016-07-01

    The rapid advancement of emerging genomics technologies and their application for assessing safety and efficacy of FDA-regulated products require a high standard of reliability and robustness supporting regulatory decision-making in the FDA. To facilitate the regulatory application, the FDA implemented a novel data submission program, Voluntary Genomics Data Submission (VGDS), and also to engage the stakeholders. As part of the endeavor, for the past 10 years, the FDA has led an international consortium of regulatory agencies, academia, pharmaceutical companies, and genomics platform providers, which was named MicroArray Quality Control Consortium (MAQC), to address issues such as reproducibility, precision, specificity/sensitivity, and data interpretation. Three projects have been completed so far assessing these genomics technologies: gene expression microarrays, whole genome genotyping arrays, and whole transcriptome sequencing (i.e., RNA-seq). The resultant studies provide the basic parameters for fit-for-purpose application of these new data streams in regulatory environments, and the solutions have been made available to the public through peer-reviewed publications. The latest MAQC project is also called the SEquencing Quality Control (SEQC) project focused on next-generation sequencing. Using reference samples with built-in controls, SEQC studies have demonstrated that relative gene expression can be measured accurately and reliably across laboratories and RNA-seq platforms. Besides prediction performance comparable to microarrays in clinical settings and safety assessments, RNA-seq is shown to have better sensitivity for low expression and reveal novel transcriptomic features. Future effort of MAQC will be focused on quality control of whole genome sequencing and targeted sequencing. PMID:27116022

  18. FDA OKs New Injectable Type 2 Diabetes Medication

    MedlinePlus

    ... shouldn't be used to treat people with type 1 diabetes. It also shouldn't be used by anyone with increased ketones (a sign that the body isn't getting enough insulin) in their blood or urine, or extremely elevated ketones (diabetic ketoacidosis), the FDA said. Common side effects of ...

  19. FDA post-approval expectations for adventitious virus contamination prevention.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Richard L

    2011-01-01

    CONFERENCE PROCEEDING Proceedings of the PDA/FDA Adventitious Viruses in Biologics: Detection and Mitigation Strategies Workshop in Bethesda, MD, USA; December 1-3, 2010 Guest Editors: Arifa Khan (Bethesda, MD), Patricia Hughes (Bethesda, MD) and Michael Wiebe (San Francisco, CA). PMID:22294604

  20. 21 CFR 60.10 - FDA assistance on eligibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PATENT... from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, FDA will assist the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office in determining whether a patent related to a product is eligible for patent term restoration as follows:...

  1. 21 CFR 60.10 - FDA assistance on eligibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PATENT... from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, FDA will assist the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office in determining whether a patent related to a product is eligible for patent term restoration as follows:...

  2. FDA Boxed Warning for Immediate-Release Opioids.

    PubMed

    Food And Drug Administration Public Health Service U S Department Of Health And Human Services

    2016-06-01

    On March 22, 2016, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced enhanced warnings for immediate-release opioid pain medications related to risks of misuse, abuse, addiction, overdose, and death. The new safety warnings also added to all prescription opioid medications to inform prescribers and patients of additional risks related to opioid use. PMID:27301692

  3. Interactive perspective: drug development and FDA approval, 1938-2013.

    PubMed

    2015-02-01

    Interactive Perspective: Drug Development and FDA Approval, 1938-2013 (June 26, 2014;370:e39). The order of authors was incorrect; Dr. Darrow should have been listed first, and Dr. Kesselheim second. The article is correct at NEJM.org. PMID:25651270

  4. 42 CFR 405.203 - FDA categorization of investigational devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false FDA categorization of investigational devices. 405.203 Section 405.203 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM FEDERAL HEALTH INSURANCE FOR THE AGED AND DISABLED Medical Services Coverage Decisions That Relate to Health...

  5. 42 CFR 405.203 - FDA categorization of investigational devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false FDA categorization of investigational devices. 405.203 Section 405.203 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM FEDERAL HEALTH INSURANCE FOR THE AGED AND DISABLED Medical Services Coverage Decisions That Relate to Health...

  6. 36 CFR 13.980 - Other FDA closures and restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... resources. Information on FDA closures and restrictions will be available for inspection at the park visitor... restrictions. 13.980 Section 13.980 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM UNITS IN ALASKA Special Regulations-Denali National Park...

  7. 36 CFR 13.980 - Other FDA closures and restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... resources. Information on FDA closures and restrictions will be available for inspection at the park visitor... restrictions. 13.980 Section 13.980 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM UNITS IN ALASKA Special Regulations-Denali National Park...

  8. 21 CFR 316.34 - FDA recognition of exclusive approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Section 316.34 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE ORPHAN DRUGS Orphan-drug Exclusive Approval § 316.34 FDA recognition of... written notice recognizing exclusive approval once the marketing application for a designated...

  9. 25 CFR 39.214 - What is the minimum number of instructional hours required in order to be considered a full-time...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false What is the minimum number of instructional hours required in order to be considered a full-time educational program? 39.214 Section 39.214 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR EDUCATION THE INDIAN SCHOOL EQUALIZATION...

  10. 25 CFR 39.214 - What is the minimum number of instructional hours required in order to be considered a full-time...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true What is the minimum number of instructional hours required in order to be considered a full-time educational program? 39.214 Section 39.214 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR EDUCATION THE INDIAN SCHOOL EQUALIZATION...

  11. 25 CFR 39.214 - What is the minimum number of instructional hours required in order to be considered a full-time...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false What is the minimum number of instructional hours required in order to be considered a full-time educational program? 39.214 Section 39.214 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR EDUCATION THE INDIAN SCHOOL EQUALIZATION...

  12. 25 CFR 39.214 - What is the minimum number of instructional hours required in order to be considered a full-time...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What is the minimum number of instructional hours required in order to be considered a full-time educational program? 39.214 Section 39.214 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR EDUCATION THE INDIAN SCHOOL EQUALIZATION...

  13. 25 CFR 39.214 - What is the minimum number of instructional hours required in order to be considered a full-time...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false What is the minimum number of instructional hours required in order to be considered a full-time educational program? 39.214 Section 39.214 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR EDUCATION THE INDIAN SCHOOL EQUALIZATION...

  14. 77 FR 14404 - Guidance for the Public, Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Advisory Committee Members, and FDA...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-09

    .... 02D-0049, now Docket No. FDA- 2002-D-0094, 67 FR 6545, February 12, 2002). The draft guidance was... comment (72 FR 61657, October 31, 2007). The Agency reviewed the submitted comments on the January 2002..., and increased the consistency and clarity of the process (73 FR 45459, August 5, 2008) (...

  15. Cigarette Graphic Warning Labels and Smoking Prevalence in Canada: A Critical Examination and Reformulation of the FDA Regulatory Impact Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jidong; Chaloupka, Frank J.; Fong, Geoffrey T.

    2014-01-01

    Background The estimated effect of cigarette graphic warning labels (GWLs) on smoking rates is a key input to FDA's regulatory impact analysis (RIA), required by law as part of its rulemaking process. However, evidence on the impact of GWLs on smoking prevalence is scarce. Objective The goal of this paper is to critically analyze FDA's approach to estimating the impact of GWLs on smoking rates in its RIA, and to suggest a path forward to estimating the impact of the adoption of GWLs in Canada on Canadian national adult smoking prevalence. Methods A quasi-experimental methodology was employed to examine the impact of adoption of GWLs in Canada in 2000, using the U.S. as a control. Findings We found a statistically significant reduction in smoking rates after the adoption of GWLs in Canada in comparison to the U.S. Our analyses show that implementation of GWLs in Canada reduced smoking rates by 2.87 to 4.68 percentage points, a relative reduction of 12.1 to 19.6% — 33 to 53 times larger than FDA's estimates of a 0.088 percentage point reduction. We also demonstrated that FDA's estimate of the impact was flawed because it is highly sensitive to the changes in variable selection, model specification, and the time period analyzed. Conclusions Adopting GWLs on cigarette packages reduces smoking prevalence. Applying our analysis of the Canadian GWLs, we estimate that if the U.S. had adopted GWLs in 2012, the number of adult smokers in the U.S. would have decreased by 5.3 to 8.6 million in 2013. Our analysis demonstrates that FDA's approach to estimating the impact of GWLs on smoking rates is flawed. Rectifying these problems before this approach becomes the norm is critical for FDA's effective regulation of tobacco products. PMID:24218057

  16. Revisiting Financial Conflicts of Interest in FDA Advisory Committees

    PubMed Central

    Pham-Kanter, Genevieve

    2014-01-01

    Context The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Safety and Innovation Act has recently relaxed conflict-of-interest rules for FDA advisory committee members, but concerns remain about the influence of members’ financial relationships on the FDA's drug approval process. Using a large newly available data set, this study carefully examined the relationship between the financial interests of FDA Center for Drug Evaluation and Research (CDER) advisory committee members and whether members voted in a way favorable to these interests. Methods The study used a data set of voting behavior and reported financial interests of 1,379 FDA advisory committee members who voted in CDER committee meetings that were convened during the 15-year period of 1997–2011. Data on 1,168 questions and 15,739 question-votes from 379 meetings were used in the analyses. Multivariable logit models were used to estimate the relationship between committee members’ financial interests and their voting behavior. Findings Individuals with financial interests solely in the sponsoring firm were more likely to vote in favor of the sponsor than members with no financial ties (OR = 1.49, p = 0.03). Members with interests in both the sponsoring firm and its competitors were no more likely to vote in favor of the sponsor than those with no financial ties to any potentially affected firm (OR = 1.16, p = 0.48). Members who served on advisory boards solely for the sponsor were significantly more likely to vote in favor of the sponsor (OR = 4.97, p = 0.005). Conclusions There appears to be a pro-sponsor voting bias among advisory committee members who have exclusive financial relationships with the sponsoring firm but not among members who have nonexclusive financial relationships (ie, those with ties to both the sponsor and its competitors). These findings point to important heterogeneities in financial ties and suggest that policymakers will need to be nuanced in their management of financial

  17. FDA changes clozapine monitoring guidelines: Implications for worldwide practice.

    PubMed

    Bastiampillai, Tarun; Gupta, Arun; Allison, Stephen

    2016-06-01

    US FDA decision to change their clozapine monitoring guidelines in 2015 for the first time. The changes proposed are as follows: lowering the neutrophil count before ceasing clozapine from 1.5 to 1.0×10(9)/l, allowing the potential for re-challenge following severe neutropenia (<1.0×10(9)/l) and allowing those with benign ethnic neutropenia the opportunity to be commenced on clozapine. These changes will allow a greater number of patients with schizophrenia in USA to be continued on clozapine. In our correspondence we summarize the evidence that support these changes. The FDA changes will likely have impact on clozapine monitoring protocols in other countries. PMID:27208449

  18. QSAR Models at the US FDA/NCTR.

    PubMed

    Hong, Huixiao; Chen, Minjun; Ng, Hui Wen; Tong, Weida

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) has been used in the scientific research community for many decades and applied to drug discovery and development in the industry. QSAR technologies are advancing fast and attracting possible applications in regulatory science. To facilitate the development of reliable QSAR models, the FDA had invested a lot of efforts in constructing chemical databases with a variety of efficacy and safety endpoint data, as well as in the development of computational algorithms. In this chapter, we briefly describe some of the often used databases developed at the FDA such as EDKB (Endocrine Disruptor Knowledge Base), EADB (Estrogenic Activity Database), LTKB (Liver Toxicity Knowledge Base), and CERES (Chemical Evaluation and Risk Estimation System) and the technologies adopted by the agency such as Mold(2) program for calculation of a large and diverse set of molecular descriptors and decision forest algorithm for QSAR model development. We also summarize some QSAR models that have been developed for safety evaluation of the FDA-regulated products. PMID:27311476

  19. FDA Approves New Drug for Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia in Patients with a Specific Chromosomal Abnormality

    MedlinePlus

    ... Newsroom Press Announcements FDA News Release FDA approves new drug for chronic lymphocytic leukemia in patients with ... of leukemia in adults, with approximately 15,000 new cases diagnosed each year. CLL is characterized by ...

  20. 21 CFR 830.100 - FDA accreditation of an issuing agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES UNIQUE DEVICE IDENTIFICATION FDA Accreditation of an Issuing Agency § 830.100 FDA... according to a single set of consistent, fair, and reasonable terms and conditions. (5) Will protect...

  1. FDA Response to the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Facility Incident

    MedlinePlus

    ... ia/importalert_621.html FDA may adjust this strategy based on additional information received from monitoring results in Japan. FDA may also further evaluate this strategy if the Government of Japan makes changes to ...

  2. 21 CFR 1.393 - What information must FDA include in the detention order?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... SERVICES GENERAL GENERAL ENFORCEMENT REGULATIONS Administrative Detention of Food for Human or Animal Consumption How Does Fda Order A Detention? § 1.393 What information must FDA include in the detention...

  3. No sisyphean task: how the FDA can regulate electronic cigarettes.

    PubMed

    Paradise, Jordan

    2013-01-01

    The adverse effects of smoking have fostered a natural market for smoking cessation and smoking reduction products. Smokers attempting to quit or reduce consumption have tried everything: "low" or "light" cigarettes; nicotine-infused chewing gum, lozenges, and lollipops; dermal patches; and even hypnosis. The latest craze in the quest to find a safer source of nicotine is the electronic cigarette. Electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) have swept the market, reaching a rapidly expanding international consumer base. Boasting nicotine delivery and the tactile feel of a traditional cigarette without the dozens of other chemical constituents that contribute to carcinogenicity, e-cigarettes are often portrayed as less risky, as a smoking reduction or even a complete smoking cessation product, and perhaps most troubling for its appeal to youth, as a flavorful, trendy, and convenient accessory. The sensationalism associated with e-cigarettes has spurred outcry from health and medical professional groups, as well as the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), because of the unknown effects on public health. Inhabiting a realm of products deemed "tobacco products" under recent 2009 legislation, e-cigarettes pose new challenges to FDA regulation because of their novel method of nicotine delivery, various mechanical and electrical parts, and nearly nonexistent safety data. Consumer use, marketing and promotional claims, and technological characteristics of e-cigarettes have also raised decades old questions of when the FDA can assert authority over products as drugs or medical devices. Recent case law restricting FDA enforcement efforts against e-cigarettes further confounds the distinction among drugs and medical devices, emerging e-cigarette products, and traditional tobacco products such as cigarettes, cigars, and smokeless tobacco. This Article investigates the e-cigarette phenomenon in the wake of the recently enacted Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act of 2009

  4. The FDA's sentinel initiative--A comprehensive approach to medical product surveillance.

    PubMed

    Ball, R; Robb, M; Anderson, S A; Dal Pan, G

    2016-03-01

    In May 2008, the Department of Health and Human Services announced the launch of the Sentinel Initiative by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to create the Sentinel System, a national electronic system for medical product safety surveillance. This system complements existing FDA surveillance capabilities that track adverse events reported after the use of FDA regulated products by allowing the FDA to proactively assess the safety of these products. PMID:26667601

  5. 21 CFR 516.34 - FDA recognition of exclusive marketing rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... exclusive marketing rights, FDA will publish this information in the Federal Register at the time of the... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false FDA recognition of exclusive marketing rights. 516... marketing rights. (a) FDA will send the sponsor (or the permanent-resident U.S. agent, if applicable)...

  6. 21 CFR 14.15 - Committees working under a contract with FDA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Committees working under a contract with FDA. 14... under a contract with FDA. (a) FDA may enter into contracts with independent scientific or technical... undertake such work through existing or new committees. Whether a particular committee working under such...

  7. 21 CFR 14.15 - Committees working under a contract with FDA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Committees working under a contract with FDA. 14... under a contract with FDA. (a) FDA may enter into contracts with independent scientific or technical... undertake such work through existing or new committees. Whether a particular committee working under such...

  8. Export of pharmaceuticals and medical devices under the federal Food, Drug & Cosmetic Act: FDA's striking change in interpretation post-Shelhigh.

    PubMed

    Basile, Edward M; Tolomeo, Deborah; Gluck, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    With no communication to industry except court filings in United States v. Undetermined Quantities of Boxes of Articles of Device (Shelhigh) and a draft guidance document, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has articulated new policies regarding export of pharmaceutical products and medical devices. FDA's departure from its historic interpretation of the export provisions of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (FDCA) significantly limits the ability of manufacturers to export misbranded drugs and medical devices that FDA deems "adulterated," contrary to the plain language and legislative intent of the FDCA. To further exacerbate the issue, FDA has begun to implement these policies without the notice-and-comment rulemaking required by the Administrative Procedures Act (APA), but rather through an enforcement proceeding brought in the United States District Court for the District of New Jersey. In a letter opinion, the District Court prevented the export of Current Good Manufacturing Practices (CGMP) --adulterated medical devices that complied with FDCA Section 801(e)(1), at least as historically interpreted by FDA. The purpose of this article is to review the history of FDA's export policies for pharmaceuticals and medical devices, particularly those aspects of the export policies that are affected by FDA's recent change in position. Three changes in FDA's interpretation of the export provisions of the FDCA will be addressed: 1) unapproved devices that a manufacturer reasonably believes are eligible for Section 510(k) clearance may no longer be exported under Section 801(e) and now must be exported under Section 802, in substantial compliance with Current CGMP; 2) adulterated devices and misbranded drugs can only be exported if the foreign purchaser's specifications cause the product to be adulterated; and 3) an article may not be exported if a like article has ever been sold or offered for sale in domestic commerce. FDA's new interpretations of FDCA

  9. Medical devices; medical device distributor reporting--FDA. Final rule; notification of status under the Safe Medical Devices Act; confirmation of effective date.

    PubMed

    1993-09-01

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing that the tentative final rule on medical device distributor reporting that appeared in the Federal Register of November 26, 1991 (56 FR 60024), is now a final rule by operation of law. This final rule requires distributors to submit reports to FDA and to manufacturers, of deaths, serious illnesses, and serious injuries related to medical devices and to submit reports to manufacturers of certain malfunctions that may cause a death, serious illness, or serious injury, if the malfunction were to recur. The final rule also changes the reporting standard for certain distributors that are importers, and changes the definition of the term "serious injury" to conform to a recent statutory amendment. In issuing this final rule, FDA is announcing that the tentative final rule relating to adverse event reporting requirements for distributors, including importers, has the status of a final rule, as of May 28, 1992, by operation of law under the Safe Medical Devices Act of 1990 (the SMDA), as amended by the Medical Device Amendments of 1992 (the 1992 amendments), and is setting forth the regulations reflecting those requirements. FDA is also amending the regulations, based on consideration of comments on the November 26, 1991, tentative final rule, to require distributors to register their facilities and to list their devices with FDA. PMID:10128335

  10. Creative penmanship in animal testing prompts FDA controls.

    PubMed

    Smith, R J

    1977-12-23

    Inaccurate science, sloppy science, fraudulent science-these are the greatest threats to the health and safety of the American people. Whether the science is wrong because of clerical error, or because of poor technique, or because of incompetence, or because of negligence, is less important than the fact that it is wrong. For if it is wrong, and if the FDA did not know it was wrong, then the protective regulatory barrier between a potentially dangerous drug and the patient is removed.-SENATOR EDWARD KENNEDY (D-Mass.), in congressional hearings on preclinical testing. PMID:17741687

  11. FDA's Laser Notice 50: a step toward global harmonization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kent, Suzie L. B.; Dennis, Jerome E.; Zaharek, Gary L.; Eng, Francis J.

    2003-06-01

    The US Food and Drug Administration, Center of Devices and Radiological Health issued Laser Notice 50 in July 2001. This Notice is a preliminary step that FDA has taken to harmonize US regulations for laser products (21 Code of Federal Regulations) with the IEC (International Electrotechnical Commission) standards for Safety of Laser Products. The paper discusses rationale for the changes and describes some of the implementation issues, including comparisons between the current standards. The impact on the regulated industry and the user community is that the same laser hazard classification scheme is used and that engineered safety features are consistentin the world markets.

  12. Lectin approaches for glycoproteomics in FDA-approved cancer biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Badr, Haitham A; Alsadek, Dina M M; Darwish, Ashraf A; Elsayed, Abdelaleim I; Bekmanov, Bakhytzhan O; Khussainova, Elmira M; Zhang, Xueji; Cho, William C S; Djansugurova, Leyla B; Li, Chen-Zhong

    2014-04-01

    The nine FDA-approved protein biomarkers for the diagnosis and management of cancer are approaching maturity, but their different glycosylation compositions relevant to early diagnosis still remain practically unexplored at the sub-glycoproteome scale. Lectins generally exhibit strong binding to specific sub-glycoproteome components and this property has been quite poorly addressed as the basis for the early diagnosis methods. Here, we discuss some glycoproteome issues that make tackling the glycoproteome particularly challenging in the cancer biomarkers field and include a brief view for next generation technologies. PMID:24611567

  13. 2015 in review: FDA approval of new drugs.

    PubMed

    Kinch, Michael S

    2016-07-01

    The myriad new molecular entities (NMEs) approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 2015 reflected both the opportunities and risks associated with the development of new medicines. On the one hand, the approval of 45 NMEs was among the highest ever recorded. Likewise, the diversity underlying the mechanistic basis of new medicines suggests continued broadening relative to the predominate trends of the past few decades. On the other hand, closer inspection indicates that business model decisions surrounding orphan indications and consolidation could be placing the industry in an ever-more precarious position, with severe implications for the sustainability of the entire enterprise. PMID:27109618

  14. Awareness of the role of science in the FDA regulatory submission process: a survey of the TERMIS-Americas membership.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Peter C; Bertram, Tim A; Carty, Neal R; Hellman, Kiki B; Tawil, Bill J; Van Dyke, Mark

    2014-06-01

    The Industry Committee of the Tissue Engineering Regenerative Medicine International Society, Americas Chapter (TERMIS-AM) administered a survey to its membership in 2013 to assess the awareness of science requirements in the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulatory process. One hundred forty-four members responded to the survey. Their occupational and geographical representation was representative of the TERMIS-AM membership as a whole. The survey elicited basic demographic information, the degree to which members were involved in tissue engineering technology development, and their plans for future involvement in such development. The survey then assessed the awareness of general FDA scientific practices as well as specific science requirements for regulatory submissions to the Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research (CBER), the Center for Drug Evaluation and Research (CDER), the Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH), and the Office of Combination Projects (OCP). The FDA-specific questions in the survey were culled from guidance documents posted on the FDA web site ( www.fda.gov ). One of the answer options was an opt-out clause that enabled survey respondents to claim a lack of sufficient awareness of the topic to answer the question. This enabled the stratification of respondents on the basis of confidence in the topic. Results indicate that across all occupational groups (academic, business, and government) that are represented in the TERMIS-AM membership, the awareness of FDA science requirements varies markedly. Those who performed best were for-profit company employees, consultants, and government employees; while students, professors, and respondents from outside the USA performed least well. Confidence in question topics was associated with increased correctness in responses across all groups, though the association between confidence and the ability to answer correctly was poorest among students and professors. Though 80% of

  15. Medically Relevant Acinetobacter Species Require a Type II Secretion System and Specific Membrane-Associated Chaperones for the Export of Multiple Substrates and Full Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Harding, Christian M.; Kinsella, Rachel L.; Palmer, Lauren D.; Skaar, Eric P.; Feldman, Mario F.

    2016-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii, A. nosocomialis, and A. pittii have recently emerged as opportunistic human pathogens capable of causing severe human disease; however, the molecular mechanisms employed by Acinetobacter to cause disease remain poorly understood. Many pathogenic members of the genus Acinetobacter contain genes predicted to encode proteins required for the biogenesis of a type II secretion system (T2SS), which have been shown to mediate virulence in many Gram-negative organisms. Here we demonstrate that Acinetobacter nosocomialis strain M2 produces a functional T2SS, which is required for full virulence in both the Galleria mellonella and murine pulmonary infection models. Importantly, this is the first bona fide secretion system shown to be required for virulence in Acinetobacter. Using bioinformatics, proteomics, and mutational analyses, we show that Acinetobacter employs its T2SS to export multiple substrates, including the lipases LipA and LipH as well as the protease CpaA. Furthermore, the Acinetobacter T2SS, which is found scattered amongst five distinct loci, does not contain a dedicated pseudopilin peptidase, but instead relies on the type IV prepilin peptidase, reinforcing the common ancestry of these two systems. Lastly, two of the three secreted proteins characterized in this study require specific chaperones for secretion. These chaperones contain an N-terminal transmembrane domain, are encoded adjacently to their cognate effector, and their disruption abolishes type II secretion of their cognate effector. Bioinformatic analysis identified putative chaperones located adjacent to multiple previously known type II effectors from several Gram-negative bacteria, which suggests that T2SS chaperones constitute a separate class of membrane-associated chaperones mediating type II secretion. PMID:26764912

  16. FDA Escherichia coli Identification (FDA-ECID) Microarray: a Pangenome Molecular Toolbox for Serotyping, Virulence Profiling, Molecular Epidemiology, and Phylogeny

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Isha R.; Gangiredla, Jayanthi; Lacher, David W.; Mammel, Mark K.; Jackson, Scott A.; Lampel, Keith A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Most Escherichia coli strains are nonpathogenic. However, for clinical diagnosis and food safety analysis, current identification methods for pathogenic E. coli either are time-consuming and/or provide limited information. Here, we utilized a custom DNA microarray with informative genetic features extracted from 368 sequence sets for rapid and high-throughput pathogen identification. The FDA Escherichia coli Identification (FDA-ECID) platform contains three sets of molecularly informative features that together stratify strain identification and relatedness. First, 53 known flagellin alleles, 103 alleles of wzx and wzy, and 5 alleles of wzm provide molecular serotyping utility. Second, 41,932 probe sets representing the pan-genome of E. coli provide strain-level gene content information. Third, approximately 125,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of available whole-genome sequences (WGS) were distilled to 9,984 SNPs capable of recapitulating the E. coli phylogeny. We analyzed 103 diverse E. coli strains with available WGS data, including those associated with past foodborne illnesses, to determine robustness and accuracy. The array was able to accurately identify the molecular O and H serotypes, potentially correcting serological failures and providing better resolution for H-nontypeable/nonmotile phenotypes. In addition, molecular risk assessment was possible with key virulence marker identifications. Epidemiologically, each strain had a unique comparative genomic fingerprint that was extended to an additional 507 food and clinical isolates. Finally, a 99.7% phylogenetic concordance was established between microarray analysis and WGS using SNP-level data for advanced genome typing. Our study demonstrates FDA-ECID as a powerful tool for epidemiology and molecular risk assessment with the capacity to profile the global landscape and diversity of E. coli. IMPORTANCE This study describes a robust, state-of-the-art platform developed from available

  17. Smokers’ and Nonsmokers’ Beliefs About Harmful Tobacco Constituents: Implications for FDA Communication Efforts

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Legislation requires the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to release information to the public about harmful constituents in tobacco and tobacco smoke. To inform these efforts, we sought to better understand how smokers and nonsmokers think about tobacco constituents. Methods: In October 2012, 300U.S. adults aged 18–66 years completed a cross-sectional Internet survey. The questions focused on 20 harmful tobacco constituents that the FDA has prioritized for communicating with the public. Results: Most participants had heard of 7 tobacco constituents (ammonia, arsenic, benzene, cadmium, carbon monoxide, formaldehyde, and nicotine), but few participants had heard of the others (e.g., acrolein). Few participants correctly understood that many constituents were naturally present in tobacco. Substances that companies add to cigarette tobacco discouraged people from wanting to smoke more than substances that naturally occur in cigarette smoke (p < .001). Ammonia, arsenic, carbon monoxide, and formaldehyde being in cigarettes elicited the most discouragement from smoking. Constituents elicited greater discouragement from wanting to smoke if respondents were nonsmokers (β = −.34, p < .05), had negative images of smokers (i.e., negative smoker prototypes; β = .19, p < .05), believed constituents are added to tobacco (β = .14, p < .05), or were older (β = .16, p < .05). Conclusions: Our study found low awareness of most tobacco constituents, with greater concern elicited by additives. Efforts to communicate health risks of tobacco constituents should consider focusing on ones that elicited the most discouragement from smoking. PMID:24151139

  18. FDA proposals to limit the hepatotoxicity of paracetamol (acetaminophen): are they reasonable?

    PubMed

    Graham, Garry G; Day, Richard O; Graudins, Andis; Mohamudally, Anthoulla

    2010-04-01

    Hepatotoxicity from paracetamol is of great concern because of the considerable number of patients who develop severe toxicity from this drug. A group of senior medical practitioners, academics and scientists were brought together on June 29 and 30, 2009 by the Food and Drug Administration of USA (FDA) with the aim of providing advice on how to limit the number of cases of hepatotoxicity due to paracetamol in USA. The most contentious recommendations were the reduction in the dose of paracetamol to 650 mg and the elimination of prescription combination products of paracetamol and opiates. The first recommendation indicates that many members of the committee consider, despite much evidence to the contrary, that therapeutic doses of paracetamol (up to 4 g daily) are associated with a significant incidence of hepatotoxicity. The second recommendation, if accepted by FDA, will require major changes in the therapeutic use of paracetamol and opiates. Adoption of these two recommendations may lead to the increased use of NSAIDs with the potential of increasing incidence of NSAIDs-related adverse reactions. PMID:20213329

  19. PsAAT3, an oomycete-specific aspartate aminotransferase, is required for full pathogenicity of the oomycete pathogen Phytophthora sojae.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rongbo; Zhang, Meixiang; Liu, Hong; Xu, Jing; Yu, Jia; He, Feng; Zhang, Xiong; Dong, Suomeng; Dou, Daolong

    2016-04-01

    Pathogen nutrient acquisition and metabolism are critical for successful infection and colonization. However, the nutrient requirements and metabolic pathways related to pathogenesis in oomycete pathogens are unknown. In this study, we bioinformatically identified Phytophthora sojae aspartate aminotransferases (AATs), which are key enzymes that coordinate carbon and nitrogen metabolism. We demonstrated that P. sojae encodes more AATs than the analysed fungi. Some of the AATs contained additional prephenate dehydratase and/or prephenate dehydrogenase domains in their N-termini, which are unique to oomycetes. Silencing of PsAAT3, an infection-inducible expression gene, reduced P. sojae pathogenicity on soybean plants and affected the growth under N-starving condition, suggesting that PsAAT3 is involved in pathogen pathogenicity and nitrogen utilisation during infection. Our results suggest that P. sojae and other oomycete pathogens may have distinct amino acid metabolism pathways and that PsAAT3 is important for its full pathogenicity. PMID:27020161

  20. Glucagon-Like Peptide-2 Requires a Full Complement of Bmi-1 for Its Proliferative Effects in the Murine Small Intestine.

    PubMed

    Smither, Bradley R; Pang, Hilary Y M; Brubaker, Patricia L

    2016-07-01

    The intestinal hormone, glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2), stimulates growth, survival, and function of the intestinal epithelium through increased crypt cell proliferation, and a long-acting analog has recently been approved to enhance intestinal capacity in patients with short bowel syndrome. The goal of the present study was to determine whether GLP-2-induced crypt cell proliferation requires a full complement of B-cell lymphoma Moloney murine leukemia virus insertion region-1 homolog (Bmi-1), using the Bmi-1(eGFP/+) mouse model in comparison with age- and sex-matched Bmi-1(+/+) littermates. Bmi-1 is a member of the polycomb-repressive complex family that promotes stem cell proliferation and self-renewal and is expressed by both stem cells and transit-amplifying (TA) cells in the crypt. The acute (6 h) and chronic (11 d) proliferative responses to long-acting human (Gly(2))GLP-2 in the crypt TA zone, but not in the active or reserve stem cell zones, were both impaired by Bmi-1 haploinsufficiency. Similarly, GLP-2-induced crypt regeneration after 10-Gy irradiation was reduced in the Bmi-1(eGFP/+) animals. Despite these findings, chronic GLP-2 treatment enhanced overall intestinal growth in the Bmi-1(eGFP/+) mice, as demonstrated by increases in small intestinal weight per body weight and in the length of the crypt-villus axis, in association with decreased apoptosis and an adaptive increase in crypt epithelial cell migration rate. The results of these studies therefore demonstrate that a full complement of Bmi-1 is required for the intestinal proliferative effects of GLP-2 in both the physiological and pathological setting, and mediates, at least in part, the proliferation kinetics of cells in the TA zone. PMID:27187177

  1. 76 FR 17138 - Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements, Regulations, Compliance, and Good...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-28

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements... public workshop on FDA's clinical trial requirements is designed to aid the clinical research... interaction with FDA representatives. The program will focus on the relationships among FDA and clinical...

  2. 76 FR 78933 - Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements, Regulations, Compliance, and Good...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-20

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements... workshop. The public workshop on FDA's clinical trial requirements is designed to aid the clinical research... interaction with FDA representatives. The program will focus on the relationships among FDA and clinical...

  3. 75 FR 51824 - Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements, Regulations, Compliance, and Good...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements... workshop. The public workshop on FDA's clinical trial requirements is designed to aid the clinical research... interaction with FDA representatives. The program will focus on the relationships among FDA and clinical...

  4. 77 FR 49448 - Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements, Compliance, and Good Clinical Practice...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements... public workshop on FDA's clinical trial requirements is designed to aid the clinical research... interaction with FDA representatives. The program will focus on the relationships among FDA and clinical...

  5. 76 FR 51040 - Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements, Regulations, Compliance, and Good...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements... workshop. The public workshop on FDA's clinical trial requirements is designed to aid the clinical research... interaction with FDA representatives. The program will focus on the relationships among FDA and clinical...

  6. 77 FR 8886 - Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements, Regulations, Compliance, and Good...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-15

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements... public workshop on FDA's clinical trial requirements is designed to aid the clinical research... interaction with FDA representatives. The program will focus on the relationships among FDA and clinical...

  7. FDA's expanding postmarket authority to monitor and publicize food and consumer health product risks: the need for procedural safeguards to reduce "transparency" policy harms in the post-9/11 regulatory environment.

    PubMed

    Roller, Sarah Taylor; Pippins, Raqiyyah R; Ngai, Jennifer W

    2009-01-01

    This article provides a summary of the expansion of FDA's discretionary authority in the post-9/11 period, particularly with respect to FDA's authority to monitor and publicize potential health risks linked to food, dietary supplements, nonprescription drugs, and other consumer health products. In addition, this article evaluates the need for FDA to establish procedural safeguards to reduce the significant risks of unintended and undue harm to people and regulated companies that can result from adverse publicity in the more "transparent" post 9/11 FDA regulatory environment. Specifically, Part I summarizes the amendments to the FDCA enacted during the post-9/11 period that have expanded FDA's postmarket authority to monitor, evaluate, and publicize potential health risks linked to food, dietary supplements, nonprescription drugs and other consumer health products marketed in the United States, in conjunction with FDA's Sentinel Initiative, Reportable Food Registry, and other adverse event reporting requirements. Part II discusses the convergence of FDA's expanded postmarket authority to publicize product-related risks with President Obama's transparency initiative aimed at fostering "open government" through increased public access to government information. In addition, Part II considers the nature of the procedural safeguards needed in the post-9/11 FDA regulatory environment, in view of FDA's historical record and illustrative cases that help expose how adverse "transparency" surrounding FDA warning letters, recalls and safety alerts concerning products in the marketplace can have undue and unintended prejudicial and harmful effects for the people and companies that are legally responsible for such products. Finally, based on these analysis, this article concludes with some observations concerning the nature of the procedural safeguards needed to reduce the significant risks of "transparency" policy harms in the pos-9/11 regulatory environment. PMID:19999646

  8. Acquisition of Mn(II) in Addition to Fe(II) Is Required for Full Virulence of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Boyer, E.; Bergevin, I.; Malo, D.; Gros, P.; Cellier, M. F. M.

    2002-01-01

    The roles of the genes feoB (ABC ferrous iron transporter), mntH (proton-dependent manganese transporter), and sitABCD (putative ABC iron and/or manganese transporter) in Salmonella pathogenicity were investigated by using mutant strains deficient in one, two, or three transporters. Our results indicated that sitABCD encodes an important transporter of Mn(II) and Fe(II) which is required for full virulence in susceptible animals (Nramp1−/−) and for replication inside Nramp1−/− macrophages in vitro. The mntH sitABCD double mutant (mutant MS) showed minimal Mn(II) uptake and increased sensitivity to H2O2 and to the divalent metal chelator 2,2′-dipyridyl (DP) and was defective for replication in macrophages. In vivo MS appeared to be as virulent as the sitABCD mutant in Nramp1−/− animals. The ferrous iron transporter Feo was required for full virulence in 129/Sv Nramp1−/− mice, and infection with multiple mutants lacking FeoB was not fatal. The sitABCD feoB mutant (mutant SF) and the mntH sitABCD feoB mutant (mutant MSF) showed minimal Fe(II) uptake and were slightly impaired for replication in susceptible macrophages. MSF showed reduced growth in minimal medium deficient in divalent cations. The role of the mntH gene, which is homologous to mammalian Nramp genes, was also investigated after overexpression in the double mutant MS. MntH preferred Mn(II) over Fe(II) and could suppress MS sensitivity to H2O2 and to DP, and it also improved the intracellular survival in Nramp1−/− macrophages. This study indicates that acquisition of Mn(II), in addition to Fe(II), is required for intracellular survival and replication of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in macrophages in vitro and for virulence in vivo. PMID:12379679

  9. Perspective on Advancing FDA Regulatory Monitoring for Mycotoxins in Foods using Liquid Chromatography and Mass Spectrometry (Review).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kai; Wong, Jon W; Krynitsky, Alexander J; Trucksess, Mary W

    2016-07-01

    The presence of mycotoxins (such as aflatoxins, deoxynivalenol, fumonisins, and patulin) is routinely monitored by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to ensure that their concentrations in food are below the levels requiring regulatory action or advisories. To improve the efficiency of mycotoxin analysis, the researchers at the FDA's Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition have been evaluating modern LC-MS technologies. Consequently, a variety of LC-tandem MS and LC-high-resolution MS methods have been developed, which simultaneously identify and quantitate multiple mycotoxins in foods and feeds. Although matrix effects (matrix-induced ion suppression or enhancement) associated with LC-MS-based mycotoxin analysis remain, this review discusses methods for managing these effects and proposes practical solutions for the future implementation of LC-MS-based multimycotoxin analysis. PMID:27330044

  10. Electrosurgical injuries during robot assisted surgery: insights from the FDA MAUDE database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuller, Andrew; Vilos, George A.; Pautler, Stephen E.

    2012-02-01

    Introduction: The da Vinci surgical system requires the use of electrosurgical instruments. The re-use of such instruments creates the potential for stray electrical currents from capacitive coupling and/or insulation failure with subsequent injury. The morbidity of such injuries may negate many of the benefits of minimally invasive surgery. We sought to evaluate the rate and nature of electrosurgical injury (ESI) associated with this device. Methods: The Manufacturer and User Facility Device Experience (MAUDE) database is administered by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and reports adverse events related to medical devices in the United States. We analyzed all incidents in the context of robotic surgery between January 2001 and June 2011 to identify those related to the use of electrosurgery. Results: In the past decade, a total of 605 reports have been submitted to the FDA with regard to adverse events related to the da Vinci robotic surgical platform. Of these, 24 (3.9%) were related to potential or actual ESI. Nine out of the 24 cases (37.5%) resulted in additional surgical intervention for repair. There were 6 bowel injuries of which only one was recognized and managed intra-operatively. The remainder required laparotomy between 5 and 8 days after the initial robotic procedure. Additionally, there were 3 skin burns. The remaining cases required conservative management or resulted in no harm. Conclusion: ESI in the context of robotic surgery is uncommon but remains under-recognized and under-reported. Surgeons performing robot assisted surgery should be aware that ESI can occur with robotic instruments and vigilance for intra- and post-operative complications is paramount.